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Sample records for complex ii-negative mice

  1. Toxicity Studies of Ethyl Maltol and Iron Complexes in Mice.

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    Li, Zhen; Lu, Jieli; Wu, Chonghui; Pang, Quanhai; Zhu, Zhiwei; Nan, Ruipeng; Du, Ruochen; Chen, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Ethyl maltol and iron complexes are products of ethyl maltol and the iron found in the cooking pots used to prepare the Chinese dish, hot-pot. Because their safety is undocumented, the toxicity study of ethyl maltol and iron complexes was conducted in male and female Kunming (KM) mice. The animal study was designed based on the preliminary study conducted to determine the median lethal dose (LD50). The doses used in the study were 0, 1/81, 1/27, 1/9, and 1/3 of the LD50 (mg kg body weight (BW)(-1) day(-1)) dissolved in the water. The oral LD50 of the ethyl maltol and iron complexes was determined to be 743.88 mg kg BW(-1) in mice. The ethyl maltol and iron complexes targeted the endocrine organs including the liver and kidneys following the 90 D oral exposure. Based on the haematological data, the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL) of the ethyl maltol and iron complexes was determined to be 1/81 LD50 (9.18 mg kg BW(-1) day(-1)) in both male and female mice. Therefore, we suggest that alternative strategies for preparing the hot-pot, including the use of non-Fe-based cookware, need to be developed and encouraged to avoid the formation of the potentially toxic complexes.

  2. Meiosis in mice without a synaptonemal complex.

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    Anna Kouznetsova

    Full Text Available The synaptonemal complex (SC promotes fusion of the homologous chromosomes (synapsis and crossover recombination events during meiosis. The SC displays an extensive structural conservation between species; however, a few organisms lack SC and execute meiotic process in a SC-independent manner. To clarify the SC function in mammals, we have generated a mutant mouse strain (Sycp1(-/-Sycp3(-/-, here called SC-null in which all known SC proteins have been displaced from meiotic chromosomes. While transmission electron microscopy failed to identify any remnants of the SC in SC-null spermatocytes, neither formation of the cohesion axes nor attachment of the chromosomes to the nuclear membrane was perturbed. Furthermore, the meiotic chromosomes in SC-null meiocytes achieved pre-synaptic pairing, underwent early homologous recombination events and sustained a residual crossover formation. In contrast, in SC-null meiocytes synapsis and MLH1-MLH3-dependent crossovers maturation were abolished, whereas the structural integrity of chromosomes was drastically impaired. The variable consequences that SC inactivation has on the meiotic process in different organisms, together with the absence of SC in some unrelated species, imply that the SC could have originated independently in different taxonomic groups.

  3. Congenic mice: cutting tools for complex immune disorders.

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    Rogner, Ute C; Avner, Philip

    2003-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are, in general, under complex genetic control and subject to strong interactions between genetics and the environment. Greater knowledge of the underlying genetics will provide immunologists with a framework for study of the immune dysregulation that occurs in such diseases. Ascertaining the number of genes that are involved and their characterization have, however, proven to be difficult. Improved methods of genetic analysis and the availability of a draft sequence of the complete mouse genome have markedly improved the outlook for such research, and they have emphasized the advantages of mice as a model system. In this review, we provide an overview of the genetic analysis of autoimmune diseases and of the crucial role of congenic and consomic mouse strains in such research.

  4. Low abundance of the matrix arm of complex I in mitochondria predicts longevity in mice.

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    Miwa, Satomi; Jow, Howsun; Baty, Karen; Johnson, Amy; Czapiewski, Rafal; Saretzki, Gabriele; Treumann, Achim; von Zglinicki, Thomas

    2014-05-12

    Mitochondrial function is an important determinant of the ageing process; however, the mitochondrial properties that enable longevity are not well understood. Here we show that optimal assembly of mitochondrial complex I predicts longevity in mice. Using an unbiased high-coverage high-confidence approach, we demonstrate that electron transport chain proteins, especially the matrix arm subunits of complex I, are decreased in young long-living mice, which is associated with improved complex I assembly, higher complex I-linked state 3 oxygen consumption rates and decreased superoxide production, whereas the opposite is seen in old mice. Disruption of complex I assembly reduces oxidative metabolism with concomitant increase in mitochondrial superoxide production. This is rescued by knockdown of the mitochondrial chaperone, prohibitin. Disrupted complex I assembly causes premature senescence in primary cells. We propose that lower abundance of free catalytic complex I components supports complex I assembly, efficacy of substrate utilization and minimal ROS production, enabling enhanced longevity.

  5. Effect of Qinglongyi Polysaccharides on Complex Mobility of Erythrocytes in S180 Mice

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    JI; Chen-feng; YUE; Lei; JI; Yu-bin

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of Qinglongyi polysaccharides (QP) in the exocarp of Juglans mandshurica on the complex mobility of erythrocytes in S180 mice. Methods Erythrocytes were collected and prepared into suspensions, and the complex mobility of cells was measured using high performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE). Optimized experimental conditions were as follows: 50 cm × 75 μm capillary, buffer for electrophoresis; phosphate solution containing hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (0.1 mol/L, pH 7.4), injection pressure 3.448 kPa, injection time 10 s, separation voltage 20 kV, and column temperature 25 ℃. Results The migration time of erythrocytes in S180 mice was longer than that in normal mice, which was 18.09 min for the model group and 12.11 min for the control group, and the complex mobility of erythrocytes in S180 mice was lower than that in normal mice, which was 0.92 × 104 cm2 /(V·s) for the model group and 1.38 × 104 cm2 /(V·s) for the control group. It was also found that S180 mice treated by QP could shorten the migration time and increase the complex mobility of erythrocytes. Conclusion QP could improve the complex mobility of erythrocytes in S180 mice, and HPCE could be used as a powerful tool for determining the physiological state and functions of erythrocytes.

  6. Lifespan effects of simple and complex nutraceutical combinations fed isocalorically to mice

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    Spindler, Stephen R.; Mote, Patricia L.; Flegal, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Present data suggest that the consumption of individual dietary supplements does not enhance the health or longevity of healthy rodents or humans. It might be argued that more complex combinations of such agents might extend lifespan or health-span by more closely mimicking the complexity of micronutrients in fruits and vegetables, which appear to extend health-span and longevity. To test this hypothesis we treated long-lived, male, F1 mice with published and commercial combinations of dietar...

  7. Membrane attack complex inhibitor CD59a protects against focal cerebral ischemia in mice

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    Nietfeld Wilfried

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complement system is a crucial mediator of inflammation and cell lysis after cerebral ischemia. However, there is little information about the exact contribution of the membrane attack complex (MAC and its inhibitor-protein CD59. Methods Transient focal cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in young male and female CD59a knockout and wild-type mice. Two models of MCAO were applied: 60 min MCAO and 48 h reperfusion, as well as 30 min MCAO and 72 h reperfusion. CD59a knockout animals were compared to wild-type animals in terms of infarct size, edema, neurological deficit, and cell death. Results and Discussion CD59a-deficiency in male mice caused significantly increased infarct volumes and brain swelling when compared to wild-type mice at 72 h after 30 min-occlusion time, whereas no significant difference was observed after 1 h-MCAO. Moreover, CD59a-deficient mice had impaired neurological function when compared to wild-type mice after 30 min MCAO. Conclusion We conclude that CD59a protects against ischemic brain damage, but depending on the gender and the stroke model used.

  8. GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex in long-sleep and short-sleep mice

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    Marley, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    LS mice are more sensitive to benzodiazepine-induced anesthesia; however, the two lines do not differ in their hypothermic response to flurazepam. SS mice are more resistant to 3-mercaptopropionic acid-induced seizures and more sensitive to the anticonvulsant effects of benzodiazepines. The various correlates of GABA and benzodiazepine actions probably are the results of different mechanisms of action and/or differential regional control. Bicuculline competition for /sup 3/H-GABA binding sites is greater in SS cerebellar tissue and /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding is greater in the mid-brain region of LS mice. GABA enhancement of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepma binding is greater in SS mice. Ethanol also enhances /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding and increases the levels of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding above those observed for GABA. Using correlational techniques on data from LS and SS mice and several inbred mouse strains, it was demonstrated that a positive relationship exists between the degree of receptor coupling within the GABA receptor complex and the degree of resistance to seizures.

  9. Methylenedioxymethamphetamine inhibits mitochondrial complex I activity in mice: a possible mechanism underlying neurotoxicity.

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    Puerta, Elena; Hervias, Isabel; Goñi-Allo, Beatriz; Zhang, Steven F; Jordán, Joaquín; Starkov, Anatoly A; Aguirre, Norberto

    2010-05-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) causes a persistent loss of dopaminergic cell bodies in the substantia nigra of mice. Current evidence indicates that such neurotoxicity is due to oxidative stress but the source of free radicals remains unknown. Inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes by MDMA was assessed as a possible source. Activities of mitochondrial complexes after MDMA were evaluated spectrophotometrically. In situ visualization of superoxide production in the striatum was assessed by ethidium fluorescence and striatal dopamine levels were determined by HPLC as an index of dopaminergic toxicity. 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine decreased mitochondrial complex I activity in the striatum of mice, an effect accompanied by an increased production of superoxide radicals and the inhibition of endogenous aconitase. alpha-Lipoic acid prevented superoxide generation and long-term toxicity independent of any effect on complex I inhibition. These effects of alpha-lipoic acid were also associated with a significant increase of striatal glutathione levels. The relevance of glutathione was supported by reducing striatal glutathione content with L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine, which exacerbated MDMA-induced dopamine deficits, effects suppressed by alpha-lipoic acid. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine, partially prevented MDMA-induced dopamine depletions, an effect reversed by L-arginine but not D-arginine. Finally, a direct relationship between mitochondrial complex I inhibition and long-term dopamine depletions was found in animals treated with MDMA in combination with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Inhibition of mitochondrial complex I following MDMA could be the source of free radicals responsible for oxidative stress and the consequent neurotoxicity of this drug in mice.

  10. Mice lacking TR4 nuclear receptor develop mitochondrial myopathy with deficiency in complex I.

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    Liu, Su; Lee, Yi-Fen; Chou, Samuel; Uno, Hideo; Li, Gonghui; Brookes, Paul; Massett, Michael P; Wu, Qiao; Chen, Lu-Min; Chang, Chawnshang

    2011-08-01

    The estimated incidence of mitochondrial diseases in humans is approximately 1:5000 to 1:10,000, whereas the molecular mechanisms for more than 50% of human mitochondrial disease cases still remain unclear. Here we report that mice lacking testicular nuclear receptor 4 (TR4(-/-)) suffered mitochondrial myopathy, and histological examination of TR4(-/-) soleus muscle revealed abnormal mitochondrial accumulation. In addition, increased serum lactate levels, decreased mitochondrial ATP production, and decreased electron transport chain complex I activity were found in TR4(-/-) mice. Restoration of TR4 into TR4(-/-) myoblasts rescued mitochondrial ATP generation capacity and complex I activity. Further real-time PCR quantification and promoter studies found TR4 could modulate complex I activity via transcriptionally regulating the complex I assembly factor NDUFAF1, and restoration of NDUFAF1 level in TR4(-/-) myoblasts increased mitochondrial ATP generation capacity and complex I activity. Together, these results suggest that TR4 plays vital roles in mitochondrial function, which may help us to better understand the pathogenesis of mitochondrial myopathy, and targeting TR4 via its ligands/activators may allow us to develop better therapeutic approaches.

  11. Locomotor activity in common spiny mice (Acomys cahirinuse: The effect of light and environmental complexity

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    Eilam David

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rodents typically avoid illuminated and open areas, favoring dark or sheltered environments for activity. While previous studies focused on the effect of these environmental attributes on the level of activity, the present study tested whether the spatio-temporal structure of activity was also modified in illuminated compared with dark and complex compared with open arenas. For this, we tested common spiny mice (Acomys cahirinus in empty or stone-containing arenas with lights on or lights off. Results In an illuminated or open arena, spiny mice moved in less frequent but longer trips with relatively long distances between consecutive stops. In contrast, in either a dark arena or an arena with stones, the animals took shorter and more frequent trips, with more stops per trip and shorter inter-stop distances. In illuminated arenas spiny mice remained mainly along the walls, whereas locomotion in the center was more prevalent in dark empty arenas, and was carried out along convoluted paths. Increasing environmental complexity by adding stones to either illuminated or dark arenas increased locomotion along straight trajectories and away from walls. Conclusions Earlier findings of reduced activity in illuminated or open areas have been extended in the present study by demonstrating changes in the spatio-temporal structure of locomotor behavior. In the more complex arenas (with stones spiny mice traveled along short straight segments whereas in the open their trips were longer and took the shape of a zigzag path which is more effective against fast or nearby predators. Alternatively, the zigzag path may reflect a difficulty in navigation.

  12. Age-related reduction of structural complexity in spleen hematopoietic tissue architecture in mice.

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    Pantic, Igor; Paunovic, Jovana; Basta-Jovanovic, Gordana; Perovic, Milan; Pantic, Senka; Milosevic, Nebojsa T

    2013-09-01

    The effects of aging on structural complexity in hematopoietic tissue are unknown. In this work, in a mouse experimental model, we report the age-related reduction of spleen hematopoietic tissue (SHT) complexity. Spleen tissue was obtained from the total of 64 male Swiss albino mice divided into 8 age groups: newborns (0 days old), 10 days, 20 days, 30 days, 120 days, 210 days, 300 and 390 days old. SHT was stained using conventional hematoxylin/eosin, and DNA-binding toluidine blue dyes. Fractal dimension as an indicator of cellular complexity, and lacunarity as indicator of tissue heterogeneity were determined based on the binarized SHT micrographs. Results indicate that fractal dimension of mice spleen hematopoietic tissue decreases with age, while lacunarity increases. These changes/trends have been detected in SHT stained both with toluidine blue and conventional hematoxylin/eosin. Fractal dimension was negatively correlated with lacunarity. The detected reduction in complexity suggests that age-related structural changes are present in mouse SHT both in general tissue architecture and progenitor cell DNA. © 2013.

  13. Diminished exercise capacity and mitochondrial bc1 complex deficiency in tafazzin-knockdown mice.

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    Corey ePowers

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The phospholipid, cardiolipin, is essential for maintaining mitochondrial structure and optimal function. Cardiolipin-deficiency in humans, Barth syndrome, is characterized by exercise intolerance, dilated cardiomyopathy, neutropenia and 3-methyl-glutaconic aciduria. The causative gene is the mitochondrial acyl-transferase, tafazzin that is essential for remodeling acyl chains of cardiolipin. We sought to determine metabolic rates in tafazzin-deficient mice during resting and exercise, and investigate the impact of cardiolipin deficiency on mitochondrial respiratory chain activities. Tafazzin knockdown in mice markedly impaired oxygen consumption rates during an exercise, without any significant effect on resting metabolic rates. CL-deficiency resulted in significant reduction of mitochondrial respiratory reserve capacity in neonatal cardiomyocytes that is likely to be caused by diminished activity of complex-III, which requires CL for its assembly and optimal activity. Our results may provide mechanistic insights of Barth syndrome pathogenesis.

  14. A complex dietary supplement augments spatial learning, brain mass, and mitochondrial electron transport chain activity in aging mice.

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    Aksenov, Vadim; Long, Jiangang; Liu, Jiankang; Szechtman, Henry; Khanna, Parul; Matravadia, Sarthak; Rollo, C David

    2013-02-01

    We developed a complex dietary supplement designed to offset five key mechanisms of aging and tested its effectiveness in ameliorating age-related cognitive decline using a visually cued Morris water maze test. All younger mice (1 year) were unable to learn the maze even after 5 days, indicative of strong cognitive decline at older ages. In contrast, no cognitive decline was evident in older supplemented mice, even when ∼2 years old. Supplemented older mice were nearly 50% better at locating the platform than age-matched controls. Brain weights of supplemented mice were significantly greater than controls, even at younger ages. Reversal of cognitive decline in activity of complexes III and IV by supplementation was significantly associated with cognitive improvement, implicating energy supply as one possible mechanism. These results represent proof of principle that complex dietary supplements can provide powerful benefits for cognitive function and brain aging.

  15. Pharmacodynamic and Pharmacokinetic Studies of β-Cyclodextrin:Dexamethasone Acetate Complexes in Mice

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    Patrik Oening Rodrigues

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo activity of the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of a suspension of the complex composed of dexamethasone acetate (DMA with β-cyclodextrin in comparison to a suspension of the pure DMA. Solid complexes prepared by different methods were evaluated in pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics studies. The pharmacodynamic effect was investigated although the capacity of the inhibited the inflammation. Models of abdominal constriction, carrageenan-induced paw oedema and formalin induced licking were used. The study of the pharmacodynamic comparison of free DMA and products of β-CD:DMA demonstrated no significant difference in the majority of the tests performed. Plasma concentrations of DMA and DMA:β-CD were assayed by HPLC. A significant (p > 0.05 decrease in the relative bioavailability was obtained with the suspension containing the DMA:β-CD complex as measured by DMA plasma levels. The area under the curve (AUC of the suspension of DMA was higher than that obtained with the suspension of the complexes. The pharmacokinetic evaluation of dexamethasone carried out on mice in the present study showed that complexed DMA with β-cyclodextrin modifieds some parameters related to the phases of absorption and elimination of this drug.

  16. A complex dietary supplement augments spatial learning, brain mass, and mitochondrial electron transport chain activity in aging mice

    OpenAIRE

    Aksenov, Vadim; Long, Jiangang; Liu, Jiankang; Szechtman, Henry; Khanna, Parul; Matravadia, Sarthak; Rollo, C. David

    2011-01-01

    We developed a complex dietary supplement designed to offset five key mechanisms of aging and tested its effectiveness in ameliorating age-related cognitive decline using a visually cued Morris water maze test. All younger mice (1 year) were unable to learn the maze even after 5 days, indicative of strong cognitive decline at older ages. In contrast, no cognitive decline was evident in older supplemented mice, even when ∼2 years old. Supplemented older mice were nearly 50% better at locating ...

  17. A novel instrumented multipeg running wheel system, Step-Wheel, for monitoring and controlling complex sequential stepping in mice.

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    Kitsukawa, Takashi; Nagata, Masatoshi; Yanagihara, Dai; Tomioka, Ryohei; Utsumi, Hideko; Kubota, Yasuo; Yagi, Takeshi; Graybiel, Ann M; Yamamori, Tetsuo

    2011-07-01

    Motor control is critical in daily life as well as in artistic and athletic performance and thus is the subject of intense interest in neuroscience. Mouse models of movement disorders have proven valuable for many aspects of investigation, but adequate methods for analyzing complex motor control in mouse models have not been fully established. Here, we report the development of a novel running-wheel system that can be used to evoke simple and complex stepping patterns in mice. The stepping patterns are controlled by spatially organized pegs, which serve as footholds that can be arranged in adjustable, ladder-like configurations. The mice run as they drink water from a spout, providing reward, while the wheel turns at a constant speed. The stepping patterns of the mice can thus be controlled not only spatially, but also temporally. A voltage sensor to detect paw touches is attached to each peg, allowing precise registration of footfalls. We show that this device can be used to analyze patterns of complex motor coordination in mice. We further demonstrate that it is possible to measure patterns of neural activity with chronically implanted tetrodes as the mice engage in vigorous running bouts. We suggest that this instrumented multipeg running wheel (which we name the Step-Wheel System) can serve as an important tool in analyzing motor control and motor learning in mice.

  18. Acute, 28days sub acute and genotoxic profiling of Quercetin-Magnesium complex in Swiss albino mice.

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    Ghosh, Nilanjan; Sandur, Rajendra; Ghosh, Deepanwita; Roy, Souvik; Janadri, Suresh

    2017-02-01

    Quercetin-Magnesium complex is one of the youngest alkaline rare earth metal (Magnesium) complexes with flavonoids (Quercetin) in organo-metalic family. Earlier studies describe the details of the complex formation, characterization and antioxidant study of the complex but toxicity profile is still under darkness. The present study was taken up to investigate the oral acute toxicity, 28days repeated oral sub-acute toxicity study and genotoxicity study of Quercetin-Magnesium complex in Swiss albino mice. Quercetin-Magnesium complex showed mortality at a dose of 185mg/kg in the Swiss albino mice. In 28days repeated oral toxicity study, Quercetin-Magnesium complex was administered to both sex of Swiss albino mice at dose levels of 150, 130 and 100mg/kg body weight respectively. Where 150mg/kg dose shows increased levels of white blood cells and changes in total protein, serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen. Histopathological study of Quercetin-Magnesium complex shows minor structural alteration in kidney at 150mg/kg dose. No observed toxic level found in 130mg/kg or below doses. No genotoxic effect found in any doses of the complex. Therefore 130mg/kg or below dose level could be better for further study.

  19. MDP: A Deinococcus Mn2+-Decapeptide Complex Protects Mice from Ionizing Radiation.

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    Gupta, Paridhi; Gayen, Manoshi; Smith, Joan T; Gaidamakova, Elena K; Matrosova, Vera Y; Grichenko, Olga; Knollmann-Ritschel, Barbara; Daly, Michael J; Kiang, Juliann G; Maheshwari, Radha K

    2016-01-01

    The radioprotective capacity of a rationally-designed Mn2+-decapeptide complex (MDP), based on Mn antioxidants in the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, was investigated in a mouse model of radiation injury. MDP was previously reported to be extraordinarily radioprotective of proteins in the setting of vaccine development. The peptide-component (DEHGTAVMLK) of MDP applied here was selected from a group of synthetic peptides screened in vitro for their ability to protect cultured human cells and purified enzymes from extreme damage caused by ionizing radiation (IR). We show that the peptides accumulated in Jurkat T-cells and protected them from 100 Gy. MDP preserved the activity of T4 DNA ligase exposed to 60,000 Gy. In vivo, MDP was nontoxic and protected B6D2F1/J (female) mice from acute radiation syndrome. All irradiated mice treated with MDP survived exposure to 9.5 Gy (LD70/30) in comparison to the untreated mice, which displayed 63% lethality after 30 days. Our results show that MDP provides early protection of white blood cells, and attenuates IR-induced damage to bone marrow and hematopoietic stem cells via G-CSF and GM-CSF modulation. Moreover, MDP mediated the immunomodulation of several cytokine concentrations in serum including G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-3 and IL-10 during early recovery. Our results present the necessary prelude for future efforts towards clinical application of MDP as a promising IR countermeasure. Further investigation of MDP as a pre-exposure prophylactic and post-exposure therapeutic in radiotherapy and radiation emergencies is warranted.

  20. The effect of 2 different housing systems on germ-free mice colonized with a complex gut microbiota

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    Lundberg, Randi; Toft, Martin Fitzner; August, Benjamin;

    2015-01-01

    communities of varying complexity. Traditionally, gnotobiotic mice are housed in isolators, which is costly both in labor and footprint. With rigorous cage handling procedures, it is possible to maintain mice germ-free in individually ventilated cages (IVCs) for shorter periods of weeks or a few months......, but there is a lack of knowledge on the stability of complex bacterial communities in IVCs. Germ-free SW mice were inoculated with a complex murine microbiota, housed in an isolator or in IVCs and bred for two generations, corresponding to a time course of 5 months. The gut microbiota was characterized by 16S...... ribosomal RNA sequencing, and the community structure of the different generations was compared to the inoculum to see the effect of housing and time on the relative bacterial abundances and the appearance of contaminants and their ability to change the overall community picture. The results indicate...

  1. Radioprotection by alpha-lipoic acid palladium complex formulation (POLY-MVA) in mice.

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    Ramachandran, Lakshmy; Krishnan, Chirakkal V; Nair, Cherupally Krishnan Krishnan

    2010-08-01

    The dietary supplement, POLY-MVA, containing palladium alpha-lipoic acid complex was examined for its efficacy as a radioprotector in mice exposed to whole-body gamma-radiation. Oral administration of POLY-MVA enhanced endogenous spleen colony formation in animals exposed to a sublethal dose of 6 Gy gamma-radiation. Alkaline comet assay revealed that the nuclear DNA comet parameters such as percent DNA in tail, tail length, tail moment, and olive tail moment, of the bone marrow cells and spleen cells, were found increased following whole-body gamma-irradiation. The radiation-induced DNA damage in these cells was reduced when POLY-MVA was administered to animals exposed to a lethal dose of 8 Gy whole-body gamma-radiation. The administration of POLY-MVA significantly reduced the gamma-radiation-induced mortality and also aided recovery from the radiation-induced loss of body weight in mice surviving after 8 Gy gamma-radiation exposure. These results suggest the potential use of POLY-MVA as a radioprotector in cases of planned radiation exposures.

  2. Immune complex glomerulonephritis following bone marrow transplantation in C3 deficient mice.

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    Thomas R Welch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of circulating complement in host defense and immune disease is well established. Although a number of cells and tissues are capable of synthesizing complement components locally, the importance of such local synthesis in immune disease has been difficult to establish. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used bone marrow transplantation (BMT between C3 knockout (C3KO and wild type (WT mice to construct animals that were discordant for systemic (hepatic and local (monocytic C3 synthetic capacity. An immune complex glomerulonephritis (GN was then induced using intraperitoneal injections of horse spleen apoferritin (HSA with a lipopolysaccharide (LPS adjuvant. All HSA/LPS animals developed a proliferative GN with glomerular infiltration by monocytes. By sensitive ELISA, monocyte C3 synthesis could be detected in C3KO animals transplanted with WT bone marrow cells. Despite this, there were no significant differences among groups of mice in measures of clinical (proteinuria, renal function or histologic (glomerular cellularity, crescents disease severity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this model of GN, local synthesis of C3 by infiltrating cells does not appear to be of pathologic importance.

  3. Scrapie affects the maturation cycle and immune complex trapping by follicular dendritic cells in mice.

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    Gillian McGovern

    Full Text Available Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases are infectious neurological disorders of man and animals, characterised by abnormal disease-associated prion protein (PrP(d accumulations in the brain and lymphoreticular system (LRS. Prior to neuroinvasion, TSE agents often accumulate to high levels within the LRS, apparently without affecting immune function. However, our analysis of scrapie-affected sheep shows that PrP(d accumulations within the LRS are associated with morphological changes to follicular dendritic cells (FDCs and tingible body macrophages (TBMs. Here we examined FDCs and TBMs in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs of scrapie-affected mice by light and electron microscopy. In MLNs from uninfected mice, FDCs could be morphologically categorised into immature, mature and regressing forms. However, in scrapie-affected MLNs this maturation cycle was adversely affected. FDCs characteristically trap and retain immune complexes on their surfaces, which they display to B-lymphocytes. In scrapie-affected MLNs, some FDCs were found where areas of normal and abnormal immune complex retention occurred side by side. The latter co-localised with PrP(d plasmalemmal accumulations. Our data suggest this previously unrecognised morphology represents the initial stage of an abnormal FDC maturation cycle. Alterations to the FDCs included PrP(d accumulation, abnormal cell membrane ubiquitin and excess immunoglobulin accumulation. Regressing FDCs, in contrast, appeared to lose their membrane-attached PrP(d. Together, these data suggest that TSE infection adversely affects the maturation and regression cycle of FDCs, and that PrP(d accumulation is causally linked to the abnormal pathology observed. We therefore support the hypothesis that TSEs cause an abnormality in immune function.

  4. Dietary magnesium restriction reduces amygdala-hypothalamic GluN1 receptor complex levels in mice.

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    Ghafari, Maryam; Whittle, Nigel; Miklósi, András G; Kotlowski, Caroline; Kotlowsky, Caroline; Schmuckermair, Claudia; Berger, Johannes; Bennett, Keiryn L; Singewald, Nicolas; Lubec, Gert

    2015-07-01

    Reduced daily intake of magnesium (Mg(2+)) is suggested to contribute to depression. Indeed, preclinical studies show dietary magnesium restriction (MgR) elicits enhanced depression-like behaviour establishing a causal relationship. Amongst other mechanisms, Mg(2+) gates the activity of N-methyl-D-asparte (NMDA) receptors; however, it is not known whether reduced dietary Mg(2+) intake can indeed affect brain NMDA receptor complexes. Thus, the aim of the current study was to reveal whether MgR induces changes in brain NMDA receptor subunit composition that would indicate altered NMDA receptor regulation. The results revealed that enhanced depression-like behaviour elicited by MgR was associated with reduced amygdala-hypothalamic protein levels of GluN1-containing NMDA complexes. No change in GluN1 mRNA levels was observed indicating posttranslational changes were induced by dietary Mg(2+) restriction. To reveal possible protein interaction partners, GluN1 immunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assays were carried out revealing the expected GluN1 subunit association with GluN2A, GluN2B, but also novel interactions with GluA1, GluA2 in addition to known downstream signalling proteins. Chronic paroxetine treatment in MgR mice normalized enhanced depression-like behaviour, but did not alter protein levels of GluN1-containing NMDA receptors, indicating targets downstream of the NMDA receptor. Collectively, present data demonstrate that dietary MgR alters brain levels of GluN1-containing NMDA receptor complexes, containing GluN2A, GluN2B, AMPA receptors GluA1, GluA2 and several protein kinases. These data indicate that the modulation of dietary Mg(2+) intake may alter the function and signalling of this receptor complex indicating its involvement in the enhanced depression-like behaviour elicited by MgR.

  5. Genetic divergence and the genetic architecture of complex traits in chromosome substitution strains of mice

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    Spiezio Sabrina H

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic architecture of complex traits strongly influences the consequences of inherited mutations, genetic engineering, environmental and genetic perturbations, and natural and artificial selection. But because most studies are under-powered, the picture of complex traits is often incomplete. Chromosome substitution strains (CSSs are a unique paradigm for these genome surveys because they enable statistically independent, powerful tests for the phenotypic effects of each chromosome on a uniform inbred genetic background. A previous CSS survey in mice and rats revealed many complex trait genes (QTLs, large phenotypic effects, extensive epistasis, as well as systems properties such as strongly directional phenotypic changes and genetically-determined limits on the range of phenotypic variation. However, the unusually close genetic relation between the CSS progenitor strains in that study raised questions about the impact of genetic divergence: would greater divergence between progenitor strains, with the corresponding changes in gene regulation and protein function, lead to significantly more distinctive phenotypic features, or alternatively would epistasis and systems constraints, which are pervasive in CSSs, limit the range of phenotypic variation regardless of the extent of DNA sequence variation? Results We analyzed results for an extensive survey of traits in two new panels of CSSs where the donor strains were derived from inbred strains with more distant origins and discovered a strong similarity in genetic and systems properties among the three CSS panels, regardless of divergence time. Conclusion Our results argue that DNA sequence differences between host and donor strains did not substantially affect the architecture of complex traits, and suggest instead that strong epistasis buffered the phenotypic effects of genetic divergence, thereby constraining the range of phenotypic variation.

  6. Genome-wide analysis reveals a complex pattern of genomic imprinting in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason B Wolf

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Parent-of-origin-dependent gene expression resulting from genomic imprinting plays an important role in modulating complex traits ranging from developmental processes to cognitive abilities and associated disorders. However, while gene-targeting techniques have allowed for the identification of imprinted loci, very little is known about the contribution of imprinting to quantitative variation in complex traits. Most studies, furthermore, assume a simple pattern of imprinting, resulting in either paternal or maternal gene expression; yet, more complex patterns of effects also exist. As a result, the distribution and number of different imprinting patterns across the genome remain largely unexplored. We address these unresolved issues using a genome-wide scan for imprinted quantitative trait loci (iQTL affecting body weight and growth in mice using a novel three-generation design. We identified ten iQTL that display much more complex and diverse effect patterns than previously assumed, including four loci with effects similar to the callipyge mutation found in sheep. Three loci display a new phenotypic pattern that we refer to as bipolar dominance, where the two heterozygotes are different from each other while the two homozygotes are identical to each other. Our study furthermore detected a paternally expressed iQTL on Chromosome 7 in a region containing a known imprinting cluster with many paternally expressed genes. Surprisingly, the effects of the iQTL were mostly restricted to traits expressed after weaning. Our results imply that the quantitative effects of an imprinted allele at a locus depend both on its parent of origin and the allele it is paired with. Our findings also show that the imprinting pattern of a locus can be variable over ontogenetic time and, in contrast to current views, may often be stronger at later stages in life.

  7. Antibodies against a class II HLA-peptide complex raised by active immunization of mice with antigen mimicking peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam-Tuxen, R; Riise, Erik Skjold

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease linked to the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes DRB1*1501, DRB5*0101 and DQB1*0602. T cells reactive towards the DRB1*1501 in complex with various peptides derived from myelin basic protein (MBP), which is the major component of myelin...... of NMRI mice with three different antigen mimicking peptides displayed on M13 bacteriophages. The peptides mimick the epitope of a monoclonal antibody specific for the DR2b-MBP(85-99) complex. The mice developed IgG antibodies not only against the peptides injected, but they also developed antibodies...... against the DR2b complex and specific antibodies against the DR2b-MBP(85-99) complex. These data open up the possibility of designing antigen mimicking peptides for vaccination against MS....

  8. GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complex sensitivity in 5-HT(1A) receptor knockout mice on a 129/Sv background.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pattij, T.; Groenink, L.; Oosting, R.S.; Gugten, J. van der; Maes, R.A.A.; Olivier, B.

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies in 5-HT(1A) receptor knockout (1AKO) mice on a mixed Swiss Websterx129/Sv (SWx129/Sv) and a pure 129/Sv genetic background suggest a differential gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A))-benzodiazepine receptor complex sensitivity in both strains, independent from the anxious phenotype. To

  9. Ethanol Modulates the Spontaneous Complex Spike Waveform of Cerebellar Purkinje Cells Recorded in vivo in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-Jian; Wu, Mao-Cheng; Shi, Jin-Di; Xu, Yin-Hua; Chu, Chun-Ping; Cui, Song-Biao; Qiu, De-Lai

    2017-01-01

    Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) are sensitive to ethanol, but the effect of ethanol on spontaneous complex spike (CS) activity in these cells in vivo is currently unknown. Here, we investigated the effect of ethanol on spontaneous CS activity in PCs in urethane-anesthetized mice using in vivo patch-clamp recordings and pharmacological manipulation. Ethanol (300 mM) induced a decrease in the CS-evoked pause in simple spike (SS) firing and in the amplitude of the afterhyperpolarization (AHP) under current clamp conditions. Under voltage-clamp conditions, ethanol significantly decreased the area under the curve (AUC) and the number of CS spikelets, without changing the spontaneous frequency of the CSs or the instantaneous frequency of the CS spikelets. Ethanol-induced a decrease in the AUC of spontaneous CSs was concentration dependent. The EC50 of ethanol for decreasing the AUC of spontaneous CSs was 168.5 mM. Blocking N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) failed to prevent the ethanol-induced decreases in the CS waveform parameters. However, blockade of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) significantly suppressed the ethanol-induced effects on the CS-evoked pause in SS firing, amplitude of the AHP, spikelet number and the AUC of CSs. Moreover, a CB1 receptor agonist not only reduced the number of spikelets and the AUC of CSs, but also prevented the ethanol-induced inhibition of CS activity. Our results indicate that ethanol inhibits CS activity via activation of the CB1 receptor in vivo in mice, suggesting that excessive ethanol intake inhibits climbing fiber (CF)–PC synaptic transmission by modulating CB1 receptors in the cerebellar cortex. PMID:28293172

  10. Contrasting the effects of proton irradiation on dendritic complexity of subiculum neurons in wild type and MCAT mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Nicole N; Caressi, Chongshan; Giedzinski, Erich; Parihar, Vipan K; Limoli, Charles L

    2016-06-01

    Growing evidence suggests that radiation-induced oxidative stress directly affects a wide range of biological changes with an overall negative impact on CNS function. In the past we have demonstrated that transgenic mice over-expressing human catalase targeted to the mitochondria (MCAT) exhibit a range of neuroprotective phenotypes following irradiation that include improved neurogenesis, dendritic complexity, and cognition. To determine the extent of the neuroprotective phenotype afforded by MCAT expression in different hippocampal regions, we analyzed subiculum neurons for changes in neuronal structure and synaptic integrity after exposure to low dose (0.5 Gy) 150 MeV proton irradiation. One month following irradiation of WT and MCAT mice, a range of morphometric parameters were quantified along Golgi-Cox impregnated neurons. Compared with WT mice, subiculum neurons from MCAT mice exhibited increased trends (albeit not statistically significant) toward increased dendritic complexity in both control and irradiated cohorts. However, Sholl analysis of MCAT mice revealed significantly increased arborization of the distal dendritic tree, indicating a protective effect on secondary and tertiary branching. Interestingly, radiation-induced increases in postsynaptic density protein (PSD-95) puncta were not as pronounced in MCAT compared with WT mice, and were significantly lower after the 0.5 Gy dose. As past data has linked radiation exposure to reduced dendritic complexity, elevated PSD-95 and impaired cognition, reductions in mitochondrial oxidative stress have proven useful in ameliorating many of these radiation-induced sequelae. Data presented here shows similar trends, and again points to the potential benefits of reducing oxidative stress in the brain to attenuate radiation injury. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:364-371, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Disrupted Junctional Membrane Complexes and Hyperactive Ryanodine Receptors Following Acute Junctophilin Knockdown in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oort, Ralph J.; Garbino, Alejandro; Wang, Wei; Dixit, Sayali S.; Landstrom, Andrew P.; Gaur, Namit; De Almeida, Angela C.; Skapura, Darlene G.; Rudy, Yoram; Burns, Alan R.; Ackerman, Michael J.; Wehrens, Xander H.T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Excitation-contraction coupling in striated muscle requires proper communication of plasmalemmal voltage-activated Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ release channels on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) within junctional membrane complexes (JMCs). Whereas previous studies revealed a loss of JMCs and embryonic lethality in germ-line junctophilin-2 (JPH2) knockout mice, it has remained unclear whether JPH2 plays an essential role in JMC formation and the Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release process in the heart. Our recent work demonstrated loss-of-function mutations in JPH2 in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Methods and Results To elucidate the role of JPH2 in the heart, we developed a novel approach to conditionally reduce JPH2 protein levels using RNA interference. Cardiac-specific JPH2 knockdown resulted in impaired cardiac contractility, which caused heart failure and increased mortality. JPH2 deficiency resulted in loss of excitation-contraction coupling gain, precipitated by a reduction in the number of JMCs and increased variability in the plasmalemma-SR distance. Conclusions Loss of JPH2 had profound effects on Ca2+ release channel inactivation, suggesting a novel functional role for JPH2 in regulating intracellular Ca2+ release channels in cardiac myocytes. Thus, our novel approach of cardiac-specific shRNA-mediated knockdown of junctophilin-2 has uncovered a critical role for junctophilin in intracellular Ca2+ release in the heart. PMID:21339484

  12. Unraveling the complexity of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: recent advances from the transgenic mutant SOD1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peviani, M; Caron, I; Pizzasegola, C; Gensano, F; Tortarolo, M; Bendotti, C

    2010-08-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), which accounts for the majority of motor neuron disorders, is a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disease leading to complete paralysis of skeletal muscles and premature death usually from respiratory failure. About 10% of all ALS cases are inherited, with the responsible gene having been identified in approximately 25% of these individuals. Mutations in the copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene were the first to be recognized nearly twenty years ago, and since then different animal models, in particular transgenic rodents, have been developed. They replicate many of the clinical, neuropathological and molecular features of ALS patients and have contributed significantly to our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of this disease. Although results obtained so far with mutant SOD1 mice have not translated into effective therapies in ALS patients, these models still represent the only experimentally accessible system to study multiple aspects of disease pathogenesis and to provide proof-of-principle for the development of new therapeutic strategies. This review will examine the most recent discoveries obtained from these animal models in an attempt to elucidate the complex mechanisms of the disease. In particular it will focus on the contribution of multiple cell types in governing the disease development and progression.

  13. Glutathione deficiency in Gclm null mice results in complex I inhibition and dopamine depletion following paraquat administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Li-Ping; Kavanagh, Terrance J; Patel, Manisha

    2013-08-01

    Depletion of glutathione has been shown to occur in autopsied brains of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and in animal models of PD. The goal of this study was to determine whether chronic glutathione (GSH) deficiency per se resulted in complex I inhibition and/or dopamine depletion and whether these indices were further potentiated by aging or administration of paraquat, a redox-cycling herbicide that produces a PD-like neurodegeneration model in rodents (Brooks, A. I., Chadwick, C. A., Gelbard, H. A., Cory-Slechta, D. A., and Federoff, H. J. [1999]. Paraquat elicited neurobehavioral syndrome caused by dopaminergic neuron loss. Brain Res. 823, 1-10; McCormack, A. L., Thiruchelvam, M., Manning-Bog, A. B., Thiffault, C., Langston, J. W., Cory-Slechta, D. A., and Di Monte, D. A. [2002]. Environmental risk factors and Parkinson's disease: Selective degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons caused by the herbicide paraquat. Neurobiol. Dis. 10, 119-127.) Deletion of the rate-limiting GSH synthesis gene, glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit (Gclm), leads to significantly lower GSH concentrations in all tissues including brain. Gclm null (Gclm (-/-)) mice provide a model of prolonged GSH depletion to explore the relationship between GSH, complex I inhibition, and dopamine loss in vivo. Despite ~60% depletion of brain GSH in Gclm (-/-) mice of ages 3-5 or 14-16 months, striatal complex I activity, dopamine levels, 3-nitrotyroine/tyrosine ratios, aconitase activity, and CoASH remained unchanged. Administration of paraquat (10mg/kg, twice/week, 3 weeks) to 3- to 5-month-old Gclm (-/-) mice resulted in significantly decreased aconitase activity, complex I activity, and dopamine levels but not in 3- to 5-month-old Gclm (+/+) mice. Furthermore, paraquat-induced inhibition of complex I and aconitase activities in Gclm (-/-) mice was observed in the striatum but not in the cortex. The results suggest that chronic deficiency of GSH in Gclm (-/-) mice was not

  14. Systemic delivery of full-length C/EBPβ /liposome complex suppresses growth of human colon cancer in nude mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li SUN; Bei Bei FU; Ding Gan LIU

    2005-01-01

    C/EBPβ(CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β) is an important transcription factor involved in cellular proliferation and differentiation. Overexpression of the full-length C/EBPβ protein results in cellular growth arrest and apoptosis.Using a nonviral liposome as carrier, we delivered the full-length C/EBPβ expression plasmid, Pcn, into nude mice bearing CW-2 human colon cancer tumors via tail vein. Southern blots revealed that the major organs and tumors were transfected. Experimental gene therapy showed that a strong suppression of tumor growth was observed in the pCNtreated mice, and such suppression was due to the overexpression of C/EBPβ, leading to the increased apoptosis in tumors of Pcn-treated mice. No apparent toxic effects of Pcn/liposome complex were observed in the animals. Thus, C/EBPβ has tumor suppression effect in vivo and may be used in gene therapy for cancers.

  15. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 regulates muscle glucose uptake during exercise in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinert, Maximilian; Parker, Benjamin L; Fritzen, Andreas Mæchel

    2017-01-01

    and running-induced changes in blood glucose, plasma lactate and muscle glycogen levels were similar in Ric WT and Ric mKO mice. At rest, muscle glucose uptake was normal, but during running muscle glucose uptake was reduced by 40% in Ric mKO mice. Running increased muscle p-AMPK similarly in Ric WT and Ric m...

  16. Uptake of the {sup 188}Re(V)-DMSA complex by cervical carcinoma cells in nude mice: pharmacokinetics and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Salinas, Laura; Ferro-Flores, Guillermina E-mail: gff@nuclear.inin.mxtendilla@acnet.net; Arteaga-Murphy, Consuelo; Pedraza-Lopez, Martha; Hernandez-Gutierrez, Salomon; Azorin-Nieto, Juan

    2001-03-01

    The uptake of the rhenium-188 ({sup 188}Re(V)-DMSA) complex of dimercaptosuccinic acid by cervical carcinoma cells in nude mice was evaluated. The pharmacokinetics and dosimetry calculations in normal rats were also evaluated. The images obtained in mice did not show significant accumulation in metabolic organs and the biodistribution studies showed that 3.52{+-}0.76% of the injected activity per gram (n=4) was taken up by the tumor. This percentage produces a cumulated activity of 35.63{+-}8.40 MBq h and an equivalent dose per injected activity of 260{+-}8.91 mSv/MBq. Pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of the {sup 188}Re(V)-DMSA complex indicate that this radiopharmaceutical could be evaluated in patients with soft tissue tumors, since the risk of radiation damage to the kidney or red bone marrow could not be an obstacle for its application in therapeutic nuclear medicine.

  17. Antidiabetic Effects of Carassius auratus Complex Formula in High Fat Diet Combined Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Hong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carassius auratus complex formula, including Carassius auratus, Rhizoma dioscoreae, Lycium chinense, and Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch, is a combination prescription of traditional Chinese medicine, which has always been used to treat diabetes mellitus in ancient China. In this study, we provided experimental evidence for the use of Carassius auratus complex formula in the treatment of high fat diet combined streptozotocin- (STZ- induced type 2 diabetes. Carassius auratus complex formula aqueous extract was prepared and the effects of it on blood glucose, serum insulin, adipose tissue weight, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, total cholesterol, and triglyceride (TG levels in mice were measured. Moreover, adiponectin, TG synthesis related gene expressions, and the inhibitory effect of aldose reductase (AR were performed to evaluate its antidiabetic effects. After the 8-week treatment, blood glucose, insulin levels, and adipose tissue weight were significantly decreased. OGTT and HOMA-IR index showed improved glucose tolerance. It could also lower plasma TG, TC, and liver TG levels. Furthermore, Carassius auratus complex formula could inhibit the activity of AR and restore adiponectin expression in serum. Based on these findings, it is suggested that Carassius auratus complex formula possesses potent anti-diabetic effects on high fat diet combined STZ-induced diabetic mice.

  18. Vaccination of mice with a Yop translocon complex elicits antibodies that are protective against infection with F1- Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Maya I; Noel, Betty L; Rampersaud, Ryan; Mena, Patricio; Benach, Jorge L; Bliska, James B

    2008-11-01

    Yersinia pestis, the bacterial agent of plague, secretes several proteins important for pathogenesis or host protection. The F1 protein forms a capsule on the bacterial cell surface and is a well-characterized protective antigen but is not essential for virulence. A type III secretion system that is essential for virulence exports Yop proteins, which function as antiphagocytic or anti-inflammatory factors. Yop effectors (e.g., YopE) are delivered across the host cell plasma membrane by a translocon, composed of YopB and YopD. Complexes of YopB, YopD, and YopE (BDE) secreted by Yersinia pseudotuberculosis were purified by affinity chromatography and used as immunogens to determine if antibodies to the translocon could provide protection against Y. pestis in mice. Mice vaccinated with BDE generated high-titer immunoglobulin G antibodies specific for BDE, as shown by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting, and were protected against lethal intravenous challenge with F1(-) but not F1(+) Y. pestis. Mice passively immunized with anti-BDE serum were protected from lethal challenge with F1(-) Y. pestis. The YopB protein or a complex of YopB and YopD (BD) was purified and determined by vaccination to be immunogenic in mice. Mice actively vaccinated with BD or passively vaccinated with anti-BD serum were protected against lethal challenge with F1(-) Y. pestis. These results indicate that anti-translocon antibodies can be used as immunotherapy to treat infections by F1(-) Y. pestis.

  19. In Vitro Maturation of Cumulus-Oocyte Complexes for Efficient Isolation of Oocytes from Outbred Deer Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung Kyu; He, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Background The outbred (as with humans) deer mice have been a useful animal model of research on human behavior and biology including that of the reproductive system. One of the major challenges in using this species is that the yield of oocyte isolation via superovulation is dismal according to the literature to date less than ∼5 oocytes per animal can be obtained so far. Objective The goal of this study is to improve the yield of oocyte isolation from outbred deer mice close to that of most laboratory mice by in vitro maturation (IVM) of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). Methods Oocytes were isolated by both superovulation and IVM. For the latter, COCs were obtained by follicular puncture of antral follicles in both the surface and inner cortical layers of ovaries. Immature oocytes in the COCs were then cultured in vitro under optimized conditions to obtain metaphase II (MII) oocytes. Quality of the oocytes from IVM and superovulation was tested by in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo development. Results Less than ∼5 oocytes per animal could be isolated by superovulation only. However, we successfully obtained 20.3±2.9 oocytes per animal by IVM (16.0±2.5) and superovulation (4.3±1.3) in this study. Moreover, IVF and embryo development studies suggest that IVM oocytes have even better quality than that from superovulation The latter never developed to beyond 2-cell stage as usual while 9% of the former developed to 4-cells. Significance We have successfully established the protocol for isolating oocytes from deer mice with high yield by IVM. Moreover, this is the first ever success to develop in vitro fertilized deer mice oocytes beyond the 2-cell stage in vitro. Therefore, this study is of significance to the use of deer mice for reproductive biology research. PMID:23457518

  20. In vitro maturation of cumulus-oocyte complexes for efficient isolation of oocytes from outbred deer mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Kyu Choi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The outbred (as with humans deer mice have been a useful animal model of research on human behavior and biology including that of the reproductive system. One of the major challenges in using this species is that the yield of oocyte isolation via superovulation is dismal according to the literature to date less than ∼5 oocytes per animal can be obtained so far. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study is to improve the yield of oocyte isolation from outbred deer mice close to that of most laboratory mice by in vitro maturation (IVM of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs. METHODS: Oocytes were isolated by both superovulation and IVM. For the latter, COCs were obtained by follicular puncture of antral follicles in both the surface and inner cortical layers of ovaries. Immature oocytes in the COCs were then cultured in vitro under optimized conditions to obtain metaphase II (MII oocytes. Quality of the oocytes from IVM and superovulation was tested by in vitro fertilization (IVF and embryo development. RESULTS: Less than ∼5 oocytes per animal could be isolated by superovulation only. However, we successfully obtained 20.3±2.9 oocytes per animal by IVM (16.0±2.5 and superovulation (4.3±1.3 in this study. Moreover, IVF and embryo development studies suggest that IVM oocytes have even better quality than that from superovulation The latter never developed to beyond 2-cell stage as usual while 9% of the former developed to 4-cells. SIGNIFICANCE: We have successfully established the protocol for isolating oocytes from deer mice with high yield by IVM. Moreover, this is the first ever success to develop in vitro fertilized deer mice oocytes beyond the 2-cell stage in vitro. Therefore, this study is of significance to the use of deer mice for reproductive biology research.

  1. Dopaminergic neuronal loss, reduced neurite complexity and autophagic abnormalities in transgenic mice expressing G2019S mutant LRRK2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ramonet

    Full Text Available Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 gene cause late-onset, autosomal dominant familial Parkinson's disease (PD and also contribute to idiopathic PD. LRRK2 mutations represent the most common cause of PD with clinical and neurochemical features that are largely indistinguishable from idiopathic disease. Currently, transgenic mice expressing wild-type or disease-causing mutants of LRRK2 have failed to produce overt neurodegeneration, although abnormalities in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurotransmission have been observed. Here, we describe the development and characterization of transgenic mice expressing human LRRK2 bearing the familial PD mutations, R1441C and G2019S. Our study demonstrates that expression of G2019S mutant LRRK2 induces the degeneration of nigrostriatal pathway dopaminergic neurons in an age-dependent manner. In addition, we observe autophagic and mitochondrial abnormalities in the brains of aged G2019S LRRK2 mice and markedly reduced neurite complexity of cultured dopaminergic neurons. These new LRRK2 transgenic mice will provide important tools for understanding the mechanism(s through which familial mutations precipitate neuronal degeneration and PD.

  2. Dopaminergic Neuronal Loss, Reduced Neurite Complexity and Autophagic Abnormalities in Transgenic Mice Expressing G2019S Mutant LRRK2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Brian M.; Stafa, Klodjan; Kim, Jaekwang; Banerjee, Rebecca; Westerlund, Marie; Pletnikova, Olga; Glauser, Liliane; Yang, Lichuan; Liu, Ying; Swing, Deborah A.; Beal, M. Flint; Troncoso, Juan C.; McCaffery, J. Michael; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Galter, Dagmar; Thomas, Bobby; Lee, Michael K.; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Moore, Darren J.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene cause late-onset, autosomal dominant familial Parkinson's disease (PD) and also contribute to idiopathic PD. LRRK2 mutations represent the most common cause of PD with clinical and neurochemical features that are largely indistinguishable from idiopathic disease. Currently, transgenic mice expressing wild-type or disease-causing mutants of LRRK2 have failed to produce overt neurodegeneration, although abnormalities in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurotransmission have been observed. Here, we describe the development and characterization of transgenic mice expressing human LRRK2 bearing the familial PD mutations, R1441C and G2019S. Our study demonstrates that expression of G2019S mutant LRRK2 induces the degeneration of nigrostriatal pathway dopaminergic neurons in an age-dependent manner. In addition, we observe autophagic and mitochondrial abnormalities in the brains of aged G2019S LRRK2 mice and markedly reduced neurite complexity of cultured dopaminergic neurons. These new LRRK2 transgenic mice will provide important tools for understanding the mechanism(s) through which familial mutations precipitate neuronal degeneration and PD. PMID:21494637

  3. The SocioBox: A novel paradigm to assess complex social recognition in male mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilja Krueger-Burg

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Impairments in social skills are central to mental disease, and developing tools for their assessment in mouse models is essential. Here we present the SocioBox, a new behavioral paradigm to measure social recognition memory. Using this paradigm, we show that male wildtype mice of different strains can readily identify an unfamiliar mouse among 5 newly acquainted animals. In contrast, female mice exhibit lower locomotor activity during social exploration in the SocioBox compared to males and do not seem to discriminate between acquainted and unfamiliar mice, likely reflecting inherent differences in gender-specific territorial tasks. In addition to a simple quantification of social interaction time of mice grounded on predefined spatial zones (zone-based method, we developed a set of unbiased, data-driven analysis tools based on heat map representations and characterized by greater sensitivity. First proof-of-principle that the SocioBox allows diagnosis of social recognition memory deficits is provided using male PSD-95 heterozygous knockout mice, a mouse model related to psychiatric pathophysiology.

  4. Effect of complex aerobic physical exercise on PSD-95 in the hippocampus and on cognitive function in juvenile mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satriani, W. H.; Redjeki, S.; Kartinah, N. T.

    2017-08-01

    Increased neuroplasticity induced by complex aerobic physical exercise is associated with improved cognitive function in adult mice. Increased cognitive function is assumed to be based on increased synapse formation. One of the regions of the brain that is important in cognitive function is the hippocampus, which plays a role in memory formation. Post synaptic density-95 (PSD-95) is an adhesion protein of the post-synaptic density scaffolding that is essential to synaptic stabilization. As we age, the PSD-95 molecule matures the synapses needed for the formation of the basic circuitry of the nervous system in the brain. However, during the growth period, synapse elimination is higher than its formation. This study aims to determine whether complex aerobic exercise can improve cognitive function and PSD-95 levels in the hippocampus of juvenile mice during their growth stage. The mice performed complex aerobic exercise starting at five weeks of age and continuing for seven weeks with a gradual increase of 8 m/min. At eight weeks it was increased to 10 m/min. The exercise was done for five days of each week. The subjects of the study were tested for cognition one week before being sacrificed (at 12 weeks). The PSD-95 in the hippocampus was measured with ELISA. The results showed that there was a significant difference in cognitive function, where p PSD-95 levels did not differ significantly between the two groups. The results of this study indicate that early complex aerobic exercise can improve cognitive ability in adulthood but does not increase the levels of PSD-95 in adults.

  5. Complex discriminative stimulus properties of (+)lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in C57Bl/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benneyworth, Michael A; Smith, Randy L; Barrett, Robert J; Sanders-Bush, Elaine

    2005-06-01

    The drug discrimination procedure is the most frequently used in vivo model of hallucinogen activity. Historically, most drug discrimination studies have been conducted in the rat. With the development of genetically modified mice, a powerful new tool has become available for investigating the mechanisms of drug-induced behavior. The current paper is part of an ongoing effort to determine the utility of the drug discrimination technique for evaluating hallucinogenic drugs in mice. To establish the training procedures and characterize the stimulus properties of (+)lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in mice. Using a two-lever drug discrimination procedure, C57Bl/6J mice were trained to discriminate 0.45 mg/kg LSD vs saline on a VI30 sec schedule of reinforcement, with vanilla-flavored Ensure serving as the reinforcer. As in rats, acquisition was orderly, but the training dose was nearly five-fold higher for mice than rats. LSD lever selection was dose-dependent. Time-course studies revealed a rapid loss of the LSD stimulus effects. The 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor agonist, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-bromoamphetamine [(-)DOB] (1.0 mg/kg), substituted fully for LSD and the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) (1.6 mg/kg), substituted partially for LSD. Pretreatment with the 5-HT(2A) receptor-selective antagonist, MDL 100907, or the 5-HT(1A)-selective antagonist WAY 100635, showed that each antagonist only partially blocked LSD discrimination. Substitution of 1.0 mg/kg (-)DOB for LSD was fully blocked by pretreatment with MDL 100907 but unaltered by WAY 100635 pretreatment. These data suggest that in mice the stimulus effects of LSD have both a 5-HT(2A) receptor and a 5-HT(1A) receptor component.

  6. GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complex ligands and stress-induced hyperthermia in singly housed mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, B.; Bouwknecht, J.A.; Pattij, T.; Leahy, C.; Oorschot, R. van; Zethof, T.J.

    2002-01-01

    Stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) in singly housed mice, in which the rectal temperature of a mouse is measured twice with a 10-min interval, enables to study the effects of a drug on the basal (T(1)) and on the stress-enhanced temperature (T(2)), 10 min later, using the rectal procedure as stressor

  7. Extraocular muscle is spared despite the absence of an intact sarcoglycan complex in gamma- or delta-sarcoglycan-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, J D; Merriam, A P; Hack, A A; Andrade, F H; McNally, E M

    2001-03-01

    Models of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex do not reconcile the novel sparing of extraocular muscle in muscular dystrophy. Extraocular muscle sparing in Duchenne muscular dystrophy implies the existence of adaptive properties in these muscles that may extend protection to other neuromuscular diseases. We studied the extraocular muscle morphology and dystrophin-glycoprotein complex organization in murine targeted deletion of the gamma-sarcoglycan (gsg(-/-)) and delta-sarcoglycan (dsg(-/-)) genes, two models of autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy. In contrast to limb and diaphragm, the principal extraocular muscles were intact in gsg(-/-) and dsg(-/-) mice. However, central nucleated, presumptive regenerative, fibers were seen in the accessory extraocular muscles (retractor bulbi, levator palpebrae superioris) of both strains. Skeletal muscles of gsg(-/-) mice exhibited in vivo Evans Blue dye permeability, while the principal extraocular muscles did not. Disruption of gamma-sarcoglycan produced secondary displacement of alpha- and beta-sarcoglycans in the extraocular muscles. The intensity of immunofluorescence for dystrophin and alpha- and beta-dystroglycan also appeared to be slightly reduced. Utrophin localization was unchanged. The finding that sarcoglycan disruption was insufficient to elicit alterations in extraocular muscle suggests that loss of mechanical stability and increased sarcolemmal permeability are not inevitable consequences of mutations that disrupt the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex organization and must be accounted for in models of muscular dystrophy.

  8. The P2X7 receptor–pannexin-1 complex decreases muscarinic acetylcholine receptor–mediated seizure susceptibility in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ji-Eun; Kang, Tae-Cheon

    2011-01-01

    Pannexin-1 (Panx1) plays a role in the release of ATP and glutamate in neurons and astrocytes. Panx1 can be opened at the resting membrane potential by extracellular ATP via the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). Panx1 opening has been shown to induce neuronal death and aberrant firing, but its role in neuronal activity has not been established. Here, we report the role of the P2X7R-Panx1 complex in regulating muscarinic acetylcholine 1 (M1) receptor function. P2X7R knockout (P2X7–/–) mice showed greater...

  9. Comparative studies between mice molars and incisors are required to draw an overview of enamel structural complexity

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    MICHEL eGOLDBERG

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the field of dentistry, the murine incisor has long been considered as an outstanding model to study amelogenesis. However, it clearly appears that enamel from wild type mouse incisors and molars presents several structural differences. In incisor, exclusively radial enamel is observed. In molars, enamel displays a high level of complexity since the inner part is lamellar whereas the outer enamel shows radial and tangential structures. Recently, the serotonin 2B receptor (5-HT2BR was shown to be involved in ameloblast function and enamel mineralization. The incisors from 5HT2BR knockout (KO mice exhibit mineralization defects mostly in the outer maturation zone and porous matrix network in the inner zone. In the molars, the mutation affects both secretory and maturation stages of amelogenesis since pronounced alterations concern overall enamel structures. Molars from 5HT2BR KO mice display reduction in enamel thickness, alterations of inner enamel architecture including defects in Hunter-Schreger Bands arrangements, and altered maturation of the outer radial enamel. Differences of enamel structure were also observed between incisor and molar from other KO mice depleted for genes encoding enamel extracellular matrix proteins.

  10. Single platelets seal neutrophil-induced vascular breaches via GPVI during immune-complex-mediated inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, Angèle; Syvannarath, Varouna; Lamrani, Lamia; Ollivier, Véronique; Loyau, Stéphane; Goerge, Tobias; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît

    2015-08-20

    Platelets protect vascular integrity during inflammation. Recent evidence suggests that this action is independent of thrombus formation and requires the engagement of glycoprotein VI (GPVI), but it remains unclear how platelets prevent inflammatory bleeding. We investigated whether platelets and GPVI act primarily by preventing detrimental effects of neutrophils using models of immune complex (IC)-mediated inflammation in mice immunodepleted in platelets and/or neutrophils or deficient in GPVI. Depletion of neutrophils prevented bleeding in thrombocytopenic and GPVI(-/-) mice during IC-mediated dermatitis. GPVI deficiency did not modify neutrophil recruitment, which was reduced by thrombocytopenia. Neutrophil cytotoxic activities were reduced in thrombocytopenic and GPVI(-/-) mice during IC-mediated inflammation. Intravital microscopy revealed that in this setting, intravascular binding sites for platelets were exposed by neutrophils, and GPVI supported the recruitment of individual platelets to these spots. Furthermore, the platelet secretory response accompanying IC-mediated inflammation was partly mediated by GPVI, and blocking of GPVI signaling impaired the vasculoprotective action of platelets. Together, our results show that GPVI plays a dual role in inflammation by enhancing neutrophil-damaging activities while supporting the activation and hemostatic adhesion of single platelets to neutrophil-induced vascular breaches.

  11. Effect of Traditional Chinese Medicine Complex for diabetes (TCM-D™ on experimentally induced diabetic mice

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    Donald Koh Fook Chen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: We previously evaluated the biochemicalchanges induced by the local product TCM fordiabetes (TCM-D™ on blood glucose levels and otherbiochemical changes in normal mice fed orally with therecommended human dose (30 ml/kg daily and tentimes this dose for eight weeks. TCM-D™ is an aqueousextract of the roots of Trichosanthes kirilowii Maxim,Paeonia lactiflora Pall, Glycyrrhiza uranlensis Fisch. andPanax ginseng Meyer (red combined at the dry weightproportions of 36%, 28%, 18% and 18% respectively.The study showed that at these dosages the bloodglucose levels as well as the body weights in treated micewere significantly reduced when compared with pretreatmentvalues and control animals. The present studyevaluated the effect of the extract in a mouse model ofType 1 diabetes mellitus.Methods: TCM-D™ extract was prepared as a 10xconcentrate and given orally at 0.3 ml/100 g and1.5 ml/100 g to mice which were experimentallyinduced diabetic with intraperitoneal injections ofstreptozotocin (5 mg/100g in sodium citrate (pH 4.5.Control diabetic mice were dosed with extract diluent(distilled water.Results: At the doses studied the compound did notshow any significant lowering of the glucose levels in amouse model of Type 1 diabetes. There were significantincreases in the alanine aminotransferase (ALT andcreatinine levels which were most likely due to thetreatment with the compound. There were no significantchanges in the aspartate aminotransferase (AST andblood urea levels due to the treatment. Neither wasthere any significant effect on the weight of the treatedanimals due to the treatment.Conclusions: It is concluded that TCM-D™ did nothave any significant blood glucose lowering effect onstreptozotocin induced diabetic mice when fed orally at1-5 times the recommended human dose. Further workis needed to determine if the extract has any significanteffect in a mouse model with Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  12. Potent antitumor effect elicited by gp96-peptide complexes pulsed by dendritic cell on mice of H22 liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Wei; CAO Chun-xia; CHU Yong-lie; LIU Qing-guang; YU Liang; PAN Cheng-en

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To improve DC-based tumor vaccination, we studied whether dendritic cells (DCs) which cocultured with H22 liver cancer cells-derived heat shock protein (HSP) glycoprotein 96(gp96) affect the T cell-activating potential in vitro and the induction of tumor immunity in vivo. Methods: Maturation of murine bone marrow-derived DC was induced by GM-CSF plus IL-4, which mimiced the immunostimulatory effect of DC. Cocultured DC and gp96-peptide complexes were used to vaccine H22liver cancer cells of mice. Using murine models we compared the immunogenecity of DC modified by gp96-peptides complexes derived from murine liver cancer cells alone or inactive tumor cells. To verify the specificity of the vaccine, in vitro assays were executed. Serum cytokine levels were quantified to explore the supposed pathway of DC modified by gp96 peptide complexes and its effect on antitumor immune response.Results: DC modified by gp96-peptide complexes can activate spleen lymphocyte and the latter can specifically kill H22 cells but not Ehrilich ascites carcinoma cells. Modified DC can induce potent tumor-antigenspecific immune response, augment the proliferation of Th1 cells, and inhibit tumor growth. Conclusion:In this study, we have developed a novel DC-mediated tumor vaccine by combing the gp96 antigenic peptides complexes and inducing immune response against specific tumor cells. gp96 can be identified as a potent DC activator.

  13. Fasting-Induced FGF21 Is Repressed by LXR Activation via Recruitment of an HDAC3 Corepressor Complex in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Amena; Venteclef, Nicolas; Mode, Agneta; Pedrelli, Matteo; Gabbi, Chiara; Clément, Karine; Parini, Paolo; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2012-01-01

    The liver plays a pivotal role in the physiological adaptation to fasting and a better understanding of the metabolic adaptive responses may give hints on new therapeutic strategies to control the metabolic diseases. The liver X receptors (LXRs) are well-established regulators of lipid and glucose metabolism. More recently fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) has emerged as an important regulator of energy homeostasis. We hypothesized that the LXR transcription factors could influence Fgf21 expression, which is induced in response to fasting. Wild-type, LXRα−/−, and LXRβ−/− mice were treated for 3 d with vehicle or the LXR agonist GW3965 and fasted for 12 h prior to the killing of the animals. Interestingly, serum FGF21 levels were induced after fasting, but this increase was blunted when the mice were treated with GW3965 independently of genotypes. Compared with wild-type mice, GW3965-treated LXRα−/− and LXRβ−/− mice showed improved insulin sensitivity and enhanced ketogenic response at fasting. Of note is that during fasting, GW3965 treatment tended to reduce liver triglycerides as opposed to the effect of the agonist in the fed state. The LXR-dependent repression of Fgf21 seems to be mainly mediated by the recruitment of LXRβ onto the Fgf21 promoter upon GW3965 treatment. This repression by LXRβ occurs through the recruitment and stabilization of the repressor complex composed of retinoid-related orphan receptor-α/Rev-Erbα/histone deacetylase 3 onto the Fgf21 promoter. Our data clearly demonstrate that there is a cross talk between the LXR and FGF21 signaling pathways in the adaptive response to fasting. PMID:23073827

  14. Effect of High-Carbohydrate Diet on Plasma Metabolome in Mice with Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex III Deficiency

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    Jayasimman Rajendran

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial disorders cause energy failure and metabolic derangements. Metabolome profiling in patients and animal models may identify affected metabolic pathways and reveal new biomarkers of disease progression. Using liver metabolomics we have shown a starvation-like condition in a knock-in (Bcs1lc.232A>G mouse model of GRACILE syndrome, a neonatal lethal respiratory chain complex III dysfunction with hepatopathy. Here, we hypothesized that a high-carbohydrate diet (HCD, 60% dextrose will alleviate the hypoglycemia and promote survival of the sick mice. However, when fed HCD the homozygotes had shorter survival (mean ± SD, 29 ± 2.5 days, n = 21 than those on standard diet (33 ± 3.8 days, n = 30, and no improvement in hypoglycemia or liver glycogen depletion. We investigated the plasma metabolome of the HCD- and control diet-fed mice and found that several amino acids and urea cycle intermediates were increased, and arginine, carnitines, succinate, and purine catabolites decreased in the homozygotes. Despite reduced survival the increase in aromatic amino acids, an indicator of liver mitochondrial dysfunction, was normalized on HCD. Quantitative enrichment analysis revealed that glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolism, and urea cycle were also partly normalized on HCD. This dietary intervention revealed an unexpected adverse effect of high-glucose diet in complex III deficiency, and suggests that plasma metabolomics is a valuable tool in evaluation of therapies in mitochondrial disorders.

  15. Effect of High-Carbohydrate Diet on Plasma Metabolome in Mice with Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex III Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Jayasimman; Tomašić, Nikica; Kotarsky, Heike; Hansson, Eva; Velagapudi, Vidya; Kallijärvi, Jukka; Fellman, Vineta

    2016-11-01

    Mitochondrial disorders cause energy failure and metabolic derangements. Metabolome profiling in patients and animal models may identify affected metabolic pathways and reveal new biomarkers of disease progression. Using liver metabolomics we have shown a starvation-like condition in a knock-in (Bcs1l(c.232A>G)) mouse model of GRACILE syndrome, a neonatal lethal respiratory chain complex III dysfunction with hepatopathy. Here, we hypothesized that a high-carbohydrate diet (HCD, 60% dextrose) will alleviate the hypoglycemia and promote survival of the sick mice. However, when fed HCD the homozygotes had shorter survival (mean ± SD, 29 ± 2.5 days, n = 21) than those on standard diet (33 ± 3.8 days, n = 30), and no improvement in hypoglycemia or liver glycogen depletion. We investigated the plasma metabolome of the HCD- and control diet-fed mice and found that several amino acids and urea cycle intermediates were increased, and arginine, carnitines, succinate, and purine catabolites decreased in the homozygotes. Despite reduced survival the increase in aromatic amino acids, an indicator of liver mitochondrial dysfunction, was normalized on HCD. Quantitative enrichment analysis revealed that glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolism, and urea cycle were also partly normalized on HCD. This dietary intervention revealed an unexpected adverse effect of high-glucose diet in complex III deficiency, and suggests that plasma metabolomics is a valuable tool in evaluation of therapies in mitochondrial disorders.

