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Sample records for complex cardiac congenital

  1. Cardiac fusion and complex congenital cardiac defects in thoracopagus twins: diagnostic value of cardiac CT

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    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Jun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Hye-Sung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Most thoracopagus twins present with cardiac fusion and associated congenital cardiac defects, and assessment of this anatomy is of critical importance in determining patient care and outcome. Cardiac CT with electrocardiographic triggering provides an accurate and quick morphological assessment of both intracardiac and extracardiac structures in newborns, making it the best imaging modality to assess thoracopagus twins during the neonatal period. In this case report, we highlight the diagnostic value of cardiac CT in thoracopagus twins with an interatrial channel and complex congenital cardiac defects. (orig.)

  2. Understanding the physiology of complex congenital heart disease using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappanayil, Mahesh; Kannan, Rajesh; Kumar, Raman Krishna

    2011-01-01

    Complex congenital heart diseases are often associated with complex alterations in hemodynamics. Understanding these key hemodynamic changes is critical to making management decisions including surgery and postoperative management. Existing tools for imaging and hemodynamic assessment like echocardiography, computed tomography and cardiac catheterization have inherent limitations. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as a powerful bouquet of tools that allow not only excellent imaging, but also a unique insight into hemodynamics. This article introduces the reader to cardiac MRI and its utility through the clinical example of a child with a complex congenital cyanotic heart disease

  3. Left atrial isomerism associated with asplenia: prenatal echocardiographic detection of complex congenital cardiac malformations

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    Stewart, P. A.; Becker, A. E.; Wladimiroff, J. W.; Essed, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Complex congenital heart disease with suspected isomerism of the atria was diagnosed in two fetuses of 20 and 29 weeks' gestation using two-dimensional and M-mode scanning techniques. The first pregnancy was terminated at 21 weeks' gestation and stillbirth occurred at 31 weeks' gestation in the

  4. Using multidetector-row CT in neonates with complex congenital heart disease to replace diagnostic cardiac catheterization for anatomical investigation: initial experiences in technical and clinical feasibility

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    Lee, Tain; Tsai, I.C.; Chen, Min-Chi; Fu, Yun-Ching; Jan, Sheng-Lin; Wang, Chung-Chi; Chang, Yen

    2006-01-01

    Echocardiography is the first-line modality for the investigation of neonatal congenital heart disease. Diagnostic cardiac catheterization, which has a small but recognized risk, is usually performed if echocardiography fails to provide a confident evaluation of the lesions. To verify the technical and clinical feasibilities of replacing diagnostic cardiac catheterization with multidetector-row CT (MDCT) in neonatal complex congenital heart disease. Over a 1-year period we prospectively enrolled all neonates with complex congenital heart disease referred for diagnostic cardiac catheterization after initial assessment by echocardiography. MDCT was performed using a 40-detector-row CT scanner with dual syringe injection. A multidisciplinary congenital heart disease team evaluated the MDCT images and decided if further diagnostic cardiac catheterization was necessary. The accuracy of MDCT in detecting separate cardiovascular anomalies and bolus geometry of contrast enhancement were calculated. A total of 14 neonates were included in the study. No further diagnostic cardiac catheterization was needed in any neonate. The accuracy of MDCT in diagnosing separate cardiovascular anomalies was 98% (53/54) with only one atrial septal defect missed in a patient with coarctation syndrome. The average cardiovascular enhancement in evaluated chambers was 471 HU. No obvious beam-hardening artefact was observed. The technical and clinical feasibility of MDCT in complex congenital heart disease in neonates is confirmed. After initial assessment with echocardiography, MDCT could probably replace diagnostic cardiac catheterization for further anatomical clarification in neonates. (orig.)

  5. Sickle cell disease and complex congenital cardiac surgery: a case report and review of the pathophysiology and perioperative management.

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    Sanders, D B; Smith, B P; Sowell, S R; Nguyen, D H; Derby, C; Eshun, F; Nigro, J J

    2014-03-01

    Sickle cell anemia and thalassemia are hemoglobinopathies rarely encountered in the United States. Compounded with congenital heart disease, patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) requiring cardiopulmonary bypass and open-heart surgery represent the proverbial "needle in the haystack". As such, there is some trepidation on the part of clinicians when these patients present for complex cardiac surgery. SCD is an autosomal, recessive condition that results from a single nucleotide polymorphism in the β-globin gene. Hemoglobin SS molecules (HgbSS) with this point mutation can polymerize under the right conditions, stiffening the erythrocyte membrane and distorting the cellular structure to the characteristic sickle shape. This shape change alters cellular transit through the microvasculature. As a result, circumstances such as hypoxia, hypothermia, acidosis or diminished blood flow can lead to aggregation, vascular occlusion and thrombosis. Chronically, SCD can give rise to multiorgan damage secondary to hemolysis and vascular obstruction. This review and case study details an 11-year-old African-American male with known SCD who presented to the cardiothoracic surgical service with congenital heart disease consisting of an anomalous, intramural right coronary artery arising from the left coronary sinus for surgical consultation and subsequent surgical correction. This case report will include a review of the pathophysiology and current literature regarding preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative management of SCD patients.

  6. Three-dimensional-printed cardiac prototypes aid surgical decision-making and preoperative planning in selected cases of complex congenital heart diseases: Early experience and proof of concept in a resource-limited environment

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    Mahesh Kappanayil

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: 3D-printed cardiac prototypes can radically assist decision-making, planning, and safe execution of complex congenital heart surgery by improving understanding of 3D anatomy and allowing anticipation of technical challenges.

  7. Whole exome sequencing in 342 congenital cardiac left sided lesion cases reveals extensive genetic heterogeneity and complex inheritance patterns

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    Alexander H. Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Left-sided lesions (LSLs account for an important fraction of severe congenital cardiovascular malformations (CVMs. The genetic contributions to LSLs are complex, and the mutations that cause these malformations span several diverse biological signaling pathways: TGFB, NOTCH, SHH, and more. Here, we use whole exome sequence data generated in 342 LSL cases to identify likely damaging variants in putative candidate CVM genes. Methods Using a series of bioinformatics filters, we focused on genes harboring population-rare, putative loss-of-function (LOF, and predicted damaging variants in 1760 CVM candidate genes constructed a priori from the literature and model organism databases. Gene variants that were not observed in a comparably sequenced control dataset of 5492 samples without severe CVM were then subjected to targeted validation in cases and parents. Whole exome sequencing data from 4593 individuals referred for clinical sequencing were used to bolster evidence for the role of candidate genes in CVMs and LSLs. Results Our analyses revealed 28 candidate variants in 27 genes, including 17 genes not previously associated with a human CVM disorder, and revealed diverse patterns of inheritance among LOF carriers, including 9 confirmed de novo variants in both novel and newly described human CVM candidate genes (ACVR1, JARID2, NR2F2, PLRG1, SMURF1 as well as established syndromic CVM genes (KMT2D, NF1, TBX20, ZEB2. We also identified two genes (DNAH5, OFD1 with evidence of recessive and hemizygous inheritance patterns, respectively. Within our clinical cohort, we also observed heterozygous LOF variants in JARID2 and SMAD1 in individuals with cardiac phenotypes, and collectively, carriers of LOF variants in our candidate genes had a four times higher odds of having CVM (odds ratio = 4.0, 95% confidence interval 2.5–6.5. Conclusions Our analytical strategy highlights the utility of bioinformatic resources, including human

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of sub-mSv prospective ECG-triggering cardiac CT in young infant with complex congenital heart disease.

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    Gao, Wei; Zhong, Yu Min; Sun, Ai Min; Wang, Qian; Ouyang, Rong Zhen; Hu, Li Wei; Qiu, Han Sheng; Wang, Shi Yu; Li, Jian Ying

    2016-06-01

    To explore the clinical value and evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of sub-mSv low-dose prospective ECG-triggering cardiac CT (CCT) in young infants with complex congenital heart disease (CHD). A total of 102 consecutive infant patients (53 boys and 49 girls with mean age of 2.9 ± 2.4 m and weight less than 5 kg) with complex CHD were prospectively enrolled. Scans were performed on a 64-slice high definition CT scanner with low dose prospective ECG-triggering mode and reconstructed with 80 % adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm. All studies were performed during free breathing with sedation. The subjective image quality was evaluated by 5-point grading scale and interobserver variability was calculated. The objective image noise (standard deviation, SD) and contrast to noise ratio (CNR) was calculated. The effective radiation dose from the prospective ECG-triggering mode was recorded and compared with the virtual conventional retrospective ECG-gating mode. The detection rate for the origin of coronary artery was calculated. All patients also underwent echocardiography before CCT examination. 81 patients had surgery and their preoperative CCT and echocardiography findings were compared with the surgical results and sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and accuracy were calculated for separate cardiovascular anomalies. Heart rates were 70-161 beats per minute (bpm) with mean value of 129.19 ± 14.52 bpm. The effective dose of 0.53 ± 0.15 mSv in the prospective ECG-triggering cardiac CT was lower than the calculated value in a conventional retrospective ECG-gating mode (2.00 ± 0.35 mSv) (p ECG-triggering CCT with sub-mSv effective dose provides excellent imaging quality and high diagnostic accuracy for young infants with complex CHD.

  9. Safety and observer variability of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging combined with low-dose dobutamine stress-testing in patients with complex congenital heart disease

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    Robbers-Visser, D.; Luijnenburg, S.E.; Berg, J. van den; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.; Strengers, J.L.; Kapusta, L.; Moelker, A.; Helbing, W.A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) abnormal ventricular stress responses have been reported with dobutamine stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance (DCMR). These abnormal stress responses are potential indicators of long-term outcome. However, safety and

  10. Three-dimensional-printed cardiac prototypes aid surgical decision-making and preoperative planning in selected cases of complex congenital heart diseases: Early experience and proof of concept in a resource-limited environment.

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    Kappanayil, Mahesh; Koneti, Nageshwara Rao; Kannan, Rajesh R; Kottayil, Brijesh P; Kumar, Krishna

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional. (3D) printing is an innovative manufacturing process that allows computer-assisted conversion of 3D imaging data into physical "printouts" Healthcare applications are currently in evolution. The objective of this study was to explore the feasibility and impact of using patient-specific 3D-printed cardiac prototypes derived from high-resolution medical imaging data (cardiac magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography [MRI/CT]) on surgical decision-making and preoperative planning in selected cases of complex congenital heart diseases (CHDs). Five patients with complex CHD with previously unresolved management decisions were chosen. These included two patients with complex double-outlet right ventricle, two patients with criss-cross atrioventricular connections, and one patient with congenitally corrected transposition of great arteries with pulmonary atresia. Cardiac MRI was done for all patients, cardiac CT for one; specific surgical challenges were identified. Volumetric data were used to generate patient-specific 3D models. All cases were reviewed along with their 3D models, and the impact on surgical decision-making and preoperative planning was assessed. Accurate life-sized 3D cardiac prototypes were successfully created for all patients. The models enabled radically improved 3D understanding of anatomy, identification of specific technical challenges, and precise surgical planning. Augmentation of existing clinical and imaging data by 3D prototypes allowed successful execution of complex surgeries for all five patients, in accordance with the preoperative planning. 3D-printed cardiac prototypes can radically assist decision-making, planning, and safe execution of complex congenital heart surgery by improving understanding of 3D anatomy and allowing anticipation of technical challenges.

  11. New Technologies for Surgery of the Congenital Cardiac Defect

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    David Kalfa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The surgical repair of complex congenital heart defects frequently requires additional tissue in various forms, such as patches, conduits, and valves. These devices often require replacement over a patient’s lifetime because of degeneration, calcification, or lack of growth. The main new technologies in congenital cardiac surgery aim at, on the one hand, avoiding such reoperations and, on the other hand, improving long-term outcomes of devices used to repair or replace diseased structural malformations. These technologies are: 1 new patches: CorMatrix® patches made of decellularized porcine small intestinal submucosa extracellular matrix; 2 new devices: the Melody® valve (for percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation and tissue-engineered valved conduits (either decellularized scaffolds or polymeric scaffolds; and 3 new emerging fields, such as antenatal corrective cardiac surgery or robotically assisted congenital cardiac surgical procedures. These new technologies for structural malformation surgery are still in their infancy but certainly present great promise for the future. But the translation of these emerging technologies to routine health care and public health policy will also largely depend on economic considerations, value judgments, and political factors.

  12. "Just-In-Time" Simulation Training Using 3-D Printed Cardiac Models After Congenital Cardiac Surgery.

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    Olivieri, Laura J; Su, Lillian; Hynes, Conor F; Krieger, Axel; Alfares, Fahad A; Ramakrishnan, Karthik; Zurakowski, David; Marshall, M Blair; Kim, Peter C W; Jonas, Richard A; Nath, Dilip S

    2016-03-01

    High-fidelity simulation using patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) models may be effective in facilitating pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU) provider training for clinical management of congenital cardiac surgery patients. The 3D-printed heart models were rendered from preoperative cross-sectional cardiac imaging for 10 patients undergoing congenital cardiac surgery. Immediately following surgical repair, a congenital cardiac surgeon and an intensive care physician conducted a simulation training session regarding postoperative care utilizing the patient-specific 3D model for the PCICU team. After the simulation, Likert-type 0 to 10 scale questionnaire assessed participant perception of impact of the training session. Seventy clinicians participated in training sessions, including 22 physicians, 38 nurses, and 10 ancillary care providers. Average response to whether 3D models were more helpful than standard hand off was 8.4 of 10. Questions regarding enhancement of understanding and clinical ability received average responses of 9.0 or greater, and 90% of participants scored 8 of 10 or higher. Nurses scored significantly higher than other clinicians on self-reported familiarity with the surgery (7.1 vs. 5.8; P = .04), clinical management ability (8.6 vs. 7.7; P = .02), and ability enhancement (9.5 vs. 8.7; P = .02). Compared to physicians, nurses and ancillary providers were more likely to consider 3D models more helpful than standard hand off (8.7 vs. 7.7; P = .05). Higher case complexity predicted greater enhancement of understanding of surgery (P = .04). The 3D heart models can be used to enhance congenital cardiac critical care via simulation training of multidisciplinary intensive care teams. Benefit may be dependent on provider type and case complexity. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Extra-cardiac manifestations of adult congenital heart disease.

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    Gaeta, Stephen A; Ward, Cary; Krasuski, Richard A

    2016-10-01

    Advancement in correction or palliation of congenital cardiac lesions has greatly improved the lifespan of congenital heart disease patients, resulting in a rapidly growing adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) population. As this group has increased in number and age, emerging science has highlighted the systemic nature of ACHD. Providers caring for these patients are tasked with long-term management of multiple neurologic, pulmonary, hepatic, renal, and endocrine manifestations that arise as syndromic associations with congenital heart defects or as sequelae of primary structural or hemodynamic abnormalities. In this review, we outline the current understanding and recent research into these extra-cardiac manifestations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Interventional treatment of common congenital heart diseases: the common view of Chinese medical experts. Part Five-transcatheter intervention for the treatment of compound congenital cardiac anomalies

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    Committee on Congenital Heart Diseases, Internal Medicine Branch of Cadiovascular Diseases of China Physicians' Association

    2011-01-01

    Compound congenital cardiac anomalies refer to two or more congenital cardiovascular defects coexisting in the same patient. Transcatheter intervention for compound congenital cardiac anomalies has got satisfactory results in recent years. However, the percutaneous closure procedure used for compound congenital cardiac defects does not mean the simple addition of single interventional technique. Clinically, it needs more specialist expertise to deal with such complex defects. This chapter will briefly describe the pathophysiology and clinical features of the following compound congenital cardiac anomalies: the ventricular septal defect (VSD) with coexistence of atrial septal defect (ASD), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) or pulmonary valve stenosis (PS), the ASD coexistence of PDA, PS or mitral stenosis (Lutembacher's syndrome), and coarctation of aorta compound with PDA. The indications and contraindications, the therapeutic principles, the matters needing attention, the postoperative management, the judgment of curative effect, etc. of using transcatheter for the treatment of such compound anomalies will also be discussed. (authors)

  15. Interventional treatment of common congenital heart diseases: the common view of Chinese medical experts. Part Five-transcatheter intervention for the treatment of compound congenital cardiac anomalies

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    Committee on Congenital Heart Diseases, Internal Medicine Branch of Cadiovascular Diseases of China Physicians' Association

    2011-05-15

    Compound congenital cardiac anomalies refer to two or more congenital cardiovascular defects coexisting in the same patient. Transcatheter intervention for compound congenital cardiac anomalies has got satisfactory results in recent years. However, the percutaneous closure procedure used for compound congenital cardiac defects does not mean the simple addition of single interventional technique. Clinically, it needs more specialist expertise to deal with such complex defects. This chapter will briefly describe the pathophysiology and clinical features of the following compound congenital cardiac anomalies: the ventricular septal defect (VSD) with coexistence of atrial septal defect (ASD), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) or pulmonary valve stenosis (PS), the ASD coexistence of PDA, PS or mitral stenosis (Lutembacher's syndrome), and coarctation of aorta compound with PDA. The indications and contraindications, the therapeutic principles, the matters needing attention, the postoperative management, the judgment of curative effect, etc. of using transcatheter for the treatment of such compound anomalies will also be discussed. (authors)

  16. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Sorantin, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is around 10 per 1000 live births in Germany. More than 90 % of these patients will survive into adulthood due to improvements in therapy. The classification of CHD may be based according to the anatomic structures involved, to the presence of an intracardiac shunt, the presence of a cyanosis and the intensity of therapy and complexity of the disease. Nearly half of all patients with CHD suffer from an intracardiac shunt, whereas complex cases such as patients with a tetralogy of Fallot or transposition of the great arteries are much more rare. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the work-up and follow-up of patients with CHD, especially after infancy and childhood. Depending on the abnormality in question, a multiparametric examination protocol is mandatory. Knowledge of operative procedures and findings of other imaging modalities help to optimize examination and time needed for it.

  17. Left-Sided Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia with Multiple Congenital Cardiac Anomalies, Hernia Sac, and Microscopic Hepatic Heterotopia: A Case Report

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    Maria Arafah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a common congenital anomaly of uncertain etiology. Its association with multiple congenital anomalies in various organs is well recognized and antenatal radiological evidence of congenital diaphragmatic hernia warrants thorough evaluation to detect other anomalies, some of which can be life threatening. Rarely, heterotopic hepatic tissue is identified in the hernia, a rare pathological finding, exhibiting more than one macroscopic and microscopic characteristics, and always associated with cardiac congenital anomalies. Herein, we report a case of left-sided microscopic heterotopic hepatic tissue in a congenital diaphragmatic hernia in an infant with multiple cardiac congenital anomalies, but with preserved pericardium.

  18. Rare association of anophthalmia, complex congenital heart disease and pulmonary hypertension: case report.

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    Ríos-Méndez, Raúl Enrique; Lozano Chinga, Michell Marola

    2016-10-07

    Clinical congenital anophthalmia is described as the uni- or bilateral absence of the eyeball that might occur in isolation or as part of a syndrome. It has a very low prevalence and its etiology is heterogeneous. Complex congenital cardiac malformations are also rare. The association of congenital anophthalmia and congenital heart disease is rarer still, and the etiology of those associations is not well understood yet. We report the case of a patient who had the very rare association of bilateral anophthalmia, multiple cardiac malformations and severe pulmonary hypertension.

  19. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

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    Driessen, Mieke M.P. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (ICIN) - Netherlands Heart Institute, PO Box 19258, Utrecht (Netherlands); Breur, Johannes M.P.J. [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Oorschot, Joep W.M. van; Leiner, Tim [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kimmenade, Roland R.J. van; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijboom, Folkert J. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. (orig.)

  20. Preoperative cardiac computed tomography for demonstration of congenital cardiac septal defect in adults

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    Eom, Hye-Joung; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kang, Joon-Won; Lim, Tae-Hwan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Cardiac Imaging Center, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae-Hee; Song, Jong-Min; Kang, Duk-Hyun; Song, Jae-Kwan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Cardiology and Heart Institute, Cardiac Imaging Center, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joon Bum; Jung, Sung-Ho; Choo, Suk Jung; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Cardiothoracic surgery, Cardiac Imaging Center, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate the role of preoperative cardiac computed tomography (CT) for adults with congenital cardiac septal defect (CSD). Sixty-five consecutive patients who underwent preoperative CT and surgery for CSD were included. The diagnostic accuracy of CT and the concordance rate of the subtype classification of CSD were evaluated using surgical findings as the reference standard. Sixty-five patients without CSD who underwent cardiac valve surgery were used as a control group. An incremental value of CT over echocardiography was described retrospectively. Sensitivity and specificity of CT for diagnosis of CSD were 95 % and 100 %, respectively. The concordance rate of subtype classification was 91 % in CT and 92 % in echocardiography. The maximum size of the defect measured by CT correlated well with surgical measurement (r = 0.82), and the limit of agreement was -0.9 ± 7.42 mm. In comparison with echocardiography, CT was able to detect combined abnormalities in three cases, and exclusively provided correct subtype classification or clarified suspected abnormal findings found on echocardiography in seven cases. Cardiac CT can accurately demonstrates CSD in preoperative adult patients. CT may have an incremental role in preoperative planning, particularly in those with more complex anatomy. (orig.)

  1. Haemodynamic findings on cardiac CT in children with congenital heart disease

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    Goo, Hyun Woo

    2011-01-01

    In patients with congenital heart disease, haemodynamic findings demonstrated on cardiac CT might provide useful hints for understanding the haemodynamics of cardiac defects. In contrast to morphological features depicted on cardiac CT, such haemodynamic findings on cardiac CT have not been comprehensively reviewed in patients with congenital heart disease. This article describes normal haemodynamic phenomena of cardiovascular structures and various abnormal haemodynamic findings with their mechanisms and clinical significance on cardiac CT in patients with congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  2. The use of intravenous digital subtraction angiography in evaluating patients with complex congenital heart disease

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    Moodie, D.S.

    1986-01-01

    The author previously described his experience in 450 patients with congenital heart disease using intravenous digital subtraction angiography (DSA) to define cardiac anatomy. He has been impressed by the utility of DSA in the evaluation of patients with congenital heart disease. It is now an integral part of his clinical practice to perform intravenous DSA studies both pre- and postoperatively on an inpatient as well as outpatient basis. This chapter details his DSA experience with complex forms of congenital heart disease

  3. Evaluation of athletes with complex congenital heart disease.

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    Bates, Benjamin A; Richards, Camille; Hall, Michael; Kerut, Edmund K; Campbell, William; McMullan, Michael R

    2017-06-01

    As a result of improvements in congenital heart surgery, there are more adults alive today with congenital heart disease (CHD) than children. Individuals with cardiac birth defects may be able to participate in physical activities but require proper cardiovascular evaluation. The American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology released guidelines in 2015 for athletes with cardiovascular abnormalities. The guidelines express that although restriction from competitive athletics may be indicated for some, the majority of individuals with CHD can and should engage in some form of physical activity. This case study demonstrates the importance of combining all aspects of history, physical examination, ECG, and imaging modalities to evaluate cardiac anatomy and function in young athletes with complex CHD. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Fourier analysis of multi-gated cardiac blood-pool data in patients with congenital heart diseases, (2). Assessment of diseases with complex cardiac anomalies, especially tetralogy of Fallot

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    Takeda, Kan; Maeda, Hisato; Yamaguchi, Nobuo; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Matsumura, Kaname; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Sakurai, Minoru; Aoki, Kenzo

    1985-04-01

    The clinical usefulness of Fourier analysis of multi-gated cardiac blood-pool data was evaluated in 18 subjects with normal cardiac functions and 14 patients with complex cardiac anomalies (ten with tetralogy of Fallot, two with tricuspid atresia (TA), one with double-outlet right ventricle (DORV), and one with Ebstein's anomaly (EA)). Using global ventricular time-activity curves, the phase and amplitude at fundamental frequency were calculated, and emptying patterns of the left and right ventricles (LV, RV) were evaluated by phase difference (D(phase)=RV phase minus LV phase) and amplitude ratio of RV to LV (R(amp)). In patients with TOF, mean values of D (phase) and R(amp) were 25.3 +- 10.5 degrees and 13.5 +- 0.49 respectively and significantly larger than those of normal subjects. D (phase) became larger in inverse proportion to the ratio of pulmonary-to-systemic blood flow and there was an inverse linear correlation between these two variables. On visual interpretation of functional images, the dynamic property of hypoplastic ventricles could be easily estimated in patients with TA or DORV. In a case with EA, the atrialized RV was shown clearly as a hypokinetic, atrial phase area. This method is valuable for pathophysiologic investigation of diseases with complex cardiac anomalies. (author).

  5. Incidence and management of life-threatening adverse events during cardiac catheterization for congenital heart disease.

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    Lin, C Huie; Hegde, Sanjeet; Marshall, Audrey C; Porras, Diego; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Balzer, David T; Beekman, Robert H; Torres, Alejandro; Vincent, Julie A; Moore, John W; Holzer, Ralf; Armsby, Laurie; Bergersen, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Continued advancements in congenital cardiac catheterization and interventions have resulted in increased patient and procedural complexity. Anticipation of life-threatening events and required rescue measures is a critical component to preprocedural preparation. We sought to determine the incidence and nature of life-threatening adverse events in congenital and pediatric cardiac catheterization, risk factors, and resources necessary to anticipate and manage events. Data from 8905 cases performed at the 8 participating institutions of the Congenital Cardiac Catheterization Project on Outcomes were captured between 2007 and 2010 [median 1,095/site (range 133-3,802)]. The incidence of all life-threatening events was 2.1 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.8-2.4 %], whereas mortality was 0.28 % (95 % CI 0.18-0.41 %). Fifty-seven life-threatening events required cardiopulmonary resuscitation, whereas 9 % required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Use of a risk adjustment model showed that age events. Using this model, standardized life-threatening event ratios were calculated, thus showing that one institution had a life-threatening event rate greater than expected. Congenital cardiac catheterization and intervention can be performed safely with a low rate of life-threatening events and mortality; preprocedural evaluation of risk may optimize preparation of emergency rescue and bailout procedures. Risk predictors (age < 1, hemodynamic vulnerability, and procedure risk category) can enhance preprocedural patient risk stratification and planning.

  6. Anaesthetic considerations in children with congenital heart disease undergoing non-cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagdish Menghraj Shahani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to provide an updated and comprehensive review on current perioperative anaesthetic management of paediatric patients with congenital heart disease (CHD coming for non-cardiac surgery. Search of terms such as "anaesthetic management," "congenital heart disease" and "non-cardiac surgery" was carried out in KKH eLibrary, PubMed, Medline and Google, focussing on significant current randomised control trials, case reports, review articles and editorials. Issues on how to tailor perioperative anaesthetic management on cases with left to right shunt, right to left shunt and complex heart disease are discussed in this article. Furthermore, the author also highlights special considerations such as pulmonary hypertension, neonates with CHD coming for extracardiac surgery and the role of regional anaesthesia in children with CHD undergoing non-cardiac operation.

  7. Gated magnetic resonance imaging of congenital cardiac malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jocobstein, M.D.; Nelson, A.D.; Riemenschneider, T.A.; Alfidi, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of a variety of cardiac malformations in 19 patients aged 1 week to 33 years were obtained using pulse plethysmographic- or ECG-gated spin echo pulse sequences. Coronal, axial, and sagittal images displaying intracardiac structures with excellent spatial and contrast resolution were acquired during systole or diastole. It is concluded that MR will be a valuable noninvasive method of diagnosing congenital heart disease

  8. Rationale and methodology of a collaborative learning project in congenital cardiac care.

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    Wolf, Michael J; Lee, Eva K; Nicolson, Susan C; Pearson, Gail D; Witte, Madolin K; Huckaby, Jeryl; Gaies, Michael; Shekerdemian, Lara S; Mahle, William T

    2016-04-01

    Collaborative learning is a technique through which individuals or teams learn together by capitalizing on one another's knowledge, skills, resources, experience, and ideas. Clinicians providing congenital cardiac care may benefit from collaborative learning given the complexity of the patient population and team approach to patient care. Industrial system engineers first performed broad-based time-motion and process analyses of congenital cardiac care programs at 5 Pediatric Heart Network core centers. Rotating multidisciplinary team site visits to each center were completed to facilitate deep learning and information exchange. Through monthly conference calls and an in-person meeting, we determined that duration of mechanical ventilation following infant cardiac surgery was one key variation that could impact a number of clinical outcomes. This was underscored by one participating center's practice of early extubation in the majority of its patients. A consensus clinical practice guideline using collaborative learning was developed and implemented by multidisciplinary teams from the same 5 centers. The 1-year prospective initiative was completed in May 2015, and data analysis is under way. Collaborative learning that uses multidisciplinary team site visits and information sharing allows for rapid structured fact-finding and dissemination of expertise among institutions. System modeling and machine learning approaches objectively identify and prioritize focused areas for guideline development. The collaborative learning framework can potentially be applied to other components of congenital cardiac care and provide a complement to randomized clinical trials as a method to rapidly inform and improve the care of children with congenital heart disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Frequency of Congenital Cardiac Malformations in the Neonates with Congenital Hypothyroidism

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    yazdan ghandi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital hypothyroidism (CH is a prevalent disorder, which is associated with several other congenital anomalies, especially cardiac diseases. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of congenital heart disease (CHD in the neonates with CH.Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on two groups of 79 subjects to compare the type and frequency of congenital cardiac anomalies between the neonates with the confirmed diagnosis of CH (TSH≥10 mlU/ml and healthy infants. The study was performed in Kowsar Clinic affiliated to Arak University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Level of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH was measured within days 3-7 of birth using the samples collected from the soles of the neonates. In addition, all the subjects were evaluated for the presence of CHD using echocardiography before day 30 of life.Results: In total, 79 neonates were enrolled in the study. The case group consisted of 34 females (43.04% and 45 males (53.96%, and the control group consisted of 43 females (54.43% and 36 males (45.57%. The groups were matched in terms of age and gender. Cardiac involvement was only detected in the case group (CH infants with the prevalence of 22.7%. Among the non-cyanotic malformations observed in the case group, one infant had ventricular septal defect (1.3%, eight infants had atrial septal defect (10.1%, three infants had patent ductus arteriosus (3.8%, three neonates had endocardial cushion defect (3.8%, two neonates had pulmonary stenosis (2.5%, and one infant had dilated cardiomyopathy (1.3%. Moreover, six neonates were diagnosed with Down syndrome. All the infants with endocardial cushion defect (n=3 had Down syndrome, and no significant association was observed between TSH and thyroxine (T4 in the presence of CHD.Conclusion: According to the results, the high prevalence of cardiac malformations in the neonates with CH necessitated cardiac examinations using echocardiography.

  10. A prospective evaluation of contrast and radiation dose and image quality in cardiac CT in children with complex congenital heart disease using low-concentration iodinated contrast agent and low tube voltage and current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Qiao-Ru; Gao, Wei; Sun, Ai-Min; Wang, Qian; Qiu, Hai-Sheng; Wang, Fang; Hu, Li-Wei; Li, Jian-Ying; Zhong, Yu-Min

    2017-02-01

    To the assess image quality, contrast dose and radiation dose in cardiac CT in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) using low-concentration iodinated contrast agent and low tube voltage and current in comparison with standard dose protocol. 110 patients with CHD were randomized to 1 of the 2 scan protocols: Group A (n = 45) with 120 mA tube current and contrast agent of 270 mgI/ml in concentration (Visipaque ™ ; GE Healthcare Ireland, Co., Cork, UK); and Group B (n = 65) with the conventional 160 mA and 370 mgI/ml concentration contrast (Iopamiro ® ; Shanghai Bracco Sine Pharmaceutical Corp Ltd, Shanghai, China). Both groups used 80 kVp tube voltage and were reconstructed with 70% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm. The CT value and noise in aortic arch were measured and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. A five-point scale was used to subjectively evaluate image quality. Contrast and radiation dose were recorded. There was no difference in age and weight between the two groups (all p > 0.05). The iodine load and radiation dose in Group A were statistically lower (3976 ± 747 mgI vs 5763 ± 1018 mgI in iodine load and 0.60 ± 0.08 mSv vs 0.77 ± 0.10 mSv in effective dose; p  0.05), and with good agreement between the two observers. Comparing the surgery results, the diagnostic accuracy for extracardiac and intracardiac defects for Group A was 96% and 92%, respectively, while the corresponding numbers for Group B were 95% and 93%. Compared with the standard dose protocol, the use of low tube voltage (80 kVp), low tube current (120 mA) and low-concentration iodinated contrast agent (270 mgI/ml) enables a reduction of 30% in iodine load and 22% in radiation dose while maintaining compatible image quality and diagnostic accuracy. Advances in knowledge: The new cardiac CT scanning protocol can largely reduce the adverse effects of

  11. Pacing and Defibrillators in Complex Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Henry; O’Neill, Mark; Rosenthal, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Device therapy in the complex congenital heart disease (CHD) population is a challenging field. There is a myriad of devices available, but none designed specifically for the CHD patient group, and a scarcity of prospective studies to guide best practice. Baseline cardiac anatomy, prior surgical and interventional procedures, existing tachyarrhythmias and the requirement for future intervention all play a substantial role in decision making. For both pacing systems and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, numerous factors impact on the merits of system location (endovascular versus non-endovascular), lead positioning, device selection and device programming. For those with Fontan circulation and following the atrial switch procedure there are also very specific considerations regarding access and potential complications. This review discusses the published guidelines, device indications and the best available evidence for guidance of device implantation in the complex CHD population. PMID:27403295

  12. Contemporary cardiac surgery for adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beurtheret, Sylvain; Tutarel, Oktay; Diller, Gerhard Paul; West, Cathy; Ntalarizou, Evangelia; Resseguier, Noémie; Papaioannou, Vasileios; Jabbour, Richard; Simpkin, Victoria; Bastin, Anthony J; Babu-Narayan, Sonya V; Bonello, Beatrice; Li, Wei; Sethia, Babulal; Uemura, Hideki; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Shore, Darryl

    2017-08-01

    Advances in early management of congenital heart disease (CHD) have led to an exponential growth in adults with CHD (ACHD). Many of these patients require cardiac surgery. This study sought to examine outcome and its predictors for ACHD cardiac surgery. This is an observational cohort study of prospectively collected data on 1090 consecutive adult patients with CHD, undergoing 1130 cardiac operations for CHD at the Royal Brompton Hospital between 2002 and 2011. Early mortality was the primary outcome measure. Midterm to longer-term survival, cumulative incidence of reoperation, other interventions and/or new-onset arrhythmia were secondary outcome measures. Predictors of early/total mortality were identified. Age at surgery was 35±15 years, 53% male, 52.3% were in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I, 37.2% in class II and 10.4% in class III/IV. Early mortality was 1.77% with independent predictors NYHA class ≥ III, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) <15 mm and female gender. Over a mean follow-up of 2.8±2.6 years, 46 patients died. Baseline predictors of total mortality were NYHA class ≥ III, TAPSE <15 mm and non-elective surgery. The number of sternotomies was not independently associated with neither early nor total mortality. At 10 years, probability of survival was 94%. NYHA class among survivors was significantly improved, compared with baseline. Contemporary cardiac surgery for ACHD performed at a single, tertiary reference centre with a multidisciplinary approach is associated with low mortality and improved functional status. Also, our findings emphasise the point that surgery should not be delayed because of reluctance to reoperate only. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Echocardiographic evaluation of simple versus complex congenital heart disease in a tertiary care Paediatrics Hospital

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    Uttam Kumar Sarkar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives:Congenital heart diseases are treatable either by catheter based intervention or open heart surgery according to their quality. In our study we aim to analyze congenital heart disease echocardiographically into simple versus complex heart disease at a tertiary care centre with a public health planning and policy making perspective.Materials & Methods:This hospital based study was done on 1010 patients, both from in-patient and out-patient, who were clinically suspected to have heart disease from January 2015 to September 2016 at Dr.B.C.Roy P.G.I.P.S. Kolkata and echocardiographically categorized.Results:A VSD was the commonest acyanotic heart disease (17. 08%.Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF was commonest complex cyanotic heart disease (10.64%, VSD +ASD was the commonest combined lesion (8.12%. Simple heart lesions (63.1% were commoner than complex (36.9% congenital heart diseases.Conclusion:Health policy makers should give due care to manage Congenital Heart Disease either catheter based or surgically keeping in mind about 63.1% of the lesions are simple cardiac lesions and 36.9% lesions are complex cardiac lesion where complex surgery is required. 

  14. Three-dimensional modelling and three-dimensional printing in pediatric and congenital cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraly, Laszlo

    2018-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) modelling and printing methods greatly support advances in individualized medicine and surgery. In pediatric and congenital cardiac surgery, personalized imaging and 3D modelling presents with a range of advantages, e.g., better understanding of complex anatomy, interactivity and hands-on approach, possibility for preoperative surgical planning and virtual surgery, ability to assess expected results, and improved communication within the multidisciplinary team and with patients. 3D virtual and printed models often add important new anatomical findings and prompt alternative operative scenarios. For the lack of critical mass of evidence, controlled randomized trials, however, most of these general benefits remain anecdotal. For an individual surgical case-scenario, prior knowledge, preparedness and possibility of emulation are indispensable in raising patient-safety. It is advocated that added value of 3D printing in healthcare could be raised by establishment of a multidisciplinary centre of excellence (COE). Policymakers, research scientists, clinicians, as well as health care financers and local entrepreneurs should cooperate and communicate along a legal framework and established scientific guidelines for the clinical benefit of patients, and towards financial sustainability. It is expected that besides the proven utility of 3D printed patient-specific anatomical models, 3D printing will have a major role in pediatric and congenital cardiac surgery by providing individually customized implants and prostheses, especially in combination with evolving techniques of bioprinting.

  15. Congenital heart disease linked to maternal autoimmunity against cardiac myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Charles R; Yutzey, Katherine E; Brar, Anoop K; Goessling, Lisa S; Van Vickle-Chavez, Sarah J; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Eghtesady, Pirooz

    2014-05-01

    Structural congenital heart disease (CHD) has not previously been linked to autoimmunity. In our study, we developed an autoimmune model of structural CHD that resembles hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), a life-threatening CHD primarily affecting the left ventricle. Because cardiac myosin (CM) is a dominant autoantigen in autoimmune heart disease, we hypothesized that immunization with CM might lead to transplacental passage of maternal autoantibodies and a prenatal HLHS phenotype in exposed fetuses. Elevated anti-CM autoantibodies in maternal and fetal sera, as well as IgG reactivity in fetal myocardium, were correlated with structural CHD that included diminished left ventricular cavity dimensions in the affected progeny. Further, fetuses that developed a marked HLHS phenotype had elevated serum titers of anti-β-adrenergic receptor Abs, as well as increased protein kinase A activity, suggesting a potential mechanism for the observed pathological changes. Our maternal-fetal model presents a new concept linking autoimmunity against CM and cardiomyocyte proliferation with cardinal features of HLHS. To our knowledge, this report shows the first evidence in support of a novel immune-mediated mechanism for pathogenesis of structural CHD that may have implications in its future diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Cardiac imaging : X-ray, magnetic resonance and ultrasound in congenital heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigby, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    In many instances, the management of simple or common congenital cardiac anomalies, such as patient arterial duct, atrial septal defect or ventricular septal defect, can be based upon clinical evaluation, the chest radiograph and conventional transthoracic echocardiography and Doppler investigation. Angiography is usually required for those conditions, such as the tetralogy of Fallot, in which the size and anatomy of the pulmonary arteries influence the timing or the type of surgical intervention. Interventional cardiac catheterization, however, requires high quality X-ray screening and, frequently, transesophageal echocardiography. The investigation of more complex anomalies, such as those in hearts with a univentricular atrioventricular connection, often involves several methods of investigation. These complex anomalies require complete morphological and physiological assessment in order to provide optimum medical and surgical management. Increasingly, the diagnosis is established in utero. Should termination of pregnancy then be encouraged? Or, should all patients be subjected to an aggressive medical and surgical treatment regimen to optimize the chances of a later successful Fontan operation? Finally, what is the role of cardiac transplantation or the Norwood operation in those infants in whom the long term prognosis of conventional treatment is considered to be poor? (author). 20 refs.; 6 figs

  17. Dynamic three-dimensional display of common congenital cardiac defects from reconstruction of two-dimensional echocardiographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, K S; Lin, C C; Liu, W S; Chen, F L

    1996-01-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography had long been a standard diagnostic modality for congenital heart disease. Further attempts of three-dimensional reconstruction using two-dimensional echocardiographic images to visualize stereotypic structure of cardiac lesions have been successful only recently. So far only very few studies have been done to display three-dimensional anatomy of the heart through two-dimensional image acquisition because such complex procedures were involved. This study introduced a recently developed image acquisition and processing system for dynamic three-dimensional visualization of various congenital cardiac lesions. From December 1994 to April 1995, 35 cases were selected in the Echo Laboratory here from about 3000 Echo examinations completed. Each image was acquired on-line with specially designed high resolution image grazmber with EKG and respiratory gating technique. Off-line image processing using a window-architectured interactive software package includes construction of 2-D ehcocardiographic pixel to 3-D "voxel" with conversion of orthogonal to rotatory axial system, interpolation, extraction of region of interest, segmentation, shading and, finally, 3D rendering. Three-dimensional anatomy of various congenital cardiac defects was shown, including four cases with ventricular septal defects, two cases with atrial septal defects, and two cases with aortic stenosis. Dynamic reconstruction of a "beating heart" is recorded as vedio tape with video interface. The potential application of 3D display of the reconstruction from 2D echocardiographic images for the diagnosis of various congenital heart defects has been shown. The 3D display was able to improve the diagnostic ability of echocardiography, and clear-cut display of the various congenital cardiac defects and vavular stenosis could be demonstrated. Reinforcement of current techniques will expand future application of 3D display of conventional 2D images.

  18. Successful cardiac transplantation outcomes in patients with adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menachem, Jonathan N; Golbus, Jessica R; Molina, Maria; Mazurek, Jeremy A; Hornsby, Nicole; Atluri, Pavan; Fuller, Stephanie; Birati, Edo Y; Kim, Yuli Y; Goldberg, Lee R; Wald, Joyce W

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of our study is (1) to characterise patients with congenital heart disease undergoing heart transplantation by adult cardiac surgeons in a large academic medical centre and (2) to describe successful outcomes associated with our multidisciplinary approach to the evaluation and treatment of adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) undergoing orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). Heart failure is the leading cause of death in patients with ACHD leading to increasing referrals for OHT. The Penn Congenital Transplant Database comprises a cohort of patients with ACHD who underwent OHT between March 2010 and April 2016. We performed a retrospective cohort study of the 20 consecutive patients. Original cardiac diagnoses include single ventricle palliated with Fontan (n=8), dextro-transposition of the great arteries after atrial switch (n=4), tetralogy of Fallot (n=4), pulmonary atresia (n=1), Ebstein anomaly (n=1), unrepaired ventricular septal defect (n=1) and Noonan syndrome with coarctation of the aorta (n=1). Eight patients required pretransplant inotropes and two required pretransplant mechanical support. Nine patients underwent heart-liver transplant and three underwent heart-lung transplant. Three patients required postoperative mechanical circulatory support. Patients were followed for an average of 38 months as of April 2016, with 100% survival at 30 days and 1 year and 94% overall survival (19/20 patients). ACHD-OHT patients require highly specialised, complex and multidisciplinary healthcare. The success of our programme is attributed to using team-based, patient-centred care including our multidisciplinary staff and specialists across programmes and departments. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Outcome of cardiac surgery in patients with congenital heart disease in England between 1997 and 2015.

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    Aleksander Kempny

    Full Text Available The number of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD is increasing worldwide and most of them will require cardiac surgery, once or more, during their lifetime. The total volume of cardiac surgery in CHD patients at a national level and the associated mortality and predictors of death associated with surgery are not known. We aimed to investigate the surgical volume and associated mortality in CHD patients in England.Using a national hospital episode statistics database, we identified all CHD patients undergoing cardiac surgery in England between 1997 and 2015.We evaluated 57,293 patients (median age 11.9years, 46.7% being adult, 56.7% female. There was a linear increase in the number of operations performed per year from 1,717 in 1997 to 5,299 performed in 2014. The most common intervention at the last surgical event was an aortic valve procedure (9,276; 16.2%, followed by repair of atrial septal defect (9,154; 16.0%, ventricular septal defect (7,746; 13.5%, tetralogy of Fallot (3,523; 6.1% and atrioventricular septal defect (3,330; 5.8% repair. Associated mortality remained raised up to six months following cardiac surgery. Several parameters were predictive of post-operative mortality, including age, complexity of surgery, need for emergency surgery and socioeconomic status. The relationship of age with mortality was "U"-shaped, and mortality was highest amongst youngest children and adults above 60 years of age.The number of cardiac operations performed in CHD patients in England has been increasing, particularly in adults. Mortality remains raised up to 6-months after surgery and was highest amongst young children and seniors.

  20. Risk factors for nosocomial infections after cardiac surgery in newborns with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Heladia; Cervantes-Luna, Beatriz; González-Cabello, Héctor; Miranda-Novales, Guadalupe

    2017-11-23

    Congenital heart diseases are among the most common congenital malformations. Approximately 50% of the patients with congenital heart disease undergo cardiac surgery. Nosocomial infections (NIs) are the main complications and an important cause of increased morbidity and mortality associated with congenital heart diseases. This study's objective was to identify the risk factors associated with the development of NIs after cardiac surgery in newborns with congenital heart disease. This was a nested case-control study that included 112 newborns, including 56 cases (with NI) and 56 controls (without NI). Variables analyzed included perinatal history, associated congenital malformations, Risk-Adjusted Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS-1) score, perioperative and postoperative factors, transfusions, length of central venous catheter, nutritional support, and mechanical ventilation. Differences were calculated with the Mann-Whitney-U test, Pearson X 2 , or Fisher's exact test. A multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the independent risk factors. Sepsis was the most common NI (37.5%), and the main causative microorganisms were gram-positive cocci. The independent risk factors associated with NI were non-cardiac congenital malformations (OR 6.1, CI 95% 1.3-29.4), central venous catheter indwelling time > 14 days (OR 3.7, CI 95% 1.3-11.0), duration of mechanical ventilation > 7 days (OR 6.6, CI 95% 2.1-20.1), and ≥5 transfusions of blood products (OR 3.1, CI 95% 1.3-8.5). Mortality attributed to NI was 17.8%. Newborns with non-cardiac congenital malformations and with >7 days of mechanical ventilation were at higher risk for a postoperative NI. Efforts must focus on preventable infections, especially in bloodstream catheter-related infections, which account for 20.5% of all NIs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Recent advances in cardiac catheterization for congenital heart disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sok-Leng Kang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The field of pediatric and adult congenital cardiac catheterization has evolved rapidly in recent years. This review will focus on some of the newer endovascular technological and management strategies now being applied in the pediatric interventional laboratory. Emerging imaging techniques such as three-dimensional (3D rotational angiography, multi-modal image fusion, 3D printing, and holographic imaging have the potential to enhance our understanding of complex congenital heart lesions for diagnostic or interventional purposes. While fluoroscopy and standard angiography remain procedural cornerstones, improved equipment design has allowed for effective radiation exposure reduction strategies. Innovations in device design and implantation techniques have enabled the application of percutaneous therapies in a wider range of patients, especially those with prohibitive surgical risk. For example, there is growing experience in transcatheter duct occlusion in symptomatic low-weight or premature infants and stent implantation into the right ventricular outflow tract or arterial duct in cyanotic neonates with duct-dependent pulmonary circulations. The application of percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation has been extended to a broader patient population with dysfunctional ‘native’ right ventricular outflow tracts and has spurred the development of novel techniques and devices to solve associated anatomic challenges. Finally, hybrid strategies, combining cardiosurgical and interventional approaches, have enhanced our capabilities to provide care for those with the most complex of lesions while optimizing efficacy and safety.

  2. Blood conservation pediatric cardiac surgery in all ages and complexity levels

    OpenAIRE

    Karimi, Mohsen; Sullivan, Jill M; Linthicum, Carrie; Mathew, Anil

    2017-01-01

    AIM To demonstrate the feasibility of blood conservation methods and practice across all ages and risk categories in congenital cardiac surgery. METHODS We retrospectively analyzed a collected database of 356 patients who underwent cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) from 2010-2015. The patients were grouped into blood conservation (n = 138) and non-conservation (n = 218) groups and sub-grouped based on their ages and procedural complexity scores. RESULTS There were no statisti...

  3. Nomenclature for congenital and paediatric cardiac disease: the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code (IPCCC) and the Eleventh Iteration of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Rodney C G; Béland, Marie J; Colan, Steven D; Walters, Henry L; Aiello, Vera D; Anderson, Robert H; Bailliard, Frédérique; Boris, Jeffrey R; Cohen, Meryl S; Gaynor, J William; Guleserian, Kristine J; Houyel, Lucile; Jacobs, Marshall L; Juraszek, Amy L; Krogmann, Otto N; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Lopez, Leo; Maruszewski, Bohdan J; St Louis, James D; Seslar, Stephen P; Srivastava, Shubhika; Stellin, Giovanni; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Weinberg, Paul M; Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2017-12-01

    An internationally approved and globally used classification scheme for the diagnosis of CHD has long been sought. The International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code (IPCCC), which was produced and has been maintained by the International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease (the International Nomenclature Society), is used widely, but has spawned many "short list" versions that differ in content depending on the user. Thus, efforts to have a uniform identification of patients with CHD using a single up-to-date and coordinated nomenclature system continue to be thwarted, even if a common nomenclature has been used as a basis for composing various "short lists". In an attempt to solve this problem, the International Nomenclature Society has linked its efforts with those of the World Health Organization to obtain a globally accepted nomenclature tree for CHD within the 11th iteration of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11). The International Nomenclature Society has submitted a hierarchical nomenclature tree for CHD to the World Health Organization that is expected to serve increasingly as the "short list" for all communities interested in coding for congenital cardiology. This article reviews the history of the International Classification of Diseases and of the IPCCC, and outlines the process used in developing the ICD-11 congenital cardiac disease diagnostic list and the definitions for each term on the list. An overview of the content of the congenital heart anomaly section of the Foundation Component of ICD-11, published herein in its entirety, is also included. Future plans for the International Nomenclature Society include linking again with the World Health Organization to tackle procedural nomenclature as it relates to cardiac malformations. By doing so, the Society will continue its role in standardising nomenclature for CHD across the globe, thereby promoting research and better outcomes for fetuses

  4. Anaesthetic management of patients with congenital heart disease presenting for non-cardiac surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohindra R

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of congenital heart disease is about one percent of all live births in the United States. Treatment is being performed at a younger age and these children are showing improved survival. It is not unusual for children with congenital heart disease to present for non-cardiac surgery. Their management depends on their age, type of lesion, extent of corrective procedure, the presence of complications and other congenital anomalies. Each patient needs a detailed pre-operative evaluation to understand the abnormal anatomy and physiology, and related anaesthetic implications. No anaesthetic agent is an absolute contraindication, although drugs beneficial for one lesion may be detrimental for another. Regional anaesthesia has also been safely used in children with congenital heart disease. However the anaesthesiologist must have a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology of the lesion and the pharmacology of drugs being used to be able to provide safe anaesthesia for children with congenital heart disease.

  5. [Nosocomial infections after cardiac surgery in infants and children with congenital heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, José; Cerda, Jaime; Abarca, Katia; Ferrés, Marcela; Fajuri, Paula; Riquelme, María; Carrillo, Diego; Clavería, Cristián

    2014-02-01

    Nosocomial infections generate high morbidity and mortality in children undergoing cardiac surgery. To determine risk factors for nosocomial infections in children after congenital heart surgery. A retrospective case-control study, in patients younger than 15 years undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease from January 2007 to December 2011 admitted to the Pediatric Critical Patient Unit (UPC-P) in a university hospital. For cases, the information was analyzed from the first episode of infection. 39 patients who develop infections and 39 controls who did not develop infection were enrolled. The median age of cases was 2 months. We identified a number of factors associated with the occurrence of infections, highlighting in univariate analysis: age, weight, univentricular heart physiology, complexity of the surgical procedure according to RACHS-1 and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time ≥ 200 minutes. Multivariate analysis identified CPB time ≥ 200 minutes as the major risk factor, with an OR of 11.57 (CI: 1.04 to 128.5). CPB time ≥ 200 minutes was the mayor risk factor associated with the development of nosocomial infections.

  6. Pattern-based approach to fetal congenital cardiovascular anomalies using the transverse aortic arch view on prenatal cardiac MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Su-Zhen; Zhu, Ming [Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Shanghai Children' s Medical Center, Shanghai (China)

    2015-05-01

    Fetal echocardiography is the imaging modality of choice for prenatal diagnosis of congenital cardiovascular anomalies. However, echocardiography has limitations. Fetal cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to complement US in detecting congenital cardiovascular anomalies. This article draws on our experience; it describes the transverse aortic arch view on fetal cardiac MRI and important clues on an abnormal transverse view at the level of the aortic arch to the diagnosis of fetal congenital cardiovascular anomalies. (orig.)

  7. Pattern-based approach to fetal congenital cardiovascular anomalies using the transverse aortic arch view on prenatal cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Su-Zhen; Zhu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Fetal echocardiography is the imaging modality of choice for prenatal diagnosis of congenital cardiovascular anomalies. However, echocardiography has limitations. Fetal cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to complement US in detecting congenital cardiovascular anomalies. This article draws on our experience; it describes the transverse aortic arch view on fetal cardiac MRI and important clues on an abnormal transverse view at the level of the aortic arch to the diagnosis of fetal congenital cardiovascular anomalies. (orig.)

  8. Morphological evaluation of complex congenital heart disease by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Osahiro

    1993-01-01

    Ninety infants and children with complex congenital heart disease were examined with magnetic resonance imaging and the accuracy of morphological diagnoses by MRI was tested by comparison to the final diagnoses primarily based on angiocardiography. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI diagnoses were generally excellent in evaluating vena caval and atrial morphology, type of AV connection, ventricular morphology, type of VA connection and great vessel morphology. Although some difficulty with evaluating the detailed anatomy of the AV valve and its suspension system and fine vascular structures, MRI could demonstrate the entire cardiac structures clearly and provide the 3-dimensional information regarding the intracardiac structures, and it was extremely valuable in morphological assessment of complex congenital heart disease. (author)

  9. Anesthetic dilemma in planning bilateral cataract surgery for an infant associated with congenital cardiac anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devalina Goswami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In a patient with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF and pulmonary atresia, treating the cardiac problem or the associated congenital illness is always a challenge. We describe the challenges and successful initial management of bilateral cataract to prevent visual loss in an infant with TOF with pulmonary atresia.

  10. Increasing mortality burden among adults with complex congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greutmann, Matthias; Tobler, Daniel; Kovacs, Adrienne H; Greutmann-Yantiri, Mehtap; Haile, Sarah R; Held, Leonhard; Ivanov, Joan; Williams, William G; Oechslin, Erwin N; Silversides, Candice K; Colman, Jack M

    2015-01-01

    Progress in management of congenital heart disease has shifted mortality largely to adulthood. However, adult survivors with complex congenital heart disease are not cured and remain at risk of premature death as young adults. Thus, our aim was to describe the evolution and mortality risk of adult patient cohorts with complex congenital heart disease. Among 12,644 adults with congenital heart disease followed at a single center from 1980 to 2009, 176 had Eisenmenger syndrome, 76 had unrepaired cyanotic defects, 221 had atrial switch operations for transposition of the great arteries, 158 had congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, 227 had Fontan palliation, and 789 had repaired tetralogy of Fallot. We depict the 30-year evolution of these 6 patient cohorts, analyze survival probabilities in adulthood, and predict future number of deaths through 2029. Since 1980, there has been a steady increase in numbers of patients followed, except in cohorts with Eisenmenger syndrome and unrepaired cyanotic defects. Between 1980 and 2009, 308 patients in the study cohorts (19%) died. At the end of 2009, 85% of survivors were younger than 50 years. Survival estimates for all cohorts were markedly lower than for the general population, with important differences between cohorts. Over the upcoming two decades, we predict a substantial increase in numbers of deaths among young adults with subaortic right ventricles, Fontan palliation, and repaired tetralogy of Fallot. Anticipatory action is needed to prepare clinical services for increasing numbers of young adults at risk of dying from complex congenital heart disease. © 2014 The Authors. Congenital Heart Disease Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Cardiac Complications of Fukuyama-Type Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The course of left ventricular function was evaluated using M-mode and Doppler echocardiography in 34 patients with Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD, in a study at the Tokyo Women’s Medical University, Tokyo, Japan.

  12. Cardiac Hemodynamics in the Pathogenesis of Congenital Heart Disease and Aortic Valve Calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Vishal

    2011-11-01

    An improved understanding of the roles of hemodynamic forces play in cardiac development and the pathogenesis of cardiac disease will have significant scientific and clinical impact. I will focus on the role of fluid dynamics in congenital heart disease and aortic valve calcification. Congenital heart defects are the most common form of birth defect. Aortic valve calcification/stenosis is the third leading cause of adult heart disease and the most common form of acquired valvular disease in developed countries. Given the high incidence of these diseases and their associated morbidity and mortality, the potential translational impact of an improved understanding of cardiac hemodynamic forces is very large. Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego

  13. Trends in the utilization of computed tomography and cardiac catheterization among children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Justin Cheng-Ta; Lin, Ming-Tai; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Chen, Shyh-Jye; Wang, Jou-Kou; Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang; Wu, Mei-Hwan; Li, Yiu-Wah

    2015-11-01

    Pediatric cardiac computed tomography (CT) is a noninvasive imaging modality used to clearly demonstrate the anatomical detail of congenital heart diseases. We investigated the impact of cardiac CT on the utilization of cardiac catheterization among children with congenital heart disease. The study sample consisted of 2648 cardiac CT and 3814 cardiac catheterization from 1999 to 2009 for congenital heart diseases. Diagnoses were categorized into 11 disease groups. The numbers of examination, according to the different modalities, were compared using temporal trend analyses. The estimated effective radiation doses (mSv) of CT and catheterization were calculated and compared. The number of CT scans and interventional catheterizations had a slight annual increase of 1.2% and 2.7%, respectively, whereas that of diagnostic catheterization decreased by 6.2% per year. Disease groups fell into two categories according to utilization trend differences between CT and diagnostic catheterization. The increased use of CT reduces the need for diagnostic catheterization in patients with atrioventricular connection disorder, coronary arterial disorder, great vessel disorder, septal disorder, tetralogy of Fallot, and ventriculoarterial connection disorder. Clinicians choose either catheterization or CT, or both examinations, depending on clinical conditions, in patients with semilunar valvular disorder, heterotaxy, myocardial disorder, pericardial disorder, and pulmonary vein disorder. The radiation dose of CT was lower than that of diagnostic cardiac catheterization in all age groups. The use of noninvasive CT in children with selected heart conditions might reduce the use of diagnostic cardiac catheterization. This may release time and facilities within the catheterization laboratory to meet the increasing demand for cardiac interventions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Population-based evaluation of a suggested anatomic and clinical classification of congenital heart defects based on the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goffinet François

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classification of the overall spectrum of congenital heart defects (CHD has always been challenging, in part because of the diversity of the cardiac phenotypes, but also because of the oft-complex associations. The purpose of our study was to establish a comprehensive and easy-to-use classification of CHD for clinical and epidemiological studies based on the long list of the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code (IPCCC. Methods We coded each individual malformation using six-digit codes from the long list of IPCCC. We then regrouped all lesions into 10 categories and 23 subcategories according to a multi-dimensional approach encompassing anatomic, diagnostic and therapeutic criteria. This anatomic and clinical classification of congenital heart disease (ACC-CHD was then applied to data acquired from a population-based cohort of patients with CHD in France, made up of 2867 cases (82% live births, 1.8% stillbirths and 16.2% pregnancy terminations. Results The majority of cases (79.5% could be identified with a single IPCCC code. The category "Heterotaxy, including isomerism and mirror-imagery" was the only one that typically required more than one code for identification of cases. The two largest categories were "ventricular septal defects" (52% and "anomalies of the outflow tracts and arterial valves" (20% of cases. Conclusion Our proposed classification is not new, but rather a regrouping of the known spectrum of CHD into a manageable number of categories based on anatomic and clinical criteria. The classification is designed to use the code numbers of the long list of IPCCC but can accommodate ICD-10 codes. Its exhaustiveness, simplicity, and anatomic basis make it useful for clinical and epidemiologic studies, including those aimed at assessment of risk factors and outcomes.

  15. Blood conservation pediatric cardiac surgery in all ages and complexity levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mohsen; Sullivan, Jill M; Linthicum, Carrie; Mathew, Anil

    2017-04-26

    To demonstrate the feasibility of blood conservation methods and practice across all ages and risk categories in congenital cardiac surgery. We retrospectively analyzed a collected database of 356 patients who underwent cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) from 2010-2015. The patients were grouped into blood conservation ( n = 138) and non-conservation ( n = 218) groups and sub-grouped based on their ages and procedural complexity scores. There were no statistical differences in gender, weight, pre-operative and pre-CPB hematocrit levels in both groups. Despite equivalent hematocrit levels during and after CPB for both groups, there was significantly less operative homologous blood utilized in blood conservation group across all ages and complexity levels. Blood conservation surgery can be performed in congenital patients needing cardiac surgery in all age groups and complexity categories. The above findings in addition to attendant risks and side effects of blood transfusion and the rising cost of safer blood products justify blood conservation in congenital cardiac surgery.

  16. Neonatal screening to detect critical congenital cardiac disease. A revolution in pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vela Amieva Marcela

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There is solid evidence that demonstrate the usefulness of routine oxygen saturation testing in every apparently healthy newborn after 24 hours of life and before 48 hours. This procedure is known as “newborn screening for critical congenital heart disease” and serves to detect timely those congenital structural cardiac malformations with hypoxema, such as heart syndrome, pulmonary valve atresia, truncus arteriosus, total anomalous pulmonary vein connection, complete transposition of the great arteries, tetralogy of Fallot and tricuspid valve atresia. This test has been included in the mandatory neonatal screening panel of many countries and its generalization all over the world, seems imminent.

  17. Nonlinear dynamics, chaos and complex cardiac arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, L.; Courtemanche, M.; Shrier, A.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    Periodic stimulation of a nonlinear cardiac oscillator in vitro gives rise to complex dynamics that is well described by one-dimensional finite difference equations. As stimulation parameters are varied, a large number of different phase-locked and chaotic rhythms is observed. Similar rhythms can be observed in the intact human heart when there is interaction between two pacemaker sites. Simplified models are analyzed, which show some correspondence to clinical observations.

  18. N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide and Phonocardiography in Differentiating Innocent Cardiac Murmurs from Congenital Cardiac Anomalies in Asymptomatic Puppies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinus, S M; Engelen, H.G.H.; Szatmári, V.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Differentiating innocent cardiac murmurs from murmurs caused by congenital cardiac anomalies can be challenging with auscultation alone in asymptomatic puppies. Hypothesis: Plasma N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentrations and phonocardiograms recorded by an

  19. Preliminary MRI study in patients with congenital complex strabismus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man Fengyuan; Wang Zhenchang; Zhao Bo; Zhu Lei; Xian Junfang; Wang Shijun; Jiao Yonghong; Wu Xiao; Zhao Kanxing

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Although the ocular motility examination has been traditionally used in the diagnosis of complex strabismus resulting from cranial nerve (CN) and extraocular muscles (EOM) abnormalities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now permits the direct imaging of lesions in CNs and EOMs. Methods: Twenty-six patients with complex strabismus underwent MRI examination on 1.5 T MR unit (Twinspeed, GE). Nerves to EOMs were imaged with T 1 weighted in orbits in all patients using phase array surface coils. Results: Patients with Duane syndrome (15 cases, 19 eyes) all exhibited absence or hypoplasia of abducens nerve (CN6), always with mild hypoplasia and apparent misdirection of oculomotor nerve (CN3) to the lateral rectus muscle in the orbit, and there were no hypoplasia of EOMs. Patients with congenital fibrosis of EOMs (9 cases, 16 eyes) exhibited severe hypoplasia of CN3 and CN6, and EOMs appeared hypoptasia to a different degree, particularly severe for the superior rectus and levated palpted muscles. Multiple nerves displayed aplasia in patients with Mobius syndrome (1 ease, 2 eyes) and there was abnormal branch from CN3 to lateral rectus. The tendons of bilateral superior oblique muscles were thin in the patients with Brown syndrome (1 case, 2 eyes). Conclusion: MRI can directly demonstrate absence or hypoplasia of CNs and corresponding EOM abnormalities in congenital complex strabismus, which suggests that the mechanism of congenital complex strabismus is perhaps abnormal innervation or displasia of the ocular motor nerves. (authors)

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of complex congenital heart disease in aduits; Magnetresonanztomographie komplexer kongenitaler Herzerkrankungen beim Erwachsenen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bremerich, J. [San Francisco Univ, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology]|[Universitaetsklinik Basel (Switzerland). Abt. fuer Medizinische Radiologie; Wyttenbach, R.; Higgins, C.B. [San Francisco Univ, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Buser, P. [Universitaetsklinik Basel (Switzerland). Abt. fuer Kardiologie; Steinbrich, W. [Universitaetsklinik Basel (Switzerland). Abt. fuer Medizinische Radiologie

    1999-04-01

    An increasing number of patients with complex congenital heart disease reaches adulthood, because treatment and patient outcome have improved considerably in recent years. Monitoring of these patients requires both definition of cardiac anatomy and assessment of function with good reproducibility. Complications after surgical repair such as restenoses of pulmonary arteries after surgical repair of Tetralogy of Fallot, ventricular hypertrophy, stenoses or leakage of baffles, or stenosis and aneurysms of anastomoses have to be detected at an early stage. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an excellent tool to monitor these patients because of its noninvasive nature, its good interstudy and interobserver reproducibility, and because it allows assessment of both cardiac anatomy and function. This paper reviews the current applications of MRI in complex congenital heart disease in adults. (orig.) [Deutsch] Durch Verbesserungen in der Diagnose und Therapie komplexer kongenitaler Herzerkrankungen kann eine zunehmende Anzahl von betroffenen Patienten das Erwachsenenalter erreichen. Diese Patienten benoetigen regelmaessige postoperative Verlaufskontrollen, um Komplikationen wie z.B. Restenosen der grossen Arterien, Stenosen, Lecks und Aneurysmata von Anastomosen, Ventrikelhypertrophie und -dilatation oder Klappendysfunktionen fruehzeitig zu erkennen und zu behandeln. Fuer nichtinvasive regelmaessige Verlaufskontrollen bietet sich die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) des Herzens an, da sie eine umfassende Untersuchung sowohl der Morphologie als auch der Funktion des Herzens mit guter Reproduzierbarkeit erlaubt. Die gegenwaertigen klinischen Anwendungen der MRT bei komplexen kongenitalen Herzerkrankungen beim Erwachsenen werden in dieser Uebersicht beschrieben. (orig.)

