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Sample records for competence-based assessments creating

  1. Assessment to Transform Competency-based Curricula

    OpenAIRE

    Farris, Karen B.; Demb, Ada; Janke, Kristin Kari; Kelley, Katherine; Scott, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to apply Kotter's 8 steps to transforming organizations as a framework for the role of assessment in competency-based curricular reform. Two analyses were conducted including (1) environmental scan of literature about assessment in curricular reform and (2) qualitative analyses of data from a college of pharmacy which instituted curricular reform. These assessment-focused data sources were interpreted in view of Kotter's 8 steps. Creating a sense of urgency, fo...

  2. Competency-based assessment in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Champin, Denisse; Escuela de Medicina, Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas. Lima, Perú. Médico internista master en educación superior

    2014-01-01

    At present, competency-based curriculum is considered to be the most appropriate model in medical education. Much has been written about this model; however, a crucial aspect of the model is the assessment of competency development which is a different point compared to the traditional model of cognitive assessment. Assessment in the context of the competencybased curriculum model must be aligned with the profile of the competencies that the institution offers. This publication reports the ev...

  3. Assessment of Competency-Based Instruction. Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, Bill E.; LaBrecque, Suzanne V.

    The extent to which competency-based instruction (CBI) has been implemented in postsecondary-level vocational-technical education programs and courses throughout Texas was assessed. Questionnaires were mailed to the occupational education deans/directors of 69 public community and technical college campuses. Each dean/director distributed the…

  4. Involving users in the refinement of the competency-based achievement system: an innovative approach to competency-based assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Shelley; Poth, Cheryl-Anne; Donoff, Michel G; Papile, Chiara; Humphries, Paul; Stasiuk, Samantha; Georgis, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Competency-based assessment innovations are being implemented to address concerns about the effectiveness of traditional approaches to medical training and the assessment of competence. Integrating intended users' perspectives during the piloting and refinement process of an innovation is necessary to ensure the innovation meets users' needs. Failure to do so results in no opportunity for users to influence the innovation, nor for developers to assess why an innovation works or does not work in different contexts. A qualitative participatory action research approach was used. Sixteen first-year residents participated in three focus groups and two interviews during piloting. Verbatim transcripts were analyzed individually and then across all transcripts using a constant comparison approach. The analysis revealed three key characteristics related to the impact on the residents' acceptance of the innovation as being a worthwhile investment of time and effort: access to frequent, timely, and specific feedback from preceptors. Findings were used to refine the innovation further. This study highlights the necessary conditions for assessing the success of implementation of educational innovations. Reciprocal communication between users and developers is vital. This reflects the approaches recommended in the Ottawa Consensus Statement on research in assessment published in Medical Teacher in March 2011.

  5. Integrating authentic assessment with competency based learning: the Protocol Portfolio Scoring.

    OpenAIRE

    Sluijsmans, Dominique; Straetmans, Gerard; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2009-01-01

    Sluijsmans, D. M. A., Straetmans, G., & Van Merriënboer, J. (2008). Integrating authentic assessment with competency based learning: the Protocol Portfolio Scoring. Journal of Vocational Education and Training, 60(2), 157-172.

  6. An Assessment of Competency-Based Simulations on E-Learners' Management Skills Enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Yair; Ramim, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the assessment of tangible skills and competence. Specifically, there is an increase in the offerings of competency-based assessments, and some academic institutions are offering college credits for individuals who can demonstrate adequate level of competency on such assessments. An increased interest has been placed…

  7. Assessment Criteria for Competency-Based Education: A Study in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastré, Greet M. J.; van der Klink, Marcel R.; Amsing-Smit, Pauline; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of type of assessment criteria (performance-based vs. competency-based), the relevance of assessment criteria (relevant criteria vs. all criteria), and their interaction on secondary vocational education students' performance and assessment skills. Students on three programmes in the domain of nursing and care…

  8. A comprehensive clinical competency-based assessment in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiloah, J; Scarbecz, M; Bland, P S; Hottel, T L

    2017-05-01

    Traditional periodontics clinical examinations in dental education frequently assess a narrow set of clinical skills and do not adequately assess the ability of students to independently manage a periodontal patient. As an alternative, the authors developed a comprehensive periodontics competency case experience (CCCE) for senior dental students and surveyed students regarding their experience with the CCCE. Students challenging the CCCE must treat a patient with moderate periodontitis and must independently decide when a state of periodontal and oral health has been achieved. Students are also required to conduct an oral presentation to periodontology faculty. Dental students who completed the CCCE had a favourable impression of the experience, compared with the traditional clinical examinations taken in the junior year. The majority of students rated all the components of the CCCE as 'somewhat' or 'very helpful'. About 72.4% of students felt that being able to work independently on the examination was very helpful for learning about the clinical management of patients with periodontal disease, followed by 'simulation of care in private practice' (65.5%), and oral photography experience (55.2%). The greatest difficulty reported by students was finding an acceptable patient. About 62.1% of students rated 'finding the right patient' as very difficult. Students reported having to screen a mean of 5.9 patients (SD: 4.5) to find a qualified patient. The results of the survey will be useful in improving the examination as an assessment tool in periodontal therapy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Programmatic assessment of competency-based workplace learning: when theory meets practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bok, H.G.; Teunissen, P.W.; Favier, R.P.; Rietbroek, N.J.; Theyse, L.F.; Brommer, H.; Haarhuis, J.C.; Beukelen, P. van; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Jaarsma, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In competency-based medical education emphasis has shifted towards outcomes, capabilities, and learner-centeredness. Together with a focus on sustained evidence of professional competence this calls for new methods of teaching and assessment. Recently, medical educators advocated the use

  10. Student perceptions of assessment and student self-efficacy in competence-based education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinther, van M.; Dochy, F.; Segers, M.; Braeken, J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide insight into the interplay between student perceptions of competence-based assessment and student self-efficacy, and how this influences student learning outcomes. Results reveal that student perceptions of the form authenticity aspect and the quality

  11. Student perceptions of assessment and student self-efficacy in competence-based education

    OpenAIRE

    Dinther, van, D.; Dochy, Filip; Segers, Mien; Braeken, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide insight into the interplay between student perceptions of competence-based assessment and student self-efficacy, and how this influences student learning outcomes. Results reveal that student perceptions of the form authenticity aspect and the quality feedback aspect of assessment do predict student self-efficacy, confirming the role of mastery experiences and social persuasions in enhancing student self-efficacy as stated by social cognitive theory. F...

  12. Barriers to the implementation of competency-based education and assessment: a survey of otolaryngology program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laeeq, Kulsoom; Weatherly, Robert A; Masood, Hamid; Thompson, Richard E; Brown, David J; Cummings, Charles W; Bhatti, Nasir I

    2010-06-01

    To identify the barriers faced by otolaryngology program directors as they implement competency-based education and assessment and to identify preferred approaches to meet these challenges as suggested by program directors. A national survey of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery program directors. We developed a 20-item questionnaire that was distributed to 102 otolaryngology program directors through SurveyMonkey. Nonrespondents were reminded by follow-up email and phone calls. Results were analyzed by descriptive statistical analysis. A total of 88 (86%) program directors responded to the survey. There was a marked discrepancy between the income received and time spent performing the duties of the program director. Program director workload was recognized as the most important barrier to the implementation of competency-based education. Creating a practical clearinghouse of existing and emerging assessment tools was given the highest rating among the approaches to meet the challenges faced by program directors. Program directors in otolaryngology do not have sufficient financial support, protected time, and personnel to fulfill their administrative and educational responsibilities. They should be provided with additional institutional assistance to help them achieve the goals of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outcome project.

  13. Surgeons' attitude toward a competency-based training and assessment program: results of a multicenter survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmans, Cornelis J; den Hoed, Pieter T; Wallenburg, Iris; van der Laan, Lijkckle; van der Harst, Erwin; van der Elst, Maarten; Mannaerts, Guido H H; Dawson, Imro; van Lanschot, Jan J B; Ijzermans, Jan N M

    2013-01-01

    Currently, most surgical training programs are focused on the development and evaluation of professional competencies. Also in the Netherlands, competency-based training and assessment programs were introduced to restructure postgraduate medical training. The current surgical residency program is based on the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists (CanMEDS) competencies and uses assessment tools to evaluate residents' competence progression. In this study, we examined the attitude of surgical residents and attending surgeons toward a competency-based training and assessment program used to restructure general surgical training in the Netherlands in 2009. In 2011, all residents (n = 51) and attending surgeons (n = 108) in 1 training region, consisting of 7 hospitals, were surveyed. Participants were asked to rate the importance of the CanMEDS competencies and the suitability of the adopted assessment tools. Items were rated on a 5-point Likert scale and considered relevant when at least 80% of the respondents rated an item with a score of 4 or 5 (indicating a positive attitude). Reliability was evaluated by calculating the Cronbach's α, and the Mann-Whitney test was applied to assess differences between groups. The response rate was 88% (n = 140). The CanMEDS framework demonstrated good reliability (Cronbach's α = 0.87). However, the importance of the competencies 'Manager' (78%) and 'Health Advocate' (70%) was undervalued. The assessment tools failed to achieve an acceptable reliability (Cronbach's α = 0.55), and individual tools were predominantly considered unsuitable for assessment. Exceptions were the tools 'in-training evaluation report' (91%) and 'objective structured assessment of technical skill' (82%). No significant differences were found between the residents and the attending surgeons. This study has demonstrated that, 2 years after the reform of the general surgical residency program, residents and attending surgeons in a large

  14. Competency-based achievement system: using formative feedback to teach and assess family medicine residents' skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Shelley; Poth, Cheryl N; Donoff, Michel; Humphries, Paul; Steiner, Ivan; Schipper, Shirley; Janke, Fred; Nichols, Darren

    2011-09-01

    Family medicine residency programs require innovative means to assess residents' competence in "soft" skills (eg, patient-centred care, communication, and professionalism) and to identify residents who are having difficulty early enough in their residency to provide remedial training. To develop a method to assess residents' competence in various skills and to identify residents who are having difficulty. The Competency-Based Achievement System (CBAS) was designed to measure competence using 3 main principles: formative feedback, guided self-assessment, and regular face-to-face meetings. The CBAS is resident driven and provides a framework for meaningful interactions between residents and advisors. Residents use the CBAS to organize and review their feedback, to guide their own assessment of their progress, and to discern their future learning needs. Advisors use the CBAS to monitor, guide, and verify residents' knowledge of and competence in important skills. By focusing on specific skills and behaviour, the CBAS enables residents and advisors to make formative assessments and to communicate their findings. Feedback indicates that the CBAS is a user-friendly and helpful system to assess competence.

  15. Beyond NAVMEC: competency-based veterinary education and assessment of the professional competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Jennifer L; Pelzer, Jacquelyn M; Inzana, Karen D

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of competency-based curricula within the health sciences has been an important paradigm shift over the past 30 years. As a result, one of the five strategic goals recommended by the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium (NAVMEC) report was to graduate career-ready veterinarians who are proficient in, and have the confidence to use, an agreed-upon set of core competencies. Of the nine competencies identified as essential for veterinary graduates, seven could be classified as professional or non-technical competencies: communication; collaboration; management (self, team, system); lifelong learning, scholarship, value of research; leadership; diversity and multicultural awareness; and adaptation to changing environments. Traditionally, the professional competencies have received less attention in veterinary curricula and their assessment is often sporadic or inconsistent. In contrast, the same or similar competencies are being increasingly recognized in other health professions as essential skills and abilities, and their assessment is being undertaken with enhanced scrutiny and critical appraisal. Several challenges have been associated with the assessment of professional competencies, including agreement as to their definition and therefore their evaluation, the fact that they are frequently complex and require multiple integrative assessments, and the ability and/or desire of faculty to teach and assess these competencies. To provide an improved context for assessment of the seven professional competencies identified in the NAVMEC report, this article describes a broad framework for their evaluation as well as specific examples of how these or similar competencies are currently being measured in medical and veterinary curricula.

  16. Defining and Assessing Competencies for Competency-Based, Outcome-Focused Management Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, Erwin; Sherman, Herbert; Washbush, John B.

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that competency-based management development programs should shift emphasis from theories and skills to decisions managers must make. Presents a model for defining types of management decisions regarding nontechnical issues. (Contains 16 references.) (SK)

  17. La supuesta neutralidad de la evaluación por competencias The alleged neutrality of competence-based assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Revilla Castro

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available La gestión por competencias se ha convertido en los últimos treinta años en uno de los temas recurrentes cuando se habla de la gestión integral en las organizaciones del siglo xxi. Los cuatro pilares sobre los que descansa dicha gestión son la selección, la formación, la retribución y la evaluación. El objetivo del presente artículo es el análisis de uno de esos elementos clave: la evaluación por competencias. El punto de partida de esta investigación es la tendencia, en aumento, a valorar a los trabajadores tanto por sus cualificaciones como por sus actitudes, dos elementos centrales en la definición de competencia. A través del análisis de diferentes entrevistas a expertos y encargados de recursos humanos implicados en la gestión por competencias, se pretende visualizar las dificultades de encontrar elementos objetivos a los que atenerse a la hora de evaluar las competencias de los trabajadores.In the last 30 years competence-based management has become a recurring theme in the integral management of 21st-century institutions. The four pillars that support competence-based management are selection, training, remuneration and assessment. The aim of the present article is to analyse one of these key elements: competence-based assessment. The starting point of the study is the increasing tendency to assess employees on the basis not only of their qualifications but also of their attitudes, two elements that are fundamental to the definition of competence. By analyzing a variety of interviews with experts and people in charge of human resources involved in competence-based management, we aim to highlight how difficult it is to find objective elements on which to base an assessment of the competences of employees.

  18. Application of competency-based education in laparoscopic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Dongbo; Bo, Hong; Zhang, Weihui; Zhao, Song; Meng, Xianzhi; Zhang, Donghua

    2015-01-01

    To induce competency-based education/developing a curriculum in the training of postgraduate students in laparoscopic surgery. This study selected postgraduate students before the implementation of competency-based education (n = 16) or after the implementation of competency-based education (n = 17). On the basis of the 5 competencies of patient care, medical knowledge, practice-based learning and improvement, interpersonal and communication skills, and professionalism, the research team created a developing a curriculum chart and specific improvement measures that were implemented in the competency-based education group. On the basis of the developing a curriculum chart, the assessment of the 5 comprehensive competencies using the 360° assessment method indicated that the competency-based education group's competencies were significantly improved compared with those of the traditional group (P education/developing a curriculum teaching helps to improve the comprehensive competencies of postgraduate students and enables them to become qualified clinicians equipped to meet society's needs.

  19. Assessment of community-based training of medical undergraduates: Development and validation of a competency-based questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewade, Hemant Deepak; Jeyashree, Kathiresan; Kalaiselvi, Selvaraj; Palanivel, Chinnakali; Panigrahi, Krishna Chandra

    2016-01-01

    The global shift toward competency-based education and assessment is also applicable to community-based training (CBT) of undergraduate medical students. There is a need for a tool to assess competencies related to CBT. This study aimed to develop a tool that uses a competency-based approach to evaluate CBT of medical undergraduates. A preliminary draft of the questionnaire was prepared by the investigators based on a conceptual framework. Using the Delphi technique, this draft was further developed by a specialist panel (n = 8) into a self-administered questionnaire. After pretesting with students, it was administered to medical undergraduates (n = 178) who had recently completed Community Medicine. Item analysis and exploratory factor analysis were performed under which principal component analysis was used. Reliability was assessed by calculating Cronbach's alpha, convergent validity by correlating the scores with Community Medicine university examination scores, and construct validity by describing percentage variance explained by the components. A 74-item questionnaire developed after the Delphi technique was further abridged to a 58-item questionnaire. Cronbach's alpha of 74 and 58-item questionnaires were 0.96 and 0.95, respectively; convergent validity was 0.07 and 0.09, respectively; and percentage variance explained by the components were 69.3% and 70.1%, respectively. Agreement between scores of both versions was 0.76. The authors developed a questionnaire which can be used for competency-based assessment in community-based undergraduate medical education. It is a valuable addition to the existing assessment methods and can guide experts in a need-based design of curriculum and teaching/training methodology.

  20. Criterion validity of a competency-based assessment center in medical education - a 4-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotthoff, Thomas; Ostapczuk, Martin S; Kröncke, Klaus D; Zimmerhofer, Alexander; Decking, Ulrich; Schneider, Matthias; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Core competencies have progressively gained importance in medical education. In other contexts, especially personnel selection and development, assessment centers (ACs) are used to assess competencies, but there is only a limited number of studies on competency-based ACs in medical education. To the best of our knowledge, the present study provides the first data on the criterion-related validity of a competency-based AC in medical education. Methods We developed an AC tailored to measure core competencies relevant to medical education (social-ethical, communicative, self, and teaching) and tested its validity in n=30 first-year medical students using 3- to 4-year follow-up measures such as (a) objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE) on basic clinical skills (n=26), (b) OSCE on communication skills (n=21), and (c) peer feedback (n=18). The AC contained three elements: interview, group discussion, and role play. Additionally, a self-report questionnaire was provided as a basis for the interview. Results Baseline AC average score and teaching competency correlated moderately with the communication OSCE average score (r=0.41, p=0.03, and r=0.38, p=0.04, respectively). Social-ethical competency in the AC showed a very strong convergent association with the communication OSCE average score (r=0.60, pcompetency correlated strongly with the overall peer feedback (r=0.50, p=0.02). We found predominantly low and insignificant correlations between the AC and the OSCE on basic clinical skills (r=-0.33 to 0.30, all p's>0.05). Conclusion The results showed that competency-based ACs can be used at a very early stage of medical training to successfully predict future performance in core competencies.

  1. Criterion validity of a competency-based assessment center in medical education--a 4-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotthoff, Thomas; Ostapczuk, Martin S; Kröncke, Klaus D; Zimmerhofer, Alexander; Decking, Ulrich; Schneider, Matthias; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Core competencies have progressively gained importance in medical education. In other contexts, especially personnel selection and development, assessment centers (ACs) are used to assess competencies, but there is only a limited number of studies on competency-based ACs in medical education. To the best of our knowledge, the present study provides the first data on the criterion-related validity of a competency-based AC in medical education. We developed an AC tailored to measure core competencies relevant to medical education (social-ethical, communicative, self, and teaching) and tested its validity in n=30 first-year medical students using 3- to 4-year follow-up measures such as (a) objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE) on basic clinical skills (n=26), (b) OSCE on communication skills (n=21), and (c) peer feedback (n=18). The AC contained three elements: interview, group discussion, and role play. Additionally, a self-report questionnaire was provided as a basis for the interview. Baseline AC average score and teaching competency correlated moderately with the communication OSCE average score (r=0.41, p=0.03, and r=0.38, p=0.04, respectively). Social-ethical competency in the AC showed a very strong convergent association with the communication OSCE average score (r=0.60, pcompetency correlated strongly with the overall peer feedback (r=0.50, p=0.02). We found predominantly low and insignificant correlations between the AC and the OSCE on basic clinical skills (r=-0.33 to 0.30, all p's>0.05). The results showed that competency-based ACs can be used at a very early stage of medical training to successfully predict future performance in core competencies.

  2. Mental health learning needs assessment: competency-based instrument for best practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Sylvia E

    2013-06-01

    A learning needs assessment focused on psychiatric/mental health nursing competency development is a central component of nursing education in specialty mental health nursing practice. The provision of education for mental health nursing relies on the underlying assumption that the learning needs of experienced mental health nurses have been assessed and educational programs implemented to address educational needs for competency in professional practice. Few professional learning needs assessments have been developed to identify learning needs in mental health nursing practice. The majority of available professional learning needs assessments focus on medical nursing practice applications rather than the psychosocial aspects of a mental health assessment. The mental health field addresses very different assessment criteria such as knowledge of suicide assessment and therapeutic interventions. The purpose of this article is to present and describe the process of developing a learning needs assessment focused on competency development for the specialty practice of mental health nursing that addresses and resolves complex learning needs.

  3. Competency-Based Medical Education and Assessment of Training: Review of Selected National Obstetrics and Gynaecology Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Milena; Aggarwal, Rajesh

    2017-07-01

    There are global variations in obstetrics and gynaecology (OBGYN) training curricula, both in length and in their structure and content. The ultimate goal for all residency programs is to ensure a skilled, competent physician, capable of independent practice by the end of his or her training. An online search was used for nationally recognized OBGYN training curricula. The curricula of Australia, Canada, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States were individually reviewed and evaluated for their use of competency-based medical education and methods of assessment, including simulation. These were also compared to the World Federation for Medical Education's Global Standards for postgraduate medical education. Comparing the OBGYN curricula of these five countries led to quite similar results. Even though curricula reviewed have or will be integrating competency-based medical education into their residency program, there is a need to develop adequate assessment tools, including simulation, to train competent physicians capable of independent practice. Standardization of curricula leads to a decrease in the variability and an increase in the quality of training and allows for measurements and comparisons across centres. Ultimately, modifications to the curricula or even consensus for an international standard, including a standardized national simulation curriculum, may potentially increase the quality and efficiency of training, which could have a direct impact on patient safety and quality of care. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Delphi study to validate competency-based criteria to assess undergraduate midwifery students' competencies in the maternity ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embo, M; Helsloot, K; Michels, N; Valcke, M

    2017-10-01

    workplace learning plays a crucial role in midwifery education. Twelve midwifery schools in Flanders (Belgium) aimed to implement a standardised and evidence-based method to learn and assess competencies in practice. This study focuses on the validation of competency-based criteria to guide and assess undergraduate midwifery students' postnatal care competencies in the maternity ward. an online Delphi study was carried out. During three consecutive sessions, experts from workplaces and schools were invited to score the assessment criteria as to their relevance and feasibility, and to comment on the content and their formulation. A descriptive quantitative analysis, and a qualitative thematic content analysis of the comments were carried out. A Mann-Whitney U-test was used to investigate differences between expert groups. eleven competencies and fifty-six assessment criteria were found appropriate to assess midwifery students' competencies in the maternity ward. Overall median scores were high and consensus was obtained for all criteria, except for one during the first round. Although all initial assessment criteria (N=89) were scored as relevant, some of them appeared not feasible in practice. Little difference was found between the expert groups. Comments mainly included remarks about concreteness and measurability. this study resulted in validated criteria to assess postnatal care competencies in the maternity ward. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The development of a competency-based assessment rubric to measure resident milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boateng, Beatrice A; Bass, Lanessa D; Blaszak, Richard T; Farrar, Henry C

    2009-09-01

    The outcomes-based assessment rubric is a novel systematic instrument for documenting improvement in clinical learning. This article describes the development of a rubric aimed at introducing specific performance indicators to measure the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies. The potential benefits and implications for medical education include specifying performance indicators and outcomes, ensuring that assessment is coherent and consistent for all residents, measuring resident outcomes based on real-life criteria, providing opportunities for residents to demonstrate proficiency in a specific competency and outcome level, and improving the quality of assessment.

  6. Competency Based Assessment Using Virtual Reality (VERT): Is It a Realistic Possibility ?

    OpenAIRE

    Flinton, David Maurice

    2015-01-01

    The education of the radiography profession is based within higher education establishments, yet a critical part of all radiography programmes is the clinical component where students learn the practical skills of the profession. Assessments therefore not only have to assess a student’s knowledge, but also their clinical competence and core skills in line with both Health and Care Professions Council and the Society and College of Radiographers requirements. This timely thesis examines the po...

  7. Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) in Psychiatry Education: A Review of Its Role in Competency-Based Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakiotis, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Over the last two decades, Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) has become an increasingly important part of psychiatry education and assessment in the Australian context. A reappraisal of the evidence base regarding the use of OSCE in psychiatry is therefore timely. This paper reviews the literature regarding the use of OSCE as an assessment tool in both undergraduate and postgraduate psychiatry training settings. Suitable articles were identified using the search terms 'psychiatry AND OSCE' in the ERIC (educational) and PubMed (healthcare) databases and grouped according to their predominant focus: (1) the validity of OSCEs in psychiatry; (2) candidate preparation and other factors impacting on performance; and (3) special topics. The literature suggests that the OSCE has been widely adopted in psychiatry education, as a valid and reliable method of assessing psychiatric competencies that is acceptable to both learners and teachers alike. The limited evidence base regarding its validity for postgraduate psychiatry examinations suggests that more research is needed in this domain. Despite any shortcomings, OSCEs are currently ubiquitous in all areas of undergraduate and postgraduate medicine and proposing a better alternative for competency-based assessment is difficult. A critical question is whether OSCE is sufficient on its own to assess high-level consultancy skills, and aspects of professionalism and ethical practice, that are essential for effective specialist practice, or whether it needs to be supplemented by additional testing modalities.

  8. An automated competency-based student performance assessment program for advanced pharmacy practice experiential programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ried, L Douglas; Nemire, Ruth; Doty, Randell; Brickler, Mildred P; Anderson, Holly H; Frenzel-Shepherd, Elizabeth; Larose-Pierre, Margareth; Dugan, Dee

    2007-12-15

    To describe the development and preliminary outcomes of the System of Universal Clinical Competency Evaluation in the Sunshine State (SUCCESS) for preceptors to assess students' clinical performance in advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). An Internet-based APPE assessment tool was developed by faculty members from colleges of pharmacy in Florida and implemented. Numeric scores and grades derived from the SUCCESS algorithm were similar to preceptors' comparison grades. The average SUCCESS GPA was slightly higher compared to preceptors' scores (0.02 grade points). The SUCCESS program met its goals, including establishing a common set of forms, standardized assessment criteria, an objective document that is accessible on the Internet, and standardized grading, and reducing pressure on preceptors from students concerning their grades.

  9. Design of a Competency-Based Assessment Model in the Field of Accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciudad-Gómez, Adelaida; Valverde-Berrocoso, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the phases involved in the design of a methodology to contribute both to the acquisition of competencies and to their assessment in the field of Financial Accounting, within the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) framework, which we call MANagement of COMpetence in the areas of Accounting (MANCOMA). Having selected and…

  10. Competency-based assessment for clinical supervisors: design-based research on a web-delivered program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Rachel; Williams, Lauren Therese; Grealish, Laurie; Jamieson, Maggie

    2015-02-27

    Clinicians need to be supported by universities to use credible and defensible assessment practices during student placements. Web-based delivery of clinical education in student assessment offers professional development regardless of the geographical location of placement sites. This paper explores the potential for a video-based constructivist Web-based program to support site supervisors in their assessments of student dietitians during clinical placements. This project was undertaken as design-based research in two stages. Stage 1 describes the research consultation, development of the prototype, and formative feedback. In Stage 2, the program was pilot-tested and evaluated by a purposeful sample of nine clinical supervisors. Data generated as a result of user participation during the pilot test is reported. Users' experiences with the program were also explored via interviews (six in a focus group and three individually). The interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis conducted from a pedagogical perspective using van Manen's highlighting approach. This research succeeded in developing a Web-based program, "Feed our Future", that increased supervisors' confidence with their competency-based assessments of students on clinical placements. Three pedagogical themes emerged: constructivist design supports transformative Web-based learning; videos make abstract concepts tangible; and accessibility, usability, and pedagogy are interdependent. Web-based programs, such as Feed our Future, offer a viable means for universities to support clinical supervisors in their assessment practices during clinical placements. A design-based research approach offers a practical process for such Web-based tool development, highlighting pedagogical barriers for planning purposes.

  11. Constructing a competency-based bariatric surgery fellowship training curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Corrigan L; Rosenthal, Raul J; Brethauer, Stacy; DeMaria, Eric; Kelly, John J; Morton, John M; Lo Menzo, Emanuele; Moore, Rachel; Pomp, Alfons; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2017-03-01

    Bariatric fellowship training after general surgery has historically been time based and competence was determined at completion based on a minimum number of cases during the fellowship. Graduate medical education is moving toward competency-based medical education where learners are evaluated during the course of their training and competence assessment occurs throughout. The Executive Council of the American Society of Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) at the direction of the American Board of Surgery wanted to transition the bariatric surgery fellowship curriculum from its traditional format to a competency-based curriculum using competency-based medical education principles. The ASMBS Education and Training Committee established a task force of 9 members to create a new curriculum and all of the necessary evaluation tools to support the curriculum, and initiate a pilot program. A competency-based curriculum consisting of 6 modules with cognitive and technical milestones, and the innovative evaluation tools needed to evaluate the learners, was created. A pilot program consisting of 10 programs and 19 fellows has been undertaken for the 2016-2017 academic year. The Education Committee of the ASMBS is leading the charge in curriculum development for competency-based medical education for bariatric fellowship. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The False Dichotomy of Quality and Quantity in the Discourse around Assessment in Competency-Based Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Cate, Olle

    2015-01-01

    Competency-based medical education stresses the attainment of competencies rather than the completion of fixed time in rotations. This sometimes leads to the interpretation that quantitative features of a program are of less importance, such as procedures practiced and weeks or months spent in clinical practice. An educational philosophy like…

  13. The false dichotomy of quality and quantity in the discourse around assessment in competency-based education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Cate, Olle

    Competency-based medical education stresses the attainment of competencies rather than the completion of fixed time in rotations. This sometimes leads to the interpretation that quantitative features of a program are of less importance, such as procedures practiced and weeks or months spent in

  14. Acceptability, Feasibility and Feedback Analysis of Perception for Objective Structured Practical Examination As an Assessment Tool in Undergraduate in Competency Based Medical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsha V. Patil

    2016-04-01

    additional assessing tool in competency based medical education. We favor introduction of OSPE method of evaluation in our setup as it covers all domains and different aspects.

  15. Competency Assessment Tool (CAT). The Evaluation of an Innovative Competency-Based Assessment Experience in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Georgeta; Cano, Elena; Cabrera, Nati

    2016-01-01

    This article examines an innovation in teaching-learning and assessment processes through the use of a platform called the Competency Assessment Tool (CAT). It allows for the tracking of student blogs with the objective of improving self-reflective processes and providing feedback. The experiment was carried out in six universities in Catalonia,…

  16. From Theory to Practice: Utilizing Competency-based Milestones to Assess Professional Growth and Development in the Foundational Science Blocks of a Pre-Clerkship Medical School Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettepher, Cathleen C; Lomis, Kimberly D; Osheroff, Neil

    2016-09-01

    Physicians-in-training require skills and attitudes beyond medical knowledge in order to mature into successful clinicians. However, because assessments in pre-clerkship curricula historically have focused almost exclusively on medical knowledge, faculty contributions to early student development often have been limited. To address this challenge and enhance student progress, we re-designed our pre-clerkship curriculum to include settings in which diverse facets of student performance could be observed and fostered. Concurrently, we transitioned to an assessment strategy focused on competency-based milestones. The implementation of this strategy has allowed pre-clerkship science faculty to provide early-stage students with rich holistic feedback designed to stimulate their professional growth.

  17. Competence-based education: An example from vocational practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselink, R.; Lans, T.; Mulder, M.; Biemans, H.J.A.

    2003-01-01

    First, the existing confusion about competence-based education is described: the behavioristic, generic and holistic approach. The following definition is formulated: Competence-based education is creating opportunities for students and workers, close to their world of experience in a meaningful

  18. Assessment of lumbar puncture skill in experts and nonexperts using checklists and quantitative tracking of needle trajectories: implications for competency-based medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinkard, David; Moult, Eric; Holden, Matthew; Davison, Colleen; Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor; McGraw, Robert

    2015-01-01

    CONSTRUCT: With the current shift toward competency-based education, rigorous assessment tools are needed for procedurally based tasks. Multiple tools exist to evaluate procedural skills, each with specific weaknesses. We sought to determine if quantitative needle tracking could be used as a measure of lumbar puncture (LP) performance and added discriminatory value to a dichotomous checklist. Thirty-two medical students were divided into 2 groups. One group was asked to practice an LP once (single practice [SP]) and the other 5 times (multiple practice [MP]). Experts (attending ER physicians, senior ER residents, and a junior anesthesia resident) were used as comparators. Medical students were assessed again at 1 month to assess skill retention. Groups were assessed performing an LP with an electromagnetic tracking device that allows the needle's 3-dimensional movements to be captured and analyzed, and a dichotomous checklist. Quantitative needle metrics as assessed by electromagnetic tracking showed a decreasing trend in needle movement distance with practice and with experience. The SP group made significantly more checklist mistakes initially as compared to the MP group (1.2 vs. 0.3, p <.05). At 1 month, there was a significant increase in both groups' mistakes (SP 3.4 vs. MP 1.3, p =.01). No correlation existed between individuals' needle motion and checklist mistakes. These findings suggest that quantitative needle tracking identifies students who struggle with needle insertion but are successful at completing the dichotomous checklist.

  19. Conceptualization and Pilot Testing of a Core Competency-Based Training Workshop in Suicide Risk Assessment and Management: Notes From the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Robert J; Bryson, Claire N; Eichorst, Morgam K; Keyes, Lee N; Ridge, Brittany E

    2017-03-01

    As professional psychology training programs and continuing education have moved toward competency based approaches, it has become equally important to develop uniform, evidence-based approaches for suicide risk assessment and management. The present article presents a workshop curriculum based on established core competencies in suicide risk assessment and management. Drawing on theories suicide risk formation, the workshop features an integration of didactic, process, and experiential components. We present pilot data from 2 small group workshops (n = 17): 1 from a clinical psychology doctoral program and 1 from a university counseling center. Workshop participation yielded increases in (a) the ability to recognize appropriate clinician responses to suicidal client statements, (b) self-perceptions of general capacity to interface with suicidal patients and mastery of the 10 core competencies, (c) factual knowledge concerning suicide risk assessment and management, and (d) the self-rated ability to assess and manage a suicidal patient. We discuss statistical and generalizability limitations as well as implications for future modification, implementation, and provision of this training method. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Competency-Based Achievement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Shelley; Poth, Cheryl N.; Donoff, Michel; Humphries, Paul; Steiner, Ivan; Schipper, Shirley; Janke, Fred; Nichols, Darren

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed Family medicine residency programs require innovative means to assess residents’ competence in “soft” skills (eg, patient-centred care, communication, and professionalism) and to identify residents who are having difficulty early enough in their residency to provide remedial training. Objective of program To develop a method to assess residents’ competence in various skills and to identify residents who are having difficulty. Program description The Competency-Based Achievement System (CBAS) was designed to measure competence using 3 main principles: formative feedback, guided self-assessment, and regular face-to-face meetings. The CBAS is resident driven and provides a framework for meaningful interactions between residents and advisors. Residents use the CBAS to organize and review their feedback, to guide their own assessment of their progress, and to discern their future learning needs. Advisors use the CBAS to monitor, guide, and verify residents’ knowledge of and competence in important skills. Conclusion By focusing on specific skills and behaviour, the CBAS enables residents and advisors to make formative assessments and to communicate their findings. Feedback indicates that the CBAS is a user-friendly and helpful system to assess competence. PMID:21918129

  1. The Role of Generic Competencies in the Entrustment of Professional Activities: A Nationwide Competency-Based Curriculum Assessed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Karsten A; Teunissen, Pim W; Driessen, Erik W; Scheele, Fedde

    2016-10-01

    Entrustable professional activities (EPAs) seek to translate essential physician competencies into clinical practice. Until now, it is not known whether EPA-based curricula offer enhanced assessment and feedback to trainees. This study examined program directors' and senior residents' justifications for entrustment decisions and what role generic, cross-specialty competencies (such as communication skills, collaboration, and understanding health care systems) play in these decisions. Entrustment decisions for all Dutch obstetrics and gynecology residents between January 2010 and April 2014 were retrieved from their electronic portfolios. Justifications for entrustment were divided into 4 categories: the resident's experience, his or her technical performance, the presence of a generic competency, and training. Template analysis was used to analyze in depth the types of justifications, which play a role in entrustment decisions. A total of 5139 entrustment decisions for 375 unique residents were extracted and analyzed. In 59% of all entrustment decisions, entrusting a professional task to a resident was justified by the experience of the resident. Generic competencies were mentioned in 0.5% of all entrustment decisions. Template analysis revealed that the amount of exposure and technical skills are leading factors, while the quality of the performance was not reported to be of any influence. Entrustment decisions only rarely are based on generic competencies, despite the introduction of competency frameworks and EPAs. For program directors, a leading factor in entrustment decisions is a resident's exposure to an activity, and the quality of a resident's performance appears to play only a minor role.