  16. Evaluation of bovine-derived lacteal complex supplementation on gene expression in BALB/c mice

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    Clerici M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mario Clerici1,2, Emmanuel Pauze3, Arienne de Jong3, Mara Biasin1, Larry E Miller41Department of Biomedical Sciences and Technology, University of Milan, Milan, Italy; 2Don C Gnocchi Foundation, IRCCS, Milan, Italy; 3Sprim Advanced Life Sciences, Milan, Italy; 4Sprim USA, San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: We conducted an evaluation of gene expression associated with innate and adaptive immunity in a double-blind ex vivo mouse study using a bovine-derived dietary ingredient (Ai/E10®, Health Technology Resources, Inc., Scottsdale, AZ, USA. BALB/c female mice (5–6 weeks of age were fed chewy granola bars supplemented with (Test or without (Control Ai/E10 for 10 days. After the feeding period, the animals were sacrificed and spleen cells were isolated and incubated with lipopolysaccharide and phorbol myristate acetate-ionomycin. RNA was extracted and mRNA expression of 84 genes involved in innate and acquired immunity was determined with real-time PCR arrays. Numerous genes associated with innate and adaptive immunity were upregulated in the Test group when stimulated with mitogens. Significant upregulation was observed in 30% (25 of 84 of genes upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation and in 14% (12 of 84 of genes upon phorbol myristate acetate + ionomycin stimulation in the Test group relative to Controls. This study illustrates that Ai/E10 supplementation results in significant and specific upregulation of genes associated with innate and adaptive immunity in mice. Notably, this effect was observed only in stimulated cultures.Keywords: dietary supplementation, immunomodulation, mice

  17. Large-scale in silico mapping of complex quantitative traits in inbred mice.

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    Pengyuan Liu

    Full Text Available Understanding the genetic basis of common disease and disease-related quantitative traits will aid in the development of diagnostics and therapeutics. The processs of gene discovery can be sped up by rapid and effective integration of well-defined mouse genome and phenome data resources. We describe here an in silico gene-discovery strategy through genome-wide association (GWA scans in inbred mice with a wide range of genetic variation. We identified 937 quantitative trait loci (QTLs from a survey of 173 mouse phenotypes, which include models of human disease (atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, cancer and obesity as well as behavioral, hematological, immunological, metabolic, and neurological traits. 67% of QTLs were refined into genomic regions <0.5 Mb with approximately 40-fold increase in mapping precision as compared with classical linkage analysis. This makes for more efficient identification of the genes that underlie disease. We have identified two QTL genes, Adam12 and Cdh2, as causal genetic variants for atherogenic diet-induced obesity. Our findings demonstrate that GWA analysis in mice has the potential to resolve multiple tightly linked QTLs and achieve single-gene resolution. These high-resolution QTL data can serve as a primary resource for positional cloning and gene identification in the research community.

  18. Thoracic aortic disease in tuberous sclerosis complex: molecular pathogenesis and potential therapies in Tsc2+/− mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jiumei; Gong, Limin; Guo, Dong-chuan; Mietzsch, Ulrike; Kuang, Shao-Qing; Kwartler, Callie S.; Safi, Hazim; Estrera, Anthony; Gambello, Michael J.; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic disorder with pleiotropic manifestations caused by heterozygous mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2. One of the less investigated complications of TSC is the formation of aneurysms of the descending aorta, which are characterized on pathologic examination by smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation in the aortic media. SMCs were explanted from Tsc2+/− mice to investigate the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysms caused by TSC2 mutations. Tsc2+/− SMCs demonstrated increased phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), S6 and p70S6K and increased proliferation rates compared with wild-type (WT) SMCs. Tsc2+/− SMCs also had reduced expression of SMC contractile proteins compared with WT SMCs. An inhibitor of mTOR signaling, rapamycin, decreased SMC proliferation and increased contractile protein expression in the Tsc2+/− SMCs to levels similar to WT SMCs. Exposure to α-elastin fragments also decreased proliferation of Tsc2+/− SMCs and increased levels of p27kip1, but failed to increase expression of contractile proteins. In response to artery injury using a carotid artery ligation model, Tsc2+/− mice significantly increased neointima formation compared with the control mice, and the neointima formation was inhibited by treatment with rapamycin. These results demonstrate that Tsc2 haploinsufficiency in SMCs increases proliferation and decreases contractile protein expression and suggest that the increased proliferative potential of the mutant cells may be suppressed in vivo by interaction with elastin. These findings provide insights into the molecular pathogenesis of aortic disease in TSC patients and identify a potential therapeutic target for treatment of this complication of the disease. PMID:20159776

  19. Fas-deficient mice have impaired alveolar neutrophil recruitment and decreased expression of anti-KC autoantibody:KC complexes in a model of acute lung injury

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    Gil Sucheol

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to mechanical ventilation enhances lung injury in response to various stimuli, such as bacterial endotoxin (LPS. The Fas/FasL system is a receptor ligand system that has dual pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory functions and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of lung injury. In this study we test the hypothesis that a functioning Fas/FasL system is required for the development of lung injury in mechanically ventilated mice. Methods C57BL/6 (B6 and Fas-deficient lpr mice were exposed to either intra-tracheal PBS followed by spontaneous breathing or intra-tracheal LPS followed by four hours mechanical ventilation with tidal volumes of 10 mL/kg, respiratory rate of 150 breaths per minute, inspired oxygen 0.21 and positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP of 3 cm of water. Results Compared with the B6 mice, the lpr mice showed attenuation of the neutrophilic response as measured by decreased numbers of BAL neutrophils and lung myeloperoxidase activity. Interestingly, the B6 and lpr mice had similar concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including CXCL1 (KC, and similar measurements of permeability and apoptosis. However, the B6 mice showed greater deposition of anti-KC:KC immune complexes in the lungs, as compared with the lpr mice. Conclusions We conclude that a functioning Fas/FasL system is required for full neutrophilic response to LPS in mechanically ventilated mice.

  20. Use of the disulfiram/copper complex for breast cancer chemoprevention in MMTV-erbB2 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanhui; Deng, Qian; Feng, Xiaoshan; Sun, Junjun

    2015-07-01

    The disulfiram/copper complex (DS/Cu) has been demonstrated to exert potent anti-tumor effects in various types of cancer. At present, whether DS/Cu has chemopreventive effects on breast cancer development remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, using MMTV-erbB2 transgenic mice, it was identified for the first time that DS/Cu treatment was able to inhibit cell growth in breast cancer cells while sparing normal cells in vitro, in addition to delaying the development of mammary tumor development in MMTV-erbB2 transgenic mice in vivo. Morphological examination demonstrated that DS/Cu treatment resulted in cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis activation in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the present study observed that DS/Cu may inhibit proliferation via inhibition of AKT and cyclin D1 signaling and promote apoptosis via c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation and suppression of nuclear factor κB signaling. These results suggested that DS/Cu treatment may be a promising therapy for the prevention of erbB2-positive breast cancer.

  1. A complex genetic basis to X-linked hybrid male sterility between two species of house mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Jeffrey M; Dean, Matthew D; Nachman, Michael W

    2008-08-01

    The X chromosome plays a central role in the evolution of reproductive isolation, but few studies have examined the genetic basis of X-linked incompatibilities during the early stages of speciation. We report the results of a large experiment focused on the reciprocal introgression of the X chromosome between two species of house mice, Mus musculus and M. domesticus. Introgression of the M. musculus X chromosome into a wild-derived M. domesticus genetic background produced male-limited sterility, qualitatively consistent with previous experiments using classic inbred strains to represent M. domesticus. The genetic basis of sterility involved a minimum of four X-linked factors. The phenotypic effects of major sterility QTL were largely additive and resulted in complete sterility when combined. No sterility factors were uncovered on the M. domesticus X chromosome. Overall, these results revealed a complex and asymmetric genetic basis to X-linked hybrid male sterility during the early stages of speciation in mice. Combined with data from previous studies, we identify one relatively narrow interval on the M. musculus X chromosome involved in hybrid male sterility. Only a handful of spermatogenic genes are within this region, including one of the most rapidly evolving genes on the mouse X chromosome.

  2. Oligomannuronate-Chromium (Ⅲ) Complex Ameliorates Insulin Resistance in C57BL/KsJ-db/db Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Cui; HAO Jiejie; WANG Wei; LI Guangsheng; ZENG Yangyang; WANG Peipei; ZHAO Xia; YU Guangli

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disease and its prevalence is increasing in many countries year by year.More than 90% of diabetes patients are type 2 diabetes,which is caused by insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction.In this paper,the oligomannuronate-chromium (Ⅲ) complex (OM2) was prepared and its effect and mechanism on attenuating insulin resistance in diabetic C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice were studied.The results indicated that oral intake of OM2 (50mgkg1d-1) for 42d decreased blood glucose and lipid concentration,which was associated with the reduced serum insulin concentration and insulin resistance.According to western blot assay,OM2 could activate AMPK pathway to regulate glycogen synthesis,gluconeogenesis and lipid metabolism in the liver,and attenuate the hyperglycemic symptom in db/db mice.The effects of OM2 on attenuating insulin resistance were comparable to that of the established antidiabetic drug metformin,and OM2 showed less adverse effect than metformin in vivo.Based on the effectiveness and low toxicity,OM2 may potentially be used for prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  3. Synthesis of (99m)TcN-clinafloxacin Dithiocarbamate Complex and Comparative Radiobiological Evaluation in Staphylococcus aureus Infected Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Syed Qaiser; Khan, Mohammad Rafiullah

    2014-09-01

    Clinafloxacin dithiocarbamate (CNND) preparation and radiolabeling through [(99m)Tc ≡ N](2+) core with the gamma (γ) emitter ((99m)Tc) was assessed. The potentiality of the (99m)Tc(V) ≡ N-CNND complex was investigated as perspective a Staphylococcus aureus (S.a.) in vivo infection radiotracer in terms of radiochemical stability in normal saline (n.s.), human serum (h.s.), binding efficacy with live and heat killed S.a. and biodistribution in female nude mice model (FNMD). More than 90% stability was observed in n.s. for 4 h with the highest yield of 98.70 ± 0.26% at 30 min after reconstitution. In h.s., the (99m)Tc(V) ≡ N-CNND complex was found stable up to 16 h with 15.35% side products. Maximum in vitro binding (68.75 ± 0.80%, 90 min) with S.a. was observed after 90 min of incubation. In FNMD, (infected with live strain) approximately six-fold higher uptakes was noted in the infected to inflamed and normal muscles. The higher stability in n.s., h.s., higher S.a. (live) up take with specific and targeted in vivo distribution confirmed potentiality of the (99m)Tc(V) ≡ N-CNND complex as perspective S.a. in vivo infection radiotracer.

  4. Complex T Cell Interactions Contribute to Helicobacter pylori Gastritis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Brian M.; Fontaine, Clinton A.; Poe, Sara A.

    2013-01-01

    Disease due to the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori varies in severity from asymptomatic to peptic ulcer disease and cancer. Accumulating evidence suggests that one source of this variation is an abnormal host response. The goal of this study was to use a mouse model of H. pylori gastritis to investigate the roles of regulatory T cells (Treg) as well as proinflammatory T cells (Th1 and Th17) in gastritis, gastric T cell engraftment, and gastric cytokine production. Our results support published data indicating that severe gastritis in T cell recipient mice is due to failure of Treg engraftment, that Treg ameliorate gastritis, and that the proinflammatory response is attributable to interactions between several cell subsets and cytokines. We confirmed that gamma interferon (IFN-γ) is essential for induction of gastritis but showed that IFN-γ-producing CD4 T cells are not necessary. Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) also contributed to gastritis, but to a lesser extent than IFN-γ. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-17F were also elevated in association with disease. These results indicate that while H. pylori-specific CD4+ T cells and IFN-γ are both essential for induction of gastritis due to H. pylori, IFN-γ production by T cells is not essential. It is likely that other proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-17F and TNF-α, shown to be elevated in this model, also contribute to the induction of disease. We suggest that gastritis due to H. pylori is associated with loss of immunoregulation and alteration of several cytokines and cell subsets and cannot be attributed to a single immune pathway. PMID:23264048

  5. EPCR-dependent PAR2 activation by the blood coagulation initiation complex regulates LPS-triggered interferon responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hai Po H; Kerschen, Edward J; Hernandez, Irene; Basu, Sreemanti; Zogg, Mark; Botros, Fady; Jia, Shuang; Hessner, Martin J; Griffin, John H; Ruf, Wolfram; Weiler, Hartmut

    2015-04-30

    Infection and inflammation are invariably associated with activation of the blood coagulation mechanism, secondary to the inflammation-induced expression of the coagulation initiator tissue factor (TF) on innate immune cells. By investigating the role of cell-surface receptors for coagulation factors in mouse endotoxemia, we found that the protein C receptor (ProcR; EPCR) was required for the normal in vivo and in vitro induction of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-regulated gene expression. In cultured bone marrow-derived myeloid cells and in monocytic RAW264.7 cells, the LPS-induced expression of functionally active TF, assembly of the ternary TF-VIIa-Xa initiation complex of blood coagulation, and the EPCR-dependent activation of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) by the ternary TF-VIIa-Xa complex were required for the normal LPS induction of messenger RNAs encoding the TLR3/4 signaling adaptor protein Pellino-1 and the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 8. In response to in vivo challenge with LPS, mice lacking EPCR or PAR2 failed to fully initiate an interferon-regulated gene expression program that included the Irf8 target genes Lif, Iigp1, Gbp2, Gbp3, and Gbp6. The inflammation-induced expression of TF and crosstalk with EPCR, PAR2, and TLR4 therefore appear necessary for the normal evolution of interferon-regulated host responses.

  6. Effects of Melatonin, Aluminum Oxide, and Polymethylsiloxane Complex on the Expression of LYVE-1 in the Liver of Mice with Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michurina, S V; Ishchenko, I Yu; Arkhipov, S A; Klimontov, V V; Rachkovskaya, L N; Konenkov, V I; Zavyalov, E L

    2016-12-01

    The effects of melatonin, aluminum oxide, and polymethylsiloxane complex on the expression of LYVE-1 (lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor) in the liver were studied in db/db mice with experimental obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The complex or placebo was administered daily by gavage from week 8 to week 16 of life. The animals receiving the complex exhibited enhanced, in comparison with the placebo group, immunohistochemical LYVE-1+ staining of endothelial cells in sinusoids. Enhanced expression of LYVE-1 was associated with less pronounced dilatation of interlobular arteries, veins, and lymphatic vessels. Thee findings suggest a protective effect of the complex towards structural changes in the liver of mice with obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  7. Nonlinear temperature effects on multifractal complexity of metabolic rate of mice

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    Fabio A. Labra

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Complex physiological dynamics have been argued to be a signature of healthy physiological function. Here we test whether the complexity of metabolic rate fluctuations in small endotherms decreases with lower environmental temperatures. To do so, we examine the multifractal temporal scaling properties of the rate of change in oxygen consumption r(VO2, in the laboratory mouse Mus musculus, assessing their long range correlation properties across seven different environmental temperatures, ranging from 0 °C to 30 °C. To do so, we applied multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA, finding that r(VO2 fluctuations show two scaling regimes. For small time scales below the crossover time (approximately 102 s, either monofractal or weak multifractal dynamics are observed depending on whether Ta  15 °C respectively. For larger time scales, r(VO2 fluctuations are characterized by an asymptotic scaling exponent that indicates multifractal anti-persistent or uncorrelated dynamics. For both scaling regimes, a generalization of the multiplicative cascade model provides very good fits for the Renyi exponents τ(q, showing that the infinite number of exponents h(q can be described by only two independent parameters, a and b. We also show that the long-range correlation structure of r(VO2 time series differs from randomly shuffled series, and may not be explained as an artifact of stochastic sampling of a linear frequency spectrum. These results show that metabolic rate dynamics in a well studied micro-endotherm are consistent with a highly non-linear feedback control system.

  8. Dll1 haploinsufficiency in adult mice leads to a complex phenotype affecting metabolic and immunological processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Rubio-Aliaga

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Notch signaling pathway is an evolutionary conserved signal transduction pathway involved in embryonic patterning and regulation of cell fates during development and self-renewal. Recent studies have demonstrated that this pathway is integral to a complex system of interactions, involving as well other signal transduction pathways, and implicated in distinct human diseases. Delta-like 1 (Dll1 is one of the known ligands of the Notch receptors. The role of the Notch ligands is less well understood. Loss-of-function of Dll1 leads to embryonic lethality, but reduction of Delta-like 1 protein levels has not been studied in adult stage. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present the haploinsufficient phenotype of Dll1 and a missense mutant Dll1 allele (Dll1(C413Y. Haploinsufficiency leads to a complex phenotype with several biological processes altered. These alterations reveal the importance of Dll1 mainly in metabolism, energy balance and in immunology. The animals are smaller, lighter, with altered fat to lean ratio and have increased blood pressure and a slight bradycardia. The animals have reduced cholesterol and triglyceride levels in blood. At the immunological level a subtle phenotype is observed due to the effect and fine-tuning of the signaling network at the different levels of differentiation, proliferation and function of lymphocytes. Moreover, the importance of the proteolytic regulation of the Notch signaling network emphasized. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, slight alterations in one player of Notch signaling alter the entire organism, emphasizing the fine-tuning character of this pathway in a high number of processes.

  9. Dll1 haploinsufficiency in adult mice leads to a complex phenotype affecting metabolic and immunological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Aliaga, Isabel; Przemeck, Gerhard K H; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Adler, Thure; Hans, Wolfgang; Horsch, Marion; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Schrewe, Anja; Wagner, Sibylle; Hoelter, Sabine M; Becker, Lore; Klopstock, Thomas; Wurst, Wolfgang; Wolf, Eckhard; Klingenspor, Martin; Ivandic, Boris T; Busch, Dirk H; Beckers, Johannes; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin

    2009-06-29

    The Notch signaling pathway is an evolutionary conserved signal transduction pathway involved in embryonic patterning and regulation of cell fates during development and self-renewal. Recent studies have demonstrated that this pathway is integral to a complex system of interactions, involving as well other signal transduction pathways, and implicated in distinct human diseases. Delta-like 1 (Dll1) is one of the known ligands of the Notch receptors. The role of the Notch ligands is less well understood. Loss-of-function of Dll1 leads to embryonic lethality, but reduction of Delta-like 1 protein levels has not been studied in adult stage. Here we present the haploinsufficient phenotype of Dll1 and a missense mutant Dll1 allele (Dll1(C413Y)). Haploinsufficiency leads to a complex phenotype with several biological processes altered. These alterations reveal the importance of Dll1 mainly in metabolism, energy balance and in immunology. The animals are smaller, lighter, with altered fat to lean ratio and have increased blood pressure and a slight bradycardia. The animals have reduced cholesterol and triglyceride levels in blood. At the immunological level a subtle phenotype is observed due to the effect and fine-tuning of the signaling network at the different levels of differentiation, proliferation and function of lymphocytes. Moreover, the importance of the proteolytic regulation of the Notch signaling network emphasized. In conclusion, slight alterations in one player of Notch signaling alter the entire organism, emphasizing the fine-tuning character of this pathway in a high number of processes.

  10. Maintenance of leukemic cell identity by the activity of the Polycomb complex PRC1 in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Alessandra; Ferrari, Karin J.; Piunti, Andrea; Jammula, SriGanesh; Chiacchiera, Fulvio; Mazzarella, Luca; Scelfo, Andrea; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Pasini, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia is a complex heterogeneous disease often driven by the expression of oncogenic fusion proteins with different molecular and biochemical properties. Whereas several fusion proteins induce leukemogenesis by activating Hox gene expression (Hox-activating fusions), others impinge on different pathways that do not involve the activation of Hox genes (non–Hox-activating fusions). It has been postulated that one of the main oncogenic properties of the HOXA9 transcription factor is its ability to control the expression of the p16/p19 tumor suppressor locus (Cdkn2a), thereby compensating Polycomb-mediated repression, which is dispensable for leukemias induced by Hox-activating fusions. We show, by genetically depleting the H2A ubiquitin ligase subunits of the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), Ring1a and Ring1b, that Hoxa9 activation cannot repress Cdkn2a expression in the absence of PRC1 and its dependent deposition of H2AK119 monoubiquitination (H2AK119Ub). This demonstrates the essential role of PRC1 activity in supporting the oncogenic potential of Hox-activating fusion proteins. By combining genetic tools with genome-wide location and transcription analyses, we further show that PRC1 activity is required for the leukemogenic potential of both Hox-activating and non–Hox-activating fusions, thus preventing the differentiation of leukemic cells independently of the expression of the Cdkn2a locus. Overall, our results genetically demonstrate that PRC1 activity and the deposition of H2AK119Ub are critical factors that maintain the undifferentiated identity of cancer cells, positively sustaining the progression of different types of leukemia. PMID:27730210

  11. Nonlinear temperature effects on multifractal complexity of metabolic rate of mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanovich, Jose M.; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Complex physiological dynamics have been argued to be a signature of healthy physiological function. Here we test whether the complexity of metabolic rate fluctuations in small endotherms decreases with lower environmental temperatures. To do so, we examine the multifractal temporal scaling properties of the rate of change in oxygen consumption r(VO2), in the laboratory mouse Mus musculus, assessing their long range correlation properties across seven different environmental temperatures, ranging from 0 °C to 30 °C. To do so, we applied multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA), finding that r(VO2) fluctuations show two scaling regimes. For small time scales below the crossover time (approximately 102 s), either monofractal or weak multifractal dynamics are observed depending on whether Ta  15 °C respectively. For larger time scales, r(VO2) fluctuations are characterized by an asymptotic scaling exponent that indicates multifractal anti-persistent or uncorrelated dynamics. For both scaling regimes, a generalization of the multiplicative cascade model provides very good fits for the Renyi exponents τ(q), showing that the infinite number of exponents h(q) can be described by only two independent parameters, a and b. We also show that the long-range correlation structure of r(VO2) time series differs from randomly shuffled series, and may not be explained as an artifact of stochastic sampling of a linear frequency spectrum. These results show that metabolic rate dynamics in a well studied micro-endotherm are consistent with a highly non-linear feedback control system.

  12. Effect of two different housing systems on the gut microbiota of germ-free SW mice reconstituted with a complex murine microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundberg, Randi; Toft, Martin Fitzner; Bahl, Martin I;

    to the inoculum to see the effect of housing and time on the relative bacterial abundances and the appearance of contaminants and their ability to change the overall community picture. With this work, we explore the possibility of housing mice with a complex microbiota over a time period of 5 months in a less...

  13. Anti-inflammatory activity of the essential oil obtained from Ocimum basilicum complexed with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Lindaiane Bezerra; Martins, Anita Oliveira Brito Pereira Bezerra; Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Cesário, Francisco Rafael Alves Santana; E Castro, Fyama Ferreira; de Albuquerque, Thaís Rodrigues; Fernandes, Maria Neyze Martins; da Silva, Bruno Anderson Fernandes; Quintans Júnior, Lucindo José; Araújo, Adriano Antunes de Sousa; Menezes, Paula Dos Passos; Nunes, Paula Santos; Matos, Isabella Gonçalves; Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; Goncalves Wanderley, Almir; de Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar

    2017-02-22

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are cyclic oligosaccharides can enhance the bioavailability of drugs. Ocimum basilicum is an aromatic plant found in Brazil used in culinary. The essential oil of this plant presents anti-edematogenic and anti-inflammatory activities in acute and chronic inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of the essential oil obtained from O. basilicum complexed with β - cyclodextrin (OBEO/β-CD) in mice. The complexation with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) was performed by different methods and analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry (TG) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using mice models of paw edema induced by carrageenan, dextran, histamine and arachidonic acid (AA); vascular permeability and peritonitis induced by carrageenan and granuloma induced by cotton block introduction. The DSC, TG and SEM analysis indicated that the OBEO was successfully complexed with β-CD. The oral administration of OEOB/β-CD prevented paw edema formation by decreasing vascular permeability in vivo, inhibited leukocyte recruitment to the peritoneal cavity, and inhibited granuloma formation in mice. Our results indicate that conjugation with β-CD improves the anti-inflammatory effects of OBEO in mice models of acute and chronic inflammation, indicating that this complex can be used in anti-inflammatory drug development.

  14. Differential Efficacy of Ketamine in the Acute versus Chronic Stages of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajerian, Maral; Leu, David; Yang, Phillip; Huang, Ting Ting; Kingery, Wade S; Clark, J David

    2015-01-01

    Background Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a painful, disabling and often chronic condition, where many patients transition from an acute phase with prominent peripheral neurogenic inflammation to a chronic phase with evident central nervous system (CNS) changes. Ketamine is a centrally-acting agent believed to work through blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and is being increasingly used for the treatment of refractory CRPS, although the basis for the drug’s effects and efficacy at different stages of the syndrome remain unclear. Methods We used a mouse model of CRPS (n=8–12/group) involving tibia fracture/cast immobilization to test the efficacy of ketamine (2 mg/kg/day; 7 days) or vehicle infusion during acute (3weeks [3w] post-fracture) and chronic (7w post-fracture) stages. Results Acute phase fracture mice displayed elevated limb temperature, edema and nociceptive sensitization that were not reduced by ketamine. Fracture mice treated with ketamine during the chronic phase showed reduced nociceptive sensitization that persisted beyond completion of the infusion. During this chronic phase, ketamine also reduced latent nociceptive sensitization and improved motor function at 18 weeks post-fracture. No side effects of the infusions were identified. These behavioral changes were associated with altered spinal astrocyte activation and expression of pain-related proteins including NMDA receptor 2b (NR2b), Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase ii (CaMK2), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BNDF). Conclusions Collectively, these results demonstrate that ketamine is efficacious in the chronic, but not acute stages of CRPS, suggesting that the centrally-acting drug is relatively ineffective in early CRPS when peripheral mechanisms are more critical for supporting nociceptive sensitization. PMID:26492479

  15. Complexity of the Microglial Activation Pathways that Drive Innate Host Responses During Lethal Alphavirus Encephalitis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilufer Esen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Microglia express multiple TLRs (Toll-like receptors and provide important host defence against viruses that invade the CNS (central nervous system. Although prior studies show these cells become activated during experimental alphavirus encephalitis in mice to generate cytokines and chemokines that influence virus replication, tissue inflammation and neuronal survival, the specific PRRs (pattern recognition receptors and signalling intermediates controlling microglial activation in this setting remain unknown. To investigate these questions directly in vivo, mice ablated of specific TLR signalling molecules were challenged with NSV (neuroadapted Sindbis virus and CNS viral titres, inflammatory responses and clinical outcomes followed over time. To approach this problem specifically in microglia, the effects of NSV on primary cells derived from the brains of wild-type and mutant animals were characterized in vitro. From the standpoint of the virus, microglial activation required viral uncoating and an intact viral genome; inactivated virus particles did not elicit measurable microglial responses. At the level of the target cell, NSV triggered multiple PRRs in microglia to produce a broad range of inflammatory mediators via non-overlapping signalling pathways. In vivo, disease survival was surprisingly independent of TLR-driven responses, but still required production of type-I IFN (interferon to control CNS virus replication. Interestingly, the ER (endoplasmic reticulum protein UNC93b1 facilitated host survival independent of its known effects on endosomal TLR signalling. Taken together, these data show that alphaviruses activate microglia via multiple PRRs, highlighting the complexity of the signalling networks by which CNS host responses are elicited by these infections.

  16. Increasing fat content from 20 to 45 wt% in a complex diet induces lower endotoxemia in parallel with an increased number of intestinal goblet cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Bérengère; Laugerette, Fabienne; Plaisancié, Pascale; Géloën, Alain; Bodennec, Jacques; Estienne, Monique; Pineau, Gaëlle; Bernalier-Donadille, Annick; Vidal, Hubert; Michalski, Marie-Caroline

    2015-04-01

    The impacts of high-fat diets (HFDs) on the onset of metabolic endotoxemia and low-grade inflammation are well established in rodent models. However, the dose-effect of dietary lipid intakes on these parameters is not known. We hypothesized that increasing dietary lipid amounts could be linked to parallel increases of endotoxemia, low-grade inflammation, and metabolic and intestinal alterations. Six-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were fed a low-fat diet (LFD, 2.6 wt% of lipids), a moderate HFD (mHFD, 22 wt% of lipids), or a very HFD (vHFD, 45 wt% of lipids) formulated mainly using chow ingredients and milk fat. After 12 weeks, white adipose tissues, liver, intestine, distal colon contents, and plasma were collected. Only vHFD mice significantly increased body weight and fat mass vs LFD mice. This was associated with increases of plasma concentrations of triglycerides, leptin and adiponectin, and liver lipids. No such differences were observed between LFD and mHFD mice. However, mHFD developed metabolic endotoxemia and inflammation, unlike vHFD mice. In turn, vHFD mice showed more goblet cells in all intestine segments vs both other groups and a decrease of Bacteroides-Prevotella in their microbiota vs LFD mice. Finally, mHFD mice colon exhibited a decrease in lactobacilli and in the levels of occludin phosphorylation. Altogether, using complex HFD, no associations were observed between dietary lipid amounts and the magnitude of endotoxemia, inflammation, and physiological alterations developed. These results reveal the impact of the diet composition on intestinal goblet cells and mucus coat, bringing new insights about further consequences on HFD-induced metabolic disorders.

  17. Behavioral and neurological correlates of ALS-parkinsonism dementia complex in adult mice fed washed cycad flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jason M B; Khabazian, Iraj; Wong, Margaret C; Seyedalikhani, Arash; Bains, Jaswinder S; Pasqualotto, Bryce A; Williams, David E; Andersen, Raymond J; Simpson, Rebecca J; Smith, Richard; Craig, Ulla-Kate; Kurland, Leonard T; Shaw, Christopher A

    2002-01-01

    Consumption of cycad seed products (Cycas circinalis) is one of the strongest epidemiological links to the Guamian neurological disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS-PDC), however, the putative toxin which causes neurodegeneration has never been identified definitively. To reexamine this issue, 6-7-mo-old, male CD-1 mice were assessed for motor and cognitive behaviours during and following feeding with pellets made from washed cycad flour. Cycad-fed animals showed early evidence of progressive motor and cognitive dysfunctions. Neurodegeneration measured using TUNEL and caspase-3 labeling was found in neocortex, various hippocampal fields, substantia nigra, olfactory bulb, and spinal cord. In vitro studies using rat neocortex have identified toxic compounds in washed cycad flour that induce depolarizing field potentials and lead to release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), both blocked by AP5. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)/mass spectrometry of cycad flour samples failed to show appreciable amounts of other known cycad toxins, cycasin, MAM, or BMAA; only trace amounts of BOAA were present. Isolation procedures employing these techniques identified the most toxic component as beta-sitosterol beta-D-glucoside (BSSG). The present data suggest that a neurotoxin, or a toxic metabolite, not previously identified in cycad, is able to gain access to central nervous system (CNS) resulting in neurodegeneration of specific neural populations and in motor and cognitive dysfunctions. These data are consistent with a number of major features of ALS-PDC in humans.

  18. Silencing Bruton's tyrosine kinase in alveolar neutrophils protects mice from LPS/immune complex-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, Agnieszka; Fol, Marek; Rahman, Moshiur; Stokes, Karen Y; Florence, Jon M; Leskov, Igor L; Khoretonenko, Mikhail V; Matthay, Michael A; Liu, Kathleen D; Calfee, Carolyn S; Tvinnereim, Amy; Rosenfield, Gabriel R; Kurdowska, Anna K

    2014-09-15

    Previous observations made by our laboratory indicate that Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) may play an important role in the pathophysiology of local inflammation in acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We have shown that there is cross talk between FcγRIIa and TLR4 in alveolar neutrophils from patients with ALI/ARDS and that Btk mediates the molecular cooperation between these two receptors. To study the function of Btk in vivo we have developed a unique two-hit model of ALI: LPS/immune complex (IC)-induced ALI. Furthermore, we conjugated F(ab)2 fragments of anti-neutrophil antibodies (Ly6G1A8) with specific siRNA for Btk to silence Btk specifically in alveolar neutrophils. It should be stressed that we are the first group to perform noninvasive transfections of neutrophils, both in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, our present findings indicate that silencing Btk in alveolar neutrophils has a dramatic protective effect in mice with LPS/IC-induced ALI, and that Btk regulates neutrophil survival and clearance of apoptotic neutrophils in this model. In conclusion, we put forward a hypothesis that Btk-targeted neutrophil specific therapy is a valid goal of research geared toward restoring homeostasis in lungs of patients with ALI/ARDS. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Antineoplastic activity of N-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)2'-hydroxyphenylimine aqua nickel(II) complex [NI(H₂O)HHP] on ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) in Swiss albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Israt Ara; Khanam, Jahan Ara; Jesmin, Mele; Ali, Mohammud Mohshin

    2016-01-01

    The present study is aimed at evaluating the antineoplastic activity of N[(2-hydroxybenzylidene)2'-hydroxyphenylimine] aqua nickel(II) complex abbreviated as [Ni(H2O)HHP] complex against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells in Swiss albino mice. The effectiveness of the drug at doses of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg body weight was assessed for five consecutive days in previously inoculated tumor (137×10(4) EAC) cells containing mice. After administration of the last dose followed by 16 h fasting, the effect of the [Ni(H2O)HHP] complex on tumor was assessed by EAC cell growth inhibition, solid tumor mass, survival time, peritoneal cell count, hematological profiles like red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells (WBC), haemoglobin (Hb)% and differential counts (i.e., lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes) and biochemical parameters like serum glucose, total cholesterol, total protein, serum urea and liver enzymes, respectively. The results have been compared with the data obtained by using a standard and highly effective clinically used anticancer drug bleomycin. [Ni(H2O)HHP] complex at dose 2.0 mg/kg i.p. (intra peritoneal) showed a significant (P=0.001) decrease in tumor volume of each mice and increased the life span as well as mean survival time of EAC bearing mice. Hematological and biochemical parameters of EAC bearing mice get back normal values after 15 days of the initial treatment. From the above outcomes indicate the possible potential use of the compound as antitumor agent in advanced researches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Increased Survivorship and Altered Cytokine Profile from Treatment of Influenza A H1N1-Infected Mice with Ekybion: A Drug Complex of Natural Extracts and Inorganic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Lupfer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ekybion is a drug complex of 16 natural extracts and inorganic compounds designed to treat a variety of respiratory pathogens of bacterial and viral origin. It is licensed throughout Europe for the treatment of respiratory tract infections from equine parainfluenza type 3 and equine herpes virus type 1 in equine stables. The purpose of this paper was to test the efficacy of Ekybion on a well-developed animal model of influenza A infection and determine a mode of action. Experiments were performed with Balb/c mice infected with a lethal dose of influenza A/PR/8/34 H1N1 virus and treated with nebulized Ekybion every 8 h in a time-dependant or dose-dependant fashion. These experiments showed that mice treated prior to infection with Ekybion had a higher survival rates (~46% compared with untreated animals (~0%. Paradoxically, these mice showed no significant difference in lung virus titer or weight loss. There was, however, a decrease in the level of GM-CSF, IL-6, and G-CSF cytokines in the lungs of Ekybion-treated, infected mice. It is possible that decreases in proinflammatory cytokines may have contributed to increased survivorship in Ekybion-treated influenza-infected mice.

  1. [Features of behavioral reactions of chronically irradiated mice in the raised crosswise labyrinth with various genetically determined radiosensitivity and possibilities of their modification by the fungal biopolymer complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seniuk, O F; Gorovoĭ, L F; Kovalev, V A; Palamar, L A; Krul', N I; Zhidkov, A V; Chemerskiĭ, G F; Kireev, S I; Khatuntseva, I V

    2013-01-01

    Structural elements of the central nervous system--neurons, along with the higher neuroendocrine structures and the hypothalamus centres, show high sensitivity to a chronic action of low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) in view of their extreme enrichment by phospholipids and intensive supply by oxygen, creating favorable conditions for the development of oxidizing stress. Stressful influences cause negative emotions in the behaviour of animals manifested as fear or uneasiness. The study represents the results of comparative research into the behavioral reactions characterized by uneasiness in the Balb/c and C57bl/6 mice exposed to a chronic irradiation at low doses. The chitin-melanin-glucan complex from fungi Fomes fomentarius (ChMG) was approved as an adaptive agent. It has been shown that under identical conditions, deposition levels of radionuclides 137Cs and 90Sr are raised in mice with IR hypersensitivity--line Balb/c, in comparison with less radio sensitive mice--line C57bl/6. Simultaneously, Balb/c mice were observed to exhibit the signs of a more anxious behaviour in the new environment. Chronic external and internal radiation exposure to rare ionizing radiation at low doses promotes strengthening of anxiety and phobic reactions in mice with IR hypersensitivity. The use of ChMG in animals neutralized the increase in anxiety and phobic reactions after a prolonged irradiation, thus indicating the presence in ChMG of the anxiolitic activity along with the above mentioned powerful radiosorbent, antioxidant, gene protective and immunomodulatory properties.

  2. The binding of 3H-labelled androgen-receptor complexes to hypothalamic chromatin of neonatal mice: effect of sex and androgenization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventanas, J; Garcia, C; López-Bote, C; López, A; Burgos, J

    1990-03-01

    The binding of 3H-labelled androgen-receptor complexes, prepared by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation from the 105,000 g supernatant of hypothalamic cytosol, to hypothalamic chromatin of neonatal mice covalently coupled to cellulose was measured in vitro. Saturation binding was also determined after extraction of histones and the masking of acidic proteins with high molarities of guanidine hydrochloride. This investigation showed the presence of high-affinity, low-capacity acceptor sites for [3H]-testosterone-receptor complexes in male hypothalamic chromatin (Kd value = 0.39 x 10(-10) M and binding sites of 41 fmol per mg of DNA). Acceptor activity seems to be associated with the acidic protein fraction of chromatin. No specific acceptor sites of similar nature were found in chromatin taken from the hypothalami of female mice. On the basis of these results, it is suggested that the androgen-unresponsiveness of female mice is related to the absence of acceptors for the androgen-receptor in female mice hypothalami.

  3. Human-derived physiological heat shock protein 27 complex protects brain after focal cerebral ischemia in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichiro Teramoto

    Full Text Available Although challenging, neuroprotective therapies for ischemic stroke remain an interesting strategy for countering ischemic injury and suppressing brain tissue damage. Among potential neuroprotective molecules, heat shock protein 27 (HSP27 is a strong cell death suppressor. To assess the neuroprotective effects of HSP27 in a mouse model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, we purified a "physiological" HSP27 (hHSP27 from normal human lymphocytes. hHSP27 differed from recombinant HSP27 in that it formed dimeric, tetrameric, and multimeric complexes, was phosphorylated, and contained small amounts of αβ-crystallin and HSP20. Mice received intravenous injections of hHSP27 following focal cerebral ischemia. Infarct volume, neurological deficit scores, physiological parameters, and immunohistochemical analyses were evaluated 24 h after reperfusion. Intravenous injections of hHSP27 1 h after reperfusion significantly reduced infarct size and improved neurological deficits. Injected hHSP27 was localized in neurons on the ischemic side of the brain. hHSP27 suppressed neuronal cell death resulting from cytochrome c-mediated caspase activation, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses. Recombinant HSP27 (rHSP27, which was artificially expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, and dephosphorylated hHSP27 did not have brain protective effects, suggesting that the phosphorylation of hHSP27 may be important for neuroprotection after ischemic insults. The present study suggests that hHSP27 with posttranslational modifications provided neuroprotection against ischemia/reperfusion injury and that the protection was mediated through the inhibition of apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Intravenously injected human HSP27 should be explored for the treatment of acute ischemic strokes.

  4. Nickel(II) diacetyl monoxime-2-pyridyl hydrazone complex can inhibit Ehrlich solid tumor growth in mice: A potential new antitumor drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Entsar A; Hassanien, Mohamed M; El-Lban, Faten W

    2017-03-11

    The chief chemotherapeutic drug, cisplatin had common bad effects such as nephrotoxicity, ototoxicity and bone marrow depression. This led us to develop a new potential anticancer drug based on nickel metal ion that may be less toxic. Nickel(II) diacetyl monoxime-2-pyridyl hydrazone complex cytoprotective effect, superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity and anticancer activities were studied. In vitro, the complex showed SOD-like activity of 86.62%. It was capable to kill 90.2% of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells and to protect 92.48% of human RBCs. In vivo, the complex lowered the tumor burden markedly in a concentration-dependent manner. Noticeably, solid tumor growth was suppressed; tumor volume and weight were reduced and mice life span was lengthened. The hematological indices were improved, catalase activity was re-elevated and malondialdehyde (MDA) level was reversed towards normal. Nucleic acids, cholesterol, triglycerides, liver enzymes, urea and creatinine contents were reduced to near normal ranges. Glutathione (GSH), SOD, albumin and total protein levels were increased. In conclusion, our results revealed that the complex has the ability to suppress Ehrlich solid tumor growth in mice with minimal side effects. This may possibly via its redox activity. Surprisingly, nickel complex antitumor activities were more potent than those of cisplatin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment of Leishmania (Leishmania) Amazonensis-Infected Mice with a Combination of a Palladacycle Complex and Heat-Killed Propionibacterium acnes Triggers Protective Cellular Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladi, Carolina S.; da Silva, Danielle A. M.; Motta, Priscila D.; Garcia, Daniel M.; Teixeira, Daniela; Longo-Maugéri, Ieda M.; Katz, Simone; Barbiéri, Clara L.

    2017-01-01

    Palladacycle complex DPPE 1.2 was previously reported to inhibit the in vitro and in vivo infection by Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis. The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of DPPE 1.2, in association with heat-killed Propionibacterium acnes, on L. (L.) amazonensis infection in two mouse strains, BALB/c and C57BL/6, and to evaluate the immune responses of the treated animals. Foot lesions of L. (L.) amazonensis-infected mice were injected with DPPE 1.2 alone, or associated with P. acnes as an adjuvant. Analysis of T-cell populations in the treated mice and in untreated controls was performed by FACS. Detection of IFN-γ-secreting lymphocytes was carried out by an ELISPOT assay and active TGF-β was measured by means of a double-sandwich ELISA test. The treatment with DPPE 1.2 resulted in a significant reduction of foot lesion sizes and parasite burdens in both mouse strains, and the lowest parasite burden was found in mice treated with DPPE 1.2 plus P. acnes. Mice treated with DPPE 1.2 alone displayed a significant increase of TCD4+ and TCD8+ lymphocytes and IFN-γ secretion which were significantly higher in animals treated with DPPE 1.2 plus P. acnes. A significant reduction of active TGF-β was observed in mice treated with DPPE 1.2 alone or associated with P. acnes. Moreover, DPPE 1.2 associated to P. acnes was non-toxic to treated animals. The destruction of L. (L.) amazonensis by DPPE 1.2 was followed by host inflammatory responses which were exacerbated when the palladacycle complex was associated with P. acnes. PMID:28321209

  6. Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The term complexity derives etymologically from the Latin plexus, which means interwoven. Intuitively, this implies that something complex is composed by elements that are difficult to separate. This difficulty arises from the relevant interactions that take place between components. This lack of separability is at odds with the classical scientific method - which has been used since the times of Galileo, Newton, Descartes, and Laplace - and has also influenced philosophy and engineering. In recent decades, the scientific study of complexity and complex systems has proposed a paradigm shift in science and philosophy, proposing novel methods that take into account relevant interactions.

  7. Urokinase plasminogen receptor and the fibrinolytic complex play a role in nerve repair after nerve crush in mice, and in human neuropathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Rivellini

    Full Text Available Remodeling of extracellular matrix (ECM is a critical step in peripheral nerve regeneration. In fact, in human neuropathies, endoneurial ECM enriched in fibrin and vitronectin associates with poor regeneration and worse clinical prognosis. Accordingly in animal models, modification of the fibrinolytic complex activity has profound effects on nerve regeneration: high fibrinolytic activity and low levels of fibrin correlate with better nerve regeneration. The urokinase plasminogen receptor (uPAR is a major component of the fibrinolytic complex, and binding to urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA promotes fibrinolysis and cell movement. uPAR is expressed in peripheral nerves, however, little is known on its potential function on nerve development and regeneration. Thus, we investigated uPAR null mice and observed that uPAR is dispensable for nerve development, whereas, loss of uPAR affects nerve regeneration. uPAR null mice showed reduced nerve repair after sciatic nerve crush. This was a consequence of reduced fibrinolytic activity and increased deposition of endoneurial fibrin and vitronectin. Exogenous fibrinolysis in uPAR null mice rescued nerve repair after sciatic nerve crush. Finally, we measured the fibrinolytic activity in sural nerve biopsies from patients with peripheral neuropathies. We showed that neuropathies with defective regeneration had reduced fibrinolytic activity. On the contrary, neuropathies with signs of active regeneration displayed higher fibrinolytic activity. Overall, our results suggest that enforced fibrinolysis may facilitate regeneration and outcome of peripheral neuropathies.

  8. Emodin ameliorated lipopolysaccharide-induced fulminant hepatic failure by blockade of TLR4/MD2 complex expression in D-galactosamine-sensitized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xinru; Gong, Xia; Jiang, Rong; Kuang, Ge; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Li; Xu, Ge; Wan, Jingyuan

    2014-11-01

    Emodin has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities. The aim of this study was to explore the effect and mechanism of emodin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) in D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-sensitized mice. Our results showed that pretreatment with emodin inhibited the elevation of plasma aminotransferases, alleviated the hepatic histopathological abnormalities and improved the survival rate of LPS/D-GalN-primed mice. Moreover, emodin markedly attenuated the increased serum and hepatic tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production, and activated hepatic p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signal pathways in LPS/D-GalN-challenged mice. Furthermore, using an in vitro experiment, we found that emodin dose-dependently suppressed TNF-α production, dampened AP-1 and NF-κB activation, and blocked toll-like receptor (TLR) 4/myeloid differentiation factor (MD) 2 complex expression in LPS-elicited RAW264.7 mouse macrophage cells. Taken together, these data suggested that emodin could effectively prevent LPS-induced FHF, which might be mediated by inhibition of TNF-α production, deactivation of MAPKs and NF-κB, and blockade of TLR4/MD2 complex expression.

  9. Urokinase Plasminogen Receptor and the Fibrinolytic Complex Play a Role in Nerve Repair after Nerve Crush in Mice, and in Human Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivellini, Cristina; Dina, Giorgia; Porrello, Emanuela; Cerri, Federica; Scarlato, Marina; Domi, Teuta; Ungaro, Daniela; Carro, Ubaldo Del; Bolino, Alessandra; Quattrini, Angelo; Comi, Giancarlo; Previtali, Stefano C.

    2012-01-01

    Remodeling of extracellular matrix (ECM) is a critical step in peripheral nerve regeneration. In fact, in human neuropathies, endoneurial ECM enriched in fibrin and vitronectin associates with poor regeneration and worse clinical prognosis. Accordingly in animal models, modification of the fibrinolytic complex activity has profound effects on nerve regeneration: high fibrinolytic activity and low levels of fibrin correlate with better nerve regeneration. The urokinase plasminogen receptor (uPAR) is a major component of the fibrinolytic complex, and binding to urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) promotes fibrinolysis and cell movement. uPAR is expressed in peripheral nerves, however, little is known on its potential function on nerve development and regeneration. Thus, we investigated uPAR null mice and observed that uPAR is dispensable for nerve development, whereas, loss of uPAR affects nerve regeneration. uPAR null mice showed reduced nerve repair after sciatic nerve crush. This was a consequence of reduced fibrinolytic activity and increased deposition of endoneurial fibrin and vitronectin. Exogenous fibrinolysis in uPAR null mice rescued nerve repair after sciatic nerve crush. Finally, we measured the fibrinolytic activity in sural nerve biopsies from patients with peripheral neuropathies. We showed that neuropathies with defective regeneration had reduced fibrinolytic activity. On the contrary, neuropathies with signs of active regeneration displayed higher fibrinolytic activity. Overall, our results suggest that enforced fibrinolysis may facilitate regeneration and outcome of peripheral neuropathies. PMID:22363796

  10. Analysis of meiosis in SUN1 deficient mice reveals a distinct role of SUN2 in mammalian meiotic LINC complex formation and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Link

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available LINC complexes are evolutionarily conserved nuclear envelope bridges, composed of SUN (Sad-1/UNC-84 and KASH (Klarsicht/ANC-1/Syne/homology domain proteins. They are crucial for nuclear positioning and nuclear shape determination, and also mediate nuclear envelope (NE attachment of meiotic telomeres, essential for driving homolog synapsis and recombination. In mice, SUN1 and SUN2 are the only SUN domain proteins expressed during meiosis, sharing their localization with meiosis-specific KASH5. Recent studies have shown that loss of SUN1 severely interferes with meiotic processes. Absence of SUN1 provokes defective telomere attachment and causes infertility. Here, we report that meiotic telomere attachment is not entirely lost in mice deficient for SUN1, but numerous telomeres are still attached to the NE through SUN2/KASH5-LINC complexes. In Sun1(-/- meiocytes attached telomeres retained the capacity to form bouquet-like clusters. Furthermore, we could detect significant numbers of late meiotic recombination events in Sun1(-/- mice. Together, this indicates that even in the absence of SUN1 telomere attachment and their movement within the nuclear envelope per se can be functional.

  11. Complex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    Schiff bases and their complex compounds have been studied for their .... establishing coordination of the N–(2 – hydroxybenzyl) - L - α - valine Schiff base ..... (1967); “Spectrophotometric Identification of Organic Compounds”, Willey, New.

  12. [IMMUNOCYTOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE DISTURBANCES IN THE STRUCTURE OF SYNAPTONEMAL COMPLEXES IN SPERMATOCYTE NUCLEI IN MICE UNDER EXPOSURE TO ROCKET FUEL COMPONENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovinskaya, A V; Kolumbayeva, S Zh; Abilev, S K; Kolomiets, O L

    2016-01-01

    There was performed an assessment of genotoxic effects of rocket fuel component--unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH, heptyl)--on forming germ cells of male mice. Immunocytochemically there was studied the structure of meiotic nuclei at different times after the intraperitoneal administration of UDMH to male mice. There were revealed following types of disturbances of the structure of synaptonemal complexes (SCs) of meiotic chromosomes: single and multiple fragments of SCs associations of autosomes with a sex bivalent, atypical structure of the SCs with a frequency higher than the reference level. In addition, there were found the premature desinapsis of sex bivalents, the disorder offormation of the genital corpuscle and ring SCs. Established disorders in SCs of spermatocytes, analyzed at 38th day after the 10-days intoxication of animal by the component of rocket fuel, attest to the risk of permanent persistence of chromosomal abnormalities occurring in the pool of stem cells.

  13. Effect of Green Tea Extract/Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid Complex in Obese Type 2 Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Cheor Bae

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is associated with the rapid spread of obesity. Obesity induces insulin resistance, resulting in β-cell dysfunction and thus T2DM. Green tea extract (GTE has been known to prevent obesity and T2DM, but this effect is still being debated. Our previous results suggested that circulating green tea gallated catechins (GCs hinders postprandial blood glucose lowering, regardless of reducing glucose and cholesterol absorption when GCs are present in the intestinal lumen. This study aimed to compare the effect of GTE with that of GTE coadministered with poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA, which is likely to inhibit the intestinal absorption of GCs.MethodsThe db/db mice and age-matched nondiabetic mice were provided with normal chow diet containing GTE (1%, γ-PGA (0.1%, or GTE+γ-PGA (1%:0.1% for 4 weeks.ResultsIn nondiabetic mice, none of the drugs showed any effects after 4 weeks. In db/db mice, however, weight gain and body fat gain were significantly reduced in the GTE+γ-PGA group compared to nondrug-treated db/db control mice without the corresponding changes in food intake and appetite. Glucose intolerance was also ameliorated in the GTE+γ-PGA group. Histopathological analyses showed that GTE+γ-PGA-treated db/db mice had a significantly reduced incidence of fatty liver and decreased pancreatic islet size. Neither GTE nor γ-PGA treatment showed any significant results.ConclusionThese results suggest that GTE+γ-PGA treatment than GTE or γ-PGA alone may be a useful tool for preventing both obesity and obesity-induced T2DM.

  14. Glutamine supplementation attenuates ethanol-induced disruption of apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and ameliorates gut barrier dysfunction and fatty liver in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit K; Shukla, Pradeep K; Mir, Hina; Manda, Bhargavi; Gangwar, Ruchika; Yadav, Nikki; McMullen, Megan; Nagy, Laura E; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies showed that glutamine (Gln) prevents acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers and human colonic mucosa. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of Gln supplementation on ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction and liver injury in mice in vivo. Ethanol feeding caused a significant increase in inulin permeability in distal colon. Elevated permeability was associated with a redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins and depletion of detergent-insoluble fractions of these proteins, suggesting that ethanol disrupts apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and increases paracellular permeability. Ethanol-induced increase in colonic mucosal permeability and disruption of junctional complexes were most severe in mice fed Gln-free diet. Gln supplementation attenuated ethanol-induced mucosal permeability and disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in a dose-dependent manner, indicating the potential role of Gln in nutritional intervention to alcoholic tissue injury. Gln supplementation dose-dependently elevated reduced-protein thiols in colon without affecting the level of oxidized-protein thiols. Ethanol feeding depleted reduced protein thiols and elevated oxidized protein thiols. Ethanol-induced protein thiol oxidation was most severe in mice fed with Gln-free diet and absent in mice fed with Gln-supplemented diet, suggesting that antioxidant effect is one of the likely mechanisms involved in Gln-mediated amelioration of ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction. Ethanol feeding elevated plasma transaminase and liver triglyceride, which was accompanied by histopathologic lesions in the liver; ethanol-induced liver damage was attenuated by Gln supplementation. These results indicate that Gln supplementation ameliorates alcohol-induced gut and liver injury.

  15. Arctigenin, a natural compound, activates AMP-activated protein kinase via inhibition of mitochondria complex I and ameliorates metabolic disorders in ob/ob mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S-L; Yu, R-T; Gong, J; Feng, Y; Dai, Y-L; Hu, F; Hu, Y-H; Tao, Y-D; Leng, Y

    2012-05-01

    Arctigenin is a natural compound that had never been previously demonstrated to have a glucose-lowering effect. Here it was found to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and the mechanism by which this occurred, as well as the effects on glucose and lipid metabolism were investigated. 2-Deoxyglucose uptake and AMPK phosphorylation were examined in L6 myotubes and isolated skeletal muscle. Gluconeogenesis and lipid synthesis were evaluated in rat primary hepatocytes. The acute and chronic effects of arctigenin on metabolic abnormalities were observed in C57BL/6J and ob/ob mice. Changes in mitochondrial membrane potential were measured using the J-aggregate-forming dye, JC-1. Analysis of respiration of L6 myotubes or isolated mitochondria was conducted in a channel oxygen system. Arctigenin increased AMPK phosphorylation and stimulated glucose uptake in L6 myotubes and isolated skeletal muscles. In primary hepatocytes, it decreased gluconeogenesis and lipid synthesis. The enhancement of glucose uptake and suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis and lipid synthesis by arctigenin were prevented by blockade of AMPK activation. The respiration of L6 myotubes or isolated mitochondria was inhibited by arctigenin with a specific effect on respiratory complex I. A single oral dose of arctigenin reduced gluconeogenesis in C57BL/6J mice. Chronic oral administration of arctigenin lowered blood glucose and improved lipid metabolism in ob/ob mice. This study demonstrates a new role for arctigenin as a potent indirect activator of AMPK via inhibition of respiratory complex I, with beneficial effects on metabolic disorders in ob/ob mice. This highlights the potential value of arctigenin as a possible treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  16. The effect of 2 different housing systems on germ-free mice colonized with a complex gut microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundberg, Randi; Toft, Martin Fitzner; August, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Translational animal models are essential prerequisites in exploring functions and causality of the microbiome in human health and disease. Animal models targeted at microbiome research can be germ-free mice inoculated either with a monoculture or with defined (gnotobiotic) or undefined bacterial...

  17. β-cyclodextrin complex containing Lippia grata leaf essential oil reduces orofacial nociception in mice - evidence of possible involvement of descending inhibitory pain modulation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Lima, Pollyana S; Araújo, Adriano A S; Lucchese, Angélica M; Quintans, Jullyana S S; Menezes, Paula P; Alves, Péricles B; de Lucca Júnior, Waldecy; Santos, Marcio R V; Bonjardim, Leonardo R; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J

    2014-02-01

    The treatment of orofacial pain remains a major challenge for modern medicine. Thus, we prepared and physicochemically characterized a new β-cyclodextrin complex containing Lippia grata leaf essential oil (β-CD/EO) to investigate their possible antinociceptive activity in animal models of orofacial pain. The results of Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and Thermogravimetry/derivative thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) showed that the products prepared by Slurry complexation (SC) method were able to incorporate greater amounts of EO. In the X-ray diffractogram, it was shown that complex between EO and β-CD was formed. Male Swiss mice were pre-treated with β-CD/EO (6, 12 or 24 mg/kg, per os, gavage, p.o.), morphine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle (distilled water, p.o.) 1 hr before treatment with formalin (20 μL, 2%), capsaicin (20 μL, 2.5 μg) or glutamate (40 μL, 25 μM) into the right upper lip. Our results demonstrated that p.o. treatment with β-CD/EO was significantly (p nociceptive face-rubbing behaviour in both phases of the formalin test. β-CD/EO-treated mice were also significantly (p nociception induced by capsaicin and glutamate. For the action in the central nervous system (CNS), ninety minutes after the treatment, the mice were perfused, the brains collected, crioprotected, cut in a criostate and submitted to an immunofluorescence protocol for Fos protein. The immunofluorescence protocol demonstrated that the β-CD/EO significantly activated (p pain.

  18. Decaffeinated green tea extract rich in epigallocatechin-3-gallate prevents fatty liver disease by increased activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes in diet-induced obesity mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamarina, Aline B; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gomes, Lara M; Okuda, Marcos H; Santana, Aline A; Streck, Emilio L; Seelaender, Marilia; do Nascimento, Claudia M Oller; Ribeiro, Eliane B; Lira, Fábio S; Oyama, Lila Missae

    2015-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has been considered the hepatic manifestation of obesity. It is unclear whether supplementation with green tea extract rich in epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) influences the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and insulin resistance in the liver. EGCG regulated hepatic mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and was capable of improving lipid metabolism, attenuating insulin resistance in obese mice. Mice were divided into four groups: control diet+water (CW) or EGCG (CE) and hyperlipidic diet+water (HFW) or EGCG (HFE). All animals received water and diets ad libitum for 16 weeks. Placebo groups received water (0.1 ml/day) and EGCG groups (0.1 ml EGCG and 50 mg/kg/day) by gavage. Cytokines concentrations were obtained by ELISA, protein expression through Western blotting and mitochondrial complex enzymatic activity by colorimetric assay of substrate degradation. HFW increased body weight gain, adiposity index, retroperitoneal and mesenteric adipose tissue relative weight, serum glucose, insulin and Homeostasis Model Assessment of Basal Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR); glucose intolerance was observed in oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) as well as ectopic fat liver deposition. HFE group decreased body weight gain, retroperitoneal and mesenteric adipose tissue relative weight, HOMA-IR, insulin levels and liver fat accumulation; increased complexes II-III and IV and malate dehydrogenase activities and improvement in glucose uptake in OGTT and insulin sensitivity by increased protein expression of total AKT, IRα and IRS1. We did not find alterations in inflammatory parameters analyzed. EGCG was able to prevent obesity stimulating the mitochondrial complex chain, increasing energy expenditure, particularly from the oxidation of lipid substrates, thereby contributing to the prevention of hepatic steatosis and improved insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of chronic fluoride exposure on object recognition memory and mRNA expression of SNARE complex in hippocampus of male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Haijun; Du, Wenjuan; Zhou, Bingrui; Zhang, Wen; Xu, Guoli; Niu, Ruiyan; Sun, Zilong

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of long-term fluoride exposure on object recognition memory and mRNA expression of soluble N-ethylmaleimidesensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors (SNARE) complex (synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25), vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP-2), and syntaxin 1A) in the hippocampus of male mice. Sixty sexually matured male Kunming mice were randomly divided into four groups: control group (given distilled water), low F group (25 mg/L NaF, corresponding to 11 mg/L F(-)), medium F group (50 mg/L NaF, corresponding to 22 mg/L F(-)), and high F group (100 mg/L NaF, corresponding to 45 mg/L F(-)). After 180 days, the spontaneous locomotor behavior and object recognition memory were detected by open field test and novel object recognition (NOR) test. Results showed that compared with the control group, frequency in each zone, total distance, and line crosses were significantly increased in low F and medium F groups, suggesting fluoride enhanced excitement of mice, while there were no marked changes in high F group. Twenty-four hours after training, a deficit of long-term memory (LTM) occurred only in high F group (P recognition memory, and upregulate VAMP-2 mRNA expression, which are involved in the adverse effects of fluoride on the object recognition memory of nervous system.

  20. Mutations in AKAP5 disrupt dendritic signaling complexes and lead to electrophysiological and behavioral phenotypes in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Weisenhaus

    Full Text Available AKAP5 (also referred to as AKAP150 in rodents and AKAP79 in humans is a scaffolding protein that is highly expressed in neurons and targets a variety of signaling molecules to dendritic membranes. AKAP5 interacts with PKA holoenzymes containing RIIalpha or RIIbeta as well as calcineurin (PP2B, PKC, calmodulin, adenylyl cyclase type V/VI, L-type calcium channels, and beta-adrenergic receptors. AKAP5 has also been shown to interact with members of the MAGUK family of PSD-scaffolding proteins including PSD95 and SAP97 and target signaling molecules to receptors and ion channels in the postsynaptic density (PSD. We created two lines of AKAP5 mutant mice: a knockout of AKAP5 (KO and a mutant that lacks the PKA binding domain of AKAP5 (D36. We find that PKA is delocalized in both the hippocampus and striatum of KO and D36 mice indicating that other neural AKAPs cannot compensate for the loss of PKA binding to AKAP5. In AKAP5 mutant mice, a significant fraction of PKA becomes localized to dendritic shafts and this correlates with increased binding to microtubule associated protein-2 (MAP2. Electrophysiological and behavioral analysis demonstrated more severe deficits in both synaptic plasticity and operant learning in the D36 mice compared with the complete KO animals. Our results indicate that the targeting of calcineurin or other binding partners of AKAP5 in the absence of the balancing kinase, PKA, leads to a disruption of synaptic plasticity and results in learning and memory defects.

  1. Class II major histocompatibility complex mutant mice to study the germ-line bias of T-cell antigen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Daniel; Krovi, Sai Harsha; Tuttle, Kathryn D; Crooks, James; Reisdorph, Richard; White, Janice; Gross, James; Matsuda, Jennifer L; Gapin, Laurent; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W

    2016-09-20

    The interaction of αβ T-cell antigen receptors (TCRs) with peptides bound to MHC molecules lies at the center of adaptive immunity. Whether TCRs have evolved to react with MHC or, instead, processes in the thymus involving coreceptors and other molecules select MHC-specific TCRs de novo from a random repertoire is a longstanding immunological question. Here, using nuclease-targeted mutagenesis, we address this question in vivo by generating three independent lines of knockin mice with single-amino acid mutations of conserved class II MHC amino acids that often are involved in interactions with the germ-line-encoded portions of TCRs. Although the TCR repertoire generated in these mutants is similar in size and diversity to that in WT mice, the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC is suggested by a shift and preferential use of some TCR subfamilies over others in mice expressing the mutant class II MHCs. Furthermore, T cells educated on these mutant MHC molecules are alloreactive to each other and to WT cells, and vice versa, suggesting strong functional differences among these repertoires. Taken together, these results highlight both the flexibility of thymic selection and the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC.

  2. Antidepressant-Like Effect of the Leaves of Pseudospondias microcarpa in Mice: Evidence for the Involvement of the Serotoninergic System, NMDA Receptor Complex, and Nitric Oxide Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatus Wewura Adongo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression continues to be a major global health problem. Although antidepressants are used for its treatment, efficacy is often inconsistent. Thus, the search for alternative therapeutic medicines for its treatment is still important. In this study, the antidepressant-like effect of Pseudospondias microcarpa extract (30–300 mg kg−1, p.o. was investigated in two predictive models of depression—forced swimming test and tail suspension test in mice. Additionally, the mechanism(s of action involved were assessed. Acute treatment with the extract dose dependently reduced immobility of mice in both models. The antidepressant-like effect of the extract (100 mg kg−1, p.o. was blocked by p-chlorophenylalanine and cyproheptadine but not prazosin, propranolol, or yohimbine. Concomitant administration of d-cycloserine and the extract potentiated the anti-immobility effect. In contrast, d-serine, a full agonist of glycine/NMDA receptors, abolished the effects. Anti-immobility effects of PME were prevented by pretreatment of mice with L-arginine (750 mg kg−1, i.p. and sildenafil (5 mg kg−1, i.p.. On the contrary, pretreatment of mice with L-NAME (30 mg kg−1, i.p. or methylene blue (10 mg kg−1, i.p. potentiated its effects. The extract produces an antidepressant-like effect in the FST and TST that is dependent on the serotoninergic system, NMDA receptor complex, and the nitric oxide pathway.

  3. Photoprotective Potential of Glycolic Acid by Reducing NLRC4 and AIM2 Inflammasome Complex Proteins in UVB Radiation-Induced Normal Human Epidermal Keratinocytes and Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Sung-Jen; Tang, Sheau-Chung; Liao, Pei-Yun; Ge, Jheng-Siang; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Yang, Jen-Hung

    2017-02-01

    Exposure to UVB radiation induces inflammation and free radical-mediated oxidative stress through reactive oxygen species (ROS) that play a crucial role in the induction of skin cancer. Glycolic acid (GA) is frequently used in cosmetics and dermatology. The aim of the study was to analyze the photoprotective mechanisms through which GA retards UVB-induced ROS accumulation and inflammation in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) and mice skin, respectively. NHEK cell line and C57BL/6J mice were treated with GA (0.1 or 5 mM) for 24 h followed by UVB irradiation. ROS accumulation, DNA damage, and expression of inflammasome complexes (NLRP3, NLRC4, ASC, and AIM2) were measured in vitro. Epidermal thickness and inflammasome complex proteins were analyzed in vivo. GA significantly prevented UVB-induced loss of skin cell viability, ROS formation, and DNA damage (single and double strands DNA break). GA suppressed the mRNA expression levels of NLRC4 and AIM2 among the inflammasome complexes. GA also blocked interleukin (IL)-1β by reducing the activity of caspase-1 in the NHEKs. Treatment with GA (2%) inhibited UVB-induced inflammation marker NLRC4 protein levels in mouse dorsal skin. The photoprotective activity of GA was ascribed to the inhibition of ROS formation and DNA damage, as well as a reduction in the activities of inflammasome complexes and IL-1β. We propose that GA has anti-inflammatory and photoprotective effects against UVB irradiation. GA is potentially beneficial to the protection of human skin from UV damage.

  4. Brain histamine depletion enhances the behavioural sequences complexity of mice tested in the open-field: Partial reversal effect of the dopamine D2/D3 antagonist sulpiride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, Andrea; Provensi, Gustavo; Costa, Alessia; Blandina, Patrizio; Ricca, Valdo; Crescimanno, Giuseppe; Casarrubea, Maurizio; Passani, M Beatrice

    2017-02-01

    Markers of histaminergic dysregulation were found in several neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by repetitive behaviours, thoughts and stereotypies. We analysed the effect of acute histamine depletion by means of i. c.v. injections of alpha-fluoromethylhistidine, a blocker of histidine decarboxylase, on the temporal organization of motor sequences of CD1 mice behaviour in the open-field test. An ethogram encompassing 9 behavioural components was employed. Durations and frequencies were only slightly affected by treatments. However, as revealed by multivariate t-pattern analysis, histamine depletion was associated with a striking increase in the number of behavioural patterns. We found 42 patterns of different composition occurring, on average, 520.90 ± 50.23 times per mouse in the histamine depleted (HD) group, whereas controls showed 12 different patterns occurring on average 223.30 ± 20.64 times. Exploratory and grooming behaviours clustered separately, and the increased pattern complexity involved exclusively exploratory patterns. To test the hypothesis of a histamine-dopamine interplay on behavioural pattern phenotype, non-sedative doses of the D2/D3 antagonist sulpiride (12.5-25-50 mg/kg) were additionally administered to different groups of HD mice. Sulpiride counterbalanced the enhancement of exploratory patterns of different composition, but it did not affect the mean number of patterns at none of the doses used. Our results provide new insights on the role of histamine on repetitive behavioural sequences of freely moving mice. Histamine deficiency is correlated with a general enhancement of pattern complexity. This study supports a putative involvement of histamine in the pathophysiology of tics and related disorders.

  5. Short-term environmental enrichment enhances adult neurogenesis, vascular network and dendritic complexity in the hippocampus of type 1 diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Beauquis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several brain disturbances have been described in association to type 1 diabetes in humans. In animal models, hippocampal pathological changes were reported together with cognitive deficits. The exposure to a variety of environmental stimuli during a certain period of time is able to prevent brain alterations and to improve learning and memory in conditions like stress, aging and neurodegenerative processes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We explored the modulation of hippocampal alterations in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice by environmental enrichment. In diabetic mice housed in standard conditions we found a reduction of adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, decreased dendritic complexity in CA1 neurons and a smaller vascular fractional area in the dentate gyrus, compared with control animals in the same housing condition. A short exposure -10 days- to an enriched environment was able to enhance proliferation, survival and dendritic arborization of newborn neurons, to recover dendritic tree length and spine density of pyramidal CA1 neurons and to increase the vascular network of the dentate gyrus in diabetic animals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The environmental complexity seems to constitute a strong stimulator competent to rescue the diabetic brain from neurodegenerative progression.

  6. Oral administration of Bis(aspirinato)zinc(II) complex ameliorates hyperglycemia and metabolic syndrome-like disorders in spontaneously diabetic KK-A(y) mice: structure-activity relationship on zinc-salicylate complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Adachi, Yusuke; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Masakazu; Sakurai, Hiromu

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the number of patients suffering from diseases, such as cancer, apoplexy, osteoporosis, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes mellitus is increasing worldwide. Type 2 diabetes, a lifestyle-related disease, is recognized as a serious disease. Various types of pharmaceutics for diabetes have been used. Since the relationship between diabetes and biometals such as vanadium, copper, and zinc ions has been recognized for many years, we have been developing the anti-diabetic metal complexes as new candidates. We found that several zinc(II) (Zn) complexes exhibit glucose-lowering activity for treating type 2 diabetes. High doses of salicylates have been known to reverse hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia in type 2 diabetic patients. These findings strongly suggest that the combined use of Zn and salicylates achieves the synergism in treating type 2 diabetes. Because aspirin, acetyl salicylic acid, has a chelating ability, we used it as a ligand to Zn. Several Zn-salicylate complexes were prepared and their biological activities were examined in this study. The complexes with an electron-withdrawing group in the ligand exhibited higher in vitro insulinomimetic activity than those of Zn complexes with an electron-donating group in the ligand. When bis(aspirinato)Zn (Zn(asp)₂) complex was orally administered on KK-A(y) mice with hereditary type 2 diabetes, the diabetic state was improved. In addition, this complex exhibited normalizing effects on serum adiponectin level and high blood pressure in metabolic syndrome. In conclusion, Zn(asp)₂ complex is newly proposed as a potent anti-diabetic and anti-metabolic syndrome agent.

