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Sample records for complementary hydrogeochemical studies

  1. Background complementary hydrogeochemical studies. SDM-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalinowski, Birgitta E. (ed.)

    2008-08-15

    The overall objectives of the hydrogeochemical description for Forsmark are to establish a detailed understanding of the hydrogeochemical conditions at the site and to develop models that fulfil the needs identified by the safety assessment groups during the site investigation phase. Issues of concern to safety assessment are radionuclide transport and technical barrier behaviour, both of which are dependent on the chemistry of groundwater and pore water and their evolution with time. The work has involved the development of descriptive and mathematical models for groundwaters in relation to rock domains, fracture domains and deformation zones. Past climate changes are one of the major driving forces for hydrogeochemical changes and therefore of fundamental importance for understanding the palaeohydrogeological, palaeohydrogeochemical and present evolution of groundwater in the crystalline bedrock of the Fennoscandian Shield. Understanding current undisturbed hydrochemical conditions at the proposed repository site is important when predicting future changes in groundwater chemistry. The causes of copper corrosion and/or bentonite degradation are of particular interest as they may jeopardise the long-term integrity of the planned SKB repository system. Thus, the following variables are considered for the hydrogeochemical site descriptive modelling: pH, Eh, sulphur species, iron, manganese, uranium, carbonate, phosphate, nitrogen species, total dissolved solids (TDS), isotopes, colloids, fulvic and humic acids and microorganisms. In addition, dissolved gases (e.g. carbon dioxide, methane and hydrogen) are of interest because of their likely participation in microbial reactions. In this series of reports, the final hydrogeochemical evaluation work of the site investigation at the Forsmark site, is presented. The work was conducted by SKB's hydrogeochemical project group, ChemNet, which consists of independent consultants and university researchers with expertise

  2. Hydrogeochemical methods for studying uranium mineralization in sedimentary rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisitsin, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    The role of hydrogeochemical studies of uranium deposits is considered, which permits to obtain data on ore forming role of water solutions. The hydrogeochemistry of ore formation is determined as a result of physicochemical analysis of mineral paragenesis. Analysis results of the content of primary and secondary gaseous - liquid inclusions into the minerals are of great importance. Another way to determine the main features of ore formation hydrogeochemistry envisages simultaneous analysis of material from a number of deposits of one genetic type but in different periods of their geochemical life: being formed, formed and preserved, and being destructed. Comparison of mineralogo-geochemical zonation and hydrogeochemical one in water-bearing horizon is an efficient method, resulting in the objective interpretation of the facts. The comparison is compulsory when determining deposit genesis

  3. Tritium tracing in hydrogeochemical studies using model-lysimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthess, G.; Pekdeger, A.; Schulz, H.D.; Rast, H.; Rauert, W.

    1978-01-01

    Tritium was used as a reference tracer for hydrogeochemical studies in the unsaturated zone. The investigators used different lysimeter types (25, 50, 100 cm), with and without suction plates filled with undisturbed soil monoliths of sandy podsol and loamy lessive. The tritium loss was greater than the evaporation amount determined. Water logging takes place in lysimeter bottoms increasing the evaporation in up to 100 cm lysimeters filled with loamy lessive and 25 cm with sandy podsol. After a 20 mm rain event seepage characteristics indicate 'by-passing' water besides intergranular seepage. Dispersion coefficients (8.5 x 10 -5 cm 2 s -1 ) are higher than molecular diffusion coefficient. Dispersion takes place mainly in top soil with wide ranging pore size distribution. Distribution coefficients of tritium in soil are rather low. Concentrations of anions and dissolved organic substance are different depending on residence time of seepage water in soil. Even a short residence time of seepage water in unsaturated soil is enough for cation exchange reactions to take place. (orig.) [de

  4. Hydrogeochemical and Isotopic Studies of Groundwater in the Central Region of Ghana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganyaglo, S. Y.; Osae, S.; Fianko, J.R., E-mail: sganyaglo@yahoo.co.uk [National Nuclear Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission and School of Nuclear Allied Sciences, University of Ghana, Legon-Accra (Ghana); Gibrilla, A.; Bam, E. [National Nuclear Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, Legon-Accra (Ghana)

    2013-07-15

    The hydrogeochemical and isotopic evolution of groundwater in the Central Region of Ghana has been studied in order to examine how hydrogeochemical processes control the overall groundwater chemistry in the study area. Two major hydrochemical facies have been identified as the Na-Cl and NaHCO{sub 3} water types. The Na/Cl molar ratio indicates that silicate weathering is one of the major hydrogeochemical processes controlling groundwater water chemistry in the area. This is further confirmed by a plot of TDS against the Na/Na+Ca ratio. The Br/Cl ratio ranges from 0.00148 to 0.7087, suggesting minimal seawater intrusion in the area. Stable isotope values of the groundwater samples ({sup 18}O and {sup 2}H) are found around the global meteoric water line (GMWL), suggesting a direct infiltration of rainwater into the groundwater system. Elevated Cl- concentrations of the groundwater is probably due to sea spray and marine aerosols deposited on the top soil, though further studies are needed to determine the cause. (author)

  5. Application of factor analysis to the hydrogeochemical study of a coastal aquifer

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz Beviá, Francisco; Gomis Yagües, Vicente; Blasco Alemany, Pilar

    1989-01-01

    The use of numerical values for the chemical components of waters from an aquifer as input data for factor analysis is shown to be sometimes more convenient than the use of the logarithms of these figures. Factor analysis was applied to the hydrogeochemical study of a coastal aquifer located in Javea, Alicante (Spain). A set of factors was found which explained the source of the ions in the water and even certain chemical processes which accompany the intrusion of seawater, such as the strong...

  6. Pollutants transport and distribution studies in groundwater system by nuclear, geophysics and hydrogeochemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Tadza Abdul Rahman; Daud Mohamad

    2000-01-01

    In Malaysia, the most common means of managing municipal refuse is by dumping it indiscriminately in piles on the selected open land. Leachate that is formed primarily in association with precipitation that infiltrates through the refuse normally results in the migration of leachate into underlying groundwater zone. The study of pollutant transport derived from domestic refuse and their impact on water quality in groundwater system has been performed in a selected landfill site at Gemencheh, Negeri Sembilan. The study involved the determination of flow velocity and flow direction of pollutants by nuclear techniques and a detail survey by geophysical method as well as hydrogeochemical approach as a supporting evidence of pollution occurrence. Hydrogeochemical approach involved the determination of pollutants species such as chloride and nitrate. A network of about 30 observation points had been identified and sampled. The results of the study have shown that the pollutants were concentrated at the middle of the dumping site and transported with the flow velocity between 0.2-15.4 metres per day toward northeast direction. Furthermore, the study established that the municipal or domestic landfalls are considered as one of the potential sources of groundwater pollution in Malaysia

  7. Hydrogeochemical and spectroscopic studies of radioactive materials in Ayrakan and Cheshmeh Shotori areas, northeastern Isfahan province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Esmaeili Vardanjani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Groundwaters hydrochemistry of Ayrakan and Cheshmeh Shotori areas and geochemistry of rare earth elements, indicate Ayrakan alkali granite as the origin of uranium and other dissolved elements in groundwaters of these areas. Geochemical and hydrogeochemical studies as well as the trend of uranium and thorium transition and mobility in aqueous environments of these areas indicate uranium adsorption by iron hydroxide (goethite as the deterrent agent against uranium transition and mobility from depth to surface. Gamma-ray spectroscopic study of sediments from Cheshmeh Shotori area by HPGe detector indicates the presence of 226Ra in high contents and as the radioactive nuclide that is the reason for high activity of these sediments. Production of 226Ra from 238U decay, shorter half-life of 226Ra compared to 238U, radium transition by groundwaters from depth to surface as well as hydrogeochemical evidences, all suggest the possibility of existence of hidden uranium deposit and uranium mineralization in depth and the distance between Ayrakan and Cheshmeh Shotori areas.

  8. Hydrogeochemical quality and suitability studies of groundwater in northern Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M J; Hakim, M A; Hanafi, M M; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Aktar, Sharmin; Siddiqa, Aysha; Rahman, A K M Shajedur; Islam, M Atikul; Halim, M A

    2014-07-01

    Agriculture, rapid urbanization and geochemical processes have direct or indirect effects on the chemical composition of groundwater and aquifer geochemistry. Hydro-chemical investigations, which are significant for assessment of water quality, were carried out to study the sources of dissolved ions in groundwater of Dinajpur district, northern Bangladesh. The groundwater samplish were analyzed for physico-chemical properties like pH, electrical conductance, hardness, alkalinity, total dissolved solids and Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+, CO3(2-), HCO3(-), SO4(2-) and Cl- ions, respectively. Based on the analyses, certain parameters like sodium adsorption ratio, soluble sodium percentage, potential salinity, residual sodium carbonate, Kelly's ratio, permeability index and Gibbs ratio were also calculated. The results showed that the groundwater of study area was fresh, slightly acidic (pH 5.3-6.4) and low in TDS (35-275 mg I(-1)). Ground water of the study area was found suitable for irrigation, drinking and domestic purposes, since most of the parameters analyzed were within the WHO recommended values for drinking water. High concentration of NO3- and Cl- was reported in areas with extensive agriculture and rapid urbanization. Ion-exchange, weathering, oxidation and dissolution of minerals were major geochemical processes governing the groundwater evolution in study area. Gibb's diagram showed that all the samples fell in the rock dominance field. Based on evaluation, it is clear that groundwater quality of the study area was suitable for both domestic and irrigation purposes.

  9. Isotope and hydrogeochemical studies of southern Jiangxi geothermal systems, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Wenbin; Li Xueli; Shi Weijun; Sun Zhanxue

    1999-01-01

    Southern Jiangxi is a geothermally active region, especially in Hengjing area. According to the work plan of IAEA Regional Collaboration in the Development of Geothermal Energy Resources and Environment Management through Isotope Techniques in East Asia and the Pacific (RAS-8-075), field investigation was carried out in Hengjing, southern Jiangxi Province, to demonstrate the use of isotope and geochemical techniques in low to medium temperature geothermal system. During the field investigation, 19 samples were taken from cold springs, hot springs and surface water in the area to determine their hydrochemical and gas compositions, hydrogen, oxygen, carbon and helium isotopes. The results of the study have shown that the geothermal waters in the studying region are of the same characteristics with the local meteoric water in oxygen and hydrogen isotope composition, indicating the geothermal waters are mainly derived from the local precipitation, while the gas composition and carbon and helium isotopes reveal that some gases in the geothermal waters have mantle origin. (author)

  10. Stable isotope and hydrogeochemical studies of Beaver Lake and Lake Radok, MacRobertson Land, East Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wand, U.; Hermichen, W.D.; Hoefling, R.; Muehle, K.

    1987-01-01

    Beaver Lake and Lake Radok, the largest known epishelf and the deepest freshwater lake on the Antarctic continent, respectively, were isotopically (δ 2 H, δ 18 O) and hydrogeochemically studied. Lake Radok is an isothermal and non-stratified, i.e. homogeneous water body, while Beaver Lake is stratified with respect to temperature, salinity and isotopic composition. The results for the latter attest to freshwater (derived from snow and glacier melt) overlying seawater. (author)

  11. Stable isotope and hydrogeochemical studies of Beaver Lake and Radok Lake, MacRobertson Land, East Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wand, U.; Hermichen, W.D.

    1988-01-01

    Beaver Lake and Radok Lake, the largest known epishelf lake and the deepest freshwater lake on the Antarctic continent, respectively, were isotopically (δ 2 H, δ 18 O) and hydrogeochemically studied. Radok Lake is an isothermal and nonstratified, i.e. homogeneous water body, while Beaver Lake is stratified with respect to temperature, salinity and isotopic composition. The results for the latter attest to freshwater (derived from snow and glacier melt) overlying seawater. (author)

  12. Groundwater Quality Assessment from a Hydrogeochemical Viewpoint A Case Study of Sarab County

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Pourakbar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater resources are the most important sources of drinking water in many communities. The direct impact of water quality on public health warrants a thorough investigation of water quality and the factors involved from a hydrogeochemical viewpoint. In the present study, 25 villages of Sarab County in East Azerbayejan Province were selected and the quality of the drinking water supplied in the region was analyzed in terms of its physicochemical parameters along with heavy metals content including 20 different metals. The results were plotted using the Arc GIS for interpretation. The selected villages were subsequently categorized using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA and the Hierarchical Cluster Analysis. Based on the result of study, the EC of the drinking water ranged over 220-2990µs/cm with an average value of 812.  A remarkable finding was the high level of dissolved solids in the Western parts of the study area. Arsenic in two villages and mercury in one village were also high. PCA results showed that the drinking water in the pilot villages could be divided into three categories. Based on certain water quality problems observed ij the region, it is suggested that substitute water supplies should be identified for some of the villages while a comprehensive investigation is also carried out on the arsenic anomaly and its health effects on water consumers in the contaminated villages.

  13. Hydrogeochemical Modelling for Groundwater in Neyveli Aquifer, Tamil Nadu, India, Using PHREEQC: A Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidambaram, S.; Anandhan, P. [Annamalai University, Department of Earth Sciences (India); Prasanna, M. V., E-mail: geoprasanna@gmail.com [Curtin University, Department of Applied Geology, School of Engineering and Science (Malaysia); Ramanathan, AL. [Jawaharlal Nehru University, School of Environmental Sciences (India); Srinivasamoorthy, K. [Pondicherry University, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Physical, Chemical and Applied Sciences (India); Senthil Kumar, G. [HNB Garwhal University, Department of Geology (India)

    2012-09-15

    Sophisticated geochemical models have been used to describe and predict the chemical behaviour of complex natural waters and also to protect the groundwater resources from future contamination. One such model is used to study the hydrogeochemical complexity in a mine area. Extraction of groundwater from the coastal aquifer has been in progress for decades to mine lignite in Neyveli. This extraction has developed a cone of depression around the mine site. This cone of depression is well established by the geochemical nature of groundwater in the region. 42 groundwater samples were collected in a definite pattern and they were analysed for major cations, anions and trace elements. The saturation index (SI) of the groundwater for carbonate, sulphate and silica minerals was studied and it has been correlated with the recharge and the discharge regions. The SI of alumino silicates has been used to decipher the stage of weathering. The SI{sub Gibbsite} - SI{sub K-feldspar} has been spatially distributed and the regions of discharge and recharge were identified. Then two flow paths A1 and A2 were identified and inverse modelling using PHREEQC were carried out to delineate the geochemical process that has taken place from recharge to discharge. The initial and final solutions in both the flow paths were correlated with the thermodynamic silicate stability diagrams of groundwater and it was found that the state of thermodynamic stability of the end solutions along the flow path were approaching similar states of equilibrium at the discharge.

  14. Optimizing Usability Studies by Complementary Evaluation Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmettow, Martin; Bach, Cedric; Scapin, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines combinations of complementary evaluation methods as a strategy for efficient usability problem discovery. A data set from an earlier study is re-analyzed, involving three evaluation methods applied to two virtual environment applications. Results of a mixed-effects logistic

  15. Hydrogeochemical exploration for uranium in parts of Bhiwani district, Haryana, India - a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pande, Dheeraj; Verma, A.K.; Srinivasan, S.; Bangroo, P.N.; Manjeet Kumar; Singh, Diwakar

    1998-01-01

    Hydrogeochemical exploration was carried out in the soil covered areas with isolated outcrops of metaquartzites of middle-Proterozoic Alwar group (Delhi supergroup) in parts of Bhiwani district of Haryana for identifying suitable locales for uranium mineralisation and also for establishing the sub-surface extensions of outcropping mineralisation. The preliminary evaluation of hydrogeochemical data indicates that the ground waters have dominantly surface water characteristics and are modified to some extent by agricultural fertilisers. Three hydrogeochemical anomalous zones, one each of uranium, uranium-vanadium and vanadium have been identified in the area. Anomalous content of uranium in the uranium zone is most likely to be due to very high sulphate content which may be a result of either heavy application of fertilisers or presence of gypsum-like horizons. The uranium-vanadium zone lies in close proximity to surface radiometric anomalies identified in the area and show little effect of agricultural contamination. The vanadium zone exhibits the least agricultural contamination and is related to ground waters of deeper origin. The uranium-vanadium and vanadium zones are found to be significant from the point of view of uranium mineralisation. The close association of uranium and vanadium in the area and the proximity of the uranium-vanadium zone to the surface radiometric anomalies suggest that the surface anomalies may have deeper extensions. (author)

  16. Hydrogeochemical analysis for Tasuj plain aquifer, Iran

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This study investigated the hydrogeochemical processes of groundwater in the .... sis was also applied for investigating groundwater ... (Tasuj climatological station, 2000–2009) (Research .... location of the sample sites is shown in figure 1.

  17. A hydro-geochemical study of Nahr-Ibrahim catchment area: Fluvial metal transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korfali, Samira

    2004-01-01

    peaks only to calcite, dolomite and quartz. No speciation of metals in flood plain soils was done, nor XRD. The flood plain contains mostly terra rossa soils high in oxides and it is expected that the Ferric soil phase would have a major role in metal retention. The objective of this study is a complete hydro-geochemical survey of Nahr-Ibrahim catchment area and this study would clarify fluvial metal transport within the catchment area. The outcome of this work might assess the factors that influence water quality. This is attained through an improved knowledge of river hydrology, texture of sediment and soil, minerals in soil and sediment and soil and sediment geochemistry

  18. Hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance, orientation study, Ouachita Mountain area, Arkansas. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, K.F.

    1982-08-01

    A hydrogeochemical ground water orientation study was conducted in the multi-mineralized area of the Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas in order to evaluate the usefulness of ground water as a sampling medium for uranium exploration in similar areas. Ninety-three springs and nine wells were sampled in Clark, Garland, Hot Springs, Howard, Montgomery, Pike, Polk, and Sevier Counties. Manganese, barite, celestite, cinnabar, stibnite, copper, lead, and zinc are present. The following parameters were determined: pH, conductivity, alkalinity, U, Br, Cl, F, He, Mn, Na, V, Al, Dy, NO 3 , NH 3 , SO 4 , and PO 4 . The minerals appear to significantly affect the chemistry of the ground water. This report is issued in draft form, without detailed technical and copy editing. This was done to make the report available to the public before the end of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation

  19. Earthquakes: hydrogeochemical precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Manga, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Earthquake prediction is a long-sought goal. Changes in groundwater chemistry before earthquakes in Iceland highlight a potential hydrogeochemical precursor, but such signals must be evaluated in the context of long-term, multiparametric data sets.

  20. Discussion on some problems in uranium hydrogeochemical prospecting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Weijun.

    1989-01-01

    The requirements for sampling density in uranium hydrogeochemical prospecting are discussed in this paper. The scales for regional hydrogeochemical survey, prospetcing survey and detailed prospecting survey are 1 : 200,000 - 1 : 100,000, 1 : 50,000 - 1 : 25,000 and 1 : 10,000 - 1 : 5,000 respectively. On the basis of explanation to the geological meaning of hydrogeochemical field defined in different stage, the principle, effect and technical requirements of small-medium scale hydrogeochemical prospecting are studied. The reason and advantage of the dispersion train prospecting using in the wet and rainy regions have been suggested. The key to the dispersion train prospecting is the sensitivity and precision of analytic methods. The general indications and salinity (conductivity) should be paid attention to in hydrogeochemical prospecting

  1. Hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment survey (NURE). Preliminary report on the Smoke Creek Desert Basin pilot study (Nevada)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) is conducting a hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment survey in the seven western states as part of ERDA's National Uranium Resources Evaluation (NURE) Program. The objective of this survey is to develop a geochemical data base for use by the private sector to locate regions of anomalous uranium content. Prior to wide area coverage, several pilot studies are being undertaken to develop and evaluate sampling and analytical techniques. The second through fifth of these studies were conducted in four playa basins in Nevada, selected to represent different regional geology and uranium occurrence. This study in the Smoke Creek Desert Basin, characterizes igneous surface geology with known uranium occurrences. The Smoke Creek Desert Basin is the largest of the four playa basins and contains an areaof about 2700 square kilometers (1003 square miles). The basin is bordered on the east by the Fox Hills and on the north and east by the Granite Ranges which are characterized by granite, pegmatites, and Tertiary rocks very similar to the lithology of the Winnemucca Basin boundary ranges (study UCID-16911-P-2). On the west the Desert is bordered by an area of extensive basalt flow. There is no known uranium occurrence in the area, and metallization of any kind is scarce. This study is applicable to the western igneous portion of the Basin and Range Province which includes southeastern Oregon, western Nevada, and southeastern California. This report contains only analytical data and sample locations

  2. Hydrogeochemical and isotopic studies of groundwater in the middle voltaian aquifers of the Gushegu district of the Northern region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salifu, Musah; Yidana, Sandow Mark; Anim-Gyampo, Maxwell; Appenteng, Michael; Saka, David; Aidoo, Felix; Gampson, Enoch; Sarfo, Mark

    2017-06-01

    This work is to establish the hydrochemistry and origin of groundwater in some parts of the Gushegu district of the Northern Region of Ghana. Hydrochemical data from 19 groundwater and 7 rock samples have been used to evaluate water quality, water types, and sources of various ions as well as origin of the groundwater. The study results show that the quality of groundwater from the area is generally not good due to their fluoride (F-), bicarbonate (HCO3 -) and electrical conductivity (EC) concentrations. The F- contents of the groundwater have values as high as 1.97 mg/L, with 53 % of the groundwater having concentrations of F- exceeding the WHO recommended allowable limits. These high F- values have the potential of causing serious health problems such as kidney failure, dental and skeletal fluorosis, reproductive problem and reduction in intelligent quotient of consumers. A plot of Gibbs diagram reveals that rock weathering and precipitation are the major hydrogeochemical processes regulating the water chemistry of the study area. Petrographic thin-section analyses of rock samples identify minerals present to be muscovite, plagioclase feldspars, quartz, sericite and iron oxide. Stable isotope (18O and 2H) composition of the waters reveals that most of the groundwater is likely to be recharged from local precipitation, indicating their meteoric origin. Some samples, however, showed considerable evaporation.

  3. Statistical and hydrogeochemical approach to study processes that affect groundwater composition in the Ferrara province (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di roma, Antonella; Vaccaro, Carmela

    2017-04-01

    The ground water should not be seen only as a reserve for the water supply, but also be protected for its environmental value. Groundwater plays an essential role in the hydrological cycle for which the characterization, pollution prevention, monitoring and restoration are essential in view of the recovery and identification of the water bodies to be submitted to recharge for the adaptation to DM n. 100/2016. Groundwater of Ferrara province presents salinisation problems and pollution of noxious metals that can be mitigated through recharge processes evaluated based on the specific site characteristics. It is essential to know the hydrogeochemical characteristics of different aquifer levels. To do this have been discuss analytical results of groundwater (2014-2015 monitoring phreatic ground water and temporal series from 2003-2015 A1-A2-A3 samples from Emilia Romagna databases). Results showed that in the territory analyzed insist both salinization and refreshening processes. Factor analysis(FA) conducted on samples has divided them into three groups. 1: samples affected by ionic exchange, 2: pH reaction on heavy metal, 3: samples affected by mineralization. The geochemical groundwater facies changed from Ca-HCO3, and NaHCO3 with a small samples group of CaSO4 and through geochemical investigations were observed the reactions that take place in the waters mixing of different composition. The Na excesses are explained by ionic exchange processes. A determinant role is played by ionic exchange between Ca and Na. In this territory is important also the role of CH4 presence which typically rises towards the surface along faults and fractures and influence rise of deep water with different composition. On samples selected from FA Group 1 has been observed an increase of the CEC (Cation exchange capacity). Adsorption-desorption exchanges take place between water and the fine fraction sediment rich in clay minerals. Higher CEC values are found in rich organic substance

  4. Acid rock drainage passive remediation using alkaline clay: Hydro-geochemical study and impacts of vegetation and sand on remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Fernando; Wen, Yipei; Liang, Xu

    2018-10-01

    Acid rock drainage (ARD) is one of the most adverse environmental problems of the mine industry, especially in regions with an abundance of coal refuse (CR) deposits (e.g. the Northern Appalachian Coalfield in the USA) where surface and ground waters are affected by this pollution due to the acidity and high content of sulfates and heavy metals. This study explores the effectiveness of the ARD passive remediation method using alkaline clay (AC) through a series of static and long-term kinetic laboratory experiments (over three years) complemented with field measurements and geochemical modeling. Two important issues associated with this passive and auto-sustainable ARD remediation method were investigated: 1) the hydrogeochemical study of the mixture in terms of the percentages of AC and CR, and, 2) impacts of vegetation cover and a saturated sand barrier on the remediation. Both the field measurements and the samples used for the experiments came from a local coal waste site. Through the analysis of the field measurements and the outcome of the laboratory experiments and the geochemical modeling, alkaline clay proved to be an effective remediation material for ARD, in terms of achieving a neutral pH in the leachate and immobilization of sulfate and metals such as Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Ni, Pb, Cd, Co. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that the use of vegetation and a saturated sand barrier are beneficial. Vegetation acted as a phytoaccumulation/phytoextraction agent, causing an additional immobilization of metals. The saturated sand barrier blocked downward the oxygen and water diffusion, reducing pyrite oxidation rates. The proposed remediation approach ensures that the acidity consumption will likely occur before all the alkalinity is exhausted. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. An exploration hydrogeochemical study at the giant Pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit, Alaska, USA, using high-resolution ICP-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppinger, Robert G.; Fey, David L.; Giles, Stuart A.; Kelley, Karen D.; Smith, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    A hydrogeochemical study using high resolution ICP-MS was undertaken at the giant Pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit and surrounding mineral occurrences. Surface water and groundwater samples from regional background and the deposit area were collected at 168 sites. Rigorous quality control reveals impressive results at low nanogram per litre (ng/l) levels. Sites with pH values below 5.1 are from ponds in the Pebble West area, where sulphide-bearing rubble crop is thinly covered. Relative to other study area waters, anomalous concentrations of Cu, Cd, K, Ni, Re, the REE, Tl, SO42− and F− are present in water samples from Pebble West. Samples from circum-neutral waters at Pebble East and parts of Pebble West, where cover is much thicker, have anomalous concentrations of Ag, As, In, Mn, Mo, Sb, Th, U, V, and W. Low-level anomalous concentrations for most of these elements were also found in waters surrounding nearby porphyry and skarn mineral occurrences. Many of these elements are present in low ng/l concentration ranges and would not have been detected using traditional quadrupole ICP-MS. Hydrogeochemical exploration paired with high resolution ICP-MS is a powerful new tool in the search for concealed deposits.

  6. Hydrogeochemical studies of historical mining areas in the Humboldt River basin and adjacent areas, northern Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, J. Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The study area comprises the Humboldt River Basin and adjacent areas, with emphasis on mining areas relatively close to the Humboldt River. The basin comprises about 16,840 mi2 or 10,800,000 acres. The mineral resources of the Humboldt Basin have been investigated by many scientists over the past 100 years, but only recently has our knowledge of regional geology and mine geology been applied to the understanding and evaluation of mining effects on water and environmental quality. The investigations reported here apply some of the techniques and perspectives developed in the Abandoned Mine Lands Initiative (AMLI) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), a program of integrated geological-hydrological-biological-chemical studies underway in the Upper Animas River watershed in Colorado and the Boulder River watershed in, Montana. The goal of my studies of sites and districts is to determine the character of mining-related contamination that is actively or potentially a threat to water quality and to estimate the potential for natural attenuation of that contamination. These geology-based studies and recommendations differ in matters of emphasis and data collection from the biology-based assessments that are the cornerstone of environmental regulations.

  7. Hydrogeochemical study of water in some aquifers of the Estado de Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, P.; Lopez, A.; Balcazar, M.; Flores, J.H.; Cardenas, S.; Schubert, M.

    2005-01-01

    The National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico (ININ), has developed a technique that allows to study the association of recharge mechanisms, residence times of the water in the aquifers, as well as the local lithology and the geochemical parameters. The viability of this technique was proven on November 2004 in the aquifers (La Perita, El Tunel y El Pedregal) located in the Asuncion Tepexoyuca, Estado de Mexico. It was observed that so much the aquifer El Tunel like La Perita are used for the human consumption, the aquifer of El Pedregal is used for the fish cultivation. The studies were carried out during March 2003 to November 2004. In the aquifer La Perita the maximum values of the radon concentration (0.76 Bq L -1 ) they were observed in the summertime time (December). In the spring El Tunel the maximum values of the radon concentration (4.08 Bq L -1 ) they were observed in the rainy season (September) this increment can be due to the contributions of the recharge of aquifers that it allows the haulage of the radon of other alternating roads of infiltration of the rain water. Of the physicochemical and radiochemical analyses carried out in the water samples of the studied aquifers, it is deduced that they are waters of good quality since for the human consumption since that they are inside on the maximum permissible limits as for their potability according to national and international standards. Likewise it was observed that the water of the aquifers is a single aquifer, since that its differences they due to the time of permanency of the water inside the aquifer. The classification of the underground water deduced that it is calcic and/or magnesic bi carbonated water belonging to the type of meteoric waters of recent infiltration. (Author)

  8. Hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical study in the municipality of Mani, Casanare Dept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloza Franco, Jairo Alfredo; Morales Arias, Carlos Julio

    2009-01-01

    Geology, Hydrogeology and Hydrogeochemistry play a crucial role in the evaluation of wells and cisterns for drinking water especially in municipalities like Mani because in times of low rainfall has not been sustainable water resources. Mani hydrogeological system is determined by interesting primary porosity reservoirs. However, given the inaccuracy and poor analysis that has been done to the aquifer is necessary to develop this study because the wells and cisterns were built in craft conditions without any professional and technical support. It is important to emphasize that Mani has no a sewer system, so the groundwater resources are highly vulnerable to contamination, which has been analyzed for the temporal and spatial evolution of the aquifer through piezometers maps in times of low and high precipitation. Hydrogeochemistry evaluation becomes more important to confirm the possible hydraulic connections surface water - groundwater, identifying chemical conditions and their behavior in the deposits and geological formations from the Pie de monte Llanero. High PO 4 levels and the presence of As are mainly due to agricultural activities using large amounts of pesticides, fertilizers and insecticides.

  9. Hydrogeochemical and Isotopic Characteristics of Tufa Precipitating Wates: A Case Study of the River Krka (Slovenia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavadlav, S.; Lojen, S. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Department of Environmental Sciences, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-07-15

    The geochemical and stable isotope composition of tufa precipitating water in the River Krka in the Slovenian karst area were studied. Surface water chemistry in the River Krka is controlled by groundwater interactions with carbonate rocks, soil CO{sub 2} and meteoric water in the aquifer. Major element chemistry of water is controlled by dissolution of dolomite and calcite. The aquifer is the main source of cations, since concentrations of Mg{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} in water are highest at the spring. Ca{sup 2+} concentrations are slightly increasing due to the additional mixing of surface and groundwater downstream. Oxygen isotope composition of water indicates homogenization of meteoric water in the aquifer, while {delta}{sup 13}C values of dissolved inorganic carbon in water are affected by biological activity in the soil. {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C of bulk tufa show that deposition of tufa precipitates in the River Krka is kinetically controlled resulting in enrichment with heavier isotopes. Calculated equilibrium temperature of tufa precipitation based on the oxygen isotope composition of water and tufa fit with measured water temperature when average {delta}{sup 18}O values of water and tufa are considered. (author)

  10. Orientation study of northern Arkansas. National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, K.F.

    1982-08-01

    Samples of ground water, stream water, and sediment were collected at 335 sites for an orientation study of northern Arkansas. Each stream site consisted of both sediment and stream water (if available), and each sediment sample was sieved to produce four size fractions for analysis. The orientation area included all or parts of Benton, Carroll, Madison, and Washington Counties. Several black shales, including the Chattanooga Shale, crop out in this area, and the Sylamore Sandstone Member has local radiation anomalies. The following analyses were performed for all water samples (both ground water and stream water): pH, conductivity, total alkalinity, temperature, nitrate, ammonia, phosphate and sulfate. Additional water was collected, filtered, and reacted with a resin that was then analyzed by neutron activation analysis for U, Br, Cl, F, Mn, Na, Al, and Dy. In addition, ground water samples were analyzed for He. The stream sediments were analyzed by neutron activation for U, Th, Hf, Ce, Fe, Mn, Sc, Ti, V, Al, Dy, Eu, La, Sm, Yb, and Lu

  11. A study on the ground water flow and hydrogeochemical interaction in fractured rock masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Jong Sung; Kim, Chun Soo; Yoon, Si Tae; Kim, Sun Joon; Chung, Chan Ho; Kim, Gye Nam

    1991-01-01

    A study site, the Precambrian gneiss complex in the vincinity of Chungyang has been investigated by geologic surface mapping, tunnel mapping and core drilling with chemical analysis and microscopic observation of rock samples and fracture filling materials. Four boreholes at depths between 50 and 200m were drilled. They are located in a potential fracture zone, which was selected based on the topographic characterisitcs and the fracture survey data. The hydraulic characteristics are described based on the results of constant pressure injection test and cross hole test. In the single hole test, the test sections varied between 1 and 5 m. The hydraulic conductivity of local fracture zones ranges from 1xlO -5 to lxlO -7 m/sec whereas that of the intact rock within the depth of 50 m is in the range of 7xlO -8 to 8xlO -9 m/sec. The field dispersivity values obtained from an injection phase range from 0.15 to 4.5 m at varying depths. The whole thickness dispersivity on the 18 m section obtained from a withdrawal phase is 0.4 m. The dispersion test in two well non-circulation mode was carried out along a single fracture set at depth between 11.5-14.5m. The longitudinal dispersivity obtained from the two well test is 8.14 m. The identified minerals of host rocks are quartz, K-feldspar,plagioclase, biotite, muscovite, sericite, chlorite, calcite, pyrite, zircon and opaque minerals. The primary minerals such as feldspar and biotite are highly altered into sericite and chlorite respectively. The fracture-filling materials from core samples identified by as calcite, kaolinite, smectite, chlorite, illitite, quartz, pyrite with fe- and Mn-oxides. (Author)

  12. Hydrogeochemical characterization of groundwater in the Outaouais Region (Québec, Canada) - A regional scale study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montcoudiol, N.; Molson, J. W.; Lemieux, J.

    2013-12-01

    As part of the Québec regional groundwater characterization program (PACES), a detailed groundwater quality survey was undertaken in the Outaouais Region (Québec, Canada). During the summers of 2011 and 2012, 139 samples were taken from municipal and private wells which were analysed for major ions, nutrients, metals and sulphides. About 70% of the samples were obtained from bedrock wells, mainly in the Canadian Shield and the remainder from wells screened in Quaternary deposit aquifers. Hydrogeochemical facies were determined for 127 samples which had anion-cation charge balance errors within ×10 %. Ca-HCO3 is the dominant water type (65%) which was mainly found in unconfined aquifers, especially Quaternary deposits, and is typical of recently infiltrated rainwater. Other relevant water types are Na-HCO3 and Na-Cl (17 and 6% respectively), characteristic of confined aquifers. This classification by water type is supported by multivariate statistical analysis, namely Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Hierarchical Clustering Analysis (HCA). PCA allows the identification of three factors controlling groundwater chemistry: salinity, silicate dissolution and F-bearing mineral dissolution. HCA results show that the samples can be grouped into seven clusters. Clusters 1 to 4 are mostly Ca-HCO3 water type and are representative of the enrichment in major ions due to carbonate and silicate dissolution, cluster 1 being closer to rainwater and cluster 4 the most evolved. Cluster 5, made of one sample with a particular chemistry, is not yet fully understood. Samples from cluster 6 present various degrees of Na-Ca exchange, a consequence of remnant Champlain Sea water (some samples from cluster 7 in confined zones) being replaced by infiltrating recharge water. Samples from cluster 7 are evolved waters with high Total Dissolved Solid (TDS) concentrations: they are remnants of the Champlain Sea in confined aquifers (bromide detected) or diluted/mixed by infiltrating

  13. Hydrogeochemical and Isotopic Study of Groundwaters from the Gañuelas-Mazarrón Tertiary Basin (Murcia, Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigo-Naharro, J.; Delgado, A.; Clemente-Jul, C.; Pérez del Villar, L.

    2015-01-01

    The hydrogeochemical characterisation of groundwaters from the Gañuelas-Mazarrón Tertiary Basin included: i) to establish the different hydrofacies present in the basin; ii) to perform a cluster analysis in order to reduce the water samples, grouping them according to their physicochemical characteristics; and iii) to determine the most relevant ion ratios for understanding the water/ rock interaction processes that regulate the main features and evolution of groundwaters. It has also been discussed the origin and concentration of the minor and trace elements to evaluate the capability of groundwaters to transport heavy elements, toxic or innocuous, towards the surface, thus determining their suitability for human consumption. Besides, the hydrogeochemical modeling has allowed determining the degree of groundwaters saturation with respect to the most representative mineral phases of the aquifers, which, in turn, it has been used to calculate their theoretical temperature in depth. The isotopic characterisation of groundwaters has included the isotopic signatures of the stable (δ18O, δ2H, δ13C-DIC, δ34S(SO4 2-) and δ18O(SO4 2-)) and radioactive (238U, 234U and 226Ra) isotopes. The first have been used to distinguish the groundwaters origin, as well as the origin of the dissolved C and SO4 2-. The radioactive isotopes have been used to determine the water/rock interaction processes involving 238U radioactive series, as well as to explain the origin of the dissolved 222Rn in groundwaters. The most important hydrogeochemical results obtained from groundwaters are: i) a large variety of hydrofacies is represented in them, corroborated by the cluster analysis; ii) they are not suitable for human consumption; iii) they have remained, apparently, over-saturated with respect to calcite and aragonite, and under-saturated with respect to gypsum, anhydrite and halite, over time; iv) they present theoretical temperatures in depth much higher than in the surface; v) they

  14. On the complementary presentation of results of risk studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhardt, J.; Bayer, A.

    1983-01-01

    The presentation of the loss of years of life provides the opportunity to illustrate in complementary way the mortality risks evaluated as part of risk studies. As phase A of the DRS (German risk study nuclear power plants) bears upon the results of the American ''Reactor Safety Study'' (WASH 1400) it does not contain that factor of failure which has only been determined in subsequent studies. Phase B intends to present the results of risk assessments increasingly in form of abridged lifetime. (orig.) [de

  15. Hydrogeochemical evolution and C isotope study of groundwaters from 'Mina Fe' U deposit (Salamanca, Spain): implications for processes in radwaste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, L. Perez del; Garralon, A.; Delgado, A.; Reyes, E.; Cozar, J.S.; Gomez, P.; Nunez, R.; Sanchez, L.; Raya, J.

    2005-01-01

    Within the framework of the ENRESA natural analogue programme, the U ore deposit of 'Mina Fe', western Spain, has been studied as a natural analogue of radioactive spent fuel behaviour after burial, in spite of being an extremely perturbed geological environment due to mining activities. The main objectives of this project are to determine the hydrogeochemical evolution of the system and identify the main water/rock interaction processes that control the physicochemical variables (pH and Eh) of groundwaters, including the role-played by the organic matter.The hydrogeochemical results from 3 consecutive groundwater sampling campaigns, separated by a phase of restoration works, indicate that the groundwater of the site shows an evolutionary trend from Ca-SO42- acid oxidising waters towards alkaline-reducing waters, though their evolution with respect to the alkaline and alkaline-earth elements is not clear. The SO42--acid waters are the result of the oxidation processes affecting the primary sulphide-rich U mineralisation, while the alkaline-reducing waters result from the buffer capacity of carbonates from fracture filling materials, as the δ 13 C values of DIC demonstrate. The reducing character of these waters mainly results from the microbiologically mediated partial oxidation of the abundant organic matter existing in the clayey walls of the major faults at the site, since other dissolved inorganic redox pairs are insufficient to explain the in situ measured redox potential. Thus, the high content in DOC of these waters is also explained, since the soil at the site is poorly developed. DOC, DIC or both can be responsible for the high U concentration measured in these groundwaters, in spite of its reducing character.The restoration works performed in the exploitation quarry have also restored the aforementioned evolutionary trend, which was the normal evolution of groundwater in the site before mining. Finally, the results are discussed in terms of the

  16. Geology - Background complementary studies. Forsmark modelling stage 2.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, Michael B. [Geological Survey of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden); Skagius, Kristina [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)] (eds.)

    2007-09-15

    During Forsmark model stage 2.2, seven complementary geophysical and geological studies were initiated by the geological modelling team, in direct connection with and as a background support to the deterministic modelling of deformation zones. One of these studies involved a field control on the character of two low magnetic lineaments with NNE and NE trends inside the target volume. The interpretation of these lineaments formed one of the late deliveries to SKB that took place after the data freeze for model stage 2.2 and during the initial stage of the modelling work. Six studies involved a revised processing and analysis of reflection seismic, refraction seismic and selected oriented borehole radar data, all of which had been presented earlier in connection with the site investigation programme. A prime aim of all these studies was to provide a better understanding of the geological significance of indirect geophysical data to the geological modelling team. Such essential interpretative work was lacking in the material acquired in connection with the site investigation programme. The results of these background complementary studies are published together in this report. The titles and authors of the seven background complementary studies are presented below. Summaries of the results of each study, with a focus on the implications for the geological modelling of deformation zones, are presented in the master geological report, SKB-R--07-45. The sections in the master report, where reference is made to each background complementary study and where the summaries are placed, are also provided. The individual reports are listed in the order that they are referred to in the master geological report and as they appear in this report. 1. Scan line fracture mapping and magnetic susceptibility measurements across two low magnetic lineaments with NNE and NE trend, Forsmark. Jesper Petersson, Ulf B. Andersson and Johan Berglund. 2. Integrated interpretation of surface and

  17. Geology - Background complementary studies. Forsmark modelling stage 2.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, Michael B.; Skagius, Kristina

    2007-09-01

    During Forsmark model stage 2.2, seven complementary geophysical and geological studies were initiated by the geological modelling team, in direct connection with and as a background support to the deterministic modelling of deformation zones. One of these studies involved a field control on the character of two low magnetic lineaments with NNE and NE trends inside the target volume. The interpretation of these lineaments formed one of the late deliveries to SKB that took place after the data freeze for model stage 2.2 and during the initial stage of the modelling work. Six studies involved a revised processing and analysis of reflection seismic, refraction seismic and selected oriented borehole radar data, all of which had been presented earlier in connection with the site investigation programme. A prime aim of all these studies was to provide a better understanding of the geological significance of indirect geophysical data to the geological modelling team. Such essential interpretative work was lacking in the material acquired in connection with the site investigation programme. The results of these background complementary studies are published together in this report. The titles and authors of the seven background complementary studies are presented below. Summaries of the results of each study, with a focus on the implications for the geological modelling of deformation zones, are presented in the master geological report, SKB-R--07-45. The sections in the master report, where reference is made to each background complementary study and where the summaries are placed, are also provided. The individual reports are listed in the order that they are referred to in the master geological report and as they appear in this report. 1. Scan line fracture mapping and magnetic susceptibility measurements across two low magnetic lineaments with NNE and NE trend, Forsmark. Jesper Petersson, Ulf B. Andersson and Johan Berglund. 2. Integrated interpretation of surface and

  18. Surface-ground water interactions and hydrogeochemical evolution in a fluvio-deltaic setting: The case study of the Pinios River delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiatos, Ioannis; Paraskevopoulou, Vasiliki; Lazogiannis, Konstantinos; Botsou, Fotini; Dassenakis, Manos; Ghionis, George; Alexopoulos, John D.; Poulos, Serafim E.

    2018-06-01

    River deltas sustain important ecosystems with rich biodiversity and large biomass, as well as human populations via the availability of water and food sources. Anthropogenic activities, such as urbanization, tourism and agriculture, may pose threats to river deltas. The knowledge of the factors controlling the regional water quality regime in these areas is important for planning sustainable use and management of the water resources. Here, hydrochemical methods and multivariate statistical techniques were combined to investigate the shallow aquifer of the Pinios River (Thessaly) deltaic plain with respect to water quality, hydrogeochemical evolution and interactions between groundwater and surface water bodies. Water quality assessment indicated that most of the river and groundwater samples fully comply with the criteria set by the Drinking Water Directive (98/83/EC). The river is recharged mainly from springs of the Tempi valley and the shallow aquifer, and to a lesser degree from precipitation, throughout the year. The hydrogeochemical characteristics indicated a cation (Ca, Mg, and Na) bicarbonate water type, which evolves to calcium-chloride, sodium-bicarbonate and sodium-chloride water type, in the northern part of the delta. Calcite and dolomite dissolution determined the major ion chemistry, but other processes, such as silicate weathering and cation exchange reactions, also contributed. In the northern part of the plain, the interaction with the deeper aquifer enriched the shallow aquifer with Na and Cl ions. Principal Component Analysis showed that five components (PCs) explain 77% of the total variance of water quality parameters; these are: (1) salinity; (2) water-silicate rocks interaction; (3) hardness due to calcite dissolution, and cation exchange processes; (4) nitrogen pollution; and (5) non-N-related artificial fertilizers. This study demonstrated that the variation of water hydrochemistry in the deltaic plain could be attributed to natural and

  19. Hydrogeochemical exploration: a reconnaissance study on northeastern Seward Peninsula, Alaska: Chapter A in Studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska, vol. 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Garth E.; Taylor, Ryan D.; Buckley, Steve

    2015-01-01

    A reconnaissance hydrogeochemical study employing high-resolution/high-sensitivity inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis of stream and seep water samples (n= 171) was conducted in an area of limited bedrock exposure on the northeastern Seward Peninsula, Alaska. Sampling was focused in drainages around four main areas—at the Anugi Pb-Zn-Ag occurrence and in streams upstream of historically and currently mined placer gold deposits in the Candle Creek, Utica, and Monument Mountain areas. The objective of the study was to determine whether distribution of elevated metal concentrations in water samples could “see” through sediment cover and provide evidence of bedrock sources for base metals and gold. Some observations include (1) elevated Ag, As, Pb, and Zn concentrations relative to the study area as a whole in stream and seep samples from over and downstream of part of the Anugi Pb-Zn-Ag prospect; (2) abrupt downstream increases in Tl and Sb ± Au concentrations coincident with the upstream termination of productive placer deposits in the Inmachuk and Old Glory Creek drainages near Utica; (3) high K, Mo, Sb, and F throughout much of the Inmachuk River drainage near Utica; and (4) elevated As ± base metals and Au at two sites along Patterson Creek near the town of Candle and three additional contiguous sites identified when an 85th percentile cut-off was employed. Molybdenum ± gold concentrations (>90th percentile) were also measured in samples from three sites on Glacier Creek near Monument Mountain. The hydrogeochemistry in some areas is consistent with limited stream-sediment data from the region, including high Pb-Zn-Ag-As concentrations associated with Anugi, as well as historical reports of arsenopyrite-bearing veins upstream of placer operations in Patterson Creek. Chemistry of samples in the Inmachuk River-Old Glory Creek area also suggest more laterally extensive stibnite- (and gold-?) bearing veining than is currently known in the Old

  20. Hydrogeochemical modelling of fluid–rock interactions triggered by seawater injection into oil reservoirs: Case study Miller field (UK North Sea)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Yunjiao; Berk, Wolfgang van; Schulz, Hans-Martin

    2012-01-01

    A hydrogeochemical model is presented and applied to quantitatively elucidate interdependent reactions among minerals and formation water–seawater mixtures at elevated levels of CO 2 partial pressure. These hydrogeochemical reactions (including scale formation) occur within reservoir aquifers and wells and are driven by seawater injection. The model relies on chemical equilibrium thermodynamics and reproduces the compositional development of the produced water (formation water–seawater mixtures) of the Miller field, UK North Sea. This composition of the produced water deviates from its calculated composition, which could result solely from mixing of both the end members (formation water and seawater). This indicates the effect of hydrogeochemical reactions leading to the formation and/or the dissolution of mineral phases. A fairly good match between the modelled and measured chemical composition of produced water indicates that hydrogeochemical interactions achieve near-equilibrium conditions within the residence time of formation water–seawater mixtures at reservoir conditions. Hence the model enables identification of minerals (including scale minerals), to quantitatively reproduce and to predict their dissolution and/or formation. The modelling results indicate that admixing of seawater into formation water triggers the precipitation of Sr–Barite solid solution, CaSO 4 phases and dolomite. In contrast, calcite and microcrystalline quartz are dissolved along the seawater flow path from the injection well towards the production well. Depending on the fraction of seawater admixed, interdependent reactions induce profound modifications to the aquifer mineral phase assemblage. At low levels of seawater admixture, Ba–Sr sulfate solid solution is precipitated and coupled to concurrent dissolution of calcite and microcrystalline quartz. Massive dissolution of calcite and the formation of CaSO 4 phases and dolomite are triggered by intense seawater admixture

  1. KBS-3H Complementary studies, 2008-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-10-15

    KBS-3H is a joint project between Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (SKB) in Sweden and Posiva Oy in Finland. The main goal during the project phase Complementary studies of horizontal emplacement KBS-3H 2008-2010 was to develop KBS-3H to such a state that a decision to go ahead with full-scale testing and demonstration could be made. The KBS-3H design is a variant of the KBS-3 method and an alternative to the KBS-3V design. In KBS-3H multiple canisters containing spent nuclear fuel are emplaced in parallel, 100-300 m long, horizontal deposition drifts at a depth of about 400-500 m in the bedrock whereas the KBS-3V design calls for vertical emplacement of the canisters in individual deposition holes. Further development and evaluation of the main KBS-3H design alternatives developed in earlier work, DAWE (Drainage, Artificial Watering and air Evacuation) and STC (Semi Tight Compartments) (Autio el al. 2007) has now enabled a well-founded KBS-3H reference design selection, DAWE has been selected. Regarding long-term safety; bentonite-metal interactions have been in focus and studies have given a good basis for material selection for the Supercontainer, plugs and other supporting structures and titanium is selected. The selections and evaluations made during this project phase will be used in the safety evaluations planned for Forsmark and Olkiluoto in the upcoming project phase. KBS-3H specific production lines have been outlined and layout adaptations for both Forsmark and Olkiluoto have been developed. Full-scale tests of system components have also been carried out with good results; the full-scale compartment plug test shows the ability to install a plug that separates drift compartments hydraulically.

  2. KBS-3H complementary studies, 2008-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-07-01

    KBS-3H is a joint project between Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (SKB) in Sweden and Posiva Oy in Finland. The main goal during the project phase Complementary studies of horizontal emplacement KBS-3H 2008-2010 was to develop KBS-3H to such a state that a decision to go ahead with full-scale testing and demonstration could be made. The KBS-3H design is a variant of the KBS-3 method and an alternative to the KBS-3V design. In KBS-3H multiple canisters containing spent nuclear fuel are emplaced in parallel, 100-300 m long, horizontal deposition drifts at a depth of about 400-500 m in the bedrock whereas the KBS- 3V design calls for vertical emplacement of the canisters in individual deposition holes. Further development and evaluation of the main KBS-3H design alternatives developed in earlier work, DAWE (Drainage, Artificial Watering and air Evacuation) and STC (Semi Tight Compartments) (Autio el al. 2007) has now enabled a well-founded KBS-3H reference design selection, DAWE has been selected. Regarding long-term safety; bentonite-metal interactions have been in focus and studies have given a good basis for material selection for the Supercontainer, plugs and other supporting structures and titanium is selected. The selections and evaluations made during this project phase will be used in the safety evaluations planned for Forsmark and Olkiluoto in the upcoming project phase. KBS-3H specific production lines have been outlined and layout adaptations for both Forsmark and Olkiluoto have been developed. Full-scale tests of system components have also been carried out with good results; the full-scale compartment plug test shows the ability to install a plug that separates drift compartments hydraulically. (orig.)

  3. KBS-3H Complementary studies, 2008-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-10-01

    KBS-3H is a joint project between Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (SKB) in Sweden and Posiva Oy in Finland. The main goal during the project phase Complementary studies of horizontal emplacement KBS-3H 2008-2010 was to develop KBS-3H to such a state that a decision to go ahead with full-scale testing and demonstration could be made. The KBS-3H design is a variant of the KBS-3 method and an alternative to the KBS-3V design. In KBS-3H multiple canisters containing spent nuclear fuel are emplaced in parallel, 100-300 m long, horizontal deposition drifts at a depth of about 400-500 m in the bedrock whereas the KBS-3V design calls for vertical emplacement of the canisters in individual deposition holes. Further development and evaluation of the main KBS-3H design alternatives developed in earlier work, DAWE (Drainage, Artificial Watering and air Evacuation) and STC (Semi Tight Compartments) (Autio el al. 2007) has now enabled a well-founded KBS-3H reference design selection, DAWE has been selected. Regarding long-term safety; bentonite-metal interactions have been in focus and studies have given a good basis for material selection for the Supercontainer, plugs and other supporting structures and titanium is selected. The selections and evaluations made during this project phase will be used in the safety evaluations planned for Forsmark and Olkiluoto in the upcoming project phase. KBS-3H specific production lines have been outlined and layout adaptations for both Forsmark and Olkiluoto have been developed. Full-scale tests of system components have also been carried out with good results; the full-scale compartment plug test shows the ability to install a plug that separates drift compartments hydraulically

  4. A study on migration of contaminants and effect on the groundwater system at the Gemencheh domestic waste disposal site, Negeri Sembilan using integrated nuclear, geophysical and hydrogeochemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Tadza Abdul Rahman

    2001-01-01

    The domestic waste disposal site at Gemencheh, Negeri Sembilan has been in operation since 1981. Integration of three methods namely nuclear, geophysical and hydrogeochemical were used to study the migration and effects of contaminants on the groundwater system at this particular site. Nuclear method was used to determine groundwater system flow velocity that delineates the migration pattern of contaminant species in the groundwater system at the study area. The groundwater flow velocity is found to be heterogeneous and depend on hydraulic conductivity caused by soil permeability except in the low-lying downstream area where the flow velocity is found to be low and constant at 2.0 x 10 -6 ms -1 . However, the flow velocity increases to as high as 17.8 x 10 -5 ms -1 during rainy season due to the influence of weather on hydraulic gradient. Weather condition also influences the flow direction, whereby during draught season, the groundwater flow direction at the middle of the study site moves from an area of high topography to the northeast and southeast of low topography areas. On the other hand, at the downstream the groundwater flows partially towards northeast and southeast whereas flow direction at the upstream is towards the east. A similar pattern was observed during rainy season in both upstream and downstream of the study site but at the middle, the flow is basically towards south-east with a side flow to the north-east and east direction. Geophysical method comprising geo electrical-imaging and electromagnetic transient techniques was used to determine the extent, depth and distribution of contamination in the groundwater system. This method shows that the most seriously contaminated areas at the middle and the downstream regions of the study site within the shallow depth of 3-6 metres. The distribution of the contaminants in groundwater is not widespread but confined within the study site only. Finally, hydrogeochemical method was used to determine the

  5. Study Gaps Relevant to Use of Complementary Medicine in Patients With Leukemia: A Review Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miladinia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Context A review of the literature of recent decades has shown that few studies have been conducted on the effects of various types of complementary medicine on patients with leukemia. Therefore, the present study aimed to find research gaps in the use of different types of complementary medicine in patients with leukemia to be applied in future studies. Evidence Acquisition The present study was a review-type design based on a review of the literature on different types of complementary medicine in patients with leukemia, up to 2015. The search was conducted through electronic databases and search engines. According to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 8 studies which had been conducted on the use of complementary medicine in patients with leukemia were selected for the identification of gaps. Results The overall results showed that few studies have been conducted on the use of exercise, massage therapy, music therapy, acupressure, and healing touch in patients with leukemia, and these subjects are potential research areas for many different studies. However, no studies have been carried out on the effects of acupuncture, relaxation, and yoga on these patients. Conclusions The results of this review showed that the number of studies on the use of complementary medicine in leukemia patients is very limited (especially in Iran, and it can be the subject of numerous studies in the future.

  6. An integrated hydrogeochemical and isotopic approach to study groundwater Salinization in the overexploited aquifers of Indo-Gangetic Plain, a part of NCR Delhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, R.

    2017-12-01

    roundwater resources in arid and semi-arid areas are highly vulnerable to salinity problems. Inadequate availability of surface water supply, vagaries of mansoonal rainfall and overexploitation due to population pressure and rapid landuse change induced decline in groundwater levels and salinization has been observed in many Asian cities. After green revolution, large part of Indo-Gangetic plain groundwater salinization has been reported. One such region is National Capital Region, Delhi- India's largest and the world's second largest agglomeration of people and economic hub of Northern India. The present study includes National capital territory, Delhi, Gurgaon and Faridabad. In the present study, different graphical plots, Piper plot, saturation index values (using PHREEQC), stable isotopes (δ18O and δD) and GIS is used to create the database for analysis of spatial variation in respective water quality parameters as well as to decipher the hydrogeochemical process occurring in the area. Major ions are analysed to describe the composition and distribution of salinization and dissolution/precipitation dynamics. It was observed that groundwater weathering is governed by carbonate and silicate weathering and reverse ion-exchange, however due to semi-arid climate evaporation is also playing a major role in groundwater chemistry and salinity of the area. δ18O and δD regression line of groundwater samples of the study area is below the LMWL also suggest from non-equilibrium fractionation during evaporation. Large lateral variation in chloride concentration indicates impact of evapotranspiration rate during recharge. Most of water facies are of Na-Cl. Stable isotope (δ18O and δD) analysis helps to identify evaporation and to better understand recharge processes and mixing dynamics in the study region. Limited availability of surface water supply, no pricing exists for groundwater extraction has resulted in a widespread decline in the water table and intermixing of

  7. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study in Pediatric Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhankar, Mukesh

    2018-01-01

    The aim was to study the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use in acutely sick hospitalized children and factors associated with it. This is a cross-sectional, hospital-based study in a tertiary care center of Delhi, India. Children admitted to a pediatric unit during the study period were assessed using a specially designed questionnaire. Out of the total 887 admitted children, 161 (18.1%) were using complementary and alternate medicine in one form or another. Of these, 113 (70.2%) were using complementary and alternate medicine for the current illness directly leading to admission and the remaining 48 (29.8%) had used complementary and alternate medicine in past. The common complementary and alternate medicine use observed in our study was combined ayurveda and spiritual approach (25.5%), ayurveda (24.8%), spiritual (21.7%), homeopathic (13%), and 47.2% of children were using spiritual approach in form of Jhada (tying piece of cloth on arm or leg or keeping a knife by the side of child). The significant factors associated with complementary and alternate medicine use were younger age, female gender, and father being employed. Complementary and alternate medicine is commonly used even in acutely sick children.

  8. Linear Optical and SERS Study on Metallic Membranes with Subwavelength Complementary Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qingzhen; Zeng, Yong; Jensen, Lasse; Werner, Douglas; Crespi, Vincent; Huang, Tony Jun; Interdepartmental Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    An efficient technique is developed to fabricate optically thin metallic films with subwavelength patterns and their complements simultaneously. By comparing the spectra of the complementary films, we show that Babinet's principle nearly holds in the optical domain. A discrete-dipole approximation can qualitatively describe their spectral dependence on the geometry of the constituent particles and the illuminating polarization. Using pyridine as probe molecules, we studied surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) from the complementary structure. Although the complementary structure posses closely related linear spectra, they have quite different near-field behaviors. For hole arrays, their averaged local field gains as well as the SERS enhancements are strongly correlated to their transmission spectra. We therefore can use cos 4 θ to approximately describe the dependence of the Raman intensity on the excitation polarization angle θ , while the complementary particle arrays present maximal local field gains at wavelengths generally much bigger than their localized surface plasmonic resonant wavelengths.

  9. Savannah River Laboratory hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance. Raw data release. III. Orientation study in the Williamsport, Pennsylvania, area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, V.; Ferguson, R.B.; Baucom, E.I.

    1976-09-01

    This report presents raw data from an orientation study in the Williamsport 1 0 x 2 0 AMS Quadrangle. The data includes sample locality maps, tables of water quality and field measurement data, and tables of uranium analyses

  10. Hydrogeologic, hydrogeochemical and isotopic studies of mineral and thermal waters from Aguas de Lindoia and Lindoia, SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinaga, S.

    1990-01-01

    The underground circulation of the so-called mineral waters of Aguas de Lindoia and Lindoia is conditioned by fractures of Complex Amparo crystalline rocks. The geologic studies and its evolutionary history are so important for understanding the origin, circulation and mineralization of these explored waters. The chemical analysis of the waters both from springs and wells pointed to low mineralization with about 100 mg/l TDS. The bi carbonated calcic and calcic-magnesian content was interpreted as coming from alteration processes of silicate minerals. The isotopes δ 18 O and δ 2 H concentrations indicate the meteoric origin, different recharge zones and evaporation phenomena in the springs and wells waters on the study area. The Radon-222 radioactivity used to classification of mineral waters in this legislation is dubious because it is unstable (3,82 days) and may be dangerous to human. (author)

  11. Hydrogeochemical characteristics of streams with and without acid mine drainage impacts: A paired catchment study in karst geology, SW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Tang, Changyuan; Wu, Pan; Strosnider, William H. J.; Han, Zhiwei

    2013-11-01

    A paired catchment study was used to assess karst hydrogeochemistry of two streams.Chemistry of streams with and without acid mine drainage (AMD) was very different.The observation was supported by PHREEQC modeling of equilibrium conditions.Ionic fluxes of AMD-impacted water were higher than that of non-AMD-impacted water.The higher ionic fluxes were predominantly controlled by the oxidation of pyrite.

  12. Hydro-geochemical studies of uranium mill tailing piles at Riverton, Wyoming and Maybell, Colorado. Annual report for FY 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Galbraith, R.M.; White, A.; Smith, A.; Schmidt, H.; Moed, B.; Tokunaga, T.

    1982-05-01

    The present study is the beginning phase of an effort to develop an understanding of the physico-chemical interactions that occur within two typical inactive uranium mill tailing piles under the jurisdiction of the UMTRA Program. These sites are located at Riverton, Wyoming and at Maybell, Colorado. The understanding is to be gained through integrated hydrological-geochemical-radiometric studies. Investigated are: (a) the release of contaminants to the interstitial fluid; and (b) the vertical transport of the contaminants either upward to the surface or downward to the water table. This investigation would determine the important contaminants, ascertain the influence of chemical/osmotic potentials (if any) on fluid movement, and investigate the possibility of temporal cycles in the upward/downward movement of fluids with seasonal changes in the moisture content of the piles. The field work carried out during fiscal 1981 extended from June to September. During this period, exploratory drilling was completed at six locations on the Riverton and Maybell piles. Over 141 Shelby tube samples were collected, which represent relatively undisturbed core samples of the tailings material. In order to gain a maximum advantage of the short time available before the onset of the winter, it was decided to concentrate the rest of the data collection at the Riverton site, where the water table is shallow

  13. Hydrogeochemical studies of the Rustler Formation and related rocks in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Area, Southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, M.D.; Lambert, S.J.; Robinson, K.L.

