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Sample records for complex rearrangement involving

  1. A complex genomic rearrangement involving the endothelin 3 locus causes dermal hyperpigmentation in the chicken.

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    Ben Dorshorst

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Dermal hyperpigmentation or Fibromelanosis (FM is one of the few examples of skin pigmentation phenotypes in the chicken, where most other pigmentation variants influence feather color and patterning. The Silkie chicken is the most widespread and well-studied breed displaying this phenotype. The presence of the dominant FM allele results in extensive pigmentation of the dermal layer of skin and the majority of internal connective tissue. Here we identify the causal mutation of FM as an inverted duplication and junction of two genomic regions separated by more than 400 kb in wild-type individuals. One of these duplicated regions contains endothelin 3 (EDN3, a gene with a known role in promoting melanoblast proliferation. We show that EDN3 expression is increased in the developing Silkie embryo during the time in which melanoblasts are migrating, and elevated levels of expression are maintained in the adult skin tissue. We have examined four different chicken breeds from both Asia and Europe displaying dermal hyperpigmentation and conclude that the same structural variant underlies this phenotype in all chicken breeds. This complex genomic rearrangement causing a specific monogenic trait in the chicken illustrates how novel mutations with major phenotypic effects have been reused during breed formation in domestic animals.

  2. A Rare De novo Complex Chromosomal Rearrangement (CCR) Involving Four Chromosomes in An Oligo-asthenosperm Infertile Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asia, Saba; Vaziri Nasab, Hamed; Sabbaghian, Marjan; Kalantari, Hamid; Zari Moradi, Shabnam; Gourabi, Hamid; Mohseni Meybodi, Anahita

    2014-01-01

    Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) are rare events involving more than two chromosomes and over two breakpoints. They are usually associated with infertility or sub fertility in male carriers. Here we report a novel case of a CCR in a 30-year-old oligoasthenosperm man with a history of varicocelectomy, normal testes size and normal endocrinology profile referred for chromosome analysis to the Genetics unit of Royan Reproductive Biomedicine Research Center. Chromosomal analysis was performed using peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures and analyzed by GTG banding. Additional tests such as C-banding and multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure for each of the involved chromosomes were performed to determine the patterns of the segregations. Y chromosome microdeletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF) region were analyzed with multiplex polymerase chain reaction. To identify the history and origin of this CCR, all the family members were analyzed. No micro deletion in Y chromosome was detected. The same de novo reciprocal exchange was also found in his monozygous twin brother. The other siblings and parents were normal. CCRs are associated with male infertility as a result of spermatogenic disruption due to complex meiotic configurations and the production of chromosomally abnormal sperms. These chromosomal rearrangements might have an influence on decreasing the number of sperms.

  3. Partial 2p deletion in a girl with a complex chromosome rearrangement involving chromosomes 2, 6, 11, and 21.

    OpenAIRE

    Young, R S; Medrano, M A; Hansen, K L

    1985-01-01

    We describe the clinical and cytogenetic findings of a 9 1/2 month old girl with a complex chromosome rearrangement resulting in a probable deletion of band 2p14. She does not resemble other reported cases of del(2p).

  4. PMS2 inactivation by a complex rearrangement involving an HERV retroelement and the inverted 100-kb duplicon on 7p22.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Julia; Wernstedt, Annekatrin; Ripperger, Tim; Pabst, Brigitte; Zschocke, Johannes; Kratz, Christian; Wimmer, Katharina

    2016-11-01

    Biallelic PMS2 mutations are responsible for more than half of all cases of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD), a recessively inherited childhood cancer predisposition syndrome. The mismatch repair gene PMS2 is partly embedded within one copy of an inverted 100-kb low-copy repeat (LCR) on 7p22.1. In an individual with CMMRD syndrome, PMS2 was found to be homozygously inactivated by a complex chromosomal rearrangement, which separates the 5'-part from the 3'-part of the gene. The rearrangement involves sequences of the inverted 100-kb LCR and a human endogenous retrovirus element and may be associated with an inversion that is indistinguishable from the known inversion polymorphism affecting the ~0.7-Mb sequence intervening the LCR. Its formation is best explained by a replication-based mechanism (RBM) such as fork stalling and template switching/microhomology-mediated break-induced replication (FoSTeS/MMBIR). This finding supports the hypothesis that the inverted LCR can not only facilitate the formation of the non-allelic homologous recombination-mediated inversion polymorphism but it also promotes the occurrence of more complex rearrangements that can be associated with a large inversion, as well, but are mediated by a RBM. This further suggests that among the inversion polymorphism on 7p22.1, more complex rearrangements might be hidden. Furthermore, as the locus is embedded in a common fragile site (CFS) region, this rearrangement also supports the recently raised hypothesis that CFS sequence motifs may facilitate replication-based rearrangement mechanisms.

  5. Exceptional Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements in Three Generations

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    Hannie Kartapradja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an exceptional complex chromosomal rearrangement (CCR found in three individuals in a family that involves 4 chromosomes with 5 breakpoints. The CCR was ascertained in a phenotypically abnormal newborn with additional chromosomal material on the short arm of chromosome 4. Maternal karyotyping indicated that the mother carried an apparently balanced CCR involving chromosomes 4, 6, 11, and 18. Maternal transmission of the derivative chromosome 4 resulted in partial trisomy for chromosomes 6q and 18q and a partial monosomy of chromosome 4p in the proband. Further family studies found that the maternal grandmother carried the same apparently balanced CCR as the proband’s mother, which was confirmed using the whole chromosome painting (WCP FISH. High resolution whole genome microarray analysis of DNA from the proband’s mother found no evidence for copy number imbalance in the vicinity of the CCR translocation breakpoints, or elsewhere in the genome, providing evidence that the mother’s and grandmother’s CCRs were balanced at a molecular level. This structural rearrangement can be categorized as an exceptional CCR due to its complexity and is a rare example of an exceptional CCR being transmitted in balanced and/or unbalanced form across three generations.

  6. A paternally transmitted complex chromosomal rearrangement (CCR) involving chromosomes 2, 6, and 18 includes eight breakpoints and five insertional translocations (ITs) through three generations.

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    Gruchy, Nicolas; Barreau, Morgane; Kessler, Ketty; Gourdier, Dominique; Leporrier, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) are uncommon and mainly occur de novo. We report here on a familial CCR involving chromosomes 2, 6, and 18. The propositus is a boy first referred because of growth delays, hypotonia, and facial anomalies, suggestive of deletion 18q syndrome. However, a cytogenetic family study disclosed a balanced CCR in three generations, which was detailed by FISH using BAC clones, and consisted of eight breakpoints with five insertional translocations (ITs). The propositus had a cryptic 18q deletion and a 6p duplication. Paternal transmission of this CCR was observed through three generations without meiotic recombination. Our investigation allowed us to provide porosities counseling and management of prenatal diagnosis for propositus cousin who carries this particular CCR.

  7. Mapping Breakpoints of Complex Chromosome Rearrangements Involving a Partial Trisomy 15q23.1-q26.2 Revealed by Next Generation Sequencing and Conventional Techniques.

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    Qiong Pan

    Full Text Available Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs, which are rather rare in the whole population, may be associated with aberrant phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS and conventional techniques, could be used to reveal specific CCRs for better genetic counseling. We report the CCRs of a girl and her mother, which were identified using a combination of NGS and conventional techniques including G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and PCR. The girl demonstrated CCRs involving chromosomes 3 and 8, while the CCRs of her mother involved chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 11 and 15. HumanCytoSNP-12 Chip analysis identified a 35.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 15q21.3-q26.2 in the proband and a 1.6 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 15q21.3 in her mother. The proband inherited the rearranged chromosomes 3 and 8 from her mother, and the duplicated region on chromosome 15 of the proband was inherited from the mother. Approximately one hundred genes were identified in the 15q21.3-q26.2 duplicated region of the proband. In particular, TPM1, SMAD6, SMAD3, and HCN4 may be associated with her heart defects, and HEXA, KIF7, and IDH2 are responsible for her developmental and mental retardation. In addition, we suggest that a microdeletion on the 15q21.3 region of the mother, which involved TCF2, TCF12, ADMA10 and AQP9, might be associated with mental retardation. We delineate the precise structures of the derivative chromosomes, chromosome duplication origin and possible molecular mechanisms for aberrant phenotypes by combining NGS data with conventional techniques.

  8. Oxidoreduction reactions involving the electrostatic and the covalent complex of cytochrome c and plastocyanin: Importance of the protein rearrangement for the intracomplex electron-transfer reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peerey, L.M.; Kostic, N.M.

    1989-01-01

    Horse heart cytochrome c and French bean plastocyanin are cross-linked one-to-one by a carbodiimide in the same general orientation in which they associate electrostatically. The reduction potentials of the Fe and Cu atoms in the covalent diprotein complex are respectively 245 and 385 mV vs NHE; the EPR spectra of the two metals are not perturbed by cross-linking. For isomers of the covalent diprotein complex, which probably differ slightly from one another in the manner of cross-linking, are separated efficiently by cation-exchange chromatography. Stopped-flow spectrophotometric experiments with the covalent diprotein complex show that the presence of plastocyanin somewhat inhibits oxidation of ferrocytochrome c by [Fe(CN) 6 ] 3- and somewhat promotes oxidation of this protein by [Fe(C 5 H 5 ) 2 ] + . These changes in reactivity are explained in terms of electrostatic and steric effects. Pulse-radiolysis experiments with the electrostatic diprotein complex yield association constants of ≥5 x 10 6 and 1 x 10 5 M -1 at ionic strengths of 1 and 40 mM, respectively, and the rate constant of 1.05 x 10 3 s -1 , regardless of the ionic strength, for the intracomplex electron-transfer reaction. Analogous pulse-radiolysis experiments with each of the four isomers of the covalent diprotein complex, at ionic strengths of both 2 and 200 mM, show an absence of the intracomplex electron-transfer reaction. A rearrangement of the proteins for this reaction seems to be possible (or unnecessary) in the electrostatic complex but impossible in the covalent complex

  9. Constitutional chromothripsis rearrangements involve clustered double-stranded DNA breaks and nonhomologous repair mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloosterman, Wigard P; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; van Roosmalen, Markus J; van Binsbergen, Ellen; Renkens, Ivo; Duran, Karen; Ballarati, Lucia; Vergult, Sarah; Giardino, Daniela; Hansson, Kerstin; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Jager, Myrthe; van Haeringen, Arie; Ippel, Elly F; Haaf, Thomas; Passarge, Eberhard; Hochstenbach, Ron; Menten, Björn; Larizza, Lidia; Guryev, Victor; Poot, Martin; Cuppen, Edwin

    2012-06-28

    Chromothripsis represents a novel phenomenon in the structural variation landscape of cancer genomes. Here, we analyze the genomes of ten patients with congenital disease who were preselected to carry complex chromosomal rearrangements with more than two breakpoints. The rearrangements displayed unanticipated complexity resembling chromothripsis. We find that eight of them contain hallmarks of multiple clustered double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) on one or more chromosomes. In addition, nucleotide resolution analysis of 98 breakpoint junctions indicates that break repair involves nonhomologous or microhomology-mediated end joining. We observed that these eight rearrangements are balanced or contain sporadic deletions ranging in size between a few hundred base pairs and several megabases. The two remaining complex rearrangements did not display signs of DSBs and contain duplications, indicative of rearrangement processes involving template switching. Our work provides detailed insight into the characteristics of chromothripsis and supports a role for clustered DSBs driving some constitutional chromothripsis rearrangements. Copyright © 2012 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nicotine affects protein complex rearrangement in Caenorhabditis elegans cells.

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    Sobkowiak, Robert; Zielezinski, Andrzej; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Lesicki, Andrzej

    2017-10-01

    Nicotine may affect cell function by rearranging protein complexes. We aimed to determine nicotine-induced alterations of protein complexes in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) cells, thereby revealing links between nicotine exposure and protein complex modulation. We compared the proteomic alterations induced by low and high nicotine concentrations (0.01 mM and 1 mM) with the control (no nicotine) in vivo by using mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques, specifically the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) discontinuous gel electrophoresis coupled with liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS and spectral counting. As a result, we identified dozens of C. elegans proteins that are present exclusively or in higher abundance in either nicotine-treated or untreated worms. Based on these results, we report a possible network that captures the key protein components of nicotine-induced protein complexes and speculate how the different protein modules relate to their distinct physiological roles. Using functional annotation of detected proteins, we hypothesize that the identified complexes can modulate the energy metabolism and level of oxidative stress. These proteins can also be involved in modulation of gene expression and may be crucial in Alzheimer's disease. The findings reported in our study reveal putative intracellular interactions of many proteins with the cytoskeleton and may contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) signaling and trafficking in cells.

  11. Rearrangements in ground and excited states

    CERN Document Server

    de Mayo, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Rearrangements in Ground and Excited States, Volume 2 covers essays on the theoretical approach of rearrangements; the rearrangements involving boron; and the molecular rearrangements of organosilicon compounds. The book also includes essays on the polytopal rearrangement at phosphorus; the rearrangement in coordination complexes; and the reversible thermal intramolecular rearrangements of metal carbonyls. Chemists and people involved in the study of rearrangements will find the book invaluable.

  12. Constitutional chromothripsis rearrangements involve clustered double-stranded DNA breaks and nonhomologous repair mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloosterman, Wigard P; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; van Roosmalen, Markus J; van Binsbergen, Ellen; Renkens, Ivo; Duran, Karen; Ballarati, Lucia; Vergult, Sarah; Giardino, Daniela; Hansson, Kerstin; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Jager, Myrthe; van Haeringen, Arie; Ippel, Elly F; Haaf, Thomas; Passarge, Eberhard; Hochstenbach, Ron; Menten, Björn; Larizza, Lidia; Guryev, Victor; Poot, Martin; Cuppen, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Chromothripsis represents a novel phenomenon in the structural variation landscape of cancer genomes. Here, we analyze the genomes of ten patients with congenital disease who were preselected to carry complex chromosomal rearrangements with more than two breakpoints. The rearrangements displayed

  13. Characterization of a complex rearrangement involving duplication and deletion of 9p in an infant with craniofacial dysmorphism and cardiac anomalies

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    Di Bartolo Daniel L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Partial duplication and partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9 have each been reported in the literature as clinically recognizable syndromes. We present clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular findings on a five-week-old female infant with concomitant duplication and terminal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9. To our knowledge ten such cases have previously been reported. Conventional cytogenetic analysis identified additional material on chromosome 9 at band p23. FISH analysis aided in determining the additional material consisted of an inverted duplication with a terminal deletion of the short arm. Microarray analysis confirmed this interpretation and further characterized the abnormality as a duplication of about 32.7 Mb, from 9p23 to 9p11.2, and a terminal deletion of about 11.5 Mb, from 9p24.3 to 9p23. The infant displayed characteristic features of Duplication 9p Syndrome (hypotonia, bulbous nose, single transverse palmar crease, cranial anomalies, as well as features associated with Deletion 9p Syndrome (flat nasal bridge, long philtrum, cardiac anomalies despite the deletion being distal to the reported critical region for this syndrome. This case suggests that there are genes or regulatory elements that lie outside of the reported critical region responsible for certain phenotypic features associated with Deletion 9p Syndrome. It also underscores the importance of utilizing array technology to precisely define abnormalities involving the short arm of 9p in order to further refine genotype/phenotype associations and to identify additional cases of duplication/deletion.

  14. Marfan syndrome with a complex chromosomal rearrangement including deletion of the FBN1 gene

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    Colovati Mileny ES

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of Marfan syndrome (MFS cases is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1, mapped to chromosome 15q21.1. Only few reports on deletions including the whole FBN1 gene, detected by molecular cytogenetic techniques, were found in literature. Results We report here on a female patient with clinical symptoms of the MFS spectrum plus craniostenosis, hypothyroidism and intellectual deficiency who presents a 1.9 Mb deletion, including the FBN1 gene and a complex rearrangement with eight breakpoints involving chromosomes 6, 12 and 15. Discussion This is the first report of MFS with a complex chromosome rearrangement involving a deletion of FBN1 and contiguous genes. In addition to the typical clinical findings of the Marfan syndrome due to FBN1 gene haploinsufficiency, the patient presents features which may be due to the other gene deletions and possibly to the complex chromosome rearrangement.

  15. Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes in cofactor biosynthesis: a treasure trove of complex organic radical rearrangement reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Angad P; Abdelwahed, Sameh H; Mahanta, Nilkamal; Fedoseyenko, Dmytro; Philmus, Benjamin; Cooper, Lisa E; Liu, Yiquan; Jhulki, Isita; Ealick, Steven E; Begley, Tadhg P

    2015-02-13

    In this minireview, we describe the radical S-adenosylmethionine enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of thiamin, menaquinone, molybdopterin, coenzyme F420, and heme. Our focus is on the remarkably complex organic rearrangements involved, many of which have no precedent in organic or biological chemistry. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Unique mosaicism of structural chromosomal rearrangement: is chromosome 18 preferentially involved?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pater, J.M. de; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Scheres, J.M.J.C.

    2003-01-01

    The mentally normal mother of a 4-year-old boy with del(18)(q21.3) syndrome was tested cytogenetically to study the possibility of an inherited structural rearrangement of chromosome 18. She was found to carry an unusual mosaicism involving chromosomes 18 and 21. Two unbalanced cell lines were seen

  17. Suppression of gross chromosomal rearrangements by a new alternative replication factor C complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Soma; Sikdar, Nilabja; Myung, Kyungjae

    2007-01-01

    Defects in DNA replication fidelity lead to genomic instability. Gross chromosomal rearrangement (GCR), a type of genomic instability, is highly enhanced by various initial mutations affecting DNA replication. Frequent observations of GCRs in many cancers strongly argue the importance of maintaining high fidelity of DNA replication to suppress carcinogenesis. Recent genome wide screens in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identified a new GCR suppressor gene, ELG1, enhanced level of genome instability gene 1. Its physical interaction with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and complex formation with Rfc2-5p proteins suggest that Elg1 functions to load/unload PCNA onto DNA during a certain DNA metabolism. High level of DNA damage accumulation and enhanced phenotypes with mutations in genes involved in cell cycle checkpoints, homologous recombination (HR), or chromatin assembly in the elg1 strain suggest that Elg1p-Rfc2-5p functions in a fundamental DNA metabolism to suppress genomic instability

  18. Region-Specific Involvement of Actin Rearrangement-Related Synaptic Structure Alterations in Conditioned Taste Aversion Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Ai-Ling; Wang, Yue; Li, Bo-Qin; Wang, Qian-Qian; Ma, Ling; Yu, Hui; Zhao, Ling; Chen, Zhe-Yu

    2010-01-01

    Actin rearrangement plays an essential role in learning and memory; however, the spatial and temporal regulation of actin dynamics in different phases of associative memory has not been fully understood. Here, using the conditioned taste aversion (CTA) paradigm, we investigated the region-specific involvement of actin rearrangement-related…

  19. Complex genomic rearrangement in CCS-LacZ transgenic mice.

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    Stroud, Dina Myers; Darrow, Bruce J; Kim, Sang Do; Zhang, Jie; Jongbloed, Monique R M; Rentschler, Stacey; Moskowitz, Ivan P G; Seidman, Jonathan; Fishman, Glenn I

    2007-02-01

    The cardiac conduction system (CCS)-lacZ insertional mouse mutant strain genetically labels the developing and mature CCS. This pattern of expression is presumed to reflect the site of transgene integration rather than regulatory elements within the transgene proper. We sought to characterize the genomic structure of the integration locus and identify nearby gene(s) that might potentially confer the observed CCS-specific transcription. We found rearrangement of chromosome 7 between regions D1 and E1 with altered transcription of multiple genes in the D1 region. Several lines of evidence suggested that regulatory elements from at least one gene, Slco3A1, influenced CCS-restricted reporter gene expression. In embryonic hearts, Slco3A1 was expressed in a spatial pattern similar to the CCS-lacZ transgene and was similarly neuregulin-responsive. At later stages, however, expression patterns of the transgene and Slco3A1 diverged, suggesting that the Slco3A1 locus may be necessary, but not sufficient to confer CCS-specific transgene expression in the CCS-lacZ line. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Analysis of chromosome rearrangements on the basis of synaptonemal complexes in the offspring of mice exposed to γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalikinskaya, E.I.; Bogdanov, Yu.F.; Kolomiets, O.L.; Shevchenko, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    Electron-microscopic analysis of synaptonemic complexes (SC), spread on the hypophase surface, was conducted to investigate chromosome rearrangements in sterile and semisterile F 1 malemause offsprings, exposed to 5 Gy γ-rays Paralelly Chromosome rearrangement account in diakinesis-metaphase 1 was conducted using light microscope, in the same animals. During SC analysis in pachytene chromosome rearrangements were found in 63% of spermatocytes. Under chromosome analysis in diakinesis-metaphase 1 in the same animals chromosome rearrangements were found only in 32% of cells. SC analysis allows one to reveal chromosome rearrangements, which can not be revealed in diakinesis-metaphase 1

  1. Ligand Rearrangements of Organometallic Complexes inSolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanoski, Jennifer E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Many chemical reactions utilize organometallic complexes as catalysts. These complexes find use in reactions as varied as bond activation, polymerization, and isomerization. This thesis outlines the construction of a new ultrafast laser system with an emphasis on the generation of tunable mid-infrared pulses, data collection, and data analysis.

  2. The diverse effects of complex chromosome rearrangements and chromothripsis in cancer development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Pagter, Mirjam S.; Kloosterman, Wigard P.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, enormous progress has been made with respect to the identification of somatic mutations that contribute to cancer development. Mutation types range from small substitutions to large structural genomic rearrangements, including complex reshuffling of the genome. Sets of mutations in

  3. Triazole–Au(I complex as chemoselective catalyst in promoting propargyl ester rearrangements

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    Dawei Wang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Triazole–Au (TA–Au catalysts were employed in several transformations involving propargyl ester rearrangement. Good chemoselectivity was observed, which allowed the effective activation of the alkyne without affecting the reactivity of the allene ester intermediates. These results led to the investigation of the preparation of allene ester intermediates with TA–Au catalysts under anhydrous conditions. As expected, the desired 3,3-rearrangement products were obtained in excellent yields (generally >90% yields with 1% loading. Besides the typical ester migrating groups, carbonates and carbamates were also found to be suitable for this transformation, which provided a highly efficient, practical method for the preparation of substituted allenes.

  4. Reproductive Incompatibility Involving Senegalese Aedes aegypti (L Is Associated with Chromosome Rearrangements.

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    Laura B Dickson

    2016-04-01

    staining was used to identify AT-rich regions, chromomycin A3 following pretreatment with barium hydroxide stained for GC-rich regions and stained the ribosomal RNA locus and YOYO-1 was used to test for differential staining. Chromosome patterns in SenAae strains revealed by these three stains differed from those in IB12. For FISH, 40 BAC clones previously physically mapped on Aaa chromosomes were used to test for chromosome rearrangements in SenAae relative to IB12. Differences in the order of markers identified two chromosomal rearrangements between IB12 and SenAae strains. The first rearrangement involves two overlapping pericentric (containing the centromere inversions in chromosome 3 or an insertion of a large fragment into the 3q arm. The second rearrangement is close to the centromere on the p arm of chromosome 2. Linkage analysis of the SDL and the white-eye locus identified a likely chromosomal rearrangement on chromosome 1. The reproductive incompatibility observed within SenAae and between SenAae and Aaa may be generally associated with chromosome rearrangements on all three chromosomes and specifically caused by pericentric inversions on chromosomes 2 and 3.

  5. Reproductive Incompatibility Involving Senegalese Aedes aegypti (L) Is Associated with Chromosome Rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Laura B.; Sharakhova, Maria V.; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A.; Fleming, Karen L.; Caspary, Alex; Sylla, Massamba; Black, William C.

    2016-01-01

    was used to identify AT-rich regions, chromomycin A3 following pretreatment with barium hydroxide stained for GC-rich regions and stained the ribosomal RNA locus and YOYO-1 was used to test for differential staining. Chromosome patterns in SenAae strains revealed by these three stains differed from those in IB12. For FISH, 40 BAC clones previously physically mapped on Aaa chromosomes were used to test for chromosome rearrangements in SenAae relative to IB12. Differences in the order of markers identified two chromosomal rearrangements between IB12 and SenAae strains. The first rearrangement involves two overlapping pericentric (containing the centromere) inversions in chromosome 3 or an insertion of a large fragment into the 3q arm. The second rearrangement is close to the centromere on the p arm of chromosome 2. Linkage analysis of the SDL and the white-eye locus identified a likely chromosomal rearrangement on chromosome 1. The reproductive incompatibility observed within SenAae and between SenAae and Aaa may be generally associated with chromosome rearrangements on all three chromosomes and specifically caused by pericentric inversions on chromosomes 2 and 3. PMID:27105225

  6. The strength of combined cytogenetic and mate-pair sequencing techniques illustrated by a germline chromothripsis rearrangement involving FOXP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazaryan, Lusine; Stefanou, Eunice G; Hansen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation mate-pair sequencing (MPS) has revealed that many constitutional complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) are associated with local shattering of chromosomal regions (chromothripsis). Although MPS promises to identify the molecular basis of the abnormal phenotypes associated with...... publication, 17 July 2013; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2013.147....

  7. Application of molecular cytogenetic techniques to clarify apparently balanced complex chromosomal rearrangements in two patients with an abnormal phenotype: case report

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    Rongen Michel A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCR are rare cytogenetic findings that are difficult to karyotype by conventional cytogenetic analysis partially because of the relative low resolution of this technique. High resolution genotyping is necessary in order to identify cryptic imbalances, for instance near the multiple breakpoints, to explain the abnormal phenotype in these patients. We applied several molecular techniques to elucidate the complexity of the CCRs of two adult patients with abnormal phenotypes. Results Multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH showed that in patient 1 the chromosomes 1, 10, 15 and 18 were involved in the rearrangement whereas for patient 2 the chromosomes 5, 9, 11 and 13 were involved. A 250 k Nsp1 SNP-array analysis uncovered a deletion in chromosome region 10p13 for patient 1, harbouring 17 genes, while patient 2 showed no pathogenic gains or losses. Additional FISH analysis with locus specific BAC-probes was performed, leading to the identification of cryptic interstitial structural rearrangements in both patients. Conclusion Application of M-FISH and SNP-array analysis to apparently balanced CCRs is useful to delineate the complex chromosomal rearrangement in detail. However, it does not always identify cryptic imbalances as an explanation for the abnormal phenotype in patients with a CCR.

  8. Hominoid chromosomal rearrangements on 17q map to complex regions of segmental duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, Maria Francesca; Jiang, Zhaoshi; D'Addabbo, Pietro; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Rocchi, Mariano; Eichler, Evan E; Ventura, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements, such as translocations and inversions, are recurrent phenomena during evolution, and both of them are involved in reproductive isolation and speciation. To better understand the molecular basis of chromosome rearrangements and their part in karyotype evolution, we have investigated the history of human chromosome 17 by comparative fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and sequence analysis. Human bacterial artificial chromosome/p1 artificial chromosome probes spanning the length of chromosome 17 were used in FISH experiments on great apes, Old World monkeys and New World monkeys to study the evolutionary history of this chromosome. We observed that the macaque marker order represents the ancestral organization. Human, chimpanzee and gorilla homologous chromosomes differ by a paracentric inversion that occurred specifically in the Homo sapiens/Pan troglodytes/Gorilla gorilla ancestor. Detailed analyses of the paracentric inversion revealed that the breakpoints mapped to two regions syntenic to human 17q12/21 and 17q23, both rich in segmental duplications. Sequence analyses of the human and macaque organization suggest that the duplication events occurred in the catarrhine ancestor with the duplication blocks continuing to duplicate or undergo gene conversion during evolution of the hominoid lineage. We propose that the presence of these duplicons has mediated the inversion in the H. sapiens/P. troglodytes/G. gorilla ancestor. Recently, the same duplication blocks have been shown to be polymorphic in the human population and to be involved in triggering microdeletion and duplication in human. These results further support a model where genomic architecture has a direct role in both rearrangement involved in karyotype evolution and genomic instability in human.

  9. Complex chromosome rearrangements related 15q14 microdeletion plays a relevant role in phenotype expression and delineates a novel recurrent syndrome

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    Tomaiuolo Anna

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Complex chromosome rearrangements are constitutional structural rearrangements involving three or more chromosomes or having more than two breakpoints. These are rarely seen in the general population but their frequency should be much higher due to balanced states with no phenotypic presentation. These abnormalities preferentially occur de novo during spermatogenesis and are transmitted in families through oogenesis. Here, we report a de novo complex chromosome rearrangement that interests eight chromosomes in eighteen-year-old boy with an abnormal phenotype consisting in moderate developmental delay, cleft palate, and facial dysmorphisms. Standard G-banding revealed four apparently balanced traslocations involving the chromosomes 1;13, 3;19, 9;15 and 14;18 that appeared to be reciprocal. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis showed no imbalances at all the breakpoints observed except for an interstitial microdeletion on chromosome 15. This deletion is 1.6 Mb in size and is located at chromosome band 15q14, distal to the Prader-Willi/Angelman region. Comparing the features of our patient with published reports of patients with 15q14 deletion this finding corresponds to the smallest genomic region of overlap. The deleted segment at 15q14 was investigated for gene content.

  10. The impact of complex chromosomal rearrangements on the detection of radiosensitivity in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubauer, Susann; Dunst, Juergen; Gebhart, Erich

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: Lymphocytes of a small fraction of cancer patients responded to in vitro irradiation with an extreme chromosomal reaction. A large portion of the observed chromosome aberrations were complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCR). The present study is an attempt to define the impact of CCR on the predictive detection of an intrinsic clinical radiosensitivity in cancer patients in more detail. Materials and methods: A three-colour 'FISH-painting' technique (chromosome in situ suppression (CISS) hybridization) was used for the detection of chromosomal rearrangements, induced by in vitro irradiation, in 81 samples of peripheral blood lymphocytes from 66 cancer patients. Thirty-three of those were assigned for radiation therapy, the others having just undergone radiation therapy. Seven healthy individuals served as controls. Results: CCRs are a very rare event in non-irradiated cells. Lymphocytes of patients who had just undergone therapeutic irradiation, however, not only exhibited high basic frequencies of CCR but also responded to in vitro irradiation with a more drastic increase of CCR than did the lymphocytes of non-exposed patients. A high inter-individual variability of the reaction to in vitro irradiation could be generally stated. The lymphocytes of patients with clinical signs of an outstanding radiosensitivity responded with an unusually high frequency of CCR. The total number of CCRs detected by CISS was found to be dependent on the interval from a previous radiation therapy and was slightly influenced by previous cytostatic therapy. Irrespective of these influences, patients with clinically defined radiation hypersensitivity were those with the highest radiosensitivity also in cytogenetic terms (including CCR). Conclusion: The successful use of FISH-painting for the detection of CCR, in addition to the general breakage frequency, highlights its suitability in the identification of individual hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. The

  11. Nitrosation of amides involves a pseudopericyclic 1,3-sigmatropic rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birney, David M

    2004-03-04

    Two possible pathways for the nitrosation of formamide and N-methyl formamide by nitrosonium ion (NO(+)) have been investigated at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level. The key steps are pseudopericyclic 1,3-sigmatropic rearrangements to give the observed N-nitrosamides. The transition structures (8a and 8b) are close to planar on the amide moiety and have remarkably low barriers of only 6.6 and 4.8 kcal/mol from the lowest energy conformations of 6a and 6b, respectively. [reaction: see text

  12. Rearrangements in ground and excited states

    CERN Document Server

    de Mayo, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Rearrangements in Ground and Excited States, Volume 3 presents essays on the chemical generation of excited states; the cis-trans isomerization of olefins; and the photochemical rearrangements in trienes. The book also includes essays on the zimmerman rearrangements; the photochemical rearrangements of enones; the photochemical rearrangements of conjugated cyclic dienones; and the rearrangements of the benzene ring. Essays on the photo rearrangements via biradicals of simple carbonyl compounds; the photochemical rearrangements involving three-membered rings or five-membered ring heterocycles;

  13. Looking for Broken TAD Boundaries and Changes on DNA Interactions: Clinical Guide to 3D Chromatin Change Analysis in Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements and Chromothripsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yauy, Kevin; Gatinois, Vincent; Guignard, Thomas; Sati, Satish; Puechberty, Jacques; Gaillard, Jean Baptiste; Schneider, Anouck; Pellestor, Franck

    2018-01-01

    Apparition of next-generation sequencing (NGS) was a breakthrough on knowledge of genome structure. Bioinformatic tools are a key point to analyze this huge amount of data from NGS and characterize the three-dimensional organization of chromosomes. This chapter describes usage of different browsers to explore publicly available online data and to search for possible 3D chromatin changes involved during complex chromosomal rearrangements as chromothripsis. Their pathogenic impact on clinical phenotype and gene misexpression can also be evaluated with annotated databases.

  14. Molecular rearrangements of superelectrophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A. Klumpp

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Superelectrophiles are multiply charged cationic species (dications, trications, etc. which are characterized by their reactions with weak nucleophiles. These reactive intermediates may also undergo a wide variety of rearrangement-type reactions. Superelectrophilic rearrangements are often driven by charge–charge repulsive effects, as these densely charged ions react so as to maximize the distances between charge centers. These rearrangements involve reaction steps similar to monocationic rearrangements, such as alkyl group shifts, Wagner–Meerwein shifts, hydride shifts, ring opening reactions, and other skeletal rearrangements. This review will describe these types of superelectrophilic reactions.

  15. De novo complex intra chromosomal rearrangement after ICSI: characterisation by BACs micro array-CGH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quimsiyeh Mazin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In routine Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART men with severe oligozoospermia or azoospermia should be informed about the risk of de novo congenital or chromosomal abnormalities in ICSI program. Also the benefits of preimplantation or prenatal genetic diagnosis practice need to be explained to the couple. Methods From a routine ICSI attempt, using ejaculated sperm from male with severe oligozoospermia and having normal karyotype, a 30 years old pregnant woman was referred to prenatal diagnosis in the 17th week for bichorionic biamniotic twin gestation. Amniocentesis was performed because of the detection of an increased foetal nuchal translucency for one of the fetus by the sonographic examination during the 12th week of gestation (WG. Chromosome and DNA studies of the fetus were realized on cultured amniocytes Results Conventional, molecular cytogenetic and microarray CGH experiments allowed us to conclude that the fetus had a de novo pericentromeric inversion associated with a duplication of the 9p22.1-p24 chromosomal region, 46,XY,invdup(9(p22.1p24 [arrCGH 9p22.1p24 (RP11-130C19 → RP11-87O1x3]. As containing the critical 9p22 region, our case is in coincidence with the general phenotype features of the partial trisomy 9p syndrome with major growth retardation, microcephaly and microretrognathia. Conclusion This de novo complex chromosome rearrangement illustrates the possible risk of chromosome or gene defects in ICSI program and the contribution of array-CGH for mapping rapidly de novo chromosomal imbalance.

  16. DNA rearrangement in human follicular lymphoma can involve the 5' or the 3' region of the bcl-2 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, Y.; Bashir, M.M.; Givol, I.; Cossman, J.; Jaffe, E.; Croce, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    In most human lymphomas, the chromosome translocation t(14;18) occurs within two breakpoint clustering regions on chromosome 18, the major one at the 3' untranslated region of the bcl-2 gene and the minor one at 3' of the gene. Analysis of a panel of follicular lymphoma DNAs using probes for the first exon of the bcl-2 gene indicates that DNA rearrangements may also occur 5' to the involved bcl-2 gene. In this case the IgH locus and the bcl-2 gene are found in an order suggesting that an inversion also occurred during the translocation process. The coding region of the bcl-2 gene, however, are left intact in all cases of follicular lymphoma studied to date

  17. Application of molecular cytogenetic techniques to clarify apparently balanced complex chromosomal rearrangements in two patients with an abnormal phenotype: Case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.P. de Vree (Paula); M.E.H. Simon (Marleen); M.F. van Dooren (Marieke); G.H.T. Stoevelaar (Gerda); J.T.W. Hilkmann (José); M.A. Rongen (Michel); G.C.M. Huijbregts (Gido); A.J.H.M. Verkerk (Annemieke); P. Poddighe (Pino)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCR) are rare cytogenetic findings that are difficult to karyotype by conventional cytogenetic analysis partially because of the relative low resolution of this technique. High resolution genotyping is necessary in order to identify cryptic

  18. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia associated with complex karyotype and SET-NUP214 rearrangement: a case study and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Guk; Park, Tae Sung; Cho, Sun Young; Lim, Gayoung; Park, Gwang Jin; Oh, Seung Hwan; Cho, Eun Hae; Chong, So Young; Huh, Ji Young

    2011-01-01

    SET-NUP214 rearrangements have been rarely reported in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), acute undifferentiated leukemia, and acute myeloid leukemia, and most documented cases have been associated with normal karyotypes in conventional cytogenetic analyses. Here, we describe a novel case of T-ALL associated with a mediastinal mass and a SET-NUP214 rearrangement, which was masked by a complex karyotype at the time of initial diagnosis. Using multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis, we detected a cryptic SET-NUP214 rearrangement in our patient. As only 11 cases (including the present study) of T-ALL with SET-NUP214 rearrangement have been reported, the clinical features and treatment outcomes have not been fully determined. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the incidence of SET-NUP214 rearrangement in T-ALL patients and the treatment responses as well as prognosis of these patients.

  19. Subunit architecture and functional modular rearrangements of the transcriptional mediator complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Tomomori-Sato, Chieri; Sato, Shigeo; Conaway, Ronald C; Conaway, Joan W; Asturias, Francisco J

    2014-06-05

    The multisubunit Mediator, comprising ∼30 distinct proteins, plays an essential role in gene expression regulation by acting as a bridge between DNA-binding transcription factors and the RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription machinery. Efforts to uncover the Mediator mechanism have been hindered by a poor understanding of its structure, subunit organization, and conformational rearrangements. By overcoming biochemical and image analysis hurdles, we obtained accurate EM structures of yeast and human Mediators. Subunit localization experiments, docking of partial X-ray structures, and biochemical analyses resulted in comprehensive mapping of yeast Mediator subunits and a complete reinterpretation of our previous Mediator organization model. Large-scale Mediator rearrangements depend on changes at the interfaces between previously described Mediator modules, which appear to be facilitated by factors conducive to transcription initiation. Conservation across eukaryotes of Mediator structure, subunit organization, and RNA polymerase II interaction suggest conservation of fundamental aspects of the Mediator mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A family of oculofaciocardiodental syndrome (OFCD) with a novel BCOR mutation and genomic rearrangements involving NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yukiko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Miyamoto, Toshinobu; Nishiyama, Kiyomi; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Doi, Hiroshi; Miyake, Noriko; Ryoo, Na-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hun; Yu, Young Suk; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2012-03-01

    Oculofaciocardiodental syndrome (OFCD) is an X-linked dominant disorder associated with male lethality, presenting with congenital cataract, dysmorphic face, dental abnormalities and septal heart defects. Mutations in BCOR (encoding BCL-6-interacting corepressor) cause OFCD. Here, we report on a Korean family with common features of OFCD including bilateral 2nd-3rd toe syndactyly and septal heart defects in three affected females (mother and two daughters). Through the mutation screening and copy number analysis using genomic microarray, we identified a novel heterozygous mutation, c.888delG, in the BCOR gene and two interstitial microduplications at Xp22.2-22.13 and Xp21.3 in all the three affected females. The BCOR mutation may lead to a premature stop codon (p.N297IfsX80). The duplication at Xp22.2-22.13 involved the NHS gene causative for Nance-Horan syndrome, which is an X-linked disorder showing similar clinical features with OFCD in affected males, and in carrier females with milder presentation. Considering the presence of bilateral 2nd-3rd toe syndactyly and septal heart defects, which is unique to OFCD, the mutation in BCOR is likely to be the major determinant for the phenotypes in this family.

  1. Array-CGH in patients with Kabuki-like phenotype: identification of two patients with complex rearrangements including 2q37 deletions and no other recurrent aberration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuscó, Ivon; del Campo, Miguel; Vilardell, Mireia; González, Eva; Gener, Blanca; Galán, Enrique; Toledo, Laura; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2008-04-11

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by specific facial features, mild to moderate mental retardation, postnatal growth delay, skeletal abnormalities, and unusual dermatoglyphic patterns with prominent fingertip pads. A 3.5 Mb duplication at 8p23.1-p22 was once reported as a specific alteration in KS but has not been confirmed in other patients. The molecular basis of KS remains unknown. We have studied 16 Spanish patients with a clinical diagnosis of KS or KS-like to search for genomic imbalances using genome-wide array technologies. All putative rearrangements were confirmed by FISH, microsatellite markers and/or MLPA assays, which also determined whether the imbalance was de novo or inherited. No duplication at 8p23.1-p22 was observed in our patients. We detected complex rearrangements involving 2q in two patients with Kabuki-like features: 1) a de novo inverted duplication of 11 Mb with a 4.5 Mb terminal deletion, and 2) a de novo 7.2 Mb-terminal deletion in a patient with an additional de novo 0.5 Mb interstitial deletion in 16p. Additional copy number variations (CNV), either inherited or reported in normal controls, were identified and interpreted as polymorphic variants. No specific CNV was significantly increased in the KS group. Our results further confirmed that genomic duplications of 8p23 region are not a common cause of KS and failed to detect other recurrent rearrangement causing this disorder. The detection of two patients with 2q37 deletions suggests that there is a phenotypic overlap between the two conditions, and screening this region in the Kabuki-like patients should be considered.

  2. Complex distal 10q rearrangement in a girl with mild intellectual disability: follow up of the patient and review of the literature of non-acrocentric satellited chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarri, Catherine; Douzgou, Sofia; Gyftodimou, Yolanda; Tümer, Zeynep; Ravn, Kirstine; Pasparaki, Angela; Sarafidou, Theologia; Kontos, Harry; Kokotas, Haris; Karadima, Georgia; Grigoriadou, Maria; Pandelia, Effie; Theodorou, Virginia; Moschonas, Nicholas K; Petersen, Michael B

    2011-11-01

    We report on an intellectually disabled girl with a de novo satellited chromosome 10 (10qs) and performed a review of the literature of the non-acrocentric satellited chromosomes (NASC). Satellites and stalks normally occur on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes; however, the literature cites several reports of satellited non-acrocentric chromosomes, which presumably result from a translocation with an acrocentric chromosome. This is, to our knowledge, the third report of a 10qs chromosome. The phenotype observed in the proband prompted a search for a structural rearrangement of chromosome 10q. By microsatellite analysis we observed a 4 Mb deletion on the long arm of chromosome 10, approximately 145 kb from the telomere. FISH and array CGH analyses revealed a complex rearrangement involving in range from the centromere to the telomere: A 9.64 Mb 10q26.11-q26.2 duplication, a 1.3 Mb region with no copy number change, followed by a 5.62 Mb 10q26.2-q26.3 deletion and a translocation of satellite material. The homology between the repeat sequences at 10q subtelomere region and the sequences on the acrocentric short arms may explain the origin of the rearrangement and it is likely that the submicroscopic microdeletion and microduplication are responsible for the abnormal phenotype in our patient. The patient presented here, with a 15-year follow-up, manifests a distinct phenotype different from the 10q26 pure distal monosomy and trisomy syndromes. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Aluminum triiodide induced complexation and structural rearrangement of the hexaphospha-pentaprismane cage, P6C4tBu4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ktaifani, M. M.

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of P 6 C 4 t Bu 4 with the Lewis acid AlI 3 in toluene at room temperature unexpectedly results in a structural rearrangement affording the ionic complex [P 6 C 4 t Bu 4 H][AlI 4 ] which was fully characterized by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and a single crystal X-ray diffraction study. Supportive evidence that the reaction might involve a simple intermediate Lewis acid-base adduct [AlI 3 (η 1 -P 6 C 4 t Bu 4 )] came from the isolation on one occasion of small number of crystals of the bis-Al adduct [(AlI)μ-(P 6 C 4 t Bu 4 )(AlI 3 )], whose molecular structure was also confirmed by a single crystal X-ray diffraction study. (author)

  4. Conventional and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of three-way complex BCR-ABL rearrangement in a chronic myeloid leukemia patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganguly Bani

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal analysis was carried out in bone marrow sample of an 11-year-old girl suspected of myeloproliferative disorder. Conventional G-banding study detected a complex three-way translocation involving 7, 9 and 22, which has resulted in the formation of a variant Philadelphia chromosome causing rearrangement of abl and bcr genes in 87% cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH confirmed the fusion of bcr-abl oncogene. Thus the bone marrow karyotype was observed as 46,XX (13% / 46,XX,t(7;9;22(q11;q34;q11 (87%. Hyperdiploidy was present in two cells. In this study, both conventional cytogenetic and FISH diagnosis proved to be significant to identify the variant nature of the Philadelphia chromosome and hyperdiploid condition for introduction of a suitable treatment regimen and estimation of life expectancy of the young girl.

  5. Sperm FISH analysis of a 44,X,der(Y),t(Y;15)(q12;q10)pat,rob(13;14)(q10;q10)mat complex chromosome rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferfouri, F; Boitrelle, F; Clement, P; Molina Gomes, D; Selva, J; Vialard, F

    2014-06-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCR) with two independent chromosome rearrangements are rare. Although CCRs lead to high unbalanced gamete rates, data on meiotic segregation in this context are scarce. A male patient was referred to our clinic as part of a family screening programme prompted by the observation of a 44,X,der(Y),t(Y;15)(q12;q10)pat,rob(13;14)(q10;q10)mat karyotype in his brother. Karyotyping identified the same CCR. Sperm FISH (with locus-specific probes for the segments involved in the translocations and nine chromosomes not involved in both rearrangements) was used to investigate the rearrangements meiotic segregation products and establish whether or not an inter-chromosomal effect was present. Sperm nuclear DNA fragmentation was also evaluated. For rob(13;14) and der(Y), the proportions of unbalanced products were, respectively, 26.4% and 60.6%. Overall, 70.3% of the meiotic segregation products were unbalanced. No evidence of an inter-chromosomal effect was found, and the sperm nuclear DNA fragmentation rate was similar to our laboratory's normal cut-off value. In view of previously published sperm FISH analyses of Robertsonian translocations (and even though the mechanism is still unknown), we hypothesise that cosegregation of der(Y) and rob(13;14) could modify rob(13;14) meiotic segregation. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Evolution of the Petasis-Ferrier union/rearrangement tactic: construction of architecturally complex natural products possessing the ubiquitous cis-2,6-substituted tetrahydropyran structural element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amos B; Fox, Richard J; Razler, Thomas M

    2008-05-01

    The frequent low abundance of architecturally complex natural products possessing significant bioregulatory properties mandates the development of rapid, efficient, and stereocontrolled synthetic tactics, not only to provide access to the biologically rare target but also to enable elaboration of analogues for the development of new therapeutic agents with improved activities and/or pharmacokinetic properties. In this Account, the genesis and evolution of the Petasis-Ferrier union/rearrangement tactic, in the context of natural product total syntheses, is described. The reaction sequence comprises a powerful tactic for the construction of the 2,6- cis-substituted tetrahydropyran ring system, a ubiquitous structural element often found in complex natural products possessing significant bioactivities. The three-step sequence, developed in our laboratory, extends two independent methods introduced by Ferrier and Petasis and now comprises: condensation between a chiral, nonracemic beta-hydroxy acid and an aldehyde to furnish a dioxanone; carbonyl olefination; and Lewis-acid-induced rearrangement of the resultant enol acetal to generate the 2,6- cis-substituted tetrahydropyranone system in a highly stereocontrolled fashion. To demonstrate the envisioned versatility and robustness of the Petasis-Ferrier union/rearrangement tactic in complex molecule synthesis, we exploited the method as the cornerstone in our now successful total syntheses of (+)-phorboxazole A, (+)-zampanolide, (+)-dactylolide, (+)-spongistatins 1 and 2, (-)-kendomycin, (-)-clavosolide A, and most recently, (-)-okilactomycin. Although each target comprises a number of synthetic challenges, this Account focuses on the motivation, excitement, and frustrations associated with the evolution and implementation of the Petasis-Ferrier union/rearrangement tactic. For example, during our (+)-phorboxazole A endeavor, we recognized and exploited the inherent pseudo symmetry of the 2,6- cis

  7. BAC-FISH assays delineate complex chromosomal rearrangements in a case of post-Chernobyl childhood thyroid cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horst F Zitzelsberger

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Structural chromosome aberrations are known hallmarks of many solid tumors. In the papillary form of thyroid cancer (PTC, for example, activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK genes, RET and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type I (NTRK1 by intra- and interchromosomal rearrangements has been suggested as a cause of the disease. However, many phenotypically similar tumors do not carry an activated RET or NTRK-1 gene or express abnormal ret or NTRK-1 transcripts. Thus, we hypothesize that other cellular RTK-type genes are aberrantly expressed in these tumors. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization-based methods, we are studying karyotype changes in a relatively rare subgroup of PTCs, i.e., tumors that arose in children following the 1986 nuclear accident in Chernobyl, Ukraine. Here, we report our technical developments and progress in deciphering complex chromosome aberrations in case S48TK, an aggressively growing PTC cell line, which shows an unusual high number of unbalanced translocations.

  8. BAC-FISH assays delineate complex chromosomal rearrangements in a case of post-Chernobyl childhood thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, Johnson; Baumgartner, Adolf; Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Weier, Jingly F.; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2009-03-09

    Structural chromosome aberrations are known hallmarks of many solid tumors. In the papillary form of thyroid cancer (PTC), for example, activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) genes, RET and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type I (NTRK1) by intra- and interchromosomal rearrangements has been suggested as a cause of the disease. However, many phenotypically similar tumors do not carry an activated RET or NTRK-1 gene or express abnormal ret or NTRK-1 transcripts. Thus, we hypothesize that other cellular RTK-type genes are aberrantly expressed in these tumors. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization-based methods, we are studying karyotype changes in a relatively rare subgroup of PTCs, i.e., tumors that arose in children following the 1986 nuclear accident in Chernobyl, Ukraine. Here, we report our technical developments and progress in deciphering complex chromosome aberrations in case S48TK, an aggressively growing PTC cell line, which shows an unusual high number of unbalanced translocations.

  9. EncM, a versatile enterocin biosynthetic enzyme involved in Favorskii oxidative rearrangement, aldol condensation, and heterocycle-forming reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Longkuan; Kalaitzis, John A.; Moore, Bradley S.

    2004-01-01

    The bacteriostatic natural product enterocin from the marine microbe “Streptomyces maritimus” has an unprecedented carbon skeleton that is derived from an aromatic polyketide biosynthetic pathway. Its caged tricyclic, nonaromatic core is derived from a linear poly-β-ketide precursor that formally undergoes a Favorskii-like oxidative rearrangement. In vivo characterization of the gene encM through mutagenesis and heterologous biosynthesis demonstrated that its protein product not only is solely responsible for the oxidative C—C rearrangement, but also facilitates two aldol condensations plus two heterocycle forming reactions. In total, at least five chiral centers and four rings are generated by this multifaceted flavoprotein. Heterologous expression of the enterocin biosynthesis genes encABCDLMN in Streptomyces lividans resulted in the formation of the rearranged metabolite desmethyl-5-deoxyenterocin and the shunt products wailupemycins D-G. Addition of the methyltransferase gene encK, which was previously proposed through mutagenesis to additionally assist EncM in the Favorskii rearrangement, shifted the production to the O-methyl derivative 5-deoxyenterocin. The O-methyltransferase EncK seems to be specific for the pyrone ring of enterocin, because bicyclic polyketides bearing pyrone rings are not methylated in vivo. Expression of encM with different combinations of homologous actinorhodin biosynthesis genes did not result in the production of oxidatively rearranged enterocin-actinorhodin hybrid compounds as anticipated, suggesting that wild-type EncM may be specific for its endogenous type II polyketide synthase or for benzoyl-primed polyketide precursors. PMID:15505225

  10. Structural rearrangements of chromosome 15 satellites resulting in Prader-Willi syndrome suggest a complex mechanism for uniparental disomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toth-Fijel, S.; Gunter, K.; Olson, S. [Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We report two cases of PWS in which there was abnormal meiosis I segregation of chromosome 15 following a rare translocation event between the heteromorphic satellite regions of chromosomes 14 and 15 and an apparent meiotic recombination in the unstable region of 15q11.2. PWS and normal appearing chromosomes in case one prompted a chromosome 15 origin analysis. PCR analysis indicated maternal isodisomy for the long arm of chromosome. However, only one chromosome 15 had short arm heteromorphisms consistent with either paternal or maternal inheritance. VNTR DNA analysis and heteromorphism data suggest that a maternal de novo translocation between chromosome 14 and 15 occurred prior to meiosis I. This was followed by recombination between D15Z1 and D15S11 and subsequent meiosis I nondisjunction. Proband and maternal karyotype display a distamycin A-DAPI positive region on the chromosome 14 homolog involved in the translocation. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses of ONCOR probes D15S11, SNRPN, D15S11 and GABRB 3 were normal, consistent with the molecular data. Case two received a Robertsonian translocation t(14;15)(p13;p13) of maternal origin. Chromosome analysis revealed a meiosis I error producing UPD. FISH analysis of the proband and parents showed normal hybridization of ONCOR probes D15Z1, D15S11, SNRPN, D15S10 and GABRB3. In both cases the PWS probands received a structurally altered chromosome 15 that had rearranged with chromosome 14 prior to meiosis. If proper meiotic segregation is dependent on the resolution of chiasmata and/or the binding to chromosome-specific spindle fibers, then it may be possible that rearrangements of pericentric or unstable regions of the genome disrupt normal disjunction and lead to uniparental disomy.

  11. Primary myelodysplastic syndrome with complex chromosomal rearrangements in a patient with Klinefelter's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Abidi, S M; Griffiths, M; Oscier, D G; Mufti, G J; Hamblin, T J

    1986-01-01

    A patient with Klinefelter's syndrome and diabetes mellitus was diagnosed as having myelodysplasia. Cytogenetic analysis of the peripheral blood and the bone marrow cells confirmed the presence of a constitutional 47,XXY chromosome complement. In addition, complex karyotypic abnormalities were present.

  12. Dimerisation, rhodium complex formation and rearrangements of N-heterocyclic carbenes of indazoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong Guan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Deprotonation of indazolium salts at low temperatures gives N-heterocyclic carbenes of indazoles (indazol-3-ylidenes which can be trapped as rhodium complexes (X-ray analysis. In the absence of Rh, the indazol-3-ylidenes spontaneously dimerize under ring cleavage of one of the N,N-bonds and ring closure to an indazole–indole spiro compound which possesses an exocyclic imine group. The E/Z isomers of the imines can be separated by column chromatography when methanol is used as eluent. We present results of a single crystal X-ray analysis of one of the E-isomers, which equilibrate in solution as well as in the solid state. Heating of the indazole–indole spiro compounds results in the formation of quinazolines by a ring-cleavage/ring-closure sequence (X-ray analysis. Results of DFT calculations are presented.

  13. A familial Cri-du-Chat/5p deletion syndrome resulted from rare maternal complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs and/or possible chromosome 5p chromothripsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Gu

    Full Text Available Cri-du-Chat syndrome (MIM 123450 is a chromosomal syndrome characterized by the characteristic features, including cat-like cry and chromosome 5p deletions. We report a family with five individuals showing chromosomal rearrangements involving 5p, resulting from rare maternal complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs, diagnosed post- and pre-natally by comprehensive molecular and cytogenetic analyses. Two probands, including a 4½-year-old brother and his 2½-year- old sister, showed no diagnostic cat cry during infancy, but presented with developmental delay, dysmorphic and autistic features. Both patients had an interstitial deletion del(5(p13.3p15.33 spanning ≈ 26.22 Mb. The phenotypically normal mother had de novo CCRs involving 11 breakpoints and three chromosomes: ins(11;5 (q23;p14.1p15.31,ins(21;5(q21;p13.3p14.1,ins(21;5(q21;p15.31p15.33,inv(7(p22q32dn. In addition to these two children, she had three first-trimester miscarriages, two terminations due to the identification of the 5p deletion and one delivery of a phenotypically normal daughter. The unaffected daughter had the maternal ins(11;5 identified prenatally and an identical maternal allele haplotype of 5p. Array CGH did not detect any copy number changes in the mother, and revealed three interstitial deletions within 5p15.33-p13.3, in the unaffected daughter, likely products of the maternal insertions ins(21;5. Chromothripsis has been recently reported as a mechanism drives germline CCRs in pediatric patients with congenital defects. We postulate that the unique CCRs in the phenotypically normal mother could resulted from chromosome 5p chromothripsis, that further resulted in the interstitial 5p deletions in the unaffected daughter. Further high resolution sequencing based analysis is needed to determine whether chromothripsis is also present as a germline structural variation in phenotypically normal individuals in this family.

  14. Genomic regulatory landscapes and chromosomal rearrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladegaard, Elisabete L Engenheiro

    2008-01-01

    The main objectives of the PhD study are to identify and characterise chromosomal rearrangements within evolutionarily conserved regulatory landscapes around genes involved in the regulation of transcription and/or development (trans-dev genes). A frequent feature of trans-dev genes is that they ......The main objectives of the PhD study are to identify and characterise chromosomal rearrangements within evolutionarily conserved regulatory landscapes around genes involved in the regulation of transcription and/or development (trans-dev genes). A frequent feature of trans-dev genes...... the complex spatio-temporal expression of the associated trans-dev gene. Rare chromosomal breakpoints that disrupt the integrity of these regulatory landscapes may be used as a tool, not only to make genotype-phenotype associations, but also to link the associated phenotype with the position and tissue...... specificity of the individual CNEs. In this PhD study I have studied several chromosomal rearrangements with breakpoints in the vicinity of trans-dev genes. This included chromosomal rearrangements compatible with known phenotype-genotype associations (Rieger syndrome-PITX2, Mowat-Wilson syndrome-ZEB2...

  15. Radical Smiles Rearrangement: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Allart-Simon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the decades the Smiles rearrangement and its variants have become essential synthetic tools in modern synthetic organic chemistry. In this mini-review we summarized some very recent results of the radical version of these rearrangements. The selected examples illustrate the synthetic power of this approach, especially if it is incorporated into a domino process, for the preparation of polyfunctionalized complex molecules.

  16. Recent applications of ring-rearrangement metathesis in organic synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambasivarao Kotha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ring-rearrangement metathesis (RRM involves multiple metathesis processes such as ring-opening metathesis (ROM/ring-closing metathesis (RCM in a one-pot operation to generate complex targets. RRM delivers complex frameworks that are difficult to assemble by conventional methods. The noteworthy point about this type of protocol is multi-bond formation and it is an atom economic process. In this review, we have covered literature that appeared during the last seven years (2008–2014.

  17. The hardness of train rearrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggermont, C.E.J.; Hurkens, C.A.J.; Modelski, M.S.; Woeginger, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    We derive several results on the computational complexity of train rearrangement problems in railway optimization. Our main result states that arranging a departing train in a depot is NP-complete, even if each track in the depot contains only two cars.

  18. Chromosomal rearrangements in Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Debes, Nanette Mol; Hjermind, Lena E

    2013-01-01

    , and identification of susceptibility genes through linkage and association studies has been complicated due to inherent difficulties such as no clear mode of inheritance, genetic heterogeneity, and apparently incomplete penetrance. Positional cloning through mapping of disease-related chromosome rearrangements has...... been an efficient tool for the cloning of disease genes in several Mendelian disorders and in a number of complex disorders. Through cytogenetic investigation of 205 TS patients, we identified three possibly disease-associated chromosome rearrangements rendering this approach relevant in chasing TS...

  19. Complex rearrangements within the human J delta-C delta/J alpha-C alpha locus and aberrant recombination between J alpha segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baer, R.; Boehm, T.; Yssel, H.; Spits, H.; Rabbitts, T. H.

    1988-01-01

    We have examined DNA rearrangements within a 120 kb cloned region of the human T cell receptor J delta-C delta/J alpha-C alpha locus. Three types of pattern emerge from an analysis of T cell lines and clones. Firstly, cells with two rearrangements within J delta-C delta; secondly, cells with one

  20. MCLR-induced PP2A inhibition and subsequent Rac1 inactivation and hyperphosphorylation of cytoskeleton-associated proteins are involved in cytoskeleton rearrangement in SMMC-7721 human liver cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Liu, Jinghui; Lin, Shuyan; Wang, Beilei; Xing, Mingluan; Guo, Zonglou; Xu, Lihong

    2014-10-01

    Cyanobacteria-derived toxin microcystin-LR (MCLR) has been widely investigated in its effects on normal cells, there is little information concerning its effects on cancer cells. In the present study, the SMMC-7721 human liver cancer cell line treated with MCLR was used to investigate the change of PP2A, cytoskeleton rearrangement, phosphorylation levels of PP2A substrates that related with cytoskeleton stability and explored underlying mechanisms. Here, we confirmed that MCLR entered into SMMC-7721 cells, bound to PP2A/C subunit and inhibited the activity of PP2A. The upregulation of phosphorylation of the PP2A/C subunit and PP2A regulation protein α4, as well as the change in the association of PP2A/C with α4, were responsible for the decrease in PP2A activity. Another novel finding is that the rearrangement of filamentous actin and microtubules led by MCLR may attribute to the increased phosphorylation of HSP27, VASP and cofilin due to PP2A inhibition. As a result of weakened interactions with PP2A and alterations in its subcellular localization, Rac1 may contribute to the cytoskeletal rearrangement induced by MCLR in SMMC-7721 cells. The current paper presents the first report demonstrating the characteristic of PP2A in MCLR exposed cancer cells, which were more susceptible to MCLR compared with the normal cell lines we previously found, which may be owing to the absence of some type of compensatory mechanisms. The hyperphosphorylation of cytoskeleton-associated proteins and Rac1 inactivation which were induced by inhibition of PP2A are shown to be involved in cytoskeleton rearrangement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Complex chromosomal rearrangement in a girl with psychomotor-retardation and a de novo inversion: inv(2)(p15;q24.2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot-Hershkovitz, Einat; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Frumkin, Ayala; Granot, David; Silverstein, Shira; Abeliovich, Dvorah

    2011-08-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of DNA from a girl with severe psychomotor retardation revealed a de novo pericentric inversion of chromosome 2: 46,XX,inv(2)(p15q24.2). In order to elucidate the possible role of the inversion in the girl's abnormal phenotype, we analyzed the inversion breakpoints. FISH analysis revealed BAC clones spanning the breakpoints at 2p and 2q of the inversion. Southern blot hybridization with DNA probes from the BAC regions was used to refine the localization of the breakpoints, followed by inverse-PCR which enabled us to sequence the inversion breakpoints. We found a complex chromosomal rearrangement, including five breakpoints, four at 2q and one at 2p joined with minor insertions/deletions of a few bases. The breakpoint at 2p was within the NRXN1 gene that has previously been associated with autism, intellectual disabilities, and psychiatric disorders. In 2q, the breakpoints disrupted two genes, TANC1 and RBMS1; the phenotypic effect of these genes is not currently known. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. An Atypical Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Line With a Complex, Stable, and Balanced Genomic Rearrangement Including a Large De Novo 1q Uniparental Disomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steichen, Clara; Maluenda, Jérôme; Tosca, Lucie; Luce, Eléanor; Pineau, Dominique; Dianat, Noushin; Hannoun, Zara; Tachdjian, Gérard; Melki, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) hold great promise for cell therapy through their use as vital tools for regenerative and personalized medicine. However, the genomic integrity of hiPSCs still raises some concern and is one of the barriers limiting their use in clinical applications. Numerous articles have reported the occurrence of aneuploidies, copy number variations, or single point mutations in hiPSCs, and nonintegrative reprogramming strategies have been developed to minimize the impact of the reprogramming process on the hiPSC genome. Here, we report the characterization of an hiPSC line generated by daily transfections of modified messenger RNAs, displaying several genomic abnormalities. Karyotype analysis showed a complex genomic rearrangement, which remained stable during long-term culture. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses were performed on the hiPSC line showing that this karyotype is balanced. Interestingly, single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis revealed the presence of a large 1q region of uniparental disomy (UPD), demonstrating for the first time that UPD can occur in a noncompensatory context during nonintegrative reprogramming of normal fibroblasts. PMID:25650439

  3. Informational analysis involving application of complex information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciupak, Clébia; Vanti, Adolfo Alberto; Balloni, Antonio José; Espin, Rafael

    The aim of the present research is performing an informal analysis for internal audit involving the application of complex information system based on fuzzy logic. The same has been applied in internal audit involving the integration of the accounting field into the information systems field. The technological advancements can provide improvements to the work performed by the internal audit. Thus we aim to find, in the complex information systems, priorities for the work of internal audit of a high importance Private Institution of Higher Education. The applied method is quali-quantitative, as from the definition of strategic linguistic variables it was possible to transform them into quantitative with the matrix intersection. By means of a case study, where data were collected via interview with the Administrative Pro-Rector, who takes part at the elaboration of the strategic planning of the institution, it was possible to infer analysis concerning points which must be prioritized at the internal audit work. We emphasize that the priorities were identified when processed in a system (of academic use). From the study we can conclude that, starting from these information systems, audit can identify priorities on its work program. Along with plans and strategic objectives of the enterprise, the internal auditor can define operational procedures to work in favor of the attainment of the objectives of the organization.

  4. [Genome Rearrangements in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 with the Involvement of the Plasmid pRhico and the Prophage phiAb-Cd].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsy, E I; Petrova, L P

    2015-12-01

    Alphaproteobacteria of the species Azospirillum brasilense have a multicomponent genome that undergoes frequent spontaneous rearrangements, yielding changes in the plasmid profiles of strains. Specifically, variants (Cd, Sp7.K2, Sp7.1, Sp7.4, Sp7.8, etc.) of the type strainA. brasilense Sp7 that had lost a 115-MDa plasmid were previously selected. In many of them, the molecular weight of a 90-MDa plasmid (p90 or pRhico), which is a kind of "depot" for glycopolymer biosynthesis genes, increased. In this study, a collection of primers was designed to the plasmid pRhico and to the DNA of prophage phiAb-Cd integrated in it. The use ofthese primers in polymerase chain reactions allowed the detection of the probable excision of phiAb-Cd phage from the DNA of A. brasilense variants Sp7.4 and Sp7.8 and other alterations of the pRhico structure in A. brasilense strains Cd, Sp7.K2, and Sp7.8. The developed primers and PCR conditions may be recoin mended for primary analysis of spontaneous plasmid rearrangements in A. brasilense Sp7 and related strains.

  5. Biotransformation and Rearrangement of Laromustine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Alaa-Eldin F; Wisnewski, Adam V; King, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    This review highlights the recent research into the biotransformations and rearrangement of the sulfonylhydrazine-alkylating agent laromustine. Incubation of [(14)C]laromustine with rat, dog, monkey, and human liver microsomes produced eight radioactive components (C-1 to C-8). There was little difference in the metabolite profile among the species examined, partly because NADPH was not required for the formation of most components, which instead involved decomposition and/or hydrolysis. The exception was C-7, a hydroxylated metabolite, largely formed by CYP2B6 and CYP3A4/5. Liquid chromatography-multistage mass spectrometry (LC-MS(n)) studies determined that collision-induced dissociation, and not biotransformation or enzyme catalysis, produced the unique mass spectral rearrangement. Accurate mass measurements performed with a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FTICR-MS) significantly aided determination of the elemental compositions of the fragments and in the case of laromustine revealed the possibility of rearrangement. Further, collision-induced dissociation produced the loss of nitrogen (N2) and methylsulfonyl and methyl isocyanate moieties. The rearrangement, metabolite/decomposition products, and conjugation reactions were analyzed utilizing hydrogen-deuterium exchange, exact mass, (13)C-labeled laromustine, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), and LC-MS(n) experiments to assist with the assignments of these fragments and possible mechanistic rearrangement. Such techniques produced valuable insights into these functions: 1) Cytochrome P450 is involved in C-7 formation but plays little or no role in the conversion of [(14)C]laromustine to C-1 through C-6 and C-8; 2) the relative abundance of individual degradation/metabolite products was not species-dependent; and 3) laromustine produces several reactive intermediates that may produce the toxicities seen in the clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for

  6. Degradations and Rearrangement Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianbo

    This section deals with recent reports concerning degradation and rearrangement reactions of free sugars as well as some glycosides. The transformations are classified in chemical and enzymatic ways. In addition, the Maillard reaction will be discussed as an example of degradation and rearrangement transformation and its application in current research in the fields of chemistry and biology.

