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Sample records for complex formation affects

  1. Say again? How complexity and format of air traffic control instructions affect pilot recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This study compared the recall of ATC information presented in cither grouped or sequential format : in a part-task simulation. It also tested the effect of complexity of ATC clearances on recall, that is, : how many pieces of information a single tr...

  2. Disease-causing mutations affecting surface residues of mitochondrial glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase impair stability, heteromeric complex formation and mitochondria architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiesing, Jessica; Lohmöller, Benjamin; Schweizer, Michaela; Tidow, Henning; Gersting, Søren W; Muntau, Ania C; Braulke, Thomas; Mühlhausen, Chris

    2017-02-01

    The neurometabolic disorder glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1) is caused by mutations in the GCDH gene encoding the mitochondrial matrix protein glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH), which forms homo- and heteromeric complexes. Twenty percent of all pathogenic mutations affect single amino acid residues on the surface of GCDH resulting in a severe clinical phenotype. We report here on heterologous expression studies of 18 missense mutations identified in GA1 patients affecting surface amino acids. Western blot and pulse chase experiments revealed that the stability of half of the GCDH mutants was significantly reduced. In silico analyses showed that none of the mutations impaired the 3D structure of GCDH. Immunofluorescence co-localisation studies in HeLa cells demonstrated that all GCDH mutants were correctly translocated into mitochondria. Surprisingly, the expression of p.Arg88Cys GCDH as well as further substitutions by alanine, lysine, or methionine but not histidine or leucine resulted in the disruption of mitochondrial architecture forming longitudinal structures composed of stacks of cristae and partial loss of the outer mitochondrial membrane. The expression of mitochondrial fusion or fission proteins was not affected in these cells. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer analyses revealed that all GCDH mutants exhibit an increased binding affinity to electron transfer flavoprotein beta, whereas only p.Tyr155His GCDH showed a reduced interaction with dihydrolipoamide succinyl transferase. Our data underscore the impact of GCDH protein interactions mediated by amino acid residues on the surface of GCDH required for proper enzymatic activity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Spray formation with complex fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lustig, S; Rosen, M, E-mail: mrosen@fi.uba.ar [Grupo de Medios Porosos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, LIA (Laboratoire International Associe).Argentina (Argentina)

    2011-05-01

    Droplet formation through Faraday excitation has been tested in the low driving frequency limit. Kerosene was used to model liquid fuel with the addition of PIB in different proportions. All fluids were characterized in detail. The mechanisms of ejection were investigated to identify the relative influence of viscosity and surface tension. It was also possible to characterize the type of instability leading to the emission drop process.

  4. Rapid formation of plasma protein corona critically affects nanoparticle pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenzer, Stefan; Docter, Dominic; Kuharev, Jörg; Musyanovych, Anna; Fetz, Verena; Hecht, Rouven; Schlenk, Florian; Fischer, Dagmar; Kiouptsi, Klytaimnistra; Reinhardt, Christoph; Landfester, Katharina; Schild, Hansjörg; Maskos, Michael; Knauer, Shirley K.; Stauber, Roland H.

    2013-10-01

    In biological fluids, proteins bind to the surface of nanoparticles to form a coating known as the protein corona, which can critically affect the interaction of the nanoparticles with living systems. As physiological systems are highly dynamic, it is important to obtain a time-resolved knowledge of protein-corona formation, development and biological relevancy. Here we show that label-free snapshot proteomics can be used to obtain quantitative time-resolved profiles of human plasma coronas formed on silica and polystyrene nanoparticles of various size and surface functionalization. Complex time- and nanoparticle-specific coronas, which comprise almost 300 different proteins, were found to form rapidly (<0.5 minutes) and, over time, to change significantly in terms of the amount of bound protein, but not in composition. Rapid corona formation is found to affect haemolysis, thrombocyte activation, nanoparticle uptake and endothelial cell death at an early exposure time.

  5. Staphylococcus aureus CcpA affects biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Kati; Goerke, Christiane; Wolz, Christiane; Mack, Dietrich; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte; Bischoff, Markus

    2008-05-01

    Biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus under in vitro growth conditions is generally promoted by high concentrations of sugar and/or salts. The addition of glucose to routinely used complex growth media triggered biofilm formation in S. aureus strain SA113. Deletion of ccpA, coding for the catabolite control protein A (CcpA), which regulates gene expression in response to the carbon source, abolished the capacity of SA113 to form a biofilm under static and flow conditions, while still allowing primary attachment to polystyrene surfaces. This suggested that CcpA mainly affects biofilm accumulation and intercellular aggregation. trans-Complementation of the mutant with the wild-type ccpA allele fully restored the biofilm formation. The biofilm produced by SA113 was susceptible to sodium metaperiodate, DNase I, and proteinase K treatment, indicating the presence of polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA), protein factors, and extracellular DNA (eDNA). The investigation of several factors which were reported to influence biofilm formation in S. aureus (arlRS, mgrA, rbf, sarA, atl, ica, citZ, citB, and cidABC) showed that CcpA up-regulated the transcription of cidA, which was recently shown to contribute to eDNA production. Moreover, we showed that CcpA increased icaA expression and PIA production, presumably over the down-regulation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle genes citB and citZ.

  6. Tuberous sclerosis complex proteins control axon formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yong-Jin; Di Nardo, Alessia; Kramvis, Ioannis; Meikle, Lynsey; Kwiatkowski, David J; Sahin, Mustafa; He, Xi

    2008-09-15

    Axon formation is fundamental for brain development and function. TSC1 and TSC2 are two genes, mutations in which cause tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a disease characterized by tumor predisposition and neurological abnormalities including epilepsy, mental retardation, and autism. Here we show that Tsc1 and Tsc2 have critical functions in mammalian axon formation and growth. Overexpression of Tsc1/Tsc2 suppresses axon formation, whereas a lack of Tsc1 or Tsc2 function induces ectopic axons in vitro and in the mouse brain. Tsc2 is phosphorylated and inhibited in the axon but not dendrites. Inactivation of Tsc1/Tsc2 promotes axonal growth, at least in part, via up-regulation of neuronal polarity SAD kinase, which is also elevated in cortical tubers of a TSC patient. Our results reveal key roles of TSC1/TSC2 in neuronal polarity, suggest a common pathway regulating polarization/growth in neurons and cell size in other tissues, and have implications for the understanding of the pathogenesis of TSC and associated neurological disorders and for axonal regeneration.

  7. Local induction of inflammation affects bone formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413641902; Kruyt, M. C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/258751606; Loozen, L.; Kragten, A. H M; Yuan, H.; Dhert, W. J.; Öner, F. C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/188615326; Alblas, Jacqueline|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/147759234

    2017-01-01

    To explore the influence of inflammatory processes on bone formation, we applied a new in vivo screening model. Confined biological pockets were first created in rabbits as a response to implanted bone cement discs. These biomembrane pockets were subsequently used to study the effects of

  8. Zein/caseinate/pectin complex nanoparticles: Formation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chao; Wang, Taoran; Hu, Qiaobin; Luo, Yangchao

    2017-11-01

    In this study, pectin was used as coating material to form zein/caseinate/pectin complex nanoparticles through pH adjustment and heating treatment for potential oral delivery applications. The preparation conditions were studied by applying heating treatment at different pHs, either the isoelectric point of zein (pH 6.2) or caseinate (pH 4.6), or consecutively at both pHs. The particulate characteristics, including particle size, polydispersity index, and zeta potential were monitored for complex nanoparticles formed under different preparation conditions. The complex nanoparticles generally exhibited particle size smaller than 200nm with narrow distribution, spherical shape, and strong negative charge. Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds were involved in the formation of complex nanoparticles, in addition to electrostatic interactions. Fresh colloidal dispersion and freeze-dried powders varied in their morphology, depending on their preparation conditions. Our results suggested that heating pH and sequence significantly affected the morphology of complex nanoparticles, and pectin coating exerted stabilization effect under simulated gastrointestinal conditions. The present study provides insight into the formation of protein/polysaccharide complex nanoparticles under different preparation conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. How hydroxylation affects hydrogen adsorption and formation on nanosilicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkeni, Boutheïna; Bacchus-Montabonel, Marie-Christine; Bromley, Stefan T.

    2017-06-01

    Silicate dust constitutes one of the primary solid components of the Universe and is thought to be an essential enabler for complex chemistry in a number of astronomical environments. Hydroxylated silicate nanoclusters (MgO)x(SiO2)y(H2O)z, where strongly absorbed water molecules are dissociated on the silicate surface, are likely to be persistent in diffuse clouds. Such precursor species are thus also primary candidates as seeds for the formation and growth of icy dust grains in dense molecular clouds. Using density functional calculations we investigate the reactivity of hydroxylated pyroxene nanoclusters (Mg4Si4O12)(H2O)N (N = 1-4) towards hydrogen physisorption, chemisorption and H2 formation. Our results show that increased hydroxylation leads to a significant reduction in the energy range for the physisorption and chemisorption of single H atoms, when compared to bare silicate grains and bare bulk silicate surfaces. Subsequent chemisorption of a second H atom is, however, little affected by hydroxylation. The H2 reaction barrier for the recombination of two chemisorbed H atoms tends to follow a linear correlation with respect to the 2Hchem binding energy, suggestive of a general Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relation for H2 formation on silicate grains, independent of dust grain size, composition and degree of hydroxylation.

  10. Single site mutations in the hetero-oligomeric Mrp antiporter from alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 that affect Na+/H+ antiport activity, sodium exclusion, individual Mrp protein levels, or Mrp complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, Masato; Natsui, Shinsuke; Ono, Tomohiro; Swartz, Talia H; Krulwich, Terry A; Ito, Masahiro

    2010-10-01

    Mrp systems are widely distributed and structurally complex cation/proton antiporters. Antiport activity requires hetero-oligomeric complexes of all six or seven hydrophobic Mrp proteins (MrpA-MrpG). Here, a panel of site-directed mutants in conserved or proposed motif residues was made in the Mrp Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporter from an alkaliphilic Bacillus. The mutant operons were expressed in antiporter-deficient Escherichia coli KNabc and assessed for antiport properties, support of sodium resistance, membrane levels of each Mrp protein, and presence of monomeric and dimeric Mrp complexes. Antiport did not depend on a VFF motif or a conserved tyrosine pair, but a role for a conserved histidine in a potential quinone binding site of MrpA was supported. The importance of several acidic residues for antiport was confirmed, and the importance of additional residues was demonstrated (e.g. three lysine residues conserved across MrpA, MrpD, and membrane-bound respiratory Complex I subunits (NuoL/M/N)). The results extended indications that MrpE is required for normal membrane levels of other Mrp proteins and for complex formation. Moreover, mutations in several other Mrp proteins lead to greatly reduced membrane levels of MrpE. Thus, changes in either of the two Mrp modules, MrpA-MrpD and MrpE-MrpG, influence the other. Two mutants, MrpB-P37G and MrpC-Q70A, showed a normal phenotype but lacked the MrpA-MrpG monomeric complex while retaining the dimeric hetero-oligomeric complex. Finally, MrpG-P81A and MrpG-P81G mutants exhibited no antiport activity but supported sodium resistance and a low [Na(+)](in). Such mutants could be used to screen hypothesized but uncharacterized sodium efflux functions of Mrp apart from Na(+) (Li(+))/H(+) antiport.

  11. Single Site Mutations in the Hetero-oligomeric Mrp Antiporter from Alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 That Affect Na+/H+ Antiport Activity, Sodium Exclusion, Individual Mrp Protein Levels, or Mrp Complex Formation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, Masato; Natsui, Shinsuke; Ono, Tomohiro; Swartz, Talia H.; Krulwich, Terry A.; Ito, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    Mrp systems are widely distributed and structurally complex cation/proton antiporters. Antiport activity requires hetero-oligomeric complexes of all six or seven hydrophobic Mrp proteins (MrpA–MrpG). Here, a panel of site-directed mutants in conserved or proposed motif residues was made in the Mrp Na+(Li+)/H+ antiporter from an alkaliphilic Bacillus. The mutant operons were expressed in antiporter-deficient Escherichia coli KNabc and assessed for antiport properties, support of sodium resistance, membrane levels of each Mrp protein, and presence of monomeric and dimeric Mrp complexes. Antiport did not depend on a VFF motif or a conserved tyrosine pair, but a role for a conserved histidine in a potential quinone binding site of MrpA was supported. The importance of several acidic residues for antiport was confirmed, and the importance of additional residues was demonstrated (e.g. three lysine residues conserved across MrpA, MrpD, and membrane-bound respiratory Complex I subunits (NuoL/M/N)). The results extended indications that MrpE is required for normal membrane levels of other Mrp proteins and for complex formation. Moreover, mutations in several other Mrp proteins lead to greatly reduced membrane levels of MrpE. Thus, changes in either of the two Mrp modules, MrpA–MrpD and MrpE–MrpG, influence the other. Two mutants, MrpB-P37G and MrpC-Q70A, showed a normal phenotype but lacked the MrpA–MrpG monomeric complex while retaining the dimeric hetero-oligomeric complex. Finally, MrpG-P81A and MrpG-P81G mutants exhibited no antiport activity but supported sodium resistance and a low [Na+]in. Such mutants could be used to screen hypothesized but uncharacterized sodium efflux functions of Mrp apart from Na+ (Li+)/H+ antiport. PMID:20624916

  12. The impact of affective and cognitive focus on attitude formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, H.L. van den; Manstead, A.S.R.; Pligt, J. van der; Wigboldus, D.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    We examined the effects of unobtrusive affective and cognitive focus on attitude formation. To induce focus, participants worked on a word-search puzzle consisting of either affective (e.g., emotion) or cognitive (e.g., reasoning) words. They then read positive and negative affective and cognitive

  13. Complex issues affecting student pharmacist debt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Jeff; Campbell, Tom; Congdon, Heather Brennan; Hancock, Kim; Kaun, Megan; Lockman, Paul R; Evans, R Lee

    2014-09-15

    It is time for colleges and schools of pharmacy to examine and confront the rising costs of pharmacy education and the increasing student loan debt borne by graduates. These phenomena likely result from a variety of complex factors. The academy should begin addressing these issues before pharmacy education becomes cost-prohibitive for future generations. This paper discusses some of the more salient drivers of cost and student debt load and offers suggestions that may help alleviate some of the financial pressures.

  14. Staphylococcus aureus CcpA affects biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    Seidl, K.; Goerke, C; Wolz, C; Mack, D; Berger-Bächi, B; Bischoff, M

    2008-01-01

    Biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus under in vitro growth conditions is generally promoted by high concentrations of sugar and/or salts. The addition of glucose to routinely used complex growth media triggered biofilm formation in S. aureus strain SA113. Deletion of ccpA, coding for the catabolite control protein A (CcpA), which regulates gene expression in response to the carbon source, abolished the capacity of SA113 to form a biofilm under static and flow conditions, while still all...

  15. The types of metanalysis and the formation of complex affixes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ольга Алексеевна Пацюкова

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Two opposite types (regressive and progressive of metanalysis are described in this article. The connection of each type and the formation of complex affixes (prefixes and suffixes is considered.

  16. Liesegang patterns: Complex formation of precipitate in an electric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Formation of 1D Liesegang patterns was studied numerically in precipitation and reversible complex formation of precipitate scenarios in an electric field. The Ostwald's supersaturation model reported by Büki, Kárpáti-Smidróczki and Zrínyi (BKZ model) was extended further. In the presence of an electric field the position of ...

  17. Dynamical complexity in the perception-based network formation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Moon, Eunyoung

    2016-12-01

    Many link formation mechanisms for the evolution of social networks have been successful to reproduce various empirical findings in social networks. However, they have largely ignored the fact that individuals make decisions on whether to create links to other individuals based on cost and benefit of linking, and the fact that individuals may use perception of the network in their decision making. In this paper, we study the evolution of social networks in terms of perception-based strategic link formation. Here each individual has her own perception of the actual network, and uses it to decide whether to create a link to another individual. An individual with the least perception accuracy can benefit from updating her perception using that of the most accurate individual via a new link. This benefit is compared to the cost of linking in decision making. Once a new link is created, it affects the accuracies of other individuals' perceptions, leading to a further evolution of the actual network. As for initial actual networks, we consider both homogeneous and heterogeneous cases. The homogeneous initial actual network is modeled by Erdős-Rényi (ER) random networks, while we take a star network for the heterogeneous case. In any cases, individual perceptions of the actual network are modeled by ER random networks with controllable linking probability. Then the stable link density of the actual network is found to show discontinuous transitions or jumps according to the cost of linking. As the number of jumps is the consequence of the dynamical complexity, we discuss the effect of initial conditions on the number of jumps to find that the dynamical complexity strongly depends on how much individuals initially overestimate or underestimate the link density of the actual network. For the heterogeneous case, the role of the highly connected individual as an information spreader is also discussed.

  18. Investigation of formation constant of complex of a new synthesized ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The complex formation between a newly synthesized tripodal ligand and the cation Cu2+ in water and surfactant media was studied spectrophotometrically using rank annihilation factor analysis (RAFA). According to molar ratio data the stoichiometry of complexation between the ligand and the cation Cu2+ was 1:1.

  19. Single Site Mutations in the Hetero-oligomeric Mrp Antiporter from Alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 That Affect Na+/H+ Antiport Activity, Sodium Exclusion, Individual Mrp Protein Levels, or Mrp Complex Formation*

    OpenAIRE

    Morino, Masato; Natsui, Shinsuke; Ono, Tomohiro; Swartz, Talia H.; Krulwich, Terry A.; Ito, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    Mrp systems are widely distributed and structurally complex cation/proton antiporters. Antiport activity requires hetero-oligomeric complexes of all six or seven hydrophobic Mrp proteins (MrpA–MrpG). Here, a panel of site-directed mutants in conserved or proposed motif residues was made in the Mrp Na+(Li+)/H+ antiporter from an alkaliphilic Bacillus. The mutant operons were expressed in antiporter-deficient Escherichia coli KNabc and assessed for antiport properties, support of sodium resista...

  20. Variants affecting exon skipping contribute to complex traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younghee Lee

    Full Text Available DNA variants that affect alternative splicing and the relative quantities of different gene transcripts have been shown to be risk alleles for some Mendelian diseases. However, for complex traits characterized by a low odds ratio for any single contributing variant, very few studies have investigated the contribution of splicing variants. The overarching goal of this study is to discover and characterize the role that variants affecting alternative splicing may play in the genetic etiology of complex traits, which include a significant number of the common human diseases. Specifically, we hypothesize that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in splicing regulatory elements can be characterized in silico to identify variants affecting splicing, and that these variants may contribute to the etiology of complex diseases as well as the inter-individual variability in the ratios of alternative transcripts. We leverage high-throughput expression profiling to 1 experimentally validate our in silico predictions of skipped exons and 2 characterize the molecular role of intronic genetic variations in alternative splicing events in the context of complex human traits and diseases. We propose that intronic SNPs play a role as genetic regulators within splicing regulatory elements and show that their associated exon skipping events can affect protein domains and structure. We find that SNPs we would predict to affect exon skipping are enriched among the set of SNPs reported to be associated with complex human traits.

  1. Membrane Curvature Affects the Formation of α-Hemolysin Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Satoshi; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2015-07-17

    Membrane proteins perform their functions within or on the lipid membrane, and lipid compositions are known to affect membrane protein integration and activity. Recently, the geometric aspect of membrane curvature was shown to play an important role in membrane protein behavior. Certain membrane proteins are known to sense the curvature of the membrane and to preferentially bind to highly curved membranes. However, although numerous membrane proteins assemble to form homo- or heterocomplexes and perform their biological functions, the dependence of membrane protein assembly on membrane curvature remains elusive. In this study, we analyzed the effect of the membrane curvature on the nanopore formation of α-hemolysin (AH), which is a toxic membrane protein derived from Staphylococcus aureus. The AH protein binds to the membrane as a monomer, assembles to form a heptamer, and forms a nanopore. By simultaneously measuring the molecules bound to the membrane and the activities of the nanopore on the membrane, we determined the nanopore formation ratio of AH. We used various sizes of liposomes and analyzed the dependence on the membrane curvature by using flow cytometry. Combining the results for positive and negative curvature, we found that the nanopore formation ratio of AH was curvature sensitive and was higher in a flat membrane than in a curved membrane. Furthermore, the nanopore formation ratio was almost identical or relatively higher in membranes with negative curvature than those with positive curvature.

  2. Curcumin complexation with cyclodextrins by the autoclave process: Method development and characterization of complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagbani, Turki Al; Nazzal, Sami

    2017-03-30

    One approach to enhance curcumin (CUR) aqueous solubility is to use cyclodextrins (CDs) to form inclusion complexes where CUR is encapsulated as a guest molecule within the internal cavity of the water-soluble CD. Several methods have been reported for the complexation of CUR with CDs. Limited information, however, is available on the use of the autoclave process (AU) in complex formation. The aims of this work were therefore to (1) investigate and evaluate the AU cycle as a complex formation method to enhance CUR solubility; (2) compare the efficacy of the AU process with the freeze-drying (FD) and evaporation (EV) processes in complex formation; and (3) confirm CUR stability by characterizing CUR:CD complexes by NMR, Raman spectroscopy, DSC, and XRD. Significant differences were found in the saturation solubility of CUR from its complexes with CD when prepared by the three complexation methods. The AU yielded a complex with expected chemical and physical fingerprints for a CUR:CD inclusion complex that maintained the chemical integrity and stability of CUR and provided the highest solubility of CUR in water. Physical and chemical characterizations of the AU complexes confirmed the encapsulated of CUR inside the CD cavity and the transformation of the crystalline CUR:CD inclusion complex to an amorphous form. It was concluded that the autoclave process with its short processing time could be used as an alternate and efficient methods for drug:CD complexation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Single gene deletions of mrpA to mrpG and mrpE point mutations affect activity of the Mrp Na+/H+ antiporter of alkaliphilic Bacillus and formation of hetero-oligomeric Mrp complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, Masato; Natsui, Shinsuke; Swartz, Talia H; Krulwich, Terry A; Ito, Masahiro

    2008-06-01

    Mrp antiporters catalyze secondary Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport and/or K(+)/H(+) antiport that is physiologically important in diverse bacteria. An additional capacity for anion flux has been observed for a few systems. Mrp is unique among antiporters in that it requires all six or seven hydrophobic gene products (MrpA to MrpG) of the mrp operon for full antiporter activity, but MrpE has been reported to be dispensable. Here, the membrane complexes formed by Mrp proteins were examined using a cloned mrp operon from alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4. The operon was engineered so that the seven Mrp proteins could be detected in single samples. Membrane extracts of an antiporter-deficient Escherichia coli strain expressing this construct were analyzed by blue native-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Mrp complexes of two sizes were identified containing all seven Mrp proteins. Studies of the single nonpolar mrp gene deletions in the construct showed that a subcomplex of MrpA, MrpB, MrpC, and MrpD was formed in the absence of MrpE, MrpF, or MrpG. By contrast, MrpE, MrpF, and MrpG were not observed in membranes lacking MrpA, MrpB, MrpC, or MrpD. Although MrpA and MrpD have been hypothesized to be the antiporter proteins, the MrpA-to-D complex was inactive. Every Mrp protein was required for an activity level near that of the wild-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporter, but a very low activity level was observed in the absence of MrpE. The introduction of an MrpE(P114G) mutation into the full Mrp complex led to antiport activity with a greatly increased apparent K(m) value for Na(+). The results suggested that interactions among the proteins of heterooligomeric Mrp complexes strongly impact antiporter properties.

  4. Coexistence facilitates interspecific biofilm formation in complex microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Røder, Henriette Lyng; Russel, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    , the underlying role of fundamental ecological factors, specifically coexistence and phylogenetic history, in biofilm formation remains unclear. This study examines how social interactions affect biofilm formation in multi-species co-cultures from five diverse environments. We found prevalence of increased...... biofilm formation among co-cultured bacteria that have coexisted in their original environment. Conversely, when randomly co-culturing bacteria across these five consortia, we found less biofilm induction and a prevalence of biofilm reduction. Reduction in biofilm formation was even more predominant when...... correlated with an increase in planktonic cell numbers, thus implying a behavioral response rather than mere growth competition. Our findings suggest that an increase in biofilm formation is a common adaptive response to long-term coexistence....

  5. How does tidal flow affect pattern formation in mussel beds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherratt, Jonathan A; Mackenzie, Julia J

    2016-10-07

    In the Wadden Sea, mussel beds self-organise into spatial patterns consisting of bands parallel to the shore. A leading explanation for this phenomenon is that mussel aggregation reduces losses from dislodgement and predation, because of the adherence of mussels to one another. Previous mathematical modelling has shown that this can lead to spatial patterning when it is coupled to the advection from the open sea of algae-the main food source for mussels in the Wadden Sea. A complicating factor in this process is that the advection of algae will actually oscillate with the tidal flow. This has been excluded from previous modelling studies, and the present paper concerns the implications of this oscillation for pattern formation. The authors initially consider piecewise constant ("square-tooth") oscillations in advection, which enables analytical investigation of the conditions for pattern formation. They then build on this to study the more realistic case of sinusoidal oscillations. Their analysis shows that future research on the details of pattern formation in mussel beds will require an in-depth understanding of how the tides affect long-range inhibition among mussels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Geology of the Biwabik Iron Formation and Duluth Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsa, Mark A; Miller, James D; Morey, G B

    2008-10-01

    The Biwabik Iron Formation is a approximately 1.9 billion year-old sequence of iron-rich sedimentary rocks that was metamorphosed at its eastern-most extent by approximately 1.1 billion year-old intrusions of the Duluth Complex. The metamorphic recrystallization of iron-formation locally produced iron-rich amphiboles and other fibrous iron-silicate minerals. The presence of these minerals in iron-formation along the eastern part of what is known as the Mesabi Iron Range, and their potential liberation by iron mining has raised environmental health concerns. We describe here the geologic setting and mineralogic composition of the Biwabik Iron Formation in and adjacent to the contact metamorphic aureole of the Duluth Complex. The effects of metamorphism are most pronounced within a few kilometers of the contact, and decrease progressively away from it. The contact aureole has been divided into four metamorphic zones-each characterized by the composition and crystal structure of the metamorphic minerals it contains. The recrystallization of iron-formation to iron-rich amphibole minerals (grunerite and cummingtonite) and iron-pyroxene minerals (hedenbergite and ferrohypersthene) is best developed in zones that are most proximal to the Duluth Complex contact.

  7. Complex Formation Between Iron(III) and Isonicotinohydroxamic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    Nigerian Journal of Basic and Applied Science (2009), 17(2): 181-188. ISSN 0794-5698. Complex Formation Between Iron(III) and ... CONHOH– groups have been extensively studied as a consequence of their biological importance ..... Cruckshank R. (1965) Medical Microbiology. Eds Church and Livingston U.K. pp 75-85.

  8. Complex Formation Between Iron(III) and Isonicotinohydroxamic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    Complex Formation Between Iron(III) and Isonicotinohydroxamic Acid and Its Microbial. Studies. *. 1. A.O. Aliyu and. 2. J.N. Nwabueze. *Department of Chemistry, Nigerian Defence Academy, PMB 2109, Kaduna. Department of Chemistry, University of Abuja, PMB 117, FCT,Abuja, Nigeria. [*Correspondence Address: ...

  9. Terminal tungsten pnictide complex formation through pnictaethynolate decarbonylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joost, Maximilian; Transue, Wesley J; Cummins, Christopher C

    2017-09-26

    Tungsten(iv) tetrakis(2,6-diisopropylphenoxide) (1) has been demonstrated to be a competent platform for decarbonylative formation of anionic terminal pnictide complexes upon treatment with pnictaethynolate anions: cyanate, 2-phosphaethynolate, and 2-arsaethynolate. These transformations constitute the first examples of terminal phosphide and arsenide complex formation at a transition metal center from OCP- and OCAs-, respectively. The phosphide and arsenide complexes are also the first to be isolated in a tetragonal, all-oxygen ligand environment. The scalar NMR coupling constants between tungsten-183 and nitrogen-15 or phosphorus-31 have been measured and contextualized using natural bond orbital (NBO) methods in terms of s orbital character in the σ bonding orbital and pnictide lone pair.

  10. Does saliva composition affect the formation of sialolithiasis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Stine; Homøe, preben; Wagner, Niels

    2017-01-01

    with sialolithiasis and 40 matched healthy controls. Patients were examined before and after sialolithiasis surgery; controls were examined once. Flow rate and the inorganic saliva composition in unstimulated whole saliva were assessed. Patients’ salivary flow prior to surgery was significantly lower compared......Saliva composition may affect sialolithiasis formation; thus, this study compared the salivary inorganic composition of sialolithiasis patients with that of healthy controls, and determined whether salivary inorganic composition changes after sialolithiasis surgery. The study included 40 patients...... to that of healthy controls, but equalised after surgery. Prior to surgery, patients’ saliva exhibited higher concentrations of calcium, magnesium, phosphorous compared to that of healthy controls. The concentration of most ions remained high after sialolithiasis surgery. Sialolithiasis patients had increased...

  11. Environmental layout complexity affects neural activity during navigation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slone, Edward; Burles, Ford; Iaria, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Navigating large-scale surroundings is a fundamental ability. In humans, it is commonly assumed that navigational performance is affected by individual differences, such as age, sex, and cognitive strategies adopted for orientation. We recently showed that the layout of the environment itself also influences how well people are able to find their way within it, yet it remains unclear whether differences in environmental complexity are associated with changes in brain activity during navigation. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate how the brain responds to a change in environmental complexity by asking participants to perform a navigation task in two large-scale virtual environments that differed solely in interconnection density, a measure of complexity defined as the average number of directional choices at decision points. The results showed that navigation in the simpler, less interconnected environment was faster and more accurate relative to the complex environment, and such performance was associated with increased activity in a number of brain areas (i.e. precuneus, retrosplenial cortex, and hippocampus) known to be involved in mental imagery, navigation, and memory. These findings provide novel evidence that environmental complexity not only affects navigational behaviour, but also modulates activity in brain regions that are important for successful orientation and navigation. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Gel phase formation in dilute triblock copolyelectrolyte complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Samanvaya; Andreev, Marat; Levi, Adam E.; Goldfeld, David J.; Mao, Jun; Heller, William T.; Prabhu, Vivek M.; de Pablo, Juan J.; Tirrell, Matthew V.

    2017-02-23

    Assembly of oppositely charged triblock copolyelectrolytes into phase-separated gels at low polymer concentrations (<1% by mass) has been observed in scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. Here we show that in contrast to uncharged, amphiphilic block copolymers that form discrete micelles at low concentrations and enter a phase of strongly interacting micelles in a gradual manner with increasing concentration, the formation of a dilute phase of individual micelles is prevented in polyelectrolyte complexation-driven assembly of triblock copolyelectrolytes. Gel phases form and phase separate almost instantaneously on solvation of the copolymers. Furthermore, molecular models of self-assembly demonstrate the presence of oligo-chain aggregates in early stages of copolyelectrolyte assembly, at experimentally unobservable polymer concentrations. Our discoveries contribute to the fundamental understanding of the structure and pathways of complexation-driven assemblies, and raise intriguing prospects for gel formation at extraordinarily low concentrations, with applications in tissue engineering, agriculture, water purification and theranostics.

  13. SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC STUDIES OF SANGUINARINE-Β-CYCLODEXTRIN COMPLEX FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veaceslav Boldescu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study was to investigate the influence of pH and the presence of hydrophilic polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone on the formation of sanguinarine-β-cyclodextrin (SANG-β-CD inclusion complex. Spectrophotometric studies of the SANG-β-CD systems in the presence and without 0.1 % PVP at the pH 5.0 did not show any evidence of the complex formation. However, the same systems showed several obvious evidences at the pH 8.0: the hyperchromic and the hypochromic effects and the presence of the isosbestic point in the region of 200 – 210 nm. The association constants calculated by three linear methods: Benesi-Hildebrand, Scott and Scatchard, were two times higher for the systems with addition of 0.1% PVP than for the systems without it.

  14. Gel phase formation in dilute triblock copolyelectrolyte complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Samanvaya; Andreev, Marat; Levi, Adam E.; Goldfeld, David J.; Mao, Jun; Heller, William T.; Prabhu, Vivek M.; de Pablo, Juan J.; Tirrell, Matthew V.

    2017-02-01

    Assembly of oppositely charged triblock copolyelectrolytes into phase-separated gels at low polymer concentrations (block copolymers that form discrete micelles at low concentrations and enter a phase of strongly interacting micelles in a gradual manner with increasing concentration, the formation of a dilute phase of individual micelles is prevented in polyelectrolyte complexation-driven assembly of triblock copolyelectrolytes. Gel phases form and phase separate almost instantaneously on solvation of the copolymers. Furthermore, molecular models of self-assembly demonstrate the presence of oligo-chain aggregates in early stages of copolyelectrolyte assembly, at experimentally unobservable polymer concentrations. Our discoveries contribute to the fundamental understanding of the structure and pathways of complexation-driven assemblies, and raise intriguing prospects for gel formation at extraordinarily low concentrations, with applications in tissue engineering, agriculture, water purification and theranostics.

  15. Formation of oxygen complexes in controlled atmosphere at surface ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 29; Issue 5. Formation of oxygen complexes in controlled atmosphere at surface of doped glassy carbon. Aleksandra A Perić-Grujić Tatjana M Vasiljević Olivera M Nešković Miomir V Veljković Zoran V Laušević Mila D Laušević. Ceramics and Glasses Volume 29 Issue ...

  16. Liesegang patterns: Complex formation of precipitate in an electric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    formed precipitate Co(OH)2(s) dissolves due to complex formation in excess ammo- nia. Zrınyi et al [26], Sultan and Panjarian [17] and Hilal and Sultan [27] observed and studied experimentally similar patterns in NaOH/Cr(NO3)3, while Das et al. [28] performed it in KI/HgCl2 system. The aim of this paper is to continue ...

  17. Correlations between community structure and link formation in complex networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Links in complex networks commonly represent specific ties between pairs of nodes, such as protein-protein interactions in biological networks or friendships in social networks. However, understanding the mechanism of link formation in complex networks is a long standing challenge for network analysis and data mining. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Links in complex networks have a tendency to cluster locally and form so-called communities. This widely existed phenomenon reflects some underlying mechanism of link formation. To study the correlations between community structure and link formation, we present a general computational framework including a theory for network partitioning and link probability estimation. Our approach enables us to accurately identify missing links in partially observed networks in an efficient way. The links having high connection likelihoods in the communities reveal that links are formed preferentially to create cliques and accordingly promote the clustering level of the communities. The experimental results verify that such a mechanism can be well captured by our approach. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings provide a new insight into understanding how links are created in the communities. The computational framework opens a wide range of possibilities to develop new approaches and applications, such as community detection and missing link prediction.

  18. Correlations between community structure and link formation in complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; He, Jia-Lin; Kapoor, Komal; Srivastava, Jaideep

    2013-01-01

    Links in complex networks commonly represent specific ties between pairs of nodes, such as protein-protein interactions in biological networks or friendships in social networks. However, understanding the mechanism of link formation in complex networks is a long standing challenge for network analysis and data mining. Links in complex networks have a tendency to cluster locally and form so-called communities. This widely existed phenomenon reflects some underlying mechanism of link formation. To study the correlations between community structure and link formation, we present a general computational framework including a theory for network partitioning and link probability estimation. Our approach enables us to accurately identify missing links in partially observed networks in an efficient way. The links having high connection likelihoods in the communities reveal that links are formed preferentially to create cliques and accordingly promote the clustering level of the communities. The experimental results verify that such a mechanism can be well captured by our approach. Our findings provide a new insight into understanding how links are created in the communities. The computational framework opens a wide range of possibilities to develop new approaches and applications, such as community detection and missing link prediction.

  19. The Dynamics of Coalition Formation on Complex Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, S; Heitzig, J; Kornek, U; Schöll, E; Kurths, J

    2015-08-25

    Complex networks describe the structure of many socio-economic systems. However, in studies of decision-making processes the evolution of the underlying social relations are disregarded. In this report, we aim to understand the formation of self-organizing domains of cooperation ("coalitions") on an acquaintance network. We include both the network's influence on the formation of coalitions and vice versa how the network adapts to the current coalition structure, thus forming a social feedback loop. We increase complexity from simple opinion adaptation processes studied in earlier research to more complex decision-making determined by costs and benefits, and from bilateral to multilateral cooperation. We show how phase transitions emerge from such coevolutionary dynamics, which can be interpreted as processes of great transformations. If the network adaptation rate is high, the social dynamics prevent the formation of a grand coalition and therefore full cooperation. We find some empirical support for our main results: Our model develops a bimodal coalition size distribution over time similar to those found in social structures. Our detection and distinguishing of phase transitions may be exemplary for other models of socio-economic systems with low agent numbers and therefore strong finite-size effects.

  20. Nanoparticle-protein complexes mimicking corona formation in ocular environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Dong Hyun; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Son, Jin Gyeong; Dan, Ki Soon; Song, Sang Hoon; Lee, Tae Geol; Kim, Jeong Hun

    2016-12-01

    Nanoparticles adsorb biomolecules to form corona upon entering the biological environment. In this study, tissue-specific corona formation is provided as a way of controlling protein interaction with nanoparticles in vivo. In the vitreous, the composition of the corona was determined by the electrostatic and hydrophobic properties of the associated proteins, regardless of the material (gold and silica) or size (20- and 100-nm diameter) of the nanoparticles. To control protein adsorption, we pre-incubate 20-nm gold nanoparticles with 5 selectively enriched proteins from the corona, formed in the vitreous, to produce nanoparticle-protein complexes. Compared to bare nanoparticles, nanoparticle-protein complexes demonstrate improved binding to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the vitreous. Furthermore, nanoparticle-protein complexes retain in vitro anti-angiogenic properties of bare nanoparticles. In particular, priming the nanoparticles (gold and silica) with tissue-specific corona proteins allows nanoparticle-protein complexes to exert better in vivo therapeutic effects by higher binding to VEGF than bare nanoparticles. These results suggest that controlled corona formation that mimics in vivo processes may be useful in the therapeutic use of nanomaterials in local environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Aging affects postural tracking of complex visual motion cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotirakis, H; Kyvelidou, A; Mademli, L; Stergiou, N; Hatzitaki, V

    2016-09-01

    Postural tracking of visual motion cues improves perception-action coupling in aging, yet the nature of the visual cues to be tracked is critical for the efficacy of such a paradigm. We investigated how well healthy older (72.45 ± 4.72 years) and young (22.98 ± 2.9 years) adults can follow with their gaze and posture horizontally moving visual target cues of different degree of complexity. Participants tracked continuously for 120 s the motion of a visual target (dot) that oscillated in three different patterns: a simple periodic (simulated by a sine), a more complex (simulated by the Lorenz attractor that is deterministic displaying mathematical chaos) and an ultra-complex random (simulated by surrogating the Lorenz attractor) pattern. The degree of coupling between performance (posture and gaze) and the target motion was quantified in the spectral coherence, gain, phase and cross-approximate entropy (cross-ApEn) between signals. Sway-target coherence decreased as a function of target complexity and was lower for the older compared to the young participants when tracking the chaotic target. On the other hand, gaze-target coherence was not affected by either target complexity or age. Yet, a lower cross-ApEn value when tracking the chaotic stimulus motion revealed a more synchronous gaze-target relationship for both age groups. Results suggest limitations in online visuo-motor processing of complex motion cues and a less efficient exploitation of the body sway dynamics with age. Complex visual motion cues may provide a suitable training stimulus to improve visuo-motor integration and restore sway variability in older adults.

  2. Multicavity formations and complexity modulation in a hyperchaotic discrete system

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shaobo; Banerjee, Santo

    2018-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel and unified approach for controlling the directions and number of cavities of a two dimensional Sine ICMIC modulation map (2D-SIMM). Two controllers are added to the system for arranging the cavity fluctuations and translating the cavities respectively. Both the controllers can effectively redesign the dynamics of reproducing cavities in different directions with grid representations. The dynamics of the proposed controlled model are investigated with bifurcation, Lyapunov and FuzzyEn algorithms under various cavity formations in different directions. A relationship is established for the complexity of the phase space with the directional control and various arrangements of the sinusoidal cavities. The proposed model is overall hyperchaotic with the high complexity in the whole parameter plane. The proposed scheme is effective for a dynamical model to reproduce the self phase structure in various arrangements for the optimization and modulation of complexity.

  3. The ribosome-associated complex antagonizes prion formation in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Alvaro J; Castanzo, Dominic T; Delany, Sean P; Selechnik, Daniel M; van Ooy, Alex; Cameron, Dale M

    2015-01-01

    The number of known fungal proteins capable of switching between alternative stable conformations is steadily increasing, suggesting that a prion-like mechanism may be broadly utilized as a means to propagate altered cellular states. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which cells regulate prion formation and toxicity we examined the role of the yeast ribosome-associated complex (RAC) in modulating both the formation of the [PSI(+)] prion - an alternative conformer of Sup35 protein - and the toxicity of aggregation-prone polypeptides. The Hsp40 RAC chaperone Zuo1 anchors the RAC to ribosomes and stimulates the ATPase activity of the Hsp70 chaperone Ssb. We found that cells lacking Zuo1 are sensitive to over-expression of some aggregation-prone proteins, including the Sup35 prion domain, suggesting that co-translational protein misfolding increases in Δzuo1 strains. Consistent with this finding, Δzuo1 cells exhibit higher frequencies of spontaneous and induced prion formation. Cells expressing mutant forms of Zuo1 lacking either a C-terminal charged region required for ribosome association, or the J-domain responsible for Ssb ATPase stimulation, exhibit similarly high frequencies of prion formation. Our findings are consistent with a role for the RAC in chaperoning nascent Sup35 to regulate folding of the N-terminal prion domain as it emerges from the ribosome.

  4. Multi-Level Formation of Complex Software Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a multi-level formation model for complex software systems. The previous works extract the software systems to software networks for further studies, but usually investigate the software networks at the class level. In contrast to these works, our treatment of software systems as multi-level networks is more realistic. In particular, the software networks are organized by three levels of granularity, which represents the modularity and hierarchy in the formation process of real-world software systems. More importantly, simulations based on this model have generated more realistic structural properties of software networks, such as power-law, clustering and modularization. On the basis of this model, how the structure of software systems effects software design principles is then explored, and it could be helpful for understanding software evolution and software engineering practices.

  5. Network-oriented modeling addressing complexity of cognitive, affective and social interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Treur, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a new approach that can be applied to complex, integrated individual and social human processes. It provides an alternative means of addressing complexity, better suited for its purpose than and effectively complementing traditional strategies involving isolation and separation assumptions. Network-oriented modeling allows high-level cognitive, affective and social models in the form of (cyclic) graphs to be constructed, which can be automatically transformed into executable simulation models. The modeling format used makes it easy to take into account theories and findings about complex cognitive and social processes, which often involve dynamics based on interrelating cycles. Accordingly, it makes it possible to address complex phenomena such as the integration of emotions within cognitive processes of all kinds, of internal simulations of the mental processes of others, and of social phenomena such as shared understandings and collective actions. A variety of sample models – including ...

  6. Characterization of Hydrogen Complex Formation in III-V Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Michael D

    2006-09-28

    Atomic hydrogen has been found to react with some impurity species in semiconductors. Hydrogenation is a methodology for the introduction of atomic hydrogen into the semiconductor for the express purpose of forming complexes within the material. Efforts to develop hydrogenation as an isolation technique for AlGaAs and Si based devices failed to demonstrate its commercial viability. This was due in large measure to the low activation energies of the formed complexes. Recent studies of dopant passivation in long wavelength (0.98 - 1.55m) materials suggested that for the appropriate choice of dopants much higher activation energies can be obtained. This effort studied the formation of these complexes in InP, This material is extensively used in optoelectronics, i.e., lasers, modulators and detectors. The experimental techniques were general to the extent that the results can be applied to other areas such as sensor technology, photovoltaics and to other material systems. The activation energies for the complexes have been determined and are reported in the scientific literature. The hydrogenation process has been shown by us to have a profound effect on the electronic structure of the materials and was thoroughly investigated. The information obtained will be useful in assessing the long term reliability of device structures fabricated using this phenomenon and in determining new device functionalities.

  7. Selenium affects biosilica formation in the demosponge Suberites domuncula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, W.E.G.; Borejko, A.; Brandt, D.; Osinga, R.; Ushijima, H.; Hamer, B.; Krasko, A.; Xupeng, C.; Mueller, I.M.; Schroeder, H.C.

    2005-01-01

    Selenium is a trace element found in freshwater and the marine environment. We show that it plays a major role in spicule formation in the demosponge Suberites domuncula. If added to primmorphs, an in vitro sponge cell culture system, it stimulates the formation of siliceous spicules. Using

  8. Thermodynamics for complex formation between palladium(ii) and oxalate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilný, Radomír; Lubal, Přemysl; Elding, Lars I

    2014-08-28

    Complex formation between [Pd(H2O)4](2+) and oxalate (ox = C2O4(2-)) has been studied spectrophoto-metrically in aqueous solution at variable temperature, ionic strength and pH. Thermodynamic parameters at 298.2 K and 1.00 mol dm(-3) HClO4 ionic medium for the complex formation [Pd(H2O)4](2+) + H2ox ⇄ [Pd(H2O)2(ox)] + 2H3O(+) with equilibrium constant K1,H (in mol dm(-3)) are log10K1,H = 3.38 ± 0.08, ΔH = -33 ± 3 kJ mol(-1), and ΔS = -48 ± 11 J K(-1) mol(-1), as determined from spectrophotometric equilibrium titrations at 15.0, 20.0, 25.0 and 31.0 °C. Thermodynamic overall stability constants β (in (mol dm(-3))(-n), n = 1,2) for [Pd(H2O)2(ox)] and [Pd(ox)2](2-) at zero ionic strength and 298.2 K, defined as the equilibrium constants for the reaction Pd(2+) + nox(2-) ⇄ [Pd(ox)n](2-2n) (water molecules omitted) are log10β = 9.04 ± 0.06 and log10β = 13.1 ± 0.3, respectively, calculated by use of Specific Ion Interaction Theory from spectrophotometric titrations with initial hydrogen ion concentrations of 1.00, 0.100 and 0.0100 mol dm(-3) and ionic strengths of 1.00, 2.00 or 3.00 mol dm(-3). The values derived together with literature data give estimated overall stability constants for Pd(ii) compounds such as [Pd(en)(ox)] and cis-[Pd(NH3)2Cl2], some of them analogs to Pt(ii) complexes used in cancer treatment. The palladium oxalato complexes are significantly more stable than palladium(ii) complexes with monodentate O-bonding ligands. A comparison between several different palladium complexes shows that different parameters contribute to the stability variations observed. These are discussed together with the so-called chelate effect.

  9. Ten-a affects the fusion of central complex primordia in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuebo Cheng

    Full Text Available The central complex of Drosophila melanogaster plays important functions in various behaviors, such as visual and olfactory memory, visual orientation, sleep, and movement control. However little is known about the genes regulating the development of the central complex. Here we report that a mutant gene affecting central complex morphology, cbd (central brain defect, was mapped to ten-a, a type II trans-membrane protein coding gene. Down-regulation of ten-a in pan-neural cells contributed to abnormal morphology of central complex. Over-expression of ten-a by C767-Gal4 was able to partially restore the abnormal central complex morphology in the cbd mutant. Tracking the development of FB primordia revealed that C767-Gal4 labeled interhemispheric junction that separated fan-shaped body precursors at larval stage withdrew to allow the fusion of the precursors. While the C767-Gal4 labeled structure did not withdraw properly and detached from FB primordia, the two fan-shaped body precursors failed to fuse in the cbd mutant. We propose that the withdrawal of C767-Gal4 labeled structure is related to the formation of the fan-shaped body. Our result revealed the function of ten-a in central brain development, and possible cellular mechanism underlying Drosophila fan-shaped body formation.

  10. Adhesion complex formation after small keratectomy wounds in the cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, E L; Kurpakus, M A; Sambol, B; Jones, J C

    1992-02-01

    The adhesion complex of the corneal epithelium consists of the hemidesmosome and its associated structures, such as anchoring filaments, lamina densa of the basement membrane, and anchoring fibrils. It contributes to the adhesion of the corneal epithelium to Bowman's layer. To understand the adhesion complex better, an electron microscopic and immunofluorescence analysis was done of the reformation of the adhesion complex in small (1 mm) keratectomy wounds in the guinea pig cornea. In these wounds, the epithelium, hemidesmosomes, basal lamina, anchoring fibrils, and anterior stroma were removed. The wound bed was epithelialized completely by 24 hr after wounding. Immunofluorescence analyses involved the use of antibodies against plaque components of the hemidesmosome, an antibody against laminin, and an antibody against the collagen VII component of anchoring fibrils. At 18 hr after wounding, there was no morphologic evidence of hemidesmosomes at the epithelial-stromal interface. At 24 hr, hemidesmosomes were observed, with or without subjacent lamina densa. Furthermore, plaque components were detected by immunofluorescence in those cells in contact with the wound bed. In contrast, no type VII collagen was detected. On day 7, collagen VII, laminin, and bullous pemphigoid autoantibody markers colocalized along the wound bed as determined by immunofluorescence. However, at the ultrastructural level, even though the lamina densa of the basal lamina was observed primarily where hemidesmosomes were present, it remained incomplete. In this study, the precise temporal sequence in which components are incorporated into the assembling adhesion complex was described during wound healing. Furthermore, the possibility that the hemidesmosomal plaque nucleates the formation of the underlying basal lamina was discussed.

  11. LuxS-Based Signaling Affects Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Akihiro; Ansai, Toshihiro; Takehara, Tadamichi; Kuramitsu, Howard K.

    2005-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is implicated as a major etiological agent in human dental caries, and one of the important virulence properties of this organism is its ability to form biofilms (dental plaque) on tooth surfaces. We examined the role of autoinducer-2 (AI-2) on S. mutans biofilm formation by constructing a GS-5 luxS-null mutant. Biofilm formation by the luxS mutant in 0.5% sucrose defined medium was found to be markedly attenuated compared to the wild type. Scanning electron microscopy al...

  12. Spontaneous formation of aqueous droplets in complex coacervate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Samim; Prabhu, Vivek

    Complex coacervation occurs when a solution of two oppositely charged polymers undergoes liquid-liquid phase separation under suitable conditions. The coacervate forms the highly viscoelastic polymer-rich phase that exhibits very low interfacial tension with the polymer-poor supernatant. This presentation will describe the spontaneous formation of micron-sized aqueous droplets in the polymer-rich coacervate domain as the temperature of the system is increased above a critical value. The spherical droplets, initiated at the liquid-liquid interface, propagates into the bulk coacervate domain. Moreover, the average size of the droplets increases monotonically with increase in temperature. This results in an optically turbid appearance of the coacervate. We evaluate the role of liquid-liquid interface and polymer structure inside the coacervate phase during such transition using rheological techniques and small-angle neutron scattering. These observations provide a foundation to understand coacervate properties at conditions useful to encapsulation, delivery media, and wet adhesives.

  13. MECHANISM OF FINANCIAL SAFETY FORMATION OF ENTERPRISES OF AGROINDUSTRIAL COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Khomenko

    2016-11-01

    answer their aims. As a result, depending on the worked out strategy of financial safety, it is possible to draw basic directions of guaranteeing his financial safety activity of enterprises of agro-industrial complex. Organizational-economic principles of forming of mechanism of financial safety of agricultural enterprises must be built on the basis of realization of its expressly certain strategy. It, in same queue, must go out from present of their production potential. This strategy is the basic internal reference-point of forming of financial safety of agricultural enterprise that sets the parameters of all her development. Practical implications. On financial safety of enterprises of agro-industrial complex testifies the conducted analysis of scientific researches, that without regard to the wide list of existing in economic literature researches on the mechanism of forming of enterprises’ financial safety, among scientific circles until now there is not a general idea. It requires forming of new knowledge’s in relation to forming of mechanism of enterprise financial safety, where not only the certain state of subject but also dynamic constituent of development must come forward as a priority lever, what is considered in this article. Value/originality. Creation of valuable mechanism of forming of financial safety of agro-industrial enterprises foresees formulation of criteria and principles of providing of financial safety of every enterprise, determinations of priority national interests in a financial sphere, realization of the permanent watching of factors, which cause a threat financial safety, and also acceptance of measures in relation to their warning and overcoming. The formed mechanism of financial safety of the agricultural formations is pre-condition of prevention of financial threats and negative financial phenomena in production activity of the agricultural formations, defence of their financial losses, and in future stabilizing of activity of the

  14. Perioperative conditions affect long-term hypertrophic scar formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veer, W.M.; Ferreira, J.A.; de Jong, E.H.; Molema, G.; Niessen, F.B.

    2010-01-01

    Corticosteroids are widely used as treatment for excessive scarring by intralesional injection with variable success rates. It is conceivable that systemically administered corticosteroids affect a wider range of inflammatory processes that influence wound healing and may be more successful in

  15. Perioperative Conditions Affect Long-term Hypertrophic Scar Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veer, Willem M.; Ferreira, Jose A.; de Jong, Etty H.; Molema, Grietje; Niessen, Frank B.

    Corticosteroids are widely used as treatment for excessive scarring by intralesional injection with variable success rates. It is conceivable that systemically administered corticosteroids affect a wider range of inflammatory processes that influence wound healing and may be more successful in

  16. Complex formation dynamics in a single-molecule electronic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Huimin; Li, Wengang; Chen, Jiewei; He, Gen; Li, Longhua; Olson, Mark A; Sue, Andrew C-H; Stoddart, J Fraser; Guo, Xuefeng

    2016-11-01

    Single-molecule electronic devices offer unique opportunities to investigate the properties of individual molecules that are not accessible in conventional ensemble experiments. However, these investigations remain challenging because they require (i) highly precise device fabrication to incorporate single molecules and (ii) sufficient time resolution to be able to make fast molecular dynamic measurements. We demonstrate a graphene-molecule single-molecule junction that is capable of probing the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of a host-guest complex. By covalently integrating a conjugated molecular wire with a pendent crown ether into graphene point contacts, we can transduce the physical [2]pseudorotaxane (de)formation processes between the electron-rich crown ether and a dicationic guest into real-time electrical signals. The conductance of the single-molecule junction reveals two-level fluctuations that are highly dependent on temperature and solvent environments, affording a nondestructive means of quantitatively determining the binding and rate constants, as well as the activation energies, for host-guest complexes. The thermodynamic processes reveal the host-guest binding to be enthalpy-driven and are consistent with conventional 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments. This electronic device opens up a new route to developing single-molecule dynamics investigations with microsecond resolution for a broad range of chemical and biochemical applications.

  17. The Smart Residential Complex Effect on Personality Formation of Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Kasra Mirpadyab

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between human beings and the environment has been a question of all times; however, the Industrial Revolution has begun to change its way. It can be seen that the human beings were a part of their environment in the past, but now with the advancement of knowledge and technology, the man can dominate in their environment. But today, the man’s needs should be well known about the interaction with the natural environment and with respect to the position of the residential complexes in the modern society, these buildings are designed to create the psychological comfort and the formation of the personality. The authors of this paper believe the mentioned event will be happening in the future generation of the buildings. These buildings will be equipped with smart automation system for all their activities. This research conducted by grounded theories about the explanation of the smart residential complexes equipped with the BMS, which can be effective for shaping the managerial character of the children in their future.

  18. A complex postnatal mental health intervention: Australian translational formative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Heather J; Wynter, Karen H; Burns, Joanna K; Fisher, Jane R W

    2017-08-01

    Reducing the burden of postnatal maternal mental health problems is an international public health priority. We developed What Were We Thinking (WWWT), a psychoeducation programme for primary postnatal health care that addresses known but neglected risks. We then demonstrated evidence of its effects in a before-and-after controlled study in preventing maternal postnatal mental health problems among women without a psychiatric history participating in the intervention compared to usual care (AOR 0.43; 95% CI 0.21, 0.89) when conducted by specialist nurses. Testing its effectiveness when implemented in routine primary care requires changes at practitioner, organizational and health system levels. This paper describes a programme of translational formative evaluation to inform the protocol for a cluster RCT. Following the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) Guidance for evaluating complex interventions, we conducted a translational formative evaluation using mixed methods. Collection and analysis of postnatal health service documents, semi-structured interviews, group discussions and an online survey were used to investigate service provision, consumers' needs and expectations, clinicians' attitudes and clinical practice, and the implications for health service delivery. Participants were expectant parents, health care providers, health service managers and government policy makers. Results documented current clinical practice, staff training needs, necessary service modifications to standardize advice to parents and include fathers, key priorities and drivers of government health policy, and informed a model of costs and expected health and social outcomes. Implementation of WWWT into routine postnatal care requires adjustments to clinical practice. Staff training, modifications to service opening hours and economic implications for the health system also need to be considered. The MRC Guidance for developing and evaluating complex interventions is a useful framework

  19. Do Workplace Sex Ratios Affect Partnership Formation and Dissolution?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svarer, Michael

    In this paper, I analyse the association between workplace sex ratios and partnership formation and dissolution. I find that the risk of dissolution increases with the fraction of coworkers of the opposite sex at both the female and male workplace. On the other hand, workplace sex ratios are not ......In this paper, I analyse the association between workplace sex ratios and partnership formation and dissolution. I find that the risk of dissolution increases with the fraction of coworkers of the opposite sex at both the female and male workplace. On the other hand, workplace sex ratios...... are not important for the overall transition rate from singlehood to partnership. The results suggest that the workplace constitutes a more important marriage market segment for individuals who are already in a partnership presumably due to higher search cost for (alternative) partners in general....

  20. Does Leisure Time as a Stress Coping Resource Increase Affective Complexity? Applying the Dynamic Model of Affect (DMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xinyi (Lisa); Yarnal, Careen M.; Almeida, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Affective complexity, a manifestation of psychological well-being, refers to the relative independence between positive and negative affect (PA, NA). According to the Dynamic Model of Affect (DMA), stressful situations lead to highly inverse PA-NA relationship, reducing affective complexity. Meanwhile, positive events can sustain affective complexity by restoring PA-NA independence. Leisure, a type of positive events, has been identified as a coping resource. This study used the DMA to assess whether leisure time helps restore affective complexity on stressful days. We found that on days with more leisure time than usual, an individual experienced less negative PA-NA relationship after daily stressful events. The finding demonstrates the value of leisure time as a coping resource and the DMA’s contribution to coping research. PMID:24659826

  1. Pore-controlled formation of 0D metal complexes in anionic 3D metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, MW; Bosch, M; Zhou, HC

    2015-01-01

    The host-guest chemistry between a series of anionic MOFs and their trapped counterions was investigated by single crystal XRD. The PCN-514 series contains crystallographically identifiable metal complexes trapped in the pores, where their formation is controlled by the size and shape of the MOF pores. A change in the structure and pore size of PCN-518 indicates that the existence of guest molecules may reciprocally affect the formation of host MOFs.

  2. Integrin activation and focal complex formation in cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser, M.; Willey, C. D.; Jiang, W.; Cooper, G. 4th; Menick, D. R.; Zile, M. R.; Kuppuswamy, D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by both remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and hypertrophic growth of the cardiocytes. Here we show increased expression and cytoskeletal association of the ECM proteins fibronectin and vitronectin in pressure-overloaded feline myocardium. These changes are accompanied by cytoskeletal binding and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr-397 and Tyr-925, c-Src at Tyr-416, recruitment of the adapter proteins p130(Cas), Shc, and Nck, and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinases ERK1/2. A synthetic peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif of fibronectin and vitronectin was used to stimulate adult feline cardiomyocytes cultured on laminin or within a type-I collagen matrix. Whereas cardiocytes under both conditions showed RGD-stimulated ERK1/2 activation, only collagen-embedded cells exhibited cytoskeletal assembly of FAK, c-Src, Nck, and Shc. In RGD-stimulated collagen-embedded cells, FAK was phosphorylated only at Tyr-397 and c-Src association occurred without Tyr-416 phosphorylation and p130(Cas) association. Therefore, c-Src activation is not required for its cytoskeletal binding but may be important for additional phosphorylation of FAK. Overall, our study suggests that multiple signaling pathways originate in pressure-overloaded heart following integrin engagement with ECM proteins, including focal complex formation and ERK1/2 activation, and many of these pathways can be activated in cardiomyocytes via RGD-stimulated integrin activation.

  3. Calcium-phosphate complex increased during subchondral bone remodeling affects earlystage osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Youn-Kwan; Han, Min-Su; Park, Hye-Ri; Lee, Eun-Ju; Jang, Ji-Ae; Kim, Gun-Woo; Lee, Sun-Young; Moon, DaeWon; Han, Seungwoo

    2018-01-11

    An activation of osteoclasts and subchondral bone remodeling is a major histologic feature of early-stage osteoarthritis (OA), which can be accompanied by an increase of calcium (Ca) and phosphate (Pi) level in the subchondral milieu. Considering articular cartilage gets most of nutrition from subchondral bone by diffusion, these micro-environmental changes in subchondral bone can affect the physiology of articular chondrocytes. Here, we have shown that Ca is increased and co-localized with Pi in articular cartilage of early-stage OA. The Ca-Pi complex increased the production of MMP-3 and MMP-13 in the hypertrophic chondrocytes, which was dependent on nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB), p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) 1/2 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling. The Ca-Pi complexes increased the expression of endocytosis markers, and the inhibition of the formation of the Ca-Pi complex ameliorated the Ca-Pi complex-mediated increases of MMPs expression in hypertrophic chondrocytes. Our data provide insight regarding the Ca-Pi complex as a potential catabolic mediator in the subchondral milieu and support the pathogenic role of subchondral bone in the early stages of cartilage degeneration.

  4. Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazawa, Masaharu; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Saotome-Nakamura, Ai; Obara, Chizuka; Yasuda, Takeshi; Gotoh, Takaya; Tanaka, Izumi; Yakumaru, Haruko; Ishihara, Hiroshi; Tajima, Katsushi, E-mail: tajima@nirs.go.jp

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Radiation increases cellular uptake of exosomes. • Radiation induces colocalization of CD29 and CD81. • Exosomes selectively bind the CD29/CD81 complex. • Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. - Abstract: Exosomes mediate intercellular communication, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or their secreted exosomes affect a number of pathophysiologic states. Clinical applications of MSC and exosomes are increasingly anticipated. Radiation therapy is the main therapeutic tool for a number of various conditions. The cellular uptake mechanisms of exosomes and the effects of radiation on exosome–cell interactions are crucial, but they are not well understood. Here we examined the basic mechanisms and effects of radiation on exosome uptake processes in MSC. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes. Radiation markedly enhanced the initial cellular attachment to exosomes and induced the colocalization of integrin CD29 and tetraspanin CD81 on the cell surface without affecting their expression levels. Exosomes dominantly bound to the CD29/CD81 complex. Knockdown of CD29 completely inhibited the radiation-induced uptake, and additional or single knockdown of CD81 inhibited basal uptake as well as the increase in radiation-induced uptake. We also examined possible exosome uptake processes affected by radiation. Radiation-induced changes did not involve dynamin2, reactive oxygen species, or their evoked p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent endocytic or pinocytic pathways. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. These findings provide essential basic insights for potential therapeutic applications of exosomes or MSC in combination with radiation.

  5. CR2-mediated activation of the complement alternative pathway results in formation of membrane attack complexes on human B lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Marquart, H V; Prodinger, W M

    2001-01-01

    convertase and consequent formation of membrane attack complexes (MAC). Deposition of C3 fragments and MAC was assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes in the presence of 30% autologous serum containing 4.4 mM MgCl2/20 mM EGTA, which abrogates the classical pathway of complement without affecting...

  6. A Nutrient Combination that Can Affect Synapse Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Wurtman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain neurons form synapses throughout the life span. This process is initiated by neuronal depolarization, however the numbers of synapses thus formed depend on brain levels of three key nutrients—uridine, the omega-3 fatty acid DHA, and choline. Given together, these nutrients accelerate formation of synaptic membrane, the major component of synapses. In infants, when synaptogenesis is maximal, relatively large amounts of all three nutrients are provided in bioavailable forms (e.g., uridine in the UMP of mothers’ milk and infant formulas. However, in adults the uridine in foods, mostly present at RNA, is not bioavailable, and no food has ever been compelling demonstrated to elevate plasma uridine levels. Moreover, the quantities of DHA and choline in regular foods can be insufficient for raising their blood levels enough to promote optimal synaptogenesis. In Alzheimer’s disease (AD the need for extra quantities of the three nutrients is enhanced, both because their basal plasma levels may be subnormal (reflecting impaired hepatic synthesis, and because especially high brain levels are needed for correcting the disease-related deficiencies in synaptic membrane and synapses.

  7. TIMESCALES ON WHICH STAR FORMATION AFFECTS THE NEUTRAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stilp, Adrienne M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Warren, Steven R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, CSS Building, Room 1024, Stadium Drive, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Skillman, Evan [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Ott, Juergen [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Turbulent neutral hydrogen (H I) line widths are often thought to be driven primarily by star formation (SF), but the timescale for converting SF energy to H I kinetic energy is unclear. As a complication, studies on the connection between H I line widths and SF in external galaxies often use broadband tracers for the SF rate, which must implicitly assume that SF histories (SFHs) have been constant over the timescale of the tracer. In this paper, we compare measures of H I energy to time-resolved SFHs in a number of nearby dwarf galaxies. We find that H I energy surface density is strongly correlated only with SF that occurred 30-40 Myr ago. This timescale corresponds to the approximate lifetime of the lowest mass supernova progenitors ({approx}8 M{sub Sun }). This analysis suggests that the coupling between SF and the neutral interstellar medium is strongest on this timescale, due either to an intrinsic delay between the release of the peak energy from SF or to the coherent effects of many supernova explosions during this interval. At {Sigma}{sub SFR} > 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}, we find a mean coupling efficiency between SF energy and H I energy of {epsilon} = 0.11 {+-} 0.04 using the 30-40 Myr timescale. However, unphysical efficiencies are required in lower {Sigma}{sub SFR} systems, implying that SF is not the primary driver of H I kinematics at {Sigma}{sub SFR} < 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}.

  8. Complex formation of Eu(III) with polyacrylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, T.; Tochiyama, O.; Tanaka, K.; Niibori, Y. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering

    2000-07-01

    For the quantitative description of the interaction of metal ions with humic substances, it is necessary to clarify the effects of both polyelectrolyte and heterogeneous nature of humic substances. To estimate the polyelectrolyte effect separately, polyacrylic acid (MW = 90 000) has been selected as a representative of well-defined, homogeneous polymeric weak acids, and its interaction with Eu(III) has been investigated by a solvent extraction method using {sup 152}Eu ({proportional_to} 10{sup -8} M) with TTA and TBP in xylene. By defining the apparent complex formation constant as {beta}{sub {alpha}} = [ML]/([M][R]), where [M] = [Eu{sup 3+}], [ML] is the concentration of Eu(III) associated with polyacrylic acid and [R] = C{sub R}{alpha} (C{sub R} is a total concentration of proton exchanging sites and {alpha} is a degree of dissociation determined by potentiometric titration), the apparent constants have been obtained at several pcH and ionic strength (0.1 M and 1.0 M NaClO{sub 4}). The constants increased with pcH and decreased with an increase of ionic strength, that is, the values of log {beta}{sub {alpha}} varied from 6.0 (at pcH = 4.7) to 7.6 (pcH = 5.5) at 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4} and from 4.8 (pcH = 4.4) to 6.5 (pcH = 5.4) at 1.0 M. The plots of log {beta}{sub {alpha}} versus log {alpha} revealed almost linear relationship both at 0.1 and 1.0 M NaClO{sub 4}. (orig.)

  9. Retrograde lawsonite formation in the Franciscan subduction complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, S.; Mulcahy, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    Lawsonite [CaAl2Si2O7(OH)2·H2O] is an index mineral of low-temperature subduction zones, contains a significant amount of water, and is an important host of rare-earth and trace elements in mafic protoliths. For these reasons, numerous studies have investigated the consequences of lawsonite breakdown during prograde subduction. In the Franciscan subduction complex, however, lawsonite in mafic blueschist largely formed along a retrograde path from pre-existing eclogite. In order to asses the conditions and significance of retrograde lawsonite formation we examined the petrology and geochemistry of lawsonite-bearing assemblages in Franciscan mafic rocks. All of the samples have the common assemblage: lawsonite, glaucophane, and sphene. Quartz is generally absent. Muscovite, chlorite, and relict epidote and rutile are variably present. Different index minerals calcite, aragonite, albite, and jadeitic pyroxene are present within lawsonite assemblages. Garnet occurs in equilibrium with lawsonite, as a relict mineral in lawsonite and the matrix, or is completely absent. Major element compositions vary from typical basalts and are strongly correlated with one another. Chondrite normalized REE compositions are variably LREE depleted or enriched, MREE are flat to enriched, and HREE are generally flat. Trace elements normalized to NMORB show variably enriched and depleted LILE. The petrology suggests lawsonite, glaucophane, and sphene formed from multiple retrograde reactions involving garnet, clinopyroxene, epidote, and rutile, together with significant hydration. Important index minerals imply lawsonite formed over a wide range of pressures within the subduction zone. The major, REE, and trace element compositions suggest lawsonite assemblages were derived from different protoliths or experienced variable amounts of metasomatism and interaction with crustally derived material and serpentinite.