  2. Competency-based education in anesthesiology: history and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Thomas J; Fox, Chris A

    2014-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education is transitioning to a competency-based system with milestones to measure progress and define success of residents. The confines of the time-based residency will be relaxed. Curriculum must be redesigned and assessments will need to be precise and in-depth. Core anesthesiology faculty will be identified and will be the "trained observers" of the residents' progress. There will be logistic challenges requiring creative management by program directors. There may be residents who achieve "expert" status earlier than the required 36 months of clinical anesthesia education, whereas others may struggle to achieve acceptable status and will require additional education time. Faculty must accept both extremes without judgment. Innovative new educational opportunities will need to be created for fast learners. Finally, it will be important that residents embrace this change. This will require programs to clearly define the specific aims and measurement endpoints for advancement and success.

  3. Developing a Competency-based Fundamentals of Management Communication Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murranka, Patricia A.; Lynch, David

    1999-01-01

    Describes steps the authors went through to develop an innovative course in fundamentals of management communication that derives from competency-based instruction. Describes how they reviewed administrative and course parameters; identified instructional modules and generated competencies for each one; and created objectives, achievement levels,…

  4. Competency-Based Education in Three Pilot Programs: Examining Implementation and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Jennifer L.; Lewis, Matthew W.; Santibanez, Lucrecia; Faxon-Mills, Susannah; Rudnick, Mollie; Stecher, Brian M.; Hamilton, Laura S.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation created the Project Mastery grant program to support competency-based education initiatives in large school systems that serve a high proportion of disadvantaged youth. Competency-based education meets students where they are academically, provides students with opportunities for choice, and awards…

  5. Issues in Competency-Based Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Patricia

    1982-01-01

    Presents three areas of skilled performance as examples of an interpretive approach to the identification of nursing competencies. Also examines competency measurement strategies, definitions of competency-based education and examination, limits of competency-based education, and alternative approaches. (CT)

  6. Implementation of Competency Based Teaching in Morogoro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Makerere Journal of Higher Education ... competency based teaching approaches in education in Morogoro Teachers' Training College Tanzania. A total of 78 ... To draw an understanding of the extent to which pre-service teachers were well trained to implement competency based teaching approaches in their teaching, ...

  7. Competitive Debate as Competency-Based Learning: Civic Engagement and Next-Generation Assessment in the Era of the Common Core Learning Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Jonathan; Milam, Myra

    2016-01-01

    As the adoption and execution of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) have steadily increased, the debate community is presented with an opportunity to be more forward thinking and sustainable through the translation to curriculum planning and next-generation assessment as a movement towards Performance-Based Assessments. This paper focuses on…

  8. Gestão de desempenho por competências: integrando a gestão por competências, o balanced scorecard e a avaliação 360 graus Competence-based performance assessment: a model which integrates competence-based management, balanced scorecard and 360º feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Pena Brandão

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo avalia a percepção de funcionários do Banco do Brasil acerca do novo modelo de gestão de desempenho adotado pela empresa. A pesquisa, de caráter descritivo e exploratório, utilizou-se de questionário semi-estruturado para coleta de dados quantitativos e qualitativos. A amostra foi constituída por 532 funcionários de nove unidades do banco, nas quais o modelo foi implementado para fins de validação. Foram realizadas análises descritivas, de variância e fatorial entre as variáveis componentes do estudo, e análise de conteúdo dos dados qualitativos. Os resultados indicam ser muito positiva a percepção dos sujeitos da pesquisa. O novo instrumento foi considerado mais eficaz, democrático e participativo, conseguindo integrar pressupostos de modelos e instrumentos de gestão referenciados pela literatura como modernos e eficazes, como a gestão por competências, o balanced scorecard e a avaliação 360 graus. Para finalizar, são apresentadas recomendações práticas e sugestões para realização de pesquisas futuras.The present work aims to assess the perception of Bank of Brazil employees on the new model of performance assessment adopted by the bank. This exploratory and descriptive research used a semi-structured questionnaire to collect the quantitative and qualitative data. The sample consisted of 532 employees working in the nine branches of the bank where the model was implemented for validation. Descriptive, factorial and variance analyses were made on the variables involved in the study, and analysis of the qualitative data. The new tool was considered more effective, democratic, participative and able to integrate postulates of management models and tools such as Competence-Based Management, Balanced Scorecard and 360º Feedback, which are accredited by the literature as being modern and effective. Practical advice and future directions for this sort of research are provided.

  9. Building a Competency-Based Leadership Program with Campus-Wide Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Kelley C; Mintner, Paul J

    2017-12-01

    This chapter outlines a process used by a large, public, research institution to create and implement a competency-based leadership development initiative across campus. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  10. [Competency-based Neurosurgery Residency Programme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Ramiro D; Jiménez Roldan, Luis; Alen, José F; Castaño, Ana M; Munarriz, Pablo M; Cepeda, Santiago; Lagares, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    A programme proposal for competency-based Neurosurgery training adapted to the specialization project is presented. This proposal has been developed by a group of neurosurgeons commissioned by the SENEC (Spanish Society of Neurosurgery) and could be modified to generate a final version that could come into force coinciding with the implementation of the specialization programme. This document aims to facilitate the test of the new programme included in the online version of our journal. Total training period is 6 years; initial 2 years belong to the surgery specialization and remaining 4 years belong to core specialty period. It is a competency-based programmed based on the map used by the US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) including the following domains of clinical competency: Medical knowledge, patient care, communication skills, professionalism, practice-based learning and improvement, health systems, interprofessional collaboration and professional and personal development. Subcompetencies map in the domains of Knowledge and Patient care (including surgical competencies) was adapted to the one proposed by AANS and CNS (annex 1 of the programme). A subcompetency map was also used for the specialization rotations. Resident's training is based on personal study (self-learning) supported by efficient use of information sources and supervised clinical practice, including bioethical instruction, clinical management, research and learning techniques. Resident evaluation proposal includes, among other instruments, theoretical knowledge tests, objective and structured evaluation of the level of clinical competency with real or standardised patients, global competency scales, 360-degree evaluation, clinical record audits, milestones for residents progress and self-assessment (annex 2). Besides, residents periodically assess the teaching commitment of the department's neurosurgeons and other professors participating in rotations, and annually

  11. Creating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kristina Vaarst; Lorenzen, Mark; Laursen, Stine

    2012-01-01

    This unique book reveals the procedural aspects of knowledge-based urban planning, development and assessment. Concentrating on major knowledge city building processes, and providing state-of-the-art experiences and perspectives, this important compendium explores innovative models, approaches an...

  12. A Competence-Based Curriculum Design for Entrepreneurship Study Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priska J.R. Siagian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is affected by global crisis. Increasing the number of entrepreneurs is one of many solutions to increase the economic growth in Indonesia. The number of entrepreneurs in Indonesia to leverage the economic growth is still limited. Entrepreneurs can be prepared through an Entrepreneurship Study Program. Entrepreneurship Study Program attempts to create qualified entrepreneurs who have relevant competences. In order to create a qualified entrepreneurs, the Entrepreneurial Studies Program requires a competency-based curriculum that will support the educational process and provide all the necessary to become future entrepreneurs who can survive through a global challenge. This research aims to design a competence-based curriculum for entrepreneurial study and uses Quality Function Deployment (QFD as the major tool to design the competence-based curriculum. From the QFD process, this research finds core and elective courses for the Entrepreneurship Study Program. The result shows the competences covered by the courses and sequence, credits, and teaching methods for each course. The competences prepared the potential entrepreneurs can be achieved through specific courses which can be acquired within 8 semesters.

  13. Productivity in public welfare services is changing: the standpoint of strategic competence-based management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollila, Seija

    2013-01-01

    In Finland the municipal restructuring project was launched in 2005. Its goal is to create a system that ensures high-quality municipal welfare services for everyone, continuing into the future. The main focus of this research is to examine the tension between strategic competence-based management and productivity in public welfare services. The theoretical basis covers theories regarding strategic competence-based management and productivity. To guarantee services and quality it is important to strengthen the supply of employees, competence, development, leverage, and benefits in public organizations. Leadership has a significant role in strategic competence-based management.

  14. Quality assessment in competency based physiotherapy education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Jørgen

    -loop-learning. This supports the evolvement of course content and didactics in the group of teachers and clinical educators. Formal settings and clinical visits secure close cooperation across sectors, linking university and clinical practice together. The connection between the taught and the tested curriculum concerns...... with information at the level of premises, in relation to the development of the written curriculum and the institutional framework supporting the education. In this way the three curriculum types are interconnected through 4 levels of evaluation and single and double loop learning, in order to ensure...... between education and current practice in physiotherapy settings. It is an on going challenge to assure responses from the students both regarding the evaluation of the response and learning level regarding their own perception of the study and their achievement of learning outcomes. Steps are being taken...

  15. Mental Snapshots: Creating an Organized Plan for Health Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosbrook, Susan Curro

    2015-01-01

    Beginning nursing students enter a rapidly moving and changing health care climate. Multiple stimulations can frighten and overwhelm the student's ability to find order of essential patient information. Students need to know how to collect, process, and manage important health data accurately and efficiently in the clinical setting. An integrative method for teaching nursing students to walk into the patient's room and construct a patterned sequence of focused assessments assists students in creating an organized plan for health assessment. The Mental Snapshots Method includes three components for health assessment: (a) sequential assessment steps of the patient; (b) color-coded visual images of the patient representing a bodily condition; and (c) focused assessment questions of primary health complaint(s) with a plan for nursing care. This mental snapshots strategy employs an information processing model of sensory, memory, and motor functioning, which enable students to maintain patient quality and safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Competency Based Vocational Education Workshop Facilitators Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Michigan Center for Career and Technical Education.

    This workshop facilitator's guide is designed to inform professional staff about competency-based vocational education (CBVE) to help eligible persons on public assistance acquire competencies necessary for gainful employment in the following occupational areas: airline reservations and travel services; computer applications; dental care;…

  17. Cosmetology: Task Analyses. Competency-Based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum Center.

    These task analyses are designed to be used in combination with the "Trade and Industrial Education Service Area Resource" in order to implement competency-based education in the cosmetology program in Virginia. The task analysis document contains the task inventory, suggested task sequence lists, and content outlines for the secondary…

  18. Competency based ophthalmology training curriculum for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The establishment of a credible, defensible and acceptable “formal competency based ophthalmology training curriculum for undergraduate medical and dental students” is fundamental to program recognition, monitoring and evaluation. The University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences (UZ-CHS) has ...

  19. Origins of Competency-Based Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCowan, Richard J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the theories and social factors that contributed to the development of competency-based training (CBT). These include behaviorism (Edward L. Thorndike), scientific management (Frederick Taylor), progressive education (John Dewey), and derivative theories including operant conditioning (B.F. Skinner), objectives-based…

  20. Competency-Based Teacher Education in Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Robert

    Some states licensing agencies are seeking to change the way in which all teachers are certified as a result of demands by state legislative bodies and citizens groups who say that they want greater returns from their tax dollars as demonstrated by increased pupil learning. There are several arguments against competency-based teacher education,…

  1. Indiana Distributive Education Competency Based Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Rod; And Others

    This Indiana distributive education competency-based curriculum model is designed to help teachers and local administrators plan and conduct a comprehensive marketing and distributive education program. It is divided into three levels--one level for each year of a three-year program. The competencies common to a variety of marketing and…

  2. Competency-based continuing professional development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campbell, Craig; Silver, Ivan; Sherbino, Jonathan; Ten Cate, Olle; Holmboe, Eric S.

    2010-01-01

    Competence is traditionally viewed as the attainment of a static set of attributes rather than a dynamic process in which physicians continuously use their practice experiences to "progress in competence'' toward the attainment of expertise. A competency-based continuing professional development

  3. The development and implementation of a competency-based curriculum for training in global health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ton, Thanh G N; Gladding, Sophia P; Zunt, Joseph R; John, Chandy; Nerurkar, Vivek R; Moyer, Cheryl A; Hobbs, Nicole; McCoy, Molly; Kolars, Joseph C

    2015-01-01

    The Fogarty International Center (FIC) Global Health Fellows Program provides trainees with the opportunity to develop research skills through a mentored research experience, increase their content expertise, and better understand trends in global health research, funding organizations, and pathways to generate support. The Northern Pacific Global Health Fellows Research and Training Consortium, which hosts one of the FIC Global Health Programs, sought to enhance research training by developing, implementing, and evaluating a competency-based curriculum that uses a modular, asynchronous, web-based format. The curriculum has 8 core competencies, 36 learning objectives, and 58 assignments. Nineteen trainees completed their 11-month fellowship, engaged in the curriculum, and provided pre- and post-fellowship self-assessments. Self-assessed scores significantly improved for all competencies. Trainees identified the curriculum as one of the strengths of the program. This competency-based curriculum represents a first step toward creating a framework of global health research competencies on which further efforts could be based. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  4. The Development and Implementation of a Competency-Based Curriculum for Training in Global Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ton, Thanh G. N.; Gladding, Sophia P.; Zunt, Joseph R.; John, Chandy; Nerurkar, Vivek R.; Moyer, Cheryl A.; Hobbs, Nicole; McCoy, Molly; Kolars, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    The Fogarty International Center (FIC) Global Health Fellows Program provides trainees with the opportunity to develop research skills through a mentored research experience, increase their content expertise, and better understand trends in global health research, funding organizations, and pathways to generate support. The Northern Pacific Global Health Fellows Research and Training Consortium, which hosts one of the FIC Global Health Programs, sought to enhance research training by developing, implementing, and evaluating a competency-based curriculum that uses a modular, asynchronous, web-based format. The curriculum has 8 core competencies, 36 learning objectives, and 58 assignments. Nineteen trainees completed their 11-month fellowship, engaged in the curriculum, and provided pre- and post-fellowship self-assessments. Self-assessed scores significantly improved for all competencies. Trainees identified the curriculum as one of the strengths of the program. This competency-based curriculum represents a first step toward creating a framework of global health research competencies on which further efforts could be based. PMID:25371189

  5. Ready for Residency: A Bloomian Analysis of Competency-Based Osteopathic Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Kyle; Skinner, Daniel; Monk, Jody

    2017-08-01

    Bloom's Taxonomy is a widely accepted tool for analyzing learning objectives, creating assessment materials, and ensuring that students move progressively through various levels of knowledge and cognition. Competency-based osteopathic medical education has, to the authors' knowledge, yet to be subjected to systematic bloomian analysis. To advance a bloomian analysis of competencies published by the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM) and draw consequences of that analysis for undergraduate osteopathic medical education. Content analysis of the verbs and contexts used in the AACOM competencies was conducted, followed by categorization by the various cognitive and knowledge dimensions as specified by the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy. The majority of AACOM competencies gravitate toward the taxonomy's apply and procedural cognitive and knowledge dimensions, respectively. In addition, 58% of the top 10 most-used verbs in the document were identified to be in the apply cognitive dimension. An analysis of the competencies revealed that 69% can be categorized under the procedural knowledge dimension. Of 657 code co-occurances, 45% were from the apply cognitive and procedural knowledge dimensions. These figures suggest a skewing toward application-based cognitive and procedural-based knowledge over other types of cognitive and knowledge dimensions. Bloom's Taxonomy offers a useful framework for understanding how competency-based osteopathic medical education is organized. Such analysis underscores the importance of attending to the language and construction of competencies to better understand how the language of competencies shapes pedagogic practices and begin a broader conversation about the appropriate use and distribution of lower- and higher-order cognitive processes within competency-based osteopathic medical education.

  6. Creating and Sustaining Change: Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metta Alsobrook

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Change is a constant condition within organizations, due to the introduction of new technologies, market place demands, external forces, and pressures to improve organizational effectiveness. However, large-scale organizational change efforts tend to fail more than 70 percent of the time. One of the recent large-scale movements within higher education institutions is towards accountability and assessment on student learning outcomes, which is higher education institutions should assess whether students learn what they should and retain the knowledge once learned. In addition, assessment findings should become a feedback mechanism to improve students’ education experiences. In this paper the author describe a change effort within a research university for compliance with regional accrediting commission requirements and program specific (engineering accreditation requirements and procedures in defining and implementing assessment of student learning outcomes. The main issue is not just introducing new contents to the member of the faculty, but making sure that the assessment effort is meaningful. Issues arrived and solutions in creating and sustaining the change effort will be discussed.

  7. Motivating Performance Learning. Implementing Competency Based Education in Community Colleges, 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, Katherine A.; And Others

    As part of a series on implementing competency-based education, this monograph examines methods of creating learning environments that enhance student motivation. After introductory material on the importance of motivation to student learning, the monograph discusses the value of: (1) identifying student perceptions; (2) securing and maintaining…

  8. Competence-Based Pharmacy Education in the University of Helsinki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Katajavuori

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to meet the expectations to act as an expert in the health care profession, it is of utmost importance that pharmacy education creates knowledge and skills needed in today’s working life. Thus, the planning of the curriculum should be based on relevant and up-to-date learning outcomes. In the University of Helsinki, a university wide curriculum reform called ‘the Big Wheel’ was launched in 2015. After the reform, the basic degrees of the university are two-cycle (Bachelor–Master and competence-based, where the learning outcomes form a solid basis for the curriculum goals and implementation. In the Faculty of Pharmacy, this curriculum reform was conducted in two phases during 2012–2016. The construction of the curriculum was based on the most relevant learning outcomes concerning working life via high quality first (Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy and second (Master of Science in Pharmacy cycle degree programs. The reform was kicked off by interviewing all the relevant stakeholders: students, teachers, and pharmacists/experts in all the working life sectors of pharmacy. Based on these interviews, the intended learning outcomes of the Pharmacy degree programs were defined including both subject/contents-related and generic skills. The curriculum design was based on the principles of constructive alignment and new structures and methods were applied in order to foster the implementation of the learning outcomes. During the process, it became evident that a competence-based curriculum can be created only in close co-operation with the stakeholders, including teachers and students. Well-structured and facilitated co-operation amongst the teachers enabled the development of many new and innovative teaching practices. The European Union funded PHAR-QA project provided, at the same time, a highly relevant framework to compare the curriculum development in Helsinki against Europe-wide definitions of competences and learning outcomes in

  9. Adopsi Model Competency Based Training dalam Kewirausahaan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ketut Santra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is improving the teaching method in entrepreneurship subject. This research adopted the competency based training (CBT into the entrepreneurship. The major task in this research is formulated and designed the entrepreneurship competency. Entrepreneurship competency indicated by Personal, Strategic and Situational and Business competence. All of entrepreneurship competences are described into sub topic of competence. After designing and formulating the game and simulation the research continuing to implement the competency based training in the real class. The time consumed to implementing the CBT one semester, starting on September 2006 to early February 2007. The lesson learnt from the implementation period, the CBT could improve the student competence in Personal, Situational Strategic and Business. The three of the competencies are important for the success entrepreneur. It is a sign of application of “Kurikulum Berbasis Kompetensi”. There are many evidences to describe the achievement of the CBT in entrepreneurship subject. Firstly, physically achievement, that all of the student’s business plan could became the real business. The evidences are presented by picture of the student’s real business. Secondly theoretically achievement, that the Personal, Situational Strategic and Business competence statistically have significant relation with Business Plan even Real Business quality. The effect of the Personal, Situational Strategic and Business competence to Business Plan quality is 84.4%. and, to the Real Business quality 77.2%. The statistic’s evidence suggests that the redesign of the entrepreneurship subject is the right way. The content of the entrepreneur competence (Personal, Situational and Strategic and Business competence have impact to the student to conduct and running for own business.

  10. Influencing engineering education through the competency-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulyanova Olga V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article poses a problem of engineering education and training of today, which are facing difficulties while developing an efficient competency-based approach realization. The authors concentrate on an urgent task of developing the integration competence of future engineers which is treated as a metadisciplinary competence providing students with ability and readiness to synthesize subject-oriented professional and social competences into a holistic system. The structure of integration competence is analyzed and the following components are determined: a value and motivation component; a practical activity component; a cognitive component; a self-analysis and self-assessment component. Among distinguishing features of the integration competence the authors define its instrumental character, metadisciplinary and universal properties as well as its nonalgorithmic character. It is shown that professionally oriented training is a core factor of integration competence development. Depending on elements being integrated, the main forms of integration of competences are determined. The model of competence integration presented in the article can serve as the basis for developing methods and conditions for its systematic elaboration in university training. The results of this study can be useful for educators of different administrative levels, teaching-and-training schools which realize a competency-based approach in their teaching.

  11. Developing a competency-based curriculum in HIV for nursing schools in Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knebel Elisa

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preparing health workers to confront the HIV/AIDS epidemic is an urgent challenge in Haiti, where the HIV prevalence rate is 2.2% and approximately 10 100 people are taking antiretroviral treatment. There is a critical shortage of doctors in Haiti, leaving nurses as the primary care providers for much of the population. Haiti's approximately 1000 nurses play a leading role in HIV/AIDS prevention, care and treatment. However, nurses do not receive sufficient training at the pre-service level to carry out this important work. Methods To address this issue, the Ministry of Health and Population collaborated with the International Training and Education Center on HIV over a period of 12 months to create a competency-based HIV/AIDS curriculum to be integrated into the 4-year baccalaureate programme of the four national schools of nursing. Results Using a review of the international health and education literature on HIV/AIDS competencies and various models of curriculum development, a Haiti-based curriculum committee developed expected HIV/AIDS competencies for graduating nurses and then drafted related learning objectives. The committee then mapped these learning objectives to current courses in the nursing curriculum and created an 'HIV/AIDS Teaching Guide' for faculty on how to integrate and achieve these objectives within their current courses. The curriculum committee also created an 'HIV/AIDS Reference Manual' that detailed the relevant HIV/AIDS content that should be taught for each course. Conclusion All nursing students will now need to demonstrate competency in HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, skills and attitudes during periodic assessment with direct observation of the student performing authentic tasks. Faculty will have the responsibility of developing exercises to address the required objectives and creating assessment tools to demonstrate that their graduates have met the objectives. This activity brought different

  12. Competence-Based View in the Marketing Theory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    István Piskóti

    2005-01-01

    .... The paper specifies the characteristics of the competence-based approach of the marketing resources, as marketing, strategic and methodological answers given to the network cooperation, integrated...

  13. The Extent of Agreement on a Definition of Competency Based Vocational Education among Vocational Curriculum Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Robert R.

    1986-01-01

    An instrument for to assessing the extent to which postsecondary vocational education programs are competency-based consisted of 159 items grouped into 8 subscales corresponding to 4 standards: (1) identification and validation of competencies; (2) procedures for assessing student competencies; (3) instructional procedures; and (4) administrative…

  14. A competency-based longitudinal core curriculum in medical neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, Lisa R; Horak, Holli A; Milligan, Tracey A; Kraakevik, Jeff A; Ali, Imran I

    2014-07-29

    Current medical educational theory encourages the development of competency-based curricula. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's 6 core competencies for resident education (medical knowledge, patient care, professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, practice-based learning, and systems-based practice) have been embraced by medical schools as the building blocks necessary for becoming a competent licensed physician. Many medical schools are therefore changing their educational approach to an integrated model in which students demonstrate incremental acquisition and mastery of all competencies as they progress through medical school. Challenges to medical schools include integration of preclinical and clinical studies as well as development of learning objectives and assessment measures for each competency. The Undergraduate Education Subcommittee (UES) of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) assembled a group of neuroscience educators to outline a longitudinal competency-based curriculum in medical neuroscience encompassing both preclinical and clinical coursework. In development of this curriculum, the committee reviewed United States Medical Licensing Examination content outlines, Liaison Committee on Medical Education requirements, prior AAN-mandated core curricula for basic neuroscience and clinical neurology, and survey responses from educators in US medical schools. The newly recommended curriculum provides an outline of learning objectives for each of the 6 competencies, listing each learning objective in active terms. Documentation of experiences is emphasized, and assessment measures are suggested to demonstrate adequate achievement in each competency. These guidelines, widely vetted and approved by the UES membership, aspire to be both useful as a stand-alone curriculum and also provide a framework for neuroscience educators who wish to develop a more detailed focus in certain areas of study. © 2014 American Academy

  15. Creating and Sustaining Change: Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Metta Alsobrook

    2011-01-01

    Change is a constant condition within organizations, due to the introduction of new technologies, market place demands, external forces, and pressures to improve organizational effectiveness. However, large-scale organizational change efforts tend to fail more than 70 percent of the time. One of the recent large-scale movements within higher education institutions is towards accountability and assessment on student learning outcomes, which is higher education institutions should assess whethe...

  16. Competence-based VET as seen by Dutch researchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselink, R.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Mulder, M.; Elsen, van den E.

    2007-01-01

    The concept of competence is increasingly the basis for (re)designing VET. In competence-based VET academic disciplines are no longer starting points for curriculum development. Competence needed for working in practice, however, is. Competence-based learning is a dominant trend in VET in several

  17. Competency-Based Learning: Definitions, Policies, and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Aubrey Scheopner; Brett, Jessica; Cox, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how competency-based learning (CBL) is defined across states in the Regional Educational Laboratory Northeast and Islands region and gain insight into barriers and facilitators to implementation of this reform. Many states in the region have started to consider and implement competency-based learning as a…

  18. Creating a Social Media Assessment Tool for Family Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risling, Tracie; Risling, Derek; Holtslander, Lorraine

    2017-02-01

    The use of social media (SM) is contributing to an unprecedented state of global connectivity and occupying an increasingly prominent position in the lives of individuals and families. The more integrated these media become into society the more likely they are to play a role in overall health and family functioning, be it positively or negatively. Family systems theory provides an ideal lens through which to examine the effects of SM in today's family life. This article introduces a new SM assessment tool aligned with the principles of this foundational theory. Family nurses can use the proposed Social Media Assessment Package (SMAP) to gain an initial picture of usage patterns within a family as well as identify and support positive future SM choices. Practitioners may also use the SMAP in a personal evaluation of their practice as a means to maximize SM use in ongoing professional development.

  19. A Resource Guide; "National and Regional Developments in Competency Based Teacher Education (CBTE) and Competency Based Certification (CBC)."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, John C.

    This resource guide on competency based teacher education (CBTE) and competency based certification (CBC) states that the degree of explicitness required in CBTE programs and CBC programs and CBC systems is greater than in traditional programs. A CBTE program must specify (a) what the learner is to do, (b) the degree or level of competency…

  20. Creating scientists teaching and assessing science practice for the NGSS

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Teach students to reason like scientists. This practical new book provides a clear framework for helping students develop scientific thinking so they are not just memorizing content but are becoming engaged in the real work scientists do. You'll learn how to teach students to analyse scientific testing, to understand if something caused something else, and to understand the value of evidence. The book offers ideas for lesson plans and assessments and also features reproducible tools and handouts that you can use in the classroom immediately.

  1. Creating Critical Objectives and Assessments Using a Critical Communication Pedagogical Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, David H., Jr.

    2018-01-01

    Courses: Instructional Communication, Graduate Teaching Assistant Training Programs. Objectives: Students will (1) understand critical communication pedagogy (CCP); (2) evaluate traditional and critical objectives and assessment procedures; and (3) create critical objectives and assessment procedures.

  2. The Competence Based Curiculum of Biological Education's Undergraduate Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Subali, Bambang

    2005-01-01

    This is the review which dealed with the curiculum of, both an educational study program generally and biological study program as well. The review showed the importance to set the curiculum up and fit it with the competence based curiculum, since that curiculum has been applied by the user, thus, it needed to response respectively.The first step is, indeed, setting up the curiculum of educational study program, becoming the competence based curiculum. That curiculum setting up by two main st...

  3. Performance evaluation of nursing students following competency-based education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jun-Yu; Wang, Yu Hsin; Chao, Li Fen; Jane, Sui-Whi; Hsu, Li-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Competency-based education is known to improve the match between educational performance and employment opportunities. This study examined the effects of competency-based education on the learning outcomes of undergraduate nursing students. The study used a quasi-experimental design. A convenience sample of 312 second-year undergraduate nursing students from northern and southern Taiwan participated in the study. The experimental group (n=163) received competency-based education and the control group received traditional instruction (n=149) in a medical-surgical nursing course. Outcome measures included students' scores on the Objective Structured Clinical Examination, Self-Evaluated Core Competencies Scale, Metacognitive Inventory for Nursing Students questionnaire, and academic performance. Students who received competency-based education had significantly higher academic performance in the medical-surgical nursing course and practicum than did the control group. Required core competencies and metacognitive abilities improved significantly in the competency-based education group as compared to the control group after adjusting for covariates. Competency-based education is worth implementing and may close the gap between education and the ever-changing work environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Preparing anesthesiology faculty for competency-based medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Amy B; Stodel, Emma J; Jee, Robert; Dubois, Daniel A; Chaput, Alan J

    2016-12-01

    Competency-based medical education (CBME) is quickly becoming the dominant organizing principle for medical residency programs. As CBME requires changes in the way medical education is delivered, faculty will need to acquire new skills in teaching and assessment in order to navigate the transition. In this paper, we examine the evidence supporting best practices in faculty development, propose strategies for faculty development for CBME-based residency programs, and discuss the results of faculty development initiatives at the pioneering anesthesia CBME residency program at the University of Ottawa. Review of the current literature and information from the University of Ottawa anesthesia residency program. Faculty development is critical to the success of CBME programs. Attention must be paid to the competence of faculty to teach and assess all of the CanMEDS roles. At the University of Ottawa, some faculty development initiatives were very successful, while others were hindered by factors both internal and external to the residency program. Many faculty development activities had low attendance rates. Faculty development must be considered in the rollout of any new educational initiative. Experts suggest that faculty development for CBME should incorporate educational activities using multiple teaching and delivery methods, and should be offered longitudinally through the planning, development, and implementation phases of curriculum change. Additionally, these educational activities must continue until all faculty have demonstrated an acceptable level of competence. Faculty buy-in is paramount to the successful delivery of any faculty development program that is not mandatory in nature.

  5. Issues and Options in Creating a National Assessment in World History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Robert B.; Shreiner, Tamara L.

    2005-01-01

    The National Assessment Governing Board (NAGB) is considering creating a National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) for world history education. On the surface, a national assessment in world history appears to be a sensible and essentially unproblematic decision. However, problems lurk below the surface challenging the creation of a…

  6. Incorporating Competency-Based Blended Learning in a Chinese Language Classroom: A Web 2.0 Drupal Module Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chung-Kai; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chiang, Yueh-Hui

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to create a blended learning environment, based on the concept of competency-based training, in a Chinese as a Foreign Language (CFL) classroom at an American university. Drupal platform and web 2.0 tools were used as supplements to traditional face-to-face classroom instruction. Students completed various selective tasks and…

  7. Flexibility in competency-based workplace transition programs: an exploratory study of community child and family health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Lynette; Gilbert, Sandra; Fereday, Jennifer

    2013-03-01

    Successful transition to practice programs that use competency-based assessment require the involvement of all staff, especially those undertaking the preceptor role. Qualitative data were collected using interview methods. Participants were 14 newly employed nurses and 7 preceptors in the child and family community health service in South Australia. Participant narratives were recorded electronically, transcribed, and thematically analyzed using the paradigm of critical social science. Five themes were identified that describe enablers as well as barriers to applying a flexible transition to practice program using competency-based assessment. These included flexibility in the program design, flexibility on the part of preceptors, flexibility to enable recognition of previous learning, flexibility in the assessment of competencies, and flexibility in workload. To ensure successful application of a transition to practice program using competency-based assessment, preceptors must understand the flexible arrangements built into the program design and have the confidence and competence to apply them. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. INFLATION OF THE COMPETENCE-BASED APPROACH IN THE RUSSIAN PEDAGOGICAL SCIENCE AND PRACTICAL TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Usol'tsev

    2017-01-01

     specialization which does not allow to be created to a complete picture of the world and leads to loss of fundamental nature of the general education. It is shown on concrete examples how the concept of competence of the Russian pedagogical science and practice «is degraded»: various common cultural, key, transparent and other competences become synonyms of the concepts "culture", «thinking», and «education». It is emphasized that the competence, which went beyond its subject domain and borders of educational process, loses the practical sense. The conclusion is drawn on inflation and insolvency of competence-based approach in modern education.Practical significance. It is offered to limit the use of category of competences only to those professional spheres which are connected with the performance of accurately algorithm-based actions that lead to receiving a concrete measurable product; or as an alternative to consider resulting educational effect as a product of independent activity of a student. Otherwise, further profanation of competence-based approach will be aggravated, and the quality of training of graduates of educational institutions of various levels will decrease.

  9. Developing competence based qualification system in the nuclear energy sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceclan, Mihail [European Commission, Petten (Netherlands). Inst. for Energy and Transport

    2016-04-15

    The Institute for Energy and Transport of the Joint Research Centre, European Commission, developed a strategy and road map for ECVET implementation. The JRC road map for European Credit System for Vocational Education and Training (ECVET) implementation has reached the stage of Competence-Based Qualification System development. The Competence-Based Qualification System can help bridge the gap between Human Resources demand and supply in the nuclear market by structuring qualifications in small independent parts. This very specific ECVET feature of a qualification, facilitates the process of competences accumulation and the lifelong learning, mobility and flexible learning pathways. New developments are presented about the Competence-Based Qualification System development for the nuclear energy sector.

  10. Introducing competency-based postgraduate medical training: gains and losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodal, Troels; Shaughnessy, Allen F.; Qvesel, Dorte

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to explore the gains and losses, from the trainees’ perspective, that occur when replacing process-oriented basic medical training with competency-based training and to explore whether competency-based training can justify a reduction in clinical training. Methods We performed a national cross-sectional survey of attitudes of Danish doctors who had completed either the old process-oriented 18-month training period (n=671) or the new competency-based 12-month training period (n=547). A total of 1218 doctors were included and 792 of them completed an online survey, yielding a response rate of 65%. Results Trainees of the old process-oriented programme (53%) felt more ready to continue medical training than the doctors (84%) who followed the new and shorter competency-based programme. The differences was statistically significant (t (790) = 11.16; p<0.0001). The latter group did not feel the competency-based programme improved the learning environment. Some trainees reported that learning objectives seem to optimize their learning within defined learning frames. They valued a curriculum that should not only contain learning objectives but that should also ensure relevant learning opportunities, providing sufficient time for learning and useful feedback. Conclusions It is unlikely that a competency-based curriculum can justify a significant reduction in the time spent on clinical training. The learning approaches and the amount of time that we dedicate to training are important. Implementation of a new curriculum requires a substantial effort.

  11. Milestones and Millennials: A Perfect Pairing-Competency-Based Medical Education and the Learning Preferences of Generation Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desy, Janeve R; Reed, Darcy A; Wolanskyj, Alexandra P

    2017-02-01

    Millennials are quickly becoming the most prevalent generation of medical learners. These individuals have a unique outlook on education and have different preferences and expectations than their predecessors. As evidenced by its implementation by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the United States and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons in Canada, competency based medical education is rapidly gaining international acceptance. Characteristics of competency based medical education can be perfectly paired with Millennial educational needs in several dimensions including educational expectations, the educational process, attention to emotional quotient and professionalism, assessment, feedback, and intended outcomes. We propose that with its attention to transparency, personalized learning, and frequent formative assessment, competency based medical education is an ideal fit for the Millennial generation as it realigns education and assessment with the needs of these 21st century learners. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Student Material for Competency-Based Education Curriculum for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Associated Educational Consultants, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA.

    This student welding competency-based education curriculum consists of six units dealing with general areas related to trade occupations and nine units covering specific aspects of working with welding equipment and performing welding operations. Topics covered in the first six units are welding opportunities, human relations, safety, basic…

  13. Teacher's Guide for Competency Based Core Curriculum for Health Occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckley, Richard; And Others

    This teacher's guide is intended to acompany the Competency Based Core Curriculum for Health Occupations student materials--see note. Contents include suggested tests and answer keys for student evaluation and a tool and equipment list. A comprehensive bibliography is organized into these topics: dental hygiene, medical laboratory technology,…

  14. Natural Resources Management: Task Analyses. Competency-Based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Madison Univ., Harrisonburg, VA.