  7. Environmental and chemotherapeutic agents induce breakage at genes involved in leukemia-causing gene rearrangements in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thys, Ryan G., E-mail: rthys@wakehealth.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1016 (United States); Lehman, Christine E., E-mail: clehman@wakehealth.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1016 (United States); Pierce, Levi C.T., E-mail: Levipierce@gmail.com [Human Longevity, Inc., San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Wang, Yuh-Hwa, E-mail: yw4b@virginia.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Avenue, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0733 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Environmental/chemotherapeutic agents cause DNA breakage in MLL and CBFB in HSPCs. • Diethylnitrosamine-induced DNA breakage at MLL and CBFB shown for the first time. • Chemical-induced DNA breakage occurs at topoisomerase II cleavage sites. • Chemical-induced DNA breaks display a pattern similar to those in leukemia patients. • Long-term exposures suggested to generate DNA breakage at leukemia-related genes. - Abstract: Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) give rise to all of the cells that make up the hematopoietic system in the human body, making their stability and resilience especially important. Damage to these cells can severely impact cell development and has the potential to cause diseases, such as leukemia. Leukemia-causing chromosomal rearrangements have largely been studied in the context of radiation exposure and are formed by a multi-step process, including an initial DNA breakage and fusion of the free DNA ends. However, the mechanism for DNA breakage in patients without previous radiation exposure is unclear. Here, we investigate the role of non-cytotoxic levels of environmental factors, benzene, and diethylnitrosamine (DEN), and chemotherapeutic agents, etoposide, and doxorubicin, in generating DNA breakage at the patient breakpoint hotspots of the MLL and CBFB genes in human HSPCs. These conditions represent exposure to chemicals encountered daily or residual doses from chemotherapeutic drugs. Exposure of HSPCs to non-cytotoxic levels of environmental chemicals or chemotherapeutic agents causes DNA breakage at preferential sites in the human genome, including the leukemia-related genes MLL and CBFB. Though benzene, etoposide, and doxorubicin have previously been linked to leukemia formation, this is the first study to demonstrate a role for DEN in the generation of DNA breakage at leukemia-specific sites. These chemical-induced DNA breakpoints coincide with sites of predicted topoisomerase II cleavage. The

  8. Environmental and chemotherapeutic agents induce breakage at genes involved in leukemia-causing gene rearrangements in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thys, Ryan G.; Lehman, Christine E.; Pierce, Levi C.T.; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Environmental/chemotherapeutic agents cause DNA breakage in MLL and CBFB in HSPCs. • Diethylnitrosamine-induced DNA breakage at MLL and CBFB shown for the first time. • Chemical-induced DNA breakage occurs at topoisomerase II cleavage sites. • Chemical-induced DNA breaks display a pattern similar to those in leukemia patients. • Long-term exposures suggested to generate DNA breakage at leukemia-related genes. - Abstract: Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) give rise to all of the cells that make up the hematopoietic system in the human body, making their stability and resilience especially important. Damage to these cells can severely impact cell development and has the potential to cause diseases, such as leukemia. Leukemia-causing chromosomal rearrangements have largely been studied in the context of radiation exposure and are formed by a multi-step process, including an initial DNA breakage and fusion of the free DNA ends. However, the mechanism for DNA breakage in patients without previous radiation exposure is unclear. Here, we investigate the role of non-cytotoxic levels of environmental factors, benzene, and diethylnitrosamine (DEN), and chemotherapeutic agents, etoposide, and doxorubicin, in generating DNA breakage at the patient breakpoint hotspots of the MLL and CBFB genes in human HSPCs. These conditions represent exposure to chemicals encountered daily or residual doses from chemotherapeutic drugs. Exposure of HSPCs to non-cytotoxic levels of environmental chemicals or chemotherapeutic agents causes DNA breakage at preferential sites in the human genome, including the leukemia-related genes MLL and CBFB. Though benzene, etoposide, and doxorubicin have previously been linked to leukemia formation, this is the first study to demonstrate a role for DEN in the generation of DNA breakage at leukemia-specific sites. These chemical-induced DNA breakpoints coincide with sites of predicted topoisomerase II cleavage. The

  9. Involvement of complexin 2 in docking, locking and unlocking of different SNARE complexes during sperm capacitation and induced acrosomal exocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Shiue J Tsai

    Full Text Available Acrosomal exocytosis (AE is an intracellular multipoint fusion reaction of the sperm plasma membrane (PM with the outer acrosomal membrane (OAM. This unique exocytotic event enables the penetration of the sperm through the zona pellucida of the oocyte. We previously observed a stable docking of OAM to the PM brought about by the formation of the trans-SNARE complex (syntaxin 1B, SNAP 23 and VAMP 3. By using electron microscopy, immunochemistry and immunofluorescence techniques in combination with functional studies and proteomic approaches, we here demonstrate that calcium ionophore-induced AE results in the formation of unilamellar hybrid membrane vesicles containing a mixture of components originating from the two fused membranes. These mixed vesicles (MV do not contain the earlier reported trimeric SNARE complex but instead possess a novel trimeric SNARE complex that contained syntaxin 3, SNAP 23 and VAMP 2, with an additional SNARE interacting protein, complexin 2. Our data indicate that the earlier reported raft and capacitation-dependent docking phenomenon between the PM and OAM allows a specific rearrangement of molecules between the two docked membranes and is involved in (1 recruiting SNAREs and complexin 2 in the newly formed lipid-ordered microdomains, (2 the assembly of a fusion-driving SNARE complex which executes Ca(2+-dependent AE, (3 the disassembly of the earlier reported docking SNARE complex, (4 the recruitment of secondary zona binding proteins at the zona interacting sperm surface. The possibility to study separate and dynamic interactions between SNARE proteins, complexin and Ca(2+ which are all involved in AE make sperm an ideal model for studying exocytosis.

  10. Sorting permutations by prefix and suffix rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintzmayer, Carla Negri; Fertin, Guillaume; Dias, Zanoni

    2017-02-01

    Some interesting combinatorial problems have been motivated by genome rearrangements, which are mutations that affect large portions of a genome. When we represent genomes as permutations, the goal is to transform a given permutation into the identity permutation with the minimum number of rearrangements. When they affect segments from the beginning (respectively end) of the permutation, they are called prefix (respectively suffix) rearrangements. This paper presents results for rearrangement problems that involve prefix and suffix versions of reversals and transpositions considering unsigned and signed permutations. We give 2-approximation and ([Formula: see text])-approximation algorithms for these problems, where [Formula: see text] is a constant divided by the number of breakpoints (pairs of consecutive elements that should not be consecutive in the identity permutation) in the input permutation. We also give bounds for the diameters concerning these problems and provide ways of improving the practical results of our algorithms.

  11. [Identification of a novel WART-like chromosome rearrangement in complex heterozygotes in an interracial hybrid zone of the common shrew Sorex araneus L].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, S V; Bulatova, N Sh

    2010-09-01

    Karyotypes uncharacteristic of pure races or hybrids were identified in the interracial hybrid zones of the common shrew Sorex araneus L. that were recently discovered in the European part of Russia. This suggests the actual existence in natural populations of WART-like rearrangements (whole-arm reciprocal translocations) along with Robertsonian fusions of acrocentrics. Demonstration of new and still rare chromosome variants is the aim of this communication.

  12. Gang Membership and Drug Involvement: Untangling the Complex Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has consistently demonstrated a relationship between gang membership and involvement in illegal substances. In addition, researchers have noted that gang members are frequently more heavily involved in drug sales, which often lead to increases in violent behaviors. Most of this research, however, is either cross-sectional or…

  13. Rearrangements of Cycloalkenyl Aryl Ethers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedesz Törincsi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rearrangement reactions of cycloalkenyl phenol and naphthyl ethers and the acid-catalyzed cyclization of the resulting product were investigated. Claisen rearrangement afforded 2-substituted phenol and naphthol derivatives. Combined Claisen and Cope rearrangement resulted in the formation of 4-substituted phenol and naphthol derivatives. In the case of cycloocthylphenyl ether the consecutive Claisen and Cope rearrangements were followed by an alkyl migration. The mechanism of this novel rearrangement reaction is also discussed.

  14. Efficacy of Two Different Instructional Methods Involving Complex Ecological Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randler, Christoph; Bogner, Franz X.

    2009-01-01

    Teaching and learning approaches in ecology very often follow linear conceptions of ecosystems. Empirical studies with an ecological focus consistent with existing syllabi and focusing on cognitive achievement are scarce. Consequently, we concentrated on a classroom unit that offers learning materials and highlights the existing complexity rather…

  15. Novel C-2 epimerization of aldoses promoted by nickel(II) diamine complexes, involving a stereospecific pinacol-type 1,2-carbon shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanase, Tomoaki; Shimizu, Fumihiko; Kuse, Manabu; Yano, Shigenobu; Hidai, Masanobu; Yoshikawa, Sadao

    1988-01-01

    The newly discovered C-2 epimerization of aldoses promoted by nickel(II) diamine complexes has been investigated in detail by using 13 C-enriched D-glucose, 13 C NMR spectroscopy, and EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure) analysis. Aldoses treated with nickel(II) diamine complexes (diamine = N,N,N'-trimethylethylenediamine (N,N,N'-Me 3 en), N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (N,N,N',N'-Me 4 en), etc.) in methanolic solutions were rapidly (60 degree C, 3-5 min) epimerized at C-2 to give equilibrium mixtures where the ratio of C-2 epimers shifts to the side of the naturally rare mannose-type aldoses (having the cis arrangement of C-2 and C-3 hydroxyl groups) compared with those in the thermodynamic equilibrium states. The epimerization product of D-[1- 13 C]glucose was exclusively D-[2- 13 C]mannose, demonstrating that the reaction involves a stereospecific 1,2-shift of the carbon skeleton resulting in inversion of configuration at C-2. Furthermore, the absorption and circular dichroism spectra of the reaction solutions indicated the presence of an intermediate nickel(II) complex containing both diamine and sugar components, which was directly revealed by EXAFS analysis to be a mononuclear nickel(II) complex having octahedral coordination geometry. All these observations strongly suggest that the C-2 epimerization proceeds through an intermediate mononuclear nickel(II) complex, where the carbinolamine-like adduct of aldose with diamine in an open-chain form is epimerized at C-2 by a stereospecific rearrangement of the carbon skeleton or a pinacol-type rearrangement involving a cyclic transition state. 44 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Classic theory for chromosome rearrangements with spatially restricted volume for broken ends interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omel'yanchuk, L.V.

    1997-01-01

    D. Lea classic theory for chromosomal rearrangements formation was modified to account for local interaction of broken chromosome ends. This assumption makes it possible to drastically improve coincidence of the theory and experiment in the case of complex rearrangements

  17. The complex translocation (9;14;14) involving IGH and CEBPE genes suggests a new subgroup in B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerrouki, Rachid; Benhassine, Traki; Bensaada, Mustapha; Lauzon, Patricia; Trabzi, Anissa

    2016-03-01

    Many subtypes of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are associated with specific chromosomal rearrangements. The complex translocation t(9;14;14), a variant of the translocation (14;14)(q11;q32), is a rare but recurrent chromosomal abnormality involving the immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IGH) and CCAAT enhancer-binding protein (CEBPE) genes in B-lineage ALL (B-ALL) and may represent a new B-ALL subgroup. We report here the case of a 5-year-old girl with B-ALL, positive for CD19, CD38 and HLA-DR. A direct technique and G-banding were used for chromosomal analysis and fluorescentin situ hybridization (FISH) with BAC probes was used to investigate a possible rearrangement of the IGH andCEBPE genes. The karyotype exhibit the chromosomal aberration 46,XX,del(9)(p21),t(14;14)(q11;q32). FISH with dual-color break-apartIGH-specific and CEPBE-specific bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) probes showed a complex t(9;14;14) associated with a deletion of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A) and paired box gene 5 (PAX5) at 9p21-13 and duplication of the fusion gene IGH-CEBPE.

  18. The complex translocation (9;14;14 involving IGH and CEBPE genes suggests a new subgroup in B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Zerrouki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many subtypes of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL are associated with specific chromosomal rearrangements. The complex translocation t(9;14;14, a variant of the translocation (14;14(q11;q32, is a rare but recurrent chromosomal abnormality involving the immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IGH and CCAAT enhancer-binding protein (CEBPE genes in B-lineage ALL (B-ALL and may represent a new B-ALL subgroup. We report here the case of a 5-year-old girl with B-ALL, positive for CD19, CD38 and HLA-DR. A direct technique and G-banding were used for chromosomal analysis and fluorescentin situ hybridization (FISH with BAC probes was used to investigate a possible rearrangement of the IGH andCEBPE genes. The karyotype exhibit the chromosomal aberration 46,XX,del(9(p21,t(14;14(q11;q32. FISH with dual-color break-apartIGH-specific and CEPBE-specific bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC probes showed a complex t(9;14;14 associated with a deletion of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A and paired box gene 5 (PAX5 at 9p21-13 and duplication of the fusion gene IGH-CEBPE.

  19. Anticancer Activity of Metal Complexes: Involvement of Redox Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungwirth, Ute; Kowol, Christian R.; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Hartinger, Christian G.; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Cells require tight regulation of the intracellular redox balance and consequently of reactive oxygen species for proper redox signaling and maintenance of metal (e.g., of iron and copper) homeostasis. In several diseases, including cancer, this balance is disturbed. Therefore, anticancer drugs targeting the redox systems, for example, glutathione and thioredoxin, have entered focus of interest. Anticancer metal complexes (platinum, gold, arsenic, ruthenium, rhodium, copper, vanadium, cobalt, manganese, gadolinium, and molybdenum) have been shown to strongly interact with or even disturb cellular redox homeostasis. In this context, especially the hypothesis of “activation by reduction” as well as the “hard and soft acids and bases” theory with respect to coordination of metal ions to cellular ligands represent important concepts to understand the molecular modes of action of anticancer metal drugs. The aim of this review is to highlight specific interactions of metal-based anticancer drugs with the cellular redox homeostasis and to explain this behavior by considering chemical properties of the respective anticancer metal complexes currently either in (pre)clinical development or in daily clinical routine in oncology. PMID:21275772

  20. Programmed Rearrangement in Ciliates: Paramecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betermier, Mireille; Duharcourt, Sandra

    2014-12-01

    Programmed genome rearrangements in the ciliate Paramecium provide a nice illustration of the impact of transposons on genome evolution and plasticity. During the sexual cycle, development of the somatic macronucleus involves elimination of ∼30% of the germline genome, including repeated DNA (e.g., transposons) and ∼45,000 single-copy internal eliminated sequences (IES). IES excision is a precise cut-and-close process, in which double-stranded DNA cleavage at IES ends depends on PiggyMac, a domesticated piggyBac transposase. Genome-wide analysis has revealed that at least a fraction of IESs originate from Tc/mariner transposons unrelated to piggyBac. Moreover, genomic sequences with no transposon origin, such as gene promoters, can be excised reproducibly as IESs, indicating that genome rearrangements contribute to the control of gene expression. How the system has evolved to allow elimination of DNA sequences with no recognizable conserved motif has been the subject of extensive research during the past two decades. Increasing evidence has accumulated for the participation of noncoding RNAs in epigenetic control of elimination for a subset of IESs, and in trans-generational inheritance of alternative rearrangement patterns. This chapter summarizes our current knowledge of the structure of the germline and somatic genomes for the model species Paramecium tetraurelia, and describes the DNA cleavage and repair factors that constitute the IES excision machinery. We present an overview of the role of specialized RNA interference machineries and their associated noncoding RNAs in the control of DNA elimination. Finally, we discuss how RNA-dependent modification and/or remodeling of chromatin may guide PiggyMac to its cognate cleavage sites.

  1. Genome organization influences partner selection for chromosomal rearrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijchers, P.J.; de Laat, W.

    2010-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements occur as a consequence of the erroneous repair of DNA double-stranded breaks, and often underlie disease. The recurrent detection of specific tumorigenic rearrangements suggests that there is a mechanism behind chromosomal partner selection involving the shape of the

  2. Low energy acetoin ions CH3C(=O)C(H)(OH)CH3.+ decompose to CH3CO. and CH3CHOH+ via a remarkable "hidden rearrangement"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Dennis; Burgers, Peter C.; Terlouw, Johan K.

    1995-06-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry based experiments on D and 18O labelled acetoin isotopomers show that the title reaction is not just a simple bond cleavage, but rather involves rearrangement via ion--dipole complexes; the intermediacy of a charge-transfer complex is proposed to account for the observed product ratios.

  3. Rearrangement moves on rooted phylogenetic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambette, Philippe; van Iersel, Leo; Jones, Mark; Lafond, Manuel; Pardi, Fabio; Scornavacca, Celine

    2017-08-01

    Phylogenetic tree reconstruction is usually done by local search heuristics that explore the space of the possible tree topologies via simple rearrangements of their structure. Tree rearrangement heuristics have been used in combination with practically all optimization criteria in use, from maximum likelihood and parsimony to distance-based principles, and in a Bayesian context. Their basic components are rearrangement moves that specify all possible ways of generating alternative phylogenies from a given one, and whose fundamental property is to be able to transform, by repeated application, any phylogeny into any other phylogeny. Despite their long tradition in tree-based phylogenetics, very little research has gone into studying similar rearrangement operations for phylogenetic network-that is, phylogenies explicitly representing scenarios that include reticulate events such as hybridization, horizontal gene transfer, population admixture, and recombination. To fill this gap, we propose "horizontal" moves that ensure that every network of a certain complexity can be reached from any other network of the same complexity, and "vertical" moves that ensure reachability between networks of different complexities. When applied to phylogenetic trees, our horizontal moves-named rNNI and rSPR-reduce to the best-known moves on rooted phylogenetic trees, nearest-neighbor interchange and rooted subtree pruning and regrafting. Besides a number of reachability results-separating the contributions of horizontal and vertical moves-we prove that rNNI moves are local versions of rSPR moves, and provide bounds on the sizes of the rNNI neighborhoods. The paper focuses on the most biologically meaningful versions of phylogenetic networks, where edges are oriented and reticulation events clearly identified. Moreover, our rearrangement moves are robust to the fact that networks with higher complexity usually allow a better fit with the data. Our goal is to provide a solid basis for

  4. Rearrangement moves on rooted phylogenetic networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Gambette

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic tree reconstruction is usually done by local search heuristics that explore the space of the possible tree topologies via simple rearrangements of their structure. Tree rearrangement heuristics have been used in combination with practically all optimization criteria in use, from maximum likelihood and parsimony to distance-based principles, and in a Bayesian context. Their basic components are rearrangement moves that specify all possible ways of generating alternative phylogenies from a given one, and whose fundamental property is to be able to transform, by repeated application, any phylogeny into any other phylogeny. Despite their long tradition in tree-based phylogenetics, very little research has gone into studying similar rearrangement operations for phylogenetic network-that is, phylogenies explicitly representing scenarios that include reticulate events such as hybridization, horizontal gene transfer, population admixture, and recombination. To fill this gap, we propose "horizontal" moves that ensure that every network of a certain complexity can be reached from any other network of the same complexity, and "vertical" moves that ensure reachability between networks of different complexities. When applied to phylogenetic trees, our horizontal moves-named rNNI and rSPR-reduce to the best-known moves on rooted phylogenetic trees, nearest-neighbor interchange and rooted subtree pruning and regrafting. Besides a number of reachability results-separating the contributions of horizontal and vertical moves-we prove that rNNI moves are local versions of rSPR moves, and provide bounds on the sizes of the rNNI neighborhoods. The paper focuses on the most biologically meaningful versions of phylogenetic networks, where edges are oriented and reticulation events clearly identified. Moreover, our rearrangement moves are robust to the fact that networks with higher complexity usually allow a better fit with the data. Our goal is to provide

  5. P chromosomes involved in intergenomic rearrangements of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-08

    Apr 8, 2014 ... [Wang Q., Han H., Gao A., Yang X. and Li L. 2014 P chromosomes ... Y, were affected predominantly by ecological factors and altitude in nine populations of Kengyilia thoroldiana (Wang et al. 2012). To investigate the effects of different altitudes on .... AB51 0LX, UK) for improving the article linguistically.

  6. Public involvement in environmental, safety and health issues at the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Laura L.; Morgan, Robert P.

    1992-01-01

    The state of public involvement in environmental, safety, and health issues at the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex is assessed through identification of existing opportunities for public involvement and through interviews with representatives of ten local citizen groups active in these issues at weapons facilities in their communities. A framework for analyzing existing means of public involvement is developed. On the whole, opportunities for public involvement are inadequate. Provisions for public involvement are lacking in several key stages of the decision-making process. Consequently, adversarial means of public involvement have generally been more effective than cooperative means in motivating change in the Weapons Complex. Citizen advisory boards, both on the local and national level, may provide a means of improving public involvement in Weapons Complex issues. (author)

  7. Exohedral and skeletal rearrangements in the molecules of fullerene derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignat' eva, Daria V; Ioffe, I N; Troyanov, Sergey I; Sidorov, Lev N [Department of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-31

    The data on the migration of monoatomic addends, perfluoroalkyl and more complex organic groups in the molecules of fullerene derivatives published mainly in the last decade are analyzed. Skeletal rearrangements of the carbon cage occurring during chemical reactions are considered.

  8. Complete nucleotide sequence and gene rearrangement of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041, People's Republic of China ... of these rearrangements involve tRNA genes, ND5 gene and ... ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/Sequin/download/seq_win_download.

  9. A Pilot Study Involving the Effect of Two Different Complex Training Protocols on Lower Body Power

    OpenAIRE

    Smith Chad E.; Lyons Brian; Hannon James C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Complex training (CT) involves the coupling of two exercises ostensibly to enhance the effect of the second exercise. Typically, the first exercise is a strength exercise and the second exercise is a power exercise involving similar muscles. In most cases, CT is designed to enhance power. The purpose of this study was twofold. First, this study was designed to determine if lower body power could be enhanced using complex training protocols. Second, this study investigated whether the...

  10. Pea Border Cell Maturation and Release Involve Complex Cell Wall Structural Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mravec, Jozef; Guo, Xiaoyuan; Hansen, Aleksander Riise; Schückel, Julia; Kračun, Stjepan Krešimir; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Mouille, Grégory; Johansen, Ida Elisabeth; Ulvskov, Peter; Domozych, David S; Willats, William George Tycho

    2017-06-01

    The adhesion of plant cells is vital for support and protection of the plant body and is maintained by a variety of molecular associations between cell wall components. In some specialized cases, though, plant cells are programmed to detach, and root cap-derived border cells are examples of this. Border cells (in some species known as border-like cells) provide an expendable barrier between roots and the environment. Their maturation and release is an important but poorly characterized cell separation event. To gain a deeper insight into the complex cellular dynamics underlying this process, we undertook a systematic, detailed analysis of pea ( Pisum sativum ) root tip cell walls. Our study included immunocarbohydrate microarray profiling, monosaccharide composition determination, Fourier-transformed infrared microspectroscopy, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR of cell wall biosynthetic genes, analysis of hydrolytic activities, transmission electron microscopy, and immunolocalization of cell wall components. Using this integrated glycobiology approach, we identified multiple novel modes of cell wall structural and compositional rearrangement during root cap growth and the release of border cells. Our findings provide a new level of detail about border cell maturation and enable us to develop a model of the separation process. We propose that loss of adhesion by the dissolution of homogalacturonan in the middle lamellae is augmented by an active biophysical process of cell curvature driven by the polarized distribution of xyloglucan and extensin epitopes. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Pea Border Cell Maturation and Release Involve Complex Cell Wall Structural Dynamics1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The adhesion of plant cells is vital for support and protection of the plant body and is maintained by a variety of molecular associations between cell wall components. In some specialized cases, though, plant cells are programmed to detach, and root cap-derived border cells are examples of this. Border cells (in some species known as border-like cells) provide an expendable barrier between roots and the environment. Their maturation and release is an important but poorly characterized cell separation event. To gain a deeper insight into the complex cellular dynamics underlying this process, we undertook a systematic, detailed analysis of pea (Pisum sativum) root tip cell walls. Our study included immunocarbohydrate microarray profiling, monosaccharide composition determination, Fourier-transformed infrared microspectroscopy, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR of cell wall biosynthetic genes, analysis of hydrolytic activities, transmission electron microscopy, and immunolocalization of cell wall components. Using this integrated glycobiology approach, we identified multiple novel modes of cell wall structural and compositional rearrangement during root cap growth and the release of border cells. Our findings provide a new level of detail about border cell maturation and enable us to develop a model of the separation process. We propose that loss of adhesion by the dissolution of homogalacturonan in the middle lamellae is augmented by an active biophysical process of cell curvature driven by the polarized distribution of xyloglucan and extensin epitopes. PMID:28400496

  12. Iron(II) complexes of new hexadentate 1,1,1-tris-(iminomethyl)ethane podands, and their 7-methyl-1,3,5-triazaadamantane rearrangement products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Sara A; Santoro, Amedeo; Kilner, Colin A; Loughrey, Jonathan J; Halcrow, Malcolm A

    2012-04-07

    New iron(II) podand complexes have been prepared, by condensation of 2-(aminomethyl)-2-methyl-1,3-diaminopropane with 3 equiv of a heterocyclic aldehyde in the presence of hydrated Fe[BF(4)](2) or Fe[ClO(4)](2) as templates. The 2-(aminomethyl)-2-methyl-1,3-diaminopropane is prepared in situ by deprotonation of its trihydrochloride salt. The chloride must be removed from these reactions by precipitation with silver, to avoid the formation of the alternative 2,4,6-trisubstituted-7-methyl-1,3,5-triazaadamantane condensation products, or their FeCl(2) adducts. The crystal structures of two 2,4,6-tri(pyridyl)-7-methyl-1,3,5-triazaadamantane-containing species are presented, and contain two different geometric isomers of this tricyclic ring with three equatorial, or two equatorial and one axial, pyridyl substituents. Both structures feature strong C-HX (X = Cl or F) hydrogen bonding from the aminal C-H groups in the triazaadamantane ring. Five iron(II) podand complexes were successfully obtained, all of which contain low-spin iron centres.

  13. Spin-dependent recombination involving oxygen-vacancy complexes in silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Franke, David P.; Hoehne, Felix; Vlasenko, Leonid S.; Itoh, Kohei M.; Brandt, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    Spin-dependent relaxation and recombination processes in $\\gamma$-irradiated $n$-type Czochralski-grown silicon are studied using continuous wave (cw) and pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR). Two processes involving the SL1 center, the neutral excited triplet state of the oxygen-vacancy complex, are observed which can be separated by their different dynamics. One of the processes is the relaxation of the excited SL1 state to the ground state of the oxygen-vacancy complex, t...

  14. Claisen thermally rearranged (CTR) polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tena, Alberto; Rangou, Sofia; Shishatskiy, Sergey; Filiz, Volkan; Abetz, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Thermally rearranged (TR) polymers, which are considered the next-generation of membrane materials because of their excellent transport properties and high thermal and chemical stability, are proven to have significant drawbacks because of the high temperature required for the rearrangement and low degree of conversion during this process. We demonstrate that using a [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement, the temperature required for the rearrangement of a solid glassy polymer was reduced by 200°C. Conversions of functionalized polyimide to polybenzoxazole of more than 97% were achieved. These highly mechanically stable polymers were almost five times more permeable and had more than two times higher degrees of conversion than the reference polymer treated under the same conditions. Properties of these second-generation TR polymers provide the possibility of preparing efficient polymer membranes in a form of, for example, thin-film composite membranes for various gas and liquid membrane separation applications. PMID:27482538

  15. Early onset of Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome with severe liver involvement in a patient with a complex rearrangement of ABHD5 promoter

    OpenAIRE

    Missaglia, Sara; Valadares, Eugenia Ribeiro; Moro, Laura; Faguntes, Eleonora Druve Tavares; quintão Roque, Raquel; Giardina, Bruno; Tavian, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Background α/β-hydrolase domain-containing protein 5 (ABHD5) plays an important role in the triacylglycerols (TAG) hydrolysis. Indeed, ABHD5 is the co-activator of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), that catalyses the initial step of TAG hydrolysis. Mutations in ABHD5 gene are associated with the onset of Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome (CDS), a rare autosomal recessive lipid storage disorder, characterized by non-bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (NCIE), hepatomegaly and liver steatos...

  16. Synthesis of (±)-amathaspiramide F and discovery of an unusual stereocontrolling element for the [2,3]-Stevens rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soheili, Arash; Tambar, Uttam K

    2013-10-04

    A formal total synthesis of (±)-amathaspiramide F through a tandem palladium-catalyzed allylic amination/[2,3]-Stevens rearrangement is reported. The unexpected diastereoselectivity of the [2,3]-Stevens rearrangement was controlled by the substitution patterns of an aromatic ring. This discovery represents a new stereocontrolling element for [2,3]-sigmatropic rearrangements in complex molecular settings.

  17. Involvement of Autophagy in Coronavirus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Britton

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses are single stranded, positive sense RNA viruses, which induce the rearrangement of cellular membranes upon infection of a host cell. This provides the virus with a platform for the assembly of viral replication complexes, improving efficiency of RNA synthesis. The membranes observed in coronavirus infected cells include double membrane vesicles. By nature of their double membrane, these vesicles resemble cellular autophagosomes, generated during the cellular autophagy pathway. In addition, coronavirus infection has been demonstrated to induce autophagy. Here we review current knowledge of coronavirus induced membrane rearrangements and the involvement of autophagy or autophagy protein microtubule associated protein 1B light chain 3 (LC3 in coronavirus replication.

  18. Facilitating Learning and Physical Change in Complex Systems through Employee Involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Eva; Dahl, Susanne

    In a Danish workplace an experiment with mobile seating was carried out. Instead of implementing a certain concept designed by the management team the process was facilitated as a user involvement process based on Stacey´s theory of complex responsive processes. Here providing alternative picture...... of the organisation challenged the discursive practice of the organisation and engaged employees in a process where they challenged each other’s accepted understandings of the organisation and of their work....

  19. Genes involved in complex adaptive processes tend to have highly conserved upstream regions in mammalian genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohane Isaac

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in genome sequencing suggest a remarkable conservation in gene content of mammalian organisms. The similarity in gene repertoire present in different organisms has increased interest in studying regulatory mechanisms of gene expression aimed at elucidating the differences in phenotypes. In particular, a proximal promoter region contains a large number of regulatory elements that control the expression of its downstream gene. Although many studies have focused on identification of these elements, a broader picture on the complexity of transcriptional regulation of different biological processes has not been addressed in mammals. The regulatory complexity may strongly correlate with gene function, as different evolutionary forces must act on the regulatory systems under different biological conditions. We investigate this hypothesis by comparing the conservation of promoters upstream of genes classified in different functional categories. Results By conducting a rank correlation analysis between functional annotation and upstream sequence alignment scores obtained by human-mouse and human-dog comparison, we found a significantly greater conservation of the upstream sequence of genes involved in development, cell communication, neural functions and signaling processes than those involved in more basic processes shared with unicellular organisms such as metabolism and ribosomal function. This observation persists after controlling for G+C content. Considering conservation as a functional signature, we hypothesize a higher density of cis-regulatory elements upstream of genes participating in complex and adaptive processes. Conclusion We identified a class of functions that are associated with either high or low promoter conservation in mammals. We detected a significant tendency that points to complex and adaptive processes were associated with higher promoter conservation, despite the fact that they have emerged

  20. Spin-dependent recombination involving oxygen-vacancy complexes in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, David P.; Hoehne, Felix; Vlasenko, Leonid S.; Itoh, Kohei M.; Brandt, Martin S.

    2014-05-01

    Spin-dependent relaxation and recombination processes in γ-irradiated n-type Czochralski-grown silicon are studied using continuous wave (cw) and pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR). Two processes involving the SL1 center, the neutral excited triplet state of the oxygen-vacancy complex, are observed which can be separated by their different dynamics. One of the processes is the relaxation of the excited SL1 state to the ground state of the oxygen-vacancy complex, the other a charge transfer between 31P donors and SL1 centers forming close pairs, as indicated by electrically detected electron double resonance. For both processes, the recombination dynamics is studied with pulsed EDMR techniques. We demonstrate the feasibility of true zero-field cw and pulsed EDMR for spin-1 systems and use this to measure the lifetimes of the different spin states of SL1 also at vanishing external magnetic field.

  1. Experimental evidence for the involvement of dinuclear alkynylcopper(I) complexes in alkyne-azide chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Benjamin R; Dann, Sandra E; Heaney, Harry

    2010-06-01

    Dinuclear alkynylcopper(I) ladderane complexes are prepared by a robust and simple protocol involving the reduction of Cu(2)(OH)(3)OAc or Cu(OAc)(2) by easily oxidised alcohols in the presence of terminal alkynes; they function as efficient catalysts in copper-catalysed alkyne-azide cycloaddition reactions as predicted by the Ahlquist-Fokin calculations. The same copper(I) catalysts are formed during reactions by using the Sharpless-Fokin protocol. The experimental results also provide evidence that sodium ascorbate functions as a base to deprotonate terminal alkynes and additionally give a convincing alternative explanation for the fact that the Cu(I)-catalysed reactions of certain 1,3-diazides with phenylacetylene give bis(triazoles) as the major products. The same dinuclear alkynylcopper(I) complexes also function as catalysts in cycloaddition reactions of azides with 1-iodoalkynes.

  2. Integrative analysis for finding genes and networks involved in diabetes and other complex diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, R.; Størling, Zenia, Marian; Hansen, Kasper Lage

    2007-01-01

    We have developed an integrative analysis method combining genetic interactions, identified using type 1 diabetes genome scan data, and a high-confidence human protein interaction network. Resulting networks were ranked by the significance of the enrichment of proteins from interacting regions. We...... identified a number of new protein network modules and novel candidate genes/proteins for type 1 diabetes. We propose this type of integrative analysis as a general method for the elucidation of genes and networks involved in diabetes and other complex diseases....

  3. Cochlear Implant: the complexity involved in the decision making process by the family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila de Souza Vieira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to understand the meanings the family attributes to the phases of the decision-making process on a cochlear implant for their child.METHOD: qualitative research, using Symbolic Interactionism and Grounded Theory as the theoretical and methodological frameworks, respectively. Data collection instrument: semistructured interview. Nine families participated in the study (32 participants.RESULTS: knowledge deficit, difficulties to contextualize benefits and risks and fear are some factors that make this process difficult. Experiences deriving from interactions with health professionals, other cochlear implant users and their relatives strengthen decision making in favor of the implant.CONCLUSION: deciding on whether or not to have the implant involves a complex process, in which the family needs to weigh gains and losses, experience feelings of accountability and guilt, besides overcoming the risk aversion. Hence, this demands cautious preparation and knowledge from the professionals involved in this intervention.

  4. Cochlear Implant: the complexity involved in the decision making process by the family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Sheila de Souza; Bevilacqua, Maria Cecília; Ferreira, Noeli Marchioro Liston Andrade; Dupas, Giselle

    2014-01-01

    to understand the meanings the family attributes to the phases of the decision-making process on a cochlear implant for their child. qualitative research, using Symbolic Interactionism and Grounded Theory as the theoretical and methodological frameworks, respectively. Data collection instrument: semistructured interview. Nine families participated in the study (32 participants). knowledge deficit, difficulties to contextualize benefits and risks and fear are some factors that make this process difficult. Experiences deriving from interactions with health professionals, other cochlear implant users and their relatives strengthen decision making in favor of the implant. deciding on whether or not to have the implant involves a complex process, in which the family needs to weigh gains and losses, experience feelings of accountability and guilt, besides overcoming the risk aversion. Hence, this demands cautious preparation and knowledge from the professionals involved in this intervention.

  5. Cochlear Implant: the complexity involved in the decision making process by the family1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Sheila de Souza; Bevilacqua, Maria Cecília; Ferreira, Noeli Marchioro Liston Andrade; Dupas, Giselle

    2014-01-01

    Objective to understand the meanings the family attributes to the phases of the decision-making process on a cochlear implant for their child. Method qualitative research, using Symbolic Interactionism and Grounded Theory as the theoretical and methodological frameworks, respectively. Data collection instrument: semistructured interview. Nine families participated in the study (32 participants). Results knowledge deficit, difficulties to contextualize benefits and risks and fear are some factors that make this process difficult. Experiences deriving from interactions with health professionals, other cochlear implant users and their relatives strengthen decision making in favor of the implant. Conclusion deciding on whether or not to have the implant involves a complex process, in which the family needs to weigh gains and losses, experience feelings of accountability and guilt, besides overcoming the risk aversion. Hence, this demands cautious preparation and knowledge from the professionals involved in this intervention. PMID:25029052

  6. Meiotic Recombination Analyses in Pigs Carrying Different Balanced Structural Chromosomal Rearrangements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Mary

    Full Text Available Correct pairing, synapsis and recombination between homologous chromosomes are essential for normal meiosis. All these events are strongly regulated, and our knowledge of the mechanisms involved in this regulation is increasing rapidly. Chromosomal rearrangements are known to disturb these processes. In the present paper, synapsis and recombination (number and distribution of MLH1 foci were studied in three boars (Sus scrofa domestica carrying different chromosomal rearrangements. One (T34he was heterozygote for the t(3;4(p1.3;q1.5 reciprocal translocation, one (T34ho was homozygote for that translocation, while the third (T34Inv was heterozygote for both the translocation and a pericentric inversion inv(4(p1.4;q2.3. All three boars were normal for synapsis and sperm production. This particular situation allowed us to rigorously study the impact of rearrangements on recombination. Overall, the rearrangements induced only minor modifications of the number of MLH1 foci (per spermatocyte or per chromosome and of the length of synaptonemal complexes for chromosomes 3 and 4. The distribution of MLH1 foci in T34he was comparable to that of the controls. Conversely, the distributions of MLH1 foci on chromosome 4 were strongly modified in boar T34Inv (lack of crossover in the heterosynaptic region of the quadrivalent, and crossover displaced to the chromosome extremities, and also in boar T34ho (two recombination peaks on the q-arms compared with one of higher magnitude in the controls. Analyses of boars T34he and T34Inv showed that the interference was propagated through the breakpoints. A different result was obtained for boar T34ho, in which the breakpoints (transition between SSC3 and SSC4 chromatin on the bivalents seemed to alter the transmission of the interference signal. Our results suggest that the number of crossovers and crossover interference could be regulated by partially different mechanisms.

  7. The GARP Complex Is Involved in Intracellular Cholesterol Transport via Targeting NPC2 to Lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jian; Zhang, Ying-Yu; Luo, Jie; Wang, Ju-Qiong; Zhou, Yu-Xia; Miao, Hong-Hua; Shi, Xiong-Jie; Qu, Yu-Xiu; Xu, Jie; Li, Bo-Liang; Song, Bao-Liang

    2017-06-27

    Proper intracellular cholesterol trafficking is critical for cellular function. Two lysosome-resident proteins, NPC1 and NPC2, mediate the egress of low-density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol from lysosomes. However, other proteins involved in this process remain largely unknown. Through amphotericin B-based selection, we isolated two cholesterol transport-defective cell lines. Subsequent whole-transcriptome-sequencing analysis revealed two cell lines bearing the same mutation in the vacuolar protein sorting 53 (Vps53) gene. Depletion of VPS53 or other subunits of the Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex impaired NPC2 sorting to lysosomes and caused cholesterol accumulation. GARP deficiency blocked the retrieval of the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR) to the trans-Golgi network. Further, Vps54 mutant mice displayed reduced cellular NPC2 protein levels and increased cholesterol accumulation, underscoring the physiological role of the GARP complex in cholesterol transport. We conclude that the GARP complex contributes to intracellular cholesterol transport by targeting NPC2 to lysosomes in a CI-MPR-dependent manner. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Jasmonate signalling in Arabidopsis involves SGT1b-HSP70-HSP90 chaperone complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Millet, Yves A; Cheng, Zhenyu; Bush, Jenifer; Ausubel, Frederick M

    Plant hormones play pivotal roles in growth, development and stress responses. Although it is essential to our understanding of hormone signalling, how plants maintain a steady state level of hormone receptors is poorly understood. We show that mutation of the Arabidopsis thaliana co-chaperone SGT1b impairs responses to the plant hormones jasmonate, auxin and gibberellic acid, but not brassinolide and abscisic acid, and that SGT1b and its homologue SGT1a are involved in maintaining the steady state levels of the F-box proteins COI1 and TIR1, receptors for jasmonate and auxin, respectively. The association of SGT1b with COI1 is direct and is independent of the Arabidopsis SKP1 protein, ASK1. We further show that COI1 is a client protein of SGT1b-HSP70-HSP90 chaperone complexes and that the complexes function in hormone signalling by stabilizing the COI1 protein. This study extends the SGT1b-HSP90 client protein list and broadens the functional scope of SGT1b-HSP70-HSP90 chaperone complexes.

  9. A Pilot Study Involving the Effect of Two Different Complex Training Protocols on Lower Body Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Chad E.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Complex training (CT involves the coupling of two exercises ostensibly to enhance the effect of the second exercise. Typically, the first exercise is a strength exercise and the second exercise is a power exercise involving similar muscles. In most cases, CT is designed to enhance power. The purpose of this study was twofold. First, this study was designed to determine if lower body power could be enhanced using complex training protocols. Second, this study investigated whether the inclusion of a power exercise instead of a strength exercise as the first exercise in CT would produce differences in lower body power. Methods. Thirty-six recreationally-trained men and women aged 20 to 29 years attending a college physical education course were randomly assigned to one of three groups: squat and countermovement squat jumps (SSJ, kettlebell swings and countermovement squat jumps (KSJ, and a control (CON. Training involving CT lasted 6 weeks. All participants were pre- and posttested for vertical jump performance in order to assess lower body power. Results. Vertical jump scores improved for all groups (p < 0.01. The results also indicated that there were no statistically significant differences between group scores across time (p = 0.215. The statistical power for this analysis was low (0.312, most likely due to the small sample size. However, the results did reveal a trend suggesting that the training improvements were greater for both the SSJ and KSJ groups compared with the CON (by 171% and 107%, respectively although significance was not reached. Conclusions. Due to the observed trend, a replication of this study with a greater number of participants over a longer period of time is warranted.

  10. Bifurcation and complex dynamics of a discrete-time predator-prey system involving group defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Sohel Rana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of a discrete-time predator-prey system involving group defense. The existence and local stability of positive fixed point of the discrete dynamical system is analyzed algebraically. It is shown that the system undergoes a flip bifurcation and a Neimark-Sacker bifurcation in the interior of R+2 by using bifurcation theory. Numerical simulation results not only show the consistence with the theoretical analysis but also display the new and interesting dynamical behaviors, including phase portraits, period-7, 20-orbits, attracting invariant circle, cascade of period-doubling bifurcation from period-20 leading to chaos, quasi-periodic orbits, and sudden disappearance of the chaotic dynamics and attracting chaotic set. The Lyapunov exponents are numerically computed to characterize the complexity of the dynamical behaviors.

  11. Structure of a preternary complex involving a prokaryotic NHEJ DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissett, Nigel C; Martin, Maria J; Pitcher, Robert S; Bianchi, Julie; Juarez, Raquel; Green, Andrew J; Fox, Gavin C; Blanco, Luis; Doherty, Aidan J

    2011-01-21

    In many prokaryotes, a specific DNA primase/polymerase (PolDom) is required for nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Here, we report the crystal structure of a catalytically active conformation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis PolDom, consisting of a polymerase bound to a DNA end with a 3' overhang, two metal ions, and an incoming nucleotide but, significantly, lacking a primer strand. This structure represents a polymerase:DNA complex in a preternary intermediate state. This polymerase complex occurs in solution, stabilizing the enzyme on DNA ends and promoting nucleotide extension of short incoming termini. We also demonstrate that the invariant Arg(220), contained in a conserved loop (loop 2), plays an essential role in catalysis by regulating binding of a second metal ion in the active site. We propose that this NHEJ intermediate facilitates extension reactions involving critically short or noncomplementary DNA ends, thus promoting break repair and minimizing sequence loss during DSB repair. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Yeast Mitochondrial Interactosome Model: Metabolon Membrane Proteins Complex Involved in the Channeling of ADP/ATP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Clémençon

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The existence of a mitochondrial interactosome (MI has been currently well established in mammalian cells but the exact composition of this super-complex is not precisely known, and its organization seems to be different from that in yeast. One major difference is the absence of mitochondrial creatine kinase (MtCK in yeast, unlike that described in the organization model of MI, especially in cardiac, skeletal muscle and brain cells. The aim of this review is to provide a detailed description of different partner proteins involved in the synergistic ADP/ATP transport across the mitochondrial membranes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to propose a new mitochondrial interactosome model. The ADP/ATP (Aacp and inorganic phosphate (PiC carriers as well as the VDAC (or mitochondrial porin catalyze the import and export of ADP, ATP and Pi across the mitochondrial membranes. Aacp and PiC, which appear to be associated with the ATP synthase, consist of two nanomotors (F0, F1 under specific conditions and form ATP synthasome. Identification and characterization of such a complex were described for the first time by Pedersen and co-workers in 2003.

  13. Formation of wood secondary cell wall may involve two type cellulose synthase complexes in Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Wang; Song, Dongliang; Sun, Jiayan; Shen, Junhui; Li, Laigeng

    2017-03-01

    Cellulose biosynthesis is mediated by cellulose synthases (CesAs), which constitute into rosette-like cellulose synthase complexe (CSC) on the plasma membrane. Two types of CSCs in Arabidopsis are believed to be involved in cellulose synthesis in the primary cell wall and secondary cell walls, respectively. In this work, we found that the two type CSCs participated cellulose biosynthesis in differentiating xylem cells undergoing secondary cell wall thickening in Populus. During the cell wall thickening process, expression of one type CSC genes increased while expression of the other type CSC genes decreased. Suppression of different type CSC genes both affected the wall-thickening and disrupted the multilaminar structure of the secondary cell walls. When CesA7A was suppressed, crystalline cellulose content was reduced, which, however, showed an increase when CesA3D was suppressed. The CesA suppression also affected cellulose digestibility of the wood cell walls. The results suggest that two type CSCs are involved in coordinating the cellulose biosynthesis in formation of the multilaminar structure in Populus wood secondary cell walls.

  14. DNA rearrangements from γ-irradiated normal human fibroblasts preferentially occur in transcribed regions of the genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrester, H.B.; Radford, I.R.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: DNA rearrangement events leading to chromosomal aberrations are central to ionizing radiation-induced cell death. Although DNA double-strand breaks are probably the lesion that initiates formation of chromosomal aberrations, little is understood about the molecular mechanisms that generate and modulate DNA rearrangement. Examination of the sequences that flank sites of DNA rearrangement may provide information regarding the processes and enzymes involved in rearrangement events. Accordingly, we developed a method using inverse PCR that allows the detection and sequencing of putative radiation-induced DNA rearrangements in defined regions of the human genome. The method can detect single copies of a rearrangement event that has occurred in a particular region of the genome and, therefore, DNA rearrangement detection does not require survival and continued multiplication of the affected cell. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA rearrangements were detected in several different regions of the genome of human fibroblast cells that were exposed to 30 Gy of γ-irradiation and then incubated for 24 hours at 37 deg C. There was a 3- to 5-fold increase in the number of products amplified from irradiated as compared with control cells in the target regions 5' to the C-MYC, CDKN1A, RB1, and FGFR2 genes. Sequences were examined from 121 DNA rearrangements. Approximately half of the PCR products were derived from possible inter-chromosomal rearrangements and the remainder were from intra-chromosomal events. A high proportion of the sequences that rearranged with target regions were located in genes, suggesting that rearrangements may occur preferentially in transcribed regions. Eighty-four percent of the sequences examined by reverse transcriptase PCR were from transcribed sequences in IMR-90 cells. The distribution of DNA rearrangements within the target regions is non-random and homology occurs between the sequences involved in rearrangements in some cases but is not

  15. Heterobimetallic coordination polymers involving 3d metal complexes and heavier transition metals cyanometallates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peresypkina, Eugenia V. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Samsonenko, Denis G. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Vostrikova, Kira E., E-mail: vosk@niic.nsc.ru [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); LMI, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2015-04-15

    The results of the first steps in the design of coordination polymers based on penta- and heptacyanometallates of heavier d transitions metals are presented. The 2D structure of the coordination polymers: [(Mn(acacen)){sub 2}Ru(NO)(CN){sub 5}]{sub n} and two complexes composed of different cyanorhenates, [Ni(cyclam)]{sub 2}[ReO(OH)(CN){sub 4}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 1.25} and [Cu(cyclam)]{sub 2}[Re(CN){sub 7}](H{sub 2}O){sub 12}, was confirmed by single crystal XRD study, the rhenium oxidation state having been proved by the magnetic measurements. An amorphism of [M(cyclam)]{sub 3}[Re(CN){sub 7}]{sub 2} (M=Ni, Cu) polymers does not allow to define strictly their dimensionality and to model anisotropic magnetic behavior of the compounds. However, with high probability a honey-comb like layer structure could be expected for [M(cyclam)]{sub 3}[Re(CN){sub 7}]{sub 2} complexes, studied in this work, because such an arrangement is the most common among the bimetallic assemblies of hexa- and octacyanometallates with a ratio [M(cyclam)]/[M(CN){sub n}]=3/2. For the first time was prepared and fully characterized a precursor (n-Bu{sub 4}N){sub 2}[Ru(NO)(CN){sub 5}], soluble in organic media. - Graphical abstract: The very first results in the design of 2D coordination polymers based on penta- and heptacyanometallates of 4d and5d transitions metals are presented. - Highlights: • Design of coordination polymers based on penta- and heptacyanometallates. • New Ru and Re cyanide based heterobimetallic coordination complexes. • Hydrolysis and ox/red processes involving [Re(CN){sub 7}]{sup 3+} during crystallization. • High magnetic anisotropy of [M(cyclam)]{sub 3}[Re(CN){sub 7}]{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub n}, M=Cu, Ni, complexes.

  16. Thermal rearrangement of 7-methylbicyclo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender; Leber; Lirio; Smith

    2000-08-25

    The gas-phase thermal rearrangement of exo-7-methylbicyclo[3.2.0]hept-2-ene yields almost exclusively 5-methylnorbornene products. Inversion (i) of configuration dominates this [1,3] sigmatropic shift although some retention (r) is also observed. Because the [1,3] migration can only occur suprafacially (s) in this geometrically constrained system, the si/sr ratio of 7 observed for the migration of C7 in exo-7-methylbicyclo[3.2.0]hept-2-ene indicates that the orbital symmetry rules are somewhat permissive for the [1,3] sigmatropic migration of carbon.

  17. Contribution of canonical nonhomologous end joining to chromosomal rearrangements is enhanced by ATM kinase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Ragini; Carson, Caree R; Lee, Gabriella; Stark, Jeremy M

    2017-01-24

    A likely mechanism of chromosomal rearrangement formation involves joining the ends from two different chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs). These events could potentially be mediated by either of two end-joining (EJ) repair pathways [canonical nonhomologous end joining (C-NHEJ) or alternative end joining (ALT-EJ)], which cause distinct rearrangement junction patterns. The relative role of these EJ pathways during rearrangement formation has remained controversial. Along these lines, we have tested whether the DNA damage response mediated by the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) kinase may affect the relative influence of C-NHEJ vs. ALT-EJ on rearrangement formation. We developed a reporter in mouse cells for a 0.4-Mbp deletion rearrangement that is formed by EJ between two DSBs induced by the Cas9 endonuclease. We found that disruption of the ATM kinase causes an increase in the frequency of the rearrangement as well as a shift toward rearrangement junctions that show hallmarks of C-NHEJ. Furthermore, ATM suppresses rearrangement formation in an experimental condition, in which C-NHEJ is the predominant EJ repair event (i.e., expression of the 3' exonuclease Trex2). Finally, several C-NHEJ factors are required for the increase in rearrangement frequency caused by inhibition of the ATM kinase. We also examined ATM effectors and found that H2AX shows a similar influence as ATM, whereas the influence of ATM on this rearrangement seems independent of 53BP1. We suggest that the contribution of the C-NHEJ pathway to the formation of a 0.4-Mbp deletion rearrangement is enhanced in ATM-deficient cells.

  18. Facilitating Site Specific and Citizens Advisory Boards: Running Effective Meetings that Involve Complex Technical Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, J.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental cleanup issues at federal sites are more often than not on the agendas of meetings of the Site Specific Advisory Boards (SSABs), also called Citizens Advisory Boards (CABs), that exist at most U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites with an Environmental Management (EM) mission. In 1994, when Congress established these committees comprised of local citizens, it enabled community stakeholders to become more directly involved in DOE EM cleanup decisions. This involvement is to help the agency make cost-effective and environmentally sound decisions which lead to faster, safer cleanups. Eight local Boards that fall under the Federal Advisory Committee Act-chartered EM SSAB charter are found in Hanford, Washington; Idaho; Northern New Mexico; Nevada; Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. These boards provide advice and recommendations about EM site-specific issues such as cleanup standards (how clean is clean?), environmental restoration, waste management, the stabilization and disposal of non-stockpile nuclear materials, future land use and long-term stewardship, risk assessment and management, and cleanup science and technology activities. These issues are, by their very nature, loaded with complicated technical terms and strategies, scientific data and interpretations, and long histories of studies and reports. The members of SSABs and CABs rotate on and off the Boards according to defined terms of office, thereby routinely opening the Boards' ranks to new members, many of whom are new to the issues. In addition, members of the public who have access to public comment periods at each Board meeting run up against the same daunting menu of obscure acronyms, scientific terms and notations, and an historical trail which is not always evident except to those involved with the issues over many years. How does a facilitator effectively guide such a group of citizens, each of whom arrives to

  19. Nuclear structure in cold rearrangement processes in fission and fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armbruster, P.

    1998-11-01

    In fission and fusion of heavy nuclei large numbers of nucleons are rearranged at a scale of excitation energy very small compared to the binding energy of the nuclei. The energies involved are less than 40 MeV at nuclear temperatures below 1.5 MeV. The shapes of the configurations in the rearrangement of a binary system into a monosystem in fusion, or vice versa in fission, change their elongations by as much as 8 fm, the radius of the monosystem. The dynamics of the reactions macroscopically described by a potential energy surface, inertia parameters, dissipation, and a collision energy is strongly modified by the nuclear structure of the participating nuclei. Experiments showing nuclear structure effects in fusion and fission of the heaviest nuclei are reviewed. The reaction kinematics and the multitude of isotopes involved are investigated by detector techniques and by recoil spectrometers. The advancement of the latter allows to find very small reaction branches in the range of 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -10}. The experiments reveal nuclear structure effects in all stages of the rearrangement processes. These are discussed pointing to analogies in fusion and fission on the microscopic scale, notwithstanding that both processes macroscopically are irreversible. Heavy clusters, as 132Sn, 208Pb, nuclei with closed shell configurations N=82,126, Z=50,82 survive in large parts of the nuclear rearrangement. They determine the asymmetry in the mass distribution of low energy fission, and they allow to synthesise superheavy elements, until now up to element 112. Experiments on the cold rearrangement in fission and fusion are presented. Here, in the range of excitation energies below 12 MeV the phenomena are observed most convincingly. (orig.)

  20. Thallium and manganese complexes involved in the luminescence emission of potassium-bearing aluminosilicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Gonzalez, Miguel A., E-mail: miguel.gomez@mncn.csic.es [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); Garcia-Guinea, Javier, E-mail: guinea@mncn.csic.es [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); Garrido, Fernando, E-mail: fernando.garrido@mncn.csic.es [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); Townsend, Peter D., E-mail: pdtownsend@gmail.com [School of Science and Technology, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Marco, Jose-Francisco, E-mail: jfmarco@iqfr.csic.es [Instituto de Química-Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Calle Serrano 119, Madrid E-28006 (Spain)

    2015-03-15

    coordinated Mn{sup 2+}. Moscovite samples display spectral CL bands at 285 and 560 nm but only when the electron-beam is directed along the (0 1 0) orientation and not along the (0 0 1) orientation. The Tl{sup +} versus K{sup +} cation isomorphism anchors the luminogenous hydrous thallium–manganese complexes to the potassium-bearing aluminosilicate surfaces under analyses. The CL emission bands at 285 and 560 nm of these complexes together with the EDS detection of thallium are a fast analytical measurement detecting the presence of thallium in further studies involving this toxic element. - Highlights: • Different K-aluminosilicates with thallium and manganese display similar CL spectra. • Cathodoluminescence bands at 285 and 560 nm are associated with Tl{sup 1+} and Mn{sup 2+}. • K-feldspar, quartz and moscovite with CL 285 nm peak have accesorial Tl{sup 1+} by EDS. • Moscovites exhibit 285 nm CL bands along (0 1 0) orientation but not along (0 0 1). • Surficial Tl{sup +} in K{sup +} sites are anchors for hydrous Tl{sup 1+}/Mn{sup 2+} complexes and clusters.

  1. Recurrent Rearrangements of Human Amylase Genes Create Multiple Independent CNV Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwan, Nzar A A; Louzada, Sandra; Yang, Fengtang; Armour, John A L

    2017-05-01

    The human amylase gene cluster includes the human salivary (AMY1) and pancreatic amylase genes (AMY2A and AMY2B), and is a highly variable and dynamic region of the genome. Copy number variation (CNV) of AMY1 has been implicated in human dietary adaptation, and in population association with obesity, but neither of these findings has been independently replicated. Despite these functional implications, the structural genomic basis of CNV has only been defined in detail very recently. In this work, we use high-resolution analysis of copy number, and analysis of segregation in trios, to define new, independent allelic series of amylase CNVs in sub-Saharan Africans, including a series of higher-order expansions of a unit consisting of one copy each of AMY1, AMY2A, and AMY2B. We use fiber-FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) to define unexpected complexity in the accompanying rearrangements. These findings demonstrate recurrent involvement of the amylase gene region in genomic instability, involving at least five independent rearrangements of the pancreatic amylase genes (AMY2A and AMY2B). Structural features shared by fundamentally distinct lineages strongly suggest that the common ancestral state for the human amylase cluster contained more than one, and probably three, copies of AMY1. © 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  2. Semiclassical asymptotic behavior and the rearrangement mechanisms for Coulomb particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, A.V.; Gevorkyan, A.S.; Dubrovskii, G.V.

    1986-01-01

    The semiclassical asymptotic behavior of the eikonal amplitude of the resonance rearrangement in a system of three Coulomb particles is studied. It is shown that the general formula for the amplitude correctly describes two classical mechanisms (pickup and knockout) and one nonclassical mechanism (stripping). The classical mechanisms predominate at high energies, while the stripping mechanism predominates at lower energies. In the region of medium energies the dominant mechanism is the pickup (or Thomas) mechanism, which is realized by nonclassical means. For such transitions the classical cross section diverges, and the amplitude must be computed on a complex trajectory. The physical reasons for introducing the approximate complex trajectories are discussed. The contributions of all the mechanisms to the rearrangement cross section are found in their analytic forms

  3. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas; Westbrook, Carol

    2013-04-09

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  4. System-wide analysis reveals a complex network of tumor-fibroblast interactions involved in tumorigenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Rajaram

    Full Text Available Many fibroblast-secreted proteins promote tumorigenicity, and several factors secreted by cancer cells have in turn been proposed to induce these proteins. It is not clear whether there are single dominant pathways underlying these interactions or whether they involve multiple pathways acting in parallel. Here, we identified 42 fibroblast-secreted factors induced by breast cancer cells using comparative genomic analysis. To determine what fraction was active in promoting tumorigenicity, we chose five representative fibroblast-secreted factors for in vivo analysis. We found that the majority (three out of five played equally major roles in promoting tumorigenicity, and intriguingly, each one had distinct effects on the tumor microenvironment. Specifically, fibroblast-secreted amphiregulin promoted breast cancer cell survival, whereas the chemokine CCL7 stimulated tumor cell proliferation while CCL2 promoted innate immune cell infiltration and angiogenesis. The other two factors tested had minor (CCL8 or minimally (STC1 significant effects on the ability of fibroblasts to promote tumor growth. The importance of parallel interactions between fibroblasts and cancer cells was tested by simultaneously targeting fibroblast-secreted amphiregulin and the CCL7 receptor on cancer cells, and this was significantly more efficacious than blocking either pathway alone. We further explored the concept of parallel interactions by testing the extent to which induction of critical fibroblast-secreted proteins could be achieved by single, previously identified, factors produced by breast cancer cells. We found that although single factors could induce a subset of genes, even combinations of factors failed to induce the full repertoire of functionally important fibroblast-secreted proteins. Together, these results delineate a complex network of tumor-fibroblast interactions that act in parallel to promote tumorigenicity and suggest that effective anti

  5. Rearrangements of organic peroxides and related processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan A. Yaremenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This review is the first to collate and summarize main data on named and unnamed rearrangement reactions of peroxides. It should be noted, that in the chemistry of peroxides two types of processes are considered under the term rearrangements. These are conventional rearrangements occurring with the retention of the molecular weight and transformations of one of the peroxide moieties after O–O-bond cleavage. Detailed information about the Baeyer−Villiger, Criegee, Hock, Kornblum−DeLaMare, Dakin, Elbs, Schenck, Smith, Wieland, and Story reactions is given. Unnamed rearrangements of organic peroxides and related processes are also analyzed. The rearrangements and related processes of important natural and synthetic peroxides are discussed separately.

  6. Structural rearrangements of chromosomes in the domestic chicken: experimental production by X-irradiation of spermatozoa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wooster, W.E.; Fechheimer, N.S.; Jaap, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    In order to produce chicks heterozygous for structural aberrations of chromosomes, 67 hens were inseminated with semen that had been exposed to 1200 R of X-rays. A sample of 204 chicks was hatched and survived. Among these, 18 (8.9%) contained rearrangements comprising 19 translocations and one pericentric inversion. All 10 males and eight females heterozygous for rearrangements were fertile and transmitted these rearrangements to approximately half their hatched progeny. Each of the major chromosomes of the chicken karyotype, except number 6, was involved in one or more of the translocations. The pericentric inversion was of a segment of chromosome number 2. (author)

  7. Arc Requires PSD95 for Assembly into Postsynaptic Complexes Involved with Neural Dysfunction and Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza Fernández

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Arc is an activity-regulated neuronal protein, but little is known about its interactions, assembly into multiprotein complexes, and role in human disease and cognition. We applied an integrated proteomic and genetic strategy by targeting a tandem affinity purification (TAP tag and Venus fluorescent protein into the endogenous Arc gene in mice. This allowed biochemical and proteomic characterization of native complexes in wild-type and knockout mice. We identified many Arc-interacting proteins, of which PSD95 was the most abundant. PSD95 was essential for Arc assembly into 1.5-MDa complexes and activity-dependent recruitment to excitatory synapses. Integrating human genetic data with proteomic data showed that Arc-PSD95 complexes are enriched in schizophrenia, intellectual disability, autism, and epilepsy mutations and normal variants in intelligence. We propose that Arc-PSD95 postsynaptic complexes potentially affect human cognitive function.

  8. Genomecmp: computer software to detect genomic rearrangements using markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulawik, Maciej; Nowak, Robert M.

    2017-08-01

    Detection of genomics rearrangements is a tough task, because of the size of data to be processed. As genome sequences may consist of hundreds of millions symbols, it is not only practically impossible to compare them by hand, but it is also complex problem for computer software. The way to significantly accelerate the process is to use rearrangement detection algorithm based on unique short sequences called markers. The algorithm described in this paper develops markers using base genome and find the markers positions on other genome. The algorithm has been extended by support for ambiguity symbols. Web application with graphical user interface has been created using three-layer architecture, where users could run the task simultaneously. The accuracy and efficiency of proposed solution has been studied using generated and real data.

  9. Microwave synthesis, spectral, thermal, and antimicrobial activities of some transition metal complexes involving 5-bromosalicylaldehyde moiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra K. Jain

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The coordination complexes of Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II derived from 5-bromosalicylidene-3,4-dimethylaniline (BSMA and 5-bromosalicylidene-3,4-dichloroaniline (BSCA have been synthesized by conventional as well as microwave methods. These compounds have been characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, molar conductance, electronic spectra, 1H-NMR, FAB-mass, ESR, magnetic susceptibility, electrical conductivity and thermal analysis. The complexes are coloured and stable in air. Analytical data revealed that all the complexes exhibited 1:2 (metal: ligand ratio with coordination number 4 or 6. IR data shows that the ligand coordinates with the metal ions in a bidentate manner through the phenolic oxygen and azomethine nitrogen. FAB-mass and thermal data show degradation pattern of the complexes. Solid state electrical conductivity studies reflect semiconducting nature of the complexes. The Schiff base and metal complexes show a good activity against the Gram-positive bacteria; Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative bacteria; Escherichia coli and fungi Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans.

  10. Systematic patient involvement for homebased outpatient administration of complex chemotherapy in acute leukemia and lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridthjof, Katrine S; Kampmann, Peter; Dünweber, Anne

    2018-01-01

    Based on experience with comprehensive patient involvement, we present data from implementation of portable, programmable infusion pumps (PPP) for home-based chemotherapy administration in patients with acute leukaemia and in lymphoma patients receiving (carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan...

  11. Involvement of detergent-insoluble complexes in the intracellular transport of intestinal brush border enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M

    1995-01-01

    A number of transmembrane digestive enzymes of the porcine small intestinal brush border membrane were found to be partially Triton X-100-insoluble at 0 degree C and colocalized in gradient centrifugation experiments with the GPI-anchored alkaline phosphatase in low-density, detergent-insoluble c...... intracellularly. I therefore propose that, in the enterocyte, the brush border enzymes are targeted directly from the trans-Golgi network toward the apical cell surface......., and their insolubility increased to that of the steady-state level soon after they achieved their mature, complex glycosylation, i.e., after passage through the Golgi complex. Detergent-insoluble complexes isolated by density gradient centrifugation were highly enriched in brush border enzymes, and the enrichment...

  12. Isolation and characterization of antigen-Ia complexes involved in T cell recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Sette, A; Colon, S M

    1986-01-01

    Using equilibrium dialysis, it has been previously demonstrated that immunogenic peptides bind specifically to the Ia molecules serving as restriction elements in the immune response to these antigens. Using gel filtration to study the formation of ovalbumin (OVA) peptide-I-Ad complexes, it is he......Using equilibrium dialysis, it has been previously demonstrated that immunogenic peptides bind specifically to the Ia molecules serving as restriction elements in the immune response to these antigens. Using gel filtration to study the formation of ovalbumin (OVA) peptide-I-Ad complexes...... with glutaraldehyde revealed that the ovalbumin peptide was cross-linked solely to the alpha chain of I-Ad. Planar membranes containing I-Ad-OVA complexes stimulated a T cell response with 2 X 10(4) less antigen than required when uncomplexed antigen was used, thus demonstrating the biologic importance...

  13. Biochemical reconstitution and phylogenetic comparison of human SET1 family core complexes involved in histone methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinsky, Stephen A; Monteith, Kelsey E; Viggiano, Susan; Cosgrove, Michael S

    2015-03-06

    Mixed lineage leukemia protein-1 (MLL1) is a member of the SET1 family of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferases that are required for metazoan development. MLL1 is the best characterized human SET1 family member, which includes MLL1-4 and SETd1A/B. MLL1 assembles with WDR5, RBBP5, ASH2L, DPY-30 (WRAD) to form the MLL1 core complex, which is required for H3K4 dimethylation and transcriptional activation. Because all SET1 family proteins interact with WRAD in vivo, it is hypothesized they are regulated by similar mechanisms. However, recent evidence suggests differences among family members that may reflect unique regulatory inputs in the cell. Missing is an understanding of the intrinsic enzymatic activities of different SET1 family complexes under standard conditions. In this investigation, we reconstituted each human SET1 family core complex and compared subunit assembly and enzymatic activities. We found that in the absence of WRAD, all but one SET domain catalyzes at least weak H3K4 monomethylation. In the presence of WRAD, all SET1 family members showed stimulated monomethyltransferase activity but differed in their di- and trimethylation activities. We found that these differences are correlated with evolutionary lineage, suggesting these enzyme complexes have evolved to accomplish unique tasks within metazoan genomes. To understand the structural basis for these differences, we employed a "phylogenetic scanning mutagenesis" assay and identified a cluster of amino acid substitutions that confer a WRAD-dependent gain-of-function dimethylation activity on complexes assembled with the MLL3 or Drosophila trithorax proteins. These results form the basis for understanding how WRAD differentially regulates SET1 family complexes in vivo. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Formation of mixed ligand complexes of UO22+ involving some nitrogen and oxygen donor ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Mamta; Ram Nayan

    1996-01-01

    The complexation reactions of UO 2 2+ ion with nitrogen and oxygen donor ligands, 1-amino-2-naphthol-4-sulphonic acid, o-aminophenol (ap), 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (sa), 3-carboxy-4-hydroxybenzenesulphonic acid (ss) and 1,2-dihydroxybenzene (ca) have been investigated in aqueous solution employing the pH-titration technique. Analysis of the experimental data recorded at 25 degC and at an ionic strength of 0.10 M KNO 3 indicates formation of binary, hydroxo and ternary complexes of uranium. Formation constant values of the existing species have been evaluated and the results have been discussed. (author). 21 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Input-output rearrangement of isolated converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mickey Pierre; Kovacevic, Milovan; Mønster, Jakob Døllner

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new way of rearranging the input and output of isolated converters. The new arrangement posses several advantages, as increased voltage range, higher power handling capabilities, reduced voltage stress and improved efficiency, for applications where galvanic isolation...

  16. The SMC5/6 complex is involved in crucial processes during human spermatogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verver, Dideke E.; Langedijk, Nathalia S. M.; Jordan, Philip W.; Repping, Sjoerd; Hamer, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Genome integrity is crucial for safe reproduction. Therefore, chromatin structure and dynamics should be tightly regulated during germ cell development. Chromatin structure and function are in large part determined by the structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) protein complexes, of which SMC5/6

  17. The synthesis of N-Zn, N-Cu complexes involving 2-amino pyridine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    amino pyridine and ethylenediamine ligands (1a-b and 2a-b) have been described. They were synthesized with a simple, one-pot method, and the crystal structures of 1a, 1b, 2a and 2b were determined by X-ray crystallography. The complexes ...