  1. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with congenital heart disease; Kardiale MRT bei Patienten mit angeborenen Herzfehlern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich [Mainz Univ. Universitaetsmedizin Mainz (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Kaufmann, Lilly [Mainz Univ. (Germany); Sorantin, Erich [Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiologie, Graz (Austria). Klinische Abt. fuer Kinderradiologie

    2015-06-15

    The prevalence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is around 10 per 1000 live births in Germany. More than 90 % of these patients will survive into adulthood due to improvements in therapy. The classification of CHD may be based according to the anatomic structures involved, to the presence of an intracardiac shunt, the presence of a cyanosis and the intensity of therapy and complexity of the disease. Nearly half of all patients with CHD suffer from an intracardiac shunt, whereas complex cases such as patients with a tetralogy of Fallot or transposition of the great arteries are much more rare. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the work-up and follow-up of patients with CHD, especially after infancy and childhood. Depending on the abnormality in question, a multiparametric examination protocol is mandatory. Knowledge of operative procedures and findings of other imaging modalities help to optimize examination and time needed for it.

  2. Adult congenital cardiopathy: percutaneous treatment of a complex case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez N, Alberto; Carvajal, Andres; Bustillo, Sabas

    2008-01-01

    Adult congenital cardiopathy is a clinical entity difficult to treat and diagnose. Since 1982 endovascular therapy changed its approach radically (1) and in the last years the design of new appliances and better balloon catheters facilitated the implementation of therapy to a greater number of patients (2). It is the election treatment for entities such as pulmonary valve stenosis (3), atrial septal defect (4) and persistent ductus arteriosus. We present the case of complex adult congenital cardiopathy that consisted of wide atrial septal defect,pulmonary valve stenosis with severe repercussion on the right ventricle, persistent PDA with severe calcification and pulmonary arterial hypertension and systemic essential arterial hypertension that were successfully treated through interventionist endovascular therapy in the Hospital Militar Central, in Bogota.

  3. Learning From Experience: Improving Early Tracheal Extubation Success After Congenital Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winch, Peter D; Staudt, Anna M; Sebastian, Roby; Corridore, Marco; Tumin, Dmitry; Simsic, Janet; Galantowicz, Mark; Naguib, Aymen; Tobias, Joseph D

    2016-07-01

    The many advantages of early tracheal extubation following congenital cardiac surgery in young infants and children are now widely recognized. Benefits include avoiding the morbidity associated with prolonged intubation and the consequences of sedation and positive pressure ventilation in the setting of altered cardiopulmonary physiology. Our practice of tracheal extubation of young infants in the operating room following cardiac surgery has evolved and new challenges in the arena of postoperative sedation and pain management have appeared. Review our institutional outcomes associated with early tracheal extubation following congenital cardiac surgery. Inclusion criteria included all children less than 1 year old who underwent congenital cardiac surgery between October 1, 2010, and October 24, 2013. A total of 416 patients less than 1 year old were included. Of the 416 patients, 234 underwent tracheal extubation in the operating room (56%) with 25 requiring reintubation (10.7%), either immediately or following admission to the cardiothoracic ICU. Of the 25 patients extubated in the operating room who required reintubation, 22 failed within 24 hours of cardiothoracic ICU admission; 10 failures were directly related to narcotic doses that resulted in respiratory depression. As a result of this review, we have instituted changes in our cardiothoracic ICU postoperative care plans. We have developed a neonatal delirium score, and have adopted the "Kangaroo Care" approach that was first popularized in neonatal ICUs. This provision allows for the early parental holding of infants following admission to the cardiothoracic ICU and allows for appropriately selected parents to sleep in the same beds alongside their postoperative children.

  4. Predictors of missed appointments in patients referred for congenital or pediatric cardiac magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jimmy C.; Dorfman, Adam L. [C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, University of Michigan Health System, University of Michigan Congenital Heart Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lowery, Ray; Yu, Sunkyung [C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, University of Michigan Health System, University of Michigan Congenital Heart Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ghadimi Mahani, Maryam [C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Agarwal, Prachi P. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Division of Cardiothoracic Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Congenital cardiac magnetic resonance is a limited resource because of scanner and physician availability. Missed appointments decrease scheduling efficiency, have financial implications and represent missed care opportunities. To characterize the rate of missed appointments and identify modifiable predictors. This single-center retrospective study included all patients with outpatient congenital or pediatric cardiac MR appointments from Jan. 1, 2014, through Dec. 31, 2015. We identified missed appointments (no-shows or same-day cancellations) from the electronic medical record. We obtained demographic and clinical factors from the medical record and assessed socioeconomic factors by U.S. Census block data by patient ZIP code. Statistically significant variables (P<0.05) were included into a multivariable analysis. Of 795 outpatients (median age 18.5 years, interquartile range 13.4-27.1 years) referred for congenital cardiac MR, a total of 91 patients (11.4%) missed appointments; 28 (3.5%) missed multiple appointments. Reason for missed appointment could be identified in only 38 patients (42%), but of these, 28 (74%) were preventable or could have been identified prior to the appointment. In multivariable analysis, independent predictors of missed appointments were referral by a non-cardiologist (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 5.8, P=0.0002), referral for research (AOR 3.6, P=0.01), having public insurance (AOR 2.1, P=0.004), and having scheduled cardiac MR from November to April (AOR 1.8, P=0.01). Demographic factors can identify patients at higher risk for missing appointments. These data may inform initiatives to limit missed appointments, such as targeted education of referring providers and patients. Further data are needed to evaluate the efficacy of potential interventions. (orig.)

  5. Congenital and hereditary causes of sudden cardiac death in young adults: diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanovska, Jadranka; Garg, Anubhav; Patel, Smita; Melville, David M; Kazerooni, Ella A; Mueller, Gisela C

    2013-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death is defined as death from unexpected circulatory arrest-usually a result of cardiac arrhythmia-that occurs within 1 hour of the onset of symptoms. Proper and timely identification of individuals at risk for sudden cardiac death and the diagnosis of its predisposing conditions are vital. A careful history and physical examination, in addition to electrocardiography and cardiac imaging, are essential to identify conditions associated with sudden cardiac death. Among young adults (18-35 years), sudden cardiac death most commonly results from a previously undiagnosed congenital or hereditary condition, such as coronary artery anomalies and inherited cardiomyopathies (eg, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy [ARVC], dilated cardiomyopathy, and noncompaction cardiomyopathy). Overall, the most common causes of sudden cardiac death in young adults are, in descending order of frequency, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, coronary artery anomalies with an interarterial or intramural course, and ARVC. Often, sudden cardiac death is precipitated by ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation and may be prevented with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Risk stratification to determine the need for an ICD is challenging and involves imaging, particularly echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Coronary artery anomalies, a diverse group of congenital disorders with a variable manifestation, may be depicted at coronary computed tomographic angiography or MR angiography. A thorough understanding of clinical risk stratification, imaging features, and complementary diagnostic tools for the evaluation of cardiac disorders that may lead to sudden cardiac death is essential to effectively use imaging to guide diagnosis and therapy.

  6. Predictors of successful early extubation following congenital cardiac surgery in neonates and infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winch, Peter D; Nicholson, Lisa; Isaacs, Janet; Spanos, Steven; Olshove, Vincent; Naguib, Aymen

    2009-08-01

    There is a paucity of literature discussing the predictive likelihood of successfully extubating neonates and infants in the operating room immediately following congenital cardiac surgery. Given the unknown consequences of anaesthetics on neurodevelopmental outcomes, minimising the exposure of this population to such agents may have long-term benefits. Retrospective chart review of 391 patients less than 1 year of age. The probability of successfully extubating these patients was based on quantifiable, objective criteria. The relevant variables include age, weight, bypass time, lactate level and specific congenital anomaly. The practice of immediate extubation of infants and neonates is achievable, safe and predicted based on specific patient variables. This practice will minimise the anaesthetic exposure of these especially young patients who may be at risk for long-term consequences related to anaesthetic exposure.

  7. Sedation and Anesthesia in Pediatric and Congenital Cardiac Catheterization: A Prospective Multicenter Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C Huie; Desai, Sanyukta; Nicolas, Ramzi; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Foerster, Susan; Sharma, Anshuman; Armsby, Laurie; Marshall, Audrey C; Odegard, Kirsten; DiNardo, James; Vincent, Julie; El-Said, Howaida; Spaeth, James; Goldstein, Bryan; Holzer, Ralf; Kreutzer, Jackie; Balzer, David; Bergersen, Lisa

    2015-10-01

    Sedation/anesthesia is critical to cardiac catheterization in the pediatric/congenital heart patient. We sought to identify current sedation/anesthesia practices, the serious adverse event rate related to airway, sedation, or anesthesia, and the rate of intra-procedural conversion from procedural sedation to the use of assisted ventilation or an artificial airway. Data from 13,611 patients who underwent catheterization at eight institutions were prospectively collected from 2007 to 2010. Ninety-four (0.69 %) serious sedation/airway-related adverse events occurred; events were more likely to occur in smaller patients (anesthesia, LMA, or tracheostomy, whereas 4232 (31 %) were managed with procedural sedation without an artificial airway, of which 75 (1.77 %) patients were converted to assisted ventilation/general anesthesia. Young age (risk procedure (category 4, OR 10.1, 95 % CI 6.5-15.6, p pediatric/congenital patients was associated with a low rate of serious sedation/airway-related adverse events. Smaller patients with non-cardiac comorbidities or low mixed venous oxygen saturation may be at higher risk. Patients under 1 year of age, undergoing high-risk procedures, or requiring continuous pressor/inotrope support may be at higher risk of requiring conversion from procedural sedation to assisted ventilation/general anesthesia.

  8. Cine magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of cardiac structure and flow dynamics in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagi, Teiji; Kiyomatsu, Yumi; Ohara, Nobutoshi; Takagi, Junichi; Sato, Noboru; Kato, Hirohisa; Eto, Takaharu.

    1989-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging (Cine MRI) was performed in 20 patients aged 19 days to 13 years (mean 4.0 years), who had congenital heart disease confirmed at echocardiography or angiography. Prior to cine MRI, gated MRI was performed to evaluate for cardiac structure. Cine MRI was demonstrated by fast low fip angle shot imaging technique with a 30deg flip angle, 15 msec echo time, 30-40 msec pulse repetition time, and 128 x 128 acquisition matrix. Abnormalities of cardiac structure were extremely well defined in all patients by gated MRI. Intracardiac or intravascular blood flow were visualized in 17 (85%) of 20 patients by cine MRI. Left to right shunt flow through ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, and endocardial cushion defect were visualized with low signal intensity area. Low intensity jets flow through the site of re-coarctation of the aorta were also visualized. However, the good recording of cine MRI was not obtained because of artifacts in 3 of 20 patients (15%) who had severe congestive heart failure or respiratory arrhythmia. Gated MRI provides excellent visualization of fine structure, and cine MRI can provide high spatial resolution imaging of flow dynamic in a variety of congenital heart disease, noninvasively. (author)

  9. Clinical Databases and Registries in Congenital and Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Cardiology, Critical Care, and Anesthesiology Worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vener, David F; Gaies, Michael; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Pasquali, Sara K

    2017-01-01

    The growth in large-scale data management capabilities and the successful care of patients with congenital heart defects have coincidentally paralleled each other for the last three decades, and participation in multicenter congenital heart disease databases and registries is now a fundamental component of cardiac care. This manuscript attempts for the first time to consolidate in one location all of the relevant databases worldwide, including target populations, specialties, Web sites, and participation information. Since at least 1,992 cardiac surgeons and cardiologists began leveraging this burgeoning technology to create multi-institutional data collections addressing a variety of specialties within this field. Pediatric heart diseases are particularly well suited to this methodology because each individual care location has access to only a relatively limited number of diagnoses and procedures in any given calendar year. Combining multiple institutions data therefore allows for a far more accurate contemporaneous assessment of treatment modalities and adverse outcomes. Additionally, the data can be used to develop outcome benchmarks by which individual institutions can measure their progress against the field as a whole and focus quality improvement efforts in a more directed fashion, and there is increasing utilization combining clinical research efforts within existing data structures. Efforts are ongoing to support better collaboration and integration across data sets, to improve efficiency, further the utility of the data collection infrastructure and information collected, and to enhance return on investment for participating institutions.

  10. Kosovo’s Experience for Children with Feeding Difficulties after Cardiac Surgery for Congenital Heart Defect

    OpenAIRE

    Bejiqi, Ramush; Retkoceri, Ragip; Bejiqi, Hana; Maloku, Arlinda; Vuçiterna, Armend; Zeka, Naim; Gerguri, Abdurrahim; Bejiqi, Rinor

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A feeding disorder in infancy and during childhood is a complex condition involving different symptoms such as food refusal and faddiest, both leading to a decreased food intake. AIM: We aimed to assess the prevalence and predictor factors of feeding difficulties in children who underwent cardiac open heart surgery in neonatal period and infancy. We address selected nutritional and caloric requirements for children after cardiac surgery and explore nutritional interdependence ...

  11. Employment characteristics of a complex adult congenital heart disease cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickup, L; Gaffey, T; Clift, P; Bowater, S; Thorne, S; Hudsmith, L

    2017-08-01

    Due to advances in surgical techniques and subsequent management, there have been remarkable improvements in the survival of patients with congenital heart disease. In particular, larger numbers of patients with complex disease are now living into adulthood and are entering the workforce. To establish the types of employment complex adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients are engaged in, based on the largest cohort of patients with a single-ventricle circulation in the UK. Records of all patients with a univentricular (Fontan) circulation at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital were reviewed. Employment status was categorized according to the Standard Occupational Classification criteria (2010). A total of 210 patient records were reviewed. There was the same proportion of professionals in our cohort compared to the rest of the UK (20% versus 20%). There were greater proportions working in the caring, leisure and other service occupations (15% versus 9%), the elementary occupations (17% versus 11%), sales and customer service occupations (14% versus 8%) and administrative and secretarial occupations (12% versus 11%). The reverse trend was observed for associate professions and technical occupations (7% versus 14%), skilled trades (10% versus 11%), process, plant and machine operatives (3% versus 6%) and managers, directors and senior officials (2% versus 10%). The data show that ACHD patients with a single ventricle are engaged in a diverse range of occupations. It is essential that early education and employment advice are given to this cohort to maximize future employment potential. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Serum Cytokines in Young Pediatric Patients with Congenital Cardiac Shunts and Altered Pulmonary Hemodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leína Zorzanelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. Inflammation is central in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. We investigated how serum cytokines correlate with clinical features, hemodynamics, and lung histology in young patients with pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital cardiac shunts. Design. Prospective, observational study. Methods and Results. Patients (n=44 were aged 2.6 to 37.6 months. Group I patients (n=31 were characterized by pulmonary congestion and higher pulmonary blood flow compared to group II (p=0.022, with no need for preoperative cardiac catheterization. Group II patients (n=13 had no congestive features. At catheterization, they had elevated pulmonary vascular resistance (5.7 [4.4–7.4] Wood units·m2, geometric mean with 95% CI. Cytokines were measured by chemiluminescence. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF was found to be inversely related to pulmonary blood flow (r=-0.33, p=0.026 and was higher in group II (high pulmonary vascular resistance compared to group I (high pulmonary blood flow (p=0.017. In contrast, RANTES chemokine (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted was characteristically elevated in Group I (p=0.022. Interleukin 16 was also negatively related to pulmonary blood flow (rS=-0.33, p=0.029 and was higher in patients with obstructive vasculopathy at intraoperative lung biopsy (p=0.021. Conclusion. Cytokines seem to be important and differentially regulated in subpopulations of young patients with cardiac shunts.

  13. A multicentric study of disease-related stress, and perceived vulnerability, in parents of children with congenital cardiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijmoet-Wiersma, C. M. Jantien; Ottenkamp, Jaap; van Roozendaal, Matty; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Koopman, Hendrik M.

    2009-01-01

    Parents of children with congenitally malformed hearts can suffer from stress as a result of the medical condition of their child. In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to describe levels of parental stress, and perceived vulnerability, in parents of children who underwent major cardiac surgery,

  14. Effect of maternal age and cardiac disease severity on outcome of pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furenäs, Eva; Eriksson, Peter; Wennerholm, Ulla-Britt; Dellborg, Mikael

    2017-09-15

    There is an increasing prevalence of women with congenital heart defects reaching childbearing age. In western countries women tend to give birth at a higher age compared to some decades ago. We evaluated the CARdiac disease in PREGnancy (CARPREG) and modified World Health Organization (mWHO) risk classifications for cardiac complications during pregnancies in women with congenital heart defects and analyzed the impact of age on risk of obstetric and fetal outcome. A single-center observational study of cardiac, obstetric, and neonatal complications with data from cardiac and obstetric records of pregnancies in women with congenital heart disease. Outcomes of 496 pregnancies in 232 women, including induced abortion, miscarriage, stillbirth, and live birth were analyzed regarding complications, maternal age, mode of delivery, and two risk classifications: CARPREG and mWHO. There were 28 induced abortions, 59 fetal loss, 409 deliveries with 412 neonates. Cardiac (14%), obstetric (14%), and neonatal (15%) complications were noted, including one maternal death and five stillbirths. The rate of cesarean section was 19%. Age above 35years was of borderline importance for cardiac complications (p=0.054) and was not a significant additional risk factor for obstetric or neonatal complications. Both risk classifications had moderate clinical utility, with area under the curve (AUC) 0.71 for CARPREG and 0.65 for mWHO on cardiac complications. Pregnancy complications in women with congenital heart disease are common but severe complications are rare. Advanced maternal age does not seem to affect complication rate. Existing risk classification systems are insufficient in predicting complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The accuracy of chest radiographs in the detection of congenital heart disease and in the diagnosis of specific congenital cardiac lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laya, Bernard F.; Goske, Marilyn J.; Morrison, Stuart; Reid, Janet R.; Swischuck, Leonard; Ey, Elizabeth H.; Murphy, Daniel J.; Lieber, Michael; Obuchowski, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric patients. Traditional teaching holds that specific types of CHD can be diagnosed on the chest radiograph (CXR) through pattern recognition. To determine the accuracy of radiologists in detecting CHD on the CXR. This study was a blinded retrospective review of chest radiographs from 281 patients (<12 years) by five pediatric radiologists from three institutions. Thirteen groups were evaluated that included 12 categories of CHD and a control group of patients without heart disease. Radiographs were assessed for heart size, heart and mediastinal shape and vascularity. Clinical information, angiography, echocardiograms and surgery were used as the gold standard for definitive diagnosis. The average accuracy of the five readers in distinguishing normal from CHD patients was 78% (range of 72% to 82%). The overall measure of accuracy in distinguishing specific congenital cardiac lesions among 13 groups of patients was 71% (range of 63% to 79%). CXR alone is not diagnostic of specific cardiac lesions, with a low accuracy of only 71%. We believe that less emphasis should be placed on the use of radiographs alone in diagnosing specific congenital cardiac lesions. (orig.)

  16. The Perioperative Use of Dexmedetomidine in Pediatric Patients with Congenital Heart Disease: An Analysis from the Congenital Cardiac Anesthesia Society-Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Disease Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Lawrence I; Twite, Mark; Gulack, Brian; Hill, Kevin; Kim, Sunghee; Vener, David F

    2016-09-01

    Dexmedetomidine is a selective α-2 receptor agonist with a sedative and cardiopulmonary profile that makes it an attractive anesthetic for pediatric patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Although several smaller, single-center studies suggest that dexmedetomidine use is gaining traction in the perioperative setting in children with CHD, there are limited multicenter data, with little understanding of the variation in use across age ranges, procedural complexity, and centers. The aim of this study was to use the Congenital Cardiac Anesthesia Society-Society of Thoracic Surgeons (CCAS-STS) registry to describe patient- and center-level variability in the use of dexmedetomidine in the perioperative setting in children with heart disease. To describe the use of dexmedetomidine in patients for CHD surgery, we analyzed all index cardiopulmonary bypass operations entered in the CCAS-STS database from 2010 to 2013. Patient and operative characteristics were compared between those who received intraoperative dexmedetomidine and those who did not. Selective outcomes associated with dexmedetomidine use were also described. Of the 12,142 operations studied, 3600 (29.6%) received perioperative dexmedetomidine (DEX) and 8542 did not receive the drug (NoDEX). Patient characteristics were different between the 2 groups with the DEX group generally exhibiting both lower patient and procedural risk factors. Patients who received dexmedetomidine were more likely to have a lower level of Society of Thoracic Surgeons mortality complexity than patient who did not receive it. Consistent with their overall lower risk profile, children in the DEX group also demonstrated improved outcomes compared with patients who did not receive dexmedetomidine. We described the growing use of dexmedetomidine in children anesthetized for surgical repair of CHD. Dexmedetomidine appears to be preferentially given to older and larger children who are undergoing less complex CHD surgery. We believe

  17. X-ray diagnosis and treatment for severe respiratory complications during cardiac catheterizations on pediatric congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cheng; Zhao Shihua; Jiang Shiliang; Huang Lianjun; Xu Zhongying; Ling Jian; Zheng Hong; Xie Ruolan; Lu Minjie

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the radiological features of severe respiratory complications during cardiac catheterizations on pediatric congenital heart disease so as to make early diagnosis and treatment. We also intend to find the mechanism of these complications. Methods: A total of 9 pediatric cases with severe respiratory complications during cardiac catheterizations were included in the study. The clinical manifestations, radiological features, and corresponding treatments were reviewed. Results: Most of the cases had severe hypoxia, with 6 cases presenting with bradycardia. Opacification of two lung fields was found in 7 cases, pulmonary edema in 1 case, and atelectasis of the upper right lung in 1 case. With intubation, oxygen inhalation and administration of certain drugs, all cases were saved except 1 case with pulmonary edema. Conclusion: Severe respiratory complications during cardiac catheterizations on pediatric congenital heart disease are emergent and critical, and they often presented with various manifestations. Early diagnosis and correct treatment are the key to successful salvage. (authors)

  18. A ferromagnetic surgical system reduces phrenic nerve injury in redo congenital cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkawa, Takeshi; Holloway, Jessica; Tang, Xinyu; Gossett, Jeffrey M; Imamura, Michiaki

    2017-05-01

    A ferromagnetic surgical system (FMwand®) is a new type of dissection device expected to reduce the risk of adjacent tissue damage. We reviewed 426 congenital cardiac operations with cardiopulmonary bypass through redo sternotomy to assess if this device prevented phrenic nerve injury. The ferromagnetic surgical system was used in 203 operations (47.7%) with regular electrocautery and scissors. The preoperative and operative details were similar between the operations with or without the ferromagnetic surgical system. The incidence of phrenic nerve injury was significantly lower with the ferromagnetic surgical system (0% vs 2.7%, P = 0.031). A logistic regression model showed that the use of the ferromagnetic surgical system was significantly associated with reduced odds of phrenic nerve injury (P < 0.001). © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  19. Outcome for Fetuses with Prenatally Detected Congenital Heart Disease and Cardiac Arrhythmias in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Mou Hsiao

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion: Outcome for fetuses with prenatally detected CHD remains poor, with the prognosis negatively influenced by the presence of complex heart defects as well as extracardiac and chromosomal anomalies. However, prognosis is good for fetuses with cardiac arrhythmia, except with long QT syndrome or hydrops fetalis.

  20. Complex versus simple models: ion-channel cardiac toxicity prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Hitesh B

    2018-01-01

    There is growing interest in applying detailed mathematical models of the heart for ion-channel related cardiac toxicity prediction. However, a debate as to whether such complex models are required exists. Here an assessment in the predictive performance between two established large-scale biophysical cardiac models and a simple linear model B net was conducted. Three ion-channel data-sets were extracted from literature. Each compound was designated a cardiac risk category using two different classification schemes based on information within CredibleMeds. The predictive performance of each model within each data-set for each classification scheme was assessed via a leave-one-out cross validation. Overall the B net model performed equally as well as the leading cardiac models in two of the data-sets and outperformed both cardiac models on the latest. These results highlight the importance of benchmarking complex versus simple models but also encourage the development of simple models.

  1. Complex versus simple models: ion-channel cardiac toxicity prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh B. Mistry

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in applying detailed mathematical models of the heart for ion-channel related cardiac toxicity prediction. However, a debate as to whether such complex models are required exists. Here an assessment in the predictive performance between two established large-scale biophysical cardiac models and a simple linear model Bnet was conducted. Three ion-channel data-sets were extracted from literature. Each compound was designated a cardiac risk category using two different classification schemes based on information within CredibleMeds. The predictive performance of each model within each data-set for each classification scheme was assessed via a leave-one-out cross validation. Overall the Bnet model performed equally as well as the leading cardiac models in two of the data-sets and outperformed both cardiac models on the latest. These results highlight the importance of benchmarking complex versus simple models but also encourage the development of simple models.

  2. An Unusual Case of Heteropagus: Autosite With a Complex Cardiac Malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulya Ozkan-Ulu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetrical form of conjoined twinning (heteropagus is an extremely rare event with an incidence of 1–2 million live births. The incomplete component of heteropagus, namely, parasite, usually consists of rudimentary organs. Therefore, the autosite component of heteropagus can be separated successfully. A wide spectrum of associated congenital cardiac malformations, which are usually minor, has been described in autosites. However, a single-ventricle heart anomaly in the autosite has been reported in a very few cases. We report an unusual case of heteropagus with a complex cardiac malformation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the third heteropagus case in the literature with a single-ventricle heart in the autosite.

  3. A Novel Role for CSRP1 in a Lebanese Family with Congenital Cardiac Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Kamar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite an obvious role for consanguinity in congenital heart disease (CHD, most studies fail to document a monogenic model of inheritance except for few cases. We hereby describe a first-degree cousins consanguineous Lebanese family with 7 conceived children: 2 died in utero of unknown causes, 3 have CHD, and 4 have polydactyly. The aim of the study is to unveil the genetic variant(s causing these phenotypes using next generation sequencing (NGS technology. Targeted exome sequencing identified a heterozygous duplication in CSRP1 which leads to a potential frameshift mutation at position 154 of the protein. This mutation is inherited from the father, and segregates only with the CHD phenotype. The in vitro characterization demonstrates that the mutation dramatically abrogates its transcriptional activity over cardiac promoters like NPPA. In addition, it differentially inhibits the physical association of CSRP1 with SRF, GATA4, and with the newly described partner herein TBX5. Whole exome sequencing failed to show any potential variant linked to polydactyly, but revealed a novel missense mutation in TRPS1. This mutation is inherited from the healthy mother, and segregating only with the cardiac phenotype. Both TRPS1 and CSRP1 physically interact, and the mutations in each abrogate their partnership. Our findings add fundamental knowledge into the molecular basis of CHD, and propose the di-genic model of inheritance as responsible for such malformations.

  4. Cardiac magnetic resonance: Impact on diagnosis and management of patients with congenital cardiovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secchi, F., E-mail: francescosecchimd@gmail.com [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); Di Leo, G. [S.C. di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Papini, G.D.E. [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); Nardella, V.G. [Facolta di Medicina e Chirurgia, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); Negura, D.; Carminati, M. [S.C. di Cardiologia Pediatrica, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Sardanelli, F. [S.C. di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Medico-Chirurgiche, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy)

    2011-08-15

    Aim: To estimate the clinical impact of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with congenital cardiovascular disease (CCD). Materials and methods: Since 2003, 1.5 T CMR was used at our university hospital to evaluate morphology, cardiac kinetics, aortic and pulmonary flow, and vascular anatomy in patients with CCD. The present study considered a consecutive series of these patients from 2003 to 2006. A paediatric cardiologist judged our reports as expected or unexpected and, secondarily, as not reliable (level 0), describing findings already known (level 1), not changing therapy/suggested lifestyle (level 2), changing therapy/suggested lifestyle (level 3) or changing diagnosis (level 4). Results: CMR reports were judged to be expected in 187/214 (87%) and unexpected in 27/214 (13%). Less than 2% of CMRs were judged as levels 0 or 1, 66% as level 2, and 5% as level 4. During 2005-2006 the clinical impact improved toward higher impact levels (p < 0.001, chi-square test). Conclusions: In patients with CCD, more than one in 10 CMR reports were unexpected to cardiologists and over seven in 10 prompted a change of diagnosis or therapy.

  5. CRISP: Catheterization RISk score for Pediatrics: A Report from the Congenital Cardiac Interventional Study Consortium (CCISC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykanen, David G; Forbes, Thomas J; Du, Wei; Divekar, Abhay A; Reeves, Jaxk H; Hagler, Donald J; Fagan, Thomas E; Pedra, Carlos A C; Fleming, Gregory A; Khan, Danyal M; Javois, Alexander J; Gruenstein, Daniel H; Qureshi, Shakeel A; Moore, Phillip M; Wax, David H

    2016-02-01

    We sought to develop a scoring system that predicts the risk of serious adverse events (SAE's) for individual pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization procedures. Systematic assessment of risk of SAE in pediatric catheterization can be challenging in view of a wide variation in procedure and patient complexity as well as rapidly evolving technology. A 10 component scoring system was originally developed based on expert consensus and review of the existing literature. Data from an international multi-institutional catheterization registry (CCISC) between 2008 and 2013 were used to validate this scoring system. In addition we used multivariate methods to further refine the original risk score to improve its predictive power of SAE's. Univariate analysis confirmed the strong correlation of each of the 10 components of the original risk score with SAE attributed to a pediatric cardiac catheterization (P pediatric cardiac catheterization procedures. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Predictors of postnatal complications and congenital cardiac diseases in infants of mothers with pregestational and gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirpençe, Savaş; Demirpençe, Banu İnce; Meşe, Timur; Arslanoğlu, Sertaç; Tavlı, Vedide; Çalkavur, Şebnem; Olukman, Özgür; Firuzan, Ali Rıza

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the postnatal problems of infants of mothers with pregestational and gestational diabetes and the clinical properties of infants who were found to have congenital cardiac disease. We retrospectively examined the records of 337 newborns who were followed up with a diagnosis of infant of diabetic mother between January 2010 and January 2012 in our Neonatology Unit. The demographic data of the diabetic mothers and their babies, the postnatal problems of the babies of diabetic mothers and congenital heart diseases found on transthoracic echocardiography were examined. The patients were classified as group A, B and C in accordance with the recommendations of The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) according to the type of diabetes. The most common postnatal problems included hyperbilirubinemia, respiratory distress, hypoglycemia and hypocalcemia. The rate of congenital heart disease was found be 17.3% in group A, 50% in group B and 9% in group C. No correlation was found between congenital heart disease and gender, multiple pregnancy, diabetes type, diet treatment, use of oral antidiabetic drugs and drug usage. A positive significant correlation was found between congenital heart disease and genetic disease, murmur, cyanosis and presence of gestational hypertension. It was shown that use of insulin, genetic disease and presence of gestational diabetes increased the risk of congenital heart disease. In our study, the overall incidence of congenital heart disease was found to be 24% in infants of diabetic mothers. It should be kept in mind that it is important to investigate the infants of mothers with pregestational and gestational diabetes in terms of the risk of congenital heart disease.

  7. Surgical Treatment for a Complex Congenital Arteriovenous Malformation of the Lower Limb

    OpenAIRE

    Ozcan, Ali Vefa; Boysan, Emre; Isikli, Osman Yasar; Goksin, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistula is defined as an abnormal communication between the arterial and venous systems. The complexity of congenital arteriovenous malformations makes treatment challenging. We present the case of a 23-year-old woman who had a complex congenital arteriovenous malformation in her left leg and a history of 2 unsuccessful coil-embolization procedures. We ligated all the feeding arteries of the arteriovenous malformation in the region of the superficial femoral artery, and the surg...

  8. Coffin-Siris syndrome with the rarest constellation of congenital cardiac defects: A case report with review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Nemani, Lalita; Barik, Ramachandra; Patnaik, Amar Narayana; Mishra, Ramesh C; Rao, Amaresh M; Kapur, Pragati

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of type-A Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) with a unique constellation of congenital heart defects. A 17-year-old Indian boy was referred to our hospital for central cyanosis with features of right heart failure. The cardiac abnormalities included biventricular outflow tract obstruction, small atrial septal defect (ASD), subaortic ventricular septal defect, drainage of left superior venacava to left atrial appendage, and aortic arch anomaly. Patient underwent successful right vent...

  9. Congenital left ventricular wall abnormalities in adults detected by gated cardiac multidetector computed tomography: Clefts, aneurysms, diverticula and terminology problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erol, Cengiz; Koplay, Mustafa; Olcay, Ayhan; Kivrak, Ali Sami; Ozbek, Seda; Seker, Mehmet; Paksoy, Yahya

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Our aim was to evaluate congenital left ventricular wall abnormalities (clefts, aneurysms and diverticula), describe and illustrate imaging features, discuss terminology problems and determine their prevalence detected by cardiac CT in a single center. Materials and methods: Coronary CT angiography images of 2093 adult patients were evaluated retrospectively in order to determine congenital left ventricular wall abnormalities. Results: The incidence of left ventricular clefts (LVC) was 6.7% (141 patients) and statistically significant difference was not detected between the sexes regarding LVC (P = 0.5). LVCs were single in 65.2% and multiple in 34.8% of patients. They were located at the basal to mid inferoseptal segment of the left ventricle in 55.4%, the basal to mid anteroseptal segment in 24.1%, basal to mid inferior segment in 17% and septal–apical septal segment in 3.5% of cases. The cleft length ranged from 5 to 22 mm (mean 10.5 mm) and they had a narrow connection with the left ventricle (mean 2.5 mm). They were contractile with the left ventricle and obliterated during systole. Congenital left ventricular septal aneurysm that was located just under the aortic valve was detected in two patients (0.1%). No case of congenital left ventricular diverticulum was detected. Conclusion: Cardiac CT allows us to recognize congenital left ventricular wall abnormalities which have been previously overlooked in adults. LVC is a congenital structural variant of the myocardium, is seen more frequently than previously reported and should be differentiated from aneurysm and diverticulum for possible catastrophic complications of the latter two.

  10. Congenital cardiac disease in childhood x socioeconomic conditions: a relationship to be considered in public health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thayanny Lopes do Vale Barros

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Congenital heart defects, cardiac malformations that occur in the embryonic period, constitute a serious health problem. They cover a proportion of 8-10 per 1000 live births and contribute to infant mortality. Objective: To identify the socioeconomic status of children undergoing cardiac surgery at the Hospital Universitário da Universidade Federal do Maranhão, in São Luis, the existence of material elements that contribute to worsening conditions. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study with a quantitative approach, descriptive and reflective, from the interviews conducted by the Social Service Social with families of children with heart disease from January 2011 to July 2012. Results: A total of 95 interviews, the results reveal that (75.79% of children have elements that suggest poor socioeconomic conditions. It also shows that only 66.33% lived in brick house, while (31.73% in mud, adobe and straw houses. With regard to income, it showed that only 4.08% received 1-2 minimum wages, while the remaining (95.9% with benchmarks oscillating half the minimum wage (27.55%, 1/4 of the minimum wage and (24.48% and income below 70 dollars per person, featuring extreme poverty. On the social security situation prevailing at children with no ties to 61.22%. With respect to benefits, we found that only (12.24% of children were in the enjoyment of the Continuous Cash Benefit - CCB. Conclusion: Poor socioeconomic conditions listed as major obstacles in meeting the needs, resulting in the maintenance of health conditions and even allowing the aggravation of an existing pathology.

  11. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Congenital Cardiac Defects and Ophthalmologic Changes - Systematization for Diagnosis in the Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Priscila H A; Souza, Beatriz S; Pacheco, Eimi N; Menegazzo, Michele S; Corrêa, Ivan S; Zen, Paulo R G; Rosa, Rafael F M; Cesa, Claudia C; Pellanda, Lucia C; Vilela, Manuel A P

    2018-01-01

    Numerous genetic syndromes associated with heart disease and ocular manifestations have been described. However, a compilation and a summarization of these syndromes for better consultation and comparison have not been performed yet. The objective of this work is to systematize available evidence in the literature on different syndromes that may cause congenital heart diseases associated with ocular changes, focusing on the types of anatomical and functional changes. A systematic search was performed on Medline electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, Lilacs) of articles published until January 2016. Eligibility criteria were case reports or review articles that evaluated the association of ophthalmic and cardiac abnormalities in genetic syndrome patients younger than 18 years. The most frequent genetic syndromes were: Down Syndrome, Velo-cardio-facial / DiGeorge Syndrome, Charge Syndrome and Noonan Syndrome. The most associated cardiac malformations with ocular findings were interatrial communication (77.4%), interventricular communication (51.6%), patent ductus arteriosus (35.4%), pulmonary artery stenosis (25.8%) and tetralogy of Fallot (22.5%). Due to their clinical variability, congenital cardiac malformations may progress asymptomatically to heart defects associated with high morbidity and mortality. For this reason, the identification of extra-cardiac characteristics that may somehow contribute to the diagnosis of the disease or reveal its severity is of great relevance.

  12. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Congenital Cardiac Defects and Ophthalmologic Changes - Systematization for Diagnosis in the Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila H. A. Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Numerous genetic syndromes associated with heart disease and ocular manifestations have been described. However, a compilation and a summarization of these syndromes for better consultation and comparison have not been performed yet. Objective: The objective of this work is to systematize available evidence in the literature on different syndromes that may cause congenital heart diseases associated with ocular changes, focusing on the types of anatomical and functional changes. Method: A systematic search was performed on Medline electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, Lilacs of articles published until January 2016. Eligibility criteria were case reports or review articles that evaluated the association of ophthalmic and cardiac abnormalities in genetic syndrome patients younger than 18 years. Results: The most frequent genetic syndromes were: Down Syndrome, Velo-cardio-facial / DiGeorge Syndrome, Charge Syndrome and Noonan Syndrome. The most associated cardiac malformations with ocular findings were interatrial communication (77.4%, interventricular communication (51.6%, patent ductus arteriosus (35.4%, pulmonary artery stenosis (25.8% and tetralogy of Fallot (22.5%. Conclusion: Due to their clinical variability, congenital cardiac malformations may progress asymptomatically to heart defects associated with high morbidity and mortality. For this reason, the identification of extra-cardiac characteristics that may somehow contribute to the diagnosis of the disease or reveal its severity is of great relevance.

  13. Adverse cardiac events in children with Williams syndrome undergoing cardiovascular surgery: An analysis of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornik, Christoph P; Collins, Ronnie Thomas; Jaquiss, Robert D B; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Jacobs, Marshall L; Pasquali, Sara K; Wallace, Amelia S; Hill, Kevin D

    2015-06-01

    Patients with Williams syndrome (WS) undergoing cardiac surgery are at risk for major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Prevalence and risk factors for such events have not been well described. We sought to define frequency and risk of MACE in patients with WS using a multicenter clinical registry. We identified cardiac operations performed in patients with WS using the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (2000-2012). Operations were divided into 4 groups: isolated supravalvular aortic stenosis, complex left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT), isolated right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT), and combined LVOT/RVOT procedures. The proportion of patients with MACE (in-hospital mortality, cardiac arrest, or postoperative mechanical circulatory support) was described and the association with preoperative factors was examined. Of 447 index operations (87 centers), median (interquartile range) age and weight at surgery were 2.4 years (0.6-7.4 years) and 10.6 kg (6.5-21.5 kg), respectively. Mortality occurred in 20 patients (5%). MACE occurred in 41 patients (9%), most commonly after combined LVOT/RVOT (18 out of 87; 21%) and complex LVOT (12 out of 131; 9%) procedures, but not after isolated RVOT procedures. Odds of MACE decreased with age (odds ratio [OR], 0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98-0.99), weight (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.93-0.99), but increased in the presence of any preoperative risk factor (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.06-4.00), and in procedures involving coronary artery repair (OR, 5.37; 95% CI, 2.05-14.06). In this multicenter analysis, MACE occurred in 9% of patients with WS undergoing cardiac surgery. Demographic and operative characteristics were associated with risk. Further study is needed to elucidate mechanisms of MACE in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prenatal screening for major congenital heart disease: assessing performance by combining national cardiac audit with maternity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Helena M; Kovacevic, Alexander; van der Heijden, Laila B; Pfeiffer, Patricia W; Franklin, Rodney Cg; Gibbs, John L; Averiss, Ian E; Larovere, Joan M

    2014-03-01

    Determine maternity hospital and lesion-specific prenatal detection rates of major congenital heart disease (mCHD) for hospitals referring prenatally and postnatally to one Congenital Cardiac Centre, and assess interhospital relative performance (relative risk, RR). We manually linked maternity data (3 hospitals prospectively and another 16 retrospectively) with admissions, fetal diagnostic and surgical cardiac data from one Congenital Cardiac Centre. This Centre submits verified information to National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research (NICOR-Congenital), which publishes aggregate antenatal diagnosis data from infant surgical procedures. We included 120 198 unselected women screened prospectively over 11 years in 3 maternity hospitals (A, B, C). Hospital A: colocated with fetal medicine, proactive superintendent, on-site training, case-review and audit, hospital B: on-site training, proactive superintendent, monthly telemedicine clinics, and hospital C: sonographers supported by local obstetrician. We then studied 321 infants undergoing surgery for complete transposition (transposition of the great arteries (TGA), n=157) and isolated aortic coarctation (CoA, n=164) screened in hospitals A, B, C prospectively, and 16 hospitals retrospectively. 385 mCHD recorded prospectively from 120 198 (3.2/1000) screened women in 3 hospitals. Interhospital relative performance (RR) in Hospital A:1.68 (1.4 to 2.0), B:0.70 (0.54 to 0.91), C:0.65 (0.5 to 0.8). Standardised prenatal detection rates (funnel plots) demonstrating inter-hospital variation across 19 hospitals for TGA (37%, 0.00 to 0.81) and CoA (34%, 0.00 to 1.06). Manually linking data sources produced hospital-specific and lesion-specific prenatal mCHD detection rates. More granular, rather than aggregate, data provides meaningful feedback to improve screening performance. Automatic maternal and infant record linkage on a national scale, requires verified, prospective maternity audit and integration of

  15. Echocardiographic evaluation of simple versus complex congenital heart disease in a tertiary care Paediatrics Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Uttam Kumar Sarkar; Anish Chatterjee; Suprit Basu; Atanu Pan; Sumit Periwal

    2017-01-01

    Background & Objectives:Congenital heart diseases are treatable either by catheter based intervention or open heart surgery according to their quality. In our study we aim to analyze congenital heart disease echocardiographically into simple versus complex heart disease at a tertiary care centre with a public health planning and policy making perspective.Materials & Methods:This hospital based study was done on 1010 patients, both from in-patient and out-patient, who were clinically s...

  16. Pattern and clinical profile of children with complex cardiac anomaly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... DORV (double outlet right ventricle) with left sided aorta, hypoplastic tricuspid valve with a PDA (patent ductus artriosus), TOF (tetralogy of fallot), prolapse of aortic valve, and pulmonary regurgitation. One of these complex cardiac anomalies presented with Turner's syndrome and another with VACTERAL association.

  17. Profiles in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freed, M.D.; Keane, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    Pediatric cardiology has made great strides in the diagnosis, management, and correction of complex congenital malformations in the past two decades. The foundation of these advances is a more precise understanding of the physiology and anatomy of complex lesions that has been obtained from cardiac catheterization and angiography. The techniques for catheterization of infants and children have been discussed in another paper. This chapter focuses on brief profiles of some of the more important congenital abnormalities. The incidence cited in the discussion of each abnormality pertains to a population comprises of children and adults referred to The Children's Hospital Medical Center and Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, respectively, for evaluation of congenital heart disease

  18. The "boomerang" malleus-incus complex in congenital aural atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S; Kesser, B W; Raghavan, P

    2014-01-01

    "Boomerang" malleus-incus fusion deformity is identified on axial high-resolution CT in a subset of patients with congenital aural atresia, and it is associated with an absent incudostapedial joint and stapes capitulum and attachment of the incus to the tympanic segment of the facial nerve canal. Twelve patients with this deformity were identified on a retrospective review of imaging from a cohort of 673 patients with congenital aural atresia, with surgical confirmation in 9 of these patients. Eight of 9 patients underwent partial ossicular replacement prosthesis reconstruction with improvement in hearing outcome. We hypothesize that the boomerang anomaly represents a more severe ossicular anomaly than is normally seen in congenital aural atresia, arising from an arrest earlier in the embryonic development of the first and second branchial arch. This has potentially important implications for surgical planning because hearing outcomes with placement of prosthesis may not be as good as with conventional atresia surgery, in which reconstruction is performed with the patient's native ossicular chain. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  19. Association of US State Implementation of Newborn Screening Policies for Critical Congenital Heart Disease With Early Infant Cardiac Deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouk, Rahi; Grosse, Scott D; Ailes, Elizabeth C; Oster, Matthew E

    2017-12-05

    In 2011, critical congenital heart disease was added to the US Recommended Uniform Screening Panel for newborns, but whether state implementation of screening policies has been associated with infant death rates is unknown. To assess whether there was an association between implementation of state newborn screening policies for critical congenital heart disease and infant death rates. Observational study with group-level analyses. A difference-in-differences analysis was conducted using the National Center for Health Statistics' period linked birth/infant death data set files for 2007-2013 for 26 546 503 US births through June 30, 2013, aggregated by month and state of birth. State policies were classified as mandatory or nonmandatory (including voluntary policies and mandates that were not yet implemented). As of June 1, 2013, 8 states had implemented mandatory screening policies, 5 states had voluntary screening policies, and 9 states had adopted but not yet implemented mandates. Numbers of early infant deaths (between 24 hours and 6 months of age) coded for critical congenital heart disease or other/unspecified congenital cardiac causes for each state-month birth cohort. Between 2007 and 2013, there were 2734 deaths due to critical congenital heart disease and 3967 deaths due to other/unspecified causes. Critical congenital heart disease death rates in states with mandatory screening policies were 8.0 (95% CI, 5.4-10.6) per 100 000 births (n = 37) in 2007 and 6.4 (95% CI, 2.9-9.9) per 100 000 births (n = 13) in 2013 (for births by the end of July); for other/unspecified cardiac causes, death rates were 11.7 (95% CI, 8.6-14.8) per 100 000 births in 2007 (n = 54) and 10.3 (95% CI, 5.9-14.8) per 100 000 births (n = 21) in 2013. Early infant deaths from critical congenital heart disease through December 31, 2013, decreased by 33.4% (95% CI, 10.6%-50.3%), with an absolute decline of 3.9 (95% CI, 3.6-4.1) deaths per 100 000 births after

  20. Surgical treatment for a complex congenital arteriovenous malformation of the lower limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Ali Vefa; Boysan, Emre; Isikli, Osman Yasar; Goksin, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistula is defined as an abnormal communication between the arterial and venous systems. The complexity of congenital arteriovenous malformations makes treatment challenging. We present the case of a 23-year-old woman who had a complex congenital arteriovenous malformation in her left leg and a history of 2 unsuccessful coil-embolization procedures. We ligated all the feeding arteries of the arteriovenous malformation in the region of the superficial femoral artery, and the surgery was successful without sequelae. The patient returned 2 years later with thrombosis of the great saphenous vein and underwent a second operation. The thrombosed vein and all varicosities were excised successfully. Surgery can be an effective method for correcting complex congenital arteriovenous malformations, especially in the lower limbs. A 2-staged surgical approach like ours might be a good option in suitable patients.

  1. Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury after Congenital Cardiac Surgery in Infants and Children: A Retrospective Observational Study.

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    Sun-Kyung Park

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI after pediatric cardiac surgery is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Modifiable risk factors for postoperative AKI including perioperative anesthesia-related parameters were assessed. The authors conducted a single-center, retrospective cohort study of 220 patients (aged 10 days to 19 years who underwent congenital cardiac surgery between January and December 2012. The incidence of AKI within 7 days postoperatively was determined using the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO criteria. Ninety-two patients (41.8% developed AKI and 18 (8.2% required renal replacement therapy within the first postoperative week. Among patients who developed AKI, 57 patients (25.9% were KDIGO stage 1, 27 patients (12.3% were KDIGO stage 2, and eight patients (3.6% were KDIGO stage 3. RACHS-1 (Risk-Adjusted classification for Congenital Heart Surgery category, perioperative transfusion and fluid administration as well as fluid overload were compared between patients with and without AKI. Multivariable logistic regression analyses determined the risk factors for AKI. AKI was associated with longer hospital stay or ICU stay, and frequent sternal wound infections. Younger age (3 g/dl from preoperative level on POD1 was entered into the multivariable analysis, it was independently associated with postoperative AKI (OR, 6.51; 95% CI, 2.23-19.03 compared with no increase. This association was significant after adjustment with patient demographics, medication history and RACHS-1 category (hemoglobin increase >3g/dl vs. no increase: adjusted OR, 6.94; 95% CI, 2.33-20.69, regardless of different age groups and cyanotic or non-cyanotic heart disease. Prospective trials are required to evaluate whether correction of preoperative anemia and prevention of hemoconcentration may ameliorate postoperative AKI in patients who underwent congenital cardiac surgery.

  2. Kosovo’s Experience for Children with Feeding Difficulties after Cardiac Surgery for Congenital Heart Defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejiqi, Ramush; Retkoceri, Ragip; Bejiqi, Hana; Maloku, Arlinda; Vuçiterna, Armend; Zeka, Naim; Gerguri, Abdurrahim; Bejiqi, Rinor

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A feeding disorder in infancy and during childhood is a complex condition involving different symptoms such as food refusal and faddiest, both leading to a decreased food intake. AIM: We aimed to assess the prevalence and predictor factors of feeding difficulties in children who underwent cardiac open heart surgery in neonatal period and infancy. We address selected nutritional and caloric requirements for children after cardiac surgery and explore nutritional interdependence with other system functions. METHODS: This was a retrospective study in a tertiary referral hospital, and prior approval from the institutional ethics committee was obtained. Information for 78 children (42 male and 36 female) was taken from patients charts. Data were analysed with descriptive statistics and logistic regression. RESULTS: From a cohort of analysed children with feeding problems we have occurred in 23% of such cases. At the time of the study, refusal to eat or poor appetite was reported as a significant problem in 19 children and subnormal height and weight were recorded in 11 children. Early neonatal intervention and reoperation were identified as risk factors for latter feeding difficulties or inadequate intake. Children with feeding problems also tended to eat less than children without feeding problems. There was a trend towards more feeding problems in patients with chromosomal abnormalities or other associated anomalies. CONCLUSION: Feeding disorder is often and a frequent long-term sequel in children after neonatal or early infancy heart surgery. Patients with chromosomal and associated anomalies who underwent multiple cardiac surgeries are at risk of developing feeding difficulties. PMID:29362619

  3. Pulmonary vascular volume ratio measured by cardiac computed tomography in children and young adults with congenital heart disease: comparison with lung perfusion scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Sang Hyub [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    Lung perfusion scintigraphy is regarded as the gold standard for evaluating differential lung perfusion ratio in congenital heart disease. To compare cardiac CT with lung perfusion scintigraphy for estimated pulmonary vascular volume ratio in patients with congenital heart disease. We included 52 children and young adults (median age 4 years, range 2 months to 28 years; 31 males) with congenital heart disease who underwent cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy without an interim surgical or transcatheter intervention and within 1 year. We calculated the right and left pulmonary vascular volumes using threshold-based CT volumetry. Then we compared right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT with right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy by using paired t-test and Bland-Altman analysis. The right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT (66.3 ± 14.0%) were significantly smaller than the right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy (69.1 ± 15.0%; P=0.001). Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of -2.8 ± 5.8% and 95% limits of agreement (-14.1%, 8.5%) between these two variables. Cardiac CT, in a single examination, can offer pulmonary vascular volume ratio in addition to pulmonary artery anatomy essential for evaluating peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis in patients with congenital heart disease. However there is a wide range of agreement between cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy. (orig.)

  4. Pulmonary vascular volume ratio measured by cardiac computed tomography in children and young adults with congenital heart disease: comparison with lung perfusion scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Sang Hyub

    2017-01-01

    Lung perfusion scintigraphy is regarded as the gold standard for evaluating differential lung perfusion ratio in congenital heart disease. To compare cardiac CT with lung perfusion scintigraphy for estimated pulmonary vascular volume ratio in patients with congenital heart disease. We included 52 children and young adults (median age 4 years, range 2 months to 28 years; 31 males) with congenital heart disease who underwent cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy without an interim surgical or transcatheter intervention and within 1 year. We calculated the right and left pulmonary vascular volumes using threshold-based CT volumetry. Then we compared right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT with right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy by using paired t-test and Bland-Altman analysis. The right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT (66.3 ± 14.0%) were significantly smaller than the right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy (69.1 ± 15.0%; P=0.001). Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of -2.8 ± 5.8% and 95% limits of agreement (-14.1%, 8.5%) between these two variables. Cardiac CT, in a single examination, can offer pulmonary vascular volume ratio in addition to pulmonary artery anatomy essential for evaluating peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis in patients with congenital heart disease. However there is a wide range of agreement between cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy. (orig.)

  5. Coffin-Siris syndrome with the rarest constellation of congenital cardiac defects: A case report with review of literature

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    Lalita Nemani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of type-A Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS with a unique constellation of congenital heart defects. A 17-year-old Indian boy was referred to our hospital for central cyanosis with features of right heart failure. The cardiac abnormalities included biventricular outflow tract obstruction, small atrial septal defect (ASD, subaortic ventricular septal defect, drainage of left superior venacava to left atrial appendage, and aortic arch anomaly. Patient underwent successful right ventricular infundibular resection, subaortic membrane resection, closure of atrial and ventricular septal defect, rerouting left superior vena cava to left pulmonary artery and aortic valve replacement.

  6. Coffin-Siris syndrome with the rarest constellation of congenital cardiac defects: A case report with review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemani, Lalita; Barik, Ramachandra; Patnaik, Amar Narayana; Mishra, Ramesh C; Rao, Amaresh M; Kapur, Pragati

    2014-09-01

    We report a case of type-A Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) with a unique constellation of congenital heart defects. A 17-year-old Indian boy was referred to our hospital for central cyanosis with features of right heart failure. The cardiac abnormalities included biventricular outflow tract obstruction, small atrial septal defect (ASD), subaortic ventricular septal defect, drainage of left superior venacava to left atrial appendage, and aortic arch anomaly. Patient underwent successful right ventricular infundibular resection, subaortic membrane resection, closure of atrial and ventricular septal defect, rerouting left superior vena cava to left pulmonary artery and aortic valve replacement.

  7. Trends in the utilization of computed tomography and cardiac catheterization among children with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Cheng-Ta Yang

    2015-11-01

    Conclusion: The use of noninvasive CT in children with selected heart conditions might reduce the use of diagnostic cardiac catheterization. This may release time and facilities within the catheterization laboratory to meet the increasing demand for cardiac interventions.

  8. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazacu, A.; Ciubotaru, A.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of congenital heart disease can be attributed to major improvements in diagnosis and treatment. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the clinical management strategy of patients with congenital heart disease. The development of new cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques allows comprehensive assessment of complex cardiac anatomy and function and provides information about the long-term residual post-operative lesions and complications of surgery. It overcomes many of the limitations of echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. This review evaluates the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging modality in the management of subject with congenital heart disease (CHD). (authors)

  9. Children diagnosed with congenital cardiac malformations at the national university departments of pediatric cardiology: positive predictive values of data in the Danish National Patient Registry

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    Peter Agergaard

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Peter Agergaard1, Anders Hebert2, Jesper Bjerre3, Karina Meden Sørensen4, Charlotte Olesen3, John Rosendal Østergaard31Department of Pediatrics, Viborg Hospital, Viborg, Denmark; 2Department of Pediatrics, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Denmark; 3Department of Pediatrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark; 4Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Immunology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, DenmarkIntroduction: The present study was conducted to establish the positive predictive value of congenital cardiac malformation diagnoses registered in the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR, thereby exploring whether the NPR can serve as a valid tool for epidemiologic studies of congenital cardiac malformations.Materials and methods: The study population comprised every individual born from 2000 to 2008 who was registered in the NPR with a congenital cardiac malformation diagnosis and treated at one of the two national departments of pediatric cardiology. Positive predictive values were established comparing NPR information with the clinical record of each individual.Results: A total of 2952 patients with a total of 3536 diagnoses were eligible for validation. Review of their clinical records unveiled no patient without cardiac malformation. In 98% (98%–99% of the cases, the NPR diagnosis could be found as the discharge diagnosis in the patient's clinical record, and in 90% (89%–91% of the cases the NPR diagnosis was considered a true reflection of the patient's actual malformation.Conclusions: Our study verifies that the present study population retrieved from the NPR is a valid tool for epidemiological research within the topic of congenital cardiac malformations, given that the research question is not dependent on a fully established sensitivity of the NPR. Precautions should be made regarding cardiac malformations characterized by low prevalence or poor predictive values, and the reported validity should not be

  10. Genetic polymorphisms of the TYMS gene are not associated with congenital cardiac septal defects in a Han Chinese population.

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    Jian-Yuan Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical research indicates that periconceptional administration of folic acid can reduce the occurrence of congenital cardiac septal defects (CCSDs. The vital roles of folate exhibits in three ways: the unique methyl donor for DNA expression regulation, the de novo biosynthesis of purine and pyrimidine for DNA construction, and the serum homocysteine removal. Thymidylate synthase (TYMS is the solo catalysis enzyme for the de novo synthesis of dTMP, which is the essential precursor of DNA biosynthesis and repair process. To examine the role of TYMS in Congenital Cardiac Septal Defects (CCSDs risk, we investigated whether genetic polymorphisms in the TYMS gene associated with the CCSDs in a Han Chinese population. METHOD: Polymorphisms in the noncoding region of TYMS were identified via direct sequencing in 32 unrelated individuals composed of half CCSDs and half control subjects. Nine SNPs and two insertion/deletion polymorphisms were genotyped from two independent case-control studies involving a total of 529 CCSDs patients and 876 healthy control participants. The associations were examined by both single polymorphism and haplotype tests using logistic regression. RESULT: We found that TYMS polymorphisms were not related to the altered CCSDs risk, and even to the changed risk of VSDs subgroup, when tested in both studied groups separately or in combination. In the haplotype analysis, there were no haplotypes significantly associated with risks for CCSDs either. CONCLUSION: Our results show no association between common genetic polymorphisms of the regulatory region of the TYMS gene and CCSDs in the Han Chinese population.

  11. Leadless pacemaker implantation in a patient with complex congenital heart disease and limited vascular access

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    Paolo Ferrero

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Management of rhythm related issues might be particularly challenging in patients with congenital heart disease due to complex anatomy and restricted vascular access. The leadless technology appears a suitable and attractive alternative for this population. We describe a patient with single ventricle physiology who successfully underwent implantation of a leadless pacemaker.

  12. Early life environment and social determinants of cardiac health in children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Peter; Denburg, Avram; Dave, Malini; Levin, Leo; Morinis, Julia Orkin; Suleman, Shazeen; Wong, Jonathan; Ford-Jones, Elizabeth; Moore, Aideen M

    2018-04-01

    Congenital heart disease is a significant cause of infant mortality. Epidemiology and social context play a crucial role in conditioning disease burden and modulating outcomes, while diagnosis and treatment remain resource intensive. This review will address the role of social demographics, environmental exposure, epigenetics and nutrition in the aetiology of congenital heart disease. We then discuss the determinant effect of social factors on the provision and outcomes of care for congenital heart disease and implications for practice. It is our hope that enhanced knowledge of the intersection of social determinants of health and congenital heart disease will facilitate effective preventative strategies at the individual and population levels to optimize heart health outcomes across the life course.

  13. Practice Variation in Single-Ventricle Patients Undergoing Elective Cardiac Catheterization: A Report from the Congenital Cardiac Catheterization Project on Outcomes (C3PO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Bryan H; Holzer, Ralf J; Trucco, Sara M; Porras, Diego; Murphy, Joshua; Foerster, Susan R; El-Said, Howaida G; Beekman, Robert H; Bergersen, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate variation in practice surrounding elective cardiac catheterization in patients with single-ventricle (SV) congenital heart disease. Patient and procedural characteristics and outcomes during SV catheterization were collected prospectively from eight centers using a web-based registry (Congenital Cardiac Catheterization Project on Outcomes). We attempted to identify a population of elective procedures by limiting the cohort in case type and timing. Cases were then stratified by stage of SV palliation (pre-bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis [pre-BCPA], pre-Fontan and post-Fontan) and limited by age. Subcohort analysis was performed by mode of airway management (assisted vs. spontaneous ventilation). Institutional variation was assessed. Between 2/2007 and 6/2010, 1459 (10.1%) of 14 467 cases in the registry met the inclusion and exclusion criteria, including 326 pre-BCPA, 571 pre-Fontan and 562 post-Fontan procedures. Median patient age was 0.4 (interquartile range 0.3, 0.5), 2.6 (1.0, 3.4) and 9.6 (5.2, 15.4) years and weight was 5.6 (4.8, 6.4), 12.2 (10.5, 14), and 26.3 (16.6, 51.8) kg in the pre-BCPA, pre-Fontan and post-Fontan cohorts, respectively. Cases were more commonly diagnostic in the pre-BCPA cohort (57%) whereas they were more commonly interventional in the pre-Fontan (69%) and post-Fontan (77%) cohorts. At least one adverse event (AE) occurred in 210 cases (14.4%) overall, including 20% of pre-BCPA, 11% of pre-Fontan and 14% of post-Fontan catheterizations. Mode of airway management was associated with statistically significant, but clinically small differences in hemodynamic measures in the pre- and post-Fontan cohorts, but not in the pre-BCPA group. Considerable practice variation exists across centers with variability in airway management, AE rate, case type, interventions performed and fluoroscopy time, in all SV cohorts. Elective catheterization in SV patients, frequently performed with

  14. Cardiac surgery in patients with congenital heart disease is associated with acute kidney injury and the risk of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Nicolas L; Goldstein, Stuart L; Frøslev, Trine; Christiansen, Christian F; Olsen, Morten

    2017-09-01

    Cardiac surgery associated-acute kidney injury (CS-AKI) occurs in 30-50% of patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. Here we determine if CS-AKI is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in patients with congenital heart disease. Using Danish regional population-based registries, our cohort study included patients with congenital heart disease born between 1990-2010 with first cardiac surgery between 2005 and 2010 (under 15 years of age). Utilizing in- and out-patient laboratory serum creatinine data, we identified individuals fulfilling KDIGO stages of AKI within 5 days of cardiac surgery. A unique personal identifier enabled unambiguous data linkage and virtually complete follow-up. The cumulative incidences of CKD stages 2-5 according to presence of CS-AKI were computed utilizing serum creatinine values and Pottel's formula. Using Cox regression, the corresponding hazard ratios were computed, adjusting for sex, age at first cardiac surgery, calendar period of surgery, and congenital heart disease severity. Of 382 patients with congenital heart disease undergoing cardiac surgery, 127 experienced CS-AKI within 5 days of surgery. Median follow-up was 4.9 years. The five-year cumulative incidence of CKD for patients with CS-AKI was 12% (95% confidence interval 7%-20%), significantly higher than the 3% (1%-5%) for those without CS-AKI with a significant adjusted hazard ratio of 3.8 (1.4-10.4). Thus, CS-AKI in patients with congenital heart disease is common and is associated with an increased risk for CKD. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Tracheal quadrifurcation associated with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Ahmad, Ozaire [Narayana Multispeciality Hospital and Mazumdar Shaw Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Bangalore (India)

    2015-08-15

    Tracheal anomalies are known in association with congenital cardiac defects. Some of the well-described anomalies include accessory (displaced) tracheal bronchus with variants, tracheal trifurcation and accessory cardiac bronchus. Here we describe a case of tracheal quadrifurcation associated with complex congenital heart disease. Illustration of complex airway anatomy was simplified by the use of multidetector CT using a variety of image display options. Awareness of this complex anomaly will expand our knowledge of tracheal anomalies and equip the anesthesia and surgical team for better airway management. (orig.)

  16. Long-term psychological distress, and styles of coping, in parents of children and adolescents who underwent invasive treatment for congenital cardiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijkerboer, Alinda W.; Helbing, Willem A.; Bogers, Ad J. J. C.; van Domburg, Ron T.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the level of psychological distress and styles of coping in both mothers and fathers of children who underwent invasive treatment for congenital cardiac disease at least 7 years and 6 months ago. The General Health Questionnaire and the Utrecht Coping List were completed by parents of

  17. A cardiac-specific health-related quality of life module for young adults with congenital heart disease: development and validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, M.; Zwinderman, K.A.H.; Vogels, T.; Vliegen, H.W.; Kamphuis, R.P.; Ottenkamp, J.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.; Bruil, J.