  7. A complex interaction between glycine/NMDA receptors and serotonergic/noradrenergic antidepressants in the forced swim test in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleszak, Ewa; Wlaź, Piotr; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Wlaź, Aleksandra; Kasperek, Regina; Wróbel, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel

    2011-11-01

    Both clinical and preclinical studies demonstrate the antidepressant activity of the functional NMDA receptor antagonists. In this study, we assessed the effects of two glycine/NMDA receptor ligands, namely L-701,324 (antagonist) and D: -cycloserine (a partial agonist) on the action of antidepressant drugs with different pharmacological profiles in the forced swim test in mice. Swim sessions were conducted by placing mice individually in glass cylinders filled with warmed water for 6 min. The duration of behavioral immobility during the last 4 min of the test was evaluated. The locomotor activity of mice was measured with photoresistor actimeters. L-701,324 and D: -cycloserine given with reboxetine (administered in subeffective doses) did not change the behavior of animals in the forced swim test. A potentiating effect was seen when both tested glycine site ligands were given concomitantly with imipramine or fluoxetine in this test. The lesion of noradrenaline nerve terminals produced by DSP-4 neither altered the baseline activity nor influenced the antidepressant-like action of L-701,324 or D: -cycloserine. The depletion of serotonin by p-CPA did not alter baseline activity in the forced swim test. However, it completely antagonized the antidepressant-like action produced by L-701,324 and D: -cycloserine. Moreover, the antidepressant-like effects of imipramine, fluoxetine and reboxetine were abolished by D: -serine, a full agonist of glycine/NMDA receptors. The present study demonstrates that glycine/NMDA receptor functional antagonists enhance the antidepressant-like action of serotonin, but not noradrenaline-based antidepressants and such their activity seems to depend on serotonin rather than noradrenaline pathway.

  8. Inhibition of Calpains Protects Mn-Induced Neurotransmitter release disorders in Synaptosomes from Mice: Involvement of SNARE Complex and Synaptic Vesicle Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Can; Xu, Bin; Ma, Zhuo; Liu, Chang; Deng, Yu; Liu, Wei; Xu, Zhao-Fa

    2017-06-16

    Overexposure to manganese (Mn) could disrupt neurotransmitter release via influencing the formation of SNARE complex, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. A previous study demonstrated that SNAP-25 is one of substrate of calpains. The current study investigated whether calpains were involved in Mn-induced disorder of SNARE complex. After mice were treated with Mn for 24 days, Mn deposition increased significantly in basal nuclei in Mn-treated and calpeptin pre-treated groups. Behaviorally, less time spent in the center of the area and decreased average velocity significantly in an open field test after 24 days of Mn exposure. With the increase in MnCl2 dosage, intracellular Ca(2+) increased significantly, but pretreatment with calpeptin caused a dose-dependent decrease in calpains activity. There were fragments of N-terminal of SNAP-25 protein appearance in Mn-treated groups, but it is decreased with pretreatment of calpeptin. FM1-43-labeled synaptic vesicles also provided evidence that the treatment with Mn resulted in increasing first and then decreasing, which was consistent with Glu release and the 80 kDa protein levels of SNARE complexes. In summary, Mn induced the disorder of neurotransmitter release through influencing the formation of SNARE complex via cleaving SNAP-25 by overactivation of calpains in vivo.

  9. A unique missense allele of BAF155, a core BAF chromatin remodeling complex protein, causes neural tube closure defects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmacek, Laura; Watkins-Chow, Dawn E; Chen, Jianfu; Jones, Kenneth L; Pavan, William J; Salbaum, J Michael; Niswander, Lee

    2014-05-01

    Failure of embryonic neural tube closure results in the second most common class of birth defects known as neural tube defects (NTDs). While NTDs are likely the result of complex multigenic dysfunction, it is not known whether polymorphisms in epigenetic regulators may be risk factors for NTDs. Here we characterized Baf155(msp3) , a unique ENU-induced allele in mice. Homozygous Baf155(mps3) embryos exhibit highly penetrant exencephaly, allowing us to investigate the roles of an assembled, but malfunctional BAF chromatin remodeling complex in vivo at the time of neural tube closure. Evidence of defects in proliferation and apoptosis were found within the neural tube. RNA-Seq analysis revealed that surprisingly few genes showed altered expression in Baf155 mutant neural tissue, given the broad epigenetic role of the BAF complex, but included genes involved in neural development and cell survival. Moreover, gene expression changes between individual mutants were variable even though the NTD was consistently observed. This suggests that inconsistent gene regulation contributes to failed neural tube closure. These results shed light on the role of the BAF complex in the process of neural tube closure and highlight the importance of studying missense alleles to understand epigenetic regulation during critical phases of development.

  10. Induction of immune responses in mice by vaccination with Liposome-entrapped DNA complexes encoding Toxoplasma gondii SAG1 and ROP1 genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈海峰; 陈观今; 郑焕钦; 郭红

    2003-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the immune responses induced by experimental DNA construct encoding Toxoplasma gondii (T.gondii) surface antigen1 (SAG1) and rhoptry protein 1 (ROP1) in mice as a hybrid gene. Methods Truncated SAG1 and ROP1 DNA fragments were amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and inserted into pEGFP-N3 vector to construct recombinant plasmid pSAG1-ROP1. NIH3T3 mammalian cells were transiently transfected with the DNA construct. Female BALB/c mice were given three intramuscular injections of 10 μg plasmid DNA entrapped in liposome. Four weeks after the final booster injection, blood samples were collected and subjected to enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) to investigate humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Reversal transcript-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to evaluate the transcription of inoculated DNA-liposome complex in the injected site. Dot-blot hybridization was employed in order to detect whether or not the injected DNA was incorporated into the genomic DNA of the immunized mice.Results Green fluorescence was observed in pSAG1-ROP1-transfected cells. Western blot analysis showed antibody recognition of the expressed SAG1-ROP1 was between 58 kDa and 75 kDa. No expression was observed in blank control plasmid-transfected cells. The sera of immunized mice exhibited antibodies to T.gondii tachyzoites and primarily interferon-γ and interlukin-2. RT-PCR showed that the duration of transcribed inoculated liposome entrapped DNA in the injected muscular tissue was at least ten days post the first injection. Dot-blot hybridization revealed that the presence of foreign DNA in the splenocytes and peripheral blood leukocytes was transient and that no foreign DNA had inserted into the genomic DNA of mice immunized with pSAG1-ROP1. Conclusions Immunization with a liposome-encapsulated DNA construct encoding the T.gondii SAG1 and ROP1 can induce humoral and cell-mediated immune responses.

  11. Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase Deficiency Inhibits Autoimmune Arthritis in Mice but Fails to Block Immune Complex-Mediated Inflammatory Arthritis.

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    Nyhoff, Lindsay E; Barron, Bridgette L; Johnson, Elizabeth M; Bonami, Rachel H; Maseda, Damian; Fensterheim, Benjamin A; Han, Wei; Blackwell, Timothy S; Crofford, Leslie J; Kendall, Peggy L

    2016-08-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a B cell signaling protein that also contributes to innate immunity. BTK inhibitors prevent autoimmune arthritis but have off-target effects, and the mechanisms of protection remain unknown. We undertook these studies using genetic deletion to investigate the role of BTK in adaptive and innate immune responses that drive inflammatory arthritis. BTK-deficient K/BxN mice were generated to study the role of BTK in a spontaneous model that requires both adaptive and innate immunity. The K/BxN serum-transfer model was used to bypass the adaptive system and elucidate the role of BTK in innate immune contributions to arthritis. BTK deficiency conferred disease protection to K/BxN mice, confirming outcomes of BTK inhibitors. B lymphocytes were profoundly reduced, more than in other models of BTK deficiency. Subset analysis revealed loss of B cells at all developmental stages. Germinal center B cells were also decreased, with downstream effects on numbers of follicular helper T cells and greatly reduced autoantibodies. In contrast, total IgG was only mildly decreased. Strikingly, and in contrast to small molecule inhibitors, BTK deficiency had no effect in the serum-transfer model of arthritis. BTK contributes to autoimmune arthritis primarily through its role in B cell signaling and not through innate immune components. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  12. Analysis of blood coagulation in mice: pre-analytical conditions and evaluation of a home-made assay for thrombin-antithrombin complexes

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    Meijers Joost CM

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of mouse models for the study of thrombotic disorders has gained increasing importance. Methods for measurement of coagulation activation in mice are, however, scarce. The primary aim of this study was to develop a specific mouse thrombin-antithrombin (TAT ELISA for measurement of coagulation activation and to compare it with two commercially available assays for human TAT complexes. In addition, we aimed to improve methods for mouse plasma anticoagulation and preparation. Methods and results First, for the measurement of TAT-complexes in plasma a mouse specific TAT-ELISA was developed using rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against mouse thrombin and rat antithrombin, respectively. This ELISA detected an increase in TAT levels in a mouse model of endotoxemia. Two commercial human TAT ELISAs appeared to be less specific for mouse thrombin-rat antithrombin complexes. Second, to prevent clotting of mouse blood sodium citrate was either mixed with blood during collection in a syringe or was injected intravenously immediately prior to blood collection. Intravenous sodium citrate completely inhibited blood coagulation resulting in plasma with consistently low TAT levels. Sodium citrate mixed with blood during collection resulted in increased TAT levels in 4 out of 16 plasma samples. Third, heparinase was added to plasma samples after in vivo injection of different heparin doses to test its neutralizing effect. Heparinase neutralized up to a 20 U of heparin/mouse and resulted in accurate APTT and factor VIII determinations. Conclusion These procedures and reagents for plasma preparation and coagulation testing will improve studies on thrombotic disorders in mice.

  13. A hippocampal nicotinic acetylcholine alpha 7-containing receptor complex is linked to memory retrieval in the multiple-T-maze in C57BL/6j mice.

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    Subramaniyan, Saraswathi; Heo, Seok; Patil, Sudarshan; Li, Lin; Hoger, Harald; Pollak, Arnold; Lubec, Gert

    2014-08-15

    The link between the cholinergic and serotonergic system in cognitive function is well-documented. There is, however, limited information on spatial memory and this formed the rationale to carry out a study with the aim to show a specific link between nicotinic and serotonergic receptor complexes rather than the corresponding subunits, to spatial memory retrieval in a land maze. A total of 46 mice were used and divided into two groups, trained and untrained (yoked) in the multiple-T-Maze (MTM) and following training during the first four days, probe trials for memory retrieval were performed on days 8, 16 and 30. Six hours following scarification, hippocampi were taken for the analysis of native receptor complex levels using blue-native gels followed by immunoblotting with specific antibodies. 5-HT1A-, 5-HT7-, nAChα4- and nACh-α7-containing receptor complexes were observed and were paralleling memory retrievals and receptor complex levels were shown to be significantly different between trained and yoked animals. Only levels of a nicotinic acetylcholine α7 receptor-containing complex at an apparent molecular weight of approximately 480kDa were shown to be linked to memory retrieval on day 8 but not to retrievals on days 16 and 30 when memory extinction has taken place. Correlation between nAChα4-, 5-HT1A- and 5-HT7-containing receptors and latencies on day 16 may point to a probable link in extinction mechanisms. A series of the abovementioned receptor complexes were correlating among each other probably indicating a serotonergic/cholinergic network paralleling spatial memory formation.

  14. Sporozoite neutralizing antibodies elicited in mice and rhesus macaques immunized with a Plasmodium falciparum repeat peptide conjugated to meningococcal outer membrane protein complex

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    Craig ePrzysiecki

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies that neutralize infectivity of malaria sporozoites target the central repeat region of the circumsporozoite (CS protein, which in Plasmodium falciparum is comprised primarily of 30-40 tandem NANP tetramer repeats. We evaluated immunogenicity of an alum-adsorbed (NANP6 peptide conjugated to an outer membrane protein complex (OMPC derived from Neisseria meningitidis, a carrier protein used in a licensed H. influenzae pediatric vaccine. Mice immunized with alum-adsorbed (NANP6-OMPC, with or without Iscomatrix© as co-adjuvant, developed high levels of anti-repeat peptide antibody that inhibited in vitro invasion of human hepatoma cells by transgenic P. berghei sporozoites that express P. falciparum CS repeats (PfPb. Inhibition of sporozoite invasion in vitro correlated with in vivo resistance to challenge by the bites of PfPb infected mosquitoes. Challenged mice had > 90% reduction of hepatic stage parasites as measured by real-time PCR, and either sterile immunity, i.e. no detectable blood stage parasites, or delayed prepatent periods which indicate neutralization of a majority, but not all, sporozoites. Rhesus macaques immunized with two doses of (NANP6-OMPC/MAA formulated with Iscomatrix© developed anti-repeat antibodies that persisted for ~2 years. A third dose of (NANP6-OMPC/MAA+ Iscomatrix© at that time elicited strong anamnestic antibody responses. Rhesus macaque immune sera obtained post second and third dose of vaccine displayed high levels of sporozoite neutralizing activity in vitro that correlated with presence of high anti-repeat antibody titers. These preclinical studies in mice of different MHC haplotypes and a non-human primate support use of CS peptide-OMPC conjugates as a highly immunogenic platform to evaluate CS protective epitopes. Potential pre-erythrocytic vaccines can be combined with sexual blood stage vaccines as a multi-antigen malaria vaccine to block invasion and transmission of Plasmodium parasites

  15. The oxygen free radicals originating from mitochondrial complex I contribute to oxidative brain injury following hypoxia-ischemia in neonatal mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niatsetskaya, Zoya V.; Sosunov, Sergei A.; Matsiukevich, Dzmitry; Utkina-Sosunova, Irina V.; Ratner, Veniamin I.; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Ten, Vadim S.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress and Ca++ toxicity are mechanisms of hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury. This work investigates if partial inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain protects HI-brain by limiting generation of oxidative radicals during reperfusion. HI-insult was produced in p10 mice treated with complex-I (C-I) inhibitor, pyridaben (P), or vehicle. Administration of P significantly decreased extent of HI injury. Mitochondria isolated from the ischemic hemisphere in P-treated animals showed reduced H2O2 emission, less oxidative damage to the mitochondrial matrix, and increased tolerance to Ca++ triggered opening of permeability transition pore. Protective effect of P administration was also observed when the reperfusion-driven oxidative stress was augmented by the exposure to 100% O2 which exacerbated brain injury only in V-treated mice. In vitro, intact brain mitochondria dramatically increased H2O2 emission in response to hyperoxia, resulting in substantial loss of Ca++ buffering capacity. However, in the presence of C-I inhibitor, rotenone, or antioxidant, catalase, these effects of hyperoxia were abolished. Our data suggest that the reperfusion-driven recovery of C-I dependent mitochondrial respiration contributes not only to the cellular survival, but also causes an oxidative damage to the mitochondria, potentiating a loss of Ca++ buffering capacity. This highlights a novel neuroprotective strategy against HI-brain injury where the major therapeutic principle is a pharmacological attenuation, rather than an enhancement of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism during early reperfusion. PMID:22378894

  16. The oxygen free radicals originating from mitochondrial complex I contribute to oxidative brain injury following hypoxia-ischemia in neonatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niatsetskaya, Zoya V; Sosunov, Sergei A; Matsiukevich, Dzmitry; Utkina-Sosunova, Irina V; Ratner, Veniamin I; Starkov, Anatoly A; Ten, Vadim S

    2012-02-29

    Oxidative stress and Ca(2+) toxicity are mechanisms of hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury. This work investigates if partial inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain protects HI brain by limiting a generation of oxidative radicals during reperfusion. HI insult was produced in p10 mice treated with complex I (C-I) inhibitor, pyridaben, or vehicle. Administration of P significantly decreased the extent of HI injury. Mitochondria isolated from the ischemic hemisphere in pyridaben-treated animals showed reduced H(2)O(2) emission, less oxidative damage to the mitochondrial matrix, and increased tolerance to the Ca(2+)-triggered opening of the permeability transition pore. A protective effect of pyridaben administration was also observed when the reperfusion-driven oxidative stress was augmented by the exposure to 100% O(2) which exacerbated brain injury only in vehicle-treated mice. In vitro, intact brain mitochondria dramatically increased H(2)O(2) emission in response to hyperoxia, resulting in substantial loss of Ca(2+) buffering capacity. However, in the presence of the C-I inhibitor, rotenone, or the antioxidant, catalase, these effects of hyperoxia were abolished. Our data suggest that the reperfusion-driven recovery of C-I-dependent mitochondrial respiration contributes not only to the cellular survival, but also causes oxidative damage to the mitochondria, potentiating a loss of Ca(2+) buffering capacity. This highlights a novel neuroprotective strategy against HI brain injury where the major therapeutic principle is a pharmacological attenuation, rather than an enhancement of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism during early reperfusion.

  17. Disruption of the ATXN1-CIC complex causes a spectrum of neurobehavioral phenotypes in mice and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hsiang-Chih; Tan, Qiumin; Rousseaux, Maxime WC; Wang, Wei; Kim, Ji-Yoen; Richman, Ronald; Wan, Ying-Wooi; Yeh, Szu-Ying; Patel, Jay M; Liu, Xiuyun; Lin, Tao; Lee, Yoontae; Fryer, John D; Han, Jing; Chahrour, Maria; Finnell, Richard H; Lei, Yunping; Zurita-Jimenez, Maria E; Ahimaz, Priyanka; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Lehalle, Daphne; Jean-Marcais, Nolwenn; Mosca-Boidron, Anne-Laure; Thevenon, Julien; Cousin, Margot A; Bro, Della E; Lanpher, Brendan C; Klee, Eric W; Alexander, Nora; Bainbridge, Matthew N; Orr, Harry T; Sillitoe, Roy V; Ljungberg, M. Cecilia; Liu, Zhandong; Schaaf, Christian P; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2017-01-01

    Gain-of function mutations in some genes underlie neurodegenerative conditions whereas loss-of-function mutations have distinct phenotypes. Such appears to be the case with the protein ataxin 1 (ATXN1), which forms a transcriptional repressor complex with capicua (CIC). Gain-of-function of the complex leads to neurodegeneration, but ATXIN1-CIC is also essential for survival. We set out to understand the functions of ATXN1-CIC in the developing forebrain and found that losing the complex results in hyperactivity, impaired learning and memory, and abnormal maturation and maintenance of upper layer cortical neurons. We also found that CIC modulates social interactions in the hypothalamus and medial amygdala. Informed by these neurobehavioral features in mouse mutants, we identified five patients with de novo heterozygous truncating mutations in CIC that share similar clinical features, including intellectual disability, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and autism spectrum disorder. Our study demonstrates that loss of ATXN1-CIC complexes causes a spectrum of neurobehavioral phenotypes. PMID:28288114

  18. Protein and lipid oxidative damage and complex I content are lower in the brain of budgerigar and canaries than in mice. Relation to aging rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Reinald; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Sanz, Alberto; Ayala, Victoria; Vasileva, Ekaterina; Barja, Gustavo

    2005-12-01

    What are the mechanisms determining the rate of animal aging? Of the two major classes of endothermic animals, bird species are strikingly long-lived compared to mammals of similar body size and metabolic rate. Thus, they are ideal models to identify longevity-related characteristics not linked to body size or low metabolic rates. Since oxidative stress seems to be related to the basic aging process, we measured specific markers of different kinds of oxidative damage to proteins, like glutamic and aminoadipic semialdehydes (GSA and AASA, specific protein carbonyls), Nɛ-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL), Nɛ-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), and Nɛ-(malondialdehyde)lysine (MDAL), as well as mitochondrial Complex I content and amino acid and membrane fatty acyl composition, in the brain of short-lived mice (maximum life span [MLSP] 3.5 years) compared with those of long-lived budgerigar 'parakeets' (MLSP, 21 years) and canaries (MLSP, 24 years). The brains of both bird species had significantly lower levels of compounds formed as a result of oxidative (GSA and AASA), glycoxidative (CEL and CML), and lipoxidative (CML and MDAL) protein modifications, as well as a lower levels of mitochondrial complex I protein. Although it is known that fatty acid unsaturation is lower in many tissues of long-lived compared to short-lived mammals, this is not true in the particular case of brain. In agreement with this, we also found that the brain tissue of bugerigars and canaries contains no fewer double bonds than that of mice. Amino acid composition analyses revealed that bird proteins have a significantly lower content of His, Leu and Phe, as well as, interestingly, of methionine, whereas Asp, Glu, Ala, Val, and Lys contents were higher than in the mammals. These results, together with those previously described in other tissues of pigeons (MLSP, 35 years) compared to rats (MLSP, 4 years), indicate that oxidative damage to proteins, lipids and mitochondrial DNA are lower in birds (very

  19. Apparatus for collection of fecal samples from undisturbed spiny mice (Acomys cahirinus) living in a complex social group.

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    Frynta, Daniel; Nováková, Marcela; Kutalová, Hana; Palme, Rupert; Sedlácek, Frantisek

    2009-03-01

    Assessment of fecal glucocorticoid metabolites has become a widely used method for monitoring stress responses. Because most small rodents are social animals whose physiologic parameters are affected by social stimuli, individual housing may compromise these data. Nevertheless, housing rodents in families or social groups may be an important limitation to the experimental design. The challenge is to collect samples from individual rodents while avoiding stress-associated effects from the sampling method itself. Here we present an apparatus and protocol allowing routine repeated collection of an individual rodent's fresh fecal samples without noticeable disturbance of any of the study animals; continuous maintenance of studied animals in a familiar environment; group housing; and uninterrupted visual and olfactory communication among group members during sampling. The apparatus consists of 1 central and 4 lateral compartments. The experimental animal was allowed to enter a lateral compartment voluntarily, where it remained for the short (4 h) period necessary for sample collection before rejoining the rest of the group. Evaluations involved Egyptian spiny mice, a social rodent increasingly studied in laboratories. The results confirmed the repeatability of the assessment of baseline levels of glucocorticoid metabolites. Moreover, keeping the animals in our experimental apparatus did not induce any increase in the levels of glucocorticoid metabolites, even when isolation in the compartment was relatively prolonged. We interpret these results as confirmation that our sampling procedure allows repeated individual sampling within a nearly undisturbed social unit.

  20. Evaluation of Nanocarrier Targeted Drug Delivery of Capecitabine-PAMAM Dendrimer Complex in a Mice Colorectal Cancer Model

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    Fatemeh Nabavizadeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Capecitabine, an effective anticancer drug in colorectal cancer chemotherapy, may create adverse side effects on healthy tissues. In the present study, we first induced colon adenocarcinoma with azoxymethane, a carcinogen agent, and then investigated the potentiality of polyamidoamine (PAMAM dendrimer to improve capecitabine therapeutic index and decrease its adverse side effects on healthy tissues like liver and bone marrow. Other variables such as nanoparticle concentrations have also been investigated. Drug loading concentration (DLC and encapsulation efficiency (EE were calculated for capecitabine/dendrimer complex. Experimental results showed an increase in DLC percentage resulted from elevated capecitabine/dendrimer ratio. Capecitabine/dendrimer complex could reduce tumor size and adverse side effects in comparison with free capecitabine form.

  1. Intranasal Administration of Novel Chitosan Nanoparticle/DNA Complexes Induces Antibody Response to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebre, F; Borchard, G; Faneca, H; Pedroso de Lima, M C; Borges, O

    2016-02-01

    The generation of strong pathogen-specific immune responses at mucosal surfaces where hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission can occur is still a major challenge. Therefore, new vaccines are urgently needed in order to overcome the limitations of existing parenteral ones. Recent studies show that this may be achieved by intranasal immunization. Chitosan has gained attention as a nonviral gene delivery system; however, its use in vivo is limited due to low transfection efficiency mostly related to strong interaction between the negatively charged DNA and the positively charged chitosan. We hypothesize that the adsorption of negatively charged human serum albumin (HSA) onto the surface of the chitosan particles would facilitate the intracellular release of DNA, enhancing transfection activity. Here, we demonstrate that a robust systemic immune response was induced after vaccination using HSA-loaded chitosan nanoparticle/DNA (HSA-CH NP/DNA) complexes. Furthermore, intranasal immunization with HSA-CH NP/DNA complexes induced HBV specific IgA in nasal and vaginal secretions; no systemic or mucosal responses were detected after immunization with DNA alone. Overall, our results show that chitosan-based DNA complexes elicited both humoral and mucosal immune response, making them an interesting and valuable gene delivery system for nasal vaccination against HBV.

  2. Apoptosis-inducing Effect of a Palladium(II) Complex-[PdCl(terpy)](sac).2H2O] on Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma (EAC) in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikitimur-Armutak, Elif I; Ulukaya, Engin; Gurel-Gurevin, Ebru; Yaylim, Ilhan; Isbilen-Basok, Banu; Sennazli, Gulbin; Yuzbasioglu-Ozturk, Gulay; Sonmez, Kivilcim; Celik, Faruk; Kucukhuseyin, Ozlem; Korkmaz, Gurbet; Yilmaz, Veysel T; Zeybek, Sakir Umit

    2016-01-01

    New compounds for cancer treatment are needed due to persistenly unsatisfactory management of cancer. [PdCl(terpy)](sac)·2H2O] (sac=saccharinate, and terpy=2,2':6',2"-terpyridine) is a compound synthesized for this purpose. We investigated its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma (EAC) in vivo. 42 Balb-c female mice were subcutaneously (s.c.) injected with EAC cells (1st day) and then randomly divided into 5 groups: control (0.9% NaCl), complex (2 mg/kg), complex (3 mg/kg) cisplatin (4 mg/kg) and paclitaxel (12.5 mg/kg). On the 5th and 12th day animals were drug administrated. At 14th day, animals were sacrificed. Expression of cell death and/or cell cycle-related markers (Bcl-2, Bax, active caspase-3, p53, PCNA) and apoptosis were investigated immunohisto-chemically. Survival-related markers (Akt, GSK-3β, IGF-1R, IR, IRS-1, p70S6K, PRAS40) were evaluated by luminex analysis. Expression of p53, PCNA, Bcl-2 was found decreased (p<0.001) and that of active caspase-3, Bax, and apoptotic cells was found increased (p<0.001) in all groups. The survival-related markers did not show any statistical difference in complex groups. The Pd(II)-complex seems to have a strong anticancer activity on EAC by inducing apoptosis via both suppression of proliferation and activation of apoptosis in vivo, similar to the effects of cisplatin and paclitaxel. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. The binding of [3H]oestradiol-receptor complex to hypothalamic chromatin of male and female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, A; Burgos, J; Ventanas, J

    1985-01-01

    Histones and masking acidic proteins were removed from hypothalamic chromatin in order to evaluate/measure the number of available acceptor sites for the [3H]oestradiol-receptor complex. This number increases after dehistonizing and unmasking and is lower than published values for comparable preparations. No sex-related difference in [3H]oestradiol-receptor binding to hypothalamic chromatin in vitro was observed. Failure to observe such a difference suggests that sexual differentiation and steroid sensitivity cannot be attributed to marked differences in the degree of chromatin masking.

  4. In vivo expansion of regulatory T cells with IL-2/IL-2 mAb complexes prevents anti-factor VIII immune responses in hemophilia A mice treated with factor VIII plasmid-mediated gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao-Lien; Ye, Peiqing; Yen, Benjamin C; Miao, Carol H

    2011-08-01

    Generation of transgene-specific immune responses can constitute a major complication following gene therapy treatment. An in vivo approach to inducing selective expansion of Regulatory T (Treg) cells by injecting interleukin-2 (IL-2) mixed with a specific IL-2 monoclonal antibody (JES6-1) was adopted to modulate anti-factor VIII (anti-FVIII) immune responses. Three consecutive IL-2 complexes treatments combined with FVIII plasmid injection prevented anti-FVIII formation and achieved persistent, therapeutic-level of FVIII expression in hemophilia A (HemA) mice. The IL-2 complexes treatment expanded CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells five- to sevenfold on peak day, and they gradually returned to normal levels within 7-14 days without changing other lymphocyte populations. The transiently expanded Treg cells are highly activated and display suppressive function in vitro. Adoptive transfer of the expanded Treg cells protected recipient mice from generation of high-titer antibodies following FVIII plasmid challenge. Repeated plasmid transfer is applicable in tolerized mice without eliciting immune responses. Mice treated with IL-2 complexes mounted immune responses against both T-dependent and T-independent neoantigens, indicating that IL-2 complexes did not hamper the immune system for long. These results demonstrate the important role of Treg cells in suppressing anti-FVIII immune responses and the potential of developing Treg cell expansion therapies that induce long-term tolerance to FVIII.

  5. The Temporal Pattern of Changes in Serum Biomarker Levels Reveal Complex and Dynamically Changing Pathologies after Exposure to a Single Low-intensity Blast in Mice

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    Farid eAhmed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Time dependent changes of protein biomarkers in the serum can help identifying the pathological processes and assessing the severity and progression of the disease in blast induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI. We obtained blood from naïve mice and mice exposed to a single, low-intensity blast at 2 hour, 1 day, 1 week and 1 month post-injury. We then determined the serum levels of biomarkers related to metabolism (4-HNE, HIF-1α, Ceruloplasmin, vascular functions (VEGF, vWF, AQP1, AQP4, FLK-1, cell adhesion (Integrin 6α, TIMP1, TIMP4, Ncad, Connexin-43, inflammation (MMP-8, MIP-1α, CINC1, Fibrinogen, CCR5, CRP, Galectin-1, MCP-1, p38, OX-44, Osteopontin, axonal (NF-H, Tau, neuronal (NSE, CK-BB and glial integrity (GFAP, S100β, MBP and compared the changes among the experimental groups. Our results indicate that in the mouse, exposure to a single, low-intensity blast caused substantial metabolic, vascular and inflammatory responses, altered cell adhesion but only minimal neuronal, axonal and glia injury as indicated by serum proteomics data. Changes in metabolism, vascular functions and inflammation remained elevated at the termination of the experiment while the others were only detectable during the acute post-injury phase. Our findings indicate that exposure to a single; low-intensity blast can induce complex pathological processes with distinct temporal profile. Hence, monitoring serum biomarker levels at various post-injury time points may provide enhanced diagnostics in bTBI.

  6. Enhancement of orofacial antinociceptive effect of carvacrol, a monoterpene present in oregano and thyme oils, by β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Juliane C; Almeida, Jackson R G S; Quintans, Jullyana S S; Gopalsamy, Rajiv Gandhi; Shanmugam, Saravanan; Serafini, Mairim Russo; Oliveira, Maria R C; Silva, Bruno A F; Martins, Anita O B P B; Castro, Fyama F; Menezes, Irwin R A; Coutinho, Henrique D M; Oliveira, Rita C M; Thangaraj, Parimelazhagan; Araújo, Adriano A S; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J

    2016-12-01

    Orofacial pain is associated with diagnosis of chronic pain of head, face, mouth, neck and all the intraoral structures. Carvacrol, a naturally occurring isoprenoid with diverse class of biological activities including anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antitumor and antioxidant properties. Now, the antinociceptive effect was studied in mice pretreatment with carvacrol (CARV) and β-cyclodextrin complex containing carvacrol (CARV-βCD) in formalin-, capsaicin-, and glutamate- induced orofacial nociception. Mice were pretreated with vehicle (0.9% Nacl, p.o.), CARV (10 and 20mg/kg, p.o.), CARV-βCD (10 and 20mg/kg, p.o.) or MOR (10mg/kg, i.p.) before the nociceptive behavior induced by subcutaneous injections (s.c.) of formalin (20μl, 2%), capsaicin (20μl, 2.5μg) or glutamate (20μl, 25μM) into the upper lip respectively. The interference on motor coordination was determined using rotarod and grip strength meter apparatus. CARV-βCD reduced the nociceptive during the two phases of the formalin test, whereas CARV did not produced the reduction in face-rubbing behavior in the initial phase. CARV-βCD (20mg/kg, p.o.) produced 49.3% behavior pain while CARV alone at 20mg/kg, p.o, produced 28.7% of analgesic inhibition in the second phase of formalin test. CARV, CARV-βCD and Morphine (MOR) showed a significant reduction against nociception caused by capsaicin or glutamate injection. Thus the encapsulation of carvacrol in β-cyclodextrin can acts as a considerable therapeutic agent with pharmacological interest for the orofacial pain management.

  7. Isolation and mutagenesis of a capsule-like complex (CLC from Francisella tularensis, and contribution of the CLC to F. tularensis virulence in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloka B Bandara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Francisella tularensis is a category-A select agent and is responsible for tularemia in humans and animals. The surface components of F. tularensis that contribute to virulence are not well characterized. An electron-dense capsule has been postulated to be present around F. tularensis based primarily on electron microscopy, but this specific antigen has not been isolated or characterized. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A capsule-like complex (CLC was effectively extracted from the cell surface of an F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS lacking O-antigen with 0.5% phenol after 10 passages in defined medium broth and growth on defined medium agar for 5 days at 32°C in 7% CO₂. The large molecular size CLC was extracted by enzyme digestion, ethanol precipitation, and ultracentrifugation, and consisted of glucose, galactose, mannose, and Proteinase K-resistant protein. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that expression of genes in a putative polysaccharide locus in the LVS genome (FTL_1432 through FTL_1421 was upregulated when CLC expression was enhanced. Open reading frames FTL_1423 and FLT_1422, which have homology to genes encoding for glycosyl transferases, were deleted by allelic exchange, and the resulting mutant after passage in broth (LVSΔ1423/1422_P10 lacked most or all of the CLC, as determined by electron microscopy, and CLC isolation and analysis. Complementation of LVSΔ1423/1422 and subsequent passage in broth restored CLC expression. LVSΔ1423/1422_P10 was attenuated in BALB/c mice inoculated intranasally (IN and intraperitoneally with greater than 80 times and 270 times the LVS LD₅₀, respectively. Following immunization, mice challenged IN with over 700 times the LD₅₀ of LVS remained healthy and asymptomatic. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicated that the CLC may be a glycoprotein, FTL_1422 and -FTL_1423 were involved in CLC biosynthesis, the CLC contributed to the virulence of F. tularensis LVS, and a CLC

  8. Nuclear annexin II negatively regulates growth of LNCaP cells and substitution of ser 11 and 25 to glu prevents nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of annexin II

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    Ayala-Sanmartin Jesus

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Annexin II heavy chain (also called p36, calpactin I is lost in prostate cancers and in a majority of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN. Loss of annexin II heavy chain appears to be specific for prostate cancer since overexpression of annexin II is observed in a majority of human cancers, including pancreatic cancer, breast cancer and brain tumors. Annexin II exists as a heterotetramer in complex with a protein ligand p11 (S100A10, and as a monomer. Diverse cellular functions are proposed for the two forms of annexin II. The monomer is involved in DNA synthesis. A leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES in the N-terminus of annexin II regulates its nuclear export by the CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway. Mutation of the NES sequence results in nuclear retention of annexin II. Results Annexin II localized in the nucleus is phosphorylated, and the appearance of nuclear phosphorylated annexin II is cell cycle dependent, indicating that phosphorylation may play a role in nuclear entry, retention or export of annexin II. By exogenous expression of annexin II in the annexin II-null LNCaP cells, we show that wild-type annexin II is excluded from the nucleus, whereas the NES mutant annexin II localizes in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. Nuclear retention of annexin II results in reduced cell proliferation and increased doubling time of cells. Expression of annexin II, both wild type and NES mutant, causes morphological changes of the cells. By site-specific substitution of glutamic acid in the place of serines 11 and 25 in the N-terminus, we show that simultaneous phosphorylation of both serines 11 and 25, but not either one alone, prevents nuclear localization of annexin II. Conclusion Our data show that nuclear annexin II is phosphorylated in a cell cycle-dependent manner and that substitution of serines 11 and 25 inhibit nuclear entry of annexin II. Aberrant accumulation of nuclear annexin II retards proliferation of LNCa

  9. Common antigenicity between Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) pollen and Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) pollen, I. H-2 complex affects cross responsiveness to Cry j 1 and Cha o 1 at the T- and B-cell level in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingetsu, I; Ohno, N; Hayashi, N; Sakaguchi, M; Inouye, S; Saito, S

    2000-04-01

    Common antigenicity among two purified Japanese cedar pollen allergens (Cry j 1 and Cry j 2) and one Japanese cypress pollen allergen (Cha o 1) was explored at the T-cell and B-cell level in mice of different H-2 haplotypes. Cry j 2 did not show any common antigenicity with Cry j 1 or Cha o 1. B10.S (H-2S) mice immunized with Cry j 1 or Cha o 1 generated T cells and antibodies reactive to both antigens, indicating the common antigenicity of these antigens. C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice were non-responders to Cry j 1. BALB/c (H-2d) mice immunized with Cry j 1 or Cha o 1 and C57BL/6 mice immunized with Cha o 1 generated T cells that were only reactive with the respective immunogen, but produced antibody reactive to both Cry j 1 and Cha o 1, indicating that Cry j 1 and Cha o 1 share their B-cell epitope but not their T-cell epitope. This finding may provide a clue for the clarification of the T-cell and B-cell epitopes of Cry j 1 and Cha o 1, even though the data are influenced by H-2 complex restriction in mice. Considering that H-2 complex restriction affects cross responsiveness to Cry j 1 and Cha o 1 at the T- and B-cell level in mice, we assessed the possible situation in humans exposed sequentially to Japanese cedar pollen and Japanese cypress pollen.

  10. 壳寡糖螯合铬对糖尿病小鼠降血糖作用的研究%Hypoglycemic Effects of Chitooligosaccharide-chromium (Ⅲ)Complex on Diabetic Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲婉秋; 唐晓琳; 王秀武

    2012-01-01

    探讨壳寡糖螯合铬(Cos-Cr)的降血糖作用.选择发育相近的健康雄性小鼠10只为正常对照组,糖尿病小鼠30只随机分为糖尿病对照组、壳寡糖组(Cos)和螯合铬组(Cos-Cr),每组各10只,实验期4w,测定小鼠血糖值.壳寡糖螯合铬可以降低糖尿病小鼠血糖,增加体重,增加脾脏指数,明显缓解糖尿病小鼠饥饿和烦渴的症状.肝脏损伤明显减轻.同时观察肝组织病理变化.壳寡糖螯合铬对糖尿病小鼠有降糖,改善糖尿病症状的作用.%To study the effects of chitooligosaccharide-chromium( III ) complex(Cos-Cr)on diabetic mice. Selecting ten male mice as the normal control group. Thirty diabetes mice were randomly divided into 3 groups, diabetes control group (n = 10),Cos group (n = 10), Cos-Cr group (n = 10). The mice were dissected after 4 weeks, determinations of serum glucose concentration. Cos-Cr can significantly decrease fasting blood glucose level, increase body weight as well as index spleen. Symptoms of hunger and thirsty were improved obviously in diabetic mice. Cos-Cr has protective effects on alloxan-induced hepatic injury in mice. Hepatocytes lesion was alleviated markedly. Cos-Cr can decrease blood glucose concentration and improve diabetic symptoms in mice.

  11. Inhibition of the membrane attack complex of the complement system reduces secondary neuroaxonal loss and promotes neurologic recovery after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluiter, Kees; Opperhuizen, Anne Loes; Morgan, B Paul; Baas, Frank; Ramaglia, Valeria

    2014-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of disability and death in young adults. The secondary neuroinflammation and neuronal damage that follows the primary mechanical injury is an important cause of disability in affected people. The membrane attack complex (MAC) of the complement system is detected in the traumatized brain early after TBI; however, its role in the pathology and neurologic outcome of TBI has not yet been investigated. We generated a C6 antisense oligonucleotide that blocks MAC formation by inhibiting C6, and we compared its therapeutic effect to that of Ornithodoros moubata complement inhibitor (OmCI), a known inhibitor of C5 activation that blocks generation of the anaphylatoxin C5a and C5b, an essential component of MAC. Severe closed head injury in mice induced abundant MAC deposition in the brain. Treatment with C6 antisense reduced C6 synthesis (85%) and serum levels (90%), and inhibited MAC deposition in the injured brain (91-96%). Treatment also reduced accumulation of microglia/macrophages (50-88%), neuronal apoptosis, axonal loss and weight loss (54-93%), and enhanced neurologic performance (84-92%) compared with placebo-treated controls after injury. These data provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that inhibition of MAC formation in otherwise complement-sufficient animals reduces neuropathology and promotes neurologic recovery after TBI. Given the importance of maintaining a functional complement opsonization system to fight infections, a critical complication in TBI patients, inhibition of the MAC should be considered to reduce posttraumatic neurologic damage. This work identifies a novel therapeutic target for TBI and will guide the development of new therapy for patients.

  12. Metabolite profiles reveal energy failure and impaired beta-oxidation in liver of mice with complex III deficiency due to a BCS1L mutation.

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    Heike Kotarsky

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: Liver is a target organ in many mitochondrial disorders, especially if the complex III assembly factor BCS1L is mutated. To reveal disease mechanism due to such mutations, we have produced a transgenic mouse model with c.232A>G mutation in Bcs1l, the causative mutation for GRACILE syndrome. The homozygous mice develop mitochondrial hepatopathy with steatosis and fibrosis after weaning. Our aim was to assess cellular mechanisms for disease onset and progression using metabolomics. METHODS: With mass spectrometry we analyzed metabolite patterns in liver samples obtained from homozygotes and littermate controls of three ages. As oxidative stress might be a mechanism for mitochondrial hepatopathy, we also assessed H(2O(2 production and expression of antioxidants. RESULTS: Homozygotes had a similar metabolic profile at 14 days of age as controls, with the exception of slightly decreased AMP. At 24 days, when hepatocytes display first histopathological signs, increases in succinate, fumarate and AMP were found associated with impaired glucose turnover and beta-oxidation. At end stage disease after 30 days, these changes were pronounced with decreased carbohydrates, high levels of acylcarnitines and amino acids, and elevated biogenic amines, especially putrescine. Signs of oxidative stress were present in end-stage disease. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest an early Krebs cycle defect with increases of its intermediates, which might play a role in disease onset. During disease progression, carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism deteriorate leading to a starvation-like condition. The mouse model is valuable for further investigations on mechanisms in mitochondrial hepatopathy and for interventions.

  13. Of mice and the 'Age of Discovery': the complex history of colonization of the Azorean archipelago by the house mouse (Mus musculus) as revealed by mitochondrial DNA variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, S I; Mathias, M L; Searle, J B

    2015-01-01

    Humans have introduced many species onto remote oceanic islands. The house mouse (Mus musculus) is a human commensal and has consequently been transported to oceanic islands around the globe as an accidental stowaway. The history of these introductions can tell us not only about the mice themselves but also about the people that transported them. Following a phylogeographic approach, we used mitochondrial D-loop sequence variation (within an 849- to 864-bp fragment) to study house mouse colonization of the Azores. A total of 239 sequences were obtained from all nine islands, and interpretation was helped by previously published Iberian sequences and 66 newly generated Spanish sequences. A Bayesian analysis revealed presence in the Azores of most of the D-loop clades previously described in the domesticus subspecies of the house mouse, suggesting a complex colonization history of the archipelago as a whole from multiple geographical origins, but much less heterogeneity (often single colonization?) within islands. The expected historical link with mainland Portugal was reflected in the pattern of D-loop variation of some of the islands but not all. A more unexpected association with a distant North European source area was also detected in three islands, possibly reflecting human contact with the Azores prior to the 15th century discovery by Portuguese mariners. Widening the scope to colonization of the Macaronesian islands as a whole, human linkages between the Azores, Madeira, the Canaries, Portugal and Spain were revealed through the sharing of mouse sequences between these areas. From these and other data, we suggest mouse studies may help resolve historical uncertainties relating to the 'Age of Discovery'.

  14. Blood glucose level and other biochemical changes induced in normal mice by oral Traditional Chinese Medicine complex for diabetes (TCM-D™

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    Donald Koh Fook Chen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: A number of Traditional ChineseMedicine (TCM preparations are being used for thetreatment of diabetes mellitus. Some componentsof these preparations have biochemical effects otherthan those of lowering blood glucose and indeed havebeen used for other medical indications in traditionalpractice. The primary objective of the study was todetermine the effect of the oral mixture of TraditionalChinese Medicine for diabetes (TCM-D™ complex onblood glucose level and the biochemical changes if any,on the liver (ALT, AST, gamma-GT, albumin, globulinand renal (blood creatinine, urea functions in normalmice. The oral mixture is an aqueous extract of four wellknowntraditional Chinese medicinal herbs and consistsof Trichosanthes kirilowii Maxim., Paeonia lactiflora Pall.,Glycyrrhiza uranlensis Fisch., and Panax ginseng (redCA Meyer in the proportion of 36%, 28%, 18%, and18% respectively of the dry weight. These herbs havebeen shown to have blood glucose lowering activity andhave been used for other traditional medicinal purposes.The safety of the combination was evaluated in thepresent study.Methods: Experimental Balb/c mice were treated orallyvia gastric tube with the extract at daily doses equivalentto 1 and 10 times the recommended human dose for8 weeks. Blood glucose and other biochemical profileswere monitored at pre-treatment and monthly posttreatmentuntil killed.Results: When compared to pre-treatment levels, theblood glucose levels were significantly lower in treatedanimals compared to those in the control group. Atthe recommended TCM-D™ dose the levels in treatedanimals were significantly lower than that of controlanimals and at pre-treatment. When compared withpre-treatment, the glucose levels were lowest at Week8 of treatment, the mean levels being 111.23%, 83.32%and 70.33% in control, and in animals given 1 x and10 x the recommended TCM-D™ dosage respectively.The blood glucose lowering effect was also associatedwith a significant

  15. The QTL within the H2 Complex Involved in the Control of Tuberculosis Infection in Mice Is the Classical Class II H2-Ab1 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logunova, Nadezhda; Korotetskaya, Maria; Polshakov, Vladimir; Apt, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    The level of susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB) infection depends upon allelic variations in numerous interacting genes. In our mouse model system, the whole-genome quantitative trait loci (QTLs) scan revealed three QTLs involved in TB control on chromosomes 3, 9, and in the vicinity of the H2 complex on chromosome 17. For the present study, we have established a panel of new congenic, MHC-recombinant mouse strains bearing differential small segments of chromosome 17 transferred from the TB-susceptible I/St (H2j) strain onto the genetic background of TB-resistant C57BL/6 (B6) mice (H2b). This allowed narrowing the QTL interval to 17Ch: 33, 77-34, 34 Mb, containing 36 protein-encoding genes. Cloning and sequencing of the H2j allelic variants of these genes demonstrated profound polymorphic variations compare to the H2b haplotype. In two recombinant strains, B6.I-249.1.15.100 and B6.I-249.1.15.139, recombination breakpoints occurred in different sites of the H2-Aβ 1 gene (beta-chain of the Class II heterodimer H2-A), providing polymorphic variations in the domain β1 of the Aβ-chain. These variations were sufficient to produce different TB-relevant phenotypes: the more susceptible B6.I-249.1.15.100 strain demonstrated shorter survival time, more rapid body weight loss, higher mycobacterial loads in the lungs and more severe lung histopathology compared to the more resistant B6.I-249.1.15.139 strain. CD4+ T cells recognized mycobacterial antigens exclusively in the context of the H2-A Class II molecule, and the level of IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells in the lungs was significantly higher in the resistant strain. Thus, we directly demonstrated for the first time that the classical H2- Ab1 Class II gene is involved in TB control. Molecular modeling of the H2-Aj product predicts that amino acid (AA) substitutions in the Aβ-chain modify the motif of the peptide-MHC binding groove. Moreover, unique AA substitutions in both α- and β-chains of the H2-Aj molecule might

  16. The QTL within the H2 Complex Involved in the Control of Tuberculosis Infection in Mice Is the Classical Class II H2-Ab1 Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda Logunova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The level of susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB infection depends upon allelic variations in numerous interacting genes. In our mouse model system, the whole-genome quantitative trait loci (QTLs scan revealed three QTLs involved in TB control on chromosomes 3, 9, and in the vicinity of the H2 complex on chromosome 17. For the present study, we have established a panel of new congenic, MHC-recombinant mouse strains bearing differential small segments of chromosome 17 transferred from the TB-susceptible I/St (H2j strain onto the genetic background of TB-resistant C57BL/6 (B6 mice (H2b. This allowed narrowing the QTL interval to 17Ch: 33, 77-34, 34 Mb, containing 36 protein-encoding genes. Cloning and sequencing of the H2j allelic variants of these genes demonstrated profound polymorphic variations compare to the H2b haplotype. In two recombinant strains, B6.I-249.1.15.100 and B6.I-249.1.15.139, recombination breakpoints occurred in different sites of the H2-Aβ 1 gene (beta-chain of the Class II heterodimer H2-A, providing polymorphic variations in the domain β1 of the Aβ-chain. These variations were sufficient to produce different TB-relevant phenotypes: the more susceptible B6.I-249.1.15.100 strain demonstrated shorter survival time, more rapid body weight loss, higher mycobacterial loads in the lungs and more severe lung histopathology compared to the more resistant B6.I-249.1.15.139 strain. CD4+ T cells recognized mycobacterial antigens exclusively in the context of the H2-A Class II molecule, and the level of IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells in the lungs was significantly higher in the resistant strain. Thus, we directly demonstrated for the first time that the classical H2- Ab1 Class II gene is involved in TB control. Molecular modeling of the H2-Aj product predicts that amino acid (AA substitutions in the Aβ-chain modify the motif of the peptide-MHC binding groove. Moreover, unique AA substitutions in both α- and β-chains of the H2-Aj

  17. Effects of long- term physical activity on complex of skeletal muscle mitochondria of old mice%长期运动对老年小鼠骨骼肌线粒体复合物的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈彩珍; 许豪文

    2000-01-01

    目的:研究长期运动训练对老年小鼠骨骼肌线粒体复合物I和复合物Ⅳ活性的影响,并探讨其机制。方法:以C57BL/6J雄性小鼠跑转笼为运动方式,通过分光光度法和极谱氧电极法测定线粒体复合物I和复合物Ⅳ的活性。结果:随着小鼠年龄的增长,骨骼肌线粒体复合物I(NADH脱氢酶)活性显著下降,复合物IV(细胞色素氧化酶)活性无明显变化。经过8个月运动训练的小鼠骨骼肌线粒体复合物I及复合物IV活性明显升高,显著高于同龄对照鼠甚至高于5月龄鼠。结论:运动训练在一定程度上致骨骼肌线粒体功能产生适应性变化。%Objective:To observe the effects of long term physical activity (running wheel) on the age- related changes of complex I and IV activities of mice skeletal muscle mitochondria. Methods:The activity level of complex I and complex Ⅳ of 10 elderly training mice,10 elder non- training mice and 10 young mice was obtained by spectrophotography and polarography.Result: The complex I activity decreased with age, and complex IV activity was not influenced. After 8 months physical training, the activities of complex I and IV increased.Conclusion:The adaptive changes of mitochondria were brought by long term physical activity which might delay the age- related decline of mitochondrial function.

  18. Mi2β is required for γ-globin gene silencing: temporal assembly of a GATA-1-FOG-1-Mi2 repressor complex in β-YAC transgenic mice.

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    Flávia C Costa

    Full Text Available Activation of γ-globin gene expression in adults is known to be therapeutic for sickle cell disease. Thus, it follows that the converse, alleviation of repression, would be equally effective, since the net result would be the same: an increase in fetal hemoglobin. A GATA-1-FOG-1-Mi2 repressor complex was recently demonstrated to be recruited to the -566 GATA motif of the (Aγ-globin gene. We show that Mi2β is essential for γ-globin gene silencing using Mi2β conditional knockout β-YAC transgenic mice. In addition, increased expression of (Aγ-globin was detected in adult blood from β-YAC transgenic mice containing a T>G HPFH point mutation at the -566 GATA silencer site. ChIP experiments demonstrated that GATA-1 is recruited to this silencer at day E16, followed by recruitment of FOG-1 and Mi2 at day E17 in wild-type β-YAC transgenic mice. Recruitment of the GATA-1-mediated repressor complex was disrupted by the -566 HPFH mutation at developmental stages when it normally binds. Our data suggest that a temporal repression mechanism is operative in the silencing of γ-globin gene expression and that either a trans-acting Mi2β knockout deletion mutation or the cis-acting -566 (Aγ-globin HPFH point mutation disrupts establishment of repression, resulting in continued γ-globin gene transcription during adult definitive erythropoiesis.

  19. Effects of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim associated to resveratrol on its free form and complexed with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin on cytokines levels of mice infected by Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottari, Nathieli B; Baldissera, Matheus D; Tonin, Alexandre A; Rech, Virginia C; Nishihira, Vivian S K; Thomé, Gustavo R; Camillo, Giovana; Vogel, Fernanda F; Duarte, Marta M M F; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Morsch, Vera M; Tochetto, Camila; Fighera, Rafael; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resveratrol on its free form and complexed with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) when associated with sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (ST) on cytokines levels of mice (n = 60) experimentally infected by Toxoplasma gondii. Groups A and E were used as controls (untreated): negative and positive, respectively. The onset of treatment started 20 days post-infection (PI), and it lasted for 10 consecutive days. ST was administered orally in doses of 0.5 mg kg(-1) for groups B and F, while 100 mg kg(-1) was the dose for resveratrol in its free form (groups C - G), inclusion complex (groups D and H), and on free and inclusion complex together (groups I - J). On day 31 PI, blood samples were collected in order to evaluate the cytokine profile. The mice that received drug combination (I and J) showed a significant (P cytokines, while IL-10 levels were reduced when compared to the Group A. Additionally, there were increased levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ in animals of groups C and D, respectively (P cytokines along with a reduction of IL-10. Treatment with the combination of drugs (the Group J) led to a protective effect, i.e. reduction in pro-inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, resveratrol associated with ST was able to modulate seric cytokine profile and moderate the tissue inflammatory process caused by T. gondii infection, as well as to reduce parasite multiplication.

  20. Combination Therapy Using IL-2/IL-2 Monoclonal Antibody Complexes, Rapamycin, and Islet Autoantigen Peptides Increases Regulatory T Cell Frequency and Protects against Spontaneous and Induced Type 1 Diabetes in Nonobese Diabetic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manirarora, Jean N; Wei, Cheng-Hong

    2015-12-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a crucial role in the maintenance of self-tolerance. In this study, we sought to expand Ag-specific Tregs in vivo and investigate whether the expanded Tregs can prevent or delay the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the NOD mouse model. NOD mice were treated with a combination of IL-2/anti-IL-2 Ab complex, islet Ag peptide, and rapamycin. After the combined treatment, CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs were significantly expanded in vivo, they expressed classical Treg markers, exerted enhanced suppressive functions in vitro, and protected against spontaneous development of T1D in NOD mice. Moreover, treated mice were almost completely protected from the adoptively transferred, aggressive form of T1D caused by in vitro-activated cytotoxic islet Ag-specific CD8 T cells. Protection from T1D was transferrable by Tregs and could be attributed to reduced islet infiltration of immune cells as well as the skewing of the immune response toward a Th2 cytokine profile. This new method of peripheral immune regulation could potentially contribute to development of novel immunotherapeutic strategies to prevent the development of T1D or to promote tolerance to islet transplants without using immunosuppressive drugs for long terms.

  1. Acquired pMHC I Complexes Greatly Enhance CD4+ Th Cell's Stimulatory Effect on CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Diabetes in Transgenic RIP-mOVA Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khawaja Ashfaque Ahmed; Yufeng Xie; Xueshu Zhang; Jim Xiang

    2008-01-01

    CD4+ helper T (Th) cells play pivotal roles in induction of CD8+ CTL immunity. However, the mechanism of CD4+ T cell help delivery to CD8+ T cells in vivo is still elusive. In this study, we used ovalbumin (OVA)-pulsed dendritic cells (DCovA) to activate OT-Ⅱ mouse CD4+ T cells, and then studied the help effect of these CD4+ T cells on CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. We also examined CTL mediated islet β cell destruction which leaded to diabetes in wild-type C57BL/6 mice and transgenic rat insulin promoter (RIP)-mOVA mice expressing β cell antigen OVA with self OVA-specific tolerance, respectively. In adoptive transfer experiments, we demonstrated that help, in the form of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) I acquired from DCovA by DCovA activation, was required for induction of OVA-specific CTL responses in C57BL/6 mice. However, in combination with TCR transgenic OT-I mouse CD8+ T cells, the tolerogenic dosage of CD4+ Th cells with acquired pMHC I, but not CD4+ (Kb-/-) Th cells without acquired pMHC I were able to cause diabetes in 8/10 (80%) RIP-mOVA mice.This study thus expands the current knowledge in T cell-mediated autoimmunity and provides insight into the nature of CD4+ T cell-mediated help in CD8+ CTL induction. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(6):407-415.

  2. EFFECTS OF COMPLEX OLIGOSACCHARIDE ON REPRODUCTIVE FUNCTION IN MALE MICE AND THE MECHANISMS%复合型寡聚糖对雄性小鼠生殖能力的影响及作用途径

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀武; 刘美思; 杨洋; 许青松

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of chitosan oligosaccharide (COS) and complex oligosaccharide (CTO) on male reproductive capacity in mice and the mechanisms involved.Methods Seventy-two adult mice (3-week-old) were randomly assigned to 3 groups: control group (NC), COS-treated group and COT-treated group. At 7 weeks old, each male mouse was mated with a female for 5 days to obtain the F1-generation. Key reproductive-related parameters of the F1-generation, including levels of T, FSH, LH, SOD, GSH-Px and MDA, sperm activities, DDX4 protein expression and testis index, were analyzed at the age of 3, 6, and 12 weeks, respectively.Results (1) Testis index were increased in 6-week old COS and COT-treated mice as compared to the NC mice, but only the difference between the CTO-treated mice and the NC were statistically significant. (2) Sperm viability and a-grade sperm percentages were significantly increased in the 12-week old CTO-treated mice as compared to the control group (P<0.05). (3) Numbers of spermatogenic cells and mature sperm in the seminiferous tubules were significantly increased in the 12-week CTO-treated mice (P<0.05). (4) Serum testosterone concentrations were significantly increased at all ages of the COS and CTO-treated mice as compared to the control group (P<0.05), and the CTO-treated mice manifested the highest levels of serum testosterone. (5) Although both CTO and COS-treated mice showed increased levels of DDX4 in testis, only the difference between the 3 and 12-week old CTO-treated group and the control group was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion Complex oligosaccharide could increase the reproductive capacity via enhancing the expression of testicular DDX4 in male mice.%目的 观察复合型寡聚糖(CTO)和单一寡糖(COS)对雄性小鼠生殖能力的影响及作用途径.方法选择21日龄雌、雄性小鼠72只,随机分为NC组、COS组和CTO组(COS:FOS:YP=1:1:1),每组24只,雌、雄各

  3. Phosphodiesterase 4B in the cardiac L-type Ca²⁺ channel complex regulates Ca²⁺ current and protects against ventricular arrhythmias in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Jérôme; Richter, Wito; Mika, Delphine; Castro, Liliana R V; Abi-Gerges, Aniella; Xie, Moses; Scheitrum, Colleen; Lefebvre, Florence; Schittl, Julia; Mateo, Philippe; Westenbroek, Ruth; Catterall, William A; Charpentier, Flavien; Conti, Marco; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Vandecasteele, Grégoire

    2011-07-01

    β-Adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) enhance cardiac contractility by increasing cAMP levels and activating PKA. PKA increases Ca²⁺-induced Ca²⁺ release via phosphorylation of L-type Ca²⁺ channels (LTCCs) and ryanodine receptor 2. Multiple cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) regulate local cAMP concentration in cardiomyocytes, with PDE4 being predominant for the control of β-AR-dependent cAMP signals. Three genes encoding PDE4 are expressed in mouse heart: Pde4a, Pde4b, and Pde4d. Here we show that both PDE4B and PDE4D are tethered to the LTCC in the mouse heart but that β-AR stimulation of the L-type Ca²⁺ current (ICa,L) is increased only in Pde4b-/- mice. A fraction of PDE4B colocalized with the LTCC along T-tubules in the mouse heart. Under β-AR stimulation, Ca²⁺ transients, cell contraction, and spontaneous Ca²⁺ release events were increased in Pde4b-/- and Pde4d-/- myocytes compared with those in WT myocytes. In vivo, after intraperitoneal injection of isoprenaline, catheter-mediated burst pacing triggered ventricular tachycardia in Pde4b-/- mice but not in WT mice. These results identify PDE4B in the CaV1.2 complex as a critical regulator of ICa,L during β-AR stimulation and suggest that distinct PDE4 subtypes are important for normal regulation of Ca²⁺-induced Ca²⁺ release in cardiomyocytes.

  4. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in mice features regulatory transcriptional network connecting major histocompatibility complex (MHC H2) with autoantigen genes in the thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donate, Paula B; Fornari, Thaís A; Junta, Cristina M; Magalhães, Danielle A; Macedo, Cláudia; Cunha, Thiago M; Nguyen, Catherine; Cunha, Fernando Q; Passos, Geraldo A

    2011-05-01

    Considering that imbalance of central tolerance in the thymus contributes to aggressive autoimmunity, we compared the expression of peripheral tissue autoantigens (PTA) genes, which are involved in self-representation in the thymic stroma, of two mouse strains; DBA-1/J (MHC-H2(q)) susceptible and DBA-2/J (MHC-H2(d)) resistant to collagen induced arthritis (CIA). We evaluate whether these strains differ in their thymic gene expression, allowing identification of genes that might play a role in susceptibility/resistance to CIA. Microarray profiling showed that 1093 PTA genes were differentially modulated between collagen immunized DBA-1/J and DBA-2/J mice. These genes were assigned to 17 different tissues/organs, including joints/bone, characterizing the promiscuous gene expression (PGE), which is implicated in self-representation. Hierarchical clustering of microarray data and quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that Aire (autoimmune regulator), an important regulator of the PGE process, Aire-dependent (insulin), Aire-independent (Col2A1 and Gad67), and other 22 joint/bone autoantigen genes were down-regulated in DBA-1/J compared with DBA-2/J in the thymus. Considering the importance of MHC-H2 in peptide-self presentation and autoimmunity susceptibility, we reconstructed transcriptional networks of both strains based on actual microarray data. The networks clearly demonstrated different MHC-H2 transcriptional interactions with PTAs genes. DBA-1/J strain featured MHC-H2 as a node influencing downstream genes. Differently, in DBA-2/J strain network MHC-H2 was exclusively self-regulated and does not control other genes. These findings provide evidence that CIA susceptibility in mice may be a reflex of a cascade-like transcriptional control connecting different genes to MHC-H2 in the thymus.

  5. The complex of PAMAM-OH dendrimer with Angiotensin (1–7) prevented the disuse-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Miranda, Valeria; Abrigo, Johanna; Rivera, Juan Carlos; Araya-Durán, Ingrid; Aravena, Javier; Simon, Felipe; Pacheco, Nicolás; González-Nilo, Fernando Danilo; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Angiotensin (1–7) (Ang-(1–7)) is a bioactive heptapeptide with a short half-life and has beneficial effects in several tissues – among them, skeletal muscle – by preventing muscle atrophy. Dendrimers are promising vehicles for the protection and transport of numerous bioactive molecules. This work explored the use of a neutral, non-cytotoxic hydroxyl-terminated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM-OH) dendrimer as an Ang-(1–7) carrier. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the Ang-(1–7)-binding capacity of the dendrimer presented a 2:1 molar ratio. Molecular dynamics simulation analysis revealed the capacity of neutral PAMAM-OH to protect Ang-(1–7) and form stable complexes. The peptide coverage ability of the dendrimer was between ~50% and 65%. Furthermore, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that neutral PAMAM-OH effectively bonded peptides. Experimental results showed that the Ang-(1–7)/PAMAM-OH complex, but not Ang-(1–7) alone, had an anti-atrophic effect when administered intraperitoneally, as evaluated by muscle strength, fiber diameter, myofibrillar protein levels, and atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expressions. The results of the Ang-(1–7)/PAMAM-OH complex being intraperitoneally injected were similar to the results obtained when Ang-(1–7) was systemically administered through mini-osmotic pumps. Together, the results suggest that Ang-(1–7) can be protected for PAMAM-OH when this complex is intraperitoneally injected. Therefore, the Ang-(1–7)/PAMAM-OH complex is an efficient delivery method for Ang-(1–7), since it improves the anti-atrophic activity of this peptide in skeletal muscle. PMID:28331320

  6. The complex of PAMAM-OH dendrimer with Angiotensin (1-7) prevented the disuse-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Miranda, Valeria; Abrigo, Johanna; Rivera, Juan Carlos; Araya-Durán, Ingrid; Aravena, Javier; Simon, Felipe; Pacheco, Nicolás; González-Nilo, Fernando Danilo; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Angiotensin (1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) is a bioactive heptapeptide with a short half-life and has beneficial effects in several tissues - among them, skeletal muscle - by preventing muscle atrophy. Dendrimers are promising vehicles for the protection and transport of numerous bioactive molecules. This work explored the use of a neutral, non-cytotoxic hydroxyl-terminated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM-OH) dendrimer as an Ang-(1-7) carrier. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the Ang-(1-7)-binding capacity of the dendrimer presented a 2:1 molar ratio. Molecular dynamics simulation analysis revealed the capacity of neutral PAMAM-OH to protect Ang-(1-7) and form stable complexes. The peptide coverage ability of the dendrimer was between ~50% and 65%. Furthermore, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that neutral PAMAM-OH effectively bonded peptides. Experimental results showed that the Ang-(1-7)/PAMAM-OH complex, but not Ang-(1-7) alone, had an anti-atrophic effect when administered intraperitoneally, as evaluated by muscle strength, fiber diameter, myofibrillar protein levels, and atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expressions. The results of the Ang-(1-7)/PAMAM-OH complex being intraperitoneally injected were similar to the results obtained when Ang-(1-7) was systemically administered through mini-osmotic pumps. Together, the results suggest that Ang-(1-7) can be protected for PAMAM-OH when this complex is intraperitoneally injected. Therefore, the Ang-(1-7)/PAMAM-OH complex is an efficient delivery method for Ang-(1-7), since it improves the anti-atrophic activity of this peptide in skeletal muscle.

  7. 2-phenylethynesulfonamide Prevents Induction of Pro-inflammatory Factors and Attenuates LPS-induced Liver Injury by Targeting NHE1-Hsp70 Complex in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Huang

    Full Text Available The endotoxin-mediated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines plays an important role in the pathogenesis of liver disorders. Heat shock protein (Hsp70 overexpression has established functions in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-mediated inflammatory response. However, little is known about the role of Hsp70 activity in LPS signaling. We hypothesized that inhibition of Hsp70 substrate binding activity can ameliorate LPS-induced liver injury by decreasing induction of pro-inflammatory factors. In this study, C57/BL6 mice were injected intraperitoneally with LPS and 2-phenylethynesulfonamide (PES, an inhibitor of Hsp70 substrate binding activity. We found that i. PES prevented LPS-induced increase in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST activity, infiltration of inflammatory cells, and liver cell apoptosis; ii. PES reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS protein expression as well as serum nitric oxide (NO, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and interleukin-6 (IL-6 content in LPS-stimulated mice; iii. PES reduced the mRNA level of iNOS, TNF-α, and IL-6 in LPS-stimulated liver. iiii. PES attenuated the degradation of inhibitor of κB-α (IκB-α as well as the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB in LPS-stimulated liver. Similar changes in the protein expression of inflammatory markers, IκB-α degradation, and NF-κB phosphorylation and nuclear translocation were observed in RAW 264.7 cells. Further mechanistic studies revealed that PES remarkably reduced the elevation of [Ca(2+]i and intracellular pH value (pHi in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Furthermore, PES significantly reduced the increase in Na(+/H(+ exchanger 1 (NHE1 association to Hsp70 in LPS-stimulated macrophages and liver, suggesting that NHE1-Hsp70 interaction is required for the involvement of NHE1 in the inflammation response. In conclusion, inhibition of Hsp70 substrate binding activity in vivo reduces the

  8. Cytological and biochemical effects of St. John's Wort supplement (a complex mixture of St. John's Wort, Rosemary and Spirulina) on somatic and germ cells of Swiss Albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleisa, A M

    2008-12-01

    Commercially available St. John's wort supplement (SJWS) composed of an herbal mixture of St. John's Wort (SJW), Rosemary (RM) and Spirulina (SP) is used as a dietary supplement for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Although the minor ingredients, (RM and SP) are proven antioxidants, their quantity is quite insignificant as compared to the SJW, which is the major ingredient. Most of the toxic effects of SJWS are attributed to the main constituents of SJW which differ due to the influence of light (hypericin) and variations in temperature above freezing point (hyperforin). However, there are no reports on toxicity of SJWS maintained at room temperature in pharmacies and supermarkets. In view of the folkloric importance, immense (prescribed or unprescribed) use and a paucity of literature on SJWS, it was found worthwhile to (1) determine the genotoxic effects of SJWS in somatic and germ cells of mice and (2) investigate the role of biochemical changes, as a possible mechanism. The protocol included the oral treatment of mice with different doses (380, 760 and 1520 mg/kg/day) of SJWS for 7 days. The following experiments were conducted: (i) cytological studies on micronucleus test, (ii) cytogenetic analysis for meiotic chromosomes, (iii) cytological analysis of spermatozoa abnormalities, (iv) quantification of proteins and nucleic acids in hepatic and testicular cells and (v) estimation of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nonprotein sulfhydryl (NP-SH) in hepatic and testicular cells. The treatment increased the frequency of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) in the femora. It caused aberrations in chromosomes of testes and induced spermatozoa abnormalities. These changes might be attributed to the epigenetic mechanisms as revealed by an increase in concentrations of MDA and depletion of nucleic acids and NP-SH levels in both hepatic and testicular cells observed in the present study. Since, the samples of SJWS used were not drawn from extremities of light

  9. The complex of PAMAM-OH dendrimer with Angiotensin (1–7 prevented the disuse-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márquez-Miranda V

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Valeria Márquez-Miranda,1,2,* Johanna Abrigo,3,4,* Juan Carlos Rivera,3,4 Ingrid Araya-Durán,1 Javier Aravena,3,4 Felipe Simon,3,4 Nicolás Pacheco,1 Fernando Danilo González-Nilo,1,2,5 Claudio Cabello-Verrugio3,4 1Center for Bioinformatics and Integrative Biology (CBIB, Facultad de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago, 2Fundación Fraunhofer Chile Research, Las Condes, 3Departamento de Ciencias Biologicas, Facultad de Ciencias Biologicas & Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Andres Bello, 4Millennium Institute on Immunology and Immunotherapy, Santiago, 5Centro Interdisciplinario de Neurociencia de Valparaíso, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valparaíso, Valparaíso, Chile *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Angiotensin (1–7 (Ang-(1–7 is a bioactive heptapeptide with a short half-life and has beneficial effects in several tissues – among them, skeletal muscle – by preventing muscle atrophy. Dendrimers are promising vehicles for the protection and transport of numerous bioactive molecules. This work explored the use of a neutral, non-cytotoxic hydroxyl-terminated poly(amidoamine (PAMAM-OH dendrimer as an Ang-(1–7 carrier. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the Ang-(1–7-binding capacity of the dendrimer presented a 2:1 molar ratio. Molecular dynamics simulation analysis revealed the capacity of neutral PAMAM-OH to protect Ang-(1–7 and form stable complexes. The peptide coverage ability of the dendrimer was between ~50% and 65%. Furthermore, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that neutral PAMAM-OH effectively bonded peptides. Experimental results showed that the Ang-(1–7/PAMAM-OH complex, but not Ang-(1–7 alone, had an anti-atrophic effect when administered intraperitoneally, as evaluated by muscle strength, fiber diameter, myofibrillar protein levels, and atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expressions. The results of the Ang-(1–7/PAMAM-OH complex being intraperitoneally

  10. ~(99m)Tc(CO)_3-CHIPDTC配合物的制备及其生物分布%PREPARATION AND BIODISTRIBUTION OF 99mTc(CO)3-CHIPDTC COMPLEX IN MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段炼; 陈宇

    2012-01-01

    采用fac-9[9mTc(CO)3(H2O)3]+与N-环己基-N-异丙基-氨荒酸盐(CHIPDTC)在室温下发生配体交换反应制得99mTc(CO)3-CHIPDTC配合物.用薄层层析(TLC)法和高效液相色谱(HPLC)法鉴定该配合物的放射化学纯度大于90%.该配合物是一种体外稳定性良好的脂溶性电中性物质.99mTc(CO)3-CHIPDTC配合物在小鼠体内生物分布结果表明,其心、脑摄取值偏低,有待进一步结构修饰以获取新型优良放射性药物.%Organometallic precursor fac-[99mTc(CO)3(H2O)3]+ was reacted with N-cyclohexyl N-isopropyl dithiocarbamate(CHIPDTC) at room temperature to produce 99mTc(CO)3-CHIPDTC complex,with the product being over 90% radiochemically pure(RCP) as measured by thin layer chromatography(TLC) and high performance liquid chromatography(HPLC).The resultant complex was neutral,lipophilic and stable for over 6 hrs at room temperature.Biodistribution studies of 99mTc(CO)3-CHIPDTC and 99mTcN-CHIPDTC complexes in mice indicated that the 9mTc(CO)3 complex showed a much lower uptake in brain and heart.It is concluded that to obtain a suitable radiopharmaceutical,structure of the dithiocarbamate ligand should be modified structurally in the future.