  18. Involvement of Spearman's g in conceptualisation versus execution of complex tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Ellen L; Bright, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Strong correlations between measures of fluid intelligence (or Spearman's g) and working memory are widely reported in the literature, but there is considerable controversy concerning the nature of underlying mechanisms driving this relationship. In the four experiments presented here we consider the role of response conflict and task complexity in the context of real-time task execution demands (Experiments 1-3) and also address recent evidence that g confers an advantage at the level of task conceptualisation rather than (or in addition to) task execution (Experiment 4). We observed increased sensitivity of measured fluid intelligence to task performance in the presence (vs. the absence) of response conflict, and this relationship remained when task complexity was reduced. Performance-g correlations were also observed in the absence of response conflict, but only in the context of high task complexity. Further, we present evidence that differences in conceptualisation or 'modelling' of task instructions prior to execution had an important mediating effect on observed correlations, but only when the task encompassed a strong element of response inhibition. Our results suggest that individual differences in ability reflect, in large part, variability in the efficiency with which the relational complexity of task constraints are held in mind. It follows that fluid intelligence may support successful task execution through the construction of effective action plans via optimal allocation of limited resources. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The synthesis of N–Zn, N–Cu complexes involving 2-amino pyridine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    alcohol, and the reaction mixture was refluxed for. 14 h. The mixture was filtered to furnish white cry- .... benzaldehyde to 2-nitro-1-phenylethanol was esta- blished according to the content ratio of the remin- ... Zn(OAc)2 ·2 H2O in ethanol, THF or acetonitrile, the corresponding complexes were obtained after reflux- ing for 14 ...

  20. Forced migrants involved in setting the agenda and designing research to reduce impacts of complex emergencies: combining Swarm with patient and public involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, Julii Suzanne; Al Assaf, Enana; Omasete, Judith; Leach, Steve; Hammer, Charlotte C; Hunter, Paul R

    2017-01-01

    The UK's National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Protection Research Unit in Emergency Preparedness and Response was asked to undertake research on how to reduce the impact of complex national/international emergencies on public health. How to focus the research and decide on priority topics was challenging, given the nature of complex events. Using a type of structured brain-storming, the researchers identified the ongoing UK, European and international migration crisis as both complex and worthy of deeper research. To further focus the research, two representatives of forced migrant communities were invited to join the project team as patient and public (PPI) representatives. They attended regular project meetings, insightfully contributed to and advised on practical aspects of potential research areas. The representatives identified cultural obstacles and community needs and helped choose the final research study design, which was to interview forced migrants about their strategies to build emotional resilience and prevent mental illness. The representatives also helped design recruitment documents, and undertake recruitment and interviewer training. Many events with wide-ranging negative health impacts are notable for complexity: lack of predictability, non-linear feedback mechanisms and unexpected consequences. A multi-disciplinary research team was tasked with reducing the public health impacts from complex events, but without a pre-specified topic area or research design. This report describes using patient and public involvement within an adaptable but structured development process to set research objectives and aspects of implementation. An agile adaptive development approach, sometimes described as swarm , was used to identify possible research areas. Swarm is meant to quickly identify strengths and weaknesses of any candidate project, to accelerate early failure before resources are invested. When aspects of the European migration crisis

  1. Low frequency of large genomic rearrangements of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in western Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Cruger, Dorthe

    2006-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose female carriers to breast and ovarian cancer. The majority of mutations identified are small deletions or insertions or are nonsense mutations. Large genomic rearrangements in BRCA1 are found with varying frequencies in different populations......, but BRCA2 rearrangements have not been investigated thoroughly. The objective in this study was to determine the frequency of large genomic rearrangements in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in a large group of Danish families with increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. A total of 617 families previously tested...... negative for mutations involving few bases were screened with multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Two deletions in BRCA1 were identified in three families; no large rearrangements were detected in BRCA2. The large deletions constitute 3.8% of the BRCA1 mutations identified, which...

  2. Synthesis of fused tricyclic systems by thermal Cope rearrangement of furan-substituted vinyl cyclopropanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Verena; Wittmann, Stéphane; Senn, Hans M; Clark, J Stephen

    2018-05-15

    A novel method for the stereoselective construction of hexahydroazuleno[4,5-b]furans from simple precursors has been developed. The route involves the use of our recently developed Brønsted acid catalysed cyclisation reaction of acyclic ynenones to prepare fused 1-furanyl-2-alkenylcyclopropanes that undergo highly stereoselective thermal Cope rearrangement to produce fused tricyclic products. Substrates possessing an E-alkene undergo smooth Cope rearrangement at 40 °C, whereas the corresponding Z-isomers do not react at this temperature. Computational studies have been performed to explain the difference in behaviour of the E- and Z-isomers in the Cope rearrangement reaction. The hexahydroazuleno[4,5-b]furans produced by Cope rearrangement have potential as advanced intermediates for the synthesis of members of the guaianolide family of natural products.

  3. Computation of resonances by two methods involving the use of complex coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bylicki, M.; Nicolaides, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    We have studied two different systems producing resonances, a highly excited multielectron Coulombic negative ion (the He - 2s2p 2 4 P state) and a hydrogen atom in a magnetic field, via the complex-coordinate rotation (CCR) and the state-specific complex-eigenvalue Schroedinger equation (CESE) approaches. For the He - 2s2p 2 4 P resonance, a series of large CCR calculations, up to 353 basis functions with explicit r ij dependence, were carried out to serve as benchmarks. For the magnetic-field problem, the CCR results were taken from the literature. Comparison shows that the state-specific CESE theory allows the physics of the problem to be incorporated systematically while keeping the overall size of the computation tractable regardless of the number of electrons

  4. Synthesis, Characterization, Luminescence and Biological Activity of Two Lanthanide Complexes Involving Mixed Ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Deyun; Guo, Haifu; Qin, Liang [Zhaoqing Univ., Zhaoqing (China); Xu, Jun [Jinan Univ., Guangzhou (China)

    2013-09-15

    Two new isostructural dinuclear complexes, Ln{sub 2}(4-cpa){sub 6}(bpy){sub 2} (Ln = Eu (1); Tb (2), 4-cpa = 4-chlorophenyl-acetate, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), have been hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), powder X-ray diffraction and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The lanthanide ions are bridged by two bidentate and two terdentate carboxylate groups to give centrosymmetric dimers with Ln···Ln separations of 3.967(2) and 3.956(3) A, respectively. Each metal atom is nine-coordinate and exhibits a distorted tricapped trigonal prismatic geometry. Three-dimensional fluorescence spectra show that both 1 and 2 emit bright red and green luminescence at room temperature, with long lifetimes of up to 0.369 ms (at 614 nm) and 0.432 ms (at 543 nm), respectively. Moreover, poor luminescence efficiency has been noted for complex 2. The 4-Hcpa ligand and complexes 1-2 have been screened for their phytogrowth-inhibitory activities against Brassica napus L. and Echinochloa crusgalli L., and the results are compared with the activity of quizalofop-P-ethyl.

  5. A Natural Mutation Involving both Pathogenicity and Perithecium Formation in the Fusarium graminearum Species Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruhisha Suga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Members of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (Fg complex or FGSC are the primary pathogens causing Fusarium head blight in wheat and barley worldwide. A natural pathogenicity mutant (strain 0225022 was found in a sample of the Fg complex collected in Japan. The mutant strain did not induce symptoms in wheat spikes beyond the point of inoculation, and did not form perithecia. No segregation of phenotypic deficiencies occurred in the progenies of a cross between the mutant and a fully pathogenic wild-type strain, which suggested that a single genetic locus controlled both traits. The locus was mapped to chromosome 2 by using sequence-tagged markers; and a deletion of ∼3 kb was detected in the mapped region of the mutant strain. The wild-type strain contains the FGSG_02810 gene, encoding a putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor protein, in this region. The contribution of FGSG_02810 to pathogenicity and perithecium formation was confirmed by complementation in the mutant strain using gene transfer, and by gene disruption in the wild-type strain.

  6. Supramolecular architecture of metal-organic frameworks involving dinuclear copper paddle-wheel complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomathi, Sundaramoorthy; Muthiah, Packianathan Thomas

    2013-12-15

    The two centrosymmetric dinuclear copper paddle-wheel complexes tetrakis(μ-4-hydroxybenzoato-κ(2)O:O')bis[aquacopper(II)] dimethylformamide disolvate dihydrate, [Cu2(C7H5O3)4(H2O)2]·2C3H7NO·2H2O, (I), and tetrakis(μ-4-methoxybenzoato-κ(2)O:O')bis[(dimethylformamide-κO)copper(II)], [Cu2(C8H7O3)4(C3H7NO)2], (II), crystallize with half of the dinuclear paddle-wheel cage unit in the asymmetric unit and, in addition, complex (I) has one dimethylformamide (DMF) and one water solvent molecule in the asymmetric unit. In both (I) and (II), two Cu(II) ions are bridged by four syn,syn-η(1):η(1):μ carboxylate groups, showing a paddle-wheel cage-type structure with a square-pyramidal coordination geometry. The equatorial positions of (I) and (II) are occupied by the carboxylate groups of 4-hydroxy- and 4-methoxybenzoate ligands, and the axial positions are occupied by aqua and DMF ligands, respectively. The three-dimensional supramolecular metal-organic framework of (I) consists of three different R2(2)(20) and an R4(4)(36) ring motif formed via O-H···O and OW-HW···O hydrogen bonds. Complex (II) simply packs as molecular species.

  7. Selectivity in inter polymer complexation involving phenolic copolymer, poly electrolytes, non-ionic polymers and transition metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasheghani Farahani, B.; Hosseinpour Rajabi, F.

    2006-01-01

    Selectivity in inter polymer complex formation involving a typical four-component phenolic copolymer (ρ-chloro phenol-ρ-aminophenol-ρ-toluidine-ρ-cresol- HCHO copolymer), poly electrolytes such as polyethylene imine and polyacrylic acid, a non-ionic homopolymer polyvinyl pyrrolidone, and some transition metal ions (e.g., Cu (II), Ni (11)) have been studied in dimethylformamide-methanol solvents mixture. The coordinating groups of phenolic copolymer form complexes through hydrogen bonding and ion-dipole interactions. The different stages of interactions have been studied by several experimental techniques, e.g., viscometry, potentiometry and conductometry. Some schemes have been suggested to explain the mode of interaction between these components

  8. Involvement of hydrogen-vacancy complexes in the baking effect of niobium cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Visentin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Baking is necessary to improve high accelerating gradient performances of superconducting niobium cavities. Ten years after this discovery in 1998, the understanding of this effect still resists a lot of theoretical explanations. For the first time, positron annihilation spectroscopy performed on niobium samples reveals the increase after baking of positrons trapped under the Nb surface. Presence of hydrogen-vacancy complexes and their dissociation by baking could both explain rf losses observed at high fields (Q drop and its cure (baking effect.

  9. A protochlorophyllide light-harvesting complex involved in de-etiolation of higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinbothe, C.; Lebedev, N.; Reinbothe, S.

    1999-01-01

    When etiolated angiosperm seedlings break through the soil after germination, they are immediately exposed to sunlight, but at this stage they are unable to perform photosynthesis1. In the absence of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b, two other porphyrin species cooperate as the basic light-harvesting structure of etiolated plants. Protochlorophyllide a and protochlorophyllide b (ref. 2) form supramolecular complexes with NADPH and two closely related NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) proteins—PORA and PORB (ref. 3)—in the prolamellar body of etioplasts. Here we report that these light-harvesting POR–protochlorophyllide complexes, named LHPP, are essential for the establishment of the photosynthetic apparatus and also confer photoprotection on the plant. They collect sunlight for rapid chlorophyll a biosynthesis and, simultaneously, dissipate excess light energy in the bulk of non-photoreducible protochlorophyllide b. Based on this dual function, it seems that LHPP provides the link between skotomorphogenesis and photosynthesis that is required for efficient de-etiolation

  10. Membrane complexes of Syntrophomonas wolfei involved in syntrophic butyrate degradation and hydrogen formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Regis Crable

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Syntrophic butyrate metabolism involves the thermodynamically unfavorable production of hydrogen and/or formate from the high potential electron donor, butyryl-CoA. Such redox reactions can occur only with energy input by a process called reverse electron transfer. Previous studies have demonstrated that hydrogen production from butyrate requires the presence of a proton gradient, but the biochemical machinery involved has not been clearly elucidated. In this study, the gene and enzyme systems involved in reverse electron transfer by Syntrophomonas wolfei were investigated using proteomic and gene expression approaches. S. wolfei was grown in coculture with Methanospirillum hungatei or Dehalococcoides mccartyi under conditions requiring reverse electron transfer and compared to both axenic S. wolfei cultures and cocultures grown in conditions that do not require reverse electron transfer. Blue native gel analysis of membranes solubilized from syntrophically grown cells revealed the presence of a membrane-bound hydrogenase, Hyd2, which exhibited hydrogenase activity during in gel assays. Bands containing a putative iron-sulfur (FeS oxidoreductase were detected in membranes of crotonate-grown and butyrate grown S. wolfei cells. The genes for the corresponding hydrogenase subunits, hyd2ABC, were differentially expressed at higher levels during syntrophic butyrate growth when compared to growth on crotonate. The expression of the FeS oxidoreductase gene increased when S. wolfei was grown with M. hungatei. Additional membrane-associated proteins detected included FoF1 ATP synthase subunits and several membrane transporters that may aid syntrophic growth. Furthermore, syntrophic butyrate metabolism can proceed exclusively by interspecies hydrogen transfer, as demonstrated by growth with D. mccartyi, which is unable to use formate. These results argue for the importance of Hyd2 and FeS oxidoreductase in reverse electron transfer during syntrophic

  11. Involvement of bacterial migration in the development of complex multicellular structures in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Mikkel; Aaes-Jorgensen, A.; Molin, Søren

    2003-01-01

    development, we have performed an investigation with time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy of biofilms formed by various combinations of colour-coded P. aeruginosa wild type and motility mutants. We show that mushroom-shaped multicellular structures in P. aeruginosa biofilms can form in a sequential...... process involving a non-motile bacterial subpopulation and a migrating bacterial subpopulation. The non-motile bacteria form the mushroom stalks by growth in certain foci of the biofilm. The migrating bacteria form the mushroom caps by climbing the stalks and aggregating on the tops in a process which...

  12. GSK3 inactivation is involved in mitochondrial complex IV defect in transforming growth factor (TGF) {beta}1-induced senescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Hae-Ok; Jung, Hyun-Jung; Seo, Yong-Hak; Lee, Young-Kyoung [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 443-721 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Molecular Science and Technology, The Graduate School, Ajou University, Suwon 443-721 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sung-Chul [Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 443-721 (Korea, Republic of); Seong Hwang, Eun [Department of Life Science, University of Seoul, Seoul 130-743 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Gyesoon, E-mail: ypeace@ajou.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 443-721 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Molecular Science and Technology, The Graduate School, Ajou University, Suwon 443-721 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-10

    Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF {beta}1) induces Mv1Lu cell senescence by persistently producing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) through decreased complex IV activity. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of TGF {beta}1 on mitochondrial complex IV activity. TGF {beta}1 progressively phosphorylated the negative regulatory sites of both glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) {alpha} and {beta}, corresponding well to the intracellular ROS generation profile. Pre-treatment of N-acetyl cysteine, an antioxidant, did not alter this GSK3 phosphorylation (inactivation), whereas pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 by SB415286 significantly increased mitochondrial ROS, implying that GSK3 phosphorylation is an upstream event of the ROS generation. GSK3 inhibition by SB415286 decreased complex IV activity and cellular O{sub 2} consumption rate and eventually induced senescence of Mv1Lu cell. Similar results were obtained with siRNA-mediated knockdown of GSK3. Moreover, we found that GSK3 not only exists in cytosol but also in mitochondria of Mv1Lu cell and the mitochondrial GSK3 binds complex IV subunit 6b which has no electron carrier and is topologically located in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Involvement of subunit 6b in controlling complex IV activity and overall respiration rate was proved with siRNA-mediated knockdown of subunit 6b. Finally, TGF {beta}1 treatment decreased the binding of the subunit 6b to GSK3 and subunit 6b phosphorylation. Taken together, our results suggest that GSK3 inactivation is importantly involved in TGF {beta}1-induced complex IV defects through decreasing phosphorylation of the subunit 6b, thereby contributing to senescence-associated mitochondrial ROS generation.

  13. Strategic planning model for achieving stakeholder involvement in environmental at DOE weapons complex sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, G.

    1994-01-01

    Within today's reality a public manager often needs to develop cooperative relationships among a number of individual, program, and organizational stakeholders to accomplish particular projects, programs, or policies. A DOE site manager charged with accomplishing environmental restoration and conversion at former weapons production sites is no exception. Important reasons for this include the technical and political complexity of the clean-up problem; limits on the funding, authority, and other resources available to DOE; authority, responsibilities, and interests of other stakeholders; and the ever present potential for conflict among stakeholders, and power of any one to hinder, if not halt, the clean-up process if conflicts aren't managed and cooperative relationships established and maintained

  14. Pea border cell maturation and release involve complex cell wall structural dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef; Guo, Xiaoyuan; Hansen, Aleksander Riise

    2017-01-01

    The adhesion of plant cells is vital for support and protection of the plant body and is maintained by a variety of molecular associations between cell wall components. In some specialized cases though, plant cells are programmed to detach and root cap-derived border cells are examples of this....... Border cells (in some species known as border-like cells) provide an expendable barrier between roots and the environment. Their maturation and release is an important but poorly characterized cell separation event. To gain a deeper insight into the complex cellular dynamics underlying this process, we...... undertook a systematic, detailed analysis of pea (Pisum sativum) root tip cell walls. Our study included immuno-carbohydrate microarray profiling, monosaccharide composition determination, Fourier-transformed infrared microspectroscopy (FT-IR), quantitative RT-PCR of cell wall biosynthetic genes, analysis...

  15. A third component of the human cytomegalovirus terminase complex is involved in letermovir resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Sunwen

    2017-12-01

    Letermovir is a human cytomegalovirus (CMV) terminase inhibitor that was clinically effective in a Phase III prevention trial. In vitro studies have shown that viral mutations conferring letermovir resistance map primarily to the UL56 component of the terminase complex and uncommonly to UL89. After serial culture of a baseline CMV laboratory strain under letermovir, mutation was observed in a third terminase component in 2 experiments, both resulting in amino acid substitution P91S in gene UL51 and adding to a pre-existing UL56 mutation. Recombinant phenotyping indicated that P91S alone conferred 2.1-fold increased letermovir resistance (EC50) over baseline, and when combined with UL56 mutation S229F or R369M, multiplied the level of resistance conferred by those mutations by 3.5-7.7-fold. Similarly a combination of UL56 mutations S229F, L254F and L257I selected in the same experiment conferred 54-fold increased letermovir EC50 over baseline, but 290-fold when combined with UL51 P91S. The P91S mutant was not perceptibly growth impaired. Although pUL51 is essential for normal function of the terminase complex, its biological significance is not well understood. Letermovir resistance mutations mapping to 3 separate genes, and their multiplier effect on the level of resistance, suggest that the terminase components interactively contribute to the structure of a letermovir antiviral target. The diagnostic importance of the UL51 P91S mutation arises from its potential to augment the letermovir resistance of some UL56 mutations at low fitness cost. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Radical Rearrangement Chemistry in Ultraviolet Photodissociation of Iodotyrosine Systems: Insights from Metastable Dissociation, Infrared Ion Spectroscopy, and Reaction Pathway Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranka, Karnamohit; Zhao, Ning; Yu, Long; Stanton, John F; Polfer, Nicolas C

    2018-05-29

    We report on the ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) chemistry of protonated tyrosine, iodotyrosine, and diiodotyrosine. Distonic loss of the iodine creates a high-energy radical at the aromatic ring that engages in hydrogen/proton rearrangement chemistry. Based on UVPD kinetics measurements, the appearance of this radical is coincident with the UV irradiation pulse (8 ns). Conversely, sequential UVPD product ions exhibit metastable decay on ca. 100 ns timescales. Infrared ion spectroscopy is capable of confirming putative structures of the rearrangement products as proton transfers from the imine and β-carbon hydrogens. Potential energy surfaces for the various reaction pathways indicate that the rearrangement chemistry is highly complex, compatible with a cascade of rearrangements, and that there is no preferred rearrangement pathway even in small molecular systems like these. Graphical Abstract.

  17. Caryolene-forming carbocation rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quynh Nhu N. Nguyen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Density functional theory calculations on mechanisms of the formation of caryolene, a putative biosynthetic precursor to caryol-1(11-en-10-ol, reveal two mechanisms for caryolene formation: one involves a base-catalyzed deprotonation/reprotonation sequence and tertiary carbocation minimum, whereas the other (with a higher energy barrier involves intramolecular proton transfer and the generation of a secondary carbocation minimum and a hydrogen-bridged minimum. Both mechanisms are predicted to involve concerted suprafacial/suprafacial [2 + 2] cycloadditions, whose asynchronicity allows them to avoid the constraints of orbital symmetry.

  18. Involvement of lipid-protein complexes in plant-microorganism interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blein Jean-Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing concerns about the environmental impact of modern agricultural have prompted research for alternate practices to pesticide treatments, notably using plant defense mechanisms. Thus, isolation and characterization of plant defense elicitors have been the main step of studies in many groups. Moreover, in the global concept of interactions between organisms and their environment, a major concern is to discriminate recognition between exogenous and endogenous signals, notably during pathogenic or allergenic interactions involving small proteins, such as elicitins or lipid transfer proteins (LTPs. Elicitins and lipid transfer proteins (LTP are both able to load and transfer lipidic molecules and share some structural and functional properties. While elicitins are known as elicitors of plant defense mechanisms, the biological function of LTPs is still an enigma. They are ubiquitous plant proteins able to load and transfer hydrophobic molecules such as fatty acids or phospholipids. Among them, LTPs1 (type 1 lipid transfer proteins constitute a multigenic family of secreted plant lipid binding proteins that are constitutively expressed in specific tissues and/or induced in response to biotic and abiotic stress (for reviews [1-4]. Their biological function is still unknown, even if some data provide arguments for a role of these proteins in the assembly of extracellular hydrophobic polymers (i.e., cutin and suberin [2, 4] and/or in plant defense against fungal pathogens [1, 3]. Beside their involvement in plant defense, LTPs1 are also known to be pan-allergens of plant-derived foods [5]. Finally, the discovery of the sterol carrier-properties of elicitins has opened new perspectives dealing with the relationship between this function and the elicitor activity of these small cystein-rich proteins. Nevertheless, this elicitor activity is restrained to few plant species, and thus does not appear in accordance with a universal lipid transfer

  19. Constitutional chromothripsis involving the critical region of 9q21.13 microdeletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genesio, Rita; Fontana, Paolo; Mormile, Angela; Casertano, Alberto; Falco, Mariateresa; Conti, Anna; Franzese, Adriana; Mozzillo, Enza; Nitsch, Lucio; Melis, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The chromothripsis is a biological phenomenon, first observed in tumors and then rapidly described in congenital disorders. The principle of the chromothripsis process is the occurrence of a local shattering to pieces and rebuilding of chromosomes in a random order. Congenital chromothripsis rearrangements often involve reciprocal rearrangements on multiple chromosomes and have been described as cause of contiguous gene syndromes. We hypothesize that chromothripsis could be responsible for known 9q21.13 microdeletion syndrome, causing a composite phenotype with additional features. The case reported is a 16- years-old female with a complex genomic rearrangement of chromosome 9 including the critical region of 9q21.13 microdeletion syndrome. The patient presents with platelet disorder and thyroid dysfunction in addition to the classical neurobehavioral phenotype of the syndrome. The presence of multiple rearrangements on the same chromosome 9 and the rebuilding of chromosome in a random order suggested that the rearrangement could origin from an event of chromthripsis. To our knowledge this is the first report of congenital chromothripsis involving chromosome 9. Furthermore this is the only case of 9q21.13 microdeletion syndrome due to chromothripsis.

  20. Multi-step rearrangement mechanism for acetyl cedrene to the hydrocarbon follower

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paknikar, Shashikumar Keshav; Kamounah, Fadhil S.; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2017-01-01

    Conversion of acetyl cedrene (2) to its follower (3) using acetic anhydride and polyphosphoric acid involves a multi-step cationic molecular rearrangement, which is consistent with deuteriation and 1-13C labeling studies of acetyl cedrene. The key step involves cyclopropylcarbinyl cation-cyclopro...

  1. Rearrangement of cluster structure during fission processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2004-01-01

    Results of molecular dynamics simulations of fission reactions $Na_10^2+ -->Na_7^++ Na_3^+ and Na_18^2+--> 2Na_9^+ are presented. The dependence of the fission barriers on the isomer structure of the parent cluster is analysed. It is demonstrated that the energy necessary for removing homothetic...... groups of atoms from the parent cluster is largely independent of the isomer form of the parent cluster. The importance of rearrangement of the cluster structure during the fission process is elucidated. This rearrangement may include transition to another isomer state of the parent cluster before actual...

  2. Displacement of ethene from the decamethyltitanocene-ethene complex with internal alkynes, substituent-dependent alkyne-to-allene rearrangement, and the electronic transition relevant to the back-bonding interaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pinkas, Jiří; Gyepes, R.; Císařová, I.; Kubišta, Jiří; Horáček, Michal; Mach, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 16 (2015), s. 7276-7291 ISSN 1477-9226 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/2368 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : titanocene -ethene complex * tail dimerization * molecular structure Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.177, year: 2015

  3. Expanding the Reach of Physics-Engaging Students in Interdisciplinary Research Involving complex, real-world situation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bililign, Solomon

    2014-03-01

    Physics plays a very important role in most interdisciplinary efforts and can provide a solid foundation for students. Retention of students in STEM areas can be facilitated by enhanced interdisciplinary education and research since students are strongly attracted to research with societal relevance and show increasing enthusiasm about problems that have practical consequences. One such area of research is a collaborative Earth System Science. The Earth System is dynamic and complex. It is comprised of diverse components that interact. By providing students the opportunities to work in interdisciplinary groups on a problem that reflects a complex, real-world situation they can see the linkages between components of the Earth system that encompass climate and all its components (weather precipitation, temperature, etc.) and technology development and deployment of sensors and sensor networks and social impacts. By involving students in the creation of their own personalized professional development plan, students are more focused and engaged and are more likely to remain in the program.

  4. Albumin is synthesized in epididymis and aggregates in a high molecular mass glycoprotein complex involved in sperm-egg fertilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kélen Fabíola Arroteia

    Full Text Available The epididymis has an important role in the maturation of sperm for fertilization, but little is known about the epididymal molecules involved in sperm modifications during this process. We have previously described the expression pattern for an antigen in epididymal epithelial cells that reacts with the monoclonal antibody (mAb TRA 54. Immunohistochemical and immunoblotting analyses suggest that the epitope of the epididymal antigen probably involves a sugar moiety that is released into the epididymal lumen in an androgen-dependent manner and subsequently binds to luminal sperm. Using column chromatography, SDS-PAGE with in situ digestion and mass spectrometry, we have identified the protein recognized by mAb TRA 54 in mouse epididymal epithelial cells. The ∼65 kDa protein is part of a high molecular mass complex (∼260 kDa that is also present in the sperm acrosomal vesicle and is completely released after the acrosomal reaction. The amino acid sequence of the protein corresponded to that of albumin. Immunoprecipitates with anti-albumin antibody contained the antigen recognized by mAb TRA 54, indicating that the epididymal molecule recognized by mAb TRA 54 is albumin. RT-PCR detected albumin mRNA in the epididymis and fertilization assays in vitro showed that the glycoprotein complex containing albumin was involved in the ability of sperm to recognize and penetrate the egg zona pellucida. Together, these results indicate that epididymal-derived albumin participates in the formation of a high molecular mass glycoprotein complex that has an important role in egg fertilization.

  5. Recent Developments in the Reformatsky-Claisen Rearrangement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumi Hatakeyama

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The rearrangement of allyl a-bromoacetates with Zn dust is known as the Reformatsky-Claisen rearrangement. Whereas the Ireland-Claisen rearrangement has been widely used in the synthesis of a diverse range of natural products, the Zn-mediated Reformatsky-Claisen rearrangement has not been utilized so often. In this article, we will provide an overview of recent advances in the Reformatsky-Claisen rearrangement field, including the In-mediated Reformatsky-Claisen rearrangement we have recently developed.

  6. Processes of fungal proteome evolution and gain of function: gene duplication and domain rearrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen-Gihon, Inbar; Nussinov, Ruth; Sharan, Roded

    2011-01-01

    During evolution, organisms have gained functional complexity mainly by modifying and improving existing functioning systems rather than creating new ones ab initio. Here we explore the interplay between two processes which during evolution have had major roles in the acquisition of new functions: gene duplication and protein domain rearrangements. We consider four possible evolutionary scenarios: gene families that have undergone none of these event types; only gene duplication; only domain rearrangement, or both events. We characterize each of the four evolutionary scenarios by functional attributes. Our analysis of ten fungal genomes indicates that at least for the fungi clade, species significantly appear to gain complexity by gene duplication accompanied by the expansion of existing domain architectures via rearrangements. We show that paralogs gaining new domain architectures via duplication tend to adopt new functions compared to paralogs that preserve their domain architectures. We conclude that evolution of protein families through gene duplication and domain rearrangement is correlated with their functional properties. We suggest that in general, new functions are acquired via the integration of gene duplication and domain rearrangements rather than each process acting independently

  7. Generalization of the quark rearrangement model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, T.; Chen, C.K.

    1976-01-01

    An extension and generalization of the quark rearrangement model of baryon annihilation is described which can be applied to all annihilation reactions and which incorporates some of the features of the highly successful quark parton model. Some p anti-p interactions are discussed

  8. Displacement of ethene from the decamethyltitanocene-ethene complex with internal alkynes, substituent-dependent alkyne-to-allene rearrangement, and the electronic transition relevant to the back-bonding interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkas, Jiří; Gyepes, Róbert; Císařová, Ivana; Kubišta, Jiří; Horáček, Michal; Mach, Karel

    2015-04-28

    The titanocene-ethene complex [Ti(II)(η(2)-C2H4)(η(5)-C5Me5)2] (1) with simple internal alkynes R(1)C≡CR(2) gives complexes [Ti(II)(η(2)-R(1)C≡CR(2))(η(5)-C5Me5)2] {R(1), R(2): Ph, Ph (3), Ph, Me (4), Me, SiMe3 (5), Ph, SiMe3 (6), t-Bu, SiMe3 (7), and SiMe3, SiMe3 (8). In contrast, alkynes with R(1) = Me and R(2) = t-Bu or i-Pr afford allene complexes [Ti(II)(η(2)-CH2=C=CHR(2))(η(5)-C5Me5)2] (11) and (12), whereas for R(2) = Et a mixture of alkyne complex (13A) and minor allene (13) is obtained. Crystal structures of 4, 6, 7 and 11 have been determined; the latter structure proved the back-bonding interaction of the allene terminal double bond. Only the synthesis of 8 from 1 was inefficient because the equilibrium constant for the reaction [1] + [Me3SiC≡CSiMe3] ⇌ [8] + [C2H4] approached 1. Compound 9 (R(1), R(2): Me), not obtainable from 1, together with compounds 3–6 and 10 (R(1), R(2): Et) were also prepared by alkyne exchange with 8, however this reaction did not take place in attempts to obtain 7. Compounds 1 and 3–9 display the longest-wavelength electronic absorption band in the range 670-940 nm due to the HOMO → LUMO transition. The assignment of the first excitation to be of predominantly a b2 → a1 transition was confirmed by DFT calculations. The calculated first excitation energies for 3–9 followed the order of hypsochromic shifts of the absorption band relative to 8 that were induced by acetylene substituents: Me > Ph ≫ SiMe3. Computational results have also affirmed the back-bonding nature in the alkyne-to-metal coordination.

  9. Dynamics of genome rearrangement in bacterial populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron E Darling

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome structure variation has profound impacts on phenotype in organisms ranging from microbes to humans, yet little is known about how natural selection acts on genome arrangement. Pathogenic bacteria such as Yersinia pestis, which causes bubonic and pneumonic plague, often exhibit a high degree of genomic rearrangement. The recent availability of several Yersinia genomes offers an unprecedented opportunity to study the evolution of genome structure and arrangement. We introduce a set of statistical methods to study patterns of rearrangement in circular chromosomes and apply them to the Yersinia. We constructed a multiple alignment of eight Yersinia genomes using Mauve software to identify 78 conserved segments that are internally free from genome rearrangement. Based on the alignment, we applied Bayesian statistical methods to infer the phylogenetic inversion history of Yersinia. The sampling of genome arrangement reconstructions contains seven parsimonious tree topologies, each having different histories of 79 inversions. Topologies with a greater number of inversions also exist, but were sampled less frequently. The inversion phylogenies agree with results suggested by SNP patterns. We then analyzed reconstructed inversion histories to identify patterns of rearrangement. We confirm an over-representation of "symmetric inversions"-inversions with endpoints that are equally distant from the origin of chromosomal replication. Ancestral genome arrangements demonstrate moderate preference for replichore balance in Yersinia. We found that all inversions are shorter than expected under a neutral model, whereas inversions acting within a single replichore are much shorter than expected. We also found evidence for a canonical configuration of the origin and terminus of replication. Finally, breakpoint reuse analysis reveals that inversions with endpoints proximal to the origin of DNA replication are nearly three times more frequent. Our findings

  10. Detection and precise mapping of germline rearrangements in BRCA1, BRCA2, MSH2, and MLH1 using zoom-in array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staaf, Johan; Törngren, Therese; Rambech, Eva

    2008-01-01

    deletions or duplications occurring in BRCA1 (n=11), BRCA2 (n=2), MSH2 (n=7), or MLH1 (n=9). Additionally, we demonstrate its applicability for uncovering complex somatic rearrangements, exemplified by zoom-in analysis of the PTEN and CDKN2A loci in breast cancer cells. The sizes of rearrangements ranged...

  11. Revisiting the polytopal rearrangements in penta-coordinate d7-metallocomplexes: modified Berry pseudorotation, octahedral switch, and butterfly isomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asatryan, Rubik; Ruckenstein, Eli; Hachmann, Johannes

    2017-08-01

    This paper provides a first-principles theoretical investigation of the polytopal rearrangements and fluxional behavior of five-coordinate d 7 -transition metal complexes. Our work is primarily based on a potential energy surface analysis of the iron tetracarbonyl hydride radical HFe˙(CO) 4 . We demonstrate the existence of distorted coordination geometries in this prototypical system and, for the first time, introduce three general rearrangement mechanisms, which account for the non-ideal coordination. The first of these mechanisms constitutes a modified version of the Berry pseudorotation via a square-based pyramidal C 4v transition state that connects two chemically identical edge-bridged tetrahedral stereoisomers of C 2v symmetry. It differs from the classical Berry mechanism, which involves two regular D 3h equilibrium structures and a C 4v transition state. The second mechanism is related to the famous "tetrahedral jump" hypothesis, postulated by Muetterties for a number of d 6 HML 4 and H 2 ML 4 complexes. Here, our study suggests two fluxional rearrangement pathways via distinct types of C 2v transition states. Both pathways of this mechanism can be described as a single-ligand migration to a vacant position of an "octahedron", thus interchanging (switching) the apical and basal ligands of the initial quasi-square pyramidal isomer, which is considered as an idealized octahedron with a vacancy. Accordingly, we call this mechanism "octahedral switch". The third mechanism follows a butterfly-type isomerization featuring a key-angle deformation, and we thus call it "butterfly isomerization". It connects the quasi-square pyramidal and edge-bridged tetrahedral isomers of HFe˙(CO) 4 through a distorted edge-bridged tetrahedral transition state of C s symmetry. Our paper discusses the overall features of the isomers and rearrangement mechanisms as well as their implications. We rationalize the existence of each stationary point through an electronic structure

  12. The Ultrafast Wolff Rearrangement in the Gas Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbacher, Andreas; Roeding, Sebastian; Brixner, Tobias; Nuernberger, Patrick

    The Wolff rearrangement of gas-phase 5-diazo Meldrum's acid is disclosed with femtosecond ion spectroscopy. Distinct differences are found for 267 nm and 200 nm excitation, the latter leading to even two ultrafast rearrangement reactions.

  13. Translocation and gross deletion breakpoints in human inherited disease and cancer II: Potential involvement of repetitive sequence elements in secondary structure formation between DNA ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuzhanova, Nadia; Abeysinghe, Shaun S; Krawczak, Michael; Cooper, David N

    2003-09-01

    Translocations and gross deletions are responsible for a significant proportion of both cancer and inherited disease. Although such gene rearrangements are nonuniformly distributed in the human genome, the underlying mutational mechanisms remain unclear. We have studied the potential involvement of various types of repetitive sequence elements in the formation of secondary structure intermediates between the single-stranded DNA ends that recombine during rearrangements. Complexity analysis was used to assess the potential of these ends to form secondary structures, the maximum decrease in complexity consequent to a gross rearrangement being used as an indicator of the type of repeat and the specific DNA ends involved. A total of 175 pairs of deletion/translocation breakpoint junction sequences available from the Gross Rearrangement Breakpoint Database [GRaBD; www.uwcm.ac.uk/uwcm/mg/grabd/grabd.html] were analyzed. Potential secondary structure was noted between the 5' flanking sequence of the first breakpoint and the 3' flanking sequence of the second breakpoint in 49% of rearrangements and between the 5' flanking sequence of the second breakpoint and the 3' flanking sequence of the first breakpoint in 36% of rearrangements. Inverted repeats, inversions of inverted repeats, and symmetric elements were found in association with gross rearrangements at approximately the same frequency. However, inverted repeats and inversions of inverted repeats accounted for the vast majority (83%) of deletions plus small insertions, symmetric elements for one-half of all antigen receptor-mediated translocations, while direct repeats appear only to be involved in mediating simple deletions. These findings extend our understanding of illegitimate recombination by highlighting the importance of secondary structure formation between single-stranded DNA ends at breakpoint junctions. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disease involving the pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriden, Zina; Bullock, Grant C; Bagg, Adam; Bonatti, Hugo; Cousar, John B; Lopes, M Beatriz; Robbins, Mark K; Cathro, Helen P

    2010-11-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are heterogeneous lesions with variable morphology, immunophenotype, and molecular characteristics. Multiple distinct primary lesions can occur in PTLD, rarely with both B-cell and T-cell characteristics. Lesions can involve both grafted organs and other sites; however, PTLD involving the pituitary gland has not been previously reported. We describe a patient who developed Epstein-Barr virus-negative PTLD 13 years posttransplantation involving the terminal ileum and pituitary, which was simultaneously involved by a pituitary adenoma. Immunohistochemistry of the pituitary lesion showed expression of CD79a, CD3, and CD7 with clonal rearrangements of both T-cell receptor gamma chain (TRG@) and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH@) genes. The terminal ileal lesion was immunophenotypically and molecularly distinct. This is the first report of pituitary PTLD and illustrates the potentially complex nature of PTLD. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cooperative use of VCD and XRD for the determination of tetrahydrobenzoisoquinolines absolute configuration: a reliable proof of memory of chirality and retention of configuration in enediyne rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Shovan; Naubron, Jean-Valère; Campolo, Damien; Giorgi, Michel; Bertrand, Michéle P; Nechab, Malek

    2013-12-01

    The absolute configurations (AC) of azaheterocylic compounds resulting from the cascade rearrangement of enediynes involving only light atoms were unambiguously assigned by the joint use of vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and copper radiation single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). These AC determinations proved that the rearrangements of enediynes proceeded with memory of chirality and retention of configuration. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Chimeric Amino Acid Rearrangements as Immune Targets in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Chimeric Amino Acid Rearrangements as Immune Targets in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...that result from gene rearrangements given their high frequency relative to somatic point mutations. Gene rearrangements can yield novel chimeric

  17. Unexpected rearrangements in the synthesis of an unsymmetrical tridentate dianionic N-heterocyclic carbene

    KAUST Repository

    Despagnet-Ayoub, Emmanuelle; Miqueu, Karinne; Sotiropoulos, Jean-Marc; Henling, Lawrence M.; Day, Michael W.; Labinger, Jay A.; Bercaw, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the same ethylenediamine species, three valuable carbene precursors were synthesized under differing conditions: a tridentate dianionic N-heterocyclic carbene bearing an aniline, a phenol and a central dihydroimidazolium salt, its benzimidazolium isomer by intramolecular rearrangement and a dicationic benzimidazolium-benzoxazolium salt by changing the Brønsted acid from HCl to HBF4. A DFT study was performed to understand the rearrangement pathway. The structure of a bis[(NCO)carbene] zirconium complex was determined. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  18. Deciphering the Code of the Cancer Genome: Mechanisms of Chromosome Rearrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Nicholas A.; Rass, Emilie; Scully, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangement plays a causal role in tumorigenesis by contributing to the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, the dysregulated expression or amplification of oncogenes and the generation of novel gene fusions. Chromosome breaks are important intermediates in this process. How, when and where these breaks arise and the specific mechanisms engaged in their repair strongly influence the resulting patterns of chromosome rearrangement. Here, we review recent progress in understanding how certain distinctive features of the cancer genome, including clustered mutagenesis, tandem segmental duplications, complex breakpoints, chromothripsis, chromoplexy and chromoanasynthesis may arise. PMID:26726318

  19. HOXA9 is required for survival in human MLL-rearranged acute leukemias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Faber (Joerg); A.V. Krivtsov (Andrei); M.C. Stubbs (Matthew); R. Wright (Renee); T.N. Davis (Tina); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); C.M. Zwaan (Christian Michel); A.L. Kung (Andrew); S.A. Armstrong (Scott)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractLeukemias that harbor translocations involving the mixed lineage leukemia gene (MLL) possess unique biologic characteristics and often have an unfavorable prognosis. Gene expression analyses demonstrate a distinct profile for MLL-rearranged leukemias with consistent high-level expression

  20. Aniridia-associated cytogenetic rearrangements suggest that a position effect may cause the mutant phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fantes, J.; Redeker, B.; Breen, M.; Boyle, S.; Brown, J.; Fletcher, J.; Jones, S.; Bickmore, W.; Fukushima, Y.; Mannens, M.

    1995-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that aniridia (absence of iris) is caused by loss of function of one copy of the PAX6 gene, which maps to 11p13. We present the further characterisation of two aniridia pedigrees in which the disease segregates with chromosomal rearrangements which involve 11p13 but do not

  1. Tandem catalytic allylic amination and [2,3]-Stevens rearrangement of tertiary amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soheili, Arash; Tambar, Uttam K

    2011-08-24

    We have developed a catalytic allylic amination involving tertiary aminoesters and allylcarbonates, which is the first example of the use of tertiary amines as intermolecular nucleophiles in metal-catalyzed allylic substitution chemistry. This process is employed in a tandem ammonium ylide generation/[2,3]-rearrangement reaction, which formally represents a palladium-catalyzed Stevens rearrangement. Low catalyst loadings and mild reaction conditions are compatible with an unprecedented substrate scope for the ammonium ylide functionality, and products are generated in high yields and diastereoselectivities. Mechanistic studies suggested the reversible formation of an ammonium intermediate.

  2. Mechanistic and kinetic insights into the thermally induced rearrangement of alpha-pinene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolle, Achim; Ondruschka, Bernd; Findeisen, Matthias

    2008-11-07

    The thermal rearrangement of alpha-pinene (1) is interesting from mechanistic as well as kinetic point of view. Carrier gas pyrolyses with 1 and its acyclic isomers ocimene (2) and alloocimene (3) were performed to investigate the thermal network of these hydrocarbons. Kinetic analysis of the major reaction steps allows for a deeper insight in the reaction mechanism. Thus it was possible to explain the racemization of 1, the formation of racemic limonene (4), and the absence of the primary pyrolysis product 2 in the reaction mixture resulting from thermal rearrangement of 1. Results supported the conclusion that the reactions starting with 1 involve biradical transition states.

  3. Multiple scattering in the nuclear rearrangement reactions at medium energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tekou, A.

    1980-09-01

    It is shown that the multiple scattering mechanism is very important in the transfer of the large momenta involved in the nuclear rearrangement reactions at medium energy. In contrast to the usual belief, the reaction cross-section is not very sensitive to the high momenta components of the nuclear wave function. The multiple scattering mechanism is especially important in 4 He(p,d) 3 He reaction around 800 MeV. Here the collisions involving two nucleons of the target nucleus are dominant. The triple collisions contribution is also important. The four collision contribution is negligible in the forward direction and sizeable at large angles. Thus, using the K.M.T. approach in DWBA calculations, the second order term of the optical potential must be included. So, is it not well established that the second term of the K.M.T. optical potential is important for the proton elastic scattering on light nuclei. (author)

  4. Dysregulation of the DNA Damage Response and KMT2A Rearrangement in Fetal Liver Hematopoietic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Nanya

    Full Text Available Etoposide, a topoisomerase 2 (TOP2 inhibitor, is associated with the development of KMT2A (MLL-rearranged infant leukemia. An epidemiological study suggested that in utero exposure to TOP2 inhibitors may be involved in generation of KMT2A (MLL rearrangement. The present study examined the mechanism underlying the development of KMT2A (MLL-rearranged infant leukemia in response to in utero exposure to etoposide in a mouse model. Fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells were more susceptible to etoposide than maternal bone marrow mononuclear cells. Etoposide-induced Kmt2a breakage was detected in fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells using a newly developed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay. Assessment of etoposide-induced chromosomal translocation by next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq identified several chimeric fusion messenger RNAs that were generated by etoposide treatment. However, Kmt2a (Mll-rearranged fusion mRNA was detected in Atm-knockout mice, which are defective in the DNA damage response, but not in wild-type mice. The present findings suggest that in utero exposure to TOP2 inhibitors induces Kmt2a rearrangement when the DNA damage response is defective.

  5. Characterization of apparently balanced chromosomal rearrangements from the developmental genome anatomy project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Anne W; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Bosco, Amy F; Brown, Kerry K; Bruns, Gail A P; Donovan, Diana J; Eisenman, Robert; Fan, Yanli; Farra, Chantal G; Ferguson, Heather L; Gusella, James F; Harris, David J; Herrick, Steven R; Kelly, Chantal; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Kishikawa, Shotaro; Korf, Bruce R; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Lally, Eric; Leach, Natalia T; Lemyre, Emma; Lewis, Janine; Ligon, Azra H; Lu, Weining; Maas, Richard L; MacDonald, Marcy E; Moore, Steven D P; Peters, Roxanna E; Quade, Bradley J; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; Saadi, Irfan; Shen, Yiping; Shendure, Jay; Williamson, Robin E; Morton, Cynthia C

    2008-03-01

    Apparently balanced chromosomal rearrangements in individuals with major congenital anomalies represent natural experiments of gene disruption and dysregulation. These individuals can be studied to identify novel genes critical in human development and to annotate further the function of known genes. Identification and characterization of these genes is the goal of the Developmental Genome Anatomy Project (DGAP). DGAP is a multidisciplinary effort that leverages the recent advances resulting from the Human Genome Project to increase our understanding of birth defects and the process of human development. Clinically significant phenotypes of individuals enrolled in DGAP are varied and, in most cases, involve multiple organ systems. Study of these individuals' chromosomal rearrangements has resulted in the mapping of 77 breakpoints from 40 chromosomal rearrangements by FISH with BACs and fosmids, array CGH, Southern-blot hybridization, MLPA, RT-PCR, and suppression PCR. Eighteen chromosomal breakpoints have been cloned and sequenced. Unsuspected genomic imbalances and cryptic rearrangements were detected, but less frequently than has been reported previously. Chromosomal rearrangements, both balanced and unbalanced, in individuals with multiple congenital anomalies continue to be a valuable resource for gene discovery and annotation.

  6. Quantitative and Qualitative Changes in V-J α Rearrangements During Mouse Thymocytes Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqual, Nicolas; Gallagher, Maighréad; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Loiodice, Mélanie; Thuderoz, Florence; Demongeot, Jacques; Ceredig, Rod; Marche, Patrice Noël; Jouvin-Marche, Evelyne

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge of the complete nucleotide sequence of the mouse TCRAD locus allows an accurate determination V-J rearrangement status. Using multiplex genomic PCR assays and real time PCR analysis, we report a comprehensive and systematic analysis of the V-J recombination of TCR α chain in normal mouse thymocytes during development. These respective qualitative and quantitative approaches give rise to four major points describing the control of gene rearrangements. (a) The V-J recombination pattern is not random during ontogeny and generates a limited TCR α repertoire; (b) V-J rearrangement control is intrinsic to the thymus; (c) each V gene rearranges to a set of contiguous J segments with a gaussian-like frequency; (d) there are more rearrangements involving V genes at the 3′ side than 5′ end of V region. Taken together, this reflects a preferential association of V and J gene segments according to their respective positions in the locus, indicating that accessibility of both V and J regions is coordinately regulated, but in different ways. These results provide a new insight into TCR α repertoire size and suggest a scenario for V usage during differentiation. PMID:12417627

  7. Catalytic synthesis of amides via aldoximes rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crochet, Pascale; Cadierno, Victorio

    2015-02-14

    Amide bond formation reactions are among the most important transformations in organic chemistry because of the widespread occurrence of amides in pharmaceuticals, natural products and biologically active compounds. The Beckmann rearrangement is a well-known method to generate secondary amides from ketoximes. However, under the acidic conditions commonly employed, aldoximes RHC=NOH rarely rearrange into the corresponding primary amides RC(=O)NH2. In recent years, it was demonstrated that this atom-economical transformation can be carried out efficiently and selectively with the help of metal catalysts. Several homogeneous and heterogenous systems have been described. In addition, protocols offering the option to generate the aldoximes in situ from the corresponding aldehydes and hydroxylamine, or even from alcohols, have also been developed, as well as a series of tandem processes allowing the access to N-substituted amide products. In this Feature article a comprehensive overview of the advances achieved in this particular research area is presented.

  8. The He+H¯→He p¯+e+ rearrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Allan C.; Armour, Edward A. G.

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, we present a summary of our work in progress on calculating cross sections for the He+H¯→He p¯+e+ rearrangement process in He H¯ scattering. This has involved a study of the system He p¯ within the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation using the Rayleigh-Ritz variational method. This work has been reported in [A.C. Todd, E.A.G. Armour, J. Phys. B 38 (2005) 3367] and is summarised here. Similar calculations are in progress for the He+H¯ entrance channel. We intend to use the entrance channel and rearrangement channel wave functions to obtain the cross sections for the rearrangement using the distorted wave Born approximation T-matrix method described elsewhere in these proceedings [E.A.G. Armour, S. Jonsell, Y. Liu, A.C. Todd, these Proceedings, doi:10.1016/j.nimb.2006.01.049].

  9. The He+H-bar → Hep-bar +e+ rearrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, Allan C.; Armour, Edward A.G.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present a summary of our work in progress on calculating cross sections for the He+H-bar ->Hep-bar +e + rearrangement process in HeH-bar scattering. This has involved a study of the system Hep-bar within the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation using the Rayleigh-Ritz variational method. This work has been reported in [A.C. Todd, E.A.G. Armour, J. Phys. B 38 (2005) 3367] and is summarised here. Similar calculations are in progress for the He+H-bar entrance channel. We intend to use the entrance channel and rearrangement channel wave functions to obtain the cross sections for the rearrangement using the distorted wave Born approximation T-matrix method described elsewhere in these proceedings [E.A.G. Armour, S. Jonsell, Y. Liu, A.C. Todd, these Proceedings, doi:10.1016/j.nimb.2006.01.049

  10. Mutations and Rearrangements in the Genome of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redder, P.; Garrett, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    The genome of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 carries a larger number of transposable elements than any other sequenced genome from an archaeon or bacterium and, as a consequence, may be particularly susceptible to rearrangement and change. In order to gain more insight into the natures and frequencies...... of different types of mutation and possible rearrangements that can occur in the genome, the pyrEF locus was examined for mutations that were isolated after selection with 5-fluoroorotic acid. About two-thirds of the 130 mutations resulted from insertions of mobile elements, including insertion sequence (IS...... deletions, insertions, and a duplication, were observed, and about one-fifth of the mutations occurred elsewhere in the genome, possibly in an orotate transporter gene. One mutant exhibited a 5-kb genomic rearrangement at the pyrEF locus involving a two-step IS element-dependent reaction, and its boundaries...

  11. System for the detection of chromosomal rearrangements using Sordaria macrospora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaise, S.; Leblon, G.; Lares, L. (Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Lab. de Biologie Cellulaire et Genetique)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described for the detection and diagnosis of induced chromosomal rearrangement using Sordaria macrospora. The system uses the property of the rearrangement to produce defective white ascospores as meiotic progeny from heterozygous crosses. Two reconstruction experiments have shown that this system is able to give reliable quantitative measures of rearrangement frequencies. Evidence for a photoreactivation process was obtained, suggesting that pyrimidine dimers may well be an important lesion in UV-induced chromosomal rearrangement. No evidence of induction of chromosomal rearrangement was obtained in experiments with the powerful chemical mutagen N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine.

  12. The Wolff rearrangement in radical cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Mamoru; Tsujimoto, Kazuo; Shida, Yasuo; Yamada, Yasuji.

    1975-01-01

    The mass spectrometric behavior of 1-phenyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzotriazole and its seven membered analog is described. The principal fragmentation process of the molecular ions is loss of nitrogen. It was concluded from the results of deuterium labeling and accurate mass measurements that the subsequent fragmentation of the M-N 2 ions proceeds via isomerization to the ring-contracted ketenimine ions by the Wolff rearrangement, in sharp contrast to the case of 1-phenylbenzotriazole. (auth.)

  13. Enantioselective catalytic fluorinative aza-semipinacol rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov-Michailidis, Fedor; Pupier, Marion; Besnard, Céline; Bürgi, Thomas; Alexakis, Alexandre

    2014-10-03

    An efficient and highly stereoselective fluorinative aza-semipinacol rearrangement is described. The catalytic reaction requires use of Selectfluor in combination with the chiral, enantiopure phosphate anion derived from acid L3. Under optimized conditions, cyclopropylamines A were transformed into β-fluoro cyclobutylimines B in good yields and high levels of diastereo- and enantiocontrol. Furthermore, the optically active cyclobutylimines were reduced diastereoselectively with L-Selectride in the corresponding fluorinated amines C, compounds of significant interest in the pharmacological industry.

  14. Occupancy statistics arising from weighted particle rearrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huillet, Thierry

    2007-01-01

    The box-occupancy distributions arising from weighted rearrangements of a particle system are investigated. In the grand-canonical ensemble, they are characterized by determinantal joint probability generating functions. For doubly non-negative weight matrices, fractional occupancy statistics, generalizing Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics, can be defined. A spatially extended version of these balls-in-boxes problems is investigated

  15. Comparing genomes with rearrangements and segmental duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Mingfu; Moret, Bernard M E

    2015-06-15

    Large-scale evolutionary events such as genomic rearrange.ments and segmental duplications form an important part of the evolution of genomes and are widely studied from both biological and computational perspectives. A basic computational problem is to infer these events in the evolutionary history for given modern genomes, a task for which many algorithms have been proposed under various constraints. Algorithms that can handle both rearrangements and content-modifying events such as duplications and losses remain few and limited in their applicability. We study the comparison of two genomes under a model including general rearrangements (through double-cut-and-join) and segmental duplications. We formulate the comparison as an optimization problem and describe an exact algorithm to solve it by using an integer linear program. We also devise a sufficient condition and an efficient algorithm to identify optimal substructures, which can simplify the problem while preserving optimality. Using the optimal substructures with the integer linear program (ILP) formulation yields a practical and exact algorithm to solve the problem. We then apply our algorithm to assign in-paralogs and orthologs (a necessary step in handling duplications) and compare its performance with that of the state-of-the-art method MSOAR, using both simulations and real data. On simulated datasets, our method outperforms MSOAR by a significant margin, and on five well-annotated species, MSOAR achieves high accuracy, yet our method performs slightly better on each of the 10 pairwise comparisons. http://lcbb.epfl.ch/softwares/coser. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. Magnetic field re-arrangement after prominence eruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, R.A.; Poletto, G.

    1986-01-01

    It has long been known that magnetic reconnection plays a fundamental role in a variety of solar events. Although mainly invoked in flare problems, large-scale loops interconnecting active regions, evolving coronal hole boundaries, the solar magnetic cycle itself, provide different evidence of phenomena which involve magnetic reconnection. A further example might be given by the magnetic field rearrangement which occurs after the eruption of a prominence. Since most often a prominence reforms after its disappearance and may be observed at about the same position it occupied before erupting, the magnetic field has to undergo a temporary disruption to relax back, via reconnection, to a configuration similar to the previous one. The above sequence of events is best observable in the case of two-ribbon (2-R) flares but most probably is associated with all filament eruptions. Even if the explanation of the magnetic field rearrangement after 2-R flares in terms of reconnection is generally accepted, the lack of a three-dimensional model capable of describing the field reconfiguration, has prevented, up to now, a thorough analysis of its topology as traced by Hα/x-ray loops. The purpose of the present work is to present a numerical technique which enables one to predict and visualize the reconnected configuration, at any time t, and therefore allows one to make a significant comparison of observations and model predictions throughout the whole process. 5 refs., 3 figs

  17. A general heuristic for genome rearrangement problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Ulisses; Galvão, Gustavo Rodrigues; Lintzmayer, Carla Négri; Dias, Zanoni

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present a general heuristic for several problems in the genome rearrangement field. Our heuristic does not solve any problem directly, it is rather used to improve the solutions provided by any non-optimal algorithm that solve them. Therefore, we have implemented several algorithms described in the literature and several algorithms developed by ourselves. As a whole, we implemented 23 algorithms for 9 well known problems in the genome rearrangement field. A total of 13 algorithms were implemented for problems that use the notions of prefix and suffix operations. In addition, we worked on 5 algorithms for the classic problem of sorting by transposition and we conclude the experiments by presenting results for 3 approximation algorithms for the sorting by reversals and transpositions problem and 2 approximation algorithms for the sorting by reversals problem. Another algorithm with better approximation ratio can be found for the last genome rearrangement problem, but it is purely theoretical with no practical implementation. The algorithms we implemented in addition to our heuristic lead to the best practical results in each case. In particular, we were able to improve results on the sorting by transpositions problem, which is a very special case because many efforts have been made to generate algorithms with good results in practice and some of these algorithms provide results that equal the optimum solutions in many cases. Our source codes and benchmarks are freely available upon request from the authors so that it will be easier to compare new approaches against our results.

  18. Reactions of the ionized enol tautomer of acetanilide: elimination of HNCO via a novel rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydorn, Lisa N; Carter, Lynn M; Bowen, Richard D; Terlouw, Johan K

    2003-01-01

    The reactions of ionised acetanilide, C(6)H(5)NH(=O)CH(3)(.+), and its enol, C(6)H(5)NH(OH)=CH(2)(.+), have been studied by a combination of tandem mass spectrometric and computational methods. These two isomeric radical cations have distinct chemistries at low internal energies. The keto tautomer eliminates exclusively CH(2)=C=O to give ionised aniline. In contrast, the enol tautomer loses H-N=C=O, via an unusual skeletal rearrangement, to form predominantly ionised methylene cyclohexadiene. Hydrogen atom loss also occurs from the enol tautomer, with the formation of protonated oxindole. The mechanisms for H-N=C=O and hydrogen atom loss both involve cyclisation; the former proceeds via a spiro transition state formed by attachment of the methylene group to the ipso position, whereas the latter entails the formation of a five-membered ring by attachment to the ortho position. The behaviour of labelled analogues reveals that these two processes have different site selectivities. Hydrogen atom loss involves a reverse critical energy and is subject to an isotope effect. Surprisingly, attempts to promote the enolisation of ionised acetanilide by proton-transport catalysis were unsuccessful. In a reversal of the usual situation for ionised carbonyl compounds, ionised acetanilide is actually more stable than its enol tautomer. The enol tautomer was resistant to proton-transport catalysed ketonisation to ionised acetanilide, possibly because the favoured geometry of the encounter complex with the base molecule is inappropriate for facilitating tautomerisation.

  19. The GIP gamma-tubulin complex-associated proteins are involved in nuclear architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgane eBatzenschlager

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available During interphase, the microtubular cytoskeleton of cycling plant cells is organized in both cortical and perinuclear arrays. Perinuclear microtubules (MTs are nucleated from γ-Tubulin Complexes (γ-TuCs located at the surface of the nucleus. The molecular mechanisms of γ-TuC association to the nuclear envelope are currently unknown. The γ-TuC Protein 3 (GCP3-Interacting Protein 1 (GIP1 is the smallest γ-TuC component identified so far. AtGIP1 and its homologous protein AtGIP2 participate in the localization of active γ-TuCs at interphasic and mitotic MT nucleation sites. Arabidopsis gip1gip2 mutants are impaired in establishing a fully functional mitotic spindle and exhibit severe developmental defects.In this study, gip1gip2 knock down mutants were further characterized at the cellular level. In addition to defects in both the localization of γ-TuC core proteins and MT fibre robustness, gip1gip2 mutants exhibited a severe alteration of the nuclear shape associated with an abnormal distribution of the nuclear pore complexes. Simultaneously, they showed a misorganization of the inner nuclear membrane protein AtSUN1. Furthermore, AtGIP1 was identified as an interacting partner of AtTSA1 which was detected, like the AtGIP proteins, at the nuclear envelope.These results provide the first evidence for the involvement of a γ-TuC component in both nuclear shaping and nuclear envelope organization. Functional hypotheses are discussed in order to propose a model for a GIP-dependent nucleo-cytoplasmic continuum.

  20. Stable X chromosome inactivation involves the PRC1 Polycomb complex and requires histone MACROH2A1 and the CULLIN3/SPOP ubiquitin E3 ligase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernández-Muñoz, Inmaculada; Lund, Anders H; van der Stoop, Petra

    2005-01-01

    X inactivation involves the stable silencing of one of the two X chromosomes in XX female mammals. Initiation of this process occurs during early development and involves Xist (X-inactive-specific transcript) RNA coating and the recruitment of Polycomb repressive complex (PRC) 2 and PRC1 proteins...

  1. Phylogenetic signal from rearrangements in 18 Anopheles species by joint scaffolding extant and ancestral genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmetti, Yoann; Duchemin, Wandrille; Tannier, Eric; Chauve, Cedric; Bérard, Sèverine

    2018-05-09

    Genomes rearrangements carry valuable information for phylogenetic inference or the elucidation of molecular mechanisms of adaptation. However, the detection of genome rearrangements is often hampered by current deficiencies in data and methods: Genomes obtained from short sequence reads have generally very fragmented assemblies, and comparing multiple gene orders generally leads to computationally intractable algorithmic questions. We present a computational method, ADSEQ, which, by combining ancestral gene order reconstruction, comparative scaffolding and de novo scaffolding methods, overcomes these two caveats. ADSEQ provides simultaneously improved assemblies and ancestral genomes, with statistical supports on all local features. Compared to previous comparative methods, it runs in polynomial time, it samples solutions in a probabilistic space, and it can handle a significantly larger gene complement from the considered extant genomes, with complex histories including gene duplications and losses. We use ADSEQ to provide improved assemblies and a genome history made of duplications, losses, gene translocations, rearrangements, of 18 complete Anopheles genomes, including several important malaria vectors. We also provide additional support for a differentiated mode of evolution of the sex chromosome and of the autosomes in these mosquito genomes. We demonstrate the method's ability to improve extant assemblies accurately through a procedure simulating realistic assembly fragmentation. We study a debated issue regarding the phylogeny of the Gambiae complex group of Anopheles genomes in the light of the evolution of chromosomal rearrangements, suggesting that the phylogenetic signal they carry can differ from the phylogenetic signal carried by gene sequences, more prone to introgression.

  2. High-Order Finite-Difference Solution of the Poisson Equation Involving Complex Geometries in Embedded Meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Alexandre; Nave, Jean-Christophe; Rosales, Ruben

    2011-11-01

    The Poisson equation is of central importance in the description of fluid flows and other physical phenomena. In prior work, Marques, Nave, and Rosales introduced the Correction Function Method (CFM) to obtain fourth-order accurate solutions for the constant coefficient Poisson problem with prescribed jump conditions for the solution and its normal derivative across arbitrary interfaces. Here we combine this method with the ideas introduced by Mayo to solve other Poisson problems involving complex geometries. In summary, we are able to rewrite the problem as a boundary integral equation in terms of a potential distribution over the boundary or interface. The solution of this integral equation is discontinuous across the boundary or interface. Hence, after this integral equation is solved using standard techniques, the potential distribution can be used to determine the jump discontinuities. We are then able to use the CFM to solve the resulting Poisson equation with jump discontinuities. The outcome is a fourth-order accurate scheme to solve general Poisson problems which, over arbitrary geometries, has a cost that is approximately twice that of a fast Poisson solver using FFT on a rectangular geometry of the same size. Details of the method and applications will be presented.

  3. Broncho-pleural fistula with hydropneumothorax at CT: Diagnostic implications in mycobacterium avium complex lung disease with pleural involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Chung, Myung Jin; Lee, Kyung Soo; Park, Hye Yun; Koh, Won Jung; Kim, Jung Soo

    2016-01-01

    To determine the patho-mechanism of pleural effusion or hydropneumothorax in Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease through the computed tomographic (CT) findings. We retrospectively collected data from 5 patients who had pleural fluid samples that were culture-positive for MAC between January 2001 and December 2013. The clinical findings were investigated and the radiological findings on chest CT were reviewed by 2 radiologists. The 5 patients were all male with a median age of 77 and all had underlying comorbid conditions. Pleural fluid analysis revealed a wide range of white blood cell counts (410-100690/µL). The causative microorganisms were determined as Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare in 1 and 4 patients, respectively. Radiologically, the peripheral portion of the involved lung demonstrated fibro-bullous changes or cavitary lesions causing lung destruction, reflecting the chronic, insidious nature of MAC lung disease. All patients had broncho-pleural fistulas (BPFs) and pneumothorax was accompanied with pleural effusion. In patients with underlying MAC lung disease who present with pleural effusion, the presence of BPFs and pleural air on CT imaging are indicative that spread of MAC infection is the cause of the effusion

  4. Broncho-pleural fistula with hydropneumothorax at CT: Diagnostic implications in mycobacterium avium complex lung disease with pleural involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Chung, Myung Jin; Lee, Kyung Soo; Park, Hye Yun; Koh, Won Jung [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Soo [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    To determine the patho-mechanism of pleural effusion or hydropneumothorax in Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease through the computed tomographic (CT) findings. We retrospectively collected data from 5 patients who had pleural fluid samples that were culture-positive for MAC between January 2001 and December 2013. The clinical findings were investigated and the radiological findings on chest CT were reviewed by 2 radiologists. The 5 patients were all male with a median age of 77 and all had underlying comorbid conditions. Pleural fluid analysis revealed a wide range of white blood cell counts (410-100690/µL). The causative microorganisms were determined as Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare in 1 and 4 patients, respectively. Radiologically, the peripheral portion of the involved lung demonstrated fibro-bullous changes or cavitary lesions causing lung destruction, reflecting the chronic, insidious nature of MAC lung disease. All patients had broncho-pleural fistulas (BPFs) and pneumothorax was accompanied with pleural effusion. In patients with underlying MAC lung disease who present with pleural effusion, the presence of BPFs and pleural air on CT imaging are indicative that spread of MAC infection is the cause of the effusion.

  5. Exploring the Genome and Proteome of Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB2 for its Protein Complexes Involved in Metal Reduction and Dechlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang-Hoon, Kim; Hardzman, Christina; Davis, John k.; Hutcheson, Rachel; Broderick, Joan B.; Marsh, Terence L.; Tiedje, James M.

    2012-09-27

    Desulfitobacteria are of interest to DOE mission because of their ability to reduce many electron acceptors including Fe(III), U(VI), Cr(VI), As(V), Mn(IV), Se(VI), NO3- and well as CO2, sulfite, fumarate and humates, their ability to colonize more stressful environments because they form spores, fix nitrogen and they have the more protective Gram positive cell walls. Furthermore at least some of them reductively dechlorinate aromatic and aliphatic pollutants. Importantly, most of the metals and the organochlorine reductions are coupled to ATP production and support growth providing for the organism's natural selection at DOE's contaminant sites. This work was undertaken to gain insight into the genetic and metabolic pathways involved in dissimilatory metal reduction and reductive dechlorination, (ii) to discern the commonalities among these electron-accepting processes, (iii) to identify multi-protein complexes catalyzing these functions and (iv) to elucidate the coordination in expression of these pathways and processes.