    This task analysis guide is intended to help teachers and administrators develop instructional materials and implement competency-based education for natural resources management courses in the agricultural resources program. Section 1 contains a validated task inventory for natural resources management. For each task, applicable information…

  15. Competency-Based Education Programs: A Library Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Competency-based education (CBE) is an emerging model for higher education designed to reduce certain barriers to educational attainment. This essay describes CBE and the challenges and opportunities for academic librarians desiring to serve students and faculty in Library and Information Management Master of Library Science (MLS) programs. Every…

  16. The Power of Competency-Based Teacher Education: A Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Benjamin; And Others

    This hardcover report, commonly known as the Rosner Report, is based on the findings of the Committee on National Program Priorities in Teacher Education (CNPPTE). The recommendations focus on developing the necessary conditions for competency-based teacher education and certification as well as developing incentives for inservice teacher…

  17. The Power of Competency-Based Teacher Education. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Benjamin; And Others

    The Committee on National Program Priorities in Teacher Education (CNPPTE) was established to make recommendations for program development to the U.S. Office of Education Personnel Development and Task Force '72. The recommendations focus on developing the necessary conditions for competency-based teacher education and certification, as well as…

  18. Competency-Based Teacher Education Workshops in CBE/ESL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Deborah L.; Van Duzer, Carol H.

    This document contains five modules for presenting a series of workshops on competency-based education (CBE) to teachers of English as a second language (ESL). Each module consists of the following: competency sheet (including rationale, performance objective, and enabling objectives), background notes and resources, suggested format for a…

  19. Competency Based Curriculum for Clothing Services and Production Sewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Charlotte

    Designed to meet individual needs and learning levels of high school and postsecondary students enrolled in vocational training for occupations in clothing services and production sewing, this competency-based curriculum teaches skills in alterations, dressmaking, and power sewing machine operations. Skills are organized into 13 units: Awareness…

  20. Competence Based Educational Metadata for Supporting Lifelong Competence Development Programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampson, Demetrios; Fytros, Demetrios

    2008-01-01

    Sampson, D., & Fytros, D. (2008). Competence Based Educational Metadata for Supporting Lifelong Competence Development Programmes. In P. Diaz, Kinshuk, I. Aedo & E. Mora (Eds.), Proceedings of the 8th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT 2008), pp. 288-292. July,

  1. Competence Models in Technology-enhanced Competence-based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampson, Demetrios; Fytros, Demetrios

    2008-01-01

    Please cite as: Sampson, D., & Fytros, D. (2008). Competence Models in Technology-enhanced Competence-based Learning. In H. H. Adelsberger, Kinshuk, J. M. Pawlowski & D. Sampson (Eds.), International Handbook on Information Technologies for Education and Training, 2nd Edition, Springer, June 2008

  2. Competency-based evaluation of project managers' performance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Competency-based evaluation of project managers' performance in mass house building projects in Ghana – the fuzzy set theory approach. ... Alternatively, you can download the PDF file directly to your computer, from where it can be opened using a PDF reader. To download the PDF, click the Download link above.

  3. Competency-Based Education Curriculum for Firefighter Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West Virginia State Vocational Curriculum Lab., Cedar Lakes.

    This competency-based education curriculum, developed by firefighters and educators in West Virginia, is designed for use as a resource for the development of improved firefighter training programs. It consists of an introductory note to the instructor and 140 competency sheets. These sheets deal with tasks in the following areas: general…

  4. Employment Competence based Management to enhance Training Effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Goff, Solenn; Ristol, Santi; Estévez, José Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Please, cite this publication as: Le Goff, S., Ristol, S., & Estévez, J.A. (2006). Employing Competence based Management to enhance Training Effectiveness. Proceedings of International Workshop in Learning Networks for Lifelong Competence Development, TENCompetence Conference. March 30th-31st,

  5. CNC Turning Technician. A Competency-Based Instructional System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Kelly; Hilley, Robert

    This competency-based curriculum guide for instructing students in using computer numerically controlled (CNC) turning machines is one of a series of instructional guides for the machinist field developed in Oklahoma. Although developed jointly with Baxter Technologies Corporation and oriented toward the Baxter Vo-Tec 2000 Future Builder CNC…

  6. Competence-Based Education and Training– about Frequently Asked Questions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, M.

    2012-01-01

    This article follows the author's previous piece on practical guidelines for the development of comprehensive competence-based education and training (Mulder, 2012). It is about the questions that have been and are still frequently asked in presentations, workshops and classes about the introduction

  7. Competency-based medical education : theory to practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank, Jason R.; Snell, Linda S.; Ten Cate, Olle; Holmboe, Eric S.; Carraccio, Carol; Swing, Susan R.; Harris, Peter; Glasgow, Nicholas J.; Campbell, Craig; Dath, Deepak; Harden, Ronald M.; Iobst, William; Long, Donlin M.; Mungroo, Rani; Richardson, Denyse L.; Sherbino, Jonathan; Silver, Ivan; Taber, Sarah; Talbot, Martin; Harris, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    Although competency-based medical education (CBME) has attracted renewed interest in recent years among educators and policy-makers in the health care professions, there is little agreement on many aspects of this paradigm. We convened a unique partnership - the International CBME Collaborators - to

  8. Development of the educational activity monitoring system on the basis of competence-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Makushkina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we give the mathematical description of the model of transferring the grades, obtained by students, based on the results of completing tasks into the assessment of the level of mastering competencies by them, the description is given of the educational activity monitoring system developed according to a mathematical model on the basis of competence-based approach, and the results of assessing its efficiency. Research goal: to reveal the interrelation between score estimates of the student and level of mastering competences and to make the process of determining the level of mastering competences automatic. The mathematical model of the grades transfer to assessing the level of mastering competences is developed in order to achieve this goal. The formulas solving this problem are presented. A study manual was created based on the developed mathematical model, which is intended for: 1 creating and maintaining reference books (teachers, students, competences, disciplines, means of estimation; 2 maintaining the online journal of students’ progress record; 3 determining the level of mastering competences in accordance with the developed algorithm; 4 maintaining the mechanism of data access restriction; 5 forming reports of the registered form of various complexity degrees. The task was solved by means of this study manual. Materials and methods: the fund of estimation means for the subject served as the material for the research, it contains data on the number of points, that a student can receive in the course of studying the subject, and direct distribution of these points for a certain kind of activity and competences which are formed in the course of studying the given subject. The journal of student’s progress is described, reflecting the received number of points in the course of studying the subject by each type of occupation. Results: Because of using the developed software program, the level of mastering each of the

  9. Moving toward competency-based education: Challenges and the way forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas V Chacko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at giving a broad overview on competency-based education to those who are currently in the predominantly knowledge focused discipline-based curriculum and so are uninitiated to the competency-based educational paradigm. This is done by taking them through the curricular trends in medical education that have happened elsewhere in the world and providing them with a gist of what is competency-based medical education, how it is different from the earlier paradigms of instruction, the advantages that this paradigm of mastery learning presents to help the learner acquire competencies needed for doing the professional tasks and duties that are in alignment with health needs of the country, the framework and the broad steps involved in its implementation, the challenges that its implementation presents particularly with regard to benchmarking for assessment as revealed by the experiences in the Western world that resulted in a three-decade lag between intention to change and actual change and the way forward to overcome these challenges particularly through faculty capacity-building using longitudinal faculty development programs or series of faculty retreats to ensure that it can be successfully implemented and sustained to serve the purpose of producing job-ready professionals.

  10. Competency-Based Blended Learning: Flipping Professional Practice Classes to Enhance Competence Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Ragg

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, health and human service educational programs have transitioned to competence-based outcomes to enhance the quality of graduating professionals. While such outcomes are a critical step in ensuring professional quality, they require curricular and pedagogical adjustments that do not fit easily within university environments. Technology has eased many problems of fit through the development of hybrid and flipped courses that allow on-campus time to be better focused on developing professional skills. This study explored the question: Can flipped delivery improve competence-based outcomes in social work practice classes? The study assessed pedagogical adjustments that integrated competence-based learning principles with flipped classroom delivery. Principles of organizing the class to maximize competence development are explored and illustrated. Improved competence development and student satisfaction were demonstrated in three flipped practice courses with a combined sample size of 269 Bachelor of Social Work (BSW and Masters of Social Work (MSW students. Researchers concluded that using flipped-classroom methods enhanced the students’ capacity to apply concepts and develop skills. In particular, the ability to receive and process feedback on applied skills was improved.

  11. Peculiarities of Professional Training Standards Development and Implementation within Competency-Based Approach: Foreign Experience

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    Desyatov Tymofiy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the development of competency-based professional training standards and their implementation into educational process in foreign countries. It determines that the main idea of competency-based approach is competency-and-active learning, which aims at complex acquirement of diverse skills and ways of practice activities via mastering respective competences. The article states that competency is the product of competence due to which a person successfully realizes themselves in different spheres of their professional engagement, gains social independence and becomes mobile and qualified. The article also dwells on the international experience of professional and training standards development, it analyses specific internal national, as well as external all-European and worldwide conceptions of professional and training standards development, conceptual foundations of competency-based approach in national higher education within the framework of global information society formation. It highlights specific aspects of standards development based on activity-oriented technologies and professional competence assessment. The article states that within the framework of competency-based teaching and training, quality-assuring actions have to ensure the correspondence of standards and learning outcomes. It informs that the labour market is represented by employers, trade unions and the government. The article explores the fact that in Russia, Ukraine and many other countries the employers and the trade unions do not collaborate to formulate their needs with regard to professional training standards, that is why the government and its administration bodies have to do the task of predicting labour market needs on their own.

  12. Toward a shared language for competency-based medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, Robert; Frank, Jason R; Carraccio, Carol; Sherbino, Jonathan; Ross, Shelley; Snell, Linda

    2017-06-01

    The paradigm shift brought about by the advent of competency-based medical education (CBME) can be characterized as an adaptive change. Currently, its development and implementation suffer from the lack of a lingua franca. A shared language is needed to support collaboration and dissemination across the world community of medical educators. The International CBME Collaborators held a second summit in 2013 to explore this and other contemporary CBME issues. We present the resulting International CBME Collaborator's glossary of CBME terms. Particular attention is given to the terms competency, entrustable professional activity (EPA), and milestone and their interrelationships. Medical education scholars and enthusiasts of the competency-based approach are encouraged to adopt these terms and definitions, although no doubt the vocabulary of CBME will continue to evolve.

  13. Improving Assessment: Creating a Culture of Assessment with a Change Management Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Michael R.; Lane, Peggy L.; Rich, John; Wheeling, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    For more than twenty years accrediting agencies have required assessment as part of their initial accreditation or reaffirmation processes. During that period of time thousands of institutions have successfully prepared plans to achieve or maintain their accreditation. Why then does a culture of assessment not exist? And why is assessment still an…

  14. Competency-based orientation in pediatric critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidig, J R; Dalgas-Pelish, P; Johnston, D L; Galligan, J; Longfield, E; Mosby, K; Peterson, A

    1993-05-01

    Having recognized the need to update and modify their orientation program, a PICU nursing management team decided to develop a competency-based program. The goal was to facilitate transition of an orientee into a competent entry-level practitioner. This article outlines the procedure used to develop the initial phases: lists of competencies, competency evaluation worksheet and performance checklists. Later, various learning options and additional evaluation methods will be explored.

  15. Competency-based medical education: the discourse of infallibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Victoria A; Whitehead, Cynthia R; Thille, Patricia; Ginsburg, Shiphra; Brydges, Ryan; Kuper, Ayelet

    2017-10-27

    Over the last two decades, competency-based frameworks have been internationally adopted as the primary educational approach in medicine. Yet competency-based medical education (CBME) remains contested in the academic literature. We look broadly at the nature of this debate to explore how it may shape scholars' understanding of CBME, and its implications for medical education research and practice. In doing so, we deconstruct unarticulated discourses and assumptions embedded in the CBME literature. We assembled an archive of literature focused on CBME. The archive dates from 1996, the publication year of the first CanMEDS Physician Competency Framework. We then conducted a Foucauldian critical discourse analysis (CDA) to delineate the dominant discourses underpinning the literature. CDA examines the intersections of language, social practices, knowledge and power relations to highlight how entrenched ways of thinking influence what can or cannot be said about a topic. Detractors of CBME have advanced an array of conceptual critiques. Proponents have often responded with a recurring discursive strategy that minimises these critiques and deflects attention from the underlying concept of the competency-based approach. As part of this process, conceptual concerns are reframed as two practical problems: implementation and interpretation. Yet the assertion that these are the construct's primary concerns was often unsupported by empirical evidence. These practices contribute to a discourse of infallibility of CBME. In uncovering the discourse of infallibility, we explore how it can silence critical voices and hinder a rigorous examination of the competency-based approach. These discursive practices strengthen CBME by constructing it as infallible in the literature. We propose re-approaching the dialogue surrounding CBME as a starting point for empirical investigation, driven by the aim to broaden scholars' understanding of its design, development and implementation in

  16. COMPETENCE-BASED APPROACH TO MODELLING STRUCTURES OF THE MAIN EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Gerasimova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available By the analysis results of scientific works in the field of competence-based approach in education authors proved need of computer support of the planning and development stage of the main educational program, they developed the main educational program structure automatic formation model on the graphs basis, offered the integrated criterion of an discipline assessment and developed a strategic map of a discipline complex assessment. The executed theoretical researches are a basis for creation of the main educational program planning and development support automated system.

  17. A Competency-Based and Field-Centered Teacher Education Program in French: Teacher Competencies and Evidence of Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Anthony

    The foreign language teacher training program described here is competency-based and therefore assumes the use of stated assessment criteria. Foreign language teacher competencies are listed in three categories: (1) content area, (2) learning-teaching process, and (3) teacher-school-community and profession. The team leader responsible for…

  18. A competency based selection procedure for Dutch postgraduate GP training: a pilot study on validity and reliability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, M.I.; Tromp, F.; Zuithoff, N.P.; Pieters, R.H.; Damoiseaux, R.A.; Kuyvenhoven, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Historically, semi-structured interviews (SSI) have been the core of the Dutch selection for postgraduate general practice (GP) training. This paper describes a pilot study on a newly designed competency-based selection procedure that assesses whether candidates have the

  19. The Stimulation of Students’ Interest in the Teaching by Competency-based Approach: Latin American Perspective

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    Zhyzhko Olena

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of scientific-pedagogical research, which consisted in identifying, what are the best strategies of stimulation of students’ interest in the teaching by competency-based approach studying the works of Latin American scientists. With support in the pedagogic-comparative study the author has found out that in the Mexican education system the competency-based approach has been implemented since 2009 through the new national educational policies and Reform of Basic Education in which documents it is argued that competence means putting in play knowledge, attitudes, skills and values for achieving purposes in certain contexts and situations. One of the key tasks of the teacher is to lead and keep the attention of his/her students towards certain goals. Motivation to learning represents the socio-emotional or psychosocial variables (social identity, attitude to the subject, motivation, involved in learning on par with the educational variables (teacher, methodology, learning context; individual variables (subject learning abilities, aptitudes, needs, personality; socio-demographic variables (student’s age, sex, socio-economic and socio-cultural level; sociopolitical context variables (importance in the society of knowledge that provides the subject. The study has showed that the best strategies for stimulation of students’ interest in the learning by competency-based approach, following the Latin American scientists, are, among others, modeling, adapting, making the content of the studied discipline “accessible” to the student’s needs; developing students’ autonomy in learning; promoting conscious learning; establishing dynamic and equitable system of interrelations in the class; creating positive psychological environment; raising the illustrative and dynamic teaching; ensuring the self-control and self-regulation; using the error as part of the learning process (and not as punitive.

  20. A Flow-chart for Developing Competency-Based Courses in Vocational Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Robert

    1984-01-01

    Describes a flowchart to be used in developing competency-based vocational education materials. The flowchart leads the developer logically through the process and to the point where s/he will be comfortable with competency-based materials. (JOW)

  1. PEMBUATAN APLIKASI SISTEM COMPETENCY BASED DEVELOPMENT PURPOSE BERBASIS WEB

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    Eko Aribowo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Strategi Perusahaan dalam mencapai visi dan Misi ditetapkan enam langkah dan salah satunya adalah Penerapan CBHRM (Competency Based Human Resources Management. CBHRM adalah strategi perhutani dalam meningkatkan kualitas pegawai Perhutani. Dalam menjalankan strategi ini salah satu tahapan yang harus dilakukan adalah melakukan pengembangan kompentensi atau dinamakan Competency Based Development Purpose (CBDP. Dalam tahap ini Pegawai Perum Perhutani akan dinilai level kompetensi yang mereka miliki untuk mengetahui program pengembangan yang sesuai dengan kompetensi yang disyaratkan. Penentuan pelatihan yang dilakukan secara manual membuat Perum Perhutani membutuhkan waktu yang lama dan pelatihan yang diikuti karyawan kurang sesuai, selain itu karyawan juga merasa kesulitan untuk memilihnya. Tujuan dari pembuatan aplikasi ini adalah dapat mempermudah Perum Perhutani dalam menentukan pelatihan untuk karyawan yang sesuai dengan hasil tes kompetensi dan memberikan kesempatan kepada karyawan untuk memilih pelatihan yang akan diikutinya.  Pengumpulan data dilakukan dengan berbagai metode antara lain : studi pustaka, interview dan observasi. Model proses yang digunakan adalah waterfall yang terdiri dari analisa kebutuhan sistem, perancangan, implementasi dan pengujian. Pada perancangan sistem dimulai dari perancangan kebutuhan sistem,perancangan proses, perancangan database dan perancangan interface. Pada tahap implementasi menggunakan PHPMyAdmin untuk membangun basisdata dan PHP untuk teknologi Serverside Tahap terakhir adalah pengujian sistem yang dilakukan dengan Black Box Test dan Alpha Test.  Hasil penelitian ini berupa  aplikasi sistem Competency Based Development Purpose berbasis web yang dapat membantu Perum Perhtani dalam menentukan pelatih untuk pengembangan karyawan yang sesuai dengan hasil tes kompetensi yang telah dilakukan sebelumnya oleh karyawan.

  2. Teacher interpersonal behaviour and student motivation in competence-based vocational education : Evidence from Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Misbah, Zainun; Gulikers, Judith; Maulana, Ridwan; Mulder, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Competence-based education requires changing teacher roles probably affecting teacher–student interactions and student motivation. This study examines how students (N = 1469) from competence-based and less-competence-based vocational schools perceive their teachers' interpersonal behaviour and its

  3. Going Global: Toward Competency-Based Best Practices for Global Health in Dental Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Brittany; Shick, Elizabeth; Chaffee, Benjamin W; Benzian, Habib

    2017-06-01

    The Global Oral Health Interest Group of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health (GOHIG-CUGH) published recommended competencies to support development of competency-based global health education in dental schools. However, there has been no comprehensive, systematically derived, or broadly accepted framework for creating and delivering competency-based global health education to dental students. This article describes the results of a collaborative workshop held at the 2016 American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Annual Session & Exhibition designed to build on the GOHIG-CUGH competencies and start to develop systematic approaches for their practical application. Workshop organizers developed a preliminary theoretical framework for guiding the development of global health in dental education, grounded in published research. Collectively, workshop participants developed detailed outcomes for the theoretical framework with a focus on three educational practices: didactic, experiential, and research learning and how each can meet the competencies. Participants discussed learning objectives, keys to implementation, ethical considerations, challenges, and examples of success. Outcomes demonstrated that no educational practice on its own meets all 33 recommended competencies for dental students; however, the three educational practices combined may potentially cover all 33. Participants emphasized the significance of sustainable approaches to student learning for both students and communities, with identified partners in the communities to collaborate on the development, implementation, evaluation, and long-term maintenance of any student global health activity. These findings may represent early steps toward professional consensus and best practices for global health in dental education in the United States.

  4. Simulation for Teaching Orthopaedic Residents in a Competency-based Curriculum: Do the Benefits Justify the Increased Costs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nousiainen, Markku T; McQueen, Sydney A; Ferguson, Peter; Alman, Benjamin; Kraemer, William; Safir, Oleg; Reznick, Richard; Sonnadara, Ranil

    2016-04-01

    Although simulation-based training is becoming widespread in surgical education and research supports its use, one major limitation is cost. Until now, little has been published on the costs of simulation in residency training. At the University of Toronto, a novel competency-based curriculum in orthopaedic surgery has been implemented for training selected residents, which makes extensive use of simulation. Despite the benefits of this intensive approach to simulation, there is a need to consider its financial implications and demands on faculty time. This study presents a cost and faculty work-hours analysis of implementing simulation as a teaching and evaluation tool in the University of Toronto's novel competency-based curriculum program compared with the historic costs of using simulation in the residency training program. All invoices for simulation training were reviewed to determine the financial costs before and after implementation of the competency-based curriculum. Invoice items included costs for cadavers, artificial models, skills laboratory labor, associated materials, and standardized patients. Costs related to the surgical skills laboratory rental fees and orthopaedic implants were waived as a result of special arrangements with the skills laboratory and implant vendors. Although faculty time was not reimbursed, faculty hours dedicated to simulation were also evaluated. The academic year of 2008 to 2009 was chosen to represent an academic year that preceded the introduction of the competency-based curriculum. During this year, 12 residents used simulation for teaching. The academic year of 2010 to 2011 was chosen to represent an academic year when the competency-based curriculum training program was functioning parallel but separate from the regular stream of training. In this year, six residents used simulation for teaching and assessment. The academic year of 2012 to 2013 was chosen to represent an academic year when simulation was used equally

  5. A competencies-based mental health training model for health professionals in low and middle income countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    KUTCHER, STAN; CHEHIL, SONIA; CASH, COLLEEN; MILLAR, JIM

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a competencies-based training model specifically created to teach needed mental health skills to health professionals in low and middle income countries (LMICs). The model combines a mental health training needs assessment with the delivery of mental health training modules aligned with national/regional mental health priorities and designed to be used by all health professionals at various levels of the health care system. The model also defines a sustainability framework that involves the creation of a multidisciplinary training team embedded in the national/regional health system. The training program consists of a number of modules, each one designed to enhance specific mental health competencies for a variety of health care workers. These modules are linked to a number of clinically useful tools that facilitate knowledge transfer into clinical care while concurrently addressing health equity issues. This model may provide an efficient and cost-effective alternative to traditional profession-based mental health training approaches, which have to date not been successful at meeting mental health delivery needs and mental health service priorities in LMICs. PMID:16633545

  6. Validation of an ICT system supporting Competence-Based Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Mana

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to present the evaluation of eSchooling, an ICT system supporting competence-based education. The eSchooling team ran an experiment involving ten high schools throughout an entire school year, so as to cover all the teaching stages (from activities planning to the final students evaluations. In order to guarantee objectivity and independence, external experts performed monitoring, validation and evaluation of the experimental results. These experts analysed different aspects: the logs of the eSchooling system, the response of a user community, the logs of the interactive e-book system and the outputs of users focus groups. The main indication derived from the analysis of the collected data is to involve entire groups of teachers of the same class, rather than isolated ones, when evaluating such kinds of educative tools. Another suggestion is to move in the direction of a tighter integration with other ICT tools such as the electronic board for recording activity, even when it is not competence-based.

  7. Toward a definition of competency-based education in medicine: a systematic review of published definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jason R; Mungroo, Rani; Ahmad, Yasmine; Wang, Mimi; De Rossi, Stefanie; Horsley, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    Competency-based education (CBE) has emerged in the health professions to address criticisms of contemporary approaches to training. However, the literature has no clear, widely accepted definition of CBE that furthers innovation, debate, and scholarship in this area. To systematically review CBE-related literature in order to identify key terms and constructs to inform the development of a useful working definition of CBE for medical education. We searched electronic databases and supplemented searches by using authors' files, checking reference lists, contacting relevant organizations and conducting Internet searches. Screening was carried out by duplicate assessment, and disagreements were resolved by consensus. We included any English- or French-language sources that defined competency-based education. Data were analyzed qualitatively and summarized descriptively. We identified 15,956 records for initial relevancy screening by title and abstract. The full text of 1,826 records was then retrieved and assessed further for relevance. A total of 173 records were analyzed. We identified 4 major themes (organizing framework, rationale, contrast with time, and implementing CBE) and 6 sub-themes (outcomes defined, curriculum of competencies, demonstrable, assessment, learner-centred and societal needs). From these themes, a new definition of CBE was synthesized. This is the first comprehensive systematic review of the medical education literature related to CBE definitions. The themes and definition identified should be considered by educators to advance the field.

  8. Fairness: the hidden challenge for competency-based postgraduate medical education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, Colleen Y; French, Judith C; Herring, Mary Elizabeth; Dannefer, Elaine F

    2017-10-01

    Competency-based medical education systems allow institutions to individualize teaching practices to meet the needs of diverse learners. Yet, the focus on continuous improvement and individualization of curricula does not exempt programs from treating learners in a fair manner. When learners fail to meet key competencies and are placed on probation or dismissed from training programs, issues of fairness may form the basis of their legal claims. In a literature search, we found no in-depth examination of fairness. In this paper, we utilize a systems lens to examine fairness within postgraduate medical education contexts, focusing on educational opportunities, assessment practices, decision-making processes, fairness from a legal standpoint, and fairness in the context of the learning environment. While we provide examples of fairness issues within US training programs, concerns regarding fairness are relevant in any medical education system which utilizes a competency-based education framework.Assessment oversight committees and annual programmatic evaluations, while recommended, will not guarantee fairness within postgraduate medical education programs, but they can provide a window into 'hidden' threats to fairness, as everything from training experiences to assessment practices may be examined by these committees. One of the first steps programs can take is to recognize that threats to fairness may exist in any educational program, including their own, and begin conversations about how to address these issues.

  9. Assessment of current practices in creating and using passwords as a control mechanism for information access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. Wessels

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the critical issues in managing information within an organization is to ensure that proper controls exist and are applied in allowing people access to information. Passwords are used extensively as the main control mechanism to identify users wanting access to systems, applications, data files, network servers or personal information. In this article, the issues involved in selecting and using passwords are discussed and the current practices employed by users in creating and storing passwords to gain access to sensitive information are assessed. The results of this survey conclude that information managers cannot rely only on users to employ proper password control in order to protect sensitive information.

  10. Challenges in Developing Competency-based Training Curriculum for Food Safety Regulators in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thippaiah, Anitha; Allagh, Komal Preet; Murthy, G. V.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The Food Safety and Standards Act have redefined the roles and responsibilities of food regulatory workforce and calls for highly skilled human resources as it involves complex management procedures. Aims: 1) Identify the competencies needed among the food regulatory workforce in India. 2) Develop a competency-based training curriculum for food safety regulators in the country. 3) Develop training materials for use to train the food regulatory workforce. Settings and Design: The Indian Institute of Public Health, Hyderabad, led the development of training curriculum on food safety with technical assistance from the Royal Society for Public Health, UK and the National Institute of Nutrition, India. The exercise was to facilitate the implementation of new Act by undertaking capacity building through a comprehensive training program. Materials and Methods: A competency-based training needs assessment was conducted before undertaking the development of the training materials. Results: The training program for Food Safety Officers was designed to comprise of five modules to include: Food science and technology, Food safety management systems, Food safety legislation, Enforcement of food safety regulations, and Administrative functions. Each module has a facilitator guide for the tutor and a handbook for the participant. Essentials of Food Hygiene-I (Basic level), II and III (Retail/ Catering/ Manufacturing) were primarily designed for training of food handlers and are part of essential reading for food safety regulators. Conclusion: The Food Safety and Standards Act calls for highly skilled human resources as it involves complex management procedures. Despite having developed a comprehensive competency-based training curriculum by joint efforts by the local, national, and international agencies, implementation remains a challenge in resource-limited setting. PMID:25136155

  11. Challenges in Developing Competency-based Training Curriculum for Food Safety Regulators in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thippaiah, Anitha; Allagh, Komal Preet; Murthy, G V

    2014-07-01

    The Food Safety and Standards Act have redefined the roles and responsibilities of food regulatory workforce and calls for highly skilled human resources as it involves complex management procedures. 1) Identify the competencies needed among the food regulatory workforce in India. 2) Develop a competency-based training curriculum for food safety regulators in the country. 3) Develop training materials for use to train the food regulatory workforce. The Indian Institute of Public Health, Hyderabad, led the development of training curriculum on food safety with technical assistance from the Royal Society for Public Health, UK and the National Institute of Nutrition, India. The exercise was to facilitate the implementation of new Act by undertaking capacity building through a comprehensive training program. A competency-based training needs assessment was conducted before undertaking the development of the training materials. THE TRAINING PROGRAM FOR FOOD SAFETY OFFICERS WAS DESIGNED TO COMPRISE OF FIVE MODULES TO INCLUDE: Food science and technology, Food safety management systems, Food safety legislation, Enforcement of food safety regulations, and Administrative functions. Each module has a facilitator guide for the tutor and a handbook for the participant. Essentials of Food Hygiene-I (Basic level), II and III (Retail/ Catering/ Manufacturing) were primarily designed for training of food handlers and are part of essential reading for food safety regulators. The Food Safety and Standards Act calls for highly skilled human resources as it involves complex management procedures. Despite having developed a comprehensive competency-based training curriculum by joint efforts by the local, national, and international agencies, implementation remains a challenge in resource-limited setting.

  12. Challenges in developing competency-based training curriculum for food safety regulators in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha Thippaiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The Food Safety and Standards Act have redefined the roles and responsibilities of food regulatory workforce and calls for highly skilled human resources as it involves complex management procedures. Aims: 1 Identify the competencies needed among the food regulatory workforce in India. 2 Develop a competency-based training curriculum for food safety regulators in the country. 3 Develop training materials for use to train the food regulatory workforce. Settings and Design: The Indian Institute of Public Health, Hyderabad, led the development of training curriculum on food safety with technical assistance from the Royal Society for Public Health, UK and the National Institute of Nutrition, India. The exercise was to facilitate the implementation of new Act by undertaking capacity building through a comprehensive training program. Materials and Methods: A competency-based training needs assessment was conducted before undertaking the development of the training materials. Results: The training program for Food Safety Officers was designed to comprise of five modules to include: Food science and technology, Food safety management systems, Food safety legislation, Enforcement of food safety regulations, and Administrative functions. Each module has a facilitator guide for the tutor and a handbook for the participant. Essentials of Food Hygiene-I (Basic level, II and III (Retail/ Catering/ Manufacturing were primarily designed for training of food handlers and are part of essential reading for food safety regulators. Conclusion: The Food Safety and Standards Act calls for highly skilled human resources as it involves complex management procedures. Despite having developed a comprehensive competency-based training curriculum by joint efforts by the local, national, and international agencies, implementation remains a challenge in resource-limited setting.

  13. Implications of accreditation criteria when transforming a traditional nursing curriculum to a competency-based curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Botma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nurse educators in a resource-poor country have identified the need to change from content-driven curriculum to a competency-based curriculum. A rapid assessment was done to determine the standing of nursing education in the country. Structured interviews were conducted with educational and administrative staff as well as students at all six nursing schools in Lesotho. Programme design, human resources, teaching and learning, physical resources, and programme accreditation were addressed during the rapid assessment. The results were uniform due to the country being small and four nursing schools forming a consortium. A traditional content-driven three-year diploma programme that renders a single-qualified nurse is being offered. A five-year degree programme in nursing is being offered by the only university in the country. Nursing schools are resource-poor with limited or no external funding sources. Changing to and sustaining a competency-based curriculum will require extensive empowerment of nurse educators. Professional governing bodies should produce supporting rules and regulations.

  14. Competence-based demands made of senior physicians: an empirical study to evaluate leadership competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, Bosco; Ostermann, Herwig; Schubert, Harald

    2011-01-01

    As a result of more economising in German hospitals, changes evolve in organising the deployment of senior medical staff. New demands are made of senior hospital management. Leadership competencies in the training and development of physicians are of prime importance to the successful perception of managerial responsibilities. The present study investigates the actual and targeted demands of leadership made of senior medical staff in terms of how these demands are perceived. To this end, the demands of leadership were surveyed using a competence-based questionnaire and investigated with a view to potentials in professional development by way of example of the senior management of psychiatric hospitals in Germany. In all, the results show high ratings in personal performance, the greatest significance being attributed to value-oriented competence in the actual assessment of demands on leadership. Besides gender-specific differences in the actual assessments of single fields of competence, the greatest differences between the targeted and the actual demands are, in all, shown to be in the competencies of self-management and communication. Competence-based core areas in leadership can be demonstrated for the professional development of physicians and an adaptive mode of procedure deduced. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  15. Competency-Based Postgraduate Medical Education: Past, Present and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Cate, Olle

    2017-01-01

    Since the turn of the twenty-first century, competency-based medical education (CBME) has become a dominant approach to postgraduate medical education in many countries. CBME has a history dating back half a century and is rooted in general educational approaches such as outcome-based education and mastery learning. Despite controversies around the terminology and the CBME approach, important national medical regulatory bodies in Canada, the United States, and other countries have embraced CBME. CBME can be characterized as having two distinct features: a focus on specific domains of competence, and a relative independence of time in training, making it an individualized approach that is particularly applicable in workplace training. It is not the length of training that determines a person's readiness for unsupervised practice, but the attained competence or competencies. This shift in focus makes CBME different from traditional training. In this contribution, definitions of CBME and related concepts are detailed.

  16. Competency-Based Postgraduate Medical Education: Past, Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ten Cate, Olle

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the turn of the twenty-first century, competency-based medical education (CBME has become a dominant approach to postgraduate medical education in many countries. CBME has a history dating back half a century and is rooted in general educational approaches such as outcome-based education and mastery learning. Despite controversies around the terminology and the CBME approach, important national medical regulatory bodies in Canada, the United States, and other countries have embraced CBME. CBME can be characterized as having two distinct features: a focus on specific domains of competence, and a relative independence of time in training, making it an individualized approach that is particularly applicable in workplace training. It is not the length of training that determines a person’s readiness for unsupervised practice, but the attained competence or competencies. This shift in focus makes CBME different from traditional training. In this contribution, definitions of CBME and related concepts are detailed.

  17. A Competence-Based Approach to Sustainable Innovation Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAloone, Timothy Charles

    2007-01-01

    on sustainable innovation. By focusing particularly on the Design & Innovation programme’s fifth semester, which is entitled Innovation for Sustainability, the efforts we have made to renew the educational approach and contents in our engineering teaching will be shown in this paper. This semester has been...... the object of a research exercise, to affect and observe various approaches to the teaching of design. Particular attention will be paid in this case to competencies, both initiated in the teaching and the evaluated in the students’ interpretation of the theoretical contents. The lessons learned from...... the first three years of this semester’s application and teaching to approximately 55 students per year are presented and discussed. After introducing the motivation and background for establishing the education programme, the consideration of competence-based education is described, in the context...

  18. How do physicians assess their family physician colleagues' performance?: creating a rubric to inform assessment and feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargeant, Joan; Macleod, Tanya; Sinclair, Douglas; Power, Mary

    2011-01-01

    The Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta and Nova Scotia (CPSNS) use a standardized multisource feedback program, the Physician Achievement Review (PAR/NSPAR), to provide physicians with performance assessment data via questionnaires from medical colleagues, coworkers, and patients on 5 practice domains: consultation communication, patient interaction, professional self-management, clinical competence, and psychosocial management of patients. Physicians receive a confidential report; the intent is practice improvement. However, research indicates that feedback from medical colleagues appears to be less understood than that from coworkers or patients, due to a lack of specificity and concerns regarding feedback credibility. The purpose of this study was to determine how physicians make decisions about performance ratings for family physician (FP) colleagues in the 5 practice domains. This was an exploratory qualitative study using focus groups-one with 11 family physicians and one with 12 specialists-who had served as NSPAR "medical colleague'' reviewers. We analyzed focus group transcripts using content analysis. Family and specialist physicians provided examples of behaviors indicative of both high- and low-scoring performance for items within the 5 practice domains. From these, an assessment rubric was created to inform both external reviewers and the physicians being reviewed of performance expectations. Reviewers reported using varied sources of information to make assessments, including shared patients, medical records, referral letters, feedback from others, and self-reference. The CPSNS has used the assessment rubric to create an online resource to inform medical colleague assessment and enhance the usefulness of their NSPAR scores. Further research will be required to determine its impact. Copyright © 2011 The Alliance for Continuing Medical Education, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for

  19. Competency based training in robotic surgery: benchmark scores for virtual reality robotic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raison, Nicholas; Ahmed, Kamran; Fossati, Nicola; Buffi, Nicolò; Mottrie, Alexandre; Dasgupta, Prokar; Van Der Poel, Henk

    2017-05-01

    To develop benchmark scores of competency for use within a competency based virtual reality (VR) robotic training curriculum. This longitudinal, observational study analysed results from nine European Association of Urology hands-on-training courses in VR simulation. In all, 223 participants ranging from novice to expert robotic surgeons completed 1565 exercises. Competency was set at 75% of the mean expert score. Benchmark scores for all general performance metrics generated by the simulator were calculated. Assessment exercises were selected by expert consensus and through learning-curve analysis. Three basic skill and two advanced skill exercises were identified. Benchmark scores based on expert performance offered viable targets for novice and intermediate trainees in robotic surgery. Novice participants met the competency standards for most basic skill exercises; however, advanced exercises were significantly more challenging. Intermediate participants performed better across the seven metrics but still did not achieve the benchmark standard in the more difficult exercises. Benchmark scores derived from expert performances offer relevant and challenging scores for trainees to achieve during VR simulation training. Objective feedback allows both participants and trainers to monitor educational progress and ensures that training remains effective. Furthermore, the well-defined goals set through benchmarking offer clear targets for trainees and enable training to move to a more efficient competency based curriculum. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Reliability of competency-based, multi-dimensional, multiple-rater performance ratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. De Lange

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to test the assumption that the utilisation of competency-based, multi-dimensional, multiple-rater performance ratings would result in reliable and useful measurements of the performance of managers (N=200 in a specific South African organisation. Reliability coefficients were computed and factor analysis were undertaken to determine the reliability of the ratings. The results indicated high inter-method reliability and low inter-rater reliability. Although the competency- based, multi-dimensional, multiple-rater approach appeared to have facilitated valuable input towards the assessment process a greater degree of reliability, validity and usefulness was not necessarily achieved. Implications of these findings are discussed. Opsomming Die doel van die studie was om die aanname dat die gebruik van bevoegdheidsgebaseerde, multi-dimensionele, meervoudige-beoordelaar prestasiebeoordeling tot betroubare en bruikbare metings van die prestasie van bestuurders (N=200 in ’n spesifieke Suid-Afrikaanse organisasie sou lei, te toets. Betroubaarheidskoëffisiënte is bereken en faktorontledings is uitgevoer om die betroubaarhede te bepaal. Die resultate het hoë inter-metodiese en lae inter-beoordelaar betroubaarhede aangedui. Hoewel dit wou voorkom of die bevoegdheids gebaseerde, multidimensionele, meervoudige beoordelaar benadering tot prestasie beoordeling nuttige inligting aan die prestasie beoordelingsproses verskaf, is ’n verhoogde mate van betroubaarheid, geldigheid en ruikbaarheid nie noodwendig verkry nie. Implikasies van die bevindinge word bespreek.