  11. Oncogenic mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc activate mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 in mice and zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. Valvezan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Truncating mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC are strongly linked to colorectal cancers. APC is a negative regulator of the Wnt pathway and constitutive Wnt activation mediated by enhanced Wnt–β-catenin target gene activation is believed to be the predominant mechanism responsible for APC mutant phenotypes. However, recent evidence suggests that additional downstream effectors contribute to APC mutant phenotypes. We previously identified a mechanism in cultured human cells by which APC, acting through glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3, suppresses mTORC1, a nutrient sensor that regulates cell growth and proliferation. We hypothesized that truncating Apc mutations should activate mTORC1 in vivo and that mTORC1 plays an important role in Apc mutant phenotypes. We find that mTORC1 is strongly activated in apc mutant zebrafish and in intestinal polyps in Apc mutant mice. Furthermore, mTORC1 activation is essential downstream of APC as mTORC1 inhibition partially rescues Apc mutant phenotypes including early lethality, reduced circulation and liver hyperplasia. Importantly, combining mTORC1 and Wnt inhibition rescues defects in morphogenesis of the anterior-posterior axis that are not rescued by inhibition of either pathway alone. These data establish mTORC1 as a crucial, β-catenin independent effector of oncogenic Apc mutations and highlight the importance of mTORC1 regulation by APC during embryonic development. Our findings also suggest a new model of colorectal cancer pathogenesis in which mTORC1 is activated in parallel with Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  12. Synthesis of platinum(II) and palladium(II) complexes with 9,9-dihexyl-4,5-diazafluorene and their in vivo antitumour activity against Hep3B xenografted mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q-W; Lam, P-L; Wong, R S-M; Cheng, G Y-M; Lam, K-H; Bian, Z-X; Ho, C-L; Feng, Y-H; Gambari, R; Lo, Y-H; Wong, W-Y; Chui, C-H

    2016-11-29

    Two complexes dichloro(9,9-dihexyl-4,5-diazafluorene)platinum(II) (Pt-DHF) and dichloro(9,9-dihexyl-4,5-diazafluorene)palladium(II) (Pd-DHF) were synthesized and their in vivo antitumour activity was investigated using an athymic nude mice model xenografted with human Hep3B carcinoma cells. Pt-DHF- and Pd-DHF-treated groups showed significant tumour growth inhibition (with about 9-fold and 3-fold tumour growth retardation) when compared with the vehicle control group. The liver toxicology effects on the animals of the two compounds were investigated. Pt-DHF and Pd-DHF-treated groups had a lower alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase values than those of the vehicle treated group as the animals from the vehicle control group had very heavy hepatoma burden. We assume that both complexes could be further investigated as effective antitumour agents and it is worthwhile to study their underlying working mechanism.

  13. Impaired synthesis of erythropoietin, glutamine synthetase and metallothionein in the skin of NOD/SCID/gamma(c)(null) and Foxn1 nu/nu mice with misbalanced production of MHC class II complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielyan, L; Verleysdonk, S; Buadze, M; Gleiter, C H; Buniatian, G H

    2010-06-01

    Most skin pathologies are characterized by unbalanced synthesis of major histocompatability complex II (MHC-II) proteins. Healthy skin keratinocytes simultaneously produce large amounts of MHC-II and regeneration-supporting proteins, e.g. erythropoietin (EPO), EPO receptor (EPOR), glutamine synthetase (GS) and metallothionein (MT). To investigate the level of regeneration-supporting proteins in the skin during misbalanced production of MHC-II, skin sections from nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID)/gamma (c) (null) and or Foxn1 nu/nu mice which are a priory known to under- and over-express MHC II, respectively, were used. Double immunofluorescence analysis of NOD/SCID/gamma (c) (null) skin sections showed striking decrease in expression of MHC-II, EPO, GS and MT. In Foxn1 nu/nu mouse skin, GS was strongly expressed in epidermis and in hair follicles (HF), which lacked EPO. In nude mouse skin EPO and MHC-II were over-expressed in dermal fibroblasts and they were completely absent from cortex, channel, medulla and keratinocytes surrounding the HF, suggest a role for EPO in health and pathology of hair follicle. The level of expression of EPO and GS in both mutant mice was confirmed by results of Western blot analyses. Strong immunoresponsiveness of EPOR in the hair channels of NOD/SCID/gamma (c) (null) mouse skin suggests increased requirements of skin cells for EPO and possible benefits of exogenous EPO application during disorders of immune system accompanied by loss MHC-II in skin cells.

  14. Native cone photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated channel is a heterotetrameric complex comprising both CNGA3 and CNGB3: a study using the cone-dominant retina of Nrl-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, Alexander V; Quiambao, Alexander B; Browning Fitzgerald, J; Ding, Xi-Qin

    2008-09-01

    Cone vision mediated by photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel activation is essential for central and color vision and visual acuity. Mutations in genes encoding the cone CNG channel subunits, CNGA3 and CNGB3, have been linked to various forms of achromatopsia and progressive cone dystrophy in humans. This study investigates the biochemical components of native cone CNG channels, using the cone-dominant retina in mice deficient in the transcription factor neural retina leucine zipper (Nrl). Abundant expression of CNGA3 and CNGB3 but no rod CNG channel expression was detected in Nrl-/- retina by western blotting and immunolabeling. Localization of cone CNG channel in both blue (S)- and red/green (M)-cones was shown by double immunolabeling using antibodies against the channel subunits and against the S- and M-opsins. Immunolabeling also showed co-localization of CNGA3 and CNGB3 in the mouse retina. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated the direct interaction between CNGA3 and CNGB3. Chemical cross-linking readily generated products at sizes consistent with oligomers of the channel complexes ranging from dimeric to tetrameric complexes, in a concentration- and time-dependent pattern. Thus this work provides the first biochemical evidence showing the inter-subunit interaction between CNGA3 and CNGB3 and the presence of heterotetrameric complexes of the native cone CNG channel in retina. No association between CNGA3 and the cone Na(+)/Ca(2+)-K(+) exchanger (NCKX2) was shown by co-immunoprecipitation and chemical cross-linking. This may implicate a distinct modulatory mechanism for Ca(2+) homeostasis in cones compared to rods.

  15. 复合不平衡氨基酸对荷肝癌H22小鼠肿瘤的影响%Effect of Complex Amino Acid Imbalance Solutions on Hepatocarcinoma in Tumor Bearing H22 Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫忠芳; 陆伟; 齐玉梅; 杨晶; 金玉坤; 钱绍诚

    2011-01-01

    weight/cracass body weight, tumor cell necrosis rate, PCNA expression and DNA ploidy. Results: The factors used to assess tumor inhibition were significantly lower in groups B, C, D, E, F, G, H and Ithan in group A ( P < 0.05 ), except for tumor cell necrosis and DNA ploidy ( P > 0.05 ). Cell cycle analysis showed that in a comparison of group H and I with group A, the percentage of cells in G0/G1 ptase was increased in group H and I, while the percentage of cells in S phase and G2/M phase was decreased in the two groups ( P< 0.01 ). Conclusion: Balanced amino acid solution can stimulate tumor growth, while the complex amino acid inbalance solutions and some individual amino acid imbalance solutions have inhibitory effect on hepatocarcinoma in nude mice.

  16. Linkage disequilibrium in wild mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy C Laurie

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Crosses between laboratory strains of mice provide a powerful way of detecting quantitative trait loci for complex traits related to human disease. Hundreds of these loci have been detected, but only a small number of the underlying causative genes have been identified. The main difficulty is the extensive linkage disequilibrium (LD in intercross progeny and the slow process of fine-scale mapping by traditional methods. Recently, new approaches have been introduced, such as association studies with inbred lines and multigenerational crosses. These approaches are very useful for interval reduction, but generally do not provide single-gene resolution because of strong LD extending over one to several megabases. Here, we investigate the genetic structure of a natural population of mice in Arizona to determine its suitability for fine-scale LD mapping and association studies. There are three main findings: (1 Arizona mice have a high level of genetic variation, which includes a large fraction of the sequence variation present in classical strains of laboratory mice; (2 they show clear evidence of local inbreeding but appear to lack stable population structure across the study area; and (3 LD decays with distance at a rate similar to human populations, which is considerably more rapid than in laboratory populations of mice. Strong associations in Arizona mice are limited primarily to markers less than 100 kb apart, which provides the possibility of fine-scale association mapping at the level of one or a few genes. Although other considerations, such as sample size requirements and marker discovery, are serious issues in the implementation of association studies, the genetic variation and LD results indicate that wild mice could provide a useful tool for identifying genes that cause variation in complex traits.

  17. Effect of VEGF/bFGF complex peptide vaccine on toxicity and reproduc-tivity in female-mice%VEGF/bFGF 复合多肽疫苗对雌性小鼠的毒性及其生殖的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁锐强; 潘磊; 彭卉彤; 吕成定; 邓宁

    2015-01-01

    目的:初步探究血管内皮生长因子( VEGF )/碱性成纤维细胞生长因子( bFGF )复合多肽疫苗( VEGF/bFGF complex peptide vaccine,VBP3)对雌性小鼠的毒性及其生殖的影响。方法:通过镍离子亲和层析柱纯化VBP3蛋白,将纯化获得的VBP3免疫雌性BALB/c小鼠,酶联免疫吸附实验( ELISA)方法检测小鼠血清抗体效价和特异性,监测亲本小鼠体重,测定亲本小鼠脏器重量并对小鼠脏器进行HE染色观察;将免疫小鼠与未免疫雄性小鼠交配后,测定F1代小鼠存活率、体重、相关脏器重量,并对相关脏器进行HE染色观察。结果:间接ELISA检测结果显示免疫小鼠血清中抗VEGF、抗bFGF抗体滴度分别为1∶3000、1∶20000,且免疫组F1代小鼠能检测出低滴度的抗bFGF抗体,但抗VEGF抗体不能检出。在小鼠生产率实验中,免疫组与对照组崽鼠数目未见明显差异,但免疫组F1代小鼠存活率较对照组降低( P<0.05)。在亲本小鼠中,免疫组小鼠各脏器重量与对照组比较均未有差异,而在F1代小鼠中,2个组别的小鼠肝脏重量存在差异,但其它脏器重量未有差异;HE染色显示,在亲本小鼠中,2个组别小鼠的各脏器形态未有明显差异;在F1代小鼠中,免疫组F1代小鼠的肝脏与对照组相比存在形态差异。结论:VEGF/bFGF复合多肽疫苗未对亲本小鼠主要脏器造成直接损伤,但对亲本小鼠的生殖及F1代小鼠健康具有一定的影响。%[ ABSTRACT ] AIM: To investigate the toxicity and reproductive effect of vascular endothelial growth factor ( VEGF)/basic fibroblast growth factor ( bFGF) complex peptide vaccine ( VBP3) on the female-mice.METHODS:The VBP3 was purified with Ni-NTA affinity chromatography.The female BALB/c mice were immunized with the purified VBP3.The antibody titer in the serum was detected by ELISA.The data of the body weight and the organ

  18. Physico-chemical and biochemical approaches to assessing the development of precancerous pathologies of the gastrointestinal tract during their modeling in mice with complex effects of stress factors of different nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alieva, Zamira O.; Kanevskiy, Matvej V.; Galitskaya, Anna A.; Mironova, Irina K.; Pleshakova, Ekaterina V.; Velikov, Vladimir A.; Chumakov, Daniil S.; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, Oxana V.; Konnova, Svetlana A.

    2016-04-01

    It was shown in the experience with 60 white mice that separate and combined effects of stress factors: noctidial lighting (800 lux), sodium nitrite (0.2% solution in water) and p-toluidine (with food) within 107 days causes a change in impedance value of erythrocytes at frequencies 1 Hz - 1MHz. Changes in the activity of intracellular aminotransferases, creatinine and urea were observed, indicating cardiotoxic and hepatotoxic effects.

  19. Evaluation of Cytotoxicity, Genotoxicity and Hematotoxicity of the Recombinant Spore-Crystal Complexes Cry1Ia, Cry10Aa and Cry1Ba6 from Bacillus thuringiensis in Swiss Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Freire, Ingrid; Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Barbosa, Lilian Carla Pereira; Martins, Erica Soares; Monnerat, Rose Gomes; Grisolia, Cesar Koppe

    2014-01-01

    The insecticidal properties of Cry-endotoxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have long been used as spore-crystals in commercial spray formulations for insect control. Recently, some Bt-endotoxin genes have been cloned in many different plants. Toxicological evaluations of three spore-crystal endotoxins, BtCry1Ia, BtCry10Aa and BtCry1Ba6 from B. thuringiensis, were carried out on mice to understand their adverse effects on hematological systems and on genetic material. These three spore-crystals have shown toxic activity to the boll weevil, which is one of the most aggressive pests of the cotton crop. Cry1Ia, Cry10Aa and Cry1Ba6 did not increase the micronucleus frequency in the peripheral erythrocytes of mice and did not cause changes in the frequency of polychromatic erythrocytes. However, some hematologic disburbances were observed, specifically related to Cry1Ia and Cry1Ba6, respectively, for the erythroid and lymphoid lineage. Thus, although the profile of such adverse side effects can be related to their high level of exposure, which is not commonly found in the environment, results showed that these Bt spore-crystals were not harmless to mice, indicating that each spore-crystal endotoxin presents a characteristic profile of toxicity and might be investigated individually. PMID:25268978

  20. Evaluation of cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and hematotoxicity of the recombinant spore-crystal complexes Cry1Ia, Cry10Aa and Cry1Ba6 from Bacillus thuringiensis in Swiss mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Freire, Ingrid; Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Barbosa, Lilian Carla Pereira; Martins, Erica Soares; Monnerat, Rose Gomes; Grisolia, Cesar Koppe

    2014-09-29

    The insecticidal properties of Cry-endotoxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have long been used as spore-crystals in commercial spray formulations for insect control. Recently, some Bt-endotoxin genes have been cloned in many different plants. Toxicological evaluations of three spore-crystal endotoxins, BtCry1Ia, BtCry10Aa and BtCry1Ba6 from B. thuringiensis, were carried out on mice to understand their adverse effects on hematological systems and on genetic material. These three spore-crystals have shown toxic activity to the boll weevil, which is one of the most aggressive pests of the cotton crop. Cry1Ia, Cry10Aa and Cry1Ba6 did not increase the micronucleus frequency in the peripheral erythrocytes of mice and did not cause changes in the frequency of polychromatic erythrocytes. However, some hematologic disburbances were observed, specifically related to Cry1Ia and Cry1Ba6, respectively, for the erythroid and lymphoid lineage. Thus, although the profile of such adverse side effects can be related to their high level of exposure, which is not commonly found in the environment, results showed that these Bt spore-crystals were not harmless to mice, indicating that each spore-crystal endotoxin presents a characteristic profile of toxicity and might be investigated individually.

  1. Evaluation of Cytotoxicity, Genotoxicity and Hematotoxicity of the Recombinant Spore-Crystal Complexes Cry1Ia, Cry10Aa and Cry1Ba6 from Bacillus thuringiensis in Swiss Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid de Souza Freire

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The insecticidal properties of Cry-endotoxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt have long been used as spore-crystals in commercial spray formulations for insect control. Recently, some Bt-endotoxin genes have been cloned in many different plants. Toxicological evaluations of three spore-crystal endotoxins, BtCry1Ia, BtCry10Aa and BtCry1Ba6 from B. thuringiensis, were carried out on mice to understand their adverse effects on hematological systems and on genetic material. These three spore-crystals have shown toxic activity to the boll weevil, which is one of the most aggressive pests of the cotton crop. Cry1Ia, Cry10Aa and Cry1Ba6 did not increase the micronucleus frequency in the peripheral erythrocytes of mice and did not cause changes in the frequency of polychromatic erythrocytes. However, some hematologic disburbances were observed, specifically related to Cry1Ia and Cry1Ba6, respectively, for the erythroid and lymphoid lineage. Thus, although the profile of such adverse side effects can be related to their high level of exposure, which is not commonly found in the environment, results showed that these Bt spore-crystals were not harmless to mice, indicating that each spore-crystal endotoxin presents a characteristic profile of toxicity and might be investigated individually.

  2. Effect of Cage-Induced Stereotypies on Measures of Affective State and Recurrent Perseveration in CD-1 and C57BL/6 Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Janja; Bailoo, Jeremy D.; Melotti, Luca; Würbel, Hanno

    2016-01-01

    Stereotypies are abnormal repetitive behaviour patterns that are highly prevalent in laboratory mice and are thought to reflect impaired welfare. Thus, they are associated with impaired behavioural inhibition and may also reflect negative affective states. However, in mice the relationship between stereotypies and behavioural inhibition is inconclusive, and reliable measures of affective valence are lacking. Here we used an exploration based task to assess cognitive bias as a measure of affective valence and a two-choice guessing task to assess recurrent perseveration as a measure of impaired behavioural inhibition to test mice with different forms and expression levels of stereotypic behaviour. We trained 44 CD-1 and 40 C57BL/6 female mice to discriminate between positively and negatively cued arms in a radial maze and tested their responses to previously inaccessible ambiguous arms. In CD-1 mice (i) mice with higher stereotypy levels displayed a negative cognitive bias and this was influenced by the form of stereotypy performed, (ii) negative cognitive bias was evident in back-flipping mice, and (iii) no such effect was found in mice displaying bar-mouthing or cage-top twirling. In C57BL/6 mice neither route-tracing nor bar-mouthing was associated with cognitive bias, indicating that in this strain these stereotypies may not reflect negative affective states. Conversely, while we found no relation of stereotypy to recurrent perseveration in CD-1 mice, C57BL/6 mice with higher levels of route-tracing, but not bar-mouthing, made more repetitive responses in the guessing task. Our findings confirm previous research indicating that the implications of stereotypies for animal welfare may strongly depend on the species and strain of animal as well as on the form and expression level of the stereotypy. Furthermore, they indicate that variation in stereotypic behaviour may represent an important source of variation in many animal experiments. PMID:27145080

  3. Social transfer of pain in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Monique L.; Hostetler, Caroline M.; Heinricher, Mary M.; Ryabinin, Andrey E.

    2016-01-01

    A complex relationship exists between the psychosocial environment and the perception and experience of pain, and the mechanisms of the social communication of pain have yet to be elucidated. The present study examined the social communication of pain and demonstrates that “bystander” mice housed and tested in the same room as mice subjected to inflammatory pain or withdrawal from morphine or alcohol develop corresponding hyperalgesia. Olfactory cues mediate the transfer of hyperalgesia to the bystander mice, which can be measured using mechanical, thermal, and chemical tests. Hyperalgesia in bystanders does not co-occur with anxiety or changes in corticosterone and cannot be explained by visually dependent emotional contagion or stress-induced hyperalgesia. These experiments reveal the multifaceted relationship between the social environment and pain behavior and support the use of mice as a model system for investigating these factors. In addition, these experiments highlight the need for proper consideration of how experimental animals are housed and tested.

  4. Carney Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types of Cancer > Carney Complex Request Permissions Carney Complex Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/2015 What is Carney complex? Carney complex is a hereditary condition associated with: ...

  5. Complex Beauty

    OpenAIRE

    Franceschet, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Complex systems and their underlying convoluted networks are ubiquitous, all we need is an eye for them. They pose problems of organized complexity which cannot be approached with a reductionist method. Complexity science and its emergent sister network science both come to grips with the inherent complexity of complex systems with an holistic strategy. The relevance of complexity, however, transcends the sciences. Complex systems and networks are the focal point of a philosophical, cultural ...

  6. MICE IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The MICE (Meetings, Incentives, Conventions, and Exhibitions) industry has exploded worldwide over the past decade. The benefits brought by meetings, incentives, conventions, and exhibitions are also benefiting other sectors involved in MICE events, including hotels, travel, and retail. Industry analysts estimate that the income from the global MICE industry will soon exceed USD 220 billion, and is expected to increase by 8-10% each year.

  7. Complexity explained

    CERN Document Server

    Erdi, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This book explains why complex systems research is important in understanding the structure, function and dynamics of complex natural and social phenomena. Readers will learn the basic concepts and methods of complex system research.

  8. α-硫辛酸合锌对痴呆模型小鼠学习记忆能力的影响%Effects of Zinc α-lipoate Complex on the Learning and Memory Abilities of Scopolamine-induced Amnesia Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张迪; 李燕; 罗瑛; 田卫群; 周青山

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate effects of zincα-lipoate complex on the learning and memory abilities as well as the oxidative stress in scopolamine-induced amnesia mice. Methods A total of 32 mice were randomly divided into the model control group, the group with α-lipoic acid, the group with zinc sulfate, the group with zincα-lipoate complex. rats in each group were administered corresponding drugs and trained with Y-maze five hours later. After 8 days,Rats in each group received the celiac injection of the scopolamine at a dose of 5mg/kg. After half an hour, the memory ability was tested, and then the mice were decapitated. The content of GSH and protein, the activity of SOD in the cerebral tissue were determined. Results Compared with the model control group and other groups, the zincα-li-poate complex can decrease the false times and the activity of SOD (P < 0. 01) in the cerebral tissue, while increase the content of GSH (P < 0. 01) and protein (P < 0. 05). Conclusion The zinc α-lipoate complex can improve the learning and memory abilities and de-crease the level of oxidative stress in the cerebral tissue of amnesia mice.%目的 观察α-硫辛酸合锌对东莨菪碱致痴呆模型小鼠学习记忆能力及氧化应激的影响. 方法 将32只昆明小鼠随机均分成模型对照组、硫辛酸组、硫酸锌组、α-硫辛酸合锌组. 每组每天分别给予生理盐水、硫辛酸、硫酸锌和α-硫辛酸合锌,每次给药5h后进行Y迷宫训练,连续8天后各组均给予5mg/kg东莨菪碱,半小时后进行记忆能力测试. 测定小鼠匀浆后脑组织内还原型谷胱甘肽和蛋白含量及超氧化物歧化酶的活力. 结果 与模型对照组及其他各组相比,α-硫辛酸合锌组小鼠错误次数明显减少,脑组织内还原型谷胱甘肽和蛋白质含量明显升高(P<0. 05),超氧化物歧化酶活力明显降低(P<0. 01). 结论α-硫辛酸合锌可以显著提高痴呆小鼠的学习记忆能力,降低脑组织内氧化应激水平.

  9. Dehydration anorexia is attenuated in oxytocin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaman, Linda; Vollmer, Regis R; Karam, Joseph; Phillips, Donnesha; Li, Xia; Amico, Janet A

    2005-06-01

    Evidence in rats suggests that central oxytocin (OT) signaling pathways contribute to suppression of food intake during dehydration (i.e., dehydration anorexia). The present study examined water deprivation-induced dehydration anorexia in wild-type and OT -/- mice. Mice were deprived of food alone (fasted, euhydrated) or were deprived of both food and water (fasted, dehydrated) for 18 h overnight. Fasted wild-type mice consumed significantly less chow during a 60-min refeeding period when dehydrated compared with their intake when euhydrated. Conversely, fasting-induced food intake was slightly but not significantly suppressed by dehydration in OT -/- mice, evidence for attenuated dehydration anorexia. In a separate experiment, mice were deprived of water (but not food) overnight for 18 h; then they were anesthetized and perfused with fixative for immunocytochemical analysis of central Fos expression. Fos was elevated similarly in osmo- and volume-sensitive regions of the basal forebrain and hypothalamus in wild-type and OT -/- mice after water deprivation. OT-positive neurons expressed Fos in dehydrated wild-type mice, and vasopressin-positive neurons were activated to a similar extent in wild-type and OT -/- mice. Conversely, significantly fewer neurons within the hindbrain dorsal vagal complex were activated in OT -/- mice after water deprivation compared with activation in wild-type mice. These findings support the view that OT-containing projections from the hypothalamus to the hindbrain are necessary for the full expression of compensatory behavioral and physiological responses to dehydration.

  10. Intestinal microbiota modulates gluten-induced immunopathology in humanized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galipeau, Heather J; McCarville, Justin L; Huebener, Sina; Litwin, Owen; Meisel, Marlies; Jabri, Bana; Sanz, Yolanda; Murray, Joseph A; Jordana, Manel; Alaedini, Armin; Chirdo, Fernando G; Verdu, Elena F

    2015-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The recent increase in CD incidence suggests that additional environmental factors, such as intestinal microbiota alterations, are involved in its pathogenesis. However, there is no direct evidence of modulation of gluten-induced immunopathology by the microbiota. We investigated whether specific microbiota compositions influence immune responses to gluten in mice expressing the human DQ8 gene, which confers moderate CD genetic susceptibility. Germ-free mice, clean specific-pathogen-free (SPF) mice colonized with a microbiota devoid of opportunistic pathogens and Proteobacteria, and conventional SPF mice that harbor a complex microbiota that includes opportunistic pathogens were used. Clean SPF mice had attenuated responses to gluten compared to germ-free and conventional SPF mice. Germ-free mice developed increased intraepithelial lymphocytes, markers of intraepithelial lymphocyte cytotoxicity, gliadin-specific antibodies, and a proinflammatory gliadin-specific T-cell response. Antibiotic treatment, leading to Proteobacteria expansion, further enhanced gluten-induced immunopathology in conventional SPF mice. Protection against gluten-induced immunopathology in clean SPF mice was reversed after supplementation with a member of the Proteobacteria phylum, an enteroadherent Escherichia coli isolated from a CD patient. The intestinal microbiota can both positively and negatively modulate gluten-induced immunopathology in mice. In subjects with moderate genetic susceptibility, intestinal microbiota changes may be a factor that increases CD risk.

  11. Of mice and men

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    At the end of March , sixty mice were irradiated at the synchro-cyclotron in the course of an experimental programme studying radiation effects on mice and plants (Vicia faba bean roots) being carried out by the CERN Health Physics Group.

  12. A Family of Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ 一、故事内容 There is a family of mice in my house. They are father mouse, mother mouse and baby mouse. Baby mouse likes dancing. He is very cute. Father mouse likes watching TV. He likes the sports on TV best. These three mice are clever.

  13. Bucolic Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Brešar, Bostjan; Chepoi, Victor; Gologranc, Tanja; Osajda, Damian

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we introduce and investigate bucolic complexes, a common generalization of systolic complexes and of CAT(0) cubical complexes. This class of complexes is closed under Cartesian products and amalgamations over some convex subcomplexes. We study various approaches to bucolic complexes: from graph-theoretic and topological viewpoints, as well as from the point of view of geometric group theory. Bucolic complexes can be defined as locally-finite simply connected prism complexes satisfying some local combinatorial conditions. We show that bucolic complexes are contractible, and satisfy some nonpositive-curvature-like properties. In particular, we prove a version of the Cartan-Hadamard theorem, the fixed point theorem for finite group actions, and establish some results on groups acting geometrically on such complexes. We also characterize the 1-skeletons (which we call bucolic graphs) and the 2-skeletons of bucolic complexes. In particular, we prove that bucolic graphs are precisely retracts of Ca...

  14. Successive Administration of Streptococcus Type 5 Group A Antigens and S. typhimurium Antigenic Complex Corrects Elevation of Serum Cytokine Concentration and Number of Bone Marrow Stromal Pluripotent Cells in CBA Mice Induced by Each Antigen Separately.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorskaya, Yu F; Danilova, T A; Grabko, V I; Nesterenko, V G

    2015-12-01

    Administration of bacterial antigens to CBA mice induced an increase in serum concentration of virtually all cytokines with a peak in 4 h after administration of S. typhimurium antigens and in 7 h after administration of streptococcus antigens. In 20 h, cytokine concentrations returned to the control level or were slightly below it. In 4 h after administration of S. typhimurium antigens preceded 3 h before by administration of streptococcus antigens, we observed a significant decrease in serum concentrations of IFN-γ, IL-10, GM-CSF, IL-12, and TNF-α, in comparison with injection S. typhimurium antigens alone and IL-5, IL-10, GM-CSF, and TNF-α in comparison with injection of streptococcus antigens alone; the concentrations of IL-2 and IFN-γ, in contrast, increased by 1.5 times in this case. In 20 h after administration of S. typhimurium antigens, the number of multipotential stromal cells (MSC) in the bone marrow and their cloning efficiency (ECF-MSC) increased by 4.8 and 4.4 times, respectively, in comparison with the control, while after administration of streptococcus antigens by 2.6 and 2.4 times, respectively. In 20 h after administration of S. typhimurium antigens preceded 3 h before by administration of streptococcus antigens, these parameters increased by 3.2 and 2.9 times, respectively, in comparison with the control, i.e. the observed increase in the level of MSC count and ECF-MSC is more consistent with the response of the stromal tissue to streptococcus antigens. Thus, successive administration of two bacterial antigens corrected both serum cytokine profiles and MSC response to administration of each antigen separately, which indicates changeability of the stromal tissue in response to changes in the immune response.

  15. Antitumor effect of arabinogalactan and platinum complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkov, A K; Zamay, T N; Savchenko, A A; Ingevatkin, E V; Titova, N M; Kolovskaya, O S; Luzan, N A; Silkin, P P; Kuznetsova, S A

    2016-03-01

    The article presents the results of investigation of antitumor properties of platinum-arabinogalactan complex. We showed the ability of the complex to inhibit the growth of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. It is found that the distribution of the platinum-arabinogalactan complex is not specific only for tumor cells in mice. The complex was found in all tissues and organs examined (ascites cells, embryonic cells, kidney, and liver). The mechanism of action of the arabinogalactan-platinum complex may be similar to cisplatin as the complex is able to accumulate in tumor cells.

  16. Communication complexity and information complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratov, Denis

    Information complexity enables the use of information-theoretic tools in communication complexity theory. Prior to the results presented in this thesis, information complexity was mainly used for proving lower bounds and direct-sum theorems in the setting of communication complexity. We present three results that demonstrate new connections between information complexity and communication complexity. In the first contribution we thoroughly study the information complexity of the smallest nontrivial two-party function: the AND function. While computing the communication complexity of AND is trivial, computing its exact information complexity presents a major technical challenge. In overcoming this challenge, we reveal that information complexity gives rise to rich geometrical structures. Our analysis of information complexity relies on new analytic techniques and new characterizations of communication protocols. We also uncover a connection of information complexity to the theory of elliptic partial differential equations. Once we compute the exact information complexity of AND, we can compute exact communication complexity of several related functions on n-bit inputs with some additional technical work. Previous combinatorial and algebraic techniques could only prove bounds of the form theta( n). Interestingly, this level of precision is typical in the area of information theory, so our result demonstrates that this meta-property of precise bounds carries over to information complexity and in certain cases even to communication complexity. Our result does not only strengthen the lower bound on communication complexity of disjointness by making it more exact, but it also shows that information complexity provides the exact upper bound on communication complexity. In fact, this result is more general and applies to a whole class of communication problems. In the second contribution, we use self-reduction methods to prove strong lower bounds on the information

  17. Coping with parvovirus infections in mice: health surveillance and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, Lydia M; Bleich, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Parvoviruses of mice, minute virus of mice (MVM) and mouse parvovirus (MPV), are challenging pathogens to eradicate from laboratory animal facilities. Due to the impediment on rodent-based research, recent studies have focused on the assessment of re-derivation techniques and parvoviral potential to induce persistent infections. Summarizing recent data, this review gives an overview on studies associated with parvoviral impact on research, diagnostic methods, parvoviral persistence and re-derivation techniques, demonstrating the complex nature of parvovirus infection in mice and unfolding the challenge of controlling parvovirus infections in laboratory animal facilities.

  18. Complexity Plots

    KAUST Repository

    Thiyagalingam, Jeyarajan

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a novel visualization technique for assisting the observation and analysis of algorithmic complexity. In comparison with conventional line graphs, this new technique is not sensitive to the units of measurement, allowing multivariate data series of different physical qualities (e.g., time, space and energy) to be juxtaposed together conveniently and consistently. It supports multivariate visualization as well as uncertainty visualization. It enables users to focus on algorithm categorization by complexity classes, while reducing visual impact caused by constants and algorithmic components that are insignificant to complexity analysis. It provides an effective means for observing the algorithmic complexity of programs with a mixture of algorithms and black-box software through visualization. Through two case studies, we demonstrate the effectiveness of complexity plots in complexity analysis in research, education and application. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Early Neurobehavioral Development of Mice Lacking Endogenous PACAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Jozsef; Sandor, Balazs; Tamas, Andrea; Kiss, Peter; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Nagy, Andras D; Fulop, Balazs D; Juhasz, Tamas; Manavalan, Sridharan; Reglodi, Dora

    2017-04-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a multifunctional neuropeptide. In addition to its diverse physiological roles, PACAP has important functions in the embryonic development of various tissues, and it is also considered as a trophic factor during development and in the case of neuronal injuries. Data suggest that the development of the nervous system is severely affected by the lack of endogenous PACAP. Short-term neurofunctional outcome correlates with long-term functional deficits; however, the early neurobehavioral development of PACAP-deficient mice has not yet been evaluated. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to describe the postnatal development of physical signs and neurological reflexes in mice partially or completely lacking PACAP. We examined developmental hallmarks during the first 3 weeks of the postnatal period, during which period most neurological reflexes and motor coordination show most intensive development, and we describe the neurobehavioral development using a complex battery of tests. In the present study, we found that PACAP-deficient mice had slower weight gain throughout the observation period. Interestingly, mice partially lacking PACAP weighed significantly less than homozygous mice. There was no difference between male and female mice during the first 3 weeks. Some other signs were also more severely affected in the heterozygous mice than in the homozygous mice, such as air righting, grasp, and gait initiation reflexes. Interestingly, incisor teeth erupted earlier in mice lacking PACAP. Motor coordination, shown by the number of foot-faults on an elevated grid, was also less developed in PACAP-deficient mice. In summary, our results show that mice lacking endogenous PACAP have slower weight gain during the first weeks of development and slower neurobehavioral development regarding a few developmental hallmarks.

  20. Complement deficiency promotes cutaneous wound healing in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafail, Stavros; Kourtzelis, Ioannis; Foukas, Periklis G; Markiewski, Maciej M; DeAngelis, Robert A; Guariento, Mara; Ricklin, Daniel; Grice, Elizabeth A; Lambris, John D

    2015-02-01

    Wound healing is a complex homeostatic response to injury that engages numerous cellular activities, processes, and cell-to-cell interactions. The complement system, an intricate network of proteins with important roles in immune surveillance and homeostasis, has been implicated in many physiological processes; however, its role in wound healing remains largely unexplored. In this study, we employ a murine model of excisional cutaneous wound healing and show that C3(-/-) mice exhibit accelerated early stages of wound healing. Reconstitution of C3(-/-) mice with serum from C3(+/+) mice or purified human C3 abrogated the accelerated wound-healing phenotype. Wound histology of C3(-/-) mice revealed a reduction in inflammatory infiltrate compared with C3(+/+) mice. C3 deficiency also resulted in increased accumulation of mast cells and advanced angiogenesis. We further show that mice deficient in the downstream complement effector C5 exhibit a similar wound-healing phenotype, which is recapitulated in C5aR1(-/-) mice, but not C3aR(-/-) or C5aR2(-/-) mice. Taken together, these data suggest that C5a signaling through C5aR may in part play a pivotal role in recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells to the wound environment, which in turn could delay the early stages of cutaneous wound healing. These findings also suggest a previously underappreciated role for complement in wound healing, and may have therapeutic implications for conditions of delayed wound healing.

  1. Engaging complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gys M. Loubser

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I discuss studies in complexity and its epistemological implications for systematic and practical theology. I argue that engagement with complexity does not necessarily assurea non-reductionist approach. However, if complexity is engaged transversally, it becomes possible to transcend reductionist approaches. Moreover, systematic and practical the ologians can draw on complexity in developing new ways of understanding and, therefore, new ways of describing the focus, epistemic scope and heuristic structures of systematic and practical theology. Firstly, Edgar Morin draws a distinction between restricted and general complexity based on the epistemology drawn upon in studies in complexity. Moving away from foundationalist approaches to epistemology, Morin argues for a paradigm of systems. Secondly,I discuss Kees van Kooten Niekerk�s distinction between epistemology, methodology andontology in studies in complexity and offer an example of a theological argument that drawson complexity. Thirdly, I argue for the importance of transversality in engaging complexity by drawing on the work of Wentzel van Huyssteen and Paul Cilliers. In conclusion, I argue that theologians have to be conscious of the epistemic foundations of each study in complexity, and these studies illuminate the heart of Reformed theology.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: Therefore, this article has both intradisciplinary and interdisciplinary implications. When theologians engage studies incomplexity, the epistemological roots of these studies need to be considered seeing thatresearchers in complexity draw on different epistemologies. Drawing on transversality wouldenhance such considerations. Furthermore, Edgar Morin�s and Paul Cilliers� approach tocomplexity will inform practical and theoretical considerations in church polity and unity.

  2. Computational Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Tenreiro Machado

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex systems (CS involve many elements that interact at different scales in time and space. The challenges in modeling CS led to the development of novel computational tools with applications in a wide range of scientific areas. The computational problems posed by CS exhibit intrinsic difficulties that are a major concern in Computational Complexity Theory. [...

  3. Complex narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper brings together narratology, game theory, and complexity theory to untangle the intricate nature of complex narratives in contemporary cinema. It interrogates the different terms - forking-path narratives, mind-game films, modular narratives, multiple-draft films, database narratives, puz

  4. Complex odontoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preetha, A; Balikai, Bharati S; Sujatha, D; Pai, Anuradha; Ganapathy, K S

    2010-01-01

    Odontomas are hamartomatous lesions or malformations composed of mature enamel, dentin, and pulp. They may be compound or complex, depending on the extent of morphodifferentiation or their resemblance to normal teeth. The etiology of odontoma is unknown, although several theories have been proposed. This article describes a case of a large infected complex odontoma in the residual mandibular ridge, resulting in considerable mandibular expansion.

  5. Simplifying complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemput, van de I.A.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis I use mathematical models to explore the properties of complex systems ranging from microbial nitrogen pathways and coral reefs to the human state of mind. All are examples of complex systems, defined as systems composed of a number of interconnected parts, where the systemic behavior

  6. MICE Particle Identification System

    CERN Document Server

    Bogomilov, M

    2010-01-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment, MICE, at the ISIS accelerator lo- cated at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK, will be the first experiment to study muon cooling at high precision. Demonstration of muon ionization cooling is an essential step towards the construction of a neutrino factory or a muon collider. Muons are produced by pion decay in a superconducting solenoid and reach MICE with a range of emittances and momenta. The purity of the muon beam is ensured by a system of particle detectors we will briefly describe here.

  7. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, Stephen D

    1999-01-01

    The most important topics in the theory and application of complex variables receive a thorough, coherent treatment in this introductory text. Intended for undergraduates or graduate students in science, mathematics, and engineering, this volume features hundreds of solved examples, exercises, and applications designed to foster a complete understanding of complex variables as well as an appreciation of their mathematical beauty and elegance. Prerequisites are minimal; a three-semester course in calculus will suffice to prepare students for discussions of these topics: the complex plane, basic

  8. Managing Complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maylath, Bruce; Vandepitte, Sonia; Minacori, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the largest and most complex international learning-by-doing project to date- a project involving translation from Danish and Dutch into English and editing into American English alongside a project involving writing, usability testing, and translation from English into Dut...... and into French. The complexity of the undertaking proved to be a central element in the students' learning, as the collaboration closely resembles the complexity of international documentation workplaces of language service providers. © Association of Teachers of Technical Writing....

  9. Influence of acupuncture in Baihui ( GV20 ) and Dazhui ( GV14 ) on activity of brain mitochondrial complex in mice with Parkinson's disease%针刺百会、大椎穴对帕金森病小鼠脑线粒体复合物活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙红梅; 和欣; 王媛媛; 王志永; 许红; 高誉珊; 吴海霞; 白丽敏

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the protective effect of acupuncture on brain mitochondrial function in mice with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into the normal group, model group, acupuncture group, Medopa group and acupuncture combining with Medopa group (combining group). The model of PD was established by intraperitoneal injection of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). The acupuncture group, Medopa group and combining group were given different therapies after modeling. After mice survived for 14 days and 28 days respectively, the mouse brain were collected and extracted for dissolving brain mitochondria by using GENMED-kit. The staining of Coomassie brilliant blue G250 was used for protein quantification and biochemical colorimetric method was used for detecting the activities of mitochondrial complex Ⅰ , Ⅱ , Ⅲ and Ⅳ. Results After 14 days, the activity of mitochondrial complex Ⅰ decreased in the model group (P < 0. 05 ), and the activity of mitochondrial complex Ⅱ increased significantly in the acupuncture group compared with the model group ( P < 0. 05 ), and decreased significantly in the Medopa group compared with the acupuncture group (P < 0. 05 ). After 28 days, the activity of mitochondrial complex Ⅳ decreased significantly in the model group ( P < 0. 05 ), increased significantly in the acupuncture group and combining group compared with the model group (P < 0. 05 ), and had no changes in the Medopa group (P > 0. 05 ). Conclusion Acupuncture in Baihui ( GV20 ) and Dazhui (GV14) and Medopa can inhibit the decrease of activity of mitochondrial complex and protect its function.%目的 探讨针刺对帕金森病(PD)小鼠脑线粒体功能的保护作用.方法 C57BL/6雄性小鼠随机分为5组:正常组、模型组、针刺组、美多巴组、针刺结合美多巴组(简称针美组).首先腹腔注射1-甲基4-苯基-1,2,3,6-四氢吡啶(MPTP)建立帕金森病模型,后3组

  10. Of mice and men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Troels Askhøj; Troelsen, Karin de Linde Lind; Larsen, Lars Allan

    2014-01-01

    CHD is part of the phenotype. Furthermore, mapping of genomic copy number variants and exome sequencing of CHD patients have led to the identification of a large number of candidate disease genes. Experiments in animal models, particularly in mice, have been used to verify human disease genes...

  11. Colorful Kindergarten Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobick, Bryna; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Developing kindergarten lessons can be very challenging, especially at the beginning of the school year when many students are just learning to cut paper and hold crayons. The author's favorite beginning unit of the year is "mice paintings," a practical introduction to drawing, color theory, and painting. This unit also incorporates children's…

  12. Lecithin Complex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    yellow power was collected as polydatin-lecithin complex. ... performed on an Agilent 1260 HPLC system. The injection volume .... rabbits. Biomed. Pharmacother 2009; 63: 457-462. 4. Liu B, Du J, Zeng J, Chen C, Niu S. Characterization and.

  13. CCK Response Deficiency in Synphilin-1 Transgenic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanli W Smith

    Full Text Available Previously, we have identified a novel role for the cytoplasmic protein, synphilin-1(SP1, in the controls of food intake and body weight in both mice and Drosophila. Ubiquitous overexpression of human SP1 in brain neurons in transgenic mice results in hyperphagia expressed as an increase in meal size. However, the mechanisms underlying this action of SP1 remain to be determined. Here we investigate a potential role for altered gut feedback signaling in the effects of SP1 on food intake. We examined responses to peripheral administration of cholecytokinin (CCK, amylin, and the glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptor agonist, exendin-4. Intraperitoneal administration of CCK at doses ranging from 1-10 nmol/kg significantly reduced glucose intake in wild type (WT mice, but failed to affect intake in SP1 transgenic mice. Moreover, there was a significant attenuation of CCK-induced c-Fos expression in the dorsal vagal complex in SP1 transgenic mice. In contrast, WT and SP1 transgenic mice were similarly responsive to both amylin and exendin-4 treatment. These studies demonstrate that SP1 results in a CCK response deficiency that may contribute to the increased meal size and overall hyperphagia in synphillin-1 transgenic mice.

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in parkin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacino, James J; Sagi, Dijana; Goldberg, Matthew S; Krauss, Stefan; Motz, Claudia; Wacker, Maik; Klose, Joachim; Shen, Jie

    2004-04-30

    Loss-of-function mutations in parkin are the predominant cause of familial Parkinson's disease. We previously reported that parkin-/- mice exhibit nigrostriatal deficits in the absence of nigral degeneration. Parkin has been shown to function as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Loss of parkin function, therefore, has been hypothesized to cause nigral degeneration via an aberrant accumulation of its substrates. Here we employed a proteomic approach to determine whether loss of parkin function results in alterations in abundance and/or modification of proteins in the ventral midbrain of parkin-/- mice. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry revealed decreased abundance of a number of proteins involved in mitochondrial function or oxidative stress. Consistent with reductions in several subunits of complexes I and IV, functional assays showed reductions in respiratory capacity of striatal mitochondria isolated from parkin-/- mice. Electron microscopic analysis revealed no gross morphological abnormalities in striatal mitochondria of parkin-/- mice. In addition, parkin-/- mice showed a delayed rate of weight gain, suggesting broader metabolic abnormalities. Accompanying these deficits in mitochondrial function, parkin-/- mice also exhibited decreased levels of proteins involved in protection from oxidative stress. Consistent with these findings, parkin-/- mice showed decreased serum antioxidant capacity and increased protein and lipid peroxidation. The combination of proteomic, genetic, and physiological analyses reveal an essential role for parkin in the regulation of mitochondrial function and provide the first direct evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in the absence of nigral degeneration in a genetic mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

  15. CCK Response Deficiency in Synphilin-1 Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Wanli W; Smith, Megan; Yang, Dejun; Choi, Pique P; Moghadam, Alexander; Li, Tianxia; Moran, Timothy H

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have identified a novel role for the cytoplasmic protein, synphilin-1(SP1), in the controls of food intake and body weight in both mice and Drosophila. Ubiquitous overexpression of human SP1 in brain neurons in transgenic mice results in hyperphagia expressed as an increase in meal size. However, the mechanisms underlying this action of SP1 remain to be determined. Here we investigate a potential role for altered gut feedback signaling in the effects of SP1 on food intake. We examined responses to peripheral administration of cholecytokinin (CCK), amylin, and the glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, exendin-4. Intraperitoneal administration of CCK at doses ranging from 1-10 nmol/kg significantly reduced glucose intake in wild type (WT) mice, but failed to affect intake in SP1 transgenic mice. Moreover, there was a significant attenuation of CCK-induced c-Fos expression in the dorsal vagal complex in SP1 transgenic mice. In contrast, WT and SP1 transgenic mice were similarly responsive to both amylin and exendin-4 treatment. These studies demonstrate that SP1 results in a CCK response deficiency that may contribute to the increased meal size and overall hyperphagia in synphillin-1 transgenic mice.

  16. Effects of 4 months of smoking in mice with ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melgert, B. N.; Timens, W.; Kerstjens, H. A.; Geerlings, M.; Luinge, M. A.; Schouten, J. P.; Postma, D. S.; Hylkema, M. N.

    2007-01-01

    Background The effects of smoking on asthma pathogenesis are complex and not well studied. We have shown recently that 3 weeks of smoking attenuates ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway inflammation in mice and that 4-6 months of smoking induces emphysema in mice without airway inflammation. Effects of co

  17. Mice Drawer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancedda, Ranieri

    2008-01-01

    The Mice Drawer System (MDS) is an Italian Space Agency (ASI) facility which is able to support mice onboard the International Space Station during long-duration exploration missions (from 100 to 150-days) by living space, food, water, ventilation and lighting. Mice can be accommodated either individually (maximum 6) or in groups (4 pairs). MDS is integrated in the Space Shuttle middeck during transportation (uploading and downloading) to the ISS and in an EXPRESS Rack in Destiny, the US Laboratory during experiment execution. Osteoporosis is a debilitating disease that afflicts millions of people worldwide. One of the physiological changes experienced by astronauts during space flight is the accelerated loss of bone mass due to the lack of gravitational loading on the skeleton. This bone loss experienced by astronauts is similar to osteoporosis in the elderly population. MDS will help investigate the effects of unloading on transgenic (foreign gene that has been inserted into its genome to exhibit a particular trait) mice with the Osteoblast Stimulating Factor-1, OSF-1, a growth and differentiation factor, and to study the genetic mechanisms underlying the bone mass pathophysiology. MDS will test the hypothesis that mice with an increased bone density are likely to be more protected from osteoporosis, when the increased bone mass is a direct effect of a gene involved in skeletogenesis (skeleton formation). Osteoporosis is a debilitating disease that afflicts millions worldwide. One of the physiological changes experienced by astronauts during space flight is the accelerated loss of bone mass due to the lack of gravitational loading on the skeleton, a loss that is similar to osteoporosis in the elderly population on Earth. Osteoblast Stimulating Factor-1 (OSF-1), also known as pleiotrophin (PTN) or Heparin-Binding Growth- Associated Molecule (HB-GAM) belongs to a family of secreted heparin binding proteins..OSF-1 is an extracellular matrix-associated growth and

  18. Binding Isotherms and Cooperative Effects for Metal-DNA Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Gelagutashvili, Eteri

    2008-01-01

    The stoichiometric binding constants of Nickel(II), Cobalt(II), Manganese(II), Silver(I), Zinc(II) ions with DNA, from Spirulina platensis were determined from their binding isotherms by equilibrium dialysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. It was shown, that the nature of these ions interaction with DNA, from S .platensis is different. For Cobalt(II), Zinc(II) ions were observed cooperative effects and existence of two different types of the binding sites. Nickel(II)_, Silver(I) -DNA complexes shows independent and identical binding sites and Manganese(II)_ negative cooperative interaction. The logarithm of binding constants for Cobalt (II)_, Nickel (II)_, Manganese (II)_, Zinc (II)_, Silver (I) - DNA, from S. platensis in 3 mM Na(I) are 5.11; 5.18; 4.77; 5.05; 5.42; respectively. The linear correlation of logarithm of binding constants (for complexes of metal-DNA from S. platensis) and the covalent index of Pauling are observed.

  19. Nonlinear dynamical analysis of carbachol induced hippocampal oscillations in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Metin AKAY; Kui WANG; Yasemin M AKAY; Andrei DRAGOMIR; Jie WU

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Hippocampal neuronal network and synaptic impairment underlie learning and memory deficit in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and animal models. In this paper, we analyzed the dynamics and complexity of hippocampal neuronal network synchronization induced by acute exposure to carbachol, a nicotinic and muscarinic receptor co-agonist, using the nonlinear dynamical model based on the Lempel-Ziv estimator. We compared the dynamics of hippocampal oscillations between wild-type (WT) and triple-transgenic (3xTg) mice, as an AD animal model. We also compared these dynamic alterations between different age groups (5 and 10 months). We hypothesize that there is an impairment of complexity of CCh-induced hippocampal oscillations in 3xTg AD mice compared to WT mice, and that this impairment is age-dependent. Methods: To test this hypothesis, we used electrophysiological recordings (field potential) in hippocampal slices. Results: Acute exposure to 100 nmol/L CCh induced field potential oscillations in hippocampal CA1 region, which exhibited three distinct patterns: (1) continuous neural firing, (2) repeated burst neural firing and (3) the mixed (continuous and burst) pattern in both WT and 3xTg AD mice. Based on Lempel-Ziv estimator, pattern (2) was significantly lower than patterns (1) and (3) in 3xTg AD mice compared to WT mice (P<0.001), and also in 10-month old WT mice compared to those in 5-month old WT mice (P<0.01).Conclusion: These results suggest that the burst pattern (theta oscillation) of hippocampal network is selectively impaired in 3xTg AD mouse model, which may reflect a learning and memory deficit in the AD patients.

  20. PARP inhibition delays progression of mitochondrial encephalopathy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felici, Roberta; Cavone, Leonardo; Lapucci, Andrea; Guasti, Daniele; Bani, Daniele; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are deadly childhood diseases for which therapeutic remedies are an unmet need. Given that genetic suppression of the nuclear enzyme poly (adenine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase(PARP)-1 improves mitochondrial functioning, we investigated whether pharmacological inhibition of the enzyme affords protection in a mouse model of a mitochondrial disorder. We used mice lacking the Ndufs4 subunit of the respiratory complex I (Ndufs4 knockout [ KO] mice); these mice undergo progressive encephalopathy and die around postnatal day 50. Mice were treated daily with the potent PARP inhibitor N-(6-oxo-5,6-dihydrophenanthridin-2-yl)-(N,N-dimethylamino)acetamide hydrochloride (PJ34); neurological parameters, PARP activity, and mitochondrial homeostasis were evaluated. We found that mice receiving N-(6-oxo-5,6-dihydrophenanthridin-2-yl)-(N,N-dimethylamino)acetamide hydrochloride from postnatal day 30 to postnatal day 50 show reduced neurological impairment, and increased exploratory activity and motor skills compared with vehicle-treated animals. However, drug treatment did not delay or reduce death. We found no evidence of increased PARP activity within the brain of KO mice compared with heterozygous, healthy controls. Conversely, a 10-day treatment with the PARP inhibitor significantly reduced basal poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in different organs of the KO mice, including brain, skeletal muscle, liver, pancreas, and spleen. In keeping with the epigenetic role of PARP-1, its inhibition correlated with increased expression of mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits and organelle number. Remarkably, pharmacological targeting of PARP reduced astrogliosis in olfactory bulb and motor cortex, but did not affect neuronal loss of KO mice. In light of the advanced clinical development of PARP inhibitors, these data emphasize their relevance to treatment of mitochondrial respiratory defects.

  1. Complex analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Freitag, Eberhard

    2005-01-01

    The guiding principle of this presentation of ``Classical Complex Analysis'' is to proceed as quickly as possible to the central results while using a small number of notions and concepts from other fields. Thus the prerequisites for understanding this book are minimal; only elementary facts of calculus and algebra are required. The first four chapters cover the essential core of complex analysis: - differentiation in C (including elementary facts about conformal mappings) - integration in C (including complex line integrals, Cauchy's Integral Theorem, and the Integral Formulas) - sequences and series of analytic functions, (isolated) singularities, Laurent series, calculus of residues - construction of analytic functions: the gamma function, Weierstrass' Factorization Theorem, Mittag-Leffler Partial Fraction Decomposition, and -as a particular highlight- the Riemann Mapping Theorem, which characterizes the simply connected domains in C. Further topics included are: - the theory of elliptic functions based on...

  2. Psychopharmacological Studies in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Since 1998, when the laboratory of Medicinal Pharmacology was established in the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, I have been interested in psychopharmacological research topics. During this period, we identified a number of novel regulatory mechanisms that control the prefrontal dopamine system through functional interaction between serotonin1A and dopamine D2 receptors or between serotonin1A and σ1 receptors. Our findings suggest that strategies that enhance the prefrontal dopamine system may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. We also found that environmental factors during development strongly impact the psychological state in adulthood. Furthermore, we clarified the pharmacological profiles of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors donepezil, galantamine, and rivastigmine, providing novel insights into their mechanisms of action. Finally, we developed the female encounter test, a novel method for evaluating motivation in mice. This simple method should help advance future psychopharmacological research. In this review, we summarize the major findings obtained from our recent studies in mice.

  3. Neuroglobin over expressing mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raida, Zindy; Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Nyengaard, Jens R

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke is a major cause of death and severe disability, but effective treatments are limited. Neuroglobin, a neuronal heme-globin, has been advocated as a novel pharmacological target in combating stroke and neurodegenerative disorders based on cytoprotective properties. Using...... thoroughly validated antibodies and oligos, we give a detailed brain anatomical characterization of transgenic mice over expressing Neuroglobin. Moreover, using permanent middle artery occlusion the effect of elevated levels of Neuroglobin on ischemic damage was studied. Lastly, the impact of mouse strain...... genetic background on ischemic damage was investigated. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A four to five fold increase in Neuroglobin mRNA and protein expression was seen in the brain of transgenic mice. A β-actin promoter was used to drive Neuroglobin over expression, but immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization...

  4. The MICE PID Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Bonesini, M

    2008-01-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will carry out a systematic investigation of ionization cooling of a muon beam. As the emittance measurement will be done on a particle-by-particle basis, sophisticated beam instrumentation is needed to measure particle coordinates and timing vs RF. A PID system based on three time-of-flight stations, two Aerogel Cerenkov detectors and a KLOE-like calorimeter has been constructed in order to keep beam contamination ($e, \\pi$) well below 1%. The MICE time-of-flight system will measure timing with a resolution better than 70 ps per plane, in a harsh environment due to high particle rates, fringe magnetic fields and electron backgrounds from RF dark current.

  5. THE MECHANISM OF ANTI-IMPLANTATION EFFECT OF PROGESTERONE MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES IN MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGMin-Yi; HEZhi-Ying; WANGHan-Zheng

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the mechanism by which antiprogcsterone monoclonal antibodies block early pregnancy in mice. The mechanism of passive immunization is a complex issue as indicated below:

  6. Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Evsukoff, Alexandre; González, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade we have seen the emergence of a new inter-disciplinary field focusing on the understanding of networks which are dynamic, large, open, and have a structure sometimes called random-biased. The field of Complex Networks is helping us better understand many complex phenomena such as the spread of  deseases, protein interactions, social relationships, to name but a few. Studies in Complex Networks are gaining attention due to some major scientific breakthroughs proposed by network scientists helping us understand and model interactions contained in large datasets. In fact, if we could point to one event leading to the widespread use of complex network analysis is the availability of online databases. Theories of Random Graphs from Erdös and Rényi from the late 1950s led us to believe that most networks had random characteristics. The work on large online datasets told us otherwise. Starting with the work of Barabási and Albert as well as Watts and Strogatz in the late 1990s, we now know th...

  7. Complex chemistry with complex compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eichler Robert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years gas-phase chemical studies assisted by physical pre-separation allowed for the investigation of fragile single molecular species by gas-phase chromatography. The latest success with the heaviest group 6 transactinide seaborgium is highlighted. The formation of a very volatile hexacarbonyl compound Sg(CO6 was observed similarly to its lighter homologues molybdenum and tungsten. The interactions of these gaseous carbonyl complex compounds with quartz surfaces were investigated by thermochromatography. Second-generation experiments are under way to investigate the intramolecular bond between the central metal atom of the complexes and the ligands addressing the influence of relativistic effects in the heaviest compounds. Our contribution comprises some aspects of the ongoing challenging experiments as well as an outlook towards other interesting compounds related to volatile complex compounds in the gas phase.

  8. Heart regeneration in adult MRL mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leferovich, John M.; Bedelbaeva, Khamilia; Samulewicz, Stefan; Zhang, Xiang-Ming; Zwas, Donna; Lankford, Edward B.; Heber-Katz, Ellen

    2001-08-01

    The reaction of cardiac tissue to acute injury involves interacting cascades of cellular and molecular responses that encompass inflammation, hormonal signaling, extracellular matrix remodeling, and compensatory adaptation of myocytes. Myocardial regeneration is observed in amphibians, whereas scar formation characterizes cardiac ventricular wound healing in a variety of mammalian injury models. We have previously shown that the MRL mouse strain has an extraordinary capacity to heal surgical wounds, a complex trait that maps to at least seven genetic loci. Here, we extend these studies to cardiac wounds and demonstrate that a severe transmural, cryogenically induced infarction of the right ventricle heals extensively within 60 days, with the restoration of normal myocardium and function. Scarring is markedly reduced in MRL mice compared with C57BL/6 mice, consistent with both the reduced hydroxyproline levels seen after injury and an elevated cardiomyocyte mitotic index of 10-20% for the MRL compared with 1-3% for the C57BL/6. The myocardial response to injury observed in these mice resembles the regenerative process seen in amphibians.

  9. Managing Complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassin, David P.; Posse, Christian; Malard, Joel M.

    2004-08-01

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today’s most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This paper explores the state of the art in the use physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and to deriving stable and robust control strategies for them. In particular we review and discussion applications of some analytic methods based on the thermodynamic metaphor according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood.

  10. Morphological changes in the trigemino-rubral pathway in dystrophic (mdx) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Magali Luci; Tokunaga, Heloisa Helena Vieira Olyntho; Souccar, Caden; Schoorlemmer, Guus H M; Lapa, Rita de Cássia Ribeiro da Silva

    2007-04-12

    The lack of dystrophin that causes Duchenne muscle disease affects not only the muscles but also the central nervous system. Dystrophin-deficient mdx mice present changes in several brain fiber systems. We compared the projections from the trigeminal sensory nuclear complex to the red nucleus in control and mdx mice using retrograde tracers. Injection of 200 nL 2% fluorogold into the red nucleus caused labeling in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus, the principal sensory nucleus and the oral, interpolar, and caudal subnuclei of the spinal trigeminal nucleus in both control and mdx mice. Injection of latex microbeads labeled with rhodamine and fluorescein gave results similar to those seen with fluorogold. The number of labeled neurons in the trigeminal sensory nuclear complex was significantly reduced in mdx mice. In the oral subnucleus of the spinal trigeminal nucleus this reduction was 50%. These results indicate that the trigemino-rubral pathway is reduced in dystrophin-deficient mice.

  11. MPD in Telomerase Null Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    telomere dysfunctional mice will further fuel the genomic instability generated from progressive Figure 5 5FU treated telomere dysfunction bone...marrow has increased megakaryocytic colonies. Equal number of bone marrow cells from the 5FU treated mice of the various indicated cohorts are...We treated the cohorts of the G4 mTerc mutant mice with telomere dysfunction and normal G0 controls with 5FU at (50mg/kg body weight) once every

  12. Impaired receptivity and decidualization in DHEA-induced PCOS mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Yun; Song, Zhuo; Song, Min-Jie; Qin, Jia-Wen; Zhao, Meng-Long; Yang, Zeng-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a complex endocrine disorder, is a leading cause of female infertility. An obvious reason for infertility in PCOS women is anovulation. However, success rate with high quality embryos selected by assisted reproduction techniques in PCOS patients still remain low with a high rate of early clinical pregnancy loss, suggesting a problem in uterine receptivity. Using a dehydroepiandrosterone-induced mouse model of PCOS, some potential causes of decreased fertility in PCOS patients were explored. In our study, ovulation problem also causes sterility in PCOS mice. After blastocysts from normal mice are transferred into uterine lumen of pseudopregnant PCOS mice, the rate of embryo implantation was reduced. In PCOS mouse uteri, the implantation-related genes are also dysregulated. Additionally, artificial decidualization is severely impaired in PCOS mice. The serum estrogen level is significantly higher in PCOS mice than vehicle control. The high level of estrogen and potentially impaired LIF-STAT3 pathway may lead to embryo implantation failure in PCOS mice. Although there are many studies about effects of PCOS on endometrium, both embryo transfer and artificial decidualization are applied to exclude the effects from ovulation and embryos in our study. PMID:27924832

  13. Environmental enrichment induces behavioural disturbances in neuropeptide Y knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmann, Florian; Wegerer, Vanessa; Jain, Piyush; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Hassan, Ahmed M; Fröhlich, Esther E; Bock, Elisabeth; Pritz, Elisabeth; Herzog, Herbert; Holzer, Peter; Leitinger, Gerd

    2016-06-16

    Environmental enrichment (EE) refers to the provision of a complex and stimulating housing condition which improves well-being, behaviour and brain function of laboratory animals. The mechanisms behind these beneficial effects of EE are only partially understood. In the current report, we describe a link between EE and neuropeptide Y (NPY), based on findings from NPY knockout (KO) mice exposed to EE. Relative to EE-housed wildtype (WT) animals, NPY KO mice displayed altered behaviour as well as molecular and morphological changes in amygdala and hippocampus. Exposure of WT mice to EE reduced anxiety and decreased central glucocorticoid receptor expression, effects which were absent in NPY KO mice. In addition, NPY deletion altered the preference of EE items, and EE-housed NPY KO mice responded to stress with exaggerated hyperthermia, displayed impaired spatial memory, had higher hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA levels and altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity, effects which were not seen in WT mice. Accordingly, these findings suggest that NPY contributes to the anxiolytic effect of EE and that NPY deletion reverses the beneficial effects of EE into a negative experience. The NPY system could thus be a target for "enviromimetics", therapeutics which reproduce the beneficial effects of enhanced environmental stimulation.

  14. Oxytocin in the treatment of dystocia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narver, Heather L

    2012-01-01

    Physicians and veterinarians often prescribe oxytocin to treat dystocia. However, oxytocin administration to pregnant women or animals is not without risk. In the venue of laboratory animal medicine, the use of oxytocin may present confounding variables to research. Although oxytocin has been studied extensively, many of its physiologic effects and interactions with other hormones remain unclear. Investigator concerns about adverse and confounding effects of oxytocin in their research mice prompted the current review of oxytocin and its use to treat murine dystocia. Well-controlled studies of oxytocin in dystocic mice have not been conducted. However, in humans and other animals, inconsistent and adverse effects are well-documented. Limited knowledge of the complex physiologic and molecular mechanisms of action of oxytocin and scant support for the efficacy of oxytocin in dystocic mice fail to meet the standards of evidence-based veterinary medical practice. The administration of oxytocin is contraindicated in many cases of dystocia in research mice, and its use in dystocic mice may be unfounded. A brief review of oxytocin and the physiologic mechanisms of parturition are provided to support this conclusion. Alternative treatments for murine dystocia are discussed, and a holistic approach is advocated to better serve animal welfare and to safeguard the integrity of valuable research. Laboratory animal veterinarians overseeing the development of guidelines or standard operating procedures for technician or investigator treatment of dystocic mice should understand the effects of oxytocin administration in light of relevant research.

  15. Function of mitochondrial respiration chain complex in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells of SAMP6 mice%SAMP6小鼠骨髓间充质干细胞线粒体呼吸链复合体功能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨邁; 胡成虎; 张少锋; 金岩

    2015-01-01

    AIM:To detect senescence condition,osteogenic differentiation ability and the activity of mito-chondrial respiration chain complex of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs)from senescence accelerated mouse strain prone 6 (SAMP6).METHODS:BMMSCs of SAMP6 and its control strain SAMR1 mice were isolated and cultured.The cell senescence and osteogenic differentiation ability were detected by RT-PCR,Western Blot and cell staining respectively.The function of mitochondrial respiration complex was examined by activity assay and related gene expression assay.RESULTS:Compared with control strain SAMR1 ,BMMSCs of SAMP6 BMMSCs of SAMP6 performed increase of cellular senescence ce related genes and protein level,increase ofβ-gal positive cell ratio(P<0.05),and decline of osteogenic function(P<0.05),.CONCLUSION:BMMSCs from SAMP6 perform senescence and osteogenic differentiation dysfunction with significant decline of mitochondrial respiration chain complex.%目的:研究自发性老年性骨质疏松模型SAMP6小鼠骨髓间充质干细胞(BMMSCs)的衰老状态、分化功能及线粒体呼吸链复合体活性。方法:分离培养SAMP6及其对照品系SAMR1小鼠BMMSCs,分别以实时定量PCR(RT-PCR)、Western Blot及细胞染色的方法,检测衰老、分化相关指标,并分别检测线粒体呼吸链复合体活性及复合体相关基因的表达。结果:与对照品系SAMR1小鼠相比,SAMP6小鼠BMMSCs的衰老相关基因、蛋白水平及β-gal染色阳性率显著升高(P<0.05);成骨分化相关基因、蛋白水平及茜素红染色阳性率显著降低(P<0.05);线粒体呼吸链复合体Ⅰ和Ⅲ活性显著降低,且呼吸链复合体相关基因表达亦降低(P<0.05)。结论:SAMP6小鼠BMMSCs存在细胞衰老及成骨分化功能障碍,其线粒体呼吸链复合体功能显著下降。

  16. Genetics of meiosis and recombination in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcun-Filas, Ewelina; Schimenti, John C

    2012-01-01

    Meiosis is one of the most critical developmental processes in sexually reproducing organisms. One round of DNA replication followed by two rounds of cell divisions results in generation of haploid gametes (sperm and eggs in mammals). Meiotic failure typically leads to infertility in mammals. In the process of meiotic recombination, maternal and paternal genomes are shuffled, creating new allelic combinations and thus genetic variety. However, in order to achieve this, meiotic cells must self-inflict DNA damage in the form of programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs). Complex processes evolved to ensure proper DSB repair, and to do so in a way that favors interhomolog reciprocal recombination and crossovers. The hallmark of meiosis, a structurally conserved proteinaceous structure called the synaptonemal complex, is found only in meiotic cells. Conversely, meiotic homologous recombination is an adaptation of the mitotic DNA repair process but involving specialized proteins. In this chapter, we summarize current developments in mammalian meiosis enabled by genetically modified mice.

  17. Polycomb complexes act redundantly to repress genomic repeats and genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeb, Martin; Pasini, Diego; Novatchkova, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Polycomb complexes establish chromatin modifications for maintaining gene repression and are essential for embryonic development in mice. Here we use pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells to demonstrate an unexpected redundancy between Polycomb-repressive complex 1 (PRC1) and PRC2 during the form...