  6. Chromosomal Rainbows detect Oncogenic Rearrangements of Signaling Molecules in Thyroid Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Benjamin; Jossart, Gregg H.; Ito, Yuko; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Munne, Santiago; Clark, Orlo H.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2010-08-19

    Altered signal transduction can be considered a hallmark of many solid tumors. In thyroid cancers the receptor tyrosine kinase (rtk) genes NTRK1 (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man = OMIM *191315, also known as 'TRKA'), RET ('Rearranged during Transfection protooncogene', OMIM *164761) and MET (OMIM *164860) have been reported as activated, rearranged or overexpressed. In many cases, a combination of cytogenetic and molecular techniques allows elucidation of cellular changes that initiate tumor development and progression. While the mechanisms leading to overexpression of the rtk MET gene remain largely unknown, a variety of chromosomal rearrangements of the RET or NTKR1 gene could be demonstrated in thyroid cancer. Abnormal expressions in these tumors seem to follow a similar pattern: the rearrangement translocates the 3'-end of the rtk gene including the entire catalytic domain to an expressed gene leading to a chimeric RNA and protein with kinase activity. Our research was prompted by an increasing number of reports describing translocations involving ret and previously unknown translocation partners. We developed a high resolution technique based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to allow rapid screening for cytogenetic rearrangements which complements conventional chromosome banding analysis. Our technique applies simultaneous hybridization of numerous probes labeled with different reporter molecules which are distributed along the target chromosome allowing the detection of cytogenetic changes at near megabase-pair (Mbp) resolution. Here, we report our results using a probe set specific for human chromosome 10, which is altered in a significant portion of human thyroid cancers (TC's). While rendering accurate information about the cytogenetic location of rearranged elements, our multi-locus, multi-color analysis was developed primarily to overcome limitations of whole chromosome painting (WCP) and chromosome banding

  7. Adiabatic Rearrangement of Hollow PV Towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Hendricks

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabatic heating from deep moist convection in the hurricane eyewall produces a towering annular structure of elevated potential vorticity (PV. This structure has been referred to as a hollow PV tower. The sign reversal of the radial gradient of PV satisfies the Charney-Stern necessary condition for combined barotropic-baroclinic instability. For thin enough annular structures, small perturbations grow exponentially, extract energy from the mean flow, and lead to hollow tower breakdown, with significant vortex structural and intensity change. The three-dimensional adiabatic rearrangements of two prototypical hurricane-like hollow PV towers (one thick and one thin are examined in an idealized framework. For both hollow towers, dynamic instability causes air parcels with high PV to be mixed into the eye preferentially at lower levels, where unstable PV wave growth rates are the largest. Little or no mixing is found to occur at upper levels. The mixing at lower and middle levels is most rapid for the breakdown of the thin hollow tower, consistent with previous barotropic results. For both hollow towers, this advective rearrangement of PV affects the tropical cyclone structure and intensity in a number of ways. First, the minimum central pressure and maximum azimuthal mean velocity simultaneously decrease, consistent with previous barotropic results. Secondly, isosurfaces of absolute angular momentum preferentially shift inward at low levels, implying an adiabatic mechanism by which hurricane eyewall tilt can form. Thirdly, a PV bridge, similar to that previously found in full-physics hurricane simulations, develops as a result of mixing at the isentropic levels where unstable PV waves grow most rapidly. Finally, the balanced mass field resulting from the PV rearrangement is warmer in the eye between 900 and 700 hPa. The location of this warming is consistent with observed warm anomalies in the eye, indicating that in certain instances the hurricane

  8. Gene activation by induced DNA rearrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnipper, L.E.; Chan, V.; Sedivy, J.; Jat, P.; Sharp, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    A murine cell line (EN/NIH) containing the retroviral vector ZIPNeoSV(x)1 that was modified by deletion of the enhancer elements in the viral long terminal repeats has been used as an assay system to detect induced DNA rearrangements that result in activation of a transcriptionally silent reporter gene encoded by the viral genome. The spontaneous frequency of G418 resistance is less than 10(-7), whereas exposure to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or the combination of UV irradiation plus TPA resulted in the emergence of drug resistant cell lines at a frequency of 5 per 10(6) and 67 per 10(6) cells, respectively. In several of the cell lines that were analyzed a low level of amplification of one of the two parental retroviral integrants was observed, whereas in others no alteration in the region of the viral genome was detected. To determine the effect of the SV40 large T antigen on induced DNA rearrangements, EN/NIH cells were transfected with a temperature sensitive (ts) mutant of SV40 T. Transfectants were maintained at the permissive temperature (33 degrees C) for varying periods of time (1-5 days) in order to vary SV40 T antigen exposure, after which they were shifted to 39.5 degrees C for selection in G418. The frequency of emergence of drug resistant cell clones increased with duration of exposure to large T antigen (9-52 per 10(6) cells over 1-5 days, respectively), and all cell lines analyzed demonstrated DNA rearrangements in the region of the neo gene. A novel 18-kilobase pair XbaI fragment was cloned from one cell line which revealed the presence of a 2.0-kilobase pair EcoRI segment containing an inverted duplication which hybridized to neo sequences. It is likely that the observed rearrangement was initiated by the specific binding of large T antigen to the SV40 origin of replication encoded within the viral genome

  9. Rationalization of the selectivity between 1,3- and 1,2-migration: a DFT study on gold(i)-catalyzed propargylic ester rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jingxing; Liu, Yan; Hou, Cheng; Li, Yinwu; Luan, Zihong; Zhao, Cunyuan; Ke, Zhuofeng

    2016-04-14

    Gold catalyzed rearrangement of propargylic esters can undergo 1,3-acyloxy migration to form allenes, or undergo 1,2-acyloxy migration to access gold-carbenoids. The variation in migration leads to different reactivities and diverse cascade transformations. The effect of terminal substituents is very important for the rearrangement. However, it remains ambiguous how terminal substituents govern the selectivity of the rearrangement. This study presents a theoretical model based on the resonance structure of gold activated propargylic ester complexes to rationalize the rearrangement selectivity. Substrates with a major resonance contributor A prefer 5-exo-dig cyclization (1,2-migration), while those with a major resonance contributor B prefer 6-endo-dig cyclization (1,3-migration). This concise model would be helpful in understanding and tuning the selectivity of the metal catalyzed rearrangement of propargylic esters.

  10. Detection and precise mapping of germline rearrangements in BRCA1, BRCA2, MSH2, and MLH1 using zoom-in array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staaf, Johan; Törngren, Therese; Rambech, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Disease-predisposing germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes may consist of large genomic rearrangements that are challenging to detect and characterize using standard PCR-based mutation screening methods. Here, we describe a custom-made zoom-in microarray comparative genomic hybridizat......Disease-predisposing germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes may consist of large genomic rearrangements that are challenging to detect and characterize using standard PCR-based mutation screening methods. Here, we describe a custom-made zoom-in microarray comparative genomic...... deletions or duplications occurring in BRCA1 (n=11), BRCA2 (n=2), MSH2 (n=7), or MLH1 (n=9). Additionally, we demonstrate its applicability for uncovering complex somatic rearrangements, exemplified by zoom-in analysis of the PTEN and CDKN2A loci in breast cancer cells. The sizes of rearrangements ranged...... from several 100 kb, including large flanking regions, to rearrangements, allowing convenient design...

  11. Sterile DJH rearrangements reveal that distance between gene segments on the human Ig H chain locus influences their ability to rearrange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina Østergaard; Lange, Anders Blaabjerg; Barington, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Rearrangement of the Ig locus occurs in two steps. First, a JH gene is rearranged to a D gene followed by a VH gene rearranging to the DJH rearrangement. By next generation sequencing, we analyzed 9969 unique DJH rearrangements and 5919 unique VHDJH rearrangements obtained from peripheral blood B...... frequently than JH locus distal D genes, whereas VH locus proximal D genes were observed more frequently in nonproductive VHDJH rearrangements. We further demonstrate that the distance between VH, D, and JH gene segments influence their ability to rearrange within the human Ig locus....

  12. Dynamic behavior of rearranging carbocations – implications for terpene biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie R. Hare

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This review describes unexpected dynamical behaviors of rearranging carbocations and the modern computational methods used to elucidate these aspects of reaction mechanisms. Unique potential energy surface topologies associated with these rearrangements have been discovered in recent years that are not only of fundamental interest, but also provide insight into the way Nature manipulates chemical space to accomplish specific chemical transformations. Cautions for analyzing both experimental and theoretical data on carbocation rearrangements are included throughout.

  13. A tandem cross-metathesis/semipinacol rearrangement reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Christopher W; Soheili, Arash; Leighton, James L

    2012-05-18

    An efficient and (E)-selective synthesis of a 6-alkylidenebicyclo[3.2.1]octan-8-one has been developed. The key step is a tandem cross-metathesis/semipinacol rearrangement reaction, wherein the Hoveyda-Grubbs II catalyst, or more likely a derivative thereof, serves as the Lewis acid for the rearrangement. Despite the fact that both the starting alkene and the cross-metathesis product are viable rearrangement substrates, only the latter rearranges, suggesting that the Lewis acidic species is generated only after the cross-metathesis reaction is complete.

  14. Molecular screening of pituitary adenomas for gene mutations and rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, V.; Drazin, N.Z.; Gonskey, R.; Melmed, S. (Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1993-07-01

    Although pituitary tumors arise as benign monoclonal neoplasms, genetic alterations have not readily been identified in these adenomas. The authors studied restriction fragment abnormalities involving the GH gene locus, and mutations in the p53 and H-, K-, and N-ras genes in 22 human GH cell adenomas. Twenty two nonsecretory adenomas were also examined for p53 and ras gene mutations. Seven prolactinoma DNA samples were tested for deletions in the multiple endocrine neoplasia-1 (MEN-1) locus, as well as for rearrangements in the hst gene, a member of the fibroblast growth factor family. In DNA from GH-cell adenomas, identical GH restriction patterns were detected in both pituitary and lymphocyte DNA in all patients and in one patient with a mixed GH-TSH cell adenoma. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single stranded conformation polymorphism analysis, no mutations were detected in exons 5, 6, 7 and 8 of the p53 gene in GH cell adenomas nor in 22 nonsecretory adenomas. Codons 12/13 and 61 of H-ras, K-ras, and N-ras genes were also intact on GH cell adenomas and in nonsecretory adenomas. Site-specific probes for chromosome 11q13 including, PYGM, D11S146, and INT2 were used in 7 sporadic PRL-secreting adenomas to detect deletions of the MEN-1 locus on chromosome 11. One patient was identified with a loss of 11p, and the remaining 6 patients did not demonstrate loss of heterozygosity in the pituitary 11q13 locus, compared to lymphocyte DNA. None of these patients demonstrated hst gene rearrangements which also maps to this locus. These results show that p53 and ras gene mutations are not common events in the pathogenesis of acromegaly and nonsecretory tumors. Although hst gene rearrangements and deletions of 11q13 are not associated with sporadic PRl-cell adenoma formation, a single patient was detected with a partial loss of chromosome 11, including the putative MEN-1 site. 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Mediator structure and rearrangements required for holoenzyme formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Yu, Xiaodi; Gopalan, Sneha; Chao, Ti-Chun; Zhang, Ying; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Murakami, Kenji; Conaway, Ronald C; Conaway, Joan W; Asturias, Francisco J

    2017-04-13

    The conserved Mediator co-activator complex has an essential role in the regulation of RNA polymerase II transcription in all eukaryotes. Understanding the structure and interactions of Mediator is crucial for determining how the complex influences transcription initiation and conveys regulatory information to the basal transcription machinery. Here we present a 4.4 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy map of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mediator in which conserved Mediator subunits are individually resolved. The essential Med14 subunit works as a central backbone that connects the Mediator head, middle and tail modules. Comparison with a 7.8 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy map of a Mediator-RNA polymerase II holoenzyme reveals that changes in the structure of Med14 facilitate a large-scale Mediator rearrangement that is essential for holoenzyme formation. Our study suggests that access to different conformations and crosstalk between structural elements are essential for the Mediator regulation mechanism, and could explain the capacity of the complex to integrate multiple regulatory signals.

  16. Intergenomic rearrangements after polyploidization of Kengyilia thoroldiana (Poaceae: Triticeae) affected by environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuxia; Liu, Huitao; Gao, Ainong; Yang, Xinming; Liu, Weihua; Li, Xiuquan; Li, Lihui

    2012-01-01

    Polyploidization is a major evolutionary process. Approximately 70-75% species of Triticeae (Poaceae) are polyploids, involving 23 genomes. To investigate intergenomic rearrangements after polyploidization of Triticeae species and to determine the effects of environmental factors on them, nine populations of a typical polyploid Triticeae species, Kengyilia thoroldiana (Keng) J.L.Yang et al. (2n = 6x = 42, StStPPYY), collected from different environments, were studied using genome in situ hybridization (GISH). We found that intergenomic rearrangements occurred between the relatively large P genome and the small genomes, St (8.15%) and Y (22.22%), in polyploid species via various types of translocations compared to their diploid progenitors. However, no translocation was found between the relatively small St and Y chromosomes. Environmental factors may affect rearrangements among the three genomes. Chromosome translocations were significantly more frequent in populations from cold alpine and grassland environments than in populations from valley and lake-basin habitats (P<0.05). The relationship between types of chromosome translocations and altitude was significant (r = 0.809, P<0.01). Intergenomic rearrangements associated with environmental factors and genetic differentiation of a single basic genome should be considered as equally important genetic processes during species' ecotype evolution.

  17. Intergenomic rearrangements after polyploidization of Kengyilia thoroldiana (Poaceae: Triticeae affected by environmental factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuxia Wang

    Full Text Available Polyploidization is a major evolutionary process. Approximately 70-75% species of Triticeae (Poaceae are polyploids, involving 23 genomes. To investigate intergenomic rearrangements after polyploidization of Triticeae species and to determine the effects of environmental factors on them, nine populations of a typical polyploid Triticeae species, Kengyilia thoroldiana (Keng J.L.Yang et al. (2n = 6x = 42, StStPPYY, collected from different environments, were studied using genome in situ hybridization (GISH. We found that intergenomic rearrangements occurred between the relatively large P genome and the small genomes, St (8.15% and Y (22.22%, in polyploid species via various types of translocations compared to their diploid progenitors. However, no translocation was found between the relatively small St and Y chromosomes. Environmental factors may affect rearrangements among the three genomes. Chromosome translocations were significantly more frequent in populations from cold alpine and grassland environments than in populations from valley and lake-basin habitats (P<0.05. The relationship between types of chromosome translocations and altitude was significant (r = 0.809, P<0.01. Intergenomic rearrangements associated with environmental factors and genetic differentiation of a single basic genome should be considered as equally important genetic processes during species' ecotype evolution.

  18. Bootstrapping phylogenies inferred from rearrangement data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale sequencing of genomes has enabled the inference of phylogenies based on the evolution of genomic architecture, under such events as rearrangements, duplications, and losses. Many evolutionary models and associated algorithms have been designed over the last few years and have found use in comparative genomics and phylogenetic inference. However, the assessment of phylogenies built from such data has not been properly addressed to date. The standard method used in sequence-based phylogenetic inference is the bootstrap, but it relies on a large number of homologous characters that can be resampled; yet in the case of rearrangements, the entire genome is a single character. Alternatives such as the jackknife suffer from the same problem, while likelihood tests cannot be applied in the absence of well established probabilistic models. Results We present a new approach to the assessment of distance-based phylogenetic inference from whole-genome data; our approach combines features of the jackknife and the bootstrap and remains nonparametric. For each feature of our method, we give an equivalent feature in the sequence-based framework; we also present the results of extensive experimental testing, in both sequence-based and genome-based frameworks. Through the feature-by-feature comparison and the experimental results, we show that our bootstrapping approach is on par with the classic phylogenetic bootstrap used in sequence-based reconstruction, and we establish the clear superiority of the classic bootstrap for sequence data and of our corresponding new approach for rearrangement data over proposed variants. Finally, we test our approach on a small dataset of mammalian genomes, verifying that the support values match current thinking about the respective branches. Conclusions Our method is the first to provide a standard of assessment to match that of the classic phylogenetic bootstrap for aligned sequences. Its

  19. Bootstrapping phylogenies inferred from rearrangement data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu; Rajan, Vaibhav; Moret, Bernard Me

    2012-08-29

    Large-scale sequencing of genomes has enabled the inference of phylogenies based on the evolution of genomic architecture, under such events as rearrangements, duplications, and losses. Many evolutionary models and associated algorithms have been designed over the last few years and have found use in comparative genomics and phylogenetic inference. However, the assessment of phylogenies built from such data has not been properly addressed to date. The standard method used in sequence-based phylogenetic inference is the bootstrap, but it relies on a large number of homologous characters that can be resampled; yet in the case of rearrangements, the entire genome is a single character. Alternatives such as the jackknife suffer from the same problem, while likelihood tests cannot be applied in the absence of well established probabilistic models. We present a new approach to the assessment of distance-based phylogenetic inference from whole-genome data; our approach combines features of the jackknife and the bootstrap and remains nonparametric. For each feature of our method, we give an equivalent feature in the sequence-based framework; we also present the results of extensive experimental testing, in both sequence-based and genome-based frameworks. Through the feature-by-feature comparison and the experimental results, we show that our bootstrapping approach is on par with the classic phylogenetic bootstrap used in sequence-based reconstruction, and we establish the clear superiority of the classic bootstrap for sequence data and of our corresponding new approach for rearrangement data over proposed variants. Finally, we test our approach on a small dataset of mammalian genomes, verifying that the support values match current thinking about the respective branches. Our method is the first to provide a standard of assessment to match that of the classic phylogenetic bootstrap for aligned sequences. Its support values follow a similar scale and its receiver

  20. Gestalt Theory Rearranged: Back to Wertheimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelia Guberman

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wertheimer's seminal paper of 1923 was of gerat influence in psychology and other sciences. Wertheimer also emphasized the weaknesses of the newborn Gestalt theory: too many basic laws, and the ambiguity of definitions. At the same time, the paper contained potential solutions to these problems, in the form of a number of very important ideas, some of which were presented implicitly: perception through imitation, communicative nature of linear drawings and writings, transfer from the visual domain to motor domain, linguistic interpretation of the Gestalt. In this paper it will be shown that based on these ideas the Gestalt theory can be rearranged so that the main notions can be well defined, and the general principle of Gestalt perception, which overarches all known laws and unifies different Gestalt phenomena (the imitation principle can be introduced. The presented model of Gestalt perception is supported by fundamental neurophysiological data—the mirror neurons phenomenon and simulation theory.

  1. Gestalt Theory Rearranged: Back to Wertheimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guberman, Shelia

    2017-01-01

    Wertheimer's seminal paper of 1923 was of gerat influence in psychology and other sciences. Wertheimer also emphasized the weaknesses of the newborn Gestalt theory: too many basic laws, and the ambiguity of definitions. At the same time, the paper contained potential solutions to these problems, in the form of a number of very important ideas, some of which were presented implicitly: perception through imitation, communicative nature of linear drawings and writings, transfer from the visual domain to motor domain, linguistic interpretation of the Gestalt. In this paper it will be shown that based on these ideas the Gestalt theory can be rearranged so that the main notions can be well defined, and the general principle of Gestalt perception, which overarches all known laws and unifies different Gestalt phenomena (the imitation principle) can be introduced. The presented model of Gestalt perception is supported by fundamental neurophysiological data-the mirror neurons phenomenon and simulation theory.

  2. New progress in snake mitochondrial gene rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nian; Zhao, Shujin

    2009-08-01

    To further understand the evolution of snake mitochondrial genomes, the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences were determined for representative species from two snake families: the Many-banded krait, the Banded krait, the Chinese cobra, the King cobra, the Hundred-pace viper, the Short-tailed mamushi, and the Chain viper. Thirteen protein-coding genes, 22-23 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 2 control regions were identified in these mtDNAs. Duplication of the control region and translocation of the tRNAPro gene were two notable features of the snake mtDNAs. These results from the gene rearrangement comparisons confirm the correctness of traditional classification schemes and validate the utility of comparing complete mtDNA sequences for snake phylogeny reconstruction.

  3. Rickettsia parkeri invasion of diverse host cells involves an Arp2/3 complex, WAVE complex and Rho-family GTPase-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Shawna C O; Serio, Alisa W; Welch, Matthew D

    2012-04-01

    Rickettsiae are obligate intracellular pathogens that are transmitted to humans by arthropod vectors and cause diseases such as spotted fever and typhus. Although rickettsiae require the host cell actin cytoskeleton for invasion, the cytoskeletal proteins that mediate this process have not been completely described. To identify the host factors important during cell invasion by Rickettsia parkeri, a member of the spotted fever group (SFG), we performed an RNAi screen targeting 105 proteins in Drosophila melanogaster S2R+ cells. The screen identified 21 core proteins important for invasion, including the GTPases Rac1 and Rac2, the WAVE nucleation-promoting factor complex and the Arp2/3 complex. In mammalian cells, including endothelial cells, the natural targets of R. parkeri, the Arp2/3 complex was also crucial for invasion, while requirements for WAVE2 as well as Rho GTPases depended on the particular cell type. We propose that R. parkeri invades S2R+ arthropod cells through a primary pathway leading to actin nucleation, whereas invasion of mammalian endothelial cells occurs via redundant pathways that converge on the host Arp2/3 complex. Our results reveal a key role for the WAVE and Arp2/3 complexes, as well as a higher degree of variation than previously appreciated in actin nucleation pathways activated during Rickettsia invasion. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Constituent rearrangement model and large transverse momentum reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Yuji; Imachi, Masahiro; Matsuoka, Takeo; Otsuki, Shoichiro; Sawada, Shoji.

    1978-01-01

    In this chapter, two models based on the constituent rearrangement picture for large p sub( t) phenomena are summarized. One is the quark-junction model, and the other is the correlating quark rearrangement model. Counting rules of the models apply to both two-body reactions and hadron productions. (author)

  5. Árni Magnússon's rearrangement of paper manuscripts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Beeke

    Árni Magnússon’s rearrangement of paper manuscripts draws attention to the early history of Árni Magnússon’s (1663-1730) manuscript collection. The thesis examines Árni’s extensive rearrangement of paper manuscripts, showing that he repeatedly altered the physical composition of codices in his...

  6. Circumambulatory rearrangements of cyclopolyenes containing element-centred migrants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkin, Vladimir I; Mikhailov, Igor E; Dushenko, Galina A; Zschunke, Adolf

    2003-01-01

    Data on circumambulatory rearrangements caused by rapid migrations of substituents formed by Group 13-17 elements around three- to nine-membered cyclopolyenes are generalised and systematised. Depending on the ring size, the nature of the migrating group, substituents in the ring and the medium, the rate constants of circumambulatory rearrangements vary over a wide range from 10 6 to 10 -8 s -1 at room temperature. Particular attention is given to analysis of the mechanisms of these rearrangements ([1, j]-, [2,3]- and [3,3]-sigmatropic shifts, haptotropic rearrangements and ionisation-recombination) and to the correlation of these mechanisms with the structural characteristics of the compounds that undergo rearrangements.

  7. Exploiting the CNC side chain in heterocyclic rearrangements: synthesis of 4(5)-acylamino-imidazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccionello, Antonio Palumbo; Buscemi, Silvestre; Vivona, Nicolò; Pace, Andrea

    2010-08-06

    A new variation on the Boulton-Katritzky reaction is reported, namely, involving use of a CNC side chain. A novel Montmorillonite-K10 catalyzed nonreductive transamination of a 3-benzoyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole afforded a 3-(alpha-aminobenzyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole, which was condensed with benzaldehydes to afford the corresponding imines. In the presence of strong base, these imines underwent Boulton-Katritzky-type rearrangement to afford novel 4(5)-acylaminoimidazoles.

  8. Phase-based treatment of a complex severely mentally ill case involving complex posttraumatic stress disorder and psychosis related to Dandy Walker syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauritz, M.W.; van de Sande, R.; Goossens, P.J.J.; van Achterberg, T.; Draijer, N.

    2014-01-01

    For patients with comorbid complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and psychotic disorder, trauma-focused therapy may be difficult to endure. Phase-based treatment including (a) stabilization, (b) trauma-focused therapy, and (c) integration of personality with recovery of connection appears to

  9. A Distinct Class of Genome Rearrangements Driven by Heterologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Ortiz, Ana María; Panier, Stephanie; Sarek, Grzegorz; Vannier, Jean-Baptiste; Patel, Harshil; Campbell, Peter J; Boulton, Simon J

    2018-01-18

    Erroneous DNA repair by heterologous recombination (Ht-REC) is a potential threat to genome stability, but evidence supporting its prevalence is lacking. Here we demonstrate that recombination is possible between heterologous sequences and that it is a source of chromosomal alterations in mitotic and meiotic cells. Mechanistically, we find that the RTEL1 and HIM-6/BLM helicases and the BRCA1 homolog BRC-1 counteract Ht-REC in Caenorhabditis elegans, whereas mismatch repair does not. Instead, MSH-2/6 drives Ht-REC events in rtel-1 and brc-1 mutants and excessive crossovers in rtel-1 mutant meioses. Loss of vertebrate Rtel1 also causes a variety of unusually large and complex structural variations, including chromothripsis, breakage-fusion-bridge events, and tandem duplications with distant intra-chromosomal insertions, whose structure are consistent with a role for RTEL1 in preventing Ht-REC during break-induced replication. Our data establish Ht-REC as an unappreciated source of genome instability that underpins a novel class of complex genome rearrangements that likely arise during replication stress. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Tourette Syndrome: Overview and Classroom Interventions. A Complex Neurobehavioral Disorder Which May Involve Learning Problems, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Symptoms, and Stereotypical Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Ramona A.; Collins, Edward C.

    Tourette Syndrome is conceptualized as a neurobehavioral disorder, with behavioral aspects that are sometimes difficult for teachers to understand and deal with. The disorder has five layers of complexity: (1) observable multiple motor, vocal, and cognitive tics and sensory involvement; (2) Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder; (3)…

  11. Internal flow inside droplets within a concentrated emulsion during droplet rearrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Chia Min; Gai, Ya; Tang, Sindy K. Y.

    2018-03-01

    Droplet microfluidics, in which each droplet serves as a micro-reactor, has found widespread use in high-throughput biochemical screening applications. These droplets are often concentrated at various steps to form a concentrated emulsion. As part of a serial interrogation and sorting process, such concentrated emulsions are typically injected into a tapered channel leading to a constriction that fits one drop at a time for the probing of droplet content in a serial manner. The flow physics inside the droplets under these flow conditions are not well understood but are critical for predicting and controlling the mixing of reagents inside the droplets as reactors. Here we investigate the flow field inside droplets of a concentrated emulsion flowing through a tapered microchannel using micro-particle image velocimetry. The confining geometry of the channel forces the number of rows of drops to reduce by one at specific and uniformly spaced streamwise locations, which are referred to as droplet rearrangement zones. Within each rearrangement zone, the phase-averaged velocity results show that the motion of the droplets involved in the rearrangement process, also known as a T1 event, creates vortical structures inside themselves and their adjacent droplets. These flow structures increase the circulation inside droplets up to 2.5 times the circulation in droplets at the constriction. The structures weaken outside of the rearrangement zones suggesting that the flow patterns created by the T1 process are transient. The time scale of circulation is approximately the same as the time scale of a T1 event. Outside of the rearrangement zones, flow patterns in the droplets are determined by the relative velocity between the continuous and disperse phases.

  12. Phosphorescent heterobimetallic complexes involving platinum(iv) and rhenium(vii) centers connected by an unsupported μ-oxido bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaee, Hajar; Nabavizadeh, S Masoud; Jamshidi, Mahboubeh; Vilsmeier, Max; Pfitzner, Arno; Samandar Sangari, Mozhgan

    2017-11-28

    Heterobimetallic compounds [(C^N)LMe 2 Pt(μ-O)ReO 3 ] (C^N = ppy, L = PPh 3 , 2a; C^N = ppy, L = PMePh 2 , 2b; C^N = bhq, L = PPh 3 , 2c; C^N = bhq, L = PMePh 2 , 2d) containing a discrete unsupported Pt(iv)-O-Re(vii) bridge have been synthesized through a targeted synthesis route. The compounds have been prepared by a single-pot synthesis in which the Pt(iv) precursor [PtMe 2 I(C^N)L] complexes are allowed to react easily with AgReO 4 in which the iodide ligand of the starting Pt(iv) complex is replaced by an ReO 4 - anion. In these Pt-O-Re complexes, the Pt(iv) centers have an octahedral geometry, completed by a cyclometalated bidentate ligand (C^N), two methyl groups and a phosphine ligand, while the Re(vii) centers have a tetrahedral geometry. Elemental analysis, single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy are used to establish their identities. The new complexes exhibit phosphorescence emission in the solid and solution states at 298 and 77 K, which is an uncommon property of platinum complexes with an oxidation state of +4. According to DFT calculations, we found that this emission behavior in the new complexes originates from ligand centered 3 LC (C^N) character with a slight amount of metal to ligand charge transfer ( 3 MLCT). The solid-state emission data of the corresponding cycloplatinated(iv) precursor complexes [PtMe 2 I(C^N)L], 1a-1d, pointed out that the replacement of I - by an ReO 4 - anion helps enhancing the emission efficiency besides shifting the emission wavelengths.

  13. Synthesis of metal complexes involving Schiff base ligand with methylenedioxy moiety: spectral, thermal, XRD and antimicrobial studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, M L; Jeyakumar, T; Anandakumaran, J; Karpanai Selvan, B

    2014-10-15

    Metal complexes of Zn(II), Cd(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Mn(II) Hg(II), and Ag(I) have been synthesized from Schiff base ligand, prepared by the condensation of 3,4-(methylenedioxy)aniline and 5-bromo salicylaldehyde. All the compounds have been characterized by using elemental analysis, molar conductance, FT-IR, UV-Vis, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, mass spectra, powder XRD and thermal analysis (TG/DTA) technique. The elemental analysis suggests the stoichiometry to be 1:1 (metal:ligand). The FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and UV-Vis spectral data suggest that the ligand coordinate to the metal atom by imino nitrogen and phenolic oxygen as bidentate manner. Mass spectral data further support the molecular mass of the compounds and their structure. Powder XRD indicates the crystalline state and morphology of the ligand and its metal complexes. The thermal behaviors of the complexes prove the presence of lattice as well as coordinated water molecules in the complexes. Melting point supports the thermal stability of all the compounds. The in vitro antimicrobial effects of the synthesized compounds were tested against five bacterial and three fungal species by well diffusion method. Antioxidant activities have also been performed for all the compounds. Metal complexes show more biological activity than the Schiff base. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Hemolymph Melanization in the Silkmoth Bombyx mori Involves Formation of a High Molecular Mass Complex That Metabolizes Tyrosine*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kevin D.; Strand, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    The phenoloxidase (PO) cascade regulates the melanization of blood (hemolymph) in insects and other arthropods. Most studies indicate that microbial elicitors activate the PO cascade, which results in processing of the zymogen PPO to PO. PO is then thought to oxidize tyrosine and o-diphenols to quinones, which leads to melanin. However, different lines of investigation raise questions as to whether these views are fully correct. Here we report that hemolymph from the silkmoth, Bombyx mori, rapidly melanizes after collection from a wound site. Prior studies indicated that in vitro activated PPO hydroxylates Tyr inefficiently. Measurement of in vivo substrate titers, however, suggested that Tyr was the only PO substrate initially present in B. mori plasma and that it is rapidly metabolized by PO. Fractionation of plasma by gel filtration chromatography followed by bioassays indicated that melanization activity was primarily associated with a high mass complex (∼670 kDa) that contained PO. The prophenoloxidase-activating protease inhibitor Egf1.0 blocked formation of this complex and Tyr metabolism, but the addition of phenylthiourea to plasma before fractionation enhanced complex formation and Tyr metabolism. Mass spectrometry analysis indicated that the complex contained PO plus other proteins. Taken together, our results indicate that wounding alone activates the PO cascade in B. mori. They also suggest that complex formation is required for efficient use of Tyr as a substrate. PMID:23553628

  15. Dynamic 3D cell rearrangements guided by a fibronectin matrix underlie somitogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel G Martins

    Full Text Available Somites are transient segments formed in a rostro-caudal progression during vertebrate development. In chick embryos, segmentation of a new pair of somites occurs every 90 minutes and involves a mesenchyme-to-epithelium transition of cells from the presomitic mesoderm. Little is known about the cellular rearrangements involved, and, although it is known that the fibronectin extracellular matrix is required, its actual role remains elusive. Using 3D and 4D imaging of somite formation we discovered that somitogenesis consists of a complex choreography of individual cell movements. Epithelialization starts medially with the formation of a transient epithelium of cuboidal cells, followed by cell elongation and reorganization into a pseudostratified epithelium of spindle-shaped epitheloid cells. Mesenchymal cells are then recruited to this medial epithelium through accretion, a phenomenon that spreads to all sides, except the lateral side of the forming somite, which epithelializes by cell elongation and intercalation. Surprisingly, an important contribution to the somite epithelium also comes from the continuous egression of mesenchymal cells from the core into the epithelium via its apical side. Inhibition of fibronectin matrix assembly first slows down the rate, and then halts somite formation, without affecting pseudopodial activity or cell body movements. Rather, cell elongation, centripetal alignment, N-cadherin polarization and egression are impaired, showing that the fibronectin matrix plays a role in polarizing and guiding the exploratory behavior of somitic cells. To our knowledge, this is the first 4D in vivo recording of a full mesenchyme-to-epithelium transition. This approach brought new insights into this event and highlighted the importance of the extracellular matrix as a guiding cue during morphogenesis.

  16. Regioselectivity in the Thermal Rearrangement of Unsymmetrical 4-Methyl-4H-1,2,4-triazoles to 1-Methyl-1H-1,2,4-triazoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per H.J. Carlsen

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available The rearrangement of 4-methyl-3,5-diaryl-4H-1,2,4-triazoles to the corresponding 1-methyl-3,5-diaryl-1H-1,2,4-triazoles showed regioselectivity comparable to that observed for the alkylation of 3,5-diaryl-1H-1,2,4-triazoles. This lends support to a proposed mechanism for the rearrangement that involves consecutive nucleophilic displacements steps.

  17. No evidence for a paternal interchromosomal effect from analysis of the origin of nondisjunction in Down syndrome patients with concomitant familial chromosome rearrangements.

    OpenAIRE

    Schinzel, A A; Adelsberger, P A; Binkert, F; Basaran, S; Antonarakis, S E

    1992-01-01

    The parental origin of the extra chromosome 21 was determined with DNA polymorphisms in seven families in whom the proband and one of the parents carried an additional chromosome rearrangement (balanced translocation or pericentric inversion) not involving chromosome 21. The balanced rearrangement was inherited from the mother in two families and from the father in five families, whereas the additional chromosome 21 was derived from the mother in all seven families. These findings are not in ...

  18. Caenorhabditis elegans expressing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae NADH alternative dehydrogenase Ndi1p, as a tool to identify new genes involved in complex I related diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raynald eCossard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Isolated complex I deficiencies are one of the most commonly observed biochemical features in patients suffering from mitochondrial disorders. In the majority of these clinical cases the molecular bases of the diseases remain unknown suggesting the involvement of unidentified factors that are critical for complex I function.The Saccharomyces cerevisiae NDI1 gene, encoding the mitochondrial internal NADH dehydrogenase was previously shown to complement a complex I deficient strain in Caenorhabitis elegans with notable improvements in reproduction, whole organism respiration. These features indicate that Ndi1p can functionally integrate the respiratory chain, allowing complex I deficiency complementation. Taking into account the Ndi1p ability to bypass complex I, we evaluate the possibility to extend the range of defects/mutations causing complex I deficiencies that can be alleviated by NDI1 expression.We report here that NDI1 expressing animals unexpectedly exhibit a slightly shortened lifespan, a reduction in the progeny and a depletion of the mitochondrial genome. However, Ndi1p is expressed and targeted to the mitochondria as a functional protein that confers rotenone resistance to those animals and without affecting their respiration rate and ATP content.We show that the severe embryonic lethality level caused by the RNAi knockdowns of complex I structural subunit encoding genes (e.g. NDUFV1, NDUFS1, NDUFS6, NDUFS8 or GRIM-19 human orthologs in wild type animals is significantly reduced in the Ndi1p expressing worm.All together these results open up the perspective to identify new genes involved in complex I function, assembly or regulation by screening an RNAi library of genes leading to embryonic lethality that should be rescued by NDI1 expression.

  19. REARRANGEMENT IN THE B-GENOME FROM DIPLOID PROGENITOR TO WHEAT ALLOPOLYPOLID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salina E.A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Three key periods that were accompanied by considerable rearrangements in the B genome of wheat and its progenitor can be considered. The first period covers the period from the divergence of diploid Triticum and Aegilops species from their common progenitor (2.5–6 million years ago to formation of the tetraploid T. diccocoides (about 500 thousand years ago. Significant genomic rearrangements in the diploid progenitor of the B genome, Ae. speltoides (SS genome, involved a considerable amplification of repeated DNA sequences, which led to an increase in the number of heterochromatin blocks on chromosomes relative to other diploid Aegilops and Triticum species. Our analysis has demonstrated that during this period the Spelt1 repeats intensively amplified as well as several mobile elements proliferated, in particular, the genome-specific gypsy LTR-retrotransposon Fatima and CACTA DNA-transposon Caspar. The second period in the B-genome evolution was associated with the emergence of tetraploid (BBAA genome and its subsequent evolution. The third most important event leading to the next rearrangement of the B genome took place relatively recently, 7000–9500 years ago, being associated with the emergence of hexaploid wheat with the genomic formula BBAADD. The evolution of the B/S genome involved intergenomic and intragenomic translocations and chromosome inversions. So far, five rearrangements in the B-genome chromosomes of polyploid wheats has been observed and described; the majority of them took place during the formation and evolution of tetraploid species. The mapping of the S-genome chromosomes and comparison with the B-genome chromosome maps have demonstrated that individual rearrangements pre-existed in Ae. speltoides; moreover, Ae. speltoides is polymorphic for these rearrangements.Chromosome 5B is nearly 870 Mbp (5BL = 580 Mbp and 5BS = 290 Mbp and is known to carry important genes controlling the key aspects of wheat biology, in

  20. Kinase Expression and Chromosomal Rearrangements in Papillary Thyroid Cancer Tissues: Investigations at the Molecular and Microscopic Levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich; Kwan, Johnson; Lu, Chun-Mei; Ito, Yuko; Wang, Mei; Baumgartner, Adolf; Hayward, Simon W.; Weier, Jingly F.; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.

    2009-01-01

    Structural chromosome aberrations are known hallmarks of many solid tumors. In the papillary form of thyroid cancer (PTC), for example, activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) genes, ret or the neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type I (NTRK1) by intra- or interchromosomal rearrangements have been suggested as a cause of the disease. The 1986 accident at the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl, USSR, led to the uncontrolled release of high levels of radioisotopes. Ten years later, the incidence of childhood papillary thyroid cancer (chPTC) near Chernobyl had risen by two orders of magnitude. Tumors removed from some of these patients showed aberrant expression of the ret RTK gene due to a ret/PTC1 or ret/PTC3 rearrangement involving chromosome 10. However, many cultured chPTC cells show a normal G-banded karyotype and no ret rearrangement. We hypothesize that the 'ret-negative' tumors inappropriately express a different oncogene or have lost function of a tumor suppressor as a result of chromosomal rearrangements, and decided to apply molecular and cytogenetic methods to search for potentially oncogenic chromosomal rearrangements in Chernobyl chPTC cases. Knowledge of the kind of genetic alterations may facilitate the early detection and staging of chPTC as well as provide guidance for therapeutic intervention.

  1. Kinase Expression and Chromosomal Rearrangements in Papillary Thyroid Cancer Tissues: Investigations at the Molecular and Microscopic Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich; Kwan, Johnson; Lu, Chun-Mei; Ito, Yuko; Wang, Mei; Baumgartner, Adolf; Hayward, Simon W.; Weier, Jingly F.; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.

    2009-07-07

    Structural chromosome aberrations are known hallmarks of many solid tumors. In the papillary form of thyroid cancer (PTC), for example, activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) genes, ret or the neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type I (NTRK1) by intra- or interchromosomal rearrangements have been suggested as a cause of the disease. The 1986 accident at the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl, USSR, led to the uncontrolled release of high levels of radioisotopes. Ten years later, the incidence of childhood papillary thyroid cancer (chPTC) near Chernobyl had risen by two orders of magnitude. Tumors removed from some of these patients showed aberrant expression of the ret RTK gene due to a ret/PTC1 or ret/PTC3 rearrangement involving chromosome 10. However, many cultured chPTC cells show a normal G-banded karyotype and no ret rearrangement. We hypothesize that the 'ret-negative' tumors inappropriately express a different oncogene or have lost function of a tumor suppressor as a result of chromosomal rearrangements, and decided to apply molecular and cytogenetic methods to search for potentially oncogenic chromosomal rearrangements in Chernobyl chPTC cases. Knowledge of the kind of genetic alterations may facilitate the early detection and staging of chPTC as well as provide guidance for therapeutic intervention.

  2. Molecular structure of tetraaqua adenosine 5'-triphosphate aluminium(III) complex: A study involving Raman spectroscopy, theoretical DFT and potentiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenório, Thaís; Silva, Andréa M.; Ramos, Joanna Maria; Buarque, Camilla D.; Felcman, Judith

    2013-03-01

    The Alzheimer's disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases that affect elderly population, due to the formation of β-amyloid protein aggregate and several symptoms, especially progressive cognitive decline. The result is a decrease in capture of glucose by cells leading to obliteration, meddling in the Krebs cycle, the principal biochemical route to the energy production leading to a decline in the levels of adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Aluminium(III) is connected to Alzheimer's and its ion provides raise fluidity of the plasma membrane, decrease cell viability and aggregation of amyloid plaques. Studies reveal that AlATP complex promotes the formation of reactive fibrils of β-amyloid protein and independent amyloidogenic peptides, suggesting the action of the complex as a chaperone in the role pathogenic process. In this research, one of complexes formed by Al(III) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate in aqueous solution is analyzed by potentiometry, Raman spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. The value of the log KAlATP found was 9.21 ± 0.01 and adenosine 5'-triphosphate should act as a bidentate ligand in the complex. Raman spectroscopy and potentiometry indicate that donor atoms are the oxygen of the phosphate β and the oxygen of the phosphate γ, the terminal phosphates. Computational calculations using Density Functional Theory, with hybrid functions B3LYP and 6-311++G(d,p) basis set regarding water solvent effects, have confirmed the results. Frontier molecular orbitals, electrostatic potential contour surface, electrostatic potential mapped and Mulliken charges of the title molecule were also investigated.

  3. Genome-wide signatures of 'rearrangement hotspots' within segmental duplications in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Uddin

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study was to create a genome-wide high resolution map (i.e., >100 bp of 'rearrangement hotspots' which can facilitate the identification of regions capable of mediating de novo deletions or duplications in humans. A hierarchical method was employed to fragment segmental duplications (SDs into multiple smaller SD units. Combining an end space free pairwise alignment algorithm with a 'seed and extend' approach, we have exhaustively searched 409 million alignments to detect complex structural rearrangements within the reference-guided assembly of the NA18507 human genome (18× coverage, including the previously identified novel 4.8 Mb sequence from de novo assembly within this genome. We have identified 1,963 rearrangement hotspots within SDs which encompass 166 genes and display an enrichment of duplicated gene nucleotide variants (DNVs. These regions are correlated with increased non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR event frequency which presumably represents the origin of copy number variations (CNVs and pathogenic duplications/deletions. Analysis revealed that 20% of the detected hotspots are clustered within the proximal and distal SD breakpoints flanked by the pathogenic deletions/duplications that have been mapped for 24 NAHR-mediated genomic disorders. FISH Validation of selected complex regions revealed 94% concordance with in silico localization of the highly homologous derivatives. Other results from this study indicate that intra-chromosomal recombination is enhanced in genic compared with agenic duplicated regions, and that gene desert regions comprising SDs may represent reservoirs for creation of novel genes. The generation of genome-wide signatures of 'rearrangement hotspots', which likely serve as templates for NAHR, may provide a powerful approach towards understanding the underlying mutational mechanism(s for development of constitutional and acquired diseases.

  4. Synthesis, Characterization and in Vitro Antitumor Activity of Platinum(II Oxalato Complexes Involving 7-Azaindole Derivatives as Coligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Štarha

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The platinum(II oxalato complexes [Pt(ox(naza2] (1–3 were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis (C, H, N, multinuclear NMR spectroscopy (1H, 13C, 15N, 195Pt and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS; naza = 4-chloro-7-azaindole (4Claza; 1, 3-bromo-7-azaindole (3Braza; 2 or 4-bromo-7-azaindole (4Braza; 3. The prepared substances were screened for their in vitro antitumor activity on the osteosarcoma (HOS and breast adenocarcinoma (MCF7 human cancer cell lines, where 2 showed moderate antitumor effect (IC50 = 27.5 μM, and 18.3 μM, respectively. The complex 2 was further tested on a panel of six others human cancer cell lines, including the malignant melanoma (G361, cervix carcinoma (HeLa, ovarian carcinoma (A2780, cisplatin-resistant ovarian carcinoma (A2780R, lung carcinoma (A549 and prostate adenocarcinoma (LNCaP. This substance was found to be moderate antitumor effective against G361 (IC50 = 17.3 μM, HeLa (IC50 = 31.8 μM and A2780 (IC50 = 19.2 μM cell lines. The complex 2 was also studied by NMR for its solution stability and by ESI-MS experiments for its ability to interact with biomolecules, such as cysteine, glutathione or guanosine 5'-monophosphate.

  5. Quantum control of the photoinduced Wolff rearrangement of diazonaphthoquinone in the condensed phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolpert, Daniel; Gerber, Gustav; Brixner, Tobias [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Schade, Marco; Langhojer, Florian [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany)], E-mail: brixner@phys-chemie.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2008-04-14

    A shaped UV pump-MIR probe setup is employed for quantum control of the photoinduced Wolff rearrangement reaction of diazonaphthoquinone (DNQ) dissolved in methanol, yielding a ketene photoproduct. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy is a well-suited tool to monitor a photoreaction in the liquid phase as the narrow vibrational lines allow the observation of structural changes. Especially in the mid-infrared region, marker modes originating from different photoproducts can be identified unambiguously providing suitable feedback signals for open-loop or closed-loop control schemes. We report an experiment where the initiation of a complicated structural change of a molecule, involving bond cleavage and rearrangement, in the liquid phase can be controlled and mechanistic insight is obtained. Single-parameter scans show that the molecule is sensitive to intrapulse dumping during the excitation. Adaptive optimizations lead to pulse structures which can be understood consistently with this dumping mechanism.

  6. TGIF1 is a negative regulator of MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willer, Anton; Jakobsen, Janus Schou; Ohlsson, E

    2015-01-01

    orchestrates a transcriptional program required for the maintenance of MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia (AML). TGIF1/TGIF2 are relatively uncharacterized TALE transcription factors, which, in contrast to the remaining family, have been shown to act as transcriptional repressors. Given the general......Members of the TALE (three-amino-acid loop extension) family of atypical homeodomain-containing transcription factors are important downstream effectors of oncogenic fusion proteins involving the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene. A well-characterized member of this protein family is MEIS1, which...... influence the clinical outcome. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that TALE family members can act both positively and negatively on transcriptional programs responsible for leukemic maintenance and provide novel insights into the regulatory gene expression circuitries in MLL-rearranged AML.Leukemia...

  7. Computational investigation of rearrangements in huisgen cycloadducts of azolium N-dicyanomethanide 1,3-dipoles with alkynes: a mechanistic panoply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Luke A; Butler, Richard N

    2009-08-07

    The reaction surfaces leading to rearrangements and ring expansions of azapentalene cycloadducts of imidazolo- and triazolodicyanomethanide 1,3-dipoles with alkynes are studied with the B3LYP DFT method using the 6-31G(d) and 6-311+G(2d,p) basis sets. The surprisingly complex surface involves (1) consecutive but not combined pericyclic steps, a coarctate TS, and pseudopericyclic mechanisms, (2) anchimerically assisted H-atom transfer competing effectively with concerted symmetry-allowed sigmatropic steps, and (3) azolium methanide zwitterions and ketenimines as key intermediates. The azolium methanide is identified as the intermediate detected previously in a variable-temperature NMR experiment that converted the unstable cycloadduct to product imine.

  8. Segmental Duplication, Microinversion, and Gene Loss Associated with a Complex Inversion Breakpoint Region in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvete, Oriol; González, Josefa; Betrán, Esther; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal inversions are usually portrayed as simple two-breakpoint rearrangements changing gene order but not gene number or structure. However, increasing evidence suggests that inversion breakpoints may often have a complex structure and entail gene duplications with potential functional consequences. Here, we used a combination of different techniques to investigate the breakpoint structure and the functional consequences of a complex rearrangement fixed in Drosophila buzzatii and comprising two tandemly arranged inversions sharing the middle breakpoint: 2m and 2n. By comparing the sequence in the breakpoint regions between D. buzzatii (inverted chromosome) and D. mojavensis (noninverted chromosome), we corroborate the breakpoint reuse at the molecular level and infer that inversion 2m was associated with a duplication of a ∼13 kb segment and likely generated by staggered breaks plus repair by nonhomologous end joining. The duplicated segment contained the gene CG4673, involved in nuclear transport, and its two nested genes CG5071 and CG5079. Interestingly, we found that other than the inversion and the associated duplication, both breakpoints suffered additional rearrangements, that is, the proximal breakpoint experienced a microinversion event associated at both ends with a 121-bp long duplication that contains a promoter. As a consequence of all these different rearrangements, CG5079 has been lost from the genome, CG5071 is now a single copy nonnested gene, and CG4673 has a transcript ∼9 kb shorter and seems to have acquired a more complex gene regulation. Our results illustrate the complex effects of chromosomal rearrangements and highlight the need of complementing genomic approaches with detailed sequence-level and functional analyses of breakpoint regions if we are to fully understand genome structure, function, and evolutionary dynamics. PMID:22328714

  9. Triisobutylaluminium (TIBAL Promoted Rearrangement of C-glycosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sinay

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Triisobutylaluminium-promoted rearrangement of unsaturated glycosides containing electron-donating aglycons, such as C-aryl glycosides, provides direct access to highly functionalised cyclohexane derivatives.

  10. The α2δ-1-NMDA Receptor Complex Is Critically Involved in Neuropathic Pain Development and Gabapentin Therapeutic Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjun Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available α2δ-1, commonly known as a voltage-activated Ca2+ channel subunit, is a binding site of gabapentinoids used to treat neuropathic pain and epilepsy. However, it is unclear how α2δ-1 contributes to neuropathic pain and gabapentinoid actions. Here, we show that Cacna2d1 overexpression potentiates presynaptic and postsynaptic NMDAR activity of spinal dorsal horn neurons to cause pain hypersensitivity. Conversely, Cacna2d1 knockdown or ablation normalizes synaptic NMDAR activity increased by nerve injury. α2δ-1 forms a heteromeric complex with NMDARs in rodent and human spinal cords. The α2δ-1-NMDAR interaction predominantly occurs through the C terminus of α2δ-1 and promotes surface trafficking and synaptic targeting of NMDARs. Gabapentin or an α2δ-1 C terminus-interfering peptide normalizes NMDAR synaptic targeting and activity increased by nerve injury. Thus, α2δ-1 is an NMDAR-interacting protein that increases NMDAR synaptic delivery in neuropathic pain. Gabapentinoids reduce neuropathic pain by inhibiting forward trafficking of α2δ-1-NMDAR complexes.

  11. Combinatorial aspects of genome rearrangements and haplotype networks

    OpenAIRE

    Labarre , Anthony

    2008-01-01

    The dissertation covers two problems motivated by computational biology: genome rearrangements, and haplotype networks. Genome rearrangement problems are a particular case of edit distance problems, where one seeks to transform two given objects into one another using as few operations as possible, with the additional constraint that the set of allowed operations is fixed beforehand; we are also interested in computing the corresponding distances between those objects, i.e. merely computing t...

  12. Dehydrophenylnitrenes: matrix isolation and photochemical rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Wolfram; Winkler, Michael; Cakir, Bayram; Grote, Dirk; Bettinger, Holger F

    2007-02-02

    The photochemistry of 3-iodo-2,4,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl azide 8 and 3,5-diiodo-2,4,6-trifluorophenyl azide 9 was studied by IR and EPR spectroscopy in cryogenic argon and neon matrices. Both compounds form the corresponding nitrenes as primary photoproducts in photostationary equilibria with their azirine and ketenimine isomers. In contrast to fluorinated phenylnitrenes, ring-opened products are obtained upon short-wavelength irradiation of the iodine-containing systems, indicative of C-I bond cleavage in the nitrenes or didehydroazepines under these conditions. Neither 3-dehydrophenylnitrene 6 nor 3,5-didehydrophenylnitrene 7 could be detected directly. The structures of the acyclic photoproducts were identified by extensive comparison with DFT calculated spectra. Mechanistic aspects of the rearrangements leading to the observed products and the electronic properties of the title intermediates are discussed on the basis of DFT as well as high-level ab initio calculations. The computations indicate strong through-bond coupling of the exocyclic orbital in the meta position with the singly occupied in-plane nitrene orbital in the monoradical nitrenes. In contrast to the ortho or para isomers, this interaction results in low-spin ground states for meta nitrene radicals and a weakening of the C1-C2 bond causing the kinetic instability of these species even under low-temperature conditions. 3,5-Didehydrophenylnitrenes, on the other hand, in which a strong C3-C5 interaction reduces coupling of the radical sites with the nitrene unit, might be accessible synthetic targets if the intermediate formation of labile monoradicals could be circumvented.

  13. Synthesis of rearranged unsaturated drimane derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda Domingos S. de

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A full account to the preparation and application of three appropriately substituted vinylcyclohexenes (2,2-dimethyl-3-vinylcyclohex-3-en-1-ol, 2,2-dimethyl-3-vinylcyclohex-3-en-1-one and 3,3-dimethyl-2-vinylcyclohexene in thermal Diels-Alder reactions with alpha,beta-unsaturated esters (methyl tiglate and methyl angelate is given. This approach delivered the racemic synthesis of ten octalin derivatives bearing a rearranged drimane skeleton (4 diastereomers of 1-methoxycarbonyl-6-hydroxy-1,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1,2,3,5,6,7, 8,8a-octahydronaphthalene; 1-methoxycarbonyl-6-oxo-1,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8-octahydronaphthalene; 2-methoxycarbonyl-6-oxo-1,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1,2,3,5,6,7,8,8a-octahydronaphthalene; 3 diastereomers of 1-methoxycarbonyl-1,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1,2,3,5,6,7,8,8a-octahydronaphthalene and 2-methoxycarbonyl-1,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1,2,3,5,6,7,8,8a-octahydronaphthalene . Central synthetic features included preparation of enoltriflates by Stang's protocol and the successful palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction (Stille reaction of the triflate with the tri-n-butylvinylstannane. The octalins relative stereochemistry was unequivocally ascertained by spectroscopic methods and/or X-ray crystallography and these data now stand as useful tools to support the correct assignment of related natural products usually isolated in minute amounts.

  14. Extracting the Beat: An Experience-dependent Complex Integration of Multisensory Information Involving Multiple Levels of the Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel J. Trainor

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In a series of studies we have shown that movement (or vestibular stimulation that is synchronized to every second or every third beat of a metrically ambiguous rhythm pattern biases people to perceive the meter as a march or as a waltz, respectively. Riggle (this volume claims that we postulate an "innate", "specialized brain unit" for beat perception that is "directly" influenced by vestibular input. In fact, to the contrary, we argue that experience likely plays a large role in the development of rhythmic auditory-movement interactions, and that rhythmic processing in the brain is widely distributed and includes subcortical and cortical areas involved in sound processing and movement. Further, we argue that vestibular and auditory information are integrated at various subcortical and cortical levels along with input from other sensory modalities, and it is not clear which levels are most important for rhythm processing or, indeed, what a "direct" influence of vestibular input would mean. Finally, we argue that vestibular input to sound location mechanisms may be involved, but likely cannot explain the influence of vestibular input on the perception of auditory rhythm. This remains an empirical question for future research.

  15. Studies of transfer reactions of photosensitized electrons involving complexes of transition metals in view of solar energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakubo, Masaaki

    1984-01-01

    This research thesis addresses electron transfer reactions occurring during photosynthesis, for example, photosensitized reaction in which chlorophyll is the sensitizer. More specifically, the author studied experimentally electron photo-transfers with type D sensitizers (riboflavin, phenoxazine and porphyrin), and various complexes of transition metals. After a presentation of these experiments, the author describes the photosensitisation process (photo-physics of riboflavin, oxygen deactivation, sensitized photo-oxidation and photo-reduction). The theoretical aspect of electron transfer is then addressed: generalities, deactivation of the riboflavin triplet, initial efficiency of electron transfer. Experimental results on three basic processes (non-radiative deactivation, energy transfer, electron transfer) are interpreted in a unified way by using the non-radiative transfer theory. Some applications are described: photo-electrochemical batteries, photo-oxidation and photo-reduction of the cobalt ion

  16. Involvement of heme oxygenase-1 in β-cyclodextrin-hemin complex-induced cucumber adventitious rooting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuting; Li, Meiyue; Huang, Liqin; Shen, Wenbiao; Ren, Yong

    2012-09-01

    Our previous results showed that β-cyclodextrin-hemin complex (CDH) exhibited a vital protective role against cadmium-induced oxidative damage and toxicity in alfalfa seedling roots by the regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene expression. In this report, we further test whether CDH exhibited the hormonal-like response. The application of CDH and an inducer of HO-1, hemin, were able to induce the up-regulation of cucumber HO-1 gene (CsHO1) expression and thereafter the promotion of adventitious rooting in cucumber explants. The effect is specific for HO-1 since the potent HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) blocked the above responses triggered by CDH, and the inhibitory effects were reversed further when 30% saturation of CO aqueous solution was added together. Further, molecular evidence showed that CDH triggered the increases of the HO-1-mediated target genes responsible for adventitious rooting, including one DnaJ-like gene (CsDNAJ-1) and two calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) genes (CsCDPK1 and CsCDPK5), and were inhibited by ZnPP and reversed by CO. The calcium (Ca2+) chelator ethylene glycol-bis (2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and the Ca2+ channel blocker lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) not only compromised the induction of adventitious rooting induced by CDH but also decreased the transcripts of above three target genes. However, the application of ascorbic acid (AsA), a well-known antioxidant in plants, failed to exhibit similar inducible effect on adventitious root formation. In short, above results illustrated that the response of CDH in the induction of cucumber adventitious rooting might be through HO-1-dependent mechanism and calcium signaling. Physiological, pharmacological and molecular evidence showed that β-cyclodextrin-hemin complex (CDH) was able to induce cucumber adventitious rooting through heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)-dependent mechanism and calcium signaling.

  17. Using a Virtual Tablet Machine to Improve Student Understanding of the Complex Processes Involved in Tablet Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Sofia; Sjöström, Hans-Erik; Englund, Claire

    2016-06-25

    Objective. To develop and implement a virtual tablet machine simulation to aid distance students' understanding of the processes involved in tablet production. Design. A tablet simulation was created enabling students to study the effects different parameters have on the properties of the tablet. Once results were generated, students interpreted and explained them on the basis of current theory. Assessment. The simulation was evaluated using written questionnaires and focus group interviews. Students appreciated the exercise and considered it to be motivational. Students commented that they found the simulation, together with the online seminar and the writing of the report, was beneficial for their learning process. Conclusion. According to students' perceptions, the use of the tablet simulation contributed to their understanding of the compaction process.

  18. Complex Virus-Host Interactions Involved in the Regulation of Classical Swine Fever Virus Replication: A Minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Su; Wang, Jinghan; Yang, Qian; Naveed Anwar, Muhammad; Yu, Shaoxiong; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2017-07-05

    Classical swine fever (CSF), caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV), is one of the most devastating epizootic diseases of pigs in many countries. Viruses are small intracellular parasites and thus rely on the cellular factors for replication. Fundamental aspects of CSFV-host interactions have been well described, such as factors contributing to viral attachment, modulation of genomic replication and translation, antagonism of innate immunity, and inhibition of cell apoptosis. However, those host factors that participate in the viral entry, assembly, and release largely remain to be elucidated. In this review, we summarize recent progress in the virus-host interactions involved in the life cycle of CSFV and analyze the potential mechanisms of viral entry, assembly, and release. We conclude with future perspectives and highlight areas that require further understanding.

  19. FOXP1 and TP63 involvement in the progression of myelodysplastic syndrome with 5q- and additional cytogenetic abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L’Abbate, Alberto; Tagliafico, Enrico; Minoia, Carla; De Tullio, Giacoma; Guarini, Attilio; Testoni, Nicoletta; Agostinelli, Claudio; Storlazzi, Clelia Tiziana; Lo Cunsolo, Crocifissa; Macrì, Ettore; Iuzzolino, Paolo; Mecucci, Cristina; Doglioni, Claudio; Coco, Michelina; Muscarella, Lucia Anna; Salati, Simona

    2014-01-01

    The progression of low-risk del(5q) myelodysplastic syndrome to acute myeloid leukemia is increased when associated with mutations of TP53, or with additional chromosomal abnormalities. However, to date the prognostic impact and molecular consequences of these rearrangements were poorly investigated. Single additional alterations to del(5q) by balanced chromosome rearrangements were rarely found in myelodysplasia. In particular, balanced alterations involving TP63 and FOXP1 genes were never reported in the literature. Here we report on a 79-year woman with an aggressive form of myelodysplastic syndrome with del(5q), no TP53 mutation, and a novel complex rearrangement of chromosome 3 in bone marrow cells. Our results revealed that the FOXP1 and TP63 genes were both relocated along chromosome 3. Strikingly, immunohistochemistry analysis showed altered protein levels, disclosing that this rearrangement triggered the expression of FOXP1 and TP63 genes. FOXP1 was also found activated in other patients with myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia, showing that it is an important, recurrent event. We document an apparent role of FOXP1 and TP63, up to now poorly documented, in the progression of MDS in our patient who is lacking mutations in the TP53 tumor suppressor gene normally associated with poor outcome in myelodysplastic syndrome with 5q-. Finally, our results may suggest a possible broader role of FOXP1 in the pathogenesis and progression of myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia

  20. Fungal Iron Availability during Deep Seated Candidiasis Is Defined by a Complex Interplay Involving Systemic and Local Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potrykus, Joanna; Stead, David; MacCallum, Donna M.; Urgast, Dagmar S.; Raab, Andrea; van Rooijen, Nico; Feldmann, Jörg; Brown, Alistair J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Nutritional immunity – the withholding of nutrients by the host – has long been recognised as an important factor that shapes bacterial-host interactions. However, the dynamics of nutrient availability within local host niches during fungal infection are poorly defined. We have combined laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP MS), MALDI imaging and immunohistochemistry with microtranscriptomics to examine iron homeostasis in the host and pathogen in the murine model of systemic candidiasis. Dramatic changes in the renal iron landscape occur during disease progression. The infection perturbs global iron homeostasis in the host leading to iron accumulation in the renal medulla. Paradoxically, this is accompanied by nutritional immunity in the renal cortex as iron exclusion zones emerge locally around fungal lesions. These exclusion zones correlate with immune infiltrates and haem oxygenase 1-expressing host cells. This local nutritional immunity decreases iron availability, leading to a switch in iron acquisition mechanisms within mature fungal lesions, as revealed by laser capture microdissection and qRT-PCR analyses. Therefore, a complex interplay of systemic and local events influences iron homeostasis and pathogen-host dynamics during disease progression. PMID:24146619

  1. How computational methods and relativistic effects influence the study of chemical reactions involving Ru-NO complexes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenha, Renato Pereira; Santiago, Régis Tadeu; Haiduke, Roberto Luiz Andrade; Galembeck, Sérgio Emanuel

    2017-05-05

    Two treatments of relativistic effects, namely effective core potentials (ECP) and all-electron scalar relativistic effects (DKH2), are used to obtain geometries and chemical reaction energies for a series of ruthenium complexes in B3LYP/def2-TZVP calculations. Specifically, the reaction energies of reduction (A-F), isomerization (G-I), and Cl - negative trans influence in relation to NH 3 (J-L) are considered. The ECP and DKH2 approaches provided geometric parameters close to experimental data and the same ordering for energy changes of reactions A-L. From geometries optimized with ECP, the electronic energies are also determined by means of the same ECP and basis set combined with the computational methods: MP2, M06, BP86, and its derivatives, so as B2PLYP, LC-wPBE, and CCSD(T) (reference method). For reactions A-I, B2PLYP provides the best agreement with CCSD(T) results. Additionally, B3LYP gave the smallest error for the energies of reactions J-L. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Automation of ALK gene rearrangement testing with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH): a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwaenepoel, Karen; Merkle, Dennis; Cabillic, Florian; Berg, Erica; Belaud-Rotureau, Marc-Antoine; Grazioli, Vittorio; Herelle, Olga; Hummel, Michael; Le Calve, Michele; Lenze, Dido; Mende, Stefanie; Pauwels, Patrick; Quilichini, Benoit; Repetti, Elena

    2015-02-01

    In the past several years we have observed a significant increase in our understanding of molecular mechanisms that drive lung cancer. Specifically in the non-small cell lung cancer sub-types, ALK gene rearrangements represent a sub-group of tumors that are targetable by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor Crizotinib, resulting in significant reductions in tumor burden. Phase II and III clinical trials were performed using an ALK break-apart FISH probe kit, making FISH the gold standard for identifying ALK rearrangements in patients. FISH is often considered a labor and cost intensive molecular technique, and in this study we aimed to demonstrate feasibility for automation of ALK FISH testing, to improve laboratory workflow and ease of testing. This involved automation of the pre-treatment steps of the ALK assay using various protocols on the VP 2000 instrument, and facilitating automated scanning of the fluorescent FISH specimens for simplified enumeration on various backend scanning and analysis systems. The results indicated that ALK FISH can be automated. Significantly, both the Ikoniscope and BioView system of automated FISH scanning and analysis systems provided a robust analysis algorithm to define ALK rearrangements. In addition, the BioView system facilitated consultation of difficult cases via the internet. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dithiothreitol activation of the insulin receptor/kinase does not involve subunit dissociation of the native α2β2 insulin receptor subunit complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, L.J.; Wilden, P.A.; Pessin, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The subunit composition of the dithiothreitol- (DTT) activated insulin receptor/kinase was examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration chromatography under denaturing or nondenaturing conditions. Pretreatment of 32 P-labeled insulin receptors with 50 mM DTT followed by gel filtration chromatography in 0.1% SDS demonstrated the dissociation of the α 2 β 2 insulin receptor complex (M/sub r/ 400,000) into the monomeric 95,000 β subunit. In contrast, pretreatment of the insulin receptors with 1-50 mM DTT followed by gel filtration chromatography in 0.1% Triton X-100 resulted in no apparent alteration in mobility compared to the untreated insulin receptors. Resolution of this complex by nonreducing SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography demonstrated the existence of the α 2 β 2 heterotetrameric complex with essentially no αβ heterodimeric or free monomeric β subunit species present. This suggests that the insulin receptor can reoxidize into the M/sub r/ 400,000 complex after the removal of DTT by gel filtration chromatography. To prevent reoxidation, the insulin receptors were pretreated with 50 mM DTT. Under the conditions the insulin receptors migrated as the M/sub r/ 400,000 α 2 β 2 complex. These results demonstrate that treatment of the insulin receptors with high concentrations of DTT, followed by removal of DTT by gel filtration, results in reoxidation of the reduced α 2 β 2 insulin receptor complex. Further, these results document that although the DTT stimulation of the insulin receptor/kinase does involve reduction of the insulin receptor subunits, it does not result in dissociation of the native α 2 β 2 insulin receptor subunit complex

  4. High-Risk Microgranular Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia with a Five-Way Complex Translocation Involving PML-RARA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Powers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL is classically characterized by chromosomal translocation (15;17, resulting in the PML-RARA fusion protein leading to disease. Here, we present a case of a 50-year-old man who presented with signs and symptoms of acute leukemia with concern for APL. Therapy was immediately initiated with all-trans retinoic acid. The morphology of his leukemic blasts was consistent with the hypogranular variant of APL. Subsequent FISH and cytogenetic analysis revealed a unique translocation involving five chromosomal regions: 9q34, 17q21, 15q24, 12q13, and 15q26.1. Molecular testing demonstrated PML/RARA fusion transcripts. Treatment with conventional chemotherapy was added and he went into a complete remission. Given his elevated white blood cell count at presentation, intrathecal chemotherapy for central nervous system prophylaxis was also given. The patient remains on maintenance therapy and remains in remission. This is the first such report of a 5-way chromosomal translocation leading to APL. Similar to APL with chromosomal translocations other than classical t(15;17 which result in the typical PML-RARA fusion, our patient responded promptly to an ATRA-containing regimen and remains in complete remission.