  10. Habitat Complexity in Aquatic Microcosms Affects Processes Driven by Detritivores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorea Flores

    Full Text Available Habitat complexity can influence predation rates (e.g. by providing refuge but other ecosystem processes and species interactions might also be modulated by the properties of habitat structure. Here, we focussed on how complexity of artificial habitat (plastic plants, in microcosms, influenced short-term processes driven by three aquatic detritivores. The effects of habitat complexity on leaf decomposition, production of fine organic matter and pH levels were explored by measuring complexity in three ways: 1. as the presence vs. absence of habitat structure; 2. as the amount of structure (3 or 4.5 g of plastic plants; and 3. as the spatial configuration of structures (measured as fractal dimension. The experiment also addressed potential interactions among the consumers by running all possible species combinations. In the experimental microcosms, habitat complexity influenced how species performed, especially when comparing structure present vs. structure absent. Treatments with structure showed higher fine particulate matter production and lower pH compared to treatments without structures and this was probably due to higher digestion and respiration when structures were present. When we explored the effects of the different complexity levels, we found that the amount of structure added explained more than the fractal dimension of the structures. We give a detailed overview of the experimental design, statistical models and R codes, because our statistical analysis can be applied to other study systems (and disciplines such as restoration ecology. We further make suggestions of how to optimise statistical power when artificially assembling, and analysing, 'habitat complexity' by not confounding complexity with the amount of structure added. In summary, this study highlights the importance of habitat complexity for energy flow and the maintenance of ecosystem processes in aquatic ecosystems.

  11. A Solution Study of Complex Formation of Some Diamines with Lanthanones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Vora

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the metal ligand equilibrium in aqueous solution, the well known Irving-Rossotti titration method was used. The temperature selected is 30±0.10C at ionic strength 0.2 M (NaClO4 which was maintained constant through out the work. The binary metal complex (ML2 formation was studied. The metals selected are Sm3+, Gd3+, Dy3+ and Yb3+. The diamine ligands taken are ethylenediamine, 1,2 diamino propane, 1,3 diamino propane, N-N diethyl ethylenediamine and N-N -dimethyl ethylenediamine. Factors that affected the stability of the complexes are size and ionic potential of lanthanone ions, basicity of ligands, ring size and steric effect of ligands.

  12. Hormad1 mutation disrupts synaptonemal complex formation, recombination, and chromosome segregation in mammalian meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Hyun Shin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Meiosis is unique to germ cells and essential for reproduction. During the first meiotic division, homologous chromosomes pair, recombine, and form chiasmata. The homologues connect via axial elements and numerous transverse filaments to form the synaptonemal complex. The synaptonemal complex is a critical component for chromosome pairing, segregation, and recombination. We previously identified a novel germ cell-specific HORMA domain encoding gene, Hormad1, a member of the synaptonemal complex and a mammalian counterpart to the yeast meiotic HORMA domain protein Hop1. Hormad1 is essential for mammalian gametogenesis as knockout male and female mice are infertile. Hormad1 deficient (Hormad1(-/ (- testes exhibit meiotic arrest in the early pachytene stage, and synaptonemal complexes cannot be visualized by electron microscopy. Hormad1 deficiency does not affect localization of other synaptonemal complex proteins, SYCP2 and SYCP3, but disrupts homologous chromosome pairing. Double stranded break formation and early recombination events are disrupted in Hormad1(-/ (- testes and ovaries as shown by the drastic decrease in the γH2AX, DMC1, RAD51, and RPA foci. HORMAD1 co-localizes with γH2AX to the sex body during pachytene. BRCA1, ATR, and γH2AX co-localize to the sex body and participate in meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and transcriptional silencing. Hormad1 deficiency abolishes γH2AX, ATR, and BRCA1 localization to the sex chromosomes and causes transcriptional de-repression on the X chromosome. Unlike testes, Hormad1(-/ (- ovaries have seemingly normal ovarian folliculogenesis after puberty. However, embryos generated from Hormad1(-/ (- oocytes are hyper- and hypodiploid at the 2 cell and 8 cell stage, and they arrest at the blastocyst stage. HORMAD1 is therefore a critical component of the synaptonemal complex that affects synapsis, recombination, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and transcriptional silencing.

  13. VUV photochemistry of the H2OCO complex in noble-gas matrices: formation of the OHCO complex and the HOCO radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryazantsev, Sergey V; Duarte, Luís; Feldman, Vladimir I; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2016-12-21

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 130-170 nm) photochemistry of the H2OCO complex is studied by matrix-isolation infrared spectroscopy. The H2OCO complexes in Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe matrices are generated by ultraviolet (UV, 193 and 250 nm) photolysis of formic acid (HCOOH). VUV photolysis of the H2OCO complexes is found to lead to the formation of the OHCO radical-molecule complexes and trans-HOCO radicals. It is shown that the matrix material, local matrix morphology, and possibly the H2OCO complex geometry strongly affect the VUV photolysis pathways. The intrinsic reactivity of the matrix-isolated OHCO complex resulting in the formation of trans-HOCO is directly demonstrated for the first time. This reaction occurs in Ar, Kr, and Xe matrices upon annealing above 25 K and may proceed over the barrier. The case of a Ne matrix is very special because the formation of trans-HOCO from the OHCO complex is observed even at the lowest experimental temperature (4.5 K), which is in sharp contrast to the other matrices. It follows that quantum tunneling is probably involved in this process in the Ne matrix at such a low temperature. Infrared light also promotes this reaction in the Ne matrix at 4.5 K, which is not the case in the other matrices. The last findings show the effect of the environment on the tunneling and infrared-induced rates of this fundamental chemical reaction.

  14. Biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance in Salmonella Typhimurium are affected by different ribonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saramago, Margarida; Domingues, Susana; Viegas, Sandra Cristina; Arraiano, Cecília Maria

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance are important determinants for bacterial pathogenicity. Ribonucleases control RNA degradation and there is increasing evidence that they have an important role in virulence mechanisms. In this report, we show that ribonucleases affect susceptibility against ribosome-targeting antibiotics and biofilm formation in Salmonella.

  15. Starch-lipid inclusion complexes for aerogel formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently we reported that aqueous slurries of starch can be excess steam jet-cooked and blended with aqueous solutions of fatty acid salts to produce inclusion complexes between amylose and the fatty acid salt. These complexes can be simply prepared on large scale using commercially available steam ...

  16. The effect of temperature and time on the formation of amylose- lysophosphatidylcholine inclusion complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadiabhari, Salomeh; Woortman, Albert J. J.; Oudhuis, A. A. C. M. (Lizette); Hamer, Rob J.; Loos, Katja

    The formation of amylose inclusion complexes could help to decrease the susceptibility of starch granules against amylase digestion. We studied the formation of amylose-lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) inclusion complexes at temperatures at and below the gelatinization temperature of starch, using DSC,

  17. Meiotic cohesin complexes are essential for the formation of the axial element in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Llano, Elena; Herrán, Yurema; García-Tuñón, Ignacio; Gutiérrez-Caballero, Cristina; de Álava, Enrique; Barbero, José Luis; Schimenti, John; de Rooij, Dirk G.; Sánchez-Martín, Manuel; Pendás, Alberto M.

    2012-01-01

    Cohesin is a conserved multisubunit protein complex that participates in chromosome segregation, DNA damage repair, chromatin regulation, and synaptonemal complex (SC) formation. Yeast, but not mice, depleted of the cohesin subunit Rec8 are defective in the formation of the axial elements (AEs) of

  18. fhlA repression by OxyS RNA: kissing complex formation at two sites results in a stable antisense-target RNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argaman, L; Altuvia, S

    2000-07-28

    OxyS is a small untranslated RNA that is induced in response to oxidative stress in Escherichia coli. This small RNA acts as a global regulator affecting the expression of multiple genes. OxyS represses the translation of fhlA, a transcriptional activator for formate metabolism. Previously, we have shown that fhlA repression by OxyS is mediated through base-pairing with a short sequence overlapping the ribosome binding site. Here we show that the OxyS-fhlA interaction involves a second site residing further downstream, within the coding region of fhlA. Mutations that disrupt pairing at this site affect the ability of OxyS to prevent 30 S ribosomes from binding to fhlA mRNA. Structure probing of fhlA mRNA demonstrates that both sites reside in the loops of two stem-loop structures. OxyS-fhlA pairing analysis shows that OxyS binds wild-type fhlA with an apparent dissociation constant of 25 nM, indicating that kissing complex formation between OxyS and fhlA results in a stable antisense-target complex. Mutations at either site, which disrupt pairing of OxyS to fhlA, decrease the stability of this complex. Our results indicate that kissing complex formation is sufficient to repress fhlA translation by OxyS. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  19. Glucose attenuation of auxin-mediated bimodality in lateral root formation is partly coupled by the heterotrimeric G protein complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Booker

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Auxin and glucose are both essential elements in normal root development. The heterotrimeric G protein complex in Arabidopsis thaliana, defined as containing alpha (AtGPA1, beta (AGB1, and gamma (AGG subunits and a GTPase accelerating protein called Regulator of G Signaling 1 protein (AtRGS1, are involved in glucose signaling and regulate auxin transport.A systems approach was used to show that formation of lateral roots, a process requiring coordinated cell division followed by targeted cell expansion, involves a signaling interaction between glucose and auxin. We dissected the relationship between auxin and glucose action using lateral root formation as the biological context. We found that auxin and glucose act synergistically to yield a complex output involving both stimulatory and antagonist glucose effects on auxin responsiveness. Auxin-induced, lateral-root formation becomes bimodal with regard to auxin dose in the presence of glucose. This bimodality is mediated, in part, by the G protein complex defined above.Auxin and glucose are essential signals controlling the rate of cell proliferation and expansion in roots. Auxin promotes the formation of lateral roots and is consequently essential for proper root architecture. Glucose affects the activation state of the heterotrimeric G protein complex which regulates auxin distribution in the root. The bimodality of auxin-induced, lateral-root formation becomes prominent in the presence of glucose and in roots lacking the G protein complex. Bimodality is apparent without added glucose in all loss-of-function mutants for these G protein components, suggesting that the heterotrimeric G protein complex attenuates the bimodality and that glucose inhibits this attenuation through the complex. The bimodality can be further resolved into the processes of lateral root primordia formation and lateral root emergence, from which a model integrating these signals is proposed.

  20. How vegetation patterning affects sediment dynamics in complex landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baartman, Jantiene; Temme, Arnaud; Saco, Patricia

    2016-04-01

    Semi-arid ecosystems are often spatially self-organized in typical patterns of vegetation bands with high plant cover interspersed with bare soil areas, also known as 'tigerbush'. Tigerbush dynamics have been studied using model simulations on flat synthetic landscapes, although in some cases straight slopes were used. The feedbacks between vegetation and more realistic and complex landscapes have not been studied yet, even though these landscapes are much more prevalent. Hence, our objective was to determine the effect of landform variation on vegetation patterning and sediment dynamics. We linked two existing models that simulate (a) plant growth, death and dispersal of vegetation, and (b) erosion and sedimentation. The model was calibrated on a straight planar hillslope and then applied to (i) a set of synthetic but more complex topographies and (ii) three real-world landscapes. Furthermore, sediment dynamics were evaluated by comparing simulated sediment output with and without vegetation dynamics. Results show banded vegetation patterning on all synthetic topographies, always perpendicular to the slope gradient. For real topographies, banded vegetation was simulated in the relatively flat, rolling landscape and in the dissected landscape when slopes were gentle. In the steep dissected landscape and the alluvial fan, vegetation was simulated to grow in local depressions where moisture is present whereas hilltops were bare. Including vegetation dynamics resulted in significantly less simulated erosion and relatively more deposition compared to simulations with uniformly distributed vegetation.

  1. The Formation of the Self. Nietzsche and Complexity | Cilliers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship between the formation of the self and the worldly horizon within which this self achieves its meaning. Our inquiry takes place from two perspectives: the first derived from the Nietzschean analysis of how one becomes what one is; the other from current developments in ...

  2. Quality Enhancement by Inclusion Complex Formation of Simvastatin Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emőke Rédai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Simvastatin is an inhibitor of hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, used in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. To enhance its bioavailability by inclusion complexation, as host molecule randommethyl-β-cyclodextrin had been used. After evaluating the complexes we chose the kneading product in 1:2 molar ratio for incorporation of 10 mg simvastatin tablets. Materials and methods: We prepared homogenous mixtures of the inclusion complex and some excipients. The tablets were prepared by direct compression. The tablets were evaluated in regard to: weight uniformity, thickness, diameter, hardness, friability, disintegration and dissolution profile. Results: Weights are in the range of 196-208 mg, diameter 6.83-6.86 mm, height 3.86-4.01 mm, hardness 78.3-113.1 N, friability 0.75- 1.19 %, disintegration above 15 minutes. The dissolved amounts of simvastatin from the tablets are higher compared to the dissolution of pure simvastatin, but lower than the dissolution of the complex itself. Excipients, like disintegrants and lubricants greatly influence the dissolution properties of the tablets. Conclusions: According to our results, tablets containing inclusion complex of simvastatin exhibit better solubility, according to the dissolved amount of simvastatin, than pure drug alone. Proper physical parameters of the tablets are obtained by application of 5 % Primellose

  3. Deep Impact: How a Job-Embedded Formative Assessment Professional Development Model Affected Teacher Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A. Stewart

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study supports the work of Black and Wiliam (1998, who demonstrated that when teachers effectively utilize formative assessment strategies, student learning increases significantly. However, the researchers also found a “poverty of practice” among teachers, in that few fully understood how to implement classroom formative assessment. This qualitative case study examined a series of voluntary workshops offered at one middle school designed to address this poverty of practice. Data were gathered via semi-structured interviews. These research questions framed the study: (1 What role did a professional learning community structure play in shaping workshop participants’ perceived effectiveness of a voluntary formative assessment initiative? (2 How did this initiative affect workshop participants’ perceptions of their knowledge of formative assessment and differentiation strategies? (3 How did it affect workshop participants’ perceptions of their abilities to teach others about formative assessment and differentiated instruction? (4 How did it affect school-wide use of classroom-level strategies? Results indicated that teacher workshop participants experienced a growth in their capacity to use and teach others various formative assessment strategies, and even non-participating teachers reported greater use of formative assessment in their own instruction. Workshop participants and non-participating teachers perceived little growth in the area of differentiation of instruction, which contradicted some administrator perceptions.

  4. Effect of ultrasonic waves on the water turbidity during the oxidation of phenol. Formation of (hydro)peroxo complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villota, Natalia; Lomas, Jose M; Camarero, Luis M

    2017-11-01

    Analysis of the kinetics of aqueous phenol oxidation by a sono-Fenton process reveals that the via involving ortho-substituted intermediates prevails: catechol (25.0%), hydroquinone (7.7%) and resorcinol (0.6%). During the oxidation, water rapidly acquires color that reaches its maximum intensity at the maximum concentration of p-benzoquinone. Turbidity formation occurs at a slower rate. Oxidant dosage determines the nature of the intermediates, being trihydroxylated benzenes (pyrogallol, hydroxyhydroquinone) and muconic acid the main precursors causing turbidity. It is found that the concentration of iron species and ultrasonic waves affects the intensity of the turbidity. The pathway of (hydro)peroxo-iron(II) complexes formation is proposed. Operating with 20.0-27.8mgFe(2+)/kW rates leads to formation of (hydro)peroxo-iron(II) complexes, which induce high turbidity levels. These species would dissociate into ZZ-muconic acid and ferrous ions. Applying relationships around 13.9mgFe(2+)/kW, the formation of (hydro)peroxo-iron(III) complexes would occur, which could react with carboxylic acids (2,5-dioxo-3-hexenedioic acid). That reaction induces turbidity slower. This is due to the organic substrate reacting with two molecules of the (hydro)peroxo complex. Therefore, it is necessary to accelerate the iron regeneration, intensifying the ultrasonic irradiation. Afterwards, this complex would dissociate into maleic acid and ferric ions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Complexity of gold nanoparticle formation disclosed by dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Sørensen, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Although chemically synthesized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) from gold salt (HAuCl4) are among the most studied nanomaterials, understanding the formation mechanisms is a challenge mainly due to limited dynamics information. A range of in situ methods with down to millisecond (ms) time resolution...... from redox potential, pH, conductivity, and turbidity of the solution enables distinct observation of reduction and nucleation/growth of AuNPs phases. The dynamics of the electrochemical potential shows that reduction of gold salt (HAuCl 4 and its hydrolyzed forms) occurs via intermediate [AuCl 2......]- to form Au atoms during the early stage of the synthesis process. pH- and conductivity-dynamics point further clearly to formation of coating layers on AuNPs and adsorbate exchange between MES and starch. © 2013 American Chemical Society....

  6. Regulation of neurogenesis: factors affecting of new neurons formation in adult mammals brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalina Respondek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis is a complex and multi-step process of generating completely functional neurons. This process in adult brain is based on pluripotentional neuronal stem cells (NSC, which are able to proliferation and differentiation into mature neurons or glial cells. NSC are located in subgranular zone inside hippocampus and in subventricular zone. The new neurons formation depends on many endo- and exogenous factors which modulate each step of neurogenesis. This article describes the most important regulators of adult neurogenesis, mainly: neurotrophins, growth factors, hormones, neurotransmitters and microenvironment of NSC. Some drugs, especially antipsychotics, antidepressants and normothymics may affect the neurogenic properties of adult brain. Moreover pathological processes such as neuroinflammation, stroke or epilepsy are able to induce proliferation of NSC. The proneurogenic effects of psychotropic drugs and pathological processes are associated with their ability to increase some hormones and neurotrophins level, as well as with rising the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein and metalloproteinase MMP-2. Additionaly, some drugs, for example haloperidol, are able to block prolactin and dopaminergic neuroblasts receptors. Down-regulation of adult neurogenesis is associated with alcohol abuse and high stress level. Negative effect of many drugs, such as cytostatics, COX-2 inhibitors and opioides was also observed. The proneurogenic effect of described factors suggest their broad therapeutic potential and gives a new perspective on an effective and modern treatment of many neuropsychiatric disorders. This effect can also help to clarify the pathogenesis of disorders associated with proliferation and degeneration of adult brain cells.

  7. [Regulation of neurogenesis: factors affecting of new neurons formation in adult mammals brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respondek, Michalina; Buszman, Ewa

    2015-12-31

    Neurogenesis is a complex and multi-step process of generating completely functional neurons. This process in adult brain is based on pluripotentional neuronal stem cells (NSC), which are able to proliferation and differentiation into mature neurons or glial cells. NSC are located in subgranular zone inside hippocampus and in subventricular zone. The new neurons formation depends on many endo- and exogenous factors which modulate each step of neurogenesis. This article describes the most important regulators of adult neurogenesis, mainly: neurotrophins, growth factors, hormones, neurotransmitters and microenvironment of NSC. Some drugs, especially antipsychotics, antidepressants and normothymics may affect the neurogenic properties of adult brain. Moreover pathological processes such as neuroinflammation, stroke or epilepsy are able to induce proliferation of NSC. The proneurogenic effects of psychotropic drugs and pathological processes are associated with their ability to increase some hormones and neurotrophins level, as well as with rising the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein and metalloproteinase MMP-2. Additionaly, some drugs, for example haloperidol, are able to block prolactin and dopaminergic neuroblasts receptors. Down-regulation of adult neurogenesis is associated with alcohol abuse and high stress level. Negative effect of many drugs, such as cytostatics, COX-2 inhibitors and opioides was also observed. The proneurogenic effect of described factors suggest their broad therapeutic potential and gives a new perspective on an effective and modern treatment of many neuropsychiatric disorders. This effect can also help to clarify the pathogenesis of disorders associated with proliferation and degeneration of adult brain cells.

  8. Factors affecting the development of respiratory disease complex in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, W B

    1990-01-01

    Factors playing a part in the development of respiratory disease complex in chickens were investigated in a series of experiments. The experimental infection was produced by exposing chickens to Mycoplasma gallisepticum and the B1 vaccine strain of Newcastle disease virus and later exposing them to aerosols containing the O1:K1 serotype of Escherichia coli. Chickens became susceptible (pericarditis or death) to E. coli 8 days after mixed respiratory disease challenge. One day after respiratory disease challenge, lesions consisted of edema and infiltration with lymphoid cells and heterophils. At the time of susceptibility to E. coli, the lesions were strongly lymphoid with many dense follicular areas and very few heterophils. The incidence of pericarditis and death was similar when the concentration of bacteria in the aerosol inoculum ranged between 10(9)/ml and 10(5)/ml. At the time of maximum susceptibility to aerosol challenge, chickens were less susceptible to intravenously administered E. coli than were the uninfected controls. Resistance of chickens that had been selectively bred for a high (HA) or low (LA) antibody response to sheep erythrocytes was compared. HA chickens were more resistant to respiratory agents and less resistant to E. coli than LA line chickens. When the lines were exposed to respiratory disease followed by exposure to aerosols containing E. coli, the HA line had the lowest incidence of pericarditis and death.

  9. The Effect of Complex Formation upon the Redox Potentials of Metallic Ions. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiments in which students prepare in situ soluble complexes of metal ions with different ligands and observe and estimate the change in formal potential that the ion undergoes upon complexation. Discusses student formation and analysis of soluble complexes of two different metal ions with the same ligand. (CW)

  10. Formation of complex anodic films on porous alumina matrices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The kinetics of growth of complex anodic alumina films was investigated. These films were formed by filling porous oxide films (matrices) having deep pores. The porous films (matrices) were obtained voltastatically in (COOH)2 aqueous solution under various voltages. The filling was done by re-anodization in an electrolyte ...

  11. Visual Complexity and Affect: Ratings Reflect More Than Meets the Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Madan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pictorial stimuli can vary on many dimensions, several aspects of which are captured by the term ‘visual complexity.’ Visual complexity can be described as, “a picture of a few objects, colors, or structures would be less complex than a very colorful picture of many objects that is composed of several components.” Prior studies have reported a relationship between affect and visual complexity, where complex pictures are rated as more pleasant and arousing. However, a relationship in the opposite direction, an effect of affect on visual complexity, is also possible; emotional arousal and valence are known to influence selective attention and visual processing. In a series of experiments, we found that ratings of visual complexity correlated with affective ratings, and independently also with computational measures of visual complexity. These computational measures did not correlate with affect, suggesting that complexity ratings are separately related to distinct factors. We investigated the relationship between affect and ratings of visual complexity, finding an ‘arousal-complexity bias’ to be a robust phenomenon. Moreover, we found this bias could be attenuated when explicitly indicated but did not correlate with inter-individual difference measures of affective processing, and was largely unrelated to cognitive and eyetracking measures. Taken together, the arousal-complexity bias seems to be caused by a relationship between arousal and visual processing as it has been described for the greater vividness of arousing pictures. The described arousal-complexity bias is also of relevance from an experimental perspective because visual complexity is often considered a variable to control for when using pictorial stimuli.

  12. CR2-mediated activation of the complement alternative pathway results in formation of membrane attack complexes on human B lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Marquart, H V; Prodinger, W M

    2001-01-01

    Normal human B lymphocytes activate the alternative pathway of complement via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), that binds hydrolysed C3 (iC3) and thereby promotes the formation of a membrane-bound C3 convertase. We have investigated whether this might lead to the generation of a C5...... convertase and consequent formation of membrane attack complexes (MAC). Deposition of C3 fragments and MAC was assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes in the presence of 30% autologous serum containing 4.4 mM MgCl2/20 mM EGTA, which abrogates the classical pathway of complement without affecting...

  13. Structural Basis for TSC-1 TSC-2 Complex Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    organs, including brain, skin, kidney, heart, and liver (1-2). This syndrome often manifests in early age with infantile seizures and patients may have...tuberin: working together for tumour suppression. Int. J. Cancer 118: 1-5 2. Astrinidis A, Henske EP. (2005). Tuberous sclerosis complex: linking growth...be regulated by changes in pH. Importantly, the BARD1 BRCT structure provides insights into the mechanisms by which the cancer - associated missense

  14. Structural Basis of Clostridium perfringens Toxin Complex Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams,J.; Gregg, K.; Bayer, E.; Boraston, A.; Smith, S.

    2008-01-01

    The virulent properties of the common human and livestock pathogen Clostridium perfringens are attributable to a formidable battery of toxins. Among these are a number of large and highly modular carbohydrate-active enzymes, including the {mu}-toxin and sialidases, whose catalytic properties are consistent with degradation of the mucosal layer of the human gut, glycosaminoglycans, and other cellular glycans found throughout the body. The conservation of noncatalytic ancillary modules among these enzymes suggests they make significant contributions to the overall functionality of the toxins. Here, we describe the structural basis of an ultra-tight interaction (Ka = 1.44 x 1011 M-1) between the X82 and dockerin modules, which are found throughout numerous C. perfringens carbohydrate-active enzymes. Extensive hydrogen-bonding and van der Waals contacts between the X82 and dockerin modules give rise to the observed high affinity. The {mu}-toxin dockerin module in this complex is positioned {approx}180 relative to the orientation of the dockerin modules on the cohesin module surface within cellulolytic complexes. These observations represent a unique property of these clostridial toxins whereby they can associate into large, noncovalent multitoxin complexes that allow potentiation of the activities of the individual toxins by combining complementary toxin specificities.

  15. Formation of natamycin:cyclodextrin inclusion complexes and their characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, John L; Marcy, Joseph E

    2003-11-19

    Natamycin is a broad spectrum antimycotic with very low water solubility, which is used to extend the shelf life of shredded cheese products. beta-Cyclodextrin (beta-CD), hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin (HP beta-CD), and gamma-cyclodextrin (gamma-CD) were found to form inclusion complexes with natamycin in aqueous solution. The increase in solubility of natamycin with added beta-CD was observed to be linear (type A(L) phase solubility diagram). The 1:1 stability constant of natamycin:beta-CD complex was estimated from its phase solubility diagram to be 1010 M(-1). The phase solubility diagrams of both gamma-CD and HP beta-CD exhibited negative deviation from linearity (type A(N) diagram) and, therefore, did not allow the estimation of binding constants. The water solubility of natamycin was increased 16-fold, 73-fold, and 152-fold with beta-CD, gamma-CD, and HP beta-CD, respectively. The natamycin:CD inclusion complexes resulted in in vitro antifungal activity nearly equivalent to that of natamycin in its free state.

  16. Base Flipping in Open Complex Formation at Bacterial Promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Karpen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the process of transcription initiation, the bacterial RNA polymerase binds double-stranded (ds promoter DNA and subsequently effects strand separation of 12 to 14 base pairs (bp, including the start site of transcription, to form the so-called “open complex” (also referred to as RPo. This complex is competent to initiate RNA synthesis. Here we will review the role of σ70 and its homologs in the strand separation process, and evidence that strand separation is initiated at the −11A (the A of the non-template strand that is 11 bp upstream from the transcription start site of the promoter. By using the fluorescent adenine analog, 2-aminopurine, it was demonstrated that the −11A on the non-template strand flips out of the DNA helix and into a hydrophobic pocket where it stacks with tyrosine 430 of σ70. Open complexes are remarkably stable, even though in vivo, and under most experimental conditions in vitro, dsDNA is much more stable than its strand-separated form. Subsequent structural studies of other researchers have confirmed that in the open complex the −11A has flipped into a hydrophobic pocket of σ70. It was also revealed that RPo was stabilized by three additional bases of the non-template strand being flipped out of the helix and into hydrophobic pockets, further preventing re-annealing of the two complementary DNA strands.

  17. Older adults' affective experiences across 100 days are less variable and less complex than younger adults'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brose, Annette; de Roover, K.; Ceulemans, Eva; Kuppens, Peter

    Older adults are often described as being more emotionally competent than younger adults, and higher levels of affect complexity are seen as an indicator of this competence. We argue, however, that once age differences in affect variability are taken into account, older adults' everyday affective

  18. The formation and study of titanium, zirconium, and hafnium complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Bobby; Sarin, Sam; Smith, Laverne; Wilson, Melanie

    1989-01-01

    Research involves the preparation and characterization of a series of Ti, Zr, Hf, TiO, and HfO complexes using the poly(pyrazole) borates as ligands. The study will provide increased understanding of the decomposition of these coordination compounds which may lead to the production of molecular oxygen on the Moon from lunar materials such as ilmenite and rutile. The model compounds are investigated under reducing conditions of molecular hydrogen by use of a high temperature/pressure stainless steel autoclave reactor and by thermogravimetric analysis.

  19. The complex interplay between semantics and grammar in impression formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreves, Wyley B; Hart, William; Adams, John M; Guadagno, Rosanna E; Eno, Cassie A

    2014-09-01

    We sought to bridge findings showing that (a) describing a person's behavior with the perfective verb aspect (did), compared to the imperfective aspect (was doing), increases processing of semantic knowledge unrelated to the target's action such as stereotypes and (b) an increased recognition of stereotypical thoughts often promotes a judgment correction for the stereotypes. We hypothesized an interplay between grammar (verb conjugation) and semantic information (gender) in impression-formation. Participants read a resume, attributed to a male or female, for a traditionally masculine job. When the resume was written in the imperfective, people rated a male (vs. female) more positively. When the resume was in the perfective, this pattern reversed. Only these latter effects of gender were influenced by cognitive load. Further, people more quickly indicated the applicant's gender in the perfective condition, suggesting an enhanced focus on gender during processing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Formation of Au and tetrapyridyl porphyrin complexes in superfluid helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Cheng; Latimer, Elspeth; Spence, Daniel; Al Hindawi, Aula M A A; Bullen, Shem; Boatwright, Adrian; Ellis, Andrew M; Yang, Shengfu

    2015-07-14

    Binary clusters containing a large organic molecule and metal atoms have been formed by the co-addition of 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-pyridyl)porphyrin (H2TPyP) molecules and gold atoms to superfluid helium nanodroplets, and the resulting complexes were then investigated by electron impact mass spectrometry. In addition to the parent ion H2TPyP yields fragments mainly from pyrrole, pyridine and methylpyridine ions because of the stability of their ring structures. When Au is co-added to the droplets the mass spectra are dominated by H2TPyP fragment ions with one or more Au atoms attached. We also show that by switching the order in which Au and H2TPyP are added to the helium droplets, different types of H2TPyP-Au complexes are clearly evident from the mass spectra. This study suggests a new route for the control over the growth of metal-organic compounds inside superfluid helium nanodroplets.

  1. Carbon–heteroatom bond formation catalysed by organometallic complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, John F.

    2010-01-01

    At one time the synthetic chemist’s last resort, reactions catalysed by transition metals are now the preferred method for synthesizing many types of organic molecule. A recent success in this type of catalysis is the discovery of reactions that form bonds between carbon and heteroatoms (such as nitrogen, oxygen, sulphur, silicon and boron) via complexes of transition metals with amides, alkoxides, thiolates, silyl groups or boryl groups. The development of these catalytic processes has been supported by the discovery of new elementary reactions that occur at metal–heteroatom bonds and by the identification of factors that control these reactions. Together, these findings have led to new synthetic processes that are in daily use and have formed a foundation for the development of processes that are likely to be central to synthetic chemistry in the future. PMID:18800130

  2. Controlled assembly of artificial protein-protein complexes via DNA duplex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płoskoń, Eliza; Wagner, Sara C; Ellington, Andrew D; Jewett, Michael C; O'Reilly, Rachel; Booth, Paula J

    2015-03-18

    DNA-protein conjugates have found a wide range of applications. This study demonstrates the formation of defined, non-native protein-protein complexes via the site specific labeling of two proteins of interest with complementary strands of single-stranded DNA in vitro. This study demonstrates that the affinity of two DNA-protein conjugates for one another may be tuned by the use of variable lengths of DNA allowing reversible control of complex formation.

  3. OTDM-to-WDM Conversion of Complex Modulation Formats by Time-Domain Optical Fourier Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palushani, Evarist; Richter, T.; Ludwig, R.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the utilization of the optical Fourier transform technique for serial-to-parallel conversion of 64×10-GBd OTDM data tributaries with complex modulation formats into 50-GHz DWDM grid without loss of phase and amplitude information.......We demonstrate the utilization of the optical Fourier transform technique for serial-to-parallel conversion of 64×10-GBd OTDM data tributaries with complex modulation formats into 50-GHz DWDM grid without loss of phase and amplitude information....

  4. Microbanded manganese formations; protoliths in the Franciscan Complex, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, J. Stephen; Flohr, Marta J.

    1990-01-01

    The Buckeye manganese deposit, 93 km southeast of San Francisco in the California Coast Ranges, preserves a geologic history that provides clues to the origin of numerous lenses of manganese carbonate, oxides, and silicates that occur with interbedded radiolarian chert and metashale of the Franciscan Complex. Compositionally and mineralogically laminated Mn-rich protoliths were deformed and dismembered, in a manner that mimics in smaller scale the deformation of the host complex, and then were incipiently metamorphosed at blueschistfacies conditions. Eight phases occur as almost monomineralic protoliths and mixtures: rhodochrosite, caryopilite, chlorite, gageite, taneyamalite, braunite, hausmannite, and laminated chert (quartz). Braunite, gageite, and some chlorite and caryopilite layers were deposited as gel-like materials; rhodochrosite, most caryopilite, and at least some hausmannite layers as lutites; and the chert as turbidites of radiolarian sand. Some gel-like materials are now preserved as transparent, sensibly isotropic relics of materials that fractured or shattered when deformed, creating curved surfaces. In contrast, the micrites flowed between the fragments of gel-like materials. The orebody and most of its constituent minerals have unusually Mn-rich compositions that are described by the system MnO-SiO2-O2-CO2-H2O. High values of Mn/Fe and U/Th, and low concentrations of Co, Cu, and Ni, distinguish the Buckeye deposit from many high-temperature hydrothermal deposits and hydrogenous or diagenetic manganese and ferromanganese nodules and pavements. This chemical signature suggests that ore deposition was related to fluids from the sediment column and seawater. Tungsten is associated exclusively with gageite, in concentrations as high as 80 parts per million. The source of the manganese is unknown; because basalts do not occur near the deposit, it was probably manganese leached from the sediment column by reducing solutions. Low concentrations of calcium

  5. THE PRINCIPLES OF POWER-RISE BUILDINGS COMPLEXES FORMATION USING WIND ENERGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEVGAMONNIY G. U.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. The methodology of designing energy-efficient tower building should be based on systematic analysis of the building as a unified energy system. The prominent architect Norman Foster (Sir Norman Foster writes: "Architects cannot solve all the world's environmental problems, but we can design buildings that require only a fraction of current energy consumption, in addition, through proper urban planning we can affect traffic flows. The location and functionality of buildings, its structural flexibility and technological resources, orientation, shape and structure, heating and ventilation characteristics used in the construction materials - all these parameters affect the amount of energy required for the construction, operation and maintenance of the building, and as for transportation, moving to it and from it" [1]. Purpose. The purpose of the study is scientific justification principles of architectural formation decisions of the power-rise energy efficient complexes and developing methods of architectural design of PRBC using wind energy. To develop the science-based principles forming the architectural buildings with the use of alternative energy and determine the specific features of the architectural design of buildings. Conclusion. The principles of architectural forming in the use of wind power and identify possible trends for the development of buildings with integrated wind installations. Polyfunctional wind power plants are in special properties of certain material and structural elements of the building structure, improve aerodynamic performance of the outer shell and therefore wind energy devices. Thus, the power efficiency of energy active building depends on its space solutions.

  6. Formation of wood secondary cell wall may involve two type cellulose synthase complexes in Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Wang; Song, Dongliang; Sun, Jiayan; Shen, Junhui; Li, Laigeng

    2017-03-01

    Cellulose biosynthesis is mediated by cellulose synthases (CesAs), which constitute into rosette-like cellulose synthase complexe (CSC) on the plasma membrane. Two types of CSCs in Arabidopsis are believed to be involved in cellulose synthesis in the primary cell wall and secondary cell walls, respectively. In this work, we found that the two type CSCs participated cellulose biosynthesis in differentiating xylem cells undergoing secondary cell wall thickening in Populus. During the cell wall thickening process, expression of one type CSC genes increased while expression of the other type CSC genes decreased. Suppression of different type CSC genes both affected the wall-thickening and disrupted the multilaminar structure of the secondary cell walls. When CesA7A was suppressed, crystalline cellulose content was reduced, which, however, showed an increase when CesA3D was suppressed. The CesA suppression also affected cellulose digestibility of the wood cell walls. The results suggest that two type CSCs are involved in coordinating the cellulose biosynthesis in formation of the multilaminar structure in Populus wood secondary cell walls.

  7. Structural characterization of Am(III) formate complexes. Combining EXAFS spectroscopy with DFT and thermodynamical calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossberg, Andre [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Molecular Structures; Froehlich, D.R. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisch-Chemisches Inst.

    2017-06-01

    We used iterative transformation factor analysis (ITFA) in order to isolate the EXAFS spectral contributions of the complexing ligand from a Am(III)/formate pH-series. Thermodynamic calculations were used as constraint for ITFA and for density functional theory (DFT) calculations to identify the coordination mode within the formed complexes.

  8. Dynamics of Nanoparticle-Protein Corona Complex Formation: Analytical Results from Population Balance Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabi Sahneh, Faryad; Scoglio, Caterina; Riviere, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Background Nanoparticle-protein corona complex formation involves absorption of protein molecules onto nanoparticle surfaces in a physiological environment. Understanding the corona formation process is crucial in predicting nanoparticle behavior in biological systems, including applications of nanotoxicology and development of nano drug delivery platforms. Method This paper extends the modeling work in to derive a mathematical model describing the dynamics of nanoparticle corona complex formation from population balance equations. We apply nonlinear dynamics techniques to derive analytical results for the composition of nanoparticle-protein corona complex, and validate our results through numerical simulations. Results The model presented in this paper exhibits two phases of corona complex dynamics. In the first phase, proteins rapidly bind to the free surface of nanoparticles, leading to a metastable composition. During the second phase, continuous association and dissociation of protein molecules with nanoparticles slowly changes the composition of the corona complex. Given sufficient time, composition of the corona complex reaches an equilibrium state of stable composition. We find analytical approximate formulae for metastable and stable compositions of corona complex. Our formulae are very well-structured to clearly identify important parameters determining corona composition. Conclusion The dynamics of biocorona formation constitute vital aspect of interactions between nanoparticles and living organisms. Our results further understanding of these dynamics through quantitation of experimental conditions, modeling results for in vitro systems to better predict behavior for in vivo systems. One potential application would involve a single cell culture medium related to a complex protein medium, such as blood or tissue fluid. PMID:23741371

  9. Dynamics of nanoparticle-protein corona complex formation: analytical results from population balance equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabi Sahneh, Faryad; Scoglio, Caterina; Riviere, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle-protein corona complex formation involves absorption of protein molecules onto nanoparticle surfaces in a physiological environment. Understanding the corona formation process is crucial in predicting nanoparticle behavior in biological systems, including applications of nanotoxicology and development of nano drug delivery platforms. This paper extends the modeling work in to derive a mathematical model describing the dynamics of nanoparticle corona complex formation from population balance equations. We apply nonlinear dynamics techniques to derive analytical results for the composition of nanoparticle-protein corona complex, and validate our results through numerical simulations. The model presented in this paper exhibits two phases of corona complex dynamics. In the first phase, proteins rapidly bind to the free surface of nanoparticles, leading to a metastable composition. During the second phase, continuous association and dissociation of protein molecules with nanoparticles slowly changes the composition of the corona complex. Given sufficient time, composition of the corona complex reaches an equilibrium state of stable composition. We find analytical approximate formulae for metastable and stable compositions of corona complex. Our formulae are very well-structured to clearly identify important parameters determining corona composition. The dynamics of biocorona formation constitute vital aspect of interactions between nanoparticles and living organisms. Our results further understanding of these dynamics through quantitation of experimental conditions, modeling results for in vitro systems to better predict behavior for in vivo systems. One potential application would involve a single cell culture medium related to a complex protein medium, such as blood or tissue fluid.

  10. Urban habitat complexity affects species richness but not environmental filtering of morphologically-diverse ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Michael A.; Christie, Fiona J.; Hahs, Amy K.; Livesley, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Habitat complexity is a major determinant of structure and diversity of ant assemblages. Following the size-grain hypothesis, smaller ant species are likely to be advantaged in more complex habitats compared to larger species. Habitat complexity can act as an environmental filter based on species size and morphological traits, therefore affecting the overall structure and diversity of ant assemblages. In natural and semi-natural ecosystems, habitat complexity is principally regulated by ecological successions or disturbance such as fire and grazing. Urban ecosystems provide an opportunity to test relationships between habitat, ant assemblage structure and ant traits using novel combinations of habitat complexity generated and sustained by human management. We sampled ant assemblages in low-complexity and high-complexity parks, and high-complexity woodland remnants, hypothesizing that (i) ant abundance and species richness would be higher in high-complexity urban habitats, (ii) ant assemblages would differ between low- and high-complexity habitats and (iii) ants living in high-complexity habitats would be smaller than those living in low-complexity habitats. Contrary to our hypothesis, ant species richness was higher in low-complexity habitats compared to high-complexity habitats. Overall, ant assemblages were significantly different among the habitat complexity types investigated, although ant size and morphology remained the same. Habitat complexity appears to affect the structure of ant assemblages in urban ecosystems as previously observed in natural and semi-natural ecosystems. However, the habitat complexity filter does not seem to be linked to ant morphological traits related to body size. PMID:26528416

  11. Thermodynamics of formation reaction and hydrometallurgical application of metal-ammonia complexes in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, V. E.; Pashkov, G. L.; Stupko, T. V.

    1992-09-01

    Critically selected activity coefficients of individual ions stepwise stability constants, and enthalpy and entropy changes during formation of metal-ammonia complexes in aqueous salt solutions are summarised and analysed. Special attention is paid to the specifics of ammonia complexation in solutions with high ammonia concentrations (>=1 mol dm-3), which are of interest in hydrometallurgy. Certain problems and prospects for use of metal-ammonia complexation in hydrometallurgy are discussed. The bibliography includes 154 references.

  12. Mixed ligand complex formation of Fe III with boric acid and typical N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fe(L) 2 3 + , Fe(L)2(H2BO4) and Fe2(L)4(BO4)+ complexes are also indicated with 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline. Complex formation equilibria and stability constants of the complexes at 25 ± 0 × 1° C in aqueous solution at a fixed ionic strength, = 0.1 mol -3 (NaNO3) have been determined by potentiometric ...

  13. Micro-Level Affect Dynamics in Psychopathology Viewed From Complex Dynamical System Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wichers, M.; Wigman, J. T. W.; Myin-Germeys, I.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the role of moment-to-moment affect dynamics in mental disorder and aims to integrate recent literature on this topic in the context of complex dynamical system theory. First, we will review the relevance of temporal and contextual aspects of affect dynamics in relation to

  14. Mediation, moderation, and context: Understanding complex relations among cognition, affect, and health behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, Marc T; Ellis, Erin M; Hall, Marissa G; Moss, Jennifer L; Lillie, Sarah E; Brewer, Noel T; Klein, William M P

    2018-01-01

    Researchers have historically treated cognition and affect as separate constructs in motivating health behaviour. We present a framework and empirical evidence for complex relations between cognition and affect in predicting health behaviour. Main Outcome, Design and Results: First, affect and cognition can mediate each other's relation to health behaviour. Second, affect and cognition can moderate the other's impact. Third, context can change the interplay of affect and cognition. Fourth, affect and cognition may be indelibly fused in some psychological constructs (e.g. worry, anticipated regret and reactance). These four propositions in our framework are not mutually exclusive. Examination of the types of complex relations described here can benefit theory development, empirical testing of theories and intervention design. Doing so will advance the understanding of mechanisms involved in regulation of health behaviours and the effectiveness of interventions to change health behaviours.

  15. Ionic exchange in p-sulfonatocalix[4]arene-mediated formation of metal-ligand complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Vitor; Basílio, Nuno; García-Río, Luis

    2014-05-01

    The effect of alkali and transition metal cations in the formation of host-guest complexes with the water-soluble p-sulfonatocalix[4]arene (SC4) was studied using 2-chloropyridine and Na(+) and Cu(2+) as model guest and model cations, respectively. The results obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR experiments provide evidence for the formation of 1:1:1 ternary complexes for both cations with Cu(2+) showing positive cooperativity and Na(+) negative cooperativity. The formation of ternary complexes comprising transition metal cations has been scarcely explored but present high potential for devising catalytic systems/models or for enhancing the stability and selectivity of SC4 complexes. Because transition metal cations are usually present in solution together with other SC4 countercations (e.g., Na(+)), a general binding model that considers the dynamic formation of all possible complexes (including ionic exchange between ternary complexes) is presented. This model allows the optimization of the conditions required to selectively form target complexes.

  16. Effects of presentation duration on measures of complexity in affective environmental scenes and representational paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Manuela M; Leder, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Complexity constitutes an integral part of humans' environment and is inherent to information processing. However, little is known about the dynamics of visual complexity perception of affective environmental scenes (IAPS pictures) and artworks, such as affective representational paintings. In three experiments, we studied the time course of visual complexity perception by varying presentation duration and comparing subjective ratings with objective measures of complexity. In Experiment 1, 60 females rated 96 IAPS pictures, presented either for 1, 5, or 25s, for familiarity, complexity, pleasantness and arousal. In Experiment 2, another 60 females rated 96 representational paintings. Mean ratings of complexity and pleasantness changed according to presentation duration in a similar vein in both experiments, suggesting an inverted U-shape. No common pattern of results was observed for arousal and familiarity ratings across the two picture sets. The correlations between subjective and objective measures of complexity increased with longer exposure durations for IAPS pictures, but results were more ambiguous for paintings. Experiment 3 explored the time course of the multidimensionality of visual complexity perception. Another 109 females rated the number of objects, their disorganization and the differentiation between a figure-ground vs. complex scene composition of pictures presented for 1 and 5s. The multidimensionality of visual complexity only clearly emerged in the 5-s condition. In both picture sets, the strength of the correlations with objective measures depended on the type of subdimension of complexity and was less affected by presentation duration than correlations with general complexity in Experiments 1 and 2. These results have clear implications for perceptual and cognitive theories, especially for those of esthetic experiences, in which the dynamical changes of complexity perception need to be integrated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  17. Structure, stability, dynamics, high-field relaxivity and ternary-complex formation of a new tris(aquo) gadolinium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonat, Aline; Fries, Pascal H; Pécaut, Jacques; Mazzanti, Marinella

    2007-01-01

    The tripodal hexadentate picolinate ligand dpaa3- (H3dpaa=N,N'-bis[(6-carboxypyridin-2-yl)methyl]glycine) has been synthesised. It can form 1:1 and 1:2 lanthanide/ligand complexes. The crystal structure of the bis(aquo) lutetium complex [Lu(dpaa)(H2O)2] has been determined by X-ray diffraction studies. The number of water molecules was determined by luminescence lifetime studies of the terbium and europium complexes. The tris(aquo) terbium complex shows a fairly high luminescence quantum yield (22 %). The [Gd(dpaa)(H2O)3] complex displays a high water solubility and an increased stability (pGd=12.3) with respect to the analogous bis(aquo) complex [Gd(tpaa)(H2O)2] (pGd=11.2). Potentiometric and relaxometric studies show the formation of a soluble GdIII hydroxo complex at high pH values. A unique aquohydroxo gadolinium complex has been isolated and its crystal structure determined. This complex crystallises as a 1D polymeric chain consisting of square-shaped tetrameric units. In heavy water, the [Gd(dpaa)-(D2O)3] complex shows a quite high HOD proton relaxivity at high field (11.93 s(-1) mM(-1) at 200 MHz and 298 K) because of the three inner-sphere water molecules. The formation of ternary complexes with physiological anions has been monitored by relaxometric studies, which indicate that even under conditions favourable to the formation of adducts with oxyanions, the mean relaxivity remains higher than those of most of the currently used commercial contrast agents except for the citrate. However, the measured relaxivity (r1=7.9 s(-1) mM(-1)) in a solution containing equimolar concentrations of [Gd(dpaa)(D2O)3] and citrate is still high. The interaction with albumin has been investigated by relaxometric and luminescence studies. Finally, a new versatile method to unravel the geometric and dynamic molecular factors that explain the high-field relaxivities has been developed. This approach uses a small, uncharged non-coordinating probe solute, the outer

  18. Affect and Cognition in Attitude Formation toward Familiar and Unfamiliar Attitude Objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Giesen, Roxanne I; Fischer, Arnout R H; van Dijk, Heleen; van Trijp, Hans C M

    2015-01-01

    At large attitudes are built on earlier experience with the attitude object. If earlier experiences are not available, as is the case for unfamiliar attitude objects such as new technologies, no stored evaluations exist. Yet, people are still somehow able to construct attitudes on the spot. Depending on the familiarity of the attitude object, attitudes may find their basis more in affect or cognition. The current paper investigates differences in reliance on affect or cognition in attitude formation toward familiar and unfamiliar realistic attitude objects. In addition, individual differences in reliance on affect (high faith in intuition) or cognition (high need for cognition) are taken into account. In an experimental survey among Dutch consumers (N = 1870), we show that, for unfamiliar realistic attitude objects, people rely more on affect than cognition. For familiar attitude objects where both affective and cognitive evaluations are available, high need for cognition leads to more reliance on cognition, and high faith in intuition leads to more reliance on affect, reflecting the influence of individually preferred thinking style. For people with high need for cognition, cognition has a higher influence on overall attitude for both familiar and unfamiliar realistic attitude objects. On the other hand, affect is important for people with high faith in intuition for both familiar and unfamiliar attitude objects and for people with low faith in intuition for unfamiliar attitude objects; this shows that preferred thinking style is less influential for unfamiliar objects. By comparing attitude formation for familiar and unfamiliar realistic attitude objects, this research contributes to understanding situations in which affect or cognition is the better predictor of overall attitudes.

  19. Affect and Cognition in Attitude Formation toward Familiar and Unfamiliar Attitude Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Giesen, Roxanne I.

    2015-01-01

    At large attitudes are built on earlier experience with the attitude object. If earlier experiences are not available, as is the case for unfamiliar attitude objects such as new technologies, no stored evaluations exist. Yet, people are still somehow able to construct attitudes on the spot. Depending on the familiarity of the attitude object, attitudes may find their basis more in affect or cognition. The current paper investigates differences in reliance on affect or cognition in attitude formation toward familiar and unfamiliar realistic attitude objects. In addition, individual differences in reliance on affect (high faith in intuition) or cognition (high need for cognition) are taken into account. In an experimental survey among Dutch consumers (N = 1870), we show that, for unfamiliar realistic attitude objects, people rely more on affect than cognition. For familiar attitude objects where both affective and cognitive evaluations are available, high need for cognition leads to more reliance on cognition, and high faith in intuition leads to more reliance on affect, reflecting the influence of individually preferred thinking style. For people with high need for cognition, cognition has a higher influence on overall attitude for both familiar and unfamiliar realistic attitude objects. On the other hand, affect is important for people with high faith in intuition for both familiar and unfamiliar attitude objects and for people with low faith in intuition for unfamiliar attitude objects; this shows that preferred thinking style is less influential for unfamiliar objects. By comparing attitude formation for familiar and unfamiliar realistic attitude objects, this research contributes to understanding situations in which affect or cognition is the better predictor of overall attitudes. PMID:26517876

  20. Identifying the key factors that affect the formation of humic substance during different materials composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junqiu; Zhao, Yue; Qi, Haishi; Zhao, Xinyu; Yang, Tianxue; Du, Yingqiu; Zhang, Hui; Wei, Zimin

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this work was to identify the factors which can affect humic substance (HS) formation. Composting periods, HS precursors, bacteria communities and environment factors were recognized as the key factors and few studies explored the potential relationships among them. During composting, HS precursors were mainly formed in the heating and thermophilic phases, but HS were polymerized in the cooling and mature phases. Moreover, bacterial species showed similar classification of community structure in the same composting period of different materials. Furthermore, structural equation model showed that NH4(-)-N and NO3(-)-N were the indirect environmental factors for regulating HS formation by the bacteria and precursors as the indirect and direct driver, respectively. Therefore, both environmental factors and HS precursors can be the regulating factors to promote HS formation. Given that, a new staging regulating method had been proposed to improve the amount of HS during different materials composting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. How Enterprise Architecture Formative Critical Success Facets Might Affect Enterprise Architecture Success: A Literature Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Haining; Luo, Aimin; Luo, Xueshan

    2014-01-01

    Part 4: Enterprise Architecture; International audience; Though Enterprise Architecture (EA) is getting increasing attentions from both academics and practitioners, EA research around EA success factors remains modest and immature. This study explores how EA formative critical success facets/factors would affect the achievement of EA success. This research highlights the importance of four mediators, i.e., (I) Real and mature business needs; (II) Real and continuous commitment; (III) Actionab...

  2. Electrochemical detection of oligopeptides through the precolumn formation of biuret complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, H Y; Weber, S G

    1991-04-12

    The relatively slow kinetics of formation of the electroactive Cu(II)-peptide complexes from larger (greater than 6 amino acids) peptides requires relatively high temperature and long reaction times for a postcolumn reactor. The precolumn incubation of bradykinin, Tyr8-bradykinin and insulin A chain with biuret reagent for 20 min at 60 degrees C leads to the formation of biuret complexes which can be subjected to chromatography in acidic or basic eluents. These complexes are detected electrochemically with a sensitivity similar to the Cu(II)-(ala)3 complex (1 nC/pmol at 1.0 ml/min). The influence of the column-packing material on the electrochemical detector response of the Cu-peptide complexes has also been studied.

  3. Complex 3D Vortex Lattice Formation by Phase-Engineered Multiple Beam Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolly Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the computational results on the formation of diverse complex 3D vortex lattices by a designed superposition of multiple plane waves. Special combinations of multiples of three noncoplanar plane waves with a designed relative phase shift between one another are perturbed by a nonsingular beam to generate various complex 3D vortex lattice structures. The formation of complex gyrating lattice structures carrying designed vortices by means of relatively phase-engineered plane waves is also computationally investigated. The generated structures are configured with both periodic as well as transversely quasicrystallographic basis, while these whirling complex lattices possess a long-range order of designed symmetry in a given plane. Various computational analytical tools are used to verify the presence of engineered geometry of vortices in these complex 3D vortex lattices.

  4. Nixtamalization Process Affects Resistant Starch Formation and Glycemic Index of Tamales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscal-Moreno, Rosa María; de Dios Figueroa Cárdenas, Juan; Santiago-Ramos, David; Rayas-Duarte, Patricia; Veles-Medina, José Juan; Martínez-Flores, Héctor Eduardo

    2017-05-01

    Tamales were prepared with 3 nixtamalization processes (traditional, ecological, and classic) and evaluated for chemical composition, starch properties, and glycemic index. Resistant starch (RS) in tamales increased 1.6 to 3.7 times compared to raw maize. This increment was due to the starch retrogradation (RS3) and amylose-lipid complexes (RS5) formation. Tamales elaborated with classic and ecological nixtamalization processes exhibited the highest total, soluble and insoluble dietary fiber content, and the highest RS content and lower in vivo glycemic index compared to tamales elaborated with traditional nixtamalization process. Thermal properties of tamales showed 3 endotherms: amylopectin retrogradation (42.7 to 66.6 °C), melting of amylose lipid complex type I (78.8 to 105.4), and melting of amylose-lipid complex type II (110.7 to 129.7). Raw maize exhibited X-ray diffraction pattern type A, after nixtamalization and cooking of tamales it changed to V-type polymorph structure, due to amylose-lipid complexes formation. Tamales from ecological nixtamalization processes could represent potential health benefits associated with the reduction on blood glucose response after consumption. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  5. Evolution of multi-mineral formation evaluation using LWD data in complex carbonates offshore Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraris, Paolo; Borovskaya, Irina [Schlumberger, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Petrophysical Formation Evaluation using Logging While Drilling (LWD) measurements is a new requisite when drilling in carbonates reservoirs offshore Brazil. These reservoirs are difficult to characterize due to an unusual mixture of the minerals constituting the matrix and affecting rock texture. As wells are getting deeper and more expensive, an early identification of the drilled targets potential is necessary for valuable decisions. Brazil operators have been especially demanding towards service providers, pushing for development of suitable services able to positively identify and quantify not only the presence of hydrocarbons but also their flowing capability. In addition to the standard gamma ray / resistivity / porosity and density measurements, three new measurements have proven to be critical to evaluate complex carbonate formations: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Spectroscopy and Capture Cross-Section (sigma). Under appropriate logging conditions, NMR data provides lithology independent porosity, bound and free fluids fractions, reservoir texture and permeability. Capture Spectroscopy allows assessment of mineral composition in terms of calcite, dolomite, quartz and clay fractions, and in addition highlights presence of other heavier minerals. Finally, sigma allows performing a volumetric formation evaluation without requiring custom optimization of the classical exponents used in all forms of resistivity saturation equations. All these new measurements are inherently statistical and if provided by wireline after drilling the well they may result in significant usage of rig time. When acquired simultaneously while drilling they have three very clear advantages: 1) no extra rig time, 2) improved statistics due to long formation exposure (drilling these carbonates is a slow process and rate of penetration (ROP) rarely exceeds 10 m/hr), 3) less invasion effect and better hole condition. This paper describes the development of two LWD tools performing the

  6. Complex Formation of Human Proelastases with Procarboxypeptidases A1 and A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, András; Pilsak, Claudia; Bence, Melinda; Witt, Heiko; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2016-08-19

    The pancreas secretes digestive proenzymes typically in their monomeric form. A notable exception is the ternary complex formed by proproteinase E, chymotrypsinogen C, and procarboxypeptidase A (proCPA) in cattle and other ruminants. In the human and pig pancreas binary complexes of proCPA with proelastases were found. To characterize complex formation among human pancreatic protease zymogens in a systematic manner, we performed binding experiments using recombinant proelastases CELA2A, CELA3A, and CELA3B; chymotrypsinogens CTRB1, CTRB2, CTRC, and CTRL1; and procarboxypeptidases CPA1, CPA2, and CPB1. We found that proCELA3B bound not only to proCPA1 (KD 43 nm) but even more tightly to proCPA2 (KD 18 nm), whereas proCELA2A bound weakly to proCPA1 only (KD 152 nm). Surprisingly, proCELA3A, which shares 92% identity with proCELA3B, did not form stable complexes due to the evolutionary replacement of Ala(241) with Gly. The polymorphic nature of position 241 in both CELA3A (∼4% Ala(241) alleles) and CELA3B (∼2% Gly(241) alleles) points to individual variations in complex formation. The functional effect of complex formation was delayed procarboxypeptidase activation due to increased affinity of the inhibitory activation peptide, whereas proelastase activation was unchanged. We conclude that complex formation among human pancreatic protease zymogens is limited to a subset of proelastases and procarboxypeptidases. Complex formation stabilizes the inhibitory activation peptide of procarboxypeptidases and thereby increases zymogen stability and controls activation. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Complex Formation of Human Proelastases with Procarboxypeptidases A1 and A2*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, András; Pilsak, Claudia; Bence, Melinda; Witt, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    The pancreas secretes digestive proenzymes typically in their monomeric form. A notable exception is the ternary complex formed by proproteinase E, chymotrypsinogen C, and procarboxypeptidase A (proCPA) in cattle and other ruminants. In the human and pig pancreas binary complexes of proCPA with proelastases were found. To characterize complex formation among human pancreatic protease zymogens in a systematic manner, we performed binding experiments using recombinant proelastases CELA2A, CELA3A, and CELA3B; chymotrypsinogens CTRB1, CTRB2, CTRC, and CTRL1; and procarboxypeptidases CPA1, CPA2, and CPB1. We found that proCELA3B bound not only to proCPA1 (KD 43 nm) but even more tightly to proCPA2 (KD 18 nm), whereas proCELA2A bound weakly to proCPA1 only (KD 152 nm). Surprisingly, proCELA3A, which shares 92% identity with proCELA3B, did not form stable complexes due to the evolutionary replacement of Ala241 with Gly. The polymorphic nature of position 241 in both CELA3A (∼4% Ala241 alleles) and CELA3B (∼2% Gly241 alleles) points to individual variations in complex formation. The functional effect of complex formation was delayed procarboxypeptidase activation due to increased affinity of the inhibitory activation peptide, whereas proelastase activation was unchanged. We conclude that complex formation among human pancreatic protease zymogens is limited to a subset of proelastases and procarboxypeptidases. Complex formation stabilizes the inhibitory activation peptide of procarboxypeptidases and thereby increases zymogen stability and controls activation. PMID:27358403

  8. Cleavage and formation of molecular dinitrogen in a single system assisted by molybdenum complexes bearing ferrocenyldiphosphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Takamasa; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Tanabe, Yoshiaki; Yuki, Masahiro; Nakajima, Kazunari; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki

    2014-10-20

    The N≡N bond of molecular dinitrogen bridging two molybdenum atoms in the pentamethylcyclopentadienyl molybdenum complexes that bear ferrocenyldiphosphine as an auxiliary ligand is homolytically cleaved under visible light irradiation at room temperature to afford two molar molybdenum nitride complexes. Conversely, the bridging molecular dinitrogen is reformed by the oxidation of the molybdenum nitride complex at room temperature. This result provides a successful example of the cleavage and formation of molecular dinitrogen induced by a pair of two different external stimuli using a single system assisted by molybdenum complexes bearing ferrocenyldiphosphine under ambient conditions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Complex formation, promiscuity and multi-functionality: protein interactions in disease-resistance pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasu, Ken; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2003-06-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that plant disease-resistance (R) proteins assemble in hetero-multimeric protein complexes in the absence of pathogens. Such complexes might enable the indirect recognition of pathogen effector molecules during attempted pathogen invasion. RAR1 and SGT1 are required for the function of most known R proteins. They interact with each other and with diverse protein complexes, which might explain their multi-functionality. The promiscuous behavior of RAR1 and SGT1 might be crucial for the formation and activation of R protein-containing recognition complexes as well as for regulating downstream signaling processes.

  10. Complexometric determination: Part I - EDTA and complex formation with the Cu2+ ion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Compounds forming very stable complexes - chelates, have a wide field of application in analytical chemistry. The most famous group of these compounds are complexons. Complexons represent organic polyaminocarbonic acids as for example ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA and its salts. The EDTA molecule has six coordinative sites. It is a hexadentate ligands i.e. it has two binding nitrogen atoms and four oxygen atoms from carboxyl groups and it forms complexes with almost all metal ions. EDTA as a tetraprotonic acid, H4Y disociates through four steps, yielding the ions HsY-, H2Y2-, HY3- and Y4-. Which of the EDTA forms will be encountered in a solution, depends on the pH. Due to the poor solubility of EDTA in pure water, as well as in most organic solvents, the disodium salt of EDTA Na2H2Y-2H2O, under the commercial name complexon III, is utilized for analytical determinations. In water, EDTA forms soluble, stabile chelate complexes with all cations, at the molar ratio 1:1, regardless of the charge of the metal ion. In contrast to other equilibria, which are mainly defined by Le Chatellier's principle, equilibria related to metal-EDTA complex formation are also dependent on the influence of the secondary equilibria of EDTA complex formation. Complexing reactions, which are equilibrium reactions, are simultaneously influenced by the following factors: solution pH and the presence of complexing agents which may also form a stabile complex with metal ions. The secondary reaction influence may be viewed and monitored through conditional stability constants. In the first part of the paper, the reaction of the formation of the Cu2+-ion complex with EDTA is analyzed beginning from the main reaction through various influences of secondary reactions on the complex Cu2+-EDTA: pH effect, complexation effect and hydrolysis effect. The equations are given for conditional stability constants, which include equilibrium reactions under actual conditions.

  11. Plasmodium falciparum origin recognition complex subunit 5: functional characterization and role in DNA replication foci formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashish; Mehra, Parul; Dhar, Suman Kumar

    2008-08-01

    The mechanism of DNA replication initiation and progression is poorly understood in the parasites, including human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Using bioinformatics tools and yeast complementation assay, we identified a putative homologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiaeorigin recognition complex subunit 5 in P. falciparum (PfORC5). PfORC5 forms distinct nuclear foci colocalized with the replication foci marker proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PfPCNA) and co-immunoprecipitates with PCNA during early-to-mid trophozoite stage replicating parasites. Interestingly, these proteins separate from each other at the non-replicating late schizont stage, citing the evidence of the presence of both PCNA and ORC components in replication foci during eukaryotic DNA replication. PfORC1, another ORC subunit, colocalizes with PfPCNA and PfORC5 at the beginning of DNA replication, but gets degraded at the late schizont stage, ensuring the regulation of DNA replication in the parasites. Further, we have identified putative PCNA-interacting protein box in PfORC1 that may explain in part the colocalization of PfORC and PfPCNA. Additionally, use of specific DNA replication inhibitor hydroxyurea affects ORC5/PCNA foci formation and parasitic growth. These results strongly favour replication factory model in the parasites and confer great potential to understand the co-ordination between ORC and PCNA during eukaryotic DNA replication in general.

  12. Unforeseen decreases in dissolved oxygen levels affect tube formation kinetics in collagen gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Truitt, Rachel; Tan, Scott

    2011-01-01

    The availability of oxygen (O2) is a critical parameter affecting vascular tube formation. In this study, we hypothesize that dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in collagen gels change during the three-dimensional (3D) culture of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in atmospheric conditions and that such changes affect the kinetics of tube formation through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We demonstrate a decrease in O2 tension during 3D cultures of HUVECs. Noninvasive measurements of DO levels during culture under atmospheric conditions revealed a profound decrease that reached as low as 2% O2 at the end of 24 h. After media replacement, DO levels rose rapidly and equilibrated at ∼15% O2, creating a reoxygenated environment. To accurately estimate DO gradients in 3D collagen gels, we developed a 3D mathematical model and determined the Michaelis-Menten parameters, Vmax and Km, of HUVECs in collagen gels. We detected an increase in ROS levels throughout the culture period. Using diphenyliodonium to inhibit ROS production resulted in the complete inhibition of tube formation. Interference RNA studies further showed that hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs)-1α and -2α are not involved in the formation of 3D tubes in collagen gels. We conclude that ROS affect the tubulogenesis process through HIFα-independent pathways, where the levels of ROS are influenced by the uncontrolled variations in DO levels. This study is the first demonstration of the critical and unexpected role of O2 during 3D in vitro culture models of tubulogenesis in atmospheric conditions. PMID:21543738

  13. Effects of chemical and enzymatic modifications on starch-linoleic acid complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arijaje, Emily Oluwaseun; Wang, Ya-Jane

    2017-02-15

    This study investigated the complexation yield and physicochemical properties of soluble and insoluble starch complexes with linoleic acid when a β-amylase treatment was applied to acetylated and debranched potato starch. The degree of acetylation was generally higher in the soluble complexes than in the insoluble ones. The insoluble complexes from the acetylated starch displayed the V-type pattern, whereas, the soluble complexes displayed a mixture of either the A-/V-type or the B-/V-type pattern. Acetylation decreased onset and peak melting temperatures for the insoluble complexes, whereas no melting endotherm was observed in the soluble complexes. Acetylation substantially increased the amount of complexed linoleic acid in the insoluble complexes, but had little positive effect on the formation of the soluble complexes. The β-amylase treatment significantly increased the complexed linoleic content in both soluble and insoluble complexes for the low acetylated starch, but not for the high acetylated starch. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Complex Formation of Selected Radionuclides with Ligands Commonly Found in Ground Water: Low Molecular Organic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bror Skytte; Jensen, H.

    1985-01-01

    A general approach to the analysis of potentiometric data on complex formation between cations and polybasic amphoteric acids is described. The method is used for the characterisation of complex formation between Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, La 3+, and Eu3+ with a α-hydroxy acids, tartaric acid and citric ac......, and with the α-amino acids, aspartic acid and L-cysteine. The cations have been chosen as typical components of reactor waste, and the acids because they are often found as products of microbial activity in pits or wherever organic material decays...

  15. Complex Formation of Selected Radionuclides with Ligands Commonly Found in Ground Water: Low Molecular Organic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bror Skytte; Jensen, H.

    1985-01-01

    A general approach to the analysis of potentiometric data on complex formation between cations and polybasic amphoteric acids is described. The method is used for the characterisation of complex formation between Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, La 3+, and Eu3+ with a α-hydroxy acids, tartaric acid and citric acid......, and with the α-amino acids, aspartic acid and L-cysteine. The cations have been chosen as typical components of reactor waste, and the acids because they are often found as products of microbial activity in pits or wherever organic material decays...