  18. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Joseph L

    2011-01-01

    The text covers a broad spectrum between basic and advanced complex variables on the one hand and between theoretical and applied or computational material on the other hand. With careful selection of the emphasis put on the various sections, examples, and exercises, the book can be used in a one- or two-semester course for undergraduate mathematics majors, a one-semester course for engineering or physics majors, or a one-semester course for first-year mathematics graduate students. It has been tested in all three settings at the University of Utah. The exposition is clear, concise, and lively

  19. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Flanigan, Francis J

    2010-01-01

    A caution to mathematics professors: Complex Variables does not follow conventional outlines of course material. One reviewer noting its originality wrote: ""A standard text is often preferred [to a superior text like this] because the professor knows the order of topics and the problems, and doesn't really have to pay attention to the text. He can go to class without preparation."" Not so here-Dr. Flanigan treats this most important field of contemporary mathematics in a most unusual way. While all the material for an advanced undergraduate or first-year graduate course is covered, discussion

  20. Complex dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Carleson, Lennart

    1993-01-01

    Complex dynamics is today very much a focus of interest. Though several fine expository articles were available, by P. Blanchard and by M. Yu. Lyubich in particular, until recently there was no single source where students could find the material with proofs. For anyone in our position, gathering and organizing the material required a great deal of work going through preprints and papers and in some cases even finding a proof. We hope that the results of our efforts will be of help to others who plan to learn about complex dynamics and perhaps even lecture. Meanwhile books in the field a. re beginning to appear. The Stony Brook course notes of J. Milnor were particularly welcome and useful. Still we hope that our special emphasis on the analytic side will satisfy a need. This book is a revised and expanded version of notes based on lectures of the first author at UCLA over several \\Vinter Quarters, particularly 1986 and 1990. We owe Chris Bishop a great deal of gratitude for supervising the production of cour...

  1. Immune-privileged embryonic Swiss mouse STO and STO cell-derived progenitor cells: major histocompatibility complex and cell differentiation antigen expression patterns resemble those of human embryonic stem cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Katherine S; Son, Kyung-Hwa; Maehr, Rene; Pellicciotta, Illenia; Ploegh, Hidde L; Zanetti, Maurizio; Sell, Stewart; Leffert, Hyam L

    2006-09-01

    Embryonic mouse STO (S, SIM; T, 6-thioguanine resistant; O, ouabain resistant) and 3(8)21-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) cell lines exhibit long-term survival and hepatic progenitor cell behaviour after xenogeneic engraftment in non-immunosuppressed inbred rats, and were previously designated major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I- and class II-negative lines. To determine the molecular basis for undetectable MHC determinants, the expression and haplotype of H-2K, H-2D, H-2L and I-A proteins were reassessed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), cDNA sequencing, RNA hybridization, immunoblotting, quantitative RT-PCR (QPCR), immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry. To detect cell differentiation (CD) surface antigens characteristic of stem cells, apoptotic regulation or adaptive immunity that might facilitate progenitor cell status or immune privilege, flow cytometry was also used to screen untreated and cytokine [interferon (IFN)-gamma]-treated cultures. Despite prior PCR genotyping analyses suggestive of H-2q haplotypes in STO, 3(8)21-EGFP and parental 3(8)21 cells, all three lines expressed H-2K cDNA sequences identical to those of d-haplotype BALB/c mice, as well as constitutive and cytokine-inducible H-2K(d) determinants. In contrast, apart from H-2L(d[LOW]) display in 3(8)21 cells, H-2Dd, H-2Ld and I-Ad determinants were undetectable. All three lines expressed constitutive and cytokine-inducible CD34; however, except for inducible CD117([LOW]) expression in 3(8)21 cells, no expression of CD45, CD117, CD62L, CD80, CD86, CD90.1 or CD95L/CD178 was observed. Constitutive and cytokine-inducible CD95([LOW]) expression was detected in STO and 3(8)21 cells, but not in 3(8)21-EGFP cells. MHC (class I(+[LOW])/class II-) and CD (CD34+/CD80-/CD86-/CD95L-) expression patterns in STO and STO cell-derived progenitor cells resemble patterns reported for human embryonic stem cell lines. Whether these patterns reflect associations with

  2. Cosmic Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    What explains the extraordinary complexity of the observed universe, on all scales from quarks to the accelerating universe? My favorite explanation (which I certainty did not invent) ls that the fundamental laws of physics produce natural instability, energy flows, and chaos. Some call the result the Life Force, some note that the Earth is a living system itself (Gaia, a "tough bitch" according to Margulis), and some conclude that the observed complexity requires a supernatural explanation (of which we have many). But my dad was a statistician (of dairy cows) and he told me about cells and genes and evolution and chance when I was very small. So a scientist must look for me explanation of how nature's laws and statistics brought us into conscious existence. And how is that seemll"!gly Improbable events are actually happening a!1 the time? Well, the physicists have countless examples of natural instability, in which energy is released to power change from simplicity to complexity. One of the most common to see is that cooling water vapor below the freezing point produces snowflakes, no two alike, and all complex and beautiful. We see it often so we are not amazed. But physlc!sts have observed so many kinds of these changes from one structure to another (we call them phase transitions) that the Nobel Prize in 1992 could be awarded for understanding the mathematics of their common features. Now for a few examples of how the laws of nature produce the instabilities that lead to our own existence. First, the Big Bang (what an insufficient name!) apparently came from an instability, in which the "false vacuum" eventually decayed into the ordinary vacuum we have today, plus the most fundamental particles we know, the quarks and leptons. So the universe as a whole started with an instability. Then, a great expansion and cooling happened, and the loose quarks, finding themselves unstable too, bound themselves together into today's less elementary particles like protons and

  3. Cosmic Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    What explains the extraordinary complexity of the observed universe, on all scales from quarks to the accelerating universe? My favorite explanation (which I certainty did not invent) ls that the fundamental laws of physics produce natural instability, energy flows, and chaos. Some call the result the Life Force, some note that the Earth is a living system itself (Gaia, a "tough bitch" according to Margulis), and some conclude that the observed complexity requires a supernatural explanation (of which we have many). But my dad was a statistician (of dairy cows) and he told me about cells and genes and evolution and chance when I was very small. So a scientist must look for me explanation of how nature's laws and statistics brought us into conscious existence. And how is that seemll"!gly Improbable events are actually happening a!1 the time? Well, the physicists have countless examples of natural instability, in which energy is released to power change from simplicity to complexity. One of the most common to see is that cooling water vapor below the freezing point produces snowflakes, no two alike, and all complex and beautiful. We see it often so we are not amazed. But physlc!sts have observed so many kinds of these changes from one structure to another (we call them phase transitions) that the Nobel Prize in 1992 could be awarded for understanding the mathematics of their common features. Now for a few examples of how the laws of nature produce the instabilities that lead to our own existence. First, the Big Bang (what an insufficient name!) apparently came from an instability, in which the "false vacuum" eventually decayed into the ordinary vacuum we have today, plus the most fundamental particles we know, the quarks and leptons. So the universe as a whole started with an instability. Then, a great expansion and cooling happened, and the loose quarks, finding themselves unstable too, bound themselves together into today's less elementary particles like protons and

  4. Resilience in Aging Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, James L; Stout, Michael B; Sierra, Felipe

    2016-11-01

    Recently discovered interventions that target fundamental aging mechanisms have been shown to increase life span in mice and other species, and in some cases, these same manipulations have been shown to enhance health span and alleviate multiple age-related diseases and conditions. Aging is generally associated with decreases in resilience, the capacity to respond to or recover from clinically relevant stresses such as surgery, infections, or vascular events. We hypothesize that the age-related increase in susceptibility to those diseases and conditions is driven by or associated with the decrease in resilience. Thus, a test for resilience at middle age or even earlier could represent a surrogate approach to test the hypothesis that an intervention delays the process of aging itself. For this, animal models to test resilience accurately and predictably are needed. In addition, interventions that increase resilience might lead to treatments aimed at enhancing recovery following acute illnesses, or preventing poor outcomes from medical interventions in older, prefrail subjects. At a meeting of basic researchers and clinicians engaged in research on mechanisms of aging and care of the elderly, the merits and drawbacks of investigating effects of interventions on resilience in mice were considered. Available and potential stressors for assessing physiological resilience as well as the notion of developing a limited battery of such stressors and how to rank them were discussed. Relevant ranking parameters included value in assessing general health (as opposed to focusing on a single physiological system), ease of use, cost, reproducibility, clinical relevance, and feasibility of being repeated in the same animal longitudinally. During the discussions it became clear that, while this is an important area, very little is known or established. Much more research is needed in the near future to develop appropriate tests of resilience in animal models within an aging context

  5. Muscarinic receptor subtypes involved in regulation of colonic motility in mice: functional studies using muscarinic receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Takaji; Nakajima, Miwa; Teraoka, Hiroki; Unno, Toshihiro; Komori, Sei-ichi; Yamada, Masahisa; Kitazawa, Takio

    2011-11-16

    Although muscarinic M(2) and M(3) receptors are known to be important for regulation of gastric and small intestinal motility, muscarinic receptor subtypes regulating colonic function remain to be investigated. The aim of this study was to characterize muscarinic receptors involved in regulation of colonic contractility. M(2) and/or M(3) receptor knockout (KO) and wild-type mice were used in in vivo (defecation, colonic propulsion) and in vitro (contraction) experiments. Amount of feces was significantly decreased in M(3)R-KO and M(2)/M(3)R-KO mice but not in M(2)R-KO mice. Ranking of colonic propulsion was wild-type=M(2)R-KO>M(3)R-KO>M(2)/M(3)R-KO. In vitro, the amplitude of migrating motor complexes in M(2)R-KO, M(3)R-KO and M(2)/M(3)R-KO mice was significantly lower than that in wild-type mice. Carbachol caused concentration-dependent contraction of the proximal colon and distal colon from wild-type mice. In M(2)R-KO mice, the concentration-contraction curves shifted to the right and downward. In contrast, carbachol caused non-sustained contraction and relaxation in M(3)R-KO mice depending on its concentration. Carbachol did not cause contraction but instead caused relaxation of colonic strips from M(2)/M(3)R-KO mice. 4-[[[(3-chlorophenyl)amino]carbonyl]oxy]-N,N,N-trimethyl-2-butyn-1-aminium chloride (McN-A-343) caused a non-sustained contraction of colonic strips from wild-type mice, and this contraction was changed to a sustained contraction by tetrodotoxin, pirenzepine and L-nitroarginine methylester (L-NAME). In the colon of M(2)/M(3)R-KO mice, McN-A-343 caused only relaxation, which was decreased by tetrodotoxin, pirenzepine and L-NAME. In conclusion, M(1), M(2) and M(3) receptors regulate colonic motility of the mouse. M(2) and M(3) receptors mediate cholinergic contraction, but M(1) receptors on inhibitory nitrergic nerves counteract muscarinic contraction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Of mice and men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Troels Askhøj; Troelsen, Karin de Linde Lind; Larsen, Lars Allan

    2014-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) affects nearly 1 % of the population. It is a complex disease, which may be caused by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Studies in human genetics have led to the identification of more than 50 human genes, involved in isolated CHD or genetic syndromes, whe...

  7. Impaired exercise tolerance and skeletal muscle myopathy in sulfonylurea receptor-2 mutant mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Douglas; Pytel, Peter; Katz, Sophie; Earley, Judy U.; Collins, Keith; Metcalfe, Jamie; Lang, Roberto M.

    2009-01-01

    By sensing intracellular energy levels, ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels help regulate vascular tone, glucose metabolism, and cardioprotection. SUR2 mutant mice lack full-length KATP channels in striated and smooth muscle and display a complex phenotype of hypertension and coronary vasospasm. SUR2 mutant mice also display baseline cardioprotection and can withstand acute sympathetic stress better than normal mice. We now studied response to a form of chronic stress, namely that induced by 4 wk of daily exercise on SUR2 mutant mice. Control mice increased exercise capacity by 400% over the training period, while SUR2 mutant mice showed little increase in exercise capacity. Unexercised SUR2 mutant showed necrotic and regenerating fibers in multiple muscle skeletal muscles, including quadriceps, tibialis anterior, and diaphragm muscles. Unlike exercised control animals, SUR2 mutant mice did not lose weight, presumably due to less overall exertion. Unexercised SUR2 mutant mice showed a trend of mildly reduced cardiac function, measured by fractional shortening, (46 ± 4% vs. 57 ± 7% for SUR2 mutant and control, respectively), and this decrease was not exacerbated by chronic exercise exposure. Despite an improved response to acute sympathetic stress and baseline cardioprotection, exercise intolerance results from lack of SUR2 KATP channels in mice. PMID:19675276

  8. Inborn anemias in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  9. Mice, men and MHC supertypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Claus

    2010-01-01

    vaccine formulations. Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite, causes severe neurologic and ocular disease in congenitally infected and immunocompromised individuals. No protective vaccine exists against human toxoplasmosis. However, studies with mice have revealed immunodominant cytotoxic T...

  10. Transgenic mice in developmental toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woychik, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Advances in molecular biology and embryology are being utilized for the generation of transgenic mice, animals that contain specific additions, deletions, or modifications of genes or sequences in their DNA. Mouse embryonic stem cells and homologous recombination procedures have made it possible to target specific DNA structural alterations to highly localized region in the host chromosomes. The majority of the DNA structural rearrangements in transgenic mice can be passed through the germ line and used to establish new genetic traits in the carrier animals. Since the use of transgenic mice is having such an enormous impact on so many areas of mammalian biological research, including developmental toxicology, the objective of this review is to briefly describe the fundamental methodologies for generating transgenic mice and to describe one particular application that has direct relevance to the field of genetic toxicology.

  11. Transgenic mice in developmental toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woychik, R.P.

    1992-12-31

    Advances in molecular biology and embryology are being utilized for the generation of transgenic mice, animals that contain specific additions, deletions, or modifications of genes or sequences in their DNA. Mouse embryonic stem cells and homologous recombination procedures have made it possible to target specific DNA structural alterations to highly localized region in the host chromosomes. The majority of the DNA structural rearrangements in transgenic mice can be passed through the germ line and used to establish new genetic traits in the carrier animals. Since the use of transgenic mice is having such an enormous impact on so many areas of mammalian biological research, including developmental toxicology, the objective of this review is to briefly describe the fundamental methodologies for generating transgenic mice and to describe one particular application that has direct relevance to the field of genetic toxicology.

  12. Owls and larks in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina ePfeffer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Humans come in different chronotypes and, particularly, the late chronotype (the so-called owl has been shown to be associated with a number of health risks. Recent studies indicate that laboratory mice also display various chronotypes. In mice as well as in humans, the chronotype shows correlations with the period length and rhythm stability. In addition, some mouse models for human diseases show alterations in their chronotypic behavior which are comparable to those humans. Thus, analysis of the behavior of mice is a powerful tool to unravel the molecular and genetic background of the chronotype and the prevalence of risks and diseases that are associated with it. In this review, we summarize the correlation of chronotype with free-running period length and rhythm stability in the most commonly used inbred mouse strains, in mice with a compromised molecular clockwork and in a mouse model for neurodegeneration.

  13. Generation of Pediatric Leukemia Xenograft Models in NSG-B2m Mice: Comparison with NOD/SCID Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Anilkumar; Kolb, E Anders; Dhanan, Priyanka; Bojja, Aruna Sri; Mason, Robert W; Corao, Diana; Barwe, Sonali P

    2016-01-01

    Generation of orthotopic xenograft mouse models of leukemia is important to understand the mechanisms of leukemogenesis, cancer progression, its cross talk with the bone marrow microenvironment, and for preclinical evaluation of drugs. In these models, following intravenous injection, leukemic cells home to the bone marrow and proliferate there before infiltrating other organs, such as spleen, liver, and the central nervous system. Moreover, such models have been shown to accurately recapitulate the human disease and correlate with patient response to therapy and prognosis. Thus, various immune-deficient mice strains have been used with or without recipient preconditioning to increase engraftment efficiency. Mice homozygous for the severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mutation and with non-obese diabetic background (NOD/SCID) have been used in the majority of leukemia xenograft studies. Later, NOD/SCID mice deficient for interleukin 2 receptor gamma chain (IL2Rγ) gene called NSG mice became the model of choice for leukemia xenografts. However, engraftment of leukemia cells without irradiation preconditioning still remained a challenge. In this study, we used NSG mice with null alleles for major histocompatibility complex class I beta2-microglobulin (β2m) called NSG-B2m. This is a first report describing the 100% engraftment efficiency of pediatric leukemia cell lines and primary samples in NSG-B2m mice in the absence of host preconditioning by sublethal irradiation. We also show direct comparison of the engraftment efficiency and growth rate of pediatric acute leukemia cells in NSG-B2m and NOD/SCID mice, which showed 80-90% engraftment efficiency. Secondary and tertiary xenografts in NSG-B2m mice generated by injection of cells isolated from the spleens of leukemia-bearing mice also behaved similar to the primary patient sample. We have successfully engrafted 25 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 5 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples with

  14. Lack of commensal flora in H. pylori-infected INS-GAS mice reduces gastritis and delays intraepithelial neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofgren, Jennifer L.; Whary, Mark T.; Ge, Zhongming; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Taylor, Nancy S.; Mobley, Melissa; Potter, Amanda; Varro, Andrea; Eibach, Daniel; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Wang, Timothy C.; Fox, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Transgenic, insulin–gastrin (INS–GAS) mice have high circulating levels of gastrin. On a FVB/N background, these mice develop spontaneous atrophic gastritis and gastrointestinal intraepithelial neoplasia (GIN) with 80% prevalence 6 months after Helicobacter pylori infection. GIN is associated with gastric atrophy and achlorhydria, predisposing mice to non-helicobacter microbiota overgrowth. We determined if germ-free INS–GAS mice spontaneously develop GIN and if H. pylori accelerates GIN in gnotobiotic INS–GAS mice. Methods We compared gastric lesions and levels of mRNA, serum inflammatory mediators, antibodies, and gastrin among germ-free and H. pylori-monoinfected INS-GAS mice. Microbiota composition of specific pathogen-free (SPF) INS-GAS mice was quantified by pyro-sequencing. Results Germ-free INS-GAS mice had mild hypergastrinemia but did not develop significant gastric lesions until they were 9 months old; they did not develop GIN through 13 months. H. pylori monoassociation caused progressive gastritis, epithelial defects, oxyntic gland atrophy, marked foveolar hyperplasia and dysplasia, and strong serum and tissue proinflammatory immune responses (particularly in male mice) between 5 and 11 months post infection (P<0.05, compared with germ-free controls). Only 2 of 26 female, whereas 8 of 18 male, H. pylori-infected INS-GAS mice developed low- to high-grade GIN by 11 months post infection. Stomachs of H. pylori-infected SPF male mice had significant reductions in Bacteroidetes and significant increases in Firmicutes. Conclusions Gastric lesions take 13 months longer to develop in germ-free INS–GAS mice than male SPF INS-GAS mice. H. pylori-monoassociation accelerated gastritis and GIN but caused less-severe gastric lesions and delayed onset of GIN compared to H. pylori-infected INS-GAS mice with complex gastric microbiota. Changes of gastric microbiota composition might promote GIN in the achlorhydric stomachs of SPF mice. PMID

  15. DNA Mismatch Repair Deficiency Accelerates Endometrial Tumorigenesis in Pten Heterozygous Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hong WANG; Douglas, Wayne; Lia, Marie; Edelmann, Winfried; Kucherlapati, Raju; Podsypanina, Katrina; Parsons, Ramon; Ellenson, Lora Hedrick

    2002-01-01

    PTEN mutation and microsatellite instability are two of the most common genetic alterations in uterine endometrioid carcinoma. Furthermore, previous studies have suggested an association between the two alterations, however the basis and consequence of the association is not understood. Recently it has been shown that 100% of female Pten+/− mice develop complex atypical hyperplasia by 32 weeks of age that progresses to endometrial carcinoma in ∼20 to 25% of mice at 40 weeks. In an attempt to ...

  16. Of mice and men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chomba, Susan; Kariuki, Juliet; Lund, Jens Friis;

    2017-01-01

    basis and theoretical arguments, that we had put forward. In this rebuttal, we demonstrate that there were no empirical differences between our original paper and Githiru’s response that had bearing on our findings, but that there are substantial differences in our interpretations of legality and equity......, and consequently divergence about who can expect to benefit from REDD+. In a context where land ownership has historically and presently involved processes of dispossession, marginalization and even evictions, this rebuttal illustrates the complexity of the dominant discourse on land tenure and benefits under REDD...

  17. Induction of animal model of Graves disease in BALB/c mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To construct an animal model of Graves' disease(GD)by immunizing BALB/c mice with hM12 cells co-expressing major histocompatibility complex(MHC)class II molecules and human thyrotropin receptor(TSHR)molecules.Methods BALB/c mice in experimental group(H-2d)were immunized with hM12 cells intraperitoneally every 2 weeks for six times,while mice in control group were immunized with M12 cells.Five weeks later,the thyroids were histologically examined,and serum samples were tested for thyroid-stimulatin...

  18. Palatable meal anticipation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia T Hsu

    Full Text Available The ability to sense time and anticipate events is a critical skill in nature. Most efforts to understand the neural and molecular mechanisms of anticipatory behavior in rodents rely on daily restricted food access, which induces a robust increase of locomotor activity in anticipation of daily meal time. Interestingly, rats also show increased activity in anticipation of a daily palatable meal even when they have an ample food supply, suggesting a role for brain reward systems in anticipatory behavior, and providing an alternate model by which to study the neurobiology of anticipation in species, such as mice, that are less well adapted to "stuff and starve" feeding schedules. To extend this model to mice, and exploit molecular genetic resources available for that species, we tested the ability of wild-type mice to anticipate a daily palatable meal. We observed that mice with free access to regular chow and limited access to highly palatable snacks of chocolate or "Fruit Crunchies" avidly consumed the snack but did not show anticipatory locomotor activity as measured by running wheels or video-based behavioral analysis. However, male mice receiving a snack of high fat chow did show increased food bin entry prior to access time and a modest increase in activity in the two hours preceding the scheduled meal. Interestingly, female mice did not show anticipation of a daily high fat meal but did show increased activity at scheduled mealtime when that meal was withdrawn. These results indicate that anticipation of a scheduled food reward in mice is behavior, diet, and gender specific.

  19. Multifactorial Control of Autoimmune Insulin-Dependent Diabetes in NOD Mice: Lessons for IBD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward H Leiter

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of autoimmune insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in nonobese diabetic (NOD mice is an example of a complex multifactorial disease with strong genetic and environmental components. As such, this model may provide insight not only into mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease, but also may provide insight into how the environment may interact with the genome to initiate pathogenesis in humans. NOD mice are characterized by accumulation of unusually high percentages of T lymphocytes in lymphoid organs. Pancreatic beta cell destruction in NOD mice is T lymphocyte-mediated. Complex interactions between the inherently diabetogenic major histocompatibility complex (MHC haplotype of this strain and non-MHC-associated insulin-dependent diabetes susceptibility genes (Idd are required for cytopathic activation of the leukocytic infiltrates in the pancreas (insulitis. Penetrance of the diabetogenic Idd genes is strongly influenced by both dietary and microbiological factors in the environment. Genetic susceptibility is transmitted by hemopoietic stem cells, and specific defects in T immunoregulation have been traced to defects in the development and function of marrow-derived antigen presenting cells. The spontaneous development of diabetes in NOD mice is different from experimentally induced forms of diabetes in mice in several important respects. In addition to the pathognomic development of pancreatic insulitis, the generalized loss of immunoregulatory control of autoreactive T lymphocytes in NOD mice is reflected by development of leukocytic infiltrates into a plethora of organ systems including the submandibular salivary glands, thyroid glands, kidneys and, occasionally, the colon.

  20. Deletion of PTH rescues skeletal abnormalities and high osteopontin levels in Klotho-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Yuan

    Full Text Available Maintenance of normal mineral ion homeostasis is crucial for many biological activities, including proper mineralization of the skeleton. Parathyroid hormone (PTH, Klotho, and FGF23 have been shown to act as key regulators of serum calcium and phosphate homeostasis through a complex feedback mechanism. The phenotypes of Fgf23(-/- and Klotho(-/- (Kl(-/- mice are very similar and include hypercalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, hypervitaminosis D, suppressed PTH levels, and severe osteomalacia/osteoidosis. We recently reported that complete ablation of PTH from Fgf23(-/- mice ameliorated the phenotype in Fgf23(-/-/PTH(-/- mice by suppressing serum vitamin D and calcium levels. The severe osteomalacia in Fgf23(-/- mice, however, persisted, suggesting that a different mechanism is responsible for this mineralization defect. In the current study, we demonstrate that deletion of PTH from Kl(-/- (Kl(-/-/PTH(-/- or DKO mice corrects the abnormal skeletal phenotype. Bone turnover markers are restored to wild-type levels; and, more importantly, the skeletal mineralization defect is completely rescued in Kl(-/-/PTH(-/- mice. Interestingly, the correction of the osteomalacia is accompanied by a reduction in the high levels of osteopontin (Opn in bone and serum. Such a reduction in Opn levels could not be observed in Fgf23(-/-/PTH(-/- mice, and these mice showed sustained osteomalacia. This significant in vivo finding is corroborated by in vitro studies using calvarial osteoblast cultures that show normalized Opn expression and rescued mineralization in Kl(-/-/PTH(-/- mice. Moreover, continuous PTH infusion of Kl(-/- mice significantly increased Opn levels and osteoid volume, and decreased trabecular bone volume. In summary, our results demonstrate for the first time that PTH directly impacts the mineralization disorders and skeletal deformities of Kl(-/-, but not of Fgf23(-/- mice, possibly by regulating Opn expression. These are significant new perceptions into

  1. Heme oxygenase-1 modulates degeneration of the intervertebral disc after puncture in Bach 1 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Ryo; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Nakanishi, Kazuyoshi; Kamei, Naosuke; Nakamae, Toshio; Izumi, Bunichiro; Fujioka, Yuki; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2012-09-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration is considered to be a major feature of low back pain. Furthermore, oxidative stress has been shown to be an important factor in degenerative diseases such as osteoarthritis and is considered a cause of intervertebral disc degeneration. The purpose of this study was to clarify the correlation between oxidative stress and intervertebral disc degeneration using Broad complex-Tramtrack-Bric-a-brac and cap'n'collar homology 1 deficient (Bach 1-/-) mice which highly express heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). HO-1 protects cells from oxidative stress. Caudal discs of 12-week-old and 1-year-old mice were evaluated as age-related models. Each group and period, 5 mice (a total of 20 mice, a total of 20 discs) were evaluated as age-related model. C9-C10 caudal discs in 12-week-old Bach 1-/- and wild-type mice were punctured using a 29-gauge needle as annulus puncture model. Each group and period, 5 mice (a total of 60 mice, a total of 60 discs) were evaluated. The progress of disc degeneration was evaluated at pre-puncture, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks post-puncture. Radiographic, histologic and immunohistologic analysis were performed to compare between Bach 1-/- and wild-type mice. In the age-related model, there were no significant differences between Bach 1-/- and wild-type mice radiologically and histologically. However, in the annulus puncture model, histological scoring revealed significant difference at 8 and 12 weeks post-puncture. The number of HO-1 positive cells was significantly greater in Bach 1-/- mice at every period. The apoptosis rate was significantly lower at 1 and 2 weeks post-puncture in Bach 1-/- mice. Oxidative stress prevention may avoid the degenerative process of the intervertebral disc after puncture, reducing the number of apoptosis cells. High HO-1 expression may also inhibit oxidative stress and delay the process of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  2. Genetics of Rapid and Extreme Size Evolution in Island Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Melissa M; Parmenter, Michelle D; Hogan, Caley A; Ford, Irene; Cuthbert, Richard J; Ryan, Peter G; Broman, Karl W; Payseur, Bret A

    2015-09-01

    Organisms on islands provide a revealing window into the process of adaptation. Populations that colonize islands often evolve substantial differences in body size from their mainland relatives. Although the ecological drivers of this phenomenon have received considerable attention, its genetic basis remains poorly understood. We use house mice (subspecies: Mus musculus domesticus) from remote Gough Island to provide a genetic portrait of rapid and extreme size evolution. In just a few hundred generations, Gough Island mice evolved the largest body size among wild house mice from around the world. Through comparisons with a smaller-bodied wild-derived strain from the same subspecies (WSB/EiJ), we demonstrate that Gough Island mice achieve their exceptional body weight primarily by growing faster during the 6 weeks after birth. We use genetic mapping in large F(2) intercrosses between Gough Island mice and WSB/EiJ to identify 19 quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for the evolution of 16-week weight trajectories: 8 QTL for body weight and 11 QTL for growth rate. QTL exhibit modest effects that are mostly additive. We conclude that body size evolution on islands can be genetically complex, even when substantial size changes occur rapidly. In comparisons to published studies of laboratory strains of mice that were artificially selected for divergent body sizes, we discover that the overall genetic profile of size evolution in nature and in the laboratory is similar, but many contributing loci are distinct. Our results underscore the power of genetically characterizing the entire growth trajectory in wild populations and lay the foundation necessary for identifying the mutations responsible for extreme body size evolution in nature. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  3. Cadmium modulates adipocyte functions in metallothionein-null mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Takashige; Nishiyama, Kaori; Kadota, Yoshito; Sato, Masao; Inoue, Masahisa; Suzuki, Shinya, E-mail: suzukis@ph.bunri-u.ac.jp

    2013-11-01

    Our previous study has demonstrated that exposure to cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal, causes a reduction of adipocyte size and the modulation of adipokine expression. To further investigate the significance of the Cd action, we studied the effect of Cd on the white adipose tissue (WAT) of metallothionein null (MT{sup −/−}) mice, which cannot form atoxic Cd–MT complexes and are used for evaluating Cd as free ions, and wild type (MT{sup +/+}) mice. Cd administration more significantly reduced the adipocyte size of MT{sup −/−} mice than that of MT{sup +/+} mice. Cd exposure also induced macrophage recruitment to WAT with an increase in the expression level of Ccl2 (MCP-1) in the MT{sup −/−} mice. The in vitro exposure of Cd to adipocytes induce triglyceride release into culture medium, decrease in the expression levels of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and lipid hydrolysis at 24 h, and at 48 h increase in phosphorylation of the lipid-droplet-associated protein perilipin, which facilitates the degradation of stored lipids in adipocytes. Therefore, the reduction in adipocyte size by Cd may arise from an imbalance between lipid synthesis and lipolysis. In addition, the expression levels of leptin, adiponectin and resistin decreased in adipocytes. Taken together, exposure to Cd may induce unusually small adipocytes and modulate the expression of adipokines differently from the case of physiologically small adipocytes, and may accelerate the risk of developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. - Highlights: • Cd causes a marked reduction in adipocyte size in MT-null mice. • Cd enhances macrophage migration into adipose tissue and disrupt adipokine secretion. • MT gene alleviates Cd-induced adipocyte dysfunctions. • Cd enhances the degradation of stored lipids in adipocytes, mediated by perilipin. • Cd induces unusually small adipocytes and the abnormal expression of adipokines.

  4. Exploring female mice interstrain differences relevant for models of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela de Sá Calçada

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Depression is an extremely heterogeneous disorder. Diverse molecular mechanisms have been suggested to underlie its etiology. To understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for this complex disorder, researchers have been using animal models extensively, namely mice from various genetic backgrounds and harboring distinct genetic modifications. The use of numerous mouse models has contributed to enrich our knowledge on depression. However, accumulating data also revealed that the intrinsic characteristics of each mouse strain might influence the experimental outcomes, which may justify some conflicting evidence reported in the literature. To further understand the impact of the genetic background we performed a multimodal comparative study encompassing the most relevant parameters commonly addressed in depression in three of the most widely used mouse strains: Balb/c, C57BL/6 and CD-1. Moreover, female mice were selected for this study taken into account the higher prevalence of depression in woman and the fewer animal studies using this gender. Our results show that Balb/c mice have a more pronounced anxious-like behavior than CD-1 and C57BL/6 mice, whereas C57BL/6 animals present the strongest depressive-like trait. Furthermore, C57BL/6 mice display the highest rate of proliferating cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression levels in the hippocampus, while hippocampal dentate granular neurons of Balb/c mice show smaller dendritic lengths and fewer ramifications. Of notice, the expression levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNos predict 39,5% of the depressive-like behavior index, which suggests a key role of hippocampal iNOS in depression.Overall, this study reveals important interstrain differences in several behavioral dimensions and molecular and cellular parameters that should be considered when preparing and analyzing experiments addressing depression using mouse models. It further contributes to the literature by

  5. Automatic visual tracking and social behaviour analysis with multiple mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Giancardo

    Full Text Available Social interactions are made of complex behavioural actions that might be found in all mammalians, including humans and rodents. Recently, mouse models are increasingly being used in preclinical research to understand the biological basis of social-related pathologies or abnormalities. However, reliable and flexible automatic systems able to precisely quantify social behavioural interactions of multiple mice are still missing. Here, we present a system built on two components. A module able to accurately track the position of multiple interacting mice from videos, regardless of their fur colour or light settings, and a module that automatically characterise social and non-social behaviours. The behavioural analysis is obtained by deriving a new set of specialised spatio-temporal features from the tracker output. These features are further employed by a learning-by-example classifier, which predicts for each frame and for each mouse in the cage one of the behaviours learnt from the examples given by the experimenters. The system is validated on an extensive set of experimental trials involving multiple mice in an open arena. In a first evaluation we compare the classifier output with the independent evaluation of two human graders, obtaining comparable results. Then, we show the applicability of our technique to multiple mice settings, using up to four interacting mice. The system is also compared with a solution recently proposed in the literature that, similarly to us, addresses the problem with a learning-by-examples approach. Finally, we further validated our automatic system to differentiate between C57B/6J (a commonly used reference inbred strain and BTBR T+tf/J (a mouse model for autism spectrum disorders. Overall, these data demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of this new machine learning system in the detection of social and non-social behaviours in multiple (>2 interacting mice, and its versatility to deal with different

  6. Colitis susceptibility in p47(phox-/-) mice is mediated by the microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, E Liana; Abusleme, Loreto; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Lionakis, Michail S; Ding, Li; Hsu, Amy P; Zelazny, Adrian M; Moutsopoulos, Niki M; Kuhns, Douglas B; Deming, Clay; Quiñones, Mariam; Segre, Julia A; Bryant, Clare E; Holland, Steven M

    2016-04-05

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is caused by defects in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2 (NOX2) complex subunits (gp91(phox) (a.k.a. Nox2), p47(phox), p67(phox), p22(phox), p40(phox)) leading to reduced phagocyte-derived reactive oxygen species production. Almost half of patients with CGD develop inflammatory bowel disease, and the involvement of the intestinal microbiome in relation to this predisposing immunodeficiency has not been explored. Although CGD mice do not spontaneously develop colitis, we demonstrate that p47(phox-/-) mice have increased susceptibility to dextran sodium sulfate colitis in association with a distinct colonic transcript and microbiome signature. Neither restoring NOX2 reactive oxygen species production nor normalizing the microbiome using cohoused adult p47(phox-/-) with B6Tac (wild type) mice reversed this phenotype. However, breeding p47(phox+/-) mice and standardizing the microflora between littermate p47(phox-/-) and B6Tac mice from birth significantly reduced dextran sodium sulfate colitis susceptibility in p47(phox-/-) mice. We found similarly decreased colitis susceptibility in littermate p47(phox-/-) and B6Tac mice treated with Citrobacter rodentium. Our findings suggest that the microbiome signature established at birth may play a bigger role than phagocyte-derived reactive oxygen species in mediating colitis susceptibility in CGD mice. These data further support bacteria-related disease in CGD colitis.

  7. Practical pathology of aging mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piper M. M. Treuting

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Old mice will have a subset of lesions as part of the progressive decline in organ function that defines aging. External and palpable lesions will be noted by the research, husbandry, or veterinary staff during testing, cage changing, or physical exams. While these readily observable lesions may cause alarm, not all cause undue distress or are life-threatening. In aging research, mice are maintained until near end of life that, depending on strain and genetic manipulation, can be upwards of 33 months. Aging research has unique welfare issues related to age-related decline, debilitation, fragility, and associated pain of chronic diseases. An effective aging research program includes the collaboration and education of the research, husbandry, and veterinary staff, and of the members of the institution animal care and use committee. This collaborative effort is critical to humanely maintaining older mice and preventing excessive censorship due to non-lethal diseases. Part of the educational process is becoming familiar with how old mice appear clinically, at necropsy and histopathologically. This baseline knowledge is important in making the determination of humane end points, defining health span, contributing causes of death and effects of interventions. The goal of this paper is to introduce investigators to age-associated diseases and lesion patterns in mice from clinical presentation to pathologic assessment. To do so, we present and illustrate the common clinical appearances, necropsy and histopathological lesions seen in subsets of the aging colonies maintained at the University of Washington.

  8. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishimoto, S.; Suzuki, S.; Yoshida, M.; Green, Michael A.; Kuno, Y.; Lau, Wing

    2010-05-30

    Liquid hydrogen absorbers for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) have been developed, and the first absorber has been tested at KEK. In the preliminary test at KEK we have successfully filled the absorber with {approx}2 liters of liquid hydrogen. The measured hydrogen condensation speed was 2.5 liters/day at 1.0 bar. No hydrogen leakage to vacuum was found between 300 K and 20 K. The MICE experiment includes three AFC (absorber focusing coil) modules, each containing a 21 liter liquid hydrogen absorber made of aluminum. The AFC module has safety windows to separate its vacuum from that of neighboring modules. Liquid hydrogen is supplied from a cryocooler with cooling power 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The first absorber will be assembled in the AFC module and installed in MICE at RAL.

  9. Magnetic eye tracking in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Hannah L; Raymond, Jennifer L

    2017-09-05

    Eye movements provide insights about a wide range of brain functions, from sensorimotor integration to cognition; hence, the measurement of eye movements is an important tool in neuroscience research. We describe a method, based on magnetic sensing, for measuring eye movements in head-fixed and freely moving mice. A small magnet was surgically implanted on the eye, and changes in the magnet angle as the eye rotated were detected by a magnetic field sensor. Systematic testing demonstrated high resolution measurements of eye position of eye tracking offers several advantages over the well-established eye coil and video-oculography methods. Most notably, it provides the first method for reliable, high-resolution measurement of eye movements in freely moving mice, revealing increased eye movements and altered binocular coordination compared to head-fixed mice. Overall, magnetic eye tracking provides a lightweight, inexpensive, easily implemented, and high-resolution method suitable for a wide range of applications.

  10. Progress of the MICE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bonesini, M

    2015-01-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling of a muon beam. The demonstration is based on a simplified version of a neutrino factory cooling channel. As the emittance measurement will be done on a particle-by-particle basis, sophisticated beam instrumentation has been developed to measure particle coordinates and timing vs RF. The muon beamline has been characterized and a preliminary measure of the beam emittance, using a particle-by-particle method with only the TOF detector system, has been performed (MICE STEP I). Data taking for the study of the properties that determine the cooling performance (MICE Step IV) has just started in 2015, while the demonstration of ionization cooling with re-acceleration is foreseen for 2017.

  11. Toxoplasma gondii: sexual transmission in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Asgari, Qasem; Keshavarz Valian, Hossein; REZAEIAN, Mostafa; SHOJAEE, Saeedeh; Mehrabani, Davood

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate sexual transmission of Toxoplasma gondii in mice. RH strain tachyzoites were intraperitoneally inoculated into 10 Balb/C male mice and after 48 h, their semen were collected from epididymis and examined by giemsa staining and PCR. Twenty Balb/C female mice mated with four infected male mice four times and any mating time was 48 h whilst 20 female control mice mated with four uninfected male mice for 8 days. Female mate choice was assessed using a three-cha...

  12. Aerosol phage therapy efficacy in Burkholderia cepacia complex respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semler, Diana D; Goudie, Amanda D; Finlay, Warren H; Dennis, Jonathan J

    2014-07-01

    Phage therapy has been suggested as a potential treatment for highly antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as the species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC). To address this hypothesis, experimental B. cenocepacia respiratory infections were established in mice using a nebulizer and a nose-only inhalation device. Following infection, the mice were treated with one of five B. cenocepacia-specific phages delivered as either an aerosol or intraperitoneal injection. The bacterial and phage titers within the lungs were assayed 2 days after treatment, and mice that received the aerosolized phage therapy demonstrated significant decreases in bacterial loads. Differences in phage activity were observed in vivo. Mice that received phage treatment by intraperitoneal injection did not demonstrate significantly reduced bacterial loads, although phage particles were isolated from their lung tissue. Based on these data, aerosol phage therapy appears to be an effective method for treating highly antibiotic-resistant bacterial respiratory infections, including those caused by BCC bacteria.

  13. Mice Lacking Brinp2 or Brinp3, or Both, Exhibit Behaviors Consistent with Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowicz, Susan R.; Featherby, Travis J.; Whisstock, James C.; Bird, Phillip I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brinps 1–3, and Astrotactins (Astn) 1 and 2, are members of the Membrane Attack Complex/Perforin (MACPF) superfamily that are predominantly expressed in the mammalian brain during development. Genetic variation at the human BRINP2/ASTN1 and BRINP1/ASTN2 loci has been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders. We, and others, have previously shown that Brinp1−/− mice exhibit behavior reminiscent of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: We created Brinp2−/− mice and Brinp3−/− mice via the Cre-mediated LoxP system to investigate the effect of gene deletion on anatomy and behavior. Additionally, Brinp2−/−Brinp3−/− double knock-out mice were generated by interbreeding Brinp2−/− and Brinp3−/− mice. Genomic validation was carried out for each knock-out line, followed by histological, weight and behavioral examination. Brinp1−/−Brinp2−/−Brinp3−/− triple knock-out mice were also generated by crossing Brinp2/3 double knock-out mice with previously generated Brinp1−/− mice, and examined by weight and histological analysis. Results: Brinp2−/− and Brinp3−/− mice differ in their behavior: Brinp2−/− mice are hyperactive, whereas Brinp3−/− mice exhibit marked changes in anxiety-response on the elevated plus maze. Brinp3−/− mice also show evidence of altered sociability. Both Brinp2−/− and Brinp3−/− mice have normal short-term memory, olfactory responses, pre-pulse inhibition, and motor learning. The double knock-out mice show behaviors of Brinp2−/− and Brinp3−/− mice, without evidence of new or exacerbated phenotypes. Conclusion: Brinp3 is important in moderation of anxiety, with potential relevance to anxiety disorders. Brinp2 dysfunction resulting in hyperactivity may be relevant to the association of ADHD with chromosome locus 1q25.2. Brinp2−/− and Brinp3−/− genes do not compensate in the mammalian brain and likely have

  14. Dietary sugar intake increases liver tumor incidence in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Marin E; Lahiri, Sujoy; Hargett, Stefan R; Chow, Jenny D Y; Byrne, Frances L; Breen, David S; Kenwood, Brandon M; Taddeo, Evan P; Lackner, Carolin; Caldwell, Stephen H; Hoehn, Kyle L

    2016-02-29

    Overnutrition can promote liver cancer in mice and humans that have liver damage caused by alcohol, viruses, or carcinogens. However, the mechanism linking diet to increased liver tumorigenesis remains unclear in the context of whether tumorigenesis is secondary to obesity, or whether nutrients like sugar or fat drive tumorigenesis independent of obesity. In male mice, liver tumor burden was recently found to correlate with sugar intake, independent of dietary fat intake and obesity. However, females are less susceptible to developing liver cancer than males, and it remains unclear how nutrition affects tumorigenesis in females. Herein, female mice were exposed to the liver carcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and fed diets with well-defined sugar and fat content. Mice fed diets with high sugar content had the greatest liver tumor incidence while dietary fat intake was not associated with tumorigenesis. Diet-induced postprandial hyperglycemia and fasting hyperinsulinemia significantly correlated with tumor incidence, while tumor incidence was not associated with obesity and obesity-related disorders including liver steatosis, glucose intolerance, or elevated serum levels of estrogen, ALT, and lipids. These results simplify the pathophysiology of diet-induced liver tumorigenesis by focusing attention on the role of sugar metabolism and reducing emphasis on the complex milieu associated with obesity.

  15. Hippocampal network oscillations in APP/APLP2-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomin Zhang

    Full Text Available The physiological function of amyloid precursor protein (APP and its two homologues APP-like protein 1 (APLP1 and 2 (APLP2 is largely unknown. Previous work suggests that lack of APP or APLP2 impairs synaptic plasticity and spatial learning. There is, however, almost no data on the role of APP or APLP at the network level which forms a critical interface between cellular functions and behavior. We have therefore investigated memory-related synaptic and network functions in hippocampal slices from three lines of transgenic mice: APPsα-KI (mice expressing extracellular fragment of APP, corresponding to the secreted APPsα ectodomain, APLP2-KO, and combined APPsα-KI/APLP2-KO (APPsα-DM for "double mutants". We analyzed two prominent patterns of network activity, gamma oscillations and sharp-wave ripple complexes (SPW-R. Both patterns were generally preserved in all strains. We find, however, a significantly reduced frequency of gamma oscillations in CA3 of APLP2-KO mice in comparison to APPsα-KI and WT mice. Network activity, basic synaptic transmission and short-term plasticity were unaltered in the combined mutants (APPsα-DM which showed, however, reduced long-term potentiation (LTP. Together, our data indicate that APLP2 and the intracellular domain of APP are not essential for coherent activity patterns in the hippocampus, but have subtle effects on synaptic plasticity and fine-tuning of network oscillations.

  16. Immature mice are more susceptible than adult mice to acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose induces acute liver injury. The aim of the present study was to analyze the difference of susceptibility between immature and adult mice to APAP-induced acute liver injury. Weanling immature and adult mice were injected with APAP (300 mg/kg). As expected, immature mice were more susceptible than adult mice to APAP-induced acute liver injury. APAP-evoked hepatic c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation was stronger in immature mice than in adult mice. Hepatic receptor-interacting protein (RIP)1 was obviously activated at APAP-exposed immature and adult mice. Interestingly, hepatic RIP3 activation was more obvious in APAP-treated immature mice than adult mice. Although there was no difference on hepatic GSH metabolic enzymes between immature and adult mice, immature mice were more susceptible than adult mice to APAP-induced hepatic GSH depletion. Of interest, immature mice expressed a much higher level of hepatic Cyp2e1 and Cyp3a11 mRNAs than adult mice. Correspondingly, immature mice expressed a higher level of hepatic CYP2E1, the key drug metabolic enzyme that metabolized APAP into the reactive metabolite NAPQI. These results suggest that a higher level of hepatic drug metabolic enzymes in immature mice than adult mice might contribute to the difference of susceptibility to APAP-induced acute liver injury. PMID:28205631

  17. Genetic control of ATGL-mediated lipolysis modulates adipose triglyceride stores in leptin-deficient mice[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelin, Genevieve; Liu, Shun-Mei; Li, Xiaosong; Schwartz, Gary J.; Chua, Streamson

    2012-01-01

    Dissecting the genetics of complex traits such as obesity allows the identification of causal genes for disease. Here, we show that the BALB/c mouse strain carries genetic variants that confer resistance to obesity induced by leptin-deficiency or a high-fat diet (HFD). We set out to identify the physiological and genetic bases underlying this phenotype. When compared with C57BL6/J ob/ob mice (B6), BALB/c ob/ob mice exhibited decreased food intake, increased thermogenic capacity, and improved fat catabolism, each of which can potentially modify obesity. Interestingly, analysis of F1 ob/ob (progeny of B6 ob/+ × BALB/c ob+) mice revealed that obesity resistance in BALB/c ob/ob mice principally relied upon improved fat mobilization. This was mechanistically explained by increased adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) content in adipocytes, along with increased lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation. We conducted a genome-wide scan and defined a quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome 2. BALB/c alleles on chromosome 2 not only associated with the obesity resistance phenotype but also supported increased ATGL content in adipose tissue. In summary, our study provides evidence that leptin-independent control of adipocyte lipolysis rates directly modifies the balance of macronutrient handling and is sufficient to regulate fat mass in the absence of alterations in food intake and energy expenditure.—Marcelin, G., S-M. Liu, X. Li, G. J. Schwartz, and S. Chua. PMID:22383686

  18. Turning Back the Aging Clock -- in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 164250.html Turning Back the Aging Clock -- in Mice Elderly rodents treated with cellular therapy regained lost fur, became ... 2017 THURSDAY, March 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Aging mice became more youthful following a new cellular therapy ...

  19. Modified Protein Improves Vitiligo Symptoms in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2013 (historical) Modified Protein Improves Vitiligo Symptoms in Mice Altering a key protein involved in the development ... pigmentation loss associated with the skin disorder in mice, according to recent research funded by the NIH’s ...

  20. Nanoparticles Ease Aching Joints in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161188.html Nanoparticles Ease Aching Joints in Mice Treatment might one ... News) -- New research in mice suggests that tiny nanoparticles might one day be a better way to ...

  1. Compensatory eye movements in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. van Alphen (Adriaan)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis will address the generation of compensatory eye movements in naturally mutated or genetically modified mice. The reason for generating compensatory eye movements is solely related to the requirements for good vision. In a subject moving through its environment the projection

  2. HZE Radiation Leukemogenesis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yuanlin

    Radiation exposure is a risk factor for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The Leukemogenesis NSCOR was developed to compare this risk for low LET vs HZE radiations as a means to better assess the leukemia risk to astronauts posed by space radiation. Individual projects within the NSCOR explore HZE radiation leukemogenesis in murine model systems and extend the findings to AML in humans. AML sensitive CBA/CaJ mice have been irradiated with 1 GeV 56 Fe particles at NSRL and with 137 Cs gamma-rays at Colorado State University and followed to 800 days of age for the development of AML. Molecular and cytogenetic analyses of HZE- and gamma-induced AML, including assays for chromosomal aberrations, PU.1 deletion, gene expression, array CGH and microsatellite instability are ongoing. Preliminary data indicate that 56 Fe particles are no more effective in inducing AML or shortening lifespan than gamma-rays. Studies designed to address the individual molecular steps in leukemogenesis and determine the effects of radiation and genetic background on each step have been initiated using knockout mice. Deletion of the PU.1 gene on mouse chromosome 2 is a critical step in this murine model of radiation leukemogenesis. Two of the three HZE-induced AMLs that could be assayed and thirteen of fourteen γ-induced AMLs had PU.1 loss as determined by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (FISH). We have found that AML sensitive CBA/CaJ mice have a higher incidence of Chr. 2 deletion in bone marrow cells following 56 Fe irradiation than AML resistant C57BL/6 mice. This study is being extended to proton irradiated mice. Our preliminary results indicate that microsatellite instability may be common in HZE irradiated progenitor cells. To determine if these cytogenetic changes can be induced in human myeloid progenitor cells by gamma, proton or HZE irradiation we are generating NOD/SCID mice that have been "humanized" by being transplanted with human hematopoietic stem cells. We are currently

  3. EFFECTS OF AEROBIC TRAINING ON THE CARDIOMYOCYTES OF THE RIGHT ATRIUM OF MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Gonçalves Coutinho de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Polypeptide hormones (natriuretic peptides, NPs are secreted by the cardiac atria and play an important role in the regulation of blood pressure. Objective: To evaluate the effects of aerobic training on the secretory apparatus of NPs in cardiomyocytes of the right atrium. Methods: Nine-month-old mice were divided in two groups (n=10: control group (CG and trained group (TG. The training protocol was performed on a motor treadmill for 8 weeks. Systolic blood pressure was measured at the beginning of the experiment (9 months of age and at moment of the sacrifice (11 months of age. Electron micrographs were used to quantify the following variables: the quantitative density and area of NP granules, the relative volumes of the mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi complex and the relative volume of euchromatin in the nucleus and the number of pores per 10 µm of the nuclear membrane. The results were compared by Student's t test (p< 0.05. Results: The cardiomyocytes obtained from TG mice showed increased density and sectional area of secretory granules of NP, higher relative volume of endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and Golgi complex compared with the CG mice. Furthermore, the quantitative density of nuclear pores and the relative volume of euchromatin in the nucleus were significantly higher compared with the CG mice. Conclusion: Aerobic training caused hypertrophy of the secretory apparatus in the cardiomyocytes of right atrium, which could explain the intense synthesis of natriuretic peptides in trained mice with respect to the untrained mice.

  4. Progress on Cherenkov Reconstruction in MICE

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, Daniel M; Rajaram, Durga; Winter, Miles; Cremaldi, Lucien; Sanders, David; Summers, Don

    2016-01-01

    Two beamline Cherenkov detectors (Ckov-a,-b) support particle identification in the MICE beamline. Electrons and high-momentum muons and pions can be identified with good efficiency. We report on the Ckov-a,-b performance in detecting pions and muons with MICE Step I data and derive an upper limit on the pion contamination in the standard MICE muon beam.

  5. The intestinal flora is required to support antibody responses to systemic immunization in infant and germ free mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamousé-Smith, Esi S; Tzeng, Alice; Starnbach, Michael N

    2011-01-01

    The presence of a complex and diverse intestinal flora is functionally important for regulating intestinal mucosal immune responses. However, the extent to which a balanced intestinal flora regulates systemic immune responses is still being defined. In order to specifically examine whether the acquisition of a less complex flora influences responses to immunization in the pre-weaning stages of life, we utilize a model in which infant mice acquire an intestinal flora from their mothers that has been altered by broad-spectrum antibiotics. In this model, pregnant dams are treated with a cocktail of antibiotics that alters both the density and microbial diversity of the intestinal flora. After challenge with a subcutaneous immunization, the antibiotic altered flora infant mice have lower antigen specific antibody titers compared to control age-matched mice. In a second model, we examined germ free (GF) mice to analyze how the complete lack of flora influences the ability to mount normal antibody responses following subcutaneous immunization. GF mice do not respond well to immunization and introduction of a normal flora into GF mice restores the capacity of these mice to respond. These results indicate that a gastrointestinal flora reduced in density and complexity at critical time points during development adversely impacts immune responses to systemic antigens.

  6. The intestinal flora is required to support antibody responses to systemic immunization in infant and germ free mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esi S Lamousé-Smith

    Full Text Available The presence of a complex and diverse intestinal flora is functionally important for regulating intestinal mucosal immune responses. However, the extent to which a balanced intestinal flora regulates systemic immune responses is still being defined. In order to specifically examine whether the acquisition of a less complex flora influences responses to immunization in the pre-weaning stages of life, we utilize a model in which infant mice acquire an intestinal flora from their mothers that has been altered by broad-spectrum antibiotics. In this model, pregnant dams are treated with a cocktail of antibiotics that alters both the density and microbial diversity of the intestinal flora. After challenge with a subcutaneous immunization, the antibiotic altered flora infant mice have lower antigen specific antibody titers compared to control age-matched mice. In a second model, we examined germ free (GF mice to analyze how the complete lack of flora influences the ability to mount normal antibody responses following subcutaneous immunization. GF mice do not respond well to immunization and introduction of a normal flora into GF mice restores the capacity of these mice to respond. These results indicate that a gastrointestinal flora reduced in density and complexity at critical time points during development adversely impacts immune responses to systemic antigens.

  7. Diet selection in immunologically manipulated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Gerlinde; Paschoal, Patrícia Olaya; de Oliveira, Vivian Leite; Pedruzzi, Monique M B; Campos, Sylvia M N; Andrade, Luiz; Nóbrega, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Diet selection is a complex problem that animals in wildlife have to deal with daily. In their natural environment, these animals meet a great variety of foods some of which they are able and prepared to eat, yet, not all of it is eaten. In addition to the biological factors, some of which we shall discuss deeper in this paper, an important factor in food preference is social contact. Alterations in the physiology of mammals can have profound effects on the choice or preference for certain foods. On the other hand the decline of taste and smell perception in the elderly, the degree of food restriction, the sensorial properties of foods (such as presentation, taste, and smell) can be considered factors that influence feeding behavior leading to aversion. Many species, including man, learn to associate nausea with taste, and as a consequence avoid its specific intake, which has been shown to be persistent. Conditioned taste aversion is a form of associative learning in which animals display an aversion to the taste of a food that has previously been paired with illness. Our group has investigated the pattern of ingestion of foods that are frequently eaten by mice in wildlife and are potentially allergenic to humans in order to study the immunological consequences to these foods such as oral tolerance and inflammatory processes of the gut. We have chosen two seeds, peanuts (Arachis hypogea) and cashew nuts (Anacardium occidentale), as our source of antigens as the first is considered to be one of the most potent food allergens and for the second there seems to be very little allergy in the human setting. We used male and female, normal, adult CBA/J, A/J, C57BL/6 and Balb/c mice 2-3 months old and hybrid (C57Bl/6xBalb/c) F1, (Balb/cxC57Bl/6) F1), (C57Bl/6xDBA2) F1 mice. Food preference appeared to be strain-specific. Animals tolerized to a determined seed, then immunized with its protein extract and re-exposed to the seed in natura alter their feeding pattern. We

  8. Male mice song syntax depends on social contexts and influences female preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eChabout

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In 2005 Holy & Guo advanced the idea that male mice produce ultrasonic vocalizations (USV with some features similar to courtship songs of songbirds. Since then, studies showed that male mice emit USV songs in different contexts (sexual and other and possess a multisyllabic repertoire. Debate still exists for and against plasticity in their vocalizations. But the use of a multisyllabic repertoire can increase potential flexibility and information, in how elements are organized and recombined, namely syntax. In many bird species, modulating song syntax has ethological relevance for sexual behavior and mate preferences. In this study we exposed adult male mice to different social contexts and developed a new approach of analyzing their USVs based on songbird syntax analysis. We found that male mice modify their syntax, including specific sequences, length of sequence, repertoire composition, and spectral features, according to stimulus and social context. Males emit longer and simpler syllables and sequences when singing to females, but more complex syllables and sequences in response to fresh female urine. Playback experiments show that the females prefer the complex songs over the simpler ones. We propose the complex songs are to lure females in, whereas the directed simpler sequences are used for direct courtship. These results suggest that although mice have a much more limited ability of song modification, they could still be used as animal models for understanding some vocal communication features that songbirds are used for.

  9. Male mice song syntax depends on social contexts and influences female preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabout, Jonathan; Sarkar, Abhra; Dunson, David B; Jarvis, Erich D

    2015-01-01

    In 2005, Holy and Guo advanced the idea that male mice produce ultrasonic vocalizations (USV) with some features similar to courtship songs of songbirds. Since then, studies showed that male mice emit USV songs in different contexts (sexual and other) and possess a multisyllabic repertoire. Debate still exists for and against plasticity in their vocalizations. But the use of a multisyllabic repertoire can increase potential flexibility and information, in how elements are organized and recombined, namely syntax. In many bird species, modulating song syntax has ethological relevance for sexual behavior and mate preferences. In this study we exposed adult male mice to different social contexts and developed a new approach of analyzing their USVs based on songbird syntax analysis. We found that male mice modify their syntax, including specific sequences, length of sequence, repertoire composition, and spectral features, according to stimulus and social context. Males emit longer and simpler syllables and sequences when singing to females, but more complex syllables and sequences in response to fresh female urine. Playback experiments show that the females prefer the complex songs over the simpler ones. We propose the complex songs are to lure females in, whereas the directed simpler sequences are used for direct courtship. These results suggest that although mice have a much more limited ability of song modification, they could still be used as animal models for understanding some vocal communication features that songbirds are used for.

  10. CART treatment improves memory and synaptic structure in APP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jia-li; Liou, Anthony K F; Shi, Yejie; Yin, Kai-lin; Chen, Ling; Li, Ling-ling; Zhu, Xiao-lei; Qian, Lai; Yang, Rong; Chen, Jun; Xu, Yun

    2015-05-11

    Major characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include deposits of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide in the brain, loss of synapses, and cognitive dysfunction. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) has recently been reported to attenuate Aβ-induced toxicity. In this study, CART localization in APP/PS1 mice was characterized and the protective effects of exogenous CART treatment were examined. Compared to age-matched wild type mice, 8-month-old APP/PS1 mice had significantly greater CART immunoreactivity in the hippocampus and cortex. A strikingly similar pattern of Aβ plaque-associated CART immunoreactivity was observed in the cortex of AD cases. Treatment of APP/PS1 mice with exogenous CART ameliorated memory deficits; this effect was associated with improvements in synaptic ultrastructure and long-term potentiation, but not a reduction of the Aβ plaques. Exogenous CART treatment in APP/PS1 mice prevented depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and stimulated mitochondrial complex I and II activities, resulting in an increase in ATP levels. CART treatment of APP/PS1 mice also reduced reactive oxygen species and 4-hydroxynonenal, and mitigated oxidative DNA damage. In summary, CART treatment reduced multiple neuropathological measures and improved memory in APP/PS1 mice, and may therefore be a promising and novel therapy for AD.

  11. CART treatment improves memory and synaptic structure in APP/PS1 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jia-li; Liou, Anthony K.F.; Shi, Yejie; Yin, Kai-lin; Chen, Ling; Li, Ling-ling; Zhu, Xiao-lei; Qian, Lai; Yang, Rong; Chen, Jun; Xu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Major characteristics of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) include deposits of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide in the brain, loss of synapses, and cognitive dysfunction. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) has recently been reported to attenuate Aβ-induced toxicity. In this study, CART localization in APP/PS1 mice was characterized and the protective effects of exogenous CART treatment were examined. Compared to age-matched wild type mice, 8-month-old APP/PS1 mice had significantly greater CART immunoreactivity in the hippocampus and cortex. A strikingly similar pattern of Aβ plaque-associated CART immunoreactivity was observed in the cortex of AD cases. Treatment of APP/PS1 mice with exogenous CART ameliorated memory deficits; this effect was associated with improvements in synaptic ultrastructure and long-term potentiation, but not a reduction of the Aβ plaques. Exogenous CART treatment in APP/PS1 mice prevented depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and stimulated mitochondrial complex I and II activities, resulting in an increase in ATP levels. CART treatment of APP/PS1 mice also reduced reactive oxygen species and 4-hydroxynonenal, and mitigated oxidative DNA damage. In summary, CART treatment reduced multiple neuropathological measures and improved memory in APP/PS1 mice, and may therefore be a promising and novel therapy for AD. PMID:25959573

  12. Orexin administration to mice that underwent chronic stress produces bimodal effects on emotion-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hye-Seung; Kim, Jae-Gon; Kim, Jae-Won; Kim, Hyung-Wook; Yoon, Bong-June

    2014-11-01

    Orexin plays diverse roles in regulating behaviors, such as sleep and wake, reward processing, arousal, and stress and anxiety. The orexin system may accomplish these multiple tasks through its complex innervations throughout the brain. The emerging evidence indicates a role of orexin in emotional behaviors; however, most of the previous studies have investigated the function of orexin in naïve animals. Here, we examined a functional role of orexin in mice that had been exposed to repeated stress. Chronic social defeat stress produced differential social interaction behaviors in mice (susceptible versus resilient) and these two groups of mice displayed different levels of prepro-orexin in the hypothalamus. Exogenously added orexin A to the brain induced an antidepressant-like effect in only the susceptible mice but not in the resilient mice. In contrast, orexin A and orexin B infused together produced an anxiogenic effect in only the resilient mice and not in the susceptible mice. Furthermore, we found that the antidepressant-like effect of orexin A is mediated by the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) after exposure to chronic restraint stress. These findings reveal a bimodal effect of the orexin system in regulating emotional behavior that depends on stress susceptibility.

  13. Enhanced acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in transgenic mice overexpressing BCL-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M L; Pierce, R H; Vail, M E; White, C C; Tonge, R P; Kavanagh, T J; Fausto, N; Nelson, S D; Bruschi, S A

    2001-11-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in the cell death induced by many drugs, including hepatotoxicity from overdose of the popular analgesic, acetaminophen (APAP). To investigate mitochondrial alterations associated with APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, the subcellular distribution of proapoptotic BAX was determined. Based on the antiapoptotic characteristics of BCL-2, we further hypothesized that if a BAX component was evident then BCL-2 overexpression may be hepatoprotective. Mice, either with a human bcl-2 transgene (-/+) or wild-type mice (WT; -/-), were dosed with 500 or 600 mg/kg (i.p.) APAP or a nonhepatotoxic isomer, N-acetyl-m-aminophenol (AMAP). Immunoblot analyses indicated increased mitochondrial BAX-beta content very early after APAP or AMAP treatment. This was paralleled by disappearance of BAX-alpha from the cytosol of APAP treated animals and, to a lesser extent, with AMAP treatment. Early pathological evidence of APAP-induced zone 3 necrosis was seen in bcl-2 (-/+) mice, which progressed to massive panlobular necrosis with hemorrhage by 24 h. In contrast, WT mice dosed with APAP showed a more typical, and less severe, centrilobular necrosis. AMAP-treated bcl-2 (-/+) mice displayed only early microvesicular steatosis without progression to extensive necrosis. Decreased complex III activity, evident as early as 6 h after treatment, correlated well with plasma enzyme activities at 24 h (AST r(2) = 0.89, ALT r(2) = 0.87) thereby confirming a role for mitochondria in APAP-mediated hepatotoxicity. In conclusion, these data suggest for the first time that BAX may be an early determinant of APAP-mediated hepatotoxicity and that BCL-2 overexpression unexpectedly enhances APAP hepatotoxicity.

  14. [Model of meningococcal sepsis in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoproshina, L I; Ermakova, L G; Belova, T N; Filippov, Iu V; Efimov, D D

    1978-11-01

    The authors studied a possibility of obtaining experimental meningococcus sepsis model on mice. The use of cyclophosphane, iron compounds, yolk medium produced no significant organism. When 4--5% mucine was injected intraperitoneally together with meningococcus culture mice died with sepsis phenomena. Differences were revealed in the sensitivity of linear and mongrel mice to meningococcus infection--AKR mice proved to be more sensitive. At the same time it was found that mongrel mice weighing from 10 to 12 g could be used to induce meningococcus sepsis.

  15. Dominant inheritance of retinal ganglion cell resistance to optic nerve crush in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlamp Cassandra L

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several neurodegenerative diseases are influenced by complex genetics that affect an individual's susceptibility, disease severity, and rate of progression. One such disease is glaucoma, a chronic neurodegenerative condition of the eye that targets and stimulates apoptosis of CNS neurons called retinal ganglion cells. Since ganglion cell death is intrinsic, it is reasonable that the genes that control this process may contribute to the complex genetics that affect ganglion cell susceptibility to disease. To determine if genetic background influences susceptibility to optic nerve damage, leading to ganglion cell death, we performed optic nerve crush on 15 different inbred lines of mice and measured ganglion cell loss. Resistant and susceptible strains were used in a reciprocal breeding strategy to examine the inheritance pattern of the resistance phenotype. Because earlier studies had implicated Bax as a susceptibility allele for ganglion cell death in the chronic neurodegenerative disease glaucoma, we conducted allelic segregation analysis and mRNA quantification to assess this gene as a candidate for the cell death phenotype. Results Inbred lines showed varying levels of susceptibility to optic nerve crush. DBA/2J mice were most resistant and BALB/cByJ mice were most susceptible. F1 mice from these lines inherited the DBA/2J phenotype, while N2 backcross mice exhibited the BALB/cByJ phenotype. F2 mice exhibited an intermediate phenotype. A Wright Formula calculation suggested as few as 2 dominant loci were linked to the resistance phenotype, which was corroborated by a Punnett Square analysis of the distribution of the mean phenotype in each cross. The levels of latent Bax mRNA were the same in both lines, and Bax alleles did not segregate with phenotype in N2 and F2 mice. Conclusion Inbred mice show different levels of resistance to optic nerve crush. The resistance phenotype is heritable in a dominant fashion involving

  16. Socially induced morphine pseudosensitization in adolescent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Stephen R; Hofford, Rebecca S; Roberts, Kris W; Wellman, Paul J; Eitan, Shoshana

    2010-03-01

    Given that social influences are among the strongest predictors of adolescents' drug use, this study examined the effect of social interaction on morphine-induced hyperlocomotion in both adolescent and adult mice. Three experimental groups of adolescent and adult male mice were examined (i) morphine-treated mice (twice daily, 10-40 mg/kg, subcutaneous), (ii) saline-injected mice housed together with the morphine-treated mice ('saline cage-mates'), and (iii) saline-injected mice housed physically and visually separated from the morphine-treated mice ('saline alone'). After the treatment period, mice were tested individually for their locomotor response to 10 mg/kg morphine (subcutaneous). Adolescent saline cage-mates, though administered morphine for the very first time, exhibited an enhanced hyperlocomotion response similar to the locomotor sensitization response exhibited by the morphine-treated mice. This was not observed in adults. In adults, there were no significant differences in morphine-induced hyperlocomotion between saline alone and saline cage-mates. As expected, morphine-treated adults and adolescents both exhibited locomotor sensitization. These results show a vulnerability to social influences in adolescent mice, which does not exist in adult mice.

  17. Severe osteogenesis imperfecta in cyclophilin B-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Won Choi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI is a human syndrome characterized by exquisitely fragile bones due to osteoporosis. The majority of autosomal dominant OI cases result from point or splice site mutations in the type I collagen genes, which are thought to lead to aberrant osteoid within developing bones. OI also occurs in humans with homozygous mutations in Prolyl-3-Hydroxylase-1 (LEPRE1. Although P3H1 is known to hydroxylate a single residue (pro-986 in type I collagen chains, it is unclear how this modification acts to facilitate collagen fibril formation. P3H1 exists in a complex with CRTAP and the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase cyclophilin B (CypB, encoded by the Ppib gene. Mutations in CRTAP cause OI in mice and humans, through an unknown mechanism, while the role of CypB in this complex has been a complete mystery. To study the role of mammalian CypB, we generated mice lacking this protein. Early in life, Ppib-/- mice developed kyphosis and severe osteoporosis. Collagen fibrils in Ppib-/- mice had abnormal morphology, further consistent with an OI phenotype. In vitro studies revealed that in CypB-deficient fibroblasts, procollagen did not localize properly to the golgi. We found that levels of P3H1 were substantially reduced in Ppib-/- cells, while CRTAP was unaffected by loss of CypB. Conversely, knockdown of either P3H1 or CRTAP did not affect cellular levels of CypB, but prevented its interaction with collagen in vitro. Furthermore, knockdown of CRTAP also caused depletion of cellular P3H1. Consistent with these changes, post translational prolyl-3-hydroxylation of type I collagen by P3H1 was essentially absent in CypB-deficient cells and tissues from CypB-knockout mice. These data provide significant new mechanistic insight into the pathophysiology of OI and reveal how the members of the P3H1/CRTAP/CypB complex interact to direct proper formation of collagen and bone.