  5. Resveratrol upregulates Egr-1 expression and activity involving extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and ternary complex factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rössler, Oliver G.; Glatzel, Daniel; Thiel, Gerald, E-mail: gerald.thiel@uks.eu

    2015-03-01

    Many intracellular functions have been attributed to resveratrol, a polyphenolic phytoalexin found in grapes and in other plants. Here, we show that resveratrol induces the expression of the transcription factor Egr-1 in human embryonic kidney cells. Using a chromosomally embedded Egr-1-responsive reporter gene, we show that the Egr-1 activity was significantly elevated in resveratrol-treated cells, indicating that the newly synthesized Egr-1 protein was biologically active. Stimulus-transcription coupling leading to the resveratrol-induced upregulation of Egr-1 expression and activity requires the protein kinases Raf and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase ERK, while MAP kinase phosphatase-1 functions as a nuclear shut-off device that interrupts the signaling cascade connecting resveratrol stimulation with enhanced Egr-1 expression. On the transcriptional level, Elk-1, a key transcriptional regulator of serum response element-driven gene transcription, connects the intracellular signaling cascade elicited by resveratrol with transcription of the Egr-1 gene. These data were corroborated by the observation that stimulation of the cells with resveratrol increased the transcriptional activation potential of Elk-1. The SRE as well as the GC-rich DNA binding site of Egr-1 function as resveratrol-responsive elements. Thus, resveratrol regulates gene transcription via activation of the stimulus-regulated protein kinases Raf and ERK and the stimulus-responsive transcription factors TCF and Egr-1. - Highlights: • The plant polyphenol resveratrol upregulates Egr-1 expression and activity. • The stimulation of Egr-1 requires the protein kinases ERK and Raf. • Resveratrol treatment upregulates the transcriptional activation potential of Elk-1. • Resveratrol-induced stimulation of Egr-1 requires ternary complex factors. • Two distinct resveratrol-responsive elements were identified.

  6. Resveratrol upregulates Egr-1 expression and activity involving extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and ternary complex factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rössler, Oliver G.; Glatzel, Daniel; Thiel, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Many intracellular functions have been attributed to resveratrol, a polyphenolic phytoalexin found in grapes and in other plants. Here, we show that resveratrol induces the expression of the transcription factor Egr-1 in human embryonic kidney cells. Using a chromosomally embedded Egr-1-responsive reporter gene, we show that the Egr-1 activity was significantly elevated in resveratrol-treated cells, indicating that the newly synthesized Egr-1 protein was biologically active. Stimulus-transcription coupling leading to the resveratrol-induced upregulation of Egr-1 expression and activity requires the protein kinases Raf and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase ERK, while MAP kinase phosphatase-1 functions as a nuclear shut-off device that interrupts the signaling cascade connecting resveratrol stimulation with enhanced Egr-1 expression. On the transcriptional level, Elk-1, a key transcriptional regulator of serum response element-driven gene transcription, connects the intracellular signaling cascade elicited by resveratrol with transcription of the Egr-1 gene. These data were corroborated by the observation that stimulation of the cells with resveratrol increased the transcriptional activation potential of Elk-1. The SRE as well as the GC-rich DNA binding site of Egr-1 function as resveratrol-responsive elements. Thus, resveratrol regulates gene transcription via activation of the stimulus-regulated protein kinases Raf and ERK and the stimulus-responsive transcription factors TCF and Egr-1. - Highlights: • The plant polyphenol resveratrol upregulates Egr-1 expression and activity. • The stimulation of Egr-1 requires the protein kinases ERK and Raf. • Resveratrol treatment upregulates the transcriptional activation potential of Elk-1. • Resveratrol-induced stimulation of Egr-1 requires ternary complex factors. • Two distinct resveratrol-responsive elements were identified

  7. Prior stress promotes the generalization of contextual fear memories: Involvement of the gabaergic signaling within the basolateral amygdala complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, C L; Otamendi, A; Calfa, G D; Molina, V A

    2018-04-20

    Fear generalization occurs when a response, previously acquired with a threatening stimulus, is transferred to a similar one. However, it could be maladaptive when stimuli that do not represent a real threat are appraised as dangerous, which is a hallmark of several anxiety disorders. Stress exposure is a major risk factor for the occurrence of anxiety disorders and it is well established that it influences different phases of fear memory; nevertheless, its impact on the generalization of contextual fear memories has been less studied. In the present work, we have characterized the impact of acute restraint stress prior to contextual fear conditioning on the generalization of this fear memory, and the role of the GABAergic signaling within the basolateral amygdala complex (BLA) on the stress modulatory effects. We have found that a single stress exposure promoted the generalization of this memory trace to a different context that was well discriminated in unstressed conditioned animals. Moreover, this effect was dependent on the formation of a contextual associative memory and on the testing order (i.e., conditioning context first vs generalization context first). Furthermore, we observed that increasing GABA-A signaling by intra-BLA midazolam administration prior to the stressful session exposure prevented the generalization of fear memory, whereas intra-BLA administration of the GABA-A antagonist (Bicuculline), prior to fear conditioning, induced the generalization of fear memory in unstressed rats. We concluded that stress exposure, prior to contextual fear conditioning, promotes the generalization of fear memory and that the GABAergic transmission within the BLA has a critical role in this phenomenon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Prediction of novel families of enzymes involved in oxidative and other complex modifications of bases in nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Tahiliani, Mamta; Rao, Anjana; Aravind, L

    2009-06-01

    Modified bases in nucleic acids present a layer of information that directs biological function over and beyond the coding capacity of the conventional bases. While a large number of modified bases have been identified, many of the enzymes generating them still remain to be discovered. Recently, members of the 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase super-family, which modify diverse substrates from small molecules to biopolymers, were predicted and subsequently confirmed to catalyze oxidative modification of bases in nucleic acids. Of these, two distinct families, namely the AlkB and the kinetoplastid base J binding proteins (JBP) catalyze in situ hydroxylation of bases in nucleic acids. Using sensitive computational analysis of sequences, structures and contextual information from genomic structure and protein domain architectures, we report five distinct families of 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase that we predict to be involved in nucleic acid modifications. Among the DNA-modifying families, we show that the dioxygenase domains of the kinetoplastid base J-binding proteins belong to a larger family that includes the Tet proteins, prototyped by the human oncogene Tet1, and proteins from basidiomycete fungi, chlorophyte algae, heterolobosean amoeboflagellates and bacteriophages. We present evidence that some of these proteins are likely to be involved in oxidative modification of the 5-methyl group of cytosine leading to the formation of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. The Tet/JBP homologs from basidiomycete fungi such as Laccaria and Coprinopsis show large lineage-specific expansions and a tight linkage with genes encoding a novel and distinct family of predicted transposases, and a member of the Maelstrom-like HMG family. We propose that these fungal members are part of a mobile transposon. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a eukaryotic transposable element that encodes its own DNA-modification enzyme with a

  9. Stress-induced resistance to the fear memory labilization/reconsolidation process. Involvement of the basolateral amygdala complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo, Pablo Javier; Ortiz, Vanesa; Martijena, Irene Delia; Molina, Victor Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    Consolidated memories can enter into a labile state after reactivation followed by a restabilization process defined as reconsolidation. This process can be interfered with Midazolam (MDZ), a positive allosteric modulator of the GABA-A receptor. The present study has evaluated the influence of prior stress on MDZ's interfering effect. We also assessed the influence of both systemic and intra-basolateral amygdala (BLA) infusion of d-cycloserine (DCS), a partial agonist of the NMDA receptors, on the MDZ effect in previously stressed rats. Furthermore, we analyzed the effect of stress on the expression of Zif-268 and the GluN2B sites, two molecular markers of the labilization/reconsolidation process, following reactivation. The results revealed that prior stress resulted into a memory trace that was insensitive to the MDZ impairing effect. Both systemic and intra-BLA DCS administration previous to reactivation restored MDZ's disruptive effect on memory reconsolidation in stressed animals. Further, reactivation enhanced Zif-268 expression in the BLA in control unstressed rats, whereas no elevation was observed in stressed animals. In agreement with the behavioral findings, DCS restored the increased level of Zif-268 expression in the BLA in stressed animals. Moreover, memory reactivation in unstressed animals elevated GluN2B expression in the BLA, thus suggesting that this effect is involved in memory destabilization, whereas stressed animals did not reveal any changes. These findings are consistent with resistance to the MDZ effect in these rats, indicating that stress exposure prevents the onset of destabilization following reactivation. In summary, prior stress limited both the occurrence of the reactivation-induced destabilization and restabilization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Involving older people in a multi-centre randomised trial of a complex intervention in pre-hospital emergency care: implementation of a collaborative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koniotou, Marina; Evans, Bridie Angela; Chatters, Robin; Fothergill, Rachael; Garnsworthy, Christopher; Gaze, Sarah; Halter, Mary; Mason, Suzanne; Peconi, Julie; Porter, Alison; Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Toghill, Alun; Snooks, Helen

    2015-07-10

    Health services research is expected to involve service users as active partners in the research process, but few examples report how this has been achieved in practice in trials. We implemented a model to involve service users in a multi-centre randomised controlled trial in pre-hospital emergency care. We used the generic Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) from our Clinical Trials Unit (CTU) as the basis for creating a model to fit the context and population of the SAFER 2 trial. In our model, we planned to involve service users at all stages in the trial through decision-making forums at 3 levels: 1) strategic; 2) site (e.g. Wales; London; East Midlands); 3) local. We linked with charities and community groups to recruit people with experience of our study population. We collected notes of meetings alongside other documentary evidence such as attendance records and study documentation to track how we implemented our model. We involved service users at strategic, site and local level. We also added additional strategic level forums (Task and Finish Groups and Writing Days) where we included service users. Service user involvement varied in frequency and type across meetings, research stages and locations but stabilised and increased as the trial progressed. Involving service users in the SAFER 2 trial showed how it is feasible and achievable for patients, carers and potential patients sharing the demographic characteristics of our study population to collaborate in a multi-centre trial at the level which suited their health, location, skills and expertise. A standard model of involvement can be tailored by adopting a flexible approach to take account of the context and complexities of a multi-site trial. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN60481756. Registered: 13 March 2009.

  11. Role of a transductional-transcriptional processor complex involving MyD88 and IRF-7 in Toll-like receptor signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Kenya; Yanai, Hideyuki; Mizutani, Tatsuaki; Negishi, Hideo; Shimada, Naoya; Suzuki, Nobutaka; Ohba, Yusuke; Takaoka, Akinori; Yeh, Wen-Chen; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu

    2004-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation is central to immunity, wherein the activation of the TLR9 subfamily members TLR9 and TLR7 results in the robust induction of type I IFNs (IFN-α/β) by means of the MyD88 adaptor protein. However, it remains unknown how the TLR signal “input” can be processed through MyD88 to “output” the induction of the IFN genes. Here, we demonstrate that the transcription factor IRF-7 interacts with MyD88 to form a complex in the cytoplasm. We provide evidence that this complex also involves IRAK4 and TRAF6 and provides the foundation for the TLR9-dependent activation of the IFN genes. The complex defined in this study represents an example of how the coupling of the signaling adaptor and effector kinase molecules together with the transcription factor regulate the processing of an extracellular signal to evoke its versatile downstream transcriptional events in a cell. Thus, we propose that this molecular complex may function as a cytoplasmic transductional-transcriptional processor. PMID:15492225

  12. Quantum concept of the rearrangement of a crystal lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gureev, M.D.; Mednikov, S.I.

    1995-01-01

    Using quantum considerations based on the concept of lattice rearrangement waves, we carried out an analysis of processes of rearrangement of a crystal lattice occurring on a moving front (interface) of crystal rearrangement. For the introduction and quantization of these waves we use the method of acoustomechanical analogy and the Sommerfeld quantum conditions. We calculate the energies and the propagation velocities of the lattice rearrangement waves. Along with quanta having a certain momentum, quanta that have a certain angular momentum are introduced into consideration. On the basis of the concepts developed, we suggest a new expression for calculating the probability of thermofluctuational processes in a crystal. We perform a numerical analysis of the rate of growth of the γ-phase in iron in the process of α-γ-conversion. Satisfactory agreement with experiment is obtained. We discuss the limitations and prospects of further development of the concept suggested. For direct experimental verification of the concept we propose to investigate the diffraction of electrons and other particles on the lattice rearrangement waves, i.e., in the process of phase conversions or disintegration of crystals

  13. Nitrile anion cyclization with epoxysilanes followed by Brook rearrangement/ring-opening of cyclopropane nitriles/alkylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okugawa, Seigo; Masu, Hyuma; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Takeda, Kei

    2005-12-09

    [reactions: see text] The reaction of delta-silyl-gamma,delta-epoxypentanenitrile derivatives 9-12 with a base and an alkylating agent affords (Z)-delta-siloxy-gamma,delta-unsaturated pentanenitrile derivatives via a tandem process that involves the formation of a cyclopropane derivative by epoxy nitrile cyclization followed by Brook rearrangement and an anion-induced cleavage of the cyclopropane ring. Exclusive formation of a (Z)-derivative from trans-epoxides is explained by the reaction pathway that involves a backside displacement of the epoxide by the alpha-nitrile carbanion and the O-Si bond formation followed by concerted processes involving Brook rearrangement and the anti-mode of eliminative ring fission of the cyclopropane from the rotamer 19. The fact that (E)-isomers are exclusively obtained from cis-epoxides and alpha-cyclopropyl-alpha-silylcarbinol derivative 26 provides experimental support for the proposed pathway.

  14. NONO ubiquitination is mediated by FBW7 and GSK3 β via a degron lost upon chromosomal rearrangement in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Luigi; Caporaso, Antonella; Altieri, Angela; Costa, Caterina; Forte, Iris M; Iannuzzi, Carmelina A; Barone, Daniela; Esposito, Luca; Giordano, Antonio; Pentimalli, Francesca

    2018-05-01

    NONO is an RNA-binding protein involved in transcription, mRNA splicing, DNA repair, and checkpoint activation in response to UV radiation. NONO expression has been found altered in several tumor types, including prostate, colon, breast, melanoma, and in papillary renal carcinoma, in which an X chromosome inversion generates a NONO-TFE3 fusion protein. Upon such rearrangement, NONO loses its C-terminal domain. Through bioinformatics analysis, we identified a putative degron motif, known to be recognized by the Skp1-Cul1-F-box-protein (SCF) complex. Here, we evaluated how this domain could affect NONO protein biology. We showed that NONO interacts with the nuclear FBW7α isoform and its ubiquitination is regulated following modulation of the GSK3β kinase. Mutation of T428A/T432A within the degron impaired polyubiquitination upon FBW7α and GSK3β overexpression. Overall, our data suggest that NONO is likely subjected to proteasome-mediated degradation and add NONO to the list of proteins targeted by FBW7, which is itself often deregulated in cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Telomerase activation by genomic rearrangements in high-risk neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peifer, Martin; Hertwig, Falk; Roels, Frederik; Dreidax, Daniel; Gartlgruber, Moritz; Menon, Roopika; Krämer, Andrea; Roncaioli, Justin L.; Sand, Frederik; Heuckmann, Johannes M.; Ikram, Fakhera; Schmidt, Rene; Ackermann, Sandra; Engesser, Anne; Kahlert, Yvonne; Vogel, Wenzel; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Thierry-Mieg, Danielle; Mariappan, Aruljothi; Heynck, Stefanie; Mariotti, Erika; Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Glöckner, Christian; Bosco, Graziella; Leuschner, Ivo; Schweiger, Michal R.; Savelyeva, Larissa; Watkins, Simon C.; Shao, Chunxuan; Bell, Emma; Höfer, Thomas; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Theissen, Jessica; Volland, Ruth; Saadati, Maral; Eggert, Angelika; de Wilde, Bram; Berthold, Frank; Peng, Zhiyu; Zhao, Chen; Shi, Leming; Ortmann, Monika; Büttner, Reinhard; Perner, Sven; Hero, Barbara; Schramm, Alexander; Schulte, Johannes H.; Herrmann, Carl; O’Sullivan, Roderick J.; Westermann, Frank; Thomas, Roman K.; Fischer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a malignant paediatric tumour of the sympathetic nervous system1. Roughly half of these tumours regress spontaneously or are cured by limited therapy. By contrast, high-risk neuroblastomas have an unfavourable clinical course despite intensive multimodal treatment, and their molecular basis has remained largely elusive2–4. Here we have performed whole-genome sequencing of 56 neuroblastomas (high-risk, n = 39; low-risk, n = 17) and discovered recurrent genomic rearrangements affecting a chromosomal region at 5p15.33 proximal of the telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (TERT). These rearrangements occurred only in high-risk neuroblastomas (12/39, 31%) in a mutually exclusive fashion with MYCN amplifications and ATRX mutations, which are known genetic events in this tumour type1,2,5. In an extended case series (n = 217), TERT rearrangements defined a subgroup of high-risk tumours with particularly poor outcome. Despite a large structural diversity of these rearrangements, they all induced massive transcriptional upregulation of TERT. In the remaining high-risk tumours, TERT expression was also elevated in MYCN-amplified tumours, whereas alternative lengthening of telomeres was present in neuroblastomas without TERT or MYCN alterations, suggesting that telomere lengthening represents a central mechanism defining this subtype. The 5p15.33 rearrangements juxtapose the TERT coding sequence to strong enhancer elements, resulting in massive chromatin remodelling and DNA methylation of the affected region. Supporting a functional role of TERT, neuroblastoma cell lines bearing rearrangements or amplified MYCN exhibited both upregulated TERT expression and enzymatic telomerase activity. In summary, our findings show that remodelling of the genomic context abrogates transcriptional silencing of TERT in high-risk neuroblastoma and places telomerase activation in the centre of transformation in a large fraction of these tumours. PMID:26466568

  16. Recurrent DNA inversion rearrangements in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores, Margarita; Morales, Lucía; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that reiterated sequences in the human genome are targets for nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR), which facilitates genomic rearrangements. We have used a PCR-based approach to identify breakpoint regions of rearranged structures in the human genome...... to human genomic variation is discussed........ In particular, we have identified intrachromosomal identical repeats that are located in reverse orientation, which may lead to chromosomal inversions. A bioinformatic workflow pathway to select appropriate regions for analysis was developed. Three such regions overlapping with known human genes, located...

  17. Epigenetic involvement of Alien/ESET complex in thyroid hormone-mediated repression of E2F1 gene expression and cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Wei; Li, Jinru; Wang, Bo; Chen, Linfeng; Niu, Wenyan; Yao, Zhi; Baniahmad, Aria

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corepressor Alien interacts with histone methyltransferase ESET in vivo. ► Alien/ESET complex is recruited to nTRE of T3-responsive gene by liganded TRβ1. ► ESET-mediated H3K9 methylation is required for liganded TRβ1-repressed transcription. ► ESET is involved in T3-repressed G1/S phase transition and proliferation. -- Abstract: The ligand-bound thyroid hormone receptor (TR) is known to repress via a negative TRE (nTRE) the expression of E2F1, a key transcription factor that controls the G1/S phase transition. Alien has been identified as a novel interacting factor of E2F1 and acts as a corepressor of E2F1. The detailed molecular mechanism by which Alien inhibits E2F1 gene expression remains unclear. Here, we report that the histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methyltransferase (HMT) ESET is an integral component of the corepressor Alien complex and the Alien/ESET complex is recruited to both sites, the E2F1 and the nTRE site of the E2F1 gene while the recruitment to the negative thyroid hormone response element (nTRE) is induced by the ligand-bound TRβ1 within the E2F1 gene promoter. We show that, overexpression of ESET promotes, whereas knockdown of ESET releases, the inhibition of TRβ1-regulated gene transcription upon T3 stimulation; and H3K9 methylation is required for TRβ1-repressed transcription. Furthermore, depletion of ESET impairs thyroid hormone-repressed proliferation as well as the G1/S transition of the cell cycle. Taken together, our data indicate that ESET is involved in TRβ1-mediated transcription repression and provide a molecular basis of thyroid hormone-induced repression of proliferation.

  18. Octamer-binding protein 4 affects the cell biology and phenotypic transition of lung cancer cells involving β-catenin/E-cadherin complex degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhong-Shu; Ling, Dong-Jin; Zhang, Yang-De; Feng, Jian-Xiong; Zhang, Xue-Yu; Shi, Tian-Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Clinical studies have reported evidence for the involvement of octamer‑binding protein 4 (Oct4) in the tumorigenicity and progression of lung cancer; however, the role of Oct4 in lung cancer cell biology in vitro and its mechanism of action remain to be elucidated. Mortality among lung cancer patients is more frequently due to metastasis rather than their primary tumors. Epithelial‑mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a prominent biological event for the induction of epithelial cancer metastasis. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether Oct4 had the capacity to induce lung cancer cell metastasis via the promoting the EMT in vitro. Moreover, the effect of Oct4 on the β‑catenin/E‑cadherin complex, associated with EMT, was examined using immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation assays as well as western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that Oct4 enhanced cell invasion and adhesion accompanied by the downregulation of epithelial marker cytokeratin, and upregulation of the mesenchymal markers vimentin and N‑cadherin. Furthermore, Oct4 induced EMT of lung cancer cells by promoting β‑catenin/E‑cadherin complex degradation and regulating nuclear localization of β‑catenin. In conclusion, the present study indicated that Oct4 affected the cell biology of lung cancer cells in vitro through promoting lung cancer cell metastasis via EMT; in addition, the results suggested that the association and degradation of the β‑catenin/E‑cadherin complex was regulated by Oct4 during the process of EMT.

  19. Thermography imaging during static and controlled thermoregulation in complex regional pain syndrome type 1: diagnostic value and involvement of the central sympathetic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westra Mirjam

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 (CRPS1 is a clinical diagnosis based on criteria describing symptoms of the disease. The main aim of the present study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of calculation methods used to assess thermographic images (infrared imaging obtained during temperature provocation. The secondary objective was to obtain information about the involvement of the sympathetic system in CRPS1. Methods We studied 12 patients in whom CRPS1 was diagnosed according to the criteria of Bruehl. High and low whole body cooling and warming induced and reduced sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity. The degree of vasoconstrictor activity in both hands was monitored using a videothermograph. The sensitivity and specificity of the calculation methods used to assess the thermographic images were calculated. Results The temperature difference between the hands in the CRPS patients increases significantly when the sympathetic system is provoked. At both the maximum and minimum vasoconstriction no significant differences were found in fingertip temperatures between both hands. Conclusion The majority of CRPS1 patients do not show maximal obtainable temperature differences between the involved and contralateral extremity at room temperature (static measurement. During cold and warm temperature challenges this temperature difference increases significantly. As a result a higher sensitivity and specificity could be achieved in the diagnosis of CRPS1. These findings suggest that the sympathetic efferent system is involved in CRPS1.

  20. Type IX secretion: the generation of bacterial cell surface coatings involved in virulence, gliding motility and the degradation of complex biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veith, Paul D; Glew, Michelle D; Gorasia, Dhana G; Reynolds, Eric C

    2017-10-01

    The Type IX secretion system (T9SS) is present in over 1000 sequenced species/strains of the Fibrobacteres-Chlorobi-Bacteroidetes superphylum. Proteins secreted by the T9SS have an N-terminal signal peptide for translocation across the inner membrane via the SEC translocon and a C-terminal signal for secretion across the outer membrane via the T9SS. Nineteen protein components of the T9SS have been identified including three, SigP, PorX and PorY that are involved in regulation. The inner membrane proteins PorL and PorM and the outer membrane proteins PorK and PorN interact and a complex comprising PorK and PorN forms a large ring structure of 50 nm in diameter. PorU, PorV, PorQ and PorZ form an attachment complex on the cell surface of the oral pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis. P. gingivalis T9SS substrates bind to PorV suggesting that after translocation PorV functions as a shuttle protein to deliver T9SS substrates to the attachment complex. The PorU component of the attachment complex is a novel Gram negative sortase which catalyses the cleavage of the C-terminal signal and conjugation of the protein substrates to lipopolysaccharide, anchoring them to the cell surface. This review presents an overview of the T9SS focusing on the function of T9SS substrates and machinery components. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Screening for subtle chromosomal rearrangements in an Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A descriptive study was carried out to screen for subtle chromosomal rearrangements in a group of Egyptian children with idiopathic mental retardation (IMR) to estimate its frequency if detected. The study enrolled 30 patients with IMR, with the perquisite criteria of being <18 years at referral, their IQ <70, and manifesting at ...

  2. Screening for genomic rearrangements at BRCA1 locus in Iranian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 92; Issue 1. Screening for genomic rearrangements at BRCA1 locus in Iranian women with breast cancer using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Vahid R. Yassaee Babak Emamalizadeh Mir Davood Omrani. Research Note Volume 92 Issue 1 ...

  3. Selenium-mediated synthesis of biaryls through rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Sohail A; Vivant, Clotilde; Wirth, Thomas

    2010-03-19

    A new cyclization of beta-keto ester substituted stilbene derivatives using selenium electrophiles in the presence of Lewis acids is described. Substituted naphthols are obtained through cyclization and subsequent 1,2-rearrangement of aryl groups under very mild reaction conditions.

  4. Conjugated polyaniline as a result of the benzidine rearrangement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sapurina, Irina; Tenkovtsev, A. V.; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 4 (2015), s. 453-465 ISSN 0959-8103 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH14199; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00270S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : aniline * aniline oligomers * benzidine rearrangement Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.414, year: 2015

  5. Frequent Chromatin Rearrangements in Myelodysplastic Syndromes - What Stands Behind?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pagáčová, Eva; Falk, Martin; Falková, Iva; Lukášová, Emilie; Michalová, K.; Oltová, A.; Raška, I.; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 2014 (2014), s. 1-7 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G157; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0030 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : myelodysplastic syndromes * chromosomal rearrangements * chromosome 5 deletions Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2014

  6. Genome rearrangements and phylogeny reconstruction in Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkareva, Olga O; Dranenko, Natalia O; Ocheredko, Elena S; Kanevsky, German M; Lozinsky, Yaroslav N; Khalaycheva, Vera A; Artamonova, Irena I; Gelfand, Mikhail S

    2018-01-01

    Genome rearrangements have played an important role in the evolution of Yersinia pestis from its progenitor Yersinia pseudotuberculosis . Traditional phylogenetic trees for Y. pestis based on sequence comparison have short internal branches and low bootstrap supports as only a small number of nucleotide substitutions have occurred. On the other hand, even a small number of genome rearrangements may resolve topological ambiguities in a phylogenetic tree. We reconstructed phylogenetic trees based on genome rearrangements using several popular approaches such as Maximum likelihood for Gene Order and the Bayesian model of genome rearrangements by inversions. We also reconciled phylogenetic trees for each of the three CRISPR loci to obtain an integrated scenario of the CRISPR cassette evolution. Analysis of contradictions between the obtained evolutionary trees yielded numerous parallel inversions and gain/loss events. Our data indicate that an integrated analysis of sequence-based and inversion-based trees enhances the resolution of phylogenetic reconstruction. In contrast, reconstructions of strain relationships based on solely CRISPR loci may not be reliable, as the history is obscured by large deletions, obliterating the order of spacer gains. Similarly, numerous parallel gene losses preclude reconstruction of phylogeny based on gene content.

  7. Ring Expansion and Rearrangements of Rhodium(II) Azavinyl Carbenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selander, Nicklas; Worrell, Brady T.

    2013-01-01

    An efficient, regioselective and convergent method for the ring expansion and rearrangement of 1-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles under rhodium(II)-catalyzed conditions is described. These denitrogenative reactions form substituted enaminone and olefin-based products, which in the former case can be further functionalized to unique products rendering the sulfonyl triazole traceless. PMID:23161725

  8. Investigation of scattering processes in quantum few-body systems involving long-range interaction by the complex-rotation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, M. V.; Elander, N.; Yakovlev, S. L.; Yarevsky, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    The complex-rotation method adapted to solving the multichannel scattering problem in the two-body system where the interaction potential contains the long-range Coulomb components is described. The scattering problem is reformulated as the problem of solving a nonhomogeneous Schrödinger equation in which the nonhomogeneous term involves a Coulomb potential cut off at large distances. The incident wave appearing in the nonhomogeneous term is a solution of the Schrödinger equation with longrange Coulomb interaction. This formulation is free from approximations associated with a direct cutoff of Coulomb interaction at large distances. The efficiency of this formalism is demonstrated by considering the example of solving scattering problems in the α-α and p-p systems.

  9. Identification of CD34+ and CD34− leukemia-initiating cells in MLL-rearranged human acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Yuki; Watanabe, Takashi; Saito, Yoriko; Kuroki, Yoko; Hijikata, Atsushi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Eguchi, Mariko; Eguchi-Ishimae, Minenori; Kaneko, Akiko; Ono, Rintaro; Sato, Kaori; Suzuki, Nahoko; Fujiki, Saera; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Ishii, Eiichi; Shultz, Leonard D.; Ohara, Osamu; Mizutani, Shuki

    2015-01-01

    Translocation of the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene with AF4, AF9, or ENL results in acute leukemia with both lymphoid and myeloid involvement. We characterized leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) in primary infant MLL-rearranged leukemia using a xenotransplantation model. In MLL-AF4 patients, CD34+CD38+CD19+ and CD34−CD19+ cells initiated leukemia, and in MLL-AF9 patients, CD34−CD19+ cells were LICs. In MLL-ENL patients, either CD34+ or CD34− cells were LICs, depending on the pattern of CD34 expression. In contrast, in patients with these MLL translocations, CD34+CD38−CD19−CD33− cells were enriched for normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with in vivo long-term multilineage hematopoietic repopulation capacity. Although LICs developed leukemic cells with clonal immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IGH) rearrangement in vivo, CD34+CD38−CD19−CD33− cells repopulated recipient bone marrow and spleen with B cells, showing broad polyclonal IGH rearrangement and recipient thymus with CD4+ single positive (SP), CD8+ SP, and CD4+CD8+ double-positive (DP) T cells. Global gene expression profiling revealed that CD9, CD32, and CD24 were over-represented in MLL-AF4, MLL-AF9, and MLL-ENL LICs compared with normal HSCs. In patient samples, these molecules were expressed in CD34+CD38+ and CD34− LICs but not in CD34+CD38−CD19−CD33− HSCs. Identification of LICs and LIC-specific molecules in primary human MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemia may lead to improved therapeutic strategies for MLL-rearranged leukemia. PMID:25538041

  10. [Lung adenocarcinoma with concomitant EGFR mutation and ALK rearrangement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliez, J; Monnet, I; Pujals, A; Rousseau-Bussac, G; Jabot, L; Boudjemaa, A; Leroy, K; Chouaid, C

    2017-05-01

    Among patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, coexistence of EGFR mutation and ALK rearrangement is rare. We describe the clinical features of two patients with this double anomaly. A 62-year-old Caucasian non-smoking woman was diagnosed with cT4N0M0 lung adenocarcinoma. Initial biopsy showed EGFR mutation and ALK rearrangement. She received cisplatin-gemcitabine, followed by 17 months of gemcitabine. Owing to progression, she received erlotinib for 14 months, then paclitaxel for 6 months and finally crizotinib. A partial response was achieved and maintained for 24 months. A 45-year-old Caucasian woman, light smoker, was diagnosed with cT2N3M0 lung adenocarcinoma. Only EGFR mutation was found on initial analysis. She underwent treatment with cisplatin-gemcitabine and thoracic radiotherapy. Progression occurred after 8 months and afatinbib was started. Eight months later, progression was observed with a neoplasic pleural effusion in which tumor cells expressing ALK rearrangement were found. A new FISH analysis was performed on the initial tumor but did not find this rearrangement. Despite a third line of crizotinib, the patient died one month later. The literature shows 45 other cases of these two abnormalities, observed either from the start or during follow-up. EGFR's TKI were almost always given before ALK's TKI. Therapeutic strategy needs to be clarified in cases of double alteration. With regard to the second patient, appearance of ALK rearrangement may constitute a resistance mechanism to EGFR's TKI. Copyright © 2016 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Ligand flexibility and framework rearrangement in a new family of porous metal-organic frameworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawxwell, Samuel M; Espallargas, Guillermo Mínguez; Bradshaw, Darren

    2007-01-01

    Ligand flexibility permits framework rearrangement upon evacuation and gas uptake in a new family of porous MOFs.......Ligand flexibility permits framework rearrangement upon evacuation and gas uptake in a new family of porous MOFs....

  12. Claisen, Cope and Related Rearrangements in the Synthesis of Flavour and Fragrance Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Nowicki

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available A review of the use of the Claisen, Cope and related [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangements, sequential ("tandem" sigmatropic rearrangements and the "ene" reaction in the syntheses of flavour and fragrance compounds is presented.

  13. Fine-tiling array CGH to improve diagnostics for alpha- and beta-thalassemia rearrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phylipsen, M.; Chaibunruang, A.; Vogelaar, I.P.; Balak, J.R.; Schaap, R.A.; Ariyurek, Y.; Fucharoen, S.; den Dunnen, J.T.; Giordano, P.C.; Bakker, E.; Harteveld, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    Implementation of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for thalassemia causing deletions has lead to the detection of new rearrangements. Knowledge of the exact breakpoint sequences should give more insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying these rearrangements, and would

  14. The use of genome-wide eQTL associations in lymphoblastoid cell lines to identify novel genetic pathways involved in complex traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josine L Min

    Full Text Available The integrated analysis of genotypic and expression data for association with complex traits could identify novel genetic pathways involved in complex traits. We profiled 19,573 expression probes in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs from 299 twins and correlated these with 44 quantitative traits (QTs. For 939 expressed probes correlating with more than one QT, we investigated the presence of eQTL associations in three datasets of 57 CEU HapMap founders and 86 unrelated twins. Genome-wide association analysis of these probes with 2.2 m SNPs revealed 131 potential eQTLs (1,989 eQTL SNPs overlapping between the HapMap datasets, five of which were in cis (58 eQTL SNPs. We then tested 535 SNPs tagging the eQTL SNPs, for association with the relevant QT in 2,905 twins. We identified nine potential SNP-QT associations (P<0.01 but none significantly replicated in five large consortia of 1,097-16,129 subjects. We also failed to replicate previous reported eQTL associations with body mass index, plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides levels derived from lymphocytes, adipose and liver tissue. Our results and additional power calculations suggest that proponents may have been overoptimistic in the power of LCLs in eQTL approaches to elucidate regulatory genetic effects on complex traits using the small datasets generated to date. Nevertheless, larger tissue-specific expression data sets relevant to specific traits are becoming available, and should enable the adoption of similar integrated analyses in the near future.

  15. A novel two-step mechanism for removal of a mitochondrial signal sequence involves the mAAA complex and the putative rhomboid protease Pcp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Karlheinz; Tursun, Baris; Ingenhoven, Martin; Michaelis, Georg; Pratje, Elke

    2002-11-08

    The yeast protein cytochrome c peroxidase (Ccp1) is nuclearly encoded and imported into the mitochondrial intermembrane space, where it is involved in degradation of reactive oxygen species. It is known, that Ccp1 is synthesised as a precursor with a N-terminal pre-sequence, that is proteolytically removed during transport of the protein. Here we present evidence for a new processing pathway, involving novel signal peptidase activities. The mAAA protease subunits Yta10 (Afg3) and Yta12 (Rca1) were identified both to be essential for the first processing step. In addition, the Pcp1 (Ygr101w) gene product was found to be required for the second processing step, yielding the mature Ccp1 protein. The newly identified Pcp1 protein belongs to the rhomboid-GlpG superfamily of putative intramembrane peptidases. Inactivation of the protease motifs in mAAA and Pcp1 blocks the respective steps of proteolysis. A model of coupled Ccp1 transport and N-terminal processing by the mAAA complex and Pcp1 is discussed. Similar processing mechanisms may exist, because the mAAA subunits and the newly identified Pcp1 protein belong to ubiquitous protein families.

  16. The cellular endosomal sorting complex required for transport pathway is not involved in avian metapneumovirus budding in a virus-like-particle expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yuejin; Lu, Wuxun; Harmon, Aaron; Xiang, Xiaoxiao; Deng, Qiji; Song, Minxun; Wang, Dan; Yu, Qingzhong; Li, Feng

    2011-05-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (AMPV) is a paramyxovirus that principally causes respiratory disease and egg production drops in turkeys and chickens. Together with its closely related human metapneumovirus (HMPV), they comprise the genus Metapneumovirus in the family Paramyxoviridae. Little is currently known about the mechanisms involved in the budding of metapneumovirus. By using AMPV as a model system, we showed that the matrix (M) protein by itself was insufficient to form virus-like-particles (VLPs). The incorporation of M into VLPs was shown to occur only when both the viral nucleoprotein (N) and the fusion (F) proteins were co-expressed. Furthermore, we provided evidence indicating that two YSKL and YAGL segments encoded within the M protein were not a functional late domain, and the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery was not involved in metapneumovirus budding, consistent with a recent observation that human respiratory syncytial virus, closely related to HMPV, uses an ESCRT-independent budding mechanism. Taken together, these results suggest that metapneumovirus budding is independent of the ESCRT pathway and the minimal budding machinery described here will aid our future understanding of metapneumovirus assembly and egress.

  17. A saturated SSR/DArT linkage map of Musa acuminata addressing genome rearrangements among bananas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsumoto Takashi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Musa is a large species complex which includes cultivars at diploid and triploid levels. These sterile and vegetatively propagated cultivars are based on the A genome from Musa acuminata, exclusively for sweet bananas such as Cavendish, or associated with the B genome (Musa balbisiana in cooking bananas such as Plantain varieties. In M. acuminata cultivars, structural heterozygosity is thought to be one of the main causes of sterility, which is essential for obtaining seedless fruits but hampers breeding. Only partial genetic maps are presently available due to chromosomal rearrangements within the parents of the mapping populations. This causes large segregation distortions inducing pseudo-linkages and difficulties in ordering markers in the linkage groups. The present study aims at producing a saturated linkage map of M. acuminata, taking into account hypotheses on the structural heterozygosity of the parents. Results An F1 progeny of 180 individuals was obtained from a cross between two genetically distant accessions of M. acuminata, 'Borneo' and 'Pisang Lilin' (P. Lilin. Based on the gametic recombination of each parent, two parental maps composed of SSR and DArT markers were established. A significant proportion of the markers (21.7% deviated (p Conclusions We propose a synthetic map with 11 linkage groups containing 489 markers (167 SSRs and 322 DArTs covering 1197 cM. This first saturated map is proposed as a "reference Musa map" for further analyses. We also propose two complete parental maps with interpretations of structural rearrangements localized on the linkage groups. The structural heterozygosity in P. Lilin is hypothesized to result from a duplication likely accompanied by an inversion on another chromosome. This paper also illustrates a methodological approach, transferable to other species, to investigate the mapping of structural rearrangements and determine their consequences on marker

  18. A saturated SSR/DArT linkage map of Musa acuminata addressing genome rearrangements among bananas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippolyte, Isabelle; Bakry, Frederic; Seguin, Marc; Gardes, Laetitia; Rivallan, Ronan; Risterucci, Ange-Marie; Jenny, Christophe; Perrier, Xavier; Carreel, Françoise; Argout, Xavier; Piffanelli, Pietro; Khan, Imtiaz A; Miller, Robert N G; Pappas, Georgios J; Mbéguié-A-Mbéguié, Didier; Matsumoto, Takashi; De Bernardinis, Veronique; Huttner, Eric; Kilian, Andrzej; Baurens, Franc-Christophe; D'Hont, Angélique; Cote, François; Courtois, Brigitte; Glaszmann, Jean-Christophe

    2010-04-13

    The genus Musa is a large species complex which includes cultivars at diploid and triploid levels. These sterile and vegetatively propagated cultivars are based on the A genome from Musa acuminata, exclusively for sweet bananas such as Cavendish, or associated with the B genome (Musa balbisiana) in cooking bananas such as Plantain varieties. In M. acuminata cultivars, structural heterozygosity is thought to be one of the main causes of sterility, which is essential for obtaining seedless fruits but hampers breeding. Only partial genetic maps are presently available due to chromosomal rearrangements within the parents of the mapping populations. This causes large segregation distortions inducing pseudo-linkages and difficulties in ordering markers in the linkage groups. The present study aims at producing a saturated linkage map of M. acuminata, taking into account hypotheses on the structural heterozygosity of the parents. An F1 progeny of 180 individuals was obtained from a cross between two genetically distant accessions of M. acuminata, 'Borneo' and 'Pisang Lilin' (P. Lilin). Based on the gametic recombination of each parent, two parental maps composed of SSR and DArT markers were established. A significant proportion of the markers (21.7%) deviated (p DArTs) covering 1197 cM. This first saturated map is proposed as a "reference Musa map" for further analyses. We also propose two complete parental maps with interpretations of structural rearrangements localized on the linkage groups. The structural heterozygosity in P. Lilin is hypothesized to result from a duplication likely accompanied by an inversion on another chromosome. This paper also illustrates a methodological approach, transferable to other species, to investigate the mapping of structural rearrangements and determine their consequences on marker segregation.

  19. Deletional rearrangement in the human T-cell receptor α-chain locus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Villartay, J.P.; Lewis, D.; Hockett, R.; Waldmann, T.A.; Korsmeyer, S.J.; Cohen, D.I.

    1987-01-01

    The antigen-specific receptor on the surface of mature T lymphocytes is a heterodimer consisting of polypeptides termed α and β. In the course of characterizing human T-cell tumors with an immature (CD4 - , CD8 - ) surface phenotype, the authors detected a 2-kilobase α-related transcript. Analysis of cDNA clones corresponding to this transcript established that a genetic element (which they call TEA, for T early α) located between the α-chain variable- and joining-region genes had been spliced to the α constant region. The TEA transcript is present early in thymocyte ontogeny, and its expression declines during T-cell maturation. More important, the TEA area functions as an active site for rearrangement within the α gene locus. Blot hybridization of restriction enzyme-digested DNA with a TEA probe revealed a narrowly limited pattern of rearrangement in polyclonal thymic DNA, surprisingly different from the pattern expected for the mature α gene with its complex diversity. These DNA blots also showed that TEA is generally present in the germ-line configuration in cells expressing the γδ heterodimeric receptor and is deleted from mature (αβ-expressing) T-lymphocyte tumors and lines. Moreover, the TEA transcript lacked a long open reading frame for protein but instead possessed multiple copies of a repetitive element resembling those utilized in the heavy-chain class switch of the immunoglobulin genes. The temporal nature of the rearrangements and expression detected by TEA suggests that this recombination could mediate a transition between immature (γδ-expressing) T cells and mature (αβ-expressing) T cells

  20. Epigenetic involvement of Alien/ESET complex in thyroid hormone-mediated repression of E2F1 gene expression and cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Wei, E-mail: hongwei@tijmu.edu.cn [Department of Immunology, Tianjin Medical University, 300070 Tianjin (China); College of Basic Medicine, Tianjin Medical University, 300070 Tianjin (China); Li, Jinru; Wang, Bo [College of Basic Medicine, Tianjin Medical University, 300070 Tianjin (China); Chen, Linfeng [Department of Medical Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, 02115 MA (United States); Niu, Wenyan; Yao, Zhi [Department of Immunology, Tianjin Medical University, 300070 Tianjin (China); Baniahmad, Aria, E-mail: aban@mti.uni-jena.de [Institute for Human Genetics, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany)

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corepressor Alien interacts with histone methyltransferase ESET in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alien/ESET complex is recruited to nTRE of T3-responsive gene by liganded TR{beta}1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ESET-mediated H3K9 methylation is required for liganded TR{beta}1-repressed transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ESET is involved in T3-repressed G1/S phase transition and proliferation. -- Abstract: The ligand-bound thyroid hormone receptor (TR) is known to repress via a negative TRE (nTRE) the expression of E2F1, a key transcription factor that controls the G1/S phase transition. Alien has been identified as a novel interacting factor of E2F1 and acts as a corepressor of E2F1. The detailed molecular mechanism by which Alien inhibits E2F1 gene expression remains unclear. Here, we report that the histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methyltransferase (HMT) ESET is an integral component of the corepressor Alien complex and the Alien/ESET complex is recruited to both sites, the E2F1 and the nTRE site of the E2F1 gene while the recruitment to the negative thyroid hormone response element (nTRE) is induced by the ligand-bound TR{beta}1 within the E2F1 gene promoter. We show that, overexpression of ESET promotes, whereas knockdown of ESET releases, the inhibition of TR{beta}1-regulated gene transcription upon T3 stimulation; and H3K9 methylation is required for TR{beta}1-repressed transcription. Furthermore, depletion of ESET impairs thyroid hormone-repressed proliferation as well as the G1/S transition of the cell cycle. Taken together, our data indicate that ESET is involved in TR{beta}1-mediated transcription repression and provide a molecular basis of thyroid hormone-induced repression of proliferation.

  1. Non-random distribution of instability-associated chromosomal rearrangement breakpoints in human lymphoblastoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Stephen R.; Papworth, David; Grosovsky, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    Genomic instability is observed in tumors and in a large fraction of the progeny surviving irradiation. One of the best-characterized phenotypic manifestations of genomic instability is delayed chromosome aberrations. Our working hypothesis for the current study was that if genomic instability is in part attributable to cis mechanisms, we should observe a non-random distribution of chromosomes or sites involved in instability-associated rearrangements, regardless of radiation quality, dose, or trans factor expression. We report here the karyotypic examination of 296 instability-associated chromosomal rearrangement breaksites (IACRB) from 118 unstable TK6 human B lymphoblast, and isogenic derivative, clones. When we tested whether IACRB were distributed across the chromosomes based on target size, a significant non-random distribution was evident (p < 0.00001), and three IACRB hotspots (chromosomes 11, 12, and 22) and one IACRB coldspot (chromosome 2) were identified. Statistical analysis at the chromosomal band-level identified four IACRB hotspots accounting for 20% of all instability-associated breaks, two of which account for over 14% of all IACRB. Further, analysis of independent clones provided evidence within 14 individual clones of IACRB clustering at the chromosomal band level, suggesting a predisposition for further breaks after an initial break at some chromosomal bands. All of these events, independently, or when taken together, were highly unlikely to have occurred by chance (p < 0.000001). These IACRB band-level cluster hotspots were observed independent of radiation quality, dose, or cellular p53 status. The non-random distribution of instability-associated chromosomal rearrangements described here significantly differs from the distribution that was observed in a first-division post-irradiation metaphase analysis (p = 0.0004). Taken together, these results suggest that genomic instability may be in part driven by chromosomal cis mechanisms

  2. Molecular Subtyping of Primary Prostate Cancer Reveals Specific and Shared Target Genes of Different ETS Rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Paulo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to evaluate whether ETS transcription factors frequently involved in rearrangements in prostate carcinomas (PCa, namely ERG and ETV1, regulate specific or shared target genes. We performed differential expression analysis on nine normal prostate tissues and 50 PCa enriched for different ETS rearrangements using exon-level expression microarrays, followed by in vitro validation using cell line models. We found specific deregulation of 57 genes in ERG-positive PCa and 15 genes in ETV1-positive PCa, whereas deregulation of 27 genes was shared in both tumor subtypes. We further showed that the expression of seven tumor-associated ERG target genes (PLA1A, CACNA1D, ATP8A2, HLA-DMB, PDE3B, TDRD1, and TMBIM1 and two tumor-associated ETV1 target genes (FKBP10 and GLYATL2 was significantly affected by specific ETS silencing in VCaP and LNCaP cell line models, respectively, whereas the expression of three candidate ERG and ETV1 shared targets (GRPR, KCNH8, and TMEM45B was significantly affected by silencing of either ETS. Interestingly, we demonstrate that the expression of TDRD1, the topmost overexpressed gene of our list of ERG-specific candidate targets, is inversely correlated with the methylation levels of a CpG island found at -66 bp of the transcription start site in PCa and that TDRD1 expression is regulated by direct binding of ERG to the CpG island in VCaP cells. We conclude that ETS transcription factors regulate specific and shared target genes and that TDRD1, FKBP10, and GRPR are promising therapeutic targets and can serve as diagnostic markers for molecular subtypes of PCa harboring specific fusion gene rearrangements.

  3. Anisotropic behavior and complex colinear magnetic structures of cerium and actinide intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, B.R.

    1977-01-01

    A review is given of the experimental situation and degree of theoretical understanding for the occurrence of complex colinear magnetic structures in cerium and actinide intermetallics of NaCl structure. In doing this, emphasis is on the qualitative nature of the anisotropic effects necessary to understand the behavior. With this in mind we focus on the I to IA magnetic structure transition, and indeed more simply, on the occurrence of the IA magnetic structure which appears for CeBi, UAs, and some of the mixed uranium monopnictide-monochalcogenides. We show how the experimental observations involving properties related to the IA magnetic structure indicate important qualitative features of the physical mechanism involved. Through discussion of the possible analogue to the situation in UO 2 , the idea is introduced that magnetoelastic effects involving internal rearrangement modes may play a key role in the occurrence of the IA structure. Internal rearrangement modes are modes where one ionic species remains at its site in the undistorted crystal structure, and the other species is displaced from its position in the undistorted structure. We show that in a very natural way one can anticipate the possible occurrence of an internal rearrangement mode having a four-layer, periodic displacement sequence for planes for one species in the NaCl structure crystals, while the other species remains undisplaced. The presence of such a static lattice mode is susceptible to direct experimental observation. (author)

  4. Intra-ring haptotropic rearrangements of Mn(CO3 in fluorenyl ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souhila Laib

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Geometric parameters, and intra-ring haptotropic rearrangements π–π (intra-ring-HRs ŋ5⇌ŋ3 of the manganesetricarbonyl complexes (ŋ5-9-R-C13H8Mn(CO3, R = But and Ph in 18e zero-valence are carried out using density functional theory DFT at PBE/TZP level. The calculated activation barriers to ŋ5⇌ŋ3 intra-ring HR in (ŋ5-9-R-C13H8Mn(CO3, R = But and Ph are (28.5 and 69.5 kcal.mol−1 respectively. The compute of HOMA and FLU indexes indicates the reduction of aromaticity when going from free to coordinated complex. The energy decomposition analysis reveals the dominant ionic character in manganese–Cp bond in the presence of covalent contribution.

  5. Synthesis of Methylenebicyclo[3.2.1]octanol by a Sm(II)-Induced 1,2-Rearrangement Reaction with Ring Expansion of Methylenebicyclo[4.2.0]octanone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatori, Kazuhiko; Ota, Shoya; Tendo, Kenta; Matsunaga, Kazuma; Nagasawa, Kokoro; Watanabe, Shinya; Kishida, Atsushi; Kogen, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Hiroto

    2017-07-21

    Direct conversion of methylenebicyclo[4.2.0]octanone to methylenebicyclo[3.2.1]octanol by a Sm(II)-induced 1,2-rearrangement with ring expansion of the methylenecyclobutane is described. Three conditions were optimized to allow the adaptation of this approach to various substrates. A rearrangement mechanism is proposed involving the generation of a ketyl radical and cyclopentanation by ketyl-olefin cyclization, followed by radical fragmentation and subsequent protonation.

  6. Rh-Catalyzed rearrangement of vinylcyclopropane to 1,3-diene units attached to N-heterocycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Brandi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Dienes embedded in quinolizidine and indolizidine structures can be prepared in four steps from cyclic nitrones and bicyclopropylidene. The key intermediates α-spirocyclopropanated N-heterocyclic ketones, generated via a domino 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition/thermal rearrangement sequence, were converted by Wittig methylenation to the corresponding vinylcyclopropanes (VCPs, which underwent rearrangement to 1,3-dienes in the presence of the Wilkinson Rh(I complex under microwave heating. The previously unexplored Rh(I-catalyzed opening of the VCP moiety embedded in an azapolycyclic system occurs at high temperature (110–130 °C to afford the corresponding 1,3-dienes in moderate yield (34–53%.

  7. Actin cytoskeleton rearrangements in Arabidopsis roots under stress and during gravitropic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozhvanov, Gregory; Medvedev, Sergei; Suslov, Dmitry; Demidchik, Vadim

    Among environmental factors, gravity vector is the only one which is constant in direction and accompanies the whole plant ontogenesis. That said, gravity vector can be considered as an essential factor for correct development of plants. Gravitropism is a plant growth response against changing its position relative to the gravity vector. It is well estableshed that gravitropism is directed by auxin redistribution across the gravistimulated organ. In addition to auxin, actin cytoskeleton was shown to be involved in gravitropism at different stages: gravity perception, signal transduction and gravitropic bending formation. However, the relationship between IAA and actin is still under discussion. In this work we studied rearrangements of actin cytoskeleton during root gravitropic response. Actin microfilaments were visualized in vivo in GFP-fABD2 transgenic Arabidopsis plants, and their angle distribution was acquired from MicroFilament Analyzer software. The curvature of actin microfilaments in root elongation zone was shown to be increased within 30-60 min of gravistimulation, the fraction of axially oriented microfilaments decreased with a concomitant increase in the fraction of oblique and transversally oriented microfilaments. In particular, the fraction of transversally oriented microfilaments (i.e. parallel to the gravity vector) increased 3-5 times. Under 10 min of sub-lethal salt stress impact, actin microfilament orientations widened from an initial axial orientation to a set of peaks at 15(°) , 45(°) and 90(°) . We conclude that the actin cytoskeleton rearrangements observed are associated with the regulation of basic mechanisms of cell extension growth by which the gravitropic bending is formed. Having common stress-related features, gravity-induced actin cytoskeleton rearrangement is slower but results in higher number of g-vector-parallel microfilaments when compared to salt stress-induced rearrangement. Also, differences in gravistimulated root

  8. Electronic charge rearrangement at metal/organic interfaces induced by weak van der Waals interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Nicola; Ambrosetti, Alberto; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2017-07-01

    Electronic charge rearrangements at interfaces between organic molecules and solid surfaces play a key role in a wide range of applications in catalysis, light-emitting diodes, single-molecule junctions, molecular sensors and switches, and photovoltaics. It is common to utilize electrostatics and Pauli pushback to control the interface electronic properties, while the ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions are often considered to have a negligible direct contribution (beyond the obvious structural relaxation). Here, we apply a fully self-consistent Tkatchenko-Scheffler vdW density functional to demonstrate that the weak vdW interactions can induce sizable charge rearrangements at hybrid metal/organic systems (HMOS). The complex vdW correlation potential smears out the interfacial electronic density, thereby reducing the charge transfer in HMOS, changes the interface work functions by up to 0.2 eV, and increases the interface dipole moment by up to 0.3 Debye. Our results suggest that vdW interactions should be considered as an additional control parameter in the design of hybrid interfaces with the desired electronic properties.

  9. Anxiolytic-like actions of the hexane extract from leaves of Annona cherimolia in two anxiety paradigms: possible involvement of the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rubalcava, C; Piña-Medina, B; Estrada-Reyes, R; Heinze, G; Martínez-Vázquez, M

    2006-01-11

    A hexane extract of leaves of Annona cherimolia produced anxiolytic-like actions when administered to mice and tested in two animal models of anxiety: the mouse avoidance exploratory behavior and the burying behavior tests. In order to discard unspecific drug-actions on general activity, all treatments studied in the anxiety paradigms were also analyzed in the open field test. Results showed that A. cherimolia induced anxiolytic-like actions at the doses of 6.25, 12.5, 25.0 and 50.0 mg/kg. Picrotoxin (0.25 mg/kg), a GABA-gated chloride ion channel blocker, antagonized the anxiolytic-like actions of A. cherimolia, while a sub-effective dose of muscimol (0.5 mg/kg), a selective GABA(A) receptor agonist, facilitated the effects of a sub-optimal dose of A. cherimolia (3.12 mg/kg). Thus, the involvement of the GABA(A) receptor complex in the anxiolytic-like actions of A. cherimolia hexane extract is suggested. In addition the extract was also able to enhance the duration of sodium pentobarbital induced sleeping time. Taken together, results indicate that the hexane extract of A. cherimolia has depressant activity on the Central Nervous System and could interact with the GABA(A) receptor complex. On the other hand, the chromatographic separation of this extract led to the isolation of palmitone, and beta-sitosterol as major constituents. In addition a GC-MS study of some fractions revealed the presence of several compounds such beta-cariophyllene, beta-selinene, alpha-cubebene, and linalool that have been reported to show effects on behavior that could explain some of the extract effects.

  10. The SDH mutation database: an online resource for succinate dehydrogenase sequence variants involved in pheochromocytoma, paraganglioma and mitochondrial complex II deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devilee Peter

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SDHA, SDHB, SDHC and SDHD genes encode the subunits of succinate dehydrogenase (succinate: ubiquinone oxidoreductase, a component of both the Krebs cycle and the mitochondrial respiratory chain. SDHA, a flavoprotein and SDHB, an iron-sulfur protein together constitute the catalytic domain, while SDHC and SDHD encode membrane anchors that allow the complex to participate in the respiratory chain as complex II. Germline mutations of SDHD and SDHB are a major cause of the hereditary forms of the tumors paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma. The largest subunit, SDHA, is mutated in patients with Leigh syndrome and late-onset optic atrophy, but has not as yet been identified as a factor in hereditary cancer. Description The SDH mutation database is based on the recently described Leiden Open (source Variation Database (LOVD system. The variants currently described in the database were extracted from the published literature and in some cases annotated to conform to current mutation nomenclature. Researchers can also directly submit new sequence variants online. Since the identification of SDHD, SDHC, and SDHB as classic tumor suppressor genes in 2000 and 2001, studies from research groups around the world have identified a total of 120 variants. Here we introduce all reported paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma related sequence variations in these genes, in addition to all reported mutations of SDHA. The database is now accessible online. Conclusion The SDH mutation database offers a valuable tool and resource for clinicians involved in the treatment of patients with paraganglioma-pheochromocytoma, clinical geneticists needing an overview of current knowledge, and geneticists and other researchers needing a solid foundation for further exploration of both these tumor syndromes and SDHA-related phenotypes.

  11. Ionization-induced rearrangement of defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinetskij, V.L.; Manojlo, M.A.; Matvijchuk, A.S.; Strikha, V.I.; Kholodar', G.A.

    1988-01-01

    Ionizing factor effect on defect rearrangement in silicon including centers with deep local electron levels in the p-n-transition region is considered. Deep center parameters were determined using non-steady-state capacity spectroscopy of deep levels (NCDLS) method. NCDLS spectrum measurement was performed using source p + -n - diodes and after their irradiation with 15 keV energy electrons or laser pulses. It is ascertained that in silicon samples containing point defect clusters defect rearrangement under ionizing factor effect takes place, i.e. deep level spectra are changed. This mechanism is efficient in case of silicon irradiation with subthreshold energy photons and electrons and can cause degradation of silicon semiconducting structures

  12. Incremental exposure facilitates adaptation to sensory rearrangement. [vestibular stimulation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, J. R.; Lobovits, D. N.

    1978-01-01

    Visual-target pointing experiments were performed on 24 adult volunteers in order to compare the relative effectiveness of incremental (stepwise) and single-step exposure conditions on adaptation to visual rearrangement. The differences between the preexposure and postexposure scores served as an index of the adaptation elicited during the exposure period. It is found that both single-step and stepwise exposure to visual rearrangement elicit compensatory changes in sensorimotor coordination. However, stepwise exposure, when compared to single-step exposur in terms of the average magnitude of visual displacement over the exposure period, clearly enhances the rate of adaptation. It seems possible that the enhancement of adaptation to unusual patterns of sensory stimulation produced by incremental exposure reflects a general principle of sensorimotor function.

  13. Characterization of the Unusual Product from the Reaction between Cobalt(II) Chloride, Ethane-1,2-diamine, and Hydrochloric Acid: An Undergraduate Project Involving an Unknown Metal Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Neil F.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the need for student research-type chemistry projects based upon "unknown" metal complexes. Describes an experiment involving the product from the reaction between cobalt(II) chloride, ethane-1,2-diamine (en) and concentrated hydrochloric acid. Outlines the preparation of the cobalt complex, along with procedure, results and…

  14. Involvement of the major histocompatibility complex region in the genetic regulation of circulating CD8 T-cell numbers in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, E; Vieira, J; Gonçalves, R; Alves, H; Almeida, S; Rodrigues, P; Lacerda, R; Porto, G

    2004-07-01

    Variability in T-lymphocyte numbers is partially explained by a genetic regulation. From studies in animal models, it is known that the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) is involved in this regulation. In humans, this has not been shown yet. The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that genes in the MHC region influence the regulation of T-lymphocyte numbers. Two approaches were used. Association studies between T-cell counts (CD4(+) and CD8(+)) or total lymphocyte counts and HLA class I alleles (A and B) or mutations in the HFE (C282Y and H63D), the hemochromatosis gene, in an unrelated population (n = 264). A second approach was a sibpair correlation analysis of the same T-cell counts in relation to HLA-HFE haplotypes in subjects belonging to 48 hemochromatosis families (n = 456 sibpairs). In the normal population, results showed a strong statistically significant association of the HLA-A*01 with high numbers of CD8(+) T cells and a less powerful association with the HLA-A*24 with low numbers of CD8(+) T cells. Sibpair correlations revealed the most significant correlation for CD8(+) T-cell numbers for sibpairs with HLA-HFE-identical haplotypes. This was not observed for CD4(+) T cells. These results show that the MHC region is involved in the genetic regulation of CD8(+) T-cell numbers in humans. Identification of genes responsible for this control may have important biological and clinical implications.

  15. A system for the detection of chromosomal rearrangements using Sordaria macrospora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaise, S.; Leblon, G.; Lares, L.

    1984-01-01

    A system is described for the detection and diagnosis of induced chromosomal rearrangement using Sordaria macrospora. The system uses the property of the rearrangement to produce defective white ascospores as meiotic progeny from heterozygous crosses. Two reconstruction experiments have shown that this system is able to give reliable quantitative measures of rearrangement frequencies. Evidence for a photoreactivation process was obtained, suggesting that pyrimidine dimers may well be an important lesion in UV-induced chromosomal rearrangement. No evidence of induction of chromosomal rearrangement was obtained in experiments with the powerful chemical mutagen N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. (orig.)

  16. A system for the detection of chromosomal rearrangements using Sordaria macrospora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaise, S; Leblon, G; Lares, L

    1984-01-01

    A system is described for the detection and diagnosis of induced chromosomal rearrangement using Sordaria macrospora. The system uses the property of the rearrangement to produce defective white ascospores as meiotic progeny from heterozygous crosses. Two reconstruction experiments have shown that this system is able to give reliable quantitative measures of rearrangement frequencies. Evidence for a photoreactivation process was obtained, suggesting that pyrimidine dimers may well be an important lesion in UV-induced chromosomal rearrangement. No evidence of induction of chromosomal rearrangement was obtained in experiments with the powerful chemical mutagen N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine.

  17. Level rearrangement in exotic atoms and quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combescure, Monique; Khare, Avinash; Raina, Ashok; Richard Jean-Marc; Weydert, Carole

    2007-01-01

    A presentation and a generalisation are given of the phenomenon of level rearrangement, which occurs when an attractive long-range potential is supplemented by a short-range attractive potential of increasing strength. This problem has been discovered in condensate-matter physics and has also been studied in the physics of exotic atoms. A similar phenomenon occurs in a situation inspired by quantum dots, where a short-range interaction is added to an harmonic confinement. (authors)

  18. Detection of genomic rearrangements in cucumber using genomecmp software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulawik, Maciej; Pawełkowicz, Magdalena Ewa; Wojcieszek, Michał; PlÄ der, Wojciech; Nowak, Robert M.

    2017-08-01

    Comparative genomic by increasing information about the genomes sequences available in the databases is a rapidly evolving science. A simple comparison of the general features of genomes such as genome size, number of genes, and chromosome number presents an entry point into comparative genomic analysis. Here we present the utility of the new tool genomecmp for finding rearrangements across the compared sequences and applications in plant comparative genomics.

  19. Understanding the complex relationships among actors involved in the implementation of public-private mix (PPM) for TB control in India, using social theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salve, Solomon; Harris, Kristine; Sheikh, Kabir; Porter, John D H

    2018-06-07

    Public Private Partnerships (PPP) are increasingly utilized as a public health strategy for strengthening health systems and have become a core component for the delivery of TB control services in India, as promoted through national policy. However, partnerships are complex systems that rely on relationships between a myriad of different actors with divergent agendas and backgrounds. Relationship is a crucial element of governance, and relationship building an important aspect of partnerships. To understand PPPs a multi-disciplinary perspective that draws on insights from social theory is needed. This paper demonstrates how social theory can aid the understanding of the complex relationships of actors involved in implementation of Public-Private Mix (PPM)-TB policy in India. Ethnographic research was conducted within a district in a Southern state of India over a 14 month period, combining participant observations, informal interactions and in-depth interviews with a wide range of respondents across public, private and non-government organisation (NGO) sectors. Drawing on the theoretical insights from Bourdieu's "theory of practice" this study explores the relationships between the different actors. The study found that programme managers, frontline TB workers, NGOs, and private practitioners all had a crucial role to play in TB partnerships. They were widely regarded as valued contributors with distinct social skills and capabilities within their organizations and professions. However, their potential contributions towards programme implementation tended to be unrecognized both at the top and bottom of the policy implementation chain. These actors constantly struggled for recognition and used different mechanisms to position themselves alongside other actors within the programme that further complicated the relationships between different actors. This paper demonstrates that applying social theory can enable a better understanding of the complex relationship

  20. 1,2-Fluorine Radical Rearrangements: Isomerization Events in Perfluorinated Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoomissen, Daniel J; Vyas, Shubham

    2017-11-16

    Devising effective degradation technologies for perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) is an active area of research, where the molecular mechanisms involving both oxidative and reductive pathways are still elusive. One commonly neglected pathway in PFAS degradation is fluorine atom migration in perfluoroalkyl radicals, which was largely assumed to be implausible because of the high C-F bond strength. Using density functional theory calculations, it was demonstrated that 1,2-F atom migrations are thermodynamically favored when the fluorine atom migrated from a less branched carbon center to a more branched carbon center. Activation barriers for these rearrangements were within 19-29 kcal/mol, which are possible to easily overcome at elevated temperatures or in photochemically activated species in the gas or aqueous phase. It was also found that the activation barriers for the 1,2-F atom migration are lowered as much as by 10 kcal/mol when common oxidative degradation products such as HF assisted the rearrangements or if the resulting radical center was stabilized by vicinal π-bonds. Natural bond orbital analyses showed that fluorine moves as a radical in a noncharge-separated state. These findings add an important reaction to the existing knowledge of mechanisms for PFAS degradation and highlights the fact that 1,2-F atom shifts may be a small channel for isomerization of these compounds, but upon availability of mineralization products, this isomerization process could become more prominent.

  1. Analysis of TCRAD gene recombination: radio-induct rearrangement and signal joint structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touvrey, C.

    2005-09-01

    We have shown that irradiation of pre-TCR-deficient CD3ε -/- mice restores thymocyte differentiation, by a p53-dependent and by a p53-independent pathway. Events normally associated during normal thymocyte development are dissociated in response to radiation exposure. Both of these pathways require LAT expression. Therefore, radiation exposure activates pre-TCR-like signals. TCRA gene rearrangement is induced following radiation exposure. The signal joints resulting from TCRA gene rearrangement have the same structure than those found in wild type mice. All signal joint analyzed in un-manipulated wild type mice do exhibit junctional diversity. This diversity results mainly from TdT activity. We present evidences that proteins involved in DNA repair and genomic stability participated in SJ formation. We propose that signal joint diversity is not an aberrant process but is a key feature of V(D)J recombination. All our work increases our understanding of molecular events associated with V(D)J recombination. (author)

  2. The rearranged mitochondrial genome of Leptopilina boulardi (Hymenoptera: Figitidae, a parasitoid wasp of Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S. Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract The partial mitochondrial genome sequence of Leptopilina boulardi (Hymenoptera: Figitidae was characterized. Illumina sequencing was used yielding 35,999,679 reads, from which 102,482 were utilized in the assembly. The length of the sequenced region of this partial mitochondrial genome is 15,417 bp, consisting of 13 protein-coding, two rRNA, and 21tRNA genes (the trnaM failed to be sequenced and a partial A+T-rich region. All protein-coding genes start with ATN codons. Eleven protein-coding genes presented TAA stop codons, whereas ND6 and COII that presented TA, and T nucleotides, respectively. The gene pattern revealed extensive rearrangements compared to the typical pattern generally observed in insects. These rearrangements involve two protein-coding and two ribosomal genes, along with the 16 tRNA genes. This gene order is different from the pattern described for Ibalia leucospoides (Ibaliidae, Cynipoidea, suggesting that this particular gene order can be variable among Cynipoidea superfamily members. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis of the main groups of Apocrita was performed using amino acid sequence of 13 protein-coding genes, showing monophyly for the Cynipoidea superfamily within the Hymenoptera phylogeny.

  3. Quantifying stretching and rearrangement in epithelial sheet migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Rachel M; Nordstrom, Kerstin N; Losert, Wolfgang; Kelley, Douglas H; Ouellette, Nicholas T

    2013-01-01

    Although understanding the collective migration of cells, such as that seen in epithelial sheets, is essential for understanding diseases such as metastatic cancer, this motion is not yet as well characterized as individual cell migration. Here we adapt quantitative metrics used to characterize the flow and deformation of soft matter to contrast different types of motion within a migrating sheet of cells. Using a finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) analysis, we find that—in spite of large fluctuations—the flow field of an epithelial cell sheet is not chaotic. Stretching of a sheet of cells (i.e. positive FTLE) is localized at the leading edge of migration and increases when the cells are more highly stimulated. By decomposing the motion of the cells into affine and non-affine components using the metric D m in 2 , we quantify local plastic rearrangements and describe the motion of a group of cells in a novel way. We find an increase in plastic rearrangements with increasing cell densities, whereas inanimate systems tend to exhibit less non-affine rearrangements with increasing density. (paper)

  4. Elevated Rate of Genome Rearrangements in Radiation-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repar, Jelena; Supek, Fran; Klanjscek, Tin; Warnecke, Tobias; Zahradka, Ksenija; Zahradka, Davor

    2017-04-01

    A number of bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic species are known for their resistance to ionizing radiation. One of the challenges these species face is a potent environmental source of DNA double-strand breaks, potential drivers of genome structure evolution. Efficient and accurate DNA double-strand break repair systems have been demonstrated in several unrelated radiation-resistant species and are putative adaptations to the DNA damaging environment. Such adaptations are expected to compensate for the genome-destabilizing effect of environmental DNA damage and may be expected to result in a more conserved gene order in radiation-resistant species. However, here we show that rates of genome rearrangements, measured as loss of gene order conservation with time, are higher in radiation-resistant species in multiple, phylogenetically independent groups of bacteria. Comparison of indicators of selection for genome organization between radiation-resistant and phylogenetically matched, nonresistant species argues against tolerance to disruption of genome structure as a strategy for radiation resistance. Interestingly, an important mechanism affecting genome rearrangements in prokaryotes, the symmetrical inversions around the origin of DNA replication, shapes genome structure of both radiation-resistant and nonresistant species. In conclusion, the opposing effects of environmental DNA damage and DNA repair result in elevated rates of genome rearrangements in radiation-resistant bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Repar et al.