  16. Examining complexity across domains: relating subjective and objective measures of affective environmental scenes, paintings and music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Manuela M; Leder, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Subjective complexity has been found to be related to hedonic measures of preference, pleasantness and beauty, but there is no consensus about the nature of this relationship in the visual and musical domains. Moreover, the affective content of stimuli has been largely neglected so far in the study of complexity but is crucial in many everyday contexts and in aesthetic experiences. We thus propose a cross-domain approach that acknowledges the multidimensional nature of complexity and that uses a wide range of objective complexity measures combined with subjective ratings. In four experiments, we employed pictures of affective environmental scenes, representational paintings, and Romantic solo and chamber music excerpts. Stimuli were pre-selected to vary in emotional content (pleasantness and arousal) and complexity (low versus high number of elements). For each set of stimuli, in a between-subjects design, ratings of familiarity, complexity, pleasantness and arousal were obtained for a presentation time of 25 s from 152 participants. In line with Berlyne's collative-motivation model, statistical analyses controlling for familiarity revealed a positive relationship between subjective complexity and arousal, and the highest correlations were observed for musical stimuli. Evidence for a mediating role of arousal in the complexity-pleasantness relationship was demonstrated in all experiments, but was only significant for females with regard to music. The direction and strength of the linear relationship between complexity and pleasantness depended on the stimulus type and gender. For environmental scenes, the root mean square contrast measures and measures of compressed file size correlated best with subjective complexity, whereas only edge detection based on phase congruency yielded equivalent results for representational paintings. Measures of compressed file size and event density also showed positive correlations with complexity and arousal in music, which is

  17. Mass-dependent and -independent fractionation of isotopes in Ni and Pb chelate complex formation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Masao; Kudo, Takashi; Adachi, Atsuhiko; Aida, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2013-11-01

    Mass independent fractionation (MIF) has been a very interesting topic in the field of inorganic isotope chemistry, in particular, geo- and cosmo- chemistry. In the present work, we studied the isotope fractionation of Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions in complex formation with chelating reagent EDTA. To obtain clear results on the mass dependence of the isotope fractionation, we have conducted long-distance ion exchange chromatography of Ni(II) and Pb(II), using chelate complex reagent EDTA. The results apparently show that the isotope fractionation in Ni complex formation system is governed by the mass dependent rule. On the other hand the isotope fractionation in the Pb complex system is governed by the mass independent rule or the nuclear volume effect.

  18. Formation of trans-activation competent HIV-1 Rev:RRE complexes requires the recruitment of multiple protein activation domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Dirk; Schwarck, Doreen; Banning, Carina; Brenner, Matthias; Mariyanna, Lakshmikanth; Krepstakies, Marcel; Schindler, Michael; Millar, David P; Hauber, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The HIV-1 Rev trans-activator is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein that is essential for virus replication. Rev directly binds to unspliced and incompletely spliced viral RNA via the cis-acting Rev Response Element (RRE) sequence. Subsequently, Rev oligomerizes cooperatively and interacts with the cellular nuclear export receptor CRM1. In addition to mediating nuclear RNA export, Rev also affects the stability, translation and packaging of Rev-bound viral transcripts. Although it is established that Rev function requires the multimeric assembly of Rev molecules on the RRE, relatively little is known about how many Rev monomers are sufficient to form a trans-activation competent Rev:RRE complex, or which specific activity of Rev is affected by its oligomerization. We here analyzed by functional studies how homooligomer formation of Rev affects the trans-activation capacity of this essential HIV-1 regulatory protein. In a gain-of-function approach, we fused various heterologous dimerization domains to an otherwise oligomerization-defective Rev mutant and were able to demonstrate that oligomerization of Rev is not required per se for the nuclear export of this viral trans-activator. In contrast, however, the formation of Rev oligomers on the RRE is a precondition to trans-activation by directly affecting the nuclear export of Rev-regulated mRNA. Moreover, experimental evidence is provided showing that at least two protein activation domains are required for the formation of trans-activation competent Rev:RRE complexes. The presented data further refine the model of Rev trans-activation by directly demonstrating that Rev oligomerization on the RRE, thereby recruiting at least two protein activation domains, is required for nuclear export of unspliced and incompletely spliced viral RNA.

  19. Dynamics of nanoparticle-protein corona complex formation: analytical results from population balance equations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faryad Darabi Sahneh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nanoparticle-protein corona complex formation involves absorption of protein molecules onto nanoparticle surfaces in a physiological environment. Understanding the corona formation process is crucial in predicting nanoparticle behavior in biological systems, including applications of nanotoxicology and development of nano drug delivery platforms. METHOD: This paper extends the modeling work in to derive a mathematical model describing the dynamics of nanoparticle corona complex formation from population balance equations. We apply nonlinear dynamics techniques to derive analytical results for the composition of nanoparticle-protein corona complex, and validate our results through numerical simulations. RESULTS: The model presented in this paper exhibits two phases of corona complex dynamics. In the first phase, proteins rapidly bind to the free surface of nanoparticles, leading to a metastable composition. During the second phase, continuous association and dissociation of protein molecules with nanoparticles slowly changes the composition of the corona complex. Given sufficient time, composition of the corona complex reaches an equilibrium state of stable composition. We find analytical approximate formulae for metastable and stable compositions of corona complex. Our formulae are very well-structured to clearly identify important parameters determining corona composition. CONCLUSION: The dynamics of biocorona formation constitute vital aspect of interactions between nanoparticles and living organisms. Our results further understanding of these dynamics through quantitation of experimental conditions, modeling results for in vitro systems to better predict behavior for in vivo systems. One potential application would involve a single cell culture medium related to a complex protein medium, such as blood or tissue fluid.

  20. Theoretical study of the possibility of glycin with thiotriazoline complexes formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Kucherenko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain strokes are widely spread all over the world and are among the most dangerous for the population. Often it leads to death, complete or partial loss of ability to work. The correction of imbalance of Excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems by activation of natural inhibitory processes is a promising direction of primary neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia. Particular attention is drawn to the natural inhibitory neurotransmitter – glycine and its role in the mechanisms of acute cerebral ischemia. There are data on the ability of the thiotriazoline antioxidant to potentiate the therapeutic effect of neurometabolic cerebroprotectors. Therefore, the creation of new combined preparation based on glycine with thiotriazoline is important today. Objective: to study the structure, and estimate the energy of formation and geometric characteristics of the intermolecular hydrogen bonds for complexes which are formed with glycine, 3-methyl-1,2,4-triazolyl-5-thioacetate (MTTA and morpholine. Method of calculation. The initial approximation to the structure of the complexes was obtained with the help of molecular docking procedure using the AutoDock Vina program. The resulting three-component complexes were preliminarily optimized by the semiempirical PM7 method, taking into account the outward influences, which was simulated by the COSMO method. The calculations were carried out using the MOPAC2012 program. The complexes were optimized using the density functional method with the empirical dispersion correction B97-D3/SVP+COSMO (Water using geometric correction for the incompleteness of the gCP basic set. A more accurate calculation of the solvation energy was carried out by SMD method. Calculations by the density functional method were carried out using the ORCA 3.0.3 program. The energy of formation of complexes in solution was calculated as the difference between the free Gibbs energies of the solvated complex and its individual solvated

  1. The sound of a mobile phone ringing affects the complex reaction time of its owner

    OpenAIRE

    Zajdel, Radoslaw; Zajdel, Justyna; Zwolińska, Anna; Śmigielski, Janusz; Beling, Piotr; Cegliński, Tomasz; Nowak, Dariusz

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mobile phone conversation decreases the ability to concentrate and impairs the attention necessary to perform complex activities, such as driving a car. Does the ringing sound of a mobile phone affect the driver's ability to perform complex sensory-motor activities? We compared a subject's reaction time while performing a test either with a mobile phone ringing or without. Material and methods The examination was performed on a PC-based reaction time self-constructed system React...

  2. Cation-induced formation of a macro-glucan synthase complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delmer, D.; Solomon, M.; Andrawis, A.; Amor, Y. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel))

    1990-05-01

    Incubation of Chaps or digitonin-solubilized membrane proteins from cotton fiber with Ca{sup 2+} in combination with Mg{sup 2+}, leads to formation of a complex which can be sedimented within 15 min at 15,000 g. The complex is enriched >10-fold in callose synthase activity and possesses a characteristic pattern of enriched polypeptides when analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Although cation dependent, formation of the complex is not dependent upon the presence of the callose synthase substrate, UDP-glc, indicating that complex formation is not due to entrapment of the enzyme by association with glucan product. The enriched polypeptides include: >200, 50, and 46 kD, all of which have been shown by direct photo-labeling to interact with {sup 92}P-UDP-glc in a Ca{sup 2+} or beta-glucoside dependent reaction are considered likely subunits of callose synthase; a 60-62 kD doublet which is recognized by our MAb 2-1 which can form an immune complex with callose synthase; 74 and 34 kD polypeptides which also interact with UDP-glc, but do not associate with callose synthase in the presence of EDTA. A similar phenomenon is also observed with solubilized membrane proteins from mung beans. Possible functions of each of the enriched polypeptides, the catalytic properties, and ultra-structure of this macro-glucan synthase complex are currently under investigation.

  3. Mutations at the Qo-Site of the Cytochrome bc1 Complex Strongly Affect Oxygen Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husen, Peter; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2017-01-01

    The homodimeric bc1 protein complex is embedded in membranes of mitochondria and photosynthetic bacteria, where it transports protons across the membrane to maintain an electrostatic potential used to drive ATP synthesis as part of the respiratory or photosynthetic pathways. The reaction cycle...... investigation employs molecular dynamics simulations to study the effect of mutations in the Qo binding sites of the bc1 complex on the ability of oxygen molecules to migrate to and bind at various locations within the complex. It is found that the mutations strongly affect the ability of oxygen to bind...

  4. ZnO Nanoparticles Affect Bacillus subtilis Cell Growth and Biofilm Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Huang Hsueh

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs are an important antimicrobial additive in many industrial applications. However, mass-produced ZnO NPs are ultimately disposed of in the environment, which can threaten soil-dwelling microorganisms that play important roles in biodegradation, nutrient recycling, plant protection, and ecological balance. This study sought to understand how ZnO NPs affect Bacillus subtilis, a plant-beneficial bacterium ubiquitously found in soil. The impact of ZnO NPs on B. subtilis growth, FtsZ ring formation, cytosolic protein activity, and biofilm formation were assessed, and our results show that B. subtilis growth is inhibited by high concentrations of ZnO NPs (≥ 50 ppm, with cells exhibiting a prolonged lag phase and delayed medial FtsZ ring formation. RedoxSensor and Phag-GFP fluorescence data further show that at ZnO-NP concentrations above 50 ppm, B. subtilis reductase activity, membrane stability, and protein expression all decrease. SDS-PAGE Stains-All staining results and FT-IR data further demonstrate that ZnO NPs negatively affect exopolysaccharide production. Moreover, it was found that B. subtilis biofilm surface structures became smooth under ZnO-NP concentrations of only 5-10 ppm, with concentrations ≤ 25 ppm significantly reducing biofilm formation activity. XANES and EXAFS spectra analysis further confirmed the presence of ZnO in co-cultured B. subtilis cells, which suggests penetration of cell membranes by either ZnO NPs or toxic Zn+ ions from ionized ZnO NPs, the latter of which may be deionized to ZnO within bacterial cells. Together, these results demonstrate that ZnO NPs can affect B. subtilis viability through the inhibition of cell growth, cytosolic protein expression, and biofilm formation, and suggest that future ZnO-NP waste management strategies would do well to mitigate the potential environmental impact engendered by the disposal of these nanoparticles.

  5. Trans-complex formation by proteolipid channels in the terminal phase of membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, C; Bayer, M J; Bühler, S

    2001-01-01

    -complex formation occurs downstream from trans-SNARE pairing, and depends on both the Rab-GTPase Ypt7 and calmodulin. The maintenance of existing complexes and completion of fusion are independent of trans-SNARE pairs. Reconstituted proteolipids form sealed channels, which can expand to form aqueous pores in a Ca2......+/calmodulin-dependent fashion. V0 trans-complexes may therefore form a continuous, proteolipid-lined channel at the fusion site. We propose that radial expansion of such a protein pore may be a mechanism for intracellular membrane fusion....

  6. Peculiarities of litter invertebrates’ multispecies complexes formation on the Khortitsa Island (Zaporizhzhya province)

    OpenAIRE

    Fedorchenko, D.; Brygadyrenko, V.

    2008-01-01

    Peculiarities of litter invertebrates’ complexes formation under conditions of the Khortitsa National Reserve (Zaporizhzhya province) are studied. The dispersion of taxonomic groups of different levels (families and species) in litter mesofauna is swayed by the inter- and intrasystem factors; the largest influence has the power of litter and its humidity. The rate of ecological factors’ influence at different taxonomic levels may diverge.

  7. Copper(II) complex as a precursor for formation of cyano-bridged ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chemsci

    Copper(II) complex as a precursor for formation of cyano-bridged pentanuclear Fe. III. -Cu. II bimetallic assembly: Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and antibacterial ... Single-crystal X-ray analysis indicated that 2 crystallized in the monoclinic system with ..... maximum absorption band at 431nm was assigned to.

  8. Thermodynamic characteristics of the formation of complexes of nickel(II) with L-homoserine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridchin, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    The formation of complexes of nickel(II) with L-homoserine at 298.15 K and ionic strengths I = 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 (KNO3) are investigated by potentiometry and calorimetry. Standard characteristics of studied equilibria (log K°, Δr G°, Δr H°, and Δr S°) are determined.

  9. Copper (II) complex as a precursor for formation of cyano-bridged ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Copper(II) complex as a precursor for formation of cyano-bridged pentanuclear FeIII-CuII bimetallic assembly: Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and ... ATCC 27853 strains were studied and compared with standard drugs, which showed moderate antibacterial activity compared with Penicillin and Gentamicin.

  10. The Vtc proteins in vacuole fusion: coupling NSF activity to V(0) trans-complex formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Oliver; Bayer, Martin J; Peters, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    The fusion of cellular membranes comprises several steps; membrane attachment requires priming of SNAREs and tethering factors by Sec18p/NSF (N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor) and LMA1. This leads to trans-SNARE pairing, i.e. formation of SNARE complexes between apposed membranes. The yeast...

  11. Mixed-ligand complex formation equilibria of Cu with biguanide in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    metric EDTA titration methods.23 Equilibrium study for the determination of proton-ligand and metal- ligand complex formation constants involved pH- metric titrations of series of solutions, each of initial volume 0⋅025 dm–3, containing known amounts. (0⋅001–0⋅002 mol dm–3) of the ligands, biguanide and/or glycine in ...

  12. Proton transfer and complex formation of angiotensin I ions with gaseous molecules at various temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonose, Shinji, E-mail: nonose@yokohama-cu.ac.jp; Yamashita, Kazuki; Sudo, Ayako; Kawashima, Minami

    2013-09-23

    Highlights: • Proton transfer from angiotensin I ions (z = 2, 3) to gaseous molecules was studied. • Temperature dependence of absolute reaction rate constants was measured. • Remarkable changes were obtained for distribution of product ions and reaction rate constants. • Proton transfer reaction was enhanced and reduced by complex formation. • Conformation changes are induced by complex formation and or by thermal collision with He. - Abstract: Proton transfer reactions of angiotensin I ions for +2 charge state, [M + 2H]{sup 2+}, to primary, secondary and aromatic amines were examined in the gas phase. Absolute reaction rate constants for proton transfer were determined from intensities of parent and product ions in the mass spectra. Temperature dependence of the reaction rate constants was measured. Remarkable change was observed for distribution of product ions and reaction rate constants. Proton transfer reaction was enhanced or reduced by complex formation of [M + 2H]{sup 2+} with gaseous molecules. The results relate to conformation changes of [M + 2H]{sup 2+} with change of temperature, which are induced by complex formation and or by thermal collision with He. Proton transfer reactions of angiotensin I ions for +3 charge state, [M + 3H]{sup 3+}, were also studied. The reaction rates did not depend on temperature so definitely.

  13. On the complex formation approach in modeling predator prey relations, mating, and sexual disease transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horst R. Thieme

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Complex formation is used as a unified approach to derive representations and approximations of the functional response in predator prey relations, mating, and sexual disease transmission. Applications are given to the impact of a generalist predator on a prey population and the spread of a sexually transmitted disease in a multi-group heterosexual population.

  14. Complex formation of Np(V) with fulvic acid at tracer metal concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, K. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Sasaki, T. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2013-03-01

    Apparent formation constants of pentavalent Np with fulvic acid (FA) were determined in 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4}, at 25 C using a solvent extraction technique with thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) and phenanthroline (phen) in an isoamyl alcohol solution. The metal concentration was set constant to a tracer level of 10{sup -15} M Np(V), relevant for the far field safety assessment of a nuclear waste disposal site. The impact of several solution conditions, namely pH, ionic strength, the initial fulvic acid concentration and the presence of Ca{sup 2+}, on the complex formation were studied. Similar to the sodium system, the divalent calcium ion effectively prevents complexation of the neptunyl ion with fulvic acid. Furthermore, the derived apparent formation constants were comparatively discussed with literature values obtained at very similar solution conditions. (orig.)

  15. Terabit bandwidth-adaptive transmission using low-complexity format-transparent digital signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuge, Qunbi; Morsy-Osman, Mohamed; Chagnon, Mathieu; Xu, Xian; Qiu, Meng; Plant, David V

    2014-02-10

    In this paper, we propose a low-complexity format-transparent digital signal processing (DSP) scheme for next generation flexible and energy-efficient transceiver. It employs QPSK symbols as the training and pilot symbols for the initialization and tracking stage of the receiver-side DSP, respectively, for various modulation formats. The performance is numerically and experimentally evaluated in a dual polarization (DP) 11 Gbaud 64QAM system. Employing the proposed DSP scheme, we conduct a system-level study of Tb/s bandwidth-adaptive superchannel transmissions with flexible modulation formats including QPSK, 8QAM and 16QAM. The spectrum bandwidth allocation is realized in the digital domain instead of turning on/off sub-channels, which improves the performance of higher order QAM. Various transmission distances ranging from 240 km to 6240 km are demonstrated with a colorless detection for hardware complexity reduction.

  16. High-Frequency Promoter Firing Links THO Complex Function to Heavy Chromatin Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouaikel, John; Causse, Sébastien Z; Rougemaille, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    The THO complex is involved in transcription, genome stability, and messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) formation, but its precise molecular function remains enigmatic. Under heat shock conditions, THO mutants accumulate large protein-DNA complexes that alter the chromatin density of target genes...... (heavy chromatin), defining a specific biochemical facet of THO function and a powerful tool of analysis. Here, we show that heavy chromatin distribution is dictated by gene boundaries and that the gene promoter is necessary and sufficient to convey THO sensitivity in these conditions. Single......-molecule fluorescence insitu hybridization measurements show that heavy chromatin formation correlates with an unusually high firing pace of the promoter with more than 20 transcription events per minute. Heavy chromatin formation closely follows the modulation of promoter firing and strongly correlates with polymerase...

  17. Erythromycin resistance features and biofilm formation affected by subinhibitory erythromycin in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hong-Jing; Sun, Feng-Jun; Wang, Qian; Liu, Yao; Xiong, Li-Rong; Xia, Pei-Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Subminimal inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC) of antibiotics can modify the phenotype of biofilm formation in bacteria. However, the relationship between resistance phenotypes, genotypes, and the biofilm formation phenotype in response to sub-MIC antibiotics remains unclear. Here, we collected 96 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) and investigated the erythromycin (ERY) susceptibility, the biofilm formation in respond to sub-MIC ERY, the presence and transcription expression of erm genes. Serial passage of induction resistance was used against ERY-susceptible isolates and biofilm formation in response to their new sub-MIC ERY was determined. The incidence of biofilm phenotype modification in ERY-resistant isolates was significantly higher than that of ERY-susceptible isolates [27/85 (31.8%) vs. 0/11 (0%), p = 0.031]. Yet, ERY-susceptible isolates displayed the phenomenon of biofilm phenotype modification (7/11), after induction of resistance to ERY. The ermC gene was absolutely dominant among the three macrolide resistant genes including erm (A, B, C) [6/96 (6.2%), 6/96 (6.2%), and 91/96 (94.8%), respectively]. With statistic stratification analysis, a linear and positive correlation was identified between the two factors in the biofilm-enhanced strains, a linear and negative correlation in biofilm-inhibited strains, and a weakly positive correlation in biofilm-unaffected strains (R(2) = 0.4992, 0.3686, and 0.0512, respectively). The results suggest that the ERY resistance phenotype and the transcription expression of ermC gene could be considered as important signs to estimate whether the biofilm formation phenotype in S. epidermidis clinical isolates can be easily affected by sub-MIC ERY. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Recrystallized Impact Glasses of the Onaping Formation and the Sudbury Igneous Complex, Sudbury Structure, Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, B. O.; Weiser, T.; Brockmeyer, P.

    1996-01-01

    The origin of the Sudbury Structure and of the associated heterolithic breccias of the Onaping Formation and the Sudbury Igneous Complex have been controversial. While an impact origin of the structure has gained wide acceptance over the last 15 years, the origin of the recrystallized Onaping Formation glasses and of the igneous complex is still being debated. Recently the interpretation of the breccias of the Onaping Formation as suevitic fall-back impact breccias has been challenged. The igneous complex is interpreted either as a differentiated impact melt sheet or as a combination of an upper impact melt represented by the granophyre, and a lower, impact-triggered magmatic body consisting of the norite-sublayer formations. The Onaping Formation contains glasses as fluidal and nonfluidal fragments of various shapes and sizes. They are recrystallized, and our research indicates that they are petrographically heterogeneous and span a wide range of chemical compositions. These characteristics are not known from glasses of volcanic deposits. This suggests an origin by shock vitrification, an interpretation consistent with their association with numerous and varied country rock clasts that exhibit microscopic shock metamorphic features. The recrystallized glass fragments represent individual solid-state and liquid-state vitrified rocks or relatively small melt pods. The basal member lies beneath the Gray and Black members of the Onaping Formation and, where not metamorphic, has an igneous matrix. Igneous-textured melt bodies occur in the upper two members and above the Basal Member. A comparison of the chemical compositions of recrystallized glasses and of the matrices of the Basal Member and the melt bodies with the components and the bulk composition of the igneous complex is inconclusive as to the origin of the igneous complex. Basal Member matrix and Melt Bodies, on average, are chemically similar to the granophyre of the Sudbury Igneous Complex, suggesting that

  19. Complexes of dextran sulfate and anthocyanins from Vaccinium myrtillus: Formation and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimaviciute, Rima; Navikaite, Vesta; Jakstas, Valdas; Ivanauskas, Liudas

    2015-09-20

    To improve the stability and antioxidant activity of anthocyanins (ATC), complexes of dextran sulfate (DESU) and ATC extracted from Vaccinium myrtillus were formed during electrostatic interaction between sulfo groups of DESU and cationic moieties of ATC. At the optimal weight ratio DESU/ATC=0.4 g/g, the amount of ATC introduced into a complex depended on the total concentration of the reagents. About 1.7 g of ATC per g of DESU could be incorporated into a complex. The formation of DESU/ATC complexes was confirmed by HPLC and FT-IR spectroscopy. According to HPLC analysis, the amount of individual ATC incorporated into a complex varied from 73.7% in the case of malvidin-3-O-glucoside to 90.8% in the case of delphinidin-3-arabinoside. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Stability of furosemide polymorphs and the effects of complex formation with β-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnero, Claudia; Chattah, Ana Karina; Longhi, Marcela

    2016-11-05

    The effect of the formation of supramolecular binary complexes with β-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin on the chemical and physical stability of the polymorphs I and II of furosemide was evaluated in solid state. The solid samples were placed under accelerated storage conditions and exposed to daylight into a stability chamber for a 6-month. Chemical stability was monitored by high performance liquid chromatography, while the physical stability was studied by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Changes in the physical appearance of the samples were evaluated. The studies showed a significant stabilizing effect of β-cyclodextrin on furosemide form II. Our results suggest that the complex formation is a useful tool for improving the stability of furosemide polymorphs. These new complexes are promising candidates that can be used in the pharmaceutical industry for the preparation of alternative matrices that improve physicochemical properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Lethal synergism between organic and inorganic wood preservatives via formation of an unusual lipophilic ternary complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Zhi-Guo; Li, Yan; Fan, Rui-Mei; Chao, Xi-Juan [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhu, Ben-Zhan, E-mail: bzhu@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    We have shown previously that exposing bacteria to wood preservatives pentachlorophenol (PCP) and copper-containing compounds together causes synergistic toxicity. However, it is not clear whether these findings also hold true in mammalian cells; and if so, what is the underlying molecular mechanism? Here we show that PCP and a model copper complex bis-(1,10-phenanthroline) cupric (Cu(OP){sub 2}), could also induce synergistic cytotoxicity in human liver cells. By the single crystal X-ray diffraction and atomic absorption spectroscopy assay, the synergism was found to be mainly due to the formation of a lipophilic ternary complex with unusual structural and composition characteristics and subsequent enhanced cellular copper uptake, which markedly promoted cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, leading to apoptosis by decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing pro-apoptotic protein expression, releasing cytochrome c from mitochondria and activating caspase-3, and -9. Analogous results were observed with other polychlorinated phenols (PCPs) and Cu(OP){sub 2}. Synergistic cytotoxicity could be induced by PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} via formation of an unusual lipophilic complex in HepG2 cells. The formation of ternary complexes with similar lipophilic character could be of relevance as a general mechanism of toxicity, which should be taken into consideration especially when evaluating the toxicity of environmental pollutants found at currently-considered non- or sub-toxic concentrations. -- Highlights: ► The combination of PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} induces synergistic cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. ► The synergism is mainly due to forming a lipophilic ternary complex between them. ► The formation of lipophilic ternary complex enhances cellular copper uptake. ► PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} stimulates the cellular ROS production. ► The ROS promoted by PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

  2. Density of founder cells affects spatial pattern formation and cooperation in Bacillus subtilis biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Weissing, Franz J; Kuipers, Oscar P; Kovács, Ákos T

    2014-01-01

    In nature, most bacteria live in surface-attached sedentary communities known as biofilms. Biofilms are often studied with respect to bacterial interactions. Many cells inhabiting biofilms are assumed to express ‘cooperative traits', like the secretion of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS). These traits can enhance biofilm-related properties, such as stress resilience or colony expansion, while being costly to the cells that express them. In well-mixed populations cooperation is difficult to achieve, because non-cooperative individuals can reap the benefits of cooperation without having to pay the costs. The physical process of biofilm growth can, however, result in the spatial segregation of cooperative from non-cooperative individuals. This segregation can prevent non-cooperative cells from exploiting cooperative neighbors. Here we examine the interaction between spatial pattern formation and cooperation in Bacillus subtilis biofilms. We show, experimentally and by mathematical modeling, that the density of cells at the onset of biofilm growth affects pattern formation during biofilm growth. At low initial cell densities, co-cultured strains strongly segregate in space, whereas spatial segregation does not occur at high initial cell densities. As a consequence, EPS-producing cells have a competitive advantage over non-cooperative mutants when biofilms are initiated at a low density of founder cells, whereas EPS-deficient cells have an advantage at high cell densities. These results underline the importance of spatial pattern formation for competition among bacterial strains and the evolution of microbial cooperation. PMID:24694715

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv ESAT-6-CFP-10 complex formation confers thermodynamic and biochemical stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, Akshaya K; Bal, Naresh Chandra; Chary, Kandala V R; Arora, Ashish

    2006-04-01

    The 6-kDa early secretory antigenic target (ESAT-6) and culture filtrate protein-10 (CFP-10), expressed from the region of deletion-1 (RD1) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, are known to play a key role in virulence. In this study, we explored the thermodynamic and biochemical changes associated with the formation of the 1 : 1 heterodimeric complex between ESAT-6 and CFP-10. Using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), we precisely determined the association constant and free energy change for formation of the complex to be 2 x 10(7) M(-1) and -9.95 kcal.mol(-1), respectively. Strikingly, the thermal unfolding of the ESAT-6-CFP-10 heterodimeric complex was completely reversible, with a T(m) of 53.4 degrees C and DeltaH of 69 kcal.mol(-1). Mixing of ESAT-6 and CFP-10 at any temperature below the T(m) of the complex led to induction of helical conformation, suggesting molecular recognition between specific segments of unfolded ESAT-6 and CFP-10. Enhanced biochemical stability of the complex was indicated by protection of ESAT-6 and an N-terminal fragment of CFP-10 from proteolysis with trypsin. However, the flexible C-terminal of CFP-10 in the complex, which has been shown to be responsible for binding to macrophages and monocytes, was cleaved by trypsin. In the presence of phospholipid membranes, ESAT-6, but not CFP-10 and the complex, showed an increase in alpha-helical content and enhanced thermal stability. Overall, complex formation resulted in structural changes, enhanced thermodynamic and biochemical stability, and loss of binding to phospholipid membranes. These features of complex formation probably determine the physiological role of ESAT-6, CFP-10 and/or the complex in vivo. The ITC and thermal unfolding approach described in this study can readily be applied to characterization of the 11 other pairs of ESAT-6 family proteins and for screening ESAT-6 and CFP-10 mutants.

  4. The role of focal adhesion complexes in fibroblast mechanotransduction during scar formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustad, Kristine C; Wong, Victor W; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2013-10-01

    Historically, great efforts have been made to elucidate the biochemical pathways that direct the complex process of wound healing; however only recently has there been recognition of the importance that mechanical signals play in the process of tissue repair and scar formation. The body's physiologic response to injury involves a dynamic interplay between mechanical forces and biochemical cues which directs a cascade of signals leading ultimately to the formation of fibrotic scar. Fibroblasts are a highly mechanosensitive cell type and are also largely responsible for the generation of the fibrotic matrix during scar formation and are thus a critical player in the process of mechanotransduction during tissue repair. Mechanotransduction is initiated at the interface between the cell membrane and the extracellular matrix where mechanical signals are first translated into a biochemical response. Focal adhesions are dynamic multi-protein complexes through which the extracellular matrix links to the intracellular cytoskeleton. These focal adhesion complexes play an integral role in the propagation of this initial mechanical cue into an extensive network of biochemical signals leading to widespread downstream effects including the influx of inflammatory cells, stimulation of angiogenesis, keratinocyte migration, fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis. Increasing evidence has demonstrated the importance of the biomechanical milieu in healing wounds and suggests that an integrated approach to the discovery of targets to decrease scar formation may prove more clinically efficacious than previous purely biochemical strategies. Copyright © 2012 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Formation of zinc-chlorophyll-derivative complexes in thermally processed green pears (Pyrus communis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, T; Zhao, Y

    2007-09-01

    The formation of zinc-chlorophyll-derivative complexes was investigated in peels-on green D'Anjou pears when subjected to blanching in zinc ion solution (1300, 2600, and 0 ppm) at 94 degrees C for 6, 12, or 18 min and then canning at 94 degrees C for 20 min. The peels removed from the pears were freeze-dried and ground into powders in liquid nitrogen for pigment extraction using ethyl ether. The visual absorption of the extracts was measured using a spectrophotometer along with identification and quantification of chlorophyll derivatives using reverse-phase HPLC method. Furthermore, pears with or without the peels were blanched in 2600 ppm of zinc solution for 12 min following the canning process in 10 degree Brix syrup solution. Total antioxidant (TA) and total phenolic content (TPC) of the pear flesh and peels were evaluated using Folin-Ciocalteu's phenol and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl assays. Thermal processing destroyed chlorophylls on pear peels, in which pheophytins were found to be the major degraded compounds while an insignificant amount of pyropheophytins was also formed. In zinc blanched peels, Zn pheophytins a was the dominant green compound, and its amount increased about 100% and 144.4% in peels blanched in 1300 ppm zinc solution for 6 and 12 min, respectively. When blanching peels in 2600 ppm zinc solution for 6 and 12 min, the pigment increased about 118% and 242%, respectively. Significant reductions in TA and TPC were found on the peels of zinc treated pears, but the overall TA and TPC of whole fruits were not significantly affected by the treatments.

  6. THE FORMATION OF THE COMPETITIVENESS OF THE ENTERPRISES OF MACHINE-BUILDING COMPLEX OF UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Zbyrannyk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose is to analyse the existing approaches to determine the value of the production of innovative products and innovation in enterprises of machine-building complex of Ukraine in order to improve their level of competitiveness. Methodology. Statistical analysis and generalization of scientific approaches to the formation of the competitiveness of machine-building enterprises. Results of the of the analyzed approaches allowed to identify the cause of the imperfection of innovation policy in engineering. According to the research, the number of machine-building enterprises engaged in innovation activity, constantly shrinks; the share of innovative products in the total is only 3.5-4%, and the volume of imports of high-tech products exceeding the size of own production; the level of knowledge-intensive industrial production is only 0.3%. All this slows down the process of creating competitive products and as a result, the failure to provide highly own products to other industries, take a niche world of mechanical engineering. Practical implications. Ensure accelerated economic growth of the country as the defining condition for implementation of the European integration aspirations of Ukraine in the short term requires the intensification of innovative activity of the machine-building enterprises. The current state of innovation activity of enterprises in Ukraine is characterized by a number of negative factors: the internal environment of the majority of machine-building enterprises does not correspond to the market conditions of managing: high energy productions, the growth of the degree of wear and tear of fixed assets and reduce investment to update them, the lack of introduction of advanced production and resource-saving technologies, reducing innovation activity due to lack of financial resources significantly affect the level of the competitive machine-building enterprises. Value/ originality systematic approaches to determining the

  7. Physicochemical Properties, Micromorphology and Clay Mineralogy of Soils Affected by Geological Formations, Geomorphology and Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bayat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil genesis and development in arid and semi-arid areas are strongly affected by geological formations and geomorphic surfaces. Various morphological, physical, and geochemical soil properties at different geomorphic positions are usually attributed to different soil forming factors including parent material and climate. Due to variations in climate, geological formations (Quaternary, Neogene and Cretaceous and geomorphology, the aim of the present research was the study of genesis, development, clay mineralogy, and micromorphology of soils affected by climate, geology and geomorphology in Bardsir area, Kerman Province. Materials and Methods: The study area, 25000 ha, starts from Bardsir and extends to Khanesorkh elevations close to Sirjan city. The climate of the area is warm and semi-arid with mean annual temperature and precipitation of 14.9 °C and 199 mm, respectively. Soil moisture and temperature regimes of the area are aridic and mesic due to 1:2500000 map, provided by Soil and Water Research Institute. Moving to west and southwest, soil moisture regime of the area changes to xeric with increasing elevation. Using topography and geology maps (1:100000 together with Google Earth images, geomorphic surfaces and geologic formations of the area were investigated. Mantled pediment (pedons 1, 3, 7, and 8, rock pediment (pedon 2, semi-stable alluvial plain (pedon 6, unstable alluvial plain (pedon 5, piedmont plain (pedons 9 and 11, intermediate surface of alluvial plain and pediment (pedon 4, and old river terrace (pedon 10 are among geomorphic surfaces investigated in the area. Mantled pediment is composed of young Quaternary sediments and Cretaceous marls. Rock pediments are mainly formed by Cretaceous marls. Quaternary formations are dominant in alluvial plains. Alluvial terraces and intermediate surface of alluvial plain and pediment are dominated by Neogene conglomerates. Siltstone, sandstone, and Neogene marls together with

  8. Daily Stress, Coping, and Negative and Positive Affect in Depression: Complex Trigger and Maintenance Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkley, David M; Lewkowski, Maxim; Lee, Ihno A; Preacher, Kristopher J; Zuroff, David C; Berg, Jody-Lynn; Foley, J Elizabeth; Myhr, Gail; Westreich, Ruta

    2017-05-01

    Major depressive disorder is characterized by emotional dysfunction, but mood states in daily life are not well understood. This study examined complex explanatory models of daily stress and coping mechanisms that trigger and maintain daily negative affect and (lower) positive affect in depression. Sixty-three depressed patients completed perfectionism measures, and then completed daily questionnaires of stress appraisals, coping, and affect for 7 consecutive days. Multilevel structural equation modeling (MSEM) demonstrated that, across many stressors, when the typical individual with depression perceives more criticism than usual, he/she uses more avoidant coping and experiences higher event stress than usual, and this is connected to daily increases in negative affect as well as decreases in positive affect. In parallel, results showed that perceived control, less avoidant coping, and problem-focused coping commonly operate together when daily positive affect increases. MSEM also showed that avoidant coping tendencies and ongoing stress, in combination, explain why people with depression and higher self-critical perfectionism maintain daily negative affect and lower positive affect. These findings advance a richer and more detailed understanding of specific stress and coping patterns to target in order to more effectively accomplish the two predominant therapy goals of decreasing patients' distress and strengthening resilience. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. A Reaction Method for Estimating Gibbs Energy and Enthalpy of Formation of Complex Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruibing; Zhang, Tingan; Liu, Yan; Kuang, Shibo

    2017-04-01

    New and updated thermodynamic data for simple binary compounds are readily available from both experimental measurements and theoretical calculations. Based on these available data, an approach is proposed to predict Gibbs energies and enthalpies of formation for complex minerals of metallurgical, chemical, and other industrial importance. The approach assumes that complex minerals are formed from binary composite oxides, which in turn, are formed from individual pure oxides. The validity of this approach is examined by comparing the calculated values of Gibbs energies and enthalpies against the experimentally measured ones reported in literature. The results show that for typical complex minerals with available experimental data, the calculated results exhibit an average residual of 0.51 pct for Gibbs energies and 0.52 pct for enthalpies, compared to the experimental results. This new approach thus correlates well with experimental approaches and can be applied to most of the complex minerals.

  10. 3D structure and formation of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Møre Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjoberg, Sigurd; Schmiedel, Tobias; Planke, Sverre; Svensen, Henrik H.; Galland, Oliver; Jerram, Dougal A.

    2016-04-01

    The mid-Norwegian Møre margin is regarded as a type example of a volcanic rifted margin, with its formation usually related to the influence of the Icelandic plume activity. The area is characterized by the presence of voluminous basaltic complexes such as extrusive lava sequences, intrusive sills and dikes, and hydrothermal vent complexes within the Møre Basin. Emplacement of hydrothermal vent complexes is accommodated by deformation of the host rock. The edges of igneous intrusions mobilize fluids by heat transfer into the sedimentary host rock (aureoles). Fluid expansion may lead to formation of piercing structures due to upward fluid migration. Hydrothermal vent complexes induce bending of overlying strata, leading to the formation of dome structures at the paleo-surface. These dome structures are important as they indicate the accommodation created for the intrusions by deformation of the upper layers of the stratigraphy, and may form important structures in many volcanic margins. Both the morphological characteristics of the upper part and the underlying feeder-structure (conduit-zone) can be imaged and studied on 3D seismic data. Seismic data from the Tulipan prospect located in the western part of the Møre Basin have been used in this study. The investigation focusses on (1) the vent complex geometries, (2) the induced surface deformation patterns, (3) the relation to the intrusions (heat source), as well as (4) the emplacement depth of the hydrothermal vent complexes. We approach this by doing a detailed 3D seismic interpretation of the Tulipan seismic data cube. The complexes formed during the initial Eocene, and are believed to be a key factor behind the rapid warming event called the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). The newly derived understanding of age, eruptive deposits, and formation of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Møre Basin enables us to contribute to the general understanding of the igneous plumbing system in volcanic basins and

  11. Green synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles via complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatimah, Is; Yudha, Septian P.; Mutiara, Nur Afisa Lintang

    2016-02-01

    Synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles(NPs) were conducted via Zn(II) complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract as template. Curcuma longa extract has the ability to form zinc ions complex with curcumin as ligating agent. Study on synthesis was conducted by monitoring thermal degradation of the material. Successful formation of zinc oxide nanoparticles was confirmed by employing x-ray diffraction, surface area analysis and transmission electron microscopy(TEM) studies. From the XRD analysis it is denoted that ZnO in hexagonal wurtzite phase was formed and particle size was varied as varied temperature. The data are also confirmed by TEM analysis which shows the particle sie at the range 20-80nm. The NPs exhibited excelent photocatalytic activity for methylene blue degradation and also significant antibacterial activity for Eschericia coli. The activity in methylene blue degradation was also confirmed from fast chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction.

  12. FORMATION OF METHODICAL COMPETENCE OF FUTURE PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS USING THE MULTIMEDIA METHODOLOGICAL COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Haran

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The future primary school teachers training to teach mathematics is carried out by means of the academic discipline «Methods of Teaching of Educational Branch «Mathematics»». The aim and result of the training is methodical competence formation of future primary school teachers. In the article the content and structure of methodical competence of the primary school teacher is considered, according to which statutory, variable, specifically methodical, control estimate, designing and modeling and technological components are specified . Author determined the composition of the multimedia methodical complex of discipline «Methods of Teaching of the Educational Branch «Mathematics»», including designer of presentations of lectures, bank of multimedia material for practical/laboratory work, bank of multimedia for self-activity work of students and bank of tests. The influence of multimedia that make up the components of the complex of methodical competence formation is substantiated

  13. Green synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles via complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatimah, Is, E-mail: isfatimah@uii.ac.id; Yudha, Septian P.; Mutiara, Nur Afisa Lintang [Chemistry Department, Islamic University of Indonesia Kampus Terpadu UII, Jl. Kaliurang Km 14, Sleman, Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    Synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles(NPs) were conducted via Zn(II) complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract as template. Curcuma longa extract has the ability to form zinc ions complex with curcumin as ligating agent. Study on synthesis was conducted by monitoring thermal degradation of the material. Successful formation of zinc oxide nanoparticles was confirmed by employing x-ray diffraction, surface area analysis and transmission electron microscopy(TEM) studies. From the XRD analysis it is denoted that ZnO in hexagonal wurtzite phase was formed and particle size was varied as varied temperature. The data are also confirmed by TEM analysis which shows the particle sie at the range 20-80nm. The NPs exhibited excelent photocatalytic activity for methylene blue degradation and also significant antibacterial activity for Eschericia coli. The activity in methylene blue degradation was also confirmed from fast chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction.

  14. Formation of Inclusion Complexes of Cycldextrin with Ethanol under Anhydrous Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, H; Kometani, T; Furuta, T; Watanabe, Y; Linko, Y Y; Linko, P

    1998-01-01

    Complex formation of poorly water soluble organic compounds with cyclodextrin (CD) is quite difficult in an aqueous cyclodextrin system. Formation of the inclusion complex of d-limonene, phenyl ethanol, acetophenone, or menthol was investigated in a slurry form of α-, β-, or γ-CD in organic solvents or alcohol under anhydrous conditions. Ethanol and methanol were found to be good solvents for this method. The use of ethanol as the solvent was investigated in greater detail. There existed an optimal amount of ethanol for the maximum inclusion of d-limonene as the guest compound. However, an excess of ethanol inhibited the inclusion. An adsorption model of alcohol on CD, analogous to the substrate inhibition model of enzyme kinetics, could correlate the inclusion ratio with the amount of alcohol added to CD.

  15. Growth condition-dependent Esp expression by Enterococcus faecium affects initial adherence and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wamel, Willem J B; Hendrickx, Antoni P A; Bonten, Marc J M; Top, Janetta; Posthuma, George; Willems, Rob J L

    2007-02-01

    A genetic subpopulation of Enterococcus faecium, called clonal complex 17 (CC-17), is strongly associated with hospital outbreaks and invasive infections. Most CC-17 strains contain a putative pathogenicity island encoding the E. faecium variant of enterococcal surface protein (Esp). Western blotting, flow cytometric analyses, and electron microscopy showed that Esp is expressed and exposed on the surface of E. faecium, though Esp expression and surface exposure are highly varied among different strains. Furthermore, Esp expression depends on growth conditions like temperature and anaerobioses. When grown at 37 degrees C, five of six esp-positive E. faecium strains showed significantly increased levels of surface-exposed Esp compared to bacteria grown at 21 degrees C, which was confirmed at the transcriptional level by real-time PCR. In addition, a significant increase in surface-exposed Esp was found in half of these strains when grown at 37 degrees C under anaerobic conditions compared to the level in bacteria grown under aerobic conditions. Finally, amounts of surface-exposed Esp correlated with initial adherence to polystyrene (R(2) = 0.7146) and biofilm formation (R(2) = 0.7535). Polystyrene adherence was competitively inhibited by soluble recombinant N-terminal Esp. This study demonstrates that Esp expression on the surface of E. faecium (i) varies consistently between strains, (ii) is growth condition dependent, and (iii) is quantitatively correlated with initial adherence and biofilm formation. These data indicate that E. faecium senses and responds to changing environmental conditions, which might play a role in the early stages of infection when bacteria transit from oxygen-rich conditions at room temperature to anaerobic conditions at body temperature. In addition, variation of surface exposure may explain the contrasting findings reported on the role of Esp in biofilm formation.

  16. Regulation of Botulinum Neurotoxin Synthesis and Toxin Complex Formation by Arginine and Glucose in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, Chase M; Lin, Guangyun; Johnson, Eric A

    2017-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), produced by neurotoxigenic clostridia, is the most potent biological toxin known and the causative agent of the paralytic disease botulism. The nutritional, environmental, and genetic regulation of BoNT synthesis, activation, stability, and toxin complex (TC) formation is not well studied. Previous studies indicated that growth and BoNT formation were affected by arginine and glucose in Clostridium botulinum types A and B. In the present study, C. botulinum ATCC 3502 was grown in toxin production medium (TPM) with different levels of arginine and glucose and of three products of arginine metabolism, citrulline, proline, and ornithine. Cultures were analyzed for growth (optical density at 600 nm [OD 600 ]), spore formation, and BoNT and TC formation by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation and for BoNT activity by mouse bioassay. A high level of arginine (20 g/liter) repressed BoNT production approximately 1,000-fold, enhanced growth, slowed lysis, and reduced endospore production by greater than 1,000-fold. Similar effects on toxin production were seen with equivalent levels of citrulline but not ornithine or proline. In TPM lacking glucose, levels of formation of BoNT/A1 and TC were significantly decreased, and extracellular BoNT and TC proteins were partially inactivated after the first day of culture. An understanding of the regulation of C. botulinum growth and BoNT and TC formation should be valuable in defining requirements for BoNT formation in foods and clinical samples, improving the quality of BoNT for pharmaceutical preparations, and elucidating the biological functions of BoNTs for the bacterium. IMPORTANCE Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is a major food safety and bioterrorism concern and is also an important pharmaceutical, and yet the regulation of its synthesis, activation, and stability in culture media, foods, and clinical samples is not well understood. This paper provides insights into the effects of critical

  17. A disymmetric terpyridine based ligand for the formation of luminescent di-aquo lanthanide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnière, Loïc J; Mameri, Samir; Flot, David; Waltz, Fanny; Zandanel, Christelle; Ziessel, Raymond F

    2007-06-14

    The synthesis of ligand H3 based on a disymmetrically substituted terpyridine core functionalised by a carboxylic acid in the 6-position and a bis(carboxymethyl)aminomethyl function in the 6''-position is described. The coordination behaviour of this heptadentate (4N/3O) ligand with lanthanide cations (Ln=Eu, Gd and Tb) was studied in solution showing the formation of complexes with [Ln] stoichiometry. Complexes with general formula [Ln(H2O)2] were isolated from neutral water solutions containing equimolar amounts of cations and ligands, and the complexes were characterized in the solid state (elemental analysis, IR) and in solution (mass spectrometry). The photo-physical properties of the luminescent complexes of Eu and Tb were studied in water solution by means of absorption, steady state and time-resolved emission spectroscopies. Evolution of the luminescence lifetimes of the Eu and Tb complexes in H2O and D2O reveals the presence of two water molecules coordinated in the first coordination sphere of the cations. Despite this important hydration number, the overall luminescence quantum yields of the complexes remained elevated, especially in the case of Tb (Phi=22.0 and 6.5% respectively for Tb and Eu). Upon crystallisation the Gd complex formed dimeric species in which two gadolinium atoms are each heptacoordinated by one ligand, the coordination sphere being completed by a single water molecule and a bridging carboxylate function, pointing to different behaviours in the solid and liquid states.

  18. EPR study of complex formation between copper (II) ions and sympathomimetic amines in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preoteasa, E.A. [Inst. of Atomic Physics, IFIN, Bucharest (Romania); Duliu, O.G.; Grecu, V.V. [Bucharest, Univ. (Romania). Dept. of Atomic and Nuclear Physics

    1997-07-01

    The complex formation between sympathomimetic amines (SA): adrenaline (AD), noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA), ephedrine (ED) and p-tyramine (pTA), and Cu(II) ion in aqueous solution has been studied by X-band EPR at room temperature. Excepting pTA, all investigated SA yielded two types of complexes in different pH domains. All complexes consistent with a ligand fields having a distorted octahedral symmetry, i.e., hexacoordination of Cu(II). The covalence coefficient calculated from the isotropic g and A values has shown strong ionic sigma-type ligand bonds. A structural model with the Cu(II) ion bound by four catecholic O(hydroxy) atoms for the low pH complexes of AD, NA and DA is proposed. For the high pH complexes of the former compounds as well as for both Ed complexes, the authors suppose Cu(II) bound by two N (amino) and two O (hydroxy) atoms. The spectra are consistent to water binding on the longitudinal octahedron axis in all compounds excepting the high pH complex of Ed, where OH2- ions are bound. Possible implications for the SA-cell receptors interactions are discussed.

  19. Advancing complex explanatory conceptualizations of daily negative and positive affect: trigger and maintenance coping action patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkley, David M; Ma, Denise; Lee, Ihno A; Preacher, Kristopher J; Zuroff, David C

    2014-01-01

    The present study addressed a fundamental gap between research and clinical work by advancing complex explanatory conceptualizations of coping action patterns that trigger and maintain daily negative affect and (low) positive affect. One hundred ninety-six community adults completed measures of perfectionism, and then 6 months later completed questionnaires at the end of the day for 14 consecutive days to provide simultaneous assessments of appraisals, coping, and affect across different stressful situations in everyday life. Multilevel structural equation modeling (MSEM) supported complex explanatory conceptualizations that demonstrated (a) disengagement trigger patterns consisting of several distinct appraisals (e.g., event stress) and coping strategies (e.g., avoidant coping) that commonly operate together across many different stressors when the typical individual experiences daily increases in negative affect and drops in positive affect; and (b) disengagement maintenance patterns composed of different appraisal and coping maintenance factors that, in combination, can explain why individuals with higher levels of self-critical perfectionism have persistent daily negative affect and low positive mood 6 months later. In parallel, engagement patterns (triggers and maintenance) composed of distinct appraisals (e.g., perceived social support) and coping strategies (e.g., problem-focused coping) were linked to compensatory experiences of daily positive affect. These findings demonstrate the promise of using daily diary methodologies and MSEM to promote a shared understanding between therapists and clients of trigger and maintenance coping action patterns that explain what precipitates and perpetuates clients' difficulties, which, in turn, can help achieve the 2 overarching therapy goals of reducing clients' distress and bolstering resilience. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Peculiarities of litter invertebrates’ multispecies complexes formation on the Khortitsa island (Zaporizhzhya province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. О. Fedorchenko

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Peculiarities of litter invertebrates’ complexes formation under conditions of the Khortitsa National Reserve (Zaporizhzhya province are studied. The dispersion of taxonomic groups of different levels (families and species in litter mesofauna is swayed by the inter- and intrasystem factors; the largest influence has the power of litter and its humidity. The rate of ecological factors’ influence at different taxonomic levels may diverge.

  1. Simultaneous measurement of amyloid fibril formation by dynamic light scattering and fluorescence reveals complex aggregation kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M Streets

    Full Text Available An apparatus that combines dynamic light scattering and Thioflavin T fluorescence detection is used to simultaneously probe fibril formation in polyglutamine peptides, the aggregating subunit associated with Huntington's disease, in vitro. Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder in a class of human pathologies that includes Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. These pathologies are all related by the propensity of their associated protein or polypeptide to form insoluble, β-sheet rich, amyloid fibrils. Despite the wide range of amino acid sequence in the aggregation prone polypeptides associated with these diseases, the resulting amyloids display strikingly similar physical structure, an observation which suggests a physical basis for amyloid fibril formation. Thioflavin T fluorescence reports β-sheet fibril content while dynamic light scattering measures particle size distributions. The combined techniques allow elucidation of complex aggregation kinetics and are used to reveal multiple stages of amyloid fibril formation.

  2. A pleiotropic regulator, Frp, affects exopolysaccharide synthesis, biofilm formation, and competence development in Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Kuramitsu, Howard K

    2006-08-01

    Exopolysaccharide synthesis, biofilm formation, and competence are important physiologic functions and virulence factors for Streptococcus mutans. In this study, we report the role of Frp, a transcriptional regulator, on the regulation of these traits crucial to pathogenesis. An Frp-deficient mutant showed decreased transcription of several genes important in virulence, including those encoding fructosyltransferase (Ftf), glucosyltransferase B (GtfB), and GtfC, by reverse transcription and quantitative real-time PCR. Expression of Ftf was decreased in the frp mutant, as assessed by Western blotting as well as by the activity assays. Frp deficiency also inhibited the production of GtfB in the presence of glucose and sucrose as well as the production of GtfC in the presence of glucose. As a consequence of the effects on GtfB and -C, sucrose-induced biofilm formation was decreased in the frp mutant. The expression of competence mediated by the competence-signaling peptide (CSP) system, as assessed by comC gene transcription, was attenuated in the frp mutant. As a result, the transformation efficiency was decreased in the frp mutant but was partially restored by adding synthetic CSP. Transcription of the frp gene was significantly increased in the frp mutant under all conditions tested, indicating that frp transcription is autoregulated. Furthermore, complementation of the frp gene in the frp mutant restored transcription of the affected genes to levels similar to those in the wild-type strain. These results suggest that Frp is a novel pleiotropic effector of multiple cellular functions and is involved in the modulation of exopolysaccharide synthesis, sucrose-dependent biofilm formation, and competence development.

  3. Globular cluster formation with multiple stellar populations from hierarchical star cluster complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekki, Kenji

    2017-05-01

    Most old globular clusters (GCs) in the Galaxy are observed to have internal chemical abundance spreads in light elements. We discuss a new GC formation scenario based on hierarchical star formation within fractal molecular clouds. In the new scenario, a cluster of bound and unbound star clusters ('star cluster complex', SCC) that have a power-law cluster mass function with a slope (β) of 2 is first formed from a massive gas clump developed in a dwarf galaxy. Such cluster complexes and β = 2 are observed and expected from hierarchical star formation. The most massive star cluster ('main cluster'), which is the progenitor of a GC, can accrete gas ejected from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars initially in the cluster and other low-mass clusters before the clusters are tidally stripped or destroyed to become field stars in the dwarf. The SCC is initially embedded in a giant gas hole created by numerous supernovae of the SCC so that cold gas outside the hole can be accreted on to the main cluster later. New stars formed from the accreted gas have chemical abundances that are different from those of the original SCC. Using hydrodynamical simulations of GC formation based on this scenario, we show that the main cluster with the initial mass as large as [2-5] × 105 M⊙ can accrete more than 105 M⊙ gas from AGB stars of the SCC. We suggest that merging of hierarchical SSCs can play key roles in stellar halo formation around GCs and self-enrichment processes in the early phase of GC formation.

  4. Glycinin-gum arabic complex formation: Turbidity measurement and charge neutralization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Die; Hua, Yufei

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between glycinin and anionic polysaccharides has gained considerable attention recently because of its scientific impact on the stability of acid soymilk systems. In this study, the formation of glycinin/gum arabic complexes driven by electrostatic interactions was investigated. Turbidity titrations at different glycinin/gum arabic ratios were conducted and critical pH values (pHφ1) where insoluble complexes began forming were determined firstly. The corresponding pHφ1 values at glycinin/gum arabic ratios of 1:4, 1:2, 1:1, 2:1, 4:1 and 8:1 were 2.85, 3.25, 3.70, 4.40, 4.85 and 5.35, respectively. Afterwards, electromobilities for glycinin and gum arabic at the pH values between 4.1 and 2.6 were measured, and charge densities (ZN) for glycinin and gum arabic were calculated based on the soft particle analysis theory. Further analysis indicated that the product of glycinin/gum arabic ratio (ρ) and ZN ratio of glycinin/gum arabic was approximate 1 at any pHφ1 values. It was revealed that charge neutralization was achieved when glycinin/gum arabic insoluble complexes began forming. NaCl displayed multiple effects on glycinin/gum arabic complex formation according to turbidity and compositional analysis. The present study could provide basic guidance in acid soymilk designing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Structure of solvated Fe(CO)5: complex formation during solvation in alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessing, Joshua; Li, Xiaodi; Lee, Taewoo; Rose-Petruck, Christoph G

    2008-03-20

    The equilibrium structure of iron pentacarbonyl, Fe(CO)5, solvated in various alcohols has been investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements and density functional theory calculations. This system was studied because it is prototypical of a larger class of monometallic systems, which are electronically saturated but not sterically crowded. Upon solvation, the Fe(CO)5 is not just surrounded by a solvation shell. Instead, solute-solvent complexes are formed with the oxygen of the alcohol oriented toward an axial ligand of the Fe(CO)5 giving a formation energy on the order of -5 kJ/mol. This complexation is not a chemical reaction but rather a "preassembly" of the solute molecules with a single solvent molecule. For instance, at room temperature the interaction between Fe(CO)5 and ethanol results in 87% of all Fe(CO)5 molecules being complexated with a single ethanol molecule. This complexation was found in all the alcohol systems studied in this paper. The stability of these complexes was found to depend on the alcohol chain length and branching. The observed complexation mechanism is accompanied by an electron density shift from the complexed alcohol molecule toward Fe(CO)5 where it induces a dipole moment. The finding that Fe(CO)5 forms a complex with the hydroxyl group of a single solvent molecule might have significant implications for ligand substitution reactions. This implies that ligand substitution reactions do not have to proceed via a dissociative mechanism. Instead, the reaction might proceed through a concerted mechanism with the leaving CO simultaneously being replaced by the incoming alcohol that was complexed to Fe(CO)5 prior to the photoexcitation.

  6. Functional cooperation between FACT and MCM is coordinated with cell cycle and differential complex formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chih-Li

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional cooperation between FACT and the MCM helicase complex constitutes an integral step during DNA replication initiation. However, mode of regulation that underlies the proper functional interaction of FACT and MCM is poorly understood. Methods & Results Here we present evidence indicating that such interaction is coordinated with cell cycle progression and differential complex formation. We first demonstrate the existence of two distinct FACT-MCM subassemblies, FACT-MCM2/4/6/7 and FACT-MCM2/3/4/5. Both complexes possess DNA unwinding activity and are subject to cell cycle-dependent enzymatic regulation. Interestingly, analysis of functional attributes further suggests that they act at distinct, and possibly sequential, steps during origin establishment and replication initiation. Moreover, we show that the phosphorylation profile of the FACT-associated MCM4 undergoes a cell cycle-dependent change, which is directly correlated with the catalytic activity of the FACT-MCM helicase complexes. Finally, at the quaternary structure level, physical interaction between FACT and MCM complexes is generally dependent on persistent cell cycle and further stabilized upon S phase entry. Cessation of mitotic cycle destabilizes the complex formation and likely leads to compromised coordination and activities. Conclusions Together, our results correlate FACT-MCM functionally and temporally with S phase and DNA replication. They further demonstrate that enzymatic activities intrinsically important for DNA replication are tightly controlled at various levels, thereby ensuring proper progression of, as well as exit from, the cell cycle and ultimately euploid gene balance.

  7. Background complexity affects response of a looming-sensitive neuron to object motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana C; McMillan, Glyn A; Santos, Cristina P; Gray, John R

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of studies show how stimulus complexity affects the responses of looming-sensitive neurons across multiple animal taxa. Locusts contain a well-described, descending motion-sensitive pathway that is preferentially looming sensitive. However, the lobula giant movement detector/descending contralateral movement detector (LGMD/DCMD) pathway responds to more than simple objects approaching at constant, predictable trajectories. In this study, we presented Locusta migratoria with a series of complex three-dimensional visual stimuli presented while simultaneously recording DCMD activity extracellularly. In addition to a frontal looming stimulus, we used a combination of compound trajectories (nonlooming transitioning to looming) presented at different velocities and onto a simple, scattered, or progressive flow field background. Regardless of stimulus background, DCMD responses to looming were characteristic and related to previously described effects of azimuthal approach angle and velocity of object expansion. However, increasing background complexity caused reduced firing rates, delayed peaks, shorter rise phases, and longer fall phases. DCMD responded to transitions to looming with a characteristic drop in a firing rate that was relatively invariant across most stimulus combinations and occurred regardless of stimulus background. Spike numbers were higher in the presence of the scattered background and reduced in the flow field background. We show that DCMD response time to a transition depends on unique expansion parameters of the moving stimulus irrespective of background complexity. Our results show how background complexity shapes DCMD responses to looming stimuli, which is explained within a behavioral context. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Affection of the Respiratory Muscles in Combined Complex I and IV Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Rauschka, Helmut; Segal, Liane; Kovacs, Gabor G; Rolinski, Boris

    2017-01-01

    Combined complex I+IV deficiency has rarely been reported to manifest with the involvement of the respiratory muscles. A 45y male was admitted for hypercapnia due to muscular respiratory insufficiency. He required intubation and mechanical ventilation. He had a previous history of ophthalmoparesis since age 6y, ptosis since age 23y, and anterocollis since at least age 40y. Muscle biopsy from the right deltoid muscle at age 41y was indicative of mitochondrial myopathy. Biochemical investigations revealed a combined complex I+IV defect. Respiratory insufficiency was attributed to mitochondrial myopathy affecting not only the extra-ocular and the axial muscles but also the shoulder girdle and respiratory muscles. In addition to myopathy, he had mitochondrial neuropathy, abnormal EEG, and elevated CSF-protein. Possibly, this is why a single cycle of immunoglobulins was somehow beneficial. For muscular respiratory insufficiency he required tracheostomy and was scheduled for long-term intermittent positive pressure ventilation. Mitochondrial myopathy due to a combined complex I+IV defect with predominant affection of the extra-ocular muscles may progress to involvement of the limb-girdle, axial and respiratory muscles resulting in muscular respiratory insufficiency. In patients with mitochondrial myopathy, neuropathy and elevated cerebrospinal fluid protein, immunoglobulins may be beneficial even for respiratory functions.

  9. THE FACTORS AFFECTING THE EXPORT POTENTIAL AND ITS FORMATION UNDER THE CONDITIONS OF INTEGRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Lavriv

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to analyze the factors affecting the export capacity of the country and their interpretation by domestic and foreign scientists; to distinguish the basic classification and to form the unified system of factors that affect export potential of Ukrainian agricultural enterprises. On the basis of the classification of factors it is necessary to distinguish the main stages of development of the export opportunities of agrarian formations in the context of European integration. The method. Theoretical and methodological basis of the study is a critical analysis of the fundamental works devoted to the export potential increasing. The given tasks were solved on the basis of a systematic approach with using the scientific methods of analysis and synthesis. The method of abstraction was used in order to research the economic essence of the economic factors that impact the export potential of the company. The combination of the methods of analysis and synthesis were used to determine the priority directions of export opportunities development. The results of the research. The analysis of theoretical approaches to identify factors influencing the export potential of the enterprise is provided. This allowed identifying the several directions of classification. Results of the research helped to shape a common classification of factors that affect the export potential of agricultural enterprises and to distinguish the integration processes as a separate group of factors. On the basis of the classification of the main factors it was formed the phase of development of export opportunities in the context of approximation of the Ukrainian economy to the European standards. The prospects of development of the domestic agriculture export potential under the influence of international integration processes are grounded. They consist of the ability to increase the efficiency by redistribution of export volumes among major importers. The

  10. Revised nomenclature and stratigraphic relationships of the Fredericksburg Complex and Quantico Formation of the Virginia Piedmont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlides, Louis

    1980-01-01

    The Fredericksburg Complex, in part a migmatitic terrane in northeast Virginia, is subdivided on the basis of lithology, as well as aeromagnetic and aeroradiometric data, into two metamorphic suites. These suites are separated by the northeast-trending Spotsylvania lineament, a rectilinear geophysical feature that is probably the trace of an old fault zone. East of the lineament, the Po River Metamorphic Suite, of Proterozoic Z and (or) early Paleozoic age, consists dominantly of biotite gneiss, generally augen gneiss, and lesser amounts of hornblende gneiss and mica schist. West of the Spotsylvania lineament is the Ta River Metamorphic Suite, composed mostly of amphibolite and amphibole gneiss. However, to the southwest, along its strike belt, the Ta River contains abundant biotite gneiss and mica schist. Both the Ta River and Po River contain abundant foliated granitoid and pegmatoid bodies as concordant tabular masses and as crosscutting dikes; these rocks are considered part of the Ta River and Po River Metamorphic Suites. The amphibolitic Holly Corner Gneiss is interpreted to be a western allochthonous equivalent of the Ta River. Both the Ta River and Holly Corner are considered to be coeval, eastern, distal facies of the Lower Cambrian(?) Chopawamsic Formation. The Paleozoic Falls Run Granite Gneiss intrudes the Ta River Metamorphic Suite and the Holly Corner Gneiss; locally the Falls Run is interpreted to have been transported westward with the Holly Corner after intrusion. The Quantico Formation, in the core of the Quantico-Columbia synclinorium, rests with angular unconformity along its northwest and southeast limbs, respectively, on the Chopawamsic Formation and the Ta River Metamorphic Suite. The Quantico Formation is assigned the same Late Ordovician age and similar stratigraphic position as the Arvonia Slate of the Arvonia syncline. The youngest rocks of the area are the granitoid and pegmatoid bodies of the Falmouth Intrusive Suite. They consist of

  11. CARBON DIOXIDE INFLUENCE ON THE THERMAL FORMATION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN INTERSTELLAR ICE ANALOGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinogradoff, V.; Fray, N.; Bouilloud, M.; Cottin, H. [LISA Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques, UMR CNRS 7583, Université Paris Est Créteil (UPEC), Université Paris Diderot (UPD), Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Labex ESEP, Paris (France); Duvernay, F.; Chiavassa, T., E-mail: vvinogradoff@mnhn.fr [PIIM, Laboratoire de Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moléculaires, Université Aix-Marseille, UMR CNRS 7345, Marseille (France)

    2015-08-20

    Interstellar ices are submitted to energetic processes (thermal, UV, and cosmic-ray radiations) producing complex organic molecules. Laboratory experiments aim to reproduce the evolution of interstellar ices to better understand the chemical changes leading to the reaction, formation, and desorption of molecules. In this context, the thermal evolution of an interstellar ice analogue composed of water, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and formaldehyde is investigated. The ice evolution during the warming has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The formation of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and polymethylenimine (PMI) are observed in the organic refractory residue left after ice sublimation. A better understanding of this result is realized with the study of another ice mixture containing methylenimine (a precursor of HMT) with carbon dioxide and ammonia. It appears that carbamic acid, a reaction product of carbon dioxide and ammonia, plays the role of catalyst, allowing the reactions toward HMT and PMI formation. This is the first time that such complex organic molecules (HMT, PMI) are produced from the warming (without VUV photolysis or irradiation with energetic particles) of abundant molecules observed in interstellar ices (H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}CO). This result strengthens the importance of thermal reactions in the ices’ evolution. HMT and PMI, likely components of interstellar ices, should be searched for in the pristine objects of our solar system, such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites.

  12. Deciphering Front-Side Complex Formation in SN2 Reactions via Dynamics Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, István; Olasz, Balázs; Czakó, Gábor

    2017-07-06

    Due to their importance in organic chemistry, the atomistic understanding of bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reactions shows exponentially growing interest. In this publication, the effect of front-side complex (FSC) formation is uncovered via quasi-classical trajectory computations combined with a novel analysis method called trajectory orthogonal projection (TOP). For both F(-) + CH3Y [Y = Cl,I] reactions, the lifetime distributions of the F(-)···YCH3 front-side complex revealed weakly trapped nucleophiles (F(-)). However, only the F(-) + CH3I reaction features strongly trapped nucleophiles in the front-side region of the prereaction well. Interestingly, both back-side and front-side attack show propensity to long-lived FSC formation. Spatial distributions of the nucleophile demonstrate more prominent FSC formation in case of the F(-) + CH3I reaction compared to F(-) + CH3Cl. The presence of front-side intermediates and the broad spatial distribution in the back-side region may explain the indirect nature of the F(-) + CH3I reaction.