    1991-08-01

    Chemical, mineralogical, isotopic, and hydrological studies of the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation and related rocks are used to delineate hydrochemical facies and form the basis for a conceptual model for post-Pleistocene groundwater flow and chemical evolution. Modern flow within the Culebra in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) area appears to be largely north-to-south; however, these flow directions under confined conditions are not consistent with the salinity distribution in the region surrounding the WIPP Site. Isotopic, mineralogical, and hydrological data suggest that vertical recharge to the Culebra in the WIPP area and to the immediate east and south has not occurred for several thousand years. Eastward increasing 234 U/ 238 U activity ratios suggest recharge from a near-surface Pleistocene infiltration zone flowing from the west-northwest and imply a change in flow direction in the last 30,000 to 12,000 years. 49 refs., 34 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Hydrogeochemical studies of the Rustler Formation and related rocks in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Area, Southeastern New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, M.D.; Lambert, S.J.; Robinson, K.L. (eds.)

    1991-08-01

    Chemical, mineralogical, isotopic, and hydrological studies of the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation and related rocks are used to delineate hydrochemical facies and form the basis for a conceptual model for post-Pleistocene groundwater flow and chemical evolution. Modern flow within the Culebra in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) area appears to be largely north-to-south; however, these flow directions under confined conditions are not consistent with the salinity distribution in the region surrounding the WIPP Site. Isotopic, mineralogical, and hydrological data suggest that vertical recharge to the Culebra in the WIPP area and to the immediate east and south has not occurred for several thousand years. Eastward increasing {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios suggest recharge from a near-surface Pleistocene infiltration zone flowing from the west-northwest and imply a change in flow direction in the last 30,000 to 12,000 years. 49 refs., 34 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. A hydrogeochemical study of rain water to characterize the source of atmospheric pollutants at Jodhpur - desert city of India (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, K.L.; Ojha, S.K.

    1999-01-01

    A study was undertaken has been conducted to determined the physical parameters and chemical species in the first precipitants of the season at desert city of Jodhpur to understand firstly, the degree of pollutants in the atmosphere and secondly to identity the minerals/pollutants of the atmosphere to characterize its possible source of origin. The precipitate samples for cations and other physical and chemical parameters by standard analytical methods. The results obtained on turbidity, conductivity, total dissolved solids and the ratio of total dissolved solids and conductivity, show a moderate degree of pollutants at all the four sites, A, B, C and D but slightly higher at C and D sites. The concentration of various water-soluble chemical species present in the precipitates, specially a balance between acidic and basic constituents decides its pH value. Hydrogen ions are mainly responsible for acidification of rain waters and are derived chiefly from oxidation of SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub 2/ to from H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and HNO/sub 3/ respectively. Hence a correlation study carried out between H/sup */and SO/sub 4//sup --/, NO/sub 3/ and Cl. Result shows no strong correlation between H/sup +/ and Cl/up -/. A group of strongly corrected elements Cl, Na/sup +/,K/sup +/ and Mg/sup ++/ were observed representing a similar source of their origin. The atmospheric desert dust components chiefly consist of quartz, mica flakes, clays like illite, kaolinite etc., and especially clays, may neutralize the acidity of precipitates via H/sup +/ exchange. Some minerals like Halite, Gypsum, Dolomite, Calcite may get slightly dissolved in the rainwater to replace H/sup +/ ions and so, impart alkalinity. Thus, it is logical to believe that the cations may have been derived originally from some of the geological source. Some rations like Cl/Na, Mg/Na, Ca/Na are known to have been used in characterization of the source. As expected in the atmosphere of desert city, like Jodhpur, the solid

  16. Imouraren mining exploitation : Complementary studies Synthetic report Volum B - Mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The object of the current study is to determine the main technical characteristics of the reference project of a mine that can supply the necessary ore quantity at a production of 3000 tonnes uranium per year, along 10 years. The project is one of the possible solutions for exploiting the mine. The current study permits to establish : investment and functioning cost estimation, overall project of the mining exploitation program, necessary strength estimation, average ore grades evaluation and variations of these grades, utilities needs, production vizing program, main exploitation methods and necessary materials. Reference project study of the mine serves as base to the economics studies and studies optimization [fr

  17. SRL-NURE hydrogeochemical data management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, J.H.; Wren, H.F.; Honeck, H.C.; Tharin, C.R.; Howard, M.D.

    1976-07-01

    A data management system was developed to store and retrieve all physical, chemical, and geological data collected for the NURE Hydrogeochemical Reconnaissance program by the Savannah River laboratory (SRL). In 1975, SRL accepted responsibility for hydrogeochemical reconnaissance of twenty-five states in the eastern United States as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program to identify areas favorable for uranium exploration. The SRL-NURE hydrogeochemical data management system is written in FORTRAN IV for an IBM System 360/195 computer. The system is designed to accommodate the changes in the types of data collected about a sampling site and for the different numbers of samples taken at the sites. The data are accepted as they become available and are combined with relevant data already in the system

  18. MODERN COMPLEMENTARY FOODS IN THE PREVENTION OF ALLERGIC DISEASES: PROSPECTIVE STUDY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. E. Borovik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rate allergenic properties of the complementary food line based on grains, fruits/vegetables and meat in the diet of infants (0–1 years old. Methods: The study included children aged 4–6 months with natural, mixed or artificial feeding, who had not received any complementary food before. The children were almost healthy or had a burdened allergic history. Complementary foods (porridge, vegetable puree, meat puree and fruit puree were administered basing on an individual plan depending on age, nutritional status and nature of feces. Tolerability of products and dynamics of mass-height and laboratory parameters were evaluated. At the beginning and at the end of the study, capillary blood was taken to determine the content of hemoglobin in red blood cells (MCH, the equivalent of hemoglobin in reticulocytes (RetHe, iron, ferritin, prealbumin, and specific E class immunoglobulin (IgE to the proteins in cow's and goat milk, apples, pears, prunes, zucchini, broccoli, cauliflower, rice, maize, buckwheat, turkey meat, and rabbit meat (quantitative allergy diagnostics using an express method. In addition, a scatological study was performed. Results: 60 healthy children received complementary foods based on grains, fruits/vegetables and meat on a step-by-step basis. The level of specific IgE to food allergens in all children under the study was within normal range (0–135 IU/ml both initially and after the administration of all the complementary foods studied. Conclusion: The investigated complementary foods have a low sensitizing potential, including in children with a burdened allergic history. This allows us to describe them as hypoallergenic products.

  19. Modeling Radionuclide Decay Chain Migration Using HYDROGEOCHEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T. C.; Tsai, C. H.; Lai, K. H.; Chen, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear technology has been employed for energy production for several decades. Although people receive many benefits from nuclear energy, there are inevitably environmental pollutions as well as human health threats posed by the radioactive materials releases from nuclear waste disposed in geological repositories or accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear facilities. Theoretical studies have been undertaken to understand the transport of radionuclides in subsurface environments because that the radionuclide transport in groundwater is one of the main pathway in exposure scenarios for the intake of radionuclides. The radionuclide transport in groundwater can be predicted using analytical solution as well as numerical models. In this study, we simulate the transport of the radionuclide decay chain using HYDROGEOCHEM. The simulated results are verified against the analytical solution available in the literature. Excellent agreements between the numerical simulation and the analytical are observed for a wide spectrum of concentration. HYDROGECHEM is a useful tool assessing the ecological and environmental impact of the accidental radionuclide releases such as the Fukushima nuclear disaster where multiple radionuclides leaked through the reactor, subsequently contaminating the local groundwater and ocean seawater in the vicinity of the nuclear plant.

  20. Home-made and commercial complementary meals in German infants: results of the DONALD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbig, A; Foterek, K; Kersting, M; Alexy, U

    2015-12-01

    Infant complementary food can be home-made or bought as ready-to-eat commercial products. The nutrient composition of commercial products is regularised in a European Commission guideline, whereas the preparation of home-made complementary meals is the responsibility of caregivers. In the present study, the composition of commercial and home-made complementary meals as eaten by healthy German infants was compared. Of 8226 complementary meals (74% commercial and 26% home-made) recorded in 1083, 3-day weighed dietary records from 396 participants (6-12 months old) of the German DONALD (DOrtmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed) study were analysed. Median energy density (kcal 100 g(-1)) was highest in commercial and home-made cereal-milk meals (89 kcal 100 g(-1)). In home-made savoury and cereal-fruit meals, the energy density was significantly higher compared to their commercial counterparts. Median protein contents were highest in savoury and cereal-milk meals (>2.5 g 100 g(-1)) and dairy-fruit meals (2-4 g 100 g(-1)). Added sugars were found in less than a quarter of meals. Highest median sodium contents were found not only in commercial savoury meals (median 38 mg 100 g(-1)) and vegetable meals (32 mg 100 g(-1)), but also in home-made cereal-milk meals (36 mg 100 g(-1)). Both median fat and iron contents were higher in home-made meals compared to commercial savoury and cereal-fruit meals. With the exception of the higher sodium content in commercial savoury meals for older infants, the lower fat content in commercial savoury and cereal-fruit meals, and the added sugar content in some commercial dairy-fruit meals, a comparison of commercial and home-made complementary meals did not reveal any serious inadequacy. © 2015 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  1. Complementary feeding and the early origins of obesity risk: a study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Muniandy, Naleena Devi; Allotey, Pascale A; Soyiri, Ireneous N; Reidpath, Daniel D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The rise in the prevalence of childhood obesity worldwide calls for an intervention earlier in the life cycle. Studies show that nutrition during early infancy may contribute to later obesity. Hence, this study is designed to determine if the variation in complementary feeding practices poses a risk for the development of obesity later in life. A mixed methods approach will be used in conducting this study. Methods and analysis The target participants are infants born from Januar...

  2. Review of the analytical techniques used in the hydrogeochemical prospecting of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimbert, A.; Berthollet, P.

    1959-01-01

    This report examines the methods recommended for the estimation of uranium in water. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods are studied with respect to the qualities necessary for the hydrogeochemical prospecting of uranium sensitivity of the order of 1/5 ppb with an accuracy of 15 to 20 per cent, high fidelity, rapidity, simplicity and low cost. (author) [fr

  3. The characteristics of hydrogeochemical zonation of groundwater in inland plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin-yu, HOU; Li-ting, XING; Yi, YANG; Wen-jing, ZHANG; Guang-yao, CHI

    2018-05-01

    To find out the hydrochemical zoning of groundwaterin the inland plain, taking Jiyang plain as an example, based on mathematical statistics, ion ratio coefficient and isotopic analysis method, the characteristics of water chemical composition and its zoning at different depths of 500m were studied. The result shows: ①The groundwater flow system in the study area can be divided into local flow system, intermediate flow system and regional flow system. ②The hydrochemical type of shallow groundwater is complex. The hydrochemical types of middle confined water are mainly ClṡSO4—MgṡNa and SO4ṡCl—NaṡMg. The deep confined water is mainly HCO3. ③The TDS of shallow groundwater increases gradually along the direction of groundwater flow. ④The shallow saltwater and freshwater are alternately distributed in horizontal direction, and saltwater is distributed sporadically in the interfluve area with sporadic punctate or banded, and hydrochemical types are mainly ClṡSO4—NaṡMgṡCa. Conclusion: Groundwater in the study area is affected by complicated hydrogeochemical action, mainly in the form of filtration, cation exchange and evaporation. The inland plain area is characterized by hydrogeochemical zonation in horizontal and vertical.

  4. [Complex febrile seizures: study of the associated pathology and practical use of complementary tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzosa López, R; Ramos Fernández, J M; Martínez Antón, J; Espinosa Fernández, M G; Urda Cardona, A

    2014-06-01

    Although one third of febrile seizures are complex, a consensus has still not been reached on how to manage them, as is the case with simple febrile seizures. The objective of this study is to estimate the usefulness of complementary examinations and the risk of associated serious intracranial pathology. A retrospective review was conducted from 2003 until 2011 on patients from 6 months to 6 years presenting with a complex febrile seizure admitted to a tertiary care hospital, excluding the cases with previous neurological disease. Epidemiological and clinic variables were collected, as well as complementary tests and complications. We found 65 patients (31 females and 34 males), of whom 44 had repeated seizures in the first 24 hours, with 15 having focal seizures. The vast majority (90%) of the recurrences occurred before 15 hours. The mean age was 20.7 months and temperature was 39.1 ± 0.12°C. None of the patients had severe intracranial pathology. The electroencephalogram gave no helpful information for the diagnosis. Neuroimaging was normal in all studied cases. The incidence of complications in complex febrile seizure in our series did not justify the systematic admission or the systematic study with complementary tests when the neurological examination was normal. The routine electroencephalogram does not appear to be justified. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Application of INAA complementary gamma ray photopeaks to homogeneity study of candidate reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Edson G.; Vasconcellos, Marina B.A.; Lima, Ana P.S.; Catharino, Marilia G.M.; Maihara, Vera A.; Saiki, Mitiko

    2009-01-01

    Characterization and certification of reference materials, RMs, is a complex task involving many steps. One of them is the homogeneity testing to assure that key property values will not present variation among RM bottles. Good precision is the most important figure of merit of an analytical technique to allow it to be used in the homogeneity testing of candidate RMs. Due to its inherent characteristics, Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis, INAA, is an analytical technique of choice for homogeneity testing. Problems with sample digestion and contamination from reagents are not an issue in INAA, as solid samples are analyzed directly. For element determination via INAA, the activity of a suitable gamma ray decay photopeak for an element is chosen and it is compared to the activity of a standard of the element. An interesting possibility is the use of complementary gamma ray photopeaks (for the elements that present them) to confirm the homogeneity test results for an element. In this study, an investigation of the use of the complementary gamma ray photopeaks of 110 mAg, 82 Br, 60 Co, 134 Cs, 152 Eu, 59 Fe, 140 La, 233 Pa (for Th determination), 46 Sc and 75 Se radionuclides was undertaken in the between bottle homogeneity study of a mussel candidate RM under preparation at IPEN - CNEN/SP. Although some photopeaks led to biased element content results, the use of complementary gamma ray photopeaks proved to be helpful in supporting homogeneity study conclusions of new RMs. (author)

  6. Adherence with early infant feeding and complementary feeding guidelines in the Cork BASELINE Birth Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, Sinéad M; Murray, Deirdre M; Hourihane, Jonathan O'B; Kenny, Louise C; Irvine, Alan D; Kiely, Mairead

    2015-10-01

    To describe adherence with infant feeding and complementary feeding guidelines. Prospective study of infant feeding and complementary feeding practices were collected as part of the Cork BASELINE Birth Cohort Study. Cork, Ireland. Data are described for the 823 infants for whom a diary was completed. Breast-feeding was initiated in 81 % of infants, and 34 %, 14 % and 1 % of infants were exclusively breast-fed at hospital discharge, 2 and 6 months, respectively. Stage one infant formula decreased from 71 % at 2 months to 13 % at 12 months. The majority of infants (79 %) were introduced to solids between 17 and 26 weeks and 18 % were given solid foods before 17 weeks. Mothers of infants who commenced complementary feeding prior to 17 weeks were younger (29·8 v. 31·5 years; P<0·001) and more likely to smoke (18 v. 8 %; P=0·004). The first food was usually baby rice (69 %), infant breakfast cereals (14 %) or fruit/vegetables (14 %). Meals were generally home-made (49 %), cereal-based (35 %), manufactured (10 %), dairy (3 %) and dessert-based (3 %). The median gap between the first-second, second-third, third-fourth and fourth-fifth new foods was 4, 2, 2 and 2 d, respectively. We present the largest prospective cohort study to date on early infant feeding in Ireland. The rate of breast-feeding is low by international norms. Most mothers introduce complementary foods between 4 and 6 months with lengthy gaps between each new food/food product. There is a high prevalence of exposure to infant breakfast cereals, which are composite foods, among the first foods introduced.

  7. Timing and Determinants of the Introduction of Complementary Foods in Kuwait: Results of a Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jane A; Dashti, Manal; Al-Sughayer, Mona; Edwards, Christine A

    2015-08-01

    The early introduction of complementary foods is common in Middle Eastern countries but little is known about the determinants of this practice in this region. This prospective cohort study conducted from October 2007 to October 2008 investigated the determinants of the very early (before 17 weeks) introduction of complementary foods in Kuwait and compared rates of this practice against rates reported in the mid-1990s. A total of 373 women were recruited from maternity hospitals in Kuwait City and followed to 26 weeks postpartum. Data on complementary feeding practices were available from 303 women. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the association of very early introduction of complementary foods with infant sex and maternal characteristics including age, years of education, employment intentions at 6 months postpartum, parity, prepregnancy body mass index, and prepregnancy smoking status. All infants had received complementary foods by 26 weeks of age, with 30.4% receiving complementary foods before 17 weeks of age. Women born in other Arabic countries were less likely to introduce complementary foods before 17 weeks (adjusted odds ratio [adj OR] = 0.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.22-0.73) than women born in Kuwait. Women who were exclusively formula feeding at 6 weeks postpartum were less likely to introduce complementary foods before 17 weeks (adj OR = 0.40; 95% CI, 0.23-0.71) than women who were still breastfeeding. Compared to the mid-1990s, fewer infants in Kuwait were receiving complementary foods before 17 weeks. Nevertheless, all infants had received complementary foods by 6 months of age. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the Pediatrics with Leukemia: A Narrative Review Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Miladinia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundFor using of complementary and alternative medicine methods (CAM in the leukemia pediatrics than other types of cancer, we have two great challenges; first challenge is their safety and risks and second challenge is study gaps in this field. Regarding to these challenges, this study is a narrative review of some CAM methods in the leukemia pediatrics from the perspective of their safety, risks and study gaps.Materials and MethodsIn this narrative review study searched both international electronic databases including ISI Web of science, PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, ISC, Embase, Scopus, Google Scholar and also, Iranian electronic databases including Magiran, Medlib and SID. Also, searches were performed separately in the specialized journals in the field of leukemia pediatrics and complementary and alternative medicine research.ResultsMusic therapy, gentle yoga movements, gentle massage types are quite safe for leukemia pediatrics. But, use of heavy yoga movements, massages with deep pressure, acupressure and acupuncture can be dangerous for leukemia pediatrics (risks of bleeding and or infection. Also, this study showed that, the number of investigations about the use of CAM in the leukemia pediatrics is very limited; especially in the field of yoga and acupuncture.ConclusionThe results of this study can be a basis both for chose of safe CAM method in these children and a basis for future studies on the basis of identified study gaps in this review study.

  9. Complementary therapy use by patients and parents of children with asthma and the implications for NHS care: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharp Debbie

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients are increasingly using complementary therapies, often for chronic conditions. Asthma is the most common chronic condition in the UK. Previous research indicates that some asthma patients experience gaps in their NHS care. However, little attention has been given to how and why patients and parents of children with asthma use complementary therapies and the implications for NHS care. Methods Qualitative study, comprising 50 semi-structured interviews with a purposeful sample of 22 adults and 28 children with asthma (plus a parent, recruited from a range of NHS and non-NHS settings in Bristol, England. Data analysis was thematic, drawing on the principles of constant comparison. Results A range of complementary therapies were being used for asthma, most commonly Buteyko breathing and homeopathy. Most use took place outside of the NHS, comprising either self-treatment or consultation with private complementary therapists. Complementary therapies were usually used alongside not instead of conventional asthma treatment. A spectrum of complementary therapy users emerged, including "committed", "pragmatic" and "last resort" users. Motivating factors for complementary therapy use included concerns about conventional NHS care ("push factors" and attractive aspects of complementary therapies ("pull factors". While participants were often uncertain whether therapies had directly helped their asthma, breathing techniques such as the Buteyko Method were most notably reported to enhance symptom control and enable reduction in medication. Across the range of therapies, the process of seeking and using complementary therapies seemed to help patients in two broad ways: it empowered them to take greater personal control over their condition rather than feel dependant on medication, and enabled exploration of a broader range of possible causes of their asthma than commonly discussed within NHS settings. Conclusion Complementary therapy

  10. Hydrogeochemical And Isotopic Investigation Of Nasrettin Hoca Springs, Eskisehir, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet ÇELİK

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study are to investigate the water quality, the contamination and water-rock interaction of the Nasrettin Hoca springs, with an ultimate aim of establishing protection measures. Within the scope of this study, the springs in and around the catchment area, Bağbaşı springs, Hatip spring, Ali spring, Saracık Fountain and Babadat spring, were investigated. The springs are of Ca-Mg-HCO3 type when basic hydrogeochemical features are considered, are under the influence of marble-limestone and meta ophiolitic units located in the recharge area and are of shallow circulation. The trace element contents of the springs show the influence of the carbonate rocks comprising the reservoir (Sr and the basement rocks (Ni, Al. The protection areas of Nasrettin Hoca springs against contamination are determined as three different zones by considering the hydrogeologic and topographical features of the region and the Turkish Standards

  11. Prevalence and use of complementary health approaches among women with chronic pelvic pain in a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Maria T; Abercrombie, Priscilla D; Nakagawa, Sanae; Gregorich, Steven E; Learman, Lee A; Kuppermann, Miriam

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of and factors associated with use of complementary health approaches among women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP). We analyzed data from the Study of Pelvic Problems, Hysterectomy, and Intervention Alternatives, a prospective cohort study of women seeking care for noncancerous pelvic problems with intact uteri at enrollment. Among a subset of 699 participants who reported having CPP, we analyzed the prevalence of complementary health approaches used and associated patient sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, health-related quality of life, attitudes and beliefs, and conventional health care practices. At baseline, slightly over one-half (51%) of women with CPP used at least one complementary health approach in the past year, including acupuncture (8%), special foods or diets (22%), herbs (27%), and vitamins and minerals (29%). During follow-up surveys conducted annually for 4 years, a substantial proportion of women (44.8%) used complementary health approaches at more than half of the assessments. Users of complementary health approaches were more likely to undergo a hysterectomy or oophorectomy or to use gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists or opioids during the study compared with nonusers. Women with CPP who used complementary health approaches also had more optimal health-related quality of life measured by the Pelvic Problem Impact Questionnaire (31.6 vs 25.6, P complementary health approaches. The substantial interest in and high prevalence of complementary health approaches used alongside conventional medical approaches highlight the need for better understanding of multimodal approaches to address the complex condition of CPP. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Coping behavior in multiple sclerosis-complementary and alternative medicine: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommer, Paulus S; König, Nicolaus; Sühnel, Annett; Zettl, Uwe K

    2018-04-10

    Treatment options for multiple sclerosis (MS) have enlarged tremendously over the last years. Nonetheless, lots of patients look for alternative treatment options. The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widespread in MS, however, its scientific investigation is limited so far. The aim of the study is to analyse clinical and demographical differences of MS patients in dependency of their CAM utilization as coping strategy. A total of 254 patients with a clinically definite MS were examined in a semistructured interview. Additional standardized questionnaires were used to measure different aspects of coping with illness. All patients underwent neurological examination. About 206 of all enrolled patients are CAM users (81.1%). They have a longer disease duration (8.3 years vs 7.3 years, P = 0.028) and show higher disability (median EDSS 4.0 vs 2.0, P alternative or complementary methods. CAM utilization may mirror unmet needs in the treatment of MS. © 2018 The Authors. CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. INTRODUCTION OF COMPLEMENTARY FOODS AND FOOD ALLERGIES: NEW STUDIES AND MODERN CLINICAL GUIDELINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla S. Namazova-Baranova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted  to the issues  of introducing  complementary  foods  as prevention  of atopy  and diet therapy in children with food allergy. Food sensibilization,  as a rule, is the initial link of allergy manifestations.  It represents  the first step of the so-called atopic  march,  followed  by  possible  development  of more  severe,  including  respiratory,  manifestations.  Considering  the  fact  that allergic diseases  are currently one of the most common pathologies with a growing tendency,  the correct choice of foods and the timely introduction of complementary foods are relevant, especially for children with hereditary tainted allergies. These products should be as safe as possible, should not cause sensibilization and at the same time should provide the child with the necessary macroand micronutrients. The publication provides an overview of the most relevant studies conducted in this field as well as a modern approach based on evidence-based  medicine and presented in the clinical guidelines on food allergy in children developed and approved by the professional association «Union of Pediatricians of Russia».

  14. Hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance program at LLL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinney, J.F.

    1977-03-01

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) is conducting a Hydrogeochemical and Stream-Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) survey in support of ERDA's National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Included in the LLL portion of this survey are seven western states (Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Washington). Similar surveys are being carried out in the rest of the continental United States, including Alaska, as part of a systematic nationwide study of the distribution of uranium in surface water, groundwater, and stream sediment. The overall objective is to identify favorable areas for uranium exploration. This paper describes the program being conducted by LLL to complete our portion of the survey by 1981. The topics discussed are geology and sample acquisition, sample preparation and analysis, and data-base management

  15. Hydrological and hydrogeochemical investigations in boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, L.; Olsson, T.

    1985-07-01

    Underground investigations in boreholes are presumed to be an important investigation technique for the detailed design of a final repository for nuclear waste. The siting of the repository will be based on surface investigations, but for detailed investigations when the access shafts are sunk, investigations in underground boreholes from the initial shafts and tunnels will be of importance. The hydrogeological investigations in boreholes aimed at testing and developing of hydrogeological techniques and instruments for use in an underground environment in order to reflect actual working and testing conditions. This report is the final report from the hydrogeological investigations in boreholes, and it summarizes the different activities carried out during the course of the program. Most of the included activities are reported in separate internal reports, and therefore only the most important results are included, together with the experiences and conclusions gained during the investigations. The hydrogeochemical part of the program is in a separate final report, consequently no hydrogeochemical information is in the current report. (Author)

  16. Complementary feeding and the early origins of obesity risk: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniandy, Naleena Devi; Allotey, Pascale A; Soyiri, Ireneous N; Reidpath, Daniel D

    2016-11-15

    The rise in the prevalence of childhood obesity worldwide calls for an intervention earlier in the life cycle. Studies show that nutrition during early infancy may contribute to later obesity. Hence, this study is designed to determine if the variation in complementary feeding practices poses a risk for the development of obesity later in life. A mixed methods approach will be used in conducting this study. The target participants are infants born from January to June 2015 in the South East Asia Community Observatory (SEACO) platform. The SEACO is a Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) that is established in the District of Segamat in the state of Johor, Malaysia. For the quantitative strand, the sociodemographic data, feeding practices, anthropometry measurement and total nutrient intake will be assessed. The assessment will occur around the time complementary feeding is expected to start (7 Months) and again at 12 months. A 24-hour diet recall and a 2-day food diary will be used to assess the food intake. For the qualitative strand, selected mothers will be interviewed to explore their infant feeding practices and factors that influence their practices and food choices in detail. Ethical clearance for this study was sought through the Monash University Human Research and Ethics Committee (application number CF14/3850-2014002010). Subsequently, the findings of this study will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals, national and international conferences. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Liquid chromatographic determination of saccharin in beverages and desserts: complementary collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, A M

    1988-01-01

    A complementary collaborative study was conducted on a liquid chromatographic method for determination of saccharin in accordance with the latest international recommendations. One industrial and 6 official food control laboratories analyzed 3 samples of a juice, a soft drink, and a dessert at concentration levels of 26-90 mg/L, 33-73 mg/L, and 56-147 mg/kg, respectively. Blind duplicates and a blank were supplied for each type of material at each concentration level. The beverage was chromatographed directly and the dessert was extracted with ethanol before chromatography. Average recoveries were 95-107%. The reproducibility relative standard deviations were 6.4-7.3% for the juice, 9.2-20.6% for the soft drink, and 13.4-16.2% for the dessert. The outlier percentage was 14.3%. The results were compared with those of an earlier collaborative study by Nordic laboratories and with general collaborative results obtained by AOAC.

  18. Susceptibility to saline contamination of coastal confined aquifer of the Uraba banana axis with hydrogeochemical and isotopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes Zuniga, Vanessa

    2010-01-01

    The project has covered an area of study of 8916 km 2 is located in the Northwestern part of the Department of Antioquia, Colombia. Interest area is geologically constituted by tertiary sedimentary rocks (T1 and T2) and alluvial deposits (Quaternary). Hydrogeological units, potentially better use of groundwater, have been established for the unit T2 (confined aquifer) and quaternary deposits.) The area has been of 2600 mm/year to 3600 mm/year of average rainfall. The susceptibility to saline contamination has been determined of coastal aquifer of the Uraba banana axis. Hydrochemical and geological information, geophysics, hydraulic and hydrochemical is used improving existing conceptual hydrogeological model. A hydrochemical characterization has been performed to evaluate the processes of salinity in the confined aquifer. The integration of geological information, geophysical and hydrogeological has been methodology used to validate the hydraulic characteristics of the aquifer, its geometry and operation, updating the conceptual hydrogeological model. The use of complementary tools been able to determine and identify processes that may affect natural physico-chemical characteristics of groundwater. The results have showed that salinization processes present in the coastal aquifer of Uraba Banana Axis could be linked to water-rock interaction, to mixtures with water have become saline as a result of transgression - regression processes in the former study. The hydrogeochemical techniques have become a complementary tool to the hydrogeology allowing respond the questions were presented in complex systems, such as the case of coastal aquifers, where sanitation is usually associated with saline intrusion processes and can also be obeying the conjunction with other hydroclimatological and hydrodynamic aspects. (author) [es

  19. Complementary feeding patterns in a developing country: a cross-sectional study across Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batal, M; Boulghourjian, C; Akik, C

    2010-02-01

    This first, large-scale study on complementary feeding in Lebanon analysed the timing and types of food introduced to infants according to mothers' demographic and socioeconomic and infants' characteristics. A cross-sectional survey over 10 months found that the majority of infants were introduced to solid foods at or after 4 months of age. A large number of infants were given liquids other than breast or formula milk earlier. Women in employment outside the home were almost twice as likely to introduce solid foods before age 4 months. The most common starting food was cereals. More than half the children consumed starchy foods and fruits every day, but not meats and fish.

  20. Using Complementary Learning Clusters in Studying Literature to Enhance Students' Medical Humanities Literacy, Critical Thinking, and English Proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hung-Chang; Wang, Ya-Huei

    2016-04-01

    This study examined whether students studying literature in complementary learning clusters would show more improvement in medical humanities literacy, critical thinking skills, and English proficiency compared to those in conventional learning clusters. Ninety-three students participated in the study (M age = 18.2 years, SD = 0.4; 36 men, 57 women). A quasi-experimental design was used over 16 weeks, with the control group (n = 47) working in conventional learning clusters and the experimental group (n = 46) working in complementary learning clusters. Complementary learning clusters were those in which individuals had complementary strengths enabling them to learn from and offer assistance to other cluster members, hypothetically facilitating the learning process. Measures included the Medical Humanities Literacy Scale, Critical Thinking Disposition Assessment, English proficiency tests, and Analytic Critical Thinking Scoring Rubric. The results showed that complementary learning clusters have the potential to improve students' medical humanities literacy, critical thinking skills, and English proficiency. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of General Practitioners toward Complementary and Alternative Medicine: a Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barikani, Ameneh; Beheshti, Akram; Javadi, Maryam; Yasi, Marzieh

    2015-08-01

    Orientation of public and physicians to the complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is one of the most prominent symbols of structural changes in the health service system. The aim of his study was a determination of knowledge, attitude, and practice of general practitioners in complementary and alternative medicine. This cross- sectional study was conducted in Qazvin, Iran in 2013. A self-administered questionnaire was used for collecting data including four information parts: population information, physicians' attitude and knowledge, methods of getting information and their function. A total of 228 physicians in Qazvin comprised the population of study according to the deputy of treatment's report of Qazvin University of Medical Sciences. A total of 150 physicians were selected randomly, and SPSS Statistical program was used to enter questionnaires' data. Results were analyzed as descriptive statistics and statistical analysis. Sixty percent of all responders were male. About sixty (59.4) percent of participating practitioners had worked less than 10 years.96.4 percent had a positive attitude towards complementary and alternative medicine. Knowledge of practitioners about traditional medicine in 11 percent was good, 36.3% and 52.7% had average and little information, respectively. 17.9% of practitioners offered their patients complementary and alternative medicine for treatment. Although there was little knowledge among practitioners about traditional medicine and complementary approaches, a significant percentage of them had attitude higher than the lower limit.

  2. Hydrogeochemical characteristics and bacterial community diversity in leachate from animal carcass disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaown, D.; Kim, H.; Lee, S.; Hyun, Y.; Moon, H.; Ko, K.; Lee, K.

    2012-12-01

    The release of leachate from animal carcass disposal can potentially contaminate soil and groundwater. During the Korea's foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) outbreak in 2010-2011, about 3.53 million of pigs and cattle were slaughtered and 4,538 burial sites were constructed. The objectives of this study are to determine the hydrogeochemical characteristics and bacterial community diversity in leachate from animal carcass disposal. Hydrogeochemical characteristics and bacterial community diversity in leachate from animal carcass burial facilities were monitored to prevent further soil and groundwater contamination and to build effective plans for stabilization of the burial site. Two burial sites were investigated in this study. An animal carcass disposal site is located in a flat area and another disposal site is found in mountain area. The hydrogeochemical and hydrogeological characteristics were analyzed to identify groundwater contamination by leachate from livestock burial sites. After 5-6 months of burial, the concentrations of NH4+, Cl-, and HCO3- in leachate were decreased since the leachate was regularly pumped and treated. However, high concentrations of major contaminants (NH4+, Cl-, and HCO3-) were still observed in landfill leachate of mountain area even though pumping and treatment of leachate were continuously conducted. Bacterial community diversity over time in leachate from animal carcass disposal was analyzed using 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing. The impact of landfill leachate on change of bacterial community in soil and groundwater were monitored for a year.

  3. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment detailed geochemical survey for Edgemont, South Dakota; Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    An area on the Long Mountain Structure Zone was chosen for examination of hydrogeochemical data. The data suggest the presence of a hydrogeochemical boundary approximately 5 to 7 km (3-1/2 to 4-1/2 mi) downdip of exposed mines and prospects in the Inyan Kara Group. Based on studies by Gatt, et al (1974) the hydrogeochemical boundary is interpreted to represent a zone of ion exchange favorable for precipitation of uranium. Updip of the boundary, the groundwater is of a calcium sulfate type. Uranium concentrations range from <0.2 to 32 ppB (mean = 13 ppB), calcium concentrations range from 85 to 320 ppB (mean = 158 ppB), and sulfate concentrations range from 600 to 1800 ppM (mean = 708 ppM). Sodium concentrations range from 43 to 363 ppM (mean = 168 ppM) and total alkalinity values range from 130 to 330 ppM (mean = 244 ppM). Downdip of the boundary, the groundwater is of a sodium bicarbonate type. Uranium concentrations range from < 0.2 to 0.54 ppB (mean = .28 ppB), calcium concentrations range from 1.0 to 45 ppB (mean = 8.4 ppB), and sulfate concentrations range from 41 to 1400 ppM (mean = 266 ppM). Sodium concentrations range from 176 to 744 ppM (mean = 296 ppM) and total alkalinity values range from 140 to 920 ppM (mean = 596 ppM). The maximum uranium value observed (32 ppB) occurs near the hydrogeochemical boundary

  4. Hydrogeochemical site descriptive model - a strategy for the model development during site investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smellie, John; Laaksoharju, Marcus; Tullborg, Eva-Lena

    2002-12-01

    material (mainly humic), and populations of colloids and microbes. These data may be related broadly to three major site subdivisions, i.e. surface, near-surface and sub-surface. Alternative subdivisions may be considered depending on the complexity of the site under investigation and the availability of data. Hydraulic data and geological data will play an important role in establishing such divisions. Hydrogeochemical output data, together with available geological and hydrogeological data, will be evaluated and modelled to derive an understanding of the origin and evolution of the different groundwater types. This will include emphasis on identifying the major chemical processes through modelling water/rock reactions and also modelling the mixing effects of different groundwater end members. Studies will involve not only present-day hydraulic conditions, but will also attempt to trace past conditions using palaeo-evidence from groundwaters and fracture minerals. The final version of the Hydrogeochemical Site Descriptive Model should represent a site-scale hydrogeochemical interpretation fully integrated with the corresponding final site descriptive versions of the geological and hydrogeological models. This final model version should show clearly: the major lithological and structural units comprising the site; the major groundwater flow directions (and minor flow directions if possible); the relationship of chemistry (i.e. mixing of end members; chemical reactions etc) to these major hydraulically conducting pathways; a clear indication of the groundwater types representative of the main hydraulic rock mass units characterised by fractures of lower transmissivities; an indication, if possible, of the chemistry of the rock matrix pore space fluid/groundwater (i.e. confined to rock units of lowest permeability). Such information will also help to establish the input boundary conditions for the numerical hydrodynamic models

  5. Personality does not predict treatment preference, treatment experience does: a study of four complementary pain treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasche, Gerhard; Melchart, Herbert; Leitner, Daniela; Marktl, Wolfgang

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the extent to which personality and treatment experience affect patients' appraisals of 4 complementary treatments for chronic pain. A total of 232 chronic pain patients (164 females, 68 males, average age 56.6 years) visiting a spa clinic in Austria returned a questionnaire on patient characteristics and personality (autonomy, depressiveness, assertiveness, self-control) as well as attitudes towards (i.e. appealing, effective, pleasant) and experience of the treatments. Results were analysed by use of linear regression analysis and confidence intervals. Although all treatments were appraised positively, the passive treatments (thermal water tub baths, classical massage) were favoured more than the active treatments (relaxation training or exercise therapy). Treatment appraisal was not predicted by any of the personality traits but to a large extent by treatment experience. Relaxing, not unpleasant treatments were the most highly esteemed treatments. How strenuous or tiring a treatment was only had a minor effect on its appraisal. Neither do dependent, passive patients prefer passive treatments, nor do conscientious patients prefer active treatments. Instead, the appraisal of treatments that induce specific somatosensory sensations is largely determined by treatment experiences, i.e. what the treatment feels like. Despite the popularity of CAM which encompasses many experientially intensive treatments, treatment experience has to date been a neglected topic of treatment research.

  6. The Current Studies of Education for a Traditional and Complementary Medicine in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Jin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the current tradition and complementary medicine (T&CM) education in Malaysia. We referred to literature regarding to traditional medicine education in Malaysia, and collected the information via website or interview with faculty of T&CM in universities/colleges and Division of T&CM, Ministry of Health, Malaysia. T&CM education in Malaysia has been following China’s T&CM systems for 50 years. Currently, Division of T&CM, Ministry of Health; and Ministry of Higher Education has approved 11 institutions to offer T&CM education. Students may major in Chinese herbal medicine, acupuncture, or other T&CM subjects. Generally, clinical training programs in China, Taiwan, or Australia include substantial proportion of clinical training. We report on the general information of T&CM education in Malaysia. This result would be the first-stage information for the establishment of a strategy regarding the enhancement of T&CM education in Malaysia. PMID:28853309

  7. Use of complementary alternative medicine for low back pain consulting in general practice: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenot, Jean-François; Becker, Annette; Leonhardt, Corinna; Keller, Stefan; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert; Baum, Erika; Pfingsten, Michael; Hildebrandt, Jan; Basler, Heinz-Dieter; Kochen, Michael M

    2007-12-18

    Although back pain is considered one of the most frequent reasons why patients seek complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies little is known on the extent patients are actually using CAM for back pain. This is a post hoc analysis of a longitudinal prospective cohort study embedded in a RCT. General practitioners (GPs) recruited consecutively adult patients presenting with LBP. Data on physical function, on subjective mood, and on utilization of health services was collected at the first consultation and at follow-up telephone interviews for a period of twelve months A total of 691 (51%) respectively 928 (69%) out of 1,342 patients received one form of CAM depending on the definition. Local heat, massage, and spinal manipulation were the forms of CAM most commonly offered. Using CAM was associated with specialist care, chronic LBP and treatment in a rehabilitation facility. Receiving spinal manipulation, acupuncture or TENS was associated with consulting a GP providing these services. Apart from chronicity disease related factors like functional capacity or pain only showed weak or no association with receiving CAM. The frequent use of CAM for LBP demonstrates that CAM is popular in patients and doctors alike. The observed association with a treatment in a rehabilitation facility or with specialist consultations rather reflects professional preferences of the physicians than a clear medical indication. The observed dependence on providers and provider related services, as well as a significant proportion receiving CAM that did not meet the so far established selection criteria suggests some arbitrary use of CAM.

  8. Evaluation of complementary-alternative medicine (CAM) questionnaire development for Indonesian clinical psychologists: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Andrian; Newcombe, Peter A; Pohlman, Annie

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate questionnaire development to measure the knowledge of Complementary-Alternative Medicine (CAM), attitudes towards CAM, CAM experiences, and CAM educational needs of clinical psychologists in Indonesia. A 26-item questionnaire was developed through an extensive literature search. Data was obtained from provisional psychologists from the Master of Professional Clinical Psychology programs at two established public universities in urban areas of Indonesia. To validate the questionnaire, panel reviews by executive members of the Indonesian Clinical Psychology Association (ICPA), experts in health psychology, and experts in public health and CAM provided their professional judgements. The self-reporting questionnaire consisted of four scales including: knowledge of CAM (6 items), attitudes towards CAM (10 items), CAM experiences (4 items), and CAM educational needs (6 items). All scales, except CAM Experiences, were assessed on a 7-point Likert scale. Sixty provisional psychologists were eligible to complete the questionnaire with a response rate of 73% (N=44). The results showed that the CAM questionnaire was reliable (Cronbach's coefficient alpha range=0.62-0.96; item-total correlation range=0.14-0.92) and demonstrated content validity. Following further psychometric evaluation, the CAM questionnaire may provide the evidence-based information to inform the education and practice of Indonesian clinical psychologists. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermal Analysis: A Complementary Method to Study the Shurijeh Clay Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golnaz Jozanikohan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Clay minerals are considered the most important components of clastic reservoir rock evaluation studies. The Shurijeh gas reservoir Formation, represented by shaly sandstones of the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous age, is the main reservoir rock in the Eastern Kopet-Dagh sedimentary Basin, NE Iran. In this study, X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray fluorescence (XRF, scanning electron microscopic (SEM studies, and thermal analysis including differential thermal analysis (DTA, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA techniques were utilized in the characterization of the Shurijeh clay minerals in ten representative samples. The XRF studies showed that silica and aluminum oxides are present quantities. The XRD test was then used to determine the mineralogical composition of bulk components, as well as the clay fraction. The XRD patterns indicated the presence of dominant amount of quartz and plagioclase, with moderate to minor amounts of alkali feldspar, anhydrite, carbonates (calcite and dolomite, hematite and clay minerals. The most common clays in the Shurijeh Formation were illite, chlorite, and kaolinite. However, in very few samples, glauconite, smectite, and mixed layer clay minerals of both illite-smectite and chlorite-smectite types were also recognized. The XRD results were quantified, using the elemental information from the XRF test, showing that each Shurijeh exhibited low to moderate amounts of clay minerals, typically up to 21%. The amount of illite, the most dominant clay mineral, reached maximum of 13.5%, while the other clay types were significantly smaller. Based on the use of SEM and thermal data, the results of the identification of clay minerals, corresponded with the powder X-ray diffraction analysis, which can be taken into account as an evidence of the effectiveness of the thermal analysis technique in clay typing, as a complementary method besides the XRD.

  10. Savannah River Laboratory hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance. Raw data release II. Orientation studies in Alabama. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, V.; Ferguson, R.B.

    1976-07-01

    Raw data for two orientation studies in the Alabama Valley and Ridge, and Upper Coastal Plain are presented. These studies were conducted in cooperation with the Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama

  11. Rural Australian community pharmacists' views on complementary and alternative medicine: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willis Jon A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs are being used increasingly across the world. In Australia, community pharmacists are a major supplier of these products but knowledge of the products and interactions with other medicines is poor. Information regarding the use of CAMs by metropolitan pharmacists has been documented by the National Prescribing Service (NPS in Australia but the views of rural/regional community pharmacists have not been explored. The aim of this pilot study was to explore the knowledge, attitudes and information seeking of a cohort of rural community pharmacists towards CAMs and to compare the findings to the larger NPS study. Methods A cross sectional self-administered postal questionnaire was mailed to all community pharmacists in one rural/regional area of Australia. Using a range of scales, data was collected regarding attitudes, knowledge, information seeking behaviour and demographics. Results Eighty eligible questionnaires were returned. Most pharmacists reported knowing that they should regularly ask consumers if they are using CAMs but many lacked the confidence to do so. Pharmacists surveyed for this study were more knowledgeable in regards to side effects and interactions of CAMs than those in the NPS survey. Over three quarters of pharmacists surveyed reported sourcing CAM information at least several times a month. The most frequently sought information was drug interactions, dose, contraindications and adverse effects. A variety of resources were used to source information, the most popular source was the internet but the most useful resource was CAM text books. Conclusions Pharmacists have varied opinions on the use of CAMs and many lack awareness of or access to good quality CAMs information. Therefore, there is a need to provide pharmacists with opportunities for further education. The data is valuable in assisting interested stakeholders with the development of initiatives to

  12. Factors affecting pharmacists’ recommendation of complementary medicines – a qualitative pilot study of Australian pharmacists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Culverhouse Sarah E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary medicines (CMs are widely used by the Australian public, and pharmacies are major suppliers of these medicines. The integration of CMs into pharmacy practice is well documented, but the behaviours of pharmacists in recommending CMs to customers are less well studied. This study reports on factors that influence whether or not pharmacists in Australia recommend CMs to their customers. Methods Data were collected from semi-structured interviews with twelve practicing pharmacists based in Brisbane, Australia. The qualitative data were analysed by thematic analysis. Results The primary driver of the recommendation of CMs was a desire to provide a health benefit to the customer. Other important drivers were an awareness of evidence of efficacy, customer feedback and pharmacy protocols to recommend a CM alongside a particular pharmaceutical medication. The primary barrier to the recommendation of CMs was safety concerns around patients on multiple medications or with complex health issues. Also, a lack of knowledge of CMs, a perceived lack of evidence or a lack of time to counsel patients were identified as barriers. There was a desire to see a greater integration of CM into formal pharmacy education. Additionally, the provision of good quality educational materials was seen as important to allow pharmacists to assess levels of evidence for CMs and educate them on their safe and appropriate use. Conclusions Pharmacists who frequently recommend CMs identify many potential benefits for patients and see it as an important part of providing a ‘healthcare solution’. To encourage the informed use of CMs in pharmacy there is a need for the development of accessible, quality resources on CMs. In addition, incorporation of CM education into pharmacy curricula would better prepare graduate pharmacists for community practice. Ultimately, such moves would contribute to the safe and effective use of CMs to the benefit of

  13. Why seek complementary medicine? An observational study in homeopathic, acupunctural and naturopathic medical practices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, S. van; Groot, J. de; Koster, D.; Heiligers, P.

    2010-01-01

    There is a steady increase in patients seeking complementary medicine (CM). Little is known about Dutch CM patients and the extent in which they differ from those of mainstream health care seekers. 1839 consecutive new patients consulting one of 40 CM physicians completed a questionnaire before

  14. Use of complementary alternative medicine for low back pain consulting in general practice: a cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenot, Jean-François; Becker, Annette; Leonhardt, Corinna; Keller, Stefan; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert; Baum, Erika; Pfingsten, Michael; Hildebrandt, Jan; Basler, Heinz-Dieter; Kochen, Michael M

    2007-01-01

    Background Although back pain is considered one of the most frequent reasons why patients seek complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies little is known on the extent patients are actually using CAM for back pain. Methods This is a post hoc analysis of a longitudinal prospective cohort study embedded in a RCT. General practitioners (GPs) recruited consecutively adult patients presenting with LBP. Data on physical function, on subjective mood, and on utilization of health services was collected at the first consultation and at follow-up telephone interviews for a period of twelve months Results A total of 691 (51%) respectively 928 (69%) out of 1,342 patients received one form of CAM depending on the definition. Local heat, massage, and spinal manipulation were the forms of CAM most commonly offered. Using CAM was associated with specialist care, chronic LBP and treatment in a rehabilitation facility. Receiving spinal manipulation, acupuncture or TENS was associated with consulting a GP providing these services. Apart from chronicity disease related factors like functional capacity or pain only showed weak or no association with receiving CAM. Conclusion The frequent use of CAM for LBP demonstrates that CAM is popular in patients and doctors alike. The observed association with a treatment in a rehabilitation facility or with specialist consultations rather reflects professional preferences of the physicians than a clear medical indication. The observed dependence on providers and provider related services, as well as a significant proportion receiving CAM that did not meet the so far established selection criteria suggests some arbitrary use of CAM. PMID:18088435

  15. Use of complementary alternative medicine for low back pain consulting in general practice: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baum Erika

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although back pain is considered one of the most frequent reasons why patients seek complementary and alternative medical (CAM therapies little is known on the extent patients are actually using CAM for back pain. Methods This is a post hoc analysis of a longitudinal prospective cohort study embedded in a RCT. General practitioners (GPs recruited consecutively adult patients presenting with LBP. Data on physical function, on subjective mood, and on utilization of health services was collected at the first consultation and at follow-up telephone interviews for a period of twelve months Results A total of 691 (51% respectively 928 (69% out of 1,342 patients received one form of CAM depending on the definition. Local heat, massage, and spinal manipulation were the forms of CAM most commonly offered. Using CAM was associated with specialist care, chronic LBP and treatment in a rehabilitation facility. Receiving spinal manipulation, acupuncture or TENS was associated with consulting a GP providing these services. Apart from chronicity disease related factors like functional capacity or pain only showed weak or no association with receiving CAM. Conclusion The frequent use of CAM for LBP demonstrates that CAM is popular in patients and doctors alike. The observed association with a treatment in a rehabilitation facility or with specialist consultations rather reflects professional preferences of the physicians than a clear medical indication. The observed dependence on providers and provider related services, as well as a significant proportion receiving CAM that did not meet the so far established selection criteria suggests some arbitrary use of CAM.

  16. Savannah River Laboratory hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance. Orientation study data release VI: Leesville, South Carolina, area. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, V.; Jones, P.L.

    1978-03-01

    Raw data from an orientation study in the Leesville, South Carolina, area are presented. The area comprises parts of Lexington, Aiken, and Saluda Counties, South Carolina. This report includes sample locality maps, uranium distribution maps, tables of water quality and field measurement data, and tables of uranium and other elemental concentrations

  17. Hydrogeochemical characteristics of the River Idrijca (Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjaša Kanduč

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The hydrogeochemical and isotope characteristics of the River Idrijca, Slovenia, where the world’s second largest mercury (Hg mine is located, were investigated. The River Idrijca, a typical steep mountain river has an HCO3- - Ca2+ - Mg2+ chemical composition. Its Ca2+/Mg2+ molar ratio indicates that dolomite weathering prevails in the watershed. The River Idrijca and its tributaries are over saturated with respect to calcite and dolomite. The pCO2 pressure is up to 13 times over atmospheric pressure and represents a source of CO2 to the atmosphere. δ18O values in river water indicate primary control from precipitation and enrichment of the heavy oxygen isotope of infiltrating water recharging the River Idrijca from its slopes.The δ13 CDIC values range from −10.8 to −6.6 ‰ and are controlled by biogeochemical processes in terrestrial environments and in the stream: 1 exchange with atmospheric CO2, 2 degradation of organic matter, 3 dissolution of carbonates, and 4 tributaries. The contributions of these inputs were calculated according to steady state equations and are estimated to be -11 %: 19 %: 31 %: 61 % in the autumn and 0 %: 6 %: 9 %: 35 % in the spring sampling seasons.

  18. Investigations in hydrogeochemical samples for uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnakumar, M.

    2015-01-01

    The primary mandate of Atomic Minerals Directorate for Exploration and Research (AMD) is to explore and establish the uranium and other atomic mineral resources required for the country's nuclear power programme. During the geochemical exploration, a large number of ground, surface, spring, stream and lake water samples are collected and analysed for various parameters. These include physical parameters such as temperature, pH, Eh, electrical conductivity etc., and concentrations of uranium and multi-ions at mg/L to ng/L using state-of-the-art instrumental analytical techniques. Hydrogeochemical analysis is considered to be a cost effective and rapid exploration tool for getting sub-surface information leading to finding of concealed uranium deposits. Water samples from a bore well, dug well, stream, spring which is in dynamic equilibrium with the rocks are collected in a white, thick walled, non-transparent, non-recycled and air-tight container, stored and analysed within eight hours if possible to avoid change in Eh-pH conditions and precipitation-dissolution of trace elements

  19. Isotopic and hydrogeochemical characterization of high-altitude karst aquifers in complex geological settings. The Ordesa and Monte Perdido National Park (Northern Spain) case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambán, L.J., E-mail: javier.lamban@igme.es [Geological Survey of Spain (IGME) (Spain); Jódar, J., E-mail: jorge.jodar@upc.edu [Department of Geotechnical Engineering and Geosciences, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Barcelona (Spain); Custodio, E., E-mail: emilio.custodio@upc.edu [Department of Geotechnical Engineering and Geosciences, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Barcelona (Spain); Soler, A., E-mail: albertsoler@ub.edu [Grup de Mineralogia Aplicada i Medi Ambient, Departament Cristal lografia Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona (UB) (Spain); Sapriza, G., E-mail: g.sapriza@usask.ca [Global Institute for Water Security, National Hydrology Research Centre (Canada); Soto, R., E-mail: r.soto@igme.es [Geological Survey of Spain (IGME) (Spain)

    2015-02-15

    The Ordesa and Monte Perdido National Park, located in the Southern Pyrenees, constitutes the highest karst system in Western Europe. No previous studies regarding its geochemical and isotopic groundwater characterization are available in this area. This work presents the results of field and sampling campaigns carried out between July 2007 and September 2013. The groundwater presents high calcium bicarbonate contents due to the occurrence of upper Cretaceous and lower Paleocene–Eocene carbonate materials in the studied area. Other relevant processes include dissolution of anhydrite and/or gypsum and incongruent dissolution of Mg-limestone and dolomite. The water stable isotopes (δ{sup 18}O, δ{sup 2}H) show that the oceanic fronts from the Atlantic Ocean are responsible for the high levels of precipitation. In autumn, winter, and spring, a deuterium excess is found in the recharge water, which could be related to local atmospheric transport of low-altitude snow sublimation vapour and its later condensation on the snow surface at higher altitude, where recharge is mostly produced. The recharge zones are mainly between 2500 m and 3200 m a.s.l. The tritium content of the water suggests short groundwater transit times. The isotopic composition of dissolved sulphate points to the existence of regional fluxes mixed with local discharge in some of the springs. This work highlights the major role played by the altitude difference between the recharge and discharge zones in controlling the chemistry and the vertical variability of the isotopic composition in high-altitude karst aquifers. - Highlights: • Environmental tracers are essential to study complex alpine karst aquifers. • The long presence of snow controls the deuterium excess in groundwater. • Seasonal δD content in springs depends on gap between recharge and discharge points. • The first hydrogeological characterization of the Ordesa National Park is presented. • Sulphate content in springs comes

  20. Hydrogeochemical study of water in some aquifers of the Estado de Mexico; Estudio hidrogeoquimico de agua de algunos manantiales del Estado de Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, P.; Lopez, A.; Balcazar, M.; Flores, J.H.; Cardenas, S. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Schubert, M. [UFZ Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle GMBH, Permoser Str. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico (ININ), has developed a technique that allows to study the association of recharge mechanisms, residence times of the water in the aquifers, as well as the local lithology and the geochemical parameters. The viability of this technique was proven on November 2004 in the aquifers (La Perita, El Tunel y El Pedregal) located in the Asuncion Tepexoyuca, Estado de Mexico. It was observed that so much the aquifer El Tunel like La Perita are used for the human consumption, the aquifer of El Pedregal is used for the fish cultivation. The studies were carried out during March 2003 to November 2004. In the aquifer La Perita the maximum values of the radon concentration (0.76 Bq L{sup -1}) they were observed in the summertime time (December). In the spring El Tunel the maximum values of the radon concentration (4.08 Bq L{sup -1}) they were observed in the rainy season (September) this increment can be due to the contributions of the recharge of aquifers that it allows the haulage of the radon of other alternating roads of infiltration of the rain water. Of the physicochemical and radiochemical analyses carried out in the water samples of the studied aquifers, it is deduced that they are waters of good quality since for the human consumption since that they are inside on the maximum permissible limits as for their potability according to national and international standards. Likewise it was observed that the water of the aquifers is a single aquifer, since that its differences they due to the time of permanency of the water inside the aquifer. The classification of the underground water deduced that it is calcic and/or magnesic bi carbonated water belonging to the type of meteoric waters of recent infiltration. (Author)

  1. Recharge sources and hydrogeochemical evolution of groundwater in semiarid and karstic environments: A field study in the Granada Basin (Southern Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohfahl, Claus; Sprenger, Christoph; Herrera, Jose Benavente; Meyer, Hanno; Chacon, Franzisca Fernandez; Pekdeger, Asaf

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to refine the understanding of recharge processes in watersheds representative for karstic semiarid areas by means of stable isotope analysis and hydrogeochemistry. The study focuses on the Granada aquifer system which is located in an intramontane basin bounded by high mountain ranges providing elevation differences of almost 2900 m. These altitude gradients lead to important temperature and precipitation gradients and provide excellent conditions for the application of stable isotopes of water whose composition depends mainly on temperature. Samples of rain, snow, surface water and groundwater were collected at 154 locations for stable isotope studies (δ 18 O, D) and, in the case of ground- and surface waters, also for major and minor ion analysis. Thirty-seven springs were sampled between 2 and 5 times from October 2004 to March 2005 along an altitudinal gradient from 552 masl in the Granada basin to 2156 masl in Sierra Nevada. Nine groundwater samples were taken from the discharge of operating wells in the Granada basin which are all located between 540 and 728 masl. The two main rivers were monitored every 2-3 weeks at three different altitudes. Rainfall being scarce during the sampling period, precipitation could only be sampled during four rainfall events. Calculated recharge altitudes of springs showed that source areas of mainly snowmelt recharge are generally located between 1600 and 2000 masl. The isotope compositions of spring water indicate water sources from the western Mediterranean as well as from the Atlantic without indicating a seasonal trend. The isotope pattern of the Quaternary aquifer reflects the spatial separation of different sources of recharge which occur mainly by bankfiltration of the main rivers. Isotopic signatures in the southeastern part of the aquifer indicate a considerable recharge contribution by subsurface flow discharged from the adjacent carbonate aquifer. No evaporation effects due to

  2. Recharge sources and hydrogeochemical evolution of groundwater in semiarid and karstic environments: A field study in the Granada Basin (Southern Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohfahl, Claus [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institute of Geological Sciences, Malteserstr. 74-100, D-12249 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: kohfahl@zedat.fu-berlin.de; Sprenger, Christoph [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institute of Geological Sciences, Malteserstr. 74-100, D-12249 Berlin (Germany); Herrera, Jose Benavente [Instituto del Agua de la Universidad de Granada, Ramon y Cajal, 4, 18071 Granada (Spain); Meyer, Hanno [Isotope Laboratory of the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Research Unit Potsdam, Telegrafenberg A 43, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Chacon, Franzisca Fernandez [Dpto. Hidrogeologia y Aguas Subterraneas, Instituto Geologico y Minero de Espana, Oficina de Proyectos, Urb. Alcazar del Genil 4, Edificio Zulema bajo, 18006 Granada (Spain); Pekdeger, Asaf [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institute of Geological Sciences, Malteserstr. 74-100, D-12249 Berlin (Germany)

    2008-04-15

    The objective of this study is to refine the understanding of recharge processes in watersheds representative for karstic semiarid areas by means of stable isotope analysis and hydrogeochemistry. The study focuses on the Granada aquifer system which is located in an intramontane basin bounded by high mountain ranges providing elevation differences of almost 2900 m. These altitude gradients lead to important temperature and precipitation gradients and provide excellent conditions for the application of stable isotopes of water whose composition depends mainly on temperature. Samples of rain, snow, surface water and groundwater were collected at 154 locations for stable isotope studies ({delta}{sup 18}O, D) and, in the case of ground- and surface waters, also for major and minor ion analysis. Thirty-seven springs were sampled between 2 and 5 times from October 2004 to March 2005 along an altitudinal gradient from 552 masl in the Granada basin to 2156 masl in Sierra Nevada. Nine groundwater samples were taken from the discharge of operating wells in the Granada basin which are all located between 540 and 728 masl. The two main rivers were monitored every 2-3 weeks at three different altitudes. Rainfall being scarce during the sampling period, precipitation could only be sampled during four rainfall events. Calculated recharge altitudes of springs showed that source areas of mainly snowmelt recharge are generally located between 1600 and 2000 masl. The isotope compositions of spring water indicate water sources from the western Mediterranean as well as from the Atlantic without indicating a seasonal trend. The isotope pattern of the Quaternary aquifer reflects the spatial separation of different sources of recharge which occur mainly by bankfiltration of the main rivers. Isotopic signatures in the southeastern part of the aquifer indicate a considerable recharge contribution by subsurface flow discharged from the adjacent carbonate aquifer. No evaporation effects due

  3. Results of a hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical study of a semi-arid karst aquifer in Tezbent plateau, Tebessa region, northeast of Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfar, Dalila; Fehdi, Chemseddine; Baali, Fethi; Salameh, Elias

    2017-06-01

    The Hammamet Plain, situated in the northwest of the Tezbent mountain range, northeast of Algeria, drains carbonate aquifers through some important karst springs. The physical and chemical characteristics of spring and well water samples were studied for 2 years to assess the origin of groundwater and determine the factors driving the geochemical composition. The ionic speciation and mineral dissolution/precipitation was calculated. Water wells, characterizing groundwater circulation at shallow depths, are moderate to high mineralized waters of Na-HCO3 type. In contrast to the shallow environment, the CO2-rich, deeper waters are of the Ca-HCO3-SO4 type and undergo significant changes in the baseline chemistry along flow lines with increasing residence time. The main factors controlling the groundwater composition and its seasonal variations are the geology, because of the presence of carbonate formations, the elevation and the rate of karst development. In both groups, the carbonate chemistry is diagnostic of the effect of karst development. The supersaturation with respect to calcite indicates CO2 degassing, occurring either inside the aquifer in open conduits, or at the outlet in reservoirs. The undersaturation with respect to calcite shows the existence of fast flow and short residence time conditions inside the aquifer. Interaction between groundwater and surrounding host rocks is believed to be the main process responsible for the observed chemical characteristics of groundwater in the study area.