    2004-01-01

    This study represents the development and validation of a cardiac-specific module of the generic health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instrument, the TAAQOL (TNO/AZL Adult Quality Of Life), for young adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). Items were selected based on literature, an

  18. Proximity to Pediatric Cardiac Surgical Care among Adolescents with Congenital Heart Defects in 11 New York Counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerhalter, Kristin M; Insaf, Tabassum Z; Akkaya-Hocagil, Tugba; McGarry, Claire E; Farr, Sherry L; Downing, Karrie F; Lui, George K; Zaidi, Ali N; Van Zutphen, Alissa R

    2017-11-01

    Many individuals with congenital heart defects (CHDs) discontinue cardiac care in adolescence, putting them at risk of adverse health outcomes. Because geographic barriers may contribute to cessation of care, we sought to characterize geographic access to comprehensive cardiac care among adolescents with CHDs. Using a population-based, 11-county surveillance system of CHDs in New York, we characterized proximity to the nearest pediatric cardiac surgical care center among adolescents aged 11 to 19 years with CHDs. Residential addresses were extracted from surveillance records documenting 2008 to 2010 healthcare encounters. Addresses were geocoded using ArcGIS and the New York State Street and Address Maintenance Program, a statewide address point database. One-way drive and public transit time from residence to nearest center were calculated using R packages gmapsdistance and rgeos with the Google Maps Distance Matrix application programming interface. A marginal model was constructed to identify predictors associated with one-way travel time. We identified 2522 adolescents with 3058 corresponding residential addresses and 12 pediatric cardiac surgical care centers. The median drive time from residence to nearest center was 18.3 min, and drive time was 30 min or less for 2475 (80.9%) addresses. Predicted drive time was longest for rural western addresses in high poverty census tracts (68.7 min). Public transit was available for most residences in urban areas but for few in rural areas. We identified areas with geographic barriers to surgical care. Future research is needed to determine how these barriers influence continuity of care among adolescents with CHDs. Birth Defects Research 109:1494-1503, 2017.© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Alpha-cardiac myosin heavy chain (MYH6) mutations affecting myofibril formation are associated with congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados-Riveron, Javier T; Ghosh, Tushar K; Pope, Mark; Bu'Lock, Frances; Thornborough, Christopher; Eason, Jacqueline; Kirk, Edwin P; Fatkin, Diane; Feneley, Michael P; Harvey, Richard P; Armour, John A L; David Brook, J

    2010-10-15

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) are collectively the most common form of congenital malformation. Studies of human cases and animal models have revealed that mutations in several genes are responsible for both familial and sporadic forms of CHD. We have previously shown that a mutation in MYH6 can cause an autosomal dominant form of atrial septal defect (ASD), whereas others have identified mutations of the same gene in patients with hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy. In the present study, we report a mutation analysis of MYH6 in patients with a wide spectrum of sporadic CHD. The mutation analysis of MYH6 was performed in DNA samples from 470 cases of isolated CHD using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and sequence analysis to detect point mutations and small deletions or insertions, and multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization to detect partial or complete copy number variations. One non-sense mutation, one splicing site mutation and seven non-synonymous coding mutations were identified. Transfection of plasmids encoding mutant and non-mutant green fluorescent protein-MYH6 fusion proteins in mouse myoblasts revealed that the mutations A230P and A1366D significantly disrupt myofibril formation, whereas the H252Q mutation significantly enhances myofibril assembly in comparison with the non-mutant protein. Our data indicate that functional variants of MYH6 are associated with cardiac malformations in addition to ASD and provide a novel potential mechanism. Such phenotypic heterogeneity has been observed in other genes mutated in CHD.

  20. Kosovo’s Experience for Children with Feeding Difficulties after Cardiac Surgery for Congenital Heart Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramush Bejiqi

    2017-11-01

    CONCLUSION: Feeding disorder is often and a frequent long-term sequel in children after neonatal or early infancy heart surgery. Patients with chromosomal and associated anomalies who underwent multiple cardiac surgeries are at risk of developing feeding difficulties.

  1. Branchial cleft anomaly, congenital heart disease, and biliary atresia: Goldenhar complex or Lambert syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J; Schanen, N C

    2000-01-01

    The features of Goldenhar complex have been well-described and classically include branchial arch abnormalities, epibulbar dermoid and vertebral abnormalities. We have identified an infant with these features in association with complex congenital heart disease and intrahepatic biliary atresia. Although Lambert described an autosomal recessive disorder with an association of biliary atresia and branchial arch abnormalities, none of those cases had epibulbar dermoid. Diagnostic considerations in this case include inclusion of biliary atresia as a new feature in the expanding spectrum of the Goldenhar complex, versus Lambert syndrome with epibulbar dermoid.

  2. Pulmonary vascular volume ratio measured by cardiac computed tomography in children and young adults with congenital heart disease: comparison with lung perfusion scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Sang Hyub

    2017-11-01

    Lung perfusion scintigraphy is regarded as the gold standard for evaluating differential lung perfusion ratio in congenital heart disease. To compare cardiac CT with lung perfusion scintigraphy for estimated pulmonary vascular volume ratio in patients with congenital heart disease. We included 52 children and young adults (median age 4 years, range 2 months to 28 years; 31 males) with congenital heart disease who underwent cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy without an interim surgical or transcatheter intervention and within 1 year. We calculated the right and left pulmonary vascular volumes using threshold-based CT volumetry. Then we compared right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT with right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy by using paired t-test and Bland-Altman analysis. The right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT (66.3 ± 14.0%) were significantly smaller than the right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy (69.1 ± 15.0%; P=0.001). Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of -2.8 ± 5.8% and 95% limits of agreement (-14.1%, 8.5%) between these two variables. Cardiac CT, in a single examination, can offer pulmonary vascular volume ratio in addition to pulmonary artery anatomy essential for evaluating peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis in patients with congenital heart disease. However there is a wide range of agreement between cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy.

  3. Congenital deficiency of two polypeptide subunits of the iron-protein fragment of mitochondrial complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreadith, R W; Cleeter, M W; Ragan, C I; Batshaw, M L; Lehninger, A L

    1987-02-01

    Recently, we described a patient with severe lactic acidosis due to congenital complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) deficiency. We now report further enzymatic and immunological characterizations. Both NADH and ferricyanide titrations of complex I activity (measured as NADH-ferricyanide reductase) were distinctly altered in the mitochondria from the patient's tissues. In addition, antisera against complex I immunoprecipitated NADH-ferricyanide reductase from the control but not the patient's mitochondria. However, immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of complex I polypeptides demonstrated that the majority of the 25 polypeptides comprising complex I were present in the affected mitochondria. A more detailed analysis using subunit selective antisera against the main polypeptides of the iron-protein fragments of complex I revealed a selective absence of the 75- and 13-kD polypeptides. These findings suggest that the underlying basis for this patient's disease was a congenital deficiency of at least two polypeptides comprising the iron-protein fragment of complex I, which resulted in the inability to correctly assemble a functional enzyme complex.

  4. 18F-FDG-PET/CT angiography in the diagnosis of infective endocarditis and cardiac device infection in adult patients with congenital heart disease and prosthetic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, María N; Dos-Subirà, L; Roque, Albert; Fernández-Hidalgo, Nuria; Cuéllar-Calabria, Hug; Pijuan Domènech, Antonia; Gonzàlez-Alujas, María T; Subirana-Domènech, M T; Miranda-Barrio, B; Ferreira-González, Ignacio; González-López, Juan J; Igual, Albert; Maisterra-Santos, Olga; García-Dorado, David; Castell-Conesa, Joan; Almirante, Benito; Escobar Amores, Manuel; Tornos, Pilar; Aguadé-Bruix, Santiago

    2017-12-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) and cardiac device infection (CDI) are a major complication in the growing number of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) reaching adulthood. We aimed to evaluate the added value of 18 F-FDG-PET/CT angiography (PET/CTA) in the diagnosis of IE-CDI in adults with CHD and intravascular or intracardiac prosthetic material, in whom echocardiography (ECHO) and modified Duke Criteria (DC) have limitations because of the patients' complex anatomy. A prospective study was conducted in a referral center with multidisciplinary IE and CHD Units. PET/CTA and ECHO findings were compared in consecutive adult (≥18years) patients with CHD who have prosthetic material and suspected IE-CDI. The initial diagnosis using the DC and the diagnosis with the additional PET/CTA data (DC+PET/CTA) were compared with the final diagnostic consensus established by an expert team at three months. Between November-2012 and April-2017, 25 patients (15 men; median age 40years) were included. Cases were initially classified as definite in 8 (32%), possible in 14 (56%) and rejected in 3 (12%). DC+PET/CTA allowed reclassification of 12/14 (86%) cases initially identified as possible IE. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of DC at IE suspicion were 39.1%/83.3%/90.4%/25.5%/61.2%, respectively. The diagnostic performance increased significantly with addition of PET/CTA data: 87%/83.3%/95.4%/61.5%/85.1%, respectively. PET/CTA also provided an alternative diagnosis in 3 patients with rejected IE, and detected pulmonary embolisms in 3 patients. PET/CTA was a useful diagnostic tool in the complex group of adult patients with CHD who have cardiac or intravascular prosthetic material and suspected IE or CDI, providing added diagnostic value to the modified DC (increased sensitivity) and improving case classification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Entrance radiation doses during paediatric cardiac catheterizations performed for diagnosis or the treatment of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopoulou, D.; Yakoumakis, Em; Sandilos, P.; Thanopoulos, V.; Makri, Tr; Gialousis, G.; Houndas, D.; Yakoumakis, N.; Georgiou, Ev

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the radiation exposure of children, during cardiac catheterizations for the diagnosis or treatment of congenital heart disease. Radiation doses were estimated for 45 children aged from 1 d to 13 y old. Thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) were used to estimate the posterior entrance dose (D P ), the lateral entrance dose (D LAT ), the thyroid dose and the gonads dose. A dose-area product (DAP) meter was also attached externally to the tube of the angiographic system and gave a direct value in mGy cm 2 for each procedure. Posterior and lateral entrance dose values during cardiac catheterizations ranged from 1 to 197 mGy and from 1.1 to 250.3 mGy, respectively. Radiation exposure to the thyroid and the gonads ranged from 0.3 to 8.4 mGy to 0.1 and 0.7 mGy, respectively. Finally, the DAP meter values ranged between 360 and 33,200 mGy cm 2 . Radiation doses measured in this study are comparable with those reported to previous studies. Moreover, strong correlation was found between the DAP values and the entrance radiation dose measured with TLDs. (authors)

  6. A complex of cardiac cytochrome c1 and cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Y L; Kaminsky, L S; King, T E

    1976-01-10

    The interactions of cytochrome c1 and cytochrome c from bovine cardiac mitochondria were investigated. Cytochrome c1 and cytochrome c formed a 1:1 molecular complex in aqueous solutions of low ionic strength. The complex was stable to Sephadex G-75 chromatography. The formation and stability of the complex were independent of the oxidation state of the cytochrome components as far as those reactions studied were concerned. The complex was dissociated in solutions of ionic strength higher than 0.07 or pH exceeding 10 and only partially dissociated in 8 M urea. No complexation occurred when cytochrome c was acetylated on 64% of its lysine residues or photooxidized on its 2 methionine residues. Complexes with molecular ratios of less than 1:1 (i.e. more cytochrome c) were obtained when polymerized cytochrome c, or cytochrome c with all lysine residues guanidinated, or a "1-65 heme peptide" from cyanogen bromide cleavage of cytochrome c was used. These results were interpreted to imply that the complex was predominantly maintained by ionic interactions probably involving some of the lysine residues of cytochrome c but with major stabilization dependent on the native conformations of both cytochromes. The reduced complex was autooxidizable with biphasic kinetics with first order rate constants of 6 X 10(-5) and 5 X U0(-5) s-1 but did not react with carbon monoxide. The complex reacted with cyanide and was reduced by ascorbate at about 32% and 40% respectively, of the rates of reaction with cytochrome c alone. The complex was less photoreducible than cytochrome c1 alone. The complex exhibited remarkably different circular dichroic behavior from that of the summation of cytochrome c1 plus cytochrome c. We concluded that when cytochromes c1 and c interacted they underwent dramatic conformational changes resulting in weakening of their heme crevices. All results available would indicate that in the complex cytochrome c1 was bound at the entrance to the heme crevice of

  7. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome after Transradial Cardiac Catheterization

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    Chih-Jou Lai

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a disease with unclear pathophysiology. The condition is characterized by pain, soft tissue change, vasomotor change, and even psychosocial disturbance. It may affect the upper more than the lower extremities, and the distal more than the proximal. The trigger factors include carpal tunnel release, Dupuytren's repair, tendon release procedures, knee surgery, crush injury, ankle arthrodesis, amputation, and hip arthroplasty. Rarely, it has been associated with stroke, mastectomy, pregnancy, and osteogenesis imperfecta. Herein, we present a rare case of a patient who was diagnosed with CRPS after transradial cardiac catheterization. CRPS was first diagnosed due to hand swelling, allodynia, paresthesia, and the limited range of motion of interphalangeal, metacarpophalangeal, and wrist joints, with the preceding factor of transradial cardiac catheterization, and was then confirmed by a three-phase bone scan. After intensive physical therapy with hydrotherapy, manual soft tissue release, and occupational therapy for the hand function, there was much improvement in range of motion and hand function. There was no allodynia or painful sensation in the follow-up. After training, the functional status of this patient was adequate for daily activity.

  8. Modeling Major Adverse Outcomes of Pediatric and Adult Patients With Congenital Heart Disease Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization: Observations From the NCDR IMPACT Registry (National Cardiovascular Data Registry Improving Pediatric and Adult Congenital Treatment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, Natalie; Spertus, John A; Kennedy, Kevin F; Vincent, Robert; Martin, Gerard R; Curtis, Jeptha P; Nykanen, David; Moore, Phillip M; Bergersen, Lisa

    2017-11-21

    Risk standardization for adverse events after congenital cardiac catheterization is needed to equitably compare patient outcomes among different hospitals as a foundation for quality improvement. The goal of this project was to develop a risk-standardization methodology to adjust for patient characteristics when comparing major adverse outcomes in the NCDR's (National Cardiovascular Data Registry) IMPACT Registry (Improving Pediatric and Adult Congenital Treatment). Between January 2011 and March 2014, 39 725 consecutive patients within IMPACT undergoing cardiac catheterization were identified. Given the heterogeneity of interventional procedures for congenital heart disease, new procedure-type risk categories were derived with empirical data and expert opinion, as were markers of hemodynamic vulnerability. A multivariable hierarchical logistic regression model to identify patient and procedural characteristics predictive of a major adverse event or death after cardiac catheterization was derived in 70% of the cohort and validated in the remaining 30%. The rate of major adverse event or death was 7.1% and 7.2% in the derivation and validation cohorts, respectively. Six procedure-type risk categories and 6 independent indicators of hemodynamic vulnerability were identified. The final risk adjustment model included procedure-type risk category, number of hemodynamic vulnerability indicators, renal insufficiency, single-ventricle physiology, and coagulation disorder. The model had good discrimination, with a C-statistic of 0.76 and 0.75 in the derivation and validation cohorts, respectively. Model calibration in the validation cohort was excellent, with a slope of 0.97 (standard error, 0.04; P value [for difference from 1] =0.53) and an intercept of 0.007 (standard error, 0.12; P value [for difference from 0] =0.95). The creation of a validated risk-standardization model for adverse outcomes after congenital cardiac catheterization can support reporting of risk

  9. Cardiac catheterization and percutaneus catheter in grown-up congenital heart diseases: single center experience at developing country

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    Luh G.A.P. Dewi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Grown-up congenital heart disease (GUCH patients are unique and challenges especially at developing country. The numbers of diagnostic as well as interventional cardiac catheterization procedures in GUCH patients are growing. The aim of this study was to report the outcome of cardiac catheterization including intervention procedure in GUCH.Methods: The descriptive study was conducted at Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia. All patients (age of more than 12 years who underwent cardiac catheterization from 2011 until 2017 were included in this study. Patients, characteristic, types of catheter procedures, immediate complications, and outcomes were documented.Results: A total 54 subjects were included with median age of 23 years and 70% were female. The first symptom that brought patients to hospital is dyspnea 46% and palpitation 32%. Five subjects underwent a diagnostic catheter procedure and 49 (91% diagnostic and catheter based interventions. Transcatheter interventions procedures included atrial septal defect (ASD (success rate of 20 per 21, patent ductus arteriosus (PDA (success rate of 16 per16, ventricular septal defect (VSD (success rate of  9 per 9, pulmonal stenosis (PS (success rate of 1 per 2, and aortic stenosis (AS (success rate of 1 per 1. The complications encountered were transient dysrhythmias in 15 subjects, device embolization in 4 subjects, massive bleeding in 1 subject, and overall mortality in 2 subjects.Conclusion: The number of the catheterization interventions in GUCH was 91% and ASD device closure was the most common procedure. Transcatheter intervention has a high procedural success rates (96% and low procedural-related complications.

  10. Effects of eHealth physical activity encouragement in adolescents with complex congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Susanne Hwiid; Andersen, Lars L; Søndergaard, Lars

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess benefit and harms of adding an eHealth intervention to health education and individual counseling in adolescents with congenital heart disease. DESIGN: Randomized clinical trial. SETTING: Denmark. PATIENTS: A total of 158 adolescents aged 13-16years with no physical activity...... restrictions after repaired complex congenital heart disease. INTERVENTIONS: PReVaiL consisted of individually tailored eHealth encouragement physical activity for 52weeks. All patients received 45min of group-based health education and 15min of individual counseling involving patients' parents. OUTCOMES......·kg(-1)·min(-1) (95% CI -2.66 to 1.36). Between-group differences at 1year in physical activity, generic health-related quality of life, and disease-specific quality of life were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Adding a tailored eHealth intervention to health education and individual...

  11. Cryo-EM Structure of a KCNQ1/CaM Complex Reveals Insights into Congenital Long QT Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ji; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2017-06-01

    KCNQ1 is the pore-forming subunit of cardiac slow-delayed rectifier potassium (I Ks ) channels. Mutations in the kcnq1 gene are the leading cause of congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS). Here, we present the cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of a KCNQ1/calmodulin (CaM) complex. The conformation corresponds to an "uncoupled," PIP 2 -free state of KCNQ1, with activated voltage sensors and a closed pore. Unique structural features within the S4-S5 linker permit uncoupling of the voltage sensor from the pore in the absence of PIP 2 . CaM contacts the KCNQ1 voltage sensor through a specific interface involving a residue on CaM that is mutated in a form of inherited LQTS. Using an electrophysiological assay, we find that this mutation on CaM shifts the KCNQ1 voltage-activation curve. This study describes one physiological form of KCNQ1, depolarized voltage sensors with a closed pore in the absence of PIP 2 , and reveals a regulatory interaction between CaM and KCNQ1 that may explain CaM-mediated LQTS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prophylactic milrinone for the prevention of low cardiac output syndrome and mortality in children undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Barbara E U; Rücker, Gerta; Stiller, Brigitte

    2015-03-25

    Children with congenital heart disease often undergo heart surgery at a young age. They are at risk for postoperative low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) or death. Milrinone may be used to provide inotropic and vasodilatory support during the immediate postoperative period. This review examines the effectiveness of prophylactic postoperative use of milrinone to prevent LCOS or death in children having undergone surgery for congenital heart disease. Electronic and manual literature searches were performed to identify randomised controlled trials. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science in February 2014 and conducted a top-up search in September 2014 as well as clinical trial registries and reference lists of published studies. We did not apply any language restrictions. Only randomised controlled trials were selected for analysis. We considered studies with newborn infants, infants, toddlers, and children up to 12 years of age. Two review authors independently extracted data according to a pre-defined protocol. We obtained additional information from all study authors. Three of the five included studies compared milrinone versus levosimendan, one study compared milrinone with placebo, and one compared milrinone verus dobutamine, with 101, 242, and 50 participants, respectively. Three trials were at low risk of bias while two were at higher risk of bias. The number and definitions of outcomes were non-uniform as well. In one study comparing two doses of milrinone and placebo, there was some evidence in an overall comparison of milrinone versus placebo that milrinone lowered risk for LCOS (risk ratio (RR) 0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.28 to 0.96; 227 participants). The results from two small studies do not provide enough information to determine whether milrinone increases the risk of LCOS when compared to levosimendan (RR 1.22, 95% CI 0.32 to 4.65; 59 participants). Mortality rates in the studies were low, and there was insufficient evidence to

  13. Cardiac rhabdomyoma associated with tuberosclerosis complex in a newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgin Torer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac rhabdomyomas are the most comman cardiac tumors in children. They are hamartomatous benign tumors composed of myocytes. They often presents as multiple lesions involving the ventricular cavities. Rhabdomyomas are usually detected in utero by fetal echocardiography. Although patients with cardiac rhabdomyomas are generally asymptomatic these tumors may cause heart failure, severe arrhyhmias and sudden death. Cardiac rhabdomyomas are often associated with tuberosclerosis and they may be the earliest manifestation of tuberosclerosis. Here, we report a newborn infant with antenatally detected cardiac rhabdomyomas associated with tuberosclerosis and we want to emphasize that other diagnostic features of tuberosclerosis should be evaluated in patients with cardiac rhabdomyomas. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(0.100: 56-59

  14. Health-related fitness profiles in adolescents with complex congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Susanne Hwiid; Wetterslev, Jørn; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study investigates whether subgroups of different health-related fitness (HrF) profiles exist among girls and boys with complex congenital heart disease (ConHD) and how these are associated with lifestyle behaviors. METHODS: We measured the cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle strength...... in the Robust clusters reported leading a physically active lifestyle and participants in the Less robust cluster reported leading a sedentary lifestyle. Diagnoses were evenly distributed between clusters. CONCLUSIONS: The cluster analysis attributed some of the variability in cardiorespiratory fitness among...

  15. A congenital malformation of the systemic heart complex in Sepia officinalis L. (Cephalopoda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipp, R.; von Boletzky, S.; Jakobs, P.; Labourg, P. J.

    1998-03-01

    In semi-adult Sepia officinalis L. (Cephalopoda) from the Bay of Arcachon (France) a congenital malformation of the systemic heart is described by macro-and microscopical methods. It concerns an atypical doubling of the site of insertion at the cephalic aorta at the apical ventricle. Its comparison with the paired anlagen of the systemic heart complex in normal embryogenesis and the central circulatory system of Nautilus gives rise to interpret it as a form of atavism. The possible causal role of mutagenic antifoulings is discussed.

  16. Identifying improvements to complex pathways: evidence synthesis and stakeholder engagement in infant congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Sonya; Knowles, Rachel; Wray, Jo; Tregay, Jenifer; Ridout, Deborah A; Utley, Martin; Franklin, Rodney; Bull, Catherine L; Brown, Katherine L

    2016-06-06

    Many infants die in the year following discharge from hospital after surgical or catheter intervention for congenital heart disease (3-5% of discharged infants). There is considerable variability in the provision of care and support in this period, and some families experience barriers to care. We aimed to identify ways to improve discharge and postdischarge care for this patient group. A systematic evidence synthesis aligned with a process of eliciting the perspectives of families and professionals from community, primary, secondary and tertiary care. UK. A set of evidence-informed recommendations for improving the discharge and postdischarge care of infants following intervention for congenital heart disease was produced. These address known challenges with current care processes and, recognising current resource constraints, are targeted at patient groups based on the number of patients affected and the level and nature of their risk of adverse 1-year outcome. The recommendations include: structured discharge documentation, discharging certain high-risk patients via their local hospital, enhanced surveillance for patients with certain (high-risk) cardiac diagnoses and an early warning tool for parents and community health professionals. Our recommendations set out a comprehensive, system-wide approach for improving discharge and postdischarge services. This approach could be used to address challenges in delivering care for other patient populations that can fall through gaps between sectors and organisations. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Case series: Dexmedetomidine and ketamine for anesthesia in patients with uncorrected congenital cyanotic heart disease presenting for non-cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhee Goyal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of patients with uncorrected congenital cyanotic heart disease is less but at times some may present for non-cardiac surgery with a high anesthetic risk. Some of these may even be adults with compromised cardiopulmonary physiology posing greater challenges to the anesthesiologist. The authors have used a combination of dexmedetomidine and ketamine for anesthesia for non cardiac surgery in five patients with cyanotic heart disease and right to left shunt (3-Eisenmenger′s syndrome, 2-Tetralogy of Fallot. The sympathoinhibitory effects of dexmedetomidine were balanced with the cardiostimulatory effects of ketamine, thereby maintaining good cardiovascular stability. The analgesia was good and there was no postoperative agitation.This drug combination was effective and safe for patients with cyanotic heart disease for non cardiac surgeries.

  18. Factors Influencing Adaptation and Performance at Physical Exercise in Complex Congenital Heart Diseases after Surgical Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Bassareo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last thirty years, steady progress in the diagnostic tools and care of subjects affected by congenital heart diseases (CHD has resulted in a significant increase in their survival to adulthood, even for those affected by complex CHD. Based on these premises, a number of teenagers and adults affected by corrected (surgically or through interventional techniques CHD ask to be allowed to undertake sporting activities, both at a recreational and competitive level. The purpose of this review is to examine the mechanisms influencing the adaption at physical exercise of patients suffering from complex CHD. The conclusion is that even if there are some modest risks with exercise, they should be seen in perspective, and the life-long benefits of regular exercise on general health, mood, and well-being should be emphasized.

  19. Non-invasive assessment of congenital pulmonary vein stenosis in children using cardiac-non-gated CT with 64-slice technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou, Phalla; Marini, Davide; Celermajer, David S.; Agnoletti, Gabriella; Vouhe, Pascal; Sidi, Daniel; Bonnet, Damien; Brunelle, Francis

    2009-01-01

    Background: Management of congenital pulmonary vein stenosis is a diagnostic challenge. Echocardiography may be insufficient and thus cardiac catheterization remains the reference standard in this setting. The aim of the study was to investigate the accuracy of cardiac-non-gated CT using 64-slice technology in detecting congenital pulmonary vein stenosis in children. Materials and methods: CT examinations were consecutively performed from May 2005 to December 2006 in 13 children aged 1.5-12 months (median 5 months) for suspected congenital pulmonary vein stenosis. Cardiac-non-gated CT acquisitions were performed after the peripheral injection of contrast agent. Pulmonary veins were evaluated for their pattern of connectivity from the lung to the left atrium and for the presence of stenosis. CT findings of pulmonary vein stenosis were compared with combined findings available from echocardiography, catheterization and surgery. Results: Pulmonary veins from the right lung (n = 29) and left lung (n = 26) were evaluated as separate structures (N = 55). Of the 55 structures, 32 had surgical and/or catheterization data and 45 had echocardiography for comparison. CT visualized 100% (55/55) of the investigated structures, while echocardiography visualized 82% (45/55). In the 13 subjects CT identified 10 stenotic pulmonary veins. CT confirmed the echocardiography suspicion of pulmonary vein stenosis in 100% (7/7) and established a new diagnosis in 3 other patients. CT agreed with surgery/catheterization in 100% (10/10) of the available comparisons. Conclusion: Cardiac-non-gated CT assessed the pulmonary veins more completely than echocardiography and should be considered as a viable alternative for invasive pulmonary venography for detecting pulmonary vein stenosis in children.

  20. Burden and impact of congenital syndromes and comorbidities among adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracher, Isabelle; Padrutt, Maria; Bonassin, Francesca; Santos Lopes, Bruno; Gruner, Christiane; Stämpfli, Simon F; Oxenius, Angela; De Pasquale, Gabriella; Seeliger, Theresa; Lüscher, Thomas F; Attenhofer Jost, Christine; Greutmann, Matthias

    2017-08-01

    Our aim was to assess the overall burden of congenital syndromes and non-cardiac comorbidities among adults with congenital heart disease and to assess their impact on circumstances of living and outcomes. Within a cohort of 1725 adults with congenital heart defects (65% defects of moderate or great complexity) followed at a single tertiary care center, congenital syndromes and comorbidities were identified by chart review. Their association with arrhythmias, circumstances of living and survival was analyzed. Within the study cohort, 232 patients (13%) had a genetic syndrome, 51% at least one comorbidity and 23% ≥2 comorbidities. Most prevalent comorbidities were systemic arterial hypertension (11%), thyroid dysfunction (9%), psychiatric disorders (9%), neurologic disorders (7%), chronic lung disease (7%), and previous stroke (6%). In contrast to higher congenital heart defect complexity, the presence of comorbidities had no impact on living circumstances but patients with comorbidities were less likely to work full-time. Atrial arrhythmias were more common among patients with moderate/great disease complexity and those with comorbidities but were less common among patients with congenital syndromes (pCongenital syndromes and comorbidities are highly prevalent in adults with congenital heart disease followed at specialist centers and add to the overall complexity of care. The presence of these additional factors has an impact on living circumstances, is associated with arrhythmias and needs to be further explored as prognostic markers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houyel, Lucile; To-Dumortier, Ngoc-Tram; Lepers, Yannick; Petit, Jérôme; Roussin, Régine; Ly, Mohamed; Lebret, Emmanuel; Fadel, Elie; Hörer, Jürgen; Hascoët, Sébastien

    2017-05-01

    With the advances in congenital cardiac surgery and postoperative care, an increasing number of children with complex congenital heart disease now reach adulthood. There are already more adults than children living with a congenital heart defect, including patients with complex congenital heart defects. Among these adults with congenital heart disease, a significant number will develop ventricular dysfunction over time. Heart failure accounts for 26-42% of deaths in adults with congenital heart defects. Heart transplantation, or heart-lung transplantation in Eisenmenger syndrome, then becomes the ultimate therapeutic possibility for these patients. This population is deemed to be at high risk of mortality after heart transplantation, although their long-term survival is similar to that of patients transplanted for other reasons. Indeed, heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease is often challenging, because of several potential problems: complex cardiac and vascular anatomy, multiple previous palliative and corrective surgeries, and effects on other organs (kidney, liver, lungs) of long-standing cardiac dysfunction or cyanosis, with frequent elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance. In this review, we focus on the specific problems relating to heart and heart-lung transplantation in this population, revisit the indications/contraindications, and update the long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Sonic Hedgehog mutations are not a common cause of congenital hypopituitarism in the absence of complex midline cerebral defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, Sabrina Soares; Fernandes-Rosa, Fábio L; Turatti, Wendy; Coeli-Lacchini, Fernanda Borchers; Martinelli, Carlos E; Nakiri, Guilherme S; Moreira, Ayrton C; Santos, Antônio C; de Castro, Margaret; Antonini, Sonir R

    2015-04-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) and GLI2, an obligatory mediator of SHH signal transduction, are holoprosencephaly (HPE)-associated genes essential in pituitary formation. GLI2 variants have been found in patients with congenital hypopituitarism without complex midline cerebral defects (MCD). However, data on the occurrence of SHH mutations in these patients are limited. We screened for SHH and GLI2 mutations or copy number variations (CNV) in patients with congenital hypopituitarism without MCD or with variable degrees of MCD. Detailed data on clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging findings of 115 patients presenting with congenital hypopituitarism without MCD, septo-optic dysplasia or HPE were analysed. The SHH and GLI2 genes were directly sequenced, and the presence of gene CNV was analysed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Anterior pituitary deficiency was found in 74% and 53% of patients with SOD or HPE, respectively. Diabetes insipidus was common in patients with HPE (47%) but infrequent in patients with congenital hypopituitarism or SOD (7% and 8%, respectively). A single heterozygous nonsense SHH mutation (p.Tyr175Ter) was found in a patient presenting with hypopituitarism and alobar HPE. No other SHH mutations or CNV were found. Nine GLI2 variations (8 missense and 1 frameshift) including a homozygous and a compound heterozygous variation were found in patients with congenital hypopituitarism or SOD, but not in HPE patients. No GLI2 CNV were found. SHH mutations or copy number variations are not a common cause of congenital hypopituitarism in patients without complex midline cerebral defects. GLI2 variants are found in some patients with congenital hypopituitarism without complex midline cerebral defects or septo-optic dysplasia. However, functional analyses of these variants are needed to strengthen genotype-phenotype relationship. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Impaired perception of harmonic complexity in congenital amusia: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Catherine L; Cahn, Steven J; Cory, Christopher; Szaflarski, Jerzy P

    2011-07-01

    This study investigates whether congenital amusia (an inability to perceive music from birth) also impairs the perception of musical qualities that do not rely on fine-grained pitch discrimination. We established that G.G. (64-year-old male, age-typical hearing) met the criteria of congenital amusia and demonstrated music-specific deficits (e.g., language processing, intonation, prosody, fine-grained pitch processing, pitch discrimination, identification of discrepant tones and direction of pitch for tones in a series, pitch discrimination within scale segments, predictability of tone sequences, recognition versus knowing memory for melodies, and short-term memory for melodies). Next, we conducted tests of tonal fusion, harmonic complexity, and affect perception: recognizing timbre, assessing consonance and dissonance, and recognizing musical affect from harmony. G.G. displayed relatively unimpaired perception and production of environmental sounds, prosody, and emotion conveyed by speech compared with impaired fine-grained pitch perception, tonal sequence discrimination, and melody recognition. Importantly, G.G. could not perform tests of tonal fusion that do not rely on pitch discrimination: He could not distinguish concurrent notes, timbre, consonance/dissonance, simultaneous notes, and musical affect. Results indicate at least three distinct problems-one with pitch discrimination, one with harmonic simultaneity, and one with musical affect-and each has distinct consequences for music perception.

  4. Multidisciplinary management of pregnancy in complex congenital heart disease: a model for coordination of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Rachel C; Fries, Melissa H; Boyle, Annelee; Adeniji-Adele, Hassan; Cherian, Zacharia; Klein, Nancy; John, Anitha S

    2014-01-01

    With advancements in medical care, many women with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) are now living into adulthood and childbearing years. The strains of pregnancy and parturition can be dangerous in such patients, and careful interdisciplinary plans must be made to optimize maternal and fetal health through this process. Several large studies have been published regarding risk prediction and medical management of pregnancy in complex CHD, though few case studies detailing clinical care plans have been published. The objective of this report is to describe the process of developing a detailed pregnancy and delivery care plan for three women with complex CHD, including perspectives from the multidisciplinary specialists involved in the process. This article demonstrates that collaboration between specialists in the fields of cardiology, anesthesiology, high-risk obstetrics, maternal fetal medicine, and neonatology results in clinically successful individualized treatment plans for the management of pregnancy in complex CHD. Multidisciplinary collaboration is a crucial element in the management of pregnancy in complex CHD. We provide a template used in three cases which can serve as a model for the design of future care plans. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The cardiac proteome in patients with congenital ventricular septal defect: A comparative study between right atria and right ventricles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, A R; Iacobazzi, D; Abdul-Ghani, S; Ghorbel, M T; Heesom, K J; George, S J; Caputo, M; Suleiman, M-S; Tulloh, R M

    2018-03-20

    Right ventricle (RV) remodelling occurs in neonatal patients born with ventricular septal defect (VSD). The presence of a defect between the two ventricles allows for shunting of blood from the left to right side. The resulting RV hypertrophy leads to molecular remodelling which has thus far been largely investigated using right atrial (RA) tissue. In this study we used proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis in order to determine any difference between the proteomes for RA and RV. Samples were therefore taken from the RA and RV of five infants (0.34 ± 0.05 years, mean ± SEM) with VSD who were undergoing cardiac surgery to repair the defect. Significant differences in protein expression between RV and RA were seen. 150 protein accession numbers were identified which were significantly lower in the atria, whereas none were significantly higher in the atria compared to the ventricle. 19 phosphorylation sites (representing 19 phosphoproteins) were also lower in RA. This work has identified differences in the proteome between RA and RV which reflect differences in contractile activity and metabolism. As such, caution should be used when drawing conclusions based on analysis of the RA and extrapolating to the hypertrophied RV. RV hypertrophy occurs in neonatal patients born with VSD. Very little is known about how the atria responds to RV hypertrophy, especially at the protein level. Access to tissue from age-matched groups of patients is very rare, and we are in the unique position of being able to get tissue from both the atria and ventricle during reparative surgery of these infants. Our findings will be beneficial to future research into heart chamber malformations in congenital heart defects. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Role of angiocardiography in the diagnosis and management of complex/complicated congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling Jian; Liu Yuqing

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of angiocadiography (ACG) in the diagnosis and management of complex/complicated congenital heart disease (CHD). Methods: A retrospective study of ACG findings in 360 cases with complex/complicated CHD was performed with a comparision to that of echocardiography (Echo) and related clinical examination. Results: The present series of CHD cases included pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect in 75 cases, double outlet of right ventricle in 62 cases, Fallot's tetralogy in 60 cases, single ventricle in 52 cases, transposition of the great arteries in 42 cases, tricuspid valve atresia in 15 cases, coronary abnormality in 6 eases, total abnormal pulmonary venous connection in 5 cases, total endocardial cushion defect in 5 cases, persistent truncus arteriosus in 4 cases, pulmonary atresia with normal ventricular septum in 3 cases, other disorders in 7 eases, and postsurgical operation in 24 cases. ACG was superior to that of Echo in demonstrating the abnormalities of systemic, pulmonary, and coronary arteries and their branches of complex/complicated CHD as well as measuring the pressure of pulmonary artery, vein, and systemic-pulmonary collateral vessels. Conclusion: In the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of knotty cases with complex and complicated CHD, particularly in the demonstration of full view of systemic, pulmonary, and coronary arterial branches and accurate measurement of' pulmonary arterial pressure/resistance, and atrial, ventricular, and systemic arterial pressure, ACG (including DSA) still plays an important and irreplaceable role. (authors)

  7. Predictive Value of Intraoperative Thromboelastometry for the Risk of Perioperative Excessive Blood Loss in Infants and Children Undergoing Congenital Cardiac Surgery: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunhee; Shim, Haeng Seon; Kim, Won Ho; Lee, Sue-Young; Park, Sun-Kyung; Yang, Ji-Hyuk; Jun, Tae-Gook; Kim, Chung Su

    2016-10-01

    Laboratory hemostatic variables and parameters of rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) were evaluated for their ability to predict perioperative excessive blood loss (PEBL) after congenital cardiac surgery. Retrospective and observational. Single, large university hospital. The study comprised 119 children younger than 10 years old undergoing congenital cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Intraoperative excessive blood loss was defined as estimated blood loss≥50% of estimated blood volume (EBV). Postoperative excessive blood loss was defined as measured postoperative chest tube and Jackson-Pratt drainage≥30% of EBV over 12 hours or≥50% of EBV over 24 hours in the intensive care unit. PEBL was defined as either intraoperative or postoperative excessive blood loss. External temogram (EXTEM) and fibrinogen temogram (FIBTEM) were analyzed before and after CPB with ROTEM and laboratory hemostatic variables. Multivariate logistic regression was performed. Incidence of PEBL was 19.3% (n = 23). Independent risk factors for PEBL were CPB time>120 minutes, post-CPB FIBTEM alpha-angle, clot firmness after 10 minutes20%. Laboratory hemostatic variables were not significant in multivariate analysis. The risk prediction model was developed from the results of multivariate analysis. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.94 (95% confidence interval: 0.90-0.99). Post-CPB ROTEM may be useful for predicting both intraoperative and postoperative excessive blood loss in congenital cardiac surgery. This study provided an accurate prediction model for PEBL and supported intraoperative transfusion guidance using post-CPB FIBTEM-A10 and EXTEM-A10. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Nitric Oxide Induces Cardiac Protection by Preventing Extracellular Matrix Degradation through the Complex Caveolin-3/EMMPRIN in Cardiac Myocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Cuadrado

    Full Text Available Inhibition of Extracellular Matrix degradation by nitric oxide (NO induces cardiac protection against coronary ischemia/reperfusion (IR. Glycosylation of Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer (EMMPRIN stimulates enzymatic activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs in the heart, although the mechanisms leading to EMMPRIN glycosylation are poorly understood. We sought to determine if NO may induce cardiac protection by preventing glycosylation of EMMPRIN in a mouse model of IR. Here we found that Caveolin-3 binds to low glycosylated EMMPRIN (LG-EMMPRIN in cardiac cells and in the hearts of healthy mice, whereas IR disrupted the complex in nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2 knockout (KO mice. By contrast, the binding was partially restored when mice were fed with an NO donor (DEA-NO in the drinking water, showing a significant reduction on infarct size (NOS2KO: 34.6±5 vs NOS2KO+DEA-NO: 20.7±9, in expression of matrix metalloproteinases, and cardiac performance was improved (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF. NOS2KO: 31±4 vs NOS2KO+DEA-NO: 46±6. The role of Caveolin-3/EMMPRIN in NO-mediated cardiac protection was further assayed in Caveolin-3 KO mice, showing no significant improvement on infarct size (Caveolin-3 KO: 34.8±3 vs Caveolin-3 KO+DEA-NO:33.7±5, or in the expression of MMPs, suggesting that stabilization of the complex Caveolin-3/LG-EMMPRIN may play a significant role in the cardioprotective effect of NO against IR.

  9. Nitric Oxide Induces Cardiac Protection by Preventing Extracellular Matrix Degradation through the Complex Caveolin-3/EMMPRIN in Cardiac Myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado, Irene; Castejon, Borja; Martin, Ana M; Saura, Marta; Reventun-Torralba, Paula; Zamorano, Jose Luis; Zaragoza, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of Extracellular Matrix degradation by nitric oxide (NO) induces cardiac protection against coronary ischemia/reperfusion (IR). Glycosylation of Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer (EMMPRIN) stimulates enzymatic activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the heart, although the mechanisms leading to EMMPRIN glycosylation are poorly understood. We sought to determine if NO may induce cardiac protection by preventing glycosylation of EMMPRIN in a mouse model of IR. Here we found that Caveolin-3 binds to low glycosylated EMMPRIN (LG-EMMPRIN) in cardiac cells and in the hearts of healthy mice, whereas IR disrupted the complex in nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) knockout (KO) mice. By contrast, the binding was partially restored when mice were fed with an NO donor (DEA-NO) in the drinking water, showing a significant reduction on infarct size (NOS2KO: 34.6±5 vs NOS2KO+DEA-NO: 20.7±9), in expression of matrix metalloproteinases, and cardiac performance was improved (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). NOS2KO: 31±4 vs NOS2KO+DEA-NO: 46±6). The role of Caveolin-3/EMMPRIN in NO-mediated cardiac protection was further assayed in Caveolin-3 KO mice, showing no significant improvement on infarct size (Caveolin-3 KO: 34.8±3 vs Caveolin-3 KO+DEA-NO:33.7±5), or in the expression of MMPs, suggesting that stabilization of the complex Caveolin-3/LG-EMMPRIN may play a significant role in the cardioprotective effect of NO against IR.

  10. Correlation of 64 row MDCT, echocardiography and cardiac catheterization angiography in assessment of pulmonary arterial anatomy in children with cyanotic congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrashekhar, Guruprasadh; Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh; Saxena, Akshay Kumar; Rohit, Manoj Kumar; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the correlation of low-dose 64-row multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) with echocardiography and cardiac catheterization angiography (CCA) in the assessment of pulmonary arterial anatomy in children with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). Materials and methods: This prospective study included 105 children (74 males, 31 females) with CCHD, in the age group of 2 months to 20 years, who underwent 64-row MDCT examination (low-dose CT protocol), echocardiography and CCA for the assessment of pulmonary arteries, including visualization, presence of confluence, stenosis and collaterals. Statistical analysis was performed using the non-parametric statistical analysis test to evaluate the concordance or discordance between echocardiography, MDCT and CCA. Results: 64-row MDCT detected significantly more main and branch pulmonary arteries, patent pulmonary confluences, and more cases of pulmonary artery stenosis. CCA detected more major aorto-pulmonary collaterals than MDCT, whereas echocardiography failed to identify these major aorto-pulmonary collaterals. The effective CT radiation dose to patients less than 2 years of age was in the range of 0.7–2.5 mSv, where as the dose in patients more than 2 years of age ranged from that of 2.1 to 4.2 mSv, which is much less than the radiation dose reported in cardiac catheterization angiography. Conclusion: In cases where cardiac MRI cannot be performed, or is not sufficiently informative, low-dose 64-row MDCT correlates well with CCA and can provide adequate information about pulmonary arterial anatomy in children with cyanotic congenital heart disease, and can replace invasive cardiac catheterization angiography with markedly reduced radiation dosage to the patient.

  11. Clinical features and risk assessment for cardiac surgery in adult congenital heart disease: Three years at a single Japanese center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kurokawa

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Cardiac surgery could be safely performed in most ACHD cases. Exercise tolerance testing can be useful in identifying patients at high risk of mortality or major complications. BNP can be valuable in predicting poor outcomes after cardiac surgery.

  12. Executive Functioning and School Performance Among Pediatric Survivors of Complex Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstle, Melissa; Beebe, Dean W.; Drotar, Dennis; Cassedy, Amy; Marino, Bradley S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the presence and severity of real-world impairments in executive functioning– responsible for children’s regulatory skills (metacognition, behavioral regulation) – and its potential impact on school performance among pediatric survivors of complex congenital heart disease (CHD). Study design Survivors of complex CHD aged 8–16 years (n=143)and their parents/guardians from a regional CHD survivor registry participated (81% participation rate). Parents completed proxy measures of executive functioning, school competency, and school-related quality of life (QOL). Patients also completed a measure of school QOL and underwent IQ testing. Patients were categorized into two groups based on heart lesion complexity: two-ventricle or single-ventricle. Results Survivors of complex CHD performed significantly worse than norms for executive functioning, IQ, school competency, and school QOL. Metacognition was more severely affected than behavioral regulation, and metacognitive deficits were more often present in older children. Even after taking into account demographic factors, disease severity, and IQ, metacognition uniquely and strongly predicted poorer school performance. In exploratory analyses, patients with single-ventricle lesions were rated as having lower school competency and school QOL, and patients with two-ventricle lesions were rated as having poorer behavioral regulation. Conclusions Survivors of complex CHD experience greater executive functioning difficulties than healthy peers, with metacognition particularly impacted and particularly relevant for day-to-day school performance. Especially in older children, clinicians should watch for metacognitive deficits, such as problems with organization, planning, self-monitoring, and follow-through on tasks. PMID:26875011

  13. Evaluation of congenital heart disease by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, A. de; Roest, A.A.W.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has proven to be useful in the assessment of patients with complex congenital heart disease and in the post-surgical follow-up of patients with corrected congenital heart disease. A thorough understanding of the congenital cardiac malformations that can be encountered is needed and the use of the sequential segmental analysis helps to standardize the evaluation and diagnosis of (complex) congenital heart disease. After surgical correction of congenital heart defects, patients must be followed over extended periods of time, because morphological and functional abnormalities may still be present or may develop. The use of echocardiography may be hampered in these patients as scar tissue and thorax deformities limit the acoustic window. Magnetic resonance imaging has proven to be advantageous in the follow-up of these post-surgical patients and with the use of several different techniques the morphological as well as functional abnormalities can be evaluated and followed over time. (orig.)

  14. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in congenital cardiac disease - the need for refinement of the Evian-Venice classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Albada, Mirjam E.; Berger, Rolf M. F.

    Pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital systemic-to-pulmonary shunts has been classified, in the Evian-Venice classification, as Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, which includes a heterogeneous group of conditions. Emerging options for treatment of patients with pulmonary arterial

  15. The effect of neuromuscular blockade on oxygen consumption in sedated and mechanically ventilated pediatric patients after cardiac surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemson, J.; Driessen, J.J.; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure the effect of intense neuromuscular blockade (NMB) on oxygen consumption (VO(2)) in deeply sedated and mechanically ventilated children on the first day after complex congenital cardiac surgery. DESIGN: Prospective clinical interventional study. SETTING: Pediatric intensive

  16. Congenital heat disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, C.B.; Silverman, N.H.; Kersting-Somerhoff, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    The book covers the tomographic anatomy of the normal and congenitally malformed heart and tomographic imaging of the normal heat. It then compares echocardiographic evaluation and the use of MR imaging in the diagnosis and evaluation of individual congenital cardiac malformations

  17. Determining cardiac vagal threshold from short term heart rate complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdan Rami Abou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating individual aerobic exercise capacity is fundamental in sports and exercise medicine but associated with organizational and instrumental effort. Here, we extract an index related to common performance markers, the aerobic and anaerobic thresholds enabling the estimation of exercise capacity from a conventional sports watch supporting beatwise heart rate tracking. Therefore, cardiac vagal threshold (CVT was determined in 19 male subjects performing an incremental maximum exercise test. CVT varied around the anaerobic threshold AnT with mean deviation of 7.9 ± 17.7 W. A high correspondence of the two thresholds was indicated by Bland-Altman plots with limits of agreement −27.5 W and 43.4 W. Additionally, CVT was strongly correlated AnT (rp = 0.86, p < 0.001 and reproduced this marker well (rc = 0.81. We conclude, that cardiac vagal threshold derived from compression entropy time course can be useful to assess physical fitness in an uncomplicated way.

  18. Comprehensive blood conservation program in a new congenital cardiac surgical program allows bloodless surgery for the Jehovah Witness and a reduction for all patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshove, Vincent; Berndsen, Nicole; Sivarajan, Veena; Nawathe, Pooja; Phillips, Alistair

    2018-04-01

    Cardiac surgery on Jehovah's Witnesses (JW) can be challenging, given the desire to avoid blood products. Establishment of a blood conservation program involving the pre-, intra- and post-operative stages for all patients may lead to a minimized need for blood transfusion in all patients. Pre-operatively, all JW patients were treated with high dose erythropoietin 500 IU/kg twice a week. JW patients were compared to matching non-JW patients from the congenital cardiac database, two per JW to serve as control. Blood use, ventilation time, bypass time, pre-operative hematocrit, first in intensive care unit (ICU) and at discharge and 24 hour chest drainage were compared. Pre-operative huddle, operating room huddle and post-operative bedside handoff were done with the congenital cardiac surgeon, perfusionist, anesthesiologist and intensive care team in all patients for goal alignment. Five JW patients (mean weight 24.4 ± 25.0 Kg, range 6.3 - 60 Kg) were compared to 10 non-JW patients (weight 22.0 ± 22.8 Kg, range 6.2 - 67.8 Kg). There was no difference in bypass, cross-clamp, time to extubation (0.8 vs. 2.1 hours), peak inotrope score (2.0 vs. 2.3) or chest drainage. No JW patient received a blood product compared to 40% of non-JW. The pre-operative hematocrit (Hct) was statistically greater for the JW patients (46.1 ± 3.3% vs. 36.3 ± 4.7%, pconservation techniques across the continuum of care allowed bloodless surgery for JW and non-JW patients alike. Blood conservation is a team sport and to make significant strides requires participation and input by all care providers.

  19. The morphology of the coronary sinus in patients with congenitally corrected transposition: implications for cardiac catheterisation and re-synchronisation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Vera D; Ferreira, Flávia C N; Scanavacca, Mauricio I; Anderson, Robert H; D'Avila, André

    2016-02-01

    Patients with congenitally corrected transposition frequently benefit from re-synchronisation therapy or ablation procedures. This is likely to require catheterisation of the coronary sinus. Its anatomy, however, is not always appreciated, despite being well-described. With this caveat in mind, we have evaluated its location and structure in hearts with congenitally corrected transposition in order to reinforce the guidance needed by the cardiac interventionist. We dissected and inspected the coronary sinus, the oblique vein of the left atrium, and the left-sided-circumflex venous channel in eight heart specimens with corrected transposition and eight controls, measuring the orifice and length of the sinus and the atrioventricular valves. In two-thirds of the malformed hearts, the sinus deviated from its anticipated course in the atrioventricular groove, ascending obliquely on the left atrial inferior wall to meet the left oblique vein. The maximal deviation coincided in all hearts with the point where the left oblique vein joined the left-sided-circumflex vein to form the coronary sinus. We describe a circumflex vein, rather than the great cardiac vein, as the latter venous channel is right-sided in the setting of corrected transposition. The length of the sinus correlated positively with the diameter of the tricuspid valve (p=0.02). Compared with controls, the left oblique vein in the malformed hearts joined the circumflex venous channel significantly closer to the mouth of the sinus. The unexpected course of the coronary sinus in corrected transposition and the naming of the cardiac veins have important implications for venous cannulation and interpretation of images.

  20. Complex congenital heart malformation evaluated with MR imaging at 0.3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmgren, N.; Hochbergs, P.; Holmqvist, C.; Sandstroem, S.; Laurin, S.; Bjoerkhem, G.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of MR imaging at 0.3 T as the single modality in diagnosing complex congenital heart disease (CHD). Films from 45 cases were reviewed in two stages by four specialists and one fellow in pediatric radiology, who were unfamiliar with the patients. First a general review of CHD diagnosis was made, then a detailed study of anomalous venous return was performed. Regarding the general diagnosis of cardiovascular anomalies the results were good, with sensitivity of 80%, specificity of 96%, a positive predictive value of 88%, a negative predictive value of 93% and accuracy of 92%. As expected, the less experienced reviewer had somewhat lower figures. As for detailed evaluation of the anomalous veins, the diagnostic results were again good (sensitivity 85%), although less so when also the connection sites of the anomalous veins were considered (sensitivity 79%). The specificity of the findings was high at 97%. MR imaging at 0.3 T is valuable in the diagnosis of comples CHD, especially for anomalous vessels and their connections. (orig.)

  1. The adaptation process of mothers raising a child with complex congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jeong-Ah; Lee, Sunhee

    2018-01-01

    Mothers of children with congenital heart disease (CHD) tend to be concerned about their child's normal life. The majority of these mothers tend to experience negative psychological problems. In this study, the adaptation process of mothers raising a child with complex CHD was investigated based on the sociocultural context of Korea. The data collection was conducted by in-depth interviews and theoretical sampling was performed until the data were saturated. The collected data were analyzed using continuous theoretical comparisons. The results of the present study showed that the core category in the mothers' adaptation process was 'anxiety regarding the future', and the mothers' adaptation process consisted of the impact phase, standing against phase, and accepting phase. In the impact phase, the participants emotionally fluctuated between 'feelings of abandonment' and 'entertaining hope'. In the standing against phase, participants tended to dedicate everything to child-rearing while being affected by 'being encouraged by support' and 'being frustrated by tasks beyond their limits'. In the accepting phase, the subjects attempted to 'accept the child as is', 'resist hard feelings', and 'share hope'. Health-care providers need to develop programs that include information regarding CHD, how to care for a child with CHD, and effective child-rearing behaviors.

  2. Hypoxic Challenge Testing (Fitness to Fly) in children with complex congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Nitha; Doughty, Victoria L; Starling, Luke; Franklin, Rodney C; Ward, Simon; Daubeney, Piers E F; Balfour-Lynn, Ian M

    2018-02-14

    Commercial airplanes fly with an equivalent cabin fraction of inspired oxygen of 0.15, leading to reduced oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) in passengers. How this affects children with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) is unknown. We conducted Hypoxic Challenge Testing (HCT) to assess need for inflight supplemental oxygen. Children aged heart rate, QT interval corrected for heart rate and partial pressure of carbon dioxide measured transcutaneously (PtcCO 2 ). A test failed when children with (1) normal baseline SpO 2 desaturated to 85%, (2) baseline SpO 2 85%-94% desaturated by 15% of baseline; and (3) baseline SpO 2 75%-84% desaturated to 70%. There were 68 children, mean age 3.3 years (range 10 weeks-14.5 years). Children with normal (n=36) baseline SpO 2 desaturated from median 99% to 91%, Pheart rate and QT interval corrected for heart rate were unaffected by the hypoxic state. This is the first evidence to help guide which children with CHD need a preflight HCT. We suggest all children with an actual or potential R-L shunt should be tested. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Infant temperament and parental stress in 3-month-old infants after surgery for complex congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torowicz, Deborah; Irving, Sharon Y; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Sumpter, Danica F; Medoff-Cooper, Barbara

    2010-04-01

    This study aimed to identify and compare differences in temperament and maternal stress between infants with complex congenital heart disease and healthy controls at 3 months of age. Study sample was drawn from an existing longitudinal study examining growth in infants with congenital heart disease when compared with healthy controls. Infant temperament and parental stress were measured in 129 mother-infant dyads. Inclusion criteria for infants with congenital heart disease were > or = 36-week postmenstrual age, > or = 2500 g at birth, surgery in first 6 weeks of life, and no major congenital anomalies or genetic syndromes. The Early Infancy Temperament Questionnaire and Parent Stress Index were the assessment tools used. Infants with single ventricular (SV) physiology were more negative in mood (F = 7.14, p parenting an irritable infant with SV physiology put these mothers at risk for high levels of stress. Results suggest the need for predischarge anticipatory guidance for parents to better understand and respond to the behavioral style of their infants, in particular, infants with SV physiology.

  4. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of limb-body wall complex: case series of a rare congenital anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Bhat, MBBS, DMRD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Three case reports of a rare congenital anomaly “limb-body wall complex” also known as “body stalk syndrome” are presented with prenatal ultrasonographic diagnostic features, immediate after delivery evaluation, and histopathologic analysis.

  5. Post-cardiac arrest level of free-plasma DNA and DNA-histone complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, A N; Hvas, A-M; Grejs, A M

    2017-01-01

    Background Plasma DNA-histone complexes and total free-plasma DNA have the potential to quantify the ischaemia-reperfusion damages occurring after cardiac arrest. Furthermore, DNA-histone complexes may have the potential of being a target for future treatment. The aim was to examine if plasma DNA-histone...... after 22, 46 and 70 h. Samples for DNA-histone complexes were quantified by Cell Death Detection ELISAplus. The total free-plasma DNA analyses were quantified with qPCR by analysing the Beta-2 microglobulin gene. The control group comprised 40 healthy individuals. Results We found no difference...... in the level of DNA-histone complexes between the 22-h sample and healthy individuals (P = 0.10). In the 46-h sample, there was an increased level of DNA-histone complexes in non-survivors compared with survivors 30 days after the cardiac arrest (P

  6. Patterns of Transition Experience for Parents Going Home from Hospital with their Infant after First Stage Surgery for Complex Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Kerry L

    2017-12-04

    The purpose of this study was to explore parents' experiences of one specific timepoint in their infant's journey: the transition from hospital to home, following the first stage of their infant's cardiac surgery for complex congenital heart disease. A prospective longitudinal mixed methods study, underpinned with Middle Range Transition Theory (Meleis, Sawyer, Im, Hilfinger Messias, & Schumacher, 2000). Face to face and telephone interviews were conducted and self-report forms completed by parents at four-time points: before discharge (T0), 2weeks after discharge (T1), 8weeks after discharge (T2) and after stage two surgery (T3). Interviews were transcribed verbatim before inductive thematic analysis. Parents were recruited over a 15-month period from 2013 to 2015. Twelve mothers and 4 fathers took part. The infants had functionally univentricular heart (left n=10, right n=1) and a systemic shunt dependent lesion, tetralogy of Fallot (n=1). Dynamic constructivist and constructionist social processes occurred for all parents, involving physical, physiological, psychological and cognitive elements within four 'patterns of experience', two of which 'safety and security' and 'love and support' are presented in this paper. Parental support is essential; parents need to be engaged in discharge planning process and given the opportunity to express their needs to ensure that discharge care is truly patient and family centered. Transition from hospital to home was complex and multi-faceted, with unanticipated physical and emotional transitions superimposed upon those that were expected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The association of congenital neuroblastoma and congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellah, R.; D'Andrea, A.; Children's Hospital, Boston, MA; Darillis, E.; Fellows, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    Several authors have reported an association between neuroblastoma and congenital heart disease; others contend that, unlike specific wellknown associations between malignancy and congenital defects (Wilm's tumor and aniridia, leukemia and Down's syndrome), no real relationship exists. We present three cases of cyanotic congenital heart disease in which subclinical neuroblastoma was found. We speculate that abnormal neural crest cell migration and development may be a common link between cardiac malformations and congenital neuroblastoma. (orig.)

  8. Selective cerebro-myocardial perfusion in complex congenital aortic arch pathology: a novel technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rita, Fabrizio; Lucchese, Gianluca; Barozzi, Luca; Menon, Tiziano; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Luciani, Giovanni Battista

    2011-11-01

    Simultaneous cerebro-myocardial perfusion has been described in neonatal and infant arch surgery, suggesting a reduction in cardiac morbidity. Here reported is a novel technique for selective cerebral perfusion combined with controlled and independent myocardial perfusion during surgery for complex or recurrent aortic arch lesions. From April 2008 to April 2011, 10 patients with arch pathology underwent surgery (two hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLHS], four recurrent arch obstruction, two aortic arch hypoplasia + ventricular septal defect [VSD], one single ventricle + transposition of the great arteries + arch hypoplasia, one interrupted aortic arch type B + VSD). Median age was 63 days (6 days-36 years) and median weight 4.0 kg (1.6-52). Via midline sternotomy, an arterial cannula (6 or 8 Fr for infants) was directly inserted into the innominate artery or through a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft (for neonates cerebro-myocardial perfusion was 39 ± 18 min (17-69). Weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass was achieved without inotropic support in three and with low dose in seven patients. One patient required veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Four patients, body weight cerebro-myocardial perfusion is feasible in patients with complex or recurrent aortic arch disease, starting from premature newborn less than 2.0 kg of body weight to adults. The technique is as safe as previously reported methods of cerebro-myocardial perfusion and possibly more versatile. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Assessment of adult congenital heart disease with multi-detector computed tomography - beyond coronary lumenography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicol, E.D.; Gatzoulis, M.; Padley, S.P.G.; Rubens, M.

    2007-01-01

    Adult congenital heart disease is an increasingly prevalent condition with more than 135,000 patients affected in England alone. With this increased patient population and an increase in interventional procedures being performed on them, traditional imaging techniques such as cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) may be unavailable locally or contra-indicated. Cardiac multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is rapidly emerging as an alternative imaging method for the investigation of these patients and this review highlights the broad application of cardiac MDCT to this population and makes recommendations on the stardardized reporting of complex congenital heart disease

  10. Assessment of adult congenital heart disease with multi-detector computed tomography - beyond coronary lumenography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, E.D. [Department of Radiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom) and Department of Cardiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: e.nicol@rbht.nhs.uk; Gatzoulis, M. [Adult Congenital Heart Centre and Centre for Pulmonary Hypertension, Royal Brompton Hospital and National Heart and Lung Institute, London (United Kingdom); Padley, S.P.G. [Department of Radiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Rubens, M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-06-15

    Adult congenital heart disease is an increasingly prevalent condition with more than 135,000 patients affected in England alone. With this increased patient population and an increase in interventional procedures being performed on them, traditional imaging techniques such as cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) may be unavailable locally or contra-indicated. Cardiac multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is rapidly emerging as an alternative imaging method for the investigation of these patients and this review highlights the broad application of cardiac MDCT to this population and makes recommendations on the stardardized reporting of complex congenital heart disease.

  11. A Proposal for Cardiac Arrhythmia Classification using Complexity Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AROTARITEI, D.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are one of the major problems of humanity and therefore one of their component, arrhythmia detection and classification drawn an increased attention worldwide. The presence of randomness in discrete time series, like those arising in electrophysiology, is firmly connected with computational complexity measure. This connection can be used, for instance, in the analysis of RR-intervals of electrocardiographic (ECG signal, coded as binary string, to detect and classify arrhythmia. Our approach uses three algorithms (Lempel-Ziv, Sample Entropy and T-Code to compute the information complexity applied and a classification tree to detect 13 types of arrhythmia with encouraging results. To overcome the computational effort required for complexity calculus, a cloud computing solution with executable code deployment is also proposed.

  12. Cerebral monitoring during neonatal surgery for non-cardiac congenital anomalies: a first step to improve outcome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolwijk, L.J.

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring the newborn brain during surgery Cerebral monitoring in newborns, who require surgery in the first month of life, is important to protect the brain. The newborn brain is vulnerable during neonatal surgery. Newborn babies with a congenital anomaly requiring surgery in the first month of

  13. The MRI study of the sphincter muscle complex in congenital anorectal malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Shaotao; Mao Yongzhong; Wang Yong; Dong Ning; Ruan Qinglan; Peng Zhenjun; Kong Xiangquan; Liu Dingxi

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the development of the sphincter muscle complex (SMC) and defecation function in pediatric patients with congenital anorectal malformations (ARM). Methods: A total of 64 children underwent MRI, among whom 39 were patients with ARM, and the others were patients without ARM undergoing MRI because of other dieases. The dimensions of the SMC in different planes were evaluated with different sequences and coils. The relationship between the SMC development and the defecation function was investigated. Results: In control group, the absolute value of SMC width was (3.63 ± 0.22)mm, which had a high correlation with age (r=0.998, P 0.05). The SMCs in intermediate ARM patients [muscle index (MI)=0.47 ± 0.05] and low ARM patients (MI=0.49 ± 0.05) were well developed. The SMCs in a portion of patients with high ARM (MI=0.28 ± 0.06) were poorly developed, when MI≤0.18, anorectal contraction pressure was significantly lower (t=3.55, P 0.18[(0.85 ± 0.20) vs (2.24 ± 1.02) kPa]. The length of anal canal with high-pressure[(10.88 ± 3.64) vs (20.26 ± 4.34)mm] was shorter (t= 5.18, P 0.18, the anorectal angle was less than 90 degrees, and normal continent function was found in 21 of 23 cases (91%). Conclusion: MRI can be employed to evaluate the development of SMC in patients with ARM, MI was an objective criteria to evaluate the development of SMC. When MI≤0.18, maldevelopment of SMC will be highly suspected. (authors)

  14. Cardiac fibroblast transcriptome analyses support a role for interferogenic, profibrotic, and inflammatory genes in anti-SSA/Ro-associated congenital heart block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Robert M; Markham, Androo J; Jackson, Tanisha; Rasmussen, Sara E; Blumenberg, Miroslav; Buyon, Jill P

    2017-09-01

    The signature lesion of SSA/Ro autoantibody-associated congenital heart block (CHB) is fibrosis and a macrophage infiltrate, supporting an experimental focus on cues influencing the fibroblast component. The transcriptomes of human fetal cardiac fibroblasts were analyzed using two complementary approaches. Cardiac injury conditions were simulated in vitro by incubating human fetal cardiac fibroblasts with supernatants from macrophages transfected with the SSA/Ro-associated noncoding Y ssRNA. The top 10 upregulated transcripts in the stimulated fibroblasts reflected a type I interferon (IFN) response [e.g., IFN-induced protein 44-like (IFI44L), of MX dynamin-like GTPase (MX)1, MX2, and radical S -adenosyl methionine domain containing 2 (Rsad2)]. Within the fibrotic pathway, transcript levels of endothelin-1 (EDN1), phosphodiesterase (PDE)4D, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)2, and CXCL3 were upregulated, while others, including adenomedullin, RAP guanine nucleotide exchange factor 3 (RAPGEF3), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)1, TIMP3, and dual specificity phosphatase 1, were downregulated. Agnostic Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery analysis revealed a significant increase in inflammatory genes, including complement C3A receptor 1 (C3AR1), F2R-like thrombin/trypsin receptor 3, and neutrophil cytosolic factor 2. In addition, stimulated fibroblasts expressed high levels of phospho-MADS box transcription enhancer factor 2 [a substrate of MAPK5 (ERK5)], which was inhibited by BIX-02189, a specific inhibitor of ERK5. Translation to human disease leveraged an unprecedented opportunity to interrogate the transcriptome of fibroblasts freshly isolated and cell sorted without stimulation from a fetal heart with CHB and a matched healthy heart. Consistent with the in vitro data, five IFN response genes were among the top 10 most highly expressed transcripts in CHB fibroblasts. In addition, the expression of matrix-related genes

  15. Activation of the hippocampal complex during tactile maze solving in congenitally blind subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagnon, Léa; Schneider, Fabien C; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2012-01-01

    Despite their lack of vision, congenitally blind subjects are able to build and manipulate cognitive maps for spatial navigation. It is assumed that they thereby rely more heavily on echolocation, proprioceptive signals and environmental cues such as ambient temperature and audition to compensate...... imaging (fMRI) in congenitally blind and blindfolded sighted participants while they navigated through a tactile multiple T-maze. Both groups learned the maze task at a similar pace. In blind participants, tactile maze navigation was associated with increased BOLD responses in the right hippocampus...