  18. Electromagnetic treatment to old Alzheimer's mice reverses β-amyloid deposition, modifies cerebral blood flow, and provides selected cognitive benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendash, Gary W; Mori, Takashi; Dorsey, Maggie; Gonzalez, Rich; Tajiri, Naoki; Borlongan, Cesar

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have investigated physiologic and cognitive effects of "long-term" electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure in humans or animals. Our recent studies have provided initial insight into the long-term impact of adulthood EMF exposure (GSM, pulsed/modulated, 918 MHz, 0.25-1.05 W/kg) by showing 6+ months of daily EMF treatment protects against or reverses cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's transgenic (Tg) mice, while even having cognitive benefit to normal mice. Mechanistically, EMF-induced cognitive benefits involve suppression of brain β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation/deposition in Tg mice and brain mitochondrial enhancement in both Tg and normal mice. The present study extends this work by showing that daily EMF treatment given to very old (21-27 month) Tg mice over a 2-month period reverses their very advanced brain Aβ aggregation/deposition. These very old Tg mice and their normal littermates together showed an increase in general memory function in the Y-maze task, although not in more complex tasks. Measurement of both body and brain temperature at intervals during the 2-month EMF treatment, as well as in a separate group of Tg mice during a 12-day treatment period, revealed no appreciable increases in brain temperature (and no/slight increases in body temperature) during EMF "ON" periods. Thus, the neuropathologic/cognitive benefits of EMF treatment occur without brain hyperthermia. Finally, regional cerebral blood flow in cerebral cortex was determined to be reduced in both Tg and normal mice after 2 months of EMF treatment, most probably through cerebrovascular constriction induced by freed/disaggregated Aβ (Tg mice) and slight body hyperthermia during "ON" periods. These results demonstrate that long-term EMF treatment can provide general cognitive benefit to very old Alzheimer's Tg mice and normal mice, as well as reversal of advanced Aβ neuropathology in Tg mice without brain heating. Results further underscore the potential for EMF treatment

  19. Electromagnetic treatment to old Alzheimer's mice reverses β-amyloid deposition, modifies cerebral blood flow, and provides selected cognitive benefit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary W Arendash

    Full Text Available Few studies have investigated physiologic and cognitive effects of "long-term" electromagnetic field (EMF exposure in humans or animals. Our recent studies have provided initial insight into the long-term impact of adulthood EMF exposure (GSM, pulsed/modulated, 918 MHz, 0.25-1.05 W/kg by showing 6+ months of daily EMF treatment protects against or reverses cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's transgenic (Tg mice, while even having cognitive benefit to normal mice. Mechanistically, EMF-induced cognitive benefits involve suppression of brain β-amyloid (Aβ aggregation/deposition in Tg mice and brain mitochondrial enhancement in both Tg and normal mice. The present study extends this work by showing that daily EMF treatment given to very old (21-27 month Tg mice over a 2-month period reverses their very advanced brain Aβ aggregation/deposition. These very old Tg mice and their normal littermates together showed an increase in general memory function in the Y-maze task, although not in more complex tasks. Measurement of both body and brain temperature at intervals during the 2-month EMF treatment, as well as in a separate group of Tg mice during a 12-day treatment period, revealed no appreciable increases in brain temperature (and no/slight increases in body temperature during EMF "ON" periods. Thus, the neuropathologic/cognitive benefits of EMF treatment occur without brain hyperthermia. Finally, regional cerebral blood flow in cerebral cortex was determined to be reduced in both Tg and normal mice after 2 months of EMF treatment, most probably through cerebrovascular constriction induced by freed/disaggregated Aβ (Tg mice and slight body hyperthermia during "ON" periods. These results demonstrate that long-term EMF treatment can provide general cognitive benefit to very old Alzheimer's Tg mice and normal mice, as well as reversal of advanced Aβ neuropathology in Tg mice without brain heating. Results further underscore the potential for EMF

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi: serum antibody reactivity to the parasite antigens in susceptible and resistant mice

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The specific antibody responses were compared among susceptible (A/Sn), moderately susceptible (Balb/c) and resistant (C57 BL/lOJ) mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi (Y strain). Sera obtained during the second week of infection recognized a surface trypomastigote antigen of apparent Mr 80 kDa while displaying complex reactivity to surface epimastigote antigens. Complex trypomastigote antigens recognition was detected around the middle of the third week of infection. No major differences wer...

  1. Hyper Space Complex Number

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Shanguang

    2007-01-01

    A new kind of numbers called Hyper Space Complex Numbers and its algebras are defined and proved. It is with good properties as the classic Complex Numbers, such as expressed in coordinates, triangular and exponent forms and following the associative and commutative laws of addition and multiplication. So the classic Complex Number is developed from in complex plane with two dimensions to in complex space with N dimensions and the number system is enlarged also.

  2. Complex networks analysis of language complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Amancio, Diego R; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Costa, Luciano da F; 10.1209/0295-5075/100/58002

    2013-01-01

    Methods from statistical physics, such as those involving complex networks, have been increasingly used in quantitative analysis of linguistic phenomena. In this paper, we represented pieces of text with different levels of simplification in co-occurrence networks and found that topological regularity correlated negatively with textual complexity. Furthermore, in less complex texts the distance between concepts, represented as nodes, tended to decrease. The complex networks metrics were treated with multivariate pattern recognition techniques, which allowed us to distinguish between original texts and their simplified versions. For each original text, two simplified versions were generated manually with increasing number of simplification operations. As expected, distinction was easier for the strongly simplified versions, where the most relevant metrics were node strength, shortest paths and diversity. Also, the discrimination of complex texts was improved with higher hierarchical network metrics, thus point...

  3. Postnatal Hematopoiesis and Gut Microbiota in NOD Mice Deviate from C57BL/6 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Silke Malling Damlund

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal studies in different mouse strains reveal that early life colonization affects the development of adaptive immunity in mice. The nonobese diabetic (NOD mouse spontaneously develops autoimmune diabetes, but neonatal studies of NOD mice are lacking. We hypothesized that NOD mice deviate from another much used mouse strain, C57BL/6, with respect to postnatal microbiota and/or hematopoiesis and compared this in newborn mice of dams housed under the same conditions. A distinct bacteria profile rich in staphylococci was found at postnatal days (PND 1–4 in NOD mice. Furthermore, a distinct splenic cell profile high in a granulocytic phenotype was evident in the neonatal NOD mice whereas neonatal C57BL/6 mice showed a profile rich in monocytes. Neonatal expression of Reg3g and Muc2 in the gut was deviating in NOD mice and coincided with fewer bacteria attaching to the Mucosal surface in NOD compared to C57BL/6 mice.

  4. A single exposure to photochemical smog causes airway irritation and cardiac dysrhythmia in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The data presented here shows that a single exposure to photochemical smog causes airway irritation and cardiac dysrhythmia in mice. Smog, which is a complex mixture of particulate matter and gaseous irritants (ozone, sulfur dioxide, reactive aldehydes), as well as components whi...

  5. Motor, emotional and cognitive deficits in adult BACHD mice : A model for Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abada, Yah-se K.; Schreiber, Rudy; Ellenbroek, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Huntington's disease (HD) is characterized by progressive motor dysfunction, emotional disturbances and cognitive deficits. It is a genetic disease caused by an elongation of the polyglutamine repeats in the huntingtin gene. Whereas HD is a complex disorder, previous studies in mice model

  6. Behavioral and cognitive data in mice with different tryptophan-metabolizing enzymes knocked out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Too, Lay Khoon; Li, Kong M; Suarna, Cacang; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Stocker, Roland; McGregor, Iain S; Hunt, Nicholas H

    2016-12-01

    This article demonstrates behavioral changes in mice in response to free adaptation and drinking session adaptation modules implemented in their social home environment, the IntelliCage. These data complement the study "Deletion of TDO2, IDO-1 and IDO-2 differentially affects mouse behavior and cognitive function" (Too LK, Li KM, Suarna C, Maghzal GJ, Stocker R, McGregor IS, et al., 2016) [1]. Prior to programmed drinking sessions, all mice were exposed to a home cage adaptation module during which there was no time limit on water access - the free adaptation module. The exploratory behaviors are here expressed as percentages of visits with nosepokes and of visits with licks. The measurements by percentage of exploratory activity showed minimal genotype effects. The number of nosepokes or licks per corner visit also was compared between WT and gene knockout (GKO) IDO1 mice, WT and GKO IDO2 mice and WT and GKO TDO2 mice and demonstrated unremarkable behavioral changes during the free adaptation module. Analysis of drinking session adaptation behavior showed no genotype effect between WT and GKO of IDO1, IDO2 or TDO2 background. Notwithstanding the absence of genotype differences, each IDO1, IDO2 or TDO2 animal group displayed a specific pattern of adaptation to the drinking session modules. Furthermore, IDO1 GKO mice showed a more rapid recovery of lick frequency to the baseline level compared to the WT equivalents in a simple patrolling task during the first complete testing cycle (R1). TDO2 GKO mice on the other hand did not differ from their WT equivalents in terms of lick frequency over the three test days of complex patrolling and discrimination reversal tasks. Lastly, IDO2 GKO mice reduced their visits to the permanently non-rewarding reference corners by the same degree as did the WT mice.

  7. Executionary pathway for apoptosis: lessons from mutant mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death (PCD) is an evolutionarily conserved cellular process that is essential for normal development and homeostasis of multicellular organisms. Defects in the apoptosis signaling result in many diseases including autoimmune diseases and cancer. The apoptosis signaling pathway was first described genetically in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans which serves as a framework for the more complex apop totic pathways that exist in mammals. In this review, we will discuss the apoptotic pathways that are emerging in mammals as elucidated by studies of gene-targeted mutant mice.

  8. Executionary pathway for apoptosis:lessons from mutant mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WOOMINNA; RAZQALLAHHAKEM; 等

    2000-01-01

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death(PCD) is an evolutionarily conserved cellular process that is essential for normal development and homeostasis of multicellular organisms.Defects in the apoptosis signaling result in many diseases including autoimmune diseases and cancer.The apoptosis signaling pathway was first described genetically in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans which serves as a framework for the more complex apoptotic pathways that exist in mammals.In this review,we will discuss the apoptotic pathways that are emerging in mammals as elucidated by studies of gene-targeted mutant mice.

  9. Detonation nanodiamond complexes with cancer stem cells inhibitors or paracrine products of mesenchymal stem cells as new potential medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konoplyannikov, A. G.; Alekseenskiy, A. E.; Zlotin, S. G.; Smirnov, B. B.; Kalsina, S. Sh.; Lepehina, L. A.; Semenkova, I. V.; Agaeva, E. V.; Baboyan, S. B.; Rjumshina, E. A.; Nosachenko, V. V.; Konoplyannikov, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    Combined use of complexes of the most active chemotherapeutic drugs and detonation nanodiamonds (DND) is a new trend in cancer therapy, which is probably related to selective chemotherapeutic drug delivery by DND to the zone of so-called cancer stem cells (CSC). Stable DND complexes of 4-5 nm size with salinomycin—a strong CSC inhibitor—have been obtained (as a suspension). It has been demonstrated that a complex administration considerably increases the drug antitumor effect on the transplantable tumor of LLC mice. A similar effect has been observed in CSC models in vivo, obtained by exposure of stem cells of normal mice tissues to a carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine. It has also been found out, that administration of DND complexes with the conditioned medium from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) cultures to mice results in a considerable stimulation of stem cell pools in normal mice tissues, which can be used in regenerative medicine.

  10. Complex differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Fangyang

    2002-01-01

    The theory of complex manifolds overlaps with several branches of mathematics, including differential geometry, algebraic geometry, several complex variables, global analysis, topology, algebraic number theory, and mathematical physics. Complex manifolds provide a rich class of geometric objects, for example the (common) zero locus of any generic set of complex polynomials is always a complex manifold. Yet complex manifolds behave differently than generic smooth manifolds; they are more coherent and fragile. The rich yet restrictive character of complex manifolds makes them a special and interesting object of study. This book is a self-contained graduate textbook that discusses the differential geometric aspects of complex manifolds. The first part contains standard materials from general topology, differentiable manifolds, and basic Riemannian geometry. The second part discusses complex manifolds and analytic varieties, sheaves and holomorphic vector bundles, and gives a brief account of the surface classifi...

  11. Erionite induces production of autoantibodies and IL-17 in C57BL/6 mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zebedeo, Christian Nash; Davis, Chad [Department of Biological Sciences, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID (United States); Peña, Cecelia [Northwest Nazarene University, Nampa, ID (United States); Ng, Kok Wei [Department of Biological Sciences, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID (United States); Pfau, Jean C., E-mail: pfaujean@isu.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Background: Erionite has similar chemical and physical properties to amphibole asbestos, which induces autoantibodies in mice. Current exposures are occurring in North Dakota due to the use of erionite-contaminated gravel. While erionite is known to cause mesothelioma and other diseases associated with asbestos, there is little known about its effects on the immune system. Objectives: We performed this study to determine whether erionite evokes autoimmune reactions in mice. Methods: Bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) were used to measure toxicity induced by erionite. Cytokine production by BMDM and splenocytes of C57BL/6 mice was examined by bead arrays and ELISA following exposure to erionite, amphiboles and chrysotile. Wild type C57BL/6 mice were exposed to saline, erionite, amphibole asbestos (Libby 6-Mix) or chrysotile through intratracheal instillations at equal mass (60 μg/mouse). Seven months after exposure, sera were examined for anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) and IL-17. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect immune complex deposition in the kidneys. Results: Erionite and tremolite caused increased cytokine production belonging to the T{sub H}17 profile including IL-17, IL-6, TGF-β, and TNF-α. The frequency of ANA was increased in mice treated with erionite or amphibole compared to saline-treated mice. IL-17 and TNF-α were elevated in the sera of mice treated with erionite. The frequency of immune complex deposition in the kidneys increased from 33% in saline-treated mice to 90% with erionite. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that both erionite and amphibole asbestos induce autoimmune responses in mice, suggesting a potential for adverse effects in exposed communities. - Highlights: • Erionite, a fibrous mineral, is a current public health concern in the western USA. • Erionite exposure induces antinuclear autoantibodies in exposed mice. • Erionite induces a clear Th17 cytokine response in vitro and in vivo. • These responses were

  12. Multiphysics Integrated Coupling Environment (MICE) User Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varija Agarwal; Donna Post Guillen

    2013-08-01

    The complex, multi-part nature of waste glass melters used in nuclear waste vitrification poses significant modeling challenges. The focus of this project has been to couple a 1D MATLAB model of the cold cap region within a melter with a 3D STAR-CCM+ model of the melter itself. The Multiphysics Integrated Coupling Environment (MICE) has been developed to create a cohesive simulation of a waste glass melter that accurately represents the cold cap. The one-dimensional mathematical model of the cold cap uses material properties, axial heat, and mass fluxes to obtain a temperature profile for the cold cap, the region where feed-to-glass conversion occurs. The results from Matlab are used to update simulation data in the three-dimensional STAR-CCM+ model so that the cold cap is appropriately incorporated into the 3D simulation. The two processes are linked through ModelCenter integration software using time steps that are specified for each process. Data is to be exchanged circularly between the two models, as the inputs and outputs of each model depend on the other.

  13. Radioisotope trithiol complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurisson, Silvia S.; Cutler, Cathy S.; Degraffenreid, Anthony J.

    2016-08-30

    The present invention is directed to a series of stable radioisotope trithiol complexes that provide a simplified route for the direct complexation of radioisotopes present in low concentrations. In certain embodiments, the complex contains a linking domain configured to conjugate the radioisotope trithiol complex to a targeting vector. The invention is also directed to a novel method of linking the radioisotope to a trithiol compound to form the radioisotope trithiol complex. The inventive radioisotope trithiol complexes may be utilized for a variety of applications, including diagnostics and/or treatment in nuclear medicine.

  14. Cytological and Biochemical Effects of St. John’s Wort Supplement (A Complex Mixture of St. John’s Wort, Rosemary and Spirulina on Somatic and Germ Cells of Swiss Albino Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Aleisa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Commercially available St. John’s wort supplement (SJWS composed of an herbal mixture of St. John’s Wort (SJW, Rosemary (RM and Spirulina (SP is used as a dietary supplement for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Although the minor ingredients, (RM and SP are proven antioxidants, their quantity is quite insignificant as compared to the SJW, which is the major ingredient. Most of the toxic effects of SJWS are attributed to the main constituents of SJW which differ due to the influence of light (hypericin and variations in temperature above freezing point (hyperforin. However, there are no reports on toxicity of SJWS maintained at room temperature in pharmacies and supermarkets. In view of the folkloric importance, immense (prescribed or unprescribed use and a paucity of literature on SJWS, it was found worthwhile to (1 determine the genotoxic effects of SJWS in somatic and germ cells of mice and (2 investigate the role of biochemical changes, as a possible mechanism. The protocol included the oral treatment of mice with different doses (380, 760 and 1520 mg/kg/day of SJWS for 7 days. The following experiments were conducted: (i cytological studies on micronucleus test, (ii cytogenetic analysis for meiotic chromosomes, (iii cytological analysis of spermatozoa abnormalities, (iv quantification of proteins and nucleic acids in hepatic and testicular cells and (v estimation of malondialdehyde (MDA and nonprotein sulfhydryl (NP-SH in hepatic and testicular cells. The treatment increased the frequency of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE in the femora. It caused aberrations in chromosomes of testes and induced spermatozoa abnormalities. These changes might be attributed to the epigenetic mechanisms as revealed by an increase in concentrations of MDA and depletion of nucleic acids and NP-SH levels in both hepatic and testicular cells observed in the present study. Since, the samples of SJWS used were not drawn

  15. Genetic interactions between neurofibromin and endothelin receptor B in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mugdha Deo

    Full Text Available When mutations in two different genes produce the same mutant phenotype, it suggests that the encoded proteins either interact with each other, or act in parallel to fulfill a similar purpose. Haploinsufficiency of Neurofibromin and over-expression of Endothelin 3 both cause increased numbers of melanocytes to populate the dermis during mouse development, and thus we are interested in how these two signaling pathways might intersect. Neurofibromin is mutated in the human genetic disease, neurofibromatosis type 1, which is characterized by the development of Schwann cell based tumors and skin hyper-pigmentation. Neurofibromin is a GTPase activating protein, while the Endothelin 3 ligand activates Endothelin receptor B, a G protein coupled receptor. In order to study the genetic interactions between endothelin and neurofibromin, we defined the deletion breakpoints of the classical Ednrb piebald lethal allele (Ednrb(s-l and crossed these mice to mice with a loss-of-function mutation in neurofibromin, Dark skin 9 (Dsk9. We found that Neurofibromin haploinsufficiency requires Endothelin receptor B to darken the tail dermis. In contrast, Neurofibromin haploinsufficiency increases the area of the coat that is pigmented in Endothelin receptor B null mice. We also found an oncogenic mutation in the G protein alpha subunit, GNAQ, which couples to Endothelin receptor B, in a uveal melanoma from a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1. Thus, this data suggests that there is a complex relationship between Neurofibromin and Endothelin receptor B.

  16. Teratogenic effects of sulfur mustard on mice fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjarmoosavi, Nasrin; Sanjarmoosavi, Naser; Shahsavan, Marziyeh; Hassanzadeh-Nazarabadi, Mohammad

    2012-05-01

    Sulfur Mustard (SM) has been used as a chemical warfare agent, in the World War I and more recently during Iraq-Iran war in early 1980s'. Its biological poisoning effect could be local or systemic and its effect depends on environmental conditions, exposed organs, and the extent and duration of exposure. It is considered as a strong alkylating agent with known mutagenic, carcinogenic effects; although a few studies have been performed on its teratogenicity so far. Mice were administered with SM intraperitoneally with a dose of 0.75 and 1.5 mg/kg in different periods of their gestation (gestational age of 11, 13 and 14 weeks). Control mice groups were included. Between 5 and 9 mice were used in each group. Dams underwent cesarean section on day 19 of their gestation. External examination was performed on the animals investigating craniofacial and septal defects and limb malformations such as adactyly and syndactyly. All data were analyzed by Chi-Square test and Fisher's exact test. The P- value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Craniofacial and septal defects as well as the limb malformations were the most common types of birth defects, displaying an extremely complex biomedical problem. This study confirms a significant correlation between SM exposure and its teratogenic effect. We postulated that the malformations could be caused by an uncontrolled migration of neural crest cells, causing developmental disorders. In addition to environmental factors, modifying genes could play an important role in the pathogenesis of the defects.

  17. Dark matter: are mice the solution to missing heritability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Carlin Parker

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS in humans have identified hundreds of single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with complex traits, yet for most traits studied, the sum total of all these identified variants fail to explain a significant portion of the heritable variation. Reasons for this missing heritability are thought to include the existence of rare causative variants not captured by current genotyping arrays, structural variants that go undetected by existing technology, insufficient power to identify multi-gene interactions, small sample sizes, and the influence of environmental and epigenetic effects. As genotyping technologies have evolved it has become inexpensive and relatively straightforward to perform GWAS in mice. Mice offer a powerful tool for elucidating the genetic architecture of behavioral and physiological traits, and are complementary to human studies. Unlike F2 crosses of inbred strains, advanced intercross lines, heterogeneous stocks, outbred, and wild-caught mice have more rapid breakdown of linkage disequilibrium which allow for increasingly high resolution mapping. Because some of these populations are created using a small number of founder chromosomes they are not expected to harbor rare alleles. We discuss the differences between these mouse populations and examine their potential to overcome some of the pitfalls that have plagued human GWAS studies.

  18. Doxorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doxorubicin lipid complex is used to treat ovarian cancer that has not improved or that has worsened after treatment with other medications. Doxorubicin lipid complex is also used to treat Kaposi's ...

  19. Irinotecan Lipid Complex Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irinotecan lipid complex is used in combination with other medications to treat pancreatic cancer that has spread to other ... worsened after treatment with other chemotherapy medications. Irinotecan lipid complex is in a class of antineoplastic medications ...

  20. Daunorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunorubicin lipid complex is used to treat advanced Kaposi's sarcoma (a type of cancer that causes abnormal tissue to ... body) related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Daunorubicin lipid complex is in a class of medications called ...

  1. Vincristine Lipid Complex Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincristine lipid complex is used to treat a certain type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; a type of cancer ... least two different treatments with other medications. Vincristine lipid complex is in a class of medications called ...

  2. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  3. Postnatal hematopoiesis and gut microbiota in NOD mice deviate from C57BL/6 mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damlund, Dina Silke Malling; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Hasselby, Jane Preuss

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal studies in different mouse strains reveal that early life colonization affects the development of adaptive immunity in mice. The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse spontaneously develops autoimmune diabetes, but neonatal studies of NOD mice are lacking. We hypothesized that NOD mice deviate...... from another much used mouse strain, C57BL/6, with respect to postnatal microbiota and/or hematopoiesis and compared this in newborn mice of dams housed under the same conditions. A distinct bacteria profile rich in staphylococci was found at postnatal days (PND) 1-4 in NOD mice. Furthermore......, a distinct splenic cell profile high in a granulocytic phenotype was evident in the neonatal NOD mice whereas neonatal C57BL/6 mice showed a profile rich in monocytes. Neonatal expression of Reg3g and Muc2 in the gut was deviating in NOD mice and coincided with fewer bacteria attaching to the Mucosal surface...

  4. Evolution of biological complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Adami, Christoph; Ofria, Charles; Travis C. Collier

    2000-01-01

    In order to make a case for or against a trend in the evolution of complexity in biological evolution, complexity needs to be both rigorously defined and measurable. A recent information-theoretic (but intuitively evident) definition identifies genomic complexity with the amount of information a sequence stores about its environment. We investigate the evolution of genomic complexity in populations of digital organisms and monitor in detail the evolutionary transitions that increase complexit...

  5. Arterial Pressure Monitoring in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Ho, David; Gao, Shumin; Hong, Chull; Vatner, Dorothy E.; Vatner, Stephen F.

    2011-01-01

    The use of mice for the evaluation and study of cardiovascular pathophysiology is growing rapidly, primarily due to the relative ease for developing genetically engineered mouse models. Arterial pressure monitoring is central to the evaluation of the phenotypic changes associated with cardiovascular pathology and interventions in these transgenic and knockout models. There are four major techniques for measuring arterial pressure in the mouse: tail cuff system, implanted fluid filled catheters, Millar catheters and implanted telemetry systems. Here we provide protocols for their use and discuss the advantages and limitations for each of these techniques . PMID:21686061

  6. Mucosal maltase-glucoamylase plays a crucial role in starch digestion and prandial glucose homeostasis of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Buford L; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto; Robayo-Torres, Claudia C; Ao, Zihua; Hamaker, Bruce R; Butte, Nancy F; Marini, Juan; Jahoor, Farook; Sterchi, Erwin E

    2009-04-01

    Starch is the major source of food glucose and its digestion requires small intestinal alpha-glucosidic activities provided by the 2 soluble amylases and 4 enzymes bound to the mucosal surface of enterocytes. Two of these mucosal activities are associated with sucrase-isomaltase complex, while another 2 are named maltase-glucoamylase (Mgam) in mice. Because the role of Mgam in alpha-glucogenic digestion of starch is not well understood, the Mgam gene was ablated in mice to determine its role in the digestion of diets with a high content of normal corn starch (CS) and resulting glucose homeostasis. Four days of unrestricted ingestion of CS increased intestinal alpha-glucosidic activities in wild-type (WT) mice but did not affect the activities of Mgam-null mice. The blood glucose responses to CS ingestion did not differ between null and WT mice; however, insulinemic responses elicited in WT mice by CS consumption were undetectable in null mice. Studies of the metabolic route followed by glucose derived from intestinal digestion of (13)C-labeled and amylase-predigested algal starch performed by gastric infusion showed that, in null mice, the capacity for starch digestion and its contribution to blood glucose was reduced by 40% compared with WT mice. The reduced alpha-glucogenesis of null mice was most probably compensated for by increased hepatic gluconeogenesis, maintaining prandial glucose concentration and total flux at levels comparable to those of WT mice. In conclusion, mucosal alpha-glucogenic activity of Mgam plays a crucial role in the regulation of prandial glucose homeostasis.

  7. High fat diet drives obesity regardless the composition of gut microbiota in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabot, Sylvie; Membrez, Mathieu; Blancher, Florence; Berger, Bernard; Moine, Déborah; Krause, Lutz; Bibiloni, Rodrigo; Bruneau, Aurélia; Gérard, Philippe; Siddharth, Jay; Lauber, Christian L.; Chou, Chieh Jason

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota is involved in many aspects of host physiology but its role in body weight and glucose metabolism remains unclear. Here we studied the compositional changes of gut microbiota in diet-induced obesity mice that were conventionally raised or received microbiota transplantation. In conventional mice, the diversity of the faecal microbiota was weakly associated with 1st week weight gain but transferring the microbiota of mice with contrasting weight gain to germfree mice did not change obesity development or feed efficiency of recipients regardless whether the microbiota was taken before or after 10 weeks high fat (HF) feeding. Interestingly, HF-induced glucose intolerance was influenced by microbiota inoculation and improved glucose tolerance was associated with a low Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio. Transplantation of Bacteroidetes rich microbiota compared to a control microbiota ameliorated glucose intolerance caused by HF feeding. Altogether, our results demonstrate that gut microbiota is involved in the regulation of glucose metabolism and the abundance of Bacteroidetes significantly modulates HF-induced glucose intolerance but has limited impact on obesity in mice. Our results suggest that gut microbiota is a part of complex aetiology of insulin resistance syndrome, individual microbiota composition may cause phenotypic variation associated with HF feeding in mice. PMID:27577172

  8. Lectin binding pattern in the uterus of pregnant mice infected with Tritrichomonas foetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woudwyk, M A; Gimeno, E J; Soto, P; Barbeito, C G; Monteavaro, C E

    2013-01-01

    Bovine genital tritrichomonosis is caused by the protozoon Tritrichomonas foetus and leads to embryonic death and abortion. The complexity of handling bovine experimental systems has led to the development of alternative models. The infection has been reproduced in pregnant BALB/c mice. In the pathogenesis of the disease, adhesion of the protozoon to host cell surface glycoproteins is important. Labelling with soya bean agglutinin (SBA) and peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectins increases in the luminal and glandular uterine epithelium of non-pregnant infected mice. The aim of the present study was to determine whether these changes also occur in pregnant infected BALB/c mice. Female BALB/c mice were inoculated intravaginally with T. foetus and, 15 ± 3 days post infection, were paired with males overnight. Infected and control mice were sacrificed 6, 8 and 10 days later. Samples of uterus were labelled with a panel of biotinylated lectins. Infected mice showed increased binding of PNA and SBA. There was also increased binding of concanavalin (Con-A) by luminal epithelium and Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA-1) by glandular epithelium at day 6 post coitum. These changes may be due to the production of enzymes by T. foetus, which could act to enhance adhesion and colonization and thus favour infection.

  9. PROLIFERATION RESPONSES IN PREIMMUNIZED MICE LYMPHOCYTES BY BORDETELLA PERTUSSIS CELL WALL COMPONENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Mohabbati Mobarez

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis infects the respiratory tract of the human host and causes whooping cough in children. The nature of immunity against Bordetella pertussis infection and disease is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate cell mediated immunity in mice immunized with outer membrane component of cell wall, of B. Pertussis.A group of mice were immunized with outer membrane complex (OMC and killed whole cell (WCV of B. pertussis, with an interval of 2 weeks. During a period of 7 weeks following the immunization, lymphocytes were isolated from lymph nodes of immunized mice. The in vitro proliferative response of isolated lymphocyte to stimulation with 20 ^g of 30 and 69 kDa outer membrane protein (OMP were measured as parameters for cell mediated immunity (CMI. The data were expressed as mean count per minute (CPMxlO3 after subtraction of the CPM of unstimulated control cultures. Lymphoblastogenic response was observed in immunized mice with WCV and OMC. At 30 days of post immunization a significant increase in response to 30 and 69 kDa OMP was observed, a small decrease in the response was evident against P30 and P69 at 60 and 120 days of post immunization, but the response was still higher than what was observed in control mice.Current findings indicate strongly the potential of outer membrane protein component of B. pertussis in proliferating lymphocytes in the mice.

  10. Adolescent mice are more vulnerable than adults to single injection-induced behavioral sensitization to amphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Sonia R; Fukushiro, Daniela F; Trombin, Thaís F; Procópio-Souza, Roberta; Patti, Camilla L; Hollais, André W; Calzavara, Mariana B; Abílio, Vanessa C; Ribeiro, Rosana A; Tufik, Sergio; D'Almeida, Vânia; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2011-04-01

    Drug-induced behavioral sensitization in rodents has enhanced our understanding of why drugs acquire increasing motivational and incentive value. Compared to adults, human adolescents have accelerated dependence courses with shorter times from first exposure to dependence. We compared adolescent and adult mice in their ability to develop behavioral sensitization to amphetamine following a single injection. Adult (90-day-old) and adolescent (45-day-old) male Swiss mice received an acute intraperitoneal injection of saline or amphetamine (1.0, 2.0 or 4.0 mg/kg). Seven days later, half of the mice from the saline group received a second injection of saline. The remaining animals were challenged with 2.0 mg/kg amphetamine. Following all of the injections, mice were placed in activity chambers and locomotion was quantified for 45 min. The magnitude of both the acute and sensitized locomotor stimulatory effect of amphetamine was higher in the adolescent mice. Previous experience with the test environment inhibited the acute amphetamine stimulation in both adolescent and adult mice, but facilitated the detection of elevated spontaneous locomotion in adolescent animals. These results support the notion that the adolescent period is associated with an increased risk for development of drug abuse. Additionally, they indicate a complex interaction between the environmental novelty, adolescence and amphetamine.

  11. Regulation of mTOR activity in Snell dwarf and GH receptor gene-disrupted mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Graham; Berryman, Darlene E; List, Edward O; Kopchick, John J; Li, Xinna; Miller, Richard A; Garcia, Gonzalo G

    2015-02-01

    The involvement of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in lifespan control in invertebrates, calorie-restricted rodents, and extension of mouse lifespan by rapamycin have prompted speculation that diminished mTOR function may contribute to mammalian longevity in several settings. We show here that mTOR complex-1 (mTORC1) activity is indeed lower in liver, muscle, heart, and kidney tissue of Snell dwarf and global GH receptor (GHR) gene-disrupted mice (GHR-/-), consistent with previous studies. Surprisingly, activity of mTORC2 is higher in fasted Snell and GHR-/- than in littermate controls in all 4 tissues tested. Resupply of food enhanced mTORC1 activity in both controls and long-lived mutant mice but diminished mTORC2 activity only in the long-lived mice. Mice in which GHR has been disrupted only in the liver do not show extended lifespan and also fail to show the decline in mTORC1 and increase in mTORC2 seen in mice with global loss of GHR. The data suggest that the antiaging effects in the Snell dwarf and GHR-/- mice are accompanied by both a decline in mTORC1 in multiple organs and an increase in fasting levels of mTORC2. Neither the lifespan nor mTOR effects appear to be mediated by direct GH effects on liver or by the decline in plasma IGF-I, a shared trait in both global and liver-specific GHR-/- mice. Our data suggest that a more complex pattern of hormonal effects and intertissue interactions may be responsible for regulating both lifespan and mTORC2 function in these mouse models of delayed aging.

  12. Complexity, Systems, and Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-14

    complex ( Hidden issues; dumbs down operator) 11 Complexity, Systems, and Software Sarah Sheard August 14, 2014 © 2014 Carnegie...August 14, 2014 © 2014 Carnegie Mellon University Addressing Complexity in SoSs Source: SEBOK Wiki System Con truer Strateglc Context

  13. Complexity Near Horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, Edi

    2015-01-01

    We generalize the concept of complexity near horizons to all nondegenerate black holes. For Schwarzschild black holes, we show that Rindler observers see a complexity change of $S$ during proper time $1/\\kappa$ which corresponds to the creation of a causal patch with proper length $1/\\kappa$ inside the horizon. We attempt to describe complexity in the horizon CFT and the Euclidean picture.

  14. Quaternionic versus complex maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asorey, M [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad de Zaragoza 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Scolarici, G [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita del Salento and INFN, Sezione di Lecce, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Solombrino, L [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita del Salento and INFN, Sezione di Lecce, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2007-11-15

    We discuss the relation between completely positive quaternionic maps and the corresponding complex maps obtained via projection operation. In order to illustrate this formalism, we reobtain the (complex) qubit subdynamics of maximally entangled Bell states, as complex projection of unitary dynamics between quaternionic pure states.

  15. Pathogenesis of anemia in Trypanosoma brucei-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amole, B O; Clarkson, A B; Shear, H L

    1982-01-01

    The pathogenesis of anemia was studied in trypanosome-infected mice. A strain of Trypanosoma brucei, TREU 667, was used which first produces an acute phase marked by waves of parasitemia. Erythrocytes from infected animals were coated with immunoglobulin M during or just before the waves of anemia and parasitological crises. Erythrocytes from normal animals could be sensitized with "precrisis" sera presumably containing antigen and antibody. These data suggest that anemia during the acute phase is due to sensitization of erythrocytes with immunoglobulin M-antigen complexes. The anemia is partially compensated by a strong erythropoietic response. The acute phase is followed by a chronic phase marked by a constant high parasitemia and immunosuppression. The less marked anemia occurring during this latter phase is due to hemodilution and perhaps a low but significant immune response to the parasites, which causes continuing erythrocyte sensitization by immunoglobulin M-antigen complexes. PMID:7201455

  16. Adult neurogenesis in the four-striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olatunbosun O Olaleye; Amadi O Ihunwo

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated non-captive four-striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio) for evidence that adult neurogenesis occurs in the adult brain of animal models in natural environment. Ki-67 (a marker for cell proliferation) and doublecortin (a marker for immature neurons) immunos-taining conifrmed that adult neurogenesis occurs in the active sites of subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle with the migratory stream to the olfactory bulb, and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. No Ki-67 proliferating cells were observed in the striatum substantia nigra, amygdala, cerebral cortex or dorsal vagal complex. Doublecortin-immunore-active cells were observed in the striatum, third ventricle, cerebral cortex, amygdala, olfactory bulb and along the rostral migratory stream but absent in the substantia nigra and dorsal vagal complex. The potential neurogenic sites in the four-striped mouse species could invariably lead to increased neural plasticity.

  17. Muscle Structure Influences Utrophin Expression in mdx Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Glen B.; Combs, Ariana C.; Odom, Guy L.; Bloch, Robert J.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscle wasting disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. To examine the influence of muscle structure on the pathogenesis of DMD we generated mdx4cv:desmin double knockout (dko) mice. The dko male mice died of apparent cardiorespiratory failure at a median age of 76 days compared to 609 days for the desmin−/− mice. An ∼2.5 fold increase in utrophin expression in the dko skeletal muscles prevented necrosis in ∼91% of 1a, 2a and 2d/x fiber-types. In contrast, utrophin expression was reduced in the extrasynaptic sarcolemma of the dko fast 2b fibers leading to increased membrane fragility and dystrophic pathology. Despite lacking extrasynaptic utrophin, the dko fast 2b fibers were less dystrophic than the mdx4cv fast 2b fibers suggesting utrophin-independent mechanisms were also contributing to the reduced dystrophic pathology. We found no overt change in the regenerative capacity of muscle stem cells when comparing the wild-type, desmin−/−, mdx4cv and dko gastrocnemius muscles injured with notexin. Utrophin could form costameric striations with α-sarcomeric actin in the dko to maintain the integrity of the membrane, but the lack of restoration of the NODS (nNOS, α-dystrobrevin 1 and 2, α1-syntrophin) complex and desmin coincided with profound changes to the sarcomere alignment in the diaphragm, deposition of collagen between the myofibers, and impaired diaphragm function. We conclude that the dko mice may provide new insights into the structural mechanisms that influence endogenous utrophin expression that are pertinent for developing a therapy for DMD. PMID:24922526

  18. Effects of subchronic exposures to concentrated ambient particles in mice. IX. Integral assessment and human health implications of subchronic exposures of mice to CAPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, Morton; Gordon, Terry; Chen, Lung Chi

    2005-04-01

    In order to examine the biologic plausibility of adverse chronic cardiopulmonary effects in humans associated with ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure, we exposed groups of normal mice (C57) and knockout mice that develop atherosclerotic plaque (ApoE-/- and ApoE-/- LDLr-/-) for 6 h/day, 5 days/wk for 5 or 6 mo during the spring/summer of 2003 to either filtered air or 10-fold concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) in Tuxedo, NY (average PM2.5 concentration during exposure = 110 microg/m3). Some of the mice had implanted electrocardiographic monitors. We demonstrated that: (1) this complex interdisciplinary study was technically feasible in terms of daily exposure, collection of air quality monitoring data, the collection, analysis, and interpretation of continuous data on cardiac function, and the collection and analyses of tissues of the animals sacrificed at the end of the study; (2) the daily variations in CAPs were significantly associated, in ApoE-/- mice, with daily variations in cardiac functions; (3) there were significant differences between CAPs and sham-exposed ApoE-/- mice in terms of cardiac function after the end of exposure period, as well as small differences in atherosclerotic plaque density, coronary artery disease, and cell density in the substantia nigra in the brain in the ApoE-/- mice; (4) there are suggestive indications of gene expression changes for genes associated with the control of circadian rhythm in the ApoE-/- LDLr-/- double knockout (DK) mice. These various CAPs-related effects on cardiac function and the development of histological evidence of increased risk of clinically significant disease at the end of exposures in animal models of atherosclerosis provide biological plausibility for the premature mortality associated with PM2.5 exposure in human subjects and provide suggestive evidence for neurogenic disease as well.

  19. SYSTEMS WITH COMPLEXITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chenghong; ZHANG Lijun

    2004-01-01

    Science of Complexity is a newly emerging branch of natural scienceAlthoughwe still haven't a precise definition, there are some principles for justifying whether a systemis a complex systemThe purpose of this article is to reveal some of such principlesOnthe basis of them, the concept of a system with complexity is proposedThey may helpus to distinguish a real complex system from complicated objects in common senseThenwe propose some fundamental problems faced by the study of systems with complexity.

  20. Complex variables I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Solomon, Alan D

    2013-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Complex Variables I includes functions of a complex variable, elementary complex functions, integrals of complex functions in the complex plane, sequences and series, and poles and r

  1. Amylin induces hypoglycemia in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz H. Guerreiro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Amylin is a 37-aminoacid pancreatic protein that exerts control over several metabolic events such as glycemia and lacticemia. Amylin has long been shown to induce increases in arterial plasma glucose. We decided to investigate whether amylin plays additional roles in the glucose metabolism. We evaluated glucose homeostasis using whole blood from the tail tip of fasting, conscious, unrestrained normal and streptozotocyn-induced diabetic mice following subcutaneous administration of mouse amylin. Subcutaneous injection of 1 μg mouse amylin caused a transient decrease in whole blood glucose in both normal and diabetic mice in the absence of insulin. The blood glucose levels were lowest approximately 2 hours after amylin administration, after that they gradually recovered to the levels of the control group. The hypoglycemic effect followed a dose-dependent response ranging from 0.1 to 50 µg / mouse. These results reveal the ability for amylin in the direct control of glycemia at low doses in the absence of insulin.

  2. AGONISTIC BEHAVIOR OF LABORATORY MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cinghiţă

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we study agonistic behavior of laboratory white mice when they are kept in captivity. For all this experimental work we used direct observation of mice, in small lists, because we need a reduced space to emphasize characteristics of agonistic behavior. Relations between members of the same species that live in organized groups are based in most cases on hierarchical structure. Relations between leader and subservient, decided by fighting, involve a thorough observation between individuals. Each member of a group has its own place on the ierarchical scale depending on resultes of fhights – it can be leader or it can be subsurvient, depending on if it wines or looses the fight. Once hierarchical scale made, every animal will adjust its behavior. After analyzing the obtained data we have enough reasons to believe that after fights the winner, usually, is the massive mouse, but it is also very important the sexual ripeness, so the immature male will be beaten. The leader male had a big exploring area and it checks up all territory.The females can be more aggressive, its fights are more brutal, than male fights are, when they fight for supremacy, but in this case fights are not as frequent as in the case of males. Always the superior female, on hierarchical scale, shows males its own statute, so the strongest genes will be perpetuated.

  3. Mice embryology: a microscopic overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, Maria Letícia Baptista; Lessa, Thais Borges; Russo, Fabiele Baldino; Fernandes, Renata Avancini; Kfoury, José Roberto; Braga, Patricia Cristina Baleeiro Beltrão; Miglino, Maria Angélica

    2012-10-01

    In this work, we studied the embryology of mice of 12, 14, and 18 days of gestation by gross observation, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Grossly, the embryos of 12 days were observed in C-shaped region of the brain, eye pigmentation of the retina, first, second, and third pharyngeal arches gill pit nasal region on the fourth ventricle brain, cervical curvature, heart, liver, limb bud thoracic, spinal cord, tail, umbilical cord, and place of the mesonephric ridge. Microscopically, the liver, cardiovascular system and spinal cord were observed. In the embryo of 14 days, we observed structures that make up the liver and heart. At 18 days of gestation fetuses, it was noted the presence of eyes, mouth, and nose in the cephalic region, chest and pelvic region with the presence of well-developed limbs, umbilical cord, and placenta. Scanning electron microscopy in 18 days of gestation fetuses evidenced head, eyes closed eyelids, nose, vibrissae, forelimb, heart, lung, kidney, liver, small bowel, diaphragm, and part of the spine. The results obtained in this work describe the internal and external morphology of mice, provided by an integration of techniques and review of the morphological knowledge of the embryonic development of this species, as this animal is of great importance to scientific studies.

  4. Endurance training ameliorates complex 3 deficiency in a mouse model of Barth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soustek, Meghan S; Baligand, Celine; Falk, Darin J; Walter, Glenn A; Lewin, Alfred S; Byrne, Barry J

    2015-09-01

    Barth syndrome (BTHS) is an X-linked metabolic disorder that causes cardiomyopathy in infancy and is linked to mutations within the Tafazzin (TAZ) gene. The first mouse model, a TAZ knockdown model (TAZKD), has been generated to further understand the bioenergetics leading to cardiomyopathy. However, the TAZKD model does not show early signs of cardiomyopathy, and cardiac pathophysiology has not been documented until 7-8 months of age. Here we sought to determine the impact of endurance training on the cardiac and skeletal muscle phenotype in young TAZKD mice. TAZKD exercise trained (TAZKD-ET) and control exercise trained (CON-ET) mice underwent a 35-day swimming protocol. Non-trained aged matched TAZKD and CON mice were used as controls. At the end of the protocol, cardiac MRI was used to assess cardiac parameters. Cardiac MRI showed that training resulted in cardiac hypertrophy within both groups and did not result in a decline of ejection fraction. TAZKD mice exhibited a decrease in respiratory complex I, III, and IV enzymatic activity in cardiac tissue compared to control mice; however, training led to an increase in complex III activity in TAZKD-ET mice resulting in similar levels to those of CON-ET mice. (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the gastrocnemius showed a significantly lowered pH in TAZKD-ET mice post electrical-stimulation compared to CON-ET mice. Endurance training does not accelerate cardiac dysfunction in young TAZKD mice, but results in beneficial physiological effects. Furthermore, our results suggest that a significant drop in intracellular pH levels may contribute to oxidative phosphorylation defects during exercise.

  5. Impaired striatum-dependent behavior in GASP-1-knock-out mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, C; Bott, J-B; Candusso, M-P; Simonin, F; Cassel, J-C

    2011-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) associated sorting protein-1 (GASP-1) is suspected to play a key role in recycling and degradation of several GPCRs. In a previous study, we have shown that GASP-1-knock-out (GASP-1-KO) mice displayed deficits in acquiring a cocaine self-administration task, associated with an exacerbated down-regulation of striatal dopaminergic and cholinergic receptors. Among several possibilities, GASP-1 deficiency could have impaired memory processes underlying the acquisition of the operant conditioning task. Therefore, the present study investigated cognitive performances of GASP-1-KO mice and their wild-type littermates (WT) in a broad variety of memory tasks. Consistent with a deficit in procedural memory, GASP-1-KO mice showed delayed acquisition of a food-reinforced bar-press task. During water-maze training in hidden- or visible-platform paradigms, mutant and WT mice acquired the tasks at the same rate. However, GASP-1 mice exhibited persistent thigmotaxic swimming, longer distance to the platform, and reduced swim speed. There was no deficit in several tasks requiring simple behavioral responses (Barnes maze, object recognition and passive avoidance tasks). Thus, the ability to acquire and/or express complex responses seems affected in GASP-1-deficient mice. Hippocampal functions were preserved, as the retention of an acquired memory in spatial tasks remained unaffected. The pattern of behavioral deficits observed in GASP-1-KO mice is coherent with current knowledge on the role of striatal GPCRs in acquisition/expression of skilled behavior and in motivation. Together with the previous findings, the so far established phenotype of GASP-1-KO mice makes them a potentially exciting tool to study striatal functions. © 2010 The Authors. Genes, Brain and Behavior © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  6. Mice overexpressing BAFF develop a commensal flora–dependent, IgA-associated nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Douglas D.; Kujawa, Julie; Wilson, Cheryl; Papandile, Adrian; Poreci, Urjana; Porfilio, Elisa A.; Ward, Lesley; Lawson, Melissa A.E.; Macpherson, Andrew J.; McCoy, Kathy D.; Pei, York; Novak, Lea; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Julian, Bruce A.; Novak, Jan; Ranger, Ann; Gommerman, Jennifer L.; Browning, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    B cell activation factor of the TNF family (BAFF) is a potent B cell survival factor. BAFF overexpressing transgenic mice (BAFF-Tg mice) exhibit features of autoimmune disease, including B cell hyperplasia and hypergammaglobulinemia, and develop fatal nephritis with age. However, basal serum IgA levels are also elevated, suggesting that the pathology in these mice may be more complex than initially appreciated. Consistent with this, we demonstrate here that BAFF-Tg mice have mesangial deposits of IgA along with high circulating levels of polymeric IgA that is aberrantly glycosylated. Renal disease in BAFF-Tg mice was associated with IgA, because serum IgA was highly elevated in nephritic mice and BAFF-Tg mice with genetic deletion of IgA exhibited less renal pathology. The presence of commensal flora was essential for the elevated serum IgA phenotype, and, unexpectedly, commensal bacteria–reactive IgA antibodies were found in the blood. These data illustrate how excess B cell survival signaling perturbs the normal balance with the microbiota, leading to a breach in the normal mucosal-peripheral compartmentalization. Such breaches may predispose the nonmucosal system to certain immune diseases. Indeed, we found that a subset of patients with IgA nephropathy had elevated serum levels of a proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL), a cytokine related to BAFF. These parallels between BAFF-Tg mice and human IgA nephropathy may provide a new framework to explore connections between mucosal environments and renal pathology. PMID:21881212

  7. Complexity Through Nonextensivity

    CERN Document Server

    Bialek, W; Tishby, N; Bialek, William; Nemenman, Ilya; Tishby, Naftali

    2001-01-01

    The problem of defining and studying complexity of a time series has interested people for years. In the context of dynamical systems, Grassberger has suggested that a slow approach of the entropy to its extensive asymptotic limit is a sign of complexity. We investigate this idea further by information theoretic and statistical mechanics techniques and show that these arguments can be made precise, and that they generalize many previous approaches to complexity, in particular unifying ideas from the physics literature with ideas from learning and coding theory; there are even connections of this statistical approach to algorithmic or Kolmogorov complexity. Moreover, a set of simple axioms similar to those used by Shannon in his development of information theory allows us to prove that the divergent part of the subextensive component of the entropy is a unique complexity measure. We classify time series by their complexities and demonstrate that beyond the `logarithmic' complexity classes widely anticipated in...

  8. Photocytotoxic lanthanide complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhtar Hussain; Akhil R Chakravarty

    2012-11-01

    Lanthanide complexes have recently received considerable attention in the field of therapeutic and diagnostic medicines. Among many applications of lanthanides, gadolinium complexes are used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents in clinical radiology and luminescent lanthanides for bioanalysis, imaging and sensing. The chemistry of photoactive lanthanide complexes showing biological applications is of recent origin. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a non-invasive treatment modality of cancer using a photosensitizer drug and light. This review primarily focuses on different aspects of the chemistry of lanthanide complexes showing photoactivated DNA cleavage activity and cytotoxicity in cancer cells. Macrocyclic texaphyrin-lanthanide complexes are known to show photocytotoxicity with the PDT effect in near-IR light. Very recently, non-macrocyclic lanthanide complexes are reported to show photocytotoxicity in cancer cells. Attempts have been made in this perspective article to review and highlight the photocytotoxic behaviour of various lanthanide complexes for their potential photochemotherapeutic applications.

  9. In vivo formation of complex microvessels lined by human endothelial cells in an immunodeficient mouse

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    We have identified conditions for forming cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) into tubes within a three-dimensional gel that on implantation into immunoincompetent mice undergo remodeling into complex microvessels lined by human endothelium. HUVEC suspended in mixed collagen/fibronectin gels organize into cords with early lumena by 24 h and then apoptose. Twenty-hour constructs, s.c. implanted in immunodeficient mice, display HUVEC-lined thin-walled microvessels within the...

  10. Metabolic impacts of high dietary exposure to persistent organic pollutants in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Mohammad Madani; Fjære, Even; Lock, Erik-Jan

    2012-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have been linked to metabolic diseases. Yet, the effects of high exposure to dietary POPs remain unclear. We therefore investigated whether elevated exposure to POPs provided by whale meat supplementation could contribute to insulin resistance. C57BL/6J mice w...... significant body burden of POPs. This indicates complex interactions between organic pollutants and nutrition in the development of metabolic disorders.......Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have been linked to metabolic diseases. Yet, the effects of high exposure to dietary POPs remain unclear. We therefore investigated whether elevated exposure to POPs provided by whale meat supplementation could contribute to insulin resistance. C57BL/6J mice...

  11. Neutrophil Recruitment by Tumor Necrosis Factor from Mast Cells in Immune Complex Peritonitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Ramos, Bernard F.; Jakschik, Barbara A.

    1992-12-01

    During generalized immune complex-induced inflammation of the peritoneal cavity, two peaks of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were observed in the peritoneal exudate of normal mice. In mast cell-deficient mice, the first peak was undetected, and the second peak of TNF and neutrophil influx were significantly reduced. Antibody to TNF significantly inhibited neutrophil infiltration in normal but not in mast cell-deficient mice. Mast cell repletion of the latter normalized TNF, neutrophil mobilization, and the effect of the antibody to TNF. Thus, in vivo, mast cells produce the TNF that augments neutrophil emigration.

  12. Euthanasia of neonatal mice with carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, K.; Corrow, D.; Stockwell, J.; Smith, A.

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most prevalent method used to euthanize rodents in biomedical research. The purpose of this study was to determine the time of CO2 exposure required to euthanize neonatal mice (0 to 10 days old). Multiple groups of mice were exposed to 100% CO 2 for time periods between 5 and 60 min. Mice were placed in room air for 10 or 20 min after CO2 exposure, to allow for the chance of recovery. If mice recovered at one time point, a longer exposure was examined. Inbred and outbred mice were compared. Results of the study indicated that time to death varied with the age of the animals and could be as long as 50 min on the day of birth and differed between inbred and outbred mice. Institutions euthanizing neonatal mice with CO2 may wish to adjust their CO 2 exposure time periods according the age of the mice and their genetic background. Copyright 2005 by the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science.

  13. Bacterial infections in Myd88-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villano, Jason S; Rong, Fang; Cooper, Timothy K

    2014-04-01

    Three breeding colonies of Myd88(-/-) mice had a history of significant morbidity and mortality. Although strain-specific poor reproductive performance might explain neonatal death and dystocia, mice were found dead or required euthanasia because of moribundity, distended abdomen, head tilt, and seizures. Histopathology results included bacteremia, placentitis, metritis, peritonitis with abscess formation, and suppurative meningoencephalitis. Intralesional gram-negative coccobacilli were present, often in extremely high number. Cultures of samples of the cardiac blood of a mouse and from water-bottle sipper tubes provided to some affected mice grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition, affected tissues from 2 mice and feces from a third tested PCR-positive for P. aeruginosa. Although the mice had received autoclaved reverse-osmosis-purified drinking water, we suspect that the mice were inoculated with P. aeruginosa through contaminated sipper tubes. Because of the deficiency in most of the Toll-like receptor signaling pathways, these Myd88(-/-) mice were unlikely to have developed competitive innate and adaptive immune responses, resulting in bacterial infections. These clinical cases underscore the importance of understanding how genotype, phenotype and environment affect animal health. Sound husbandry and experimental practices are needed to prevent the exposure of immuno-deficient mice to pathogens.

  14. Surfactant protein D is proatherogenic in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Grith L; Madsen, Jens; Kejling, Karin

    2006-01-01

    -/-) mice. Atherogenesis involves both inflammation and lipid deposition, and we investigated the role of SP-D in the development of atherosclerosis. SP-D synthesis was localized to vascular endothelial cells. Atherosclerotic lesion areas were 5.6-fold smaller in the aortic roots in Spd-/- mice compared...

  15. [Gastrointestinal myoelectric complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeberhard, P

    1977-03-01

    Complexes of high amplitude action potentials have been shownn to occur in the stomach and duodenum of fasting dogs. These complexes recur at regular intervals as long as the animal is fasting, and they are propagated aborally over the whole lenght of the small bowel. The cyclical pattern is replaced by the digestive of "fed" pattern of activity upon feeding. Therefore the pattern has been known as the interdigestive myoelectrical complex. Studies in herbivorous species however, in which the flow of digesta is more or less continous have show that cyclically recurring migrating complexes can be demonstrated in these species as well. Thus, the term "migratory myoelectrical complex" may be more appropriate. Propagation of the complex is not dependent upon continuity of the bowel wall nor movement of luminal contents. Replacement of the complex by the digestive pattern of activity upon feeding and the restitution of the interdigestive pattern at the end of the digestive phase seem to be under nervous as well as hormonal control. The interdigestive complex in the dog has been looked upon as a "housekeeper" which sweeps the bowel clear of contents at the end of the digestive phase. Aspects of possible physiological significance of the complex are: periodic elimination of refluxed duodenal contents from the stomach and prevention of bacterial colonization of the small bowel by the colonic flora. The existence of propagated complexes has not been demonstrated in man, but there is increasing evidence for cyclical activity which fits the pattern.

  16. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    CERN Document Server

    Bogomilov, M.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Chignoli, F.; Mazza, R.; Palladino, V.; de Bari, A.; Cecchet, G.; Capponi, M.; Iaciofano, A.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Tortora, L.; Kuno, Y.; Sakamoto, H.; Ishimoto, S.; Japan, Ibaraki; Filthaut, F.; Hansen, O.M.; Ramberger, S.; Vretenar, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Blondel, A.; Drielsma, F.; Karadzhov, Y.; Charnley, G.; Collomb, N.; Gallagher, A.; Grant, A.; Griffiths, S.; Hartnett, T.; Martlew, B.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Oates, A.; Owens, P.; Stokes, G.; Warburton, P.; White, C.; Adams, D.; Barclay, P.; Bayliss, V.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Courthold, M.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Hayler, T.; Hills, M.; Lintern, A.; Macwaters, C.; Nichols, A.; Preece, R.; Ricciardi, S.; Rogers, C.; Stanley, T.; Tarrant, J.; Watson, S.; Wilson, A.; Bayes, R.; Nugent, J.C.; Soler, F.J.P.; Cooke, P.; Gamet, R.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Barber, G.; Colling, D.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Hunt, C.; Lagrange, J-B.; Long, K.; Martyniak, J.; Middleton, S.; Pasternak, J.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Uchida, M.A.; Blackmore, V.J.; Carlisle, T.; Cobb, J.H.; Lau, W.; Rayner, M.A.; Tunnell, C.D.; Booth, C.N.; Hodgson, P.; Langlands, J.; Nicholson, R.; Overton, E.; Robinson, M.; Smith, P.J.; Dick, A.; Ronald, K.; Speirs, D.; Whyte, C.G.; Young, A.; Boyd, S.; Franchini, P.; Greis, J.R.; Pidcott, C.; Taylor, I.; Gardener, R.; Kyberd, P.; Littlefield, M.; Nebrensky, J.J.; Bross, A.D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, R.; Roberts, T.J.; Bowring, D.; DeMello, A.; Gourlay, S.; Li, D.; Prestemon, S.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Drews, M.; Hanlet, P.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D.M.; Rajaram, D.; Snopok, P.; Torun, Y.; Winter, M.; Blot, S.; Kim, Y.K.; Bravar, U.; Onel, Y.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Hart, T.L.; Luo, T.; Sanders, D.A.; Summers, D.J.; Cline, D.; Yang, X.; Coney, L.; Hanson, G.G.; Heidt, C.

    2016-01-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240\\,MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than $\\sim$1\\% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is $f_\\pi < 1.4\\%$ at 90\\% C.L., including systematic uncertainties. Therefore, the MICE Muon Beam is able to meet the stringent pion-contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.

  17. Surfactant protein D is proatherogenic in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Grith L; Madsen, Jens; Kejling, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an important innate immune defense molecule that mediates clearance of pathogens and modulates the inflammatory response. Moreover, SP-D is involved in lipid homeostasis, and pulmonary accumulation of phospholipids has previously been observed in SP-D-deficient (Spd......-/-) mice. Atherogenesis involves both inflammation and lipid deposition, and we investigated the role of SP-D in the development of atherosclerosis. SP-D synthesis was localized to vascular endothelial cells. Atherosclerotic lesion areas were 5.6-fold smaller in the aortic roots in Spd-/- mice compared...... with wild-type C57BL/6N mice on an atherogenic diet. HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) was significantly elevated in Spd-/- mice. Treatment of Spd-/- mice with a recombinant fragment of human SP-D resulted in decreases of HDL-C (21%) as well as total cholesterol (26%), and LDL cholesterol (28%). Plasma TNF...

  18. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V. J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bowring, D.; Boyd, S.; Brashaw, T. W.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A. D.; Capponi, M.; Carlisle, T.; Cecchet, G.; Charnley, C.; Chignoli, F.; Cline, D.; Cobb, J. H.; Colling, G.; Collomb, N.; Coney, L.; Cooke, P.; Courthold, M.; Cremaldi, L. M.; DeMello, A.; Dick, A.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Drews, M.; Drielsma, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Franchini, P.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Gallagher, A.; Gamet, R.; Gardener, R.; Gourlay, S.; Grant, A.; Greis, J. R.; Griffiths, S.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, O. M.; Hanson, G. G.; Hart, T. L.; Hartnett, T.; Hayler, T.; Heidt, C.; Hills, M.; Hodgson, P.; Hunt, C.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishimoto, S.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D. M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Kuno, Y.; Kyberd, P.; Lagrange, J.-B.; Langlands, J.; Lau, W.; Leonova, M.; Li, D.; Lintern, A.; Littlefield, M.; Long, K.; Luo, T.; Macwaters, C.; Martlew, B.; Martyniak, J.; Mazza, R.; Middleton, S.; Moretti, A.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Nebrensky, J. J.; Neuffer, D.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, R.; Nugent, J. C.; Oates, A.; Onel, Y.; Orestano, D.; Overton, E.; Owens, P.; Palladino, V.; Pasternak, J.; Pastore, F.; Pidcott, C.; Popovic, M.; Preece, R.; Prestemon, S.; Rajaram, D.; Ramberger, S.; Rayner, M. A.; Ricciardi, S.; Roberts, T. J.; Robinson, M.; Rogers, C.; Ronald, K.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, P.; Sakamato, H.; Sanders, D. A.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Smith, P. J.; Snopok, P.; Soler, F. J. P.; Speirs, D.; Stanley, T.; Stokes, G.; Summers, D. J.; Tarrant, J.; Taylor, I.; Tortora, L.; Torun, Y.; Tsenov, R.; Tunnell, C. D.; Uchida, M. A.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Virostek, S.; Vretenar, M.; Warburton, P.; Watson, S.; White, C.; Whyte, C. G.; Wilson, A.; Winter, M.; Yang, X.; Young, A.; Zisman, M.

    2016-03-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240 MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than ~1% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is fπ < 1.4% at 90% C.L., including systematic uncertainties. Therefore, the MICE Muon Beam is able to meet the stringent pion-contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.

  19. Electrophysiological study, biodistribution in mice, and preliminary PET evaluation in a rhesus monkey of 1-amino-3-[{sup 18}F]fluoromethyl-5-methyl-adamantane ({sup 18}F-MEM): a potential radioligand for mapping the NMDA-receptor complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samnick, Samuel; Ametamey, Simon; Leenders, Klaus L.; Vontobel, Peter; Quack, Guenter; Parsons, Chris G.; Neu, Henrik; Schubiger, Pius A

    1998-05-01

    The effect of the fluorinated memantine derivative and NMDA receptor antagonist, 1-amino-3-fluoromethyl-5-methyl-adamantane ({sup 19}F-MEM), at the NMDA receptor ion channel was studied by patch clamp recording. The results showed that {sup 19}F-MEM is a moderate NMDA receptor channel blocker. A procedure for the routine preparation of the {sup 18}F-labelled analog {sup 18}F-MEM has been developed using a two-step reaction sequence. This involves the no-carrier-added nucleophilic radiofluorination of 1-[N-(tert-butyloxy)carbamoyl]-3-(toluenesulfonyloxy)methyl-5- methyl-adamantane and the subsequent cleavage of the BOC-protecting group using aqueous HCl. The {sup 18}F-MEM was obtained in 22{+-}7% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected to EOB) in a total synthesis time including HPLC purification of 90 min. A biodistribution study after IV injection of {sup 18}F-MEM in mice showed a fast clearance of radioactivity from blood and relatively high initial uptake in the kidney and in the lung, which gradually decreased with time. The brain uptake was high (up to 3.6% ID/g, 60 min postinjection) with increasing brain-blood ratios: 2.40, 5.10, 6.33, and 9.27 at 5, 30, 60, and 120 min, respectively. The regional accumulation of the radioactivity in the mouse brain was consistent with the known distribution of the PCP recognition site. Preliminary PET evaluation of the radiotracer in a rhesus monkey demonstrated good uptake and prolonged retention in the brain, with a plateau from 35 min onwards p.i. in the NMDA receptor-rich regions (frontal cortex, striata, and temporal cortex). Delineation of the hippocampus, a region known to contain a high density of NMDA receptors, was not possible owing to the resolution of the PET tomograph. The regional brain uptake of {sup 18}F-MEM was changed by memantine and by a pharmacological dose of (+)-MK-801, indicating competition for the same binding sites. In a preliminary experiment, haloperidol, a dopamine D2 and sigma receptor

  20. Simplicial complexes of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Jonsson, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    A graph complex is a finite family of graphs closed under deletion of edges. Graph complexes show up naturally in many different areas of mathematics, including commutative algebra, geometry, and knot theory. Identifying each graph with its edge set, one may view a graph complex as a simplicial complex and hence interpret it as a geometric object. This volume examines topological properties of graph complexes, focusing on homotopy type and homology. Many of the proofs are based on Robin Forman's discrete version of Morse theory. As a byproduct, this volume also provides a loosely defined toolbox for attacking problems in topological combinatorics via discrete Morse theory. In terms of simplicity and power, arguably the most efficient tool is Forman's divide and conquer approach via decision trees; it is successfully applied to a large number of graph and digraph complexes.

  1. Measuring static complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Goertzel

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of “pattern” is introduced, formally defined, and used to analyze various measures of the complexity of finite binary sequences and other objects. The standard Kolmogoroff-Chaitin-Solomonoff complexity measure is considered, along with Bennett's ‘logical depth’, Koppel's ‘sophistication'’, and Chaitin's analysis of the complexity of geometric objects. The pattern-theoretic point of view illuminates the shortcomings of these measures and leads to specific improvements, it gives rise to two novel mathematical concepts--“orders” of complexity and “levels” of pattern, and it yields a new measure of complexity, the “structural complexity”, which measures the total amount of structure an entity possesses.

  2. On Complex Random Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwer Khurshid

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE In this paper, it is shown that a complex multivariate random variable  is a complex multivariate normal random variable of dimensionality if and only if all nondegenerate complex linear combinations of  have a complex univariate normal distribution. The characteristic function of  has been derived, and simpler forms of some theorems have been given using this characterization theorem without assuming that the variance-covariance matrix of the vector  is Hermitian positive definite. Marginal distributions of  have been given. In addition, a complex multivariate t-distribution has been defined and the density derived. A characterization of the complex multivariate t-distribution is given. A few possible uses of this distribution have been suggested.

  3. Complex networks and computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuigeng ZHOU; Zhongzhi ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    @@ Nowadays complex networks are pervasive in various areas of science and technology. Popular examples of complex networks include the Internet, social networks of collaboration, citations and co-authoring, as well as biological networks such as gene and protein interactions and others. Complex networks research spans across mathematics, computer science, engineering, biology and the social sciences. Even in computer science area, increasing problems are either found to be related to complex networks or studied from the perspective of complex networks, such as searching on Web and P2P networks, routing in sensor networks, language processing, software engineering etc. The interaction and mergence of complex networks and computing is inspiring new chances and challenges in computer science.

  4. Complex Systems and Dependability

    CERN Document Server

    Zamojski, Wojciech; Sugier, Jaroslaw

    2012-01-01

    Typical contemporary complex system is a multifaceted amalgamation of technical, information, organization, software and human (users, administrators and management) resources. Complexity of such a system comes not only from its involved technical and organizational structure but mainly from complexity of information processes that must be implemented in the operational environment (data processing, monitoring, management, etc.). In such case traditional methods of reliability analysis focused mainly on technical level are usually insufficient in performance evaluation and more innovative meth

  5. Recognizing dualizing complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Jorgensen, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Let A be a noetherian local commutative ring and let M be a suitable complex of A-modules. This paper proves that M is a dualizing complex for A if and only if the trivial extension A \\ltimes M is a Gorenstein Differential Graded Algebra. As a corollary follows that A has a dualizing complex if and only if it is a quotient of a Gorenstein local Differential Graded Algebra.

  6. Genetics of complex diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motulsky, Arno G

    2006-02-01

    Approaches to the study of the genetic basis of common complex diseases and their clinical applications are considered. Monogenic Mendelian inheritance in such conditions is infrequent but its elucidation may help to detect pathogenic mechanisms in the more common variety of complex diseases. Involvement by multiple genes in complex diseases usually occurs but the isolation and identification of specific genes so far has been exceptional. The role of common polymorphisms as indicators of disease risk in various studies is discussed.

  7. Interferon-lambda contributes to innate immunity of mice against influenza A virus but not against hepatotropic viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Mordstein

    Full Text Available Virus-infected cells secrete a broad range of interferon (IFN subtypes which in turn trigger the synthesis of antiviral factors that confer host resistance. IFN-alpha, IFN-beta and other type I IFNs signal through a common universally expressed cell surface receptor, whereas IFN-lambda uses a distinct receptor complex for signaling that is not present on all cell types. Since type I IFN receptor-deficient mice (IFNAR1(0/0 exhibit greatly increased susceptibility to various viral diseases, it remained unclear to which degree IFN-lambda might contribute to innate immunity. To address this issue we performed influenza A virus infections of mice which carry functional alleles of the influenza virus resistance gene Mx1 and which, therefore, develop a more complete innate immune response to influenza viruses than standard laboratory mice. We demonstrate that intranasal administration of IFN-lambda readily induced the antiviral factor Mx1 in mouse lungs and efficiently protected IFNAR1(0/0 mice from lethal influenza virus infection. By contrast, intraperitoneal application of IFN-lambda failed to induce Mx1 in the liver of IFNAR1(0/0 mice and did not protect against hepatotropic virus infections. Mice lacking functional IFN-lambda receptors were only slightly more susceptible to influenza virus than wild-type mice. However, mice lacking functional receptors for both IFN-alpha/beta and IFN-lambda were hypersensitive and even failed to restrict usually non-pathogenic influenza virus mutants lacking the IFN-antagonistic factor NS1. Interestingly, the double-knockout mice were not more susceptible against hepatotropic viruses than IFNAR1(0/0 mice. From these results we conclude that IFN-lambda contributes to inborn resistance against viral pathogens infecting the lung but not the liver.

  8. Berger Engineering Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Engineering laboratory The Berger Lab Complex is a multi-purpose building with professional office, 100 seat auditorium, general purpose labs,...

  9. Higher Koszul complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶郁; 张璞

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we generalize the Koszul complexes and Koszul algebras, and introduce the higherKoszul (t-Koszul) complexes and higher Koszul algebras, where t ≥ 2 is an integer. We prove that an algebra ist-Koszul if and only if its t-Koszul complex is augmented, i.e. the higher degree (≥ 1) homologies vanish. Forarbitrary t-Koszul algebra , we also give a description of the structure of the cohomology algebra Ext ( 0, 0)by using the t-Koszul complexes, where the 0 is the direct sum of the simples.

  10. Morphological Evidence of Telocytes in Mice Aorta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Qi Zhang; Shan-Shan Lu; Ting Xu; Yan-Ling Feng; Hua Li; Jun-Bo Ge

    2015-01-01

    Background:Telocytes (TCs) are a novel type of interstitial cells,which have been recently described in a large variety of cavitary and noncavitary organs.TCs have small cell bodies,and remarkably thin,long,and moniliform prolongations called telopodes (Tps).Until now,TCs have been found in various loose connective tissues surrounding the arterioles,venules,and capillaries,but as a histological cellular component,whether TCs exist in large arteries remains unexplored.Methods:TCs were identified by transmission electron microscope in the aortic arch of male C57BL/6 mice.Results:TCs in aortic arch had small cell bodies (length:6.06-13.02 μm; width:1.05-4.25 μm) with characteristics of specific long (7.74-39.05 μm),thin,and moniliform Tps; TCs distributed in the whole connective tissue layer of tunica adventitia:TCs in the innermost layer of tunica adventitia,located at the juncture between media and adventitia,with their long axes oriented parallel to the outer elastic membrane; and TCs in outer layers oftunica adventitia,were embedded among transverse and longitudinal oriented collagen fibers,forming a highly complex three-dimensional meshwork.Moreover,desmosomes were observed,serving as pathways connecting neighboring Tps.In addition,vesicles shed from the surface of TCs into the extracellular matrix,participating in some biological processes.Conclusions:TCs in aorta arch are a newly recognized complement distinct from other interstitial cells in large arteries,such as fibroblasts.And further biologically functional correlations need to be elucidated.