  4. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance. Raw data report: Winnemucca Dry Lake Basin orientation study, Lovelock and Reno 10 x 20 NTMS area, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puchlik, K.P.; Holder, B.E.; Smith, C.F.

    1978-01-01

    This report presents the results of the Winnemucca Dry Lake Basin, Nevada, orientation study in the Lovelock and Reno 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangles of the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS). Wet, dry, and playa sediment samples were collected throughout the 597 km 2 semi-arid, closed basin. Water samples were collected at the few available streams and springs. In addition to neutron activation analysis for uranium and 15 to 20 trace elements on all samples, field and laboratory measurements were made on water samples. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tabular hardcopy and fiche format. Eight full-size overlays for use with the Lovelock and Reno NTMS 1:250,000 quadrangles are included. Water sample site locations, water sample uranium concentration, sediment sample site locations, and sediment sample total uranium concentration are shown on the separate overlays. A general description of the area and the rock type distribution is presented. Some of the data in this report have been issued previously in ''Preliminary Report on the Winnemucca Dry Lake Basin Pilot Study,'' GJBX-41(76), August 1976

  5. Radioactive hydrogeochemical processes in the Chihuahua-Sacramento Basin, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burillo, J. C.; Reyes C, M.; Montero C, M. E.; Renteria V, M.; Herrera P, E. F. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S. C., Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico); Reyes, I.; Espino, M. S., E-mail: elena.montero@cimav.edu.mx [Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, Facultad de Ingenieria, Nuevo Campus Universitario, Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2012-06-15

    The Chihuahua Basin is divided by its morphology into three main sub basins: Chihuahua-Sacramento sub basin, Chihuahua Dam sub basin and Chuviscar River sub basin. In the aquifers at the Sacramento sub basin, specific concentrations of uranium in groundwater range from 460 to 1260 Bq / m{sup 3}. The presence of strata and sandy clay lenses with radiometric anomalies in the N W of Chihuahua Valley was confirmed by a litostatigraphic study and gamma spectrometry measurements of drill cuttings. High uranium activity values found in the water of some deep wells may correspond to the presence of fine material bodies of carbonaceous material, possible forming pa leo-sediment of flooding or pa leo-soils. It is suggested that these clay horizons are uranyl ion collectors. Uranyl may suffer a reduction process by organic material. Furthermore the groundwater, depending on its ph and Eh, oxidizes and re-dissolves uranium. The hydrogeochemical behavior of San Marcos dam and the N W Valley area is the subject of studies that should help to clarify the origin of the radioactive elements and their relationships with other pollutants in the watershed. (Author)

  6. Radioactive hydrogeochemical processes in the Chihuahua-Sacramento Basin, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burillo, J. C.; Reyes C, M.; Montero C, M. E.; Renteria V, M.; Herrera P, E. F.; Reyes, I.; Espino, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    The Chihuahua Basin is divided by its morphology into three main sub basins: Chihuahua-Sacramento sub basin, Chihuahua Dam sub basin and Chuviscar River sub basin. In the aquifers at the Sacramento sub basin, specific concentrations of uranium in groundwater range from 460 to 1260 Bq / m 3 . The presence of strata and sandy clay lenses with radiometric anomalies in the N W of Chihuahua Valley was confirmed by a litostatigraphic study and gamma spectrometry measurements of drill cuttings. High uranium activity values found in the water of some deep wells may correspond to the presence of fine material bodies of carbonaceous material, possible forming pa leo-sediment of flooding or pa leo-soils. It is suggested that these clay horizons are uranyl ion collectors. Uranyl may suffer a reduction process by organic material. Furthermore the groundwater, depending on its ph and Eh, oxidizes and re-dissolves uranium. The hydrogeochemical behavior of San Marcos dam and the N W Valley area is the subject of studies that should help to clarify the origin of the radioactive elements and their relationships with other pollutants in the watershed. (Author)

  7. Hydrogeochemical investigations of groundwater in Ziarat valley, Baluchistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akram, W.; Ahmad, M.; Rafiq, M.

    2010-03-01

    Present study was undertaken in Ziarat Valley, Baluchistan to investigate recent trends of groundwater chemistry (geochemical facies, geochemical evolution) and assess the groundwater quality for drinking and irrigation purposes. For this purpose samples of groundwater (open wells, tube wells, karezes, springs) were periodically collected from different locations and analyzed for dissolved chemical constituents such as sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, carbonate, bicarbonate, chloride and sulphate. The data indicated that concentrations of sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium vary from 5 to 113,0.3 to 3,18 to 62 and 27 to 85 mg/l respectively. Values of anions i. e. bicarbonate, chloride and sulphate lie in the range of 184 to 418, 14 to 77 and 8 to 318 mg/l respectively. Hydrogeochemical facies revealed that groundwater in the study area belongs to Mg-HCO/sub 3/ type at 72% surveyed locations. Dissolution and calcite precipitation were found to be the main processes controlling the groundwater chemistry. Chemical quality was assessed for drinking use by comparing with WHO, Indian and proposed national standards, and for irrigation use using empirical indices such as SAR and RSC. The results show that groundwater is quite suitable for irrigation and drinking purposes. (author)

  8. A pilot study of complementary and alternative medicine use in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wall GC

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS is a complex disorder, with primary symptoms of sleep disturbances, pain, and fatigue. FMS is one of the most common reasons for patient visits to a rheumatologist. Previous studies have suggested that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use in patients with rheumatic diseases is common, but such data specific to FMS patients is limited. Objective: The following study sought to describe the prevalence of CAM use in a primary care practice of patients with FMS and assess whether these patients discuss CAM use with their physician, physician-extender, and/or pharmacist. Methods: A one-group cross-sectional survey design was implemented in a large, community-based, private physician practice of patients diagnosed with FMS. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed during clinic visits. It solicited information related to demographic characteristics; FMS-specific health background; whether CAM use had been discussed with a health care provider; and the “ever-use” of common types of CAM. Respondents returned the questionnaire via US mail in a postage-paid, self-addressed envelope. Results: A total of 115 surveys were distributed with 54 returned for analysis (47% completion rate. The sample was predominantly female, well educated and had a mean age of 55.6 years. All respondents were White. Most respondents (92.6% reported using some type of CAM. Exercise (92.2%, chiropractic treatment (48.1%, lifestyle and diet (45.8%, relaxation therapy (44.9%, and dietary and herbal supplements (36.5% were most commonly reported CAM therapies “ever-used” by respondents. Dietary and herbal supplements with the highest prevalence of “ever-use” were magnesium (19.2%, guaifenesin (11.5%, and methylsulfonylmethane (MSM (9.6%. Respondents most commonly discussed CAM with the clinic rheumatologist and the primary care physician (53.7% and 38.9%, respectively. Only 14.8% of respondents discussed CAM with a pharmacist

  9. Prevalence, patterns, and perceived value of complementary and alternative medicine among HIV patients: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahall, Mandreker

    2017-08-23

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widespread among different patient populations despite the availability of evidence-based conventional medicine and lack of supporting evidence for the claims of most CAM types. This study explored the prevalence, patterns, and perceived value of CAM among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients. This quantitative descriptive study was conducted between November 1, 2014 and March 31, 2015 among a cross-sectional, convenience sample of attendees of the HIV clinic of a public tertiary health care institution. Face-to-face interviews using a 34-item questionnaire were conducted. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, and binary logistic regression analysis. CAM was used by 113 (32.8%) of a total of 343 HIV patients, but Medicinal herbs were the most common type of CAM used (n = 110, 97.3%) followed by spiritual therapy (n = 56, 49.6%), including faith healing/prayer and meditation. The most used medicinal herbs were Aloe vera (n = 54, 49.1%), ginger (n = 33, 30.0%), and garlic (n = 23, 20.9%). The most used vitamins were complex B vitamins (n = 70, 61.9%), followed by vitamin A (n = 58, 51.3%), vitamin E (n = 51, 45.1%), and vitamin D (n = 42, 37.1%). Most CAM users continued using conventional medicine in addition to CAM and were willing to use CAM without supervision and without informing their health care provider. Patients were generally satisfied with CAM therapy (n = 91, 80.5%). The main reasons for CAM use were the desire to take control of their treatment (8.8%) or just trying anything that could help (18.8%). Main influences were the mass media (32.7%) and non-hospital health personnel (19.5%). Predictors of CAM use were being 30-50 years, married and having a secondary school education. About one-third of HIV patients used CAM, but virtually none informed their healthcare provider. Medicinal herbs were the most common type of CAM, followed by spiritual

  10. The development and application of the AstroFit program for complementary dark matter studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Lan Nelly

    2013-02-01

    This doctoral thesis describes the development and application of the AstroFit program. Many studies have shown the existence of dark matter (DM), a mass component that constitutes over eighty percent of the entire matter in the Universe. From historical astrophysical evidence to latest reconstructions with sophisticated methods, the gravitational effect of DM can be shown, but its nature remains unknown. Many theoretical explanations aim at describing DM, for example as weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), within particular frameworks. The majority of these frameworks extend the existing standard model of particle physics (SM), so that new particles are added to the known set of elementary particles. One of these frameworks is the constrained supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM) that naturally introduces a DM candidate in form of the lightest supersymmetric particle(LSP). Searches for DM particles are undertaken in three different ways. First, directly with fixed-target experiments that measure WIMPs coming towards the Earth with nuclei of the target material. Second, indirectly by reconstructing DM signatures in particle spectra of known particles observed with ground-based telescopes, spaceborne satellites or balloon-borne experiments. And third, indirectly via direct production of DM at particle colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and energy reconstructions where missing transverse energy is presumably carried away by the DM particles. Global fit programs used in particle physics, such as Fittino, are designed to fit parameters of theories beyond the SM simultaneously that are in accordance with the experimental and observed data in order to probe models and constrain the parameter space. To explore complementarity in DM research, the AstroFit interface program has been developed to combine all available information from direct and indirect searches for DM as well as collider searches for new physics in such global fits. To demonstrate

  11. The development and application of the AstroFit program for complementary dark matter studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Lan Nelly

    2013-02-15

    This doctoral thesis describes the development and application of the AstroFit program. Many studies have shown the existence of dark matter (DM), a mass component that constitutes over eighty percent of the entire matter in the Universe. From historical astrophysical evidence to latest reconstructions with sophisticated methods, the gravitational effect of DM can be shown, but its nature remains unknown. Many theoretical explanations aim at describing DM, for example as weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), within particular frameworks. The majority of these frameworks extend the existing standard model of particle physics (SM), so that new particles are added to the known set of elementary particles. One of these frameworks is the constrained supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM) that naturally introduces a DM candidate in form of the lightest supersymmetric particle(LSP). Searches for DM particles are undertaken in three different ways. First, directly with fixed-target experiments that measure WIMPs coming towards the Earth with nuclei of the target material. Second, indirectly by reconstructing DM signatures in particle spectra of known particles observed with ground-based telescopes, spaceborne satellites or balloon-borne experiments. And third, indirectly via direct production of DM at particle colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and energy reconstructions where missing transverse energy is presumably carried away by the DM particles. Global fit programs used in particle physics, such as Fittino, are designed to fit parameters of theories beyond the SM simultaneously that are in accordance with the experimental and observed data in order to probe models and constrain the parameter space. To explore complementarity in DM research, the AstroFit interface program has been developed to combine all available information from direct and indirect searches for DM as well as collider searches for new physics in such global fits. To demonstrate

  12. Hydrogeochemical site descriptive model - a strategy for the model development during site investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smellie, John [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Laaksoharju, Marcus [GeoPoint AB, Sollentuna (Sweden); Tullborg, Eva-Lena [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)

    2002-12-01

    organic material (mainly humic), and populations of colloids and microbes. These data may be related broadly to three major site subdivisions, i.e. surface, near-surface and sub-surface. Alternative subdivisions may be considered depending on the complexity of the site under investigation and the availability of data. Hydraulic data and geological data will play an important role in establishing such divisions. Hydrogeochemical output data, together with available geological and hydrogeological data, will be evaluated and modelled to derive an understanding of the origin and evolution of the different groundwater types. This will include emphasis on identifying the major chemical processes through modelling water/rock reactions and also modelling the mixing effects of different groundwater end members. Studies will involve not only present-day hydraulic conditions, but will also attempt to trace past conditions using palaeo-evidence from groundwaters and fracture minerals.

  13. Racial and Ethnic Profiles of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Among Young Adults in the United States: Findings From the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upchurch, Dawn M; Wexler Rainisch, Bethany K

    2012-10-01

    This study describes complementary and alternative medicine use among a national sample of young adults, with an emphasis on characterizing racial and ethnic differences, highlighting variation across subgroups of Hispanics. The authors examined young adults ages 18 to 27 years (n = 14 128) from wave III (2001-2002) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Prevalence estimates and logistic regression results were weighted and adjusted for complex sample design. The study examined recent complementary and alternative medicine use in the past 12 months, recent use for each of 15 specific complementary and alternative medicine modalities, and the 5 most commonly used modalities (herbs, massage, chiropractic, relaxation, and vitamins). Results showed that 29% of young adults aged 18 to 27 years recently used complementary and alternative medicine. Prevalence was highest among Cuban Americans (42%) and lowest among blacks (22%). Young adults used a diversity of complementary and alternative medicine modalities and there were substantial differences in use across racial and ethnic groups.

  14. Synthesizing Earth's geochemical data for hydrogeochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, S. L.; Kubicki, J.; Miller, D.; Richter, D.; Giles, L.; Mitra, P.

    2007-12-01

    For over 200 years, geochemical, microbiological, and chemical data have been collected to describe the evolution of the surface earth. Many of these measurements are data showing variations in time or in space. To forward predict hydrologic response to changing tectonic, climatic, or anthropogenic forcings requires synthesis of these data and utilization in hydrogeochemical models. Increasingly, scientists are attempting to synthesize such data in order to make predictions for new regions or for future time periods. However, to make such complex geochemical data accessible requires development of sophisticated cyberinfrastructures that both invite uploading as well as usage of data. Two such cyberinfrastructure (CI) initiatives are currently developing, one to invite and promote the use of environmental kinetics data (laboratory time course data) through ChemxSeer, and the other to invite and promote the use of spatially indexed geochemical data for the Earth's Critical Zone through CZEN.org. The vision of these CI initiatives is to provide cyber-enhanced portals that encourage domain scientists to upload their data before publication (in private cyberspace), and to make these data eventually publicly accessible (after an embargo period). If the CI can be made to provide services to the domain specialist - e.g. to provide data analysis services or data comparison services - we envision that scientists will upload data. In addition, the CI can promote the use and comparison of datasets across disciplines. For example, the CI can facilitate the use of spatially indexed geochemical data by scientists more accustomed to dealing with time-course data for hydrologic flow, and can provide user-friendly interfaces with CI established to facilitate the use of hydrologic data. Examples of the usage of synthesized data to predict soil development over the last 13ky and its effects on active hydrological flow boundaries in surficial systems will be discussed for i) a N

  15. Hydrogeochemical signatures and evolution of groundwater impacted by the Bayan Obo tailing pond in northwest China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiang [Institute of Water Sciences and College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Comprehensive Utilization of Tailing Resources, Shangluo University, Shaanxi (China); Deng, Hailin, E-mail: hailin.deng@gmail.com [CSIRO Land and Water, Private Bag No. 5, Wembley, WA 6913 (Australia); Zheng, Chunmiao [Institute of Water Sciences and College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing (China); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen (China); Department of Geological Science, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Cao, Guoliang [Institute of Water Sciences and College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing (China)

    2016-02-01

    Uncontrolled leakage from mine tailing ponds can pose a serious environmental threat. Groundwater quality in a semi-arid region with extensive worries about the leakage from one of world's largest tailing ponds is studied herein through an integrated hydrogeochemical analysis and multivariate statistical analysis. Results show that elevated concentrations of NO{sub 2}{sup −}, B, Mn, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, F{sup −}, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} in groundwater were probably caused by leakage from the tailing pond and transported with the regional groundwater flow towards downstream Yellow River. While NO{sub 2}{sup −} contamination is only limited to areas close to the pond, high B concentrations persist within the contaminated plume originating from the tailing pond. Our current study shows that there is no geochemical evidence for U and Th contamination in groundwater due to leakage from the Bayan Obo tailing pond. Combining effects which includes regional variations, pond leaking and downstream mixing, mineral precipitation and dissolution, redox processes, ion exchange processes and agricultural activities, controlled groundwater hydrogeochemical signatures in the studied area. This study demonstrate that an increase in knowledge of evolution of groundwater quality by integrating field hydrochemical data and multivariate statistical analysis will help understand major water–rock interactions and provide a scientific basis for protection and rational utilization of groundwater resources in this and other tailing-impacted areas. - Highlights: • Combining hydrogeochemical methods and multivariate statistical analysis. • First reporting geochemical processes in aquifers nearby Bayan Obo REE tailing pond. • No geochemical evidence for uranium and thorium contamination in shallow groundwater.

  16. Complementary feeding: study on prevalence of food intake in two health centers of São Paulo city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchioni, D M; Latorre, M do R; Szarfarc, S C; de Souza, S B

    2001-06-01

    The infant feeding practices in the first year of life are of fundamental importance for their growth and development. This study was carried out aiming at checking on the prevalence of food intake by the infants during their first year of life. One-hundred-and-seventy-five children aged up to one year, attended to in two Health Centers of São Paulo city, Brazil, participated in this study. Their feeding practices, obtained through the status quo approach, were analyzed through multiple logistic regression models, using curves of prevalence for complementary food consumption. Fruit was the first solid food to be part of the infant diet, followed by vegetables, cereal, meat and/or eggs and, beans. Animal-protein-containing source foods (meat and eggs) entered the diet much later, being consumed by practically all children only at the end of their first year of life. The early introduction of complementary foods into the infant diet was made evident. The introduction of solid foods to complement breastfeeding is started with low-calorie density foods, in disagreement with the recommendations for Brazilian children. Results of this paper disclose a need for having programmatic actions in health education being carried out, in special those regarding exclusive breastfeeding promotion and orientation on the adequate introduction of complementary feeding.

  17. Pimonidazole: a novel hypoxia marker for complementary study of tumor hypoxia and tumor biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varia, Mahesh A.; Kennedy, Andrew S.; Calkins-Adams, Dennise P.; Rinker, Lillian; Novotny, Debra; Fowler, Wesley C.; Raleigh, James A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Tumor hypoxia appears to be associated with treatment resistance and with gene expression that may lead to hypoxia-mediated selection of tumor cells as a source for cell growth and metastases. The objective of this study was to develop complementary techniques of hypoxia detection with molecular markers of cell proliferation and metastases in order to investigate the role of tumor hypoxia in tumor biology. Materials and Methods: Pimonidazole is a 2-nitroimidazole which is reductively-activated and becomes covalently bound to thiol-containing proteins only in hypoxic cells. These adducts can be detected using immunohistochemistry, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay or flow cytometry as a measure of hypoxia in tumors. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis has been completed for five patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix who were given pimonidazole hydrochloride (0.5 g/m 2 intravenously) followed by cervical biopsies 24 hours later. Informed consent was obtained according to a protocol approved by the Institutional Review Board. A minimum of 3 random biopsies were obtained from the tumors and at least four sections examined from each biopsy site. Formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue sections were immunostained for pimonidazole binding using a mouse monoclonal antibody. Commercially available monoclonal antibodies were used to detect cell proliferation markers MIB-1 (Ki-67) and to detect vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in tumor cells in contiguous sections. The extent of immunostaining was expressed as the percent of immunostained to total tumor cells as determined by Chalkley point counting. Results: No clinical toxicities were associated with pimonidazole infusion. Immunostaining with pimonidazole antibody was observed in all patients indicating the presence of tumor hypoxia. Qualitatively there is little or no overlap between the areas of hypoxia and proliferation. Quantitative data tabulated below show the

  18. The hydrogeochemical characteristics of the certain uranium deposit and their relationship with uranium mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huanguang

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of previous work, this paper studies characteristics of the stratum,lithology,structure, ore bodies, ore and wall rocks and the relations between hydrochemical characteristics and uranium mineraliztion are stressed and anaysed.The environmental index of hydrogeochemisty is closely related with the uranium form, migration,and precipitation. According to negative ion, the ground water is classified into HCO3-,SO42-, HCO3--SO42-and HCO3-Cl-. For deposit genesis, uranium source comes from two parts; there are five mineralizations such as leaching, adsorption, hydrogeochemistry, palaeo-climatology and geothermal mineralization. Hydrogeochemical mineralization is the key process.. (authors)

  19. Study of complementary feeding practices among mothers of children aged six months to two years – A study from coastal south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao S

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundInfants and young children are at an increased risk ofmalnutrition from six months of age onwards, when breastmilk alone is no longer sufficient to meet all their nutritionalrequirements and complementary feeding should bestarted. Hence this study was undertaken to assess thepractices of complementary feeding.MethodThis hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted attwo private hospitals – Dr TMA Pai Hospital Udupi and DrTMA Pai Hospital Karkala and a public hospital, RegionalAdvanced Paediatric Care Centre, Mangalore, of coastalsouth India for a two-month period from August 2010 toOctober 2010. Two-hundred mothers of children betweensix months and two years attending the paediatricoutpatient departments of the above-mentioned hospitalsfor growth monitoring, immunisation and minor illnessessuch as upper respiratory tract infections were selected forthe study. The subjects were selected for the study by theorder of their arrival to the outpatient department duringthe study period.ResultsIn the present study 77.5% mothers had startedcomplementary feeding at the recommended time of sixmonths. Only 32% of mothers were giving an adequatequantity of complementary feeds. The association ofinitiation of complementary feeding with socio-economicstatus, birth order, place of delivery and maternal educationwas found to be statistically significant. However thepractice of giving an adequate quantity of complementaryfeeds was significantly associated only with the place ofdelivery.ConclusionIn the present study, initiation of complementary feeding atthe recommended time of six months was seen in themajority of children. However the quantity ofcomplementary feeding was insufficient. Advice aboutbreast feeding and complementary feeding during antenatalcheck-ups and postnatal visits might improve feedingpractices.

  20. Self-reported efficacy of complementary and alternative medicine: the Akershus study of chronic headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Espen Saxhaug; Aaseth, Kjersti; Grande, Ragnhild Berling; Lundqvist, Christofer; Russell, Michael Bjørn

    2013-04-18

    Chronic headache is associated with disability and high utilisation of health care including complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). We investigated self-reported efficacy of CAM in people with chronic headache from the general population. Respondents with possible self-reported chronic headache were interviewed by physicians experienced in headache diagnostics. CAM queried included acupuncture, chiropractic, homeopathy, naprapathy, physiotherapy, psychological treatment, and psychomotor physiotherapy. Sixty-two % and 73% of those with primary and secondary chronic headache had used CAM.Self-reported efficacy of CAM ranged from 0-43% without significant differences between gender, headache diagnoses, co-occurrence of migraine, medication use or physician contact. CAM is widely used, despite self-reported efficacy of different CAM modalities is modest in the management of chronic headache.

  1. Uranium Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance in southwestern Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broxton, D.E.

    1978-02-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory conducted a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance in southwestern Montana from early August to mid-October of 1976. A total of 1240 water and 1933 sediment samples were collected from 1994 locations at a nominal density of one location per 10 km/sup 2/. The water samples were collected from streams, wells, and springs; sediment samples were taken at streams and springs. All samples were analyzed at Los Alamos for total uranium by fluorometry or delayed-neutron counting. The uranium content of water samples ranges from below the detection limit (less than 0.3 ppB) to 45.30 ppB and has a mean value of 1.40 ppB. The uranium content of the sediment samples ranges between 0.20 and 206.80 ppM and averages 6.12 ppM. The chosen uranium anomaly threshold value was 7 ppB for surface waters (streams), 9 ppB for groundwaters (wells and springs), and 25 ppM for all sediment samples. The study area consists of the following lithologic groups: Precambrian basement complex, Precambrian Belt metasediments, Paleozoic and Mesozoic shelf sediments, Cretaceous and early Tertiary volcanic and plutonic rocks, Laramide orogenic clastic sediments, and middle to late Tertiary volcanic rocks and intermontane basin sediments. Most of the anomalous water and sediment samples with well-developed dispersion trains occur in areas underlain by or adjacent to silicic plutonic rocks of the Idaho and Boulder batholiths. These anomalies may indicate the presence of uraniferous veins and pegmatites similar to those already known to exist in the area. Fewer anomalous water samples occur in areas underlain by Precambrian basement complex and Tertiary basin fill.

  2. Uranium Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance in southwestern Montana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broxton, D.E.

    1978-02-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory conducted a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance in southwestern Montana from early August to mid-October of 1976. A total of 1240 water and 1933 sediment samples were collected from 1994 locations at a nominal density of one location per 10 km 2 . The water samples were collected from streams, wells, and springs; sediment samples were taken at streams and springs. All samples were analyzed at Los Alamos for total uranium by fluorometry or delayed-neutron counting. The uranium content of water samples ranges from below the detection limit (less than 0.3 ppB) to 45.30 ppB and has a mean value of 1.40 ppB. The uranium content of the sediment samples ranges between 0.20 and 206.80 ppM and averages 6.12 ppM. The chosen uranium anomaly threshold value was 7 ppB for surface waters (streams), 9 ppB for groundwaters (wells and springs), and 25 ppM for all sediment samples. The study area consists of the following lithologic groups: Precambrian basement complex, Precambrian Belt metasediments, Paleozoic and Mesozoic shelf sediments, Cretaceous and early Tertiary volcanic and plutonic rocks, Laramide orogenic clastic sediments, and middle to late Tertiary volcanic rocks and intermontane basin sediments. Most of the anomalous water and sediment samples with well-developed dispersion trains occur in areas underlain by or adjacent to silicic plutonic rocks of the Idaho and Boulder batholiths. These anomalies may indicate the presence of uraniferous veins and pegmatites similar to those already known to exist in the area. Fewer anomalous water samples occur in areas underlain by Precambrian basement complex and Tertiary basin fill

  3. Use of complementary PIV and LDV techniques to study industrial complex flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahen, C.; Benard, J.; Barcoula, M.; Hofmann, F.

    1996-06-01

    Cracks detected in some nuclear vessels led to design a scale mockup in order to understand the origin of this problem and where experimental results and computation could be compared. Two methods, LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry) and PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry), were used to measure the velocity field. It appeared that the two methods were complementary: LDV was dedicated to measure precisely the velocity and the turbulent energy fields, PIV was used to capture flow patterns as the location of stagnation point. If LDV is a local pointwise measurement, classical PIV is intrinsically A 2D image measurement. Consequently, a detailed analysis is done of the 3D effects upon the 2D measurements. The methodology of this analysis is presented. The results have demonstrated the capability of the code to predict such a complex flow even though some discrepancies were found. PIV needs some improvements especially in terms of an higher capacity of processing large set of data a methodology to compute the actual measurement accuracy. (authors). 4 refs., 12 figs

  4. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Clinical Study in 1,016 Hematology/Oncology Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hierl, Marina; Pfirstinger, Jochen; Andreesen, Reinhard; Holler, Ernst; Mayer, Stephanie; Wolff, Daniel; Vogelhuber, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Surveys state a widespread use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in patients with malignant diseases. CAM methods might potentially interfere with the metabolization of tumor-specific therapy. However, there is little communication about CAM use in hematology/oncology patients between patients, CAM providers, and oncologists. A self-administered questionnaire was handed out to all patients attending to the hematology/oncology outpatient clinic of Regensburg University Hospital. Subsequently, a chart review of all CAM users was performed. Questionnaires of 1,016 patients were analyzed. Of these patients, 30% used CAM, preferably vitamins and micronutrients. Main information sources for CAM methods were physicians/nonmedical practitioners and friends/relatives. CAM therapies were provided mainly by licensed physicians (29%), followed by nonmedical practitioners (14%) and the patients themselves (13%). Although 62% of the CAM users agreed that the oncologist may know about their CAM therapy, a chart entry about CAM use was found only in 41%. CAM is frequently used by hematology/oncology patients. Systematic communication about CAM is essential to avoid possible drug interactions. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Sample collection: an overview of the Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar, S.L.

    1979-01-01

    A Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) for uranium is currently being conducted throughout the conterminous United States and Alaska. The HSSR is part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This ambitious geochemical reconnaissance program is conducted by four national laboratories: Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and Savannah River Laboratory. The program is based on an extensive review of world literature, reconnaissance work done in other countries, and pilot studies conducted by each laboratory. Sample-collection methods and sample density are determined to optimize the probability of detecting potential uranium mineralization. To achieve this aim, each laboratory has developed independent standardized field collection procedures that are designed for its section of the country. Field parameters such as pH, conductivity, climate, geography, and geology are recorded at each site. Most samples are collected at densities of one sample site per 10 to 23 km 2 . The HSSR program has helped to improve existing hydrogeochemical reconnaissance exploration techniques. In addition to providing industry with data that may help to identify potential uranium districts and to extend known uranium provinces, the HSSR also provides multi-element analytical data, which can be used in water quality, soil, sediment, environmental, and base-metal exploration studies

  6. Overview of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar, S.L.

    1980-01-01

    A Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) for uranium is currently being conducted throughout the conterminous United States and Alaska. The HSSR is part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This ambitious geochemical reconnaissance program is conducted by four Department of Energy laboratories: Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and Savannah River Laboratory. The program is based on an extensive review of world literature, reconnaissance work done in other countries, and pilot studies conducted by each laboratory. Sample-collection methods and sample density are determined to optimize the probability of detecting potential uranium mineralization. To achieve this aim, each laboratory has developed independent standardized field collection procedures that are designed for its section of the country. Field parameters such as pH, conductivity, climate, geography, and geology are recorded at each site. Most areas are sampled at densities of one sample site per 10 to 23 km 2 . The HSSR program has helped to improve existing hydrogeochemical reconnaissance exploration techniques. In addition to providing industry with data that may help to identify potential uranium districts and to extend known uranium provinces, the HSSR also provides multielement analytical data that can be used in water quality, soil, sediment, environmental, and base-metal exploration studies

  7. Overview of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar, S.L.

    1980-07-01

    A Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) for uranium is currently being conducted throughout the conterminous United States and Alaska. The HSSR is part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This ambitious geochemical reconnasissance program is conducted by four Department of Energy Laboratories: Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and Savannah River Laboratory. Each laboratory was assigned a geographic region of the United States. The program is based on an extensive review of world literature, reconnaissance work done in other countries, and pilot studies conducted by each laboratory. Sample-collection methods and sample density are determined to optimize the probability of detecting potential uranium mineralization. To achieve this aim, each laboratory has developed independent standardized field collection procedures that are designed for its section of the country. Field parameters such as pH, conductivity, climate, geography, and geology are recorded at each site. Most areas are sampled at densities of one sample site per 10 to 23 km 2 . The HSSR program has helped to improve existing hydrogeochemical reconnaissance exploration techniques. In addition to providing industry with data that may help to identify potential uranium districts and to extend known uranium provinces, the HSSR also provides multielement analytical data that can be used in water quality, soil, sediment, environmental, and base-metal exploration studies

  8. Groundwater flow and hydrogeochemical evolution in the Jianghan Plain, central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yiqun; Zhao, Ke; Deng, Yamin; Liang, Xing; Ma, Teng; Wang, Yanxin

    2018-05-01

    Hydrogeochemical analysis and multivariate statistics were applied to identify flow patterns and major processes controlling the hydrogeochemistry of groundwater in the Jianghan Plain, which is located in central Yangtze River Basin (central China) and characterized by intensive surface-water/groundwater interaction. Although HCO3-Ca-(Mg) type water predominated in the study area, the 457 (21 surface water and 436 groundwater) samples were effectively classified into five clusters by hierarchical cluster analysis. The hydrochemical variations among these clusters were governed by three factors from factor analysis. Major components (e.g., Ca, Mg and HCO3) in surface water and groundwater originated from carbonate and silicate weathering (factor 1). Redox conditions (factor 2) influenced the geogenic Fe and As contamination in shallow confined groundwater. Anthropogenic activities (factor 3) primarily caused high levels of Cl and SO4 in surface water and phreatic groundwater. Furthermore, the factor score 1 of samples in the shallow confined aquifer gradually increased along the flow paths. This study demonstrates that enhanced information on hydrochemistry in complex groundwater flow systems, by multivariate statistical methods, improves the understanding of groundwater flow and hydrogeochemical evolution due to natural and anthropogenic impacts.

  9. Is complementary and alternative medicine effective in job satisfaction among dentists with musculoskeletal disorders? A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Devanand; Bhaskar, Dara John; Gupta, Rajendra Kumar; Jain, Ankita; Yadav, Priyanka; Dalai, Deepak Ranjan; Singh, Rajeshwar; Singh, Nisha; Chaudhary, Varunjeet; Singh, Ankit; Yadav, Ankit; Karim, Bushra

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders have serious impact on the profession of dentistry. There is common occurrence of pain due to incorrect posture in dental professionals. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies may cast a new light on preventing and intercepting musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). An epidemiological study was conducted in an effort to contribute to the prevention of musculoskeletal disorders in dentistry. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of MSD at dentists using CAM as a treatment and preventive modality for MSD and to compare job/career satisfaction between dentists who use CAM and conventional therapy (CT). Dentists registered in Uttrakhand state, India, under the Dental Council of India and registered members of the Indian Dental Association, Uttrakhand branch (N = 1496) were surveyed. Statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS 17. A response rate of 84% (N = 1257) was obtained, revealing that 90% (N = 1131) had the problem of MSD. Seventy three percentage (N = 826) of dentists with MSD reported the use of CAM and CT. Complementary and alternative medicine users reported greater overall health (72.7% vs. 51%, p alternative medicine therapies may improve quality of life, reduce work interruption and enhance job satisfaction for dentists who suffers from MSD. Through the course of their studies, dentists should be equipped with knowledge on ergonomics and CAM therapies, such as yoga and others, to help them prevent musculoskeletal disorders more effectively.

  10. Transmuted Complementary Weibull Geometric Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Z. A…fify

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a new generalization of the complementary Weibull geometric distribution that introduced by Tojeiro et al. (2014, using the quadratic rank transmutation map studied by Shaw and Buckley (2007. The new distribution is referred to as transmuted complementary Weibull geometric distribution (TCWGD. The TCWG distribution includes as special cases the complementary Weibull geometric distribution (CWGD, complementary exponential geometric distribution(CEGD,Weibull distribution (WD and exponential distribution (ED. Various structural properties of the new distribution including moments, quantiles, moment generating function and RØnyi entropy of the subject distribution are derived. We proposed the method of maximum likelihood for estimating the model parameters and obtain the observed information matrix. A real data set are used to compare the ‡exibility of the transmuted version versus the complementary Weibull geometric distribution.

  11. Factors affecting the distribution of hydrocarbon contaminants and hydrogeochemical parameters in a shallow sand aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Yong; Cheon, Jeong-Yong; Lee, Kang-Kun; Lee, Seok-Young; Lee, Min-Hyo

    2001-07-01

    The distributions of hydrocarbon contaminants and hydrogeochemical parameters were investigated in a shallow sand aquifer highly contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons leaked from solvent storage tanks. For these purposes, a variety of field investigations and studies were performed, which included installation of over 100 groundwater monitoring wells and piezometers at various depths, soil logging and analyses during well and piezometer installation, chemical analysis of groundwater, pump tests, and slug tests. Continuous water level monitoring at three selected wells using automatic data-logger and manual measuring at other wells were also conducted. Based on analyses of the various investigations and tests, a number of factors were identified to explain the distribution of the hydrocarbon contaminants and hydrogeochemical parameters. These factors include indigenous biodegradation, hydrostratigraphy, preliminary pump-and-treat remedy, recharge by rainfall, and subsequent water level fluctuation. The permeable sandy layer, in which the mean water table elevation is maintained, provided a dominant pathway for contaminant transport. The preliminary pump-and-treat action accelerated the movement of the hydrocarbon contaminants and affected the redox evolution pattern. Seasonal recharge by rain, together with indigenous biodegradation, played an important role in the natural attenuation of the petroleum hydrocarbons via mixing/dilution and biodegradation. The water level fluctuations redistributed the hydrocarbon contaminants by partitioning them into the soil and groundwater. The identified factors are not independent but closely inter-correlated.

  12. Use of alternative and complementary therapies in labor and delivery care: a cross-sectional study of midwives’ training in Catalan hospitals accredited as centers for normal birth

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz-Sellés, Ester; Vallès-Segalés, Antoni; Goberna-Tricas, Josefina

    2013-01-01

    Background: The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and complementary and alternative therapies (CAT) during pregnancy is increasing. Scientific evidence for CAM and CAT in the field of obstetrics mainly covers pain relief in labor. Midwives are responsible for labor and delivery care: hence, their knowledge of CAM and CAT is important. The aims of this study are to describe the professional profile of midwives who provide care for natural childbirth in Catalan hospitals accre...

  13. Texture evolution and microstructural changes during solid-state dewetting: A correlative study by complementary in situ TEM techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niekiel, Florian; Kraschewski, Simon M.; Schweizer, Peter; Butz, Benjamin; Spiecker, Erdmann

    2016-01-01

    The transition of a thin film into an energetically favorable set of particles at temperatures below the melting point of the bulk material is known as solid-state dewetting. In this work the dewetting behavior of 16 nm thick discontinuous Au thin films on amorphous silicon nitride membranes is quantitatively studied by complementary in situ transmission electron microscopy techniques taking advantage of the unique capabilities of a chip-based heating system. The combination of dedicated imaging and diffraction techniques is used to investigate the interplay of grain growth and texture evolution with the process of dewetting. The results show an initial coarsening of the microstructure preceding the other processes. Texture evolution is highly correlated to material retraction and agglomeration during the following dewetting process. In-plane grain rotation has been observed, acting as an additional mechanism for orientation changes. From a methodological perspective this work demonstrates the capabilities of today’s transmission electron microscopy in combination with state-of-the-art in situ instrumentation. In particular the combination of complementary information from different dedicated techniques in one and the same setup is demonstrated to be highly beneficial.

  14. Use of complementary and alternative medicines by a sample of Turkish women for infertility enhancement: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolusari Ali

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infertility patients are a vulnerable group that often seeks a non-medical solution for their failure to conceive. World-wide, women use CAM for productive health, but only a limited number of studies report on CAM use to enhance fertility. Little is known about traditional and religious forms of therapies that are used in relation to conventional medicine in Turkey. We investigated the prevalence and types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM used by infertile Turkish women for fertility enhancement. Methods A face-to-face questionnaire inquiring demographic information and types of CAM used for fertility enhancement were completed by hundred infertility patients admitted to a primary care family planning centre in Van, Turkey between January and July 2009. Results The vast majority of infertile women had used CAM at least once for infertility. CAM use included religious interventions, herbal products and recommendations of traditional "hodja's" (faith healers. Of these women, 87.8% were abused in the last 12 months, 36.6% felt not being supported by her partner and 80.5% had never spoken with a physician about CAM. Conclusions Infertile Turkish women use complementary medicine frequently for fertility enhancement and are in need of information about CAM. Religious and traditional therapies are used as an adjunct to, rather than a substitute for, conventional medical therapy. Physicians need to approach fertility patients with sensitivity and should be able to council their patients about CAM accordingly.

  15. Hydrogeochemical Evolution of the Laxemar Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimeno, Maria J.; Auque, Luis F.; Gomez, Javier B.; Salas, Joaquin; Molinero, Jorge

    2010-11-01

    induce changes in the geochemical composition of groundwater around the repository. In this way, the present report summarizes the results obtained by the geochemical simulations performed to simulate the hydrogeochemical evolution of groundwaters in the Laxemar area. In the safety assessment of the candidate repository site, a series of functions and parameters must be evaluated. From a geochemical point of view, the most important are redox properties, pH and concentration of solutes. Other factors to be considered are the groundwater content of potassium, sulphide and iron, as they might affect the chemical stability of the buffer and the canister. Additionally, the effects of grouting in the geosphere and cement materials in the engineered barriers could affect groundwater's pH. Discussions of the results will be focused on these aspects. The starting point of the geochemical calculations is a series of hydrological models (using ConnectFlow and DarcyTools), which, based on the understanding of the palaeohydrogeological history of the sites (which assumes the presence of different water mixing events due to the input of different reference waters over the time), have provided information on (1) the transport of fractions of selected reference waters (deep saline, old meteoric, glacial, marine and present meteoric waters), in the case of the temperate period, or (2) the transport of salts, in the case of the glacial cycle. In the latter case, the rock volume initially contains a mixture of two reference waters: a deep saline groundwater and a dilute water from meteoric origin. The proportion of these two waters can be obtained from the salinity at any point in the rock volume. With the advancement and retreat of the glacier, the proportion of a third mixing end-member is calculated from the decrease of salinity at any point in the rock volume (a newly incoming glacial melt-water), changing the proportions of the other two reference waters correspondingly. Finally

  16. Hydrogeochemical Evolution of the Laxemar Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimeno, Maria J.; Auque, Luis F.; Gomez, Javier B. (Univ. of Zaragoza (Spain)); Salas, Joaquin; Molinero, Jorge (Amphos 21, Barcelona (Spain))

    2010-11-15

    induce changes in the geochemical composition of groundwater around the repository. In this way, the present report summarizes the results obtained by the geochemical simulations performed to simulate the hydrogeochemical evolution of groundwaters in the Laxemar area. In the safety assessment of the candidate repository site, a series of functions and parameters must be evaluated. From a geochemical point of view, the most important are redox properties, pH and concentration of solutes. Other factors to be considered are the groundwater content of potassium, sulphide and iron, as they might affect the chemical stability of the buffer and the canister. Additionally, the effects of grouting in the geosphere and cement materials in the engineered barriers could affect groundwater's pH. Discussions of the results will be focused on these aspects. The starting point of the geochemical calculations is a series of hydrological models (using ConnectFlow and DarcyTools), which, based on the understanding of the palaeohydrogeological history of the sites (which assumes the presence of different water mixing events due to the input of different reference waters over the time), have provided information on (1) the transport of fractions of selected reference waters (deep saline, old meteoric, glacial, marine and present meteoric waters), in the case of the temperate period, or (2) the transport of salts, in the case of the glacial cycle. In the latter case, the rock volume initially contains a mixture of two reference waters: a deep saline groundwater and a dilute water from meteoric origin. The proportion of these two waters can be obtained from the salinity at any point in the rock volume. With the advancement and retreat of the glacier, the proportion of a third mixing end-member is calculated from the decrease of salinity at any point in the rock volume (a newly incoming glacial melt-water), changing the proportions of the other two reference waters correspondingly. Finally

  17. Hydrogeochemical evaluation. Preliminary site description Forsmark area - version 1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus

    2005-03-01

    Siting studies for SKB's programme of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste currently involves the investigation of two locations, Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp, on the eastern coast of Sweden to determine their geological, hydrogeochemical and hydrogeological characteristics. Present work completed has resulted in Model version 1.2 which represents the second evaluation of the available Forsmark groundwater analytical data collected up to June, 2004. The Hydrochemical Analytical Group (HAG) had access to data where a total of 1,131 water samples had been collected from the surface and sub-surface environment; 252 samples were collected from drilled boreholes. The deepest fracture groundwater samples with sufficient analytical data reflected depths down to 1 km. Most of the waters sampled (66%) lacked crucial analytical information that restricted the evaluation. Model version 1.2 focuses on geochemical and mixing processes affecting the groundwater composition in the uppermost part of the bedrock, down to repository levels, and eventually extending to 1,000 m depth. The complex groundwater evolution and patterns at Forsmark are a result of many factors such as: a) the present-day topography and proximity to the Baltic Sea, b) past changes in hydrogeology related to glaciation/deglaciation, land uplift and repeated marine/lake water regressions/ transgressions, and c) organic or inorganic alteration of the groundwater composition caused by microbial processes or water/rock interactions. The sampled groundwaters reflect to various degrees processes relating to modern or ancient water/rock interactions and mixing. The groundwater flow regimes at Forsmark are considered local and extend down to depths of around 600 m depending on hydraulic conditions. Close to the Baltic Sea coastline where topographical variation is even less, groundwater flow penetration to depth will subsequently be less marked and such areas will tend to be characterised by groundwater

  18. Hydrogeochemical evaluation. Preliminary site description Forsmark area - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus (ed.) [Geopoint AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-03-15

    Siting studies for SKB's programme of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste currently involves the investigation of two locations, Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp, on the eastern coast of Sweden to determine their geological, hydrogeochemical and hydrogeological characteristics. Present work completed has resulted in Model version 1.2 which represents the second evaluation of the available Forsmark groundwater analytical data collected up to June, 2004. The Hydrochemical Analytical Group (HAG) had access to data where a total of 1,131 water samples had been collected from the surface and sub-surface environment; 252 samples were collected from drilled boreholes. The deepest fracture groundwater samples with sufficient analytical data reflected depths down to 1 km. Most of the waters sampled (66%) lacked crucial analytical information that restricted the evaluation. Model version 1.2 focuses on geochemical and mixing processes affecting the groundwater composition in the uppermost part of the bedrock, down to repository levels, and eventually extending to 1,000 m depth. The complex groundwater evolution and patterns at Forsmark are a result of many factors such as: a) the present-day topography and proximity to the Baltic Sea, b) past changes in hydrogeology related to glaciation/deglaciation, land uplift and repeated marine/lake water regressions/ transgressions, and c) organic or inorganic alteration of the groundwater composition caused by microbial processes or water/rock interactions. The sampled groundwaters reflect to various degrees processes relating to modern or ancient water/rock interactions and mixing. The groundwater flow regimes at Forsmark are considered local and extend down to depths of around 600 m depending on hydraulic conditions. Close to the Baltic Sea coastline where topographical variation is even less, groundwater flow penetration to depth will subsequently be less marked and such areas will tend to be characterised by

  19. NMR study of the possible interaction in solution of angiotensin II with a peptide encoded by angiotensin II complementary RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, H.L.; Fesik, S.W.; Austin, R.E.; Martin, S.F.

    1989-01-01

    The potential binding of angiotensin II (Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe) (AII) to a peptide encoded by its complementary RNA (Lys-Gly-Val-Asp-Val-Try-Ala-Val) (IIA) has been studied by monitoring the 1 H NMR spectrum of IIA in aqueous phosphate or Tris·HCl buffer ( 2 H 2 O) as it is titrated with AII. For molar ratios of AII/IIA ranging from 0.2 to 1.8, the NMR spectra are unchanged as compared to the spectra of the isolated peptides. Based on these findings, the K d for the putative biomolecular complex of the two peptides under these conditions is calculated to be >10 -4 M. This result does not support the suggestion of Elton et al. that AII and IIA engage in high-affinity binding (K d ∼ 5 x 10 -8 M) with each other

  20. Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical treatments that are not part of mainstream medicine. When you are using these types of care, it may be called complementary, integrative, or alternative medicine. Complementary medicine is used together with mainstream medical ...

  1. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth / For Teens / Complementary and Alternative Medicine What's ... a replacement. How Is CAM Different From Conventional Medicine? Conventional medicine is based on scientific knowledge of ...

  2. Predictive hydrogeochemical modelling of bauxite residue sand in field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissmeier, Laurin; Barry, David A; Phillips, Ian R

    2011-07-15

    The suitability of residue sand (the coarse fraction remaining from Bayer's process of bauxite refining) for constructing the surface cover of closed bauxite residue storage areas was investigated. Specifically, its properties as a medium for plant growth are of interest to ensure residue sand can support a sustainable ecosystem following site closure. The geochemical evolution of the residue sand under field conditions, its plant nutrient status and soil moisture retention were studied by integrated modelling of geochemical and hydrological processes. For the parameterization of mineral reactions, amounts and reaction kinetics of the mineral phases natron, calcite, tricalcium aluminate, sodalite, muscovite and analcime were derived from measured acid neutralization curves. The effective exchange capacity for ion adsorption was measured using three independent exchange methods. The geochemical model, which accounts for mineral reactions, cation exchange and activity corrected solution speciation, was formulated in the geochemical modelling framework PHREEQC, and partially validated in a saturated-flow column experiment. For the integration of variably saturated flow with multi-component solute transport in heterogeneous 2D domains, a coupling of PHREEQC with the multi-purpose finite-element solver COMSOL was established. The integrated hydrogeochemical model was applied to predict water availability and quality in a vertical flow lysimeter and a cover design for a storage facility using measured time series of rainfall and evaporation from southwest Western Australia. In both scenarios the sand was fertigated and gypsum-amended. Results show poor long-term retention of fertilizer ions and buffering of the pH around 10 for more than 5 y of leaching. It was concluded that fertigation, gypsum amendment and rainfall leaching alone were insufficient to render the geochemical conditions of residue sand suitable for optimal plant growth within the given timeframe. The

  3. From Disappointment to Holistic Ideals: A Qualitative Study on Motives and Experiences of Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danell, Jenny-Ann

    2015-07-16

    Recent studies indicate increased use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in western societies, to ameliorate health problems. Even if there is substantial research on general patterns of use, there is limited knowledge on individual motives. This study contributes to a qualitative understanding of experiences of choosing and using CAM. This study consists of in-depth interviews with 10 CAM users in Sweden. The participants represent different backgrounds and experiences of using CAM. The interviews have been analysed in accordance with content analysis. In analysing experiences of choosing and using CAM four main themes were identified: frustration and critique, values and ideology, individual responsibility, and combining treatments. In general, the participants were highly reflexive on issues concerning their health. They highlighted their own role and responsibility, combined a variety of treatments, and continuously dealt with questions on risks, even if they had relatively different approaches to if and when to use CAM. The results also show that motives may change over time. Even if initial choices were closely related to frustration and critique of conventional treatments (for example, by perceiving conventional health care as limited, not receiving proper diagnoses, or being critical to conventional drugs) was long-term use motivated by ideological characteristics of CAM (such as holistic and individualized treatments, and extensive interaction with practitioners). Four main themes, concerning experiences of choosing and using CAM were identified. This study also supports the idea that initial motives for choosing CAM may differ from those explaining long-term use. Significance for public healthRecent studies indicate increased use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), both in general western populations and specific patient groups. Well-documented motives for choosing CAM are related to disappointment and failure of conventional

  4. Spectrophotometric determination of cyclamate in soft drinks and desserts: complementary collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, A M

    1988-01-01

    Fifteen official food control laboratories participated in a collaborative study of a spectrophotometric method to determine cyclamate in a soft drink and a dessert at concentrations of 90-311 mg/L and 202-526 mg/kg, respectively, with blind duplicates and a blank. Average recovery from the soft drink was 97.5%, and from the dessert, 98.6%. Reproducibility relative standard deviations were 4.7-6.5% and 6.9-8.5%, respectively. The outlier percentage was 5.5%. This study complements an earlier work by leading Nordic food laboratories and was designed according to the latest recommendations. The results of this study were compared with those of the earlier collaborative study and with general collaborative results obtained by AOAC.

  5. Complementary methods to study glasses and melts at large scale facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leydier, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, large scale facilities (neutron and synchrotron sources) were used for studying the structure and dynamic of disordered materials (liquids and glasses). In particular, three studies are presented. The first is a structural study of Ln 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 glasses where Ln represents the cations Sc, Y and La. We combined the results obtained from x-ray and neutron diffraction and x-ray absorption experiments. This work is focused on the determination of the interatomic distances and coordination numbers for the three pairs Si-O, Al-O and Ln-O. The second is a study of the iron oxide FeO in the liquid state. Photoemission experiments at the iron absorption edge were associated with x-ray and neutron diffraction measurements. The results obtained made it possible to define a consistent structural model for liquid FeO. The third is a study of the dynamics in CaAl 2 O 4 melts. From inelastic x-ray scattering experiments, it was possible to determine the apparent and isothermal sound velocities as well as the longitudinal viscosity. These measurements were complemented by quasielastic neutron scattering experiments from which atomic diffusion coefficients were determined. This work shows the interest of combining various experimental techniques for studying glasses and melts and points out the need to associate also modelling techniques such as molecular dynamics simulations. (author)

  6. The Extraordinary Nature of Barney's Drumming : A Complementary Study of Ordinary Noise Making in Chimpanzees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dufour, Valérie; Pasquaretta, Cristian; Gayet, Pierre; Sterck, Elisabeth H M

    In a previous study (Dufour et al., 2015) we reported the unusual characteristics of the drumming performance of a chimpanzee named Barney. His sound production, several sequences of repeated drumming on an up-turned plastic barrel, shared features typical for human musical drumming: it was

  7. Hydrogeochemical processes influencing groundwater quality within the Lower Pra Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tay, Collins

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogeochemical and social impact studies were carried out within the Lower Pra Basin where groundwater serves as a source of potable water supply to majority of the communities. The main objective of the study was to investigate the hydrogeochemical processes and the anthropogenic impact that influence groundwater as well as the perception of inhabitants about the impact of their socio-economic activities on the quality of groundwater and subsequently make recommendations towards proper management and development of groundwater resources within the basin. The methodology involved quarterly sampling of selected surface and groundwater sources between January 2011 and October 2012 for major ions, minor ions, stable isotopes of deuterium ( 2 H) and oxygen-18 ( 18 O) and trace metals analyses as well as administration of questionnaires designed to collect information on the socio-economic impact on the water resources within the basin. In all, a chemical data-base on three hundred and ninety seven (397) point sources was generated and three hundred (300) questionnaires were administered. The hydrochemical results show that, the major processes responsible for chemical evolution of groundwater include: silicate (SiO 4 ) 4- weathering, ion-exchange reactions, sea aerosol spray, the leaching of biotite, chlorite and actinolite. The groundwater is mildly acidic to neutral (pH 3.5 – 7.3) due principally to natural biogeochemical processes. Groundwater acidity studies show that, notwithstanding the moderately low pH, the groundwater still has the potential to neutralize acids due largely to the presence of silicates/aluminosilicates. Results of the Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) show that 98.6 % of groundwater is fresh (TDS < 500 mg/L). The relative abundance of cations and anions is in the order: Na + > Ca 2 + > Mg 2 + > K + and HCO 3 - > Cl - > SO 4 2- respectively. Stable isotopes results show that, the groundwater emanated primarily from meteoric origin with

  8. Complementary role of magnetic resonance imaging in the study of the fetal urinary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Huertas, M; Culiañez Casas, M; Molina García, F S; Carrillo Badillo, M P; Pastor Pons, E

    2016-01-01

    Urinary system birth defects represent the abnormality most often detected in prenatal studies, accounting for 30% to 50% of all structural anomalies present at birth. The most common disorders are urinary tract dilation, developmental variants, cystic kidney diseases, kidney tumors, and bladder defects. These anomalies can present in isolation or in association with various syndromes. They are normally evaluated with sonography, and the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered only in inconclusive cases. In this article, we show the potential of fetal MRI as a technique to complement sonography in the study of fetal urinary system anomalies. We show the additional information that MRI can provide in each entity, especially in the evaluation of kidney function through diffusion-weighted sequences. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Social media and scientific research are complementary-YouTube and shrikes as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dylewski, Łukasz; Mikula, Peter; Tryjanowski, Piotr; Morelli, Federico; Yosef, Reuven

    2017-06-01

    Fascination with animals and their behaviour is one the most prominent patterns persisting in all human cultures. During the last decades, however, technological development and public access to the Internet have increased the speed and the extent of information sharing at an unprecedented rate, in some cases even challenging the traditional methods used in science. In order to understand the extent of this influence, we focused on the behaviour of shrikes. Shrikes are an enigmatic group of songbirds with a unique behaviour of impaling prey. We employed an extensive Internet search on YouTube (YT), a very popular and increasingly important source of information worldwide, for videos recording shrikes. Our analyses revealed that the number of shrike videos on YT is strongly positively correlated with classical knowledge on shrikes from books and scientific articles. Our results also suggest that in some cases YT may provide an alternative source of information on shrike ecology and behaviour. YT videos may thus provide new insights into the study of certain species or subjects and help identify gaps in ecological studies, especially in poorly studied species.

  10. Biological mineralization of iron: Studies using Moesbauer spectroscopy and complementary techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, J.; Kim, K.S.; Tran, K.C.; Pierre, T.G.S.

    1988-01-01

    Biological deposition of solid Fe-containing phases can be studied using 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. Other techniques are needed in order to understand this complex process. These include proton-induced X-ray and γ-ray emission (PIXE/PIGME), electron microscopy, electron and X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and chemical characterization of organic components. This paper reviews and evaluates the application of these techniques to biological mineralization of Fe, particularly that occurring in the radula teeth of the marine molluscs, chitons and limpets. (orig.)

  11. Retrospective Study of Reported Adverse Events Due to Complementary Health Products in Singapore From 2010 to 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimin Xu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to collate and analyse adverse event reports associated with the use of complementary health products (CHP submitted to the Health Sciences Authority (HSA of Singapore for the period 2010–2016 to identify various trends and signals for pharmacovigilance purposes. A total of 147,215 adverse event reports suspected to be associated with pharmaceutical products and CHP were received by HSA between 2010 and 2016. Of these, 143,191 (97.3% were associated with chemical drugs, 1,807 (1.2% with vaccines, 1,324 (0.9% with biological drugs (biologics, and 893 (0.6% with CHP. The number of adverse event reports associated with Chinese Proprietary Medicine, other complementary medicine and health supplements are presented. Eight hundred and ninety three adverse event reports associated with CHP in the 7-year period have been successfully collated and analyzed. In agreement with other studies, adverse events related to the “skin and appendages disorders” were the most commonly reported. Most of the cases involved dermal allergies (e.g., rashes associated with the use of glucosamine products and most of the adulterated products were associated with the illegal addition of undeclared drugs for pain relief. Dexamethasone, chlorpheniramine, and piroxicam were the most common adulterants detected. Reporting suspected adverse events is strongly encouraged even if the causality is not confirmed because any signs of clustering will allow rapid regulatory actions to be taken. The findings from this study help to create greater awareness on the health risks, albeit low, when consuming CHP and dispelling the common misconception that “natural” means “safe.” In particular, healthcare professionals and the general public should be aware of potential adulteration of CHP. The analysis of spontaneously reported adverse events is an important surveillance system in monitoring the safety of CHP and helps in the understanding of the

  12. Utilization of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Multiethnic Population: The Malaysian Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Noraidatulakma; Borhanuddin, Boekhtiar; Patah, Afzan Effiza Abdul; Abdullah, Mohd Shaharom; Dauni, Andri; Kamaruddin, Mohd Arman; Shah, Shamsul Azhar; Jamal, Rahman

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the factors of CAM usage for general health and to determine the factors associated with the usage of different types of CAM after the diagnosis of chronic diseases among The Malaysian Cohort participants. This was a cross-sectional study derived from The Malaysian Cohort (TMC) project, a prospective population-based cohort aged between 35 to 65 years old that recruited from April 2006 to September 2012. Association between the CAM usage and contributing factors were determined via logistic regression. The sample were mostly female (58.1%), Malays (43.1%), came from urban (71.9%), aged 44 years and below (26.8%) and had secondary education (45.9%). The prevalence of CAM usage varied across diseases; 62.8% in cancer patients, 53.3% in hypercholesterolemia, 49.4% in hypertensives and 48.6% in diabetics. General CAM usage was greater among female (OR: 1.54, 95% CI: 1.49, 1.59), Chinese (OR: 1.15, 95% CI: 1.12, 1.19), those with higher education (OR: 3.12, 95% CI: 3.00, 3.25), urban residents (OR: 1.55, 95% CI: 1.50, 1.61) and older people (OR ranging from 1.15 to 1.75) while for post-diagnosis of chronic diseases usage, the odds were higher among those with lower education and living in rural areas. Health status, educational level, age, living location and types of chronic diseases were significant factors that influence CAM usage for the intent of either health maintenance or disease treatment. Further exploration on CAM safety and benefit are crucial to minimize the adverse effect and to ensure the efficacy of CAM product.

  13. Utilization of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Multiethnic Population: The Malaysian Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Noraidatulakma; Borhanuddin, Boekhtiar; Patah, Afzan Effiza Abdul; Abdullah, Mohd Shaharom; Dauni, Andri; Kamaruddin, Mohd Arman; Shah, Shamsul Azhar

    2018-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to identify the factors of CAM usage for general health and to determine the factors associated with the usage of different types of CAM after the diagnosis of chronic diseases among The Malaysian Cohort participants. Methods. This was a cross-sectional study derived from The Malaysian Cohort (TMC) project, a prospective population-based cohort aged between 35 to 65 years old that recruited from April 2006 to September 2012. Association between the CAM usage and contributing factors were determined via logistic regression. Results. The sample were mostly female (58.1%), Malays (43.1%), came from urban (71.9%), aged 44 years and below (26.8%) and had secondary education (45.9%). The prevalence of CAM usage varied across diseases; 62.8% in cancer patients, 53.3% in hypercholesterolemia, 49.4% in hypertensives and 48.6% in diabetics. General CAM usage was greater among female (OR: 1.54, 95% CI: 1.49, 1.59), Chinese (OR: 1.15, 95% CI: 1.12, 1.19), those with higher education (OR: 3.12, 95% CI: 3.00, 3.25), urban residents (OR: 1.55, 95% CI: 1.50, 1.61) and older people (OR ranging from 1.15 to 1.75) while for post-diagnosis of chronic diseases usage, the odds were higher among those with lower education and living in rural areas. Conclusion. Health status, educational level, age, living location and types of chronic diseases were significant factors that influence CAM usage for the intent of either health maintenance or disease treatment. Further exploration on CAM safety and benefit are crucial to minimize the adverse effect and to ensure the efficacy of CAM product. PMID:29651870

  14. Statin dose reduction with complementary diet therapy: A pilot study of personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Scolaro

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Statin intolerance, whether real or perceived, is a growing issue in clinical practice. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of reduced-dose statin therapy complemented with nutraceuticals. Methods: First phase: Initially, 53 type 2 diabetic statin-treated patients received a supplementation with fish oil (1.7 g EPA + DHA/day, chocolate containing plant sterols (2.2 g/day, and green tea (two sachets/day for 6 weeks. Second phase: “Good responders” to supplementation were identified after multivariate analysis (n = 10, and recruited for a pilot protocol of statin dose reduction. “Good responders” were then provided with supplementation for 12 weeks: standard statin therapy was kept during the first 6 weeks and reduced by 50% from weeks 6–12. Results: First phase: After 6 weeks of supplementation, plasma LDL-C (−13.7% ± 3.7, P = .002 and C-reactive protein (−35.5% ± 5.9, P = .03 were reduced. Analysis of lathosterol and campesterol in plasma suggested that intensity of LDL-C reduction was influenced by cholesterol absorption rate rather than its synthesis. Second phase: no difference was observed for plasma lipids, inflammation, cholesterol efflux capacity, or HDL particles after statin dose reduction when compared to standard therapy. Conclusions: Although limited by the small sample size, our study demonstrates the potential for a new therapeutic approach combining lower statin dose and specific dietary compounds. Further studies should elucidate “good responders” profile as a tool for personalized medicine. This may be particularly helpful in the many patients with or at risk for CVD who cannot tolerate high dose statin therapy. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02732223. Keywords: Atherosclerosis, Omega-3 fatty acids, Plant sterols, Polyphenols, Responders

  15. Hydrogeochemical Impact of CO2 Leakage from Geological Sequestration on Shallow Potable Aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cahill, Aaron Graham

    . Although considered highly unlikely following appropriate site selection, leakage of CO2 from CCGS forms a major concern for both scientists and the public. Leakage would potentially occur through faults or abandoned boreholes and ultimately result in upward migration and discharge to the atmosphere....... During migration CO2 would dissolve into groundwater forming carbonic acid, induce water-rock reactions and thus change groundwater chemistry. Therefore prior to implementation of this potentially necessary technology, environmental risks associated with leakage must be understood. Over the past 10 years...... it be detected geochemically? Some common hydrochemical development is apparent from the literature however many aspects of hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical impact of leakage into shallow aquifers used in water supply remain unclear. In this Ph.D. study an integrated approach was employed in order to answer...