  13. How does domain replacement affect fibril formation of the rabbit/human prion proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yan

    Full Text Available It is known that in vivo human prion protein (PrP have the tendency to form fibril deposits and are associated with infectious fatal prion diseases, while the rabbit PrP does not readily form fibrils and is unlikely to cause prion diseases. Although we have previously demonstrated that amyloid fibrils formed by the rabbit PrP and the human PrP have different secondary structures and macromolecular crowding has different effects on fibril formation of the rabbit/human PrPs, we do not know which domains of PrPs cause such differences. In this study, we have constructed two PrP chimeras, rabbit chimera and human chimera, and investigated how domain replacement affects fibril formation of the rabbit/human PrPs.As revealed by thioflavin T binding assays and Sarkosyl-soluble SDS-PAGE, the presence of a strong crowding agent dramatically promotes fibril formation of both chimeras. As evidenced by circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and proteinase K digestion assays, amyloid fibrils formed by human chimera have secondary structures and proteinase K-resistant features similar to those formed by the human PrP. However, amyloid fibrils formed by rabbit chimera have proteinase K-resistant features and secondary structures in crowded physiological environments different from those formed by the rabbit PrP, and secondary structures in dilute solutions similar to the rabbit PrP. The results from transmission electron microscopy show that macromolecular crowding caused human chimera but not rabbit chimera to form short fibrils and non-fibrillar particles.We demonstrate for the first time that the domains beyond PrP-H2H3 (β-strand 1, α-helix 1, and β-strand 2 have a remarkable effect on fibrillization of the rabbit PrP but almost no effect on the human PrP. Our findings can help to explain why amyloid fibrils formed by the rabbit PrP and the human PrP have different secondary structures and why macromolecular crowding has different

  14. The plant cell cycle: Pre-Replication complex formation and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasil, Juliana Nogueira; Costa, Carinne N Monteiro; Cabral, Luiz Mors; Ferreira, Paulo C G; Hemerly, Adriana S

    2017-01-01

    The multiplication of cells in all living organisms requires a tight regulation of DNA replication. Several mechanisms take place to ensure that the DNA is replicated faithfully and just once per cell cycle in order to originate through mitoses two new daughter cells that contain exactly the same information from the previous one. A key control mechanism that occurs before cells enter S phase is the formation of a pre-replication complex (pre-RC) that is assembled at replication origins by the sequential association of the origin recognition complex, followed by Cdt1, Cdc6 and finally MCMs, licensing DNA to start replication. The identification of pre-RC members in all animal and plant species shows that this complex is conserved in eukaryotes and, more importantly, the differences between kingdoms might reflect their divergence in strategies on cell cycle regulation, as it must be integrated and adapted to the niche, ecosystem, and the organism peculiarities. Here, we provide an overview of the knowledge generated so far on the formation and the developmental controls of the pre-RC mechanism in plants, analyzing some particular aspects in comparison to other eukaryotes.

  15. Donor-Acceptor Properties of a Single-Molecule Altered by On-Surface Complex Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Tobias; Pawlak, Rémy; Kawai, Shigeki; Geng, Yan; Liu, Xunshan; Decurtins, Silvio; Hapala, Prokop; Baratoff, Alexis; Liu, Shi-Xia; Jelínek, Pavel; Meyer, Ernst; Glatzel, Thilo

    2017-08-22

    Electron donor-acceptor molecules are of outstanding interest in molecular electronics and organic solar cells for their intramolecular charge transfer controlled via electrical or optical excitation. The preservation of their electronic character in the ground state upon adsorption on a surface is cardinal for their implementation in such single-molecule devices. Here, we investigate by atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy a prototypical system consisting of a π-conjugated tetrathiafulvalene-fused dipyridophenazine molecule adsorbed on thin NaCl films on Cu(111). Depending on the adsorption site, the molecule is found either in a nearly undisturbed free state or in a bound state. In the latter case, the molecule adopts a specific adsorption site, leading to the formation of a chelate complex with a single Na(+) alkali cation pulled out from the insulating film. Although expected to be electronically decoupled, the charge distribution of the complex is drastically modified, leading to the loss of the intrinsic donor-acceptor character. The chelate complex formation is reversible with respect to lateral manipulations, enabling tunable donor-acceptor molecular switches activated by on-surface coordination.

  16. Formation Mechanism of Oxide-Sulfide Complex Inclusions in High-Sulfur-Containing Steel Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae Hong; Park, Joo Hyun

    2018-02-01

    The [S] content in resulfurized steel is controlled in the range of 200 to 800 ppm to ensure good machinability and workability. It is well known that "MgAl2O4(spinel)+CaS" complex inclusions are formed in molten steel during the ladle refining process, and these cause nozzle clogging during continuous casting. Thus, in the present study, the "Refractory-Slag-Metal-Inclusions (ReSMI)" multiphase reaction model was employed in conjunction with experiments to investigate the influence of slag composition and [S] content in the steel on the formation of oxide-sulfide complex inclusions. The critical [S] and [Al] contents necessary for the precipitation of CaS in the CaO-Al2O3-MgO-SiO2 (CAMS) oxide inclusions were predicted from the composition of the liquid inclusions, as observed by scanning electron microscopy-electron dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS) and calculated using the ReSMI multiphase reaction model. The critical [S] content increases with increasing content of SiO2 in the slag at a given [Al] content. Formation mechanisms for spinel+CaS and spinel+MnS complex inclusions were also proposed.

  17. Complex conductivity response to microbial growth and biofilm formation on phenanthrene spiked medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Remy; Gourry, Jean Christophe; Simonnot, Marie-Odile; Leyval, Corinne

    2011-11-01

    Several laboratory studies have recently demonstrated the utility of geophysical methods for the investigation of microbial-induced changes over contaminated sites. However, it remains difficult to distinguish the effects due to the new physical properties imparted by microbial processes, to bacterial growth, or to the development of bacterial biofilm. We chose to study the influence of biofilm formation on geophysical response using complex conductivity measurements (0.1-1000 Hz) in phenanthrene-contaminated media. Biotic assays were conducted with two phenanthrene (PHE) degrading bacterial strains: Burkholderia sp (NAH1), which produced biofilm and Stenophomonas maltophilia (MATE10), which did not, and an abiotic control. Results showed that bacterial densities for NAH1 and MATE10 strains continuously increased at the same rate during the experiment. However, the complex conductivity signature showed noticeable differences between the two bacteria, with a phase shift of 50 mrad at 4 Hz for NAH1, which produced biofilm. Biofilm volume was quantified by Scanning Confocal Laser Microscopy (SCLM). Significant correlations were established between phase shift decrease and biofilm volume for NAH1 assays. Results suggest that complex conductivity measurements, specifically phase shift, can be a useful indicator of biofilm formation inside the overall signal of microbial activity on contaminated sites.

  18. Decay of Activity Complexes, Formation of Unipolar Magnetic Regions, and Coronal Holes in Their Causal Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubeva, E. M.; Mordvinov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The peculiar development of solar activity in the current cycle resulted in an asynchronous reversal of the Sun's polar fields. The asymmetry is also observed in the formation of polar coronal holes. A stable coronal hole was first formed at the South Pole, despite the later polar-field reversal there. The aim of this study is to understand the processes making this situation possible. Synoptic magnetic maps from the Global Oscillation Network Group and corresponding coronal-hole maps from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory are analyzed here to study the causal relationship between the decay of activity complexes, evolution of large-scale magnetic fields, and formation of coronal holes. Ensembles of coronal holes associated with decaying active regions and activity complexes are presented. These ensembles take part in global rearrangements of the Sun's open magnetic flux. In particular, the south polar coronal hole was formed from an ensemble of coronal holes that came into existence after the decay of multiple activity complexes observed during 2014.

  19. Complex Formations between Surfactants and Polyelectrolytes of the Same Charge on a Water Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafi, Amirhossein; Hu, Dan; Chou, Keng C

    2017-08-15

    The mechanism of complex formation between surfactants and polyelectrolytes with the same charge on the water surface was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations and phase-sensitive sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy. Although complex formation between highly charged surfactants and polyelectrolytes of the same charge is generally expected to be prohibited by the electrostatic repulsive force, our study shows that it is possible to form thermodynamically stable complexes when excess ions are present in the solution. We found that anionic partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) could interact with anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on a water surface in the presence of salts. With excess Na+ ions in the solution, the charge screening effect allows HPAM to weakly interact with SDS via hydrogen bonds. In the presence of divalent Ca2+ ions, the surfactant and the polymer are strongly coupled by forming Ca2+ ion bridges and hydrogen bonds. Our calculation shows that the presence of Ca2+ ions creates a steep binding energy of ∼30 kJ/mol near the water surface. These results were qualitatively verified using phase-sensitive sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

  20. Quantum-chemical analysis of formation reactions of Со2+ complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor F. Vargalyuk

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis of quantum chemical calculations results (GAMESS, density functional theory, B3LYP method as to coordination compounds of Co2+ions with H2O, NH3, OH–, F–, Cl–, Br–, I–, CN–, Ac–, Ak– generally given by [Co(H2O6–nLn]2+nx, it has been demonstrated that within the selected series of ligands, there is no correlation between the amount of energy of monosubstituted cobalt aqua complexes formation(∆Е and pK1,just like between the effective nuclear charge of the central atom (z*Со and pK1. According to the behavior of ∆Е and z*Со,we identified two groups of ligands. The first group (OH–, F–, Ac–, Ak–, CN–, NH3 demonstrates logical ∆Е decrease caused by the growth of z*Со. On the contrary, the second group (Cl–, Br–, I– demonstrates ∆Е increase caused by the growth of z*Со. This phenomenon is explained by the change in electronegativity and polarizability of donor atoms in groups and periods of the periodic table. It is established that linear correlations given by lgK = A + B·z*Со can be actualized only for complexes having ligands with similar donor atoms. Referring to the literature on stepwise complex formation of hydroxide, amine and chloride cobalt complexes in combination with z*Со calculations results, we determined A and B constants of lgK, z*Со-correlations for the atoms of oxygen (30.2, –17.7; nitrogen (125.4, –69.9 and chlorine (–6.3, 5.8. The existence of the detected correlation series enables us to lean on lgK,z*М–dependence parameters for the fixed donor atom and to determine Kn values for various complexes with complex-based ligands using calculations and z*М data. This applies to complexes having central atoms of the same nature as well as simple monodentate ligands. The mentioned approach was used to calculate the stability constants for acrylate cobalt complexes (lgK1 = 1.2 и lgК2 = 4.3, which are not covered in literature.

  1. Biofilm formation affects surface properties of novel bioactive glass-containing composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Hong-Keun; Salehi, Satin; Ferracane, Jack L

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of bacterial biofilm on the surface properties of novel bioactive glass (BAG)-containing composites of different initial surface roughness. BAG (65 mol% Si; 4% P; 31% Ca) and BAG-F (61% Si; 31% Ca; 4% P; 3% F; 1% B) were synthesized by the sol-gel method and micronized (size ∼0.1-10 μm). Composites with 72wt% total filler load were prepared by replacing 15% of the silanized Sr glass with BAG, BAG-F, or silanized silica. Specimens (n=10/group) were light-cured and divided into 4 subgroups of different surface roughness by wet polishing with 600 and then up to 1200, 2400, or 4000 grit SiC. Surface roughness (SR), gloss, and Knoop microhardness were measured before and after incubating in media with or without a Streptococcus mutans (UA 159) biofilm for 2 weeks. Results were analyzed with ANOVA/Tukey's test (α=0.05). The SR of the BAG-containing composites with the smoothest surfaces (2400/4000 grit) increased in media or bacteria; the SR of the roughest composites (600 grit) decreased. The gloss of the smoothest BAG-containing composites decreased in bacteria and media-only, but more in media-alone. The microhardness of all of the composites decreased with exposure to media or bacteria, with BAG-containing composites affected more than the control. Exposure to bacterial biofilm and its media produced enhanced roughness and reduced gloss and surface microhardness of highly polished dental composites containing a bioactive glass additive, which could affect further biofilm formation, as well as the esthetics, of restorations made from such a material. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Protein Kingdom Extended: Ordered and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins, Their Folding, Supramolecular Complex Formation, and Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turoverov, Konstantin K.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2010-01-01

    The native state of a protein is usually associated with a compact globular conformation possessing a rigid and highly ordered structure. At the turn of the last century certain studies arose which concluded that many proteins cannot, in principle, form a rigid globular structure in an aqueous environment, but they are still able to fulfill their specific functions — i.e., they are native. The existence of the disordered regions allows these proteins to interact with their numerous binding partners. Such interactions are often accompanied by the formation of complexes that possess a more ordered structure than the original components. The functional diversity of these proteins, combined with the variability of signals related to the various intra-and intercellular processes handled by these proteins and their capability to produce multi-variant and multi-directional responses allow them to form a unique regulatory net in a cell. The abundance of disordered proteins inside the cell is precisely controlled at the synthesis and clearance levels as well as via interaction with specific binding partners and posttranslational modifications. Another recently recognized biologically active state of proteins is the functional amyloid. The formation of such functional amyloids is tightly controlled and therefore differs from the uncontrolled formation of pathogenic amyloids which are associated with the pathogenesis of several conformational diseases, the development of which is likely to be determined by the failures of the cellular regulatory systems rather than by the formation of the proteinaceous deposits and/or by the protofibril toxicity. PMID:20097220

  3. THE FORMATION OF STUDENTS’ SOCIAL COMPETENCES IN A TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY AS A MULTILEVEL EDUCATIONAL COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V. Sergeyeva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the article deals with the problem of expanding students’ competencies. A modern technical University must train professionals who apart from having a high special competence, also have the understanding of the common cultural issues. The solution of the problem is possible through a specially organized activity in the system of lifelong education. The formation of students’ social competences assumes a particular relevance, in the educational process, of a technical university as a multilevel educational complex in the context of the implementation of competence-based approach. Materials and Methods: the authors use the following methods of scientific research: system-structural analysis, synthesis, working with literature, summarizing the e xperience, and critical reflection. Results: the article presents a programme “The Formation of Students’ Social Competences in a Technical University as a Multilevel Educational Complex” developed by the authors. The content of the programme suggests the formation of social competence of health preservation, civic consciousness, communication and social interaction as well as the formation of competence in th e field of information technology. Discussion and Conclusions: the programme developed by the authors is one of the results of research carried out in the work of the Russian Academy of Education experimental unit, case study of Penza State Technological University. The main target of this programme is to promote engineering staff training for a regional labour market. This programme can be used in dif ferent institutions of continuing education.

  4. Does Human Migration Affect International Trade? A Complex-Network Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagiolo, Giorgio; Mastrorillo, Marina

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the relationships between international human migration and merchandise trade using a complex-network approach. We firstly compare the topological structure of worldwide networks of human migration and bilateral trade over the period 1960–2000. Next, we ask whether pairs of countries that are more central in the migration network trade more. We show that: (i) the networks of international migration and trade are strongly correlated, and such correlation can be mostly explained by country economic/demographic size and geographical distance; (ii) centrality in the international-migration network boosts bilateral trade; (iii) intensive forms of country centrality are more trade enhancing than their extensive counterparts. Our findings suggest that bilateral trade between any two countries is not only affected by the presence of migrants from either countries, but also by their relative embeddedness in the complex web of corridors making up the network of international human migration. PMID:24828376

  5. The ASYMMETRIC LEAVES Complex Employs Multiple Modes of Regulation to Affect Adaxial-Abaxial Patterning and Leaf Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husbands, Aman Y; Benkovics, Anna H; Nogueira, Fabio T S; Lodha, Mukesh; Timmermans, Marja C P

    2015-12-01

    Flattened leaf architecture is not a default state but depends on positional information to precisely coordinate patterns of cell division in the growing primordium. This information is provided, in part, by the boundary between the adaxial (top) and abaxial (bottom) domains of the leaf, which are specified via an intricate gene regulatory network whose precise circuitry remains poorly defined. Here, we examined the contribution of the ASYMMETRIC LEAVES (AS) pathway to adaxial-abaxial patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana and demonstrate that AS1-AS2 affects this process via multiple, distinct regulatory mechanisms. AS1-AS2 uses Polycomb-dependent and -independent mechanisms to directly repress the abaxial determinants MIR166A, YABBY5, and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR3 (ARF3), as well as a nonrepressive mechanism in the regulation of the adaxial determinant TAS3A. These regulatory interactions, together with data from prior studies, lead to a model in which the sequential polarization of determinants, including AS1-AS2, explains the establishment and maintenance of adaxial-abaxial leaf polarity. Moreover, our analyses show that the shared repression of ARF3 by the AS and trans-acting small interfering RNA (ta-siRNA) pathways intersects with additional AS1-AS2 targets to affect multiple nodes in leaf development, impacting polarity as well as leaf complexity. These data illustrate the surprisingly multifaceted contribution of AS1-AS2 to leaf development showing that, in conjunction with the ta-siRNA pathway, AS1-AS2 keeps the Arabidopsis leaf both flat and simple. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  6. The ASYMMETRIC LEAVES Complex Employs Multiple Modes of Regulation to Affect Adaxial-Abaxial Patterning and Leaf Complexity[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husbands, Aman Y.; Benkovics, Anna H.; Nogueira, Fabio T.S.; Lodha, Mukesh; Timmermans, Marja C.P.

    2015-01-01

    Flattened leaf architecture is not a default state but depends on positional information to precisely coordinate patterns of cell division in the growing primordium. This information is provided, in part, by the boundary between the adaxial (top) and abaxial (bottom) domains of the leaf, which are specified via an intricate gene regulatory network whose precise circuitry remains poorly defined. Here, we examined the contribution of the ASYMMETRIC LEAVES (AS) pathway to adaxial-abaxial patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana and demonstrate that AS1-AS2 affects this process via multiple, distinct regulatory mechanisms. AS1-AS2 uses Polycomb-dependent and -independent mechanisms to directly repress the abaxial determinants MIR166A, YABBY5, and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR3 (ARF3), as well as a nonrepressive mechanism in the regulation of the adaxial determinant TAS3A. These regulatory interactions, together with data from prior studies, lead to a model in which the sequential polarization of determinants, including AS1-AS2, explains the establishment and maintenance of adaxial-abaxial leaf polarity. Moreover, our analyses show that the shared repression of ARF3 by the AS and trans-acting small interfering RNA (ta-siRNA) pathways intersects with additional AS1-AS2 targets to affect multiple nodes in leaf development, impacting polarity as well as leaf complexity. These data illustrate the surprisingly multifaceted contribution of AS1-AS2 to leaf development showing that, in conjunction with the ta-siRNA pathway, AS1-AS2 keeps the Arabidopsis leaf both flat and simple. PMID:26589551

  7. Cloud fluid compression and softening in spiral arms and the formation of giant molecular cloud complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, L. L.

    1981-04-01

    With regard to the galactodynamics of the cloudy interstellar medium, the paper considers the response of such a gas to a forcing potential in the tight-winding density wave theory. The cloud fluid is treated in the hydrodynamic limit with an equation of state which softens at high densities. It is shown that in the inner regions of the galaxy, cooling of the cloud fluid in the arms can result in gravitational instability and the formation of large bound complexes of clouds which are identified with the giant molecular clouds (GMCs). Masses, dimensions, distributions, and scale heights of the GMCs are predicted by the theory. It is suggested that the interstellar gas density in the disk is regulated by the gravitational instability mechanism in the arms which siphons material into star formation. Implications for the evolution of individual GMCs and for galactic morphology are discussed.

  8. Superoxide-mediated Fe(II) formation from organically complexed Fe(III) in coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Manabu; Ito, Hiroaki; Rose, Andrew L.; Waite, T. David; Omura, Tatsuo

    2008-12-01

    Fe(III) complexed by organic ligands (Fe(III)L) is the primary form of dissolved Fe in marine and coastal environments. Superoxide, typically produced in biological and photochemical processes, is one of the reducing agents that contributes to transformation of Fe(III)L to bioavailable, free dissolved Fe(II) (Fe(II)'). In this work, the kinetics of superoxide-mediated Fe(II)' formation from Fe(III)L in a simulated coastal water system were investigated and a comprehensive kinetic model was developed using citrate and fulvic acid as exemplar Fe-binding ligands. To simulate a coastal environment in laboratory experiments, Fe(III)L samples with various ligand/Fe ratios were incubated for 5 min to 1 week in seawater medium. At each ratio and incubation time, the rate of superoxide-mediated Fe(II)' formation was determined in the presence of the strong Fe(II) binding ligand ferrozine by spectrophotometrically measuring the ferrous-ferrozine complex generated at a constant concentration of superoxide. The Fe(II)' formation rate generally decreased with incubation time, as Fe(III)L gradually dissociated to form less reactive Fe(III) oxyhydroxide. However, when the ligand/Fe ratio was sufficiently high, the dissociation of Fe(III)L (and subsequent Fe precipitation) was suppressed and Fe(II)' was formed at a higher rate. The rate of Fe(II)' produced during the experiment was explained by the kinetic model. The model confirmed that both the ligand/Fe ratio and incubation time have a significant effect on the pathway via which Fe(II)' is formed from Fe(III)-fulvic acid complexes.

  9. Vipp1 is required for basic thylakoid membrane formation but not for the assembly of thylakoid protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseeva, Elena; Ossenbühl, Friederich; Sippel, Claudia; Cho, Won K; Stein, Bernhard; Eichacker, Lutz A; Meurer, Jörg; Wanner, Gerhard; Westhoff, Peter; Soll, Jürgen; Vothknecht, Ute C

    2007-02-01

    Vipp1 (vesicle inducing protein in plastids 1) is found in cyanobacteria and chloroplasts where it is essential for thylakoid formation. Arabidopsis thaliana mutant plants with a reduction of Vipp1 to about 20% of wild type content become albinotic at an early stage. We propose that this drastic phenotype results from an inability of the remaining Vipp1 protein to assemble into a homo-oligomeric complex, indicating that oligomerization is a prerequisite for Vipp1 function. A Vipp1-ProteinA fusion protein, expressed in the Deltavipp1 mutant background, is able to reinstate oligomerization and restore photoautotrophic growth. Plants containing Vipp1-ProteinA in amounts comparable to Vipp1 in the wild type exhibit a wild type phenotype. However, plants with a reduced amount of Vipp1-ProteinA protein are growth-retarded and significantly paler than the wild type. This phenotype is caused by a decrease in thylakoid membrane content and a concomitant reduction in photosynthetic activity. To the extent that thylakoid membranes are made in these plants they are properly assembled with protein-pigment complexes and are photosynthetically active. This strongly supports a function of Vipp1 in basic thylakoid membrane formation and not in the functional assembly of thylakoid protein complexes. Intriguingly, electron microscopic analysis shows that chloroplasts in the mutant plants are not equally affected by the Vipp1 shortage. Indeed, a wide range of different stages of thylakoid development ranging from wild-type-like chloroplasts to plastids nearly devoid of thylakoids can be observed in organelles of one and the same cell.

  10. Electrochemistry of metal complexes applications from electroplating to oxide layer formation

    CERN Document Server

    Survila, Arvydas

    2015-01-01

    This book aims to sequentially cover all the major stages of electrochemical processes (mass transport, adsorption, charge transfer), with a special emphasis on their deep interrelation. Starting with general considerations on equilibria in solutions and at interfaces as well as on mass transport, the text acquaints readers with the theory and common experimental practice for studying electrochemical reactions of metals complexes. The core part of the book deals with all important aspects of electroplating, including a systematic discussion of co-deposition of metals and formation of alloys.

  11. [Benign fibro-osseous lesions of the craniofacial complex with aneurysmal bone cyst formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldo, Ana Filipa; Mendes Dos Santos, Carolina; Tavares, Joana; Fernandes Sousa, Rita; Campos, Alexandre; Farias, João Paulo; Pimentel, José; Guedes Campos, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst are controversial osteolytic benign expansive lesions which occur more frequently in the metaphysis of long bones and spine. They are classified as primary or secondary lesions depending on the presence or absence of an associated bone pathology. The engraftment of aneurysmal bone cyst onto benign fibro-osseous lesions is established. However, in the craniofacial complex this combined lesion is rare.The authors present two histologically proven uncommon cases of benign fibro-osseous lesions (fibrous dysplasia and juvenile psammomatoid ossifying fibroma) with aneurysmal bone cyst formation, emphasizing the imaging characteristics of this hybrid entities.

  12. Methylene Blue Sensitized Photodechlorination of Isomeric Mono- and Dichloroanilines via Molecular Complex Formation Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. C. Pande

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The photosensitized dechlorination of isomeric mono- and dichloroanilines has been studied using methylene blue as photosensitizer in alkaline medium. The dechlorination products have been identified and formation of molecular complex between aniline and methylene blue has been observed. The effects of the pH, concentration of the sensitizer, concentration of the substrate, the intensity of the light and the temperature on the rate of the reaction have been studied. The quantum efficiency of the photodechlorination has been evaluated. The mechanism of the photodechlorination has been suggested.

  13. The role of Glu259 in Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu in ternary complex formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nautrup Pedersen, Gitte; Rattenborg, Thomas; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde

    1998-01-01

    Determination of the crystal structure of the ternary complex formed between elongation factor Tu:GTP and aminoacylated tRNA revealed three regions of interaction between elongation factor Tu and tRNA. The structure indicates that the conserved glutamic acid at position 271 in Thermus aquaticus EF...... spatially and chemically so that only a residue with almost the same size and chemical properties as glutamic acid fulfils the requirements with regard to size, salt bridge-formation potential and maintenance of the backbone conformation at the 259 position. Udgivelsesdato: 1998-Feb...

  14. The oyster genome reveals stress adaptation and complexity of shell formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guofan; Fang, Xiaodong; Guo, Ximing

    2012-01-01

    response and the proteome of the shell. The oyster genome is highly polymorphic and rich in repetitive sequences, with some transposable elements still actively shaping variation. Transcriptome studies reveal an extensive set of genes responding to environmental stress. The expansion of genes coding...... for heat shock protein 70 and inhibitors of apoptosis is probably central to the oyster's adaptation to sessile life in the highly stressful intertidal zone. Our analyses also show that shell formation in molluscs is more complex than currently understood and involves extensive participation of cells...

  15. Complex formation during dissolution of metal oxides in molten alkali carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Borup, Flemming; Petrushina, Irina

    1999-01-01

    Dissolution of metal oxides in molten carbonates relates directly to the stability of materials for electrodes and construction of molten carbonate fuel cells. In the present work the solubilities of PbO, NiO, Fe2O3,and Bi2O3 in molten Li/K carbonates have been measured at 650 degrees C under...... as the partial pressure of carbon dioxide varies. By combination of solubility and electromotive force measurements, a model is constructed assuming the dissolution involves complex formation. The possible species for lead are proposed to be [Pb(CO3)(2)](-2) and/or [Pb(CO3)(3)](-4). A similar complex chemistry...

  16. Fatty acid synthetase from Brevibacterium ammoniagenes: formation of monounsaturated fatty acids by a multienzyme complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, A; Okuda, S

    1977-01-01

    A multienzyme fatty acid synthetase complex isolated from Brevibacterium ammoniagenes has been purified to a specific activity of 1440 nmol of malonyl-CoA incorporated per min/mg. The enzyme is homogeneous, as judged by gel electrophoresis on agarose gels, and has a molecular weight of 1.2 X 10(6). Both NADPH and NADH are required for activity. In contrast to other fatty acid synthetase complexes, the enzyme catalyzes the synthesis of both long-chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids from malonyl-CoA and acetyl-CoA. The formation of unsaturated fatty acids is oxygen-independent and sharply reduced by 3-decynoyl-N-acetylcysteamine, a known inhibitor of Escherchia coli beta-hydroxydecanoyl thioester dehydrase (EC 4.2.1.60). PMID:20622

  17. Characterisation of complex formation between members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex CFP-10/ESAT-6 protein family: towards an understanding of the rules governing complex formation and thereby functional flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightbody, Kirsty L; Renshaw, Philip S; Collins, Michelle L; Wright, Rebecca L; Hunt, Debbie M; Gordon, Stephen V; Hewinson, R Glyn; Buxton, Roger S; Williamson, Richard A; Carr, Mark D

    2004-09-01

    We have previously shown that the secreted M. tuberculosis complex proteins CFP-10 and ESAT-6 form a tight, 1:1 complex, which may represent their functional form. In the work reported here a combination of yeast two-hybrid and biochemical analysis has been used to characterise complex formation between two other pairs of CFP-10/ESAT-6 family proteins (Rv0287/Rv0288 and Rv3019c/Rv3020c) and to determine whether complexes can be formed between non-genome paired members of the family. The results clearly demonstrate that Rv0287/Rv0288 and Rv3019c/3020c form tight complexes, as initially observed for CFP-10/ESAT-6. The closely related Rv0287/Rv0288 and Rv3019c/Rv3020c proteins are also able to form non-genome paired complexes (Rv0287/Rv3019c and Rv0288/Rv3020c), but are not capable of binding to the more distantly related CFP-10/ESAT-6 proteins.

  18. Gas Phase Reactions of Ions Derived from Anionic Uranyl Formate and Uranyl Acetate Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Evan; Hanley, Cassandra; Koehler, Stephen; Pestok, Jordan; Polonsky, Nevo; Van Stipdonk, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The speciation and reactivity of uranium are topics of sustained interest because of their importance to the development of nuclear fuel processing methods, and a more complete understanding of the factors that govern the mobility and fate of the element in the environment. Tandem mass spectrometry can be used to examine the intrinsic reactivity (i.e., free from influence of solvent and other condensed phase effects) of a wide range of metal ion complexes in a species-specific fashion. Here, electrospray ionization, collision-induced dissociation, and gas-phase ion-molecule reactions were used to create and characterize ions derived from precursors composed of uranyl cation (UVIO2 2+) coordinated by formate or acetate ligands. Anionic complexes containing UVIO2 2+ and formate ligands fragment by decarboxylation and elimination of CH2=O, ultimately to produce an oxo-hydride species [UVIO2(O)(H)]-. Cationic species ultimately dissociate to make [UVIO2(OH)]+. Anionic complexes containing acetate ligands exhibit an initial loss of acetyloxyl radical, CH3CO2•, with associated reduction of uranyl to UVO2 +. Subsequent CID steps cause elimination of CO2 and CH4, ultimately to produce [UVO2(O)]-. Loss of CH4 occurs by an intra-complex H+ transfer process that leaves UVO2 + coordinated by acetate and acetate enolate ligands. A subsequent dissociation step causes elimination of CH2=C=O to leave [UVO2(O)]-. Elimination of CH4 is also observed as a result of hydrolysis caused by ion-molecule reaction with H2O. The reactions of other anionic species with gas-phase H2O create hydroxyl products, presumably through the elimination of H2.

  19. Zeaxanthin Radical Cation Formation in Minor Light-Harvesting Complexes of Higher Plant Antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avenson, Thomas H.; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Zigmantas, Donatas; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Li, Zhirong; Ballottari, Matteo; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-01-31

    Previous work on intact thylakoid membranes showed that transient formation of a zeaxanthin radical cation was correlated with regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting via energy-dependent quenching. A molecular mechanism for such quenching was proposed to involve charge transfer within a chlorophyll-zeaxanthin heterodimer. Using near infrared (880-1100 nm) transient absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrate that carotenoid (mainly zeaxanthin) radical cation generation occurs solely in isolated minor light-harvesting complexes that bind zeaxanthin, consistent with the engagement of charge transfer quenching therein. We estimated that less than 0.5percent of the isolated minor complexes undergo charge transfer quenching in vitro, whereas the fraction of minor complexes estimated to be engaged in charge transfer quenching in isolated thylakoids was more than 80 times higher. We conclude that minor complexes which bind zeaxanthin are sites of charge transfer quenching in vivo and that they can assume Non-quenching and Quenching conformations, the equilibrium LHC(N)<--> LHC(Q) of which is modulated by the transthylakoid pH gradient, the PsbS protein, and protein-protein interactions.

  20. Cas1-Cas2 complex formation mediates spacer acquisition during CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, James K; Kranzusch, Philip J; Noeske, Jonas; Wright, Addison V; Davies, Christopher W; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-06-01

    The initial stage of CRISPR-Cas immunity involves the integration of foreign DNA spacer segments into the host genomic CRISPR locus. The nucleases Cas1 and Cas2 are the only proteins conserved among all CRISPR-Cas systems, yet the molecular functions of these proteins during immunity are unknown. Here we show that Cas1 and Cas2 from Escherichia coli form a stable complex that is essential for spacer acquisition and determine the 2.3-Å-resolution crystal structure of the Cas1-Cas2 complex. Mutations that perturb Cas1-Cas2 complex formation disrupt CRISPR DNA recognition and spacer acquisition in vivo. Active site mutants of Cas2, unlike those of Cas1, can still acquire new spacers, thus indicating a nonenzymatic role of Cas2 during immunity. These results reveal the universal roles of Cas1 and Cas2 and suggest a mechanism by which Cas1-Cas2 complexes specify sites of CRISPR spacer integration.

  1. Different Mechanisms of Catalytic Complex Formation in Two L-Tryptophan Processing Dioxygenases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Nienhaus

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The human heme enzymes tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (hTDO and indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (hIDO catalyze the initial step in L-tryptophan (L-Trp catabolism, the insertion of dioxygen into L-Trp. Overexpression of these enzymes causes depletion of L-Trp and accumulation of metabolic products, and thereby contributes to tumor immune tolerance and immune dysregulation in a variety of disease pathologies. Understanding the assembly of the catalytically active, ternary enzyme-substrate-ligand complexes is not yet fully resolved, but an essential prerequisite for designing efficient and selective de novo inhibitors. Evidence is mounting that the ternary complex forms by sequential binding of ligand and substrate in a specific order. In hTDO, the apolar L-Trp binds first, decreasing active-site solvation and, as a result, reducing non-productive oxidation of the heme iron by the dioxygen ligand, which may leave the substrate bound to a ferric heme iron. In hIDO, by contrast, dioxygen must first coordinate to the heme iron because a bound substrate would occlude ligand access to the heme iron, so the ternary complex can no longer form. Consequently, faster association of L-Trp at high concentrations results in substrate inhibition. Here, we summarize our present knowledge of ternary complex formation in hTDO and hIDO and relate these findings to structural peculiarities of their active sites.

  2. Influence of Countercation Hydration Enthalpies on the Formation of Molecular Complexes: A Thorium-Nitrate Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Geng Bang; Lin, Jian; Estes, Shanna L; Skanthakumar, S; Soderholm, L

    2017-12-13

    The influence of countercations (A n+ ) in directing the composition of monomeric metal-ligand (ML) complexes that precipitate from solution are often overlooked despite the wide usage of A n+ in materials synthesis. Herein, we describe a correlation between the composition of ML complexes and A + hydration enthalpies found for two related series of thorium (Th)-nitrate molecular compounds obtained by evaporating acidic aqueous Th-nitrate solutions in the presence of A + counterions. Analyses of their chemical composition and solid-state structures demonstrate that A + not only affects the overall solid-state packing of the Th-nitrato complexes but also influences the composition of the Th-nitrato monomeric anions themselves. Trends in composition and structure are found to correlate with A + hydration enthalpies, such that the A + with smaller hydration enthalpies associate with less hydrated and more anionic Th-nitrato complexes. This perspective, broader than the general assumption of size and charge as the dominant influence of A n+ , opens a new avenue for the design and synthesis of targeted metal-ligand complexes.

  3. Phosphate buffer and salt medium concentrations affect the inactivation of T4 phage by platinum(II) complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik B.; Josephsen, Jens; Kerszman, Gustaw

    1985-01-01

    -Tris) buffer and HEPES buffer. The phosphate abolishes the antiphage activity of the platinum complexes probably by some sort of complex formation. This together with dimerization reactions qualitatively explains the tailing off of the phage inactivation rate. High concentrations of NaNO3 as the salt medium...

  4. Habitats as complex odour environments: how does plant diversity affect herbivore and parasitoid orientation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Wäschke

    Full Text Available Plant diversity is known to affect success of host location by pest insects, but its effect on olfactory orientation of non-pest insect species has hardly been addressed. First, we tested in laboratory experiments the hypothesis that non-host plants, which increase odour complexity in habitats, affect the host location ability of herbivores and parasitoids. Furthermore, we recorded field data of plant diversity in addition to herbivore and parasitoid abundance at 77 grassland sites in three different regions in Germany in order to elucidate whether our laboratory results reflect the field situation. As a model system we used the herb Plantago lanceolata, the herbivorous weevil Mecinus pascuorum, and its larval parasitoid Mesopolobus incultus. The laboratory bioassays revealed that both the herbivorous weevil and its larval parasitoid can locate their host plant and host via olfactory cues even in the presence of non-host odour. In a newly established two-circle olfactometer, the weeviĺs capability to detect host plant odour was not affected by odours from non-host plants. However, addition of non-host plant odours to host plant odour enhanced the weeviĺs foraging activity. The parasitoid was attracted by a combination of host plant and host volatiles in both the absence and presence of non-host plant volatiles in a Y-tube olfactometer. In dual choice tests the parasitoid preferred the blend of host plant and host volatiles over its combination with non-host plant volatiles. In the field, no indication was found that high plant diversity disturbs host (plant location by the weevil and its parasitoid. In contrast, plant diversity was positively correlated with weevil abundance, whereas parasitoid abundance was independent of plant diversity. Therefore, we conclude that weevils and parasitoids showed the sensory capacity to successfully cope with complex vegetation odours when searching for hosts.

  5. Catalytic Hydrodehalogenation of Some Organic Halides by Hydrogen Transfer from Lithium Formate in the Presence of Ruthenium and Rhodium Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Marčec, Radovan

    1990-01-01

    Organic halides react with lithium formate in the presence of ruthenium and rhodium phosphine complexes as homogeneous catalysts in refluxing dioxane producing the corresponding deha- logenated compounds in moderate yields.

  6. A multi-grain reduced-complexity model for step formation and stability in steep streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saletti, Matteo; Molnar, Peter; Turowski, Jens; Rickenmann, Dieter

    2017-04-01

    We present a multi-grain particle-based reduced-complexity model for the simulation of the formation and stability of step-pool morphology by specifically considering the granular interactions between sediment and river bed leading to entrainment and deposition of grains. The model CAST2 (Cellular Automaton Sediment Transport), based on the uniform-size model of Saletti et al. [2016], contains phenomenological parameterizations of sediment supply, bed load transport, particle entrainment and deposition, and granular interactions in a cellular-automaton space. CAST2 simulates the effect of different grain sizes by considering two types of particles: fine grains, which can be mobilized by any flow, and coarse grains, whose mobility is flow-dependent. The model has been applied to test the effect of granular forces on step formation and stability in step-pool channels, as hypothesized in the jammed-state framework by Church and Zimmermann [2007]. The jamming of particles in motion and their enhanced stability on the bed are modelled explicitely: in this way steps are effectively generated during high-flow periods and they are stable during low flows when sediment supply is small. Moreover, model results are used to show which are the fundamental processes required to produce and maintain steps in steep streams and these findings are consistent with field observations. Finally the effect of flood frequency on step density is investigated by means of long stochastic simulations with repeated flood events. Model results show that systems with high flood frequency are characterized by greater step density, due to the dominance of step-forming conditions. Our results show the potential of reduced-complexity models as learning tools to gain new insight into the complex feedbacks and poorly understood processes characterizing rapidly changing geomorphic systems like step-pool streams, pointing out the importance of granular effects on the formation and stability of the step

  7. Factors affecting the formation of sub-downtowns in various metropolitan areas around the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukovsky, Roman; Pomorov, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    The paper is aimed at investigating and compiling systematic knowledge about the factors affecting formation and specificity of urban sub-downtowns (sub-centers). Sub-downtowns are autonomous territories, identical to the downtown and located within one metropolitan area with downtown. Objects corresponding to the concepts of "Edge City", "Edgeless City", "Secondary Business District", "Mixed-Use Development" were investigated as sub-downtowns. Terrestrial and satellite images, as well as functional zoning data of more than 250 metropolitan areas in all world's regions were explored. A special form of sub-downtowns characterized by direct commercial corridor connection with central business district was found and defined as "Total Business District" concept. Eight metropolitan area types were distinguished based on sub-downtown development level criterion. These types were found to have significant relation to the specific world regions. Sub-downtowns are more frequent and diverse in countries with higher level, pace and liberalization of economic development, as well as with higher motorization rate. The closer to the coast or state border the metropolitan area is, the more likely sub-downtowns within it will be developed. In the context of continental, desert, tropical, northern maritime climates sub-downtowns are less common than in subtropical, temperate and Mediterranean or Polynesian climates. In most cases, clustered (not just corridor-like) sub-downtowns are likely to be found in metropolitan areas with a population of more than 1.5-3.5 million people, depending on the geographic region of the world. The research results can improve forecasting the development and master planning of sub-downtowns in specific metropolitan areas.

  8. Studies on chalcone derivatives: Complex formation, thermal behavior, stability constant and antioxidant activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Yusif S.; Gaber, M.

    2015-02-01

    The chalcone 3-[4‧-dimethylaminophenyl]-1-(2-pyridyl) prop-2-en-1-one (DMAPP) and 3-(4‧-diethylaminophenyl)-1-(2-pyridinyl) prop-2-en-1-one abbreviated as DEAPP have been synthesized and characterized with IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques as described previously (El-Daly et al., 2008; Gaber et al., 2009; El-Sayed, 2013). By using UV visible spectroscopy method the mole fraction ratio for copper with DMAPP and DEAPP complexes were determined and it was found to be 1:1. The stability constants of this complex have been determined by Job's method. The stability constant (Kf) of copper with DMAPP and DEAPP complexes in universal buffer pH = 3.2 was determined to be 9.9 × 104 and 5.2 × 104 respectively. The effect of Cu(II) ion on the emission spectrum of the free chalcone is also assigned. Adherence to Beer's law and Ringbom optimum concentration ranges are determined. The thermal decomposition of the metal complexes is studied by TGA technique. The kinetic parameters like activation energy, pre-exponential factor and entropy of activation are estimated. The structure of complexes was energetically optimized through molecular mechanics applying MM+ force field coupled with molecular dynamics simulation. The bond lengths and bond angles have been calculated to confirm the geometry of the ligands and their Cu(II) complexes. The mode of interaction of the chalcone to copper nanoparticles was studied. The apparent association constants of the colloidal copper nanoparticles:chalcone complexes in solution were evaluated using the spectral method and compared with the formation constant of the Cu(II) chalcone complexes. Antioxidant activity of these chalcones was evaluated by using 1,1‧-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPHrad) radicals scavenging method, which showed that the antioxidant activity of DMAPP has higher value than the DEAPP. Semi-empirical study results showed that DMAPP have higher dipole moment than DEAPP [1].

  9. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of cadherin·β-catenin·α-catenin complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokutta, Sabine; Choi, Hee-Jung; Ahlsen, Goran; Hansen, Scott D; Weis, William I

    2014-05-09

    The classical cadherin·β-catenin·α-catenin complex mediates homophilic cell-cell adhesion and mechanically couples the actin cytoskeletons of adjacent cells. Although α-catenin binds to β-catenin and to F-actin, β-catenin significantly weakens the affinity of α-catenin for F-actin. Moreover, α-catenin self-associates into homodimers that block β-catenin binding. We investigated quantitatively and structurally αE- and αN-catenin dimer formation, their interaction with β-catenin and the cadherin·β-catenin complex, and the effect of the α-catenin actin-binding domain on β-catenin association. The two α-catenin variants differ in their self-association properties: at physiological temperatures, αE-catenin homodimerizes 10× more weakly than does αN-catenin but is kinetically trapped in its oligomeric state. Both αE- and αN-catenin bind to β-catenin with a Kd of 20 nM, and this affinity is increased by an order of magnitude when cadherin is bound to β-catenin. We describe the crystal structure of a complex representing the full β-catenin·αN-catenin interface. A three-dimensional model of the cadherin·β-catenin·α-catenin complex based on these new structural data suggests mechanisms for the enhanced stability of the ternary complex. The C-terminal actin-binding domain of α-catenin has no influence on the interactions with β-catenin, arguing against models in which β-catenin weakens actin binding by stabilizing inhibitory intramolecular interactions between the actin-binding domain and the rest of α-catenin.

  10. Structural and Thermodynamic Characterization of Cadherin·β-Catenin·α-Catenin Complex Formation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokutta, Sabine; Choi, Hee-Jung; Ahlsen, Goran; Hansen, Scott D.; Weis, William I.

    2014-01-01

    The classical cadherin·β-catenin·α-catenin complex mediates homophilic cell-cell adhesion and mechanically couples the actin cytoskeletons of adjacent cells. Although α-catenin binds to β-catenin and to F-actin, β-catenin significantly weakens the affinity of α-catenin for F-actin. Moreover, α-catenin self-associates into homodimers that block β-catenin binding. We investigated quantitatively and structurally αE- and αN-catenin dimer formation, their interaction with β-catenin and the cadherin·β-catenin complex, and the effect of the α-catenin actin-binding domain on β-catenin association. The two α-catenin variants differ in their self-association properties: at physiological temperatures, αE-catenin homodimerizes 10× more weakly than does αN-catenin but is kinetically trapped in its oligomeric state. Both αE- and αN-catenin bind to β-catenin with a Kd of 20 nm, and this affinity is increased by an order of magnitude when cadherin is bound to β-catenin. We describe the crystal structure of a complex representing the full β-catenin·αN-catenin interface. A three-dimensional model of the cadherin·β-catenin·α-catenin complex based on these new structural data suggests mechanisms for the enhanced stability of the ternary complex. The C-terminal actin-binding domain of α-catenin has no influence on the interactions with β-catenin, arguing against models in which β-catenin weakens actin binding by stabilizing inhibitory intramolecular interactions between the actin-binding domain and the rest of α-catenin. PMID:24692547

  11. Phonetic complexity affects children's Mandarin tone production accuracy in disyllabic words: A perceptual study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puisan Wong

    Full Text Available This is the first study to examine the effect of phonetic contexts on children's lexical tone production. Mandarin tones in disyllabic words produced by forty-four 2- to 6-year-old children and twelve mothers were low-pass filtered to eliminate lexical information. Native Mandarin-speaking adults categorized the tones based on the pitch information in the filtered stimuli. All mothers' tones were categorized with ceiling accuracy. Counter to the findings in most previous studies on children's tone acquisition and the prevailing assumption in models of speech development that children acquire suprasegmental features much earlier than segmental features, this study found that children as old as six years of age have not mastered the production of Mandarin tones. Children's tones were judged with significantly lower accuracy than mothers' productions. Tone accuracy improved, while cross subject variability in tone accuracy decreased, with age. Children's tone accuracy was affected by the articulatory complexity of phonetic contexts. Children made more errors in tone combinations with more complex fundamental frequency (F0 contours than tone sequences with simpler F0 changes. When producing disyllabic tone sequences with complex F0 contours, children tended to shift the F0 contour of the first tone to reduce the F0 change, resulting in more tone errors in the first syllable than in the second syllable and showing substantially more anticipatory coarticulation than adults. The results provide further evidence that acquisition of lexical tones is a protracted process in children. Tones produced accurately by children in one phonetic context may not be produced correctly in another phonetic context. Children demonstrate more anticipatory coarticulation in their disyllabic productions than adults, which may be attributed to children's immature speech motor control in tone production, and is presumably a by-product of their inability to accomplish

  12. Integrative strategy formation process and the management of complex work - a microorganizational analisys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalia Aldraci Barbosa Lavarda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to analyse how the strategy formation process takes place; studying the relevance of the integrative perspective and the use of the variables rationality, involvement and vision; Verifying the relationship between an integrative strategy formation process and the management of work and the consequences of this relationship in terms of performance, identifying the causes for a better fit; Also, verify the propositions that have been formulated and looking for new variables that could affect the relationship between strategic process and work management. It has been adopted a qualitative methodology through a study case. After the case analysis it has been identified two different variables (flexibility and the role of the middle manager that can have an influence in the subject of study; also, it has been found that if there is an important fit between the variables that define an integrative strategy formation process and the design variables used in the management of work, the process will be more efficient and, consequently, the organisation will obtain better results.

  13. Signal Complexity of Human Intracranial EEG Tracks Successful Associative-Memory Formation across Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Timothy C; Sreekumar, Vishnu; Inati, Sara K; Zaghloul, Kareem A

    2018-02-14

    Memory performance is highly variable among individuals. Most studies examining human memory, however, have largely focused on the neural correlates of successful memory formation within individuals, rather than the differences among them. As such, what gives rise to this variability is poorly understood. Here, we examined intracranial EEG (iEEG) recordings captured from 43 participants (23 male) implanted with subdural electrodes for seizure monitoring as they performed a paired-associates verbal memory task. We identified three separate but related signatures of neural activity that tracked differences in successful memory formation across individuals. High-performing individuals consistently exhibited less broadband power, flatter power spectral density slopes, and greater complexity in their iEEG signals. Furthermore, within individuals across three separate time scales ranging from seconds to days, successful recall was positively associated with these same metrics. Our data therefore suggest that memory ability across individuals can be indexed by increased neural signal complexity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We show that participants whose intracranial EEG exhibits less low-frequency power, flatter power spectrums, and greater sample entropy overall are better able to memorize associations, and that the same metrics track fluctuations in memory performance across time within individuals. These metrics together signify greater neural signal complexity, which may index the brain's ability to flexibly engage with information and generate separable memory representations. Critically, the current set of results provides a unique window into the neural markers of individual differences in memory performance, which have hitherto been underexplored. Copyright © 2018 the authors 0270-6474/18/381744-12$15.00/0.

  14. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN THE S235 COMPLEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Luna, A.; Mayya, Y. D. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Luis Enrique Erro # 1, Tonantzintla, Puebla, C.P. 72840, México (Mexico); Ojha, D. K.; Ninan, J. P.; Mallick, K. K. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Anandarao, B. G., E-mail: lokeshd@prl.res.in [Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad—380 009 (India)

    2016-03-01

    We have carried out an extensive multi-wavelength study to investigate the star formation process in the S235 complex. The S235 complex has a spherelike shell appearance at wavelengths longer than 2 μm and harbors an O9.5V type star approximately at its center. A near-infrared extinction map of the complex traces eight subregions (having A{sub V} > 8 mag), and five of them appear to be distributed in an almost regularly spaced manner along the spherelike shell surrounding the ionized emission. This picture is also supported by the integrated {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO intensity maps and by Bolocam 1.1 mm continuum emission. The position–velocity analysis of CO reveals an almost semi-ringlike structure, suggesting an expanding H ii region. We find that the Bolocam clump masses increase as we move away from the location of the ionizing star. This correlation is seen only for those clumps that are distributed near the edges of the shell. Photometric analysis reveals 435 young stellar objects (YSOs), 59% of which are found in clusters. Six subregions (including five located near the edges of the shell) are very well correlated with the dust clumps, CO gas, and YSOs. The average values of Mach numbers derived using NH{sub 3} data for three (East 1, East 2, and Central E) out of these six subregions are 2.9, 2.3, and 2.9, indicating these subregions are supersonic. The molecular outflows are detected in these three subregions, further confirming the ongoing star formation activity. Together, all these results are interpreted as observational evidence of positive feedback of a massive star.

  15. Foraging arena size and structural complexity affect the dynamics of food distribution in ant colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczkowski, Grzegorz; VanWeelden, Matthew

    2010-12-01

    Food acquisition by ant colonies is a complex process that starts with acquiring food at the source (i.e., foraging) and culminates with food exchange in or around the nest (i.e., feeding). While ant foraging behavior is relatively well understood, the process of food distribution has received little attention, largely because of the lack of methodology that allows for accurate monitoring of food flow. In this study, we used the odorous house ant, Tapinoma sessile (Say) to investigate the effect of foraging arena size and structural complexity on the rate and the extent of spread of liquid carbohydrate food (sucrose solution) throughout a colony. To track the movement of food, we used protein marking and double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, DAS-ELISA. Variation in arena size, in conjunction with different colony sizes, allowed us to test the effect of different worker densities on food distribution. Results demonstrate that both arena size and colony size have a significant effect on the spread of the food and the number of workers receiving food decreased as arena size and colony size increased. When colony size was kept constant and arena size increased, the percentage of workers testing positive for the marker decreased, most likely because of fewer trophallactic interactions resulting from lower worker density. When arena size was kept constant and colony size increased, the percentage of workers testing positive decreased. Nonrandom (clustered) worker dispersion and a limited supply of food may have contributed to this result. Overall, results suggest that food distribution is more complete is smaller colonies regardless of the size of the foraging arena and that colony size, rather than worker density, is the primary factor affecting food distribution. The structural complexity of foraging arenas ranged from simple, two-dimensional space (empty arenas) to complex, three-dimensional space (arenas filled with mulch). The structural

  16. Graphs versus numbers: How information format affects risk aversion in gambling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michael Dambacher; Peter Haffke; Daniel Groß; Ronald Hübner

    2016-01-01

    .... Because riskier choices would optimize profitability in such cases, the present study investigates the visual format, with which lotteries are conveyed, as potential instrument to modulate risk attitudes...

  17. Formation and Atmosphere of Complex Organic Molecules of the HH 212 Protostellar Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chin-Fei; Li, Zhi-Yun; Ho, Paul T. P.; Hirano, Naomi; Zhang, Qizhou; Shang, Hsien

    2017-07-01

    HH 212 is a nearby (400 pc) Class 0 protostellar system recently found to host a “hamburger”-shaped dusty disk with a radius of ˜60 au, deeply embedded in an infalling-rotating flattened envelope. We have spatially resolved this envelope-disk system with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array at up to ˜16 au (0.″04) resolution. The envelope is detected in HCO+ J = 4-3 down to the dusty disk. Complex organic molecules (COMs) and doubly deuterated formaldehyde (D2CO) are detected above and below the dusty disk within ˜40 au of the central protostar. The COMs are methanol (CH3OH), deuterated methanol (CH2DOH), methyl mercaptan (CH3SH), and formamide (NH2CHO, a prebiotic precursor). We have modeled the gas kinematics in HCO+ and COMs and found a centrifugal barrier (CB) at a radius of ˜44 au, within which a Keplerian rotating disk is formed. This indicates that HCO+ traces the infalling-rotating envelope down to the CB and COMs trace the atmosphere of a Keplerian rotating disk within the CB. The COMs are spatially resolved for the first time, both radially and vertically, in the atmosphere of a disk in the earliest, Class 0 phase of star formation. Our spatially resolved observations of COMs favor their formation in the disk rather than a rapidly infalling (warm) inner envelope. The abundances and spatial distributions of the COMs provide strong constraints on models of their formation and transport in low-mass star formation.

  18. Formation and Atmosphere of Complex Organic Molecules of the HH 212 Protostellar Disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chin-Fei; Ho, Paul T. P.; Hirano, Naomi; Shang, Hsien [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Li, Zhi-Yun [Astronomy Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Zhang, Qizhou, E-mail: cflee@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-07-01

    HH 212 is a nearby (400 pc) Class 0 protostellar system recently found to host a “hamburger”-shaped dusty disk with a radius of ∼60 au, deeply embedded in an infalling-rotating flattened envelope. We have spatially resolved this envelope-disk system with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array at up to ∼16 au (0.″04) resolution. The envelope is detected in HCO{sup +} J = 4–3 down to the dusty disk. Complex organic molecules (COMs) and doubly deuterated formaldehyde (D{sub 2}CO) are detected above and below the dusty disk within ∼40 au of the central protostar. The COMs are methanol (CH{sub 3}OH), deuterated methanol (CH{sub 2}DOH), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}SH), and formamide (NH{sub 2}CHO, a prebiotic precursor). We have modeled the gas kinematics in HCO{sup +} and COMs and found a centrifugal barrier (CB) at a radius of ∼44 au, within which a Keplerian rotating disk is formed. This indicates that HCO{sup +} traces the infalling-rotating envelope down to the CB and COMs trace the atmosphere of a Keplerian rotating disk within the CB. The COMs are spatially resolved for the first time, both radially and vertically, in the atmosphere of a disk in the earliest, Class 0 phase of star formation. Our spatially resolved observations of COMs favor their formation in the disk rather than a rapidly infalling (warm) inner envelope. The abundances and spatial distributions of the COMs provide strong constraints on models of their formation and transport in low-mass star formation.

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Exhibits Lineage-Specific Variations Affecting Protein Ductility and Epitope Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yruela, Inmaculada; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Magalhães, Carlos; Osório, Nuno S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The advent of whole-genome sequencing has provided an unprecedented detail about the evolution and genetic significance of species-specific variations across the whole Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex. However, little attention has been focused on understanding the functional roles of these variations in the protein coding sequences. In this work, we compare the coding sequences from 74 sequenced mycobacterial species including M. africanum, M. bovis, M. canettii, M. caprae, M. orygis, and M. tuberculosis. Results show that albeit protein variations affect all functional classes, those proteins involved in lipid and intermediary metabolism and respiration have accumulated mutations during evolution. To understand the impact of these mutations on protein functionality, we explored their implications on protein ductility/disorder, a yet unexplored feature of mycobacterial proteomes. In agreement with previous studies, we found that a Gly71Ile substitution in the PhoPR virulence system severely affects the ductility of its nearby region in M. africanum and animal-adapted species. In the same line of evidence, the SmtB transcriptional regulator shows amino acid variations specific to the Beijing lineage, which affects the flexibility of the N-terminal trans-activation domain. Furthermore, despite the fact that MTBC epitopes are evolutionary hyperconserved, we identify strain- and lineage-specific amino acid mutations affecting previously known T-cell epitopes such as EsxH and FbpA (Ag85A). Interestingly, in silico studies reveal that these variations result in differential interaction of epitopes with the main HLA haplogroups. PMID:28062754

  20. Substrate-Na{sup +} complex formation: Coupling mechanism for {gamma}-aminobutyrate symporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallo, Anna; Simon, Agnes [Department of Neurochemistry, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary); Bencsura, Akos [Department of Theoretical Chemistry, Institute of Structural Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Heja, Laszlo [Department of Neurochemistry, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary); Kardos, Julianna, E-mail: jkardos@chemres.hu [Department of Neurochemistry, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary)

    2009-07-24

    Crystal structures of transmembrane transport proteins belonging to the important families of neurotransmitter-sodium symporters reveal how they transport neurotransmitters across membranes. Substrate-induced structural conformations of gated neurotransmitter-sodium symporters have been in the focus of research, however, a key question concerning the mechanism of Na{sup +} ion coupling remained unanswered. Homology models of human glial transporter subtypes of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter {gamma}-aminobutyric acid were built. In accordance with selectivity data for subtype 2 vs. 3, docking and molecular dynamics calculations suggest similar orthosteric substrate (inhibitor) conformations and binding crevices but distinguishable allosteric Zn{sup 2+} ion binding motifs. Considering the occluded conformational states of glial human {gamma}-aminobutyric acid transporter subtypes, we found major semi-extended and minor ring-like conformations of zwitterionic {gamma}-aminobutyric acid in complex with Na{sup +} ion. The existence of the minor ring-like conformation of {gamma}-aminobutyric acid in complex with Na{sup +} ion may be attributed to the strengthening of the intramolecular H-bond by the electrostatic effect of Na{sup +} ion. Coupling substrate uptake into cells with the thermodynamically favorable Na{sup +} ion movement through substrate-Na{sup +} ion complex formation may be a mechanistic principle featuring transmembrane neurotransmitter-sodium symporter proteins.

  1. Formation of coronene:water complexes: FTIR study in argon matrices and theoretical characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, A; Noble, J A; Rouaut, G; Moudens, A; Aupetit, C; Iftner, C; Mascetti, J

    2017-03-22

    In this paper, we report a combined theoretical and experimental study of coronene:water interactions in low temperature argon matrices. The theoretical calculations were performed using the mixed density functional-based tight binding/force field approach. The results are discussed in the light of experimental matrix isolation FTIR spectroscopic data. We show that, in the solid phase, (C24H12)(H2O)n (n ≤ 6) σ-type complexes, i.e. with water molecules coordinated on the edge of coronene, are formed, whereas in the gas phase, π-interaction is preferred. These σ-complexes are characterised by small shifts in water absorption bands and a larger blue shift of the out-of-plane γ(CH) deformation of coronene, with the shift increasing with the number of complexed water molecules. Such σ interaction is expected to favour photochemical reaction between water and coronene at the edges of the coronene molecule, leading to the formation of oxidation products at low temperature, even in the presence of only a few water molecules and at radiation energies below the ionisation potential of coronene.

  2. A complex comprising phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIβ, ACBD3, and Aichi virus proteins enhances phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate synthesis and is critical for formation of the viral replication complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa-Sasaki, Kumiko; Sasaki, Jun; Taniguchi, Koki

    2014-06-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIβ (PI4KB) is a host factor required for the replication of certain picornavirus genomes. We previously showed that nonstructural proteins 2B, 2BC, 2C, 3A, and 3AB of Aichi virus (AiV), a picornavirus, interact with the Golgi protein, acyl-coenzyme A binding domain containing 3 (ACBD3), which interacts with PI4KB. These five viral proteins, ACBD3, PI4KB, and the PI4KB product phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P) colocalize to the AiV RNA replication sites (J. Sasaki et al., EMBO J. 31:754-766, 2012). We here examined the roles of these viral and cellular molecules in the formation of AiV replication complexes. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that treatment of AiV polyprotein-expressing cells with a small interfering RNA targeting ACBD3 abolished colocalization of the viral 2B, 2C, and 3A proteins with PI4KB. A PI4KB-specific inhibitor also prevented their colocalization. Virus RNA replication increased the level of cellular PI4P without affecting that of PI4KB, and individual expression of 2B, 2BC, 2C, 3A, or 3AB stimulated PI4P generation. These results suggest that the viral protein/ACBD3/PI4KB complex plays an important role in forming the functional replication complex by enhancing PI4P synthesis. Of the viral proteins, 3A and 3AB were shown to stimulate the in vitro kinase activity of PI4KB through forming a 3A or 3AB/ACBD3/PI4KB complex, whereas the ACBD3-mediated PI4KB activation by 2B and 2C remains to be demonstrated. The phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase PI4KB is a host factor required for the replication of certain picornavirus genomes. Aichi virus, a picornavirus belonging to the genus Kobuvirus, forms a complex comprising one of the viral nonstructural proteins 2B, 2BC, 2C, 3A, and 3AB, the Golgi protein ACBD3, and PI4KB to synthesize PI4P at the sites for viral RNA replication. However, the roles of this protein complex in forming the replication complex are unknown. This study showed that virus RNA replication

  3. Verbal versus Numerical Probabilities: Does Format Presentation of Probabilistic Information regarding Breast Cancer Screening Affect Women's Comprehension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabi, Mandana

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To test whether the format in which women receive probabilistic information about breast cancer and mammography affects their comprehension. Methods: A convenience sample of 180 women received pre-assembled randomized packages containing a breast health information brochure, with probabilities presented in either verbal or numeric…

  4. How Interactive Video (ITV) Web-Enhanced Format Affects Instructional Strategy and Instructor Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Catrina V.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the quality of technology associated with interactive video (ITV) classes in distance education programs and the resulting satisfaction of the instructors teaching this format. The participants were full time instructors of a rural community college that used the ITV format. Community college ITV instructors are…

  5. Internal and External Factors Affecting Teachers' Adoption of Formative Assessment to Support Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izci, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Assessment forms an important part of instruction. Assessment that aims to support learning is known as formative assessment and it contributes student's learning gain and motivation. However, teachers rarely use assessment formatively to aid their students' learning. Thus reviewing the factors that limit or support teachers' practices of…

  6. The formation of glycine and other complex organic molecules in exploding ice mantles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, J M C; Williams, D A; Viti, S; Cecchi-Pestellini, C; Duley, W W

    2014-01-01

    Complex Organic Molecules (COMs), such as propylene (CH3CHCH2) and the isomers of C2H4O2 are detected in cold molecular clouds (such as TMC-1) with high fractional abundances (Marcelino et al., Astrophys. J., 2007, 665, L127). The formation mechanism for these species is the subject of intense speculation, as is the possibility of the formation of simple amino acids such as glycine (NH2CH2COOH). At typical dark cloud densities, normal interstellar gas-phase chemistries are inefficient, whilst surface chemistry is at best ill defined and does not easily reproduce the abundance ratios observed in the gas phase. Whatever mechanism(s) is/are operating, it/they must be both efficient at converting a significant fraction of the available carbon budget into COMs, and capable of efficiently returning the COMs to the gas phase. In our previous studies we proposed a complementary, alternative mechanism, in which medium- and large-sized molecules are formed by three-body gas kinetic reactions in the warm high density gas phase. This environment exists, for a very short period of time, after the total sublimation of grain ice mantles in transient co-desorption events. In order to drive the process, rapid and efficient mantle sublimation is required and we have proposed that ice mantle 'explosions' can be driven by the catastrophic recombination of trapped hydrogen atoms, and other radicals, in the ice. Repeated cycles of freeze-out and explosion can thus lead to a cumulative molecular enrichment of the interstellar medium. Using existing studies we based our chemical network on simple radical addition, subject to enthalpy and valency restrictions. In this work we have extended the chemistry to include the formation pathways of glycine and other large molecular species that are detected in molecular clouds. We find that the mechanism is capable of explaining the observed molecular abundances and complexity in these sources. We find that the proposed mechanism is easily capable

  7. Formation of the light-harvesting complex I (B870) of anoxygenic phototrophic purple bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, G

    1996-09-01

    The light-harvesting (LH) complex I (B870) of anoxygenic photosynthetic purple bacteria is the oligomeric form of its subunit B820 consisting of the low-molecular-weight polypeptides alpha, beta, bacteriochlorophyll (BChl), and carotenoids in the stoichiometric ratio [alpha1 beta1 (BChl2) Crt1-2]n. LHI surrounds the photochemical reaction center (RC). The major absorption band of the LHI complex is species-specific and is found at 870-890 nm; those of the subunit and the monomeric BChl a (dissolved in methanol) absorb at 820 and 770 nm, respectively. The isolated LHI complex can be reversibly dissociated to the B820 subunit or to the polypeptides and pigments by addition of detergents. Reconstitution of the B820 or the functional B870 complex is still possible after partial truncation of the N- or C-terminal regions of the alpha- or beta-polypeptide or of the beta-polypeptide only. The minimal structural requirements for reconstitution of a spectrally wild-type form after truncation of the polypeptides and/or modifications of the BChl molecule are described. The insertion of the LHIalpha- and LHIbeta-polypeptides into the membrane and the in vivo assembly of LHI, studied in a cell-free system and in whole cells of Rhodobacter capsulatus, depend on the primary structures of both polypeptides, BChl, the chaperones DnaK and GroEL, membrane-bound proteins, and energized membranes. Exchanges, deletions, or insertions of amino acyl residues, especially in the conserved region of the N-terminus of the LHIalpha-polypeptide, prevent or reduce the efficiency and stability of the LHI assembly. Therefore, reconstitution of LHI in a detergent micelle does not exactly reproduce the formation of the LHI complex in the photosynthetic membrane in vivo. The N-terminal domains play a crucial role in the formation of the oligomeric protein scaffold and of the pigment array. Facultatively phototrophic bacteria such as Rhodospirillum (Rsp.) rubrum or Rhodobacter (Rba.) capsulatus can

  8. Intended and unintended (sensory-)motor coupling between the affected and unaffected upper limb in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bank, P.J.M.; Peper, C.E.; Marinus, J.; Van Hilten, J.J.; Beek, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Motor dysfunction in complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) has been associated with bilateral malfunction of sensory and motor circuits, which hints at abnormal coupling between the affected and the contralateral unaffected limb. In addition, clinical observations suggest that motor

  9. Temperature quenched DODAB dispersions: fluid and solid state coexistence and complex formation with oppositely charged surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocquyt, Jan; Olsson, Ulf; Olofsson, Gerd; Van der Meeren, Paul

    2004-05-11

    Dilute dispersions of the synthetic bilayer forming double-chained cationic lipid dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) were investigated. In dispersions sonicated above the chain melting temperature Tm (approximately 45 degrees C) it was found by H NMR that about 50% of the surfactant chains remained fluid when the samples were cooled to room temperature, which is 20 degrees C below Tm. In contrast, there was no sign of a fluid fraction in unsonicated samples at room temperature. The addition of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to DODAB dispersions at room temperature resulted in the formation of an essentially stoichiometric DODA-DS complex with frozen chains, as seen by titration calorimetry and H NMR experiments. For sonicated samples, turbidity experiments demonstrated that, after a fast complexation reaction, the system remains colloidally stable unless the SDS-to-DODAB mixing ratio is too close to unity. H NMR experiments also showed that in the unreacted DODAB the fraction of fluid chains remained close to 50%, indicating either that SDS reacts equally fast with fluid and frozen DODAB or that there is a relaxation of the fluid fraction after the complexation. The melting enthalpy and the melting temperature of the alkyl chains rise gradually as the mixing ratio increases. We observed with cryo-TEM that the fraction of large unilamellar vesicles was significantly larger after addition of SDS. This indicates vesicle fusion. Based on both wide- and small-angle X-ray scattering patterns, the structure of the equimolar SDS-DODAB complex at 25 degress C was proposed to be lamellar.