  11. Morphological Evidence of Telocytes in Mice Aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Qi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Telocytes (TCs are a novel type of interstitial cells, which have been recently described in a large variety of cavitary and noncavitary organs. TCs have small cell bodies, and remarkably thin, long, and moniliform prolongations called telopodes (Tps. Until now, TCs have been found in various loose connective tissues surrounding the arterioles, venules, and capillaries, but as a histological cellular component, whether TCs exist in large arteries remains unexplored. Methods: TCs were identified by transmission electron microscope in the aortic arch of male C57BL/6 mice. Results: TCs in aortic arch had small cell bodies (length: 6.06-13.02 μm; width: 1.05-4.25 μm with characteristics of specific long (7.74-39.05 μm, thin, and moniliform Tps; TCs distributed in the whole connective tissue layer of tunica adventitia: TCs in the innermost layer of tunica adventitia, located at the juncture between media and adventitia, with their long axes oriented parallel to the outer elastic membrane; and TCs in outer layers of tunica adventitia, were embedded among transverse and longitudinal oriented collagen fibers, forming a highly complex three-dimensional meshwork. Moreover, desmosomes were observed, serving as pathways connecting neighboring Tps. In addition, vesicles shed from the surface of TCs into the extracellular matrix, participating in some biological processes. Conclusions: TCs in aorta arch are a newly recognized complement distinct from other interstitial cells in large arteries, such as fibroblasts. And further biologically functional correlations need to be elucidated.

  12. Purification of heat shock protein 70-associated tumor peptides and their antitumor immunity to hepatoma in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai-Xiong Chen; Yan-Rong Su; Gen-Ze Shao; Zhen-Chao Qian

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To purify the heat shock protein (HSP) 70-associated tumor peptides and to observe its non-MHC-I molecule restrictive antitumor effect.METHODS: By ConA-sepharose affinity chromatography,ADP-agarose affinity chromatography, and DEAE anion exchange chromatography, we were able to purify HSP70-associated peptides from mouse hepatoma (HCaF) cells treated in heat shock at 42 ℃ . Specific active immunization and adoptive cellular immunization assay were adopted to observe the immunoprotective effect elicited by HSP70-associated peptide complexes isolated from HcaF.RESULTS: The finally purified HSP-associated peptides had a very high purity and specificity found by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Mice immunized with HSP70-associated peptide complexes purified from HCaF cells were protected from HCaF living cell challenge. This effect was dose dependent.Adoptive immunization of immune spleen cells of mice immunized with HSP70-associated peptide complexes could elicit immunity against HCaF challenge, and the tumor-free mice could resist repeated challenges. This effect could be continuously enhanced by repeated challenge with HCaF living cells. The tumor-free mice could tolerate the challenge for as high as l×107 HCaF cells. The mice immunized once with spleen cells pulsed with HSP70-associated peptide complexes in vitro could also result in a certain adoptive immunity against HCaF.CONCLUSION: High purity and specificity of HSP70-associated peptides could be achieved from tumor cells by the low-pressure affinity chromatography method used in this study. HSP70-associated peptide complexes derived from the HCaF can elicit non-MHC-I molecule restrictive immunoprotective effect against HCaF. This effect can be transferred by adoptive immunization to mice and enhanced by repeated challenge with HCaF live cells.

  13. Antidepressant-like effect of lead in adult mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantovani M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that lead can cause behavioral impairment by inhibiting the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor complex. MK-801, a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, exhibits an antidepressant-like action in the forced swimming test. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether subacute lead exposure in adult male Swiss mice weighing 30-35 g causes an antidepressant-like action in a forced swimming test. Mice were injected intraperitoneally (ip with 10 mg/kg lead acetate or saline daily for 7 consecutive days. Twenty-four hours after the last treatment, the saline and lead-treated mice received an injection of MK-801 (0.01 mg/kg, ip or saline and were tested in forced swimming and in open-field tests. Immobility time was similarly reduced in the saline-MK-801, Pb-saline and Pb-MK-801 groups compared to the saline-saline group (mean ± SEM; 197.3 ± 18.5, 193.5 ± 15.8, 191.3 ± 12.3 and 264.0 ± 14.4 s, respectively; N = 9. These data indicate that lead may exert its effect on the forced swimming test by directly or indirectly inhibiting the NMDA receptor complex. Lead treatment caused no deficit in memory of habituation and did not affect locomotor activity in an open-field (N = 14. However, mice that received MK-801 after lead exhibited a deficit in habituation (22% reduction in rearing responses between session 3 and 1; N = 14 as compared to control (41% reduction in rearing responses; N = 15, further suggesting that lead may have affected the NMDA receptor activity. Forced-swim immobility in a basin in two daily consecutive sessions was also significantly decreased by lead exposure (mean ± SEM; day 1 = 10.6 ± 3.2, day 2 = 19.6 ± 3.6; N = 16 as compared to control (day 1 = 18.4 ± 3.8, day 2 = 34.0 ± 3.7; N = 17, whereas the number of crossings was not affected by lead treatment, further indicating a specific antidepressant-like action of lead.

  14. Molecular Signatures of Membrane Protein Complexes Underlying Muscular Dystrophy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Rolf; Hsiao, Jordy J.; Smits, Melinda M.; Ng, Brandon H.; Pospisil, Tyler C.; Jones, Kayla S.; Campbell, Kevin P.; Wright, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding components of the sarcolemmal dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) are responsible for a large number of muscular dystrophies. As such, molecular dissection of the DGC is expected to both reveal pathological mechanisms, and provides a biological framework for validating new DGC components. Establishment of the molecular composition of plasma-membrane protein complexes has been hampered by a lack of suitable biochemical approaches. Here we present an analytical workflow based upon the principles of protein correlation profiling that has enabled us to model the molecular composition of the DGC in mouse skeletal muscle. We also report our analysis of protein complexes in mice harboring mutations in DGC components. Bioinformatic analyses suggested that cell-adhesion pathways were under the transcriptional control of NFκB in DGC mutant mice, which is a finding that is supported by previous studies that showed NFκB-regulated pathways underlie the pathophysiology of DGC-related muscular dystrophies. Moreover, the bioinformatic analyses suggested that inflammatory and compensatory mechanisms were activated in skeletal muscle of DGC mutant mice. Additionally, this proteomic study provides a molecular framework to refine our understanding of the DGC, identification of protein biomarkers of neuromuscular disease, and pharmacological interrogation of the DGC in adult skeletal muscle https://www.mda.org/disease/congenital-muscular-dystrophy/research. PMID:27099343

  15. Adaptive Leadership: Fighting Complexity with Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    complex tasks.30 An astonishing level of sophistication arises out of the intricate combination of these simple insect minds. 23 Snowden and Boone, “A...system: individuals, with little or no central oversight, perform simple tasks: posting Web pages and linking to other Web pages…and the co- evolutionary ...existence today. 31 Bert Hölldobler and Edward Osborne Wilson, The Superorganism: The Beauty, Elegance, and Strangeness of Insect Societies (New York, NY

  16. IL-6 Compared to Young Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihyun Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflamm-aging indicates the chronic inflammatory state resulting from increased secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and mediators such as IL-6 in the elderly. Our principle objective was to identify cell types that were affected with aging concerning IL-6 secretion in the murine model. We compared IL-6 production in spleen cells from both young and aged mice and isolated several types of cells from spleen and investigated IL-6 mRNA expression and protein production. IL-6 protein productions in cultured stromal cells from aged mice spleen were significantly high compared to young mice upon LPS stimulation. IL-6 mRNA expression level of freshly isolated stromal cells from aged mice was high compared to young mice. Furthermore, stromal cells of aged mice highly expressed IL-6 mRNA after LPS injection in vivo. These results suggest that stromal cells play a role in producing IL-6 in aged mice and imply that they contribute to the chronic inflammatory condition in the elderly.

  17. Behavioral analysis of relaxin-3 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masaki; Furube, Eriko; Aoki, Miku; Watanabe, Yoshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Relaxin-3 is a neuropeptide belonging to the relaxin/insulin superfamily. Studies using rodents have revealed that relaxin-3 is predominantly expressed in neurons in the nucleus incertus of the pons, projecting axons to forebrain regions including the hypothalamus. There is evidence that relaxin-3 is involved in several functions, including food intake and stress responses. We generated relaxin-3 gene knockout (KO) mice and examined them using a battery of behavioral tests of sensory/motor functions and emotion-related behaviors. Relaxin-3 KO mice exhibited normal growth and appearance. There was no difference in bodyweight among genotypes in both normal and high fat diet feeding. In addition, there were no significant differences between wild-type and KO mice in social interaction, depression-like behavior, and short memory test. However, in the elevated plus maze test, KO mice exhibited a robust increase in the tendency to enter open arms, although they exhibited normal performance in a light/dark transition test and showed no difference from wild-type mice in the open field test. Taken together, these results indicate that relaxin-3 KO mice exhibit mild anxiolytic characteristics relative to wild-type mice, suggesting that this peptide is involved in anxiety-related behavior.

  18. Leukemogenesis in heterozygous PU.1 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genik, Paula C; Vyazunova, Irina; Steffen, Leta S; Bacher, Jeffery W; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; McKercher, Scott; Ullrich, Robert L; Fallgren, Christina M; Weil, Michael M; Ray, F Andrew

    2014-09-01

    Most murine radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemias involve biallelic inactivation of the PU.1 gene, with one allele being lost through a radiation-induced chromosomal deletion and the other allele affected by a recurrent point mutation in codon 235 that is likely to be spontaneous. The short latencies of acute myeloid leukemias occurring in nonirradiated mice engineered with PU.1 conditional knockout or knockdown alleles suggest that once both copies of PU.1 have been lost any other steps involved in leukemogenesis occur rapidly. Yet, spontaneous acute myeloid leukemias have not been reported in mice heterozygous for a PU.1 knockout allele, an observation that conflicts with the understanding that the PU.1 codon 235 mutation is spontaneous. Here we describe experiments that show that the lack of spontaneous leukemia in PU.1 heterozygous knockout mice is not due to insufficient monitoring times or mouse numbers or the genetic background of the knockout mice. The results reveal that spontaneous leukemias that develop in mice of the mixed 129S2/SvPas and C57BL/6 background of knockout mice arise by a pathway that does not involve biallelic PU.1 mutation. In addition, the latency of radiation-induced leukemia in PU.1 heterozygous mice on a genetic background susceptible to radiation-induced leukemia indicates that the codon 235 mutation is not a rate-limiting step in radiation leukemogenesis driven by PU.1 loss.

  19. Covariation of synaptonemal complex length and mammalian meiotic exchange rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Audrey; Koehler, Kara E; Judis, LuAnn; Chan, Ernest R; Cherry, Jonathan P; Schwartz, Stuart; Seftel, Allen; Hunt, Patricia A; Hassold, Terry J

    2002-06-21

    Analysis of recombination between loci (linkage analysis) has been a cornerstone of human genetic research, enabling investigators to localize and, ultimately, identify genetic loci. However, despite these efforts little is known about patterns of meiotic exchange in human germ cells or the mechanisms that control these patterns. Using recently developed immunofluorescence methodology to examine exchanges in human spermatocytes, we have identified remarkable variation in the rate of recombination within and among individuals. Subsequent analyses indicate that, in humans and mice, this variation is linked to differences in the length of the synaptonemal complex. Thus, at least in mammals, a physical structure, the synaptonemal complex, reflects genetic rather than physical distance.

  20. Complexity and valued landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael M. McCarthy

    1979-01-01

    The variable "complexity," or "diversity," has received a great deal of attention in recent research efforts concerned with visual resource management, including the identification of complexity as one of the primary evaluation measures. This paper describes research efforts that support the hypothesis that the landscapes we value are those with...

  1. C-60 complexation revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, R.M.; Verhoeven, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    In the recent paper by Atwood et al. (Nature 368, 229-231, 1994) on a purification procedure for C60 and C70 by selective complexation with calixarenes, it was implied that we had previously studied the complexation of C60 with cyclodextrins (Williams, R. M. & Verhoeven, J. W., Recl. Trav. Chim.

  2. Complexity, Robustness, and Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Visser (Bauke)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis paper analyses the relationship between organizational complexity ( the degree of detail of information necessary to correctly assign agents to positions), robustness (the relative loss of performance due to mis-allocated agents), and performance. More complex structures are not

  3. Introductory complex analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Silverman, Richard A

    1984-01-01

    A shorter version of A. I. Markushevich's masterly three-volume Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable, this edition is appropriate for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses in complex analysis. Numerous worked-out examples and more than 300 problems, some with hints and answers, make it suitable for independent study. 1967 edition.

  4. The visibility complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pocchiola, M; Vegter, G

    1996-01-01

    We introduce the visibility complex (rr 2-dimensional regular cell complex) of a collection of n pairwise disjoint convex obstacles in the plane. It can be considered as a subdivision of the set of free rays (i.e., rays whose origins lie in free space, the complement of the obstacles). Its cells cor

  5. Schools and Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombly, Christopher E.

    2014-01-01

    As schools, districts, and the overall education system are complex entities, both the approaches taken to improve them and the methods used to study them must be similarly complex. Simple solutions imposed with no regard for schools' or districts' unique contexts hold little promise, while seemingly insignificant differences between those…

  6. Complexity and Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Jeanette Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    A central feature of complexity is that it is based on non-linear, recursive relations. However, in most current accounts of complexity such relations, while non-linear, are based on the reductive relations of a Newtonian onto-epistemological framework. This means that the systems that are emergent from the workings of such relations are a…

  7. Visual Complexity: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donderi, Don C.

    2006-01-01

    The idea of visual complexity, the history of its measurement, and its implications for behavior are reviewed, starting with structuralism and Gestalt psychology at the beginning of the 20th century and ending with visual complexity theory, perceptual learning theory, and neural circuit theory at the beginning of the 21st. Evidence is drawn from…

  8. Complexity, Robustness, and Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Visser (Bauke)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis paper analyses the relationship between organizational complexity ( the degree of detail of information necessary to correctly assign agents to positions), robustness (the relative loss of performance due to mis-allocated agents), and performance. More complex structures are not nec

  9. Conducting metal dithiolate complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underhill, A. E.; Ahmad, M. M.; Turner, D. J.;

    1985-01-01

    Further work on the chemical composition of the one-dimensional metallic metal dithiolene complex Li-Pt(mnt) is reported. The electrical conduction and thermopower properties of the nickel and palladium complexes are reported and compared with those of the platinum compound...

  10. Complexity dimensions and learnability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S-H. Nienhuys-Cheng (Shan-Hwei); M. Polman (Mark)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractA stochastic model of learning from examples has been introduced by Valiant [1984]. This PAC-learning model (PAC = probably approximately correct) reflects differences in complexity of concept classes, i.e. very complex classes are not efficiently PAC-learnable. Blumer et al. [1989

  11. Nedd4 haploinsufficient mice display moderate insulin resistance, enhanced lipolysis, and protection against high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing Jing; Ferry, Robert J; Diao, Shiyong; Xue, Bingzhong; Bahouth, Suleiman W; Liao, Francesca-Fang

    2015-04-01

    Neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated protein 4 (Nedd4) is the prototypical protein in the Nedd4 ubiquitin ligase (E3) family, which governs ubiquitin-dependent endocytosis and/or degradation of plasma membrane proteins. Loss of Nedd4 results in embryonic or neonatal lethality in mice and reduced insulin/IGF-1 signaling in embryonic fibroblasts. To delineate the roles of Nedd4 in vivo, we examined the phenotypes of heterozygous knockout mice using a high-fat diet-induced obesity (HFDIO) model. We observed that Nedd4+/- mice are moderately insulin resistant but paradoxically protected against HFDIO. After high-fat diet feeding, Nedd4+/- mice showed less body weight gain, less fat mass, and smaller adipocytes vs the wild type. Despite ameliorated HFDIO, Nedd4+/- mice did not manifest improvement in glucose tolerance vs the wild type in both genders. Nedd4+/- male, but not female, mice displayed significantly lower fasting blood glucose levels and serum insulin levels. Under obesogenic conditions, Nedd4+/- mice displayed elevated stimulated lipolytic activity, primarily through a β2-adrenergic receptor. Combined, these data support novel complex roles for Nedd4 in metabolic regulation involving altered insulin and β-adrenergic signaling pathways.

  12. Histopathological Defects in Intestine in Severe Spinal Muscular Atrophy Mice Are Improved by Systemic Antisense Oligonucleotide Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palittiya Sintusek

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI defects, including gastroesophageal reflux, constipation and delayed gastric emptying, are common in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. Similar GI dysmotility has been identified in mouse models with survival of motor neuron (SMN protein deficiency. We previously described vascular defects in skeletal muscle and spinal cord of SMA mice and we hypothesized that similar defects could be involved in the GI pathology observed in these mice. We therefore investigated the gross anatomical structure, enteric vasculature and neurons in the small intestine in a severe mouse model of SMA. We also assessed the therapeutic response of GI histopathology to systemic administration of morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (AON designed to increase SMN protein expression. Significant anatomical and histopathological abnormalities, with striking reduction of vascular density, overabundance of enteric neurons and increased macrophage infiltration, were detected in the small intestine in SMA mice. After systemic AON treatment in neonatal mice, all the abnormalities observed were significantly restored to near-normal levels. We conclude that the observed GI histopathological phenotypes and functional defects observed in these SMA mice are strongly linked to SMN deficiency which can be rescued by systemic administration of AON. This study on the histopathological changes in the gastrointestinal system in severe SMA mice provides further indication of the complex role that SMN plays in multiple tissues and suggests that at least in SMA mice restoration of SMN production in peripheral tissues is essential for optimal outcome.

  13. Molecular evidence that the spiny mouse (Acomys) is more closely related to gerbils (Gerbillinae) than to true mice (Murinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevret, P; Denys, C; Jaeger, J J; Michaux, J; Catzeflis, F M

    1993-04-15

    Spiny mice of the genus Acomys traditionally have been classified as members of the Murinae, a subfamily of rodents that also includes rats and mice with which spiny mice share a complex set of morphological characters, including a unique molar pattern. The origin and evolution of this molar pattern, documented by many fossils from Southern Asia, support the hypothesis of the monophyly of Acomys and all other Murinae. This view has been challenged by immunological studies that have suggested that Acomys is as distantly related to mice (Mus) as are other subfamilies (e.g., hamsters: Cricetinae) of the muroid rodents. We present molecular evidence derived from DNA.DNA hybridization data that indicate that the spiny mouse Acomys and two African genera of Murinae, Uranomys and Lophuromys, constitute a monophyletic clade, a view that was recently suggested on the basis of dental characters. However, our DNA.DNA hybridization data also indicate that the spiny mice (Acomys) are more closely related to gerbils (Gerbillinae) than to the true mice and rats (Murinae) with which they have been classified. Because Acomys and the brush-furred mice Uranomys and Lophuromys share no derived morphological characters with the Gerbillinae, their murine morphology must have evolved by convergence, including the molar pattern previously considered to support the monophyly of the Murinae.

  14. Bovine milk oligosaccharides decrease gut permeability and improve inflammation and microbial dysbiosis in diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudry, Gaëlle; Hamilton, M Kristina; Chichlowski, Maciej; Wickramasinghe, Saumya; Barile, Daniela; Kalanetra, Karen M; Mills, David A; Raybould, Helen E

    2017-01-25

    Obesity is characterized by altered gut homeostasis, including dysbiosis and increased gut permeability closely linked to the development of metabolic disorders. Milk oligosaccharides are complex sugars that selectively enhance the growth of specific beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract and could be used as prebiotics. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the effects of bovine milk oligosaccharides (BMO) and Bifidobacterium longum ssp. infantis (B. infantis) on restoring diet-induced obesity intestinal microbiota and barrier function defects in mice. Male C57/BL6 mice were fed a Western diet (WD, 40% fat/kcal) or normal chow (C, 14% fat/kcal) for 7 wk. During the final 2 wk of the study, the diet of a subgroup of WD-fed mice was supplemented with BMO (7% wt/wt). Weekly gavage of B. infantis was performed in all mice starting at wk 3, yet B. infantis could not be detected in any luminal contents when mice were killed. Supplementation of the WD with BMO normalized the cecal and colonic microbiota with increased abundance of Lactobacillus compared with both WD and C mice and restoration of Allobaculum and Ruminococcus levels to that of C mice. The BMO supplementation reduced WD-induced increase in paracellular and transcellular flux in the large intestine as well as mRNA levels of the inflammatory marker tumor necrosis factor α. In conclusion, BMO are promising prebiotics to modulate gut microbiota and intestinal barrier function for enhanced health.

  15. Immune responses and protective effect in mice vaccinated orally with surface sporozoite protein of Eimeria falciformis in ISCOMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanji, M; Laurent, F; Péry, P

    1994-07-01

    Immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) were built after treatment of a purified surface protein from Eimeria falciformis sporozoites with a palmitic acid derivation, leading to a high ratio (33-64%) of P27 incorporation in these cage-like structures. P27 kept its antigenicity after incorporation in ISCOMs, which induced, after iterative intubations by the oral route to groups of mice, a systemic IgG response, a local IgA response, and a local enhanced cellular response as demonstrated by lymphoproliferation of mesenteric lymph node cells upon in vitro stimulation with antigen. This immunization (120 micrograms in six oral doses at 2-day intervals) afforded mice a partial protection (60%) against a subsequent 400 oocyst challenge. The reduction in daily oocyst excretion was corroborated by significantly different weight losses between immunized and control mice on days 9 and 10 postinfection and the subsequent death of these control mice. These observations provide the first application of ISCOMs to parasitic intestinal diseases.

  16. Leading healthcare in complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    Healthcare institutions and providers are in complexity. Networks of interconnections from relationships and technology create conditions in which interdependencies and non-linear dynamics lead to surprising, unpredictable outcomes. Previous effective approaches to leadership, focusing on top-down bureaucratic methods, are no longer effective. Leading in complexity requires leaders to accept the complexity, create an adaptive space in which innovation and creativity can flourish and then integrate the successful practices that emerge into the formal organizational structure. Several methods for doing adaptive space work will be discussed. Readers will be able to contrast traditional leadership approaches with leading in complexity. They will learn new behaviours that are required of complexity leaders, along with challenges they will face, often from other leaders within the organization.

  17. Supporting complex search tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gäde, Maria; Hall, Mark; Huurdeman, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    There is broad consensus in the field of IR that search is complex in many use cases and applications, both on the Web and in domain specific collections, and both professionally and in our daily life. Yet our understanding of complex search tasks, in comparison to simple look up tasks, is fragme......There is broad consensus in the field of IR that search is complex in many use cases and applications, both on the Web and in domain specific collections, and both professionally and in our daily life. Yet our understanding of complex search tasks, in comparison to simple look up tasks......, and recommendations, and supporting exploratory search to sensemaking and analytics, UI and UX design pose an overconstrained challenge. How do we know that our approach is any good? Supporting complex search task requires new collaborations across the whole field of IR, and the proposed workshop will bring together...

  18. Comments on Holographic Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Carmi, Dean; Rath, Pratik

    2016-01-01

    We study two recent conjectures for holographic complexity: the complexity=action conjecture and the complexity=volume conjecture. In particular, we examine the structure of the UV divergences appearing in these quantities, and show that the coefficients can be written as local integrals of geometric quantities in the boundary. We also consider extending these conjectures to evaluate the complexity of the mixed state produced by reducing the pure global state to a specific subregion of the boundary time slice. The UV divergences in this subregion complexity have a similar geometric structure, but there are also new divergences associated with the geometry of the surface enclosing the boundary region of interest. We discuss possible implications arising from the geometric nature of these UV divergences.

  19. Soluble interleukin-15 complexes are generated in vivo by type I interferon dependent and independent pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M Anthony

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-15 associates with IL-15Rα on the cell surface where it can be cleaved into soluble cytokine/receptor complexes that have the potential to stimulate CD8 T cells and NK cells. Unfortunately, little is known about the in vivo production of soluble IL-15Rα/IL-15 complexes (sIL-15 complexes, particularly regarding the circumstances that induce them and the mechanisms responsible. The main objective of this study was to elucidate the signals leading to the generation of sIL-15 complexes. In this study, we show that sIL-15 complexes are increased in the serum of mice in response to Interferon (IFN-α. In bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC, IFN-α increased the activity of ADAM17, a metalloproteinase implicated in cleaving IL-15 complexes from the cell surface. Moreover, knocking out ADAM17 in BMDCs prevented the ability of IFN-α to induce sIL-15 complexes demonstrating ADAM17 as a critical protease mediating cleavage of IL-15 complexes in response to type I IFNs. Type I IFN signaling was required for generating sIL-15 complexes as in vivo induction of sIL-15 complexes by Poly I:C stimulation or total body irradiation (TBI was impaired in IFNAR-/- mice. Interestingly, serum sIL-15 complexes were also induced in mice infected with Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV or mice treated with agonistic CD40 antibodies; however, sIL-15 complexes were still induced in IFNAR-/- mice after VSV infection or CD40 stimulation indicating pathways other than type I IFNs induce sIL-15 complexes. Overall, this study has shown that type I IFNs, VSV infection, and CD40 stimulation induce sIL-15 complexes suggesting the generation of sIL-15 complexes is a common event associated with immune activation. These findings reveal an unrealized mechanism for enhanced immune responses occurring during infection, vaccination, inflammation, and autoimmunity.

  20. Optic atrophy 1 mediates coenzyme Q-responsive regulation of respiratory complex IV activity in brain mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuhide; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Shirasawa, Takuji; Takahashi, Mayumi

    2017-11-01

    The oxygen consumption rate (OCR) in brain mitochondria is significantly lower in aged mice than in young mice, and the reduced OCR is rescued by administration of water-solubilized CoQ10 to aged mice via drinking water. However, the mechanism behind this remains unclear. Here, we show that the activity of respiratory complex IV (CIV) in brain mitochondria declined in aged mice than in young mice, with no significant change in individual respiratory complex levels and their supercomplex assembly. Reduced CIV activity in the aged mice coincided with reduced binding of optic atrophy 1 (OPA1) to CIV. Both reduced activity and OPA1 binding of CIV were rescued by water-solubilized CoQ10 administration to aged mice via drinking water. OCR and the activity and OPA1 binding of CIV in isolated brain mitochondria from aged mice were restored by incubation with CoQ10, but not in the presence of 15-deoxy-prostaglandin J2, an inhibitor of a GTPase effector domain-containing GTPase such as OPA1 and DRP1. By contrast, the CoQ10-responsive restoration of OCR in the isolated mitochondria was not inhibited by Mdivi-1, a selective inhibitor of DRP1. Thus, we propose a novel function of OPA1 in regulating the CIV activity in brain mitochondria in response to CoQ10. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Biological Effect of Magnetic Field in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Wei ZENG

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the biological effect of magnetic field in mice bodies. Method: With a piece of permanent magnet embeded in mice bodies beside the femoral artery and vein to measure the electrophoretic velocity(um/s). Result: The magnetic field in mice bodies on the experiment group that the electrophoretic velocity is faster more than control and free group.Conclusion:The magnetic field in animal's body can raise the negative electric charges on the surface of erythrocyte to improve the microcirculation, this is the biological effect of magnetic field.

  2. Gluten exacerbates IgA nephropathy in humanized mice through gliadin-CD89 interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papista, Christina; Lechner, Sebastian; Ben Mkaddem, Sanae; LeStang, Marie-Bénédicte; Abbad, Lilia; Bex-Coudrat, Julie; Pillebout, Evangéline; Chemouny, Jonathan M; Jablonski, Mathieu; Flamant, Martin; Daugas, Eric; Vrtovsnik, François; Yiangou, Minas; Berthelot, Laureline; Monteiro, Renato C

    2015-08-01

    IgA1 complexes containing deglycosylated IgA1, IgG autoantibodies, and a soluble form of the IgA receptor (sCD89), are hallmarks of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Food antigens, notably gluten, are associated with increased mucosal response and IgAN onset, but their implication in the pathology remains unknown. Here, an IgAN mouse model expressing human IgA1 and CD89 was used to examine the role of gluten in IgAN. Mice were given a gluten-free diet for three generations to produce gluten sensitivity, and then challenged for 30 days with a gluten diet. A gluten-free diet resulted in a decrease of mesangial IgA1 deposits, transferrin 1 receptor, and transglutaminase 2 expression, as well as hematuria. Mice on a gluten-free diet lacked IgA1-sCD89 complexes in serum and kidney eluates. Disease severity depended on gluten and CD89, as shown by reappearance of IgAN features in mice on a gluten diet and by direct binding of the gluten-subcomponent gliadin to sCD89. A gluten diet exacerbated intestinal IgA1 secretion, inflammation, and villous atrophy, and increased serum IgA1 anti-gliadin antibodies, which correlated with proteinuria in mice and patients. Moreover, early treatment of humanized mice with a gluten-free diet prevented mesangial IgA1 deposits and hematuria. Thus, gliadin-CD89 interaction may aggravate IgAN development through induction of IgA1-sCD89 complex formation and a mucosal immune response. Hence, early-stage treatment with a gluten-free diet could be beneficial to prevent disease.

  3. Generation of human MHC (HLA-A11/DR1) transgenic mice for vaccine evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yang; Gao, Tongtong; Zhao, Guangyu; Jiang, Yuting; Yang, Yi; Yu, Hong; Kou, Zhihua; Lone, Yuchun; Sun, Shihui; Zhou, Yusen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rapid occurrence of emerging infectious diseases demonstrates an urgent need for a new preclinical experimental model that reliably replicates human immune responses. Here, a new homozygous humanized human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A11/DR1 transgenic mouse (HLA-A11+/+/DR01+/+/H-2-β2m−/−/IAβ−/−) was generated by crossing HLA-A11 transgenic (Tg) mice with HLA-A2+/+/DR01+/+/H-2-β2m−/−/IAβ−/− mice. The HLA-A11-restricted immune response of this mouse model was then examined. HLA-A11 Tg mice expressing a chimeric major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule comprising the α1, α2, and β2m domains of human HLA-A11 and the α3 transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of murine H-2Db were generated. The correct integration of HLA-A11 and HLA-DR1 into the genome of the HLA-A11/DR1 Tg mice (which lacked the expression of endogenous H-2-I/II molecules) was then confirmed. Immunizing mice with a recombinant HBV vaccine or a recombinant HIV-1 protein resulted in the generation of IFN-γ-producing cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and antigen-specific antibodies. The HLA-A11-restricted CTL response was directed at HLA immunodominant epitopes. These mice represent a versatile animal model for studying the immunogenicity of HLA CTL epitopes in the absence of a murine MHC response. The established animal model will also be useful for evaluating and optimizing T cell-based vaccines and for studying differences in antigen processing between mice and humans. PMID:26479036

  4. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Sengle

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that

  5. Environmental Enrichment Ameliorates Behavioral Impairments Modeling Schizophrenia in Mice Lacking Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Emma L; McOmish, Caitlin E; Buret, Laetitia S; Van den Buuse, Maarten; Hannan, Anthony J

    2015-07-01

    Schizophrenia arises from a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Abnormalities in glutamatergic signaling have been proposed to underlie the emergence of symptoms, in light of various lines of evidence, including the psychotomimetic effects of NMDA receptor antagonists. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) has also been implicated in the disorder, and has been shown to physically interact with NMDA receptors. To clarify the role of mGlu5-dependent behavioral expression by environmental factors, we assessed mGlu5 knockout (KO) mice after exposure to environmental enrichment (EE) or reared under standard conditions. The mGlu5 KO mice showed reduced prepulse inhibition (PPI), long-term memory deficits, and spontaneous locomotor hyperactivity, which were all attenuated by EE. Examining the cellular impact of genetic and environmental manipulation, we show that EE significantly increased pyramidal cell dendritic branching and BDNF protein levels in the hippocampus of wild-type mice; however, mGlu5 KO mice were resistant to these alterations, suggesting that mGlu5 is critical to these responses. A selective effect of EE on the behavioral response to the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 in mGlu5 KO mice was seen. MK-801-induced hyperlocomotion was further potentiated in enriched mGlu5 KO mice and treatment with MK-801 reinstated PPI disruption in EE mGlu5 KO mice only, a response that is absent under standard housing conditions. Together, these results demonstrate an important role for mGlu5 in environmental modulation of schizophrenia-related behavioral impairments. Furthermore, this role of the mGlu5 receptor is mediated by interaction with NMDA receptor function, which may inform development of novel therapeutics.

  6. Morphological and behavioral characterization of adult mice deficient for SrGAP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Jonathan; Koschützke, Leif; Pfannmöller, Jörg P; Esche, Jennifer; van Diepen, Laura; Kuss, Andreas W; Hartmann, Bianca; Bartsch, Dusan; Lotze, Martin; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    SrGAP3 belongs to the family of Rho GTPase proteins. These proteins are thought to play essential roles in development and in the plasticity of the nervous system. SrGAP3-deficient mice have recently been created and approximately 10 % of these mice developed a hydrocephalus and died shortly after birth. The others survived into adulthood, but displayed neuroanatomical alteration, including increased ventricular size. We now show that SrGAP3-deficient mice display increased brain weight together with increased hippocampal volume. This increase was accompanied by an increase of the thickness of the stratum oriens of area CA1 as well as of the thickness of the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus (DG). Concerning hippocampal adult neurogenesis, we observed no significant change in the number of proliferating cells. The density of doublecortin-positive cells also did not vary between SrGAP3-deficient mice and controls. By analyzing Golgi-impregnated material, we found that, in SrGAP3-deficient mice, the morphology and number of dendritic spines was not altered in the DG. Likewise, a Sholl-analysis revealed no significant changes concerning dendritic complexity as compared to controls. Despite the distinct morphological alterations in the hippocampus, SrGAP3-deficient mice were relatively inconspicuous in their behavior, not only in the open-field, nest building but also in the Morris water-maze. However, the SrGAP3-deficient mice showed little to no interest in burying marbles; a behavior that is seen in some animal models related to autism, supporting the view that SrGAP3 plays a role in neurodevelopmental disorders.

  7. Potent carcinogenicity of cigarette smoke in mice exposed early in life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balansky, Roumen; Ganchev, Gancho; Iltcheva, Marietta; Steele, Vernon E; D'Agostini, Francesco; De Flora, Silvio

    2007-10-01

    In spite of the dominant role of cigarette smoke (CS) in cancer epidemiology, all studies performed during the past 60 years have shown that this complex mixture is either negative or weakly tumorigenic in experimental animals. We implemented studies aimed at evaluating whether exposure of mice early in life may enhance susceptibility to CS carcinogenicity. A total of 98 newborn Swiss albino mice were either untreated (controls) or received a subcutaneous injection of benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] (positive control) or were exposed whole-body to mainstream cigarette smoke (MCS) for 120 days, starting within 12 h after birth. Complete necropsy and histopathological analyses were performed at periodical intervals. In contrast with the lack of lung tumors in controls, MCS-exposed mice developed microscopically detectable tumors, starting only 75 days after birth and reaching an overall incidence of 78.3% after 181-230 days. The mean lung tumor multiplicities were 6.1 and 13.6 tumors per mouse in males and females, respectively, showing a significant intergender difference. Most tumors were microadenomas or adenomas, but 18.4% of the mice additionally had malignant lung cancer. MCS also induced bronchial and alveolar epithelial hyperplasia, and blood vessel proliferation. Furthermore, malignant tumors, some of which may have a metastatic origin, were detected in the urinary tract and liver of MCS-exposed mice. A somewhat different spectrum of tumors was observed in B(a)P-treated mice. In conclusion, MCS is a potent and broad spectrum carcinogen in mice when exposure starts early in life, covering stages of life corresponding to neonatal, childhood and adolescence periods in humans. This animal model will be useful to explore the mechanisms involved in CS-induced carcinogenesis and to investigate the protective effects of dietary agents and chemopreventive drugs.

  8. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengle, Gerhard; Carlberg, Valerie; Tufa, Sara F; Charbonneau, Noe L; Smaldone, Silvia; Carlson, Eric J; Ramirez, Francesco; Keene, Douglas R; Sakai, Lynn Y

    2015-06-01

    Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background) are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that fibrillin-2 can

  9. Loss of AND-34/BCAR3 expression in mice results in rupture of the adult lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Near, Richard I.; Smith, Richard S.; Toselli, Paul A.; Freddo, Thomas F.; Bloom, Alexander B.; Vanden Borre, Pierre; Seldin, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose AND-34/BCAR3 (Breast Cancer Anti-Estrogen Resistance 3) associates with the focal adhesion adaptor protein, p130CAS/BCAR1. Expression of AND-34 regulates epithelial cell growth pattern, motility, and growth factor dependence. We sought to establish the effects of the loss of AND-34 expression in a mammalian organism. Methods AND-34−/− mice were generated by homologous recombination. Histopathology, in situ hybridization, and western blotting were performed on murine tissues. Results Western analyses confirmed total loss of expression in AND-34−/− splenic lymphocytes. Mice lacking AND-34 are fertile and have normal longevity. While AND-34 is widely expressed in wild type mice, histologic analysis of multiple organs in AND-34−/− mice is unremarkable and analyses of lymphocyte development show no overt changes. A small percentage of AND-34−/− mice show distinctive small white eye lesions resulting from the migration of ruptured cortical lens tissue into the anterior chamber. Following initial vacuolization and liquefaction of the lens cortex first observed at postnatal day three, posterior lens rupture occurs in all AND-34−/− mice, beginning as early as three weeks and seen in all mice at three months. Western blot analysis and in situ hybridization confirmed the presence of AND-34 RNA and protein in lens epithelial cells, particularly at the lens equator. Prior data link AND-34 expression to the activation of Akt signaling. While Akt Ser 473 phosphorylation was readily detectable in AND-34+/+ lens epithelial cells, it was markedly reduced in the AND-34−/− lens epithelium. Basal levels of p130Cas phosphorylation were higher in AND-34+/+ than in AND-34−/− lens epithelium. Conclusions These results demonstrate the loss of AND-34 dysregulates focal adhesion complex signaling in lens epithelial cells and suggest that AND-34-mediated signaling is required for maintenance of the structural integrity of the adult ocular lens. PMID:19365570

  10. Myocardial mitochondrial and contractile function are preserved in mice lacking adiponectin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Braun

    Full Text Available Adiponectin deficiency leads to increased myocardial infarct size following ischemia reperfusion and to exaggerated cardiac hypertrophy following pressure overload, entities that are causally linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. In skeletal muscle, lack of adiponectin results in impaired mitochondrial function. Thus, it was our objective to investigate whether adiponectin deficiency impairs mitochondrial energetics in the heart. At 8 weeks of age, heart weight-to-body weight ratios were not different between adiponectin knockout (ADQ-/- mice and wildtypes (WT. In isolated working hearts, cardiac output, aortic developed pressure and cardiac power were preserved in ADQ-/- mice. Rates of fatty acid oxidation, glucose oxidation and glycolysis were unchanged between groups. While myocardial oxygen consumption was slightly reduced (-24% in ADQ-/- mice in isolated working hearts, rates of maximal ADP-stimulated mitochondrial oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis in saponin-permeabilized cardiac fibers were preserved in ADQ-/- mice with glutamate, pyruvate or palmitoyl-carnitine as a substrate. In addition, enzymatic activity of respiratory complexes I and II was unchanged between groups. Phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase and SIRT1 activity were not decreased, expression and acetylation of PGC-1α were unchanged, and mitochondrial content of OXPHOS subunits was not decreased in ADQ-/- mice. Finally, increasing energy demands due to prolonged subcutaneous infusion of isoproterenol did not differentially affect cardiac contractility or mitochondrial function in ADQ-/- mice compared to WT. Thus, mitochondrial and contractile function are preserved in hearts of mice lacking adiponectin, suggesting that adiponectin may be expendable in the regulation of mitochondrial energetics and contractile function in the heart under non-pathological conditions.

  11. Myocardial mitochondrial and contractile function are preserved in mice lacking adiponectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Martin; Hettinger, Niko; Koentges, Christoph; Pfeil, Katharina; Cimolai, Maria C; Hoffmann, Michael M; Osterholt, Moritz; Doenst, Torsten; Bode, Christoph; Bugger, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Adiponectin deficiency leads to increased myocardial infarct size following ischemia reperfusion and to exaggerated cardiac hypertrophy following pressure overload, entities that are causally linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. In skeletal muscle, lack of adiponectin results in impaired mitochondrial function. Thus, it was our objective to investigate whether adiponectin deficiency impairs mitochondrial energetics in the heart. At 8 weeks of age, heart weight-to-body weight ratios were not different between adiponectin knockout (ADQ-/-) mice and wildtypes (WT). In isolated working hearts, cardiac output, aortic developed pressure and cardiac power were preserved in ADQ-/- mice. Rates of fatty acid oxidation, glucose oxidation and glycolysis were unchanged between groups. While myocardial oxygen consumption was slightly reduced (-24%) in ADQ-/- mice in isolated working hearts, rates of maximal ADP-stimulated mitochondrial oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis in saponin-permeabilized cardiac fibers were preserved in ADQ-/- mice with glutamate, pyruvate or palmitoyl-carnitine as a substrate. In addition, enzymatic activity of respiratory complexes I and II was unchanged between groups. Phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase and SIRT1 activity were not decreased, expression and acetylation of PGC-1α were unchanged, and mitochondrial content of OXPHOS subunits was not decreased in ADQ-/- mice. Finally, increasing energy demands due to prolonged subcutaneous infusion of isoproterenol did not differentially affect cardiac contractility or mitochondrial function in ADQ-/- mice compared to WT. Thus, mitochondrial and contractile function are preserved in hearts of mice lacking adiponectin, suggesting that adiponectin may be expendable in the regulation of mitochondrial energetics and contractile function in the heart under non-pathological conditions.

  12. Olig2 Silence Ameliorates Cuprizone-Induced Schizophrenia-Like Symptoms in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongxia; Zhai, Jinguo; Wang, Bin; Fang, Maosheng

    2017-10-09

    BACKGROUND The pathogenesis of schizophrenia is complex and oligodendrocyte abnormality is an important component of the pathogenesis found in schizophrenia. This study was designed to evaluate the function of olig2 in cuprizone-induced schizophrenia-like symptoms in a mouse model, and to assess the related mechanisms. MATERIAL AND METHODS The schizophrenia-like symptoms were modeled by administration of cuprizone in mice. Open-field and elevated-plus maze tests were applied to detect behavioral changes. Adenovirus encoding olig2 siRNA was designed to silence olig2 expression. Real-time PCR and western blotting were applied to detect myelin basic protein (MBP), 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and olig2 expressions. RESULTS Open field test showed that the distance and time spent in the center area were significantly decreased in cuprizone mice (model mice) when compared with control mice (psilence could significantly increase the time and distance spent in the center area compared with the model mice (psilence significantly reversed the abnormalities (psilence reversed the reduction caused by cuprizone modeling (psilence compared with model (psilence of olig2 could prevent changes, likely through regulating MBP, CNPase, and GFAP expressions.

  13. TRPV1 channels are involved in niacin-induced cutaneous vasodilation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Heather L; Inceoglu, Bora; Ma, Linlin; Zheng, Jie; Schaefer, Saul

    2015-02-01

    Niacin is effective in treating dyslipidemias but causes cutaneous vasodilation or flushing, a side effect that limits its clinical use. Blocking prostaglandins in humans reduces but does not consistently eliminate flushing, indicating additional mechanisms may contribute to flushing. The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel, when activated, causes cutaneous vasodilation and undergoes tachyphylaxis similar to that seen with niacin. Using a murine model, early phase niacin-induced flushing was examined and TRPV1 channel involvement demonstrated using pharmacologic blockade, desensitization, and genetic knockouts (TRPV1 KO). The TRPV1 antagonist AMG9810 reduced the magnitude of the initial and secondary peaks and the rapidity of the vasodilatory response (slope). TRPV1 desensitization by chronic capsaicin reduced the initial peak and slope. TRPV1 KO mice had a lower initial peak, secondary peak, and slope compared with wild-type mice. Chronic niacin reduced the initial peak, secondary peak, and slope in wild-type mice but had no effect in knockout mice. Furthermore, chronic niacin diminished the response to capsaicin in wild-type mice. Overall, these data demonstrate an important role for TRPV1 channels in niacin-induced flushing, both in the acute response and with chronic administration. That niacin-induced flushing is a complex cascade of events, which should inform pharmacological intervention against this side effect.

  14. Dopamine D3 receptor status modulates sexual dimorphism in voluntary wheel running behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinker, Florian; Ko Hnemann, Kathrin; Paulus, Walter; Liebetanz, David

    2017-08-30

    Sexual dimorphism has been described in various aspects of physiological and pathophysiological processes involving dopaminergic signaling. This might account for the different disease characteristics in men and women in e.g. Parkinson's disease or ADHD. A better understanding might contribute to the future individualization of therapy. We examined spontaneous wheel running activity of male and female mice, homo- and heterozygote for dopamine D3 receptor deficiency (D3R -/- and D3R+/-), and compared them to wild type controls. We found higher wheel running activity in female mice than in their male littermates. D3-/- mice, irrespective of sex, were also hyperactive compared to both D3+/- and wild type animals. Hyperactivity of D3-/- female mice was pronounced during the first days of wheel running but then decreased while their male counterparts continued to be hyperactive. Physical activity was menstrual cycle-dependent. Activity fluctuations were also seen in D3 receptor knockout mice and are therefore presumably independent of D3 receptor activation. Our data underscore the complex interaction of dopaminergic signaling and gonadal hormones that leads to specific running behavior. Furthermore, we detected sex- and D3 receptor status-specific reactions during novel exposure to the running wheel. These findings suggest the need for adapting dopaminergic therapies to individual factors such as sex or even menstrual cycle to optimize therapeutic success. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Behavioral improvement after chronic administration of coenzyme Q10 in P301S transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elipenahli, Ceyhan; Stack, Cliona; Jainuddin, Shari; Gerges, Meri; Yang, Lichuan; Starkov, Anatoly; Beal, M Flint; Dumont, Magali

    2012-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is a key component of the electron transport chain which plays an essential role in ATP production and also has antioxidant effects. Neuroprotective effects of coenzyme Q10 have been reported in both in vitro and in vivo models of neurodegenerative diseases. However, its effects have not been studied in cells or in animals with tau induced pathology. In this report, we administered coenzyme Q10 to transgenic mice with the P301S tau mutation, which causes fronto-temporal dementia in man. These mice develop tau hyperphosphorylation and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Coenzyme Q10 improved survival and behavioral deficits in the P301S mice. There was a modest reduction in phosphorylated tau in the cortex of P301S mice. We also examined the effects of coenzyme Q10 treatment on the electron transport chain enzymes, the mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. There was a significant increase in complex I activity and protein levels, and a reduction in lipid peroxidation. Our data show that coenzyme Q10 significantly improved behavioral deficits and survival in transgenic mice with the P301S tau mutation, upregulated key enzymes of the electron transport chain, and reduced oxidative stress.

  16. Enhanced thermal stability of lysosomal beta-D-galactosidase in parenchymal cells of tumour bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenti, L; Lipari, M; Lombardi, D; Zicari, A; Dotta, A; Pontieri, G M

    1986-12-01

    The thermal stability of the enzyme beta-D-galactosidase varies among different organs in normal C57Bl/6 mice, and increases in the same organs in mice with Lewis Lung carcinoma. Thermal stability of this enzyme is also increased by treatment of the mice with cell-free extracts of tumour cells or with inflammatory compounds such as carrageenan or orosomucoid. After desialylation, orosomucoid more effectively increases the heat stability of the enzyme. By contrast talc, which has no galactosyl groups, is without effect on the stability of the enzyme in vivo. Macrophages of tumour bearing mice release into the culture medium a more heat resistant enzyme than macrophages from control mice. In both cases the heat resistance of the secreted enzyme is higher when fetal calf serum is present in the culture medium. Bovine serum does not modify the thermal stability of beta-D-galactosidase in this system. Incubation of lysosomal fractions of various organs with the synthetic beta-D-galactosidase substrate, p-nitrophenyl-galactopyranoside, also strongly increases the heat resistance of the enzyme. The results suggest that one factor influencing the heat resistance of this enzyme may be complex formation between the enzyme and its substrates, an example of substrate protection of the enzyme. This may not be the only factor involved in enzyme stabilization in vivo.

  17. Ac-SDKP ameliorates the progression of lupus nephritis in MRL/lpr mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hechang; Zhao, Jijun; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Hongyue; Huang, Bin; Liang, Yingjie; Yu, Xueqing; Yang, Niansheng

    2012-12-01

    N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (Ac-SDKP) is an endogenous tetrapeptide which can inhibit the differentiation, migration and activation of macrophages and suppress the proliferation of fibroblast. This study examined the effects of Ac-SDKP on the progression of lupus nephritis (LN). MRL/lpr mice received subcutaneous infusion of Ac-SDKP (1.0 mg kg(-1) d(-1)) or vehicle through implanted osmotic mini-pumps from 12 to 20 weeks until being euthanized. MRL/MpJ mice served as normal controls. The data indicative of renal inflammation and fibrosis were evaluated before and after treatment. Ac-SDKP-treated MRL/lpr mice showed reduced proteinuria and improved renal function compared with vehicle-treated controls. Ac-SDKP-treated mice demonstrated decreased inflammatory infiltrates of T cells and macrophages in the kidneys as compared to vehicle-treated animals. The treatment also inhibited the activation of NF-κB and production of TNF-α. Despite this, immune complex deposition and plasma anti-dsDNA levels were not statistically different between the two groups. In addition, the treatment inhibited renal expression of TGF-β1, α-SMA and fibronectin as well as the phosphorylation of Smad2/3. Ac-SDKP treatment ameliorated LN through exerting anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects on MRL/lpr mice, providing therapeutic potential for halting the progression of LN.

  18. ENaC activity in collecting ducts modulates NCC in cirrhotic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordasini, David; Loffing-Cueni, Dominique; Loffing, Johannes; Beatrice, Rohrbach; Maillard, Marc P; Hummler, Edith; Burnier, Michel; Escher, Geneviève; Vogt, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Cirrhosis is a frequent and severe disease, complicated by renal sodium retention leading to ascites and oedema. A better understanding of the complex mechanisms responsible for renal sodium handling could improve clinical management of sodium retention. Our aim was to determine the importance of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in collecting ducts in compensate and decompensate cirrhosis. Bile duct ligation was performed in control mice (CTL) and collecting duct-specific αENaC knockout (KO) mice, and ascites development, aldosterone plasma concentration, urinary sodium/potassium ratio and sodium transporter expression were compared. Disruption of ENaC in collecting ducts (CDs) did not alter ascites development, urinary sodium/potassium ratio, plasma aldosterone concentrations or Na,K-ATPase abundance in CCDs. Total αENaC abundance in whole kidney increased in cirrhotic mice of both genotypes and cleaved forms of α and γ ENaC increased only in ascitic mice of both genotypes. The sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) abundance was lower in non-ascitic KO, compared to non-ascitic CTL, and increased when ascites appeared. In ascitic mice, the lack of αENaC in CDs induced an upregulation of total ENaC and NCC and correlated with the cleavage of ENaC subunits. This revealed compensatory mechanisms which could also take place when treating the patients with diuretics. These compensatory mechanisms should be considered for future development of therapeutic strategies.

  19. Fasting energy homeostasis in mice with adipose deficiency of desnutrin/adipose triglyceride lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiang Wei; Wang, Shu Pei; Casavant, Stéphanie; Moreau, Alain; Yang, Gong She; Mitchell, Grant A

    2012-05-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) catalyzes the first step of lipolysis of cytoplasmic triacylglycerols in white adipose tissue (WAT) and several other organs. We created adipose-specific ATGL-deficient (ATGLAKO) mice. In these mice, in vivo lipolysis, measured as the increase of plasma nonesterified fatty acid and glycerol levels after injection of a β3-adrenergic agonist, was undetectable. In isolated ATGLAKO adipocytes, β3-adrenergic-stimulated glycerol release was 10-fold less than in controls. Under fed conditions, ATGLAKO mice had normal viability, mild obesity, low plasma nonesterified fatty acid levels, increased insulin sensitivity, and increased daytime food intake. After 5 h of fasting, ATGLAKO WAT showed phosphorylation of the major protein kinase A-mediated targets hormone-sensitive lipase and perilipin A and ATGLAKO liver showed low glycogen and triacylglycerol contents. During a 48-h fast, ATGLAKO mice developed striking and complex differences from controls: progressive reduction of oxygen consumption, high respiratory exchange ratio, consistent with reduced fatty acid availability for energy production, lethargy, hypothermia, and undiminished fat mass, but greater loss of lean mass than controls. Plasma of 48 h-fasted ATGLAKO mice had a unique pattern: low 3-hydroxybutyrate, insulin, adiponectin, and fibroblast growth factor 21 with elevated leptin and corticosterone. ATGLAKO WAT, liver, skeletal muscle, and heart showed increased levels of mRNA related to autophagy and proteolysis. In murine ATGL deficiency, adipose lipolysis is critical for fasting energy homeostasis, and fasting imposes proteolytic stress on many organs, including heart and skeletal muscle.

  20. Experimental osteoarthritis models in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Julia; Grässel, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a slowly progressing, degenerative disorder of synovial joints culminating in the irreversible destruction of articular cartilage and subchondral bone. It affects almost everyone over the age of 65 and influences life quality of affected individuals with enormous costs to the health care system. Current therapeutic strategies seek to ameliorate pain and increase mobility; however, to date none of them halts disease progression or regenerates damaged cartilage or bone. Thus, there is an ultimate need for the development of new, noninvasive treatments that could substitute joint replacement for late- or end-stage patients. Therefore, osteoarthritis animal models for mimicking of all OA features are important. Mice develop an OA pathology that is comparable to humans, rapidly develop OA due to the short lifetime and show reproducible OA symptoms. They provide a versatile and widely used animal model for analyzing molecular mechanisms of OA pathology. One major advantage over large animal models is the availability of knockout or transgenic mice strains to examine genetic predispositions/contributions to OA.In this chapter, we describe three widely used instability-inducing murine osteoarthritis models. The most common two methods for surgical induction are: (1) destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) and (2) anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT). In the DMM model, the medial meniscotibial ligament is transected while in the ACLT model the anterior cruciate ligament is destroyed. In the third, chemical induced instability method, intraarticular collagenase is injected into the knee joint. Intraarticular collagenase weakens articular ligaments which cause instability of the joint, and full-blown OA develops within 6 weeks. For morphological evaluation, we correspond mainly to the recommendations of OARSI for histological assessment of osteoarthritis in mouse. For statistical evaluation summed or mean scores of all four knee areas

  1. Regulatory variation at glypican-3 underlies a major growth QTL in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Oliver

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The genetic basis of variation in complex traits remains poorly understood, and few genes underlying variation have been identified. Previous work identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL responsible for much of the response to selection on growth in mice, effecting a change in body mass of approximately 20%. By fine-mapping, we have resolved the location of this QTL to a 660-kb region containing only two genes of known function, Gpc3 and Gpc4, and two other putative genes of unknown function. There are no non-synonymous polymorphisms in any of these genes, indicating that the QTL affects gene regulation. Mice carrying the high-growth QTL allele have approximately 15% lower Gpc3 mRNA expression in kidney and liver, whereas expression differences at Gpc4 are non-significant. Expression profiles of the two other genes within the region are inconsistent with a factor responsible for a general effect on growth. Polymorphisms in the 3' untranslated region of Gpc3 are strong candidates for the causal sequence variation. Gpc3 loss-of-function mutations in humans and mice cause overgrowth and developmental abnormalities. However, no deleterious side-effects were detected in our mice, indicating that genes involved in Mendelian diseases also contribute to complex trait variation. Furthermore, these findings show that small changes in gene expression can have substantial phenotypic effects.

  2. P-Selectin preserves immune tolerance in mice and is reduced in human cutaneous lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Tajuelo, Rafael; Silván, Javier; Pérez-Frías, Alicia; de la Fuente-Fernández, María; Tejedor, Reyes; Espartero-Santos, Marina; Vicente-Rabaneda, Esther; Juarranz, Ángeles; Muñoz-Calleja, Cecilia; Castañeda, Santos; Gamallo, Carlos; Urzainqui, Ana

    2017-02-02

    Mice deficient in P-Selectin presented altered immunity/tolerance balance. We have observed that the absence of P-Selectin promotes splenomegaly with reduced naïve T cell population, elevated activated/effector T cell subset, increased germinal center B and Tfh populations and high production of autoreactive antibodies. Moreover, 1.5-3-month-old P-selectin KO mice showed reduced IL-10-producing leukocytes in blood and a slightly reduced Treg population in the skin. With aging and, coinciding with disease severity, there is an increase in the IL17(+) circulating and dermal T cell subpopulations and reduction of dermal Treg. As a consequence, P-Selectin deficient mice developed a progressive autoimmune syndrome showing skin alterations characteristic of lupus prone mice and elevated circulating autoantibodies, including anti-dsDNA. Similar to human SLE, disease pathogenesis was characterized by deposition of immune complexes in the dermoepidermal junction and renal glomeruli, and a complex pattern of autoantibodies. More important, skin biopsies of cutaneous lupus erythematosus patients did not show increased expression of P-Selectin, as described for other inflammatory diseases, and the number of vessels expressing P-Selectin was reduced.

  3. Brain-Specific Superoxide Dismutase 2 Deficiency Causes Perinatal Death with Spongiform Encephalopathy in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izuo, Naotaka; Nojiri, Hidetoshi; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Noda, Yoshihiro; Kawakami, Satoru; Kojima, Shuji; Sasaki, Toru; Shirasawa, Takuji; Shimizu, Takahiko

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is believed to greatly contribute to the pathogenesis of various diseases, including neurodegeneration. Impairment of mitochondrial energy production and increased mitochondrial oxidative damage are considered early pathological events that lead to neurodegeneration. Manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD, SOD2) is a mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme that converts toxic superoxide to hydrogen peroxide. To investigate the pathological role of mitochondrial oxidative stress in the central nervous system, we generated brain-specific SOD2-deficient mice (B-Sod2(-/-)) using nestin-Cre-loxp system. B-Sod2(-/-) showed perinatal death, along with severe growth retardation. Interestingly, these mice exhibited spongiform neurodegeneration in motor cortex, hippocampus, and brainstem, accompanied by gliosis. In addition, the mutant mice had markedly decreased mitochondrial complex II activity, but not complex I or IV, in the brain based on enzyme histochemistry. Furthermore, brain lipid peroxidation was significantly increased in the B-Sod2(-/-), without any compensatory alterations of the activities of other antioxidative enzymes, such as catalase or glutathione peroxidase. These results suggest that SOD2 protects the neural system from oxidative stress in the perinatal stage and is essential for infant survival and central neural function in mice.

  4. Brain-Specific Superoxide Dismutase 2 Deficiency Causes Perinatal Death with Spongiform Encephalopathy in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naotaka Izuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is believed to greatly contribute to the pathogenesis of various diseases, including neurodegeneration. Impairment of mitochondrial energy production and increased mitochondrial oxidative damage are considered early pathological events that lead to neurodegeneration. Manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD, SOD2 is a mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme that converts toxic superoxide to hydrogen peroxide. To investigate the pathological role of mitochondrial oxidative stress in the central nervous system, we generated brain-specific SOD2-deficient mice (B-Sod2−/− using nestin-Cre-loxp system. B-Sod2−/− showed perinatal death, along with severe growth retardation. Interestingly, these mice exhibited spongiform neurodegeneration in motor cortex, hippocampus, and brainstem, accompanied by gliosis. In addition, the mutant mice had markedly decreased mitochondrial complex II activity, but not complex I or IV, in the brain based on enzyme histochemistry. Furthermore, brain lipid peroxidation was significantly increased in the B-Sod2−/−, without any compensatory alterations of the activities of other antioxidative enzymes, such as catalase or glutathione peroxidase. These results suggest that SOD2 protects the neural system from oxidative stress in the perinatal stage and is essential for infant survival and central neural function in mice.

  5. Producing fully ES cell-derived mice from eight-cell stage embryo injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeChiara, Thomas M; Poueymirou, William T; Auerbach, Wojtek; Frendewey, David; Yancopoulos, George D; Valenzuela, David M

    2010-01-01

    complex genotypes in a defined genetic background directly from engineered ES cells without the need for inefficient and lengthy breeding schemes. Examples include creation of F0 knockout mice from ES cells carrying a homozygous null mutation, and creation of a mouse with a tissue-specific gene inactivation by combining null and floxed conditional alleles for the target gene with a transgenic Cre recombinase allele controlled by a tissue-specific promoter. VelociMice with the combinatorial alleles are ready for immediate phenotypic studies, which greatly accelerates gene function assignment and the creation of valuable models of human disease.

  6. Dystrophin deficiency exacerbates skeletal muscle pathology in dysferlin-null mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Renzhi

    2011-12-01

    -null muscles, suggesting that dysferlin is required for the initial recovery from lengthening contraction-induced muscle injury of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex-compromised muscles. Conclusions The results of our study suggest that dysferlin-mediated membrane repair helps to limit the dystrophic changes in dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle. Dystrophin deficiency unmasks the function of dysferlin in membrane repair during lengthening contractions. Dystrophin/dysferlin-deficient mice provide a very useful model with which to evaluate the effectiveness of therapies designed to treat dysferlin deficiency.

  7. Stable Spirocyclic Meisenheimer Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Guirado

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Meisenheimer complexes are important intermediates in Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution Reactions (SNAr. They are formed by the addition of electron rich species to polynitro aromatic compounds or aromatic compounds with strong electron withdrawing groups. It is possible to distinguish two types of Meisenheimer or σ-complexes, the σHcomplex or σX-complex (also named ipso, depending on the aromatic ring position attacked by the nucleophile (a non-substituted or substituted one, respectively. Special examples of σX- or ipso-complexes are formed through intermediate spiro adducts, via intramolecular SNAr. Some of these spirocyclic Meisenheimer complexes, a type of σXcomplex, are exceptionally stable in solution and/or as solids. They can be isolated and characterized using X-ray, and various spectroscopic techniques such as NMR, UV-Vis, IR, and fluorescence. A few of these stable spirocyclic Meisenheimer complexes are zwitterionic and exhibit interesting photophysical and redox properties. We will review recent advances, synthesis and potential applications of these stable spirocyclic Meisenheimer complexes.

  8. Selenophene transition metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Carter James [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1994-07-27

    This research shows that selenophene transition metal complexes have a chemistry that is similar to their thiophene analogs. Selenophene coordination has been demonstrated and confirmed by molecular structure in both the η5- and the η1(Se)-coordination modes. The reaction chemistry of selenophene complexes closely resembles that of the analogous thiophene complexes. One major difference, however, is that selenophene is a better donor ligand than thiophene making the selenophene complexes more stable than the corresponding thiophene complexes. The 77Se NMR chemical shift values for selenophene complexes fall within distinct regions primarily depending on the coordination mode of the selenophene ligand. In the final paper, the C-H bond activation of η1(S)-bound thiophenes, η1(S)-benzothiophene and η1(Se)-bound selenophenes has been demonstrated. The deprotonation and rearrangement of the η1(E)-bound ligand to the carbon bound L-yl complex readily occurs in the presence of base. Reprotonation with a strong acid gives a carbene complex that is unreactive towards nucleophilic attack at the carbene carbon and is stable towards exposure to air. The molecular structure of [Cp(NO)(PPh3)Re(2-benzothioenylcarbene)]O3SCF3 was determined and contains a Re-C bond with substantial double bond character. Methyl substitution for the thienylcarbene or selenylcarbene gives a carbene that rearranges thermally to give back the η1(E)-bound complex. Based on these model reactions, a new mechanism for the H/D exchange of thiophene over the hydrodesulfurization catalyst has been proposed.

  9. The olfactory transcriptomes of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximena Ibarra-Soria

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The olfactory (OR and vomeronasal receptor (VR repertoires are collectively encoded by 1700 genes and pseudogenes in the mouse genome. Most OR and VR genes were identified by comparative genomic techniques and therefore, in many of those cases, only their protein coding sequences are defined. Some also lack experimental support, due in part to the similarity between them and their monogenic, cell-specific expression in olfactory tissues. Here we use deep RNA sequencing, expression microarray and quantitative RT-PCR in both the vomeronasal organ and whole olfactory mucosa to quantify their full transcriptomes in multiple male and female mice. We find evidence of expression for all VR, and almost all OR genes that are annotated as functional in the reference genome, and use the data to generate over 1100 new, multi-exonic, significantly extended receptor gene annotations. We find that OR and VR genes are neither equally nor randomly expressed, but have reproducible distributions of abundance in both tissues. The olfactory transcriptomes are only minimally different between males and females, suggesting altered gene expression at the periphery is unlikely to underpin the striking sexual dimorphism in olfactory-mediated behavior. Finally, we present evidence that hundreds of novel, putatively protein-coding genes are expressed in these highly specialized olfactory tissues, and carry out a proof-of-principle validation. Taken together, these data provide a comprehensive, quantitative catalog of the genes that mediate olfactory perception and pheromone-evoked behavior at the periphery.

  10. Intravenous injections in neonatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombash Lampe, Sara E; Kaspar, Brian K; Foust, Kevin D

    2014-11-11

    Intravenous injection is a clinically applicable manner to deliver therapeutics. For adult rodents and larger animals, intravenous injections are technically feasible and routine. However, some mouse models can have early onset of disease with a rapid progression that makes administration of potential therapies difficult. The temporal (or facial) vein is just anterior to the ear bud in mice and is clearly visible for the first two days after birth on either side of the head using a dissecting microscope. During this window, the temporal vein can be injected with volumes up to 50 μl. The injection is safe and well tolerated by both the pups and the dams. A typical injection procedure is completed within 1-2 min, after which the pup is returned to the home cage. By the third postnatal day the vein is difficult to visualize and the injection procedure becomes technically unreliable. This technique has been used for delivery of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors, which in turn can provide almost body-wide, stable transgene expression for the life of the animal depending on the viral serotype chosen.

  11. Controllability of Complex Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotine, Jean-Jacques

    2013-03-01

    We review recent work on controllability of complex systems. We also discuss the interplay of our results with questions of synchronization, and point out key directions of future research. Work done in collaboration with Yang-Yu Liu, Center for Complex Network Research and Departments of Physics, Computer Science and Biology, Northeastern University and Center for Cancer Systems Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; and Albert-László Barabási, Center for Complex Network Research and Departments of Physics, Computer Science and Biology, Northeastern University; Center for Cancer Systems Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; and Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School.

  12. Managing complex child law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Idamarie Leth

    2017-01-01

    The article reports the findings of a qualitative study of Danish legal regulation of the public initial assessment of children and young persons and municipal practitioners’ decision-making under this regulation. The regulation mirrors new and complex relations between families and society...... in the form of 7 individual vignette interviews with municipal mid-level managers and professional consultants in five Danish municipalities. The study finds that the regulation is more complex than it looks, and that the complexity is handled through simplifying decision-making patterns that can be seen...

  13. Genes influencing circadian differences in blood pressure in hypertensive mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine Z Marques

    Full Text Available Essential hypertension is a common multifactorial heritable condition in which increased sympathetic outflow from the central nervous system is involved in the elevation in blood pressure (BP, as well as the exaggerated morning surge in BP that is a risk factor for myocardial infarction and stroke in hypertensive patients. The Schlager BPH/2J mouse is a genetic model of hypertension in which increased sympathetic outflow from the hypothalamus has an important etiological role in the elevation of BP. Schlager hypertensive mice exhibit a large variation in BP between the active and inactive periods of the day, and also show a morning surge in BP. To investigate the genes responsible for the circadian variation in BP in hypertension, hypothalamic tissue was collected from BPH/2J and normotensive BPN/3J mice at the 'peak' (n = 12 and 'trough' (n = 6 of diurnal BP. Using Affymetrix GeneChip® Mouse Gene 1.0 ST Arrays, validation by quantitative real-time PCR and a statistical method that adjusted for clock genes, we identified 212 hypothalamic genes whose expression differed between 'peak' and 'trough' BP in the hypertensive strain. These included genes with known roles in BP regulation, such as vasopressin, oxytocin and thyrotropin releasing hormone, as well as genes not recognized previously as regulators of BP, including chemokine (C-C motif ligand 19, hypocretin and zinc finger and BTB domain containing 16. Gene ontology analysis showed an enrichment of terms for inflammatory response, mitochondrial proton-transporting ATP synthase complex, structural constituent of ribosome, amongst others. In conclusion, we have identified genes whose expression differs between the peak and trough of 24-hour circadian BP in BPH/2J mice, pointing to mechanisms responsible for diurnal variation in BP. The findings may assist in the elucidation of the mechanism for the morning surge in BP in essential hypertension.

  14. Genes influencing circadian differences in blood pressure in hypertensive mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Francine Z; Campain, Anna E; Davern, Pamela J; Yang, Yee Hwa J; Head, Geoffrey A; Morris, Brian J

    2011-04-26

    Essential hypertension is a common multifactorial heritable condition in which increased sympathetic outflow from the central nervous system is involved in the elevation in blood pressure (BP), as well as the exaggerated morning surge in BP that is a risk factor for myocardial infarction and stroke in hypertensive patients. The Schlager BPH/2J mouse is a genetic model of hypertension in which increased sympathetic outflow from the hypothalamus has an important etiological role in the elevation of BP. Schlager hypertensive mice exhibit a large variation in BP between the active and inactive periods of the day, and also show a morning surge in BP. To investigate the genes responsible for the circadian variation in BP in hypertension, hypothalamic tissue was collected from BPH/2J and normotensive BPN/3J mice at the 'peak' (n = 12) and 'trough' (n = 6) of diurnal BP. Using Affymetrix GeneChip® Mouse Gene 1.0 ST Arrays, validation by quantitative real-time PCR and a statistical method that adjusted for clock genes, we identified 212 hypothalamic genes whose expression differed between 'peak' and 'trough' BP in the hypertensive strain. These included genes with known roles in BP regulation, such as vasopressin, oxytocin and thyrotropin releasing hormone, as well as genes not recognized previously as regulators of BP, including chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 19, hypocretin and zinc finger and BTB domain containing 16. Gene ontology analysis showed an enrichment of terms for inflammatory response, mitochondrial proton-transporting ATP synthase complex, structural constituent of ribosome, amongst others. In conclusion, we have identified genes whose expression differs between the peak and trough of 24-hour circadian BP in BPH/2J mice, pointing to mechanisms responsible for diurnal variation in BP. The findings may assist in the elucidation of the mechanism for the morning surge in BP in essential hypertension.