  16. Music therapy as specific and complementary training for adults after cochlear implantation: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, E; Argstatter, H; Grapp, M; Plinkert, P K

    2015-09-01

    Although cochlear implant (CI) users achieve good speech comprehension, they experience difficulty perceiving music and prosody in speech. As the provision of music training in rehabilitation is limited, a novel concept of music therapy for rehabilitation of adult CI users was developed and evaluated in this pilot study. Twelve unilaterally implanted, postlingually deafened CI users attended ten sessions of individualized and standardized training. The training started about 6 weeks after the initial activation of the speech processor. Before and after therapy, psychological and musical tests were applied in order to evaluate the effects of music therapy. CI users completed the musical tests in two conditions: bilateral (CI + contralateral, unimplanted ear) and unilateral (CI only). After therapy, improvements were observed in the subjective sound quality (Hearing Implant Sound Quality Index) and the global score on the self-concept questionnaire (Multidimensional Self-Concept Scales) as well as in the musical subtests for melody recognition and for timbre identification in the unilateral condition. Discussion Preliminary results suggest improvements in subjective hearing and music perception, with an additional increase in global self-concept and enhanced daily listening capacities. The novel concept of individualized music therapy seems to provide an effective treatment option in the rehabilitation of adult CI users. Further investigations are necessary to evaluate effects in the area of prosody perception and to separate therapy effects from general learning effects in CI rehabilitation.

  17. Quasi-experimental study designs series-paper 2: complementary approaches to advancing global health knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldsetzer, Pascal; Fawzi, Wafaie

    2017-09-01

    Quasi-experiments have been infrequently used in the health sciences. Focusing on health systems implementation research, this article details key advantages of quasi-experiments and argues that they can complement (but not replace) randomized evaluations. Specifically, it may be possible to use a quasi-experiment to study the causal effect of an intervention that cannot feasibly be randomized or that would be unethical (e.g., because the intervention has become the standard of care) to test in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). In addition, because they usually take advantage of routinely collected data, quasi-experiments may be feasible when it is too costly (either financially or in terms of the required time) to carry out a RCT - an important advantage in research on health systems, which vary widely between settings. Nonetheless, we argue that RCTs will continue to be indispensable for implementation research because i) the assumptions needed to establish causality with a quasi-experiment are often unverifiable, ii) available data frequently do not allow for a rigorous quasi-experiment, and iii) randomized designs tend to lend themselves more to informing policy makers of causal effects prior to (or during) the full-scale rollout of an intervention than quasi-experiments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A pilot-study of hypnotherapy as complementary treatment for pain in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juel, Jacob; Abrahamsen, Randi; Olesen, Søren S; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2018-05-10

    BackgroundChronic pain is the hallmark symptom of chronic pancreatitis (CP). Its treatment is complicated, and often the patients have side-effects notwithstanding that pain is not ameliorated in many cases. Hypnotherapy has been shown to improve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome including abdominal pain and, as such, may serve as a remedy to relive pain. The aim of this open-label pilot-study was to test the effect of hypnotherapy for pain in patients with CP. MethodsFour patients with CP and chronic abdominal pain were included and followed for four consecutive weeks. The primary efficacy parameter was pain relief. After 1 week of baseline patients received a 1-h session of hypnotherapy. This was repeated at day 15 and day 23 and supplemented by self-administered hypnotherapy. ResultsThree of four participants completed the trial and experienced short lasting pain reduction during the trial. The reported pain relief was in the range of 20%-39% compared to baseline. Hypnotherapy improved self-reported sleep, vitality, and social life. ConclusionsThe results suggest that hypnotherapy may reduce pain related to CP. Furthermore, no adverse effects were reported and the majority of participants completed the trial. Further prospective controlled trials are warranted to examine the potential of hypnotherapy.

  19. Characterization study of an intensified complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor active pixel sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, J. A.; Chen, D.; Turchetta, R.; Royle, G. J.

    2011-03-01

    An intensified CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) has been constructed for operation in low-light-level applications: a high-gain, fast-light decay image intensifier has been coupled via a fiber optic stud to a prototype "VANILLA" APS, developed by the UK based MI3 consortium. The sensor is capable of high frame rates and sparse readout. This paper presents a study of the performance parameters of the intensified VANILLA APS system over a range of image intensifier gain levels when uniformly illuminated with 520 nm green light. Mean-variance analysis shows the APS saturating around 3050 Digital Units (DU), with the maximum variance increasing with increasing image intensifier gain. The system's quantum efficiency varies in an exponential manner from 260 at an intensifier gain of 7.45 × 103 to 1.6 at a gain of 3.93 × 101. The usable dynamic range of the system is 60 dB for intensifier gains below 1.8 × 103, dropping to around 40 dB at high gains. The conclusion is that the system shows suitability for the desired application.

  20. Effectiveness of Baby Friendly Community Initiative (BFCI) on complementary feeding in Koibatek, Kenya: a randomized control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maingi, Mildred; Kimiywe, Judith; Iron-Segev, Sharon

    2018-05-08

    Appropriate infant and young child nutrition is critical for proper growth and development. In order to promote optimal nutrition at an early age, the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF have developed the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) to address poor breastfeeding practices in maternity wards. However, impact is limited in less developed countries like Kenya, where more than half of all births are home deliveries. Therefore, Kenya has explored the adoption of Baby Friendly Community Initiative (BFCI) in its rural settings. In contrast to the BFHI, the BFCI supports breastfeeding and optimal infant feeding in community. BFCI has been implemented in Koibatek, in rural Kenya. This study aimed at assessing the effectiveness of BFCI on complementary feeding practices of children aged 6-23 months, by comparing intervention and control groups. This was a randomized control study design that included 270 mother-infant pairs enrolled in the Baby Friendly Community Initiative (BFCI) project in Koibatek. Evaluation was carried out using structured questionnaires. A statistically significantly higher proportion of children in the intervention group compared to the control group attained minimum dietary diversity (77% vs. 58%; p = 0.001), minimum meal frequency (96% vs. 89%; p = 0.046) and minimum acceptable diet (77% vs. 61%; p = 0.005). The odds of attaining minimum dietary diversity, minimum meal frequency and minimum acceptable diet were statistically significantly higher for the intervention group compared to control group (OR: 4.95; 95%CI 2.44-10.03, p = < 0.001; OR: 14.84; 95%CI 2.75-79.9, p = 0.002; OR: 4.61; 95%CI 2.17-9.78, p = < 0.001 respectively). The BFCI intervention was successful in improving complementary feeding practices. Strengthening and prioritizing BFCI interventions could have a significant impact on child health outcomes in rural Kenya. ISRCTN03467700 . Registration 24 September 2014. Retrospectively

  1. Assessing anthropogenic impact on boreal lakes with historical fish species distribution data and hydrogeochemical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valinia, Salar; Englund, Göran; Moldan, Filip; Futter, Martyn N; Köhler, Stephan J; Bishop, Kevin; Fölster, Jens

    2014-09-01

    Quantifying the effects of human activity on the natural environment is dependent on credible estimates of reference conditions to define the state of the environment before the onset of adverse human impacts. In Europe, emission controls that aimed at restoring ecological status were based on hindcasts from process-based models or paleolimnological reconstructions. For instance, 1860 is used in Europe as the target for restoration from acidification concerning biological and chemical parameters. A more practical problem is that the historical states of ecosystems and their function cannot be observed directly. Therefore, we (i) compare estimates of acidification based on long-term observations of roach (Rutilus rutilus) populations with hindcast pH from the hydrogeochemical model MAGIC; (ii) discuss policy implications and possible scope for use of long-term archival data for assessing human impacts on the natural environment and (iii) present a novel conceptual model for interpreting the importance of physico-chemical and ecological deviations from reference conditions. Of the 85 lakes studied, 78 were coherently classified by both methods. In 1980, 28 lakes were classified as acidified with the MAGIC model, however, roach was present in 14 of these. In 2010, MAGIC predicted chemical recovery in 50% of the lakes, however roach only recolonized in five lakes after 1990, showing a lag between chemical and biological recovery. Our study is the first study of its kind to use long-term archival biological data in concert with hydrogeochemical modeling for regional assessments of anthropogenic acidification. Based on our results, we show how the conceptual model can be used to understand and prioritize management of physico-chemical and ecological effects of anthropogenic stressors on surface water quality. © 2014 The Authors Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Conceptual study of a complementary scram system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanmaercke, S.; Van den Eynde, G.; Tijskens, E.; Bartosiewicz, Y.

    2009-01-01

    GEN-IV reactors promise higher safety and reliability as one of the major improvements over previous generations of reactors. To achieve that, all GEN-IV reactor concepts require two completely independent shutdown systems that rely on different operating principles. For liquid metal cooled reactors the first system is an absorber-rod based solution. The second system that by requirement should rely on another principle, is however quite a challenge to design. The second system used in current PWR reactors is to dissolve a neutron absorber, boric acid, into the primary coolant. This method cannot be used in liquid metal cooled reactors because of the high cost of cleaning the coolant. In this paper an overview of the existing literature on scram systems is given, each with their advantages and limitations. A promising new concept is also presented. This concept leads to a totally passive self activating device using small absorbing particles that flow into a dedicated channel to shutdown the reactor. The system consists of tubes filled with particles of an absorber material. During normal operation, these particles are kept above the active core by means of a metallic seal. In case of an accident, the system is activated by the temperature increase in the coolant. This leads to melting of the metal seal. The ongoing work conducted at SCK·CEN and UCL/TERM aims at assessing the reliability of this new concept both experimentally and numerically. This study is multidisciplinary as neutronic and thermal hydraulics issues are tackled. Most challenging is however the thermal hydraulics related to understanding and predicting the liberation and flow of the absorber particles during a shutdown. Simple experiments are envisaged to compare to numerical simulations using the Discrete Element Method for simulating the particles. In a later stage this will be coupled with Smoothed Particles Hydrodynamics for simulating the melting of the seal. Some preliminary experimental and

  3. Patient's Decision to Disclose the Use of Traditional and Complementary Medicine to Medical Doctor: A Descriptive Phenomenology Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelak, Johny Anak; Safii, Razitasham

    2018-01-01

    Nondisclosure of traditional and complementary medicine (T&CM) use may cause individual to be at risk of undue harm. This study aimed to explore patient's experience and views on their decision to disclose the use of T&CM to the doctor. An exploratory qualitative study using in-depth interview involving 10 primary care clinics attendees in Kuching was conducted. The results indicated that disclosure of T&CM use will motivate them to get information, increase doctor's awareness, and get support from family and friends for disclosure. Fear of negative relationship and negative response from doctors was a barrier for disclosure. Doctor's interpersonal and communication skills of being involved, treating patients respectfully, listening attentively, respecting privacy, and taking time for the patient were a critical component for disclosure. Intrapersonal trust regarding doctor influences their satisfaction on healthcare. Women are more open and receptive to a health concern and expressing negative emotions and tend to share problems, whereas men always described themselves as healthy, tended to keep their own personal feeling to themselves, and tended to not share. The doctor should consider gender differences in disclosure, their attitude towards T&CM use, and gained patient's trust in the delivery of healthcare services. Good interpersonal and communication skills must be maintained between doctor and patients. PMID:29636778

  4. Study of Pictorial technique in a colonial wall painting from El Padre coffee plantation using XRF and complementary technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Mendoza, A.

    2001-01-01

    This investigation is based on the study of the pictorial technique employed in a wall painting from El Padre coffee plantation situation in Madruga, Havana, and built at beginning of XIX century. The knowledge about pictorical techniques that was used in a painting is a typical research in Archaeometry, because it is so important the art historical information as scientific results to conclude about the real materials and procedures that were used in the past by the artists . The prediction of a wall painting pictorical technique is carrying out trough the knowledge of pigments, mortars layers and binding substance composition. The non destructive inorganic microanalysis of mortars layers and pigments was determined by a portable XRF system, which is very useful because of the most of pigments are of inorganic nature. A pinpoint samples microanalysis of each color from the painting were done by complementary and traditional technique in stratigraphic studies such as: optical microscopy, micro- chemical drop test, Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-Ray attachment (SEM-EDX), gas chromatography and Fourier Transformed Infra Red Spectroscopy (FTIR). The overlapping of layers was obtained by optical microscopy, The mortars composition was investigated by micro-chemical drop test and SEM/EDX and further confirmed by FTIR. The presence of binding substances in colors layers was identified by specific staining test and Gas Chromatography

  5. Hydrogeochemical attributes and ground water quality of Ngbo Community in Ohaukwu Area Council, Ebonyi State, Nigeria

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    Omaka Ndukaku Omaka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the hydrogeochemical attributes and quality of groundwater resources in Ngbo, Ohaukwu Area Council of Ebonyi State, Nigeria in order to determine whether boreholes in the area were suitable for potable uses. Eleven groundwater samples were collected from hand-dug boreholes between February and March, 2013. The physiochemical parameters of the samples were then analyzed to determine electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids, total alkalinity, major cations and anions, and trace metals. The quality of these characteristics was evaluated by comparing them to the Nigerian Institute of Standards, the Bureau of Indian Standards and the World Health Organization standards for drinking water quality. Mass abundance of the major ions was in the order of Mg2+ > Ca2+ for cations, Cl- > SO4 2 - > NO3 - > PO4 3 - for anions and Fe > As > Mn > Cu > Zn > Cr > Ni > Pb > Cd for trace metals. Correlation analysis revealed both positive and negative correlations among the parameters. Also, one-way ANOVA tests revealed that no significant differences existed between physiochemical parameters (F = 1.004 < Fcrit =1.977, major cations and anions (F =0.547 < Fcrit =2.008 and trace metals (F = 0.772 < Fcrit = 1.940 regardless of the sampling location. Groundwater in the area was generally hard, alkaline and highly mineralized, making it unsuitable for drinking in some places due to high total hardness and TDS; but it was generally suitable for irrigation purposes. It is recommended that boreholes be flushed regularly to aid in the removal of mineralized deposits, and that regular hydrogeochemical studies be conducted in order to detect future deterioration of water quality

  6. The role of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in Germany – A focus group study of GPs

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    Rosemann Thomas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been a marked increase in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in recent years worldwide. In Germany, apart from 'Heilpraktiker' (= state-licensed, non-medical CAM practitioners, some general practitioners (GPs provide CAM in their practices. This paper aims to explore the attitudes of GPs about the role of CAM in Germany, in relation to the healthcare system, quality of care, medical education and research. Furthermore, experiences of GPs integrating CAM in their daily practice were explored. Methods Using a qualitative methodological approach 3 focus groups with a convenience sample of 17 GPs were conducted. The discussions were transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results The majority of the participating GPs had integrated one or more CAM therapies into their every-day practice. Four key themes were identified based on the topics covered in the focus groups: the role of CAM within the German healthcare system, quality of care, education and research. Within the theme 'role of CAM within the healthcare system' there were five categories: integration of CAM, CAM in the Statutory Health Insurance, modernisation of the Statutory Health Insurance Act, individual healthcare services and 'Heilpraktiker'. Regarding quality of care there were two broad groups of GPs: those who thought patients would benefit from standardizing CAM and those who feared that quality control would interfere with the individual approach of CAM. The main issues identified relating to research and education were the need for the development of alternative research strategies and the low quality of existing CAM education respectively. Conclusion The majority of the participating GPs considered CAM as a reasonable complementary approach within primary care. The study increased our understanding of GPs attitudes about the role of CAM within the German healthcare system and the use of

  7. HYDROGEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE ST. IVAN SPRING IN ISTRIA, CROATIA

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    Tatjana Vlahović

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In addition to geological, hydrogeological investigations and groundwater tracing, detailed surveying of the groundwater quality is becoming particularly important for environmental impact monitoring on karst aquifers. Groundwater quality data contain two types of information i.e. the natural chemistry of water and its modifications caused by antropogenic impacts. The method of results presentation as well as the importance of water quality surveying particularly with respect to the indicators showing its natural chemistry, are shown here exemplified by the St. Ivan spring in Istria, Croatia. Natural chemistry of the groundwater is a consequence of hydrogeochemical facies, and it is used here for interpretation of spring generating conditions and the origin of groundwater. Results obtained so far confirm that the extent of recharge area of the spring change in dependence of the hydrological conditions. Hydrogeochemical characteristics of the spring are presented graphically in the form of correlation diagrams showing major groundwater parameters, saturation conditions and trends of particular parameters as a function of time.

  8. La Divisa - Complementary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, J.

    1982-11-01

    This work is a complement of geophysics report: S tudy of the baseboard depth by electrical soundings in Paraje La Divisa . The main conclusion is the existence of a crystalline hollow in the direction N 30 to N 35 through electrical sounding points 14, 15 and 7 which could have been a paleogeographic wall limiting to the S W a small sub basin of 55 m average depth. The main conclusion is the existence of a crystalline hollow in the direction N 30 to N 35 through the points of electrical sounding 14, 15 and 7 could have been a paleogeographic wall limiting to the S W a small sub basin average depth of 55 m. This hypothesis must be verified in outcrop in their eventual prolongations N and S of the baseboard by drilling

  9. Medical students' attitudes to complementary and alternative medicine: further validation of the IMAQ and findings from an international longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Charlotte E; Wearn, Andy M; Dennis, Ian; Amri, Hakima; Greenfield, Sheila M

    2009-02-01

    Current research mainly employs cross-sectional designs to examine changes in medical students' attitudes towards complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). This paper reports the findings of a longitudinal study to further validate the Integrative Medicine Attitude Questionnaire (IMAQ) and examine changes in medical students' attitudes over 3 years. A total of 154 medical students from four schools in three countries completed a modified version of the IMAQ during their first (T1) and fourth year (T2). We established the validity of a three-factor model for the IMAQ: (1) attitudes towards holism; (2) attitudes towards the effectiveness of CAM therapies, and (3) attitudes towards introspection and the doctor-patient relationship. We found that IMAQ factor scores did not differ significantly from T1 to T2, emphasizing the relative stability in attitudes across time. Various student characteristics were significantly associated with IMAQ factor scores at T2: age, gender, CAM use, CAM education and school; and two variables (gender and CAM use) predicted changes in medical students' attitudes between T1 and T2. We urge medical educators to continue exploring medical students' attitude changes towards CAM and we provide examples of what further research is needed.

  10. Changes in the use of complementary and alternative medicine in Taiwan: a comparison study of 2007 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mei-Ying; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Hsiao-Yu

    2014-06-01

    In this study, we explored the differences in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) based on data from 2007 and 2011 national surveys in Taiwan. Two cross-sectional, community-based epidemiological surveys were conducted in Taiwan. Participants 18 years and older were interviewed regarding their CAM use in the previous 12 months. Nationally representative random-household telephone surveys using a sampling method with a probability proportional to size were conducted in 2007 and 2011. The data were analysed to compare the results between surveys. We obtained a total of 1260 and 2266 valid responses in 2007 and 2011, respectively. The use of at least one or more CAM therapies during the previous year decreased from 48.9% in 2007 to 37.8% in 2011 (p herbs followed by health supplement products and tuina. We observed the greatest relative increase in CAM use between 2007 and 2011 in health supplement products (12.8% vs. 16.0%) and massage (1.3% vs. 2.9%), whereas the largest relative decrease occurred for tuina (24.4-13.4%) and Chinese medicinal herbs (31.6-25.4%). Widespread CAM use reflects a more personal orientation towards maintaining health and selecting health care support services. Thus, a set of standards should be established for the safety and effectiveness of therapies, and consensus building is required to overcome the differences among practitioners from various backgrounds and traditions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Complementary and alternative medicine use in thalassemia patients in Shiraz, southern Iran: A cross-sectional study

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    Mohammadreza Bordbar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the frequency and pattern of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use in thalassemia patients in south of Iran. The survey was done using a validated questionnaire which was distributed among 122 thalassemia patients. Only 108 questionnaires were completed and turned back (response rate 88.5%. Patients referred to an outpatient thalassemia clinic in Shiraz, southern Iran for blood transfusion. The mean age of the patients was 22.9 ± 7.9 years (range 4–45 years with female/male ratio 1.84. Seventy four (68.5% of the responders used CAM at least once during their life, and about half of them used it concurrently with their conventional treatments. The most reported CAM product was mint juice (50%. The most common reason of CAM use was increased general health. The most common information source about CAM was physicians who were the most trusted source as well. CAM is frequently being used in thalassemia patients to ensure their sense of well-being and help them overcome the complications of their illnesses.

  12. Hydrogeochemical contrast between brown and grey sand aquifers in shallow depth of Bengal Basin: consequences for sustainable drinking water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Ashis; Nath, Bibhash; Bhattacharya, Prosun; Halder, Dipti; Kundu, Amit K; Mandal, Ujjal; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Chatterjee, Debashis; Mörth, Carl-Magnus; Jacks, Gunnar

    2012-08-01

    Delineation of safe aquifer(s) that can be targeted by cheap drilling technology for tubewell (TW) installation becomes highly imperative to ensure access to safe and sustainable drinking water sources for the arsenic (As) affected population in Bengal Basin. This study investigates the potentiality of brown sand aquifers (BSA) as a safe drinking water source by characterizing its hydrogeochemical contrast to grey sand aquifers (GSA) within shallow depth (water guidelines, which warrants rigorous assessment of attendant health risk for Mn prior to considering mass scale exploitation of the BSA for possible sustainable drinking water supply. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Portable XRF and PIXE as complementary techniques for the analysis of old books: study of decorated flyleaves and edges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torner M, L.; Gonzalez T, C.; Ruvalcaba S, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Traditionally in the study of ancient books, the binding (leather, parchment, cloth) and their decorations have not the same importance than other parts of the book. Most of the times, paper, inks and internal decorations attract entirely the attention for analytical studies. Nevertheless, it must be considered that the binding keep the book safe and it may be exposed D higher deterioration. Moreover, often it is changed and the historical value of this part of the book is lost. his is also the case of binding's decorations. For these reasons, it is clear that he binding of ancient books must be studied as a part of their material essence. In this work, methodology based on t]he combined use of microscopic and elemental analyses was applied in order to study four types of decorations of guards of books (marbled, colored, splashed, dotted). In particular, this study was focused on Colonial and Mexican books from XVIII and XIX centuries from the collection of the Biblioteca Nacional de Antropologia e Historia, lNAH. Twelve books and 62 decoration's colors were analyzed in situ, in the library, using a portable X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy system (XRF) for a quick nondestructive pigment identification and to select a reduced number of books for complementary analyses at the laboratory by Particle Induced X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (PIXE). By combining these nondestructive techniques, it was possible to identify most of the pigments used in the decorations and to establish a general pattern of use of colorants and pigments in XVIII and XIX centuries for the guard's decorations. This work represents the first study on this topic. (Author)

  14. Instrumental variable analysis as a complementary analysis in studies of adverse effects : venous thromboembolism and second-generation versus third-generation oral contraceptives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boef, Anna G C; Souverein, Patrick C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/243074948; Vandenbroucke, Jan P; van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid; de Boer, Anthonius|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075097346; le Cessie, Saskia; Dekkers, Olaf M

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: A potentially useful role for instrumental variable (IV) analysis may be as a complementary analysis to assess the presence of confounding when studying adverse drug effects. There has been discussion on whether the observed increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) for

  15. Analysis of the Erosion Law of Karst Groundwater Using Hydrogeochemical Theory in Liulin Spring Area, North China

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    Xiuqing Zheng

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The comprehensive geological, hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical model of the Liulin karstic spring area in the eastern limb of the Ordos syncline was established by a combination of chemical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics and hydrogeology. The study area was divided into four zones based on the saturation indices of calcite, dolomite and gypsum, which were computed by the groundwater-chemical simulation software PHREEQC (a computer program for speciation, batch-reaction, one-dimensional transport, and inverse geochemical calculations, with consideration of the geological and hydrogeological conditions and hydro-geochemical reactions. The weight and volume modulus of carbonate rocks and sulphate rocks in each zone were calculated by the method of correlation analysis to evaluate the dissolution law of karst groundwater. The results showed that in the zone I (saturation index of calcite βc ≤ 1 the dissolution of calcite was the major geochemical reaction, the weight modulus of calcite was higher than that of dolomite and gypsum, and the pore space generated by the dissolution of calcite was one order of magnitude larger than that of dolomite and gypsum. In zone II (saturation index of calcite βc > 1 to saturation index of dolomite βd ≤ 1 the corrosion moduli were all smaller than that in zone I, the solubility of dolomite and gypsum increased, and calcite reached saturation. The space occupied by the calcite sediment was less than that dissolved by dolomite and gypsum. In zone III (saturation index of dolomite βd > 1 to saturation index of gypsum βg ≤ 1, calcite and dolomite had reached saturation, accompanied by dedolomitization, and the amount of gypsum dissolution increased obviously. The conclusions indicate that the hydrogeochemical environment plays an important role in mineral dissolution.

  16. Goechemical and Hydrogeochemical Properties of Cappadocia Geothermal Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furkan Sener, Mehmet; Sener, Mehmet; Uysal, Tonguc

    2016-04-01

    conclude that the same hydrothermal fluid in geothermal system was reached to the surface and interacted with the surface rocks. Our conceptual geothermal model for Cappadocia Geothermal Province based on our geochemical and hydrogeochemical data in combination with geological and geophysical information suggest that the geothermal resources in this region are controlled by primary (active fault) and secondary (buried fault) tectonic belts. Further, our geochemical data indicate the Paleozoic-Mesozoic marble and gneiss being the reservoir rocks. Geogradient and impending heat fluxes to the surface with a possible crustal thinning, which was developed after regional tectonic activities during the Late Pliocene-Quaternary period, constitutes the heat sources. In addition, our study suggest that the Quaternary tuff and ignimbrites of Cappadocia Volcanics represent the seal rock of the geothermal system. In conclusion this study provide evidence for a significant geothermal potential in the Cappadocia region with well-defined seal rocks. However, further studies are needed to resolve the geothermal fluid source problem. Keywords: Cappadocia, geothermal systems, geochemistry, rare earth elements, hydrogeochemistry, hydrothermal alteration.

  17. Pattern of complementary and alternative medicine use among Malaysian stroke survivors: A hospital-based prospective study

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    Azidah Abdul Kadir

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM; 補充與替代醫學 bǔ chōng yǔ tì dài yī xué is widely practiced among stroke patients globally. We conducted a study to determine the pattern of CAM use and its associated factors in stroke survivors attending a tertiary hospital in Malaysia within 6 months after the stroke. This was a prospective cohort study that included all stroke patients who were admitted to a tertiary center in Malaysia from December 2009 to December 2010. Patients were interviewed and examined within 72 hours of admission. The sociodemographic data and medical history were collected. Clinical examinations were done to assess the stroke severity using the Scandinavian Stroke Scale and functional status based on modified Barthel index (MBI. Patients were reassessed at 6 months after the stroke on the CAM use and functional status (MBI. The response rate was 92%. The study population consisted of 52 men and 41 women with a mean age of 63.7 ± 10.3 years. Sixty-seven percent practiced CAM. Massage was the most frequently used method (63.4%, followed by vitamins (7.5%. In multiple logistic regression analysis, functional status (MBI score on discharge (p = 0.004, odds ratio 1.034, 95% confidence interval 1.01–1.06 and Scandinavian Stroke Scale score (p = 0.045, odds ratio 1.87, 95% confidence interval 1.01–3.43 were significant predictors for use of CAM. In conclusion, the use of CAM among stroke survivors is high. Patients who have better functional status on discharge and less severe stroke are more likely to use CAM.

  18. Traditional and Complementary Medicine (TCM) among Study Population with Cardiovascular Risk; use and Substitution for Conventional Medicine in Pahang, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kew, Y; Chia, Y L; Lai, S M; Chong, K Y; Ho, X L; Liew, D W; Moy, F M; Selvarajah, S

    2015-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the main cause of morbidity and mortality in Malaysia. There is evidence of high traditional and complementary medicine (TCM) use among population with cardiovascular risk and there have been anecdotal reports about substitution of conventional medicines with TCM. We investigated the prevalence of TCM use, treatment preference and substitution of conventional medicines in study population with cardiovascular risk factors in Pahang, Malaysia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted using an interviewer-administered questionnaire in five districts of Pahang. A total of 1250 households were chosen through proportionate and systematic sampling. Respondents aged 18 years and above were selected. The study population with cardiovascular risk factors who used TCM was higher than the general population (31.7% versus 25.9%). There were no clear preferences in using TCM by gender, age groups, educational level and income even though other bumiputeras showed a slight inclination towards TCM use. Among the study population with cardiovascular risk factors who consumed TCM, 20-30% of them were using TCM as a substitute for their conventional medications. Respondents from the younger age group (18-40 years) (57.1%), highest educational level (43.2%), other bumiputeras (38.4%) and highest income group (31.4%) preferred the combination of both conventional and traditional medicine. TCM use among population with cardiovascular risk factors is high. The high preference for combination therapy of TCM and conventional medications among young adults and the use of TCM to substitute conventional medications show that much research is needed to provide proven TCM therapies to avoid self-mismanagement of cardiovascular risk in Malaysia.

  19. Clinical indications and perceived effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine in departments of obstetrics in Germany: a questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münstedt, Karsten; Brenken, Anja; Kalder, Matthias

    2009-09-01

    Our earlier study on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) methods showed that acupuncture, homeopathy, and aromatherapy are available in most obstetrics departments in Germany but it did not evaluate the clinical indications for using CAM. The present study aimed to explore further the effectiveness of CAM use in obstetrics. We sent all departments of obstetrics in North Rhine-Westphalia a questionnaire designed to delineate their use of acupuncture, homeopathy, and aromatherapy during childbirth. It sought details on who provided the CAM therapy (midwife or physician). We asked respondents to indicate on a five-point scale how reasonable or otherwise they would consider the provision of CAM in each of six common problem situations and to estimate for each the proportion of patients given the CAM treatment. Respondents were also asked about the rationale for offering CAM, quality assurance and side effects. Spearman's bivariate correlation, cross-tabulation and Pearson's chi(2) test were used for statistical analysis. About 73.4% (138/187) of the departments responded. Acupuncture and homoeopathy were most widely used. Although obstetricians are responsible for patient care, decisions to provide CAM were largely taken by midwives, and the midwives' belief in the methods' effectiveness and patient demand were the principle motivating factors. Rates of CAM use in the six problem scenarios evaluated were directly related to practitioners' perceptions of the methods' therapeutic effectiveness. CAM methods were widely offered despite the lack of evidence of effectiveness or information on adverse consequences. In Germany, including CAM in the mandatory national quality assurance measures and perinatal surveys would provide valuable information; CAM use elsewhere merits further study.

  20. Complementary alternative medicine use among patients with dengue fever in the hospital setting: a cross-sectional study in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, SiewMooi; Ramachandran, Vasudevan; Gew, Lai Teck; Lim, Sazlyna Mohd Sazlly; Sulaiman, Wan Aliaa Wan; Foo, Yoke Loong; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Samsudin, Nurul Huda; Lau, Paul Chih Ming Chih; Veettil, Sajesh K; Hoo, Fankee

    2016-01-29

    In Malaysia, the number of reported cases of dengue fever demonstrates an increasing trend. Since dengue fever has no vaccine or antiviral treatment available, it has become a burden. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has become one of the good alternatives to treat the patients with dengue fever. There is limited study on the use of CAM among patients with dengue fever, particularly in hospital settings. This study aims to determine the prevalence, types, reasons, expenditure, and resource of information on CAM use among patients with dengue fever. This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study of 306 patients with dengue fever, which was carried out at the dengue clinic of three hospitals. Data were analysed using IBM SPSS Statistics version 21.0 and logistic regression analysis was used to determine the factors associated with CAM use. The prevalence of CAM use was 85.3% among patients with dengue fever. The most popular CAMs were isotonic drinks (85.8%), crab soup (46.7%) and papaya leaf extract (22.2%). The most common reason for CAM use was a good impression of CAM from other CAM users (33.3%). The main resource of information on CAM use among patients with dengue fever was family (54.8%). In multiple logistic regression analysis, dengue fever patients with a tertiary level are more likely to use CAM 5.8 (95% confidence interval (CI 1.62-20.45) and 3.8 (95% CI 1.12-12.93) times than secondary level and primary and below respectively. CAM was commonly used by patients with dengue fever. The predictor of CAM use was a higher level of education.

  1. Predictors for adolescent visits to practitioners of complementary and alternative medicine in a total population (the Young-HUNT Studies.

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    Aslak Steinsbekk

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the factors predicting adolescent visits to practitioners of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. METHODS: A longitudinal cohort study conducted in an adolescent total population in Central Norway (The Nord-Trøndelag Health Studies (HUNT. In Young-HUNT 1, all inhabitants aged 13 to 19 years (N = 8944, 89% response rate were invited to participate, and the youngest group (13 to 15 year olds was surveyed again 4 years later (Young-HUNT 2, N = 2429, 82% response rate. The participants completed a comprehensive questionnaire on health and life style which included a question regarding visits to a CAM practitioner in the last 12 months. RESULTS: One in eleven (8.7%, 95%CI 7.6-9.8% had visited a CAM practitioner, an increase of 26% in 4 years (1.8% points. The final multivariable analysis predicted increased odds of an adolescent becoming a CAM visitor four years later (p<0.05 if she or he had previously visited a CAM practitioner (adjOR 3.4, had musculoskeletal pain (adjOR 1.5, had migraine (adjOR 2.3, used asthma medicines (adjOR 1.8 or suffered from another disease lasting more than three months (adjOR 2.1. Being male predicted reduced odds of visiting a CAM practitioner in the future (adjOR 0.6. CONCLUSION: We can conclude from this study that future visits to a CAM practitioner are predicted by both predisposing factors (being female, having visited a CAM practitioner previously and medical need factors (having had musculoskeletal pain, migraine, used asthma medicines or experienced another disease lasting more than three months. None of the specific variables associated with CAM visits were predictive for CAM visits four years later.

  2. A Prospective, Multicenter Study of Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM) Utilization During Definitive Radiation for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, Meena S.; Ma Shuangge; Jagsi, Reshma; Yang, Tzu-I Jonathan; Higgins, Susan A.; Weidhaas, Joanne B.; Wilson, Lynn D.; Lloyd, Shane; Peschel, Richard; Gaudreau, Bryant; Rockwell, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Although complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization in breast cancer patients is reported to be high, there are few data on CAM practices in breast patients specifically during radiation. This prospective, multi-institutional study was conducted to define CAM utilization in breast cancer during definitive radiation. Materials/Methods: A validated CAM instrument with a self-skin assessment was administered to 360 Stage 0-III breast cancer patients from 5 centers during the last week of radiation. All data were analyzed to detect significant differences between users/nonusers. Results: CAM usage was reported in 54% of the study cohort (n=194/360). Of CAM users, 71% reported activity-based CAM (eg, Reiki, meditation), 26% topical CAM, and 45% oral CAM. Only 16% received advice/counseling from naturopathic/homeopathic/medical professionals before initiating CAM. CAM use significantly correlated with higher education level (P<.001), inversely correlated with concomitant hormone/radiation therapy use (P=.010), with a trend toward greater use in younger patients (P=.066). On multivariate analysis, level of education (OR: 6.821, 95% CI: 2.307-20.168, P<.001) and hormones/radiation therapy (OR: 0.573, 95% CI: 0.347-0.949, P=.031) independently predicted for CAM use. Significantly lower skin toxicity scores were reported in CAM users vs nonusers, respectively (mild: 34% vs 25%, severe: 17% vs 29%, P=.017). Conclusion: This is the first prospective study to assess CAM practices in breast patients during radiation, with definition of these practices as the first step for future investigation of CAM/radiation interactions. These results should alert radiation oncologists that a large percentage of breast cancer patients use CAM during radiation without disclosure or consideration for potential interactions, and should encourage increased awareness, communication, and documentation of CAM practices in patients undergoing radiation treatment for breast

  3. Perceptions of complementary medicine integration in supportive cancer care of Arabs and Jews in Israel: a cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Schiff, Elad; Silbermann, Michael; Agbarya, Abed; Bar-Sela, Gil

    2015-05-01

    There is a dearth of studies on how cultural background influences patients' attitudes and choices regarding complementary and traditional medicine (CTM) integration. To explore Arab and Jewish patients' perspectives regarding CTM use and its possible integration within conventional cancer care. This was a cross-cultural study. We developed a 27-item questionnaire that evaluates patients' perceptions regarding CTM integration in supportive cancer care. The questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of patients receiving cancer care in community and hospital oncology centers. Of the 770 respondents (response rate 88%), 324 defined their religion as Muslim, Christian, or Druze (henceforth, regarded as Arabs) and 446 were Jews. Respondents in the two groups differed significantly in terms of age, gender, marital status, number of children, education, religiosity, and prevalence of cancer types (excluding breast cancer). Although Arab respondents reported less use of CTM for cancer-related outcomes (39.6% vs. 52.1%; P = 0.001), they expressed greater support than Jewish respondents for optional CTM consultation if provided within conventional oncology care (P < 0.0001). Respondents in both groups stated that their primary expectation from the oncologist concerning CTM was to participate in formulating a CTM treatment plan to be provided within the oncology department. Compared with Arab respondents, Jews expected CTM consultations to focus on improving daily functioning and coping, reducing chemotherapy side effects, and providing spiritual support. Although quality of life-related expectations are more pronounced among Jewish respondents, both groups share the expectation from their health care providers to be actively involved in construction of a tailored integrative CTM treatment plan. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. New insight into unstable hillslopes hydrology from hydrogeochemical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, C.; Marc, V.; Malet, J.-P.

    2010-05-01

    In the black marl outcrops of the French South Alps, sub surface flow conditions are considered as the main triggering factor for initiation and reactivation of landslides. The problem is traditionally addressed in term of hydrological processes (how does percolation to the water table occur?) but in some cases the origin of water is also in question. Direct rainfall is generally assumed as the only water source for groundwater recharge in shallow hillslope aquifers. The bedrock is also supposed impervious and continuous. Yet the geological environment of the study area is very complex owing to the geological history of this alpine sector. The autochthonous callovo-oxfordian black marl bedrock is highly tectonized (Maquaire et al., 2003) and may be affected by large, possibly draining discontinuities. A deep water inflow at the slip surface may at least locally result in increase the pore pressure and decrease the effective shearing resistance of the landslide material. In the active slow-moving landslide of Super-Sauze (Malet and Maquaire, 2003), this question has been addressed using hydrochemical investigations. The groundwater was sampled during five field campaigns uniformly spread out over the year from a network of boreholes. Water chemistry data were completed by geochemical and mineralogical analyses of the marl material. The major hydro-geochemical processes over area proved (1) mixing processes, (2) pyrite alteration, (3) dissolution/precipitation of carbonates and (4) cations exchange (de Montety et al., 2007). A geochemical modelling was carried out using the model Phreeqc (Parkhurst and Appelo, version 2.15, 2008) to check how suitable was observed water chemistry with the reservoir characteristics. The modelling exercise was based on a kinetics approach of soil-water interactions. The model simulates the rock alteration by the dissolution of the primary minerals and the precipitation of new phases. Initial parameters were obtained from geochemical

  5. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by patients with localized prostate carcinoma. Study at a single institute in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimura, Koji; Ichioka, Kentaro; Terada, Naoki; Terai, Akito [Kurashiki Central Hospital, Okayama (Japan); Arai, Yoichi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2003-02-01

    The use of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) has recently received considerable attention throughout the world. We evaluated the prevalence and predictors of CAM use among Japanese patients with localized prostate cancer. A total of 177 patients with localized prostate carcinoma underwent radical retropubic prostatecotomy or external beam radiation therapy between January 1994 and January 2001. Of them, 138 (78%) answered a self-administered questionnaire on CAM use and were eligible for this study. The overall prevalence, types of CAM used, and costs of CAM were assessed. The effects of age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, clinical stage, pretreatment Gleason score, patients' income, patients' final educational status, and general health-related quality of life at baseline and 1 year after treatment, as estimated using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Prostate Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire on the prevalence of CAM use, were evaluated. Twenty-seven patients (20%) had once used or had been using some types of CAM. Herbal medicine and vitamins were the most common types of CAM used. Preoperative Gleason score was significantly associated with CAM use, as determined by the {chi}''2 test (P0.0198), and PSA level and posttreatment physical function domain were marginally associated with CAM use, as determined by the Mann-Whitney U-test (P=0.0734 and P=0.0597, respectively). Patient age, income, and final educational status had no impact on CAM use. A relatively small proportion of Japanese patients with localized prostate cancer have tried CAM compared with the proportions of patients described in previous reports from Western countries. (author)

  6. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by patients with localized prostate carcinoma. Study at a single institute in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Koji; Ichioka, Kentaro; Terada, Naoki; Terai, Akito; Arai, Yoichi

    2003-01-01

    The use of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) has recently received considerable attention throughout the world. We evaluated the prevalence and predictors of CAM use among Japanese patients with localized prostate cancer. A total of 177 patients with localized prostate carcinoma underwent radical retropubic prostatecotomy or external beam radiation therapy between January 1994 and January 2001. Of them, 138 (78%) answered a self-administered questionnaire on CAM use and were eligible for this study. The overall prevalence, types of CAM used, and costs of CAM were assessed. The effects of age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, clinical stage, pretreatment Gleason score, patients' income, patients' final educational status, and general health-related quality of life at baseline and 1 year after treatment, as estimated using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Prostate Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire on the prevalence of CAM use, were evaluated. Twenty-seven patients (20%) had once used or had been using some types of CAM. Herbal medicine and vitamins were the most common types of CAM used. Preoperative Gleason score was significantly associated with CAM use, as determined by the χ''2 test (P0.0198), and PSA level and posttreatment physical function domain were marginally associated with CAM use, as determined by the Mann-Whitney U-test (P=0.0734 and P=0.0597, respectively). Patient age, income, and final educational status had no impact on CAM use. A relatively small proportion of Japanese patients with localized prostate cancer have tried CAM compared with the proportions of patients described in previous reports from Western countries. (author)

  7. Complementary and alternative medicine use and cost in functional bowel disorders: A six month prospective study in a large HMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drossman Douglas A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional Bowel Disorders (FBD are chronic disorders that are difficult to treat and manage. Many patients and doctors are dissatisfied with the level of improvement in symptoms that can be achieved with standard medical care which may lead them to seek alternatives for care. There are currently no data on the types of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM used for FBDs other than Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS, or on the economic costs of CAM treatments. The aim of this study is to determine prevalence, types and costs of CAM in IBS, functional diarrhea, functional constipation, and functional abdominal pain. Methods 1012 Patients with FBD were recruited through a health care maintenance organization and followed for 6 months. Questionnaires were used to ascertain: Utilization and expenditures on CAM, symptom severity (IBS-SS, quality of life (IBS-QoL, psychological distress (BSI and perceived treatment effectiveness. Costs for conventional medical care were extracted from administrative claims. Results CAM was used by 35% of patients, at a median yearly cost of $200. The most common CAM types were ginger, massage therapy and yoga. CAM use was associated with female gender, higher education, and anxiety. Satisfaction with physician care and perceived effectiveness of prescription medication were not associated with CAM use. Physician referral to a CAM provider was uncommon but the majority of patients receiving this recommendation followed their physician's advice. Conclusion CAM is used by one-third of FBD patients. CAM use does not seem to be driven by dissatisfaction with conventional care. Physicians should discuss CAM use and effectiveness with their patients and refer patients if appropriate.

  8. Pilot study of the efficacy of empowering patients through coaching as a complementary therapy in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Ron, A; Serrano Grasa, R; Blanco Lago, R; Huete Hernani, B; Pérez Martinez, D A

    2016-03-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most frequent neurodevelopmental disorder and must be considered a public health priority because of its functional repercussions in school, family, and social settings. Health empowerment is an innovative model of care for patients with chronic diseases based on self-management education. Our goal is to evaluate the effectiveness of empowerment using coaching within a multimodal treatment plan in paediatric patients with ADHD. Descriptive open prospective study. We included children between 6 and 12 years old belonging to patient association in a suburban area of the Region of Madrid. We evaluated the situation before and after 5 cost-free coaching sessions using the Conners Questionnaire, Dundee difficult times of day scale, and satisfaction scales. We included 49 patients (73.5% males) with an average age of 8.5 years. The ADHD hyperactive-impulsive subtype was present in 63.3% and 77.6% had some type of comorbidity. All were treated with methylphenidate and their clinical course was poor. Clinical improvements were observed in 79.6% with a 34.6% mean reduction in symptoms (SD 11.1), and improvements remained stable at 6 months follow-up after coaching. We reached a satisfaction level of 7.8 out of 10 (SD 1.7), and 95.9% of the participants recommended this treatment to other families. Our results provide information on the potential benefits of coaching as complementary treatment for ADHD. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. A complementary MOS process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jhabvala, M.D.

    1977-03-01

    The complete sequence used to manufacture complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits is described. The fixed-gate array concept is presented as a means of obtaining CMOS integrated circuits in a fast and reliable fashion. Examples of CMOS circuits fabricated by both the conventional method and the fixed-gate array method are included. The electrical parameter specifications and characteristics are given along with typical values used to produce CMOS circuits. Temperature-bias stressing data illustrating the thermal stability of devices manufactured by this process are presented. Results of a preliminary study on the radiation sensitivity of circuits manufactured by this process are discussed. Some process modifications are given which have improved the radiation hardness of our CMOS devices. A formula description of the chemicals and gases along with the gas flow rates is also included

  10. Preliminary Hydrogeochemical Site Description SFR (version 0.2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Ann-Chatrin (Geosigma AB, Uppaala (Sweden)); Tullborg, Eva-Lena (Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)); Smellie, John (Conterra AB, Partille (Sweden))

    2010-05-15

    The final repository for low and intermediate level radioactive operational waste, SFR, located about 150 km north of Stockholm, is to undergo a future extension. The present on-going project, scheduled from 2007 to 2011, is to define and characterise a suitable bedrock volume for the extended repository. This will include the drilling and geoscientific evaluation of seven core-drilled and four percussion boreholes as well as subsequent interpretation and modelling based on the obtained results in order to provide the necessary information for safety assessment and repository design. This report presents a preliminary hydrogeochemical site description for the SFR site and should be considered as an early progress report rather than a complete hydrochemical site descriptive model. The completed hydrogeochemical field investigations have yielded chemical data from a total of 12 borehole sections in five boreholes and additional data from the entire length of two open boreholes in connection with hydraulic tests. These data, together with data from a total of 18 early boreholes in the present SFR tunnel system, were used in the interpretation work. The main part of the data consisted of basic groundwater analyses including major ions and isotopes. Some sporadic gas, microbe and measured redox data are available, but these are either not treated in this report, or are only briefly discussed. This was due to time constraints since special care is needed when interpreting few data of varying quality. The groundwaters in the SFR dataset cover a maximum depth down to about .400 masl and represent a relatively limited salinity range (1,500 to 5,500 mg/L chloride). However, the delta18O values show a wide variation (-1.55 to -0.75% V-SMOW) similar to that reported from the Forsmark site investigations. At the SFR, marine indicators such as Mg/Cl, K/Cl and Br/Cl also show relatively large variations considering the limited salinity range. From very few measured Eh values, and

  11. Preliminary Hydrogeochemical Site Description SFR (version 0.2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Ann-Chatrin; Tullborg, Eva-Lena; Smellie, John

    2010-05-01

    The final repository for low and intermediate level radioactive operational waste, SFR, located about 150 km north of Stockholm, is to undergo a future extension. The present on-going project, scheduled from 2007 to 2011, is to define and characterise a suitable bedrock volume for the extended repository. This will include the drilling and geoscientific evaluation of seven core-drilled and four percussion boreholes as well as subsequent interpretation and modelling based on the obtained results in order to provide the necessary information for safety assessment and repository design. This report presents a preliminary hydrogeochemical site description for the SFR site and should be considered as an early progress report rather than a complete hydrochemical site descriptive model. The completed hydrogeochemical field investigations have yielded chemical data from a total of 12 borehole sections in five boreholes and additional data from the entire length of two open boreholes in connection with hydraulic tests. These data, together with data from a total of 18 early boreholes in the present SFR tunnel system, were used in the interpretation work. The main part of the data consisted of basic groundwater analyses including major ions and isotopes. Some sporadic gas, microbe and measured redox data are available, but these are either not treated in this report, or are only briefly discussed. This was due to time constraints since special care is needed when interpreting few data of varying quality. The groundwaters in the SFR dataset cover a maximum depth down to about .400 masl and represent a relatively limited salinity range (1,500 to 5,500 mg/L chloride). However, the δ 18 O values show a wide variation (-1.55 to -0.75% V-SMOW) similar to that reported from the Forsmark site investigations. At the SFR, marine indicators such as Mg/Cl, K/Cl and Br/Cl also show relatively large variations considering the limited salinity range. From very few measured Eh values, and

  12. The use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in pregnancy: data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J L; Northstone, K; Green, J R; Thompson, E A

    2011-12-01

    To report the frequency of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use by a population of pregnant women in the UK. Four postal self-completion questionnaires completed at 8, 12, 18 and 32 weeks' gestation provided the source of CAMs used. Questions asked for written descriptions about the use of any treatments, pills, medicines, ointments, homeopathic medicines, herbal medicines, supplements, drinks and herbal teas. An observational, population-based, cohort study of parents and children of 14,541 pregnant women residing within the former county of Avon in south-west England. Data was available for 14,115 women. Over a quarter (26.7%; n=3774) of women had used a CAM at least once in pregnancy, the use rising from 6% in the 1st trimester to 12.4% in the 2nd to 26.3% in the 3rd. Herbal teas were the most commonly reported CAM at any time in pregnancy (17.7%; n=2499) followed by homeopathic medicine (14.4%; n=2038) and then herbal medicine (5.8%; n=813). The most commonly used herbal product was chamomile used by 14.6% of women, the most commonly used homeopathic product was Arnica used by 3.1% of women. Other CAMs (osteopathy, aromatherapy, acupuncture/acupressure, Chinese herbal medicine, chiropractic, cranial sacral therapy, hypnosis, non-specific massage and reflexology) accounted for less than 1% of users. CAM use in pregnancy, where a wide range of CAMs has been assessed, has not been widely reported. Studies that have been conducted report varying results to this study (26.7%) by between 13.3% and 87% of pregnant women. Survey results will be affected by a number of factors namely the inclusion/exclusion of vitamins and minerals, the timing of data collection, the country of source, the number of women surveyed, and the different selection criteria of either recruiting women to the study or of categorising and identifying a CAM treatment or product. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. SR-Site - hydrogeochemical evolution of the Forsmark site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas, Joaquin; Molinero, Jorge; Juarez, Iker; Gimeno, Maria Jose; Auque, Luis; Gomez, Javier

    2010-12-01

    The present work has involved the development of a methodology in order to simulate the evolution of the groundwater composition within the candidate repository site of the Forsmark area. A series of climate periods is expected to be probable after the repository closure (temperate, periglacial and glacial) and, eventually, the area could be submerged under seawaters or under a lake of glacial melt waters. These environmental conditions will affect groundwater flow and composition around of the candidate repository volume. The present report summarizes the results obtained by the calculations which reproduce the hydrogeochemical evolution in the Forsmark area, and within the candidate repository volume. The hydrogeochemical evolution of groundwaters is one of the key factors affecting the chemical stability of the buffer and the canister. In this way, the main objective of the hydrogeochemical simulations is to assay the evolution of a series of safety assessment factors, such as salinity, redox potential, pH, and concentrations of iron, sulphide and potassium, among others. Using ConnectFlow, previous hydrological calculations have provided the transport of (1) the fractions of selected reference waters (Deep Saline, Old Meteoric, Glacial, Littorina and Altered Meteoric groundwaters), or (2) salinities, depending on the working team (Serco or Terrasolve). The results of the regional-scale groundwater flow modelling for each specific climate period are used as input of the geochemical models. Groundwater compositions have been modelled using PHREEQC, through mixing and chemical reactions between the waters obtained from the hydrogeological models and the reactive fracture-filling minerals. Both models (hydrological and geochemical) are not fully coupled, and it allows a description of the geochemical heterogeneity, which otherwise would be hard to attain. The stage of the open repository has been non-numerically analysed. Aspects as salinity, redox conditions

  14. SR-Site - hydrogeochemical evolution of the Forsmark site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, Joaquin; Molinero, Jorge; Juarez, Iker (Amphos 21 (Spain)); Gimeno, Maria Jose; Auque, Luis; Gomez, Javier (Univ. of Zaragoza (Spain))

    2010-12-15

    The present work has involved the development of a methodology in order to simulate the evolution of the groundwater composition within the candidate repository site of the Forsmark area. A series of climate periods is expected to be probable after the repository closure (temperate, periglacial and glacial) and, eventually, the area could be submerged under seawaters or under a lake of glacial melt waters. These environmental conditions will affect groundwater flow and composition around of the candidate repository volume. The present report summarizes the results obtained by the calculations which reproduce the hydrogeochemical evolution in the Forsmark area, and within the candidate repository volume. The hydrogeochemical evolution of groundwaters is one of the key factors affecting the chemical stability of the buffer and the canister. In this way, the main objective of the hydrogeochemical simulations is to assay the evolution of a series of safety assessment factors, such as salinity, redox potential, pH, and concentrations of iron, sulphide and potassium, among others. Using ConnectFlow, previous hydrological calculations have provided the transport of (1) the fractions of selected reference waters (Deep Saline, Old Meteoric, Glacial, Littorina and Altered Meteoric groundwaters), or (2) salinities, depending on the working team (Serco or Terrasolve). The results of the regional-scale groundwater flow modelling for each specific climate period are used as input of the geochemical models. Groundwater compositions have been modelled using PHREEQC, through mixing and chemical reactions between the waters obtained from the hydrogeological models and the reactive fracture-filling minerals. Both models (hydrological and geochemical) are not fully coupled, and it allows a description of the geochemical heterogeneity, which otherwise would be hard to attain. The stage of the open repository has been non-numerically analysed. Aspects as salinity, redox conditions

  15. Hydrogeochemical conditions at the Haestholmen site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luukkonen, A.; Pitkaenen, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Leino-Forsman, H.; Snellman, M.

    1999-06-01

    The characterisation and interpretation of groundwater geochemistry has been ongoing at several study sites for spent fuel disposal in Finland since the late 1980s. The former evaluation of the Haestholmen groundwater from depths to 240 m was performed between 1980 and 1992 during the investigations for the construction of the reactor waste repository. Haestholmen was included in the site characterisation programme for spent fuel disposal in 1997. The sampling of groundwater down to 1000 m was started in 1997 from deep boreholes and this study presents the evaluation of the hydro-geochemistry at Haestholmen extending below 200m. The dilute HCO 3 -rich groundwater seems to be limited to the upper 60 m and it is probably controlled by subhorizontal zone R1. According to the tritium data, the dilute groundwater is recently infiltrated, less than 45 years ago. Brackish SO 4 -rich groundwater has been obtained from a depth of about 60 m to a depth of about 600 m. The data show a strong input of the Litorina sea water mixed in the groundwater system as well as input of glacial melt water in the brackish ground-water layer. The infiltration of Litorina sea water is based on marine Br/Cl ratios, δO-18/δH-2, and δS-34 data. The C-14 datings, together with a higher salinity than the present Baltic indicate a Litorina Sea water origin. Melt water is interpreted according to decreasing δH-2 and δO-18 with salinity and depth in the brackish water layer. The saline groundwater is obtained from below 600 m. Stable isotope (δO-18 and δH-2) results, high Ca/Cl, Ca/Mg and Br/Cl ratios suggest a hydrothermal saline end-member. However, the marine signature is also observable in saline water, which is interpreted to originate from the Pre-Weichselian Sea, possibly from the Eem Sea. In accordance with another study site, Olkiluoto, the hydrochemistry of Haestholmen seems to contain a layered sequence of climatic and shoreline changes from modern times through former Baltic

  16. Hydrogeochemical conditions at the Haestholmen site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luukkonen, A.; Pitkaenen, P. [VTT Communities and Infrastructure, Espoo (Finland); Ruotsalainen, P. [Fintact Oy (Finland); Leino-Forsman, H. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Snellman, M. [Posiva Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1999-06-01

    The characterisation and interpretation of groundwater geochemistry has been ongoing at several study sites for spent fuel disposal in Finland since the late 1980s. The former evaluation of the Haestholmen groundwater from depths to 240 m was performed between 1980 and 1992 during the investigations for the construction of the reactor waste repository. Haestholmen was included in the site characterisation programme for spent fuel disposal in 1997. The sampling of groundwater down to 1000 m was started in 1997 from deep boreholes and this study presents the evaluation of the hydro-geochemistry at Haestholmen extending below 200m. The dilute HCO{sub 3}-rich groundwater seems to be limited to the upper 60 m and it is probably controlled by subhorizontal zone R1. According to the tritium data, the dilute groundwater is recently infiltrated, less than 45 years ago. Brackish SO{sub 4}-rich groundwater has been obtained from a depth of about 60 m to a depth of about 600 m. The data show a strong input of the Litorina sea water mixed in the groundwater system as well as input of glacial melt water in the brackish ground-water layer. The infiltration of Litorina sea water is based on marine Br/Cl ratios, {delta}O-18/{delta}H-2, and {delta}S-34 data. The C-14 datings, together with a higher salinity than the present Baltic indicate a Litorina Sea water origin. Melt water is interpreted according to decreasing {delta}H-2 and {delta}O-18 with salinity and depth in the brackish water layer. The saline groundwater is obtained from below 600 m. Stable isotope ({delta}O-18 and {delta}H-2) results, high Ca/Cl, Ca/Mg and Br/Cl ratios suggest a hydrothermal saline end-member. However, the marine signature is also observable in saline water, which is interpreted to originate from the Pre-Weichselian Sea, possibly from the Eem Sea. In accordance with another study site, Olkiluoto, the hydrochemistry of Haestholmen seems to contain a layered sequence of climatic and shoreline changes

  17. Prevalence, patterns, and perceived value of complementary and alternative medicine among cancer patients: a cross-sectional, descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahall, Mandreker

    2017-06-30

    Sophisticated conventional medicine (CM) has brought significant advances to cancer prevention, detection, and treatment. However, many cancer patients still turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatment. This study explored the prevalence, patterns, and perceived value of CAM among cancer patients. This quantitative descriptive study was conducted between March 1, 2015, and July 31, 2015, among a cross-sectional, convenience sample of patients from the Oncology Department of San Fernando General Hospital in Trinidad and Tobago. Face-to-face interviews were conducted at the oncology clinic and treatment suite after obtaining informed consent. Data analysis included descriptive analysis, chi-square tests, and binary logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of CAM use among a sample of 350 cancer patients was 39.1% (39.6% for breast cancer, 44.4% for prostate cancer, 37% for ovarian cancer, and 38.7% for colon cancer patients). Herbs were the most common type of CAM used (93.4%), followed by spiritual therapy (73.7%). CAM use was more prevalent among females (68.6%), Indo-Trinidadians (63.5%), and patients aged 41-50 years (37.2%). The majority (70%-80%) rated CAM efficacy on perceived value. CAM was used mainly because of a desire to try anything that might help (67.6%), followed by it being congruent with the patients' beliefs (59.1%). Patients knew about CAM mainly through friends (69.3%) and family (69.3%). Most patients were generally satisfied (93.6%) and considered CAM helpful (89.8%), but the majority never informed their health care provider of CAM use (78.8%). Patients reported the simultaneous use of more than one type of CAM, without considering or knowing of possible side-effects. The perceived value of CAM included empowerment, control, cure, and improved quality of life. CAM use was associated with age, but no predictors of CAM use could be identified. Medicinal herbs and spiritual therapy are commonly used among cancer patients

  18. Stakeholders' perspectives on the regulation and integration of complementary and alternative medicine products in Lebanon: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The regulation of the markets for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) products presents a global challenge. There is a dearth of studies that have examined or evaluated the regulatory policies of CAM products in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR). We investigate the regulatory frameworks and the barriers for the proper regulation and integration of CAM products in Lebanon, as an example of an EMR country with a weak public infrastructure. Methods We utilized a qualitative study design involving a series of semi-structured interviews with stakeholders of the CAM market in Lebanon. Snowball sampling was used to identify interviewees; interviews continued until the "saturation" point was reached. A total of 16 interviews were carried out with decision makers, representatives of professional associations, academic researchers, CAM product importers, policy makers and a media representative. Interviews were transcribed and thematic analysis of scripts was carried out. Results There was a consensus among all stakeholders that the regulation of the market for CAM products in Lebanon needs to be strengthened. Thematic analysis identified a number of impediments jeopardizing the safety of public consumption and hindering the integration of CAM therapies into mainstream medicine; including: weak infrastructure, poor regulation, ineffective policies and politics, weak CAM awareness and sub-optimal coordination and cooperation among stakeholders. With respect to policy instruments, voluntary instruments (self regulation) were deemed ineffective by stakeholders due to poor awareness of both users and providers on safe use of CAM products. Stakeholders' rather recommended the adoption of a combination of mixed (enhancing public awareness and integration of CAM into medical and nursing curricula) and compulsory (stricter governmental regulation) policy instruments for the regulation of the market for CAM products. Conclusions The current status quo with

  19. Emerging issues in complementary feeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Kim F.; Grummer-Strawn, Laurence; Bégin, France

    2017-01-01

    the complementary feeding period is summarized. The increased availability of sugar-containing beverages and unhealthy snack foods and its negative effect on young child's diet is described. Negative effects of nonresponsive feeding and force feeding are also discussed, although few scientific studies have...

