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Sample records for complex mediates epidermal

  1. Complex Mediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Andersen, Peter Bøgh

    2005-01-01

    This article has its starting point in a large number of empirical findings regarding computer-mediated work. These empirical findings have challenged our understanding of the role of mediation in such work; on the one hand as an aspect of communication and cooperation at work and on the other hand...... as an aspect of human engagement with instruments of work. On the basis of previous work in activity-theoretical and semiotic human—computer interaction, we propose a model to encompass both of these aspects. In a dialogue with our empirical findings we move on to propose a number of types of mediation...... that have helped to enrich our understanding of mediated work and the design of computer mediation for such work....

  2. Epidermal growth factor mediates spermatogonial proliferation in newt testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abé Shin-ichi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The complex processes of spermatogenesis are regulated by various factors. The aim of the current study is to determine the effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF on spermatogonial proliferation and clarify the mechanism causing the proliferation in newt testis. In the organ culture, EGF stimulated spermatogonial proliferation, but not their differentiation into spermatocytes. cDNA cloning identified 3 members of the EGF receptors, ErbB1, ErbB2, and ErbB4, in the testis. RT-PCR showed that all the receptors cloned were expressed in both Sertoli and germ cells at the spermatogonial stage. In the organ cultures with inhibitors for the EGF receptors, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K, the EGF-induced spermatogonial proliferation was suppressed. Furthermore, when the organ culture was exposed to EGF, the expressions of stem cell factor (SCF, immunoglobulin-like domain containing neuregulin1 (Ig-NRG1, and ErbB4 mRNA were increased. These results suggested that, since the spermatogonia are sequestered within cysts by the blood-testis barrier consisted of Sertoli cells, EGF possibly mediates spermatogonial proliferation in an endocrine manner through the receptors including ErbB1, ErbB2, and ErbB4 expressed on Sertoli cells via activation of MAPK cascade or/and PI3K cascade by elevating the expressions of SCF, Ig-NRG1, and ErbB4.

  3. [Epidermal growth factor receptor expression and epidermal growth factor blood plasma content in simple and complex endometrial hyperplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dznelashvili, N; Kasradze, D; Tavartkiladze, A; Mariamidze, A

    2014-01-01

    The goal of our study was to concurrently determine the prognostic significance of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) expression in endometrium and Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) blood content in simple and complex hyperplasia. In order to detect EGFR expression, immunohistochemical examination of endometrial scarp from 35 patients was done along with HPLC (High performance liquid chromatography) method, for measuring EGF blood plasma content. The numerical data obtained were processed statistically using computer program SPSS-12. According to the results: 1. A significant/marked increase in EGF blood plasma level together with pronounced EGFR expression in simple endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia) suggests that simple hyperplasia is likely to transform into complex form, while unchanged level of EGF against the background of mild EGFR expression is probably indicative of not very bad prognosis. 2. Normal indices of EGF blood plasma level in simple endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia), accompanied by mild EGFR expression is suggestive of good prognosis. 3. A sharp or extremely sharp increase in EGF blood plasma level with pronounced EGFR expression in complex endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia) is likely to indicate poor prognosis that may lead to the transformation into atypical form. However, unchanged EGF blood plasma level against the background of mild EGFR expression in complex endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia) is likely to point to not very bad prognosis. 4. A marked increase in EGF blood plasma level with a pronounced EGFR expression in complex endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia) is likely to indicate poor prognosis that may lead to the transformation into atypical form. Because it is evident that drastic increase in EGF blood plasma level is not necessary, other factor should be suspected to play the major role, i.e the substance that will (or will not) withstand neoplasia.

  4. Homologs of SCAR/WAVE complex components are required for epidermal cell morphogenesis in rice.

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    Zhou, Wenqi; Wang, Yuchuan; Wu, Zhongliang; Luo, Liang; Liu, Ping; Yan, Longfeng; Hou, Suiwen

    2016-07-01

    Filamentous actins (F-actins) play a vital role in epidermal cell morphogenesis. However, a limited number of studies have examined actin-dependent leaf epidermal cell morphogenesis events in rice. In this study, two recessive mutants were isolated: less pronounced lobe epidermal cell2-1 (lpl2-1) and lpl3-1, whose leaf and stem epidermis developed a smooth surface, with fewer serrated pavement cell (PC) lobes, and decreased papillae. The lpl2-1 also exhibited irregular stomata patterns, reduced plant height, and short panicles and roots. Molecular genetic studies demonstrated that LPL2 and LPL3 encode the PIROGI/Specifically Rac1-associated protein 1 (PIR/SRA1)-like and NCK-associated protein 1 (NAP1)-like proteins, respectively, two components of the suppressor of cAMP receptor/Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-family verprolin-homologous protein (SCAR/WAVE) regulatory complex involved in actin nucleation and function. Epidermal cells exhibited abnormal arrangement of F-actins in both lpl2 and lpl3 expanding leaves. Moreover, the distorted trichomes of Arabidopsis pir could be partially restored by an overexpression of LPL2 A yeast two-hybrid assay revealed that LPL2 can directly interact with LPL3 in vitro Collectively, the results indicate that LPL2 and LPL3 are two functionally conserved homologs of the SCAR/WAVE complex components, and that they play an important role in controlling epidermal cell morphogenesis in rice by organising F-actin.

  5. Functional Role of Milk Fat Globule-Epidermal Growth Factor VIII in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses and Inflammatory/Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Young-Su Yi

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation involves a series of complex biological processes mediated by innate immunity for host defense against pathogen infection. Chronic inflammation is considered to be one of the major causes of serious diseases, including a number of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases, cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and neurological diseases. Milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor 8 (MFG-E8) is a secreted protein found in vertebrates and was initially discovered as a critical component of the mil...

  6. Wdr1-mediated cell shape dynamics and cortical tension are essential for epidermal planar cell polarity.

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    Luxenburg, Chen; Heller, Evan; Pasolli, H Amalia; Chai, Sophia; Nikolova, Maria; Stokes, Nicole; Fuchs, Elaine

    2015-05-01

    During mouse development, core planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins become polarized in the epidermal plane to guide angling/morphogenesis of hair follicles. How PCP is established is poorly understood. Here, we identify a key role for Wdr1 (also known as Aip1), an F-actin-binding protein that enhances cofilin/destrin-mediated F-actin disassembly. We show that cofilin and destrin function redundantly in developing epidermis, but their combined depletion perturbs cell adhesion, cytokinesis, apicobasal polarity and PCP. Although Wdr1 depletion accentuates single-loss-of-cofilin/destrin phenotypes, alone it resembles core PCP mutations. Seeking a mechanism, we find that Wdr1 and cofilin/destrin-mediated actomyosin remodelling are essential for generating or maintaining cortical tension within the developing epidermal sheet and driving the cell shape and planar orientation changes that accompany establishment of PCP in mammalian epidermis. Our findings suggest intriguing evolutionary parallels but mechanistic modifications to the distal wing hinge-mediated mechanical forces that drive cell shape change and orient PCP in the Drosophila wing disc.

  7. Simvastatin-induced Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emmanouil Petrou; Vasiliki Karali; Emmanouil Papadakis

    2014-01-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis comprises a severe immune-complex mediated hypersensitivity reaction that typically involves the skin and mucous membranes.Herein, we describe a68-year -old man who presented with the condition after simvastatin administration.

  8. Simvastatin-induced Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Petrou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxic epidermal necrolysis comprises a severe immune-complex mediated hypersensitivity reaction that typically involves the skin and mucous membranes. Herein, we describe a 68-year -old man who presented with the condition after simvastatin administration.

  9. p63 and Brg1 control developmentally regulated higher-order chromatin remodelling at the epidermal differentiation complex locus in epidermal progenitor cells

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    Mardaryev, Andrei N.; Gdula, Michal R.; Yarker, Joanne L.; Emelianov, Vladimir N.; Poterlowicz, Krzysztof; Sharov, Andrey A.; Sharova, Tatyana Y.; Scarpa, Julie A.; Chambon, Pierre; Botchkarev, Vladimir A.; Fessing, Michael Y.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin structural states and their remodelling, including higher-order chromatin folding and three-dimensional (3D) genome organisation, play an important role in the control of gene expression. The role of 3D genome organisation in the control and execution of lineage-specific transcription programmes during the development and differentiation of multipotent stem cells into specialised cell types remains poorly understood. Here, we show that substantial remodelling of the higher-order chromatin structure of the epidermal differentiation complex (EDC), a keratinocyte lineage-specific gene locus on mouse chromosome 3, occurs during epidermal morphogenesis. During epidermal development, the locus relocates away from the nuclear periphery towards the nuclear interior into a compartment enriched in SC35-positive nuclear speckles. Relocation of the EDC locus occurs prior to the full activation of EDC genes involved in controlling terminal keratinocyte differentiation and is a lineage-specific, developmentally regulated event controlled by transcription factor p63, a master regulator of epidermal development. We also show that, in epidermal progenitor cells, p63 directly regulates the expression of the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeller Brg1, which binds to distinct domains within the EDC and is required for relocation of the EDC towards the nuclear interior. Furthermore, Brg1 also regulates gene expression within the EDC locus during epidermal morphogenesis. Thus, p63 and its direct target Brg1 play an essential role in remodelling the higher-order chromatin structure of the EDC and in the specific positioning of this locus within the landscape of the 3D nuclear space, as required for the efficient expression of EDC genes in epidermal progenitor cells during skin development. PMID:24346698

  10. Epidermal Differentiation Complex: A Review on Its Epigenetic Regulation and Potential Drug Targets

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    Sinha Abhishek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The primary feature of the mammalian skin includes the hair follicle, inter-follicular epidermis and the sebaceous glands, all of which form pilo-sebaceous units. The epidermal protective layer undergoes an ordered/programmed process of proliferation and differentiation, ultimately culminating in the formation of a cornified envelope consisting of enucleated corneocytes. These terminally differentiated cells slough off in a cyclic manner and this process is regulated via induction or repression of epidermal differentiation complex (EDC genes. These genes, spanning 2 Mb region of human chromosome 1q21, play a crucial role in epidermal development, through various mechanisms. Each of these mechanisms employs a unique chromatin re-modelling factor or an epigenetic modifier. These factors act to regulate epidermal differentiation singly and/or in combination. Diseases like psoriasis and cancer exhibit aberrations in proliferation and differentiation through, in part, dysregulation in these epigenetic mechanisms. Knowledge of the existing mechanisms in the physiological and the aforesaid pathological contexts may not only facilitate drug development, it also can make refinements to the existing drug delivery systems.

  11. Epidermal Differentiation Complex: A Review on Its Epigenetic Regulation and Potential Drug Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhishek, Sinha; Palamadai Krishnan, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The primary feature of the mammalian skin includes the hair follicle, inter-follicular epidermis and the sebaceous glands, all of which form pilo-sebaceous units. The epidermal protective layer undergoes an ordered/programmed process of proliferation and differentiation, ultimately culminating in the formation of a cornified envelope consisting of enucleated corneocytes. These terminally differentiated cells slough off in a cyclic manner and this process is regulated via induction or repression of epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) genes. These genes, spanning 2 Mb region of human chromosome 1q21, play a crucial role in epidermal development, through various mechanisms. Each of these mechanisms employs a unique chromatin re-modelling factor or an epigenetic modifier. These factors act to regulate epidermal differentiation singly and/or in combination. Diseases like psoriasis and cancer exhibit aberrations in proliferation and differentiation through, in part, dysregulation in these epigenetic mechanisms. Knowledge of the existing mechanisms in the physiological and the aforesaid pathological contexts may not only facilitate drug development, it also can make refinements to the existing drug delivery systems.

  12. Distinct functions of epidermal and myeloid-derived VEGF-A in skin tumorigenesis mediated by HPV8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaolei; Lucas, Tina; Marcuzzi, Gian P; Pfister, Herbert; Eming, Sabine A

    2015-01-15

    Beta human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been suspected to be carcinogenic in nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC), but the basis for potential viral contributions to these cancers is poorly understood. In particular, it is unresolved how HPV-infected keratinocytes escape cell-cycle control and whether their cross-talk with immune cells is critical for tumorigenesis. In nonviral preclinical models, the angiogenic cytokine VEGF-A has been identified as a critical regulator of NMSC. In this study, we dissected the contribution of epidermal versus myeloid cell-derived VEGF-A in HPV-mediated skin cancer by interbreeding an HPV8 transgenic mouse model with a conditional disruption of VEGF-A restricted to either epidermal or myeloid cells. Although only epidermal-derived VEGF-A was essential for initiation of skin tumor development, both spontaneously and UV-light triggered, both epidermal and myeloid cell-derived VEGF-A contributed to regeneration-induced tumorigenesis upon HPV8 overexpression, partly not only through a paracrine effect on endothelial cells, but also most probably through an additional autocrine effect on epidermal cells. Our findings offer new mechanistic insights into distinct functions of epidermal versus myeloid cell-derived VEGF-A during HPV-mediated tumorigenesis, with possible implications for preventing this disease.

  13. Identification and comparative analysis of the epidermal differentiation complex in snakes

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    Brigit Holthaus, Karin; Mlitz, Veronika; Strasser, Bettina; Tschachler, Erwin; Alibardi, Lorenzo; Eckhart, Leopold

    2017-01-01

    The epidermis of snakes efficiently protects against dehydration and mechanical stress. However, only few proteins of the epidermal barrier to the environment have so far been identified in snakes. Here, we determined the organization of the Epidermal Differentiation Complex (EDC), a cluster of genes encoding protein constituents of cornified epidermal structures, in snakes and compared it to the EDCs of other squamates and non-squamate reptiles. The EDC of snakes displays shared synteny with that of the green anole lizard, including the presence of a cluster of corneous beta-protein (CBP)/beta-keratin genes. We found that a unique CBP comprising 4 putative beta-sheets and multiple cysteine-rich EDC proteins are conserved in all snakes and other squamates investigated. Comparative genomics of squamates suggests that the evolution of snakes was associated with a gene duplication generating two isoforms of the S100 fused-type protein, scaffoldin, the origin of distinct snake-specific EDC genes, and the loss of other genes that were present in the EDC of the last common ancestor of snakes and lizards. Taken together, our results provide new insights into the evolution of the skin in squamates and a basis for the characterization of the molecular composition of the epidermis in snakes. PMID:28345630

  14. Identification and comparative analysis of the epidermal differentiation complex in snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigit Holthaus, Karin; Mlitz, Veronika; Strasser, Bettina; Tschachler, Erwin; Alibardi, Lorenzo; Eckhart, Leopold

    2017-03-27

    The epidermis of snakes efficiently protects against dehydration and mechanical stress. However, only few proteins of the epidermal barrier to the environment have so far been identified in snakes. Here, we determined the organization of the Epidermal Differentiation Complex (EDC), a cluster of genes encoding protein constituents of cornified epidermal structures, in snakes and compared it to the EDCs of other squamates and non-squamate reptiles. The EDC of snakes displays shared synteny with that of the green anole lizard, including the presence of a cluster of corneous beta-protein (CBP)/beta-keratin genes. We found that a unique CBP comprising 4 putative beta-sheets and multiple cysteine-rich EDC proteins are conserved in all snakes and other squamates investigated. Comparative genomics of squamates suggests that the evolution of snakes was associated with a gene duplication generating two isoforms of the S100 fused-type protein, scaffoldin, the origin of distinct snake-specific EDC genes, and the loss of other genes that were present in the EDC of the last common ancestor of snakes and lizards. Taken together, our results provide new insights into the evolution of the skin in squamates and a basis for the characterization of the molecular composition of the epidermis in snakes.

  15. Glucocorticoid receptor, but not mineralocorticoid receptor, mediates cortisol regulation of epidermal ionocyte development and ion transport in zebrafish (danio rerio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly Abad Cruz

    Full Text Available Cortisol is the major endogenous glucocorticoid (GC both in human and fish, mediated by corticosteroid receptors. Due to the absence of aldosterone production in teleost fish, cortisol is also traditionally accepted to function as mineralocorticoid (MC; but whether it acts through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR or the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR remains a subject of debate. Here, we used loss-of-function and rescue assays to determine whether cortisol affects zebrafish epidermal ionocyte development and function via the GR and/or the MR. GR knockdown morphants displayed a significant decrease in the major ionocytes, namely Na(+-K(+-ATPase-rich cells (NaRCs and H(+-ATPase-rich cells (HRCs, as well as other cells, including epidermal stem cells (ESCs, keratinocytes, and mucus cells; conversely, cell numbers were unaffected in MR knockdown morphants. In agreement, GR morphants, but not MR morphants, exhibited decreased NaRC-mediated Ca(2+ uptake and HRC-mediated H(+ secretion. Rescue via GR capped mRNA injection or exogenous cortisol incubation normalized the number of epidermal ionocytes in GR morphants. We also provide evidence for GR localization in epidermal cells. At the transcript level, GR mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in gill sections and present in both NaRCs and HRCs, supporting the knockdown and functional assay results in embryo. Altogether, we have provided solid molecular evidence that GR is indeed present on ionocytes, where it mediates the effects of cortisol on ionocyte development and function. Hence, cortisol-GR axis performs the roles of both GC and MC in zebrafish skin and gills.

  16. Mediated exodus of L-dopa from human epidermal Langerhans cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falck, B; Bendsoe, N; Ronquist, G

    2004-03-01

    L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa) is not metabolized within human epidermal Langerhans cells (LC); yet they can take up substantial amounts of this amino acid which subsequently can be released into the extracellular space. We recently reported that human epidermal energy metabolism is predominantly anaerobic and that the influx mechanism is a unidirectional L-dopa/proton counter-transport system and now we describe conditions for the mediated transport of L-dopa out of the LC. It is demonstrated that certain amino acids and one dipeptide can effectively trigger the efflux of L-dopa taken up by the LC.Thus, alpha-methyl-dopa (alpha-m-dopa), D-dopa and the dipeptide, met-ala at the outside of the plasma membrane stimulated the efflux of L-dopa from L-dopa loaded LC. Similar effects were achieved by a variety of other amino acids in the extracellular fluid while some other amino acids were inactive. The time required for 50% D-methionine-induced exodus of L-dopa from L-dopa loaded LC was in the range of 5-7 min and a complete exodus of L-dopa was attained at about 20 min of incubation. This dislocation of L-dopa to the extracellular fluid is interpreted as an expression of trans-stimulation. In the case of alpha-m-dopa, D-dopa and met-ala, which admittedly were not able to penetrate the plasma membrane of LC, the concept of trans-stimulation was given a new purport, since none of them were able to participate in an exchange reaction. Finally, it could be concluded that L-dopa escaped by a route different from the one responsible for L-dopa uptake in LC.Thus, while the influx of L-dopa supports extrusion of protons deriving from anaerobic glycolysis in the LC, L-dopa efflux can provide the cells with useful amino acids in an energy-saving way, altogether a remarkable biological process. From this follows that L-dopa has a biological function of its own, besides being a precursor in the catecholamine and pigment syntheses.

  17. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates epidermal growth factor-induced muscle satellite cell activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Yosuke, E-mail: cynagata@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Ohashi, Kazuya; Wada, Eiji; Yuasa, Yuki; Shiozuka, Masataka; Nonomura, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle can regenerate repeatedly due to the presence of resident stem cells, called satellite cells. Because satellite cells are usually quiescent, they must be activated before participating in muscle regeneration in response to stimuli such as injury, overloading, and stretch. Although satellite cell activation is a crucial step in muscle regeneration, little is known of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Recent work showed that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays crucial roles in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of muscle satellite cells. We investigated the role of growth factors in S1P-mediated satellite cell activation. We found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) in combination with insulin induced proliferation of quiescent undifferentiated mouse myoblast C2C12 cells, which are also known as reserve cells, in serum-free conditions. Sphingosine kinase activity increased when reserve cells were stimulated with EGF. Treatment of reserve cells with the D-erythro-N,N-dimethylsphingosine, Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitor, or siRNA duplexes specific for sphingosine kinase 1, suppressed EGF-induced C2C12 activation. We also present the evidence showing the S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. Moreover, we demonstrated a combination of insulin and EGF promoted activation of satellite cells on single myofibers in a manner dependent on SPHK and S1P2. Taken together, our observations show that EGF-induced satellite cell activation is mediated by S1P and its receptor. - Highlights: • EGF in combination with insulin induces proliferation of quiescent C2C12 cells. • Sphingosine kinase activity increases when reserve cells are stimulated with EGF. • EGF-induced activation of reserve cells is dependent on sphingosine kinase and ERK. • The S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. • EGF-induced reserve cell activation is mediated by S1P and its

  18. Rapidly activated epidermal growth factor receptor mediates lipopolysaccharide-triggered migration of microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wen-Sheng; Liu, Jun-Li; Li, Chun-Yu; Li, Xiao; Xie, Min-Jie; Wang, Wei; Tian, Dai-Shi

    2015-11-01

    Previous reports have suggested that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is involved in microglia activation characterized by cell morphology changes, cytokine production and cell migration; and the biochemical regulation of the microglia migration is a potential therapeutic target following CNS inflammatory damages. However, the role of EGFR in microglia motility after inflammatory stimulation remains unknown. In the present study, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was found to trigger rapid EGFR phosphorylation within 10 min, which was sustained during long-term stimulation in both primary microglial cells and the cultured BV2 microglial cells, furthermore, blocking EGFR phosphorylation by AG1478 significantly attenuated the LPS-induced chemotactic and chemokinetic migration of microglia. In addition, LPS could initiate calcium oscillation in microglia during live-cell recording, however, an intracellular calcium chelator and a selective inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, but not an extracellular calcium chelator, remarkably suppressed the LPS-induced EGFR phosphorylation in BV2 microglia cells. As EGFR is not a traditional receptor for LPS, these findings suggest that the rapid phosphorylation of EGFR is attributed to the LPS-triggered intracellular calcium mobilization. By examining the downstream signals of EGFR, we further proved that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is essential for EGFR-mediated microglia migration, because ERK inhibition attenuated the chemotactic and chemokinetic migration of microglia that had been induced by either LPS or EGF. Collectively, these results suggest that LPS could trigger the rapid phosphorylation of EGFR and subsequent ERK activation through mobilizing calcium activity, which underlies the microglia migration in an inflammatory condition.

  19. Trichloroethylene-mediated cytotoxicity in human epidermal keratinocytes is mediated by the rapid accumulation of intracellular calcium: Interception by naringenin.

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    Ali, F; Khan, A Q; Khan, R; Sultana, S

    2016-02-01

    Industrial solvents pose a significant threat to the humankind. The mechanisms of their toxicity still remain in debate. Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widespread industrial solvent responsible for severe liver dysfunction, cutaneous toxicity in occupationally exposed humans. We utilized an in vitro system of human epidermal keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells in this study to avoid complex cell and extracellular interactions. We report the cytotoxicity of organic solvent TCE in HaCaT and its reversal by a natural flavanone, naringenin (Nar). The cytotoxicity was attributed to the rapid intracellular free calcium (Ca(2+)) release, which might lead to the elevation of protein kinase C along with robust free radical generation, instability due to energy depletion, and sensitization of intracellular stress signal transducer nuclear factor κB. These effects were actually seen to induce significant amount of genomic DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, all these effects of TCE were effectively reversed by the treatment of Nar, a natural flavanone. Our studies identify intracellular Ca as a unique target used by organic solvents in the cytotoxicity and highlight the Ca(2+) ion stabilizer properties of Nar.

  20. The Mediator complex and transcription regulation

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    Poss, Zachary C.; Ebmeier, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    The Mediator complex is a multi-subunit assembly that appears to be required for regulating expression of most RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcripts, which include protein-coding and most non-coding RNA genes. Mediator and pol II function within the pre-initiation complex (PIC), which consists of Mediator, pol II, TFIIA, TFIIB, TFIID, TFIIE, TFIIF and TFIIH and is approximately 4.0 MDa in size. Mediator serves as a central scaffold within the PIC and helps regulate pol II activity in ways that remain poorly understood. Mediator is also generally targeted by sequence-specific, DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) that work to control gene expression programs in response to developmental or environmental cues. At a basic level, Mediator functions by relaying signals from TFs directly to the pol II enzyme, thereby facilitating TF-dependent regulation of gene expression. Thus, Mediator is essential for converting biological inputs (communicated by TFs) to physiological responses (via changes in gene expression). In this review, we summarize an expansive body of research on the Mediator complex, with an emphasis on yeast and mammalian complexes. We focus on the basics that underlie Mediator function, such as its structure and subunit composition, and describe its broad regulatory influence on gene expression, ranging from chromatin architecture to transcription initiation and elongation, to mRNA processing. We also describe factors that influence Mediator structure and activity, including TFs, non-coding RNAs and the CDK8 module. PMID:24088064

  1. Recent Positive Selection in Genes of the Mammalian Epidermal Differentiation Complex Locus

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    Goodwin, Zane A.; de Guzman Strong, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) is the most rapidly evolving locus in the human genome compared to that of the chimpanzee. Yet the EDC genes that are undergoing positive selection across mammals and in humans are not known. We sought to identify the positively selected genetic variants and determine the evolutionary events of the EDC using mammalian-wide and clade-specific branch- and branch-site likelihood ratio tests and a genetic algorithm (GA) branch test. Significant non-synonymous substitutions were found in filaggrin, SPRR4, LELP1, and S100A2 genes across 14 mammals. By contrast, we identified recent positive selection in SPRR4 in primates. Additionally, the GA branch test discovered lineage-specific evolution for distinct EDC genes occurring in each of the nodes in the 14-mammal phylogenetic tree. Multiple instances of positive selection for FLG, TCHHL1, SPRR4, LELP1, and S100A2 were noted among the primate branch nodes. Branch-site likelihood ratio tests further revealed positive selection in specific sites in SPRR4, LELP1, filaggrin, and repetin across 14 mammals. However, in addition to continuous evolution of SPRR4, site-specific positive selection was also found in S100A11, KPRP, SPRR1A, S100A7L2, and S100A3 in primates and filaggrin, filaggrin2, and S100A8 in great apes. Very recent human positive selection was identified in the filaggrin2 L41 site that was present in Neanderthal. Together, our results identifying recent positive selection in distinct EDC genes reveal an underappreciated evolution of epidermal skin barrier function in primates and humans. PMID:28119736

  2. On the role of the epidermal differentiation complex in ichthyosis vulgaris, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffjan, S; Stemmler, S

    2007-09-01

    Undisturbed epidermal differentiation is crucial for an intact skin barrier function. The epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) is a cluster of genes on chromosome 1q21 encoding proteins that fulfil important functions in terminal differentiation in the human epidermis, including filaggrin, loricrin, S100 proteins and others. Recently, evidence emerged that variation within EDC genes plays an important role in the pathogenesis of three common skin disorders, ichthyosis vulgaris, atopic dermatitis (AD) and psoriasis. Two loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin (FLG) gene, R501X and 2282del4, were identified as causative for ichthyosis vulgaris in 15 affected European families, and the mode of inheritance was found to be semidominant. As ichthyosis vulgaris and AD often occur concomitantly in affected individuals, these two mutations were subsequently investigated in AD patients and found to be strongly associated with the disease. Following this first report, seven replication studies have been performed that all confirm an association of these two mutations with AD (or AD subtypes) in several European cohorts. Additionally, two unique loss-of-function mutations in the FLG gene were identified in Japanese ichthyosis vulgaris families and found to be associated with AD in a Japanese cohort. Thus, the FLG mutations are among the most consistently replicated associations for AD. Additionally, linkage analysis has suggested that variation within the EDC might also predispose for psoriasis but the exact susceptibility variation(s) have not yet been elucidated. Taken together, these findings convincingly demonstrate the important role of barrier dysfunction in various common skin disorders.

  3. An epidermal barrier wound repair pathway in Drosophila is mediated by grainy head.

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    Mace, Kimberly A; Pearson, Joseph C; McGinnis, William

    2005-04-15

    We used wounded Drosophila embryos to define an evolutionarily conserved pathway for repairing the epidermal surface barrier. This pathway includes a wound response enhancer from the Ddc gene that requires grainy head (grh) function and binding sites for the Grh transcription factor. At the signaling level, tyrosine kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activities are induced in epidermal cells near wounds, and activated ERK is required for a robust wound response. The conservation of this Grh-dependent pathway suggests that the repair of insect cuticle and mammal skin is controlled by an ancient, shared control system for constructing and healing the animal body surface barrier.

  4. Epidermal differentiation complex yields a secret: mutations in the cornification protein filaggrin underlie ichthyosis vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segre, Julia A

    2006-06-01

    Ichthyosis vulgaris (IV), characterized by mild scaling on limbs and lower abdomen, has an incidence of 1 in 250. Smith, McLean, and colleagues demonstrate that common mutations in filaggrin underlie IV. Filaggrin aggregates keratin intermediate filaments and is cross-linked into the cornified envelope to form the epidermal barrier. These findings reinforce the importance of the epidermal barrier in pathogenesis of skin diseases.

  5. Functional Role of Milk Fat Globule-Epidermal Growth Factor VIII in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses and Inflammatory/Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Su Yi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation involves a series of complex biological processes mediated by innate immunity for host defense against pathogen infection. Chronic inflammation is considered to be one of the major causes of serious diseases, including a number of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases, cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and neurological diseases. Milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor 8 (MFG-E8 is a secreted protein found in vertebrates and was initially discovered as a critical component of the milk fat globule. Previously, a number of studies have reported that MFG-E8 contributes to various biological functions including the phagocytic removal of damaged and apoptotic cells from tissues, the induction of VEGF-mediated neovascularization, the maintenance of intestinal epithelial homeostasis, and the promotion of mucosal healing. Recently, emerging studies have reported that MFG-E8 plays a role in inflammatory responses and inflammatory/autoimmune diseases. This review describes the characteristics of MFG-E8-mediated signaling pathways, summarizes recent findings supporting the roles of MFG-E8 in inflammatory responses and inflammatory/autoimmune diseases, and discusses MFG-E8 targeting as a potential therapeutic strategy for the development of anti-inflammatory/autoimmune disease drugs.

  6. Functional Role of Milk Fat Globule-Epidermal Growth Factor VIII in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses and Inflammatory/Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Young-Su

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation involves a series of complex biological processes mediated by innate immunity for host defense against pathogen infection. Chronic inflammation is considered to be one of the major causes of serious diseases, including a number of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases, cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and neurological diseases. Milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor 8 (MFG-E8) is a secreted protein found in vertebrates and was initially discovered as a critical component of the milk fat globule. Previously, a number of studies have reported that MFG-E8 contributes to various biological functions including the phagocytic removal of damaged and apoptotic cells from tissues, the induction of VEGF-mediated neovascularization, the maintenance of intestinal epithelial homeostasis, and the promotion of mucosal healing. Recently, emerging studies have reported that MFG-E8 plays a role in inflammatory responses and inflammatory/autoimmune diseases. This review describes the characteristics of MFG-E8-mediated signaling pathways, summarizes recent findings supporting the roles of MFG-E8 in inflammatory responses and inflammatory/autoimmune diseases, and discusses MFG-E8 targeting as a potential therapeutic strategy for the development of anti-inflammatory/autoimmune disease drugs.

  7. Induction of PD-L1 expression by epidermal growth factor receptor–mediated signaling in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang W

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wencheng Zhang,1 Qingsong Pang,1 Cihui Yan,2 Qifeng Wang,3 Jingsong Yang,3 Shufei Yu,3 Xiao Liu,3 Zhiyong Yuan,1 Ping Wang,1 Zefen Xiao3 1Department of Radiation Oncology, 2Department of Immunology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effect of activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling pathway on the expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC cells with EGFR overexpression. Methods: Flow cytometry and Western blot methods were used to assess PD-L1 expression on ESCC cells when EGFR signaling pathway was activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF with or without EGFR-specific inhibitor AG-1478, and then EGFR signaling array was applied to analyze the potential signaling pathways involved. Results: This study found that PD-L1 expression increased significantly in an EGFR-dependent manner by the activation of EGFR signaling and decreased sharply when EGFR signaling was blocked. The upregulated expression of PD-L1 was not associated with EGFR-STAT3 signaling pathway, but may be affected by EGFR–PI3K–AKT, EGFR–Ras–Raf–Erk, and EGR–PLC-γ signaling pathways. Conclusion: The expression of PD-L1 can be regulated by EGFR signaling activation in ESCC, which indicates an important role for EGFR-mediated immune escape and potential molecular pathways for EGFR-targeted therapy and immunotherapy. Keywords: epidermal growth factor receptor, programmed death-ligand 1, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, immune checkpoint

  8. Epidermal cell differentiation in cotton mediated by the homeodomain leucine zipper gene, GhHD-1.

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    Walford, Sally-Ann; Wu, Yingru; Llewellyn, Danny J; Dennis, Elizabeth S

    2012-08-01

    Gossypium hirsutum L. (cotton) fibres are specialized trichomes a few centimetres in length that grow from the seed coat. Few genes directly involved in the differentiation of these epidermal cells have been identified. These include GhMYB25-like and GhMYB25, two related MYB transcription factors that regulate fibre cell initiation and expansion. We have also identified a putative homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) transcription factor, GhHD-1, expressed in trichomes and early fibres that might play a role in cotton fibre initiation. Here, we characterize GhHD-1 homoeologues from tetraploid G. hirsutum and show, using reporter constructs and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), that they are expressed predominantly in epidermal tissues during early fibre development, and in other tissues bearing epidermal trichomes. Silencing of GhHD-1 reduced trichome formation and delayed the timing of fibre initiation. Constitutive overexpression of GhHD-1 increased the number of fibres initiating on the seed, but did not affect leaf trichomes. Expression of GhHD-1 in cotton silenced for different fibre MYBs suggest that in ovules it acts downstream of GhMYB25-like, but is unaffected in GhMYB25- or GhMYB109-silenced plants. Microarray analysis of silencing and overexpression lines of GhHD-1 indicated that it potentially regulates the levels of ethylene and reactive oxidation species (ROS) through a WRKY transcription factor and calcium-signalling pathway genes to activate downstream genes necessary for cell expansion and elongation. © 2012 CSIRO. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Protein antigen delivery by gene gun-mediated epidermal antigen incorporation (EAI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Ritter, Uwe; Thalhamer, Josef; Weiss, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The gene gun technology can not only be employed for efficient transfer of gene vaccines into upper layers of the skin, but also for application of protein antigens. As a tissue rich in professional antigen presenting cells, the skin represents an attractive target for immunizations. In this chapter we present a method for delivery of the model antigen ovalbumin into the skin of mice termed epidermal antigen incorporation and describe in detail how antigen-specific proliferation in draining lymph nodes can be followed by flow cytometry.

  10. Induction of PD-L1 expression by epidermal growth factor receptor–mediated signaling in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wencheng; Pang, Qingsong; Yan, Cihui; Wang, Qifeng; Yang, Jingsong; Yu, Shufei; Liu, Xiao; Yuan, Zhiyong; Wang, Ping; Xiao, Zefen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effect of activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway on the expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells with EGFR overexpression. Methods Flow cytometry and Western blot methods were used to assess PD-L1 expression on ESCC cells when EGFR signaling pathway was activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) with or without EGFR-specific inhibitor AG-1478, and then EGFR signaling array was applied to analyze the potential signaling pathways involved. Results This study found that PD-L1 expression increased significantly in an EGFR-dependent manner by the activation of EGFR signaling and decreased sharply when EGFR signaling was blocked. The upregulated expression of PD-L1 was not associated with EGFR-STAT3 signaling pathway, but may be affected by EGFR–PI3K–AKT, EGFR–Ras–Raf–Erk, and EGR–PLC-γ signaling pathways. Conclusion The expression of PD-L1 can be regulated by EGFR signaling activation in ESCC, which indicates an important role for EGFR-mediated immune escape and potential molecular pathways for EGFR-targeted therapy and immunotherapy.

  11. Photoprotective Potential of Glycolic Acid by Reducing NLRC4 and AIM2 Inflammasome Complex Proteins in UVB Radiation-Induced Normal Human Epidermal Keratinocytes and Mice.

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    Hung, Sung-Jen; Tang, Sheau-Chung; Liao, Pei-Yun; Ge, Jheng-Siang; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Yang, Jen-Hung

    2017-02-01

    Exposure to UVB radiation induces inflammation and free radical-mediated oxidative stress through reactive oxygen species (ROS) that play a crucial role in the induction of skin cancer. Glycolic acid (GA) is frequently used in cosmetics and dermatology. The aim of the study was to analyze the photoprotective mechanisms through which GA retards UVB-induced ROS accumulation and inflammation in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) and mice skin, respectively. NHEK cell line and C57BL/6J mice were treated with GA (0.1 or 5 mM) for 24 h followed by UVB irradiation. ROS accumulation, DNA damage, and expression of inflammasome complexes (NLRP3, NLRC4, ASC, and AIM2) were measured in vitro. Epidermal thickness and inflammasome complex proteins were analyzed in vivo. GA significantly prevented UVB-induced loss of skin cell viability, ROS formation, and DNA damage (single and double strands DNA break). GA suppressed the mRNA expression levels of NLRC4 and AIM2 among the inflammasome complexes. GA also blocked interleukin (IL)-1β by reducing the activity of caspase-1 in the NHEKs. Treatment with GA (2%) inhibited UVB-induced inflammation marker NLRC4 protein levels in mouse dorsal skin. The photoprotective activity of GA was ascribed to the inhibition of ROS formation and DNA damage, as well as a reduction in the activities of inflammasome complexes and IL-1β. We propose that GA has anti-inflammatory and photoprotective effects against UVB irradiation. GA is potentially beneficial to the protection of human skin from UV damage.

  12. The effect of epidermal levels of urocanic acid on 25-hydroxyvitamin D synthesis and inflammatory mediators upon narrowband UVB irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landeck, Lilla; Jakasa, Ivone; Dapic, Irena

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Urocanic acid (UCA) absorbs ultraviolet (UV)B radiation in the epidermis which may interfere with phototherapy. Therefore, the influence of individual levels of UCA on immune reactivity and vitamin D synthesis induced by narrowband UVB radiation was assessed. METHODS: 28 subje...... levels of trans-UCA affect vitamin D synthesis, but not cutaneous immune reactivity upon repeated exposure to suberythemal doses of narrowband UVB radiation. However, this requires further exploration. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.......10/IP-10, CCL2/MCP-1, CCL4/MIP-1β, and the IL-1RA/IL-1α ratio. The levels of IL-1α and CXCL9/MIG showed a trend toward increase. The changes in the levels of inflammatory and immunomodulatory mediators did not depend on baseline levels of trans-UCA. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that epidermal...

  13. RNA interference mediated JAM-A gene silencing promotes human epidermal stem cell proliferation.

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    Zhou, Tong; Wu, Minjuan; Guo, Xiaocan; Liu, Houqi

    2015-04-01

    The objective of the study was to explore the influence of junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) gene decoration on proliferation and differentiation of human epidermal stem cells (hEpSCs). JAM-A gene and JAM-A interference gene lentivirus eukaryotic expression vectors were established. The recombinant lentivirus was introduced into hEpSCs to observe and detect viral transfection by fluorescence microscopy and Western blot, respectively. After confirmation of successful introduction of the target gene, cell growth curves were mapped out by cytometry to detect cell proliferation in different groups. The expression of hEpSCs labeled molecules was detected by immunofluorescence, and cell safety was detected by teratoma test in all groups. (1) Fluorescence microscopy showed that in the JAM-A over-expression (JAM-A(ov) EpSCs) group, the green fluorescence was mainly distributed in the cell membrane; in the JAM-A interference (JAM-A(kd) EpSCs) group and blank vector (GFP EpSCs) group, all cell bodies were luminous. Western blot showed that JAM-A protein was up-regulated in JAM-A(ov) EpSCs and down-regulated in JAM-A(kd) EpSCs. (2) Growth curves showed that hEpSCs entered the quick-growing phase 4 days after inoculation and reached the platform phase at day 7. JAM-A(ov) EpSCs proliferated more slowly than GFP EpSCs, while JAM-A(kd) EpSCs proliferated significantly faster than GFP EpSCs. (3) Immunofluorescence showed that the expression of transient amplification epidermal marker keratin 14, hEpSCs marker keratin I9 and β-integrin was down-regulated in JAM-A(kd) EpSCs group as compared to that in the GFP EpSCs group, and the expression of epidermal terminal differentiation marker K10 was negative in the JAM-A(kd) EpSCs group. There was no significant difference in the expression of specific molecules between JAM-A(ov) EpSCs and hEpSCs. (4) The result of teratoma test was negative in all groups. The proliferative ability of hEpSCs was increased markedly after down

  14. MATRIX METALLOPROTEINS (MMP)-MEDIATED PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR (EGFR) IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS (HAEC) EXPOSED TO ZINC (ZN)

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    Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP)-Mediated Phosphorylation of The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) in Human Airway Epithelial Cells (HAEC) Exposed to Zinc (Zn)Weidong Wu, James M. Samet, Robert Silbajoris, Lisa A. Dailey, Lee M. Graves, and Philip A. BrombergCenter fo...

  15. Local Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Mediates the Systemic Pathogenic Effects of Staphylococcus aureus Toxic Shock Syndrome.

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    Laura M Breshears

    Full Text Available Secreted factors of Staphylococcus aureus can activate host signaling from the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. The superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1 contributes to mucosal cytokine production through a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM-mediated shedding of EGFR ligands and subsequent EGFR activation. The secreted hemolysin, α-toxin, can also induce EGFR signaling and directly interacts with ADAM10, a sheddase of EGFR ligands. The current work explores the role of EGFR signaling in menstrual toxic shock syndrome (mTSS, a disease mediated by TSST-1. The data presented show that TSST-1 and α-toxin induce ADAM- and EGFR-dependent cytokine production from human vaginal epithelial cells. TSST-1 and α-toxin also induce cytokine production from an ex vivo porcine vaginal mucosa (PVM model. EGFR signaling is responsible for the majority of IL-8 production from PVM in response to secreted toxins and live S. aureus. Finally, data are presented demonstrating that inhibition of EGFR signaling with the EGFR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478 significantly increases survival in a rabbit model of mTSS. These data indicate that EGFR signaling is critical for progression of an S. aureus exotoxin-mediated disease and may represent an attractive host target for therapeutics.

  16. Epidermal growth factor mediates detachment from and invasion through collagen I and Matrigel in Capan-1 pancreatic cancer cells

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    Kuver Rahul

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a highly invasive neoplasm. Epidermal growth factor (EGF and its receptor are over expressed in pancreatic cancer, and expression correlates with invasion and metastasis. We hypothesized that EGF receptor and integrin signalling pathways interact in mediating cellular adhesion and invasion in pancreatic cancer, and that invasiveness correlates temporally with detachment from extracellular matrix. Methods We tested this hypothesis by investigating the role of EGF in mediating adhesion to and invasion through collagen I and Matrigel in the metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line Capan-1. Adhesion and invasion were measured using in vitro assays of fluorescently-labeled cells. Adhesion and invasion assays were also performed in the primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line MIA PaCa-2. Results EGF inhibited adhesion to collagen I and Matrigel in Capan-1 cells. The loss of adhesion was reversed by AG825, an inhibitor of erbB2 receptor signalling and by wortmannin, a PI3K inhibitor, but not by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. EGF stimulated invasion through collagen I and Matrigel at concentrations and time courses similar to those mediating detachment from these extracellular matrix components. Adhesion to collagen I was different in MIA PaCa-2 cells, with no significant change elicited following EGF treatment, whereas treatment with the EGF family member heregulin-alpha elicited a marked increase in adhesion. Invasion through Matrigel in response to EGF, however, was similar to that observed in Capan-1 cells. Conclusion An inverse relationship exists between adhesion and invasion capabilities in Capan-1 cells but not in MIA PaCa-2 cells. EGF receptor signalling involving the erbB2 and PI3K pathways plays a role in mediating these events in Capan-1 cells.

  17. Arabidopsis D6PK is a lipid domain-dependent mediator of root epidermal planar polarity.

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    Stanislas, Thomas; Hüser, Anke; Barbosa, Inês C R; Kiefer, Christian S; Brackmann, Klaus; Pietra, Stefano; Gustavsson, Anna; Zourelidou, Melina; Schwechheimer, Claus; Grebe, Markus

    2015-11-02

    Development of diverse multicellular organisms relies on coordination of single-cell polarities within the plane of the tissue layer (planar polarity). Cell polarity often involves plasma membrane heterogeneity generated by accumulation of specific lipids and proteins into membrane subdomains. Coordinated hair positioning along Arabidopsis root epidermal cells provides a planar polarity model in plants, but knowledge about the functions of proteo-lipid domains in planar polarity signalling remains limited. Here we show that Rho-of-plant (ROP) 2 and 6, phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase 3 (PIP5K3), DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN (DRP) 1A and DRP2B accumulate in a sterol-enriched, polar membrane domain during root hair initiation. DRP1A, DRP2B, PIP5K3 and sterols are required for planar polarity and the AGCVIII kinase D6 PROTEIN KINASE (D6PK) is a modulator of this process. D6PK undergoes phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate- and sterol-dependent basal-to-planar polarity switching into the polar, lipid-enriched domain just before hair formation, unravelling lipid-dependent D6PK localization during late planar polarity signalling.

  18. Catalytic Organic Transformations Mediated by Actinide Complexes

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    Isabell S. R. Karmel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This review article presents the development of organoactinides and actinide coordination complexes as catalysts for homogeneous organic transformations. This chapter introduces the basic principles of actinide catalysis and deals with the historic development of actinide complexes in catalytic processes. The application of organoactinides in homogeneous catalysis is exemplified in the hydroelementation reactions, such as the hydroamination, hydrosilylation, hydroalkoxylation and hydrothiolation of alkynes. Additionally, the use of actinide coordination complexes for the catalytic polymerization of α-olefins and the ring opening polymerization of cyclic esters is presented. The last part of this review article highlights novel catalytic transformations mediated by actinide compounds and gives an outlook to the further potential of this field.

  19. ATP-mediated transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor in airway epithelial cells involves DUOX1-dependent oxidation of Src and ADAM17.

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    Derek Sham

    Full Text Available The respiratory epithelium is subject to continuous environmental stress and its responses to injury or infection are largely mediated by transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and downstream signaling cascades. Based on previous studies indicating involvement of ATP-dependent activation of the NADPH oxidase homolog DUOX1 in epithelial wound responses, the present studies were performed to elucidate the mechanisms by which DUOX1-derived H(2O(2 participates in ATP-dependent redox signaling and EGFR transactivation. ATP-mediated EGFR transactivation in airway epithelial cells was found to involve purinergic P2Y(2 receptor stimulation, and both ligand-dependent mechanisms as well as ligand-independent EGFR activation by the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Src. Activation of Src was also essential for ATP-dependent activation of the sheddase ADAM17, which is responsible for liberation and activation of EGFR ligands. Activation of P2Y(2R results in recruitment of Src and DUOX1 into a signaling complex, and transient siRNA silencing or stable shRNA transfection established a critical role for DUOX1 in ATP-dependent activation of Src, ADAM17, EGFR, and downstream wound responses. Using thiol-specific biotin labeling strategies, we determined that ATP-dependent EGFR transactivation was associated with DUOX1-dependent oxidation of cysteine residues within Src as well as ADAM17. In aggregate, our findings demonstrate that DUOX1 plays a central role in overall epithelial defense responses to infection or injury, by mediating oxidative activation of Src and ADAM17 in response to ATP-dependent P2Y(2R activation as a proximal step in EGFR transactivation and downstream signaling.

  20. Plant Mediator complex and its critical functions in transcription regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Li, Ling; Qu, Li-Jia

    2016-02-01

    The Mediator complex is an important component of the eukaryotic transcriptional machinery. As an essential link between transcription factors and RNA polymerase II, the Mediator complex transduces diverse signals to genes involved in different pathways. The plant Mediator complex was recently purified and comprises conserved and specific subunits. It functions in concert with transcription factors to modulate various responses. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in understanding the plant Mediator complex and its diverse roles in plant growth, development, defense, non-coding RNA production, response to abiotic stresses, flowering, genomic stability and metabolic homeostasis. In addition, the transcription factors interacting with the Mediator complex are also highlighted.

  1. Pharmacological inhibition of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 suppresses epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated tumor growth and angiogenesis.

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    Federica Finetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Blockade of Prostaglandin (PG E(2 production via deletion of microsomal Prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1 gene reduces tumor cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo on xenograft tumors. So far the therapeutic potential of the pharmacological inhibition of mPGES-1 has not been elucidated. PGE(2 promotes epithelial tumor progression via multiple signaling pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we evaluated the antitumor activity of AF3485, a compound of a novel family of human mPGES-1 inhibitors, in vitro and in vivo, in mice bearing human A431 xenografts overexpressing EGFR. Treatment of the human cell line A431 with interleukin-1beta (IL-1β increased mPGES-1 expression, PGE(2 production and induced EGFR phosphorylation, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 expression. AF3485 reduced PGE(2 production, both in quiescent and in cells stimulated by IL-1β. AF3485 abolished IL-1β-induced activation of the EGFR, decreasing VEGF and FGF-2 expression, and tumor-mediated endothelial tube formation. In vivo, in A431 xenograft, AF3485, administered sub-chronically, decreased tumor growth, an effect related to inhibition of EGFR signalling, and to tumor microvessel rarefaction. In fact, we observed a decrease of EGFR phosphorylation, and VEGF and FGF-2 expression in tumours explanted from treated mice. CONCLUSION: Our work demonstrates that the pharmacological inhibition of mPGES-1 reduces squamous carcinoma growth by suppressing PGE(2 mediated-EGFR signalling and by impairing tumor associated angiogenesis. These results underscore the potential of mPGES-1 inhibitors as agents capable of controlling tumor growth.

  2. Differential requirement of the epidermal growth factor receptor for G protein-mediated activation of transcription factors by lysophosphatidic acid

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    Dent Paul

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and other receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs in provoking biological actions of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs has been one of the most disputed subjects in the field of GPCR signal transduction. The purpose of the current study is to identify EGFR-mediated mechanisms involved in activation of G protein cascades and the downstream transcription factors by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA. Results In ovarian cancer cells highly responsive to LPA, activation of AP-1 by LPA was suppressed by inhibition of EGFR, an effect that could be reversed by co-stimulation of another receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met with hepatocyte growth factor, indicating that LPA-mediated activation of AP-1 requires activity of a RTK, not necessarily EGFR. Induction of AP-1 components by LPA lied downstream of Gi, G12/13, and Gq. Activation of the effectors of Gi, but not Gq or G12/13 was sensitive to inhibition of EGFR. In contrast, LPA stimulated another prominent transcription factor NF-κB via the Gq-PKC pathway in an EGFR-independent manner. Consistent with the importance of Gi-elicited signals in a plethora of biological processes, LPA-induced cytokine production, cell proliferation, migration and invasion require intact EGFR. Conclusions An RTK activity is required for activation of the AP-1 transcription factor and other Gi-dependent cellular responses to LPA. In contrast, activation of G12/13, Gq and Gq-elicited NF-κB by LPA is independent of such an input. These results provide a novel insight into the role of RTK in GPCR signal transduction and biological functions.

  3. Degradation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mediates Dasatinib-Induced Apoptosis in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells

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    Yu-Chin Lin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is an important oncoprotein that promotes cell growth and proliferation. Dasatinib, a bcr-abl inhibitor, has been approved clinically for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia and demonstrated to be effective against solid tumors in vitro through Src inhibition. Here, we disclose that EGFR degradation mediated dasatinib-induced apoptosis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC cells. HNSCC cells, including Ca9-22, FaDu, HSC3, SAS, SCC-25, and UMSCC1, were treated with dasatinib, and cell viability, apoptosis, and underlying signal transduction were evaluated. Dasatinib exhibited differential sensitivities against HNSCC cells. Growth inhibition and apoptosis were correlated with its inhibition on Akt, Erk, and Bcl-2, irrespective of Src inhibition. Accordingly, we found that down-regulation of EGFR was a determinant of dasatinib sensitivity. Lysosome inhibitor reversed dasatinib-induced EGFR down-regulation, and c-cbl activity was increased by dasatinib, indicating that dasatinib-induced EGFR down-regulation might be through c-cbl-mediated lysosome degradation. Increased EGFR activation by ligand administration rescued cells from dasatinib-induced apoptosis, whereas inhibition of EGFR enhanced its apoptotic effect. Estrogen receptor α (ERα was demonstrated to play a role in Bcl-2 expression, and dasatinib inhibited ERα at the pretranslational level. ERα was associated with EGFR in dasatinib-treated HNSCC cells. Furthermore, the xenograft model showed that dasatinib inhibited HSC3 tumor growth through in vivo down-regulation of EGFR and ERα. In conclusion, degradation of EGFR is a novel mechanism responsible for dasatinib-induced apoptosis in HNSCC cells.

  4. DeltaNp63alpha-mediated induction of epidermal growth factor receptor promotes pancreatic cancer cell growth and chemoresistance.

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    Alexey V Danilov

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is highly resistant to current chemotherapy regimens, in part due to alterations in the p53 tumor suppressor pathway. p53 homolog p63 is a transcription factor essential for the development and differentiation of epithelial surfaces. However its function in cancer is controversial and its role in PDAC is not known. We discovered that ΔNp63α was the predominantly expressed p63 variant in pancreatic cancer cell lines. ΔNp63α protein and mRNA levels were high in T3M4, BxPC3 and COLO-357 pancreatic cancer cells and low in ASPC-1 and PANC-1 cells. Overexpression of ΔNp63α in PANC-1 cells and shRNA-mediated knockdown in T3M4 cells indicated that ΔNp63α promoted anchorage-dependent and -independent growth, motility and invasion, and enhanced resistance to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling pathways contribute to the biological aggressiveness of PDAC, and we found that the motogenic effects of ΔNp63α were augmented in presence of EGF. Ectopic expression of ΔNp63α resulted in upregulation of EGFR and β1-integrin in PANC-1 cells. Conversely, ΔNp63α knockdown had an opposite effect in T3M4 cells. ΔNp63α potentiated EGF-mediated activation of ERK, Akt and JNK signaling. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and functional reporter assays demonstrated that ΔNp63α activated EGFR transcription. 14-3-3σ transcription was also positively regulated by ΔNp63α and we have previously shown that 14-3-3σ contributes to chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer cell lines. Conversely, shRNA-mediated knockdown of 14-3-3σ led to abrogation of the ΔNp63α effects on cell proliferation and invasion. Thus, p53 homolog ΔNp63α enhances the oncogenic potential of pancreatic cancer cells through trans-activation of EGFR and 14-3-3σ.

  5. Neural cell adhesion molecule-180-mediated homophilic binding induces epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) down-regulation and uncouples the inhibitory function of EGFR in neurite outgrowth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays important roles in neuronal development, regeneration, and synaptic plasticity. NCAM homophilic binding mediates cell adhesion and induces intracellular signals, in which the fibroblast growth factor receptor plays a prominent role. Recent studies...... not require NCAM-mediated fibroblast growth factor receptor activation....... on axon guidance in Drosophila suggest that NCAM also regulates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, 28, 2005, 141). A possible interaction between NCAM and EGFR in mammalian cells has not been investigated. The present study demonstrates for the first time...

  6. The cotton transcription factor TCP14 functions in auxin-mediated epidermal cell differentiation and elongation.

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    Wang, Miao-Ying; Zhao, Pi-Ming; Cheng, Huan-Qing; Han, Li-Bo; Wu, Xiao-Min; Gao, Peng; Wang, Hai-Yun; Yang, Chun-Lin; Zhong, Nai-Qin; Zuo, Jian-Ru; Xia, Gui-Xian

    2013-07-01

    Plant-specific TEOSINTE-BRANCHED1/CYCLOIDEA/PCF (TCP) transcription factors play crucial roles in development, but their functional mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we characterized the cellular functions of the class I TCP transcription factor GhTCP14 from upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). GhTCP14 is expressed predominantly in fiber cells, especially at the initiation and elongation stages of development, and its expression increased in response to exogenous auxin. Induced heterologous overexpression of GhTCP14 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) enhanced initiation and elongation of trichomes and root hairs. In addition, root gravitropism was severely affected, similar to mutant of the auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED2 (PIN2) gene. Examination of auxin distribution in GhTCP14-expressing Arabidopsis by observation of auxin-responsive reporters revealed substantial alterations in auxin distribution in sepal trichomes and root cortical regions. Consistent with these changes, expression of the auxin uptake carrier AUXIN1 (AUX1) was up-regulated and PIN2 expression was down-regulated in the GhTCP14-expressing plants. The association of GhTCP14 with auxin responses was also evidenced by the enhanced expression of auxin response gene IAA3, a gene in the AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID (Aux/IAA) family. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that GhTCP14 bound the promoters of PIN2, IAA3, and AUX1, and transactivation assays indicated that GhTCP14 had transcription activation activity. Taken together, these results demonstrate that GhTCP14 is a dual-function transcription factor able to positively or negatively regulate expression of auxin response and transporter genes, thus potentially acting as a crucial regulator in auxin-mediated differentiation and elongation of cotton fiber cells.

  7. [Expression of epidermal growth factor receptor and plasmatic level of melatonin in simple and complex endometrial hyperplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dznelashvili, N O; Kasradze, D G; Tavartkiladze, A G; Mariamidze, A G; Dzhinchveladze, D N

    2013-10-01

    The goal of our research was to find the prognostic significance of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in the hyperplastic endometrium. Immunohistochemical study of morphological material (endometrial scrap) was conducted in order to reveal the EGFR expression (in 35 patients). The study of consistence of melatonin (universal antiproliferative and anticancerogenic hormone) in patients' blood serum was performed as well (using ELISA method). The numeric data of investigation were processed statistically using the SPSS-12 program and IBM SPSS Statistics, 20. According to received results, the more complicated the type of endometrial hyperplasia is, the stronger EGFR expression is and the more melatonin consistence is reduced in blood plasma. However, sometimes much lower level of melatonin not only in case of complex hyperplasia (with atypia), but also in case of simple hyperplasia (without atypia) was observed. In addition, melatonin consistence is in norm not only in case of simple hyperplasia, but also in case of complex hyperplasia. Also, unimportant reduction of melatonin level is seen in plasma in case of both types of endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia): if, for example, in simple hyperplasia, this slight reduction of melatonin level in plasma is seen in condition of sharp EGFR expression, the same amount reduction of plasmatic melatonin in complex hyperplasia is seen in condition of weak EGFR expression. To sum up: in case of simple endometrial hyperplasia without atypia, reduction of plasma melatonin level should be a bad prognostic indicator and this condition can be followed by transformation of hyperplasia into atypical form; the normal plasmatic level of melatonin in complex endometrial hyperplasia without atypia (in condition of weak EGFR expression) should be a good prognostic indicator; unimportant reduction of plasma melatonin level and in addition, EGFR sharp expression in simple hyperplasia, is probably the sign, that hyperplasia can

  8. Horse hooves and bird feathers: Two model systems for studying the structure and development of highly adapted integumentary accessory organs--the role of the dermo-epidermal interface for the micro-architecture of complex epidermal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragulla, Hermann; Hirschberg, Ruth M

    2003-08-15

    Accessory organs of the integument are locally modified parts of the potentially feather-bearing skin in birds (e.g., the rhamphotheca, claws, or scales), and of the potentially hairy skin in mammals (e.g., the rhinarium, nails, claws, or hooves). These special parts of the integument are characterised by a modified structure of their epidermal, dermal and subcutaneous layers. The developmental processes of these various integumentary structures in birds and mammals show both similarities and differences. For example, the development of the specialised epidermal structures of both feathers and the hoof capsule is influenced by the local three-dimensional configuration of the dermis. However, in feathers, in contrast to hooves, the arrangement of the corneous cells is only partially a direct result of the particular arrangement and shape of the dermal surface of the papillary body. Whereas the diameter of the feather papilla, as well as the number, length, and width of dermal ridges on the surface of the feather papilla influence the three-dimensional architecture of the feather rami, there is no apparent direct correlation between the dermo-epidermal interface and the development of the highly ordered architecture of the radii and hamuli in the feather vane. In order to elucidate this morphogenic problem and the problem of locally different processes of keratinisation and cornification, the structure and development of feathers in birds are compared to those of the hoof capsule in horses. The equine hoof is the most complex mammalian integumentary structure, which is determined directly by the dermal surface of the papillary body. Perspectives for further research on the development of modified integumentary structures, such as the role of the dermal microangioarchitecture and the selective adhesion and various differentiation pathways of epidermal cells, are discussed. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. T Cell-Independent Mechanisms Associated with Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation and Selective Autophagy in IL-17A-Mediated Epidermal Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Erika; Maverakis, Emanual; Sarin, Ritu; Bouchareychas, Laura; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Nestle, Frank O; Adamopoulos, Iannis E

    2016-12-01

    IL-17A has been strongly associated with epidermal hyperplasia in many cutaneous disorders. However, because IL-17A is mainly produced by αβ and γδT cells in response to IL-23, the role of T cells and IL-23 has overshadowed any IL-17A-independent actions. In this article, we report that IL-17A gene transfer induces epidermal hyperplasia in Il23r(-/-)Rag1(-/-)- and Tcrδ-deficient mice, which can be prevented by neutrophil depletion. Moreover, adoptive transfer of CD11b(+)Gr-1(hi) cells, after IL-17A gene transfer, was sufficient to phenocopy the disease. We further show that the IL-17A-induced pathology was prevented in transgenic mice with impaired neutrophil extracellular trap formation and/or neutrophils with conditional deletion of the master regulator of selective autophagy, Wdfy3. Our data demonstrate a novel T cell-independent mechanism that is associated with neutrophil extracellular trap formation and selective autophagy in IL-17A-mediated epidermal hyperplasia. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Deformed epidermal autoregulatory factor-1 (DEAF1 interacts with the Ku70 subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J Jensik

    Full Text Available Deformed Epidermal Autoregulatory Factor 1 (DEAF1 is a transcription factor linked to suicide, cancer, autoimmune disorders and neural tube defects. To better understand the role of DEAF1 in protein interaction networks, a GST-DEAF1 fusion protein was used to isolate interacting proteins in mammalian cell lysates, and the XRCC6 (Ku70 and the XRCC5 (Ku80 subunits of DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK complex were identified by mass spectrometry, and the DNA-PK catalytic subunit was identified by immunoblotting. Interaction of DEAF1 with Ku70 and Ku80 was confirmed to occur within cells by co-immunoprecipitation of epitope-tagged proteins, and was mediated through interaction with the Ku70 subunit. Using in vitro GST-pulldowns, interaction between DEAF1 and the Ku70 subunit was mapped to the DEAF1 DNA binding domain and the C-terminal Bax-binding region of Ku70. In transfected cells, DEAF1 and Ku70 colocalized to the nucleus, but Ku70 could not relocalize a mutant cytoplasmic form of DEAF1 to the nucleus. Using an in vitro kinase assay, DEAF1 was phosphorylated by DNA-PK in a DNA-independent manner. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that DEAF1 or Ku70/Ku80 did not interfere with the DNA binding of each other, but DNA containing DEAF1 binding sites inhibited the DEAF1-Ku70 interaction. The data demonstrates that DEAF1 can interact with the DNA-PK complex through interactions of its DNA binding domain with the carboxy-terminal region of Ku70 that contains the Bax binding domain, and that DEAF1 is a potential substrate for DNA-PK.

  11. Abca12-mediated lipid transport and Snap29-dependent trafficking of lamellar granules are crucial for epidermal morphogenesis in a zebrafish model of ichthyosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoli Li

    2011-11-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio can serve as a model system to study heritable skin diseases. The skin is rapidly developed during the first 5–6 days of embryonic growth, accompanied by expression of skin-specific genes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM of wild-type zebrafish at day 5 reveals a two-cell-layer epidermis separated from the underlying collagenous stroma by a basement membrane with fully developed hemidesmosomes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM reveals an ordered surface contour of keratinocytes with discrete microridges. To gain insight into epidermal morphogenesis, we have employed morpholino-mediated knockdown of the abca12 and snap29 genes, which are crucial for secretion of lipids and intracellular trafficking of lamellar granules, respectively. Morpholinos, when placed on exon-intron junctions, were >90% effective in preventing the corresponding gene expression when injected into one- to four-cell-stage embryos. By day 3, TEM of abca12 morphants showed accumulation of lipid-containing electron-dense lamellar granules, whereas snap29 morphants showed the presence of apparently empty vesicles in the epidermis. Evaluation of epidermal morphogenesis by SEM revealed similar perturbations in both cases in the microridge architecture and the development of spicule-like protrusions on the surface of keratinocytes. These morphological findings are akin to epidermal changes in harlequin ichthyosis and CEDNIK syndrome, autosomal recessive keratinization disorders due to mutations in the ABCA12 and SNAP29 genes, respectively. The results indicate that interference of independent pathways involving lipid transport in the epidermis can result in phenotypically similar perturbations in epidermal morphogenesis, and that these fish mutants can serve as a model to study the pathomechanisms of these keratinization disorders.

  12. EGF receptor signaling blocks aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated transcription and cell differentiation in human epidermal keratinocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Sutter, Carrie Hayes; Yin, Hong; Li, Yunbo; Mammen, Jennifer S.; Bodreddigari, Sridevi; Stevens, Gaylene; Cole, Judith A; Sutter, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    Dioxin is an extremely potent carcinogen. In highly exposed people, the most commonly observed toxicity is chloracne, a pathological response of the skin. Most of the effects of dioxin are attributed to its activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a transcription factor that binds to the Ah receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) to regulate the transcription of numerous genes, including CYP1A1 and CYP1B1. In cultures of normal human epidermal keratinocytes dioxin accelerates cell diff...

  13. Proteomic Analysis of the Mediator Complex Interactome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthe, Henriette; Vanselow, Jens T.; Schlosser, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Here we present the most comprehensive analysis of the yeast Mediator complex interactome to date. Particularly gentle cell lysis and co-immunopurification conditions allowed us to preserve even transient protein-protein interactions and to comprehensively probe the molecular environment of the Mediator complex in the cell. Metabolic 15N-labeling thereby enabled stringent discrimination between bona fide interaction partners and nonspecifically captured proteins. Our data indicates a functional role for Mediator beyond transcription initiation. We identified a large number of Mediator-interacting proteins and protein complexes, such as RNA polymerase II, general transcription factors, a large number of transcriptional activators, the SAGA complex, chromatin remodeling complexes, histone chaperones, highly acetylated histones, as well as proteins playing a role in co-transcriptional processes, such as splicing, mRNA decapping and mRNA decay. Moreover, our data provides clear evidence, that the Mediator complex interacts not only with RNA polymerase II, but also with RNA polymerases I and III, and indicates a functional role of the Mediator complex in rRNA processing and ribosome biogenesis. PMID:28240253

  14. Mapping of the associated phenotype of an absent granular layer in ichthyosis vulgaris to the epidermal differentiation complex on chromosome 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, John G; DiGiovanna, John J; Johnston, Kay A; Fleckman, Philip; Bale, Sherri J

    2002-12-01

    Ichthyosis vulgaris (IV) is a mild to severe scaling disorder of uncertain etiology estimated to affect as many as 1 : 250 in the population. Family studies have shown that in many cases IV follows an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern, but gene mapping studies have not been reported. To investigate the genetic basis for inherited IV, we have performed gene linkage studies in two multigenerational families where affected individuals have clinical features of IV but distinct histological features. The epidermis in this disorder characteristically displays non-specific orthohyperkeratosis. Notably, a subset of IV patients with a reduced or absent granular epidermal layer (AGL) have been reported, and decreased filaggrin levels have been described in others. The prominent role of profilaggrin in human keratohyalin suggests that defects in the gene for profilaggrin (FLG), its processing of profillagrin to filaggrin, or a gene involved in profilaggrin regulation may underlie or modify the pathology in IV. Family 1 had seven individuals with IV, severe heat intolerance and epidermis with 1-3 granular layers (consistent with normal epidermal histology). Ichthyosis vulgaris in this family did not segregate with FLG or other genes in the epidermal differentiation complex. In contrast, five of the six IV patients in Family 2, all siblings, had epidermis with no granular layer. Significant evidence was obtained for linkage of IV with the associated AGL phenotype to the epidermal differentiation complex (which includes FLG) assuming either a recessive (max Lod 3.4) or dominant (max Lod 3.6) inheritance model. Sequence analysis of FLG did not reveal a mutation in the amino or carboxyl terminal portions of the coding sequence adjacent to filaggrin repeats. The AGL may represent an endophenotype for IV, and the presence of a modifier of IV pathology at this locus is discussed.

  15. Circulating chromatin-anti-chromatin antibody complexes bind with high affinity to dermo-epidermal structures in murine and human lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fismen, S; Hedberg, A; Fenton, K A

    2009-01-01

    Murine and human lupus nephritis are characterized by glomerular deposits of electron-dense structures (EDS). Dominant components of EDS are chromatin fragments and IgG antibodies. Whether glomerular EDS predispose for similar deposits in skin is unknown. We analysed (i) whether dermo-epidermal i...... were present in capillary lumina in glomeruli and skin of all nephritic individuals. Thus, chromatin-IgG complexes accounting for lupus nephritis seem to reach skin through circulation, but other undetermined factors are required for these complexes to deposit within skin membranes....

  16. Epidermal differentiation complex (locus 1q21) gene expression in head and neck cancer and normal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyszkiewicz, Tomasz; Jarzab, Michal; Szymczyk, Cezary; Kowal, Monika; Krajewska, Jolanta; Jaworska, Magdalena; Fraczek, Marcin; Krajewska, Anna; Hadas, Ewa; Swierniak, Michal; Markowski, Jaroslaw; Lange, Dariusz; Poltorak, Stanislaw; Wiench, Malgorzata; Krecicki, Tomasz; Jarzab, Jerzy; Maciejewski, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) comprises a number of genes associated with human skin diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and hyperkeratosis. These genes have also been linked to numerous cancers, among them skin, gastric, colorectal, lung, ovarian and renal carcinomas. The involvement of EDC components encoding S100 proteins, small proline-rich proteins (SPRRs) and other genes in the tumorigenesis of head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) has been previously suggested. The aim of the study was to systematically analyze the expression of EDC components on the transcript level in HNSCC. Tissue specimens from 93 patients with HNC of oral cavity and 87 samples from adjacent or distant grossly normal oral mucosawere analyzed. 48 samples (24 tumor and 24 corresponding surrounding tissue) were hybridized to Affymetrix GeneChip Human 1.0 ST Arrays. For validation by quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR) the total RNA from all180 samples collected in the study was analyzed with Real-Time PCR system and fluorescent amplicon specific-probes. Additional set of samples from 14 patients with laryngeal carcinoma previously obtained by HG-U133 Plus 2.0 microarray was also included in the analyses. The expression of analyzed EDC genes was heterogeneous. Two transcripts (S100A1 and S100A4) were significantly down-regulated in oral cancer when compared to normal mucosa (0.69 and 0.36-fold change, respectively), showing an opposite pattern of expression to the remaining S100 genes. Significant up-regulation in tumors was found for S100A11, S100A7, LCE3D, S100A3 and S100A2 genes. The increased expression of S100A7 was subsequently validated by QPCR, confirming significant differences. The remaining EDC genes, including all encoding SPRR molecules, did not show any differences between oral cancer and normal mucosa. The observed differences were also assessed in the independent set of laryngeal cancer samples, confirming the role of S100A3 and LCE3D transcripts in

  17. [Effects of lentivirus-mediated epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 silencing on proliferation and invasion of human laryngeal carcinoma Hep-2 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingjia; Ye, Jin; Zhuang, Shimin; Wang, Tao; Wang, Zhiyuan; Chang, Lihong; Zhang, Gehua

    2014-08-01

    To explore the effects of epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 (EGFL7) gene silencing on the proliferation and invasion ablity of laryngeal carcinoma cells. A lentiviral vector expressing EGFL7 shRNA was constructed and transfected into human laryngeal carcinoma Hep-2 cells. The expressions of EGFL7 mRNA and protein were detected by Real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. Cell proliferation was evaluated by CCK-8 assay, cell cycle and apoptosis were tested by flow cytometry, and cell invasion was detected by transwell invasion assay. The relative expression level s of EGFL7 mRNA and protein in EGFL7-SuRNA group were svgnificantly lower than control group (P Hep-2 cells. The proliferation of Hep-2 cells was significantly inhibited after transfection (P Hep-2 cells can be inhibited by siRNA mediated EGFL7 gene silencing.

  18. ROLES OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF-A) IN MEDIATION OF DIOXIN (TCDD)-INDUCED DELAYS IN DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOUSE MAMMARY GLAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roles of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) and Transforming Growth Factor-alpha (TGF-a) in Mediation of Dioxin (TCDD)-Induced Delays in Development of the Mouse Mammary Gland.Suzanne E. Fenton, Barbara Abbott, Lamont Bryant, and Angela Buckalew. U.S. EPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Tox...