  1. From aggregation to interpretation: how assessors judge complex data in a competency-based portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudkerk Pool, Andrea; Govaerts, Marjan J B; Jaarsma, Debbie A D C; Driessen, Erik W

    2017-10-14

    While portfolios are increasingly used to assess competence, the validity of such portfolio-based assessments has hitherto remained unconfirmed. The purpose of the present research is therefore to further our understanding of how assessors form judgments when interpreting the complex data included in a competency-based portfolio. Eighteen assessors appraised one of three competency-based mock portfolios while thinking aloud, before taking part in semi-structured interviews. A thematic analysis of the think-aloud protocols and interviews revealed that assessors reached judgments through a 3-phase cyclical cognitive process of acquiring, organizing, and integrating evidence. Upon conclusion of the first cycle, assessors reviewed the remaining portfolio evidence to look for confirming or disconfirming evidence. Assessors were inclined to stick to their initial judgments even when confronted with seemingly disconfirming evidence. Although assessors reached similar final (pass-fail) judgments of students' professional competence, they differed in their information-processing approaches and the reasoning behind their judgments. Differences sprung from assessors' divergent assessment beliefs, performance theories, and inferences about the student. Assessment beliefs refer to assessors' opinions about what kind of evidence gives the most valuable and trustworthy information about the student's competence, whereas assessors' performance theories concern their conceptualizations of what constitutes professional competence and competent performance. Even when using the same pieces of information, assessors furthermore differed with respect to inferences about the student as a person as well as a (future) professional. Our findings support the notion that assessors' reasoning in judgment and decision-making varies and is guided by their mental models of performance assessment, potentially impacting feedback and the credibility of decisions. Our findings also lend further

  2. The Art of Making Assessment Anti-Venom: Injecting Assessment in Small Doses to Create a Faculty Culture of Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Philip I.

    2009-01-01

    Many college faculty react to student outcomes assessment the way most people react when they see a rattlesnake within striking distance. Common faculty reactions to the perceived threat of assessment include metaphorically running away and throwing rocks or sticks at it. Like a hiker in the desert doing her best to avoid being struck when she…

  3. Competency-based curricular design to encourage significant learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtubise, Larry; Roman, Brenda

    2014-07-01

    Most significant learning (SL) experiences produce long-lasting learning experiences that meaningfully change the learner's thinking, feeling, and/or behavior. Most significant teaching experiences involve strong connections with the learner and recognition that the learner felt changed by the teaching effort. L. Dee Fink in Creating Significant Learning Experiences: An Integrated Approach to Designing College Course defines six kinds of learning goals: Foundational Knowledge, Application, Integration, Human Dimension, Caring, and Learning to Learn. SL occurs when learning experiences promote interaction between the different kinds of goals, for example, acquiring knowledge alone is not enough, but when paired with a learning experience, such as an effective patient experience as in Caring, then significant (and lasting) learning occurs. To promote SL, backward design principles that start with clearly defined learning goals and the context of the situation of the learner are particularly effective. Emphasis on defining assessment methods prior to developing teaching/learning activities is the key: this ensures that assessment (where the learner should be at the end of the educational activity/process) drives instruction and that assessment and learning/instruction are tightly linked so that assessment measures a defined outcome (competency) of the learner. Employing backward design and the AAMC's MedBiquitous standard vocabulary for medical education can help to ensure that curricular design and redesign efforts effectively enhance educational program quality and efficacy, leading to improved patient care. Such methods can promote successful careers in health care for learners through development of self-directed learning skills and active learning, in ways that help learners become fully committed to lifelong learning and continuous professional development. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. COMPETENCY-BASED TRAINING IN NURSING: LIMITS AND POSSIBILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Franco da Rocha Tonhom

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the possibilities and limits of competency-based training in nursing. Method An integrative review of the literature on the subject was carried out, and an analysis was made of the results of a survey evaluating a nursing course based on areas of competency. A dialog was then established between the review and the results of the research. Results On the question of which theoretical type of competency the articles from the literature relate to, there is a predominance of the constructivist perspective, followed by the functionalist approach and the dialog-based approach. In the dialog between the literature and the research, limits and possibilities were observed in the development of a training by areas of competency. Conclusion The dialog-based approach to competency is the proposition that most approximates to the profile defined by the National Curriculum Guidelines for training in nursing, and this was also identified in the evaluation survey that was studied. However, it is found that there are aspects on better work is needed, such as: partnership between school and the workplace, the role of the teacher, the role of the student, and the process of evaluation.

  5. An Integrated Competency-Based Training Model for theological training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K. Mwangi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the relationship between theological training and practical ministry with the purpose of addressing the fundamental problems that hinder theological training from becoming relevant. There exists a general concern about the way theological schools are preparing men and women for church ministry, with the church leadership feeling like graduates are not up to the task of ministering despite the theological training. The research has established that there is a relationship between theological training and practice of ministry and that practical ministry can only be improved through enhancing theological training. Ultimately the article establishes the need for a competent training programme modelled after the New Testament Discipleship Model approach. This model integrates knowledge, being and practical training. The article tries to outline a model of training (i.e. the Integrated Competency-Based Training Model that will seek to address many of the inadequacies in the training of church ministers with the aim of making theological training translate into the practice of ministry.

  6. Competency-based teacher training: A systematic revision of a proven programme in medical didactics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griewatz, Jan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Competency-based medical education (CBME requires factual knowledge to be practically applied together with skills and attitudes. With the National Competence-Based Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM representing a strong official demand for competence-orientation, it is generally important to explicitly outline its characteristics and review its realisation in teacher trainings. Further requirements are given by the core competencies for medical teachers (KLM. As an example the MQ programme (“Medizindidaktische Qualifikation” in Baden-Wuerttemberg, a long established and well-accepted training, has been critically revised on this basis, concerning its suitability for the demands of CBME, its needs for adjustment and the efforts to be undertaken for its implementation.Methods: In a systematic quality management process the MQ curriculum and its organisational framing were analysed and further developed in a step-wise comprehensive approach, using the six-step cycle by Kern. The procedures included a thorough needs assessment (e.g. literature research, programme mapping, strategic decisions on structure and content, piloting and evaluation. During the process essential elements of project and change management were considered.Results: The experiences of the MQ example revealed helpful information for key factors to be considered in the pending change process any training provider will be confronted with. Guiding questions were developed related to the process phases. Our analyses showed persistent key points of proven value as stable foundation for change, as well as components needing special consideration to foster competence-oriented aims and transfer into practice: reflection, feedback, application-oriented methods and transparent competence development. These aspects have to be consciously perceived and experienced by participants. Taking this into account, we re-designed the course evidence

  7. Competency-based teacher training: A systematic revision of a proven programme in medical didactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griewatz, Jan; Simon, Melanie; Lammerding-Koeppel, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Competency-based medical education (CBME) requires factual knowledge to be practically applied together with skills and attitudes. With the National Competence-Based Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM) representing a strong official demand for competence-orientation, it is generally important to explicitly outline its characteristics and review its realisation in teacher trainings. Further requirements are given by the core competencies for medical teachers (KLM). As an example the MQ programme ("Medizindidaktische Qualifikation") in Baden-Wuerttemberg, a long established and well-accepted training, has been critically revised on this basis, concerning its suitability for the demands of CBME, its needs for adjustment and the efforts to be undertaken for its implementation. Methods: In a systematic quality management process the MQ curriculum and its organisational framing were analysed and further developed in a step-wise comprehensive approach, using the six-step cycle by Kern. The procedures included a thorough needs assessment (e.g. literature research, programme mapping), strategic decisions on structure and content, piloting and evaluation. During the process essential elements of project and change management were considered. Results: The experiences of the MQ example revealed helpful information for key factors to be considered in the pending change process any training provider will be confronted with. Guiding questions were developed related to the process phases. Our analyses showed persistent key points of proven value as stable foundation for change, as well as components needing special consideration to foster competence-oriented aims and transfer into practice: reflection, feedback, application-oriented methods and transparent competence development. These aspects have to be consciously perceived and experienced by participants. Taking this into account, we re-designed the course evidence-based. Besides

  8. How to set the bar in competency-based medical education: standard setting after an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Tim; Wright, Sarah; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan Mahan; Theodoropoulos, John; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Wasserstein, David; Ringsted, Charlotte; Hodges, Brian; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell

    2016-01-04

    The goal of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) in Competency-based Medical Education (CBME) is to establish a minimal level of competence. The purpose of this study was to 1) to determine the credibility and acceptability of the modified Angoff method of standard setting in the setting of CBME, using the Borderline Group (BG) method and the Borderline Regression (BLR) method as a reference standard; 2) to determine if it is feasible to set different standards for junior and senior residents, and 3) to determine the desired characteristics of the judges applying the modified Angoff method. The results of a previous OSCE study (21 junior residents, 18 senior residents, and six fellows) were used. Three groups of judges performed the modified Angoff method for both junior and senior residents: 1) sports medicine surgeons, 2) non-sports medicine orthopedic surgeons, and 3) sports fellows. Judges defined a borderline resident as a resident performing at a level between competent and a novice at each station. For each checklist item, the judges answered yes or no for "will the borderline/advanced beginner examinee respond correctly to this item?" The pass mark was calculated by averaging the scores. This pass mark was compared to that created using both the BG and the BLR methods. A paired t-test showed that all examiner groups expected senior residents to get significantly higher percentage of checklist items correct compared to junior residents (all stations p setting different pass marks for senior and junior residents. The use of this method enables both senior and junior residents to sit the same OSCE, preferable in the regular assessment environment of CBME.

  9. Blending toward Competency. Early Patterns of Blended Learning and Competency-Based Education in New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, Julia

    2014-01-01

    As the education field strives to differentiate and personalize learning to cater to each student, two related movements are gaining attention: competency-based education and blended learning. In competency-based models, students advance on the basis of mastery, rather than according to the traditional methods of counting progress in terms of time…

  10. Competency-based education: the essential basis of pre-service education for the professional midwifery workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Judith T; Thompson, Joyce B; Johnson, Peter

    2013-10-01

    many articles published in the decade since promulgation of the Millennium Development Goals have acknowledged the distinct advantages to maternal and newborn health outcomes that can be achieved as a result of expanding access to skilled birth attendant (including midwifery) services. However, these advantages are often predicated on the assumption that the midwifery workforce shares a common definition and identity. Regrettably, a clear delineation of midwifery competencies is rarely addressed. A core set of midwifery competencies is essential to providing the high quality services that lead to the desirable health outcomes described in that body of research. Attribution of improved outcomes to access to midwifery cannot be made without a common understanding of a defined set of services provided to standard by the midwifery workforce across the inter-conceptional and childbearing time frame. The International Confederation of Midwives (ICM) has developed a clear list of competencies that delineate the domains of practice for the fully qualified, professional midwife. These domains frame the educational outcomes that must be conveyed within competency-based education programmes. this article explores the concept of competency-based education for midwives; first exploring the concept of competency itself, then providing examples of what is already known about competency-based approaches to curriculum design, teacher preparation, teacher support and assessment of student learning. These concepts are linked to the ICM competencies as the unifying construct for education of individuals who share a common definition and identity as midwives. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Building a competency-based workplace curriculum around entrustable professional activities: The case of physician assistant training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Hanneke; Ten Cate, Olle; Daalder, Rieneke; Berkvens, Josephine

    2010-01-01

    Competency-based medical education (CBME) is increasingly dominating clinical training, but also poses questions as to its practical implementation. There is a need for practical guidelines to translate CBME to the clinical work floor. This article aims to provide a practical model, based on the concept of entrustable professional activities (EPAs) to make this translation, derived from curriculum building for physician assistants (PAs). For the training of PAs at the Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, a three-step model was developed to guide competency-based curriculum development, teaching and assessment. It includes specific guidelines for the identification, systematic description and planning of EPAs. The EPA concept appeared to be a useful tool to build competency-based clinical workplace curricula. Implementation of the curriculum requires use of trainee portfolios and progress interviews, statements of rewarded responsibility and training of supervisors. The individualised approach and flexibility that true CBME implies is brought into practice with this model. The model may also be transferred to other domains of clinical training, among which postgraduate training for medical specialties.

  12. The electronic residency application service application can predict accreditation council for graduate medical education competency-based surgical resident performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolan, Amy M; Kaji, Amy H; Quach, Chi; Hines, O Joe; de Virgilio, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Program directors often struggle to determine which factors in the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) application are important in the residency selection process. With the establishment of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies, it would be important to know whether information available in the ERAS application can predict subsequent competency-based performance of general surgery residents. This study is a retrospective correlation of data points found in the ERAS application with core competency-based clinical rotation evaluations. ACGME competency-based evaluations as well as technical skills assessment from all rotations during residency were collected. The overall competency score was defined as an average of all 6 competencies and technical skills. A total of77 residents from two (one university and one community based university-affiliate) general surgery residency programs were included in the analysis. Receiving honors for many of the third year clerkships and AOA membership were associated with a number of the individual competencies. USMLE scores were predictive only of Medical Knowledge (p = 0.004). Factors associated with higher overall competency were female gender (p = 0.02), AOA (p = 0.06), overall number of honors received (p = 0.04), and honors in Ob/Gyn (p = 0.03) and Pediatrics (p = 0.05). Multivariable analysis showed honors in Ob/Gyn, female gender, older age, and total number of honors to be predictive of a number of individual core competencies. USMLE scores were only predictive of Medical Knowledge. The ERAS application is useful for predicting subsequent competency based performance in surgical residents. Receiving honors in the surgery clerkship, which has traditionally carried weight when evaluating a potential surgery resident, may not be as strong a predictor of future success. Copyright © 2010 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  13. Qualitative assessment of precocious puberty-related user-created contents on YouTube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo-Kyoung Nam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available PurposeUser-created content (UCC has provided a considerable amount of medical information and become an important source. We aimed to evaluate the quality and scientific accuracy of precocious puberty-related UCC on YouTube.MethodsThe keywords "precocious puberty", "early puberty", "sexual precocity", and "precocity" were searched for on YouTube during June and July 2014. More than 1,500 UCC matched the keywords. According to the information provider, UCC was classified as medical, oriental, or commercial & others. We evaluated the quality and scientific accuracy of the information provided in UCC using the DISCERN instrument and information scores, respectively.ResultsWe selected 51 UCC, which were categorized into three types: medical (n=17, oriental (n=17, or commercial & others (n=17. The overall quality score for medical UCC (3.4 was significantly higher relative to those of oriental and commercial & others UCC (2.8 and 2.3, respectively (P<0.001. In the assessment of scientific accuracy, the mean information score for medical UCC (30.7 was significantly higher than those of oriental and commercial & others UCC (15.9 and 5.1, respectively (P<0.001. The mean duration of oriental UCC was the longest (P<0.001, however, it was viewed less frequently among them (P=0.086.ConclusionThe quality and accuracy of precocious puberty-related health information in UCC were variable and often unreliable. The overall quality of UCC regarding precocious puberty was moderate. Only medical UCC provided scientifically accurate information. As UCC becomes a popular source of health information, it is important to provide reliable, scientifically accurate information.

  14. Designing the framework for competency-based master of public health programs in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kavya; Zodpey, Sanjay; Morgan, Alison; Gaidhane, Abhay; Syed, Zahiruddin Quazi; Kumar, Rajeev

    2013-01-01

    Competency in the practice of public health is the implicit goal of education institutions that offer master of public health (MPH) programs. With the expanding number of institutions offering courses in public health in India, it is timely to develop a common framework to ensure that graduates are proficient in critical public health. Steps such as situation assessment, survey of public health care professionals in India, and national consultation were undertaken to develop a proposed competency-based framework for MPH programs in India. The existing curricula of all 23 Indian MPH courses vary significantly in content with regard to core, concentration, and crosscutting discipline areas and course durations. The competency or learning outcome is not well defined. The findings of the survey suggest that MPH graduates in India should have competencies ranging from monitoring of health problems and epidemics in the community, applying biostatistics in public health, conducting action research, understanding social and community influence on public health developing indicators and instruments to monitor and evaluate community health programs, developing proposals, and involving community in planning, delivery, and monitoring of health programs. Competency statements were framed and mapped with domains including epidemiology, biostatistics, social and behavioral sciences, health care system, policy, planning, and financing, and environmental health sciences and a crosscutting domain that include health communication and informatics, health management and leadership, professionalism, systems thinking, and public health biology. The proposed competency-based framework for Indian MPH programs can be adapted to meet the needs of diverse, unique programs. The framework ensures the uniqueness and diversity of individual MPH programs in India while contributing to measures of overall program success.

  15. Preparing teachers for competency-based medical education: Fundamental teaching activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Allyn; Koppula, Sudha; Antao, Viola; Bethune, Cheri; Cameron, Stewart; Cavett, Teresa; Clavet, Diane; Dove, Marion

    2017-11-07

    The move to competency-based medical education has created new challenges for medical teachers, including the need to reflect on and further develop their own competencies as teachers. Guidance is needed to ensure comprehensive and coherent programs of faculty development to meet the needs of teachers. The Working Group on Faculty Development of the College of Family Physicians of Canada developed a new concept, Fundamental Teaching Activities (FTAs), to describe the day-to-day work of teachers. These activities are intended to guide teacher professional development. Using task analysis and iterative reviews with teachers and educational leaders, these FTAs were organized into a framework for teachers to identify the actions involved in various teaching tasks, and to reflect on their teaching performance and next steps in personal development. In addition to use by teachers for personal development, the framework is being employed to guide the development of comprehensive faculty development offerings and curriculum, and to organize the beginnings of a national repository of teaching tools. Designed to support and aid teachers and those charged with faculty development, the Fundamental Teaching Activities Framework holds promise for all teachers in health sciences education.

  16. Design and Implementation of a Competency-Based Transfusion Medicine Training Program in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Michelle P; Sherbino, Jonathan; Whitman, Lucinda; Skeate, Robert; Arnold, Donald M

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion medicine training in Canada is currently undergoing a transformation from a time- and process-based curriculum to a competency-based medical education framework. Transfusion medicine is the first accredited postgraduate medical education training program in Canada to adopt a purely competency-based curriculum. It is serving as an example for a number of other postgraduate medical training programs undergoing a similar transition. The purpose of this review is to highlight the elements of competency-based medical education, describe its application to transfusion medicine training, and report on the development and implementation of the new transfusion medicine curriculum in Canada. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Creating standards: Creating illusions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Mai Skjøtt

    written standards may open up for the creation of illusions. These are created when written standards' content is not in accordance with the perception standard adopters and standard users have of the specific practice phenomenon's content. This general theoretical argument is exemplified by the specific...

  18. Competency-based evaluation tools for integrative medicine training in family medicine residency: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Craig

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As more integrative medicine educational content is integrated into conventional family medicine teaching, the need for effective evaluation strategies grows. Through the Integrative Family Medicine program, a six site pilot program of a four year residency training model combining integrative medicine and family medicine training, we have developed and tested a set of competency-based evaluation tools to assess residents' skills in integrative medicine history-taking and treatment planning. This paper presents the results from the implementation of direct observation and treatment plan evaluation tools, as well as the results of two Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs developed for the program. Methods The direct observation (DO and treatment plan (TP evaluation tools developed for the IFM program were implemented by faculty at each of the six sites during the PGY-4 year (n = 11 on DO and n = 8 on TP. The OSCE I was implemented first in 2005 (n = 6, revised and then implemented with a second class of IFM participants in 2006 (n = 7. OSCE II was implemented in fall 2005 with only one class of IFM participants (n = 6. Data from the initial implementation of these tools are described using descriptive statistics. Results Results from the implementation of these tools at the IFM sites suggest that we need more emphasis in our curriculum on incorporating spirituality into history-taking and treatment planning, and more training for IFM residents on effective assessment of readiness for change and strategies for delivering integrative medicine treatment recommendations. Focusing our OSCE assessment more narrowly on integrative medicine history-taking skills was much more effective in delineating strengths and weaknesses in our residents' performance than using the OSCE for both integrative and more basic communication competencies. Conclusion As these tools are refined further they will be of value both in improving

  19. Creating First-Year Assessment Support: Lecturer Perspectives and Student Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargusch, Joanne; Harris, Lois R.; Reid-Searl, Kerry; Taylor, Benjamin A.

    2017-01-01

    While online courses provide opportunities for a range of assessment tools and resources, little is known about how lecturers might best provide assessment cues to support diverse cohorts. This study explored how lecturers communicate messages about assessment expectations to first-year students in two courses at an Australian regional university…

  20. Challenges in Implementing Competency-based English Language Teaching at University Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Riyandari

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Competency-based curriculum has been widely implemented by many higher institutions in Indonesia. It is expected that the competency-based curriculum, which puts more emphasis on the needs of job market, prepare students for specified tasks. Competency in a general sense can be seen from the task performance. English language competency is one of the basic competencies which should be acquired by a university graduate in order to enter international market and survive the global competition. The institution which offers English language as part of their curriculum must answer the demand for an English language competent graduate by preparing the best way to teach the language. This article examines the steps to develop a competency-based English language teaching where student's attitude and achievement comprise the important segments of evaluation. It focuses on the challenges, which will probably be faced by the teachers in implementing this competency-based teaching at the university level.

  1. Teachers’ individual action theories about competence-based education: the value of the cognitive apprenticeship model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seezink, Audrey; Poell, Rob; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Seezink, A., Poell, R. F., & Kirschner, P. A. (2009). Teachers' individual action theories about competence-based education: The value of the cognitive apprenticeship model. Journal of Vocational Education & Training, 61, 203-215.

  2. Crossing boundaries – competence-based learning for sustainable development in a virtual mobility setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kraker, Joop; Cörvers, Ron; Ivens, Wilfried; Lansu, Angelique; Van Dam-Mieras, Rietje

    2010-01-01

    To contribute effectively to sustainable development, professionals should have the competence to communicate and collaborate across the traditional boundaries of, for example, discipline, nation, or culture. Important ingredients of competence-based learning environments for sustainable development

  3. Defining competency-based evaluation objectives in family medicine: communication skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Tom; Wetmore, Stephen; Allen, Tim; Brailovsky, Carlos; Crichton, Tom; Bethune, Cheri; Donoff, Michel; Lawrence, Kathrine

    2012-04-01

    To provide a pragmatic approach to the evaluation of communication skills using observable behaviours, as part of a multiyear project to develop competency-based evaluation objectives for Certification in family medicine. A nominal group technique was used to develop themes and subthemes and to identify positive and negative observable behaviours that demonstrate competence in communication in family medicine. The College of Family Physicians of Canada in Mississauga, Ont. An expert group of 7 family physicians and 1 educational consultant, all of whom had experience in assessing competence in family medicine. Group members represented the Canadian context with respect to region, sex, language, community type, and experience. The group used the nominal group technique to derive a list of observable behaviours that would constitute a detailed operational definition of competence in communication skills; multiple iterations were used until saturation was achieved. The group met several times a year, and membership remained unchanged during the 4 years in which the work was conducted. The iterative process was undertaken twice--once for communication with patients and once for communication with colleagues. Five themes, 5 subthemes, and 106 positive and negative observable behaviours were generated. The subtheme of charting skills was defined using a key-features analysis. Communication skills were defined in terms of themes and observable behaviours. These definitions were intended to help assess family physicians' competence at the start of independent practice.

  4. Competency-based training for PMH nurse generalists: inpatient intervention and prevention of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puntil, Cheryl; York, Janet; Limandri, Barbara; Greene, Pamela; Arauz, Eric; Hobbs, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the United States. Approximately 90,000 psychiatric mental health (PMH) nurse generalists work in hospitals in the United States, mostly on inpatient psychiatric units where the most acutely suicidal patients are hospitalized. Although competencies have been developed for mental health clinicians in assessing and managing suicide risk, there are no standard competencies for PMH nurse generalists. Widely accepted nursing practices do not meet suicide-specific standards of care or evidence-based criteria. Although both the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education Essentials for Baccalaureate Education and the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses competencies stress the necessity for comprehensive assessment, safe clinical practices, patient-centered care, evidence-based interventions, and interprofessional communication and collaboration, there are no specific requirements for suicide prevention training in educational and clinical programs. The American Psychiatric Nurses Association has an opportunity to provide leadership in developing, implementing, and evaluating competency-based training for nurses and partner with the national effort to increase the competencies in suicide prevention in the behavioral health workforce.

  5. Are They Getting It?: Creating Dance Assessments That Honor the Creative Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranicke, Michelle; Pruitt, Lara

    2012-01-01

    This article examines assessment of "intangible" concepts in dance education such as creativity, risk, originality, or artistic thinking. Through the development of assessment workshops for arts educators, conducted from 2009 through 2011 across the state of Illinois and supported by the Illinois Arts Council, the authors developed a…

  6. Creating a faculty community that values curricular assessment and improvement: one DNP program's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Julie A; Runshe, Debra; Young, Judith; Embree, Jennifer; Riner, Mary Beth

    2015-01-01

    Developing faculty ownership of ongoing curricular improvement presents educational and management challenges for schools of nursing, yet little has been published about which components help build a faculty community that values curricular assessment and improvement. The purpose of this case study was to describe key features of and faculty satisfaction with one school of nursing's doctor of nursing practice curricular assessment process, with a description of key considerations for developing an ePortfolio-supported curricular assessment process. ePortfolio matrices were used as a curricular organizing structure for mapping and scoring each completed student assignment to an American Association of Colleges of Nursing Essential descriptor using a rubric that measured evidence of student learning. Faculty satisfaction with the process was also evaluated. First-year results indicated high levels of faculty satisfaction with the assessment process. The initial findings led to four actions for curricular improvement and agreement to continue the assessment process biannually. The curricular assessment was successful in generating faculty satisfaction, identifying needed areas to improve the curriculum, and obtaining faculty agreement to continue the process. A faculty community supportive of curricular assessment is essential to a transformational learning environment that prepares future nursing leaders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of implementing undergraduate competency-based medical education on students' knowledge acquisition, clinical performance and perceived preparedness for practice: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerdijk, Wouter; Snoek, Jos W; van Hell, Elisabeth A; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2013-05-27

    Little is known about the gains and losses associated with the implementation of undergraduate competency-based medical education. Therefore, we compared knowledge acquisition, clinical performance and perceived preparedness for practice of students from a competency-based active learning (CBAL) curriculum and a prior active learning (AL) curriculum. We included two cohorts of both the AL curriculum (n=453) and the CBAL curriculum (n=372). Knowledge acquisition was determined by benchmarking each cohort on 24 interuniversity progress tests against parallel cohorts of two other medical schools. Differences in knowledge acquisition were determined comparing the number of times CBAL and AL cohorts scored significantly higher or lower on progress tests. Clinical performance was operationalized as students' mean clerkship grade. Perceived preparedness for practice was assessed using a survey. The CBAL cohorts demonstrated relatively lower knowledge acquisition than the AL cohorts during the first study years, but not at the end of their studies. We found no significant differences in clinical performance. Concerning perceived preparedness for practice we found no significant differences except that students from the CBAL curriculum felt better prepared for 'putting a patient problem in a broad context of political, sociological, cultural and economic factors' than students from the AL curriculum. Our data do not support the assumption that competency-based education results in graduates who are better prepared for medical practice. More research is needed before we can draw generalizable conclusions on the potential of undergraduate competency-based medical education.

  8. A content validity approach to creating an end-user computer skill assessment tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Gibbs

    Full Text Available Practical assessment instruments are commonly used in the workplace and educational environments to assess a person\\'s level of digital literacy and end-user computer skill. However, it is often difficult to find statistical evidence of the actual validity of instruments being used. To ensure that the correct factors are being assessed for a particular purpose it is necessary to undertake some type of psychometric testing, and the first step is to study the content relevance of the measure. The purpose of this paper is to report on the rigorous judgment-quantification process using panels of experts in order to establish inter-rater reliability and agreement in the development of end-user instruments developed to measure workplace skills using spreadsheet and word-processing applications.

  9. Types of Feedback in Competency-Based Predoctoral Orthodontics: Effects on Students' Attitudes and Confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipp, Mitchell J; Cho, Kiyoung; Kim, Han Suk

    2017-05-01

    Feedback can exert a powerful influence on learning and achievement although its effect varies. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of three types of feedback on dental students' attitudes and confidence in a competency-based course in predoctoral orthodontics at New York University College of Dentistry. In 2013-14, all 253 third-year students in a course using test-enhanced instructional methods received written feedback on formative assessments. The type of feedback varied across three groups: pass/fail grades (PF) N=77, emoticons (EM) N=90, or written comments (WC) N=86. At the end of the course, students completed surveys that included four statements addressing their attitudes toward course instruction and confidence in their abilities. The survey response rate ranged from 75% to 100% among groups. The lowest response rate (75%) was in the PF group. In attitudes toward course instruction and confidence in their abilities, the WC group trended to more positive responses than the other groups, while the PF group trended to negative responses. On two of the four statements, the trend for the WC group was significant (95% CI). In both statements concerning attitudes toward instruction, the PF group trended to negative responses that were significant (95% CI). These results support the effectiveness of descriptive written comments over pass/fail grades or emoticons in improving dental students' confidence in their abilities and their attitudes toward instruction.

  10. Competency based clinical shoulder examination training improves physical exam, confidence, and knowledge in common shoulder conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hose, Michal Kalli; Fontanesi, John; Woytowitz, Manjulika; Jarrin, Diego; Quan, Anna

    2017-11-01

    Deficiencies in musculoskeletal knowledge are reported at every stage of learning. Medical programs are looking for effective ways to incorporate competency-based training into musculoskeletal education. To evaluate the impact of bedside feedback on learner's shoulder examination skills, confidence, and knowledge of common shoulder conditions. Four-week musculoskeletal clinic rotation. UCSD third year medical students and internal medicine residents. Learners completed three baseline evaluations: videotaped shoulder examination, attitude survey, and knowledge test. During the 4-week intervention learners received bedside observation and feedback from musculoskeletal experts while evaluating patients with shoulder conditions. Post-intervention learners repeated the three assessments. Eighty-nine learners participated. In the primary outcome measure evaluating the pre/post videotaped shoulder examination, significant improvement was seen in 21 of 23 shoulder examination maneuvers. Secondary outcomes include changes in learner confidence and knowledge. Greatest gains in learner confidence were seen in performing the shoulder examination (61.5% improvement) and performing injections (97.1% improvement). Knowledge improved significantly in all categories including anatomy/examination interpretation, diagnosis, and procedures. Direct observation and feedback during clinical evaluation of patients with shoulder pain improves shoulder examination competency, provider confidence, and knowledge of common shoulder conditions.

  11. Context-Based Assessment: Creating Opportunities for Resonance between Classroom Fields and Societal Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellocchi, Alberto; King, Donna T.; Ritchie, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    There is on-going international interest in the relationships between assessment instruments, students' understanding of science concepts and context-based curriculum approaches. This study extends earlier research showing that students can develop connections between contexts and concepts--called "fluid transitions"--when studying…

  12. Methods and Strategies for Creating a Culture of Collections Assessment at Comprehensive Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Heath; Robles-Smith, Kimberley; Garrison, Julie; Way, Doug

    2009-01-01

    Differing from those of their liberal arts and Association of Research Libraries counterparts, today's comprehensive universities face a variety of unique challenges and opportunities when it comes to assessing their collections. This article looks at the different needs and interests of comprehensive universities and focuses on the challenges…

  13. Assessing Creativity: Creating a Rubric to Effectively Evaluate Mediated Digital Portfolios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffrey S.

    2017-01-01

    Objectively assessing student creative work in the fields associated with mass media can be problematic. Communicating expectations to students, as well as providing them with a clear yet flexible rubric for evaluation of copywriting, newswriting, audio production, video production, and web-design, requires examination of the relevant student…

  14. Designing Their Own: Increasing Urban High School Teacher Capacity for Creating Interim Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ado, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    This case study analyzes and documents factors that affect teacher learning and instructional practices in connection to the design your own (DYO) interim or periodic assessment process at one newly developed high school in New York City. Examining these factors through Riggan and Nabors Olah's (2011) conceptual framework offers insights into the…

  15. Creating Trauma-Informed Child Welfare Systems Using a Community Assessment Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Alison; Conradi, Lisa; Wilson, Charles

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a community assessment process designed to evaluate a specific child welfare jurisdiction based on the current definition of trauma-informed child welfare and its essential elements. This process has recently been developed and pilot tested within three diverse child welfare systems in the United States. The purpose of the…

  16. Woodworking: Arizona HSST/CDA Competency Based Training Module #30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannen, Nina

    Two purposes of this Child Development Associate (CDA) module are to teach CDA interns the value of woodworking activities in the preschool center and to provide them with information about the needed equipment, materials and supplies. Objectives are stipulated, intern activities for each objective are suggested, and an assessment checklist is…

  17. Creating a spatial multi-criteria decision support system for energy related integrated environmental impact assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanderer, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.wanderer@dlr.de; Herle, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.herle@rwth-aachen.de

    2015-04-15

    By their spatially very distributed nature, profitability and impacts of renewable energy resources are highly correlated with the geographic locations of power plant deployments. A web-based Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS) based on a Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) approach has been implemented for identifying preferable locations for solar power plants based on user preferences. The designated areas found serve for the input scenario development for a subsequent integrated Environmental Impact Assessment. The capabilities of the SDSS service get showcased for Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants in the region of Andalusia, Spain. The resulting spatial patterns of possible power plant sites are an important input to the procedural chain of assessing impacts of renewable energies in an integrated effort. The applied methodology and the implemented SDSS are applicable for other renewable technologies as well. - Highlights: • The proposed tool facilitates well-founded CSP plant siting decisions. • Spatial MCDA methods are implemented in a WebGIS environment. • GIS-based SDSS can contribute to a modern integrated impact assessment workflow. • The conducted case study proves the suitability of the methodology.