  20. Characterising flow regime and interrelation between surface-water and ground-water in the Fuente de Piedra salt lake basin by means of stable isotopes, hydrogeochemical and hydraulic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohfahl, Claus; Rodriguez, Miguel; Fenk, Cord; Menz, Christian; Benavente, Jose; Hubberten, Hans; Meyer, Hanno; Paul, Liisa; Knappe, Andrea; López-Geta, Juan Antonio; Pekdeger, Asaf

    2008-03-01

    SummaryThis research reports the characterisation of ground- and surface-water interaction in the Fuente de Piedra Salt lake basin in southern Spain by a combined approach using hydraulic, hydrogeochemical and stable isotope data. During three sampling campaigns (February 2004, 2005 and October 2005) ground- and surface-water samples were collected for stable isotope studies ( 18O, D) and for major and minor ion analysis. Hydraulic measurements at multilevel piezometers were carried out at four different locations around the lake edge. Conductivity logs were performed at four piezometers located along a profile at the northern lake border and at two deeper piezometers in the Miocene basin at a greater distance from the lake. To describe processes that control the brine evolution different hydrogeochemical simulations were performed. Hydrogeochemical data show a variety of brines related to thickness variations of lacustrine evaporites around the lake. Salinity profiles in combination with stable isotope and hydraulic data indicate the existence of convection cells and recycled brines. Furthermore restricted ground-water inflow into the lake was detected. Dedolomitisation processes were identified by hydrogeochemical simulations and different brine origins were reproduced by inverse modelling approaches.

  1. Psycho-socioeconomic factors affecting complementary and alternative medicine use among selected rural communities in Malaysia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganasegeran, Kurubaran; Rajendran, Anantha Kumar; Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman

    2014-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as a source of cure has gained much spectrum worldwide, despite skeptics and advocates of evidence-based practice conceptualized such therapies as human nostrum. This study aimed to explore the factors affecting CAM use among rural communities in Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was carried out on 288 occupants across four rural villages within the District of Selama, Perak, Malaysia. A survey that consisted of socio-economic characteristics, history of CAM use and the validated Holistic Complementary and Alternative Medicine Questionnaire (HCAMQ) were used. The prevalence of self-reported CAM use over the past one year was 53.1%. Multiple logistic regression analyses yielded three significant predictors of CAM use: monthly household income of less than MYR 2500, higher education level, and positive attitude towards CAM. Psycho-socioeconomic factors were significantly associated with CAM use among rural communities in Malaysia.

  2. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapies are often lacking; therefore, the safety and effectiveness of many CAM therapies are uncertain. The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) is sponsoring research designed to fill this ...

  3. Comprehensive studies of hydrogeochemical processes and quality status of groundwater with tools of cluster, grouping analysis, and fuzzy set method using GIS platform: a case study of Dalcheon in Ulsan City, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatramanan, S; Chung, S Y; Rajesh, R; Lee, S Y; Ramkumar, T; Prasanna, M V

    2015-08-01

    This research aimed at developing comprehensive assessments of physicochemical quality of groundwater for drinking and irrigation purposes at Dalcheon in Ulsan City, Korea. The mean concentration of major ions represented as follows: Ca (94.3 mg/L) > Mg (41.7 mg/L) > Na (19.2 mg/L) > K (3.2 mg/L) for cations and SO4 (351 mg/L) > HCO3 (169 mg/L) > Cl (19 mg/L) for anions. Thematic maps for physicochemical parameters of groundwater were prepared, classified, weighted, and integrated in GIS method with fuzzy logic. The maps exhibited that suitable zone of drinking and irrigation purpose occupied in SE, NE, and NW sectors. The undesirable zone of drinking purpose was observed in SW and central parts and that of irrigation was in the western part of the study area. This was influenced by improperly treated effluents from an abandoned iron ore mine, irrigation, and domestic fields. By grouping analysis, groundwater types were classified into Ca(HCO3)2, (Ca,Mg)Cl2, and CaCl2, and CaHCO3 was the most predominant type. Grouping analysis also showed three types of irrigation water such as C1S1, C1S2, and C1S3. C1S3 type of high salinity to low sodium hazard was the most dominant in the study area. Equilibrium processes elucidated the groundwater samples were in the saturated to undersaturated condition with respect to aragonite, calcite, dolomite, and gypsum due to precipitation and deposition processes. Cluster analysis suggested that high contents of SO4 and HCO3 with low Cl was related with water-rock interactions and along with mining impact. This study showed that the effluents discharged from mining waste was the main sources of groundwater quality deterioration.

  4. Hydrogeochemical characterization and groundwater quality assessment in intruded coastal brine aquifers (Laizhou Bay, China).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Miao, Jinjie; Hu, Bill X; Liu, Hongwei; Zhang, Hanxiong; Ma, Zhen

    2017-09-01

    The aquifer in the coastal area of the Laizhou Bay is affected by salinization processes related to intense groundwater exploitation for brine resource and for agriculture irrigation during the last three decades. As a result, the dynamic balances among freshwater, brine, and seawater have been disturbed and the quality of groundwater has deteriorated. To fully understand the groundwater chemical distribution and evolution in the regional aquifers, hydrogeochemical and isotopic studies have been conducted based on the water samples from 102 observation wells. Groundwater levels and salinities in four monitoring wells are as well measured to inspect the general groundwater flow and chemical patterns and seasonal variations. Chemical components such as Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , Sr 2+ , Cl - , SO 4 2- , HCO 3 - , NO 3 - , F - , and TDS during the same period are analyzed to explore geochemical evolution, water-rock interactions, sources of salt, nitrate, and fluoride pollution in fresh, brackish, saline, and brine waters. The decreased water levels without typical seasonal variation in the southeast of the study area confirm an over-exploitation of groundwater. The hydrogeochemical characteristics indicate fresh-saline-brine-saline transition pattern from inland to coast where evaporation is a vital factor to control the chemical evolution. The cation exchange processes are occurred at fresh-saline interfaces of mixtures along the hydraulic gradient. Meanwhile, isotopic data indicate that the brine in aquifers was either originated from older meteoric water with mineral dissolution and evaporation or repeatedly evaporation of retained seawater with fresher water recharge and mixing in geological time. Groundwater suitability for drinking is further evaluated according to water quality standard of China. Results reveal high risks of nitrate and fluoride contamination. The elevated nitrate concentration of 560 mg/L, which as high as 28 times of the standard content

  5. Hydrogeochemical evaluation for Simpevarp model version 1.2. Preliminary site description of the Simpevarp area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus

    2004-12-01

    Siting studies for SKB's programme of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste currently involves the investigation of two locations, Simpevarp and Forsmark, to determine their geological, hydrogeochemical and hydrogeological characteristics. Present work completed has resulted in Model version 1.2 which represents the second evaluation of the available Simpevarp groundwater analytical data collected up to April, 2004. The deepest fracture groundwater samples with sufficient analytical data reflected depths down to 1.7 km. Model version 1.2 focusses on geochemical and mixing processes affecting the groundwater composition in the uppermost part of the bedrock, down to repository levels, and eventually extending to 1000 m depth. The groundwater flow regimes at Laxemar/Simpevarp are considered local and extend down to depths of around 600-1000 m depending on local topography. The marked differences in the groundwater flow regimes between Laxemar and Simpevarp are reflected in the groundwater chemistry where four major hydrochemical groups of groundwaters (types A-D) have been identified: TYPE A: This type comprises dilute groundwaters ( 3 type present at shallow ( 300 m) levels at Simpevarp, and at even greater depths (approx. 1200 m) at Laxemar. At Simpevarp the groundwaters are mainly Na-Ca-Cl with increasingly enhanced Br and SO 4 with depth. At Laxemar they are mainly Ca-Na-Cl also with increasing enhancements of Br and SO 4 with depth. Main reactions involve ion exchange (Ca). At both sites a glacial component and a deep saline component are present. At Simpevarp the saline component may be potentially non marine and/or non-marine/old Littorina marine in origin; at Laxemar it is more likely to be non-marine in origin. TYPE D: This type comprises reducing highly saline groundwaters (> 20 000 mg/L Cl; to a maximum of ∼70 g/L TDS) and only has been identified at Laxemar at depths exceeding 1200 m. It is mainly Ca-Na-Cl with higher Br but lower SO 4 compared

  6. Application of factor analysis in identification of dominant hydrogeochemical processes of some nitrogenous groundwater of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojković Jana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multivariate statistical analyses are used for reducing large datasets to a smaller number of variables, which explain main hydrogeochemical processes that control water geochemistry. Factor analysis (FA allows discovering intercorrelations inside the data matrix and grouping of similar variables, i.e. chemical parameters. In this way new variables are extracted, which are called factors, and each factor is explained by some hydrogeochemical process. Applying FA to a dataset that consists of 15 chemical parameters measured on 40 groundwater samples from Serbia, four factors were extracted, which explain 73.9% of total variance in the analyzed dataset. Interpretation of obtained factors indicated several hydrogeochemical processes: the impact of sea water intrusions and volatiles in previous geological periods, solutes diffusion from the marine clay, cation exchange and dissolution of carbonate and silicate minerals. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 43004

  7. Complementary studies of lipid membrane dynamics using iSCAT and super-resolved fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, Francesco; Galiani, Silvia; Shrestha, Dilip; Sezgin, Erdinc; de Wit, Gabrielle; Cole, Daniel; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Kukura, Philipp; Eggeling, Christian

    2018-06-01

    Observation techniques with high spatial and temporal resolution, such as single-particle tracking based on interferometric scattering (iSCAT) microscopy, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy applied on a super-resolution STED microscope (STED-FCS), have revealed new insights of the molecular organization of membranes. While delivering complementary information, there are still distinct differences between these techniques, most prominently the use of fluorescent dye tagged probes for STED-FCS and a need for larger scattering gold nanoparticle tags for iSCAT. In this work, we have used lipid analogues tagged with a hybrid fluorescent tag–gold nanoparticle construct, to directly compare the results from STED-FCS and iSCAT measurements of phospholipid diffusion on a homogeneous supported lipid bilayer (SLB). These comparative measurements showed that while the mode of diffusion remained free, at least at the spatial (>40 nm) and temporal (50  ⩽  t  ⩽  100 ms) scales probed, the diffussion coefficient was reduced by 20- to 60-fold when tagging with 20 and 40 nm large gold particles as compared to when using dye tagged lipid analogues. These FCS measurements of hybrid fluorescent tag–gold nanoparticle labeled lipids also revealed that commercially supplied streptavidin-coated gold nanoparticles contain large quantities of free streptavidin. Finally, the values of apparent diffusion coefficients obtained by STED-FCS and iSCAT differed by a factor of 2–3 across the techniques, while relative differences in mobility between different species of lipid analogues considered were identical in both approaches. In conclusion, our experiments reveal that large and potentially cross-linking scattering tags introduce a significant slow-down in diffusion on SLBs but no additional bias, and our labeling approach creates a new way of exploiting complementary information from STED-FCS and iSCAT measurements.

  8. Complementary Coffee Cups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banchoff, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    What may have been the birth of a new calculus problem took place when the author noticed that two coffee cups, one convex and one concave, fit nicely together, and he wondered which held more coffee. The fact that their volumes were about equal led to the topic of this article: complementary surfaces of revolution with equal volumes.

  9. Complementary and Integrative Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: • Acupressure and acupuncture • Aromatherapy • Art therapy and music therapy • Chiropractic medicine and massage • Guided imagery • Meditation and ... should I avoid? • Is this complementary therapy (name therapy) safe? Is there research showing it is safe? • Are there side effects ...

  10. Hydrogeochemical radioactive features and prospecting in granopegmatite type uranium ore district in Danfeng area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Zhangsheng

    2011-01-01

    Hydrochemical radioactive prospecting plays an important role in the all stages of grano-pegmatite type uranium deposit exploration in Danfeng area dut to its fast, simple, economic and high effective advantage. Radioactive anomalous halo in the shallow underground water has identical distribution scopes with the ore-bearing biotite granite-pegmatite, which can be used to delineate uranium ore-forming prospective area, reconnaissance area and detailed prospecting area. Deep underground water close to the ore is characterized by hydrogeochemical radioactive features with high uranium and radon content. Through prospecting engineering of radioactive hydrogeochemical, the situation of blind ore bodies can be used to guide the layout. (authors)

  11. Hydrogeochemical investigation of groundwater in shallow coastal aquifer of Khulna District, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, S. M. Didar-Ul; Bhuiyan, Mohammad Amir Hossain; Rume, Tanjena; Azam, Gausul

    2017-12-01

    Groundwater acts as a lifeline in the coastal regions to meet out the domestic, drinking, irrigational and industrial needs. To investigate the hydrogeochemical characteristics of groundwater and its suitability, twenty samples were collected from the shallow tubewells of study area having screen depth 21-54 m. The water quality assessment has been carried out by evaluating the physicochemical parameters such as temperature, pH, EC, TDS and major ions i.e., Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cl-, SO4 2-, NO3 -, HCO3 -. Results found that, the water is slightly alkaline and brackish in nature. The trends of cations and anions are Na+ > Ca2+ > Mg2+ > K+ and Cl- > HCO3 - > SO4 2- > NO3 -, respectively and Na-Cl-HCO3 is the dominant groundwater type. The analyzed samples were also characterized with different indices, diagram and permissible limit i.e., electric conductivity (EC), total dissolved solids (TDS), chloride content (Cl), soluble sodium percentage (SSP), sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), residual sodium carbonate (RSC), magnesium adsorption ratio (MAR), Kelley's ratio (KR), Wilcox diagram and USSL diagram, and results showed that groundwater are not suitable for drinking and irrigational use. The factors responsible for the geochemical characterization were also attempted by using standard plot and it was found that mixing of seawater with entrapped water plays a significant role in the study area.

  12. Discovering complementary colors from the perspective of steam education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabey, Burak; Yigit Koyunkaya, Melike; Enginoglu, Turan; Yurumezoglu, Kemal

    2018-05-01

    This study explored the theory and applications of complementary colors using a technology-based activity designed from the perspective of STEAM education. Complementary colors and their areas of use were examined from the perspective of physics, mathematics and art, respectively. The study, which benefits from technology, makes the theory of complementary colors accessible to all through practical applications and provides a multidisciplinary, integrated and innovative technique of teaching the subject of colors, which could be used to teach complementary colors.

  13. Baby-Led Introduction to SolidS (BLISS) study: a randomised controlled trial of a baby-led approach to complementary feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Lisa; Heath, Anne-Louise M; Williams, Sheila M; Cameron, Sonya L; Fleming, Elizabeth A; Taylor, Barry J; Wheeler, Ben J; Gibson, Rosalind S; Taylor, Rachael W

    2015-11-12

    In 2002, the World Health Organization recommended that the age for starting complementary feeding should be changed from 4 to 6 months of age to 6 months. Although this change in age has generated substantial debate, surprisingly little attention has been paid to whether advice on how to introduce complementary foods should also be changed. It has been proposed that by 6 months of age most infants will have developed sufficient motor skills to be able to feed themselves rather than needing to be spoon-fed by an adult. This has the potential to predispose infants to better growth by fostering better energy self-regulation, however no randomised controlled trials have been conducted to determine the benefits and risks of such a "baby-led" approach to complementary feeding. This is of particular interest given the widespread use of "Baby-Led Weaning" by parents internationally. The Baby-Led Introduction to SolidS (BLISS) study aims to assess the efficacy and acceptability of a modified version of Baby-Led Weaning that has been altered to address potential concerns with iron status, choking and growth faltering. The BLISS study will recruit 200 families from Dunedin, New Zealand, who book into the region's only maternity hospital. Parents will be randomised into an intervention (BLISS) or control group for a 12-month intervention with further follow-up at 24 months of age. Both groups will receive the standard Well Child care provided to all parents in New Zealand. The intervention group will receive additional parent contacts (n = 8) for support and education on BLISS from before birth to 12 months of age. Outcomes of interest include body mass index at 12 months of age (primary outcome), energy self-regulation, iron and zinc intake and status, diet quality, choking, growth faltering and acceptability to parents. This study is expected to provide insight into the feasibility of a baby-led approach to complementary feeding and the extent to which this method of

  14. Association between use of self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine and menopause-related symptoms: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wenbo; Sibbritt, David W; Hickman, Louise; Adams, Jon

    2015-10-01

    To examine the association between self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine use and menopause-related symptoms, stratified by menopausal status. Data were obtained from a cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of 10,011 menopausal women from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, conducted in 2010. Multivariable logistic regression models were applied to identify if the use of selected self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine was significantly associated with a range of menopause-related symptoms. Vitamins/minerals were more likely to be used by natural menopausal women experiencing anxiety (adjusted OR=1.20) and/or stiff/painful joints (adjusted OR=1.16). Yoga/meditation was more likely to be used by women with hysterectomy (adjusted OR=1.76) or natural menopausal women (adjusted OR=1.38) experiencing anxiety. Herbal medicines were more likely to be used by natural menopausal women experiencing anxiety (adjusted OR=1.22), tiredness (adjusted OR=1.20), and/or stiff/painful joints (adjusted OR=1.17), and by women with oophorectomy experiencing tiredness (adjusted OR=1.45). Aromatherapy oils were more likely to be used by natural menopausal women experiencing night sweats (adjusted OR=1.25) and by women with hysterectomy experiencing anxiety (adjusted OR=2.02). Chinese medicines were more likely to be used by women with oophorectomy experiencing stiff/painful joints (adjusted OR=4.06) and/or palpitations (adjusted OR=3.06). Our study will help improve the patient-provider communication regarding complementary and alternative medicine use for menopause, and we conclude that menopausal status should be taken into account by providers for menopause care. The women's experience and motivations of such use warrant further research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of isotopic and hydro-geochemical methods in identifying sources of mine inrushing water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dou Huiping; Ma Zhiyuan; Cao Haidong; Liu Feng; Hu Weiwei; Li Ting

    2011-01-01

    Isotopic and hydro-geochemical surveys were carried out to identify the source of mine inrushing water at the #73003 face in the Laohutai Mine.Based on the analysis of isotopes and hydro-chemical features of surface water,groundwater from different levels and the inrushing water,a special relationship between water at the #73003 face and cretaceous water has been found.The results show that the isotopic and hydro-chemical features of the inrushing water are completely different from those of other groundwater bodies,except for the cretaceous water.The isotopic and hydrochemical characteristics of cretaceous water are similar to the inrushing water of the #73003 face,which aided with obtaining the evidence for the possible source of the inrushing water at the #73003 face.The isotope calculations show that the inrushing water at the #73003 face is a mixture of cretaceous water and Quaternary water,water from the cretaceous conglomerate is the main source,accounting for 67% of the inrushing water,while the Quaternary water accounts for 33%.The conclusion is also supported by a study of inrushing-water channels and an active fault near the inrushing-water plot on the #73003 face.

  16. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program: the Hydrogeochemical Stream Sediment Reconnaissance Program at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, G.H.

    1980-08-01

    From early 1975 to mid 1979, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) participated in the Hydrogeochemical Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR), part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Laboratory was initially responsible for collecting, analyzing, and evaluating sediment and water samples from approximately 200,000 sites in seven western states. Eventually, however, the NURE program redefined its sampling priorities, objectives, schedules, and budgets, with the increasingly obvious result that LLNL objectives and methodologies were not compatible with those of the NURE program office, and the LLNL geochemical studies were not relevant to the program goal. The LLNL portion of the HSSR program was consequently terminated, and all work was suspended by June 1979. Of the 38,000 sites sampled, 30,000 were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analyses (INAA), delayed neutron counting (DNC), optical emission spectroscopy (OES), and automated chloride-sulfate analyses (SC). Data from about 13,000 sites have been formally reported. From each site, analyses were published of about 30 of the 60 elements observed. Uranium mineralization has been identified at several places which were previously not recognized as potential uranium source areas, and a number of other geochemical anomalies were discovered

  17. Hydrogeochemical assessment of mine-impacted water and sediment of iron ore mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur Atirah Affandi, Fatin; Kusin, Faradiella Mohd; Aqilah Sulong, Nur; Madzin, Zafira

    2018-04-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the hydrogeochemical behaviour of mine-impacted water and sediment of a former iron ore mining area. Sampling of mine water and sediment were carried out at selected locations within the mine including the former mining ponds, mine tailings and the nearby stream. The water samples were analysed for their hydrochemical facies, major and trace elements including heavy metals. The water in the mining ponds and the mine tailings was characterised as highly acidic (pH 2.54-3.07), but has near-neutral pH in the nearby stream. Results indicated that Fe and Mn in water have exceeded the recommended guidelines values and was also supported by the results of geochemical modelling. The results also indicated that sediments in the mining area were contaminated with Cd and As as shown by the potential ecological risk index values. The total risk index of heavy metals in the sediment were ranked in the order of Cd>As>Pb>Cu>Zn>Cr. Overall, the extent of potential ecological risks of the mining area were categorised as having low to moderate ecological risk.

  18. Groundwater Mixing Process Identification in Deep Mines Based on Hydrogeochemical Property Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Karst collapse columns, as a potential water passageway for mine water inrush, are always considered a critical problem for the development of deep mining techniques. This study aims to identify the mixing process of groundwater deriving two different limestone karst-fissure aquifer systems. Based on analysis of mining groundwater hydrogeochemical properties, hydraulic connection between the karst-fissure objective aquifer systems was revealed. In this paper, piper diagram was used to calculate the mixing ratios at different sampling points in the aquifer systems, and PHREEQC Interactive model (Version 2.5, USGS, Reston, VA, USA, 2001 was applied to modify the mixing ratios and model the water–rock interactions during the mixing processes. The analysis results show that the highest mixing ratio is 0.905 in the C12 borehole that is located nearest to the #2 karst collapse column, and the mixing ratio decreases with the increase of the distance from the #2 karst collapse column. It demonstrated that groundwater of the two aquifers mixed through the passage of #2 karst collapse column. As a result, the proposed Piper-PHREEQC based method can provide accurate identification of karst collapse columns’ water conductivity, and can be applied to practical applications.

  19. Dissemination and implementation of an educational tool for veterans on complementary and alternative medicine: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Rachel Forster; Santos, Susan; Marki, Michelle; Helmer, Drew

    2016-09-02

    We developed and disseminated an educational DVD to introduce U.S. Veterans to independently-practiced complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) techniques and encourage CAM experimentation. The project's goal was to determine optimal dissemination methods to facilitate implementation within the Veteran's Health Administration. In the first phase, the DVD was disseminated using four methods: passive, provider-mediated, active, and peer-mediated. In the second, implementation phase, "champion" providers who supported CAM integrated dissemination into clinical practice. Qualitative data came from Veteran focus groups and semi-structured provider interviews. Data from both phases was triangulated to identify common themes. Effective dissemination requires engaging patients. Providers who most successfully integrated the DVD into practice already had CAM knowledge, and worked in settings where CAM was accepted clinical practice, or with leadership or infrastructure that supported a culture of CAM use. Institutional buy-in allowed for provider networking and effective implementation of the tool. Providers were given autonomy to determine the most appropriate dissemination strategies, which increased enthusiasm and use. Many of the lessons learned from this project can be applied to dissemination of any new educational tool within a healthcare setting. Results reiterate the importance of utilizing best practices for introducing educational tools within the healthcare context and the need for thoughtful, multi-faceted dissemination strategies.

  20. Study of microstress state of P91 steel using complementary mechanical Barkhausen, magnetoacoustic emission, and X-ray diffraction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustyniak, Bolesław, E-mail: bolek@mif.pg.gda.pl; Piotrowski, Leszek; Maciakowski, Paweł; Chmielewski, Marek [Faculty of Applied Physics and Mathematics, Gdansk University of Technology, 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Lech-Grega, Marzena; Żelechowski, Janusz [The Institute of Non-Ferrous Metals, 32-050 Skawina (Poland)

    2014-05-07

    The paper deals with assessment of microstress state of martensite P91 steel using three complementary techniques: mechanical Barkhausen emission, magnetoacoustic emission (MAE), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) profile analysis. Magnetic coercivity Hc and microstructure were investigated with inductive magnetometry and magnetic force microscopy (MFM), respectively. Internal stress level of P91 steel was modified by heat treatment. Steel samples were austenitized, quenched, and then tempered at three temperatures (720 °C, 750 °C, and 780 °C) during increasing time (from 15 min up to 240 min). The microstrain level ε{sub i} was evaluated using Williamson–Hall method. It was revealed that during tempering microstrain systematically decreases from ε{sub i} = 2.5 × 10{sup −3} for as quenched state down to ε{sub i} = 0.3 × 10{sup −3} for well tempered samples. Both mechanical hardness (Vicker's HV) and magnetic hardness (coercivity) decrease almost linearly with decreasing microstrain while the MAE and MBE intensities strongly increase. Tempering leads to evident shift of the MeBN intensity maximum recorded for the first load towards lower applied strain values and to increase of MAE intensity. This indicates that the microstress state deduced by magnetic techniques is correlated with microstrains evaluated with XRD technique.

  1. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These observations could be explained by some qualitative and /or quantitative differences observed between the constituents of the two essential oils studied. Keywords: Cymbopogon nardus, Essential oil, Chemistry, Analgesic, Comparison, Benin, Congo. African Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine Vol.

  2. Complementary feeding practices and nutritional status of children 6 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Inappropriate complementary feeding practices among children aged 6-23 months is major cause of under nutrition. There is scarce information on the relationship between complementary feeding practices and nutritional status. This study aimed to determine the factors contributing to the complementary ...

  3. Collection and preparation of water samples for hydrogeochemical reconnaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baucom, E.I.; Ferguson, R.B.; Wallace, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A method based on ion exchange and neutron activation analysis (NAA) was developed and field-tested to determine uranium over the range 0.02 to 10,000 ppb in natural water using a single procedure. Water samples are filtered in the field using a specially-designed one-liter filter apparatus pressurized to 40 psig with an inert gas. The filtered water is treated with a high purity, mixed cation-anion resin in the hydronium-hydroxide form. All ions are removed from solution under the strong driving force of the neutralization reaction. Anionic, cationic, and natural complexes of uranium can be concentrated with this method. Field tests showed greater than 95 percent recovery of 13 elements analyzed (including greater than 99 percent recovery of uranium) and greater than or equal to 90 percent recovery of 4 other elements. Uranium collected on the resin was quantitatively determined by NAA. Coefficient of variation for sampling plus analysis was less than 20 percent for samples containing more than 0.1 ppb uranium. Advantages of this method include: (1) wide dynamic range, (2) low detection limit for uranium (0.02 ppb), (3) high precision and accuracy, (4) relatively low cost, (5) high-yield recovery from low-level aqueous samples without risk of loss to containers, (6) decreased risk of significant sample contamination compared with other low-level methods, (7) production of stable samples suitable for retrievable storage, and(8) concentration of other ions that can be determined by NAA. This paper presents (1) background regarding development of procedures for sample collection and preparation, (2) results of development programs, (3) description of equipment and field procedures, and (4) preliminary conclusions regarding use of this technology for hydrogeochemical reconnaissance for uranium

  4. Savannah River Laboratory semiannual report, April-September 1979. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance: National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-10-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments, status, and program of the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) contribution to the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. SRL has accepted responsibility for Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of 1,500,000 square miles in 30 eastern and 7 far-western states. The report is a progress report covering the period April 1979 through September 1979. SRL efforts in the following areas are discussed: reconnaissance and detailed studies in geological programs; management, analysis, and interpretation of analytical and field data; reporting of HSSR results; sample preparation methods; and neutron activation analysis and other analytical techniques. Appendix A to the report summarizes the SRL-NURE production of the April 1979-September 1979 period and the program plans for the first half of FY-1980. Page-scale maps are included that show the status of completed sampling, analysis, and data reports placed on open file

  5. Traditional, complementary and alternative medicine use by HIV patients a decade after public sector antiretroviral therapy roll out in South Africa: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nlooto, Manimbulu; Naidoo, Panjasaram

    2016-05-17

    The roll out of antiretroviral therapy in the South African public health sector in 2004 was preceded by the politicisation of HIV-infection which was used to promote traditional medicine for the management of HIV/AIDS. One decade has passed since; however, questions remain on the extent of the use of traditional, complementary and alternative medicine (TCAM) by HIV-infected patients. This study therefore aimed at investigating the prevalence of the use of African traditional medicine (ATM), complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) by adult patients in the eThekwini and UThukela Health Districts, South Africa. A cross- sectional study was carried out at 8 public health sector antiretroviral clinics using interviewer-administered semi-structured questionnaires. These were completed from April to October 2014 by adult patients who had been on antiretroviral therapy (ART) for at least three months. Use of TCAM by patients was analysed by descriptive statistics using frequency and percentages with standard error. Where the associated relative error was equal or greater to 0.50, the percentage was rejected as unstable. A p-value public health sector, the use of TCAM is still prevalent amongst a small percentage of HIV infected patients attending public healthcare sector antiretroviral clinics. Further research is needed to explore reasons for use and health benefits or risks experienced by the minority that uses both conventional antiretroviral therapy with TCAM.

  6. PIXE and PGAA - Complementary methods for studies on ancient glass artefacts (from Byzantine, late medieval to modern Murano glass)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Bogdan; Cristea-Stan, Daniela; Szőkefalvi-Nagy, Zoltán; Kovács, Imre; Harsányi, Ildikó; Kasztovszky, Zsolt

    2018-02-01

    Combined external milli-beam Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis (PGAA) analysis was applied to characterize the composition of paste and colorants from some fragments of Byzantine bracelets (10th-12th Centuries AD), late medieval (17th-18th Centuries AD) and modern Murano glass pieces. As fluxes, PGAA revealed the samples are soda-lime glass, except four samples - two medieval vessel white shards and two dark Byzantine fragments of bracelets - which have potash flux. Aluminium was detected in various proportions in all samples indicating different sources for the added sand. The presence of Magnesium is relevant only in one bracelet fragment suggesting the use of plant (wood?) ash and confirming that the Byzantine bracelet is manufactured from the mixture of both types of glass (natron and plant ash based). PGAA also indicated the presence of low quantities of Cadmium, high level of Arsenic and Lead (possibly lead arsenate) in one medieval sample and of ZnO in Murano glass, and of CoO traces (maximum 0.1%) in all blue-colored Byzantine, late medieval to modern Murano glass artefacts. PIXE confirmed the use of small quantities of CoO for blue color, indicated Manganese combined with Iron for dark glass, Copper for green, Lead, Tin and an Arsenic compound (orpiment?) for yellow and in the case of modern Murano glass Selenium and Cadmium to obtain a reddish color. Despite PIXE - PIGE combination is probably the best one for glass analysis, our external milli-PIXE - PGAA methods proved to be adequate complementary tools to determine many chemical elements from glass composition - Si, Na, K, Ca, Al, Mg, various metallic oxides.

  7. The use of complementary and alternative medicine in chronic pain patients in Singapore: a single-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Michelle G E; Win, Ma Thin; Khan, Shariq Ali

    2013-03-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in Singapore for a variety of conditions has been reported to be high. However in Asian chronic pain patients, there is no data on their use of CAM and its perceived benefits. A cross-sectional survey of 210 patients was carried out in Pain Management Centre. Patients were interviewed directly on their use of CAM. The outcomes were prevalence of CAM use, the types of CAM used, the perceived efficacy and factors influencing its use. The prevalence of CAM users in chronic pain is 84%. The most common class of CAM is traditional Chinese medicine (68%) the subset of which, acupuncture, was most frequently utilised (49% of patients using CAM). In univariate analyses, ethnicity was significantly linked to CAM use but not gender, age, education level and income (P = 0.027). Specifically for neck pain, it was significant that patients were more likely to see a chiropractor, to use massage, to take take vitamins and ginseng to alleviate their symptoms. With upper limb pain, it was the use of Tui na, massage and seeing a TCM practitioner. For abdominal pain, it was the use of herbal medicines. The majority felt that CAM helped with their pain (72%) although less expressed satisfaction with CAM (64%). Reasons for using CAM included: having more control over their pain; fewer side effects; safety and lower costs compared to conventional medicine. The use of CAM in chronic pain patients is higher than the general population. Most felt that it improved their pain. As part of multimodal therapy, CAM may have a role in the management of chronic pain.

  8. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Red Creek quartzite special study area, Vernal NTMS Quadrangle, Utah/Colorado, including concentrations of forty-six additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, S.; George, W.E.; Apel, C.T.; Hansel, J.M.; Fuka, M.A.; Bunker, M.E.; Hanks, D.

    1981-04-01

    Totals of 22 water and 140 sediment samples were collected from 148 locations in the study area. The study area, in the north-central portion of the Vernal NTMS quadrangle, is covered by four 7-1/2' topographic maps: Dutch John, Goslin Mountain, and Clav Basin, Utah; and Willow Creek Butte, Utah/Colorado. Additional HSSR data are available for the entire Vernal quadrangle (Purson, 1980). All field and analytical data are presented in Appendix I. Figure 1 is an index and sample location map that can be used in conjunction with the 1:250,000-scale topographic map of the Vernal quadrangle (USGS, 1954). Standarized field, analytical, and data base management procedures were followed in all phases of the study. These procedures are described briefly in Appendix II-A and in reports by Sharp (1977), Hues et al (1977), Sharp and Aamodt (1978), Cheadle (1977), and Kosiewicz (1979). The data presented in Appendix I are available on magnetic tape from GJOIS Project, Union Carbide Corporation (UCC-ND), Computer Applications Department, 4500 North Building, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box X, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830. Because this is simply a data release, intended to make the data available to the DOE and the public as quickly as possible, no discussion of the geology of the region, uranium occurrences, or data evaluation is included

  9. A fission track technique used for hydrogeochemical prospecting in Northern India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, N.P.; Singh, S.; Virk, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    A fission track technique is employed to determine the uranium content of water samples collected from different locations of the middle and outer Himalayas. The regional threshold for the uranium content is determined for water samples of different areas. The identification of anomalies in an area of uranium mineralization confirmed that the hydrogeochemical technique could successfully be used for uranium exploration. (author)

  10. Fibromyalgia and Complementary Health Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Web site . What the Science Says About Complementary Health Approaches for Fibromyalgia Mind ... Complementary and alternative medical therapies in fibromyalgia . Current Pharmaceutical Design . 2006;12(1):47–57. Sherman KJ, ...

  11. Yoga as a complementary treatment for smoking cessation: rationale, study design and participant characteristics of the Quitting-in-Balance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennings Ernestine

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tobacco smoking remains the leading preventable cause of death among American women. Exercise has shown promise as an aid to smoking cessation because it reduces weight gain and weight concerns, improves affect, and reduces nicotine withdrawal symptoms and cigarette craving. Studies have shown that the practice of yoga improves weight control, and reduces perceived stress and negative affect. Yoga practice also includes regulation of breathing and focused attention, both of which may enhance stress reduction and improve mood and well-being and may improve cessation outcomes. Methods/Design This pilot efficacy study is designed to examine the rates of cessation among women randomized to either a novel, 8-week Yoga plus Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT smoking cessation intervention versus a Wellness program plus the same CBT smoking cessation intervention. Outcome measures include 7-day point prevalence abstinence at end of treatment, 3 and 6 months follow up and potential mediating variables (e.g., confidence in quitting smoking, self-efficacy. Other assessments include measures of mindfulness, spirituality, depressive symptoms, anxiety and perceived health (SF-36. Discussion Innovative treatments are needed that address barriers to successful smoking cessation among men and women. The design chosen for this study will allow us to explore potential mediators of intervention efficacy so that we may better understand the mechanism(s by which yoga may act as an effective complementary treatment for smoking cessation. If shown to be effective, yoga can offer an alternative to traditional exercise for reducing negative symptoms that often accompany smoking cessation and predict relapse to smoking among recent quitters. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials NCT00492310

  12. Identifying and assessing human activity impacts on groundwater quality through hydrogeochemical anomalies and NO3-, NH4+, and COD contamination: a case study of the Liujiang River Basin, Hebei Province, P.R. China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cong; He, Jiang-Tao; Wang, Man-Li; Zhang, Zhen-Guo; Wang, Lei

    2018-02-01

    In the face of rapid economic development and increasing human activity, the deterioration of groundwater quality has seriously affected the safety of the groundwater supply in eastern China. Identifying and assessing the impact of human activities is key to finding solutions to this problem. This study is an effort to scientifically and systematically identify and assess the influence of human activities on groundwater based on irregularities in hydrochemical properties and water contamination, which are considered to directly result from anthropogenic activity. The combination of the hydrochemical anomaly identification (HAI) and the contaminant identification (CI) was proposed to identify the influence of human activities on groundwater quality. And the degree of abnormality was quantified by the background threshold value. The principal component analysis (PCA) and land use map were used to verify the reliability of the identification result. The final result show that the strong influence areas mainly distributed in the south of the basin and the affected indicators contained the major elements and NO 3 - , NH 4 + , COD. Impacts from anthropogenic activities can be divided into two types: mine drainage that disrupts natural water-rock interaction processes, agricultural cultivation, and sewage emissions that contribute to nitrate pollution.

  13. The use of complementary and alternative medicines among patients with locally advanced breast cancer – a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakovitch Eileen

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use is common among cancer patients. This paper reviews the use of CAM in a series of patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC. Methods Women with LABC attending a specialist clinic at a single Canadian cancer centre were identified and approached. Participants completed a self-administered survey regarding CAM usage, beliefs associated with CAM usage, views of their risks of developing recurrent cancer and of dying of breast cancer. Responses were scored and compared between CAM users and non-users. Results Thirty-six patients were approached, 32 completed the questionnaire (response rate 89%. Forty-seven percent of LABC patients were identified as CAM users. CAM users were more likely to be younger, married, in a higher socioeconomic class and of Asian ethnicity than non-users. CAM users were likely to use multiple modalities simultaneously (median 4 with vitamins being the most popular (60%. Motivation for CAM therapy was described as, "assisting their body to heal" (75%, to 'boost the immune system' (56% and to "give a feeling of control with respect to their treatment" (56%. CAM therapy was used concurrently with conventional treatment in 88% of cases, however, 12% of patients felt that CAM could replace their conventional therapy. Psychological evaluation suggests CAM users perceived their risk of dying of breast cancer was similar to that of the non-Cam group (33% vs. 35%, however the CAM group had less severe anxiety and depression. Conclusion The motivation, objectives and benefits of CAM therapy in a selected population of women with LABC are similar to those reported for women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer. CAM users display less anxiety and depression and are less likely to believe they will die of their breast cancer. However the actual benefit to overall and disease free survival has yet to be demonstrated, as well as the possible interactions with

  14. Hydro-geochemical paths of multi-layer groundwater system in coal mining regions - Using multivariate statistics and geochemical modeling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pu; Hoth, Nils; Drebenstedt, Carsten; Sun, Yajun; Xu, Zhimin

    2017-12-01

    Groundwater is an important drinking water resource that requires protection in North China. Coal mining industry in the area may influence the water quality evolution. To provide primary characterization of the hydrogeochemical processes and paths that control the water quality evolution, a complex multi-layer groundwater system in a coal mining area is investigated. Multivariate statistical methods involving hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) are applied, 6 zones and 3 new principal components are classified as major reaction zones and reaction factors. By integrating HCA and PCA with hydrogeochemical correlations analysis, potential phases, reactions and connections between various zones are presented. Carbonates minerals, gypsum, clay minerals as well as atmosphere gases - CO 2 , H 2 O and NH 3 are recognized as major reactants. Mixtures, evaporation, dissolution/precipitation of minerals and cation exchange are potential reactions. Inverse modeling is finally used, and it verifies the detailed processes and diverse paths. Consequently, 4 major paths are found controlling the variations of groundwater chemical properties. Shallow and deep groundwater is connected primarily by the flow of deep groundwater up through fractures and faults into the shallow aquifers. Mining does not impact the underlying aquifers that represent the most critical groundwater resource. But controls should be taken to block the mixing processes from highly polluted mine water. The paper highlights the complex hydrogeochemical evolution of a multi-layer groundwater system under mining impact, which could be applied to further groundwater quality management in the study area, as well as most of the other coalfields in North China. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hydrogeochemical and Isotopic Study of Groundwaters from the Gañuelas-Mazarrón Tertiary Basin (Murcia, Spain); Estudio Hidrogeoquímico e Isotópico de las Aguas de la Cuenca Terciaria de Gañuelas-Mazarrón (Murcia, España)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigo-Naharro, J.; Delgado, A.; Clemente-Jul, C.; Pérez del Villar, L.

    2015-07-01

    The hydrogeochemical characterisation of groundwaters from the Gañuelas-Mazarrón Tertiary Basin included: i) to establish the different hydrofacies present in the basin; ii) to perform a cluster analysis in order to reduce the water samples, grouping them according to their physicochemical characteristics; and iii) to determine the most relevant ion ratios for understanding the water/ rock interaction processes that regulate the main features and evolution of groundwaters. It has also been discussed the origin and concentration of the minor and trace elements to evaluate the capability of groundwaters to transport heavy elements, toxic or innocuous, towards the surface, thus determining their suitability for human consumption. Besides, the hydrogeochemical modeling has allowed determining the degree of groundwaters saturation with respect to the most representative mineral phases of the aquifers, which, in turn, it has been used to calculate their theoretical temperature in depth. The isotopic characterisation of groundwaters has included the isotopic signatures of the stable (δ18O, δ2H, δ13C-DIC, δ34S(SO4 2-) and δ18O(SO4 2-)) and radioactive (238U, 234U and 226Ra) isotopes. The first have been used to distinguish the groundwaters origin, as well as the origin of the dissolved C and SO4 2-. The radioactive isotopes have been used to determine the water/rock interaction processes involving 238U radioactive series, as well as to explain the origin of the dissolved 222Rn in groundwaters. The most important hydrogeochemical results obtained from groundwaters are: i) a large variety of hydrofacies is represented in them, corroborated by the cluster analysis; ii) they are not suitable for human consumption; iii) they have remained, apparently, over-saturated with respect to calcite and aragonite, and under-saturated with respect to gypsum, anhydrite and halite, over time; iv) they present theoretical temperatures in depth much higher than in the surface; v) they

  16. hydrogeochemical hydrogeochemical and biophysical

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    8'830”N were collected for biological and physiochemical analysis in order to collected for biological ..... leachate from the major dumpsite couple with the effluent and ... [3] Asuen, G.O. Ihenye, A.E and Ugboyibo U.J. The Level of Heavy Metal ...

  17. Hydrogeochemical investigation of six geothermal sites in Honduras, Central America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, F.E.; Truesdell, A.H.; Grigsby, C.O.; Janik, C.J.; Shevenell, L.A.; Paredes, J.R.; Gutierrez, J.W.; Trujillo, Jr.; Counce, D.A.

    1987-06-01

    We conducted detailed hydrogeochemical investigations at six geothermal sites in western Honduras: Azacualpa, El Olivar, Pavana, Platanares, Sambo Creek, and San Ignacio. None of the sites is associated with Quaternary silicic volcanism, although El Olivar lies adjacent to a small Quaternary basalt field and Pavana is part of a belt of hot spring activity parallel to and 35 km east of the Central American volcanic arc. None of the sites contains acid-sulfate waters indicative of vapor-dominated conditions. Thermal fluids are characterized by pH between 7 and 10, Cl<125 mg/l, HCO/sub 3/>Cl, SO/sub 4/greater than or equal toCl, Bless than or equal to17 mg/l, Liless than or equal to4 mg/l, and Asless than or equal to1.25 mg/l. Stable isotope analyses of the water show that recharge to the geothermal systems generally occurs from areas of higher elevation adjacent to the sites. Tritium contents of apparently undiluted thermal fluids range from 0 to 0.4 T.U., indicating residence times of fluids in the systems of more than 500 y. Various geochemical indicators show that mixing of hot and cold end-member fluids occurs in the system at Platanares and, to a lesser degree, in the systems at San Ignacio and Azacualpa. No mixing is apparent in the fluids discharging at Pavana, Sambo Creek, or El Olivar. Boiling is the dominant process responsible for subtle geochemical variations at Azacualpa and, possibly, San Ignacio. Our best estimates of subsurface reservoir temperatures are 225/sup 0/C at Platanares, 190/sup 0/C at San Ignacio, 185/sup 0/C at Azacualpa, 155/sup 0/C at Sambo Creek, 150/sup 0/C at Pavana, and 120/sup 0/C at El Olivar. The estimated power output of the three hottest sites is 45 thermal megawatts at Platanares, 14 thermal megawatts at San Ignacio, and 13 thermal megawatts at Azacualpa.

  18. Determinants of use of care provided by complementary and alternative health care practitioners to pregnant women in primary midwifery care : A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feijen-de Jong, Esther I.; Jansen, Danielle E. M. C.; Baarveld, Frank; Spelten, Evelien; Schellevis, Francois; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pregnant women visit complementary/alternative health care practitioners in addition to regular maternal health care practitioners. A wide variation has been reported with regard to rates and determinants of use of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM), which may be due to

  19. Detraditionalisation, gender and alternative and complementary medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sointu, Eeva

    2011-03-01

    This article is premised on the importance of locating the appeal and meaning of alternative and complementary medicines in the context of gendered identities. I argue that the discourse of wellbeing--captured in many alternative and complementary health practices--is congruent with culturally prevalent ideals of self-fulfilling, authentic, unique and self-responsible subjectivity. The discourse of wellbeing places the self at the centre, thus providing a contrast with traditional ideas of other-directed and caring femininity. As such, involvement in alternative and complementary medicines is entwined with a negotiation of shifting femininities in detraditionalising societies. Simultaneously, many alternative and complementary health practices readily tap into and reproduce traditional representations of caring femininity. It is through an emphasis on emotional honesty and intimacy that the discourse of wellbeing also captures a challenge to traditional ideas of masculinity. Expectations and experiences relating to gender add a further level of complexity to the meaningfulness and therapeutic value of alternative and complementary medicines and underlie the gender difference in the utilisation of holistic health practices. I draw on data from a qualitative study with 44, primarily white, middle-class users and practitioners of varied alternative and complementary medicines in the UK. © 2010 The Author. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2010 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Hydrogeochemical evaluation. Preliminary site description Laxemar subarea - version 1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus

    2006-04-01

    Siting studies for SKB's programme of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste currently involves the investigation of two locations, Simpevarp and Forsmark, on the eastern coast of Sweden to determine their geological, hydrogeochemical and hydrogeological characteristics. Present work completed has resulted in Model version 1.2 for Laxemar subarea which represents the third evaluation of the available Simpevarp area groundwater analytical data collected up to November, 2004. Model version 1.2 focusses on improving the methodology and tools used for evaluating the hydrochemistry combined with a sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the available data. The major goal has been to consolidate groundwater geochemical understanding and the models used at the site. The complex groundwater evolution and patterns at Simpevarp are a result of many factors such as: a) the present-day topography and proximity to the Baltic Sea, b) past changes in hydrogeology related to glaciation/deglaciation, land uplift and repeated marine/lake water regressions/transgressions, and c) organic or inorganic alteration of the groundwater composition caused by microbial processes or water/rock interactions. The sampled groundwaters reflect to various degrees processes relating to modern or ancient water/rock interactions and mixing. The groundwater flow regimes at Laxemar/Simpevarp are considered local and extend down to depths of around 600-1,000 m depending on local topography. Close to the Baltic Sea coastline where topographical variation is small, groundwater flow penetration to depth will subsequently be less marked. In contrast, the Laxemar subarea is characterised by higher topography resulting in a much more dynamic groundwater circulation which appears to extend to 1,000 m depth in the vicinity of borehole KLX02. The marked differences in the groundwater flow regimes between the Laxemar and Simpevarp are reflected in the groundwater chemistry where four major hydrochemical

  1. Hydrogeochemical evaluation. Preliminary site description Laxemar subarea - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus (ed.) [Geopoint AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-04-15

    Siting studies for SKB's programme of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste currently involves the investigation of two locations, Simpevarp and Forsmark, on the eastern coast of Sweden to determine their geological, hydrogeochemical and hydrogeological characteristics. Present work completed has resulted in Model version 1.2 for Laxemar subarea which represents the third evaluation of the available Simpevarp area groundwater analytical data collected up to November, 2004. Model version 1.2 focusses on improving the methodology and tools used for evaluating the hydrochemistry combined with a sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the available data. The major goal has been to consolidate groundwater geochemical understanding and the models used at the site. The complex groundwater evolution and patterns at Simpevarp are a result of many factors such as: a) the present-day topography and proximity to the Baltic Sea, b) past changes in hydrogeology related to glaciation/deglaciation, land uplift and repeated marine/lake water regressions/transgressions, and c) organic or inorganic alteration of the groundwater composition caused by microbial processes or water/rock interactions. The sampled groundwaters reflect to various degrees processes relating to modern or ancient water/rock interactions and mixing. The groundwater flow regimes at Laxemar/Simpevarp are considered local and extend down to depths of around 600-1,000 m depending on local topography. Close to the Baltic Sea coastline where topographical variation is small, groundwater flow penetration to depth will subsequently be less marked. In contrast, the Laxemar subarea is characterised by higher topography resulting in a much more dynamic groundwater circulation which appears to extend to 1,000 m depth in the vicinity of borehole KLX02. The marked differences in the groundwater flow regimes between the Laxemar and Simpevarp are reflected in the groundwater chemistry where four major

  2. Use of alternative and complementary therapies in labor and delivery care: a cross-sectional study of midwives' training in Catalan hospitals accredited as centers for normal birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Sellés, Ester; Vallès-Segalés, Antoni; Goberna-Tricas, Josefina

    2013-11-15

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and complementary and alternative therapies (CAT) during pregnancy is increasing. Scientific evidence for CAM and CAT in the field of obstetrics mainly covers pain relief in labor. Midwives are responsible for labor and delivery care: hence, their knowledge of CAM and CAT is important. The aims of this study are to describe the professional profile of midwives who provide care for natural childbirth in Catalan hospitals accredited as centers for normal birth, to assess midwives' level of training in CAT and their use of these therapies, and to identify specific resources for CAT in labor wards. A descriptive, cross-sectional, quantitative method was used to assess the level of training and use of CAT by midwives working at 28 hospitals in Catalonia, Spain, accredited as public normal birth centers. Just under a third of midwives (30.4%) trained in CAT after completion of basic training. They trained in an average of 5.97 therapies (SD 3.56). The number of CAT in which the midwives were trained correlated negatively with age (r = - 0.284; p trained in CAT considered that the following therapies were useful or very useful for pain relief during labor and delivery: relaxation techniques (64.3%), hydrotherapy (84.8%) and the application of compresses to the perineum (75.9%). The availability of resources for providing CAT during normal birth care varied widely from center to center. Age may influence attitudes towards training. It is important to increase the number of midwives trained in CAM for pain relief during childbirth, in order to promote the use of CAT and ensure efficiency and safety. CAT resources at accredited hospitals providing normal childbirth care should also be standardized.

  3. Major hydrogeochemical processes in the two reservoirs of the Yangbajing geothermal field, Tibet, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qinghai; Wang, Yanxin; Liu, Wei

    2007-10-01

    The Yangbajing geothermal field with the highest reservoir temperature in China is located about 90 km northwest to Lhasa City, capital of Tibet, where high temperature geothermal fluids occur both in shallow and deep reservoirs. The geophysical survey by the INDEPTH (International Deep Profiling of Tibet and the Himalayas) project group proved the existence of magmatic heat source at Yangbajing. In the study area, the hydrochemistry of cold surface waters and groundwaters and that of thermal groundwaters from both reservoirs are distinctively different. However, analysis of the relationship between enthalpy values and Cl concentrations of cold groundwaters and geothermal fluids indicates that the geothermal fluids from the shallow reservoir were formed as a result of mixing of cold groundwaters with geothermal fluids from the deep reservoir. In other words, the geothermal fluids from the deep reservoir flowed upwards into the shallow reservoir where it was diluted by the shallow cold groundwaters to form the shallow geothermal fluids with much lower temperature. A binary mixing model with two endmembers (the cold groundwaters and the deep geothermal fluids) was proposed and the mixing ratios for the geothermal fluid from each shallow well were estimated. Using the mixing ratios, the concentrations of some constituents in shallow geothermal fluids, such as As, B, SiO 2, SO 42- and F, were calculated and their differences with the actual concentrations were estimated. The results show that the differences between estimated and actual concentrations of As and B are small (the average absolute values being only 1.9% and 7.9%, respectively), whereas those of SiO 2, SO 42- and F are much bigger, indicating that other hydrogeochemical processes are responsible for the concentrations of these constituents. It is postulated that SiO 2 precipitation due to water temperature decrease, H 2S oxidation and ion exchange between OH - in geothermal waters and exchangeable F - in

  4. Identification of the Hydrogeochemical Processes in Groundwater Using Classic Integrated Geochemical Methods and Geostatistical Techniques, in Amol-Babol Plain, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhy Narany, Tahoora; Ramli, Mohammad Firuz; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Sulaiman, Wan Nor Azmin; Juahir, Hafizan; Fakharian, Kazem

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogeochemical investigations had been carried out at the Amol-Babol Plain in the north of Iran. Geochemical processes and factors controlling the groundwater chemistry are identified based on the combination of classic geochemical methods with geographic information system (GIS) and geostatistical techniques. The results of the ionic ratios and Gibbs plots show that water rock interaction mechanisms, followed by cation exchange, and dissolution of carbonate and silicate minerals have influenced the groundwater chemistry in the study area. The hydrogeochemical characteristics of groundwater show a shift from low mineralized Ca-HCO3, Ca-Na-HCO3, and Ca-Cl water types to high mineralized Na-Cl water type. Three classes, namely, C1, C2, and C3, have been classified using cluster analysis. The spatial distribution maps of Na+/Cl−, Mg2+/Ca2+, and Cl−/HCO3 − ratios and electrical conductivity values indicate that the carbonate and weathering of silicate minerals played a significant role in the groundwater chemistry on the southern and western sides of the plain. However, salinization process had increased due to the influence of the evaporation-precipitation process towards the north-eastern side of the study area. PMID:24523640

  5. Hydrogeochemical evaluation for Simpevarp model version 1.2. Preliminary site description of the Simpevarp area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus (ed.) [Geopoint AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    Siting studies for SKB's programme of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste currently involves the investigation of two locations, Simpevarp and Forsmark, to determine their geological, hydrogeochemical and hydrogeological characteristics. Present work completed has resulted in Model version 1.2 which represents the second evaluation of the available Simpevarp groundwater analytical data collected up to April, 2004. The deepest fracture groundwater samples with sufficient analytical data reflected depths down to 1.7 km. Model version 1.2 focusses on geochemical and mixing processes affecting the groundwater composition in the uppermost part of the bedrock, down to repository levels, and eventually extending to 1000 m depth. The groundwater flow regimes at Laxemar/Simpevarp are considered local and extend down to depths of around 600-1000 m depending on local topography. The marked differences in the groundwater flow regimes between Laxemar and Simpevarp are reflected in the groundwater chemistry where four major hydrochemical groups of groundwaters (types A-D) have been identified: TYPE A: This type comprises dilute groundwaters (< 1000 mg/L Cl; 0.5-2.0 g/L TDS) of Na-HCO{sub 3} type present at shallow (<200 m) depths at Simpevarp, but at greater depths (0-900 m) at Laxemar. At both localities the groundwaters are marginally oxidising close to the surface, but otherwise reducing. Main reactions involve weathering, ion exchange (Ca, Mg), surface complexation, and dissolution of calcite. Redox reactions include precipitation of Fe-oxyhydroxides and some microbially mediated reactions (SRB). Meteoric recharge water is mainly present at Laxemar whilst at Simpevarp potential mixing of recharge meteoric water and a modern sea component is observed. Localised mixing of meteoric water with deeper saline groundwaters is indicated at both Laxemar and Simpevarp. TYPE B: This type comprises brackish groundwaters (1000-6000 mg/L Cl; 5-10 g/L TDS) present at

  6. Complementary school garden, nutrition, water, sanitation and hygiene interventions to improve children’s nutrition and health status in Burkina Faso and Nepal: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Séverine Erismann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malnutrition and intestinal parasitic infections are common among children in Burkina Faso and Nepal. However, specific health-related data in school-aged children in these two countries are scarce. In the frame of a larger multi-stakeholder project entitled “Vegetables go to School: Improving Nutrition through Agricultural Diversification” (VgtS, a study has been designed with the objectives to: (i describe schoolchildren’s health status in Burkina Faso and Nepal; and to (ii provide an evidence-base for programme decisions on the relevance of complementary school garden, nutrition, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH interventions. Methods/Design The studies will be conducted in the Centre Ouest and the Plateau Central regions of Burkina Faso and the Dolakha and Ramechhap districts of Nepal. Data will be collected and combined at the level of schools, children and their households. A range of indicators will be used to examine nutritional status, intestinal parasitic infections and WASH conditions in 24 schools among 1144 children aged 8–14 years at baseline and a 1-year follow-up. The studies are designed as cluster randomised trials and the schools will be assigned to two core study arms: (i the ‘complementary school garden, nutrition and WASH intervention’ arm; and the (ii ‘control’ arm with no interventions. Children will be subjected to parasitological examinations using stool and urine samples and to quality-controlled anthropometric and haemoglobin measurements. Drinking water will be assessed for contamination with coliform bacteria and faecal streptococci. A questionnaire survey on nutritional and health knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP will be administered to children and their caregivers, also assessing socioeconomic, food-security and WASH conditions at household level. Focus group and key-informant interviews on children’s nutrition and hygiene perceptions and behaviours will be

  7. Studies of the subsurface zone created in aluminium and its alloys by means of positron annihilation and complementary methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dryzek, E.

    2008-01-01

    There are presented the results of the studies of the subsurface zone created in aluminium and its alloys during sliding or other surface modification treatments. The application of the positron annihilation techniques due to their high sensitivity to crystal lattice defects enabled to determine defects profiles in the subsurface zone. The positron annihilation studies were correlated with other conventional measurements applied in tribology, i.e. microhardness measurements, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and in a special case stress distribution calculated theoretically. It was shown that the positron annihilation spectroscopy is a useful tool for profiling of the subsurface zone created during sliding even for light metals their alloys and composites. The total range of the subsurface zone detected by the positron annihilation extends from 50 μm to 450 μm depending on the material studied and surface modification treatment. Additionally, the type of the main defects can be determined. The studies of the pure aluminium samples after dry sliding enabled to find the defect concentration of vacancy type in the depth less then 1 μm and to correlate its value with the size of crystallites. It supports the conclusion on recovery processes taking place in this layer. There was made the attempt to apply the Doppler broadening coincidence spectroscopy to the studies of aluminium alloy and composite. In view of the interdisciplinary character the present thesis enclose also the review of the basic issues of tribology, measurement methods applied to the subsurface zone studies and positron annihilation experimental techniques. (author)

  8. Complementary PET studies of striatal neuronal function in the differential diagnosis between multiple system atrophy and Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonini, A; Leenders, KL; Vontobel, P; Maguire, RP; Missimer, J; Psylla, M; Gunther, [No Value

    1997-01-01

    We used PET with the tracers [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), [F-18]fluorodopa (FDOPA) and [C-11]raclopride (RACLO) to study striatal glucose and dopa metabolism, and dopamine D-2 receptor binding, respectively, in nine patients with multiple system atrophy. Ten patients with classical Parkinson's

  9. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by patients with diabetes mellitus in Bahrain: a cross-sectional study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khalaf, Abeer J

    2010-01-01

    CAM use is widespread, especially among patients with diabetes. The Gulf States have a high prevalence of diabetes, alongside a long tradition of CAM use. The aim of this study is to establish the prevalence of CAM use among patients with diabetes mellitus in Bahrain and to examine the characteristics of the CAM users.

  10. Krypton 81m and xenon 133 for complementary ventilation imaging in pulmonary perfusion studies: a clinical comparison. Chapter 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, P.M.; Remedios, L.V.dos.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-four patients with suspected pulmonary embolism were studied to determine the relative usefulness of 133 Xe and 81 Krsup(m) as indicators of pulmonary ventilation in complementing perfusion studies. In most cases, where krypton produced results superior to xenon, this could be attributed to better resolution of the 190 keV photon and to the fact that multiple views could be obtained, with each view paired precisely with a corresponding perfusion image, the direct result of the ease of use of krypton and its short 13 second half-life. This was well demonstrated in both of the patients with presumed pulmonary embolism and co-existing other pulmonary disease in which the results with xenon and krypton differed. In each case the mis-match was obscured by closely related areas of delayed xenon wash-out. In those patients where xenon demonstrated greater sensitivity in identifying areas of pulmonary disease, the lesions noted on wash-out appeared as areas of positive activity, while with krypton the defects were always photogenic and, when small probably obscured by scatter from adjacent normal activity. In the patient who might have been improperly categorized as a mis-match without the krypton study, the xenon study may have been normal because of inadequate equilibration time. (author)

  11. (COPD) on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of complementary and alternative medicine usage in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients living in the eastern part of Turkey. In this study a descriptive design was used. The study was conducted with 216 patients who were present at the clinic.

  12. Mining exploitation of Imouraren.Complementary studies.Report of synthesis - volume G. and H. Organization and professional training -Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    The volume G objective is to present a study that defines an organization, a staff policy and recruiting system and professional training in harmony with mine, plant and other services needs by considering available human resources and bearing in mind the Rick possible achievement of nigeriens staff, employee and personal advanced qualification and training.While the volume H describes the divers transportation methods for important equipments and reactive tonnage, during construction and project functioning phase of Imouraren sit. The possible divers way toward the sit are described. And transport methods and retained possible ways as base for the cost estimation are mentioned. In both volumes relative costs are estimated [fr

  13. A scaling approach to Budyko's framework and the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration in humid environments: case study of the Amazon River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, A. M.; Poveda, G.; Sivapalan, M.; Vallejo-Bernal, S. M.; Bustamante, E.