  19. Role of protein kinase C in diacylglycerol-mediated induction of ornithine decarboxylase and reduction of epidermal growth factor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetten, A M; Ganong, B R; Vandenbark, G R; Shirley, J E; Bell, R M

    1985-01-01

    Tumor-promoting phorbol esters induce ornithine decarboxylase (ODCase) activity and reduce epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding in rat tracheal epithelial 2C5 cells. Phorbol esters activate protein kinase C by interacting at the same site as sn-1,2-diacylglycerols, the presumed physiological regulators. The effects of added sn-1,2-diacylglycerols and those generated by phospholipase C treatment of 2C5 cells on ODCase induction and EGF binding were investigated to establish a role for protein kinase C in these cellular responses. Treatment of 2C5 cells with phospholipase C induced ODCase activity and reduced EGF binding, whereas phospholipases A2 and D were inactive. When sn-1,2-diacylglycerols containing fatty acids 3-10 carbons in length were added to 2C5 cells, those diacylglycerols containing fatty acids 5-10 carbons in length caused ODCase induction and reduction in EGF binding. sn-1,2-Dioctanoylglycerol was one of the most active compounds tested. It induced ODCase in a dose- (50-500 microM) and time-dependent manner. The reduction of binding of 125I-labeled EGF by sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol was also time and dose dependent and appeared to result from a change in EGF affinity and not the number of receptor sites. This series of sn-1,2-diacylglycerols showed similar structure-function relationships in their ability to induce ODCase activity, to decrease EGF binding, to stimulate protein kinase C, and to inhibit [3H]phorbol dibutyrate binding to the phorbol ester receptor. These data demonstrate biological activities for a number of diacylglycerols and indicate that protein kinase C activation is implicated in ODCase induction and decreased EGF binding. PMID:3157191

  20. Novel epidermal growth factor receptor pathway mediates release of human β-defensin 3 from Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Jibran S; Zaidi, Syed F; Zhou, Yue; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    Persistent Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in hostile gastric mucosa can result in gastric diseases. Helicobacter pylori induces to express antimicrobial peptides from gastric epithelial cells, especially human β-defensin 3 (hBD3), as an innate immune response, and this expression of hBD3 is mediated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. In this study, we found that phosphorylation of a serine residue of EGFR via transforming growth factor β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1), and subsequent p38α activation is essential for H. pylori-induced hBD3 release from gastric epithelial cells. We showed that this pathway was dependent on H. pylori type IV secretion system and was independent of H. pylori-derived CagA or peptidoglycan. H. pylori infection induced phosphorylation of serine residue of EGFR, and this phosphorylation was followed by internalization of EGFR; consequently, hBD3 was released at an early phase of the infection. In the presence of TAK1 or p38α inhibitors, synthesis of hBD3 was completely inhibited. Similar results were observed in EGFR-, TAK1- or p38α-knockdown cells. However, NOD1 knockdown in gastric epithelial cells did not inhibit hBD3 induction. Our study has firstly demonstrated that this novel EGFR activating pathway functioned to induce hBD3 at an early phase of H. pylori infection.

  1. Epidermal growth factor receptor mediated proliferation depends on increased lipid droplet density regulated via a negative regulatory loop with FOXO3/Sirtuin6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penrose, Harrison; Heller, Sandra; Cable, Chloe [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine, 1430 Tulane Ave SL-79, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Makboul, Rania [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine, 1430 Tulane Ave SL-79, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Pathology Department, Assiut University, Assiut (Egypt); Chadalawada, Gita; Chen, Ying [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine, 1430 Tulane Ave SL-79, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Crawford, Susan E. [Department of Pathology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, 1402 South Grand Blvd, Saint Louis, MO 63104 (United States); Savkovic, Suzana D., E-mail: ssavkovi@tulane.edu [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine, 1430 Tulane Ave SL-79, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The proliferation of colon cancer cells is mediated in part by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and requires sustained levels of cellular energy to meet its high metabolic needs. Intracellular lipid droplets (LDs) are a source of energy used for various cellular functions and they are elevated in density in human cancer, yet their regulation and function are not well understood. Here, in human colon cancer cells, EGF stimulates increases in LD density, which depends on EGFR expression and activation as well as the individual cellular capacity for lipid synthesis. Increases in LDs are blockaded by inhibition of PI3K/mTOR and PGE2 synthesis, supporting their dependency on select upstream pathways. In colon cancer cells, silencing of the FOXO3 transcription factor leads to down regulation of SIRT6, a negative regulator of lipid synthesis, and consequent increases in the LD coat protein PLIN2, revealing that increases in LDs depend on loss of FOXO3/SIRT6. Moreover, EGF stimulates loss of FOXO3/SIRT6, which is blockaded by the inhibition of upstream pathways as well as lipid synthesis, revealing existence of a negative regulatory loop between LDs and FOXO3/SIRT6. Elevated LDs are utilized by EGF treatment and their depletion through the inhibition of lipid synthesis or silencing of PLIN2 significantly attenuates proliferation. This novel mechanism of proliferative EGFR signaling leading to elevated LD density in colon cancer cells could potentially be therapeutically targeted for the treatment of tumor progression. - Highlights: • In colon cancer cells, EGFR activation leads to increases in LD density. • EGFR signaling includes PI3K/mTOR and PGE2 leading to lipid synthesis. • Increases in LDs are controlled by a negative regulatory loop with FOXO3/SIRT6. • EGFR mediated colon cancer cell proliferation depends on increased LD density.

  2. sli-3 negatively regulates the LET-23/epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated vulval induction pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Bhagwati P; Liu, Jing; Hwang, Byung J; Moghal, Nadeem; Sternberg, Paul W

    2006-11-01

    The LIN-3-LET-23-mediated inductive signaling pathway plays a major role during vulval development in C. elegans. Studies on the components of this pathway have revealed positive as well as negative regulators that function to modulate the strength and specificity of the signal transduction cascade. We have carried out genetic screens to identify new regulators of this pathway by screening for suppressors of lin-3 vulvaless phenotype. The screens recovered three loci including alleles of gap-1 and a new gene represented by sli-3. Our genetic epistasis experiments suggest that sli-3 functions either downstream or in parallel to nuclear factors lin-1 and sur-2. sli-3 synergistically interacts with the previously identified negative regulators of the let-23 signaling pathway and causes excessive cell proliferation. However, in the absence of any other mutation sli-3 mutant animals display wild-type vulval induction and morphology. We propose that sli-3 functions as a negative regulator of vulval induction and defines a branch of the inductive signaling pathway. We provide evidence that sli-3 interacts with the EGF signaling pathway components during vulval induction but not during viability and ovulation processes. Thus, sli-3 helps define specificity of the EGF signaling to induce the vulva.

  3. Activation of epidermal growth factor receptor mediates mucin production stimulated by p40, a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-derived protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihong; Cao, Hailong; Liu, Liping; Wang, Bangmao; Walker, W Allan; Acra, Sari A; Yan, Fang

    2014-07-18

    The mucus layer coating the gastrointestinal tract serves as the first line of intestinal defense against infection and injury. Probiotics promote mucin production by goblet cells in the intestine. p40, a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-derived soluble protein, has been shown to transactivate the EGF receptor (EGFR) in intestinal epithelial cells, which is required for inhibition of apoptosis and preservation of barrier function in the colon, thereby ameliorating intestinal injury and colitis. Because activation of EGFR has been shown to up-regulate mucin production in goblet cells, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanisms of p40 regulation of mucin production. p40 activated EGFR and its downstream target, Akt, in a concentration-dependent manner in LS174T cells. p40 stimulated Muc2 gene expression and mucin production in LS174T cells, which were abolished by inhibition of EGFR kinase activity, down-regulation of EGFR expression by EGFR siRNA transfection, or suppression of Akt activation. Treatment with p40 increased mucin production in the colonic epithelium, thus thickening the mucus layer in the colon of wild type, but not of Egfr(wa5) mice, which have a dominant negative mutation in the EGFR kinase domain. Furthermore, inhibition of mucin-type O-linked glycosylation suppressed the effect of p40 on increasing mucin production and protecting intestinal epithelial cells from TNF-induced apoptosis in colon organ culture. Thus, these results suggest that p40-stimulated activation of EGFR mediates up-regulation of mucin production, which may contribute to the mechanisms by which p40 protects the intestinal epithelium from injury.

  4. The Alteration of the Epidermal Basement Membrane Complex of Human Nevus Tissue and Keratinocyte Attachment after High Hydrostatic Pressurization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Morimoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that human nevus tissue was inactivated after high hydrostatic pressure (HHP higher than 200 MPa and that human cultured epidermis (hCE engrafted on the pressurized nevus at 200 MPa but not at 1000 MPa. In this study, we explore the changes to the epidermal basement membrane in detail and elucidate the cause of the difference in hCE engraftment. Nevus specimens of 8 mm in diameter were divided into five groups (control and 100, 200, 500, and 1000 MPa. Immediately after HHP, immunohistochemical staining was performed to detect the presence of laminin-332 and type VII collagen, and the specimens were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. hCE was placed on the pressurized nevus specimens in the 200, 500, and 1000 MPa groups and implanted into the subcutis of nude mice; the specimens were harvested at 14 days after implantation. Then, human keratinocytes were seeded on the pressurized nevus and the attachment was evaluated. The immunohistochemical staining results revealed that the control and 100 MPa, 200 MPa, and 500 MPa groups were positive for type VII collagen and laminin-332 immediately after HHP. TEM showed that, in all of the groups, the lamina densa existed; however, anchoring fibrils were not clearly observed in the 500 or 1000 MPa groups. Although the hCE took in the 200 and 500 MPa groups, keratinocyte attachment was only confirmed in the 200 MPa group. This result indicates that HHP at 200 MPa is preferable for inactivating nevus tissue to allow its reuse for skin reconstruction in the clinical setting.

  5. Mechanotransduction in epidermal Merkel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Masashi; Maksimovic, Srdjan; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A

    2015-01-01

    The cellular and molecular basis of vertebrate touch reception remains least understood among the traditional five senses. Somatosensory afferents that innervate the skin encode distinct tactile qualities, such as flutter, slip, and pressure. Gentle touch is thought to be transduced by somatosensory afferents whose tactile end organs selectively filter mechanical stimuli. These tactile end organs comprise afferent terminals in association with non-neuronal cell types such as Merkel cells, keratinocytes, and Schwann cells. An open question is whether these non-neuronal cells serve primarily as passive mechanical filters or whether they actively participate in mechanosensory transduction. This question has been most extensively studied in Merkel cells, which are epidermal cells that complex with sensory afferents in regions of high tactile acuity such as fingertips, whisker follicles, and touch domes. Merkel cell-neurite complexes mediate slowly adapting type I (SAI) responses, which encode sustained pressure and represent object features with high fidelity. How Merkel cells contribute to unique SAI firing patterns has been debated for decades; however, three recent studies in rodent models provide some direct answers. First, whole-cell recordings demonstrate that Merkel cells are touch-sensitive cells with fast, mechanically activated currents that require Piezo2. Second, optogenetics and intact recordings show that Merkel cells mediate sustained SAI firing. Finally, loss-of-function studies in transgenic mouse models reveal that SAI afferents are also touch sensitive. Together, these studies identify molecular mechanisms of mechanotransduction in Merkel cells, reveal unexpected functions for these cells in touch, and support a revised, two-receptor site model of mechanosensory transduction.

  6. Angiotensin II-induced Akt activation through the epidermal growth factor receptor in vascular smooth muscle cells is mediated by phospholipid metabolites derived by activation of phospholipase D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Malik, Kafait U

    2005-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) activates cytosolic Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)), phospholipase D (PLD), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Akt in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between Akt activation by Ang II and other signaling molecules in rat VSMC. Ang II-induced Akt phosphorylation was significantly reduced by the PLD inhibitor 1-butanol, but not by its inactive analog 2-butanol, and by brefeldin A, an inhibitor of the PLD cofactor ADP-ribosylation factor, and in cells infected with retrovirus containing PLD(2) siRNA or transfected with PLD(2) antisense but not control LacZ or sense oligonucleotide. Diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor II diminished Ang II-induced and diC8-phosphatidic acid (PA)-increased Akt phosphorylation, suggesting that PLD-dependent Akt activation is mediated by PA. Ang II-induced EGFR phosphorylation was inhibited by 1-butanol and PLD(2) siRNA and also by cPLA(2) siRNA. In addition, the inhibitor of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA) reduced both Ang II- and AA-induced EGFR transactivation. Furthermore, ETYA, cPLA(2) antisense, and cPLA(2) siRNA attenuated Ang II-elicited PLD activation. p38 MAPK inhibitor SB202190 [4-(4-flurophenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole] reduced PLD activity and EGFR and Akt phosphorylation elicited by Ang II. Pyrrolidine-1, a cPLA(2) inhibitor, and cPLA(2) siRNA decreased p38 MAPK activity. These data indicate that Ang II-stimulated Akt activity is mediated by cPLA(2)-dependent, p38 MAPK regulated PLD(2) activation and EGFR transactivation. We propose the following scheme of the sequence of events leading to activation of Akt in VSMC by Ang II: Ang II-->cPLA(2)-->AA-->p38 MAPK-->PLD(2)-->PA-->EGFR-->Akt.

  7. Evaluation of Epidermal Skin Grafts for the Treatment of Complex Wounds in a Wound Care Center: A 94-Patient Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Katherine; Hyde, Jessica

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, a new technology for autologous epidermal harvesting has been developed to produce epidermal skin grafts (ESGs) for use over wounds. This technology employs negative pressure and heat to raise the epidermal skin layer, allowing for consistent and reproducible epidermal harvesting. The aim of this case series is to present the authors' experience using an automated, epidermal harvesting system to produce ESGs to treat wounds of patients with multiple comorbidities. This case series was conducted between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2014. Patients with wounds (≤ 25 cm2) that failed to heal were treated with ESGs by a group of 3 wound care physicians in 2 outpatient wound care centers in a community health center setting. A total of 94 patients with 102 wounds were identified. Of the 94 patients, 3 were noncompliant and 9 were lost to follow-up. Therefore, 82 patients with 90 wounds were included in the analysis. The majority of wounds demonstrated epithelialization (83/90, 92.2%). Of the 90 wounds, 75 (83.3%) healed following epidermal grafting, 4 (4.4%) wounds displayed improvement, and 11 (12.2%) did not heal. Minimal or no pain at the donor site was reported by the patients, and all donor sites healed without complications. This case series provides additional evidence for the use of ESGs for the treatment of wounds that fail to heal.

  8. Epidermal Growth Factor Induces Proliferation of Hair Follicle-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Through Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Mediated Activation of ERK and AKT Signaling Pathways Associated with Upregulation of Cyclin D1 and Downregulation of p16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Tingting; Liu, Feilin; Zou, Fei; Zhao, Guifang; Jiang, Yixu; Liu, Li; Shi, Jiahong; Hao, Deshun; Zhang, Qi; Zheng, Tong; Zhang, Yingyao; Liu, Mingsheng; Li, Shilun; Qi, Liangchen; Liu, Jin Yu

    2017-01-15

    The maintenance of highly proliferative capacity and full differentiation potential is a necessary step in the initiation of stem cell-based regenerative medicine. Our recent study showed that epidermal growth factor (EGF) significantly enhanced hair follicle-derived mesenchymal stem cell (HF-MSC) proliferation while maintaining the multilineage differentiation potentials. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Herein, we investigated the role of EGF in HF-MSC proliferation. HF-MSCs were isolated and cultured with or without EGF. Immunofluorescence staining, flow cytometry, cytochemistry, and western blotting were used to assess proliferation, cell signaling pathways related to the EGF receptor (EGFR), and cell cycle progression. HF-MSCs exhibited surface markers of mesenchymal stem cells and displayed trilineage differentiation potentials toward adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts. EGF significantly increased HF-MSC proliferation as well as EGFR, ERK1/2, and AKT phosphorylation (p-EGFR, p-ERK1/2, and p-AKT) in a time- and dose-dependent manner, but not STAT3 phosphorylation. EGFR inhibitor (AG1478), PI3K-AKT inhibitor (LY294002), ERK inhibitor (U0126), and STAT3 inhibitor (STA-21) significantly blocked EGF-induced HF-MSC proliferation. Moreover, AG1478, LY294002, and U0126 significantly decreased p-EGFR, p-AKT, and p-ERK1/2 expression. EGF shifted HF-MSCs at the G1 phase to the S and G2 phase. Concomitantly, cyclinD1, phosphorylated Rb, and E2F1expression increased, while that of p16 decreased. In conclusion, EGF induces HF-MSC proliferation through the EGFR/ERK and AKT pathways, but not through STAT-3. The G1/S transition was stimulated by upregulation of cyclinD1 and inhibition of p16 expression.

  9. Verrucous epidermal nevus

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Randie; Marmon, Shoshana; Kaplan, Jennifer; Kamino, Hideko; Pomeranz, Miriam Keltz

    2013-01-01

    A 64-year-old man presented with a three-year history of an enlarging, pruritic, linear, verrucous plaque on his left lower extremity. Histopathologic examination was consistent with a verrucous epidermal nevus, which is a benign epidermal hamartoma, most commonly observed in the pediatric population. Verrucous epidermal nevi are often refractory to treatment and have high rates of recurrences, causing them to be therapeutic challenges. We review the treatment modalities reported to be effect...

  10. Power Analysis for Complex Mediational Designs Using Monte Carlo Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoemmes, Felix; MacKinnon, David P.; Reiser, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Applied researchers often include mediation effects in applications of advanced methods such as latent variable models and linear growth curve models. Guidance on how to estimate statistical power to detect mediation for these models has not yet been addressed in the literature. We describe a general framework for power analyses for complex…

  11. Genetics Home Reference: epidermal nevus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thicker and darker and develop a wart-like (verrucous) appearance. Often, keratinocytic epidermal nevi follow a pattern ... are also known as linear epidermal nevi or verrucous epidermal nevi, based on characteristics of their appearance. ...

  12. Evolution of dinosaur epidermal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Paul M; Evans, David C; Campione, Nicolás E

    2015-06-01

    Spectacularly preserved non-avian dinosaurs with integumentary filaments/feathers have revolutionized dinosaur studies and fostered the suggestion that the dinosaur common ancestor possessed complex integumentary structures homologous to feathers. This hypothesis has major implications for interpreting dinosaur biology, but has not been tested rigorously. Using a comprehensive database of dinosaur skin traces, we apply maximum-likelihood methods to reconstruct the phylogenetic distribution of epidermal structures and interpret their evolutionary history. Most of these analyses find no compelling evidence for the appearance of protofeathers in the dinosaur common ancestor and scales are usually recovered as the plesiomorphic state, but results are sensitive to the outgroup condition in pterosaurs. Rare occurrences of ornithischian filamentous integument might represent independent acquisitions of novel epidermal structures that are not homologous with theropod feathers. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  13. The dermis contains langerin+ dendritic cells that develop and function independently of epidermal Langerhans cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Lionel Franz; Henri, Sandrine; de Bovis, Béatrice; Devilard, Elisabeth; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; Malissen, Bernard

    2007-12-24

    Langerhans cells (LCs) constitute a subset of dendritic cells (DCs) that express the lectin langerin and that reside in their immature state in epidermis. Paradoxically, in mice permitting diphtheria toxin (DT)-mediated ablation of LCs, epidermal LCs reappeared with kinetics that lagged behind that of their putative progeny found in lymph nodes (LNs). Using bone marrow (BM) chimeras, we showed that a major fraction of the langerin(+), skin-derived DCs found in LNs originates from a developmental pathway that is independent from that of epidermal LCs. This pathway, the existence of which was unexpected, originates in the dermis and gives rise to langerin(+) dermal DCs (DDCs) that should not be confused with epidermal LCs en route to LNs. It explains that after DT treatment, some langerin(+), skin-derived DCs reappear in LNs long before LC-derived DCs. Using CD45 expression and BrdU-labeling kinetics, both LCs and langerin(+) DDCs were found to coexist in wild-type mice. Moreover, DT-mediated ablation of epidermal LCs opened otherwise filled niches and permitted repopulation of adult noninflammatory epidermis with BM-derived LCs. Our results stress that the langerin(+) DC network is more complex than originally thought and have implications for the development of transcutaneous vaccines and the improvement of humanized mouse models.

  14. Complement-mediated solubilization of immune complexes and their interaction with complement C3 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ivan; Baatrup, Gunnar; Jepsen, H H;

    1985-01-01

    Some of the molecular events in the complement (C)-mediated solubilization of immune complexes (IC) have been clarified in recent years. The solubilization is primarily mediated by alternative C pathway proteins whereas factors in the classical pathway accelerate the process. Components of the me......Some of the molecular events in the complement (C)-mediated solubilization of immune complexes (IC) have been clarified in recent years. The solubilization is primarily mediated by alternative C pathway proteins whereas factors in the classical pathway accelerate the process. Components...

  15. Mediated attachment as a mechanism for growth of complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Shekatkar, Snehal M

    2014-01-01

    Connection topologies of many networked systems like human brain, biological cell, world wide web, power grids, human society and ecological food webs markedly deviate from that of completely random networks indicating the presence of organizing principles behind their evolution. The five important features that characterize such networks are scale-free topology, small average path length, high clustering, hierarchical community structure and assortative mixing. Till now the generic mechanisms underlying the existence of these properties are not well understood. Here we show that potentially a single mechanism, which we call "mediated attachment", where two nodes get connected through a mediator or common neighbor, could be responsible for the emergence of all important properties of real networks. The mediated attachment naturally unifies scale-free topology, high clustering, small world nature, hierarchical community structure and dissortative nature of networks. Further, with additional mixing by age, this...

  16. Cetuximab Inhibits T790M-Mediated Resistance to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor in a Lung Adenocarcinoma Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Petra; Stewart, Erin; Pham, Nhu-An; Mascaux, Celine; Panchal, Devang; Li, Ming; Kim, Lucia; Sakashita, Shingo; Wang, Dennis; Sykes, Jenna; Friess, Thomas; Shepherd, Frances A; Liu, Geoffrey; Tsao, Ming-Sound

    2016-09-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase domain T790M (amino acid substitution at position 790 in EGFR from threonine [T] to methionine [M]) mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) results in resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). We used a patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDX) model containing an EGFR exon 19 deletion/T790M mutation to assess response to the EGFR-directed antibody cetuximab. Changes in the EGFR signaling pathway and ligand expression after treatment were investigated. PDX were randomized into control and treatment arms. Pharmacodynamic studies were performed at 2 and 24 hours and at 4 days after a single administration of cetuximab, erlotinib, or dacomitinib. Changes in the EGFR signaling pathway were assessed using Western blot analysis, and baseline mRNA expression of EGFR ligands using microarray analysis. Relative changes after treatment were assessed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The xenograft showed a dramatic response to cetuximab. A complete reduction of total EGFR and phosphorylated EGFR occurred after cetuximab treatment. The PDX had increased baseline levels of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) compared with other PDX models with or without EGFR mutations. Amphiregulin was significantly reduced 2 hours after treatment with cetuximab. Compared with control mice, cetuximab- and EGFR-TKI-treated mice had significantly reduced HB-EGF gene expression at 2 hours, however, by day 4 the level of HB-EGF expression was higher. The effect of cetuximab compared with EGFR TKI on HB-EGF gene expression levels differed significantly at 2 and 24 hours but not at 4 days. We showed a dramatic tumor response with cetuximab in an exon 19 deletion/T790M EGFR mutant lung adenocarcinoma PDX model, which suggests a role for the autocrine feedback loop in the mutant EGFR signaling pathway. Further investigation using cetuximab in NSCLC with T790M mutation is warranted. Copyright

  17. Emerging functions of multi-protein complex Mediator with special emphasis on plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Naveen; Agarwal, Pinky; Tyagi, Akhilesh

    2017-10-01

    Mediator is a multi-subunit protein complex which is involved in transcriptional regulation in yeast and other eukaryotes. As a co-activator, it connects information from transcriptional activators/repressors to transcriptional machinery including RNA polymerase II and general transcription factors. It is not only involved in transcription initiation but also has important roles to play in transcription elongation and termination. Functional attributes of different Mediator subunits have been largely defined in yeast and mammalian systems earlier, while such studies in plants have gained momentum recently. Mediator regulates various processes related to plant development and is also involved in biotic and abiotic stress response. Thus, plant Mediator, like yeast and mammalian Mediator complex, is indispensable for plant growth and survival. Interaction of its multiple subunits with other regulatory proteins and their ectopic expression or knockdown in model plant like Arabidopsis and certain crop plants are paving the way to biochemical analysis and unravel molecular mechanisms of action of Mediator in plants.

  18. Toksisk epidermal nekrolyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, Anette; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2006-01-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a rare, mostly drug-induced life-threatening mucocutaneous reaction with generalised symptoms and internal organ involvement. Current treatment strategy focuses on supportive intensive care with close collaboration among many specialties. Specific therapies...

  19. Complement-mediated solubilization of immune complexes. Solubilization inhibition and complement factor levels in SLE patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, Gunnar; Petersen, Ivan; Kappelgaard, E;

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-two of 36 serum samples from 19 SLE patients showed reduced capacity to mediate complement-dependent solubilization of immune complexes (IC). SLE patients with nephritis exerted the lowest complement-mediated solubilization capacity (CMSC) whereas sera from patients with inactive disease g...

  20. DEPENDENCE OF PPAR LIGAND-INDUCED MAPK SIGNALING ON EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR TRANSACTIVATION HEPARIN-BINDING EGF CLEAVAGE MEDIATES ZINC-INDUCED EGF RECEPTOR PHOSPHORYLATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear hormone receptors that function as ligand-activated transcription factors regulating lipid metabolism and homeostasis. In addition to their ability to regulate PPAR-mediated gene transcription, PPARalpha and gamma li...

  1. Integrin alpha1beta1 controls reactive oxygen species synthesis by negatively regulating epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated Rac activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiwu; Abair, Tristin D; Ibanez, Maria R; Su, Yan; Frey, Mark R; Dise, Rebecca S; Polk, D Brent; Singh, Amar B; Harris, Raymond C; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2007-05-01

    Integrins control many cell functions, including generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and regulation of collagen synthesis. Mesangial cells, found in the glomerulus of the kidney, are able to produce large amounts of ROS via the NADPH oxidase. We previously demonstrated that integrin alpha1-null mice develop worse fibrosis than wild-type mice following glomerular injury and this is due, in part, to excessive ROS production by alpha1-null mesangial cells. In the present studies, we describe the mechanism whereby integrin alpha1-null mesangial cells produce excessive ROS. Integrin alpha1-null mesangial cells have constitutively increased basal levels of activated Rac1, which result in its increased translocation to the cell membrane, excessive ROS production, and consequent collagen IV deposition. Basal Rac1 activation is a direct consequence of ligand-independent increased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation in alpha1-null mesangial cells. Thus, our study demonstrates that integrin alpha1beta1-EGFR cross talk is a key step in negatively regulating Rac1 activation, ROS production, and excessive collagen synthesis, which is a hallmark of diseases characterized by irreversible fibrosis.

  2. Activation of nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Bmx/Etk mediated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase, epidermal growth factor receptor, and ErbB3 in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xinnong; Borgesi, Robert A; McKnight, Nicole C; Kaur, Ramneet; Carpenter, Christopher L; Balk, Steven P

    2007-11-09

    Pathways activated downstream of constitutively active phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer (PCa) cells are possible therapeutic targets. We found that the nonreceptor Tec family tyrosine kinase Bmx/Etk was activated by tyrosine phosphorylation downstream of Src and PI 3-kinase in PTEN-deficient LNCaP and PC3 PCa cells and that Bmx down-regulation by short interfering RNA markedly inhibited LNCaP cell growth. Bmx also associated with ErbB3 in LNCaP cells, and heregulin-beta1 enhanced this interaction and further stimulated Bmx activity. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) similarly stimulated an interaction between Bmx and EGF receptor and rapidly increased Bmx kinase activity. Bmx stimulation in response to heregulin-beta1 and EGF was Src-dependent, and heregulin-beta1 stimulation of Bmx was also PI 3-kinase-dependent. In contrast, the rapid tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of Bmx in response to EGF was PI 3-kinase-independent. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Bmx is a critical downstream target of the constitutively active PI 3-kinase in PTEN-deficient PCa cells and further show that Bmx is recruited by the EGF receptor and ErbB3 and activated in response to their respective ligands. Therefore, Bmx may be a valuable therapeutic target in PCa and other epithelial malignancies in which PI 3-kinase or EGF receptor family pathways are activated.

  3. C-NH2 bond formation mediated by iridium complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Mena, Inmaculada; Casado, Miguel A.; Polo, Víctor; García-Orduña, P.; Lahoz, Fernando J.; Oro, Luis A.

    2014-01-01

    In the presence of phosphanes (PR3), the amido-bridged trinuclear complex [{Ir(μ-NH2)(tfbb)}3] (tfbb=tetrafluorobenzobarrelene) transforms into mononuclear discrete compounds [Ir(1,2-η2-4-κ-C12H8F 4N)(PR3)3], which are the products of the C-N coupling between the amido moiety and a vinylic carbon of the diolefin. An alternative synthetic approach to these species involves the reaction of the 18-e- complex [Ir(Cl)(tfbb)(PMePh2)2] with gaseous ammonia and additional phosphane. DFT studies show ...

  4. Cdk11-CyclinL Controls the Assembly of the RNA Polymerase II Mediator Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Drogat

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The large Mediator (L-Mediator is a general coactivator of RNA polymerase II transcription and is formed by the reversible association of the small Mediator (S-Mediator and the kinase-module-harboring Cdk8. It is not known how the kinase module association/dissociation is regulated. We describe the fission yeast Cdk11-L-type cyclin pombe (Lcp1 complex and show that its inactivation alters the global expression profile in a manner very similar to that of mutations of the kinase module. Cdk11 is broadly distributed onto chromatin and phosphorylates the Med27 and Med4 Mediator subunits on conserved residues. The association of the kinase module and the S-Mediator is strongly decreased by the inactivation of either Cdk11 or the mutation of its target residues on the Mediator. These results show that Cdk11-Lcp1 regulates the association of the kinase module and the S-Mediator to form the L-Mediator complex.

  5. Cdk11-cyclinL controls the assembly of the RNA polymerase II mediator complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drogat, Julie; Migeot, Valérie; Mommaerts, Elise; Mullier, Caroline; Dieu, Marc; van Bakel, Harm; Hermand, Damien

    2012-11-29

    The large Mediator (L-Mediator) is a general coactivator of RNA polymerase II transcription and is formed by the reversible association of the small Mediator (S-Mediator) and the kinase-module-harboring Cdk8. It is not known how the kinase module association/dissociation is regulated. We describe the fission yeast Cdk11-L-type cyclin pombe (Lcp1) complex and show that its inactivation alters the global expression profile in a manner very similar to that of mutations of the kinase module. Cdk11 is broadly distributed onto chromatin and phosphorylates the Med27 and Med4 Mediator subunits on conserved residues. The association of the kinase module and the S-Mediator is strongly decreased by the inactivation of either Cdk11 or the mutation of its target residues on the Mediator. These results show that Cdk11-Lcp1 regulates the association of the kinase module and the S-Mediator to form the L-Mediator complex.

  6. Reduced complement-mediated immune complex solubilizing capacity and the presence of incompletely solubilized immune complexes in SLE sera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, Gunnar; Petersen, I; Jensenius, J C

    1983-01-01

    Reduced complement-mediated solubilization (CMS) of pre-formed immune complexes (IC) was demonstrated in sera from 11 out of 12 SLE patients. The presence of incompletely solubilized endogeneous IC in SLE sera was indicated by the following findings: (1) When IC positive SLE sera with reduced CMS...

  7. Epidermal nevus syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, Sarah; Sugarman, Jeffrey L

    2015-01-01

    The term epidermal nevus syndrome (ENS) has been used to describe the association of epidermal hamartomas and extracutaneous abnormalities. Although many continue to use the term "ENS," it is now understood that this is not one disease, but rather a heterogeneous group with distinct genetic profiles defined by a common cutaneous phenotype: the presence of epidermal and adnexal hamartomas that are associated with other organ system involvement. One commonality is that epidermal nevi often follow the lines of Blaschko and it appears the more widespread the cutaneous manifestations, the greater the risk for extracutaneous manifestations. The majority of the extracutaneous manifestations involve the brain, eye, and skeletal systems. The CNS involvement is wide ranging and involves both clinical manifestations such as intellectual disability and seizures, as well as structural anomalies. Several subsets of ENS with characteristic features have been delineated including the nevus sebaceus syndrome, Proteus syndrome, CHILD syndrome, Becker's nevus syndrome, nevus comedonicus syndrome, and phakomatosis pigmentokeratotica. Advances in molecular biology have revealed that the manifestations of ENS are due to genomic mosaicism. It is likely that the varied clinical manifestations of ENS are due in great part to the functional effects of specific genetic defects. Optimal management of the patient with ENS involves an interdisciplinary approach given the potential for multisystem involvement. Of note, epidermal nevi have been associated with both benign and malignant neoplasms, and thus ongoing clinical follow-up is required.

  8. Epidermal nevus syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura, Flores-Sarnat

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal nevus syndrome (ENS) is an inclusive term for a heterogeneous group of congenital disorders characterized by the presence of epidermal nevi associated with systemic involvement. These disorders, as are all primary neurocutaneous syndromes, are neurocristopathies. The epidermal nevi that follow the lines of Blaschko and most systemic anomalies in skeletal, ocular, cardiovascular, endocrine, and orodental tissues, as well as lipomas, are due to defective neural crest. The most important and frequent anomaly in the brain in all forms of epidermal nevus syndromes (ENSs) is hemimegalencephaly (HME). This malformation often is not recognized, despite being the principal cause of neurological manifestations in ENSs. They consist mainly of epilepsy and developmental delay or intellectual disability. The onset of epilepsy in ENS usually is in early infancy, often as infantile spasms. Several syndromic forms have been delineated. I propose the term "Heide's syndrome" for those distinctive cases with the typical triad of hemifacial epidermal nevus, ipsilateral facial lipoma, and hemimegalencephaly. Most ENSs are sporadic. The mechanism is thought to be genetic mosaicism with a lethal autosomal dominant gene. Specific genetic mutations (PTEN, FGFR3, PIK3CA, and AKT1) have been documented in some patients. The large number of contributors for over more than a century and a half to the description of these disorders precludes the use of new author eponyms.

  9. ZEB1 Mediates Acquired Resistance to the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Yoshida

    Full Text Available Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT is one mechanism of acquired resistance to inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinases (EGFR-TKIs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The precise mechanisms of EMT-related acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs in NSCLC remain unclear. We generated erlotinib-resistant HCC4006 cells (HCC4006ER by chronic exposure of EGFR-mutant HCC4006 cells to increasing concentrations of erlotinib. HCC4006ER cells acquired an EMT phenotype and activation of the TGF-β/SMAD pathway, while lacking both T790M secondary EGFR mutation and MET gene amplification. We employed gene expression microarrays in HCC4006 and HCC4006ER cells to better understand the mechanism of acquired EGFR-TKI resistance with EMT. At the mRNA level, ZEB1 (TCF8, a known regulator of EMT, was >20-fold higher in HCC4006ER cells than in HCC4006 cells, and increased ZEB1 protein level was also detected. Furthermore, numerous ZEB1 responsive genes, such as CDH1 (E-cadherin, ST14, and vimentin, were coordinately regulated along with increased ZEB1 in HCC4006ER cells. We also identified ZEB1 overexpression and an EMT phenotype in several NSCLC cells and human NSCLC samples with acquired EGFR-TKI resistance. Short-interfering RNA against ZEB1 reversed the EMT phenotype and, importantly, restored erlotinib sensitivity in HCC4006ER cells. The level of micro-RNA-200c, which can negatively regulate ZEB1, was significantly reduced in HCC4006ER cells. Our results suggest that increased ZEB1 can drive EMT-related acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs in NSCLC. Attempts should be made to explore targeting ZEB1 to resensitize TKI-resistant tumors.

  10. The proliferative effects of Pyropia yezoensis peptide on IEC-6 cells are mediated through the epidermal growth factor receptor signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Kyeong; Kim, In-Hye; Choi, Youn-Hee; Choi, Jeong-Wook; Kim, Young-Min; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2015-04-01

    For a number of years, seaweed has been used as a functional food in Asian countries, particularly in Korea, Japan and China. Pyropia yezoensis is a marine red alga that has potentially beneficial biological activities. In this study, we examined the mechanisms through which a Pyropia yezoensis peptide [PYP1 (1-20)] induces the proliferation of IEC-6 cells, a rat intestinal epithelial cell line, and the involvement of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway. First, cell viability assay revealed that PYP1 (1-20) induced cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. Subsequently, we examined the mechanisms responsible for this induction of proliferation induced by PYP1 (1-20). EGFR is widely expressed in mammalian epithelial tissues, and the binding of this ligand affects a variety of cell physiological parameters, such as cell growth and proliferation. PYP1 (1-20) increased the expression of EGFR, Shc, growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2) and son of sevenless (SOS). EGFR also induced the activation of the Ras signaling pathway through Raf, MEK and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. In addition, cell cycle analysis revealed the expression of cell cycle-related proteins. The results demonstrated an increased number of cells in the G1 phase and an enhanced cell proliferation. In addition, the upregulation of cyclin D, cyclin E, Cdk2, Cdk4 and Cdk6 was observed accompanied by a decreased in p21 and p27 expression. These findings suggest that PYP1 (1-20) stimulates the proliferation of rat IEC-6 cells by activating the EGFR signaling pathway. Therefore, PYP1 (1-20) may be a potential source for the development of bio-functional foods which promotes the proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells.

  11. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor Signaling is Necessary for Epidermal Growth Factor Mediated Proliferation of SVZ Neural Precursors Following Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhivyaa eAlagappan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study we assessed the importance of insulin-like growth factor (IGF and epidermal growth factor (EGF receptor co-signaling for rat neural precursor (NP cell proliferation and self-renewal in the context of a developmental brain injury that is associated with cerebral palsy. Consistent with previous studies, we found that there is an increase in the in vitro growth of subventricular zone (SVZ NPs isolated acutely after cerebral hypoxia-ischemia; however, when cultured in medium that is insufficient to stimulate the IGF type 1 receptor, neurosphere formation and the proliferative capacity of those NPs was severely curtailed. This reduced growth capacity could not be attributed simply to failure to survive. The growth and self-renewal of the NPs could be restored by addition of both IGF-I and IGF-II. Since the size of the neurosphere is predominantly due to cell proliferation we hypothesized that the IGFs were regulating progression through the cell cycle. Analyses of cell cycle progression revealed that IGF-1R activation together with EGFR co-signaling decreased the percentage of cells in G1 and enhanced cell progression into S and G2. This was accompanied by increases in expression of cyclin D1, phosphorylated histone 3 and phosphorylated Rb. Based on these data we conclude that coordinate signaling between the EGF receptor and the IGF type 1 receptor is necessary for the normal proliferation of NPs as well as for their reactive expansion after injury. These data indicate that manipulations that maintain or amplify IGF signaling in the brain during recovery from developmental brain injuries will enhance the production of new brain cells to improve neurological function in children who are at risk for developing cerebral palsy.

  12. Complex-mediated microwave-assisted synthesis of polyacrylonitrile nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinath Biswal

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Trinath Biswal, Ramakanta Samal, Prafulla K SahooDepartment of Chemistry, Utkal University, Vani Vihar, Bhubaneswar 751004, IndiaAbstract: The polymerization of acrylonitrile (AN is efficiently, easily, and quickly achieved in the presence of trans-[Co(IIIen2Cl2]Cl complex in a domestic microwave (MW oven. MW irradiation notably promoted the polymerization reaction; this phenomenon is ascribed to the acceleration of the initiator, ammonium persulfate (APS, decomposition by microwave irradiation in the presence of [Co(IIIen2Cl2]Cl. The conversion of monomer to the polymer was mostly excellent in gram scale. Irradiation at low power and time produced more homogeneous polymers with high molecular weight and low polydispersity when compared with the polymer formed by a conventional heating method. The interaction of reacting components was monitored by UV-visible spectrometer. The average molecular weight was derived by gel permeation chromatography (GPC, viscosity methods, and sound velocity by ultrasonic interferometer. The uniform and reduced molecular size was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, the diameter of polyacrylonitrile nanoparticles (PAN being in the range 50–115 nm and 40–230 nm in microwave and conventional heating methods respectively. The surface morphology of PAN prepared by MW irradiation was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM. From the kinetic results, the rate of polymerization (Rp was expressed as Rp = [AN]0.63 [APS]0.57 [complex (I].0.88Keywords: microwave, complex catalyst, nanoparticle, kinetics

  13. Pomegranate fruit extract modulates UV-B-mediated phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and activation of nuclear factor kappa B in normal human epidermal keratinocytes paragraph sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afaq, Farrukh; Malik, Arshi; Syed, Deeba; Maes, Daniel; Matsui, Mary S; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2005-01-01

    Excessive exposure of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, particularly its UV-B component, to humans causes many adverse effects that include erythema, hyperplasia, hyperpigmentation, immunosuppression, photoaging and skin cancer. In recent years, there is increasing use of botanical agents in skin care products. Pomegranate derived from the tree Punica granatum contains anthocyanins (such as delphinidin, cyanidin and pelargonidin) and hydrolyzable tannins (such as punicalin, pedunculagin, punicalagin, gallagic and ellagic acid esters of glucose) and possesses strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Recently, we have shown that pomegranate fruit extract (PFE) possesses antitumor promoting effects in a mouse model of chemical carcinogenesis. To begin to establish the effect of PFE for humans in this study, we determined its effect on UV-B-induced adverse effects in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK). We first assessed the effect of PFE on UV-B-mediated phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathway in NHEK. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that the treatment of NHEK with PFE (10-40 microg/mL) for 24 h before UV-B (40 mJ/cm(2)) exposure dose dependently inhibited UV-B-mediated phosphorylation of ERKl/2, JNK1/2 and p38 protein. We also observed that PFE (20 microg/mL) inhibited UV-B-mediated phosphorylation of MAPK in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, in dose- and time-dependent studies, we evaluated the effect of PFE on UV-B-mediated activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) pathway. Using Western blot analysis, we found that PFE treatment of NHEK resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of UV-B-mediated degradation and phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha and activation of IKKalpha. Using immunoblot analysis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and electrophoretic mobility shift assay, we found that PFE treatment to NHEK resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of UV-B-mediated nuclear translocation and

  14. Comprehensive analysis of the transcriptional profile of the Mediator complex across human cancer types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syring, Isabella; Klümper, Niklas; Offermann, Anne; Braun, Martin; Deng, Mario; Boehm, Diana; Queisser, Angela; von Mässenhausen, Anne; Brägelmann, Johannes; Vogel, Wenzel; Schmidt, Doris; Majores, Michael; Schindler, Anne; Kristiansen, Glen; Müller, Stefan C; Ellinger, Jörg; Shaikhibrahim, Zaki; Perner, Sven

    2016-04-26

    The Mediator complex is a key regulator of gene transcription and several studies demonstrated altered expressions of particular subunits in diverse human diseases, especially cancer. However a systematic study deciphering the transcriptional expression of the Mediator across different cancer entities is still lacking.We therefore performed a comprehensive in silico cancer vs. benign analysis of the Mediator complex subunits (MEDs) for 20 tumor entities using Oncomine datasets. The transcriptional expression profiles across almost all cancer entities showed differentially expressed MEDs as compared to benign tissue. Differential expression of MED8 in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and MED12 in lung cancer (LCa) were validated and further investigated by immunohistochemical staining on tissue microarrays containing large numbers of specimen. MED8 in clear cell RCC (ccRCC) associated with shorter survival and advanced TNM stage and showed higher expression in metastatic than primary tumors. In vitro, siRNA mediated MED8 knockdown significantly impaired proliferation and motility in ccRCC cell lines, hinting at a role for MED8 to serve as a novel therapeutic target in ccRCC. Taken together, our Mediator complex transcriptome proved to be a valid tool for identifying cancer-related shifts in Mediator complex composition, revealing that MEDs do exhibit cancer specific transcriptional expression profiles.

  15. Induction of interleukin-6 production by ultraviolet radiation in normal human epidermal keratinocytes and in a human keratinocyte cell line is mediated by DNA damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petit-Frère, C.; Clingen, P.H.; Grewe, M.; Krutmann, J.; Roza, L.; Arlett, C.F.; Green, M.H.L.

    1998-01-01

    The sunburn reaction is the most common consequence of human exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR), and is mediated at least in part by interleukin- 6 (IL-6). The aim of this study was to determine if DNA is a major chromophore involved in the induction of IL-6 following UV irradiation of a human

  16. Actomyosin-mediated cellular tension drives increased tissue stiffness and beta-catenin activation to induce epidermal hyperplasia and tumor growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samuel, M.S.; Lopez, J.I.; McGhee, E.J.; Croft, D.R.; Strachan, D.; Timpson, P.; Munro, J.; Schroder, E.; Zhou, J.; Brunton, V.; Barker, N.; Clevers, H.; Sansom, O.J.; Anderson, K.I.; Weaver, V.M.; Olson, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Tumors and associated stroma manifest mechanical properties that promote cancer. Mechanosensation of tissue stiffness activates the Rho/ROCK pathway to increase actomyosin-mediated cellular tension to re-establish force equilibrium. To determine how actomyosin tension affects tissue homeostasis and

  17. The Inflammasome and the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR Are Involved in the Staphylococcus aureus-Mediated Induction of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta in Human Keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Simanski

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus (S. aureus is an important pathogen causing various infections including those of the skin. Keratinocytes are able to sense invading S. aureus and to initiate a fast defense reaction by the rapid release of innate defense mediators such as antimicrobial peptides and cytokines. There is increasing evidence that the cytokines IL-1alpha and IL-1beta, which both signal through the IL-1 receptor, play an important role in cutaneous defense against S. aureus. The aim of this study was to gain more insight into the underlying mechanisms leading to the S. aureus-induced IL-1alpha and IL-1beta expression in keratinocytes. Infection of human primary keratinocytes with S. aureus led to the induction of gene expression and protein secretion of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta. Full S. aureus-induced IL-1 protein release required the inflammasome components caspase-1 and ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD whereas gene induction of IL-1alpha and IL-beta by S. aureus was not dependent on caspase-1 and ASC. Since patients receiving anti-cancer therapy by inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR often suffer from skin infections caused by S. aureus we additionally evaluated whether the EGFR pathway may be involved in the IL-1alpha and IL-1beta induction by S. aureus. Inactivation of the EGFR with a blocking antibody decreased the S. aureus-mediated IL-1alpha and IL-1beta induction in primary keratinocytes. Moreover, the use of siRNA experiments revealed that ADAM17 (A Disintegrin and A Metalloprotease 17, a metalloproteinase known to mediate the shedding and release of EGFR ligands, was required for full induction of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta in keratinocytes infected with S. aureus. A failure of keratinocytes to adequately upregulate IL-1alpha and IL-1beta may promote S. aureus skin infections.

  18. The Inflammasome and the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Are Involved in the Staphylococcus aureus-Mediated Induction of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta in Human Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanski, Maren; Rademacher, Franziska; Schröder, Lena; Gläser, Regine; Harder, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is an important pathogen causing various infections including those of the skin. Keratinocytes are able to sense invading S. aureus and to initiate a fast defense reaction by the rapid release of innate defense mediators such as antimicrobial peptides and cytokines. There is increasing evidence that the cytokines IL-1alpha and IL-1beta, which both signal through the IL-1 receptor, play an important role in cutaneous defense against S. aureus. The aim of this study was to gain more insight into the underlying mechanisms leading to the S. aureus-induced IL-1alpha and IL-1beta expression in keratinocytes. Infection of human primary keratinocytes with S. aureus led to the induction of gene expression and protein secretion of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta. Full S. aureus-induced IL-1 protein release required the inflammasome components caspase-1 and ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD) whereas gene induction of IL-1alpha and IL-beta by S. aureus was not dependent on caspase-1 and ASC. Since patients receiving anti-cancer therapy by inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) often suffer from skin infections caused by S. aureus we additionally evaluated whether the EGFR pathway may be involved in the IL-1alpha and IL-1beta induction by S. aureus. Inactivation of the EGFR with a blocking antibody decreased the S. aureus-mediated IL-1alpha and IL-1beta induction in primary keratinocytes. Moreover, the use of siRNA experiments revealed that ADAM17 (A Disintegrin and A Metalloprotease 17), a metalloproteinase known to mediate the shedding and release of EGFR ligands, was required for full induction of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta in keratinocytes infected with S. aureus. A failure of keratinocytes to adequately upregulate IL-1alpha and IL-1beta may promote S. aureus skin infections.

  19. C-NH2 bond formation mediated by iridium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Inmaculada; Casado, Miguel A; Polo, Víctor; García-Orduña, Pilar; Lahoz, Fernando J; Oro, Luis A

    2014-09-01

    In the presence of phosphanes (PR3 ), the amido-bridged trinuclear complex [{Ir(μ-NH2 )(tfbb)}3 ] (tfbb=tetrafluorobenzobarrelene) transforms into mononuclear discrete compounds [Ir(1,2-η(2) -4-κ-C12 H8 F4 N)(PR3 )3 ], which are the products of the CN coupling between the amido moiety and a vinylic carbon of the diolefin. An alternative synthetic approach to these species involves the reaction of the 18 e(-) complex [Ir(Cl)(tfbb)(PMePh2 )2 ] with gaseous ammonia and additional phosphane. DFT studies show that both transformations occur through nucleophilic attack. In the first case the amido moiety attacks a diolefin coordinated to a neighboring molecule following a bimolecular mechanism induced by the highly basic NH2 moiety; the second pathway involves a direct nucleophilic attack of ammonia to a coordinated tfbb molecule. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Epidermal growth factor (EGF and interleukin (IL-1β synergistically promote ERK1/2-mediated invasive breast ductal cancer cell migration and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Liqiang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with invasive breast ductal carcinoma (IBDC with metastasis have a very poor prognosis. Little is known about the synergistic action of growth and inflammatory factors in IBDC metastases. Methods The expression of activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (phosphorylated or p-ERK1/2 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in IBDC tissue samples from 80 cases. BT474 IBDC cell migration and invasion were quantified using the Transwell assay. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 expression and activity were analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blotting and zymography. Activator protein (AP-1 activity was measured with a luciferase reporter gene assay. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test, Chi-square test, the partition of Chi-square test, independent t-test, and Spearman’s method were used for the statistical analysis. Results Phosphorylated ERK1/2 was detected in 58/80 (72.5% IBDC tissues, and was associated with higher TNM stage and lymph node metastasis, but not patient age or tumor size. Individually, epidermal growth factor (EGF, and interleukin (IL-1β activated ERK1/2, increased cell migration and invasion, MMP-9 expression and activity, AP-1 activation in vitro and the expression of p-ERK1/2 was positively correlated with EGF expression levels, as well as IL-1β, MMP-9 and c-fos in IBDC tissue samples. Co-stimulation with EGF and IL-1β synergistically increased ERK1/2 and AP-1 activation, cell migration and invasion, and MMP-9 expression and activity. Inhibition of ERK1/2 using U0126 or siRNA abolished EGF and/or IL-1β-induced cell migration and invasion in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion Activated ERK1/2 was associated with higher TNM stage and lymph node metastasis in IBDC. Both in vitro and in vivo studies indicated that ERK-1/2 activation may increase the metastatic ability of IBDC cells. Growth and inflammatory factors synergistically induced IBDC cell migration and invasion via ERK1/2 signaling, AP-1 activation

  1. Transition metal complexes as mediator-titrants in protein redox potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Paul V; Chen, Kuan-I; Sharpe, Philip C

    2006-10-01

    A selection of nine macrocyclic Fe(III/II) and Co(III/II) transition metal complexes has been chosen to serve as a universal set of mediator-titrants in redox potentiometry of protein samples. The potential range spanned by these mediators is approximately from +300 to -700 mV vs the normal hydrogen electrode, which covers the range of most protein redox potentials accessible in aqueous solution. The complexes employed exhibit stability in both their oxidized and their reduced forms as well as pH-independent redox potentials within the range 6 < pH < 9. The mediators were also chosen on the basis of their very weak visible absorption maxima in both oxidation states, which will enable (for the first time) optical redox potentiometric titrations of proteins with relatively low extinction coefficients. This has previously been impractical with organic mediators, such as indoles, viologens and quinones, whose optical spectra interfere strongly with those of the protein.

  2. A standardized method for quantitating the complement-mediated immune complex solubilizing capacity of human serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, G; Peterson, I; Svehag, S E;

    1983-01-01

    A standardized radioassay for measuring the complement-mediated immune complex solubilizing capacity (CMSC) and the initial kinetics of the solubilization (IKS) reaction is described. The total complement (C)-mediated solubilizing capacity was determined after incubation of diluted serum and 125I......-BSA-anti-BSA. Percentage C-mediated solubilization (CMS) was measured after centrifugation by determining the distribution of radioactivity. The dependency of CMSC upon factors such as serum dilution and buffer system used, amount of IC added to serum, serum storage conditions and centrifugation conditions...

  3. Penile Epidermal Inclusion Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. El-Shazly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of epidermal inclusion cyst in a 32-year-old male. This was a complication of circumcision that was neglected over years to form stones and urethrocutaneous fistula. Complete excision of the cyst and repair of the fistula were performed successfully. Histopathological examination confirmed our diagnosis.

  4. Generalization mediates sensitivity to complex odor features in the honeybee.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine A Wright

    Full Text Available Animals use odors as signals for mate, kin, and food recognition, a strategy which appears ubiquitous and successful despite the high intrinsic variability of naturally-occurring odor quantities. Stimulus generalization, or the ability to decide that two objects, though readily distinguishable, are similar enough to afford the same consequence, could help animals adjust to variation in odor signals without losing sensitivity to key inter-stimulus differences. The present study was designed to investigate whether an animal's ability to generalize learned associations to novel odors can be influenced by the nature of the associated outcome. We use a classical conditioning paradigm for studying olfactory learning in honeybees to show that honeybees conditioned on either a fixed- or variable-proportion binary odor mixture generalize learned responses to novel proportions of the same mixture even when inter-odor differences are substantial. We also show that the resulting olfactory generalization gradients depend critically on both the nature of the stimulus-reward paradigm and the intrinsic variability of the conditioned stimulus. The reward dependency we observe must be cognitive rather than perceptual in nature, and we argue that outcome-dependent generalization is necessary for maintaining sensitivity to inter-odor differences in complex olfactory scenes.

  5. NMNAT2:HSP90 Complex Mediates Proteostasis in Proteinopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousuf O Ali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase 2 (NMNAT2 is neuroprotective in numerous preclinical models of neurodegeneration. Here, we show that brain nmnat2 mRNA levels correlate positively with global cognitive function and negatively with AD pathology. In AD brains, NMNAT2 mRNA and protein levels are reduced. NMNAT2 shifts its solubility and colocalizes with aggregated Tau in AD brains, similar to chaperones, which aid in the clearance or refolding of misfolded proteins. Investigating the mechanism of this observation, we discover a novel chaperone function of NMNAT2, independent from its enzymatic activity. NMNAT2 complexes with heat shock protein 90 (HSP90 to refold aggregated protein substrates. NMNAT2's refoldase activity requires a unique C-terminal ATP site, activated in the presence of HSP90. Furthermore, deleting NMNAT2 function increases the vulnerability of cortical neurons to proteotoxic stress and excitotoxicity. Interestingly, NMNAT2 acts as a chaperone to reduce proteotoxic stress, while its enzymatic activity protects neurons from excitotoxicity. Taken together, our data indicate that NMNAT2 exerts its chaperone or enzymatic function in a context-dependent manner to maintain neuronal health.

  6. A linear polyethylenimine mediated siRNA-based therapy targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor in SPC-A1 xenograft mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pinghai; Xu, Nuo; Zhou, Lei; Xu, Xin; Wang, Yuehong; Li, Ka; Zeng, Zhaochong; Wang, Xiangdong; Zhang, Xin; Bai, Chunxue

    2013-12-01

    Linear polyethylenimine (LPEI) is considered as a desirable gene in vivo delivery system, but whether it could deliver the specific siRNA targeted EGFR to the tumor site to inhibit the growth of NSCLC xenograft in nude mice still needs to be examined. In this study, LPEI/siRNA was made into a complex and SPC-A1-xenografted mice model was established. Then, stable LPEI/siRNA-EGFR complexes were intraperitoneally administrated. Afterwards, tumor growth was measured every 3 days. At the end of the experiment, tumor volume was calculated, and tumors were weighed, and examined for EGFR expression, proliferation, and apoptosis evaluations. By using blood samples, toxicity tests including aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), urea and creatinine (Cr) were measured for liver and renal function evaluation. Serum concentrations of TNF-α and IFN-γ were also examined. Our results demonstrated that LPEI/siRNA-EGFR complexes could downregulate EGFR expression in SPC-A1 xenografted tumor upon single i.p. injection. LPEI/siRNA-EGFR complexes inhibited tumor growth and did not induce organ toxicity in SPC-A1-xenografted mice. At the end of the experiment no significant IFN-α increase was detected in LPEI/siRNA complexes or glucose-treated groups. The novel modality of siRNA-based therapy targeting EGFR may be of great potential in NSCLC treatment.

  7. Functional cyclic AMP response element in the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) promoter modulates epidermal growth factor receptor pathway- or androgen withdrawal-mediated BCRP/ABCG2 transcription in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Natarajan, Karthika; Safren, Lowell; Hamburger, Anne W; Hussain, Arif; Ross, Douglas D

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorylated cyclic-AMP (cAMP) response element binding protein (p-CREB) is a downstream effector of a variety of important signaling pathways. We investigated whether the human BCRP promoter contains a functional cAMP response element (CRE). 8Br-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, increased the activity of a BCRP promoter reporter construct and BCRP mRNA in human carcinoma cells. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway activation also led to an increase in p-CREB and in BCRP promoter reporter activity via two major downstream EGFR signaling pathways: the phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, AKT, ERK and CREB, while simultaneously enhancing BCRP mRNA and functional protein expression. EGF-stimulated CREB phosphorylation and BCRP induction were diminished by inhibition of EGFR, PI3K/AKT or RAS/MAPK signaling. CREB silencing using RNA interference reduced basal levels of BCRP mRNA and diminished the induction of BCRP by EGF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that a putative CRE site on the BCRP promoter bound p-CREB by a point mutation of the CRE site abolished EGF-induced stimulation of BCRP promoter reporter activity. Furthermore, the CREB co-activator, cAMP-regulated transcriptional co-activator (CRTC2), is involved in CREB-mediated BCRP transcription: androgen depletion of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells increased both CREB phosphorylation and CRTC2 nuclear translocation, and enhanced BCRP expression. Silencing CREB or CRTC2 reduced basal BCRP expression and BCRP induction under androgen-depletion conditions. This novel CRE site plays a central role in mediating BCRP gene expression in several human cancer cell lines following activation of multiple cancer-relevant signaling pathways.

  8. The epidermal growth factor receptor is a regulator of epidermal complement component expression and complement activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Humaidan, Anas H A; Ananthoju, Nageshwar; Mohanty, Tirthankar;

    2014-01-01

    The complement system is activated in response to tissue injury. During wound healing, complement activation seems beneficial in acute wounds but may be detrimental in chronic wounds. We found that the epidermal expression of many complement components was only increased to a minor extent in skin...... wounds in vivo and in cultured keratinocytes after exposure to supernatant from stimulated mononuclear cells. In contrast, the epidermal expression of complement components was downregulated in ex vivo injured skin lacking the stimulation from infiltrating inflammatory cells but with intact injury......-induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated growth factor response. In cultured primary keratinocytes, stimulation with the potent EGFR ligand, TGF-α, yielded a significant downregulation of complement component expression. Indeed, EGFR inhibition significantly enhanced the induction of complement...

  9. Core Self-Evaluations as Causes of Satisfaction: The Mediating Role of Seeking Task Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Abhishek; Locke, Edwin A.; Judge, Timothy A.; Adams, John W.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the mediating role of task complexity in the relationship between core self-evaluations (CSE) and satisfaction. In Study 1, eighty three undergraduate business students worked on a strategic decision-making simulation. The simulated environment enabled us to verify the temporal sequence of variables, use an objective measure of…

  10. Core Self-Evaluations as Causes of Satisfaction: The Mediating Role of Seeking Task Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Abhishek; Locke, Edwin A.; Judge, Timothy A.; Adams, John W.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the mediating role of task complexity in the relationship between core self-evaluations (CSE) and satisfaction. In Study 1, eighty three undergraduate business students worked on a strategic decision-making simulation. The simulated environment enabled us to verify the temporal sequence of variables, use an objective measure of…

  11. Peer-Mediated vs. Individual Writing: Measuring Fluency, Complexity, and Accuracy in Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Maryam; Modirkhamene, Sima; Sadeghi, Karim

    2017-01-01

    Drawing upon Vygotsky's Sociocultural Theory (SCT), this study aimed at investigating the effect of two writing modes, namely, peer-mediated/collaborative vs. individual writing on measures of fluency, accuracy, and complexity of female EFL learners' writing. Based on an in-house placement test and the First Certificate in English writing paper, a…

  12. Electron Transfer Mediators for Photoelectrochemical Cells Based on Cu(I Metal Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Brugnati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and the photoelectrochemical characterization of a series of bipyridine and pyridyl-quinoline Cu(I complexes, used as electron transfer mediators in regenerative photoelectrochemical cells, are reported. The best performing mediators produced maximum IPCEs of the order of 35–40%. The J-V curves recorded under monochromatic light showed that the selected Cu(I/(II couples generated higher Vocs and fill factors compared to an equivalent I-/I3- cell, due to a decreased dark current.

  13. Baclofen, a GABABR agonist, ameliorates immune-complex mediated acute lung injury by modulating pro-inflammatory mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shunying; Merchant, Michael L; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; McLeish, Kenneth R; Lederer, Eleanor D; Torres-Gonzalez, Edilson; Fraig, Mostafa; Barati, Michelle T; Lentsch, Alex B; Roman, Jesse; Klein, Jon B; Rane, Madhavi J

    2015-01-01

    Immune-complexes play an important role in the inflammatory diseases of the lung. Neutrophil activation mediates immune-complex (IC) deposition-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Components of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) signaling, including GABA B receptor 2 (GABABR2), GAD65/67 and the GABA transporter, are present in the lungs and in the neutrophils. However, the role of pulmonary GABABR activation in the context of neutrophil-mediated ALI has not been determined. Thus, the objective of the current study was to determine whether administration of a GABABR agonist, baclofen would ameliorate or exacerbate ALI. We hypothesized that baclofen would regulate IC-induced ALI by preserving pulmonary GABABR expression. Rats were subjected to sham injury or IC-induced ALI and two hours later rats were treated intratracheally with saline or 1 mg/kg baclofen for 2 additional hours and sacrificed. ALI was assessed by vascular leakage, histology, TUNEL, and lung caspase-3 cleavage. ALI increased total protein, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α and interleukin-1 receptor associated protein (IL-1R AcP), in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Moreover, ALI decreased lung GABABR2 expression, increased phospho-p38 MAPK, promoted IκB degradation and increased neutrophil influx in the lung. Administration of baclofen, after initiation of ALI, restored GABABR expression, which was inhibited in the presence of a GABABR antagonist, CGP52432. Baclofen administration activated pulmonary phospho-ERK and inhibited p38 MAPK phosphorylation and IκB degradation. Additionally, baclofen significantly inhibited pro-inflammatory TNF-α and IL-1βAcP release and promoted BAL neutrophil apoptosis. Protective effects of baclofen treatment on ALI were possibly mediated by inhibition of TNF-α- and IL-1β-mediated inflammatory signaling. Interestingly, GABABR2 expression was regulated in the type II pneumocytes in lung tissue sections from lung injured patients, further suggesting a

  14. Baclofen, a GABABR agonist, ameliorates immune-complex mediated acute lung injury by modulating pro-inflammatory mediators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunying Jin

    Full Text Available Immune-complexes play an important role in the inflammatory diseases of the lung. Neutrophil activation mediates immune-complex (IC deposition-induced acute lung injury (ALI. Components of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA signaling, including GABA B receptor 2 (GABABR2, GAD65/67 and the GABA transporter, are present in the lungs and in the neutrophils. However, the role of pulmonary GABABR activation in the context of neutrophil-mediated ALI has not been determined. Thus, the objective of the current study was to determine whether administration of a GABABR agonist, baclofen would ameliorate or exacerbate ALI. We hypothesized that baclofen would regulate IC-induced ALI by preserving pulmonary GABABR expression. Rats were subjected to sham injury or IC-induced ALI and two hours later rats were treated intratracheally with saline or 1 mg/kg baclofen for 2 additional hours and sacrificed. ALI was assessed by vascular leakage, histology, TUNEL, and lung caspase-3 cleavage. ALI increased total protein, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α and interleukin-1 receptor associated protein (IL-1R AcP, in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF. Moreover, ALI decreased lung GABABR2 expression, increased phospho-p38 MAPK, promoted IκB degradation and increased neutrophil influx in the lung. Administration of baclofen, after initiation of ALI, restored GABABR expression, which was inhibited in the presence of a GABABR antagonist, CGP52432. Baclofen administration activated pulmonary phospho-ERK and inhibited p38 MAPK phosphorylation and IκB degradation. Additionally, baclofen significantly inhibited pro-inflammatory TNF-α and IL-1βAcP release and promoted BAL neutrophil apoptosis. Protective effects of baclofen treatment on ALI were possibly mediated by inhibition of TNF-α- and IL-1β-mediated inflammatory signaling. Interestingly, GABABR2 expression was regulated in the type II pneumocytes in lung tissue sections from lung injured patients, further suggesting

  15. Polymorphism of DNA-anionic liposome complexes reveals hierarchy of ion-mediated interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hongjun; Harries, Daniel; Wong, Gerard C L

    2005-08-09

    Self-assembled DNA delivery systems based on anionic lipids (ALs) complexed with DNA mediated by divalent cations have been recently introduced as an alternative to cationic lipid-DNA complexes because of their low cytotoxicity. We investigate AL-DNA complexes induced by different cations by using synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering and confocal microscopy to show how different ion-mediated interactions are expressed in the self-assembled structures and phase behavior of AL-DNA complexes. The governing interactions in AL-DNA systems are complex: divalent ions can mediate strong attractions between different combinations of the components (such as DNA-DNA and membrane-membrane). Moreover, divalent cations can coordinate non-electrostatically with lipids and modify the resultant membrane structure. We find that at low membrane charge densities AL-DNA complexes organize into a lamellar structure of alternating DNA and membrane layers crosslinked by ions. At high membrane charge densities, a new phase with no analog in cationic lipid-DNA systems is observed: DNA is expelled from the complex, and a lamellar stack of membranes and intercalated ions is formed. For a subset of the ionic species, high ion concentrations generate an inverted hexagonal phase comprised of DNA strands wrapped by ion-coated lipid tubes. A simple theoretical model that takes into account the electrostatic and membrane elastic contributions to the free energy shows that this transition is consistent with an ion-induced change in the membrane spontaneous curvature, c0. Moreover, the crossover between the lamellar and inverted hexagonal phases occurs at a critical c0 that agrees well with experimental values.

  16. The structure of an LIM-only protein 4 (LMO4 and Deformed epidermal autoregulatory factor-1 (DEAF1 complex reveals a common mode of binding to LMO4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Joseph

    Full Text Available LIM-domain only protein 4 (LMO4 is a widely expressed protein with important roles in embryonic development and breast cancer. It has been reported to bind many partners, including the transcription factor Deformed epidermal autoregulatory factor-1 (DEAF1, with which LMO4 shares many biological parallels. We used yeast two-hybrid assays to show that DEAF1 binds both LIM domains of LMO4 and that DEAF1 binds the same face on LMO4 as two other LMO4-binding partners, namely LIM domain binding protein 1 (LDB1 and C-terminal binding protein interacting protein (CtIP/RBBP8. Mutagenic screening analysed by the same method, indicates that the key residues in the interaction lie in LMO4LIM2 and the N-terminal half of the LMO4-binding domain in DEAF1. We generated a stable LMO4LIM2-DEAF1 complex and determined the solution structure of that complex. Although the LMO4-binding domain from DEAF1 is intrinsically disordered, it becomes structured on binding. The structure confirms that LDB1, CtIP and DEAF1 all bind to the same face on LMO4. LMO4 appears to form a hub in protein-protein interaction networks, linking numerous pathways within cells. Competitive binding for LMO4 therefore most likely provides a level of regulation between those different pathways.

  17. Structural basis for Spt5-mediated recruitment of the Paf1 complex to chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wier, Adam D; Mayekar, Manasi K; Héroux, Annie; Arndt, Karen M; VanDemark, Andrew P

    2013-10-22

    Polymerase associated factor 1 complex (Paf1C) broadly influences gene expression by regulating chromatin structure and the recruitment of RNA-processing factors during transcription elongation. The Plus3 domain of the Rtf1 subunit mediates Paf1C recruitment to genes by binding a repeating domain within the elongation factor Spt5 (suppressor of Ty). Here we provide a molecular description of this interaction by reporting the structure of human Rtf1 Plus3 in complex with a phosphorylated Spt5 repeat. We find that Spt5 binding is mediated by an extended surface containing phosphothreonine recognition and hydrophobic interfaces that interact with residues outside the Spt5 motif. Changes within these interfaces diminish binding of Spt5 in vitro and chromatin localization of Rtf1 in vivo. The structure reveals the basis for recognition of the repeat motif of Spt5, a key player in the recruitment of gene regulatory factors to RNA polymerase II.

  18. Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated cell death via impairing electron transport chain complex III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seokheon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Hwang, Joohyun [Department of Molecular Biology, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Ki Soon [Department of Biology, Department of Life and Nanopharmaceutical Sciences, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Shin Jung, E-mail: sjkang@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Biology, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Heptachlor inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. •Heptachlor promoted generation of reactive oxygen species. •Heptachlor induced Bax activation. •Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis. -- Abstract: Environmental toxins like pesticides have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Epidemiological studies suggested that exposures to organochlorine pesticides have an association with an increased PD risk. In the present study, we examined the mechanism of toxicity induced by an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor. In a human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, heptachlor induced both morphological and functional damages in mitochondria. Interestingly, the compound inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. Rapid generation of reactive oxygen species and the activation of Bax were then detected. Subsequently, mitochondria-mediated, caspase-dependent apoptosis followed. Our results raise a possibility that an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor can act as a neurotoxicant associated with PD.

  19. Transferrin serves as a mediator to deliver organometallic ruthenium(II) anticancer complexes into cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Luo, Qun; Li, Xianchan; Zhao, Yao; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Wang, Fuyi

    2013-05-06

    We report herein a systematic study on interactions of organometallic ruthenium(II) anticancer complex [(η(6)-arene)Ru(en)Cl](+) (arene = p-cymene (1) or biphenyl (2), en = ethylenediamine) with human transferrin (hTf) and the effects of the hTf-ligation on the bioavailability of these complexes with cisplatin as a reference. Incubated with a 5-fold excess of complex 1, 2, or cisplatin, 1 mol of diferric hTf (holo-hTf) attached 0.62 mol of 1, 1.01 mol of 2, or 2.14 mol of cisplatin. Mass spectrometry revealed that both ruthenium complexes coordinated to N-donors His242, His273, His578, and His606, whereas cisplatin bound to O donors Tyr136 and Tyr317 and S-donor Met256 in addition to His273 and His578 on the surface of both apo- and holo-hTf. Moreover, cisplatin could bind to Thr457 within the C-lobe iron binding cleft of apo-hTf. Neither ruthenium nor platinum binding interfered with the recognition of holo-hTf by the transferrin receptor (TfR). The ruthenated/platinated holo-hTf complexes could be internalized via TfR-mediated endocytosis at a similar rate to that of holo-hTf itself. Moreover, the binding to holo-hTf well preserved the bioavailability of the ruthenium complexes, and the hTf-bound 1 and 2 showed a similar cytotoxicity toward the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 to those of the complexes themselves. However, the conjugation with holo-hTf significantly reduced the cellular uptake of cisplatin and the amount of platinated DNA adducts formed intracellularly, leading to dramatic reduction of cisplatin cytotoxicity toward MCF-7. These findings suggest that hTf can serve as a mediator for the targeting delivery of Ru(arene) anticancer complexes while deactivating cisplatin.

  20. Cephalosporin Induced Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis and Subsequent Penicillin Drug Exanthem

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda Lam; Inderpal Randhawa; William Klaustermeyer

    2008-01-01

    Background: Drug hypersensitivity is classically divided into IgE mediated and non-IgE mediated disease. We report a rare case of consequent IgE mediated and non-IgE mediated reactions within the beta lactam class of antibiotics. Case Summary: An 84-year-old man developed toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) due to ceftriaxone, a third generation cephalosporin, involving 72% of the body surface area. The patient recovered but within weeks subsequently developed an acute IgE mediated allergic r...