  18. A Simulation Screening Mammography Module Created for Instruction and Assessment: Radiology Residents vs National Benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poot, Jeffrey D; Chetlen, Alison L

    2016-11-01

    To improve mammographic screening training and breast cancer detection, radiology residents participated in a simulation screening mammography module in which they interpreted an enriched set of screening mammograms with known outcomes. This pilot research study evaluates the effectiveness of the simulation module while tracking the progress, efficiency, and accuracy of radiology resident interpretations and also compares their performance against national benchmarks. A simulation module was created with 266 digital screening mammograms enriched with high-risk breast lesions (seven cases) and breast malignancies (65 cases). Over a period of 27 months, 39 radiology residents participated in the simulation screening mammography module. Resident sensitivity and specificity were compared to Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC data through 2009) national benchmark and American College of Radiology (ACR) Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) acceptable screening mammography audit ranges. The sensitivity, the percentage of cancers with an abnormal initial interpretation (BI-RADS 0), among residents was 84.5%, similar to the BCSC benchmark sensitivity of 84.9% (sensitivity for tissue diagnosis of cancer within 1 year following the initial examination) and within the acceptable ACR BI-RADS medical audit range of ≥75%. The specificity, the percentage of noncancers that had a negative image interpretation (BI-RADS 1 or 2), among residents was 83.2% compared to 90.3% reported in the BCSC benchmark data, but lower than the suggested ACR BI-RADS range of 88%-95%. Using simulation modules for interpretation of screening mammograms is a promising method for training radiology residents to detect breast cancer and to help them achieve competence toward national benchmarks. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Competency-based preparedness training for public health practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horney, Jennifer A; Sollecito, William; Alexander, Lorraine K

    2005-11-01

    The bioterrorism preparedness training needs of the public health workforce have been described in several studies, assessments, and surveys. To meet these needs, the North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness (NCCPHP) and the Public Health Leadership Program (PHLP) at the University of North Carolina School of Public Health developed a new distance learning course, Introduction to Public Health Preparedness for Disasters and Emergencies. After a review of assessment data to identify training needs, we conducted a literature review of methodology and concluded that a distance learning course would be the best approach. The course curriculum is based on the Bioterrorism and Emergency Readiness Competencies for All Public Health Workers. This paper describes the course development process and methods used to make this course an effective training tool.

  20. Evaluation of clinical teaching quality in competency-based residency training in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaižgėlienė, Eglė; Padaiga, Žilvinas; Rastenytė, Daiva; Tamelis, Algimantas; Petrikonis, Kęstutis; Fluit, Cornelia

    2017-09-07

    In 2013, all residency programs at the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences were renewed into the competency-based medical education curriculum (CBME). In 2015, we implemented the validated EFFECT questionnaire together with the EFFECT-System for quality assessment of clinical teaching in residency training. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of characteristics of the resident (year of training) and clinical teacher (gender, age, and type of academic position) on teaching quality, as well as to assess areas for teaching quality improvement. Residents from 7 different residency study programs filled out 333 EFFECT questionnaires evaluating 146 clinical teachers. We received 143 self-evaluations of clinical teachers using the same questionnaire. Items were scored on a 6-point Likert scale. Main outcome measures were residents' mean overall (MOS), mean subdomain (MSS) and clinical teachers' self-evaluation scores. The overall comparisons of MOS and MSS across study groups and subgroups were done using Student's t test and ANOVA for trend. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated in order to see how residents' evaluations match with self-evaluations for every particular teacher. To indicate areas for quality improvement items were analyzed subtracting their mean score from the respective (sub)domain score. MOS for domains of "role modeling", "task allocation", "feedback", "teaching methodology" and "assessment" valued by residents were significantly higher than those valued by teachers (Pevaluation questionnaires were rated significantly higher by residents in role modeling subdomains (Phigher than the female teachers (Phigher (Pevaluations of clinical teachers are influenced by teachers' age, gender, year of residency training, type of teachers' academic position and whether or not a clinical teacher performed self-evaluation. Development of CBME should be focused on the continuous evaluation of quality, clinical teachers

  1. Assessments of ecosystem services and human well-being in Thailand build and create demand for coproductive capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Lebel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Assessments of ecosystem services have been proposed as one way of incorporating concerns about environmental change and ecosystem conditions into subnational development planning. In Thailand a policy window for such initiatives is opening because of a transition in national policy toward area-based planning combined with broader political reforms to expand public participation and encourage more evidence-based decision making. We explored three case studies in Thailand in which central and local government agencies and research organizations partnered to engage local communities and other stakeholders in assessments of ecosystem services and human well-being. The analysis focused on the role ecosystem assessments play in building and creating demand for coproductive capacity. By coproductive capacities we mean the ability to combine scientific resources and governance capabilities in ways that bring about informed social change. We found evidence that the assessments built capacities for governance actors to explore scientific and research-based evidence, to consult scientific experts, and then to evaluate existing policies and plans using this newly acquired information. At the same time, scientific experts also learned to explore public policy issues, to consult planners and decision makers in government, and based on this knowledge to evaluate scientific evidence and revise the scope and goals of their research and analytical activities to better meet policy needs and demands. Coproductive capacities were built when various stakeholders jointly engaged in compilation and interpretation of evidence. Doing so helped legitimize the assessment process with positive feedback on both governance and science capacities. We also found evidence, however, of significant cultural and institutional constraints to designing and making better use of ecosystem services assessments. These constraints included insufficient resources for both knowledge making

  2. Competence-based approach and the future sociohumanitarian education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryzgalina Elena Vladimirovna

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The article traces the relationship between the understanding of the purposes of higher education and assessment of educational outcomes. Inclination of our country to the continental variant of understanding of the educational goals, when the main contracting authority is the state, leads to the existence of standards as an expression of the conventional expectations of society in relation to the formation of a certain level and profile. Borrowing competence model of standards related to the adoption of pragmatic approach to education in Russia as a way to increment of human capital.

  3. A competency-based performance appraisal for nurse leaders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Kvas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An employee performance appraisal is used internationally to improve employee performance, productivity, efficiency and effectiveness in nursing care. The purpose of the study was to assess the performance and efficiency of nurse leaders at all levels of leadership, identify deficient areas for each individual leader and propose improvements. Methods: Two surveys were conducted in 15 Slovenian public hospitals. The sample from the first survey included 1311 nurses who assessed the level of competencies of their immediate superiors. The sample from the second survey included 236 nurse leaders. Data envelopment analysis is used in this study to develop a model of practice outputs and inputs to help identify the most efficient nurse leaders. Results: Significant differences exist in the performance appraisal among the leaders in nursing. A total of 203 (86 % nurse leaders are defined as inefficient and could improve their leadership performance. On average, inefficient leaders could improve their behaviour most in the areas of generic leadership competencies (by 51.7 % and interprofessional relationships (by 47.7 %. Discussion and conclusion: The areas with the worst performance are generic leadership competencies and interprofessional relationships where also the most significant improvements are possible. Nurse leaders and hospital managers can use the analysis results to determine in which areas the leaders in their organisation should improve the levels of their competencies.

  4. Assessing the need for a medical interpreter: are all questions created equal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okrainec, Karen; Miller, Mark; Holcroft, Christina; Boivin, Jean-François; Greenaway, Christina

    2014-08-01

    Language preference is currently being used in clinical practice to determine whether an interpreter is needed. The concordance of ability to communicate and language proficiency with each other and to language preference was measured with kappa agreement scores, sensitivity and specificity among 1,000 patients surveyed in Montreal, Canada. Though concordance between language preference and language proficiency or ability to communicate was moderate, both variables had low sensitivity (69 and 55 % respectively). A total of 25 % of persons with limited language proficiency and 15 % of those with limited ability to communicate were not identified to have a language preference for their mother tongue. Also, 31 and 45 % of those who preferred to be served in their mother tongue had good language proficiency and good ability to communicate. When assessing a patients' need for an interpreter, language preference is insufficient as a stand-alone question.

  5. Creating community, assessing need: preparing for a community physical activity intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, Diane E; Haley, Philip P

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes the preliminary steps needed to begin a community physical activity intervention in a rural context, including forming a community coalition and assessing values, beliefs, and knowledge about physical activity. A random mail survey (N = 171) indicated relatively high activity rates, and perceived barriers consistent with the literature (time, program convenience, safety issues). Perceived benefits included improving/sustaining health and looking better/improving appearance. Five focus groups added additional barriers (e.g., physical isolation, lack of transportation). Residents were unaware of many existing services and indicated a desire for more walking trails, health-related activities, and low-cost exercise facilities. The discussion focuses on the importance of establishing a community coalition and implications for future program development and research.

  6. Competency-based medical education: An overview and application in pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nilima; Desai, Chetna; Jorwekar, Gokul; Badyal, Dinesh; Singh, Tejinder

    2016-10-01

    Competency-based medical education (CBME) is gaining momentum across the globe. The Medical Council of India has described the basic competencies required of an Indian Medical Graduate and designed a competency-based module on attitudes and communication. Widespread adoption of a competency-based approach would mean a paradigm shift in the current approach to medical education. CBME, hence, needs to be reviewed for its usefulness and limitations in the Indian context. This article describes the rationale of CBME and provides an overview of its components, i.e., competency, entrustable professional activity, and milestones. It elaborates how CBME could be implemented in an institute, in the context of basic sciences in general and pharmacology in particular. The promises and perils of CBME that need to be kept in mind to maximize its gains are described.

  7. Content Validity for a Child Care Self-assessment Tool: Creating Healthy Eating Environments Scale (CHEERS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafave, Lynne; Tyminski, Sheila; Riege, Theresa; Hoy, Diane; Dexter, Bria

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop and content validate both a formative and summative self-assessment scale designed to measure the nutrition and physical activity environment in community-based child care programs. The study followed a mixed-method modified Ebel procedure. An expert group with qualifications in nutrition, physical activity, and child care were recruited for content validation. The survey was subjected to expert review through digital communication followed by a face-to-face validation meeting. To establish consensus for content validity beyond the standard error of proportion (P validity index (CVI) required was ≥0.78. Of the initial 64 items, 44 scored an acceptable CVI for inclusion. The remaining items were discussed, missing concepts identified, and a final CVI employed to determine inclusion. The final tool included 62 items with 5 subscales: food served, healthy eating program planning, healthy eating environment, physical activity environment, and healthy body image environment. Content validation is an integral step in scale development that is often overlooked or poorly carried out. Initial content validity of this scale has been established and will be of value to researchers and practitioners interested in conducting healthy eating interventions in child care.

  8. A modified Delphi method to create a scoring system for assessing team performance during maternal cardiopulmonary arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banayan, Jennifer; Blood, Angela; Park, Yoon Soo; Shahul, Sajid; Scavone, Barbara M

    2015-01-01

    Maternal cardiopulmonary arrest is a rare but often fatal emergency. The authors used a modified Delphi method to create a checklist of tasks for practitioners. Within each round, experts ranked tasks on a scale from zero through five. Consensus was defined a priori as 80% exact agreement. Three rounds were required to achieve consensus resulting in a checklist of 45 tasks. Round One results revealed five tasks, Round Two included 25 tasks, and Round Three resulted in 29 tasks with 80% exact agreement. The modified Delphi method resulted in a weighted scoring system that can be used to objectively assess team performance.

  9. Creating rigidly stabilized fractures for assessing intramembranous ossification, distraction osteogenesis, or healing of critical sized defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan-yiu; Bahney, Chelsea; Hu, Diane; Marcucio, Ralph S; Miclau, Theodore

    2012-04-11

    Assessing modes of skeletal repair is essential for developing therapies to be used clinically to treat fractures. Mechanical stability plays a large role in healing of bone injuries. In the worst-case scenario mechanical instability can lead to delayed or non-union in humans. However, motion can also stimulate the healing process. In fractures that have motion cartilage forms to stabilize the fracture bone ends, and this cartilage is gradually replaced by bone through recapitulation of the developmental process of endochondral ossification. In contrast, if a bone fracture is rigidly stabilized bone forms directly via intramembranous ossification. Clinically, both endochondral and intramembranous ossification occur simultaneously. To effectively replicate this process investigators insert a pin into the medullary canal of the fractured bone as described by Bonnarens. This experimental method provides excellent lateral stability while allowing rotational instability to persist. However, our understanding of the mechanisms that regulate these two distinct processes can also be enhanced by experimentally isolating each of these processes. We have developed a stabilization protocol that provides rotational and lateral stabilization. In this model, intramembranous ossification is the only mode of healing that is observed, and healing parameters can be compared among different strains of genetically modified mice, after application of bioactive molecules, after altering physiological parameters of healing, after modifying the amount or time of stabilization, after distraction osteogenesis, after creation of a non-union, or after creation of a critical sized defect. Here, we illustrate how to apply the modified Ilizarov fixators for studying tibial fracture healing and distraction osteogenesis in mice.

  10. Creating a Global Building Inventory for Earthquake Loss Assessment and Risk Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Kishor; Wald, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Earthquakes have claimed approximately 8 million lives over the last 2,000 years (Dunbar, Lockridge and others, 1992) and fatality rates are likely to continue to rise with increased population and urbanizations of global settlements especially in developing countries. More than 75% of earthquake-related human casualties are caused by the collapse of buildings or structures (Coburn and Spence, 2002). It is disheartening to note that large fractions of the world's population still reside in informal, poorly-constructed & non-engineered dwellings which have high susceptibility to collapse during earthquakes. Moreover, with increasing urbanization half of world's population now lives in urban areas (United Nations, 2001), and half of these urban centers are located in earthquake-prone regions (Bilham, 2004). The poor performance of most building stocks during earthquakes remains a primary societal concern. However, despite this dark history and bleaker future trends, there are no comprehensive global building inventories of sufficient quality and coverage to adequately address and characterize future earthquake losses. Such an inventory is vital both for earthquake loss mitigation and for earthquake disaster response purposes. While the latter purpose is the motivation of this work, we hope that the global building inventory database described herein will find widespread use for other mitigation efforts as well. For a real-time earthquake impact alert system, such as U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER), (Wald, Earle and others, 2006), we seek to rapidly evaluate potential casualties associated with earthquake ground shaking for any region of the world. The casualty estimation is based primarily on (1) rapid estimation of the ground shaking hazard, (2) aggregating the population exposure within different building types, and (3) estimating the casualties from the collapse of vulnerable buildings. Thus, the

  11. Welding. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Terry

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  12. Competence-Based Blended Learning in Building Automation: Towards a EU Curriculum in "Domotica"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommaruga, L.; De Angelis, E.

    2007-01-01

    A competence-based approach was applied to a blended learning on line distance training in the Euroinno EU project aimed at vocational training in building automation. The current paper describes the experience gathered during the learning process and the definition of the curriculum. A number of issues emerged during the sessions concerning…

  13. An Integrated Competency-Based Approach to Management Education: An Italian MBA Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camuffo, Arnaldo; Gerli, Fabrizio

    2004-01-01

    Several studies have analysed the impact of competency-based methodologies on human resource management, with special emphasis on their applications to management education and development. As concerns management education, however, these studies have usually focused on one or few separate aspects, never proposing a consistent application of…

  14. Can Competency-Based Training Fly?: An Overview of Key Issues for "Ab Initio" Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Peter; Hay, Stephen; Mavin, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Competency-based training (CBT) for pilots was formally introduced in 1999 by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) for training leading to the issue of aeroplane private and commercial pilot licences. This initiative followed the Australian government's introduction of CBT policy for vocational and workplace training in the late 1980's.…

  15. Evaluation Criteria for Competency-Based Syllabi: A Chilean Case Study Applying Mixed Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerez, Oscar; Valenzuela, Leslier; Pizarro, Veronica; Hasbun, Beatriz; Valenzuela, Gabriela; Orsini, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, higher education institutions worldwide have been moving from knowledge-based to competence-based curricula. One of the greatest challenges in this transition is the difficulty in changing the knowledge-oriented practices of teachers. This study evaluates the consistency between syllabus design and the requirements imposed by a…

  16. Cogenerating a Competency-based HRM Degree: A Model and Some Lessons from Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Kevin C.; Elden, Max

    2001-01-01

    A competency-based degree program in human resource management was co-generated by six groups of stakeholders who synthesized competency models using group decision support software. The program focuses on core human resource processes, general business management, strategic decision making and problem solving, change management, and personal…

  17. Competence Based Management Development Provision to SMEs and the Providers' Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alison; Whittaker, John; Clark, John Loan; Boocock, Graham

    1999-01-01

    A British study of 29 providers of competency-based management training to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and a survey of 591 SMEs revealed that the value of National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs) was unclear to both groups. Providers felt NVQs lacked relevance to SMEs and were time consuming. Some SMEs participated only because…

  18. Competency-Based Training: Objective Structured Clinical Exercises (OSCE) in Marriage and Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John K.

    2010-01-01

    The field of marriage and family therapy (MFT) has recently engaged in the process of defining core competencies for the profession. Many MFT training programs are adapting their curriculum to develop more competency-based training strategies. The Objective Structured Clinical "Examination" (OSCE) is widely used in the medical profession to assess…

  19. Competency Based Education Curriculum for the Orientation and Safety Program of the Oil and Gas Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Career Center, Clarksburg, WV.

    This competency-based education curriculum for teaching the orientation and safety program for the oil and gas industry in West Virginia is organized into seven units. These units cover the following topics: introduction to oil and gas, first aid, site preparation, drilling operations, equipment familiarity, well completion, and preparation for…

  20. Task Listing for Piano Technology for the Visually Impaired. Competency-Based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia State Dept. of Education, Richmond. Div. of Vocational and Adult Education.

    This task listing was developed for use in Piano Technology, a course offered to visually impaired students at the Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind. The listing is intended to be used with the "Trade and Industrial Education Service Area Resource Guide" in the implementation of competency-based education for this population. The…

  1. Competency-Based Common-Core Curriculum for Criminal Justice Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona State Board of Directors for Junior Colleges, Phoenix.

    This publication presents the competency-based, common-core criminal justice curriculum developed to respond to a need for a curriculum recognized by Arizona criminal justice agencies, community colleges, and universities. It contains the five courses of the core curriculum--Introduction to Criminal Justice, Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, Rules…

  2. The Effect of Competency-Based Dental Education on Postdoctoral General Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Spencer W.

    1994-01-01

    If competency-based dental education is implemented in the United States, it will have a significant impact on postdoctoral general dentistry, particularly in the areas of accreditation standards and the specificity of competencies required. Development of a core of standards for all postdoctoral programs is recommended. (MSE)

  3. A Competency-Based Technical Training Model That Embraces Learning Flexibility and Rewards Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasinski, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Today's adult learners are continuously searching for successful programs with added learner flexibility, a positive learning experience, and the best education for their investment. Red Deer College's unique competency based welder apprenticeship training model fulfills this desire for many adult learners.

  4. A CBC Primer. Report of a Conference: Competency-Based Curricula in General Undergraduate Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, William R., Jr.; Moomaw, W. Edmund

    This booklet represents a summary of a regional conference and is designed to serve as an introductory discussion of the use of the competency based education concept in general undergraduate programs. Emphasis is placed on essential conditions of competency, current factors affecting higher education, the scope and variety in competency-based…

  5. A Competence-Based Course Authoring Concept for Learning Platforms with Legacy Assignment Tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Then, Matthias; Wallenborn, Benjamin; Ianniello, Birgit; Vu, Duc; Swoboda, Tobias; Fuchs, Michael; Hemmje, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with several of the most important aspects of Competence-Based Learning (CBL): course authoring, assignments, and categorization of learning content. The latter is part of the so-called Bologna Process (BP) and can effectively be supported by integrating knowledge resources

  6. Design science research approach a way for implementing competence based internships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Josephine Lappia; Wouter van Rennes

    2006-01-01

    Since 2000, all Dutch Universities of Professional Education are confronted with three major renewals. The first was the European agreement to implement the Bachelor-Master system in Higher Education. The second was the strong tendence to renew eduction towards Competence Based Education. The third

  7. The University of Toledo Competency-Based Teacher Education and Individually Guided Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, George E.

    The cooperative program for competency-based teacher education (CBTE) and individually guided education (IGE) operating in the Toledo, Ohio, area is described. Planning, development, design, and redesign processes of the program (which involves the University of Toledo, and public and private schools in the district) are surveyed. Nineteen forces…

  8. A Competency Based Instructional Program for Teachers of Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Erin Kent; And Others

    Described is a 9-week, summer, competency-based, instructional program for teachers of deaf blind children. Information provided includes the background and rationale for the program, a list of administrative and instructional staff members, program goals, and a sample scheduling sequence. Goals, session topics, texts and materials, session…

  9. The Management Development Program: A Competency-Based Model for Preparing Hospitality Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Judi; Chung, Beth G.

    2001-01-01

    The master of management program at Cornell University focused on competency-based development of skills for the hospitality industry through core courses, minicourses, skill benchmarking, and continuous improvement. Benefits include a shift in the teacher role to advocate/coach, increased information sharing, student satisfaction, and clear…

  10. Implementation of innovations in higher education : the case of competency-based training in Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boahin, Peter; Hofman, W. H. Adriaan

    2012-01-01

    A notable trend in recent years has been the introduction of competency-based training (CBT) in vocational education and training systems in many countries. Several CBT training programmes in Ghana have been accredited and quality assured. This article explores the perception of both students and

  11. Competence-Based, Research-Related Lab Courses for Materials Modeling: The Case of Organic Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellhammer, Karl Sebastian; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2017-01-01

    We are hereby presenting a didactic concept for an advanced lab course that focuses on the design of donor materials for organic solar cells. Its research-related and competence-based approach qualifies the students to independently and creatively apply computational methods and to profoundly and critically discuss the results obtained. The high…

  12. Competence based learning for an on-line course on flood modelling for management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popescu, Ioanna; Jonoski, Andreja; Keuls, Carel

    2009-01-01

    Popescu, I., Jonoski, A., & Keuls, C. (2009). Competence based learning for an on-line course on flood modelling for management. Proceedings of the 33rd International Association of Hydraulic Engineering & Research (IAHR Congress). August, 9-14, 2009, Vancouver, Canada: TENCompetence.

  13. OpenScout: Competence based management education with community-improved open educational resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco; Specht, Marcus; Nadolski, Rob; Bastiaens, Yves; Leirs, Nele; Pawlowski, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Kalz, M., Specht, M., Nadolski, R., Bastiaens, Y., Leirs, N., & Pawlowski, J. (2010). OpenScout: Competence based management education with community-improved open educational resources. In Halley et al. (Eds.), Proceedings of the 17th EDINEB Conference. Crossing Borders in Education and work-based

  14. Developing a Competency-Based Pan-European Accreditation Framework for Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battel-Kirk, Barbara; Van der Zanden, Gerard; Schipperen, Marielle; Contu, Paolo; Gallardo, Carmen; Martinez, Ana; Garcia de Sola, Silvia; Sotgiu, Alessandra; Zaagsma, Miriam; Barry, Margaret M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The CompHP Pan-European Accreditation Framework for Health Promotion was developed as part of the CompHP Project that aimed to develop competency-based standards and an accreditation system for health promotion practice, education, and training in Europe. Method: A phased, multiple-method approach was employed to facilitate consensus…

  15. An Analysis of the Competency-Based Secondary Mathematics Curriculum in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egodawatte, Gunawardena

    2014-01-01

    In education, there is a growing interest in the concept of "competency" especially in vocational training and professional development. The concept is strongly associated with the ability to apply knowledge and skills in effective ways in unanticipated situations. In Sri Lanka, a new competency-based mathematics curriculum was…

  16. A competence-based and multi-dimensional operationalization and measurement of employability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijde, C.M.; van der Heijden, B.I.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Employability is a critical requirement for enabling both sustained competitive advantage at the firm level and career success at the individual level. We propose a competence-based approach to employability derived from an expansion of the resource-based view of the firm. In this contribution, we

  17. Nevada Competency-Based Adult High School Diploma Project. Student Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevada Univ., Las Vegas. Coll. of Education.

    Developed by the Nevada Competency-Based Adult High School Diploma (CBAHSD) project, this student handbook accompanies a teacher's guide and ten curriculum guides which cover the following subjects: consumer education; environmental education; health; language arts; citizenship; American Government; United States History; mathematics; earth and…

  18. Nevada Competency-Based Adult High School Diploma Project. Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Melinda K.

    Developed by the Nevada Competency-Based Adult High School Diploma (CBAHSD) Project, this teacher's guide accompanies a student handbook and ten curriculum guides which cover the following subjects: consumer education; environmental education; health; language arts; citizenship; American Government; United States History; mathematics; earth and…

  19. The Domain Five Observation Instrument: A Competency-Based Coach Evaluation Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangraw, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    The Domain Five Observation Instrument (DFOI) is a competency-based observation instrument recommended for sport leaders or researchers who wish to evaluate coaches' instructional behaviors. The DFOI includes 10 behavior categories and four timed categories that encompass 34 observable instructional benchmarks outlined in domain five of the…

  20. An Old Chestnut Revisited: Teachers' Opinions and Attitudes toward Grading within a Competency Based Training Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, James

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore teachers' opinions with regard to the value and process of grading within a competency based training (CBT) framework, following the introduction of a formalised grading system at a specialist Technical and Further Education centre for hospitality and tourism training The data were gathered using a 16-item…

  1. Toward A Competency-Based Teacher Education Program in Foreign Languages at SUNY/Buffalo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Anthony

    SUNY/Buffalo's competency-based teacher education program in foreign languages emphasizes: (1) a field-centered program, (2) a multi-institutional pattern of organizations, (3) feedback to students regarding their progress, (4) preservice/inservice continuum. The competencies required of foreign language teachers include: a practical command of…

  2. Rational and Challenges of Competency-Based Education and Training: The "Wickedness" of the Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyugi, Jacob L.

    2015-01-01

    Our students will continue to be confronted with many environment and sustainability issues during their lifetimes because they are unpredictable, serious and complex by nature. These issues challenge not just our technologies but our universities and educational institutions, values and way of living and interaction. Competency-based education…

  3. How to Develop PACs. Performance and Competency-based Student Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Bill, Comp.

    This booklet is designed for developing performance and competency-based student materials (PACs). The PAC, an instructional tool that focuses on helping students master a specific objective, lends itself to vocational instruction. The first nine sections of the guide, consisting of information to assist teachers in gathering background materials…

  4. A Disciplinary Perspective of Competency-Based Training on the Acquisition of Employability Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boahin, Peter; Hofman, Adriaan

    2013-01-01

    In the changing global economy, employability skills increasingly are the focus of vocational education and training institutions. This paper explores the effect of academic disciplines, students' background characteristics and industry training on the acquisition of employability skills through competency-based training. A significant…

  5. A competence-based and multidimensional operationalization and measurement of employability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijde, C.M.; van der Heijden, Beatrice

    2006-01-01

    Employability is a critical requirement for enabling both sustained competitive advantage at the firm level and career success at the individual level. We propose a competence-based approach to employability derived from an expansion of the resource-based view of the firm. In this contribution, we

  6. The relation between characteristics of learning environments and students' knowledge development in competence-based education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr P.J. Teune; prof dr Douwe Beijaard; Dr. M. Koopman

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the development of student knowledge in Pre-Vocational Secondary Education schools which differ in the manner and extent to which they have implemented characteristics of competence-based education. The implementation of these characteristics was

  7. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olopade FE

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Funmilayo Eniola Olopade,1 Oluwatosin Adekunle Adaramoye,2 Yinusa Raji,3 Abiodun Olubayo Fasola,4 Emiola Oluwabunmi Olapade-Olaopa5 1Department of Anatomy, 2Department of Biochemistry, 3Department of Physiology, 4Department of Oral Pathology, 5Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria Abstract: The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the “old” curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula

  8. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olopade, Funmilayo Eniola; Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Raji, Yinusa; Fasola, Abiodun Olubayo; Olapade-Olaopa, Emiola Oluwabunmi

    2016-01-01

    The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the "old" curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula successfully. The modifications to the teaching and assessment of the core basic medical science subjects have resulted in improved learning and performance at the final examinations.

  9. Development of a competency-based formative progress test with student-generated MCQs: Results from a multi-centre pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Stefan; Möltner, Andreas; Tımbıl, Sevgi; Gornostayeva, Maryna; Schultz, Jobst-Hendrik; Brüstle, Peter; Mohr, Daniela; Vander Beken, Anna; Better, Julian; Fries, Martin; Gottschalk, Marc; Günther, Janine; Herrmann, Laura; Kreisel, Christian; Moczko, Tobias; Illg, Claudius; Jassowicz, Adam; Müller, Andreas; Niesert, Moritz; Strübing, Felix; Jünger, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Progress tests provide students feedback on their level of proficiency over the course of their medical studies. Peer-assisted learning and competency-based education have become increasingly important in medical education. Although progress tests have been proven to be useful as a longitudinal feedback instrument, there are currently no progress tests that have been created in cooperation with students or that focus on competency in medical education. In this study, we investigated the extent to which students can be included in the development of a progress test and demonstrated that aspects of knowledge related to competency can be represented on a competency-based progress test. Methods: A two-dimensional blueprint for 144 multiple-choice questions (MCQs) covering groups of medical subjects and groups of competency areas was generated by three expert groups for developing the competency-based progress test. A total of 31 students from seven medical schools in Germany actively participated in this exercise. After completing an intensive and comprehensive training programme, the students generated and reviewed the test questions for the competency-based progress test using a separate platform of the ItemManagementSystem (IMS). This test was administered as a formative test to 469 students in a pilot study in November 2013 at eight medical schools in Germany. The scores were analysed for the overall test and differentiated according to the subject groups and competency areas. Results: A pool of more than 200 MCQs was compiled by the students for pilot use, of which 118 student-generated MCQs were used in the progress test. University instructors supplemented this pool with 26 MCQs, which primarily addressed the area of scientific skills. The post-review showed that student-generated MCQs were of high quality with regard to test statistic criteria and content. Overall, the progress test displayed a very high reliability. When the academic years were

  10. Development of a competency-based formative progress test with student-generated MCQs: Results from a multi-centre pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagener, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Progress tests provide students feedback on their level of proficiency over the course of their medical studies. Peer-assisted learning and competency-based education have become increasingly important in medical education. Although progress tests have been proven to be useful as a longitudinal feedback instrument, there are currently no progress tests that have been created in cooperation with students or that focus on competency in medical education.In this study, we investigated the extent to which students can be included in the development of a progress test and demonstrated that aspects of knowledge related to competency can be represented on a competency-based progress test.Methods: A two-dimensional blueprint for 144 multiple-choice questions (MCQs covering groups of medical subjects and groups of competency areas was generated by three expert groups for developing the competency-based progress test. A total of 31 students from seven medical schools in Germany actively participated in this exercise. After completing an intensive and comprehensive training programme, the students generated and reviewed the test questions for the competency-based progress test using a separate platform of the ItemManagementSystem (IMS. This test was administered as a formative test to 469 students in a pilot study in November 2013 at eight medical schools in Germany. The scores were analysed for the overall test and differentiated according to the subject groups and competency areas.Results: A pool of more than 200 MCQs was compiled by the students for pilot use, of which 118 student-generated MCQs were used in the progress test. University instructors supplemented this pool with 26 MCQs, which primarily addressed the area of scientific skills. The post-review showed that student-generated MCQs were of high quality with regard to test statistic criteria and content. Overall, the progress test displayed a very high reliability. When the

  11. The learner as co-creator: A new peer review and self-assessment feedback form created by student nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duers, Lorraine E

    2017-11-01

    Engagement with peer review and self-assessment is not always regarded by student nurses as an activity that results in a positive learning experience. Literature indicates that withdrawal from the learning process becomes attractive to individuals affected by a negative experience of peer review. Literature also provides examples of student nurses' feeling 'torn to shreds' during the process of peer review, resulting in loss of confidence and self-esteem. An influencing factor in such situations appears to be the absence of specific learner-driven criteria against which student nurses can assess peer and self-performance. The idea was thus ignited, that creation and utilisation of a learner-driven feedback form might potentially prevent, or at least minimise, the possibility of negative peer review experience. Set within the context of a pre-registration nursing programme, within a Higher Education institution, student nurses (n=25), created a peer review/self-assessment feedback form. Its potential cross-discipline, global applicability is reasonably speculated. Purposive sampling, followed by Stratified Random sampling, maximised participant variation. Data collection took place on 34 occasions, utilising focus group discussions using Nominal Group Technique, a practical task which was video recorded for mediating artefact purposes, and individual interviews. Analysis was concept and theme driven. The study found that participants desired a new feedback form that specifically asks the evaluator to judge human qualities, such as 'compassion' and 'kindness', in addition to the skills and knowledge criteria that any peer review or self-assessment form used currently had incorporated. Providing the participants with the opportunity to develop criteria, against which performance could be measured, with emphasis being afforded to student inclusivity and resultant shift in power balance from the educator to the learner, embraces the idea of teaching and learning in the

  12. The effect of implementing undergraduate competency-based medical education on students’ knowledge acquisition, clinical performance and perceived preparedness for practice: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about the gains and losses associated with the implementation of undergraduate competency-based medical education. Therefore, we compared knowledge acquisition, clinical performance and perceived preparedness for practice of students from a competency-based active learning (CBAL) curriculum and a prior active learning (AL) curriculum. Methods We included two cohorts of both the AL curriculum (n = 453) and the CBAL curriculum (n = 372). Knowledge acquisition was determined by benchmarking each cohort on 24 interuniversity progress tests against parallel cohorts of two other medical schools. Differences in knowledge acquisition were determined comparing the number of times CBAL and AL cohorts scored significantly higher or lower on progress tests. Clinical performance was operationalized as students’ mean clerkship grade. Perceived preparedness for practice was assessed using a survey. Results The CBAL cohorts demonstrated relatively lower knowledge acquisition than the AL cohorts during the first study years, but not at the end of their studies. We found no significant differences in clinical performance. Concerning perceived preparedness for practice we found no significant differences except that students from the CBAL curriculum felt better prepared for ‘putting a patient problem in a broad context of political, sociological, cultural and economic factors’ than students from the AL curriculum. Conclusions Our data do not support the assumption that competency-based education results in graduates who are better prepared for medical practice. More research is needed before we can draw generalizable conclusions on the potential of undergraduate competency-based medical education. PMID:23711403

  13. A competency based selection procedure for Dutch postgraduate GP training: a pilot study on validity and reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Margit I; Tromp, Fred; Zuithoff, Nicolaas P A; Pieters, Ron H M; Damoiseaux, Roger A M J; Kuyvenhoven, Marijke M

    2014-12-01

    Abstract Background: Historically, semi-structured interviews (SSI) have been the core of the Dutch selection for postgraduate general practice (GP) training. This paper describes a pilot study on a newly designed competency-based selection procedure that assesses whether candidates have the competencies that are required to complete GP training. The objective was to explore reliability and validity aspects of the instruments developed. The new selection procedure comprising the National GP Knowledge Test (LHK), a situational judgement tests (SJT), a patterned behaviour descriptive interview (PBDI) and a simulated encounter (SIM) was piloted alongside the current procedure. Forty-seven candidates volunteered in both procedures. Admission decision was based on the results of the current procedure. Study participants did hardly differ from the other candidates. The mean scores of the candidates on the LHK and SJT were 21.9 % (SD 8.7) and 83.8% (SD 3.1), respectively. The mean self-reported competency scores (PBDI) were higher than the observed competencies (SIM): 3.7(SD 0.5) and 2.9(SD 0.6), respectively. Content-related competencies showed low correlations with one another when measured with different instruments, whereas more diverse competencies measured by a single instrument showed strong to moderate correlations. Moreover, a moderate correlation between LHK and SJT was found. The internal consistencies (intraclass correlation, ICC) of LHK and SJT were poor while the ICC of PBDI and SIM showed acceptable levels of reliability. Findings on content validity and reliability of these new instruments are promising to realize a competency based procedure. Further development of the instruments and research on predictive validity should be pursued.

  14. Using a competency-based approach to patient education: achieving congruence among learning, teaching and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Whei Ming; Herron, Bobbi; Osisek, Paul J

    2011-09-01

    Millions of Americans are living with, and managing, their chronic health problems. Patient education plays an essential role in promoting safe self-management practice. To ensure that patients attain the required abilities, patient education needs to be competency-based. When developing and applying a competency-based patient education lesson/program, each nurse must answer questions concerning essential competencies, optimal teaching methods, best method to evaluate patient achievement, and documentation of evidence. This article describes how the authors used these questions as a guide to achieve congruence among intended learning, instruction, and evaluation to design and implement a patient education program, Managing Heart Failure, at a local hospital. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Competency-Based Objectives in Global Underserved Women's Health for Medical Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi Chiung Grace; Dougherty, Anne; Whetstone, Sara; Mama, Saifuddin T; Larkins-Pettigrew, Margaret; Raine, Susan P; Autry, Amy M

    2017-10-01

    The Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Committee on Global Health developed an inclusive definition of global women's health and competency-based objectives that reflected work internationally, as well as with U.S. vulnerable and underserved populations, such as refugee and immigrant populations or those who would otherwise have compromised access to health care. The knowledge, skill, and attitude-based competencies required to fulfill each learning objective were mapped to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Outcomes Project's educational domains and the Consortium of Universities for Global Health competency domains. The proposed global women's health definition and competency-based learning objective framework is a first step in ensuring quality standards for educating trainees to address global women's health needs. By proposing these objectives, we hope to guide future program development and spark a broader conversation that will improve health for vulnerable women and shape educational, ethical, and equitable global health experiences for medical trainees.