    2016-02-01

    This paper studies a 3-D state space representation of Budyko's framework designed to capture the mutual interdependence among long-term mean actual evapotranspiration (E), potential evapotranspiration (Ep) and precipitation (P). For this purpose we use three dimensionless and dependent quantities: Ψ = E ⁄ P, Φ = Ep ⁄ P and Ω = E ⁄ Ep. This 3-D space and its 2-D projections provide an interesting setting to test the physical soundness of Budyko's hypothesis. We demonstrate analytically that Budyko-type equations are unable to capture the physical limit of the relation between Ω and Φ in humid environments, owing to the unfeasibility of Ep ⁄ P = 0 when E ⁄ Ep → 1. Using data from 146 sub-catchments in the Amazon River basin we overcome this inconsistency by proposing a physically consistent power law: Ψ = kΦe, with k = 0.66, and e = 0.83 (R2 = 0.93). This power law is compared with two other Budyko-type equations. Taking into account the goodness of fits and the ability to comply with the physical limits of the 3-D space, our results show that the power law is better suited to model the coupled water and energy balances within the Amazon River basin. Moreover, k is found to be related to the partitioning of energy via evapotranspiration in terms of Ω. This suggests that our power law implicitly incorporates the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration into the Budyko curve, which is a consequence of the dependent nature of the studied variables within our 3-D space. This scaling approach is also consistent with the asymmetrical nature of the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration. Looking for a physical explanation for the parameters k and e, the inter-annual variability of individual catchments is studied. Evidence of space-time symmetry in Amazonia emerges, since both between-catchment and between-year variability follow the same Budyko curves. Finally, signs of co-evolution of catchments are explored by linking spatial

  14. Video games as a complementary therapy tool in mental disorders: PlayMancer, a European multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Santamaría, Juan J; Gunnard, Katarina; Soto, Antonio; Kalapanidas, Elias; Bults, Richard G A; Davarakis, Costas; Ganchev, Todor; Granero, Roser; Konstantas, Dimitri; Kostoulas, Theodoros P; Lam, Tony; Lucas, Mikkel; Masuet-Aumatell, Cristina; Moussa, Maher H; Nielsen, Jeppe; Penelo, Eva

    2012-08-01

    Previous review studies have suggested that computer games can serve as an alternative or additional form of treatment in several areas (schizophrenia, asthma or motor rehabilitation). Although several naturalistic studies have been conducted showing the usefulness of serious video games in the treatment of some abnormal behaviours, there is a lack of serious games specially designed for treating mental disorders. The purpose of our project was to develop and evaluate a serious video game designed to remediate attitudinal, behavioural and emotional processes of patients with impulse-related disorders. The video game was created and developed within the European research project PlayMancer. It aims to prove potential capacity to change underlying attitudinal, behavioural and emotional processes of patients with impulse-related disorders. New interaction modes were provided by newly developed components, such as emotion recognition from speech, face and physiological reactions, while specific impulsive reactions were elicited. The video game uses biofeedback for helping patients to learn relaxation skills, acquire better self-control strategies and develop new emotional regulation strategies. In this article, we present a description of the video game used, rationale, user requirements, usability and preliminary data, in several mental disorders.

  15. Video games as a complementary therapy tool in mental disorders: PlayMancer, a European multicentre study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Santamaría, Juan J.; Gunnard, Katarina; Soto, Antonio; Kalapanidas, Elias; Bults, Richard G. A.; Davarakis, Costas; Ganchev, Todor; Granero, Roser; Konstantas, Dimitri; Kostoulas, Theodoros P.; Lam, Tony; Lucas, Mikkel; Masuet-Aumatell, Cristina; Moussa, Maher H.; Nielsen, Jeppe; Penelo, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous review studies have suggested that computer games can serve as an alternative or additional form of treatment in several areas (schizophrenia, asthma or motor rehabilitation). Although several naturalistic studies have been conducted showing the usefulness of serious video games in the treatment of some abnormal behaviours, there is a lack of serious games specially designed for treating mental disorders. Aim: The purpose of our project was to develop and evaluate a serious video game designed to remediate attitudinal, behavioural and emotional processes of patients with impulse-related disorders. Method and results: The video game was created and developed within the European research project PlayMancer. It aims to prove potential capacity to change underlying attitudinal, behavioural and emotional processes of patients with impulse-related disorders. New interaction modes were provided by newly developed components, such as emotion recognition from speech, face and physiological reactions, while specific impulsive reactions were elicited. The video game uses biofeedback for helping patients to learn relaxation skills, acquire better self-control strategies and develop new emotional regulation strategies. In this article, we present a description of the video game used, rationale, user requirements, usability and preliminary data, in several mental disorders. PMID:22548300

  16. Computational Study of Magic-Size CdSe Clusters with Complementary Passivation by Carboxylic and Amine Ligands

    KAUST Repository

    Voznyy, Oleksandr; Mokkath, Junais Habeeb; Jain, Ankit; Sargent, Edward H.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The electronic and optical properties of tetrahedral CdSe magic clusters (average diameter.5 nm) protected by carboxyl and amine ligands, which correspond to previously reported experimental structures, are studied using density functional theory. We find extreme ligand packing densities, capping every single dangling bond of the inorganic core, strong dependence of the Z-type metal carboxylate binding on the amount of excess amine, and potential for improved photoluminescence upon replacing phenyl ligands with alkanes. The computed absorption spectra of the Cd35Se20 cluster agree well with experiments, resolving the 0.2 eV splitting of the first exciton peak due to spin-orbit coupling. We discuss the origin of the significant broadening of the optical spectra as due to phonons and structural variations in the ligand configurations and inorganic core apexes. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  17. Computational Study of Magic-Size CdSe Clusters with Complementary Passivation by Carboxylic and Amine Ligands

    KAUST Repository

    Voznyy, Oleksandr

    2016-04-28

    The electronic and optical properties of tetrahedral CdSe magic clusters (average diameter.5 nm) protected by carboxyl and amine ligands, which correspond to previously reported experimental structures, are studied using density functional theory. We find extreme ligand packing densities, capping every single dangling bond of the inorganic core, strong dependence of the Z-type metal carboxylate binding on the amount of excess amine, and potential for improved photoluminescence upon replacing phenyl ligands with alkanes. The computed absorption spectra of the Cd35Se20 cluster agree well with experiments, resolving the 0.2 eV splitting of the first exciton peak due to spin-orbit coupling. We discuss the origin of the significant broadening of the optical spectra as due to phonons and structural variations in the ligand configurations and inorganic core apexes. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  18. Intergrated metabonomic study of the effects of Guizhi Fuling capsule intervention on primary dysmenorrheal using RP-UPLC-MS complementary with HILIC-UPLC-MS technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Lang; Meng, Zhaorui; Sun, Lan; Xiao, Wei; Zhao, Longshan; Xiong, Zhili

    2018-02-01

    Guizhi Fuling capsule (GFC), developed from the traditional Chinese prescription of Guizhi Fuling Wan, has been commonly used for the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea (PD). However, the intervention effective mechanism in vivo has not been well elucidated. In this study, an integrated plasma metabonomic strategy based on RP-UPLC-MS coupled with HILIC-UPLC-MS technique has been developed to investigate the global therapeutic effects and intervention mechanisms of GFC on dysmenorrhea rats induced by oxytocin. The 20 potential biomarkers were identified and primarily related to sphingolipid metabolism, steroid hormone biosynthesis, glycerophospholipid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, lipid metabolism and energy metabolism. The results showed that the GFC has therapeutic effects on rats with dysmenorrhea via the regulation of multiple metabolic pathways. Some new potential biomarkers associated with primary dysmenorrhea such as phenylalanine, tryptophan, taurine, carnitine, betaine, creatine and creatinine have been discovered in this study for the first time. This study provides a metabonomic platform based on RP-UPLC-MS complementary to HILIC-UPLC-MS technique to investigate both nonpolar and polar compounds, so as to get a more comprehensive metabolite information to yield insight into the pathophysiology of PD and assessing the efficacy of GFC on PD rats. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. [Complementary and alternative medicine in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, J

    2013-06-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine are frequently used by cancer patients. The main benefit of complementary medicine is that it gives patients the chance to become active. Complementary therapy can reduce the side effects of conventional therapy. However, we have to give due consideration to side effects and interactions: the latter being able to reduce the effectiveness of cancer therapy and so to jeopardise the success of therapy. Therefore, complementary therapy should be managed by the oncologist. It is based on a common concept of cancerogenesis with conventional therapy. Complement therapy can be assessed in studies. Alternative medicine in contrast rejects common rules of evidence-based medicine. It starts from its own concepts of cancerogenesis, which is often in line with the thinking of lay persons. Alternative medicine is offered as either "alternative" to recommended cancer treatment or is used at the same time but without due regard for the interactions. Alternative medicine is a high risk to patients. In the following two parts of the article, the most important complementary and alternative therapies cancer patients use nowadays are presented and assessed according to published evidence.

  20. Use of black vulture (Coragyps atratus in complementary and alternative therapies for cancer in Colombia: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Pedraza Ricardo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although Coragyps atratus has been used as a traditional therapy for patients with cancer, the scientific literature does not contain enough information on how this therapy is used or the mechanisms that explain this therapeutic practice. Objectives To understand the methods of use and the reasons given by patients and caregivers for the use of Coragyps atratus in cancer treatment. Methods This study used a qualitative design based on twenty in-depth interviews of patients with cancer or caregivers of patients with the disease. The analysis of the text was based on an inductive thematic approach. Results Resistance to disease and immune enhancement are properties attributed to Coragyps atratus when used for cancer treatment. The most recommended method of use is fresh blood ingestion, and the associated mechanism of action is transfer of immune factors to the individual who consumes it. Conclusions Use of Coragyps atratus as a treatment for cancer is a popular alternative therapy in Colombia. More studies are needed to understand the clinical effects of this intervention in cancer patients. Spanish abstract Introducción Aunque Coragyps atratus se usa tradicionalmente como terapia para pacientes con cáncer, no existe suficiente información en la literatura científica sobre su forma de utilización ni sobre los mecanismos explicativos que subyacen a esta práctica terapéutica. Objetivos Conocer métodos de utilización y mecanismos explicativos dados por los pacientes y cuidadores de pacientes sobre el uso de Coragyps atratus en el tratamiento del cáncer. Materiales y métodos Diseño cualitativo basado en veinte entrevistas en profundidad de pacientes con cáncer o cuidadores de pacientes con esta enfermedad. Análisis de texto basado en enfoque temático inductivo. Resultados Al Coragyps atratus se le atribuyen propiedades de resistencia y fortalecimiento del sistema inmune de personas enfermas de cáncer. La forma de

  1. Use of black vulture (Coragyps atratus) in complementary and alternative therapies for cancer in Colombia: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Although Coragyps atratus has been used as a traditional therapy for patients with cancer, the scientific literature does not contain enough information on how this therapy is used or the mechanisms that explain this therapeutic practice. Objectives To understand the methods of use and the reasons given by patients and caregivers for the use of Coragyps atratus in cancer treatment. Methods This study used a qualitative design based on twenty in-depth interviews of patients with cancer or caregivers of patients with the disease. The analysis of the text was based on an inductive thematic approach. Results Resistance to disease and immune enhancement are properties attributed to Coragyps atratus when used for cancer treatment. The most recommended method of use is fresh blood ingestion, and the associated mechanism of action is transfer of immune factors to the individual who consumes it. Conclusions Use of Coragyps atratus as a treatment for cancer is a popular alternative therapy in Colombia. More studies are needed to understand the clinical effects of this intervention in cancer patients. Spanish abstract Introducción Aunque Coragyps atratus se usa tradicionalmente como terapia para pacientes con cáncer, no existe suficiente información en la literatura científica sobre su forma de utilización ni sobre los mecanismos explicativos que subyacen a esta práctica terapéutica. Objetivos Conocer métodos de utilización y mecanismos explicativos dados por los pacientes y cuidadores de pacientes sobre el uso de Coragyps atratus en el tratamiento del cáncer. Materiales y métodos Diseño cualitativo basado en veinte entrevistas en profundidad de pacientes con cáncer o cuidadores de pacientes con esta enfermedad. Análisis de texto basado en enfoque temático inductivo. Resultados Al Coragyps atratus se le atribuyen propiedades de resistencia y fortalecimiento del sistema inmune de personas enfermas de cáncer. La forma de utilización mas común es la

  2. Thin layer activation and ultra thin layer activation: two complementary techniques for wear and corrosion studies in various fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauvage, T.; Vincent, L.; Blondiaux, G.

    2002-01-01

    Thin layer activation (TLA) is widely used since more than 25 years to study surface wear or corrosion. This well known technique uses most of the time charged particles activation, which gives sensitivity in the range of the micrometer, except when the fluid mode of detection is utilized. In this case application of the method is limited to phenomena where we have transport of radioactive fragments to detection point. The main disadvantage of this procedure is the error due to trapping phenomena between the wear or corrosion point and detection setup. So the ultra thin layer activation (UTLA) has been developed to get nanometric sensitivity without using any fluid for radioactivity transportation, which is the main source of error of the TLA technique. In this paper we shall briefly describe the TLA technique and the most important fields of application. Then we shall emphasise on UTLA with a presentation of the principle of the method and actual running of application. The main problem concerning UTLA is calibration which requires the use of thin films (usually 10 to 100 nanometers) deposited on substrate. This process is time consuming and we shall demonstrate how running software developed in the lab can solve it. We shall finish the presentation by giving some potential application of the technique in various fields. (authors)

  3. Study of the top quark production in complementary phase space regions and impact on PDFs in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00507411

    2017-01-01

    The first measurement of the top quark pair production cross section ($\\sigma_{\\rm{t}\\bar{\\rm{t}}}$) in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 5.02$ TeV is reviewed. The data have been collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC and analyzed considering events with at least one charged lepton. The extraction of $\\sigma_{\\rm{t}\\bar{\\rm{t}}}$ can be used to constrain the gluon distribution function (PDF) at large longitudinal parton momentum fraction and to establish experimentally the relation between the top-quark mass as implemented in Monte-Carlo generators and the Lagrangian mass parameter. The impact of the measurement on the determination of the gluon PDF is illustrated through a quantum chromodynamic analysis at next-to-next-to-leading order and the result is furthermore put in context with other top quark measurements in different phase space regions. The measurement has paved the way for the first observation of top quark production in nuclear collisions and the subsequent study of modifications induc...

  4. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by patients with end-stage renal disease on haemodialysis in Trinidad: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahall, Mandreker

    2017-05-04

    Despite the paucity of scientific evidence, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widely used for the prevention and treatment of illness, holistic care, and counteracting the adverse effects of conventional medicine (CM). This study investigates the use of CAM by patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on haemodialysis. This quantitative study was conducted from November 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014 in the haemodialysis unit at San Fernando General Hospital (San Fernando, Trinidad). Face-to-face questionnaire-based interviews were held with101of 125 eligible patients (response rate, 80.5%) at the chairside during haemodialysis. The completed questionnaires were entered into a secure computer database. Data analysis included descriptive analysis, χ 2 tests, and binary logistic regression analysis. A minority of the patients were CAM users (n = 19; 18.8%). All 19 CAM users took medicinal herbs, 78.9% (n = 15) used spiritual therapy, and 10.5% (n = 2) used alternative systems. Medicinal tea (n = 15; 78.9%), garlic (Allium sativum) (n = 17; 73.7%), and ginger (Zingiber officinale roscoe) (n = 13; 68.4%) were the most commonly used medicinal herbs. Seven (36.8%) patients used Chinese herbal medicines and 3 (15.8%) patients used Aloe vera. All CAM users were willing to use CAM without supervision or monitoring by their doctors while receiving CM. The use of CAM could not be predicted by age, sex, ethnicity, education, religion, marital status, or employment. Nearly all (98%) patients were satisfied with CAM. More than one-third (36.8%) of patients did not disclose their use of CAM to their doctors, who were generally indifferent to such therapy. The use of CAM by patients with ESRD was relatively infrequent. All patients used medicinal herbs, most patients used spiritual therapy, and a minority of patients used alternative systems. Complementary and alternative medicine was primarily used for spiritual reasons and the likelihood of its use

  5. Complementary methods of study for Zr1-xCexO2 compounds for applications in medical prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Adriana; Craus, Mihail-Liviu; Turchenko, Vitalii; Bruma, Alina; Dubos, Pierre-Antoine; Malo, Sylvie; Konstantinova, Tatiana E.; Burkhovetsky, Valerii V.

    2017-08-01

    Zirconia (ZrO2)-based ceramics are preferred due to their advanced mechanical properties such as high-fracture toughness and bulk modulus, corrosion resistance, high dielectric constant, chemical inertness, low chemical conductivity and biocompatibility. The medical prosthesis components made from ZrO2 oxides present a very good biocompatibility as well as especially mechanical properties. In order to ensure implant safety of these prostheses, wide ranges of examinations based on nondestructive testing are imperative for these medical implants. In this study, we aim to emphasize the improvement of Zr-based ceramics properties as a function of addition of Ce ions in the structure of the original ceramics. The substitution of the Zr with Ce in the Zr1-xCexO2 compounds, where x = 0.0-0.17, leads to a change of the phase composition, a gradual transition from the monoclinic to tetragonal structure, at room temperature. The structural investigations proposed in this paper are based on X-ray and neutron diffraction in order to establish a first indication of the variation of the phase composition and the structural parameters, as well as micro-hardness measurements and nondestructive evaluations in order to establish a correlation between the structural parameters and mechanical properties of the samples. These ranges of tests are imperative in order to ensure the safety and reliability of these composite materials, which are widely used as hip-implants or dental implants/coatings. In combination of Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy, which makes use of the resonance frequencies corresponding to the normal vibrational modes of a solid in order to evaluate the elastic constants of the materials, we emphasize a unique approach on evaluating the physical properties of these ceramics, which could help in advancing the understanding of properties and applications in medical fields.

  6. Narrative journalism as complementary inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgen Jeppesen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Narrative journalism is a method to craft stories worth reading about real people. In this article, we explore the ability of that communicative power to produce insights complementary to those obtainable through traditional qualitative and quantitative research methods. With examples from a study of journalistic narrative as patient involvement in professional rehabilitation, interview data transcribed as stories are analyzed for qualities of heterogeneity, sensibility, transparency, and reflexivity. Building on sociological theories of thinking with stories, writing as inquiry, and public journalism as ethnography, we suggest that narrative journalism as a common practice might unfold dimensions of subjective otherness of the self. Aspiring to unite writing in both transparently confrontational and empathetically dialogic ways, the narrative journalistic method holds a potential to expose dynamics of power within the interview.

  7. Review of complementary and alternative medicine and selected nutraceuticals: background for a pilot study on nutrigenomic intervention in patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varker, Kimberly A; Ansel, Adam; Aukerman, Glen; Carson, William E

    2012-01-01

    As commonly defined, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a broad category that includes biologically based practices, mind-body medicine, manipulative and bodybased practices, and energy medicine as well as complete medical systems such as naturopathy, homeopathy, Ayurvedic medicine, and traditional Chinese medicine. Several CAM methodologies show promise for the treatment of chronic conditions such as depression and pain disorders or have demonstrated effects upon the immune response in experimental studies. There is growing interest in the use of integrative medicine the combination of CAM methodologies with a conventional medical approach-for the optimization of treatment of various cancers. The Ohio State University Center for Integrative Medicine has developed a specialized nutrigenomic protocol for integrative cancer care. The center uses a comprehensive nutritional and medical evaluation, including a panel of proinflammatory molecules and physiologic parameters, to guide a program of individualized dietary interventions. Dietary supplementation is a current focus of study, including: (1) Omega-3 fatty acids and B vitamins, which are thought to play important roles in immunomodulation; (2) Magnesium oxide, which has been shown to decrease inflammation and improve insulin resistance and lipid profiles; and (3) Cinnamon extract, which reportedly decreases serum glucose levels. This article presents a brief overview of CAM and integrative medicine and a discussion of the relevant nutraceuticals.

  8. Understanding cancer survivors' information needs and information-seeking behaviors for complementary and alternative medicine from short- to long-term survival: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarton, Lou Ann; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Oakley-Girvan, Ingrid; Gibson, Bryan; Logan, Robert; Workman, T Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    The research examined complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) information-seeking behaviors and preferences from short- to long-term cancer survival, including goals, motivations, and information sources. A mixed-methods approach was used with cancer survivors from the "Assessment of Patients' Experience with Cancer Care" 2004 cohort. Data collection included a mail survey and phone interviews using the critical incident technique (CIT). Seventy survivors from the 2004 study responded to the survey, and eight participated in the CIT interviews. Quantitative results showed that CAM usage did not change significantly between 2004 and 2015. The following themes emerged from the CIT: families' and friends' provision of the initial introduction to a CAM, use of CAM to manage the emotional and psychological impact of cancer, utilization of trained CAM practitioners, and online resources as a prominent source for CAM information. The majority of participants expressed an interest in an online information-sharing portal for CAM. Patients continue to use CAM well into long-term cancer survivorship. Finding trustworthy sources for information on CAM presents many challenges such as reliability of source, conflicting information on efficacy, and unknown interactions with conventional medications. Study participants expressed interest in an online portal to meet these needs through patient testimonials and linkage of claims to the scientific literature. Such a portal could also aid medical librarians and clinicians in locating and evaluating CAM information on behalf of patients.

  9. The clinical factors associated with benefit finding of complementary medicine use in patients with back pain: A cross-sectional study with cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavadar, Gulis; Demircioğlu, Demet Tekdos; Can, Halil; Emre, Tuluhan Yunus; Civelek, Erdinç; Senyigit, Abdulhalim

    2017-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use has been increasing. To identify the factors associated with perceived benefit from CAM methods in back problems. The study was conducted on patients who practiced any CAM methods due to complaints of back pain. Social-demographic properties, details of CAM methods employed were questioned. Severity of pain was measured by visual analog scale (VAS); benefits were evaluated by the Likert scale. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to discover relationships among variables. In total, 500 patients (265 female, 235 male) were included in the study. Mostly used methods were herbal therapy (32%), balneotherapy (31%), cupping (19.4%) and massage-manipulation (19.2%). Of patients, 355 (71%) were satisfied. The variables associated with benefit finding were female gender, age, chronicity and severity of pain, high educational level, upper middle income status, use as a result of recommendation, dissatisfaction with conventional methods, residence in an urban area, non-herbal method use, being married, and social insurance (p CAM perceived benefits; in particular, women living in urban areas, highly educated, aged more than 40, who suffer from severe chronic back pain, may be more inclined to go to CAM therapists.

  10. Statistical analysis of results from the quantitative mapping of fracture minerals in Laxemar. Site descriptive modelling - complementary studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loefgren, Martin (Niressa AB, Norsborg (Sweden)); Sidborn, Magnus (Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    Within the Laxemar site investigation campaign, quantitative mapping of different fracture minerals has been performed. This has been done by studying fracture surfaces of drill core sections from many different boreholes at the Laxemar site /Eklund and Mattsson 2008/. The drill core mapping was focused on the rock in the vicinity of flow anomalies detected by the Posiva Flow Log (PFL). The quantitative mapping was performed only on open fractures. The fracture minerals that were mapped are calcite, chlorite, clay minerals (as a group), hematite, and pyrite. In this present report, data from the quantitative mineral mapping campaign are refined, sorted into different data subsets, and analysed by parametric and non-parametric statistical methods. The data subsets are associated with 17 different rock volumes, representing different elevations, rock domains, fracture domains, and groups of deformation zones. In total 1,852 fractures were mapped at the site, and the most frequent mineral was calcite. Its amount could be quantitatively estimated in 51% of the mapped fractures. Of the other minerals, chlorite was quantitatively estimated in 46%, pyrite in 19%, clay minerals in 16%, and hematite in 0.05% of the mapped fractures. For fractures where the averaged fracture mineral thickness, d{sub mean} [mm], and visible coverage, C{sub vis} [%], could be quantitatively estimated, the following arithmetic means were found: calcite = 0.25 mm and 22%, chlorite = 0.29 mm and 41%, pyrite =1.3 mum and 0.2%, and clay minerals = 0.15 mm and 35%. These quantities are based on visual inspection of fracture surfaces and do not include the contribution from non-consolidated fracture fillings. It is shown that there is significant spatial variability of d{sub mean} and C{sub vis} within the examined rock volumes. Furthermore, the non-parametric analyses indicate that there are differences in d{sub mean} and C{sub vis} between the different rock volumes. Even so, the differences are

  11. Statistical analysis of results from the quantitative mapping of fracture minerals in Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling - complementary studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loefgren, Martin (Niressa AB, Norsborg (Sweden)); Sidborn, Magnus (Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    Within the Forsmark site investigation campaign, quantitative mapping of different fracture minerals has been performed. This has been done by studying fracture surfaces of drill core sections from many different boreholes at the Forsmark site /Eklund and Mattsson 2009/. The drill core mapping was focused on the rock in the vicinity of flow anomalies detected by the Posiva Flow Log (PFL). The quantitative mapping was performed only on open fractures. The fracture minerals that were mapped are calcite, chlorite, clay minerals (as a group), hematite, and pyrite. In this present report, data from the quantitative mineral mapping campaign are refined, sorted into different data subsets, and analysed by parametric and non-parametric statistical methods. The data subsets are associated with 21 different rock volumes, representing different elevations, rock domains, fracture domains, and groups of deformation zones. In total 2,071 fractures were mapped at the site, and the most frequent mineral was calcite. Its amount could be quantitatively estimated in 32% of the mapped fractures. Of the other minerals, chlorite was quantitatively estimated in 24%, clay minerals in 11%, pyrite in 10%, and hematite in 0.4% of the mapped fractures. For fractures where the averaged fracture mineral thickness, d{sub mean} [mm], and visible coverage, C{sub vis} [%], could be quantitatively estimated, the following arithmetic means were found: calcite = 0.11 mm and 18%, chlorite = 0.22 mm and 38%, clay minerals = 0.14 mm and 40%, pyrite = 2.3 mum and 0.5%, hematite = 19 mum and 14%. These quantities are based on visual inspection of fracture surfaces and do not include the contribution from non-consolidated fracture fillings. It is shown that there is significant spatial variability of d{sub mean} and C{sub vis} within the examined rock volumes. Furthermore, the non-parametric analyses indicate that there are differences in d{sub mean} and C{sub vis} between the different rock volumes. Even

  12. Complementary Chinese herbal medicine therapy improves survival of patients with gastric cancer in Taiwan: A nationwide retrospective matched-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Kuo-Feng; Hsu, Ching-Ping; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Lin, Hung-Jen; Kuo, Yi-Ting; Sun, Mao-Feng; Yen, Hung-Rong

    2017-03-06

    Many patients with gastric cancer seek traditional medicine consultations in Asian countries. This study aimed to investigate the prescription of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) and its benefits for the patients with gastric cancer in Taiwan. From the Registry for Catastrophic Illness Patients Database, we included all patients with gastric cancer whose age at diagnosis was ≥18 from 1997 to 2010 in Taiwan. We used 1:1 frequency matching by age, sex, Charlson comorbidity score, treatment and index year to compare the CHM users and non-CHM users. We used the Cox regression model to compare the hazard ratios (HR) for the risk of mortality and the Kaplan-Meier curve for the survival time. There was a total of 1333 patients in the CHM-cohort and 44786 patients in the non-CHM cohort. After matching, we compared 962 newly diagnosed CHM users and 962 non-CHM users. Adjusted HRs (aHR) were higher among patients of above 60-year-old group, with a Charlson Comorbidity Index score ≥2 before the index date, and those who need surgery combined with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. CHM users had a lower HR of mortality risk (adjusted HR: 0.55, 95% CI: 0.48-0.62). Compared to the non-CHM users, the aHR among CHM-users is 0.37 (95% CI:0.2-0.67) for those who used CHM more than 180 days annually. The Kaplan-Meier curve revealed that the survival probability was higher for complementary CHM-users. Bai-Hua-She-She-Cao (Herba Hedyotidis Diffusae) was the most commonly used single herb and Xiang-Sha-Liu-Jun-Zi-Tang was the most commonly used herbal formula among CHM prescriptions. Complementary CHM improves the overall survival among patients with gastric cancer in Taiwan. Further ethnopharmacological investigations and clinical trials are required to validate the efficacy and safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hypertension management: Perspectives of complementary and al ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information available on the various forms of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) used in the management of hypertension is inadequate and conflicting. The primary objective of this study was to assess the use of CAM in the management of hypertension by CAM practition-ers. A qualitative study utilizing ...

  14. The initiation of complementary feeding among Qom indigenous people

    OpenAIRE

    Irene Olmedo, Sofía; Valeggia, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    As of six months of life, breastfeeding no longer covers an infant’s energy or micronutrient needs, so appropriate complementary feeding should be provided. The objective of this study was to assess the time and adequacy for introducing complementary feeding in a Qom/Toba population and analyze the sociocultural concepts of families regarding complementary feeding. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected by participant observation and semistructured surveys administered to mothers of...

  15. Legislation should support optimal breastfeeding practices and access to low-cost, high-quality complementary foods: Indonesia provides a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soekarjo, Damayanti; Zehner, Elizabeth

    2011-10-01

    It is important to support women to exclusively breastfeed for 6 months and continue breastfeeding for 24 months and beyond. It is also necessary to provide the poor with access to affordable ways to improve the quality of complementary foods. Currently, many countries do not have the legal and policy environment necessary to support exclusive and continued breastfeeding. Legislative and policy changes are also necessary for introducing complementary food supplements, allowing them to be marketed to those who need them, and ensuring that marketing remains appropriate and in full compliance with the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes. This paper aims to illustrate the above with examples from Indonesia and to identify legislative requirements for supporting breastfeeding and enabling appropriate access to high-quality complementary food supplements for children 6-24 months of age. Requirements include improved information, training, monitoring and enforcement systems for the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes; implementation and monitoring of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative; establishment of a registration category for complementary food supplements to enhance availability of high-quality, low-cost fortified products to help improve young child feeding; clear identification and marketing of these products as complementary food supplements for 6-24-month-olds so as to promote proper use and not interfere with breastfeeding. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. A randomized, multicenter, controlled study, comparing efficacy and safety of a new complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) versus Solifenacin Succinate in women with overactive bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchioli-Scaldazza, Carlo; Morosetti, Carolina; Maruccia, Serena; Casellato, Stefano; Rociola, Wilma; Illiano, Ester; Garofalo, Francesco

    2017-12-31

    To assess efficacy and tolerability of a new complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) consisting of vitamins (C and D), herbal products (cucurbita maxima, capsicum annum, polygonum capsicatum) and amino acid L-Glutammina, in the treatment of female Overactive Bladder syndrome (OAB). 90 consecutive women with OAB symptoms were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, controlled study. Women were divided randomly into two groups of 45 patients each. In group A, women received Solifenacin Succinate (SS), 5 mg. once a day for 12 weeks. In group B, women received CAM, 930 mg, twice daily for 12 weeks. Women were assessed with 3-day micturition diary, Patient Perception of Intensity of Urgency Scale (PPIUS), Overactive Bladder questionnaire Short Form (OAB-q SF) and Patient Global Impression of Improvement questionnaire (PGI-I). 8 patients in group A and 1 patient in group B dropped out from therapy because of side effects. A reduction in the number of daily micturitions, nocturia and episodes of urge incontinence was present with both SS and CAM with statistically highly significant differences, but CAM was significantly more effective than SS. PPIUS and OAB-q SF showed improvements with both SS and CAM with a more significant efficacy of CAM. PGI-I, demonstrated improvements in the two groups of patients with a greater satisfaction expressed by patients treated with CAM. the small number of patients does not permit definitive conclusions; however, the results of the research showed the greater effectiveness and tolerability of CAM.

  17. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by 7427 Australian women with cyclic perimenstrual pain and discomfort: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Carole; Adams, Jon; Hickman, Louise; Sibbritt, David

    2016-05-18

    To assess the prevalence of cyclic perimenstrual pain and discomfort and to detail the pattern of complementary and alternative (CAM) use adopted by women for the treatment of these symptoms. Data from the 2012 national Australian Longitudinal Study of Women's Health (ALSWH) cross-sectional survey of 7427 women aged 34-39 years were analysed to estimate the prevalence of endometriosis, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), irregular or heavy periods and severe dysmenorrhoea and to examine the association between their symptoms and their visits to CAM practitioners as well as their use of CAM therapies and products in the previous 12 months. The prevalence of endometriosis was 3.7 % and of the perimenstrual symptoms assessed, PMS was most prevalent at 41.2 % whilst irregular bleeding (22.2 %), heavy periods (29.8 %) and severe period pain (24.1 %) were reported at lower levels. Women with endometriosis were more likely than non-sufferers to have consulted with a massage therapist or acupuncturist and to have used vitamins/minerals, yoga/meditation or Chinese medicines (p alternative health practitioner and to have used all forms of CAM therapies except Chinese medicines than women who had infrequent PMS (all p medicines, Chinese medicines and other alternative therapies compared to non-sufferers (all p effective use and to ascertain their significance as a treatment option enabling women with menstrual problems and their care providers to improve their quality of life.

  18. Potential of Red Spinach Leaves Ethanolic Extract (Amaranthus tricolor L. as a Complementary Therapy For Hiperlipidemia: Study in Vivo of Histopathologic and Activity of Alanin Aminotransferase (ALT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimas Adhi Pradana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the potential of ethanolic extract of red spinach leaves (Amaranthus tricolor L. with control quality as a complementary treatment of hyperlipidemic based on histopathology and activity of alanin aminotrasferase (ALT. A total of 24 male Wistar rats were randomized in 6 groups: normal group; positive control group were given the drug simvastatin; negative control group; 1st treatment group was given extract at dose of 400mg/kgBW rat, 2nd group was given extract at dose of 400mg/kgBW rat and simvastatin dose 0.18 mg/kgBW rat; 3rd treatment groups were given extract at dose of 800mg/kgBW rat and simvastatin dose 0.18 mg/kgBW rat. Induction hyperlipidemic using high fat diet and poloxamer. The data obtained were tested normality with the Shapiro-Wilk test. Statistical analysis using Oneway ANOVA and Post-Hoc Tukey HSD to determine the significance of differences between groups for ALT parameter. Result show the use of ethanolic extract of red spinach leaves can reduce fatty liver condition based on decreased level of ALT and liver histopathologic. It is concluded that the ethanolic extract of red spinach leaves dose 400mg/kgBW rat combine with simvastatin can reduce activity of ALT until 31.57 U1-1.

  19. Breast cancer patients' perspectives on and use of complementary and alternative medicine: a study by the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astin, John A; Reilly, Colleen; Perkins, Cheryl; Child, Wendy L

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine patterns and predictors of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among breast cancer patients. A review of the existing survey literature on CAM use for breast cancer was conducted with a series of eight focus groups (N = 67) to further examine the perspectives of breast cancer patients on CAM. The rates of CAM use varied from 17 to 75%, with a mean of 45%. Vitamins and minerals and herbs were the most frequently cited categories. Users tended to be younger, more educated, and more likely to have used CAM prior to their diagnosis. Focus group data indicate that breast cancer patients use a wide array of CAM for a variety of reasons, including symptom management, improving quality of life, and enhancing immune function. Although women rely on a variety of resources for information, they frequently experience frustration owing to the absence or conflicting nature of such information. Communication with conventional providers about CAM is frequently experienced as either unsupportive or not helpful by many patients. The results point to the value of developing better evidence-based informational resources related to CAM and cancer and the need for physicians to become better educated about CAM and how to communicate more effectively with their breast cancer patients about it.

  20. The impact of major life events on the use of complementary and alternative medicine among individuals with chronic pain: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Ming; Fortier, Michelle A; Cheng, David Y; Perret, Danielle; Hata, Justin; Tan, Edwin T; Kain, Zeev N

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pain affects millions of Americans. Treating chronic pain can be difficult because it is a complex condition influenced by genetic makeup and physiological and psychological factors. The experience of major life events has also been found to affect the psychosocial functioning, health, and health behaviors of patients. Whereas the impact of major life events on the use of traditional medical practices has been explored, only one study to date has examined the relationship between major life events and use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). This study examined the impact of major life events on the use of CAM among patients with chronic pain syndromes. Participants were consecutive patients seeking treatment at a pain clinic. The study occurred at a tertiary center for pain management in Southern California. Participants were adult patients experiencing chronic pain for at least 6 mo, seeking treatment at a pain center. Participants completed a measure assessing their use of CAM modalities as well as their receptiveness to using previously unused CAM modalities, and they provided demographic information, including the occurrence of major life events, such as a job loss. A total of 199 adults with chronic pain participated in the study. The majority (91.6%) of chronic pain patients in the study reported using at least one form of CAM, with an average of at least five different forms of CAM. Individuals reported receptiveness to CAM modalities that they had not previously used (P CAM use were greater among those that had experienced a major life event in the prior 6 mo (P chronic pain frequently use CAM therapies, especially those who had recently experienced a major life event. Major life events may motivate patients with chronic pain to seek out different forms of CAM as a way to manage their pain.

  1. Mental disorders frequency alternative and complementary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HT) are chronic disorders with which mental disorders may coexist and for which patients may resort to alternative medicine use. Alternative and complementary medicine is a treatment option that patients tend to use. This study is to determine the prevalence of mental ...

  2. Comparison of the complementary feeding practices between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to compare the complementary feeding practices between mothers with twins and mothers with singletons. Methods: mother-infant pairs (50 mother-twin pairs and 50 mother-singleton pairs) with children aged 6 to 23 months were recruited from two public health clinics and communities in Tema ...

  3. Geochemical tracing and hydrogeochemical modelling of water-rock interactions during salinization of alluvial groundwater (Upper Rhine Valley, France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, Y., E-mail: yann.lucas@eost.u-strasbg.fr [Universite de Strasbourg et CNRS, Laboratoire d' Hydrologie et de Geochimie de Strasbourg, Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre, 1, rue Blessig, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Schmitt, A.D., E-mail: anne-desiree.schmitt@univ-fcomte.fr [Universite de Strasbourg et CNRS, Laboratoire d' Hydrologie et de Geochimie de Strasbourg, Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre, 1, rue Blessig, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France)] [Universite de Franche-Comte et CNRS-UMR 6249, Chrono-Environnement, 16, Route de Gray, 25030 Besancon Cedex (France); Chabaux, F., E-mail: francois.chabaux@eost.u-strasbg.fr [Universite de Strasbourg et CNRS, Laboratoire d' Hydrologie et de Geochimie de Strasbourg, Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre, 1, rue Blessig, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Clement, A.; Fritz, B. [Universite de Strasbourg et CNRS, Laboratoire d' Hydrologie et de Geochimie de Strasbourg, Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre, 1, rue Blessig, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Elsass, Ph. [BRGM, GEODERIS, 1, rue Claude Chappe, 57070 Metz (France); Durand, S. [Universite de Strasbourg et CNRS, Laboratoire d' Hydrologie et de Geochimie de Strasbourg, Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre, 1, rue Blessig, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2010-11-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Major and trace elements along with strontium and uranium isotopic ratios show that groundwater geochemical characteristics along the saline plumes cannot reflect a conservative mixing. {yields} A coupled hydrogeochemical model demonstrates that cationic exchange between alkalis from polluted waters and alkaline-earth elements from montmorillonite present in the host rock of the aquifer is the primary process. {yields} The model requires only a small amount of montmorillonite. {yields} It is necessary to consider the pollution history to explain the important chloride, sodium and calcium concentration modifications. {yields} The model shows that the rapidity of the cationic exchange reactions insures a reversibility of the cation fixation on clays in the aquifer. - Abstract: In the southern Upper Rhine Valley, groundwater has undergone intensive saline pollution caused by the infiltration of mining brines, a consequence of potash extraction carried out during the 20th century. Major and trace elements along with Sr and U isotopic ratios show that groundwater geochemical characteristics along the saline plumes cannot reflect conservative mixing between saline waters resulting from the dissolution of waste heaps and one or more unpolluted end-members. The results imply the occurrence of interactions between host rocks and polluted waters, and they suggest that cationic exchange mechanisms are the primary controlling process. A coupled hydrogeochemical model has been developed with the numerical code KIRMAT, which demonstrates that cationic exchange between alkalis from polluted waters and alkaline-earth elements from montmorillonite present in the host rock of the aquifer is the primary process controlling the geochemical evolution of the groundwater. The model requires only a small amount of montmorillonite (between 0.75% and 2.25%), which is in agreement with the observed mineralogical composition of the aquifer. The model also proves

  4. Discovering Complementary Colors from the Perspective of STEAM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabey, Burak; Koyunkaya, Melike Yigit; Enginoglu, Turan; Yurumezoglu, Kemal

    2018-01-01

    This study explored the theory and applications of complementary colors using a technology-based activity designed from the perspective of STEAM education. Complementary colors and their areas of use were examined from the perspective of physics, mathematics and art, respectively. The study, which benefits from technology, makes the theory of…

  5. Ethnic differences in choices of health information by cancer patients using complementary and alternative medicine: an exploratory study with correspondence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakai, Hisako; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Shumay, Dianne M; Tatsumura, Yvonne; Tasaki, Katsuya

    2003-02-01

    This study examined patterns in the use of health information among Caucasian, Japanese, and non-Japanese Asian Pacific Islander cancer patients in Hawaii and explored the relation of ethnicity and educational level to choices of health information sources. Information from 140 cancer patients, most of whom were users of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), was analyzed using correspondence analysis. Three clusters of health information pertinent to the three ethnic groups emerged from the data. The results of this study revealed that Caucasian patients preferred objective, scientific, and updated information obtained through medical journals or newsletters from research institutions, telephone information services, and the internet. Japanese patients relied on media and commercial sources including television, newspapers, books, magazines and CAM providers. Non-Japanese Asians and Pacific Islanders used information sources involving person-to-person communication with their physicians, social groups, and other cancer patients. A higher educational level was closely related to a cluster of health information stressing objective, scientific and updated information, while a lower educational level was associated with interpersonally communicated information. The three ethnicity-specific patterns of health information use remained relatively stable at different educational levels, implying that the effect of patients' ethnicity overrides their educational level in shaping their choices of health information. The results of this study indicate the importance of recognizing cancer patients' culturally developed world views when understanding their health information-seeking behavior. For medical practice, these findings indicate the need for healthcare providers to assist cancer patients to obtain accurate health information in a culturally sensitive way.

  6. Children and Complementary Health Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... review and meta-analysis. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology . 2014;112(6):503–510. Ethical Conduct of ... Print this page Health Topics A–Z Related Topics Complementary, Alternative, or Integrative Health: What’s In a ...

  7. Ibuanyidanda (Complementary Reflection), Communalism and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Prof. Asouzu

    Glossary of Igbo Terms and Phrases ihe ahụ na anya ... other words, it is in mutual dependence that the feeling of intimacy found among kindred ..... Complementary Reflection, Communalism and Theory Formulation in African Philosophy 25.

  8. Cancer and Complementary Health Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... According to the 2007 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), which included a comprehensive survey on the use ... their use of complementary health approaches. In the NHIS, survey respondents who had been diagnosed with cancer ...

  9. BASED COMPLEMENTARY FOODS USING GERMINAT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2010-08-08

    Aug 8, 2010 ... Malnutrition affects physical growth, morbidity, mortality, cognitive development, reproduction, and ... malnutrition. Development of complementary foods is guided by nutritional value, acceptability, availability and affordability of raw materials, and simplicity of food processing ... (Memmert, Germany) at 55. 0.

  10. Two complementary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods to study the excretion and metabolic interaction of edaravone and taurine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dao-quan; Zheng, Xiao-xiao; Li, Yin-jie; Bian, Ting-ting; Yu, Yan-yan; Du, Qian; Yang, Dong-zhi; Jiang, Shui-shi

    2014-11-01

    In this study, two independent and complementary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods were respectively developed and validated for the determination of edaravone or taurine in rat urine, feces and bile after intravenous administration, using 3-methyl-l-p-tolyl-5-pyrazolone and sulfanilic acid as the internal standards (IS). Edaravone was separated on an Agilent Eclipse Plus C18 column (100×2.1 mm, 3.5 μm) using methanol and water (containing 5 mM ammonium formate and 0.02% formic acid) as mobile phase, while taurine was performed on a Waters Atlantis HILIC Silica column (150×2.1 mm, 3 μm) using acetonitrile and water (containing 5mM ammonium formate and 0.2% formic acid) as mobile phase. The mass analysis was performed in a Triple Quadrupole mass spectrometer via multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) with negative ionization mode. The optimized mass transition ion pairs (m/z) for quantification were 173.1→92.2 and 187.2→106.0 for edaravone and its IS, 124.1→80.0 and 172.0→80.0 for taurine and its IS, respectively. The validated methods have been successfully applied to the excretion and metabolism interaction study of edaravone and taurine in rats after independent intravenous administration and co-administration with a single dose. The results demonstrated that there were no significant alternations on the metabolism and cumulative excretion rate of edaravone and taurine, implying that the proposed combination therapy was pharmacologically viable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevalence of Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Herbal Remedy Use in Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Women: Results from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robin R; Santoro, Nanette; Allshouse, Amanda A; Neal-Perry, Genevieve; Derby, Carol

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use, including botanical/herbal remedies, among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN), New Jersey site. We also examined whether attitudes toward CAM and communication of its use to providers differed for Hispanic and non-Hispanic women. SWAN is a community-based, multiethnic cohort study of midlife women. At the 13th SWAN follow-up, women at the New Jersey site completed both a general CAM questionnaire and a culturally sensitive CAM questionnaire designed to capture herbal products commonly used in Hispanic/Latina communities. Prevalence of and attitudes toward CAM use were compared by race/ethnicity and demographic characteristics. Among 171 women (average age 61.8 years), the overall prevalence of herbal remedy use was high in both Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women (88.8% Hispanic and 81.3% non-Hispanic white), and prayer and herbal teas were the most common modalities used. Women reported the use of multiple herbal modalities (mean 6.6 for Hispanic and 4.0 for non-Hispanic white women; p = 0.001). Hispanic women were less likely to consider herbal treatment drugs (16% vs. 37.5%; p = 0.005) and were less likely to report sharing the use of herbal remedies with their doctors (14.4% Hispanic vs. 34% non-Hispanic white; p = 0.001). The number of modalities used was similar regardless of the number of prescription medications used. High prevalence of herbal CAM use was observed for both Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women. Results highlight the need for healthcare providers to query women regarding CAM use to identify potential interactions with traditional treatments and to determine whether CAM is used in lieu of traditional medications.

  12. Attitudes of Arab and Jewish patients toward integration of complementary medicine in primary care clinics in Israel: a cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Karkabi, Khaled; Karkabi, Sonia; Keshet, Yael; Haddad, Maria; Frenkel, Moshe

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-cultural study was to evaluate patient perspectives on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) integration within primary care clinics. It is one of the first multiethnic studies to explore patients' perspectives on the best model for integrating CAM into the conventional care setting. We developed a 13-item questionnaire that addresses issues of CAM use, expectations from the primary care physicians concerning CAM, and attitudes toward CAM integration within a patient's primary care clinic. We constructed the questionnaire with cross-cultural sensitivity concerning the core concepts of CAM and traditional medicine in both the Arab and Jewish communities in northern Israel. Data for statistical analysis were obtained from 3840 patients attending seven primary care clinics. Of the 3713 respondents who were willing to identify their religion, 2184 defined themselves as Muslims, Christians, or Druze and 1529 as Jews. Respondents in the two groups were equally distributed by sex but differed significantly by age, education, self-rated religiosity, and self-reported chronic diseases in their medical background. Respondents in the two groups reported comparable overall CAM use during the previous year, but the Arab respondents reported more use of herbs and traditional medicine. Respondents in both groups stated that their primary expectation from a family physician concerning CAM was to refer them appropriately and safely to a CAM practitioner. Respondents in both groups greatly supported a theoretical scenario of CAM integration into primary medical care. However, Arab respondents were more supportive of the option that non-physician CAM practitioners would provide CAM rather than physicians.

  13. Factors controlling groundwater quality in the Yeonjegu District of Busan City, Korea, using the hydrogeochemical processes and fuzzy GIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatramanan, Senapathi; Chung, Sang Yong; Selvam, Sekar; Lee, Seung Yeop; Elzain, Hussam Eldin

    2017-10-01

    The hydrogeochemical processes and fuzzy GIS techniques were used to evaluate the groundwater quality in the Yeonjegu district of Busan Metropolitan City, Korea. The highest concentrations of major ions were mainly related to the local geology. The seawater intrusion into the river water and municipal contaminants were secondary contamination sources of groundwater in the study area. Factor analysis represented the contamination sources of the mineral dissolution of the host rocks and domestic influences. The Gibbs plot exhibited that the major ions were derived from the rock weathering condition. Piper's trilinear diagram showed that the groundwater quality was classified into five types of CaHCO 3 , NaHCO 3 , NaCl, CaCl 2 , and CaSO 4 types in that order. The ionic relationship and the saturation mineral index of the ions indicated that the evaporation, dissolution, and precipitation processes controlled the groundwater chemistry. The fuzzy GIS map showed that highly contaminated groundwater occurred in the northeastern and the central parts and that the groundwater of medium quality appeared in most parts of the study area. It suggested that the groundwater quality of the study area was influenced by local geology, seawater intrusion, and municipal contaminants. This research clearly demonstrated that the geochemical analyses and fuzzy GIS method were very useful to identify the contaminant sources and the location of good groundwater quality.

  14. Hydrogeochemical characterization of groundwater of peninsular Indian region using multivariate statistical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacintha, T. German Amali; Rawat, Kishan Singh; Mishra, Anoop; Singh, Sudhir Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Groundwater quality of Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India) has been assessed during different seasons of year 2012. Three physical (pH, EC, and TDS) and four chemical parameters (Ca2+, Cl-, TH, Mg2+ and SO4 2-) from 18 bore wells were assessed. The results showed that pH of majority of groundwater samples indicates a slightly basic condition (7.99post-monsoon and 8.35pre-monsoon). TH was slightly hard [322.11 mg/lpre-monsoon, 299.37 mg/lpost-monsoon but lies under World Health Organization (WHO) upper limit]. EC, TDS, Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations were under WHO permissible limit during post-monsoon (1503.42 μS/cm, 1009.37, 66.58 and 32.42 mg/l respectively) and pre-monsoon (1371.58 μS/cm, 946.84, 71.79 and 34.79 mg/l, respectively). EC shows a good correlation with SO4 2- ( R 2 = 0.59pre-monsoon, 0.77post-monsoon) which indicates that SO4 2- plays a major role in EC of ground water of bore wells. SO4 2- has also showed positive correlations with TDS ( R 2 = 0.84pre-monsoon, 0.95post-monsoon) and TH ( R 2 = 0.70pre-monsoon, 0.75post-monsoon). The principal component analysis (PCA)/factor analysis (FA) was carried out; Factor1 explains 59.154 and 69.278 % of the total variance during pre- and post-monsoon, respectively, with a strong positive loading on Ca2+, Mg2+, SO4 2-, TDS and a negative loading on pH. Factor2 accounts for 13.94 and 14.22 % of the total variance during pre- and post-monsoon, respectively, and was characterized by strong positive loading of only pH and poor/negative loading of EC, Ca2+, Mg2+, SO4 2-, TDS and TH during pre- and post-monsoon. We recommend routine monitoring and thorough treatment before consumption. Further, this study has demonstrated the effectiveness of PCA/FA to assess the hydrogeochemical processes governing the groundwater chemistry in the area.

  15. Hydrogeochemical characteristics and assessment of water quality in the Al-Saad Lake, Abha Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Javed

    2017-10-01

    Hydrogeochemical characteristics and assessment of water quality investigations have been carried out at Abha, located in Saudi Arabia, where Al-Saad Lake represents a rare example of natural endorheic lake. The ecosystem within and around the Al-Saad Lake including catchment area is of great social, cultural, aesthetic, environmental and economic values to Abha. Sampling and experiments of lake water has been carried out with the aim of characterizing the main physico-chemical parameters, such as DO, EC, TDS, Mg2+, Ca2+, Na+, K+, SO4 2-, Cl-, HCO3, NO3 - and F- concentration. The ordinary kriging (OK) method was used to produce the spatial patterns of water quality. The Result of DO (mean 5.38 mg/L) trend in Al-Saad Lake is not very encouraging as majority of the lake area is under DO stress or marginally above it. So, proper management strategies are needed to be formulated to protect flora and fauna of the lake. Furthermore, the chemical analysis results show the abundance of the major cations in the order Mg2+ > Ca2+ > Na+ > K+ whereas the abundance of anions are in the order SO4 2- > Cl- > HCO3 > NO3 - > F-. The result obtained in this investigation inferred that the cations in water i.e. sodium and iron are within the permissible limits but magnesium and potassium have exceeded the permissible limit. Whereas anions such as nitrate and fluoride are within the permissible range but chloride and sulphate have exceeded the permissible limits. The concentration of cation, magnesium (Mg) and potassium (K) in the lake water has exceeded the desirable range (30, 10 mg/L, respectively). This may be due to weathering and transported from rocks and particularly from sulphate deposits such as gypsum and anhydride and subsequently ends up in water. The concentration of anion, Sulphate (SO4) and chloride are above the desirable limit. The major source of bicarbonate are the carbonate rocks containing calcite (CaCO3) and dolomite (CaMg (CO3)2), Calcium (Ca) and Magnesium

  16. A randomized, multicenter, controlled study, comparing efficacy and safety of a new complementary and alternative medicine (CAM versus Solifenacin Succinate in women with overactive bladder syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Vecchioli-Scaldazza

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To assess efficacy and tolerability of a new complementary and alternative medicine (CAM consisting of vitamins (C and D, herbal products (cucurbita maxima, capsicum annum, polygonum capsicatum and amino acid L-Glutammina, in the treatment of female Overactive Bladder syndrome (OAB. Materials and methods: 90 consecutive women with OAB symptoms were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, controlled study. Women were divided randomly into two groups of 45 patients each. In group A, women received Solifenacin Succinate (SS, 5 mg. once a day for 12 weeks. In group B, women received CAM, 930 mg, twice daily for 12 weeks. Women were assessed with 3-day micturition diary, Patient Perception of Intensity of Urgency Scale (PPIUS, Overactive Bladder questionnaire Short Form (OAB-q SF and Patient Global Impression of Improvement questionnaire (PGI-I. Results: 8 patients in group A and 1 patient in group B dropped out from therapy because of side effects. A reduction in the number of daily micturitions, nocturia and episodes of urge incontinence was present with both SS and CAM with statistically highly significant differences, but CAM was significantly more effective than SS. PPIUS and OAB-q SF showed improvements with both SS and CAM with a more significant efficacy of CAM. PGI-I, demonstrated improvements in the two groups of patients with a greater satisfaction expressed by patients treated with CAM. Conclusions: the small number of patients does not permit definitive conclusions; however, the results of the research showed the greater effectiveness and tolerability of CAM.

  17. The potential of complementary and alternative medicine in promoting well-being and critical health literacy: a prospective, observational study of shiatsu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Andrew F

    2009-06-18

    The potential contribution of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities to promote and support critical health literacy has not received substantial attention within either the health promotion or the CAM literature. This paper explores the potential of one CAM modality, shiatsu, in promoting well-being and critical health literacy. Data are drawn from a longitudinal, 6 months observational, pragmatic study of the effects and experience of shiatsu within three European countries (Austria, Spain and the UK). Client postal questionnaires included: advice received, changes made 6 months later, clients 'hopes' from having shiatsu and features of the client-practitioner relationship. At baseline, three-quarters of clients (n = 633) received advice, on exercise, diet, posture, points to work on at home or other ways of self-care. At 6 months follow-up, about four-fifths reported making changes to their lifestyle 'as a result of having shiatsu treatment', including taking more rest and relaxation or exercise, changing their diet, reducing time at work and other changes such as increased body/mind awareness and levels of confidence and resolve. Building on the findings, an explanatory model of possible ways that a CAM therapy could contribute to health promotion is presented to guide future research, both within and beyond CAM. Supporting individuals to take control of their self-care requires advice-giving within a supportive treatment context and practitioner relationship, with clients who are open to change and committed to maintaining their health. CAM modalities may have an important role to play in this endeavour.

  18. The potential of complementary and alternative medicine in promoting well-being and critical health literacy: a prospective, observational study of shiatsu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Andrew F

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential contribution of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM modalities to promote and support critical health literacy has not received substantial attention within either the health promotion or the CAM literature. This paper explores the potential of one CAM modality, shiatsu, in promoting well-being and critical health literacy. Methods Data are drawn from a longitudinal, 6 months observational, pragmatic study of the effects and experience of shiatsu within three European countries (Austria, Spain and the UK. Client postal questionnaires included: advice received, changes made 6 months later, clients 'hopes' from having shiatsu and features of the client-practitioner relationship. Result At baseline, three-quarters of clients (n = 633 received advice, on exercise, diet, posture, points to work on at home or other ways of self-care. At 6 months follow-up, about four-fifths reported making changes to their lifestyle 'as a result of having shiatsu treatment', including taking more rest and relaxation or exercise, changing their diet, reducing time at work and other changes such as increased body/mind awareness and levels of confidence and resolve. Building on the findings, an explanatory model of possible ways that a CAM therapy could contribute to health promotion is presented to guide future research, both within and beyond CAM. Conclusion Supporting individuals to take control of their self-care requires advice-giving within a supportive treatment context and practitioner relationship, with clients who are open to change and committed to maintaining their health. CAM modalities may have an important role to play in this endeavour.

  19. Adoption of Enriched Local Complementary Food in Osun State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Locally processed complementary foods, appropriately enriched can complement breast milk and traditional foods during the nutritionally vulnerable periods of a child life. The study therefore examines the adoption of enriched local complementary foods in Osun State Nigeria. Structured interview schedule was used to ...

  20. Application of Environmental Isotope and Hydrogeochemical Techniques in Investigating the Geothermal Resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamarudin Samuding; Noor Akhmal Kamarudin; Mohd Shahrizal Mohamed Sharifodin; Azrul Arifin; Kamaruzaman Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    An investigation of geothermal resources at Ulu Slim has been carried out using integrated environmental isotope and hydro-geochemical techniques. Environmental isotope Oxygen-18 ("1"8O) and Deuterium ("2H) and Tritium ("3H) were used to identify the recharge zones and origin of the water, whereas the hydro-geochemical technique is used to determine the water type and the level of solutes in the geothermal waters out flowing at the surface as well as in shallow and deep groundwater system. The sampling programme includes precipitations, surface waters, hot springs, groundwater for isotopes and hydro-geochemical analyses. The plot graph of (δ"1"8O vs δ"2H) show that the stable isotope composition of hot spring is relatively depleted as compared to surface water and groundwater. This indicates that the recharge of the hot spring is likely to occur from farther and higher elevation areas of the geothermal system. Tritium content in hot spring, groundwater and surface water is ranged between 0.85 - 0.92 TU, 0.81- 1.05 TU, 1.60-2.07 TU respectively. The values of TU in hot spring and groundwater is seen similar suggests that these samples are older than the surface water. Based on the plot of Ternary Major Anion diagram (Cl-SO_4- HCO_3) and Tri-linear Piper diagram, all the water samples are identified from the type of bicarbonate (HCO_3). Nevertheless, the content of sodium (Na) in hot spring is detected relatively higher as compared to surface water. Tri-linear Piper diagram also shows that there is no mixing process between hot spring and surface water. (author)

  1. Hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical investigations in boreholes - Final report of the phase I geochemical investigations of the Stripa groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordstroem, D.K.; Carlsson, L.; Fontes, J.C.; Frits, P.; Moser, H.; Olsson, T.

    1985-07-01

    The hydrogeochemical investigations of Phase I of the Stripa Project (1980-1984) have been completed, and the results are presented in this final report. All chemical and isotopic data on the groundwaters from the beginning to the Stripa Project to the present (1977-84) are tabulated an used in the final interpretations. The background geology and hydrology is summarized and updated along with new analyses of the Stripa grantie. Water-rock interactions form a basic framework for the changes in major-element chemistry with depth, including carbonate geochemistry, the fluid-inclusion hypothesis, redox processes, and mineral precipitation. The irregular distribution of chloride suggests channelling is occurring and the effect of thermomechanical perturbations on the groundwater chemistry is documented. Stable and radioactive isotpes provide information of the origin and evolution of the groundwater itself and of several elments within the groundwater. Subsurface production of radionuclides is documented in these investigations, and a general picture of uranium transformations during weathering is presented. One of the primary conclusions reached in these studies is that different dissolved constituents will provide different residence times because they have different origins and different evolutionary histories that may or may not be related to the overall evolution of the groundwater itself. (author)

  2. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnasissance of the Trinidad NTMS Quadrangle, Colorado, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, S.S. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Uranium and other elemental data resulting from the Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Trinidad National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) quadrangle, Colorado, by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) are reported herein. This study was conducted as part of the United States Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE), which is designed to provide improved estimates of the availability and economics of nuclear fuel resources and to make available to industry information for use in exploration and development of uranium resources. The HSSR data will ultimately be integrated with other NURE data (e.g., airborne radiometric surveys and geological investigations) to complete the entire NURE program. This report is a supplement to the HSSR uranium evaluation report for the Trinidad quadrange (Morris et al, 1978), which presented the field and uranium data for the 1060 water and 1240 sediment samples collected from 1768 locations in the quadrangle. The earlier report contains an evaluation of the uranium concentrations of the samples as well as descriptions of the geology, hydrology, climate, and uranium occurrences of the quadrange. This supplement presents the sediment field and uranium data again and the analyses of 42 other elements in the sediments. All uranium samples were redetermined by delayed-neutron counting (DNC) when the sediment samples were analyzed for 31 elements by neutron activation. For 99.6% of the sediment samples analyzed, the differences between the uranium contents first determined (Morris et al, 1978) and the analyses reported herein are less than 10%

  3. Characterization of mechanisms and processes of groundwater salinization in irrigated coastal area using statistics, GIS, and hydrogeochemical investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzourra, Hazar; Bouhlila, Rachida; Elango, L; Slama, Fairouz; Ouslati, Naceur

    2015-02-01

    Coastal aquifers are at threat of salinization in most parts of the world. This study was carried out in coastal shallow aquifers of Aousja-Ghar El Melh and Kalâat el Andalous, northeastern of Tunisia with an objective to identify sources and processes of groundwater salinization. Groundwater samples were collected from 42 shallow dug wells during July and September 2007. Chemical parameters such as Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), K(+), Cl(-), SO4 (2-), HCO3 (-), NO3 (-), Br(-), and F(-) were analyzed. The combination of hydrogeochemical, statistical, and GIS approaches was used to understand and to identify the main sources of salinization and contamination of these shallow coastal aquifers as follows: (i) water-rock interaction, (ii) evapotranspiration, (iii) saltwater is started to intrude before 1972 and it is still intruding continuously, (iv) irrigation return flow, (v) sea aerosol spray, and finally, (vi) agricultural fertilizers. During 2005/2006, the overexploitation of the renewable water resources of aquifers caused saline water intrusion. In 2007, the freshening of a brackish-saline groundwater occurred under natural recharge conditions by Ca-HCO3 meteoric freshwater. The cationic exchange processes are occurred at fresh-saline interfaces of mixtures along the hydraulic gradient. The sulfate reduction process and the neo-formation of clays minerals characterize the hypersaline coastal Sebkha environments. Evaporation tends to increase the concentrations of solutes in groundwater from the recharge areas to the discharge areas and leads to precipitate carbonate and sulfate minerals.