  10. Probing the modulated formation of gold nanoparticles-beta-lactoglobulin corona complexes and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiang; Wang, Bo; You, Youngsang; Chang, Woo-Jin; Tang, Ke; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Zhang, Wenzhao; Ding, Feng; Gunasekaran, Sundaram

    2017-11-23

    Understanding the interactions between proteins and nanoparticles (NPs) along with the underlying structural and dynamic information is of utmost importance to exploit nanotechnology for biomedical applications. Upon adsorption onto a NP surface, proteins form a well-organized layer, termed the corona, that dictates the identity of the NP-protein complex and governs its biological pathways. Given its high biological relevance, in-depth molecular investigations and applications of NPs-protein corona complexes are still scarce, especially since different proteins form unique corona patterns, making identification of the biomolecular motifs at the interface critical. In this work, we provide molecular insights and structural characterizations of the bio-nano interface of a popular food-based protein, namely bovine beta-lactoglobulin (β-LG), with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and report on our investigations of the formation of corona complexes by combined molecular simulations and complementary experiments. Two major binding sites in β-LG were identified as being driven by citrate-mediated electrostatic interactions, while the associated binding kinetics and conformational changes in the secondary structures were also characterized. More importantly, the superior stability of the corona led us to further explore its biomedical applications, such as in the smartphone-based point-of-care biosensing of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and in the computed tomography (CT) of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract through oral administration to probe GI tolerance and functions. Considering their biocompatibility, edible nature, and efficient excretion through defecation, AuNPs-β-LG corona complexes have shown promising perspectives for future in vitro and in vivo clinical settings.

  11. Complex formation of U(VI) with Bacillus-isolates from a uranium mining waste pile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panak, P.J.; Nitsche, H. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (FZR) (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Center; Raff, J.; Selenska-Pobell, S.; Geipel, G.; Bernhard, G. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (FZR) (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie

    2000-07-01

    Accumulation studies with vegetative cells and spores of three Bacillus isolates (JG-A 30, JG-A 12, JG-A 22, classified as Bacillus cereus, Bacillus sphaericus, Bacillus megaterium) from a uranium mining waste pile (Johanngeorgenstadt, Saxony) and their corresponding reference strains have shown that Bacilli accumulate high amounts of U(VI) in the concentration range examined (11-214 mg/L). Information on the binding strength and the reversibility were obtained from extraction studies with different extractants. With 0.01 M EDTA solution the uranium bound to the biomass was released almost quantitatively. The characterization of the bacterial-UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-complexes by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) showed the formation of inner-sphere complexes with phosphate groups of the biomass. The results lead to the conclusion that the cell wall components with phosphate residues e.g., polysaccharides, teichoic and teichuroic acids or phospholipide layers of the membranes are responsible for the uranium binding. The spectroscopic studies of the U(VI)-complexes with isolated bacterial cell walls and isolated surface-layer proteins of the strain Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602 after cell fractionation have shown that the complexation of U(VI) with intact cells (vegetative cells or spores) is different from the coordination with isolated cell wall components, especially with the S-layer proteins. For all Bacillus strains studied in this work, a significant contribution of the S-layer proteins to the binding of uranyl to living cells can be excluded. (orig.)

  12. Coupling of downstream RNA polymerase-promoter interactions with formation of catalytically competent transcription initiation complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekler, Vladimir; Minakhin, Leonid; Borukhov, Sergei; Mustaev, Arkady; Severinov, Konstantin

    2014-12-12

    Bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) makes extensive contacts with duplex DNA downstream of the transcription bubble in initiation and elongation complexes. We investigated the role of downstream interactions in formation of catalytically competent transcription initiation complex by measuring initiation activity of stable RNAP complexes with model promoter DNA fragments whose downstream ends extend from +3 to +21 relative to the transcription start site at +1. We found that DNA downstream of position +6 does not play a significant role in transcription initiation when RNAP-promoter interactions upstream of the transcription start site are strong and promoter melting region is AT rich. Further shortening of downstream DNA dramatically reduces efficiency of transcription initiation. The boundary of minimal downstream DNA duplex needed for efficient transcription initiation shifted further away from the catalytic center upon increasing the GC content of promoter melting region or in the presence of bacterial stringent response regulators DksA and ppGpp. These results indicate that the strength of RNAP-downstream DNA interactions has to reach a certain threshold to retain the catalytically competent conformation of the initiation complex and that establishment of contacts between RNAP and downstream DNA can be coupled with promoter melting. The data further suggest that RNAP interactions with DNA immediately downstream of the transcription bubble are particularly important for initiation of transcription. We hypothesize that these active center-proximal contacts stabilize the DNA template strand in the active center cleft and/or position the RNAP clamp domain to allow RNA synthesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Polysaccharide charge density regulating protein adsorption to air/water interfaces by protein/polysaccharide complex formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzevles, R.A.; Kosters, H.; Vliet, T. van; Stuart, M.A.C.; Jongh, H.H.J. de

    2007-01-01

    Because the formation of protein/polysaccharide complexes is dominated by electrostatic interaction, polysaccharide charge density is expected to play a major role in the adsorption behavior of the complexes. In this study, pullulan (a non-charged polysaccharide) carboxylated to four different

  14. Temperature and dose dependence of defect complex formation with ion implanted Mn/Fe in ZnO

    CERN Document Server

    Mølholt, T E; Gunnlaugsson, H P; Bharuth-Ram, K; Fanciulli, M; Gíslason, H P; Johnston, K; Kobayashi, Y; Langouche, G; Masenda, H; Naidoo, D; Ólafsson, S; Sielemann, R; Weyer, G

    2009-01-01

    57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy following ion implantation of radioactive 57Mn+ ( T1/2=85.4 s) has been applied to study the formation of Fe/Mn implantation-induced defects in ZnO at temperatures between 319 and 390 K. The formation of ferric iron–vacancy complexes is found to depend strongly on the implanted dose and to be faster and more efficient at higher temperatures. The results at these temperatures suggest the mobility of the Zn vacancy, together with vacancy trapping at the substitutional Mn/Fe impurities are responsible for the formation of Fe–VZn complexes

  15. The effects of lower crustal strength and preexisting midcrustal shear zones on the formation of continental core complexes and low-angle normal faults

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Guangliang

    2016-08-22

    To investigate the formation of core complexes and low-angle normal faults, we devise thermomechanical simulations on a simplified wedge-like orogenic hinterland that has initial topography, Moho relief, and a preexisting midcrustal shear zone that can accommodate shear at very low angles (<20°). We mainly vary the strength of the lower crust and the frictional strength of the preexisting midcrustal shear zone. We find that the strength of the lower crust and the existence and strength of a preexisting shear zone significantly affect the formation and evolution of core complexes. With increasing lower crustal strength, we recognize varying extensional features with decreasing exhumation rate: these are characterized by bivergent metamorphic massifs, classic Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes, multiple consecutive core complexes (or boudinage structures), and a flexural core complex underlined by a large subsurface low-angle detachment fault with a small convex curvature. Topographic loading and mantle buoyancy forces, together with divergent boundaries, drive a regional lower crustal flow that leads to the exhumation of the lower crust where intensive upper crustal faulting induces strong unloading. The detachment fault is a decoupling zone that accommodates large displacement and accumulates sustained shear strain at very low angle between upper and lower crust. Though the regional stress is largely Andersonian, we find non-Andersonian stress in regions adjacent to the preexisting shear zone and those with high topographic gradient. Our new models provide a view that is generally consistent with geological and geophysical observations on how core complexes form and evolve.

  16. Thermodynamics of Complex Sulfide Inclusion Formation in Ca-Treated Al-Killed Structural Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yin-tao; He, Sheng-ping; Chen, Gu-jun; Wang, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Controlling the morphology of the sulfide inclusion is of vital importance in enhancing the properties of structural steel. Long strip-shaped sulfides in hot-rolled steel can spherize when, instead of the inclusion of pure single-phase MnS, the guest is a complex sulfide, such as an oxide-sulfide duplex and a solid-solution sulfide particle. In this study, the inclusions in a commercial rolled structural steel were investigated. Spherical and elongated oxide-sulfide duplex as well as single-phase (Mn,Ca)S solid solution inclusions were observed in the steel. A thermodynamic equilibrium between the oxide and sulfide inclusions was proposed to understand the oxide-sulfide duplex inclusion formation. Based on the equilibrium solidification principle, thermodynamic discussions on inclusion precipitation during the solidification process were performed for both general and resulfurized structural steel. The predicted results of the present study agreed well with the experimental ones.

  17. Unraveling the complexities of circadian and sleep interactions with memory formation through invertebrate research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian eMichel

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Across phylogeny, the endogenous biological clock has been recognized as providing adaptive advantages to organisms through coordination of physiological and behavioral processes. Recent research has emphasized the role of circadian modulation of memory in generating peaks and troughs in cognitive performance. The circadian clock along with homeostatic processes also regulates sleep, which itself impacts the formation and consolidation of memory. Thus, the circadian clock, sleep and memory form a triad with ongoing dynamic interactions. With technological advances and the development of a global 24/7 society, understanding the mechanisms underlying these connections becomes pivotal for development of therapeutic treatments for memory disorders and to address issues in cognitive performance arising from non-traditional work schedules. Invertebrate models, such as Drosophila melanogaster and the mollusks Aplysia and Lymnaea, have proven invaluable tools for identification of highly conserved molecular processes in memory. Recent research from invertebrate systems has outlined the influence of sleep and the circadian clock upon synaptic plasticity. In this review, we discuss the effects of the circadian clock and sleep on memory formation in invertebrates drawing attention to the potential of in vivo and in vitro approaches that harness the power of simple invertebrate systems to correlate individual cellular processes with complex behaviors. In conclusion, this review highlights how studies in invertebrates with relatively simple nervous systems can provide mechanistic insights into corresponding behaviors in higher organisms and can be used to outline possible therapeutic options to guide further targeted inquiry.

  18. Formation of Large Polysulfide Complexes during the Lithium-Sulfur Battery Discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bin [Vanderbilt University, Nashville; Alhassan, Saeed M. [The Petroleum Institute; Pantelides, Sokrates T [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur cathodes have much larger capacities than transition-metal-oxide cathodes used in commercial lithium-ion batteries but suffer from unsatisfactory capacity retention and long-term cyclability. Capacity degradation originates from soluble lithium polysulfides gradually diffusing into the electrolyte. Understanding of the formation and dynamics of soluble polysulfides during the discharging process at the atomic level remains elusive, which limits further development of lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. Here we report first-principles molecular dynamics simulations and density functional calculations, through which the discharging products of Li-S batteries are studied. We find that, in addition to simple Li2Sn (1 n 8) clusters generated from single cyclooctasulfur (S8) rings, large Li-S clusters form by collectively coupling several different rings to minimize the total energy. At high lithium concentration, a Li-S network forms at the sulfur surfaces. The results can explain the formation of the soluble Li-S complex, such as Li2S8, Li2S6, and Li2S4, and the insoluble Li2S2 and Li2S structures. In addition, we show that the presence of oxygen impurities in graphene, particularly oxygen atoms bonded to vacancies and edges, may stabilize the lithium polysulfides that may otherwise diffuse into the electrolyte.

  19. Catalysis on microstructured surfaces: Pattern formation during CO oxidation in complex Pt domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, M. D.; Bär, M.; Kevrekidis, I. G.; Asakura, K.; Lauterbach, J.; Rotermund, H.-H.; Ertl, G.

    1995-07-01

    The exploration of pattern formation by reaction-diffusion systems in complex bounded domains has begun only recently. While theoretical and numerical information points to a strong interaction between patterns and boundaries, experiments are rare and for heterogeneous catalytic reactions practically nonexistent. By constructing (using microlithography) catalytic surfaces of arbitrary shape and size, we are able to study this interaction for the catalytic oxidation of CO on Pt(110). Experiments along these lines shed light on issues such as anisotropic diffusion and the behavior of individual defects. In addition, certain geometries give rise to patterns that have not been observed on the untreated catalyst and bring to light surface mechanisms that have no analog in homogeneous reaction-diffusion systems. Simple domains of controlled size constitute paradigms that make the comparisons between theory and experiment more fruitful, as we demonstrate through modeling and simulation of such examples. This approach opens the way for systematically probing certain aspects of pattern formation unique to heterogeneous catalysis.

  20. Coprinus cinereus Mer3 is required for synaptonemal complex formation during meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Hiroko; Iwabata, Kazuki; Koshiyama, Akiyo; Yanai, Takuro; Daikuhara, Yoko; Namekawa, Satoshi H; Hamada, Fumika N; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2009-02-01

    Mer3 is an evolutionarily conserved DNA helicase that has crucial roles in meiotic recombination and crossover formation. We have identified the MER3 homolog in Coprinus cinereus (Ccmer3) and show that it is expressed in zygotene and pachytene meiocytes. Immunostaining analysis indicated that CcMer3 was localized on chromosomes at zygotene and pachytene and CcMer3 foci were more frequent on paired than unpaired chromosomes. We generated a C. cinereus mer3 mutant (#1) and found that it showed abnormal meiosis progression and underwent apoptosis after prophase I. Basidiospore production in #1 was reduced to 0.8% of the wild-type level; the spores showed slower germination at 25 degrees C but were similar to the wild type at 37 degrees C. Electron microscopic analysis of chromosome spreads revealed that axial elements were formed in the mutant but that synapsis was defective, resulting in a reduction in spore production. Our results demonstrate that CcMer3 is required for synaptonemal complex formation after axial elements align and is thus essential for homologous synapsis.

  1. Formation of polyelectrolyte complexes with diethylaminoethyl dextran: charge ratio and molar mass effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cerf, Didier; Pepin, Anne Sophie; Niang, Pape Momar; Cristea, Mariana; Karakasyan-Dia, Carole; Picton, Luc

    2014-11-26

    The formation of polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) between carboxymethyl pullulan and DEAE Dextran, was investigated, in dilute solution, with emphasis on the effect of charge density (molar ratio or pH) and molar masses. Electrophoretic mobility measurements have evidenced that insoluble PECs (neutral electrophoretic mobility) occurs for charge ratio between 0.6 (excess of polycation) and 1 (stoichiometry usual value) according to the pH. This atypical result is explained by the inaccessibility of some permanent cationic charge when screened by pH dependant cationic ones (due to the Hoffman alkylation). Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) indicates an endothermic formation of PEC with a binding constant around 10(5) L mol(-1). Finally asymmetrical flow field flow fractionation coupled on line with static multi angle light scattering (AF4/MALS) evidences soluble PECs with very large average molar masses and size around 100 nm, in agreement with scrambled eggs multi-association between various polyelectrolyte chains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Interfacial complex formation in uranyl extraction by tributyl phosphate in dodecane diluent: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xianggui; Cui, Shengting; de Almeida, Valmor; Khomami, Bamin

    2009-07-23

    Atomistic simulations have been carried out in a multicomponent two-phase system (aqueous and organic phases in direct contact) to investigate the interfacial molecular mechanisms leading to uranyl extraction from the aqueous to organic phase. The aqueous phase consists of the dissolved ions UO2(2+) and nitrate NO3-, with or without H3O+, in water to describe acidic or neutral condition; the organic phase consists of tributyl phosphate, the extractant, in dodecane as the diluent. We find that the interface facilitates the formation of various uranyl complexes, with a general formula UO2(2+)(NO3-)n *mTBP*kH2O, with n+m+k=5, suggesting a 5-fold coordination. The coordination for all three molecular entities has the common feature that they all bind to the uranyl at the uranium atom with an oxygen atom in the equatorial plane perpendicular to the molecular axis of the uranyl, forming a 5-fold symmetry plane. Nitric acid has a strong effect in enhancing the formation of extractable species, which is consistent with experimental findings.

  3. In vivo formation and bioavailability of isothiocyanates from glucosinolates in broccoli as affected by processing conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliviero, T.; Verkerk, R.; Vermeulen, M.; Dekker, M.

    2014-01-01

    Scope: To study the effect of residual myrosinase (MYR) activity in differently processed broccoli on sulforaphane (SR) and iberin (IB) formation, bioavailability, and excretion in human volunteers. Methods and results: Five different broccoli products were obtainedwith similar glucoraphanin (GR)

  4. Pathology, assessment and treatment of structures affected by Delayed Ettringite Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Godart, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    The expansive sulphate internal reaction of concrete due to Delayed Ettringite Formation (DEF) can damage concrete structures severely. DEF is defined as the formation of ettringite in a concrete after setting, and without any external sulphate supply, but with water supply. This phenomenon occurs in concretes exposed to frequent humidity or contact to water, and subjected to a relatively high thermal treatment (> 65°C) or having reached high temperatures during casting. This reaction ma...

  5. Pathology, assessment and treatment of structures affected by Delayed Ettringite Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Godart, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    The expansive sulphate internal reaction of concrete due to Delayed Ettringite Formation (DEF) can damage concrete structures severely. DEF is defined as the formation of ettringite in a concrete after setting, and without any external sulphate supply, but with water supply. This phenomenon occurs in concretes exposed to frequent humidity or contact to water, and subjected to a relatively high thermal treatment (> 65°C) or having reached high temperatures during casting. This reaction may...

  6. DINOFLAGELLATE CYSTS AND CALCAREOUS NANNOFOSSILS FROM THE UPPER CRETACEOUS SARACENO FORMATION (CALABRIA, ITALY: IMPLICATIONS ABOUT THE HISTORY OF THE LIGURIDE COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STEFANO TORRICELLI

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts and calcareous nannofossils recovered from the turbidites of the Saraceno Formation outcropping in the type area (north-eastern Calabria, Italy are presented. They provide new information about the age of the Saraceno Formation, hence a constraint to reconstruct the timing of deformations that affected the Liguride Complex. The distribution of dinoflagellate cysts and calcareous nannofossils in the succession studied is compared with biostratigraphies available for the Upper Cretaceous. Accordingly, the age of the lowermost part of the Fiumara Saraceno section is latest Albian to Turonian, whereas the upper part of the section is dated as late Campanian-?earliest Maastrichtian. A hiatus spanning che Coniacian, che Santonian and most of che Campanian is inferred between these two successions, which are also distinguished by the presence and absence of flint respectively. Consistencies and discrepancies of che present data with biostratigraphical information previously published for che Saraceno Formation, are discussed. 

  7. Study of inclusion complex formation between chlorpromazine hydrochloride, as an antiemetic drug, and {beta}-cyclodextrin, using conductometric technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafati, Amir Abbas, E-mail: aa_rafati@basu.ac.ir [Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, P.O. Box 65174, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hamnabard, Nazanin; Ghasemian, Ensieh; Nojini, Zabiolah Bolboli [Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, P.O. Box 65174, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-04-30

    The behavior of micellization of chlorpromazine hydrochloride (CPH) as an antiemetic drug and its inclusion complex formation with {beta}-cyclodextrin ({beta}-CD) was studied using conductometric technique. The binding or association constant of the complexation equilibrium is evaluated from conductometric measurements by using a nonlinear regression method. The resulting K values for micellization as well as complexation are analyzed. The experiments were carried out at different temperatures. It has been found that CPH form only the 1:1 complex. The association constant values are used for evaluation of thermodynamic parameters of complexation, such as {Delta}G{sub complex}{sup o}, {Delta}H{sub complex}{sup o} and {Delta}S{sub complex}{sup o}.

  8. Donor-acceptor complex formation in evaporated small molecular organic photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susarova, Diana K.; Troshin, Pavel A.; Lyubovskaya, Rimma N.; Razumov, Vladimir F. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences, Semenov Prospect 1, Chernogolovka, Moscow 142432 (Russian Federation); Hoeglinger, Doris; Koeppe, Robert; Serdar Sariciftci, N. [Linz Institute for Organic Solar Cells (LIOS), Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Babenko, Sergey D. [Institute for Energy Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (Branch), Semenov Prospect 1/10, Chernogolovka, Moscow 142432 (Russian Federation)

    2010-05-15

    Novel perylene diimide Py-PDI and naphthalene diimide Py-NDI possessing chelating pyridyl groups have been synthesized. The materials are comparatively investigated as electron acceptors in small molecular photovoltaic cells comprising zinc phthalocyanine ZnPc as an electron donor component. It was shown that these compounds form self-assembled coordination complexes with ZnPc in solution and co-evaporated solid blends. Py-PDI and Py-NDI used as electron acceptor materials in photovoltaic cells with donor ZnPc significantly outperform the reference materials, i.e. perylene and naphthalene diimides that possess no chelating pyridyl groups. Superior photovoltaic performance of Py-PDI and Py-NDI is explained by a complex formation between these compounds and ZnPc. Such interactions of donor and acceptor materials strongly improve photoinduced charge carrier generation. This gives great advantages not just for the construction of organic solar cells but also for organic photodetectors. The devices fabricated in this study are also useful as fast and highly sensitive photodetectors with response times of less than 10 microseconds as well as a strong photoconductive behavior under forward bias. (author)

  9. Spectrophotometric Determination of Gemifloxacin Mesylate in Pharmaceutical Formulations Through Ion-Pair Complex Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marothu Vamsi Krishna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Four simple and sensitive ion-pairing spectrophotometric methods have been described for the assay of gemifloxacin mesylate (GFX either in pure form or in pharmaceutical formulations. The developed methods involve formation of colored chloroform extractable ion-pair complexes of the drug with safranin O (SFN O and methylene blue (MB in basic medium; Napthol blue 12BR (NB 12BR and azocaramine G (AG in acidic medium. The extracted complexes showed absorbance maxima at 525, 650, 620 and 540 nm for SFN O, MB, NB 12BR and AG, respectively.Beer's law is obeyed in the concentration ranges 3-15, 4-20, 2-10 and 2-10 μg/mL with molar absorptivity of 2.81 × 104, 2.20 x 104, 4.02 × 104 and 4.15 × 104 L mole−1 cm−1 and relative standard deviation of 0.077, 0.104, 0.080 and 0.103% for SFN O, MB, NB 12BR and AG, respectively. These methods have been successfully applied for the assay of drug in pharmaceutical formulations. No interference was observed from common pharmaceutical adjuvants. Results of analysis were validated statistically and through recovery studies.

  10. Mdm35p imports Ups proteins into the mitochondrial intermembrane space by functional complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Yasushi; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2010-09-01

    Ups1p, Ups2p, and Ups3p are three homologous proteins that control phospholipid metabolism in the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS). The Ups proteins are atypical IMS proteins in that they lack the two major IMS-targeting signals, bipartite presequences and cysteine motifs. Here, we show that Ups protein import is mediated by another IMS protein, Mdm35p. In vitro import assays show that import of Ups proteins requires Mdm35p. Loss of Mdm35p led to a decrease in steady state levels of Ups proteins in mitochondria. In addition, mdm35Delta cells displayed a similar phenotype to ups1Deltaups2Deltaups3Delta cells. Interestingly, unlike typical import machineries, Mdm35p associated stably with Ups proteins at a steady state after import. Demonstrating that Mdm35p is a functional component of Ups-Mdm35p complexes, restoration of Ups protein levels in mdm35Delta mitochondria failed to restore phospholipid metabolism. These findings provide a novel mechanism in which the formation of functional protein complexes drives mitochondrial protein import.

  11. Redox-state-dependent complex formation between pseudoazurin and nitrite reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impagliazzo, Antonietta; Blok, Anneloes J; Cliff, Matthew J; Ladbury, John E; Ubbink, Marcellus

    2007-01-10

    Bacterial copper-containing nitrite reductase catalyzes the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide as part of the denitrification process. Pseudoazurin interacts with nitrite reductase in a transient fashion to supply the necessary electrons. The redox-state dependence of complex formation between pseudoazurin and nitrite reductase was studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry. Binding of pseudoazurin in the reduced state is characterized by the presence of two binding modes, a slow and a fast exchange mode, with a K(d)(app) of 100 microM. In the oxidized state of pseudoazurin, binding occurs in a single fast exchange mode with a similar affinity. Metal-substituted proteins have been used to show that the mode of binding of pseudoazurin is independent of the metal charge of nitrite reductase. Contrary to what was found for other cupredoxins, protonation of the exposed His ligand to the copper of pseudoazurin, His81, does not appear to be involved directly in the dual binding mode of the reduced form. A model assuming the presence of a minor form of pseudoazurin is proposed to explain the behavior of the complex in the reduced state.

  12. Enhanced conformational sampling to visualize a free-energy landscape of protein complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Shinji; Nakamura, Haruki; Higo, Junichi

    2016-06-15

    We introduce various, recently developed, generalized ensemble methods, which are useful to sample various molecular configurations emerging in the process of protein-protein or protein-ligand binding. The methods introduced here are those that have been or will be applied to biomolecular binding, where the biomolecules are treated as flexible molecules expressed by an all-atom model in an explicit solvent. Sampling produces an ensemble of conformations (snapshots) that are thermodynamically probable at room temperature. Then, projection of those conformations to an abstract low-dimensional space generates a free-energy landscape. As an example, we show a landscape of homo-dimer formation of an endothelin-1-like molecule computed using a generalized ensemble method. The lowest free-energy cluster at room temperature coincided precisely with the experimentally determined complex structure. Two minor clusters were also found in the landscape, which were largely different from the native complex form. Although those clusters were isolated at room temperature, with rising temperature a pathway emerged linking the lowest and second-lowest free-energy clusters, and a further temperature increment connected all the clusters. This exemplifies that the generalized ensemble method is a powerful tool for computing the free-energy landscape, by which one can discuss the thermodynamic stability of clusters and the temperature dependence of the cluster networks. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. Perferryl complex of nitric oxide synthase: role in secondary free radical formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porasuphatana, Supatra; Tsai, Pei; Pou, Sovitj; Rosen, Gerald M

    2002-01-15

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS I) has been shown to generate nitric oxide (NO*) and superoxide (O(2)*-)during enzymatic cycling, the ratio of each free radical is dependent upon the concentration of L-arginine. Using spin trapping and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, we recently reported that NOS I can oxidize ethanol (EtOH) to alpha-hydroxyethyl radical (CH(3)*CHOH). We speculated that the perferryl complex of NOS, (NOS-[Fe(5+)[double bond]O](3+)) was responsible for the generation of CH(3)*CHOH. Using potassium monopersulfate (KHSO(5)) to oxidize the heme of NOS I to NOS-[Fe(5+)[double bond]O](3+), we were able to demonstrate that this perferryl complex can oxidize L-arginine to L-citrulline and NO*. Even in the absence of L-arginine, EtOH was oxidized to CH(3)*CHOH by NOS-[Fe(5+)[double bond]O](3+). Sodium cyanide (NaCN), a heme blocker, inhibited the formation of CH(3)*CHOH by NOS.

  14. Biofilm formation and genetic variability of BCR1 gene in the Candida parapsilosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño-Rangel, Rogelio de J; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Irám P; Rosas-Taraco, Adrián G; Hernández-Bello, Romel; González, José G; González, Gloria M

    2015-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis, and Candida metapsilosis are cryptic species that belong to the C. parapsilosis complex, which has been increasingly associated to fungemia in various geographic regions, principally due to the capability of these yeasts to form biofilms on indwelling medical devices. BCR1 is one of the most studied genes related to Candida spp. biofilms. To evaluate the biofilm forming capability of a subset of 65 clinical isolates of the C. parapsilosis complex using two conventional approaches, and to look for an association between the biofilm forming phenotype and genetic variants of a fragment of BCR1. The biofilm determination was carried out by crystal violet staining and tetrazolium reduction assay. On the other hand, a segment of BCR1 gene was sequenced by Sanger methodology. C. parapsilosis sensu stricto was statistically associated with a low biofilm production phenotype, while C. orthopsilosis was significantly associated with both phenotypes (high and low biofilm producers). According to the BCR1 sequence analysis, genetic variability was detected in C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis without a particular biofilm formation phenotype association. Under the adopted experimental design, C. parapsilosis sensu stricto was associated with the low biofilm phenotype and C. orthopsilosis with both phenotypes (high and low biofilm producers). On the other hand, an association between a biofilm forming phenotype and a particular genetic variant of the analyzed BCR1 fragment was not found. Copyright © 2014 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. A reduced-complexity model for river delta formation - Part 1: Modeling deltas with channel dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, M.; Voller, V. R.; Paola, C.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we develop a reduced-complexity model (RCM) for river delta formation (referred to as DeltaRCM in the following). It is a rule-based cellular morphodynamic model, in contrast to reductionist models based on detailed computational fluid dynamics. The basic framework of this model (DeltaRCM) consists of stochastic parcel-based cellular routing schemes for water and sediment and a set of phenomenological rules for sediment deposition and erosion. The outputs of the model include a depth-averaged flow field, water surface elevation and bed topography that evolve in time. Results show that DeltaRCM is able (1) to resolve a wide range of channel dynamics - including elongation, bifurcation, avulsion and migration - and (2) to produce a variety of deltas such as alluvial fan deltas and deltas with multiple orders of bifurcations. We also demonstrate a simple stratigraphy recording component which tracks the distribution of coarse and fine materials and the age of the deposits. Essential processes that must be included in reduced-complexity delta models include a depth-averaged flow field that guides sediment transport a nontrivial water surface profile that accounts for backwater effects at least in the main channels, both bedload and suspended sediment transport, and topographic steering of sediment transport.

  16. Oceanic crust formation in the Egeria Fracture Zone Complex (Central Indian Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Minor, Marine; Gaina, Carmen; Sigloch, Karin; Minakov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to analyse in detail the oceanic crust fabric and volcanic features (seamounts) formed for the last 10 million years at the Central Indian Ridge between 19 and 21 latitude south. Multibeam bathymetry and magnetic data has been collected in 2013 as part of the French-German expedition RHUM-RUM (Reunion hotspot and upper mantle - Reunion's unterer mantel). Three long profiles perpendicular on the Central Indian Ridge (CIR), south of the Egeria fracture zone, document the formation of oceanic crust since 10 million years, along with changes in plate kinematics and variations in the magmatic input. We have inspected the abyssal hill geometry and orientation along conjugate oceanic flanks and within one fracture zone segment where we could identify J-shaped features that are indicators of changes in plate kinematics. The magnetic anomaly data shows a slight asymmetry in seafloor spreading rates on conjugate flanks: while a steady increase in spreading rate from 10 Ma to the present is shown by the western flank, the eastern part displays a slowing down from 5 Ma onwards. The deflection of the anti J-shaped abyssal hill lineations suggest that the left-stepping Egeria fracture zone complex (including the Egeria, Flinders and an un-named fracture zone to the southeast) was under transpression from 9 to 6 Ma and under transtension since 3 Ma. The transpressional event was triggered by a clockwise mid-ocean ridge reorientation and a decrease of its offset, whereas the transtensional regime was probably due to a counter-clockwise change in the spreading direction and an increase of the ridge offset. The new multibeam data along the three profiles reveal that crust on the eastern side is smoother (as shown by the abyssal hill number and structure) and hosts several seamounts (with age estimations of 7.67, 6.10 and 0.79 Ma), in contrast to the rougher conjugate western flank. Considering that the western flank was closer to the Reunion plume, and therefore

  17. Evidence for Complex Formation of the Bacillus cereus Haemolysin BL Components in Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Tausch

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Haemolysin BL is an important virulence factor regarding the diarrheal type of food poisoning caused by Bacillus cereus. However, the pathogenic importance of this three-component enterotoxin is difficult to access, as nearly all natural B. cereus culture supernatants additionally contain the highly cytotoxic Nhe, the second three-component toxin involved in the aetiology of B. cereus-induced food-borne diseases. To better address the toxic properties of the Hbl complex, a system for overexpression and purification of functional, cytotoxic, recombinant (rHbl components L2, L1 and B from E. coli was established and an nheABC deletion mutant was constructed from B. cereus reference strain F837/76. Furthermore, 35 hybridoma cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against Hbl L2, L1 and B were generated. While mAbs 1H9 and 1D8 neutralized Hbl toxicity and thus, represent important tools for future investigations of the mode-of-action of Hbl on the target cell surface, mAb 1D7, in contrast, even enhanced Hbl toxicity by supporting the binding of Hbl B to the cell surface. By using the specific mAbs in Dot blots, indirect and hybrid sandwich enzyme immuno assays (EIAs, complex formation between Hbl L1 and B, as well as L1 and L2 in solution could be shown for the first time. Surface plasmon resonance experiments with the rHbl components confirmed these results with KD values of 4.7 × 10−7 M and 1.5 × 10−7 M, respectively. These findings together with the newly created tools lay the foundation for the detailed elucidation of the molecular mode-of-action of the highly complex three-component Hbl toxin.

  18. Evidence for Complex Formation of the Bacillus cereus Haemolysin BL Components in Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tausch, Franziska; Dietrich, Richard; Janowski, Robert; Märtlbauer, Erwin; Jessberger, Nadja

    2017-01-01

    Haemolysin BL is an important virulence factor regarding the diarrheal type of food poisoning caused by Bacillus cereus. However, the pathogenic importance of this three-component enterotoxin is difficult to access, as nearly all natural B. cereus culture supernatants additionally contain the highly cytotoxic Nhe, the second three-component toxin involved in the aetiology of B. cereus-induced food-borne diseases. To better address the toxic properties of the Hbl complex, a system for overexpression and purification of functional, cytotoxic, recombinant (r)Hbl components L2, L1 and B from E. coli was established and an nheABC deletion mutant was constructed from B. cereus reference strain F837/76. Furthermore, 35 hybridoma cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against Hbl L2, L1 and B were generated. While mAbs 1H9 and 1D8 neutralized Hbl toxicity and thus, represent important tools for future investigations of the mode-of-action of Hbl on the target cell surface, mAb 1D7, in contrast, even enhanced Hbl toxicity by supporting the binding of Hbl B to the cell surface. By using the specific mAbs in Dot blots, indirect and hybrid sandwich enzyme immuno assays (EIAs), complex formation between Hbl L1 and B, as well as L1 and L2 in solution could be shown for the first time. Surface plasmon resonance experiments with the rHbl components confirmed these results with KD values of 4.7 × 10−7 M and 1.5 × 10−7 M, respectively. These findings together with the newly created tools lay the foundation for the detailed elucidation of the molecular mode-of-action of the highly complex three-component Hbl toxin. PMID:28926954

  19. Factors affecting the formation of iodo-trihalomethanes during oxidation with chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wanhong; Shan, Yingchun; Yang, Xin

    2014-01-15

    Effects of water characteristics, reaction time, temperature, bromide and iodide ion concentrations, oxidant doses, and pH on formation of iodinated trihalomethanes (I-THM) during oxidation of iodide-containing water with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) were investigated. Among the water samples collected from ten water sources, iodoform (CHI3) was the predominant I-THM and trace amount of chlorodiiodomethane (CHClI2) was occasionally found. CHI3 yields correlated moderately with specific UV absorbance (SUVA) (R(2)=0.79), indicating that hydrophobic aromatic content were important precursors. Longer reaction time led to continued formation of CHI3. I-THM containing bromide was also found in waters containing both bromide and iodide, but CHI3 was dominant. The formation of CHI3 was higher at 25°C than 5°C and 35°C. CHI3 formation showed an increase followed by a decrease trend with increasing ClO2 doses and iodide concentrations and the highest yields occurred at iodide to ClO2 molar ratios of 1-2. pH 8 resulted in the highest CHI3 formation. It should be noted that a high iodide concentration was spiked to waters before adding ClO2 and the results may not reflect the formation yields of iodinated THMs in real conditions, but they provide information about formation trend of I-THM during oxidation of ClO2. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Affectivity in educational context and in the teacher’s formation: mobilization, social participation and ethical-politics suffering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Melo de Mendonça

    Full Text Available It was intended to draw reflections on the subject and affectivity constitution within the theoretical and methodological approach of the socio-historical psychology, having as a field of analysis the question of ethical-political suffering in educational context and teacher’s formation. It was concluded that the challenge for education and formation of undergraduates and teachers is to propose alternatives that enable educational institutions to rethink their social practices with adolescents and youth to produce spaces of rights and respect for differences.

  1. Formation of ethylene glycol and other complex organic molecules in star-forming regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Beltrán, M. T.; Cesaroni, R.; Fontani, F.; Codella, C.; Zhang, Q.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The detection of complex organic molecules related with prebiotic chemistry in star-forming regions allows us to investigate how the basic building blocks of life are formed. Aims: Ethylene glycol (CH2OH)2 is the simplest sugar alcohol and the reduced alcohol of the simplest sugar glycoladehyde (CH2OHCHO). We study the molecular abundance and spatial distribution of (CH2OH)2, CH2OHCHO and other chemically related complex organic species (CH3OCHO, CH3OCH3, and C2H5OH) towards the chemically rich massive star-forming region G31.41+0.31. Methods: We analyzed multiple single-dish (Green Bank Telescope and IRAM 30 m) and interferometric (Submillimeter Array) spectra towards G31.41+0.31, covering a range of frequencies from 45 to 258 GHz. We fitted the observed spectra with a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) synthetic spectra, and obtained excitation temperatures and column densities. We compared our findings in G31.41+0.31 with the results found in other environments, including low- and high-mass star-forming regions, quiescent clouds and comets. Results: We report for the first time the presence of the aGg' conformer of (CH2OH)2 towards G31.41+0.31, detecting more than 30 unblended lines. We also detected multiple transitions of other complex organic molecules such as CH2OHCHO, CH3OCHO, CH3OCH3, and C2H5OH. The high angular resolution images show that the (CH2OH)2 emission is very compact, peaking towards the maximum of the 1.3 mm continuum. These observations suggest that low abundance complex organic molecules, like (CH2OH)2 or CH2OHCHO, are good probes of the gas located closer to the forming stars. Our analysis confirms that (CH2OH)2 is more abundant than CH2OHCHO in G31.41+0.31, as previously observed in other interstellar regions. Comparing different star-forming regions we find evidence of an increase of the (CH2OH)2/CH2OHCHO abundance ratio with the luminosity of the source. The CH3OCH3/CH3OCHO and (CH2OH)2/C2H5OH ratios are nearly constant with

  2. The Formation of Group Affect and Team Effectiveness : The Moderating Role of Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanghe, Jacqueline; Wisse, Barbara; van der Flier, Henk

    In the current research we use the social identity perspective to enhance our understanding of group affect (i.e. a collectively shared pattern of affective states among group members). Because higher identification (i.e. the extent to which group members define themselves in terms of their group

  3. Environmental Stress Affects the Formation of Staphylococcus aureus Persisters Tolerant to Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubistova, Lucie; Dvoracek, Lukas; Tkadlec, Jan; Melter, Oto; Licha, Irena

    2017-08-16

    The ability to form persisters has been observed in many microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus, mainly in the context of chronic infections and the pathogenicity of these microbes. In our research, we have demonstrated that salt or oxidative stress could play a role in the formation of S. aureus persisters outside the host's intracellular interface. We pre-exposed planktonic growing bacterial culture to an oxidative or salt stress and monitored the dynamics of persister formation after ciprofloxacin and gentamicin treatment. In parallel, using the quantitative PCR (qPCR) approach, we determined the expression level of the stress sigma factor SigB. The pre-exposure of bacteria to salt stress caused a 1-2.5 order of magnitude increase in persister formation in the bacterial population after antibiotic exposure, depending on the type and concentration of the antibiotic used. In contrast, oxidative stress only minimally influenced the formation of persisters, without correlation to the antibiotic type and concentration. We have demonstrated that both stress and antibiotic exposure increase the expression of sigB in bacterial populations from very early on. And that the expression level of sigB differs with the type of antibiotic and stress, but no correlation was observed between persister formation and sigB expression. The method used could be helpful in testing the ability that strains can have, to form persisters.

  4. Investigation of organic desulfurization additives affecting the calcium sulfate crystals formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Lina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the study, the optimal experimental conditions for gypsum crystals formation were 323 K, 300 rpm stirring speed. The major impurities of Mg2+, Al3+ and Fe3+ were found to inhibit calcium sulfate crystals formation. Fe3+ caused the strongest inhibition, followed by Mg2+ and Al3+. The influence of desulfurization additives on the gypsum crystals formation was explored with the properties of moisture content, particle size distribution and crystal morphology. The organic desulfurization additives of adipic acid, citric acid, sodium citrate and benzoic acid were investigated. Citric acid and sodium citrate were found to improve the quality of gypsum. Moisture contents were reduced by more than 50%, gypsum particle sizes were respectively enlarged by 9.1 and 22.8%, induction time extended from 4.3 (blank to 5.3 and 7.8 min, and crystal morphology trended to be thicker.

  5. Alginate production affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development and architecture, but is not essential for biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stapper, A.P.; Narasimhan, G.; Oman, D.E.

    2004-01-01

    -overproducing (mucA22) and alginate-defective (algD) variants in order to discern the role of alginate in biofilm formation. These strains, PAO1, Alg(+) PAOmucA22 and Alg(-) PAOalgD, tagged with green fluorescent protein, were grown in a continuous flow cell system to characterize the developmental cycles...... of their biofilm formation using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Biofilm Image Processing (BIP) and Community Statistics (COMSTAT) software programs were used to provide quantitative measurements of the two-dimensional biofilm images. All three strains formed distinguishable biofilm architectures, indicating...... that the production of alginate is not critical for biofilm formation. Observation over a period of 5 days indicated a three-stage development pattern consisting of initiation, establishment and maturation. Furthermore, this study showed that phenotypically distinguishable biofilms can be quantitatively...

  6. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I Affects Brain Structure in Prefrontal and Motor Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleger, Burkhard; Draganski, Bogdan; Schwenkreis, Peter; Lenz, Melanie; Nicolas, Volkmar; Maier, Christoph; Tegenthoff, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare but debilitating pain disorder that mostly occurs after injuries to the upper limb. A number of studies indicated altered brain function in CRPS, whereas possible influences on brain structure remain poorly investigated. We acquired structural magnetic resonance imaging data from CRPS type I patients and applied voxel-by-voxel statistics to compare white and gray matter brain segments of CRPS patients with matched controls. Patients and controls were statistically compared in two different ways: First, we applied a 2-sample ttest to compare whole brain white and gray matter structure between patients and controls. Second, we aimed to assess structural alterations specifically of the primary somatosensory (S1) and motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the CRPS affected side. To this end, MRI scans of patients with left-sided CRPS (and matched controls) were horizontally flipped before preprocessing and region-of-interest-based group comparison. The unpaired ttest of the “non-flipped” data revealed that CRPS patients presented increased gray matter density in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. The same test applied to the “flipped” data showed further increases in gray matter density, not in the S1, but in the M1 contralateral to the CRPS-affected limb which were inversely related to decreased white matter density of the internal capsule within the ipsilateral brain hemisphere. The gray-white matter interaction between motor cortex and internal capsule suggests compensatory mechanisms within the central motor system possibly due to motor dysfunction. Altered gray matter structure in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex may occur in response to emotional processes such as pain-related suffering or elevated analgesic top-down control. PMID:24416397

  7. Complex interactions between spatial pattern of resident species and invasiveness of newly arriving species affect invasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thébault, Aurélie; Stoll, Peter; Buttler, Alexandre

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the factors that affect establishment success of new species in established communities requires the study of both the ability of new species to establish and community resistance. Spatial pattern of species within a community can affect plant performance by changing the outcome of inter-specific competition, and consequently community invasibility. We studied the effects of spatial pattern of resident plant communities on fitness of genotypes from the native and introduced ranges of two worldwide invasive species, Centaurea stoebe and Senecio inaequidens, during their establishment stage. We experimentally established artificial plant mixtures with 4 or 8 resident species in intra-specifically aggregated or random spatial patterns, and added seedlings of genotypes from the native and introduced ranges of the two target species. Early growth of both S. inaequidens and C. stoebe was higher in aggregated than randomly assembled mixtures. However, a species-specific interaction between invasiveness and invasibility highlighted more complex patterns. Genotypes from native and introduced ranges of S. inaequidens showed the same responses to spatial pattern. By contrast, genotypes from the introduced range of C. stoebe did not respond to spatial pattern whereas native ones did. Based on phenotypic plasticity, we argue that the two target species adopted different strategies to deal with the spatial pattern of the resident plant community. We show that effects of spatial pattern of the resident community on the fitness of establishing species may depend on the diversity of the recipient community. Our results highlight the need to consider the interaction between invasiveness and invasibility in order to increase our understanding of invasion success.

  8. A robust identity-by-descent procedure using affected sib pairs: multipoint mapping for complex diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, K Y; Chiu, Y F; Beaty, T H

    2001-01-01

    Multipoint linkage analysis is a powerful tool to localize susceptibility genes for complex diseases. However, the conventional lod score method relies critically on the correct specification of mode of inheritance for accurate estimation of gene position. On the other hand, allele-sharing methods, as currently practiced, are designed to test the null hypothesis of no linkage rather than estimate the location of the susceptibility gene(s). In this paper, we propose an identity-by-descent (IBD)-based procedure to estimate the location of an unobserved susceptibility gene within a chromosomal region framed by multiple markers. Here we deal with the practical situation where some of the markers might not be fully informative. Rather the IBD statistic at an arbitrary within the region is imputed using the multipoint marker information. The method is robust in that no assumption about the genetic mechanism is required other than that the region contains no more than one susceptibility gene. In particular, this approach builds upon a simple representation for the expected IBD at any arbitrary locus within the region using data from affected sib pairs. With this representation, one can carry out a parametric inference procedure to locate an unobserved susceptibility gene. In addition, here we derive a sample size formula for the number of affected sib pairs needed to detect linkage with multiple markers. Throughout, the proposed method is illustrated through simulated data. We have implemented this method including exploratory and formal model-fitting procedures to locate susceptibility genes, plus sample size and power calculations in a program, GENEFINDER, which will be made available shortly. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Complex regional pain syndrome type I affects brain structure in prefrontal and motor cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Pleger

    Full Text Available The complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a rare but debilitating pain disorder that mostly occurs after injuries to the upper limb. A number of studies indicated altered brain function in CRPS, whereas possible influences on brain structure remain poorly investigated. We acquired structural magnetic resonance imaging data from CRPS type I patients and applied voxel-by-voxel statistics to compare white and gray matter brain segments of CRPS patients with matched controls. Patients and controls were statistically compared in two different ways: First, we applied a 2-sample ttest to compare whole brain white and gray matter structure between patients and controls. Second, we aimed to assess structural alterations specifically of the primary somatosensory (S1 and motor cortex (M1 contralateral to the CRPS affected side. To this end, MRI scans of patients with left-sided CRPS (and matched controls were horizontally flipped before preprocessing and region-of-interest-based group comparison. The unpaired ttest of the "non-flipped" data revealed that CRPS patients presented increased gray matter density in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. The same test applied to the "flipped" data showed further increases in gray matter density, not in the S1, but in the M1 contralateral to the CRPS-affected limb which were inversely related to decreased white matter density of the internal capsule within the ipsilateral brain hemisphere. The gray-white matter interaction between motor cortex and internal capsule suggests compensatory mechanisms within the central motor system possibly due to motor dysfunction. Altered gray matter structure in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex may occur in response to emotional processes such as pain-related suffering or elevated analgesic top-down control.

  10. Complex regional pain syndrome type I affects brain structure in prefrontal and motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleger, Burkhard; Draganski, Bogdan; Schwenkreis, Peter; Lenz, Melanie; Nicolas, Volkmar; Maier, Christoph; Tegenthoff, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare but debilitating pain disorder that mostly occurs after injuries to the upper limb. A number of studies indicated altered brain function in CRPS, whereas possible influences on brain structure remain poorly investigated. We acquired structural magnetic resonance imaging data from CRPS type I patients and applied voxel-by-voxel statistics to compare white and gray matter brain segments of CRPS patients with matched controls. Patients and controls were statistically compared in two different ways: First, we applied a 2-sample ttest to compare whole brain white and gray matter structure between patients and controls. Second, we aimed to assess structural alterations specifically of the primary somatosensory (S1) and motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the CRPS affected side. To this end, MRI scans of patients with left-sided CRPS (and matched controls) were horizontally flipped before preprocessing and region-of-interest-based group comparison. The unpaired ttest of the "non-flipped" data revealed that CRPS patients presented increased gray matter density in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. The same test applied to the "flipped" data showed further increases in gray matter density, not in the S1, but in the M1 contralateral to the CRPS-affected limb which were inversely related to decreased white matter density of the internal capsule within the ipsilateral brain hemisphere. The gray-white matter interaction between motor cortex and internal capsule suggests compensatory mechanisms within the central motor system possibly due to motor dysfunction. Altered gray matter structure in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex may occur in response to emotional processes such as pain-related suffering or elevated analgesic top-down control.

  11. On aquifer thicknesses and geological complexity affecting fresh/salt groundwater distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamrsky, Daniel; Oude Essink, Gualbert; Bierkens, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Large coastal populations will face serious issues associated with global sea level rise in the near future. Among those are increased risk of coastal flooding and upconing of old saline groundwater caused by expected regional groundwater overexploitation initiated by growing urbanization. With predictions of rising sea level by 60-100cm by 2100 and a recent study suggesting even much larger changes than previously thought, it is essential to conduct a study to identify the most threatened coastal aquifers worldwide. Previous global studies dealing with salt water intrusion into coastal aquifers only considered homogenous geological conditions. However, literature and local data show a higher degree of heterogeneity. In our study, we consider possible geological scenarios and their impact on the fresh/salt groundwater distribution. The focus is on coastal aquifers that consist of unconsolidated sediments formed during the recent geological times and are underlain by a consolidated bedrock formation. Aquifer thickness and inland extent are the two most important parameters that determine the vulnerability of the coastal aquifer to salt water intrusion. To estimate these two parameters, a method using the latest global geological and elevation datasets is presented. By combining these inputs, we can estimate the slope of a bedrock formation that underlies a coastal aquifer consisting of unconsolidated sediments. Our estimated thicknesses are compared to a validation dataset of open source boreholes and literature information collected over numerous locations worldwide. While our results show that using our method to estimate coastal aquifer (made of unconsolidated sediments) thickness leads to satisfying results, it remains challenging to obtain information about the type of the sediments (gravel, sand, clay) themselves on such a scale. Therefore, we constructed a substantial set of 2D vertical variable-density groundwater flow models perpendicular to the shoreline

  12. From PII signaling to metabolite sensing: a novel 2-oxoglutarate sensor that details PII-NAGK complex formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Lüddecke

    Full Text Available The widespread PII signal transduction proteins are known for integrating signals of nitrogen and energy supply and regulating cellular behavior by interacting with a multitude of target proteins. The PII protein of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus forms complexes with the controlling enzyme of arginine synthesis, N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK in a 2-oxoglutarate- and ATP/ADP-dependent manner. Fusing NAGK and PII proteins to either CFP or YFP yielded a FRET sensor that specifically responded to 2-oxoglutarate. The impact of the fluorescent tags on PII and NAGK was evaluated by enzyme assays, surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and isothermal calorimetric experiments. The developed FRET sensor provides real-time data on PII - NAGK interaction and its modulation by the effector molecules ATP, ADP and 2-oxoglutarate in vitro. Additionally to its utility to monitor 2-oxoglutarate levels, the FRET assay provided novel insights into PII - NAGK complex formation: (i It revealed the formation of an encounter-complex between PII and NAGK, which holds the proteins in proximity even in the presence of inhibitors of complex formation; (ii It revealed that the PII T-loop residue Ser49 is neither essential for complex formation with NAGK nor for activation of the enzyme but necessary to form a stable complex and efficiently relieve NAGK from arginine inhibition; (iii It showed that arginine stabilizes the NAGK hexamer and stimulates PII - NAGK interaction.

  13. How stimuli presentation format affects visual attention and choice outcomes in choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller Loose, Simone; Orquin, Jacob Lund

    information table, a table with visual attributes levels and a realistic product mock-up presentation. Presentation format was found to exert a significant bottom-up effect on visual attention and subsequent choice. Visual attention and choice behaviour in discrete choice experiments were found to be strongly...

  14. Phenolic compounds affect production of pyocyanin, swarming motility and biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Ugurlu

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: We may suggest that if swarming and consecutive biofilm formation could be inhibited by the natural products as shown in our study, the bacteria could not attach to the surfaces and produce chronic infections. Antimicrobials and natural products could be combined and the dosage of antimicrobials could be reduced to overcome antimicrobial resistance and drug side effects.

  15. Does evidence presentation format affect judgment? An experimental evaluation of displays of data for judgments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanfey, A.G.; Hastie, R.

    1998-01-01

    Information relevant to a prediction was presented in one of eight formats: a table of numbers, a brief text, a longer biographical story, and five different types of bar graphs. Experimental participants made judgments of marathon finishing times based on information about the runners' ages, prior

  16. Deficiency in Cardiac Dystrophin Affects the Abundance of the α-/β-Dystroglycan Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Lohan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Although Duchenne muscular dystrophy is primarily categorised as a skeletal muscle disease, deficiency in the membrane cytoskeletal protein dystrophin also affects the heart. The central transsarcolemmal linker between the actin membrane cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix is represented by the dystrophin-associated dystroglycans. Chemical cross-linking analysis revealed no significant differences in the dimeric status of the α-/β-dystroglycan subcomplex in the dystrophic mdx heart as compared to normal cardiac tissue. In analogy to skeletal muscle fibres, heart muscle also exhibited a greatly reduced abundance of both dystroglycans in dystrophin-deficient cells. Immunoblotting demonstrated that the degree of reduction in α-dystroglycan is more pronounced in matured mdx skeletal muscle as contrasted to the mdx heart. The fact that the deficiency in dystrophin triggers a similar pathobiochemical response in both types of muscle suggests that the cardiomyopathic complications observed in x-linked muscular dystrophy might be initiated by the loss of the dystrophin-associated surface glycoprotein complex.

  17. Purification of SUMO-1 modified IκBα and complex formation with NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lens, Zoé; Dewitte, Frédérique; Van Lint, Carine; de Launoit, Yvan; Villeret, Vincent; Verger, Alexis

    2011-12-01

    Covalent modification of proteins with SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like MOdifier) affects many cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, DNA repair and signal transduction. Although hundreds of SUMO targets have been identified, many biological outcomes of protein sumoylation remain poorly understood. In particular, biochemical and structural analysis can only be easily conducted if highly pure sumoylated substrates are available. Purification of sumoylated substrates in vitro or in bacteria have been previously reported but separating the sumoylated protein from the undesired unmodified fraction is often technically challenging, inefficient and time consuming. Here we develop a new vector system for in vivo sumoylation in Escherichia coli which improves purification of sumoylated proteins. We describe the purification of IκBα, its sumoylation, the subsequent separation and purification of the modified and the unmodified forms and the purification of the complex IκBα-SUMO-1/NF-κB. After a first GST affinity chromatography and GST-tag removal, a unique metal-ion affinity chromatography using a 6xHis-SUMO-1 tag results in mgs of highly pure SUMO-1 modified IκBα. Our pure SUMO-1 modified IκB/NF-κB complex could be a useful tool to identify new interaction partner specific of the SUMO-1 modified IκBα form. This approach may be extended to other SUMO substrates not isolable by classical chromatography techniques. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors affecting the development of scar formation in abdominal surgery performed for gynecologic and obstetric conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serpil Aydoğmuş

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: The aim of this study is to investigate whether there can be a difference in types of scars developed on the same type of incisions due to cesarean section or benign gynecologic operations, and to examine the effect of regenerative process occurring in the puerperal period on scar formation. Materials and Methods: A total of 586 female patients aged 20-40 years, who applied to our dermatology and gynecology and obstetrics outpatient clinics, were included in this case control study. Patients who were operated due to benign gynecologic conditions were assigned to group 1 (n=293, and those who underwent cesarean section to group 2 (n=293, and the types of scars were compared. A p value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Atrophic and hypertrophic scars were developed in 237 (80.9% and 56 (19.1% of group 1 patients, respectively. However, 245 (83.6% of patients in group 2 had atrophic scars and 48 (16.4% had hypertrophic scars. In terms of the type of scar distribution, no significant difference was found between the two groups (p>0.05. Patients with hypertrophic scar formation constituted 53.8% of group 1 patients and 46.2% of group 2 patients. There was no significant difference between the groups for the risk of hypertrophic scar formation (p>0.05. Conclusion: Our study concluded that there is no significant difference in scar formation on abdominal incision site between benign gynecologic surgeries performed at any period of childbearing age and cesarean section. In addition, the presence of striae, wound infection or hematoma, and duration of wound healing were found to be associated with the risk for hypertrophic scar formation in incision sites in both cesarean section and benign gynecological operations.

  19. Shock-induced kelyphite formation in the core of a complex impact crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deseta, Natalie; Boonsue, Suporn; Gibson, Roger L.; Spray, John G.

    2017-10-01

    We present a compositional and textural analysis of shock-induced microtextures in garnet porphyroblasts in migmatitic garnet-cordierite-biotite paragneisses from the centre of the Vredefort impact structure, South Africa. Detailed imaging and major element analysis of deformation features in, and adjacent to, the garnet porphyroblasts record a complex, heterogeneous distribution of shock effects at the microscale. As the most competent silicate mineral in the assemblage, with the highest Hugoniot Elastic Limit and a wide pressure-temperature stability field, the porphyroblastic garnet preserves a more diverse shock deformation response compared to minerals such as quartz and feldspar, which underwent more comprehensive shock metamorphism and subsequent annealing. The garnet porphyroblasts display pre-impact fractures that are overprinted by later intra-granular Hertzian and distinctive planar fractures associated with the impact event. Shock-induced strain localization occurred along internal slip planes and defects, including pre-existing fractures and inclusion boundaries in the garnet. Symplectitic (kelyphitic) coronas commonly enclose the garnet porphyroblasts, and inhabit intra-granular fractures. The kelyphite assemblage in fractures with open communication beyond garnet grain boundaries is characterized by orthopyroxene—cordierite—sapphirine. Conversely, the kelyphite assemblage in closed-off intra-granular fractures is highly variable, comprising spatially restricted combinations of a secondary garnet phase with a majoritic component, Al-rich orthopyroxene, sapphirine and cordierite. The impedance contrast between garnet porphyroblasts and their inclusions further facilitated the formation of shock-induced features (Al-rich orthopyroxene coronas). Together, the textural and mineralogical data suggest that these features provide a record of oscillatory shock perturbations initiated under confining pressure beneath the transient crater floor. This

  20. Myotube formation is affected by adipogenic lineage cells in a cell-to-cell contact-independent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takegahara, Yuki; Yamanouchi, Keitaro, E-mail: akeita@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Nakamura, Katsuyuki; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Nishihara, Masugi

    2014-05-15

    Intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) formation is observed in some pathological conditions such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and sarcopenia. Several studies have suggested that IMAT formation is not only negatively correlated with skeletal muscle mass but also causes decreased muscle contraction in sarcopenia. In the present study, we examined w hether adipocytes affect myogenesis. For this purpose, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were transfected with siRNA of PPARγ (siPPARγ) in an attempt to inhibit adipogenesis. Myosin heavy chain (MHC)-positive myotube formation was promoted in cells transfected with siPPARγ compared to that of cells transfected with control siRNA. To determine whether direct cell-to-cell contact between adipocytes and myoblasts is a prerequisite for adipocytes to affect myogenesis, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with pre- or mature adipocytes in a Transwell coculture system. MHC-positive myotube formation was inhibited when skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with mature adipocytes, but was promoted when they were cocultured with preadipocytes. Similar effects were observed when pre- or mature adipocyte-conditioned medium was used. These results indicate that preadipocytes play an important role in maintaining skeletal muscle mass by promoting myogenesis; once differentiated, the resulting mature adipocytes negatively affect myogenesis, leading to the muscle deterioration observed in skeletal muscle pathologies. - Highlights: • We examined the effects of pre- and mature adipocytes on myogenesis in vitro. • Preadipocytes and mature adipocytes affect myoblast fusion. • Preadipocytes play an important role in maintaining skeletal muscle mass. • Mature adipocytes lead to muscle deterioration observed in skeletal muscle pathologies.

  1. Swarming and complex pattern formation in Paenibacillus vortex studied by imaging and tracking cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Eshel

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Swarming motility allows microorganisms to move rapidly over surfaces. The Gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus vortex exhibits advanced cooperative motility on agar plates resulting in intricate colonial patterns with geometries that are highly sensitive to the environment. The cellular mechanisms that underpin the complex multicellular organization of such a simple organism are not well understood. Results Swarming by P. vortex was studied by real-time light microscopy, by in situ scanning electron microscopy and by tracking the spread of antibiotic-resistant cells within antibiotic-sensitive colonies. When swarming, P. vortex was found to be peritrichously flagellated. Swarming by the curved cells of P. vortex occurred on an extremely wide range of media and agar concentrations (0.3 to 2.2% w/v. At high agar concentrations (> 1% w/v rotating colonies formed that could be detached from the main mass of cells by withdrawal of cells into the latter. On lower percentage agars, cells moved in an extended network composed of interconnected "snakes" with short-term collision avoidance and sensitivity to extracts from swarming cells. P. vortex formed single Petri dish-wide "supercolonies" with a colony-wide exchange of motile cells. Swarming cells were coupled by rapidly forming, reversible and non-rigid connections to form a loose raft, apparently connected via flagella. Inhibitors of swarming (p-Nitrophenylglycerol and Congo Red were identified. Mitomycin C was used to trigger filamentation without inhibiting growth or swarming; this facilitated dissection of the detail of swarming. Mitomycin C treatment resulted in malcoordinated swarming and abortive side branch formation and a strong tendency by a subpopulation of the cells to form minimal rotating aggregates of only a few cells. Conclusion P. vortex creates complex macroscopic colonies within which there is considerable reflux and movement and interaction of cells. Cell

  2. EPR demonstration of iron-nitrosyl complex formation by cytotoxic activated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, J R; Hibbs, J B

    1990-02-01

    Activated macrophage cytotoxicity is characterized by loss of intracellular iron and inhibition of certain enzymes that have catalytically active nonheme-iron coordinated to sulfur. This phenomenon involves the oxidation of one of the terminal guanidino nitrogen atoms of L-arginine, which results in the production of citrulline and inorganic nitrogen oxides (NO2-, NO3-, and NO). We report here the results of an electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic study performed on cytotoxic activated macrophage (CAM) effector cells, which develop the same pattern of metabolic inhibition as their targets. Examination of activated macrophages from mice infected with Mycobacterium bovis (strain bacillus Calmette-Guérin) that were cultured in medium with lipopolysaccharide and L-arginine showed the presence of an axial signal at g = 2.039, which is similar to previously described iron-nitrosyl complexes formed from the destruction of iron-sulfur centers by nitric oxide (NO). Inhibition of the L-arginine-dependent pathway by addition of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (methyl group on a terminal guanidino nitrogen) inhibits the production of nitrite, nitrate, citrulline, and the g = 2.039 signal. Comparison of the hyperfine structure of the signal from cells treated with L-arginine with terminal guanidino nitrogen atoms of natural abundance N14 atoms or labeled with N15 atoms showed that the nitrosyl group in this paramagnetic species arises from one of these two atoms. These results show that loss of iron-containing enzyme function in CAM is a result of the formation of iron-nitrosyl complexes induced by the synthesis of nitric oxide from the oxidation of a terminal guanidino nitrogen atom of L-arginine.

  3. EPR demonstration of iron-nitrosyl complex formation by cytotoxic activated macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancaster, J.R. Jr.; Hibbs, J.B. Jr. (Utah State Univ., Logan (USA))

    1990-02-01

    Activated macrophage cytotoxicity is characterized by loss of intracellular iron and inhibition of certain enzymes that have catalytically active nonheme-iron coordinated to sulfur. This phenomenon involves the oxidation of one of the terminal guanidino nitrogen atoms of L-arginine, which results in the production of citrulline and inorganic nitrogen oxides (NO2-, NO3-, and NO). We report here the results of an electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic study performed on cytotoxic activated macrophage (CAM) effector cells, which develop the same pattern of metabolic inhibition as their targets. Examination of activated macrophages from mice infected with Mycobacterium bovis (strain bacillus Calmette-Guerin) that were cultured in medium with lipopolysaccharide and L-arginine showed the presence of an axial signal at g = 2.039, which is similar to previously described iron-nitrosyl complexes formed from the destruction of iron-sulfur centers by nitric oxide (NO). Inhibition of the L-arginine-dependent pathway by addition of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (methyl group on a terminal guanidino nitrogen) inhibits the production of nitrite, nitrate, citrulline, and the g = 2.039 signal. Comparison of the hyperfine structure of the signal from cells treated with L-arginine with terminal guanidino nitrogen atoms of natural abundance N14 atoms or labeled with N15 atoms showed that the nitrosyl group in this paramagnetic species arises from one of these two atoms. These results show that loss of iron-containing enzyme function in CAM is a result of the formation of iron-nitrosyl complexes induced by the synthesis of nitric oxide from the oxidation of a terminal guanidino nitrogen atom of L-arginine.

  4. Structure Formation of Ultrathin PEO Films at Solid Interfaces—Complex Pattern Formation by Dewetting and Crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Georg Braun

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The direct contact of ultrathin polymer films with a solid substrate may result in thin film rupture caused by dewetting. With crystallisable polymers such as polyethyleneoxide (PEO, molecular self-assembly into partial ordered lamella structures is studied as an additional source of pattern formation. Morphological features in ultrathin PEO films (thickness < 10 nm result from an interplay between dewetting patterns and diffusion limited growth pattern of ordered lamella growing within the dewetting areas. Besides structure formation of hydrophilic PEO molecules, n-alkylterminated (hydrophobic PEO oligomers are investigated with respect to self-organization in ultrathin films. Morphological features characteristic for pure PEO are not changed by the presence of the n-alkylgroups.

  5. Silicon Promotes Exodermal Casparian Band Formation in Si-Accumulating and Si-Excluding Species by Forming Phenol Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Martin; Specht, André; Waßmann, Friedrich; Schreiber, Lukas; Schenk, Manfred K.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effect of Silicon (Si) on Casparian band (CB) development, chemical composition of the exodermal CB and Si deposition across the root in the Si accumulators rice and maize and the Si non-accumulator onion. Plants were cultivated in nutrient solution with and without Si supply. The CB development was determined in stained root cross-sections. The outer part of the roots containing the exodermis was isolated after enzymatic treatment. The exodermal suberin was transesterified with MeOH/BF3 and the chemical composition was measured using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) and flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (LA-ICP-MS) was used to determine the Si deposition across root cross sections. Si promoted CB formation in the roots of Si-accumulator and Si non-accumulator species. The exodermal suberin was decreased in rice and maize due to decreased amounts of aromatic suberin fractions. Si did not affect the concentration of lignin and lignin-like polymers in the outer part of rice, maize and onion roots. The highest Si depositions were found in the tissues containing CB. These data along with literature were used to suggest a mechanism how Si promotes the CB development by forming complexes with phenols. PMID:26383862

  6. Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehmann, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the following, a new conceptual framework for investigating nowadays’ “technical” phenomena shall be introduced, that of formats. The thesis is that processes of formatting account for our recent conditions of life, and will do so in the very next future. It are processes whose foundations have been laid in modernity and which will further unfold for the time being. These processes are embedded in the format of the value chain, a circumstance making them resilient to change. In addition, they are resilient in themselves since forming interconnected systems of reciprocal causal circuits.Which leads to an overall situation that our entire “Lebenswelt” became formatted to an extent we don’t fully realize, even influencing our very percep-tion of it.

  7. How Environment Affects Star Formation: Tracing Activity in High Redshift Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Stacey; Pope, A.; Brodwin, M.; Atlee, D. W.; Lin, Y.; Chary, R.; Dey, A.; Eisenhardt, P. R.; Gettings, D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Jannuzi, B.; Mancone, C.; Moustakas, J.; Snyder, G. F.; Stanford, S. A.; Stern, D.; Weiner, B. J.; Zeimann, G.

    2014-01-01

    The emerging picture of the evolution of cluster galaxies indicates that the epoch of z>1 is a crucial period of active star formation and mass assembly in clusters. In this dissertation, I leverage a uniformly-selected cluster sample from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS) with Herschel imaging to analyse the star formation (SF) activity in cluster galaxies over the past ten billion years. This analysis is two-fold: 1) using 274 clusters across the 9 square degree Bootes field, I perform a stacking analysis of mass-limited samples of cluster and field galaxies using wide-field Herschel observations over a long redshift baseline, z=0.3-1.5. I find that the average SF activity in cluster galaxies is evolving faster than in the field, with field-like SF in the cluster cores and enhanced SF activity in the cluster outskirts at z>1.2. By further breaking down my analysis by galaxy mass and type, I determine which mechanisms are capable of driving this evolution. 2) I use unique, deep Herschel imaging of 11 spectroscopically-confirmed clusters from z=1.1-1.8 to study the properties of individual infrared bright cluster galaxies as a function of redshift and cluster-centric radius. Combined with ancillary data, I determine the star formation, dust, and AGN properties of the most active cluster galaxies and tie the evolution of these properties back to the environment by comparing to field populations. By combining these two approaches, I constrain cluster galaxy properties during a pivotal epoch of dust-obscured star formation activity and mass assembly in some of the most extreme structures in the Universe.

  8. HOW GRAVITY WAVES AFFECT FORMATION OF LOW TEMPERATURE REGION IN ANTARCTIC LOWER STRATOSPHERE

    OpenAIRE

    タナカ, ヒロシ; Hiroshi, Tanaka

    1987-01-01

    A mechanism is proposed for the formation of an "ozone hole" over Antarctica. Gravity waves emitted from the circum-continental mountain (or cliff) belt may be partly saturated in the lower stratosphere and suppress planetary wave activity there. This process results in shielding a poleward heat transport associated with planetary waves. A long-term trend of gravity wave activity and prevailing wind system for the past several years should be detected in the polar region.