  16. Reflective Writing in the Competency-Based Curriculum at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Isaacson, J. Harry; Salas, Renee; Koch, Carl; McKenzie, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    The Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University is a five-year medical school where the major emphasis is to train physician investigators. In this article we describe our experience with reflective writing in our competency-based medical school, which has reflective practice as one of the nine core competencies. We outline how we use reflective writing as a way to help students develop their reflective practice skills. Reflective writing opportunities, exce...

  17. General surgery morning report: a competency-based conference that enhances patient care and resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Brendon M; Reece, T Brett; Hedrick, Traci L; Garwood, Robert A; Hughes, Michael G; Dubose, Joseph J; Adams, Reid B; Schirmer, Bruce D; Sanfey, Hilary A; Sawyer, Robert G

    2006-01-01

    After adopting a night float system, the residency program at the University of Virginia Health System Department of Surgery initiated a daily morning report (MR). The conference was originated to sign out new admissions and consults from the previous day to the services that would assume care. Although initially oriented toward transfer of patient information, MR is also hypothesized to serve as a competency-based resident education tool. An anonymous survey was distributed to on-service residents (n = 25). Questions were asked on a 5-point Likert scale. Respondents also ranked the weekly conferences, including MR, in terms of educational benefit derived. Most residents agreed that MR is an efficient method to sign-out patient care [84% stongly agree (SA) or agree (A)] and that it provides an excellent educational experience (88% SA or A). They agreed that it is presented in an evidence-based format (88% SA or A). Regarding the core competencies, residents all asserted that MR addresses "patient care" (100% SA or A) and "medical knowledge" (100% SA or A). Most agreed that it addresses "professionalism" (60% SA or A), "interpersonal skills and communication" (76% SA or A), and "practice-based learning and improvement" (92% SA or A). The 4 most important components identified with respect to continuing to improve both patient care and resident education were the presence of the on-call attending, a review of relevant radiology, provision of follow-up on select cases, and critical review of the literature. On average, MR was seen as the most educational conference, with 52% of residents ranking it first. Although MR is ubiquitous in most primary care residency programs, such a conference has not typically been held on surgical services. The MR was developed at the University of Virginia Health System Department of Surgery as a necessity for patient sign-out. As this conference has continued to evolve, it has become an excellent tool for resident education. It now

  18. COMPETENCY-BASED PAY AND SERVICE QUALITY: AN EMPIRICAL STUDY OF MALAYSIAN PUBLIC ORGANISATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilhaamie Abdul Ghani Azmi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A higher number of complaints have been filed by the public due to delays by public sectors in taking action and providing services to the public. This suggests that service quality is not being delivered as expected by customers. With competency-based pay being offered in the public sector under the System Saraan Malaysia (SSM, which aims to produce capable workers who are responsive to customers' demands by providing quality services, one would expect that there would be an improvement in the general quality of the services rendered. Thus, this research aimed to investigate the relationship between the extent of competency-based pay practices and service quality. The findings suggest that there is a positive relationship between competency-based pay practices and service provision, one of the SERVQUAL dimensions found in this study. Thus, Malaysian public organisations should offer this type of pay as frequently as possible in order to motivate civil servants to provide quality services to the public.

  19. Evaluation of competence-based teaching in higher education: From theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsmann, Evelyn; Schultes, Marie-Therese; Winter, Petra; Schober, Barbara; Spiel, Christiane

    2015-10-01

    Competence-based teaching in higher education institutions and its evaluation have become a prevalent topic especially in the European Union. However, evaluation instruments are often limited, for example to single student competencies or specific elements of the teaching process. The present paper provides a more comprehensive evaluation concept that contributes to sustainable improvement of competence-based teaching in higher education institutions. The evaluation concept considers competence research developments as well as the participatory evaluation approach. The evaluation concept consists of three stages. The first stage evaluates whether the competencies students are supposed to acquire within the curriculum (ideal situation) are well defined. The second stage evaluates the teaching process and the competencies students have actually acquired (real situation). The third stage evaluates concrete aspects of the teaching process. Additionally, an implementation strategy is introduced to support the transfer from the theoretical evaluation concept to practice. The evaluation concept and its implementation strategy are designed for internal evaluations in higher education and primarily address higher education institutions that have already developed and conducted a competence-based curriculum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Competency-based medical education: National Catalogue of Learning Objectives in surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadmon, M; Bender, M J; Adili, F; Arbab, D; Heinemann, M K; Hofmann, H S; König, S; Küper, M A; Obertacke, U; Rennekampff, H-O; Rolle, U; Rücker, M; Sader, R; Tingart, M; Tolksdorf, M M; Tronnier, V; Will, B; Walcher, F

    2013-04-01

    Competency-based medical education is a prerequisite to prepare students for the medical profession. A mandatory professional qualification framework is a milestone towards this aim. The National Competency-based Catalogue of Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM) of the German Medical Faculty Association (MFT) and the German Medical Association will constitute a basis for a core curriculum of undergraduate medical training. The Surgical Working Group on Medical Education (CAL) of the German Association of Surgeons (DGCH) aims at formulating a competency-based catalogue of learning objectives for surgical undergraduate training to bridge the gap between the NKLM and the learning objectives of individual medical faculties. This is intended to enhance the prominence and visibility of the surgical discipline in the context of medical education. On the basis of different faculty catalogues of learning objectives, the catalogue of learning objectives of the German Association of Orthopedics and Orthopedic Surgery and the Swiss Catalogue of Learning Objectives representatives of all German Surgical Associations cooperated towards a structured selection process of learning objectives and the definition of levels and areas of competencies. After completion the catalogue of learning objectives will be available online on the webpage of the DGCH.

  1. Are all certified EHRs created equal? Assessing the relationship between EHR vendor and hospital meaningful use performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, A Jay; Adler-Milstein, Julia; McCullough, Jeffrey

    2017-11-24

    The federal electronic health record (EHR) certification process was intended to ensure a baseline level of system quality and the ability to support meaningful use criteria. We sought to assess whether there was variation across EHR vendors in the degree to which hospitals using products from those vendors were able to achieve high levels of performance on meaningful use criteria. We created a cross-sectional national hospital sample from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology EHR Products Used for Meaningful Use Attestation public use file and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare EHR Incentive Program Eligible Hospitals public use file. We used regression models to assess the relationship between vendor and hospital performance on 6 Stage 2 Meaningful Use criteria, controlling for hospital characteristics. We also calculated how much variation in performance is explained by vendor choice. We found significant associations between specific vendor and level of hospital performance for all 6 meaningful use criteria. Epic was associated with significantly higher performance on 5 of the 6 criteria; relationships for other vendors were mixed, with some associated with significantly worse performance on multiple criteria. EHR vendor choice accounted for between 7% and 34% of performance variation across the 6 criteria. A nontrivial proportion of variation in hospital meaningful use performance is explained by vendor choice, and certain vendors are more often associated with better meaningful use performance than others. Our results suggest that policy-makers should improve the certification process by including more "real-world" scenario testing and provider feedback or ratings to reduce this variation. Hospitals can use these results to guide interactions with vendors. Vendor choice accounts for a meaningful proportion of variation in hospital meaningful use performance, and specific vendors are consistently associated

  2. Creating a Positive Prior Learning Assessment (PLA Experience: A Step-by-Step Look at University PLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. Leiste

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A prior learning assessment (PLA can be an intimidating process for adult learners. Capella University’s PLA team has developed best practices, resources, and tools to foster a positive experience and to remove barriers in PLA and uses three criteria to determine how to best administer the assessment. First, a PLA must be motivating, as described by the ARCS model. Second, it must enable success. Finally, it must use available resources efficiently. The tools and resources developed according to these criteria fall into two categories: staff and online resources. PLA programs can use both to ensure that all departments provide consistent communication to learners about the PLA process, which will foster a positive experience. The PLA online lab houses centralized resources and offers one-on-one interaction with a facilitator to assist learners step-by-step in the development of their petitions. Each unit contains resources, examples, and optional assignments that help learners to develop specific aspects of the petition. By following the examples and recommendations, learners are able to submit polished petitions after they complete the units. The lab facilitator supports learners throughout the units by answering questions and providing recommendations. When learners submit their petitions, the facilitator reviews it entirely and provides feedback to strengthen the final submission that goes to a faculty reviewer for an official evaluation. All of these individuals and tools work together to help create a positive experience for learners who submit a PLA petition. This article shares these resources with the goal of strengthening PLA as a field.

  3. The Haiti Medical Education Project: development and analysis of a competency based continuing medical education course in Haiti through distance learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battat, Robert; Jhonson, Marc; Wiseblatt, Lorne; Renard, Cruff; Habib, Laura; Normil, Manouchka; Remillard, Brian; Brewer, Timothy F; Sacajiu, Galit

    2016-10-19

    Recent calls for reform in healthcare training emphasize using competency-based curricula and information technology-empowered learning. Continuing Medical Education programs are essential in maintaining physician accreditation. Haitian physicians have expressed a lack access to these activities. The Haiti Medical Education Project works in alliance with Haitian medical leadership, faculty and students to support the Country's medical education system. We present the creation, delivery and evaluation of a competency-based continuing medical education curriculum for physicians in rural Haiti. Real time lectures from local and international institutions were teleconferenced to physicians in remote Haitian sites using VidyoConferencing™ technology. With American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) and College of Family Physicians Canada (CFPC) guidelines as references, a competency-derived syllabus was created for a Haitian continuing medical education program. The resulting educational goals were reviewed by a committee of Haitian and North American physician/medical education practitioners to reflect local needs. All authors reviewed lectures and then conferred to establish agreement on competencies presented for each lecture. Sixty-seven lectures were delivered. Human immunodeficiency virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, ophthalmologic, infectious diseases, renal and endocrine competencies were well-represented, with more than 50 % of the joint AAFP and CFPC recommended competencies outlined. Areas under-represented included allergy and immunology, cardiology, surgery, pain management, gastroenterology, neurology, pulmonology, men's health and rheumatology; these topics accounted for less than 25 % of AAFP/CFPC recommended competencies. Areas not covered included geriatrics, nutrition, occupational health and women's health. Within practice-based lectures, only disaster medicine, health promotion and information management were included, but only partially

  4. The effect of implementing undergraduate competency-based medical education on students' knowledge acquisition, clinical performance and perceived preparedness for practice : a comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerdijk, Wouter; Snoek, Jos W.; van Hell, Elisabeth A.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2013-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the gains and losses associated with the implementation of undergraduate competency-based medical education. Therefore, we compared knowledge acquisition, clinical performance and perceived preparedness for practice of students from a competency-based active

  5. Hands in medicine: understanding the impact of competency-based education on the formation of medical students’ identities in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Gonsalves

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose There have been critiques that competency training, which defines the roles of a physician by simple, discrete tasks or measurable competencies, can cause students to compartmentalize and focus mainly on being assessed without understanding how the interconnected competencies help shape their role as future physicians. Losing the meaning and interaction of competencies can result in a focus on ‘doing the work of a physician’ rather than identity formation and ‘being a physician.’ This study aims to understand how competency-based education impacts the development of a medical student’s identity. Methods Three ceramic models representing three core competencies ‘medical knowledge,’ ‘patient care,’ and ‘professionalism’ were used as sensitizing objects, while medical students reflected on the impact of competency-based education on identity formation. Qualitative analysis was used to identify common themes. Results Students across all four years of medical school related to the ‘professionalism’ competency domain (50%. They reflected that ‘being an empathetic physician’ was the most important competency. Overall, students agreed that competency-based education played a significant role in the formation of their identity. Some students reflected on having difficulty in visualizing the interconnectedness between competencies, while others did not. Students reported that the assessment structure deemphasized ‘professionalism’ as a competency. Conclusion Students perceive ‘professionalism’ as a competency that impacts their identity formation in the social role of ‘being a doctor,’ albeit a competency they are less likely to be assessed on. High-stakes exams, including the United States Medical Licensing Exam clinical skills exam, promote this perception.

  6. Continuing professional development needs of teachers in schools for competence-based vocational education: A case study from The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prof. Dr. Rob F. Poell; Dr. Audrey Seezink

    2010-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this article is to help schools for vocational education determine teachers' continuing professional development needs associated with implementing competence-based education programs, so that these schools can develop better attuned HR policies. It investigates which

  7. Training directors have positive perceptions of a competency-based gastroenterology and transplant hepatology fellowship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halegoua-De Marzio, Dina L; Herrine, Steven K

    2015-02-01

    In 2012, the American Board of Internal Medicine approved a pilot competency-based transplant hepatology (TH) training program. This program allows gastroenterology (GI) and TH fellowships to be completed in 3 years. We investigated the perceptions and beliefs of GI and TH division and fellowship program directors on the competency-based TH training program. All current GI and TH division and fellowship program directors from the 162 fellowship programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education were invited via e-mail to anonymously complete the online survey. The survey questioned their perceptions of the 3-year combined GI and TH training program. A total of 116 participants completed the survey (∼38% response rate). Most respondents were GI fellowship directors (61%); 15% were GI and hepatology division directors, 19% were TH fellowship directors, 14% were TH division directors, and 5% were GI division directors. Most of the respondents were in favor of the pilot program (85%). Only 63% of all respondents believed that graduates of the pilot program would achieve the same level of competency in GI as those who completed the traditional program. Overall, 71% believed incorporation of the 3-year training model would increase interest and participation in TH fellowships. Most of the academic GI and TH division and fellowship program directors embrace competency-based fellowship education and TH subspecialty training during the designated 3-year GI fellowship. Future studies will be needed to reevaluate these beliefs after several years. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Reflective writing in the competency-based curriculum at the cleveland clinic lerner college of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, J Harry; Salas, Renee; Koch, Carl; McKenzie, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    The Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University is a five-year medical school where the major emphasis is to train physician investigators. In this article we describe our experience with reflective writing in our competency-based medical school, which has reflective practice as one of the nine core competencies. We outline how we use reflective writing as a way to help students develop their reflective practice skills. Reflective writing opportunities, excerpts of student pieces, and faculty and student perspectives are included. We have experienced the value of reflective writing in medical school education and believe elements of our program can be adapted to other training environments.

  9. Evaluation of Teaching Performance: Considerations from the Competency-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Rueda Beltrán

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The article gives an overview of the main arguments and characteristics attributed to the Competency-based Approach in education, so as to analyze the various definitions available and some of the proposals on the subject of teaching skills. Approaches and strategies are suggested for developing teacher-evaluation programs in the context of a generalized environment in the educational sector which is adopting the model of competencies for school reform, curriculum redesign, modifications in teaching strategies, and manners and functions of evaluation.

  10. Improving the quality of the NHS workforce through values and competency-based selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Clare; Rankin, Jean; Matthews, Lynsay; Cerinus, Marie; Zaveri, Swati

    2016-07-01

    Robust selection processes are essential to ensure the best and most appropriate candidates for nursing, midwifery and allied health professional (NMAHP) positions are appointed, and subsequently enhance patient care. This article reports on a study that explored interviewers' and interviewees' experiences of using values and competency-based interview (VCBI) methods for NMAHPs. Results suggest that this resource could have a positive effect on the quality of the NMAHP workforce, and therefore on patient care. This method of selection could be used in other practice areas in health care, and refinement of the resource should focus on supporting interview panels to develop their VCBI skills and experience.

  11. Providing for the severely handicapped: a case for competency-based preparation of occupational therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R M; Greer, J G; McFadden, S M

    1976-01-01

    Recent court decisions that mandate the development of new instructional alternatives for severely handicapped children will have significant implications for occupational therapists. Focusing on such issues as mainstreaming, accountability, and certification standards, this paper places in perspective the problems and trends that have led to this new challenge. It also provides suggestions for the development and disposition of training programs that can ultimately result in more appropriate programming for the handicapped children in the new population to be served in the public schools. Illustrated with examples of competency components and behavioral objectives, competency-based occupational therapy preparation programs are emphasized.

  12. Nurturing global leaders: using competency based assessment techniques to develop employees

    OpenAIRE

    Howe-Walsh, Liza; Turnbull, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    To achieve success in the global marketplace organisations need to operate effectively across borders and manage positive cross-cultural relationships. Selecting and developing individuals that are able to manage themselves and their relationships with others from different cultures is imperative. Organisations therefore need to be able to identify the skills and traits necessary for their employees to manage in culturally diverse environments and develop an individual’s global competencies. ...

  13. Developing a Competence-Based Addiction Medicine Curriculum in Indonesia: The Training Needs Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinxten, W.J.L.; Jong, C.A.J. de; Hidayat, T.; Istiqomah, A.N.; Achmad, T.H.; Raya, R.P.; Norviatin, D.; Siregar, I.M.P.

    2011-01-01

    Indonesia has one of the fastest growing, injecting drugs user-driven, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemics in Asia. Coverage of needle and syringe programs (NSPs), opioid substitution therapy (OST), and antiretroviral treatment (ART) is increasing, but is still low, whereas professional

  14. Competency-based veterinary education - An integrative approach to learning and assessment in the clinical workplace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bok, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    When graduating from veterinary school, veterinary professionals must be ready to enter the complex veterinary profession. Therefore, one of the major responsibilities of any veterinary school is to develop training programmes that support students’ competency development on the trajectory from

  15. Assessment of Teacher Performance: Constructs of Teacher Competencies Based on Factor Analysis of Observation Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, William; And Others

    This study focused on a comparison of the factor structures of the scores on l8 teacher competencies measured by both low-inference and high-inference observation. The observation inventories used were the Classroom Observations Keyed for Effectiveness Research (COKER) for low-inference observation, and the Teacher Performance Assessment…

  16. Formative Competence-Based-Assessment through blogs. A project carried out in six Catalan universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Cano Garcia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Academic programs in Design have always faced the challenge of providing the best education in a sphere so changing as Design discipline itself. This is especially true within the current renewal of curricula derived from the implementation of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA and, to a much more general level, the adaptation of the discipline of Design to the new challenges posed by the Knowledge Society. In this context, we present the educational experience of a serious games design workshop, which has been conducted at the University of Barcelona's Design BA. This pedagogical activity emphazises on three aspects which we believe are fundamental to the current pedagogy of design: to give a more transverse view of this discipline; to value the role of Design as a means of innovation in today's Knowledge Society; and to rethink the social function of Design.

  17. Competency-based tool for evaluation of community-based training in undergraduate medical education in India – a Delphi approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shewade HD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemant Deepak Shewade,1,2 Kathiresan Jeyashree,3 Selvaraj Kalaiselvi,4 Chinnakali Palanivel,5 Krishna Chandra Panigrahi,2 1Department of Operational Research, International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union, South-East Asia Office, New Delhi, 2Department of Community Medicine, Indira Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Puducherry, 3Department of Community Medicine, Velammal Medical College Hospital and Research Institute, Madurai, 4Department of Community Medicine, Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences, 5Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India Introduction: A community-based training (CBT program, where teaching and training are carried out in the community outside of the teaching hospital, is a vital part of undergraduate medical education. Worldwide, there is a shift to competency-based training, and CBT is no exception. We attempted to develop a tool that uses a competency-based approach for assessment of CBT. Methods: Based on a review on competencies, we prepared a preliminary list of major domains with items under each domain. We used the Delphi technique to arrive at a consensus on this assessment tool. The Delphi panel consisted of eight purposively selected experts from the field of community medicine. The panel rated each item for its relevance, sensitivity, specificity, and understandability on a scale of 0–4. Median ratings were calculated at the end of each round and shared with the panel. Consensus was predefined as when 70% of the experts gave a rating of 3 or above for an item under relevance, sensitivity, and specificity. If an item failed to achieve consensus after being rated in 2 consecutive rounds, it was excluded. Anonymity of responses was maintained. Results: The panel arrived at a consensus at the end of 3 rounds. The final version of the self-assessment tool consisted of 7 domains and 74

  18. COMPUTER EVALUATION OF SKILLS FORMATION QUALITY IN THE IMPLEMENTATION OF COMPETENCE-BASED APPROACH TO LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitalia A. Zhuravleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of effective organization of skills forming as an important part of the competence approach in education, implemented via educational standards of new generation. The solution of the problem suggests using of computer tools to assess the quality of skills formation and abilities based on the proposed model of the problem. This paper proposes an approach to creating an assessing model of the level of skills formation in knowledge management systems based on mathematical modeling methods. Attention is paid to the evaluation strategy and technology of assessment, which is based on the use of rules of fuzzy mathematics. Algorithmic implementation of the proposed model of evaluation of the quality of skills development is shown as well. 

  19. Creating Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, John

    Encouraging exploration and practice, this book offers hundreds of exercises and numerous tips covering every step involved in creating poetry. Each chapter is a self-contained unit offering an overview of material in the chapter, a definition of terms, and poetry examples from well-known authors designed to supplement the numerous exercises.…

  20. LHC Create

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    LHC Create is an upcoming 2-day workshop held at IdeaSquare in November. Participants from CERN and IPAC school of design will compete to design an exhibit that explains why CERN does what it does. The winner will have their exhibit fully realised and made available to experiments, institutes, and tourism agencies around the world.

  1. Facilitating students’ motivation and learning through competence-based didactic units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makovec-Radovan Danijela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to examine the influence of the “Competence-based didactic units” in vocational education on students’ motivation and self-regulated learning. The sample consisted of 115 males and 133 females (n=250 who were attending secondary vocational or technical schools in Slovenia. The students were included in an experimental project that introduced a “competence- based didactic unit” (CBDU in vocational schools’ curricula. In our study, the introduction of the CBDU was used to measure changes in the motivational, cognitive, and metacognitive aspects of self-regulated learning and to examine how they were subsequently related to other students characteristists, such as gender, school performance and time spent on school work. The results show the importance of CBDUs, on the one hand, on motivational factors such as intrinsic goal orientation, task value, and self-efficacy, and, on the other hand, differences in gender and grade level. The findings are discussed in terms of how teaching strategies in vocational education can contribute to the development of individuals’ motivation.

  2. Motivations for learning of family medicine residents trained in competency-based education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babenko, Oksana; Szafran, Olga; Koppula, Sudha; Au, Lillian

    2017-08-16

    Family physicians regularly encounter clinical uncertainty and ambiguity and thus, are expected to engage in on-going learning to respond to changing needs of family practice. Using Achievement Goal Theory, the objective of this study was to examine motivations for learning of family medicine residents in a competency-based program. This was a cross-sectional study, employing a survey methodology with family medicine residents at the mid-point of training at a Canadian university. Multivariate analyses of variance and covariance were used to examine residents' goal orientations (performance approach, mastery approach, performance avoidance, mastery avoidance) for the group as a whole and to test for the effects of residents' gender and program stream (urban/rural), respectively. A total of 52 (67%) residents completed the survey. Overall, residents scored highest on mastery approach and lowest on performance avoidance, thus, exhibiting adaptive motivations for learning. Male residents demonstrated higher levels of performance approach, performance avoidance, and mastery avoidance than female residents. No significant differences in goal orientations were found between urban and rural residents. Family medicine residents trained in the culture of competency-based education appear to be mastery approach oriented. This motivation orientation is critical in the dynamic practice of family medicine and is consistent with the life-long learning mandate of the medical profession.

  3. Development of national competency-based learning objectives "Medical Informatics" for undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrig, R; Stausberg, J; Dugas, M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this project is to develop a catalogue of competency-based learning objectives "Medical Informatics" for undergraduate medical education (abbreviated NKLM-MI in German). The development followed a multi-level annotation and consensus process. For each learning objective a reason why a physician needs this competence was required. In addition, each objective was categorized according to the competence context (A = covered by medical informatics, B = core subject of medical informatics, C = optional subject of medical informatics), the competence level (1 = referenced knowledge, 2 = applied knowledge, 3 = routine knowledge) and a CanMEDS competence role (medical expert, communicator, collaborator, manager, health advocate, professional, scholar). Overall 42 objectives in seven areas (medical documentation and information processing, medical classifications and terminologies, information systems in healthcare, health telematics and telemedicine, data protection and security, access to medical knowledge and medical signal-/image processing) were identified, defined and consented. With the NKLM-MI the competences in the field of medical informatics vital to a first year resident physician are identified, defined and operationalized. These competencies are consistent with the recommendations of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA). The NKLM-MI will be submitted to the National Competence-Based Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education. The next step is implementation of these objectives by the faculties.

  4. Neoliberalism and the government of nursing through competency-based education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foth, Thomas; Holmes, Dave

    2017-04-01

    Competency has become a key concept in education in general over the last four decades. This article examines the development of the competency-based movement with a particular focus on the significance it has had for nursing education. Our hypothesis is that the competency movement can only adequately be understood if it is analyzed in relation to the broad societal transformation of the last decades-often summarized under the catchword neoliberalism-and with it the emergence of managerial models for Human Resource Management (HRM) for the reorganization of social services. Classical professions, which were characterized under welfarism by an esoteric knowledge based on ethical norms, have now become marketable commodities that can be evaluated in the same way as other commodities. We want to underline that while this development is still under way, it is the concept of competency that was the decisive political instrument enabling this profound change. With the widespread implementation of competency-based education that now governs nursing knowledge, the development of a critical, oppositional perspective becomes more challenging, if not entirely impossible. We will be focusing primarily on nursing education in Canada, although we maintain that it has relevance for nursing internationally. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [Competency-based training and work world: from grading to employability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, John H M

    2012-06-01

    Considered as an element of business discourse, the competence-based education emerges associated with processes of productive restructuring influencing the economy since 1970. These processes arise as a consequence of the crisis of the accumulation model based on mass production and consumption following the principles of taylorism and fordism. In the last decades, the State has been unable to solve the periodic crisis that afflicts late capitalism. Because of this, the State moves away from its economic mission, promotes marketing mechanisms and, in the meantime, it tries to manage the motivational crisis of the population. This challenge forces the State to take interest in the vital world of individuals trying to solve the legitimacy crisis through educational reforms that affect the world of work. The relationship between the vertiginous changes of working world and a new educational formation is explicit. This educational formation must consider (at the same time) the management capacity, learning capacity, teamwork capacity and self-training. Based on this situation, there is a direct relationship between technologic advances, the structural crisis of capitalism and work organization. Besides, the "qualification" term is replaced with "competency-based education".

  6. Competency-Based Medical Education: Can Both Junior Residents and Senior Residents Achieve Competence After a Sports Medicine Training Module?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Tim; Wright, Sara; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan M; Theodoropoulos, John; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Wasserstein, David; Ringsted, Charlotte; Hodges, Brian; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell

    2015-12-02

    Competency-based medical education as a resident-training format will move postgraduate training away from time-based training, to a model based on observable outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether junior residents and senior residents could demonstrate clinical skills to a similar level, after a sports medicine rotation. All residents undertaking a three-month sports medicine rotation had to pass an Objective Structured Clinical Examination. The stations tested the fundamentals of history-taking, examination, image interpretation, differential diagnosis, informed consent, and clinical decision-making. Performance at each station was assessed with a binary station-specific checklist and an overall global rating scale, in which 1 indicated novice, 2 indicated advanced beginner, 3 indicated competent, 4 indicated proficient, and 5 indicated expert. A global rating scale was also given for each domain of knowledge. Over eighteen months, thirty-nine residents (twenty-one junior residents and eighteen senior residents) and six fellows (for a total of forty-five participants) completed the examination. With regard to junior residents and senior residents, analysis using a two-tailed t test demonstrated a significant difference (p < 0.01) in both total checklist score and overall global rating scale; the mean total checklist score (and standard deviation) was 56.15% ± 10.99% for junior residents and 71.87% ± 8.94% for senior residents, and the mean global rating scale was 2.44 ± 0.55 for junior residents and 3.79 ± 0.49 for senior residents. There was a significant difference between junior residents and senior residents for each knowledge domain, with a significance of p < 0.05 for history-taking and p < 0.01 for the remainder of the domains. Despite intensive teaching within a competency-based medical education model, junior residents were not able to demonstrate knowledge as well as senior residents, suggesting that overall clinical experience

  7. Towards a Competency-Based, Ethical, and Socially Valid Approach to the Supervision of Applied Behavior Analytic Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Laura B; Fischer, Aaron J; Luiselli, James K

    2016-12-01

    Competency-based supervision of trainees has recently come to the forefront of behavior analytic practice; however, there are minimal data to support the effectiveness of various supervision practices on trainee outcomes. Accordingly, this paper is intended to spark further discussion and research activity regarding the supervision of those seeking to become Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBA). We present a practice model and considerations for supervising applied behavior analytic trainees consistent with the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline (Behavior Analyst Certification Board, 2012b), the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (Behavior Analyst Certification Board, 2014), and extant literature from behavior analysis and related fields. Inherent to the current model is a focus on bi-directional feedback and collaboration between the supervisor and trainee to frequently evaluate the acceptability of the procedures, process, outcomes, and effectiveness of supervision. We present a Supervision Monitoring and Evaluation Form consistent with the current model and discuss the assumed importance of objective and subjective self-assessment of supervisor competence to the ultimate advancement of the practice of applied behavior analysis.

  8. Implementing Competency-Based Medical Education in a Postgraduate Family Medicine Residency Training Program: A Stepwise Approach, Facilitating Factors, and Processes or Steps That Would Have Been Helpful.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Karen; Griffiths, Jane

    2016-05-01

    In 2009-2010, the postgraduate residency training program at the Department of Family Medicine, Queen's University, wrestled with the practicalities of competency-based medical education (CBME) implementation when its accrediting body, the College of Family Physicians of Canada, introduced the competency-based Triple C curriculum. The authors used a stepwise approach to implement CMBE; the steps were to (1) identify objectives, (2) identify competencies, (3) map objectives and competencies to learning experiences and assessment processes, (4) plan learning experiences, (5) develop an assessment system, (6) collect and interpret data, (7) adjust individual residents' training programs, and (8) distribute decisions to stakeholders. The authors also note overarching processes, costs, and facil itating factors and processes or steps that would have been helpful for CBME implementation. Early outcomes are encouraging. Residents are being directly observed more often with increased documented feedback about performance based on explicit competency standards (24,000 data points for 150 residents from 2013 to 2015). These multiple observations are being collated in a way that is allowing the identification of patterns of performance, red flags, and competency development trajectory. Outliers are being identified earlier, resulting in earlier individualized modification of their residency training program. The authors will continue to provide and refine faculty development, are developing an entrustable professional activity field note app for handheld devices, and are undertaking research to explore what facilitates learners' competency development, what increases assessors' confidence in making competence decisions, and whether residents are better trained as a result of CBME implementation.

  9. Mitigating the Dangers of a Single Story: Creating Large-Scale Writing Assessments Aligned With Sociocultural Theory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Behizadeh, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    The dangers of a single story in current U.S. large-scale writing assessment are that assessment practice does not align with theory and this practice has negative effects on instruction and students...

  10. Learning by doing – creating competences in engineering students on how and when to perform and use life cycle assessments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2003-01-01

    The course Life cycle assessment of products and systems has been given for eight consecutive years at the Technical University of Denmark. From the beginning, the course has been a targeted on life cycle assessment with a strong emphasis on the performance and use of life cycle assessment...... as decision support to industry and authorities. While different applications of life cycle assessments are introduced in lectures during the course, the main focus is on how to do an LCA....

  11. Self-Assessment of the Use of Plagiarism Avoiding Techniques to Create Ethical Scholarship Among Research Students

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed Ahmad; Ahsan Ullah

    2015-01-01

    The use of plagiarism avoiding techniques can be helpful to maintain academic integrity, a better learning environment and intellectual honesty. This explored the use of plagiarism avoiding techniques for creating ethical scholarship among research students. It also measured the association between the frequency of using plagiarism avoiding techniques and the satisfaction about knowledge of plagiarism. Data were collected from seven universities through an online self-struct...

  12. Intercultural Communicative Competence, Complexity Theory and Assessment: Considerations for Creating Effective Intercultural and Foreign Language Development Programs

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

      The recent interest to prepare Japanese university students to study abroad or work in intercultural contexts, has caused a demand for foreign language educators to create effective intercultural and foreign language development programs. This paper will give an overview of how intercultural communicative competence (ICC) can help educators meet these demands. ICC has made a relatively small impact within the Japanese educational system, thus the main purpose of this paper is to bring a gre...

  13. THE DEVELOPMENT OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING (ELT COMPETENCY-BASED SYLLABUS IN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besral Besral

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Although competency has long been the major concern in ELT either in the EFL or ESL contexts, the rise of competency-based syllabus launched by the Ministry of National Education (2006 brought about significant issue among the English teachers in the country. One of the crucial issues is that how to transfer the concepts of competences into the syllabus design.  Since a syllabus does not only contain a list of subject content, but also how curriculum planners (teachers reflect their understanding and belief about nature of language and of language teaching and learning, the ELT must be carried out to achieve communicative competence. Current investigation on the practices of ELT, however, indicates that English teachers are still walking in place, leaving the CC as a big slogan in their jobs.

  14. A competency-based approach to couple and family therapy supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celano, Marianne P; Smith, Chaundrissa Oyeshiku; Kaslow, Nadine J

    2010-03-01

    The competency-based movement continues to guide professional psychology. This has been highlighted through the establishment of essential foundational and functional competencies. The current paper focuses on the intervention competency domain and delineates its relevance within the field of couple and family therapy (CFT). We begin by providing an overview of 8 essential components of CFT: developing a systemic formulation, forging a systemic therapeutic alliance, understanding family-of-origin issues, reframing, managing negative interactions, building cohesion/intimacy/communication, restructuring/parenting, and understanding and applying evidence-based CFT models. We then provide a brief illustration of foundational and functional competencies essential to CFT. We conclude by addressing the CFT competency within an integrative approach to supervision and provide a case illustration that depicts this process. The relevance of establishing unique, evidence-based, theory-specific competency components is highlighted. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved

  15. Setting Up New Standards: A Preview of Indonesia's New Competence-Based Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena I.R. Agustien

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at describing some theoretical foundations as well as practical considerations underlying the new competence-based curriculum. First, a pedagogically motivated model of communicative competence (CC suggested by Celce-Murcia et al. (1995 is discussed. Second, a systemic functional view regarding the relations between text, context of situation and context of culture (Halliday 1985 relevant to the production of various genres is also a central issue. Third, literacy levels - performative, functional, informational, epistemic (Wells 1991 - have also been taken into considerations. Fourth, the curriculum regards meanings as its top priority and, metafunctions (Halliday 1978 are of primary importance. Finally, similarities and differences of spoken and written language (Halliday 1986 that tend to be overlooked in the previous/existing curricula are now illuminated.