  1. Epidermal cell death in frogs with chytridiomycosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Alexandra A.; Skerratt, Lee F.; Berger, Lee

    2017-01-01

    Background Amphibians are declining at an alarming rate, and one of the major causes of decline is the infectious disease chytridiomycosis. Parasitic fungal sporangia occur within epidermal cells causing epidermal disruption, but these changes have not been well characterised. Apoptosis (planned cell death) can be a damaging response to the host but may alternatively be a mechanism of pathogen removal for some intracellular infections. Methods In this study we experimentally infected two endangered amphibian species Pseudophryne corroboree and Litoria verreauxii alpina with the causal agent of chytridiomycosis. We quantified cell death in the epidermis through two assays: terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labelling (TUNEL) and caspase 3/7. Results Cell death was positively associated with infection load and morbidity of clinically infected animals. In infected amphibians, TUNEL positive cells were concentrated in epidermal layers, correlating to the localisation of infection within the skin. Caspase activity was stable and low in early infection, where pathogen loads were light but increasing. In animals that recovered from infection, caspase activity gradually returned to normal as the infection cleared. Whereas, in amphibians that did not recover, caspase activity increased dramatically when infection loads peaked. Discussion Increased cell death may be a pathology of the fungal parasite, likely contributing to loss of skin homeostatic functions, but it is also possible that apoptosis suppression may be used initially by the pathogen to help establish infection. Further research should explore the specific mechanisms of cell death and more specifically apoptosis regulation during fungal infection. PMID:28168107

  2. Dia2 controls transcription by mediating assembly of the RSC complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J Andress

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dia2 is an F-box protein found in the budding yeast, S. cerevisiae. Together with Skp1 and Cul1, Dia2 forms the substrate-determining part of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, otherwise known as the SCF. Dia2 has previously been implicated in the control of replication and genome stability via its interaction with the replisome progression complex. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified components of the RSC chromatin remodelling complex as genetic interactors with Dia2, suggesting an additional role for Dia2 in the regulation of transcription. We show that Dia2 is involved in controlling assembly of the RSC complex. RSC belongs to a group of ATP-dependent nucleosome-remodelling complexes that controls the repositioning of nucleosomes. The RSC complex is expressed abundantly and its 17 subunits are recruited to chromatin in response to both transcription activation and repression. In the absence of Dia2, RSC-mediated transcription regulation was impaired, with concomitant abnormalities in nucleosome positioning. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings imply that Dia2 is required for the correct assembly and function of the RSC complex. Dia2, by controlling the RSC chromatin remodeller, fine-tunes transcription by controlling nucleosome positioning during transcriptional activation and repression.

  3. Identifying causal gateways and mediators in complex spatio-temporal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Jakob; Petoukhov, Vladimir; Donges, Jonathan; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Jajcay, Nikola; Vejmelka, Martin; Hartman, David; Marwan, Norbert; Palus, Milan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Identifying regions important for spreading and mediating perturbations is crucial to assess the susceptibilities of spatio-temporal complex systems such as the Earth's climate to volcanic eruptions, extreme events or geoengineering. Here a data-driven approach is introduced based on a dimension reduction, causal reconstruction, and novel network measures based on causal effect theory that go beyond standard complex network tools by distinguishing direct from indirect pathways. Applied to a data set of atmospheric dynamics, the method identifies several strongly uplifting regions acting as major gateways of perturbations spreading in the atmosphere. Additionally, the method provides a stricter statistical approach to pathways of atmospheric teleconnections, yielding insights into the Pacific-Indian Ocean interaction relevant for monsoonal dynamics. The novel causal interaction perspective provides a complementary approach to simulations or experiments for understanding the functioning of complex spatio-temporal systems with potential applications in increasing their resilience to shocks or extreme events. Reference: Runge, J., Petoukhov, V., Donges, J. F., Hlinka, J., Jajcay, N., Vejmelka, M., Hartman, D., Marwan, M., Paluš, M., Kurths, J. (2015). Identifying causal gateways and mediators in complex spatio-temporal systems. Nature Communications, 6, 8502. doi:10.1038/ncomms9502

  4. Differential role of lipocalin-2 during immune-complex mediated acute and chronic inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashidharamurthy, Rangaiah; Machiah, Deepa; Aitken, Jesse D; Putty, Kalyani; Srinivasan, Gayathri; Chassaing, Benoit; Parkos, Charles A; Selvaraj, Periasamy; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Lipocalin-2 (Lcn2) is an innate immune protein expressed by a variety of cells and is highly upregulated during several pathological conditions including immune-complex (IC) mediated inflammatory/autoimmune disorders. However, the function of Lcn2 during IC-mediated inflammation is largely unknown. Therefore our objective was to investigate the role of Lcn2 in IC-mediated diseases. Methods The upregulation of Lcn2 was determined by ELISA in three different mouse models of IC-mediated autoimmune disease: systemic lupus erythematosus, collagen-induced arthritis and serum-induced arthritis. The in vivo role of Lcn2 during IC-mediated inflammation was investigated using Lcn2 knockout (Lcn2KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates. Results Lcn2 levels were significantly elevated in all the three autoimmune disease models. Further, in an acute skin inflammation model, Lcn2KO mice demonstrated a 50% reduction in inflammation with histopathological analysis revealing strikingly reduced immune cell infiltration compared to WT mice. Administration of recombinant Lcn2 to Lcn2KO mice restored inflammation to levels observed in WT mice. Neutralization of Lcn2 using a monoclonal antibody significantly reduced inflammation in WT mice. In contrast, Lcn2KO mice developed more severe serum-induced arthritis compared to WT mice. Histological analysis revealed extensive tissue and bone destruction with significantly reduced neutrophil infiltration but considerably more macrophage migration in Lcn2KO mice when compared to WT. Conclusion These results demonstrate that Lcn2 may regulate immune cell recruitment to the site of inflammation, a process essential for the controlled initiation, perpetuation and resolution of inflammatory processes. Thus, Lcn2 may present a promising target in the treatment of IC-mediated inflammatory/autoimmune diseases. PMID:23280250

  5. Intracellular transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor by α1A-adrenoceptor is mediated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase independently of activation of extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 and serine-threonine kinases in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulu, Nadir; Henning, Robert H; Guner, Sahika; Zoto, Teuta; Duman-Dalkilic, Basak; Duin, Marry; Gurdal, Hakan

    2013-10-01

    Transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by α1-adrenoceptor (α1-AR) is implicated in contraction and hypertrophy of vascular smooth muscle (VSM). We examine whether all α1-AR subtypes transactivate EGFR and explore the mechanism of transactivation. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably expressing one subtype of α1-AR were transiently transfected with EGFR. The transactivation mechanism was examined both by coexpression of a chimeric erythropoietin (EPO)-EGFR with an extracellular EPO and intracellular EGFR domain, and by pharmacologic inhibition of external and internal signaling routes. All three α1-AR subtypes transactivated EGFR, which was dependent on the increase in intracellular calcium. The EGFR kinase inhibitor AG1478 [4-(3'-chloroanilino)-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline] abrogated α1A-AR and α1D-AR induced phosphorylation of EGFR, but both the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases by GM6001 [(R)-N4-hydroxy-N(1)-[(S)-2-(1H-indol-3-yl)-1-methylcarbamoyl-ethyl]-2-isobutyl-succinamide] or blockade of EGFR by cetuximab did not. Stimulation of α1A-AR and α1D-AR also induced phosphorylation of EPO-EGFR chimeric receptors. Moreover, α1A-AR stimulation enhanced phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and serine-threonine kinases (Akt), which were both unaffected by AG1478, indicating that ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation is independent of EGFR transactivation. Accordingly, inhibitors of ERK1/2 or Akt did not influence the α1A-AR-mediated EGFR transactivation. Inhibition of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and Src, however, did block EGFR transactivation by α1A-AR and α1D-AR. These findings demonstrate that all α1-AR subtypes transactivate EGFR, which is dependent on an intracellular signaling route involving an increase in calcium and activation of CaMKII, PI3K, and Src, but not the of ERK1/2 and Akt pathways.

  6. Self-made amniotic carrier complex implanted with epidermal cells for full-thickness skin defects%自制羊膜载体复合物植入表皮细胞修复全层皮肤缺损

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    富玲; 宋宁; 苏学忠; 于宁; 孙佩杰; 李娜然; 杨晓霞

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The composite skin developed by using tissue engineering and cell culture technology is still not an ideal artificial skin, which is limited by weak local skin, poor tensile strength and resistance to friction and no skin appendages.OBJECTIVE:To observe the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor and vitamin C epidermal cell composite transplantation on full-thickness skin defects and to investigate the optimal time promoting the epidermal growth.METHODS:A total of 36 New Zealand white rabbits were prepared for three full-thickness skin defect models at the back. The self-made amnion carrying composite with basic fibroblast growth factor and vitamin C, pure amnion carrying composite, pure capping were implanted into the three defects, and were randomly divided into three groups. Epidermal cells were implanted into the site in related groups after 7, 14, and 21 days. After 7 days, general observation, histological observation,immunohistochemical observation were carried out.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:The groups with autologuos epidermal cells implantation at 21 days had a better effect that those with autologous epidermal cells implantation at 14 and 7 days. Self-made amniotic carrier complex with basic fibroblast growth factor and vitamin C was superior to pure amnion carrying composite and pure capping. Basic fibroblast growth factor and vitamin C promoted the regeneration and renascence of the dermis. The latter of the dermis repairing and the former of the dermis restoring were the best stage which accelerates the renascence and regeneration of the epidermis.%背景:利用组织工程和细胞培养技术研制的复合皮肤距理想的人工皮肤尚有一定的差距,如局部皮肤薄弱、抗拉及抗摩擦能力差、无皮肤附属器等.目的:观察含碱性成纤维细胞生长因子和维生素C的羊膜载体复合物对皮肤缺损局部真皮组织的修复作用,寻找真皮组织修复重建促进表皮生长的最佳时期.

  7. Structural and biophysical characteristics of human skin in maintaining proper epidermal barrier function

    OpenAIRE

    Boer, Magdalena; Duchnik, Ewa; Maleszka, Romuald; Marchlewicz, Mariola

    2016-01-01

    The complex structure of human skin and its physicochemical properties turn it into an efficient outermost defence line against exogenous factors, and help maintain homeostasis of the human body. This role is played by the epidermal barrier with its major part – stratum corneum. The condition of the epidermal barrier depends on individual and environmental factors. The most important biophysical parameters characterizing the status of this barrier are the skin pH, epidermal hydration, transep...

  8. A study of the Fenton-mediated oxidation of methylene blue-cucurbit[n]uril complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuenzalida, Tomás; Fuentealba, Denis

    2015-04-01

    Cucurbit[n]urils efficiently decreased the Fenton-mediated oxidation of encapsulated dyes, providing a mechanism for some control and selectivity over the degradation. The encapsulation of methylene blue into cucurbit[7]uril made it highly refractory against Fenton oxidation in the dark or under UVA light irradiation. However, the oxidation of the encapsulated dye was significantly enhanced under visible light irradiation. This behavior was selective for the cucurbit[7]uril complex and not for the cucurbit[8]uril complex, which achieved the same degree of protection irrespective of the irradiation conditions. This different reactivity of the complexes was further discussed in terms of their excited state properties. The main mechanism for protection was the seclusion of the dye into cucurbit[n]urils as shown by the fact that the non-encapsulated dye safranin was protected much less than methylene blue. Additionally, cucurbit[n]urils efficiently trapped hydroxyl radicals, which contributed significantly to the protection of the dyes from Fenton-mediated oxidation.

  9. The talin head domain reinforces integrin-mediated adhesion by promoting adhesion complex stability and clustering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J Ellis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Talin serves an essential function during integrin-mediated adhesion in linking integrins to actin via the intracellular adhesion complex. In addition, the N-terminal head domain of talin regulates the affinity of integrins for their ECM-ligands, a process known as inside-out activation. We previously showed that in Drosophila, mutating the integrin binding site in the talin head domain resulted in weakened adhesion to the ECM. Intriguingly, subsequent studies showed that canonical inside-out activation of integrin might not take place in flies. Consistent with this, a mutation in talin that specifically blocks its ability to activate mammalian integrins does not significantly impinge on talin function during fly development. Here, we describe results suggesting that the talin head domain reinforces and stabilizes the integrin adhesion complex by promoting integrin clustering distinct from its ability to support inside-out activation. Specifically, we show that an allele of talin containing a mutation that disrupts intramolecular interactions within the talin head attenuates the assembly and reinforcement of the integrin adhesion complex. Importantly, we provide evidence that this mutation blocks integrin clustering in vivo. We propose that the talin head domain is essential for regulating integrin avidity in Drosophila and that this is crucial for integrin-mediated adhesion during animal development.

  10. Snapin mediates insulin secretory granule docking, but not trans-SNARE complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somanath, Sangeeta [Blizard Institute, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, E1 2AT (United Kingdom); Partridge, Christopher J. [Diabetes Research Laboratories, Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Churchill Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX3 7LJ (United Kingdom); Marshall, Catriona [Blizard Institute, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, E1 2AT (United Kingdom); Rowe, Tony [CSL Limited, 45 Poplar Road, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Turner, Mark D., E-mail: mark.turner@ntu.ac.uk [Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research Centre, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, NG11 8NS (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-29

    Secretory granule exocytosis is a tightly regulated process requiring granule targeting, tethering, priming, and membrane fusion. At the heart of this process is the SNARE complex, which drives fusion through a coiled-coil zippering effect mediated by the granule v-SNARE protein, VAMP2, and the plasma membrane t-SNAREs, SNAP-25 and syntaxin-1A. Here we demonstrate that in pancreatic β-cells the SNAP-25 accessory protein, snapin, C-terminal H2 domain binds SNAP-25 through its N-terminal Sn-1 domain. Interestingly whilst snapin binds SNAP-25, there is only modest binding of this complex with syntaxin-1A under resting conditions. Instead synataxin-1A appears to be recruited in response to secretory stimulation. These results indicate that snapin plays a role in tethering insulin granules to the plasma membrane through coiled coil interaction of snapin with SNAP-25, with full granule fusion competency only resulting after subsequent syntaxin-1A recruitment triggered by secretory stimulation. - Highlights: • Snapin mediates granule docking. • Snapin binds SNAP-25. • SNARE complex forms downstream.

  11. Intracellular Transactivation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor by alpha(1A)-Adrenoceptor Is Mediated by Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Independently of Activation of Extracellular Signal Regulated Kinases 1/2 and Serine-Threonine Kinases in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulu, Nadir; Henning, Robert H.; Guner, Sahika; Zoto, Teuta; Duman-Dalkilic, Basak; Duin, Marry; Gurdal, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by alpha(1)-adrenoceptor (alpha(1)-AR) is implicated in contraction and hypertrophy of vascular smooth muscle (VSM). We examine whether all alpha(1)-AR subtypes transactivate EGFR and explore the mechanism of transactivation. Chinese hamster

  12. Targeting epidermal Langerhans cells by epidermal powder immunization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Immune reactions to foreign or self-antigens lead to protective immunity and, sometimes, immune disorders such as allergies and autoimmune diseases. Antigen presenting cells (APC) including epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) play an important role in the course and outcome of the immune reactions. Epidermal powder immunization (EPI) is a technology that offers a tool to manipulate the LCs and the potential to harness the immune reactions towards prevention and treatment of infectious diseases and immune disorders.

  13. Ammonia-Borane and Amine-Borane Dehydrogenation Mediated by Complex Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossin, Andrea; Peruzzini, Maurizio

    2016-08-10

    This review is a comprehensive survey of the last 10 years of research on ammonia-borane and amine-borane dehydrogenation mediated by complex metal hydrides (CMHs), within the broader context of chemical hydrogen storage. The review also collects those cases where CMHs are the catalyst spent form or its resting state. Highlights on the reaction mechanism (strictly dependent on the CMH of choice) and the catalysts efficiency (in terms of equivalents of H2 produced and relative reaction rates) are provided throughout the discussion.

  14. Structure and antagonism of the receptor complex mediated by human TSLP in allergy and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, Kenneth; Peelman, Frank; Braun, Harald; Lopez, Juan; Van Rompaey, Dries; Dansercoer, Ann; Vandenberghe, Isabel; Pauwels, Kris; Tavernier, Jan; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida; De Winter, Hans; Beyaert, Rudi; Lippens, Guy; Savvides, Savvas N

    2017-04-03

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is pivotal to the pathophysiology of widespread allergic diseases mediated by type 2 helper T cell (Th2) responses, including asthma and atopic dermatitis. The emergence of human TSLP as a clinical target against asthma calls for maximally harnessing its therapeutic potential via structural and mechanistic considerations. Here we employ an integrative experimental approach focusing on productive and antagonized TSLP complexes and free cytokine. We reveal how cognate receptor TSLPR allosterically activates TSLP to potentiate the recruitment of the shared interleukin 7 receptor α-chain (IL-7Rα) by leveraging the flexibility, conformational heterogeneity and electrostatics of the cytokine. We further show that the monoclonal antibody Tezepelumab partly exploits these principles to neutralize TSLP activity. Finally, we introduce a fusion protein comprising a tandem of the TSLPR and IL-7Rα extracellular domains, which harnesses the mechanistic intricacies of the TSLP-driven receptor complex to manifest high antagonistic potency.

  15. Transition Metal Polypyridine Complexes: Studies of Mediation in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells and Charge Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, C. Michael [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Prieto, Amy L. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-02-08

    The Elliott group has long been supported by DOE for studies of cobalt(II/III) trisbypiridine (DTB) mediator complexes in dye sensitized solar cells. Previous work demonstrated that Co(II/III) chemistry is sensitive to the environment, showing unprecedented electrode-surface and electrolyte dependant voltammetry. In electrolytes that have large lipophilic cations, voltammetry of the [Co(DTB)3]2+/3+ couple is nearly Nernstian in appearance on nominally oxide-free metal surfaces. In contrast, on semiconductor electrodes in electrolytes with small, hard cations such as Li+, the electron transfer rates are so slow that it is difficult to measure any Faradaic current even at overpotentials of ±1 V. These studies are of direct relevance to the operation of cobalt-based mediators in solar cells. The research has also shown that these mediators are compatible with copper phenantroline based dyes, in contrast to I- due to the insolubility of CuI.

  16. Toxic epidermal necrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelain, Florence; Humbert, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a severe mucocutaneous drug-induced syndrome that causes massive keratinocyte apoptosis and therefore hydro-electrolytic disorders and systemic infection. TEN approximately affects one to two cases per million per year. Mortality rate may reach thirty percent of cases. Thus, TEN constitutes a therapeutic emergency at diagnosis. Typically, clinical examination shows a mucocutaneous detachment involving more than thirty percent of body area. Definitive diagnosis is made on cutaneous biopsy with histological exam that shows the blister of necrotic keratinocytes. Main differential diagnosis are acute staphylococcus epidermis, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, paraneoplastic pemphigus, bullous fixed pigmented erythema, acute lupus erythematosus. In the early days, SCORTEN gives a good estimation and is now widely used as prognostic score. Drugs are generally considered as the main etiology of TEN but in some cases bacterial or viral infections could be involved. Physiopathology remains unclear even if recent advances have reported the possible implication of immune pathways based on activation of T and NK cells. Treatment of TEN requires to be instituted as soon as the diagnosis is made and the patient is preferentially referred to a specialized unit. Supportive care consist of covering areas of cutaneous detachment. No other therapy has demonstrated its efficiency, but high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin might improve the prognosis.

  17. Influence of epidermal growth factor and insulin-like growth factor 1 on nuclear maturation and fertilization of buffalo cumulus oocyte complexes in serum free media and their subsequent development in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, G N; Brady, M S; Sharma, S S

    2005-07-01

    The in vitro maturation, fertilization and development of Indian water buffalo (Bubalus sp.) cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) to blastocysts were studied during culture, either in serum free tissue culture medium 199 (TCM 199) or Waymouth MB (WM). Based on different supplements added to these media, the experimental groups included: (a) no supplement (control); (b) hormones (FSH, LH and oestradiol) (c) Epidermal growth factor (EGF); (d) IGF-1; and (e) EGF + IGF-1. Experiments were conducted to note three end points: (1) nuclear maturation 24 h after culture (eight replicates); (2) fertilization 24 h after insemination (10 replicates); (3) development to blastocysts (nine replicates). The oocytes were cultured in groups of up to five per drop. Using a two-way (5 x 2) factorial model with interactions, the results were compared using generalized linear models with binomial errors and the logit link function. In experiment 1, the proportion of oocytes reaching metaphase II was higher for all the supplement treatments than the control treatment (t = 3.68, p hormone (chi2 = 17.23, p hormones (31.0%, chi2 = 12.5, p = 0.0004), IGF-1 (35.7%, chi2 = 20.53, p produce a significantly higher rate of progression to blastocysts compared to the control. Once again, media had no effect on outcome. It was concluded that maturation, fertilization and development of buffalo oocytes were enhanced by all supplements tested. Enhancement was maximal with the combination of EGF+IGF-1. In contrast, no significant differences were found between the two types of media used.

  18. Structural modeling of HLA-B*1502/peptide/carbamazepine/T-cell receptor complex architecture: implication for the molecular mechanism of carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peng; Zhang, Shilei; Wang, Yewang; Yang, Chao; Huang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Drug-induced adverse reactions are a significant problem in healthcare worldwide and are estimated to cost billions of dollars annually in the United States. A portion of such reactions is observed to strongly associate with certain human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles; one of the strongest associations is the HLA-B*1502 protein with carbamazepine (CBZ)-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) - the odds ratio value can even be higher than one thousand. The particularly strong association in CBZ-induced SJS/TEN suggests that the HLA-B*1502 is not only a genetic marker but also a participant in the pathogenesis of the disease. In the current study, we attempt to computationally model the atomic-level structure of the complete HLA-B*1502/peptide/CBZ/T-cell receptor (TCR) complex architecture based on prior knowledge obtained from epidemiological investigations as well as in vitro and in vivo assays. The model tells a different story about the molecular mechanism of CBZ-induced SJS/TEN from that previously reported for abacavir (ABC)-induced hypersensitivity (HSR); the CBZ molecule is located at the interface between HLA-B*1502/peptide and TCR, directly contacts the P3-P6 residues of antigen peptide, and bound within a pocket region encompassed by two TCR CDR3 fingers. Molecular dynamics simulation and binding energy analysis further reveal that the CBZ shows considerably high affinity to TCR over HLA-B*1502/peptide, which can tightly interact with the former rather than the latter. From the model, two hypotheses are proposed that can well explain most previous observations and are expected to guide next wet-lab experiments. This study could help to promote our understanding of the molecular mechanism and pathological implication underlying CBZ-induced SJS/TEN.

  19. The plant-specific CDKB1-CYCB1 complex mediates homologous recombination repair in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimer, Annika K; Biedermann, Sascha; Harashima, Hirofumi; Roodbarkelari, Farshad; Takahashi, Naoki; Foreman, Julia; Guan, Yonsheng; Pochon, Gaëtan; Heese, Maren; Van Damme, Daniël; Sugimoto, Keiko; Koncz, Csaba; Doerner, Peter; Umeda, Masaaki; Schnittger, Arp

    2016-10-04

    Upon DNA damage, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are typically inhibited to block cell division. In many organisms, however, it has been found that CDK activity is required for DNA repair, especially for homology-dependent repair (HR), resulting in the conundrum how mitotic arrest and repair can be reconciled. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana solves this dilemma by a division of labor strategy. We identify the plant-specific B1-type CDKs (CDKB1s) and the class of B1-type cyclins (CYCB1s) as major regulators of HR in plants. We find that RADIATION SENSITIVE 51 (RAD51), a core mediator of HR, is a substrate of CDKB1-CYCB1 complexes. Conversely, mutants in CDKB1 and CYCB1 fail to recruit RAD51 to damaged DNA CYCB1;1 is specifically activated after DNA damage and we show that this activation is directly controlled by SUPPRESSOR OF GAMMA RESPONSE 1 (SOG1), a transcription factor that acts similarly to p53 in animals. Thus, while the major mitotic cell-cycle activity is blocked after DNA damage, CDKB1-CYCB1 complexes are specifically activated to mediate HR. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  20. A functional portrait of Med7 and the mediator complex in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiza Tebbji

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mediator is a multi-subunit protein complex that regulates gene expression in eukaryotes by integrating physiological and developmental signals and transmitting them to the general RNA polymerase II machinery. We examined, in the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, a set of conditional alleles of genes encoding Mediator subunits of the head, middle, and tail modules that were found to be essential in the related ascomycete Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Intriguingly, while the Med4, 8, 10, 11, 14, 17, 21 and 22 subunits were essential in both fungi, the structurally highly conserved Med7 subunit was apparently non-essential in C. albicans. While loss of CaMed7 did not lead to loss of viability under normal growth conditions, it dramatically influenced the pathogen's ability to grow in different carbon sources, to form hyphae and biofilms, and to colonize the gastrointestinal tracts of mice. We used epitope tagging and location profiling of the Med7 subunit to examine the distribution of the DNA sites bound by Mediator during growth in either the yeast or the hyphal form, two distinct morphologies characterized by different transcription profiles. We observed a core set of 200 genes bound by Med7 under both conditions; this core set is expanded moderately during yeast growth, but is expanded considerably during hyphal growth, supporting the idea that Mediator binding correlates with changes in transcriptional activity and that this binding is condition specific. Med7 bound not only in the promoter regions of active genes but also within coding regions and at the 3' ends of genes. By combining genome-wide location profiling, expression analyses and phenotyping, we have identified different Med7p-influenced regulons including genes related to glycolysis and the Filamentous Growth Regulator family. In the absence of Med7, the ribosomal regulon is de-repressed, suggesting Med7 is involved in central aspects of growth control.

  1. Mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Mediatization research shares media effects studies' ambition of answering the difficult questions with regard to whether and how media matter and influence contemporary culture and society. The two approaches nevertheless differ fundamentally in that mediatization research seeks answers...... to these general questions by distinguishing between two concepts: mediation and mediatization. The media effects tradition generally considers the effects of the media to be a result of individuals being exposed to media content, i.e. effects are seen as an outcome of mediated communication. Mediatization...... research is concerned with long-term structural changes involving media, culture, and society, i.e. the influences of the media are understood in relation to how media are implicated in social and cultural changes and how these processes come to create new conditions for human communication and interaction...

  2. Nuclear DAMP complex-mediated RAGE-dependent macrophage cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ruochan [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Infectious Diseases and State Key Lab of Viral Hepatitis, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Fu, Sha; Fan, Xue-Gong [Department of Infectious Diseases and State Key Lab of Viral Hepatitis, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh, Herbert J. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Tang, Daolin, E-mail: tangd2@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Kang, Rui, E-mail: kangr@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2015-03-13

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), histone, and DNA are essential nuclear components involved in the regulation of chromosome structure and function. In addition to their nuclear function, these molecules act as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) alone or together when released extracellularly. The synergistic effect of these nuclear DNA-HMGB1-histone complexes as DAMP complexes (nDCs) on immune cells remains largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that nDCs limit survival of macrophages (e.g., RAW264.7 and peritoneal macrophages) but not cancer cells (e.g., HCT116, HepG2 and Hepa1-6). nDCs promote production of inflammatory tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) release, triggering reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but not toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and TLR-2, was required for Akt-dependent TNFα release and subsequent cell death following treatment with nDCs. Genetic depletion of RAGE by RNAi, antioxidant N-Acetyl-L-cysteine, and TNFα neutralizing antibody significantly attenuated nDC-induced cell death. These findings provide evidence supporting novel signaling mechanisms linking nDCs and inflammation in macrophage cell death. - Highlights: • Nuclear DAMP complexes (nDCs) selectively induce cell death in macrophages, but not cancer cells. • TNFα-mediated oxidative stress is required for nDC-induced death. • RAGE-mediated Akt activation is required for nDC-induced TNFα release. • Blocking RAGE and TNFα inhibits nDC-induced macrophage cell death.

  3. Mediator complex subunit 12 exon 2 mutation analysis in different subtypes of smooth muscle tumors confirms genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaff, Marieke A; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Szuhai, Károly; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2013-08-01

    Recently, heterozygous mutations in exon 2 of the mediator complex subunit 12 gene have been described in 50% to 70% of uterine leiomyomas; the recurrent nature of these mutations suggests an important role in their pathogenesis. Mediator complex subunit 12 is involved in regulation of transcription and Wnt signaling. So far, little is known about the pathogenesis of the different subtypes of extrauterine leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas. We performed mutation analysis of mediator complex subunit 12 and immunohistochemistry for β-catenin, using 69 tumors of 64 patients including 19 uterine leiomyomas, 6 abdominal leiomyomas, 9 angioleiomyomas, 5 piloleiomyomas, and 7 uterine and 23 soft tissue leiomyosarcomas. In line with previous observations, 58% of uterine leiomyomas carried a mediator complex subunit 12 mutation. However, all other extrauterine leiomyomas were negative with the exception of 1 abdominal leiomyoma with a likely primary uterine origin. Of the 30 leiomyosarcomas, only 1 uterine tumor harbored a mutation. A new observation is the identification of 3 tumors with a homozygous mutation; a monosomy X or interstitial deletion was excluded. β-Catenin immunohistochemistry showed nuclear positivity in only 55% of the mediator complex subunit 12-mutated uterine leiomyomas, suggesting the involvement of pathways other than canonical Wnt signaling in tumorigenesis. Interestingly, 80% of mediator complex subunit 12 wild-type sporadic piloleiomyomas displayed nuclear β-catenin positivity, indicating its involvement in this leiomyoma subtype. The lack of mediator complex subunit 12 mutations in extrauterine leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas indicates that these tumors arise through a different pathway, emphasizing the genetic heterogeneity of smooth muscle tumors.

  4. Efficient Wnt mediated intestinal hyperproliferation requires the cyclin D2-CDK4/6 complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sansom Owen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inactivation of the gene encoding the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC tumour suppressor protein is recognized as the key early event in the development of colorectal cancers (CRC. Apc loss leads to nuclear localization of beta-catenin and constitutive activity of the beta-catenin-Tcf4 transcription complex. This complex drives the expression of genes involved in cell cycle progression such as c-Myc and cyclin D2. Acute loss of Apc in the small intestine leads to hyperproliferation within the intestinal crypt, increased levels of apoptosis, and perturbed differentiation and migration. It has been demonstrated that c-Myc is a critical mediator of the phenotypic abnormalities that follow Apc loss in the intestine. As it may be difficult to pharmacologically inhibit transcription factors such as c-Myc, investigating more druggable targets of the Wnt-c-Myc pathway within the intestine may reveal potential therapeutic targets for CRC. Recent work in our laboratory has shown that the cyclin D2-cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK4/6 complex promotes hyperproliferation in Apc deficient intestinal tissue and ApcMin/+ adenomas. We showed that the hyperproliferative phenotype associated with Apc loss in vivo was partially dependent on the expression of cyclin D2. Most importantly, tumour growth and development in ApcMin/+ mice was strongly perturbed in mice lacking cyclin D2. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of CDK4/6 suppressed the proliferation of adenomatous cells. This commentary discusses the significance of this work in providing evidence for the importance of the cyclin D2-CDK4/6 complex in colorectal adenoma formation. It also argues that inhibition of this complex may be an effective chemopreventative strategy in CRC.

  5. Force-Mediated Kinetics of Single P-Selectin/Ligand Complexes Observed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Jurgen; Katopodis, Andreas G.; Kolbinger, Frank; Anselmetti, Dario

    1998-10-01

    Leukocytes roll along the endothelium of postcapillary venules in response to inflammatory signals. Rolling under the hydrodynamic drag forces of blood flow is mediated by the interaction between selectins and their ligands across the leukocyte and endothelial cell surfaces. Here we present force-spectroscopy experiments on single complexes of P-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 by atomic force microscopy to determine the intrinsic molecular properties of this dynamic adhesion process. By modeling intermolecular and intramolecular forces as well as the adhesion probability in atomic force microscopy experiments we gain information on rupture forces, elasticity, and kinetics of the P-selectin/P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 interaction. The complexes are able to withstand forces up to 165 pN and show a chain-like elasticity with a molecular spring constant of 5.3 pN nm-1 and a persistence length of 0.35 nm. The dissociation constant (off-rate) varies over three orders of magnitude from 0.02 s-1 under zero force up to 15 s-1 under external applied forces. Rupture force and lifetime of the complexes are not constant, but directly depend on the applied force per unit time, which is a product of the intrinsic molecular elasticity and the external pulling velocity. The high strength of binding combined with force-dependent rate constants and high molecular elasticity are tailored to support physiological leukocyte rolling.

  6. The transcriptional coactivator DRIP/mediator complex is involved in vitamin D receptor function and regulates keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Yuko; Chalkley, Robert J; Burlingame, Alma L; Bikle, Daniel D

    2010-10-01

    Mediator is a multisubunit coactivator complex that facilitates transcription of nuclear receptors. We investigated the role of the mediator complex as a coactivator for vitamin D receptor (VDR) in keratinocytes. Using VDR affinity beads, the vitamin D receptor interacting protein (DRIP)/mediator complex was purified from primary keratinocytes, and its subunit composition was determined by mass spectrometry. The complex included core subunits, such as DRIP205/MED1 (MED1), that directly binds to VDR. Additional subunits were identified that are components of the RNA polymerase II complex. The functions of different mediator components were investigated by silencing its subunits. The core subunit MED1 facilitates VDR activity and regulating keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. A newly described subunit MED21 also has a role in promoting keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation, whereas MED10 has an inhibitory role. Blocking MED1/MED21 expression caused hyperproliferation of keratinocytes, accompanied by increases in mRNA expression of the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 and/or glioma-associated oncogene homolog. Blocking MED1 or MED21 expression also resulted in defects in calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation, as indicated by decreased expression of differentiation markers and decreased translocation of E-cadherin to the membrane. These results show that keratinocytes use the transcriptional coactivator mediator to regulate VDR functions and control keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation.

  7. Measurement of the formation of complexes in tyrosine kinase-mediated signal transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladbury, John E., E-mail: j.ladbury@biochem.ucl.ac.uk [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-01

    The use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides a full thermodynamic characterization of an interaction in one experiment. The determination of the affinity is an important value; however, the additional layer of information provided by the change in enthalpy and entropy can help in understanding the biology. This is demonstrated with respect to tyrosine kinase-mediated signal transduction. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides highly complementary data to high-resolution structural detail. An overview of the methodology of the technique is provided. Ultimately, the correlation of the thermodynamic parameters determined by ITC with structural perturbation observed on going from the free to the bound state should be possible at an atomic level. Currently, thermodynamic data provide some insight as to potential changes occurring on complex formation. Here, this is demonstrated in the context of in vitro quantification of intracellular tyrosine kinase-mediated signal transduction and the issue of specificity of the important interactions. The apparent lack of specificity in the interactions of domains of proteins involved in early signalling from membrane-bound receptors is demonstrated using data from ITC.

  8. Distinct conformations of GPCR–β-arrestin complexes mediate desensitization, signaling, and endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Thomas J.; Thomsen, Alex R. B.; Tarrasch, Jeffrey T.; Plouffe, Bianca; Nguyen, Anthony H.; Yang, Fan; Huang, Li-Yin; Kahsai, Alem W.; Bassoni, Daniel L.; Gavino, Bryant J.; Lamerdin, Jane E.; Triest, Sarah; Shukla, Arun K.; Berger, Benjamin; Little, John; Antar, Albert; Blanc, Adi; Qu, Chang-Xiu; Chen, Xin; Kawakami, Kouki; Inoue, Asuka; Aoki, Junken; Steyaert, Jan; Sun, Jin-Peng; Bouvier, Michel; Skiniotis, Georgios; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    β-Arrestins (βarrs) interact with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to desensitize G protein signaling, to initiate signaling on their own, and to mediate receptor endocytosis. Prior structural studies have revealed two unique conformations of GPCR–βarr complexes: the “tail” conformation, with βarr primarily coupled to the phosphorylated GPCR C-terminal tail, and the “core” conformation, where, in addition to the phosphorylated C-terminal tail, βarr is further engaged with the receptor transmembrane core. However, the relationship of these distinct conformations to the various functions of βarrs is unknown. Here, we created a mutant form of βarr lacking the “finger-loop” region, which is unable to form the core conformation but retains the ability to form the tail conformation. We find that the tail conformation preserves the ability to mediate receptor internalization and βarr signaling but not desensitization of G protein signaling. Thus, the two GPCR–βarr conformations can carry out distinct functions. PMID:28223524

  9. Dab2, megalin, cubilin and amnionless receptor complex might mediate intestinal endocytosis in the suckling rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Carretero, María D; Palomo, Marta; García-Miranda, Pablo; Sánchez-Aguayo, Inmaculada; Peral, María J; Calonge, María L; Ilundain, Anunciación A

    2014-03-01

    We previously proposed that Dab2 participates in the endocytosis of milk macromolecules in rat small intestine. Here we investigate the receptors that may mediate this endocytosis by studying the effects of age and diet on megalin, VLDLR, and ApoER2 expression, and that of age on the expression of cubilin and amnionless. Of megalin, VLDLR and ApoER2, only the megalin expression pattern resembles that of Dab2 previously reported. Thus the mRNA and protein levels of megalin and Dab2 are high in the intestine of the suckling rat, down-regulated by age and up-regulated by milk diet, mainly in the ileum. Neither age nor diet affect ApoER2 mRNA levels. The effect of age on VLDLR mRNA levels depends on the epithelial cell tested but they are down-regulated by milk diet. In the suckling rat, the intestinal expressions of both cubilin and amnionless are similar to that of megalin and megalin, cubilin, amnionless and Dab2 co-localize at the microvilli and in the apical endocytic apparatus. Co-localization of Dab2 with ApoER2 and VLDLR at the microvilli and in the apical endocytic apparatus is also observed. This is the first report showing intestinal co-localization of: megalin/cubilin/amnionless/Dab2, VLDLR/Dab2 and ApoER2/Dab2. We conclude that the megalin/cubilin/amnionless/Dab2 complex/es participate in intestinal processes, mainly during the lactation period and that Dab2 may act as an adaptor in intestinal processes mediated by ApoER2 and VLDLR.

  10. Defluoridation of water using dicarboxylic acids mediated chitosan-polyaniline/zirconium biopolymeric complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu Prabhu, Subbaiah; Meenakshi, Sankaran

    2016-04-01

    The present investigation describes the preparation of hydrogen bonded chitosan-polyaniline/zirconium biopolymeric matrix by grafting method under dicarboxylic acid medium for the removal of fluoride, first time. Herein, the dicarboxylic acids, oxalic acid, malonic acid, succinic acid were used as medium. The synthesized complex was characterized by usual analytical techniques like FTIR, XRD, SEM and EDAX analysis. From the batch equilibrium experiments, the maximum defluoridation capacity (DC) was found to be 8.713 mg/g at room temperature with the minimum contact time of 24 min at 100mg of the sorbent dosage. The temperature study results of adsorption kinetics showed the adsorption behavior could be better described by the pseudo-second-order equation than pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The adsorption isotherm was well fitted by the Freundlich equation rather than Langmuir and D-R isotherms. The mechanism of fluoride removal was ligand exchange at neutral pH and electrostatic attraction at acidic pH of the medium. Regeneration studies were carried out to identify the best regenerant which makes the process cost-effective. Conclusions of this work demonstrate the potential applicability of the dicarboxylic acid mediated chitosan-polyaniline/zirconium complex as an effective adsorbent for fluoride removal from water.

  11. An RLP23-SOBIR1-BAK1 complex mediates NLP-triggered immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Isabell; Böhm, Hannah; Albert, Markus; Feiler, Christina E; Imkampe, Julia; Wallmeroth, Niklas; Brancato, Caterina; Raaymakers, Tom M; Oome, Stan; Zhang, Heqiao; Krol, Elzbieta; Grefen, Christopher; Gust, Andrea A; Chai, Jijie; Hedrich, Rainer; Van den Ackerveken, Guido; Nürnberger, Thorsten

    2015-10-05

    Plants and animals employ innate immune systems to cope with microbial infection. Pattern-triggered immunity relies on the recognition of microbe-derived patterns by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Necrosis and ethylene-inducing peptide 1-like proteins (NLPs) constitute plant immunogenic patterns that are unique, as these proteins are produced by multiple prokaryotic (bacterial) and eukaryotic (fungal, oomycete) species. Here we show that the leucine-rich repeat receptor protein (LRR-RP) RLP23 binds in vivo to a conserved 20-amino-acid fragment found in most NLPs (nlp20), thereby mediating immune activation in Arabidopsis thaliana. RLP23 forms a constitutive, ligand-independent complex with the LRR receptor kinase (LRR-RK) SOBIR1 (Suppressor of Brassinosteroid insensitive 1 (BRI1)-associated kinase (BAK1)-interacting receptor kinase 1), and recruits a second LRR-RK, BAK1, into a tripartite complex upon ligand binding. Stable, ectopic expression of RLP23 in potato (Solanum tuberosum) confers nlp20 pattern recognition and enhanced immunity to destructive oomycete and fungal plant pathogens, such as Phytophthora infestans and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. PRRs that recognize widespread microbial patterns might be particularly suited for engineering immunity in crop plants.

  12. The Nuclear Cap-Binding Complex Mediates Meiotic Silencing by Unpaired DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Logan M.; Xiao, Hua; Boone, Erin C.; Vierling, Michael M.; Shanker, Benjamin S.; Kingston, Shanika L.; Boone, Shannon F.; Haynes, Jackson B.; Shiu, Patrick K.T.

    2017-01-01

    In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, cross walls between individual cells are normally incomplete, making the entire fungal network vulnerable to attack by viruses and selfish DNAs. Accordingly, several genome surveillance mechanisms are maintained to help the fungus combat these repetitive elements. One of these defense mechanisms is called meiotic silencing by unpaired DNA (MSUD), which identifies and silences unpaired genes during meiosis. Utilizing common RNA interference (RNAi) proteins, such as Dicer and Argonaute, MSUD targets mRNAs homologous to the unpaired sequence to achieve silencing. In this study, we have identified an additional silencing component, namely the cap-binding complex (CBC). Made up of cap-binding proteins CBP20 and CBP80, CBC associates with the 5′ cap of mRNA transcripts in eukaryotes. The loss of CBC leads to a deficiency in MSUD activity, suggesting its role in mediating silencing. As confirmed in this study, CBC is predominantly nuclear, although it is known to travel in and out of the nucleus to facilitate RNA transport. As seen in animals but not in plants, CBP20’s robust nuclear import depends on CBP80 in Neurospora. CBC interacts with a component (Argonaute) of the perinuclear meiotic silencing complex (MSC), directly linking the two cellular factors. PMID:28179391

  13. The Nuclear Cap-Binding Complex Mediates Meiotic Silencing by Unpaired DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logan M. Decker

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, cross walls between individual cells are normally incomplete, making the entire fungal network vulnerable to attack by viruses and selfish DNAs. Accordingly, several genome surveillance mechanisms are maintained to help the fungus combat these repetitive elements. One of these defense mechanisms is called meiotic silencing by unpaired DNA (MSUD, which identifies and silences unpaired genes during meiosis. Utilizing common RNA interference (RNAi proteins, such as Dicer and Argonaute, MSUD targets mRNAs homologous to the unpaired sequence to achieve silencing. In this study, we have identified an additional silencing component, namely the cap-binding complex (CBC. Made up of cap-binding proteins CBP20 and CBP80, CBC associates with the 5′ cap of mRNA transcripts in eukaryotes. The loss of CBC leads to a deficiency in MSUD activity, suggesting its role in mediating silencing. As confirmed in this study, CBC is predominantly nuclear, although it is known to travel in and out of the nucleus to facilitate RNA transport. As seen in animals but not in plants, CBP20’s robust nuclear import depends on CBP80 in Neurospora. CBC interacts with a component (Argonaute of the perinuclear meiotic silencing complex (MSC, directly linking the two cellular factors.

  14. AUTOIMMUNE EPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs are uncommon, potentially fatal diseases of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with deposits of autoantibodies and complement against distinct molecules of the epidermis and dermal/epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ. These autoantibodies lead to a loss in skin molecular integrity, which manifests clinically as formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus vulgaris, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis. The pioneering work of Ernst H. Beutner, Ph.D. and Robert E. Jordon, M.D. confirmed the autoimmune nature of these diseases. Walter F. Lever, M.D. contributed significantly to our understanding of the histopathologic features of these diseases. Walter Lever, M.D. and Ken Hashimoto, M.D. contributed electron microscopic studies of these diseases, especially in pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. In bullous pemphigoid (BP, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, loss of adhesion takes place within or underneath the BMZ. Classic EBA demonstrates extensive skin fragility; DH is commonly associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and manifests clinically with pruritic papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The clinical spectrum of bullous pemphigoid includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo-like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy, and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a „cluster of jewels”-like pattern in childhood (chronic bullous disease of childhood and is more clinically heterogeneous in adulthood. Many of the autoantigens in these disorders are known and have been well characterized. ABDs may be influenced by both genetic and exogenous factors. The diagnoses of

  15. The epidermal growth factor system in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghal, Nadeem; Sternberg, Paul W

    2003-03-10

    The single known epidermal growth factor-like growth factor and single epidermal growth factor receptor in Caenorhabditis elegans mediate two types of processes, each via a distinct signal transduction pathway. Several instances of cell fate specification during organogenesis require the RAS-MAP kinase pathway, as well as multiple nuclear factors. By contrast, appropriate myoepithelial contractions during ovulation involve IP3-mediated signal transduction. Positive modulators of the RAS pathway include KSR, SUR-8, phosphatase PP2A, and a zinc cation diffusion facilitator. Negative regulators of the RAS pathway include homologs of CBL, GAP-1, ACK, and MAP kinase phosphatase, while negative regulators of the IP3 pathway are enzymes that modify IP3. In addition to its stimulation of RAS activity, the GRB2 homolog SEM-5 acts negatively on both signaling pathways, as does the Ack-related kinase ARK-1.

  16. The effects of childhood abuse on symptom complexity in a clinical sample: mediating effects of emotion regulation difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Young; Choi, Young Min; Gim, Min Sook; Park, Jun Hyun; Park, Soo Hyun

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to first examine whether childhood abuse predicts symptom complexity, as indicated by the number of clinically elevated scales on the MMPI-2 in an adult clinical sample. Secondly, we investigated whether emotion regulation difficulties mediated the relationship between childhood abuse and symptom complexity. A total of 162 adult outpatients not presenting with psychotic symptoms completed the Korean Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (K-CTQ), Life Events Checklist (LEC), Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), and Korean Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2). Partial correlation analysis results indicated that after controlling for the presence of adulthood trauma, childhood abuse was associated with more symptom complexity, or more clinically elevated scales on the MMPI-2. Furthermore, structural equation modeling results showed that emotion regulation difficulties partially mediated the relationship between childhood abuse and symptom complexity. These findings indicate that individuals who had experienced childhood abuse evidence simultaneous presentation of diverse clinical symptoms.

  17. Photoacoustic measurement of epidermal melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viator, John A.; Svaasand, Lars O.; Aguilar, Guillermo; Choi, Bernard; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2003-06-01

    Most dermatologic laser procedures must consider epidermal melanin, as it is a broadband optical absorber which affects subsurface fluence, effectively limiting the amount of light reaching the dermis and targeted chromophores. An accurate method for quantifying epidermal melanin content would aid clinicians in determining proper light dosage for therapeutic laser procedures. While epidermal melanin content has been quantified non-invasively using optical methods, there is currently no way to determine the melanin distribution in the epidermis. We have developed a photoacoustic probe that uses a Q-switched, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at 532nm to generate acoustic pulses in skin in vivo. The probe contained a piezoelectric element that detected photoacoustic waves which were then analyzed for epidermal melanin content, using a photoacoustic melanin index (PAMI). We tested 15 human subjects with skin types I--VI using the photoacoustic probe. We also present photoacoustic data for a human subject with vitiligo. Photoacoustic measurement showed melanin in the vitiligo subject was almost completely absent.

  18. Sparfloxacin induced toxic epidermal necrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh M

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN is a life-threatening cutaneous adverse drug reaction. TEN is known to occur with the fluoroquinolone class of antibiotics, but only four cases of sparfloxacin induced TEN have been reported to the WHO database. This is another case report of sparfloxacin induced TEN.

  19. Understanding the role of ETS-mediated gene regulation in complex biological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, Victoria J; LaRue, Amanda C; Turner, David P; Watson, Patricia M; Watson, Dennis K

    2013-01-01

    Ets factors are members of one of the largest families of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors, regulating critical functions in normal cell homeostasis, which when perturbed contribute to tumor progression. The well-documented alterations in ETS factor expression and function during cancer progression result in pleiotropic effects manifested by the downstream effect on their target genes. Multiple ETS factors bind to the same regulatory sites present on target genes, suggesting redundant or competitive functions. The anti- and prometastatic signatures obtained by examining specific ETS regulatory networks will significantly improve our ability to accurately predict tumor progression and advance our understanding of gene regulation in cancer. Coordination of multiple ETS gene functions also mediates interactions between tumor and stromal cells and thus contributes to the cancer phenotype. As such, these new insights may provide a novel view of the ETS gene family as well as a focal point for studying the complex biological control involved in tumor progression. One of the goals of molecular biology is to elucidate the mechanisms that contribute to the development and progression of cancer. Such an understanding of the molecular basis of cancer will provide new possibilities for: (1) earlier detection, as well as better diagnosis and staging of disease; (2) detection of minimal residual disease recurrences and evaluation of response to therapy; (3) prevention; and (4) novel treatment strategies. Increased understanding of ETS-regulated biological pathways will directly impact these areas. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Biocombinatorial Synthesis of Novel Lipopeptides by COM Domain-Mediated Reprogramming of the Plipastatin NRPS Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Both donors and acceptors of communication-mediating (COM domains are essential for coordinating intermolecular communication within nonribosomal peptides synthetases (NRPSs complexes. Different sets of COM domains provide selectivity, allowing NRPSs to utilise different natural biosynthetic templates. In this study, novel lipopeptides were synthesised by reprogramming the plipastatin biosynthetic machinery. A Thr-to-Asp point mutation was sufficient to shift the selectivity of the donor COM domain of ppsB toward that of ppsD. Deletion and/or interchangeability established donor and acceptor function. Variations in acceptor COM domain did not result in novel product formation in the presence of its partner donor, whereas plipastatin formation was completely abrogated by altering donor modules. Five novel lipopeptides (cyclic pentapeptide, linear hexapeptide, nonapeptide, heptapeptide and cyclic octapeptide were identified and verified by high-resolution LC-ESI-MS/MS. In addition, we demonstrated the potential to generate novel strains with the antimicrobial activity by selecting compatible COM domains, and the novel lipopeptides exhibited antimicrobial activity against five of the fungal species at a contention of 31.25-125 μg/ml.

  1. Therapeutic Blockade of Immune Complex-Mediated Glomerulonephritis by Highly Selective Inhibition of Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Samantha A; Doerner, Jessica; Bosanac, Todd; Khalil, Sara; Smith, Dustin; Harcken, Christian; Dimock, Janice; Der, Evan; Herlitz, Leal; Webb, Deborah; Seccareccia, Elise; Feng, Di; Fine, Jay S; Ramanujam, Meera; Klein, Elliott; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-05-19

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a potentially dangerous end organ pathology that affects upwards of 60% of lupus patients. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is important for B cell development, Fc receptor signaling, and macrophage polarization. In this study, we investigated the effects of a novel, highly selective and potent BTK inhibitor, BI-BTK-1, in an inducible model of LN in which mice receive nephrotoxic serum (NTS) containing anti-glomerular antibodies. Mice were treated once daily with vehicle alone or BI-BTK-1, either prophylactically or therapeutically. When compared with control treated mice, NTS-challenged mice treated prophylactically with BI-BTK-1 exhibited significantly attenuated kidney disease, which was dose dependent. BI-BTK-1 treatment resulted in decreased infiltrating IBA-1+ cells, as well as C3 deposition within the kidney. RT-PCR on whole kidney RNA and serum profiling indicated that BTK inhibition significantly decreased levels of LN-relevant inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Renal RNA expression profiling by RNA-seq revealed that BI-BTK-1 dramatically modulated pathways related to inflammation and glomerular injury. Importantly, when administered therapeutically, BI-BTK-1 reversed established proteinuria and improved renal histopathology. Our results highlight the important role for BTK in the pathogenesis of immune complex-mediated nephritis, and BTK inhibition as a promising therapeutic target for LN.

  2. Plant root exudates mediate neighbour recognition and trigger complex behavioural changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semchenko, Marina; Saar, Sirgi; Lepik, Anu

    2014-11-01

    Some plant species are able to distinguish between neighbours of different genetic identity and attempt to pre-empt resources through root proliferation in the presence of unrelated competitors, but avoid competition with kin. However, studies on neighbour recognition have met with some scepticism because the mechanisms by which plants identify their neighbours have remained unclear. In order to test whether root exudates could mediate neighbour recognition in plants, we performed a glasshouse experiment in which plants of Deschampsia caespitosa were subjected to root exudates collected from potential neighbours of different genetic identities, including siblings and individuals belonging to the same or a different population or species. Our results show that root exudates can carry specific information about the genetic relatedness, population origin and species identity of neighbours, and trigger different responses at the whole root system level and at the level of individual roots in direct contact with locally applied exudates. Increased root density was mainly achieved through changes in morphology rather than biomass allocation, suggesting that plants are able to limit the energetic cost of selfish behaviour. This study reveals a new level of complexity in the ability of plants to interpret and react to their surroundings.

  3. Hepatitis C virus genomic RNA dimerization is mediated via a kissing complex intermediate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Sumangala; Kim, Seungtaek; Shimakami, Tetsuro; Lemon, Stanley M.; Mihailescu, Mihaela-Rita

    2010-01-01

    With over 200 million people infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) worldwide, there is a need for more effective and better-tolerated therapeutic strategies. The HCV genome is a positive-sense; single-stranded RNA encoding a large polyprotein cleaved at multiple sites to produce at least ten proteins, among them an error-prone RNA polymerase that confers a high mutation rate. Despite considerable overall sequence diversity, in the 3′-untranslated region of the HCV genomic RNA there is a 98-nucleotide (nt) sequence named X RNA, the first 55 nt of which (X55 RNA) are 100% conserved among all HCV strains. The X55 region has been suggested to be responsible for in vitro dimerization of the genomic RNA in the presence of the viral core protein, although the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. In this study, we analyzed the X55 region and characterized the mechanism by which it mediates HCV genomic RNA dimerization. Similar to a mechanism proposed previously for the human immunodeficiency 1 virus (HIV-1) genome, we show that dimerization of the HCV genome involves formation of a kissing complex intermediate, which is converted to a more stable extended duplex conformation in the presence of the core protein. Mutations in the dimer linkage sequence loop sequence that prevent RNA dimerization in vitro significantly reduced but did not completely ablate the ability of HCV RNA to replicate or produce infectious virus in transfected cells. PMID:20360391

  4. Copper-obatoclax derivative complexes mediate DNA cleavage and exhibit anti-cancer effects in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jung-Chen; Chang, Jung-Hua; Huang, Jui-Wen; Chen, Peter P-Y; Chen, Kuen-Feng; Tseng, Ping-Hui; Shiau, Chung-Wai

    2015-02-25

    Obatoclax is an indole-pyrrole compound that induces cancer cell apoptosis through targeting the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein family. Previously, we developed a series of obatoclax derivatives and studied their STAT3 inhibition-dependent activity against cancer cell lines. The obatoclax analog, prodigiosin, has been reported to mediate DNA cleavage in cancer cells by coordinating with copper complexes. To gain an understanding of copper-obatoclax complex activity, we applied obatoclax derivatives to examine their copper-mediated nuclease activity as a means to establish a basis for structure activity relationship. Replacement of the indole ring of obatoclax with furanyl, thiophenyl or Boc-indolyl rings reduced the DNA cleavage ability. The same effect was achieved through the replacement of the obatoclax pyrrolyl ring with thiazolidinedione and thioacetal. Among the compounds tested, we demonstrated that the complex of obatoclax or compound 7 with copper exhibited potent DNA strand scission which correlated with HCC cell growth inhibition.

  5. Optimization of ultrasound parameters for microbubble-nanoliposome complex-mediated delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Il Yoon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify the optimal ultrasound (US parameters for gene and drug delivery. Methods: In order to target SkBr3, which is a breast cancer cell overexpressing the Her2 receptor, trastuzumab (Herceptin was used. Micobubble-nanoliposome complex (MLC was mixed with trastuzumab and stored overnight. Finally, MLC was combined with Her2Ab. A US device equipped with a 1-MHz probe was used for delivery to the cell. Several parameters, including intensity (w/cm2, time (minutes, and duty cycle (%, were varied within a range from 1 w/cm2, 1 minute, and 20% to 2 w/cm2, 2 minutes, and 60%, respectively. A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM was used to confirm the delivery of MLC to the cells after US treatment. Results: MLC with fluorescent dyes and trastuzumab was synthesized successfully. By delivering MLC with Her2Ab to cells, the targeting effect of trastuzumab with MLC was confirmed by CLSM. The cell membranes showed green (fluorescein isothiocyanate and red (Texas red fluorescence but treatments with MLC without Her2Ab did not show any fluorescence. Optimal conditions for US-mediated delivery were 1 or 2 w/cm2, 2 minutes, and 60% (uptake ratio, 95.9% for 1 w/cm2 and 95.7% for 2 w/cm2 for hydrophobic materials and 2 w/cm2, 2 minutes, and 60% (uptake ratio, 95.0% for hydrophilic materials. Conclusion: The greater the strength, duty cycle, and period of US application within the tested range, the more efficiently the fluorescent contents were conveyed.

  6. The TPLATE Adaptor Complex Drives Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis in Plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadeyne, A.; Sanchez-Rodriguez, C.; Rubbo, Di S.; Ketelaar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is the major mechanism for eukaryotic plasma membrane-based proteome turn-over. In plants, clathrin-mediated endocytosis is essential for physiology and development, but the identification and organization of the machinery operating this process remains largely obscure.

  7. Structural and biophysical characteristics of human skin in maintaining proper epidermal barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, Magdalena; Duchnik, Ewa; Maleszka, Romuald; Marchlewicz, Mariola

    2016-02-01

    The complex structure of human skin and its physicochemical properties turn it into an efficient outermost defence line against exogenous factors, and help maintain homeostasis of the human body. This role is played by the epidermal barrier with its major part - stratum corneum. The condition of the epidermal barrier depends on individual and environmental factors. The most important biophysical parameters characterizing the status of this barrier are the skin pH, epidermal hydration, transepidermal water loss and sebum excretion. The knowledge of biophysical skin processes may be useful for the implementation of prophylactic actions whose aim is to restore the barrier function.

  8. Structural and biophysical characteristics of human skin in maintaining proper epidermal barrier function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Boer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The complex structure of human skin and its physicochemical properties turn it into an efficient outermost defence line against exogenous factors, and help maintain homeostasis of the human body. This role is played by the epidermal barrier with its major part – stratum corneum. The condition of the epidermal barrier depends on individual and environmental factors. The most important biophysical parameters characterizing the status of this barrier are the skin pH, epidermal hydration, transepidermal water loss and sebum excretion. The knowledge of biophysical skin processes may be useful for the implementation of prophylactic actions whose aim is to restore the barrier function.

  9. Melatonin enhances mitochondrial ATP synthesis, reduces reactive oxygen species formation, and mediates translocation of the nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 resulting in activation of phase-2 antioxidant enzymes (γ-GCS, HO-1, NQO1) in ultraviolet radiation-treated normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleszczyński, Konrad; Zillikens, Detlef; Fischer, Tobias W

    2016-09-01

    Melatonin is an ubiquitous molecule with a variety of functions including potent antioxidative properties. Due to its lipophilic character, it easily crosses cellular and intracellular membranes and reaches all subcellular organelles. Because of its ability to scavenge free radicals, melatonin protects against oxidative stress, for example, induced by ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Here, we investigated, in a dose-dependent (0, 10, 25, and 50 mJ/cm(2) ) and time-dependent (0, 4, 24, 48 hr post-UVR) manner, whether melatonin prevents the UVR-mediated alterations in ATP synthesis and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK). Additionally, we evaluated the molecular mechanism of action of melatonin with regard to activation of phase-2 antioxidative enzymes via nuclear erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2). We found that (i) melatonin counteracted UVR-induced alterations in the ATP synthesis and reduced free radical formation; (ii) melatonin induced the translocation of Nrf2 transcription factor from the cytosol into the nucleus resulting in, (iii) melatonin enhanced gene expression of phase-2 antioxidative enzymes including γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and NADPH: quinone dehydrogenase-1 (NQO1) representing an elevated antioxidative response of keratinocytes. These results suggest that melatonin not only directly scavenges ROS, but also significantly induces the activation of phase-2 antioxidative enzymes via the Nrf2 pathway uncovering a new action mechanism that supports the ability of keratinocytes to protect themselves from UVR-mediated oxidative stress.

  10. Feedback regulation on PTEN/AKT pathway by the ER stress kinase PERK mediated by interaction with the Vault complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei; Neo, Suat Peng; Gunaratne, Jayantha

    2015-01-01

    The high proliferation rate of cancer cells, together with environmental factors such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation can cause Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) stress. The protein kinase PERK is an essential mediator in one of the three ER stress response pathways. Genetic and pharmacological...... inhibition of PERK has been reported to limit tumor growth in xenograft models. Here we provide evidence that inactive PERK interacts with the nuclear pore-associated Vault complex protein and that this compromises Vault-mediated nuclear transport of PTEN. Pharmacological inhibition of PERK under ER stress...... results is abnormal sequestration of the Vault complex, leading to increased cytoplasmic PTEN activity and lower AKT activation. As the PI3K/PTEN/AKT pathway is crucial for many aspects of cell growth and survival, this unexpected effect of PERK inhibitors on AKT activity may have implications...

  11. Proteomic analysis reveals GIT1 as a novel mTOR complex component critical for mediating astrocyte survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithson, Laura J; Gutmann, David H

    2016-06-15

    As a critical regulator of cell growth, the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) protein operates as part of two molecularly and functionally distinct complexes. Herein, we demonstrate that mTOR complex molecular composition varies in different somatic tissues. In astrocytes and neural stem cells, we identified G-protein-coupled receptor kinase-interacting protein 1 (GIT1) as a novel mTOR-binding protein, creating a unique mTOR complex lacking Raptor and Rictor. Moreover, GIT1 binding to mTOR is regulated by AKT activation and is essential for mTOR-mediated astrocyte survival. Together, these data reveal that mTOR complex function is partly dictated by its molecuflar composition in different cell types.

  12. Electrocatalytic Oxidation of NADH Based on Self-assembled Colloidal Gold and Nafion Matrixes and Co Complex Mediator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na WANG; Ruo YUAN; Ya Qin CHAI; Dian Ping TANG; Qiang ZHU; Xue Lian LI

    2006-01-01

    A novel approach based on self-assembled colloidal gold and Nafion matrixes and Co complex mediator to construct Co(bpy)33+/nano-Au/Co(bpy)33+/nafion/GC electrode, on which formed stable redox-active films. This electrode can decrease the overpotential about 330 mV for the oxidation of NADH with high stability, wide linear range and low detection limit.

  13. Noncanonical role of Arabidopsis COP1/SPA complex in repressing BIN2-mediated PIF3 phosphorylation and degradation in darkness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jun-Jie; Li, Jian; Zhu, Danmeng; Deng, Xing Wang

    2017-03-28

    The E3 ligase CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1) has been known to mediate key signaling factors for degradation via the ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway in both plants and animals. Here, we report a noncanonical function of Arabidopsis COP1, the central repressor of photomorphogenesis, in the form of a COP1/ SUPPRESSOR of phyA-105 (SPA) complex. We show that the COP1/SPA complex associates with and stabilizes PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 3 (PIF3) to repress photomorphogenesis in the dark. We identify the GSK3-like kinase BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE 2 (BIN2) as a kinase of PIF3, which induces PIF3 degradation via 26S proteasome during skotomorphogenesis. Mutations on two typical BIN2 phosphorylation motifs of PIF3 lead to a strong stabilization of the protein in the dark. We further show that the COP1/SPA complex promotes PIF3 stability by repressing BIN2 activity. Intriguingly, without affecting BIN2 expression, the COP1/SPA complex modulates BIN2 activity through interfering with BIN2-PIF3 interaction, thereby inhibiting BIN2-mediated PIF3 phosphorylation and degradation. Taken together, our results suggest another paradigm for COP1/SPA complex action in the precise control of skotomorphogenesis.

  14. Epidermal nevus syndrome and dysplatic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Nickavar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal nevus syndrome is a rare congenital disorder, characterized by epidermal nevi and multiple organ involvement. Multicystic kidney disease has been very rarely reported in this syndrome. Here is the report of a boy presented with multiple epidermal nevi, cardiac anomaly, seizure attack, hemi hypertrophy, and multicystic dysplastic kidney complicated with Wilms' tumor. According to this association, it is suggested to search for dysplastic kidney disease in patients with neurocutaneous disorders.

  15. Single platelets seal neutrophil-induced vascular breaches via GPVI during immune-complex-mediated inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, Angèle; Syvannarath, Varouna; Lamrani, Lamia; Ollivier, Véronique; Loyau, Stéphane; Goerge, Tobias; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît

    2015-08-20

    Platelets protect vascular integrity during inflammation. Recent evidence suggests that this action is independent of thrombus formation and requires the engagement of glycoprotein VI (GPVI), but it remains unclear how platelets prevent inflammatory bleeding. We investigated whether platelets and GPVI act primarily by preventing detrimental effects of neutrophils using models of immune complex (IC)-mediated inflammation in mice immunodepleted in platelets and/or neutrophils or deficient in GPVI. Depletion of neutrophils prevented bleeding in thrombocytopenic and GPVI(-/-) mice during IC-mediated dermatitis. GPVI deficiency did not modify neutrophil recruitment, which was reduced by thrombocytopenia. Neutrophil cytotoxic activities were reduced in thrombocytopenic and GPVI(-/-) mice during IC-mediated inflammation. Intravital microscopy revealed that in this setting, intravascular binding sites for platelets were exposed by neutrophils, and GPVI supported the recruitment of individual platelets to these spots. Furthermore, the platelet secretory response accompanying IC-mediated inflammation was partly mediated by GPVI, and blocking of GPVI signaling impaired the vasculoprotective action of platelets. Together, our results show that GPVI plays a dual role in inflammation by enhancing neutrophil-damaging activities while supporting the activation and hemostatic adhesion of single platelets to neutrophil-induced vascular breaches.

  16. Nanoconjugation prolongs endosomal signaling of the epidermal growth factor receptor and enhances apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; Xu, F.; Reinhard, B. M.

    2016-07-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that intracellular signaling can be subject to strict spatial control. As the covalent attachment of a signaling ligand to a nanoparticle (NP) impacts ligand-receptor binding, uptake, and trafficking, nanoconjugation provides new opportunities for manipulating intracellular signaling in a controlled fashion. To establish the effect of nanoconjugation on epidermal growth factor (EGF) mediated signaling, we investigate here the intracellular fate of nanoconjugated EGF (NP-EGF) and its bound receptor (EGFR) by quantitative correlated darkfield/fluorescence microscopy and density-based endosomal fractionation. We demonstrate that nanoconjugation prolongs the dwell time of phosphorylated receptors in the early endosomes and that the retention of activated EGFR in the early endosomes is accompanied by an EGF mediated apoptosis at effective concentrations that do not induce apoptosis in the case of free EGF. Overall, these findings indicate nanoconjugation as a rational strategy for modifying signaling that acts by modulating the temporo-spatial distribution of the activated EGF-EGFR ligand-receptor complex.It is becoming increasingly clear that intracellular signaling can be subject to strict spatial control. As the covalent attachment of a signaling ligand to a nanoparticle (NP) impacts ligand-receptor binding, uptake, and trafficking, nanoconjugation provides new opportunities for manipulating intracellular signaling in a controlled fashion. To establish the effect of nanoconjugation on epidermal growth factor (EGF) mediated signaling, we investigate here the intracellular fate of nanoconjugated EGF (NP-EGF) and its bound receptor (EGFR) by quantitative correlated darkfield/fluorescence microscopy and density-based endosomal fractionation. We demonstrate that nanoconjugation prolongs the dwell time of phosphorylated receptors in the early endosomes and that the retention of activated EGFR in the early endosomes is accompanied by an EGF

  17. Penile Epidermal Cyst: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaraguru, Veerapandian; Prabhu, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal cysts also known as epidermoid cysts, is one of the common benign tumours presenting anywhere in the body. However, epidermal cyst in the penis is very rare. This condition in children is usually congenital due to abnormal embryologic closure of the median raphe; hence, it is termed as median raphe cysts (MRCs). Penile epidermal cysts may occur in adults following trauma or surgery due to epidermal elements being trapped within closed space. During wound healing, trapped squamous epithelium, undergoing keratinisation leads to cyst formation. Here, we report a rare case of patient with a penile epidermoid cyst whose main complaints was discomfort during coitus. PMID:27437298

  18. Ionizing radiation enhances matrix metalloproteinase-2 secretion and invasion of glioma cells through Src/epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated p38/Akt and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang-Min; Park, Myung-Jin; Kwak, Hee-Jin; Lee, Hyung-Chahn; Kim, Mi-Suk; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Park, In-Chul; Rhee, Chang Hun; Hong, Seok-Il

    2006-09-01

    Glioblastoma is a severe type of primary brain tumor, and its highly invasive character is considered to be a major therapeutic obstacle. Several recent studies have reported that ionizing radiation (IR) enhances the invasion of tumor cells, but the mechanisms for this effect are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the possible signaling mechanisms involved in IR-induced invasion of glioma cells. IR increased the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 promoter activity, mRNA transcription, and protein secretion along with the invasiveness of glioma cells lacking functional PTEN (U87, U251, U373, and C6) but not those harboring wild-type (WT)-PTEN (LN18 and LN428). IR activated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt, and mammalian target of rapamycin, and blockade of these kinases by specific inhibitors (LY294002, Akt inhibitor IV, and rapamycin, respectively) and transfection of dominant-negative (DN) mutants (DN-p85 and DN-Akt) or WT-PTEN suppressed the IR-induced MMP-2 secretion in U251 and U373 cells. In addition, inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR; AG490 and AG1478), Src (PP2), and p38 (SB203580), EGFR neutralizing antibody, and transfection of DN-Src and DN-p38 significantly blocked IR-induced Akt phosphorylation and MMP-2 secretion. IR-induced activation of EGFR was suppressed by PP2, whereas LY294002 and SB203580 did not affect the activations of p38 and PI3K, respectively. Finally, these kinase inhibitors significantly reduced the IR-induced invasiveness of these cells on Matrigel. Taken together, our findings suggest that IR induces Src-dependent EGFR activation, which triggers the p38/Akt and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways, leading to increased MMP-2 expression and heightened invasiveness of PTEN mutant glioma cells.

  19. Discrimination between platelet-mediated and coagulation-mediated mechanisms in a model of complex thrombus formation in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadroy, Y.; Horbett, T.A.; Hanson, S.R.

    1989-04-01

    To study mechanisms of complex thrombus formation in vivo, and to compare the relative antithrombotic effects of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, a model was developed in baboons. Segments of collagen-coated tubing followed by two sequentially placed expansion chambers exhibiting disturbed flow patterns were exposed to native blood under laminar flow conditions. The device was incorporated for 1 hour into an exteriorized arteriovenous shunt in baboons under controlled blood flow (20 ml/min). Morphologic evaluation by scanning electron microscopy showed that thrombi associated with collagen were relatively rich in platelets but thrombi in the chambers were rich in fibrin and red cells. Deposition of indium 111-labeled platelets was continuously measured with a scintillation camera. Platelet deposition increased in a linear (collagen-coated segment) or exponential (chambers 1 and 2) fashion over time, with values after 40 minutes averaging 24.1 +/- 3.3 x 10(8) platelets (collagen segment), 16.7 +/- 3.4 x 10(8) platelets (chamber 1), and 8.4 +/- 2.4 x 10(8) platelets (chamber 2). Total fibrinogen deposition after 40 minutes was determined by using iodine 125-labeled baboon fibrinogen and averaged 0.58 +/- 0.14 mg in the collagen segment, 1.51 +/- 0.27 mg in chamber 1, and 0.95 +/- 0.25 mg in chamber 2. Plasma levels of beta-thromboglobulin (beta TG), platelet-factor 4 (PF4), and fibrinopeptide A (FPA) increased fourfold to fivefold after 60 minutes of blood exposure to the thrombotic device. Platelet deposition onto the collagen segment, chamber 1, and chamber 2 was linearly dependent on the circulating platelet count. Platelet accumulation in chamber 1 and chamber 2 was also dependent on the presence of the proximal collagen segment.

  20. Substrate-mediated delivery of gene complex nanoparticles via polydopamine coating for enhancing competitiveness of endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo-Chao; Chang, Hao; Ren, Ke-Feng; Ji, Jian

    2016-11-01

    Substrate-mediated delivery of functional plasmid DNA (pDNA) has been proven to be a promising strategy to promote competitiveness of endothelial cells (ECs) over smooth muscle cells (SMCs), which is beneficial to inducing fast endothelialization of implanted vascular devices. Thus, it is of great importance to develop universal approaches with simplicity and easiness to immobilize DNA complex nanoparticles on substrates. In this study, the bioinspired polydopamine (PDA) coating was employed in immobilization of DNA complex nanoparticles, which were composed of protamine (PrS) and plasmid DNA encoding with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF-pDNA) gene. We demonstrated that the DNA complex nanoparticles can be successfully immobilized onto the PDA surface. Consequently, the HGF expression of both ECs and SMCs were significantly improved when they cultured on the DNA complex nanoparticles-immobilized substrates. Furthermore, EC proliferation was specifically promoted due to bioactivity of HGF, leading to an enhancement of EC competitiveness over SMCs. Our findings demonstrated the substrate-mediated functional gene nanoparticle delivery through PDA coating as a simple and efficient approach. It may hold great potential in the field of interventional cardiovascular implants.