  16. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, we discuss the methodologies that make Xenopus an ideal model system to investigate heart development and disease. We also outline congenital heart conditions linked to cardiac genes that have been well-studied in Xenopus and describe some emerging technologies that will further aid in the study of these complex syndromes. PMID:21538812

  17. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Congenital Cardiac Defects and Ophthalmologic Changes - Systematization for Diagnosis in the Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Priscila H. A.; Souza, Beatriz S.; Pacheco, Eimi N.; Menegazzo, Michele S.; Corrêa, Ivan S.; Zen, Paulo R. G.; Rosa, Rafael F. M.; Cesa, Claudia C.; Pellanda, Lucia C.; Vilela, Manuel A. P.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: Numerous genetic syndromes associated with heart disease and ocular manifestations have been described. However, a compilation and a summarization of these syndromes for better consultation and comparison have not been performed yet. Objective: The objective of this work is to systematize available evidence in the literature on different syndromes that may cause congenital heart diseases associated with ocular changes, focusing on the types of anatomical and functional ...

  18. Use of milrinone to treat cardiac dysfunction in infants with pulmonary hypertension secondary to congenital diaphragmatic hernia: a review of six patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension and secondary cardiac dysfunction are important contributors of morbidity and mortality in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Milrinone, a phosphodiesterase-3 inhibitor, may be useful in this setting for its combined actions as a pulmonary vasodilator and to improve systolic and diastolic function. This study aimed to assess the effects of milrinone on cardiac function and pulmonary artery pressure in infants with CDH. A retrospective review of echocardiograms performed on infants with CDH who received milrinone was performed. Tissue Doppler imaging velocities were used to assess systolic and diastolic function. Pulmonary artery pressure was assessed from the pattern and velocity of ductal shunting. Six infants with CDH and severe pulmonary hypertension were identified. Systolic and diastolic myocardial velocities were reduced in the right ventricle (RV) and interventricular septum (IVS) at baseline. In the 72 h after commencement of milrinone, there was a significant increase in early diastolic myocardial velocities in the RV, accompanied by increasing systolic velocities in the RV and IVS. Oxygenation index was significantly reduced, blood pressure unchanged, and ductal shunt velocity minimally altered over the same time period. Milrinone use was associated with an improvement in systolic and diastolic function in the RV, corresponding to an improvement in clinical status. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Incidence of milrinone blood levels outside the therapeutic range and their relevance in children after cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Guerra, Gonzalo; Joffe, Ari R; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan; Kutsogiannis, Demetrios J; Parshuram, Christopher S

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate whether variability in milrinone blood levels (MBL) occurs during administration to critically ill children after surgical repair of congenital heart disease, and the clinical relevance of this variability. Prospective cohort study conducted in the pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary care teaching and referral hospital. MBL were measured at three time periods after starting milrinone infusion (9-12, 18-24, 40-48 h) and at the end of the infusion. MBL were categorized as within (100-300 ng/ml) or outside the therapeutic range. Low cardiac output syndrome was defined by elevation of either lactate (>2 mmol/l) or arteriovenous oxygen difference (>30%). Five other clinical outcomes were evaluated. Regression analyses evaluated the relationships between MBL and outcomes. Sixty-three patients were included with a total of 220 MBL. Quantification of MBL was by high-performance liquid chromatography. Overall, 114 (52%) MBL were outside the therapeutic range: 78 (36%) subtherapeutic, and 36 (16%) supratherapeutic. Repeated-measures analysis found a significant association between supratherapeutic MBL and low cardiac output syndrome (p = 0.02), and supratherapeutic MBL were associated with arterial-central venous oxygen saturation difference >30% at time 3 (p = 0.007). In this cohort, nontherapeutic MBL were common. Further investigation of milrinone dosing recommendations may improve the postoperative outcomes of children.

  20. Clinical impact of left ventricular eccentricity index using cardiac MRI in assessment of right ventricular hemodynamics and myocardial fibrosis in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamasaki, Yuzo; Kamitani, Takeshi; Yamanouchi, Torahiko; Honda, Hiroshi [Kyushu University, Departments of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Nagao, Michinobu; Kawanami, Satoshi [Kyushu University, Molecular Imaging and Diagnosis, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamamura, Kenichiro [Kyushu University, Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Sakamoto, Ichiro [Kyushu University, Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Yabuuchi, Hidetake [Kyushu University, Health SciencesGraduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    To investigate the utility of eccentricity index (EI) using cardiac cine MRI for the assessment of right ventricular (RV) hemodynamics in congenital heart disease (CHD). Fifty-five patients with CHD (32 women; mean age, 40.7 ± 20.9 years) underwent both cardiac MRI and right heart catheterization. EI was defined as the ratio of the distance between the anterior-posterior wall and the septal-lateral wall measured in the short-axis of mid-ventricular cine MRI. Correlations between EIs and RV hemodynamic parameters were analyzed. EIs were compared between patients with and without late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). A strong correlation between mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) and systolic EI (r = 0.81, p < 0.0001) and a moderate negative correlation between diastolic EI and RV ejection fraction (EF) (r = -0.62, p < 0.0001) were observed. Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed optimal EI thresholds for detecting patients with mean PAP ≥40 mmHg with C-statistics of 0.90 and patients with RVEF <40 % with C-statistics of 0.78. Systolic EIs were significantly greater for patients with LGE (1.45 ± 0.05) than for those without LGE (1.15 ± 0.07; p < 0.001). EI offers a simple, comprehensive index that can predict pulmonary hypertension and RV dysfunction in CHD. (orig.)

  1. A Homolog Pentameric Complex Dictates Viral Epithelial Tropism, Pathogenicity and Congenital Infection Rate in Guinea Pig Cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Stewart; Choi, K Yeon; Root, Matthew; McGregor, Alistair

    2016-07-01

    In human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), tropism to epithelial and endothelial cells is dependent upon a pentameric complex (PC). Given the structure of the placenta, the PC is potentially an important neutralizing antibody target antigen against congenital infection. The guinea pig is the only small animal model for congenital CMV. Guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) potentially encodes a UL128-131 HCMV PC homolog locus (GP128-GP133). In transient expression studies, GPCMV gH and gL glycoproteins interacted with UL128, UL130 and UL131 homolog proteins (designated GP129 and GP131 and GP133 respectively) to form PC or subcomplexes which were determined by immunoprecipitation reactions directed to gH or gL. A natural GP129 C-terminal deletion mutant (aa 107-179) and a chimeric HCMV UL128 C-terminal domain swap GP129 mutant failed to form PC with other components. GPCMV infection of a newly established guinea pig epithelial cell line required a complete PC and a GP129 mutant virus lacked epithelial tropism and was attenuated in the guinea pig for pathogenicity and had a low congenital transmission rate. Individual knockout of GP131 or 133 genes resulted in loss of viral epithelial tropism. A GP128 mutant virus retained epithelial tropism and GP128 was determined not to be a PC component. A series of GPCMV mutants demonstrated that gO was not strictly essential for epithelial infection whereas gB and the PC were essential. Ectopic expression of a GP129 cDNA in a GP129 mutant virus restored epithelial tropism, pathogenicity and congenital infection. Overall, GPCMV forms a PC similar to HCMV which enables evaluation of PC based vaccine strategies in the guinea pig model.

  2. Prophylactic levosimendan for the prevention of low cardiac output syndrome and mortality in paediatric patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Johanna; Rücker, Gerta; Stiller, Brigitte

    2017-08-02

    Low cardiac output syndrome remains a serious complication, and accounts for substantial morbidity and mortality in the postoperative course of paediatric patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. Standard prophylactic and therapeutic strategies for low cardiac output syndrome are based mainly on catecholamines, which are effective drugs, but have considerable side effects. Levosimendan, a calcium sensitiser, enhances the myocardial function by generating more energy-efficient myocardial contractility than achieved via adrenergic stimulation with catecholamines. Thus potentially, levosimendan is a beneficial alternative to standard medication for the prevention of low cardiac output syndrome in paediatric patients after open heart surgery. To review the efficacy and safety of the postoperative prophylactic use of levosimendan for the prevention of low cardiac output syndrome and mortality in paediatric patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. We identified trials via systematic searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and Web of Science, as well as clinical trial registries, in June 2016. Reference lists from primary studies and review articles were checked for additional references. We only included randomised controlled trials (RCT) in our analysis that compared prophylactic levosimendan with standard medication or placebo, in infants and children up to 18 years of age, who were undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias according to a pre-defined protocol. We obtained additional information from all but one of the study authors of the included studies. We used the five GRADE considerations (study limitations, consistency of effect, imprecision, indirectness, and publication bias) to assess the quality of evidence from the studies that contributed data to the meta-analyses for the prespecified outcomes. We created a 'Summary of findings' table to

  3. Prostaglandin E1 treatment in ductus dependent congenital cardiac malformation. A review of the treatment of 34 neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, A; Halken, S; Kamper, J

    1988-01-01

    and safe regiment that could be initiated after clinical diagnosis of a severe duct dependent cardiac defect, whose clinical course would be adversely affected by ductus closure. After an initial dosage of 0.1 micrograms/kg/min, effective clinical improvement was achieved in 28 infants (82%). In all 28...

  4. Spiral wave drift and complex-oscillatory spiral waves caused by heterogeneities in two-dimensional in vitro cardiac tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Sung-Jae; Hong, Jin Hee; Kim, Tae Yun; Bae, Byung Wook; Lee, Kyoung J

    2008-01-01

    Understanding spiral reentry wave dynamics in cardiac systems is important since it underlies various cardiac arrhythmia including cardiac fibrillation. Primary cultures of dissociated cardiac cells have been a convenient and useful system for studying cardiac wave dynamics, since one can carry out systematic and quantitative studies with them under well-controlled environments. One key drawback of the dissociated cell culture is that, inevitably, some spatial inhomogeneities in terms of cell types and density, and/or the degree of gap junction connectivity, are introduced to the system during the preparation. These unintentional spatial inhomogeneities can cause some non-trivial wave dynamics, for example, the entrainment dynamics among different spiral waves and the generation of complex-oscillatory spiral waves. The aim of this paper is to quantify these general phenomena in an in vitro cardiac system and provide explanations for them with a simple physiological model having some realistic spatial inhomogeneities incorporated

  5. Age is not a good predictor of irreversibility of pulmonary hypertension in congenital cardiac malformations with left-to-right shunt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinpour, Amir-Reza; Perez, Marie-Hélène; Longchamp, David; Cotting, Jacques; Sekarski, Nicole; Hurni, Michel; Prêtre, René; Di Bernardo, Stefano

    2018-03-01

    Congenital cardiac malformations with high pulmonary blood flow and pressure due to left-to-right shunts are usually repaired in early infancy for both the benefits of early relief of heart failure and the fear that the concomitant pulmonary hypertension may become irreversible unless these defects are corrected at an early age. Age, however, has been a poor predictor of irreversibility of pulmonary hypertension in our experience, which is presented here. A retrospective observational study. We defined "late" as age ≥2 years. We examined clinical, echocardiographic, and hemodynamic data from all patients aged ≥2 years with such malformations referred to us from 2004 untill 2015. Department of Pediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery, University Hospital of Vaud, Lausanne, Switzerland. There were 39 patients, aged 2-35 years (median: 5 years), without chromosomal abnormalities. All had malformations amenable to biventricular repair, and all had high systolic right ventricular pressures by echocardiography prior to referral. All patients underwent catheterization for assessment of pulmonary hypertension. If this was reversible, surgical correction was offered. (1) Operability based on reversibility of pulmonary hypertension. (2) When surgery was offered, mortality and evidence of persisting postoperative pulmonary hypertension were examined. Eighteen patients had no pulmonary hypertension, 5 of variable ages were inoperable due to irreversible pulmonary hypertension, and 16 had reversible pulmonary hypertension. Therefore, 34 patients underwent corrective surgery, with no immediate or late mortality. Pulmonary arterial and right ventricular pressures decreased noticeably in all operated patients. This is sustained to date; they are all asymptomatic with no echocardiographic evidence of pulmonary hypertension at a median follow-up of 7 years (range 2-13 years). Pulmonary hypertension may still be reversible in many surprisingly old patients with left

  6. Estimation of radiation dose and risk to children undergoing cardiac catheterization for the treatment of a congenital heart disease using Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakoumakis, Emmanuel; Kostopoulou, Helen; Dimitriadis, Anastastios; Georgiou, Evaggelos [University of Athens, Medical Physics Department, Medical School, Athens (Greece); Makri, Triantafilia [' Agia Sofia' Hospital, Medical Physics Unit, Athens (Greece); Tsalafoutas, Ioannis [Anticancer-Oncology Hospital of Athens ' Agios Savvas' , Medical Physics Department, Athens (Greece)

    2013-03-15

    Children diagnosed with congenital heart disease often undergo cardiac catheterization for their treatment, which involves the use of ionizing radiation and therefore a risk of radiation-induced cancer. The purpose of this study was to calculate the effective and equivalent organ doses (H{sub T}) in those children and estimate the risk of exposure-induced death. Fifty-three children were divided into three groups: atrial septal defect (ASD), ventricular septal defect (VSD) and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). In all procedures, the exposure conditions and the dose-area product meters readings were recorded for each individual acquisition. Monte Carlo simulations were run using the PCXMC 2.0 code and mathematical phantoms simulating a child's anatomy. The H{sub T} values to all irradiated organs and the resulting E and risk of exposure-induced death values were calculated. The average dose-area product values were, respectively, 40 {+-} 12 Gy.cm{sup 2} for the ASD, 17.5 {+-} 0.7 Gy.cm{sup 2} for the VSD and 9.5 {+-} 1 Gy.cm{sup 2} for the PDA group. The average E values were 40 {+-} 12, 22 {+-} 2.5 and 17 {+-} 3.6 mSv for ASD, VSD and PDA groups, respectively. The respective estimated risk of exposure-induced death values per procedure were 0.109, 0.106 and 0.067%. Cardiac catheterizations in children involve a considerable risk for radiation-induced cancer that has to be further reduced. (orig.)

  7. Gerbode defect and multivalvular dysfunction: Complex complications in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruivo, Catarina; Guardado, Joana; Montenegro Sá, Fernando; Saraiva, Fátima; Antunes, Alexandre; Correia, Joana; Morais, João

    2017-07-01

    We report a clinical case of a 40-year-old male with surgically corrected congenital heart disease (CHD) 10 years earlier: closure of ostium primum, mitral annuloplasty, and aortic valve and root surgery. The patient was admitted with acute heart failure. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) revealed a dysmorphic and severely incompetent aortic valve, a partial tear of the mitral valve cleft repair and annuloplasty ring dehiscence. A true left ventricular-to-right atrial shunt confirmed a direct Gerbode defect. The authors aim to discuss the diagnostic challenge of adult CHD, namely the key role of TEE on septal defects and valve regurgitations description. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Role of MDCT angiography in the preoperative evaluation of anomalous pulmonary venous connection associated with complex cardiac abnormality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jingzhe; Wu Qingyu; Xu Yufeng; Bai Yan; Liu Zhibo; Li Hongyin; Zhu Jiemin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of MDCT in patients with APVC associated with complex cardiac abnormality. Materials and methods: The clinical and imaging data of 39 patients with APVC confirmed by surgery were retrospectively reviewed. According to accompanied cardiac malformations, patients with APVC were classified as isolated and complex group. Using surgical findings as the reference standard, diagnostic agreement of MDCT, TTE (transthoracic echocardiography) and cardiac catheterization for detection of APVC were calculated. Results: At surgery, 27 patients were considered as complex APVCs. MDCT correctly diagnosed APVC in all patients and the diagnostic agreements between MDCT and surgery were both 100% in isolated and complex groups. All 5 APVCs which could not be detected at cardiac catheterization were in complex group, and the diagnostic agreements were 100% and 76.2% in isolated and complex groups, respectively. At TTE, eight of nine disagreed patients were complex cases. The diagnostic agreements of TTE were 91.7% and 66.7% in isolated and complex groups, respectively. The dysmorphic pulmonary veins were identified in 11 patients by MDCT. Conclusions: MDCT is superior to catheterization and TTE in evaluation of APVC associated with complex cardiac defects.

  9. Radiation dose and risk to children undergoing cardiac catheterization for the treatment of a congenital heart disease using Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakoumakis, E; Kostopoulou, H.; Dimitriadis, T.; Georgiou, E.; Makri, T.; Tsalafoutas, I.

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective: Children diagnosed with congenital heart disease often undergo cardiac catheterization for their treatment, which involves the use of ionizing radiation and therefore a risk of radiation induced cancer. Our objective was to calculate the effective (E) and equivalent organ doses (HT) in those children and estimate the risk of radiation induced cancer (REID). Materials and methods: Fifty three children were divided into three groups, atrial septal defect (ASD), ventricular septal defect (VSD), and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), depending on their heart condition. In all procedures, the exposure conditions and the Dose-Area Product (DAP) meters readings were recorded for each individual acquisition. Monte Carlo simulations were run using the PCXMC 2.0 code and mathematical phantoms simulating children anatomy. The HT values to all irradiated organs and the resulting E and REID values were calculated. Results: The average DAP values were respectively 40±12 Gy·cm 2 for the ASD, 17.5±0.7 Gy·cm 2 for the VSD and 9.5±1 Gy·cm 2 for the PDA group. The average E values were 40±12, 22±2.5 and 17±3.6 mSv for ASD, VSD and PDA groups, respectively. The respective estimated REID values per procedure were 0.109, 0.106 and 0.067 %. For all groups the most heavily irradiated organs were the thymus, heart, breast, lung and stomach. (authors)

  10. Estimation of children's radiation dose from cardiac catheterisations, performed for the diagnosis or the treatment of a congenital heart disease using TLD dosimetry and Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakoumakis, E N; Gialousis, G I; Papadopoulou, Despina; Makri, Triantafillia; Pappouli, Zografia; Yakoumakis, Nikolaos; Papagiannis, Panayotis; Georgiou, Evangelos

    2009-01-01

    Entrance surface radiation doses were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters for 98 children who were referred to a cardiology department for the diagnosis or the treatment of a congenital heart disease. Additionally, all the radiographic parameters were recorded and Monte Carlo simulations were performed for the estimation of entrance surface dose to effective dose conversion factors, in order to further calculate the effective dose for each child. For diagnostic catheterisations the values ranged from 0.16 to 14.44 mSv, with average 3.71 mSv, and for therapeutic catheterisations the values ranged from 0.38 to 25.01 mSv, with average value 5 mSv. Effective doses were estimated for diagnostic procedures and interventional procedures performed for the treatment of five different heart diseases: (a) atrial septal defect (ASD), (b) ventricular septal defect (VSD), (c) patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), (d) aorta coarctation and (e) pulmonary stenosis. The high levels of radiation exposure are, however, balanced with the advantages of cardiac catheterisations such as the avoidance of surgical closure and the necessity of shorter or even no hospitalisation.

  11. Estimation of children's radiation dose from cardiac catheterisations, performed for the diagnosis or the treatment of a congenital heart disease using TLD dosimetry and Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakoumakis, E N; Gialousis, G I; Papadopoulou, Despina; Makri, Triantafillia; Pappouli, Zografia; Yakoumakis, Nikolaos; Papagiannis, Panayotis; Georgiou, Evangelos [Medical Physics Department, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias Street, Athens 11527 (Greece)

    2009-06-15

    Entrance surface radiation doses were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters for 98 children who were referred to a cardiology department for the diagnosis or the treatment of a congenital heart disease. Additionally, all the radiographic parameters were recorded and Monte Carlo simulations were performed for the estimation of entrance surface dose to effective dose conversion factors, in order to further calculate the effective dose for each child. For diagnostic catheterisations the values ranged from 0.16 to 14.44 mSv, with average 3.71 mSv, and for therapeutic catheterisations the values ranged from 0.38 to 25.01 mSv, with average value 5 mSv. Effective doses were estimated for diagnostic procedures and interventional procedures performed for the treatment of five different heart diseases: (a) atrial septal defect (ASD), (b) ventricular septal defect (VSD), (c) patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), (d) aorta coarctation and (e) pulmonary stenosis. The high levels of radiation exposure are, however, balanced with the advantages of cardiac catheterisations such as the avoidance of surgical closure and the necessity of shorter or even no hospitalisation.

  12. What Are Congenital Heart Defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a baby with a congenital heart defect. Family history and genetics Congenital heart disease is not usually passed along ... you or your child to a specialist in genetic testing. Cardiac MRI to diagnose a ... Factors to review family history, smoking, and medicines that increase your risk of ...

  13. Health in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuypers, Judith A. A. E.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.

    2016-01-01

    Since the introduction of cardiac surgery, the prospects for children born with a cardiac defect have improved spectacularly. Many reach adulthood and the population of adults with congenital heart disease is increasing and ageing. However, repair of congenital heart disease does not mean cure. Many

  14. Adult patient decision-making regarding implantation of complex cardiac devices: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecki-Ketchell, Alison; Marshall, Paul; Maclean, Joan

    2017-10-01

    Complex cardiac rhythm management device (CRMD) therapy provides an important treatment option for people at risk of sudden cardiac death. Despite the survival benefit, device implantation is associated with significant physical and psychosocial concerns presenting considerable challenges for the decision-making process surrounding CRMD implantation for patients and physicians. The purpose of this scoping review was to explore what is known about how adult (>16 years) patients make decisions regarding implantation of CRMD therapy. Published, peer reviewed, English language studies from 2000 to 2016 were identified in a search across eight healthcare databases. Eligible studies were concerned with patient decision-making for first time device implantation. Quality assessment was completed using the mixed methods appraisal tool for all studies meeting the inclusion criteria. The findings of eight qualitative and seven quantitative studies, including patients who accepted or declined primary or secondary sudden cardiac death prevention devices, were clustered into two themes: knowledge acquisition and the process of decision-making, exposing similarities and distinctions with the treatment decision-making literature. The review revealed some insight in to the way patients approach decision-making but also exposed a lack of clarity and research activity specific to CRMD patients. Further research is recommended to support the development and application of targeted decision support mechanisms.

  15. TEG-Directed Transfusion in Complex Cardiac Surgery: Impact on Blood Product Usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Kevin; Redfern, Roberta E; March, Rebekah L; Bobulski, Nathan; Kuehne, Michael; Chen, John T; Moront, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Complex cardiac procedures often require blood transfusion because of surgical bleeding or coagulopathy. Thrombelastography (TEG) was introduced in our institution to direct transfusion management in cardiothoracic surgery. The goal of this study was to quantify the effect of TEG on transfusion rates peri- and postoperatively. All patients who underwent complex cardiac surgery, defined as open multiple valve repair/replacement, coronary artery bypass grafting with open valve repair/replacement, or aortic root/arch repair before and after implementation of TEG were identified and retrospectively analyzed. Minimally invasive cases were excluded. Patient characteristics and blood use were compared with t test and chi-square test. A generalized linear model including patient characteristics, preoperative and postoperative lab values, and autotransfusion volume was used to determine the impact of TEG on perioperative, postoperative, and total blood use. In total, 681 patients were identified, 370 in the pre-TEG period and 311 patients post-TEG. Patient demographics were not significantly different between periods. Mean units of red blood cells, plasma, and cryoprecipitate were significantly reduced after TEG was implemented (all, p platelets was reduced but did not reach significance. Mean units of all blood products in the perioperative period and over the entire stay were reduced by approximately 40% (both, p < .0001). Total proportion of patients exposed to transfusion was significantly lower after introduction of TEG ( p < .01). Controlling for related factors on multivariate analysis, such as preoperative laboratory values and autotransfusion volume, use of TEG was associated with significant reduction in perioperative and overall blood product transfusion. TEG-directed management of blood product administration during complex cardiac surgeries significantly reduced the units of blood products received perioperatively but not blood usage more than 24 hours after

  16. Complex Nonlinear Autonomic Nervous System Modulation Link Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy and Peripheral Vascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinda eKhalaf

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physiological interactions are abundant within, and between, body systems. These interactions may evolve into discrete states during pathophysiological processes resulting from common mechanisms. An association between arterial stenosis, identified by low ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI and cardiovascular disease (CVD as been reported. Whether an association between vascular calcification - characterized by high ABPI and a different pathophysiology - is similarly associated with CVD, has not been established. The current study aims to investigate the association between ABPI, and cardiac rhythm, as an indicator of cardiovascular health and functionality, utilising heart rate variability (HRV.Methods and Results: Two hundred and thirty six patients underwent ABPI assessment. Standard time and frequency domain, and non-linear HRV measures were determined from 5-minute electrocardiogram. ABPI data were divided into normal (n=101, low (n=67 and high (n=66 and compared to HRV measures.(DFAα1 and SampEn were significantly different between the low ABPI, high ABPI and control groups (p<0.05.Conclusion: A possible coupling between arterial stenosis and vascular calcification with decreased and increased HRV respectively was observed. Our results suggest a model for interpreting the relationship between vascular pathophysiology and cardiac rhythm. The cardiovascular system may be viewed as a complex system comprising a number of interacting subsystems. These cardiac and vascular subsystems/networks may be coupled and undergo transitions in response to internal or external perturbations. From a clinical perspective, the significantly increased sample entropy compared to the normal ABPI group and the decreased and increased complex correlation properties measured by DFA for the low and high ABPI groups respectively, may be useful indicators that a more holistic treatment approach in line with this more complex clinical picture is required.

  17. Trends in pediatric echocardiography and the yield for congenital heart disease in a major cardiac referral hospital in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkoke, Clovis; Balti, Eric; Menanga, Alain; Dzudie, Anastase; Lekoubou, Alain; Kingue, Samuel; Kengne, Andre Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a common condition in children in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where it is associated with poor outcomes. Diagnosis of CHD in SSA depends essentially on echocardiography, which is available only in few urban referral centers. Our aim was to assess time changes in the pattern of referral for pediatric echocardiography and the subsequent diagnosis of structural CHD in a major SSA city. All pediatric echocardiography performed between 2004 and 2013 at the echocardiography laboratory of the Yaounde General Hospital were reviewed. The primary indication of the study and the presence of structural CHD were recorded. Between 2004 and 2013, 9,390 echocardiograms were performed and 834 (8.9%) children aged 1 day to 15 years underwent echocardiography at the center, and 227 (27.2%) cases of definite structural CHD were diagnosed, with 123 (54.2%) in boys. The most frequent indications for echocardiography were heart murmurs (40%) and the suspicion of CHD (37.4%). The commonest CHD was ventricular septal defect (VSD) (30%) with tetralogy of Fallot being the most frequent cyanotic heart lesion (5.3%). The proportion of pediatric echocardiography decreased from 13.3% in 2004-2005 to 6.1% in 2012-2013 (P=0.001) but not in a linear fashion (P=0.072 for linear trend).The diagnosis of structural CHD increased from 25.1% in 2004-2005 to 27.1% in 2012-2013. This increase however was non-significant (P=0.523) and did not follow a linear trend (P=0.230). The pattern of referral for pediatric echocardiography at this center has changed over time, but diagnosis of structural CHD has remained the same. Improving access to this diagnostic procedure and subsequent treatment of diagnosed CHD will help improving the outcome of the disease in this setting.

  18. Cardiac T1 mapping in congenital heart disease: bolus vs. infusion protocols for measurements of myocardial extracellular volume fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wakeel-Marquard, Nadya; Rastin, Sanaz; Muench, Frédéric; O H-Ici, Darach; Yilmaz, Sevim; Berger, Felix; Kuehne, Titus; Messroghli, Daniel R

    2017-12-01

    Myocardial extracellular volume fraction (ECV) reflecting diffuse myocardial fibrosis can be measured with T1 mapping cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) before and after the application of a gadolinium-based extracellular contrast agent. The equilibrium between blood and myocardium contrast concentration required for ECV measurements can be obtained with a primed contrast infusion (equilibrium contrast-CMR). We hypothesized that equilibrium can also be achieved with a single contrast bolus to accurately measure diffuse myocardial fibrosis in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Healthy controls (n = 17; median age 24.0 years) and patients with CHD (n = 19; 25.0 years) were prospectively enrolled. Using modified Look-Locker inversion recovery T1 mapping before, 15 min after bolus injection, and during constant infusion of gadolinium-DOTA, T1 values were obtained for blood pool and myocardium of the left ventricle (LV), the interventricular septum (IVS), and the right ventricle (RV) in a single midventricular plane in short axis or in transverse orientation. ECV of LV, IVS and RV by bolus-only and bolus-infusion correlated significantly in CHD patients (r = 0.94, 0.95, and 0.74; p < 0.01, respectively) and healthy controls (r = 0.96, 0.89, and 0.64; p < 0.05, respectively). Bland-Altman plots revealed no significant bias between the techniques for any of the analyzed regions. ECV of LV and RV myocardium measured by bolus-only T1 mapping agrees well with bolus-infusion measurements in patients with CHD. The use of a bolus-only approach facilitates the integration of ECV measurements into existing CMR imaging protocols, allowing for assessment of diffuse myocardial fibrosis in CHD in clinical routine.

  19. The prevalence at birth of congenital malformations in the city of Ozyorsk located near the nuclear complex Mayak production association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrushkina, N. P.; Koshurnikova, N. A.; Okatenko, P. V.

    2004-07-01

    For many years possible genetic effects of exposure to ionizing radiation have been a subject of interest and concern, but data from studies of the risk of radiation-induced hereditary effects in humans are limited. the most extensive human studies of genetic effects were those conducted on the Japanese. A-bomb survivors. In These studies in investigators examined the association of various levels of radiation exposure and several different endpoints, including major congenital defects, stillbirth, death during the first week of life, survivals, and sex ratio and Down's syndrome (8, (14-16). Although associations of these outcomes with radiation exposure were in the positive direction, none were close to statistical significance. Only teratogenic effects of in utero exposure at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, microcephaly and mental retardation, have been observed (8, (10, 16)). Of most interest is possible association of congenital malformations (CMs) with parental occupational radiation exposure. Determination of the role of parental occupational exposure in induction of CMs in children is necessary to evaluate reliability of radiation protection standards Epidemiological studies conducted on the basis of Registries of children who were born in regions located near a nuclear complex may be useful for such evaluation. It is preferable to carry out such studies on the basis of population registries, since long follow-up in large populations allows to reveal increased frequency of even very rare forms of congenital abnormalities. In a case-control study of association of parental occupational exposure due to Hanford Nuclear Site and risk of CMs in their offspring there was no evidence of such an association (12, 13). Our investigation is conducted on the basis of the basis of the Registry of children of Ozyorsk. The whole Registry includes all children with 1948-1988 birth years show were born or-came to town at the age of 0-14 years, and were residents of these towns

  20. The prevalence at birth of congenital malformations in the city of Ozyorsk located near the nuclear complex Mayak production association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrushkina, N. P.; Koshurnikova, N. A.; Okatenko, P. V.

    2004-01-01

    For many years possible genetic effects of exposure to ionizing radiation have been a subject of interest and concern, but data from studies of the risk of radiation-induced hereditary effects in humans are limited. the most extensive human studies of genetic effects were those conducted on the Japanese. A-bomb survivors. In These studies in investigators examined the association of various levels of radiation exposure and several different endpoints, including major congenital defects, stillbirth, death during the first week of life, survivals, and sex ratio and Down's syndrome (8, (14-16). Although associations of these outcomes with radiation exposure were in the positive direction, none were close to statistical significance. Only teratogenic effects of in utero exposure at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, microcephaly and mental retardation, have been observed (8, (10, 16)). Of most interest is possible association of congenital malformations (CMs) with parental occupational radiation exposure. Determination of the role of parental occupational exposure in induction of CMs in children is necessary to evaluate reliability of radiation protection standards Epidemiological studies conducted on the basis of Registries of children who were born in regions located near a nuclear complex may be useful for such evaluation. It is preferable to carry out such studies on the basis of population registries, since long follow-up in large populations allows to reveal increased frequency of even very rare forms of congenital abnormalities. In a case-control study of association of parental occupational exposure due to Hanford Nuclear Site and risk of CMs in their offspring there was no evidence of such an association (12, 13). Our investigation is conducted on the basis of the basis of the Registry of children of Ozyorsk. The whole Registry includes all children with 1948-1988 birth years show were born or-came to town at the age of 0-14 years, and were residents of these towns one

  1. What's New in Congenital Scoliosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahys, Joshua M; Guille, James T

    2018-03-01

    36 papers were selected for review based upon new findings. Classic manuscripts on congenital scoliosis are also included to provide sufficient background information. Congenital scoliosis represents a wide range of pathology from the simple, stable hemivertebra to the complex, progressive spinal deformity with chest wall abnormalities and associated cardiac, renal, and neural axis anomalies. This paper reviews the natural history and associated anomalies with congenital scoliosis as well as the most up-to-date classification schemes and various treatment options for the care of this challenging patient population. Level 5.

  2. Angiocardiography in congenital heart malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, B.; Pacifico, A.D.

    1990-01-01

    The contents of this book are well organized, it deals with the technique of angiocardiography, and describes the angiocardiographic anatomy of the normal heart and offers an excellent sequential analysis of cardiac morphology. The rest of the book describes the angiocardiographic findings observed in individual congenital cardiac disorders

  3. Fatal cardiac arrhythmia and long-QT syndrome in a new form of congenital generalized lipodystrophy with muscle rippling (CGL4 due to PTRF-CAVIN mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rajab

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated eight families with a novel subtype of congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL4 of whom five members had died from sudden cardiac death during their teenage years. ECG studies revealed features of long-QT syndrome, bradycardia, as well as supraventricular and ventricular tachycardias. Further symptoms comprised myopathy with muscle rippling, skeletal as well as smooth-muscle hypertrophy, leading to impaired gastrointestinal motility and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in some children. Additionally, we found impaired bone formation with osteopenia, osteoporosis, and atlanto-axial instability. Homozygosity mapping located the gene within 2 Mbp on chromosome 17. Prioritization of 74 candidate genes with GeneDistiller for high expression in muscle and adipocytes suggested PTRF-CAVIN (Polymerase I and transcript release factor/Cavin as the most probable candidate leading to the detection of homozygous mutations (c.160delG, c.362dupT. PTRF-CAVIN is essential for caveolae biogenesis. These cholesterol-rich plasmalemmal vesicles are involved in signal-transduction and vesicular trafficking and reside primarily on adipocytes, myocytes, and osteoblasts. Absence of PTRF-CAVIN did not influence abundance of its binding partner caveolin-1 and caveolin-3. In patient fibroblasts, however, caveolin-1 failed to localize toward the cell surface and electron microscopy revealed reduction of caveolae to less than 3%. Transfection of full-length PTRF-CAVIN reestablished the presence of caveolae. The loss of caveolae was confirmed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM in combination with fluorescent imaging. PTRF-CAVIN deficiency thus presents the phenotypic spectrum caused by a quintessential lack of functional caveolae.

  4. Treatment of Children with Protein – Losing Enteropathy After Fontan and Other Complex Congenital Heart Disease Procedures in Condition with Limited Human and Technical Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejiqi, Ramush; Retkoceri, Ragip; Zeka, Naim; Bejiqi, Hana; Vuqiterna, Armend; Maloku, Arlinda

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) is a disorder characterized by abnormal and often profound enteric protein loss. It’s relatively uncommon complication of Fontan and other complex congenital heart disease (CCHD) procedures. Because of the complexity and rarity of this disease process, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of protein-losing enteropathy remain poorly understood, and attempts at treatment seldom yield long-term success. Aim of presentation is to describe single centre experience in diagnosis, evaluation, management and treatment of children with protein-losing enteropathy after Fontan and other CCHD procedures in the current era and in centre with limited human and technical resources, follows with a comprehensive review of protein-losing enteropathy publications, and concludes with suggestions for prevention and treatment. Material and methodology Retrospectively we analyzed patients with CCHD and protein-losing enteropathy in our institution, starting from January 2000 to December 2012. The including criteria were age between two and 17 years, to have a complex congenital heart disease and available complete documentation of cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. Results Of all patients we evaluated 18 cases with protein-losing enteropathy, aged 6 to 19 years (mean 14±9); there were three children who had undergone screening procedure for D-transposition, one Tetralogy of Fallot, and remaining 14 patients had undergone Fontan procedures; (anatomic diagnosis are: six with tricuspid atresia, seven with d-transposition, double outlet right ventricle and pulmonary atresia and two with hypoplastic left heart syndrome). The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy was made at median age of 5.6 years, ranging from 13 months to 15 years. Diagnosis was made using alpha 1-antitrypsin as a gold marker in stool. By physical examination in 14 patients edema was found, in three ascites, and six patients had pleural effusion. Laboratory findings

  5. Low grade mosaic for a complex supernumerary ring chromosome 18 in an adult patient with multiple congenital anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoogeboom A Jeannette M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several cases have been reported of patients with a ring chromosome 18 replacing one of the normal chromosomes 18. Less common are patients with a supernumerary ring chromosomes 18. High resolution whole genome examination in patients with multiple congenital abnormalities might reveal cytogenetic abnormalities of an unexpected complexity. Results We report a 24 years old male patient with lower spinal anomalies, hypospadia, bifid scrotum, cryptorchism, anal atresia, kidney stones, urethra anomalies, radial dysplasia, and a hypoplastic thumb. Some of the anomalies overlap with the VACTERL association. Chromosome analysis of cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed an additional ring chromosome in 13% of the metaphases. Both parents had a normal karyotype, demonstrating the de novo origin of this ring chromosome. FISH analysis using whole chromosome paints showed that the additional chromosomal material was derived from chromosome 18. Chromosome analysis of cultured fibroblasts revealed only one cell with the supernumerary ring chromosome in the 400 analyzed. To characterize the ring chromosome in more detail peripheral blood derived DNA was analyzed using SNP-arrays. The array results indicated a 5 Mb gain of the pericentromeric region of chromosome 18q10-q11.2. FISH analysis using BAC-probes located in the region indicated the presence of 6 signals on the r(18 chromosome. In addition, microsatellite analysis demonstrated that the unique supernumerary ring chromosome was paternally derived and both normal copies showed biparental disomy. Conclusions We report on an adult patient with multiple congenital abnormalities who had in 13% of his cells a unique supernumerary ring chromosome 18 that was composed of 6 copies of the 5 Mb gene rich region of 18q11.

  6. Compliance with Adult Congenital Heart Disease Guidelines: Are We Following the Recommendations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardin, Jennifer F; Menk, Jeremiah S; Pyles, Lee A; Martin, Cindy M; Lohr, Jamie L

    2016-05-01

    As the adult congenital heart disease population increases, poor transition from pediatric to adult care can lead to suboptimal quality of care and an increase in individual and institutional costs. In 2008, the American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association updated the adult congenital heart disease practice guidelines and in 2011, the American Heart Association recommended transition guidelines to standardize and encourage appropriate timing of transition to adult cardiac services. The objective of this study was to evaluate if patient age or complexity of congenital heart disease influences pediatric cardiologists' decision to transfer care to adult providers and to evaluate the compliance of different types of cardiology providers with current adult congenital heart disease treatment guidelines. A single-center retrospective review of 991 adult congenital heart disease patients identified by ICD-9 code from 2010 to 2012. Academic and community outpatient cardiology clinics. Nine hundred ninety-one patients who are 18 years and older with congenital heart disease. None. The compliance with health maintenance and transfer of care recommendations in the outpatient setting. For patients seen by pediatric cardiologists, only 20% had transfer of care discussions documented, most often in younger simple patients. Significant differences in compliance with preventative health guidelines were found between cardiology provider types. Even though a significant number of adults with congenital heart disease are lost to appropriate follow-up in their third and fourth decades of life, pediatric cardiologists discussed transfer of care with moderate and complex congenital heart disease patients less frequently. Appropriate transfer of adults with congenital heart disease to an adult congenital cardiologist provides an opportunity to reinforce the importance of regular follow-up in adulthood and may improve outcomes as adult congenital cardiologists followed the

  7. Treatment of Children with Protein – Losing Enteropathy After Fontan and Other Complex Congenital Heart Disease Procedures in Condition with Limited Human and Technical Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Bejiqi, Ramush; Retkoceri, Ragip; Zeka, Naim; Bejiqi, Hana; Vuqiterna, Armend; Maloku, Arlinda

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) is a disorder characterized by abnormal and often profound enteric protein loss. It’s relatively uncommon complication of Fontan and other complex congenital heart disease (CCHD) procedures. Because of the complexity and rarity of this disease process, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of protein-losing enteropathy remain poorly understood, and attempts at treatment seldom yield long-term success. Aim of presentation is to describe single centre ...

  8. Evaluation of obstructive airway lesions in complex congenital heart disease using composite volume-rendered images from multislice CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Ki Seok; Kim, Chang Won; Lee, Tae Hong; Kim, Suk; Kim, Kun Il; Lee, Hyoung Doo; Ban, Ji Eun; Sung, Si Chan; Chang, Yun Hee

    2006-01-01

    Multislice CT (MSCT) allows high-quality volume-rendered (VR) and composite volume-rendered images. To investigate the clinical usefulness of composite VR images in the evaluation of the relationship between cardiovascular structures and the airway in children with complex congenital heart disease (CHD). Four- or 16-slice MSCT scanning was performed consecutively in 77 children (mean age 6.4 months) with CHD and respiratory symptoms, a chest radiographic abnormality, or abnormal course of the pulmonary artery on ECHO. MSCT scanning was performed during breathing or after sedation. Contrast medium (2 ml/kg) was administered through a pedal venous route or arm vein in all patients. The VR technique was used to reconstruct the cardiovascular structures and airway, and then both VR images were composed using the commercial software (VoxelPlus 2 ; Daejeon, Korea). Stenoses were seen in the trachea in 1 patient and in the bronchi in 14 patients (19%). Other patients with complex CHD did not have significant airway stenoses. Composite VR images with MSCT can provide more exact airway images in relationship to the surrounding cardiovascular structures and thus help in optimizing management strategies in treating CHD. (orig.)

  9. A Novel Alpha Cardiac Actin (ACTC1 Mutation Mapping to a Domain in Close Contact with Myosin Heavy Chain Leads to a Variety of Congenital Heart Defects, Arrhythmia and Possibly Midline Defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Augière

    Full Text Available A Lebanese Maronite family presented with 13 relatives affected by various congenital heart defects (mainly atrial septal defects, conduction tissue anomalies and midline defects. No mutations were found in GATA4 and NKX2-5.A set of 399 poly(AC markers was used to perform a linkage analysis which peaked at a 2.98 lod score on the long arm of chromosome 15. The haplotype analysis delineated a 7.7 meganucleotides genomic interval which included the alpha-cardiac actin gene (ACTC1 among 36 other protein coding genes. A heterozygous missense mutation was found (c.251T>C, p.(Met84Thr in the ACTC1 gene which changed a methionine residue conserved up to yeast. This mutation was absent from 1000 genomes and exome variant server database but segregated perfectly in this family with the affection status. This mutation and 2 other ACTC1 mutations (p.(Glu101Lys and p.(Met125Val which result also in congenital heart defects are located in a region in close apposition to a myosin heavy chain head region by contrast to 3 other alpha-cardiac actin mutations (p.(Ala297Ser,p.(Asp313His and p.(Arg314His which result in diverse cardiomyopathies and are located in a totally different interaction surface.Alpha-cardiac actin mutations lead to congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathies and eventually midline defects. The consequence of an ACTC1 mutation may in part be dependent on the interaction surface between actin and myosin.

  10. Cardiac pacemaker battery discharge after external electrical cardioversion for broad QRS Complex Tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamaria, Martino; Andrea, Scapigliati; Michela, Casella; Tommaso, Sanna; Gemma, Pelargonio; Antonio, Dello Russo; Roberto, Zamparelli; Stefano, De Paulis; Fulvio, Bellocci; Rocco, Schiavello

    2008-08-01

    External electrical cardioversion or defibrillation may be necessary in patients with implanted cardiac pacemaker (PM) or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Sudden discharge of high electrical energy employed in direct current (DC) transthoracic countershock may damage the PM/ICD system resulting in a series of possible device malfunctions. For this reason, when defibrillation or cardioversion must be attempted in a patient with a PM or ICD, some precautions should be taken, particularly in PM dependent patients, in order to prevent damage to the device. We report the case of a 76-year-old woman with a dual chamber PM implanted in the right subclavicular region, who received two consecutive transthoracic DC shocks to treat haemodynamically unstable broad QRS complex tachycardia after cardiac surgery performed with a standard sternotomic approach. Because of the sternal wound and thoracic drainage tubes together with the severe clinical compromise, the anterior paddle was positioned near the pulse generator. At the following PM test, a complete battery discharge was detected.

  11. Psychosocial outcomes for preschool children and families after surgery for complex congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosig, C L; Mussatto, K A; Kuhn, E M; Tweddell, J S

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to assess the psychosocial outcomes of preschool-aged survivors (ages 3-6 years) of hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS; n=13) and transposition of the great arteries (TGA; n=13). Parents completed the following measures: Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, Impact on the Family Scale, Parenting Stress Index, Parent Behavior Checklist, and Child Behavior Checklist. Quality of life scores did not differ from those of healthy controls. Parents of children with HLHS reported more negative impact of the child's illness on the family and more parenting stress than parents of children with TGA. Parents of both groups of children were more permissive in their parenting style than parents of healthy controls. Children with HLHS had higher rates of attention and externalizing behavior problems than children with TGA. The results highlight the need for practitioners working with these children and families to ask about parental stress, family functioning, and behavioral expectations for the child in the context of routine medical/cardiac follow-up.

  12. Health in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuypers, Judith A A E; Utens, Elisabeth M W J; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2016-09-01

    Since the introduction of cardiac surgery, the prospects for children born with a cardiac defect have improved spectacularly. Many reach adulthood and the population of adults with congenital heart disease is increasing and ageing. However, repair of congenital heart disease does not mean cure. Many adults with congenital heart disease encounter late complications. Late morbidity can be related to the congenital heart defect itself, but may also be the consequence of the surgical or medical treatment or longstanding alterations in hemodynamics, neurodevelopment and psychosocial development. This narrative review describes the cardiac and non-cardiac long-term morbidity in the adult population with congenital heart disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Spectrum Of Congenital Heart Disease In Full Term Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Saima; Hussain Gilani, Syed Yasir; Bibi, Shawana

    2018-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is a significant problem world over especially in neonates. Early diagnosis and prompt interventions in neonatal period precludes the mortality associated with this disorder. The objective of this study was to highlight the diversity of congenital cardiac defects in our region so that appropriate interventions are devised to minimize significant morbidity and mortality associated with this disorder. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at the Neonatology Unit of Department of Paediatrics, Ayub Teaching Hospital from January 2015 to December 2016. Approval of ethical committee was taken. All fullterm neonates of either gender who presented in department of neonatology including those delivered in hospital or received from other sources (private settings, home deliveries), diagnosed as having congenital heart disease on echocardiography were included in the study. Preterm neonates of either gender were excluded from the study. Patient characteristics were recorded in a designed proforma. Data was entered in SPSS version 20 and analysed. A total of 89 neonates were included in the study. Mean age of presentation was 6.34±7.058 days and range of 1-28 days. There was a male preponderance with 57 (64%) male patients as compared to 32 (36%) female patients. Ventricular septal defect (VSD) was the commonest cardiac lesion being present in 34 (38.2%) patients. Other defects included complex congenital heart disease in 8 (9%), atrial septal defect (ASD) and transposition of great arteries (TGA) in 7 (7.9%) each, atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) in 6 (6.7%) and Fallots's tetralogy (TOF) and hypoplastic left heart syndrome in 5 (5.6%) each.. Congenital heart disease is a problem of profound importance. It constitutes approximately one third of the total major congenital malformations. There is a diversity of cardiac lesions in our region that warrant early and prompt interventions so that the disease is recognized and treated at

  14. Cor triatriatum dexter, a very rare congenital anomaly presented in a complex pathological context – case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gozar Liliana

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Cor triatriatum dexter is an extremely rare congenital anomaly, and in most cases, without hemodynamic significance. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection is the most common viral infection, the majority of infected infants being asymptomatic and only 5-15% being symptomatic in the neonatal period.

  15. Virtual Surgery in Congenital Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Mosegaard, Jesper; Kislinskiy, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    et al., Cardiol Young 13:451–460, 2003). In combination with the availability of virtual models of congenital heart disease (CHD), techniques for computer- based simulation of cardiac interventions have enabled early clinical exploration of the emerging concept of virtual surgery (Sorensen et al...... Teaching, diagnosing, and planning of therapy in patients with complex structural cardiovascular heart disease require profound understanding of the three-dimensional (3D) nature of cardiovascular structures in these patients. To obtain such understanding, modern imaging modalities provide high...

  16. Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery for Complex Stones in a Toddler with Congenital Renal Anomalies: Technical Details

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Can Kiremit

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We report herein the management of a challenging case due to anatomic and stone-related complications in a 37-month-old Caucasian toddler with megacalycosis and complex stone in the left kidney and duplicated ureter on the right side.

  17. Potential implications of the helical heart in congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corno, Antonio F; Kocica, Mladen J

    2007-01-01

    The anatomic and functional observations made by Francisco Torrent-Guasp, in particular his discovery of the helical ventricular myocardial band (HVMB), have challenged what has been taught to cardiologists and cardiac surgeons over centuries. A literature debate is ongoing, with interdependent articles and comments from supporters and critics. Adequate understanding of heart structure and function is obviously indispensable for the decision-making process in congenital heart defects. The HVMB described by Torrent-Guasp and the potential impact on the understanding and treatment of congenital heart defects has been analyzed in the following settings: embryology, ventriculo-arterial discordance (transposition of great arteries), Ebstein's anomaly, pulmonary valve regurgitation after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, Ross operation, and other congenital heart defects. The common structural spiral feature is only one of the elements responsible for the functional interaction of right and left ventricles, and understanding the form/function relationship in congenital heart defects is more difficult than for acquired heart disease because of the variety and complexity of congenital heart defects. Individuals involved in the care of patients with congenital heart defects have to be stimulated to consider further investigations and alternative surgical strategies.

  18. Complex ABCC8 DNA variations in congenital hyperinsulinism: lessons from functional studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzyamba, Morris; Farzaneh, Tabasum; Behe, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    nonfunctional. Combining the two mutations (SUR1D1193V/R1436Q) led to intracellular retention of the channel complex. In a second family, the patient had histologically focal disease and was heterozygous for two mutations from his father (G228D and D1471N) and one from his mother (V1572I). SUR1 G228D and D1471N...

  19. Pictorial Review of Surgical Anatomy in Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cecco, Carlo N; Muscogiuri, Giuseppe; Madrid Pérez, José M; Eid, Marwen; Suranyi, Pal; Lesslie, Virginia W; Bastarrika, Gorka

    2017-07-01

    The survival rate of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) has dramatically improved over the last 2 decades because of technological and surgical advances in diagnosis and treatment, respectively. The vast majority of CHD patients are, in fact, amenable to treatment by either device closure or surgery. Considering the wide spectrum of surgical procedures and complex native and derived anatomy, continuous and detailed follow-up is of paramount importance. Cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography angiography are the cornerstones of diagnosis and follow-up of CHD, allowing for comprehensive noninvasive assessment of the heart, coronary tree, and intrathoracic great vessels, along with both morphological and functional evaluation. The aim of this pictorial review is to provide an overview of the most common CHDs and their related surgical procedures as familiarity with the radiological findings of grown-up congenital heart disease patients is crucial for proper diagnostic and follow-up pathways.

  20. Epidemiology and Outcomes After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Punkaj; Jacobs, Jeffrey P.; Pasquali, Sara K.; Hill, Kevin D.; Gaynor, J. William; O’Brien, Sean M.; He, Max; Sheng, Shubin; Schexnayder, Stephen M.; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Imamura, Michiaki; Jacobs, Marshall L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Multicenter data regarding cardiac arrest in children undergoing heart operations are limited. We describe epidemiology and outcomes associated with postoperative cardiac arrest in a large multiinstitutional cohort. Methods Patients younger than 18 years in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (2007 through 2012) were included. Patient factors, operative characteristics, and outcomes were described for patients with and without postoperative cardiac arrest. Multivariable models were used to evaluate the association of center volume with cardiac arrest rate and mortality after cardiac arrest, adjusting for patient and procedural factors. Results Of 70,270 patients (97 centers), 1,843 (2.6%) had postoperative cardiac arrest. Younger age, lower weight, and presence of preoperative morbidities (all p < 0.0001) were associated with cardiac arrest. Arrest rate increased with procedural complexity across common benchmark operations, ranging from 0.7% (ventricular septal defect repair) to 12.7% (Norwood operation). Cardiac arrest was associated with significant mortality risk across procedures, ranging from 15.4% to 62.3% (all p < 0.0001). In multivariable analysis, arrest rate was not associated with center volume (odds ratio, 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71 to 1.57 in low- versus high-volume centers). However, mortality after cardiac arrest was higher in low-volume centers (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.52 to 2.63). This association was present for both high- and low-complexity operations. Conclusions Cardiac arrest carries a significant mortality risk across the stratum of procedural complexity. Although arrest rates are not associated with center volume, lower-volume centers have increased mortality after cardiac arrest. Further study of mechanisms to prevent cardiac arrest and to reduce mortality in those with an arrest is warranted. PMID:25443018

  1. Cardiac Arrhythmia: In vivo screening in the zebrafish to overcome complexity in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrae, Calum A

    2010-07-01

    IMPORTANCE OF THE FIELD: Cardiac arrhythmias remain a major challenge for modern drug discovery. Clinical events are paroxysmal, often rare and may be asymptomatic until a highly morbid complication. Target selection is often based on limited information and though highly specific agents are identified in screening, the final efficacy is often compromised by unanticipated systemic responses, a narrow therapeutic index and substantial toxicities. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW: Our understanding of complexity of arrhythmogenesis has grown dramatically over the last two decades, and the range of potential disease mechanisms now includes pathways previously thought only tangentially involved in arrhythmia. This review surveys the literature on arrhythmia mechanisms from 1965 to the present day, outlines the complex biology underlying potentially each and every rhythm disturbance, and highlights the problems for rational target identification. The rationale for in vivo screening is described and the utility of the zebrafish for this approach and for complementary work in functional genomics is discussed. Current limitations of the model in this setting and the need for careful validation in new disease areas are also described. WHAT THE READER WILL GAIN: An overview of the complex mechanisms underlying most clinical arrhythmias, and insight into the limits of ion channel conductances as drug targets. An introduction to the zebrafish as a model organism, in particular for cardiovascular biology. Potential approaches to overcoming the hurdles to drug discovery in the face of complex biology including in vivo screening of zebrafish genetic disease models. TAKE HOME MESSAGE: In vivo screening in faithful disease models allows the effects of drugs on integrative physiology and disease biology to be captured during the screening process, in a manner agnostic to potential drug target or targets. This systematic strategy bypasses current gaps in our understanding of disease

  2. Cardiac ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillis, L.D.; Grossman, W.

    1986-01-01

    Cardiac ventriculography has been used extensively to define the anatomy of the ventricles and related structures in patients with congenital, valvular, coronary, and cardiomyopathic heart disease. Specifically, left ventriculography may provide valuable information about global and segmental left ventricular function, mitral valvular incompetence, and the presence, location, and severity of a number of other abnormalities, including ventricular septal defect and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. As a result, it should be a routine part of catheterization in patients being evaluated for coronary artery disease, aortic or mitral valvular disease, unexplained left ventricular failure, or congenital heart disease. Similarly, right ventriculography may provide information about global and segmental right ventricular function and can be especially helpful in patients with congenital heart disease

  3. Common variation in ISL1 confers genetic susceptibility for human congenital heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen N Stevens

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD is the most common birth abnormality and the etiology is unknown in the overwhelming majority of cases. ISLET1 (ISL1 is a transcription factor that marks cardiac progenitor cells and generates diverse multipotent cardiovascular cell lineages. The fundamental role of ISL1 in cardiac morphogenesis makes this an exceptional candidate gene to consider as a cause of complex congenital heart disease. We evaluated whether genetic variation in ISL1 fits the common variant-common disease hypothesis. A 2-stage case-control study examined 27 polymorphisms mapping to the ISL1 locus in 300 patients with complex congenital heart disease and 2,201 healthy pediatric controls. Eight genic and flanking ISL1 SNPs were significantly associated with complex congenital heart disease. A replication study analyzed these candidate SNPs in 1,044 new cases and 3,934 independent controls and confirmed that genetic variation in ISL1 is associated with risk of non-syndromic congenital heart disease. Our results demonstrate that two different ISL1 haplotypes contribute to risk of CHD in white and black/African American populations.

  4. Coronary artery visibility in free-breathing young children with congenital heart disease on cardiac 64-slice CT: dual-source ECG-triggered sequential scan vs. single-source non-ECG-synchronized spiral scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Yang, Dong Hyun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    The potential impact of dual-source ECG-triggered sequential CT scan on coronary artery visibility has not been evaluated in free-breathing young children. To compare coronary artery visibility in free-breathing young children with congenital heart disease on cardiac 64-slice CT between dual-source ECG-triggered sequential (DSET) scan and single-source non-ECG-synchronized spiral (SSNE) scan. In 93 young children, 108 cardiac 64-slice CT examinations were performed during free-breathing. Visibility of coronary arteries and side branches was compared between SSNE and DSET scans. Heart rates and trigger delays for DSET scan were recorded. Effective dose of each scan technique was calculated. Visual grades were significantly higher (P < 0.001 or =0.011) on DSET scan than on SSNE scan except for the distal left anterior descending artery. Coronary arteries were traceable in 79.3% on DSET scan and 54.3% on SSNE scan in the overlapped scan range (P < 0.0001), and 97.1% and 71.9% for the origins and proximal segments (P < 0.0001). Visibility of side branches was improved on DSET scan by a factor of 2.0. Heart rates and trigger delays for DSET scan were 131 {+-} 24 beats per min and 199 {+-} 44 ms, respectively. Effective doses of DSET and SSNE scans were 0.36 {+-} 0.12 mSv and 0.99 {+-} 0.23 mSv, respectively. DSET scan improves visibility of coronary arteries on cardiac 64-slice CT in free-breathing young children with congenital heart disease, compared with SSNE scan. (orig.)

  5. Congenital Hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Congenital Hypothyroidism March 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Rosalind S. ... Resources MedlinePlus (NIH) Mayo Clinic What is congenital hypothyroidism? Newborn babies who are unable to make enough ...

  6. [Clinical analysis of 15 pediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis complex complicated by cardiac rhabdomyomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guo-Qiang; Zhai, Qiong-Xiang; Yu, Jun-Hao; Wang, Chun; Zhuo, Mu-Qing; Wang, Lin-Gan

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the clinical features in children with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC)-associated cardiac rhabdomyomas (CRM). The clinical data of 15 children with TSC complicated by CRM were collected. The clinical features of the patients were analyzed, and TSC gene mutations were detected. Eleven cases (73%) developed multiple CRM. The majority of the tumors were located in the left and right ventricles. Most tumors presented as a round-like hyperechogenic mass with a clear margin on echocardiography. Arrhythmias occurred in 3 patients and 2 patients experienced heart failure. Gene mutation tests were performed in 2 patients, and pathogenic mutations were detected in both patients, which were TSC1 mutation and TSC2 mutation, respectively. Three patients were followed up for 6 to 38 months, and their CRM shrank or regressed spontaneously. TSC-associated CRM is generally multiple. Heart failure and arrhythmias may occur in some patients. Echocardiography is important for diagnosis of CRM. TSC-associated CRM has an inclination to spontaneous regression. TSC can be diagnosed at a molecular genetic level by TSC gene mutation detection.

  7. Deficiency in Cardiac Dystrophin Affects the Abundance of the α-/β-Dystroglycan Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Lohan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Although Duchenne muscular dystrophy is primarily categorised as a skeletal muscle disease, deficiency in the membrane cytoskeletal protein dystrophin also affects the heart. The central transsarcolemmal linker between the actin membrane cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix is represented by the dystrophin-associated dystroglycans. Chemical cross-linking analysis revealed no significant differences in the dimeric status of the α-/β-dystroglycan subcomplex in the dystrophic mdx heart as compared to normal cardiac tissue. In analogy to skeletal muscle fibres, heart muscle also exhibited a greatly reduced abundance of both dystroglycans in dystrophin-deficient cells. Immunoblotting demonstrated that the degree of reduction in α-dystroglycan is more pronounced in matured mdx skeletal muscle as contrasted to the mdx heart. The fact that the deficiency in dystrophin triggers a similar pathobiochemical response in both types of muscle suggests that the cardiomyopathic complications observed in x-linked muscular dystrophy might be initiated by the loss of the dystrophin-associated surface glycoprotein complex.

  8. Complex genetic architecture of cardiac disease in a wild type inbred strain of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zhang

    Full Text Available Natural populations of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, segregate genetic variation that leads to cardiac disease phenotypes. One nearly isogenic line from a North Carolina peach orchard, WE70, is shown to harbor two genetically distinct heart phenotypes: elevated incidence of arrhythmias, and a dramatically constricted heart diameter in both diastole and systole, with resemblance to restrictive cardiomyopathy in humans. Assuming the source to be rare variants of large effect, we performed Bulked Segregant Analysis using genomic DNA hybridization to Affymetrix chips to detect single feature polymorphisms, but found that the mutant phenotypes are more likely to have a polygenic basis. Further mapping efforts revealed a complex architecture wherein the constricted cardiomyopathy phenotype was observed in individual whole chromosome substitution lines, implying that variants on both major autosomes are sufficient to produce the phenotype. A panel of 170 Recombinant Inbred Lines (RIL was generated, and a small subset of mutant lines selected, but these each complemented both whole chromosome substitutions, implying a non-additive (epistatic contribution to the "disease" phenotype. Low coverage whole genome sequencing was also used to attempt to map chromosomal regions contributing to both the cardiomyopathy and arrhythmia, but a polygenic architecture had to be again inferred to be most likely. These results show that an apparently simple rare phenotype can have a complex genetic basis that would be refractory to mapping by deep sequencing in pedigrees. We present this as a cautionary tale regarding assumptions related to attempts to map new disease mutations on the assumption that probands carry a single causal mutation.