  9. Does student learning style affect performance on different formats of biomechanics examinations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chengtu; Mache, Melissa; Knudson, Duane

    2012-03-01

    Students' learning style preferences have been widely adapted into teaching and learning environments. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-reported and assessed learning style preferences (visual, auditory, reading/writing, kinesthetic: VARK) on performance in different types of multiple-choice examinations (T1: text only format and T2: visual format) given in an introductory biomechanics class. Students who enrolled in three biomechanics classes at a state university were recruited to participate in the study. Ninety students (47 males and 43 females) completed a learning style survey and two types of examinations. Results showed that approximately half of the students were assessed and self-reported as kinesthetic for their preferred learning style. There was no significant difference in test performance between students who preferred visual and reading/writing learning styles (self-reported and assessed). These students demonstrated similar learning and comprehension of biomechanical concepts regardless of whether the test material was presented in their preferred sensory mode or not. Interestingly, female students' perceptions of their learning style preference may have a positive effect on the test results when the test is presented in their preferred format.

  10. Can the removal of molecular cloud envelopes by external feedback affect the efficiency of star formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, William E.; Bonnell, Ian A.; Forgan, Duncan H.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate how star formation efficiency (SFE) can be significantly decreased by the removal of a molecular cloud's envelope by feedback from an external source. Feedback from star formation has difficulties halting the process in dense gas but can easily remove the less dense and warmer envelopes where star formation does not occur. However, the envelopes can play an important role keeping their host clouds bound by deepening the gravitational potential and providing a constraining pressure boundary. We use numerical simulations to show that removal of the cloud envelopes results in all cases in a fall in the SFE. At 1.38 free-fall times, our 4 pc cloud simulation experienced a drop in the SFE from 16 to 6 per cent, while our 5 pc cloud fell from 27 to 16 per cent. At the same time, our 3 pc cloud (the least bound) fell from an SFE of 5.67 per cent to zero when the envelope was lost. The SFE per free-fall time varied from zero to ≈0.25 according to α, defined to be the ratio of the kinetic plus thermal to gravitational energy, and irrespective of the absolute star-forming mass available. Furthermore, the fall in SFE associated with the loss of the envelope is found to even occur at later times. We conclude that the SFE will always fall should a star-forming cloud lose its envelope due to stellar feedback, with less bound clouds suffering the greatest decrease.

  11. Kinetics of acrylamide formation/elimination reactions as affected by water activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vleeschouwer, Kristel; Van der Plancken, Iesel; Van Loey, Ann; Hendrickx, Marc E

    2007-01-01

    The influence of water activity on the kinetics of acrylamide formation and elimination reaction was investigated using low-moisture equimolar asparagine-glucose model systems, which were heated at temperatures between 120 and 200 degrees C for variable heating times. To determine the water content corresponding to the water activities tested, a sorption moisture isotherm was constructed experimentally. The acrylamide concentrations measured at different water activities could be modeled on the basis of a reaction scheme including not only acrylamide formation and elimination reactions but also an alternative Maillard reaction between both reactants. The corresponding rate constants and activation energies were estimated using nonlinear regression analysis. Whereas the rate constant for acrylamide formation varied only slightly with the initial water activity of the model system, the elimination rate constant showed a clear minimum around a water activity of 0.82. The opposite trend, namely, a maximum at a water activity of 0.82, was found for the Maillard reaction rate constant as a function of water activity, which confirms data from literature. The activation energies for the different reactions changed in a comparable way as the corresponding rate constant with water activity.

  12. Candida albicans survival, growth and biofilm formation are differently affected by mouthwashes: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulone, Simona; Malavasi, Giulia; Ardizzoni, Andrea; Orsi, Carlotta Francesca; Peppoloni, Samuele; Neglia, Rachele Giovanna; Blasi, Elisabetta

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common cause of oral mycoses. The aim of the present study was to investigate in vitro the susceptibility of C. albicans to mouthwashes, in terms of growth, survival and biofilm formation. Candida albicans, laboratory strain SC5314, and 7 commercial mouthwashes were employed: 3 with 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate; 1 with 0.06% chlorhexidine digluconate and 250 ppm F- sodium fluoride; 3 with fluorine-containing molecules. None of the mouthwashes contained ethanol in their formulations. The anti-Candida effects of the mouthwashes were assessed by disk diffusion, crystal violet and XTT assays. By using five protocols combining different dilutions and contact times the mouthwashes were tested against: 1) C. albicans growth; 2) biofilm formation; 3) survival of fungal cells in early, developing and mature Candida biofilm. Chlorhexidine digluconate-containing mouthwashes consistently exhibited the highest anti-Candida activity, irrespective of the protocols employed. Fungal growth, biofilm formation and survival of Candida cells within biofilm were impaired, the effects strictly depending on both the dilution employed and the time of contact. These in vitro studies provide evidence that mouthwashes exert anti-Candida activity against both planktonic and biofilm fungal structures, but to a different extent depending on their composition. This suggests special caution in the choice of mouthwashes for oral hygiene, whether aimed at prevention or treatment of oral candidiasis.

  13. Scienti fi c Approaches and Methods in the Investigation of the Formation and Stability of Hydromorphic Natural Complexes of the Irtysh River Valley System (The Kazakhstan Part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Tsaregorodtseva

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The current geo-environmental situation of the Irtysh River valley system is connected with the high degree of control of the river drainage, which affects the functioning of its entire ecosystem and determines some morphological features of its channel. In the present work, the methodological approaches in the study of formation of the valley’s hydromorphic natural complexes are discussed, and the results of studies on the channel processes in the middle course of the Irtysh River are given.

  14. How Health Care Complexity Leads to Cooperation and Affects the Autonomy of Health Care Professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molleman, Eric; Broekhuis, Manda; Stoffels, Renee; Jaspers, Frans

    2008-01-01

    Health professionals increasingly face patients with complex health problems and this pressurizes them to cooperate. The authors have analyzed how the complexity of health care problems relates to two types of cooperation: consultation and multidisciplinary teamwork (MTW). Moreover, they have

  15. Resolving detailed molecular structures in complex organic mixtures and modeling their secondary organic aerosol formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman-Rendall, Kevin A. S.; Zhuang, Yang R.; Amirav, Aviv; Chan, Arthur W. H.

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) remains an ongoing challenge towards developing detailed and accurate inputs for modeling secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Traditional techniques based on gas chromatography/electron impact-mass spectrometry induce excessive fragmentation, making it difficult to speciate and quantify isomers precisely. The goal of this study is to identify individual organic isomers by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beam (SMB-GC/MS, also known as GC/MS with Cold EI) and to incorporate speciated isomers into an SOA model that accounts for the specific structures elucidated. Two samples containing atmospherically relevant UCMs are analyzed. The relative isomer distributions exhibit remarkably consistent trends across a wide range of carbon numbers. Constitutional isomers of different alkanes are speciated and individually quantified as linear, branched - for the first time by position of branching - multiply branched, or unsaturated - by degree of ring substitution and number of rings. Relative amounts of exact molecular structures are used as input parameters in an SOA box model to study the effects of molecular structures on SOA yields and volatility evolution. Highly substituted cyclic, mono-substituted cyclic, and linear species have the highest SOA yields while branched alkanes formed the least SOA. The rate of functionalization of a representative UCM is found to be in agreement with current volatility basis set (VBS) parameterizations based on detailed knowledge of composition and known oxidation mechanisms, confirming the validity of VBS parameters currently used in air quality models.

  16. Formation and Identification of Unresolved Complex Mixtures in Lacustrine Biodegraded Oil from Nanxiang Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC/TOFMS method has been developed for the formation and identification of unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs in lacustrine biodegraded oils that with the same source rock, similar maturity, and increasing degradation rank from Nanxiang Basin, China. Normal alkanes, light hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, steranes, and terpanes are degraded gradually from oil B330 to oil G574. The compounds in biodegraded oil (oil G574 have fewer types, the polarity difference of compounds in different types is minor, and the relative content of individual compounds is similar. All the features make the compounds in biodegraded oil coelute in GC analysis and form the raised “baseline hump” named UCMs. By injecting standard materials and analyzing mass spectrums of target compounds, it is shown that cyclic alkanes with one to five rings are the major components of UCMs. Furthermore, UCMs were divided into six classes. Classes I and II, composed of alkyl-cyclohexanes, alkyl-naphthanes, and their isomers, are originated from the enrichment of hydrocarbons resistant to degradation in normal oils. Classes III ~ VI, composed of sesquiterpenoids, tricyclic terpanes, low molecular steranes, diasteranes, norhopanes, and their isomers, are probably from some newly formed compounds during the microbial transformation of oil.

  17. Calculating the contribution of different binding modes to Quinacrine - DNA complex formation from polarized fluorescence data

    CERN Document Server

    Voloshin, Igor; Karachevtsev, Victor; Zozulya, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Binding of acridine derivative quinacrine (QA) to chicken erythrocyte DNA was studied by methods of absorption and polarized fluorescent spectroscopy. Measurements were carried out in aqueous buffered solutions (pH 6.9) of different dye concentrations (QA concentration range from $10^{-6}$ till $10^{-4}$ M) and ionic strengths ($Na^{+}$ concentration rang from $10^{-3}$ till 0.15 M) in a wide range of phosphate-to-dye molar ratios ($P/D$). It is established that the minimum of fluorescent titration curve plotted as relative fluorescence intensity $vs$ $P/D$ is conditioned by the competition between the two types of QA binding to DNA which posses by different emission parameters: (i) intercalative one dominating under high $P/D$ values, and (ii) outside electrostatic binding dominating under low $P/D$ values, which is accompanied by the formation of non-fluorescent dye associates on the DNA backbone. Absorption and fluorescent characteristics of complexes formed were determined. The method of calculation of di...

  18. Decamethylytterbocene complexes of bipyridines and diazabutadines: multiconfigurational ground states and open-shell singlet formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Eric D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Booth, C H [LBNL; Walter, M D [LBNL; Kazhdan, D [LBNL; Hu, Y - J [LBNL; Lukens, Wayne [LBNL; Maron, Laurent [INSA TOULOUSE; Eisentein, Odile [UNIV MONTPELLIER 2; Anderson, Richard [LBNL

    2009-01-01

    Partial ytterbium f-orbital occupancy (i.e. intermediate valence) and open-shell singlet Draft 12/formation are established for a variety of bipyridine and diazabutadiene adducts to decamethylytterbocene, (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb or Cp*{sub 2}Yb. Data used to support this claim includes ytterbium valence measurements using Yb Lm-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility and Complete Active Space Self-Consistent Field (CASSCF) multi configurational calculations, as well as structural measurements compared to density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. The CASSCF calculations indicate that the intermediate valence is the result of a multiconfigurational ground state wave function that has both an open-shell singlet f{sup 13} and a closed-shell singlet f{sup 14} component. A number of other competing theories for the unusual magnetism in these materials are ruled out by the presence of intermediate valence and its lack of any significant temperature dependence. These results have implications for understanding chemical bonding not only in organolanthanide complexes, but also for organometallic chemistry in general, as well as understanding magnetic interactions in nanopartic1es and devices.

  19. Decamethylytterbocene Complexes of Bipyridines and Diazabutadienes: Multiconfigurational Ground States and Open-Shell Singlet Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, Corwin H.; Walter, Marc D.; Kazhdan, Daniel; Hu, Yung-Jin; Lukens, Wayne W.; Bauer, Eric D.; Maron, Laurent; Eisenstein, Odile; Andersen, Richard A.

    2009-04-22

    Partial ytterbium f-orbital occupancy (i.e., intermediate valence) and open-shell singlet formation are established for a variety of bipyridine and diazabutadiene adducts with decamethylytterbocene, (C5Me5)2Yb, abbreviated as Cp*2Yb. Data used to support this claim include ytterbium valence measurements using Yb LIII-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) multiconfigurational calculations, as well as structural measurements compared to density functional theory calculations. The CASSCF calculations indicate that the intermediate valence is the result of a multiconfigurational ground-state wave function that has both an open-shell singlet f13(?*)1, where pi* is the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the bipyridine or dpiazabutadiene ligands, and a closed-shell singlet f14 component. A number of other competing theories for the unusual magnetism in these materials are ruled out by the lack of temperature dependence of the measured intermediate valence. These results have implications for understanding chemical bonding not only in organolanthanide complexes but also for f-element chemistry in general, as well as understanding magnetic interactions in nanoparticles and devices.

  20. How mycorrhizal plant-soil interactions affect formation and degradation of soil organic matter in boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Bartosz; Sietiö, Outi-Maaria; Ahvenainen, Anu; Strakova, Petra; Heinonsalo, Jussi

    2017-04-01

    Forest soil organic matter (SOM) contains more carbon (C) than all the flora and atmosphere combined and that is why C release as CO2 from SOM may have drastic consequences for climate globally. SOM is enormous C sink which has the potential to become C source (IPCC 2013). To predict long-term soil C storage and climate feedbacks we need profound understanding of dynamics and drivers of SOM decomposition. Ecosystem processes associated with C cycle are constrained by C and N interactions. At the level of ecosystem boreal forest is N-limited, as most of soil N is stored in recalcitrant organic form bound or complexed with soil compounds such as polyphenols. To improve N uptake, also from less available pools, plant species form symbioses with mycorrhizal fungi able to degrade recalcitrant N and sharing it with plants. As a feedback, plants provide to fungal symbiont assimilated C. Climate change through elevated CO2 level led to increases in photosynthesis which enhance the C flow belowground accelerating N uptake by plants also from more recalcitrant N pools. Increased SOM decomposition would possibly result also in increase of CO2 production from soil. Our field experiment was conducted at Hyytiälä forestry field station (SMEAR II, University of Helsinki) located in southern Finland (61°84'N, 24°26'E). In this 3-year long experiment, we discriminated SOM decomposition with different mesh bags filled with humus. These mesh bags allowed for the entrance of mycorrhiza and fine roots (1mm mesh size), or only mycorrhiza (50µm), or both were excluded (1µm). We followed changes in SOM content, N pools and enzymatic activity. The results suggests that plant-mycorrhiza interactions increase recalcitrant pool of organic N in SOM due to root-derived tannins, but mycorrhizal plants have still access to this N. Although mycorrhizal plant-soil interaction seems to strongly affect the formation of recalcitrant SOM, the net decomposition is not hindered by these chemical

  1. Formation of stacked luminescent complex of 8-hydroxyquinoline molecules on hydroxyapatite coating by using cold isostatic pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuya, Takehiko [Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka-shi, Niigata 940–2188 (Japan); Otsuka, Yuichi, E-mail: otsuka@vos.nagaokaut.ac.jp [Department of System Safety, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka-shi, Niigata 940–2188 (Japan); Tagaya, Motohiro [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka-shi, Niigata 940–2188 (Japan); Motozuka, Satoshi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Gifu National College of Technology, 2236-2 Kamimakuwa, Motosu-shi, Gifu 501–0495 (Japan); Ohnuma, Kiyoshi [Department of Bioengineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka-shi, Niigata 940–2188 (Japan); Mutoh, Yoshiharu [Department of System Safety, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka-shi, Niigata 940–2188 (Japan)

    2016-01-01

    Cold isostatic pressing successfully formed a chelate complex of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8Hq) molecules on plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HAp) coating by solid-state reaction. The complex emits a fluorescence peak at approximately 500 nm by UV irradiation. The red shift of the fluorescence was newly observed in the cases of highly compressed complex due to π – π stacking of aromatic ring in the molecular structure of 8Hq. The immersed complex coating in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) demonstrated amorphous apatite precipitation and kept its fluorescence property. - Highlights: • Cold isostatic pressing can form a complex of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8Hq) with hydroxyapatite (HAp) • Cold isostatic pressing can form HAp/8Hq complex on rough surfaces • Peak shift of the fluorescence from CIPEd HAp/8Hq was observed. • Formation of HAp/8Hq did not disturb precipitation property of HAp itself. • The peak shift was due to the increase in density of 8Hq molecules.

  2. Evaluation of concrete structures affected by alkali-silica reaction and delayed ettringite formation - part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This report details the results of a comprehensive research project aimed at evaluating the potential use of : non-destructive testing (NDT) to assess structures affected by ASR and/or DEF. This project was a : collaborative effort between the Univer...

  3. Timing of mTOR activation affects tuberous sclerosis complex neuropathology in mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Magri

    2013-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is a dominantly inherited disease with high penetrance and morbidity, and is caused by mutations in either of two genes, TSC1 or TSC2. Most affected individuals display severe neurological manifestations – such as intractable epilepsy, mental retardation and autism – that are intimately associated with peculiar CNS lesions known as cortical tubers (CTs. The existence of a significant genotype-phenotype correlation in individuals bearing mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2 is highly controversial. Similar to observations in humans, mouse modeling has suggested that a more severe phenotype is associated with mutation in Tsc2 rather than in Tsc1. However, in these mutant mice, deletion of either gene was achieved in differentiated astrocytes. Here, we report that loss of Tsc1 expression in undifferentiated radial glia cells (RGCs early during development yields the same phenotype detected upon deletion of Tsc2 in the same cells. Indeed, the same aberrations in cortical cytoarchitecture, hippocampal disturbances and spontaneous epilepsy that have been detected in RGC-targeted Tsc2 mutants were observed in RGC-targeted Tsc1 mutant mice. Remarkably, thorough characterization of RGC-targeted Tsc1 mutants also highlighted subventricular zone (SVZ disturbances as well as STAT3-dependent and -independent developmental-stage-specific defects in the differentiation potential of ex-vivo-derived embryonic and postnatal neural stem cells (NSCs. As such, deletion of either Tsc1 or Tsc2 induces mostly overlapping phenotypic neuropathological features when performed early during neurogenesis, thus suggesting that the timing of mTOR activation is a key event in proper neural development.

  4. Complexities of Emotional Responses to Social and Nonsocial Affective Stimuli in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel S. Peterman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adaptive emotional responses are important in interpersonal relationships. We investigated self-reported emotional experience, physiological reactivity, and micro-facial expressivity in relation to the social nature of stimuli in individuals with schizophrenia.METHOD: Galvanic skin response (GSR and facial electromyography (fEMG were recorded in medicated outpatients with schizophrenia (SZ and demograph-ically-matched healthy controls (CO while they viewed social and non-social im-ages from the International Affective Pictures System (IAPS. Participants rated the valence and arousal, and selected a label for experienced emotions. Symp-tom severity in the SZ, and schizotypy in CO were assessed.RESULTS: The two groups did not differ in their labeling of the emotions evoked by the stimuli, but individuals with schizophrenia were more positive in their va-lence ratings. Although self-reported arousal was similar in both groups, GSR was greater in schizophrenia, suggesting differential awareness or calibration of internal states. Both groups reported social images to be more arousing than non-social images but their physiological responses to nonsocial vs. social imag-es were different. Self-reported arousal to neutral social images was correlated with positive symptoms in schizophrenia. Negative symptoms in SZ and disor-ganized schizotypy in CO were associated with reduced fEMG. Greater corruga-tor fEMG activity for positive images in SZ indicates valence-incongruent facial expressions.CONCLUSIONS: The patterns of emotional responses differed between the two groups. While both groups were in broad agreement in self-reported arousal and emotion labels, their GSR and fEMG correlates of emotion diverged in relation to the social nature of the stimuli and clinical measures. Importantly, these results suggest disrupted self awareness of internal states in schizophrenia and under-score the complexities of emotion processing in health and

  5. Cell phone ringtone, but not landline phone ringtone, affects complex reaction time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosław Zajdel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Legislation systems of most countries prohibited using the handheld mobile phone while driving due to the fact that it disturbs concentration and causes hand involvement. Every phone owner is accustomed to the ringtone of his phone and almost involuntarily endeavors to pick it up or check who calls. This engages one’s psychomotor skills, which in our opinion contributes to the attenuation of reaction time needed for performing other crucial functions. Objectives: The aim of the study was: (1 to evaluate the infl uence of the sound of a ringing mobile phone on the complex reaction time (RT score in healthy subjects (owners, and (2 to check if there are any differences in RT when a landline phone and mobile phone ring. Methods: To assess RT we used our system and protocol of examination, previously validated. The examination conditions were standardized. All tests were performed in the same room with the same light and general acoustic conditions. The test group consisted of 23 women and 24 men, aged 19–24 years. The examination comprised 4 sessions: Training Session (TS during which the subjects were accustomed with the application and sample stimuli, Control Session (CS with no telephone ringing, Landline Session (LS with landline phone ringing, Mobile Session (MS with mobile phone ringing. Results: The median RT in the study population was signifi cantly elongated (p 0.05. Conclusions: We think that the specifi c ‘bond’ between a person and their private phone can signifi cantly disrupt their attention and thus affect the attention-demanding activities.

  6. Evolutionary factors affecting Lactate dehydrogenase A and B variation in the Daphnia pulex species complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristescu Melania E

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence for historical, demographic and selective factors affecting enzyme evolution can be obtained by examining nucleotide sequence variation in candidate genes such as Lactate dehydrogenase (Ldh. Two closely related Daphnia species can be distinguished by their electrophoretic Ldh genotype and habitat. Daphnia pulex populations are fixed for the S allele and inhabit temporary ponds, while D. pulicaria populations are fixed for the F allele and inhabit large stratified lakes. One locus is detected in most allozyme surveys, but genome sequencing has revealed two genes, LdhA and LdhB. Results We sequenced both Ldh genes from 70 isolates of these two species from North America to determine if the association between Ldh genotype and habitat shows evidence for selection, and to elucidate the evolutionary history of the two genes. We found that alleles in the pond-dwelling D. pulex and in the lake-dwelling D. pulicaria form distinct groups at both loci, and the substitution of Glutamine (S for Glutamic acid (F at amino acid 229 likely causes the electrophoretic mobility shift in the LDHA protein. Nucleotide diversity in both Ldh genes is much lower in D. pulicaria than in D. pulex. Moreover, the lack of spatial structuring of the variation in both genes over a wide geographic area is consistent with a recent demographic expansion of lake populations. Neutrality tests indicate that both genes are under purifying selection, but the intensity is much stronger on LdhA. Conclusions Although lake-dwelling D. pulicaria hybridizes with the other lineages in the pulex species complex, it remains distinct ecologically and genetically. This ecological divergence, coupled with the intensity of purifying selection on LdhA and the strong association between its genotype and habitat, suggests that experimental studies would be useful to determine if variation in molecular function provides evidence that LDHA variants are adaptive.

  7. Structure Formation of Ultrathin PEO Films at Solid Interfaces—Complex Pattern Formation by Dewetting and Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Hans-Georg; Meyer, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    The direct contact of ultrathin polymer films with a solid substrate may result in thin film rupture caused by dewetting. With crystallisable polymers such as polyethyleneoxide (PEO), molecular self-assembly into partial ordered lamella structures is studied as an additional source of pattern formation. Morphological features in ultrathin PEO films (thickness PEO molecules, n-alkylterminated (hydrophobic) PEO oligomers are investigated with respect to self-organization in ultrathin films. Morphological features characteristic for pure PEO are not changed by the presence of the n-alkylgroups. PMID:23385233

  8. Weaning markedly affects transcriptome profiles and Peyer’s patch formation in piglet ileum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo eInoue

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptome analyses were conducted on the ileal mucosa of 14-35 day-old piglets to investigate postnatal gut development during suckling and post-weaning. The transcriptome profiles of 14 day-old suckling piglets showed a considerably higher number of differentially expressed genes than did those of 21, 28 and 35 day olds, indicating an intensive gut development during the first 14-21 postnatal days. In addition, the analysis of biological pathways indicated that Chemotaxis Leucocyte chemotaxis was the most significantly affected pathway in suckling piglets between 14 and 21 days of age. Weaning negatively affected pathways associated with acquired immunity, but positively affected those associated with innate immunity. Interestingly, pathway Chemotaxis Leucocyte chemotaxis was found positively affected when comparing 14 and 21 day-old suckling piglets, but negatively affected in 28 day-old piglets weaned at 21 days of age, when compared with 28 day-old suckling piglets. Genes CXCL13, SLA-DOA (MHC class II, ICAM1, VAV1 and VCAM1 were involved in the pathway Chemotaxis Leukocyte chemotaxis and they were found to significantly change between 14 and 21 day-old suckling piglets, and between groups of suckling and weaned piglets. The expression of these genes significantly declined after weaning at 14, 21 and 28 days of age. This decline indicated that CXCL13, SLA-DOA, ICAM1, VAV1 and VCAM1 may be involved in the development of Peyer’s patches because lower gene expression clearly corresponded with smaller areas of Peyer’s patches in the ileal mucosa of piglets. Moreover, weaning piglets prior to a period of intensive gut development i.e., 14 days of age, caused significant adverse effects on the size of Peyer’s patches, which were not reverted even 14 days post-weaning.

  9. Thermodynamics of mixed-ligand complex formation of zinc nitrilotriacetate with amino acids and dipeptides in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyreu, Dmitrii, E-mail: pyreu@mail.ru [Department of Inorganic and Analytic Chemistry, Ivanovo State UniversityErmak 39, Ivanovo 153025 (Russian Federation); Gruzdev, Matvey; Kumeev, Roman [G.A. Krestov Institute of Solution Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ivanovo (Russian Federation); Gridchin, Sergei [Ivanovo State University of Chemistry and Technology, Ivanovo (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-20

    Highlights: • Stable mixed ligand complexes of ZnNta with amino acids and dipeptides. • Histamine-like coordination mode of His in the complex ZnNtaHis. • Glycine-like coordination of Lys and Orn in the complexes ZnNtaL and ZnNtaHL • NH{sub 2}, CO-coordination mode of GlyGly in the complex ZnNtaGG. • NH{sub 2}, N{sup −} or NH2, N{sup −}, COO-coordination modes of GlyGly in the complex ZnNtaGGH{sub −1}. - Abstract: The isothermal calorimetry, pH-potentiometric titration and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR methods has been used to study the mixed-ligand complex formation in the systems Zn{sup 2+}–Nta{sup 3–}–L{sup −} (L = His, Orn, Lys, GlyGly, AlaAla) in aqueous solution at 298.15 K and the ionic strength of I = 0.5 (KNO{sub 3}). The thermodynamic parameters of formation of the mixed complexes have been determined. The relationship between the probable coordination modes of the complexone and amino acid or dipeptide molecules in the mixed-ligand complex and the thermodynamic parameters has been discussed.

  10. Acid environments affect biofilm formation and gene expression in isolates of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Denis; McCabe, Evonne M; McCusker, Matthew P; Martins, Marta; Fanning, Séamus; Duffy, Geraldine

    2015-08-03

    The aim of this study was to examine the survival and potential virulence of biofilm-forming Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 under mild acid conditions. Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 employs an acid tolerance response (ATR) allowing it to adapt to acidic environments. The threat that these acid adapted cells pose to food safety could be enhanced if they also produce biofilms in acidic conditions. The cells were acid-adapted by culturing them in 1% glucose and their ability to form biofilms on stainless steel and on the surface of Luria Bertani (LB) broth at pH7 and pH5 was examined. Plate counts were performed to examine cell survival. RNA was isolated from cells to examine changes in the expression of genes associated with virulence, invasion, biofilm formation and global gene regulation in response to acid stress. Of the 4 isolates that were examined only one (1481) that produced a rigid biofilm in LB broth at pH7 also formed this same structure at pH5. This indicated that the lactic acid severely impeded the biofilm producing capabilities of the other isolates examined under these conditions. Isolate 1481 also had higher expression of genes associated with virulence (hilA) and invasion (invA) with a 24.34-fold and 13.68-fold increase in relative gene expression respectively at pH5 compared to pH7. Although genes associated with biofilm formation had increased expression in response to acid stress for all the isolates this only resulted in the formation of a biofilm by isolate 1481. This suggests that in addition to the range of genes associated with biofilm production at neutral pH, there are genes whose protein products specifically aid in biofilm production in acidic environments. Furthermore, it highlights the potential for the use of lactic acid for the inhibition of Salmonella biofilms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of Chloride Intracellular Channel Protein 3 as a Novel Gene Affecting Human Bone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brum, A M; Leije, M; J, Schreuders-Koedam

    2017-01-01

    involved in osteoblast differentiation of human bone marrow–derived MSCs (hMSCs). We identified the gene chloride intracellular channel protein 3 (CLIC3) to be strongly upregulated during MSC-derived osteoblast differentiation. Lentiviral overexpression of CLIC3 in hMSCs caused a 60% increase of matrix......-fold increase in bone formation (0.33% versus 5.05% bone area relative to scaffold). Using a Clic3-His-tagged pull-down assay and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LS/MS)-based proteomics analysis in lysates of osteogenically differentiated hMSCs, we showed that CLIC3 interacts with NIMA...

  12. 78 FR 58316 - Complex Issues in Developing Medical Devices for Pediatric Patients Affected by Rare Diseases...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ... Devices for Pediatric Patients Affected by Rare Diseases.'' This public workshop is organized by the... diagnosis and treatment of pediatric patients affected by rare diseases: Current approaches toward use of... medical devices and therapies for pediatric patients affected by rare diseases. This is part of an ongoing...

  13. Conductance Studies on Complex Formation between c-Methylcalix[4]resorcinarene and Titanium (III in Acetonitrile-H2O Binary Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghmeh Saadati

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Calixresorcinarenes have proved to be unique molecules for molecular recognition via hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic and ionic interactions with suitable substrates such as cations. The study of the interactions involved in the complexation of different cations with calixresorcinarenes in solvent mixtures is important for a better understanding of the mechanism of biological transport, molecular recognition, and other analytical applications. This article summarizes different aspects of the complexes of the Ti3+ metal cation with c-methylcalix[4]resorcinarene (CMCR as studied by conductometry in acetonitrile (AN–water (H2O binary mixtures at different temperatures. Conductance data show that the metal cation/ligand (ML stoichiometry of the complexes in solution is 1:1 in all cases. Non-linear behaviour was observed for the variation of logKf of the complexes vs. the composition of the binary solvent mixtures. Selectivity of CMCR for the Ti3+ cation is sensitive to solvent composition; in some cases and at certain compositions of the mixed solvent systems, the selectivity order is changed. Values of thermodynamic parameters (, for formation of the CMCR–Ti3+ complexes in AN–H2O binary systems were obtained from the temperature dependence of stability constants, and the results show that the thermodynamics of complexation reactions are affected by the nature and composition of the mixed solvents.

  14. Favipiravir inhibits acetaminophen sulfate formation but minimally affects systemic pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanli; Harmatz, Jerold S; Epstein, Carol R; Nakagawa, Yukako; Kurosaki, Chie; Nakamura, Tetsuro; Kadota, Takumi; Giesing, Dennis; Court, Michael H; Greenblatt, David J

    2015-11-01

    The antiviral agent favipiravir is likely to be co-prescribed with acetaminophen (paracetamol). The present study evaluated the possiblility of a pharmacokinetic interaction between favipiravir and acetaminophen, in vitro and in vivo. The effect of favipivir on the transformation of acetaminophen to its glucuronide and sulfate metabolites was studied using a pooled human hepatic S9 fraction in vitro. The effect of acute and extended adminstration of favipiravir on the pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen and metabolites was evaluated in human volunteers. Favipiravir inhibited the in vitro formation of acetaminophen sulfate, but not acetaminophen glucuronide. In human volunteers, both acute (1 day) and extended (6 days) administration of favipiravir slightly but significantly increased (by about 20 %) systemic exposure to acetaminophen (total AUC), whereas Cmax was not significantly changed. AUC for acetaminophen glucuronide was increased by 23 to 35 % above control by favipiravir, while AUC for acetaminophen sulfate was reduced by about 20 % compared to control. Urinary excretion of acetaminophen sulfate was likewise reduced to 44 to 65 % of control values during favipiravir co-administration, while excretion of acetaminophen glucuronide increased to 17 to 32 % above control. Favipiravir inhibits acetaminophen sulfate formation in vitro and in vivo. However the increase in systemic exposure to acetaminophen due to favipiravir co-administration, though statistically significant, is small in magnitude and unlikely to be of clinical importance. © 2015 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. The glabra1 mutation affects cuticle formation and plant responses to microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ye; Yu, Keshun; Navarre, Duroy; Seebold, Kenneth; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2010-10-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of defense that provides resistance against a broad spectrum of pathogens in plants. Previous work indicates a role for plastidial glycerolipid biosynthesis in SAR. Specifically, mutations in FATTY ACID DESATURASE7 (FAD7), which lead to reduced trienoic fatty acid levels and compromised plastidial lipid biosynthesis, have been associated with defective SAR. We show that the defective SAR in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) fad7-1 plants is not associated with a mutation in FAD7 but rather with a second-site mutation in GLABRA1 (GL1), a gene well known for its role in trichome formation. The compromised SAR in gl1 plants is associated with impairment in their cuticles. Furthermore, mutations in two other components of trichome development, GL3 and TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1, also impaired cuticle development and SAR. This suggests an overlap in the biochemical pathways leading to cuticle and trichome development. Interestingly, exogenous application of gibberellic acid (GA) not only enhanced SAR in wild-type plants but also restored SAR in gl1 plants. In contrast to GA, the defense phytohoromes salicylic acid and jasmonic acid were unable to restore SAR in gl1 plants. GA application increased levels of cuticular components but not trichome formation on gl1 plants, thus implicating cuticle, but not trichomes, as an important component of SAR. Our findings question the prudence of using mutant backgrounds for genetic screens and underscore a need to reevaluate phenotypes previously studied in the gl1 background.

  16. Forced chondrocyte expression of sonic hedgehog impairs joint formation affecting proliferation and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavella, S; Biticchi, R; Morello, R; Castagnola, P; Musante, V; Costa, D; Cancedda, R; Garofalo, S

    2006-09-01

    Proliferation and apoptosis are two fundamental processes that occur during limb development, and in particular in joint formation. To study the role of hedgehog proteins in limbs, we have misexpressed Sonic Hedgehog specifically in chondrocytes. We found that the appendicular skeleton was severely misshapen while pelvic and shoulder girdles developed normally. In particular, we detected fusion of the elbow/knee joint, no definite carpal/tarsal, metacarpal/metatarsal bones and absence of distinct phalanges, fused in a continuous cartilaginous rod. Molecular markers of joints, such as Gdf5 and sFrp2 were absent at presumptive joint sites and Tenascin C, a molecule associated with joint formation and expressed in permanent cartilage, was expressed in a wider region in transgenic animals as compared to the wild type. The ratio of proliferating to non-proliferating chondrocytes was about two times higher in transgenic developing cartilage as compared to the wild type. Accordingly, the proapoptotic gene Bax was barely detectable in the growth plate of transgenic mice and Tunel assay showed the absence of apoptosis in presumptive joints at E15.5. Taken together, these results suggest that misexpression of Sonic Hedgehog causes apoptosis and proliferation defects leading to the lack of joint cavity and fusion of selected limb skeletal elements.

  17. Sub-lethal doses of photodynamic therapy affect biofilm formation ability and metabolic activity of Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhajibagher, M; Chiniforush, N; Shahabi, S; Ghorbanzadeh, R; Bahador, A

    2016-09-01

    During photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of a primary endodontic infection, it is extremely likely that microorganisms would be exposed to sub-lethal doses of PDT (sPDT). Although sPDT cannot kill microorganisms, it can considerably influence microbial virulence. This study was conducted to characterize the effect of sPDT using toluidine blue O (TBO), methylene blue (MB), and indocyanine green (ICG) on biofilm formation ability and metabolic activity of Enterococcus faecalis. The antimetabolic and antibiofilm potential of ICG-, TBO-, and MB-sPDT against E. faecalis was analyzed at sub-lethal doses (1/2-1/64 minimum inhibitory concentration) using the XTT reduction assay, crystal violet assay, and scanning electron microscopy. Higher doses of sPDT adversely affected biofilm formation ability and metabolic activity. ICG-, TBO-, and MB-PDT at a maximum sub-lethal dose markedly reduced the formation of biofilm up to 42.8%, 22.6%, and 19.5%, respectively. ICG-, TBO-, and MB-sPDT showed a marked reduction in bacterial metabolic activity by 98%, 94%, and 82%, respectively. ICG-PDT showed a stronger inhibitory effect on biofilm formation in E. faecalis than MB- and TBO-PDT at sub-lethal levels. Interestingly, a gradual increase in metabolic activity and biofilm formation upon exposure to a lower dose of test sPDT were observed. sPDT showed dual effect on biofilm formation ability and metabolic activity of E. faecalis. High doses revealed antimetabolic and antibiofilm potential activity, whereas lower doses had conflicting results. Hence, when PDT is prescribed in clinical settings, the dose of PDT used in vivo should be taken into consideration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ab initio study on the formation of triiodide CT complex from the reaction of iodine with 2,3-diaminopyridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hashimi, Nessreen A; Hussein, Yasser H A

    2010-01-01

    The charge transfer (CT) interaction between iodine and 2,3-diaminopyridine (DAPY) has been thoroughly investigated via theoretical calculations. A Hartree-Fock, 3-21G level of theory was used to optimize and calculate the Mullican charge distribution scheme as well as the vibrational frequencies of DAPY alone and both its CT complexes with one and two iodine molecules. A very good agreement was found between experiment and theory. New illustrations were concluded with a deep analysis and description for the vibrational frequencies of the formed CT complexes. The two-step CT complex formation mechanism published earlier was supported. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Formative assessment in an online learning environment to support flexible on-the-job learning in complex professional domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desirée Joosten-ten Brinke; Dominique Sluijsmans; Tamara van Gog; F. J. Prins

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a blueprint for an online learning environment that is based on prominent instructional design and assessment theories for supporting learning in complex domains. The core of this environment consists of formative assessment tasks (i.e., assessment for learning) that center on

  20. Neutral copper-phosphido-borane complexes: synthesis, characterization, and use as precatalysts in C(sp)-P bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellah, Ibrahim; Bernoud, Elise; Lohier, Jean-François; Alayrac, Carole; Toupet, Loïc; Lepetit, Christine; Gaumont, Annie-Claude

    2012-04-28

    Copper-phosphido-borane complexes were synthesized and isolated for the first time. Their structures were experimentally and computationally investigated. They were shown to display catalytic activity in C(sp)-P bond formation. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  1. Complex formation of 2-(o-hydroxyphenyl)-benzoxazole and 2-(o-hydroxyphenyl)-benzothiazole with beryllium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladilovich, D.B.; Stolyarov, K.P. (Leningradskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR))

    1984-12-01

    Using spectrophotometric and luminescence methods the interaction of beryllium ions With 2-(0-hydroxyphenyl)-benzoxazole and 2-(0-hydroxyphenyl)-benzothiazole has been studied. The formation of at least three BeL/sup +/, Be(OH)L and BeL/sub 2/ complexes (where L=singly charged anion of ligand) is established.

  2. Multi-Robot Coalitions Formation with Deadlines: Complexity Analysis and Solutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Guerrero

    Full Text Available Multi-robot task allocation is one of the main problems to address in order to design a multi-robot system, very especially when robots form coalitions that must carry out tasks before a deadline. A lot of factors affect the performance of these systems and among them, this paper is focused on the physical interference effect, produced when two or more robots want to access the same point simultaneously. To our best knowledge, this paper presents the first formal description of multi-robot task allocation that includes a model of interference. Thanks to this description, the complexity of the allocation problem is analyzed. Moreover, the main contribution of this paper is to provide the conditions under which the optimal solution of the aforementioned allocation problem can be obtained solving an integer linear problem. The optimal results are compared to previous allocation algorithms already proposed by the first two authors of this paper and with a new method proposed in this paper. The results obtained show how the new task allocation algorithms reach up more than an 80% of the median of the optimal solution, outperforming previous auction algorithms with a huge reduction of the execution time.

  3. Multi-Robot Coalitions Formation with Deadlines: Complexity Analysis and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Multi-robot task allocation is one of the main problems to address in order to design a multi-robot system, very especially when robots form coalitions that must carry out tasks before a deadline. A lot of factors affect the performance of these systems and among them, this paper is focused on the physical interference effect, produced when two or more robots want to access the same point simultaneously. To our best knowledge, this paper presents the first formal description of multi-robot task allocation that includes a model of interference. Thanks to this description, the complexity of the allocation problem is analyzed. Moreover, the main contribution of this paper is to provide the conditions under which the optimal solution of the aforementioned allocation problem can be obtained solving an integer linear problem. The optimal results are compared to previous allocation algorithms already proposed by the first two authors of this paper and with a new method proposed in this paper. The results obtained show how the new task allocation algorithms reach up more than an 80% of the median of the optimal solution, outperforming previous auction algorithms with a huge reduction of the execution time. PMID:28118384

  4. Complex interplay between formation routes and natural organic matter modification controls capabilities of C60 nanoparticles (nC60) to accumulate organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lei; Fortner, John D; Wang, Ximeng; Zhang, Chengdong; Wang, Lilin; Chen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of organic contaminants on fullerene nanoparticles (nC60) may significantly affect the risks of C60 in the environment. The objective of this study was to further understand how the interplay of nC60 formation routes and humic acid modification affects contaminant adsorption of nC60. Specifically, adsorption of 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene (a model nonionic, hydrophobic organic contaminant) on nC60 was greatly affected by nC60 formation route - the formation route significantly affected the aggregation properties of nC60, thus affecting the available surface area and the extent of adsorption via the pore-filling mechanism. Depending on whether nC60 was formed via the "top-down" route (i.e., sonicating C60 powder in aqueous solution) or "bottom-up" route (i.e., phase transfer from an organic solvent) and the type of solvent involved (toluene versus tetrahydrofuran), modification of nC60 with Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) could either enhance or inhibit the adsorption affinity of nC60. The net effect depended on the specific way in which SRHA interacted with C60 monomers and/or C60 aggregates of different sizes and morphology, which determined the relative importance of enhanced adsorption from SRHA modification via preventing C60 aggregation and inhibited adsorption through blocking available adsorption sites. The findings further demonstrate the complex mechanisms controlling interactions between nC60 and organic contaminants, and may have significant implications for the life-cycle analysis and risk assessment of C60. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Investigation on some factors affecting crack formation in high resistance aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Brotzu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum alloys having good mechanical properties are Al-ZnMg alloys (7xxx and Al-Cu-Li alloys (Weldalite. These alloys may be subjected to stress corrosion cracking. In order to overcome this problem the Al 7050 alloy has been developed and it is widely used for aerospace applications. Despite that, some components made of this alloy cracked during the manufacturing process including machining and chemical anodization. In a previous work cracked Al 7050 components have been analyzed in order to identify possible causes of crack formation. In this work the susceptibility of this alloy to intergranular corrosion has been analysed and compared with that of other high resistance aluminum alloys

  6. Dm nxf1/sbr gene affects the formation of meiotic spindle in female Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubkova, Elena V; Markova, Ekaterina G; Markov, Anton V; Avanesyan, Elina O; Nokkala, Seppo; Mamon, Ludmila A

    2009-01-01

    The small bristles (sbr) gene of Drosophila melanogaster belongs to the family of nuclear export factor (NXF) genes that participate in mRNA nuclear export. During meiosis, females of Drosophila melanogaster that carry various combinations of mutant alleles of the Dm nxf1/sbr gene exhibit disruption of the division spindle and misalignment of chromosomes at the metaphase plate. Meiosis of sbr ( 5 ) /+ females is characterized by the formation of tripolar spindles during the first cell division. According to the sequencing results, the sbr ( 5 ) (l(1)K4) lethal allele is a deletion of 492 nucleotides. In SBR(5) protein, 57 of the 146 amino acids that have been lost by deletion belong to the NTF2-like domain.

  7. Genetic variation of the α2b-adrenoceptor affects neural correlates of successful emotional memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urner, Maren; van Wingen, Guido; Franke, Barbara; Rijpkema, Mark; Fernández, Guillén; Tendolkar, Indira

    2011-12-01

    Enhanced memory for emotionally charged events helps us to remember potentially vital information. There are large interindividual differences in emotional-memory enhancement, but little is known about their neurobiological basis. Recently, a functional deletion variant of the gene that codes for the α2b-adrenoceptor (ADRA2B) has been shown to affect memory for emotional experiences. Initial neuroimaging evidence linked this behavioral effect to increased amygdala activity, but its influence on successful memory processing remains unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the common deletion in the ADRA2B gene on neural activity related to specific mnemonic processing, successful memory formation, and retrieval. Twenty-three noncarriers (10 males) and 28 deletion carriers (13 males) with a mean age of 24 years were investigated while performing an emotional-learning task with sad and happy scenes. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was acquired both during memory formation and retrieval. Although there were no differences in memory performance between groups, the common deletion variant of ADRA2B was related to enhanced activity in the amygdala and inferior frontal gyrus during successful emotional memory formation, but not retrieval. Deletion carriers showed a larger differential response in these brain regions between later-remembered and later-forgotten stimuli than nondeletion carriers did. Our results demonstrate that the ADRA2B polymorphism influences emotional memory formation but not memory retrieval in the amygdala and left inferior frontal gyrus. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Explicit solution format for complex-valued natural frequency of beam with R-shunted piezoelectric laminate transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgsberg, Jan Becker; Cöent, Adrien Le

    2014-01-01

    Analysis and design of resistive shunt circuits for piezoelectric damping of beam structures is often based on a representation in terms of the single target vibration mode of the beam, neglecting spill-over effects from the out-of-bandwidth or residual vibration modes. In this article, a solution...... format is derived for the complex-valued natural frequency of the beam with a shunted piezoelectric laminate transducer, where the influence from the residual modes is taken into account by a quasi-static representation. This explicit solution format contains system parameters that directly represent....... The accuracy of the explicit frequency solution format is verified by comparison with numerical results. It is found that the complex-valued natural frequency of the first vibration mode of a beam with a piezoelectric laminate transducer shunted to a resistance is estimated with sufficient accuracy...

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of charge transfer complex formation between Silver Nitrate and Benzylcyanide in Solvent Ethylene Glycol

    CERN Document Server

    Modarress, H

    2003-01-01

    The formation constant for charge transfer complexes between electron acceptor (AgNo sub 3) and electron donor benzylcyanide (C sub 6 H sub 5 -CH sub 2 -C ident to N) in solvent ethyleneglycol [(CH sub 2 OH) sub 2] has been evaluated by using the nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of aromatic group of benzylcyanide measured against external references, tetramethylsilane, hexamethyldisilane and cyclohexane at 20 sup d ig sup C. The external referencing procedure eliminated the interference of internal reference in the course of complexation. The necessary bulk magnetic susceptibility corrections on the measured chemical shifts have been made. The solution nationalised and their effects on the formation constant have been considered and a new equation has been suggested to obtain the main ionic activity coefficient of AgNO sub 3 from nuclear magnetic resonance results. The mean ionic activity coefficient has been taken into account in the formation constant calculations. The results indicated that the a...

  10. Formation of atoll garnets in the UHP eclogites of the Tso Morari Complex, Ladakh, Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnalagadda, Mallika K.; Karmalkar, Nitin R.; Duraiswami, Raymond A.; Harshe, Shivani; Gain, Sarah; Griffin, William L.

    2017-12-01

    The eclogites of the Tso Morari Complex, Ladakh, NW Himalayas preserve both garnets with spectacular atoll textures, as well as whole porphyroblastic garnets. Whole garnets are euhedral, idiomorphic and enclose inclusions of amphibole, phengite and zoisite within the cores, and omphacite and quartz/coesite towards the rims. Detailed electron microprobe analyses and back-scattered electron images show well-preserved prograde zoning in the whole garnets with an increase in Mg and decrease in Ca and Mn contents from the core to the rim. The atoll garnets commonly consist of euhedral ring over island/peninsular core containing inclusions of phengite, omphacite and rarely amphibole between the core and ring. Compositional profiles across the studied atoll grains show elemental variations with higher concentrations of Ca and Mn with low Mg at the peninsula/island cores; contrary to this low Ca, Mn and high Mg is observed at the outer rings. Temperature estimates yield higher values at the Mg-rich atoll garnet outer rings compared to the atoll cores. Atoll garnet formation was favoured by infiltration of fluid formed due to breakdown of hydrous phases, and/or the release of structurally bounded OH from nominally anhydrous minerals at the onset of exhumation. Infiltration of fluids along pre-existing fracture pathways and along mineral inclusion boundaries triggered breakdown of the original garnet cores and released elements which were subsequently incorporated into the newly-grown garnet rings. This breakdown of garnet cores and inward re-growth at the outer ring produced the atoll structure. Calibrated geo-thermobarometers and mineral equilibria reflect that the Tso Morari eclogites attain peak pressures prior to peak temperatures representing a clockwise path of evolution.

  11. Monitoring the formation of carbide crystal phases during the thermal decomposition of 3d transition metal dicarboxylate complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huba, ZJ; Carpenter, EE

    2014-06-06

    Single molecule precursors can help to simplify the synthesis of complex alloys by minimizing the amount of necessary starting reagents. However, single molecule precursors are time consuming to prepare with very few being commercially available. In this study, a simple precipitation method is used to prepare Fe, Co, and Ni fumarate and succinate complexes. These complexes were then thermally decomposed in an inert atmosphere to test their efficiency as single molecule precursors for the formation of metal carbide phases. Elevated temperature X-ray diffraction was used to identify the crystal phases produced upon decomposition of the metal dicarboxylate complexes. Thermogravimetric analysis coupled with an infrared detector was used to identify the developed gaseous decomposition products. All complexes tested showed a reduction from the starting M2+ oxidation state to the M oxidation state, upon decomposition. Also, each complex tested showed CO2 and H2O as gaseous decomposition products. Nickel succinate, iron succinate, and iron fumarate complexes were found to form carbide phases upon decomposition. This proves that transition metal dicarboxylate salts can be employed as efficient single molecule precursors for the formation of metal carbide crystal phases.

  12. Dimension socio-affective et abandon en formation ouverte et à distance

    OpenAIRE

    Dussarps, Clément

    2014-01-01

    The drop out in open and distance learning (ODL) is an important issue both for the learners and training organizations, whether for economic, social or image (self-image or brand image). The accompanying needs of learners are both technical, cognitive and meta-cognitive, and affective. The latter particularly interest us in this thesis to understand the drop out. To take account of the social dimension of the person and his relationship with teachers, peers or family, we will discuss socio-e...

  13. A Stimulation Function of Synaptotagmin-1 in Ternary SNARE Complex Formation Dependent on Munc18 and Munc13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Ca2+ sensor synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1 plays an essential function in synaptic exocytosis. Recently, Syt1 has been implicated in synaptic vesicle priming, a maturation step prior to Ca2+-triggered membrane fusion that is believed to involve formation of the ternary SNARE complex and require priming proteins Munc18-1 and Munc13-1. However, the mechanisms of Syt1 in synaptic vesicle priming are still unclear. In this study, we found that Syt1 stimulates the transition from the Munc18-1/syntaxin-1 complex to the ternary SNARE complex catalyzed by Munc13-1. This stimulation can be further enhanced in a membrane-containing environment. Further, we showed that Syt1, together with Munc18-1 and Munc13-1, stimulates trans ternary SNARE complex formation on membranes in a manner resistant to disassembly factors NSF and α-SNAP. Disruption of a proposed Syt1/SNARE binding interface strongly abrogated the stimulation function of Syt1. Our results suggest that binding of Syt1 to an intermediate SNARE assembly with Munc18-1 and Munc13-1 is critical for the stimulation function of Syt1 in ternary SNARE complex formation, and this stimulation may underlie the priming function of Syt1 in synaptic exocytosis.

  14. Subsistence of inclusion complex via assembly of a drug into cyclic oligosaccharide: Its formation, mechanism, behaviour and importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Mitali; Roy, Mahendra Nath

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this present work is to make soluble DEPM in aqueous medium through the formation inclusion complex into the hydrophobic hollow space of β-cyclodextrin (β-Cyd) which will provide a novel approach for designing drug delivery system in aqueous medium. The study of supramolecular complexation of DEPM with β-Cyd has been designed in both solution and solid state. In solution phase the evidences of the presence of non-covalent interactions in inclusion complex with 1:1 stoichiometry behaviour are obtained by investigating the UV-spectroscopy. The resultant solid of DEPM and β-Cyd is established by 1H NMR, FTIR, powder XRD and SEM techniques. So, β-Cyd has the ability to encapsulate DEPM into their core without formation any covalent bonds and also increases the bioavailability of the water insoluble DEPM drug.

  15. The Complex Relation Between Bullying, Victimization, Acceptance, and Rejection : Giving Special Attention to Status, Affection, and Sex Differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, René; Lindenberg, Siegwart; Munniksma, Anke; Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis

    2010-01-01

    To understand the complex nature of bullies' acceptance and rejection, this article considered goal-framing effects of status and affection as they relate to the gender of the bully (male vs. female bullies), the target (male vs. female victims), and the evaluator (acceptance and rejection from male

  16. Evidence of major genes affecting stress response in rainbow trout using Bayesian methods of complex segregation analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallejo, R L; Rexroad III, C E; Silverstein, J T

    2009-01-01

    As a first step toward the genetic mapping of QTL affecting stress response variation in rainbow trout, we performed complex segregation analyses (CSA) fitting mixed inheritance models of plasma cortisol by using Bayesian methods in large full-sib families of rainbow trout. To date, no studies ha...

  17. Collectin-11/MASP complex formation triggers activation of the lectin complement pathway--the fifth lectin pathway initiation complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Garred, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Collectins and ficolins are important in the clearance of endogenous and exogenous danger materials. A new human collectin-11 was recently identified in low concentration in serum in complex with mannose-binding lectin (MBL)/ficolin-associated serine proteases. Collectin-11 binds to carbohydrate...... residues present on various microorganisms. Thus, we hypothesized that collectin-11 could be a novel initiation molecule in the lectin pathway of complement. We can show that collectin-11 associates with all the known MBL-associated serine proteases (MASP-1, MASP-2 and MASP-3) as well as the lectin...... complement complex on C. albicans. Moreover, spiking collectin-11-depleted serum, which did not mediate complement activation, with recombinant collectin-11 restored the complement activation capability. These results define collectin-11 as the fifth recognition molecule in the lectin complement pathway...

  18. Fundamental and overtone vibrational spectroscopy, enthalpy of hydrogen bond formation and equilibrium constant determination of the methanol-dimethylamine complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lin; Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjaergaard, Henrik G

    2013-07-07

    We have measured gas phase vibrational spectra of the bimolecular complex formed between methanol (MeOH) and dimethylamine (DMA) up to about 9800 cm(-1). In addition to the strong fundamental OH-stretching transition we have also detected the weak second overtone NH-stretching transition. The spectra of the complex are obtained by spectral subtraction of the monomer spectra from spectra recorded for the mixture. For comparison, we also measured the fundamental OH-stretching transition in the bimolecular complex between MeOH and trimethylamine (TMA). The enthalpies of hydrogen bond formation (ΔH) for the MeOH-DMA and MeOH-TMA complexes have been determined by measurements of the fundamental OH-stretching transition in the temperature range from 298 to 358 K. The enthalpy of formation is found to be -35.8 ± 3.9 and -38.2 ± 3.3 kJ mol(-1) for MeOH-DMA and MeOH-TMA, respectively, in the 298 to 358 K region. The equilibrium constant (Kp) for the formation of the MeOH-DMA complex has been determined from the measured and calculated transition intensities of the OH-stretching fundamental transition and the NH-stretching second overtone transition. The transition intensities were calculated using an anharmonic oscillator local mode model with dipole moment and potential energy curves calculated using explicitly correlated coupled cluster methods. The equilibrium constant for formation of the MeOH-DMA complex was determined to be 0.2 ± 0.1 atm(-1), corresponding to a ΔG value of about 4.0 kJ mol(-1).

  19. Copper(II) Chloro Complex Formation Thermodynamics and Structure in Ionic Liquid, 1-Butyl-3-Methylimidazolium Trifluoromethanesulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Ryo; Uchida, Shuma; Kodamatani, Hitoshi; Tomiyasu, Takashi

    2017-10-19

    Metal ions in ionic liquids are laid under an unprecedented reaction field. In order to assess the reaction thermodynamics of metal ions in such a situation, Cu(2+)-chloro complex formation was examined with spectroscopic and calorimetric titrations in an ionic liquid, 1-buthyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate (C4mimTfO). In addition, the effect of the structure of the solvated complexes on the complexation mechanism was investigated with the aid of DFT calculations. Chloro complexation successively proceeded and finally provided a [CuCl4](2-) species, which is also the final product in conventional molecular solvents. Their stability constants were comparable to those in molecular solvents. Interestingly, in spite of the charged solvent in the ionic liquid, the entropy profile of the complexation resembled that in the conventional molecular liquids. This indicates that the entropy gain of the released solvent species from the complexes is the main driving force of the chloro complexation in the ionic liquid. In contrast, unlike the major molecular solvents, the total coordination number of Cu(2+) is saturated to 4 in the ionic liquid, and the Cl(-) complexation tends to be accompanied by a 1:1 exchange of the solvent TfO(-) from the complex. In addition, this ligand exchange was almost athermal. This possibly indicates that the coordination number is dominated by the electrostatic hindrance among the ligands including the solvent ions in the primary coordination sphere.

  20. Memory formation and retention are affected in adult miR-132/212 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Rapp, Julia; Smith, Pascal Y; Filali, Mohammed; Goupil, Claudia; Planel, Emmanuel; Magill, Stephen T; Goodman, Richard H; Hébert, Sébastien S

    2015-01-01

    The miR-132/212 family is thought to play an important role in neural function and plasticity, while its misregulation has been observed in various neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we analyzed 6-month-old miR-132/212 knockout mice in a battery of cognitive and non-cognitive behavioral tests. No significant changes were observed in reflexes and basic sensorimotor functions as determined by the SHIRPA primary screen. Accordingly, miR-132/212 knockout mice did not differ from wild-type controls in general locomotor activity in an open-field test. Furthermore, no significant changes of anxiety were measured in an elevated plus maze task. However, the mutant mice showed retention phase defects in a novel object recognition test and in the T-water maze. Moreover, the learning and probe phases in the Barnes maze were clearly altered in knockout mice when compared to controls. Finally, changes in BDNF, CREB, and MeCP2 were identified in the miR-132/212-deficient mice, providing a potential mechanism for promoting memory loss. Taken together, these results further strengthen the role of miR-132/212 in memory formation and retention, and shed light on the potential consequences of its deregulation in neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Replication Rate, Framing, and Format Affect Attitudes and Decisions about Science Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ralph M.; Tobin, Stephanie J.; Johnston, Heather M.; MacKenzie, Noah; Taglang, Chelsea M.

    2016-01-01

    A series of five experiments examined how the evaluation of a scientific finding was influenced by information about the number of studies that had successfully replicated the initial finding. The experiments also tested the impact of frame (negative, positive) and numeric format (percentage, natural frequency) on the evaluation of scientific findings. In Experiments 1 through 4, an attitude difference score served as the dependent measure, while a measure of choice served as the dependent measure in Experiment 5. Results from a diverse sample of 188 non-institutionalized U.S. adults (Experiment 2) and 730 undergraduate college students (Experiments 1, 3, and 4) indicated that attitudes became more positive as the replication rate increased and attitudes were more positive when the replication information was framed positively. The results also indicate that the manner in which replication rate was framed had a greater impact on attitude than the replication rate itself. The large effect for frame was attenuated somewhat when information about replication was presented in the form of natural frequencies rather than percentages. A fifth study employing 662 undergraduate college students in a task in which choice served as the dependent measure confirmed the framing effect and replicated the replication rate effect in the positive frame condition, but provided no evidence that the use of natural frequencies diminished the effect. PMID:27920743

  2. Structural insights into dynamics of RecU-HJ complex formation elucidates key role of NTR and stalk region toward formation of reactive state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavnekar, Sagar; Dantu, Sarath Chandra; Sedelnikova, Svetlana; Ayora, Sylvia; Rafferty, John; Kale, Avinash

    2017-01-25

    Holliday junction (HJ) resolving enzyme RecU is involved in DNA repair and recombination. We have determined the crystal structure of inactive mutant (D88N) of RecU from Bacillus subtilis in complex with a 12 base palindromic DNA fragment at a resolution of 3.2 Å. This structure shows the stalk region and the essential N-terminal region (NTR) previously unseen in our DNA unbound structure. The flexible nature of the NTR in solution was confirmed using SAXS. Thermofluor studies performed to assess the stability of RecU in complex with the arms of an HJ indicate that it confers stability. Further, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of wild type and an NTR deletion variant of RecU, with and without HJ. The NTR is observed to be highly flexible in simulations of the unbound RecU, in agreement with SAXS observations. These simulations revealed domain dynamics of RecU and their role in the formation of complex with HJ. The MD simulations also elucidate key roles of the NTR, stalk region, and breathing motion of RecU in the formation of the reactive state. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Structural insights into dynamics of RecU–HJ complex formation elucidates key role of NTR and stalk region toward formation of reactive state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavnekar, Sagar; Dantu, Sarath Chandra; Sedelnikova, Svetlana; Ayora, Sylvia; Rafferty, John; Kale, Avinash

    2017-01-01

    Holliday junction (HJ) resolving enzyme RecU is involved in DNA repair and recombination. We have determined the crystal structure of inactive mutant (D88N) of RecU from Bacillus subtilis in complex with a 12 base palindromic DNA fragment at a resolution of 3.2 Å. This structure shows the stalk region and the essential N-terminal region (NTR) previously unseen in our DNA unbound structure. The flexible nature of the NTR in solution was confirmed using SAXS. Thermofluor studies performed to assess the stability of RecU in complex with the arms of an HJ indicate that it confers stability. Further, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of wild type and an NTR deletion variant of RecU, with and without HJ. The NTR is observed to be highly flexible in simulations of the unbound RecU, in agreement with SAXS observations. These simulations revealed domain dynamics of RecU and their role in the formation of complex with HJ. The MD simulations also elucidate key roles of the NTR, stalk region, and breathing motion of RecU in the formation of the reactive state. PMID:27903910

  4. VEGF-A/NRP1 stimulates GIPC1 and Syx complex formation to promote RhoA activation and proliferation in skin cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumi Yoshida

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuropilin-1 (NRP1 has been identified as a VEGF-A receptor. DJM-1, a human skin cancer cell line, expresses endogenous VEGF-A and NRP1. In the present study, the RNA interference of VEGF-A or NRP1 suppressed DJM-1 cell proliferation. Furthermore, the overexpression of the NRP1 wild type restored shNRP1-treated DJM-1 cell proliferation, whereas NRP1 cytoplasmic deletion mutants did not. A co-immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that VEGF-A induced interactions between NRP1 and GIPC1, a scaffold protein, and complex formation between GIPC1 and Syx, a RhoGEF. The knockdown of GIPC1 or Syx reduced active RhoA and DJM-1 cell proliferation without affecting the MAPK or Akt pathway. C3 exoenzyme or Y27632 inhibited the VEGF-A-induced proliferation of DJM-1 cells. Conversely, the overexpression of the constitutively active form of RhoA restored the proliferation of siVEGF-A-treated DJM-1 cells. Furthermore, the inhibition of VEGF-A/NRP1 signaling upregulated p27, a CDK inhibitor. A cell-penetrating oligopeptide that targeted GIPC1/Syx complex formation inhibited the VEGF-A-induced activation of RhoA and suppressed DJM-1 cell proliferation. In conclusion, this new signaling pathway of VEGF-A/NRP1 induced cancer cell proliferation by forming a GIPC1/Syx complex that activated RhoA to degrade the p27 protein.

  5. A study of the coordination shell of aluminum(III) and magnesium(II) in model protein environments: thermodynamics of the complex formation and metal exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezabal, Elixabete; Mercero, Jose M; Lopez, Xabier; Ugalde, Jesus M

    2006-03-01

    Al(III) toxicity in living organisms is based on competition with other metal cations. Mg(II) is one of the most affected cations, since the size similarity dominates over the charge identity. The slow ligand exchange rates for Al(III) render the ion useless as a metal ion at the active sites of enzymes and provide a mechanism by which Al(III) inhibits Mg(II) dependent biochemical processes. Al(III) cation interactions with relevant bioligands have been studied in a protein-model environment in gas and aqueous phases using density functional theory methods. The protein model consists of the metal cation bound to two chosen bioligands (functional groups of the amino acid side chains, one of them being always an acetate) and water molecules interacting with the cation to complete its first coordination shell. Analogous Mg(II) complexes are calculated and compared with the Al(III) ones. Formation energies of the complexes are calculated in both phases and magnesium/aluminum exchange energies evaluated. The effect of different dielectric media is also analyzed. The presence of an acetate ligand in the binding site is found to promote both, complex formation and metal exchange reactions. In addition, buried binding sites (with low dielectric constant) of the protein favor metal exchange, whereas fully solvated environments of high dielectric constant require the presence of two anionic ligands for metal exchange to occur.

  6. The medical history of adults with complex congenital heart disease affects their social development and professional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsenty, Clement; Maury, Philippe; Blot-Souletie, Nathalie; Ladouceur, Magalie; Leobon, Bertrand; Senac, Valérie; Mondoly, Pierre; Elbaz, Meyer; Galinier, Michel; Dulac, Yves; Carrié, Didier; Acar, Philippe; Hascoet, Sebastien

    2015-11-01

    In recent decades, advances in surgery and therapeutic catheterization have steadily increased the life expectancy and prevalence of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). We assessed medical and psychosocial variables of adults with CHD, according to the disease complexity. We included, from a single-centre observational cohort study, 135 consecutive adults with CHD (median age of 40 years, interquartile range: 28.0-51.0) followed in our cardiology unit, who answered a questionnaire assessing daily activity and psychosocial functioning. Disease complexity was classified according to the Bethesda conference. Cardiac malformation complexity was simple in 61 (45.2%), moderate in 50 (37.0%) and complex in 24 (17.8%) patients. Cardiac surgery had been performed in 86.5% of moderate and complex patients. Complications (such as heart failure, arrhythmia and pulmonary hypertension) were mainly observed in the complex group (P=0.003). Physical activity was lower in the complex group (no activity in 58.8%, but sport previously contraindicated in 50% of these; P=0.03). Education level tended to be lower in the complex and moderate groups than in the simple group (respectively, 31.2% and 33.3% vs. 45.7% had passed the Baccalaureate; P=0.47). The pass rate was lower in patients with complications (P=0.037) or more than one cardiac surgery (P=0.03). In the complex group, 56.3% of patients were unemployed (P=0.048). Complexity of heart disease and medical history affect education level and employment of adults with CHD. Academic education of children with a complex defect and career counselling are important to prevent unemployment among adults with CHD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular features governing the stability and specificity of functional complex formation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis CFP-10/ESAT-6 family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightbody, Kirsty L; Ilghari, Dariush; Waters, Lorna C; Carey, Gemma; Bailey, Mark A; Williamson, Richard A; Renshaw, Philip S; Carr, Mark D

    2008-06-20

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex CFP-10/ESAT-6 family proteins play essential but poorly defined roles in tuberculosis pathogenesis. In this article we report the results of detailed spectroscopic studies of several members of the CFP-10/ESAT-6 family. This work shows that the CFP-10/ESAT-6 related proteins, Rv0287 and Rv0288, form a tight 1:1 complex, which is predominantly helical in structure and is predicted to closely resemble the complex formed by CFP-10 and ESAT-6. In addition, the Rv0287.Rv0288 complex was found to be significantly more stable to both chemical and temperature induced denaturation than CFP-10.ESAT-6. This approach demonstrated that neither Rv0287.Rv0288 nor the CFP-10.ESAT-6 complexes are destabilized at low pH (4.5), indicating that even in low pH environments, such as the mature phagosome, both Rv0287.Rv0288 and CFP-10.ESAT-6 undoubtedly function as complexes rather than individual proteins. Analysis of the structure of the CFP-10.ESAT-6 complex and optimized amino acid sequence alignments of M. tuberculosis CFP-10/ESAT-6 family proteins revealed that residues involved in the intramolecular contacts between helices are conserved across the CFP-10/ESAT-6 family, but not those involved in primarily intermolecular contacts. This analysis identified the molecular basis for the specificity and stability of complex formation between CFP-10/ESAT-6 family proteins, and indicates that the formation of functional complexes with key roles in pathogenesis will be limited to genome partners, or very closely related family members, such as Rv0287/Rv0288 and Rv3019c/Rv3020c.