  1. Transcriptional profiling of epidermal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoja, Nada; Gazel, Alix; Banno, Tomohiro; Yano, Shoichiro; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2006-10-03

    In epidermal differentiation basal keratinocytes detach from the basement membrane, stop proliferating, and express a new set of structural proteins and enzymes, which results in an impermeable protein/lipid barrier that protects us. To define the transcriptional changes essential for this process, we purified large quantities of basal and suprabasal cells from human epidermis, using the expression of beta4 integrin as the discriminating factor. The expected expression differences in cytoskeletal, cell cycle, and adhesion genes confirmed the effective separation of the cell populations. Using DNA microarray chips, we comprehensively identify the differences in genes expressed in basal and differentiating layers of the epidermis, including the ECM components produced by the basal cells, the proteases in both the basal and suprabasal cells, and the lipid and steroid metabolism enzymes in suprabasal cells responsible for the permeability barrier. We identified the signaling pathways specific for the two populations and found two previously unknown paracrine and one juxtacrine signaling pathway operating between the basal and suprabasal cells. Furthermore, using specific expression signatures, we identified a new set of late differentiation markers and mapped their chromosomal loci, as well as a new set of melanocyte-specific markers. The data represent a quantum jump in understanding the mechanisms of epidermal differentiation.

  2. Reptin and Pontin function antagonistically with PcG and TrxG complexes to mediate Hox gene control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diop, Soda Balla; Bertaux, Karine; Vasanthi, Dasari; Sarkeshik, Ali; Goirand, Benjamin; Aragnol, Denise; Tolwinski, Nicholas S; Cole, Michael D; Pradel, Jacques; Yates, John R; Mishra, Rakesh K; Graba, Yacine; Saurin, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    Pontin (Pont) and Reptin (Rept) are paralogous ATPases that are evolutionarily conserved from yeast to human. They are recruited in multiprotein complexes that function in various aspects of DNA metabolism. They are essential for viability and have antagonistic roles in tissue growth, cell signalling and regulation of the tumour metastasis suppressor gene, KAI1, indicating that the balance of Pont and Rept regulates epigenetic programmes critical for development and cancer progression. Here, we describe Pont and Rept as antagonistic mediators of Drosophila Hox gene transcription, functioning with Polycomb group (PcG) and Trithorax group proteins to maintain correct patterns of expression. We show that Rept is a component of the PRC1 PcG complex, whereas Pont purifies with the Brahma complex. Furthermore, the enzymatic functions of Rept and Pont are indispensable for maintaining Hox gene expression states, highlighting the importance of these two antagonistic factors in transcriptional output. PMID:18259215

  3. Adhesive F-actin Waves: A Novel Integrin-Mediated Adhesion Complex Coupled to Ventral Actin Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Lindsay B.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2011-01-01

    At the leading lamellipodium of migrating cells, protrusion of an Arp2/3-nucleated actin network is coupled to formation of integrin-based adhesions, suggesting that Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization and integrin-dependent adhesion may be mechanistically linked. Arp2/3 also mediates actin polymerization in structures distinct from the lamellipodium, in “ventral F-actin waves” that propagate as spots and wavefronts along the ventral plasma membrane. Here we show that integrins engage the extracellular matrix downstream of ventral F-actin waves in several mammalian cell lines as well as in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. These “adhesive F-actin waves” require a cycle of integrin engagement and disengagement to the extracellular matrix for their formation and propagation, and exhibit morphometry and a hierarchical assembly and disassembly mechanism distinct from other integrin-containing structures. After Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization, zyxin and VASP are co-recruited to adhesive F-actin waves, followed by paxillin and vinculin, and finally talin and integrin. Adhesive F-actin waves thus represent a previously uncharacterized integrin-based adhesion complex associated with Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization. PMID:22069459

  4. Adhesive F-actin waves: a novel integrin-mediated adhesion complex coupled to ventral actin polymerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay B Case

    Full Text Available At the leading lamellipodium of migrating cells, protrusion of an Arp2/3-nucleated actin network is coupled to formation of integrin-based adhesions, suggesting that Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization and integrin-dependent adhesion may be mechanistically linked. Arp2/3 also mediates actin polymerization in structures distinct from the lamellipodium, in "ventral F-actin waves" that propagate as spots and wavefronts along the ventral plasma membrane. Here we show that integrins engage the extracellular matrix downstream of ventral F-actin waves in several mammalian cell lines as well as in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. These "adhesive F-actin waves" require a cycle of integrin engagement and disengagement to the extracellular matrix for their formation and propagation, and exhibit morphometry and a hierarchical assembly and disassembly mechanism distinct from other integrin-containing structures. After Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization, zyxin and VASP are co-recruited to adhesive F-actin waves, followed by paxillin and vinculin, and finally talin and integrin. Adhesive F-actin waves thus represent a previously uncharacterized integrin-based adhesion complex associated with Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization.

  5. Periostin contributes to epidermal hyperplasia in psoriasis common to atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Kazuhiko; Ohta, Shoichiro; Takagi, Atsushi; Shiraishi, Hiroshi; Masuoka, Miho; Ontsuka, Kanako; Suto, Hajime; Suzuki, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Ken-Ichi; Ogawa, Masahiro; Simmons, Olga; Yamaguchi, Yukie; Toda, Shuji; Aihara, Michiko; Conway, Simon J; Ikeda, Shigaku; Izuhara, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal hyperplasia is a histological hallmark observed in both atopic dermatitis (AD) and psoriasis, although the clinical features and the underlying immunological disorders of these diseases are different. We previously showed that periostin, a matricellular protein, plays a critical role in epidermal hyperplasia in AD, using a mouse model and a 3-dimensional organotypic coculture system. In this study, we explore the hypothesis that periostin is involved in epidermal hyperplasia in psoriasis. To examine expression of periostin in psoriasis patients, we performed immunohistochemical analysis on skin biopsies from six such patients. To investigate periostin's role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, we evaluated periostin-deficient mice in a psoriasis mouse model induced by topical treatment with imiquimod (IMQ). Periostin was substantially expressed in the dermis of all investigated psoriasis patients. Epidermal hyperplasia induced by IMQ treatment was impaired in periostin-deficient mice, along with decreased skin swelling. However, upon treatment with IMQ, periostin deficiency did not alter infiltration of inflammatory cells such as neutrophils; production of IL-17, -22, or -23; or induction/expansion of IL-17- and IL-22-producing group 3 innate lymphoid cells. Periostin plays an important role during epidermal hyperplasia in IMQ-induced skin inflammation, independently of the IL-23-IL-17/IL-22 axis. Periostin appears to be a mediator for epidermal hyperplasia that is common to AD and psoriasis. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Streptococcus induces circulating CLA(+) memory T-cell-dependent epidermal cell activation in psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferran, Marta; Galván, Ana B; Rincón, Catalina; Romeu, Ester R; Sacrista, Marc; Barboza, Erika; Giménez-Arnau, Ana; Celada, Antonio; Pujol, Ramon M; Santamaria-Babí, Luis F

    2013-04-01

    Streptococcal throat infection is associated with a specific variant of psoriasis and with HLA-Cw6 expression. In this study, activation of circulating psoriatic cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA)(+) memory T cells cultured together with epidermal cells occurred only when streptococcal throat extracts were added. This triggered the production of Th1, Th17, and Th22 cytokines, as well as epidermal cell mediators (CXCL8, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11). Streptococcal extracts (SEs) did not induce any activation with either CLA(-) cells or memory T cells cultured together with epidermal cells from healthy subjects. Intradermal injection of activated culture supernatants into mouse skin induced epidermal hyperplasia. SEs also induced activation when we used epidermal cells from nonlesional skin of psoriatic patients with CLA(+) memory T cells. Significant correlations were found between SE induced upregulation of mRNA expression for ifn-γ, il-17, il-22, ip-10, and serum level of antistreptolysin O in psoriatic patients. This study demonstrates the direct involvement of streptococcal infection in pathological mechanisms of psoriasis, such as IL-17 production and epidermal cell activation.

  7. Focus on opportunities as a mediator of the relationships between age, job complexity, and work performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zacher, Hannes; Heusner, Sandra; Schmitz, Michael; Zwierzanska, Monika M.; Frese, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Focus on opportunities is a cognitive-motivational facet of occupational future time perspective that describes how many new goals, options, and possibilities individuals expect to have in their personal work-related futures. This study examined focus on opportunities as a mediator of the relationsh

  8. Rsp5-Bul1/2 complex is necessary for the HSE-mediated gene expression in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaida, Daisuke; Toh-e, Akio; Kikuchi, Yoshiko

    2003-07-11

    Rsp5 is an essential ubiquitin ligase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is concerned with many functions such as endocytosis and transcription through ubiquitination of various substrates. Bul1 or its homologue Bul2 binds to Rsp5 through the PY-motif and the bul1 bul2 double mutant is sensitive to various stresses. We demonstrate here that heat shock element (HSE)-mediated gene expression was defective in both rsp5-101 and bul1 bul2 mutants under high temperature condition. The bul1 gene containing mutations in the PY motif region did not recover this defective gene expression of the bul1 bul2 mutant. The protein level and phosphorylation state of the HSE-binding transcription factor, Hsf1, was not affected by these mutations. Thus, the Rsp5-Bul1/2 complex has a new function for the HSE-mediated gene expression and may regulate it through other factors than Hsf1.

  9. The Arabidopsis mediator complex subunit16 positively regulates salicylate-mediated systemic acquired resistance and jasmonate/ethylene-induced defense pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xudong; Wang, Chenggang; Zhang, Yanping; Sun, Yijun; Mou, Zhonglin

    2012-10-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a long-lasting plant immunity against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Biological induction of SAR requires the signal molecule salicylic acid (SA) and involves profound transcriptional changes that are largely controlled by the transcription coactivator nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes1 (NPR1). However, it is unclear how SAR signals are transduced from the NPR1 signaling node to the general transcription machinery. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis thaliana Mediator subunit16 (MED16) is an essential positive regulator of SAR. Mutations in MED16 reduced NPR1 protein levels and completely compromised biological induction of SAR. These mutations also significantly suppressed SA-induced defense responses, altered the transcriptional changes induced by the avirulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) DC3000/avrRpt2, and rendered plants susceptible to both Pst DC3000/avrRpt2 and Pst DC3000. In addition, mutations in MED16 blocked the induction of several jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET)-responsive genes and compromised resistance to the necrotrophic fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria brassicicola. The Mediator complex acts as a bridge between specific transcriptional activators and the RNA polymerase II transcription machinery; therefore, our data suggest that MED16 may be a signaling component in the gap between the NPR1 signaling node and the general transcription machinery and may relay signals from both the SA and the JA/ET pathways.

  10. Phospholipase C-epsilon regulates epidermal morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael P Vázquez-Manrique

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Migration of cells within epithelial sheets is an important feature of embryogenesis and other biological processes. Previous work has demonstrated a role for inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3-mediated calcium signalling in the rearrangement of epidermal cells (also known as hypodermal cells during embryonic morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans. However the mechanism by which IP(3 production is stimulated is unknown. IP(3 is produced by the action of phospholipase C (PLC. We therefore surveyed the PLC family of C. elegans using RNAi and mutant strains, and found that depletion of PLC-1/PLC-epsilon produced substantial embryonic lethality. We used the epithelial cell marker ajm-1::gfp to follow the behaviour of epidermal cells and found that 96% of the arrested embryos have morphogenetic defects. These defects include defective ventral enclosure and aberrant dorsal intercalation. Using time-lapse confocal microscopy we show that the migration of the ventral epidermal cells, especially of the leading cells, is slower and often fails in plc-1(tm753 embryos. As a consequence plc-1 loss of function results in ruptured embryos with a Gex phenotype (gut on exterior and lumpy larvae. Thus PLC-1 is involved in the regulation of morphogenesis. Genetic studies using gain- and loss-of-function alleles of itr-1, the gene encoding the IP(3 receptor in C. elegans, demonstrate that PLC-1 acts through ITR-1. Using RNAi and double mutants to deplete the other PLCs in a plc-1 background, we show that PLC-3/PLC-gamma and EGL-8/PLC-beta can compensate for reduced PLC-1 activity. Our work places PLC-epsilon into a pathway controlling epidermal cell migration, thus establishing a novel role for PLC-epsilon.

  11. Phospholipase C-epsilon regulates epidermal morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael P Vázquez-Manrique

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Migration of cells within epithelial sheets is an important feature of embryogenesis and other biological processes. Previous work has demonstrated a role for inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3-mediated calcium signalling in the rearrangement of epidermal cells (also known as hypodermal cells during embryonic morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans. However the mechanism by which IP(3 production is stimulated is unknown. IP(3 is produced by the action of phospholipase C (PLC. We therefore surveyed the PLC family of C. elegans using RNAi and mutant strains, and found that depletion of PLC-1/PLC-epsilon produced substantial embryonic lethality. We used the epithelial cell marker ajm-1::gfp to follow the behaviour of epidermal cells and found that 96% of the arrested embryos have morphogenetic defects. These defects include defective ventral enclosure and aberrant dorsal intercalation. Using time-lapse confocal microscopy we show that the migration of the ventral epidermal cells, especially of the leading cells, is slower and often fails in plc-1(tm753 embryos. As a consequence plc-1 loss of function results in ruptured embryos with a Gex phenotype (gut on exterior and lumpy larvae. Thus PLC-1 is involved in the regulation of morphogenesis. Genetic studies using gain- and loss-of-function alleles of itr-1, the gene encoding the IP(3 receptor in C. elegans, demonstrate that PLC-1 acts through ITR-1. Using RNAi and double mutants to deplete the other PLCs in a plc-1 background, we show that PLC-3/PLC-gamma and EGL-8/PLC-beta can compensate for reduced PLC-1 activity. Our work places PLC-epsilon into a pathway controlling epidermal cell migration, thus establishing a novel role for PLC-epsilon.

  12. The Non-canonical Tetratricopeptide Repeat (TPR) Domain of Fluorescent (FLU) Mediates Complex Formation with Glutamyl-tRNA Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Zhang, Feilong; Fang, Ying; Chen, Xuemin; Chen, Yuhong; Zhang, Wenxia; Dai, Huai-En; Lin, Rongcheng; Liu, Lin

    2015-07-10

    The tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing protein FLU is a negative regulator of chlorophyll biosynthesis in plants. It directly interacts through its TPR domain with glutamyl-tRNA reductase (GluTR), the rate-limiting enzyme in the formation of δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). Delineation of how FLU binds to GluTR is important for understanding the molecular basis for FLU-mediated repression of synthesis of ALA, the universal tetrapyrrole precursor. Here, we characterize the FLU-GluTR interaction by solving the crystal structures of the uncomplexed TPR domain of FLU (FLU(TPR)) at 1.45-Å resolution and the complex of the dimeric domain of GluTR bound to FLU(TPR) at 2.4-Å resolution. Three non-canonical TPR motifs of each FLU(TPR) form a concave surface and clamp the helix bundle in the C-terminal dimeric domain of GluTR. We demonstrate that a 2:2 FLU(TPR)-GluTR complex is the functional unit for FLU-mediated GluTR regulation and suggest that the formation of the FLU-GluTR complex prevents glutamyl-tRNA, the GluTR substrate, from binding with this enzyme. These results also provide insights into the spatial regulation of ALA synthesis by the membrane-located FLU protein.

  13. The adaptor molecule Nck localizes the WAVE complex to promote actin polymerization during CEACAM3-mediated phagocytosis of bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Pils

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CEACAM3 is a granulocyte receptor mediating the opsonin-independent recognition and phagocytosis of human-restricted CEACAM-binding bacteria. CEACAM3 function depends on an intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM-like sequence that is tyrosine phosphorylated by Src family kinases upon receptor engagement. The phosphorylated ITAM-like sequence triggers GTP-loading of Rac by directly associating with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF Vav. Rac stimulation in turn is critical for actin cytoskeleton rearrangements that generate lamellipodial protrusions and lead to bacterial uptake. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In our present study we provide biochemical and microscopic evidence that the adaptor proteins Nck1 and Nck2, but not CrkL, Grb2 or SLP-76, bind to tyrosine phosphorylated CEACAM3. The association is phosphorylation-dependent and requires the Nck SH2 domain. Overexpression of the isolated Nck1 SH2 domain, RNAi-mediated knock-down of Nck1, or genetic deletion of Nck1 and Nck2 interfere with CEACAM3-mediated bacterial internalization and with the formation of lamellipodial protrusions. Nck is constitutively associated with WAVE2 and directs the actin nucleation promoting WAVE complex to tyrosine phosphorylated CEACAM3. In turn, dominant-negative WAVE2 as well as shRNA-mediated knock-down of WAVE2 or the WAVE-complex component Nap1 reduce internalization of bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide novel mechanistic insight into CEACAM3-initiated phagocytosis. We suggest that the CEACAM3 ITAM-like sequence is optimized to co-ordinate a minimal set of cellular factors needed to efficiently trigger actin-based lamellipodial protrusions and rapid pathogen engulfment.

  14. Survivin mediates targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex to the centromere and midbody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vader, G; Kauw, JJW; Medema, RH; Lens, SMA

    2006-01-01

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) coordinates chromosomal and cytoskeletal events of mitosis. The enzymatic core of this complex (Aurora-B) is guided through the mitotic cell by its companion chromosomal passenger proteins, inner centromere protein (INCENP), Survivin and Borealin/Dasra-B, ther

  15. Calpains mediate integrin attachment complex maintenance of adult muscle in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etheridge, Timothy; Oczypok, Elizabeth A; Lehmann, Susann; Fields, Brandon D; Shephard, Freya; Jacobson, Lewis A; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J

    2012-01-01

    Two components of integrin containing attachment complexes, UNC-97/PINCH and UNC-112/MIG-2/Kindlin-2, were recently identified as negative regulators of muscle protein degradation and as having decreased mRNA levels in response to spaceflight. Integrin complexes transmit force between the inside and outside of muscle cells and signal changes in muscle size in response to force and, perhaps, disuse. We therefore investigated the effects of acute decreases in expression of the genes encoding these multi-protein complexes. We find that in fully developed adult Caenorhabditis elegans muscle, RNAi against genes encoding core, and peripheral, members of these complexes induces protein degradation, myofibrillar and mitochondrial dystrophies, and a movement defect. Genetic disruption of Z-line- or M-line-specific complex members is sufficient to induce these defects. We confirmed that defects occur in temperature-sensitive mutants for two of the genes: unc-52, which encodes the extra-cellular ligand Perlecan, and unc-112, which encodes the intracellular component Kindlin-2. These results demonstrate that integrin containing attachment complexes, as a whole, are required for proper maintenance of adult muscle. These defects, and collapse of arrayed attachment complexes into ball like structures, are blocked when DIM-1 levels are reduced. Degradation is also blocked by RNAi or drugs targeting calpains, implying that disruption of integrin containing complexes results in calpain activation. In wild-type animals, either during development or in adults, RNAi against calpain genes results in integrin muscle attachment disruptions and consequent sub-cellular defects. These results demonstrate that calpains are required for proper assembly and maintenance of integrin attachment complexes. Taken together our data provide in vivo evidence that a calpain-based molecular repair mechanism exists for dealing with attachment complex disruption in adult muscle. Since C. elegans lacks

  16. Calpains mediate integrin attachment complex maintenance of adult muscle in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Etheridge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two components of integrin containing attachment complexes, UNC-97/PINCH and UNC-112/MIG-2/Kindlin-2, were recently identified as negative regulators of muscle protein degradation and as having decreased mRNA levels in response to spaceflight. Integrin complexes transmit force between the inside and outside of muscle cells and signal changes in muscle size in response to force and, perhaps, disuse. We therefore investigated the effects of acute decreases in expression of the genes encoding these multi-protein complexes. We find that in fully developed adult Caenorhabditis elegans muscle, RNAi against genes encoding core, and peripheral, members of these complexes induces protein degradation, myofibrillar and mitochondrial dystrophies, and a movement defect. Genetic disruption of Z-line- or M-line-specific complex members is sufficient to induce these defects. We confirmed that defects occur in temperature-sensitive mutants for two of the genes: unc-52, which encodes the extra-cellular ligand Perlecan, and unc-112, which encodes the intracellular component Kindlin-2. These results demonstrate that integrin containing attachment complexes, as a whole, are required for proper maintenance of adult muscle. These defects, and collapse of arrayed attachment complexes into ball like structures, are blocked when DIM-1 levels are reduced. Degradation is also blocked by RNAi or drugs targeting calpains, implying that disruption of integrin containing complexes results in calpain activation. In wild-type animals, either during development or in adults, RNAi against calpain genes results in integrin muscle attachment disruptions and consequent sub-cellular defects. These results demonstrate that calpains are required for proper assembly and maintenance of integrin attachment complexes. Taken together our data provide in vivo evidence that a calpain-based molecular repair mechanism exists for dealing with attachment complex disruption in adult muscle. Since C

  17. Local IL-13 gene transfer prior to immune-complex arthritis inhibits chondrocyte death and matrix-metalloproteinase-mediated cartilage matrix degradation despite enhanced joint inflammation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabbe, K.C.A.M.; Lent, P.L.E.M. van; Holthuysen, A.E.M.; Sloetjes, A.W.; Koch, A.E.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Berg, W.B. van den

    2005-01-01

    During immune-complex-mediated arthritis (ICA), severe cartilage destruction is mediated by Fcgamma receptors (FcgammaRs) (mainly FcgammaRI), cytokines (e.g. IL-1), and enzymes (matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)). IL-13, a T helper 2 (Th2) cytokine abundantly found in synovial fluid of patients with

  18. Alu-mediated diverse and complex pathogenic copy-number variants within human chromosome 17 at p13.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shen; Yuan, Bo; Campbell, Ian M; Beck, Christine R; Carvalho, Claudia M B; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Erez, Ayelet; Patel, Ankita; Bacino, Carlos A; Shaw, Chad A; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Cheung, Sau Wai; Bi, Weimin; Lupski, James R

    2015-07-15

    Alu repetitive elements are known to be major contributors to genome instability by generating Alu-mediated copy-number variants (CNVs). Most of the reported Alu-mediated CNVs are simple deletions and duplications, and the mechanism underlying Alu-Alu-mediated rearrangement has been attributed to non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR). Chromosome 17 at the p13.3 genomic region lacks extensive low-copy repeat architecture; however, it is highly enriched for Alu repetitive elements, with a fraction of 30% of total sequence annotated in the human reference genome, compared with the 10% genome-wide and 18% on chromosome 17. We conducted mechanistic studies of the 17p13.3 CNVs by performing high-density oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization, specifically interrogating the 17p13.3 region with ∼150 bp per probe density; CNV breakpoint junctions were mapped to nucleotide resolution by polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing. Studied rearrangements include 5 interstitial deletions, 14 tandem duplications, 7 terminal deletions and 13 complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs). Within the 17p13.3 region, Alu-Alu-mediated rearrangements were identified in 80% of the interstitial deletions, 46% of the tandem duplications and 50% of the CGRs, indicating that this mechanism was a major contributor for formation of breakpoint junctions. Our studies suggest that Alu repetitive elements facilitate formation of non-recurrent CNVs, CGRs and other structural aberrations of chromosome 17 at p13.3. The common observation of Alu-mediated rearrangement in CGRs and breakpoint junction sequences analysis further demonstrates that this type of mechanism is unlikely attributed to NAHR, but rather may be due to a recombination-coupled DNA replicative repair process.

  19. Nicotinic acid receptor abnormalities in human skin cancer: implications for a role in epidermal differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yira Bermudez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic UV skin exposure leads to epidermal differentiation defects in humans that can be largely restored by pharmacological doses of nicotinic acid. Nicotinic acid has been identified as a ligand for the human G-protein-coupled receptors GPR109A and GPR109B that signal through G(i-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. We have examined the expression, cellular distribution, and functionality of GPR109A/B in human skin and skin derived epidermal cells. RESULTS: Nicotinic acid increases epidermal differentiation in photodamaged human skin as judged by the terminal differentiation markers caspase 14 and filaggrin. Both GPR109A and GPR109B genes are transcribed in human skin and in epidermal keratinocytes, but expression in dermal fibroblasts is below limits of detection. Receptor transcripts are greatly over-expressed in squamous cell cancers. Receptor protein in normal skin is prominent from the basal through granular layers of the epidermis, with cellular localization more dispersive in the basal layer but predominantly localized at the plasma membrane in more differentiated epidermal layers. In normal human primary and immortalized keratinocytes, nicotinic acid receptors show plasma membrane localization and functional G(i-mediated signaling. In contrast, in a squamous cell carcinoma derived cell line, receptor protein shows a more diffuse cellular localization and the receptors are nearly non-functional. CONCLUSIONS: The results of these studies justify future genetic and pharmacological intervention studies to define possible specific role(s of nicotinic acid receptors in human skin homeostasis.

  20. Combination of ruthenium(II)-arene complex [Ru(η6-p-cymene)Cl2(pta)] (RAPTA-C) and the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib results in efficient angiostatic and antitumor activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndsen, Robert H.; Weiss, Andrea; Abdul, U. Kulsoom; Wong, Tse J.; Meraldi, Patrick; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Dyson, Paul J.; Nowak-Sliwinska, Patrycja

    2017-01-01

    Ruthenium-based compounds show strong potential as anti-cancer drugs and are being investigated as alternatives to other well-established metal-based chemotherapeutics. The organometallic compound [Ru(η6-p-cymene)Cl2(pta)], where pta = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane (RAPTA-C) exhibits broad acting anti-tumor efficacy with intrinsic angiostatic activity. In the search for an optimal anti-angiogenesis drug combination, we identified synergistic potential between RAPTA-C and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, erlotinib. This drug combination results in strong synergistic inhibition of cell viability in human endothelial (ECRF24 and HUVEC) and human ovarian carcinoma (A2780 and A2780cisR) cells. Additionally, erlotinib significantly enhances the cellular uptake of RAPTA-C relative to treatment with RAPTA-C alone in human ovarian carcinoma cells, but not endothelial cells. Drug combinations induce the formation of chromosome bridges that persist after mitotic exit and delay abscission in A2780 and A2780cisR, therefore suggesting initiation of cellular senescence. The therapeutic potential of these compounds and their combination is further validated in vivo on A2780 tumors grown on the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model, and in a preclinical model in nude mice. Immunohistochemical analysis confirms effective anti-angiogenic and anti-proliferative activity in vivo, based on a significant reduction of microvascular density and a decrease in proliferating cells. PMID:28223694

  1. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Regulation Mediated by Biochemically Distinct SWI/SNF Complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse R Raab

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple positions within the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex can be filled by mutually exclusive subunits. Inclusion or exclusion of these proteins defines many unique forms of SWI/SNF and has profound functional consequences. Often this complex is studied as a single entity within a particular cell type and we understand little about the functional relationship between these biochemically distinct forms of the remodeling complex. Here we examine the functional relationships among three complex-specific ARID (AT-Rich Interacting Domain subunits using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation, transcriptome analysis, and transcription factor binding maps. We find widespread overlap in transcriptional regulation and the genomic binding of distinct SWI/SNF complexes. ARID1B and ARID2 participate in wide-spread cooperation to repress hundreds of genes. Additionally, we find numerous examples of competition between ARID1A and another ARID, and validate that gene expression changes following loss of one ARID are dependent on the function of an alternative ARID. These distinct regulatory modalities are correlated with differential occupancy by transcription factors. Together, these data suggest that distinct SWI/SNF complexes dictate gene-specific transcription through functional interactions between the different forms of the SWI/SNF complex and associated co-factors. Most genes regulated by SWI/SNF are controlled by multiple biochemically distinct forms of the complex, and the overall expression of a gene is the product of the interaction between these different SWI/SNF complexes. The three mutually exclusive ARID family members are among the most frequently mutated chromatin regulators in cancer, and understanding the functional interactions and their role in transcriptional regulation provides an important foundation to understand their role in cancer.

  2. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Regulation Mediated by Biochemically Distinct SWI/SNF Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Jesse R.; Resnick, Samuel; Magnuson, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Multiple positions within the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex can be filled by mutually exclusive subunits. Inclusion or exclusion of these proteins defines many unique forms of SWI/SNF and has profound functional consequences. Often this complex is studied as a single entity within a particular cell type and we understand little about the functional relationship between these biochemically distinct forms of the remodeling complex. Here we examine the functional relationships among three complex-specific ARID (AT-Rich Interacting Domain) subunits using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation, transcriptome analysis, and transcription factor binding maps. We find widespread overlap in transcriptional regulation and the genomic binding of distinct SWI/SNF complexes. ARID1B and ARID2 participate in wide-spread cooperation to repress hundreds of genes. Additionally, we find numerous examples of competition between ARID1A and another ARID, and validate that gene expression changes following loss of one ARID are dependent on the function of an alternative ARID. These distinct regulatory modalities are correlated with differential occupancy by transcription factors. Together, these data suggest that distinct SWI/SNF complexes dictate gene-specific transcription through functional interactions between the different forms of the SWI/SNF complex and associated co-factors. Most genes regulated by SWI/SNF are controlled by multiple biochemically distinct forms of the complex, and the overall expression of a gene is the product of the interaction between these different SWI/SNF complexes. The three mutually exclusive ARID family members are among the most frequently mutated chromatin regulators in cancer, and understanding the functional interactions and their role in transcriptional regulation provides an important foundation to understand their role in cancer. PMID:26716708

  3. Asymmetric catalysis mediated by the ligand sphere of octahedral chiral-at-metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Lei; Chen, Liang-An; Meggers, Eric

    2014-10-06

    Due to the relationship between structure and function in chemistry, access to novel chemical structures ultimately drives the discovery of novel chemical function. In this light, the formidable utility of the octahedral geometry of six-coordinate metal complexes is founded in its stereochemical complexity combined with the ability to access chemical space that might be unavailable for purely organic compounds. In this Minireview we wish to draw attention to inert octahedral chiral-at-metal complexes as an emerging class of metal-templated asymmetric "organocatalysts" which exploit the globular, rigid nature and stereochemical options of octahedral compounds and promise to provide new opportunities in the field of catalysis.

  4. Rcf1 mediates cytochrome oxidase assembly and respirasome formation, revealing heterogeneity of the enzyme complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukotic, Milena; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Wiese, Sebastian; Vögtle, F Nora; Meisinger, Chris; Meyer, Helmut E; Zieseniss, Anke; Katschinski, Doerthe M; Jans, Daniel C; Jakobs, Stefan; Warscheid, Bettina; Rehling, Peter; Deckers, Markus

    2012-03-01

    The terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, cytochrome oxidase, transfers electrons to molecular oxygen, generating water. Within the inner mitochondrial membrane, cytochrome oxidase assembles into supercomplexes, together with other respiratory chain complexes, forming so-called respirasomes. Little is known about how these higher oligomeric structures are attained. Here we report on Rcf1 and Rcf2 as cytochrome oxidase subunits in S. cerevisiae. While Rcf2 is specific to yeast, Rcf1 is a conserved subunit with two human orthologs, RCF1a and RCF1b. Rcf1 is required for growth in hypoxia and complex assembly of subunits Cox13 and Rcf2, as well as for the oligomerization of a subclass of cytochrome oxidase complexes into respirasomes. Our analyses reveal that the cytochrome oxidase of mitochondria displays intrinsic heterogeneity with regard to its subunit composition and that distinct forms of respirasomes can be formed by complex variants.

  5. Epigenetic silencing by the HUSH complex mediates position-effect variegation in human cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tchasovnikarova, I. A; Timms, R. T; Matheson, N. J; Wals, K; Antrobus, R; Gottgens, B; Dougan, G; Dawson, M. A; Lehner, P. J

    2015-01-01

    ... (see the Perspective by Brummelkamp). They identified a complex of proteins in human cells they called HUSH that kept particular parts of the genome silent by changing associated histone methylation marks...

  6. Regulation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Trafficking by Lysine Deacetylase HDAC6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissanu Deribe, Yonathan; Wild, Philipp; Chandrashaker, Akhila;

    2009-01-01

    Binding of epidermal growth factor (EGF) to its receptor leads to receptor dimerization, assembly of protein complexes, and activation of signaling networks that control key cellular responses. Despite their fundamental role in cell biology, little is known about protein complexes associated...

  7. Cation-mediated conversion of the state of charge in uranium arene inverted-sandwich complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camp, Clement; Mougel, Victor; Pecaut, Jacques; Mazzanti, Marinella [Laboratoire de Reconnaissance Ionique et Chimie de Coordination, SCIB, UMR-E3 CEA-UJF, INAC, CEA-Grenoble (France); Maron, Laurent [LCPNO, CNRS and INSA, UPS, Universite de Toulouse (France)

    2013-12-16

    Two new arene inverted-sandwich complexes of uranium supported by siloxide ancillary ligands [K{U(OSi(OtBu)_3)_3}{sub 2}(μ-η{sup 6}:η{sup 6}-C{sub 7}H{sub 8})] (3) and [K{sub 2}{U(OSi(OtBu)_3)_3}{sub 2}(μ-η{sup 6}:η{sup 6}-C{sub 7}H{sub 8})] (4) were synthesized by the reduction of the parent arene-bridged complex [{U(OSi(OtBu)_3)_3}{sub 2}(μ-η{sup 6}:η{sup 6}-C{sub 7}H{sub 8})] (2) with stoichiometric amounts of KC{sub 8} yielding a rare family of inverted-sandwich complexes in three states of charge. The structural data and computational studies of the electronic structure are in agreement with the presence of high-valent uranium centers bridged by a reduced tetra-anionic toluene with the best formulation being U{sup V}-(arene{sup 4-})-U{sup V}, KU{sup IV}-(arene{sup 4-})-U{sup V}, and K{sub 2}U{sup IV}-(arene{sup 4-})-U{sup IV} for complexes 2, 3, and 4 respectively. The potassium cations in complexes 3 and 4 are coordinated to the siloxide ligands both in the solid state and in solution. The addition of KOTf (OTf=triflate) to the neutral compound 2 promotes its disproportionation to yield complexes 3 and 4 (depending on the stoichiometry) and the U{sup IV} mononuclear complex [U(OSi(OtBu){sub 3}){sub 3}(OTf)(thf){sub 2}] (5). This unprecedented reactivity demonstrates the key role of potassium for the stability of these complexes. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Psoriatic architecture constructed by epidermal remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Hajime; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi

    2004-08-01

    Epidermal remodeling is the concept that epidermal architecture is determined by a simple self-organizing mechanism; epidermal hyperproliferation constructs typical psoriatic architecture. This is based on the assumption that the enlargements in both the two-dimensional proliferative compartment (basal cell layer) and three-dimensional whole epidermal volume coexist. During this process, the dermal papillae become markedly, but passively, expanded by enlargement of the proliferative compartment. This creates a considerable shrinkage force against the crowded basal cell layer, which is forced to lose adherence to the dermal extracellular matrix (ECM). This results in anoikis, a type of apoptosis characterized by cell detachment, and, consequently, a markedly diminished epidermal turnover time in psoriasis. The papillary shrinkage force also explains the fact that dermal papillary height does not exceed a certain limit. At the cessation of hyperproliferation a normalisation remodeling takes place toward normal tissue architecture. Thus the concept of epidermal remodeling explains the self-organizing mechanism of the architectural change in psoriasis, which is essentially a reversible disorder depending on epidermal hyperproliferation.

  9. Epidermal electronic systems for sensing and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Nanshu; Ameri, Shideh K.; Ha, Taewoo; Nicolini, Luke; Stier, Andrew; Wang, Pulin

    2017-04-01

    Epidermal electronic system is a class of hair thin, skin soft, stretchable sensors and electronics capable of continuous and long-term physiological sensing and clinical therapy when applied on human skin. The high cost of manpower, materials, and photolithographic facilities associated with its manufacture limit the availability of disposable epidermal electronics. We have invented a cost and time effective, completely dry, benchtop "cut-and-paste" method for the green, freeform and portable manufacture of epidermal electronics within minutes. We have applied the "cut-and-paste" method to manufacture epidermal electrodes, hydration and temperature sensors, conformable power-efficient heaters, as well as cuffless continuous blood pressure monitors out of metal thin films, two-dimensional (2D) materials, and piezoelectric polymer sheets. For demonstration purpose, we will discuss three examples of "cut-and-pasted" epidermal electronic systems in this paper. The first will be submicron thick, transparent epidermal graphene electrodes that can be directly transferred to human skin like a temporary transfer tattoo and can measure electrocardiogram (ECG) with signal-to-noise ratio and motion artifacts on par with conventional gel electrodes. The second will be a chest patch which houses both electrodes and pressure sensors for the synchronous measurements of ECG and seismocardiogram (SCG) such that beat-to-beat blood pressure can be inferred from the time interval between the R peak of the ECG and the AC peak of the SCG. The last example will be a highly conformable, low power consumption epidermal heater for thermal therapy.

  10. LINC complexes mediate the positioning of cone photoreceptor nuclei in mouse retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Razafsky

    Full Text Available It has long been observed that many neuronal types position their nuclei within restricted cytoplasmic boundaries. A striking example is the apical localization of cone photoreceptors nuclei at the outer edge of the outer nuclear layer of mammalian retinas. Yet, little is known about how such nuclear spatial confinement is achieved and further maintained. Linkers of the Nucleoskeleton to the Cytoskeleton (LINC complexes consist of evolutionary-conserved macromolecular assemblies that span the nuclear envelope to connect the nucleus with the peripheral cytoskeleton. Here, we applied a new transgenic strategy to disrupt LINC complexes either in cones or rods. In adult cones, we observed a drastic nuclear mislocalization on the basal side of the ONL that affected cone terminals overall architecture. We further provide evidence that this phenotype may stem from the inability of cone precursor nuclei to migrate towards the apical side of the outer nuclear layer during early postnatal retinal development. By contrast, disruption of LINC complexes within rod photoreceptors, whose nuclei are scattered across the outer nuclear layer, had no effect on the positioning of their nuclei thereby emphasizing differential requirements for LINC complexes by different neuronal types. We further show that Sun1, a component of LINC complexes, but not A-type lamins, which interact with LINC complexes at the nuclear envelope, participate in cone nuclei positioning. This study provides key mechanistic aspects underlying the well-known spatial confinement of cone nuclei as well as a new mouse model to evaluate the pathological relevance of nuclear mispositioning.

  11. Structural characterization of the ternary complex that mediates termination of NF-κB signaling by IκBα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sulakshana P; Quintas, Pedro O; McNulty, Reginald; Komives, Elizabeth A; Dyson, H Jane

    2016-05-31

    The transcription factor NF-κB is used in many systems for the transduction of extracellular signals into the expression of signal-responsive genes. Published structural data explain the activation of NF-κB through degradation of its dedicated inhibitor IκBα, but the mechanism by which NF-κB-mediated signaling is turned off by its removal from the DNA in the presence of newly synthesized IκBα (termed stripping) is unknown. Previous kinetic studies showed that IκBα accelerates NF-κB dissociation from DNA, and a transient ternary complex between NF-κB, its cognate DNA sequence, and IκBα was observed. Here we structurally characterize the >100-kDa ternary complex by NMR and negative stain EM and show a modeled structure that is consistent with the measurements. These data provide a structural basis for previously unidentified insights into the molecular mechanism of stripping.

  12. Synthesis, characterization, and photoactivated DNA cleavage by copper (II)/cobalt (II) mediated macrocyclic complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, H R Prakash; Naik, H S Bhojya; Aravinda, T; Lamani, D S

    2010-01-01

    We report the synthesis of new photonuclease consisting of two Co(II)/Cu(II) complexes of macrocyclic fused quinoline. Metal complexes are [MLX(2)], type where M = Co(II) (5), Cu(II) (6), and X = Cl, and are well characterized by elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, (1)H-NMR and electronic spectra. We have shown that photocleavage of plasmid DNA is markedly enhanced when this ligand is irradiated in the presence of Cu(II), and more so than that of cobalt. The chemistry of ternary and binary Co(II) complexes showing efficient light induced (360 nm) DNA cleavage activity is summarized. The role of the metal in photoinduced DNA cleavage reactions is explored by designing complex molecules having macrocyclic structure. The mechanistic pathways are found to be concentration dependent on Co(II)/Cu(II) complexes and the photoexcitation energy photoredox chemistry. Highly effective DNA cleavage ability of 6 is attributed to the effective cooperation of the metal moiety.

  13. A modular phosphate tether-mediated divergent strategy to complex polyols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R. Hanson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An efficient and divergent synthesis of polyol subunits utilizing a phosphate tether-mediated, one-pot, sequential RCM/CM/reduction process is reported. A modular, 3-component coupling strategy has been developed, in which, simple “order of addition” of a pair of olefinic-alcohol components to a pseudo-C2-symmetric phosphoryl chloride, coupled with the RCM/CM/reduction protocol, yields five polyol fragments. Each of the product polyols bears a central 1,3-anti-diol subunit with differential olefinic geometries at the periphery.

  14. Rif1 controls DNA replication by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 to reverse Cdc7-mediated phosphorylation of the MCM complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraga, Shin-Ichiro; Alvino, Gina M; Chang, Fujung; Lian, Hui-Yong; Sridhar, Akila; Kubota, Takashi; Brewer, Bonita J; Weinreich, Michael; Raghuraman, M K; Donaldson, Anne D

    2014-02-15

    Initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication requires phosphorylation of the MCM complex by Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), composed of Cdc7 kinase and its activator, Dbf4. We report here that budding yeast Rif1 (Rap1-interacting factor 1) controls DNA replication genome-wide and describe how Rif1 opposes DDK function by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1)-mediated dephosphorylation of the MCM complex. Deleting RIF1 partially compensates for the limited DDK activity in a cdc7-1 mutant strain by allowing increased, premature phosphorylation of Mcm4. PP1 interaction motifs within the Rif1 N-terminal domain are critical for its repressive effect on replication. We confirm that Rif1 interacts with PP1 and that PP1 prevents premature Mcm4 phosphorylation. Remarkably, our results suggest that replication repression by Rif1 is itself also DDK-regulated through phosphorylation near the PP1-interacting motifs. Based on our findings, we propose that Rif1 is a novel PP1 substrate targeting subunit that counteracts DDK-mediated phosphorylation during replication. Fission yeast and mammalian Rif1 proteins have also been implicated in regulating DNA replication. Since PP1 interaction sites are evolutionarily conserved within the Rif1 sequence, it is likely that replication control by Rif1 through PP1 is a conserved mechanism.

  15. Rif1 controls DNA replication by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 to reverse Cdc7-mediated phosphorylation of the MCM complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraga, Shin-ichiro; Alvino, Gina M.; Chang, FuJung; Lian, Hui-yong; Sridhar, Akila; Kubota, Takashi; Brewer, Bonita J.; Weinreich, Michael; Raghuraman, M.K.; Donaldson, Anne D.

    2014-01-01

    Initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication requires phosphorylation of the MCM complex by Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), composed of Cdc7 kinase and its activator, Dbf4. We report here that budding yeast Rif1 (Rap1-interacting factor 1) controls DNA replication genome-wide and describe how Rif1 opposes DDK function by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1)-mediated dephosphorylation of the MCM complex. Deleting RIF1 partially compensates for the limited DDK activity in a cdc7-1 mutant strain by allowing increased, premature phosphorylation of Mcm4. PP1 interaction motifs within the Rif1 N-terminal domain are critical for its repressive effect on replication. We confirm that Rif1 interacts with PP1 and that PP1 prevents premature Mcm4 phosphorylation. Remarkably, our results suggest that replication repression by Rif1 is itself also DDK-regulated through phosphorylation near the PP1-interacting motifs. Based on our findings, we propose that Rif1 is a novel PP1 substrate targeting subunit that counteracts DDK-mediated phosphorylation during replication. Fission yeast and mammalian Rif1 proteins have also been implicated in regulating DNA replication. Since PP1 interaction sites are evolutionarily conserved within the Rif1 sequence, it is likely that replication control by Rif1 through PP1 is a conserved mechanism. PMID:24532715

  16. Infrared spectrum of the Ag(+)-(pyridine)2 ionic complex: probing interactions in artificial metal-mediated base pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Shamik; Dopfer, Otto

    2011-07-11

    The isolated pyridine-Ag(+)-pyridine unit (Py-Ag(+)-Py) is employed as a model system to characterize the recently observed Ag(+)-mediated base pairing in DNA oligonucleotides at the molecular level. The structure and infrared (IR) spectrum of the Ag(+)-Py(2) cationic complex are investigated in the gas phase by IR multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations to determine the preferred metal-ion binding site and other salient properties of the potential-energy surface. The IRMPD spectrum has been obtained in the 840-1720 cm(-1) fingerprint region by coupling the IR free electron laser at the Centre Laser Infrarouge d'Orsay (CLIO) with a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionization source. The spectroscopic results are interpreted with quantum chemical calculations conducted at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level. The analysis of the IRMPD spectrum is consistent with a σ complex, in which the Ag(+) ion binds to the nitrogen lone pairs of the two Py ligands in a linear configuration. The binding motif of Py-Ag(+)-Py in the gas phase is the same as that observed in Ag(+)-mediated base pairing in solution. Ag(+) bonding to the π-electron system of the aromatic ring is predicted to be a substantially less-favorable binding motif.

  17. Ikaros mediates gene silencing in T cells through Polycomb repressive complex 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravecz, Attila; Apostolov, Apostol; Polak, Katarzyna; Jost, Bernard; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    T-cell development is accompanied by epigenetic changes that ensure the silencing of stem cell-related genes and the activation of lymphocyte-specific programmes. How transcription factors influence these changes remains unclear. We show that the Ikaros transcription factor forms a complex with Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in CD4−CD8− thymocytes and allows its binding to more than 500 developmentally regulated loci, including those normally activated in haematopoietic stem cells and others induced by the Notch pathway. Loss of Ikaros in CD4−CD8− cells leads to reduced histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation and ectopic gene expression. Furthermore, Ikaros binding triggers PRC2 recruitment and Ikaros interacts with PRC2 independently of the nucleosome remodelling and deacetylation complex. Our results identify Ikaros as a fundamental regulator of PRC2 function in developing T cells. PMID:26549758

  18. GENE SILENCING. Epigenetic silencing by the HUSH complex mediates position-effect variegation in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchasovnikarova, Iva A; Timms, Richard T; Matheson, Nicholas J; Wals, Kim; Antrobus, Robin; Göttgens, Berthold; Dougan, Gordon; Dawson, Mark A; Lehner, Paul J

    2015-06-26

    Forward genetic screens in Drosophila melanogaster for modifiers of position-effect variegation have revealed the basis of much of our understanding of heterochromatin. We took an analogous approach to identify genes required for epigenetic repression in human cells. A nonlethal forward genetic screen in near-haploid KBM7 cells identified the HUSH (human silencing hub) complex, comprising three poorly characterized proteins, TASOR, MPP8, and periphilin; this complex is absent from Drosophila but is conserved from fish to humans. Loss of HUSH components resulted in decreased H3K9me3 both at endogenous genomic loci and at retroviruses integrated into heterochromatin. Our results suggest that the HUSH complex is recruited to genomic loci rich in H3K9me3, where subsequent recruitment of the methyltransferase SETDB1 is required for further H3K9me3 deposition to maintain transcriptional silencing.

  19. Filaggrin and the great epidermal barrier grief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, John A

    2008-05-01

    One of the principal functions of human skin is to form an effective mechanical barrier against the external environment. This involves the maturation and death of epidermal keratinocytes as well as the assembly of a complex network of differentially and spatially expressed proteins, glycoproteins and lipids into the keratinocyte cell membrane and surrounding extracellular space. In 2006, the key role of the granular cell layer protein filaggrin (filament-aggregating protein) in maintaining the skin barrier was determined with the identification of loss-of-function mutations in the profilaggrin gene (FLG). These mutations have been shown to be the cause of ichthyosis vulgaris and a major risk factor for the development of atopic dermatitis, asthma associated with atopic dermatitis as well as systemic allergies. Mutations in the FLG gene are extremely common, occurring in approximately 9% of individuals from European populations. The remarkable discovery of these widespread mutations is expected to have a major impact on the classification and management of many patients with ichthyosis and atopic disease. It is also hoped that the genetic discovery of FLG mutations will lead to the future development of more specific, non-immunosuppressive treatments capable of restoring effective skin barrier function and alleviating or preventing disease in susceptible individuals.

  20. Plant structural complexity and mechanical defenses mediate predator-prey interactions in an odonate-bird system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grof-Tisza, Patrick; LoPresti, Eric; Heath, Sacha K; Karban, Richard

    2017-03-01

    Habitat-forming species provide refuges for a variety of associating species; these refuges may mediate interactions between species differently depending on the functional traits of the habitat-forming species. We investigated refuge provisioning by plants with different functional traits for dragonfly and damselfly (Odonata: Anisoptera and Zygoptera) nymphs emerging from water bodies to molt into their adult stage. During this period, nymphs experience high levels of predation by birds. On the shores of a small pond, plants with mechanical defenses (e.g., thorns and prickles) and high structural complexity had higher abundances of odonate exuviae than nearby plants which lacked mechanical defenses and exhibited low structural complexity. To disentangle the relative effects of these two potentially important functional traits on nymph emergence-site preference and survival, we conducted two fully crossed factorial field experiments using artificial plants. Nymphs showed a strong preference for artificial plants with high structural complexity and to a lesser extent, mechanical defenses. Both functional traits increased nymph survival but through different mechanisms. We suggest that future investigations attempt to experimentally separate the elements contributing to structural complexity to elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of refuge provisioning.

  1. Hydrolytic protein cleavage mediated by unusual mononuclear copper(II) complexes: X-ray structures and solution studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Mauricio C B; Scarpellini, Marciela; Neves, Ademir; Terenzi, Hernán; Bortoluzzi, Adailton J; Szpoganics, Bruno; Greatti, Alessandra; Mangrich, Antônio S; de Souza, Emanuel M; Fernandez, Pablo M; Soares, Marcia R

    2005-02-21

    The crystal structures and redox and UV-vis/EPR spectroscopic properties of two new mononuclear copper(II) complexes, [Cu(HL1)Cl2] (1) and [Cu(L1)Cl] (2), prepared through the reaction between copper(II) chloride and the ligand 2-[(bis(pyridylmethyl)amino)methyl]-4-methyl-6-formylphenol (HL1) under distinct base conditions, are reported along with solution studies. Also, we demonstrate that these CuII complexes are able to cleave unactivated peptide bonds from bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the thermostable enzyme Taq DNA polymerase at micromolar concentration, under mild pH and temperature conditions. The cleavage activity seems to be specific with defined proteolytic fragments appearing after protein treatment. The location of the specific cleavage sites was tentatively assigned to solvent-accessible portions of the protein. These are two of the most active Cu(II) complexes described to date, since their cleavage activity is detected in minutes and evidence is here presented for a hydrolytic mechanism mediating protein cleavage by these complexes.

  2. Med1 subunit of the mediator complex in nuclear receptor-regulated energy metabolism, liver regeneration, and hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuzhi; Viswakarma, Navin; Reddy, Janardan K

    2014-01-01

    Several nuclear receptors regulate diverse metabolic functions that impact on critical biological processes, such as development, differentiation, cellular regeneration, and neoplastic conversion. In the liver, some members of the nuclear receptor family, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptor (LXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and others, regulate energy homeostasis, the formation and excretion of bile acids, and detoxification of xenobiotics. Excess energy burning resulting from increases in fatty acid oxidation systems in liver generates reactive oxygen species, and the resulting oxidative damage influences liver regeneration and liver tumor development. These nuclear receptors are important sensors of exogenous activators as well as receptor-specific endogenous ligands. In this regard, gene knockout mouse models revealed that some lipid-metabolizing enzymes generate PPARα-activating ligands, while others such as ACOX1 (fatty acyl-CoA oxidase1) inactivate these endogenous PPARα activators. In the absence of ACOX1, the unmetabolized ACOX1 substrates cause sustained activation of PPARα, and the resulting increase in energy burning leads to hepatocarcinogenesis. Ligand-activated nuclear receptors recruit the multisubunit Mediator complex for RNA polymerase II-dependent gene transcription. Evidence indicates that the Med1 subunit of the Mediator is essential for PPARα, PPARγ, CAR, and GR signaling in liver. Med1 null hepatocytes fail to respond to PPARα activators in that these cells do not show induction of peroxisome proliferation and increases in fatty acid oxidation enzymes. Med1-deficient hepatocytes show no increase in cell proliferation and do not give rise to liver tumors. Identification of nuclear receptor-specific coactivators and Mediator subunits should further our understanding of the complexities of metabolic

  3. The Arabidopsis Mediator Complex Subunit16 Is a Key Component of Basal Resistance against the Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenggang; Yao, Jin; Du, Xuezhu; Zhang, Yanping; Sun, Yijun; Rollins, Jeffrey A; Mou, Zhonglin

    2015-09-01

    Although Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a devastating necrotrophic fungal plant pathogen in agriculture, the virulence mechanisms utilized by S. sclerotiorum and the host defense mechanisms against this pathogen have not been fully understood. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Mediator complex subunit MED16 is a key component of basal resistance against S. sclerotiorum. Mutants of MED16 are markedly more susceptible to S. sclerotiorum than mutants of 13 other Mediator subunits, and med16 has a much stronger effect on S. sclerotiorum-induced transcriptome changes compared with med8, a mutation not altering susceptibility to S. sclerotiorum. Interestingly, med16 is also more susceptible to S. sclerotiorum than coronatine-insensitive1-1 (coi1-1), which is the most susceptible mutant reported so far. Although the jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) defense pathway marker gene PLANT DEFENSIN1.2 (PDF1.2) cannot be induced in either med16 or coi1-1, basal transcript levels of PDF1.2 in med16 are significantly lower than in coi1-1. Furthermore, ET-induced suppression of JA-activated wound responses is compromised in med16, suggesting a role for MED16 in JA-ET cross talk. Additionally, MED16 is required for the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to PDF1.2 and OCTADECANOID-RESPONSIVE ARABIDOPSIS ETHYLENE/ETHYLENE-RESPONSIVE FACTOR59 (ORA59), two target genes of both JA/ET-mediated and the transcription factor WRKY33-activated defense pathways. Finally, MED16 is physically associated with WRKY33 in yeast and in planta, and WRKY33-activated transcription of PDF1.2 and ORA59 as well as resistance to S. sclerotiorum depends on MED16. Taken together, these results indicate that MED16 regulates resistance to S. sclerotiorum by governing both JA/ET-mediated and WRKY33-activated defense signaling in Arabidopsis.

  4. Ligand-Controlled CO2 Activation Mediated by Cationic Titanium Hydride Complexes, [LTiH](+) (L=Cp2 , O).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shi-Ya; Rijs, Nicole J; Li, Jilai; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2015-06-01

    CO2 activation mediated by [LTiH](+) (L=Cp2 , O) is observed in the gas phase at room temperature using electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry, and reaction details are derived from traveling wave ion-mobility mass spectrometry. Wheresas oxygen-atom transfer prevails in the reaction of the oxide complex [OTiH](+) with CO2 , generating [OTi(OH)](+) under the elimination of CO, insertion of CO2 into the metal-hydrogen bond of the cyclopentadienyl complex, [Cp2 TiH](+) , gives rise to the formate complex [Cp2 Ti(O2 CH)](+) . DFT-based methods were employed to understand how the ligand controls the observed variation in reactivity toward CO2 . Insertion of CO2 into the Ti-H bond constitutes the initial step for the reaction of both [Cp2 TiH](+) and [OTiH](+) , thus generating formate complexes as intermediates. In contrast to [Cp2 Ti(O2 CH)](+) which is kinetically stable, facile decarbonylation of [OTi(O2 CH)](+) results in the hydroxo complex [OTi(OH)](+) . The longer lifetime of [Cp2 Ti(O2 CH)](+) allows for secondary reactions with background water, as a result of which, [Cp2 Ti(OH)](+) is formed. Further, computational studies reveal a good linear correlation between the hydride affinity of [LTi](2+) and the barrier for CO2 insertion into various [LTiH](+) complexes. Understanding the intrinsic ligand effects may provide insight into the selective activation of CO2 .

  5. Zeolite-mediated photochemical charge separation using a surface-entrapped ruthenium-polypyridyl complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yanghee; Lee, Hyunjung; Dutta, Prabir K; Das, Amitava

    2003-06-30

    Employing the strategy of quaternization of the 2,2' N atoms of the conjugated bipyridine ligand 1,4-bis[2-(4'-methyl-2,2'-bipyrid-4-yl)ethenyl]benzene (L), a polypyridyl complex of ruthenium(II) was tethered on the surface of zeolite Y. Electrochemical and spectroscopic properties of the complex suggest that, upon visible photoexcitation of the MLCT band, the electron is localized on the conjugated ligand rather than the bipyridines. Electron transfer from the surface complex to bipyridinium ions (methyl viologen) within the zeolite was observed. Visible light photolysis of the ruthenium-zeolite solid ion-exchanged with diquat and suspended in a propyl viologen sulfonate solution led to permanent formation of the blue propyl viologen sulfonate radical ion in solution. The model that is proposed involves intrazeolitic charge transfer to ion-exchanged diquat followed by interfacial (zeolite to solution) electron transfer to propyl viologen sulfonate in solution. Because of the slow intramolecular back-electron-transfer reaction and the forward electron propagation via the ion-exchanged diquat, Ru(III) is formed. This Ru(III) complex formed on the zeolite is proposed to react rapidly with water in the presence of light, followed by reaction with the propyl viologen sulfonate, to form pyridones and regeneration of Ru(II), which then continues the photochemical process.

  6. Structure and mechanism of the CMR complex for CRISPR-mediated antiviral immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Rouillon, Christophe; Kerou, Melina; Reeks, Judith; Brugger, Kim; Graham, Shirley; Reimann, Julia; Cannone, Giuseppe; Liu, Huanting; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Naismith, James H; Spagnolo, Laura; White, Malcolm F

    2012-01-01

    Summary The prokaryotic Clusters of Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) system utilizes genomically-encoded CRISPR RNA (crRNA), derived from invading viruses and incorporated into ribonucleoprotein complexes with CRISPR-associated (CAS) proteins, to target and degrade viral DNA or RNA on subsequent infection. RNA is targeted by the CMR complex. In Sulfolobus solfataricus, this complex is composed of seven CAS protein subunits (Cmr1-7) and carries a diverse “payload” of targeting crRNA. The crystal structure of Cmr7 and low resolution structure of the complex are presented. S. solfataricus CMR cleaves RNA targets in an endonucleolytic reaction at UA dinucleotides. This activity is dependent on the 8-nucleotide repeat-derived 5′ sequence in the crRNA, but not on the presence of a proto-spacer associated motif (PAM) in the target. Both target and guide RNAs can be cleaved, although a single molecule of guide RNA can support the degradation of multiple targets. PMID:22227115

  7. Mediating Complex Texts in the Upper Grades: Considering Motivation, Instructional Intensity, and Cognitive Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford-Connors, Evelyn; Dougherty, Susan; Robertson, Dana A.; Paratore, Jeanne R.

    2015-01-01

    Rising expectations for middle grade students to independently read and comprehend complex, discipline-specific texts have also raised expectations for the ways teachers will teach. Helping all students, despite assessed reading levels, to access grade level texts calls for instructional approaches that not only meet readers where they are, but…

  8. Tuning interaction in dinuclear ruthenium complexes : HOMO versus LUMO mediated superexchange through azole and azine bridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Browne, Wesley; Hage, R; Vos, Johannes G.

    2006-01-01

    In this review the interaction between metal centers in dinuclear complexes based on azole and azine containing bridging ligands is reviewed. The focus of the review is on the manner in which the interaction pathway can be manipulated by variations in the nature of both the direct bridging unit and

  9. Trigeminal star-like platinum complexes induce cancer cell senescence through quadruplex-mediated telomere dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao-Hui; Mu, Ge; Zhong, Yi-Fang; Zhang, Tian-Peng; Cao, Qian; Ji, Liang-Nian; Zhao, Yong; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-12-01

    Two trigeminal star-like platinum complexes were synthesized to induce the formation of human telomere G-quadruplex (hTel G4) with extremely high selectivity and affinity. The induced hTel G4 activates strong telomeric DNA damage response (TDDR), resulting in telomere dysfunction and cell senescence.

  10. Organometallic mediated radical polymerization of vinyl acetate using bis(imino)pyridine vanadium trichloride complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Mitchell R; Allan, Laura E N; Decken, Andreas; Shaver, Michael P

    2013-07-07

    The synthesis and characterization of one novel proligand and six novel vanadium(III) trichloride complexes is described. The controlled radical polymerization activity towards vinyl acetate of these, and eight other bis(imino)pyridine vanadium trichloride complexes previously reported, is investigated. Those complexes possessing variation at the N-aryl para-position with no steric protection offered by ortho-substituents (4 examples) result in poor control over poly(vinyl acetate) polymerization. Control is improved with increasing steric bulk at the ortho-position of the N-aryl substituent (4 examples) although attempts to increase steric bulk past isopropyl were unsuccessful. Synthesizing bis(imino)pyridine vanadium trichloride complexes with substituted imine backbones restores polymerization control when aliphatic substituents are used (4 examples) but ceases to make any drastic improvements on catalyst lifetime. Modification of the polymerization conditions is also investigated, in an attempt to improve the catalyst lifetime. Expansion of the monomer scope to include other vinyl esters, particularly those derived from renewable resources, shows promising results.

  11. Recombination-Mediated Telomere Maintenance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is Not Dependent on the Shu Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula M van Mourik

    Full Text Available In cells lacking telomerase, telomeres shorten progressively during each cell division due to incomplete end-replication. When the telomeres become very short, cells enter a state that blocks cell division, termed senescence. A subset of these cells can overcome senescence and maintain their telomeres using telomerase-independent mechanisms. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, these cells are called 'survivors' and are dependent on Rad52-dependent homologous recombination and Pol32-dependent break-induced replication. There are two main types of survivors: type I and type II. The type I survivors require Rad51 and maintain telomeres by amplification of subtelomeric elements, while the type II survivors are Rad51-independent, but require the MRX complex and Sgs1 to amplify the C1-3A/TG1-3 telomeric sequences. Rad52, Pol32, Rad51, and Sgs1 are also important to prevent accelerated senescence, indicating that recombination processes are important at telomeres even before the formation of survivors. The Shu complex, which consists of Shu1, Shu2, Psy3, and Csm2, promotes Rad51-dependent homologous recombination and has been suggested to be important for break-induced replication. It also promotes the formation of recombination intermediates that are processed by the Sgs1-Top3-Rmi1 complex, as mutations in the SHU genes can suppress various sgs1, top3, and rmi1 mutant phenotypes. Given the importance of recombination processes during senescence and survivor formation, and the involvement of the Shu complex in many of the same processes during DNA repair, we hypothesized that the Shu complex may also have functions at telomeres. Surprisingly, we find that this is not the case: the Shu complex does not affect the rate of senescence, does not influence survivor formation, and deletion of SHU1 does not suppress the rapid senescence and type II survivor formation defect of a telomerase-negative sgs1 mutant. Altogether, our data suggest that the Shu complex is not

  12. Actin-Sorting Nexin 27 (SNX27)-Retromer Complex Mediates Rapid Parathyroid Hormone Receptor Recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarvey, Jennifer C; Xiao, Kunhong; Bowman, Shanna L; Mamonova, Tatyana; Zhang, Qiangmin; Bisello, Alessandro; Sneddon, W Bruce; Ardura, Juan A; Jean-Alphonse, Frederic; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A; Friedman, Peter A

    2016-05-20

    The G protein-coupled parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR) regulates mineral-ion homeostasis and bone remodeling. Upon parathyroid hormone (PTH) stimulation, the PTHR internalizes into early endosomes and subsequently traffics to the retromer complex, a sorting platform on early endosomes that promotes recycling of surface receptors. The C terminus of the PTHR contains a type I PDZ ligand that binds PDZ domain-containing proteins. Mass spectrometry identified sorting nexin 27 (SNX27) in isolated endosomes as a PTHR binding partner. PTH treatment enriched endosomal PTHR. SNX27 contains a PDZ domain and serves as a cargo selector for the retromer complex. VPS26, VPS29, and VPS35 retromer subunits were isolated with PTHR in endosomes from cells stimulated with PTH. Molecular dynamics and protein binding studies establish that PTHR and SNX27 interactions depend on the PDZ recognition motif in PTHR and the PDZ domain of SNX27. Depletion of either SNX27 or VPS35 or actin depolymerization decreased the rate of PTHR recycling following agonist stimulation. Mutating the PDZ ligand of PTHR abolished the interaction with SNX27 but did not affect the overall rate of recycling, suggesting that PTHR may directly engage the retromer complex. Coimmunoprecipitation and overlay experiments show that both intact and mutated PTHR bind retromer through the VPS26 protomer and sequentially assemble a ternary complex with PTHR and SNX27. SNX27-independent recycling may involve N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor, which binds both PDZ intact and mutant PTHRs. We conclude that PTHR recycles rapidly through at least two pathways, one involving the ASRT complex of actin, SNX27, and retromer and another possibly involving N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor.

  13. Actin-Sorting Nexin 27 (SNX27)-Retromer Complex Mediates Rapid Parathyroid Hormone Receptor Recycling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarvey, Jennifer C.; Xiao, Kunhong; Bowman, Shanna L.; Mamonova, Tatyana; Zhang, Qiangmin; Bisello, Alessandro; Sneddon, W. Bruce; Ardura, Juan A.; Jean-Alphonse, Frederic; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A.; Friedman, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    The G protein-coupled parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR) regulates mineral-ion homeostasis and bone remodeling. Upon parathyroid hormone (PTH) stimulation, the PTHR internalizes into early endosomes and subsequently traffics to the retromer complex, a sorting platform on early endosomes that promotes recycling of surface receptors. The C terminus of the PTHR contains a type I PDZ ligand that binds PDZ domain-containing proteins. Mass spectrometry identified sorting nexin 27 (SNX27) in isolated endosomes as a PTHR binding partner. PTH treatment enriched endosomal PTHR. SNX27 contains a PDZ domain and serves as a cargo selector for the retromer complex. VPS26, VPS29, and VPS35 retromer subunits were isolated with PTHR in endosomes from cells stimulated with PTH. Molecular dynamics and protein binding studies establish that PTHR and SNX27 interactions depend on the PDZ recognition motif in PTHR and the PDZ domain of SNX27. Depletion of either SNX27 or VPS35 or actin depolymerization decreased the rate of PTHR recycling following agonist stimulation. Mutating the PDZ ligand of PTHR abolished the interaction with SNX27 but did not affect the overall rate of recycling, suggesting that PTHR may directly engage the retromer complex. Coimmunoprecipitation and overlay experiments show that both intact and mutated PTHR bind retromer through the VPS26 protomer and sequentially assemble a ternary complex with PTHR and SNX27. SNX27-independent recycling may involve N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor, which binds both PDZ intact and mutant PTHRs. We conclude that PTHR recycles rapidly through at least two pathways, one involving the ASRT complex of actin, SNX27, and retromer and another possibly involving N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor. PMID:27008860

  14. Structures of coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and poliovirus polymerase elongation complexes solved by engineering RNA mediated crystal contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Peng; Kortus, Matthew G; Nix, Jay C; Davis, Ralph E; Peersen, Olve B

    2013-01-01

    RNA-dependent RNA polymerases play a vital role in the growth of RNA viruses where they are responsible for genome replication, but do so with rather low fidelity that allows for the rapid adaptation to different host cell environments. These polymerases are also a target for antiviral drug development. However, both drug discovery efforts and our understanding of fidelity determinants have been hampered by a lack of detailed structural information about functional polymerase-RNA complexes and the structural changes that take place during the elongation cycle. Many of the molecular details associated with nucleotide selection and catalysis were revealed in our recent structure of the poliovirus polymerase-RNA complex solved by first purifying and then crystallizing stalled elongation complexes. In the work presented here we extend that basic methodology to determine nine new structures of poliovirus, coxsackievirus, and rhinovirus elongation complexes at 2.2-2.9 Å resolution. The structures highlight conserved features of picornaviral polymerases and the interactions they make with the template and product RNA strands, including a tight grip on eight basepairs of the nascent duplex, a fully pre-positioned templating nucleotide, and a conserved binding pocket for the +2 position template strand base. At the active site we see a pre-bound magnesium ion and there is conservation of a non-standard backbone conformation of the template strand in an interaction that may aid in triggering RNA translocation via contact with the conserved polymerase motif B. Moreover, by engineering plasticity into RNA-RNA contacts, we obtain crystal forms that are capable of multiple rounds of in-crystal catalysis and RNA translocation. Together, the data demonstrate that engineering flexible RNA contacts to promote crystal lattice formation is a versatile platform that can be used to solve the structures of viral RdRP elongation complexes and their catalytic cycle intermediates.

  15. Structures of coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and poliovirus polymerase elongation complexes solved by engineering RNA mediated crystal contacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Gong

    Full Text Available RNA-dependent RNA polymerases play a vital role in the growth of RNA viruses where they are responsible for genome replication, but do so with rather low fidelity that allows for the rapid adaptation to different host cell environments. These polymerases are also a target for antiviral drug development. However, both drug discovery efforts and our understanding of fidelity determinants have been hampered by a lack of detailed structural information about functional polymerase-RNA complexes and the structural changes that take place during the elongation cycle. Many of the molecular details associated with nucleotide selection and catalysis were revealed in our recent structure of the poliovirus polymerase-RNA complex solved by first purifying and then crystallizing stalled elongation complexes. In the work presented here we extend that basic methodology to determine nine new structures of poliovirus, coxsackievirus, and rhinovirus elongation complexes at 2.2-2.9 Å resolution. The structures highlight conserved features of picornaviral polymerases and the interactions they make with the template and product RNA strands, including a tight grip on eight basepairs of the nascent duplex, a fully pre-positioned templating nucleotide, and a conserved binding pocket for the +2 position template strand base. At the active site we see a pre-bound magnesium ion and there is conservation of a non-standard backbone conformation of the template strand in an interaction that may aid in triggering RNA translocation via contact with the conserved polymerase motif B. Moreover, by engineering plasticity into RNA-RNA contacts, we obtain crystal forms that are capable of multiple rounds of in-crystal catalysis and RNA translocation. Together, the data demonstrate that engineering flexible RNA contacts to promote crystal lattice formation is a versatile platform that can be used to solve the structures of viral RdRP elongation complexes and their catalytic cycle

  16. Epidermal growth factor in the rat prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Niels; Jørgensen, P E; Poulsen, Steen Seier;

    1998-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) induces proliferation in prostate epithelial and stromal cells in primary culture. This investigation was set up to characterize the time and spatial expression of EGF in the rat prostate.......Epidermal growth factor (EGF) induces proliferation in prostate epithelial and stromal cells in primary culture. This investigation was set up to characterize the time and spatial expression of EGF in the rat prostate....

  17. Epidermal Inclusion Cysts of The Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir R. Motabar

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal inclusion cysts are uncommon in the breast, but the consequences can besevere when these cysts occur in the breast parenchyma. Here,we report two suchcases. The patient in case 1 was an 37-year-old woman with a 3-cm palpable mass inthe right breast. Mammography revealed a round and smoothly outlined mass, whichindicated a benign tumor, and sonography showed an irregularly shaped and heterogeneoushypoechoic mass, fibroadenoma was suspected on the basis of clinical andimage findings, but excisional biopsy revealed an epidermal inclusion cyst. The patientin case 2 was a 50-year-old woman with a 2.5-cm lesion in the left breast. Mammographyrevealed a round, dense, smoothly outlined mass, and sonography showeda well-defined, central hyperechoic mass. . Breast cancer was suspected on the basisof the sonographic findings and the age of the patient, but the resected specimen revealedan epidermal inclusion cyst. Although epidermal inclusion cysts are benign,occasionally they may play a role in the origin of squamous carcinoma of the breast. .Mammographic and sonographic features of an epidermal cyst may mimic a malignantlesion. Malignant change appears to occur more frequently in epidermal inclusioncysts in the mammary gland, compared to common epidermal inclusion cysts,and this may be associated with origination of mammary epidermal inclusion cystsfrom squamous metaplasia of the mammary duct epithelium.Epidermmoid inclusion cyst of the breast is potentially serious, although such cystsare rare, and differentiation from a malignant or benign breast tumor is required. Excisionis probably the most appropriate treatment, and can eliminate the possible riskof malignant transformation.