  16. Effects of mobile and digital support for a structured, competency-based curriculum in neurosurgery residency education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Nestor R; Dusick, Joshua R; Martin, Neil A

    2012-07-01

    Changes in neurosurgical practice and graduate medical education impose new challenges for training programs. We present our experience providing neurosurgical residents with digital and mobile educational resources in support of the departmental academic activities. A weekly mandatory conference program for all clinical residents based on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies, held in protected time, was introduced. Topics were taught through didactic sessions and case discussions. Faculty and residents prepare high-quality presentations, equivalent to peer-review leading papers or case reports. Presentations are videorecorded, stored in a digital library, and broadcasted through our Website and iTunes U. Residents received mobile tablet devices with remote access to the digital library, applications for document/video management, and interactive teaching tools. Residents responded to an anonymous survey, and performances on the Self-Assessment in Neurological Surgery examination before and after the intervention were compared. Ninety-two percent reported increased time used to study outside the hospital and attributed the habit change to the introduction of mobile devices; 67% used the electronic tablets as the primary tool to access the digital library, followed by 17% hospital computers, 8% home computers, and 8% personal laptops. Forty-two percent have submitted operative videos, cases, and documents to the library. One year after introducing the program, results of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons-Self-Assessment in Neurological Surgery examination showed a statistically significant improvement in global scoring and improvement in 16 of the 18 individual areas evaluated, 6 of which reached statistical significance. A structured, competency-based neurosurgical education program supported with digital and mobile resources improved reading habits among residents and performance on the Congress of Neurological Surgeons-Self-Assessment

  17. Conceptualization of competency based curricula in pre-service nursing and midwifery education: A grounded theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraraneza, Claudine; Mtshali, Gloria Ntombifikile

    2018-01-01

    In health professional education, the competency-based curriculum concept has been an important driver of reform in the training of competent graduates for the 21st century. In African countries, although there has been implementing it in pre-service nursing and midwifery education and the literature reports a lack of understanding of what is it on the part of the implementers. This article explores the meaning of competency based curriculum in pre-service nursing and midwifery education in Rwanda. A grounded theory approach, following Corbin and Strauss, was used. Following ethical clearance by the university ethical committee, data was collected from 17 participants through in-depth individual interviews of staff. Four categories emerged: (a) transformation, (b) tool for primary health care philosophy, (c) technological approach to education, (d) and modular system. Competency-based curriculum is confirmed as an appropriate educational tool in producing competent graduates for today and the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Lessons learned from a community-academic initiative: the development of a core competency-based training for community-academic initiative community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Yumary; Matos, Sergio; Kapadia, Smiti; Islam, Nadia; Cusack, Arthur; Kwong, Sylvia; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2012-12-01

    Despite the importance of community health workers (CHWs) in strategies to reduce health disparities and the call to enhance their roles in research, little information exists on how to prepare CHWs involved in community-academic initiatives (CAIs). Therefore, the New York University Prevention Research Center piloted a CAI-CHW training program. We applied a core competency framework to an existing CHW curriculum and bolstered the curriculum to include research-specific sessions. We employed diverse training methods, guided by adult learning principles and popular education philosophy. Evaluation instruments assessed changes related to confidence, intention to use learned skills, usefulness of sessions, and satisfaction with the training. Results demonstrated that a core competency-based training can successfully affect CHWs' perceived confidence and intentions to apply learned content, and can provide a larger social justice context of their role and work. This program demonstrates that a core competency-based framework coupled with CAI-research-specific skill sessions (1) provides skills that CAI-CHWs intend to use, (2) builds confidence, and (3) provides participants with a more contextualized view of client needs and CHW roles.

  19. Value creation with life cycle assessment: an approach to contextualize the application of life cycle assessment in chemical companies to create sustainable value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manda, B.M. Krishna|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328212733; Bosch, Henk; Karanam, Sreepadaraj; Beers, Heidi; Bosman, Harrie; Rietveld, Eelco; Worrell, Ernst|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/106856715; Patel, Martin K.

    2016-01-01

    Businesses have a responsibility to shareholders and other stakeholders. By establishing a direct link between sustainability and shareholder value, businesses can successfully include sustainability considerations in managerial decisions and create sustainable value. The value creation

  20. The discourse of professional competence-based training based: a critical analysis of professionals’ initial training at higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fernández Rodríguez

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at carrying out a political analysis of the discourse of training based on competences offering elements of reflection that distort the readiness with which this model of teaching training has been assumed in Spain. The article is divided into two sections. In the first one, competence-based training is framed within the new ways of work organisation in a postfordian economy and the main elements of a curricular design based on a professional-competence approach are described. In the second section some mythologies associated to training for employability and to competence-based learning are explored.

  1. Self-Assessment of the Use of Plagiarism Avoiding Techniques to Create Ethical Scholarship Among Research Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Ahmad

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of plagiarism avoiding techniques can be helpful to maintain academic integrity, a better learning environment and intellectual honesty. This explored the use of plagiarism avoiding techniques for creating ethical scholarship among research students. It also measured the association between the frequency of using plagiarism avoiding techniques and the satisfaction about knowledge of plagiarism. Data were collected from seven universities through an online self-structured questionnaire. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was used to explore the variance. The association between the frequency of using plagiarism avoiding techniques and satisfaction about knowledge of plagiarism was indicated. Differences were also found on the basis of gender, discipline, level and stage of study.

  2. Indicator development methodology for volunteer tourism in host communities: creating a low-cost, locally applicable, rapid assessment tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher A. Lupoli; Wayde C. Morse; Conner Bailey; John Schelhas

    2015-01-01

    Two prominent critiques of volunteer tourism are that it is a top-down imposed form of development treating host communities as passive recipients of international aid, and that the impacts of volunteer tourism in host communities are not systematically evaluated. To address this we identified a pre-existing participatory methodology for assessing community...

  3. Vaccination: Developing and implementing a competency-based-curriculum at the Medical Faculty of LMU Munich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogel, B.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Germany medical students should gain proficiency and specific skills in the vaccination field. Especially important is the efficient communication of scientific results about vaccinations to the community, in order to give professional counseling with a complete overview about therapeutic options.Aim of the project: The aim of this project is to set up a vaccination-related curriculum in the Medical Faculty at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich. The structure of the curriculum is based on the National catalogue for competency-based learning objectives in the field of vaccination (Nationaler Kompetenzbasierter Lernzielekatalog Medizin NKLM. Through this curriculum, the students will not only acquire the classical educational skills concerning vaccination in theory and practice, but they will also learn how to become independent in the decision-making process and counseling. Moreover, the students will become aware of consequences of action related to this specific topic.Methods: According to defined guidelines, an analysis was performed on courses, which are currently offered by the university. A separate analysis of the NKLM was carried out. Both analyses identified the active courses related to the topic of vaccination as well as the NKLM learning objectives. The match between the topics taught in current courses and the NKLM learning objectives identified gaps concerning the teaching of specific content. Courses were modified in order to implement the missing NKLM learning objectives.Results: These analyses identified 24 vaccination-related courses, which are currently taught at the University. Meanwhile, 35 learning objectives on vaccination were identified in the NKLM catalogue. Four of which were identified as not yet part of the teaching program. In summary, this interdisciplinary work enabled the development of a new vaccination-related curriculum, including 35 learning objectives, which are now implemented in

  4. Vaccination: Developing and implementing a competency-based-curriculum at the Medical Faculty of LMU Munich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, B; Reuter, S; Taverna, M; Fischer, M R; Schelling, J

    2016-01-01

    In Germany medical students should gain proficiency and specific skills in the vaccination field. Especially important is the efficient communication of scientific results about vaccinations to the community, in order to give professional counseling with a complete overview about therapeutic options. AIM OF THE PROJECT: The aim of this project is to set up a vaccination-related curriculum in the Medical Faculty at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich. The structure of the curriculum is based on the National catalogue for competency-based learning objectives in the field of vaccination (Nationaler Kompetenzbasierter Lernzielekatalog Medizin NKLM). Through this curriculum, the students will not only acquire the classical educational skills concerning vaccination in theory and practice, but they will also learn how to become independent in the decision-making process and counseling. Moreover, the students will become aware of consequences of action related to this specific topic. According to defined guidelines, an analysis was performed on courses, which are currently offered by the university. A separate analysis of the NKLM was carried out. Both analyses identified the active courses related to the topic of vaccination as well as the NKLM learning objectives. The match between the topics taught in current courses and the NKLM learning objectives identified gaps concerning the teaching of specific content. Courses were modified in order to implement the missing NKLM learning objectives. These analyses identified 24 vaccination-related courses, which are currently taught at the University. Meanwhile, 35 learning objectives on vaccination were identified in the NKLM catalogue. Four of which were identified as not yet part of the teaching program. In summary, this interdisciplinary work enabled the development of a new vaccination-related curriculum, including 35 learning objectives, which are now implemented in regular teaching courses by the Medical Faculty

  5. Facilitators and barriers to a nationwide implementation of competency-based postgraduate medical curricula : A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jippes, E.; Luijk, S.J.; Pols, J.; Achterkamp, M.C.; van Engelen, J.M.L.; Brand, P.L.P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Postgraduate medical education (PGME) curricula are being redesigned across the western world. Aim: This study examined the implementation process (what works where and why) of new competency-based PGME curricula and relevant factors influencing this process. Methods: In a nationwide

  6. The Development of a Competency Based Food Preparations Curriculum for High School Special Needs Students in New Castle County, Delaware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Richard Lee

    A competency-based culinary arts food preparation curriculum for Delaware high school students with special needs was developed during a project that included the following activities: review of the state's existing culinary arts curriculum for regular education students; incumbent worker survey administered to 24 restaurant…

  7. Implementation of a competency-based residency curriculum : experiences from a resource-limited environment in the Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busari, Jamiu O.; Verhagen, Eduard A. A.; Muskiet, Fred D.; Duits, Ashley J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The introduction of competency-based curricula in institutions situated in resource-limited environments is likely to pose new challenges for the implementation process. The St. Elisabeth Hospital (SEHOS) in Curacao, Dutch Caribbean, is affiliated to university teaching hospitals in the

  8. Competency-Based Framework and Continuing Education for Preparing a Skilled School Health Workforce for Asthma Care: The Colorado Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicutto, Lisa; Gleason, Melanie; Haas-Howard, Christy; Jenkins-Nygren, Lynn; Labonde, Susan; Patrick, Kathy

    2017-01-01

    School health teams commonly address the needs of students with asthma, which requires specific knowledge and skills. To develop a skilled school health team, a competency-based framework for managing asthma in schools was developed. A modified Delphi with 31 panelists was completed. Consensus (=80% agreement) was reached for all 148 items…

  9. An Evaluation of "Foundations of Competency Based Curriculum"; A Summer In-Service CBC Staff Development Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC. Dept. of Research and Evaluation.

    "Foundations of Competency Based Curriculum (CBC)," a one-week inservice course was offered to CBC team members from each Washington, D.C., public school during the summer of 1977. It was designed to assist instructional personnel in acquiring the necessary competencies and skills to plan, initiate, and implement competency based…

  10. A Competence-Based Science Learning Framework Illustrated through the Study of Natural Hazards and Disaster Risk Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyao, Sheila G.; Holbrook, Jack; Rannikmäe, Miia; Pagunsan, Marmon M.

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes a competence-based learning framework for science teaching, applied to the study of "big ideas", in this case to the study of natural hazards and disaster risk reduction (NH&DRR). The framework focuses on new visions of competence, placing emphasis on nurturing connectedness and behavioral actions toward…

  11. The construct validity and predictive validity of a self-efficacy measure for student teachers in competence-based education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prof.Dr. Filip Dochy; Dr. Johan Braeken; Dr. Mart van Dinther; Prof.Dr. Mien Segers

    2013-01-01

    This study intends to investigate the validity of a self-efficacy measure which is developed for predictive and diagnostic purposes concerning student teachers in competence-based education. CFA results delivered converging evidence for the multidimensionality of the student teacher self-efficacy

  12. Competency-Based Education in Three Pilot Programs: What It Is, How It's Implemented, and How It's Working. Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Jennifer L.; Lewis, Matthew W.; Santibanez, Lucrecia; Faxon-Mills, Susannah; Rudnick, Mollie; Stecher, Brian M.; Hamilton, Laura S.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation extended grants to three educational organizations working to develop or enhance competency-based approaches in large, urbanized school systems. The grant initiative, called Project Mastery, funded the development of technology-enhanced tools, including curriculum materials and online learning…

  13. Automotive and Diesel Engine Rebuilding. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Gerald

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  14. From the Analysis of Work-Processes to Designing Competence-Based Occupational Standards and Vocational Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutlys, Vidmantas; Spöttl, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore methodological and institutional challenges on application of the work-process analysis approach in the design and development of competence-based occupational standards for Lithuania. Design/methodology/approach: The theoretical analysis is based on the review of scientific literature and the analysis of…

  15. Formative Studies of First Year of the Competency-Based Field Center for Teacher Education at Hamburg, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicknell, J. E.; And Others

    This report describes the first-year progress of the Fredonia/Hamburg Teacher Education Center and is concerned with aspects of the general format, program, and organization of the center. Chapter one defines and discusses the development of competency-based programs and describes the purpose of the Teacher Education Center at Fredonia/Hamburg.…

  16. Continuing Professional Development Needs of Teachers in Schools for Competence-Based Vocational Education: A Case Study from The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seezink, Audrey; Poell, Rob F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to help schools for vocational education determine teachers' continuing professional development needs associated with implementing competence-based education programs, so that these schools can develop better attuned HR policies. It investigates which elements from the cognitive apprenticeship model and…

  17. A Case Study of the Implementation of a Competency-based Curriculum in a Caribbean Teaching Hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeijers, J. J.; Busari, J. O.; Duits, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Several teaching hospitals are currently modifying their curriculum to comply with the changing demands in medical education. As a result, we decided to evaluate whether a competency-based curriculum implemented in a Caribbean teaching hospital fulfilled the requirements as defined by the

  18. Competency-Based Approach to Education in International Documents and Theoretical Researches of Educators in Great Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshina-Pala, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Modern educators consider that the acquiring of important-for-life competencies can give an individual the opportunities to orient in a modern society, informational space, changing development of labour and post-graduation education. Competency-based approach became a new conceptual orientation of schools in foreign countries and causes a number…

  19. Development and Evaluation of Nutrition Education Competencies and a Competency-Based Resource Guide for Preschool-Aged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Reed, Heather; Briggs, Marilyn; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this research was to develop and evaluate nutrition education competencies and a competency-based resource guide, Connecting the Dots...Healthy Foods, Healthy Choices, Healthy Kids (CTD), for preschool-aged children in California. Methods: Nutrition education experts and California Department of Education staff…

  20. THE EFFECT OF VIRTUAL VERSUS TRADITIONAL LEARNING IN ACHIEVING COMPETENCY-BASED SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leili MOSALANEJAD (Corresponding author

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available By rapid developing of the network technology, the internet-based learning methods are substituting the traditional classrooms making them expand to the virtual network learning environment. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of virtual systems on competency-based skills of first-year nursing students.Materials and methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 86 freshman nursing students were recruited. Nursing Fundamentals and Skills (including theoretical and practical credits was decided as the teaching course. The theory and practical contents were taught in one group by conventional method (face to face teaching, demonstration on moulage and for another by virtual simulation and interactive multimedia. The two groups were the same for the content being taught, the instructor and the final evaluation. Paired t-test and independent sample t-test was used for statistical analysis.Results: In theoretical exam, the mean score in virtual teaching group was higher than traditional group (P<0.001; however, there was no significant difference between the two groups in the result of objective structured clinical examination.Conclusions: Using virtual systems is beneficial in enhancing student learning. Both traditional and virtual methods can be used in teaching skills in nursing students; however, it seems that combination of the two can facilitate knowledge transfer.

  1. THE EFFECT OF VIRTUAL VERSUS TRADITIONAL LEARNING IN ACHIEVING COMPETENCY-BASED SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leili MOSALANEJAD

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: By rapid developing of the network technology, the internet-based learning methods are substituting the traditional classrooms making them expand to the virtual network learning environment. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of virtual systems on competency-based skills of first-year nursing students. Materials and methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 86 freshman nursing students were recruited. Nursing Fundamentals and Skills (including theoretical and practical credits was decided as the teaching course. The theory and practical contents were taught in one group by conventional method (face to face teaching, demonstration on moulage and for another by virtual simulation and interactive multimedia. The two groups were the same for the content being taught, the instructor and the final evaluation. Paired t-test and independent sample t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results: In theoretical exam, the mean score in virtual teaching group was higher than traditional group (P<0.001; however, there was no significant difference between the two groups in the result of objective structured clinical examination.Conclusions: Using virtual systems is beneficial in enhancing student learning. Both traditional and virtual methods can be used in teaching skills in nursing students; however, it seems that combination of the two can facilitate knowledge transfer.

  2. Pilot-testing an applied competency-based approach to health human resources planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomblin Murphy, Gail; MacKenzie, Adrian; Alder, Rob; Langley, Joanne; Hickey, Marjorie; Cook, Amanda

    2013-10-01

    A competency-based approach to health human resources (HHR) planning is one that explicitly considers the spectrum of knowledge, skills and judgement (competencies) required for the health workforce based on the health needs of the relevant population in some specific circumstances. Such an approach is of particular benefit to planners challenged to make optimal use of limited HHR as it allows them to move beyond simply estimating numbers of certain professionals required and plan instead according to the unique mix of competencies available from the existing health workforce. This kind of flexibility is particularly valuable in contexts where healthcare providers are in short supply generally (e.g. in many developing countries) or temporarily due to a surge in need (e.g. a pandemic or other disease outbreak). A pilot application of this approach using the context of an influenza pandemic in one health district of Nova Scotia, Canada, is described, and key competency gaps identified. The approach is also being applied using other conditions in other Canadian jurisdictions and in Zambia.

  3. Implementing competency based admissions at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, Noreen; Akabas, Myles H; Betzler, Thomas F; Castaldi, Maria; Kelly, Mary S; Levy, Adam S; Reichgott, Michael J; Ruberman, Louise; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2016-01-01

    The Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Einstein) was founded in 1955 during an era of limited access to medical school for women, racial minorities, and many religious and ethnic groups. Located in the Bronx, NY, Einstein seeks to educate physicians in an environment of state-of-the-art scientific inquiry while simultaneously fulfilling a deep commitment to serve its community by providing the highest quality clinical care. A founding principle of Einstein, the basis upon which Professor Einstein agreed to allow the use of his name, was that admission to the student body would be based entirely on merit. To accomplish this, Einstein has long used a 'holistic' approach to the evaluation of its applicants, actively seeking a diverse student body. More recently, in order to improve its ability to identify students with the potential to be outstanding physicians, who will both advance medical knowledge and serve the pressing health needs of a diverse community, the Committee on Admissions reexamined and restructured the requirements for admission. These have now been categorized as four 'Admissions Competencies' that an applicant must demonstrate. They include: 1) cocurricular activities and relevant experiences; 2) communication skills; 3) personal and professional development; and 4) knowledge. The purpose of this article is to describe the process that resulted in the introduction and implementation of this competency based approach to the admission process.

  4. Competency based teaching of college physics: The philosophy and the practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapaksha, Ajith; Hirsch, Andrew S.

    2017-12-01

    The practice of learning physics contributes to the development of many transdisciplinary skills learners are able to exercise independent of the physics discipline. However, the standard practices of physics instruction do not explicitly include the monitoring or evaluation of these skills. In a competency-based (CB) learning model, the skills (competencies) are clearly defined and evaluated. We envisioned that a CB approach, where the underlying competencies are highlighted within the instructional process, would be more suitable to teaching physics to learners with diversified disciplinary interests. A model CB course curriculum was developed and practiced at Purdue University to teach introductory college physics to learners who were majoring in the technology disciplines. The experiment took place from the spring semester in 2015 until the spring semester in 2017. The practice provided a means to monitor and evaluate a set of developmental transdisciplinary competencies that underlie the learning of force and motion concepts in classical physics. Additionally, the CB practice contributed to produce substantial physics learning outcomes among learners who were underprepared to learn physics in college.

  5. Enhancing Medical Student Education by Implementing a Competency-Based Ophthalmology Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Succar, Tony; McCluskey, Peter; Grigg, John

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate innovative educational strategies that help optimize ophthalmology teaching in a crowded medical curriculum. The knowledge acquisition and perceptions of medical students undertaking the revised competency-based curriculum were compared with the prior content-based curriculum within the Sydney Medical Program. A mixed-methods research design was employed to include both quantitative and qualitative dimensions in evaluating the revised curriculum with medical students (n = 328) undergoing their ophthalmology rotation. Quantitative evaluation was performed with a 20-item multiple choice pre- and post-test of ophthalmic knowledge. A 12-month follow-up test was readministered to compare the long-term retention rate of graduates. Qualitative evaluation was measured with student satisfaction questionnaires. In the original curriculum there was an improvement of 19.9% from pre- to post-test scores [2.15; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.35-2.94; P higher than students from the original curriculum (1.56; 95% CI, 0.42-2.71; P = 0.008). In addition, qualitative feedback also improved, with the rotation being highly valued. The revised ophthalmic curriculum resulted in an increase in academic performance and a higher degree of student satisfaction. Given the gradual decline of ophthalmic education in the standard medical school curriculum, our results are timely in providing guidance for minimum ophthalmic curriculum exposure and strategies to improve ophthalmic education in medical schools. Copyright© 2017 Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology.

  6. Competency based teaching of college physics: The philosophy and the practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajith Rajapaksha

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The practice of learning physics contributes to the development of many transdisciplinary skills learners are able to exercise independent of the physics discipline. However, the standard practices of physics instruction do not explicitly include the monitoring or evaluation of these skills. In a competency-based (CB learning model, the skills (competencies are clearly defined and evaluated. We envisioned that a CB approach, where the underlying competencies are highlighted within the instructional process, would be more suitable to teaching physics to learners with diversified disciplinary interests. A model CB course curriculum was developed and practiced at Purdue University to teach introductory college physics to learners who were majoring in the technology disciplines. The experiment took place from the spring semester in 2015 until the spring semester in 2017. The practice provided a means to monitor and evaluate a set of developmental transdisciplinary competencies that underlie the learning of force and motion concepts in classical physics. Additionally, the CB practice contributed to produce substantial physics learning outcomes among learners who were underprepared to learn physics in college.

  7. Using Informatics to Create a New Triangular Array of e-Assessment Tools through an International Synergy between Education and Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary R. Tucker

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The increased power of the Internet, advances in authoring software, and the availability of sophisticated content management systems (CMS have enabled instructional designers, educators, and teachers, to create flexible learning environments that use advanced pedagogies based on active learning, collaboration, multiple perspectives and knowledge building. As the new learning environments gain ground instruction there is an increased emphasis in what is called "authentic assessment." Due to the difficulty with translating authentic assessment into grades faculty are not being provided the information technology support systems that they need. This is a report on three assessment tools developed to address this need that came about due to the synergy of an international partnership.

  8. Needs Assessment for Creating a Patient-Centered, Community-Engaged Health Program for Homeless Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tegan Ake

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Women who experience homelessness during pregnancy have poorer birth outcomes than the general population. This exploratory research describes the needs assessment of homeless women currently living at a shelter in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to identify unmet needs related to maternal and infant perinatal health as the first step in designing a mutually beneficial patient-centered service-learning program for medical students to address these needs. Methods: Two 1-hour focus groups were held at a shelter for women who are homeless and/or victims of domestic violence. A total of 13 women participated in each session; four medical students and a physician served as facilitators and scribes at each session. The facilitators alternated asking predetermined open- and close-ended questions, followed by discussion among participants. Questions elicited experiences during pregnancy, what went well, what women living in the shelter struggled with, and what support they wished for but did not have. Scribes captured the conversation through hand-written notes and used content analysis in order of frequency. Results: Thirteen themes were identified. The 5 most frequently identified themes were a need for pregnancy education, access/transportation, baby care, advocacy, and material necessities. Participating shelter residents and the medical students expressed interest in working with one another and forming a long-term partnership with the shelter. Conclusions: Results of this needs assessment will inform the creation of a new shelter-based medical education program that will meet homeless women’s needs while preparing medical students for patient-centered, community-responsive care.

  9. Creating a Virtual Gymnasium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Leah H.; Castelli, Darla

    2005-01-01

    Physical educators struggle with the challenges of assessing student performance, providing feedback about motor skills, and creating opportunities for all students to engage in game-play on a daily basis. The integration of technology in the gymnasium can address some of these challenges by improving teacher efficiency and increasing student…

  10. Creating a Competitive Advantage by Developing an Innovative Tool to Assess Suppliers in Agri-Food Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedina Daniel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to introduce a new certified applied methodology for Assessing Suppliers in Agri-Food Complex as a tool for company competitiveness. The work is based on the results obtained in the research project NAZV QG60148/2005 funded by the Czech Ministry of Agriculture and on the requirements of agricultural practice. The novelty lies in the use of practices of the worldwide respected GLOBALG.A.P. standard (formerly EUREPGAP as yet not well known in our country. Based on the practical experience of the authors with the application of food safety standards in the food manufacturing industry and application of GLOBALG. A.P. standard in agricultural primary production, risk and hazard analysis was developed for the product group of fruit and vegetables. Subsequently, a checklist was designed for the implementation of the suppliers’ audit. The result is a methodology for food manufacturers based on the identification of sources of risks in primary production, which can threaten food safety. As part of the introduced methodology are proposed methodological criteria for evaluating suppliers of fruit and vegetables, including rating scales and the possibilities of its implementation. Different variations of the introduction of this approach are discussed from the management, time, and financial viewpoints. The use of this procedure in practice aims to reduce the likelihood of hygiene and health hazards of the basic input raw material according to the principles of the certified standards and thus strengthen the competitiveness of a given manufacturer on the market.

  11. Development of the competency-based medical curriculum for the new Augsburg University Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härtl, Anja; Berberat, Pascal; Fischer, Martin R; Forst, Helmuth; Grützner, Stefanie; Händl, Thomas; Joachimski, Felix; Linné, Renate; Märkl, Bruno; Naumann, Markus; Putz, Reinhard; Schneider, Werner; Schöler, Claus; Wehler, Markus; Hoffmann, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    Aim: With the resolution from April 28, 2014, the Bavarian state government in Germany decided to found a new medical school at Augsburg University, thereby requiring the development of a competency-based medical curriculum. Methods: Two interdisciplinary groups developed a spiral curriculum (following Harden) employing the model of Thumser-Dauth & Öchsner. The curriculum focuses on specifically defined competencies: medical expertise, independent scientific reasoning, argumentation and scholarship, as well as communication skills. Results: The spiral curriculum was developed as a hybrid curriculum. Its modular structure incorporates the mandatory subjects required by the German regulations for medical licensure (Approbationsordnung) into organ- and system-centered blocks which are integrated both horizontally and vertically. Basic preclinical sciences are covered in the blocks "Movement," "Balance" and "Contact." The clinical sciences are organized according to six pillars (conservative medicine, surgical medicine, men's-women's-children's medicine, the senses, the nervous system and the mind, and general medicine) which students revisit three times each over the course of the program. A longitudinal clinical course incorporates interdisciplinary education. A particular focus is on scientific education encompassing a longitudinal course in the sciences (including interdisciplinary classes with other university departments), block practicums, and two scientific projects. Conclusion: It is not only the degree of integration und intensity of the Augsburg University undergraduate medical degree program, but also its targeted advancement of academic, social and communication skills that have not yet been realized to such an extent elsewhere in Germany. On July 8, 2016, the German Council of Science and Humanities unanimously gave this concept a positive evaluation. Future research will examine and evaluate the Augsburg medical curriculum and the impact of the new

  12. Development of the competency-based medical curriculum for the new Augsburg University Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Härtl, Anja

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: With the resolution from April 28, 2014, the Bavarian state government in Germany decided to found a new medical school at Augsburg University, thereby requiring the development of a competency-based medical curriculum.Methods: Two interdisciplinary groups developed a spiral curriculum (following Harden employing the model of Thumser-Dauth & Öchsner. The curriculum focuses on specifically defined competencies: medical expertise, independent scientific reasoning, argumentation and scholarship, as well as communication skills.Results: The spiral curriculum was developed as a hybrid curriculum. Its modular structure incorporates the mandatory subjects required by the German regulations for medical licensure (Approbationsordnung into organ- and system-centered blocks which are integrated both horizontally and vertically. Basic preclinical sciences are covered in the blocks “Movement,” “Balance” and “Contact.” The clinical sciences are organized according to six pillars (conservative medicine, surgical medicine, men’s-women’s-children’s medicine, the senses, the nervous system and the mind, and general medicine which students revisit three times each over the course of the program. A longitudinal clinical course incorporates interdisciplinary education. A particular focus is on scientific education encompassing a longitudinal course in the sciences (including interdisciplinary classes with other university departments, block practicums, and two scientific projects.Conclusion: It is not only the degree of integration und intensity of the Augsburg University undergraduate medical degree program, but also its targeted advancement of academic, social and communication skills that have not yet been realized to such an extent elsewhere in Germany. On July 8, 2016, the German Council of Science and Humanities unanimously gave this concept a positive evaluation. Future research will examine and evaluate the Augsburg medical curriculum

  13. Kicking ASSessment: Using Information Fluency Assessment to Expand Librarian Roles, Engage in High-Impact Practices, and Create Sustained Contact with Online Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Katherine; Wiley, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Iowa Wesleyan University (IW) has historically struggled with both assessment and supporting online students. Newly-appointed librarians and an impending re-accreditation visit prompted an increase in involvement and presence with assessment. In an attempt to expand the library's influence on campus, librarians took on a nontraditional role in the…

  14. Creating a brief rating scale for the assessment of learning disabilities using reliability and true score estimates of the scale's items based on the Rasch model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideridis, Georgios; Padeliadu, Susana

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present studies was to provide the means to create brief versions of instruments that can aid the diagnosis and classification of students with learning disabilities and comorbid disorders (e.g., attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder). A sample of 1,108 students with and without a diagnosis of learning disabilities took part in study 1. Using information from modern theory methods (i.e., the Rasch model), a scale was created that included fewer than one third of the original battery items designed to assess reading skills. This best item synthesis was then evaluated for its predictive and criterion validity with a valid external reading battery (study 2). Using a sample of 232 students with and without learning disabilities, results indicated that the brief version of the scale was equally effective as the original scale in predicting reading achievement. Analysis of the content of the brief scale indicated that the best item synthesis involved items from cognition, motivation, strategy use, and advanced reading skills. It is suggested that multiple psychometric criteria be employed in evaluating the psychometric adequacy of scales used for the assessment and identification of learning disabilities and comorbid disorders.

  15. Creating Student-Friendly Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salend, Spencer J.

    2011-01-01

    Creating a fair, reliable, teacher-made test is a challenge. Every year poorly designed tests fail to accurately measure many students' learning--and negatively affect their academic futures. Salend, a well-known writer on assessment for at-risk students who consults with schools on assessment procedures, offers guidelines for creating tests that…

  16. Changing the culture of medical training: An important step toward the implementation of competency-based medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Peter C; Caverzagie, Kelly J; Nousiainen, Markku T; Snell, Linda

    2017-06-01

    The current medical education system is steeped in tradition and has been shaped by many long-held beliefs and convictions about the essential components of training. The objective of this article is to propose initiatives to overcome biases against competency-based medical education (CBME) in the culture of medical education. At a retreat of the International Competency Based Medical Education (ICBME) Collaborators group, an intensive brainstorming session was held to determine potential barriers to adoption of CBME in the culture of medical education. This was supplemented with a review of the literature on the topic. There continues to exist significant key barriers to the widespread adoption of CBME. Change in educational culture must be embraced by all components of the medical education hierarchy. Research is essential to provide convincing evidence of the benefit of CBME. The widespread adoption of CBME will require a change in the professional, institutional, and organizational culture surrounding the training of medical professionals.

  17. Mapping a competency-based surgical curriculum in urology: Agreement (and discrepancies) in the Canadian national opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, Keith Francis; MacNeily, Andrew E

    2016-01-01

    Urology residency training in Canada is quickly evolving from a time-based to a competency-based model. We aim to better define core surgical competencies that would comprise a surgical curriculum and assess any discrepancies in opinion nationally. A web-based survey was validated and sent to the 536 practicing members of the Canadian Urological Association (CUA) in August and October 2014. The survey consisted of questions regarding practice demographics, fellowship training, and evaluated the 76 most common urological procedures (using a five-point Likert scale) in the context of the question, "After completion of residency training in Canada a urologist should be proficient in…" A core procedure was defined as one for which there was ≥75% agreement. Descriptive statistics and non-parametric testing were used to summarize the findings. A total of 138 urologists completed the survey (25.7% response rate) with representation from all geographic regions. Respondents included 40.6% community and 59.4% academic urologists. The survey identified 16 procedures with 90-100% agreement and a total of 30 core procedures with ≥75% agreement. When comparing community and academic urologists, there was statistically significant disagreement on 27 procedures, including 11 core procedures, most notably cystectomy (88.5% agreement vs. 67.1%; p=0.002), open pyeloplasty (84.6% vs. 65.8%; p=0.04), simple prostatectomy (78.9% vs. 69.7%; p=0.03), perineal urethrostomy (80.8% vs. 67.1%; p=0.02), open radical prostatectomy (96.1% vs. 80.3%; p=0.007), and Boari flap (90.4% vs. 76.3%; p=0.004). Regional discrepancies were also found, demonstrating eight procedures deemed uniquely core and three core procedures deemed less important regionally. This national survey has provided some consensus on 30 procedures that should comprise a core surgical curriculum in urology. However, there are some key differences of opinion (most notably between community and academic urologists) that must

  18. Issues and challenges of curriculum reform to competency-based curricula in Africa: A meta-synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraraneza, Claudine; Mtshali, Ntombifikile Gloria; Mukamana, Donatilla

    2017-03-01

    Although in recent decades reforms to undergraduate nursing and midwifery education have increasingly been guided by the concept of competency-based curriculum in a drive to produce competent graduates in the African context, the topic remains poorly researched in-depth. The related issues and challenges need to be explored in the interest of evidence-based practice. This article stems from a systematic review of qualitative literature on the design and implementation of competency-based curriculum. Data was inductively analyzed using constant comparison. The two categories that emerged were: (i) the need for a paradigm shift to competency-based curriculum; and (ii) the associated issues and challenges, such as a shift from informative to transformative learning, lack or limited of involvement of key stakeholders in curriculum development, focus on hospital-oriented education, lack of preparation of educators, and inappropriate resources. While ongoing reform of nursing and midwifery education continues, much still needs to be done - in particular, extensive financial investment to increase the capacity of educators, mentors and infrastructure, and the development of collaborative frameworks between nursing and midwifery and higher educational councils. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Status of Competency-Based Medical Education in Endoscopy Training: A Nationwide Survey of US ACGME-Accredited Gastroenterology Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S G; Keswani, R; Elta, G; Saini, S; Menard-Katcher, P; Del Valle, J; Hosford, L; Myers, A; Ahnen, D; Schoenfeld, P; Wani, S

    2015-07-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) emphasizes the importance of medical trainees meeting specific performance benchmarks and demonstrating readiness for unsupervised practice. The aim of this study was to examine the readiness of Gastroenterology (GI) fellowship programs for competency-based evaluation in endoscopic procedural training. ACGME-accredited GI program directors (PDs) and GI trainees nationwide completed an online survey of domains relevant to endoscopy training and competency assessment. Participants were queried about current methods and perceived quality of endoscopy training and assessment of competence. Participants were also queried about factors deemed important in endoscopy competence assessment. Five-point Likert items were analyzed as continuous variables by an independent t-test and χ(2)-test was used for comparison of proportions. Survey response rate was 64% (94/148) for PDs and 47% (546/1,167) for trainees. Twenty-three percent of surveyed PDs reported that they do not have a formal endoscopy curriculum. PDs placed less importance (1—very important to 5—very unimportant) on endoscopy volume (1.57 vs. 1.18, Peducation, there is a need for improved endoscopy curricula which are better suited to demonstrate readiness for unsupervised practice.

  20. A digital platform as a facilitator for assessing innovation potential and creating business models: a case study from the i3 project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellini Francesco

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Many ideas flow into the innovation funnel but only 1 out 3000 becomes a successful new product. There are many variables that interact in this complex process and investors decisions are often based on experience and feeling rather than a comprehensive evaluation of the social, economic and technological factors. The innovation potential, the innovator capability, the accessibility of the technology as well as the social acceptance and the chosen business model are the some of the critical factors of a successful innovation strategy. In the broad sense, a business model is the approach of doing business through which a company can sustain itself and generate profits in the long term. Digital platforms can help manage and facilitate the complexity of value propositions and provide an immediate feedback to the entrepreneur. Creating value is necessary, but not sufficient, for an organization to profit from its business model. It is important to see the whole picture of the business that is why the business models are so important for a good start of the business. However, innovation assessment and business model development sometimes are not an easy task and ICT can make this process easier. Then, the aim of this paper is to explore the role of digital platforms as facilitators for the techno-socio-economic impact assessment and the development of sustainable business models through the analysis of a case study from the EU Horizon 2020 “i3 project”.