  5. Highly variable rates of genome rearrangements between hemiascomycetous yeast lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemiascomycete yeasts cover an evolutionary span comparable to that of the entire phylum of chordates. Since this group currently contains the largest number of complete genome sequences it presents unique opportunities to understand the evolution of genome organization in eukaryotes. We inferred rates of genome instability on all branches of a phylogenetic tree for 11 species and calculated species-specific rates of genome rearrangements. We characterized all inversion events that occurred within synteny blocks between six representatives of the different lineages. We show that the rates of macro- and microrearrangements of gene order are correlated within individual lineages but are highly variable across different lineages. The most unstable genomes correspond to the pathogenic yeasts Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. Chromosomal maps have been intensively shuffled by numerous interchromosomal rearrangements, even between species that have retained a very high physical fraction of their genomes within small synteny blocks. Despite this intensive reshuffling of gene positions, essential genes, which cluster in low recombination regions in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, tend to remain syntenic during evolution. This work reveals that the high plasticity of eukaryotic genomes results from rearrangement rates that vary between lineages but also at different evolutionary times of a given lineage.

  6. On colour rearrangement in hadronic W+W- events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoestrand, T.; Khoze, V.A.

    1994-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of colour rearrangement in e + e - →W + W - →q 1 anti q 2 q 3 anti q 4 events, i.e. that the original colour singlets q 1 anti q 2 and q 3 anti q 4 may be transmuted, for instance, into new singlets q 1 anti q 4 and q 3 anti q 2 . The effects on event properties could be quite large if such a rearrangement would occur instantaneously, so that gluon emission would be restricted to each of the new singlets separately. We argue that such a scenario is unlikely for two reasons. Firstly, the W + and W - usually decay at separate times after the W + W - production, which leads to large relative phases for energetic radiation off the two constituents of a rearranged system, and a corresponding dampening of the QCD cascades. Secondly, within the perturbative scenario the colour transmutation appears only in order α s 2 and is colour-suppressed. Colour reconnection at longer time scales is quite feasible, however, and may affect the fragmentation phase. If so, the nature of non-perturbative QCD can be probed in a new way. We formulate several alternative toy models and use these to estimate the colour reconnection probability as a function of the event kinematics. Possible consequences for LEP 2 events are illustrated, with special attention to systematic errors in W mass determinations. (orig.)

  7. Involvement of F-Actin in Chaperonin-Containing t-Complex 1 Beta Regulating Mouse Mesangial Cell Functions in a Glucose-Induction Cell Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Shuen Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the role of chaperonin-containing t-complex polypeptide 1 beta (CCT2 in the regulation of mouse mesangial cell (mMC contraction, proliferation, and migration with filamentous/globular-(F/G- actin ratio under high glucose induction. A low CCT2 mMC model induced by treatment of small interference RNA was established. Groups with and without low CCT2 induction examined in normal and high (H glucose conditions revealed the following major results: (1 low CCT2 or H glucose showed the ability to attenuate F/G-actin ratio; (2 groups with low F/G-actin ratio all showed less cell contraction; (3 suppression of CCT2 may reduce the proliferation and migration which were originally induced by H glucose. In conclusion, CCT2 can be used as a specific regulator for mMC contraction, proliferation, and migration affected by glucose, which mechanism may involve the alteration of F-actin, particularly for cell contraction.

  8. Soaking suggests "alternative facts": Only co-crystallization discloses major ligand-induced interface rearrangements of a homodimeric tRNA-binding protein indicating a novel mode-of-inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Rainer Ehrmann

    Full Text Available For the efficient pathogenesis of Shigella, the causative agent of bacillary dysentery, full functionality of tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (TGT is mandatory. TGT performs post-transcriptional modifications of tRNAs in the anticodon loop taking impact on virulence development. This suggests TGT as a putative target for selective anti-shigellosis drug therapy. Since bacterial TGT is only functional as homodimer, its activity can be inhibited either by blocking its active site or by preventing dimerization. Recently, we discovered that in some crystal structures obtained by soaking the full conformational adaptation most likely induced in solution upon ligand binding is not displayed. Thus, soaked structures may be misleading and suggest irrelevant binding modes. Accordingly, we re-investigated these complexes by co-crystallization. The obtained structures revealed large conformational rearrangements not visible in the soaked complexes. They result from spatial perturbations in the ribose-34/phosphate-35 recognition pocket and, consequently, an extended loop-helix motif required to prevent access of water molecules into the dimer interface loses its geometric integrity. Thermodynamic profiles of ligand binding in solution indicate favorable entropic contributions to complex formation when large conformational adaptations in the dimer interface are involved. Native MS titration experiments reveal the extent to which the homodimer is destabilized in the presence of each inhibitor. Unexpectedly, one ligand causes a complete rearrangement of subunit packing within the homodimer, never observed in any other TGT crystal structure before. Likely, this novel twisted dimer is catalytically inactive and, therefore, suggests that stabilizing this non-productive subunit arrangement may be used as a further strategy for TGT inhibition.

  9. Effects of cooling rate on particle rearrangement statistics: Rapidly cooled glasses are more ductile and less reversible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Meng; Wang, Minglei; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Yanhui; Schroers, Jan; Shattuck, Mark D; O'Hern, Corey S

    2017-02-01

    Amorphous solids, such as metallic, polymeric, and colloidal glasses, display complex spatiotemporal response to applied deformations. In contrast to crystalline solids, during loading, amorphous solids exhibit a smooth crossover from elastic response to plastic flow. In this study, we investigate the mechanical response of binary Lennard-Jones glasses to athermal, quasistatic pure shear as a function of the cooling rate used to prepare them. We find several key results concerning the connection between strain-induced particle rearrangements and mechanical response. We show that the energy loss per strain dU_{loss}/dγ caused by particle rearrangements for more rapidly cooled glasses is larger than that for slowly cooled glasses. We also find that the cumulative energy loss U_{loss} can be used to predict the ductility of glasses even in the putative linear regime of stress versus strain. U_{loss} increases (and the ratio of shear to bulk moduli decreases) with increasing cooling rate, indicating enhanced ductility. In addition, we characterized the degree of reversibility of particle motion during a single shear cycle. We find that irreversible particle motion occurs even in the linear regime of stress versus strain. However, slowly cooled glasses, which undergo smaller rearrangements, are more reversible during a single shear cycle than rapidly cooled glasses. Thus, we show that more ductile glasses are also less reversible.

  10. A complex molecular interplay of auxin and ethylene signaling pathways is involved in Arabidopsis growth promotion by Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Josefina Poupin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of phytohormones homeostasis is one of the proposed mechanisms to explain plant growth promotion induced by beneficial rhizobacteria (PGPR. However, there is still limited knowledge about the molecular signals and pathways underlying these beneficial interactions. Even less is known concerning the interplay between phytohormones in plants inoculated with PGPR. Auxin and ethylene are crucial hormones in the control of plant growth and development, and recent studies report an important and complex crosstalk between them in the regulation of different plant developmental processes. The objective of this work was to study the role of both hormones in the growth promotion of Arabidopsis thaliana plants induced by the well-known PGPR Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN. For this, the spatiotemporal expression patterns of several genes related to auxin biosynthesis, perception and response and ethylene biosynthesis were studied, finding that most of these genes showed specific transcriptional regulations after inoculation in roots and shoots. PsJN-growth promotion was not observed in Arabidopsis mutants with an impaired ethylene (ein2-1 or auxin (axr1-5 signaling. Even, PsJN did not promote growth in an ethylene overproducer (eto2, indicating that a fine regulation of both hormones signaling and homeostasis is necessary to induce growth of the aerial and root tissues. Auxin polar transport is also involved in growth promotion, since PsJN did not promote primary root growth in the pin2 mutant or under chemical inhibition of transport in wild type plants. Finally, a key role for ethylene biosynthesis was found in the PsJN-mediated increase in root hair number. These results not only give new insights of PGPR regulation of plant growth but also are also useful to understand key aspects of Arabidopsis growth control.

  11. Precision medicine approaches may be the future for CRLF2 rearranged Down Syndrome Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Elyse C; Heatley, Susan L; Yeung, David T; Thomas, Paul Q; White, Deborah L

    2018-06-04

    Breakthrough studies over the past decade have uncovered unique gene fusions implicated in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). The critical gene, cytokine receptor-like factor 2 (CRLF2), is rearranged in 5-16% of B-ALL, comprising 50% of Philadelphia-like ALL and cooperates with genomic lesions in the Jak, Mapk and Ras signalling pathways. Children with Down Syndrome (DS) have a predisposition to developing CRLF2 rearranged-ALL which is observed in 60% of DS-ALL patients. These patients experience a poor survival outcome. Mutations of genes involved in epigenetic regulation are more prevalent in DS-ALL patients than non-DS ALL patients, highlighting the potential for alternative treatment strategies. DS-ALL patients also suffer greater treatment-related toxicity from current ALL treatment regimens compared to non-DS-ALL patients. An increased gene dosage of critical genes on chromosome 21 which have roles in purine synthesis and folate transport may contribute. As the genomic landscape of DS-ALL patients is different to non-DS-ALL patients, targeted therapies for individual lesions may improve outcomes. Therapeutically targeting each rearrangement with targeted or combination therapy that will perturb the transforming signalling pathways will likely improve the poor survival rates of this subset of patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection of clonal immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements by the polymerase chain reaction and capillary gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongxin; Robetorye, Ryan S

    2013-01-01

    Although well-established diagnostic criteria exist for mature B-cell neoplasms, a definitive diagnosis of a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder cannot always be obtained using more conventional techniques such as flow cytometric immunophenotyping, conventional cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization, or immunohistochemistry. However, because B-cell malignancies contain identically rearranged immunoglobulin heavy chain genes, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can be a fast, convenient, and dependable option to identify clonal B-cell processes. This chapter describes the use of PCR and capillary electrophoresis to identify clonal immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) variable and joining region (VH-JH) gene rearrangements (IGH VH-JH PCR) using a commercially available method employing multiple multiplex PCR tubes that was originally developed as the result of a large European BIOMED-2 collaborative study (Invivoscribe Technologies). The core protocol involves the use of three separate master mix tubes that target the conserved framework (FR1, FR2, and FR3) and joining (J) regions of the IGH gene. Analysis of these three framework regions can detect approximately 88% of clonal IGH gene rearrangements.

  13. Most ultraviolet irradiation induced mutations in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans are chromosomal rearrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, H.I.; Rosenbluth, R.E.; Baillie, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    In this study the utility of 254-nm ultraviolet light (UV) as a magnetic tool in C.elegans is determined. It is demonstrated that irradiation of adult hermaphrodites provides a simple method for the induction of heritable chromosomal rearrangements. A screening protocol was employed that identifies either recessive lethal mutations in the 40 map unit region balanced by the translocation eT1(III;V), or unc-36(III) duplications. Mutations were recovered in 3% of the chromosomes screened after a dose of 120 J/m 2 . This rate resembles that for 1500 R γ-ray-induced mutations selected in a similar manner. The mutations were classified either as lethals [mapping to Linkage Group (LG)III or LGV] or as putative unc-36 duplications. In contrast to the majority of UV-induced mutations analysed in micro-organisms, a large fraction of the C.elegans UV-induced mutations were found to be not simple intragenic lesions, but deficiencies for more than one adjacent gene or more complex events. Preliminary evidence for this conclusion came from the high frequency of mutations that had a dominant effect causing reduced numbers of adult progeny. Subsequently 6 out of 9 analysed LGV mutations were found to be deficiencies. Other specific rearrangements also identified were: one translocation, sT5(II;III), and two unc-36 duplications, sDp8 and sDp9. It was concluded that UV irradiation can easily be used as an additional tool for the analysis of C.elegans chromosomes, and that C.elegans should prove to be a useful organism in which to study the mechanisms whereby UV acts as a mutagen in cells of complex eukaryotes. (author). 46 refs.; 5 figs.; 4 tabs

  14. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Maliszewska-Olejniczak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs. Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium

  15. Organocatalyzed Domino [3+2] Cycloaddition/Payne-Type Rearrangement using Carbon Dioxide and Epoxy Alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleij, Arjan Willem; Sopeña, Sergio; Cozzolino, Mariachiara; Escudero-Adán, Eduardo C; Martínez Belmonte, Marta; Maquilón, Cristina

    2018-05-09

    An unprecedented organocatalytic approach towards highly substituted cyclic carbonates from tri- and tetra-substituted oxiranes and carbon dioxide has been developed. The protocol involves the use of a simple and cheap superbase under mild, additive- and metal-free conditions towards the initial formation of a less substituted carbonate product that equilibrates to a tri- or even tetra-substituted cyclic carbonate under thermodynamic control. The latter are conveniently trapped in situ providing overall a new domino process for synthetically elusive heterocyclic scaffolds. Control experiments provide a rationale for the observed cascade reactions, which demonstrate high similarity with the well-known Payne rearrangement of epoxy alcohols. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Refining borders of genome-rearrangements including repetitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JA Arjona-Medina

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA rearrangement events have been widely studied in comparative genomic for many years. The importance of these events resides not only in the study about relatedness among different species, but also to determine the mechanisms behind evolution. Although there are many methods to identify genome-rearrangements (GR, the refinement of their borders has become a huge challenge. Until now no accepted method exists to achieve accurate fine-tuning: i.e. the notion of breakpoint (BP is still an open issue, and despite repeated regions are vital to understand evolution they are not taken into account in most of the GR detection and refinement methods. Methods and results We propose a method to refine the borders of GR including repeated regions. Instead of removing these repetitions to facilitate computation, we take advantage of them using a consensus alignment sequence of the repeated region in between two blocks. Using the concept of identity vectors for Synteny Blocks (SB and repetitions, a Finite State Machine is designed to detect transition points in the difference between such vectors. The method does not force the BP to be a region or a point but depends on the alignment transitions within the SBs and repetitions. Conclusion The accurate definition of the borders of SB and repeated genomic regions and consequently the detection of BP might help to understand the evolutionary model of species. In this manuscript we present a new proposal for such a refinement. Features of the SBs borders and BPs are different and fit with what is expected. SBs with more diversity in annotations and BPs short and richer in DNA replication and stress response, which are strongly linked with rearrangements.

  17. Recurrence risk in de novo structural chromosomal rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röthlisberger, Benno; Kotzot, Dieter

    2007-08-01

    According to the textbook of Gardner and Sutherland [2004], the standard on genetic counseling for chromosome abnormalities, the recurrence risk of de novo structural or combined structural and numeric chromosome rearrangements is less than 0.5-2% and takes into account recurrence by chance, gonadal mosaicism, and somatic-gonadal mosaicism. However, these figures are roughly estimated and neither any systematic study nor exact or evidence-based risk calculations are available. To address this question, an extensive literature search was performed and surprisingly only 29 case reports of recurrence of de novo structural or combined structural and numeric chromosomal rearrangements were found. Thirteen of them were with a trisomy 21 due to an i(21q) replacing one normal chromosome 21. In eight of them low-level mosaicism in one of the parents was found either in fibroblasts or in blood or in both. As a consequence of the low number of cases and theoretical considerations (clinical consequences, mechanisms of formation, etc.), the recurrence risk should be reduced to less than 1% for a de novo i(21q) and to even less than 0.3% for all other de novo structural or combined structural and numeric chromosomal rearrangements. As the latter is lower than the commonly accepted risk of approximately 0.3% for indicating an invasive prenatal diagnosis and as the risk of abortion of a healthy fetus after chorionic villous sampling or amniocentesis is higher than approximately 0.5%, invasive prenatal investigation in most cases is not indicated and should only be performed if explicitly asked by the parents subsequent to appropriate genetic counseling. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Precise detection of rearrangement breakpoints in mammalian chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautier Christian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomes undergo large structural changes that alter their organisation. The chromosomal regions affected by these rearrangements are called breakpoints, while those which have not been rearranged are called synteny blocks. We developed a method to precisely delimit rearrangement breakpoints on a genome by comparison with the genome of a related species. Contrary to current methods which search for synteny blocks and simply return what remains in the genome as breakpoints, we propose to go further and to investigate the breakpoints themselves in order to refine them. Results Given some reliable and non overlapping synteny blocks, the core of the method consists in refining the regions that are not contained in them. By aligning each breakpoint sequence against its specific orthologous sequences in the other species, we can look for weak similarities inside the breakpoint, thus extending the synteny blocks and narrowing the breakpoints. The identification of the narrowed breakpoints relies on a segmentation algorithm and is statistically assessed. Since this method requires as input synteny blocks with some properties which, though they appear natural, are not verified by current methods for detecting such blocks, we further give a formal definition and provide an algorithm to compute them. The whole method is applied to delimit breakpoints on the human genome when compared to the mouse and dog genomes. Among the 355 human-mouse and 240 human-dog breakpoints, 168 and 146 respectively span less than 50 Kb. We compared the resulting breakpoints with some publicly available ones and show that we achieve a better resolution. Furthermore, we suggest that breakpoints are rarely reduced to a point, and instead consist in often large regions that can be distinguished from the sequences around in terms of segmental duplications, similarity with related species, and transposable elements. Conclusion Our method leads to smaller

  19. [Synthetic biology and rearrangements of microbial genetic material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Quan-Feng; Wang, Qian; Qi, Qing-Sheng

    2011-10-01

    As an emerging discipline, synthetic biology has shown great scientific values and application prospects. Although there have been many reviews of various aspects on synthetic biology over the last years, this article, for the first time, attempted to discuss the relationship and difference between microbial genetics and synthetic biology. We summarized the recent development of synthetic biology in rearranging microbial genetic materials, including synthesis, design and reduction of genetic materials, standardization of genetic parts and modularization of genetic circuits. The relationship between synthetic biology and microbial genetic engineering was also discussed in the paper.

  20. Acid Rearrangement of Secoiridoids Related to Oleuropein and Secologanin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bianco, Armandodoriano; Jensen, Søren Rosendal; Olesen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Acid treatment of an iridoid glycoside results in the cleavage of the acetal bond between the sugar unit and the monoterpenoid aglycon. Iridoids possessing non-conjugated enol ether systems, however, undergo the hydration of the iridoid enol ether functionality in acid medium, as well as the hydr...... as the hydrolysis of the bond. We examined the acid rearrangement of secoiridoids such as oleuropein (1) and secologanin (2) and their reduction products oleuropeinol (3) and secologaninol (4), to examine whether similar behaviour also occurs in this case....

  1. Evidence for compact cooperatively rearranging regions in a supercooled liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elenius, M; Dzugutov, M

    2009-01-01

    We examine structural relaxation in a supercooled glass-forming liquid simulated by constant-energy constant-volume (NVE) molecular dynamics. Time correlations of the total kinetic energy fluctuations are used as a comprehensive measure of the system's approach to the ergodic equilibrium. We find that, under cooling, the total structural relaxation becomes delayed as compared with the decay of the component of the intermediate scattering function corresponding to the main peak of the structure factor. This observation can be explained by collective movements of particles preserving many-body structural correlations within compact three-dimensional (3D) cooperatively rearranging regions.

  2. Identification of a multi-protein reductive dehalogenase complex in Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain CBDB1 suggests a protein-dependent respiratory electron transport chain obviating quinone involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kublik, Anja; Deobald, Darja; Hartwig, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    electrophoresis (BN-PAGE), gel filtration and ultrafiltration an active dehalogenating protein complex with a molecular mass of 250–270 kDa was identified. The active subunit of reductive dehalogenase (RdhA) colocalised with a complex iron-sulfur molybdoenzyme (CISM) subunit (CbdbA195) and an iron-sulfur cluster...... of the dehalogenating complex prior to membrane solubilisation. Taken together, the identification of the respiratory dehalogenase protein complex and the absence of indications for quinone participation in the respiration suggest a quinone-independent protein-based respiratory electron transfer chain in D. mccartyi....

  3. Gold(I)-assisted catalysis - a comprehensive view on the [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement of allyl acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freindorf, Marek; Cremer, Dieter; Kraka, Elfi

    2018-03-01

    The unified reaction valley approach (URVA) combined with the local mode, ring puckering and electron density analysis is applied to elucidate the mechanistic differences of the non-catalysed and the Au[I]-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-catalysed [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement of allyl acetate. Using a dual-level approach (DFT and DLPNO-CCSD(T)), the influence of solvation, counter-ions, bulky and electron withdrawing/donating substituents as well as the exchange of the Au[I]-NHC with a Au[I]-phosphine catalyst is investigated. The catalyst breaks up the rearrangement into two steps by switching between Au[I]-π and Au[I]-σ complexation, thus avoiding the energy-consuming CO cleavage in the first step. Based on local stretching force constants ka(C=C), we derive for the first time a quantitative measure of the π-acidity of the Au[I] catalyst; in all catalysed reactions, the bond order n(C=C) drops from 2 to 1.65. The ring puckering analysis clarifies that all reactions start and end via a six-membered ring with a boat form. All Au[I]-σ-complex intermediates show a considerable admixture of the chair form. The non-catalysed [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement goes through a maximum of charge separation between the allyl and acetate units at the transition state, while all catalysed reactions proceed via a minimum of charge separation reached in the region of the Au[I]-σ-complex.

  4. Ku-mediated coupling of DNA cleavage and repair during programmed genome rearrangements in the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Marmignon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available During somatic differentiation, physiological DNA double-strand breaks (DSB can drive programmed genome rearrangements (PGR, during which DSB repair pathways are mobilized to safeguard genome integrity. Because of their unique nuclear dimorphism, ciliates are powerful unicellular eukaryotic models to study the mechanisms involved in PGR. At each sexual cycle, the germline nucleus is transmitted to the progeny, but the somatic nucleus, essential for gene expression, is destroyed and a new somatic nucleus differentiates from a copy of the germline nucleus. In Paramecium tetraurelia, the development of the somatic nucleus involves massive PGR, including the precise elimination of at least 45,000 germline sequences (Internal Eliminated Sequences, IES. IES excision proceeds through a cut-and-close mechanism: a domesticated transposase, PiggyMac, is essential for DNA cleavage, and DSB repair at excision sites involves the Ligase IV, a specific component of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ pathway. At the genome-wide level, a huge number of programmed DSBs must be repaired during this process to allow the assembly of functional somatic chromosomes. To understand how DNA cleavage and DSB repair are coordinated during PGR, we have focused on Ku, the earliest actor of NHEJ-mediated repair. Two Ku70 and three Ku80 paralogs are encoded in the genome of P. tetraurelia: Ku70a and Ku80c are produced during sexual processes and localize specifically in the developing new somatic nucleus. Using RNA interference, we show that the development-specific Ku70/Ku80c heterodimer is essential for the recovery of a functional somatic nucleus. Strikingly, at the molecular level, PiggyMac-dependent DNA cleavage is abolished at IES boundaries in cells depleted for Ku80c, resulting in IES retention in the somatic genome. PiggyMac and Ku70a/Ku80c co-purify as a complex when overproduced in a heterologous system. We conclude that Ku has been integrated in the Paramecium

  5. A Prediction Model for ROS1-Rearranged Lung Adenocarcinomas based on Histologic Features

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Jianya; Zhao, Jing; Zheng, Jing; Kong, Mei; Sun, Ke; Wang, Bo; Chen, Xi; Ding, Wei; Zhou, Jianying

    2016-01-01

    Aims To identify the clinical and histological characteristics of ROS1-rearranged non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs) and build a prediction model to prescreen suitable patients for molecular testing. Methods and Results We identified 27 cases of ROS1-rearranged lung adenocarcinomas in 1165 patients with NSCLCs confirmed by real-time PCR and FISH and performed univariate and multivariate analyses to identify predictive factors associated with ROS1 rearrangement and finally developed predi...

  6. A BAC clone fingerprinting approach to the detection of human genome rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzywinski, Martin; Bosdet, Ian; Mathewson, Carrie; Wye, Natasja; Brebner, Jay; Chiu, Readman; Corbett, Richard; Field, Matthew; Lee, Darlene; Pugh, Trevor; Volik, Stas; Siddiqui, Asim; Jones, Steven; Schein, Jacquie; Collins, Collin; Marra, Marco

    2007-01-01

    We present a method, called fingerprint profiling (FPP), that uses restriction digest fingerprints of bacterial artificial chromosome clones to detect and classify rearrangements in the human genome. The approach uses alignment of experimental fingerprint patterns to in silico digests of the sequence assembly and is capable of detecting micro-deletions (1-5 kb) and balanced rearrangements. Our method has compelling potential for use as a whole-genome method for the identification and characterization of human genome rearrangements. PMID:17953769

  7. Large Clinically Consequential Imbalances Detected at the Breakpoints of Apparently Balanced and Inherited Chromosome Rearrangements

    OpenAIRE

    South, Sarah T.; Rector, Lyndsey; Aston, Emily; Rowe, Leslie; Yang, Samuel P.

    2010-01-01

    When a chromosome abnormality is identified in a child with a developmental delay and/or multiple congenital anomalies and the chromosome rearrangement appears balanced, follow-up studies often examine both parents for this rearrangement. If either clinically unaffected parent has a chromosome abnormality with a banding pattern identical to the affected child's study, then it is assumed that the chromosome rearrangement is balanced and directly inherited from the normal carrier parent. It is ...

  8. Transposon domestication versus mutualism in ciliate genome rearrangements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Vogt

    Full Text Available Ciliated protists rearrange their genomes dramatically during nuclear development via chromosome fragmentation and DNA deletion to produce a trimmer and highly reorganized somatic genome. The deleted portion of the genome includes potentially active transposons or transposon-like sequences that reside in the germline. Three independent studies recently showed that transposase proteins of the DDE/DDD superfamily are indispensible for DNA processing in three distantly related ciliates. In the spirotrich Oxytricha trifallax, high copy-number germline-limited transposons mediate their own excision from the somatic genome but also contribute to programmed genome rearrangement through a remarkable transposon mutualism with the host. By contrast, the genomes of two oligohymenophorean ciliates, Tetrahymena thermophila and Paramecium tetraurelia, encode homologous PiggyBac-like transposases as single-copy genes in both their germline and somatic genomes. These domesticated transposases are essential for deletion of thousands of different internal sequences in these species. This review contrasts the events underlying somatic genome reduction in three different ciliates and considers their evolutionary origins and the relationships among their distinct mechanisms for genome remodeling.

  9. Insights into structural variations and genome rearrangements in prokaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periwal, Vinita; Scaria, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Structural variations (SVs) are genomic rearrangements that affect fairly large fragments of DNA. Most of the SVs such as inversions, deletions and translocations have been largely studied in context of genetic diseases in eukaryotes. However, recent studies demonstrate that genome rearrangements can also have profound impact on prokaryotic genomes, leading to altered cell phenotype. In contrast to single-nucleotide variations, SVs provide a much deeper insight into organization of bacterial genomes at a much better resolution. SVs can confer change in gene copy number, creation of new genes, altered gene expression and many other functional consequences. High-throughput technologies have now made it possible to explore SVs at a much refined resolution in bacterial genomes. Through this review, we aim to highlight the importance of the less explored field of SVs in prokaryotic genomes and their impact. We also discuss its potential applicability in the emerging fields of synthetic biology and genome engineering where targeted SVs could serve to create sophisticated and accurate genome editing. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. FASEB Summer Research Conference. Genetic Recombination and Chromosome Rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2002-02-01

    The 2001 meeting entitled ''Genetic Recombination and Genome Rearrangements'' was held July 21-26 in Snowmass, Colorado. The goal of the meeting was to bring together scientists using diverse approaches to study all aspects of genetic recombination. This goal was achieved by integrating talks covering the genetics, biochemistry and structural biology of homologous recombination, site-specific recombination, and nonhomologous recombination. The format of the meeting consisted of a keynote address on the opening evening, two formal plenary sessions on each of the four full meeting days, a single afternoon workshop consisting of short talks chosen from among submitted abstracts, and afternoon poster sessions on each of the four full meeting days. The eight plenary session were entitled: (1) Recombination Mechanisms, (2) Prokaryotic Recombination, (3) Repair and Recombination, (4) Site-specific Recombination and Transposition, (5) Eukaryotic Recombination I, (6) Genome Rearrangements, (7) Meiosis, and (8) Eukaryotic Recombination II. Each session included a mix of genetic, biochemical and structural talks; talks were limited to 20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of very lively, general discussion. Much of the data presented in the plenary sessions was unpublished, thus providing attendees with the most up-to-date knowledge of this rapidly-moving field.

  11. Regioselective 1-N-Alkylation and Rearrangement of Adenosine Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oslovsky, Vladimir E; Drenichev, Mikhail S; Mikhailov, Sergey N

    2015-01-01

    Several methods for the preparation of some N(6)-substituted adenosines based on selective 1-N-alkylation with subsequent Dimroth rearrangement were developed. The proposed methods seem to be effective for the preparation of natural N(6)-isopentenyl- and N(6)-benzyladenosines, which are known to possess pronounced biological activities. Direct 1-N-alkylation of 2',3',5'-tri-O-acetyladenosine and 3',5'-di-O-acetyl-2'-deoxyadenosine with alkyl halides in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) in the presence of BaCO3 and KI gave 1-N-substituted derivatives with quantitative yields, whereas 1-N-alkylation of adenosine was accompanied by significant O-alkylation. Moreover, the reaction of trimethylsilyl derivatives of N(6)-acetyl-2',3',5'-tri-O-acetyladenosine and N(6)-acetyl-3',5'-di-O-acetyl-2'-deoxyadenosine with alkyl halides leads to the formation of the stable 1-N-substituted adenosines. Dimroth rearrangement of 1-N-substituted adenosines in aqueous ammonia yields pure N(6)-substituted adenosines.

  12. Potentiometric studies on ternary complexes involving some divalent transition metal ions, gallic acid and biologically abundant aliphatic dicarboxylic acids in aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelatty Mohamed Radalla

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Formation of binary and ternary complexes of the divalent transition metal ions, Cu2+, Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ with gallic acid and the biologically important aliphatic dicarboxylic acids (adipic, succinic, malic, malonic, maleic, tartaric and oxalic acids were investigated by means of the potentiometric technique at 25 °C and I = 0.10 mol dm−3 NaNO3. The acid-base properties of the ligands were investigated and discussed. The acidity constants of gallic acid and aliphatic dicarboxylic acids were determined and used for determining the stability constants of the binary and ternary complexes formed in the aqueous medium under the above experimental conditions. The formation of the different 1:1 and 1:2 binary complexes and 1:1:1 ternary complexes are inferred from the corresponding potentiometric pH-metric titration curves. The ternary complex formation was found to occur in a stepwise manner. The stability constants of these binary and ternary systems were calculated. The values of Δ log K, percentage of relative stabilization (%R.S. and log X were evaluated and discussed. The concentration distribution of the various complex species formed in solution was evaluated and discussed. The mode of chelation of ternary complexes formed was ascertained by conductivity measurements.

  13. Biotransformation of Daclatasvir In Vitro and in Nonclinical Species: Formation of the Main Metabolite by Pyrrolidine δ-Oxidation and Rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenying; Zhao, Weiping; Liu, Xiaohong; Huang, Xiaohua; Lopez, Omar D; Leet, John E; Fancher, R Marcus; Nguyen, Van; Goodrich, Jason; Easter, John; Hong, Yang; Caceres-Cortes, Janet; Chang, Shu Y; Ma, Li; Belema, Makonen; Hamann, Lawrence G; Gao, Min; Zhu, Mingshe; Shu, Yue-Zhong; Humphreys, W Griffith; Johnson, Benjamin M

    2016-06-01

    Daclatasvir is a first-in-class, potent, and selective inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 5A replication complex. In support of nonclinical studies during discovery and exploratory development, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance were used in connection with synthetic and radiosynthetic approaches to investigate the biotransformation of daclatasvir in vitro and in cynomolgus monkeys, dogs, mice, and rats. The results of these studies indicated that disposition of daclatasvir was accomplished mainly by the release of unchanged daclatasvir into bile and feces and, secondarily, by oxidative metabolism. Cytochrome P450s were the main enzymes involved in the metabolism of daclatasvir. Oxidative pathways included δ-oxidation of the pyrrolidine moiety, resulting in ring opening to an aminoaldehyde intermediate followed by an intramolecular reaction between the aldehyde and the proximal imidazole nitrogen atom. Despite robust formation of the resulting metabolite in multiple systems, rates of covalent binding to protein associated with metabolism of daclatasvir were modest (55.2-67.8 pmol/mg/h) in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced form)-supplemented liver microsomes (human, monkey, rat), suggesting that intramolecular rearrangement was favored over intermolecular binding in the formation of this metabolite. This biotransformation profile supported the continued development of daclatasvir, which is now marketed for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. Evidence that the assembly of the yeast cytochrome bc1 complex involves the formation of a large core structure in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Vincenzo; Conte, Laura; Trumpower, Bernard L

    2009-04-01

    The assembly status of the cytochrome bc(1) complex has been analyzed in distinct yeast deletion strains in which genes for one or more of the bc(1) subunits were deleted. In all the yeast strains tested, a bc(1) sub-complex of approximately 500 kDa was found when the mitochondrial membranes were analyzed by blue native electrophoresis. The subsequent molecular characterization of this sub-complex, carried out in the second dimension by SDS/PAGE and immunodecoration, revealed the presence of the two catalytic subunits, cytochrome b and cytochrome c(1), associated with the noncatalytic subunits core protein 1, core protein 2, Qcr7p and Qcr8p. Together, these bc(1) subunits build up the core structure of the cytochrome bc(1) complex, which is then able to sequentially bind the remaining subunits, such as Qcr6p, Qcr9p, the Rieske iron-sulfur protein and Qcr10p. This bc(1) core structure may represent a true assembly intermediate during the maturation of the bc(1) complex; first, because of its wide distribution in distinct yeast deletion strains and, second, for its characteristics of stability, which resemble those of the intact homodimeric bc(1) complex. By contrast, the bc(1) core structure is unable to interact with the cytochrome c oxidase complex to form respiratory supercomplexes. The characterization of this novel core structure of the bc(1) complex provides a number of new elements clarifying the molecular events leading to the maturation of the yeast cytochrome bc(1) complex in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

  15. Evidence that assembly of the yeast cytochrome bc1 complex involves formation of a large core structure in the inner mitochondrial membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Vincenzo; Conte, Laura; Trumpower, Bernard L.

    2009-01-01

    The assembly status of the cytochrome bc1 complex has been analyzed in distinct yeast deletion strains in which genes for one or more of the bc1 subunits had been deleted. In all the yeast strains tested a bc1 sub-complex of about 500 kDa was found when the mitochondrial membranes were analyzed by blue native electrophoresis. The subsequent molecular characterization of this sub-complex, carried out in the second dimension by SDS-PAGE and immunodecoration, revealed the presence of the two catalytic subunits cytochrome b and cytochrome c1, associated with the non catalytic subunits core protein 1, core protein 2, Qcr7p and Qcr8p. Altogether these bc1 subunits build up the core structure of the cytochrome bc1 complex which is then able to sequentially bind the remaining subunits, such as Qcr6p, Qcr9p, the Rieske iron-sulfur protein and Qcr10p. This bc1 core structure may represent a true assembly intermediate during the maturation of the bc1 complex, first because of its wide distribution in distinct yeast deletion strains and second for its characteristics of stability which resemble those of the intact homodimeric bc1 complex. Differently from this latter, however, the bc1 core structure is not able to interact with the cytochrome c oxidase complex to form respiratory supercomplexes. The characterization of this novel core structure of the bc1 complex provides a number of new elements for clarification of the molecular events leading to the maturation of the yeast cytochrome bc1 complex in the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:19236481

  16. Application of the inter-line PCR for the analyse of genomic rearrangements in radiation-transformed mammalian cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibhard, S.; Smida, J.

    1996-01-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences of the LINE-family (long interspersed elements) that are widely distributed among the mammalian genome can be activated or altered by the exposure to ionizing radiation [1]. By the integration at new sites in the genome alterations in the expression of genes that are involved in cell transformation and/or carcinogenesis may occur [2, 3]. A new technique -the inter-LINE PCR - has been developed in order to detect and analyse such genomic rearrangements in radiation-transformed cell lines. From the sites of transformation- or tumour-specific changes in the genome it might be possible to develop new tumour markers for diagnostic purpose. (orig.) [de

  17. -Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes of Mineral Acids

    KAUST Repository

    Brill, Marcel; Nahra, Fady; Gó mez-Herrera, Alberto; Zinser, Caroline; Cordes, David B.; Slawin, Alexandra M. Z.; Nolan, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    We have synthesized and characterized new gold-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes derived from the deprotonation of mineral acids. The use of sulfuric acid was a particularly interesting case. These complexes were tested in known gold-catalyzed reactions, such as the hydration of alkynes and the Meyer–Schuster rearrangement. They proved to be highly efficient in both reactions.

  18. -Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes of Mineral Acids

    KAUST Repository

    Brill, Marcel

    2016-11-08

    We have synthesized and characterized new gold-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes derived from the deprotonation of mineral acids. The use of sulfuric acid was a particularly interesting case. These complexes were tested in known gold-catalyzed reactions, such as the hydration of alkynes and the Meyer–Schuster rearrangement. They proved to be highly efficient in both reactions.

  19. Novel tumorigenic rearrangement, Δrfp/ret, in a papillary thyroid carcinoma from externally irradiated patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenko, Vladimir; Rogounovitch, Tatiana; Shimizu-Yoshida, Yuki; Abrosimov, Aleksandr; Lushnikov, Eugeny; Roumiantsev, Pavel; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Nakashima, Masahiro; Meirmanov, Serik; Ohtsuru, Akira; Namba, Hiroyuki; Tsyb, Anatoly; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2003-01-01

    Molecular analysis of cDNA derived from a papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) (follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma on histology) which developed in an externally irradiated patient 4 years after exposure identified a portion of the 5' region, exons 1-3, of the rfp gene juxtaposed upstream of the fragment encoding the tyrosine kinase (TK) domain of the ret gene. The fusion gene, termed Δrfp/ret, was the result of a balanced chromosomal translocation t(6;10) (p21.3;q11.2) confirmed by interphase FISH painting, with breakpoints occurring in introns 3 and 11 of the rfp and ret genes, respectively. Both Δrfp/ret and reciprocal ret/rfp chimeric introns had small deletions around breakpoints consistent with presumed misrepair of a radiation-induced double-strand DNA break underlying the rearrangement. No extensive sequence homology was found between the fragments flanking the breakpoints. The fusion protein retained the propensity to form oligomers likely to be mediated by a coiled-coil of the RFP polypeptide as assessed by a yeast two-hybrid system. NIH 3T3 fibroblasts stably transfected with a mammalian expression vector encoding full-length ΔRFP/RET readily gave rise to the tumors in athymic mice suggestive of high transforming potential of the fusion protein. Thus, the Δrfp/ret rearrangement may be causatively involved in cancerogenesis and provides additional evidence of the role of activated ret oncogene in the development of a subset of papillary thyroid carcinoma

  20. Chromosomal rearrangements and protein globularity changes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from cerebrospinal fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seow Hoon Saw

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Meningitis is a major cause of mortality in tuberculosis (TB. It is not clear what factors promote central nervous system invasion and pathology but it has been reported that certain strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb might have genetic traits associated with neurotropism. Methods In this study, we generated whole genome sequences of eight clinical strains of Mtb that were isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients presenting with tuberculous meningitis (TBM in Malaysia, and compared them to the genomes of H37Rv and other respiratory Mtb genomes either downloaded from public databases or extracted from local sputum isolates. We aimed to find genomic features that might be distinctly different between CSF-derived and respiratory Mtb. Results Genome-wide comparisons revealed rearrangements (translocations, inversions, insertions and deletions and non-synonymous SNPs in our CSF-derived strains that were not observed in the respiratory Mtb genomes used for comparison. These rearranged segments were rich in genes for PE (proline-glutamate/PPE (proline-proline-glutamate, transcriptional and membrane proteins. Similarly, most of the ns SNPs common in CSF strains were noted in genes encoding PE/PPE proteins. Protein globularity differences were observed among mycobacteria from CSF and respiratory sources and in proteins previously reported to be associated with TB meningitis. Transcription factors and other transcription regulators featured prominently in these proteins. Homologs of proteins associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis and Neisseria meningitidis virulence were identified in neuropathogenic as well as respiratory mycobacterial spp. examined in this study. Discussion The occurrence of in silico genetic differences in CSF-derived but not respiratory Mtb suggests their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of TBM. However, overall findings in this comparative analysis support the postulation that TB

  1. Novel tumorigenic rearrangement, {delta}rfp/ret, in a papillary thyroid carcinoma from externally irradiated patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenko, Vladimir; Rogounovitch, Tatiana; Shimizu-Yoshida, Yuki; Abrosimov, Aleksandr; Lushnikov, Eugeny; Roumiantsev, Pavel; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Nakashima, Masahiro; Meirmanov, Serik; Ohtsuru, Akira; Namba, Hiroyuki; Tsyb, Anatoly; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2003-06-19

    Molecular analysis of cDNA derived from a papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) (follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma on histology) which developed in an externally irradiated patient 4 years after exposure identified a portion of the 5' region, exons 1-3, of the rfp gene juxtaposed upstream of the fragment encoding the tyrosine kinase (TK) domain of the ret gene. The fusion gene, termed {delta}rfp/ret, was the result of a balanced chromosomal translocation t(6;10) (p21.3;q11.2) confirmed by interphase FISH painting, with breakpoints occurring in introns 3 and 11 of the rfp and ret genes, respectively. Both {delta}rfp/ret and reciprocal ret/rfp chimeric introns had small deletions around breakpoints consistent with presumed misrepair of a radiation-induced double-strand DNA break underlying the rearrangement. No extensive sequence homology was found between the fragments flanking the breakpoints. The fusion protein retained the propensity to form oligomers likely to be mediated by a coiled-coil of the RFP polypeptide as assessed by a yeast two-hybrid system. NIH 3T3 fibroblasts stably transfected with a mammalian expression vector encoding full-length {delta}RFP/RET readily gave rise to the tumors in athymic mice suggestive of high transforming potential of the fusion protein. Thus, the {delta}rfp/ret rearrangement may be causatively involved in cancerogenesis and provides additional evidence of the role of activated ret oncogene in the development of a subset of papillary thyroid carcinoma.

  2. Nucleoplasmic bridges are a sensitive measure of chromosome rearrangement in the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenech, M.; Umegaki, K.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We have performed experiments using the WIL2-NS human B-lymphoblastoid cell line and primary human lymphocytes to (a) determine the importance of including measurements of nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) in the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay and (b) provide evidence that NPB originate from dicentric chromosomes and centric ring chromosomes. In addition we describe theoretical models that explain how dicentric chromosomes and centric ring chromosomes may result in the formation of NPB at anaphase. The results with WIL2-NS showed that it was possible to distinguish genotoxic effects induced by different oxidizing agents in terms of the NPB/micronucleus frequency ratio. The results with lymphocytes indicated a strong correlation (a) between NPB, centric ring chromosomes and dicentric chromosomes in metaphases (R>0.93, P 0.93, P<0.0001). The dose-response curves with gamma rays were very similar for NPB, ring chromosomes and dicentric chromosomes, as were the dose-responses for MNi, acentric rings and fragments. However, not all acentric chromosomes and dicentric chromosomes/centric rings were converted to MNi and NPB respectively, depending on the dose of radiation. Preliminary data, using FISH, suggests that NPB often represent DNA from a structural rearrangement involving only one or two homologous chromosomes. The results from this study validate the inclusion of NPB in the CBMN assay which provides a valuable measure of chromosome breakage/ rearrangement that was otherwise not available in the micronucleus assay. The CBMN assay allows NPB measurement to be achieved reliably because inhibition of cytokinesis prevents the loss of NPB that would otherwise occur if cells were allowed to divide

  3. Studies on the mixed ligand complexes of copper(II involving a sulfa drug and some potentially bi or tridentate ligands under physiological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Regupathy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The stability constants of mixed ligand complexes formed in the Cu(II-sulfathiazole(stz(A-glycine(gly, dl-2-aminobutanoic acid(2aba, dl-3-aminobutanoic acid(3aba, 1,2-diaminopropane(dp, 1,3-diaminopropane(tp, dl-2,3-diaminopropanoic acid(dapa, dl-2,4-diaminobutanoic acid(daba, dl-2,5-diaminopentanoic acid(ornithine, orn(B systems have been determined pH-metrically at 37 °C and I = 0.15 mol dm−3 (NaClO4 using SCOGS program. Analysis of experimental data indicates the presence of CuABH, CuAB, CuAB2H2 or CuAB2 species. The Δlog K values demonstrate higher stabilities for the mixed ligand complexes compared to the binary analogues. The CuAB complexes with B = gly, 2aba, dapa & orn systems were isolated and characterized using micro analytical, magnetic moment, ESR, electrochemical studies, TG/DTA, power XRD and SEM analysis. Magnetic susceptibility and electronic spectral studies suggest square planar geometry for the CuAB complexes. The g values indicate that the unpaired electron lies in thedx2-y2 orbital. The TG/DTA studies reveal that the complexes are non hydrated and possesses high thermal stability. The powder XRD data suggest that the complex is microcrystalline. The antimicrobial activity and CT DNA cleavage studies of the complexes are also reported.

  4. Coffin-Siris syndrome and related disorders involving components of the BAF (mSWI/SNF) complex: historical review and recent advances using next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosho, Tomoki; Miyake, Noriko; Carey, John C

    2014-09-01

    This issue of Seminars in Medical Genetics, American Journal of Medical Genetics Part C investigates the human diseases caused by mutations in the BAF complex (also known as the mammalian SWI/SNF complex) genes, particularly focusing on Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS). CSS is a rare congenital malformation syndrome characterized by developmental delay or intellectual disability (ID), coarse facial appearance, feeding difficulties, frequent infections, and hypoplasia/aplasia of the fifth fingernails and fifth distal phalanges. In 2012, 42 years after the first description of CSS in 1970, five causative genes (SMARCB1, SMARCE1, SMARCA4, ARID1A, ARID1B), all encoding components of the BAF complex, were identified as being responsible for CSS through whole exome sequencing and pathway-based genetic screening. The identification of two additional causative genes (PHF6, SOX11) followed. Mutations in another BAF complex gene (SMARCA2) and (TBC1D24) were found to cause clinically similar conditions with ID, Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome and DOORS syndrome, respectively. Also, ADNP was found to be mutated in an autism/ID syndrome. Furthermore, there is growing evidences for germline or somatic mutations in the BAF complex genes to be causal for cancer/cancer predisposition syndromes. These discoveries have highlighted the role of the BAF complex in the human development and cancer formation. The biology of BAF is very complicated and much remains unknown. Ongoing research is required to reveal the whole picture of the BAF complex in human development, and will lead to the development of new targeted therapies for related disorders in the future. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Early recurrence in standard-risk medulloblastoma patients with the common idic(17)(p11.2) rearrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien-Willner, Gabriel A.; López-Terrada, Dolores; Bhattacharjee, Meena B.; Patel, Kayuri U.; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Lupski, James R.; Pfeifer, John D.; Perry, Arie

    2012-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is diagnosed histologically; treatment depends on staging and age of onset. Whereas clinical factors identify a standard- and a high-risk population, these findings cannot differentiate which standard-risk patients will relapse and die. Outcome is thought to be influenced by tumor subtype and molecular alterations. Poor prognosis has been associated with isochromosome (i)17q in some but not all studies. In most instances, molecular investigations document that i17q is not a true isochromosome but rather an isodicentric chromosome, idic(17)(p11.2), with rearrangement breakpoints mapping within the REPA/REPB region on 17p11.2. This study explores the clinical utility of testing for idic(17)(p11.2) rearrangements using an assay based on fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). This test was applied to 58 consecutive standard- and high-risk medulloblastomas with a 5-year minimum of clinical follow-up. The presence of i17q (ie, including cases not involving the common breakpoint), idic(17)(p11.2), and histologic subtype was correlated with clinical outcome. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were consistent with literature reports. Fourteen patients (25%) had i17q, with 10 (18%) involving the common isodicentric rearrangement. The presence of i17q was associated with a poor prognosis. OS and DFS were poor in all cases with anaplasia (4), unresectable disease (7), and metastases at presentation (10); however, patients with standard-risk tumors fared better. Of these 44 cases, tumors with idic(17)(p11.2) were associated with significantly worse patient outcomes and shorter mean DFS. FISH detection of idic(17)(p11.2) may be useful for risk stratification in standard-risk patients. The presence of this abnormal chromosome is associated with early recurrence of medulloblastoma. PMID:22573308

  6. Scope and Mechanism of a True Organocatalytic Beckmann Rearrangement with a Boronic Acid/Perfluoropinacol System under Ambient Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xiaobin; Morgan, Timothy D R; Ang, Hwee Ting; Hall, Dennis G

    2018-04-18

    Catalytic activation of hydroxyl functionalities is of great interest for the production of pharmaceuticals and commodity chemicals. Here, 2-alkoxycarbonyl- and 2-phenoxycarbonyl-phenylboronic acid were identified as efficient catalysts for the direct and chemoselective activation of oxime N-OH bonds in the Beckmann rearrangement. This classical organic reaction provides a unique approach to prepare functionalized amide products that may be difficult to access using traditional amide coupling between carboxylic acids and amines. Using only 5 mol % of boronic acid catalyst and perfluoropinacol as an additive in a polar solvent mixture, the operationally simple protocol features mild conditions, a broad substrate scope, and a high functional group tolerance. A wide variety of diaryl, aryl-alkyl, heteroaryl-alkyl, and dialkyl oximes react under ambient conditions to afford high yields of amide products. Free alcohols, amides, carboxyesters, and many other functionalities are compatible with the reaction conditions. Investigations of the catalytic cycle revealed a novel boron-induced oxime transesterification providing an acyl oxime intermediate involved in a fully catalytic nonself-propagating Beckmann rearrangement mechanism. The acyl oxime intermediate was prepared independently and was subjected to the reaction conditions. It was found to be self-sufficient; it reacts rapidly, unimolecularly without the need for free oxime. A series of control experiments and 18 O labeling studies support a true catalytic pathway involving an ionic transition structure with an active and essential role for the boronyl moiety in both steps of transesterification and rearrangement. According to 11 B NMR spectroscopic studies, the additive perfluoropinacol provides a transient, electrophilic boronic ester that is thought to serve as an internal Lewis acid to activate the ortho-carboxyester and accelerate the initial, rate-limiting step of transesterification between the precatalyst

  7. A Divergent Mechanistic Course of Pd(0)-Catalyzed Aza-Claisen Rearrangement and Aza-Rautenstrauch-Type Cyclization of N-Allyl-Ynamides

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKorver, Kyle A.; Hsung, Richard P.; Lohse, Andrew G.; Zhang, Yu

    2010-01-01

    A fascinating mechanistic study of ynamido-palladium-π-allyl complexes is described that features isolation of a unique silyl-ketenimine via aza-Claisen rearrangement, which can be accompanied by an unusual thermal N-to-C 1,3-Ts shift in the formation of tertiary nitriles, and a novel cyclopentenimine formation via a palladium catalyzed aza-Rautenstrauch-type cyclization pathway. PMID:20337418

  8. SYNTHESIS OF ALLYL PHENYL ETHER AND CLAISEN REARRANGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagik Torosyan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been established the possibility for phenol allylation on natural zeolites and them analogs. Here is demonstrated the synthesis of allyl phenol, which has wide industrial applications. The offered method in comparison with the traditional methods has more advantages – higher selectivity, smaller material and power resources consumption. It has been obtained the mixture of allylating phenols (30% in general with allyl phenyl ether (1 with 80% yields. At 600 K is obtained allylphenyl ether, at 700 K beginning the formation of allyl phenols, which is the result of direct C-allylation of the aromatic ring. It has been investigated the possibility of Claisen rearrangement in the same conditions. All of that are established by gas-liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography data.

  9. Highly rearranged mitochondrial genome in Nycteria parasites (Haemosporidia) from bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadjian, Gregory; Hassanin, Alexandre; Saintpierre, Benjamin; Gembu Tungaluna, Guy-Crispin; Ariey, Frederic; Ayala, Francisco J; Landau, Irene; Duval, Linda

    2016-08-30

    Haemosporidia parasites have mostly and abundantly been described using mitochondrial genes, and in particular cytochrome b (cytb). Failure to amplify the mitochondrial cytb gene of Nycteria parasites isolated from Nycteridae bats has been recently reported. Bats are hosts to a diverse and profuse array of Haemosporidia parasites that remain largely unstudied. There is a need to obtain more molecular data from chiropteran parasites. Such data would help to better understand the evolutionary history of Haemosporidia, which notably include the Plasmodium parasites, malaria's agents. We use next-generation sequencing to obtain the complete mitochondrial genome of Nycteria parasites from African Nycteris grandis (Nycteridae) and Rhinolophus alcyone (Rhinolophidae) and Asian Megaderma spasma (Megadermatidae). We report four complete mitochondrial genomes, including two rearranged mitochondrial genomes within Haemosporidia. Our results open outlooks into potentially undiscovered Haemosporidian diversity.

  10. New type of cells with multiple chromosome rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aseeva, Elena A. [National Research Centre for Hematology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Novozykovsky proezd 4a, 125167 Moscow (Russian Federation); Snigiryova, Galina P. [Russian Scientific Centre of Roentgenology and Radiology, ul. Profsoyuznaya 86, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Neverova, Anna L. [National Research Centre for Hematology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Novozykovsky proezd 4a, 125167 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bogomazova, Alexandra N.; Novitskaya, Natalia N.; Khazins, Eva D. [Russian Scientific Centre of Roentgenology and Radiology, ul. Profsoyuznaya 86, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Domracheva, Elena V. [National Research Centre for Hematology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Novozykovsky proezd 4a, 125167 Moscow (Russian Federation)], E-mail: dom@blood.ru

    2010-04-15

    A comparative analysis of the distribution and the frequency of multiaberrant cells (MAC) among lymphocytes in different categories of low dose (up to 0.5 Gy) irradiated people was carried out. The highest MAC frequency was observed in people exposed to {alpha}-radiation (Pu, Rn) and in cosmonauts. This fact allows MAC to be considered as an indicator of a high-energy local exposure. A new type of cells with multiple chromosome rearrangements was discovered in the course of analysis of stable aberrations by the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method. The biological consequences of MAC formation and possibility of revealing the whole diversity of cells with multiple aberrations by means of modern molecular-cytogenetic methods are discussed.

  11. New type of cells with multiple chromosome rearrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aseeva, E.A.; Domracheva, E.V.; Neverova, A.L; Bogomazova, A.N.; Snigiryova, G.P.; Novitskaya, N.N.; Khazins, E.D.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: A comparative analysis of the distribution and the frequency of multiaberrant cells (MAC) among lymphocytes in different categories of low dose (up to 0.5 Gy) irradiated people was carried out. MAC were found in most of the examined groups and they were absent in the control population. A highest MAC frequency was observed in people exposed to alpha radiation (Pu, Ra). This fact allows MAC to be considered as an indicator of a high-energy local exposure. A new type of cells with multiple chromosome rearrangements was discovered in the course of analysis of stable aberrations by the FISH method. The biological consequences of MAC formation and possibility of revealing the whole diversity of cells with multiple aberrations by means of modern molecular-cytogenetic methods is discussed

  12. Deep ancestry of programmed genome rearrangement in lampreys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A; Lampman, Ralph T; Hess, Jon E; Porter, Laurie L; Smith, Jeramiah J

    2017-09-01

    In most multicellular organisms, the structure and content of the genome is rigorously maintained over the course of development. However some species have evolved genome biologies that permit, or require, developmentally regulated changes in the physical structure and content of the genome (programmed genome rearrangement: PGR). Relatively few vertebrates are known to undergo PGR, although all agnathans surveyed to date (several hagfish and one lamprey: Petromyzon marinus) show evidence of large scale PGR. To further resolve the ancestry of PGR within vertebrates, we developed probes that allow simultaneous tracking of nearly all sequences eliminated by PGR in P. marinus and a second lamprey species (Entosphenus tridentatus). These comparative analyses reveal conserved subcellular structures (lagging chromatin and micronuclei) associated with PGR and provide the first comparative embryological evidence in support of the idea that PGR represents an ancient and evolutionarily stable strategy for regulating inherent developmental/genetic conflicts between germline and soma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Infrared divergence enforces a rearranged perturbation expansion II QED

    CERN Document Server

    Matsson, L

    1977-01-01

    For pt.I see ibid., vol.39A, p.604 (1977). Part I showed, for the case of scalar electrodynamics, that the ordinary perturbation expansion (OPE) must, except in certain cases, be rearranged in order to carry out uniquely the infrared (IR) exponentiation in a translation- and gauge-invariant way. The uniqueness of the exponent of order alpha follows from requiring exact order-by-order agreement with the OPE before summation and also from requiring that exponentiation of all factorizable parts must be done before integration. This technique is applied to ordinary spinor QED and a similar result is obtained without making the gamma -matrix algebra more complicated than in the OPE. This technique explicitly exhibits the structure of the remaining IR-regular part, which appears in terms of a correlation expansion with respect to photon momenta. (9 refs).

  14. X-ray studies on crystalline complexes involving amino acids and peptides. XXXII. Effect of chirality on ionisation state, stoichiometry and aggregation in the complexes of oxalic acid with DL- and L-lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, J; Prabu, M M; Vijayan, M

    1997-08-01

    Crystals of the oxalic acid complex of DL-lysine (triclinic P1; a = 5.540(1), b = 10.764(2), c = 12.056(2) A, alpha = 77.8(1), beta = 80.6(1), gamma = 75.6(1).; R = 4.7% for 2023 observed reflections) contain lysine and semioxalate ions in the 1:1 ratio, whereas the ratio of lysine and semioxalate/oxalate ions is 2:3 in the crystals of the L-lysine complex (monoclinic P2(1); alpha = 4.906(1), b = 20.145(4), c = 12.455(1) A, beta = 92.5(1).; R = 4.4% for 1494 observed reflections). The amino acid molecule in the L-lysine complex has an unusual ionisation state with positively charged alpha- and side-chain amino groups and a neutral carboxyl group. The unlike molecules aggregate into separate alternating layers in the DL-lysine complex in a manner similar to that observed in several of the amino acid complexes. The L-lysine complex exhibits a new aggregation pattern which cannot be easily explained in terms of planar features, thus emphasizing the fundamental dependence of aggregation on molecular characteristics. Despite the differences in stoichiometry, ionisation state and long-range aggregation patterns, the basic element of aggregation in the two complexes exhibits considerable similarity.

  15. Recent applications of the divinylcyclopropane–cycloheptadiene rearrangement in organic synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Krüger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the application of the divinylcyclopropane–cycloheptadiene rearrangement in synthetic organic chemistry. A brief overview of the new mechanistic insights concerning the title reaction is provided as well as a condensed account on the biological relevance of the topic. Heteroatom variants of this rearrangement are covered briefly.

  16. Hydrogen rearrangement to and from radical z fragments in electron capture dissociation of peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savitski, Mikhail M; Kjeldsen, Frank; Nielsen, Michael L

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen rearrangement is an important process in radical chemistry. A high degree of H. rearrangement to and from z. ionic fragments (combined occurrence frequency 47% compared with that of z.) is confirmed in analysis of 15,000 tandem mass spectra of tryptic peptides obtained with electron...

  17. Initiation of MLL-rearranged AML is dependent on C/EBPα

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlsson, Ewa; Hasemann, Marie Sigurd; Willer, Anton

    2014-01-01

    have compared gene expression profiles from human MLL-rearranged AML to normal progenitors and identified the myeloid tumor suppressor C/EBPα as a putative collaborator in MLL-rearranged AML. Interestingly, we find that deletion of Cebpa rendered murine hematopoietic progenitors completely resistant...

  18. Heterogeneity of BCR-ABL rearrangement in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Najia; Saboor, Mohammad; Ghani, Rubina; Moinuddin, Moinuddin

    2014-07-01

    Breakpoint cluster region-Abelson (BCR-ABL) rearrangement or Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) is derived from a reciprocal chromosomal translocation between ABL gene on chromosome 9 and BCR gene on chromosome 22. This chimeric protein has various sizes and therefore different clinical behaviour. The purpose of this study was to determine the heterogeneity of BCR-ABL rearrangement in patients with Ph(+)CML in Pakistan. The study was conducted at Civil Hospital and Baqai Institute of Hematology (BIH) Karachi. Blood samples from 25 patients with CML were collected. Multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to identify various BCR-ABL transcripts. All 25 samples showed BCR-ABL rearrangements. Out of these, 24 (96%) patients expressed p210 BCR-ABL rearrangements i.e. 60% (n=15) had b3a2 and 32% (n=8) had b2a2 rearrangements. Co-expression of b3a2 /b2a2 rearrangement and p190 (e1a3) rearrangement was also identified in two patients. It is apparent that majority of the patients had p210 BCR-ABL rearrangements. Frequency of co-expression and rare fusion transcripts was very low.

  19. Photoprotection in Plants Involves a Change in Lutein 1 Binding Domain in the Major Light-harvesting Complex of Photosystem II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilioaia, C.; Johnson, M.P.; Liao, P.N.; Pascal, A.A.; van Grondelle, R.; Walla, P.J.; Ruban, A.V.; Robert, B.

    2011-01-01

    Nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) is the fundamental process by which plants exposed to high light intensities dissipate the potentially harmful excess energy as heat. Recently, it has been shown that efficient energy dissipation can be induced in the major light-harvesting complexes of photosystem

  20. Antigen detection in vivo after immunization with different presentation forms of rabies virus antigen: Involvement of marginal metallophilic macrophages in the uptake of immune-stimulating complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, I.J.T.M.; Osterhaus, A.D.M.E.; Claassen, E.

    1995-01-01

    Several mechanisms have been postulated to explain the relatively high immunogenicity of antigens presented in immune-stimulating complexes (iscom). Their potency can in part be explained by the specific targeting of these structures to cells presenting antigens to the immune system. However, until

  1. Antigen detection in vivo after immunization with different presentation forms of rabies virus antigen: involvement of marginal metallophilic macrophages in the uptake of immune-stimulating complexes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.J.Th.M. Claassen (Ivo); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); H.J.H.M. Claassen (Eric)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSeveral mechanisms have been postulated to explain the relatively high immunogenicity of antigens presented in immune-stimulating complexes (iscom). Their potency can in part be explained by the specific targeting of these structures to cells presenting antigens to the immune system.

  2. Csbnd H⋯Ni and Csbnd H⋯π(chelate) interactions in nickel(II) complexes involving functionalized dithiocarbamates and triphenylphosphine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiyaraj, E.; Thirumaran, S.; Selvanayagam, S.; Sridhar, B.; Ciattini, Samuele

    2018-05-01

    New bis(N-benzyl-N-substituted benzyldithiocarbamato-S,S‧)nickel(II) (1-3) and (N-benzyl-N-substituted benzyldithiocarbamato-S,S‧)(isothiocyanato-N)- (triphenylphosphane)nickel(II) (4-6) [where substituted benzyl = 2-HOsbnd C6H4sbnd CH2sbnd (1,4), 3-HOsbnd C6H4sbnd CH2sbnd (2,5), 4-Fsbnd C6H4sbnd CH2sbnd (3,6)] were synthesized and characterized using IR, electronic, and NMR (1H and 13C) spectra. X-ray structural analysis of homoleptic complex (1) and heteroleptic complexes (5 and 6) confirmed the presence of four coordinated nickel in a distorted square planar arrangement with NiS4 and NiS2PN chromophores, respectively. The νC-S stretching vibrations are observed around 990 cm-1 without any splitting supporting the bidentate coordination of the dithiocarbamate ligand. Electronic spectral studies of all the complexes (1-6) indicate that the geometry of the nickel atom is probably square planar. NMR spectra of all homoleptic and heteroleptic complexes (1-6) reveal a weak signal associated with the backbone carbon (N13CS2) in the region 204.0-210.0 ppm with a weak intensity characteristic of the quaternary carbon signals. The greater trans influence of triphenylphosphine in complexes 5 and 6 is supported by the long Nisbnd S distance compared to other Nisbnd S distance which is opposite to the NCS- ligand. In the structure of complex 5, C-H⋯π(chelate) interactions results in polymeric chain. Both structures show intramolecular Ni⋯H interactions but that on 6 is the strongest. C-H⋯π interactions are also found in 1, 5 and 6. Hirshfeld surface analysis and the associated 2D fingerprint plots of 1, 5 and 6 have been studied to evaluate intermolecular interactions. The molecular geometries of complexes 1, 5 and 6 have been optimized by abinitio HF method using LANL2DZ program.

  3. The RTR Complex Partner RMI2 and the DNA Helicase RTEL1 Are Both Independently Involved in Preserving the Stability of 45S rDNA Repeats in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Röhrig

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The stability of repetitive sequences in complex eukaryotic genomes is safeguarded by factors suppressing homologues recombination. Prominent in this is the role of the RTR complex. In plants, it consists of the RecQ helicase RECQ4A, the topoisomerase TOP3α and RMI1. Like mammals, but not yeast, plants harbor an additional complex partner, RMI2. Here, we demonstrate that, in Arabidopsis thaliana, RMI2 is involved in the repair of aberrant replication intermediates in root meristems as well as in intrastrand crosslink repair. In both instances, RMI2 is involved independently of the DNA helicase RTEL1. Surprisingly, simultaneous loss of RMI2 and RTEL1 leads to loss of male fertility. As both the RTR complex and RTEL1 are involved in suppression of homologous recombination (HR, we tested the efficiency of HR in the double mutant rmi2-2 rtel1-1 and found a synergistic enhancement (80-fold. Searching for natural target sequences we found that RTEL1 is required for stabilizing 45S rDNA repeats. In the double mutant with rmi2-2 the number of 45S rDNA repeats is further decreased sustaining independent roles of both factors in this process. Thus, loss of suppression of HR does not only lead to a destabilization of rDNA repeats but might be especially deleterious for tissues undergoing multiple cell divisions such as the male germline.

  4. The RTR Complex Partner RMI2 and the DNA Helicase RTEL1 Are Both Independently Involved in Preserving the Stability of 45S rDNA Repeats in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrig, Sarah; Schröpfer, Susan; Knoll, Alexander; Puchta, Holger

    2016-10-01

    The stability of repetitive sequences in complex eukaryotic genomes is safeguarded by factors suppressing homologues recombination. Prominent in this is the role of the RTR complex. In plants, it consists of the RecQ helicase RECQ4A, the topoisomerase TOP3α and RMI1. Like mammals, but not yeast, plants harbor an additional complex partner, RMI2. Here, we demonstrate that, in Arabidopsis thaliana, RMI2 is involved in the repair of aberrant replication intermediates in root meristems as well as in intrastrand crosslink repair. In both instances, RMI2 is involved independently of the DNA helicase RTEL1. Surprisingly, simultaneous loss of RMI2 and RTEL1 leads to loss of male fertility. As both the RTR complex and RTEL1 are involved in suppression of homologous recombination (HR), we tested the efficiency of HR in the double mutant rmi2-2 rtel1-1 and found a synergistic enhancement (80-fold). Searching for natural target sequences we found that RTEL1 is required for stabilizing 45S rDNA repeats. In the double mutant with rmi2-2 the number of 45S rDNA repeats is further decreased sustaining independent roles of both factors in this process. Thus, loss of suppression of HR does not only lead to a destabilization of rDNA repeats but might be especially deleterious for tissues undergoing multiple cell divisions such as the male germline.

  5. Correlating Structural Order with Structural Rearrangement in Dusty Plasma Liquids: Can Structural Rearrangement be Predicted by Static Structural Information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yen-Shuo; Liu, Yu-Hsuan; I, Lin

    2012-11-01

    Whether the static microstructural order information is strongly correlated with the subsequent structural rearrangement (SR) and their predicting power for SR are investigated experimentally in the quenched dusty plasma liquid with microheterogeneities. The poor local structural order is found to be a good alarm to identify the soft spot and predict the short term SR. For the site with good structural order, the persistent time for sustaining the structural memory until SR has a large mean value but a broad distribution. The deviation of the local structural order from that averaged over nearest neighbors serves as a good second alarm to further sort out the short time SR sites. It has the similar sorting power to that using the temporal fluctuation of the local structural order over a small time interval.