  18. Bridging function mediated intermetallic coupling in diruthenium-bis(bipyridine) complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soma Chakraborty; Biplab Mondal; Biprajit Sarkar; Goutam Kumar Lahiri

    2002-08-01

    The interactions of potentially dinucleating bridging functionalities (I-VI) with the ruthenium-bis(bypyridine) precursor [RuII(bpy)2(EtOH)2]2+ have been explored. The bridging functions I, II and VI directly result in the expected dinuclear complexes of the type [(bpy)2RuII{L}RuII(bpy)2]+ (1, 2, 7 and 8) ( = 0, = 4 and = -2, = 2). The bridging ligand III undergoes N-N or N-C bond cleavage reaction on coordination to the RuII(bpy)2 core which eventually yields a mononuclear complex of the type [(bpy)2RuII(L)]+, 3, where L = -OC6H3(R)C(R′)=N-H. However, the electrogenerated mononuclear ruthenium(III) congener, 3+ in acetonitrile dimerises to [(bpy)2RuIII {-OC6H3(R)C(R′)=N-N=(R′)C(R)C6H3O-}RuIII(bpy)2]4+ (4). In the presence of a slight amount of water content in the acetonitrile solvent the dimeric species (4) reduces back to the starting ruthenium(II) monomer (3). The preformed bridging ligand IV undergoes multiple transformations on coordination to the Ru(bpy)2 core, such as hydrolysis of the imine groups of IV followed by intermolecular head-to-tail oxidative coupling of the resultant amino phenol moieties, which in turn results in a new class of dimeric complex of the type [(bpy)2RuII {-OC6H4-N=C6H3(=NH)O-}RuII(bpy)2]2+ (5). In 5, the bridging ligand comprises of two , chelating binding sites each formally in the semiquinone level and there is a -benzoquinonediimine bridge between the metal centres. In complex 6, the preformed bridging ligand, 3,6-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-1,2-dihydro-1,2,4,5- tetrazine, H2L (V) undergoes oxidative dehydrogenation to aromatic tetrazine based bridging unit, 3,6-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine, L. The detailed spectroelectrochemical aspects of the complexes have been studied in order to understand the role of the bridging units towards the intermetallic electronic coupling in the dinuclear complexes.

  19. Rapidly Developing Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Oline Barrios Poulsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe cutaneous reactions with potentially fatal outcomes can have many different causes. The Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN are rare. They are characterized by a low incidence but high mortality, and drugs are most commonly implicated. Urgent active therapy is required. Prompt recognition and withdrawal of suspect drug and rapid intervention can result in favourable outcome. No further international guidelines for treatment exist, and much of the treatment relies on old or experimental concepts with no scientific evidence. We report on a 54-year-old man experiencing rapidly developing drug-induced severe TEN and presented multiorgan failure involving the respiratory and circulatory system, coagulopathy, and renal insufficiency. Detachment counted 30% of total body surface area (TBSA. SCORTEN = 5, indicating a mortality rate >90%. The patient was sedated and mechanically ventilated, supported with fluids and inotropes to maintain a stable circulation. Component therapy was guided by thromboelastography (TEG. The patient received plasmapheresis, and shock reversal treatment was initiated. He was transferred to a specialized intensive care burn unit within 24 hours from admittance. The initial care was continued, and hemodialysis was started. Pulmonary, circulatory, and renal sequelae resolved with intensive care, and re-epithelialization progressed slowly. The patient was discharged home on hospital day 19.

  20. Epigenetic silencing by the HUSH complex mediates position-effect variegation in human cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Nicholas J.; Wals, Kim; Antrobus, Robin; Göttgens, Berthold; Dougan, Gordon; Dawson, Mark A.; Lehner, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Forward genetic screens in Drosophila melanogaster for modifiers of position-effect variegation have revealed the basis of much of our understanding of heterochromatin. We took an analogous approach to identify genes required for epigenetic repression in human cells. A non-lethal forward genetic screen in near-haploid KBM7 cells identified the Human Silencing Hub (HUSH), a complex of three poorly-characterised proteins, TASOR, MPP8, and periphilin, which is absent from Drosophila but conserved from fish to humans. Loss of HUSH subunits resulted in decreased H3K9me3 at both endogenous genomic loci and retroviruses integrated into heterochromatin. Our results suggest that the HUSH complex is recruited to genomic loci rich in H3K9me3, where subsequent recruitment of the methyltransferase SETDB1 is required for further H3K9me3 deposition to maintain transcriptional silencing. PMID:26022416

  1. TWEAK inhibits TRAF2-mediated CD40 signaling by destabilization of CD40 signaling complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann, Steffen; Lang, Isabell; Rosenthal, Alevtina; Schäfer, Viktoria; Weisenberger, Daniela; Carmona Arana, José Antonio; Trebing, Johannes; Siegmund, Daniela; Neumann, Manfred; Wajant, Harald

    2013-09-01

    We found recently that TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) and fibroblast growth factor-inducible-14 (Fn14) by virtue of their strong capability to reduce the freely available cytoplasmic pool of TNFR-associated factor (TRAF)2 and cellular inhibitors of apoptosis (cIAPs) antagonize the functions of these molecules in TNFR1 signaling, resulting in sensitization for apoptosis and inhibition of classical NF-κB signaling. In this study, we demonstrate that priming of cells with TWEAK also interferes with activation of the classical NF-κB pathway by CD40. Likewise, there was strong inhibition of CD40 ligand (CD40L)-induced activation of MAPKs in TWEAK-primed cells. FACS analysis and CD40L binding studies revealed unchanged CD40 expression and normal CD40L-CD40 interaction in TWEAK-primed cells. CD40L immunoprecipitates, however, showed severely reduced amounts of CD40 and CD40-associated proteins, indicating impaired formation or reduced stability of CD40L-CD40 signaling complexes. The previously described inhibitory effect of TWEAK on TNFR1 signaling has been traced back to reduced activity of the TNFR1-associated TRAF2-cIAP1/2 ubiquitinase complex and did not affect the stability of the immunoprecipitable TNFR1 receptor complex. Thus, the inhibitory effect of TWEAK on CD40 signaling must be based at least partly on other mechanisms. In line with this, signaling by the CD40-related TRAF2-interacting receptor TNFR2 was also attenuated but still immunoprecipitable in TWEAK-primed cells. Collectively, we show that Fn14 activation by soluble TWEAK impairs CD40L-CD40 signaling complex formation and inhibits CD40 signaling and thus identify the Fn14-TWEAK system as a potential novel regulator of CD40-related cellular functions.

  2. Importance of iron complexation for Fenton-mediated hydroxyl radical production at circumneutral pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Miller

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The reaction between Fe(II and H2O2 to yield hydroxyl radicals (HO•, the Fenton reaction, is of interest due to its role in trace metal and natural organic matter biogeochemistry, its utility in water treatment and its role in oxidative cell degradation and associated human disease. There is significant dispute over whether HO•, the most reactive of the so-called reactive oxygen species, is formed in this reaction, particularly under circumneutral conditions relevant to natural systems. In this work we have studied the oxidation kinetics of Fe(II complexed by L = citrate, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA and also measured HO• production using phthalhydrazide as a probe compound at pH 8.2. It is shown that HO• is the sole product of the Fe(IIL-H2O2 reaction for L = EDTA and DTPA, with kinetic modelling of the full reaction pathway utilized to confirm this finding. Quantitative HO• production also appears likely for L = citrate, although uncertainties with the speciation of Fe(II-citrate complexes as well as difficulties in modelling the oxidation kinetics of these complexes has prevented a definitive conclusion. In the absence of ligands at circumneutral pH, inorganic Fe(II reacts with H2O2 to yield a species other than HO•, contrary to the well-established production of HO• from inorganic Fe(II at low pH. Our results suggest that at high pH Fe(II must be complexed for HO• production to occur.

  3. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorhagen, Susanne; Niessen, Carien M

    2014-11-01

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Reductive Cleavage of CO2 by Metal-Ligand-Cooperation Mediated by an Iridium Pincer Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Moran; Gellrich, Urs; Anaby, Aviel; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Milstein, David

    2016-05-25

    A unique mode of stoichiometric CO2 activation and reductive splitting based on metal-ligand-cooperation is described. The novel Ir hydride complexes [((t)Bu-PNP*)Ir(H)2] (2) ((t)Bu-PNP*, deprotonated (t)Bu-PNP ligand) and [((t)Bu-PNP)Ir(H)] (3) react with CO2 to give the dearomatized complex [((t)Bu-PNP*)Ir(CO)] (4) and water. Mechanistic studies have identified an adduct in which CO2 is bound to the ligand and metal, [((t)Bu-PNP-COO)Ir(H)2] (5), and a di-CO2 iridacycle [((t)Bu-PNP)Ir(H)(C2O4-κC,O)] (6). DFT calculations confirm the formation of 5 and 6 as reversibly formed side products, and suggest an η(1)-CO2 intermediate leading to the thermodynamic product 4. The calculations support a metal-ligand-cooperation pathway in which an internal deprotonation of the benzylic position by the η(1)-CO2 ligand leads to a carboxylate intermediate, which further reacts with the hydride ligand to give complex 4 and water.

  5. The IDOL–UBE2D complex mediates sterol-dependent degradation of the LDL receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Fairall, Louise; Goult, Benjamin T.; Calkin, Anna C.; Hong, Cynthia; Millard, Christopher J.; Tontonoz, Peter; Schwabe, John W.R.

    2011-01-01

    We previously identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase IDOL as a sterol-dependent regulator of the LDL receptor (LDLR). The molecular pathway underlying IDOL action, however, remains to be determined. Here we report the identification and biochemical and structural characterization of an E2–E3 ubiquitin ligase complex for LDLR degradation. We identified the UBE2D family (UBE2D1–4) as E2 partners for IDOL that support both autoubiquitination and IDOL-dependent ubiquitination of the LDLR in a cell-free system. NMR chemical shift mapping and a 2.1 Å crystal structure of the IDOL RING domain–UBE2D1 complex revealed key interactions between the dimeric IDOL protein and the E2 enzyme. Analysis of the IDOL–UBE2D1 interface also defined the stereochemical basis for the selectivity of IDOL for UBE2Ds over other E2 ligases. Structure-based mutations that inhibit IDOL dimerization or IDOL–UBE2D interaction block IDOL-dependent LDLR ubiquitination and degradation. Furthermore, expression of a dominant-negative UBE2D enzyme inhibits the ability of IDOL to degrade the LDLR in cells. These results identify the IDOL–UBE2D complex as an important determinant of LDLR activity, and provide insight into molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of cholesterol uptake. PMID:21685362

  6. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorhagen, Susanne; Niessen, Carien M., E-mail: carien.niessen@uni-koeln.de

    2014-11-01

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium.

  7. The mate recognition protein gene mediates reproductive isolation and speciation in the Brachionus plicatilis cryptic species complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gribble Kristin E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemically mediated prezygotic barriers to reproduction likely play an important role in speciation. In facultatively sexual monogonont rotifers from the Brachionus plicatilis cryptic species complex, mate recognition of females by males is mediated by the Mate Recognition Protein (MRP, a globular glycoprotein on the surface of females, encoded by the mmr-b gene family. In this study, we sequenced mmr-b copies from 27 isolates representing 11 phylotypes of the B. plicatilis species complex, examined the mode of evolution and selection of mmr-b, and determined the relationship between mmr-b genetic distance and mate recognition among isolates. Results Isolates of the B. plicatilis species complex have 1–4 copies of mmr-b, each composed of 2–9 nearly identical tandem repeats. The repeats within a gene copy are generally more similar than are gene copies among phylotypes, suggesting concerted evolution. Compared to housekeeping genes from the same isolates, mmr-b has accumulated only half as many synonymous differences but twice as many non-synonymous differences. Most of the amino acid differences between repeats appear to occur on the outer face of the protein, and these often result in changes in predicted patterns of phosphorylation. However, we found no evidence of positive selection driving these differences. Isolates with the most divergent copies were unable to mate with other isolates and rarely self-crossed. Overall the degree of mate recognition was significantly correlated with the genetic distance of mmr-b. Conclusions Discrimination of compatible mates in the B. plicatilis species complex is determined by proteins encoded by closely related copies of a single gene, mmr-b. While concerted evolution of the tandem repeats in mmr-b may function to maintain identity, it can also lead to the rapid spread of a mutation through all copies in the genome and thus to reproductive isolation. The mmr-b gene is evolving

  8. Toxic epidermal necrolysis associated with severe cytomegalovirus infection in a patient on regular hemodialysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Khalaf

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary illness with cytomegalovirus leads to latent infection with possible reactivations especially in the immunocompromised patients. Toxic epidermal necrolysis is an immune mediated cytotoxic reaction. A fifty years old female diabetic hypertensive patient with end stage renal disease was admitted with fever of unknown origin, constitutional symptoms, vague upper gastrointestinal symptoms and skin rash. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopic biopsy confirmed her diagnosis with cytomegalovirus esophagitis and duodenitis. Cytomegalovirus immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G levels were negative but polymerase chain reaction showed fulminant viremia. Biopsy of the skin rash was consistent with toxic epidermal necrolysis. Despite treatment with Ganciclovir, intravenous immunoglobulins, and granulocyte colony stimulating factor the patient’s condition rapidly deteriorated and she died due to multiorgan failure, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy and overwhelming sepsis. Probably there is a true association linking toxic epidermal necrolysis to fulminant reactivation of cytomegalovirus. The aim of this anecdote is reporting a newly recognized presentation of cytomegalovirus.

  9. Role of mucosal prostaglandins and DNA synthesis in gastric cytoprotection by luminal epidermal growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konturek, S J; Brzozowski, T; Piastucki, I; Dembinski, A; Radecki, T; Dembinska-Kiec, A; Zmuda, A; Gregory, H

    1981-01-01

    This study compares the effect of epidermal growth factor and prostaglandins (PGE2 or PGI2), applied topically to gastric mucosa, on gastric secretion and formation of ASA-induced gastric ulcerations in rats. Epidermal growth factor given topically in non-antisecretory doses prevented dose-dependently the formation of ASA-induced ulcers without affecting prostaglandin generation but with a significant rise in DNA synthesis in the oxyntic mucosa. The anti-ulcer effect of topical prostaglandins was also accompanied by an increase in DNA synthesis. This study indicates that topical epidermal growth factor, like PGE2 or PGI2, is cytoprotective and that this cytoprotection is not mediated by the inhibition of gastric secretion or prostaglandin formation but related to the increase in DNA synthesis in oxyntic mucosa. PMID:7030877

  10. SLAC, a complex between Sla1 and Las17, regulates actin polymerization during clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, Daniel; Di Pietro, Santiago M

    2012-11-01

    During clathrin-mediated endocytosis, branched actin polymerization nucleated by the Arp2/3 complex provides force needed to drive vesicle internalization. Las17 (yeast WASp) is the strongest activator of the Arp2/3 complex in yeast cells; it is not autoinhibited and arrives to endocytic sites 20 s before actin polymerization begins. It is unclear how Las17 is kept inactive for 20 s at endocytic sites, thus restricting actin polymerization to late stages of endocytosis. In this paper, we demonstrate that Las17 is part of a large and biochemically stable complex with Sla1, a clathrin adaptor that inhibits Las17 activity. The interaction is direct, multivalent, and strong, and was mapped to novel Las17 polyproline motifs that are simultaneously class I and class II. In vitro pyrene-actin polymerization assays established that Sla1 inhibition of Las17 activity depends on the class I/II Las17 polyproline motifs and is based on competition between Sla1 and monomeric actin for binding to Las17. Furthermore, live-cell imaging showed the interaction with Sla1 is important for normal Las17 recruitment to endocytic sites, inhibition during the initial 20 s, and efficient endocytosis. These results advance our understanding of the regulation of actin polymerization in endocytosis.

  11. A TDG/CBP/RARα Ternary Complex Mediates the Retinoic Acid-dependent Expression of DNA Methylation-sensitive Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Léger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG is a multifunctional enzyme, which is essential for embryonic development. It mediates the base excision repair (BER of G:T and G:U DNA mismatches arising from the deamination of 5-methyl cytosine (5-MeC and cytosine, respectively. Recent studies have pointed at a role of TDG during the active demethylation of 5-MeC within CpG islands. TDG interacts with the histone acetylase CREB-binding protein (CBP to activate CBP-dependent transcription. In addition, TDG also interacts with the retinoic acid receptor α (RARα, resulting in the activation of RARα target genes. Here we provide evidence for the existence of a functional ternary complex containing TDG, CBP and activated RARα. Using global transcriptome profiling, we uncover a coupling of de novo methylation-sensitive and RA-dependent transcription, which coincides with a significant subset of CBP target genes. The introduction of a point mutation in TDG, which neither affects overall protein structure nor BER activity, leads to a significant loss in ternary complex stability, resulting in the deregulation of RA targets involved in cellular networks associated with DNA replication, recombination and repair. We thus demonstrate for the first time a direct coupling of TDG’s epigenomic and transcription regulatory function through ternary complexes with CBP and RARα.

  12. Preparation and characterization of nanocrystalline CuO powders with the different surfactants and complexing agent mediated precipitation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendran, V.; Gajendiran, J., E-mail: gaja.nanotech@gmail.com

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • CuO nanostructures by surfactants mediated method. • Structural and optical properties of CuO nanostructures changes under the effect of surface modifier. • Citric acid assisted is the best, in terms of size, morphology and optical properties than that of CTAB, SDS and PEG-400. - Abstract: Nanostructures of copper oxide (CuO) was synthesized into crystallite sized ranging from 20 to 50 nm in the presence of different surfactants, and complex agent such as cityl tri methyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), sodium do decyl sulfate (SDS), poly ethylene glycol (PEG-400) and citric acid via a precipitation route. Variations in several parameters and their effects on the structural and optical properties of CuO nanostructures (crystallite size, morphology and band gap) were investigated by XRD, FTIR, SEM and UV analysis. The UV–visible absorption spectra of the different surfactants and complexing agent assisted CuO nanostructures indicates that the estimated optical band gap energy value (1.94–1.98 eV) is higher than that of the bulk CuO value (1.4 eV), which is attributed to the quantum confinement effect. The formation mechanism of different surfactants and complexing agent assisted CuO nanostructures is also proposed.

  13. The evolution of the dystroglycan complex, a major mediator of muscle integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine C. Adams

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Basement membrane (BM extracellular matrices are crucial for the coordination of different tissue layers. A matrix adhesion receptor that is important for BM function and stability in many mammalian tissues is the dystroglycan (DG complex. This comprises the non-covalently-associated extracellular α-DG, that interacts with laminin in the BM, and the transmembrane β-DG, that interacts principally with dystrophin to connect to the actin cytoskeleton. Mutations in dystrophin, DG, or several enzymes that glycosylate α-DG underlie severe forms of human muscular dystrophy. Nonwithstanding the pathophysiological importance of the DG complex and its fundamental interest as a non-integrin system of cell-ECM adhesion, the evolution of DG and its interacting proteins is not understood. We analysed the phylogenetic distribution of DG, its proximal binding partners and key processing enzymes in extant metazoan and relevant outgroups. We identify that DG originated after the divergence of ctenophores from porifera and eumetazoa. The C-terminal half of the DG core protein is highly-conserved, yet the N-terminal region, that includes the laminin-binding region, has undergone major lineage-specific divergences. Phylogenetic analysis based on the C-terminal IG2_MAT_NU region identified three distinct clades corresponding to deuterostomes, arthropods, and mollusks/early-diverging metazoans. Whereas the glycosyltransferases that modify α-DG are also present in choanoflagellates, the DG-binding proteins dystrophin and laminin originated at the base of the metazoa, and DG-associated sarcoglycan is restricted to cnidarians and bilaterians. These findings implicate extensive functional diversification of DG within invertebrate lineages and identify the laminin-DG-dystrophin axis as a conserved adhesion system that evolved subsequent to integrin-ECM adhesion, likely to enhance the functional complexity of cell-BM interactions in early metazoans.

  14. The evolution of the dystroglycan complex, a major mediator of muscle integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Josephine C; Brancaccio, Andrea

    2015-08-28

    Basement membrane (BM) extracellular matrices are crucial for the coordination of different tissue layers. A matrix adhesion receptor that is important for BM function and stability in many mammalian tissues is the dystroglycan (DG) complex. This comprises the non-covalently-associated extracellular α-DG, that interacts with laminin in the BM, and the transmembrane β-DG, that interacts principally with dystrophin to connect to the actin cytoskeleton. Mutations in dystrophin, DG, or several enzymes that glycosylate α-DG underlie severe forms of human muscular dystrophy. Nonwithstanding the pathophysiological importance of the DG complex and its fundamental interest as a non-integrin system of cell-ECM adhesion, the evolution of DG and its interacting proteins is not understood. We analysed the phylogenetic distribution of DG, its proximal binding partners and key processing enzymes in extant metazoan and relevant outgroups. We identify that DG originated after the divergence of ctenophores from porifera and eumetazoa. The C-terminal half of the DG core protein is highly-conserved, yet the N-terminal region, that includes the laminin-binding region, has undergone major lineage-specific divergences. Phylogenetic analysis based on the C-terminal IG2_MAT_NU region identified three distinct clades corresponding to deuterostomes, arthropods, and mollusks/early-diverging metazoans. Whereas the glycosyltransferases that modify α-DG are also present in choanoflagellates, the DG-binding proteins dystrophin and laminin originated at the base of the metazoa, and DG-associated sarcoglycan is restricted to cnidarians and bilaterians. These findings implicate extensive functional diversification of DG within invertebrate lineages and identify the laminin-DG-dystrophin axis as a conserved adhesion system that evolved subsequent to integrin-ECM adhesion, likely to enhance the functional complexity of cell-BM interactions in early metazoans.

  15. Conserved SMP domains of the ERMES complex bind phospholipids and mediate tether assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AhYoung, Andrew P; Jiang, Jiansen; Zhang, Jiang; Khoi Dang, Xuan; Loo, Joseph A; Zhou, Z Hong; Egea, Pascal F

    2015-06-23

    Membrane contact sites (MCS) between organelles are proposed as nexuses for the exchange of lipids, small molecules, and other signals crucial to cellular function and homeostasis. Various protein complexes, such as the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial encounter structure (ERMES), function as dynamic molecular tethers between organelles. Here, we report the reconstitution and characterization of subcomplexes formed by the cytoplasm-exposed synaptotagmin-like mitochondrial lipid-binding protein (SMP) domains present in three of the five ERMES subunits--the soluble protein Mdm12, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident membrane protein Mmm1, and the mitochondrial membrane protein Mdm34. SMP domains are conserved lipid-binding domains found exclusively in proteins at MCS. We show that the SMP domains of Mdm12 and Mmm1 associate into a tight heterotetramer with equimolecular stoichiometry. Our 17-Å-resolution EM structure of the complex reveals an elongated crescent-shaped particle in which two Mdm12 subunits occupy symmetric but distal positions at the opposite ends of a central ER-anchored Mmm1 homodimer. Rigid body fitting of homology models of these SMP domains in the density maps reveals a distinctive extended tubular structure likely traversed by a hydrophobic tunnel. Furthermore, these two SMP domains bind phospholipids and display a strong preference for phosphatidylcholines, a class of phospholipids whose exchange between the ER and mitochondria is essential. Last, we show that the three SMP-containing ERMES subunits form a ternary complex in which Mdm12 bridges Mmm1 to Mdm34. Our findings highlight roles for SMP domains in ERMES assembly and phospholipid binding and suggest a structure-based mechanism for the facilitated transport of phospholipids between organelles.

  16. Central complex and mushroom bodies mediate novelty choice behavior in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Narendra; Wolf, Reinhard; Heisenberg, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Novelty choice, a visual paired-comparison task, for the fly Drosophila melanogaster is studied with severely restrained single animals in a flight simulator. The virtual environment simulates free flight for rotation in the horizontal plane. The behavior has three functional components: visual azimuth orientation, working memory, and pattern discrimination (perception). Here we study novelty choice in relation to its neural substrate in the brain and show that it requires the central complex and, in particular, the ring neurons of the ellipsoid body. Surprisingly, it also involves the mushroom bodies which are needed specifically in the comparison of patterns of different sizes.

  17. Copper-Mediated Fluorination of Arylboronate Esters. Identification of a Copper(III) Fluoride Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fier, Patrick S.; Luo, Jingwei; Hartwig, John F.

    2013-01-01

    A method for the direct conversion of arylboronate esters to aryl fluorides under mild conditions with readily available reagents is reported. Tandem reactions have also been developed for the fluorination of arenes and aryl bromides through aryl-boronate ester intermediates. Mechanistic studies suggest that this fluorination reaction occurs through facile oxidation of Cu(I) to Cu(III) followed by rate-limiting transmetallation of a bound arylboronate to Cu(III). Fast C-F reductive elimination is proposed to occur from an aryl-copper(III)-fluoride complex. Cu(III) intermediates have been generated independently and identified by NMR spectroscopy and ESI-MS. PMID:23384209

  18. Well-defined silica-supported zirconium–imido complexes mediated heterogeneous imine metathesis

    KAUST Repository

    Hamzaoui, Bilel

    2016-02-15

    Upon prolonged thermal exposure under vacuum, a well-defined single-site surface species [(≡Si-O-)Zr(NEt2)3] (1) evolves into an ethylimido complex [(≡Si-O-)Zr(=NEt)NEt2] (2). Reactions of 2 with an imine substrate result in imido/imine (=NRi, R: Et, Ph) exchange (metathesis) with the formation of [(≡Si-O-)Zr(=NPh)NEt2] (3). Compounds 2 and 3 effectively catalyze imine/imine cross-metathesis and are thus considered as the first heterogeneous catalysts active for imine metathesis. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2016.

  19. Complex molecular mechanisms cooperate to mediate histone deacetylase inhibitors anti-tumour activity in neuroblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardou Katya

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi are a new class of promising anti-tumour agent inhibiting cell proliferation and survival in tumour cells with very low toxicity toward normal cells. Neuroblastoma (NB is the second most common solid tumour in children still associated with poor outcome in higher stages and, thus NB strongly requires novel treatment modalities. Results We show here that the HDACi Sodium Butyrate (NaB, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA and Trichostatin A (TSA strongly reduce NB cells viability. The anti-tumour activity of these HDACi involved the induction of cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, followed by the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, via the activation of the caspases cascade. Moreover, HDACi mediated the activation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bid and BimEL and the inactivation of the anti-apoptotic proteins XIAP, Bcl-xL, RIP and survivin, that further enhanced the apoptotic signal. Interestingly, the activity of these apoptosis regulators was modulated by several different mechanisms, either by caspases dependent proteolytic cleavage or by degradation via the proteasome pathway. In addition, HDACi strongly impaired the hypoxia-induced secretion of VEGF by NB cells. Conclusion HDACi are therefore interesting new anti-tumour agents for targeting highly malignant tumours such as NB, as these agents display a strong toxicity toward aggressive NB cells and they may possibly reduce angiogenesis by decreasing VEGF production by NB cells.

  20. Lipolysis - a highly regulated multi-enzyme complex mediates the catabolism of cellular fat stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, Achim; Zimmermann, Robert; Oberer, Monika; Zechner, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    Lipolysis is the biochemical pathway responsible for the catabolism of triacylglycerol (TAG) stored in cellular lipid droplets. The hydrolytic cleavage of TAG generates non-esterified fatty acids, which are subsequently used as energy substrates, essential precursors for lipid and membrane synthesis, or mediators in cell signaling processes. Consistent with its central importance in lipid and energy homeostasis, lipolysis occurs in essentially all tissues and cell types, it is most abundant, however, in white and brown adipose tissue. Over the last 5years, important enzymes and regulatory protein factors involved in lipolysis have been identified. These include an essential TAG hydrolase named adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) [annotated as patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein A2], the ATGL activator comparative gene identification-58 [annotated as α/β hydrolase containing protein 5], and the ATGL inhibitor G0/G1 switch gene 2. Together with the established hormone-sensitive lipase [annotated as lipase E] and monoglyceride lipase, these proteins constitute the basic "lipolytic machinery". Additionally, a large number of hormonal signaling pathways and lipid droplet-associated protein factors regulate substrate access and the activity of the "lipolysome". This review summarizes the current knowledge concerning the enzymes and regulatory processes governing lipolysis of fat stores in adipose and non-adipose tissues. Special emphasis will be given to ATGL, its regulation, and physiological function. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Lipolysis – A highly regulated multi-enzyme complex mediates the catabolism of cellular fat stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, Achim; Zimmermann, Robert; Oberer, Monika; Zechner, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    Summary Lipolysis is the biochemical pathway responsible for the catabolism of triacylglycerol (TAG) stored in cellular lipid droplets. The hydrolytic cleavage of TAG generates non-esterified fatty acids, which are subsequently used as energy substrates, essential precursors for lipid and membrane synthesis, or mediators in cell signaling processes. Consistent with its central importance in lipid and energy homeostasis, lipolysis occurs in essentially all tissues and cell types, it is most abundant, however, in white and brown adipose tissue. Over the last 5 years, important enzymes and regulatory protein factors involved in lipolysis have been identified. These include an essential TAG hydrolase named adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) [annotated as patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein A2], the ATGL activator comparative gene identification-58 [annotated as α/β hydrolase containing protein 5], and the ATGL inhibitor G0/G1 switch gene 2. Together with the established hormone-sensitive lipase [annotated as lipase E] and monoglyceride lipase, these proteins constitute the basic “lipolytic machinery”. Additionally, a large number of hormonal signaling pathways and lipid droplet-associated protein factors regulate substrate access and the activity of the “lipolysome”. This review summarizes the current knowledge concerning the enzymes and regulatory processes governing lipolysis of fat stores in adipose and non-adipose tissues. Special emphasis will be given to ATGL, its regulation, and physiological function. PMID:21087632

  2. Main Group Lewis Acid-Mediated Transformations of Transition-Metal Hydride Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Ayan; Teets, Thomas S

    2016-08-10

    This Review highlights stoichiometric reactions and elementary steps of catalytic reactions involving cooperative participation of transition-metal hydrides and main group Lewis acids. Included are reactions where the transition-metal hydride acts as a reactant as well as transformations that form the metal hydride as a product. This Review is divided by reaction type, illustrating the diverse roles that Lewis acids can play in mediating transformations involving transition-metal hydrides as either reactants or products. We begin with a discussion of reactions where metal hydrides form direct adducts with Lewis acids, elaborating the structure and dynamics of the products of these reactions. The bulk of this Review focuses on reactions where the transition metal and Lewis acid act in cooperation, and includes sections on carbonyl reduction, H2 activation, and hydride elimination reactions, all of which can be promoted by Lewis acids. Also included is a section on Lewis acid-base secondary coordination sphere interactions, which can influence the reactivity of hydrides. Work from the past 50 years is included, but the majority of this Review focuses on research from the past decade, with the intent of showcasing the rapid emergence of this field and the potential for further development into the future.

  3. REST-mediated recruitment of polycomb repressor complexes in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Nikolaj; Lerdrup, Mads; Landt, Eskild

    2012-01-01

    Polycomb Repressive Complex (PRC) 1 and PRC2 regulate genes involved in differentiation and development. However, the mechanism for how PRC1 and PRC2 are recruited to genes in mammalian cells is unclear. Here we present evidence for an interaction between the transcription factor REST, PRC1......, and increased gene expression. Genome-wide analysis of Polycomb binding in Rest¿/¿ and Eed¿/¿ mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells showed that Rest was required for PRC1 recruitment to a subset of Polycomb regulated neuronal genes. Furthermore, we found that PRC1 can be recruited to Rest binding sites independently...... of CpG islands and the H3K27Me3 mark. Surprisingly, PRC2 was frequently increased around Rest binding sites located in CpG-rich regions in the Rest¿/¿ mES cells, indicating a more complex interplay where Rest also can limit PRC2 recruitment. Therefore, we propose that Rest has context...

  4. Drying-Mediated Self-Assembly of Highly Ordered Complex Structures: From Polymers to Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhiqun

    2009-03-01

    Drying of a sessile drop containing nonvolatile solutes readily self-assembles into a number of concentric ``coffee rings'' by repetitive ``stick-slip'' motion of the three-phase contact line. However, due mainly to lack of control over the evaporation process of the drop, the challenge remains to use evaporative self-assembly to rationally ``synthesize'' ``coffee rings'' of different shapes and sizes of high regularity and fidelity. Here, we report a facile, robust, and one-step evaporation method for producing in a precisely controllable manner versatile microstructures possessing high regularity, dispensing with the need for lithographic techniques and externally applied fields. Polymer or nanocrystal solutions are confined in a simple geometry comprised of a curved surface placed upon a flat substrate. By changing the shape of the upper surface of the imposed geometry, the controlled, evaporative self-assembly of polymer or nanocrystal solutions yields a variety of complex, intriguing, and well-ordered structures over large areas. As such, this method represents a significant advance in creating regularly organized, complex structures with potential applications in microelectronics, optoelectronics, and biotechnology, among other areas.

  5. Complex-Mediated Synthesis of Tantalum Oxyfluoride Hierarchical Nanostructures for Highly Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Leilei; Gong, Haotian; Deng, Li; Long, Fei; Gu, Yu; Guan, Jianguo

    2016-04-13

    In this work, we have, for the first time, developed a facile wet-chemical route to obtain a novel photocatalytic material of tantalum oxyfluoride hierarchical nanostructures composed of amorphous cores and single crystalline TaO2F nanorod shells (ACHNs) by regulating the one-step hydrothermal process of TaF5 in a mixed solution of isopropanol (i-PrOH) and H2O. In this approach, elaborately controlling the reaction temperature and volume ratio of i-PrOH and H2O enabled TaF5 to transform into intermediate coordination complex ions of [TaOF3·2F](2-) and [TaF7](2-), which subsequently produced tantalum oxyfluoride ACHNs via a secondary nucleation and growth due to a stepwise change in hydrolysis rates of the two complex ions. Because of the unique chemical composition, crystal structure and micromorphology, the as-prepared tantalum oxyfluoride ACHNs show a more negative flat band potential, an accelerated charge transfer, and a remarkable surface area of 152.4 m(2) g(-1) contributing to increased surface reaction sites. As a result, they exhibit a photocatalytic activity for hydrogen production up to 1.95 mmol h(-1) g(-1) under the illumination of a simulated solar light without any assistance of co-catalysts, indicating that the as-prepared tantalum oxyfluoride ACHNs are a novel promising photocatalytic material for hydrogen production.

  6. Complex interactions mediate the effects of fish farming on benthic chemistry within a region of Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Daniel J; Solan, Martin

    2011-07-01

    Fish farms typically generate a localised gradient of both organic and inorganic pollutants in the underlying sediments. The factors governing the extent of such impacts remain poorly understood, particularly when multiple sites are considered. We used regression-type techniques to examine the drivers of sediment chemistry patterns around five Scottish fish farms that ranged in size (120-2106 tonnes) and fish species, but were located within farm illustrate that between-site variability can be high, even at this regional-scale. These effects must be accounted for when comparing the effects of fish farming at different locations. All measured chemical parameters declined rapidly as a function of distance from the cage edge, with the rate of decline depending on local current speeds. Only phosphorus concentrations increased directly with farm size. Increasing current speeds at farms carbon in the underlying sediments, whereas the opposite occurred at larger farms. The counterintuitive effect of current speed at farms above the threshold size suggests that the physical properties of the seabed at these locations favour the accumulation of organic wastes and/or that the underlying communities have a lower assimilative capacity. These imply that the environmental efficiency of fish farming activities may be further optimised by taking into account the interaction between current speed, substrate complexity and the functional characteristics of the benthos. Collectively, our analyses demonstrate that the fate of fish farm-derived wastes is complex and highlight the need for site-specific management techniques.

  7. Crystal Structure of the ERp44-Peroxiredoxin 4 Complex Reveals the Molecular Mechanisms of Thiol-Mediated Protein Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Li, De-Feng; Wang, Xi'e; Liang, Jinzhao; Sitia, Roberto; Wang, Chih-Chen; Wang, Xi

    2016-10-04

    ERp44 controls the localization and transport of diverse proteins in the early secretory pathway. The mechanisms that allow client recognition and the source of the oxidative power for forming intermolecular disulfides are as yet unknown. Here we present the structure of ERp44 bound to a client, peroxiredoxin 4. Our data reveal that ERp44 binds the oxidized form of peroxiredoxin 4 via thiol-disulfide interchange reactions. The structure explains the redox-dependent recognition and characterizes the essential non-covalent interactions at the interface. The ERp44-Prx4 covalent complexes can be reduced by glutathione and protein disulfide isomerase family members in the ER, allowing the two components to recycle. This work provides insights into the mechanisms of thiol-mediated protein retention and indicates the key roles of ERp44 in this biochemical cycle to optimize oxidative folding and redox homeostasis.

  8. TGFbeta-mediated formation of pRb-E2F complexes in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao Tang

    2008-05-01

    TGFbeta is well known for its inhibitory effect on cell cycle G1 checkpoint kinases. However, its role in the control of pRb-E2F complexes is not well established. TGFbeta inhibits phosphorylation of pRb at several serine and threonine residues and regulates the association of E2F transcription factors with pRb family proteins. Recent studies found that predominantly E2F-4, p130, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) are found to bind to corresponding E2F-responsive promoters in G0/G1 phase. As cells progress through mid-G1, p130-E2F4 complex are replaced by p107-E2F4 followed by activators E2F1, 2, and 3. pRb was not detectable in the promoters containing the E2F-responsive site in cycling cells but was associated with E2F4-p130 complexes or E2F4-p107 complexes during G0/G1 phase. In human myeloid leukemia cell line, MV4-11, TGFbeta upregulated pRb-E2F-4 and p130-E2F-4, and downregulated p107-E2F-4 complexes. However, pRB-E2F1 and pRb-E2F3 complexes were found in proliferating cells but not in TGFbeta arrested G1 cells. In addition, electrophoretic gel mobility shift assay (EMSA) could not detect pRb-E2F DNA-binding activities either in S or G1 phase but exhibited the existence of p107-E2F4 in proliferating cells and p130-E2F4 complexes in TGFbeta-arrested G1 cells, respectively. Our data suggest that p107 and p130, but not pRb, and the repressor E2F, but not activator E2Fs, play a critical role in regulating E2F-responsive gene expression in TGFbeta-mediated cell cycle control in human myeloid leukemia cells.

  9. The Growing Complexity of Cancer Cell Response to DNA-Damaging Agents: Caspase 3 Mediates Cell Death or Survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Andrais, Bonnie; Kumar, Piyush; Murray, David

    2016-05-11

    It is widely stated that wild-type p53 either mediates the activation of cell cycle checkpoints to facilitate DNA repair and promote cell survival, or orchestrates apoptotic cell death following exposure to cancer therapeutic agents. This reigning paradigm has been challenged by numerous discoveries with different human cell types, including solid tumor-derived cell lines. Thus, activation of the p53 signaling pathway by ionizing radiation and other DNA-damaging agents hinders apoptosis and triggers growth arrest (e.g., through premature senescence) in some genetic backgrounds; such growth arrested cells remain viable, secrete growth-promoting factors, and give rise to progeny with stem cell-like properties. In addition, caspase 3, which is best known for its role in the execution phase of apoptosis, has been recently reported to facilitate (rather than suppress) DNA damage-induced genomic instability and carcinogenesis. This observation is consistent with an earlier report demonstrating that caspase 3 mediates secretion of the pro-survival factor prostaglandin E₂, which in turn promotes enrichment of tumor repopulating cells. In this article, we review these and related discoveries and point out novel cancer therapeutic strategies. One of our objectives is to demonstrate the growing complexity of the DNA damage response beyond the conventional "repair and survive, or die" hypothesis.

  10. A component of the transcriptional mediator complex inhibits RAS-dependent vulval fate specification in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghal, Nadeem; Sternberg, Paul W

    2003-01-01

    Negative regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)/RAS signaling pathways is important for normal development and the prevention of disease in humans. We have used a genetic screen in C. elegans to identify genes that antagonize the activity of activated LET-23, a member of the EGFR family of RTKs. We identified two loss-of-function mutations in dpy-22, previously cloned as sop-1, that promote the ability of activated LET-23 to induce ectopic vulval fates. DPY-22 is a glutamine-rich protein that is most similar to human TRAP230, a component of a transcriptional mediator complex. DPY-22 has previously been shown to regulate WNT responses through inhibition of the beta-catenin-like protein BAR-1. We provide evidence that DPY-22 also inhibits RAS-dependent vulval fate specification independently of BAR-1, and probably regulates the activities of multiple transcription factors during development. Furthermore, we demonstrate that although inhibition of BAR-1-dependent gene expression has been shown to require the C-terminal glutamine-rich region, this region is dispensable for inhibition of RAS-dependent cell differentiation. Thus, the glutamine-rich region contributes to specificity of this class of mediator protein.

  11. Well-defined silica-supported zirconium-imido complexes mediated heterogeneous imine metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzaoui, Bilel; Pelletier, Jérémie D A; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-03-28

    Upon prolonged thermal exposure under vacuum, a well-defined single-site surface species [([triple bond, length as m-dash]Si-O-)Zr(NEt2)3] () evolves into an ethylimido complex [([triple bond, length as m-dash]Si-O-)Zr([double bond, length as m-dash]NEt)NEt2] (). Reactions of with an imine substrate result in imido/imine ([double bond, length as m-dash]NRi, R: Et, Ph) exchange (metathesis) with the formation of [([triple bond, length as m-dash]Si-O-)Zr([double bond, length as m-dash]NPh)NEt2] (). Compounds and effectively catalyze imine/imine cross-metathesis and are thus considered as the first heterogeneous catalysts active for imine metathesis.

  12. Inter-plant communication through mycorrhizal networks mediates complex adaptive behaviour in plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzelak, Monika A; Asay, Amanda K; Pickles, Brian J; Simard, Suzanne W

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive behaviour of plants, including rapid changes in physiology, gene regulation and defence response, can be altered when linked to neighbouring plants by a mycorrhizal network (MN). Mechanisms underlying the behavioural changes include mycorrhizal fungal colonization by the MN or interplant communication via transfer of nutrients, defence signals or allelochemicals. We focus this review on our new findings in ectomycorrhizal ecosystems, and also review recent advances in arbuscular mycorrhizal systems. We have found that the behavioural changes in ectomycorrhizal plants depend on environmental cues, the identity of the plant neighbour and the characteristics of the MN. The hierarchical integration of this phenomenon with other biological networks at broader scales in forest ecosystems, and the consequences we have observed when it is interrupted, indicate that underground 'tree talk' is a foundational process in the complex adaptive nature of forest ecosystems.

  13. Sustained immune complex-mediated reduction in CD16 expression after vaccination regulates NK cell function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin R Goodier

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cross-linking of FcγRIII (CD16 by immune complexes induces antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC by natural killer (NK cells, contributing to control of intracellular pathogens; this pathway can also be targeted for immunotherapy of cancerous or otherwise diseased cells. However, down-regulation of CD16 expression on activated NK cells may limit or regulate this response. Here, we report sustained downregulation of CD16 expression on NK cells in vivo after intramuscular (but not intranasal influenza vaccination. CD16 downregulation persisted for at least 12 weeks after vaccination and was associated with robust enhancement of influenza-specific plasma antibodies after intramuscular (but not intranasal vaccination. This effect could be emulated in vitro by co-culture of NK cells with influenza antigen and immune serum and, consistent with the sustained effects after vaccination, only very limited recovery of CD16 expression was observed during long term in vitro culture of immune complex-treated cells. CD16 downregulation was most marked among normally CD16high CD57+ NK cells, irrespective of NKG2C expression, and was strongly positively associated with degranulation (surface CD107a expression. CD16 downregulation was partially reversed by inhibition of ADAM17 matrix metalloprotease, leading to a sustained increase in both CD107a and CD25(IL-2R expression. Both the degranulation and CD25 responses of CD57+ NK cells were uniquely dependent on TIV-specific IgG. These data support a role for CD16 in early activation of NK cells after vaccination and for CD16 down regulation as a means to modulate NK cell responses and maintain immune homeostasis of both antibody and T cell-dependent pathways.

  14. Immune-Complexed Adenovirus Induce AIM2-Mediated Pyroptosis in Human Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichholz, Karsten; Bru, Thierry; Tran, Thi Thu Phuong; Fernandes, Paulo; Mennechet, Franck J. D.; Manel, Nicolas; Alves, Paula; Perreau, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are nonenveloped proteinaceous particles containing a linear double-stranded DNA genome. HAdVs cause a spectrum of pathologies in all populations regardless of health standards. Following repeat exposure to multiple HAdV types, we develop robust and long-lived humoral and cellular immune responses that provide life-long protection from de novo infections and persistent HAdV. How HAdVs, anti-HAdV antibodies and antigen presenting cells (APCs) interact to influence infection is still incompletely understood. In our study, we used physical, pharmacological, biochemical, fluorescence and electron microscopy, molecular and cell biology approaches to dissect the impact of immune-complexed HAdV (IC-HAdV) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). We show that IC-HAdV generate stabilized complexes of ~200 nm that are efficiently internalized by, and aggregate in, MoDCs. By comparing IC-HAdV, IC-empty capsid, IC-Ad2ts1 (a HAdV-C2 impaired in endosomal escape due to a mutation that impacts protease encapsidation) and IC-AdL40Q (a HAdV-C5 impaired in endosomal escape due to a mutation in protein VI), we demonstrate that protein VI-dependent endosomal escape is required for the HAdV genome to engage the DNA pattern recognition receptor AIM2 (absent in melanoma 2). AIM2 engagement induces pyroptotic MoDC death via ASC (apoptosis-associated speck protein containing a caspase activation/recruitment domain) aggregation, inflammasome formation, caspase 1 activation, and IL-1β and gasdermin D (GSDMD) cleavage. Our study provides mechanistic insight into how humoral immunity initiates an innate immune response to HAdV-C5 in human professional APCs. PMID:27636895

  15. REST-mediated recruitment of polycomb repressor complexes in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaj Dietrich

    Full Text Available Polycomb Repressive Complex (PRC 1 and PRC2 regulate genes involved in differentiation and development. However, the mechanism for how PRC1 and PRC2 are recruited to genes in mammalian cells is unclear. Here we present evidence for an interaction between the transcription factor REST, PRC1, and PRC2 and show that RNF2 and REST co-regulate a number of neuronal genes in human teratocarcinoma cells (NT2-D1. Using NT2-D1 cells as a model of neuronal differentiation, we furthermore showed that retinoic-acid stimulation led to displacement of PRC1 at REST binding sites, reduced H3K27Me3, and increased gene expression. Genome-wide analysis of Polycomb binding in Rest⁻/⁻ and Eed⁻/⁻ mouse embryonic stem (mES cells showed that Rest was required for PRC1 recruitment to a subset of Polycomb regulated neuronal genes. Furthermore, we found that PRC1 can be recruited to Rest binding sites independently of CpG islands and the H3K27Me3 mark. Surprisingly, PRC2 was frequently increased around Rest binding sites located in CpG-rich regions in the Rest⁻/⁻ mES cells, indicating a more complex interplay where Rest also can limit PRC2 recruitment. Therefore, we propose that Rest has context-dependent functions for PRC1- and PRC2- recruitment, which allows this transcription factor to act both as a recruiter of Polycomb as well as a limiting factor for PRC2 recruitment at CpG islands.

  16. Peptide-based antibodies against glutathione-binding domains suppress superoxide production mediated by mitochondrial complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingfeng; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Rawale, Sharad; Chen, Chun-An; Zweier, Jay L; Kaumaya, Pravin T P; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2010-01-29

    Complex I (NQR) is a critical site of superoxide (O2-*) production and the major host of redox protein thiols in mitochondria. In response to oxidative stress, NQR-derived protein thiols at the 51- and 75-kDa subunits are known to be reversibly S-glutathionylated. Although several glutathionylated domains from NQR 51 and 75 kDa have been identified, their roles in the regulatory functions remain to be explored. To gain further insights into protein S-glutathionylation of complex I, we used two peptides of S-glutathionylated domain ((200)GAGAYICGEETALIESIEGK(219) of 51-kDa protein and (361)VDSDTLCTEEVFPTAGAGTDLR(382) of 75-kDa protein) as chimeric epitopes incorporating a "promiscuous" T-cell epitope to generate two polyclonal antibodies, AbGSCA206 and AbGSCB367. Binding of AbGSCA206 and AbGSCB367 inhibited NQR-mediated O2-* generation by 37 and 57%, as measured by EPR spin-trapping. To further provide an appropriate control, two peptides of non-glutathionylated domain ((21)SGDTTAPKKTSFGSLKDFDR(40) of 51-kDa peptide and (100)WNILTNSEKTKKAREGVMEFL(120) of 75-kDa peptide) were synthesized as chimeric epitopes to generate two polyclonal antibodies, Ab51 and Ab75. Binding of A51 did not affect NQR-mediated generation to a significant level. However, binding of Ab75 inhibited NQR-mediated O2-*generation by 35%. None of AbGSCA206, AbGSCB367, Ab51, or Ab75 showed an inhibitory effect on the electron transfer activity of NQR, suggesting that antibody binding to the glutathione-binding domain decreased electron leakage from the hydrophilic domain of NQR. When heart tissue homogenates were immunoprecipitated with Ab51 or Ab75 and probed with an antibody against glutathione, protein S-glutathionylation was enhanced in post-ischemic myocardium at the NQR 51-kDa subunit, but not at the 75-kDa subunit, indicating that the 51-kDa subunit of flavin subcomplex is more sensitive to oxidative stress resulting from myocardial infarction.

  17. Forgetting is regulated via Musashi-mediated translational control of the Arp2/3 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadziselimovic, Nils; Vukojevic, Vanja; Peter, Fabian; Milnik, Annette; Fastenrath, Matthias; Fenyves, Bank Gabor; Hieber, Petra; Demougin, Philippe; Vogler, Christian; de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Stetak, Attila

    2014-03-13

    A plastic nervous system requires the ability not only to acquire and store but also to forget. Here, we report that musashi (msi-1) is necessary for time-dependent memory loss in C. elegans. Tissue-specific rescue demonstrates that MSI-1 function is necessary in the AVA interneuron. Using RNA-binding protein immunoprecipitation (IP), we found that MSI-1 binds to mRNAs of three subunits of the Arp2/3 actin branching regulator complex in vivo and downregulates ARX-1, ARX-2, and ARX-3 translation upon associative learning. The role of msi-1 in forgetting is also reflected by the persistence of learning-induced GLR-1 synaptic size increase in msi-1 mutants. We demonstrate that memory length is regulated cooperatively through the activation of adducin (add-1) and by the inhibitory effect of msi-1. Thus, a GLR-1/MSI-1/Arp2/3 pathway induces forgetting and represents a novel mechanism of memory decay by linking translational control to the structure of the actin cytoskeleton in neurons.

  18. AP-2-complex-mediated endocytosis of Drosophila Crumbs regulates polarity by antagonizing Stardust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ya-Huei; Currinn, Heather; Pocha, Shirin Meher; Rothnie, Alice; Wassmer, Thomas; Knust, Elisabeth

    2015-12-15

    Maintenance of epithelial polarity depends on the correct localization and levels of polarity determinants. The evolutionarily conserved transmembrane protein Crumbs is crucial for the size and identity of the apical membrane, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms controlling the amount of Crumbs at the surface. Here, we show that Crumbs levels on the apical membrane depend on a well-balanced state of endocytosis and stabilization. The adaptor protein 2 (AP-2) complex binds to a motif in the cytoplasmic tail of Crumbs that overlaps with the binding site of Stardust, a protein known to stabilize Crumbs on the surface. Preventing endocytosis by mutation of AP-2 causes expansion of the Crumbs-positive plasma membrane domain and polarity defects, which can be partially rescued by removing one copy of crumbs. Strikingly, knocking down both AP-2 and Stardust leads to the retention of Crumbs on the membrane. This study provides evidence for a molecular mechanism, based on stabilization and endocytosis, to adjust surface levels of Crumbs, which are essential for maintaining epithelial polarity.

  19. The simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster Crassostrea gigas mediates complex functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Wang, Lingling; Zhou, Zhi; Sun, Ying; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Hou, Zhanhui; Gao, Dahai; Gao, Qiang; Song, Linsheng

    2016-05-01

    The neuroendocrine-immune (NEI) regulatory network is a complex system, which plays an indispensable role in the immunity of the host. In the present study, the bioinformatical analysis of the transcriptomic data from oyster Crassostrea gigas and further biological validation revealed that oyster TNF (CgTNF-1 CGI_10018786) could activate the transcription factors NF-κB and HSF (heat shock transcription factor) through MAPK signaling pathway, and then regulate apoptosis, redox reaction, neuro-regulation and protein folding in oyster haemocytes. The activated immune cells then released neurotransmitters including acetylcholine, norepinephrine and [Met5]-enkephalin to regulate the immune response by arising the expression of three TNF (CGI_10005109, CGI_10005110 and CGI_10006440) and translocating two NF-κB (Cgp65, CGI_10018142 and CgRel, CGI_10021567) between the cytoplasm and nuclei of haemocytes. Neurotransmitters exhibited the immunomodulation effects by influencing apoptosis and phagocytosis of oyster haemocytes. Acetylcholine and norepinephrine could down-regulate the immune response, while [Met5]-enkephalin up-regulate the immune response. These results suggested that the simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster might be activated by oyster TNF and then regulate the immune response by virtue of neurotransmitters, cytokines and transcription factors.

  20. The MMS22L-TONSL complex mediates recovery from replication stress and homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Lara; Panier, Stephanie; Wildenhain, Jan; Tkach, Johnny M; Al-Hakim, Abdallah; Landry, Marie-Claude; Escribano-Diaz, Cristina; Szilard, Rachel K; Young, Jordan T F; Munro, Meagan; Canny, Marella D; Kolas, Nadine K; Zhang, Wei; Harding, Shane M; Ylanko, Jarkko; Mendez, Megan; Mullin, Michael; Sun, Thomas; Habermann, Bianca; Datti, Alessandro; Bristow, Robert G; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Tyers, Michael D; Brown, Grant W; Durocher, Daniel

    2010-11-24

    Genome integrity is jeopardized each time DNA replication forks stall or collapse. Here we report the identification of a complex composed of MMS22L (C6ORF167) and TONSL (NFKBIL2) that participates in the recovery from replication stress. MMS22L and TONSL are homologous to yeast Mms22 and plant Tonsoku/Brushy1, respectively. MMS22L-TONSL accumulates at regions of ssDNA associated with distressed replication forks or at processed DNA breaks, and its depletion results in high levels of endogenous DNA double-strand breaks caused by an inability to complete DNA synthesis after replication fork collapse. Moreover, cells depleted of MMS22L are highly sensitive to camptothecin, a topoisomerase I poison that impairs DNA replication progression. Finally, MMS22L and TONSL are necessary for the efficient formation of RAD51 foci after DNA damage, and their depletion impairs homologous recombination. These results indicate that MMS22L and TONSL are genome caretakers that stimulate the recombination-dependent repair of stalled or collapsed replication forks. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. MicroProtein-mediated recruitment of CONSTANS into a TOPLESS trimeric complex represses flowering in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graeff, Moritz; Straub, Daniel; Eguen, Tenai E.

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana microProteins, miP1a and miP1b, physically interact with CONSTANS (CO) a potent regulator of flowering time. The miP1a/b-type microProteins evolved in dicotyledonous plants and have an additional carboxy-terminal PF(V/L)FL motif. This motif enables miP1a/b microProteins to interact......MicroProteins are short, single domain proteins that act by sequestering larger, multi-domain proteins into non-functional complexes. MicroProteins have been identified in plants and animals, where they are mostly involved in the regulation of developmental processes. Here we show that two...... with TOPLESS/TOPLESS-RELATED (TPL/TPR) proteins. Interaction of CO with miP1a/b/TPL causes late flowering due to a failure in the induction of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) expression under inductive long day conditions. Both miP1a and miP1b are expressed in vascular tissue, where CO and FT are active. Genetically...

  2. Hepatocyte gene transfer mediated by stable polyplexes based on MPP-containing DNA complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-Feng Yu; Wan-I Li; Xiao-Nian Hu; Yue-Hong Zhang; Bo Niu; Jun Xie

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the field of gene therapy, viral vectors as delivery tools have a number of disadvantages for medical application. This study aimed to explore a novel nonviral vector as a vehicle for gene therapy. METHODS: Transvector-rpE-MPP and EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) were used as the gene transfer carrier and the reporter gene, respectively. Polyplexes which integrate transvector-rpE-MPP, the object gene, and EGFP were formed. The optimal charge ratio, stability, and transduction capacity of the polyplexes in mouse hepatocytes in vitro and in mouse liver in vivo were investigated. The polyplexes of transvector-rpE-MPP and pcDNA3-EGFP, with charge ratios of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1 and 1.5 were compared to determine the optimal charge ratio. RESULTS:  Polyplexes with charge ratios of 1∶1 were most stable; pcDNA3-EGFP in these complexes resisted digestion by DNase Ⅰ and blood plasma. On the other hand, pcDNA3-EGFP alone was digested. Fluorescence analysis indicated that transvector-rpE-MPP successfully delivered the reporter gene EGFP into hepatocytes and that EGFP expression was detected in hepatocyte cultures and in liver tissue. CONCLUSION: These results have laid a foundation for further study of a novel nonviral gene delivery system.

  3. Sme4 coiled-coil protein mediates synaptonemal complex assembly, recombinosome relocalization, and spindle pole body morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espagne, Eric; Vasnier, Christelle; Storlazzi, Aurora; Kleckner, Nancy E; Silar, Philippe; Zickler, Denise; Malagnac, Fabienne

    2011-06-28

    We identify a large coiled-coil protein, Sme4/PaMe4, that is highly conserved among the large group of Sordariales and plays central roles in two temporally and functionally distinct aspects of the fungal sexual cycle: first as a component of the meiotic synaptonemal complex (SC) and then, after disappearing and reappearing, as a component of the spindle pole body (SPB). In both cases, the protein mediates spatial juxtaposition of two major structures: linkage of homolog axes through the SC and a change in the SPB from a planar to a bent conformation. Corresponding mutants exhibit defects, respectively, in SC and SPB morphogenesis, with downstream consequences for recombination and astral-microtubule nucleation plus postmeiotic nuclear migration. Sme4 is also required for reorganization of recombination complexes in which Rad51, Mer3, and Msh4 foci relocalize from an on-axis position to a between-axis (on-SC) position concomitant with SC installation. Because involved recombinosome foci represent total recombinational interactions, these dynamics are irrespective of their designation for maturation into cross-overs or noncross-overs. The defined dual roles for Sme4 in two different structures that function at distinct phases of the sexual cycle also provide more functional links and evolutionary dynamics among the nuclear envelope, SPB, and SC.

  4. Proteasomal degradation of preemptive quality control (pQC) substrates is mediated by an AIRAPL–p97 complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunstein, Ilana; Zach, Lolita; Allan, Susanne; Kalies, Kai-Uwe; Stanhill, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    The initial folding of secreted proteins occurs in the ER lumen, which contains specific chaperones and where posttranslational modifications may occur. Therefore lack of translocation, regardless of entry route or protein identity, is a highly toxic event, as the newly synthesized polypeptide is misfolded and can promiscuously interact with cytosolic factors. Mislocalized proteins bearing a signal sequence that did not successfully translocate through the translocon complex are subjected to a preemptive quality control (pQC) pathway and are degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). In contrast to UPS-mediated, ER-associated degradation, few components involved in pQC have been identified. Here we demonstrate that on specific translocation inhibition, a p97–AIRAPL complex directly binds and regulates the efficient processing of polyubiquitinated pQC substrates by the UPS. We also demonstrate p97’s role in pQC processing of preproinsulin in cases of naturally occurring mutations within the signal sequence of insulin. PMID:26337389

  5. Ribosomal protein S3: a KH domain subunit in NF-kappaB complexes that mediates selective gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Fengyi; Anderson, D Eric; Barnitz, Robert A; Snow, Andrew; Bidere, Nicolas; Zheng, Lixin; Hegde, Vijay; Lam, Lloyd T; Staudt, Louis M; Levens, David; Deutsch, Walter A; Lenardo, Michael J

    2007-11-30

    NF-kappaB is a DNA-binding protein complex that transduces a variety of activating signals from the cytoplasm to specific sets of target genes. To understand the preferential recruitment of NF-kappaB to specific gene regulatory sites, we used NF-kappaB p65 in a tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry proteomic screen. We identified ribosomal protein S3 (RPS3), a KH domain protein, as a non-Rel subunit of p65 homodimer and p65-p50 heterodimer DNA-binding complexes that synergistically enhances DNA binding. RPS3 knockdown impaired NF-kappaB-mediated transcription of selected p65 target genes but not nuclear shuttling or global protein translation. Rather, lymphocyte-activating stimuli caused nuclear translocation of RPS3, parallel to p65, to form part of NF-kappaB bound to specific regulatory sites in chromatin. Thus, RPS3 is an essential but previously unknown subunit of NF-kappaB involved in the regulation of key genes in rapid cellular activation responses. Our observations provide insight into how NF-kappaB selectively controls gene expression.

  6. Cytotoxicity of Manganese (III) Complex in Human Breast Adenocarcinoma Cell Line Is Mediated by the Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Followed by Mitochondrial Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Anbaky, Qudes; Al-Karakooly, Zeiyad; Kilaparty, Surya P; Agrawal, Megha; Albkuri, Yahya M; RanguMagar, Ambar B; Ghosh, Anindya; Ali, Nawab

    2016-11-01

    Manganese (Mn) complexes are widely studied because of their important catalytic properties in synthetic and biochemical reactions. A Mn (III) complex of an amidoamine ligand was synthesized using a tetradentate amidoamine ligand. In this study, the Mn (III) complex was evaluated for its biological activity by measuring its cytotoxicity in human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7). Cytotoxic effects of the Mn (III) complex were determined using established biomarkers in an attempt to delineate the mechanism of action and the utility of the complex as a potential anticancer drug. The Mn (III) complex induces cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner as shown by microculture tetrazolium assay, a measure of cytotoxic cell death. Our results demonstrated that cytotoxic effects were significantly increased at higher concentrations of Mn (III) complex and with longer time of treatment. The IC50 (Inhibitor concentration that results in 50% cell death) value of Mn (III) complex in MCF-7 cells was determined to be 2.5 mmol/L for 24 hours of treatment. In additional experiments, we determined the Mn (III) complex-mediated cell death was due to both apoptotic and nonspecific necrotic cell death mechanisms. This was assessed by ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining and flow cytometry techniques. The Mn (III) complex produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) triggering the expression of manganese superoxide dismutase 1 and ultimately damaging the mitochondrial function as is evident by a decline in mitochondrial membrane potential. Treatment of the cells with free radical scavenger, N, N-dimethylthiourea decreased Mn (III) complex-mediated generation of ROS and attenuated apoptosis. Together, these results suggest that the Mn (III) complex-mediated MCF-7 cell death utilizes combined mechanism involving apoptosis and necrosis perhaps due to the generation of ROS.

  7. Squamous cell carcinoma arising in a multiple verrucous epidermal nevus*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarak, Samira; Machado, Taila Yuri Siqueira; Ogawa, Marilia Marufuji; Almeida, Mirian Luzia da Silva; Enokihara, Milvia Maria Simões e Silva; Porro, Adriana Maria

    2016-01-01

    Verrucous epidermal nevi are hamartomatous lesions of the epidermis that, unlike other epidermal nevi (such as sebaceous nevus or nevus comedonicus), are rarely associated with malignant neoplasms. The majority of squamous cell carcinoma develop in linear or multiple epidermal nevus and rarely in solitary epidermal nevus. In general, the prognosis is favorable. We report a case of well-differentiated invasive squamous cell carcinoma arising from a multiple verrucous epidermal nevus. Although there is no consensus on prophylactic removal of epidermal nevus, its removal and biopsy should be considered if changes occur. PMID:28300931

  8. BCNU-induced gR2 defect mediates S-glutathionylation of Complex I and respiratory uncoupling in myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Patrick T; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Ren, Pei; Guarini, Giacinta; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2014-06-15

    A deficiency of mitochondrial glutathione reductase (or GR2) is capable of adversely affecting the reduction of GSSG and increasing mitochondrial oxidative stress. BCNU [1,3-bis (2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea] is an anticancer agent and known inhibitor of cytosolic GR ex vivo and in vivo. Here we tested the hypothesis that a BCNU-induced GR2 defect contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent impairment of heart function. Intraperitoneal administration of BCNU (40 mg/kg) specifically inhibited GR2 activity by 79.8 ± 2.7% in the mitochondria of rat heart. However, BCNU treatment modestly enhanced the activities of mitochondrial Complex I and other ETC components. The cardiac function of BCNU-treated rats was analyzed by echocardiography, revealing a systolic dysfunction associated with decreased ejection fraction, decreased cardiac output, and an increase in left ventricular internal dimension and left ventricular volume in systole. The respiratory control index of isolated mitochondria from the myocardium was moderately decreased after BCNU treatment, whereas NADH-linked uncoupling of oxygen consumption was significantly enhanced. Extracellular flux analysis to measure the fatty acid oxidation of myocytes indicated a 20% enhancement after BCNU treatment. When the mitochondria were immunoblotted with antibodies against GSH and UCP3, both protein S-glutathionylation of Complex I and expression of UCP3 were significantly up-regulated. Overexpression of SOD2 in the myocardium significantly reversed BCNU-induced GR2 inhibition and mitochondrial impairment. In conclusion, BCNU-mediated cardiotoxicity is characterized by the GR2 deficiency that negatively regulates heart function by impairing mitochondrial integrity, increasing oxidative stress with Complex I S-glutathionylation, and enhancing uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration.

  9. A theoretical analysis of the extraction of heterocyclic organic compounds from an organic phase using chemically mediated electrochemically modulated complexation in ion exchange polymer beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozekin, K.; Noble, R.D.; Koval, C.A.

    1991-01-01

    A cyclical electrochemical process for the removal of heterocyclic organic compounds (pollutants) from an organic solvent using an ion-exchange polymer is analyzed. In this analysis, there are three main steps: In the first step, the polymer beads containing the active form of the complexing agent are contacted with the contaminated (feed) hydrocarbon phase. The pollutant diffuses into the beads and binds with the complexing agent which is in the reduced state. It is a fast reversible reaction. For the second step, the beads which contain a pollutant are contacted with a waste (receiving) phase and a chemical mediator is then used to oxidize the complexing agent and to reduce its affinity towards the pollutant so that it can be released. The oxidation of the complexing agent is an irreversible reaction. This is a moving boundary problem with countercurrent diffusion. For each mole of mediator that goes into the bead, one mole of pollutant exits since each complexing agent binds one pollutant. In the third step, the waste hydrocarbon phase is removed and a second chemical mediator is then used to reduce the complexing agent. The reduction of the complexing agent is also an irreversible reaction. Partial differential equations are used to analyze this process. 26 refs., 9 figs.

  10. [Beyond immunopathogenesis. Insulin resistance and "epidermal dysfunction"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehncke, W-H; Boehncke, S; Buerger, C

    2012-03-01

    Insulin is a central player in the regulation of metabolic as well as non-metabolic cells: inefficient signal transduction (insulin resistance) not only represents the cornerstone in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, but also drives atherosclerosis through inducing endothelial dysfunction. Last but not least epidermal homeostasis depends on insulin. We summarize the effects of insulin on proliferation and differentiation of human keratinocytes as well as the relevance of cytokine-induced insulin resistance for alterations in epidermal homeostasis characteristic for psoriasis. Kinases involved in both insulin- as well as cytokine-receptor signaling represent potential targets for innovative therapeutics. Such small molecules would primarily normalize "epidermal dysfunction", thus complementing the immunomodulatory strategies of today's biologics.

  11. Carbamzepine-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nithyananda K Chowta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN, also known as Lyell′s syndrome, is a widespread life-threatening mucocutaneous disease where there is extensive detachment of the skin and mucous membrane. Many factors involved in the etiology of TEN including adverse drug reactions. Here we are reporting a case of toxic epidermal necrolysis in an adult male patient after receiving carbamazepine in a 38 year old male. On the18th day of carbamazepine, patient developed blisters which first appeared on the trunk, chest and arms. The erythematous rash was covering almost all over the body with epidermal detachment of 70% body surface area. There was loss of eye lashes, congestion of conjunctiva with mucopurulent discharge and exposure keratitis. The clinical impression was TEN induced by carbamazepine. Carbamazepine was stopped immediately. He was treated with high dose intravenous betamethasone and systemic and topical antibiotics. After one month, the progression of the skin lesions halted and he was discharged.

  12. Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The term complexity derives etymologically from the Latin plexus, which means interwoven. Intuitively, this implies that something complex is composed by elements that are difficult to separate. This difficulty arises from the relevant interactions that take place between components. This lack of separability is at odds with the classical scientific method - which has been used since the times of Galileo, Newton, Descartes, and Laplace - and has also influenced philosophy and engineering. In recent decades, the scientific study of complexity and complex systems has proposed a paradigm shift in science and philosophy, proposing novel methods that take into account relevant interactions.

  13. Cyclin-dependent kinase-mediated phosphorylation of RBP1 and pRb promotes their dissociation to mediate release of the SAP30·mSin3·HDAC transcriptional repressor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryadinata, Randy; Sadowski, Martin; Steel, Rohan; Sarcevic, Boris

    2011-02-18

    Eukaryotic cell cycle progression is mediated by phosphorylation of protein substrates by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). A critical substrate of CDKs is the product of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene, pRb, which inhibits G(1)-S phase cell cycle progression by binding and repressing E2F transcription factors. CDK-mediated phosphorylation of pRb alleviates this inhibitory effect to promote G(1)-S phase cell cycle progression. pRb represses transcription by binding to the E2F transactivation domain and recruiting the mSin3·histone deacetylase (HDAC) transcriptional repressor complex via the retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 (RBP1). RBP1 binds to the pocket region of pRb via an LXCXE motif and to the SAP30 subunit of the mSin3·HDAC complex and, thus, acts as a bridging protein in this multisubunit complex. In the present study we identified RBP1 as a novel CDK substrate. RBP1 is phosphorylated by CDK2 on serines 864 and 1007, which are N- and C-terminal to the LXCXE motif, respectively. CDK2-mediated phosphorylation of RBP1 or pRb destabilizes their interaction in vitro, with concurrent phosphorylation of both proteins leading to their dissociation. Consistent with these findings, RBP1 phosphorylation is increased during progression from G(1) into S-phase, with a concurrent decrease in its association with pRb in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. These studies provide new mechanistic insights into CDK-mediated regulation of the pRb tumor suppressor during cell cycle progression, demonstrating that CDK-mediated phosphorylation of both RBP1 and pRb induces their dissociation to mediate release of the mSin3·HDAC transcriptional repressor complex from pRb to alleviate transcriptional repression of E2F.

  14. An epidermal inclusion cyst mimicking chronic prepatellar bursitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Meredith; Werner, Jordan; Joshi, Bhavesh; Abramovici, Liugia; Strauss, Eric J

    2013-12-01

    Soft tissue lesions are common to the prepatellar region, often due to acute or chronic trauma, and most frequently include prepatellar bursitis, lipomas, and ganglion cysts. We report a case of a posttraumatic prepatellar epidermal inclusion cyst to highlight the diagnostic complexities that can arise with soft tissue lesions in this location. On the basis of our case report, treating orthopaedic surgeons should consider the possibility of an epidermal inclusion cyst in patients who present with atypical anterior soft tissue masses with a history of trauma to the anterior knee. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Epidermal melanin absorption in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norvang Nilsen, Lill T.; Fiskerstrand, Elisanne J.; Nelson, J. Stuart; Berns, Michael W.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    1996-01-01

    The principle of laser induced selective photothermolysis is to induced thermal damage to specific targets in such a manner that the temperature of the surrounding tissue is maintained below the threshold for thermal damage. The selectivity is obtained by selection of a proper wavelength and pulse duration. The technique is presently being used in the clinic for removal of port-wine stains. The presence of melanin in the epidermal layer can represent a limitation to the selectivity. Melanin absorption drops off significantly with increasing wavelength, but is significant in the entire wavelength region where the blood absorption is high. Treatment of port-wine stain in patients with high skin pigmentation may therefore give overheating of the epidermis, resulting in epidermal necrosis. Melanosomal heating is dependent on the energy and duration of the laser pulse. The heating mechanism for time scales less than typically 1 microsecond(s) corresponds to a transient local heating of the individual melanosomes. For larger time scales, heat diffusion out of the melanosomes become of increased importance, and the temperature distribution will reach a local steady state condition after typically 10 microsecond(s) . For even longer pulse duration, heat diffusing from neighboring melanosomes becomes important, and the temperature rise in a time scale from 100 - 500 microsecond(s) is dominated by this mechanism. The epidermal heating during the typical 450 microsecond(s) pulse used for therapy is thus dependent on the average epidermal melanin content rather than on the absorption coefficient of the individual melanosomes. This study will present in vivo measurements of the epidermal melanin absorption of human skin when exposed to short laser pulses (< 0.1 microsecond(s) ) from a Q-switched ruby laser and with long laser pulses (approximately 500 microsecond(s) ) from a free-running ruby laser or a long pulse length flashlamp pumped dye laser. The epidermal melanin

  16. From diffuse growth to planar polarity in Arabidopsis root epidermal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria eBalcerowicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant roots fulfill important functions as they serve in water and nutrient uptake, provide anchorage of the plant body in the soil and in some species form the site of symbiotic interactions with soil-living biota. Root hairs, tubular-shaped outgrowths of specific epidermal cells, significantly increase the root's surface area and aid in these processes. In this review we focus on the molecular mechanisms that determine the hair and non-hair cell fate of epidermal cells and that define the site on the epidermal cell where the root hair will be initiated (= planar polarity determination. In the model plant Arabidopsis, trichoblast and atrichoblast cell fate results from intra- and intercellular position-dependent signaling and from complex feedback loops that ultimately regulate GL2 expressing and non-expressing cells. When epidermal cells reach the end of the root expansion zone, root hair promoting transcription factors dictate the establishment of polarity within epidermal cells followed by the selection of the root hair initiation site at the more basal part of the trichoblast. Molecular players in the abovementioned processes as well as the role of phytohormones are discussed, and open areas for future experiments are identified.