  4. Data management and analysis systems for large-scale hydrogeochemical reconnaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, R.B.; Maddox, J.H.; Wren, H.F.

    1976-01-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory has developed a versatile, computerized data recording, processing, updating, and retrieval system for handling an expected 150 million bytes of hydrogeochemical data from 150,000 to 200,000 sample sites over the next four years. A sub-system accounts for the movements of samples from initial receipt through final storage. Approximately 6 million sample movements are expected. Two- and three-dimensional plots of sampled geographic areas showing concentrations and locations of individual chemical elements are displayed and reproduced photographically. Pattern recognition techniques enable multivariate data to be categorized into ''clusters'' which indicate sites favorable for uranium exploration

  5. Application of Kriging to hydrogeochemical data from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.E.; Begovich, C.L.; Butz, T.R.; Kane, V.E.

    1980-12-01

    The Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) Program is an important part of the data collection segment of the NURE Program. This report presents the preliminary results of applying a new geostatistical tool, known as Kriging, to HSSR data from the Plainview Quadrangle in Texas. The essential conclusion of this report is that Kriging can be useful in characterizing geochemical data and identification of the anomalous geographic regions used in resource appraisal. Computer codes were prepared for use either on other variables or stream sediment data and/or data from other quadrangles. Several ways of using Kriging to enhance HSSR data for the purpose of identifying favorable areas were identified

  6. FORTRAN computer programs to process Savannah River Laboratory hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.

    1980-03-01

    FORTRAN computer programs have been written to read, edit, and reformat the hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance data produced by Savannah River Laboratory for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. The data are presorted by Savannah River Laboratory into stream sediment, ground water, and stream water for each 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle. Extraneous information is eliminated, and missing analyses are assigned a specific value (-99999.0). Negative analyses are below the detection limit; the absolute value of a negative analysis is assumed to be the detection limit

  7. Intrathecal long-term gene expression by self-complementary adeno-associated virus type 1 suitable for chronic pain studies in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janssen William GM

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intrathecal (IT gene transfer is an attractive approach for targeting spinal mechanisms of nociception but the duration of gene expression achieved by reported methods is short (up to two weeks impairing their utility in the chronic pain setting. The overall goal of this study was to develop IT gene transfer yielding true long-term transgene expression defined as ≥ 3 mo following a single vector administration. We defined "IT" administration as atraumatic injection into the lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF modeling a lumbar puncture. Our studies focused on recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV, one of the most promising vector types for clinical use. Results Conventional single stranded rAAV2 vectors performed poorly after IT delivery in rats. Pseudotyping of rAAV with capsids of serotypes 1, 3, and 5 was tested alone or in combination with a modification of the inverted terminal repeat. The former alters vector tropism and the latter allows packaging of self-complementary rAAV (sc-rAAV vectors. Combining both types of modification led to the identification of sc-rAAV2/l as a vector that performed superiorly in the IT space. IT delivery of 3 × 10e9 sc-rAAV2/l particles per animal led to stable expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP for ≥ 3 mo detectable by Western blotting, quantitative PCR, and in a blinded study by confocal microscopy. Expression was strongest in the cauda equina and the lower sections of the spinal cord and only minimal in the forebrain. Microscopic examination of the SC fixed in situ with intact nerve roots and meninges revealed strong EGFP fluorescence in the nerve roots. Conclusion sc-rAAVl mediates stable IT transgene expression for ≥ 3 mo. Our findings support the underlying hypothesis that IT target cells for gene transfer lack the machinery for efficient conversion of the single-stranded rAAV genome into double-stranded DNA and favor uptake of serotype 1 vectors over 2

  8. The Short-Term Effect of Integrated Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatment in Inpatients Diagnosed with Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Herniation: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Joon-Shik; Lee, Jinho; Kim, Me-Riong; Jung, Jaehoon; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Lee, Myeong Soo; Ha, In-Hyuk

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the short-term effect of hospital-based intensive nonsurgical treatment in lumbar intervertebral disc herniation (IDH) inpatients admitted to an integrated hospital that offers both complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and conventional medicine treatment. A prospective observational study. A private Korean medicine hospital inpatient setting in Korea. A total of 524 inpatients diagnosed with lumbar IDH admitted from June 1, 2012, to May 31, 2013. The participants received treatment according to a CAM treatment protocol (herbal medicine, acupuncture, bee venom pharmacopuncture, and Chuna manipulation) and conventional medicine treatment as needed. Numeric rating scale (NRS) of low back pain (LBP) and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and patient global impression of change. The study also assessed whether improvement was obtained over minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in LBP or leg pain. The average hospital stay was 24.4 ± 13.2 days. The majority of patients received CAM treatment and a few selected conventional medicine, such as pain killers (22.7%; 4.2 ± 3.0 administrations) or nerve blocks (14.1%; 1.4 ± 0.7 sessions). At discharge, the average reduction in NRS was 3.18 ± 2.29 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.99-3.38) for LBP and 2.61 ± 2.60 (95% CI, 2.38-2.83) for leg pain the average reduction in ODI was 19.45 ± 19.53 (95% CI, 17.77-21.12). Two-hundred and seventy patients (51.5%) showed improvement over MCID in both NRS and ODI, 150 (28.6%) in either NRS or ODI, and 104 (19.8%) in neither. Integrated CAM treatment during hospitalization was effective for patients with lumbar IDH who had severe LBP and disability. However, these results must be investigated further to assess whether the effects surpass those seen with placebo and are cost-effective.

  9. Mindfulness as a complementary intervention in the treatment of overweight and obesity in primary health care: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Vera; Kristeller, Jean; Marin, Jesus Montero; Sanudo, Adriana; Lourenço, Bárbara Hatzlhoffer; Schveitzer, Mariana Cabral; D'Almeida, Vania; Morillo, Héctor; Gimeno, Suely Godoy Agostinho; Garcia-Campayo, Javier; Demarzo, Marcelo

    2018-05-11

    Mindfulness has been applied in the United States and Europe to improve physical and psychological health; however, little is known about its feasibility and efficacy in a Brazilian population. Mindfulness may also be relevant in tackling obesity and eating disorders by decreasing binge eating episodes-partly responsible for weight regain for a large number of people-and increasing awareness of emotional and other triggers for overeating. The aim of the present study protocol is to evaluate and compare the feasibility and efficacy of two mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) addressing overweight and obesity in primary care patients: a general programme called Mindfulness-Based Health Promotion and a targeted mindful eating protocol called Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training. A randomised controlled trial will be conducted to compare treatment as usual separately in primary care with both programmes (health promotion and mindful eating) added to treatment as usual. Two hundred forty adult women with overweight and obesity will be enrolled. The primary outcome will be an assessment of improvement in eating behaviour. Secondary outcomes will be (1) biochemical control; (2) anthropometric parameters, body composition, dietary intake and basal metabolism; and (3) levels of mindfulness, stress, depression, self-compassion and anxiety. At the end of each intervention, a focus group will be held to assess the programme's impact on the participants' lives, diet and health. A feasibility study on access to benefits from and importance of MBIs at primary care facilities will be conducted among primary care health care professionals and participants. Monthly maintenance sessions lasting at least 1 hour will be offered, according to each protocol, during the 3-month follow-up periods. This clinical trial will result in more effective mindfulness-based interventions as a complementary treatment in primary care for people with overweight and obesity. If the findings of

  10. Characteristics of users and implications for the use of complementary and alternative medicine in Ghanaian cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy and chemotherapy: a cross- sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarney Joel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is widespread use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM in Ghana, driven by cultural consideration and paradigm to disease causation. Whether there is concurrent use of conventional medicine and CAM in cancer patients is unknown. This study investigates the prevalence, pattern and predictors of CAM use in cancer patients. Overlapping toxicity, sources of information, and whether users inform their doctor about CAM use is examined. Method Cross-sectional study using a questionnaire administered to cancer patients, who were receiving radiotherapy and or chemotherapy or had recently completed treatment at a single institution was used. Results Ninety eight patients participated in the study with a mean age of 55.5 (18–89, made up of 51% females. Married individuals formed 56% of the respondents, whilst 49% had either secondary or tertiary education. Head and neck cancer patients were 15.3%, breast (21.4%, abdomen/pelvic cancers constituted (52%.Seventy seven (78.6% patients received radiotherapy only, 16.3% received radiation and chemotherapy and 5.3% had chemotherapy only. Ninety five patients were diagnosed of cancer within the past 24 months,73.5% were CAM users as follows; massage(66.3%, herbal(59.2%, mega vitamins(55.1%, Chinese medicine(53.1%,and prayer(42.9%. Sixty eight percent were treated with curative intent. Overlapping toxicity was reported. Majority (83.3% of users had not informed their doctor about CAM use. On univariate analysis, female (p=0.004 and palliative patients, p=0.032 were more likely to be CAM users. Multivariate analysis identified female (p Friends and Media are the main sources of information on CAM. There was increase in CAM use after the diagnosis of cancer mainly for Chinese Medicine and vitamins. Conclusion There is high CAM usage among Cancer patients, comparable to use in the general population, there is concurrent use of CAM and conventional medicine with reported

  11. Monetary valorization of the sanitary and environmental impacts of a nuclear accident: synthesis of ''ExternE'' studies, interests and limits of complementary developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.; Schneider, Th.

    2002-09-01

    This document constitutes a synthesis of the various available methods for the monetary evaluation of the nuclear accidents impacts in order to reveal the already evaluated impacts, those which need complementary developments and those for which the monetary approach currently seems to come up against limits. It is based primarily on the approach realized by the ''ExternE'' project of the European Commission, consisting in the evaluation of the external costs of the nuclear energy industry. (A.L.B.)

  12. Hydrogeochemical evaluation of the Simpevarp area, model version 1.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus (ed.) [Geopoint AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Smellie, John [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Gimeno, Maria; Auque, Luis; Gomez, Javier [Univ. of Zaragoza (Spain). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Tullborg, Eva-Lena [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden); Gurban, Ioana [3D-Terra (Sweden)

    2004-02-01

    Siting studies for SKB's programme of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste currently involves the investigation of two locations, Simpevarp and Forsmark, on the eastern coast of Sweden to determine their geological, hydrogeochemical and hydrogeological characteristics. Present work completed has resulted in model version 1.1 which represents the first evaluation of the available Simpevarp groundwater analytical data collected up to July 1st, 2003 (i.e. the first 'data freeze' of the site). The HAG (Hydrochemical Analytical Group) group had access to a total of 535 water samples collected from the surface and sub-surface environment (e.g. soil pipes in the overburden, streams and lakes); only a few samples were collected from drilled boreholes. The deepest fracture groundwater samples with sufficient analytical data reflected depths down to 250 m. Furthermore, most of the waters sampled (79%) lacked crucial analytical information that restricted the evaluation. Consequently, model version 1.1 focussed on the processes taking place in the uppermost part of the bedrock rather than at repository levels. The complex groundwater evolution and patterns at Simpevarp are a result of many factors such as: a) the flat topography and proximity to the Baltic Sea, b) changes in hydrogeology related to glaciation/deglaciation and land uplift, c) repeated marine/lake water regressions/transgressions, and d) organic or inorganic alteration of the groundwater composition caused by microbial processes or water/rock interactions. The sampled groundwaters reflect to various degrees of modern or ancient water/rock interactions and mixing processes. Higher topography to the west of Simpevarp has resulted in hydraulic gradients which have partially flushed out old water types. Except for sea waters, most surface waters and some groundwaters from percussion boreholes are fresh, non-saline waters according to the classification used for Aespoe groundwaters. The rest

  13. Hydrogeological and Hydrogeochemical Modelling of the Alicun de las Torres Termal System (Province of Granada). Isotope Hydrochemistry and Gases in Groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado Perez, A. J.; Delgado, A.; Crespo, M. T.; Martin, A.; Vaselli, O.; Perez del Villar, L.

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of a Singular Strategic Project entitled: A dvanced Technologies of Carbon, Capture and Storage (CCS) , supported by the MICINN (Spain) and the FEDER founds (EU), specifically in the Carbon Storage Task, a comprehensive study on the CO 2 leakage as DIC (Dissolved Inorganic Carbon) in the Alicun de Las Torres (Prov. of Granada) natural analogue thermal system was envisaged. This analogous system is characterised by the presence of a very important travertine formation, which can be considered as a permanent and stable sink for CO 2 . In order to explain the formation of these travertine mass an hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical model of the area has been established by using the hydrochemical data, the stable and radioactive isotope characteristics, the dissolved inorganic carbon, as well as the chemical and isotopic composition of the free and dissolved gases of the above mentioned Thermal System. (Author) 11 refs.

  14. Review of the analytical techniques used in the hydrogeochemical prospecting of uranium; Revue des techniques analytiques utilisees dans la prospection hydrogeochimique de l'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimbert, A; Berthollet, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Section de Geochimie de la Dir. des Recherches et Exploitations Minieres, Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    1959-07-01

    This report examines the methods recommended for the estimation of uranium in water. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods are studied with respect to the qualities necessary for the hydrogeochemical prospecting of uranium sensitivity of the order of 1/5 ppb with an accuracy of 15 to 20 per cent, high fidelity, rapidity, simplicity and low cost. (author) [French] Ce rapport examine les methodes preconisees pour le dosage de l'uranium dans les eaux; les avantages et les inconvenients de ces methodes sont etudies en fonction des qualites necessitees par la prospection hydrogeochimique de l'uranium: sensibilite de l'ordre de 1/5 de ppb avec une precision de 15 a 20 pour cent, grande fidelite, rapidite, simplicite, et bas prix de revient. (auteur)

  15. A feasibility pilot study on the use of complementary therapies delivered via mobile technologies on Icelandic surgical patients' reports of anxiety, pain, and self-efficacy in healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Margaret M

    2015-03-28

    Complementary therapies (CT), such as relaxation technique, massage, guided imagery, and accupuncture have shown to benefit patients undergoing surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of using audio relaxation technique (ART), music intervention (MI), nature video application with music (NVAM), and nature video application without music (NVA) delivered via mobile technologies in a clinical setting. Secondary, the effects of ART, MI, NVAM and NVA on patients' state anxiety, pain perception, and perceived self-efficacy in healing were determined. A randomized clinical trial (RCT) involving 105 same day surgery (SDS) patients, who were assigned to an ART (n = 25), MI (n = 25), NVAM (n = 15), NVA (n = 16), or a control group (n = 24) were assessed for state anxiety, self-reported pain, and self-efficacy four days prior to surgery, immediately prior and following a surgical intervention, and day five post-operative. ANOVA found no statistically significant differences in anxiety scores; pain, or perceived self-efficacy between the five groups. Matched pairs t-Test revealed all participants had an increase in anxiety from pre-op to day 10 follow-up; a significant change in pain levels from pre-op to day 10 follow-up; and all participants had a significant increase in general self-efficacy from pre-op to day 10 follow-up. Mean pain level scores from day 1 to pre-op showed a significant decrease in pain for the ART group and NVAM group. Matched pairs t-Test for self-efficacy scores indicated the MI group and the NVA group had significant increases in self-efficacy. A significant decrease in anxiety from pre-op to day 10 for participants reporting a prior history of anxiety and for those reporting prior history of taking anti-anxiety medications. Despite the non-significant findings between the five groups, at any measurement point, there were valuable trends toward significance and confirmed feasibility in a clinical setting

  16. Hydrogeochemical transport modeling of 24 years of Rhine water infiltration in the dunes of the Amsterdam Water Supply.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Breukelen, B.M.; Appelo, C.A.J.; Olsthoorn, T.N.

    1998-01-01

    Water quality changes were modelled along a flowpath in a plume of artificially recharged, pretreated Rhine water in the dunes of the Amsterdam Water Supply, after 24 years of infiltration. The hydrogeochemical transport model PHREEQC was extended with dispersion/diffusion and kinetics for selected

  17. Predictability of the evolution of hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical systems; geological disposal of nuclear waste in crystalline rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, W.M.; Diodato, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Confidence in long-term geologic isolation of high-level nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel requires confidence in predictions of the evolution of hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical systems. Prediction of the evolution of hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical systems is based on scientific understanding of those systems in the present - an understanding that can be tested with data from the past. Crystalline rock settings that have been geologically stable for millions of years and longer offer the potential of predictable, long-term waste isolation. Confidence in predictions of geologic isolation of radioactive waste can measured by evaluating the extent to which those predictions and their underlying analyses are consistent with multiple independent lines of evidence identified in the geologic system being analysed, as well as with evidence identified in analogs to that geologic system. The proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, United States, differs in significant ways from potential repository sites being considered by other nations. Nonetheless, observations of hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical systems of Yucca Mountain and Yucca Mountain analogs present multiple independent lines of evidence that can be used in evaluating long-term predictions of the evolution of hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical systems at Yucca Mountain. (authors)

  18. Complementary therapies for acne vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huijuan; Yang, Guoyan; Wang, Yuyi; Liu, Jian Ping; Smith, Caroline A; Luo, Hui; Liu, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    Background Acne is a chronic skin disease characterised by inflamed spots and blackheads on the face, neck, back, and chest. Cysts and scarring can also occur, especially in more severe disease. People with acne often turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, and dietary modifications, because of their concerns about the adverse effects of conventional medicines. However, evidence for CAM therapies has not been systematically assessed. Objectives To assess the effects and safety of any complementary therapies in people with acne vulgaris. Search methods We searched the following databases from inception up to 22 January 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 1), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), AMED (from 1985), CINAHL (from 1981), Scopus (from 1966), and a number of other databases listed in the Methods section of the review. The Cochrane CAM Field Specialised Register was searched up to May 2014. We also searched five trials registers and checked the reference lists of articles for further references to relevant trials. Selection criteria We included parallel-group randomised controlled trials (or the first phase data of randomised cross-over trials) of any kind of CAM, compared with no treatment, placebo, or other active therapies, in people with a diagnosis of acne vulgaris. Data collection and analysis Three authors collected data from each included trial and evaluated the methodological quality independently. They resolved disagreements by discussion and, as needed, arbitration by another author. Main results We included 35 studies, with a total of 3227 participants. We evaluated the majority as having unclear risk of selection, attrition, reporting, detection, and other biases. Because of the clinical heterogeneity between trials and the incomplete data reporting, we could only include four

  19. Complementary therapies for acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huijuan; Yang, Guoyan; Wang, Yuyi; Liu, Jian Ping; Smith, Caroline A; Luo, Hui; Liu, Yueming

    2015-01-19

    Acne is a chronic skin disease characterised by inflamed spots and blackheads on the face, neck, back, and chest. Cysts and scarring can also occur, especially in more severe disease. People with acne often turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, and dietary modifications, because of their concerns about the adverse effects of conventional medicines. However, evidence for CAM therapies has not been systematically assessed. To assess the effects and safety of any complementary therapies in people with acne vulgaris. We searched the following databases from inception up to 22 January 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014,Issue 1), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), AMED (from 1985), CINAHL (from 1981), Scopus (from 1966), and a number of other databases listed in the Methods section of the review. The Cochrane CAM Field Specialised Register was searched up to May 2014. We also searched five trials registers and checked the reference lists of articles for further references to relevant trials. We included parallel-group randomised controlled trials (or the first phase data of randomised cross-over trials) of any kind of CAM, compared with no treatment, placebo, or other active therapies, in people with a diagnosis of acne vulgaris. Three authors collected data from each included trial and evaluated the methodological quality independently. They resolved disagreements by discussion and, as needed, arbitration by another author. We included 35 studies, with a total of 3227 participants. We evaluated the majority as having unclear risk of selection, attrition, reporting, detection, and other biases. Because of the clinical heterogeneity between trials and the incomplete data reporting, we could only include four trials in two meta-analyses, with two trials in each meta-analysis. The categories of CAM included

  20. Use of complementary and alternative medicines during the third trimester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallivalapila, Abdul Rouf; Stewart, Derek; Shetty, Ashalatha; Pande, Binita; Singh, Rajvir; McLay, James S

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence, indications, and associated factors for complementary and alternative medicine use during the last trimester of pregnancy. A questionnaire survey was conducted of women with a live birth (N=700) admitted to the postnatal unit at the Royal Aberdeen Maternity Hospital, northeast Scotland. Outcome measures included: complementary and alternative medicine used; vitamins and minerals used; reasons for complementary and alternative medicine use; independent associated factors for use; views; and experiences. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis was performed. The response rate was 79.6% of eligible women. Two thirds of respondents (61.4%) reported using complementary and alternative medicine, excluding vitamins and minerals, during the third trimester. Respondents reported using a total of 30 different complementary and alternative medicine modalities, of which oral herbal products were the most common (38% of respondents, 40 different products). The independent associated factors for complementary and alternative medicine use identified were: complementary and alternative medicine use before pregnancy (odds ratio [OR] 4.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.39-7.95, Palternative medicine use by family or friends (OR 2.36, 95% CI 1.61-3.47, Palternative medicines were safer than prescribed medicines (P=.006), less likely to be associated with side effects (P≤.001), and could interfere with conventional medicines (P≤.001). Despite the majority of respondents, and notably users, being uncertain about their safety and effectiveness, complementary and alternative medicine modalities and complementary and alternative medicine products are widely used during the third trimester of pregnancy in this study population. Although prior use was the most significant independent associated factor, the role of family and friends, rather than health professionals, in the decision to use complementary and alternative medicine may be of concern

  1. Complementary Colours for a Physicist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babic, Vitomir; Cepic, Mojca

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple experiment which enables splitting incident light into two different modes, each having a colour exactly complementary to the other. A brief historical development of colour theories and differences in a physicist's point of view with respect to an artist's one is discussed. An experimental system for producing…

  2. Parental concerns about complementary feeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annemette; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Holm, Lotte

    2013-01-01

    Background/objectives:To investigate and analyze differences in parental concerns during earlier and later phases of complementary feeding.Subject/methods:Eight focus group interviews were conducted with 45 mothers of children aged 7 or 13 months. Deductive and inductive coding procedures were ap......:10.1038/ejcn.2013.165....

  3. Complementary therapies in social psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, Anita; Dürr, Dorte Wiwe

    three residential homes (n= 51 / 91 respondents - response rate 56 %) shows that the most common used complementary therapy is music therapy 43%, and only 10% of residents do not use these therapies at all. Overall, 43% of residents strongly agree, that these therapies strengthens their recovery process...

  4. Industrial Evolution Through Complementary Convergence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøslev Christensen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The article addresses the dynamics through which product markets become derailed from early product life cycle (PLC)-tracks and engaged in complementary convergence with other product markets or industries. We compare and contrast the theories that can explain, respectively, the PLC...

  5. Hydrogeochemical impact of CO{sub 2} leakage from geological sequestration on shallow potable aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, A.G.

    2013-09-15

    Over the past 10 years scientists have worked in earnest to understand the potential effects of leakage in order that an informed decision on CCGS implementation can be made. This research can be broadly described as aiming to answer two key questions; how deleterious is leakage of CCGS to groundwater resources? and can it be detected geochemically? Some common hydrochemical development is apparent from the literature however many aspects of hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical impact of leakage into shallow aquifers used in water supply remain unclear. In this Ph.D. study an integrated approach was employed in order to answer the two key questions regarding leakage of CO{sub 2} into shallow aquifers. Consequently a combination of laboratory and field investigations were conducted supported by numerical geochemical modeling in order to identify, constrain and quantify processes controlling groundwater chemistry evolution. The output is 4 journal articles and 3 technical reports. In paper I and technical report I simple batch reactors were employed coupled to comprehensive sediment characterization to determine the likely effects of CO{sub 2} on water chemistry in a range of shallow aquifers. Results showed aquifers can be broadly divided into three types; carbonate dominated, silicate dominated and mixed. Each aquifer type showed distinct water chemistry evolution thus inherent risks vary. These studies also highlighted the complexity of risk assessment and detection caused by the range of formation types potentially overlying storage reservoirs. Investigations described in Papers II, III and technical report II increase applicability to real leakage by observing in situ effects including groundwater flow. A silicate dominated shallow aquifer in Vroegum, western Denmark forms the focus of study upon which a series of investigations were conducted. The main field study involved injection of 1600 kg of gas phase CO{sub 2} into the shallow Vroegum aquifer over 72 days

  6. Learning from nature: binary cooperative complementary nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bin; Guo, Wei; Jiang, Lei

    2015-03-01

    In this Review, nature-inspired binary cooperative complementary nanomaterials (BCCNMs), consisting of two components with entirely opposite physiochemical properties at the nanoscale, are presented as a novel concept for the building of promising materials. Once the distance between the two nanoscopic components is comparable to the characteristic length of some physical interactions, the cooperation between these complementary building blocks becomes dominant and endows the macroscopic materials with novel and superior properties. The first implementation of the BCCNMs is the design of bio-inspired smart materials with superwettability and their reversible switching between different wetting states in response to various kinds of external stimuli. Coincidentally, recent studies on other types of functional nanomaterials contribute more examples to support the idea of BCCNMs, which suggests a potential yet comprehensive range of future applications in both materials science and engineering. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Monitoring and evaluating the adherence to a complementary food supplement (Ying Yang Bao) among young children in rural Qinghai, China: a mixed methods evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Yanfeng; Chang, Suying; Wang, Wei; Helena van Velthoven, Michelle; Han, Huijun; Xing, Min; Chen, Li; Du, Xiaozhen; Scherpbier, Robert W

    2017-06-01

    Large investments are currently made in community-based complementary food supplement (Ying Yang Bao, YYB) programs to improve nutrition of young children in rural areas in China. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the experience and challenges of implementing YYB programs in China. We aimed to: 1) monitor distribution of YYB; 2) assess children's adherence to and acceptability of YYB; and 3) evaluate community-based strategies to improve the program. This mixed methods evaluation study combined data from surveys and focus groups that took place during a controlled interventional evaluation trial. The trial aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of community-based YYB distribution on improving children's health status in rural areas in China. We conducted five cross-sectional surveys with caregivers of children aged 6-23 months (baseline survey (N = 1804) in August 2012 and four follow-up cross-sectional surveys: 1) N = 494 in January 2013; 2) N = 2187 in August 2013; 3) N = 504 in January 2014; and 4) N = 2186 in August 2014) in one rural county in Qinghai Province. We used a two-stage cluster sampling technique to select mothers with eligible children for each survey. Information was collected from caregivers on household characteristics, YYB consumption and acceptability in the surveys. High adherence in each survey was defined as children who consumed at least four YYB sachets during the previous week. A logistic regression model was developed to obtain odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals of factors associated with high adherence. Also, we conducted 10 focus groups with73 caregivers and health workers involved in the YYB distribution. Content analysis was used to explore qualitative findings, which were used to gain deeper insight into the quantitative results. Around 90% of caregivers had ever received YYB and more than 80% of children ever took YYB. Caregivers mainly knew about YYB through their village doctors. High

  8. Complementary X-ray and neutron radiography study of the initial lithiation process in lithium-ion batteries containing silicon electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Fu, E-mail: fu.sun@helmholtz-berlin.de [Institute of Material Science and Technologies, Technical University Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Markötter, Henning [Institute of Material Science and Technologies, Technical University Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Manke, Ingo; Hilger, André [Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Alrwashdeh, Saad S. [Institute of Material Science and Technologies, Technical University Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Mu' tah University, P.O. Box 7, Al-Karak 61710 Jordan (Jordan); Kardjilov, Nikolay [Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Banhart, John [Institute of Material Science and Technologies, Technical University Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • A radiography cell for in operando X-ray radiography was designed and built. • A self-assembled CR2032 coin cell was built for in operando neutron radiography. • In operando X-ray and neuron radiography were conducted by using Si electrode half cells. - Abstract: Complementary in operando X-ray radiography and neutron radiography measurements were conducted to investigate and visualize the initial lithiation in silicon-electrode lithium-ion batteries. By means of X-ray radiography, a significant volume expansion of Si particles and the Si electrode during the first discharge was observed. In addition, many Si particles were found that never undergo electrochemical reactions. These findings were confirmed by neutron radiography, which, for the first time, showed the process of Li alloying with the Si electrode during initial lithiation. These results demonstrate that complementary X-ray and neutron radiography is a powerful tool to investigate the lithiation mechanisms inside Si-electrode based lithium-ion batteries.

  9. The Survey of hydro-geochemical and health related of water quality in Ramian city, Golestan province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    fahimeh Khanduzi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Investigation of water quality is an important step for the suitable use of water resources in order to drinking and irrigation. Water quality affects agriculture programming.  Hence the need of the study of water quality is strongly considered in the water resources management. Material and Methods: In this study Hydro-geochemical quality of ground water resources in the Ramian city -Golestan province has been studied for drinking and agriculture purpose. For this purpose, 15 qualitative characteristics of the 13 wells of Golestan province in two dry and wet seasons in 2011-2012 were analyzed by Aua Chem and Aq-qa. Results: The results showed that the ground water in the study area is classified in hard and very hard water. The original cations and anions in water are Ca2+> Mg2+> Na+ and HCO3-> Cl-> SO42-. Based on hydro-chemical diagram the dominant of water type is classified as Ca-HCO3. Salinity index of water indicated that more samples in two seasons are in the middle class. According to Schuler and Wilcox groundwater quality index, they are moderate suitable for agricultural and drinking consumption and in for agricultural purpose and 77% cases are in C3-S1 category. Conclusion: The results show that too much salt is one of the most important problems of water supply in the Ramian city for irrigation. This reduced plant growth or even stops the growth of some plant. If water resources in this area do not manage, after shortly time the soil will be suffered and polluted.

  10. The use of complementary and alternative therapies in childhood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines ... based on a descriptive survey from the western black sea region of Turkey ... Materials and Methods: The study, of cross-sectional design, was conducted with the ...

  11. Hydrogeochemical evaluation of the Forsmark site, model version 1.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus (ed.) [GeoPoint AB, Sollentuna (Sweden); Gimeno, Maria; Auque, Luis; Gomez, Javier [Univ. of Zaragoza (Spain). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Smellie, John [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Tullborg, Eva-Lena [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden); Gurban, Ioana [3D-Terra, Montreal (Canada)

    2004-01-01

    Siting studies for SKB's programme of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste currently involves the investigation of two locations, Forsmark and Simpevarp, on the eastern coast of Sweden to determine their geological, geochemical and hydrogeological characteristics. Present work completed has resulted in model version 1.1 which represents the first evaluation of the available Forsmark groundwater analytical data collected up to May 1, 2003 (i.e. the first 'data freeze'). The HAG group had access to a total of 456 water samples collected mostly from the surface and sub-surface environment (e.g. soil pipes in the overburden, streams and lakes); only a few samples were collected from drilled boreholes. The deepest samples reflected depths down to 200 m. Furthermore, most of the waters sampled (74%) lacked crucial analytical information that restricted the evaluation. Consequently, model version 1.1 focussed on the processes taking place in the uppermost part of the bedrock rather than at repository levels. The complex groundwater evolution and patterns at Forsmark are a result of many factors such as: a) the flat topography and closeness to the Baltic Sea resulting in relative small hydrogeological driving forces which can preserve old water types from being flushed out, b) the changes in hydrogeology related to glaciation/deglaciation and land uplift, c) repeated marine/lake water regressions/transgressions, and d) organic or inorganic alteration of the groundwater caused by microbial processes or water/rock interactions. The sampled groundwaters reflect to various degrees modern or ancient water/rock interactions and mixing processes. Based on the general geochemical character and the apparent age two major water types occur in Forsmark: fresh-meteoric waters with a bicarbonate imprint and low residence times (tritium values above detection limit), and brackish-marine waters with Cl contents up to 6,000 mg/L and longer residence times (tritium

  12. 78 FR 10184 - National Center For Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal... Alternative Medicine Special Emphasis Panel; Clinical Studies of Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Date... Person: Hungyi Shau, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, National Center For Complementary, and Alternative...

  13. 76 FR 59707 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    ... Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal... for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special Emphasis Panel, Training and Education. Date... Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special Emphasis Panel, Clinical Studies of CAM Therapies. Date: November...

  14. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory approach to hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance for uranium in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolivar, S.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory of the United States is conducting a geochemical survey for uranium in the Rocky Mountain states of New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana and in Alaska. This survey is part of a national hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance in which four Department of Energy laboratories will study the uranium resources of the United States to provide data for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. The reconnaissance will identify areas having higher than background concentrations of uranium in ground waters, surface waters, and water-transported sediments. Water and sediment samples are collected at a nominal density of one sample location per 10 km/sup 2/ except for lake areas of Alaska where the density is one sample location per 23 km/sup 2/. Water samples are analyzed for uranium by fluorometry which has a 0.02 parts per billion lower limit of detection. Concentrations of 12 additional elements in water are determined by plasma-source emission spectrography. All sediments are analyzed for uranium by delayed-neutron counting with a 20 parts per billion lower limit of detection, which is well below the range of uranium concentrations in natural sediment samples. Elemental concentrations in sediments are also determined by neutron activation analysis for 31 elements by x-ray fluorescence for 9 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. The multielement analyses provide valuable data for studies concerning pathfinder elements, environmental pollution, elemental distributions, dispersion halos, and economic ore deposits other than uranium. To date, all of four Rocky Mountain states and about 80% of Alaska have been sampled. About 220,000 samples have been collected from an area of nearly 2,500,000 km/sup 2/.

  15. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory approach to hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance for uranium in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar, S.L.

    1980-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory of the United States is conducting a geochemical survey for uranium in the Rocky Mountain states of New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana and in Alaska. This survey is part of a national hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance in which four Department of Energy laboratories will study the uranium resources of the United States to provide data for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. The reconnaissance will identify areas having higher than background concentrations of uranium in ground waters, surface waters, and water-transported sediments. The reconnaissance data will be combined with data from airborne radiometric surveys and geological and geophysical investigations to provide an improved estimate for the economics and availability of nuclear fuel resources in the United States and to make information available to industry for use in the exploration and development of uranium resources. Water samples are analyzed for uranium by fluorometry which has a 0.02 parts per billion lower limit of detection. Concentrations of 12 additional elements in water are determined by plasma-source emission spectrography. All sediments are analyzed for uranium by delayed-neutron counting and a 20 parts per billion lower limit of detection. Elemental concentrations in sediments are also determined by neutron activation analysis, x-ray fluorescence, and by arc-source emission spectrography. To date, all of four Rocky Mountain states and about 80% of Alaska have been sampled. About 220,000 samples have been collected from an area of nearly 2,500,000 km 2 . The philosophy, sampling methodology, analytical techniques, and progress of the reconnaissance are described in several published pilot study, reconnaissance, and technical reports. The Los Alamos program was designed to maximize the identification of uranium in terrains of varied geography, geology, and climate

  16. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory approach to hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance for uranium in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar, S.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory of the United States is conducting a geochemical survey for uranium in the Rocky Mountain states of New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana and in Alaska. This survey is part of a national hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance in which four Department of Energy laboratories will study the uranium resources of the United States to provide data for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. The reconnaissance will identify areas having higher than background concentrations of uranium in ground waters, surface waters, and water-transported sediments. Water and sediment samples are collected at a nominal density of one sample location per 10 km 2 except for lake areas of Alaska where the density is one sample location per 23 km 2 . Water samples are analyzed for uranium by fluorometry which has a 0.02 parts per billion lower limit of detection. Concentrations of 12 additional elements in water are determined by plasma-source emission spectrography. All sediments are analyzed for uranium by delayed-neutron counting with a 20 parts per billion lower limit of detection, which is well below the range of uranium concentrations in natural sediment samples. Elemental concentrations in sediments are also determined by neutron activation analysis for 31 elements by x-ray fluorescence for 9 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. The multielement analyses provide valuable data for studies concerning pathfinder elements, environmental pollution, elemental distributions, dispersion halos, and economic ore deposits other than uranium. To date, all of four Rocky Mountain states and about 80% of Alaska have been sampled. About 220,000 samples have been collected from an area of nearly 2,500,000 km 2

  17. Mining exploitation of Imouraren.Complementary studies.Report of synthesis - volume I. and J. Project realization Economics variants and studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    The object of volume I is to propose a plan for the Imouraren project realization. The study consists essentially of studies realization, supplies and construction and operator particular activities during investment period.This study : technical activities level to be attained and recommended method for their execution, project realization planning and overall complex investment costs mine, processing plant, utilities and general services, town and infrastructures. The aim of the volume J is to present studies result that have been carried out within three main directions : an essay of several procedure variants for the plant ; a modification of mining exploitation planning to minimize the overburden and obtain an average grade of maximum ore during first years functionment and economical studies in order to economically evaluate the project in many cases by calculating the internal rate of profit for many uranium sell prices and by utilizing as base investment costs and functioning project reference [fr

  18. Geochemistry and hydrogeochemical process of groundwater in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    the aquifer system in the study area (lithology, structure, conditions and underground circulation ... rock types, quality of recharge water and inputs from sources other ...... hydrogeology of the carbonate peninsulas of Florida and Yucatan. J.

  19. Experiences and meanings of integration of TCAM (Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medical) providers in three Indian states: results from a cross-sectional, qualitative implementation research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, D; Narayan, V V; Josyula, L K; Porter, J D H; Sathyanarayana, T N; Sheikh, K

    2014-11-25

    Efforts to engage Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medical (TCAM) practitioners in the public health workforce have growing relevance for India's path to universal health coverage. We used an action-centred framework to understand how policy prescriptions related to integration were being implemented in three distinct Indian states. Health departments and district-level primary care facilities in the states of Kerala, Meghalaya and Delhi. In each state, two or three districts were chosen that represented a variation in accessibility and distribution across TCAM providers (eg, small or large proportions of local health practitioners, Homoeopaths, Ayurvedic and/or Unani practitioners). Per district, two blocks or geographical units were selected. TCAM and allopathic practitioners, administrators and representatives of the community at the district and state levels were chosen based on publicly available records from state and municipal authorities. A total of 196 interviews were carried out: 74 in Kerala, and 61 each in Delhi and Meghalaya. We sought to understand experiences and meanings associated with integration across stakeholders, as well as barriers and facilitators to implementing policies related to integration of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative (TCA) providers at the systems level. We found that individual and interpersonal attributes tended to facilitate integration, while system features and processes tended to hinder it. Collegiality, recognition of stature, as well as exercise of individual personal initiative among TCA practitioners and of personal experience of TCAM among allopaths enabled integration. The system, on the other hand, was characterised by the fragmentation of jurisdiction and facilities, intersystem isolation, lack of trust in and awareness of TCA systems, and inadequate infrastructure and resources for TCA service delivery. State-tailored strategies that routinise interaction, reward individual and system

  20. Integrative Medicine and Complementary and Alternative Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... complementary therapies with your healthcare team: Are there complementary therapies that you would recommend? What research is available about this therapy’s safety and effectiveness? What are the benefits and risks of this ...

  1. Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C Research. Information. Outreach. The Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine (OCCAM) was established in October 1998 to coordinate ... National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the arena of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). More about us. CAM at the NCI ...

  2. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines: Advanced Search. Journal Home > African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines: Advanced Search. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  3. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Valdez NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Valdez NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System (GJOIS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A to D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream sediment, lake sediment, stream water, lake water, and ground water samples.

  4. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment sampling for uranium in the sandstone environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenrich, K.J.

    1985-01-01

    Sandstone terranes commonly host uranium occurrences in the western United States. In addition, because sedimentary terranes, particularly shales and immature, not well cemented sandstone, contribute more sediment and soluble material than do plutonic, volcanic, or metamorphic terranes they are an excellent regime for hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment prospecting. Because of higher conductivity, and hence higher uranium content, of waters draining such environments the sampling need not be as precise nor the analytical detection limit as low as in other terranes to yield a successful survey. Nevertheless, reasonable preparation and care of the samples is recommended: (1) The water samples should be filtered through 0.45 μm membranes and acidified to a pH of less than 1. (2) Because the adsorption of uranium by organic material is so significant it is recommended that the reasonable finest stream-sediment fraction, 4 , conductivity, etc.) are useful in the data reduction towards the elimination of false anomalies. (author)

  5. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Healy NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    Results of a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Healy NTMS quadrangle, Alaska are presented. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. In this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A to D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs into groups of stream sediment, lake sediment, stream water, lake water, and ground water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements multivariate statistical analyses have been included

  6. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Seldovia NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    Results of a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Seldovia NTMS quadrangle, Alaska are presented. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. In this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A to D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs into groups of stream sediment, lake sediment, stream water, lake water, and ground water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report

  7. Hydrogeochemical assessment of crystaline rock for radioactive waste disposal: the Stripa experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, J.; Fontes, J.C.; Fritz, P.; Nordstroem, K.

    1988-08-01

    This report presents a program for the hydro-geochemical assessment of a crystalline rock site for radioactive waste disposal. It is based upon experience gained during the international program of hydrochemical work at the Stripa mine. The important result of this work are summarized in this report and fuller details may be found in the separate final reports of the Phase 1 and Phase 2 geochemical investigations of the Stripa groundwaters. The present report summarizes the general sampling requirements for a successful hydrochecmical investigation; the isotopic and chemical parameters which should be determined an the geochemical characterization of the rock matrix necessary for the interpretation of hydrochemistry. A general strategy for site evaluation by geochemical methods is presented. (authors)

  8. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Philip Smith Mountains NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    Results of a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Philip Smith Mountains NTMS quadrangle, Alaska are presented. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. In this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs into groups of stream sediment and lake sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report

  9. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Philip Smith Mountains NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-09-01

    Results of a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Philip Smith Mountains NTMS quadrangle, Alaska are presented. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. In this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs into groups of stream sediment and lake sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report.

  10. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Mt. Hayes NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    Results of a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Mt. Hayes quadrangle, Alaska, are presented. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. In this data release are location data, field analyses, and Laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A to D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs into groups of stream sediment, lake sediment, stream water, lake water, and ground water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report

  11. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Chandalar NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    Results of a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Chandalar NTMS quadrangle, Alaska are presented. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. In this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, may field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs into groups of stream sediment and lake sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report

  12. Multivariate statistical analysis of the hydrogeochemical and isotopic composition of the groundwater resources in northeastern Peloponnesus (Greece).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiatos, Ioannis; Alexopoulos, Apostolos; Godelitsas, Athanasios

    2014-04-01

    The present study involves an integration of the hydrogeological, hydrochemical and isotopic (both stable and radiogenic) data of the groundwater samples taken from aquifers occurring in the region of northeastern Peloponnesus. Special emphasis has been given to health-related ions and isotopes in relation to the WHO and USEPA guidelines, to highlight the concentrations of compounds (e.g., As and Ba) exceeding the drinking water thresholds. Multivariate statistical analyses, i.e. two principal component analyses (PCA) and one discriminant analysis (DA), combined with conventional hydrochemical methodologies, were applied, with the aim to interpret the spatial variations in the groundwater quality and to identify the main hydrogeochemical factors and human activities responsible for the high ion concentrations and isotopic content in the groundwater analysed. The first PCA resulted in a three component model, which explained approximately 82% of the total variance of the data sets and enabled the identification of the hydrogeological processes responsible for the isotopic content i.e., δ(18)Ο, tritium and (222)Rn. The second PCA, involving the trace element presence in the water samples, revealed a four component model, which explained approximately 89% of the total variance of the data sets, giving more insight into the geochemical and anthropogenic controls on the groundwater composition (e.g., water-rock interaction, hydrothermal activity and agricultural activities). Using discriminant analysis, a four parameter (δ(18)O, (Ca+Mg)/(HCO3+SO4), EC and Cl) discriminant function concerning the (222)Rn content was derived, which favoured a classification of the samples according to the concentration of (222)Rn as (222)Rn-safe (11 Bq·L(-1)). The selection of radon builds on the fact that this radiogenic isotope has been generally related to increased health risk when consumed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. NURE [National Uranium Resource Evaluation] HSSR [Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance] Introduction to Data Files, United States: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    One product of the Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) program, a component of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE), is a data-base of interest to scientists and professionals in the academic, business, industrial, and governmental communities. This database contains individual records for water and sediment samples taken during the reconnaissance survey of the entire United States, excluding Hawaii. The purpose of this report is to describe the NURE HSSR data by highlighting its key characteristics and providing user guides to the data. A companion report, ''A Technical History of the NURE HSSR Program,'' summarizes those aspects of the HSSR Program which are likely to be important in helping users understand the database. Each record on the database contains varying information on general field or site characteristics and analytical results for elemental concentrations in the sample; the database is potentially valuable for describing the geochemistry of specified locations and addressing issues or questions in other areas such as water quality, geoexploration, and hydrologic studies. This report is organized in twelve volumes. This first volume presents a brief history of the NURE HSSR program, a description of the data files produced by ISP, a Users' Dictionary for the Analysis File and graphs showing the distribution of elemental concentrations for sediments at the US level. Volumes 2 through 12 are comprised of Data Summary Tables displaying the percentile distribution of the elemental concentrations on the file. Volume 2 contains data for the individual states. Volumes 3 through 12 contain data for the 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangles, organized into eleven regional files; the data for the two regional files for Alaska (North and South) are bound together as Volume 12

  14. Hydrogeochemical characteristics and sources of salinity of the springs near Wenquanzhen in the eastern Sichuan Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Juan; Zhou, Xun; Wang, Lidong; Zhang, Yuqi; Shen, Xiaowei; Zhou, Haiyan; Ye, Shen; Fang, Bin

    2017-12-01

    Natural springs have the potential to provide important information on hydrogeochemical processes within aquifers. This study used traditional and classic technical methods and procedures to determine the characteristics and evolution of springs to gain further knowledge on the differences between hot saline springs and cold fresh springs. In a short river segment near Wenquanzhen in the eastern Sichuan Basin, southwest China, several natural springs coexist with total dissolved solids (TDS) ranging from less than 1 to 15 g/L and temperatures from 15 to 40 °C. The springs emanate from the outcropping Lower and Middle Triassic carbonates in the river valley cutting the core of an anticline. The cold springs are of Cl·HCO3-Na·Ca and Cl·SO4-Na types, and the hot saline springs are mainly of Cl-Na type. The chemistry of the springs has undergone some changes with time. The stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes indicate that the spring waters are of a meteoric origin. The salinity of the springs originates from dissolution of minerals, including halite, gypsum, calcite and dolomite. The evolution of the springs involves the following mechanisms: the groundwater receives recharge from infiltration of precipitation, then undergoes deep circulation in the core of the anticline (incongruent dissolution of the salt-bearing strata occurs), and emerges in the river valley in the form of hot springs with high TDS. Groundwater also undergoes shallow circulation in the northern and southern flanks of the anticline and appears in the river valley in the form of cold springs with low TDS.

  15. The assessment of processes controlling the spatial distribution of hydrogeochemical groundwater types in Mali using multivariate statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keita, Souleymane; Zhonghua, Tang

    2017-10-01

    Sustainable management of groundwater resources is a major issue for developing countries, especially in Mali. The multiple uses of groundwater led countries to promote sound management policies for sustainable use of the groundwater resources. For this reason, each country needs data enabling it to monitor and predict the changes of the resources. Also given the importance of groundwater quality changes often marked by the recurrence of droughts; the potential impacts of regional and geological setting of groundwater resources requires careful study. Unfortunately, recent decades have seen a considerable reduction of national capacities to ensure the hydrogeological monitoring and production of qualit data for decision making. The purpose of this work is to use the groundwater data and translate into useful information that can improve water resources management capacity in Mali. In this paper, we used groundwater analytical data from accredited, laboratories in Mali to carry out a national scale assessment of the groundwater types and their distribution. We, adapted multivariate statistical methods to classify 2035 groundwater samples into seven main groundwater types and built a national scale map from the results. We used a two-level K-mean clustering technique to examine the hydro-geochemical records as percentages of the total concentrations of major ions, namely sodium (Na), magnesium (Mg), calcium (Ca), chloride (Cl), bicarbonate (HCO3), and sulphate (SO4). The first step of clustering formed 20 groups, and these groups were then re-clustered to produce the final seven groundwater types. The results were verified and confirmed using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and RockWare (Aq.QA) software. We found that HCO3 was the most dominant anion throughout the country and that Cl and SO4 were only important in some local zones. The dominant cations were Na and Mg. Also, major ion ratios changed with geographical location and geological, and climatic

  16. Evaluation of Groundwater for Arsenic Contamination Using Hydrogeochemical Properties and Multivariate Statistical Methods in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah S. Al-Farraj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to evaluate arsenic distribution and associated hydrogeochemical parameters in 27 randomly selected boreholes representing aquifers in the Al-Kharj geothermal fields of Saudi Arabia. Arsenic was detected at all sites, with 92.5% of boreholes yielding concentrations above the WHO permissible limit of 10 μg/L. The maximum concentration recorded was 122 μg/L (SD = 29 μg/L skewness = 1.87. The groundwater types were mainly Ca+2-Mg+2-SO4-2-Cl− and Na+-Cl−-SO4-2, accounting for 67% of the total composition. Principal component analysis (PCA showed that the main source of arsenic release was geothermal in nature and was linked to processes similar to those involved in the release of boron. The PCA yielded five components, which accounted for 44.1%, 17.0%, 10.1%, 08.4%, and 06.5% of the total variance. The first component had positive loadings for arsenic and boron along with other hydrogeochemical parameters, indicating the primary sources of As mobilization are derived from regional geothermal systems and weathering of minerals. The remaining principal components indicated reductive dissolution of iron oxyhydroxides as a possible mechanism. Spatial evaluation of the PCA results indicated that this secondary mechanism of arsenic mobilization may be active and correlates positively with total organic carbon. The aquifers were found to be contaminated to a high degree with organic carbon ranging from 0.57 mg/L to 21.42 mg/L and showed high concentrations of NO3- ranging from 8.05 mg/L to 248.2 mg/L.

  17. Hydrogeochemical interpretation of the groundwater at the Haestholmen site, Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordstrom, D.K.

    1986-11-01

    This investigation forms a part of the research aimed at marking an assessment of the suitability of rapakivi granite at Haestholmen, an island off the southeastern coast of Finland, for the storage of reactor waste from the Loviisa nuclear power plant. The purpose of this study is to provide preliminary interpretations of the groundwater chemistry based on analyses of groundwater samples taken from several drillholes down to depths of 200 m, as well as other hydrogeological studies made on the site. Chemical analyses of grounfwaters at Haestholmen have demonstrated a fresh-water/saline-water interface at 60-150 m depth, depending on the distance from the coast. The main conclusions from this study are that (1) the saline water has a seawater origin, (2) the saline water is most likely old Baltic seawater from the early to middle Holocene, (3) this seawater has been chemically modified by at least four processes: calcite precipitation, fluorite dissolution and precipitation, Na-K-Mg-Ca cation exchange and sulfate reduction, (4) the saline groundwaters are not chemically uniform with depth and (5) the saline water chemistry reflects a structural control by the bedrock

  18. Complementary and alternative medicine use in children with thalassaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efe, Emine; Işler, Ayşegül; Sarvan, Süreyya; Başer, Hayriye; Yeşilipek, Akif

    2013-03-01

    The aims of this study were to: (1) determine the types of complementary and alternative medicine use among children with thalassaemia as reported by parents and (2) describe sociodemographic and medical factors associated with the use of such treatments in families residing in southern Turkey. Thalassaemia is one of the most common human genetic diseases. Despite the therapeutic efforts, patients will encounter a variety of physical and psychological problems. Therefore, the use of complementary and alternative medicines among children thalassaemia is becoming increasingly popular. This is a descriptive study of complementary and alternative medicine. This study was conducted in the Hematology Outpatient Clinic at Akdeniz University Hospital and in the Thalassemia Centre at Ministry of Health Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Antalya, Turkey, between January 2010-December 2010. Parents of 97 paediatric patients, among 125 parents who applied to the haematology outpatient clinic and thalassaemia centre between these dates, agreed to take part in the study with whom contact could be made were included. Data were collected by using a questionnaire. The proportion of parents who reported using one or more of the complementary and alternative medicine methods was 82·5%. Of these parents, 61·8% were using prayer/spiritual practice, 47·4% were using nutritional supplements and 35·1% were using animal materials. It was determined that a significant portion of the parents using complementary and alternative medicine use it to treat their children's health problems, they were informed about complementary and alternative medicine by their paediatricians and family elders, and they have discussed the use of complementary and alternative medicine with healthcare professionals. To sustain medical treatment and prognosis of thalassaemia, it is important for nurses to consult with their patients and parents regarding the use and potential risks of some complementary

  19. Hydrogeochemical modeling of large fluvial basins: impact of climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaulieu, E.

    2011-01-01

    The chemical weathering of continental surfaces represents the one of carbon sinks at the Earth's surface which regulates the climate through feedback mechanism. The weathering intensity is controlled by climate but also by lithology, vegetal cover, hydrology and presence of smectites and acids in soils. In this work, a study at global scale on grid cells highlighted that a CO 2 concentration increase in the atmosphere would involve a decrease of evapotranspiration due to stomatal progressive closure, and a rise of soil acidity related to enhanced bio-spheric productivity. These changes would promote the silicates chemical weathering and as a result, would lead to CO 2 consumption increase by 3% for 100 ppmv of CO 2 concentration rise in the atmosphere. Then, the study on the one of the most important catchments located in arctic environment, the Mackenzie basin (Canada), showed the high sensitivity of chemical weathering to sulfuric acid production. Indeed, the Mackenzie mean CO 2 consumption has decreased by 56%, taking account the pyrite presence in the catchment. In addition, the mean CO 2 consumption of this basin could rise by 53% between today climate and a climatic scenario predicted for the end of century. (author)

  20. Major hydrogeochemical processes in an Acid Mine Drainage affected estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asta, Maria P.; Calleja, Maria Ll.; Pérez-López, Rafael; Auqué, Luis F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Mixing of acid riverine water with alkaline seawater was studied in an estuary. • Combination of data and geochemical tools allowed modeling the water mixing. • The main geochemical processes were identified and for the first time quantified. • Water chemistry is the result of mixing, dissolution-precipitation and sorption. • Main reactions: gypsum and calcite dissolution and Al and Fe solids precipitation. - Abstract: This study provides geochemical data with the aim of identifying and quantifying the main processes occurring in an Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) affected estuary. With that purpose, water samples of the Huelva estuary were collected during a tidal half-cycle and ion–ion plots and geochemical modeling were performed to obtain a general conceptual model. Modeling results indicated that the main processes responsible for the hydrochemical evolution of the waters are: (i) the mixing of acid fluvial water with alkaline ocean water; (ii) precipitation of Fe oxyhydroxysulfates (schwertmannite) and hydroxides (ferrihydrite); (iii) precipitation of Al hydroxysulfates (jurbanite) and hydroxides (amorphous Al(OH) 3 ); (iv) dissolution of calcite; and (v) dissolution of gypsum. All these processes, thermodynamically feasible in the light of their calculated saturation states, were quantified by mass-balance calculations and validated by reaction-path calculations. In addition, sorption processes were deduced by the non-conservative behavior of some elements (e.g., Cu and Zn)

  1. Groundwater quality and hydrogeochemical properties of Torbali Region, Izmir, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayfur, Gokmen; Kirer, Tugba; Baba, Alper

    2008-11-01

    The large demand for drinking, irrigation and industrial water in the region of Torbali (Izmir, Turkey) is supplied from groundwater sources. Almost every factory and farm has private wells that are drilled without permission. These cause the depletion of groundwater and limiting the usage of groundwater. This study investigates spatial and temporal change in groundwater quality, relationships between quality parameters, and sources of contamination in Torbali region. For this purpose, samples were collected from 10 different sampling points chosen according to their geological and hydrogeological properties and location relative to factories, between October 2001 and July 2002. Various physical (pH, temperature, EC), chemical (calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chloride, alkalinity, copper, chromium, cadmium, lead, zinc) and organic (nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, COD and cyanide) parameters were monitored. It was observed that the groundwater has bicarbonate alkalinity. Agricultural contamination was determined in the region, especially during the summer. Nitrite and ammonia concentrations were found to be above drinking water standard. Organic matter contamination was also investigated in the study area. COD concentrations were higher than the permissible limits during the summer months of the monitoring period.

  2. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by patients with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsal, Ayla; Gözüm, Sebahat

    2010-04-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use in patients with arthritis, the types of complementary and alternative medicine used, pertinent socio-demographic factors associated with complementary and alternative medicine use and its perceived efficacy. Arthritis is a major health issue, and the use of complementary and alternative medicine among patients with arthritis is common. This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. Data were obtained from 250 patients with arthritis at the physiotherapy and immunology clinics Atatürk University Hospital in eastern Turkey between May-July 2005 using a questionnaire developed specifically for this study. The instrument included questions on socio-demographic information, disease specifics and complementary and alternative medicine usage. Seventy-six per cent of participants reported use of at least one form of complementary and alternative medicine in the previous year. Complementary and alternative medicine users and non-users were not significantly different in most socio-demographic characteristics including age, gender, marital status and education level with the exception of economic status. We categorised treatment into six complementary and alternative medicine categories: 62.6% of patients used thermal therapies; 41.5% used oral herbal therapies; 40.5% used hot therapies; 32.6% used externally applied (skin) therapies; 28.4% used massage and 12.6% used cold therapies. All forms of complementary and alternative medicine except thermal and oral herbal therapies were perceived as very effective by more than half of study participants. Complementary and alternative medicine therapy is widely used by patients with arthritis and has perceived beneficial effects. It is important for nurses and other health care professionals to be knowledgeable about the use of complementary and alternative medicine therapies when providing care to patients with arthritis because of

  3. The initiation of complementary feeding among Qom indigenous people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, Sofia Irene; Valeggia, Claudia

    2014-06-01

    As of six months of life, breastfeeding no longer covers an infant's energy or micronutrient needs, so appropriate complementary feeding should be provided. The objective of this study was to assess the time and adequacy for introducing complementary feeding in a Qom/Toba population and analyze the sociocultural concepts of families regarding complementary feeding. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected by participant observation and semistructured surveys administered to mothers of 0-2 year old infants. Qom breastfeed their infants long term and on demand. Most infants have an adequate nutritional status and start complementary feeding at around 6 months old as per the local health center and international standards. However, mostly due to socioeconomic factors, foods chosen to complement breastfeeding have a relatively scarce nutritional value.

  4. Posiva safety case hydrogeochemical evolution of the Olkiluoto site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinchero, P.; Roman-Ross, G.; Maia, F.; Molinero, J. [Amphos 21 Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-03-15

    The goal of the present work is to assess the hydrochemical evolution and related changes in the buffering capacity of the Olkiluoto site using reactive transport models. The analysis covers a number of operational-related and climatic-related modelling periods that take place during a glacial cycle; namely, the present conditions with the open repository (Operational Period), the post-closure conditions (Temperate Period) and a stage of the glacial cycle representative of the ice sheet retreat phase (Melting Period). With the aim of reproducing the interplay between the hydrodynamic and geochemical processes, the reactive transport calculations summarised in this document integrate the results of a hydrogeological model with a number of geochemical reactions whose parameterisation relies on previous site investigation studies. The conceptual model on which the study is based, assumes that the hydrochemical evolution of the groundwater at repository depth is the result of infiltration processes from the surface of the domain to the repository. The infiltration occurs along flowpaths through deformation zones and fractures in the bedrock. The infiltrating water, in turn, undergo geochemical reactions with the rock and minerals, namely calcite and iron sulphide precipitation/dissolution, kinetic dissolution of aluminosilicates, cation exchange and aqueous redox reactions. Mass exchange between the transmissive fractures and the low permeability matrix is simulated using a dual porosity approach for the Temperate and Melting Periods. On the contrary, the Operational Period, which is characterised by high hydraulic gradients with advection being the dominant transport mechanism, is simulated using a single porosity model. In all the reactive transport simulations denoted as 'Base Case', pyrite is assumed to be the main iron sulphide mineral in the fracture filling. A set of sensitivity simulations, denoted as 'Variant Case', has been defined where

  5. Hydrogeochemical tracing of mineral water in Jingyu County, Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Baizhong; Xiao, Changlai; Liang, Xiujuan; Wu, Shili

    2016-02-01

    The east Jilin Province in China, Jingyu County has been explored as a potential for enriching mineral water. In order to assess the water quality and quantity, it is of crucial importance to investigate the origin of the mineral water and its flow paths. In this study, eighteen mineral springs were sampled in May and September of 2012, May and September of 2013, and May 2014 and the environment, evolvement, and reaction mechanism of mineral water formation were analysed by hydrochemical data analysis, geochemical modelling and multivariate statistical analysis. The results showed that the investigated mineral water was rich in calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, bicarbonate, chloride, sulphate, fluoride, nitrate, total iron, silicate, and strontium, and mineral water ages ranged from 11.0 to more than 61.0 years. The U-shape contours of the mineral ages indicate a local and discrete recharge. The mineral compositions of the rocks were olivine, potassium feldspar, pyroxene, albite, and anorthite and were under-saturated in the mineral water. The origin of mineral water was from the hydrolysis of basalt minerals under a neutral to slightly alkaline and CO2-rich environment.

  6. Hydrogeochemical characteristics of groundwater in selected areas of NWFP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akram, W.; Sajjad, M.I.; Sheikh, M.R.; Iqbal, M.Z.