  8. Estrogen and bisphenol A affect male rat enamel formation and promote ameloblast proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedeon, Katia; Loiodice, Sophia; Marciano, Clémence; Vinel, Alexia; Canivenc Lavier, Marie-Chantal; Berdal, Ariane; Babajko, Sylvie

    2014-09-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widespread endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) strongly suspected to have adverse health effects. Numerous tissues and cells are affected by BPA, and we showed recently that BPA targets include ameloblasts and enamel. We therefore investigated the effects of BPA on ameloblasts and the possible involvement of the estrogen signaling pathway. Rats were exposed daily to low-dose BPA, and developed enamel hypomineralization similar to human molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH). BPA increased ameloblast proliferation in vivo and in vitro. The proliferation of the rat dental epithelial cell line HAT-7 was also increased by estrogen (E2). Ameloblasts express ERα but not ERβ both in vivo and in vitro. The ER antagonist ICI 182,780 was used to inactivate ERα and abolished the effects of E2 on cell proliferation and transcription, but only partially reduced the effects of BPA. In conclusion, we show, for the first time, that: 1) BPA has ER-dependent and ER-independent effects on ameloblast proliferation and gene transcription; 2) the estrogen signaling pathway is involved in tooth development and the enamel mineralization process; and 3) BPA impacts preferentially amelogenesis in male rats. These results are consistent with the steroid hormones having effect on ameloblasts, raising the issues of the hormonal influence on amelogenesis and possible differences in enamel quality between sexes.

  9. THE FORMATION OF DESIGN AND ORGANIZATIONAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL DECISIONS OF THE CONSTRUCTION OF HIGH-RISE MULTIPURPOSE COMPLEXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOLSHAKOV V. I.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The formation of the many ways the construction of high-rise multipurpose complexes. Methodology. The formation of system implementation variants of creation and functioning of high-rise multipurpose complexes using combinatorial morphological analysis and synthesis. Findings. Many life cycle options of high-rise multipurpose complexes. Originality. The developed method of formation of organizational and technological solutions adapted to the conditions of the construction of high-rise multipurpose complexes, which provides the opportunity for multi-variant conditions, taking into account regulatory requirements for fire safety, insolation of buildings and premises, protection against noise and vibration, energy efficiency, infrastructure and population density of a residential district with a full range of institutions and enterprises of local significance, within existing resource constraints, to ensure the commissioning of objects with specified technical and economic characteristics. Practical value. The proposed model and the methodology allow to determine a rational variant of high-rise building according to specified criteria and constraints.

  10. N-acetyl-L-cysteine affects growth, extracellular polysaccharide production, and bacterial biofilm formation on solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Ann-Cathrin; Hermansson, Malte; Elwing, Hans

    2003-08-01

    N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) is used in medical treatment of patients with chronic bronchitis. The positive effects of NAC treatment have primarily been attributed to the mucus-dissolving properties of NAC, as well as its ability to decrease biofilm formation, which reduces bacterial infections. Our results suggest that NAC also may be an interesting candidate for use as an agent to reduce and prevent biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces in environments typical of paper mill plants. Using 10 different bacterial strains isolated from a paper mill, we found that the mode of action of NAC is chemical, as well as biological, in the case of bacterial adhesion to stainless steel surfaces. The initial adhesion of bacteria is dependent on the wettability of the substratum. NAC was shown to bind to stainless steel, increasing the wettability of the surface. Moreover, NAC decreased bacterial adhesion and even detached bacteria that were adhering to stainless steel surfaces. Growth of various bacteria, as monocultures or in a multispecies community, was inhibited at different concentrations of NAC. We also found that there was no detectable degradation of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) by NAC, indicating that NAC reduced the production of EPS, in most bacteria tested, even at concentrations at which growth was not affected. Altogether, the presence of NAC changes the texture of the biofilm formed and makes NAC an interesting candidate for use as a general inhibitor of formation of bacterial biofilms on stainless steel surfaces.

  11. Application of the Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM 6) to Potomac River NWR Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) report presents a model for projecting the effects of sea-level rise on coastal marshes and related habitats on...

  12. Accuracy of travel time distribution (TTD) models as affected by TTD complexity, observation errors, and model and tracer selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher T.; Zhang, Yong; Jurgens, Bryant C.; Starn, J. Jeffrey; Landon, Matthew K.

    2014-01-01

    Analytical models of the travel time distribution (TTD) from a source area to a sample location are often used to estimate groundwater ages and solute concentration trends. The accuracies of these models are not well known for geologically complex aquifers. In this study, synthetic datasets were used to quantify the accuracy of four analytical TTD models as affected by TTD complexity, observation errors, model selection, and tracer selection. Synthetic TTDs and tracer data were generated from existing numerical models with complex hydrofacies distributions for one public-supply well and 14 monitoring wells in the Central Valley, California. Analytical TTD models were calibrated to synthetic tracer data, and prediction errors were determined for estimates of TTDs and conservative tracer (NO3−) concentrations. Analytical models included a new, scale-dependent dispersivity model (SDM) for two-dimensional transport from the watertable to a well, and three other established analytical models. The relative influence of the error sources (TTD complexity, observation error, model selection, and tracer selection) depended on the type of prediction. Geological complexity gave rise to complex TTDs in monitoring wells that strongly affected errors of the estimated TTDs. However, prediction errors for NO3− and median age depended more on tracer concentration errors. The SDM tended to give the most accurate estimates of the vertical velocity and other predictions, although TTD model selection had minor effects overall. Adding tracers improved predictions if the new tracers had different input histories. Studies using TTD models should focus on the factors that most strongly affect the desired predictions.

  13. Enhanced Cartilaginous Tissue Formation with a Cell Aggregate-Fibrin-Polymer Scaffold Complex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Soojin Lee; Kangwon Lee; Soo Hyun Kim; Youngmee Jung

    2017-01-01

    .... Here, we developed an engineered cartilage with a cell aggregate-hydrogel-polymer scaffold complex capable of inducing the effective regeneration of cartilage tissue similar to natural cartilage...

  14. Formation of W(3)A(1) electron-transferring flavoprotein (ETF) hydroquinone in the trimethylamine dehydrogenase x ETF protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, M H; Scrutton, N S; Hille, R

    2000-04-28

    The electron-transferring flavoprotein (ETF) from Methylophilus methylotrophus (sp. W(3)A(1)) exhibits unusual oxidation-reduction properties and can only be reduced to the level of the semiquinone under most circumstances (including turnover with its physiological reductant, trimethylamine dehydrogenase (TMADH), or reaction with strong reducing reagents such as sodium dithionite). In the present study, we demonstrate that ETF can be reduced fully to its hydroquinone form both enzymatically and chemically when it is in complex with TMADH. Quantitative titration of the TMADH x ETF protein complex with sodium dithionite shows that a total of five electrons are taken up by the system, indicating that full reduction of ETF occurs within the complex. The results indicate that the oxidation-reduction properties of ETF are perturbed upon binding to TMADH, a conclusion further supported by the observation of a spectral change upon formation of the TMADH x ETF complex that is due to a change in the environment of the FAD of ETF. The results are discussed in the context of ETF undergoing a conformational change during formation of the TMADH x ETF electron transfer complex, which modulates the spectral and oxidation-reduction properties of ETF such that full reduction of the protein can take place.

  15. Signatures of natural selection on genetic variants affecting complex human traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ge; Muglia, Louis J; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Akey, Joshua M; Williams, Scott M

    2013-12-01

    It has recently been hypothesized that polygenic adaptation, resulting in modest allele frequency changes at many loci, could be a major mechanism behind the adaptation of complex phenotypes in human populations. Here we leverage the large number of variants that have been identified through genome-wide association (GWA) studies to comprehensively study signatures of natural selection on genetic variants associated with complex traits. Using population differentiation based methods, such as F ST and phylogenetic branch length analyses, we systematically examined nearly 1300 SNPs associated with 38 complex phenotypes. Instead of detecting selection signatures at individual variants, we aimed to identify combined evidence of natural selection by aggregating signals across many trait associated SNPs. Our results have revealed some general features of polygenic selection on complex traits associated variants. First, natural selection acting on standing variants associated with complex traits is a common phenomenon. Second, characteristics of selection for different polygenic traits vary both temporarily and geographically. Third, some studied traits (e.g. height and urate level) could have been the primary targets of selection, as indicated by the significant correlation between the effect sizes and the estimated strength of selection in the trait associated variants; however, for most traits, the allele frequency changes in trait associated variants might have been driven by the selection on other correlated phenotypes. Fourth, the changes in allele frequencies as a result of selection can be highly stochastic, such that, polygenic adaptation may accelerate differentiation in allele frequencies among populations, but generally does not produce predictable directional changes. Fifth, multiple mechanisms (pleiotropy, hitchhiking, etc) may act together to govern the changes in allele frequencies of genetic variants associated with complex traits.

  16. Spontaneous Binding of Molecular Oxygen at the Qo-Site of the bc1 Complex Could Stimulate Superoxide Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husen, Peter; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2016-01-01

    to drive ATP synthesis. This molecular machinery, however, is suspected to be a source of superoxide, which is toxic to the cell, even in minuscular quantities, and believed to be a factor in aging. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate here the migration of molecular oxygen in the bc1...... complex in order to identify possible reaction sites that could lead to superoxide formation. It is found, in particular, that oxygen penetrates spontaneously the Qo binding site of the bc1 complex in the presence of an intermediate semiquinone radical, thus making the Qo-site a strong candidate for being...... a center of superoxide production....

  17. Predicting permeability from the characteristic relaxation time and intrinsic formation factor of complex conductivity spectra

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Revil, A; Binley, A; Mejus, L; Kessouri, P

    2015-01-01

    .... The intrinsic formation factor can either be determined at several salinities using an electrical conductivity model or at a single salinity using a relationship between the surface and quadrature conductivities...

  18. Unique behaviour of dinitrogen-bridged dimolybdenum complexes bearing pincer ligand towards catalytic formation of ammonia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Arashiba, Kazuya; Kuriyama, Shogo; Sasada, Akira; Nakajima, Kazunari; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    It is vital to design effective nitrogen fixation systems that operate under mild conditions, and to this end we recently reported an example of the catalytic formation of ammonia using a dinitrogen...

  19. Model based multi-wavelength spectrophotometric method for calculation of formation constants of phenanthrenequinone thiosemicarbazone complexes with some metallic cations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Samadi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In traditional spectrophotometric determination of stability constants of complexation, it is necessary to find a wavelength at which only one of the components has absorbance without any spectroscopic interference of the other reaction components. In the present work, a simple multi-wavelength model-based method has been developed to determine stability constants for complexation reaction regardless of the spectra overlapping of components. Also, pure spectra and concentration profiles of all components are extracted using multi-wavelength model based method. In the present work spectrophotometric titration of several cationic metal ions with new synthetic ligand were studied in order to calculate the formation constant(s. In order to estimate the formation constants a chemometrics method, model based analysis was applied.

  20. HPV16E6-Dependent c-Fos Expression Contributes to AP-1 Complex Formation in SiHa Cells

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    Feixin Liang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, the major role of HPV16E6 in cancer has been considered to be its ability to inhibit the p53 tumor-suppressor protein, thereby thwarting p53-mediated cytotoxic responses to cellular stress signals. Here, we show that HPV16E6-dependent c-fos oncogenic protein expression contributes to AP-1 complex formation under oxidative stress in SiHa cells (HPV16-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. In addition, we examined the role of HPV16E6 in TGF-α-induced c-fos expression and found that the c-fos protein expression induced by TGF-α is HPV16E6 dependent. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that HPV16E6 contributes to AP-1 complex formation after both ligand-dependent and independent EGFR activation, suggesting a new therapeutic approach to the treatment of HPV-associated tumors.

  1. Microbial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation on Microfiltration Membranes: A Detailed Characterization Using Model Organisms with Increasing Complexity

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    L. Vanysacker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since many years, membrane biofouling has been described as the Achilles heel of membrane fouling. In the present study, an ecological assay was performed using model systems with increasing complexity: a monospecies assay using Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Escherichia coli separately, a duospecies assay using both microorganisms, and a multispecies assay using activated sludge with or without spiked P. aeruginosa. The microbial adhesion and biofilm formation were evaluated in terms of bacterial cell densities, species richness, and bacterial community composition on polyvinyldifluoride, polyethylene, and polysulfone membranes. The data show that biofouling formation was strongly influenced by the kind of microorganism, the interactions between the organisms, and the changes in environmental conditions whereas the membrane effect was less important. The findings obtained in this study suggest that more knowledge in species composition and microbial interactions is needed in order to understand the complex biofouling process. This is the first report describing the microbial interactions with a membrane during the biofouling development.

  2. Translation-competent 48S complex formation on HCV IRES requires the RNA-binding protein NSAP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Mi; Paek, Ki Young; Hong, Ka Young; Jang, Christopher J; Cho, Sungchan; Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Jong Heon; Jan, Eric; Jang, Sung Key

    2011-09-01

    Translation of many cellular and viral mRNAs is directed by internal ribosomal entry sites (IRESs). Several proteins that enhance IRES activity through interactions with IRES elements have been discovered. However, the molecular basis for the IRES-activating function of the IRES-binding proteins remains unknown. Here, we report that NS1-associated protein 1 (NSAP1), which augments several cellular and viral IRES activities, enhances hepatitis C viral (HCV) IRES function by facilitating the formation of translation-competent 48S ribosome-mRNA complex. NSAP1, which is associated with the solvent side of the 40S ribosomal subunit, enhances 80S complex formation through correct positioning of HCV mRNA on the 40S ribosomal subunit. NSAP1 seems to accomplish this positioning function by directly binding to both a specific site in the mRNA downstream of the initiation codon and a 40S ribosomal protein (or proteins).

  3. Ephemeral collision complexes mediate chemically termolecular transformations that affect system chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael P.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.

    2017-11-01

    Termolecular association reactions involve ephemeral collision complexes—formed from the collision of two molecules—that collide with a third and chemically inert 'bath gas' molecule that simply transfers energy to/from the complex. These collision complexes are generally not thought to react chemically on collision with a third molecule in the gas-phase systems of combustion and planetary atmospheres. Such 'chemically termolecular' reactions, in which all three molecules are involved in bond making and/or breaking, were hypothesized long ago in studies establishing radical chain branching mechanisms, but were later concluded to be unimportant. Here, with data from ab initio master equation and kinetic-transport simulations, we reveal that reactions of H + O2 collision complexes with other radicals constitute major kinetic pathways under common combustion situations. These reactions are also found to influence flame propagation speeds, a common measure of global reactivity. Analogous chemically termolecular reactions mediated by ephemeral collision complexes are probably of significance in various combustion and planetary environments.

  4. Rhythm perception: speeding up or slowing down affects different subcomponents of the ERP P3 complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, M.A.; Meeuwissen, Esther; Vos, Piet G.; Maes, Roald

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate, by measuring the event related potential (ERP) P3 complex, whether the perception of small accelerations differs from that of small decelerations. Participants had to decide whether the last beat of a short sequence was presented ‘too early’ or ‘too late’.

  5. Factors Affecting Grammatical and Lexical Complexity of Long-Term L2 Speakers' Oral Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahmann, Cornelia; Steinkrauss, Rasmus; Schmid, Monika S.

    2016-01-01

    There remains considerable disagreement about which factors drive second language (L2) ultimate attainment. Age of onset (AO) appears to be a robust factor, lending support to theories of maturational constraints on L2 acquisition. The present study is an investigation of factors that influence grammatical and lexical complexity at the stage of L2…

  6. How Stimulus and Task Complexity Affect Monitoring in High-Functioning Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolen, Sophieke; Vissers, Constance Th. W. M.; Egger, Jos I. M.; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined whether individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are able to update and monitor working memory representations of visual input, and whether performance is influenced by stimulus and task complexity. 15 high-functioning adults with ASD and 15 controls were asked to allocate either elements of abstract figures or…

  7. Factors Affecting Learning of Vector Math from Computer-Based Practice: Feedback Complexity and Prior Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckler, Andrew F.; Mikula, Brendon D.

    2016-01-01

    In experiments including over 450 university-level students, we studied the effectiveness and time efficiency of several levels of feedback complexity in simple, computer-based training utilizing static question sequences. The learning domain was simple vector math, an essential skill in introductory physics. In a unique full factorial design, we…

  8. Defects in the COG complex and COG-related trafficking regulators affect neuronal Golgi function.

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    Leslie K Climer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Conserved Oligomeric Golgi (COG complex is an evolutionarily conserved hetero-octameric protein complex that has been proposed to organize vesicle tethering at the Golgi apparatus. Defects in seven of the eight COG subunits are linked to Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG-type II, a family of rare diseases involving misregulation of protein glycosylation, alterations in Golgi structure, variations in retrograde trafficking through the Golgi and system-wide clinical pathologies. A troublesome aspect of these diseases are the neurological pathologies such as low IQ, microcephaly and cerebellar atrophy. The essential function of the COG complex is dependent upon interactions with other components of trafficking machinery, such as Rab-GTPases and SNAREs. COG-interacting Rabs and SNAREs have been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Defects in Golgi maintenance disrupts trafficking and processing of essential proteins, frequently associated with and contributing to compromised neuron function and human disease. Despite the recent advances in molecular neuroscience, the subcellular bases for most neurodegenerative diseases are poorly understood. This article gives an overview of the potential contributions of the COG complex and its Rab and SNARE partners in the pathogenesis of different neurodegenerative disorders.

  9. Effect of the formation of EDTA complexes on the diffusion of metal ions in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Kenji; Takahashi, Yoshio; Sato, Haruo

    2007-09-01

    The diffusion coefficients of aquo metal ions (M z+ ) and their EDTA complexes (M-EDTA ( z-4)+ ) were compared to understand the effect of EDTA complexation on the diffusion of metal ions by the diffusion cell method for Co 2+, Ga 3+, Rb +, Sr 2+, Ag +, Cd 2+, Cs +, Th 4+, UO22+, and trivalent lanthanides. Most studies about ionic diffusion in water have dealt with free ion (hydrated ion). In many cases, however, polyvalent ions are dissolved as complexed species in natural waters. Hence, we need to study the diffusion behavior of complexes in order to understand the diffusion phenomenon in natural aquifer and to measure speciation by diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT), which requires the diffusion coefficients of the species examined. For many ions, the diffusion coefficients of M-EDTA ( z-4)+ are smaller than those of hydrated ions, but the diffusion coefficients of M-EDTA ( z-4)+ are larger than those of hydrated ions for ions with high ionic potentials (Ga 3+ and Th 4+). As a result, the diffusion coefficients of EDTA complexes are similar among various metal ions. In other words, the diffusion of each ion loses its characteristics by the complexation with EDTA. Although the difference is subtle, it was also found that the diffusion coefficients of EDTA complexes increase as the ionic potential increases, which can be explained by the size of the EDTA complex of each metal ion.

  10. Co-adsorption of NH3 and SO2 on quartz : Formation of a stabilized complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grecea, M.L.; Gleeson, M.A.; van Schaik, W.; Kleyn, A.W.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the co-adsorption of NH3 and SO2 on the quartz(0 0 0 1) surface by TPD and RAIRS. A surface complex is formed as a result of various relative exposures of NH3 and SO2, irrespective of dosage order. However, the relative molecular composition of the complex is dependent on the

  11. Formation of inclusion complexes between high amylose starch and octadecyl ferulate via steam jet cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amylose can form inclusion complexes with guest molecules and represents an interesting approach to deliver bioactive molecules. However, ferulic acid has been shown not to form single helical inclusion complexes with amylose. To overcome this problem a ferulic acid ester, octadecyl ferulate, posses...

  12. Volcanostratigraphic Sequences of Kebo-Butak Formation at Bayat Geological Field Complex, Central Java Province and Yogyakarta Special Province, Indonesia

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    Sri Mulyaningsih

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI:10.17014/ijog.3.2.77-94Bayat Complex is usually used as a work field for students of geology and other geosciences. The study area is located in the southern part of the Bayat Complex. Administratively, it belongs to Central Java Province and Yogyakarta Special Province. The lithology of Bayat is very complex, composed of various kinds of igneous, sedimentary, metamorphic, and volcanic rocks. Most of previous researchers interpreted Bayat as a melange complex constructed within a subduction zone. Kebo-Butak is one of formations that forms the Bayat field complex. The formation is composed of basalt, layers of pumice, tuff, shale, and carbonaceous tuff. Most of them are known as volcanic rocks. These imply that volcanic activities are more probable to construct the geology of Bayat rather than the subducted melange complex. The geological mapping, supported by geomorphology, petrology, stratigraphy, and geological structures, had been conducted in a comprehensive manner using the deduction-induction method. The research encounters basalt, black pumice, tuff with basaltic glasses fragments, zeolite, argilic clay, as well as feldspathic- and pumice tuff. Petrographically, the basalt is composed of labradorite, olivine, clinopyroxene, and volcanic glass. Black pumice and tuff contain prismatic clinopyroxene, granular olivine, and volcanic glasses. Feldspathic tuff and pumice tuff are crystal vitric tuff due to more abundant feldspar, quartz, and amphibole than volcanic glass. Zeolite comprises chlorite and altered glasses as deep sea altered volcanic rocks. The geologic structure is very complex, the major structures are normal faults with pyrite in it. There were two deep submarine paleovolcanoes namely Tegalrejo and Baturagung. The first paleovolcano erupted effusively producing basaltic sequence, while the second one erupted explosively ejecting feldspathic-rich pyroclastic material. The two paleovolcanoes erupted simultaneously and

  13. Are gas-phase reactions of five-coordinate divalent metal ion complexes affected by coordination geometry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combariza, Marianny Y; Fermann, Justin T; Vachet, Richard W

    2004-04-19

    Five-coordinate metal complex ions of the type [ML](2+) [where M = Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and L= 1,9-bis(2-pyridyl)-2,5,8-triazanonane (DIEN-(pyr)(2)) and 1,9-bis(2-imidazolyl)-2,5,8-triazanonane (DIEN-(imi)(2)] have been reacted with acetonitrile in the gas phase using a modified quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The kinetics and thermodynamics of these reactions show that the reactivity of these complexes is affected by metal electronic structure and falls into three groups: Mn(II) and Ni(II) complexes are the most reactive, Fe(II) and Co(II) complexes exhibit intermediate reactivity, and Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes are the least reactive. To help explain the experimental trends in reactivity, theoretical calculations have been used. Due to the relatively large size of the metal complexes involved, we have utilized a two-layered ONIOM method to perform geometry optimizations and single point energy calculations for the [ML](2+) and [ML + CH(3)CN](2+) systems. The calculations show that the reactant five-coordinate complexes ([ML](2+)) exhibit structures that are slightly distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometries, while the six-coordinate complexes ([ML + CH(3)CN](2+)) have geometries that are close to octahedral. The Delta G values obtained from the ONIOM calculations roughly agree with the experimental data, but the calculations fail to completely explain the trends for the different metal complexes. The failure to consider all possible isomers as well as adequately represent pi-d interactions for the metal complexes is the likely cause of this discrepancy. Using the angular overlap model (AOM) to obtain molecular orbital stabilization energies (MOSE) also fails to reproduce the experimental trends when only sigma interactions are considered but succeeds in explaining the trends when pi interactions are taken into account. These results indicate that the pi-donor character of the CH(3)CN plays a subtle, yet important, role in

  14. Mechanism of Formation and Stabilization of Nanoparticles Produced by Heating Electrostatic Complexes of WPI-Dextran Conjugate and Chondroitin Sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qingyuan; Zhu, Xiuling; Yu, Jingyang; Karangwa, Eric; Xia, Shuqin; Zhang, Xiaoming; Jia, Chengsheng

    2016-07-13

    Protein conformational changes were demonstrated in biopolymer nanoparticles, and molecular forces were studied to elucidate the formation and stabilization mechanism of biopolymer nanoparticles. The biopolymer nanoparticles were prepared by heating electrostatic complexes of whey protein isolate (WPI)-dextran conjugate (WD) and chondroitin sulfate (ChS) above the denaturation temperature and near the isoelectric point of WPI. The internal characteristics of biopolymer nanoparticles were analyzed by several spectroscopic techniques. Results showed that grafted dextran significantly (p electrostatic interaction with WD changed the fluorescence intensity of WD regardless of heat treatment. Far-UV circular dichroism (CD) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopies confirmed that glycosylation and ionic polysaccharide did not significantly cause protein conformational changes in WD and ChS (WDC) during heat treatment. In addition, hydrophobic bonds were the major molecular force for the formation and stabilization of biopolymer nanoparticles. However, hydrogen bonds slightly influenced their formation and stabilization. Ionic bonds only promoted the formation of biopolymer nanoparticles, while disulfide bonds partly contributed to their stability. This work will be beneficial to understand protein conformational changes and molecular forces in biopolymer nanoparticles, and to prepare the stable biopolymer nanoparticles from heating electrostatic complexes of native or glycosylated protein and polysaccharide.

  15. DNA damage response clamp 9-1-1 promotes assembly of ZMM proteins for formation of crossovers and synaptonemal complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Miki; Hayashihara, Kayoko; Grubb, Jennifer T.; Bishop, Douglas K.; Shinohara, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Formation of crossovers between homologous chromosomes during meiosis is positively regulated by the ZMM proteins (also known as SIC proteins). DNA damage checkpoint proteins also promote efficient formation of interhomolog crossovers. Here, we examined, in budding yeast, the meiotic role of the heterotrimeric DNA damage response clamp composed of Rad17, Ddc1 and Mec3 (known as ‘9-1-1’ in other organisms) and a component of the clamp loader, Rad24 (known as Rad17 in other organisms). Cytological analysis indicated that the 9-1-1 clamp and its loader are not required for the chromosomal loading of RecA homologs Rad51 or Dmc1, but are necessary for the efficient loading of ZMM proteins. Interestingly, the loading of ZMM proteins onto meiotic chromosomes was independent of the checkpoint kinase Mec1 (the homolog of ATR) as well as Rad51. Furthermore, the ZMM member Zip3 (also known as Cst9) bound to the 9-1-1 complex in a cell-free system. These data suggest that, in addition to promoting interhomolog bias mediated by Rad51–Dmc1, the 9-1-1 clamp promotes crossover formation through a specific role in the assembly of ZMM proteins. Thus, the 9-1-1 complex functions to promote two crucial meiotic recombination processes, the regulation of interhomolog recombination and crossover formation mediated by ZMM. PMID:25736290

  16. Shatter Complex Formation in the Twin Craters Lava Flow, Zuni-Bandera Field, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Meerscheidt, H. C.; Bleacher, J. E.; Brand, B. D.; deWet, A.; Samuels, R.; Hamilton, C.; Garry, W. B.; Bandfield, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    . Prominent ';a';a channels travel around the bluff, leaving a 'wake' of uncovered ground on the downstream side. We interpret this shatter area to have been a branching tube network within an active sheet. The limestone bluff acted as an obstacle that caused a backup of lava within the tubes, driving episodes of shattering. The mounds likely represent earlier solidified sections between active, possibly braided, tube branches, which remained as mounds within the shatter area after the adjacent crust subsided. When lava broke out from the pressurized sheet-like lobe, it formed the ';a';a channels. This section of the flow field is interpreted using inferences from shatter ring formation, but is perhaps better termed a shatter sheet or shatter complex. This study has implications for understanding lava flow dynamics at constriction points, as well as the evolution and morphology of shatter rings.

  17. Nitrosothiol formation and protection against Fenton chemistry by nitric oxide-induced dinitrosyliron complex formation from anoxia-initiated cellular chelatable iron increase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Li, Chuanyu; Mahtani, Harry K; Du, Jian; Patel, Aashka R; Lancaster, Jack R

    2014-07-18

    Dinitrosyliron complexes (DNIC) have been found in a variety of pathological settings associated with (•)NO. However, the iron source of cellular DNIC is unknown. Previous studies on this question using prolonged (•)NO exposure could be misleading due to the movement of intracellular iron among different sources. We here report that brief (•)NO exposure results in only barely detectable DNIC, but levels increase dramatically after 1-2 h of anoxia. This increase is similar quantitatively and temporally with increases in the chelatable iron, and brief (•)NO treatment prevents detection of this anoxia-induced increased chelatable iron by deferoxamine. DNIC formation is so rapid that it is limited by the availability of (•)NO and chelatable iron. We utilize this ability to selectively manipulate cellular chelatable iron levels and provide evidence for two cellular functions of endogenous DNIC formation, protection against anoxia-induced reactive oxygen chemistry from the Fenton reaction and formation by transnitrosation of protein nitrosothiols (RSNO). The levels of RSNO under these high chelatable iron levels are comparable with DNIC levels and suggest that under these conditions, both DNIC and RSNO are the most abundant cellular adducts of (•)NO. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Reactions of guanine with methyl chloride and methyl bromide: O6-methylation versus charge transfer complex formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, P. K.; Mishra, P. C.; Suhai, S.

    Density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-31+G* and B3LYP/AUG-cc-pVDZ levels was employed to study O6-methylation of guanine due to its reactions with methyl chloride and methyl bromide and to obtain explanation as to why the methyl halides cause genotoxicity and possess mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. Geometries of the various isolated species involved in the reactions, reactant complexes (RCs), and product complexes (PCs) were optimized in gas phase. Transition states connecting the reactant complexes with the product complexes were also optimized in gas phase at the same levels of theory. The reactant complexes, product complexes, and transition states were solvated in aqueous media using the polarizable continuum model (PCM) of the self-consistent reaction field theory. Zero-point energy (ZPE) correction to total energy and the corresponding thermal energy correction to enthalpy were made in each case. The reactant complexes of the keto form of guanine with methyl chloride and methyl bromide in water are appreciably more stable than the corresponding complexes involving the enol form of guanine. The nature of binding in the product complexes was found to be of the charge transfer type (O6mG+ · X-, X dbond Cl, Br). Binding of HCl, HBr, and H2O molecules to the PCs obtained with the keto form of guanine did not alter the positions of the halide anions in the PCs, and the charge transfer character of the PCs was also not modified due to this binding. Further, the complexes obtained due to the binding of HCl, HBr, and H2O molecules to the PCs had greater stability than the isolated PCs. The reaction barriers involved in the formation of PCs were found to be quite high (?50 kcal/mol). Mechanisms of genotoxicity, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis caused by the methyl halides appear to involve charge transfer-type complex formation. Thus the mechanisms of these processes involving the methyl halides appear to be quite different from those that involve the

  19. Diversification of the AlpB Outer Membrane Protein of Helicobacter pylori Affects Biofilm Formation and Cellular Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonezawa, Hideo; Osaki, Takako; Fukutomi, Toshiyuki; Hanawa, Tomoko; Kurata, Satoshi; Zaman, Cynthia; Hojo, Fuhito; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2017-03-15

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common causes of bacterial infection in humans, and it forms biofilms on human gastric mucosal epithelium as well as on in vitro abiotic surfaces. Bacterial biofilm is critical not only for environmental survival but also for successful infection. We previously demonstrated that strain TK1402, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with duodenal and gastric ulcers, has high biofilm-forming ability in vitro relative to other strains. In addition, we showed that outer membrane vesicles (OMV) play an important role in biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to analyze which protein(s) in the OMV contributes to biofilm formation in TK1402. We obtained a spontaneous mutant strain derived from TK1402 lacking biofilm-forming ability. The protein profiles of the OMV were compared between this mutant strain and the wild type, and it was found that AlpB, an outer membrane protein in the OMV of the mutant strain, was markedly decreased compared to that of the wild type. Restoration of TK1402 alpB to the mutant strain fully recovered the ability to form biofilm. However, restoration with alpB from other strains demonstrated incomplete recovery of biofilm-forming ability. We therefore inferred that the variable region of AlpB (amino acid positions 121 to 146) was involved in TK1402 biofilm formation. In addition, diversification of the AlpB sequence was shown to affect the ability to adhere to AGS cells. These results demonstrate a new insight into the molecular mechanisms of host colonization by H. pyloriIMPORTANCE Bacterial biofilm is critical not only for environmental survival but also for successful infection. The mechanism of Helicobacter pylori adherence to host cells mediated by cell surface adhesins has been the focus of many studies, but little is known regarding factors involved in H. pylori biofilm formation. Our study demonstrated that AlpB plays an important role in biofilm formation and that this property depends

  20. FORMATION OF INFORMATIVE AND INNOVATIVE BASIS OF THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF INVESTMENT AND CONSTRUCTION COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uvarova Svetlana Sergeevna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The authors determined the trends of sustainable development of the complex and the limitations obstructing them. The dynamics of investment and construction complex is considered as a self-organization process basing on information interchange, which allowed presenting a conceptual scheme and lifecycle of the changes in the system as a process of accumulation and dynamics of different innovations. The theoretical assumptions on the essence of the management process were proved thanks to empirical analysis of control system changes of investment and construction complex basing on the model of converging development spiral.

  1. Complexity, collective effects, and modeling of ecosystems: formation, function, and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Henrik Jeldtoft; Arcaute, Elsa

    2010-05-01

    We discuss the relevance of studying ecology within the framework of Complexity Science from a statistical mechanics approach. Ecology is concerned with understanding how systems level properties emerge out of the multitude of interactions among large numbers of components, leading to ecosystems that possess the prototypical characteristics of complex systems. We argue that statistical mechanics is at present the best methodology available to obtain a quantitative description of complex systems, and that ecology is in urgent need of "integrative" approaches that are quantitative and nonstationary. We describe examples where combining statistical mechanics and ecology has led to improved ecological modeling and, at the same time, broadened the scope of statistical mechanics.

  2. Parasites affect food web structure primarily through increased diversity and complexity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Dunne

    Full Text Available Comparative research on food web structure has revealed generalities in trophic organization, produced simple models, and allowed assessment of robustness to species loss. These studies have mostly focused on free-living species. Recent research has suggested that inclusion of parasites alters structure. We assess whether such changes in network structure result from unique roles and traits of parasites or from changes to diversity and complexity. We analyzed seven highly resolved food webs that include metazoan parasite data. Our analyses show that adding parasites usually increases link density and connectance (simple measures of complexity, particularly when including concomitant links (links from predators to parasites of their prey. However, we clarify prior claims that parasites "dominate" food web links. Although parasites can be involved in a majority of links, in most cases classic predation links outnumber classic parasitism links. Regarding network structure, observed changes in degree distributions, 14 commonly studied metrics, and link probabilities are consistent with scale-dependent changes in structure associated with changes in diversity and complexity. Parasite and free-living species thus have similar effects on these aspects of structure. However, two changes point to unique roles of parasites. First, adding parasites and concomitant links strongly alters the frequency of most motifs of interactions among three taxa, reflecting parasites' roles as resources for predators of their hosts, driven by trophic intimacy with their hosts. Second, compared to free-living consumers, many parasites' feeding niches appear broader and less contiguous, which may reflect complex life cycles and small body sizes. This study provides new insights about generic versus unique impacts of parasites on food web structure, extends the generality of food web theory, gives a more rigorous framework for assessing the impact of any species on trophic

  3. Parasites affect food web structure primarily through increased diversity and complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Jennifer A.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Dobson, Andrew P.; Hechinger, Ryan F.; Kuris, Armand M.; Martinez, Neo D.; McLaughlin, John P.; Mouritsen, Kim N.; Poulin, Robert; Reise, Karsten; Stouffer, Daniel B.; Thieltges, David W.; Williams, Richard J.; Zander, Claus Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Comparative research on food web structure has revealed generalities in trophic organization, produced simple models, and allowed assessment of robustness to species loss. These studies have mostly focused on free-living species. Recent research has suggested that inclusion of parasites alters structure. We assess whether such changes in network structure result from unique roles and traits of parasites or from changes to diversity and complexity. We analyzed seven highly resolved food webs that include metazoan parasite data. Our analyses show that adding parasites usually increases link density and connectance (simple measures of complexity), particularly when including concomitant links (links from predators to parasites of their prey). However, we clarify prior claims that parasites ‘‘dominate’’ food web links. Although parasites can be involved in a majority of links, in most cases classic predation links outnumber classic parasitism links. Regarding network structure, observed changes in degree distributions, 14 commonly studied metrics, and link probabilities are consistent with scale-dependent changes in structure associated with changes in diversity and complexity. Parasite and free-living species thus have similar effects on these aspects of structure. However, two changes point to unique roles of parasites. First, adding parasites and concomitant links strongly alters the frequency of most motifs of interactions among three taxa, reflecting parasites’ roles as resources for predators of their hosts, driven by trophic intimacy with their hosts. Second, compared to free-living consumers, many parasites’ feeding niches appear broader and less contiguous, which may reflect complex life cycles and small body sizes. This study provides new insights about generic versus unique impacts of parasites on food web structure, extends the generality of food web theory, gives a more rigorous framework for assessing the impact of any species on trophic

  4. Preserved Affective Sharing But Impaired Decoding of Contextual Complex Emotions in Alcohol Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grynberg, Delphine; Maurage, Pierre; Nandrino, Jean-Louis

    2017-04-01

    Prior research has repeatedly shown that alcohol dependence is associated with a large range of impairments in psychological processes, which could lead to interpersonal deficits. Specifically, it has been suggested that these interpersonal difficulties are underpinned by reduced recognition and sharing of others' emotional states. However, this pattern of deficits remains to be clarified. This study thus aimed to investigate whether alcohol dependence is associated with impaired abilities in decoding contextual complex emotions and with altered sharing of others' emotions. Forty-one alcohol-dependent individuals (ADI) and 37 matched healthy individuals completed the Multifaceted Empathy Test, in which they were instructed to identify complex emotional states expressed by individuals in contextual scenes and to state to what extent they shared them. Compared to healthy individuals, ADI were impaired in identifying negative (Cohen's d = 0.75) and positive (Cohen's d = 0.46) emotional states but, conversely, presented preserved abilities in sharing others' emotional states. This study shows that alcohol dependence is characterized by an impaired ability to decode complex emotional states (both positive and negative), despite the presence of complementary contextual cues, but by preserved emotion-sharing. Therefore, these results extend earlier data describing an impaired ability to decode noncontextualized emotions toward contextualized and ecologically valid emotional states. They also indicate that some essential emotional competences such as emotion-sharing are preserved in alcohol dependence, thereby offering potential therapeutic levers. Copyright © 2017 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  5. Task complexity differentially affects executed and imagined movement preparation: evidence from movement-related potentials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Kranczioch

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The neural simulation theory predicts similarity for the neural mechanisms subserving overt (motor execution and covert (movement imagination actions. Here we tested this prediction for movement preparation, a key characteristic of motor cognition.High-density electroencephalogram (EEG was recorded during covert and overt actions. Movement preparation was studied with a motor priming paradigm, which varied task complexity and amount of advance information. Participants performed simple or complex sequential finger movements either overtly or covertly. Advance information was either fully predictive or partially predictive. Stimulus-locked event-related potential (ERP data showed the typical pattern of foreperiod activation for overt and covert movements. The foreperiod contingent negative variation (CNV differed between simple and complex movements only in the execution task. ERP topographies differed between execution and imagination only when advance information was fully predictive.Results suggest a differential contribution of the movement preparation network to action imagination and execution. Overt and covert actions seem to involve similar though not identical mechanisms, where overt actions engage a more fine-grained modulation of covert preparatory states.

  6. Formation of Complexes of Flavonoids and Metals. Determination of the Stoichiometry and Stability Constants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Pomilio

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The complexes between some flavonoids and metals (Co(II, Cu(II, Mn(II, Mg(II, Sn(II have been studied by spectrophotometric methods in order to determine the stoichiometry and stability constants.

  7. Interaction of phosphorus dendrimers with HIV peptides—Fluorescence studies of nano-complexes formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciepluch, Karol, E-mail: ciepluch@biol.uni.lodz.pl [Department of General Biophysics, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Lodz, Pomorska Street 141/143, 90-236 Lodz (Poland); Ionov, Maksim [Department of General Biophysics, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Lodz, Pomorska Street 141/143, 90-236 Lodz (Poland); Majoral, Jean-Pierre [Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination du CNRS (LCC), 205 Route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Muñoz-Fernández, Maria Angeles [Laboratorio InmunoBiología Molecular, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Bryszewska, Maria [Department of General Biophysics, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Lodz, Pomorska Street 141/143, 90-236 Lodz (Poland)

    2014-04-15

    In this study, dendrimers emerge as an alternative approach for delivery of HIV peptides to dendritic cells. Gp160, NH-EIDNYTNTIYTLLEE-COOH; P24, NH-DTINEEAAEW-COOH and Nef, NHGMDDPEREVLEWRFDSRLAF-COOH peptides were complexed with two types of positively charged phosphorus-containing dendrimers (CPD). Fluorescence polarization, dynamic light scattering, transmission and electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were chosen to evaluate the dendriplexes stability. We were able to show that complexes were stable in time and temperature. This is crucial for using these peptide/dendrimer nano-complexes in a new vaccine against HIV-1 infection. -- Highlights: • The phosphorus dendrimers as nanocarriers of HIV-peptides are proposed. • The complexes of dendrimers and HIV-peptides were stable in time, temperature. • The results convince that phosphorus dendrimers could be consider as anti-HIV vaccine candidates.

  8. Formation constants of Cd(II) complexes with dithizone and related compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Math, K; Freiser, H

    1974-11-01

    The stability constants of cadmium complexes of compounds related to dithizone are reported. Substitution in the ortho position lowers the stability constant. It is probable that this is a consequence of deviation from coplanarity of the phenyl and chelate rings.

  9. A Consideration of Cognitive Complexity and Primacy - Recency Effects in Impression Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronko, Michael R.; Perin, Charles T.

    1970-01-01

    Classifies subjects as cognitively simple" or cognitively complex" and notes that the latter are much nore successful at reconciling inconsistent information than are the former, whose impressions are formed by the information which makes the greatest impact. (RW)

  10. Mathematical simulation of complex formation of protein molecules allowing for their domain structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshlan, T. V.; Kulikov, K. G.

    2017-04-01

    A physical model of the interactions between protein molecules has been presented and an analysis of their propensity to form complex biological complexes has been performed. The reactivities of proteins have been studied using electrostatics methods based on the example of the histone chaperone Nap1 and histones H2A and H2B. The capability of proteins to form stable biological complexes that allow for different segments of amino acid sequences has been analyzed. The ability of protein molecules to form compounds has been considered by calculating matrices of electrostatic potential energy of amino acid residues constituting the polypeptide chain. The method of block matrices has been used in the analysis of the ability of protein molecules to form complex biological compounds.

  11. FORMATION OF BINARY COMPLEXES OF Co(II), Ni(II) AND Cu(II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    binary complex systems contain the chemical species ML, ML2, MLH, ML2H and ML2H2 for Co(II), Ni(II) and. Cu(II) in dioxan-water ... KEY WORDS: Binary species, Stability constants, Metal, Dopa, Dioxan, pH-metry ..... application in complex equilibria to decide whether inclusion of more species in the model is necessary ...

  12. Study on the mechanism of copper-ammonia complex decomposition in struvite formation process and enhanced ammonia and copper removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cong; Chai, Liyuan; Tang, Chongjian; Min, Xiaobo; Song, Yuxia; Duan, Chengshan; Yu, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Heavy metals and ammonia are difficult to remove from wastewater, as they easily combine into refractory complexes. The struvite formation method (SFM) was applied for the complex decomposition and simultaneous removal of heavy metal and ammonia. The results indicated that ammonia deprivation by SFM was the key factor leading to the decomposition of the copper-ammonia complex ion. Ammonia was separated from solution as crystalline struvite, and the copper mainly co-precipitated as copper hydroxide together with struvite. Hydrogen bonding and electrostatic attraction were considered to be the main surface interactions between struvite and copper hydroxide. Hydrogen bonding was concluded to be the key factor leading to the co-precipitation. In addition, incorporation of copper ions into the struvite crystal also occurred during the treatment process. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Complex formation of blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) anthocyanins during freeze-drying and its influence on their biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Betanzo, Julieta; Padmanabhan, Priya; Corredig, Milena; Subramanian, Jayasankar; Paliyath, Gopinadhan

    2015-03-25

    Biological activity of polyphenols is influenced by their uptake and is highly influenced by their interactions with the food matrix. This study evaluated the complex formation of blueberry polyphenols with fruit matrixes such as pectin and cellulose and their effect on the biological and antiproliferative properties of human colon cell lines HT-29 and CRL 1790. Free or complexed polyphenols were isolated by dialyzing aqueous or methanolic blueberry homogenates. Seven phenolic compounds and thirteen anthocyanins were identified in blueberry extracts. Blueberry extracts showed varying degrees of antioxidant and antiproliferative activities, as well as α-glucosidase activity. Fruit matrix containing cellulose and pectin, or purified polygalacturonic acid and cellulose, did not retain polyphenols and showed very low antioxidant or antiproliferative activities. These findings suggest that interactions between polyphenols and the food matrix may be more complex than a simple association and may play an important role in the bioefficacy of blueberry polyphenols.

  14. Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine and Nε-(carboxyethyl)lysine in tea and the factors affecting their formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Ye; He, Jialiang; Li, Fengli; Tao, Guanjun; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Shikang; Qin, Fang; Zeng, Maomao; Chen, Jie

    2017-10-01

    The levels of N ε -(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and N ε -(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL) in 99 tea samples from 14 geographic regions, including 44 green, 7 oolong, 41 black, and 7 dark teas were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The CML and CEL contents varied from 11.0 to 1701μg/g tea and 4.6 to 133μg/g tea, respectively. Dark tea presented the highest levels of CML and CEL, whereas green and oolong teas presented the lowest levels. Five kinds of catechins in the tea were also analyzed, and spearman's correlation coefficients showed that all the catechins negatively correlated with CML and CEL. The results suggested that withering, fermentation and pile fermentation may facilitate the formation of CML and CEL. Catechins might inhibit the formation of CML and CEL, but their inhibitory effects may be affected by tea processing. The results of this study are useful for the production of healthier tea. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. The affective tie that binds: Examining the contribution of positive emotions and anxiety to relationship formation in social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Charles T; Pearlstein, Sarah L; Stein, Murray B

    2017-06-01

    Individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) have difficulty forming social relationships. The prevailing clinical perspective is that negative emotions such as anxiety inhibit one's capacity to develop satisfying social connections. However, empirical findings from social psychology and affective neuroscience suggest that positive emotional experiences are fundamental to establishing new social bonds. To reconcile these perspectives, we collected repeated measurements of anxiety, positive emotions (pleasantness), and connectedness over the course of a controlled relationship formation encounter in 56 participants diagnosed with SAD (64% female; M age =23.3, SD=4.7). Participants experienced both increases in positive emotions and decreases in anxiety throughout the interaction. Change in positive emotions was the most robust predictor of subsequent increases in connectedness, as well as a greater desire to engage one's partner in future social activities, above and beyond reductions in anxiety (medium to large sized effects). Those findings suggest that anxiety-based models alone may not fully explain difficulties in relationship formation in SAD, and underscore the potential value of considering positive emotional experiences in conceptual and treatment models of SAD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Monkeypox Virus Host Factor Screen Using Haploid Cells Identifies Essential Role of GARP Complex in Extracellular Virus Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realegeno, Susan; Puschnik, Andreas S; Kumar, Amrita; Goldsmith, Cynthia; Burgado, Jillybeth; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Olson, Victoria A; Carroll, Darin; Damon, Inger; Hirata, Tetsuya; Kinoshita, Taroh; Carette, Jan E; Satheshkumar, Panayampalli Subbian

    2017-06-01

    Monkeypox virus (MPXV) is a human pathogen that is a member of the Orthopoxvirus genus, which includes Vaccinia virus and Variola virus (the causative agent of smallpox). Human monkeypox is considered an emerging zoonotic infectious disease. To identify host factors required for MPXV infection, we performed a genome-wide insertional mutagenesis screen in human haploid cells. The screen revealed several candidate genes, including those involved in Golgi trafficking, glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis, and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor biosynthesis. We validated the role of a set of vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) genes during infection, VPS51 to VPS54 (VPS51-54), which comprise the Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex. The GARP complex is a tethering complex involved in retrograde transport of endosomes to the trans -Golgi apparatus. Our data demonstrate that VPS52 and VPS54 were dispensable for mature virion (MV) production but were required for extracellular virus (EV) formation. For comparison, a known antiviral compound, ST-246, was used in our experiments, demonstrating that EV titers in VPS52 and VPS54 knockout (KO) cells were comparable to levels exhibited by ST-246-treated wild-type cells. Confocal microscopy was used to examine actin tail formation, one of the viral egress mechanisms for cell-to-cell dissemination, and revealed an absence of actin tails in VPS52KO- or VPS54KO-infected cells. Further evaluation of these cells by electron microscopy demonstrated a decrease in levels of wrapped viruses (WVs) compared to those seen with the wild-type control. Collectively, our data demonstrate the role of GARP complex genes in double-membrane wrapping of MVs necessary for EV formation, implicating the host endosomal trafficking pathway in orthopoxvirus infection. IMPORTANCE Human monkeypox is an emerging zoonotic infectious disease caused by Monkeypox virus (MPXV). Of the two MPXV clades, the Congo Basin strain is associated with severe

  17. Complexities of Isfahani or Hindi style and Backgrounds of its Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GH Shiri

    2010-05-01

    All of these characteristics have been forgotten in dominant simple, traditional, honest and imitating culture of society. Of course, the influence of circular criticisms in coffee houses, the dialect of Persian speakers of India, and the creativity of a number of poets of Isfahan and its suroundings on the formation of this style should not be forgotten.

  18. Complex formation in mixtures of lysozyme-stabilized emulsions and human saliva

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silletti, E.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Norde, W.; Aken, van G.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the interaction between human unstimulated saliva and lysozyme-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions (10 wt/wt% oil phase, 10 mM NaCl, pH 6.7), to reveal the driving force for flocculation of these emulsions. Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) showed formation of

  19. A Case Study of Teacher Personal Practice Assessment Theories and Complexities of Implementing Formative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Box, Cathy; Skoog, Gerald; Dabbs, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    The value and effectiveness of formative assessment in the classroom has gained an increasing amount of attention during the past decade, especially since the publication of seminal work by Black and Wiliam titled "Assessment and Classroom Learning." Since that time, there has been a renewed interest in describing and evaluating teacher…

  20. Using Microcomputers to Format Large and Complex Manuscripts: Myth or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatro, Donna E.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Cornell University computer services and its programs to assist graduate students in editing and formatting their theses and dissertations. Discusses the discontinuance of its CUTHESIS software on the mainframe computer because of the proliferation of microcomputing resources. Examines the cost of the change and the process through which…

  1. Academic status does not affect outcome following complex hepato-pancreato-biliary procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Maria S; Yang, Jie; Groves, Donald; Yin, Donglei; Cagino, Kristen; Talamini, Mark; Pryor, Aurora

    2017-11-03

    There is a growing debate regarding outcomes following complex hepato-pancreato-biliary (HPB) procedures. The purpose of our study is to examine if facility type has any impact on complications, readmission rates, emergency department (ED) visit rates, and length of stay (LOS) for patients undergoing HPB surgery. The SPARCS administrative database was used to identify patients undergoing complex HPB procedures between 2012 and 2014 in New York. Univariate generalized linear mixed models were fit to estimate the marginal association between outcomes such as overall/severe complication rates, 30-day and 1-year readmission rates, 30-day and 1-year ED-visit rates, and potential risk factors. Univariate linear mixed models were used to estimate the marginal association between possible risk factors and LOS. Facility type, as well as any variables found to be significant in our univariate analysis (p = 0.05), was further included in the multivariable regression models. There were 4122 complex HPB procedures performed. Academic facilities were more likely to have a higher hospital volume (p academic facilities were less likely to have coexisting comorbidities; however, they were more likely to have metastatic cancer and/or liver disease (p = 0.0114, academic facilities experienced higher overall complication rates, and higher severe complication rates, when compared to those at academic facilities (p academic facility. No significant difference was found when comparing the outcomes of academic and non-academic facilities, after adjusting for age, gender, race, region, insurance, and hospital volume. Patients from academic facilities were more likely to be readmitted within the first 30-days after surgery.

  2. Molecular adsorption of small alkanes on a PdO(101) thin film: Evidence of sigma-complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Jason F; Hakanoglu, Can; Hawkins, Jeffery M; Asthagiri, Aravind

    2010-01-14

    We investigated the molecular adsorption of methane, ethane, and propane on a PdO(101) thin film using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The TPD data reveal that each of the alkanes adsorbs into a low-coverage molecular state on PdO(101) in which the binding is stronger than that for alkanes physically adsorbed on Pd(111). Analysis of the TPD data using limiting values of the desorption prefactors predicts that the alkane binding energies on PdO(101) increase linearly with increasing chain length, but that the resulting line extrapolates to a nonzero value between about 22 and 26 kJ/mol at zero chain length. This constant offset implies that a roughly molecule-independent interaction contributes to the alkane binding energies for the molecules studied. DFT calculations predict that the small alkanes bind on PdO(101) by forming dative bonds with coordinatively unsaturated Pd atoms. The resulting adsorbed species are analogous to alkane sigma-complexes in that the bonding involves electron donation from C-H sigma bonds to the Pd center as well as backdonation from the metal, which weakens the C-H bonds. The binding energies predicted by DFT lie in a range from 16 to 24 kJ/mol, in good agreement with the constant offsets estimated from the TPD data. We conclude that both the dispersion interaction and the formation of sigma-complexes contribute to the binding of small alkanes on PdO(101), and estimate that sigma-complex formation accounts for between 30% and 50% of the total binding energy for the molecules studied. The predicted weakening of C-H bonds resulting from sigma-complex formation may help to explain the high activity of PdO surfaces toward alkane activation.

  3. How Linearity and Structural Complexity Interact and Affect the Recognition of Italian Derived Words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgers, Franca Ferrari; Kacinik, Natalie

    2017-02-01

    The majority of words in most languages consist of derived poly-morphemic words but a cross-linguistic review of the literature (Amenta and Crepaldi in Front Psychol 3:232-243, 2012) shows a contradictory picture with respect to how such words are represented and processed. The current study examined the effects of linearity and structural complexity on the processing of Italian derived words. Participants performed a lexical decision task on three types of prefixed and suffixed words and nonwords differing in the complexity of their internal structure. The processing of these words was indeed found to vary according to the nature of the affixes, the order in which they appear, and the type of information the affix encodes. The results thus indicate that derived words are not a uniform class and the best account of these findings appears to be a constraint-based or probabilistic multi-route processing model (e.g., Kuperman et al. in Lang Cogn Process 23:1089-1132, 2008; J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 35:876-895, 2009; J Mem Lang 62:83-97, 2010).

  4. The Arabidopsis thaliana elongator complex subunit 2 epigenetically affects root development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuebin; Tian, Huiyu; Li, Hongjiang; Yu, Qianqian; Wang, Lei; Friml, Jiri; Ding, Zhaojun

    2015-08-01

    The elongator complex subunit 2 (ELP2) protein, one subunit of an evolutionarily conserved histone acetyltransferase complex, has been shown to participate in leaf patterning, plant immune and abiotic stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, its role in root development was explored. Compared to the wild type, the elp2 mutant exhibited an accelerated differentiation of its root stem cells and cell division was more active in its quiescent centre (QC). The key transcription factors responsible for maintaining root stem cell and QC identity, such as AP2 transcription factors PLT1 (PLETHORA1) and PLT2 (PLETHORA2), GRAS transcription factors such as SCR (SCARECROW) and SHR (SHORT ROOT) and WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX5 transcription factor WOX5, were all strongly down-regulated in the mutant. On the other hand, expression of the G2/M transition activator CYCB1 was substantially induced in elp2. The auxin efflux transporters PIN1 and PIN2 showed decreased protein levels and PIN1 also displayed mild polarity alterations in elp2, which resulted in a reduced auxin content in the root tip. Either the acetylation or methylation level of each of these genes differed between the mutant and the wild type, suggesting that the ELP2 regulation of root development involves the epigenetic modification of a range of transcription factors and other developmental regulators. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  5. Chromium(IV)–Peroxo Complex Formation and Its Nitric Oxide Dioxygenase Reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Atsutoshi; Han, Jung Eun; Cho, Jaeheung; Kubo, Minoru; Ogura, Takashi; Siegler, Maxime A.; Karlin, Kenneth D.; Nam, Wonwoo

    2012-01-01

    The O2 and NO reactivity of a Cr(II) complex bearing a 12-membered tetraazamacrocyclic TMC ligand, [CrII(12-TMC)(Cl)]+ (1), and the NO reactivity of its peroxo derivative, [CrIV(12-TMC)(O2)(Cl)]+ (2), are described. By contrast to the previously reported Cr(III)-superoxo complex, [CrIII(14-TMC)(O2)(Cl)]+, a Cr(IV)-peroxo complex (2) is formed in the reaction of 1 and O2. Full spectroscopic and X-ray analysis reveals that 2 possesses a side-on η2-peroxo ligation. A quantitative reaction of 2 with NO affords a reduction in Cr oxidation state and production of a Cr(III)-nitrato complex, [CrIII(12-TMC)(NO3)(Cl)]+ (3). The latter is suggested to form via a Cr(III)-peroxynitrite intermediate. A Cr(II)-nitrosyl complex, [CrII(12-TMC)(NO)(Cl)]+ (4), derived from 1 andNO could also be synthesized; however, it does not react with O2. PMID:22950528

  6. The pyrrolidinoindoline alkaloid Psm2 inhibits platelet aggregation and thrombus formation by affecting PI3K/Akt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xing-Li; Su, Wen; Wang, Ying; Wang, Yue-Hu; Ming, Xin; Kong, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Psm2, one of the pyrrolidinoindoline alkaloids isolated from whole Selaginella moellendorffii plants, has shown a potent antiplatelet activity. In this study, we further evaluated the antiplatelet effects of Psm2, and elucidated the underlying mechanisms. Human platelet aggregation in vitro and rat platelet aggregation ex vivo were investigated. Agonist-induced platelet aggregation was measured using a light transmission aggregometer. The antithrombotic effects of Psm2 were evaluated in arteriovenous shunt thrombosis model in rats. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the antiplatelet activity of Psm2, ELISAs, Western blotting and molecular docking were performed. The bleeding risk of Psm2 administration was assessed in a mouse tail cutting model, and the cytotoxicity of Psm2 was measured with MTT assay in EA.hy926 cells. Psm2 dose-dependently inhibited human platelet aggregation induced by ADP, U4619, thrombin and collagen with IC50 values of 0.64, 0.37, 0.35 and 0.87 mg/mL, respectively. Psm2 (1, 3, 10 mg/kg) administered to rats significantly inhibited platelet aggregation ex vivo induced by ADP. Psm2 (1, 3, 10 mg/mL, iv) administered to rats with the A-V shunt dose-dependently decreased the thrombus formation. Psm2 inhibited platelet adhesion to fibrinogen and collagen with IC50 values of 84.5 and 96.5 mg/mL, respectively, but did not affect the binding of fibrinogen to GPIIb/IIIa. Furthermore, Psm2 inhibited AktSer473 phosphorylation, but did not affect MAPK signaling and Src kinase activation. Molecular docking showed that Psm2 bound to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase β (PI3Kβ) with a binding free energy of -13.265 kcal/mol. In addition, Psm2 did not cause toxicity in EA.hy926 cells and produced only slight bleeding in a mouse tail cutting model. Psm2 inhibits platelet aggregation and thrombus formation by affecting PI3K/Akt signaling. Psm2 may be a lead compound or drug candidate that could be developed for the prevention or treatment of thrombotic

  7. Sorting it out: bedding particle size and nesting material processing method affect nest complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Junker, Amy; Morin, Amelia; Pritchett-Corning, Kathleen; Gaskill, Brianna N

    2017-04-01

    As part of routine husbandry, an increasing number of laboratory mice receive nesting material in addition to standard bedding material in their cages. Nesting material improves health outcomes and physiological performance in mice that receive it. Providing usable nesting material uniformly and efficiently to various strains of mice remains a challenge. The aim of this study was to determine how bedding particle size, method of nesting material delivery, and processing of the nesting material before delivery affected nest building in mice of strong (BALB/cAnNCrl) and weak (C3H/HeNCrl) gathering abilities. Our data suggest that processing nesting material through a grinder in conjunction with bedding material, although convenient for provision of bedding with nesting material 'built-in', negatively affects the integrity of the nesting material and subsequent nest-building outcomes. We also found that C3H mice, previously thought to be poor nest builders, built similarly scored nests to those of BALB/c mice when provided with unprocessed nesting material. This was true even when nesting material was mixed into the bedding substrate. We also observed that when nesting material was mixed into the bedding substrate, mice of both strains would sort their bedding by particle size more often than if it were not mixed in. Our findings support the utility of the practice of distributing nesting material mixed in with bedding substrate, but not that of processing the nesting material with the bedding in order to mix them.

  8. Laparoscopic Cryoablation Of Small Renal Tumors – Does Anatomical Tumor Complexity Affect Treatment Outcome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tommy Kjærgaard; Østraat, Øyvind; Andersen, Gratien

    status: 1.2 (95%CI 1.0;1.3). Mean tumor size: 27 mm (95%CI 26;29). Mean follow-up time: 24 months (95%CI 20;27). A total of 16 patients (13%) were previously diagnosed with renal cancer and the majority of these patients had previously undergone nephrectomy. PADUA-score was found to be low or moderate......Background: Renal cryoablation is a valid treatment option for localized pT1a renal tumors and has been the modality of choice at Aarhus University Hospital since 2005. Anatomical tumor classification systems such as PADUA and RENAL scores were initially introduced as tools to evaluate complication...... compared to patients with a less anatomical complex tumor when treated with laparoscopic cryoablation. Material and methods: A retrospective review of Aarhus Cryoablation Register identified 120 patients with a single biopsy-verified pT1a renal tumor, treated with primary laparoscopic cryoablation between...

  9. Formation of Angerh Minue Cave in Asmari Karst Complex of Zagros Mountain, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassem Ghaderi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Angerh Minue Cave, located in one km from west Angerh village which is about 97 km far from Shiraz of Fars Province, the Cultural Capital of Iran. The main entrance of the cave is at an altitude of 2430 having a depth of 176 m and length 776 m. It developed along the bedding of limestone layers. Asmari Formation is the host rock of the Angerh Minue cave. Mountainous region of Zagros, where the Angerh Minue cave is located could be referred as seismic region due to the presence of various basement faults, some of which are still active. In the present study, the geological process behind the formation of Angerh Minue Cave has been tried to analyze.

  10. Order formation processes of complex systems including different parity order parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Yoichiro; Suzuki, Masuo; Okamura, Soichiro

    2014-06-01

    In the present study, we focus on the parity of the order parameters and clarify the order formation process in a system including two order parameters. Each order parameter shows different parity under a gauge transformation, namely even and odd order parameters. For example, in a spin-glass model, the even order parameter corresponds to the spin-glass order parameter while the odd one corresponds to the magnetization. We introduce phenomenologically a set of Langevin equations to express the ordering process under a white Gaussian noise. Using two kinds of Fokker-Planck equations, we analyze the order formation process and the entropy production. Furthermore, we show the noise dependence of the onset time.

  11. Exploring the formation of multiple layer hydrates for a complex pharmaceutical compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin S; Siepmann, J Ilja; Xu, Wei; Kiang, Y-H; Sheth, Agam R; Karaborni, Sami

    2009-04-30

    The pharmaceutical compound A, 3-{2-oxo-3-[3-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro[1,8]naphthyridin-2-yl)propyl]imidazolidin-1-yl}-3(S)-(6-methoxypyridin-3-yl)propionic acid, is known to exist in five different crystalline forms that differ in the hydration state ranging from the anhydrous desolvate over hemihydrate, dihydrate, and tetrahydrate forms to the pentahydrate. The formation of the higher hydrates and the concomitant lattice expansion leads to undesirable tablet cracking at higher humidities. In this work, particle-based simulation techniques are used to explore the hydrate formation of compound A as a function of humidity. It is found that a simulation strategy employing Monte Carlo simulations in the isobaric-isothermal and Gibbs ensembles and transferable force fields, which are not parametrized against any experimental data for compound A, is able to yield satisfactory crystal structures for the anhydrate and pentahydrate and to predict the existence of all five hydrates.

  12. The Anaphase-Promoting Complex (APC ubiquitin ligase affects chemosensory behavior in C. elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of fundamental aspects of neurobiological function has been linked to the ubiquitin signaling system (USS, which regulates the degradation and activity of proteins and is catalyzed by E1, E2, and E3 enzymes. The Anaphase-Promoting Complex (APC is a multi-subunit E3 ubiquitin ligase that controls diverse developmental and signaling processes in post-mitotic neurons; however, potential roles for the APC in sensory function have yet to be explored. In this study, we examined the effect of the APC ubiquitin ligase on chemosensation in Caenorhabditis elegans by testing chemotaxis to the volatile odorants, diacetyl, pyrazine, and isoamyl alcohol, to which wild-type worms are attracted. Animals with loss of function mutations in either of two alleles (g48 and ye143 of the gene encoding the APC subunit EMB-27 APC6 showed increased chemotaxis towards diacetyl and pyrazine, odorants sensed by AWA neurons, but exhibited normal chemotaxis to isoamyl alcohol, which is sensed by AWC neurons. The statistically significant increase in chemotaxis in the emb-27 APC6 mutants suggests that the APC inhibits AWA-mediated chemosensation in C. elegans. Increased chemotaxis to pyrazine was also seen with mutants lacking another essential APC subunit, MAT-2 APC1; however, mat-2 APC1 mutants exhibited wild type responses to diacetyl. The difference in responsiveness of these two APC subunit mutants may be due to differential strength of these hypomorphic alleles or may indicate the presence of functional sub-complexes of the APC at work in this process. These findings are the first evidence for APC-mediated regulation of chemosensation and lay the groundwork for further studies aimed at identifying the expression levels, function, and targets of the APC in specific sensory neurons. Because of the similarity between human and C. elegans nervous systems, the role of the APC in sensory neurons may also advance our understanding of human sensory function and

  13. In vivo protein interactions and complex formation in the Pectobacterium atrosepticum subtype I-F CRISPR/Cas System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Richter

    Full Text Available Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR and their associated proteins (Cas; CRISPR associated are a bacterial defense mechanism against extra-chromosomal elements. CRISPR/Cas systems are distinct from other known defense mechanisms insofar as they provide acquired and heritable immunity. Resistance is accomplished in multiple stages in which the Cas proteins provide the enzymatic machinery. Importantly, subtype-specific proteins have been shown to form complexes in combination with small RNAs, which enable sequence-specific targeting of foreign nucleic acids. We used Pectobacterium atrosepticum, a plant pathogen that causes soft-rot and blackleg disease in potato, to investigate protein-protein interactions and complex formation in the subtype I-F CRISPR/Cas system. The P. atrosepticum CRISPR/Cas system encodes six proteins: Cas1, Cas3, and the four subtype specific proteins Csy1, Csy2, Csy3 and Cas6f (Csy4. Using co-purification followed by mass spectrometry as well as directed co-immunoprecipitation we have demonstrated complex formation by the Csy1-3 and Cas6f proteins, and determined details about the architecture of that complex. Cas3 was also shown to co-purify all four subtype-specific proteins, consistent with its role in targeting. Furthermore, our results show that the subtype I-F Cas1 and Cas3 (a Cas2-Cas3 hybrid proteins interact, suggesting a protein complex for adaptation and a role for subtype I-F Cas3 proteins in both the adaptation and interference steps of the CRISPR/Cas mechanism.

  14. Molecular dynamics of formation of TD lesioned DNA complexed with repair enzyme - onset of the enzymatic repair process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinak, Miroslav [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-12-01

    To describe the first step of the enzymatic repair process (formation of complex enzyme-DNA), in which the thymine dimer (TD) part is removed from DNA, the 500 picosecond (ps) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of TD lesioned DNA and part of repair enzyme cell (inclusive of catalytic center - Arg-22, Glu-23, Arg-26 and Thr-2) was performed. TD is UV originated lesion in DNA and T4 Endonuclease V is TD specific repair enzyme. Both molecules were located in the same simulation cell and their relative movement was examined. During the simulation the research was focused on the role of electrostatic energy in formation of complex enzyme-DNA. It is found, that during the first 100 ps of MD, the part of enzyme approaches the DNA surface at the TD lesion, interacts extensively by electrostatic and van der Walls interactions with TD part of DNA and forms complex that lasts stabile for 500 ps of MD. In the beginning of MD, the positive electrostatic interaction energy between part of enzyme and TD ({approx} +10 kcal/mol) drives enzyme towards the DNA molecule. Water-mediated hydrogen bonds between enzyme and DNA help to keep complex stabile. As a reference, the MD simulation of the identical system with native DNA molecule (two native thymines (TT) instead of TD) was performed. In this system the negative electrostatic interaction energy between part of enzyme and TT ({approx} -11 kcal/mol), in contrary to the positive one in the system with TD, doesn't drive enzyme towards DNA and complex is not formed. (author)

  15. Catalytic C-N, C-O, and C-S Bond Formation Promoted by Organoactinide Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Moris S.

    Throughout this last decade, we have witnessed impressively how the chemistry of electrophilic d0/fn actinides has been prospering either in their new synthetic approaches reaching very interesting compounds or in their use in stoichiometric and catalytic reactions leading to high levels of complexity. The unique rich and complex features of organoactinides prompted the development of this field toward catalysis in demanding chemical transformations. In this review, we present a brief and selective survey of the recent developments in homogenous catalysis of organoactinide complexes, especially toward the formation of new C-N, C-O, and C-S bonds. We start by presenting the synthesis and characterization of the corresponding organoactinide complexes, followed by the homogeneous catalytic chemical transformations that include the hydroamination of terminal alkynes, the polymerization of ɛ-caprolactone and L-lactide, the reduction of azides and hydrazines by high-valent organouranium complexes, the hydrothiolation of terminal alkynes, and the catalytic Tishchenko reaction. For each reaction, the scope and the thermodynamic, kinetic, and mechanistic aspects are presented.