  17. TALE homeodomain proteins regulate site-specific terminal differentiation, LCE genes and epidermal barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Ben; Brown, Stuart J; Avilion, Ariel A; O'Shaughnessy, Ryan F L; Sully, Katherine; Akinduro, Olufolake; Murphy, Mark; Cleary, Michael L; Byrne, Carolyn

    2011-05-15

    The epidermal barrier varies over the body surface to accommodate regional environmental stresses. Regional skin barrier variation is produced by site-dependent epidermal differentiation from common keratinocyte precursors and often manifests as site-specific skin disease or irritation. There is strong evidence for body-site-dependent dermal programming of epidermal differentiation in which the epidermis responds by altering expression of key barrier proteins, but the underlying mechanisms have not been defined. The LCE multigene cluster encodes barrier proteins that are differentially expressed over the body surface, and perturbation of LCE cluster expression is linked to the common regional skin disease psoriasis. LCE subclusters comprise genes expressed variably in either external barrier-forming epithelia (e.g. skin) or in internal epithelia with less stringent barriers (e.g. tongue). We demonstrate here that a complex of TALE homeobox transcription factors PBX1, PBX2 and Pknox (homologues of Drosophila Extradenticle and Homothorax) preferentially regulate external rather than internal LCE gene expression, competitively binding with SP1 and SP3. Perturbation of TALE protein expression in stratified squamous epithelia in mice produces external but not internal barrier abnormalities. We conclude that epidermal barrier genes, such as the LCE multigene cluster, are regulated by TALE homeodomain transcription factors to produce regional epidermal barriers.

  18. Giant epidermal inclusion cyst in the male breast: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KIm, Hyun Jin; Park, Woon Ju; KIm, Sang Wook; Paik, So Ya [Daejin Medical Center Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Giant epidermal inclusion cyst is a rare disease entity, and the occurrence of this cyst in the male breast is extremely rare. We report a case of giant epidermal inclusion cyst in the breast, which presented as a palpable and painful right breast mass in a 63-year-old man. The sonographic and computed tomography (CT) features are described in-depth. Physical examination revealed a firm, well-defined mass in the upper central portion of the right breast. Ultrasonography showed a 5.2 cm sized, oval, circumscribed, and complex cystic and solid mass with posterior acoustic enhancement, and CT showed a well-defined homogeneous low density mass without enhancement in the right breast. Surgical excision was performed, and pathological examination revealed a giant epidermal inclusion cyst.

  19. Phosphorylation of Grainy head by ERK is essential for wound-dependent regeneration but not for development of an epidermal barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myungjin; McGinnis, William

    2011-01-11

    Grainy head (GRH) is a key transcription factor responsible for epidermal barrier formation and repair, whose function is highly conserved across diverse animal species. However, it is not known how GRH function is reactivated to repair differentiated epidermal barriers after wounding. Here, we show that GRH is directly regulated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, which is required for wound-dependent expression of GRH target genes in epidermal cells. Serine 91 is the principal residue in GRH that is phosphorylated by ERK. Although mutations of the ERK phosphorylation sites in GRH do not impair its DNA binding function, the ERK sites in GRH are required to activate Dopa decarboxylase (Ddc) and misshapen (msn) epidermal wound enhancers as well as functional regeneration of an epidermal barrier upon wounding. This result indicates that the phosphorylation sites are essential for damaged epidermal barrier repair. However, GRH with mutant ERK phosphorylation sites can still promote barrier formation during embryonic epidermal development, suggesting that ERK sites are dispensable for the GRH function in establishing epidermal barrier integrity. These results provide mechanistic insight into how tissue repair can be initiated by posttranslational modification of a key transcription factor that normally mediates the developmental generation of that tissue.

  20. Cell and molecular biology of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceresa, Brian P; Peterson, Joanne L

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been one of the most intensely studied cell surface receptors due to its well-established roles in developmental biology, tissue homeostasis, and cancer biology. The EGFR has been critical for creating paradigms for numerous aspects of cell biology, such as ligand binding, signal transduction, and membrane trafficking. Despite this history of discovery, there is a continual stream of evidence that only the surface has been scratched. New ways of receptor regulation continue to be identified, each of which is a potential molecular target for manipulating EGFR signaling and the resultant changes in cell and tissue biology. This chapter is an update on EGFR-mediated signaling, and describes some recent developments in the regulation of receptor biology.

  1. Epidermal Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Production Is Required for Permeability Barrier Homeostasis, Dermal Angiogenesis, and the Development of Epidermal Hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Peter M.; Arbiser, Jack; Brown, Barbara E.; Rossiter, Heidemarie; Man, Mao-Qiang; Cerimele, Francesca; Crumrine, Debra; Gunathilake, Roshan; Choi, Eung Ho; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Tschachler, Erwin; Feingold, Kenneth R.

    2008-01-01

    Primary abnormalities in permeability barrier function appear to underlie atopic dermatitis and epidermal trauma; a concomitant barrier dysfunction could also drive other inflammatory dermatoses, including psoriasis. Central to this outside-inside view of disease pathogenesis is the epidermal generation of cytokines/growth factors, which in turn signal downstream epidermal repair mechanisms. Yet, this cascade, if sustained, signals downstream epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation. We found here that acute barrier disruption rapidly stimulates mRNA and protein expression of epidermal vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) in normal hairless mice, a specific response to permeability barrier requirements because up-regulation is blocked by application of a vapor-impermeable membrane. Moreover, epidermal vegf−/− mice display abnormal permeability barrier homeostasis, attributable to decreased VEGF signaling of epidermal lamellar body production; a paucity of dermal capillaries with reduced vascular permeability; and neither angiogenesis nor epidermal hyperplasia in response to repeated tape stripping (a model of psoriasiform hyperplasia). These results support a central role for epidermal VEGF in the maintenance of epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis and a link between epidermal VEGF production and both dermal angiogenesis and the development of epidermal hyperplasia. Because psoriasis is commonly induced by external trauma [isomorphic (Koebner) phenomenon] and is associated with a prominent permeability barrier abnormality, excess VEGF production, prominent angiogenesis, and epidermal hyperplasia, these results could provide a potential outside-inside mechanistic basis for the development of psoriasis. PMID:18688025

  2. Alterations in Epidermal Eicosanoid Metabolism Contribute to Inflammation and Impaired Late Differentiation in FLG-Mutated Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunder, Stefan; Rühl, Ralph; Moosbrugger-Martinz, Verena; Krimmel, Christine; Geisler, Anita; Zhu, Huiting; Crumrine, Debra; Elias, Peter M; Gruber, Robert; Schmuth, Matthias; Dubrac, Sandrine

    2017-03-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the FLG gene cause ichthyosis vulgaris (IV) and represent the major predisposing genetic risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD). Although both conditions are characterized by epidermal barrier impairment, AD also exhibits signs of inflammation. This work was aimed at delineating the role of FLG loss-of-function mutations on eicosanoid metabolism in IV and AD. Using human epidermal equivalents (HEEs) generated with keratinocytes isolated from nonlesional skin of patients with FLG wild-type AD (WT/WT), FLG-mutated AD (FLG/WT), IV (FLG/FLG), or FLG WT control skin, we assessed the potential autocrine role of epidermal-derived eicosanoids in FLG-associated versus FLG-WT AD pathogenesis. Ultrastructural analyses demonstrated abnormal stratum corneum lipid architecture in AD and IV HEEs, independent of FLG genotype. Both AD (FLG/WT) and IV (FLG/FLG) HEEs showed impaired late epidermal differentiation. Only AD (FLG/WT) HEEs exhibited significantly increased levels of inflammatory cytokines. Analyses of lipid mediators revealed increased arachidonic acid and 12-lipoxygenase metabolites. Whereas treatment of control HEEs with arachidonic acid increased expression of inflammatory cytokines, 12-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid attenuated expression of late differentiation markers. Thus, FLG mutations lead to alterations in epidermal eicosanoid metabolism that could serve as an autocrine trigger of inflammation and impaired late epidermal differentiation in AD.

  3. Circadian and diurnal variation of circulating immune complexes, complement-mediated solubilization, and the complement split product C3d in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ivan; Baatrup, Gunnar; Brandslund, I;

    1986-01-01

    Nine patients with active classical rheumatoid arthritis (ARA criteria) were studied with reference to circadian variation of immunological and clinical parameters. Complement-mediated solubilization (CMS) of immune complexes (IC) and the level of circulating IC were found to be inversely related...

  4. Predator attack rate evolution in space: the role of ecology mediated by complex emergent spatial structure and self-shading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger, Susanna M; Ostling, Annette

    2013-11-01

    Predation interactions are an important element of ecological communities. Population spatial structure has been shown to influence predator evolution, resulting in the evolution of a reduced predator attack rate; however, the evolutionary role of traits governing predator and prey ecology is unknown. The evolutionary effect of spatial structure on a predator's attack rate has primarily been explored assuming a fixed metapopulation spatial structure, and understood in terms of group selection. But endogenously generated, emergent spatial structure is common in nature. Furthermore, the evolutionary influence of ecological traits may be mediated through the spatial self-structuring process. Drawing from theory on pathogens, the evolutionary effect of emergent spatial structure can be understood in terms of self-shading, where a voracious predator limits its long-term invasion potential by reducing local prey availability. Here we formalize the effects of self-shading for predators using spatial moment equations. Then, through simulations, we show that in a spatial context self-shading leads to relationships between predator-prey ecology and the predator's attack rate that are not expected in a non-spatial context. Some relationships are analogous to relationships already shown for host-pathogen interactions, but others represent new trait dimensions. Finally, since understanding the effects of ecology using existing self-shading theory requires simplifications of the emergent spatial structure that do not apply well here, we also develop metrics describing the complex spatial structure of the predator and prey populations to help us explain the evolutionary effect of predator and prey ecology in the context of self-shading. The identification of these metrics may provide a step towards expansion of the predictive domain of self-shading theory to more complex spatial dynamics.

  5. pRB-E2F1 complexes are resistant to adenovirus E1A-mediated disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifried, L A; Talluri, S; Cecchini, M; Julian, L M; Mymryk, J S; Dick, F A

    2008-05-01

    Disruption of pRB-E2F interactions by E1A is a key event in the adenoviral life cycle that drives expression of early viral transcription and induces cell cycle progression. This function of E1A is complicated by E2F1, an E2F family member that controls multiple processes besides proliferation, including apoptosis and DNA repair. Recently, a second interaction site in pRB that only contacts E2F1 has been discovered, allowing pRB to control proliferation separately from other E2F1-dependent activities. Based on this new insight into pRB-E2F1 regulation, we investigated how E1A affects control of E2F1 by pRB. Our data reveal that pRB-E2F1 interactions are resistant to E1A-mediated disruption. Using mutant forms of pRB that selectively force E2F1 to bind through only one of the two binding sites on pRB, we determined that E1A is unable to disrupt E2F1's unique interaction with pRB. Furthermore, analysis of pRB-E2F complexes during adenoviral infection reveals the selective maintenance of pRB-E2F1 interactions despite the presence of E1A. Our experiments also demonstrate that E2F1 functions to maintain cell viability in response to E1A expression. This suggests that adenovirus E1A's seemingly complex mechanism of disrupting pRB-E2F interactions provides selectivity in promoting viral transcription and cell cycle advancement, while maintaining cell viability.

  6. The response of electron transport mediated by active NADPH dehydrogenase complexes to heat stress in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA WeiMin; WEI LanZhen; WANG QuanXi

    2008-01-01

    The electron-transport machinery in photosynthetic membranes is known to be very sensitive to heat. In this study, the rate of electron transport (ETR) driven by photosystem Ⅰ (PSI) and photosystem Ⅱ (PSII) during heat stress in the wild-type Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 (WT) and its ndh gene inactivation mutants △ndhB (M55) and △ndhD1/ndhD2 (D1/D2) was simultaneously assessed by using the novel Dual-PAM-100 measuring system. The rate of electron transport driven by the photosystems (ETRPSs) in the WT, M55, and D1/D2 cells incubated at 30℃ and at 55℃ for 10 min was compared. Incubation at 55℃ for 10 min significantly inhibited PSII-driven ETR (ETRPSII) in the WT, M55 and D1/D2 cells, and the extent of inhibition in both the M55 and D1/D2 cells was greater than that in the WT cells. Further, PSI-driven ETR (ETRPSI) was stimulated in both the WT and D1/D2 cells, and this rate was increased to a greater extent in the D1/D2 than in the WT cells. However, ETRPSI was considerably inhibited in the M55 cells. Analysis of the effect of heat stress on ETRPSs with regard to the alterations in the 2 active NDH-1 complexes in the WT, M55, and D1/D2 cells indicated that the active NDH-1 supercomplex and mediumcomplex are essential for alleviating the heat-induced inhibition of ETRPSII and for accelerating the heat-induced stimulation of ETRPSI, respectively. Further, it is believed that these effects are most likely brought about by the electron transport mediated by each of these 2 active NDH-1 complexes.

  7. The response of electron transport mediated by active NADPH dehydrogenase complexes to heat stress in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The electron-transport machinery in photosynthetic membranes is known to be very sensitive to heat. In this study, the rate of electron transport (ETR) driven by photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII) during heat stress in the wild-type Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 (WT) and its ndh gene inactiva-tion mutants △ndhB (M55) and △ndhD1/ndhD2 (D1/D2) was simultaneously assessed by using the novel Dual-PAM-100 measuring system. The rate of electron transport driven by the photosystems (ETRPSs) in the WT, M55, and D1/D2 cells incubated at 30℃ and at 55℃ for 10 min was compared. Incubation at 55 ℃ for 10 min significantly inhibited PSII-driven ETR (ETRPSII) in the WT, M55 and D1/D2 cells, and the ex-tent of inhibition in both the M55 and D1/D2 cells was greater than that in the WT cells. Further, PSI-driven ETR (ETRPSI) was stimulated in both the WT and D1/D2 cells, and this rate was increased to a greater extent in the D1/D2 than in the WT cells. However, ETRPSI was considerably inhibited in the M55 cells. Analysis of the effect of heat stress on ETRPSs with regard to the alterations in the 2 active NDH-1 complexes in the WT, M55, and D1/D2 cells indicated that the active NDH-1 supercomplex and medi-umcomplex are essential for alleviating the heat-induced inhibition of ETRPSII and for accelerating the heat-induced stimulation of ETRPSI, respectively. Further, it is believed that these effects are most likely brought about by the electron transport mediated by each of these 2 active NDH-1 complexes.

  8. Dissection of the complex phenotype in cuticular mutants of Arabidopsis reveals a role of SERRATE as a mediator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derry Voisin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in LACERATA (LCR, FIDDLEHEAD (FDH, and BODYGUARD (BDG cause a complex developmental syndrome that is consistent with an important role for these Arabidopsis genes in cuticle biogenesis. The genesis of their pleiotropic phenotypes is, however, poorly understood. We provide evidence that neither distorted depositions of cutin, nor deficiencies in the chemical composition of cuticular lipids, account for these features, instead suggesting that the mutants alleviate the functional disorder of the cuticle by reinforcing their defenses. To better understand how plants adapt to these mutations, we performed a genome-wide gene expression analysis. We found that apparent compensatory transcriptional responses in these mutants involve the induction of wax, cutin, cell wall, and defense genes. To gain greater insight into the mechanism by which cuticular mutations trigger this response in the plants, we performed an overlap meta-analysis, which is termed MASTA (MicroArray overlap Search Tool and Analysis, of differentially expressed genes. This suggested that different cell integrity pathways are recruited in cesA cellulose synthase and cuticular mutants. Using MASTA for an in silico suppressor/enhancer screen, we identified SERRATE (SE, which encodes a protein of RNA-processing multi-protein complexes, as a likely enhancer. In confirmation of this notion, the se lcr and se bdg double mutants eradicate severe leaf deformations as well as the organ fusions that are typical of lcr and bdg and other cuticular mutants. Also, lcr does not confer resistance to Botrytis cinerea in a se mutant background. We propose that there is a role for SERRATE-mediated RNA signaling in the cuticle integrity pathway.

  9. Complex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    Schiff bases and their complex compounds have been studied for their .... establishing coordination of the N–(2 – hydroxybenzyl) - L - α - valine Schiff base ..... (1967); “Spectrophotometric Identification of Organic Compounds”, Willey, New.

  10. Stevens Johnsons syndrom og toksisk epidermal nekrolyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Zachariae, Claus; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2013-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are acute mucocutaneous diseases primarily due to drug intake. The diseases are characterised by the separation of epidermis from dermis which can be life-threatening. Mortality is often caused by sepsis and multiple organ failure. The most...

  11. Carbamate pesticide induced toxic epidermal necrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendran N

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A 36-year-old male alleged to have consumed carbamate pesticide liquid (Baygon@ developed toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN within twenty-four hours of intake. Though drugs have been commonly incriminated as offending agents for TEN, carbamate pesticide was found to be the causative agent in our case.

  12. Immune Complex Mediated Glomerulonephritis with Acute Thrombotic Microangiopathy following Newly Detected Hepatitis B Virus Infection in a Kidney Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey Salter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV presents a risk to patients and staff in renal units. To minimise viral transmission, there are international and UK guidelines recommending HBV immunisation for patients commencing renal replacement therapy (RRT and HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients. We report the case of a 56-year-old male who was immunised against HBV before starting haemodialysis. He received a deceased donor kidney transplant three years later, at which time there was no evidence of HBV infection. After a further six years he developed an acute kidney injury; allograft biopsy revealed an acute thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA with glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and C4d staining. Due to a “full house” immunoprofile, tests including virological screening were undertaken, which revealed acute HBV infection. Entecavir treatment resulted in an improvement in viral load and kidney function. HBV genotyping demonstrated a vaccine escape mutant, suggesting “past resolved” infection that reactivated with immunosuppression, though posttransplant acquisition cannot be excluded. This is the first reported case of acute HBV infection associated with immune complex mediated glomerulonephritis and TMA. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients, which although addressed by UK guidelines is not currently practiced in all UK units.

  13. The yeast and human FACT chromatin-reorganizing complexes solve R-loop-mediated transcription–replication conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Moyano, Emilia; Mergui, Xénia; García-Rubio, María L.; Barroso, Sonia; Aguilera, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription) is a chromatin-reorganizing complex that swaps nucleosomes around the RNA polymerase during transcription elongation and has a role in replication that is not fully understood yet. Here we show that recombination factors are required for the survival of yeast FACT mutants, consistent with an accumulation of DNA breaks that we detected by Rad52 foci and transcription-dependent hyperrecombination. Breaks also accumulate in FACT-depleted human cells, as shown by γH2AX foci and single-cell electrophoresis. Furthermore, FACT-deficient yeast and human cells show replication impairment, which in yeast we demonstrate by ChIP–chip (chromatin immunoprecipitation [ChIP] coupled with microarray analysis) of Rrm3 to occur genome-wide but preferentially at highly transcribed regions. Strikingly, in yeast FACT mutants, high levels of Rad52 foci are suppressed by RNH1 overexpression; R loops accumulate at high levels, and replication becomes normal when global RNA synthesis is inhibited in FACT-depleted human cells. The results demonstrate a key function of FACT in the resolution of R-loop-mediated transcription–replication conflicts, likely associated with a specific chromatin organization. PMID:24636987

  14. The yeast and human FACT chromatin-reorganizing complexes solve R-loop-mediated transcription-replication conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Moyano, Emilia; Mergui, Xénia; García-Rubio, María L; Barroso, Sonia; Aguilera, Andrés

    2014-04-01

    FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription) is a chromatin-reorganizing complex that swaps nucleosomes around the RNA polymerase during transcription elongation and has a role in replication that is not fully understood yet. Here we show that recombination factors are required for the survival of yeast FACT mutants, consistent with an accumulation of DNA breaks that we detected by Rad52 foci and transcription-dependent hyperrecombination. Breaks also accumulate in FACT-depleted human cells, as shown by γH2AX foci and single-cell electrophoresis. Furthermore, FACT-deficient yeast and human cells show replication impairment, which in yeast we demonstrate by ChIP-chip (chromatin immunoprecipitation [ChIP] coupled with microarray analysis) of Rrm3 to occur genome-wide but preferentially at highly transcribed regions. Strikingly, in yeast FACT mutants, high levels of Rad52 foci are suppressed by RNH1 overexpression; R loops accumulate at high levels, and replication becomes normal when global RNA synthesis is inhibited in FACT-depleted human cells. The results demonstrate a key function of FACT in the resolution of R-loop-mediated transcription-replication conflicts, likely associated with a specific chromatin organization.

  15. Delivery of short interfering ribonucleic acid-complexed magnetic nanoparticles in an oscillating field occurs via caveolae-mediated endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenson Lim

    Full Text Available Gene delivery technologies to introduce foreign genes into highly differentiated mammalian cells have improved significantly over the last few decades. Relatively new techniques such as magnetic nanoparticle-based gene transfection technology are showing great promise in terms of its high transfection efficiency and wide-ranging research applications. We have developed a novel gene delivery technique, which uses magnetic nanoparticles moving under the influence of an oscillating magnetic array. Herein we successfully introduced short interfering RNA (siRNA against green fluorescent protein (GFP or actin into stably-transfected GFP-HeLa cells or wild-type HeLa and rat aortic smooth muscle cells, respectively. This gene silencing technique occurred in a dose- and cell density- dependent manner, as reflected using fluorescence intensity and adhesion assays. Furthermore, using endocytosis inhibitors, we established that these magnetic nanoparticle-nucleic acid complexes, moving across the cell surface under the influence of an oscillating magnet array, enters into the cells via the caveolae-mediated endocytic pathway.

  16. Immune Complex Mediated Glomerulonephritis with Acute Thrombotic Microangiopathy following Newly Detected Hepatitis B Virus Infection in a Kidney Transplant Recipient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Hannah; Douthwaite, Sam; Newsholme, William; Horsfield, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) presents a risk to patients and staff in renal units. To minimise viral transmission, there are international and UK guidelines recommending HBV immunisation for patients commencing renal replacement therapy (RRT) and HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients. We report the case of a 56-year-old male who was immunised against HBV before starting haemodialysis. He received a deceased donor kidney transplant three years later, at which time there was no evidence of HBV infection. After a further six years he developed an acute kidney injury; allograft biopsy revealed an acute thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) with glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and C4d staining. Due to a “full house” immunoprofile, tests including virological screening were undertaken, which revealed acute HBV infection. Entecavir treatment resulted in an improvement in viral load and kidney function. HBV genotyping demonstrated a vaccine escape mutant, suggesting “past resolved” infection that reactivated with immunosuppression, though posttransplant acquisition cannot be excluded. This is the first reported case of acute HBV infection associated with immune complex mediated glomerulonephritis and TMA. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients, which although addressed by UK guidelines is not currently practiced in all UK units.

  17. Neuronal Fc gamma receptor I as a novel mediator for IgG immune complex-induced peripheral sensitization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lintao Qu

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain often accompanies immune-related diseases with an elevated level of IgG immune complex (IgG-IC) in the serum and/or the affected tissues though the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs), known as the receptors for the Fc domain of immunoglobulin G (IgG), are typically expressed on immune cells. A general consensus is that the activation of FcγRs by IgG-IC in such immune cells induces the release of proinflammatory cytokines from the immune cells, which may contribute to the IgG-IC-mediated peripheral sensitization. In addition to the immune cells, recent studies have revealed that FcγRI, but not FcγRII and FcγRIII, is also expressed in a subpopulation of primary sensory neurons. Moreover, IgG-IC directly excites the primary sensory neurons through neuronal FcγRI. These findings indicate that neuronal FcγRI provides a novel direct linkage between immunoglobulin and primary sensory neurons, which may be a novel target for the treatment of pain in the immune-related disorders. In this review, we summarize the expression pattern, functions, and the associated cellular signaling of FcγRs in the primary sensory neurons.

  18. Molecular mechanisms involved in TFF3 peptide-mediated modulation of the E-cadherin/catenin cell adhesion complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer zum Büschenfelde, Dirk; Hoschützky, Heinz; Tauber, Rudolf; Huber, Otmar

    2004-05-01

    TFF3 is a member of the TFF-domain peptide family which is constitutively expressed in mucous epithelial tissues where it acts as a motogenic factor and plays an important role during epithelial restitution after wounding and during inflammation. In contrast to these beneficial functions, TFFs were also reported to be involved in cell scattering and tumor invasion. These changes in epithelial cell morphology and motility are associated with a modulation of cell contacts. In this respect, we here investigated the E-cadherin/catenin cell adhesion complex in FLAG-hTFF3-transfected HT29/B6 and MDCK cells. In hTFF3-transfected cells the amount of E-cadherin is reduced with a concomitant reduction of alpha- and beta-catenin levels. On one hand, E-cadherin expression is lowered at the transcriptional level as shown by multiplex RT-PCR analysis. This decrease does not depend on differences in the promoter methylation status as shown by methylation-specific PCR. On the other hand, pulse-chase experiments showed a reduction in the E-cadherin half-life in hTFF3-transfected cells reflecting increased E-cadherin degradation. In summary, hTFF3 induces transcriptional and posttranslational processes resulting in a modulation of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts that may play an important role in the paradoxical benefical and pathogenic function of TFF peptides.

  19. Thermodynamic consequences of disrupting a water-mediated hydrogen bond network in a protein:pheromone complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrow, Scott D; Edmonds, Katherine A; Goodman, Michael A; Novotny, Milos V; Stone, Martin J

    2005-01-01

    The mouse pheromones (+/-)-2-sec-butyl-4,5-dihydrothiazole (SBT) and 6-hydroxy-6-methyl-3-heptanone (HMH) bind into an occluded hydrophobic cavity in the mouse major urinary protein (MUP-1). Although the ligands are structurally unrelated, in both cases binding is accompanied by formation of a similar buried, water-mediated hydrogen bond network between the ligand and several backbone and side chain groups on the protein. To investigate the energetic contribution of this hydrogen bond network to ligand binding, we have applied isothermal titration calorimetry to measure the binding thermodynamics using several MUP mutants and ligand analogs. Mutation of Tyr-120 to Phe, which disrupts a hydrogen bond from the phenolic hydroxyl group of Tyr-120 to one of the bound water molecules, results in a substantial loss of favorable binding enthalpy, which is partially compensated by a favorable change in binding entropy. A similar thermodynamic effect was observed when the hydrogen bonded nitrogen atom of the heterocyclic ligand was replaced by a methyne group. Several other modifications of the protein or ligand had smaller effects on the binding thermodynamics. The data provide supporting evidence for the role of the hydrogen bond network in stabilizing the complex.

  20. Epidermal growth factor and ras regulate gene expression in GH4 pituitary cells by separate, antagonistic signal transduction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickett, C.A.; Gutierrez-Hartmann, A. [Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO (United States)

    1995-12-01

    This report discusses the role of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) in promoting activation of the rat prolactin promoter in neuroendocrine cells via a Ras-independent mechanism. It also discusses the role of phosphotransferases in mediating EGF response. 32 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Eps15 is recruited to the plasma membrane upon epidermal growth factor receptor activation and localizes to components of the endocytic pathway during receptor internalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torrisi, M R; Lotti, L V; Belleudi, F;

    1999-01-01

    Eps15 is a substrate for the tyrosine kinase of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and is characterized by the presence of a novel protein:protein interaction domain, the EH domain. Eps15 also stably binds the clathrin adaptor protein complex AP-2. Previous work demonstrated an essential...... role for eps15 in receptor-mediated endocytosis. In this study we show that, upon activation of the EGFR kinase, eps15 undergoes dramatic relocalization consisting of 1) initial relocalization to the plasma membrane and 2) subsequent colocalization with the EGFR in various intracellular compartments...... of the endocytic pathway, with the notable exclusion of coated vesicles. Relocalization of eps15 is independent of its binding to the EGFR or of binding of the receptor to AP-2. Furthermore, eps15 appears to undergo tyrosine phosphorylation both at the plasma membrane and in a nocodazole-sensitive compartment...

  2. Simultaneous inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and enhanced activation of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor-mediated apoptosis induction by an scFv : sTRAIL fusion protein with specificity for human EGFR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremer, E; Samplonius, DF; van Genne, L; Dijkstra, MH; Kroesen, BJ; de Leij, LFMH; Helfrich, W

    2005-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling inhibition by monoclonal antibodies and EGFR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors has shown clinical efficacy in cancer by restoring susceptibility of tumor cells to therapeutic apoptosis induction. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing lig

  3. Methyl 6-Amino-6-deoxy-d-pyranoside-Conjugated Platinum(II) Complexes for Glucose Transporter (GLUT)-Mediated Tumor Targeting: Synthesis, Cytotoxicity, and Cellular Uptake Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Taoli; Gao, Xiangqian; Yang, Liu; Shi, Yunli; Gao, Qingzhi

    2016-05-19

    Methyl 6-aminodeoxy-d-pyranoside-derived platinum(II) glycoconjugates were designed and synthesized based on the clinical drug oxaliplatin for glucose transporter (GLUT)-mediated tumor targeting. In addition to a substantial improvement in water solubility, the conjugates exhibited cytotoxicity similar to or higher than that of oxaliplatin in six different human cancer cell lines. GLUT-mediated transport of the complexes was investigated with a cell-based fluorescence competition assay and GLUT-inhibitor-mediated cytotoxicity analysis in a GLUT-overexpressing human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29) cell line. The antitumor effect of the aminodeoxypyranoside-conjugated platinum(II) complexes was found to depend significantly on the GLUT inhibitor, and the cellular uptake of the molecules was regulated by GLUT-mediated transport. The results from this study demonstrate the potential advantages of aminodeoxypyranosides as sugar motifs for glycoconjugation for Warburg-effect-targeted drug design. These fundamental results also support the potential of aminodeoxypyranoside-conjugated platinum(II) complexes as lead compounds for further preclinical evaluation.

  4. Recruitment of Mediator Complex by Cell Type and Stage-Specific Factors Required for Tissue-Specific TAF Dependent Gene Activation in an Adult Stem Cell Lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenggang Lu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Onset of terminal differentiation in adult stem cell lineages is commonly marked by robust activation of new transcriptional programs required to make the appropriate differentiated cell type(s. In the Drosophila male germ line stem cell lineage, the switch from proliferating spermatogonia to spermatocyte is accompanied by one of the most dramatic transcriptional changes in the fly, as over 1000 new transcripts turn on in preparation for meiosis and spermatid differentiation. Here we show that function of the coactivator complex Mediator is required for activation of hundreds of new transcripts in the spermatocyte program. Mediator appears to act in a sequential hierarchy, with the testis activating Complex (tMAC, a cell type specific form of the Mip/dREAM general repressor, required to recruit Mediator subunits to the chromatin, and Mediator function required to recruit the testis TAFs (tTAFs, spermatocyte specific homologs of subunits of TFIID. Mediator, tMAC and the tTAFs co-regulate expression of a major set of spermatid differentiation genes. The Mediator subunit Med22 binds the tMAC component Topi when the two are coexpressed in S2 cells, suggesting direct recruitment. Loss of Med22 function in spermatocytes causes meiosis I maturation arrest male infertility, similar to loss of function of the tMAC subunits or the tTAFs. Our results illuminate how cell type specific versions of the Mip/dREAM complex and the general transcription machinery cooperate to drive selective gene activation during differentiation in stem cell lineages.

  5. The Mediator complex of Caenorhabditis elegans: insights into the developmental and physiological roles of a conserved transcriptional coregulator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grants, Jennifer M; Goh, Grace Y S; Taubert, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    .... Here, we review the current knowledge of Mediator subunit function in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a metazoan in which established and emerging genetic technologies facilitate the study...

  6. Exploration of CH···π mediated stacking interactions in saccharide: aromatic residue complexes through conformational sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Manju; Sunoj, Raghavan B; Balaji, Petety V

    2012-11-01

    Saccharides interact with aromatic residues mostly through CH···π mediated stacking interactions. The energetics of such interactions depends upon the mutual position-orientations (POs) of the two moieties. The POs found in the crystal structures are only a subset of the various possible ways of interaction. Hence, potential energy surfaces of saccharide-aromatic residue complexes have been explored by mixed Monte Carlo multiple minimum/low mode sampling. The saccharides considered in this study are α/β-D-glucose, β-D-galactose, α-D-mannose, and α/β-L-fucose. p-Hydroxytoluene, toluene, and 3-methylindole were used as analogs of tyrosine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan, respectively. The saccharides interact from either above or below the π-cloud of an aromatic ring but not along the edges. The POs preferred by different saccharides, both in the preferred chair and skew-boat forms, for interacting with different aromatic amino acid residue analogs have been identified. Aromatic residues can interact with the same -CH group in many POs but not so with the -OH groups. Changes in the configurations of pyranose ring carbon atoms cause remarkable changes in stacking preferences. β-D-Galactose and β-L-fructose interact only through their b- and a-faces, respectively. Saccharides use a wide variety of apolar patches for stacking against aromatic residues and these have been analyzed in detail. As many as four -CH groups can simultaneously participate in CH···π interactions, especially with 3-methylindole owing to its larger surface area.

  7. SUPERKILLER Complex Components Are Required for the RNA Exosome-Mediated Control of Cuticular Wax Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis Inflorescence Stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lifang; Kunst, Ljerka

    2016-06-01

    ECERIFERUM7 (CER7)/AtRRP45B core subunit of the exosome, the main cellular 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease, is a positive regulator of cuticular wax biosynthesis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) inflorescence stems. CER7-dependent exosome activity determines stem wax load by controlling transcript levels of the wax-related gene CER3 Characterization of the second-site suppressors of the cer7 mutant revealed that small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are direct effectors of CER3 expression. To explore the relationship between the exosome and posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) in regulating CER3 transcript levels, we investigated two additional suppressor mutants, wax restorer1 (war1) and war7. We show that WAR1 and WAR7 encode Arabidopsis SUPERKILLER3 (AtSKI3) and AtSKI2, respectively, components of the SKI complex that associates with the exosome during cytoplasmic 3'-to-5' RNA degradation, and that CER7-dependent regulation of wax biosynthesis also requires participation of AtSKI8. Our study further reveals that it is the impairment of the exosome-mediated 3'-5' decay of CER3 transcript in the cer7 mutant that triggers extensive production of siRNAs and efficient PTGS of CER3. This identifies PTGS as a general mechanism for eliminating highly abundant endogenous transcripts that is activated when 3'-to-5' mRNA turnover by the exosome is disrupted. Diminished efficiency of PTGS in ski mutants compared with cer7, as evidenced by lower accumulation of CER3-related siRNAs, suggests that reduced amounts of CER3 transcript are available for siRNA synthesis, possibly because CER3 mRNA that does not interact with SKI is degraded by 5'-to-3' XRN4 exoribonuclease.

  8. GR SUMOylation and formation of an SUMO-SMRT/NCoR1-HDAC3 repressing complex is mandatory for GC-induced IR nGRE-mediated transrepression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Guoqiang; Paulen, Laetitia; Chambon, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Unique among the nuclear receptor superfamily, the glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GR) can exert three distinct transcriptional regulatory functions on binding of a single natural (cortisol in human and corticosterone in mice) and synthetic [e.g., dexamethasone (Dex)] hormone. The molecular mechanisms underlying GC-induced positive GC response element [(+)GRE]-mediated activation of transcription are partially understood. In contrast, these mechanisms remain elusive for GC-induced evolutionary conserved inverted repeated negative GC response element (IR nGRE)-mediated direct transrepression and for tethered indirect transrepression that is mediated by DNA-bound NF-κB/activator protein 1 (AP1)/STAT3 activators and instrumental in GC-induced anti-inflammatory activity. We demonstrate here that SUMOylation of lysine K293 (mouse K310) located within an evolutionary conserved sequence in the human GR N-terminal domain allows the formation of a GR-small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs)-NCoR1/SMRT-HDAC3 repressing complex mandatory for GC-induced IR nGRE-mediated direct repression in vitro, but does not affect transactivation. Importantly, these results were validated in vivo: in K310R mutant mice and in mice ablated selectively for nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1)/silencing mediator for retinoid or thyroid-hormone receptors (SMRT) corepressors in skin keratinocytes, Dex-induced direct repression and the formation of repressing complexes on IR nGREs were impaired, whereas transactivation was unaffected. In mice selectively ablated for histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) in skin keratinocytes, GC-induced direct repression, but not bindings of GR and of corepressors NCoR1/SMRT, was abolished, indicating that HDAC3 is instrumental in IR nGRE-mediated repression. Moreover, we demonstrate that the binding of HDAC3 to IR nGREs in vivo is mediated through interaction with SMRT/NCoR1. We also show that the GR ligand binding domain (LBD) is not required for SMRT-mediated

  9. GR SUMOylation and formation of an SUMO-SMRT/NCoR1-HDAC3 repressing complex is mandatory for GC-induced IR nGRE-mediated transrepression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Guoqiang; Paulen, Laetitia; Chambon, Pierre

    2016-02-02

    Unique among the nuclear receptor superfamily, the glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GR) can exert three distinct transcriptional regulatory functions on binding of a single natural (cortisol in human and corticosterone in mice) and synthetic [e.g., dexamethasone (Dex)] hormone. The molecular mechanisms underlying GC-induced positive GC response element [(+)GRE]-mediated activation of transcription are partially understood. In contrast, these mechanisms remain elusive for GC-induced evolutionary conserved inverted repeated negative GC response element (IR nGRE)-mediated direct transrepression and for tethered indirect transrepression that is mediated by DNA-bound NF-κB/activator protein 1 (AP1)/STAT3 activators and instrumental in GC-induced anti-inflammatory activity. We demonstrate here that SUMOylation of lysine K293 (mouse K310) located within an evolutionary conserved sequence in the human GR N-terminal domain allows the formation of a GR-small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs)-NCoR1/SMRT-HDAC3 repressing complex mandatory for GC-induced IR nGRE-mediated direct repression in vitro, but does not affect transactivation. Importantly, these results were validated in vivo: in K310R mutant mice and in mice ablated selectively for nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1)/silencing mediator for retinoid or thyroid-hormone receptors (SMRT) corepressors in skin keratinocytes, Dex-induced direct repression and the formation of repressing complexes on IR nGREs were impaired, whereas transactivation was unaffected. In mice selectively ablated for histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) in skin keratinocytes, GC-induced direct repression, but not bindings of GR and of corepressors NCoR1/SMRT, was abolished, indicating that HDAC3 is instrumental in IR nGRE-mediated repression. Moreover, we demonstrate that the binding of HDAC3 to IR nGREs in vivo is mediated through interaction with SMRT/NCoR1. We also show that the GR ligand binding domain (LBD) is not required for SMRT-mediated

  10. Abnormal epidermal changes after argon laser treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, R.A.; Knobler, R.M.; Aberer, E.; Klein, W.; Kocsis, F.; Ott, E. (Univ. of Vienna (Austria))

    1991-02-01

    A 26-year-old woman with a congenital port-wine stain on the forehead was treated three times at 2-month intervals with an argon laser. Six months after the last treatment, moderate blanching and mild scaling confined to the treated area was observed. A biopsy specimen of the treated area revealed a significant decrease in ectatic vessels. However, epidermal changes similar to those of actinic keratosis with disorganized cell layers and marked cytologic abnormalities were seen. Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes for a defect in DNA repair was negative. Multiple, argon laser-induced photothermal effects may be responsible for the changes observed in our case and may lead to premalignant epidermal transformation.

  11. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor (EGF is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health.

  12. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Crosstalks in Liver Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berasain, Carmen, E-mail: cberasain@unav.es; Latasa, María Ujue; Urtasun, Raquel; Goñi, Saioa; Elizalde, María; Garcia-Irigoyen, Oihane; Azcona, María [Division of Hepatology and Gene Therapy, CIMA, University of Navarra, Pamplona 31008 (Spain); Prieto, Jesús [Division of Hepatology and Gene Therapy, CIMA, University of Navarra, Pamplona 31008 (Spain); CIBERehd, University Clinic, University of Navarra, Pamplona 31080 (Spain); Ávila, Matías A. [Division of Hepatology and Gene Therapy, CIMA, University of Navarra, Pamplona 31008 (Spain)

    2011-05-18

    Hepatocarcinogenesis is a complex multistep process in which many different molecular pathways have been implicated. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is refractory to conventional chemotherapeutic agents, and the new targeted therapies are meeting with limited success. Interreceptor crosstalk and the positive feedback between different signaling systems are emerging as mechanisms of targeted therapy resistance. The identification of such interactions is therefore of particular relevance to improve therapeutic efficacy. Among the different signaling pathways activated in hepatocarcinogenesis the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) system plays a prominent role, being recognized as a “signaling hub” where different extracellular growth and survival signals converge. EGFR can be transactivated in response to multiple heterologous ligands through the physical interaction with multiple receptors, the activity of intracellular kinases or the shedding of EGFR-ligands. In this article we review the crosstalk between the EGFR and other signaling pathways that could be relevant to liver cancer development and treatment.

  13. Niche interactions in epidermal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hye-Ryung Choi; Sang-Young Byun; Soon-Hyo Kwon; Kyoung-Chan Park

    2015-01-01

    Within the epidermis and dermis of the skin, cellssecrete and are surrounded by the extracellular matrix(ECM), which provides structural and biochemicalsupport. The ECM of the epidermis is the basementmembrane, and collagen and other dermal componentsconstitute the ECM of the dermis. There is significantvariation in the composition of the ECM of the epidermisand dermis, which can affect "cell to cell" and "cellto ECM" interactions. These interactions, in turn, caninfluence biological responses, aging, and woundhealing; abnormal ECM signaling likely contributes toskin diseases. Thus, strategies for manipulating cell-ECM interactions are critical for treating wounds and avariety of skin diseases. Many of these strategies focuson epidermal stem cells, which reside in a unique nichein which the ECM is the most important component;interactions between the ECM and epidermal stemcells play a major role in regulating stem cell fate. Asthey constitute a major portion of the ECM, it is likelythat integrins and type Ⅳ collagens are important instem cell regulation and maintenance. In this review,we highlight recent research-including our previouswork-exploring the role that the ECM and its associatedcomponents play in shaping the epidermal stem cellniche.

  14. Changes of epidermal thickness in vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Soo-Eun; Kang, Hee Young; Lee, Eun-So; Kim, You Chan

    2015-04-01

    The stratum corneum and epidermal pigmentation have protective roles against ultraviolet radiation. Because vitiligo skin lacks melanocytes and has no potential to produce pigment, some studies suggested that the epidermis in vitiligo skin is thicker than in normal skin. However, only a few studies investigated epidermal thickness changes in vitiligo, and some of these had relatively small sample sizes. Thus, this study aimed to compare epidermal thickness between vitiligo skin and adjacent normal-appearing skin in a large cohort. Photos of hematoxylin and eosin–stained slides of vitiligo skin and adjacent normal-appearing skin were taken under a microscope. The thicknesses of the stratum corneum, viable epidermis, and full epidermis were then measured by a computerized image analyzer. A total of 206 patients (412 sections) were included. There were significant differences between vitiligo skin and adjacent normal-appearing skin in the thickness of the stratum corneum (P = 0.009), viable epidermis (P = 0.001), and total epidermis (P = 0.001). An analysis comparing skin biopsied from a sun-exposed area versus a sun-protected area showed that the stratum corneum, viable epidermis, and total epidermis were significantly thicker in vitiligo skin than in normal-appearing skin in sun-exposed areas (P vitiligo skin than in normal-appearing skin, especially on sun-exposed skin, and that this may represent a photoprotective role compensating for absent pigmentation.

  15. Protein kinase D1 deficiency promotes differentiation in epidermal keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Vivek; Olala, Lawrence O.; Kaddour-Djebbar, Ismail; Helwa, Inas; Bollag, Wendy B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein kinase D (PKD or PKD1) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that has been shown to play a role in a variety of cellular processes; however, the function of PKD1 in the skin has not been fully investigated. The balance between proliferation and differentiation processes in the predominant cells of the epidermis, the keratinocytes, is essential for normal skin function. Objective To investigate the effect of PKD1 deficiency on proliferation and differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes. Methods We utilized a floxed PKD1 mouse model such that infecting epidermal keratinocytes derived from these mice with an adenovirus expressing Cre-recombinase allowed us to determine the effect of PKD1 gene loss in vitro. Proliferation and differentiation were monitored using qRT-PCR, Western blot, transglutaminase activity assays, [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA and cell cycle analysis. Results A significant decrease in PKD1 mRNA and protein levels was achieved in adenoviral Cre-recombinase-infected cells. Deficiency of PKD1 resulted in significant increases in the mRNA and protein expression of various differentiation markers such as loricrin, involucrin, and keratin 10 either basally and/or upon stimulation of differentiation. PKD1-deficient keratinocytes also showed an increase in transglutaminase expression and activity, indicating an anti-differentiative role of PKD1. Furthermore, the PKD1-deficient keratinocytes exhibited decreased proliferation. However, PKD1 loss had no effect on stem cell marker expression. Conclusions Cre-recombinase-mediated knockdown represents an additional approach demonstrating that PKD1 is an anti-differentiative, pro-proliferative signal in mouse keratinocytes. PMID:25450094

  16. A clinico-radiological phenotype of voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody-mediated disorder presenting with seizures and basal ganglia changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacohen, Yael; Wright, Sukhvir; Siddiqui, Ata; Pandya, Nikki; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Vincent, Angela; Lim, Ming

    2012-12-01

    In childhood, central nervous system (CNS) presentations associated with antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex include limbic encephalitis, status epilepticus, epileptic encephalopathy, and autistic regression. We report the cases of two individuals (a 6-year-old male and an 11-year-old female) who presented with an acute-onset explosive seizure disorder with positive VGKC complex antibodies and bilateral basal ganglia changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Both patients made a complete clinical recovery, without immunotherapy, with resolution of the MRI changes and normalization of the antibody levels. Extended antibody testing, including testing for leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1), contactin-associated protein 2, and contactin-2 was negative. This could suggest that the clinico-radiological phenotype in our patients may in fact be associated with a novel autoreactive target(s) within the VGKC complex, as may be the case in other children with VGKC complex-mediated CNS disorders.

  17. Childhood trauma and complex posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms in older adults: A study of direct effects and social-interpersonal factors as potential mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krammer, Sandy; Kleim, Birgit; Simmen-Janevska, Keti; Maercker, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Childhood traumatic events may lead to long-lasting psychological effects and contribute to the development of complex posttraumatic sequelae. These might be captured by the diagnostic concept of complex posttraumatic stress disorder (CPTSD) as an alternative to classic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). CPTSD comprises a further set of symptoms in addition to those of PTSD, namely, changes in affect, self, and interpersonal relationships. Previous empirical research on CPTSD has focused on middle-aged adults but not on older adults. Moreover, predictor models of CPTSD are still rare. The current study investigated the association between traumatic events in childhood and complex posttraumatic stress symptoms in older adults. The mediation of this association by 2 social-interpersonal factors (social acknowledgment as a survivor and dysfunctional disclosure) was investigated. These 2 factors focus on the perception of acknowledgment by others and either the inability to disclose traumatic experiences or the ability to do so only with negative emotional reactions. A total of 116 older individuals (age range = 59-98 years) who had experienced childhood traumatic events completed standardized self-report questionnaires indexing childhood trauma, complex trauma sequelae, social acknowledgment, and dysfunctional disclosure of trauma. The results showed that traumatic events during childhood were associated with later posttraumatic stress symptoms but with classic rather than complex symptoms. Social acknowledgment and dysfunctional disclosure partially mediated this relationship. These findings suggest that childhood traumatic stress impacts individuals across the life span and may be associated with particular adverse psychopathological consequences.

  18. Preparation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles and their internalization into colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creixell, Mar [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagueez Campus, P.O. Box 9000, Mayagueez, PR 00681 (Puerto Rico); Department of Electronics, Faculty of Physics, University of Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Herrera, Adriana P.; Ayala, Vanessa; Latorre-Esteves, Magda [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagueez Campus, P.O. Box 9000, Mayagueez, PR 00681 (Puerto Rico); Perez-Torres, Marianela [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Puerto Rico-Medical Sciences Campus, PO Box 365067, San Juan, PR 00936 (Puerto Rico); Torres-Lugo, Madeline [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagueez Campus, P.O. Box 9000, Mayagueez, PR 00681 (Puerto Rico); Rinaldi, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@upr.ed [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagueez Campus, P.O. Box 9000, Mayagueez, PR 00681 (Puerto Rico)

    2010-08-15

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) was conjugated with carboxymethyldextran (CMDx) coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles using carbodiimide chemistry to obtain magnetic nanoparticles that target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Epidermal growth factor modified magnetic nanoparticles were colloidally stable when suspended in biological buffers such as PBS and cell culture media. Both targeted and non-targeted nanoparticles were incubated with CaCo-2 cancer cells, known to overexpress EGFR. Nanoparticle localization within the cell was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy and light microscopy using Prussian blue stain. Results showed that targeted magnetic nanoparticles were rapidly accumulated in both flask-shaped small vesicles and large circular endocytic structures. Internalization patterns suggest that both clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent receptors mediated endocytosis mechanisms are responsible for nanoparticle internalization.

  19. Preparation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles and their internalization into colon cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creixell, Mar; Herrera, Adriana P.; Ayala, Vanessa; Latorre-Esteves, Magda; Pérez-Torres, Marianela; Torres-Lugo, Madeline; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2010-08-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) was conjugated with carboxymethyldextran (CMDx) coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles using carbodiimide chemistry to obtain magnetic nanoparticles that target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Epidermal growth factor modified magnetic nanoparticles were colloidally stable when suspended in biological buffers such as PBS and cell culture media. Both targeted and non-targeted nanoparticles were incubated with CaCo-2 cancer cells, known to overexpress EGFR. Nanoparticle localization within the cell was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy and light microscopy using Prussian blue stain. Results showed that targeted magnetic nanoparticles were rapidly accumulated in both flask-shaped small vesicles and large circular endocytic structures. Internalization patterns suggest that both clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent receptors mediated endocytosis mechanisms are responsible for nanoparticle internalization.

  20. Use of a serum-free epidermal culture model to show deleterious effects of epidermal growth factor on morphogenesis and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C S; Lavker, R M; Rodeck, U; Risse, B; Jensen, P J

    1995-01-01

    The presence of serum has limited the utility of many culture models for the study of cytokine effects because its complexity and variability can confound the interpretation of data. In the present study, a serum-free skin co-culture model was used to investigate the effect of exogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF) on epidermal proliferation and differentiation. Human keratinocytes cultured on collagen rafts at the air-liquid interface produced a well-differentiated epithelium that resembled normal epidermis. Keratin filaments, membrane-coating granules, and keratohyalin granules were all observed. Epidermal differentiation markers keratin K1/K10, involucrin, and transglutaminase were localized in most of the suprabasal layers, whereas profilaggrin/filaggrin was confined to the granular layers and stratum corneum. In the continual presence of 10-20 ng/mL EGF, the epidermis was less organized, thinner, and less proliferative. EGF also depressed several indicators of differentiation: The number of keratohyalin granules and membrane-coating granules was greatly decreased; antigen expression of profilaggrin/filaggrin appeared diminished by immunocytochemical staining; frequent nuclear retention was noted in the relatively thickened stratum corneum-like layers. As detected by immunohistochemical staining, the expression of EGF receptor in the epidermis was reduced by exogenous EGF. These data illustrate that EGF cannot be considered a simple mitogen. Our findings also underscore the importance of using sophisticated culture models to assess complex cytokine effects that may be dependent on the architecture of a differentiating epidermis.

  1. Epidermal cells are the primary phagocytes in the fragmentation and clearance of degenerating dendrites in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chun; Song, Yuanquan; Xiao, Hui; Wang, Denan; Franc, Nathalie C; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh-Nung

    2014-02-05

    During developmental remodeling, neurites destined for pruning often degenerate on-site. Physical injury also induces degeneration of neurites distal to the injury site. Prompt clearance of degenerating neurites is important for maintaining tissue homeostasis and preventing inflammatory responses. Here we show that in both dendrite pruning and dendrite injury of Drosophila sensory neurons, epidermal cells rather than hemocytes are the primary phagocytes in clearing degenerating dendrites. Epidermal cells act via Draper-mediated recognition to facilitate dendrite degeneration and to engulf and degrade degenerating dendrites. Using multiple dendritic membrane markers to trace phagocytosis, we show that two members of the CD36 family, croquemort (crq) and debris buster (dsb), act at distinct stages of phagosome maturation for dendrite clearance. Our finding reveals the physiological importance of coordination between neurons and their surrounding epidermis, for both dendrite fragmentation and clearance.

  2. Proteomic analysis of HIV-1 Nef cellular binding partners reveals a role for exocyst complex proteins in mediating enhancement of intercellular nanotube formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukerji Joya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 Nef protein contributes to pathogenesis via multiple functions that include enhancement of viral replication and infectivity, alteration of intracellular trafficking, and modulation of cellular signaling pathways. Nef stimulates formation of tunneling nanotubes and virological synapses, and is transferred to bystander cells via these intercellular contacts and secreted microvesicles. Nef associates with and activates Pak2, a kinase that regulates T-cell signaling and actin cytoskeleton dynamics, but how Nef promotes nanotube formation is unknown. Results To identify Nef binding partners involved in Pak2-association dependent Nef functions, we employed tandem mass spectrometry analysis of Nef immunocomplexes from Jurkat cells expressing wild-type Nef or Nef mutants defective for the ability to associate with Pak2 (F85L, F89H, H191F and A72P, A75P in NL4-3. We report that wild-type, but not mutant Nef, was associated with 5 components of the exocyst complex (EXOC1, EXOC2, EXOC3, EXOC4, and EXOC6, an octameric complex that tethers vesicles at the plasma membrane, regulates polarized exocytosis, and recruits membranes and proteins required for nanotube formation. Additionally, Pak2 kinase was associated exclusively with wild-type Nef. Association of EXOC1, EXOC2, EXOC3, and EXOC4 with wild-type, but not mutant Nef, was verified by co-immunoprecipitation assays in Jurkat cells. Furthermore, shRNA-mediated depletion of EXOC2 in Jurkat cells abrogated Nef-mediated enhancement of nanotube formation. Using bioinformatic tools, we visualized protein interaction networks that reveal functional linkages between Nef, the exocyst complex, and the cellular endocytic and exocytic trafficking machinery. Conclusions Exocyst complex proteins are likely a key effector of Nef-mediated enhancement of nanotube formation, and possibly microvesicle secretion. Linkages revealed between Nef and the exocyst complex suggest a new paradigm of

  3. leptin-induced growth stimulation of breast cancer cells involves recruitment of histone acetyltransferases and mediator complex to CYCLIN D1 promoter via activation of Stat3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Neeraj K; Vertino, Paula M; Anania, Frank A; Sharma, Dipali

    2007-05-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies documented that obesity is a risk factor for breast cancer development in postmenopausal women. Leptin, the key player in the regulation of energy balance and body weight control also acts as a growth factor on certain organs in both normal and disease state. In this study, we analyzed the role of leptin and the molecular mechanism(s) underlying its action in breast cancer cells that express both short and long isoforms of leptin receptor. Leptin increased MCF7 cell population in the S-phase of the cell cycle along with a robust increase in CYCLIN D1 expression. Also, leptin induced Stat3-phosphorylation-dependent proliferation of MCF7 cells as blocking Stat3 phosphorylation with a specific inhibitor, AG490, abolished leptin-induced proliferation. Using deletion constructs of CYCLIN D1 promoter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we show that leptin induced increase in CYCLIN D1 promoter activity is mediated through binding of activated Stat3 at the Stat binding sites and changes in histone acetylation and methylation. We also show specific involvement of coactivator molecules, histone acetyltransferase SRC1, and mediator complex in leptin-mediated regulation of CYCLIN D1 promoter. Importantly, silencing of SRC1 and Med1 abolished the leptin induced increase in CYCLIN D1 expression and MCF7 cell proliferation. Intriguingly, recruitment of both SRC1 and Med1 was dependent on phosphorylated Stat3 as AG490 treatment inhibited leptin-induced recruitment of these coactivators to CYCLIN D1 promoter. Our data suggest that CYCLIN D1 may be a target gene for leptin mediated growth stimulation of breast cancer cells and molecular mechanisms involve activated Stat3-mediated recruitment of distinct coactivator complexes.

  4. Penicillin induced toxic epidermal necrolysis with secondary impetiginization: a rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Babu Ramineni

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Drug induced allergic reactions can be categorized into IgE-mediated and non-IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions. Symptoms of IgE-mediated reactions are angioedema, bronchospasm, anaphylaxis, and urticaria that appears within 72 hours and those which are Non-IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions include morbilliform eruptions, interstitial nephritis, hemolytic anemia, serum sickness, thrombocytopenia, and erythema multiforme, after 72 hours. TEN is defined as an extensive detachment of full-thickness epidermis most often related to an adverse drug reaction. We report a rare case of penicillin induced toxic epidermal necrolysis with Secondary Impetigination in a 38-year-old male patient with complaints of rashes all over the body, chest pain and dry tongue since seven days. Based on history and clinical examination patient was diagnosed as of penicillin induced toxic epidermal necrolysis with secondary impetigination and was successfully treated with antihistamines, parenteral antibiotics and corticosteroids. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(2.000: 511-512

  5. Modification of pLL/DNA complexes with a multivalent hydrophilic polymer permits folate-mediated targeting in vitro and prolonged plasma circulation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Christopher M; Pechar, Michal; Oupicky, David; Ulbrich, Karel; Seymour, Leonard W

    2002-01-01

    Gene delivery vectors based on poly(L-lysine) and DNA (pLL/DNA complexes) have limited use for targeted systemic application in vivo since they bind cells and proteins non-specifically. In this study we have attempted to form folate-targeted vectors with extended systemic circulation by surface modification of pLL/DNA complexes with hydrophilic polymers. pLL/DNA complexes were stabilised by surface modification with a multivalent reactive polymer based on alternating segments of poly(ethylene glycol) and tripeptides bearing reactive ester groups. Folate moieties were incorporated into the vectors either by direct attachment of folate to the polymer or via intermediate poly(ethylene glycol) spacers of 800 and 3400 Da. Polymer-coated complexes show similar morphology to uncoated complexes, their zeta potential is decreased towards zero, serum protein binding is inhibited and aqueous solubility is substantially increased. Intravenous (i.v.) administration to mice of coated complexes produced extended systemic circulation, with up to 2000-fold more DNA measured in the bloodstream after 30 min compared with simple pLL/DNA complexes. In further contrast to simple pLL/DNA complexes, coated complexes do not bind blood cells in vivo. Folate receptor targeting is shown to mediate targeted association with HeLa cells in vitro, leading to increased transgene expression. We demonstrate for the first time that DNA uptake via the folate receptor is dependent on pEG spacer length, with the transgene expression relatively independent of the level of internalised DNA. We show increased systemic circulation, decreased blood cell and protein binding, and folate-targeted transgene expression using pLL/DNA complexes surface-modified with a novel multireactive hydrophilic polymer. This work provides the basis for the development of plasma-circulating targeted vectors for in vivo applications. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Cephalosporin Induced Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis and Subsequent Penicillin Drug Exanthem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Lam

    2008-01-01

    Discussion: This case demonstrates the complexity of drug hypersensitivity reactions. While it is accepted that IgE mediated penicillin allergy is a predisposition to cephalosporin allergy, this case displays an unusual correlation between drug hypersensitivity and drug class. There have been few studies that evaluate the cross reactivity with penicillin or other beta-lactams in subjects with primary hypersensitivity to cephalosporins. This clinical scenario emphasizes the need of more studies on cephalosporin allergy in particular as shown by this case of sequential non-IgE mediated cephalosporin induced TEN reaction pursuant by an IgE mediated penicillin allergy.

  7. 1)Jarid2 regulates mouse epidermal stem cell activation and differentiation ; 2)Tumor heterogeneity and metastasis-initiation in human squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Mejetta, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Jarid2 is required for the genomic recruitment of the polycomb repressive complex-2 (PRC2) in embryonic stem cells. However, its specific role during late development and adult tissues remains largely uncharacterized. In this first part of my thesis, we show that deletion of Jarid2 in mouse epidermis reduces the proliferation and potentiates the differentiation of postnatal epidermal progenitors, without affecting epidermal development. In neonatal epidermis, Jarid2 deficien...

  8. Yes and Lyn play a role in nuclear translocation of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, M; Brand, T M; Campbell, D A; Li, C; Wheeler, D L

    2013-02-07

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a central regulator of tumor progression in human cancers. Cetuximab is an anti-EGFR antibody that has been approved for use in oncology. Previously we investigated mechanisms of resistance to cetuximab using a model derived from the non-small cell lung cancer line NCI-H226. We demonstrated that cetuximab-resistant clones (Ctx(R)) had increased nuclear localization of the EGFR. This process was mediated by Src family kinases (SFKs), and nuclear EGFR had a role in resistance to cetuximab. To better understand SFK-mediated nuclear translocation of EGFR, we investigated which SFK member(s) controlled this process as well as the EGFR tyrosine residues that are involved. Analyses of mRNA and protein expression indicated upregulation of the SFK members Yes (v-Yes-1 yamaguchi sarcoma viral oncogene) and Lyn (v-yes-1 Yamaguchi sarcoma viral-related oncogene homolog) in all Ctx(R) clones. Further, immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that EGFR interacts with Yes and Lyn in Ctx(R) clones, but not in cetuximab-sensitive (Ctx(S)) parental cells. Using RNAi interference, we found that knockdown of either Yes or Lyn led to loss of EGFR translocation to the nucleus. Conversely, overexpression of Yes or Lyn in low nuclear EGFR-expressing Ctx(S) parental cells led to increased nuclear EGFR. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed nuclear EGFR complexes associated with the promoter of the known EGFR target genes B-Myb and iNOS. Further, all Ctx(R) clones exhibited upregulation of B-Myb and iNOS at the mRNA and protein levels. siRNAs directed at Yes or Lyn led to decreased binding of EGFR complexes to the B-Myb and iNOS promoters based on ChIP analyses. SFKs have been shown to phosphorylate EGFR on tyrosines 845 and 1101 (Y845 and Y1101), and mutation of Y1101, but not Y845, impaired nuclear entry of the EGFR. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Yes and Lyn phosphorylate EGFR at Y1101, which influences EGFR

  9. An oligogalacturonide-derived molecular probe demonstrates the dynamics of calcium-mediated pectin complexation in cell walls of tip-growing structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef; Kracun, Stjepan Kresimir; Rydahl, Maja Gro

    2017-01-01

    Pectic homogalacturonan (HG) is one of the main constituents of plant cell walls. When processed to low degrees of esterification, HG can form complexes with divalent calcium ions. These macromolecular structures (also called egg boxes) play an important role in determining the biomechanics of cell......-mediated binding of fluorescently tagged long oligogalacturonides (OGs) with endogenous de-esterified HG. We established that more than seven galacturonic acid residues in the HG chain are required to form a stable complex with endogenous HG through calcium complexation in situ, confirming a recently suggested....... Our results suggest a different spatial organisation of incorporation and processing of HG in the cell walls of these two tip-growing structures....

  10. Epidermal growth factor receptor regulates β-catenin location, stability, and transcriptional activity in oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Hsing-Wen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many cancerous cells accumulate β-catenin in the nucleus. We examined the role of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling in the accumulation of β-catenin in the nuclei of oral cancer cells. Results We used two strains of cultured oral cancer cells, one with reduced EGFR expression (OECM1 cells and one with elevated EGFR expression (SAS cells, and measured downstream effects, such as phosphorylation of β-catenin and GSK-3β, association of β-catenin with E-cadherin, and target gene regulation. We also studied the expression of EGFR, β-catenin, and cyclin D1 in 112 samples of oral cancer by immunostaining. Activation of EGFR signaling increased the amount of β-catenin in the nucleus and decreased the amount in the membranes. EGF treatment increased phosphorylation of β-catenin (tyrosine and GSK-3β(Ser-(9, resulting in a loss of β-catenin association with E-cadherin. TOP-FLASH and FOP-FLASH reporter assays demonstrated that the EGFR signal regulates β-catenin transcriptional activity and mediates cyclin D1 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that the EGFR signal affects chromatin architecture at the regulatory element of cyclin D1, and that the CBP, HDAC1, and Suv39h1 histone/chromatin remodeling complex is involved in this process. Immunostaining showed a significant association between EGFR expression and aberrant accumulation of β-catenin in oral cancer. Conclusions EGFR signaling regulates β-catenin localization and stability, target gene expression, and tumor progression in oral cancer. Moreover, our data suggest that aberrant accumulation of β-catenin under EGFR activation is a malignancy marker of oral cancer.

  11. Pseudosindactilia en epidermólisis bullosa

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    La epidermólisis bullosa comprende un grupo de patologías que se caracterizan por la fragilidad de la piel, formación de ampollas, y en las formas distróficas, la formación de pseudosindactilias. Debido a lo exótico de la entidad y la dificultad para el enfoque de tratamiento, se presenta un caso clínico con desarrollo de pseudosindactilias, característico usualmente de las formas distróficas. Se describe en aspectos clínicos de la entidad, el tratamiento quirúrgico de las pseudosindactilias...

  12. Giant epidermal cyst of the tarsal plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohana Majumdar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old male patient presented with a right upper eyelid mass with mechanical ptosis. The patient gave no history of trauma or surgery. On examination, there was a huge cystic mass fixed to the tarsal plate. Excisional biopsy with tarsectomy was done. Histopathology sections demonstrated a keratin-filled cyst arising from the tarsus. A thorough Pubmed search did not reveal an epidermal cyst of the tarsal plate of this size which was successfully managed. The incision was made in such a way that postoperative ptosis would be avoided. Excess skin was removed during the surgery.

  13. Epidermal cell density is autoregulated via a secretory peptide, EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR 2 in Arabidopsis leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kenta; Yokoo, Toshiya; Kajita, Ryoko; Onishi, Takaaki; Yahata, Saiko; Peterson, Kylee M; Torii, Keiko U; Kakimoto, Tatsuo

    2009-06-01

    Regulation of the number of cells is critical for development of multicellular organisms. During plant epidermal development, a protodermal cell first makes a fate decision of whether or not to be the meristemoid mother cell (MMC), which undergoes asymmetric cell division forming a meristemoid and its sister cell. The MMC-derived lineage produces all stomatal guard cells and a large proportion of non-guard cells. We demonstrate that a small secretory peptide, EPIDERMAL PATTERING FACTOR 2 (EPF2), is produced by the MMC and its early descendants, and negatively regulates the density of guard and non-guard epidermal cells. Our results suggest that EPF2 inhibits cells from adopting the MMC fate in a non-cell-autonomous manner, thus limiting the number of MMCs. This feedback loop is critical for regulation of epidermal cell density. The amino acid sequence of EPF2 resembles that of EPF1, which is known to control stomatal positioning. Over-expression of EPF1 also inhibits stomatal development, but EPF1 can act only on a later developmental process than EPF2. Overexpression and promoter swapping experiments suggested that the protein functions of EPF1 and EPF2, rather than the expression patterns of the genes, are responsible for the specific functions. Although targets of EPF1 and EPF2 are different, both EPF1 and EPF2 require common putative receptor components TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM), ERECTA (ER), ERECTA LIKE 1 (ERL1) and ERL2 in order to function.

  14. Nuclear export signal-interacting protein forms complexes with lamin A/C-Nups to mediate the CRM1-independent nuclear export of large hepatitis delta antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng; Jiang, Jia-Yin; Chang, Shin C; Tsay, Yeou-Guang; Chen, Mei-Ru; Chang, Ming-Fu

    2013-02-01

    Nuclear export is an important process that not only regulates the functions of cellular factors but also facilitates the assembly of viral nucleoprotein complexes. Chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1) that mediates the transport of proteins bearing the classical leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) is the best-characterized nuclear export receptor. Recently, several CRM1-independent nuclear export pathways were also identified. The nuclear export of the large form of hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg-L), a nucleocapsid protein of hepatitis delta virus (HDV), which contains a CRM1-independent proline-rich NES, is mediated by the host NES-interacting protein (NESI). The mechanism of the NESI protein in mediating nuclear export is still unknown. In this study, NESI was characterized as a highly glycosylated membrane protein. It interacted and colocalized well in the nuclear envelope with lamin A/C and nucleoporins. Importantly, HDAg-L could be coimmunoprecipitated with lamin A/C and nucleoporins. In addition, binding of the cargo HDAg-L to the C terminus of NESI was detected for the wild-type protein but not for the nuclear export-defective HDAg-L carrying a P205A mutation [HDAg-L(P205A)]. Knockdown of lamin A/C effectively reduced the nuclear export of HDAg-L and the assembly of HDV. These data indicate that by forming complexes with lamin A/C and nucleoporins, NESI facilitates the CRM1-independent nuclear export of HDAg-L.

  15. Complex regulation of Arabidopsis AGR1/PIN2-mediated root gravitropic response and basipetal auxin transport by cantharidin-sensitive protein phosphatases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Heungsop; Shin, Hwa-Soo; Guo, Zibiao; Blancaflor, Elison B.; Masson, Patrick H.; Chen, Rujin

    2005-01-01

    Polar auxin transport, mediated by two distinct plasma membrane-localized auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins/complexes, plays an important role in many plant growth and developmental processes including tropic responses to gravity and light, development of lateral roots and patterning in embryogenesis. We have previously shown that the Arabidopsis AGRAVITROPIC 1/PIN2 gene encodes an auxin efflux component regulating root gravitropism and basipetal auxin transport. However, the regulatory mechanism underlying the function of AGR1/PIN2 is largely unknown. Recently, protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases, respectively, have been implicated in regulating polar auxin transport and root gravitropism. Here, we examined the effects of chemical inhibitors of protein phosphatases on root gravitropism and basipetal auxin transport, as well as the expression pattern of AGR1/PIN2 gene and the localization of AGR1/PIN2 protein. We also examined the effects of inhibitors of vesicle trafficking and protein kinases. Our data suggest that protein phosphatases, sensitive to cantharidin and okadaic acid, are likely involved in regulating AGR1/PIN2-mediated root basipetal auxin transport and gravitropism, as well as auxin response in the root central elongation zone (CEZ). BFA-sensitive vesicle trafficking may be required for the cycling of AGR1/PIN2 between plasma membrane and the BFA compartment, but not for the AGR1/PIN2-mediated root basipetal auxin transport and auxin response in CEZ cells.

  16. The TWD40-2 protein and the AP2 complex cooperate in the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of cellulose synthase to regulate cellulose biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashline, Logan; Li, Shundai; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Gu, Ying

    2015-10-13

    Cellulose biosynthesis is performed exclusively by plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthases (CESAs). Therefore, the trafficking of CESAs to and from the plasma membrane is an important mechanism for regulating cellulose biosynthesis. CESAs were recently identified as cargo proteins of the classic adaptor protein 2 (AP2) complex of the clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) pathway. The AP2 complex of the CME pathway is conserved in yeast, animals, and plants, and has been well-characterized in many systems. In contrast, the recently discovered TPLATE complex (TPC), which is proposed to function as a CME adaptor complex, is only conserved in plants and a few other eukaryotes. In this study, we discovered that the TWD40-2 protein, a putative member of the TPC, is also important for the endocytosis of CESAs. Genetic analysis between TWD40-2 and AP2M of the AP2 complex revealed that the roles of TWD40-2 in CME are both distinct from and cooperative with the AP2 complex. Loss of efficient CME in twd40-2-3 resulted in the unregulated overaccumulation of CESAs at the plasma membrane. In seedlings of twd40-2-3 and other CME-deficient mutants, a direct correlation was revealed between endocytic deficiency and cellulose content deficiency, highlighting the importance of controlled CESA endocytosis in regulating cellulose biosynthesis.

  17. Photocrosslinkable Gelatin Hydrogel for Epidermal Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Lang, Qi; Yildirimer, Lara; Lin, Zhi Yuan; Cui, Wenguo; Annabi, Nasim; Ng, Kee Woei; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Natural hydrogels are promising scaffolds to engineer epidermis. Currently, natural hydrogels used to support epidermal regeneration are mainly collagen- or gelatin-based, which mimic the natural dermal extracellular matrix but often suffer from insufficient and uncontrollable mechanical and degradation properties. In this study, a photocrosslinkable gelatin (i.e., gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA)) with tunable mechanical, degradation, and biological properties is used to engineer the epidermis for skin tissue engineering applications. The results reveal that the mechanical and degradation properties of the developed hydrogels can be readily modified by varying the hydrogel concentration, with elastic and compressive moduli tuned from a few kPa to a few hundred kPa, and the degradation times varied from a few days to several months. Additionally, hydrogels of all concentrations displayed excellent cell viability (>90%) with increasing cell adhesion and proliferation corresponding to increases in hydrogel concentrations. Furthermore, the hydrogels are found to support keratinocyte growth, differentiation, and stratification into a reconstructed multilayered epidermis with adequate barrier functions. The robust and tunable properties of GelMA hydrogels suggest that the keratinocyte laden hydrogels can be used as epidermal substitutes, wound dressings, or substrates to construct various in vitro skin models.