    1998-01-01

    Chemical composition of ground water in selected area of NWFP (Pakistan) was investigated. Water samples were collected from existing open well, tube wells, springs and the river Indus. Important physico-chemical parameter like temperature, pH and electrical conductivity were measured in situ. All the collected samples were analysed for their dissolved chemical constituents (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, HCO/sub 3/, NO/sub 3, SO/sub 4///0 in the laboratory. Different standard technique likes atomic absorption spectrophotometry, UV-visible spectrophotometry, ion selective electrodes and titrimetry were used for sample analyses. Data was used to study the recent trends of ground water chemistry in these areas. Chemical quality of groundwater was evaluated to determine its suitability for drinking purposes by comparing with WHO standards. It was found that groundwater in these areas meets the norms of good quality drinking water except in very few locations. Different compositional types of water were also identified. It was observed that Ca is the dominant cation at most of the locations which is balanced by HCO/sub 3/ giving rise to calcium bicarbonate type groundwater. At few locations groundwater of sodium sodium bicarbonate or mixed type was also encountered. (author)

  7. Major hydrogeochemical processes in an acid mine drainage affected estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asta, Maria P; Calleja, Maria Ll; Pérez-López, Rafael; Auqué, Luis F

    2015-02-15

    This study provides geochemical data with the aim of identifying and quantifying the main processes occurring in an Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) affected estuary. With that purpose, water samples of the Huelva estuary were collected during a tidal half-cycle and ion-ion plots and geochemical modeling were performed to obtain a general conceptual model. Modeling results indicated that the main processes responsible for the hydrochemical evolution of the waters are: (i) the mixing of acid fluvial water with alkaline ocean water; (ii) precipitation of Fe oxyhydroxysulfates (schwertmannite) and hydroxides (ferrihydrite); (iii) precipitation of Al hydroxysulfates (jurbanite) and hydroxides (amorphous Al(OH)3); (iv) dissolution of calcite; and (v) dissolution of gypsum. All these processes, thermodynamically feasible in the light of their calculated saturation states, were quantified by mass-balance calculations and validated by reaction-path calculations. In addition, sorption processes were deduced by the non-conservative behavior of some elements (e.g., Cu and Zn). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence and predictors of complementary and alternative medicine use among people with coronary heart disease or at risk for this in the sixth Tromsø study: a comparative analysis using protection motivation theory.

    OpenAIRE

    Kristoffersen, Agnete Egilsdatter; Sirois, Fuschia; Stub, Trine; Hansen, Anne Helen

    2017-01-01

    Source at https://doi.org/10.1186/s12906-017-1817-x Background: Engagement in healthy lifestyle behaviors, such as healthy diet and regular physical activity, are known to reduce the risk of developing coronary heart disease (CHD). Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is known to be associated with having a healthy lifestyle. The primary aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and predictors of CAM use in CHD patients, and in those without CHD but at risk for developing C...

  9. Coolant compatibility studies. The effect of irradiation on tensile properties and stress corrosion cracking sensitivity of martensitic steels. MANET 4 - complementary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nystrand, A.C.

    1994-02-01

    Tensile and stress corrosion cracking tests have been carried out on MANET-type (1.4914 and FV448) and reduced activation (LA12TaLC) high-chromium martensitic steels. The materials had previously been exposed up to 5000 h at ∼275 degrees C in the core, above the core and remote from the core of a high pressure water loop in the Studsvik R2 reactor. After the mechanical testing the materials were examined visually and metallographically. The steel samples exposed in the core section showed large increases in tensile yield strengths when tested at 250 degrees C. However, the magnitude of the radiation hardening was considerably smaller in the reduced activation steel compared to the commercial steels; this observation is consistent with published data on other high-chromium martensitic steels and is associated with the lower chromium content of the LA12TaLC steel (8.9%) compared with those of the commercial steels (10.6 and 11.3%). Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) was not detected in any of the stressed steel samples after autoclave testing for times up to 1500 h at 250 degrees C in air-saturated high purity water. This apparent resistance to IASCC may be due to the high chromium martensitic steels not being sensitized by the irradiation in a comparable manner to that shown by the austenitic steels. However, additional studies are required to clarify some of the existing uncertainties with respect to IASCC of these martensitic steels

  10. Complementary Hand Responses Occur in Both Peri- and Extrapersonal Space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim W Faber

    Full Text Available Human beings have a strong tendency to imitate. Evidence from motor priming paradigms suggests that people automatically tend to imitate observed actions such as hand gestures by performing mirror-congruent movements (e.g., lifting one's right finger upon observing a left finger movement; from a mirror perspective. Many observed actions however, do not require mirror-congruent responses but afford complementary (fitting responses instead (e.g., handing over a cup; shaking hands. Crucially, whereas mirror-congruent responses don't require physical interaction with another person, complementary actions often do. Given that most experiments studying motor priming have used stimuli devoid of contextual information, this space or interaction-dependency of complementary responses has not yet been assessed. To address this issue, we let participants perform a task in which they had to mirror or complement a hand gesture (fist or open hand performed by an actor depicted either within or outside of reach. In three studies, we observed faster reaction times and less response errors for complementary relative to mirrored hand movements in response to open hand gestures (i.e., 'hand-shaking' irrespective of the perceived interpersonal distance of the actor. This complementary effect could not be accounted for by a low-level spatial cueing effect. These results demonstrate that humans have a strong and automatic tendency to respond by performing complementary actions. In addition, our findings underline the limitations of manipulations of space in modulating effects of motor priming and the perception of affordances.

  11. Complementary Hand Responses Occur in Both Peri- and Extrapersonal Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Tim W; van Elk, Michiel; Jonas, Kai J

    2016-01-01

    Human beings have a strong tendency to imitate. Evidence from motor priming paradigms suggests that people automatically tend to imitate observed actions such as hand gestures by performing mirror-congruent movements (e.g., lifting one's right finger upon observing a left finger movement; from a mirror perspective). Many observed actions however, do not require mirror-congruent responses but afford complementary (fitting) responses instead (e.g., handing over a cup; shaking hands). Crucially, whereas mirror-congruent responses don't require physical interaction with another person, complementary actions often do. Given that most experiments studying motor priming have used stimuli devoid of contextual information, this space or interaction-dependency of complementary responses has not yet been assessed. To address this issue, we let participants perform a task in which they had to mirror or complement a hand gesture (fist or open hand) performed by an actor depicted either within or outside of reach. In three studies, we observed faster reaction times and less response errors for complementary relative to mirrored hand movements in response to open hand gestures (i.e., 'hand-shaking') irrespective of the perceived interpersonal distance of the actor. This complementary effect could not be accounted for by a low-level spatial cueing effect. These results demonstrate that humans have a strong and automatic tendency to respond by performing complementary actions. In addition, our findings underline the limitations of manipulations of space in modulating effects of motor priming and the perception of affordances.

  12. Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alternative Medicine in Thyroid Disease Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Thyroid Disease (CAM) WHAT IS COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (CAM)? Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is defined ...

  13. Development of cloud point extraction - UV-visible spectrophotometric method for vanadium (V) determination in hydrogeochemical samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durani, Smeer; Mathur, Neerja; Chowdary, G.S.

    2007-01-01

    The cloud point extraction behavior (CPE) of vanadium (V) using 5,7 dibromo 8-hydroxyquinoline (DBHQ) and triton X 100 was investigated. Vanadium (V) was extracted with 4 ml of 0.5 mg/ml DBHQ and 6 ml of 8% (V/V) triton X 100 at the pH 3.7. A few hydrogeochemical samples were analysed for vanadium using the above method. (author)

  14. Explicit MDS Codes with Complementary Duals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beelen, Duals Peter; Jin, Lingfei

    2018-01-01

    In 1964, Massey introduced a class of codes with complementary duals which are called Linear Complimentary Dual (LCD for short) codes. He showed that LCD codes have applications in communication system, side-channel attack (SCA) and so on. LCD codes have been extensively studied in literature....... On the other hand, MDS codes form an optimal family of classical codes which have wide applications in both theory and practice. The main purpose of this paper is to give an explicit construction of several classes of LCD MDS codes, using tools from algebraic function fields. We exemplify this construction...

  15. Attitudes toward and education about complementary and alternative medicine among adult patients with depression in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Mei-Chi; Moyle, Wendy; Creedy, Debra; Venturato, Lorraine; Ouyang, Wen-Chen; Sun, Gwo-Ching

    2010-04-01

    To investigate patients' attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine, the education nurses provided about complementary and alternative medicine for treating depression and to test whether such education mediates the effect of complementary and alternative medicine use and attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine. Although we know that attitudes influence behaviour, very few studies simultaneously explore the relationship between attitudes, education and complementary and alternative medicine use. Survey. This study was conducted as part of a larger survey, using face-to-face survey interviews with 206 adult patients aged 50 years or over and hospitalised in conventional hospitals in Taiwan for treatment of depression. The attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine and patient education about complementary and alternative medicine instruments were specially developed for the study. Participants expressed slightly favourable attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine. Many participants (50%) expressed that they were willing to try any potential treatment for depression. They believed that complementary and alternative medicine helped them to feel better and to live a happier life. However, 66.5% of participants reported that they had inadequate knowledge of complementary and alternative medicine. Participants with a higher monthly income, longer depression duration and religious beliefs hold more positive attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine. Most participants were not satisfied with the education they received about complementary and alternative medicine. Patient education about complementary and alternative medicine was found to be a mediator for the use of complementary and alternative medicine. Patient education from nurses may predict patients' attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine. Continuing nursing education is needed to enable nurses to respond knowledgeably to

  16. One hundred prime references on hydrogeochemical and stream sediment surveying for uranium as internationally practiced, including 60 annotated references

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, R.R. Jr.; Bolivar, S.L.

    1981-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), formerly the US ERDA, has initiated a nationwide Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR). This program is part of the US National Uranium Resource Evaluation, designed to provide an improved estimate for the availability and economics of nuclear fuel resources and make available to industry information for use in exploration and development of uranium resources. The Los Alamos National Laboratory is responsible for completing the HSSR in Rocky Mountain states of New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana and in the state of Alaska. This report contains a compilation of 100 prime references on uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance as internationally practiced prior to 1977. The major emphasis in selection of these references was directed toward constructing a HSSR program with the purpose of identifying uranium in the Los Alamos National Laboratory area of responsibility. The context of the annotated abstracts are the authors' concept of what the respective article contains relative to uranium geochemistry and hydrogeochemical and stream sediment surveying. Consequently, in many cases, significant portions of the original articles are not discussed. The text consists of two parts. Part I contains 100 prime references, alphabetically arranged. Part II contains 60 select annotated abstracts, listed in chronological order

  17. Online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righettini, Paolo; Strada, Roberto; KhademOlama, Ehsan; Valilou, Shirin

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a new online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator (WCE) over position and acceleration data gathered from an electro hydraulic servo shaking table. This is a batch estimator type that is based on the wavelet filter banks which extract the high and low resolution of data. The proposed complementary estimator combines these two resolutions of velocities which acquired from numerical differentiation and integration of the position and acceleration sensors by considering a fixed moving horizon window as input to wavelet filter. Because of using wavelet filters, it can be implemented in a parallel procedure. By this method the numerical velocity is estimated without having high noise of differentiators, integration drifting bias and with less delay which is suitable for active vibration control in high precision Mechatronics systems by Direct Velocity Feedback (DVF) methods. This method allows us to make velocity sensors with less mechanically moving parts which makes it suitable for fast miniature structures. We have compared this method with Kalman and Butterworth filters over stability, delay and benchmarked them by their long time velocity integration for getting back the initial position data. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Complementary and alternative interventions in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohee; Bielory, Leonard

    2010-08-01

    The burden of atopic diseases, including atopic dermatitis (AD), is significant and far-reaching. In addition to cost of care and therapies, it affects the quality of life for those affected as well as their caretakers. Complementary and alternative therapies are commonly used because of concerns about potential adverse effects of conventional therapies and frustration with the lack of response to prescribed medications, be it due to the severity of the AD or the lack of appropriate regular use. Despite the promising results reported with various herbal medicines and biologic products, the clinical efficacy of such alternative therapies remains to be determined. Physicians need to be educated about alternative therapies and discuss benefits and potential adverse effects or limitations with patients. A systematic approach and awareness of reputable and easily accessible resources are helpful in dealing with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The use of CAM interventions is common among individuals with AD. Epidemiologic data have been a motivating drive for better elucidation of the efficacy of CAM interventions for allergic disease. Herbal medicines and biologics for AD treatment and, more recently, prevention comprise a major area of clinical investigation. Potential mechanisms of therapeutic effect elucidated by animal models and human clinical studies implicate modulation of TH2-type allergic inflammation and induction of immune tolerance. Population-based research regarding the use of CAM for allergic diseases underscores the increasing challenge for care providers with respect to identifying CAM use and ensuring safe use of allopathic and complementary medicines in disease management. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Phase III study of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer satisfaction with cancer care core questionnaire (EORTC PATSAT-C33) and specific complementary outpatient module (EORTC OUT-PATSAT7).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédart, A; Anota, A; Young, T; Tomaszewski, K A; Arraras, J I; Moura De Albuquerque Melo, H; Schmidt, H; Friend, E; Bergenmar, M; Costantini, A; Vassiliou, V; Hureaux, J; Marchal, F; Tomaszewska, I M; Chie, W-C; Ramage, J; Beaudeau, A; Conroy, T; Bleiker, E; Kulis, D; Bonnetain, F; Aaronson, N K

    2018-01-01

    Advances in cancer care delivery require revision and further development of questionnaires assessing patients' perceived quality of care. This study pre-tested the revised EORTC satisfaction with cancer care core questionnaire applicable in both the cancer inpatient and outpatient settings, and its new, outpatient-specific complementary module. The process of revision, development of the extended application, and pre-testing of these questionnaires was based on phases I to III of the "EORTC Quality of Life Group Module Development Guidelines." In phase III, patients in 11 countries in four European regions, South America and Asia completed provisional versions of the questionnaires. Fifty-seven relevant issues selected from literature reviews and input from experts were operationalized into provisional items, and subsequently translated into ten languages. Assessment of understanding, acceptability, redundancy and relevance by patients (n = 151) from oncology inpatient wards, and outpatient chemotherapy, radiotherapy and consultation settings, led to retention of, deletion of and merging of 40, 14 and 6 items respectively. Cronbach's alpha coefficients for hypothesized questionnaire scales were above 0.80. Our results provide preliminary support for the 33-item EORTC Satisfaction with cancer care core questionnaire and the 7-item complementary module specific for the outpatient care setting. A large scale phase IV cross-cultural psychometric study is now underway. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Complementary biomarker-based methods for characterising Arctic sea ice conditions: A case study comparison between multivariate analysis and the PIP25 index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köseoğlu, Denizcan; Belt, Simon T.; Smik, Lukas; Yao, Haoyi; Panieri, Giuliana; Knies, Jochen

    2018-02-01

    The discovery of IP25 as a qualitative biomarker proxy for Arctic sea ice and subsequent introduction of the so-called PIP25 index for semi-quantitative descriptions of sea ice conditions has significantly advanced our understanding of long-term paleo Arctic sea ice conditions over the past decade. We investigated the potential for classification tree (CT) models to provide a further approach to paleo Arctic sea ice reconstruction through analysis of a suite of highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) biomarkers in ca. 200 surface sediments from the Barents Sea. Four CT models constructed using different HBI assemblages revealed IP25 and an HBI triene as the most appropriate classifiers of sea ice conditions, achieving a >90% cross-validated classification rate. Additionally, lower model performance for locations in the Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ) highlighted difficulties in characterisation of this climatically-sensitive region. CT model classification and semi-quantitative PIP25-derived estimates of spring sea ice concentration (SpSIC) for four downcore records from the region were consistent, although agreement between proxy and satellite/observational records was weaker for a core from the west Svalbard margin, likely due to the highly variable sea ice conditions. The automatic selection of appropriate biomarkers for description of sea ice conditions, quantitative model assessment, and insensitivity to the c-factor used in the calculation of the PIP25 index are key attributes of the CT approach, and we provide an initial comparative assessment between these potentially complementary methods. The CT model should be capable of generating longer-term temporal shifts in sea ice conditions for the climatically sensitive Barents Sea.

  1. Complementary arsenic speciation methods: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nearing, Michelle M., E-mail: michelle.nearing@rmc.ca; Koch, Iris, E-mail: koch-i@rmc.ca; Reimer, Kenneth J., E-mail: reimer-k@rmc.ca

    2014-09-01

    The toxicity of arsenic greatly depends on its chemical form and oxidation state (speciation) and therefore accurate determination of arsenic speciation is a crucial step in understanding its chemistry and potential risk. High performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC–ICP-MS) is the most common analysis used for arsenic speciation but it has two major limitations: it relies on an extraction step (usually from a solid sample) that can be incomplete or alter the arsenic compounds; and it provides no structural information, relying on matching sample peaks to standard peaks. The use of additional analytical methods in a complementary manner introduces the ability to address these disadvantages. The use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with HPLC–ICP-MS can be used to identify compounds not extracted for HPLC–ICP-MS and provide minimal processing steps for solid state analysis that may help preserve labile compounds such as those containing arsenic-sulfur bonds, which can degrade under chromatographic conditions. On the other hand, HPLC–ICP-MS is essential in confirming organoarsenic compounds with similar white line energies seen by using XAS, and identifying trace arsenic compounds that are too low to be detected by XAS. The complementary use of electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI–MS) with HPLC–ICP-MS provides confirmation of arsenic compounds identified during the HPLC–ICP-MS analysis, identification of unknown compounds observed during the HPLC–ICP-MS analysis and further resolves HPLC–ICP-MS by identifying co-eluting compounds. In the complementary use of HPLC–ICP-MS and ESI–MS, HPLC–ICP-MS helps to focus the ESI–MS selection of ions. Numerous studies have shown that the information obtained from HPLC–ICP-MS analysis can be greatly enhanced by complementary approaches. - Highlights: • HPLC–ICP-MS is the most common method used for arsenic speciation. • HPLC limitations include

  2. Complementary arsenic speciation methods: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nearing, Michelle M.; Koch, Iris; Reimer, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    The toxicity of arsenic greatly depends on its chemical form and oxidation state (speciation) and therefore accurate determination of arsenic speciation is a crucial step in understanding its chemistry and potential risk. High performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC–ICP-MS) is the most common analysis used for arsenic speciation but it has two major limitations: it relies on an extraction step (usually from a solid sample) that can be incomplete or alter the arsenic compounds; and it provides no structural information, relying on matching sample peaks to standard peaks. The use of additional analytical methods in a complementary manner introduces the ability to address these disadvantages. The use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with HPLC–ICP-MS can be used to identify compounds not extracted for HPLC–ICP-MS and provide minimal processing steps for solid state analysis that may help preserve labile compounds such as those containing arsenic-sulfur bonds, which can degrade under chromatographic conditions. On the other hand, HPLC–ICP-MS is essential in confirming organoarsenic compounds with similar white line energies seen by using XAS, and identifying trace arsenic compounds that are too low to be detected by XAS. The complementary use of electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI–MS) with HPLC–ICP-MS provides confirmation of arsenic compounds identified during the HPLC–ICP-MS analysis, identification of unknown compounds observed during the HPLC–ICP-MS analysis and further resolves HPLC–ICP-MS by identifying co-eluting compounds. In the complementary use of HPLC–ICP-MS and ESI–MS, HPLC–ICP-MS helps to focus the ESI–MS selection of ions. Numerous studies have shown that the information obtained from HPLC–ICP-MS analysis can be greatly enhanced by complementary approaches. - Highlights: • HPLC–ICP-MS is the most common method used for arsenic speciation. • HPLC limitations include

  3. Provenance and fate of arsenic and other solutes in the Chaco-Pampean Plain of the Andean foreland, Argentina: From perspectives of hydrogeochemical modeling and regional tectonic setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychowdhury, Nilasree; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Bhattacharya, Prosun; Johannesson, Karen; Bundschuh, Jochen; Sifuentes, Gabriela Bejarano; Nordberg, Erika; Martin, Raúl A.; Storniolo, Angel del Rosario

    2014-10-01

    Extensive arsenic (As) enriched groundwater is known to occur in the aquifers of the Chaco-Pampean Plain of Argentina. Previous studies speculated that the As mobilization in these groundwaters was a direct result of their elevated pH and oxidative conditions. The volcanic glass layers present in the aquifer matrix were hypothesized as one of the possible sources of As to the groundwaters. Here, we examine the groundwater chemistry of the Santiago del Estero province of Chaco-Pampean Plains of Argentina, and test these hypotheses by using hydrogeochemical modeling within the framework of the regional geologic-tectonic setting. The study area is located in the active foreland of the Andean orogenic belt, which forms a continental arc setting, and is dotted with several hot springs. Rhyolitic volcanic glass fragments derived from arc volcanism are abundant within the aeolian-fluvial aquifer sediments, and are related to the paleo-igneous extrusion in the vicinity. Hydrogeochemical analyses show that the groundwater is in predominantly oxidative condition. In addition, some of the groundwaters exhibit very high Na, Cl- and SO42- concentrations. It is hypothesized in this study that the groundwater chemistry has largely evolved by dissolution of rhyolitic volcanic glass fragments contained within the aquifer sediments along with mixing with saline surface waters from, adjoining salinas, which are thought to be partially evaporated remnants of a paleo inland sea. Flow path modeling, stability diagrams, and thermodynamic analyses undertaken in this study indicate that the dominant evolutionary processes include ion exchange reactions, chemical weathering of silicate and evaporites, in monosialitization-dominated weathering. Geochemical modeling predicts that plagioclase feldspar and volcanic glass are the major solids phases that contribute metal cations and dissolved silica to the local groundwaters. Co-influxed oxyanions, with similar ionic radii and structure (e.g. Mo

  4. Geochemical modelling study on the age and evolution of the groundwater at the Romuvaara site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, P; Vuorinen, U; Leino-Forsman, H [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Snellman, M [Imatran Voima Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-09-01

    The objective of the study was to interpret the processes and factors which control the hydrogeochemistry (e.g. pH and redox conditions) in the radioactive waste disposal environment. A model of the hydrogeochemical evolution and the chemical flowpaths in different parts of the bedrock at the Romuvaara (in Finland) site has been created. The significance of chemical reactions along different flowpaths is calculated. Furthermore, the consistency of the hydrogeochemical model and the hydrogeological model is examined. (107 refs.).

  5. Geochemical modelling study on the age and evolution of the groundwater at the Romuvaara site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Vuorinen, U.; Leino-Forsman, H.; Snellman, M.

    1996-09-01

    The objective of the study was to interpret the processes and factors which control the hydrogeochemistry (e.g. pH and redox conditions) in the radioactive waste disposal environment. A model of the hydrogeochemical evolution and the chemical flowpaths in different parts of the bedrock at the Romuvaara (in Finland) site has been created. The significance of chemical reactions along different flowpaths is calculated. Furthermore, the consistency of the hydrogeochemical model and the hydrogeological model is examined. (107 refs.)

  6. Early introduction of complementary foods and childhood overweight in breastfed and formula-fed infants in the Netherlands: the PIAMA birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluymen, Linda P M; Wijga, Alet H; Gehring, Ulrike; Koppelman, Gerard H; Smit, Henriëtte A; van Rossem, L

    2018-02-22

    To investigate whether early introduction of complementary foods (CF) is associated with an increased risk of overweight during childhood, and whether this association differs between formula-fed and breastfed infants. We included 2611 participants that were born at term from a Dutch population-based birth cohort (n = 3963) designed to investigate the development of asthma and allergies. Parents kept records of their infant's age when CF were first introduced. Weight and height were parent reported yearly from age 1 to 8 years, and at ages 11, 14 and 17 years. We used multivariate generalized estimating equations analysis to investigate the association between timing of CF introduction (before 4 months vs at or after 4 months of age) and overweight at ages 1-17 years. Children with CF introduction before 4 months had higher odds of being overweight during childhood than children with CF introduction at or after 4 months (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.19, 1.47). This association was observed in formula-fed infants (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.17, 1.94) and breastfed infants (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.19, 1.47). The duration of breastfeeding modified the association between CF introduction and overweight: children breastfed for shorter than 4 months, but not children breastfed for 4 months or longer with CF introduction before 4 months had higher odds of being overweight (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.19, 1.57 and 1.07, 95% CI 0.87, 1.32, respectively), compared to those with CF introduction at or after 4 months. In children born at term, formula-fed infants and infants who were breastfed for shorter than 4 months, but not infants who were breastfed for 4 months or longer, had a higher risk of being overweight during childhood when being introduced to CF before 4 months of age.

  7. Chronic low back pain patients' use of, level of knowledge of and perceived benefits of complementary medicine: a cross-sectional study at an academic pain center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Julie; Scala, Emmanuelle; Faouzi, Mohamed; Decosterd, Isabelle; Burnand, Bernard; Rodondi, Pierre-Yves

    2017-04-04

    Chronic pain patients often use complementary medicine (CM) to alleviate their pain; however, little is known about the use of CM by chronic low back pain (cLBP) patients. We investigated the frequency of use of CM by cLBP patients, the perceived effects of these therapies, patients' knowledge regarding CM, and patient-physician communication regarding CM. A cross-sectional survey was conducted from November 2014 to February 2015. A questionnaire was distributed by physicians to 238 consecutive patients consulting for cLBP at the Pain Center of Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland. Poisson regression model was used to analyze patients' level of knowledge regarding various CMs, and the logistic regression model was used to assess CM use for cLBP. The questionnaire was returned by 168 cLBP patients (response rate: 70.6%). Lifetime prevalence of CM use for cLBP was 77.3%. The most commonly used therapies were osteopathy (48.8%), massage (45.2%) and acupuncture (31.6%), rated for their usefulness on a 0-10 scale as a mean ± SD of 5.4 ± 2.7, 5.9 ± 2.5 and 3.8 ± 3.2, respectively. The CM treatment best known by patients was osteopathy, followed by massage and acupuncture. If their doctors proposed CM as a treatment for cLBP, 78% of participants reported being very or somewhat likely to try CM. Respondents with CM health insurance were more likely to use CM (OR = 2.26; 95%CI: 1.07-4.78; p = 0.031) for cLBP. Respondents having experienced cLBP for more than five years were more likely to use CM to treat their cLBP than respondents having experienced cLBP for one year or less (OR = 2.84; 95%CI: 1.02-7.88; p = 0.044). More than three-quarters of cLBP patients in our sample did use CM to treat their cLBP. The results showed that the most commonly used therapies were not necessarily the highest rated in terms of perceived usefulness. These results highlight the importance of developing integrative pain centers in which patients may obtain advice

  8. Complementary and alternative medicine in pulmonology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, John D; Chung, Youngran

    2015-06-01

    To provide a comprehensive review of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies for the treatment of pulmonary disorders in children. The use of complementary medicine (CAM) is commonly used by both children and adults with breathing problems, and especially in chronic pulmonary disorders such as asthma and cystic fibrosis. Many clinics and hospitals now offer CAM, even though most of the conventionally trained health practitioners have little knowledge or education regarding CAM therapies. Research in CAM that demonstrates overall benefit is lacking, especially in children. Often parents do not report CAM use to their child's healthcare provider and this could compromise their overall quality of care. Although many research studies evaluating CAM therapies have methodological flaws, data exist to support CAM therapies in treating children with pulmonary disorders. This review examines the latest evidence of CAM use and effectiveness in children with pulmonary disorders. Physicians should be aware of the many CAM therapy options and the research surrounding them in order to provide their patients with the most current and accurate information available.

  9. Uso de terapias complementares por mães em seus filhos: estudo em um hospital universitário Use of complementary therapies by mothers in their children: study at an university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Borges Gentil

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo é avaliar a utilização de terapias complementares (TC por mães em seus filhos. Trata-se de um estudo transversal, descritivo. Foram entrevistadas 202 mães de crianças assistidas em um hospital universitário. As variáveis analisadas foram: uso de terapias complementares/motivos para tal, tipos de terapias utilizadas, sua finalidade, seus efeitos, revelação ao médico/motivos para tal e reação do médico. A prevalência de uso de terapias complementares foi 87,6%. De 177 mães que utilizavam TC, muitas mencionaram mais de um tipo, sendo: chás (72,8%, benzimento (41%, simpatias (12,9%, remédios/xaropes caseiros (8,4%, oração/promessa (7,4%, homeopatia (4,0%, tratamento espiritual/parapsicológico (4,0%, mistura de substâncias desconhecidas/garrafada (3%, massagem (2% e reiki/florais (1,5%. As ervas mais utilizadas foram erva-doce (16,7%, camomila (14,8% e hortelã (10,9%; 57,6% das mães não informaram o uso ao médico. Dos 499 tratamentos empregados, houve percepção de melhora em 429 (86% e relato de dois casos de efeitos adversos. A prevalência do uso de terapias complementares foi alta, sendo os chás a terapia mais utilizada e erva-doce, camomila e hortelã as ervas mais usadas. Houve percepção de melhora na maioria das terapias usadas.The objective of this article is to evaluate the use of complementary therapies by mothers in their children. A cross-sectional and descriptive study with 202 mothers of children that attended an University Hospital were interviewed. The variables analyzed were: use of complementary therapies/reasons, therapies used its purpose, effects, doctor's revelation/reasons and doctor's reaction. The prevalence of complementary therapies use was of 87.6%. Among the 177 mothers that used complementary therapies, many mentioned more than one kind, as follow: teas (72.8%, blessings (41%, sympathies (12.9%, homemade remedies/syrups (8.4%, prayer/promises (7.4%, homeopathy (4

  10. Complementary medicine in chronic pain treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Charles A

    2015-05-01

    This article discusses several issues related to therapies that are considered "complementary" or "alternative" to conventional medicine. A definition of "complementary and alternative medicine" (CAM) is considered in the context of the evolving health care field of complementary medicine. A rationale for pain physicians and clinicians to understand these treatments of chronic pain is presented. The challenges of an evidence-based approach to incorporating CAM therapies are explored. Finally, a brief survey of the evidence that supports several widely available and commonly used complementary therapies for chronic pain is provided. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Alternative and complementary medicine from the primary care physician's viewpoint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soós, Sándor Árpád; Eőry, Ajándék; Eőry, Ajándok; Harsányi, László; Kalabay, László

    2015-07-12

    The patients initiate the use of complementary and alternative medicine and this often remains hidden from their primary care physician. To explore general practitioners' knowledge and attitude towards complementary and alternative medicine, and study the need and appropriate forms of education, as well as ask their opinion on integration of alternative medicine into mainstream medicine. A voluntary anonymous questionnaire was used on two conferences for general practitioners organized by the Family Medicine Department of Semmelweis University. Complementary and alternative medicine was defined by the definition of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and certified modalities were all listed. 194 general practitioners answered the questionnaire (39.8% response rate). 14% of the responders had licence in at least one of the complementary and alternative therapies, 45% used complementary and alternative therapy in their family in case of illness. It was the opinion of the majority (91.8%) that it was necessary to be familiar with every method used by their patients, however, 82.5% claimed not to have enough knowledge in complementary medicine. Graduate and postgraduate education in the field was thought to be necessary by 86% of the responders; increased odds for commitment in personal education was found among female general practitioners, less than 20 years professional experience and personal experience of alternative medicine. These data suggest that general practitioners would like to know more about complementary and alternative medicine modalities used by their patients. They consider education of medical professionals necessary and a special group is willing to undergo further education in the field.

  12. U-isotopes and (226)Ra as tracers of hydrogeochemical processes in carbonated karst aquifers from arid areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, José Luis; Vallejos, Ángela; Cerón, Juan Carlos; Sánchez-Martos, Francisco; Pulido-Bosch, Antonio; Bolívar, Juan Pedro

    2016-07-01

    Sierra de Gádor is a karst macrosystem with a highly complex geometry, located in southeastern Spain. In this arid environment, the main economic activities, agriculture and tourism, are supported by water resources from the Sierra de Gádor aquifer system. The aim of this work was to study the levels and behaviour of some of the most significant natural radionuclides in order to improve the knowledge of the hydrogeochemical processes involved in this groundwater system. For this study, 28 groundwater and 7 surface water samples were collected, and the activity concentrations of the natural U-isotopes ((238)U, (235)U and (234)U) and (226)Ra by alpha spectrometry were determined. The activity concentration of (238)U presented a large variation from around 1.1 to 65 mBq L(-1). Elevated groundwater U concentrations were the result of oxidising conditions that likely promoted U dissolution. The PHREEQC modelling code showed that dissolved U mainly existed as uranyl carbonate complexes. The (234)U/(238)U activity ratios were higher than unity for all samples (1.1-3.8). Additionally, these ratios were in greater disequilibrium in groundwater than surface water samples, the likely result of greater water-rock contact time. (226)Ra presented a wide range of activity concentrations, (0.8 up to about 4 × 10(2) mBq L(-1)); greatest concentrations were detected in the thermal area of Alhama. Most of the samples showed (226)Ra/(234)U activity ratios lower than unity (median = 0.3), likely the result of the greater mobility of U than Ra in the aquifer system. The natural U-isotopes concentrations were strongly correlated with dissolution of sulphate evaporites (mainly gypsum). (226)Ra had a more complex behaviour, showing a strong correlation with water salinity, which was particularly evident in locations where thermal anomalies were detected. The most saline samples showed the lowest (234)U/(238)U activity ratios, probably due to fast uniform bulk mineral dissolution

  13. Hydrogeochemical Processes Causing Persistent Low pH in Lakes within a Reclaimed Lignite Mine, East Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, J. C.; Schwab, P.; Knappett, P.; Deng, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Surface water pH values ranging from 2.5 to 2.6 have been reported in three lakes at a reclaimed lignite mine located in the Wilcox Formation of East Texas (the site). Traditional neutralization processes using alkaline chemicals to neutralize the surface water were found to be temporary solutions at the site. Low pH conditions usually are caused by oxidation of pyritic materials in the original tailings, but that was not always apparent based on previous studies at this site. The objective of this study is to determine factors contributing to acid seepage to aid in developing pre- and post-mining strategies to mitigate persistent acidity in surface waters at this and other sites. Mineralogy, hydrogeology, and hydrogeochemical reactions were evaluated. A network of 30 wells was used to monitor the water table and chemistry of the shallow, unconfined aquifer surrounding the lakes. Pressure transducers were deployed in 18 of these wells and each of the lakes to measure high frequency water levels over approximately one year. These water levels were contoured to visualize changing hydraulic head over time and determine the correlation in time between ground water flow directions and local rainfall events. Boreholes at 15 of the monitoring wells were continuously cored, and samples were taken at selected depth intervals based on pH measurements. XRD, SEM, and TEM were used to determine the mineralogy of select soil samples. Ion chromatography was used to determine sulfate concentration, and ICP-MS was used to determine solute concentrations from water and digested soil samples. Framboidal and microcrystalline pyrite were identified in the vadose zone in silt and clay-sized fractions; these minerals have high surface area that is conducive to rapid oxidation and acidification as ground water permeates from the vadose into the saturated zone. Morphology in addition to quantity of weatherable pyrite plays a significant role in acidification. Computer models were used to

  14. Hydrogeochemical framework and factor analysis of fluoride contamination in Groundwater within the Savelugu-Nanton District, Northern Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tay, Collins K.

    2017-01-01

    Fluoride contamination of groundwater within the Savelugu-Nanton District was assessed using hydrogeochemical framework and multivariate statistical approach. Eighty-one (No) boreholes were sampled for quality assessment in May and June 2008. The main objective of this study was to assess the fluoride levels in groundwater and delineate areas of low fluoride and high fluoride within the district. The study show that, 41.9% of the boreholes are within the safe limits of 0.5 –1.5 mg/L of fluoride for the protection of bones and teeth, 43.2% of the boreholes have fluoride levels below the lower safe limit (< 0.5 mg/L) and therefore vulnerable to dental caries, 10.8% of the boreholes have fluoride levels between 1.5 and 3.0 mg/Land therefore vulnerable to dental fluorosis and 4.1% of the boreholes have fluoride levels between 3.0 and 10 mg/L and therefore vulnerable to skeletal fluorosis. The results further show that, 14.9% of groundwater requires defluoridation, while, 43.2% of groundwater requires fluoride addition to the groundwaters. PCA using Varimax with Kaiser Normalization results in the extraction of three main principal components which delineates the factors that influence the principal components of the physico-chemical parameters. The three principal components have accounted for approximately 83% of the total variance. Component 1 delineates the main natural processes through which groundwater within the basin acquire its chemical characteristics. Component 2 delineates pollution sources principally fluoride and nitrate. Component 3 suggests mineralogical influence of fluoride with some major ions on the chemistry of groundwater. The loadings and score plots of the first two PCs which explains 71.52% of the total variance show grouping pattern which indicates the strength of the mutual relation amongst the hydrochemical variables. Biological defluoridation though not very well understood, is recommended as a best alternative to the conventional methods

  15. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Arctic NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Youngquist, C.A.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Arctic NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendix A describes the sample media and summarizes the analytical results for each medium. The data were subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others into stream sediment samples. For the group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. In addition, maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses have been included. Further information about the HSSR program in general, or about the LANL portion of the program in particular, can be obtained in quarterly or semiannual program progress reports on open-file at DOE's Technical Library in Grand Junction. Information about the field and analytical procedures used by LANL during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the LANL and will not be included in this report

  16. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Nome NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Youngquist, C.A.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Nome NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others into groups of stream sediment and stream water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. In addition, maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses have been included. Further information about the HSSR program in general, or about the LANL portion of the program in particular, can be obtained in quarterly or semiannual program progress reports on open-file at DOE's Technical Library in Grand Junction. Information about the field and analytical procedures used by LANL during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the LANL, and will not be included in this report

  17. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Teshekpuk NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.

    1982-04-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Teshekpuk NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendix A describes the sample media and summarizes the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  18. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Cordova NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Youngquist, C.A.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Cordova NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others into groups of stream sediment and stream water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. In addition, maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses have been included. Further information about the HSSR program in general, or about the LANL portion of the program in particular, can be obtained in quarterly or semiannual program progress reports on open-file at DOE's Technical Library in Grand Junction. Information about the field and analytical procedures used by LANL during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the LANL and will not be included in this report

  19. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the White Sulfur Springs NTMS quadrangle, Montana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the White Sulphur Springs NTMS quadrangle, Montana. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A through C describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, stream-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses

  20. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Kenai NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance of the Kenai NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A through D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, lake-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses

  1. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the McCarthy NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaisance (HSSR) of the McCarthy NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of stream sediments. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume, these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendix A describes the sample media and summarizes the analytical result. Statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1;1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  2. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Atlin NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Altin NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Only 6 samples were taken in the Atlin Quadrangle. Appendix A describes the sample media and summarizes the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into stream-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report. Chemical analysis and field data for water samples from this quadrangle were open filed by the DOE Grand Junction Office as GJX-166

  3. National uranium resource evaluation. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Greeley NTMS quadrangle, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance of the Greeley NTMS quadrangle, Colorado. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A through D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses

  4. Hydrogeochemical situation in the flooding water of a uranium mine - the Niederschlema/Alberoda deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolkersdorfer, C.

    1996-01-01

    For reasons of economic viability and environmental considerations, the former uranium mine Niederschlema/Alberoda near Aue in the Erzgebirge (Ore Mountains) has been flooded since 1991. In statistical and hydrogeochemical evaluation of analyses, each with up to 60 parameters, it is shown that the water in the mine can be classified into three types: drainage water, intermediary water and mine water. All three types show significant differentiation in their chemical characteristics, whereby drainage water has the least mineral content and mine water the most. During the period of examination from January 1991 to December 1994, drainage and intermediary waters revealed no statistically significant changes in their physiochemical parameters, whereas the value of most of the physicochemical parameters of the mine water have increased more or less constantly up to 1994. At the end of 1994 the rate of increases in many of the parameters had slowed down or come to a halt. This is either a result of saturation of the water or it is a balance reaction of limited duration. To determine the hydrodynamic situation of the mine water a tracer experiment was carried out together with numerous deepness dependent temperature, conductibility, pH and redox measurements. (orig./SR) [de

  5. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Grand Junction NTMS quadrangle, Colorado/Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance of the Kenai NTMS quadrangle, Colorado/Utah. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, lake-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses

  6. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Denver NTMS quadrangle, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance of the Denver NTMS quadrangle, Colorado. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A through E describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, lake-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses

  7. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Solomon NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langfeldt, S.L.; Youngquist, C.A.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Solomon NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others into groups of stream sediment and stream water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. In addition, maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses have been included. Further information about the HSSR program in general, or about the LANL portion of the program in particular, can be obtained in quarterly or semiannual program progress reports on open-file at DOE's Technical Library in Grand Junction. Information about the field and analytical procedures used by LANL during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the LANL and will not be included in this report

  8. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Hughes NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Youngquist, C.A.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Hughes NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others into groups of stream sediment and lake sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. In addition, maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses have been included. Further information about the HSSR program in general, or about the LANL portion of the program in particular, can be obtained in quarterly or semiannual program progress reports on open-file at DOE's Technical Library in Grand Junction. Information about the field and analytical procedures used by LANL during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the LANL and will not be included in this report

  9. Uraniam hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Wiseman NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Wiseman NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendix A describes the sample media and summarizes the analytical results for each medium. The data were subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others (198a) into stream sediment samples. For the group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. In addition, maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses have been included. Further information about the HSSR program in general, or about the LANL portion of the program in particular, can be obtained in quarterly or semiannual program progress reports on open-file at DOE's Technical Library in Grand Junction. Information about the field and analytical procedures used by LANL during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the LANL and will not be included in this report

  10. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM):Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Special Section CAM Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... low back pain. True False Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) includes: Meditation Chiropractic Use of natural products, ...

  11. Hydrogeochemical and stable isotopic investigations on CO2-rich mineral waters from Harghita Mts. (Eastern Carpathians, Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Boglárka-Mercedesz; Baciu, Călin; Kármán, Krisztina; Kékedy-Nagy, Ladislau; Francesco, Italiano

    2013-04-01

    There is a worldwide interest on geothermal, mineral and groundwater as a resource for energy, drinking water supply and therapeutic needs. The increasing trend in replacing tap water with commercial bottled mineral water for drinking purposes has become an economic, hydrogeologic and medical concern in the last decades. Several investigations have been carried out worldwide on different topics related to geothermal and mineral waters, dealing with mineral water quality assessment, origin of geothermal and mineral waters, geochemical processes that influence water chemistry and water-rock interaction In Romania, the Călimani-Gurghiu-Harghita Neogene to Quaternary volcanic chain (Eastern Carpathians) is one of the most important areas from the point of view of CO2-rich mineral waters. These mineral water springs occur within other post-volcanic phenomena like dry CO2 emissions, moffettes, bubbling pools, H2S gas emissions etc. Mineral waters from this area are used for bottling, local spas and drinking purposes for local people. The number of springs, around 2000 according to literature data, shows that there is still a significant unexploited potential for good quality drinking water in this area. Within the youngest segment of the volcanic chain, the Harghita Mts., its volcaniclastic aprons and its boundary with the Transylvanian Basin, we have carried out an investigation on 23 CO2-rich mineral water springs from a hydrogeochemical and stable isotopic point of view. The mineral waters are Ca-Mg-HCO3 to Na-Cl type. Sometimes mixing between the two types can be observed. We have detected a great influence of water-rock interaction on the stable isotopic composition of the mineral waters, shown by isotopic shifts to the heavier oxygen isotope, mixing processes between shallow and deeper aquifers and local thermal anomalies. Acknowledgements: The present work was financially supported by the Romanian National Research Council, Project PN-II-ID-PCE-2011-3-0537 and by

  12. The role of mineral heterogeneity on the hydrogeochemical response of two fractured reservoir rocks in contact with dissolved CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Rios, Maria; Luquot, Linda; Soler, Josep M.; Cama, Jordi

    2017-04-01

    In this study we compare the hydrogeochemical response of two fractured reservoir rocks (limestone composed of 100 wt.% calcite and sandstone composed of 66 wt.% calcite, 28 wt.% quartz and 6 wt.% microcline) in contact with CO2-rich sulfate solutions. Flow-through percolation experiments were performed using artificially fractured limestone and sandstone cores and injecting a CO2-rich sulfate solution under a constant volumetric flow rate (from 0.2 to 60 mL/h) at P = 150 bar and T = 60 °C. Measurements of the pressure difference between the inlet and the outlet of the samples and of the aqueous chemistry enabled the determination of fracture permeability changes and net reaction rates. Additionally, X-ray computed microtomography (XCMT) was used to characterize and localized changes in fracture volume induced by dissolution and precipitation reactions. In all reacted cores an increase in fracture permeability and in fracture volume was always produced even when gypsum precipitation happened. The presence of inert silicate grains in sandstone samples favored the occurrence of largely distributed dissolution structures in contrast to localized dissolution in limestone samples. This phenomenon promoted greater dissolution and smaller precipitation in sandstone than in limestone experiments. As a result, in sandstone reservoirs, the larger increase in fracture volume as well as the more extended distribution of the created volume would favor the CO2 storage capacity. The different distribution of created volume between limestone and sandstone experiments led to a different variation in fracture permeability. The progressive stepped permeability increase for sandstone would be preferred to the sharp permeability increase for limestone to minimize risks related to CO2 injection, favor capillary trapping and reduce energetic storage costs. 2D reactive transport simulations that reproduce the variation in aqueous chemistry and the fracture geometry (dissolution pattern

  13. Complementary and conventional providers in cancer care: experience of communication with patients and steps to improve communication with other providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stub, Trine; Quandt, Sara A; Arcury, Thomas A; Sandberg, Joanne C; Kristoffersen, Agnete E

    2017-06-08

    Effective interdisciplinary communication is important to achieve better quality in health care. The aims of this study were to compare conventional and complementary providers' experience of communication about complementary therapies and conventional medicine with their cancer patients, and to investigate how they experience interdisciplinary communication and cooperation. This study analyzed data from a self-administrated questionnaire. A total of 606 different health care providers, from four counties in Norway, completed the questionnaire. The survey was developed to describe aspects of the communication pattern among oncology doctors, nurses, family physicians and complementary therapists (acupuncturists, massage therapists and reflexologists/zone-therapists). Between-group differences were analyzed using chi-square, ANOVA and Fisher's exact tests. Significance level was defined as p communication with their cancer patients regarding complementary therapies. While complementary therapists advised their patients to apply both complementary and conventional modalities, medical doctors were less supportive of their patients' use of complementary therapies. Of conventional providers, nurses expressed more positive attitudes toward complementary therapies. Opportunities to improve communication between conventional and complementary providers were most strongly supported by complementary providers and nurses; medical doctors were less supportive of such attempts. A number of doctors showed lack of respect for complementary therapists, but asked for more research, guidelines for complementary modalities and training in conventional medicine for complementary therapists. For better quality of care, greater communication about complementary therapy use is needed between cancer patients and their conventional and complementary providers. In addition, more communication between conventional and complementary providers is needed. Nurses may have a crucial role in

  14. Optimal advertising and pricing decisions for complementary products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleizadeh, Ata Allah; Charmchi, Masoud

    2015-03-01

    Cooperative advertising is an agreement between a manufacturer and a retailer to share advertising cost at the local level. Previous studies have not investigated cooperative advertising for complementary products and their main focus was only on one good. In this paper, we study a two-echelon supply chain consisting of one manufacturer and one retailer with two complementary goods. The demand of each good is influenced not only by its price but also by the price of the other product. We use two game theory approaches to model this problem; Stackelberg manufacturer and Stackelberg retailer.

  15. Determination of complementary therapies for prevention of striae gravidarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Teskereci

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Striae gravidarum (SG has been reported to be associated with various factors, but the role of complementary therapies in the prevention of SG is still not well understood. The aim of this study was to determine complementary therapies for prevention of SG. Materials and Methods: This descriptive research was conducted on 120 pregnant women in a maternity clinic at a university hospital. Of 120 women, 49 were going through the last trimester and 71 were going through their first postpartum 24 hours. Data were collected using a 25-item-questionnaire through face-to-face interviews between June and July in 2016. Obtained data were evaluated by using descriptive statistics, chi-square test and the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: 90.8% of women had SG. For the prevention of SG, 46.7% of women used massage, a manipulative body-based complementary therapy, 55.2% used oils, 28.6% used creams and 8.0% used a mixture of creams and oils for massaging. 42.9% of women started to use complementary therapies in their first trimester. Half of the women stated that they had received information about complementary therapies. A significantly lower rate of women using massage had SG compared to those not using massage (p=0.023. Conclusion: It was concluded that nearly half of the women used massage for the prevention of SG. In addition, massage application was found to reduce the occurrence of SG.

  16. Qualitative content analysis of complementary topical therapies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to alleviate diabetic foot problems, patients sometimes seek complementary therapies outside the professional context. This paper describes the use of complementary remedies as a topical treatment for diabetic foot ulcers among Jordanians. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse written responses of 68 ...

  17. Complementary and alternative treatment of musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazio, Simeon; Balen, Diana

    2011-12-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is high and increasing worldwide. Patients usually use CAM in addition to conventional medicine, mainly to treat pain. In a large number of cases, people use CAM for chronic musculoskeletal pain as in osteoarthritis, back pain, neck pain, or fibromyalgia. Herewith, a review is presented of CAM efficacy in treating musculoskeletal pain for which, however, no scientific research has so far provided evidence solid enough. In some rare cases where adequate pain control cannot be achieved, CAM might be considered in rational and individual approach based on the first general rule in medicine "not to harm" and on the utility theory of each intervention, i.e. according to the presumed mechanism of painful stimulus and with close monitoring of the patient's response. Further high quality studies are warranted to elucidate the efficacy and side effects of CAM methods. Therefore, conventional medicine remains the main mode of treatment for patients with musculoskeletal painful conditions.

  18. Attitudes towards holistic complementary and alternative medicine: a sample of healthy people in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erci, Behice

    2007-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the attitude towards holistic complementary and alternative medicine of healthy people, and to evaluate the relationship between attitude towards holistic complementary and alternative medicine and the characteristics of the participants. Complementary and alternative medicines are becoming more accepted. This study used descriptive and correlational designs. The study included healthy individuals who attended or visited a primary care centre for healthcare services. The sample of the study consisted of 448 persons who responded to the questionnaire. The Attitude towards Holistic Complementary and Alternative Medicine scale consisted of 11 items on a six-point, and two subscales. The mean score of holistic complementary and alternative medicine was studied in relation to attributes and holistic complementary and alternative medicine. The mean score on the scale was 58.1 SD 4.1 point, and in terms of the mean score of the scale, the sample group showed a negative attitude towards holistic complementary and alternative medicine and one subscale. Demographic characteristics of the sample group affected attitudes towards holistic complementary and alternative medicine and both subscales. In light of these results, it is clear that healthy Turkish population have a tendency towards conventional medicine. Health professionals caring for healthy people should provide comprehensive care that addresses the physical, psychosocial and spiritual needs of the individual; they could provide the consultation regarding to different patterns of complementary therapies.

  19. Modeling the Hydrogeochemical Transport of Radionuclides through Engineered Barriers System in the Proposed LLW Disposal Site of Taiwan - 12082

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wen-Sheng [Hydrotech Research Institute, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, Chen-Wuing; Tsao, Jui-Hsuan [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Li, Ming-Hsu [Institute of Hydrological and Oceanic Sciences, National Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan (China)

    2012-07-01

    A proposed site for final disposal of low-level radioactive waste located in Daren Township of Taitung County along the southeastern coast has been on the selected list in Taiwan. The geology of the Daren site consists of argillite and meta-sedimentary rocks. A mined cavern design with a tunnel system of 500 m below the surface is proposed. Concrete is used as the main confinement material for the engineered barrier. To investigate the hydrogeochemical transport of radionuclides through engineered barriers system, HYDROGEOCHEM5.0 model was applied to simulate the complex chemical interactions among radionuclides, the cement minerals of the concrete, groundwater flow, and transport in the proposed site. The simulation results showed that the engineered barriers system with the side ditch efficiently drained the ground water and lowered the concentration of the concrete degradation induced species (e.g., hydrogen ion, sulfate, and chloride). The velocity of groundwater observed at side ditch gradually decreased with time due to the fouling of pore space by the mineral formation of ettringite and thaumasite. The short half-life of Co-60, Sr-90 and Cs-137 significantly reduced the concentrations, whereas the long half-life of I-129(1.57x10{sup 7} years) and Am-241(432 years) remain stable concentrations at the interface of waste canister and concrete barrier after 300 years. The mineral saturation index (SI) was much less than zero due to the low aqueous concentration of radionuclide, so that the precipitation formation of Co-60, Sr-90, I-129, Cs-137 and Am-241 related minerals were not found. The effect of adsorption/desorption (i.e., surface complexation model) could be a crucial geochemical mechanism for the modeling of liquid-solid phase behavior of radionuclide in geochemically dynamic environments. Moreover, the development of advanced numerical models that are coupled with hydrogeochemical transport and dose assessment of radionuclide is required in the future

  20. Complementary Alternative Medicine for Children with Autism: A Physician Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, Allison E.; Ireland, Marjorie

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies suggest over half of children with autism are using complementary alternative medicine (CAM). In this study, physicians responded (n = 539, 19% response rate) to a survey regarding CAM use in children with autism. Physicians encouraged multi-vitamins (49%), essential fatty acids (25%), melatonin (25%) and probiotics (19%) and…

  1. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by cancer patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is garnering increasing interest and acceptance among the general population throughout the world. The use of CAM by cancer patients is very common in China. The referenced English literature has no rural community-based study from China on this subject. This study ...

  2. Complementary and alternative medications for chronic pelvic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Fah Che

    2014-09-01

    Chronic pelvic pain is common, but rarely cured, thus patients seek both second opinions and alternative means of controlling their pain. Complementary and alternative medicine accounts for 11.2% of out-of-pocket medical expenditures for adults for all conditions in the United States. Although there are many treatments, rigorous testing and well-done randomized studies are lacking. Dietary changes and physical modalities such as physical therapy have often been included in the category of alternative medicine, but their use is now considered mainstream. This article concentrates on other sources of alternative and complementary medicine, such as dietary supplementation and acupuncture. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Valdez NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Valdez NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System (GJOIS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A to D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream sediment, lake sediment, stream water, lake water, and ground water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. In addition, maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses have been included. Further information about the HSSR program in general, or about the LANL portion of the program in particular, can be obtained in quarterly or semiannual program progress reports on open-file at DOE's Technical Library in Grand Junction. Information about the field and analytical procedures used by LANL during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the LANL and will not be included in this report

  4. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Nulato NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Znkl, R.J.; Shellel, D.C. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.

    1982-03-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Nulato NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  5. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Sagavanirktok NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.

    1982-07-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Sagavanirktok NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  6. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Candle NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.

    1982-07-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Candle NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A through D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, and lake-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  7. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Port Alexander NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkl, R.J.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.

    1982-07-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Port Alexander NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available fom DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  8. Uranium Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Tanacross NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Tanacross NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  9. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Ketchikan NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; Minor, M.M.; McInteer, C.; Hansel, J.N.; Broxton, D.E.

    1981-11-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaisance (HSSR) of the Ketchikan NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume, these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, lake-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1;1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  10. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Point Lay NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Hardy, L.C.

    1982-07-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Point Lay NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  11. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Unalakleet NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Unalakleet NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information onthe field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  12. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance Misheguk Mountain NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Misheguk Mountain NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  13. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Glasgow NTMS quadrangle, Montana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Glasgow NTMS quadrangle, Montana. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A through C describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, stream-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  14. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Umiat NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Umiat NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  15. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Craig NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkl, R.J.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.

    1982-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Craig NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  16. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Howard Pass NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Howard Pass NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analysis, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  17. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Circle NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Hardy, L.C.

    1982-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Circle NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  18. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Ruby NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.

    1982-07-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Ruby NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  19. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Selawik NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Selawik NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A through D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, and lake-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  20. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Melozitna NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Hardy, L.C.

    1982-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Melozitna NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, lake-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  1. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Beechey Point NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Beechey Point NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANI) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory (see, for example, Planner and others, 1981) and will not be included in this report

  2. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Utukok River NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.

    1982-03-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Utukok River NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1;1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  3. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Beaver NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; Hensley, W.K.; Thomas, G.J.; Martell, C.J.; Maassen, L.W.

    1981-11-01

    The report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaisance (HSSR) of the Ketchikan NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) protion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume, these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, lake-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1;1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  4. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Nabesne NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Garcia, S.R.; Hanks, D.; George, W.E.; Boliver, S.L.

    1981-11-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Nabesna NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, lake-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory (see, for example, Planner and others, 1981), and will not be included in this report

  5. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Sterling NTMS quadrangle, Colorado. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Garcia, S.R.; Hanks, D.; George, W.E.; Boliver, S.L.

    1981-11-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaisance (HSSR) of the Sterling NTMS quadrangle, Colorado. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume, these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, lake-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1;1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  6. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Limon NTMS quadrangle, Colorado. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Minor, M.M.; McInteer, C.; Hansel, J.N.; Broxton, D.E.

    1981-11-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Limon NTMS quadrangle, Colorado. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume, these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream water, lake water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information of the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory (see, for example, Planner and others, 1981) and will not be included in this report

  7. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Coleen NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.

    1982-02-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Coleen NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these date are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laborarory and will not be included in this report

  8. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Big Delta NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, L. C.; D& #x27; Andrea, Jr., R. F.; Zinkl, R. J.; Shettel, Jr., D. L.; Langfeldt, S. L. [comps.

    1982-02-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Big Delta NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report.

  9. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Big Delta NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.

    1982-02-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Big Delta NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  10. Hydrogeochemical analysis and evaluation of groundwater in the reclaimed small basin of Abu Mina, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Zenhom E.; Atwia, Mohamed G.; El-Horiny, Mohamed M.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural reclamation activities during the last few decades in the Western Nile Delta have led to great changes in the groundwater levels and quality. In Egypt, changing the desert land into agricultural land has been done using transferred Nile water (through irrigation canal systems) or/and groundwater. This research investigates the hydrogeochemical changes accompanying the reclamation processes in the small basin of Abu Mina, which is part of the Western Nile Delta region. In summer 2008, 23 groundwater samples were collected and groundwater levels were measured in 40 observation wells. Comparing the groundwater data of the pre-reclamation (1974) and the post-reclamation (2008) periods, groundwater seems to have been subjected to many changes: rise in water level, modification of the flow system, improvement of water quality, and addition of new salts through dissolution processes. Generally, Abu Mina basin is subdivided into two areas, recharge and discharge. The dissolution and mixing were recognized in the recharge areas, while the groundwater of the discharge region carries the signature of the diluted pre-reclamation groundwater. The salts of soil and aquifer deposits play an important role in the salt content of the post and pre-reclamation groundwater. NaCl was the predominant water type in the pre-reclamation groundwater, while CaSO4, NaCl and MgSO4 are the common chemical facies in the post-reclamation groundwater. The post-reclamation groundwater mostly indicates mixing between the pre-reclamation groundwater and the infiltrated freshwater with addition of some ions due to interaction with soil and sediments.

  11. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Wainwright NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.

    1982-04-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Wainwright NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  12. Application of multivariate statistical technique for hydrogeochemical assessment of groundwater within the Lower Pra Basin, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, C. K.; Hayford, E. K.; Hodgson, I. O. A.

    2017-06-01

    Multivariate statistical technique and hydrogeochemical approach were employed for groundwater assessment within the Lower Pra Basin. The main objective was to delineate the main processes that are responsible for the water chemistry and pollution of groundwater within the basin. Fifty-four (54) (No) boreholes were sampled in January 2012 for quality assessment. PCA using Varimax with Kaiser Normalization method of extraction for both rotated space and component matrix have been applied to the data. Results show that Spearman's correlation matrix of major ions revealed expected process-based relationships derived mainly from the geochemical processes, such as ion-exchange and silicate/aluminosilicate weathering within the aquifer. Three main principal components influence the water chemistry and pollution of groundwater within the basin. The three principal components have accounted for approximately 79% of the total variance in the hydrochemical data. Component 1 delineates the main natural processes (water-soil-rock interactions) through which groundwater within the basin acquires its chemical characteristics, Component 2 delineates the incongruent dissolution of silicate/aluminosilicates, while Component 3 delineates the prevalence of pollution principally from agricultural input as well as trace metal mobilization in groundwater within the basin. The loadings and score plots of the first two PCs show grouping pattern which indicates the strength of the mutual relation among the hydrochemical variables. In terms of proper management and development of groundwater within the basin, communities, where intense agriculture is taking place, should be monitored and protected from agricultural activities. especially where inorganic fertilizers are used by creating buffer zones. Monitoring of the water quality especially the water pH is recommended to ensure the acid neutralizing potential of groundwater within the basin thereby, curtailing further trace metal

  13. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Mt. Michelson NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.

    1982-04-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Mt. Michelson NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  14. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Livengood NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.

    1981-11-01

    This report presents results of a hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Livengood NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-water and lake-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  15. Functions of Turkish complementary schools in the UK: Official vs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study focuses on one such Turkish complementary school in .... various educational services that lead to achieving certain goals .... languages, together with the issue of differences of quality of .... challenge of “tackling underachievement” of Turkish Speaking ..... Cape schools and implications for school leadership.

  16. Complementary Feeding Pattern in a Population of Pre-school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: It has been postulated that offering bland diets to infants could habituate to food refusal during early childhood. To investigate the complementary feeding pattern in Nigerian preschool children and a possible association with their current feeding habits, a cross-sectional study of two hundred (200) children was ...

  17. Nutritional and functional properties of a complementary food based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine the nutritional and functional properties of Amaranthus cruentus grain grown in Kenya for preparation of a ready-to-eat product that can be recommended as infant complementary food. Amaranth grains were subjected to steeping and steam pre-gelatinization to produce a ...

  18. Nutrient content and acceptability of soybean based complementary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutrient content and acceptability of soybean based complementary food. ... African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development ... A study was carried out in Morogoro region, Tanzania, to determine composition and acceptability of soy-based formulations with banana and cowpeas as traditional staples.

  19. Uniform and Complementary Social Interaction: Distinct Pathways to Social Unity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koudenburg, Namkje; Postmes, Tom; Gordijn, Ernestine; van Mourik Broekman, Aafke

    We examine how different forms of co-action (uniform vs. complementary co-action) give rise to feelings of solidarity. Five studies reveal that both forms of co-action increase solidarity, but have different consequences for the role of the individual within the group.

  20. Child factors associated with complementary feeding practices in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The objective of the study was to identify child factors that influenced complementary feeding practices in 2006 and 2011 in Uganda. Design: Trend analysis of Uganda Demographic and Health Surveys (UDHS) from 2006 and 2011. Subjects and setting: Children aged 6 to 23 months, Uganda. Results: Between ...

  1. Infant Feeding Practices and the Effect of Early Complementary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine infant feeding practices and the effect of early complementary feeding on the nutritional status of children in Makada Community, Sabon Gari Local Government Area (LGA), Kaduna State, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was carried out.

  2. Information Discovery from Complementary Literatures: Categorizing Viruses as Potential Weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Don R.; Smalheiser, Neil R.; Bookstein, A.

    2001-01-01

    This project demonstrates how techniques of analyzing complementary literatures might be applied to problems of defense against biological weapons. The article is based solely on the open-source scientific literature, and is oriented on informatics techniques. Findings are intended as a guide to the virus literature to support further studies that…

  3. Antiretrovirals and the use of traditional, complementary and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this prospective