  6. Dienone-phenol Rearrangement of C-9 Oxygenated Decalinic Dienone and Analogs through B-Ring Cleavage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Dehydrogenation of 9-hydroxy decalinic enones and analogs with DDQ resulted in a formal dienone-phenol type rearrangement via B-ring cleavage, while the corresponding dienone acetates underwent base-catalyzed formal dienone-phenol type rearrangement analogously.

  7. Binding of hydrocarbons and other extremely weak ligands to transition metal complexes that coordinate hydrogen: Investigation of cis-interactions and delocalized bonding involving sigma bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubas, G.J.; Eckert, J.; Luo, X.L.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). At the forefront of chemistry are efforts to catalytically transform the inert C-H bonds in alkanes to more useful products using metal compounds. The goal is to observe binding and cleavage of alkane C-H bonds on metals or to use related silane Si-H bonding as models, analogous to the discovery of hydrogen (H 2 ) binding to metals. Studies of these unique sigma complexes (M hor-ellipsis H-Y; Y double-bond H, Si, C) will aid in developing new catalysts or technologies relevant to DOE interest, e.g., new methods for tritium isotope separation. Several transition metals (Mo, W, Mn, and Pt) were found to reversibly bind and cleave H 2 , silanes, and halocarbons. The first metal-SiH 4 complexes, thus serving as a model for methane reactions. A second goal is to study the dynamics and energetics of H-Y bonds on metals by neutron scattering, and evidence for interactions between bound H-Y and nearby H atoms on metal complexes has been found

  8. Dynamic chromosomal rearrangements in Hodgkin's lymphoma are due to ongoing three-dimensional nuclear remodeling and breakage-bridge-fusion cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffei, Amanda; Sarkar, Rahul; Klewes, Ludger; Righolt, Christiaan; Knecht, Hans; Mai, Sabine

    2010-12-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is characterized by the presence of mono-nucleated Hodgkin cells and bi- to multi-nucleated Reed-Sternberg cells. We have recently shown telomere dysfunction and aberrant synchronous/asynchronous cell divisions during the transition of Hodgkin cells to Reed-Sternberg cells.1 To determine whether overall changes in nuclear architecture affect genomic instability during the transition of Hodgkin cells to Reed-Sternberg cells, we investigated the nuclear organization of chromosomes in these cells. Three-dimensional fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed irregular nuclear positioning of individual chromosomes in Hodgkin cells and, more so, in Reed-Sternberg cells. We characterized an increasingly unequal distribution of chromosomes as mono-nucleated cells became multi-nucleated cells, some of which also contained chromosome-poor 'ghost' cell nuclei. Measurements of nuclear chromosome positions suggested chromosome overlaps in both types of cells. Spectral karyotyping then revealed both aneuploidy and complex chromosomal rearrangements: multiple breakage-bridge-fusion cycles were at the origin of the multiple rearranged chromosomes. This conclusion was challenged by super resolution three-dimensional structured illumination imaging of Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg nuclei. Three-dimensional super resolution microscopy data documented inter-nuclear DNA bridges in multi-nucleated cells but not in mono-nucleated cells. These bridges consisted of chromatids and chromosomes shared by two Reed-Sternberg nuclei. The complexity of chromosomal rearrangements increased as Hodgkin cells developed into multi-nucleated cells, thus indicating tumor progression and evolution in Hodgkin's lymphoma, with Reed-Sternberg cells representing the highest complexity in chromosomal rearrangements in this disease. This is the first study to demonstrate nuclear remodeling and associated genomic instability leading to the generation of Reed-Sternberg cells of Hodgkin's lymphoma

  9. Combined mutation and rearrangement screening by quantitative PCR high-resolution melting: is it relevant for hereditary recurrent Fever genes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Pallares-Ruiz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent identification of genes implicated in hereditary recurrent fevers has allowed their specific diagnosis. So far however, only punctual mutations have been identified and a significant number of patients remain with no genetic confirmation of their disease after routine molecular approaches such as sequencing. The possible involvement of sequence rearrangements in these patients has only been examined in familial Mediterranean fever and was found to be unlikely. To assess the existence of larger genetic alterations in 3 other concerned genes, MVK (Mevalonate kinase, NLRP3 (Nod like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 and TNFRSF1A (TNF receptor superfamily 1A, we adapted the qPCR-HRM method to study possible intragenic deletions and duplications. This single-tube approach, combining both qualitative (mutations and quantitative (rearrangement screening, has proven effective in Lynch syndrome diagnosis. Using this approach, we studied 113 unselected (prospective group and 88 selected (retrospective group patients and identified no intragenic rearrangements in the 3 genes. Only qualitative alterations were found with a sensitivity similar to that obtained using classical molecular techniques for screening punctual mutations. Our results support that deleterious copy number alterations in MVK, NLRP3 and TNFRSF1A are rare or absent from the mutational spectrum of hereditary recurrent fevers, and demonstrate that a routine combined method such as qPCR-HRM provides no further help in genetic diagnosis. However, quantitative approaches such as qPCR or SQF-PCR did prove to be quick and effective and could still be useful after non contributory punctual mutation screening in the presence of clinically evocative signs.

  10. Visual motion imagery neurofeedback based on the hMT+/V5 complex: evidence for a feedback-specific neural circuit involving neocortical and cerebellar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banca, Paula; Sousa, Teresa; Catarina Duarte, Isabel; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Current approaches in neurofeedback/brain-computer interface research often focus on identifying, on a subject-by-subject basis, the neural regions that are best suited for self-driven modulation. It is known that the hMT+/V5 complex, an early visual cortical region, is recruited during explicit and implicit motion imagery, in addition to real motion perception. This study tests the feasibility of training healthy volunteers to regulate the level of activation in their hMT+/V5 complex using real-time fMRI neurofeedback and visual motion imagery strategies. Approach. We functionally localized the hMT+/V5 complex to further use as a target region for neurofeedback. An uniform strategy based on motion imagery was used to guide subjects to neuromodulate hMT+/V5. Main results. We found that 15/20 participants achieved successful neurofeedback. This modulation led to the recruitment of a specific network as further assessed by psychophysiological interaction analysis. This specific circuit, including hMT+/V5, putative V6 and medial cerebellum was activated for successful neurofeedback runs. The putamen and anterior insula were recruited for both successful and non-successful runs. Significance. Our findings indicate that hMT+/V5 is a region that can be modulated by focused imagery and that a specific cortico-cerebellar circuit is recruited during visual motion imagery leading to successful neurofeedback. These findings contribute to the debate on the relative potential of extrinsic (sensory) versus intrinsic (default-mode) brain regions in the clinical application of neurofeedback paradigms. This novel circuit might be a good target for future neurofeedback approaches that aim, for example, the training of focused attention in disorders such as ADHD.

  11. Disruption of dopamine D1/D2 receptor complex is involved in the function of haloperidol in cardiac H9c2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lencesova, L; Szadvari, I; Babula, P; Kubickova, J; Chovancova, B; Lopusna, K; Rezuchova, I; Novakova, Z; Krizanova, O; Novakova, M

    2017-12-15

    Haloperidol is an antipsychotic agent and acts as dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) antagonist, as a prototypical ligand of sigma1 receptors (Sig1R) and it increases expression of type 1 IP 3 receptors (IP 3 R1). However, precise mechanism of haloperidol action on cardiomyocytes through dopaminergic signaling was not described yet. This study investigated a role of dopamine receptors in haloperidol-induced increase in IP 3 R1 and Sig1R, and compared physiological effect of melperone and haloperidol on basic heart parameters in rats. We used differentiated NG-108 cells and H9c2 cells. Gene expression, Western blot and immunofluorescence were used to evaluate haloperidol-induced differences; proximity ligation assay (PLA) and immunoprecipitation to determine interactions of D1/D2 receptors. To evaluate cardiac parameters, Wistar albino male rats were used. We have shown that antagonism of D2R with either haloperidol or melperone results in upregulation of both, IP 3 R1 and Sig1R, which is associated with increased D2R, but reduced D1R expression. Immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation and PLA support formation of heteromeric D1/D2 complexes in H9c2 cells. Treatment with haloperidol (but not melperone) caused decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure and significant increase in heart rate. Because D1R/D2R complexes can engage Gq-like signaling in other experimental systems, these results are consistent with the possibility that disruption of D1R/D2R complex in H9c2 cells might cause a decrease in IP 3 R1 activity, which in turn may account for the increase expression of IP 3 R and Sig1R. D2R is probably not responsible for changes in cardiac parameters, since melperone did not have any effect. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Genome-wide detection of chromosomal rearrangements, indels, and mutations in circular chromosomes by short read sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Ole; Bak, Mads; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    a combination of WGS and genome copy number analysis, for the identification of mutations that suppress the growth deficiency imposed by excessive initiations from the Escherichia coli origin of replication, oriC. The E. coli chromosome, like the majority of bacterial chromosomes, is circular, and DNA...... replication is initiated by assembling two replication complexes at the origin, oriC. These complexes then replicate the chromosome bidirectionally toward the terminus, ter. In a population of growing cells, this results in a copy number gradient, so that origin-proximal sequences are more frequent than...... origin-distal sequences. Major rearrangements in the chromosome are, therefore, readily identified by changes in copy number, i.e., certain sequences become over- or under-represented. Of the eight mutations analyzed in detail here, six were found to affect a single gene only, one was a large chromosomal...

  13. 4-Aminobenzoic Acid-Coated Maghemite Nanoparticles as Potential Anticancer Drug Magnetic Carriers: A Case Study on Highly Cytotoxic Cisplatin-Like Complexes Involving 7-Azaindoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Štarha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a one-pot synthesis of superparamagnetic maghemite-based 4-aminobenzoic acid-coated spherical core-shell nanoparticles (PABA@FeNPs as suitable nanocomposites potentially usable as magnetic carriers for drug delivery. The PABA@FeNPs system was subsequently functionalized by the activated species (1* and 2* of highly in vitro cytotoxic cis-[PtCl2(3Claza2] (1; 3Claza stands for 3-chloro-7-azaindole or cis-[PtCl2(5Braza2] (2; 5Braza stands for 5-bromo-7-azaindole, which were prepared by a silver(I ion assisted dechlorination of the parent dichlorido complexes. The products 1*@PABA@FeNPs and 2*@PABA@FeNPs, as well as an intermediate PABA@FeNPs, were characterized by a combination of various techniques, such as Mössbauer, FTIR and EDS spectroscopy, thermal analysis, SEM and TEM. The results showed that the products consist of well-dispersed maghemite-based nanoparticles of 13 nm average size that represent an easily obtainable system for delivery of highly cytotoxic cisplatin-like complexes in oncological practice.

  14. Identification of a disease complex involving a novel monopartite begomovirus with beta- and alphasatellites associated with okra leaf curl disease in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Sohail; Khan, Akhtar J; Singh, Achuit S; Briddon, Rob W

    2014-05-01

    Okra leaf curl disease (OLCD) is an important viral disease of okra in tropical and subtropical areas. The disease is caused by begomovirus-satellite complexes. A begomovirus and associated betasatellite and alphasatellite were identified in symptomatic okra plants from Barka, in the Al-Batinah region of Oman. Analysis of the begomovirus sequences showed them to represent a new begomovirus most closely related to cotton leaf curl Gezira virus (CLCuGeV), a begomovirus of African origin. The sequences showed less than 85 % nucleotide sequence identity to CLCuGeV isolates. The name okra leaf curl Oman virus (OLCOMV) is proposed for the new virus. Further analysis revealed that the OLCOMV is a recombinant begomovirus that evolved by the recombination of CLCuGeV isolates with tomato yellow leaf curl virus-Oman (TYLCV-OM). An alpha- and a betasatellite were also identified from the same plant sample, which were also unique when compared to sequences available in the databases. However, although the betasatellite appeared to be of African origin, the alphasatellite was most closely related to alphasatellites originating from South Asia. This is the first report of a begomovirus-satellite complex infecting okra in Oman.

  15. The complex clinical issues involved in an athlete's decision to retire from collision sport due to multiple concussions: a case study of a professional athlete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eGardner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The issue of retirement from athletic participation due to repetitive concussive injuries remains controversial. The complexity of providing recommendations to elite athletes is highlighted by the prospect that offering inappropriate advice may foreseeably lead to engagement in a medico-legal challenge. Currently no evidenced-based, scientifically validated guidelines for forming the basis of such a decision exist. The current paper discusses the complexities of this challenge in addition to presenting a case study of a professional athlete. A number of central issues to consider when discussing athlete retirement revolve around the player’s medical and concussion histories, the current clinical profile, the athlete’s long-term life goals and understanding of the potential long-terms risks. Ensuring that thorough investigations of all possible differential diagnosis, that may explain the presenting symptoms, are conducted is also essential. Discussion pertaining to recommendations for guiding the clinical approach to the retirement issue for athletes with a history of multiple concussions is presented.

  16. N-cadherin in adult rat cardiomyocytes in culture. II. Spatio-temporal appearance of proteins involved in cell-cell contact and communication. Formation of two distinct N-cadherin/catenin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertig, C M; Butz, S; Koch, S; Eppenberger-Eberhardt, M; Kemler, R; Eppenberger, H M

    1996-01-01

    The spatio-temporal appearance and distribution of proteins forming the intercalated disc were investigated in adult rat cardiomyocytes (ARC). The 'redifferentiation model' of ARC involves extensive remodelling of the plasma membrane and of the myofibrillar apparatus. It represents a valuable system to elucidate the formation of cell-cell contact between cardiomyocytes and to assess the mechanisms by which different proteins involved in the cell-cell adhesion process are sorted in a precise manner to the sites of function. Appearance of N-cadherin, the catenins and connexin43 within newly formed adherens and gap junctions was studied. Here first evidence is provided for a formation of two distinct and separable N-cadherin/catenin complexes in cardiomyocytes. Both complexes are composed of N-cadherin and alpha-catenin which bind to either beta-catenin or plakoglobin in a mutually exclusive manner. The two N-cadherin/catenin complexes are assumed to be functionally involved in the formation of cell-cell contacts in ARC; however, the differential appearance and localization of the two types of complexes may also point to a specific role during ARC differentiation. The newly synthesized beta-catenin containing complex is more abundant during the first stages in culture after ARC isolation, while the newly synthesized plakoglobin containing complex progressively accumulates during the morphological changes of ARC. ARC formed a tissue-like pattern in culture whereby the new cell-cell contacts could be dissolved through Ca2+ depletion. Presence of cAMP and replenishment of Ca2+ content in the culture medium not only allowed reformation of cell-cell contacts but also affected the relative protein ratio between the two N-cadherin/catenin complexes, increasing the relative amount of newly synthesized beta-catenin over plakoglobin at a particular stage of ARC differentiation. The clustered N-cadherin/catenin complexes at the plasma membrane appear to be a prerequisite for the

  17. Human heavy-chain variable region gene family nonrandomly rearranged in familial chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, A.; Humphries, C.; Tucker, P.; Blattner, F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have identified a family of human immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable-region (V/sub H/) genes, one member of which is rearranged in two affected members of a family in which the father and four of five siblings developed chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Cloning and sequencing of the rearranged V/sub H/ genes from leukemic lymphocytes of three affected siblings showed that two siblings had rearranged V/sub H/ genes (V/sub H/TS1 and V/sub H/WS1) that were 90% homologous. The corresponding germ-line gene, V/sub H/251, was found to part of a small (four gene) V/sub H/ gene family, which they term V/sub H/V. The DNA sequence homology to V/sub H/WS1 (95%) and V/sub H/TS1 (88%) and identical restriction sites on the 5' side of V/sub H/ confirm that rearrangement of V/sub H/251 followed by somatic mutation produced the identical V/sub H/ gene rearrangements in the two siblings. V/sub H/TS1 is not a functional V/sub H/ gene; a functional V/sub H/ rearrangement was found on the other chromosome of this patient. The other two siblings had different V/sub H/ gene rearrangements. All used different diversity genes. Mechanisms proposed for nonrandom selection of a single V/sub H/ gene include developmental regulation of this V/sub H/ gene rearrangement or selection of a subpopulation of B cells in which this V/sub H/ has been rearranged

  18. Characterization of novel non-clonal intrachromosomal rearrangements between the H4 and PTEN genes (H4/PTEN) in human thyroid cell lines and papillary thyroid cancer specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puxeddu, Efisio; Zhao Guisheng; Stringer, James R.; Medvedovic, Mario; Moretti, Sonia; Fagin, James A.

    2005-01-01

    The two main forms of RET rearrangement in papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC) arise from intrachromosomal inversions fusing the tyrosine kinase domain of RET with either the H4 (RET/PTC1) or the ELE1/RFG genes (RET/PTC3). PTEN codes for a dual-specificity phosphatase and maps to chromosome 10q22-23. Germline mutations confer susceptibility to Cowden syndrome whereas somatic mutations or deletions are common in several sporadic human tumors. Decreased PTEN expression has been implicated in thyroid cancer development. We report the characterization of a new chromosome 10 rearrangement involving H4 and PTEN. The initial H4/PTEN rearrangement was discovered as a non-specific product of RT-PCR for RET/PTC1 in irradiated thyroid cell lines. Sequencing revealed a transcript consisting of exon 1 and 2 of H4 fused with exons 3-6 of PTEN. Nested RT-PCR with specific primers bracketing the breakpoints confirmed the H4/PTEN rearrangements in irradiated KAT-1 and KAT-50 cells. Additional H4/PTEN variants, generated by recombination of either exon 1 or exon 2 of H4 with exon 6 of PTEN, were found in non-irradiated KAK-1, KAT-50, ARO and NPA cells. Their origin through chromosomal recombination was confirmed by detection of the reciprocal PTEN/H4 product. H4/PTEN recombination was not a clonal event in any of the cell lines, as Southern blots with appropriate probes failed to demonstrate aberrant bands, and multicolor FISH of KAK1 cells with BAC probes for H4 and PTEN did not show a signal overlap in all cells. Based on PCR of serially diluted samples, the minimal frequency of spontaneous recombination between these loci was estimated to be approximately 1/10 6 cells. H4/PTEN products were found by nested RT-PCR in 4/14 normal thyroid tissues (28%) and 14/18 PTC (78%) (P < 0.01). H4/PTEN is another example of recombination involving the H4 locus, and points to the high susceptibility of thyroid cells to intrachromosomal gene rearrangements. As this also represents a plausible

  19. Characterization of novel non-clonal intrachromosomal rearrangements between the H4 and PTEN genes (H4/PTEN) in human thyroid cell lines and papillary thyroid cancer specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puxeddu, Efisio [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, PO Box 670547, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0547 (United States); Zhao Guisheng [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, PO Box 670547, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0547 (United States); Stringer, James R. [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, PO Box 670547, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0547 (United States); Medvedovic, Mario [Center for Biostatistic Service, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, PO Box 670547, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0547 (United States); Moretti, Sonia [Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, Via E. dal Pozzo, Perugia 06126, (Italy); Fagin, James A. [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, PO Box 670547, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0547 (United States)]. E-mail: james.fagin@uc.edu

    2005-02-15

    The two main forms of RET rearrangement in papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC) arise from intrachromosomal inversions fusing the tyrosine kinase domain of RET with either the H4 (RET/PTC1) or the ELE1/RFG genes (RET/PTC3). PTEN codes for a dual-specificity phosphatase and maps to chromosome 10q22-23. Germline mutations confer susceptibility to Cowden syndrome whereas somatic mutations or deletions are common in several sporadic human tumors. Decreased PTEN expression has been implicated in thyroid cancer development. We report the characterization of a new chromosome 10 rearrangement involving H4 and PTEN. The initial H4/PTEN rearrangement was discovered as a non-specific product of RT-PCR for RET/PTC1 in irradiated thyroid cell lines. Sequencing revealed a transcript consisting of exon 1 and 2 of H4 fused with exons 3-6 of PTEN. Nested RT-PCR with specific primers bracketing the breakpoints confirmed the H4/PTEN rearrangements in irradiated KAT-1 and KAT-50 cells. Additional H4/PTEN variants, generated by recombination of either exon 1 or exon 2 of H4 with exon 6 of PTEN, were found in non-irradiated KAK-1, KAT-50, ARO and NPA cells. Their origin through chromosomal recombination was confirmed by detection of the reciprocal PTEN/H4 product. H4/PTEN recombination was not a clonal event in any of the cell lines, as Southern blots with appropriate probes failed to demonstrate aberrant bands, and multicolor FISH of KAK1 cells with BAC probes for H4 and PTEN did not show a signal overlap in all cells. Based on PCR of serially diluted samples, the minimal frequency of spontaneous recombination between these loci was estimated to be approximately 1/10{sup 6} cells. H4/PTEN products were found by nested RT-PCR in 4/14 normal thyroid tissues (28%) and 14/18 PTC (78%) (P < 0.01). H4/PTEN is another example of recombination involving the H4 locus, and points to the high susceptibility of thyroid cells to intrachromosomal gene rearrangements. As this also represents a

  20. Atomic rearrangements in ordered fcc alloys during neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, M.A.; Blewitt, T.H.

    1978-01-01

    Three sets of experiments performed at Argonne National Laboratory over the past few years are described. These experiments deal with atomic rearrangements in the ordered alloys Ni 3 Mn and Cu 3 Au during fast and thermal neutron bombardment. The unique magnetic properties of ordered Ni 3 Mn are utilized to investigate radiation damage production mechanisms at low temperature (5 K) where defect migration is not possible and only disordering is observed. In the case of thermal neutron bombardment, the average recoil energy is about 450 eV and significant disordering due to [110] replacement collision sequences is observed. For fast neutron bombardment where typical recoil energies are 20 keV, significant random disordering is observed but no evidence for sizable replacement sequences is found. The bombardment of ordered Cu 3 Au by fast and thermal neutrons at higher temperature (approx. 150 0 C) is studied by electrical resistance techniques. Both ordering and disordering are observed and related to the number of migrating vacancies escaping from the high energy collision cascade

  1. Ferrier rearrangement promoted by an electrochemically generated zirconium catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanović, Dragana; Pejović, Anka; Damljanović, Ivan; Minić, Aleksandra; Bogdanović, Goran A; Vukićević, Mirjana; Radulović, Niko S; Vukićević, Rastko D

    2015-04-30

    In situ generated zirconium catalyst from a sacrificial zirconium anode was successfully applied to promote Ferrier rearrangement of 3,4,5-tri-O-acetyl-D-glucal and 6-deoxy-3,4-di-O-acetyl-L-glucal (3,4-di-O-acetyl-L-rhamnal) in the presence of three thiols and eleven thiophenols as nucleophiles. A simple constant current electrolysis (20 mA, 0.4 F mol(-1)) of an acetonitrile solution of lithium perchlorate (0.1 M) containing the corresponding glycal and S-nucleophiles, using a zirconium anode and a platinum cathode resulted in the successful synthesis of the corresponding 2,3-unsaturated peracetylated thioglycosides (with an average anomer ratio α/β=4.129 in the case of peracetylated D-glucal and 8.740 in the case of L-rhamnal). The same procedure proved to be appropriate in synthesizing dihydropyran derivatives ('C-glycosides') using allyltrimethylsilane as the nucleophile (only 'α-anomers' were obtained). All new compounds were fully characterized by spectral data, whereas single-crystal X-ray analysis was performed for two thioglycosides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Heavy cluster in cold nuclear rearrangements in fusion and fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.

    1997-01-01

    The experimental evidence for the appearance of cluster aspects in the dynamics of large rearrangements processes, as fusion and fission, is presented. Clusters in the sense as used in the following are strongly bound, doubly magic neutron rich nuclei as 48 Ca 28 , 78 Ni 50 , 132 Sn 82 , and 208 Pb 126 , the spherical nuclei Z=114 - 126 and N=184, and nuclei with closed shells N=28, 50, 82, and 126, and Z=28, 50, and 82. As with increasing nucleon numbers, the absolute shell corrections to the binding energies increase, the strongest effects are to be observed for the higher shells. The 132 cluster manifests itself in low energy fission (Faissner, H. and Wildermuth, K. Nucl. Phys., 58 (1964) 177). The 208 Pb cluster gave the new radioactivity (Rose, M.J. and Jones G.A., Nature, 307 (1984) 245) and the first superheavy elements (SHE) (Armbruster P., Ann. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci., 35 (1985) 135-94; Munzenberg, G. Rep. Progr. Phys., 51 (1988) 57). The paper discuss experiments concerning the stability of clusters to intrinsic excitation energy in fusion and fission (Armbruster, P. Lect. Notes Phys., 158 (1982) 1). and the manifestation of clusters in the fusion entrance channel (Armbruster, P., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn., 58 (1989) 232). The importance of compactness of the clustering system seems to be equally decisive in fission and fusion. Finally, it s covered the importance of clusters for the production of SHEs)

  3. Stress-induced rearrangement of Fusarium retrotransposon sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, N; Roncero, M I

    1996-11-27

    Rearrangement of fusarium oxysporum retrotransposon skippy was induced by growth in the presence of potassium chlorate. Three fungal strains, one sensitive to chlorate (Co60) and two resistant to chlorate and deficient for nitrate reductase (Co65 and Co94), were studied by Southern analysis of their genomic DNA. Polymorphism was detected in their hybridization banding pattern, relative to the wild type grown in the absence of chlorate, using various enzymes with or without restriction sites within the retrotransposon. Results were consistent with the assumption that three different events had occurred in strain Co60: genomic amplification of skippy yielding tandem arrays of the element, generation of new skippy sequences, and deletion of skippy sequences. Amplification of Co60 genomic DNA using the polymerase chain reaction and divergent primers derived from the retrotransposon generated a new band, corresponding to one long terminal repeat plus flanking sequences, that was not present in the wild-type strain. Molecular analysis of nitrate reductase-deficient mutants showed that generation and deletion of skippy sequences, but not genomic amplification in tandem repeats, had occurred in their genomes.

  4. Impact of local electrostatic field rearrangement on field ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katnagallu, Shyam; Dagan, Michal; Parviainen, Stefan; Nematollahi, Ali; Grabowski, Blazej; Bagot, Paul A. J.; Rolland, Nicolas; Neugebauer, Jörg; Raabe, Dierk; Vurpillot, François; Moody, Michael P.; Gault, Baptiste

    2018-03-01

    Field ion microscopy allows for direct imaging of surfaces with true atomic resolution. The high charge density distribution on the surface generates an intense electric field that can induce ionization of gas atoms. We investigate the dynamic nature of the charge and the consequent electrostatic field redistribution following the departure of atoms initially constituting the surface in the form of an ion, a process known as field evaporation. We report on a new algorithm for image processing and tracking of individual atoms on the specimen surface enabling quantitative assessment of shifts in the imaged atomic positions. By combining experimental investigations with molecular dynamics simulations, which include the full electric charge, we confirm that change is directly associated with the rearrangement of the electrostatic field that modifies the imaging gas ionization zone. We derive important considerations for future developments of data reconstruction in 3D field ion microscopy, in particular for precise quantification of lattice strains and characterization of crystalline defects at the atomic scale.

  5. Ultrastructural analysis of radiation induced chromosome breaks and rearrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J.L.; Goyanes, V.J.; Campos, A.; Cajigal, D.

    1990-01-01

    Chinese Hamster chromosomes R-banded in vitro were gamma-irradiated and chromatid breaks and rearrangements examined by electron microscopy employing whole-mounting technique. Breaks were preferentially located at the point of transition between G- and R-bands where the chromosome showed an average diameter 71.65 % of the wide condensed R-bands. This result was similar to the average diameter of narrow G-bands. Three chromosomes which were thin sectioned presented their broken terminal end organized as a coil constituted by two 23 nm wide chromatin fibers coiling together. Coils diameter was 43.70 % of the mean chromatid diameter. The border of damage-breakage was analyzed in whole-mounted chromosomes where breaks were photoinduced in BrdU-substituted DNA. Measurements of the angle of the sharp border of damage with respect to the chromatid axis showed a tendency to be more perpendicular as condensation progressed. These results clearly correlate with the several levels of chromatin fiber organization of the metaphase chromosome. (author)

  6. Activation of Stat-3 is involved in the induction of apoptosis after ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules on human Jurkat T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, S; Nielsen, M; Bregenholt, S

    1998-01-01

    Activation of Janus tyrosine kinases (Jak) and Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat) after ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) was explored in Jurkat T cells. Cross-linking of MHC-I mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of Tyk2, but not Jak1, Jak2, and Jak3......-probe derived from the interferon-gamma activated site (GAS) in the c-fos promoter, a common DNA sequence for Stat protein binding. An association between hSIE and Stat-3 after MHC-I ligation was directly demonstrated by precipitating Stat-3 from nuclear extracts with biotinylated hSIE probe and avidin......-coupled agarose. To investigate the function of the activated Stat-3, Jurkat T cells were transiently transfected with a Stat-3 isoform lacking the transactivating domain. This dominant-negative acting Stat-3 isoform significantly inhibited apoptosis induced by ligation of MHC-I. In conclusion, our data suggest...

  7. Transition from metal-ligand bonding to halogen bonding involving a metal as halogen acceptor a study of Cu, Ag, Au, Pt, and Hg complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Vytor; Cremer, Dieter

    2017-08-01

    Utilizing all-electron Dirac-exact relativistic calculations with the Normalized Elimination of the Small Component (NESC) method and the local vibrational mode approach, the transition from metal-halide to metal halogen bonding is determined for Au-complexes interacting with halogen-donors. The local stretching force constants of the metal-halogen interactions reveal a smooth transition from weak non-covalent halogen bonding to non-classical 3-center-4-electron bonding and finally covalent metal-halide bonding. The strongest halogen bonds are found for dialkylaurates interacting with Cl2 or FCl. Differing trends in the intrinsic halogen-metal bond strength, the binding energy, and the electrostatic potential are explained.

  8. Phorbol-ester-induced activation of the NF-κB transcription factor involves dissociation of an apparently cytoplasmic NF-κB/inhibitor complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeuerle, P.A.; Lenardo, M.; Pierce, J.W.; Baltimore, D.

    1988-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that inducible transcription of genes is mediated through the induction of the activity of trans-acting protein factors. The NF-κB transcription factor provides a model system to study the posttranslational activation of a phorbol-ester-inducible transcription factor. The finding that NF-κB activity is undectable in subcellular fractions from unstimulated cells suggests that NF-κB exists as an inactive precursor. The authors showed that NF-κB is detectable in two different forms. After selective removal of endogenous NF-κB, they demonstrate the existence of a protein inhibitor in cytosolic fractions of unstimulated cells that is able in vitro to convert NF-κB into an inactive desoxycholate-dependent form. The data are consistent with a molecular mechanism of inducible gene expression by which an apparently cytoplasmic transcription factor-inhibitor complex is dissociated by the action of TPA-activated protein kinase C

  9. Zipper-interacting protein kinase is involved in regulation of ubiquitination of the androgen receptor, thereby contributing to dynamic transcription complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felten, A; Brinckmann, D; Landsberg, G; Scheidtmann, K H

    2013-10-10

    We have recently identified apoptosis-antagonizing transcription factor (AATF), tumor-susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) and zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) as novel coactivators of the androgen receptor (AR). The mechanisms of coactivation remained obscure, however. Here we investigated the interplay and interdependence between these coactivators and the AR using the endogenous prostate specific antigen (PSA) gene as model for AR-target genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation in combination with siRNA-mediated knockdown revealed that recruitment of AATF and ZIPK to the PSA enhancer was dependent on AR, whereas recruitment of TSG101 was dependent on AATF. Association of AR and its coactivators with the PSA enhancer or promoter occurred in cycles. Dissociation of AR-transcription complexes was due to degradation because inhibition of the proteasome system by MG132 caused accumulation of AR at enhancer/promoter elements. Moreover, inhibition of degradation strongly reduced transcription, indicating that continued and efficient transcription is based on initiation, degradation and reinitiation cycles. Interestingly, knockdown of ZIPK by siRNA had a similar effect as MG132, leading to reduced transcription but enhanced accumulation of AR at androgen-response elements. In addition, knockdown of ZIPK, as well as overexpression of a dominant-negative ZIPK mutant, diminished polyubiquitination of AR. Furthermore, ZIPK cooperated with the E3 ligase Mdm2 in AR-dependent transactivation, assembled into a single complex on chromatin and phosphorylated Mdm2 in vitro. These results suggest that ZIPK has a crucial role in regulation of ubiquitination and degradation of the AR, and hence promoter clearance and efficient transcription.

  10. Selenophene transition metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Carter James [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1994-07-27

    This research shows that selenophene transition metal complexes have a chemistry that is similar to their thiophene analogs. Selenophene coordination has been demonstrated and confirmed by molecular structure in both the η5- and the η1(Se)-coordination modes. The reaction chemistry of selenophene complexes closely resembles that of the analogous thiophene complexes. One major difference, however, is that selenophene is a better donor ligand than thiophene making the selenophene complexes more stable than the corresponding thiophene complexes. The 77Se NMR chemical shift values for selenophene complexes fall within distinct regions primarily depending on the coordination mode of the selenophene ligand. In the final paper, the C-H bond activation of η1(S)-bound thiophenes, η1(S)-benzothiophene and η1(Se)-bound selenophenes has been demonstrated. The deprotonation and rearrangement of the η1(E)-bound ligand to the carbon bound L-yl complex readily occurs in the presence of base. Reprotonation with a strong acid gives a carbene complex that is unreactive towards nucleophilic attack at the carbene carbon and is stable towards exposure to air. The molecular structure of [Cp(NO)(PPh3)Re(2-benzothioenylcarbene)]O3SCF3 was determined and contains a Re-C bond with substantial double bond character. Methyl substitution for the thienylcarbene or selenylcarbene gives a carbene that rearranges thermally to give back the η1(E)-bound complex. Based on these model reactions, a new mechanism for the H/D exchange of thiophene over the hydrodesulfurization catalyst has been proposed.

  11. Chromoanasynthetic Genomic Rearrangement Identified in a N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea (ENU Mutagenesis Screen in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar A. Itani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromoanasynthesis is a recently discovered phenomenon in humans with congenital diseases that is characterized by complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs resulting from aberrant repair of catastrophic chromosomal damage. How these CGRs are induced is not known. Here, we describe the structure and function of dpDp667, a causative CGR that emerged from a Caenorhabditis elegans dauer suppressor screen in which animals were treated with the point mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU. dpDp667 comprises nearly 3 Mb of sequence on the right arm of the X chromosome, contains three duplications and one triplication, and is devoid of deletions. Sequences from three out of the four breakpoint junctions in dpDp667 reveal microhomologies that are hallmarks of chromoanasynthetic CGRs. Our findings suggest that environmental insults and physiological processes that cause point mutations may give rise to chromoanasynthetic rearrangements associated with congenital disease. The relatively subtle phenotype of animals harboring dpDp667 suggests that the prevalence of CGRs in the genomes of mutant and/or phenotypically unremarkable animals may be grossly underestimated.

  12. Evolution of the bHLH genes involved in stomatal development: implications for the expansion of developmental complexity of stomata in land plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hua Ran

    Full Text Available Stomata play significant roles in plant evolution. A trio of closely related basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH subgroup Ia genes, SPCH, MUTE and FAMA, mediate sequential steps of stomatal development, and their functions may be conserved in land plants. However, the evolutionary history of the putative SPCH/MUTE/FAMA genes is still greatly controversial, especially the phylogenetic positions of the bHLH Ia members from basal land plants. To better understand the evolutionary pattern and functional diversity of the bHLH genes involved in stomatal development, we made a comprehensive evolutionary analysis of the homologous genes from 54 species representing the major lineages of green plants. The phylogenetic analysis indicated: (1 All bHLH Ia genes from the two basal land plants Physcomitrella and Selaginella were closely related to the FAMA genes of seed plants; and (2 the gymnosperm 'SPCH' genes were sister to a clade comprising the angiosperm SPCH and MUTE genes, while the FAMA genes of gymnosperms and angiosperms had a sister relationship. The revealed phylogenetic relationships are also supported by the distribution of gene structures and previous functional studies. Therefore, we deduce that the function of FAMA might be ancestral in the bHLH Ia subgroup. In addition, the gymnosperm "SPCH" genes may represent an ancestral state and have a dual function of SPCH and MUTE, two genes that could have originated from a duplication event in the common ancestor of angiosperms. Moreover, in angiosperms, SPCHs have experienced more duplications and harbor more copies than MUTEs and FAMAs, which, together with variation of the stomatal development in the entry division, implies that SPCH might have contributed greatly to the diversity of stomatal development. Based on the above, we proposed a model for the correlation between the evolution of stomatal development and the genes involved in this developmental process in land plants.

  13. PTFE Graft as a "Bridge" to Communicating Veins Maturation in the Treatment of an Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma Involving the 3 Hepatic Veins. The Minor-but-Complex Liver Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbani, Lucio; Balestri, Riccardo; Sidoti, Francesco; Bernardini, Juri Riccardo; Arces, Francesco; Licitra, Gabriella; Leoni, Chiara; Forfori, Francesco; Colombatto, Piero; Boraschi, Piero; Castagna, Maura; Buccianti, Piero

    2016-12-01

    Parenchyma-sparing liver surgery allows resecting hepatic veins (HV) at the hepatocaval confluence with minor (PTFE graft can be used as a bridge to communicating-veins maturation to ensure the correct outflow of the spared liver. We present a video of an intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IC) involving the three HV at the hepatocaval confluence treated with this approach. In a 50-year old obese (BMI 44.8) male a 6-cm IC involving the hepatocaval confluence was identified during the follow-up for a kidney malignancy. At the preoperative CT scan the left HV was not detectable, the middle HV was incorporated within the tumor, and right HV had a 3-cm contact with the tumor. No communicating veins were evident at preoperative imaging. After a J-shape thoracophrenolaparotomy, the resection of segments II-III-IVa was partially extended to segment VIII-VII and I. The right HV was detached from the tumor, and the middle HV was reconstructed with a 7-mm ringed-armed PTFE graft anastomosed to V8. Surgery lasted 20 h and 55 min with an estimated blood loss of 3500 ml, but the postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on the 14th postoperative day. One month later the CT scan showed a patent PTFE graft with the maturation of communicating-veins. One year later a complete thrombosis of the PTFE graft was observed with normal liver perfusion and function, and the patient was disease-free. PTFE-based parenchyma-sparing liver resection is a new tool to treat tumors located at the hepatocaval confluence exploiting the maturation of intrahepatic communicating-veins between main HV.

  14. Variants of SCARB1 and VDR Involved in Complex Genetic Interactions May Be Implicated in the Genetic Susceptibility to Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Pośpiech

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current data are still inconclusive in terms of a genetic component involved in the susceptibility to renal cell carcinoma. Our aim was to evaluate 40 selected candidate polymorphisms for potential association with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC based on independent group of 167 patients and 200 healthy controls. The obtained data were searched for independent effects of particular polymorphisms as well as haplotypes and genetic interactions. Association testing implied position rs4765623 in the SCARB1 gene (OR=1.688, 95% CI: 1.104–2.582, P=0.016 and a haplotype in VDR comprising positions rs739837, rs731236, rs7975232, and rs1544410 (P=0.012 to be the risk factors in the studied population. The study detected several epistatic effects contributing to the genetic susceptibility to ccRCC. Variation in GNAS1 was implicated in a strong synergistic interaction with BIRC5. This effect was part of a model suggested by multifactor dimensionality reduction method including also a synergy between GNAS1 and SCARB1 (P=0.036. Significance of GNAS1-SCARB1 interaction was further confirmed by logistic regression (P=0.041, which also indicated involvement of SCARB1 in additional interaction with EPAS1 (P=0.008 as well as revealing interactions between GNAS1 and EPAS1 (P=0.016, GNAS1 and MC1R (P=0.031, GNAS1 and VDR (P=0.032, and MC1R and VDR (P=0.035.

  15. SUMO E3 ligase Mms21 prevents spontaneous DNA damage induced genome rearrangements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Liang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mms21, a subunit of the Smc5/6 complex, possesses an E3 ligase activity for the Small Ubiquitin-like MOdifier (SUMO. Here we show that the mms21-CH mutation, which inactivates Mms21 ligase activity, causes increased accumulation of gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs selected in the dGCR assay. These dGCRs are formed by non-allelic homologous recombination between divergent DNA sequences mediated by Rad52-, Rrm3- and Pol32-dependent break-induced replication. Combining mms21-CH with sgs1Δ caused a synergistic increase in GCRs rates, indicating the distinct roles of Mms21 and Sgs1 in suppressing GCRs. The mms21-CH mutation also caused increased rates of accumulating uGCRs mediated by breakpoints in unique sequences as revealed by whole genome sequencing. Consistent with the accumulation of endogenous DNA lesions, mms21-CH mutants accumulate increased levels of spontaneous Rad52 and Ddc2 foci and had a hyper-activated DNA damage checkpoint. Together, these findings support that Mms21 prevents the accumulation of spontaneous DNA lesions that cause diverse GCRs.

  16. Complex distal 10q rearrangement in a girl with mild intellectual disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarri, Catherine; Douzgou, Sofia; Gyftodimou, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    We report on an intellectually disabled girl with a de novo satellited chromosome 10 (10qs) and performed a review of the literature of the non-acrocentric satellited chromosomes (NASC). Satellites and stalks normally occur on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes; however, the literature cit...

  17. CNV analysis in Tourette syndrome implicates large genomic rearrangements in COL8A1 and NRXN1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Nag

    Full Text Available Tourette syndrome (TS is a neuropsychiatric disorder with a strong genetic component. However, the genetic architecture of TS remains uncertain. Copy number variation (CNV has been shown to contribute to the genetic make-up of several neurodevelopmental conditions, including schizophrenia and autism. Here we describe CNV calls using SNP chip genotype data from an initial sample of 210 TS cases and 285 controls ascertained in two Latin American populations. After extensive quality control, we found that cases (N = 179 have a significant excess (P = 0.006 of large CNV (>500 kb calls compared to controls (N = 234. Amongst 24 large CNVs seen only in the cases, we observed four duplications of the COL8A1 gene region. We also found two cases with ∼400 kb deletions involving NRXN1, a gene previously implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders, including TS. Follow-up using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (and including 53 more TS cases validated the CNV calls and identified additional patients with rearrangements in COL8A1 and NRXN1, but none in controls. Examination of available parents indicates that two out of three NRXN1 deletions detected in the TS cases are de-novo mutations. Our results are consistent with the proposal that rare CNVs play a role in TS aetiology and suggest a possible role for rearrangements in the COL8A1 and NRXN1 gene regions.

  18. Systematic chemical and molecular profiling of MLL-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia reveals efficacy of romidepsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, M N; Ford, J; Cheung, L C; Heng, J; Singh, S; Wells, J; Failes, T W; Arndt, G M; Smithers, N; Prinjha, R K; Anderson, D; Carter, K W; Gout, A M; Lassmann, T; O'Reilly, J; Cole, C H; Kotecha, R S; Kees, U R

    2017-01-01

    To address the poor prognosis of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (iALL), we generated a panel of cell lines from primary patient samples and investigated cytotoxic responses to contemporary and novel Food and Drug Administration-approved chemotherapeutics. To characterize representation of primary disease within cell lines, molecular features were compared using RNA-sequencing and cytogenetics. High-throughput screening revealed variable efficacy of currently used drugs, however identified consistent efficacy of three novel drug classes: proteasome inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. Gene expression of drug targets was highly reproducible comparing iALL cell lines to matched primary specimens. Histone deacetylase inhibitors, including romidepsin (ROM), enhanced the activity of a key component of iALL therapy, cytarabine (ARAC) in vitro and combined administration of ROM and ARAC to xenografted mice further reduced leukemia burden. Molecular studies showed that ROM reduces expression of cytidine deaminase, an enzyme involved in ARAC deactivation, and enhances the DNA damage–response to ARAC. In conclusion, we present a valuable resource for drug discovery, including the first systematic analysis of transcriptome reproducibility in vitro, and have identified ROM as a promising therapeutic for MLL-rearranged iALL. PMID:27443263

  19. Polymethylated [Fe(η6-arene)2]2+ dications: methyl-group rearrangements and application of the EINS mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štíbr, Bohumil; Bakardjiev, Mario; Hájková, Zuzana; Holub, Josef; Padělková, Zdenka; Růžička, Aleš; Kennedy, John D

    2011-06-14

    Reactions between the methylated arenes ArMe(n) [where ArMe(n) = C(6)Me(n)H((6-n)), and n = 1-6] and FeCl(2) in heptane at 90 °C in the presence of anhydrous AlCl(3) give, for the arenes with n = 1-5, extensive isomerisations and disproportionations involving the methyl groups on the arene rings, and the formation of mixtures of [Fe(ArMe(n))(2)](2+) dications that defy separation into pure species. GC-MS studies of AlCl(3)/mesitylene and AlCl(3)/durene reactions in the absence of FeCl(2) (90 °C, 2 h) allow quantitative assessments of the rearrangements, and the EINS mechanism (electrophile-induced nucleophilic substitution) is applied to rationalise the phenomena. By contrast, ArMe(n) / FeCl(2) /AlCl(3) reactions in heptane for 24-36 h at room-temperature proceed with no rearrangements, allowing the synthesis of the complete series of pure [Fe(ArMen)](2+) cations in yields of 48-71%. The pure compounds are characterised by (1)H NMR spectroscopy and electrospray-ionization mass-spectrometry (ESI-MS), and the structures of [Fe(m-xylene)(2)][PF(6)](2) and [Fe(durene)(2)][PF(6)](2) are established by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses.

  20. CNV analysis in Tourette syndrome implicates large genomic rearrangements in COL8A1 and NRXN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Abhishek; Bochukova, Elena G; Kremeyer, Barbara; Campbell, Desmond D; Muller, Heike; Valencia-Duarte, Ana V; Cardona, Julio; Rivas, Isabel C; Mesa, Sandra C; Cuartas, Mauricio; Garcia, Jharley; Bedoya, Gabriel; Cornejo, William; Herrera, Luis D; Romero, Roxana; Fournier, Eduardo; Reus, Victor I; Lowe, Thomas L; Farooqi, I Sadaf; Mathews, Carol A; McGrath, Lauren M; Yu, Dongmei; Cook, Ed; Wang, Kai; Scharf, Jeremiah M; Pauls, David L; Freimer, Nelson B; Plagnol, Vincent; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with a strong genetic component. However, the genetic architecture of TS remains uncertain. Copy number variation (CNV) has been shown to contribute to the genetic make-up of several neurodevelopmental conditions, including schizophrenia and autism. Here we describe CNV calls using SNP chip genotype data from an initial sample of 210 TS cases and 285 controls ascertained in two Latin American populations. After extensive quality control, we found that cases (N = 179) have a significant excess (P = 0.006) of large CNV (>500 kb) calls compared to controls (N = 234). Amongst 24 large CNVs seen only in the cases, we observed four duplications of the COL8A1 gene region. We also found two cases with ∼400 kb deletions involving NRXN1, a gene previously implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders, including TS. Follow-up using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (and including 53 more TS cases) validated the CNV calls and identified additional patients with rearrangements in COL8A1 and NRXN1, but none in controls. Examination of available parents indicates that two out of three NRXN1 deletions detected in the TS cases are de-novo mutations. Our results are consistent with the proposal that rare CNVs play a role in TS aetiology and suggest a possible role for rearrangements in the COL8A1 and NRXN1 gene regions.

  1. Germline rearrangements in families with strong family history of glioma and malignant melanoma, colon, and breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ulrika; Wibom, Carl; Cederquist, Kristina; Aradottir, Steina; Borg, Åke; Armstrong, Georgina N.; Shete, Sanjay; Lau, Ching C.; Bainbridge, Matthew N.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Lai, Rose; Il'yasova, Dora; Houlston, Richard S.; Schildkraut, Joellen; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Olson, Sara H.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Wrensch, Margaret; Davis, Faith G.; Merrell, Ryan; Johansen, Christoffer; Sadetzki, Siegal; Bondy, Melissa L.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Adatto, Phyllis; Morice, Fabian; Payen, Sam; McQuinn, Lacey; McGaha, Rebecca; Guerra, Sandra; Paith, Leslie; Roth, Katherine; Zeng, Dong; Zhang, Hui; Yung, Alfred; Aldape, Kenneth; Gilbert, Mark; Weinberger, Jeffrey; Colman, Howard; Conrad, Charles; de Groot, John; Forman, Arthur; Groves, Morris; Levin, Victor; Loghin, Monica; Puduvalli, Vinay; Sawaya, Raymond; Heimberger, Amy; Lang, Frederick; Levine, Nicholas; Tolentino, Lori; Saunders, Kate; Thach, Thu-Trang; Iacono, Donna Dello; Sloan, Andrew; Gerson, Stanton; Selman, Warren; Bambakidis, Nicholas; Hart, David; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Alan; Cohen, Mark; Rogers, Lisa; Nock, Charles J; Wolinsky, Yingli; Devine, Karen; Fulop, Jordonna; Barrett, Wendi; Shimmel, Kristen; Ostrom, Quinn; Barnett, Gene; Rosenfeld, Steven; Vogelbaum, Michael; Weil, Robert; Ahluwalia, Manmeet; Peereboom, David; Staugaitis, Susan; Schilero, Cathy; Brewer, Cathy; Smolenski, Kathy; McGraw, Mary; Naska, Theresa; Rosenfeld, Steven; Ram, Zvi; Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Bokstein, Felix; Umansky, Felix; Zaaroor, Menashe; Cohen, Avi; Tzuk-Shina, Tzeela; Voldby, Bo; Laursen, René; Andersen, Claus; Brennum, Jannick; Henriksen, Matilde Bille; Marzouk, Maya; Davis, Mary Elizabeth; Boland, Eamon; Smith, Marcel; Eze, Ogechukwu; Way, Mahalia; Lada, Pat; Miedzianowski, Nancy; Frechette, Michelle; Paleologos, Nina; Byström, Gudrun; Svedberg, Eva; Huggert, Sara; Kimdal, Mikael; Sandström, Monica; Brännström, Nikolina; Hayat, Amina; Tihan, Tarik; Zheng, Shichun; Berger, Mitchel; Butowski, Nicholas; Chang, Susan; Clarke, Jennifer; Prados, Michael; Rice, Terri; Sison, Jeannette; Kivett, Valerie; Duo, Xiaoqin; Hansen, Helen; Hsuang, George; Lamela, Rosito; Ramos, Christian; Patoka, Joe; Wagenman, Katherine; Zhou, Mi; Klein, Adam; McGee, Nora; Pfefferle, Jon; Wilson, Callie; Morris, Pagan; Hughes, Mary; Britt-Williams, Marlin; Foft, Jessica; Madsen, Julia; Polony, Csaba; McCarthy, Bridget; Zahora, Candice; Villano, John; Engelhard, Herbert; Borg, Ake; Chanock, Stephen K; Collins, Peter; Elston, Robert; Kleihues, Paul; Kruchko, Carol; Petersen, Gloria; Plon, Sharon; Thompson, Patricia; Johansen, C.; Sadetzki, S.; Melin, B.; Bondy, Melissa L.; Lau, Ching C.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Armstrong, Georgina N.; Liu, Yanhong; Shete, Sanjay; Yu, Robert K.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Houlston, Richard S.; Hosking, Fay J.; Robertson, Lindsay; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Sloan, Andrew E.; Barnett, Gene; Devine, Karen; Wolinsky, Yingli; Lai, Rose; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Il'yasova, Dora; Schildkraut, Joellen; Sadetzki, Siegal; Yechezkel, Galit Hirsh; Bruchim, Revital Bar-Sade; Aslanov, Lili; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Kosteljanetz, Michael; Broholm, Helle; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Olson, Sara H.; Schubert, Erica; DeAngelis, Lisa; Jenkins, Robert B.; Yang, Ping; Rynearson, Amanda; Andersson, Ulrika; Wibom, Carl; Henriksson, Roger; Melin, Beatrice S.; Cederquist, Kristina; Aradottir, Steina; Borg, Åke; Merrell, Ryan; Lada, Patricia; Wrensch, Margaret; Wiencke, John; Wiemels, Joe; McCoy, Lucie; McCarthy, Bridget J.; Davis, Faith G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although familial susceptibility to glioma is known, the genetic basis for this susceptibility remains unidentified in the majority of glioma-specific families. An alternative approach to identifying such genes is to examine cancer pedigrees, which include glioma as one of several cancer phenotypes, to determine whether common chromosomal modifications might account for the familial aggregation of glioma and other cancers. Methods Germline rearrangements in 146 glioma families (from the Gliogene Consortium; http://www.gliogene.org/) were examined using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. These families all had at least 2 verified glioma cases and a third reported or verified glioma case in the same family or 2 glioma cases in the family with at least one family member affected with melanoma, colon, or breast cancer.The genomic areas covering TP53, CDKN2A, MLH1, and MSH2 were selected because these genes have been previously reported to be associated with cancer pedigrees known to include glioma. Results We detected a single structural rearrangement, a deletion of exons 1-6 in MSH2, in the proband of one family with 3 cases with glioma and one relative with colon cancer. Conclusions Large deletions and duplications are rare events in familial glioma cases, even in families with a strong family history of cancers that may be involved in known cancer syndromes. PMID:24723567

  2. Persistence of X-ray-induced chromosomal rearrangements in long-term cultures of human diploid fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Y.; Little, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    As part of a long-term study of mechanisms of human cell neoplastic transformation, the authors have examined the change in the frequencies of X-ray-induced chromosome rearrangements in density-inhibited human foreskin fibroblasts as a function of subculture time. In nonproliferating cells, the frequency of chromosomal aberrations declined within 24 to 48 hr but still remained at a relatively high level up to 43 days after irradiation. Aberrations disappeared rapidly, however, when the cells were allowed to proliferate, indicating that these lesions are lethal to dividing cells. The frequency of induced translocations, as determined by analysis of G-banded karyotypes, was dose dependent and remained stable up to 20 mean population doublings after irradiation. When subculture of density-inhibited cultures was delayed for 4 hr after irradiation (confluent holding), the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in the first mitosis declined, whereas the translocation frequencies at later passage were elevated as compared with cells subcultured immediately. This correlates with the reported increase in the frequency of transformation under similar conditions. These findings support the hypothesis that chromosomal rearrangements induced by DNA damage may be involved in the initiation of cancer

  3. Additions, losses, and rearrangements on the evolutionary route from a reconstructed ancestor to the modern Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan L Gordon

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Comparative genomics can be used to infer the history of genomic rearrangements that occurred during the evolution of a species. We used the principle of parsimony, applied to aligned synteny blocks from 11 yeast species, to infer the gene content and gene order that existed in the genome of an extinct ancestral yeast about 100 Mya, immediately before it underwent whole-genome duplication (WGD. The reconstructed ancestral genome contains 4,703 ordered loci on eight chromosomes. The reconstruction is complete except for the subtelomeric regions. We then inferred the series of rearrangement steps that led from this ancestor to the current Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome; relative to the ancestral genome we observe 73 inversions, 66 reciprocal translocations, and five translocations involving telomeres. Some fragile chromosomal sites were reused as evolutionary breakpoints multiple times. We identified 124 genes that have been gained by S. cerevisiae in the time since the WGD, including one that is derived from a hAT family transposon, and 88 ancestral loci at which S. cerevisiae did not retain either of the gene copies that were formed by WGD. Sites of gene gain and evolutionary breakpoints both tend to be associated with tRNA genes and, to a lesser extent, with origins of replication. Many of the gained genes in S. cerevisiae have functions associated with ethanol production, growth in hypoxic environments, or the uptake of alternative nutrient sources.

  4. Association of CAD, a multifunctional protein involved in pyrimidine synthesis, with mLST8, a component of the mTOR complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background mTOR is a genetically conserved serine/threonine protein kinase, which controls cell growth, proliferation, and survival. A multifunctional protein CAD, catalyzing the initial three steps in de novo pyrimidine synthesis, is regulated by the phosphorylation reaction with different protein kinases, but the relationship with mTOR protein kinase has not been known. Results CAD was recovered as a binding protein with mLST8, a component of the mTOR complexes, from HEK293 cells transfected with the FLAG-mLST8 vector. Association of these two proteins was confirmed by the co-immuoprecipitaiton followed by immunoblot analysis of transfected myc-CAD and FLAG-mLST8 as well as that of the endogenous proteins in the cells. Analysis using mutant constructs suggested that CAD has more than one region for the binding with mLST8, and that mLST8 recognizes CAD and mTOR in distinct ways. The CAD enzymatic activity decreased in the cells depleted of amino acids and serum, in which the mTOR activity is suppressed. Conclusion The results obtained indicate that mLST8 bridges between CAD and mTOR, and plays a role in the signaling mechanism where CAD is regulated in the mTOR pathway through the association with mLST8. PMID:23594158

  5. Vasoactivity of rucaparib, a PARP-1 inhibitor, is a complex process that involves myosin light chain kinase, P2 receptors, and PARP itself.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cian M McCrudden

    Full Text Available Therapeutic inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, as monotherapy or to supplement the potencies of other agents, is a promising strategy in cancer treatment. We previously reported that the first PARP inhibitor to enter clinical trial, rucaparib (AG014699, induced vasodilation in vivo in xenografts, potentiating response to temozolomide. We now report that rucaparib inhibits the activity of the muscle contraction mediator myosin light chain kinase (MLCK 10-fold more potently than its commercially available inhibitor ML-9. Moreover, rucaparib produces additive relaxation above the maximal degree achievable with ML-9, suggesting that MLCK inhibition is not solely responsible for dilation. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis using L-NMMA also failed to impact rucaparib's activity. Rucaparib contains the nicotinamide pharmacophore, suggesting it may inhibit other NAD+-dependent processes. NAD+ exerts P2 purinergic receptor-dependent inhibition of smooth muscle contraction. Indiscriminate blockade of the P2 purinergic receptors with suramin abrogated rucaparib-induced vasodilation in rat arterial tissue without affecting ML-9-evoked dilation, although the specific receptor subtypes responsible have not been unequivocally identified. Furthermore, dorsal window chamber and real time tumor vessel perfusion analyses in PARP-1-/- mice indicate a potential role for PARP in dilation of tumor-recruited vessels. Finally, rucaparib provoked relaxation in 70% of patient-derived tumor-associated vessels. These data provide tantalising evidence of the complexity of the mechanism underlying rucaparib-mediated vasodilation.

  6. The complexities of 'otherness': reflections on embodiment of a young White British woman engaged in cross-generation research involving older people in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Meriel

    2015-05-01

    If interviews are to be considered embodied experiences, than the potential influence of the embodied researcher must be explored. A focus on specific attributes such as age or ethnicity belies the complex and negotiated space that both researcher and participant inhabit simultaneously. Drawing on empirical research with stroke survivors in an ethnically mixed area of Indonesia, this paper highlights the importance of considering embodiment as a specific methodological concern. Three specific interactions are described and analysed, illustrating the active nature of the embodied researcher in narrative production and development. The intersectionality of embodied features is evident, alongside their fluctuating influence in time and place. These interactions draw attention to the need to consider the researcher within the interview process and the subsequent analysis and presentation of narrative findings. The paper concludes with a reinforcement of the importance of ongoing and meaningful reflexivity in research, a need to consider the researcher as the other participant, and specifically a call to engage with and present the dynamic nature of embodiment.

  7. AtMMS21, an SMC5/6 complex subunit, is involved in stem cell niche maintenance and DNA damage responses in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Panglian; Yuan, Dongke; Liu, Ming; Li, Chunxin; Liu, Yiyang; Zhang, Shengchun; Yao, Nan; Yang, Chengwei

    2013-04-01

    Plants maintain stem cells in meristems to sustain lifelong growth; these stem cells must have effective DNA damage responses to prevent mutations that can propagate to large parts of the plant. However, the molecular links between stem cell functions and DNA damage responses remain largely unexplored. Here, we report that the small ubiquitin-related modifier E3 ligase AtMMS21 (for methyl methanesulfonate sensitivity gene21) acts to maintain the root stem cell niche by mediating DNA damage responses in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Mutation of AtMMS21 causes defects in the root stem cell niche during embryogenesis and postembryonic stages. AtMMS21 is essential for the proper expression of stem cell niche-defining transcription factors. Moreover, mms21-1 mutants are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents, have a constitutively increased DNA damage response, and have more DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the roots. Also, mms21-1 mutants exhibit spontaneous cell death within the root stem cell niche, and treatment with DSB-inducing agents increases this cell death, suggesting that AtMMS21 is required to prevent DSB-induced stem cell death. We further show that AtMMS21 functions as a subunit of the STRUCTURAL MAINTENANCE OF CHROMOSOMES5/6 complex, an evolutionarily conserved chromosomal ATPase required for DNA repair. These data reveal that AtMMS21 acts in DSB amelioration and stem cell niche maintenance during Arabidopsis root development.

  8. Neurobehavioral and neurometabolic (SPECT) correlates of paranormal information: involvement of the right hemisphere and its sensitivity to weak complex magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, W G; Persinger, M A; Webster, D L; Tiller, S G; Cook, C M

    2002-02-01

    Experiments were designed to help elucidate the neurophysiological correlates for the experiences reported by Sean Harribance. For most of his life he has routinely experienced "flashes of images" of objects that were hidden and of accurate personal information concerning people with whom he was not familiar. The specificity of details for target pictures of people was correlated positively with the proportion of occipital alpha activity. Results from a complete neuropsychological assessment, Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT), and screening electroencephalography suggested that his experiences were associated with increased activity within the parietal lobe and occipital regions of the right hemisphere. Sensed presences (subjectively localized to his left side) were evoked when weak, magnetic fields, whose temporal structure simulated long-term potentiation in the hippocampus, were applied over his right temporoparietal lobes. These results suggest that the phenomena attributed to paranormal or "extrasensory" processes are correlated quantitatively with morphological and functional anomalies involving the right parietotemporal cortices (or its thalamic inputs) and the hippocampal formation.

  9. Transcriptomic Analysis of Long Non-Coding RNAs and Coding Genes Uncovers a Complex Regulatory Network That Is Involved in Maize Seed Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs have been reported to be involved in the development of maize plant. However, few focused on seed development of maize. Here, we identified 753 lncRNA candidates in maize genome from six seed samples. Similar to the mRNAs, lncRNAs showed tissue developmental stage specific and differential expression, indicating their putative role in seed development. Increasing evidence shows that crosstalk among RNAs mediated by shared microRNAs (miRNAs represents a novel layer of gene regulation, which plays important roles in plant development. Functional roles and regulatory mechanisms of lncRNAs as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNA in plants, particularly in maize seed development, are unclear. We combined analyses of consistently altered 17 lncRNAs, 840 mRNAs and known miRNA to genome-wide investigate potential lncRNA-mediated ceRNA based on “ceRNA hypothesis”. The results uncovered seven novel lncRNAs as potential functional ceRNAs. Functional analyses based on their competitive coding-gene partners by Gene Ontology (GO and KEGG biological pathway demonstrated that combined effects of multiple ceRNAs can have major impacts on general developmental and metabolic processes in maize seed. These findings provided a useful platform for uncovering novel mechanisms of maize seed development and may provide opportunities for the functional characterization of individual lncRNA in future studies.

  10. Identification of FadAB Complexes Involved in Fatty Acid β-Oxidation in Streptomyces coelicolor and Construction of a Triacylglycerol Overproducing strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simón Menendez-Bravo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Oleaginous microorganisms represent possible platforms for the sustainable production of oleochemicals and biofuels due to their metabolic robustness and the possibility to be engineered. Streptomyces coelicolor is among the narrow group of prokaryotes capable of accumulating triacylglycerol (TAG as carbon and energy reserve. Although the pathways for TAG biosynthesis in this organism have been widely addressed, the set of genes required for their breakdown have remained elusive so far. Here, we identified and characterized three gene clusters involved in the β-oxidation of fatty acids (FA. The role of each of the three different S. coelicolor FadAB proteins in FA catabolism was confirmed by complementation of an Escherichia coliΔfadBA mutant strain deficient in β-oxidation. In S. coelicolor, the expression profile of the three gene clusters showed variation related with the stage of growth and the presence of FA in media. Flux balance analyses using a corrected version of the current S. coelicolor metabolic model containing detailed TAG biosynthesis reactions suggested the relevance of the identified fadAB genes in the accumulation of TAG. Thus, through the construction and analysis of fadAB knockout mutant strains, we obtained an S. coelicolor mutant that showed a 4.3-fold increase in the TAG content compared to the wild type strain grown under the same culture conditions.

  11. Unidirectional Movement of Cellulose Synthase Complexes in Arabidopsis Seed Coat Epidermal Cells Deposit Cellulose Involved in Mucilage Extrusion, Adherence, and Ray Formation1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Patricia; Young, Robin; DeBolt, Seth

    2015-01-01

    CELLULOSE SYNTHASE5 (CESA5) synthesizes cellulose necessary for seed mucilage adherence to seed coat epidermal cells of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The involvement of additional CESA proteins in this process and details concerning the manner in which cellulose is deposited in the mucilage pocket are unknown. Here, we show that both CESA3 and CESA10 are highly expressed in this cell type at the time of mucilage synthesis and localize to the plasma membrane adjacent to the mucilage pocket. The isoxaben resistant1-1 and isoxaben resistant1-2 mutants affecting CESA3 show defects consistent with altered mucilage cellulose biosynthesis. CESA3 can interact with CESA5 in vitro, and green fluorescent protein-tagged CESA5, CESA3, and CESA10 proteins move in a linear, unidirectional fashion around the cytoplasmic column of the cell, parallel with the surface of the seed, in a pattern similar to that of cortical microtubules. Consistent with this movement, cytological evidence suggests that the mucilage is coiled around the columella and unwinds during mucilage extrusion to form a linear ray. Mutations in CESA5 and CESA3 affect the speed of mucilage extrusion and mucilage adherence. These findings imply that cellulose fibrils are synthesized in an ordered helical array around the columella, providing a distinct structure to the mucilage that is important for both mucilage extrusion and adherence. PMID:25926481

  12. Differential metabolic rearrangements after cold storage are correlated with chilling injury resistance of peach fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia A Bustamante

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Reconfiguration of the metabolome is a key component involved in the acclimation to cold in plants; however, few studies have been devoted to the analysis of the overall metabolite changes after cold storage of fruits prior to consumption. Here, metabolite profiling of six peach varieties with differential susceptibility to develop mealiness, a chilling-injury (CI symptom, was performed. According to metabolic content at harvest; after cold treatment; and after ripening, either following cold treatment or not; peach fruits clustered in distinct groups, depending on harvest-time, cold treatment, and ripening state. Both common and distinct metabolic responses among the six varieties were found; common changes including dramatic galactinol and raffinose rise; GABA, Asp and Phe increase; and 2-oxo-glutarate and succinate decrease. Raffinose content after long cold treatment quantitatively correlated to the degree of mealiness resistance of the different peach varieties; and thus, raffinose emerges as a candidate biomarker of this CI disorder. Xylose increase after cold treatment was found only in the susceptible genotypes, indicating a particular cell wall reconfiguration of these varieties while being cold-stored. Overall, results indicate that peach fruit differential metabolic rearrangements due to cold treatment, rather than differential metabolic priming before cold, are better related with CI resistance. The plasticity of peach fruit metabolism renders it possible to induce a diverse metabolite array after cold, which is successful, in some genotypes, to avoid CI

  13. Evaluation of NGS and RT-PCR methods for ALK rearrangement in European NSCLC patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Letovanec, Igor; Finn, Stephen; Zygoura, Panagiota

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The reported prevalence of ALK rearrangement in NSCLC ranges from 2%-7%. The primary standard diagnostic method is fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Recently, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has also proven to be a reproducible and sensitive technique. Reverse transcriptase...

  14. Rearrangement of 5-trimethylsilylthebaine on treatment with L-selectride: an efficient synthesis of (+)-bractazonine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weibin; Wu, Huifang; Bernard, Denzil; Metcalf, Matthew D; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Flippen-Anderson, Judith L; MacKerell, Alexander D; Coop, Andrew

    2003-03-07

    Treatment of 5-trimethylsilylthebaine with L-Selectride gave rise to a rearrangement to 10-trimethylsilylbractazonine through migration of the phenyl group, whereas treatment of thebaine with strong Lewis acids is known to lead to a similar rearrangement through migration of the alkyl bridge to give, after reduction, (+)-neodihydrothebaine. It is suggested that the rearrangement of the alkyl group of thebaine is favored due to the formation of a tertiary benzylic cation. However, for 5-trimethylsilylthebaine, the lithium ion of L-Selectride acts as the Lewis acid and the beta-silyl effect dominates in the stabilization of any positive charge. This rearrangement provides a clear example of the greater relative migratory aptitude of phenyl groups over alkyl groups, and provides an efficient synthesis of (+)-bractazonine from thebaine.

  15. Recurrent reciprocal genomic rearrangements of 17q12 are associated with renal disease, diabetes, and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mefford, Heather C; Clauin, Severine; Sharp, Andrew J

    2007-01-01

    predisposed to recurrent rearrangement, by array-based comparative genomic hybridization. We found that 6% of fetal material showed evidence of microdeletion or microduplication, including three independent events that likely resulted from unequal crossing-over between segmental duplications. One...