  18. Membrane contacts between endosomes and ER provide sites for PTP1B-epidermal growth factor receptor interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Emily R; White, Ian J; Tsapara, Anna; Futter, Clare E

    2010-03-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a critical determinator of cell fate. Signalling from this receptor tyrosine kinase is spatially regulated by progression through the endocytic pathway, governing receptor half-life and accessibility to signalling proteins and phosphatases. Endocytosis of EGFR is required for interaction with the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B (ref. 1), which localizes to the cytoplasmic face of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), raising the question of how PTP1B comes into contact with endosomal EGFR. We show that EGFR-PTP1B interaction occurs by means of direct membrane contacts between the perimeter membrane of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and the ER. The population of EGFR interacting with PTP1B is the same population that undergo ESCRT-mediated (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) sorting within MVBs, and PTP1B activity promotes the sequestration of EGFR on to MVB internal vesicles. Membrane contacts between endosomes and the ER form in both the presence and absence of stimulation by EGF. Thus membrane contacts between endosomes and the ER may represent a global mechanism for direct interaction between proteins on these two organelles.

  19. Real-time studies of the interactions between epidermal growth factor and its receptor during endocytic trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Fernandez, M L; Clarke, D T; Tobin, M J; Jones, G R

    2000-09-01

    The interactions of growth factors with cell surface receptors regulate fundamental cell processes, such as growth, differentiation and transformation. Understanding the nature of these interactions at the molecular level is of fundamental importance in cell biology. This is not only from the point of view of basic science, but also because of the repercussions such knowledge might have in understanding the mode of action of drugs in cells. Receptor mediated endocytosis has been implicated in the downregulation of the mitogenic signal. However, no data are thus far available on how growth factor/receptor interactions might control endocytic trafficking. Here we show that information on modes of binding and receptor conformational changes can be obtained using time-resolved fluorescence methods. We have found that fluorescent probes bound to epidermal growth factor (EGF) show dynamic fluorescence quenching when EGF is bound to internalising EGF receptors (EGFR). We propose that this dynamic quenching takes place because EGF-bound probes interact with tryptophan residues in the extracellular domain of the EGF-EGFR complex. Real-time accumulation of fluorescent decays has also allowed us to follow the time course of a conformational change in EGFR occurring during endocytosis, and correlate this information with endosomal trafficking and EGFR recycling.

  20. Immobilized surfactant-nanotube complexes support selectin-mediated capture of viable circulating tumor cells in the absence of capture antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael J; Castellanos, Carlos A; King, Michael R

    2015-10-01

    The metastatic spread of tumor cells from the primary site to anatomically distant organs leads to a poor patient prognosis. Increasing evidence has linked adhesive interactions between circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and endothelial cells to metastatic dissemination. Microscale biomimetic flow devices hold promise as a diagnostic tool to isolate CTCs and develop metastatic therapies, utilizing E-selectin (ES) to trigger the initial rolling adhesion of tumor cells under flow. To trigger firm adhesion and capture under flow, such devices also typically require antibodies against biomarkers thought to be expressed on CTCs. This approach is challenged by the fact that CTCs are now known to exhibit heterogeneous expression of conventional biomarkers. Here, we describe surfactant-nanotube complexes to enhance ES-mediated capture and isolation of tumor cells without the use of capture antibodies. While the majority of tumor cells exhibited weaker rolling adhesion on halloysite nanotubes (HNT) coated with ES, HNT functionalization with the sodium dodecanoate (NaL) surfactant induced a switch to firm cellular adhesion under flow. Conversely, surfactant-nanotube complexes significantly reduced the number of primary human leukocytes captured via ES-mediated adhesion under flow. The switch in tumor cell adhesion was exploited to capture and isolate tumor cells in the absence of EpCAM antibodies, commonly utilized as the gold standard for CTC isolation. Additionally, HNT-NaL complexes were shown to capture tumor cells with low to negligible EpCAM expression, that are not efficiently captured using conventional approaches.

  1. Cyclodextrin-mediated enantioseparation of phenylalanine amide derivatives and amino alcohols by capillary electrophoresis-role of complexation constants and complex mobilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranyi, Anita; Péter, Antal; Ilisz, István; Fülöp, Ferenc; Scriba, Gerhard K E

    2014-10-01

    The separation of the enantiomers of phenylalanine amide and N-methyl derivatives as well as some amino alcohols was studied by CE in acidic BGEs using CDs as chiral selectors. The native CDs displayed only low chiral recognition ability at a concentration of 15 mg/mL in 20 mM sodium phosphate buffer, pH 2.5. In contrast, the analyte enantiomers were separated in the presence of randomly sulfated CDs under reversed polarity of the applied voltage. Sulfated β-CD proved to be the most universal selector resulting in the enantioseparation of all analytes. Opposite enantiomer migration order depending on the size of the CD cavity was observed for phenylalanine amide and 2-amino-2-phenylethanol. The R-enantiomers migrated first in the presence of sulfated α-CD and γ-CD while the S-enantiomers were detected first in the presence of sulfated β-CD. The enantioseparations could be rationalized based on analyte complexation by the respective CDs except for 2-amino-2-phenylethanol and sulfated β-CD where essentially equal complexation constants were derived for the enantiomers. In this case, the migration behavior could be attributed to the mobilities of the enantiomer-CD complexes adding another example to the CE-specific phenomenon of enantioseparations based primarily on complex mobilities.

  2. Penetratin-Mediated Transepithelial Insulin Permeation: Importance of Cationic Residues and pH for Complexation and Permeation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Mie; Franzyk, Henrik; Klausen, M. T.

    2015-01-01

    Penetratin is a widely used carrier peptide showing promising potential for mucosal delivery of therapeutic proteins. In the present study, the importance of specific penetratin residues and pH was investigated with respect to complexation with insulin and subsequent transepithelial insulin...... permeation. Besides penetratin, three analogues were studied. The carrier peptide-insulin complexes were characterized in terms of size and morphology at pH 5, 6.5, and 7.4 by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. At pH 7.4 mainly very large complexes were...... present, while much smaller complexes dominated at pH 5. Presence of arginine residues in the carrier peptide proved to be a prerequisite for complexation with insulin as well as for enhanced transepithelial insulin permeation in vitro. Rearrangement of tryptophan residues resulted in significantly...

  3. Immune-mediated steroid-responsive epileptic spasms and epileptic encephalopathy associated with VGKC-complex antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Jehan; Brenner, Tanja; Gill, Deepak; Troedson, Christopher; Sinclair, Adriane J; Brilot, Fabienne; Vincent, Angela; Lang, Bethan; Dale, Russell C

    2011-11-01

    Autoantibodies that bind to voltage-gated potassium-channel complex proteins (VGKC-complex antibodies) occur frequently in adults with limbic encephalitis presenting with cognitive impairment and seizures. Recently, VGKC-complex antibodies have been described in a few children with limbic encephalitis, and children with unexplained encephalitis presenting with status epilepticus. We report a case of infantile-onset epileptic spasms and developmental delay compatible with epileptic encephalopathy. Our patient was a female infant, aged 4 months at presentation. She had evidence of immune activation in the central nervous system with elevated cerebrospinal fluid neopterin and mirrored oligoclonal bands, which prompted testing for autoantibodies. VGKC-complex antibodies were elevated (201 pmol/L, normalVGKC-complex antibodies might represent a marker of immune therapy responsiveness in a subgroup of patients with infantile epileptic encephalopathy.

  4. Oxidovanadium(IV/V) complexes as new redox mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolopoulou, Andigoni; Vlasiou, Manolis; Tziouris, Petros A; Tsiafoulis, Constantinos; Tsipis, Athanassios C; Rehder, Dieter; Kabanos, Themistoklis A; Keramidas, Anastasios D; Stathatos, Elias

    2015-04-20

    Corrosiveness is one of the main drawbacks of using the iodide/triiodide redox couple in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Alternative redox couples including transition metal complexes have been investigated where surprisingly high efficiencies for the conversion of solar to electrical energy have been achieved. In this paper, we examined the development of a DSSC using an electrolyte based on square pyramidal oxidovanadium(IV/V) complexes. The oxidovanadium(IV) complex (Ph4P)2[V(IV)O(hybeb)] was combined with its oxidized analogue (Ph4P)[V(V)O(hybeb)] {where hybeb(4-) is the tetradentate diamidodiphenolate ligand [1-(2-hydroxybenzamido)-2-(2-pyridinecarboxamido)benzenato}and applied as a redox couple in the electrolyte of DSSCs. The complexes exhibit large electron exchange and transfer rates, which are evident from electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and electrochemistry, rendering the oxidovanadium(IV/V) compounds suitable for redox mediators in DSSCs. The very large self-exchange rate constant offered an insight into the mechanism of the exchange reaction most likely mediated through an outer-sphere exchange mechanism. The [V(IV)O(hybeb)](2-)/[V(V)O(hybeb)](-) redox potential and the energy of highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the sensitizing dye N719 and the HOMO of [V(IV)O(hybeb)](2-) were calculated by means of density functional theory electronic structure calculation methods. The complexes were applied as a new redox mediator in DSSCs, while the cell performance was studied in terms of the concentration of the reduced and oxidized form of the complexes. These studies were performed with the commercial Ru-based sensitizer N719 absorbed on a TiO2 semiconducting film in the DSSC. Maximum energy conversion efficiencies of 2% at simulated solar light (AM 1.5; 1000 W m(-2)) with an open circuit voltage of 660 mV, a short-circuit current of 5.2 mA cm(-2), and a fill factor of 0.58 were recorded without the presence of any additives in the

  5. Epidermal growth factor signaling induces behavioral quiescence in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Buskirk, Cheryl; Sternberg, Paul W

    2007-10-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB receptor tyrosine kinases regulate several aspects of development, including the development of the mammalian nervous system. ErbB signaling also has physiological effects on neuronal function, with influences on synaptic plasticity and daily cycles of activity. However, little is known about the effectors of EGFR activation in neurons. Here we show that EGF signaling has a nondevelopmental effect on behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans. Ectopic expression of the EGF-like ligand LIN-3 at any stage induces a reversible cessation of feeding and locomotion. These effects are mediated by neuronal EGFR (also called LET-23) and phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-gamma), diacylglycerol-binding proteins, and regulators of synaptic vesicle release. Activation of EGFR within a single neuron, ALA, is sufficient to induce a quiescent state. This pathway modulates the cessation of pharyngeal pumping and locomotion that normally occurs during the lethargus period that precedes larval molting. Our results reveal an evolutionarily conserved role for EGF signaling in the regulation of behavioral quiescence.

  6. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Prostate Cancer Derived Exosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetanjali Kharmate

    Full Text Available Exosomes proteins and microRNAs have gained much attention as diagnostic tools and biomarker potential in various malignancies including prostate cancer (PCa. However, the role of exosomes and membrane-associated receptors, particularly epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR as mediators of cell proliferation and invasion in PCa progression remains unexplored. EGFR is frequently overexpressed and has been associated with aggressive forms of PCa. While PCa cells and tissues express EGFR, it is unknown whether exosomes derived from PCa cells or PCa patient serum contains EGFR. The aim of this study was to detect and characterize EGFR in exosomes derived from PCa cells, LNCaP xenograft and PCa patient serum. Exosomes were isolated from conditioned media of different PCa cell lines; LNCaP xenograft serum as well as patient plasma/serum by differential centrifugation and ultracentrifugation on a sucrose density gradient. Exosomes were confirmed by electron microscopy, expression of exosomal markers and NanoSight™ analysis. EGFR expression was determined by western blot analysis and ELISA. This study demonstrates that exosomes may easily be derived from PCa cell lines, serum obtained from PCa xenograft bearing mice and clinical samples derived from PCa patients. Presence of exosomal EGFR in PCa patient exosomes may present a novel approach for measuring of the disease state. Our work will allow to build on this finding for future understanding of PCa exosomes and their potential role in PCa progression and as minimal invasive biomarkers for PCa.

  7. Toxic epidermal necrolysis, DRESS, AGEP : Do overlap cases exist?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouvresse, Sophie; Valeyrie-Allanore, Laurence; Ortonne, Nicolas; Konstantinou, Marie Pauline; Kardaun, Sylvia H.; Bagot, Martine; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Roujeau, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Background: Severe cutaneous adverse reactions to drugs (SCARs) include acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP), drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) and epidermal necrolysis (Stevens-Johnson syndrome-toxic epidermal necrolysis [SJS-TEN]). Because of the varied ini

  8. [Toxic epidermal necrolysis after treatment with oseltamivir: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Paula; Zuazaga, Marcela; Chede, Cecilia; Entin, Elías; Larralde, Margarita

    2010-06-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis is a rare acute and potentially life-threatening drug-related reaction. Osetalmivir is one of the drugs responsible for these reaction. We describe the case of a Down syndrome patient with toxic epidermal necrolysis previously treated with oseltamivir.

  9. Activated protein C: A regulator of human skin epidermal keratinocyte function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Kelly; Jackson, Christopher John; Xue, Meilang

    2014-05-26

    Activated protein C (APC) is a physiological anticoagulant, derived from its precursor protein C (PC). Independent of its anticoagulation, APC possesses strong anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and barrier protective properties which appear to be protective in a number of disorders including chronic wound healing. The epidermis is the outermost skin layer and provides the first line of defence against the external environment. Keratinocytes are the most predominant cells in the epidermis and play a critical role in maintaining epidermal barrier function. PC/APC and its receptor, endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR), once thought to be restricted to the endothelium, are abundantly expressed by skin epidermal keratinocytes. These cells respond to APC by upregulating proliferation, migration and matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity and inhibiting apoptosis/inflammation leading to a wound healing phenotype. APC also increases barrier function of keratinocyte monolayers by promoting the expression of tight junction proteins and re-distributing them to cell-cell contacts. These cytoprotective properties of APC are mediated through EPCR, protease-activated receptors, epidermal growth factor receptor or Tie2. Future preventive and therapeutic uses of APC in skin disorders associated with disruption of barrier function and inflammation look promising. This review will focus on APC's function in skin epidermis/keratinocytes and its therapeutical potential in skin inflammatory conditions.

  10. Activated protein C: A regulator of human skin epidermal keratinocyte function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kelly; McKelvey; Christopher; John; Jackson; Meilang; Xue

    2014-01-01

    Activated protein C(APC) is a physiological anticoagulant, derived from its precursor protein C(PC). Independent of its anticoagulation, APC possesses strong anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and barrier protective properties which appear to be protective in a number of disorders including chronic wound healing. The epidermis is the outermost skin layer and provides the first line of defence against the external environment. Keratinocytes are the most predominant cells in the epidermis and play a critical role in maintaining epidermal barrier function. PC/APC and its receptor, endothelial protein C receptor(EPCR), once thought to be restricted to the endothelium, are abundantly expressed by skin epidermal keratinocytes. These cells respond to APC by upregulating proliferation, migration and matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity and inhibiting apoptosis/inflammation leading to a wound healing phenotype. APC also increases barrier function of keratinocyte monolayers by promoting the expression of tight junction proteins and re-distributing them to cell-cell contacts. These cytoprotective properties of APC are mediated through EPCR, protease-activated receptors, epidermal growth factor receptor or Tie2. Future preventive and therapeutic uses of APC in skin disorders associated with disruption of barrier function and inflammation look promising. This review will focus on APC’s function in skin epidermis/keratinocytes and its therapeutical potential in skin inflammatory conditions.

  11. Acute Viral Escape Selectively Impairs Nef-Mediated Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Downmodulation and Increases Susceptibility to Antiviral T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Andrea M; Das, Arpita; Akinyosoye, Oluwasayo; Cui, Sherry; O'Connor, Shelby L; Scheef, Elizabeth A; Reed, Jason S; Panganiban, Antonito T; Sacha, Jonah B; Rakasz, Eva G; Friedrich, Thomas C; Maness, Nicholas J

    2015-12-04

    Nef-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes (CD8TL) are associated with control of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) despite extensive nef variation between and within animals. Deep viral sequencing of the immunodominant Mamu-B*017:01-restricted Nef165-173IW9 epitope revealed highly restricted evolution. A common acute escape variant, T170I, unexpectedly and uniquely degraded Nef's major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) downregulatory capacity, rendering the virus more vulnerable to CD8TL targeting other epitopes. These data aid in a mechanistic understanding of Nef functions and suggest means of immunity-mediated control of lentivirus replication.

  12. Solvent-mediated crystal-to-crystal interconversion between discrete lanthanide complexes and one-dimensional coordination polymers and selective sensing for small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-Ji; Ye, Yu-Xin; Qiu, Ying-Yu; Qiao, Zheng-Ping; Cao, Man-Li; Ye, Bao-Hui

    2013-06-03

    Two isostructural 1D coordination polymers {[Ln(OAc)2(H2O)(OBPT)]·3H2O}n (HOBPT = 4,6-bis(2-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazin-2-ol, Ln = Eu(3+), 1; Tb(3+), 3) and two discrete complexes [Ln(OAc)2(DMF)2(OBPT)] (Ln = Eu(3+), 2; Tb(3+), 4) have been synthesized in H2O-MeOH or DMF solvents, respectively. Their structures were identified by powder X-ray diffraction. Single-crystal X-ray studies for complexes 1 and 2 revealed that the coordination geometries of the Eu(3+) ions are similar and can be described as a distorted tricapped trigonal prism with six oxygen atoms and three nitrogen atoms. The difference between them is that one aqua ligand and one oxygen atom from the OBPT ligand complete the coordination sphere in complex 1, whereas two DMF molecules complete the coordination sphere in complex 2. Interestingly, the solvent-mediated, reversible crystal-to-crystal transformation between them was achieved by immersing the crystalline samples in the corresponding solvent (H2O or DMF) or by exposing them to solvent vapor. Complex 1 shows a highly selective luminescence enhancement in response to DMF in comparison to that observed in response to other examined solvents such as acetone, ethyl acetate, ethanol, acetonitrile, methanol, and THF.

  13. Epidermal growth factor inhibits cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the duodenal ulcerogen cysteamine on secretion of epidermal growth factor from Brunner's gland pouches was studied in the rat. Total output of immunoreactive epidermal growth factor was reduced to approximately 55%, compared with controls, 5 h after administration of cysteamine (300...... mg/kg, s.c.). Furthermore, measurements on tissue extracts of the pouches revealed that 5 h after cysteamine treatment, Brunner's glands were depleted of epidermal growth factor. The effect on ulcer development of intraduodenally applied exogenous epidermal growth factor (1 micrograms/kg . h) also...... factor used, when tested on chronic fistula rats, had no effect on acid secretion and did not influence bicarbonate secretion from Brunner's gland pouches. These results demonstrate that epidermal growth factor has a cytoprotective effect on the duodenal mucosa, and it is suggested that inhibition...

  14. Genetic analysis of Ras genes in epidermal development and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosten, Matthias; Lechuga, Carmen G; Barbacid, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes are tightly controlled to ensure proper development and homeostasis of the epidermis. The Ras family of small GTPases has emerged as a central node in the coordination of cell proliferation in the epidermis. Recent genetic evidence from mouse models has revealed that the intensity of Ras signaling modulates the proliferative capacity of epidermal keratinocytes. Interfering with Ras signaling either by combined elimination of the 3 Ras genes from the basal layer of the epidermis or by overexpression of dominant-negative Ras isoforms caused epidermal thinning due to hypoproliferation of keratinocytes. In contrast, overexpression of oncogenic Ras mutants in different epidermal cell layers led to hyperproliferative phenotypes including the development of papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Here, we discuss the value of loss- and gain-of-function studies in mouse models to assess the role of Ras signaling in the control of epidermal proliferation.

  15. Genetic analysis of Ras genes in epidermal development and tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosten, Matthias; Lechuga, Carmen G; Barbacid, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes are tightly controlled to ensure proper development and homeostasis of the epidermis. The Ras family of small GTPases has emerged as a central node in the coordination of cell proliferation in the epidermis. Recent genetic evidence from mouse models has revealed that the intensity of Ras signaling modulates the proliferative capacity of epidermal keratinocytes. Interfering with Ras signaling either by combined elimination of the 3 Ras genes from the basal layer of the epidermis or by overexpression of dominant-negative Ras isoforms caused epidermal thinning due to hypoproliferation of keratinocytes. In contrast, overexpression of oncogenic Ras mutants in different epidermal cell layers led to hyperproliferative phenotypes including the development of papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Here, we discuss the value of loss- and gain-of-function studies in mouse models to assess the role of Ras signaling in the control of epidermal proliferation. PMID:24150175

  16. Herbal medicines that benefit epidermal permeability barrier function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhi Hu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal permeability barrier function plays a critical role in regulating cutaneous functions. Hence, researchers have been searching for effective and affordable regimens to enhance epidermal permeability barrier function. In addition to topical stratum corneum lipids, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, and liver X receptor ligands, herbal medicines have been proven to benefit epidermal permeability barrier function in both normal and diseased skin, including atopic dermatitis, glucocorticoid-induced skin damage, and UVB-damaged skin. The potential mechanisms by which herbal medicines improve the permeability barrier include stimulation of epidermal differentiation, lipid production, antimicrobial peptide expression, and antioxidation. Therefore, utilization of herbal medicines could be a valuable alternative approach to enhance epidermal permeability barrier function in order to prevent and/or treat skin disorders associated with permeability barrier abnormalities.

  17. Distinct complexes of yeast Snx4 family SNX-BARs mediate retrograde trafficking of Snc1 and Atg27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Mengxiao; Burd, Christopher G; Chi, Richard J

    2017-02-01

    The yeast SNX4 sub-family of sorting nexin containing a Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs domain (SNX-BAR) proteins, Snx4/Atg24, Snx41 and Atg20/Snx42, are required for endocytic recycling and selective autophagy. Here, we show that Snx4 forms 2 functionally distinct heterodimers: Snx4-Atg20 and Snx4-Snx41. Each heterodimer coats an endosome-derived tubule that mediates retrograde sorting of distinct cargo; the v-SNARE, Snc1, is a cargo of the Snx4-Atg20 pathway, and Snx4-Snx41 mediates retrograde sorting of Atg27, an integral membrane protein implicated in selective autophagy. Live cell imaging of individual endosomes shows that Snx4 and the Vps5-Vps17 retromer SNX-BAR heterodimer operate concurrently on a maturing endosome. Consistent with this, the yeast dynamin family protein, Vps1, which was previously shown to promote fission of retromer-coated tubules, promotes fission of Snx4-Atg20 coated tubules. The results indicate that the yeast SNX-BAR proteins coat 3 distinct types of endosome-derived carriers that mediate endosome-to-Golgi retrograde trafficking.

  18. Internalization mechanisms of the epidermal growth factor receptor after activation with different ligands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse Henriksen

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR regulates normal growth and differentiation, but dysregulation of the receptor or one of the EGFR ligands is involved in the pathogenesis of many cancers. There are eight ligands for EGFR, however most of the research into trafficking of the receptor after ligand activation focuses on the effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF and transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α. For a long time it was believed that clathrin-mediated endocytosis was the major pathway for internalization of the receptor, but recent work suggests that different pathways exist. Here we show that clathrin ablation completely inhibits internalization of EGF- and TGF-α-stimulated receptor, however the inhibition of receptor internalization in cells treated with heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF or betacellulin (BTC was only partial. In contrast, clathrin knockdown fully inhibits EGFR degradation after all ligands tested. Furthermore, inhibition of dynamin function blocked EGFR internalization after stimulation with all ligands. Knocking out a number of clathrin-independent dynamin-dependent pathways of internalization had no effect on the ligand-induced endocytosis of the EGFR. We suggest that EGF and TGF-α lead to EGFR endocytosis mainly via the clathrin-mediated pathway. Furthermore, we suggest that HB-EGF and BTC also lead to EGFR endocytosis via a clathrin-mediated pathway, but can additionally use an unidentified internalization pathway or better recruit the small amount of clathrin remaining after clathrin knockdown.

  19. Expression of an Exogenous Growth Hormone Gene by Transplantable Human Epidermal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jeffrey R.; Barrandon, Yann; Green, Howard; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1987-09-01

    Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer was used to introduce a recombinant human growth hormone gene into cultured human keratinocytes. The transduced keratinocytes secreted biologically active growth hormone into the culture medium. When grafted as an epithelial sheet onto athymic mice, these cultured keratinocytes reconstituted an epidermis that was similar in appearance to that resulting from normal cells, but from which human growth hormone could be extracted. Transduced epidermal cells may prove to be a general vehicle for the delivery of gene products by means of grafting.

  20. Ichthyosis hystrix disease or verrucous epidermal nevus (a retrospective analysis of 20-year observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. El'kin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a  clinical case of ichthyosis hystrix, a rare genetic ichthyosiform dermatosis. Specifics of the disease are related to the complexity of differential diagnosis and verification of the diagnosis, because clinical manifestation of ichthyosis hystrix is similar with that of verrucous epidermal nevus. Clinical particulars of both nosologies are characterized by bizarre and widespread skin lesions of spicular hyperkeratotic growth, located along Blaschko lines. The exclusive feature of the clinical case described is a  long-term (20 years clinical and laboratory monitoring of the patient. The literature review provides brief information on etiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, differential diagnosis, and pathomorphology of ichthyosis hystrix and verrucous epidermal nevus.

  1. Epidermal nevus syndrome associated with unusual neurological, ocular, and skeletal features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal nevus syndrome (ENS is a rare disease, the pathogenesis of which is largely elusive. We, hereby, report an exclusive case of a 20-year-old man with verrucous ENS presented with dark colored papules and plaques along the Blaschko′s lines present over the head and neck area along with fleshy growth in both eyes since birth. Limb length discrepancy and kyphoscoliosis were remarkable. Skin biopsy was compatible with verrucous epidermal nevus while the biopsy of the ocular lesion confirmed complex choristoma. MRI brain revealed calcification in the right temporal lobe. Bilateral arachnoid cyst in the middle cranial fossa, scleral osteoma in the posterior part of the right eyeball, and deformed calvarium were evident on CECT skull and orbit. The present illustration emphasizes the importance of a punctilious work up of the case.

  2. eEF1A Mediates the Nuclear Export of SNAG-Containing Proteins via the Exportin5-Aminoacyl-tRNA Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Mingot

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Exportin5 mediates the nuclear export of double-stranded RNAs, including pre-microRNAs, adenoviral RNAs, and tRNAs. When tRNAs are aminoacylated, the Exportin5-aminoacyl (aa-tRNA complex recruits and coexports the translation elongation factor eEF1A. Here, we show that eEF1A binds to Snail transcription factors when bound to their main target, the E-cadherin promoter, facilitating their export to the cytoplasm in association with the aa-tRNA-Exportin5 complex. Snail binds to eEF1A through the SNAG domain, a protein nuclear export signal present in several transcription factor families, and this binding is regulated by phosphorylation. Thus, we describe a nuclear role for eEF1A and provide a mechanism for protein nuclear export that attenuates the activity of SNAG-containing transcription factors.

  3. eEF1A mediates the nuclear export of SNAG-containing proteins via the Exportin5-aminoacyl-tRNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingot, José Manuel; Vega, Sonia; Cano, Amparo; Portillo, Francisco; Nieto, M Angela

    2013-11-14

    Exportin5 mediates the nuclear export of double-stranded RNAs, including pre-microRNAs, adenoviral RNAs, and tRNAs. When tRNAs are aminoacylated, the Exportin5-aminoacyl (aa)-tRNA complex recruits and coexports the translation elongation factor eEF1A. Here, we show that eEF1A binds to Snail transcription factors when bound to their main target, the E-cadherin promoter, facilitating their export to the cytoplasm in association with the aa-tRNA-Exportin5 complex. Snail binds to eEF1A through the SNAG domain, a protein nuclear export signal present in several transcription factor families, and this binding is regulated by phosphorylation. Thus, we describe a nuclear role for eEF1A and provide a mechanism for protein nuclear export that attenuates the activity of SNAG-containing transcription factors.

  4. The Meckel syndrome- associated protein MKS1 functionally interacts with components of the BBSome and IFT complexes to mediate ciliary trafficking and hedgehog signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrington, Chloe L.; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    The importance of primary cilia in human health is underscored by the link between ciliary dysfunction and a group of primarily recessive genetic disorders with overlapping clinical features, now known as ciliopathies. Many of the proteins encoded by ciliopathy-associated genes are components of a handful of multi-protein complexes important for the transport of cargo to the basal body and/or into the cilium. A key question is whether different complexes cooperate in cilia formation, and whether they participate in cilium assembly in conjunction with intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins. To examine how ciliopathy protein complexes might function together, we have analyzed double mutants of an allele of the Meckel syndrome (MKS) complex protein MKS1 and the BBSome protein BBS4. We find that Mks1; Bbs4 double mutant mouse embryos exhibit exacerbated defects in Hedgehog (Hh) dependent patterning compared to either single mutant, and die by E14.5. Cells from double mutant embryos exhibit a defect in the trafficking of ARL13B, a ciliary membrane protein, resulting in disrupted ciliary structure and signaling. We also examined the relationship between the MKS complex and IFT proteins by analyzing double mutant between Mks1 and a hypomorphic allele of the IFTB component Ift172. Despite each single mutant surviving until around birth, Mks1; Ift172avc1 double mutants die at mid-gestation, and exhibit a dramatic failure of cilia formation. We also find that Mks1 interacts genetically with an allele of Dync2h1, the IFT retrograde motor. Thus, we have demonstrated that the MKS transition zone complex cooperates with the BBSome to mediate trafficking of specific trans-membrane receptors to the cilium. Moreover, the genetic interaction of Mks1 with components of IFT machinery suggests that the transition zone complex facilitates IFT to promote cilium assembly and structure. PMID:28291807

  5. Differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes is dependent on glucosylceramide:ceramide processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amen, Nicole; Mathow, Daniel; Rabionet, Mariona; Sandhoff, Roger; Langbein, Lutz; Gretz, Norbert; Jäckel, Carsten; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Jennemann, Richard

    2013-10-15

    Skin barrier function is primarily assigned to the outer epidermal layer, the stratum corneum (SC), mainly composed of corneocytes and lipid-enriched extracellular matrix. Epidermal ceramides (Cers) are essential barrier lipids, containing ultra-long-chain (ULC) fatty acids (FAs) with a unique ω-hydroxy group, which is necessary for binding to corneocyte proteins. In the SC, Cers are believed to derive from glucosylated intermediates, namely glucosylceramides (GlcCers), as surmised from human Gaucher's disease and related mouse models. Tamoxifen (TAM)-induced deletion of the endogenous GlcCer-synthesizing enzyme UDP-glucose:ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG) in keratin K14-positive cells resulted in epidermal GlcCer depletion. Although free extractable Cers were elevated in total epidermis and as well in SC, protein-bound Cers decreased significantly in Ugcg(f/fK14CreERT2) mice, indicating glucosylation to be required for regular Cer processing as well as arrangement and extrusion of lipid lamellae. The almost complete loss of protein-bound Cers led to a disruption of the water permeability barrier (WPB). UGCG-deficient mice developed an ichthyosis-like skin phenotype marked by impaired keratinocyte differentiation associated with delayed wound healing. Gene expression profiling of Ugcg-mutant skin revealed a subset of differentially expressed genes involved in lipid signaling and epidermal differentiation/proliferation, correlating to human skin diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta (PPARβ/δ), a Cer-sensitive transcription factor was identified as potential mediator of the altered gene sets.

  6. DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation mediates low-dose X-ray irradiation (LDI)-induced Akt activation and osteoblast differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yong; Fang, Shi-ji [The Department of Orthopedics, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215000 (China); Zhu, Li-juan [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Translational Research and Therapy for Neuro-Psycho-Diseases and Institute of Neuroscience, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215021 (China); Zhu, Lun-qing, E-mail: xiaodongwangsz@163.com [The Center of Diagnosis and Treatment for Children’s Bone Diseases, The Children’s Hospital Affiliated to Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215000 (China); Zhou, Xiao-zhong, E-mail: zhouxz@suda.edu.cn [The Department of Orthopedics, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215000 (China)

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • LDI increases ALP activity, promotes type I collagen (Col I)/Runx2 mRNA expression. • LDI induces DNA–PKcs activation, which is required for osteoblast differentiation. • Akt activation mediates LDI-induced ALP activity and Col I/Runx2 mRNA increase. • DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation mediates LDI-induced Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation. • DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation is important for osteoblast differentiation. - Abstract: Low-dose irradiation (LDI) induces osteoblast differentiation, however the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we explored the potential role of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA–PKcs)–Akt signaling in LDI-induced osteoblast differentiation. We confirmed that LDI promoted mouse calvarial osteoblast differentiation, which was detected by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as well as mRNA expression of type I collagen (Col I) and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2). In mouse osteoblasts, LDI (1 Gy) induced phosphorylation of DNA–PKcs and Akt (mainly at Ser-473). The kinase inhibitors against DNA–PKcs (NU-7026 and NU-7441) or Akt (LY294002, perifosine and MK-2206), as well as partial depletion of DNA–PKcs or Akt1 by targeted-shRNA, dramatically inhibited LDI-induced Akt activation and mouse osteoblast differentiation. Further, siRNA-knockdown of SIN1, a key component of mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), also inhibited LDI-induced Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation as well as ALP activity increase and Col I/Runx2 expression in mouse osteoblasts. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assay results demonstrated that LDI-induced DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation, which was inhibited by NU-7441 or SIN1 siRNA-knockdown in mouse osteoblasts. In summary, our data suggest that DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation-mediated Akt activation (Ser-473 phosphorylation) is required for mouse osteoblast differentiation.

  7. Pdx1 and BETA2/NeuroD1 participate in a transcriptional complex that mediates short-range DNA looping at the insulin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Daniella A; Chakrabarti, Swarup K; Garmey, James C; Mirmira, Raghavendra G

    2008-03-28

    The activity of the insulin gene, Ins, in islet beta cells is thought to arise in part from the synergistic action of the transcription factors Pdx1 and BETA2/NeuroD1. We asked how the binding of these factors to A and E elements many tens or hundreds of base pairs upstream of the start site could influence activity of transcriptional machinery. We therefore tested the hypothesis that the complex of Pdx1 and BETA2/NeuroD1 maintains a DNA conformation such that distal regions of the gene are brought into proximity of the promoter and coding region. We show by coimmunoprecipitation that Pdx1 and BETA2/NeuroD1 exist within a complex and that the two physically interact with one another in this complex as assessed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Consistent with this interaction, we found that the two factors simultaneously occupy the same fragment of the Ins gene in beta cell lines using the chromatin immunoprecipitation/re-chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Using a modification of the chromosome conformation capture assay in vitro and in beta cells, we observed that Pdx1 and BETA2/NeuroD1 mediate looping of a segment of Ins that brings EcoRI sites located at -623 and +761 bp (relative to the transcriptional start site) in proximity to one another. This looping appears to be dependent in vitro upon an intact A3 binding element, but not upon the E2 element. Based on our findings, we propose a model whereby Pdx1 and BETA2/NeuroD1 physically interact to form a nucleoprotein complex on the Ins gene that mediates formation of a short DNA loop. Our results suggest that such short loop conformations may be a general mechanism to permit interactions between transcription factors and basal transcriptional machinery.

  8. Iridium mediated phenolic O-H activation and cyclometalation of 2-(naphthyl-1'-azo)-4-methylphenol - Formation of organoiridium complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rama Acharyya; Shie-Ming Peng; Gene-Hsiang Lee; Samaresh Bhattacharya

    2009-07-01

    Reaction of 2-(naphthyl-1'-azo)-4-methylphenol with [Ir(PPh3)3Cl] in refluxing ethanol in the presence of a base (NEt3) affords an organoiridium complex of type [Ir(PPh3)2(L)(H)], where L represents the coordinated 2-(naphthyl-1'-azo)-4-methylphenolate ligand. A similar reaction carried out in toluene affords the [Ir(PPh3)2(L)(H)] complex along with a similar complex of type [Ir(PPh3)2(L)Cl]. Structures of both the [Ir(PPh3)2(L)(H)] and [Ir(PPh3)2(L)Cl] complexes have been determined by X-ray crystallography. In both the complexes, 2-(naphthyl-1'-azo)-4-methylphenol is coordinated to iridium, via C-H activation at the 2' position of the naphthyl ring, as a dianionic tridentate C, N, O-donor and the two triphenylphosphines are trans. The organoiridium complexes show intense MLCT transitions in the visible region. Cyclic voltammetry on the [Ir(PPh3)2(L)(H)] and [Ir(PPh3)2(L)Cl] complexes shows a reversible Ir(III)-Ir(IV) oxidation respectively at 0.55 and 0.73 V vs SCE. An irreversible oxidation of the coordinated 2-(naphthyl-1'-azo)-4-methylphenolate ligand is observed above 1.0 V vs SCE and an irreversible reduction of the same is observed near -1.0 V vs SCE.

  9. Cooperative Transcriptional Activation of Antimicrobial Genes by STAT and NF-κB Pathways by Concerted Recruitment of the Mediator Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Wienerroither

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptional response to infection with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes (Lm requires cooperative signals of the type I interferon (IFN-I-stimulated JAK-STAT and proinflammatory NF-κB pathways. Using ChIP-seq analysis, we define genes induced in Lm-infected macrophages through synergistic transcriptional activation by NF-κB and the IFN-I-activated transcription factor ISGF3. Using the Nos2 and IL6 genes as prime examples of this group, we show that NF-κB functions to recruit enzymes that establish histone marks of transcriptionally active genes. In addition, NF-κB regulates transcriptional elongation by employing the mediator kinase module for the recruitment of the pTEFb complex. ISGF3 has a major role in associating the core mediator with the transcription start as a prerequisite for TFIID and RNA polymerase II (Pol II binding. Our data suggest that the functional cooperation between two major antimicrobial pathways is based on promoter priming by NF-κB and the engagement of the core mediator for Pol II binding by ISGF3.

  10. Evidence for a Precursor Complex in C-H Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions Mediated by a Manganese(IV) Oxo Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Bosch, Isaac; Company Casadevall, Anna; Cady, Clyde W.; Styring, Stenbjörn; Browne, Wesley R; Ribas Salamaña, Xavi; Costas Salgueiro, Miquel

    2011-01-01

    HAT trick: [MnIV(OH)2(H,MePytacn)]2+ (A) and [MnIV(O)(OH)(H,MePytacn)]+ (B) differ in their reactions with CH bonds: compound A engages in typical single-step hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions, whereas B first forms a substrate–B encounter complex (C; see scheme). This equilibrium alters the relative CH reactivity from that expected from CH bond dissociation energies Aquest mateix article està publicat a l'edició alemanya d''Angewandte Chemie' (ISSN 0044-8249, EISSN 1521-3757), 2011, ...

  11. Charge mediation by ruthenium poly(pyridine) complexes in 'second-generation' glucose biosensors based on carboxymethylated beta-cyclodextrin polymer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosela, Edyta; Elzanowska, Hanna; Kutner, Wlodzimierz

    2002-04-01

    Four different poly(pyridine) complexes of ruthenium, viz. Ru(II)(trpy)(phen)(OH(2))](2+) (1), trans-[Ru(III)(2,2'bpy)(2)(OH(2))(OH)](2+) (2), [(2,2'bpy)(2)(OH)Ru(III)ORu(III)(OH)(2,2'bpy)(2)](4+) (3), and [Ru(II)(4,4'bpy)(NH(3))(5)](2+) (4) (2,2'bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, 4,4'bpy=4,4'-bipyridine, trpy=2,2',2"-terpyridine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline), were tested as non-physiological charge mediators of 'second-generation' glucose biosensors. The membranes for these biosensors were prepared by casting anionic carboxymethylated beta-cyclodextrin polymer films (beta-CDPA) directly onto the Pt or glassy carbon (GC) disk electrodes. Simultaneously, glucose oxidase (GOD) was immobilized in the films by covalent bonding and the Ru complexes were incorporated both by inclusion in the beta-CD molecular cavities and by ion exchange at the fixed carboxymethyl cation-exchange sites. The leakage of the mediator from the polymer has been minimized by adopting a suitable pre-treatment procedure. The biosensors catalytic activities increased in the order 1inclusion complex with beta-CD, the biosensor sensitivity was the highest and equal to 7.2 micro A mM(-1) cm(-2), detectability was as low as 1 mM, but the linear concentration range was limited only to 4 mM. In contrast, for complexes 2 and 3 the sensitivity was 0.4 and 3.2 micro A mM(-1) cm(-2), while the linear concentration range extended up to at least 24 and 14 mM glucose, respectively. Even though some common interfering substances, such as ascorbate, paracetamol or urea, are oxidized at potentials close to those of the Ru complex redox couples, their electro-oxidation currents at physiological concentrations are insignificant compared to those due to the biocatalytic oxidation of glucose. The biosensor response to glucose is reversible as demonstrated by the inhibition of GOD activity by Cu(II). That is, the Cu(II) concentration required to inhibit by half the response to glucose of the biosensor containing complex 2 was 1.0 m

  12. Epidermóide intra-raqueano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio B. Lefèvre

    1957-03-01

    Full Text Available Caso de tumor epidermóides intra-raqueano, extra-medular ao nível de T12, diagnosticado e tratado cirùrgicamente, em um menino de 9 anos. Os autores chamam a atenção para a dificuldade diagnostica deste caso, cujo quadro clínico lembrava o de uma radiculopatia compressiva por hérnia de disco intervertebral. A evolução foi favorável, com recuperação total, sem seqüelas. Lembram os autores a necessidade de ser precizada a designação dêsses tumores, que são muitas vêzes confundidos com os cistos dermóides e outros tumores congênitos.

  13. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Caused by Amoxicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celalettin Sever

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN is a severe skin reaction related to drugs and infections, characterized by fever, stomatitis and conjunctivitis. Many drug related TEN cases have been reported in literature but amoxicillin related TEN cases are rare. In this article, a case of amoxicillin related severe TEN in a female patient during treatment of tonsillitis has been reported. The increased use of amoxicillin, especially for control of infection, may be the reason for the increased incidence TEN due to the same drug. The identification of a drug as the cause for the immune related cytotoxic reaction may be difficult if the molecule is not generally known to be a classical cause of this reaction.

  14. Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honari, S; Gibran, N S; Heimbach, D M; Gibbons, J; Pharmd; Cain, V; Engrav, L H

    2001-01-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a severe exfoliative disease of the skin and mucous membranes that results in high mortality. As the elderly population increases, the number of elderly patients with TEN can also be expected to increase. Elderly patients with comparably sized burn wounds usually have a poor prognosis. Our purpose was to determine whether elderly TEN patients exhibit similarly high mortality. A retrospective review was conducted of 52 patients treated for TEN from October 1991 through September 1998. Eleven patients were older than 65 years. All patients were treated according to our TEN protocol. Eight of 11 patients recovered, and 3 died. The mean total body surface area (TBSA) involvement for the patients who recovered was 24%, compared with 66% for the nonsurvivors. The survival rate for elderly patients (73%) compares well with that for those younger than 65 years (89%). Therefore, we propose that we should be aggressive in treating elderly patients with TEN.

  15. Epidermal growth factor in the rat lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaberg, Lasse; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Nexø, Ebba

    1991-01-01

    Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) in pharmacological doses is able to induce precoccious lung maturation in rabbits and sheeps. As EGF is probably acting in a para- or autocrine way, we have searched for EGF in the lungs. We report EGF immunoreactivity to be present in the type II pneumocytes...... of the rat from a couple of days prior to birth and throughout life. Further, we report EGF immunoreactivity to be present in cells in the bronchi and the bronchioles from day 20-21 of gestation and throughout life. G-200 gelchromatography of lung extracts indicates that the EGF-reactive material is a high...... molecular weight form of EGF. Since previous studies have shown that EGF in pharmacological doses is able to promote lung maturation, our results may imply a physiological role for EGF in the lungs....

  16. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira-Cunha, Melissa, E-mail: melissacunha@doctors.org.uk [Hepatobiliary Surgery Unit, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9WL (United Kingdom); Newman, William G. [Genetic Medicine, MAHSC, University of Manchester, St Mary' s Hospital, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9WL (United Kingdom); Siriwardena, Ajith K. [Hepatobiliary Surgery Unit, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9WL (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-24

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related death. The difficulty in detecting pancreatic cancer at an early stage, aggressiveness and the lack of effective therapy all contribute to the high mortality. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is expressed in normal human tissues. It is a member of the tyrosine kinase family of growth factors receptors and is encoded by proto-oncogenes. Several studies have demonstrated that EGFR is over-expressed in pancreatic cancer. Over-expression correlates with more advanced disease, poor survival and the presence of metastases. Therefore, inhibition of the EGFR signaling pathway is an attractive therapeutic target. Although several combinations of EGFR inhibitors with chemotherapy demonstrate inhibition of tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor cell apoptosis and regression in xenograft models, these benefits remain to be confirmed. Multimodality treatment incorporating EGFR-inhibition is emerging as a novel strategy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  17. Zn(II-Chlorido complexes of phytohormone kinetin and its derivatives modulate expression of inflammatory mediators in THP-1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hošek

    Full Text Available Kinetin (N6-furfuryladenine belongs to a group of plant growth hormones involved in cell division, differentiation and other physiological processes. One of the possible ways to obtain biologically active compounds is to complex biologically relevant natural compounds to suitable metal atoms. In this work, two structural groups of Zn(II complexes [Zn(L(n2Cl2]·Solv (1-5 and [Zn(HL(nCl3] · xL(n (6-7; n=1-5, Solv=CH3OH for 1 and 2H2O for 2; x =1 for 6 and 2 for 7; involving a phytohormone kinetin and its derivatives (L(n were evaluated for their ability to modulate secretion of tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1β and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS-activated macrophage-like THP-1 cell model. The penetration of the complexes to cells was also detected. The mechanism of interactions of the zinc(II complexes with a fluorescent sensor N-(6-methoxy-8-quinolyl-p-toluene sulphonamide (TSQ and sulfur-containing biomolecules (l-cysteine and reduced glutathione was studied by electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry and flow-injection analysis with fluorescence detection. The present study showed that the tested complexes exhibited a low cytotoxic effect on the THP-1 cell line (IC50>40 µM, apart from complex 4, with an IC50=10.9 ± 1.1 µM. Regarding the inflammation-related processes, the Zn(II complexes significantly decreased IL-1β production by a factor of 1.47-2.22 compared with the control (DMSO, but did not affect TNF-α and MMP-2 secretions. However, application of the Zn(II complexes noticeably changed the pro-MMP-2/MMP-2 ratio towards a higher amount of maturated MMP-2, when they induced a 4-times higher production of maturated MMP-2 in comparison with the vehicle-treated cells under LPS stimulation. These results indicated that the complexes are able to modulate an inflammatory response by influencing secretion and activity of several inflammation-related cytokines and enzymes.

  18. Spectrophotometric determination of Mercury (II by simultaneous micelle mediated extraction through ternary complex formation in water samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzin Nekouei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a micelle mediated extraction procedure for preconcentration of trace quantities of Hg(II as a prior step to its simultaneous spectrophotometric determination has been developed. The method is based on a ternary ion-association of Hg(II, Xylidyl Blue (XB and cationic surfactant (CTAB. Major factors affecting the efficiency of the method has been studied. The limit of detection (LOD under optimum conditions based on 3Sb was 4.65 ng mL-1. The proposed method has been applied for determination of trace amount of mercury in water samples with satisfactory results.

  19. Plant nonsense-mediated mRNA decay is controlled by different autoregulatory circuits and can be induced by an EJC-like complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyikó, Tünde; Kerényi, Farkas; Szabadkai, Levente; Benkovics, Anna H.; Major, Péter; Sonkoly, Boglárka; Mérai, Zsuzsanna; Barta, Endre; Niemiec, Emilia; Kufel, Joanna; Silhavy, Dániel

    2013-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a eukaryotic quality control system that recognizes and degrades transcripts containing NMD cis elements in their 3′untranslated region (UTR). In yeasts, unusually long 3′UTRs act as NMD cis elements, whereas in vertebrates, NMD is induced by introns located >50 nt downstream from the stop codon. In vertebrates, splicing leads to deposition of exon junction complex (EJC) onto the mRNA, and then 3′UTR-bound EJCs trigger NMD. It is proposed that this intron-based NMD is vertebrate specific, and it evolved to eliminate the misproducts of alternative splicing. Here, we provide evidence that similar EJC-mediated intron-based NMD functions in plants, suggesting that this type of NMD is evolutionary conserved. We demonstrate that in plants, like in vertebrates, introns located >50 nt from the stop induces NMD. We show that orthologs of all core EJC components are essential for intron-based plant NMD and that plant Partner of Y14 and mago (PYM) also acts as EJC disassembly factor. Moreover, we found that complex autoregulatory circuits control the activity of plant NMD. We demonstrate that expression of suppressor with morphogenic effect on genitalia (SMG)7, which is essential for long 3′UTR- and intron-based NMD, is regulated by both types of NMD, whereas expression of Barentsz EJC component is downregulated by intron-based NMD. PMID:23666629

  20. The Dream About the Magic Silver Bullet – the Complexity of Designing for Tablet-Mediated Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnke, Isa; Svendsen, Niels Vandel; Johansen, Simon Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    of reducing it. The teachers must learn how to navigate during the breakdowns before media tablets reduce complexity and reach a state in which the tablets take part in the classroom ecology as functional organs. The teachers have to deal with complex situations during class in situ. In order to be able......In this paper, we report three cases of the integration of technology, such as web-enabled media tablets in Scandinavian schools. Both qualitative and quantitative data have been applied. A daily challenge for teachers is to coordinate their group of students in a way that enables collaborative...... learning. We report the gaps and interrelations between the dreams and the practice of the teachers. They dream about an interconnected praxis – the magic silver bullet – and establish their visions of inter- connectivity because of their breakdown experiences of media tablets aiding complexity instead...

  1. Upstream promoter sequences and αCTD mediate stable DNA wrapping within the RNA polymerase–promoter open complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellai, Sara; Mangiarotti, Laura; Vannini, Nicola; Naryshkin, Nikolai; Kortkhonjia, Ekaterine; Ebright, Richard H; Rivetti, Claudio

    2007-01-01

    We show that the extent of stable DNA wrapping by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) in the RNAP–promoter open complex depends on the sequence of the promoter and, in particular, on the sequence of the upstream region of the promoter. We further show that the extent of stable DNA wrapping depends on the presence of the RNAP α-subunit carboxy-terminal domain and on the presence and length of the RNAP α-subunit interdomain linker. Our results indicate that the extensive stable DNA wrapping observed previously in the RNAP–promoter open complex at the λ PR promoter is not a general feature of RNAP–promoter open complexes. PMID:17290289

  2. Upstream promoter sequences and alphaCTD mediate stable DNA wrapping within the RNA polymerase-promoter open complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellai, Sara; Mangiarotti, Laura; Vannini, Nicola; Naryshkin, Nikolai; Kortkhonjia, Ekaterine; Ebright, Richard H; Rivetti, Claudio

    2007-03-01

    We show that the extent of stable DNA wrapping by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) in the RNAP-promoter open complex depends on the sequence of the promoter and, in particular, on the sequence of the upstream region of the promoter. We further show that the extent of stable DNA wrapping depends on the presence of the RNAP alpha-subunit carboxy-terminal domain and on the presence and length of the RNAP alpha-subunit interdomain linker. Our results indicate that the extensive stable DNA wrapping observed previously in the RNAP-promoter open complex at the lambda P(R) promoter is not a general feature of RNAP-promoter open complexes.

  3. Cas1–Cas2 complex formation mediates spacer acquisition during CRISPR–Cas adaptive immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Nuñez, James K.; Kranzusch, Philip J.; Noeske, Jonas; Wright, Addison V.; Davies, Christopher W; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    The initial stage of CRISPR–Cas immunity involves the acquisition of foreign DNA spacer segments into the host genomic CRISPR locus. The nucleases Cas1 and Cas2 are the only proteins conserved amongst all CRISPR–Cas systems, yet the molecular functions of these proteins during immunity are unknown. Here we show that Cas1 and Cas2 from Escherichia coli form a stable complex that is essential for spacer acquisition and determine the 2.3-Å resolution crystal structure of the Cas1–Cas2 complex. M...

  4. Pivotal Role for a Tail Subunit of the RNA Polymerase II Mediator Complex CgMed2 in Azole Tolerance and Adherence in Candida glabrata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Sapan; Shivarathri, Raju; Srivastava, Vivek Kumar; Ferrari, Sélène; Sanglard, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Antifungal therapy failure can be associated with increased resistance to the employed antifungal agents. Candida glabrata, the second most common cause of invasive candidiasis, is intrinsically less susceptible to the azole class of antifungals and accounts for 15% of all Candida bloodstream infections. Here, we show that C. glabrata MED2 (CgMED2), which codes for a tail subunit of the RNA polymerase II Mediator complex, is required for resistance to azole antifungal drugs in C. glabrata. An inability to transcriptionally activate genes encoding a zinc finger transcriptional factor, CgPdr1, and multidrug efflux pump, CgCdr1, primarily contributes to the elevated susceptibility of the Cgmed2Δ mutant toward azole antifungals. We also report for the first time that the Cgmed2Δ mutant exhibits sensitivity to caspofungin, a constitutively activated protein kinase C-mediated cell wall integrity pathway, and elevated adherence to epithelial cells. The increased adherence of the Cgmed2Δ mutant was attributed to the elevated expression of the EPA1 and EPA7 genes. Further, our data demonstrate that CgMED2 is required for intracellular proliferation in human macrophages and modulates survival in a murine model of disseminated candidiasis. Lastly, we show an essential requirement for CgMed2, along with the Mediator middle subunit CgNut1 and the Mediator cyclin-dependent kinase/cyclin subunit CgSrb8, for the high-level fluconazole resistance conferred by the hyperactive allele of CgPdr1. Together, our findings underscore a pivotal role for CgMed2 in basal tolerance and acquired resistance to azole antifungals. PMID:25070095

  5. The caveolae-mediated sv40 entry pathway bypasses the golgi complex en route to the endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuksin Dmitry

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simian virus 40 (SV40 enters cells via an atypical caveolae-mediated endocytic pathway, which delivers the virus to a new intermediary compartment, the caveosome. The virus then is believed to go directly from the caveosome to the endoplasmic reticulum. Cholera toxin likewise enters via caveolae and traffics to caveosomes. But, in contrast to SV40, cholera toxin is transported from caveosomes to the endoplasmic reticulum via the Golgi. For that reason, and because the caveosome and Golgi may have some common markers, we revisited the issue of whether SV40 might access the endoplasmic reticulum via the Golgi. Results We confirmed our earlier finding that SV40 co localizes with the Golgi marker β-COP. However, we show that the virus does not co localize with the more discriminating Golgi markers, golgin 97 and BODIPY-ceramide. Conclusion The caveolae-mediated SV40 entry pathway does not intersect the Golgi. SV40 is seen to co localize with β-COP because that protein is a marker for caveosomes as well as the Golgi. Moreover, these results are consistent with the likelihood that the caveosome is a sorting organelle. In addition, there are at least two distinct but related routes by which a ligand might traffic from the caveosome to the ER; one route involving transport through the Golgi, and another pathway that does not involve the Golgi.

  6. The caveolae-mediated sv40 entry pathway bypasses the golgi complex en route to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, Leonard C; Kuksin, Dmitry

    2005-04-19

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) enters cells via an atypical caveolae-mediated endocytic pathway, which delivers the virus to a new intermediary compartment, the caveosome. The virus then is believed to go directly from the caveosome to the endoplasmic reticulum. Cholera toxin likewise enters via caveolae and traffics to caveosomes. But, in contrast to SV40, cholera toxin is transported from caveosomes to the endoplasmic reticulum via the Golgi. For that reason, and because the caveosome and Golgi may have some common markers, we revisited the issue of whether SV40 might access the endoplasmic reticulum via the Golgi. We confirmed our earlier finding that SV40 co localizes with the Golgi marker beta-COP. However, we show that the virus does not co localize with the more discriminating Golgi markers, golgin 97 and BODIPY-ceramide. The caveolae-mediated SV40 entry pathway does not intersect the Golgi. SV40 is seen to co localize with beta-COP because that protein is a marker for caveosomes as well as the Golgi. Moreover, these results are consistent with the likelihood that the caveosome is a sorting organelle. In addition, there are at least two distinct but related routes by which a ligand might traffic from the caveosome to the ER; one route involving transport through the Golgi, and another pathway that does not involve the Golgi.

  7. A βPIX-PAK2 complex confers protection against Scrib-dependent and cadherin-mediated apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, Scott R; Bell, Jennifer H; Frödin, Morten;

    2012-01-01

    During epithelial morphogenesis, a complex comprising the βPIX (PAK-interacting exchange factor β) and class I PAKs (p21-activated kinases) is recruited to adherens junctions. Scrib, the mammalian ortholog of the Drosophila polarity determinant and tumor suppressor Scribble, binds βPIX directly. ...

  8. Synthesis, Crystal Structure of Ruthenium 1,2-Naphthoquinone-1-oxime Complex and Its Mediated C-C Coupling Reactions of Terminal Alkynes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN, Ke; WONG, Wing-Tak; LIU, Xiao-Xia; ZHANG, Bao-Yan

    2003-01-01

    Substituted decarbonylation reaction of ruthenium 1,2-naphthoquinone-1-oxime (1-nqo) complex, cis-, cis-[Ru{ η2-N(O)C10-H6O}2(CO)2] (1), with acetonitrile gave cis-, cis-[Ru { η2-N(O)C10H6O}2(CO)(NCMe)] (2). Complex 2 was fully characterized by 1H NMR, FAB MS, IR spectra and single crystal X-ray analysis. Complex 2 maintains the coordination structure of 1 with the two naphthoquinonic oxygen atoms, as well as the two oximato nitrogen atoms located cis to each other, showing that there is no ligand rearrangement of the 1-nqo ligands during the substitution reaction. The carbonyl group originally trans to the naphthoquinonic oxygen in one 1-nqo ligand is left in its original position [O(5)-Ru-C(1), 174.0(6)°], while the other one originally trans to the oximato group of the other 1-nqo llgand is substituted by NCMe [N(1)-Ru-N(3), 170.6(6)°].This shows that the carbonyl trans to oximato group is more labile than the one trans to naphthoquinonic O atom towards substitution. This is probably due to the comparatively stronger π back bonding from ruthenium metal to the carbonyl group trans to naphthoquinonic O atom, than the one trans to oximato group, resulting in the comparatively weaker Ru-CO bond for the latter and consequently easier replacement of this carbonyl. Selected coupling of phenylacetylene mediated by 2 gave a single trans-dimerization product 3, while 2 mediated coupling reaction of methyl propiolate produced three products:one trans-dimerization product 4 and two cyclotrimeric products 5 and 6.

  9. Staphylococcus hyicus virulence in relation to exudative epidermitis in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Andresen, Lars Ole; Bille-Hansen, Vivi

    1993-01-01

    Staphylococcus hyicus strains with different phage types, plasmid profiles, and antibiotic resistance patterns were isolated from piglets with exudative epidermitis. The strains could be divided into virulent strains, producing exudative epidermitis, and avirulent strains, producing no dermal....... It is concluded that crusting reaction of piglet skin is a suitable indicator of virulence in S. hyicus in relation to exudative epidermitis, and that virulent strains produce a 30 kDa protein, absent in concentrated culture supernatants from avirulent strains. This 30 kDa protein might be an exfoliative toxin....

  10. c-Myb protein interacts with Rcd-1, a component of the CCR4 transcription mediator complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Martin; Siegert, Michaela; Schürmann, André; Sodeik, Beate; Wolfes, Heiner

    2004-06-29

    Transcriptional initiation of eukaryotic genes depends on the cooperative interaction of various transcription factors. Using the yeast two-hybrid assay, we have identified the murine Rcd-1 protein as a cofactor of the c-myb proto-oncogene product. Rcd-1 is evolutionarily conserved among many species, and moreover the yeast homologue CAF40 is part of the carbon catabolite repressor protein transcriptional mediator thought to be involved in the negative regulation of genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II. Rcd-1 is located mainly in the nucleus, and it interacts with c-Myb both in vitro and in vivo. The activation of the myeloid c-myb-specific mim-1 promoter is repressed by Rcd-1. Interestingly, rcd-1 is an erythropoietin regulated gene, which also represses the action of the AP-1 transcription factor on its target genes.

  11. Cubilin, the endocytic receptor for intrinsic factor-vitamin B(12) complex, mediates high-density lipoprotein holoparticle endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, S M; Stefansson, S; Twal, W O; Drake, C J; Fleming, P; Remaley, A; Brewer, H B; Argraves, W S

    1999-08-31

    Receptors that endocytose high-density lipoproteins (HDL) have been elusive. Here yolk-sac endoderm-like cells were used to identify an endocytic receptor for HDL. The receptor was isolated by HDL affinity chromatography and identified as cubilin, the recently described endocytic receptor for intrinsic factor-vitamin B(12). Cubilin antibodies inhibit HDL endocytosis by the endoderm-like cells and in mouse embryo yolk-sac endoderm, a prominent site of cubilin expression. Cubilin-mediated HDL endocytosis is inhibitable by HDL(2), HDL(3), apolipoprotein (apo)A-I, apoA-II, apoE, and RAP, but not by low-density lipoprotein (LDL), oxidized LDL, VLDL, apoC-I, apoC-III, or heparin. These findings, coupled with the fact that cubilin is expressed in kidney proximal tubules, suggest a role for this receptor in embryonic acquisition of maternal HDL and renal catabolism of filterable forms of HDL.

  12. KRAS protein stability is regulated through SMURF2: UBCH5 complex-mediated β-TrCP1 degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Shirish; Allam, Uday Sankar; Ahsan, Aarif; Chen, Guoan; Krishnamurthy, Pranathi Meda; Marsh, Katherine; Rumschlag, Matthew; Shankar, Sunita; Whitehead, Christopher; Schipper, Matthew; Basrur, Venkatesha; Southworth, Daniel R; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Beer, David G; Lawrence, Theodore S; Nyati, Mukesh K; Ray, Dipankar

    2014-02-01

    Attempts to target mutant KRAS have been unsuccessful. Here, we report the identification of Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor 2 (SMURF2) and UBCH5 as a critical E3:E2 complex maintaining KRAS protein stability. Loss of SMURF2 either by small interfering RNA/short hairpin RNA (siRNA/shRNA) or by overexpression of a catalytically inactive mutant causes KRAS degradation, whereas overexpression of wild-type SMURF2 enhances KRAS stability. Importantly, mutant KRAS is more susceptible to SMURF2 loss where protein half-life decreases from >12 hours in control siRNA-treated cells to stability and propose that targeting such complex may be a unique strategy to degrade mutant KRAS to kill cancer cells.

  13. KRAS Protein Stability Is Regulated through SMURF2: UBCH5 Complex-Mediated β-TrCP1 Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirish Shukla

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Attempts to target mutant KRAS have been unsuccessful. Here, we report the identification of Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor 2 (SMURF2 and UBCH5 as a critical E3:E2 complex maintaining KRAS protein stability. Loss of SMURF2 either by small interfering RNA/short hairpin RNA (siRNA/shRNA or by overexpression of a catalytically inactive mutant causes KRAS degradation, whereas overexpression of wild-type SMURF2 enhances KRAS stability. Importantly, mutant KRAS is more susceptible to SMURF2 loss where protein half-life decreases from >12 hours in control siRNA-treated cells to <3 hours on Smurf2 silencing, whereas only marginal differences were noted for wild-type protein. This loss of mutant KRAS could be rescued by overexpressing a siRNA-resistant wild-type SMURF2. Our data further show that SMURF2 monoubiquitinates UBCH5 at lysine 144 to form an active complex required for efficient degradation of a RAS-family E3, β-transducing repeat containing protein 1 (β-TrCP1. Conversely, β-TrCP1 is accumulated on SMURF2 loss, leading to increased KRAS degradation. Therefore, as expected, β-TrCP1 knockdown following Smurf2 siRNA treatment rescues mutant KRAS loss. Further, we identify two conserved proline (P residues in UBCH5 critical for SMURF2 interaction; mutation of either of these P to alanine also destabilizes KRAS. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that Smurf2 silencing reduces the clonogenic survival in vitro and prolongs tumor latency in vivo in cancer cells including mutant KRAS-driven tumors. Taken together, we show that SMURF2:UBCH5 complex is critical in maintaining KRAS protein stability and propose that targeting such complex may be a unique strategy to degrade mutant KRAS to kill cancer cells.

  14. Prefoldin Subunits Are Protected from Ubiquitin-Proteasome System-mediated Degradation by Forming Complex with Other Constituent Subunits*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Makoto; Tashiro, Erika; Kitaura, Hirotake; Maita, Hiroshi; Suto, Hiroo; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The molecular chaperone prefoldin (PFD) is a complex comprised of six different subunits, PFD1-PFD6, and delivers newly synthesized unfolded proteins to cytosolic chaperonin TRiC/CCT to facilitate the folding of proteins. PFD subunits also have functions different from the function of the PFD complex. We previously identified MM-1α/PFD5 as a novel c-Myc-binding protein and found that MM-1α suppresses transformation activity of c-Myc. However, it remains unclear how cells regulate protein levels of individual subunits and what mechanisms alter the ratio of their activities between subunits and their complex. In this study, we found that knockdown of one subunit decreased protein levels of other subunits and that transfection of five subunits other than MM-1α into cells increased the level of endogenous MM-1α. We also found that treatment of cells with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, increased the level of transfected/overexpressed MM-1α but not that of endogenous MM-1α, indicating that overexpressed MM-1α, but not endogenous MM-1α, was degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Experiments using other PFD subunits showed that the UPS degraded a monomer of PFD subunits, though extents of degradation varied among subunits. Furthermore, the level of one subunit was increased after co-transfection with the respective subunit, indicating that there are specific combinations between subunits to be stabilized. These results suggest mutual regulation of protein levels among PFD subunits and show how individual subunits form the PFD complex without degradation. PMID:21478150

  15. An Elmo-Dock complex locally controls Rho GTPases and actin remodeling during cadherin-mediated adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toret, Christopher P; Collins, Caitlin; Nelson, W James

    2014-12-08

    Cell-cell contact formation is a dynamic process requiring the coordination of cadherin-based cell-cell adhesion and integrin-based cell migration. A genome-wide RNA interference screen for proteins required specifically for cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion identified an Elmo-Dock complex. This was unexpected as Elmo-Dock complexes act downstream of integrin signaling as Rac guanine-nucleotide exchange factors. In this paper, we show that Elmo2 recruits Dock1 to initial cell-cell contacts in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. At cell-cell contacts, both Elmo2 and Dock1 are essential for the rapid recruitment and spreading of E-cadherin, actin reorganization, localized Rac and Rho GTPase activities, and the development of strong cell-cell adhesion. Upon completion of cell-cell adhesion, Elmo2 and Dock1 no longer localize to cell-cell contacts and are not required subsequently for the maintenance of cell-cell adhesion. These studies show that Elmo-Dock complexes are involved in both integrin- and cadherin-based adhesions, which may help to coordinate the transition of cells from migration to strong cell-cell adhesion. © 2014 Toret et al.

  16. Expression of epidermal growth factor receptors in human brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libermann, T A; Razon, N; Bartal, A D; Yarden, Y; Schlessinger, J; Soreq, H

    1984-02-01

    The expression of receptors for epidermal growth factor (EGF-R) was determined in 29 samples of brain tumors from 22 patients. Primary gliogenous tumors, of various degrees of cancer, five meningiomas, and two neuroblastomas were examined. Tissue samples were frozen in liquid nitrogen immediately after the operation and stored at -70 degrees until use. Cerebral tissue samples from 11 patients who died from diseases not related to the central nervous system served as controls. Immunoprecipitation of functional EGF-R-kinase complexes revealed high levels of EGF-R in all of the brain tumors of nonneuronal origin that were examined. The level of EGF-R varied between tumors from different patients and also between specimens prelevated from different areas of the same tumor. In contrast, the levels of EGF-R from control specimens were invariably low. The biochemical properties of EGF-R in brain tumor specimens were found to be indistinguishable from those of the well-characterized EGF-R from the A-431 cell line, derived from human epidermoid carcinomas. Human brain EGF-R displays a molecular weight of 170,000 by polyacrylamide-sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. It is phosphorylated mainly in tyrosine residues and shows a 2-dimensional phosphopeptide map similar to that obtained with the phosphorylated EGF-R from membranes of A-431 cells. Our observations suggest that induction of EGF-R expression may accompany the malignant transformation of human brain cells of nonneuronal origin.

  17. Meaning of relative gene expression in multilayered cultures of epidermal keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaisse, Jérémy; Hermant, Maryse; Hayez, Aurélie; Poumay, Yves; Lambert de Rouvroit, Catherine

    2014-10-01

    Reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) has become an in vitro model of choice for studying cell and tissue functions. Analysis of gene expression over the course of reconstruction must take into account the heterogeneous differentiation states of keratinocytes reconstituting the typical epidermal layers. In monolayer cultures, relative mRNA expression levels of differentiation markers are usually expressed as a ratio versus a classical reference gene (also named house-keeping gene) tested to be expressed equally in certain experimental conditions. Applied to complex tissues in which the cell number increases over time together with differentiation, calculation of relative gene expression does not take enough into account a crucial phenomenon: epidermal morphogenesis results in progressive restriction of differentiation markers, such as involucrin, to a specific layer, or in the delayed onset of mRNA expression of filaggrin or TMEM45A for instance following stratification. Our study illustrates that comparing the relative expression level of mRNAs to that of a basal layer-specific gene (e.g. ITGA6) better illustrates the contribution of specific differentiation markers to the process of epidermal morphogenesis.

  18. ZNF750 is expressed in differentiated keratinocytes and regulates epidermal late differentiation genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idan Cohen

    Full Text Available Disrupted skin barrier due to altered keratinocyte differentiation is common in pathologic conditions such as atopic dermatitis, ichthyosis and psoriasis. However, the molecular cascades governing keratinocyte terminal differentiation are poorly understood. We have previously demonstrated that a dominant mutation in ZNF750 leads to a clinical phenotype reminiscent of psoriasis and seborrheic dermatitis. Here we show that ZNF750 is a nuclear protein bearing a functional C-terminal nuclear localization signal. ZNF750 was specifically expressed in the epidermal suprabasal layers and its expression was augmented during differentiation, both in human skin and in-vitro, peaking in the granular layer. Silencing of ZNF750 in Ca2+-induced HaCaT keratinocytes led to morphologically apparent arrest in the progression of late differentiation, as well as diminished apoptosis and sustained proliferation. ZNF750 knockdown cells presented with markedly reduced expression of epidermal late differentiation markers, including gene subsets of epidermal differentiation complex and skin barrier formation such as FLG, LOR, SPINK5, ALOX12B and DSG1, known to be mutated in various human skin diseases. Furthermore, overexpression of ZNF750 in undifferentiated cells induced terminal differentiation genes. Thus, ZNF750 is a regulator of keratinocyte terminal differentiation and with its downstream targets can serve in future elucidation of therapeutics for common diseases of skin barrier.

  19. IDENTIFICATION AND AUTHENTICATION OF DRY SAMPLES OF SOME MEDICINAL PLANTS USING LEAF EPIDERMAL FEATURES AS MARKER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullahi Alanamu ABDULRAHAMAN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicine is the oldest and still the most widely used system of medicine in the world today and they are made exclusively from plants. However, most of these medicines or drugs are adulterated due to lack of proper identification of the plant samples. Method of checking adulteration of drug plants is the main focus of this study. The identification and authentication of dry samples of some medicinal plants were carried out using anatomical features. Twenty-five (25 plants materials were collected in Ibadan and Ilorin, Nigeria. The plants studied include Azardiracta indica, Newboudia leavis, Polyalthia longifolia, Cymbopogon citratus, Anarcardium occidentalis, Nicotiana tobbaccum, Jatropha curcas, Chromoleana odorata, Mangifera indica, Terminalia catappa, Ocimum gratisimum, Morus messosygia, Morinda lucida, Psidium guajava, Vitellaria paradoxa, Annona senegalensis, Vernonia amygdalina, Gliricidium sepium, Ravoulvia vomitora, Telferia occindentalis Citrus aurantifolia, C. limon, C. paradisi and C. sinensis. Leaf epidermal anatomy of these selected plants showed no major variations in stomatal complex types, frequency, size and shape of stomatal cells, epidermal cell wall and trichomes between fresh and dry samples. The variations that occur were between different species but not within species. Leaf epidermal anatomy, therefore, proved to be a significant tool for resolution of taxonomic confusion of dried samples of these plants.

  20. Epidermal barrier defects link atopic dermatitis with altered skin cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolat, Sara; Hoste, Esther; Natsuga, Ken; Quist, Sven R; Watt, Fiona M

    2014-05-05

    Atopic dermatitis can result from loss of structural proteins in the outermost epidermal layers, leading to a defective epidermal barrier. To test whether this influences tumour formation, we chemically induced tumours in EPI-/- mice, which lack three barrier proteins-Envoplakin, Periplakin, and Involucrin. EPI-/- mice were highly resistant to developing benign tumours when treated with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). The DMBA response was normal, but EPI-/- skin exhibited an exaggerated atopic response to TPA, characterised by abnormal epidermal differentiation, a complex immune infiltrate and elevated serum thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). The exacerbated TPA response could be normalised by blocking TSLP or the immunoreceptor NKG2D but not CD4+ T cells. We conclude that atopy is protective against skin cancer in our experimental model and that the mechanism involves keratinocytes communicating with cells of the immune system via signalling elements that normally protect against environmental assaults.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01888.001. Copyright © 2014, Cipolat et al.