  9. Effects of eHealth physical activity encouragement in adolescents with complex congenital heart disease: The PReVaiL randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausen, Susanne Hwiid; Andersen, Lars L; Søndergaard, Lars; Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Dideriksen, Kasper; Kruse, Anne; Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-10-15

    To assess benefit and harms of adding an eHealth intervention to health education and individual counseling in adolescents with congenital heart disease. Randomized clinical trial. Denmark. A total of 158 adolescents aged 13-16years with no physical activity restrictions after repaired complex congenital heart disease. PReVaiL consisted of individually tailored eHealth encouragement physical activity for 52weeks. All patients received 45min of group-based health education and 15min of individual counseling involving patients' parents. The primary outcome was maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) at 52weeks after randomization. The secondary outcome was physical activity. Exploratory outcomes were generic and disease-specific questionnaires. In the intervention group, 58 patients (72%) completed the final test, but of those, only 46 (57%) fulfilled the compliance criteria of using the eHealth application for at least 2 consecutive weeks. In the control group, 61 patients (79%) completed both exercise tests. Adjusted for baseline values, the difference between the intervention group and the control group in mean VO2 peak at 1year was -0.65ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) (95% CI -2.66 to 1.36). Between-group differences at 1year in physical activity, generic health-related quality of life, and disease-specific quality of life were not statistically significant. Adding a tailored eHealth intervention to health education and individual counseling did not affect outcomes among adolescents with congenital heart disease. Our results do not support the use of this eHealth intervention in adolescents with complex congenital heart disease. Clinical trials.gov identifier: NCT01189981. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Genetics of congenital heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Damien

    2017-06-01

    Developmental genetics of congenital heart diseases has evolved from analysis of serial slices in embryos towards molecular genetics of cardiac morphogenesis with a dynamic view of cardiac development. Genetics of congenital heart diseases has also changed from formal genetic analysis of familial recurrences or population-based analysis to screening for mutations in candidates genes identified in animal models. Close cooperation between molecular embryologists, pathologists involved in heart development and pediatric cardiologists is crucial for further increase of knowledge in the field of cardiac morphogenesis and genetics of cardiac defects. The genetic model for congenital heart disease has to be revised to favor a polygenic origin rather than a monogenic one. The main mechanism is altered genic dosage that can account for heart diseases in chromosomal anomalies as well as in point mutations in syndromic and isolated congenital heart diseases. The use of big data grouping information from cardiac development, interactions between genes and proteins, epigenetic factors such as chromatin remodeling or DNA methylation is the current source for improving our knowledge in the field and to give clues for future therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Detecting drug-induced prolongation of the QRS complex: New insights for cardiac safety assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cros, C., E-mail: caroline.cros@hotmail.co.uk [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Skinner, M., E-mail: Matthew.Skinner@astrazeneca.com [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Moors, J. [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Lainee, P. [Sanofi-Aventis R and D, 371, rue du Pr Joseph Blayac, 34184 Montpellier Cedex 04 (France); Valentin, J.P. [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-01

    Background: Drugs slowing the conduction of the cardiac action potential and prolonging QRS complex duration by blocking the sodium current (I{sub Na}) may carry pro-arrhythmic risks. Due to the frequency-dependent block of I{sub Na}, this study assesses whether activity-related spontaneous increases in heart rate (HR) occurring during standard dog telemetry studies can be used to optimise the detection of class I antiarrhythmic-induced QRS prolongation. Methods: Telemetered dogs were orally dosed with quinidine (class Ia), mexiletine (class Ib) or flecainide (class Ic). QRS duration was determined standardly (5 beats averaged at rest) but also prior to and at the plateau of each acute increase in HR (3 beats averaged at steady state), and averaged over 1 h period from 1 h pre-dose to 5 h post-dose. Results: Compared to time-matched vehicle, at rest, only quinidine and flecainide induced increases in QRS duration (E{sub max} 13% and 20% respectively, P < 0.01–0.001) whereas mexiletine had no effect. Importantly, the increase in QRS duration was enhanced at peak HR with an additional effect of + 0.7 ± 0.5 ms (quinidine, NS), + 1.8 ± 0.8 ms (mexiletine, P < 0.05) and + 2.8 ± 0.8 ms (flecainide, P < 0.01) (calculated as QRS at basal HR-QRS at high HR). Conclusion: Electrocardiogram recordings during elevated HR, not considered during routine analysis optimised for detecting QT prolongation, can be used to sensitise the detection of QRS prolongation. This could prove useful when borderline QRS effects are detected. Analysing during acute increases in HR could also be useful for detecting drug-induced effects on other aspects of cardiac function. -- Highlights: ► We aimed to improve detection of drug-induced QRS prolongation in safety screening. ► We used telemetered dogs to test class I antiarrhythmics at low and high heart rate. ► At low heart rate only quinidine and flecainide induced an increase in QRS duration. ► At high heart rate the effects of two

  12. Correlations between the signal complexity of cerebral and cardiac electrical activity: a multiscale entropy analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Feng Lin

    Full Text Available The heart begins to beat before the brain is formed. Whether conventional hierarchical central commands sent by the brain to the heart alone explain all the interplay between these two organs should be reconsidered. Here, we demonstrate correlations between the signal complexity of brain and cardiac activity. Eighty-seven geriatric outpatients with healthy hearts and varied cognitive abilities each provided a 24-hour electrocardiography (ECG and a 19-channel eye-closed routine electroencephalography (EEG. Multiscale entropy (MSE analysis was applied to three epochs (resting-awake state, photic stimulation of fast frequencies (fast-PS, and photic stimulation of slow frequencies (slow-PS of EEG in the 1-58 Hz frequency range, and three RR interval (RRI time series (awake-state, sleep and that concomitant with the EEG for each subject. The low-to-high frequency power (LF/HF ratio of RRI was calculated to represent sympatho-vagal balance. With statistics after Bonferroni corrections, we found that: (a the summed MSE value on coarse scales of the awake RRI (scales 11-20, RRI-MSE-coarse were inversely correlated with the summed MSE value on coarse scales of the resting-awake EEG (scales 6-20, EEG-MSE-coarse at Fp2, C4, T6 and T4; (b the awake RRI-MSE-coarse was inversely correlated with the fast-PS EEG-MSE-coarse at O1, O2 and C4; (c the sleep RRI-MSE-coarse was inversely correlated with the slow-PS EEG-MSE-coarse at Fp2; (d the RRI-MSE-coarse and LF/HF ratio of the awake RRI were correlated positively to each other; (e the EEG-MSE-coarse at F8 was proportional to the cognitive test score; (f the results conform to the cholinergic hypothesis which states that cognitive impairment causes reduction in vagal cardiac modulation; (g fast-PS significantly lowered the EEG-MSE-coarse globally. Whether these heart-brain correlations could be fully explained by the central autonomic network is unknown and needs further exploration.

  13. Detecting drug-induced prolongation of the QRS complex: New insights for cardiac safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cros, C.; Skinner, M.; Moors, J.; Lainee, P.; Valentin, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Drugs slowing the conduction of the cardiac action potential and prolonging QRS complex duration by blocking the sodium current (I Na ) may carry pro-arrhythmic risks. Due to the frequency-dependent block of I Na , this study assesses whether activity-related spontaneous increases in heart rate (HR) occurring during standard dog telemetry studies can be used to optimise the detection of class I antiarrhythmic-induced QRS prolongation. Methods: Telemetered dogs were orally dosed with quinidine (class Ia), mexiletine (class Ib) or flecainide (class Ic). QRS duration was determined standardly (5 beats averaged at rest) but also prior to and at the plateau of each acute increase in HR (3 beats averaged at steady state), and averaged over 1 h period from 1 h pre-dose to 5 h post-dose. Results: Compared to time-matched vehicle, at rest, only quinidine and flecainide induced increases in QRS duration (E max 13% and 20% respectively, P < 0.01–0.001) whereas mexiletine had no effect. Importantly, the increase in QRS duration was enhanced at peak HR with an additional effect of + 0.7 ± 0.5 ms (quinidine, NS), + 1.8 ± 0.8 ms (mexiletine, P < 0.05) and + 2.8 ± 0.8 ms (flecainide, P < 0.01) (calculated as QRS at basal HR-QRS at high HR). Conclusion: Electrocardiogram recordings during elevated HR, not considered during routine analysis optimised for detecting QT prolongation, can be used to sensitise the detection of QRS prolongation. This could prove useful when borderline QRS effects are detected. Analysing during acute increases in HR could also be useful for detecting drug-induced effects on other aspects of cardiac function. -- Highlights: ► We aimed to improve detection of drug-induced QRS prolongation in safety screening. ► We used telemetered dogs to test class I antiarrhythmics at low and high heart rate. ► At low heart rate only quinidine and flecainide induced an increase in QRS duration. ► At high heart rate the effects of two out of three

  14. Cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  15. Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2011-07-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  16. The helical ventricular myocardial band of Torrent-Guasp: potential implications in congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corno, Antonio F; Kocica, Mladen J; Torrent-Guasp, Francisco

    2006-04-01

    The new concepts of cardiac anatomy and physiology, based on the observations made by Francisco Torrent-Guasp's discovery of the helical ventricular myocardial band, can be useful in the context of the surgical strategies currently used to manage patients with congenital heart defects. The potential impact of the Torrent-Guasp's Heart on congenital heart defects have been analyzed in the following settings: ventriculo-arterial discordance (transposition of the great arteries), double (atrio-ventricular and ventriculo-arterial) discordance (congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries), Ebstein's anomaly, pulmonary valve regurgitation after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, Ross operation, and complex intra-ventricular malformations. The functional interaction of right and left ventricles occurs not only through their arrangements in series but also thanks to the structural spiral features. Changes in size and function of either ventricle may influence the performance of the other ventricle. The variety and complexity of congenital heart defects make the recognition of the relationship between form and function a vital component, especially when compared to acquired disease. The new concepts of cardiac anatomy and function proposed by Francisco Torrent-Guasp, based on his observations, should stimulate further investigations of alternative surgical strategies by individuals involved with the management of patients with congenital heart defects.

  17. Lactate up-regulates the expression of lactate oxidation complex-related genes in left ventricular cardiac tissue of rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Gabriel-Costa

    Full Text Available Besides its role as a fuel source in intermediary metabolism, lactate has been considered a signaling molecule modulating lactate-sensitive genes involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle metabolism. Even though the flux of lactate is significantly high in the heart, its role on regulation of cardiac genes regulating lactate oxidation has not been clarified yet. We tested the hypothesis that lactate would increase cardiac levels of reactive oxygen species and up-regulate the expression of genes related to lactate oxidation complex.Isolated hearts from male adult Wistar rats were perfused with control, lactate or acetate (20mM added Krebs-Henseleit solution during 120 min in modified Langendorff apparatus. Reactive oxygen species (O2●-/H2O2 levels, and NADH and NADPH oxidase activities (in enriched microsomal or plasmatic membranes, respectively were evaluated by fluorimetry while SOD and catalase activities were evaluated by spectrophotometry. mRNA levels of lactate oxidation complex and energetic enzymes MCT1, MCT4, HK, LDH, PDH, CS, PGC1α and COXIV were quantified by real time RT-PCR. Mitochondrial DNA levels were also evaluated. Hemodynamic parameters were acquired during the experiment. The key findings of this work were that lactate elevated cardiac NADH oxidase activity but not NADPH activity. This response was associated with increased cardiac O2●-/H2O2 levels and up-regulation of MCT1, MCT4, LDH and PGC1α with no changes in HK, PDH, CS, COXIV mRNA levels and mitochondrial DNA levels. Lactate increased NRF-2 nuclear expression and SOD activity probably as counter-regulatory responses to increased O2●-/H2O2.Our results provide evidence for lactate-induced up-regulation of lactate oxidation complex associated with increased NADH oxidase activity and cardiac O2●-/H2O2 driving to an anti-oxidant response. These results unveil lactate as an important signaling molecule regulating components of the lactate oxidation complex in

  18. Nomenclature and databases for the surgical treatment of congenital cardiac disease - an updated primer and an analysis of opportunities for improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip; Jacobs, Marshall Lewis; Mavroudis, Constantine; Backer, Carl Lewis; Lacour-Gayet, Francois G.; Tchervenkov, Christo I.; Franklin, Rodney C. G.; Beland, Marie J.; Jenkins, Kathy J.; Walters, Hal; Bacha, Emile A.; Maruszewski, Bohdan; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Clarke, David Robinson; Gaynor, J. William; Spray, Thomas L.; Stellin, Giovanni; Ebels, Tjark; Krogmann, Otto N.; Aiello, Vera D.; Colan, Steven D.; Weinberg, Paul; Giroud, Jorge M.; Everett, Allen; Wernovsky, Gil; Elliott, Martin J.; Edwards, Fred H.

    2008-01-01

    This review discusses the historical aspects, current state of the art, and potential future advances in the areas of nomenclature and databases for the analysis Of Outcomes of treatments for patients with congenitally malformed hearts. We will consider the current state of analysis of outcomes, lay

  19. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy

  20. Angiographic features of rapidly involuting congenital hemangioma (RICH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konez, Orhan; Burrows, Patricia E. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Mulliken, John B. [Division of Plastic Surgery, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Fishman, Steven J. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kozakewich, Harry P.W. [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Rapidly involuting congenital hemangioma (RICH) is a recently recognized entity in which the vascular tumor is fully developed at birth and undergoes rapid involution. Angiographic findings in two infants with congenital hemangioma are reported and compared with a more common postnatal infantile hemangioma and a congenital infantile fibrosarcoma. Congenital hemangiomas differed from infantile hemangiomas angiographically by inhomogeneous parenchymal staining, large and irregular feeding arteries in disorganized patterns, arterial aneurysms, direct arteriovenous shunts, and intravascular thrombi. Both infants had clinical evidence of a high-output cardiac failure and intralesional bleeding. This congenital high-flow vascular tumor is difficult to distinguish angiographically from arteriovenous malformation and congenital infantile fibrosarcoma. (orig.)

  1. Congenital tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2012-06-20

    Jun 20, 2012 ... Key words: Congenital tuberculo- sis, case report, miliary tuberculosis. Introduction. Congenital tuberculosis defines tuberculosis in infants of .... tary TB and otitis media, resulting in seizures, deafness, and death. It is therefore not surprising that the index case who presented at twelve weeks of age, had ...

  2. Congenital Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tube defects. However, there is also a genetic influence to this type of congenital anomaly. Unknown Causes The vast majority of congenital abnormalities have no known cause. This is particularly troubling for parents who plan to have more children, because there is no way to predict if ...

  3. Incorporating Comorbidity Within Risk Adjustment for UK Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Katherine L; Rogers, Libby; Barron, David J; Tsang, Victor; Anderson, David; Tibby, Shane; Witter, Thomas; Stickley, John; Crowe, Sonya; English, Kate; Franklin, Rodney C; Pagel, Christina

    2017-07-01

    When considering early survival rates after pediatric cardiac surgery it is essential to adjust for risk linked to case complexity. An important but previously less well understood component of case mix complexity is comorbidity. The National Congenital Heart Disease Audit data representing all pediatric cardiac surgery procedures undertaken in the United Kingdom and Ireland between 2009 and 2014 was used to develop and test groupings for comorbidity and additional non-procedure-based risk factors within a risk adjustment model for 30-day mortality. A mixture of expert consensus based opinion and empiric statistical analyses were used to define and test the new comorbidity groups. The study dataset consisted of 21,838 pediatric cardiac surgical procedure episodes in 18,834 patients with 539 deaths (raw 30-day mortality rate, 2.5%). In addition to surgical procedure type, primary cardiac diagnosis, univentricular status, age, weight, procedure type (bypass, nonbypass, or hybrid), and era, the new risk factor groups of non-Down congenital anomalies, acquired comorbidities, increased severity of illness indicators (eg, preoperative mechanical ventilation or circulatory support) and additional cardiac risk factors (eg, heart muscle conditions and raised pulmonary arterial pressure) all independently increased the risk of operative mortality. In an era of low mortality rates across a wide range of operations, non-procedure-based risk factors form a vital element of risk adjustment and their presence leads to wide variations in the predicted risk of a given operation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mr.-Guided Cardiac Interventions Using Mr.-Safe Passive Devices: A Preclinical Study and First-in-Man Congenital Interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzifa, A.; Krombach, G.A.; Kraemer, N.; Krueger, S.; Schuette, A.; Von Walter, M.; Schaeffter, T.; Qureshi, S.; Krasemann, T.; Rosenthal, E.; Schwartz, C.; Varma, G.; Buhl, A.; Kohlmeier, A.; Buecker, A.; Guenther, R.W.; Razavi, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Percutaneous cardiac interventions are currently performed under X-ray guidance. Magnetic resonance imaging has been employed to guide intravascular interventions in the past, but mainly in animals. Translation of MR-guided interventions into humans has been limited by the lack of fully

  5. Usefulness of electrocardiography-gated dual-source computed tomography for evaluating morphological features of the ventricles in children with complex congenital heart defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Motoo; Hara, Masaki; Sakurai, Keita; Asano, Miki; Shibamoto, Yuta; Ohashi, Kazuya

    2011-01-01

    Improved time resolution using dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) enabled adaptation of electrocardiography (ECG)-gated cardiac CT for children with a high heart rate. In this study, we evaluated the ability of ECG-gated DSCT (ECG-DSCT) to depict the morphological ventricular features in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Between August 2006 and March 2010, a total of 66 patients with CHD (aged 1 day to 9 years, median 11 months) were analyzed using ECG-DSCT. The type of anomaly was ventricular septal defect (VSD) in 32 (malaligned type in 20, perimembranous type in 7, supracristal type in 3, muscular type in 2), single ventricle (SV) in 11, and corrected transposition of the great arteries (cTGA) in 3. All patients underwent ECG-DSCT and ultrasonography (US). We evaluated the accuracy of diagnosing the type of VSD. For the cases with SV and cTGA, we evaluated the ability to depict anatomical ventricular features. In all 32 cases of VSD, DSCT could confirm the VSD defects, and the findings were identical to those obtained by US. Anatomical configurations of the SV and cTGA were correctly diagnosed, similar to that on US. Our study suggests that ECG-DSCT can clearly depict the configuration of ventricles. (author)

  6. Cardiac imaging in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority

  7. Cardiac imaging in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  8. Mutations in Subunits of the Activating Signal Cointegrator 1 Complex Are Associated with Prenatal Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Congenital Bone Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knierim, Ellen; Hirata, Hiromi; Wolf, Nicole I.; Morales-Gonzalez, Susanne; Schottmann, Gudrun; Tanaka, Yu; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Orgeur, Mickael; Zerres, Klaus; Vogt, Stefanie; van Riesen, Anne; Gill, Esther; Seifert, Franziska; Zwirner, Angelika; Kirschner, Janbernd; Goebel, Hans Hilmar; Hübner, Christoph; Stricker, Sigmar; Meierhofer, David; Stenzel, Werner; Schuelke, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional signal cointegrators associate with transcription factors or nuclear receptors and coregulate tissue-specific gene transcription. We report on recessive loss-of-function mutations in two genes (TRIP4 and ASCC1) that encode subunits of the nuclear activating signal cointegrator 1 (ASC-1) complex. We used autozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing to search for pathogenic mutations in four families. Affected individuals presented with prenatal-onset spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), multiple congenital contractures (arthrogryposis multiplex congenita), respiratory distress, and congenital bone fractures. We identified homozygous and compound-heterozygous nonsense and frameshift TRIP4 and ASCC1 mutations that led to a truncation or the entire absence of the respective proteins and cosegregated with the disease phenotype. Trip4 and Ascc1 have identical expression patterns in 17.5-day-old mouse embryos with high expression levels in the spinal cord, brain, paraspinal ganglia, thyroid, and submandibular glands. Antisense morpholino-mediated knockdown of either trip4 or ascc1 in zebrafish disrupted the highly patterned and coordinated process of α-motoneuron outgrowth and formation of myotomes and neuromuscular junctions and led to a swimming defect in the larvae. Immunoprecipitation of the ASC-1 complex consistently copurified cysteine and glycine rich protein 1 (CSRP1), a transcriptional cofactor, which is known to be involved in spinal cord regeneration upon injury in adult zebrafish. ASCC1 mutant fibroblasts downregulated genes associated with neurogenesis, neuronal migration, and pathfinding (SERPINF1, DAB1, SEMA3D, SEMA3A), as well as with bone development (TNFRSF11B, RASSF2, STC1). Our findings indicate that the dysfunction of a transcriptional coactivator complex can result in a clinical syndrome affecting the neuromuscular system. PMID:26924529

  9. Transcatheter radiofrequency ablation under the guidance of three-dimensional mapping for the treatment of complex cardiac arrhythmias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Lang; Wang Hong; Lai Hengli; Ying Qiulin; Chen Zhangqiang; Lu Linxiang; Qiu Yun; Xiao Chengwei

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effectiveness and safety of transcatheter radiofrequency ablation guided by a three-dimensional mapping system (Ensite or Carto) for the treatment of complex cardiac arrhythmias. Methods: A cohort of 123 consecutive hospitalized inpatients during the period from February 2006 to December 2008 were selected for this study. These patients suffered from various arrhythmias, including paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (n = 58), persistent or permanent atrial fibrillation (n = 10), atrial flutter (n = 13), atrial tachycardia (n = 12) and ventricular tachycardia or frequent ventricular premature beats (n = 30). Transcatheter radiofrequency ablation for arrhythmias was performed under the guidance of an EnSite3000 / NavX or Array mapping system in 80 cases, and under the guidance of a CARTO mapping system in the remaining 43 cases. Results: Successful ablation of arrhythmias was obtained by single operation in 106 cases (86.18%), including 59 cases with atrial fibrillation, 11 cases with atrial flutter, 10 cases with atrial tachycardia, and 26 cases with ventricular tachycardia or premature ventricular beat.Ablation procedure was carried out and was successful in 10 cases with a successful rate of 94.31%, including 5 cases with atrial fibrillation, 1 case with recurred atrial flutter, 1 case with recurrent atrial tachycardia, and 3 cases with ventricular tachycardia or premature ventricular beat.After operation, complications occurred in 6 cases, including cardiac tamponade in 4 cases, distal embolism of the left anterior descending coronary artery in 1 case, and pulmonary embolism in 1 case. Conclusion: Three-dimensional mapping system can clearly and stereoscopically display the cardiac structures. Therefore, this technique is of great value in guiding the transcatheter radiofrequency ablation for complex arrhythmias, in improving the success rate of ablation and in increasing the safety of the procedure. (authors)

  10. Deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of mitochondrial reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in an infant with congenital lactic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreadith, R W; Batshaw, M L; Ohnishi, T; Kerr, D; Knox, B; Jackson, D; Hruban, R; Olson, J; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1984-09-01

    We report the case of an infant with hypoglycemia, progressive lactic acidosis, an increased serum lactate/pyruvate ratio, and elevated plasma alanine, who had a moderate to profound decrease in the ability of mitochondria from four organs to oxidize pyruvate, malate plus glutamate, citrate, and other NAD+-linked respiratory substrates. The capacity to oxidize the flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked substrate, succinate, was normal. The most pronounced deficiency was in skeletal muscle, the least in kidney mitochondria. Enzymatic assays on isolated mitochondria ruled out defects in complexes II, III, and IV of the respiratory chain. Further studies showed that the defect was localized in the inner membrane mitochondrial NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I). When ferricyanide was used as an artificial electron acceptor, complex I activity was normal, indicating that electrons from NADH could reduce the flavin mononucleotide cofactor. However, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy performed on liver submitochondrial particles showed an almost total loss of the iron-sulfur clusters characteristic of complex I, whereas normal signals were noted for other mitochondrial iron-sulfur clusters. This infant is presented as the first reported case of congenital lactic acidosis caused by a deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

  11. Congenital spinal malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Reiser, M.F.

    2001-01-01

    Congenital spinal malformations form a complex and heterogeneous group of disorders whose pathogenesis is best explained embryologically. Radiologically, it is important to formulate a diagnosis when the disorder first becomes symptomatic. However, it is also crucial to detect complications of the disorder or of the respective therapeutic interventions in the further course of the disease such as hydromyelia or re-tethering after repair of a meningomyelocele. Moreover, once a congenital spinal malformation is diagnosed, associated malformations should be sought after. A possible syndromal classification such as in OEIS- or VACTERL-syndromes should also be considered. (orig.) [de

  12. Case files of the Medical Toxicology Fellowship at the Toxikon Consortium in Chicago: Cocaine-associated wide-complex dysrhythmias and cardiac arrest— treatment nuances and controversies

    OpenAIRE

    Kalimullah, Ejaaz A.; Bryant, Sean M.

    2008-01-01

    Manifestations of cocaine poisoning range widely from mild sympathomimetic overdrive to life-threatening seizures, hyperthermia, and cardiac dysrhythmias. While supportive care, including the judicious use of benzodiazepines and cooling measures, is paramount, the management of cocaine-associated wide-complex dysrhythmias and cardiac arrest regularly includes sodium bicarbonate boluses in order to narrow QRS length. When confronted with refractory dysrhythmias, one must weigh the benefits and...

  13. Outcomes Following Three-Factor Inactive Prothrombin Complex Concentrate Versus Recombinant Activated Factor VII Administration During Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Patrick C; Smith, Mark M; Brinkman, Nathan J; Passe, Melissa A; Schroeder, Darrell R; Said, Sameh M; Nuttall, Gregory A; Oliver, William C; Barbara, David W

    2018-02-01

    To compare outcomes following inactive prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) or recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) administration during cardiac surgery. Retrospective propensity-matched analysis. Academic tertiary-care center. Patients undergoing cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass who received either rFVIIa or the inactive 3-factor PCC. Outcomes following intraoperative administration of rFVIIa (263) or factor IX complex (72) as rescue therapy to treat bleeding. In the 24 hours after surgery, propensity-matched patients receiving PCC versus rFVIIa had significantly less chest tube outputs (median difference -464 mL, 95% confidence interval [CI] -819 mL to -110 mL), fresh frozen plasma transfusion rates (17% v 38%, p = 0.028), and platelet transfusion rates (26% v 49%, p = 0.027). There were no significant differences between propensity-matched groups in postoperative stroke, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, or intracardiac thrombus. Postoperative dialysis was significantly less likely in patients administered PCC versus rFVIIa following propensity matching (odds ratio = 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-0.7). No significant difference in 30-day mortality in patients receiving PCC versus rFVIIa was present following propensity matching. Use of rFVIIa versus inactive PCCs was significantly associated with renal failure requiring dialysis and increased postoperative bleeding and transfusions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Congenital rubella

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that usually closes shortly after birth remains open ( patent ductus arteriosus ) Narrowing of the large artery that ... prior to pregnancy can prevent congenital rubella. Pregnant women who have not had the vaccine should avoid ...

  15. Correction of Hemodynamic Disorders in the Complex Surgical Correction of Acquired Cardiac Valvular Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Lenkin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to compare the efficiency of using the values of transpulmonary (PiCCO and prepulmonary (Swan-Ganz catheter thermodilution as guides to targeted therapy for hemodynamic disorders in the surgical correction of mixed cardiac valvular defects. Subjects and methods. The study enrolled 40 patients operated on for acquired cardiac diseases who were randomized to two matched groups. Hemodynamics was monitored by means of a Swan-Ganz catheter in Group 1 and by transpulmonary thermodilution in Group 2. Anesthesia was maintained with propofol and fentanyl. Infusion therapy was performed using crystalloid and colloid solutions. Continuous intravenous infusion of inotropic agents was used when heart failure was developed. Hemodynamic, clinical, and laboratory parameters were estimated intraoperatively and within 24 hours postoperatively. Results. The groups did not differ in the degree of baseline heart failure, the duration of an operation and myocardial ischemia, and the length of extracorporeal circulation. In the PiCCO group, postoperative infusion volume was 33% higher than that in the Swan-Ganz group, which ensured increases in stroke volume and oxygen delivery in the early postoperative period (p<0.05. Respiratory support was 26% shorter in the PiCCO group (p<0.04. Conclusion. After surgical interventions for mixed cardiac defects, the targeted therapy algorithm based on transpulmonary thermodilution provided more steady-state values of hemodynamics and oxygen transport, which was followed by the increased scope of infusion therapy and the shorter length of postoperative mechanical ventilation than that based on hemodynamics being corrected from the values of prepul-monary thermodilution. Key words: transpulmonary thermodilution, targeted therapy, prepulmonary ther-modilution, acquired heart disease.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Koichiro; Uchishiba, Mika; Tateno, Shigeru; Aotsuka, Hiroyuki; Nakatani, Hayao; Matsuo, Kozo; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Tashima, Kazuyuki.

    1992-01-01

    We applied the segmental analysis of cardiac MR images for evaluation of congenital heart diseases (CHD). One hundred and ninety-three patients with CHD, ranging in age from 20 days to 18 years old, were studied by MRI. This study compared the effectiveness of MRI with cardiac angiography and echocardiography for the evaluation of major diagnosis of CHD and all components of cardiovascular anatomy. ECG-gated MRI was performed by spin echo and gradient refocused imaging techniques operating at 0.5 tesla. In all the patients not only cardiovascular anatomies of CHD but all structures relevant to the identification of arrangement of organs were displayed. In diagnosing a total of 193 of major cardiac anomalies and 741 segments of the vein, the atrium, the ventricle and the great vessels by MRI and angiocardiogram and/or echocardiogram, descrepancies were found in 6 patients (3.1%), and only 18 segments (2.4%), respectively. For vascular and complex cardiac anatomies MRI was able to provide good anatomical details. Based on these findings, the segmental analysis of cardiac MR images was found useful for achieving a systematic diagnosis of CHD. (author)

  17. Clinical recommendations of cardiac magnetic resonance, Part II: inflammatory and congenital heart disease, cardiomyopathies and cardiac tumors: a position paper of the working group 'Applicazioni della Risonanza Magnetica' of the Italian Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontone, Gianluca; Di Bella, Gianluca; Silvia, Castelletti; Maestrini, Viviana; Festa, Pierluigi; Ait-Ali, Lamia; Masci, Pier Giorgio; Monti, Lorenzo; di Giovine, Gabriella; De Lazzari, Manuel; Cipriani, Alberto; Guaricci, Andrea I; Dellegrottaglie, Santo; Pepe, Alessia; Marra, Martina Perazzolo; Aquaro, Giovanni D

    2017-04-01

    The current document was developed by the working group on the 'application of cardiac magnetic resonance' of the Italian Society of Cardiology to provide a perspective on the current state of technical advances and clinical cardiac magnetic resonance applications and to inform cardiologists how to implement their clinical and diagnostic pathway with the introduction of this technique in the clinical practice. Appropriateness criteria were defined using a score system: score 1-3 = inappropriate (test is not generally acceptable and is not a reasonable approach for the indication), score 4-6 = uncertain (test may be generally acceptable and may be a reasonable approach for the indication but more research and/or patient information is needed to classify the indication definitively) and score 7-9 = appropriate (test is generally acceptable and is a reasonable approach for the indication).

  18. Concise Review: Cardiac Disease Modeling Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunbo; Al-Aama, Jumana; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Keavney, Bernard; Trafford, Andrew; Lako, Majlinda; Armstrong, Lyle

    2015-09-01

    Genetic cardiac diseases are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Although animal models have been created to provide some useful insights into the pathogenesis of genetic cardiac diseases, the significant species differences and the lack of genetic information for complex genetic diseases markedly attenuate the application values of such data. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patient-specific specimens and subsequent derivation of cardiomyocytes offer novel avenues to study the mechanisms underlying cardiac diseases, to identify new causative genes, and to provide insights into the disease aetiology. In recent years, the list of human iPSC-based models for genetic cardiac diseases has been expanding rapidly, although there are still remaining concerns on the level of functionality of iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and their ability to be used for modeling complex cardiac diseases in adults. This review focuses on the development of cardiomyocyte induction from pluripotent stem cells, the recent progress in heart disease modeling using iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes, and the challenges associated with understanding complex genetic diseases. To address these issues, we examine the similarity between iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and their ex vivo counterparts and how this relates to the method used to differentiate the pluripotent stem cells into a cardiomyocyte phenotype. We progress to examine categories of congenital cardiac abnormalities that are suitable for iPSC-based disease modeling. © AlphaMed Press.

  19. Malformações cardíacas congênitas em necropsias pediátricas: características, associações e prevalência Congenital cardiac malformations in pediatric necropsies: characteristics, associations and prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinaldo de Lima Leite

    2010-03-01

    second cause of death in children younger than one year, with cardiovascular defects being responsible for 39.4% of these deaths. OBJECTIVES: To establish the prevalence and the characteristics of the congenital cardiac malformations in pediatric necropsies performed in Hospital Regional da Asa Sul, Brasília, DF, Brazil, from January 1996 to December 2007. METHODS: This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study that reviewed 1,591 necropsies performed from January 1996 to December 2007 and found 189 (11.9% with congenital cardiac malformations, included in this study. RESULTS: The cardiac abnormalities were observed mainly in the group of live births (117/61.9%, followed by the stillbirths (35/18.5%, the infant group (30/15.9% and the preschoolers' group (7/3.7%, with no cases identified among school-aged children. The main alterations detected were: interatrial communication in 96 patients (27%, interventricular communication in 66 patients (18.5% and patent ductus arteriosus in 51 (14.3%, with no predominance of either sex. In 133 patients (70.4%, the cardiopathies were multiple and in 96 (50.8% they were associated with anomalies in other organs and systems; among these, 45 (23.8% presented cardiopathies as syndrome components, especially trisomies, at all age ranges. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study show a high prevalence of congenital cardiac anomalies in our country and distribution and association that were similar to the ones observed in developed countries. The high mortality associated to such anomalies highlights the need for more comprehensive research in order to identify the risk factors and seek the primary prevention of some of these defects.

  20. Design of a cardiac monitor in terms of parameters of QRS complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen-cheng; Ni, Li-li; Su, Ke-ping; Wang, Hong-yan; Jiang, Da-zong

    2002-08-01

    Objective. To design a portable cardiac monitor system based on the available ordinary ECG machine and works on the basis of QRS parameters. Method. The 80196 single chip microcomputer was used as the central microprocessor and real time electrocardiac signal was collected and analyzed [correction of analysized] in the system. Result. Apart from the performance of an ordinary monitor, this machine possesses also the following functions: arrhythmia analysis, HRV analysis, alarm, freeze, and record of automatic papering. Convenient in carrying, the system is powered by AC or DC sources. Stability, low power and low cost are emphasized in the hardware design; and modularization method is applied in software design. Conclusion. Popular in usage and low cost made the portable monitor system suitable for use under simple conditions.

  1. A prospective examination of disease management program use by complex cardiac outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravely, Shannon; Reid, Robert D; Oh, Paul; Ross, Heather; Stewart, Donna E; Grace, Sherry L

    2012-01-01

    The use of disease management programs (DMPs) by patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) is associated with improved outcomes. Although rates of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) use are well established, less is known about other DMPs. The objectives of this study were to describe the degree of DMP utilization by CVD outpatients, and examine factors related to use. This study represents a secondary analysis of a larger prospective cohort study. In hospital, 2635 CVD inpatients from 11 hospitals in Ontario Canada completed a survey that assessed factors affecting DMP utilization. One year later, 1803 participants completed a mailed survey that assessed DMP utilization. One thousand seventy-three (59.5%) participants reported using at least 1 DMP. Overall, 951 (52.7%) reported participating in cardiac rehabilitation, and among participants with a comorbid indication, 212 (41.2%) reported attending a diabetes education centre, 28 (25.9%) attended stroke rehabilitation, 35 (12.9%) used a heart failure clinic, and 13 (11.7%) attended a smoking cessation program. A multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that compared with no DMP use, participants that attended 1 or multiple programs were younger, married, diagnosed with a myocardial infarction, less likely to have had a percutaneous coronary intervention and had higher perceptions of personal control over their heart condition. There were few differences between participants that used 1 vs multiple DMPs, however, having diabetes or comorbid stroke significantly increased the likelihood of multiple DMP use. Approximately 40% of CVD outpatients do not access DMPs. An integrated approach to vascular disease management appears warranted. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Anesthesia and the pediatric cardiac catheterization suite: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Jennifer E; Lin, Erica P; Alexy, Ryan; Aronson, Lori A

    2015-02-01

    Advances in technology over the last couple of decades have caused a shift in pediatric cardiac catheterization from a primary focus on diagnostics to innovative therapeutic interventions. These improvements allow patients a wider range of nonsurgical options for treatment of congenital heart disease. However, these therapeutic modalities can entail higher risk in an already complex patient population, compounded by the added challenges inherent to the environment of the cardiac catheterization suite. Anesthesiologists caring for children with congenital heart disease must understand not only the pathophysiology of the disease but also the effects the anesthetics and interventions have on the patient in order to provide a safe perioperative course. It is the aim of this article to review the latest catheterization modalities offered to patients with congenital heart disease, describe the unique challenges presented in the cardiac catheterization suite, list the most common complications encountered during catheterization and finally, to review the literature regarding different anesthetic drugs used in the catheterization lab. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Congenital heart defects and extracardiac malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano

    2013-06-01

    To review the association between congenital heart defects and extracardiac malformations. Scientific articles were searched in the Medline, Lilacs, and SciELO databases, using the descriptors "congenital heart disease," "congenital heart defects," "congenital cardiac malformations," "extracardiac defects," and "extracardiac malformations." All case series that specifically explored the association between congenital heart defects and extracardiac malformations were included. Congenital heart diseases are responsible for about 40% of birth defects, being one of the most common and severe malformations. Extracardiac malformations are observed in 7 to 50% of the patients with congenital heart disease, bringing a greater risk of comorbidity and mortality and increasing the risks related to heart surgery. Different studies have attempted to assess the presence of extracardiac abnormalities in patients with congenital heart disease. Among the changes described, those of the urinary tract are more often reported. However, no study has evaluated all patients in the same way. Extracardiac abnormalities are frequent among patients with congenital heart disease, and patients with these alterations may present an increased risk of morbimortality. Therefore, some authors have been discussing the importance and cost-effectiveness of screening these children for other malformations by complementary exams.

  4. Pediatric cardiac postoperative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auler Jr. José Otávio Costa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Heart Institute of the University of São Paulo, Medical School is a referral center for the treatment of congenital heart diseases of neonates and infants. In the recent years, the excellent surgical results obtained in our institution may be in part due to modern anesthetic care and to postoperative care based on well-structured protocols. The purpose of this article is to review unique aspects of neonate cardiovascular physiology, the impact of extracorporeal circulation on postoperative evolution, and the prescription for pharmacological support of acute cardiac dysfunction based on our cardiac unit protocols. The main causes of low cardiac output after surgical correction of heart congenital disease are reviewed, and methods of treatment and support are proposed as derived from the relevant literature and our protocols.

  5. Nonmuscular involvement in merosin-negative congenital muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilhuis, H.J.; Donkelaar, H.J. ten; Tanke, R.B.; Vingerhoets, D.M.; Zwarts, M.J.; Verrips, A.; Gabreëls, F.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The spectrum of nonmuscular involvement in six children with merosin-negative congenital muscular dystrophy is described. In all children, biochemical, neuroradiologic, cardiac, and neurophysiologic studies were performed. Cerebral structures that were myelinated at gestation, including internal

  6. Transcriptome complexity in cardiac development and diseases--an expanding universe between genome and phenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chen; Wang, Yibin

    2014-01-01

    With the advancement of transcriptome profiling by micro-arrays and high-throughput RNA-sequencing, transcriptome complexity and its dynamics are revealed at different levels in cardiovascular development and diseases. In this review, we will highlight the recent progress in our knowledge of cardiovascular transcriptome complexity contributed by RNA splicing, RNA editing and noncoding RNAs. The emerging importance of many of these previously under-explored aspects of gene regulation in cardiovascular development and pathology will be discussed.

  7. Quantification of pulmonary regurgitation and prediction of pulmonary valve replacement by echocardiography in patients with congenital heart defects in comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellas, Claudia; Kammerer, Laura; Gravenhorst, Verena; Lotz, Joachim; Paul, Thomas; Steinmetz, Michael

    2018-04-01

    Pulmonary regurgitation (PR) is common in patients with congenital heart defects (CHD) and contributes to morbidity and mortality in the long-term. We investigated in this retrospective analysis whether readily accessible echocardiographic parameters are useful for quantification of PR and for predicting pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) in comparison to the gold-standard phase contrast (PC) flow measurements from cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Continuous wave (CW) Doppler and colour flow images in echocardiograms from 53 patients with CHD were analysed. Slope and jet-to-RVOT ratio correlated significantly with CMR-assessed regurgitation fraction (RF), whereas pressure half time (PHT) showed an inverse correlation. Patients with mild PR in CMR had significantly higher PHT, lower slope and jet-to-RVOT ratio than patients with moderate or severe regurgitation. The AUC regarding PR severity was 0.778 for PHT (95% CI, 0.649-0.907; P = 0.007 for CMR-RF ≤ 35%), 0.744 for slope (95% CI, 0.603-0.885; P = 0.017 for CMR-RF > 35%) and 0.652 for jet-to-RVOT ratio (95% CI, 0.473-0.860; P = 0.168 for CMR-RF > 35%). The optimal cut-off values calculated from ROC analysis were 95 ms for PHT and 4.9 m/s 2 for slope. In logistic regression analysis, slope emerged as the most valuable parameter for predicting the indication for PVR (OR 12.9, 95% CI, 1.8-90.9, P = 0.010). In conclusion, echocardiographic assessment of PR was feasible. Both parameters, PHT and in particular slope, were predictors for PVR. Thus, echocardiography appears appropriate in the management of patients with PR.

  8. Work-related outcome after acute coronary syndrome: Implications of complex cardiac rehabilitation in occupational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Monica; Ratti, Gennaro; Gerardi, Donato; Capogrosso, Cristina; Ricciardi, Gianfranco; Fulgione, Cosimo; Latte, Salvatore; Tammaro, Paolo; Covino, Gregorio; Nienhaus, Albert; Grazillo, Elpidio Maria; Mallardo, Mario; Capogrosso, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is frequent in the working-age population. Traditional outcomes, such as mortality and hospital readmission, are useful for evaluating prognosis. Fit-for-work is an emerging outcome with clinical as well as socioeconomic significance. We describe the possible benefit of a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program for return to work (RTW) after acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We evaluated 204 patients with recent ACS. They were divided into 4 groups on the basis of their occupational work load: very light (VL), light (L), moderate (M), and heavy (H). Work-related outcomes were assessed with the Work Performance Scale (WPS) of the Functional Status Questionnaire and as "days missed from work" (DMW) in the previous 4 weeks. The variables considered for outcomes were percent ejection fraction, functional capacity expressed in metabolic equivalents (METs), and participation or non-participation in the CR program (CR+ and CR-). One hundred thirty (66%) patients took part in the CR program. Total WPS scores for CR+ and CR- subgroups were VL group: 18±4 vs. 14±4 (p workplace, in particular among clerical workers. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  9. Congenital amusias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, B; Albouy, P; Caclin, A

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the sophisticated music processing reported in the general population, individuals with congenital amusia show deficits in music perception and production. Congenital amusia occurs without brain damage, sensory or cognitive deficits, and has been suggested as a lifelong deficit with genetic origin. Even though recognized for a long time, this disorder has been systematically studied only relatively recently for its behavioral and neural correlates. The currently most investigated hypothesis about the underlying deficits concerns the pitch dimension, notably with impaired pitch discrimination and memory. Anatomic and functional investigations of pitch processing revealed that the amusic brain presents abnormalities in the auditory and inferior frontal cortices, associated with decreased connectivity between these structures. The deficit also impairs processing of pitch in speech material and processing of the time dimension in music for some of the amusic individuals, but does not seem to affect spatial processing. Some studies suggest at least partial dissociation in the disorder between perception and production. Recent studies revealed spared implicit pitch perception in congenital amusia, supporting the power of implicit cognition in the music domain. Current challenges consist in defining different subtypes of congenital amusia as well as developing rehabilitation programs for this "musical handicap." © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased Prevalence of Renal and Urinary Tract Anomalies in Children with Congenital Hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Juhi; Gordillo, Roberto; Kaskel, Frederick J.; Druschel, Charlotte M.; Woroniecki, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We investigated the prevalence of congenital renal and urologic anomalies in children with congenital hypothyroidism to determine whether further renal and urologic investigations would be of benefit. Study design Prevalence of congenital hypothyroidism was obtained from the New York State Congenital Malformation Registry. The occurrence of urinary tract anomalies were calculated for children with congenital hypothyroidism and compared to children without congenital hypothyroidism. In addition we obtained congenital hypothyroidism data from New York State newborn screening, and the cases were matched to Congenital Malformation Registry. Results Analysis of Congenital Malformation Registry data showed 980 children with congenital hypothyroidism and 3 661 585 children without congenital hypothyroidism born in New York State (1992-2005). Children with congenital hypothyroidism have a significantly increased risk of congenital renal and urological anomalies with the odds ratio (OR) of 13.2 (10.6-16.5). The other significantly increased defects in congenital hypothyroidism were cardiac, gastrointestinal, and skeletal. Analysis of matched data confirmed an increase of congenital renal and urologic anomalies with OR of 4.8 (3.7-6.3). Conclusions Children with congenital hypothyroidism have an increased prevalence of congenital renal and urologic anomalies. We suggest that these children should be evaluated for the presence of congenital renal and urologic anomalies with renal ultrasonography, and that further studies of common genes involved in thyroid and kidney development are warranted. PMID:18823909

  11. Choosing Between MRI and CT Imaging in the Adult with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnichsen, Crystal; Ammash, Naser

    2016-05-01

    Improvements in the outcomes of surgical and catheter-based interventions and medical therapy have led to a growing population of adult patients with congenital heart disease. Adult patients with previously undiagnosed congenital heart disease or those previously palliated or repaired may have challenging echocardiographic examinations. Understanding the distinct anatomic and hemodynamic features of the congenital anomaly and quantifying ventricular function and valvular dysfunction plays an important role in the management of these patients. Rapid advances in imaging technology with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) allow for improved visualization of complex cardiac anatomy in the evaluation of this unique patient population. Although echocardiography remains the most widely used imaging tool to evaluate congenital heart disease, alternative and, at times, complimentary imaging modalities should be considered. When caring for adults with congenital heart disease, it is important to choose the proper imaging study that can answer the clinical question with the highest quality images, lowest risk to the patient, and in a cost-efficient manner.

  12. The heart: Congenital disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    The most important diagnostic requirement in congenital heart disease (CHD) is definition of cardiovascular pathoanatomy. The considerable success in operative correction of even the most complex anomalies in recent years compels ever increasing precision in preoperative demonstration of these anomalies. Early experience with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at several institutions indicated that this modality is an effective noninvasive technique for evaluation of CHD. Indeed, MRI seems to have some advantage over other techniques, including angiography, for definitive diagnosis of congenital anomalies of the heart and great arteries and veins. The absence of ionizing radiation and contrast medium in MRI is an additional advantage; the former is particularly important for children, who, up to this time, have frequently been subjected to enormous radiation burdens from multiple cineangiograms during initial diagnosis and follow-up. This chapter describes the MRI appearance of cardiovascular anatomy im the segmental fashion proposed for analysis of complex CHD. Likewise, MRI demonstration of congenital cardiovascular lesions is organized into abnormalities situated at the four segmental cardiovascular levels: great vessels, atria, ventricles, and visceroatrial relationship. The role of MRI in evaluation of complex ventricular anomalies such as single ventricle and thoracic aortic abnormalities is specifically described

  13. Neurodevelopmental delay with critical congenital heart disease is mainly from prenatal injury not infant cardiac surgery: current evidence based on a meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Yin, S; Fang, J; Hua, Y; Wang, C; Mu, D; Zhou, K

    2015-06-01

    No consensus has been reached regarding whether brain injury related to congenital heart disease (CHD) is caused by infant cardiac surgery and/or prenatal injury resulting from the CHD. We performed this meta-analysis to identify the likely cause of neurodevelopmental delay in CHD patients. We carried out a literature search without language restriction in December 2013, retrieving records from PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and the World Health Organization trials center, to identify studies applying functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) evaluation of brain function before surgery and, in some cases, after surgery (both immediate term and short term postoperatively). The preoperative and postoperative fMRI results were extracted, and meta-analysis was performed using Revman 5.1.1 and STATA 11.0, according to the guidelines from the Cochrane review and MOOSE groups. The electronic search yielded 937 citations. Full text was retrieved for 15 articles and eight articles (nine studies) were eligible for inclusion: six studies (n = 312 cases) with fMRI analysis before surgery and three (n = 36 cases) with complete perioperative fMRI analysis. The overall average diffusivity of CHD cases was significantly higher than that of controls, with a summarized standard (std) mean difference of 1.39 (95% CI, 0.70-2.08), and the fractional anisotropy was lower in CHD cases, with a summarized mean difference of -1.43 (95% CI, -1.95 to -0.91). N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/choline (Cho) for the whole brain was significantly lower in CHD cases compared with healthy ones, while lactate/Cho was significantly higher in CHD cases. Immediate term postoperatively, significant changes in NAA/creatine and NAA/Cho, relative to preoperative values, were found. However, the difference did not persist at the short-term follow-up. This meta-analysis suggests that the delay in neurological development in newborns with CHD is due mainly to prenatal injury, and cardiac surgery might

  14. Conventional and right-sided screening for subcutaneous ICD in a population with congenital heart disease at high risk of sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Pau; Osca, Joaquín; Rueda, Joaquín; Cano, Oscar; Pimenta, Pedro; Andres, Ana; Sancho, María José; Martinez, Luis

    2017-11-01

    Information regarding suitability for subcutaneous defibrillator (sICD) implantation in tetralogy of Fallot (ToF) and systemic right ventricle is scarce and needs to be further explored. The main objective of our study was to determine the proportion of patients with ToF and systemic right ventricle eligible for sICD with both, standard and right-sided screening methods. Secondary objectives were: (i) to study sICD eligibility specifically in patients at high risk of sudden cardiac death, (ii) to identify independent predictors for sICD eligibility, and (iii) to compare the proportion of eligible patients in a nonselected ICD population. We recruited 102 patients with ToF, 33 with systemic right ventricle, and 40 consecutive nonselected patients. Conventional electrocardiographic screening was performed as usual. Right-sided alternative screening was studied by positioning the left-arm and right-arm electrodes 1 cm right lateral of the xiphoid midline. The Boston Scientific ECG screening tool was utilized. In high-risk patients with ToF, eligibility was higher with right-sided screening in comparison with standard screening (61% vs. 44%; p = .018). Eligibility in high-risk right ventricle population was identical with both screening methods (77%, p = ns). The only independent predictor for sICD eligibility was QRS duration. In high-risk patients with ToF, right-sided implantation of the sICD could be an alternative to a conventional ICD. In patients with a systemic right ventricle, implantation of a sICD is an alternative to a conventional sICD. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Cardiac CT and cardiac MRI - competitive or complementary for nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshage, W.

    2004-01-01

    In summary, cardiac computed tomography (CT) and cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) are two different technologies with distinct imaging properties that gain increasing importance in clinical cardiology. Even though images may look similar, the areas of application of CT and MR are quite different. Clinical applications of cardiac CT focus on on-invasive imaging of the coronary arteries. In this respect, the higher spatial resolution of cardiac CT constitutes a significant advantage as compared to MR and clinical results are superior. Clinical applications of cardiac MR, next to morphologic imaging of the heart, are most frequently found in the context of intra-and pericardial masses, complex congenital anomalies, and the assessment of left ventricular function (dobutamine) and perfusion (adenosine) under stress. The evaluation of the size and localization of myocardial necrosis, scars, and fibrosis gains increasing importance, for example in the workup of myocardial infarction, but also myocarditis and cardiomyopathies. In this respect, magnetic resonance imaging partly constitutes an alternative to nuclear medicine methods. Due to the lack of ionizing radiation and a relatively high spatial resolution, an increase of MR diagnostic procedures at the expense of nuclear medicine can be expected. (orig.)

  16. Integration of Computed Tomography and Three-Dimensional Echocardiography for Hybrid Three-Dimensional Printing in Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosnell, Jordan; Pietila, Todd; Samuel, Bennett P; Kurup, Harikrishnan K N; Haw, Marcus P; Vettukattil, Joseph J

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is an emerging technology aiding diagnostics, education, and interventional, and surgical planning in congenital heart disease (CHD). Three-dimensional printing has been derived from computed tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance, and 3D echocardiography. However, individually the imaging modalities may not provide adequate visualization of complex CHD. The integration of the strengths of two or more imaging modalities has the potential to enhance visualization of cardiac pathomorphology. We describe the feasibility of hybrid 3D printing from two imaging modalities in a patient with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (L-TGA). Hybrid 3D printing may be useful as an additional tool for cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons in planning interventions in children and adults with CHD.

  17. Causes of death in a contemporary adult congenital heart disease cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Christopher; Moore, Benjamin M; Kotchetkova, Irina; Cordina, Rachael L; Celermajer, David S

    2018-04-17

    The life expectancy of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) has significantly improved with advances in their paediatric medical care. Mortality patterns are changing as a result. Our study aims to describe survival and causes of death in a contemporary cohort of adult patients with CHD. We reviewed 3068 patients in our adult CHD database (age ≥16 years, seen at least once in our centre between 2000 and 2015), and documented the number and causes of death, via Australia's National Death Index. Survival and mortality patterns were analysed by complexity of CHD and by underlying congenital diagnosis. Our cohort comprised 3068 adult patients (53% male). The distribution of patients (per the Bethesda classification) was 47% simple, 34% moderate and 18% complex (1% not classifiable). Over a median follow-up of 6.2 years (IQR 3.5-10.4), 341 patients (11%) died with an incidence of 0.4 deaths/100 patient years (py). Survival was significantly worse with increasing complexity of CHD (pdeaths/100 py with a median age of death 70 years, and in the complex group was 1.0 death/100 py with a median age of death 34 years. Overall, non-cardiac causes of death outnumbered cardiac causes, at 54% and 46%, respectively. The leading single cause of death was heart failure (17%), followed by malignancy (13%). Simple adult CHD patients mostly died due to non-cardiac causes such as malignancy. Perioperative mortality only accounted for 5% of deaths. Premature death is common in adults with CHD. Although heart failure remains the most common cause of death, in the contemporary era in a specialist CHD centre, non-cardiac related deaths outnumber cardiac deaths, particularly in those with simple CHD lesions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Patient-related factors influencing detectability of coronary arteries in 320-row CT angiography in infants with complex congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Yuzo; Kawanami, Satoshi; Kamitani, Takeshi; Sagiyama, Koji; Shin, Seitaro; Hino, Takuya; Nagata, Hazumu; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Nagao, Michinobu; Honda, Hiroshi

    2018-05-05

    To investigate the performance of second-generation 320-row computed tomographic (CT) angiography (CTA) in detecting coronary arteries and identify factors influencing visibility of the coronary arteries in infants with complex congenital heart disease (CHD). Data of 60 infants (aged 0-2 years, median 2 months) with complex CHD who underwent examination using 320-row CTA with low-dose prospective electrocardiogram-triggered volume target scanning were reviewed. The coronary arteries of each infant were assessed using a 0-4-point scoring system based on the number of coronary segments with a visible course. Clinical parameters, the CT value in the ascending aorta, image noise, and the radiation dose were subjected to univariate and multivariate analyses. The mean coronary score for all examinations was 2.6 ± 1.5 points. The mean attenuation in the ascending aorta was 306.7 ± 66.2 HU and the mean standard deviation was 21.7 ± 4.4. The mean effective radiation dose was 1.27 ± 0.39 mSv. Multivariate regression analysis showed significant correlations between coronary score and body weight (p < 0.05) and between coronary score and the CT value in the ascending aorta (p < 0.02). Second-generation 320-row CTA with prospective electrocardiogram-triggered volume target scanning and hybrid iterative reconstruction allows good visibility of the coronary arteries in infants with complex CHD. Body weight and the CT value in the ascending aorta are important factors influencing the visibility of the coronary arteries in infants.

  19. Real-time MRI guidance of cardiac interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Washburn, Adrienne E; Tavallaei, Mohammad A; Pop, Mihaela; Grant, Elena K; Chubb, Henry; Rhode, Kawal; Wright, Graham A

    2017-10-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is appealing to guide complex cardiac procedures because it is ionizing radiation-free and offers flexible soft-tissue contrast. Interventional cardiac MR promises to improve existing procedures and enable new ones for complex arrhythmias, as well as congenital and structural heart disease. Guiding invasive procedures demands faster image acquisition, reconstruction and analysis, as well as intuitive intraprocedural display of imaging data. Standard cardiac MR techniques such as 3D anatomical imaging, cardiac function and flow, parameter mapping, and late-gadolinium enhancement can be used to gather valuable clinical data at various procedural stages. Rapid intraprocedural image analysis can extract and highlight critical information about interventional targets and outcomes. In some cases, real-time interactive imaging is used to provide a continuous stream of images displayed to interventionalists for dynamic device navigation. Alternatively, devices are navigated relative to a roadmap of major cardiac structures generated through fast segmentation and registration. Interventional devices can be visualized and tracked throughout a procedure with specialized imaging methods. In a clinical setting, advanced imaging must be integrated with other clinical tools and patient data. In order to perform these complex procedures, interventional cardiac MR relies on customized equipment, such as interactive imaging environments, in-room image display, audio communication, hemodynamic monitoring and recording systems, and electroanatomical mapping and ablation systems. Operating in this sophisticated environment requires coordination and planning. This review provides an overview of the imaging technology used in MRI-guided cardiac interventions. Specifically, this review outlines clinical targets, standard image acquisition and analysis tools, and the integration of these tools into clinical workflow. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 5 J

  20. Infants with complex congenital heart diseases show poor short-term memory in the mobile paradigm at 3 months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Ying; Harrison, Tondi; Heathcock, Jill

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine learning, short-term memory and general development including cognitive, motor, and language domains in infants with Complex Congenital Heart Defects (CCDH). Ten infants with CCHD (4 males, 6 females) and 14 infants with typical development (TD) were examined at 3 months of age. The mobile paradigm, where an infant's leg is tethered to an overhead mobile, was used to evaluate learning and short-term memory. The Bayley Scales of Infant Development 3rd edition (Bayley-III) was used to evaluate general development in cognitive, motor, and language domains. Infants with CCHD and infants with TD both showed learning with significant increase in kicking rate (pshort-term memory (p=0.017) in the mobile paradigm. There were no differences on cognitive, motor, and language development between infants with CCHD and infants with TD on the Bayley-III. Early assessment is necessary to guide targeted treatment in infants with CCHD. One-time assessment may fail to detect potential cognitive impairments during early infancy in infants with CCHD. Supportive intervention programs for infants with CCHD that focuses on enhancing short-term memory are recommended. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Congenital Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estey, Chelsie M

    2016-03-01

    There are several types of hydrocephalus, which are characterized based on the location of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulation. Physical features of animals with congenital hydrocephalus may include a dome-shaped skull, persistent fontanelle, and bilateral ventrolateral strabismus. Medical therapy involves decreasing the production of CSF. The most common surgical treatment is placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Postoperative complications may include infection, blockage, drainage abnormalities, and mechanical failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Congenital diplopodia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brower, Jason S.; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Costouros, John G.; Boakes, Jennette; Greenspan, Adam

    2003-01-01

    Diplopodia, or duplicated foot, is a rare congenital anomaly. It differs from polydactyly in that supernumerary metatarsal and tarsal bones are present as well as extra digits. Only a few cases of this anomaly have been reported in the literature to date. We present a newborn male without intrauterine teratogen exposure who was born with a duplicate foot of the left lower extremity and imperforate anus. (orig.)

  3. Actual state of imaging diagnosis in congenital cardiopaties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon Galindo, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    The congenital cardiac illnesses can be diagnosed through different procedures, such as echocardiography two-dimensional trans-thoracic and trans-esophagus, fetal echocardiogram, heart catheterism, three-dimensional echocardiography, three-dimensional helical on-line tomography or magnetic resonance. Some heart anomalies are of such a complexity that becomes necessary the use of methods complementary diagnoses that they give a bigger space orientation of the structures with three-dimensional character and their relationship with adjacent systems, so the pathology can understand each other and to interpret in an exact way before making a surgical correction. In a same way, when being methods of recent development, it is important to find a balance between the academic development and the readiness of this technology like an alternative in front of the conventional options in the diagnostic phase. The three-dimensional images, with the on-line helical tomography, promises to generate a revolution in the diagnosis of the congenital cardiopatie with the purpose of allowing the obtaining of more and more reliable information and of better quality, so the behaviors to continue are those most guessed right ones. With this initial approach toward these new methods diagnoses in congenital cardiopatie, intend to evaluate the possibilities that at this time are imposed as complementary methods to the current ones

  4. [Adult congenital heart disease--between guidelines and clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessa, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Advances in medical and surgical management of congenital heart disease have changed the prognosis of infants and children with cardiac defects, so that an increasing number of patients reach adolescence and adult life, even those with complex defects. Recent data suggest that the number of adults with congenital heart disease, either repaired or not, approaches the number of children with the disorder. A cure is rarely achieved and ongoing surveillance and management in conjunction with specialists in this highly specialized field is mandatory to provide optimal care for patients. The profile of this patient population is going to change over the next few decades. Ideally specialist units should be established in appropriate geographic locations; patients need to be concentrated for expertise, experience, and optimal management. Less specialized regional centers and outpatient clinics in districts in connection with grown-up congenital heart disease units should be created. Specialist units should accept responsibility for educating the professionals, training the specialists, and sharing particular skills between each other. Guidelines and recommendations should help physicians to make decision in their daily practice. However, the final judgment regarding the care of an individual patient must be made by his/her physician. This article will briefly discuss some aspects of these dedicated guidelines and how they influence the clinical daily practice.

  5. Outcome after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Puyvelde, Tim; Ameloot, Koen; Roggen, Mieke; Troost, Els; Gewillig, Marc; Budts, Werner; Van De Bruaene, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Outcome after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in patients with underlying congenital heart disease is uncertain. This study aimed at evaluating outcome after CPR in patients with underlying congenital heart disease, factors related to worse outcome after CPR and whether survivors of sudden cardiac death (SCD) have a worse outcome when compared to an age, gender and disease-matched control population. Between 1984 and 2015, all patients with congenital heart disease who received in or out-of-hospital CPR were identified from the database of congenital heart disease from the University Hospitals Leuven. Postoperative and neonatal (CPR was excluded. For each survivor of SCD, two control patients matched for gender, age and underlying heart defect were included in the study. Thirty-eight patients (66% men; median age 25 years (interquartile range 9-40); 68% out-of-hospital) were identified, of which 27 (66%) survived the event. The main cause of SCD was ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation ( n=21). Heart defect complexity (odds ratio (OR) 5.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-21.9; P=0.027), pulmonary hypertension (OR 13.8; 95% CI 2.1-89.5; P=0.006) and time to return of spontaneous circulation (OR 1.1; 95% CI 1.0-1.1; P=0.046) were related to worse outcome. Survivors of SCD had a worse prognosis when compared to an age, gender and disease-matched control group (5-year survival 76% vs. 98%; P=0.002). The complexity of underlying heart defect, pulmonary hypertension and time to return of spontaneous circulation are related to worse outcome in the case of CPR. Survivors of SCD have a worse outcome when compared to matched controls, indicating the need for adequate implantable cardioverter defibrillator indication assessment and for stringent follow-up of patients with worsening haemodynamics.

  6. Congenital toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, François; Wallon, Martine

    2013-01-01

    Congenital toxoplasmosis results from the transplacental transmission of the parasite Toxoplasma gondii after a maternal infection acquired in pregnancy. Prevalence of congenital infection ranges from 0.1 to 0.3 per 1000 live births. The maternal-fetal transmission rate increases with gestational age at maternal seroconversion, from less than 15% at 13 weeks of gestation to over 70% at 36 weeks. Conversely, the later the maternal infection, the lower the risk of symptomatic congenital infection (infections acquired during the third trimester are most often asymptomatic at birth). Prenatal diagnosis is currently performed by PCR analysis in amniotic fluid. Antenatal management and treatment vary considerably among countries. In some European countries, maternal infections are detected through serological screening allowing a prompt treatment with spiramycin, which is expected to reduce the risk of vertical transmission. If PCR analysis in amniotic fluid is positive or if maternal infection was acquired in the third trimester of pregnancy, a combination with pyrimethamine and sulphonamide is given until delivery. Benefits of antenatal treatments remain controversial. Infected newborns are prescribed pyrimethamine and sulphonamide for 12 months. Despite antenatal and postnatal treatment, chorioretinitis can occur at any age (prevalence>20% at 10 years of age): long-term ophthalmological follow-up remains necessary. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The application of transcatheter closure procedure in congenital heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Haoxue; Liu Shuyong; Jiang Rutong; Bai Hongcan; Wang Yanwei; Du Yuying; Yang Qiaoji; Qin Yongwen

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore and evaluate the value of transcatheter closure procedure in congenital heart diseases. Methods: Transcatheter closure was performed in 12 patients with congenital heart diseases including 6 ventricular septal defect (VSD), 4 atrial septal defect (ASD), 2 patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), by the Amplatzer occlusion device under local or general anesthesia. Results: The procedure was successful in all patients outcoming with the disappearance of cardiac murmur. All of them could get out of the bed within 6 to 12 hours postoperatively, and were discharged from hospital after 4 to 6 days. Conclusions: Transcatheter treatment of congenital cardiac defects by Amplatzer occlusion device is less traumatic, with good effect, simultaneously

  8. The application of transcatheter closure procedure in congenital heart diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haoxue, Guo; Shuyong, Liu; Rutong, Jiang; Hongcan, Bai; Yanwei, Wang; Yuying, Du; Qiaoji, Yang; Yongwen, Qin [Henan Provincial Corps Hospital, Chinese People' s Police Forces, Zhengzhou (China). Dept. of Surgery

    2003-10-01

    Objective: To explore and evaluate the value of transcatheter closure procedure in congenital heart diseases. Methods: Transcatheter closure was performed in 12 patients with congenital heart diseases including 6 ventricular septal defect (VSD), 4 atrial septal defect (ASD), 2 patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), by the Amplatzer occlusion device under local or general anesthesia. Results: The procedure was successful in all patients outcoming with the disappearance of cardiac murmur. All of them could get out of the bed within 6 to 12 hours postoperatively, and were discharged from hospital after 4 to 6 days. Conclusions: Transcatheter treatment of congenital cardiac defects by Amplatzer occlusion device is less traumatic, with good effect, simultaneously.

  9. Congenital heart disease in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matic, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    The clinical findings and investigation of dogs with congenital cardiac disease is described and the role of diagnostic aids including radiography, electrocardiography and echocardiography is outlined. The physical findings, prognosis and therapy of the common defects are reviewed and their aetiology is briefly discussed

  10. The right side in congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuuring, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Life expectancy of children with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased dramatically during the past years, due to the successes of cardiac surgery. At present, nearly all of these children with CHD can be operated at young age and more than 90% reach adulthood. At adult age, however, many

  11. Congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Conor P.; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Babyn, Paul S. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, M5G 1X8, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2003-09-01

    A congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunt (CEPS) is uncommon. A type 1 CEPS exists where there is absence of intrahepatic portal venous supply and a type 2 CEPS where this supply is preserved. The diagnosis of congenital portosystemic shunt is important because it may cause hepatic encephalopathy. To describe the clinical and imaging features of three children with CEPS and to review the cases in the published literature. The diagnostic imaging and medical records for three children with CEPS were retrieved and evaluated. An extensive literature search was performed. Including our cases, there are 61 reported cases of CEPS, 39 type 1 and 22 type 2. Type 1 occurs predominantly in females, while type 2 shows no significant sexual preponderance. The age at diagnosis ranges from 31 weeks of intrauterine life to 76 years. Both types of CEPS have a number of associations, the most common being nodular lesions of the liver (n=25), cardiac anomalies (n=19), portosystemic encephalopathy (n=10), polysplenia (n=9), biliary atresia (n=7), skeletal anomalies (n=5), and renal tract anomalies (n=4). MRI is recommended as an important means of diagnosing and classifying cases of CEPS and examining the associated cardiovascular and hepatic abnormalities. Screening for CEPS in patients born with polysplenia is suggested. (orig.)