  15. The Intestinal Flora Is Required to Support Antibody Responses to Systemic Immunization in Infant and Germ Free Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Lamousé-Smith, Esi S.; Alice Tzeng; Starnbach, Michael N.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of a complex and diverse intestinal flora is functionally important for regulating intestinal mucosal immune responses. However, the extent to which a balanced intestinal flora regulates systemic immune responses is still being defined. In order to specifically examine whether the acquisition of a less complex flora influences responses to immunization in the pre-weaning stages of life, we utilize a model in which infant mice acquire an intestinal flora from their mothers that ha...

  16. Zika Infection Shrinks Testicles in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163733.html Zika Infection Shrinks Testicles in Mice Study authors unsure ... 22, 2017 WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Zika virus can be sexually transmitted through semen, and ...

  17. Mice lacking neurofibromin develop gastric hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lu; Chen, Jian; Richardson, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) neoplasms are among many manifestations of the genetic disease neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). However, the physiological and pathological functions of the Nf1 gene in the GI system have not been fully studied, possibly because of a lack of mouse models. In this study, we generated conditional knockout mice with Nf1 deficiency in the GI tract. These mice develop gastric epithelial hyperplasia and inflammation together with increased cell proliferation and apoptosis. The gastric phenotypes observed in these mutant mice seem to be the consequence of loss of Nf1 in gastric fibroblasts, resulting in paracrine hyperactivation of the ERK pathway in the gastric epithelium. These mice provide a useful model to study the pathogenesis of GI lesions in a subset of patients with NF1 and to investigate the role of the Nf1 gene in the development of GI neoplasms. PMID:19661150

  18. Electroencephalographic changes with age in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriou, B E; Zolovick, A J; Elias, M F

    1975-01-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) changes, as measured by the awake state, slow-wave sleep (SWS), rapid-eye movement (REM) patterns and ratio of REM/total sleep, were recorded in aging male mice of DBA/2J and C57BL/6J strains. Results indicate that there is a significant increase in the awake state accompanied by significant decrease in SWS with advancing age for both strains, although these changes appear more pronounced in DBA/2J mice than C57BL/6J mice. Of considerable significance is the finding that REM sleep is absent in mice of DBA/2J strain at 23.5 months of age. Based on these findings, the conclusion was reached that strain DBA/2J ages significantly faster than C57BL/6J. The difference in aging between the two strains emphasizes the need for additional studies dealing with genetic aspects of aging.

  19. mice: Multivariate Imputation by Chained Equations in R

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buuren, Stef; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina Gerarda Maria

    2011-01-01

    The R package mice imputes incomplete multivariate data by chained equations. The software mice 1.0 appeared in the year 2000 as an S-PLUS library, and in 2001 as an R package. mice 1.0 introduced predictor selection, passive imputation and automatic pooling. This article documents mice, which

  20. Responses of Male C57BL/6N Mice to Observing the Euthanasia of Other Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Gregory P; Bottomley, Michael A; Grobe, Nadja

    2016-01-01

    The AVMA Panel on Euthanasia recommends that sensitive animals should not be present during the euthanasia of others, especially of their own species, but does not provide guidelines on how to identify a sensitive species. To determine if mice are a sensitive species we reviewed literature on empathy in mice, and measured the cardiovascular and activity response of mice observing euthanasia of conspecifics. We studied male 16-wk-old C57BL/6N mice and found no increase in cardiovascular parameters or activity in the response of the mice to observing CO2 euthanasia. Mice observing decapitation had an increase in all values, but this was paralleled by a similar increase during mock decapitations in which no animals were handled or euthanized. We conclude that CO2 euthanasia of mice does not have an impact on other mice in the room, and that euthanasia by decapitation likely only has an effect due to the noise of the guillotine. We support the conceptual idea that mice are both a sensitive species and display empathy, but under the controlled circumstances of the euthanasia procedures used in this study there was no signaling of stress to witnessing inhabitants in the room.

  1. Responses of Male C57BL/6N Mice to Observing the Euthanasia of Other Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Gregory P; Bottomley, Michael A; Grobe, Nadja

    2016-01-01

    The AVMA Panel on Euthanasia recommends that sensitive animals should not be present during the euthanasia of others, especially of their own species, but does not provide guidelines on how to identify a sensitive species. To determine if mice are a sensitive species we reviewed literature on empathy in mice, and measured the cardiovascular and activity response of mice observing euthanasia of conspecifics. We studied male 16-wk-old C57BL/6N mice and found no increase in cardiovascular parameters or activity in the response of the mice to observing CO2 euthanasia. Mice observing decapitation had an increase in all values, but this was paralleled by a similar increase during mock decapitations in which no animals were handled or euthanized. We conclude that CO2 euthanasia of mice does not have an impact on other mice in the room, and that euthanasia by decapitation likely only has an effect due to the noise of the guillotine. We support the conceptual idea that mice are both a sensitive species and display empathy, but under the controlled circumstances of the euthanasia procedures used in this study there was no signaling of stress to witnessing inhabitants in the room. PMID:27423146

  2. Metabolic characteristics of long-lived mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej eBartke

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic suppression of insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS can extend longevity in worms, insects, and mammals. In laboratory mice, mutations with the greatest, most consistent, and best documented positive impact on lifespan are those that disrupt growth hormone (GH release or actions. These mutations lead to major alterations in IIS but also have a variety of effects that are not directly related to the actions of insulin or insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1. Long-lived GH-resistant GHRKO mice with targeted disruption of the GH receptor gene, as well as Ames dwarf (Prop1df and Snell dwarf (Pit1dw mice lacking GH (along with prolactin and TSH, are diminutive in size and have major alterations in body composition and metabolic parameters including increased subcutaneous adiposity, increased relative brain weight, small liver, hypoinsulinemia, mild hypoglycemia, increased adiponectin levels and insulin sensitivity, and reduced serum lipids. Body temperature is reduced in Ames, Snell, and female GHRKO mice. Indirect calorimetry revealed that both Ames dwarf and GHRKO mice utilize more oxygen per gram (g of body weight than sex- and age-matched normal animals from the same strain. They also have reduced respiratory quotient (RQ, implying greater reliance on fats, as opposed to carbohydrates, as an energy source. Differences in oxygen consumption (VO2 were seen in animals fed or fasted during the measurements as well as in animals that had been exposed to 30% calorie restriction or every-other-day feeding. However, at the thermoneutral temperature of 30°C, VO2 did not differ between GHRKO and normal mice. Thus, the increased metabolic rate of the GHRKO mice, at a standard animal room temperature of 23°C, is apparently related to increased energy demands for thermoregulation in these diminutive animals. We suspect that increased oxidative metabolism combined with enhanced fatty acid oxidation contribute to the extended longevity of

  3. Pregnant phenotype in aquaporin 8-deficient mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-yan SHA; Zheng-fang XIONG; Hui-shu LIU; Zheng ZHENG; Tong-hui MA

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Aquaporin 8 (AQP8) is expressed within the female reproductive system but its physiological function reminds to be elucidated.This study investigates the role of AQP8 during pregnancy using AQP8-knockout (AQP8-KO) mice.Methods: Homozygous AQP8-KO mice were mated, and the conception rate was recorded. AQP8-KO pregnant mice or their offspring were divided into 5 subgroups according to fetal gestational day (7, 13, 16, 18 GD) and newborn. Wild type C57 pregnant mice served as the control group. The number of pregnant mice, total embryos and atrophic embryos, as well as fetal weight, placental weight and placental area were recorded for each subgroup. The amount of amniotic fluid in each sac at 13, 16, and 18 GD was calculated. Statistical significance was determined by analysis of variance of factorial design and chi-square tests.Results: Conception rates did not differ significantly between AQP8-KO and wild type mice. AQP8-KO pregnant mice had a significantly higher number of embryos compared to wild type controls. Fetal/neonatal weight was also significantly greater in the AQP8-KO group compared to age-matched wild type controls. The amount of amniotic fluid was greater in AQP8-KO pregnant mice than wild type controis, although the FM/AFA (fetal weight/amniotic fluid amount) did not differ. While AQP8-KO placental weight was significantly larger than wild type controls, there was no evidence of placental pathology in either group.Conclusion: The results suggest that AQP8 deficiency plays an important role in pregnancy outcome.

  4. Antifatigue effect of Gracilaria eucheumoides in mice

    OpenAIRE

    SHAO, JIN-TING; Wang, Mei-Yan; ZHENG, LU-BIN

    2013-01-01

    Gracilaria eucheumoides Linn (Gracilariaceae; G. eucheumoides) is abundant in dietary fiber, which aids the clearance of excess cholesterol from the blood and maintains stable blood glucose levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antifatigue effect of G. eucheumoides in mice and the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying this effect. Mice were randomly divided into four groups and three of the groups were administered different doses of G. eucheumoides extract. ...

  5. Dissociation of spontaneous seizures and brainstem seizure thresholds in mice exposed to eight flurothyl-induced generalized seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiyala, Sridhar B; Ferland, Russell J

    2017-03-01

    C57BL/6J mice exposed to eight flurothyl-induced generalized clonic seizures exhibit a change in seizure phenotype following a 28-day incubation period and subsequent flurothyl rechallenge. Mice now develop a complex seizure semiology originating in the forebrain and propagating into the brainstem seizure network (a forebrain→brainstem seizure). In contrast, this phenotype change does not occur in seizure-sensitive DBA/2J mice. The underlying mechanism(s) was the focus of these studies. DBA2/J mice were exposed to eight flurothyl-induced seizures (1/day) followed by 24-hour video-electroencephalographic recordings for 28-days. Forebrain and brainstem seizure thresholds were determined in C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice following one or eight flurothyl-induced seizures, or after eight flurothyl-induced seizures, a 28-day incubation period, and final flurothyl rechallenge. Similar to C57BL/6J mice, DBA2/J mice expressed spontaneous seizures. However, unlike C57BL/6J mice, DBA2/J mice continued to have spontaneous seizures without remission. Because DBA2/J mice do not express forebrain→brainstem seizures following flurothyl rechallenge after a 28-day incubation period, this indicated that spontaneous seizures were not sufficient for the evolution of forebrain→brainstem seizures. Therefore, we determined whether brainstem seizure thresholds were changing during this repeated-flurothyl model and whether this could account for the expression of forebrain→brainstem seizures. Brainstem seizure thresholds were not different between C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice on day one or on the last induction seizure trial (day eight). However, brainstem seizure thresholds did differ significantly on flurothyl rechallenge (day 28) with DBA/2J mice showing no lowering of their brainstem seizure thresholds. These results demonstrated that DBA/2J mice exposed to the repeated-flurothyl model develop spontaneous seizures without evidence of seizure remission and provide a new model of

  6. Injection of recombinant Fc alpha RI/CD89 in mice does not induce mesangial IgA deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Boog, PJM; van Kooten, C; van Zandbergen, G; Klar-Mohamad, N; Oortwijn, B; Bos, NA; van Remoortere, A; Hokke, CH; de Fijter, JW; Daha, MR

    2004-01-01

    Background. Earlier studies have suggested that complexes of the human IgA receptor FcalphaRI/CD89 with mouse IgA are pathogenic upon deposition in the renal mesangium. Transgenic mice expressing FcalphaRI/CD89 on macrophages/monocytes developed massive mesangial IgA deposition and a clinical

  7. IL-1 receptor blockade restores autophagy and reduces inflammation in chronic granulomatous disease in mice and in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luca, A. De; Smeekens, S.P.; Casagrande, A.; Iannitti, R.; Conway, K.L.; Gresnigt, M.S.; Begun, J.; Plantinga, T.S.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Chamilos, G.; Netea, M.G.; Xavier, R.J.; Dinarello, C.A.; Romani, L.; Veerdonk, F.L. van de

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) have a mutated NADPH complex resulting in defective production of reactive oxygen species; these patients can develop severe colitis and are highly susceptible to invasive fungal infection. In NADPH oxidase-deficient mice, autophagy is defective but

  8. Injection of recombinant Fc alpha RI/CD89 in mice does not induce mesangial IgA deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Boog, PJM; van Kooten, C; van Zandbergen, G; Klar-Mohamad, N; Oortwijn, B; Bos, NA; van Remoortere, A; Hokke, CH; de Fijter, JW; Daha, MR

    2004-01-01

    Background. Earlier studies have suggested that complexes of the human IgA receptor FcalphaRI/CD89 with mouse IgA are pathogenic upon deposition in the renal mesangium. Transgenic mice expressing FcalphaRI/CD89 on macrophages/monocytes developed massive mesangial IgA deposition and a clinical pictur

  9. Serum amyloid A regulates monopoiesis in hyperlipidemic Ldlr(-/-) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishack, Paulette A; Sontag, Timothy J; Getz, Godfrey S; Reardon, Catherine A

    2016-08-01

    We previously showed that feeding a Western-type diet (WTD) to Ldlr(-/-) mice lacking serum amyloid A (SAA) (Saa(-/-) Ldlr(-/-) mice), the level of total blood monocytes was higher than in Ldlr(-/-) mice. In this investigation we demonstrate that higher levels of bone marrow monocytes and macrophage-dendritic cell progenitor (MDP) cells were found in WTD-fed Saa(-/-) Ldlr(-/-) mice compared to Ldlr(-/-) mice and lower levels of GMP cells and CMP cells in Ldlr(-/-) mice. These data indicate that SAA regulates the level of bone marrow monocytes and their myeloid progenitors in hyperlipidemic Ldlr(-/-) mice.

  10. Mice deficient in interferon-gamma or interferon-gamma receptor 1 have distinct inflammatory responses to acute viral encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Young Lee

    Full Text Available Interferon (IFN-gamma is an important component of the immune response to viral infections that can have a role both in controlling virus replication and inducing inflammatory damage. To determine the role of IFN-gamma in fatal alphavirus encephalitis, we have compared the responses of wild type C57BL/6 (WTB6 mice with mice deficient in either IFN-gamma (GKO or the alpha-chain of the IFN-gamma receptor (GRKO after intranasal infection with a neuroadapted strain of sindbis virus. Mortalities of GKO and GRKO mice were similar to WTB6 mice. Both GKO and GRKO mice had delayed virus clearance from the brain and spinal cord, more infiltrating perforin(+ cells and lower levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha and interleukin (IL-6 mRNAs than WTB6 mice. However, inflammation was more intense in GRKO mice than WTB6 or GKO mice with more infiltrating CD3(+ T cells, greater expression of major histocompatibility complex-II and higher levels of interleukin-17A mRNA. Fibroblasts from GRKO embryos did not develop an antiviral response after treatment with IFN-gamma, but showed increases in TNF-alpha, IL-6, CXCL9 and CXCL10 mRNAs although these increases developed more slowly and were less intense than those of WTB6 fibroblasts. These data indicate that both GKO and GRKO mice fail to develop an IFN-gamma-mediated antiviral response, but differ in regulation of the inflammatory response to infection. Therefore, GKO and GRKO cannot be considered equivalent when assessing the role of IFN-gamma in CNS viral infections.

  11. Quantum Kolmogorov Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Berthiaume, A; Laplante, S; Berthiaume, Andre; Dam, Wim van; Laplante, Sophie

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we give a definition for quantum Kolmogorov complexity. In the classical setting, the Kolmogorov complexity of a string is the length of the shortest program that can produce this string as its output. It is a measure of the amount of innate randomness (or information) contained in the string. We define the quantum Kolmogorov complexity of a qubit string as the length of the shortest quantum input to a universal quantum Turing machine that produces the initial qubit string with high fidelity. The definition of Vitanyi (Proceedings of the 15th IEEE Annual Conference on Computational Complexity, 2000) measures the amount of classical information, whereas we consider the amount of quantum information in a qubit string. We argue that our definition is natural and is an accurate representation of the amount of quantum information contained in a quantum state.

  12. Complexity for Artificial Substrates (

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loke, L.H.L.; Jachowski, N.R.; Bouma, T.J.; Ladle, R.J.; Todd, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Physical habitat complexity regulates the structure and function of biological communities, although the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain unclear. Urbanisation, pollution, unsustainable resource exploitation and climate change have resulted in the widespread simplification (and loss)

  13. On scattered subword complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Kása, Zoltán

    2011-01-01

    Special scattered subwords, in which the gaps are of length from a given set, are defined. The scattered subword complexity, which is the number of such scattered subwords, is computed for rainbow words.

  14. Complexity for Artificial Substrates (

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loke, L.H.L.; Jachowski, N.R.; Bouma, T.J.; Ladle, R.J.; Todd, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Physical habitat complexity regulates the structure and function of biological communities, although the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain unclear. Urbanisation, pollution, unsustainable resource exploitation and climate change have resulted in the widespread simplification (and loss) o

  15. Beyond complex Langevin equations

    CERN Document Server

    Wosiek, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    A simple integral relation between a complex weight and the corresponding positive distribution is derived by introducing a second complex variable. Together with the positivity and normalizability conditions, this sum rule allows to construct explicitly equivalent pairs of distributions in simple cases. In particular the well known solution for a complex gaussian distribution is generalized to an arbitrary complex slope. This opens a possibility of positive representation of Feynman path integrals directly in the Minkowski time. Such construction is then explicitly carried through in the second part of this presentation. The continuum limit of the new representation exists only if some of the additional couplings tend to infinity and are tuned in a specific way. The approach is then successfully applied to three quantum mechanical examples including a particle in a constant magnetic field -- a simplest prototype of a Wilson line. Further generalizations are shortly discussed and an amusing interpretation of ...

  16. Management recommendations: Tewaukon Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a review of land management practices at the Tewaukon Complex, by a land use specialist. Recommendations, time frame and additional comments are...

  17. Complex coacervate core micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voets, Ilja K; de Keizer, Arie; Cohen Stuart, Martien A

    2009-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of the literature on the co-assembly of neutral-ionic block, graft, and random copolymers with oppositely charged species in aqueous solution. Oppositely charged species include synthetic (co)polymers of various architectures, biopolymers - such as proteins, enzymes and DNA - multivalent ions, metallic nanoparticles, low molecular weight surfactants, polyelectrolyte block copolymer micelles, metallo-supramolecular polymers, equilibrium polymers, etcetera. The resultant structures are termed complex coacervate core/polyion complex/block ionomer complex/interpolyelectrolyte complex micelles (or vesicles); i.e., in short C3Ms (or C3Vs) and PIC, BIC or IPEC micelles (and vesicles). Formation, structure, dynamics, properties, and function will be discussed. We focus on experimental work; theory and modelling will not be discussed. Recent developments in applications and micelles with heterogeneous coronas are emphasized.

  18. Complex Flow Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-05-01

    This report documents findings from a workshop on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales.

  19. A complex legacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Cristopher

    2011-11-01

    In his tragically short life, Alan Turing helped define what computing machines are capable of, and where they reach inherent limits. His legacy is still felt every day, in areas ranging from computational complexity theory to cryptography and quantum computing.

  20. DNA complexes: Durable binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbach, Adam R.

    2011-11-01

    A tetra-intercalator compound that threads through a DNA double-helix to form a remarkably stable complex exhibits an unusual combination of sequence specificity and rapid association yet slow dissociation.

  1. Physical Sciences Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This 88,000 square foot complex is used to investigate basic physical science in support of missile technology development. It incorporates office space, dedicated...

  2. Copper (II) Complex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    Key Words : Histidine, complex compound, acetylacetone, stability constant, ... of a class of chemical compounds called amino acids, which are organic .... Synthesis and techniques in inorganic chemistry W. B. Saunders campany, 2nd Edition.

  3. Low complexity MIMO receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Lin; Yu, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems can increase the spectral efficiency in wireless communications. However, the interference becomes the major drawback that leads to high computational complexity at both transmitter and receiver. In particular, the complexity of MIMO receivers can be prohibitively high. As an efficient mathematical tool to devise low complexity approaches that mitigate the interference in MIMO systems, lattice reduction (LR) has been widely studied and employed over the last decade. The co-authors of this book are world's leading experts on MIMO receivers, and here they share the key findings of their research over years. They detail a range of key techniques for receiver design as multiple transmitted and received signals are available. The authors first introduce the principle of signal detection and the LR in mathematical aspects. They then move on to discuss the use of LR in low complexity MIMO receiver design with respect to different aspects, including uncoded MIMO detection...

  4. Complex Strategic Choices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leleur, Steen

    . Complex Strategic Choices provides clear principles and methods which can guide and support strategic decision making to face the many current challenges. By considering ways in which planning practices can be renewed and exploring the possibilities for acquiring awareness and tools to add value...... and students in the field of planning and decision analysis as well as practitioners dealing with strategic analysis and decision making. More broadly, Complex Strategic Choices acts as guide for professionals and students involved in complex planning tasks across several fields such as business...... to strategic decision making, Complex Strategic Choices presents a methodology which is further illustrated by a number of case studies and example applications. Dr. Techn. Steen Leleur has adapted previously established research based on feedback and input from various conferences, journals and students...

  5. Supporting complex search tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gäde, Maria; Hall, Mark; Huurdeman, Hugo;

    2015-01-01

    There is broad consensus in the field of IR that search is complex in many use cases and applications, both on the Web and in domain specific collections, and both professionally and in our daily life. Yet our understanding of complex search tasks, in comparison to simple look up tasks......, is fragmented at best. The workshop addressed the many open research questions: What are the obvious use cases and applications of complex search? What are essential features of work tasks and search tasks to take into account? And how do these evolve over time? With a multitude of information, varying from...... introductory to specialized, and from authoritative to speculative or opinionated, when to show what sources of information? How does the information seeking process evolve and what are relevant differences between different stages? With complex task and search process management, blending searching, browsing...

  6. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  7. Physical Sciences Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This 88,000 square foot complex is used to investigate basic physical science in support of missile technology development. It incorporates office space, dedicated...

  8. complexes containing isocyanide and

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MR. S. O. OWALUDE

    Synthesis of new ruthenium(II) complexes containing isocyanide and labile nitrile ligands. Owalude,* S. O. ... both compounds has distorted octahedral coordination geometry. Key words: Nitrile ... commercial product from Acros Organics. All.

  9. Complex and unpredictable Cardano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekert, Artur

    2008-08-01

    This purely recreational paper is about one of the most colorful characters of the Italian Renaissance, Girolamo Cardano, and the discovery of two basic ingredients of quantum theory, probability and complex numbers.

  10. Network Complexity of Foodwebs

    CERN Document Server

    Standish, Russell K

    2010-01-01

    In previous work, I have developed an information theoretic complexity measure of networks. When applied to several real world food webs, there is a distinct difference in complexity between the real food web, and randomised control networks obtained by shuffling the network links. One hypothesis is that this complexity surplus represents information captured by the evolutionary process that generated the network. In this paper, I test this idea by applying the same complexity measure to several well-known artificial life models that exhibit ecological networks: Tierra, EcoLab and Webworld. Contrary to what was found in real networks, the artificial life generated foodwebs had little information difference between itself and randomly shuffled versions.

  11. Microsolvation in molecular complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquini, M; Schiccheri, N; Piani, G; Pietraperzia, G; Becucci, M; Castellucci, E [European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS), Polo Scientifico e Tecnologico Universita di Firenze, Via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)], E-mail: gianni.pietraperzia@unifi.it

    2008-11-15

    In this paper, we report the results of our study of the microsolvation process involving the anisole molecule. We are able to study bimolecular complexes of different compositions. Changing the second partner molecule bound to anisole, we observed complexes of different geometries, because of the large variety of interactions possible for the anisole. High-resolution electronic spectroscopy is the best tool to reveal the correct vibrationally (zero-point) averaged geometry of the complex. That is done by analysing the rovibronic structure of the electronic spectra, which are related to the equilibrium geometry of the complex as well as dynamical processes, both in the ground and in the excited state. The interpretation of the experimental results is supported by high-level quantum calculations.

  12. INTERHEMISPHERIC ASYMMETRY OF INDIVIDUAL BEHAVIOR IN MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Mikheev

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of the left and right hemispheres in realization of behavior for SHR, DBA/2 and C57BL/6 males mice in open field was studied. All three lines of mice differed each from other in elements of individual behavior. Comparison of effects of unilateral inactivation in SHR mice revealed domination of the right hemisphere in regulation of total duration of rearings and grooming, the most specialization of hemispheres being registered in regulation of temporary parameters of behavioral reactions. In DBA/2 mice, the left hemisphere dominated in control of rearings, and the right one did on seating. In C57BL/6 mice, the right hemisphere dominated only on locomotion. Therefore, the cortex of the brain (after inactivation did not participate in regulation of individual behavior in the majority of the experiments (11 from 18. In two cases, the symmetric participation of hemispheres in regulation of behavioral reactions was obtained, and in 5 cases, the unilateral domination of hemispheres in control of behavioral elements was registered. Thus, in three lines of mice, the pattern of interhemispheric asymmetry of individual behavior is principally different.

  13. Palmoplantar keratoderma in Slurp2-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Christopher M.; Procaccia, Shiri; Tran, Deanna; Tu, Yiping; Barnes, Richard H.; Larsson, Mikael; Allan, Bernard B.; Young, Lorraine C.; Hong, Cynthia; Tontonoz, Peter; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G.; Beigneux, Anne P.

    2015-01-01

    SLURP1, a member of the Ly6 protein family, is secreted by suprabasal keratinocytes. Mutations in SLURP1 cause a palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) known as mal de Meleda. Another secreted Ly6 protein, SLURP2, is encoded by a gene located ~20 kb downstream from SLURP1. SLURP2 is produced by suprabasal keratinocytes. To investigate the importance of SLURP2, we first examined Slurp2 knockout mice in which exon 2–3 sequences had been replaced with lacZ and neo cassettes. Slurp2−/− mice exhibited hyperkeratosis on the volar surface of the paws (i.e., PPK), increased keratinocyte proliferation, and an accumulation of lipid droplets in the stratum corneum. They also exhibited reduced body weight and hind limb clasping. These phenotypes are very similar to those of Slurp1−/− mice. To solidify a link between Slurp2 deficiency and PPK and to be confident that the disease phenotypes in Slurp2−/− mice were not secondary to the effects of the lacZ and neo cassettes on Slurp1 expression, we created a new line of Slurp2 knockout mice (Slurp2X−/−) in which Slurp2 was inactivated with a simple nonsense mutation. Slurp2X−/− mice exhibited the same disease phenotypes. Thus, Slurp2 deficiency and Slurp1 deficiencies cause the same disease phenotypes. PMID:26967477

  14. Monitoring the CNS pathology in aspartylglucosaminuria mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenhunen, K; Uusitalo, A; Autti, T; Joensuu, R; Kettunen, M; Kauppinen, R A; Ikonen, S; LaMarca, M E; Haltia, M; Ginns, E I; Jalanko, A; Peltonen, L

    1998-12-01

    Aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU) is a recessively inherited lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of the aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA) enzyme. The hallmark of AGU is slowly progressing mental retardation but the progression of brain pathology has remained uncharacterized in humans. Here we describe the long-term follow-up of mice carrying a targeted AGU-mutation in both alleles. Immunohistochemistry, histology, electron microscopy, quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and behavioral studies were carried out to evaluate the CNS affection of the disease during development. The lysosomal storage vacuoles of the AGA -/- mice were most evident in central brain regions where MRI also revealed signs of brain atrophy similar to that seen in the older human patients. By immunohistochemistry and MRI examinations, a subtle delay of myelination was observed in AGA -/- mice. The life span of the AGA -/- mice was not shortened. Similar to the slow clinical course observed in human patients, the AGA -/- mice have behavioral symptoms that emerge at older age. Thus, the AGU knock-out mice represent an accurate model for AGU, both histopathologically and phenotypically.

  15. Upconversion nanoparticles as a contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging in live mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Swarup Kumar; Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; Joseph, James; Lin, Manjing; He, Tingchao; Tong, Yan; Sun, Handong; Yu, Sidney Wing-Kwong; Zhao, Yanli

    2014-08-27

    An inclusion complex of NaYF4 :Yb(3+) ,Er(3+) upconversion nanoparticles with α-cyclodextrin in aqueous conditions exhibits luminescence quenching when excited at 980 nm. This non-radiative relaxation leads to an unprecedented photoacoustic signal enhancement. In vivo localization of α-cyclodextrin-covered NaYF4 :Yb(3+) ,Er(3+) is demonstrated using photoacoustic tomography in live mice, showing its high capability for photoacoustic imaging.

  16. Immunotoxicology in wood mice along a heavy metal pollution gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tersago, Katrien [Department of Biology, Evolutionary Biology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)]. E-mail: katrien.tersago@ua.ac.be; De Coen, Wim [Department of Biology, Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Scheirs, Jan [Department of Biology, Evolutionary Biology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Vermeulen, Katrien [Department of Medicine, Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, University of Antwerp, Antwerp University Hospital, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Blust, Ronny [Department of Biology, Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Bockstaele, Dirk van[Department of Medicine, Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, University of Antwerp, Antwerp University Hospital, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Verhagen, Ron [Department of Biology, Evolutionary Biology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2004-12-01

    We carried out an immunotoxicological field study of wood mice in three populations along a heavy metal pollution gradient. Heavy metal concentrations in liver tissue indicated that exposure to silver, arsenic, cadmium, cobalt and lead decreased with increasing distance from a non-ferrous smelter. Host resistance to the endoparasite Heligmosomoides polygyrus decreased with increasing exposure, while the abundance of tick larvae and the nematode Syphacia stroma was unrelated to heavy metal exposure. Spleen mass was increased at the intermediate and the most polluted sites and was positively correlated with the number of H. polygyrus and tick larvae. Proportion of early apoptotic leukocytes increased towards the smelter and was positively related to cadmium exposure. Red and white blood cell counts and lysozyme activity showed no relationship with metal exposure. All together, our observations suggest negative effects of heavy metal exposure on the immune function of wood mice under field conditions. - Capsule: Complex interactions among metal burden, immune response and parasite burden suggest negative effects of heavy metal exposure on the immune system of wood0011 mi.

  17. Runx1 deficiency predisposes mice to T-lymphoblastic lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Mondira; Compton, Sheila; Garrett-Beal, Lisa; Stacy, Terryl; Starost, Matthew F.; Eckhaus, Michael; Speck, Nancy A.; Liu, P. Paul

    2005-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements affecting RUNX1 and CBFB are common in acute leukemias. These mutations result in the expression of fusion proteins that act dominant-negatively to suppress the normal function of the Runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX)/core binding factor β (CBFβ) complexes. In addition, loss-of-function mutations in Runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) have been identified in sporadic cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and in association with the familial platelet disorder with propensity to develop AML (FPD/AML). In order to examine the hypothesis that decreased gene dosage of RUNX1 may be a critical event in the development of leukemia, we treated chimeric mice generated from Runx1lacZ/lacZ embryonic stem (ES) cells that have homozygous disruption of the Runx1 gene with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU). We observed an increased incidence of T-lymphoblastic lymphoma in Runx1lacZ/lacZ compared with wild-type chimeras and confirmed that the tumors were of ES-cell origin. Our results therefore suggest that deficiency of Runx1 can indeed predispose mice to hematopoietic malignancies. PMID:16051740

  18. Muscular dystrophy in PTFR/cavin-1 null mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shi-Ying; Pilch, Paul F.

    2017-01-01

    ice and humans lacking the caveolae component polymerase I transcription release factor (PTRF, also known as cavin-1) exhibit lipo- and muscular dystrophy. Here we describe the molecular features underlying the muscle phenotype for PTRF/cavin-1 null mice. These animals had a decreased ability to exercise, and exhibited muscle hypertrophy with increased muscle fiber size and muscle mass due, in part, to constitutive activation of the Akt pathway. Their muscles were fibrotic and exhibited impaired membrane integrity accompanied by an apparent compensatory activation of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex along with elevated expression of proteins involved in muscle repair function. Ptrf deletion also caused decreased mitochondrial function, oxygen consumption, and altered myofiber composition. Thus, in addition to compromised adipocyte-related physiology, the absence of PTRF/cavin-1 in mice caused a unique form of muscular dystrophy with a phenotype similar or identical to that seen in humans lacking this protein. Further understanding of this muscular dystrophy model will provide information relevant to the human situation and guidance for potential therapies.

  19. Detection of Dobrava hantavirus RNA in Apodemus mice in Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christova, Iva; Plyusnina, Angelina; Gladnishka, Teodora; Kalvatchev, Nikolay; Trifonova, Iva; Dimitrov, Hristo; Mitkovska, Vesela; Mohareb, Emad; Plyusnin, Alexander

    2015-02-01

    Several Hantaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Europe: Dobrava-Belgrade virus (DOBV), Puumala, Saaremaa, Sochi, and Seoul virus. Although HFRS is endemic in Bulgaria, genome sequences of hantaviruses have never been detected in wild rodents. To identify rodent reservoirs, a total of 691 rodents from three endemic regions were trapped in 2011-2012 and screened by TaqMan RT-PCR for detection of hantaviral genomic RNA. Partial small (S) and/or large (L)-segment sequences were recovered from six Apodemus mice: five of the species A. flavicollis and one A. agrarius. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all recovered sequences belonged to DOBV. On the phylogenetic trees, the novel Bulgarian hantavirus sequences clustered together with sequences of established previously DOBV variants recovered from Bulgarian HFRS patients and also with variants found in wild rodents trapped in Slovenia, Greece, and Slovakia. One of the novel Bulgarian DOBV S-sequences from A. agrarius was related closely to DOBV sequences recovered from A. flavicollis, suggesting a spillover of DOBV from its natural host to A. agrarius mice. The results of this study confirmed the circulation of DOBV in wild rodents in Bulgaria. The complexity of the epidemiological situation in the Balkans requires further studies of hantaviruses in rodent hosts and human HFRS cases.

  20. Brain development is impaired in c-fos -/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Fabiola N; Prucca, César G; Etienne, Olivier; D'Astolfo, Diego S; Silvestre, David C; Boussin, François D; Caputto, Beatriz L

    2015-07-10

    c-Fos is a proto-oncogene involved in diverse cellular functions. Its deregulation has been associated to abnormal development and oncogenic progression. c-fos-/- mice are viable but present a reduction in their body weight and brain size. We examined the importance of c-Fos during neocortex development at 13.5, 14.5 and 16.5 days of gestation. At E14.5, neocortex thickness, apoptosis, mitosis and expression of markers along the different stages of Neural Stem Progenitor Cells (NSPCs) differentiation in c-fos-/- and wild-type mice were analyzed. A ~15% reduction in the neocortex thickness of c-fos-/- embryos was observed which correlates with a decrease in the number of differentiated cells and an increase in apoptosis at the ventricular zone. No difference in mitosis rate was observed, although the mitotic angle was predominantly vertical in c-fos-/- embryos, suggesting a reduced trend of NSPCs to differentiate. At E13.5, changes in differentiation markers start to be apparent and are still clearly observed at E16.5. A tendency of more AP-1/DNA complexes present in nuclear extracts of cerebral cortex from c-fos-/- embryos with no differences in the lipid synthesis activity was found. These results suggest that c-Fos is involved in the normal development of NSPCs by means of its AP-1 activity.

  1. Evaluation of the antinociceptive potential of sodium valproate in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Cristina Chitac

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent research in the field of algesiology demonstrated the existence of several types of pain, with complex mediation cascades. This fact prompted the use of compounds from other drug families than classical analgesics for the treatment of pain. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the antinociceptive action of sodium valproate in mice. This investigation relies on three nociception models that use chemical, thermal, mechanical (pressure stimuli, and a model of acute inflammation induced by carrageenan. The investigations were made using male white Swiss mice, weighing 20-30 grams. Valproate administration has been made orally, using geometric progression dose sequences. According to the statistical analysis, we obtained values of ED50 for sodium valproate for each nociception model as follows: ED50 = 21.773 ± 6.786 mg/kg for the nociception model with Zymosan A, ED50 = 11.807 ± 4.035 mg/kg, for the hot plate test, ED50 = 19.247 ± 2.207 mg/kg for the Randall-Sellitto test. The action of the valproate is explained by the inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines like TNF-D IL1E, IL6 and prostaglandin mediators like PGE2. The experiments were made according to the European and Romanian legislation that concerns working with lab animals.

  2. Complex variable HVPT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killingbeck, John P [Mathematics Department, University of Hull, Hull HU6 7RX (United Kingdom); Grosjean, Alain [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de l' Observatoire de Besancon (CNRS, UPRES-A 6091), 41 bis Avenue de l' Observatoire, BP 1615, 25010 Besancon Cedex (France); Jolicard, Georges [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de l' Observatoire de Besancon (CNRS, UPRES-A 6091), 41 bis Avenue de l' Observatoire, BP 1615, 25010 Besancon Cedex (France)

    2004-08-13

    Complex variable hypervirial perturbation theory is applied to the case of oscillator and Coulomb potentials perturbed by a single term potential of the form Vx{sup n} or Vr{sup n}, respectively. The trial calculations reported show that this approach can produce accurate complex energies for resonant states via a simple and speedy calculation and can also be useful in studies of PT symmetry and tunnelling resonance effects. (addendum)

  3. Electrospun complexes - functionalised nanofibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, T.; Wolf, M.; Dreyer, B.; Unruh, D.; Krüger, C.; Menze, M.; Sindelar, R.; Klingelhöfer, G.; Renz, F.

    2016-12-01

    Here we present a new approach of using iron-complexes in electro-spun fibres. We modify poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) by replacing the methoxy group with Diaminopropane or Ethylenediamine. The complex is bound covalently via an imine-bridge or an amide. The resulting polymer can be used in the electrospinning process without any further modifications in method either as pure reagent or mixed with small amounts of not functionalised polymer resulting in fibres of different qualities (Fig. 1).

  4. Electrospun complexes - functionalised nanofibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, T.; Wolf, M.; Dreyer, B.; Unruh, D.; Krüger, C.; Menze, M. [Leibniz University Hannover, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry (Germany); Sindelar, R. [University of Applied Science Hannover, Faculty II (Germany); Klingelhöfer, G. [Gutenberg-University, Institute of Inorganic and Analytic Chemistry (Germany); Renz, F., E-mail: renz@acd.uni-hannover.de [Leibniz University Hannover, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Here we present a new approach of using iron-complexes in electro-spun fibres. We modify poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) by replacing the methoxy group with Diaminopropane or Ethylenediamine. The complex is bound covalently via an imine-bridge or an amide. The resulting polymer can be used in the electrospinning process without any further modifications in method either as pure reagent or mixed with small amounts of not functionalised polymer resulting in fibres of different qualities (Fig. 1).

  5. Complex/Symplectic Mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Chuang, W; Tomasiello, A; Chuang, Wu-yen; Kachru, Shamit; Tomasiello, Alessandro

    2005-01-01

    We construct a class of symplectic non--Kaehler and complex non--Kaehler string theory vacua, extending and providing evidence for an earlier suggestion by Polchinski and Strominger. The class admits a mirror pairing by construction. Comparing hints from a variety of sources, including ten--dimensional supergravity and KK reduction on SU(3)--structure manifolds, suggests a picture in which string theory extends Reid's fantasy to connect classes of both complex non-Kaehler and symplectic non-Kaehler manifolds.

  6. Quantum Hamiltonian Complexity

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Constraint satisfaction problems are a central pillar of modern computational complexity theory. This survey provides an introduction to the rapidly growing field of Quantum Hamiltonian Complexity, which includes the study of quantum constraint satisfaction problems. Over the past decade and a half, this field has witnessed fundamental breakthroughs, ranging from the establishment of a "Quantum Cook-Levin Theorem" to deep insights into the structure of 1D low-temperature quantum systems via s...

  7. Conversation, coupling and complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Abney, Drew; Bahrami, Bahador;

    We investigate the linguistic co-construction of interpersonal synergies. By applying a measure of coupling between complex systems to an experimentally elicited corpus of joint decision dialogues, we show that interlocutors’ linguistic behavior displays increasing signature of multi-scale coupling......, known as complexity matching, over the course of interaction. Furthermore, we show that stronger coupling corresponds with more effective interaction, as measured by collective task performance....

  8. Provability, complexity, grammars

    CERN Document Server

    Beklemishev, Lev; Vereshchagin, Nikolai

    1999-01-01

    The book contains English translations of three outstanding dissertations in mathematical logic and complexity theory. L. Beklemishev proves that all provability logics must belong to one of the four previously known classes. The dissertation of M. Pentus proves the Chomsky conjecture about the equivalence of two approaches to formal languages: the Chomsky hierarchy and the Lambek calculus. The dissertation of N. Vereshchagin describes a general framework for criteria of reversability in complexity theory.

  9. An erupted complex odontoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozoglu, Sinan; Yildirim, Umran; Buyukkurt, M Cemil

    2010-01-01

    Odontomas are benign tumors of odontogenic origin. The cause of the odontoma is unknown, but it is believed to be hereditary or due to a disturbance in tooth development triggered by trauma or infection. Odontomas may be either compound or complex. Although these tumors are seen frequently, erupted odontomas are rare. The purpose of this study is to present a rare case of complex odontoma that erupted into the oral cavity.

  10. Advances in network complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Dehmer, Matthias; Emmert-Streib, Frank

    2013-01-01

    A well-balanced overview of mathematical approaches to describe complex systems, ranging from chemical reactions to gene regulation networks, from ecological systems to examples from social sciences. Matthias Dehmer and Abbe Mowshowitz, a well-known pioneer in the field, co-edit this volume and are careful to include not only classical but also non-classical approaches so as to ensure topicality. Overall, a valuable addition to the literature and a must-have for anyone dealing with complex systems.

  11. MANAGEMENT OF SPORT COMPLEXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian STAN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The actuality of the investigated theme. Nowadays, human evolution, including his intellectual development, proves the fact that especially the creation manpower and the employment was the solution of all life’s ambitions in society. So, the fact is that in reality, man is the most important capital of the society. Also, in an individual’s life, the practice of sport plays a significant role and that’s why the initiation, the launch and the management of sports complexes activity reveal the existence of specific management features that we will identify and explain in the current study. The aim of the research refers to the elaboration of a theoretical base of the management of the sport complexes, to the pointing of the factors that influence the efficient existence and function of a sport complex in our country and to the determination of the responsibilities that have a manager who directs successfully the activity of the sport complexes. The investigation is based on theoretical methods, such as: scientific documentation, analysis, synthesis, comparison and on empirical research methods, like: study of researched literature and observation. The results of the research indicate the fact that the profitability of a sport complex must assure a particular structure to avoid the bankruptcy risk and also, that the administration of the sport complexes activity must keep in view the reliable functions of the contemporaneous management.

  12. Of mice and men: molecular genetics of congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Troels Askhøj; Troelsen, Karin de Linde Lind; Larsen, Lars Allan

    2014-04-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) affects nearly 1 % of the population. It is a complex disease, which may be caused by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Studies in human genetics have led to the identification of more than 50 human genes, involved in isolated CHD or genetic syndromes, where CHD is part of the phenotype. Furthermore, mapping of genomic copy number variants and exome sequencing of CHD patients have led to the identification of a large number of candidate disease genes. Experiments in animal models, particularly in mice, have been used to verify human disease genes and to gain further insight into the molecular pathology behind CHD. The picture emerging from these studies suggest that genetic lesions associated with CHD affect a broad range of cellular signaling components, from ligands and receptors, across down-stream effector molecules to transcription factors and co-factors, including chromatin modifiers.

  13. Disruption of nesprin-1 produces an Emery Dreifuss muscular dystrophy-like phenotype in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckelwartz, Megan J.; Kessler, Eric; Zhang, Yuan; Hodzic, Didier; Randles, K. Natalie; Morris, Glenn; Earley, Judy U.; Hadhazy, Michele; Holaska, James M.; Mewborn, Stephanie K.; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the inner nuclear membrane proteins lamins A and C produce cardiac and skeletal muscle dysfunction referred to as Emery Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. Lamins A and C participate in the LINC complex that, along with the nesprin and SUN proteins, LInk the Nucleoskeleton with the Cytoskeleton. Nesprins 1 and 2 are giant spectrin-repeat containing proteins that have large and small forms. The nesprins contain a transmembrane anchor that tethers to the nuclear membrane followed by a short domain that resides within the lumen between the inner and outer nuclear membrane. Nesprin’s luminal domain binds directly to SUN proteins. We generated mice where the C-terminus of nesprin-1 was deleted. This strategy produced a protein lacking the transmembrane and luminal domains that together are referred to as the KASH domain. Mice homozygous for this mutation exhibit lethality with approximately half dying at or near birth from respiratory failure. Surviving mice display hindlimb weakness and an abnormal gait. With increasing age, kyphoscoliosis, muscle pathology and cardiac conduction defects develop. The protein components of the LINC complex, including mutant nesprin-1α, lamin A/C and SUN2, are localized at the nuclear membrane in this model. However, the LINC components do not normally associate since coimmunoprecipitation experiments with SUN2 and nesprin reveal that mutant nesprin-1 protein no longer interacts with SUN2. These findings demonstrate the role of the LINC complex, and nesprin-1, in neuromuscular and cardiac disease. PMID:19008300

  14. Modelling Complexity in Musical Rhythm

    OpenAIRE

    Liou, Cheng-Yuan; Wu, Tai-Hei; Lee, Chia-Ying

    2007-01-01

    This paper constructs a tree structure for the music rhythm using the L-system. It models the structure as an automata and derives its complexity. It also solves the complexity for the L-system. This complexity can resolve the similarity between trees. This complexity serves as a measure of psychological complexity for rhythms. It resolves the music complexity of various compositions including the Mozart effect K488. Keyword: music perception, psychological complexity, rhythm, L-system, autom...

  15. Genetic reduction of mitochondrial complex I function does not lead to loss of dopamine neurons in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-Wook; Choi, Won-Seok; Sorscher, Noah; Park, Hyung Joon; Tronche, François; Palmiter, Richard D; Xia, Zhengui

    2015-09-01

    Inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity is hypothesized to be one of the major mechanisms responsible for dopaminergic neuron death in Parkinson's disease. However, loss of complex I activity by systemic deletion of the Ndufs4 gene, one of the subunits comprising complex I, does not cause dopaminergic neuron death in culture. Here, we generated mice with conditional Ndufs4 knockout in dopaminergic neurons (Ndufs4 conditional knockout mice [cKO]) to examine the effect of complex I inhibition on dopaminergic neuron function and survival during aging and on 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) treatment in vivo. Ndufs4 cKO mice did not show enhanced dopaminergic neuron loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta or dopamine-dependent motor deficits over the 24-month life span. These mice were just as susceptible to MPTP as control mice. However, compared with control mice, Ndufs4 cKO mice exhibited an age-dependent reduction of dopamine in the striatum and increased α-synuclein phosphorylation in dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta. We also used an inducible Ndufs4 knockout mouse strain (Ndufs4 inducible knockout) in which Ndufs4 is conditionally deleted in all cells in adult to examine the effect of adult onset, complex I inhibition on MPTP sensitivity of dopaminergic neurons. The Ndufs4 inducible knockout mice exhibited similar sensitivity to MPTP as control littermates. These data suggest that mitochondrial complex I inhibition in dopaminergic neurons does contribute to dopamine loss and the development of α-synuclein pathology. However, it is not sufficient to cause cell-autonomous dopaminergic neuron death during the normal life span of mice. Furthermore, mitochondrial complex I inhibition does not underlie MPTP toxicity in vivo in either cell autonomous or nonautonomous manner. These results provide strong evidence that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity is not sufficient to cause dopaminergic neuron

  16. Brevican-deficient mice display impaired hippocampal CA1 long-term potentiation but show no obvious deficits in learning and memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brakebusch, Cord; Seidenbecher, Constanze I; Asztely, Fredrik

    2002-01-01

    to be less prominent in mutant than in wild-type mice. Brevican-deficient mice showed significant deficits in the maintenance of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). However, no obvious impairment of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission was found, suggesting a complex cause for the LTP defect....... Detailed behavioral analysis revealed no statistically significant deficits in learning and memory. These data indicate that brevican is not crucial for brain development but has restricted structural and functional roles....

  17. Complex formation between human prostate-specific antigen and protease inhibitors in mouse plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekim, Can; Riipi, Tero; Zhu, Lei; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Koistinen, Hannu

    2010-04-01

    When secreted from the prostate, most of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is free and enzymatically active. Upon reaching circulation, active PSA is inactivated by complex formation with protease inhibitors. To justify the use of mouse models for evaluation of the function of PSA and for studies on therapeutic modalities based on modulation of PSA activity, it is important to know whether PSA complexation is similar in mouse and man. To characterize the circulating forms of PSA in mouse, we used subcutaneous LNCaP and 22RV1 human prostate cancer cell xenograft tumor models. We also added PSA directly to mouse serum. Free and total PSA were measured by immunoassay, and PSA complexes were extracted by immunopurification followed by SDS-PAGE, in-gel trypsin digestion and identification of signature peptides by mass spectrometry. In mice bearing xenograft tumors, 68% of the immunoreactive PSA occurred in complex, and when added to mouse serum, over 70% of PSA forms complexes that comprises alpha(2)-macroglobulin and members of the alpha(1)-antitrypsin (AAT) family. In mouse plasma, PSA forms complexes similar to those in man, but the major immunoreactive complex contains AAT rather than alpha(1)-antichymotrypsin, which is the main complex forming serpin in man. The complex formation of PSA produced by xenograft tumor models in mice is similar to that of human prostate tumors with respect to the complexation of PSA. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Preparation and primary biological evaluation of novel nitrido-188Re complexes/lipiodol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guanquan; WEI Hongyuan; LUO Shunzhong; HE Jiaheng; YANG Yuqing; WANG Wenjin; XIONG Xiaoling

    2008-01-01

    Two new nitrido-188Re complexes were prepared by a modified method in high yield.These complexes were stable in vitro.The biodistribution in normal mice showed that these nitrido-188Re complexes could accumulate in liver and dissipate quickly from almost all organs.TAE was performed with the use of lipiodol solutions of two complexes to rabbit VX2 liver tumor models.SPECT images showed that the two lipiodol solutions could remain in tumor for about 9 h (188ReN-NEPTDD/lipiodol) and 12 h (188ReN-NEMMPTDD/Iipiodol),respectively.

  19. D5 dopamine receptor knockout mice and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiwei; Sibley, David R; Jose, Pedro A

    2004-08-01

    Abnormalities in dopamine production and receptor function have been described in human essential hypertension and rodent models of genetic hypertension. All of the five dopamine receptor genes (D1, D2, D3, D4, and D5) expressed in mammals and some of their regulators are in loci linked to hypertension in humans and in rodents. Under normal conditions, D1-like receptors (D1 and D5) inhibit sodium transport in the kidney and the intestine. However, in the Dahl salt-sensitive and spontaneously hypertensive rats, and humans with essential hypertension, the D1-like receptor-mediated inhibition of sodium transport is impaired because of an uncoupling of the D1-like receptor from its G protein/effector complex. The uncoupling is genetic, and receptor-, organ-, and nephron segment-specific. In human essential hypertension, the uncoupling of the D1 receptor from its G protein/effector complex is caused by an agonist-independent serine phosphorylation/desensitization by constitutively active variants of the G protein-coupled receptor kinase type 4. The D5 receptor is also important in blood pressure regulation. Disruption of the D5 or the D1 receptor gene in mice increases blood pressure. However, unlike the D1 receptor, the hypertension in D5 receptor null mice is caused by increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system, apparently due to activation of oxytocin, V1 vasopressin, and non-N-methyl D-aspartate receptors in the central nervous system. The cause of the activation of these receptors remains to be determined.

  20. Functional screening of an asthma QTL in YAC transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symula, Derek J.; Frazer, Kelly A.; Ueda, Yukihiko; Denefle, Patrice; Stevens, Mary E.; Wang, Zhi-En; Locksley, Richard; Rubin, Edward M.

    1999-07-02

    While large numbers of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to genetically complex conditions have been discovered, few causative genes have been identified. This is mainly due to the large size of QTLs and the subtle connection between genotype and quantitative phenotype associated with these conditions. While large numbers of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to genetically complex conditions have been discovered, few causative genes have been identified. This is mainly due to the large size of QTLs and the subtle connection between genotype and quantitative phenotype associated with these conditions. To screen for genes contributing to an asthma QTL mapped to human chromosome 5q33, the authors characterized a panel of large-insert 5q31 transgenics based on studies demonstrating that altering gene dosage frequently affects quantitative phenotypes normally influenced by that gene. This panel of human YAC transgenics, propagating a one megabase interva2048 chromosome 5q31 containing 23 genes, was screened for quantitative changes in several asthma-associated phenotypes. Multiple independent transgenic lines with altered IgE response to antigen treatment shared a 180 kb region containing 5 genes, including human interleukin 4 (IL4) and interleukin 13 (IL13), which induce IgE class switching in B cells5. Further analysis of these mice and mice transgenic for only murine Il4 and Il13 demonstrated that moderate changes in murine Il4 and Il13 expression affect asthma-associated phenotypes in vivo. This functional screen of large-insert transgenics enabled them to sift through multiple genes in the 5q3 asthma QTL without prior consideration of assumed individual gene function and identify genes that influence the QTL phenotype in vivo.

  1. STUDY ON THE ANTI-TUMOR EFFICACY INDUCED BY HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70-PEPTIDE COMPLEXES DERIVED FROM TUMOR CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅庆国; 张玮; 孟凡东; 郭仁宣; 姚振宇

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To study the efficacy and explore the mechanism of the anti-tumor immunity elicited by heat shock protein 70-peptide complexes (HSP70-PC) derived from tumor cells. Methods. Cells culture, flow cytometric analysis, affinity chromatography for protein purification, SDS-PAGE, Western-blotting and animal experiment were used. Results. HSP70-PC immunization rendered protective effect to both naive and tumorl-bearing mice. All of the naive mice obtained complete resistance to Hcaf cell attack; 40% of the tumor-bearing mice survived for over 90 days, whereas the mice of control group died within 2 weeks (P<0.01). CD8+ subset of T lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of immunized mice increased by 12% . Conclusion. HSP70-PC induces anti-tumor immunity via activation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), and it possesses strong tumor vaccine effect. Our research adds more evidence to support the clinical use of HSP70-PC to fight human cancers.

  2. Radiation-induced apoptosis in SCID mice spleen after low dose irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, A.; Kondo, N.; Inaba, H.; Uotani, K.; Kiyohara, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Ohnishi, T.

    To assess the radioadaptive response of the whole body system in mice, we examined the temporal effect of low dose priming as an indicator of challenging irradiation-induced apoptosis through a p53 tumor suppressor protein- mediated signal transduction pathway. The p53 protein also plays an important role both in cell cycle control and DNA repair through cellular signal transduction. Using severe combined immunodeficiency mice defective in DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit, we examined the role of DNA-dependent protein kinase activity in radioadaptation induced by low dose irradiation. Specific pathogen free 5-week-old female severe combined immunodeficiency mice and the parental mice (CB-17 Icr +/ + were irradiated with X-ray at 3.0 C3y at 1, 2, 3 or 4 weeks after the conditioning irradiation at 0.15, 0.30, 0.45 or 0.60 Gy. The mice spleens were fixed for immunohistochemistry 12 h after the challenging irradiation. The p53-dependent apoptosis related Bax proteins on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections were stained by the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex method The apoptosis incidence in the sections was measured by hematoxylin-eosin staining. The frequency of Bax- and apoptosis-positive cells increased up to 12 h after the challenging irradiation in the spleen of both mice. However, these cells were not observed after a low dose irradiation at 0.15-0.60 Gy When pre-irradiation at 0.45 Gy 2 weeks before the challenging irradiation at 3.0 Gy was performed, Bax accumulation and apoptosis induced by challenging irradiation were depressed in the spleens of CB-17 Icr +/ + mice, but not in severe combined immunodeficiency mice. These data suggest that DNA-dependent protein kinase might play a major role in radioadaptation induced by pre-irradiation with a low dose in mice spleen. We expect that the present findings will provide useful information in the health care of space crews.

  3. Low Energy Electron and Nuclear Recoil Thresholds in the DRIFT-II Negative Ion TPC for Dark Matter Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Burgos, S; Forbes, J; Ghag, C; Gold, M; Hagemann, C; Kudryavtsev, V A; Lawson, T B; Loomba, D; Majewski, P; Muna, D; Murphy, A St J; Paling, S M; Petkov, A; Plank, S J S; Robinson, M; Sanghi, N; Snowden-Ifft, D P; Spooner, N J C; Turk, J; Tziaferi, E

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the ability to measure and discriminate particle events at the lowest possible energy is an essential requirement in developing new experiments to search for weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter. In this paper we detail an assessment of the potential sensitivity below 10 keV in the 1 m^3 DRIFT-II directionally sensitive, low pressure, negative ion time projection chamber (NITPC), based on event-by-event track reconstruction and calorimetry in the multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) readout. By application of a digital smoothing polynomial it is shown that the detector is sensitive to sulfur and carbon recoils down to 3.5 and 2.2 keV respectively, and 1.2 keV for electron induced tracks. The energy sensitivity is demonstrated through the 5.9 keV gamma spectrum of 55Fe, where the energy resolution is sufficient to identify the escape peak. In addition to recoil direction reconstruction for WIMP searches this sensitivity suggests new prospects for applications also in KK axion s...

  4. Lovastatin protects against experimental plague in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan Ayyadurai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plague is an ectoparasite-borne deadly infection caused by Yersinia pestis, a bacterium classified among the group A bioterrorism agents. Thousands of deaths are reported every year in some African countries. Tetracyclines and cotrimoxazole are used in the secondary prophylaxis of plague in the case of potential exposure to Y. pestis, but cotrimoxazole-resistant isolates have been reported. There is a need for additional prophylactic measures. We aimed to study the effectiveness of lovastatin, a cholesterol-lowering drug known to alleviate the symptoms of sepsis, for plague prophylaxis in an experimental model. METHODOLOGY: Lovastatin dissolved in Endolipide was intraperitoneally administered to mice (20 mg/kg every day for 6 days prior to a Y. pestis Orientalis biotype challenge. Non-challenged, lovastatin-treated and challenged, untreated mice were also used as control groups in the study. Body weight, physical behavior and death were recorded both prior to infection and for 10 days post-infection. Samples of the blood, lungs and spleen were collected from dead mice for direct microbiological examination, histopathology and culture. The potential antibiotic effect of lovastatin was tested on blood agar plates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Lovastatin had no in-vitro antibiotic effect against Y. pestis. The difference in the mortality between control mice (11/15; 73.5% and lovastatin-treated mice (3/15; 20% was significant (P<0.004; Mantel-Haenszel test. Dead mice exhibited Y. pestis septicemia and inflammatory destruction of lung and spleen tissues not seen in lovastatin-treated surviving mice. These data suggest that lovastatin may help prevent the deadly effects of plague. Field observations are warranted to assess the role of lovastatin in the prophylaxis of human plague.

  5. Dysfunctional dopaminergic neurotransmission in asocial BTBR mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squillace, M; Dodero, L; Federici, M; Migliarini, S; Errico, F; Napolitano, F; Krashia, P; Di Maio, A; Galbusera, A; Bifone, A; Scattoni, M L; Pasqualetti, M; Mercuri, N B; Usiello, A; Gozzi, A

    2014-08-19

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by pronounced social and communication deficits and stereotyped behaviours. Recent psychosocial and neuroimaging studies have highlighted reward-processing deficits and reduced dopamine (DA) mesolimbic circuit reactivity in ASD patients. However, the neurobiological and molecular determinants of these deficits remain undetermined. Mouse models recapitulating ASD-like phenotypes could help generate hypotheses about the origin and neurophysiological underpinnings of clinically relevant traits. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), behavioural and molecular readouts to probe dopamine neurotransmission responsivity in BTBR T(+) Itpr3(tf)/J mice (BTBR), an inbred mouse line widely used to model ASD-like symptoms owing to its robust social and communication deficits, and high level of repetitive stereotyped behaviours. C57BL/6J (B6) mice were used as normosocial reference comparators. DA reuptake inhibition with GBR 12909 produced significant striatal DA release in both strains, but failed to elicit fMRI activation in widespread forebrain areas of BTBR mice, including mesolimbic reward and striatal terminals. In addition, BTBR mice exhibited no appreciable motor responses to GBR 12909. DA D1 receptor-dependent behavioural and signalling responses were found to be unaltered in BTBR mice, whereas dramatic reductions in pre- and postsynaptic DA D2 and adenosine A2A receptor function was observed in these animals. Overall these results document profoundly compromised DA D2-mediated neurotransmission in BTBR mice, a finding that is likely to have a role in the distinctive social and behavioural deficits exhibited by these mice. Our results call for a deeper investigation of the role of dopaminergic dysfunction in mouse lines exhibiting ASD-like phenotypes, and possibly in ASD patient populations.

  6. Wound healing in Mac-1 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Nagaraja, Sridevi; Zhou, Jian; Zhao, Yan; Fine, David; Mitrophanov, Alexander Y; Reifman, Jaques; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2017-05-01

    Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) is a macrophage receptor that plays several critical roles in macrophage recruitment and activation. Because macrophages are essential for proper wound healing, the impact of Mac-1 deficiency on wound healing is of significant interest. Prior studies have shown that Mac-1(-/-) mice exhibit deficits in healing, including delayed wound closure in scalp and ear wounds. This study examined whether Mac-1 deficiency influences wound healing in small excisional and incisional skin wounds. Three millimeter diameter full thickness excisional wounds and incisional wounds were prepared on the dorsal skin of Mac-1 deficient (Mac-1(-/-) ) and wild type (WT) mice, and wound healing outcomes were examined. Mac-1 deficient mice exhibited a normal rate of wound closure, generally normal levels of total collagen, and nearly normal synthesis and distribution of collagens I and III. In incisional wounds, wound breaking strength was similar for Mac-1(-/-) and WT mice. Wounds of Mac-1 deficient mice displayed normal total macrophage content, although macrophage phenotype markers were skewed as compared to WT. Interestingly, amounts of TGF-β1 and its downstream signaling molecules, SMAD2 and SMAD3, were significantly decreased in the wounds of Mac-1 deficient mice compared to WT. The results suggest that Mac-1 deficiency has little impact on the healing of small excisional and incisional wounds. Moreover, the findings demonstrate that the effect of single genetic deficiencies on wound healing may markedly differ among wound models. These conclusions have implications for the interpretation of the many prior studies that utilize a single model system to examine wound healing outcomes in genetically deficient mice. © 2017 by the Wound Healing Society.

  7. Craniofacial Statistical Deformation Models of Wild-type mice and Crouzon mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Darvann, Tron Andre; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2007-01-01

    of Micro CT scannings of the heads of wild-type (normal) mice and Crouzon mice were investigated. Statistical deformation models were built to assess the anatomical differences between the groups, as well as the within-group anatomical variation. Following the approach by Rueckert et al. we built an atlas...

  8. Turbulent complex (dusty) plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Sergey; Schwabe, Mierk

    2017-04-01

    As a paradigm of complex system dynamics, solid particles immersed into a weakly ionized plasma, so called complex (dusty) plasmas, were (and continue to be) a subject of many detailed studies. Special types of dynamical activity have been registered, in particular, spontaneous pairing, entanglement and cooperative action of a great number of particles resulting in formation of vortices, self-propelling, tunneling, and turbulent movements. In the size domain of 1-10 mkm normally used in experiments with complex plasmas, the characteristic dynamic time-scale is of the order of 0.01-0.1 s, and these particles can be visualized individually in real time, providing an atomistic (kinetic) level of investigations. The low-R turbulent flow induced either by the instability in a complex plasma cloud or formed behind a projectile passing through the cloud is a typical scenario. Our simulations showed formation of a fully developed system of vortices and demonstrated that the velocity structure functions scale very close to the theoretical predictions. As an important element of self-organization, cooperative and turbulent particle motions are present in many physical, astrophysical, and biological systems. Therefore, experiments with turbulent wakes and turbulent complex plasma oscillations are a promising mean to observe and study in detail the anomalous transport on the level of individual particles.

  9. Complexity and Dynamical Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence Deacon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We argue that a critical difference distinguishing machines from organisms and computers from brains is not complexity in a structural sense, but a difference in dynamical organization that is not well accounted for by current complexity measures. We propose a measure of the complexity of a system that is largely orthogonal to computational, information theoretic, or thermodynamic conceptions of structural complexity. What we call a system’s dynamical depth is a separate dimension of system complexity that measures the degree to which it exhibits discrete levels of nonlinear dynamical organization in which successive levels are distinguished by local entropy reduction and constraint generation. A system with greater dynamical depth than another consists of a greater number of such nested dynamical levels. Thus, a mechanical or linear thermodynamic system has less dynamical depth than an inorganic self-organized system, which has less dynamical depth than a living system. Including an assessment of dynamical depth can provide a more precise and systematic account of the fundamental difference between inorganic systems (low dynamical depth and living systems (high dynamical depth, irrespective of the number of their parts and the causal relations between them.

  10. Complexity: The bigger picture

    CERN Document Server

    Vicsek, Tamás

    2010-01-01

    If a concept is not well defined, there are grounds for its abuse. This is particularly true of complexity, an inherently interdisciplinary concept that has penetrated very different fields of intellectual activity from physics to linguistics, but with no underlying, unified theory. Complexity has become a popular buzzword used in the hope of gaining attention or funding -- institutes and research networks associated with complex systems grow like mushrooms. Why and how did it happen that this vague notion has become a central motif in modern science? Is it only a fashion, a kind of sociological phenomenon, or is it a sign of a changing paradigm of our perception of the laws of nature and of the approaches required to understand them? Because virtually every real system is inherently extremely complicated, to say that a system is complex is almost an empty statement - couldn't an Institute of Complex Systems just as well be called an Institute for Almost Everything? Despite these valid concerns, the world is ...

  11. Algorithmic Relative Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Cerra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Information content and compression are tightly related concepts that can be addressed through both classical and algorithmic information theories, on the basis of Shannon entropy and Kolmogorov complexity, respectively. The definition of several entities in Kolmogorov’s framework relies upon ideas from classical information theory, and these two approaches share many common traits. In this work, we expand the relations between these two frameworks by introducing algorithmic cross-complexity and relative complexity, counterparts of the cross-entropy and relative entropy (or Kullback-Leibler divergence found in Shannon’s framework. We define the cross-complexity of an object x with respect to another object y as the amount of computational resources needed to specify x in terms of y, and the complexity of x related to y as the compression power which is lost when adopting such a description for x, compared to the shortest representation of x. Properties of analogous quantities in classical information theory hold for these new concepts. As these notions are incomputable, a suitable approximation based upon data compression is derived to enable the application to real data, yielding a divergence measure applicable to any pair of strings. Example applications are outlined, involving authorship attribution and satellite image classification, as well as a comparison to similar established techniques.

  12. Complexity of Economical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Pavlos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study new theoretical concepts are described concerning the interpretation of economical complex dynamics. In addition a summary of an extended algorithm of nonlinear time series analysis is provided which is applied not only in economical time series but also in other physical complex systems (e.g. [22, 24]. In general, Economy is a vast and complicated set of arrangements and actions wherein agents—consumers, firms, banks, investors, government agencies—buy and sell, speculate, trade, oversee, bring products into being, offer services, invest in companies, strategize, explore, forecast, compete, learn, innovate, and adapt. As a result the economic and financial variables such as foreign exchange rates, gross domestic product, interest rates, production, stock market prices and unemployment exhibit large-amplitude and aperiodic fluctuations evident in complex systems. Thus, the Economics can be considered as spatially distributed non-equilibrium complex system, for which new theoretical concepts, such as Tsallis non extensive statistical mechanics and strange dynamics, percolation, nonGaussian, multifractal and multiscale dynamics related to fractional Langevin equations can be used for modeling and understanding of the economical complexity locally or globally.

  13. Projectively related complex Finsler metrics

    CERN Document Server

    Aldea, Nicoleta

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce in study the projectively related complex Finsler metrics. We prove the complex versions of the Rapcs\\'{a}k's theorem and characterize the weakly K\\"{a}hler and generalized Berwald projectively related complex Finsler metrics. The complex version of Hilbert's Fourth Problem is also pointed out. As an application, the projectiveness of a complex Randers metric is described.

  14. Integrin-Linked Kinase in Muscle Is Necessary for the Development of Insulin Resistance in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Li; Mokshagundam, Shilpa; Reuter, Bradley; Lark, Daniel S; Sneddon, Claire C; Hennayake, Chandani; Williams, Ashley S; Bracy, Deanna P; James, Freyja D; Pozzi, Ambra; Zent, Roy; Wasserman, David H

    2016-06-01

    Diet-induced muscle insulin resistance is associated with expansion of extracellular matrix (ECM) components, such as collagens, and the expression of collagen-binding integrin, α2β1. Integrins transduce signals from ECM via their cytoplasmic domains, which bind to intracellular integrin-binding proteins. The integrin-linked kinase (ILK)-PINCH-parvin (IPP) complex interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of β-integrin subunits and is critical for integrin signaling. In this study we defined the role of ILK, a key component of the IPP complex, in diet-induced muscle insulin resistance. Wild-type (ILK(lox/lox)) and muscle-specific ILK-deficient (ILK(lox/lox)HSAcre) mice were fed chow or a high-fat (HF) diet for 16 weeks. Body weight was not different between ILK(lox/lox) and ILK(lox/lox)HSAcre mice. However, HF-fed ILK(lox/lox)HSAcre mice had improved muscle insulin sensitivity relative to HF-fed ILK(lox/lox) mice, as shown by increased rates of glucose infusion, glucose disappearance, and muscle glucose uptake during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Improved muscle insulin action in the HF-fed ILK(lox/lox)HSAcre mice was associated with increased insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt and increased muscle capillarization. These results suggest that ILK expression in muscle is a critical component of diet-induced insulin resistance, which possibly acts by impairing insulin signaling and insulin perfusion through capillaries.

  15. Human invariant chain isoform p35 restores thymic selection and antigen presentation in CD74-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genève, Laetitia; Chemali, Magali; Desjardins, Michel; Labrecque, Nathalie; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2012-10-01

    The invariant chain (Ii) has pleiotropic functions and is a key factor in antigen presentation. Ii associates with major histocompatibility complex class II molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and targets the complex in the endocytic pathway to allow antigenic peptide loading. The human Iip35 isoform includes a cytoplasmic extension containing a di-arginine motif causing ER retention. This minor isoform does not exist in mice and its function in humans has not been thoroughly investigated. We have recently generated transgenic mice expressing Iip35 and these were crossed with Ii-deficient mice to generate animals (Tgp35/mIiKO) expressing exclusively the human isoform. In these mice, we show that Iip35 is expressed in antigen presenting cells and is inducible by interferon gamma (IFN-γ). Despite the low constitutive expression of the protein and some minor differences in the Vβ repertoire of Tgp35/mIiKO mice, Iip35 restored thymic selection of CD4(+) T cells and of invariant natural killer T cells. In vitro functional assays using purified primary macrophages treated with IFN-γ showed that Iip35 allows presentation of an Ii-dependent ovalbumin T-cell epitope. Altogether, our results suggest that Iip35 is functional and does not require co-expression of other isoforms for antigen presentation.

  16. Genetic dissection of medial habenula–interpeduncular nucleus pathway function in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki eKobayashi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The habenular complex linking forebrain and midbrain structures is subdivided into the medial (mHb and the lateral nuclei (lHb