  16. Transformation of follicular lymphoma to plasmablastic lymphoma with c-myc gene rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouansafi, Ihsane; He, Bing; Fraser, Cory; Nie, Kui; Mathew, Susan; Bhanji, Rumina; Hoda, Rana; Arabadjief, Melissa; Knowles, Daniel; Cerutti, Andrea; Orazi, Attilio; Tam, Wayne

    2010-12-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is an indolent lymphoma that transforms to high-grade lymphoma, mostly diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, in about a third of patients. We present the first report of a case of FL that transformed to plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL). Clonal transformation of the FL to PBL was evidenced by identical IGH/BCL2 gene rearrangements and VDJ gene usage in rearranged IGH genes. IGH/ BCL2 translocation was retained in the PBL, which also acquired c-myc gene rearrangement. Genealogic analysis based on somatic hypermutation of the rearranged IGH genes of both FL and PBL suggests that transformation of the FL to PBL occurred most likely by divergent evolution from a common progenitor cell rather than direct evolution from the FL clone. Our study of this unusual case expands the histologic spectrum of FL transformation and increases our understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms of transformation of indolent lymphomas to aggressive lymphomas.

  17. Total synthesis of broussonetine F: the orthoamide Overman rearrangement of an allylic diol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Naoto; Aoki, Toshihiro; Miwa, Shohei; Yamazaki, Miki; Sato, Takaaki; Chida, Noritaka

    2011-02-18

    A first total synthesis of broussonetine F from diethyl L-tartrate was achieved. The cornerstone of our synthesis was an orthoamide Overman rearrangement, which provided an allylic amino alcohol with complete diastereoselectivity.

  18. Androgen receptor activation integrates complex transcriptional effects in osteoblasts, involving the growth factors TGF-β and IGF-I, and transcription factor C/EBPδ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Thomas L; Centrella, Michael

    2015-11-15

    Osteoblasts respond to many growth factors including IGF-I and TGF-β, which themselves are sensitive to other bone growth regulators. Here we show that IGF-I gene promoter activity in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) induced osteoblasts is suppressed by dihydrotestosterone (DHT) through an essential C/EBP response element (RE) in exon 1 of the igf1 gene. Inhibition by DHT fails to occur when the androgen receptor (AR) gene is mutated within its DNA binding domain. Correspondingly, DHT activated AR inhibits gene transactivation by C/EBPδ, and transgenic C/EBPδ expression inhibits AR activity. Inhibition by DHT persists when upstream Smad and Runx REs in the IGF-I gene promoter are mutated. TGF-β also enhances IGF-I gene promoter activity, although modestly relative to PGE2, and independently of the C/EBP, Smad, or Runx REs. Still, DHT suppresses TGF-β induced IGF-I promoter activity, but not its effects on DNA or collagen synthesis. Notably, DHT suppresses plasminogen activator inhibitor gene promoter activity, but synergistically increases Smad dependent gene promoter activity in TGF-β induced cells, which are differentially sensitive to AR mutations and the AR co-regulator ARA55. Finally, although the PGE2 sensitive C/EBP RE in the igf1 gene is not essential for basal TGF-β induction, C/EBPδ activity through this site is potently enhanced by TGF-β. Thus DHT suppresses the PGE2 and TGF-β induced IGF-I gene promoter and differentiates other aspects of TGF-β activity in osteoblasts. Our results extend the complex interactions among local and systemic bone growth regulators to DHT, and predict complications from anabolic steroid use in other DHT sensitive tissues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Novel Fragmentation Pathways of Anionic Adducts of Steroids Formed by Electrospray Anion Attachment Involving Regioselective Attachment, Regiospecific Decompositions, Charge-Induced Pathways, and Ion-Dipole Complex Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rannulu, Nalaka S.; Cole, Richard B.

    2012-09-01

    The analysis of several bifunctional neutral steroids, 5-α-pregnane diol (5-α-pregnane-3α-20βdiol), estradiol (3,17α-dihydroxy-1,3,5(10)-estratriene), progesterone (4-pregnene-3,20-dione), lupeol (3β-hydroxy-20(29)-lupene), pregnenolone (5-pregnen-3β-ol-20-one), and pregnenolone acetate (5-pregnen-3β-ol-20-one acetate) was accomplished by negative ion electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) employing adduct formation with various anions: fluoride, bicarbonate, acetate, and chloride. Fluoride yielded higher abundances of anionic adducts and more substantial abundances of deprotonated molecules compared with other investigated anions. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of precursor [M + anion]- adducts of these steroids revealed that fluoride adduct [M + F]- precursors first lose HF to produce [M - H]- and then undergo consecutive decompositions to yield higher abundances of structurally-informative product ions than the other tested anions. In addition to charge-remote fragmentations, the majority of CID pathways of estradiol are deduced to occur via charge-induced fragmentation. Most interestingly, certain anions exhibit preferential attachment to a specific site on these bifunctional steroid molecules, which we are calling "regioselective anion attachment." Regioselective anion attachment is evidenced by subsequent regiospecific decomposition. Regioselective attachment of fluoride (and acetate) anions to low (and moderate) acidity functional groups of pregnenolone, respectively, is demonstrated using deuterated compounds. Moreover, the formation of unique intermediate ion-dipole complexes leading to novel fragmentation pathways of fluoride adducts of pregnenolone acetate, and bicarbonate adducts of d4-pregnenolone, are also discussed.

  20. Characterizing the Hot Spots Involved in RON-MSPβ Complex Formation Using In Silico Alanine Scanning Mutagenesis and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Zarei

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Implication of protein-protein interactions (PPIs in development of many diseases such as cancer makes them attractive for therapeutic intervention and rational drug design. RON (Recepteur d’Origine Nantais tyrosine kinase receptor has gained considerable attention as promising target in cancer therapy. The activation of RON via its ligand, macrophage stimulation protein (MSP is the most common mechanism of activation for this receptor. The aim of the current study was to perform in silico alanine scanning mutagenesis and to calculate binding energy for prediction of hot spots in protein-protein interface between RON and MSPβ chain (MSPβ. Methods: In this work the residues at the interface of RON-MSPβ complex were mutated to alanine and then molecular dynamics simulation was used to calculate binding free energy. Results: The results revealed that Gln193, Arg220, Glu287, Pro288, Glu289, and His424 residues from RON and Arg521, His528, Ser565, Glu658, and Arg683 from MSPβ may play important roles in protein-protein interaction between RON and MSP. Conclusion: Identification of these RON hot spots is important in designing anti-RON drugs when the aim is to disrupt RON-MSP interaction. In the same way, the acquired information regarding the critical amino acids of MSPβ can be used in the process of rational drug design for developing MSP antagonizing agents, the development of novel MSP mimicking peptides where inhibition of RON activation is required, and the design of experimental site directed mutagenesis studies.

  1. Cytological evidence of chromosomal rearrangement in the second meiotic division after exposure to X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szemere, G. (Orvostudomanyi Egyetem, Szeged (Hungary). Orvosbiologiai Intezet)

    1982-01-01

    Metaphase II cells with unequal dyad-arms and obvious X/autosomal rearrangements were found after an exposure to X-rays (2 Gy) of male mice at different stages of meiosis (pachytene, diplotene and diakinesis) with a frequency of 0.2, 1.26 and 0.6%, respectively, giving a direct cytological evidence of structural chromosomal rearrangements in metaphase II cells, partly with autosomal and partly with X/autosomal partners.

  2. The Globular State of the Single-Stranded RNA: Effect of the Secondary Structure Rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, Zareh A.; Karapetian, Armen T.

    2015-01-01

    The mutual influence of the slow rearrangements of secondary structure and fast collapse of the long single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) in approximation of coarse-grained model is studied with analytic calculations. It is assumed that the characteristic time of the secondary structure rearrangement is much longer than that for the formation of the tertiary structure. A nonequilibrium phase transition of the 2nd order has been observed. PMID:26345143

  3. The Globular State of the Single-Stranded RNA: Effect of the Secondary Structure Rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zareh A. Grigoryan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mutual influence of the slow rearrangements of secondary structure and fast collapse of the long single-stranded RNA (ssRNA in approximation of coarse-grained model is studied with analytic calculations. It is assumed that the characteristic time of the secondary structure rearrangement is much longer than that for the formation of the tertiary structure. A nonequilibrium phase transition of the 2nd order has been observed.

  4. Isotopic labelling studies for a gold-catalysed skeletal rearrangement of alkynyl aziridines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Spencer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Isotopic labelling studies were performed to probe a proposed 1,2-aryl shift in the gold-catalysed cycloisomerisation of alkynyl aziridines into 2,4-disubstituted pyrroles. Two isotopomers of the expected skeletal rearrangement product were identified using 13C-labelling and led to a revised mechanism featuring two distinct skeletal rearrangements. The mechanistic proposal has been rationalised against the reaction of a range of 13C- and deuterium-labelled substrates.

  5. Brueckner Rearrangement Effects in $^5_\\Lambda$He and $^6_{\\Lambda\\Lambda}$He

    OpenAIRE

    Kohno, M.; Fujiwara, Y.; Akaishi, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Rearrangement effects in light hypernuclei are investigated in the framework of the Brueckner theory. We can estimate without detailed numerical calculations that the energy of the $\\alpha$-core is reduced by more than 2.5 MeV when the $\\Lambda$ adheres to $^4$He to form $^5_\\Lambda$He. Similar assessment of rearrangement contributions is essential to deduce the strength of $\\Lambda\\Lambda$ interaction from experimentally observed $\\Delta B_{\\Lambda\\Lambda}$. The recently observed experimenta...

  6. Cytological evidence of chromosomal rearrangement in the second meiotic division after exposure to X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szemere, G.

    1982-01-01

    Metaphase II cells with unequal dyad-arms and obvious X/autosomal rearrangements were found after an exposure to X-rays (2 Gy) of male mice at different stages of meiosis (pachytene, diplotene and diakinesis) with a frequency of 0.2, 1.26 and 0.6%, respectively, giving a direct cytological evidence of structural chromosomal rearrangements in metaphase II cells, partly with autosomal and partly with X/autosomal partners. (author)

  7. Deciphering the Code of the Cancer Genome: Mechanisms of Chromosome Rearrangement

    OpenAIRE

    Willis, Nicholas A.; Rass, Emilie; Scully, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangement plays a causal role in tumorigenesis by contributing to the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, the dysregulated expression or amplification of oncogenes and the generation of novel gene fusions. Chromosome breaks are important intermediates in this process. How, when and where these breaks arise and the specific mechanisms engaged in their repair strongly influence the resulting patterns of chromosome rearrangement. Here, we review recent progress in understandin...

  8. MAML2 rearrangement in primary pulmonary mucoepidermoid carcinoma and the correlation with FLT1 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Zhu

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Primary pulmonary mucoepidermoid carcinoma (PMEC is an uncommon neoplasm with remarkable resemblance to mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the salivary glands. The latter has been shown to harbor t(11,19 resulting in MECT1-MAML2 fusion, which may be of diagnostic and prognostic values. However, the importance of such feature in PMEC has not been well studied. METHODS: We detected MAML2 rearrangement using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH in tissue samples from 42 cases of PMEC and 40 of adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC, and the expression of potential downstream targets of MECT1-MAML2, including HES1, FLT1 and NR4A2 with immunohistochemistry (IHC. The findings were then examined regarding the clinicopathological parameters and patient outcomes. RESULTS: FISH analysis revealed MAML2 rearrangement in 50% of the PMEC cases, and such property was prominent in considerable younger patients (33 versus 60 years; p = 0.001 and restricted to cases of low and intermediate grades. IHC analysis showed that FLT1 and HES1 were expressed at lower level in MAML2 rearranged group than MAML2 non-rearranged group (p<0.001 and p = 0.023, respectively. Survival analysis showed significant correlation between MAML2 rearrangement and overall survival (p = 0.023 or disease-free survival (p = 0.027 as well as correlation between FLT1 and overall survival (p = 0.009. CONCLUSIONS: MAML2 rearrangement appears frequent in PMEC and specific with this tumor. Both the presence of MAML2 rearrangement and absence of FLT1 tend to confer a favorable clinical outcome. These findings suggest that molecular detection of MAML2 rearrangement combined with FLT1 may be of important clinical value for PMEC.

  9. Palindromic nucleotide analysis in human T cell receptor rearrangements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh K Srivastava

    Full Text Available Diversity of T cell receptor (TCR genes is primarily generated by nucleotide insertions upon rearrangement from their germ line-encoded V, D and J segments. Nucleotide insertions at V-D and D-J junctions are random, but some small subsets of these insertions are exceptional, in that one to three base pairs inversely repeat the sequence of the germline DNA. These short complementary palindromic sequences are called P nucleotides. We apply the ImmunoSeq deep-sequencing assay to the third complementarity determining region (CDR3 of the β chain of T cell receptors, and use the resulting data to study P nucleotides in the repertoire of naïve and memory CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cells. We estimate P nucleotide distributions in a cross section of healthy adults and different T cell subtypes. We show that P nucleotide frequency in all T cell subtypes ranges from 1% to 2%, and that the distribution is highly biased with respect to the coding end of the gene segment. Classification of observed palindromic sequences into P nucleotides using a maximum conditional probability model shows that single base P nucleotides are very rare in VDJ recombination; P nucleotides are primarily two bases long. To explore the role of P nucleotides in thymic selection, we compare P nucleotides in productive and non-productive sequences of CD8(+ naïve T cells. The naïve CD8(+ T cell clones with P nucleotides are more highly expanded.

  10. Delineating Rearrangements in Single Yeast Artificial Chromosomes by Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Wu, Jenny; Duell, Thomas

    2009-09-18

    Cloning of large chunks of human genomic DNA in recombinant systems such as yeast or bacterial artificial chromosomes has greatly facilitated the construction of physical maps, the positional cloning of disease genes or the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes for diagnostic purposes. For this process to work efficiently, the DNA cloning process and subsequent clone propagation need to maintain stable inserts that are neither deleted nor otherwise rearranged. Some regions of the human genome; however, appear to have a higher propensity than others to rearrange in any host system. Thus, techniques to detect and accurately characterize such rearrangements need to be developed. We developed a technique termed 'Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping (QDFM)' that allows accurate tagging of sequence elements of interest with near kilobase accuracy and optimized it for delineation of rearrangements in recombinant DNA clones. This paper demonstrates the power of this microscopic approach by investigating YAC rearrangements. In our examples, high-resolution physical maps for regions within the immunoglobulin lambda variant gene cluster were constructed for three different YAC clones carrying deletions of 95 kb and more. Rearrangements within YACs could be demonstrated unambiguously by pairwise mapping of cosmids along YAC DNA molecules. When coverage by YAC clones was not available, distances between cosmid clones were estimated by hybridization of cosmids onto DNA fibers prepared from human genomic DNA. In addition, the QDFM technology provides essential information about clone stability facilitating closure of the maps of the human genome as well as those of model organisms.

  11. Managing Complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maylath, Bruce; Vandepitte, Sonia; Minacori, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    and into French. The complexity of the undertaking proved to be a central element in the students' learning, as the collaboration closely resembles the complexity of international documentation workplaces of language service providers. © Association of Teachers of Technical Writing.......This article discusses the largest and most complex international learning-by-doing project to date- a project involving translation from Danish and Dutch into English and editing into American English alongside a project involving writing, usability testing, and translation from English into Dutch...

  12. Lack of nonfunctional B-cell receptor rearrangements in a patient with normal B cell numbers despite partial RAG1 deficiency and atypical SCID/Omenn syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohm-Laursen, Line; Nielsen, Christian; Fisker, Niels

    2008-01-01

    rearrangements to those of age-matched controls, cord blood, and adults revealed an almost total lack of nonproductive rearrangements (2.7% versus 14.7%, 27.6%, and 19.8% in the controls, respectively) indicating failure to correct out-of-frame rearrangements by a second rearrangement on the homologous...

  13. Antibody repertoire development in fetal and neonatal piglets. XXII. Lambda rearrangement precedes kappa rearrangement during B-cell lymphogenesis in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    PCR was used to detect VDJ and VJ rearrangement, expression of RAG-1, TdT and VpreB and the presence of signal joint circles (SJC) in an effort to identify sites of B cell lymphogenesis in tissue lysates and sorted leukocytes of fetal and newborn piglets. VDJ, VlambdaJlambda but not VkappaJkappa re...

  14. Detection of clonal T-cell receptor beta and gamma chain gene rearrangement by polymerase chain reaction and capillary gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongxin; Robetorye, Ryan S

    2013-01-01

    Although established diagnostic criteria exist for mature T-cell neoplasms, a definitive diagnosis of a T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder cannot always be obtained using more conventional techniques such as flow cytometric immunophenotyping, conventional cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization, or immunohistochemistry. However, because T-cell malignancies contain identically rearranged T-cell receptor gamma (TCRG) and/or beta (TCRB) genes, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can be a fast, convenient, and dependable option to identify clonal T-cell processes. This chapter describes the use of PCR and capillary electrophoresis to identify clonal TCRB and TCRG gene rearrangements (TCRB and TCRG PCR) using a commercially available method employing multiple multiplex PCR tubes that was originally developed as the result of a large European BIOMED-2 collaborative study (Invivoscribe Technologies). The core protocol for the TCRB assay involves the use of three separate multiplex master mix tubes. Tubes A and B target the framework regions within the variable and joining regions of the TCRB gene, and Tube C targets the diversity and joining regions of the TCRB gene. The core protocol for the TCRG assay utilizes two multiplex master mix tubes (Tubes A and B) that target the variable and joining regions of the TCRG gene. Use of the five BIOMED-2 TCRB and TCRG PCR multiplex tubes in parallel can detect approximately 94% of clonal TCR gene rearrangements.

  15. Detection of circulating tumor cells harboring a unique ALK rearrangement in ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pailler, Emma; Adam, Julien; Barthélémy, Amélie; Oulhen, Marianne; Auger, Nathalie; Valent, Alexander; Borget, Isabelle; Planchard, David; Taylor, Melissa; André, Fabrice; Soria, Jean Charles; Vielh, Philippe; Besse, Benjamin; Farace, Françoise

    2013-06-20

    The diagnostic test for ALK rearrangement in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) for crizotinib treatment is currently done on tumor biopsies or fine-needle aspirations. We evaluated whether ALK rearrangement diagnosis could be performed by using circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The presence of an ALK rearrangement was examined in CTCs of 18 ALK-positive and 14 ALK-negative patients by using a filtration enrichment technique and filter-adapted fluorescent in situ hybridization (FA-FISH), a FISH method optimized for filters. ALK-rearrangement patterns were determined in CTCs and compared with those present in tumor biopsies. ALK-rearranged CTCs and tumor specimens were characterized for epithelial (cytokeratins, E-cadherin) and mesenchymal (vimentin, N-cadherin) marker expression. ALK-rearranged CTCs were monitored in five patients treated with crizotinib. All ALK-positive patients had four or more ALK-rearranged CTCs per 1 mL of blood (median, nine CTCs per 1 mL; range, four to 34 CTCs per 1 mL). No or only one ALK-rearranged CTC (median, one per 1 mL; range, zero to one per 1 mL) was detected in ALK-negative patients. ALK-rearranged CTCs harbored a unique (3'5') split pattern, and heterogeneous patterns (3'5', only 3') of splits were present in tumors. ALK-rearranged CTCs expressed a mesenchymal phenotype contrasting with heterogeneous epithelial and mesenchymal marker expressions in tumors. Variations in ALK-rearranged CTC levels were detected in patients being treated with crizotinib. ALK rearrangement can be detected in CTCs of patients with ALK-positive NSCLC by using a filtration technique and FA-FISH, enabling both diagnostic testing and monitoring of crizotinib treatment. Our results suggest that CTCs harboring a unique ALK rearrangement and mesenchymal phenotype may arise from clonal selection of tumor cells that have acquired the potential to drive metastatic progression of ALK-positive NSCLC.

  16. Sequential Diels–Alder/[3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement reactions of β-nitrostyrene with 3-methyl-1,3-pentadiene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Wade

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The tin(IV-catalyzed reaction of β-nitrostyrene with (E-3-methyl-1,3-pentadiene in toluene afforded two major nitronic ester cycloadducts in 27% and 29% yield that arise from the reaction at the less substituted diene double bond. Also present were four cycloadducts from the reaction at the higher substituted diene double bond, two of which were the formal cycloadducts of (Z-3-methyl-1,3-pentadiene. A Friedel–Crafts alkylation product from the reaction of the diene, β-nitrostyrene, and toluene was also obtained in 10% yield. The tin(IV-catalyzed reaction of β-nitrostyrene with (Z-3-methyl-1,3-pentadiene in dichloromethane afforded four nitronic ester cycloadducts all derived from the reaction at the higher substituted double bond. One cycloadduct was isolated in 45% yield and two others are formal adducts of the E-isomer of the diene. The product formation in these reactions is consistent with a stepwise mechanism involving a zwitterionic intermediate. The initially isolated nitronic ester cycloadducts underwent tin(IV-catalyzed interconversion, presumably via zwitterion intermediates. Cycloadducts derived from the reaction at the less substituted double bond of (E-3-methyl-1,3-pentadiene underwent a [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement on heating to afford 4-nitrocyclohexenes. Cycloadducts derived from the reaction at the higher substituted diene double bond of either diene failed to undergo a thermal rearrangement. Rates and success of the rearrangement are consistent with a concerted mechanism possessing a dipolar transition state. An initial assessment of substituent effects on the rearrangement process is presented.

  17. Analysis of mutation/rearrangement frequencies and methylation patterns at a given DNA locus using restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyko, Alex; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) is a difference in DNA sequences of organisms belonging to the same species. RFLPs are typically detected as DNA fragments of different lengths after digestion with various restriction endonucleases. The comparison of RFLPs allows investigators to analyze the frequency of occurrence of mutations, such as point mutations, deletions, insertions, and gross chromosomal rearrangements, in the progeny of stressed plants. The assay involves restriction enzyme digestion of DNA followed by hybridization of digested DNA using a radioactively or enzymatically labeled probe. Since DNA can be digested with methylation sensitive enzymes, the assay can also be used to analyze a methylation pattern of a particular locus. Here, we describe RFLP analysis using methylation-insensitive and methylation-sensitive enzymes.

  18. Parental involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezra S Simon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Parent-Teacher Associations and other community groups can play a significant role in helping to establish and run refugee schools; their involvement can also help refugee adults adjust to their changed circumstances.

  19. Detection of Gene Rearrangements in Circulating Tumor Cells: Examples of ALK-, ROS1-, RET-Rearrangements in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and ERG-Rearrangements in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catelain, Cyril; Pailler, Emma; Oulhen, Marianne; Faugeroux, Vincent; Pommier, Anne-Laure; Farace, Françoise

    2017-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) hold promise as biomarkers to aid in patient treatment stratification and disease monitoring. Because the number of cells is a critical parameter for exploiting CTCs for predictive biomarker's detection, we developed a FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) method for CTCs enriched on filters (filter-adapted FISH [FA-FISH]) that was optimized for high cell recovery. To increase the feasibility and reliability of the analyses, we combined fluorescent staining and FA-FISH and developed a semi-automated microscopy method for optimal FISH signal identification in filtration-enriched CTCs . Here we present these methods and their use for the detection and characterization of ALK-, ROS1-, RET-rearrangement in CTCs from non-small-cell lung cancer and ERG-rearrangements in CTCs from prostate cancer patients.

  20. Conformational changes in the AAA ATPase p97–p47 adaptor complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuron, Fabienne; Dreveny, Ingrid; Yuan, Xuemei; Pye, Valerie E; Mckeown, Ciaran; Briggs, Louise C; Cliff, Matthew J; Kaneko, Yayoi; Wallis, Russell; Isaacson, Rivka L; Ladbury, John E; Matthews, Steve J; Kondo, Hisao; Zhang, Xiaodong; Freemont, Paul S

    2006-01-01

    The AAA+ATPase p97/VCP, helped by adaptor proteins, exerts its essential role in cellular events such as endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation or the reassembly of Golgi, ER and the nuclear envelope after mitosis. Here, we report the three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy structures at ∼20 Å resolution in two nucleotide states of the endogenous hexameric p97 in complex with a recombinant p47 trimer, one of the major p97 adaptor proteins involved in membrane fusion. Depending on the nucleotide state, we observe the p47 trimer to be in two distinct arrangements on top of the p97 hexamer. By combining the EM data with NMR and other biophysical measurements, we propose a model of ATP-dependent p97(N) domain motions that lead to a rearrangement of p47 domains, which could result in the disassembly of target protein complexes. PMID:16601695

  1. Rearrangements of MYC gene facilitate risk stratification in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients treated with rituximab-CHOP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tzankov, Alexandar; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Gerhard, Marc

    2014-01-01

    In order to address the debatable prognostic role of MYC rearrangements in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone, we evaluated MYC rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 563 cases using...... with the dual-fusion probes, 15 detectable only with the break-apart probes and 20 detectable with both dual-fusion probes and break-apart probes. MYC rearrangements correlated with germinal center B-cell origin (P=0.02), MYC protein expression (P=0.032), and larger tumor mass size (P=0.0003). Patients with MYC...... was prognostically additive. Radiotherapy seemed to diminish the prognostic effects of MYC rearrangements in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients since only 2/10 irradiated patients with MYC rearrangements died of/with disease, compared with 16/28 non-irradiated patients with MYC rearrangements. We conclude...

  2. Effect of applied hydrostatic pressure on the quenching kinetics, and electronic and molecular structure of eight and nine-coordinate lanthanide complexes in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maupin, C.L.; Riehl, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Applied hydrostatic pressure may be used as a probe of the reaction mechanism for various solution reactions involving lanthanide ions. In this work we report on the use of high pressure to probe the mechanism of enantioselective quenching between racemic luminescent lanthanide complexes containing Dy(III) Tb(III) and Eu(III), and optically active transition metal complexes as quenchers. Diastereomeric rate constants are obtained from a biexponential fit of the luminescence decay. Particular attention will be given to solvation effects on the measured diastereomeric rate constants. The source of chirality is ascribed to a enantioselective rearrangement step within a bimolecular 'encounter' complex yielding a intermolecular geometry in which the energy transfer is efficient. The effect of high pressure on the molecular and electronic structure of these complexes will also be discussed

  3. Hexose rearrangements upon fragmentation of N-glycopeptides and reductively aminated N-glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuhrer, Manfred; Koeleman, Carolien A M; Deelder, André M

    2009-06-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry of glycans and glycoconjugates in protonated form is known to result in rearrangement reactions leading to internal residue loss. Here we studied the occurrence of hexose rearrangements in tandem mass spectrometry of N-glycopeptides and reductively aminated N-glycans by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS and ESI-ion trap-MS/MS. Fragmentation of proton adducts of oligomannosidic N-glycans of ribonuclease B that were labeled with 2-aminobenzamide and 2-aminobenzoic acid resulted in transfer of one to five hexose residues to the fluorescently tagged innermost N-acetylglucosamine. Glycopeptides from various biological sources with oligomannosidic glycans were likewise shown to undergo hexose rearrangement reactions, resulting in chitobiose cleavage products that have acquired one or two hexose moieties. Tryptic immunoglobulin G Fc-glycopeptides with biantennary N-glycans likewise showed hexose rearrangements resulting in hexose transfer to the peptide moiety retaining the innermost N-acetylglucosamine. Thus, as a general phenomenon, tandem mass spectrometry of reductively aminated glycans as well as glycopeptides may result in hexose rearrangements. This characteristic of glycopeptide MS/MS has to be considered when developing tools for de novo glycopeptide structural analysis.

  4. Relationship between mitochondrial gene rearrangements and stability of the origin of light strand replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel M. Fonseca

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial gene rearrangements are much more frequent in vertebrates than initially thought. It has been suggested that the origin of light strand replication could have an important role in the process of gene rearrangements, but this hypothesis has never been tested before. We used amphibians to test the correlation between light-strand replication origin thermodynamic stability and the occurrence of gene rearrangements. The two variables were correlated in a non-phylogenetic approach, but when tested in a phylogenetically based comparative method the correlation was not significant, although species with unstable light-strand replication origins were much more likely to have undergone gene rearrangements. This indicates that within amphibians there are stable and unstable phylogenetic groups regarding mitochondrial gene order. The species analyzed showed variability in the thermodynamic stability of the secondary structure, in the length of its stem and loop, and several species did not present the 5’-GCCGG-3’ motif reported to be necessary for efficient mitochondrial DNA replication. Future studies should focus on the role of the light-strand replication origin in mitochondrial DNA replication and gene rearrangements mechanisms.

  5. Microwave-radiation-induced molecular structural rearrangement of hen egg-white lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anang K.; Burada, P. S.; Bhattacharya, Susmita; Bag, Sudipta; Bhattacharya, Amitabha; Dasgupta, Swagata; Roy, Anushree

    2018-05-01

    We have investigated the nonthermal effect of 10 GHz/22 dBm microwave radiation on hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) over different irradiation times, ranging from 2 min to 1 h. To ensure a control over the radiation parameters, a pair of microwave rectangular waveguides is used to irradiate the samples. Optical spectroscopic measurements, which include UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and far UV CD spectroscopy, reveal the exposure of the buried tryptophan (Trp) residues of the native molecule between 15 and 30 min of radiation. The higher duration of the perturbation leads to a compact structure of the protein and Trp residues are buried again. Interestingly, we do not find any change in the secondary structure of the protein even for 1 h duration of radiation. The relaxation dynamics of the irradiated molecules also has been discussed. We have shown that the molecules relax to their native configuration in 7-8 h after the radiation field is turned off. The structural rearrangement over the above timescale has further been probed by a model calculation, based on a modified Langevin equation. Our coarse-grained simulation approach utilizes the mean of atomic positions and net atomic charge of each amino acid of native HEWL to mimic the initial conformation of the molecule. The modified positions of the residues are then calculated for the given force fields. The simulation results reveal the nonmonotonous change in overall size of the molecule, as observed experimentally. The radiation parameters used in our experiments are very similar to those of some of the electronic devices we often come across. Thus, we believe that the results of our studies on a simple protein structure may help us in understanding the effect of radiation on complex biological systems as well.

  6. Characterization of the bovine type I IFN locus: rearrangements, expansions, and novel subfamilies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Angela M

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Type I interferons (IFN have major roles in the innate immune response to viruses, a function that is believed to have led to expansion in the number and complexity of their genes, although these genes have remained confined to single chromosomal region in all mammals so far examined. IFNB and IFNE define the limits of the locus, with all other Type I IFN genes except IFNK distributed between these boundaries, strongly suggesting that the locus has broadened as IFN genes duplicated and then evolved into a series of distinct families. Results The Type I IFN locus in Bos taurus has undergone significant rearrangement and expansion compared to mouse and human, however, with the constituent genes separated into two sub-loci separated by >700 kb. The IFNW family is greatly expanded, comprising 24 potentially functional genes and at least 8 pseudogenes. The IFNB (n = 6, represented in human and mouse by one copy, are also present as multiple copies in Bos taurus. The IFNT, which encode a non-virally inducible, ruminant-specific IFN secreted by the pre-implantation conceptus, are represented by three genes and two pseudogenes. The latter have sequences intermediate between IFNT and IFNW. A new Type I IFN family (IFNX of four members, one of which is a pseudogene, appears to have diverged from the IFNA lineage at least 83 million years ago, but is absent in all other sequenced genomes with the possible exception of the horse, a non-ruminant herbivore. Conclusion In summary, we have provided the first comprehensive annotation of the Type I IFN locus in Bos taurus, thereby providing an insight into the functional evolution of the Type I IFN in ruminants. The diversity and global spread of the ruminant species may have required an expansion of the Type I IFN locus and its constituent genes to provide broad anti-viral protection required for foraging and foregut fermentation.

  7. Small G proteins Rac1 and Ras regulate serine/threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5)·extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) complexes involved in the feedback regulation of Raf1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazalouskas, Matthew D; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Weber, David J; Zimmer, Danna B; Honkanen, Richard E; Wadzinski, Brian E

    2014-02-14

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5, PPP5C) is known to interact with the chaperonin heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and is involved in the regulation of multiple cellular signaling cascades that control diverse cellular processes, such as cell growth, differentiation, proliferation, motility, and apoptosis. Here, we identify PP5 in stable complexes with extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs). Studies using mutant proteins reveal that the formation of PP5·ERK1 and PP5·ERK2 complexes partially depends on HSP90 binding to PP5 but does not require PP5 or ERK1/2 activity. However, PP5 and ERK activity regulates the phosphorylation state of Raf1 kinase, an upstream activator of ERK signaling. Whereas expression of constitutively active Rac1 promotes the assembly of PP5·ERK1/2 complexes, acute activation of ERK1/2 fails to influence the phosphatase-kinase interaction. Introduction of oncogenic HRas (HRas(V12)) has no effect on PP5-ERK1 binding but selectively decreases the interaction of PP5 with ERK2, in a manner that is independent of PP5 and MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) activity, yet paradoxically requires ERK2 activity. Additional studies conducted with oncogenic variants of KRas4B reveal that KRas(L61), but not KRas(V12), also decreases the PP5-ERK2 interaction. The expression of wild type HRas or KRas proteins fails to reduce PP5-ERK2 binding, indicating that the effect is specific to HRas(V12) and KRas(L61) gain-of-function mutations. These findings reveal a novel, differential responsiveness of PP5-ERK1 and PP5-ERK2 interactions to select oncogenic Ras variants and also support a role for PP5·ERK complexes in regulating the feedback phosphorylation of PP5-associated Raf1.

  8. An active Mitochondrial Complex II Present in Mature Seeds Contains an Embryo-Specific Iron-Sulfur Subunit Regulated by ABA and bZIP53 and Is Involved in Germination and Seedling Establishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restovic, Franko; Espinoza-Corral, Roberto; Gómez, Isabel; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesús; Jordana, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Complex II (succinate dehydrogenase) is an essential mitochondrial enzyme involved in both the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the respiratory chain. In Arabidopsis thaliana , its iron-sulfur subunit (SDH2) is encoded by three genes, one of them ( SDH2.3 ) being specifically expressed during seed maturation in the embryo. Here we show that seed SDH2.3 expression is regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) and we define the promoter region (-114 to +49) possessing all the cis -elements necessary and sufficient for high expression in seeds. This region includes between -114 and -32 three ABRE (ABA-responsive) elements and one RY-enhancer like element, and we demonstrate that these elements, although necessary, are not sufficient for seed expression, our results supporting a role for the region encoding the 5' untranslated region (+1 to +49). The SDH2.3 promoter is activated in leaf protoplasts by heterodimers between the basic leucine zipper transcription factors bZIP53 (group S1) and bZIP10 (group C) acting through the ABRE elements, and by the B3 domain transcription factor ABA insensitive 3 (ABI3). The in vivo role of bZIP53 is further supported by decreased SDH2.3 expression in a knockdown bzip53 mutant. By using the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide and sdh2 mutants we have been able to conclusively show that complex II is already present in mature embryos before imbibition, and contains mainly SDH2.3 as iron-sulfur subunit. This complex plays a role during seed germination sensu-stricto since we have previously shown that seeds lacking SDH2.3 show retarded germination and now we demonstrate that low concentrations of thenoyltrifluoroacetone, a complex II inhibitor, also delay germination. Furthermore, complex II inhibitors completely block hypocotyl elongation in the dark and seedling establishment in the light, highlighting an essential role of complex II in the acquisition of photosynthetic competence and the transition from heterotrophy to autotrophy.

  9. A genomewide screen for suppressors of Alu-mediated rearrangements reveals a role for PIF1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M Chisholm

    Full Text Available Alu-mediated rearrangement of tumor suppressor genes occurs frequently during carcinogenesis. In breast cancer, this mechanism contributes to loss of the wild-type BRCA1 allele in inherited disease and to loss of heterozygosity in sporadic cancer. To identify genes required for suppression of Alu-mediated recombination we performed a genomewide screen of a collection of 4672 yeast gene deletion mutants using a direct repeat recombination assay. The primary screen and subsequent analysis identified 12 candidate genes including TSA, ELG1, and RRM3, which are known to play a significant role in maintaining genomic stability. Genetic analysis of the corresponding human homologs was performed in sporadic breast tumors and in inherited BRCA1-associated carcinomas. Sequencing of these genes in high risk breast cancer families revealed a potential role for the helicase PIF1 in cancer predisposition. PIF1 variant L319P was identified in three breast cancer families; importantly, this variant, which is predicted to be functionally damaging, was not identified in a large series of controls nor has it been reported in either dbSNP or the 1000 Genomes Project. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Pfh1 is required to maintain both mitochondrial and nuclear genomic integrity. Functional studies in yeast of human PIF1 L319P revealed that this variant cannot complement the essential functions of Pfh1 in either the nucleus or mitochondria. Our results provide a global view of nonessential genes involved in suppressing Alu-mediated recombination and implicate variation in PIF1 in breast cancer predisposition.

  10. Differential activation of brain regions involved with error-feedback and imitation based motor simulation when observing self and an expert's actions in pilots and non-pilots on a complex glider landing task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callan, Daniel E; Terzibas, Cengiz; Cassel, Daniel B; Callan, Akiko; Kawato, Mitsuo; Sato, Masa-Aki

    2013-05-15

    In this fMRI study we investigate neural processes related to the action observation network using a complex perceptual-motor task in pilots and non-pilots. The task involved landing a glider (using aileron, elevator, rudder, and dive brake) as close to a target as possible, passively observing a replay of one's own previous trial, passively observing a replay of an expert's trial, and a baseline do nothing condition. The objective of this study is to investigate two types of motor simulation processes used during observation of action: imitation based motor simulation and error-feedback based motor simulation. It has been proposed that the computational neurocircuitry of the cortex is well suited for unsupervised imitation based learning, whereas, the cerebellum is well suited for error-feedback based learning. Consistent with predictions, pilots (to a greater extent than non-pilots) showed significant differential activity when observing an expert landing the glider in brain regions involved with imitation based motor simulation (including premotor cortex PMC, inferior frontal gyrus IFG, anterior insula, parietal cortex, superior temporal gyrus, and middle temporal MT area) than when observing one's own previous trial which showed significant differential activity in the cerebellum (only for pilots) thought to be concerned with error-feedback based motor simulation. While there was some differential brain activity for pilots in regions involved with both Execution and Observation of the flying task (potential Mirror System sites including IFG, PMC, superior parietal lobule) the majority was adjacent to these areas (Observation Only Sites) (predominantly in PMC, IFG, and inferior parietal loblule). These regions showing greater activity for observation than for action may be involved with processes related to motor-based representational transforms that are not necessary when actually carrying out the task. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Discovering Host Genes Involved in the Infection by the Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Complex and in the Establishment of Resistance to the Virus Using Tobacco Rattle Virus-based Post Transcriptional Gene Silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Lozano-Durán

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of high-throughput technologies allows for evaluating gene expression at the whole-genome level. Together with proteomic and metabolomic studies, these analyses have resulted in the identification of plant genes whose function or expression is altered as a consequence of pathogen attacks. Members of the Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV complex are among the most important pathogens impairing production of agricultural crops worldwide. To understand how these geminiviruses subjugate plant defenses, and to devise counter-measures, it is essential to identify the host genes affected by infection and to determine their role in susceptible and resistant plants. We have used a reverse genetics approach based on Tobacco rattle virus-induced gene silencing (TRV-VIGS to uncover genes involved in viral infection of susceptible plants, and to identify genes underlying virus resistance. To identify host genes with a role in geminivirus infection, we have engineered a Nicotiana benthamiana line, coined 2IRGFP, which over-expresses GFP upon virus infection. With this system, we have achieved an accurate description of the dynamics of virus replication in space and time. Upon silencing selected N. benthamiana genes previously shown to be related to host response to geminivirus infection, we have identified eighteen genes involved in a wide array of cellular processes. Plant genes involved in geminivirus resistance were studied by comparing two tomato lines: one resistant (R, the other susceptible (S to the virus. Sixty-nine genes preferentially expressed in R tomatoes were identified by screening cDNA libraries from infected and uninfected R and S genotypes. Out of the 25 genes studied so far, the silencing of five led to the total collapse of resistance, suggesting their involvement in the resistance gene network. This review of our results indicates that TRV-VIGS is an exquisite reverse genetics tool that may provide new insights into the

  12. Rearrangement of a common cellular DNA domain on chromosome 4 in human primary liver tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquinelli, C.; Garreau, F.; Bougueleret, L.; Cariani, E.; Thiers, V.; Croissant, O.; Hadchouel, M.; Tiollais, P.; Brechot, C.; Grzeschik, K.H.

    1988-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA integration has been shown to occur frequently in human hepatocellular carcinomas. The authors have investigated whether common cellular DNA domains might be rearranged, possibly by HBV integration, in human primary liver tumors. Unique cellular DNA sequences adjacent to an HBV integration site were isolated from a patient with hepatitis B surface antigen-positive hepatocellular carcinoma. These probes detected rearrangement of this cellular region of chromosomal DNA in 3 of 50 additional primary liver tumors studied. Of these three tumor samples, two contained HBV DNA, without an apparent link between the viral DNA and the rearranged allele; HBV DNA sequences were not detected in the third tumor sample. By use of a panel of somatic cell hybrids, these unique cellular DNA sequences were shown to be located on chromosome 4. Therefore, this region of chromosomal DNA might be implicated in the formation of different tumors at one step of liver cell transformation, possible related to HBV integration

  13. Expedient synthesis of fused azepine derivatives using a sequential rhodium(II)-catalyzed cyclopropanation/1-aza-Cope rearrangement of dienyltriazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Erica E; Lindsay, Vincent N G; Sarpong, Richmond

    2014-09-08

    A general method for the formation of fused dihydroazepine derivatives from 1-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles bearing a tethered diene is reported. The process involves an intramolecular cyclopropanation of an α-imino rhodium(II) carbenoid, leading to a transient 1-imino-2-vinylcyclopropane intermediate which rapidly undergoes a 1-aza-Cope rearrangement to generate fused dihydroazepine derivatives in moderate to excellent yields. The reaction proceeds with similar efficiency on gram scale. The use of catalyst-free conditions leads to the formation of a novel [4.4.0] bicyclic heterocycle. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Intrachromosomal rearrangements in two representatives of the genus Saltator (Thraupidae, Passeriformes) and the occurrence of heteromorphic Z chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Michelly da Silva; Kretschmer, Rafael; Silva, Fabio Augusto Oliveira; Ledesma, Mario Angel; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Del Valle Garnero, Analía; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano Corrêa; Gunski, Ricardo José

    2015-10-01

    Saltator is a genus within family Thraupidae, the second largest family of Passeriformes, with more than 370 species found exclusively in the New World. Despite this, only a few species have had their karyotypes analyzed, most of them only with conventional staining. The diploid number is close to 80, and chromosome morphology is similar to the usual avian karyotype. Recent studies using cross-species chromosome painting have shown that, although the chromosomal morphology and number are similar to many species of birds, Passeriformes exhibit a complex pattern of paracentric and pericentric inversions in the chromosome homologous to GGA1q in two different suborders, Oscines and Suboscines. Hence, considering the importance and species richness of Thraupidae, this study aims to analyze two species of genus Saltator, the golden-billed saltator (S. aurantiirostris) and the green-winged saltator (S. similis) by means of classical cytogenetics and cross-species chromosome painting using Gallus gallus and Leucopternis albicollis probes, and also 5S and 18S rDNA and telomeric sequences. The results show that the karyotypes of these species are similar to other species of Passeriformes. Interestingly, the Z chromosome appears heteromorphic in S. similis, varying in morphology from acrocentric to metacentric. 5S and 18S probes hybridize to one pair of microchromosomes each, and telomeric sequences produce signals only in the terminal regions of chromosomes. FISH results are very similar to the Passeriformes already analyzed by means of molecular cytogenetics (Turdus species and Elaenia spectabilis). However, the paracentric and pericentric inversions observed in Saltator are different from those detected in these species, an observation that helps to explain the probable sequence of rearrangements. As these rearrangements are found in both suborders of Passeriformes (Oscines and Suboscines), we propose that the fission of GGA1 and inversions in GGA1q have occurred very

  15. Structural rearrangement of the intracellular domains during AMPA receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariassen, Linda Grønborg; Katchan, Ljudmila; Jensen, Anna Guldvang

    2016-01-01

    -clamp fluorometry of the double- and single-insert constructs showed that both the intracellular C-terminal domain (CTD) and the loop region between the M1 and M2 helices move during activation and the CTD is detached from the membrane. Our time-resolved measurements revealed unexpectedly complex fluorescence...

  16. Clinical and CT characteristics of surgically resected lung adenocarcinomas harboring ALK rearrangements or EGFR mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hua; Schabath, Matthew B.; Liu, Ying; Han, Ying; Li, Qi; Gillies, Robert J.; Ye, Zhaoxiang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if clinical and CT characteristics of surgically resected lung adenocarcinomas can distinguish those harboring ALK rearrangements from EGFR mutations. Materials and methods: Patients who had surgical resection and histologically confirmed lung adenocarcinoma were enrolled, including 41 patients with ALK rearrangements and 66 patients with EGFR mutations. Eighteen categorical and six quantitative CT characteristics were used to evaluate the tumors. Differences in clinical and CT characteristics between the two groups were investigated. Results: Age (P = 0.003), histological subtypes (P < 0.001), pathological stage (P = 0.007), and five CT characteristics, including size (P < 0.001), GGO (P = 0.001), bubble-like lucency (P = 0.048), lymphadenopathy (P = 0.001), and tumor shadow disappearance rate (P = 0.005) were significantly different between patients harboring ALK rearrangements compared to patients with EGFR mutations. When we compared histologic components, a solid pattern was more common (P = 0.009) in tumors with ALK rearrangements, and lepidic and acinar patterns were more common (P < 0.001 and P = 0.040, respectively) in those with EGFR mutations. Backward elimination analyses revealed that age (OR = 0.93; 95% CI 0.89–0.98), GGO (OR = 0.14; 95% CI 0.03–0.67), and lymphadenopathy (OR = 4.15; 95% CI 1.49–11.60) were significantly associated with ALK rearrangement status. Conclusion: Our analyses revealed that clinical and CT characteristics of lung adenocarcinomas harboring ALK rearrangements were significantly different, compared with those with EGFR mutations. These differences may be related to the molecular pathology of these diseases.

  17. Clinical and CT characteristics of surgically resected lung adenocarcinomas harboring ALK rearrangements or EGFR mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hua [Department of Radiology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China); Schabath, Matthew B. [Department of Cancer Epidemiology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Liu, Ying [Department of Radiology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China); Department of Cancer Imaging and Metabolism, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Han, Ying [Department of Biotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China); Li, Qi [Department of Pathology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China); Gillies, Robert J. [Department of Cancer Imaging and Metabolism, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Department of Radiology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Ye, Zhaoxiang, E-mail: yezhaoxiang@163.com [Department of Radiology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To determine if clinical and CT characteristics of surgically resected lung adenocarcinomas can distinguish those harboring ALK rearrangements from EGFR mutations. Materials and methods: Patients who had surgical resection and histologically confirmed lung adenocarcinoma were enrolled, including 41 patients with ALK rearrangements and 66 patients with EGFR mutations. Eighteen categorical and six quantitative CT characteristics were used to evaluate the tumors. Differences in clinical and CT characteristics between the two groups were investigated. Results: Age (P = 0.003), histological subtypes (P < 0.001), pathological stage (P = 0.007), and five CT characteristics, including size (P < 0.001), GGO (P = 0.001), bubble-like lucency (P = 0.048), lymphadenopathy (P = 0.001), and tumor shadow disappearance rate (P = 0.005) were significantly different between patients harboring ALK rearrangements compared to patients with EGFR mutations. When we compared histologic components, a solid pattern was more common (P = 0.009) in tumors with ALK rearrangements, and lepidic and acinar patterns were more common (P < 0.001 and P = 0.040, respectively) in those with EGFR mutations. Backward elimination analyses revealed that age (OR = 0.93; 95% CI 0.89–0.98), GGO (OR = 0.14; 95% CI 0.03–0.67), and lymphadenopathy (OR = 4.15; 95% CI 1.49–11.60) were significantly associated with ALK rearrangement status. Conclusion: Our analyses revealed that clinical and CT characteristics of lung adenocarcinomas harboring ALK rearrangements were significantly different, compared with those with EGFR mutations. These differences may be related to the molecular pathology of these diseases.

  18. Free energy landscape and cooperatively rearranging region in a hard sphere glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshidome, Takashi; Yoshimori, Akira; Odagaki, Takashi

    2007-08-01

    Exploiting the density functional theory, we calculate the free energy landscape (FEL) of the hard sphere glass in three dimensions. From the FEL, we estimate the number of the particles in the cooperatively rearranging region (CRR). We find that the density dependence of the number of the particles in the CRR is expressed as a power law function of the density. Analyzing the relaxation process in the CRR, we also find that the string motion is the elementary process for the structural relaxation, which leads to the natural definition of the simultaneously rearranging region as the particles displaced in the string motion.

  19. The rearrangement process in a two-stage broadcast switching network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren B.

    1988-01-01

    The rearrangement process in the two-stage broadcast switching network presented by F.K. Hwang and G.W. Richards (ibid., vol.COM-33, no.10, p.1025-1035, Oct. 1985) is considered. By defining a certain function it is possible to calculate an upper bound on the number of connections to be moved...... during a rearrangement. When each inlet channel appears twice, the maximum number of connections to be moved is found. For a special class of inlet assignment patterns in the case of which each inlet channel appears three times, the maximum number of connections to be moved is also found. In the general...

  20. Neptunium carbonato complexes in aqueous solution: an electrochemical, spectroscopic, and quantum chemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi; Tsushima, Satoru; Takao, Koichiro; Rossberg, André; Funke, Harald; Scheinost, Andreas C; Bernhard, Gert; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Hennig, Christoph

    2009-12-21

    The electrochemical behavior and complex structure of Np carbonato complexes, which are of major concern for the geological disposal of radioactive wastes, have been investigated in aqueous Na(2)CO(3) and Na(2)CO(3)/NaOH solutions at different oxidation states by using cyclic voltammetry, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. The end-member complexes of penta- and hexavalent Np in 1.5 M Na(2)CO(3) with pH = 11.7 have been determined as a transdioxo neptunyl tricarbonato complex, [NpO(2)(CO(3))(3)](n-) (n = 5 for Np(V), and 4 for Np(VI)). Hence, the electrochemical reaction of the Np(V/VI) redox couple merely results in the shortening/lengthening of bond distances mainly because of the change of the cationic charge of Np, without any structural rearrangement. This explains the observed reversible-like feature on their cyclic voltammograms. In contrast, the electrochemical oxidation of Np(V) in a highly basic carbonate solution of 2.0 M Na(2)CO(3)/1.0 M NaOH (pH > 13) yielded a stable heptavalent Np complex of [Np(VII)O(4)(OH)(2)](3-), indicating that the oxidation reaction from Np(V) to Np(VII) in the carbonate solution involves a drastic structural rearrangement from the transdioxo configuration to a square-planar-tetraoxo configuration, as well as exchanging the coordinating anions from carbonate ions (CO(3)(2-)) to hydroxide ions (OH(-)).

  1. Involvement of 5-HT(2) serotonergic receptors of the nucleus raphe magnus and nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis/paragigantocellularis complex neural networks in the antinociceptive phenomenon that follows the post-ictal immobility syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; Ferreira, Célio Marcos Dos Reis; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2006-09-01

    The post-ictal immobility syndrome is followed by a significant increase in the nociceptive thresholds in animals and men. In this interesting post-ictal behavioral response, endogenous opioid peptides-mediated mechanisms, as well as cholinergic-mediated antinociceptive processes, have been suggested. However, considering that many serotonergic descending pathways have been implicated in antinociceptive reactions, the aim of the present work is to investigate the involvement of 5-HT(2)-serotonergic receptor subfamily in the post-ictal antinociception. The analgesia was measured by the tail-flick test in seven or eight Wistar rats per group. Convulsions were followed by statistically significant increase in the tail-flick latencies (TFL), at least for 120 min of the post-ictal period. Male Wistar rats were submitted to stereotaxic surgery for introduction of a guide-cannula in the rhombencephalon, aiming either the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) or the gigantocellularis complex. In independent groups of animals, these nuclei were neurochemically lesioned with a unilateral microinjection of ibotenic acid (1.0 microg/0.2 microL). The neuronal damage of either the NRM or nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis/paragigantocellularis complex decreased the post-ictal analgesia. Also, in other independent groups, central administration of ritanserin (5.0 microg/0.2 microL) or physiological saline into each of the reticular formation nuclei studied caused a statistically significant decrease in the TFL of seizing animals, as compared to controls, in all post-ictal periods studied. These results indicate that serotonin input-connected neurons of the pontine and medullarly reticular nuclei may be involved in the post-ictal analgesia.

  2. High level of chromosomal instability in circulating tumor cells of ROS1-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pailler, E; Auger, N; Lindsay, C R; Vielh, P; Islas-Morris-Hernandez, A; Borget, I; Ngo-Camus, M; Planchard, D; Soria, J-C; Besse, B; Farace, F

    2015-07-01

    Genetic aberrations affecting the c-ros oncogene 1 (ROS1) tyrosine kinase gene have been reported in a small subset of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We evaluated whether ROS1-chromosomal rearrangements could be detected in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and examined tumor heterogeneity of CTCs and tumor biopsies in ROS1-rearranged NSCLC patients. Using isolation by size of epithelial tumor cells (ISET) filtration and filter-adapted-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FA-FISH), ROS1 rearrangement was examined in CTCs from four ROS1-rearranged patients treated with the ROS1-inhibitor, crizotinib, and four ROS1-negative patients. ROS1-gene alterations observed in CTCs at baseline from ROS1-rearranged patients were compared with those present in tumor biopsies and in CTCs during crizotinib treatment. Numerical chromosomal instability (CIN) of CTCs was assessed by DNA content quantification and chromosome enumeration. ROS1 rearrangement was detected in the CTCs of all four patients with ROS1 rearrangement previously confirmed by tumor biopsy. In ROS1-rearranged patients, median number of ROS1-rearranged CTCs at baseline was 34.5 per 3 ml blood (range, 24-55). In ROS1-negative patients, median background hybridization of ROS1-rearranged CTCs was 7.5 per 3 ml blood (range, 7-11). Tumor heterogeneity, assessed by ROS1 copy number, was significantly higher in baseline CTCs compared with paired tumor biopsies in the three patients experiencing PR or SD (P < 0.0001). Copy number in ROS1-rearranged CTCs increased significantly in two patients who progressed during crizotinib treatment (P < 0.02). CTCs from ROS1-rearranged patients had a high DNA content and gain of chromosomes, indicating high levels of aneuploidy and numerical CIN. We provide the first proof-of-concept that CTCs can be used for noninvasive and sensitive detection of ROS1 rearrangement in NSCLC patients. CTCs from ROS1-rearranged patients show considerable heterogeneity of ROS1-gene

  3. Dynamic Rearrangement of Cell States Detected by Systematic Screening of Sequential Anticancer Treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koplev, Simon; Longden, James; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Signaling networks are nonlinear and complex, involving a large ensemble of dynamic interaction states that fluctuate in space and time. However, therapeutic strategies, such as combination chemotherapy, rarely consider the timing of drug perturbations. If we are to advance drug discovery for com...

  4. Rearrangement of crystallographic domains driven by magnetic field in ferromagnetic Ni2MnGa and antiferromagnetic CoO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terai, Tomoyuki; Yasui, Motoyoshi; Yamamoto, Masataka; Kakeshita, Tomoyuki

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the rearrangement of crystallographic domains (martensite variants) in Ni 2 MnGa ferromagnetic shape memory alloy and CoO antiferromagnetic oxide by applying magnetic field up to 8.0 MA/m. From the result of optical microscope observation of Ni 2 MnGa single crystal, when a magnetic field is applied along [001] p (p represents a parent phase), the rearrangement of crystallographic domains occurs and the single domain state is obtained below T Ms = 202 K. The same rearrangement occurs but partially when a magnetic field is applied along [110] p . On the other hand, when a magnetic field is applied along [111] p , the rearrangement does not occur. In case of the CoO single crystal, when a magnetic field is applied along [001] p below T Ms = 293 K, the rearrangement occurs at 170 K ≤ T ≤ 293 K, but does not occur at T p and [111] p , the rearrangement does not occur below T Ms . In order to explain the rearrangement in the alloy and the oxide, we have evaluated the magnetic shear stress, τ mag , which is derived from the difference in magnetic energy among crystallographic domains and have compared it with the shear stress required for the twinning plane movement, τ req . As a result, we have found that the rearrangement occurs when the value of τ mag is larger than or equal to the value of τ req for the present alloy and oxide.

  5. Carbocyclization cascades of allyl ketenimines via aza-Claisen rearrangements of N-phosphoryl-N-allyl-ynamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKorver, Kyle A; Wang, Xiao-Na; Walton, Mary C; Hsung, Richard P

    2012-04-06

    A series of carbocyclization cascades of allyl ketenimines initiated through a thermal aza-Claisen rearrangement of N-phosphoryl-N-allyl ynamides is described. Interceptions of the cationic intermediate via Meerwein-Wagner rearrangements and polyene-type cyclizations en route to fused bi- and tricyclic frameworks are featured.

  6. An Efficient Synthesis of de novo Imidates via Aza-Claisen Rearrangements of N-Allyl Ynamides

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKorver, Kyle A.; North, Troy D.; Hsung, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    A novel thermal 3-aza-Claisen rearrangement of N-allyl ynamides for the synthesis of α-allyl imidates is described. Also, a sequential aza-Claisen, Pd-catalyzed Overman rearrangement is described for the synthesis of azapine-2-ones. PMID:21278848

  7. Large BRCA1 and BRCA2 genomic rearrangements in Danish high risk breast-ovarian cancer families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas v O; Jønson, Lars; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutations predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Large genomic rearrangements of BRCA1 account for 0-36% of all disease causing mutations in various populations, while large genomic rearrangements in BRCA2 are more rare. We examined 642 East Danish breast and/or ovaria...

  8. Interactions of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 with vitronectin involve an extensive binding surface and induce mutual conformational rearrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blouse, Grant E; Dupont, Daniel Miotto; Schar, Christine R

    2009-01-01

    In order to explore early events during the association of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) with its cofactor vitronectin, we have applied a robust strategy that combines protein engineering, fluorescence spectroscopy, and rapid reaction kinetics. Fluorescence stopped-flow experiments de...

  9. Mapping autism risk loci using genetic linkage and chromosomal rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatmari, Peter; Paterson, Andrew; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Roberts, Wendy; Brian, Jessica; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Vincent, John; Skaug, Jennifer; Thompson, Ann; Senman, Lili; Feuk, Lars; Qian, Cheng; Bryson, Susan; Jones, Marshall; Marshall, Christian; Scherer, Stephen; Vieland, Veronica; Bartlett, Christopher; Mangin, La Vonne; Goedken, Rhinda; Segre, Alberto; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Cuccaro, Michael; Gilbert, John; Wright, Harry; Abramson, Ruth; Betancur, Catalina; Bourgeron, Thomas; Gillberg, Christopher; Leboyer, Marion; Buxbaum, Joseph; Davis, Kenneth; Hollander, Eric; Silverman, Jeremy; Hallmayer, Joachim; Lotspeich, Linda; Sutcliffe, James; Haines, Jonathan; Folstein, Susan; Piven, Joseph; Wassink, Thomas; Sheffield, Val; Geschwind, Daniel; Bucan, Maja; Brown, Ted; Cantor, Rita; Constantino, John; Gilliam, Conrad; Herbert, Martha; Lajonchere, Clara; Ledbetter, David; Lese-Martin, Christa; Miller, Janet; Nelson, Stan; Samango-Sprouse, Carol; Spence, Sarah; State, Matthew; Tanzi, Rudolph; Coon, Hilary; Dawson, Geraldine; Devlin, Bernie; Estes, Annette; Flodman, Pamela; Klei, Lambertus; Mcmahon, William; Minshew, Nancy; Munson, Jeff; Korvatska, Elena; Rodier, Patricia; Schellenberg, Gerard; Smith, Moyra; Spence, Anne; Stodgell, Chris; Tepper, Ping Guo; Wijsman, Ellen; Yu, Chang-En; Rogé, Bernadette; Mantoulan, Carine; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Poustka, Annemarie; Felder, Bärbel; Klauck, Sabine; Schuster, Claudia; Poustka, Fritz; Bölte, Sven; Feineis-Matthews, Sabine; Herbrecht, Evelyn; Schmötzer, Gabi; Tsiantis, John; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Blasi, Francesca; Carone, Simona; Toma, Claudio; Van Engeland, Herman; De Jonge, Maretha; Kemner, Chantal; Koop, Frederieke; Langemeijer, Marjolein; Hijmans, Channa; Staal, Wouter; Baird, Gillian; Bolton, Patrick; Rutter, Michael; Weisblatt, Emma; Green, Jonathan; Aldred, Catherine; Wilkinson, Julie-Anne; Pickles, Andrew; Le Couteur, Ann; Berney, Tom; Mcconachie, Helen; Bailey, Anthony; Francis, Kostas; Honeyman, Gemma; Hutchinson, Aislinn; Parr, Jeremy; Wallace, Simon; Monaco, Anthony; Barnby, Gabrielle; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Lamb, Janine; Sousa, Ines; Sykes, Nuala; Cook, Edwin; Guter, Stephen; Leventhal, Bennett; Salt, Jeff; Lord, Catherine; Corsello, Christina; Hus, Vanessa; Weeks, Daniel; Volkmar, Fred; Tauber, Maïté; Fombonne, Eric; Shih, Andy; Meyer, Kacie

    2007-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are common, heritable neurodevelopmental conditions. The genetic architecture of ASD is complex, requiring large samples to overcome heterogeneity. Here we broaden coverage and sample size relative to other studies of ASD by using Affymetrix 10K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and 1168 families with ≥ 2 affected individuals to perform the largest linkage scan to date, while also analyzing copy number variation (CNV) in these families. Linkage and CNV analyses implicate chromosome 11p12-p13 and neurexins, respectively, amongst other candidate loci. Neurexins team with previously-implicated neuroligins for glutamatergic synaptogenesis, highlighting glutamate-related genes as promising candidates for ASD. PMID:17322880

  10. ON THE PECULIARITIES OF THE RING CONTRACTION REACTIONS OF HOMODRIMANES VIA ACID MEDIATED EPOXIDE REARRANGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veaceslav Kulciţki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A selective rearrangement of a epoxy-homodrimanic substrate is described. Using fluorosulfonic acid at low temperature leads by ring contraction to a perhydrindanic structure. On the contrary, using boron trifluoride-diethyl ether at r.t. selectively brings about angular methyl migration.

  11. Synthesis of N-protected Galactosamine Building Blocks from D-Tagatose via the Heyns Rearrangement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrodnigg, Tanja M.; Lundt, Inge; Stütz, Arnold E.

    2006-01-01

    N-Acetyl-D-galactosamine (11), a very important naturally occurring building block of oligosaccharides, is easily accessible via the Heyns rearrangement of D-tagatose (3) with benzylamine. The short and efficient synthesis of various differently N-protected D-galactosamine derivatives is reported....

  12. Conversion and non-conversion approach to preimplantation diagnosis for chromosomal rearrangements in 475 cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuliev, Anver; Janzen, Jeanine Cieslak; Zlatopolsky, Zev; Kirillova, Irina; Ilkevitch, Yury; Verlinsky, Yury

    2010-07-01

    Due to the limitations of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for chromosomal rearrangements by interphase fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, a method for obtaining chromosomes from single blastomeres was introduced by their fusion with enucleated or intact mouse zygotes, followed by FISH analysis of the resulting heterokaryons. Although this allowed a significant improvement in the accuracy of testing of both maternally and paternally derived translocations, it is still labour intensive and requires the availability of fertilized mouse oocytes, also creating ethical issues related to the formation of interspecies heterokaryons. This method was modified with a chemical conversion procedure that has now been clinically applied for the first time on 877 embryos from PGD cycles for chromosomal rearrangements and has become the method of choice for performing PGD for structural rearrangements. This is presented within the context of overall experience of 475 PGD cycles for translocations with pre-selection and transfer of balanced or normal embryos in 342 (72%) of these cycles, which resulted in 131 clinical pregnancies (38%), with healthy deliveries of 113 unaffected children. The spontaneous abortion rate in these cycles was as low as 17%, which confirms an almost five-fold reduction of spontaneous abortion rate following PGD for chromosomal rearrangements. 2010 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A single oncogenic enhancer rearrangement causes concomitant EVI1 and GATA2 deregulation in leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gröschel, Stefan; Sanders, Mathijs A; Hoogenboezem, Remco; de Wit, Elzo; Bouwman, Britta A M; Erpelinck, Claudia; van der Velden, Vincent H J; Havermans, Marije; Avellino, Roberto; van Lom, Kirsten; Rombouts, Elwin J; van Duin, Mark; Döhner, Konstanze; Beverloo, H Berna; Bradner, James E; Döhner, Hartmut; Löwenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J M; Bindels, Eric M J; de Laat, Wouter; Delwel, Ruud

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements without gene fusions have been implicated in leukemogenesis by causing deregulation of proto-oncogenes via relocation of cryptic regulatory DNA elements. AML with inv(3)/t(3;3) is associated with aberrant expression of the stem-cell regulator EVI1. Applying functional

  14. Thermally rearranged (TR) bismaleimide-based network polymers for gas separation membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Yu Seong; Lee, Won Hee; Seong, Jong Geun; Kim, Ju Sung; Wang, Ho Hyun; Doherty, Cara M; Hill, Anita J; Lee, Young Moo

    2016-11-15

    Highly permeable, thermally rearranged polymer membranes based on bismaleimide derivatives that exhibit excellent CO 2 permeability up to 5440 Barrer with a high BET surface area (1130 m 2 g -1 ) are reported for the first time. In addition, the membranes can be easily used to form semi-interpenetrating networks with other polymers endowing them with superior gas transport properties.

  15. Electron beam-induced Fries rearrangement of arylsulfonamides and arylsulfonates in the crystalline state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Jun; Yuasa, Kanako; Yamashita, Takashi; Maekawa, Yasunari; Yoshida, Masaru

    2003-01-01

    Electron beam (EB)-induced reactions of organic crystals containing a carbonyl or a sulfonyl group have been investigated. The EB irradiation of benzenesulfonanilide (BSA) in the crystalline state induced the Fries rearrangement to yield o- and p-aminodiphenylsulfones as the major and minor products, respectively. Several BSA derivatives also had the same reactivity, while benzanilide as the corresponding carbonyl compound did not rearrange under the same conditions. These results showed that the S-N bond could be cleaved selectively by EB irradiation but the C-N bond couldn't, which could take place only by the use of EB. The EB irradiation of phenyl p-toluenesulfonate (PTS) crystals gave not only Fries-type products but also the oxidation product. By comparing with the reactivity of liquid phenyl benzenesulfonate, the EB-induced Fries rearrangement was suggested to proceed under crystalline lattice restrictions. The G-values of arylsulfonamides and arylsulfonates were in the range of ca. 1-2 molecules per 100 eV of absorbed energy. This is the first Fries rearrangement via direct excitation by EB irradiation. (author)

  16. Molecular Mechanisms and Diagnosis of Chromosome 22q11.2 Rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Beverly S.

    2008-01-01

    Several recurrent, constitutional genomic disorders are present on chromosome 22q. These include the translocations and deletions associated with DiGeorge and velocardiofacial syndrome and the translocations that give rise to the recurrent t(11;22) supernumerary der(22) syndrome (Emanuel syndrome). The rearrangement breakpoints on 22q cluster…

  17. Beckmann rearrangement of aldoximes catalyzed by transition metal salts: mechanical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leusink, A.J.; Meerbeek, T.G.; Noltes, J.G.

    1977-01-01

    The Beckmann rearrangement of aldoximes catalyzed by transition metal salts like palladium and nickel acetylacetonates is shown to be a dehydration‐hydration reaction in which the anti‐oxime is converted into nitrile and the nitrile is converted into amide.

  18. Condensed tannins. Base-catalysed reactions of polymeric procyanidins with phloroglucinol: Intramolecular rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter E. Laks; Richard W. Hemingway; Anthony H. Conner

    1987-01-01

    Reactions of polymeric procyanidins with phloroglucinol at pH 12.0 and temperatures of 23 or 50°C gave epicatechin-(4β)-phloroglucinol (7), by cleavage of the interflavanoid bond between procyanidin units with subsequent addition of phloroglucinol, and (+)-catechin from the terminal unit. The phloroglucinol adduct (7) rearranged to an enolic form of 8-(3,4-...

  19. Iridium-Catalyzed Dynamic Kinetic Isomerization: Expedient Synthesis of Carbohydrates from Achmatowicz Rearrangement Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao-Yuan; Yang, Ka; Bennett, Scott R; Guo, Sheng-rong; Tang, Weiping

    2015-07-20

    A highly stereoselective dynamic kinetic isomerization of Achmatowicz rearrangement products was discovered. This new internal redox isomerization provided ready access to key intermediates for the enantio- and diastereoselective synthesis of a series of naturally occurring sugars. The nature of the de novo synthesis also enables the preparation of both enantiomers. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Single Particle Potential of a Σ Hyperon in Nuclear Matter. II Rearrangement Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowski, J.

    2000-01-01

    The rearrangement contribution to the real part of the single particle potential of a Σ hyperon in nuclear matter, U Σ , is investigated. The isospin and spin dependent parts of U Σ are considered. Results obtained for four models of the Nijmegen baryon-baryon interaction are presented and discussed. (author)