  12. Congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, Conor P.; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Babyn, Paul S.

    2003-01-01

    A congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunt (CEPS) is uncommon. A type 1 CEPS exists where there is absence of intrahepatic portal venous supply and a type 2 CEPS where this supply is preserved. The diagnosis of congenital portosystemic shunt is important because it may cause hepatic encephalopathy. To describe the clinical and imaging features of three children with CEPS and to review the cases in the published literature. The diagnostic imaging and medical records for three children with CEPS were retrieved and evaluated. An extensive literature search was performed. Including our cases, there are 61 reported cases of CEPS, 39 type 1 and 22 type 2. Type 1 occurs predominantly in females, while type 2 shows no significant sexual preponderance. The age at diagnosis ranges from 31 weeks of intrauterine life to 76 years. Both types of CEPS have a number of associations, the most common being nodular lesions of the liver (n=25), cardiac anomalies (n=19), portosystemic encephalopathy (n=10), polysplenia (n=9), biliary atresia (n=7), skeletal anomalies (n=5), and renal tract anomalies (n=4). MRI is recommended as an important means of diagnosing and classifying cases of CEPS and examining the associated cardiovascular and hepatic abnormalities. Screening for CEPS in patients born with polysplenia is suggested. (orig.)

  13. Congenital diaphramatic hernia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline-Fath, Beth M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Fetal Care Center of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, MLC 5031, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia, despite advances in therapy, remains a complex condition with significant morbidity and mortality. The etiology of the disorder is still incompletely understood, though the pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension that develop secondarily must be overcome to improve survival. Prenatal US and fetal MRI have helped in the development of a greater understanding of this disease. Also with these modalities, measurement techniques have been developed in an attempt to provide prognosticators for the development of pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension. There is a broad range of approaches for performing these measurements, and variability among imaging centers is noted. Despite inconsistent approaches, these techniques have become the foundation for counseling and prenatal and postnatal therapy. It is hoped that with further research with prenatal US and fetal MRI and the development of innovative medical and surgical therapies that the morbidity and mortality of children with congenital diaphragmatic hernias can be significantly reduced. (orig.)

  14. Congenital diaphramatic hernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kline-Fath, Beth M.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia, despite advances in therapy, remains a complex condition with significant morbidity and mortality. The etiology of the disorder is still incompletely understood, though the pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension that develop secondarily must be overcome to improve survival. Prenatal US and fetal MRI have helped in the development of a greater understanding of this disease. Also with these modalities, measurement techniques have been developed in an attempt to provide prognosticators for the development of pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension. There is a broad range of approaches for performing these measurements, and variability among imaging centers is noted. Despite inconsistent approaches, these techniques have become the foundation for counseling and prenatal and postnatal therapy. It is hoped that with further research with prenatal US and fetal MRI and the development of innovative medical and surgical therapies that the morbidity and mortality of children with congenital diaphragmatic hernias can be significantly reduced. (orig.)

  15. Pattern and Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Disease in Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the pattern of Congenital Heart Diseases (CHD) in children referred to Ahmed Gasim Cardiac Center) in Khartoum. Methods: This is a prospective cross-sectional, clinic based study conducted over a six months period. The children were referred to the Cardiac Centre because of suspected heart ...

  16. Abnormal interactions of calsequestrin with the ryanodine receptor calcium release channel complex linked to exercise-induced sudden cardiac death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terentyev, Dmitry; Nori, Alessandra; Santoro, Massimo; Viatchenko-Karpinski, Serge; Kubalova, Zuzana; Gyorke, Inna; Terentyeva, Radmila; Vedamoorthyrao, Srikanth; Blom, Nico A.; Valle, Giorgia; Napolitano, Carlo; Williams, Simon C.; Volpe, Pompeo; Priori, Silvia G.; Gyorke, Sandor

    2006-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a familial arrhythmogenic disorder associated with mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and cardiac calsequestrin (CASQ2) genes. Previous in vitro studies suggested that RyR2 and CASQ2 interact as parts of a multimolecular

  17. Fatty acid nitroalkenes induce resistance to ischemic cardiac injury by modulating mitochondrial respiration at complex II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R. Koenitzer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FA are metabolic and inflammatory-derived electrophiles that mediate pleiotropic signaling actions. It was hypothesized that NO2-FA would impact mitochondrial redox reactions to induce tissue-protective metabolic shifts in cells. Nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2 reversibly inhibited complex II-linked respiration in isolated rat heart mitochondria in a pH-dependent manner and suppressed superoxide formation. Nitroalkylation of Fp subunit was determined by BME capture and the site of modification by OA-NO2 defined by mass spectrometric analysis. These effects translated into reduced basal and maximal respiration and favored glycolytic metabolism in H9C2 cardiomyoblasts as assessed by extracellular H+ and O2 flux analysis. The perfusion of NO2-FA induced acute cardioprotection in an isolated perfused heart ischemia/reperfusion (IR model as evidenced by significantly higher rate-pressure products. Together these findings indicate that NO2-FA can promote cardioprotection by inducing a shift from respiration to glycolysis and suppressing reactive species formation in the post-ischemic interval.

  18. Cardiac-enriched BAF chromatin-remodeling complex subunit Baf60c regulates gene expression programs essential for heart development and function

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    Xin Sun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available How chromatin-remodeling complexes modulate gene networks to control organ-specific properties is not well understood. For example, Baf60c (Smarcd3 encodes a cardiac-enriched subunit of the SWI/SNF-like BAF chromatin complex, but its role in heart development is not fully understood. We found that constitutive loss of Baf60c leads to embryonic cardiac hypoplasia and pronounced cardiac dysfunction. Conditional deletion of Baf60c in cardiomyocytes resulted in postnatal dilated cardiomyopathy with impaired contractile function. Baf60c regulates a gene expression program that includes genes encoding contractile proteins, modulators of sarcomere function, and cardiac metabolic genes. Many of the genes deregulated in Baf60c null embryos are targets of the MEF2/SRF co-factor Myocardin (MYOCD. In a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified MYOCD as a BAF60c interacting factor; we showed that BAF60c and MYOCD directly and functionally interact. We conclude that Baf60c is essential for coordinating a program of gene expression that regulates the fundamental functional properties of cardiomyocytes.

  19. Supravalvular aortic stenosis with sudden cardiac death

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    Pradeep Vaideeswar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death (SCD most commonly results from previously undiagnosed congenital, acquired, or hereditary cardiac diseases. Congenital aortic valvular, subvalvular, and supravalvular disease with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is an important preventable cause of sudden death. This report documents sudden death presumably due to acute myocardial ischemia in a young male with an undiagnosed supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS due to a rare association of isolation of coronary sinuses of Valsalva. Congenital supravalvular pulmonary stenosis and mitral valvular dysplasia were also present.

  20. Síndrome de deleção 22q11 e cardiopatias congênitas complexas 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and complex congenital heart defects

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    Rafael Fabiano Machado Rosa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a frequência da síndrome de deleção 22q11 (SD22q11 entre pacientes portadores de cardiopatia congênita do tipo complexa. MÉTODOS: A amostra foi constituída por uma coorte prospectiva e consecutiva de pacientes com cardiopatia complexa em sua primeira hospitalização em uma unidade de tratamento intensivo cardiológica de um hospital pediátrico. Para cada paciente foi preenchida uma ficha de avaliação, com coleta de dados clínicos, e realizado o cariótipo de alta resolução e técnica de hibridização in situ fluorescente (FISH com pesquisa de microdeleção 22q11. Os defeitos cardíacos foram classificados por um cardiologista participante do estudo. RESULTADOS: A amostra foi composta de 66 pacientes. Quanto à análise cariotípica, alterações foram observadas em cinco pacientes (7,6%; contudo, nenhum deles apresentava deleção 22q11. A avaliação pela técnica de FISH pôde ser realizada com sucesso em 65 pacientes, sendo que a microdeleção 22q11 foi identificada em dois (3,1%. Dos 66 pacientes com defeitos complexos, 52 eram portadores de malformações do tipo conotruncal, sendo que em 51 a pesquisa para microdeleção 22q11 foi realizada. Os dois pacientes portadores da microdeleção 22q11 fizeram parte deste grupo, representando uma frequência de 3,9%. Eles apresentavam tetralogia de Fallot. CONCLUSÃO: A SD22q11 é uma anormalidade frequente entre pacientes com cardiopatias congênitas complexas e conotruncais. Variações da frequência da SD22q11 entre os estudos parecem estar associadas, principalmente, com a forma adotada para a seleção da amostra e às características da população em análise.OBJECTIVE: Investigate the frequency of 22q11 deletion syndrome among patients with complex congenital heart disease. METHODS: A prospective and consecutive cohort of patients with complex heart defects was evaluated in their first hospitalization at a cardiac intensive care unit of a pediatric

  1. Congenital heart defects in children with oral clefts

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    Nahvi H.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Oral clefts are among the most common congenital anomalies. Infants with oral clefts often have other associated congenital defects, especially congenital heart defects. The reported incidences and the types of associated malformations and congenital heart defects vary between different studies. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of associated congenital heart defects in children with oral clefts. Methods: All infants with cleft lip and palate referred to the Children's Medical Center and Bahramy; the teaching Hospitals of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences from 1991 to 2005 were prospectively enrolled in this study group. All patients were examined and noted by an academic cleft team contain; a pediatrician and a pediatric surgeon, and received cardiac consultation and echocardiography by a pediatric cardiologist. non cardiac associated anomalies, still born and patients without echocardiography were excluded from the study.  Data including age, gender, exposure to contagions and high risk elements ,consanguinity and familial history of oral cleft, type of oral cleft, results of cardiac consultation and echocardiography and associated cardiac anomalies were cumulated and analyzed by SSPS version 13.5Results: Among the 284 infants with oral clefts, 162 were male (57% and 122 were female (43%. Seventy-nine patients (27.8% had cleft lip, 84 (29.5% had cleft palate and 121 (42.6% had both cleft lip and palate. Of all the patients, 21.1% had congenital heart defects. the most common type Of these congenital heart defects(28.3%  was atrial septal defect.Conclusions: For patients with cleft lip and palate, we recommend preoperative cardiac consultation, careful examination and routine echocardiography for associated cardiac anomalies, as well as appropriate management and prophylactic antibiotic therapy for those with associated congenital heart anomaly.

  2. Congenital syphilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Kyung Soo; Hur, Don

    1983-01-01

    In recent years, marked increase in incidence of congenital syphilis has occurred throughout the world due to changes in social norms and development of penicillin-resistant strains. Early diagnosis plays an important role in congenital syphilis as the clinical manifestations may simulate many other conditions in the paediatric age group. The authors analyzed 52 cases of congenital syphilis admitted to the department of paediatrics, Chosun University Hospital, clinically and radiologically. Among them, 18 cases were born in this hospital and 34 cases were admitted from OPD, during the period of 8 years from January, 1975 to December, 1982. The results obtained were as follows; 1. In 28 of 34 cases (82%), the first clinical manifestations were below the age of 3 months. 2. Among the 52 cases, a male predominance was observed with a male to female ratio of 2 : 1. 3. The serologic test (VDRL) of the 52 studied cases showed reactive response in 49 cases (94%), and that of syphilitic mothers except 6 cases, reactive in all studied cases. 4. The major manifestations of the 52 cases were bone tenderness (12%) and swelling of the joints (7%) in skeletal system, hepatosplenomegaly (79%) and skin lesions (73%) in extraskeletal one. 5. The radiological skeletal changes were detected in 45 of 52 cases (87%), and the commonest findings were detected in 45 of 52 cases (87%), and the commonest findings were metaphysitis (83%) and periostitis (81%). The most characteristic type of metaphysitis were transverse trophic line (74%) and zone of rarefaction (65%). 6. The commonest bones to be affected were growing metaphyses of the long bones, particulary about the wrist and the knee. The order of frequency were radius (80%), uina (80%), tibia (77%), femur (69%) and humerus (40%)

  3. Congenital Short QT Syndrome

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    Charles Antzelevitch

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Long QT intervals in the ECG have long been associated with sudden cardiac death. The congenital long QT syndrome was first described in individuals with structurally normal hearts in 1957.1 Little was known about the significance of a short QT interval. In 1993, after analyzing 6693 consecutive Holter recordings Algra et al concluded that an increased risk of sudden death was present not only in patients with long QT interval, but also in patients with short QT interval (<400 ms.2 Because this was a retrospective analysis, further evaluation of the data was not possible. It was not until 2000 that a short-QT syndrome (SQTS was proposed as a new inherited clinical syndrome by Gussak et al.3 The initial report was of two siblings and their mother all of whom displayed persistently short QT interval. The youngest was a 17 year old female presenting with several episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation requiring electrical cardioversion.3 Her QT interval measured 280 msec at a heart rate of 69. Her 21 year old brother displayed a QT interval of 272 msec at a heart rate of 58, whereas the 51 year old mother showed a QT of 260 msec at a heart rate of 74. The authors also noted similar ECG findings in another unrelated 37 year old patient associated with sudden cardiac death.

  4. Sudden Cardiac Death in Children. Part 1

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    Ye.V. Pshenichnaya

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the prevalence, terminology, classification of sudden cardiac death. A description of congenital structural heart diseases associated with a risk of sudden cardiac death is given. The issues of etiology and pathogenesis of life-threatening conditions are described in detail.

  5. Congenital long QT syndrome in children

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    Cerović Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Long QT syndrome (LQTS is a cardiac repolarization disorder characterized by prolonged QT interval on the electrocardiogram (ECG and increased propensity to ventricular tachyarrhythmias and cardiac events. LQTS might be acquired or congenital, which presents a group of channelopathies that occur due to mutation in one of 15 so far identified genes. The most frequent types of congenital LTQS are LQT1, LQT2 and LQT3. Prolonged or delayed repolarization leads to the increase of action potential duration which predisposes early afterdepolarization, as well as the amplification of transmural dispersion of repolarization, both contributing to the development of Torsades de Pointes ventricular tachycardia. Clinical manifestations of LQTS are palpitations, syncope, aborted cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death, but it can also be asymptomatic. Trigger factors for symptoms are specific for certain genotype. LQTS examination includes thorough clinical and family history focused on distinctive data (repeated syncopes, cases of sudden cardiac death in the family, hereditary arrhythmias, resting ECG, exercise stress testing and genetic analysis, with additional methods (serial ECG records, 24h ECG Holter, epinephrine test. Clinical LQTS diagnosis is based on Schwartz's scoring system, while the criteria for final diagnosis of LQTS depend on Schwartz's score, QT interval duration, presence of pathogenic mutation and clinical symptoms. Treatment approach begins with lifestyle modifications and β-blockers therapy, while other options include implantable cardioverter- defibrillator, permanent pacemaker or surgical sympathectomy. Sudden cardiac death is the reason of 90% of sudden deaths in young athletes, while LQTS is one of its causes. Recommendations for physical activities in children with congenital LQTS arise from the ones for adults and they presume very strict limitations. Further researches are expected to advance the understanding of genotype

  6. Adult congenital heart disease imaging with second-generation dual-source computed tomography: initial experiences and findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshhajra, Brian B; Sidhu, Manavjot S; El-Sherief, Ahmed; Rojas, Carlos; Yeh, Doreen Defaria; Engel, Leif-Christopher; Liberthson, Richard; Abbara, Suhny; Bhatt, Ami

    2012-01-01

    Adult congenital heart disease patients present a unique challenge to the cardiac imager. Patients may present with both acute and chronic manifestations of their complex congenital heart disease and also require surveillance for sequelae of their medical and surgical interventions. Multimodality imaging is often required to clarify their anatomy and physiology. Radiation dose is of particular concern in these patients with lifelong imaging needs for their chronic disease. The second-generation dual-source scanner is a recently available advanced clinical cardiac computed tomography (CT) scanner. It offers a combination of the high-spatial resolution of modern CT, the high-temporal resolution of dual-source technology, and the wide z-axis coverage of modern cone-beam geometry CT scanners. These advances in technology allow novel protocols that markedly reduce scan time, significantly reduce radiation exposure, and expand the physiologic imaging capabilities of cardiac CT. We present a case series of complicated adult congenital heart disease patients imaged by the second-generation dual-source CT scanner with extremely low-radiation doses and excellent image quality. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Cardiac MRI in children and adolescents who have undergone surgical repair of right-sided congenital heart disease. Automated left ventricular volumes and function analysis and effects of different manual adjustments

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    Rompel, O.; Janka, R.; May, M.S.; Lell, M.M.; Uder, M.; Hammon, M. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Gloeckler, M.; Dittrich, S. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Pediatric Cardiology; Cesnjevar, R. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate automated segmentation and the effects of different manual adjustments regarding left ventricular parameter quantification in cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) data on children and adolescents who have undergone surgical repair of right-sided congenital heart disease (CHD). Dedicated software (syngo.via, Siemens AG) was used to automatically segment and/or manually adjust the end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), stroke volume (SV), myocardial mass (MM) and ejection fraction (EF) before/after manual apex/base adjustment (ADJ-step 1) and after manual apex/base/myocardial contour adjustment (ADJ-step 2; reference standard). MR data of 40 patients (13.1 ± 3.1y, 4-17y) with repaired CHD with decreased pulmonary blood flow (CHD-DPBF) were evaluated. Intra- and inter-rater reliability was determined for 10 randomly selected patients. The software correctly detected the left ventricle in 38/40 (95 %) patients. EDV after automated segmentation: 119.1 ± 44.0ml; after ADJ-step 1: 115.8 ± 39.5 ml; after ADJ-step 2: 116.2 ± 39.4 ml. The corresponding results for ESV were 52.0 ± 18.5/49.6 ± 16.9/49.7 ± 16.4 ml; for SV 67.1 ± 28.5/66.2 ± 25.4/66.5 ± 25.5 ml; for EF 55.5 ± 7.3/56.7 ± 6.6/56.7 ± 6.3%; for MM 83.7 ± 35.9/76.2 ± 28.3/74.6 ± 27.2 g. Significant differences were found for ESV/MM/EF comparing the automated segmentation results with these after ADJ-step 1 and ADJ-step 2. No significant differences were found when comparing all results of ADJ-step 1 and ADJ-step 2 or when comparing EDV/SV results. Intra- and inter-rater reliability was excellent. The mean time effort was 63.4 ± 6.9 s for the automated segmentation, 74.2 ± 8.9 s for ADJ-step 1 and 269.5 ± 39.4 s for ADJ-step 2. Automated left ventricular volumes and function analysis in children and adolescents with surgically treated CHD proved to be feasible with excellent intra- and inter-rater reliability. Automated segmentation with manual apex/base adjustment provided

  8. Cardiac MRI in children and adolescents who have undergone surgical repair of right-sided congenital heart disease. Automated left ventricular volumes and function analysis and effects of different manual adjustments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rompel, O.; Janka, R.; May, M.S.; Lell, M.M.; Uder, M.; Hammon, M.; Gloeckler, M.; Dittrich, S.; Cesnjevar, R.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate automated segmentation and the effects of different manual adjustments regarding left ventricular parameter quantification in cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) data on children and adolescents who have undergone surgical repair of right-sided congenital heart disease (CHD). Dedicated software (syngo.via, Siemens AG) was used to automatically segment and/or manually adjust the end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), stroke volume (SV), myocardial mass (MM) and ejection fraction (EF) before/after manual apex/base adjustment (ADJ-step 1) and after manual apex/base/myocardial contour adjustment (ADJ-step 2; reference standard). MR data of 40 patients (13.1 ± 3.1y, 4-17y) with repaired CHD with decreased pulmonary blood flow (CHD-DPBF) were evaluated. Intra- and inter-rater reliability was determined for 10 randomly selected patients. The software correctly detected the left ventricle in 38/40 (95 %) patients. EDV after automated segmentation: 119.1 ± 44.0ml; after ADJ-step 1: 115.8 ± 39.5 ml; after ADJ-step 2: 116.2 ± 39.4 ml. The corresponding results for ESV were 52.0 ± 18.5/49.6 ± 16.9/49.7 ± 16.4 ml; for SV 67.1 ± 28.5/66.2 ± 25.4/66.5 ± 25.5 ml; for EF 55.5 ± 7.3/56.7 ± 6.6/56.7 ± 6.3%; for MM 83.7 ± 35.9/76.2 ± 28.3/74.6 ± 27.2 g. Significant differences were found for ESV/MM/EF comparing the automated segmentation results with these after ADJ-step 1 and ADJ-step 2. No significant differences were found when comparing all results of ADJ-step 1 and ADJ-step 2 or when comparing EDV/SV results. Intra- and inter-rater reliability was excellent. The mean time effort was 63.4 ± 6.9 s for the automated segmentation, 74.2 ± 8.9 s for ADJ-step 1 and 269.5 ± 39.4 s for ADJ-step 2. Automated left ventricular volumes and function analysis in children and adolescents with surgically treated CHD proved to be feasible with excellent intra- and inter-rater reliability. Automated segmentation with manual apex/base adjustment provided

  9. Congenital heart defects in newborns with apparently isolated single gastrointestinal malformation: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierz, Ingrid Anne Mandy; Pinello, Giuseppa; Giuffrè, Mario; La Placa, Simona; Piro, Ettore; Corsello, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    Congenital gastrointestinal system malformations/abdominal wall defects (GISM) may appear as isolated defects (single or complex), or in association with multiple malformations. The high incidence of association of GISM and congenital heart defects (CHD) in patients with syndromes and malformative sequences is known, but less expected is the association of apparently isolated single GISM and CHD. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of CHD in newborns with isolated GISM, and the possibility to modify the diagnostic-therapeutic approach just before the onset of cardiac symptoms or complications. Anamnestic, clinical, and imaging data of newborns requiring abdominal surgery for GISM, between 2009 and 2014, were compared with a control group of healthy newborns. Distribution of GISM and cardiovascular abnormalities were analyzed, and risk factors for adverse outcomes were identified. Seventy-one newborns with isolated GISM were included in this study. More frequent GISM were intestinal rotation and fixation disorders. CHD were observed in 15.5% of patients, augmenting their risk for morbidity. Risk factors for morbidity related to sepsis were identified in central venous catheter, intestinal stoma, and H2-inhibitor-drugs. Moreover, 28.2% of newborns presented only functional cardiac disorders but an unexpectedly higher mortality. The high incidence of congenital heart disease in infants with apparently isolated GISM confirms the need to perform an echocardiographic study before surgery to improve perioperative management and prevent complications such as sepsis and endocarditis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute heart failure associated with congenital complete atrioventricular block due to neonatal lupus: case series report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasquez F, Carlos J; Correa, Cindy; Molina, Monica; Fernanda, Luisa; Velasquez, Nataly; Diaz, Luis H

    2010-01-01

    Neonatal lupus (NL) defines a set of clinical syndromes characterized by maternal autoantibodies against the RNA protein complex (Ro/SSA or La/SSB) that cross the placenta and potentially lead to fetal tissue damage. Little is known about other cardiac manifestations of NL different from congenital heart block (CHB), as heart failure (HF). Four cases of LN with BCC and acute HF at the first three days of life on average were reported. No complications or deaths were reported at 4,9 months of follow-up. All infants had anti-Ro high titles at the time of diagnosis.

  11. Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease: Past and Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntean, Iolanda; Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, Theodora

    2017-04-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital anomaly, representing an important cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Congenital heart disease represents a group of heart anomalies that include septal defects, valve defects, and outflow tract anomalies. The exact genetic, epigenetic, or environmental basis of congenital heart disease remains poorly understood, although the exact mechanism is likely multifactorial. However, the development of new technologies including copy number variants, single-nucleotide polymorphism, next-generation sequencing are accelerating the detection of genetic causes of heart anomalies. Recent studies suggest a role of small non-coding RNAs, micro RNA, in congenital heart disease. The recently described epigenetic factors have also been found to contribute to cardiac morphogenesis. In this review, we present past and recent genetic discoveries in congenital heart disease.

  12. Tracheostomy After Operations for Congenital Heart Disease: An Analysis of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropietro, Christopher W; Benneyworth, Brian D; Turrentine, Mark; Wallace, Amelia S; Hornik, Christoph P; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2016-06-01

    Information concerning tracheostomy after operations for congenital heart disease has come primarily from single-center reports. We aimed to describe the epidemiology and outcomes associated with postoperative tracheostomy in a multi-institutional registry. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Database (2000 to 2014) was queried for all index operations with the adverse event "postoperative tracheostomy" or "respiratory failure, requiring tracheostomy." Patients with preoperative tracheostomy or weighing less than 2.5 kg undergoing isolated closure of patent ductus arteriosus were excluded. Trends in tracheostomy incidence over time from January 2000 to June 2014 were analyzed with a Cochran-Armitage test. The patient characteristics associated with operative mortality were analyzed for January 2010 to June 2014, including deaths occurring up to 6 months after transfer of patients to long-term care facilities. From 2000 to 2014, the incidence of tracheostomy after operations for congenital heart disease increased from 0.11% in 2000 to a high of 0.76% in 2012 (p tracheostomy. The median age at operation was 2.5 months (25th, 75th percentile: 0.4, 7). Prematurity (n = 165, 26%), genetic abnormalities (n = 298, 46%), and preoperative mechanical ventilation (n = 275, 43%) were common. Postoperative adverse events were also common, including cardiac arrest (n = 131, 20%), extracorporeal support (n = 87, 13%), phrenic or laryngeal nerve injury (n = 114, 18%), and neurologic deficit (n = 51, 8%). The operative mortality was 25% (n = 153). Tracheostomy as an adverse event of operations for congenital heart disease remains rare but has been increasingly used over the past 15 years. This trend and the considerable mortality risk among patients requiring postoperative tracheostomy support the need for further research in this complex population. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cardiac MRI in patients with complex CHD following primary or secondary implantation of MRI-conditional pacemaker system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wakeel, Nadya; O h-Ici, Darach; Schmitt, Katharina R; Messroghli, Daniel R; Riesenkampff, Eugénie; Berger, Felix; Kuehne, Titus; Peters, Bjoern

    2016-02-01

    In patients with CHD, cardiac MRI is often indicated for functional and anatomical assessment. With the recent introduction of MRI-conditional pacemaker systems, cardiac MRI has become accessible for patients with pacemakers. The present clinical study aims to evaluate safety, susceptibility artefacts, and image reading of cardiac MRI in patients with CHD and MRI-conditional pacemaker systems. Material and methods CHD patients with MRI-conditional pacemaker systems and a clinical need for cardiac MRI were examined with a 1.5-T MRI system. Lead function was tested before and after MRI. Artefacts and image readings were evaluated using a four-point grading scale. A total of nine patients with CHD (mean age 34.0 years, range 19.5-53.6 years) received a total of 11 cardiac MRI examinations. Owing to clinical indications, seven patients had previously been converted from conventional to MRI-conditional pacemaker systems. All MRI examinations were completed without adverse effects. Device testing immediately after MRI and at follow-up showed no alteration of pacemaker device and lead function. Clinical questions could be addressed and answered in all patients. Cardiac MRI can be performed safely with high certainty of diagnosis in CHD patients with MRI-conditional pacemaker systems. In case of clinically indicated lead and box changing, CHD patients with non-MRI-conditional pacemaker systems should be considered for complete conversion to MRI-conditional systems.

  14. Reversible blockade of complex I or inhibition of PKCβ reduces activation and mitochondria translocation of p66Shc to preserve cardiac function after ischemia.

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    Meiying Yang

    Full Text Available Excess mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS play a vital role in cardiac ischemia reperfusion (IR injury. P66Shc, a splice variant of the ShcA adaptor protein family, enhances mROS production by oxidizing reduced cytochrome c to yield H2O2. Ablation of p66Shc protects against IR injury, but it is unknown if and when p66Shc is activated during cardiac ischemia and/or reperfusion and if attenuating complex I electron transfer or deactivating PKCβ alters p66Shc activation during IR is associated with cardioprotection.Isolated guinea pig hearts were perfused and subjected to increasing periods of ischemia and reperfusion with or without amobarbital, a complex I blocker, or hispidin, a PKCβ inhibitor. Phosphorylation of p66Shc at serine 36 and levels of p66Shc in mitochondria and cytosol were measured. Cardiac functional variables and redox states were monitored online before, during and after ischemia. Infarct size was assessed in some hearts after 120 min reperfusion.Phosphorylation of p66Shc and its translocation into mitochondria increased during reperfusion after 20 and 30 min ischemia, but not during ischemia only, or during 5 or 10 min ischemia followed by 20 min reperfusion. Correspondingly, cytosolic p66Shc levels decreased during these ischemia and reperfusion periods. Amobarbital or hispidin reduced phosphorylation of p66Shc and its mitochondrial translocation induced by 30 min ischemia and 20 min reperfusion. Decreased phosphorylation of p66Shc by amobarbital or hispidin led to better functional recovery and less infarction during reperfusion.Our results show that IR activates p66Shc and that reversible blockade of electron transfer from complex I, or inhibition of PKCβ activation, decreases p66Shc activation and translocation and reduces IR damage. These observations support a novel potential therapeutic intervention against cardiac IR injury.

  15. Congenital amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Victoria J; Stewart, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    For most people, music, like language, is acquired effortlessly in early life. But a few percent of the population have lifelong difficulties in the perception and production of music. In this chapter we discuss psycho-acoustic and behavioral studies that have attempted to delineate the nature of the auditory perceptual deficits in this group and consider whether these difficulties extend outside the musical domain. Finally, we review structural imaging studies in this group which point to subtle anomalies in temporal and frontal areas. We suggest that amusia can be considered a disorder of neural development, which has relatively specific consequences at the behavioral level. Studies of congenital amusia provide a unique window on the neurocognitive architecture of music processing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Imaging of congenital heart disease in adults: choice of modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orwat, Stefan; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Baumgartner, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Major advances in noninvasive imaging of adult congenital heart disease have been accomplished. These tools play now a key role in comprehensive diagnostic work-up, decision for intervention, evaluation for the suitability of specific therapeutic options, monitoring of interventions and regular follow-up. Besides echocardiography, magnetic resonance (CMR) and computed tomography (CT) have gained particular importance. The choice of imaging modality has thus become a critical issue. This review summarizes strengths and limitations of the different imaging modalities and how they may be used in a complementary fashion. Echocardiography obviously remains the workhorse of imaging routinely used in all patients. However, in complex disease and after surgery echocardiography alone frequently remains insufficient. CMR is particularly useful in this setting and allows reproducible and accurate quantification of ventricular function and comprehensive assessment of cardiac anatomy, aorta, pulmonary arteries and venous return including complex flow measurements. CT is preferred when CMR is contraindicated, when superior spatial resolution is required or when "metallic" artefacts limit CMR imaging. In conclusion, the use of currently available imaging modalities in adult congenital heart disease needs to be complementary. Echocardiography remains the basis tool, CMR and CT should be added considering specific open questions and the ability to answer them, availability and economic issues.

  17. Effect of exercise training on sports enjoyment and leisure-time spending in adolescents with complex congenital heart disease: the moderating effect of health behavior and disease knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulfer, Karolijn; Duppen, Nienke; Blom, Nico A.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Helbing, Wim A.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a standardized exercise program on sports enjoyment and leisure-time spending in adolescents with congenital heart disease and to know what the moderating impact of their baseline health behavior and disease knowledge is. Included were 93

  18. Genetically engineered excitable cardiac myofibroblasts coupled to cardiomyocytes rescue normal propagation and reduce arrhythmia complexity in heterocellular monolayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luqia Hou

    Full Text Available The use of genetic engineering of unexcitable cells to enable expression of gap junctions and inward rectifier potassium channels has suggested that cell therapies aimed at establishing electrical coupling of unexcitable donor cells to host cardiomyocytes may be arrhythmogenic. Whether similar considerations apply when the donor cells are electrically excitable has not been investigated. Here we tested the hypothesis that adenoviral transfer of genes coding Kir2.1 (I(K1, Na(V1.5 (I(Na and connexin-43 (Cx43 proteins into neonatal rat ventricular myofibroblasts (NRVF will convert them into fully excitable cells, rescue rapid conduction velocity (CV and reduce the incidence of complex reentry arrhythmias in an in vitro model.We used adenoviral (Ad- constructs encoding Kir2.1, Na(V1.5 and Cx43 in NRVF. In single NRVF, Ad-Kir2.1 or Ad-Na(V1.5 infection enabled us to regulate the densities of I(K1 and I(Na, respectively. At varying MOI ratios of 10/10, 5/10 and 5/20, NRVF co-infected with Ad-Kir2.1+ Na(V1.5 were hyperpolarized and generated action potentials (APs with upstroke velocities >100 V/s. However, when forming monolayers only the addition of Ad-Cx43 made the excitable NRVF capable of conducting electrical impulses (CV = 20.71±0.79 cm/s. When genetically engineered excitable NRVF overexpressing Kir2.1, Na(V1.5 and Cx43 were used to replace normal NRVF in heterocellular monolayers that included neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM, CV was significantly increased (27.59±0.76 cm/s vs. 21.18±0.65 cm/s, p<0.05, reaching values similar to those of pure myocytes monolayers (27.27±0.72 cm/s. Moreover, during reentry, propagation was faster and more organized, with a significantly lower number of wavebreaks in heterocellular monolayers formed by excitable compared with unexcitable NRVF.Viral transfer of genes coding Kir2.1, Na(V1.5 and Cx43 to cardiac myofibroblasts endows them with the ability to generate and propagate APs. The results

  19. Familial Atrial Septal Defect and Sudden Cardiac Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellesøe, Sabrina Gade; Johansen, Morten Munk; Bjerre, Jesper Vandborg

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Atrial septal defect (ASD) is the second most common congenital heart defect (CHD) and is observed in families as an autosomal dominant trait as well as in nonfamilial CHD. Mutations in the NKX2-5 gene, located on chromosome 5, are associated with ASD, often combined with conduction...... disturbances, cardiomyopathies, complex CHD, and sudden cardiac death as well. Here, we show that NKX2-5 mutations primarily occur in ASD patients with conduction disturbances and heritable ASD. Furthermore, these families are at increased risk of sudden cardiac death. RESULTS: We screened 39 probands...... with familial CHD for mutations in NKX2-5 and discovered a novel mutation in one family (2.5%) with ASD and atrioventricular block. A review of the literature revealed 59 different NKX2-5 mutations in 202 patients. Mutations were significantly more common in familial cases compared to nonfamilial cases (P = 7...

  20. Neonatal outcomes in fetuses with cardiac anomalies and the impact of delivery route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Laura I; Grantz, Katherine L; Iqbal, Sara N; Huang, Chun-Chih; Landy, Helain J; Fries, Melissa H; Reddy, Uma M

    2017-10-01

    Congenital fetal cardiac anomalies compromise the most common group of fetal structural anomalies. Several previous reports analyzed all types of fetal cardiac anomalies together without individualized neonatal morbidity outcomes based on cardiac defect. Mode of delivery in cases of fetal cardiac anomalies varies greatly as optimal mode of delivery in these complex cases is unknown. We sought to determine rates of neonatal outcomes for fetal cardiac anomalies and examine the role of attempted route of delivery on neonatal morbidity. Gravidas with fetal cardiac anomalies and delivery >34 weeks, excluding stillbirths and aneuploidies (n = 2166 neonates, n = 2701 cardiac anomalies), were analyzed from the Consortium on Safe Labor, a retrospective cohort study of electronic medical records. Cardiac anomalies were determined using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes and organized based on morphology. Neonates were assigned to each cardiac anomaly classification based on the most severe cardiac defect present. Neonatal outcomes were determined for each fetal cardiac anomaly. Composite neonatal morbidity (serious respiratory morbidity, sepsis, birth trauma, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, and neonatal death) was compared between attempted vaginal delivery and planned cesarean delivery for prenatal and postnatal diagnosis. We used multivariate logistic regression to calculate adjusted odds ratio for composite neonatal morbidity controlling for race, parity, body mass index, insurance, gestational age, maternal disease, single or multiple anomalies, and maternal drug use. Most cardiac anomalies were diagnosed postnatally except hypoplastic left heart syndrome, which had a higher prenatal than postnatal detection rate. Neonatal death occurred in 8.4% of 107 neonates with conotruncal defects. Serious respiratory morbidity occurred in 54.2% of 83 neonates with left ventricular outflow tract defects. Overall, 76.3% of pregnancies with fetal

  1. Ca2+-induced PRE-NMR changes in the troponin complex reveal the possessive nature of the cardiac isoform for its regulatory switch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Cordina

    Full Text Available The interaction between myosin and actin in cardiac muscle, modulated by the calcium (Ca2+ sensor Troponin complex (Tn, is a complex process which is yet to be fully resolved at the molecular level. Our understanding of how the binding of Ca2+ triggers conformational changes within Tn that are subsequently propagated through the contractile apparatus to initiate muscle activation is hampered by a lack of an atomic structure for the Ca2+-free state of the cardiac isoform. We have used paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE-NMR to obtain a description of the Ca2+-free state of cardiac Tn by describing the movement of key regions of the troponin I (cTnI subunit upon the release of Ca2+ from Troponin C (cTnC. Site-directed spin-labeling was used to position paramagnetic spin labels in cTnI and the changes in the interaction between cTnI and cTnC subunits were then mapped by PRE-NMR. The functionally important regions of cTnI targeted in this study included the cTnC-binding N-region (cTnI57, the inhibitory region (cTnI143, and two sites on the regulatory switch region (cTnI151 and cTnI159. Comparison of 1H-15N-TROSY spectra of Ca2+-bound and free states for the spin labeled cTnC-cTnI binary constructs demonstrated the release and modest movement of the cTnI switch region (∼10 Å away from the hydrophobic N-lobe of troponin C (cTnC upon the removal of Ca2+. Our data supports a model where the non-bound regulatory switch region of cTnI is highly flexible in the absence of Ca2+ but remains in close vicinity to cTnC. We speculate that the close proximity of TnI to TnC in the cardiac complex is favourable for increasing the frequency of collisions between the N-lobe of cTnC and the regulatory switch region, counterbalancing the reduction in collision probability that results from the incomplete opening of the N-lobe of TnC that is unique to the cardiac isoform.

  2. [Congenital hypothyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla Peón, María Fernanda

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is a cause of preventable mental retardation; therefore, timely diagnosis and treatment by the primary care physician is very important. CH screening must be performed between the second and fifth days of life with capillary blood done with a heel prick and must be confirmed by measurement of thyroid hormones in venous blood. The most common cause of CH is thyroid dysgenesis, which may be identified by a thyroid scan carried out before initiating treatment. Treatment should be with levothyroxine (10-15μg/kg/day) and should not be delayed or suspended during the first 3 years of life due to the deleterious effect on neurodevelopment in case of low thyroid hormones during this time. Preterm or sick infants or those with Down syndrome require special consideration. This article provides diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms for CH. Copyright © 2015 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Safety in cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siregar, S.

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of safety in cardiac surgery is a complex process, which involves many clinical, practical, methodological and statistical issues. The objective of this thesis was to measure and to compare safety in cardiac surgery in The Netherlands using the Netherlands Association for

  4. Congenital obstructive posterior urethral membranes and recurrent urinary tract infection: a rare case of congenital hypertrophy of the verumontanum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Bancin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital obstructive posterior urethral membranes (COPUM is a complex disease closely related to several pathological changes in kidney development and function, as a result of urinary reflux since in utero. This congenital anomaly of urinary tract potentially causes hydroureteronephrosis that is often associated with recurrent urinary tract infections and, ultimately, one of the most common causes of end-stage renal disease in children.1,2 Congenital hypertrophy of the verumontanum as part of COPUM is very rare. Only a few reports have been written on congenital hypertrophy of the vermontanum causing congenital obstructive uropathy.3-6

  5. Renal anomalies in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Hee; Kim, In One; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Yoon, Yong Soo

    1987-01-01

    In general, the incidence of urinary tract anomalies in congenital heart disease is higher than that in general population. So authors performed abdominal cineradiography in 1045 infants and children undergoing cineangiographic examinations for congenital heart disease, as a screening method for the detection, the incidence, and the nature of associated urinary tract anomalies. The results were as follows: 1. The incidence of urinary tract anomaly associated with congenital heart disease was 4.1% (<2% in general population). 2. Incidence of urinary tract anomalies was 4.62% in 671 acyanotic heart diseases, 3.20% in 374 cyanotic heart diseases. 3. There was no constant relationship between the type of cardiac anomaly and the type of urinary tract anomaly

  6. Congenital platelet function defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... Congenital platelet function defects are bleeding disorders that cause reduced platelet function. Most of the time, people with these disorders have ...

  7. Congenital Heart Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart defects. Important Notice The Congenital Heart Information Network website is temporarily out of service. Please join ... and Uwe Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright © ...

  8. Congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a problem with the heart's structure and function that is present at birth. ... Fraser CD, Kane LC. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM Jr, ... Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: The Biological Basis of Modern ...

  9. Congenital coronary artery fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Yeon Hee; Kim, Hong; Zeon, Seoc Kil; Suh, Soo Jhi

    1986-01-01

    Congenital coronary artery fistula (CCAF) is communication of a coronary artery or its main branch with one of the atria or ventricles, the coronary sinus, the superior vena cava, or the pulmonary artery. In Korean peoples, only 4 cases of the CCAF were reported as rare as worldwide and authors want to report another case of CCAF, confirmed by operation. 10-year-old girl shows a fistula between sinus node artery of the right coronary artery and right atrium on root aortogram with left-to-right shunt and Qp/Qs=1.58, in which simple ligation of the sinus node artery from right coronary artery was performed. All of the 5 Korean CCAF (4 were previously reported and 1 of authors) were originated from right coronary artery, and of which 4 were opening into right ventricle and 1 of authors were into right atrium. Associated cardiac anomaly was noted in only 1 case as single coronary artery. Ages were from 9 months of age to 10 years old and no adult left case were found. 3 were female and 2 were male patients.

  10. Congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campisi Corradino

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia (PL is a rare developmental disorder involving the lung, and characterized by pulmonary subpleural, interlobar, perivascular and peribronchial lymphatic dilatation. The prevalence is unknown. PL presents at birth with severe respiratory distress, tachypnea and cyanosis, with a very high mortality rate at or within a few hours of birth. Most reported cases are sporadic and the etiology is not completely understood. It has been suggested that PL lymphatic channels of the fetal lung do not undergo the normal regression process at 20 weeks of gestation. Secondary PL may be caused by a cardiac lesion. The diagnostic approach includes complete family and obstetric history, conventional radiologic studies, ultrasound and magnetic resonance studies, lymphoscintigraphy, lung functionality tests, lung biopsy, bronchoscopy, and pleural effusion examination. During the prenatal period, all causes leading to hydrops fetalis should be considered in the diagnosis of PL. Fetal ultrasound evaluation plays a key role in the antenatal diagnosis of PL. At birth, mechanical ventilation and pleural drainage are nearly always necessary to obtain a favorable outcome of respiratory distress. Home supplemental oxygen therapy and symptomatic treatment of recurrent cough and wheeze are often necessary during childhood, sometimes associated with prolonged pleural drainage. Recent advances in intensive neonatal care have changed the previously nearly fatal outcome of PL at birth. Patients affected by PL who survive infancy, present medical problems which are characteristic of chronic lung disease.

  11. Congenital heart disease screening: which referral factors are most important

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayyaz, A.; Ahmed, W.

    2013-01-01

    To identify the referral factors for fetal echocardiography which are associated with congenital cardiac defects in the fetus. Study Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Radiology Department, CMH, Rawalpindi, from January 2007 to November 2010. Methodology: All patients referred for fetal echocardiography with one or more risk factors for the development of congenital heart disease, and those patients with incidental discovery of congenital heart disease on antenatal ultrasound were evaluated. Patients with no risk factors who were found to have normal fetal echocardiography were excluded from the study. Univariate logistic regression analysis was carried out for each variable. The variables with statistical significance of less than 0.05 were subjected to multivariate logistic regression. Fetal echocardiographic diagnosis was taken as the dependent variable and all other variables were the independent variables. Results: Two hundred and sixty four patients were evaluated by fetal echocardiography for congenital heart disease. The statistically significant factor was detection of congenital heart disease on routine ultrasound examination. Conclusion: A routine obstetric scan should include evaluation of the heart with four-chamber and base-of-heart views to exclude cardiac anomalies. A cardiac anomaly picked up on routine ultrasound scan is the most important indication for referral for fetal echocardiography. Fetal arrhythmias and echogenic focus in the left ventricle do not have a significant association with structural cardiac malformation. (author)

  12. Prevalence and Correlates of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lisa X; Khan, Abigail May; Drajpuch, David; Fuller, Stephanie; Ludmir, Jonathan; Mascio, Christopher E; Partington, Sara L; Qadeer, Ayesha; Tobin, Lynda; Kovacs, Adrienne H; Kim, Yuli Y

    2016-03-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with adverse outcomes and increased mortality in cardiac patients. No studies have examined PTSD in the adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) population. The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of self-reported symptoms of PTSD in patients with ACHD and explore potential associated factors. Patients were enrolled from an outpatient ACHD clinic and completed several validated measures including the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Clinical data were abstracted through medical data review. A total of 134 participants (mean age 34.6 ± 10.6; 46% men) were enrolled. Of the 127 participants who completed the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, 14 (11%) met criteria for elevated PTSD symptoms specifically related to their congenital heart disease or treatment. Of the 134 patients who completed PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version, 27 (21%) met criteria for global PTSD symptoms. In univariate analyses, patients with congenital heart disease-specific PTSD had their most recent cardiac surgery at an earlier year (p = 0.008), were less likely to have attended college (p = 0.04), had higher rates of stroke or transient ischemic attack (p = 0.03), and reported greater depressive symptoms on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (7 vs 2, p <0.001). In multivariable analysis, the 2 factors most strongly associated with PTSD were depressive symptoms (p <0.001) and year of most recent cardiac surgery (p <0.03). In conclusion, PTSD is present in 11% to 21% of subjects seen at a tertiary referral center for ACHD. The high prevalence of PTSD in this complex group of patients has important implications for the medical and psychosocial management of this growing population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Congenital Heart Defects and Coronary Anatomy

    OpenAIRE

    Mawson, John B.

    2002-01-01

    Coronary artery anomalies are a well recognized feature of many cardiac malformations and have been catalogued in a number of reviews. This overview concentrates on 1) the interplay between congenital heart defects and coronary morphogenesis, examining how some of the embryology fits with the experiments of nature encountered in clinical practice; and 2) the influence of coronary anatomy on patient management. This overview uses, as examples, pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum, ...

  14. Virtual cardiotomy based on 3-D MRI for preoperative planning in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, Thomas Sangild; Beerbaum, Philipp; Razavi, Reza; Greil, Gerald Franz; Mosegaard, Jesper; Rasmusson, Allan; Schaeffter, Tobias; Austin, Conal

    2008-01-01

    Patient-specific preoperative planning in complex congenital heart disease may be greatly facilitated by virtual cardiotomy. Surgeons can perform an unlimited number of surgical incisions on a virtual 3-D reconstruction to evaluate the feasibility of different surgical strategies. To quantitatively evaluate the quality of the underlying imaging data and the accuracy of the corresponding segmentation, and to qualitatively evaluate the feasibility of virtual cardiotomy. A whole-heart MRI sequence was applied in 42 children with congenital heart disease (age 3±3 years, weight 13±9 kg, heart rate 96± 21 bpm). Image quality was graded 1-4 (diagnostic image quality ≥2) by two independent blinded observers. In patients with diagnostic image quality the segmentation quality was also graded 1-4 (4 no discrepancies, 1 misleading error). The average image quality score was 2.7 - sufficient for virtual reconstruction in 35 of 38 patients (92%) older than 1 month. Segmentation time was 59±10 min (average quality score 3.5). Virtual cardiotomy was performed in 19 patients. Accurate virtual reconstructions of patient-specific cardiac anatomy can be produced in less than 1 h from 3-D MRI. The presented work thus introduces a new, clinically feasible noninvasive technique for improved preoperative planning in complex cases of congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  15. Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele D'Alto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD, with most cases occurring in patients with congenital cardiac shunts. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodelling and dysfunction, resulting in a progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart. Eventually, reversal of the shunt may arise, with the development of Eisenmenger's syndrome, the most advanced form of PAH-CHD. The prevalence of PAH-CHD has fallen in developed countries over recent years and the number of patients surviving into adulthood has increased markedly. Today, the majority of PAH-CHD patients seen in clinical practice are adults, and many of these individuals have complex disease or received a late diagnosis of their defect. While there have been advances in the management and therapy in recent years, PAH-CHD is a heterogeneous condition and some subgroups, such as those with Down's syndrome, present particular challenges. This article gives an overview of the demographics, pathophysiology and treatment of PAH-CHD and focuses on individuals with Down's syndrome as an important and challenging patient group.

  16. MR imaging of congenital heart diseases in adolescents and adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Kang, I Seok; Park, Seung Woo; Lee, Heung Jae [Sungkwunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-09-01

    Echocardiography and catheterization angiography suffer certain limitations in the evaluation of congenital heart diseases in adults, though these are overcome by MRI, in which a wide field-of view, unlimited multiplanar imaging capability and three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography techniques are used. In adults, recently introduced fast imaging techniques provide cardiac MR images of sufficient quality and with less artifacts. Ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and vascular flow measurements, including pressure gradients and pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio, can be calculated or obtained using fast cine MRI, phase-contrast MR flow-velocity mapping, and semiautomatic analysis software. MRI is superior to echocardiography in diagnosing partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection, unroofed coronary sinus, anomalies of the pulmonary arteries, aorta and systemic veins, complex heart diseases, and postsurgical sequelae. Biventricular function is reliably evaluated with cine MRI after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, and Senning's and Mustard's operations. MRI has an important and growing role in the morphologic and functional assessment of congenital heart diseases in adolescents and adults.

  17. MR imaging of congenital heart diseases in adolescents and adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Kang, I Seok; Park, Seung Woo; Lee, Heung Jae

    2001-01-01

    Echocardiography and catheterization angiography suffer certain limitations in the evaluation of congenital heart diseases in adults, though these are overcome by MRI, in which a wide field-of view, unlimited multiplanar imaging capability and three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography techniques are used. In adults, recently introduced fast imaging techniques provide cardiac MR images of sufficient quality and with less artifacts. Ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and vascular flow measurements, including pressure gradients and pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio, can be calculated or obtained using fast cine MRI, phase-contrast MR flow-velocity mapping, and semiautomatic analysis software. MRI is superior to echocardiography in diagnosing partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection, unroofed coronary sinus, anomalies of the pulmonary arteries, aorta and systemic veins, complex heart diseases, and postsurgical sequelae. Biventricular function is reliably evaluated with cine MRI after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, and Senning's and Mustard's operations. MRI has an important and growing role in the morphologic and functional assessment of congenital heart diseases in adolescents and adults

  18. Congenital Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woong Hee; Kim, Young Tong; Jou, Sung Shick; Shin, Hyeong Cheol [Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Intrahepatic portosystemic shunts are an anomalous connection between the portal vein and hepatic vein/IVC, which may be either congenital or acquired secondary to liver cirrhosis or portal hypertension. Cases of congenital intrahepatic shunts are usually encountered in children and may spontaneously resolve. We report 5 cases of congenital intrahepatic portosystemic shunts in neonates and an adult

  19. Cardiac radiology: centenary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roos, Albert; Higgins, Charles B

    2014-11-01

    During the past century, cardiac imaging technologies have revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of acquired and congenital heart disease. Many important contributions to the field of cardiac imaging were initially reported in Radiology. The field developed from the early stages of cardiac imaging, including the use of coronary x-ray angiography and roentgen kymography, to nowadays the widely used echocardiographic, nuclear medicine, cardiac computed tomographic (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) applications. It is surprising how many of these techniques were not recognized for their potential during their early inception. Some techniques were described in the literature but required many years to enter the clinical arena and presently continue to expand in terms of clinical application. The application of various CT and MR contrast agents for the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia is a case in point, as the utility of contrast agents continues to expand the noninvasive characterization of myocardium. The history of cardiac imaging has included a continuous process of advances in our understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, along with advances in imaging technology that continue to the present day.

  20. Digital subtraction angiography in cardiac diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Deuk Lin; Kim, Ki Jeong

    1986-01-01

    DSA was done in 133 examinations of 128 patients during 2 years consist of 9 examination of IV DSA and 124 examination of selective cardiac DSA after cardiac catheterization. Open heart surgery was performed in 90 patients and 12 patients showed discrepancy between pre-and post operative diagnosis, showing a total 86.7% of diagnostic accuracy with DSA. We experienced the significant reduction in dose of contrast media, 30-40% of dose of conventional cardiac angiography. It is concluded that DSA is useful in the evaluation of septal defects, valvular disease and other congenital heart disease. DSA is an accurate simple and safe method in evaluating of cardiac diseases.

  1. The Complex Role of Store Operated Calcium Entry Pathways and Related Proteins in the Function of Cardiac, Skeletal and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Avila-Medina

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle cells shared the common feature of contraction in response to different stimuli. Agonist-induced muscle's contraction is triggered by a cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration increase due to a rapid Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and a transmembrane Ca2+ influx, mainly through L-type Ca2+ channels. Compelling evidences have demonstrated that Ca2+ might also enter through other cationic channels such as Store-Operated Ca2+ Channels (SOCCs, involved in several physiological functions and pathological conditions. The opening of SOCCs is regulated by the filling state of the intracellular Ca2+ store, the sarcoplasmic reticulum, which communicates to the plasma membrane channels through the Stromal Interaction Molecule 1/2 (STIM1/2 protein. In muscle cells, SOCCs can be mainly non-selective cation channels formed by Orai1 and other members of the Transient Receptor Potential-Canonical (TRPC channels family, as well as highly selective Ca2+ Release-Activated Ca2+ (CRAC channels, formed exclusively by subunits of Orai proteins likely organized in macromolecular complexes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the complex role of Store Operated Calcium Entry (SOCE pathways and related proteins in the function of cardiac, skeletal, and vascular smooth muscle cells.

  2. Pediatric cardiac emergencies: Children are not small adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frazier Aisha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared with adults, cardiac emergencies are infrequent in children and clinical presentation is often quite variable. In adults, cardiac emergencies are most commonly related to complications of coronary artery disease; however, in pediatric cases, the coronaries are only rarely the underlying problem. Pediatric cardiac emergencies comprise a range of pathology including but not limited to undiagnosed congenital heart disease in the infant; complications of palliated congenital heart disease in children; arrhythmias related to underlying cardiac pathology in the teenager and acquired heart disease. The emergency room physician and pediatric intensivist will usually be the first and second lines of care for pediatric cardiac emergencies and thus it is imperative that they have knowledge of the diverse presentations of cardiac disease in order to increase the likelihood of delivering early appropriate therapy and referral. The objective of this review is to outline cardiac emergencies in the pediatric population and contrast the presentation with adults.

  3. Congenital sensorineural hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mafee, M.F.; Selis, J.E.; Yannias, D.A.; Valvassori, G.E.; Pruzansky, S.; Applebaum, E.L.; Capek, V.

    1984-01-01

    The ears of 47 selected patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined with complex-motion tomography. The patients were divided into 3 general categories: those with a recognized syndrome, those with sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to any known syndrome, and those with microtia. A great variety of inner ear anomalies was detected, but rarely were these characteristic of a particular clinical entity. The most common finding was the Mondini malformation or one of its variants. Isolated dysplasia of the internal auditory canal or the vestibular aqueduct may be responsible for sensorineural hearing loss in some patients. Patients with microtia may also have severe inner ear abnormalities despite the fact that the outer and inner ears develop embryologically from completely separate systems

  4. Congenital sensorineural hearing loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mafee, M.F.; Selis, J.E.; Yannias, D.A.; Valvassori, G.E.; Pruzansky, S.; Applebaum, E.L.; Capek, V.

    1984-02-01

    The ears of 47 selected patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined with complex-motion tomography. The patients were divided into 3 general categories: those with a recognized syndrome, those with sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to any known syndrome, and those with microtia. A great variety of inner ear anomalies was detected, but rarely were these characteristic of a particular clinical entity. The most common finding was the Mondini malformation or one of its variants. Isolated dysplasia of the internal auditory canal or the vestibular aqueduct may be responsible for sensorineural hearing loss in some patients. Patients with microtia may also have severe inner ear abnormalities despite the fact that the outer and inner ears develop embryologically from completely separate systems.

  5. Two-year survival and neurodevelopmental outcomes after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in neonatal patients after complex cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Gregory; Joffe, Ari R; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Robertson, Charlene M T; Biggs, Wayne S G; Ross, David B; Rebeyka, Ivan M

    2011-03-01

    To examine survival and neurodevelopmental outcomes in neonates having post-operative cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This inception cohort study included all neonates (6 weeks old or less) who received postoperative CPR (Group 1) after cardiac surgery from 1996 to 2005, matched for heart defect, year of surgery, chromosomal abnormality, and socioeconomic status to two neonates who did not receive postoperative CPR (Group 2). Two-year neurodevelopment was prospectively assessed with Bayley Scales of Infant Development II and Adaptive Behavior Assessment System II. Pre-, intra-, and post-operative variables were collected prospectively. Cardiac arrest variables were collected retrospectively. Predictors of mortality were analyzed by univariate analysis and conditional multiple logistic regression. There were 29 patients in Group 1, and 58 patients in Group 2. In survivors, there were no significant differences between Groups 1 and 2 in outcomes [mean (SD)] of mental developmental index [84.5 (12.2) vs. 81.0 (18.9)], psychomotor developmental index [82.8 (13.8) vs. 80.1 (21.9)], General Adaptive Composite [84.6 (15.3) vs. 84.3 (19.2)], Motor scale [8.4 (3.2) vs. 8.0 (3.8)], or delay on any of these scales. Two-year mortality [58.6% Group 1; 8.6% Group 2], was associated on conditional multiple logistic regression with CPR (OR 26.6; 95% CI, 5.4, 129.5). In Group 1, on multiple logistic regression, 2-year mortality was associated with minutes of chest compressions (OR 1.04, 95% CI, 1.01, 1.08). Among neonates having cardiac surgery, CPR is associated with greater mortality. There is no evidence that CPR survivors have different 2-year neurodevelopmental outcomes than those neonates not having CPR. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pacing in congenital heart disease - A four-decade experience in a single tertiary centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midha, Disha; Chen, Zhong; Jones, David G; Williams, Howell J; Lascelles, Karen; Jarman, Julian; Clague, Jonathan; Till, Janice; Dimopoulos, Konstatinos; Babu-Narayan, Sonya V; Markides, Vias; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Wong, Tom

    2017-08-15

    The increased risk of brady- and tachy-arrhythmias in the congenital heart disease (CHD) population means that cardiac rhythm management devices are often required at an early age and expose patients to device-related complications. The present study drew upon four decades of experience at a tertiary adult congenital heart disease ACHD center and aimed to investigate the indication for cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) and predictors of late device-related complication requiring re-intervention. A retrospective review of pacing records of ACHD patients over forty years was carried out. The primary outcome measure was device related complication requiring re-intervention. Between 1970 and 2009, 238 structural CHD patients who received CIEDs with follow-up data were identified (structural group). As a comparator group, 98 patients with congenital conduction disease or long QT syndrome with a structurally normal heart (electrical group) were included in the study. During a mean follow-up of 9.6±8.5years, 72 (21%) patients (44 structural group, 28 electrical group) required ≥1 re-intervention due to device related complications. Multivariate analysis showed that age at the time of device implant was an independent predictor of late device-related complications (HR 0.77, 95% CI 0.60-0.98, p=0.04). Sub-analysis of the structural group showed that ACHD complexity (Bethesda guideline) was the only predictor late device-related complication in the structural group (HR 2.96, 95% CI: 1.67-5.26, p<0.01). Increasing age at device implant was inversely associated with late device-related complications. ACHD patients with complex anatomy are at increased risk of device-related complications at mid and long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Apparent change in cardiac geometry during single-photon emission tomography thallium-201 acquisition: a complex phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisner, R.L.; Aaron, A.M.; Worthy, M.R.; Boyers, A.S.; Leon, A.R.; Fajman, W.A.; Patterson, R.E.; Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA

    1993-01-01

    We investigated the frequency and extent of changes in heart positon and geometry independent of body motion during stress single-photon emission tomography (SPET) thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging. Following an exercise treadmill test, patients had a 22.1-min SPET acquisition which was followed immediately by a static image acquisition for 1 min with the camera position identical to the first fiew of the SPET study. Point sources were placed on the body to monitor patient motion. Cardiac motion was assessed by an approach which mimicked a cross-correlation technique applied to cardia count profiles along the horizontal and vertical directions from the first view of the SPET study and the static image. A large percentage (87.5%) of cases had some degree of horizontal or vertical motion. Pixel shifts in caridac position of ≥2 pixels (12 mm) occurred in 60% of patients. In 37% of patients who moved the caridac motion was consistent with simple translation of the heart and thus amenable to correction using proposed SPET motion-correction programs. The peak heart rate achieved during stress and the ratio of the heart rate immediately before SPET acquisition to the resting heart rate were determined to be independent predictors of patient motion during SPET acquisition. Cardiac motion changes were minimal at (13.3±2.2) min after cessation of exercise. The implications of these findings for the accuracy of SPET 201 TI require further investigation. (orig.)

  8. Multidetector CT for congenital heart patients: what a paediatric radiologist should know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Jean-Francois; Rohnean, Adela; Sigal-Cinqualbre, Anne [Radiology Unit, Marie Lannelongue Hospital, Plessis-Robinson (France)

    2010-06-15

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) is increasingly used for imaging congenital heart disease (CHD) patients in addition to echocardiography, due to its ability to provide high quality three-dimensional images, giving a comprehensive evaluation of complex heart malformations. Using 4-slice or 16-slice CT, diagnostic information in CHD patients is limited to extra-cardiac anatomy, mainly the pulmonary arteries, aorta and venous connections. Due to high heart rates in babies however, coronary evaluation and intra-cardiac analysis were not reliable with the first generations of MDCT. Larger detector size with 64-slice CT and faster acquisition time, up to 75 ms for one slice, has progressively improved coronary and intra-cardiac visualization. Because radiation dose is the main concern, especially in children, every attempt to minimize dose whilst preserving image quality is important: the ALARA concept should always be applied in this population. The 80 kVp setting is now well accepted as a standard for more and more radiological teams involved in CT of children. Different acquisition strategies are now possible for childhood coronary imaging, using retrospective or even prospective gating. Using the latest technology, sub-mSv acquisitions are now attainable for scanning a whole thorax, providing a complete analysis of any 3-D cardiac malformation, including coronary artery course visualisation. This review will describe how technological developments have improved image quality with continuous reduction of radiation dose. (orig.)