  1. MiRNA-Mediated Regulation of the SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeling Complex Controls Pluripotency and Endodermal Differentiation in Human ESCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Staton L; Langer, Lee F; Ward, James M; Archer, Trevor K

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNAs and chromatin remodeling complexes represent powerful epigenetic mechanisms that regulate the pluripotent state. miR-302 is a strong inducer of pluripotency, which is characterized by a distinct chromatin architecture. This suggests that miR-302 regulates global chromatin structure; however, a direct relationship between miR-302 and chromatin remodelers has not been established. Here, we provide data to show that miR-302 regulates Brg1 chromatin remodeling complex composition in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) through direct repression of the BAF53a and BAF170 subunits. With the subsequent overexpression of BAF170 in hESCs, we show that miR-302's inhibition of BAF170 protein levels can affect the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation. Furthermore, miR-302-mediated repression of BAF170 regulates pluripotency by positively influencing mesendodermal differentiation. Overexpression of BAF170 in hESCs led to biased differentiation toward the ectoderm lineage during EB formation and severely hindered directed definitive endoderm differentiation. Taken together, these data uncover a direct regulatory relationship between miR-302 and the Brg1 chromatin remodeling complex that controls gene expression and cell fate decisions in hESCs and suggests that similar mechanisms are at play during early human development.

  2. Fatal toxic epidermal necrolysis associated with minoxidil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoui, Lamis R; Chahine-Chakhtoura, Corinne

    2009-04-01

    Minoxidil is a direct-acting peripheral vasodilator for the treatment of symptomatic hypertension, or refractory hypertension associated with target organ damage, that is not manageable with a diuretic and two other antihypertensive drugs. The most frequent adverse events associated with minoxidil include hypertrichosis and cardiovascular events related to its powerful antihypertensive effect, and less frequently, rashes, bullous eruptions, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS). Evidence suggests that SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are variants of a single disease with common causes and mechanisms, but differing severities. Epidermal detachment is mild in SJS, moderate in overlap SJS-TEN, and severe (> 30% of body surface area) in TEN. We describe a case of minoxidil-associated SJS that evolved into fatal TEN. A 69-year-old African-American woman with a history of chronic kidney disease was admitted to the hospital for a cerebrovascular accident and uncontrolled hypertension. On hospital day 12, oral minoxidil was added to her drug regimen. On day 23, she developed a maculopapular rash on her face that gradually diffused to her chest and back. Vesicles and papular lesions extended to her extremities and mucosal membranes; results of a skin biopsy revealed SJS. A positive Nikolsky's sign (blisters spread on application of pressure) was detected. On days 27-31, diffuse bullae developed with rash exacerbation. Skin detachment exceeded 30% and was consistent with TEN. The patient died on day 39. An evaluation of the causality and time course suggested that minoxidil was the most likely culpable drug, with a Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale score indicating that the likelihood of the association was possible (score of 3). The mechanism of this reaction has not been well elucidated. It may be related to an impaired clearance of the minoxidil metabolite, or an immune stimulation resulting in apoptosis and epidermis destruction. To our knowledge, this

  3. Genetic Markers and Danger Signals in Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hung Chung

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN are life-threatening adverse reactions, which could be induced by a variety of drugs. It was proposed that human leukocyte antigen (HLA-restricted presentation of antigens (drugs or their metabolites to T lymphocytes initiates the immune reactions of SJS/ TEN. However, the genetic susceptibility and the exact pathogenesis were not clear until the recent studies. We first identified that HLA-B*1502 is strongly associated with carbamazepine (CBZ-induced SJS/TEN and HLA-B*5801 with allopurinol-SJS/TEN in Han Chinese. The same associations had been validated across different human populations. For the downstream danger signals, Fas-Fas ligand (FasL and perforin/granzyme B had been advocated as cytotoxic mediators for keratinocyte death in SJS/TEN. However, expression levels of these cytotoxic proteins from the skin lesions were too low to explain the distinct and extensive epidermal necrosis. Our recent study identified that the granulysin, a cytotoxic protein released from cytotoxic T cells or natural killer (NK cells, is a key mediator for disseminated keratinocyte death in SJS/TEN. This article aims to provide an overview of both of the genomic and immunologic perspectives of SJS/TEN. These studies give us a better understanding of the immune mechanisms, biomarkers for disease prevention and early diagnosis, as well as providing the therapeutic targets for the treatments of SJS/TEN.

  4. The tomato SlSHINE3 transcription factor regulates fruit cuticle formation and epidermal patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jian Xin; Adato, Avital; Alkan, Noam; He, Yonghua; Lashbrooke, Justin; Matas, Antonio J; Meir, Sagit; Malitsky, Sergey; Isaacson, Tal; Prusky, Dov; Leshkowitz, Dena; Schreiber, Lukas; Granell, Antonio R; Widemann, Emilie; Grausem, Bernard; Pinot, Franck; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Rogachev, Ilana; Rothan, Christophe; Aharoni, Asaph

    2013-01-01

    Fleshy tomato fruit typically lacks stomata; therefore, a proper cuticle is particularly vital for fruit development and interaction with the surroundings. Here, we characterized the tomato SlSHINE3 (SlSHN3) transcription factor to extend our limited knowledge regarding the regulation of cuticle formation in fleshy fruits. We created SlSHN3 overexpressing and silenced plants, and used them for detailed analysis of cuticular lipid compositions, phenotypic characterization, and the study on the mode of SlSHN3 action. Heterologous expression of SlSHN3 in Arabidopsis phenocopied overexpression of the Arabidopsis SHNs. Silencing of SlSHN3 results in profound morphological alterations of the fruit epidermis and significant reduction in cuticular lipids. We demonstrated that SlSHN3 activity is mediated by control of genes associated with cutin metabolism and epidermal cell patterning. As with SlSHN3 RNAi lines, mutation in the SlSHN3 target gene, SlCYP86A69, resulted in severe cutin deficiency and altered fruit surface architecture. In vitro activity assays demonstrated that SlCYP86A69 possesses NADPH-dependent ω-hydroxylation activity, particularly of C18:1 fatty acid to the 18-hydroxyoleic acid cutin monomer. This study provided insights into transcriptional mechanisms mediating fleshy fruit cuticle formation and highlighted the link between cutin metabolism and the process of fruit epidermal cell patterning.

  5. FasL and TRAIL Induce Epidermal Apoptosis and Skin Ulceration Upon Exposure to Leishmania major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidsmo, Liv; Fluur, Caroline; Rethi, Bence; Eriksson Ygberg, Sofia; Ruffin, Nicolas; De Milito, Angelo; Akuffo, Hannah; Chiodi, Francesca

    2007-01-01

    Receptor-mediated apoptosis is proposed as an important regulator of keratinocyte homeostasis in human epidermis. We have previously reported that Fas/FasL interactions in epidermis are altered during cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) and that keratinocyte death through apoptosis may play a pathogenic role for skin ulceration. To further investigate the alterations of apoptosis during CL, a keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) and primary human epidermal keratinocytes were incubated with supernatants from Leishmania major-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells. An apoptosis-specific microarray was used to assess mRNA expression in HaCaT cells exposed to supernatants derived from L. major-infected cultures. Fas and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) mRNA and protein expression were significantly up-regulated, and apoptosis was detected in both HaCaT and human epidermal keratinocyte cells. The keratinocyte apoptosis was partly inhibited through blocking of Fas or FasL and even more efficiently through TRAIL neutralization. Up-regulation of Fas on keratinocytes in epidermis and the presence of FasL-expressing macrophages and T cells in dermis were previously reported by us. In this study, keratinocytes expressing TRAIL, as well as the proapoptotic receptor TRAIL-R2, were detected in skin biopsies from CL cases. We propose that activation of Fas and TRAIL apoptosis pathways, in the presence of inflammatory mediators at the site of infection, leads to tissue destruction and ulceration during CL. PMID:17200196

  6. Clinical and Microscopic Characteristics of Canine Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Banovic, F; Olivry, T; Bazzle, L; Tobias, J. R; Atlee, B; Zabel, S; Hensel, N; Linder, K. E

    2015-01-01

    Canine toxic epidermal necrosis (TEN), a rare and life-threatening cutaneous drug reaction, traditionally has been described as full-thickness devitalization of the epidermis with minimal dermal inflammation...

  7. Epidermal Nevus Syndrome Associated with Brain Malformations and Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers at Juntendo University and Tokyo Women’s Medical University, Japan; and University of California, San Francisco, Ca, report a male infant with epidermal nevus syndrome associated with brainstem and cerebellar malformations and neonatal medulloblastoma.

  8. Pattern of hormone receptors and human epidermal growth factor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-02-05

    Feb 5, 2015 ... Key words: Breast cancer, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu, immunohistochemistry, ... therapy.[6‑8] Of all these prognostic and predictive factors, ... one of the biggest private medical laboratories in Nigeria.

  9. the significance of epidermal growth factor receptor and survivin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-01

    Jan 1, 2013 ... SURVIVIN EXPRESSION IN BLADDER CANCER TISSUE AND URINE ... Objective: To assess whether epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and survivin ..... lung cancer by the FDA in 2003 (28) and is currently.

  10. Epidermal and dermal integumentary structures of ankylosaurian dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbour, Victoria M; Burns, Michael E; Bell, Phil R; Currie, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosaurian dinosaurs are most notable for their abundant and morphologically diverse osteoderms, which would have given them a spiky appearance in life. Isolated osteoderms are relatively common and provide important information about the structure of the ankylosaur dermis, but fossilized impressions of the soft-tissue epidermis of ankylosaurs are rare. Nevertheless, well-preserved integument exists on several ankylosaur fossils that shows osteoderms were covered by a single epidermal scale, but one or many millimeter-sized ossicles may be present under polygonal, basement epidermal scales. Evidence for the taxonomic utility of ankylosaurid epidermal scale architecture is presented for the first time. This study builds on previous osteological work that argues for a greater diversity of ankylosaurids in the Dinosaur Park Formation of Alberta than has been traditionally recognized and adds to the hypothesis that epidermal skin impressions are taxonomically relevant across diverse dinosaur clades. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Multiple domains of Stardust differentially mediate localisation of the Crumbs-Stardust complex during photoreceptor development in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgakova, Natalia A; Kempkens, Ozlem; Knust, Elisabeth

    2008-06-15

    Drosophila Stardust (Sdt), a member of the MAGUK family of scaffolding proteins, is a constituent of the evolutionarily conserved Crumbs-Stardust (Crb-Sdt) complex that controls epithelial cell polarity in the embryo and morphogenesis of photoreceptor cells. Although apical localisation is a hallmark of the complex in all cell types and in all organisms analysed, only little is known about how individual components are targeted to the apical membrane. We have performed a structure-function analysis of Sdt by constructing transgenic flies that express altered forms of Sdt to determine the roles of individual domains for localisation and function in photoreceptor cells. The results corroborate the observation that the organisation of the Crb-Sdt complex is differentially regulated in pupal and adult photoreceptors. In pupal photoreceptors, only the PDZ domain of Sdt - the binding site of Crb - is required for apical targeting. In adult photoreceptors, by contrast, targeting of Sdt to the stalk membrane, a distinct compartment of the apical membrane between the rhabdomere and the zonula adherens, depends on several domains, and seems to be a two-step process. The N-terminus, including the two ECR domains and a divergent N-terminal L27 domain that binds the multi-PDZ domain protein PATJ in vitro, is necessary for targeting the protein to the apical pole of the cell. The PDZ-, the SH3- and the GUK-domains are required to restrict the protein to the stalk membrane. Drosophila PATJ or Drosophila Lin-7 are stabilised whenever a Sdt variant that contains the respective binding site is present, independently of where the variant is localised. By contrast, only full-length Sdt, confined to the stalk membrane, stabilises and localises Crb, although only in reduced amounts. The amount of Crumbs recruited to the stalk membrane correlates with its length. Our results highlight the importance of the different Sdt domains and point to a more intricate regulation of the Crb

  12. The P2X7 receptor–pannexin-1 complex decreases muscarinic acetylcholine receptor–mediated seizure susceptibility in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ji-Eun; Kang, Tae-Cheon

    2011-01-01

    Pannexin-1 (Panx1) plays a role in the release of ATP and glutamate in neurons and astrocytes. Panx1 can be opened at the resting membrane potential by extracellular ATP via the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). Panx1 opening has been shown to induce neuronal death and aberrant firing, but its role in neuronal activity has not been established. Here, we report the role of the P2X7R-Panx1 complex in regulating muscarinic acetylcholine 1 (M1) receptor function. P2X7R knockout (P2X7–/–) mice showed greater...

  13. Arabidopsis COMPASS-like complexes mediate histone H3 lysine-4 trimethylation to control floral transition and plant development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danhua Jiang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Histone H3 lysine-4 (H3K4 methylation is associated with transcribed genes in eukaryotes. In Drosophila and mammals, both di- and tri-methylation of H3K4 are associated with gene activation. In contrast to animals, in Arabidopsis H3K4 trimethylation, but not mono- or di-methylation of H3K4, has been implicated in transcriptional activation. H3K4 methylation is catalyzed by the H3K4 methyltransferase complexes known as COMPASS or COMPASS-like in yeast and mammals. Here, we report that Arabidopsis homologs of the COMPASS and COMPASS-like complex core components known as Ash2, RbBP5, and WDR5 in humans form a nuclear subcomplex during vegetative and reproductive development, which can associate with multiple putative H3K4 methyltransferases. Loss of function of ARABIDOPSIS Ash2 RELATIVE (ASH2R causes a great decrease in genome-wide H3K4 trimethylation, but not in di- or mono-methylation. Knockdown of ASH2R or the RbBP5 homolog suppresses the expression of a crucial Arabidopsis floral repressor, FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC, and FLC homologs resulting in accelerated floral transition. ASH2R binds to the chromatin of FLC and FLC homologs in vivo and is required for H3K4 trimethylation, but not for H3K4 dimethylation in these loci; overexpression of ASH2R causes elevated H3K4 trimethylation, but not H3K4 dimethylation, in its target genes FLC and FLC homologs, resulting in activation of these gene expression and consequent late flowering. These results strongly suggest that H3K4 trimethylation in FLC and its homologs can activate their expression, providing concrete evidence that H3K4 trimethylation accumulation can activate eukaryotic gene expression. Furthermore, our findings suggest that there are multiple COMPASS-like complexes in Arabidopsis and that these complexes deposit trimethyl but not di- or mono-methyl H3K4 in target genes to promote their expression, providing a molecular explanation for the observed coupling of H3K4 trimethylation (but not H3

  14. T cell responses affected by aminopeptidase N (CD13)-mediated trimming of major histocompatibility complex class II-bound peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, S L; Pedersen, L O; Buus, S;

    1996-01-01

    the exopeptidase Aminopeptidase N (APN, CD13) as one of the enzymes involved in the observed cell-surface antigen processing. The NH2-terminal end of the longer peptide could, even while bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, be digested by APN with dramatic consequences for T cell...... antigen recognition. This could be demonstrated both in cell-free systems using purified reagents and in cellular systems. Thus, MHC class II and APN may act in concert to generate the final T cell epitopes....

  15. Epidermal vascular endothelial growth factor production is required for permeability barrier homeostasis, dermal angiogenesis, and the development of epidermal hyperplasia: implications for the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Peter M; Arbiser, Jack; Brown, Barbara E; Rossiter, Heidemarie; Man, Mao-Qiang; Cerimele, Francesca; Crumrine, Debra; Gunathilake, Roshan; Choi, Eung Ho; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Tschachler, Erwin; Feingold, Kenneth R

    2008-09-01

    Primary abnormalities in permeability barrier function appear to underlie atopic dermatitis and epidermal trauma; a concomitant barrier dysfunction could also drive other inflammatory dermatoses, including psoriasis. Central to this outside-inside view of disease pathogenesis is the epidermal generation of cytokines/growth factors, which in turn signal downstream epidermal repair mechanisms. Yet, this cascade, if sustained, signals downstream epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation. We found here that acute barrier disruption rapidly stimulates mRNA and protein expression of epidermal vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) in normal hairless mice, a specific response to permeability barrier requirements because up-regulation is blocked by application of a vapor-impermeable membrane. Moreover, epidermal vegf(-/-) mice display abnormal permeability barrier homeostasis, attributable to decreased VEGF signaling of epidermal lamellar body production; a paucity of dermal capillaries with reduced vascular permeability; and neither angiogenesis nor epidermal hyperplasia in response to repeated tape stripping (a model of psoriasiform hyperplasia). These results support a central role for epidermal VEGF in the maintenance of epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis and a link between epidermal VEGF production and both dermal angiogenesis and the development of epidermal hyperplasia. Because psoriasis is commonly induced by external trauma [isomorphic (Koebner) phenomenon] and is associated with a prominent permeability barrier abnormality, excess VEGF production, prominent angiogenesis, and epidermal hyperplasia, these results could provide a potential outside-inside mechanistic basis for the development of psoriasis.

  16. A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for the identification of species within the Echinococcus granulosus complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassermann, Marion; Mackenstedt, Ute; Romig, Thomas

    2014-02-24

    To facilitate the specific identification of Echinococcus spp. isolates in endemic countries, a LAMP (loop-mediated isothermal amplification) assay was developed to detect the various agents known to cause cystic echinococcosis (E. granulosus s.s., E. equinus, E. ortleppi, E. canadensis and E. felidis). The infectivity of the different species and the severity of the disease in humans and livestock vary significantly among those species, and correct molecular identification of large numbers of field isolates is crucial to understand their epidemiology. However, funding constraints in many CE endemic countries often prevent PCR-based screening of field isolates. The LAMP method allows the amplification of DNA fragments under isothermal conditions which can be achieved using an ordinary waterbath, and the detection of amplification products only requires a UV light source. In the present study a LAMP assay was developed which allows the detection and differentiation of the 5 CE causing Echinococcus species. The diagnostic power was adjusted to species level, i.e. intraspecific strains (G1-3 within E. granulosus s.s., G6-10 within E. canadensis) are not discriminated. Wherever this would be necessary for epidemiological purposes, the method can be adjusted according to local requirements. The sensitivity of the assay was tested down to one fiftieth of a single protoscolex or egg, respectively. The present study describes a fast and simple method for the differentiation of CE causing Echinococcus species which can facilitate epidemiological studies in endemic countries.

  17. The anaphase-promoting complex protein 5 (AnapC5 associates with A20 and inhibits IL-17-mediated signal transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen W Ho

    Full Text Available IL-17 is the founding member of a family of cytokines and receptors with unique structures and signaling properties. IL-17 is the signature cytokine of Th17 cells, a relatively new T cell population that promotes inflammation in settings of infection and autoimmunity. Despite advances in understanding Th17 cells, mechanisms of IL-17-mediated signal transduction are less well defined. IL-17 signaling requires contributions from two receptor subunits, IL-17RA and IL-17RC. Mutants of IL-17RC lacking the cytoplasmic domain are nonfunctional, indicating that IL-17RC provides essential but poorly understood signaling contributions to IL-17-mediated signaling. To better understand the role of IL-17RC in signaling, we performed a yeast 2-hybrid screen to identify novel proteins associated with the IL-17RC cytoplasmic tail. One of the most frequent candidates was the anaphase promoting complex protein 7 (APC7 or AnapC7, which interacted with both IL-17RC and IL-17RA. Knockdown of AnapC7 by siRNA silencing exerted no detectable impact on IL-17 signaling. However, AnapC5, which associates with AnapC7, was also able to bind IL-17RA and IL-17RC. Moreover, AnapC5 silencing enhanced IL-17-induced gene expression, suggesting an inhibitory activity. Strikingly, AnapC5 also associated with A20 (TNFAIP3, a recently-identified negative feedback regulator of IL-17 signal transduction. IL-17 signaling was not impacted by knockdown of Itch or TAXBP1, scaffolding proteins that mediate A20 inhibition in the TNFα and IL-1 signaling pathways. These data suggest a model in which AnapC5, rather than TAX1BP1 and Itch, is a novel adaptor and negative regulator of IL-17 signaling pathways.

  18. P-TEFb, the super elongation complex and mediator regulate a subset of non-paused genes during early Drosophila embryo development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olle Dahlberg

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b (P-TEFb is a kinase consisting of Cdk9 and Cyclin T that releases RNA Polymerase II (Pol II into active elongation. It can assemble into a larger Super Elongation Complex (SEC consisting of additional elongation factors. Here, we use a miRNA-based approach to knock down the maternal contribution of P-TEFb and SEC components in early Drosophila embryos. P-TEFb or SEC depletion results in loss of cells from the embryo posterior and in cellularization defects. Interestingly, the expression of many patterning genes containing promoter-proximal paused Pol II is relatively normal in P-TEFb embryos. Instead, P-TEFb and SEC are required for expression of some non-paused, rapidly transcribed genes in pre-cellular embryos, including the cellularization gene Serendipity-α. We also demonstrate that another P-TEFb regulated gene, terminus, has an essential function in embryo development. Similar morphological and gene expression phenotypes were observed upon knock down of Mediator subunits, providing in vivo evidence that P-TEFb, the SEC and Mediator collaborate in transcription control. Surprisingly, P-TEFb depletion does not affect the ratio of Pol II at the promoter versus the 3' end, despite affecting global Pol II Ser2 phosphorylation levels. Instead, Pol II occupancy is reduced at P-TEFb down-regulated genes. We conclude that a subset of non-paused, pre-cellular genes are among the most susceptible to reduced P-TEFb, SEC and Mediator levels in Drosophila embryos.

  19. Optic atrophy 1 mediates coenzyme Q-responsive regulation of respiratory complex IV activity in brain mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuhide; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Shirasawa, Takuji; Takahashi, Mayumi

    2017-11-01

    The oxygen consumption rate (OCR) in brain mitochondria is significantly lower in aged mice than in young mice, and the reduced OCR is rescued by administration of water-solubilized CoQ10 to aged mice via drinking water. However, the mechanism behind this remains unclear. Here, we show that the activity of respiratory complex IV (CIV) in brain mitochondria declined in aged mice than in young mice, with no significant change in individual respiratory complex levels and their supercomplex assembly. Reduced CIV activity in the aged mice coincided with reduced binding of optic atrophy 1 (OPA1) to CIV. Both reduced activity and OPA1 binding of CIV were rescued by water-solubilized CoQ10 administration to aged mice via drinking water. OCR and the activity and OPA1 binding of CIV in isolated brain mitochondria from aged mice were restored by incubation with CoQ10, but not in the presence of 15-deoxy-prostaglandin J2, an inhibitor of a GTPase effector domain-containing GTPase such as OPA1 and DRP1. By contrast, the CoQ10-responsive restoration of OCR in the isolated mitochondria was not inhibited by Mdivi-1, a selective inhibitor of DRP1. Thus, we propose a novel function of OPA1 in regulating the CIV activity in brain mitochondria in response to CoQ10. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Electron-transfer-mediated binding of optically active cobalt(III) complexes to horse heart cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, Ulrich; Merchán, Alejandro Castillejo; Bernauer, Klaus

    2005-03-22

    Optically active cobalt(II) complexes are used as reducing agents in the electron-transfer reaction involving horse heart cytochrome c. Analysis of the circular dichroism (CD) spectra of reaction products indicates that the corresponding cobalt(III) species of both enantiomers of [CoII(alamp)] (H2alamp=N,N'-[(pyridine-2,6-diyl)bis(methylene)]-bis[alanine]) are partly attached to the protein during electron transfer by coordination to an imidazole unit of one of the histidine residues. His-26 and His-33 are both solvent exposed, and the results suggest that one of these histidine residues acts as a bridge in the electron transfer to and from the haem iron of cytochrome c. The reaction is enantioselective: the ratio of the relative reactivity at 15 degrees C is 2.9 in favour of the R,R-enantiomer. A small induced CD activity in the haem chromophore reveals that some structural changes in the protein occur consecutively with the binding of the cobalt(III) complex.

  1. [Epidermal growth factor, innovation and safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquirol Caussa, Jordi; Herrero Vila, Elisabeth

    2015-10-05

    Bioidentical recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) is available in concentrations and purity suitable for therapeutic use in long time stable formulations. Beneficial effects in several skin pathologies and lesions have been reported (traumatic and surgical wound healing, laser induced wounds, abnormal scars, keloids, radiation or chemotherapy induced dermatitis, post inflammatory hyperpigmentation or for skin aging damage repairing) and also may be considered for the treatment of several oropharingeal and high gastroesophageal tract mucosa diseases (mouth sores, pharyngeal fistulas, ulcers), and several corneal or conjunctive mucosa lesions. rhEGF has not shown any important side or collateral effects in humans or in laboratory experimentation animals, showing optimal tolerability and safety with continuous use for months. Compounding gives advantages of versatility, individualization, personalization, molecular stability, safety and effectiveness in ideal conditions, showing good tissue penetration, both on intact skin and skin lesions that expose the lower planes to the surface. rhEGF compounds can be considered for prevention or as a treatment of diverse skin and mucosa diseases and conditions through compounding preparations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Epidermal growth factor (urogastrone) in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Y; Orth, D N

    1979-04-01

    Human epidermal growth factor (hEGF), which stimulates the growth of a variety of tissues, was first isolated from mouse submandibular glands, but is also excreted in large amounts (about 50 micrograms/day) in human urine and is probably identical to human beta-urogastrone (hUG), a potent inhibitor of stimulated gastric acid secretion. However, the primary tissue source of hEGF/hUG is as yet unknown. The hEGF/hUG in homogenates of human salivary glands and a wide variety of other endocrine and nonendocrine tissues was extracted by Amberlite CG-50 cation exchange chromatography and immune affinity chromatography using the immunoglobulin fraction of rabbit anti-hEGF serum covalently bound to agarose. The extracts were subjected to homologous hEGF RIA. Immunoreactive hEGF was found in extracts of adult submandibular gland, thyroid gland, duodenum, jejunum, and kidney, but not in several fetal tissues. The tissue immunoreactive hEGF was similar to standard hEGF in terms of immunoreactivity and elution from Sephadex G-50 Fine resin, but its concentrations were very low (1.3-5.5 ng/g wet tissue). Thus, it is not certain that these tissues represent the only source of the large amounts of hEGF/hUG that appear to be filtered by the kidneys each day.

  3. Trauma typology as a risk factor for aggression and self-harm in a complex PTSD population: the mediating role of alterations in self-perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Kevin F W; Dorahy, Martin J; Shannon, Maria; Corry, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the role of prolonged, repeated traumatic experiences such as childhood and sectarian trauma in the development of posttraumatic aggression and self-harm. Forty-four adult participants attending therapy for complex trauma in Northern Ireland were obtained via convenience sampling. When social desirability was controlled, childhood emotional and physical neglect were significant correlates of posttraumatic hostility and history of self-harm. These relationships were mediated by alterations in self-perception (e.g., shame, guilt). Severity of sectarian-related experiences was not related to self-destructive behaviors. Moreover, none of the trauma factors were related to overt aggressive behavior. The findings have implications for understanding risk factors for posttraumatic aggression and self-harm, as well as their treatment.

  4. Microhomology-mediated end joining is activated in irradiated human cells due to phosphorylation-dependent formation of the XRCC1 repair complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Arijit; Eckelmann, Bradley; Adhikari, Sanjay; Ahmed, Kazi Mokim; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Pandey, Arvind; Hegde, Pavana M; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Tainer, John A; Weinfeld, Michael; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Mitra, Sankar

    2017-03-17

    Microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ), an error-prone pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, is implicated in genomic rearrangement and oncogenic transformation; however, its contribution to repair of radiation-induced DSBs has not been characterized. We used recircularization of a linearized plasmid with 3΄-P-blocked termini, mimicking those at X-ray-induced strand breaks, to recapitulate DSB repair via MMEJ or nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). Sequence analysis of the circularized plasmids allowed measurement of relative activity of MMEJ versus NHEJ. While we predictably observed NHEJ to be the predominant pathway for DSB repair in our assay, MMEJ was significantly enhanced in preirradiated cells, independent of their radiation-induced arrest in the G2/M phase. MMEJ activation was dependent on XRCC1 phosphorylation by casein kinase 2 (CK2), enhancing XRCC1's interaction with the end resection enzymes MRE11 and CtIP. Both endonuclease and exonuclease activities of MRE11 were required for MMEJ, as has been observed for homology-directed DSB repair (HDR). Furthermore, the XRCC1 co-immunoprecipitate complex (IP) displayed MMEJ activity in vitro, which was significantly elevated after irradiation. Our studies thus suggest that radiation-mediated enhancement of MMEJ in cells surviving radiation therapy may contribute to their radioresistance and could be therapeutically targeted. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion is required for nuclear envelope formation and completion of nuclear pore complex assembly in Xenopus laevis egg extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Tina; Ramadan, Kristijan; Schlundt, Andreas; Kartenbeck, Jürgen; Meyer, Hemmo H

    2007-08-15

    Despite the progress in understanding nuclear envelope (NE) reformation after mitosis, it has remained unclear what drives the required membrane fusion and how exactly this is coordinated with nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. Here, we show that, like other intracellular fusion reactions, NE fusion in Xenopus laevis egg extracts is mediated by SNARE proteins that require activation by NSF. Antibodies against Xenopus NSF, depletion of NSF or the dominant-negative NSF(E329Q) variant specifically inhibited NE formation. Staging experiments further revealed that NSF was required until sealing of the envelope was completed. Moreover, excess exogenous alpha-SNAP that blocks SNARE function prevented membrane fusion and caused accumulation of non-flattened vesicles on the chromatin surface. Under these conditions, the nucleoporins Nup107 and gp210 were fully recruited, whereas assembly of FxFG-repeat-containing nucleoporins was blocked. Together, we define NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion events as essential steps during NE formation downstream of Nup107 recruitment, and upstream of membrane flattening and completion of NPC assembly.

  6. Structure of the E6/E6AP/p53 complex required for HPV-mediated degradation of p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Zapien, Denise; Ruiz, Francesc Xavier; Poirson, Juline; Mitschler, André; Ramirez-Ramos, Juan; Forster, Anne; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Masson, Murielle; Pol, Scott Vande; Podjarny, Alberto; Travé, Gilles; Zanier, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Summary The p53 pro-apoptotic tumor suppressor is mutated or functionally altered in most cancers. In epithelial tumors induced by “high-risk” mucosal Human Papillomaviruses (hrm-HPVs), including human cervical carcinoma and a growing number of head-and-neck cancers 1, p53 is degraded by the viral oncoprotein E6 2. In this process, E6 binds to a short LxxLL consensus sequence within the cellular ubiquitin ligase E6AP 3. Subsequently, the E6/E6AP heterodimer recruits and degrades p53 4. Neither E6 nor E6AP are separately able to recruit p53 3,5, and the precise mode of assembly of E6, E6AP and p53 is unknown. Here, we solved the crystal structure of a ternary complex comprising full-length HPV16 E6, the LxxLL motif of E6AP and the core domain of p53. The LxxLL motif of E6AP renders the conformation of E6 competent for interaction with p53 by structuring a p53-binding cleft on E6. Mutagenesis of critical positions at the E6-p53 interface disrupts p53 degradation. The E6-binding site of p53 is distal from previously described DNA- and protein-binding surfaces of the core domain. This suggests that, in principle, E6 may avoid competition with cellular factors by targeting both free and bound p53 molecules. The E6/E6AP/p53 complex represents a prototype of viral hijacking of both the ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation pathway and the p53 tumor suppressor pathway. The present structure provides a framework for the design of inhibitory therapeutic strategies against HPV-mediated oncogenesis. PMID:26789255

  7. Specification of Epidermal Cell Fate in Plant Shoots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinobu eTakada

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Land plants have evolved a single layer of epidermal cells, which are characterized by mostly anticlinal cell division patterns, formation of a waterproof coat called cuticle, and unique cell types such as stomatal guard cells and trichomes. The shoot epidermis plays important roles not only to protect plants from dehydration and pathogens but also to ensure their proper organogenesis and growth control. Extensive molecular genetic studies in Arabidopsis and maize have identified a number of genes that are required for epidermal cell differentiation. However, the mechanism that specifies shoot epidermal cell fate during plant organogenesis remains largely unknown. Particularly, little is known regarding positional information that should restrict epidermal cell fate to the outermost cell layer of the developing organs. Recent studies suggested that certain members of the HD-ZIP class IV homeobox genes are possible master regulators of shoot epidermal cell fate. Here, we summarize the roles of the regulatory genes that are involved in epidermal cell fate specification and discuss the possible mechanisms that limit the expression and/or activity of the master transcriptional regulators to the outermost cell layer in plant shoots.

  8. Autologous epidermal cell suspension: A promising treatment for chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongliang; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Cuiping; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-02-01

    Chronic wounds have become an increasing medical and economic problem of aging societies because they are difficult to manage. Skin grafting is an important treatment method for chronic wounds, which are refractory to conservative therapy. The technique involving epidermal cell suspensions was invented to enable the possibility of treating larger wounds with only a small piece of donor skin. Both uncultured and cultured autologous epidermal cell suspensions can be prepared and survive permanently on the wound bed. A systematic search was conducted of EMBASE, Cochrane Library, PubMed and web of science by using Boolean search terms, from the establishment of the database until May 31, 2014. The bibliographies of all retrieved articles in English were searched. The search terms were: (epithelial cell suspension OR keratinocyte suspension) and chronic and wound. From the included, 6 studies are descriptive interventions and discussed the use of autologous keratinocyte suspension to treat 61 patients' chronic wound. The various methods of preparation of epidermal cell suspension are described. The advantages and shortcomings of different carriers for epidermal cell suspensions are also summarised. Both uncultured and cultured autologous epidermal cell suspensions have been used to treat chronic wounds. Although the limitations of these studies include the small number of patient populations with chronic wounds and many important problems that remain to be solved, autologous epidermal cell suspension is a promising treatment for chronic wounds. Copyright © 2015 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Tight junction regulates epidermal calcium ion gradient and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurasawa, Masumi; Maeda, Tetsuo; Oba, Ai; Yamamoto, Takuya [Pola Chemical Industries Inc., 560 Kashio-cho, Totsuka-ku, Yokohama 244-0812 (Japan); Sasaki, Hiroyuki, E-mail: sasakih@jikei.ac.jp [Division of Fine Morphology, Core Research Facilities, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8461 (Japan); The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Infomatics, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We disrupted epidermal tight junction barrier in reconstructed epidermis. {yields} It altered Ca{sup 2+} distribution and consequentially differentiation state as well. {yields} Tight junction should affect epidermal homeostasis by maintaining Ca{sup 2+} gradient. -- Abstract: It is well known that calcium ions (Ca{sup 2+}) induce keratinocyte differentiation. Ca{sup 2+} distributes to form a vertical gradient that peaks at the stratum granulosum. It is thought that the stratum corneum (SC) forms the Ca{sup 2+} gradient since it is considered the only permeability barrier in the skin. However, the epidermal tight junction (TJ) in the granulosum has recently been suggested to restrict molecular movement to assist the SC as a secondary barrier. The objective of this study was to clarify the contribution of the TJ to Ca{sup 2+} gradient and epidermal differentiation in reconstructed human epidermis. When the epidermal TJ barrier was disrupted by sodium caprate treatment, Ca{sup 2+} flux increased and the gradient changed in ion-capture cytochemistry images. Alterations of ultrastructures and proliferation/differentiation markers revealed that both hyperproliferation and precocious differentiation occurred regionally in the epidermis. These results suggest that the TJ plays a crucial role in maintaining epidermal homeostasis by controlling the Ca{sup 2+} gradient.

  10. The DinB•RecA complex of Escherichia coli mediates an efficient and high-fidelity response to ubiquitous alkylation lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafarelli, Tiziana M; Rands, Thomas J; Godoy, Veronica G

    2014-03-01

    Alkylation DNA lesions are ubiquitous, and result from normal cellular metabolism as well as from treatment with methylating agents and chemotherapeutics. DNA damage tolerance by translesion synthesis DNA polymerases has an important role in cellular resistance to alkylating agents. However, it is not yet known whether Escherichia coli (E. coli) DNA Pol IV (DinB) alkylation lesion bypass efficiency and fidelity in vitro are similar to those inferred by genetic analyses. We hypothesized that DinB-mediated bypass of 3-deaza-3-methyladenine, a stable analog of 3-methyladenine, the primary replication fork-stalling alkylation lesion, would be of high fidelity. We performed here the first kinetic analyses of E. coli DinB•RecA binary complexes. Whether alone or in a binary complex, DinB inserted the correct deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) opposite either lesion-containing or undamaged template; the incorporation of other dNTPs was largely inefficient. DinB prefers undamaged DNA, but the DinB•RecA binary complex increases its catalytic efficiency on lesion-containing template, perhaps as part of a regulatory mechanism to better respond to alkylation damage. Notably, we find that a DinB derivative with enhanced affinity for RecA, either alone or in a binary complex, is less efficient and has a lower fidelity than DinB or DinB•RecA. This finding contrasts our previous genetic analyses. Therefore, mutagenesis resulting from alkylation lesions is likely limited in cells by the activity of DinB•RecA. These two highly conserved proteins play an important role in maintaining genomic stability when cells are faced with ubiquitous DNA damage. Kinetic analyses are important to gain insights into the mechanism(s) regulating TLS DNA polymerases.

  11. Extended C termini of CPC-LIKE MYB proteins confer functional diversity in Arabidopsis epidermal cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga-Wada, Rumi; Wada, Takuji

    2017-07-01

    The CAPRICE (CPC) gene encodes a R3-type MYB transcription factor that promotes differentiation of root hair cells in Arabidopsis thaliana Here, we have compared the functions of five CPC-homologous genes for epidermal cell differentiation using CPC promoter-driven transgenic plants. Our results show that TRIPTYCHON (TRY) and ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC2 (ETC2) were less effective in root hair cell differentiation and were unstable in root epidermal cells when compared with CPC, ETC1 or CPC LIKE MYB3 (CPL3). The deletion of the extended C-terminal domain of TRY and ETC2 enhanced protein stability and conferred the ability to induce root hair cell differentiation on them. Treatment with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, also led to the accumulation of TRY, indicating that TRY proteolysis is mediated by the proteasome-dependent pathway. Our results indicate that the CPC family includes relatively stable (CPC, ETC1 and CPL3) and unstable (TRY and ETC2) proteins that might be degraded by the proteasome. Our findings provide new insights into the regulatory mechanism of CPC family proteins that mediate root hair cell differentiation and should be useful in understanding epidermal development. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Investigation of the receptor-mediated endocytosis of transcobalamin/intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beedholm, Rasmus; Grissom, Charles B.; Fedosov, Sergey N.

    receptor structure. This receptor is suggested to be regulated by the vitamin B12 level in the cells, which is interesting in relation to cancer growth. The cellular endocytosis of TC- B12 complex by this unknown receptor is being investigated, using confocal microscopy. Fluorescently labeled B12 molecules...... (Oregon green linked to B12) have been synthesized to determine the B12 uptake level in normal and various tumour-derived cells (e.g. Hela cells from cervix epithelioid carcinoma and BN- cells from rat yolk sac sarcoma). Costaining of the B12 binders has been performed using fluorescently labelled...... secondary antibodies recognising primary antibodies against IF and TC. The data show a cell growth-regulated uptake of free fluorescent B12 but a strong inducement of uptake by TC and IF. After uptake the B12 fluorochrome colocalizes with the B12 binders. ...

  13. CR2-mediated activation of the complement alternative pathway results in formation of membrane attack complexes on human B lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Marquart, H V; Prodinger, W M;

    2001-01-01

    Normal human B lymphocytes activate the alternative pathway of complement via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), that binds hydrolysed C3 (iC3) and thereby promotes the formation of a membrane-bound C3 convertase. We have investigated whether this might lead to the generation of a C5...... convertase and consequent formation of membrane attack complexes (MAC). Deposition of C3 fragments and MAC was assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes in the presence of 30% autologous serum containing 4.4 mM MgCl2/20 mM EGTA, which abrogates the classical pathway of complement without affecting...... the alternative pathway. Blockade of the CR2 ligand-binding site with the monoclonal antibody FE8 resulted in 56 +/- 13% and 71 +/- 9% inhibition of the C3-fragment and MAC deposition, respectively, whereas the monoclonal antibody HB135, directed against an irrelevant CR2 epitope, had no effect. Blockade...

  14. Epidermal growth factor induces changes of interaction between epidermal growth factor receptor and actin in intact cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Song; Haixing Xuan; Qishui Lin

    2008-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a cyto-skeleton-binding protein. Although purified EGFR can interact with actins in vitro and normally at least 10% of EGFR exist in the insoluble cytoskeleton fraction of A431 cells, interaction of cytosolic EGFR with actin can only be visualized by fluorescence resonance energy transfer when epidermal growth factor presents in the cell medium. Results indicate that the correct orientation between EGFR and actin is important in the signal transduction process.

  15. Transient expression of P-type ATPases in tobacco epidermal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedas, Lisbeth Rosager; Palmgren, Michael Broberg; Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura

    2016-01-01

    Transient expression in tobacco cells is a convenient method for several purposes such as analysis of protein-protein interactions and the subcellular localization of plant proteins. A suspension of Agrobacterium tumefaciens cells carrying the plasmid of interest is injected into the intracellular...... for example protein-protein interaction studies. In this chapter, we describe the procedure to transiently express P-type ATPases in tobacco epidermal cells, with focus on subcellular localization of the protein complexes formed by P4-ATPases and their β-subunits....

  16. The origin of room temperature ferromagnetism mediated by Co–VZn complexes in the ZnO grain boundary

    KAUST Repository

    Devi, Assa Aravindh Sasikala

    2016-05-20

    Ferromagnetism in polycrystalline ZnO doped with Co has been observed to be sustainable in recent experiments. We use first-principle calculations to show that Co impurities favorably substitute at the grain boundary (GB) rather than in the bulk. We reveal that room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) at the Co-doped ZnO GB in the presence of Zn vacancies is due to ferromagnetic exchange coupling of a pair of closely associated Co atoms in the GB, with a ferromagnetic exchange coupling energy of ∼300 meV, which is in contrast to a previous study that suggested the O vacancy-Co complex induced ferromagnetism. Electronic structure analysis was used to predict the exchange coupling mechanism, showing that the hybridization of O p states with Co and Zn d states enhances the magnetic polarization originating from the GB. Our results indicate that RTFM originates from Co clusters at interfaces or in GBs. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  17. Rare ecomorphological convergence on a complex adaptive landscape: Body size and diet mediate evolution of jaw shape in squirrels (Sciuridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelditch, Miriam Leah; Ye, Ji; Mitchell, Jonathan S; Swiderski, Donald L

    2017-03-01

    Convergence is widely regarded as compelling evidence for adaptation, often being portrayed as evidence that phenotypic outcomes are predictable from ecology, overriding contingencies of history. However, repeated outcomes may be very rare unless adaptive landscapes are simple, structured by strong ecological and functional constraints. One such constraint may be a limitation on body size because performance often scales with size, allowing species to adapt to challenging functions by modifying only size. When size is constrained, species might adapt by changing shape; convergent shapes may therefore be common when size is limiting and functions are challenging. We examine the roles of size and diet as determinants of jaw shape in Sciuridae. As expected, size and diet have significant interdependent effects on jaw shape and ecomorphological convergence is rare, typically involving demanding diets and limiting sizes. More surprising is morphological without ecological convergence, which is equally common between and within dietary classes. Those cases, like rare ecomorphological convergence, may be consequences of evolving on an adaptive landscape shaped by many-to-many relationships between ecology and function, many-to-one relationships between form and performance, and one-to-many relationships between functionally versatile morphologies and ecology. On complex adaptive landscapes, ecological selection can yield different outcomes. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  18. Solvent-mediated pseudo-quadruple hydrogen-bond motifs in three lamotrigine-carboxylic acid complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Balasubramanian; Nanubolu, Jagadeesh Babu; Ravikumar, Krishnan

    2013-10-01

    Lamotrigine, an antiepileptic drug, has been complexed with three aromatic carboxylic acids. All three compounds crystallize with the inclusion of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) solvent, viz. lamotriginium [3,5-diamino-6-(2,3-dichlorophenyl)-1,2,4-triazin-2-ium] 4-iodobenzoate N,N-dimethylformamide monosolvate, C9H8Cl2N5(+)·C7H4IO2(-)·C3H7NO, (I), lamotriginium 4-methylbenzoate N,N-dimethylformamide monosolvate, C9H7Cl2N5(+)·C8H8O2(-)·C3H7NO, (II), and lamotriginium 3,5-dinitro-2-hydroxybenzoate N,N-dimethylformamide monosolvate, C9H8Cl2N5(+)·C7H3N2O7(-)·C3H7NO, (III). In all three structures, proton transfer takes place from the acid to the lamotrigine molecule. However, in (I) and (II), the acidic H atom is disordered over two sites and there is only partial transfer of the H atom from O to N. In (III), the corresponding H atom is ordered and complete proton transfer has occurred. Lamotrigine-lamotrigine, lamotrigine-acid and lamotrigine-solvent interactions are observed in all three structures and they thereby exhibit isostructurality. The DMF solvent extends the lamotrigine-lamotrigine dimers into a pseudo-quadruple hydrogen-bonding motif.

  19. Histidine availability is decisive in ROS-mediated cytotoxicity of copper complexes of Aβ1-16 peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginotra, Yamini P; Ramteke, Shefali N; Walke, Gulshan R; Rapole, Srikanth; Kulkarni, Prasad P

    2016-01-01

    The binding of metal ions to Aβ peptide plays an important role in the etiology of AD. Copper coordinates chiefly to His residues and produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon redox cycling. ROS builds enormous burden on the normal functioning of neuronal cells and results into deleterious effects. Recently, two structurally distinct copper binding sites with contrasting redox properties were characterized. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the effect of binding of two equivalents of Cu(2+) on redox properties and cytotoxicity of Aβ peptide. Our electrochemical data and ascorbate consumption assay suggest that in the presence of two equivalents of copper; Aβ peptide has higher propensity of H2O2 generation. The oxidation of Aβ1-16 peptide due to both gamma radiolysis and metal catalyzed oxidation in the presence of two equivalents of copper is inhibited confirming the binding of both equivalents of copper to peptide. The electrochemical and cytotoxicity study shows that negative shift in the reduction potential is reflected as slightly higher cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cell lines for Aβ1-16-Cu(2+) (1:2) complex.

  20. Dysphagia-gastroesophageal reflux complex: complications due to dysfunction of solitary tract nucleus-mediated vago-vagal reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Y; Kawashima, Y; Kondo, A; Chikumaru, Y; Matsui, A; Nagata, I; Ohno, K

    2006-06-01

    We report on the complication of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in four patients with lower brainstem dysfunction. These patients suffered from perinatal asphyxia, cerebellar hemorrhage, or congenital dysphagia of unknown origin and showed facial nerve palsy, inspiratory stridor due to vocal cord paralysis, central sleep apnea, and dysphagia, in various combinations. Naso-intestinal tube feeding was introduced in all of the patients due to recurrent vomiting and aspiration pneumonia resulting from GER. T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed symmetrical high intensity lesions in the tegmentum of the lower pons and the medulla oblongata in two of the patients, and pontomedullary atrophy in another patient. In normal subjects, lower esophageal sphincter contraction is provoked by distension of the gastric wall, through a vago-vagal reflex. Since this reflex arc involves the solitary tract nucleus, where the swallowing center is located, the association of dysphagia and GER in the present patients is thought to result from the lesions in the tegmentum of medulla oblongata. We propose the term "dysphagia-GER complex" to describe the disturbed motility of the upper digestive tract due to lower brainstem involvement. In children with brainstem lesions, neurological assessment of GER is warranted, in addition to the examination of other signs of brainstem dysfunction, including dysphagia and respiratory disturbance.

  1. Pathways for epidermal cell differentiation via the homeobox gene GLABRA2: update on the roles of the classic regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qing; Qing, Lin; Aoyama, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    Recent plant development studies have identified regulatory pathways for epidermal cell differentiation in Arabidopsis thaliana. Interestingly, some of such pathways contain transcriptional networks with a common structure in which the homeobox gene GLABLA2 (GL2) is downstream of the transactivation complex consisting of MYB, bHLH, and WD40 proteins. Here, we review the role of GL2 as an output device of the conserved network, and update the knowledge of epidermal cell differentiation pathways downstream of GL2. Despite the consistent position of GL2 within the network, its role in epidermal tissues varies; in the root epidermis, GL2 promotes non-hair cell differentiation after cell pattern formation, whereas in the leaf epidermis, it is likely to be involved in both pattern formation and differentiation of trichomes. GL2 expression levels act as quantitative factors for initiation of cell differentiation in the root and leaf epidermis; the quantity of hairless cells in non-root hair cell files is reduced by gl2 mutations in a semi-dominant manner, and entopically additive expression of GL2 and a heterozygous gl2 mutation increase and decrease the number of trichomes, respectively. Although few direct target genes have been identified, evidence from genetic and expression analyses suggests that GL2 directly regulates genes with various hierarchies in epidermal cell differentiation pathways. © 2012 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  2. Pathways for Epidermal Cell Differentiation via the Homeobox Gene GLABRA2: Update on the Roles of the Classic Regulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Qing; Takashi Aoyama

    2012-01-01

    Recent plant development studies have identified regulatory pathways for epidermal cell differentiation in Arabidopsis thaliana.Interestingly,some of such pathways contain transcriptional networks with a common structure in which the homeobox gene GLABLA2 (GL2) is downstream of the transactivation complex consisting of MYB,bHLH,and WD40 proteins.Here,we review the role of GL2 as an output device of the conserved network,and update the knowledge of epidermal cell differentiation pathways downstream of GL2.Despite the consistent position of GL2 within the network,its role in epidermal tissues varies; in the root epidermis,GL2 promotes non-hair cell differentiation after cell pattern formation,whereas in the leaf epidermis,it is likely to be involved in both pattern formation and differentiation of trichomes.GL2 expression levels act as quantitative factors for initiation of cell differentiation in the root and leaf epidermis; the quantity of hairless cells in non-root hair cell files is reduced by g/2 mutations in a semi-dominant manner,and entopically additive expression of GL2 and a heterozygous g/2 mutation increase and decrease the number of trichomes,respectively.Although few direct target genes have been identified,evidence from genetic and expression analyses suggests that GL2 directly regulates genes with various hierarchies in epidermal cell differentiation pathways.

  3. Rmi1 functions in S phase-mediated cohesion establishment via a pathway involving the Ctf18-RFC complex and Mrc1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Mong Sing; Seki, Masayuki; Tada, Shusuke; Enomoto, Takemi

    2012-10-26

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae RecQ helicase (Sgs1) combines with DNA topoisomerase III (Top3) and RecQ-mediated genome instability 1 (Rmi1) to form an evolutionarily conserved complex that is required for processing homologous recombination intermediates and restarting collapsed replication forks. It was previously reported that Rmi1 contributes to sister chromatid cohesion; however, the underlying molecular mechanism has been unclear. In the present study, Rmi1 was found to be enriched at the region close to an early-firing replication origin when replication forks were arrested near their origins in the presence of hydroxyurea. Genetic analyses revealed that Rmi1 promoted sister chromatid cohesion in a process that was distinct from both the cohesion establishment pathway involving Ctf4, Csm3, and Chl1 and the pathway involving the acetylation of Smc3. On the other hand, Rmi1 seemed to function in a pathway involving the Ctf18-RFC complex and Mrc1, which were previously predicted to regulate leading-strand DNA replication.

  4. Magnetism mediated by a majority of [Fe³⁺ + VO²⁻] complexes in Fe-doped CeO₂ nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paidi, V K; Ferreira, N S; Goltz, D; van Lierop, J

    2015-08-26

    We examine the role of Fe(3+) and vacancies (V(O)) on the magnetism of Fe-doped CeO2 nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles of Ce(100-x)Fe(x)O2 (x  =  0, 0.26, 1.82, 2.64, 5.26, 6.91, and 7.22) were prepared by a co-precipitation method, and their structural, compositional and magnetic properties were investigated. The CeO2 nanoparticles had a mixed valance of Ce(4+) and Ce(3+) ions, and doping introduced Fe(3+) ions. The decrease in Ce(3+) and increase in Fe(3+) concentrations indicated the presence of more [Fe(3+) + V(O)(2-)] complexes with Fe loading in the particles. Charge neutralization, Fe(3+) + V(O)(2-) + 2Ce(4+) ↔ 2Ce(3+) + Fe(3+), identified the impact of V(O) on the magnetism, where our results suggest that the Fe-doped CeO2 nanoparticle magnetism is mediated by a majority of [Fe(3+) + V(O)(2-)]-Ce(3+) -[Fe(3+) + V(O)(2-)] complexes.

  5. Antibody repertoire complexity and effector cell biology determined by assays for IgE-mediated basophil and T-cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Gitte; Willumsen, Nicholas; Holm, Jens; Christensen, Lars Harder; Würtzen, Peter Adler; Lund, Kaare

    2012-09-28

    Effector cell activation and T-cell activation, the latter mediated by facilitated antigen presentation, are immunological mechanisms that play crucial roles in the manifestation and maintenance of allergic disease. In addition to their relevance for the pathogenesis of allergy in-vivo, in-vitro assays based on these immunological mechanisms have been established and used for diagnostics, for monitoring the progression of disease and for the effect of specific immunotherapy as well as for basic research purposes. Here we review different parameters that affect effector cell activation and facilitated antigen uptake and presentation, including assay designs, readout parameters and critical experimental conditions. Central to the two immunological mechanisms is complex formation between allergen-specific IgE, allergen, and cell surface-anchored immunoglobulin receptor; the high affinity IgE-receptor FcεRI on basophils and mast cells, and the low affinity IgE-receptor FcεRII (CD23) on B-cells. Accordingly, the effect of IgE repertoire complexity and allergen diversity on effector cell and facilitated antigen presentation is discussed in detail.

  6. Dual-channel detection of metallothioneins and mercury based on a mercury-mediated aptamer beacon using thymidine-mercury-thymidine complex as a quencher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si-Han; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Tang, Xian; Cao, Jin-Xiu; Li, Ming-Hui; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Yu-Feng; Huang, Yan-Qin

    2015-01-01

    A novel dual-channel strategy for the detection of metallothioneins (MTs) and Hg(2+) has been developed based on a mercury-mediated aptamer beacon (MAB) using thymidine-mercury-thymidine complex as a quencher for the first time. In the presence of Hg(2+), the T-rich oligonucleotide with a 6-carboxyfluorescein (TRO-FAM) can form an aptamer beacon via the formation of T-Hg(2+)-T base pairs, which results in a fluorescence quenching of the sensing system owing to the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the fluorophore of FAM to the terminated T-Hg(2+)-T base pair. The addition of MTs into this solution leads to the disruption of the T-Hg(2+)-T complex, resulting in an increase of the fluorescent signal of the system. In the optimizing condition, ΔF was directly proportional to the concentrations ranging from 5.63 nM to 0.275 μM for MTs, and 14.2 nM to 0.30 μM for Hg(2+) with the detection limits of 1.69 nM and 4.28 nM, respectively. The proposed dual-channel method avoids the label steps of a quencher in common molecular beacon strategies, without tedious procedure or the requirement of sophisticated equipment, and is rapid, inexpensive and sensitive.

  7. Epidermal growth factor and insulin-like growth factor I upregulate the expression of the epidermal growth factor system in rat liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bor, M V; Sørensen, B S; Vinter-Jensen, L

    2000-01-01

    as the expression of transforming growth factor-alpha peptide. The level of epidermal growth factor receptor and transforming growth factor-alpha mRNA expression was found to correlate both in control and growth factor-treated animals, whereas the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor and epidermal growth...

  8. Fluorescence lifetime to image epidermal ionic concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behne, Martin J.; Barry, Nicholas P.; Moll, Ingrid; Gratton, Enrico; Mauro, Theodora M.

    2004-09-01

    Measurements of ionic concentrations in skin have traditionally been performed with an array of methods which either did not reveal detailed localization information, or only provided qualitative, not quantitative information. FLIM combines a number of advantages into a method ideally suited to visualize concentrations of ions such as H+ in intact, unperturbed epidermis and stratum corneum (SC). Fluorescence lifetime is dye concentration-independent, the method requires only low light intensities and is therefore not prone to photobleaching or phototoxic artifacts, and because multiphoton lasers of IR wavelength are used, light penetrates deep into intact tissue. The standard method to measure SC pH is the flat pH electrode, which provides reliable information only about surface pH changes, without further vertical or subcellular spatial resolution; i.e., specific microdomains such as the corneocyte interstices are not resolved, and the deeper SC is inaccessible without resorting to inherently disruptive stripping methods. Furthermore, the concept of a gradient of pH through the SC stems from such stripping experiments, but other confirmation for this concept is lacking. Our investigations into the SC pH distribution so far have revealed the crucial role of the Sodium/Hydrogen Antiporter NHE1 in generation of SC acidity, the colocalization of enzymatic lipid processing activity in the SC with acidic domains of the SC, and the timing and localization of emerging acidity in the SC of newborns. Together, these results have led to an improved understanding of the SC pH, its distribution, origin, and regulation. Future uses for this method include measurements of other ions important for epidermal processes, such as Ca2+, and a quantitative approach to topical drug penetration.

  9. Metabolic epidermal necrosis-hepatocutaneous syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, K P

    1999-11-01

    It is clear that cutaneous lesions of metabolic epidermal necrosis in the dog can occur either with a demonstrable glucagon-secreting tumor or with hepatic disease without any detectable glucagonoma. Additional clinical case reports of the disease in cats are needed to better characterize the disease in this species. The lesions of NME-MEN may not represent a specific physiological mechanism of cutaneous disease but instead a pathophysiological process that can be triggered by several systemic metabolic abnormalities. The fact that NME is observed in association with a variety of conditions supports the theory that an overall metabolic derangement results in the rash. The prognosis for canine MEN is poor; however, some affected dogs have been maintained for many months with dietary management. High-quality protein diets such as Hill's Prescription Diet a/d (Hill's Pet Products) or other "recovery" diets may be helpful. Zinc and essential fatty acid supplementation may help some patients. Dietary supplementation with cooked egg yolks may be helpful. It is prudent to avoid corticosteroids in these cases, as development of diabetes mellitus worsens the prognosis. Histopathological examination of the pancreas coupled with determination of plasma glucagon may help define the characteristics of GS versus HS in dogs. It is possible that some dogs diagnosed with MEN-HS may have an undetected pancreatic tumor. Although the hepatic ultrasound findings in dogs with MEN-HS are becoming well characterized, it is possible for dogs with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors to also have abnormal hepatic ultrasonography. As the presence of MEN and hepatic disease does not necessarily rule out the presence of a pancreatic tumor, prospective studies correlating plasma glucagon levels with pancreatic histopathology in cases of MEN-GS versus MEN-HS seem warranted.

  10. Adaptor protein complex 2-mediated, clathrin-dependent endocytosis, and related gene activities, are a prominent feature during maturation stage amelogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Brookes, Steven J; Wen, Xin; Jimenez, Jaime M; Vikman, Susanna; Hu, Ping; White, Shane N; Lyngstadaas, S Petter; Okamoto, Curtis T; Smith, Charles E; Paine, Michael L

    2013-03-01

    Molecular events defining enamel matrix removal during amelogenesis are poorly understood. Early reports have suggested that adaptor proteins (AP) participate in ameloblast-mediated endocytosis. Enamel formation involves the secretory and maturation stages, with an increase in resorptive function during the latter. Here, using real-time PCR, we show that the expression of clathrin and adaptor protein subunits are upregulated in maturation stage rodent enamel organ cells. AP complex 2 (AP-2) is the most upregulated of the four distinct adaptor protein complexes. Immunolocalization confirms the presence of AP-2 and clathrin in ameloblasts, with strongest reactivity at the apical pole. These data suggest that the resorptive functions of enamel cells involve AP-2 mediated, clathrin-dependent endocytosis, thus implying the likelihood of specific membrane-bound receptor(s) of enamel matrix protein debris. The mRNA expression of other endocytosis-related gene products is also upregulated during maturation including: lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (Lamp1); cluster of differentiation 63 and 68 (Cd63 and Cd68); ATPase, H(+) transporting, lysosomal V0 subunit D2 (Atp6v0d2); ATPase, H(+) transporting, lysosomal V1 subunit B2 (Atp6v1b2); chloride channel, voltage-sensitive 7 (Clcn7); and cathepsin K (Ctsk). Immunohistologic data confirms the expression of a number of these proteins in maturation stage ameloblasts. The enamel of Cd63-null mice was also examined. Despite increased mRNA and protein expression in the enamel organ during maturation, the enamel of Cd63-null mice appeared normal. This may suggest inherent functional redundancies between Cd63 and related gene products, such as Lamp1 and Cd68. Ameloblast-like LS8 cells treated with the enamel matrix protein complex Emdogain showed upregulation of AP-2 and clathrin subunits, further supporting the existence of a membrane-bound receptor-regulated pathway for the endocytosis of enamel matrix proteins. These data

  11. Epigenetic involvement of Alien/ESET complex in thyroid hormone-mediated repression of E2F1 gene expression and cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Wei, E-mail: hongwei@tijmu.edu.cn [Department of Immunology, Tianjin Medical University, 300070 Tianjin (China); College of Basic Medicine, Tianjin Medical University, 300070 Tianjin (China); Li, Jinru; Wang, Bo [College of Basic Medicine, Tianjin Medical University, 300070 Tianjin (China); Chen, Linfeng [Department of Medical Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, 02115 MA (United States); Niu, Wenyan; Yao, Zhi [Department of Immunology, Tianjin Medical University, 300070 Tianjin (China); Baniahmad, Aria, E-mail: aban@mti.uni-jena.de [Institute for Human Genetics, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany)

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corepressor Alien interacts with histone methyltransferase ESET in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alien/ESET complex is recruited to nTRE of T3-responsive gene by liganded TR{beta}1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ESET-mediated H3K9 methylation is required for liganded TR{beta}1-repressed transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ESET is involved in T3-repressed G1/S phase transition and proliferation. -- Abstract: The ligand-bound thyroid hormone receptor (TR) is known to repress via a negative TRE (nTRE) the expression of E2F1, a key transcription factor that controls the G1/S phase transition. Alien has been identified as a novel interacting factor of E2F1 and acts as a corepressor of E2F1. The detailed molecular mechanism by which Alien inhibits E2F1 gene expression remains unclear. Here, we report that the histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methyltransferase (HMT) ESET is an integral component of the corepressor Alien complex and the Alien/ESET complex is recruited to both sites, the E2F1 and the nTRE site of the E2F1 gene while the recruitment to the negative thyroid hormone response element (nTRE) is induced by the ligand-bound TR{beta}1 within the E2F1 gene promoter. We show that, overexpression of ESET promotes, whereas knockdown of ESET releases, the inhibition of TR{beta}1-regulated gene transcription upon T3 stimulation; and H3K9 methylation is required for TR{beta}1-repressed transcription. Furthermore, depletion of ESET impairs thyroid hormone-repressed proliferation as well as the G1/S transition of the cell cycle. Taken together, our data indicate that ESET is involved in TR{beta}1-mediated transcription repression and provide a molecular basis of thyroid hormone-induced repression of proliferation.

  12. Electrophilic Pt(II) complexes: precision instruments for the initiation of transformations mediated by the cation-olefin reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Ryan J; Munro-Leighton, Colleen; Gagné, Michel R

    2014-08-19

    A discontinuity exists between the importance of the cation-olefin reaction as the principal C-C bond forming reaction in terpene biosynthesis and the synthetic tools for mimicking this reaction under catalyst control; that is, having the product identity, stereochemistry, and functionality under the control of a catalyst. The main reason for this deficiency is that the cation-olefin reaction starts with a reactive intermediate (a carbocation) that reacts exothermically with an alkene to reform the reactive intermediate; not to mention that reactive intermediates can also react in nonproductive fashions. In this Account, we detail our efforts to realize catalyst control over this most fundamental of reactions and thereby access steroid like compounds. Our story is organized around our progress in each component of the cascade reaction: the metal controlled electrophilic initiation, the propagation and termination of the cyclization (the cyclase phase), and the turnover deplatinating events. Electrophilic Pt(II) complexes efficiently initiate the cation-olefin reaction by first coordinating to the alkene with selection rules that favor less substituted alkenes over more substituted alkenes. In complex substrates with multiple alkenes, this preference ensures that the least substituted alkene is always the better ligand for the Pt(II) initiator, and consequently the site at which all electrophilic chemistry is initiated. This control element is invariant. With a suitably electron deficient ligand set, the catalyst then activates the coordinated alkene to intramolecular addition by a second alkene, which initiates the cation-olefin reaction cascade and generates an organometallic Pt(II)-alkyl. Deplatination by a range of mechanisms (β-H elimination, single electron oxidation, two-electron oxidation, etc.) provides an additional level of control that ultimately enables A-ring functionalizations that are orthogonal to the cyclase cascade. We particularly focus on

  13. The CCR4-NOT complex mediates deadenylation and degradation of stem cell mRNAs and promotes planarian stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Solana

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are of fundamental importance to form robust genetic networks, but their roles in stem cell pluripotency remain poorly understood. Here, we use freshwater planarians as a model system to investigate this and uncover a role for CCR4-NOT mediated deadenylation of mRNAs in stem cell differentiation. Planarian adult stem cells, the so-called neoblasts, drive the almost unlimited regenerative capabilities of planarians and allow their ongoing homeostatic tissue turnover. While many genes have been demonstrated to be required for these processes, currently almost no mechanistic insight is available into their regulation. We show that knockdown of planarian Not1, the CCR4-NOT deadenylating complex scaffolding subunit, abrogates regeneration and normal homeostasis. This abrogation is primarily due to severe impairment of their differentiation potential. We describe a stem cell specific increase in the mRNA levels of key neoblast genes after Smed-not1 knock down, consistent with a role of the CCR4-NOT complex in degradation of neoblast mRNAs upon the onset of differentiation. We also observe a stem cell specific increase in the frequency of longer poly(A tails in these same mRNAs, showing that stem cells after Smed-not1 knock down fail to differentiate as they accumulate populations of transcripts with longer poly(A tails. As other transcripts are unaffected our data hint at a targeted regulation of these key stem cell mRNAs by post-transcriptional regulators such as RNA-binding proteins or microRNAs. Together, our results show that the CCR4-NOT complex is crucial for stem cell differentiation and controls stem cell-specific degradation of mRNAs, thus providing clear mechanistic insight into this aspect of neoblast biology.

  14. The CCR4-NOT complex mediates deadenylation and degradation of stem cell mRNAs and promotes planarian stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solana, Jordi; Gamberi, Chiara; Mihaylova, Yuliana; Grosswendt, Stefanie; Chen, Chen; Lasko, Paul; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Aboobaker, A Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are of fundamental importance to form robust genetic networks, but their roles in stem cell pluripotency remain poorly understood. Here, we use freshwater planarians as a model system to investigate this and uncover a role for CCR4-NOT mediated deadenylation of mRNAs in stem cell differentiation. Planarian adult stem cells, the so-called neoblasts, drive the almost unlimited regenerative capabilities of planarians and allow their ongoing homeostatic tissue turnover. While many genes have been demonstrated to be required for these processes, currently almost no mechanistic insight is available into their regulation. We show that knockdown of planarian Not1, the CCR4-NOT deadenylating complex scaffolding subunit, abrogates regeneration and normal homeostasis. This abrogation is primarily due to severe impairment of their differentiation potential. We describe a stem cell specific increase in the mRNA levels of key neoblast genes after Smed-not1 knock down, consistent with a role of the CCR4-NOT complex in degradation of neoblast mRNAs upon the onset of differentiation. We also observe a stem cell specific increase in the frequency of longer poly(A) tails in these same mRNAs, showing that stem cells after Smed-not1 knock down fail to differentiate as they accumulate populations of transcripts with longer poly(A) tails. As other transcripts are unaffected our data hint at a targeted regulation of these key stem cell mRNAs by post-transcriptional regulators such as RNA-binding proteins or microRNAs. Together, our results show that the CCR4-NOT complex is crucial for stem cell differentiation and controls stem cell-specific degradation of mRNAs, thus providing clear mechanistic insight into this aspect of neoblast biology.

  15. Oxidative stress disassembles the p38/NPM/PP2A complex, which leads to modulation of nucleophosmin-mediated signaling to DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillonneau, Maëva; Paris, François; Dutoit, Soizic; Estephan, Hala; Bénéteau, Elise; Huot, Jacques; Corre, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress is a leading cause of endothelial dysfunction. The p38 MAPK pathway plays a determinant role in allowing cells to cope with oxidative stress and is tightly regulated by a balanced interaction between p38 protein and its interacting partners. By using a proteomic approach, we identified nucleophosmin (NPM) as a new partner of p38 in HUVECs. Coimmunoprecipitation and microscopic analyses confirmed the existence of a cytosolic nucleophosmin (NPM)/p38 interaction in basal condition. Oxidative stress, which was generated by exposure to 500 µM H2O2, induces a rapid dephosphorylation of NPM at T199 that depends on phosphatase PP2A, another partner of the NPM/p38 complex. Blocking PP2A activity leads to accumulation of NPM-pT199 and to an increased association of NPM with p38. Concomitantly to its dephosphorylation, oxidative stress promotes translocation of NPM to the nucleus to affect the DNA damage response. Dephosphorylated NPM impairs the signaling of oxidative stress-induced DNA damage via inhibition of the phosphorylation of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit. Overall, these results suggest that the p38/NPM/PP2A complex acts as a dynamic sensor, allowing endothelial cells to react rapidly to acute oxidative stress.-Guillonneau, M., Paris, F., Dutoit, S., Estephan, H., Bénéteau, E., Huot, J., Corre, I. Oxidative stress disassembles the p38/NPM/PP2A complex, which leads to modulation of nucleophosmin-mediated signaling to DNA damage response.

  16. Mn(2+)-mediated homogeneous Fenton-like reaction of Fe(III)-NTA complex for efficient degradation of organic contaminants under neutral conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yifan; Sun, Jianhui; Sun, Sheng-Peng

    2016-08-05

    In this work, we report a novel Mn(2+)-mediated Fenton-like process based on Fe(III)-NTA complex that is super-efficient at circumneutral pH range. Kinetics experiments showed that the presence of Mn(2+) significantly enhanced the effectiveness of Fe(III)-NTA complex catalyzed Fenton-like reaction. The degradation rate constant of crotamiton (CRMT), a model compound, by the Fe(III)- NTA_Mn(2+) Fenton-like process was at least 1.6 orders of magnitude larger than that in the absence of Mn(2+). Other metal ions such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Co(2+) and Cu(2+) had no impacts or little inhibitory effect on the Fe(III)-NTA complex catalyzed Fenton-like reaction. The generation of hydroxyl radical (HO) and superoxide radical anion (O2(-)) in the Fe(III)-NTA_Mn(2+) Fenton-like process were suggested by radicals scavenging experiments. The degradation efficiency of CRMT was inhibited significantly (approximately 92%) by the addition of HO scavenger 2-propanol, while the addition of O2(-) scavenger chloroform resulted in 68% inhibition. Moreover, the results showed that other chelating agents such as EDTA- and s,s-EDDS-Fe(III) catalyzed Fenton-like reactions were also enhanced significantly by the presence of Mn(2+). The mechanism involves an enhanced generation of O2(-) from the reactions of Mn(2+)-chelates with H2O2, indirectly promoting the generation of HO by accelerating the reduction rate of Fe(III)-chelates to Fe(II)- chelates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. 表皮生长因子受体通过MAPK/ERK信号通路调节基质金属蛋白酶1表达的研究%Epidermal growth factor receptor mediates matrix metalloproteinase 1 expression in SiHa cells through MAPK/ERK pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宗峰; 王红丽; 时小丁; 马鑫; 李佩玲

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the regulatory effect of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) in cervical cancer SiHa cell and to elucidate the related signal transduction mechanisms.Methods SiHa cells were treated with EGF , and the signal transduction pathway blockers of EGFR,PI3-K, MEK, and JNK were used to investigate the effect of EGFR on the expression of MMP-1 and the phosphorylation of signaling pathways.Results EGF induced the expression of MMP-1 at both the mRNA and protein levels (all P <0.05).MMP-1 induction was blocked by MAPK or ERK kinase inhibitors (all P < 0.05).Conclusion Conclusion EGFR up-regulated the synthesis of MMP-1 through the MAPK/ERK pathway.%目的 探讨表皮生长因子受体(EGFR)在宫颈癌SiHa细胞中对基质金属蛋白酶-1(MMP-1)表达的调节作用,明确其相关的信号传导机制.方法 利用表皮生长因子(EGF)作为干预因素,信号通路阻断剂分别阻断EGFR、AKT、ERK、P38和JNK的磷酸化,观察EGFR对MMP-1表达的影响及其下游信号通路的变化.结果 EGF在mRNA和蛋白水平上诱导MMP-1的表达增加(P均<0.05);MAPK和ERK激酶抑制剂在mRNA和蛋白水平上可阻断这种诱导(P均<0.05).结论 EGFR通过MAPK/ERK信号通路上调MMP-1的表达.

  18. Integrative multicellular biological modeling: a case study of 3D epidermal development using GPU algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christley Scott

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simulation of sophisticated biological models requires considerable computational power. These models typically integrate together numerous biological phenomena such as spatially-explicit heterogeneous cells, cell-cell interactions, cell-environment interactions and intracellular gene networks. The recent advent of programming for graphical processing units (GPU opens up the possibility of developing more integrative, detailed and predictive biological models while at the same time decreasing the computational cost to simulate those models. Results We construct a 3D model of epidermal development and provide a set of GPU algorithms that e