  16. Hexagonal wheel formation through the hydrogen-bonded assembly of cobalt Pacman complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeland, James W; White, Fraser J; Love, Jason B

    2011-04-14

    A cobalt aquo-hydroxo complex of a ditopic Schiff-base pyrrole-crown ether macrocycle has been prepared and forms a rigid Pacman-clefted structure that assembles through hydrogen-bonding into a hexagonal wheel motif in the solid state.

  17. Complexity in word-formation processes in New Varieties of South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the article, the focus is on lexical innovation and morphologically complex forms in a corpus of approximately 703 300 words from the Vaal Weekly community newspaper. The data are analysed according to semantic domains and morphological structure. To determine if SAE has gone beyond Phase three of Schneider's ...

  18. Mixed ligand complex formation of Fe with boric acid and typical N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    with boric acid and typical N-donor multidentate ligands. G N MUKHERJEE* and ANSUMAN DAS. Department of Chemistry, Calcutta University, University College of ... borate complexes through pseudo substitution reactions, in which Co–O bonds remain ... acid–base, ion exchange and complexometric titrations5.

  19. Imaging inclusion complex formation in starch granules using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manca, Marianna; Woortman, Albert J. J.; Loos, Katja; Loi, Maria A.

    The tendency of amylose to form inclusion complexes with guest molecules has been an object of wide interest due to its fundamental role in food processing. Here we investigated the features of starch granules from several botanical sources using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and

  20. Viewbrics: Formative Assessment of Complex Skills with Video-Enhanced Rubrics (VER) in Dutch Secondary Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusman, Ellen; Nadolski, Rob; Boon, Jo; Ackermans, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    To learn complex skills, like collaboration, learners need to acquire a concrete and consistent mental model of what it means to master this skill. If learners know their current mastery level and know their targeted mastery level, they can better determine their subsequent learning activities.

  1. Mouse Sycp1 functions in synaptonemal complex assembly, meiotic recombination., and XY body formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de F.A.T.; Boer, de E.; Bosch, M.; Baarends, W.M.; Ooms, M.; Yuan, L.; Liu, J.G.; Zeeland, van A.A.; Heyting, C.; Pastink, A.

    2005-01-01

    In meiotic prophase, synaptonemal complexes (SCs) closely appose homologous chromosomes (homologs) along their length. SCs are assembled from two axial elements (AEs), one along each homolog, which are connected by numerous transverse filaments (TFs). We disrupted the mouse gene encoding TF protein

  2. Nucleophilicity and P-C bond formation reactions of a terminal phosphanido iridium complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serrano, Á.L.; Casado, M.A.; Ciriano, M.A.; de Bruin, B.; López, J.A.; Tejel, C.

    2016-01-01

    The diiridium complex [{Ir(ABPN(2))(CO)}(2)(μ-CO)] (1; [ABPN(2)]- = [(allyl)B(Pz)(2)(CH(2)PPh(2))]-) reacts with diphenylphosphane affording [Ir(ABPN(2))(CO)(H) (PPh(2))] (2), the product of the oxidative addition of the P-H bond to the metal. DFT studies revealed a large contribution of the

  3. [A complexity analysis of Chinese herbal property theory: the multiple formations of herbal property].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Rui; Zhang, Bing

    2012-11-01

    Chinese herbal property theory (CHPT) is the fundamental characteristic of Chinese materia medica different from modern medicines. It reflects the herbal properties associated with efficacy and formed the early framework of four properties and five flavors in Shennong's Classic of Materia Medica. After the supplement and improvement of CHPT in the past thousands of years, it has developed a theory system including four properties, five flavors, meridian entry, direction of medicinal actions (ascending, descending, floating and sinking) and toxicity. However, because of the influence of philosophy about yin-yang theory and five-phase theory and the difference of cognitive approach and historical background at different times, CHPT became complex. One of the complexity features was the multiple methods for determining herbal property, which might include the inference from herbal efficacy, the thought of Chinese Taoist School and witchcraft, the classification thinking according to manifestations, etc. Another complexity feature was the multiselection associations between herbal property and efficacy, which indicated that the same property could be inferred from different kinds of efficacy. This paper analyzed these complexity features and provided the importance of cognitive approaches and efficacy attributes corresponding to certain herbal property in the study of CHPT.

  4. Formation of polymeric assemblies of six-coordinate metal complexes with mixed bridges of dicarboxylato-azido moieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyadh M. Ahmed

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available New biscarboxylato zwitterionic ligands, namely bis(N-carboxylatoethyl-4,4′-dipyridinum L1 and bis(N-carboxylatopropyl--4,4′-dipyridinum L2, were synthesized from the reaction of 4,4′-dipyridine with 3-bromopropanoic acid and 4-bromobutanoic acid, respectively. The reaction of these ligands and the azido coligand with some metal ions resulted in the formation of polymeric complexes of general formulae [Cr2(Ln(N34]Cl2·H2O and [M2(Ln(N34] xH2O, where (M=Mn (II, Fe(II, Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II, Zn(II and Cd(II; n=1, 2; x=1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, and 1, respectively. The oxygens of the carboxylato group are coordinated to the metal ion in a bidentate fashion. The mode of bonding and overall geometry of the complexes were determined through IR, UV–VIS, NMR and mass spectral studies, magnetic moment measurements, elemental analysis, metal content, chloride content and conductance. These studies revealed the formation of polymeric assemblies of six-coordinate complexes with distorted octahedral geometries about metal centers.

  5. Concomitant carboxylate and oxalate formation from the activation of CO{sub 2} by a thorium(III) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Formanuik, Alasdair; Ortu, Fabrizio; Mills, David P. [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Inman, Christopher J. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom); Kerridge, Andrew [Department of Chemistry, Lancaster University (United Kingdom); Castro, Ludovic; Maron, Laurent [LPCNO, CNRA et INSA, Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France)

    2016-12-12

    Improving our comprehension of diverse CO{sub 2} activation pathways is of vital importance for the widespread future utilization of this abundant greenhouse gas. CO{sub 2} activation by uranium(III) complexes is now relatively well understood, with oxo/carbonate formation predominating as CO{sub 2} is readily reduced to CO, but isolated thorium(III) CO{sub 2} activation is unprecedented. We show that the thorium(III) complex, [Th(Cp''){sub 3}] (1, Cp''={C_5H_3(SiMe_3)_2-1,3}), reacts with CO{sub 2} to give the mixed oxalate-carboxylate thorium(IV) complex [{Th(Cp'')_2[κ"2-O_2C{C_5H_3-3,3'-(SiMe_3)_2}]}{sub 2}(μ-κ{sup 2}:κ{sup 2}-C{sub 2}O{sub 4})] (3). The concomitant formation of oxalate and carboxylate is unique for CO{sub 2} activation, as in previous examples either reduction or insertion is favored to yield a single product. Therefore, thorium(III) CO{sub 2} activation can differ from better understood uranium(III) chemistry. (copyright 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA.)

  6. Dynamic titration: determination of dissociation constants for noncovalent complexes in multiplexed format using HPLC-ESI-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frycák, Petr; Schug, Kevin A

    2008-03-01

    With recent growth in fields such as life sciences and supramolecular chemistry, there has been an ever increasing need for high-throughput methods that would permit determination of binding affinities for noncovalent complexes of various host-guest systems. These are traditionally measured by titration experiments where concentration-dependent signals of species participating in solution-based binding equilibria are monitored by methods such as UV-vis spectrophotometry, calorimetry, or nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Here we present a new titration technique that unifies and allows chromatographic separation of guests with determination of dissociation constants by electrospray mass spectrometry in a multiplexed format. A theoretical model has been derived that describes the complex formation for the guests eluted from a chromatographic column when hosts are admixed postcolumn. The model takes possible competition equilibria into account; i.e., it can deal with unresolved peaks of guests with the possible addition of multiple hosts in one experiment. This on-line workflow makes determination of binding affinities for large libraries of compounds possible. The potential of the method is demonstrated on the determination of dissociation constants for complexes of beta- and gamma-cyclodextrins with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs ibuprofen, naproxen, and flurbiprofen.

  7. The Thermodynamic Mechanism of Peptide–MHC Class II Complex Formation Is a Determinant of Susceptibility to HLA-DM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Megan; Hoffman, Megan; Castellini, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Peptides bind MHC class II molecules through a thermodynamically nonadditive process consequent to the flexibility of the reactants. Currently, how the specific outcome of this binding process affects the ensuing epitope selection needs resolution. Calorimetric assessment of binding thermodynamics for hemagglutinin 306–319 peptide variants to the human MHC class II HLA-DR1 (DR1) and a mutant DR1 reveals that peptide/DR1 complexes can be formed with different enthalpic and entropic contributions. Complexes formed with a smaller entropic penalty feature circular dichroism spectra consistent with a non–compact form, and molecular dynamics simulation shows a more flexible structure. The opposite binding mode, compact and less flexible, is associated with greater entropic penalty. These structural variations are associated with rearrangements of residues known to be involved in HLA-DR (DM) binding, affinity of DM for the complex, and complex susceptibility to DM-mediated peptide exchange. Thus, the thermodynamic mechanism of peptide binding to DR1 correlates with the structural rigidity of the complex, and DM mediates peptide exchange by “sensing” flexible complexes in which the aforementioned residues are rearranged at a higher frequency than in more rigid ones. PMID:26116504

  8. The Thermodynamic Mechanism of Peptide-MHC Class II Complex Formation Is a Determinant of Susceptibility to HLA-DM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, Andrea; Templeton, Megan; Hoffman, Megan; Castellini, Margaret J

    2015-08-01

    Peptides bind MHC class II molecules through a thermodynamically nonadditive process consequent to the flexibility of the reactants. Currently, how the specific outcome of this binding process affects the ensuing epitope selection needs resolution. Calorimetric assessment of binding thermodynamics for hemagglutinin 306-319 peptide variants to the human MHC class II HLA-DR1 (DR1) and a mutant DR1 reveals that peptide/DR1 complexes can be formed with different enthalpic and entropic contributions. Complexes formed with a smaller entropic penalty feature circular dichroism spectra consistent with a non-compact form, and molecular dynamics simulation shows a more flexible structure. The opposite binding mode, compact and less flexible, is associated with greater entropic penalty. These structural variations are associated with rearrangements of residues known to be involved in HLA-DR (DM) binding, affinity of DM for the complex, and complex susceptibility to DM-mediated peptide exchange. Thus, the thermodynamic mechanism of peptide binding to DR1 correlates with the structural rigidity of the complex, and DM mediates peptide exchange by "sensing" flexible complexes in which the aforementioned residues are rearranged at a higher frequency than in more rigid ones. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Light-scattering study of polyelectrolyte complex formation between anionic and cationic nanogels in an aqueous salt-free system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Masafumi; Ogawa, Kazuyoshi; Kokufuta, Etsuo

    2006-08-15

    We studied complex formation in an aqueous salt-free system (pH approximately 3 and at 25 degrees C) between nanogel particles having opposite charges. Anionic gel (AG) and cationic gel (CG) particles consist of lightly cross-linked N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) copolymers with 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid and with 1-vinylimidazole, respectively. The number of charges per particle was -4490 for AG and +20 300 for CG, as estimated from their molar masses (3.33 MD for AG and 11.7 MD for CG) by static light scattering (SLS) and their charge densities (1.35 mmol/g for AG and 1.74 mmol/g for CG) by potentiometric titration. The complexes were formed through the addition of AG to CG and vice versa using a turbidimetric titration technique. At the endpoint of the titration, the aggregate formed was a complex based upon stoichiometric charge neutralization: CG(n)()(+) + xAG(m)()(-) --> CG(n)()(+) (AG(m)()(-))(x)() where x = (n)()/(m)(). At different stages of the titration before the endpoint, the resulting complexes were examined in detail using dynamic light scattering, SLS, and electrophoretic light scattering (ELS). The main results are summarized as follows: (i) When AG with a hydrodynamic radius (R(h)) of 119 nm is added to CG (R(h) approximately 156 nm), the (R(h)) of the complex size decreases from 156 to 80 nm. (ii) In contrast to this (R(h)) change, the molar mass increases from 11.7 MD to 24 MD with increasing amounts of added AG. (iii) Upon addition of CG to AG, the complex formed has the same size ((R(h)) approximately 80 nm) and the same molar mass (55 +/- 2.5 MD) until 55 +/- 5% of AG has been consumed in the complexation. To understand these results, we used the following two models: the random model (RM), in which the added AG particles uniformly bind to all of the CG particles in the system via a strong electrostatic attraction, and the all-or-none model (AONM), in which part of the AG particles in the system preferably bind to the added CG

  10. Simultaneous determination of alcohols including diols and triols by HPLC with ultraviolet detection based on the formation of a copper(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Sohei; Dohi, Takumi; Aizawa, Sen-Ichi; Kemmei, Tomoko; Terashima, Hiroyuki; Taga, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kodama, Shuji

    2017-08-29

    We developed a reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method with ultraviolet detection using on-line complexation with Cu(II) ion for analysis of five alcohols including diols and triol (methanol, ethanol, 1,2-propanediol, 1,3-propanediol, and glycerol). The Cu(II) ion concentration in the mobile phase had a great influence on the peak areas of these alcohols, but not on their retention times. Column temperature (25-40°C) and pH of the mobile phase did not affect the separation of analytes. The optimum separation conditions were determined as 5 mM CuSO4 , 3 mM H2 SO4 , and 3 mM NaOH at 30°C. The ratio of the peak areas for three alcohols (methanol, 1,2-propanediol, and glycerol) was in good agreement with that calculated from the obtained stability constants, molar absorption coefficients for the 1:1 Cu(II) complexes with the three alcohols, and the injected molar quantities. This fact strongly suggests that the observed high-performance liquid chromatography signals resulted from formation of the 1:1 Cu(II)-alcohol complexes. Using the proposed method, these five alcohols in spirit, liquid for electronic cigarette, mouthwash, and nail enamel remover samples were successfully analyzed with only a simple pretreatment. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Labeled EF-Tus for rapid kinetic studies of pretranslocation complex formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wei; Kavaliauskas, Darius; Schrader, Jared

    2014-01-01

    ) the effects of the misreading-inducing antibiotics streptomycin and paromomycin on tRNA selection at the A-site, and (iii) how strengthening the binding of aa-tRNA to EF-Tu affects the rate of EF-Tu movement away from L11 on the ribosome. These FRET assays have the potential to be adapted for high throughput...

  12. Movement Complexity and Neuromechanical Factors Affect the Entropic Half-Life of Myoelectric Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson-Tole, Emma F.; Wakeling, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Appropriate neuromuscular functioning is essential for survival and features underpinning motor control are present in myoelectric signals recorded from skeletal muscles. One approach to quantify control processes related to function is to assess signal variability using measures such as Sample Entropy. Here we developed a theoretical framework to simulate the effect of variability in burst duration, activation duty cycle, and intensity on the Entropic Half-Life (EnHL) in myoelectric signals. EnHLs were predicted to be signal amplitude and activation duty cycle. Comparison with myoelectic data from rats walking and running at a range of speeds and inclines confirmed the range of EnHLs, however, the direction of EnHL change in response to altered locomotor demand was not correctly predicted. The discrepancy reflected different associations between the ratio of the standard deviation and mean signal intensity (Ist:It¯) and duty factor in simulated and physiological data, likely reflecting additional information in the signals from the physiological data (e.g., quiescent phase content; variation in action potential shapes). EnHL could have significant value as a novel marker of neuromuscular responses to alterations in perceived locomotor task complexity and intensity. PMID:28974932

  13. The Smc5-Smc6 complex regulates recombination at centromeric regions and affects kinetochore protein sumoylation during normal growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Yong-Gonzales

    Full Text Available The Smc5-Smc6 complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is both essential for growth and important for coping with genotoxic stress. While it facilitates damage tolerance throughout the genome under genotoxin treatment, its function during unperturbed growth is mainly documented for repetitive DNA sequence maintenance. Here we provide physical and genetic evidence showing that the Smc5-Smc6 complex regulates recombination at non-repetitive loci such as centromeres in the absence of DNA damaging agents. Mutating Smc6 results in the accumulation of recombination intermediates at centromeres and other unique sequences as assayed by 2D gel analysis. In addition, smc6 mutant cells exhibit increased levels of Rad52 foci that co-localize with centromere markers. A rad52 mutation that decreases centromeric, but not overall, levels of Rad52 foci in smc6 mutants suppresses the nocodazole sensitivity of these cells, suggesting that the Smc6-mediated regulation of recombination at centromeric regions impacts centromere-related functions. In addition to influencing recombination, the SUMO ligase subunit of the Smc5-Smc6 complex promotes the sumoylation of two kinetochore proteins and affects mitotic spindles. These results suggest that the Smc5-Smc6 complex regulates both recombination and kinetochore sumoylation to facilitate chromosomal maintenance during growth.

  14. Rapunzel’s complex: Social relations, and sexuality affectivity of adolescents with HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana França Cescon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to reflect on the influence of HIV / AIDS on social relations, sexuality and adolescent affectivity. We conducted a literature review and subsequent theoretical discussion on the topic, with the methodology of qualitative analysis of texts and scientific articles. The findings of the study demonstrated that it is necessary to fully consider the various psychosocial aspects of this dynamic, since the psychological aspects significantly influence disease progression and quality of life of HIV patient. For adolescents, this influence becomes even greater, because puberty is a specific stage of biological development, emotional and social, where social interaction plays an important role for the construction of the subject's personality. It is hoped that this study may contribute to the reflection on the importance of creating themselves coping strategies and health care interventions geared to this particular group, especially with regard to the psychologist, who should seek to accommodate these demands subjects, contributing to a healthy psychosocial development, considering its specific features.

  15. How Mood and Task Complexity Affect Children's Recognition of Others' Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Andrew J; Rennels, Jennifer L

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies examined how mood affects children's accuracy in matching emotional expressions and labels (label-based tasks). This study was the first to assess how induced mood (positive, neutral, or negative) influenced 5- to 8-year-olds' accuracy and reaction time using both context-based tasks, which required inferring a character's emotion from a vignette, and label-based tasks. Both tasks required choosing one of four facial expressions to respond. Children responded more accurately to label-based questions relative to context-based questions at 5 to 7 years of age, but showed no differences at 8 years of age, and when the emotional expression being identified was happiness, sadness, or surprise, but not disgust. For the context-based questions, children were more accurate at inferring sad and disgusted emotions compared to happy and surprised emotions. Induced positive mood facilitated 5-year-olds' processing (decreased reaction time) in both tasks compared to induced negative and neutral moods. Results demonstrate how task type and children's mood influence children's emotion processing at different ages.

  16. How Mood and Task Complexity Affect Children's Recognition of Others’ Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Andrew J.; Rennels, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies examined how mood affects children's accuracy in matching emotional expressions and labels (label-based tasks). This study was the first to assess how induced mood (positive, neutral, or negative) influenced 5- to 8-year-olds’ accuracy and reaction time using both context-based tasks, which required inferring a character's emotion from a vignette, and label-based tasks. Both tasks required choosing one of four facial expressions to respond. Children responded more accurately to label-based questions relative to context-based questions at 5 to 7 years of age, but showed no differences at 8 years of age, and when the emotional expression being identified was happiness, sadness, or surprise, but not disgust. For the context-based questions, children were more accurate at inferring sad and disgusted emotions compared to happy and surprised emotions. Induced positive mood facilitated 5-year-olds’ processing (decreased reaction time) in both tasks compared to induced negative and neutral moods. Results demonstrate how task type and children's mood influence children's emotion processing at different ages. PMID:24489442

  17. Electromediated formation of DNA complexes with cell membranes and its consequences for gene delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Escoffre, Jean-Michel; Favard, Cyril; Teissié, Justin; Dean, David S; Rols, Marie-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Electroporation is a physical method to induce the uptake of therapeutic drugs and DNA, by eukaryotic cells and tissues. The phenomena behind electro-mediated membrane permeabilization to plasmid DNA have been shown to be significantly more complex than those for small molecules. Small molecules cross the permeabilized membrane by diffusion whereas plasmid DNA first interacts with the electropermeabilized part of the cell surface, forming localized aggregates. The dynamics of this process is still poorly understood because direct observations have been limited to scales of the order of seconds. Here, cells are electropermeabilized in the presence of plasmid DNA and monitored with a temporal resolution of 2 ms. This allows us to show that during the first pulse application, plasmid complexes, or aggregates, start to form at distinct sites on the cell membrane. FRAP measurements show that the positions of these sites are remarkably immobile during the application of further pluses. A theoretical model is propos...

  18. Spectrophotometric Determination of Metoprolol Tartrate in Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms on Complex Formation with Cu(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Cesme

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new, simple, sensitive and accurate spectrophotometric method has been developed for the assay of metoprolol tartrate (MPT, which is based on the complexation of drug with copper(II [Cu(II] at pH 6.0, using Britton-Robinson buffer solution, to produce a blue adduct. The latter has a maximum absorbance at 675 nm and obeys Beer’s law within the concentration range 8.5-70 mg/mL. Regression analysis of the calibration data showed a good correlation coefficient (r = 0.998 with a limit of detection of 5.56 mg/mL. The proposed procedure has been successfully applied to the determination of this drug in its tablets. In addition, the spectral data and stability constant for the binuclear copper(II complex of MPT (Cu2MPT2Cl2 have been reported.

  19. Formation of Angerh Minue Cave in Asmari Karst Complex of Zagros Mountain, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Ghassem Ghaderi; Leila Karimi

    2014-01-01

    The Angerh Minue Cave, located in one km from west Angerh village which is about 97 km far from Shiraz of Fars Province, the Cultural Capital of Iran. The main entrance of the cave is at an altitude of 2430 having a depth of 176 m and length 776 m. It developed along the bedding of limestone layers. Asmari Formation is the host rock of the Angerh Minue cave. Mountainous region of Zagros, where the Angerh Minue cave is located could be referred as seismic region due to the presence of various ...

  20. Interaction of ionic liquids with polysaccharides, 8 - synthesis of cellulose sulfates suitable for polyelectrolyte complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gericke, Martin; Liebert, Tim; Heinze, Thomas

    2009-04-08

    Water-soluble CS with different DS were synthesized by homogeneous conversion of cellulose (microcrystalline cellulose and spruce sulfite pulp) with different sulfating agents in the ionic liquids BMIMCl, AMIMCl and EMIMAc. N,N-Dimethylformamide was used as a dipolar aprotic co-solvent in order to improve the miscibility of the reaction mixture. The CS prepared by the new homogeneous reaction pathway were studied towards the formation of PEC capsules. CS obtained from SSP formed mechanically stable PEC capsules with PolyDADMAC. Exploiting this method, the microencapsulation of glucose oxidase was studied and enzyme activity tests were performed with encapsulated GOD.

  1. Stable complex formation of CENP-B with the CENP-A nucleosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Risa; Otake, Koichiro; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Horikoshi, Naoki; Miya, Yuta; Shiga, Tatsuya; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Ohzeki, Jun-ichirou; Larionov, Vladimir; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    CENP-A and CENP-B are major components of centromeric chromatin. CENP-A is the histone H3 variant, which forms the centromere-specific nucleosome. CENP-B specifically binds to the CENP-B box DNA sequence on the centromere-specific repetitive DNA. In the present study, we found that the CENP-A nucleosome more stably retains human CENP-B than the H3.1 nucleosome in vitro. Specifically, CENP-B forms a stable complex with the CENP-A nucleosome, when the CENP-B box sequence is located at the proximal edge of the nucleosome. Surprisingly, the CENP-B binding was weaker when the CENP-B box sequence was located in the distal linker region of the nucleosome. This difference in CENP-B binding, depending on the CENP-B box location, was not observed with the H3.1 nucleosome. Consistently, we found that the DNA-binding domain of CENP-B specifically interacted with the CENP-A-H4 complex, but not with the H3.1-H4 complex, in vitro. These results suggested that CENP-B forms a more stable complex with the CENP-A nucleosome through specific interactions with CENP-A, if the CENP-B box is located proximal to the CENP-A nucleosome. Our in vivo assay also revealed that CENP-B binding in the vicinity of the CENP-A nucleosome substantially stabilizes the CENP-A nucleosome on alphoid DNA in human cells. PMID:25916850

  2. Formation and stability of calcium complexes of dimethyl sulfoxide in water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakl, M.; Straka, Michal; Jaklová Dytrtová, Jana; Roithová, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 360, č. 1 (2014), s. 8-14 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-21409P Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/12/0539 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : bonding energies * DFT * ESI-MS * complexation * speciation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.972, year: 2014

  3. Formation and characterization of stable fluorescent complexes between neutral conjugated polymers and cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Tomé, Maria José; Esquembre, Rocío; Mallavia, Ricardo; Mateo, C Reyes

    2013-01-01

    Solubilisation and stabilization of conjugated polymers, CPs, in aqueous media remains a challenge for many researches trying to extend the biological and environmental applications of this kind of polymers. A number of different alternatives have been considered to address this problem, which are mostly based on the enhancement of the macromolecule polarity, by appending hydrophilic side chains on the polymer backbone. In this work we have investigated a new strategy in which water solubilization is reached by external addition of classical cyclodextrins (α-, β- and γ-CDs) to a solution of non-polar CPs. This strategy allows working with such polymers eliminating the need to synthesize new water-soluble species. The polymer selected for the study was poly-[9,9-bis(6'-bromohexyl-2,7-fluoren-dyil)-co-alt-(benzene-1,4-diy)], PFPBr(2), a polyfluorene previously synthesized in our laboratory. Results show that PFPBr(2) forms fluorescent complexes in aqueous media with β-CD and γ-CD, and much less efficiently with α-CD, probably due to the small size of its cavity. The new PFPBr(2)/CD complexes are stable in time and in a large range of pH, however, at high concentration and temperature, they tend to aggregate and precipitate. In order to increase stabilization and minimize polymer aggregation, complexes were encapsulated inside the pores of silica glasses fabricated using the sol-gel process, obtaining transparent and fluorescent hybrid matrices which were stable in time and temperature. In addition, immobilization of the complexes allows an easy manipulation of the material, thus offering promising applications in the development of biological and chemical sensors.

  4. Structure of ultradisperse nickel particles produced by the thermolysis of nickel formate-monoethanol amine complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khvorov, M.M.; Dudchenko, A.K.; Khimchenko, IU.I.

    1986-05-01

    Histograms of the size distribution of ultradisperse nickel particles produced by the thermolysis of amine complexes are plotted using dark-field and light-field electron microscopy data. It is found that the size distribution can be adequately approximated by logarithmically probabilistic functions. The ultradisperse nickel particles feature several types of structure, i.e., faceted stable single crystals coated by an organic film, small aggregates of such crystals, large stable globules, and hexahedral and trihedral crystals. 8 references.

  5. Unusual C-C bond cleavage in the formation of amine-bis(phenoxy) group 4 benzyl complexes: Mechanism of formation and application to stereospecific polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Gowda, Ravikumar R.

    2014-08-11

    Group 4 tetrabenzyl compounds MBn4 (M = Zr, Ti), upon protonolysis with an equimolar amount of the tetradentate amine-tris(phenol) ligand N[(2,4-tBu2C6H2(CH 2)OH]3 in toluene from -30 to 25 °C, unexpectedly lead to amine-bis(phenoxy) dibenzyl complexes, BnCH2N[(2,4- tBu2C6H2(CH2)O] 2MBn2 (M = Zr (1), Ti (2)) in 80% (1) and 75% (2) yields. This reaction involves an apparent cleavage of the >NCH2-ArOH bond (loss of the phenol in the ligand) and formation of the >NCH 2-CH2Bn bond (gain of the benzyl group in the ligand). Structural characterization of 1 by X-ray diffraction analysis confirms that the complex formed is a bis(benzyl) complex of Zr coordinated by a newly derived tridentate amine-bis(phenoxy) ligand arranged in a mer configuration in the solid state. The abstractive activation of 1 and 2 with B(C6F 5)3·THF in CD2Cl2 at room temperature generates the corresponding benzyl cations {BnCH2N[(2,4- tBu2C6H2(CH2)O] 2MBn(THF)}+[BnB(C6F5) 3]- (M = Zr (3), Ti, (4)). These cationic complexes, along with their analogues derived from (imino)phenoxy tri- and dibenzyl complexes, [(2,6-iPr2C6H3)N=C(3,5- tBu2C6H2)O]ZrBn3 (5) and [2,4-Br2C6H2(O)(6-CH2(NC 5H9))CH2N=CH(2-adamantyl-4-MeC 6H2O)]ZrBn2 (6), have been found to effectively polymerize the biomass-derived renewable β-methyl-α-methylene- γ-butyrolactone (βMMBL) at room temperature into the highly stereoregular polymer PβMMBL with an isotacticity up to 99% mm. A combined experimental and DFT study has yielded a mechanistic pathway for the observed unusual C-C bond cleavage in the present protonolysis reaction between ZrBn4 and N[(2,4-tBu2C 6H2(CH2)OH]3 for the formation of complex 1, which involves the benzyl radical and the Zr(III) species, resulting from thermal and photochemical decomposition of ZrBn4, followed by a series of reaction sequences consisting of protonolysis, tautomerization, H-transfer, oxidation, elimination, and radical coupling. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  6. Snapin mediates insulin secretory granule docking, but not trans-SNARE complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somanath, Sangeeta [Blizard Institute, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, E1 2AT (United Kingdom); Partridge, Christopher J. [Diabetes Research Laboratories, Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Churchill Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX3 7LJ (United Kingdom); Marshall, Catriona [Blizard Institute, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, E1 2AT (United Kingdom); Rowe, Tony [CSL Limited, 45 Poplar Road, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Turner, Mark D., E-mail: mark.turner@ntu.ac.uk [Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research Centre, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, NG11 8NS (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-29

    Secretory granule exocytosis is a tightly regulated process requiring granule targeting, tethering, priming, and membrane fusion. At the heart of this process is the SNARE complex, which drives fusion through a coiled-coil zippering effect mediated by the granule v-SNARE protein, VAMP2, and the plasma membrane t-SNAREs, SNAP-25 and syntaxin-1A. Here we demonstrate that in pancreatic β-cells the SNAP-25 accessory protein, snapin, C-terminal H2 domain binds SNAP-25 through its N-terminal Sn-1 domain. Interestingly whilst snapin binds SNAP-25, there is only modest binding of this complex with syntaxin-1A under resting conditions. Instead synataxin-1A appears to be recruited in response to secretory stimulation. These results indicate that snapin plays a role in tethering insulin granules to the plasma membrane through coiled coil interaction of snapin with SNAP-25, with full granule fusion competency only resulting after subsequent syntaxin-1A recruitment triggered by secretory stimulation. - Highlights: • Snapin mediates granule docking. • Snapin binds SNAP-25. • SNARE complex forms downstream.

  7. Ammonia formation by a thiolate-bridged diiron amide complex as a nitrogenase mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Li, Ying; Wang, Baomin; Luo, Yi; Yang, Dawei; Tong, Peng; Zhao, Jinfeng; Luo, Lun; Zhou, Yuhan; Chen, Si; Cheng, Fang; Qu, Jingping

    2013-04-01

    Although nitrogenase enzymes routinely convert molecular nitrogen into ammonia under ambient temperature and pressure, this reaction is currently carried out industrially using the Haber-Bosch process, which requires extreme temperatures and pressures to activate dinitrogen. Biological fixation occurs through dinitrogen and reduced NxHy species at multi-iron centres of compounds bearing sulfur ligands, but it is difficult to elucidate the mechanistic details and to obtain stable model intermediate complexes for further investigation. Metal-based synthetic models have been applied to reveal partial details, although most models involve a mononuclear system. Here, we report a diiron complex bridged by a bidentate thiolate ligand that can accommodate HN=NH. Following reductions and protonations, HN=NH is converted to NH3 through pivotal intermediate complexes bridged by N2H3- and NH2- species. Notably, the final ammonia release was effected with water as the proton source. Density functional theory calculations were carried out, and a pathway of biological nitrogen fixation is proposed.

  8. A novel two-component system of Streptococcus sanguinis affecting functions associated with viability in saliva and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Tarsila M; Stipp, Rafael N; Alves, Lívia A; Harth-Chu, Erika N; Höfling, José F; Mattos-Graner, Renata O

    2018-01-16

    Streptococcus sanguinis is a pioneer species of teeth and a common opportunistic pathogen of infective endocarditis. In this study, we identified a two-component system, SptRS Ss , affecting S. sanguinis survival in saliva and biofilm formation. Isogenic mutants of sptRSs (SKsptR) and sptSSs (SKsptS) showed reduced cell counts in ex vivo assays of viability in saliva, compared to parent strain SK36 and complemented mutants. Reduced counts of the mutants in saliva were associated with reduced growth rates in poor nutrient medium (RPMI) and increased susceptibility to deposition of C3b and MAC of the complement system, a defense component of saliva and serum. Conversely, sptR/SSs mutants showed increased biofilm formation associated with higher production of H2O2 and extracellular DNA. RT-qPCR comparisons of strains indicated a global role of SptRS Ss in repressing genes for H2O2 production (2.5 to 15-fold up-regulation of spxB, spxR, vicR, tpk and ackA in sptR/SSs mutants), biofilm formation and/or evasion to host immunity (2.1 to 11.4-fold up-regulation of srtA, pcsB, cwdP, iga, nt5e). Compatible with SptR Ss homology with AraC-type regulators, duplicate to multiple conserved repeats were identified in 1,000 bp regulatory regions of downstream genes, suggesting that SptR Ss regulates transcription by DNA looping. Significant transcriptional changes in the regulatory genes vicR, spxR, comE, comX, and mecA in the sptR/SSs mutants, further indicated that SptRS Ss is part of a regulatory network which coordinates cell wall homeostasis, H2O2 production, and competence. This study reveals that SptRS Ss is involved in the regulation of crucial functions for S. sanguinis persistence in the oral cavity. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Age-related changes in posture control are differentially affected by postural and cognitive task complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard-Demanze, L; Dumitrescu, M; Jimeno, P; Borel, L; Lacour, M

    2009-07-01

    The simple postural task of quiet standing, which requires minimal attentional resources, is generally paired with cognitive activity. Competition for attentional resources is a consequence of simultaneously performing balance tasks and cognitive tasks, and impairment of attentional resource allocation with aging leads to increased risks of fall. We investigated age-related changes in posture control during dual task performance, using a paradigm that crossed a static (quiet standing) and a dynamic (keeping balance on a translational force plate) postural task and cognitive tasks of low demand (mental arithmetic) and high demand (spatial memory). Postural performance was analyzed through center-of-pressure displacements using both statistical (body sway area/sway velocity) and nonlinear (wavelet transform) methods in three age groups (younger, middle-aged, and older healthy participants). Results showed that 1) the nonlinear analysis method was more sensitive than the traditional approach in distinguishing performance between age groups, a result that explains discrepancies in the dual-task literature; 2) dual-tasking costs were dependent on both postural task difficulty and cognitive task complexity, corroborating previous investigations; 3) younger adults improved their postural performance during dual-tasking, but older adults lowered their performance; 4) balance recovery strategies in the dynamic postural task appeared to differ in younger versus older adults. Together, our findings on dual-tasking can be interpreted within the conceptual frame of task prioritization: shifting attention away from postural task automates posture control in the younger adults, whereas prioritization of postural task and selection of compensatory strategy are the main characteristics of posture control in the older population.

  10. Factors affecting learning of vector math from computer-based practice: Feedback complexity and prior knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F. Heckler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In experiments including over 450 university-level students, we studied the effectiveness and time efficiency of several levels of feedback complexity in simple, computer-based training utilizing static question sequences. The learning domain was simple vector math, an essential skill in introductory physics. In a unique full factorial design, we studied the relative effects of “knowledge of correct response” feedback and “elaborated feedback” (i.e., a general explanation both separately and together. A number of other factors were analyzed, including training time, physics course grade, prior knowledge of vector math, and student beliefs about both their proficiency in and the importance of vector math. We hypothesize a simple model predicting how the effectiveness of feedback depends on prior knowledge, and the results confirm this knowledge-by-treatment interaction. Most notably, elaborated feedback is the most effective feedback, especially for students with low prior knowledge and low course grade. In contrast, knowledge of correct response feedback was less effective for low-performing students, and including both kinds of feedback did not significantly improve performance compared to elaborated feedback alone. Further, while elaborated feedback resulted in higher scores, the learning rate was at best only marginally higher because the training time was slightly longer. Training time data revealed that students spent significantly more time on the elaborated feedback after answering a training question incorrectly. Finally, we found that training improved student self-reported proficiency and that belief in the importance of the learned domain improved the effectiveness of training. Overall, we found that computer based training with static question sequences and immediate elaborated feedback in the form of simple and general explanations can be an effective way to improve student performance on a physics essential skill

  11. Ising-based model of opinion formation in a complex network of interpersonal interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, A.; Kosiński, R. A.

    2006-03-01

    In our work the process of opinion formation in the human population, treated as a scale-free network, is modeled and investigated numerically. The individuals (nodes of the network) are characterized by their authorities, which influence the interpersonal interactions in the population. Hierarchical, two-level structures of interpersonal interactions and spatial localization of individuals are taken into account. The effect of the mass media, modeled as an external stimulation acting on the social network, on the process of opinion formation is investigated. It was found that in the time evolution of opinions of individuals critical phenomena occur. The first one is observed in the critical temperature of the system TC and is connected with the situation in the community, which may be described by such quantifiers as the economic status of people, unemployment or crime wave. Another critical phenomenon is connected with the influence of mass media on the population. As results from our computations, under certain circumstances the mass media can provoke critical rebuilding of opinions in the population.

  12. Mesoscopic Modeling of Thrombus Formation and Growth: Platelet Deposition in Complex Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Alireza; Karniadakis, George

    2014-11-01

    Haemodynamics and blood rheology are important contributing factors to thrombus formation at a vulnerable vessel wall, and adhesion of platelets to a vascular surface, particularly in regions of flow stagnation, recirculation and reattachment is significantly important in formation of thrombi. For example, haemodynamic micro-environment can have effects on thrombosis inside the atherosclerotic plaques and aneurysms. To study these effects, we have developed and validated a model for platelet aggregation in blood flow using Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method. In this model platelets are considered as single DPD particles interacting with each other via Morse potential once activated. We assign an activation delay time to each platelet such that they remain passive during that time. We investigate the effect of different geometries on platelet aggregation by considering arterial stenosis at different levels of occlusion, and aneurysms of different shapes and sizes. The results show a marked increase in platelet aggregation within the boundaries of deceleration zone by increasing the degree of stenosis. Further, we observe enhanced platelet margination and wall deposition in the presence of red blood cells.

  13. Physalin H from Solanum nigrum as an Hh signaling inhibitor blocks GLI1-DNA-complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Midori A; Uchida, Kyoko; Sadhu, Samir K; Ahmed, Firoj; Ishibashi, Masami

    2014-01-13

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays an important role in embryonic development, cell maintenance and cell proliferation. Moreover, Hh signaling contributes to the growth of cancer cells. Physalins are highly oxidized natural products with a complex structure. Physalins (1-7) were isolated from Solanum nigrum (Solanaceae) collected in Bangladesh by using our cell-based assay. The isolated physalins included the previously reported Hh inhibitors 5 and 6. Compounds 1 and 4 showed strong inhibition of GLI1 transcriptional activity, and exhibited cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines with an aberrant activation of Hh signaling. Compound 1 inhibited the production of the Hh-related proteins patched (PTCH) and BCL2. Analysis of the structures of different physalins showed that the left part of the physalins was important for Hh inhibitory activity. Interestingly, physalin H (1) disrupted GLI1 binding to its DNA binding domain, while the weak inhibitor physalin G (2) did not show inhibition of GLI1-DNA complex formation.

  14. Formation and annealing of metastable (interstitial oxygen)-(interstitial carbon) complexes in n- and p-type silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Makarenko, L F; Lastovskii, S B; Murin, L I; Moll, M; Pintilie, I

    2014-01-01

    It is shown experimentally that, in contrast to the stable configuration of (interstitial carbon)-(interstitial oxygen) complexes (CiOi), the corresponding metastable configuration (CiOi{*}) cannot be found in n-Si based structures by the method of capacitance spectroscopy. The rates of transformation CiOi{*} -> CiOi are practically the same for both n- and p-Si with a concentration of charge carriers of no higher than 10(13) cm(-3). It is established that the probabilities of the simultaneous formation of stable and metastable configurations of the complex under study in the case of the addition of an atom of interstitial carbon to an atom of interstitial oxygen is close to 50\\%. This is caused by the orientation dependence of the interaction potential of an atom of interstitial oxygen with an interstitial carbon atom, which diffuses to this oxygen atom.

  15. The Catabolite Repressor Protein-Cyclic AMP Complex Regulates csgD and Biofilm Formation in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufnagel, David A; Evans, Margery L; Greene, Sarah E; Pinkner, Jerome S; Hultgren, Scott J; Chapman, Matthew R

    2016-12-15

    The extracellular matrix protects Escherichia coli from immune cells, oxidative stress, predation, and other environmental stresses. Production of the E. coli extracellular matrix is regulated by transcription factors that are tuned to environmental conditions. The biofilm master regulator protein CsgD upregulates curli and cellulose, the two major polymers in the extracellular matrix of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) biofilms. We found that cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates curli, cellulose, and UPEC biofilms through csgD The alarmone cAMP is produced by adenylate cyclase (CyaA), and deletion of cyaA resulted in reduced extracellular matrix production and biofilm formation. The catabolite repressor protein (CRP) positively regulated csgD transcription, leading to curli and cellulose production in the UPEC isolate, UTI89. Glucose, a known inhibitor of CyaA activity, blocked extracellular matrix formation when added to the growth medium. The mutant strains ΔcyaA and Δcrp did not produce rugose biofilms, pellicles, curli, cellulose, or CsgD. Three putative CRP binding sites were identified within the csgD-csgB intergenic region, and purified CRP could gel shift the csgD-csgB intergenic region. Additionally, we found that CRP binded upstream of kpsMT, which encodes machinery for K1 capsule production. Together our work shows that cAMP and CRP influence E. coli biofilms through transcriptional regulation of csgD IMPORTANCE The catabolite repressor protein (CRP)-cyclic AMP (cAMP) complex influences the transcription of ∼7% of genes on the Escherichia coli chromosome (D. Zheng, C. Constantinidou, J. L. Hobman, and S. D. Minchin, Nucleic Acids Res 32:5874-5893, 2004, https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkh908). Glucose inhibits E. coli biofilm formation, and ΔcyaA and Δcrp mutants show impaired biofilm formation (D. W. Jackson, J.W. Simecka, and T. Romeo, J Bacteriol 184:3406-3410, 2002, https://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.184.12.3406-3410.2002). We determined that the c

  16. Cas1–Cas2 complex formation mediates spacer acquisition during CRISPR–Cas adaptive immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, James K.; Kranzusch, Philip J.; Noeske, Jonas; Wright, Addison V.; Davies, Christopher W.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    The initial stage of CRISPR–Cas immunity involves the acquisition of foreign DNA spacer segments into the host genomic CRISPR locus. The nucleases Cas1 and Cas2 are the only proteins conserved amongst all CRISPR–Cas systems, yet the molecular functions of these proteins during immunity are unknown. Here we show that Cas1 and Cas2 from Escherichia coli form a stable complex that is essential for spacer acquisition and determine the 2.3-Å resolution crystal structure of the Cas1–Cas2 complex. Mutations that perturb Cas1–Cas2 complex formation disrupt CRISPR DNA recognition and spacer acquisition in vivo. Unlike Cas1, active site mutants of Cas2 can still acquire new spacers indicating a non-enzymatic role of Cas2 during immunity. These results reveal the universal roles of Cas1 and Cas2 and suggest a mechanism by which Cas1–Cas2 complexes specify sites of CRISPR spacer integration. PMID:24793649

  17. NOM-facilitated transport of metal ions in aquifers: importance of complex-dissociation kinetics and colloid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, D; Saravia, F; Frimmel, F H; Schuessler, W

    2003-09-01

    The transport of metal ions (Al, Fe, Zn, Pb) complexed by natural organic matter (NOM) was investigated by column experiments. Direct breakthrough of metal-NOM complexes was observed after elution of one bed volume for Al, Fe, and Pb, but not for Zn. This observation cannot be understood assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium in the columns. Hence, a model was developed, taking into account the kinetics of the interactions of metal ions with NOM and the solid phase. Of all possible reactions during passage through the column, the dissociation of the metal-NOM complexes was assumed to be the rate-determining step. Dissociation-rate constants were determined by cation-exchange experiments with a non-NOM-adsorbing cation-exchange resin (Chelex-100). These rate constants were used to predict the migration of metal-NOM complexes in the column experiments. Experimental and modeling results were in good agreement for the bivalent metal ions. Also, the model well predicted the pH dependence of breakthrough of trivalent metal ions and the differences between Al and Fe breakthrough on a qualitative basis. This leads to the conclusion that the dissociation kinetics of metal-NOM complexes is an essential parameter for the estimation of NOM-facilitated metal transport. However, for the trivalent metals, Al and Fe, the model overestimated the direct breakthrough, thus giving a worst case prediction of metal transport. With the help of coupling size-exclusion chromatography to inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, the formation of Al-hydroxide and Fe-hydroxide colloids in addition to NOM complexes was detected. These colloids, which were not considered in the model, were partially filtered off in the column, thus leading to overestimation of metal breakthrough.

  18. Nuclear antigens in Trichinella spiralis infected muscle cells: nuclear extraction, compartmentalization and complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, C; Jasmer, D P

    1998-05-01

    Infection of mammalian skeletal muscle cells by Trichinella spiralis induces a series of changes that include: reentry of the terminally differentiated host cell into the cell cycle; suspension of infected cells in apparent G2/M; and transcriptional inactivation of the differentiated skeletal muscle gene program. Cell cycle repositioning and genetic reprogramming are chronic characteristics of host cells that can remain infected for years. Nuclear antigens (NA, 79, 86 and 97 kDa) that localize to host cell nuclei have been detected with antibodies against T. spiralis proteins. Since NA may play a role in regulating the infected cell phenotype, their origin, nuclear compartmentalization, and biochemical properties were investigated. We show that a monoclonal antibody to a defined epitope of T. spiralis glycans binds these NA, which indicates the parasite origin of these proteins. NA were not extracted under conditions that solubilized chromatin from infected cell nuclei. In contrast, NA were coextracted with B lamins (nuclear envelope) by 4 M urea. Urea extraction was pH dependent (8.0), suggesting ionic interaction of NA in protein complexes. Nevertheless, confocal microscopy demonstrated colocalization of NA with host chromatin, and not B lamins. Nuclear protein complexes containing NA were observed under non-reducing conditions, and NA were readily cross-linked in isolated nuclei by succinimidyl protein conjugating reagents. The results establish methods to extract NA from infected cell nuclei for further biochemical analysis, establish the existence of nuclear protein complexes containing NA and demonstrate colocalization of NA with host chromatin. Collectively, the results provide a foundation from which to investigate the role of NA in regulating the T. spiralis infected skeletal muscle cell phenotype.

  19. Periungual pyogenic granuloma formation in a patient with complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resenstein, Rachel; Lewellis, Stephen; Leger, Marie

    2015-12-16

    Peripheral nerve injury has been associated with the development of periungual pyogenic granuolomas (PGs). We present the case of a 39-year-old woman with an eight-month history of periungual PGs in the setting of a four-to-five year history of a traumatic inciting event that produced symptoms consistent with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Although recurrent, these periungual PGs have remitted after treatment with topical timolol maleate. This case exhibits an underappreciated association between peripheral neurologic abnormalities, which include CRPS, and cutaneous abnormalities. It also presents evidence that supports the concept that PGs that are not appropriate for surgical treatments may be treated with topical timolol maleate.

  20. Water-soluble triscyclometalated organoiridium complex: phosphorescent nanoparticle formation, nonlinear optics, and application for cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuanpeng; Zhao, Jingyi; Yan, Qifan; Chen, Peng R; Zhao, Dahui

    2014-03-12

    Two water-soluble triscyclometalated organoiridium complexes, 1 and 2, with polar side chains that form nanoparticles emitting bright-red phosphorescence in water were synthesized. The optimal emitting properties are related to both the triscyclometalated structure and nanoparticle-forming ability in aqueous solution. Nonlinear optical properties are also observed with the nanoparticles. Because of their proper cellular uptake in addition to high emission brightness and effective two-photon absorbing ability, cell imaging can be achieved with nanoparticles of 2 bearing quaternary ammonium side chains at ultra-low effective concentrations using NIR incident light via the multiphoton excitation phosphorescence process.

  1. Complex-formation-enhanced fluorescence quenching effect for efficient detection of picric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Aixiang; Yang, Longmei; Zhang, Yuyang; Zhang, Gaobin; Kong, Lin; Zhang, Xuanjun; Tian, Yupeng; Tao, Xutang; Yang, Jiaxiang

    2014-09-15

    Amine-functionalized α-cyanostilbene derivatives (Z)-2-(4-aminophenyl)-3-(4-butoxyphenyl)acrylonitrile (ABA) and (Z)-3-(4-butoxyphenyl)-2-[4-(butylamino)phenyl]acrylonitrile (BBA) were designed for specific recognition of picric acid (PA), an environmental and biological pollutant. The 1:1 host-guest complexes formed between the chemosensors and PA enhanced fluorescence quenching, thus leading to sensitive and selective detection in aqueous media and the solid phase. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Fault strength and the formation of rider blocks and domes in continental and oceanic core complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, W. Roger; Choi, Eunseo

    2014-05-01

    Core complexes are places where slip of normal sense 'detachment' faults exhumes rocks from more than 10 km depth. We first present 2D cross-sectional model results showing that core complex detachment faults are strong and that their strength has to be in a narrow range to allow kilometer scale "rider blocks" to develop. Previous numerical simulations of lithospheric extension produced the large offset, core complex-forming, normal faults only when the faults were weaker than a given threshold. High-resolution simulations are needed to resolve rider blocks and they only form when the faults are stronger than a given level. A narrow range of fault weakening, relative to intact surrounding rock, allows for a consecutive series of rider blocks to emerge in a core complex-like geometry. Rider blocks develop when the dominant form of weakening is by reduction of fault cohesion while faults that weaken primarily by friction reduction do not form distinct rider blocks. The term 'core' refers to the oval region of rocks exhumed from depth and surrounded by rocks formed at shallower depths. Cores are typically 10-15 km wide and longer in the extension direction. 2 and 3D numerical and analog models are used to show that the cores could form as a result of 'continuous casting' of warm, ductile lower plate rocks pulled up against a cold upper plate (Spencer, 1999). Spencer (1999) considered undulations in the surface of a brittle plate while here we consider how a both the surface and base of the plate can be "cast" with a nearly parallel shape. Ridges can locally migrate in time and may do so in response to along-axis variations in the magmatic accommodation of plate separation. We suggest that the core geometry is formed by along strike variations in the horizontal position of the detachment boundary. Long wavelength (compared to the brittle layer thickness) horizontal undulations in the position of the detachment can produce parallel undulations in both the surface and

  3. A strategy for complex dimer formation when biomimicry fails: total synthesis of ten coccinellid alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Trevor C; Trotta, Adam H; Snyder, Scott A

    2014-07-09

    Although dimeric natural products can often be synthesized in the laboratory by directly merging advanced monomers, these approaches sometimes fail, leading instead to non-natural architectures via incorrect unions. Such a situation arose during our studies of the coccinellid alkaloids, when attempts to directly dimerize Nature's presumed monomeric precursors in a putative biomimetic sequence afforded only a non-natural analogue through improper regiocontrol. Herein, we outline a unique strategy for dimer formation that obviates these difficulties, one which rapidly constructs the coccinellid dimers psylloborine A and isopsylloborine A through a terminating sequence of two reaction cascades that generate five bonds, five rings, and four stereocenters. In addition, a common synthetic intermediate is identified which allows for the rapid, asymmetric formal or complete total syntheses of eight monomeric members of the class.

  4. Membrane complexes of Syntrophomonas wolfei involved in syntrophic butyrate degradation and hydrogen formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Regis Crable

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Syntrophic butyrate metabolism involves the thermodynamically unfavorable production of hydrogen and/or formate from the high potential electron donor, butyryl-CoA. Such redox reactions can occur only with energy input by a process called reverse electron transfer. Previous studies have demonstrated that hydrogen production from butyrate requires the presence of a proton gradient, but the biochemical machinery involved has not been clearly elucidated. In this study, the gene and enzyme systems involved in reverse electron transfer by Syntrophomonas wolfei were investigated using proteomic and gene expression approaches. S. wolfei was grown in coculture with Methanospirillum hungatei or Dehalococcoides mccartyi under conditions requiring reverse electron transfer and compared to both axenic S. wolfei cultures and cocultures grown in conditions that do not require reverse electron transfer. Blue native gel analysis of membranes solubilized from syntrophically grown cells revealed the presence of a membrane-bound hydrogenase, Hyd2, which exhibited hydrogenase activity during in gel assays. Bands containing a putative iron-sulfur (FeS oxidoreductase were detected in membranes of crotonate-grown and butyrate grown S. wolfei cells. The genes for the corresponding hydrogenase subunits, hyd2ABC, were differentially expressed at higher levels during syntrophic butyrate growth when compared to growth on crotonate. The expression of the FeS oxidoreductase gene increased when S. wolfei was grown with M. hungatei. Additional membrane-associated proteins detected included FoF1 ATP synthase subunits and several membrane transporters that may aid syntrophic growth. Furthermore, syntrophic butyrate metabolism can proceed exclusively by interspecies hydrogen transfer, as demonstrated by growth with D. mccartyi, which is unable to use formate. These results argue for the importance of Hyd2 and FeS oxidoreductase in reverse electron transfer during syntrophic

  5. Mechanisms of defect complex formation and environmental-assisted fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, B.R.; Muratov, L.S.; Kang, B.S.J.; Li, K.Z. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide has excellent corrosion resistance in high-temperature oxidizing-sulfidizing environments; however, there are problems at room and medium temperature with hydrogen embrittlement as related to exposure to moisture. In this research, a coordinated computational modeling/experimental study of mechanisms related to environmental-assisted fracture behavior of selected iron aluminides is being undertaken. The modeling and the experimental work will connect at the level of coordinated understanding of the mechanisms for hydrogen penetration and for loss of strength and susceptibility to fracture. The focus of the modeling component at this point is on the challenging question of accurately predicting the iron vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell} and the subsequent tendency, if present, for vacancy clustering. The authors have successfully performed, on an ab initio basis, the first calculation of the vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell}. These calculations include lattice relaxation effects which are quite large. This has significant implications for vacancy clustering effects with consequences to be explored for hydrogen diffusion. The experimental work at this stage has focused on the relationship of the choice and concentration of additives to the improvement of resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and hence to the fracture behavior. For this reason, comparative crack growth tests of FA-186, FA-187, and FA-189 iron aluminides (all with basic composition of Fe-28A{ell}-5Cr, at % with micro-alloying additives of Zr, C or B) under, air, oxygen, or water environment have been performed. These tests showed that the alloys are susceptible to room temperature hydrogen embrittlement in both B2 and DO{sub 3} conditions. Test results indicated that FA-187, and FA-189 are intrinsically more brittle than FA-186.

  6. Complex formation and functional interaction between adenosine A1 receptor and type-1 metabotropic glutamate receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Kamikubo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The adenosine A1 receptor (A1R is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR for adenosine, a ubiquitous neuromodulator, and thus regulates neuronal excitability, as well as arousal and sensitivity to pain. In addition, we have previously described a new mode of action for A1R: in cerebellar Purkinje cells, its activation attenuates neuronal responses to glutamate, as mediated by the type-1 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR1. mGluR1 is also a GPCR, and elicits such responses as long-term depression of the postsynaptic response to glutamate, a cellular basis for cerebellar motor learning. Here, we explore in greater detail the interaction between A1R and mGluR1 using non-neuronal cells. Co-immunoprecipitation and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET analysis reveal that A1R and mGluR1 form a complex. Furthermore, we found that mGluR1 activation inhibits A1R signaling, as measured by changes in intracellular cAMP. These findings demonstrate that A1R and mGluR1 have the intrinsic ability to form a heteromeric complex and mutually modulate signaling. This interaction may represent a new form of intriguing GPCR-mediated cellular responses.

  7. Formation of sulfido ciobium complexes through C-S bond activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo Nélio Pires

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Upon reacting (eta5-C5H52NbCl2, eta5-C5H5 = Cp, and (Ph3Sn(SPh, in THF, (eta5-C5H52Nb(Cl(mu-SSn(Ph3(Cl, 1, and (eta5-C5H52Nb(SCl, 2, were obtained. Complexes 1 and 2 were characterized by IR, ¹H-NMR, 13C-NMR, Mössbauer spectroscopies, elemental analysis as well as by atomic absorption. Hydrolysis of 1 yielded the mu-oxo species, (eta5-C5H52Nb(Cl(mu-OSn(Ph3Cl, 3, which was characterized by IR, ¹H-NMR, 13C-NMR and Mössbauer spectroscopies, elemental analysis, atomic absorption as well as by X-ray crystallography. It crystallizes in the space group Pca2(1 with a = 17.282(3, b = 18.122(4, c = 17.3269(2, V = 5426.2(16 ų, and Z = 8. Additional studies indicated that the complexes were formed as a result of the nucleophilic displacement of the niobium-chloride bond by the thiolate ligand followed by a C-S bond cleavage. The cleavage occurs with an excess of the thiolate compound equal to or greater than 2:1.

  8. Synthesis and Mechanism of Formation of Hydride-Sulfide Complexes of Iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnet, Nicholas A; McWilliams, Sean F; DeRosha, Daniel E; Mercado, Brandon Q; Holland, Patrick L

    2017-08-07

    Iron-sulfide complexes with hydride ligands provide an experimental precedent for spectroscopically detected hydride species on the iron-sulfur MoFe 7 S 9 C cofactor of nitrogenase. In this contribution, we expand upon our recent synthesis of the first iron sulfide hydride complex from an iron hydride and a sodium thiolate ( Arnet, N. A.; Dugan, T. R.; Menges, F. S.; Mercado, B. Q.; Brennessel, W. W.; Bill, E.; Johnson, M. A.; Holland, P. L., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2015 , 137 , 13220 - 13223 ). First, we describe the isolation of an analogous iron sulfide hydride with a smaller diketiminate supporting ligand, which benefits from easier preparation of the hydride precursor and easier isolation of the product. Second, we describe mechanistic studies on the C-S bond cleavage through which the iron sulfide hydride product is formed. In a key experiment, use of cyclopropylmethanethiolate as the sulfur precursor leads to products from cyclopropane ring opening, implicating an alkyl radical as an intermediate. Combined with the results of isotopic labeling studies, the data are consistent with a mechanism in which homolytic C-S bond cleavage is followed by rebound of the alkyl radical to abstract a hydrogen atom from iron to give the observed alkane and iron-sulfide products.

  9. Separation of drug stereoisomers by the formation of. beta. -cyclodextrin inclusion complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, D.W.; Ward, T.J.; Armstrong, R.D.; Beesley, T.E.

    1986-05-30

    For many drugs, only racemic mixtures are available for clinical use. Because different stereoisomers of drugs often cause different physiological responses, the use of pure isomers could elicit more exact therapeutic effects. Differential complexation of a variety of drug stereoisomers by immobilized ..beta..-cyclodextrin was investigated. Chiral recognition and racemic resolution were observed with a number of compounds from such clinically useful classes as ..beta..-blockers, calcium-channel blockers, sedative hypnotics, antihistamines, anticonvulsants, diuretics, and synthetic opiates. Separation of the diastereomers of the cardioactive and antimalarial cinchona alkaloids and of two antiestrogens was demonstrated as well. Three dimensional projections of ..beta..-cyclodextrin complexes of propanol, which is resolved by this technique, and warfarin, which is not, are compared. These studies have improved the understanding and application of the chiral interactions of ..beta..-cyclodextrin, and they have demonstrated a means to measure optical purity and to isolate or produce pure enantiomers of drugs. In addition, this highly specific technique could also be used in the pharmacological evaluation of enantiometric drugs. 27 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  10. Formation of a repressive complex in the mammalian circadian clock is mediated by the secondary pocket of CRY1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Alicia K.; Fribourgh, Jennifer L.; Chelliah, Yogarany; Sandate, Colby R.; Hura, Greg L.; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Partch, Carrie L.

    2017-01-01

    The basic helix–loop–helix PAS domain (bHLH-PAS) transcription factor CLOCK:BMAL1 (brain and muscle Arnt-like protein 1) sits at the core of the mammalian circadian transcription/translation feedback loop. Precise control of CLOCK:BMAL1 activity by coactivators and repressors establishes the ∼24-h periodicity of gene expression. Formation of a repressive complex, defined by the core clock proteins cryptochrome 1 (CRY1):CLOCK:BMAL1, plays an important role controlling the switch from repression to activation each day. Here we show that CRY1 binds directly to the PAS domain core of CLOCK:BMAL1, driven primarily by interaction with the CLOCK PAS-B domain. Integrative modeling and solution X-ray scattering studies unambiguously position a key loop of the CLOCK PAS-B domain in the secondary pocket of CRY1, analogous to the antenna chromophore-binding pocket of photolyase. CRY1 docks onto the transcription factor alongside the PAS domains, extending above the DNA-binding bHLH domain. Single point mutations at the interface on either CRY1 or CLOCK disrupt formation of the ternary complex, highlighting the importance of this interface for direct regulation of CLOCK:BMAL1 activity by CRY1. PMID:28143926

  11. Wsv023 interacted with Litopenaeus vannamei γ-tubulin complex associated proteins 2, and decreased the formation of microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yihong; Bi, Haitao; Li, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Zezhi; Yue, Haitao; Weng, Shaoping; He, Jianguo

    2017-04-01

    A previous study found the key transcription factor of Litopenaeus vannamei PERK-eIF2α pathway cyclic AMP-dependent transcription factor 4 (LvATF4) was involved in the transcriptional regulation of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) gene wsv023. Knocked-down expression of LvATF4 reduced the viral copy number and the cumulative mortality of WSSV-infected shrimp. These results suggested that wsv023 may be critical to WSSV infection but the precise function of wsv023 was still unknown. By using co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down assays, we show that wsv023 interacts with L. vannamei gamma complex-associated protein 2 (LvGCP2), which is the core protein of the γ-tubulin small complex. Knocked-down, the wsv023 gene significantly reduced the copy number of WSSV in L. vannamei muscle, as well as the cumulative mortality of infected shrimp. And PERK-eIF2α pathway inhibition also showed reduced virus copy number and abrogated shrimp mortality. Furthermore, overexpression of wsv023 inhibited the formation of microtubules in 293T cells. Flow cytometry revealed that WSSV infection similarly decreased the formation of microtubules in L. vannamei haemocytes. These findings suggested that wsv023 plays a role in microtubule organization in host cells, which in turn may be beneficial to WSSV.

  12. CRISPR-Cas9 induced mutations along de novo purine synthesis in HeLa cells result in accumulation of individual enzyme substrates and affect purinosome formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baresova, Veronika; Krijt, Matyas; Skopova, Vaclava; Souckova, Olga; Kmoch, Stanislav; Zikanova, Marie

    2016-11-01

    Purines are essential molecules for nucleic acid synthesis and are the most common carriers of chemical energy in all living organisms. The cellular pool of purines is maintained by the balance between their de novo synthesis (DNPS), recycling and degradation. DNPS includes ten reactions catalysed by six enzymes. To date, two genetically determined disorders of DNPS enzymes have been described, and the existence of other defects manifested by neurological symptoms and the accumulation of DNPS intermediates in bodily fluids is highly presumable. In the current study, we prepared specific recombinant DNPS enzymes and used them for the biochemical preparation of their commercially unavailable substrates. These compounds were used as standards for the development and validation of quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). To simulate manifestations of known and putative defects of DNPS we prepared CRISPR-Cas9 genome-edited HeLa cells deficient for the individual steps of DNPS (CR-cells), assessed the substrates accumulation in cell lysates and growth media and tested how the mutations affect assembly of the purinosome, the multi-enzyme complex of DNPS enzymes. In all model cell lines with the exception of one, an accumulation of the substrate(s) for the knocked out enzyme was identified. The ability to form the purinosome was reduced. We conclude that LC-MS/MS analysis of the dephosphorylated substrates of DNPS enzymes in bodily fluids is applicable in the selective screening of the known and putative DNPS disorders. This approach should be considered in affected individuals with neurological and neuromuscular manifestations of unknown aetiology. Prepared in vitro human model systems can serve in various studies that aim to provide a better characterization and understanding of physiology and pathology of DNPS, to study the role of each DNPS protein in the purinosome formation and represent an interesting way for the screening of potential

  13. Formation of the Yandangshan volcanic-plutonic complex (SE China) by melt extraction and crystal accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li-Li; He, Zhen-Yu; Jahn, Bor-ming; Zhao, Zhi-Dan

    2016-12-01

    The association of volcanic and shallow plutonic rocks in caldera may provide important clues to the geochemical evolution of silicic magma systems. The Yandangshan caldera is a typical example of late Mesozoic volcanic-plutonic complex in SE China. It is composed of a series of rhyolitic extrusives and subvolcanic intrusions of porphyritic quartz syenites. In this work, we conducted petrological and geochemical studies, as well as zircon dating, on the coexisting volcanic and plutonic rocks from the Yandangshan caldera. The results of SHRIMP and LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating revealed that the crystallization of the rhyolitic extrusives and subvolcanic intrusions was contemporaneous within analytical errors and in a short period (104-98 Ma). Geochemically, the volcanic rocks are characterized by high Rb/Sr and Rb/Ba ratios and depletion in Ba, Sr, P, Eu and Ti, while the shallow plutons show high K, Ba, Al, Fe and low Rb/Sr and Rb/Ba ratios with insignificant negative Eu anomalies. The volcanic and plutonic rocks have a similar range of zircon Hf isotopic compositions (εHf(t) = - 10.0 to + 1.5) and TDM2 model ages of 2.10-1.23 Ga. They also have comparable whole-rock Sr and Nd isotopic compositions ((87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.7084-0.7090; εNd(t) = - 7.8 to - 6.5) and zircon oxygen isotopic compositions (δ18O mainly = 4.5 to 6.0‰). We argue that the volcanic-plutonic complex of the Yandangshan caldera was formed by reworking of Paleoproterozoic lower crusts in the eastern Cathaysia block, and that the complex could be linked by fractional crystallization and crystal accumulation in a shallow magma chamber. The volcanic rocks represent the highly fractionated end-member, whereas the subvolcanic intrusions of porphyritic quartz syenites could be the residual crystal mushes. This case study could have a general implication for the genetic relationship between volcanic and shallow plutonic rocks in calderas.

  14. Viral Glycoprotein Complex Formation, Essential Function and Immunogenicity in the Guinea Pig Model for Cytomegalovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddux, Sarah; Choi, K. Yeon; McGregor, Alistair

    2015-01-01

    Development of a cytomegalovirus (CMV) vaccine is a major public health priority due to the risk of congenital infection. A key component of a vaccine is thought to be an effective neutralizing antibody response against the viral glycoproteins necessary for cell entry. Species specificity of human CMV (HCMV) precludes direct studies in an animal model. The guinea pig is the only small animal model for congenital cytomegalovirus infection. Analysis of the guinea pig CMV (GPCMV) genome indicates that it potentially encodes homologs to the HCMV glycoproteins (including gB, gH, gL, gM, gN and gO) that form various cell entry complexes on the outside of the virus: gCI (gB); gCII (gH/gL/gO); gCIII (gM/gN). The gB homolog (GP55) has been investigated as a candidate subunit vaccine but little is known about the other homolog proteins. GPCMV glycoproteins were investigated by transient expression studies which indicated that homolog glycoproteins to gN and gM, or gH, gL and gO were able to co-localize in cells and generate respective homolog complexes which could be verified by immunoprecipitation assays. ELISA studies demonstrated that the individual complexes were highly immunogenic in guinea pigs. The gO (GP74) homolog protein has 13 conserved N-glycosylation sites found in HCMV gO. In transient expression studies, only the glycosylated protein is detected but in virus infected cells both N-glycosylated and non-glycosylated gO protein were detected. In protein interaction studies, a mutant gO that lacked N-glycosylation sites had no impact on the ability of the protein to interact with gH/gL which indicated a potential alternative function associated with these sites. Knockout GPCMV BAC mutagenesis of the respective glycoprotein genes (GP55 for gB, GP75 for gH, GP115 for gL, GP100 for gM, GP73 for gN and GP74 for gO)