  9. Preschool Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Children with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosig, Cheryl L; Bear, Laurel; Allen, Sydney; Hoffmann, Raymond G; Pan, Amy; Frommelt, Michele; Mussatto, Kathleen A

    2017-04-01

    To describe preschool neurodevelopmental outcomes of children with complex congenital heart disease (CHD), who were evaluated as part of a longitudinal cardiac neurodevelopmental follow-up program, as recommended by the American Heart Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics, and identify predictors of neurodevelopmental outcomes in these children. Children with CHD meeting the American Heart Association/American Academy of Pediatrics high-risk criteria for neurodevelopmental delay were evaluated at 4-5 years of age. Testing included standardized neuropsychological measures. Parents completed measures of child functioning. Scores were compared by group (single ventricle [1V]; 2 ventricles [2V]; CHD plus known genetic condition) to test norms and classified as: normal (within 1 SD of mean); at risk (1-2 SD from mean); and impaired (>2 SD from mean). Data on 102 patients were analyzed. Neurodevelopmental scores did not differ based on cardiac anatomy (1V vs 2V); both groups scored lower than norms on fine motor and adaptive behavior skills, but were within 1 SD of norms. Patients with genetic conditions scored significantly worse than 1V and 2V groups and test norms on most measures. Children with CHD and genetic conditions are at greatest neurodevelopmental risk. Deficits in children with CHD without genetic conditions were mild and may not be detected without formal longitudinal testing. Parents and providers need additional education regarding the importance of developmental follow-up for children with CHD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Disruption of dopamine D1/D2 receptor complex is involved in the function of haloperidol in cardiac H9c2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lencesova, L; Szadvari, I; Babula, P; Kubickova, J; Chovancova, B; Lopusna, K; Rezuchova, I; Novakova, Z; Krizanova, O; Novakova, M

    2017-12-15

    Haloperidol is an antipsychotic agent and acts as dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) antagonist, as a prototypical ligand of sigma1 receptors (Sig1R) and it increases expression of type 1 IP 3 receptors (IP 3 R1). However, precise mechanism of haloperidol action on cardiomyocytes through dopaminergic signaling was not described yet. This study investigated a role of dopamine receptors in haloperidol-induced increase in IP 3 R1 and Sig1R, and compared physiological effect of melperone and haloperidol on basic heart parameters in rats. We used differentiated NG-108 cells and H9c2 cells. Gene expression, Western blot and immunofluorescence were used to evaluate haloperidol-induced differences; proximity ligation assay (PLA) and immunoprecipitation to determine interactions of D1/D2 receptors. To evaluate cardiac parameters, Wistar albino male rats were used. We have shown that antagonism of D2R with either haloperidol or melperone results in upregulation of both, IP 3 R1 and Sig1R, which is associated with increased D2R, but reduced D1R expression. Immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation and PLA support formation of heteromeric D1/D2 complexes in H9c2 cells. Treatment with haloperidol (but not melperone) caused decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure and significant increase in heart rate. Because D1R/D2R complexes can engage Gq-like signaling in other experimental systems, these results are consistent with the possibility that disruption of D1R/D2R complex in H9c2 cells might cause a decrease in IP 3 R1 activity, which in turn may account for the increase expression of IP 3 R and Sig1R. D2R is probably not responsible for changes in cardiac parameters, since melperone did not have any effect. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cyanotic congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Yoo, Shi Joon; Han, Man Chung; Hong, Chang Yee; Lee, Yung Kyoon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-12-15

    Authors analyzed 265 cases of cyanotic congenital heart disease in which cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were done at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital between April 1973 and August 1979. The results are as follows; 1. Among 265 cases, 178 patients were male and 87 patients were female. 240 patients were below the age of 20 and none was over 35 year. 2. The incidence of individual lesions are as follows: tetralogy of Fallot-176; double outlet right ventricle-20; pentalogy-12; trilogy-11; corrected transposition of great arteries-10; complete transposition of great arteries-8; pulmonary atresia-7; single ventricle-6; Ebstein's anomaly-5; total anomalous pulmonary venous return-4; tricuspid atresia-3; double outlet left ventricle-1; truncus arteriosus-1; hypoplastic left ventricle-1. 3. Fallot's teralogy, pentalogy and trilogy were characteristic in their simple chest and angiocardiographic manifestations, but in a few cases of tetralogy and pentalogy it was difficult to differentiate them from double outlet right ventricle or pulmonary atresia. 4. In double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries which are the pathologic spectrum resulting from abnormal conal growth, differential points were ventricular and great arterial loop patterns and their connections but it was very difficult to differentiate them from each other by single injection into one ventricle alone. 5. Ebstein's anomaly and total anomalous pulmonary venous return were so characteristic in angiocardiography was done ventriculography alone. 6. In 7 cases with double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries, selective biventriculography was done and more accurate diagnosis could be made, which was quite difficult with one ventriculography alone. In 31 cases, cineangiocardiography was done and it gave more accurate information about the type and degree of pulmonary stenosis and overriding of aorta, the origin

  12. Cyanotic congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Yoo, Shi Joon; Han, Man Chung; Hong, Chang Yee; Lee, Yung Kyoon

    1979-01-01

    Authors analyzed 265 cases of cyanotic congenital heart disease in which cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were done at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital between April 1973 and August 1979. The results are as follows; 1. Among 265 cases, 178 patients were male and 87 patients were female. 240 patients were below the age of 20 and none was over 35 year. 2. The incidence of individual lesions are as follows: tetralogy of Fallot-176; double outlet right ventricle-20; pentalogy-12; trilogy-11; corrected transposition of great arteries-10; complete transposition of great arteries-8; pulmonary atresia-7; single ventricle-6; Ebstein's anomaly-5; total anomalous pulmonary venous return-4; tricuspid atresia-3; double outlet left ventricle-1; truncus arteriosus-1; hypoplastic left ventricle-1. 3. Fallot's teralogy, pentalogy and trilogy were characteristic in their simple chest and angiocardiographic manifestations, but in a few cases of tetralogy and pentalogy it was difficult to differentiate them from double outlet right ventricle or pulmonary atresia. 4. In double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries which are the pathologic spectrum resulting from abnormal conal growth, differential points were ventricular and great arterial loop patterns and their connections but it was very difficult to differentiate them from each other by single injection into one ventricle alone. 5. Ebstein's anomaly and total anomalous pulmonary venous return were so characteristic in angiocardiography was done ventriculography alone. 6. In 7 cases with double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries, selective biventriculography was done and more accurate diagnosis could be made, which was quite difficult with one ventriculography alone. In 31 cases, cineangiocardiography was done and it gave more accurate information about the type and degree of pulmonary stenosis and overriding of aorta, the origin of great

  13. Congenital anomalies in Primorsky region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiku, P; Voronin, S; Golokhvast, K

    2015-01-01

    has increased dramatically since 2000. This was due to the beginning of activities of medicogenetic service since 1998: the legal framework and information database were created, the flow of pregnant women was formed actively, and invasive prenatal diagnosis was introduced.Incidence of congenital anomalies has a reliable statistical association (chi-square) with bioclimatic zones and ecological situation. The high level of pathology is observed in both teenagers and children in the critical environmental situation areas, where there are enterprises of coal, mining and chemical industry, ship repair, construction, engineering sites, and areas with intensive chemical use and improvement of agriculture. For the most part these are cities and districts of the region where more than a half of the major manufacturing plants of the 1st and 2nd hazard classes are located. Exceeding the maximum allowable concentrations (MAC) of harmful substances in the air, soil, and water in these areas often reaches tenfold. It should be noted that in the territories with the critical environmental situation a relatively high level of malformations is observed in adolescents in the continental bioclimatic zone, and in children - on the coast, suggesting the influence of different climatic factors. Also a high level of the same congenital anomalies was revealed in children in bioclimatic zones of the coast and transition zones with the intense environmental situation.According to the results of the regression analysis, the varying degrees of influence of ecological and hygienic factors on the incidence of congenital anomalies were determined. In children, up to 77.3% of the spread of pathology depends on the complex of parameters of the environment; the proportion of the influence of sanitary and hygienic indicators is 63.1%, and natural and climatic indicators - 14.2%. Such factors as the characteristics of the soil condition, the level of air pollution, chemical pollution and adverse

  14. Epidemiology of adult congenital heart disease: demographic variations worldwide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, B. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The population of adults with a congenital heart defect (CHD) is increasing, due to improved survival after cardiac surgery. To accommodate the specialised care for these patients, a profound interest in the epidemiology of CHD is required. The exact size of the current population of adults with CHD

  15. Basic imaging in congenital heart disease. 3rd Ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swischuk, L.E.; Sapire, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    The book retains its previous format with chapters on embryology, plain film interpretation, classification of pulmonary vascular patterns, cardiac malpositions and vascular anomalies, and illustrative cases. The book is organized with an abundance of illustrative figures, diagrams, and image reproductions. These include plain chest radiographs, angiograms, echocardiograms, and MR images. The authors present the pathophysiology and imaging of congenital heart lesions

  16. Sexual functioning is impaired in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Opic (Petra); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien); J.A.A.E. Cuypers (Judith); M. Witsenburg (Maarten); A.E. van den Bosch (Annemien); R.T. van Domburg (Ron); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad); E.M.W.J. Utens (Elisabeth)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To investigate the overall sexual functioning and disease specific sexual problems in congenital heart disease (ConHD) patients, for both genders and different cardiac diagnostic groups, and compare these with Dutch normative data. Also disease specific sexual problems were

  17. Sexual functioning is impaired in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opić, Petra; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; Cuypers, Judith A. A. C.; Witsenburg, Maarten; van den Bosch, Annemien; van Domburg, Ron T.; Bogers, Ad J. J. C.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the overall sexual functioning and disease specific sexual problems in congenital heart disease (ConHD) patients, for both genders and different cardiac diagnostic groups, and compare these with Dutch normative data. Also disease specific sexual problems were investigated. From a

  18. Prevalence of congenital anomalies in newborns with congenital heart disease diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbe, Alexander; Lee, Simon; Ho, Deborah; Uppu, Santosh; Srivastava, Shubhika

    2014-01-01

    There is a known association between congenital heart disease (CHD) and other congenital anomalies (CA). These associations have been altered by changes in prenatal factors in recent time. We reviewed the largest database of inpatient hospitalization information and analyzed the current association between common CHD diagnoses and other congenital anomalies. Case-control study design. We reviewed the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 1998 to 2008 and identified all live births with CHD diagnosis (case) and live births without CHD diagnosis (control). We compared prevalence of associated congenital anomalies between the case and control groups. Our cohort consisted of 97,154 and 12,078,482 subjects in the case and control groups, respectively. In the CHD population, prevalence of non-syndromic congenital anomaly (NSCA), genetic syndrome (GS), and overall extra-cardiac congenital anomaly (CA) were 11.4, 2.2, and 13.6%, respectively. In the control group, prevalence of NSCA, GS, and CA were 6.7, 0.3, and 7.0%, respectively. NSCA (odds ratio (OR): 1.88, confidence interval (CI): 1.73-1.94), GS (OR 2.52, CI 2.44-2.61), and overall CA (OR: 2.01, CI: 1.97-2.14) were strongly associated with CHD. Prevalence of GS and multiple organ-system CA decreased significantly over the study period. This is the largest and most comprehensive population-based study evaluating association between CHD and extra-cardiac malformation (ECM) in newborns. There was significant decrease in prevalence of GS and multiple CA over the study period

  19. Effect of exercise training on sports enjoyment and leisure-time spending in adolescents with complex congenital heart disease: the moderating effect of health behavior and disease knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulfer, Karolijn; Duppen, Nienke; Blom, Nico A; van Dijk, Arie P J; Helbing, Wim A; Verhulst, Frank C; Utens, Elisabeth M W J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a standardized exercise program on sports enjoyment and leisure-time spending in adolescents with congenital heart disease and to know what the moderating impact of their baseline health behavior and disease knowledge is. Included were 93 patients, aged 10 to 25, with surgical repair for tetralogy of Fallot or with a Fontan circulation for single-ventricle physiology, of 5 participating centers of pediatric cardiology in The Netherlands. They were randomly allocated, stratified for age, gender, and type of congenital heart disease to a 12-week period with either: (1) three times per week standardized exercise training or (2) care as usual (randomization ratio 2:1). At baseline and after 12 weeks, participants completed Web-based questionnaires and were interviewed by phone. Primary analyses tested changes from baseline to follow-up in sports enjoyment and leisure-time spending in the exercise group vs. control group. Secondary analyses concerned the moderating influence of baseline health behavior and disease knowledge on changes from baseline to follow-up, and comparison with normative data. At follow-up, the exercise group reported a decrease in passive leisure-time spending (watching television and computer usage) compared with controls. Exercise training had no effect on sports enjoyment and active leisure-time spending. Disease knowledge had a moderating effect on improvement in sports enjoyment, whereas health behavior did not. Compared with normative data, patients obtained similar leisure time scores and lower frequencies as to drinking alcohol and smoking. Exercise training decreased passive, but not active, leisure-time spending. It did not influence sports enjoyment. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Congenital orbital teratoma

    OpenAIRE

    Aiyub, Shereen; Chan, Weng Onn; Szetu, John; Sullivan, Laurence J; Pater, John; Cooper, Peter; Selva, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of mature congenital orbital teratoma managed with lid-sparing exenteration and dermis fat graft. This is a case report on the management of congenital orbital teratoma. A full-term baby was born in Fiji with prolapsed right globe which was surrounded by a nonpulsatile, cystic mass. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with congenital orbital teratoma. Due to limited surgical expertise, the patient was transferred to Adelaide, Australia for further management. The p...

  1. Landmark lecture on cardiac intensive care and anaesthesia: continuum and conundrums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laussen, Peter C

    2017-12-01

    Cardiac anesthesia and critical care provide an important continuum of care for patients with congenital heart disease. Clinicians in both areas work in complex environments in which the interactions between humans and technology is critical. Understanding our contributions to outcomes (modifiable risk) and our ability to perceive and predict an evolving clinical state (low failure-to-predict rate) are important performance metrics. Improved methods for capturing continuous physiologic signals will allow for new and interactive approaches to data visualization, and for sophisticated and iterative data modeling that will help define a patient's phenotype and response to treatment (precision physiology).

  2. Cytomegalovirus Congenital Cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridha Wahyutomo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus congenital infection is an infection caused by the the subfamily â Herpesviridae, during pregnancy. The incidence of infections among newborn infants is 1 %. One of the effects of congenitally acquired infection is the congenital cataract. A 6-year-old child complained to have a blurred vision diagnosed with cytomegalovirus congenital cataract. The diagnosis was confirmed by a positive serology testing for Ig M and Ig G CMV. The laboratory test using Giemsa staining to find inclusion bodies and a faster PCR could not be carried out (Sains Medika, 3(1:84-88.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Congenital hypothyroidism Congenital hypothyroidism Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Congenital hypothyroidism is a partial or complete loss of function ...

  4. Benefits of Balloon-Dilatable Bilateral Pulmonary Artery Banding in Patients With Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome and Other Complex Cardiac Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kise, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Shoji; Hoshiai, Minako; Toda, Takako; Koizumi, Keiichi; Hasebe, Yohei; Kono, Yosuke; Honda, Yoshihiro; Kaga, Shigeaki; Sugita, Kanji

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of balloon-dilatable bilateral pulmonary artery banding (b-PAB) and its impact on the configuration of the pulmonary artery (PA). We have previously used balloon-dilatable b-PAB as first-stage palliation for patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) and other complex cardiac anomalies. Two pliable tapes were placed around each branch of the PA and tightened with 7-0 polypropylene sutures in a manner that allowed for the subsequent adjustment of PA diameters. We retrospectively examined the adjustability of PA diameters by balloon dilation and the need for surgical PA angioplasty at later stages. From January 2010 to October 2013, we performed b-PAB in 8 patients, including 3 borderline cases between biventricular repair (BVR) and univentricular repair (UVR). The b-PAB procedures were performed at a median age of 6.5 days (range, 2-10 days). Balloon dilations were performed in 10 lesions in 4 patients. All of the procedures were performed safely. Two patients reached definite BVR. The remaining 6 patients underwent open palliative procedures with univentricular physiologies that resulted in 2 deaths unrelated to the initial b-PAB. In all but 1 of the patients, the PA configuration was properly maintained and did not require surgical pulmonary angioplasty. Balloon-dilatable b-PAB can be performed safely and prevents PA distortion at later stages. This technique should be considered for patients with complex cardiac anomalies if uncertainty exists regarding the optimal surgical strategy (BVR or UVR) in early infancy. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Novel PIGT Variant in Two Brothers: Expansion of the Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia Seizures Syndrome 3 Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Skauli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Biallelic PIGT variants were previously reported in seven patients from three families with Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia Seizures Syndrome 3 (MCAHS3, characterized by epileptic encephalopathy, hypotonia, global developmental delay/intellectual disability, cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, craniofacial dysmorphisms, and skeletal, ophthalmological, cardiac, and genitourinary abnormalities. We report a novel homozygous PIGT missense variant c.1079G>T (p.Gly360Val in two brothers with several of the typical features of MCAHS3, but in addition, pyramidal tract neurological signs. Notably, they are the first patients with MCAHS3 without skeletal, cardiac, or genitourinary anomalies. PIGT encodes a crucial subunit of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI transamidase complex, which catalyzes the attachment of proteins to GPI-anchors, attaching the proteins to the cell membrane. In vitro studies in cells from the two brothers showed reduced levels of GPI-anchors and GPI-anchored proteins on the cell surface, supporting the pathogenicity of the novel PIGT variant.

  6. Resource Utilization Associated with Extracardiac Co-morbid Conditions Following Congenital Heart Surgery in Infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomela, Krista E; Gordon, John B; Cassidy, Laura D; Johaningsmeir, Sarah; Ghanayem, Nancy S

    2017-06-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is often associated with chronic extracardiac co-morbid conditions (ECC). The presence of ECC has been associated with greater resource utilization during the operative period; however, the impact beyond hospital discharge has not been described. This study sought to understand the scope of chronic ECC in infants with CHD as well as to describe the impact of ECC on resource utilization after discharge from the index cardiac procedure. IRB approved this retrospective study of infants Whitney Rank Sum Test with p < 0.05 considered significant. ECC occurred in 55% (481/876) of infants. Median STAT score was higher in the group with ECC (3 vs. 2, p < 0.001). Resource utilization after discharge from the index procedure as defined by median hospital charges (78 vs. 10 K, p < 0.001 and unplanned hospital days 4 vs. 0, p < 0.001) was higher in those with ECC, and increased with the greater number of ECC, even after accounting for surgical complexity. STAT score and the presence of multiple ECC were associated with higher resource utilization following the index cardiac surgical procedure. These data may be helpful in deciding which children might benefit from a cardiac complex care program that partners families and providers to improve health and decrease healthcare costs.

  7. Mobile health in adults with congenital heart disease: Current use and future needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuuring, M.J.; A. Backx (Ad); Zwart, R.; Veelenturf, A.H.; D. Robbers-Visser (Daniëlle); M. Groenink (Maarten); A. Abu-Hanna (Ameen); N. Bruining (Nico); M.P. Schijven; B.J.M. Mulder (Barbara); B.J. Bouma (Berto)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective Many adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) are affected lifelong by cardiac events, particularly arrhythmias and heart failure. Despite the care provided, the cardiac event rate remains high. Mobile health (mHealth) brings opportunities to enhance daily monitoring and

  8. Identification of a Kir3.4 Mutation in Congenital Long QT Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yanzong; Yang, Yiqing; Liang, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a hereditary disorder that leads to sudden cardiac death secondary to fatal cardiac arrhythmias. Although many genes for LQTS have been described, the etiology remains unknown in 30%-40% of cases. In the present study, a large Chinese family (four generations...

  9. Congenital Unilateral Hypoplasia of Depressor Anguli Oris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seckin O. Ulualp

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Asymmetric facial appearance may originate from abnormalities of facial musculature or facial innervation. We describe clinical features of congenital hypoplasia of depressor anguli oris muscle in a child. Material and Methods. Chart of a 10-month-old female referred to a tertiary care pediatric hospital for assessment of facial paralysis was reviewed. Data included relevant history and physical examination, diagnostic work up, and management. Results. The child presented with asymmetric movement of lower lip since birth. Asymmetry of lower lip was more pronounced when she smiled and cried. Rest of the face movement was symmetric. On examination, the face appeared symmetric at rest. The child had inward deviation of right lower lip when she smiled. Facial nerve function, as determined by frowning/forehead, wrinkling, eye closure, nasolabial fold depth, and tearing, was symmetric. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporal bones and internal auditory canals were within normal limits. Echocardiogram did not show cardiac abnormality. Auditory brainstem response showed no abnormality. Conclusions. Congenital hypoplasia of depressor anguli oris is a rare anomaly that causes asymmetric crying face. Pediatricians and otolaryngologists need to be cognizant of cardiac, head and neck, and central nervous system anomalies associated with congenital unilateral hypoplasia of depressor anguli oris.

  10. Mitochondrial disorders in congenital myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Kharlamov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature review gives data on the role of mitochondrial disorders in the pathogenesis of congenital myopathies: congenital muscular dystrophies and congenital structural myopathies. It describes changes in congenital muscular dystrophies with type VI collagen, in myodystrophy with giant mitochondria, in congenital central core myopathies, myotubular myopathy, etc. Clinical and experimental findings are presented. Approaches to therapy for energy disorders in congenital myopathies are depicted.

  11. Introduction to the Congenital Heart Defects: Anatomy of the Conduction System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeremy P; Aboulhosn, Jamil A

    2017-06-01

    The position and course of the conduction system in congenital heart disease are intricately tied to the underlying congenital malformation. Although only subtle differences exist between the anatomy of the conduction axis for simple congenital heart lesions and normal anatomy, almost every patient with congenital heart disease harbors some important anatomic variation. This article summarizes the body of literature by retaining original classical concepts and by attempting to translate the available knowledge into useful points for the congenital heart disease specialist. This discussion spans the entire spectrum of simple to complex congenital heart disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of the High-Frequency Content in Human QRS Complexes by the Continuous Wavelet Transform: An Automatized Analysis for the Prediction of Sudden Cardiac Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Iglesias, Daniel; Roqueñi Gutiérrez, Nieves; De Cos, Francisco Javier; Calvo, David

    2018-02-12

    Fragmentation and delayed potentials in the QRS signal of patients have been postulated as risk markers for Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD). The analysis of the high-frequency spectral content may be useful for quantification. Forty-two consecutive patients with prior history of SCD or malignant arrhythmias (patients) where compared with 120 healthy individuals (controls). The QRS complexes were extracted with a modified Pan-Tompkins algorithm and processed with the Continuous Wavelet Transform to analyze the high-frequency content (85-130 Hz). Overall, the power of the high-frequency content was higher in patients compared with controls (170.9 vs. 47.3 10³nV²Hz -1 ; p = 0.007), with a prolonged time to reach the maximal power (68.9 vs. 64.8 ms; p = 0.002). An analysis of the signal intensity (instantaneous average of cumulative power), revealed a distinct function between patients and controls. The total intensity was higher in patients compared with controls (137.1 vs. 39 10³nV²Hz -1 s -1 ; p = 0.001) and the time to reach the maximal intensity was also prolonged (88.7 vs. 82.1 ms; p content of the QRS complexes was distinct between patients at risk of SCD and healthy controls. The wavelet transform is an efficient tool for spectral analysis of the QRS complexes that may contribute to stratification of risk.

  13. Educational series in congenital heart disease:Congenital left-sided heart obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Michelle; Curtis, Stephanie; Marek, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Congenital obstruction of the left ventricular outflow tract remains a significant problem and multilevel obstruction can often coexist. Obstruction can take several morphological forms and may involve the subvalvar, valvar or supravalvar portion of the aortic valve complex. Congenital valvar stenosis presenting in the neonatal period represents a spectrum of disorders ranging from the hypoplastic left heart syndrome to almost normal hearts. Treatment options vary dependent on the severity of...

  14. Adult Congenital Heart Disease with Focus on Pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.P.E. Ruys (Titia)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe prevalence of Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) has been described to be 8,2 per 1000 live births in European countries.(1) Congenital heart disease is a collective term for a large number of different diagnoses with different anatomical substrate, complexity and prognosis. The most

  15. Post cardiac injury syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S L; Nielsen, F E

    1991-01-01

    The post-pericardiotomy syndrome is a symptom complex which is similar in many respects to the post-myocardial infarction syndrome and these are summarized under the diagnosis of the Post Cardiac Injury Syndrome (PCIS). This condition, which is observed most frequently after open heart surgery, i...... on the coronary vessels, with cardiac tamponade and chronic pericardial exudate. In the lighter cases, PCIS may be treated with NSAID and, in the more severe cases, with systemic glucocorticoid which has a prompt effect....

  16. Sequential segmental classification of feline congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scansen, Brian A; Schneider, Matthias; Bonagura, John D

    2015-12-01

    Feline congenital heart disease is less commonly encountered in veterinary medicine than acquired feline heart diseases such as cardiomyopathy. Understanding the wide spectrum of congenital cardiovascular disease demands a familiarity with a variety of lesions, occurring both in isolation and in combination, along with an appreciation of complex nomenclature and variable classification schemes. This review begins with an overview of congenital heart disease in the cat, including proposed etiologies and prevalence, examination approaches, and principles of therapy. Specific congenital defects are presented and organized by a sequential segmental classification with respect to their morphologic lesions. Highlights of diagnosis, treatment options, and prognosis are offered. It is hoped that this review will provide a framework for approaching congenital heart disease in the cat, and more broadly in other animal species based on the sequential segmental approach, which represents an adaptation of the common methodology used in children and adults with congenital heart disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanical Dyssynchrony by Tissue Doppler Cross-Correlation is Associated with Risk for Complex Ventricular Arrhythmias after Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tayal, Bhupendar; Gorcsan, John; Delgado-Montero, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tissue Doppler cross-correlation analysis has been shown to be associated with long-term survival after cardiac resynchronization defibrillator therapy (CRT-D). Its association with ventricular arrhythmia (VA) is unknown. METHODS: From two centers 151 CRT-D patients (New York Heart...... Association functional classes II-IV, ejection fraction ≤ 35%, and QRS duration ≥ 120 msec) were prospectively included. Tissue Doppler cross-correlation analysis of myocardial acceleration curves from the basal segments in the apical views both at baseline and 6 months after CRT-D implantation was performed...... with a substantially increased risk for VA (hazard ratio [HR], 4.4; 95% CI, 1.2-16.3; P = .03) and VA or death (HR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.7-9.6; P = .002) after adjusting for other covariates. Similarly, patients with new dyssynchrony had increased risk for VA (HR, 10.6; 95% CI, 2.8-40.4; P = .001) and VA or death (HR, 5...

  18. Congenital Complete Tracheal Ring in a Neonate: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra ARUN ÖZER

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities of the upper airway tract lead to congenital high airway obstruction and may complicate neonatal airway management in the delivery room. Congenital complete tracheal rings are a rare and unusual tracheal anomaly, usually presenting in the neonate or infant as respiratory distress. The clinical presentation can vary from almost asymptomatic patients to near-fatal airway obstruction. It may exist as an isolated entity, or in association with other congenital malformations, in particular, cardiac anomalies along with vascular rings and pulmonary slings. Other associated anomalies have also been reported, for example, chromosomal anomalies, malformation of other parts of the respiratory tract, esophagus and skeletal systems. Here, we report an extreme case of VACTERL/TACRD association presented with congenital complete tracheal ring, encephalocele, bilateral radial agenesis with absent thumbs, equinovalgus deformity on right foot, low-set ears and micrognathia.

  19. Maternal smoking in pregnancy and risk for congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leite, Mimmi; Albieri, Vanna; Kjaer, Susanne K.

    2014-01-01

    and registered in the Danish Medical Birth Register containing detailed information on smoking during pregnancy and congenital malformations. METHODS: Associations [odds ratios (OR) with 95% CI] between maternal smoking and risk for various groups of congenital malformations, investigated using the generalized.......e. when two or more malformations are diagnosed in a child) (odds ratio 1.06, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.10) and various main groups of congenital malformations including the cardiovascular system (odds ratio 1.13, 95% confidence interval 1.07-1.19), the respiratory system (odds ratio 1.25, 95......% confidence interval 1.11-1.41), the digestive system (odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.07-1.24) and oral clefts (odds ratio 1.29, 95% confidence interval 1.14-1.46), as well as for some specific congenital malformations including cardiac septal defects, malformations of the pulmonary and tricuspid...

  20. Cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rehab; Heart failure - cardiac rehab References Anderson L, Taylor RS. Cardiac rehabilitation for people with heart disease: ... of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed ...

  1. Cardiac Delayed Rectifier Potassium Channels in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Sampson, Kevin J.; Kass, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac delayed rectifier potassium channels conduct outward potassium currents during the plateau phase of action potentials and play pivotal roles in cardiac repolarization. These include IKs, IKr and the atrial specific IKur channels. In this chapter, we will review the molecular identities and biophysical properties of these channels. Mutations in the genes encoding delayed rectifiers lead to loss- or gain-of-function phenotypes, disrupt normal cardiac repolarization and result in various cardiac rhythm disorders, including congenital Long QT Syndrome, Short QT Syndrome and familial atrial fibrillation. We will also discuss the possibility and prospect of using delayed rectifier channels as therapeutic targets to manage cardiac arrhythmia. PMID:27261823

  2. Cardiac Delayed Rectifier Potassium Channels in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Sampson, Kevin J; Kass, Robert S

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac delayed rectifier potassium channels conduct outward potassium currents during the plateau phase of action potentials and play pivotal roles in cardiac repolarization. These include IKs, IKr and the atrial specific IKur channels. In this article, we will review their molecular identities and biophysical properties. Mutations in the genes encoding delayed rectifiers lead to loss- or gain-of-function phenotypes, disrupt normal cardiac repolarization and result in various cardiac rhythm disorders, including congenital Long QT Syndrome, Short QT Syndrome and familial atrial fibrillation. We will also discuss the prospect of using delayed rectifier channels as therapeutic targets to manage cardiac arrhythmia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described.

  4. A contemporary, single-institutional experience of surgical versus expectant management of congenital heart disease in trisomy 13 and 18 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, John P; Weiderhold, Allison; Louis, Clauden; Shaughnessy, Conner; Peer, Syed M; Zurakowski, David; Jonas, Richard A; Nath, Dilip S

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine a large institutional experience of patients with trisomy 13 and trisomy 18 in the setting of comorbid congenital heart disease and present the outcomes of surgical versus expectant management. It is a retrospective single-institution cohort study. Institutional review board approved this study. Thirteen consecutive trisomy 18 patients and three consecutive trisomy 13 patients (sixteen patients in total) with comorbid congenital heart disease who were evaluated by our institution's Division of Cardiovascular Surgery between January 2008 and December 2013 were included in the study. The primary outcome measures evaluated were operative mortality (for patients who received surgical management), overall mortality (for patients who received expectant management), and total length of survival during follow-up. Of the thirteen trisomy 18 patients, seven underwent surgical management and six received expectant management. With surgical management, operative mortality was 29 %, and 80 % of patients were alive after a median follow-up of 116 days. With expectant management, 50 % of patients died before hospital discharge. Of the three patients with trisomy 13, one patient underwent surgical management and two received expectant management. The patient who received surgical management with complete repair was alive at last follow-up over 2 years after surgery; both patients managed expectantly died before hospital discharge. Trisomy 13 and trisomy 18 patients with comorbid congenital heart disease can undergo successful cardiac surgical intervention. In this population, we advocate that nearly all patients with cardiovascular indications for operative congenital heart disease intervention should be offered complete surgical repair over palliative approaches for moderately complex congenital cardiac anomalies.

  5. Parental overprotection and heart-focused anxiety in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Lephuong; Nolan, Robert P; Irvine, Jane; Kovacs, Adrienne H

    2011-09-01

    The care of adult patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) is challenging from a mental health perspective, as these patients continue to face a variety of biopsychosocial issues that may impact emotional functioning. Despite these issues, there are limited data on the psychosocial functioning of adults with CHD, and there are no data on the impact of parental overprotection on heart-focused anxiety in this patient population. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between patient recollections of parental overprotection and current heart-focused anxiety in adults with CHD. A cross-sectional sample of 190 adult patients with CHD (51% male; mean age = 32.28, SD = 11.86 years) completed validated measures of perceived parental overprotection (Parental Bonding Instrument) and heart-focused anxiety (Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire). The results indicated that perceived parental overprotection (β = 0.19, p = 0.02) and heart defect complexity (β = 0.17, p = 0.03) were significantly related to heart-focused anxiety. Contrary to hypotheses, perceived parental overprotection did not vary as a function of heart defect complexity (F (2, 169) = 0.02, p = 0.98). Perceived parental overprotection and heart defect complexity are associated with heart-focused anxiety in adults with congenital heart disease. These results can inform the development of clinical interventions aimed at improving the psychosocial adjustment of this patient population.

  6. Major congenital anomalies in babies born with Down syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, Joan K; Garne, Ester; Wellesley, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that over 40% of babies with Down syndrome have a major cardiac anomaly and are more likely to have other major congenital anomalies. Since 2000, many countries in Europe have introduced national antenatal screening programs for Down syndrome. This study aimed...... to determine if the introduction of these screening programs and the subsequent termination of prenatally detected pregnancies were associated with any decline in the prevalence of additional anomalies in babies born with Down syndrome. The study sample consisted of 7,044 live births and fetal deaths with Down...... syndrome registered in 28 European population-based congenital anomaly registries covering seven million births during 2000-2010. Overall, 43.6% (95% CI: 42.4-44.7%) of births with Down syndrome had a cardiac anomaly and 15.0% (14.2-15.8%) had a non-cardiac anomaly. Female babies with Down syndrome were...

  7. Histone methylations in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-Jun; Liu, Zhi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Heart development comprises myocyte specification, differentiation and cardiac morphogenesis. These processes are regulated by a group of core cardiac transcription factors in a coordinated temporal and spatial manner. Histone methylation is an emerging epigenetic mechanism for regulating gene transcription. Interplay among cardiac transcription factors and histone lysine modifiers plays important role in heart development. Aberrant expression and mutation of the histone lysine modifiers during development and in adult life can cause either embryonic lethality or congenital heart diseases, and influences the response of adult hearts to pathological stresses. In this review, we describe current body of literature on the role of several common histone methylations and their modifying enzymes in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases.

  8. Dietary intake in infants with complex congenital heart disease: a case-control study on macro- and micronutrient intake, meal frequency and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, L; Öhlund, I; Lind, T; Stecksén-Blicks, C; Rydberg, A

    2016-02-01

    Children with severe congenital heart disease (CHD) need considerable nutritional support to reach normal growth. The actual intake of macro- and micronutrients in outpatient CHD infants over a 6-month period in infancy is not described in the literature. The present study aimed to prospectively investigate the distribution between macro- and micronutrient intake, meal frequency and growth in children with CHD. At 6, 9 and 12 months of age, a 3-day food diary and anthropometric data were collected in 11 infants with severe CHD and 22 healthy age- and feeding-matched controls. Macro- and micronutrient intake, meal frequency and growth were calculated. Compared to the healthy controls, CHD infants had a statistically significantly higher intake of fat at 9 months of age (4.8 versus 3.6 g kg(-1) day(-1) ), a higher percentage energy (E%) from fat, (40.6% versus 34.5%) and a lower E% from carbohydrates (46.1% versus 39.6%) at 12 months of age, and a lower intake of iron (7.22 versus 9.28 mg day(-1) ) at 6 months of age. Meal frequency was significantly higher at 6 and 9 months of age (P meal frequency, the intake does not meet the needs for growth, and the results may indicate a low intake of micronutrients in CHD infants. © 2014 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  9. Key aspects congenital infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Lobzin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The key questions to solve the problem of congenital infection in the Russian Federation are: using in national practice over world accepted terminology adapted to the recommendations of the World Health Organization; representation of the modern concepts of an infectious process in the classification of congenital infections; scientific development and introducing in clinical practice the «standard case definitions», applied to different congenital infections; optimization of protocols and clinical guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of congenital infections; improvement a knowledge in the infectious disease for all  pecialists involved in the risk assessment of congenital infections, manage pregnancy and children. Based on our experience and analysis of publications, the authors suggest possible solutions.

  10. Atrial tachyarrhythmia in adult congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbassi, Arsha; Nair, Krishnakumar; Harris, Louise; Wald, Rachel M; Roche, S Lucy

    2017-01-01

    The adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) population continues to grow and most cardiologists, emergency room physicians and family doctors will intermittently come into contact with these patients. Oftentimes this may be in the setting of a presentation with atrial tachyarrhythmia; one of the commonest late complications of ACHD and problem with potentially serious implications. Providing appropriate initial care and ongoing management of atrial tachyarrhythmia in ACHD patients requires a degree of specialist knowledge and an awareness of certain key issues. In ACHD, atrial tachyarrhythmia is usually related to the abnormal anatomy of the underlying heart defect and often occurs as a result of surgical scar or a consequence of residual hemodynamic or electrical disturbances. Arrhythmias significantly increase mortality and morbidity in ACHD and are the most frequent reason for ACHD hospitalization. Intra-atrial reentrant tachycardia and atrial fibrillation are the most prevalent type of arrhythmia in this patient group. In hemodynamically unstable patients, urgent cardioversion is required. Acute management of the stable patient includes anticoagulation, rate control, and electrical or pharmacological cardioversion. In ACHD, rhythm control is the preferred management strategy and can often be achieved. However, in the long-term, medication side-effects can prove problematic. Electrophysiology studies and catheter ablation are important treatments modalities and in certain cases, surgical or percutaneous treatment of the underlying cardiac defect has a role. ACHD patients, especially those with complex CHD, are at increased risk of thromboembolic events and anticoagulation is usually required. Female ACHD patients of child bearing age may wish to pursue pregnancies. The risk of atrial arrhythmias is increased during pregnancy and management of atrial tachyarrhythmia during pregnancy needs specific consideration. PMID:28706585

  11. Intraventricular Hemorrhage in Moderate to Severe Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortinau, Cynthia M; Anadkat, Jagruti S; Smyser, Christopher D; Eghtesady, Pirooz

    2018-01-01

    Determine the prevalence of intraventricular hemorrhage in infants with moderate to severe congenital heart disease, investigate the impact of gestational age, cardiac diagnosis, and cardiac intervention on intraventricular hemorrhage, and compare intraventricular hemorrhage rates in preterm infants with and without congenital heart disease. A single-center retrospective review. A tertiary care children's hospital. All infants admitted to St. Louis Children's Hospital from 2007 to 2012 with moderate to severe congenital heart disease requiring cardiac intervention in the first 90 days of life and all preterm infants without congenital heart disease or congenital anomalies/known genetic diagnoses admitted during the same time period. None. Cranial ultrasound data were reviewed for presence/severity of intraventricular hemorrhage. Head CT and brain MRI data were also reviewed in the congenital heart disease infants. Univariate analyses were undertaken to determine associations with intraventricular hemorrhage, and a final multivariate logistic regression model was performed. There were 339 infants with congenital heart disease who met inclusion criteria and 25.4% were born preterm. Intraventricular hemorrhage was identified on cranial ultrasound in 13.3% of infants, with the majority of intraventricular hemorrhage being low-grade (grade I/II). The incidence increased as gestational age decreased such that intraventricular hemorrhage was present in 8.7% of term infants, 19.2% of late preterm infants, 26.3% of moderately preterm infants, and 53.3% of very preterm infants. There was no difference in intraventricular hemorrhage rates between cardiac diagnoses. Additionally, the rate of intraventricular hemorrhage did not increase after cardiac intervention, with only three infants demonstrating new/worsening high-grade (grade III/IV) intraventricular hemorrhage after surgery. In a multivariate model, only gestational age at birth and African-American race were predictors

  12. Role of CT in Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajiah, Prabhakar; Saboo, Sachin S; Abbara, Suhny

    2017-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases (CHD) are being increasingly encountered in cardiac imaging due to improved outcomes from surgical and interventional techniques. Imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of CHD, both prior to and after surgeries and interventions. Computed tomography (CT) has several advantages in the evaluation of these disorders, particularly its high spatial resolution, multi-planar reconstruction capabilities at sub-millimeter isotropic resolution, good temporal resolution, wide field of view, and rapid turnaround time, which minimizes the need for sedation and anesthesia in young children or children with disabilities. With modern scanners, images can be acquired as fast as within one heartbeat. Although there is a risk of ionizing radiation, the radiation dose can be minimized by using several dose reduction strategies. There is a risk of contrast nephrotoxicity in patients with renal dysfunction. In this article, we will review the role of CT in the evaluation of several congenital heart diseases, both in children and adults.

  13. Congenital and childhood atrioventricular blocks: pathophysiology and contemporary management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruteau, Alban-Elouen; Pass, Robert H; Thambo, Jean-Benoit; Behaghel, Albin; Le Pennec, Solène; Perdreau, Elodie; Combes, Nicolas; Liberman, Leonardo; McLeod, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    Atrioventricular block is classified as congenital if diagnosed in utero, at birth, or within the first month of life. The pathophysiological process is believed to be due to immune-mediated injury of the conduction system, which occurs as a result of transplacental passage of maternal anti-SSA/Ro-SSB/La antibodies. Childhood atrioventricular block is therefore diagnosed between the first month and the 18th year of life. Genetic variants in multiple genes have been described to date in the pathogenesis of inherited progressive cardiac conduction disorders. Indications and techniques of cardiac pacing have also evolved to allow safe permanent cardiac pacing in almost all patients, including those with structural heart abnormalities. Early diagnosis and appropriate management are critical in many cases in order to prevent sudden death, and this review critically assesses our current understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms, clinical course, and optimal management of congenital and childhood AV block. • Prevalence of congenital heart block of 1 per 15,000 to 20,000 live births. AV block is defined as congenital if diagnosed in utero, at birth, or within the first month of life, whereas childhood AV block is diagnosed between the first month and the 18th year of life. As a result of several different etiologies, congenital and childhood atrioventricular block may occur in an entirely structurally normal heart or in association with concomitant congenital heart disease. Cardiac pacing is indicated in symptomatic patients and has several prophylactic indications in asymptomatic patients to prevent sudden death. • Autoimmune, congenital AV block is associated with a high neonatal mortality rate and development of dilated cardiomyopathy in 5 to 30 % cases. What is New: • Several genes including SCN5A have been implicated in autosomal dominant forms of familial progressive cardiac conduction disorders. • Leadless pacemaker technology and gene therapy for

  14. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia interval on chromosome 8p23.1 characterized by genetics and protein interaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longoni, Mauro; Hansen, Kasper Lage; Russell, Meaghan K.

    2012-01-01

    Chromosome 8p23.1 is a common hotspot associated with major congenital malformations, including congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and cardiac defects. We present findings from high‐resolution arrays in patients who carry a loss (n = 18) or a gain (n = 1) of sub‐band 8p23.1. We confirm a region...

  15. Does age at the time of elective cardiac surgery or catheter intervention in children influence the longitudinal development of psychological distress and styles of coping of parents?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Utens, Elisabeth M.; Versluis-den Bieman, Herma J.; Witsenburg, Maarten; Bogers, Ad J. J. C.; Hess, John; Verhulst, Frank C.

    2002-01-01

    To assess the influence of age at a cardiac procedure of children, who underwent elective cardiac surgery or interventional cardiac catheterisation for treatment of congenital cardiac defects between 3 months and 7 years of age, on the longitudinal development of psychological distress and styles of

  16. [Penile congenital abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boillot, B; Teklali, Y; Moog, R; Droupy, S

    2013-07-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the penis are usually diagnosed at birth and pose aesthetic and functional problems sometimes requiring surgical management. A literature review was conducted on Medline considering the articles listed until January 2012. Hypospadias is the most common malformation (1 in 250 boys. Familial forms: 7%). The causes remain hypothetical but the doubling of the incidence in 30 years could be linked to fetal exposure to endocrine disruptors "estrogen-like" used in the food industry in particular. Surgical treatment is usually intended to improve the aesthetic appearance but sometimes, in case of significant curvature or posterior meatus, necessary for normal sexual life and fertility. Other malformations (epispades, buried penis, transpositions, twists and preputial abnormalities) as well as management for functional or aesthetic consequences of these malformations in adulthood require complex surgical care in a specialized environment. The improvement of surgical techniques and pediatric anesthesia allows an early and effective specialized surgical approach of penile malformations. Management of sequelae in adulthood must be discussed and requires experience of surgical techniques on pediatric and adult penis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Congenital symmastia revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Nanna H; Hölmich, Lisbeth R; Siersen, Hans Erik

    2012-01-01

    Symmastia is defined as medial confluence of the breast. The term 'symmastia' is modified from Greek (syn meaning 'together', and mastos meaning 'breast') and was first presented by Spence et al. in 1983. Two forms of symmastia exist: an iatrogenic and a congenital version. Congenital symmastia...... is a rare condition in which web-like soft tissue traverses the sternum to connect the breasts medially. The literature on congenital symmastia is limited, few cases have been published, and knowledge about ideal treatment is still insufficient....

  18. Trends in 30-day mortality rate and case mix for paediatric cardiac surgery in the UK between 2000 and 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Katherine L; Crowe, Sonya; Franklin, Rodney; McLean, Andrew; Cunningham, David; Barron, David; Tsang, Victor; Pagel, Christina; Utley, Martin

    2015-01-01

    To explore changes over time in the 30-day mortality rate for paediatric cardiac surgery and to understand the role of attendant changes in the case mix. Included were: all mandatory submissions to the National Institute of Cardiovascular Outcomes Research (NICOR) relating to UK cardiac surgery in patients aged case mix indicators, in 10 consecutive time periods, from 2000 to 2010. Comparisons were made between two 5-year eras of: 30-day mortality, period prevalence and mean age for 30 groups of specific operations. 30-day mortality for an episode of surgical management. Our analysis includes 36 641 surgical episodes with an increase from 2283 episodes in 2000 to 3939 in 2009 (pcase mix became more complex in terms of the percentage of patients case mix complexity, and compares well with international benchmarks. Definitive repair is now more likely at a younger age for selected infants with congenital heart defects.

  19. Changing Landscape of Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Berto J; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2017-03-17

    Congenital heart disease is the most frequently occurring congenital disorder affecting ≈0.8% of live births. Thanks to great efforts and technical improvements, including the development of cardiopulmonary bypass in the 1950s, large-scale repair in these patients became possible, with subsequent dramatic reduction in morbidity and mortality. The ongoing search for progress and the growing understanding of the cardiovascular system and its pathophysiology refined all aspects of care for these patients. As a consequence, survival further increased over the past decades, and a new group of patients, those who survived congenital heart disease into adulthood, emerged. However, a large range of complications raised at the horizon as arrhythmias, endocarditis, pulmonary hypertension, and heart failure, and the need for additional treatment became clear. Technical solutions were sought in perfection and creation of new surgical techniques by developing catheter-based interventions, with elimination of open heart surgery and new electronic devices enabling, for example, multisite pacing and implantation of internal cardiac defibrillators to prevent sudden death. Over time, many pharmaceutical studies were conducted, changing clinical treatment slowly toward evidence-based care, although results were often limited by low numbers and clinical heterogeneity. More attention has been given to secondary issues like sports participation, pregnancy, work, and social-related difficulties. The relevance of these issues was already recognized in the 1970s when the need for specialized centers with multidisciplinary teams was proclaimed. Finally, research has become incorporated in care. Results of intervention studies and registries increased the knowledge on epidemiology of adults with congenital heart disease and their complications during life, and at the end, several guidelines became easily accessible, guiding physicians to deliver care appropriately. Over the past decades

  20. Imaging of congenital diaphragmatic hernias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, George A.; Estroff, Judy A.; Atalabi, Omolola M.

    2009-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernias are complex and life-threatening lesions that are not just anatomic defects of the diaphragm, but represent a complex set of physiologic derangements of the lung, the pulmonary vasculature, and related structures. Imaging plays an increasingly important role in the care of these infants. Prenatal sonography and MRI have allowed early and accurate identification of the defect and associated anomalies. These tools have also been the key to defining the degree of pulmonary hypoplasia and to predicting neonatal survival and need for aggressive respiratory rescue strategies. In the postnatal period, conventional radiography supplemented by cross-sectional imaging in selected cases can be very useful in sorting out the differential diagnosis of intrathoracic masses, in the detection of associated anomalies, and in the management of complications. Understanding the pathogenesis of diaphragmatic defects, the underlying physiologic disturbances, and the strengths and limitations of current imaging protocols is essential to the effective and accurate management of these complex patients. (orig.)

  1. Imaging of congenital diaphragmatic hernias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, George A.; Estroff, Judy A. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Atalabi, Omolola M. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); The College of Medicine/University College Hospital, Ibadan (Nigeria)

    2009-01-15

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernias are complex and life-threatening lesions that are not just anatomic defects of the diaphragm, but represent a complex set of physiologic derangements of the lung, the pulmonary vasculature, and related structures. Imaging plays an increasingly important role in the care of these infants. Prenatal sonography and MRI have allowed early and accurate identification of the defect and associated anomalies. These tools have also been the key to defining the degree of pulmonary hypoplasia and to predicting neonatal survival and need for aggressive respiratory rescue strategies. In the postnatal period, conventional radiography supplemented by cross-sectional imaging in selected cases can be very useful in sorting out the differential diagnosis of intrathoracic masses, in the detection of associated anomalies, and in the management of complications. Understanding the pathogenesis of diaphragmatic defects, the underlying physiologic disturbances, and the strengths and limitations of current imaging protocols is essential to the effective and accurate management of these complex patients. (orig.)

  2. Three-dimensional printing in congenital heart disease: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ivan; Sun, Zhonghua

    2018-02-17

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has shown great promise in medicine with increasing reports in congenital heart disease (CHD). This systematic review aims to analyse the main clinical applications and accuracy of 3D printing in CHD, as well as to provide an overview of the software tools, time and costs associated with the generation of 3D printed heart models. A search of different databases was conducted to identify studies investigating the application of 3D printing in CHD. Studies based on patient's medical imaging datasets were included for analysis, while reports on in vitro phantom or review articles were excluded from the analysis. A total of 28 studies met selection criteria for inclusion in the review. More than half of the studies were based on isolated case reports with inclusion of 1-12 cases (61%), while 10 studies (36%) focused on the survey of opinion on the usefulness of 3D printing by healthcare professionals, patients, parents of patients and medical students, and the remaining one involved a multicentre study about the clinical value of 3D printed models in surgical planning of CHD. The analysis shows that patient-specific 3D printed models accurately replicate complex cardiac anatomy, improve understanding and knowledge about congenital heart diseases and demonstrate value in preoperative planning and simulation of cardiac or interventional procedures, assist surgical decision-making and intra-operative orientation, and improve patient-doctor communication and medical education. The cost of 3D printing ranges from USD 55 to USD 810. This systematic review shows the usefulness of 3D printed models in congenital heart disease with applications ranging from accurate replication of complex cardiac anatomy and pathology to medical education, preoperative planning and simulation. The additional cost and time required to manufacture the 3D printed models represent the limitations which need to be addressed in future studies. © 2018 The Authors

  3. Structural and congenital heart disease interventions: the role of three-dimensional printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, L M; Meineri, M; Qua Hiansen, J; Horlick, E M

    2017-02-01

    Advances in catheter-based interventions in structural and congenital heart disease have mandated an increased demand for three-dimensional (3D) visualisation of complex cardiac anatomy. Despite progress in 3D imaging modalities, the pre- and periprocedural visualisation of spatial anatomy is relegated to two-dimensional flat screen representations. 3D printing is an evolving technology based on the concept of additive manufacturing, where computerised digital surface renders are converted into physical models. Printed models replicate complex structures in tangible forms that cardiovascular physicians and surgeons can use for education, preprocedural planning and device testing. In this review we discuss the different steps of the 3D printing process, which include image acquisition, segmentation, printing methods and materials. We also examine the expanded applications of 3D printing in the catheter-based treatment of adult patients with structural and congenital heart disease while highlighting the current limitations of this technology in terms of segmentation, model accuracy and dynamic capabilities. Furthermore, we provide information on the resources needed to establish a hospital-based 3D printing laboratory.

  4. Hypokalemia and sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Keld

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately three million people suffer sudden cardiac death annually. These deaths often emerge from a complex interplay of substrates and triggers. Disturbed potassium homeostasis among heart cells is an example of such a trigger. Thus, hypokalemia and, also, more transient...... of fatal arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death a patient is, the more attention should be given to the potassium homeostasis....

  5. Nitric Oxide-Sensitive Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Rubella Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Raimondi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent pulmonary hypertension is a very rare presentation of congenital virus infection. We discuss the case of complete congenital rubella syndrome presenting at echocardiography with pulmonary hypertension that worsened after ductus ligation. Cardiac catheterization showed a normal pulmonary valve and vascular tree but a PAP=40 mmHg. The infant promptly responded to inhaled nitric oxide while on mechanical ventilation and was later shifted to oral sildenafil. It is not clear whether our observation may be due to direct viral damage to the endothelium or to the rubella virus increasing the vascular tone via a metabolic derangement.

  6. Congenital abnormalities associated with hemivertebrae in relation to hemivertebrae location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollini, Gerard; Launay, Franck; Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Viehweger, Elke; Jouve, Jean-Luc

    2010-01-01

    Numerous congenital abnormalities have been reported in association with hemivertebrae (HV). No data exist about their incidence depending on the location of the HV. From 1980 to 2003, 75 patients with 80 HV responsible for evolutive congenital scoliosis were managed by HV resection using a double approach and short anterior and posterior convex fusion. The associated abnormalities were evaluated with MRI, echocardiography and renal ultrasound. Associated genitourinary abnormalities were found in 24% of patients, cardiac abnormalities in 8% and intrathecal abnormalities in 15%. Medullar abnormalities were more frequent in case of vertebral malformations at lumbosacral level.

  7. Congenital orbital teratoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiyub, Shereen; Chan, Wengonn; Szetu, John; Sullivan, Laurence J; Pater, John; Cooper, Peter; Selva, Dinesh

    2013-12-01

    We present a case of mature congenital orbital teratoma managed with lid-sparing exenteration and dermis fat graft. This is a case report on the management of congenital orbital teratoma. A full-term baby was born in Fiji with prolapsed right globe which was surrounded by a nonpulsatile, cystic mass. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with congenital orbital teratoma. Due to limited surgical expertise, the patient was transferred to Adelaide, Australia for further management. The patient underwent a lid-sparing exenteration with frozen section control of the apical margin. A dermis fat graft from the groin was placed beneath the lid skin to provide volume. Histopathology revealed mature tissues from each of the three germ cell layers which confirmed the diagnosis of mature teratoma. We describe the successful use of demis fat graft in socket reconstruction following lid-sparing exenteration for congenital orbital teratoma.

  8. Congenital orbital teratoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen Aiyub

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of mature congenital orbital teratoma managed with lid-sparing exenteration and dermis fat graft. This is a case report on the management of congenital orbital teratoma. A full-term baby was born in Fiji with prolapsed right globe which was surrounded by a nonpulsatile, cystic mass. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with congenital orbital teratoma. Due to limited surgical expertise, the patient was transferred to Adelaide, Australia for further management. The patient underwent a lid-sparing exenteration with frozen section control of the apical margin. A dermis fat graft from the groin was placed beneath the lid skin to provide volume. Histopathology revealed mature tissues from each of the three germ cell layers which confirmed the diagnosis of mature teratoma. We describe the successful use of demis fat graft in socket reconstruction following lid-sparing exenteration for congenital orbital teratoma.

  9. Congenital Constriction Band Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Gupta, Fareed Malik, Rishabh Gupta, M.A.Basit, Dara Singh

    2008-01-01

    Congenital constriction bands are anomalous bands that encircle a digit or an extremity. Congenitalconstriction band syndrome is rare condition and is mostly associated with other musculoskeletaldisorders.We report such a rare experience.

  10. Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hyun Sub; Chung, Young Sun; Suh, Chee Jang; Won, Jong Jin

    1985-01-01

    Two cases of congenital anterior urethral diverticular which have occurred in a 4 year old and one month old boy are presented. Etiology, diagnostic procedures, and its clinical results are briefly reviewed

  11. Congenital chylous ascites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanska-Kita, J.; Borszewska-Kornacka, M. K.; Rudzinska, I.; Wawrzoniak, T.; Dobrzanska, A.; Czech-Kowalska, J.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital chylous ascites is a rare entity, conditioned by numerous factors and with changing dynamics of the disease. Because of the lack of therapeutic and diagnostic standards, this disease constitutes to be a medical challenge. This article presents current knowledge on pathogenesis, diagnostics and management of this disease, as well as a case of a newborn with primary congenital chylous ascites in the abdominal cavity. (authors)

  12. Multifocal Congenital Hemangiopericytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robl, Renata; Carvalho, Vânia Oliveira; Abagge, Kerstin Taniguchi; Uber, Marjorie; Lichtvan, Leniza Costa Lima; Werner, Betina; Mehrdad Nadji, Mehrdad

    2017-01-01

    Congenital hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is a rare mesenchymal tumor with less aggressive behavior and a more favorable prognosis than similar tumors in adults. Multifocal presentation is even less common than isolated HPC and hence its clinical and histologic recognition may be challenging. A newborn infant with multifocal congenital HPC causing severe deformity but with a favorable outcome after chemotherapy and surgical removal is reported. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Utility of physical examination and comparison to echocardiography for cardiac diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Patel

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Careful clinical auscultation using a stethoscope remains a valuable tool for cardiac diagnosis. Decision on initial diagnosis and management of valvular and congenital heart diseases should be based on clinical examination and integrating such information with echocardiography as required.

  14. [Certification and quality management of a complex university cardiac center according to law EN ISO 9001: 2000].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beholz, Sven; Koch, Christina; Konertz, Wolfgang

    2003-04-01

    Quality management systems can improve quality in health care units. The introduction of a quality management system according to ISO 9001: 2000 in a university department of cardiovascular surgery is described. First a thorough analysis of all processes of patient treatment and clinical research was obtained. Multiple interfaces had to be defined to different departments as well as to administration units. All necessary resources were evaluated and optimised. Customer satisfaction was evaluated by surveys of patients and collaborating physicians. Quality rounds including physicians, nurses and technicians were instituted. Based on these preparatory works all processes including their responsibilities and necessary resources were redefined and described in the quality manual. After 18 months' of certification of our quality management system according to ISO 9001: 2000 was recommended by an independent, accredited organisation. In summary, certification of a university department of cardiovascular surgery according to ISO 9001: 2000 is possible and may represent the first step towards total quality management. In complex health care units the certification of individual departments may help to generate a consciousness for quality on the road to total quality management.

  15. Results of rapid-response extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children with refractory cardiac arrest following cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsoufi, Bahaaldin; Awan, Abid; Manlhiot, Cedric; Guechef, Alexander; Al-Halees, Zohair; Al-Ahmadi, Mamdouh; McCrindle, Brian W; Kalloghlian, Avedis

    2014-02-01

    Survival of children having cardiac arrest refractory to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is very poor. We sought to examine current era outcomes of extracorporeal CPR (ECPR) support for refractory arrest following surgical correction of congenital heart disease. Demographic, anatomical, clinical, surgical and support details of children requiring postoperative ECPR (2007-12) were included in multivariable logistic regression models to determine the factors associated with survival. Thirty-nine children, median age 44 days (4 days-10 years), required postoperative ECPR at a median interval of 1 day (up to 15 days) after surgery. Thirteen (33%) children had single-ventricle pathology; Risk Adjustment in Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS)-1 categories were 2, 3, 4 and 6 in 6, 15, 13 and 5 patients, respectively. Median CPR duration was 34 (8-125) min, while median support duration was 4 (1-17) days. Seven (18%) patients underwent cardiac re-operation, 28 (72%) survived >24 h after support discontinuation and 16 (41%) survived. Survival rates in neonates, infants and older children were 53, 39 and 17% (P=0.13). Survival rates for single- vs two-ventricle pathology patients were 54 and 35%, (P=0.25) and 50, 47, 23 and 60% in RACHS-1 2, 3, 4 and 6 patients, respectively (P=0.37). Survivors had shorter CPR duration (25 vs 34 min, P=0.05), lower pre-arrest lactate (2.6 vs 4.6 mmol/l, P=0.05) and postextracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) peak lactate (15.4 vs 20.0 mmol/l, P<0.001). On multivariable analysis, factors associated with death were higher immediate post-ECMO lactate (odds ratio, OR 1.34 per mmol/l, P=0.008) and renal failure requiring haemodialysis (OR 14.1, P=0.01). ECPR plays a valuable role in children having refractory postoperative cardiac arrest. Survival is unrelated to cardiac physiology or surgical complexity. Timely support prior to the emergence of end-organ injury and surgical correction of residual cardiac lesions might enhance

  16. Real-time three dimensional CT and MRI to guide interventions for congenital heart disease and acquired pulmonary vein stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntharos, Patcharapong; Setser, Randolph M; Bradley-Skelton, Sharon; Prieto, Lourdes R

    2017-10-01

    To validate the feasibility and spatial accuracy of pre-procedural 3D images to 3D rotational fluoroscopy registration to guide interventional procedures in patients with congenital heart disease and acquired pulmonary vein stenosis. Cardiac interventions in patients with congenital and structural heart disease require complex catheter manipulation. Current technology allows registration of the anatomy obtained from 3D CT and/or MRI to be overlaid onto fluoroscopy. Thirty patients scheduled for interventional procedures from 12/2012 to 8/2015 were prospectively recruited. A C-arm CT using a biplane C-arm system (Artis zee, VC14H, Siemens Healthcare) was acquired to enable 3D3D registration with pre-procedural images. Following successful image fusion, the anatomic landmarks marked in pre-procedural images were overlaid on live fluoroscopy. The accuracy of image registration was determined by measuring the distance between overlay markers and a reference point in the image. The clinical utility of the registration was evaluated as either "High", "Medium" or "None". Seventeen patients with congenital heart disease and 13 with acquired pulmonary vein stenosis were enrolled. Accuracy and benefit of registration were not evaluated in two patients due to suboptimal images. The distance between the marker and the actual anatomical location was 0-2 mm in 18 (64%), 2-4 mm in 3 (11%) and >4 mm in 7 (25%) patients. 3D3D registration was highly beneficial in 18 (64%), intermediate in 3 (11%), and not beneficial in 7 (25%) patients. 3D3D registration can facilitate complex congenital and structural interventions. It may reduce procedure time, radiation and contrast dose.

  17. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Trevisan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype.DATA SOURCES: Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on.DATA SYNTHESIS: Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesions. Several researchers have evaluated the presence of chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype in patients with congenital heart disease. However, most of the articles were retrospective studies developed in Europe and only some of the studied patients had a karyotype exam. In this review, only one study was conducted in Latin America, in Brazil. It is known that chromosomal abnormalities are frequent, being present in about one in every ten patients with congenital heart disease. Among the karyotype alterations in these patients, the most important is the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome. These patients often have associated extra-cardiac malformations, with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, which makes heart surgery even more risky.CONCLUSIONS: Despite all the progress made in recent decades in the field of cytogenetic, the karyotype remains an essential tool in order to evaluate patients with congenital heart disease. The detailed dysmorphological physical examination is of great importance to indicate the need of a karyotype.

  18. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Patrícia; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Koshiyama, Dayane Bohn; Zen, Tatiana Diehl; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype. DATA SOURCES: Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on. DATA SYNTHESIS: Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesions. Several researchers have evaluated the presence of chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype in patients with congenital heart disease. However, most of the articles were retrospective studies developed in Europe and only some of the studied patients had a karyotype exam. In this review, only one study was conducted in Latin America, in Brazil. It is known that chromosomal abnormalities are frequent, being present in about one in every ten patients with congenital heart disease. Among the karyotype alterations in these patients, the most important is the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). These patients often have associated extra-cardiac malformations, with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, which makes heart surgery even more risky. CONCLUSIONS: Despite all the progress made in recent decades in the field of cytogenetic, the karyotype remains an essential tool in order to evaluate patients with congenital heart disease. The detailed dysmorphological physical examination is of great importance to indicate the need of a karyotype. PMID:25119760

  19. Hypertension, obesity, and coronary artery disease in the survivors of congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, S Lucy; Silversides, Candice K

    2013-07-01

    Obesity, hypertension, and coronary artery disease are prevalent in the general population and well recognized as contributors to cardiac morbidity and mortality. With surgical and medical advances, there is a growing and aging population with congenital heart disease who are also at risk of developing these comorbidities. In addition, some congenital cardiac lesions predispose patients to conditions such as hypertension or coronary artery disease. The effect of these comorbidities on the structurally abnormal heart is not well understood, but might be very important, especially in those with residual abnormalities. Thus, in addition to surveillance for and treatment of late complications it is important for the congenital cardiologist to consider and aggressively manage acquired comorbidities. In this review we explore the prevalence of hypertension, obesity, and coronary artery disease, discuss congenital lesions that predispose to these conditions and review management strategies for this unique population. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Recent developments in cardiac pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, D J

    1995-10-01

    Indications for cardiac pacing continue to expand. Pacing to improve functional capacity, which is now common, relies on careful patient selection and technical improvements, such as complex software algorithms and diagnostic capabilities.

  1. CONGENITAL MYOTONIC DYSTROPHY – CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Neubauer

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Myotonic dystrophy is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by myotonia, myopathy of voluntary and involuntary muscles, frontal baldness in men, cardiac conduction abnormalities, catharacts, intellectual deterioration and endocrinopathy. Men with this disorder have often gonadal atrophy and infertility. On the other hand women are generally fertile. During pregnancy their myopathy worsens, often causing severe obstetrical complications. Their children may develop congenital form of the disease with signs of myopathy in utero and have great difficulties in maintaining life functions after birth, together with other characteristical signs of this form: bilateral facial weakness, severe hypotonia, feeding difficulties, talipes equinovarus and mental retardation. The authors present a female newborn with such congenital form of myotonic dystrophy.Conclusions. The authors have emphasized the importance of medical history, regular updating of all the cases of neuromuscular diseases in the region and clinical characteristics for the recognition of congenital form of myotonic dystrophy because of possible prenatal diagnostics and better antenatal and postantal care.

  2. Congenital heart defects in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2017-01-01

    Yuan SM. Congenital heart defects in Williams syndrome. Turk J Pediatr 2017; 59: 225-232. Williams syndrome (WS), also known as Williams-Beuren syndrome, is a rare genetic disorder involving multiple systems including the circulatory system. However, the etiologies of the associated congenital heart defects in WS patients have not been sufficiently elucidated and represent therapeutic challenges. The typical congenital heart defects in WS were supravalvar aortic stenosis, pulmonary stenosis (both valvular and peripheral), aortic coarctation and mitral valvar prolapse. The atypical cardiovascular anomalies include tetralogy of Fallot, atrial septal defects, aortic and mitral valvular insufficiencies, bicuspid aortic valves, ventricular septal defects, total anomalous pulmonary venous return, double chambered right ventricle, Ebstein anomaly and arterial anomalies. Deletion of the elastin gene on chromosome 7q11.23 leads to deficiency or abnormal deposition of elastin during cardiovascular development, thereby leading to widespread cardiovascular abnormalities in WS. In this article, the distribution, treatment and surgical outcomes of typical and atypical cardiac defects in WS are discussed.

  3. Congenital heart malformations induced by hemodynamic altering surgical interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeline eMidgett

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic heart formation results from a dynamic interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Blood flow during early embryonic stages plays a critical role in heart development, as interactions between flow and cardiac tissues generate biomechanical forces that modulate cardiac growth and remodeling. Normal hemodynamic conditions are essential for proper cardiac development, while altered blood flow induced by surgical manipulations in animal models result in heart defects similar to those seen in humans with congenital heart disease. This review compares the altered hemodynamics, changes in tissue properties, and cardiac defects reported after common surgical interventions that alter hemodynamics in the early chick embryo, and shows that interventions produce a wide spectrum of cardiac defects. Vitelline vein ligation and left atrial ligation decrease blood pressure and flow; and outflow tract banding increases blood pressure and flow velocities. These three surgical interventions result in many of the same cardiac defects, which indicate that the altered hemodynamics interfere with common looping, septation and valve formation processes that occur after intervention and that shape the four-chambered heart. While many similar defects develop after the interventions, the varying degrees of hemodynamic load alteration among the three interventions also result in varying incidence and severity of cardiac defects, indicating that the hemodynamic modulation of cardiac developmental processes is strongly dependent on hemodynamic load.

  4. Application of ultrasound in fetal cardiac abnormalitis screening and analyzing of influencing factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Wei; Chen Hui; Guo Hua; Fu Lijuan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To identify the application value of ultrasound in the screening of fetal cardiac abnormalities and to reduce its affecting factors, in order to maximally decrease the birth of oaf. Methods: Adopting the method of four chamber hearts cross-section and sound beam plane head laterodeviation, 3821 fetal hearts were screened by ultrasonocardiography in middle and late fetal period. The influencing factors were also analyzed. Screening results were compared with the autopsy following induced labor and the ultrasonocardiogram after borne. Results: Total 23 cases of the cardiac anomalies were confirmed by odinopoeia or after borned, 21 cases were diagnosed by antepartum ultrasonocardiography, the detectable rate were 91.3%(21/23). And the complex cardiac anomalies were 19 cases, accounted for 82.61%(19/23), the general malformation were 4 cases, accounted for 17.39%(4/23). In 19 cases of the complex anomalies, 17 cases were diagnosed by antepartum examination in the first time, 2 cases were diagnosed by reexamination, the total detectable rate were 100%(19/19). Conclusion: Ultrasonography is not only non-invasive but also unique method in detecting fetal heart defects. It will help to diagnose definitely the vast majority of congenital malformation in the fetal heart, especially complex malformation in the middle and later fetal period. There are some limitations and chronergy in ultrasonography for the screening of fetal heart defects, which should be followed-up when the fetal appeared 'normal' in the early screening. (authors)

  5. Increased arterial stiffness in children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häcker, Anna-Luisa; Reiner, Barbara; Oberhoffer, Renate; Hager, Alfred; Ewert, Peter; Müller, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Objective Central systolic blood pressure (SBP) is a measure of arterial stiffness and strongly associated with atherosclerosis and end-organ damage. It is a stronger predictor of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality than peripheral SBP. In particular, for children with congenital heart disease, a higher central SBP might impose a greater threat of cardiac damage. The aim of the study was to analyse and compare central SBP in children with congenital heart disease and in healthy counterparts. Patients and methods Central SBP was measured using an oscillometric method in 417 children (38.9% girls, 13.0 ± 3.2 years) with various congenital heart diseases between July 2014 and February 2017. The test results were compared with a recent healthy reference cohort of 1466 children (49.5% girls, 12.9 ± 2.5 years). Results After correction for several covariates in a general linear model, central SBP of children with congenital heart disease was significantly increased (congenital heart disease: 102.1 ± 10.2 vs. healthy reference cohort: 100.4 ± 8.6, p congenital heart disease subgroups revealed higher central SBP in children with left heart obstructions (mean difference: 3.6 mmHg, p congenital heart disease have significantly higher central SBP compared with healthy peers, predisposing them to premature heart failure. Screening and long-term observations of central SBP in children with congenital heart disease seems warranted in order to evaluate the need for treatment.

  6. Lung herniation into pericardial cavity: A case of partial congenital absence of right pericardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadashiv B Tamagond

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital absence of pericardium is rarely seen, often diagnosed intraoperatively during cardiac and thoracic surgeries. Left-sided pericardial defects are more common than right-sided ones. We present a case of an incidentally detected congenital absence of right pericardium with herniation of part of the right lung during ventricular septal defect closure surgery in a male child aged 4 years.

  7. Congenital malaria in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yong Tao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Congenital malaria, in which infants are directly infected with malaria parasites from their mother prior to or during birth, is a potentially life-threatening condition that occurs at relatively low rates in malaria-endemic regions. It is recognized as a serious problem in Plasmodium falciparum-endemic sub-Saharan Africa, where recent data suggests that it is more common than previously believed. In such regions where malaria transmission is high, neonates may be protected from disease caused by congenital malaria through the transfer of maternal antibodies against the parasite. However, in low P. vivax-endemic regions, immunity to vivax malaria is low; thus, there is the likelihood that congenital vivax malaria poses a more significant threat to newborn health. Malaria had previously been a major parasitic disease in China, and congenital malaria case reports in Chinese offer valuable information for understanding the risks posed by congenital malaria to neonatal health. As most of the literature documenting congenital malaria cases in China are written in Chinese and therefore are not easily accessible to the global malaria research community, we have undertaken an extensive review of the Chinese literature on this subject. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we reviewed congenital malaria cases from three major searchable Chinese journal databases, concentrating on data from 1915 through 2011. Following extensive screening, a total of 104 cases of congenital malaria were identified. These cases were distributed mainly in the eastern, central, and southern regions of China, as well as in the low-lying region of southwest China. The dominant species was P. vivax (92.50%, reflecting the malaria parasite species distribution in China. The leading clinical presentation was fever, and other clinical presentations were anaemia, jaundice, paleness, diarrhoea, vomiting, and general weakness. With the exception of two cases, all patients

  8. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Rednak-Paradiž

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: CMV is the most common agent that causes congenital virus infection. Only 10 % of infected children have symptomatic infection immediately after birth. Signs of central nervous system damage, neurosensory deafness and delayed psychomotor development may manifest as a result of asimptomatic congenital infection later in childhood. In the article we present basic properties of CMV; we describe clinical picture of the congenital infection and possibilities of diagnose and its treatment. We present five children with symptomatic congenital CMV infection that were hospitalized for the period 1992–2002 at the Neonatal department in the University Children’s Hospital in Ljubljana.Conclusions: Identification of infected neonates, especially those with asimptomatic congenital CMV infection, is difficult. Latest incidence of infection in Slovenia is unknown. With new investigations the efficiency of antiviral therapy was discovered but exact indications for therapy are not yet known. CMV vaccine, once available, may ultimately be the best control strategy for this important public health problem. Proper educating women in childbearing age about the risks of CMV and how to avoid disease transmission during pregnancy (hand washing, avoiding mouth-to-mouth contact with preschool children, usage of gloves especially when handling dipers or respiratory secretions are the only control strategies available.

  9. Prevalence of congenital amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Isabelle; Vuvan, Dominique T

    2017-05-01

    Congenital amusia (commonly known as tone deafness) is a lifelong musical disorder that affects 4% of the population according to a single estimate based on a single test from 1980. Here we present the first large-based measure of prevalence with a sample of 20 000 participants, which does not rely on self-referral. On the basis of three objective tests and a questionnaire, we show that (a) the prevalence of congenital amusia is only 1.5%, with slightly more females than males, unlike other developmental disorders where males often predominate; (b) self-disclosure is a reliable index of congenital amusia, which suggests that congenital amusia is hereditary, with 46% first-degree relatives similarly affected; (c) the deficit is not attenuated by musical training and (d) it emerges in relative isolation from other cognitive disorder, except for spatial orientation problems. Hence, we suggest that congenital amusia is likely to result from genetic variations that affect musical abilities specifically.

  10. The congenital long QT syndrome Type 3: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Ricardo Pérez-Riera

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3 is the third in frequency compared to the 15 forms known currently of congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS. Cardiac events are less frequent in LQT3 when compared with LQT1 and LQT2, but more likely to be lethal; the likelihood of dying during a cardiac event is 20% in families with an LQT3 mutation and 4% with either an LQT1 or an LQT2 mutation. LQT3 is consequence of mutation of gene SCN5A which codes for the Nav1.5 Na+ channel α-subunit and electrocardiographically characterized by a tendency to bradycardia related to age, prolonged QT/QTc interval (mean QTc value 478 ± 52 ms, accentuated QT dispersion consequence of prolonged ST segment, late onset of T wave and frequent prominent U wave because of longer repolarization of the M cell across left ventricular wall.

  11. Electron-beam CT diagnosis of congenital cardiovascular diverticula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Youyou; Zheng Lili; Li Xiangmin; Zhou Xuhui; Peng Qian; Meng Quanfei; Dai Ruping

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical application of electron-beam CT (EBCT) in the diagnosis of congenital cardiovascular diverticula. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 9 patients with congenital cardiovascular diverticula confirmed by operation and pathology was done. Of them, enhanced continuous volume scan was performed on 8 patients and enhanced single slice scan was performed on one patient with an Imatron C-150 scanner. Results: The group of 9 patients included one patient with diverticulum of the left ventricle, 3 patients with diverticulum of the atria and 5 patients with diverticulum of the aorta. EBCT scan and three dimensional reconstruction could demonstrate not only the origin, size, shape, location and adjacent structure of diverticula, but also other important complicated abnormalities such as ventriculoarterial connection disorder, cardiac septal defect, aortic coarctation and even dissection. Conclusion: EBCT is an ideal noninvasive technique in the diagnosis of congenital cardiovascular diverticula. (authors)

  12. LR-Spring Mass Model for Cardiac Surgical Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosegaard, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the research conducted was to develop a real-time surgical simulator for preoperative planning of surgery in congenital heart disease. The main problem simulating procedures on cardiac morphology is the need for a large degree of detail and simulation speed. In combination with a d......The purpose of the research conducted was to develop a real-time surgical simulator for preoperative planning of surgery in congenital heart disease. The main problem simulating procedures on cardiac morphology is the need for a large degree of detail and simulation speed. In combination...

  13. Added value of three-dimensional ultrasound with STIC technology in the diagnosis of fetus with cardiac abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Hongning; Zhu Yunxiao; Lin Meifang; Li Lijuan; Wang Zilian; Shi Huijuan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC) technology of three- dimensional ultrasound (3DUS) for fetal congenital heart disease (CHD). Methods: The study was conducted in the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University from January 2006 to October 2008. Twenty-four fetuses with suspected cardiac defects on routine 2DUS underwent STIC volume sweep. The diagnosis was confirmed by autopsy. Fetal cardiac STIC volume data set was analyzed by using the software of 4D View (GE, Kretztechnik). The concordance of' fetal cardiac defects diagnosed on 2DUS and STIC was compared to autopsy. Results: There were 92 cardiac defects in 24 cases. The overall concordance of various fetal cardiac defects diagnosed on STIC (97.8%) was significantly higher than that of 2DUS (64.1%) (P 0.05). However, concordance rate of STIC (100%, 100%, 97.5%) was significantly (P<0.05) higher than that of 2DUS (37.5%, 54.5%, 57.5%) for diagnosing anomalies of atrio-venous junction and ventriculo-arterial junction, arterial trunk and its branch. Conclusion: STIC technology of 3DUS may provide considerable diagnostic information for prenatal diagnosis of complex CHD, especially in abnormalities of atrio-venous junction, ventriculo-arterial junction, arterial trunk and its branches. (authors)

  14. Nitrofurantoin and congenital abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2001-01-01

    or fetuses with Down’s syndrome (patient controls), 23 (2.8%) pregnant women were treated with nitrofurantoin. The above differences between population controls and cases may be connected with recall bias, because the case-control pair analysis did not indicate a teratogenic potential of nitrofurantoin use......Objective: To study human teratogenic potential of oral nitrofurantoin treatment during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: Pair analysis of cases with congenital abnormalities and matched population controls in the population-based dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital...... during the second and the third months of gestation, i.e. in the critical period for major congenital abnormalities. Conclusion: Treatment with nitrofurantoin during pregnancy does not present detectable teratogenic risk to the fetus....

  15. Congenital syphilis: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Chaida Sonda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Syphilis is an infectious disease caused by Treponema pallidum and has high rates of vertical transmission, which can reach 100% depending on the maternal disease and stage of pregnancy. The diagnosis of gestational syphilis is simple and its screening is required during the prenatal period. However, this disease still has a high prevalence, affecting two million pregnant women worldwide. The procedures performed in newborns with congenital syphilis represent costs that are three-fold higher than the ones spent with a baby without this infection. The treatment is generally carried out with penicillin and must be extended to sexual partners. Inadequate or lack of treatment of congenital syphilis can result in miscarriage, premature birth, acute complications and other fetal sequelae. KEYWORDS: Congenital syphilis. Treponema pallidum. Vertical transmission.

  16. Congenital cataract screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhale Rajavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (1 year is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender.

  17. Epidemiology of adult congenital heart disease: demographic variations worldwide

    OpenAIRE

    Mulder, B. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The population of adults with a congenital heart defect (CHD) is increasing, due to improved survival after cardiac surgery. To accommodate the specialised care for these patients, a profound interest in the epidemiology of CHD is required. The exact size of the current population of adults with CHD is unknown, but the best available evidence suggests that currently overall prevalence of CHD in the adult population is about 3000 per million. Regional differences in CHD prevalence have been de...

  18. Congenital heart disease in the newborn requiring early intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sin Weon Yun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Although antenatal diagnostic technique has considerably improved, precise detection and proper management of the neonate with congenital heart disease (CHD is always a great concern to pediatricians. Congenital cardiac malformations vary from benign to serious conditions such as complete transposition of the great arteries (TGA, critical pulmonary and aortic valvular stenosis/atresia, hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS, obstructed total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR, which the baby needs immediate diagnosis and management for survival. Unfortunately, these life threatening heart diseases may not have obvious evidence early after birth, most of the clinical and physical findings are nonspecific and vague, which makes the diagnosis difficult. High index of suspicion and astute acumen are essential to decision making. When patent ductus arteriosus (PDA is opened widely, many serious malformations may not be noticed easily in the early life, but would progress as severe acidosis/shock/cyanosis or even death as PDA constricts after few hours to days. Ductus dependent congenital cardiac lesions can be divided into the ductus dependent systemic or pulmonary disease, but physiologically quite different from each other and treatment strategy has to be tailored to the clinical status and cardiac malformations. Inevitably early presentation is often regarded as a medical emergency. Differential diagnosis with inborn error metabolic disorders, neonatal sepsis, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN and other pulmonary conditions are necessary. Urgent identification of the newborn at such high risk requires timely referral to a pediatric cardiologist, and timely intervention is the key in reducing mortality and morbidity. This following review deals with the clinical presentations, investigative modalities and approach to management of congenital cardiac malformations presenting in the early life.

  19. Patent Ductus Arteriosus Associated with Congenital Anomaly of Coronary Artery

    OpenAIRE

    Maleki, Majid; Azizian, Nassrin; Esmaeilzadeh, Maryam; Moradi, Bahieh

    2013-01-01

    We reported a case of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) with congenital anomaly of coronary arteries as abnormal origin of right coronary artery (RCA) and left coronary artery (LCA) from a single ostium of the right coronary sinus. A 21-year-old man referred to our institution for evaluation of cardiac murmur. He has suffered from palpitation and atypical chest pain for three months. On physical examination, a continuous murmur was heard in the second left parasternal space. Transthoracic echoca...

  20. Three-dimensional cine MRI in free-breathing infants and children with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, Achim; Fenchel, Michael C.; Kramer, Ulrich; Bretschneider, Christiane; Doering, Joerg; Claussen, Claus D.; Miller, Stephan [University of Tuebingen (Germany). Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Greil, Gerald F. [St. Thomas Hospital, Division of Imaging Sciences, King' s College London (United Kingdom); Martirosian, Petros [University of Tuebingen, Section of Experimental Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Sieverding, Ludger [University of Tuebingen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    Patients with congenital heart disease frequently have complex cardiac and vascular malformations requiring detailed non-invasive diagnostic evaluation including functional parameters. To evaluate the morphological and functional information provided by a novel 3-D cine steady-state free-precession (SSFP) sequence. Twenty consecutive children (mean age 2.2 years, nine boys) were examined using a 1.5-T MR system including 2-D cine gradient-recalled-echo sequences, static 3-D SSFP and 3-D cine SSFP sequences. Measurement of ventricular structures and volumes showed close agreement between the 3-D cine SSFP sequence and the 2-D cine gradient-recalled-echo and static 3-D SSFP sequences (left ventricular volumes mean difference 1.0-1.9 ml and 8.8-11.4%, respectively; right ventricular volumes 1.7-2.1 ml and 9.9-16.9%, respectively). No systematic bias was observed. 3-D cine MRI provides anatomic as well as functional information with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution in free-breathing infants with congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  1. Three-dimensional cine MRI in free-breathing infants and children with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeger, Achim; Fenchel, Michael C.; Kramer, Ulrich; Bretschneider, Christiane; Doering, Joerg; Claussen, Claus D.; Miller, Stephan; Martirosian, Petros; Sieverding, Ludger

    2009-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart disease frequently have complex cardiac and vascular malformations requiring detailed non-invasive diagnostic evaluation including functional parameters. To evaluate the morphological and functional information provided by a novel 3-D cine steady-state free-precession (SSFP) sequence. Twenty consecutive children (mean age 2.2 years, nine boys) were examined using a 1.5-T MR system including 2-D cine gradient-recalled-echo sequences, static 3-D SSFP and 3-D cine SSFP sequences. Measurement of ventricular structures and volumes showed close agreement between the 3-D cine SSFP sequence and the 2-D cine gradient-recalled-echo and static 3-D SSFP sequences (left ventricular volumes mean difference 1.0-1.9 ml and 8.8-11.4%, respectively; right ventricular volumes 1.7-2.1 ml and 9.9-16.9%, respectively). No systematic bias was observed. 3-D cine MRI provides anatomic as well as functional information with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution in free-breathing infants with congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  2. Accuracy of the all patient refined diagnosis related groups classification system in congenital heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, Aimee S; Shults, Justine; Gaynor, J William; Leonard, Mary B; Dai, Dingwei; Feudtner, Chris

    2014-02-01

    Administrative data are increasingly used to evaluate clinical outcomes and quality of care in pediatric congenital heart surgery (CHS) programs. Several published analyses of large pediatric administrative data sets have relied on the All Patient Refined Diagnosis Related Groups (APR-DRG, version 24) diagnostic classification system. The accuracy of this classification system for patients undergoing CHS is unclear. We performed a retrospective cohort study of all 14,098 patients 0 to 5 years of age undergoing any of six selected congenital heart operations, ranging in complexity from isolated closure of a ventricular septal defect to single-ventricle palliation, at 40 tertiary-care pediatric centers in the Pediatric Health Information Systems database between 2007 and 2010. Assigned APR-DRGs (cardiac versus noncardiac) were compared using χ2 or Fisher's exact tests between those patients admitted during the first day of life versus later and between those receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support versus those not. Recursive partitioning was used to assess the greatest determinants of APR-DRG type in the model. Every patient admitted on day 1 of life was assigned to a noncardiac APR-DRG (pDRG (pDRG experienced a significantly increased mortality (pDRG coding has systematic misclassifications, which may result in inaccurate reporting of CHS case volumes and mortality. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nutrition and growth in congenital heart disease: a challenge in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medoff-Cooper, Barbara; Ravishankar, Chitra

    2013-03-01

    Growth failure secondary to feeding problems after complex neonatal cardiac surgery is well documented, but not well understood. The purpose of this review is to describe feeding and growth pattern in children with congenital heart defects. Nearly half of the infants with univentricular heart defects require supplementation with nasogastric or gastrostomy tube at discharge from neonatal surgery. Feeding challenges contribute to parental stress, and persist beyond infancy. These infants are 'stunted' with both weight and height being below normal. Nearly a quarter of these infants meet the definition of 'failure to thrive' in the first year of life. Short stature is a significant problem for many of these children, and has an impact on neurodevelopmental outcomes. A structured nutritional program can have a positive impact on growth in the interstage period prior to the superior cavopulmonary connection. Optimizing nutritional intake has been targeted as a key component of the National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative. This initiative has enabled the development of best practices that have the potential to mitigate poor growth in children with congenital heart defects.

  4. Contemporary management and outcomes in congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutty, Shelby; Danford, David A; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Tutarel, Oktay

    2018-01-11

    Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (ccTGA) can occur in isolation, or in combination with other structural cardiac anomalies, most commonly ventricular septal defect, pulmonary stenosis and tricuspid valve disease. Clinical recognition can be challenging, so echocardiography is often the means by which definitive diagnosis is made. The tricuspid valve and right ventricle are on the systemic arterial side of the ccTGA circulation, and are therefore subject to progressive functional deterioration. The natural history of ccTGA is also greatly influenced by the nature and severity of accompanying lesions, some of which require surgical repair. Some management strategies leave the right ventricle as the systemic arterial pump, but carry the risk of worsening heart failure. More complex 'double switch' repairs establish the left ventricle as the systemic pump, and include an atrial baffle to redirect venous return in combination with either arterial switch or Rastelli operation (if a suitable ventricular septal defect permits). Occasionally, the anatomic peculiarities of ccTGA do not allow straightforward biventricular repair, and Fontan palliation is a reasonable option. Regardless of the approach selected, late cardiovascular complications are relatively common, so ongoing outpatient surveillance should be established in an age-appropriate facility with expertise in congenital heart disease care. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Congenital maxillary double lip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Singh Chauhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Double lip, also referred to as "macrocheilia," is a rare anomaly which affects the upper lip more commonly than the lower lip. It consists of a fold of excess or redundant hypertrophic tissue on the mucosal side of the lip. The congenital double lip is believed to be present at birth and becomes more prominent after eruption of teeth. It affects esthetics and also interferes with speech and mastication. Simple surgical excision produces good functional and cosmetic results. We report a case of a non-syndromic congenital maxillary double lip in a 21-year-old male patient.

  6. Congenital hearing impairment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robson, Caroline D. [Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2006-04-15

    Establishing the etiology of congenital hearing impairment can significantly improve treatment for certain causes of hearing loss and facilitates genetic counseling. High-resolution CT and MRI have contributed to the evaluation and management of hearing impairment. In addition, with the identification of innumerable genetic loci and genetic defects involved in hearing loss, genetic testing has emerged as an invaluable tool in the assessment of hearing impairment. Some of the common forms of congenital hearing loss are reviewed and their imaging features illustrated. (orig.)

  7. Congenital hearing impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robson, Caroline D.

    2006-01-01

    Establishing the etiology of congenital hearing impairment can significantly improve treatment for certain causes of hearing loss and facilitates genetic counseling. High-resolution CT and MRI have contributed to the evaluation and management of hearing impairment. In addition, with the identification of innumerable genetic loci and genetic defects involved in hearing loss, genetic testing has emerged as an invaluable tool in the assessment of hearing impairment. Some of the common forms of congenital hearing loss are reviewed and their imaging features illustrated. (orig.)

  8. Congenital laryngeal anomalies,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Rutter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is essential for clinicians to understand issues relevant to the airway management of infants and to be cognizant of the fact that infants with congenital laryngeal anomalies are at particular risk for an unstable airway. Objectives: To familiarize clinicians with issues relevant to the airway management of infants and to present a succinct description of the diagnosis and management of an array of congenital laryngeal anomalies. Methods: Revision article, in which the main aspects concerning airway management of infants will be analyzed. Conclusions: It is critical for clinicians to understand issues relevant to the airway management of infants.

  9. During childhood unrecognized congenital heart defect in patient with Turner syndrome, and its implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaskova, E.; Kapralova, S.; Zapletalova, J.; Tuedoes, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease affects approximately 50 % of individuals with Turner syndrome (TS). Bicuspid aortic valve, aortic coarctation, ascending aorta dilatation and arterial hypertension are important risk factors for life-threatening aortic dissection or rupture. Authors discuss the importance of a careful cardiac examination including cardiac magnetic resonance imaging study and life-long follow-up by experienced cardiologist in TS patients, and point out high maternal mortality and morbidity during pregnancy. They present a case report of woman with TS and the above-mentioned in childhood unrecognized congenital heart defects that underwent infertility treatment without pre conceptional counselling focused on cardiovascular risk for aortic dissection. (author)

  10. Nursing diagnoses in children with congenital heart disease: a survival analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins da Silva, Viviane; Lopes, Marcos Venícios de Oliveira; Leite de Araujo, Thelma

    2007-01-01

    To analyze the relationship between nursing diagnoses and survival rates in children with congenital heart disease. A total of 270 observations were carried out in 45 children with congenital heart disease who were followed for 15 days. Differences in mean survival times were identified in children not more than 4 months of age with respect to the following diagnoses: impaired gas exchange, ineffective breathing pattern, activity intolerance, delayed growth and development, and decreased cardiac output. The main diagnoses are identified early in the hospitalization period and are conditions resulting from hemodynamic alterations and prescribed medical treatment. Congenital heart disease provokes serious hemodynamic alterations that generate human responses, which should be treated proactively.

  11. Congenital Heart Defects and CCHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and more. Stony Point, NY 10980 Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Congenital heart defects and ... in congenital heart defects. You have a family history of congenital heart ... syndrome or VCF. After birth Your baby may be tested for CCHD as ...

  12. Congenital Anorectal Malformation Severity Does Not Predict Severity of Congenital Heart Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, Jara E; Liem, Eryn T; Elzenga, Nynke J; Molenbuur, Bouwe; Trzpis, Monika; Broens, Paul M A

    2016-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of congenital heart defects (CHDs) in patients with mild or severe congenital anorectal malformations (CARMs), and whether all patients with CARM need pediatric cardiology screening. We included 129 patients with CARM born between 2004 and 2013, and referred to University Medical Center Groningen. Recto-perineal and recto-vestibular fistulas were classified as mild CARMs, all others as severe. Significant patent foramen ovale, secundum atrial septal defect, and small ventricular septum defect were classified as minor CHDs, all others as major. Of 129 patients with CARM, 67% had mild CARM, 33% severe CARM, and 17% were additionally diagnosed with CHD. CHDs were distributed equally in patients with mild or severe CARMs. Patients with multiple congenital abnormalities were more frequently diagnosed with CHD (n = 16, 36%) than patients without multiple congenital malformations (n = 5, 9%, P = .001). Patients with CARM diagnosed with CHD using pediatric cardiac echo screening were younger than 3 months of age at diagnosis. Earlier general pediatric examinations missed 7 (50%) children with mild and 4 (50%) with severe CHDs. The severity of CARM could predict neither prevalence nor severity of CHD. More than one-half of CHDs were missed during the first physical examination. No new CHDs were found in patients older than 3 months of age at the time CARMs were diagnosed. We recommend screening all patients with CARM younger than 3 months of age for CHD at the time CARM is diagnosed. Preoperative echocardiography should be the rule in children younger than 3 months of age and with multiple congenital anomalies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Radionuclide angiocardiography in the diagnosis of congenital heart disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Austin, E.H.; Peter, C.A.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Radionuclide angiocardiography provides a noninvasive assessment of cardiac function and blood flow through the heart and lungs. During the past three years, this procedure has been used at the Duke University Medical Center for evaluation of 343 patients with congenital heart disorders. A review of this experience shows tat the resulting data were frequently useful in the surgical management of these patients. In patients with abnormal blood flow patterns, noninvasive imaging of blood flow was useful before and after operative correction. Radionuclide measurements of left-to-right intracardiac shunts were sufficiently accurate for use in the initial evaluation of patients with murmurs and to document the absence of shunt after operative closure of intracardiac septal defects. Moreover, measurements of right-to-left cardiac shunts were of benefit in the management of children with cyanotic heart disease. Measurements of left ventricular function obtained during rest and exercise were most useful in patients with origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery and in patients with congenital valvular insufficiency. This experience demonstrates that radionuclide angiocardiography provides important measurements of central hemodynamics and cardiac function which are useful in the management of patients with congenital heart disorders

  14. Cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... magnesium. These minerals help your heart's electrical system work. Abnormally high or low levels can cause cardiac arrest. Severe physical stress. Anything that causes a severe stress on your ...

  15. Cardiac Ochronosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erek, Ersin; Casselman, Filip P.A.; Vanermen, Hugo

    2004-01-01

    We report the case of 67-year-old woman who underwent aortic valve replacement and mitral valve repair due to ochronotic valvular disease (alkaptonuria), which was diagnosed incidentally during cardiac surgery. PMID:15745303

  16. Cardiac catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tests. However, it is very safe when done by an experienced team. The risks include: Cardiac tamponade Heart attack Injury to a coronary artery Irregular heartbeat Low blood pressure Reaction to the contrast dye Stroke Possible complications ...

  17. Nuclear cardiac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutsky, R.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear medicine and cardiology has continued to produce a surfeit of interesting, illuminating, and important reports involving the analysis of cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism. To simplify the presentation, this review is broken down into three major subheadings: analysis of myocardial perfusion; imaging of the recent myocardial infarction; and the evaluation of myocardial function. There appears to be an increasingly important relationship between cardiology, particularly cardiac physiology, and nuclear imaging techniques

  18. [Optimization of postoperative medical therapy of infective endocarditis in patients with congenital valvular heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistyakov, I S; Medvedev, A P; Pichugin, V V

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of combined surgical and medical treatment of infective endocarditis in patients with congenital valvular heart disease when included in a regimen of the drug Reamberin. In this regard, the analysis of the effectiveness of a combination regimen of 74 patients with valvular congenital heart diseases complicated with infective endocarditis. Given the indications for surgical correction operative technique features and possible technical difficulties in carrying out such operations, due to the inflammatory changes and tissue destruction, and ways to overcome them. For the correction of metabolic disorders in the postoperative period, 47 patients (main group) was appointed Reamberin: once, intravenous drip 400 ml/day during the first 5 days after surgery. 27 patients (control group) was conducted infusion therapy depending on the severity of the condition according to the classical scheme. In addition to standard clinical and laboratory examination, to assess the effectiveness of Reamberin was investigated catalase activity of CPK in blood serum in the dynamics of observation (1, 3 and 5 days after surgery). It is revealed that surgical approach, used in complex treatment of patients with valvular congenital heart diseases, including reorganization of the cavities of the heart, increasing the frequency of joints and the use of reinforcing strips of synthetic material that prevents the cutting of sutures through the inflamed tissue has achieved good short-and long-term results. Infective endocarditis and destruction of the valvular annulus fibrosus the use of a frame of strips of polytetrafluoroethylene allows you to restore its integrity and to implant a mechanical prosthesis. The inclusion in the regimen of patients with infective endocarditis complicated by cardiac insufficiency in the early postoperative period the drug Reamberin improves the efficiency of treatment by a more rapid restoration of the normal

  19. Congenital Heart Surgery Case Mix Across North American Centers and Impact on Performance Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Sara K; Wallace, Amelia S; Gaynor, J William; Jacobs, Marshall L; O'Brien, Sean M; Hill, Kevin D; Gaies, Michael G; Romano, Jennifer C; Shahian, David M; Mayer, John E; Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2016-11-01

    Performance assessment in congenital heart surgery is challenging due to the wide heterogeneity of disease. We describe current case mix across centers, evaluate methodology inclusive of all cardiac operations versus the more homogeneous subset of Society of Thoracic Surgeons benchmark operations, and describe implications regarding performance assessment. Centers (n = 119) participating in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (2010 through 2014) were included. Index operation type and frequency across centers were described. Center performance (risk-adjusted operative mortality) was evaluated and classified when including the benchmark versus all eligible operations. Overall, 207 types of operations were performed during the study period (112,140 total cases). Few operations were performed across all centers; only 25% were performed at least once by 75% or more of centers. There was 7.9-fold variation across centers in the proportion of total cases comprising high-complexity cases (STAT 5). In contrast, the benchmark operations made up 36% of cases, and all but 2 were performed by at least 90% of centers. When evaluating performance based on benchmark versus all operations, 15% of centers changed performance classification; 85% remained unchanged. Benchmark versus all operation methodology was associated with lower power, with 35% versus 78% of centers meeting sample size thresholds. There is wide variation in congenital heart surgery case mix across centers. Metrics based on benchmark versus all operations are associated with strengths (less heterogeneity) and weaknesses (lower power), and lead to differing performance classification for some centers. These findings have implications for ongoing efforts to optimize performance assessment, including choice of target population and appropriate interpretation of reported metrics. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. An extremely rare clinical entity: congenitally corrected transposition with situs ınversus and single coronary artery presented with complete atrioventricular block in a young man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirakoglu, Omer Faruk; Bayraktar, Ali; Sayin, Muhammet Rasit

    2018-05-01

    Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries is a rare form of CHD. Situs inversus is a much less common variant of a congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries. In rare cases, transposition events may be accompanied by various cardiac anomalies. However, situs inversus patients with congenitally corrected transposition, single coronary artery anomaly, and atrioventricular block together have not been reported previously. This combination of abnormalities is presented as a first in the literature.

  1. Congenital Complete Absence of Pericardium Masquerading as Pulmonary Embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Saad; Mahmood, Sultan; Madeira, Samuel; Tarasov, Ethan

    2013-01-01

    Congenital absence of the pericardium is a rare cardiac condition, which can be either isolated or associated with other cardiac and extracardiac anomalies. There are six different types, depending on the severity of the involvement. Most of the patients with this defect are asymptomatic, especially the ones with complete absence of the pericardium. However, some patients are symptomatic, reporting symptoms that include chest pain, palpitations, dyspnea, and syncope. Diagnosis is established by the characteristic features on chest X-ray, echocardiogram, chest computed tomography (CT), and/or cardiac magnetic resonance imging (MRI). We present here a case of a 23 year-old-male, who presented to our hospital with complaints of pleuritic chest pain and exertional dyspnea, of a two-week duration. He was physically active and his past history was otherwise insignificant. His chest CT with contrast was interpreted as showing evidence of multiple emboli, predominantly in the left lung, and he was started on a heparin and warfarin therapy. A repeat chest CT with contrast three weeks later showed no significant change from the previous CT scan. Both scans showed that the heart was abnormally rotated to the left side of the chest. An echocardiogram raised the suspicion of congenital absence of the pericardium, with a posteriorly displaced heart. In retrospect, motion artifact on the left lung, attributed to cardiac pulsations and the lack of pericardium, resulted in a CT chest appearance, mimicking findings of pulmonary embolism. The misdiagnosis of pulmonary embolism was attributed to the artifact caused by excessive cardiac motion artifact on the chest CT scan. In non-gated CT angiograms, excessive motion causes an artifact that blurs the pulmonary vessels, reminiscent of a ′seagull′ or a ′boomerang′. Physicians need to be aware of this phenomenon, as well as the characteristic radiological features of this congenital anomaly, to enable them to make a correct

  2. Severe congenital neutropenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In this issue of Blood, Tidwell et al1 demonstrate that mutations in the start codon (protein synthesis is initiated at the codon ATG) of neutrophil elastase (ELANE) result in the production of N-terminally truncated elastase, which mislocates to the nucleus and results in severe congenital neutr...... neutropenia (SCN)....

  3. Giant Congenital Melanocytic Nevus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Bo Sonnich; Henriksen, Trine Foged; Kølle, Stig-Frederik Trojahn

    2015-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevi (GCMN) occur in 1:20,000 livebirths and are associated with increased risk of malignant transformation. The treatment of GCMN from 1981 to 2010 in a tertiary referral center was reviewed evaluating the modalities used, cosmetic results, associated complications...

  4. Congenital neck masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Peter A; Hirsch, David L; Dierks, Eric J

    2008-08-01

    Congenital neck lesions reflect abnormal embryogenesis in head and neck development. A thorough knowledge of embryology and anatomy is critical in the diagnosis and treatment of these lesions. The appropriate diagnosis of these lesions is necessary to provide appropriate treatment and long-term follow up, because some of these lesions may undergo malignant transformation or be harbingers of malignant disease.

  5. Congenital cystic eyeball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta V

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of histopathologically proved case of congenital cystic eye in a one day old girl is described. It was an unusually large cystic mass bulging forwards stretching the upperlid. There was no rudimentary eyeball in the orbit. The cystic eye′s predilection for the left eye has been pointed out for the first time in this article.

  6. Congenital extracranial meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, H.F.; Ng, S.H.; Wai, Y.Y.; Wan, Y.L.; Kong, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The authors report a case of congenital meningioma in a newborn. This tumour is extremely rare and only six cases have been reported in the literature. Those reported cases were mainly intracranial. This is the first case of a neonatal extracranial meningioma that was evaluated preoperatively by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  7. Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, A.K.; Azam, M.; Maqsood, R.; Naz, B.; Salam, A.

    2003-01-01

    This case report presents the clinical picture, diagnostic methodology and surgical treatment of a female child who presented with chronic cough and dyspnoea due to congenital malformation of lung. A discussion of diagnosis and management is presented at the end. (author)

  8. Pseudoamblyopia in Congenital Cyclotropia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Frattolillo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To study the effect of surgery on amblyopia and suppression associated with congenital cyclovertical strabismus. Methods. The fixation pattern was investigated with microperimetry before and soon after surgery in ten consecutive children operated for congenital superior oblique palsy at the S. Martino Hospital, Belluno, Italy, between September 2014 and December 2015. Changes in visual performance in terms of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA and stereopsis between the day before and one week after surgery were also evaluated. No other amblyopia treatment has been administered during the time study. Results. Surgical correction of the excyclodeviation in congenital SO palsy determined monocular and binocular sensory consequences: monocularly, in the cyclodeviated amblyopic eye, BCVA (0.46–0.03 LogMAR; p<0.0001 and the fixation pattern improved, as demonstrated by microperimetry examination. Binocularly, stereopsis improved or emerged while suppression at the Worth four-dot test disappeared. Conclusions. In the absence of further amblyopic factors such as coexisting constant vertical and/or horizontal deviation and anisometropia, the amblyopia encountered in congenital SO palsy may resolve soon after the surgical alignment. Therefore, it may be considered and defined “pseudoamblyopia.”

  9. Identification of congenital deafblindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2012-01-01

    . The study evaluated the assessment procedure of 190 children and adults found to be congenitally deafblind. Among the 190 individuals 76 percent were determined using functional assessment in addition to medical examination. A case example involving a 12-year-old child is also presented to illustrate...

  10. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac-derived peptide hormones were identified more than 25 years ago. An astonishing amount of clinical studies have established cardiac natriuretic peptides and their molecular precursors as useful markers of heart disease. In contrast to the clinical applications, the biogenesis of cardiac...... peptides has only been elucidated during the last decade. The cellular synthesis including amino acid modifications and proteolytic cleavages has proven considerably more complex than initially perceived. Consequently, the elimination phase of the peptide products in circulation is not yet well....... An inefficient post-translational prohormone maturation will also affect the biology of the cardiac natriuretic peptide system. This review aims at summarizing the myocardial synthesis of natriuretic peptides focusing on B-type natriuretic peptide, where new data has disclosed cardiac myocytes as highly...

  11. Genomic imbalances in syndromic congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molck, Miriam Coelho; Simioni, Milena; Paiva Vieira, Társis; Sgardioli, Ilária Cristina; Paoli Monteiro, Fabíola; Souza, Josiane; Fett-Conte, Agnes Cristina; Félix, Têmis Maria; Lopes Monlléo, Isabella; Gil-da-Silva-Lopes, Vera Lúcia

    To identify pathogenic genomic imbalances in patients presenting congenital heart disease (CHD) with extra cardiac anomalies and exclusion of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS). 78 patients negative for the 22q11.2 deletion, previously screened by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and/or multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA) were tested by chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA). Clinically significant copy number variations (CNVs ≥300kb) were identified in 10% (8/78) of cases. In addition, potentially relevant CNVs were detected in two cases (993kb duplication in 15q21.1 and 706kb duplication in 2p22.3). Genes inside the CNV regions found in this study, such as IRX4, BMPR1A, SORBS2, ID2, ROCK2, E2F6, GATA4, SOX7, SEMAD6D, FBN1, and LTPB1 are known to participate in cardiac development and could be candidate genes for CHD. These data showed that patients presenting CHD with extra cardiac anomalies and exclusion of 22q11.2 DS should be investigated by CMA. The present study emphasizes the possible role of CNVs in CHD. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Congenital anophthalmia: current concepts in management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta-Leoni, Francesco M

    2011-09-01

    The introduction of hydrogel socket and orbital expanders has modified the approach towards the rehabilitation of congenital anophthalmia. This study highlights the most recent advances for the treatment of congenital anophthalmia based on personal experience and the review of recent literature. Hydrogel socket expanders may be positioned as an out-patient procedure with topical anaesthesia, using cyanoacrylate glue as opposed to temporary tarsorraphy. Increased orbital volume has been confirmed by computed tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following early dermis-fat graft in children with congenital anophthalmia. An orbital tissue expander made of an inflatable silicone globe sliding on a titanium T-plate and secured to the lateral orbital rim appears to be effective to stimulate orbital bone growth and development. Congenital anophthalmia has a complex cause with both genetic and environmental factors involved. The ideal treatment is simultaneous expansion of the eyelids, socket and orbital bones, and it should begin after birth as soon as possible. Socket expansion with self-inflating expanders is a useful technique, although custom-made conformers may produce similar results. Dermis-fat grafts are another reasonable option as an orbital implant, following adequate lid and socket expansion.

  13. Radiologic analysis of congenital limb anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hong Jun; Kim, Ok Hwa; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Kim, Nam Ae

    1994-01-01

    Congenital limb anomalies are manifested in various degree of severity and complexity bearing conclusion for description and nomenclature of each anomaly. We retrospectively analyzed the roentgenograms of congenital limb anomalies for the purpose of further understanding of the radiologic manifestations based on the embryonal defect and also to find the incidence of each anomaly. Total number of the patients was 89 with 137 anomalies. Recently the uniform system of classification for congenital anomalies of the upper limb was adopted by International Federation of Societies for Surgery of the Hand (IFSSH), which were categorized as 7 classifications. We used the IFSSH classification with some modification as 5 classifications; failure of formation of parts, failure of differentiation of parts, duplications, overgrowth and undergrowth. The patients with upper limb anomalies were 65 out of 89(73%), lower limb were 21(24%), and both upper and lower limb anomalies were 3(4%). Failure of formation was seen in 18%, failure of differentiation 39%, duplications 39%, overgrowth 8%, and undergrowth in 12%. Thirty-five patients had more than one anomaly, and 14 patients had intergroup anomalies. The upper limb anomalies were more common than lower limb. Among the anomalies, failure of differentiation and duplications were the most common types of congenital limb anomalies. Patients with failure of formation, failure of differentiation, and undergrowth had intergroup association of anomalies, but duplication and overgrowth tended to be isolated anomalies

  14. Identification of heart rate-associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    den Hoed, Marcel; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Esko, Tõnu

    2013-01-01

    of dilated cardiomyopathy, congenital heart failure and/or sudden cardiac death. In addition, genetic susceptibility to increased heart rate is associated with altered cardiac conduction and reduced risk of sick sinus syndrome, and both heart rate-increasing and heart rate-decreasing variants associate...

  15. [3.0 T MRI with a high resolution protocol for the study of benign disease of the anus and rectum. Part one: High resolution protocol for 3.0 T MRI, anatomic review, benign tumors, and congenital or acquired alterations of the sphincter complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herráiz Hidalgo, L; Cano Alonso, R; Carrascoso Arranz, J; Álvarez Moreno, E; Martínez de Vega Fernández, V

    2014-01-01

    Benign anorectal disease comprises a broad group of processes with very diverse origins; these processes may be congenital or acquired as well as inflammatory or tumor related. However, benign anorectal disease has received less attention in the scientific literature than malignant disease. We present an image-based review of the most common benign diseases of the anus and rectum. In this first part, we review the anatomy of the region and provide a brief description of the peculiarities of the high resolution protocol that we use with 3.0 T MRI. We go on to describe the most common benign anorectal tumors and developmental cystic lesions, together with their differential diagnoses, as well as congenital and acquired anomalies of the anorectal sphincter complex. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Congenital diarrheal disorders: an updated diagnostic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrin, Gianluca; Tomaiuolo, Rossella; Passariello, Annalisa; Elce, Ausilia; Amato, Felice; Di Costanzo, Margherita; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Canani, Roberto Berni

    2012-01-01

    Congenital diarrheal disorders (CDDs) are a group of inherited enteropathies with a typical onset early in the life. Infants with these disorders have frequently chronic diarrhea of sufficient severity to require parenteral nutrition. For most CDDs the disease-gene is known and molecular analysis may contribute to an unequivocal diagnosis. We review CDDs on the basis of the genetic defect, focusing on the significant contribution of molecular analysis in the complex, multistep diagnostic work-up.

  17. Congenital Diarrheal Disorders: An Updated Diagnostic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Castaldo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital diarrheal disorders (CDDs are a group of inherited enteropathies with a typical onset early in the life. Infants with these disorders have frequently chronic diarrhea of sufficient severity to require parenteral nutrition. For most CDDs the disease-gene is known and molecular analysis may contribute to an unequivocal diagnosis. We review CDDs on the basis of the genetic defect, focusing on the significant contribution of molecular analysis in the complex, multistep diagnostic work-up.

  18. 5th German cardiodiagnostic meeting 2013 with the 6th Leipzig Symposium on non-invasive cardiovascular imaging. Challenges and limit of the non-invasive cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The proceedings on the German cardiodiagnostic meeting 2013 together with the 6th Leipzig Symposium on non-invasive cardiovascular imaging include abstracts concerning the following topics: Imaging in the rhythmology; adults with congenital cardiac defects; cardiac myopathies - myocarditis; cardiac valves (before and after transcutaneous valve replacement); coronary heart diseases; technical developments.

  19. Cardiac echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Krstić Branislava A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatid disease is rare. We report on an uncommon hydatid cyst localized in the right ventricular wall, right atrial wall tricuspid valve left atrium and pericard. A 33-year-old woman was treated for cough, fever and chest pain. Cardiac echocardiograpic examination revealed a round tumor (5.8 x 4 cm in the right ventricular free wall and two smaller cysts behind that tumor. There were cysts in right atrial wall and tricuspidal valve as well. Serologic tests for hydatidosis were positive. Computed tomography finding was consistent with diagnosis of hydatid cyst in lungs and right hylar part. Surgical treatment was rejected due to great risk of cardiac perforation. Medical treatment with albendazole was unsuccessful and the patient died due to systemic hydatid involvement of the lungs, liver and central nervous system.

  20. The genetics of congenital heart disease… understanding and improving long-term outcomes in congenital heart disease: a review for the general cardiologist and primary care physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, M Abigail; Brueckner, Martina

    2017-10-01

    This review has two purposes: to provide an updated review of the genetic causes of congenital heart disease (CHD) and the clinical implications of these genetic mutations, and to provide a clinical algorithm for clinicians considering a genetics evaluation of a CHD patient. A large portion of congenital heart disease is thought to have a significant genetic contribution, and at this time a genetic cause can be identified in approximately 35% of patients. Through the advances made possible by next generation sequencing, many of the comorbidities that are frequently seen in patients with genetic congenital heart disease patients can be attributed to the genetic mutation that caused the congenital heart disease. These comorbidities are both cardiac and noncardiac and include: neurodevelopmental disability, pulmonary disease, heart failure, renal dysfunction, arrhythmia and an increased risk of malignancy. Identification of the genetic cause of congenital heart disease helps reduce patient morbidity and mortality by improving preventive and early intervention therapies to address these comorbidities. Through an understanding of the clinical implications of the genetic underpinning of congenital heart disease, clinicians can provide care tailored to an individual patient and continue to improve the outcomes of congenital heart disease patients.

  1. Paediatric cardiac anaesthesia in sickle cell disease: a case series

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paediatric patients with SCD and congenital heart defects may require ... Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) presenting for cardiac ... fluid, calculated according to body weight, was initiated. ... oxygen mixture and intravenous fentanyl (5–10 mcg/kg) and .... erythropoiesis, and in this way reduces HbS production.

  2. Congenital imprinting disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermann, Thomas; Netchine, Irène; Temple, I Karen

    2015-01-01

    Imprinting disorders (IDs) are a group of eight rare but probably underdiagnosed congenital diseases affecting growth, development and metabolism. They are caused by similar molecular changes affecting regulation, dosage or the genomic sequence of imprinted genes. Each ID is characterised...... by specific clinical features, and, as each appeared to be associated with specific imprinting defects, they have been widely regarded as separate entities. However, they share clinical characteristics and can show overlapping molecular alterations. Nevertheless, IDs are usually studied separately despite...... EUCID.net (European network of congenital imprinting disorders) now aims to promote better clinical care and scientific investigation of imprinting disorders by establishing a concerted multidisciplinary alliance of clinicians, researchers, patients and families. By encompassing all IDs and establishing...

  3. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Dušan Đ.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a disease which leads to protein losing enteropathy. Tortous, dilated lymphatic vessels in the intestinal wall and mesenterium are typical features of the disease. Clinical manifestations include malabsorption, diarrhea, steatorrhea, edema and effusions. Specific diet and medication are required for disease control. Case report. A 19-year old male patient was hospitalized due to diarrhea, abdominal swelling, weariness and fatigue. Physical examination revealed growth impairment, ascites, and lymphedema of the right hand and forearm. Laboratory assessment indicated iron deficiency anaemia, lymphopenia, malabsorption, inflammatory syndrome, and urinary infection. Enteroscopy and video capsule endoscopy demonstrated dilated lymphatic vessels in the small intestine. The diagnosis was confirmed by intestinal biopsy. The patient was put on high-protein diet containing medium-chain fatty acids, somatotropin and suportive therapy. Conclusion. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease, usually diagnosed in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and adequate treatment can prevent development of various complications.

  4. [Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Dugan D j; Spuran, Milan; Alempijević, Tamara; Krstić, Miodrag; Djuranović, Srdjan; Kovacević, Nada; Damnjanović, Svetozar; Micev, Marjan

    2011-03-01

    Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a disease which leads to protein losing enteropathy. Tortuous, dilated lymphatic vessels in the intestinal wall and mesenterium are typical features of the disease. Clinical manifestations include malabsorption, diarrhea, steatorrhea, edema and effusions. Specific diet and medication are required for disease control. A 19-year old male patient was hospitalized due to diarrhea, abdominal swelling, weariness and fatigue. Physical examination revealed growth impairment, ascites, and lymphedema of the right hand and forearm. Laboratory assessment indicated iron deficiency anaemia, lymphopenia, malabsorption, inflammatory syndrome, and urinary infection. Enteroscopy and video capsule endoscopy demonstrated dilated lymphatic vessels in the small intestine. The diagnosis was confirmed by intestinal biopsy. The patient was put on high-protein diet containing medium-chain fatty acids, somatotropin and supportive therapy. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease, usually diagnosed in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and adequate treatment can prevent development of various complications.

  5. Congenital Hepatic Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Recinos

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital hepatic cyst is a rare and nonsymptomatic condition in infants and children. Its incidence is 2.5% in the postnatal life with a much lower incidence in the prenatal period. Incidental finding on antenatal imaging is the most common presentation. We present a case of a newborn in whom fetal ultrasound detected a cyst within the fetal liver. Postnatal imaging revealed a liver cyst in the right lobe of the liver, with no other intrahepatic structure affected. Liver function tests were abnormal, but the patient was asymptomatic. Posterior follow-up imaging showed a minor decrease in size. Management of congenital hepatic cyst is usually conservative, done with periodic ultrasound monitoring. However, surgical treatment is the mainstay of treatment when hydrops, progressive enlargement, hemorrhage, torsion, or compression of adjacent structures occurs. Malignant transformation can occur, but it is extremely rare. Partial or total removal of the cyst is the preferred treatment in neonates with a large lesion.

  6. Multicentric osteolysis with nodulosis and arthropathy (MONA) with cardiac malformation, mimicking polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castberg, Filip Christian; Kjaergaard, Susanne; Mosig, Rebecca A

    2013-01-01

    six also had congenital cardiac malformations. Despite treatment attempts of our patient with methotrexate, eternacept and prednisolone, serial X-ray studies documented continuous severe bone degeneration. Conclusion: The case documents the natural history of MONA and establishes a link between MMP2...... deficiency and heart development, and given the recurring cardiac association, we suggest that all MONA patients be examined for possible cardiac defects....

  7. Characterizing Congenital Amusia

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    The ability to make sense of the music in our environment involves sophisticated cognitive mechanisms that, for most people, are acquired effortlessly and in early life. A special population of individuals, with a disorder termed congenital amusia, report lifelong difficulties in this regard. Exploring the nature of this developmental disorder provides a window onto the cognitive architecture of typical musical processing, as well as allowing a study of the relationship between processing of ...

  8. Value of cardiac catheterization and cineangiography in infantile lobar emphysema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roguin, N.; Peleg, H.; Naveh, Y.; Riss, E.

    1980-01-01

    Lobar emphysema is an uncommon cause of respiratory distress in infancy. Congenital heart disease is seen in about 20% of the patients with infantile (congenital) lobar emphysema. We described six infants with lobar emphysema. In three of them a congenital heart disease was demonstrated by cardiac catheterization and cineangiography; two had a tetralogy of Fallot with right aortic arch and the third infant a ventricular septal defect. The pulmonary angiography showed stretching of the arteries with very poor filling of the peripheral arteries and a characteristic smaller pulmonary vein in the affected lobe. In all the six patients the pulmonary artery pressure was normal. All the patients underwent lobectomy with good results. We feel that a preoperative cardiac catheterization and cineangiography is of value in this very sick group of infants.

  9. Pulse Oximetry and Auscultation for Congenital Heart Disease Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Jing; Ma, Xiao-Jing; Zhao, Qu-Ming; Yan, Wei-Li; Ge, Xiao-Ling; Jia, Bing; Liu, Fang; Wu, Lin; Ye, Ming; Liang, Xue-Cun; Zhang, Jing; Gao, Yan; Zhai, Xiao-Wen; Huang, Guo-Ying

    2017-10-01

    Pulse oximetry (POX) has been confirmed as a specific screening modality for critical congenital heart disease (CCHD), with moderate sensitivity. However, POX is not able to detect most serious and critical cardiac lesions (major congenital heart disease [CHD]) without hypoxemia. In this study, we investigated the accuracy and feasibility of the addition of cardiac auscultation to POX as a screening method for asymptomatic major CHD. A multicenter prospective observational screening study was conducted at 15 hospitals in Shanghai between July 1, 2012, and December 31, 2014. Newborns with either an abnormal POX or cardiac auscultation were defined as screen positive. All screen-positive newborns underwent further echocardiography. False-negative results were identified by clinical follow-up, parents' feedback, and telephone review. We assessed the accuracy of POX plus cardiac auscultation for the detection of major CHD. CHD screening was completed in all 15 hospitals, with a screening rate of 94.0% to 99.8%. In total, 167 190 consecutive asymptomatic newborn infants were screened, of which 203 had major CHD (44 critical and 159 serious). The sensitivity of POX plus cardiac auscultation was 95.5% (95% confidence interval 84.9%-98.7%) for CCHD and 92.1% (95% confidence interval 87.7%-95.1%) for major CHD. The false-positive rate was 1.2% for detecting CCHD and 1.1% for detecting major CHD. In our current study, we show that using POX plus cardiac auscultation significantly improved the detection rate of major CHD in the early neonatal stage, with high sensitivity and a reasonable false-positive rate. It provides strong evidence and a reliable method for neonatal CHD screening. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. Lung scan alterations in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, R; Sanchez, J; Munoz, A; Lanaro, A E; Pico, A M

    1975-04-01

    This report analyzes the patterns in 54 lung scannings of 34 patients with altered pulmonary blood flow due to congenital heart disease. The technique and the results are presented. According to the images obtained, the patients are classified in three groups: Group I--normal distribution with more concentration of particles over the right lung and the bases. Group II--normal scannings found in left to right shunts unless there is pulmonary venous hypertension in which case the apex-base relationship was inverted. Group III--patients with right to left shunts of different types presenting various patterns according to severity, associated anomalies and palliative surgery. The hemodynamics created by cardiac defects and surgical procedures explain these alterations. This method is recommended in view of its advantages and accurate results.

  11. Congenital Absence of Left Circumflex Coronary Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ansari

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Congenital absence of left circumflex artery is a rare congenitalanomaly of the coronary arteries. The prevalence of theanomaly in different studies ranges from 0.6% to 1.3%. Ofthese, 80% are benign and asymptomatic and 20% are clinicallyimportant. We report a 56-year-old man presented withacute resting chest pain who was diagnosed as having acuteanterolateral infarction accompanied by electrocardiographicchanges and elevated cardiac enzymes. Coronary angiographyin different views was conducted, however, no left circumflexartery was found. The territory supplied by the artery had beenperfused by the super dominant right coronary artery. Therewas no left circumflex coronary artery with anomalous origin.Sever stenosis of left anterior ascending artery superimposedto the absent left circumflex artery was presented as acute anterolateralinfarction. Although absence of the artery is mostlyconsidered as a benign condition, atherosclerotic lesions maybe more important in such cases because of diminished compensatingmechanisms.

  12. [Cardiac cachexia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miján, Alberto; Martín, Elvira; de Mateo, Beatriz

    2006-05-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF), especially affecting the right heart, frequently leads to malnutrition. If the latter is severe and is combined to other factors, it may lead to cardiac cachexia. This one is associated to increased mortality and lower survival of patients suffering from it. The causes of cardiac cachexia are diverse, generally associated to maintenance of a negative energy balance, with increasing evidence of its multifactorial origin. Neurohumoral, inflammatory, immunological, and metabolic factors, among others, are superimposed in the patient with CHF, leading to involvement and deterioration of several organs and systems, since this condition affects both lean (or active cellular) mass and adipose and bone tissue osteoporosis. Among all, the most pronounced deterioration may be seen at skeletal muscle tissue, at both structural and functional levels, the heart not being spared. As for treatment, it should be based on available scientific evidence. Assessment of nutritional status of any patient with CHF is a must, with the requirement of nutritional intervention in case of malnutrition. In this situation, especially if accompanied by cardiac cachexia, it is required to modify energy intake and oral diet quality, and to consider the indication of specific complementary or alternative artificial nutrition. Besides, the causal relationship of the beneficial role of moderate physical exertion is increasing, as well as modulation of metabolic and inflammatory impairments observed in cardiac cachexia with several drugs, leading to a favorable functional and structural response in CHF patients.

  13. Cardiac Pacemakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiandra, O.; Espasandin, W.; Fiandra, H.

    1984-01-01

    A complete survey of physiological biophysical,clinical and engineering aspects of cardiac facing,including the history and an assessment of possible future developments.Among the topics studied are: pacemakers, energy search, heart stimulating with pacemakers ,mathematical aspects of the electric cardio stimulation chronic, pacemaker implants,proceeding,treatment and control

  14. An unreported type of coronary artery naomaly in congenitally corrected transposition of great arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Min Kyu; Jeong, Yeon Joo; Lee, Gee Won; Lee, Nam Kyung; Choi, Jung Hyun; Lee, Ji Won [Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Coronary artery variations are associated anomalies in 45% of congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (ccTGA) cases, and it is important to detect any coronary artery anomalies before cardiac surgery. We report a case of a 51-year-old woman with ccTGA and an unreported type of coronary artery anomaly.

  15. Prenatal Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (m TORC1) Inhibition by Rapamycin Treatment of Pregnant Mice Causes Intrauterine Growth Restriction and Alters Postnatal Cardiac Growth, Morphology, and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Maria; Fiedler, Saskia; Jux, Christian; Thierfelder, Ludwig; Drenckhahn, Jörg-Detlef

    2017-08-04

    Fetal growth impacts cardiovascular health throughout postnatal life in humans. Various animal models of intrauterine growth restriction exhibit reduced heart size at birth, which negatively influences cardiac function in adulthood. The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) integrates nutrient and growth factor availability with cell growth, thereby regulating organ size. This study aimed at elucidating a possible involvement of mTORC1 in intrauterine growth restriction and prenatal heart growth. We inhibited mTORC1 in fetal mice by rapamycin treatment of pregnant dams in late gestation. Prenatal rapamycin treatment reduces mTORC1 activity in various organs at birth, which is fully restored by postnatal day 3. Rapamycin-treated neonates exhibit a 16% reduction in body weight compared with vehicle-treated controls. Heart weight decreases by 35%, resulting in a significantly reduced heart weight/body weight ratio, smaller left ventricular dimensions, and reduced cardiac output in rapamycin- versus vehicle-treated mice at birth. Although proliferation rates in neonatal rapamycin-treated hearts are unaffected, cardiomyocyte size is reduced, and apoptosis increased compared with vehicle-treated neonates. Rapamycin-treated mice exhibit postnatal catch-up growth, but body weight and left ventricular mass remain reduced in adulthood. Prenatal mTORC1 inhibition causes a reduction in cardiomyocyte number in adult hearts compared with controls, which is partially compensated for by an increased cardiomyocyte volume, resulting in normal cardiac function without maladaptive left ventricular remodeling. Prenatal rapamycin treatment of pregnant dams represents a new mouse model of intrauterine growth restriction and identifies an important role of mTORC1 in perinatal cardiac growth. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  16. Early extubation after congenital heart surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Halimić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite recent advances in anesthesia, cardiopulmonary bypass and surgical techniques, children undergoing congenital heart surgery require postoperativemechanical ventilation. Early extubation was definedas ventilation shorter than 12 hours. Aim of this study is to identify factors associated with successful early extubation after pediatric cardiac surgery.Methods: The study was performed during period from January 2006 to January 2011 at Pediatric Clinic and Heart Center University Clinical center Sarajevo. One hundred children up to 5 years of age, who have had congenital heart disease, with left–right shunt and obstructive heart disease were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups: Group I - patients extubated within 12 hours after surgery and Group II - patients extubated 12 or more hours after surgery. Results: The most frequently encountered preoperative variables were age with odds ratio 4% 95%CI (1-7%, Down's syndrome 8.5 95%CI (1.6-43.15, failure to thrive 4.3 95%CI( 1-18. Statistically significant postoperative data included lung disease (reactive airways, pneumonia, atelectasis, pneumothorax and with odds ratio 35.1 95 %CI (4-286 and blood transfusion with odds ratio 4.6 95%CI (2-12. Blood transfusion (p=0.002 (Wald=9.2 95%CI (2-12, during as well as after operation procedure has statistically significant influence on prediction time of extubation. Proven markers were age with cut of 21.5 months (sensitivity 74% and specificity 70% and extracorporeal circulation (ECC with cut-of 45.5 minutes (sensitivity 71% and specificity 65%.Conclusion: Early extubation is possible in many children undergoing congenital heart surgery. Younger age and prolonged ECC time are markers associated with prolonged mechanical ventilation.

  17. NAD Deficiency, Congenital Malformations, and Niacin Supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongjun; Enriquez, Annabelle; Rapadas, Melissa; Martin, Ella M M A; Wang, Roni; Moreau, Julie; Lim, Chai K; Szot, Justin O; Ip, Eddie; Hughes, James N; Sugimoto, Kotaro; Humphreys, David T; McInerney-Leo, Aideen M; Leo, Paul J; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Halliday, Jake; Smith, Janine; Colley, Alison; Mark, Paul R; Collins, Felicity; Sillence, David O; Winlaw, David S; Ho, Joshua W K; Guillemin, Gilles J; Brown, Matthew A; Kikuchi, Kazu; Thomas, Paul Q; Stocker, Roland; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Chapman, Gavin; Duncan, Emma L; Sparrow, Duncan B; Dunwoodie, Sally L

    2017-08-10

    Congenital malformations can be manifested as combinations of phenotypes that co-occur more often than expected by chance. In many such cases, it has proved difficult to identify a genetic cause. We sought the genetic cause of cardiac, vertebral, and renal defects, among others, in unrelated patients. We used genomic sequencing to identify potentially pathogenic gene variants in families in which a person had multiple congenital malformations. We tested the function of the variant by using assays of in vitro enzyme activity and by quantifying metabolites in patient plasma. We engineered mouse models with similar variants using the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas9 system. Variants were identified in two genes that encode enzymes of the kynurenine pathway, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid 3,4-dioxygenase (HAAO) and kynureninase (KYNU). Three patients carried homozygous variants predicting loss-of-function changes in the HAAO or KYNU proteins (HAAO p.D162*, HAAO p.W186*, or KYNU p.V57Efs*21). Another patient carried heterozygous KYNU variants (p.Y156* and p.F349Kfs*4). The mutant enzymes had greatly reduced activity in vitro. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is synthesized de novo from tryptophan through the kynurenine pathway. The patients had reduced levels of circulating NAD. Defects similar to those in the patients developed in the embryos of Haao-null or Kynu-null mice owing to NAD deficiency. In null mice, the prevention of NAD deficiency during gestation averted defects. Disruption of NAD synthesis caused a deficiency of NAD and congenital malformations in humans and mice. Niacin supplementation during gestation prevented the malformations in mice. (Funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia and others.).

  18. Adult Congenital Heart Disease with Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The number of women with congenital heart disease (CHD) at risk of pregnancy is growing because over 90% of them are grown-up into adulthood. The outcome of pregnancy and delivery is favorable in most of them provided that functional class and systemic ventricular function are good. Women with CHD such as pulmonary hypertension (Eisenmenger syndrome), severe left ventricular outflow stenosis, cyanotic CHD, aortopathy, Fontan procedure and systemic right ventricle (complete transposition of the great arteries [TGA] after atrial switch, congenitally corrected TGA) carry a high-risk. Most frequent complications during pregnancy and delivery are heart failure, arrhythmias, bleeding or thrombosis, and rarely maternal death. Complications of fetus are prematurity, low birth weight, abortion, and stillbirth. Risk stratification of pregnancy and delivery relates to functional status of the patient and is lesion specific. Medication during pregnancy and post-delivery (breast feeding) is a big concern. Especially prescribing medication with teratogenicity should be avoidable. Adequate care during pregnancy, delivery, and the postpartum period requires a multidisciplinary team approach with cardiologists, obstetricians, anesthesiologists, neonatologists, nurses and other related disciplines. Caring for a baby is an important issue due to temporarily pregnancy-induced cardiac dysfunction, and therefore familial support is mandatory especially during peripartum and after delivery. Timely pre-pregnancy counseling should be offered to all women with CHD to prevent avoidable pregnancy-related risks. Successful pregnancy is feasible for most women with CHD at relatively low risk when appropriate counseling and optimal care are provided. PMID:29625509

  19. Early detection of congenital syphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagalakshmi Chowdhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Late congenital syphilis is a very rare clinical entity, and its early diagnosis and treatment is essential. Dental findings often provide valuable evidence for the diagnosis of late congenital syphilis. It occurs due to the transmission of the disease from an infected mother to her fetus through placenta. This long forgotten disease continues to effect pregnant women resulting in perinatal morbidity and mortality. Congenital syphilis is a preventable disease, and its presence reflects a failure of prenatal care delivery system, as well as syphilis control programs. We are reporting a case of late congenital syphilis with only Hutchinson′s teeth.

  20. Congenital abnormalities of the posterior fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Orman, Gunes; Boltshauser, Eugen; Tekes, Aylin; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The frequency and importance of the evaluation of the posterior fossa have increased significantly over the past 20 years owing to advances in neuroimaging. Nowadays, conventional and advanced neuroimaging techniques allow detailed evaluation of the complex anatomic structures within the posterior fossa. A wide spectrum of congenital abnormalities has been demonstrated, including malformations (anomalies due to an alteration of the primary developmental program caused by a genetic defect) and disruptions (anomalies due to the breakdown of a structure that had a normal developmental potential). Familiarity with the spectrum of congenital posterior fossa anomalies and their well-defined diagnostic criteria is crucial for optimal therapy, an accurate prognosis, and correct genetic counseling. The authors discuss the spectrum of posterior fossa malformations and disruptions, with emphasis on neuroimaging findings (including diagnostic criteria), neurologic presentation, systemic involvement, prognosis, and risk of recurrence. RSNA, 2015