  1. Qualitative Study Exploring Implementation of a Point-of-Care Competency-Based Lumbar Puncture Program Across Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternack, Julie R; Dadiz, Rita; McBeth, Ryan; Gerard, James M; Scherzer, Daniel; Tiyyagura, Gunjan; Zaveri, Pavan; Chang, Todd P; Auerbach, Marc; Kessler, David

    2016-01-01

    To explore the factors that facilitated or hindered successful implementation of a multi-centered infant lumbar puncture (LP) competency-based education program that required interns to demonstrate skills readiness on a task trainer before performing their first clinical LP. In 2013, investigators conducted a qualitative study utilizing semistructured interviews and focus groups of site directors (SDs) from the International Network for Simulation-Based Pediatric Innovation, Research, and Education (INSPIRE) who were responsible for implementing the LP competency-based education program. Transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory to identify and verify emergent themes and subthemes. Thematic saturation was attained after interviewing 19 SDs in 12 interviews and 3 focus groups. The most significant strategies and barriers were organized into 4 main themes: 1) alignment of different visions to obtain buy-in, 2) balance between providing education versus patient care, 3) acceptance of novel teaching paradigms, and 4) communication logistics. The ability to overcome barriers was influenced by institutional culture on trainee education, patient safety and research; the level of relational coordination between different groups of stakeholders; and the ability of SDs to identify and diversify entrepreneurial strategies. INSPIRE SDs reveal the challenges of implementing a network-wide competency-based educational initiative that determines interns' readiness to perform LPs in clinical settings. Strategizing to align the common goals of graduate medical training, patient care and research instructs clinician educators and leaders on how to successfully change educational culture in academic medicine. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. First Steps Toward a Quality of Climate Finance Scorecard (QUODA-CF): Creating a Comparative Index to Assess International Climate Finance Contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, Katherine; Roberts, Timmons; de Nevers, Michele; Langley, Claire; Smith, Cory

    2013-06-15

    Are climate finance contributor countries, multilateral aid agencies and specialized funds using widely accepted best practices in foreign assistance? How is it possible to measure and compare international climate finance contributions when there are as yet no established metrics or agreed definitions of the quality of climate finance? As a subjective metric, quality can mean different things to different stakeholders, while of donor countries, recipients and institutional actors may place quality across a broad spectrum of objectives. This subjectivity makes the assessment of the quality of climate finance contributions a useful and necessary exercise, but one that has many challenges. This work seeks to enhance the development of common definitions and metrics of the quality of climate finance, to understand what we can about those areas where climate finance information is available and shine a light on the areas where there is a severe dearth of data. Allowing for comparisons of the use of best practices across funding institutions in the climate sector could begin a process of benchmarking performance, fostering learning across institutions and driving improvements when incorporated in internal evaluation protocols of those institutions. In the medium term, this kind of benchmarking and transparency could support fundraising in contributor countries and help build trust with recipient countries. As a feasibility study, this paper attempts to outline the importance of assessing international climate finance contributions while describing the difficulties in arriving at universally agreed measurements and indicators for assessment. In many cases, data are neither readily available nor complete, and there is no consensus on what should be included. A number of indicators are proposed in this study as a starting point with which to analyze voluntary contributions, but in some cases their methodologies are not complete, and further research is required for a

  3. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competency-based on-line computer course in pediatric oncology for urology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaJusta, Daniel G; Mueller, Thomas J; Barone, Joseph G

    2008-05-01

    To develop an on-line course in pediatric urology for our urology residents, to expose residents to required pediatric urology content within the confines of an 80-hour work week. An on-line, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competency-based course in pediatric urology was designed using a commercially based platform. The computer-based teaching course was flexible and provided virtually limitless opportunities for course design, structure, and content. Computer-based teaching platforms may be a useful alternative teaching method to facilitate urology resident education within the confines of an 80-hour work week.

  4. Application of acoustic telemetry to assess residency and movements of rockfish and lingcod at created and natural habitats in Prince William Sound.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad F Reynolds

    Full Text Available Loss and/or degradation of nearshore habitats have led to increased efforts to restore or enhance many of these habitats, particularly those that are deemed essential for marine fishes. Copper rockfish (Sebastes caurinus and lingcod (Ophiodon enlongatus are dominant members of the typical reef fish community that inhabit rocky and high-relief substrates along the Pacific Northwest. We used acoustic telemetry to document their residency and movements in the nearshore waters of Prince William Sound, Alaska in order to assess use of created reef habitat in an individual-based manner. A total of 57 fish were surgically implanted with acoustic transmitters. Forty-five fish were captured and monitored in three habitats: artificial reef, low-relief natural reef, and patchy high-relief natural reef. Within each habitat, both rockfish and lingcod exhibited long periods of residency with limited movements. Twelve rockfish were captured at the natural reefs and displaced a distance of 4.0 km to the artificial reef. Five of the 12 rockfish returned within 10 d of their release to their initial capture site. Another five of the 12 displaced fish established residency at the artificial reef through the duration of our study. Our results suggest the potential for artificial reefs to provide rockfish habitat in the event of disturbances to natural habitat.

  5. Development of a competency based training programme to support multidisciplinary working in a combined biochemistry/haematology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, R S; Longmire, W; Galloway, M J; Smellie, W S

    2000-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a competency based training programme to support multidisciplinary working in a combined biochemistry and haematology laboratory. The training programme was developed to document that staff were trained in the full range of laboratory tests that they were expected to perform. This programme subsequently formed the basis for the annual performance review of all staff. All staff successfully completed the first phase of the programme. This allowed laboratory staff to work unsupervised at night as part of a partial shift system. All staff are now working towards achieving a level of competence equivalent to the training level required for state registration by the Council for Professions Supplementary to Medicine. External evaluation of the training programme has included accreditation by the Council for Professions Supplementary to Medicine and reinspection by Clinical Pathology Accreditation (UK) Ltd. The development of a competency based training system has facilitated the introduction of multidisciplinary working in the laboratory. In addition, it enables the documentation of all staff to ensure that they are fully trained and are keeping up to date, because the continuing professional development programme in use in our laboratory has been linked to this training scheme. This approach to documentation of training facilitated a recent reinspection by Clinical Pathology Accreditation (UK) Ltd.

  6. Identification of the Most Commonly Used Laboratory Techniques in Regenerative Medicine: A Roadmap for Developing a Competency Based Education Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen L. Rego

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we are proposing and testing the use of literature reviews as a method to identify essential competencies for specific fields. This has implications in how educators develop and structure both traditional and competency based curricula. Our focus will be on utilizing this method to identify the most relevant and commonly used techniques in the field of regenerative medicine. This publication review method may be used to develop competency based education (CBE programs that focus on commonly utilized skills. CBE is an emerging trend in higher education that will greatly enhance student learning experiences. CBE works by providing students with field specific skills and knowledge; thus, it is imperative for educators to identify the most essential competencies in a given field. Therefore, we reason that a literature review of the techniques performed in studies published in prevalent peer reviewed journals for a given field offers an ideal method to identify and rank competencies that should be delivered to students by a respective curriculum. Here, we reviewed recent articles published on topics in the field of regenerative medicine as a proof of concept for the use of literature reviews as a guide for the development of a regenerative medicine CBE curriculum.

  7. Flexibility in individualized, competency-based workplace curricula with EPAs: Analyzing four cohorts of physician assistants in training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Fraukje; Berkvens, Josephine; Ten Cate, Olle

    2017-05-01

    Entrustable professional activities (EPAs) were introduced as a principle for individualized physician assistant (PA) workplace curricula at the University of Applied Sciences (UAS) Utrecht in 2008. We studied how the focus on EPAs served the competency-based flexibility intention of the program. We analyzed data of those 119 students who enrolled in the program 2010 through 2013, and completed the program before April 2016. We analyzed the number of EPAs per student at start and end of the program, number changed during training and the reasons for change. Data of 101 students were suitable for evaluation. Excluded were 16 students ending the program prematurely and two with study delay. Mean number of EPAs per student at the start was 6.8 (range 4-12) and at the end 6.6 (range 3-13). On average 1.5 EPAs were altered (range 0-13). Reasons included extension of the EPA package during training (n = 10), lack of proficiency at planned moments of summative entrustment decisions (n = 9) and procedures not being suitable for PAs at closer look (n = 6). All changes resulted in a curriculum meeting the school's standards for graduation. The flexibility of the EPA concept enabled changes in the individualized curriculum of students, according to the intended competency-based nature of the educational program.

  8. Are Teachers Colleges Really Prepared To Handle Competency Based Teacher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Patricia M.; Rosner, Benjamin

    1973-01-01

    This paper discussed the need for clarification of the meaning of CBTE, emphasized the development of instructional materials and assessment procedures as necessary components of CBTE and the intimate connection between CBTE and teacher behavior research. (Author/RK)

  9. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A A A Listen En Español Create Your Plate Create Your Plate is a simple and effective ... and that your options are endless. Create Your Plate! Click on the plate sections below to add ...

  10. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plate Create Your Plate is a simple and effective way to manage your blood glucose levels and ... Steps to Create Your Plate It's simple and effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating ...

  11. The effects of performance-based assessment criteria on student performance and self-assessment skills

    OpenAIRE

    Fastré, Greet; Klink, Marcel; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of performance-based versus competence-based assessment criteria on task performance and self-assessment skills among 39 novice secondary vocational education students in the domain of nursing and care. In a performance-based assessment group students are provided with a preset list of performance-based assessment criteria, describing what students should do, for the task at hand. The performance-based group is compared to a competence-based assessment group...

  12. Three-Dimensional Computer Simulation as an Important Competence Based Aspect of a Modern Mining Professional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aksenova Olesya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of necessity of educational process transformation to meet the requirements of modern miming industry; cooperative developing of new educational programs and implementation of educational process taking into account modern manufacturability. The paper proves the idea of introduction into mining professionals learning process studying of three-dimensional models of surface technological complex, ore reserves and underground digging complex as well as creating these models in different graphic editors and working with the information analysis model obtained on the basis of these three-dimensional models. The technological process of manless coal mining at the premises of the mine Polysaevskaya controlled by the information analysis models built on the basis of three-dimensional models of individual objects and technological process as a whole, and at the same time requiring the staff able to use the programs of three-dimensional positioning in the miners and equipment global frame of reference is covered.

  13. Three-Dimensional Computer Simulation as an Important Competence Based Aspect of a Modern Mining Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenova, Olesya; Pachkina, Anna

    2017-11-01

    The article deals with the problem of necessity of educational process transformation to meet the requirements of modern miming industry; cooperative developing of new educational programs and implementation of educational process taking into account modern manufacturability. The paper proves the idea of introduction into mining professionals learning process studying of three-dimensional models of surface technological complex, ore reserves and underground digging complex as well as creating these models in different graphic editors and working with the information analysis model obtained on the basis of these three-dimensional models. The technological process of manless coal mining at the premises of the mine Polysaevskaya controlled by the information analysis models built on the basis of three-dimensional models of individual objects and technological process as a whole, and at the same time requiring the staff able to use the programs of three-dimensional positioning in the miners and equipment global frame of reference is covered.

  14. The scholar role in the National Competence Based Catalogues of Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM compared to other international frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hautz, Stefanie C.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Germany, a national competence based catalogue of learning objectives in medicine (NKLM was developed by the Society for Medical Education and the Council of Medical Faculties. As many of its international counterparts the NKLM describes the qualifications of medical school graduates. The definition of such outcome frameworks indents to make medical education transparent to students, teachers and society. The NKLM aims to amend existing lists of medical topics for assessment with learnable competencies. All outcome frameworks are structured into chapters, domains or physician roles. The definition of the scholar-role poses a number of questions such as: What distinguishes necessary qualifications of a scientifically qualified physician from those of a medical scientist? Methods: 13 outcome frameworks were identified through a systematic three-step literature review and their content compared to the scholar role in the NKLM by means of a qualitative text analysis. The three steps consist of (1 search for outcome frameworks, (2 in- and exclusion, and (3 data extraction, categorization, and validation. The results were afterwards matched with the scholar role of the NKLM.Results: Extracted contents of all frameworks may be summarized into the components , and . Compared to the included frameworks the NKLM emphasises competencies necessary for research and teaching while clinical application is less prominently mentioned. Conclusion: The scholar role of the NKLM differs from other international outcome frameworks. Discussing these results shall increase propagation and understanding of the NKLM and thus contribute to the qualification of future medical graduates in Germany.

  15. Migrating a professional field of study in a multi-institutional partnership: facilitators’ experience in the competence-based curriculum development process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Proscovia Namubiru Ssentamu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available With the urge to Africanise the curriculum following colonisation, many African countries are still wary of the educational initiatives from the developed countries. However, with the clear curriculum design and development guidelines provided by various national Quality Assurance bodies, African countries need not fear migrating curricula from developed countries. Drawing from the workshop experiences, authors of this paper illustrate the steps involved in migrating, contextualising and adapting a professional field of study in a multi-institutional partnership, with particular focus on the competence-based curriculum design and development process. The process of migrating higher education (HE Administration, Leadership and Management curriculum taught at the University of Tampere (Finland to a Postgraduate Diploma in Higher Education Leadership and Management (PGDHELM curriculum at Uganda Management Institute (UMI in partnership with the Makerere University and the University of Helsinki involved undertaking a needs assessment, training of trainers and adapting the programme to the UMI context. The training of trainers provided opportunity for the trainees to reflect and generate information on the status of HE leadership and management in Uganda. The curriculum was institutionalised by aligning it to the vision, mission and profile of UMI in the context of the existing internal and external Quality Assurance frameworks. This paper underscores the importance of involving stakeholders, taking into account national and institutional requirements in all the steps when migrating an academic curriculum.

  16. The scholar role in the National Competence Based Catalogues of Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM) compared to other international frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautz, Stefanie C; Hautz, Wolf E; Keller, Niklas; Feufel, Markus A; Spies, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    In Germany, a national competence based catalogue of learning objectives in medicine (NKLM) was developed by the Society for Medical Education and the Council of Medical Faculties. As many of its international counterparts the NKLM describes the qualifications of medical school graduates. The definition of such outcome frameworks indents to make medical education transparent to students, teachers and society. The NKLM aims to amend existing lists of medical topics for assessment with learnable competencies. All outcome frameworks are structured into chapters, domains or physician roles. The definition of the scholar-role poses a number of questions such as: What distinguishes necessary qualifications of a scientifically qualified physician from those of a medical scientist? 13 outcome frameworks were identified through a systematic three-step literature review and their content compared to the scholar role in the NKLM by means of a qualitative text analysis. The three steps consist of (1) search for outcome frameworks, (2) in- and exclusion, and (3) data extraction, categorization, and validation. The results were afterwards matched with the scholar role of the NKLM. Extracted contents of all frameworks may be summarized into the components Common Basics, Clinical Application, Research, Teaching and Education, and Lifelong Learning. Compared to the included frameworks the NKLM emphasises competencies necessary for research and teaching while clinical application is less prominently mentioned. The scholar role of the NKLM differs from other international outcome frameworks. Discussing these results shall increase propagation and understanding of the NKLM and thus contribute to the qualification of future medical graduates in Germany.

  17. Creative solution for implementation of experiential, competency-based palliative care training for internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Douglas D; Shpritz, Deborah W; Wolfsthal, Susan D; Zimrin, Ann B; Keay, Timothy J; Fang, Hong-Bin; Schuetz, Carl A; Stapleton, Laura M; Weissman, David E

    2011-09-01

    To graduate internal medicine residents with basic competency in palliative care, we employ a two-pronged strategy targeted at both residents and attending physicians as learners. The first prong provides a knowledge foundation using web-based learning programs designed specifically for residents and clinical faculty members. The second prong is assessment of resident competency in key palliative care domains by faculty members using direct observation during clinical rotations. The faculty training program contains Competency Assessment Tools addressing 19 topics distributed amongst four broad palliative care domains designed to assist faculty members in making the clinical competency assessments. Residents are required to complete their web-based training by the end of their internship year; they must demonstrate competency in one skill from each of the four broad palliative care domains prior to graduation. Resident and faculty evaluation of the training programs is favorable. Outcome-based measures are planned to evaluate long-term program effectiveness.

  18. Cooperative Planning: Arizona HSST/CDA Competency Based Training Module #4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Barbara

    This Child Development Associate (CDA) training module provides guidelines for cooperative curriculum planning involving both children and adults. Objectives are stipulated and activities for achieving each objective are suggested in an assessment checklist format. A study guide emphasizes (1) how to include children in the planning process, (2)…

  19. Collecting, Organizing, and Using Teaching Aids: Arizona HSST/CDA Competency Based Training Module #7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Barbara

    The purpose of this Child Development Associate (CDA) training module is to provide the CDA intern with knowledge of how to collect, organize, and use teaching aids. Objectives are presented along with suggested activities for achieving each objective and an assessment checklist. Also provided is a study guide emphasizing children's profiles,…

  20. Enhancing a Positive Self-Concept: Arizona HSST/CDA Competency Based Training Module #20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Barbara

    This Child Development Associate (CDA) training module helps interns establish a preschool center environment that promotes the development of positive self concepts among young children. Objectives are stipulated, activities for achieving each objective are suggested, and an assessment checklist is provided. A study guide emphasized (1)…

  1. Guidance Principles for Encouraging Self-Discipline: Arizona HSST/CDA Competency Based Training Module #5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Barbara

    This Child Development Associate (CDA) module focuses on child guidance strategies that promote children's self control and positive social behavior. Objectives are stipulated, activities for achieving each objective are suggested, and an assessment checklist is provided. A study guide emphasizes (1) teacher qualities which lead to close, warm,…

  2. Securing the second front: achieving first receiver safety and security through competency-based tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jamal; Staub, Judith; Seymore, Andrew; Scott, Lancer A

    2014-12-01

    Limited research has focused on the safety and security of First Responders and Receivers, including clinicians, hospital workers, public safety officials, community volunteers, and other lay personnel, during public health emergencies. These providers are, in some cases, at greater peril during large-scale disasters due to their lack of training and inadequate resources to handle major influxes of patients. Exemplified in the 1995 Tokyo sarin gas attacks and the 2008 Wenchuan earthquakes, lack of training results in poor outcomes for both patients and First Receivers. The improvement of knowledge and comfort level of First Receivers preparing for a medical disaster via an affordable, repeatable emergency preparedness training (EPT) curriculum. A 5-hour EPT curriculum was developed including nine learning objectives, 18 competencies, and 34 performance objectives. Following brief didactic and small group sessions, interprofessional teams of four to six trainees were observed in a large patient simulator designed to recreate environmentally challenging (ie, flood evacuation), multi-patient scenarios using a novel technique developed to utilize trainees as actors. Trained observers assessed successful completion of 16 individual and 18 team performance objectives. Prior to training, team members completed a 24-question knowledge assessment, a demographic survey, and a comfort level self-assessment. Following training, trainees repeated the 24 questions, self-assessment, and course assessment. One hundred ninety-five participants completed the course between November 2012 and August 2013. One hundred ninety-one (98.5%), 150 (76.9%), and 66 (33.8%) participants completed the pretest, post-test, and course assessment, respectively. The mean (SD) percentage of correct answers between the pretest and post-test increased from 46.3 (13.4) to 75.3 (12.2), P < .0001. Thirty-eight participants (19.5%) reported more than three hours of disaster EPT each year while 157

  3. Assessment of Scientific Literacy of Estonian Gymnasium Students during the Operation of a Competence-Based Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laius, Anne; Post, Aveliis; Rannikmäe, Miia

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable societies need a workforce with a very creative and flexible nature to be able cope with rapidly changing situations making creative and reasonable decisions. The only suggested way to obtain this is through education that is oriented to competences. The goal of this research is to determine the influence of a new competence-based…

  4. Evaluating Continuous Assessment Quality in Competence-Based Education Online: The Case of the E-Folio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Alda; Oliveira, Isolina; Tinoca, Luis; Amante, Lucia; Relvas, Maria de Jesus; Pinto, Maria do Carmo Teixeira; Moreira, Darlinda

    2009-01-01

    Universidade Aberta (UAb), being a distance teaching university, is particularly suited to tackle some of the recommendations concerning the assurance of accessibility to education expressed in the "Education and Training 2010" goals. Meanwhile, the University's strategic plan for 2006/2010 decided to implement a fully virtual innovative…

  5. Evaluation of the Project Management Competences Based on the Semantic Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanta Nicoleta BODEA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the testing and evaluation facilities of the SinPers system. The SinPers is a web based learning environment in project management, capable of building and conducting a complete and personalized training cycle, from the definition of the learning objectives to the assessment of the learning results for each learner. The testing and evaluation facilities of SinPers system are based on the ontological approach. The educational ontology is mapped on a semantic network. Further, the semantic network is projected into a concept space graph. The semantic computability of the concept space graph is used to design the tests. The paper focuses on the applicability of the system in the certification, for the knowledge assessment, related to each element of competence. The semantic computability is used for differentiating between different certification levels.

  6. Competency-Based Framework and Continuing Education for Preparing a Skilled School Health Workforce for Asthma Care: The Colorado Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicutto, Lisa; Gleason, Melanie; Haas-Howard, Christy; Jenkins-Nygren, Lynn; Labonde, Susan; Patrick, Kathy

    2017-08-01

    School health teams commonly address the needs of students with asthma, which requires specific knowledge and skills. To develop a skilled school health team, a competency-based framework for managing asthma in schools was developed. A modified Delphi with 31 panelists was completed. Consensus (≥80% agreement) was reached for all 148 items regarding the appropriateness as a minimum competency for asthma care in schools. The resultant Colorado Competency Framework for Asthma Care in Schools guided the development and pilot testing of a continuing education curriculum for school nurses. Pre- and postassessments demonstrated significant improvements in knowledge and self-confidence related to asthma care in schools and inhaler technique skills. This work is the first to use a consensus process to identify a framework of minimum competencies for providing asthma care in schools. This framework informed a continuing education curriculum that resulted in improved knowledge, confidence, and skills for school nurses.

  7. Creating New Incentives for Risk Identification and Insurance Process for the Electric Utility Industry (initial award through Award Modification 2); Energy & Risk Transfer Assessment (Award Modifications 3 - 6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Ebert

    2008-02-28

    This is the final report for the DOE-NETL grant entitled 'Creating New Incentives for Risk Identification & Insurance Processes for the Electric Utility Industry' and later, 'Energy & Risk Transfer Assessment'. It reflects work done on projects from 15 August 2004 to 29 February 2008. Projects were on a variety of topics, including commercial insurance for electrical utilities, the Electrical Reliability Organization, cost recovery by Gulf State electrical utilities after major hurricanes, and review of state energy emergency plans. This Final Technical Report documents and summarizes all work performed during the award period, which in this case is from 15 August 2004 (date of notification of original award) through 29 February 2008. This report presents this information in a comprehensive, integrated fashion that clearly shows a logical and synergistic research trajectory, and is augmented with findings and conclusions drawn from the research as a whole. Four major research projects were undertaken and completed during the 42 month period of activities conducted and funded by the award; these are: (1) Creating New Incentives for Risk Identification and Insurance Process for the Electric Utility Industry (also referred to as the 'commercial insurance' research). Three major deliverables were produced: a pre-conference white paper, a two-day facilitated stakeholders workshop conducted at George Mason University, and a post-workshop report with findings and recommendations. All deliverables from this work are published on the CIP website at http://cipp.gmu.edu/projects/DoE-NETL-2005.php. (2) The New Electric Reliability Organization (ERO): an examination of critical issues associated with governance, standards development and implementation, and jurisdiction (also referred to as the 'ERO study'). Four major deliverables were produced: a series of preliminary memoranda for the staff of the Office of Electricity Delivery and

  8. Outcome (competency) based education: an exploration of its origins, theoretical basis, and empirical evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørcke, Anne Mette; Dornan, Tim; Eika, Berit

    2013-01-01

    components: A review of historical landmarks in the evolution of OBE; a review of conceptual frameworks and theories; and a systematic review of empirical publications from 1999 to 2010 that reported data concerning the effects of learning outcomes on undergraduate medical education. OBE had its origins...... in behaviourist theories of learning. It is tightly linked to the assessment and regulation of proficiency, but less clearly linked to teaching and learning activities. Over time, there have been cycles of advocacy for, then criticism of, OBE. A recurring critique concerns the place of complex personal...

  9. Problem Based Learning (PBL in Competence Based Curriculum and The Accademic Achievement: Evaluation of PBL Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiwik Kusumawati

    2012-12-01

    Design and Method: This study used quantitative and qualitative method. Data collection method is by distributing questionnaires, focus group discussion (FGD and document analysis of students’ academic achievement. This study included 3 year level students (2004, 2005, 2006 using PBL in school of medicine faculty of medicine and health sciences UMY (FMHS UMY. Result: GPA average > 2.5 is 32.47 %, MCQ > 60 is 33.1% and OSCE is 92.8%. The role of tutor and also practical instructor to facilitate learning objective was not optimal. The factors for the poor implementation of PBL includes curriculum planning (understanding of PBL concept and dissemination of curriculum, implementation of curriculum (various of block load, opportunity for self directed learning, e-learning effectivity, etc and assessment system (the number of students who reach minimal standar of MCQ is low, validity of MCQ is also low, etc. Conclusion: This study suggest the need to improve planning, implementation and curriculum assessment to support implementation of PBL. The role of Lecturer, tutor and practical instructor should be improved through faculty development to faciliate teaching learning proccess in PBL method (Sains Medika, 4(1:30-38.

  10. A competency-based approach to recruiting, developing, and giving feedback to department chairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Megan; Hoffmann-Longtin, Krista; Walvoord, Emily; Bogdewic, Stephen P; Dankoski, Mary E

    2015-04-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) are under unprecedented pressure, making strong leadership during these challenging times critical. Department chairs have tremendous influence in their AHCs, yet data indicate that--despite outstanding academic credentials--they are often underprepared to take on these important leadership roles. The authors sought to improve the approach to recruiting, developing, and giving feedback to department chairs at their institution, the Indiana University School of Medicine (IUSM), by reorganizing these processes around six key leadership competencies: leadership and team development, performance and talent management, vision and strategic planning, emotional intelligence, communication skills, and commitment to the tripartite mission. Over a two-year period (2009-2011), IUSM faculty and administrators developed standardized recruitment procedures to assess potential chairs based on the six leadership domains, and searches are now streamlined through centralized staff support in the dean's office. Additionally, IUSM offers a chair development series to support learning around these leadership competencies and to meet the stated professional development needs of the chairs. Finally, chairs receive structured feedback regarding their leadership (among other considerations) through two different assessment instruments, IUSM's Department Chair 360° Leadership Survey and IUSM's Faculty Vitality Survey--both of which the dean reviews annually. Strategically attending to the way that chairs are selected, developed, and given feedback has tremendous potential to increase the success of chairs and, in turn, to constructively shape the culture of AHCs.

  11. Collaborative Language Learning in Immersive Virtual Worlds: Competence-based Formative Feedback and Open Learner Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Kickmeier-Rust

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The uptake of information and communication technologies in the classrooms is a key trend over the past years and decades. Teachers are using Moodle courses, e-Portfolios, Google Docs, perhaps learning games or virtual worlds such as OpenSim for educational purposes. A second trend pushes towards a formatively inspired assessment and feedback, often combined with attempts of educational data mining and learning analytics. In this paper we present a role model for teaching English as a second language using OpenSim and a tool that enables teachers to perform real-time learning analytics and direct formative feedback and interventions in the virtual learning session. Also we present an approach to aggregate and store the learning information into open learner models.

  12. Test-Enhanced Learning in Competence-Based Predoctoral Orthodontics: A Four-Year Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freda, Nicolas M; Lipp, Mitchell J

    2016-03-01

    Dental educators intend to promote integration of knowledge, skills, and values toward professional competence. Studies report that retrieval, in the form of testing, results in better learning with retention than traditional studying. The aim of this study was to evaluate test-enhanced experiences on demonstrations of competence in diagnosis and management of malocclusion and skeletal problems. The study participants were all third-year dental students (2011 N=88, 2012 N=74, 2013 N=91, 2014 N=85) at New York University College of Dentistry. The 2013 and 2014 groups received the test-enhanced method emphasizing formative assessments with written and dialogic delayed feedback, while the 2011 and 2012 groups received the traditional approach emphasizing lectures and classroom exercises. The students received six two-hour sessions, spaced one week apart. At the final session, a summative assessment consisting of the same four cases was administered. Students constructed a problem list, treatment objectives, and a treatment plan for each case, scored according to the same criteria. Grades were based on the number of cases without critical errors: A=0 critical errors on four cases, A-=0 critical errors on three cases, B+=0 critical errors on two cases, B=0 critical errors on one case, F=critical errors on four cases. Performance grades were categorized as high quality (B+, A-, A) and low quality (F, B). The results showed that the test-enhanced groups demonstrated statistically significant benefits at 95% confidence intervals compared to the traditional groups when comparing low- and high-quality grades. These performance trends support the continued use of the test-enhanced approach.

  13. Competency-Based Teaching in Radiology - Implementation and Evaluation of Interactive Workstation-Based Learning to Apply NKLM-Based Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koestner, Wolfgang; Otten, Wiebke; Kaireit, Till; Wacker, Frank K; Dettmer, Sabine

    2017-11-01

    Purpose  New teaching formats are required to implement competency-based teaching in radiology teaching. Therefore, we have established and evaluated two practical competency-based radiological courses. Materials and Methods  The courses were held in a multimedia room with 25 computers and a professional DICOM viewer. Students were taught basic image analysis and presented clinical cases with a DICOM viewer under supervision of an instructor using desktop monitoring software. Two courses (elective course and obligatory course) were evaluated by the students (n = 160 and n = 100) and instructors (n = 9) using an anonymized online survey. Results  Courses were evaluated positively by the students and instructors. From the perspective of the students, the courses increased understanding of cross-sectional anatomy (elective/obligatory course: 97 %/95 %) and radiologic findings (97 %/99 %). Furthermore, the course increased the students' interest in radiology (61 %/65 %). The students considered this way of teaching to be relevant to their future occupation (92 % of students in the obligatory course). The higher incidence of teacher-student interaction and the possibility of independent image analysis were rated positively. The majority of instructors did not observe increased distractibility due to the computers (67 %) or notice worse preparation for MC tests (56 %). However, 56 % of instructors reported greater preparation effort. Conclusion  Practical competency-based radiological teaching using a DICOM viewer is a feasible innovative approach with high acceptance among students and instructors. It fosters competency-based learning as proposed by the model curriculum of the German Radiological Society (DRG) and the National Competency-based Catalogue of Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM). Key Points   · Practical competency-based radiological teaching is highly accepted by students and instructors

  14. Teaching nurses teamwork: Integrative review of competency-based team training in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Glenn; Bruce, Anne; Schreiber, Rita

    2017-12-20

    Widespread demands for high reliability healthcare teamwork have given rise to many educational initiatives aimed at building team competence. Most effort has focused on interprofessional team training however; Registered Nursing teams comprise the largest human resource delivering direct patient care in hospitals. Nurses also influence many other health team outcomes, yet little is known about the team training curricula they receive, and furthermore what specific factors help translate teamwork competency to nursing practice. The aim of this review is to critically analyse empirical published work reporting on teamwork education interventions in nursing, and identify key educational considerations enabling teamwork competency in this group. CINAHL, Web of Science, Academic Search Complete, and ERIC databases were searched and detailed inclusion-exclusion criteria applied. Studies (n = 19) were selected and evaluated using established qualitative-quantitative appraisal tools and a systematic constant comparative approach. Nursing teamwork knowledge is rooted in High Reliability Teams theory and Crew or Crisis Resource Management sources. Constructivist pedagogy is used to teach, practice, and refine teamwork competency. Nursing teamwork assessment is complex; involving integrated yet individualized determinations of knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Future initiatives need consider frontline leadership, supportive followership and skilled communication emphasis. Collective stakeholder support is required to translate teamwork competency into nursing practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Interprofessional education as part of becoming a doctor or physiotherapist in a competency-based curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Interprofessional learning is a critical pre-requisite for future interprofessional work. Structural adaptations in education offer possibilities to introduce new concepts. Rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMD are both prevented and treated by physicians and physiotherapists but the development of interprofessional roles is seldom part of curricula.Project description: A complex, longitudinal interprofessional educational approach for future doctors and physiotherapists was designed and implanted at various stages (anatomy, physical examination, pathology, therapy. Most segments of the RMD curriculum are now based on interprofessional classes. Student satisfaction with learning is continually and comparatively evaluated. Learning success is assessed with practical and written exams.Results: Interprofessional teaching was first introduced in 2013 for 420 first-year and 360 fourth-year medical students, along with 40 first- and third-year physiotherapy majors. The satisfaction with teaching and learning is high and distinctly above average for all teaching areas (satisfaction RMD rated as 2.4; average for all is 3.3. The percentage of those who pass the final exam is 94%. 100% of the students surveyed support the continuation of this interprofessional unit.Conclusion: Interprofessional teaching of RMD can be successfully implemented for future physicians and physiotherapists at different learning levels.

  16. Embracing a competency-based specialty curriculum for community-based nursing roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Pamela F; Swider, Susan M; Breakwell, Susan; Cowell, Julia M; Reising, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The Quad Council competencies for public health nursing (PHN) provide guidance in developing curricula at both the generalist and specialist level. However, these competencies are based on nursing roles in traditional public health agencies and community/public health is defined more broadly than official agency practice. The question arises as to whether community-based specialties require largely the same knowledge and skill set as PHN. The purpose of the competency cross-mapping project reported here was to (a) assess the intersection of the Quad Council competencies with four community-based specialties and (b) ensure the appropriateness of a Quad Council-based curriculum to prepare graduates across these four specialties (home health, occupational health, environmental health, and school nursing). This article details the multistep cross-mapping process, including validation with practice leaders. Results indicate strong alignment of community-based specialty competencies with Quad Council competencies. Community-based specialty-specific content that did not align well is identified, along with examples of didactic and clinical strategies to address gaps. This work indicates that a Quad Council-based curriculum is appropriate to prepare graduates in community-based specialties when attention to the specialty-specific competencies in the clinical setting is included. This work guides the development of a doctorate of nursing practice curriculum in PHN, encompassing the four additional community-based specialties. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook ... Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart- ...

  18. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatments for those living with diabetes. Other Ways to Give Become a Member Vehicle Donation Planned Giving ... Share Create Your Plate ! Share: Seven Simple Steps to Create Your Plate It's simple and effective for ...

  19. Formality and Informality in the Summative Assessment of Motor Vehicle Apprentices: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colley, Helen; Jarvis, Janis

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the interaction of formal and informal attributes of competence-based assessment. Specifically, it presents evidence from a small qualitative case study of summative assessment practices for competence-based qualifications within apprenticeships in the motor industry in England. The data are analysed through applying an…

  20. Combination Welding Technical Terms. English-Thai Lexicon. Introduction to Combination Welding. Thai Version. Multi-Cultural Competency-Based Vocational/Technical Curricula Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Masako T.

    This English-Thai lexicon and program introduction for combination welding is one of eight documents in the Multicultural Competency-Based Vocational/Technical Curricula Series. It is intended for use in postsecondary, adult, and preservice teacher and administrator education. The first two sections provide Thai equivalencies of English…

  1. Adult Competency Education Kit. Basic Skills in Speaking, Math, and Reading for Employment. Part G. ACE Competency Based Job Descriptions: #22--Refrigerator Mechanic; #24--Motorcycle Repairperson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Mateo County Office of Education, Redwood City, CA. Career Preparation Centers.

    This fourth of fifteen sets of Adult Competency Education (ACE) Competency Based Job Descriptions in the ACE kit contains job descriptions for Refrigerator Mechanic and Motorcycle Repairperson. Each begins with a fact sheet that includes this information: occupational title, D.O.T. code, ACE number, career ladder, D.O.T. general educational…

  2. How to investigate the goal orientations of students in competence-based pre-vocational secondary education: choosing the right instrument.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr P.J. Teune; Dr. M. Koopman; prof dr Douwe Beijaard

    2008-01-01

    This study explores the psychometric properties of three instruments: a semi-structured interview, a questionnaire and a sorting task. The central question is which instrument is most suitable to investigate the goal orientations of students in competence-based Pre-Vocational Secondary Education.

  3. How to Investigate the Goal Orientations of Students in Competence-Based Pre-Vocational Secondary Education: Choosing the Right Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Maaike; Teune, Peter; Beijaard, Douwe

    2008-01-01

    This study explores the psychometric properties of three instruments: a semi-structured interview, a questionnaire and a sorting task. The central question is which instrument is most suitable to investigate the goal orientations of students in competence-based pre-vocational secondary education. The questionnaire proved most accurate. The…

  4. Correlation between the Availability of Resources and Efficiency of the School System within the Framework of the Implementation of Competency-Based Teaching Approaches in Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esongo, Njie Martin

    2017-01-01

    The study takes an in-depth examination of the extent to which the availability of resources relates to the efficiency of the school system within the framework of the implementation of competency-based teaching approaches in Cameroon. The study employed a mix of probability sampling approaches, namely simple, cluster and stratified random…

  5. A Competency-Based Clinical Chemistry Course for the Associate Degree Medical Laboratory Technician Graduate in a Medical Technology Baccalaureate Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccelli, Pamela

    Presented is a project that developed a competency-based clinical chemistry course for associate degree medical laboratory technicians (MLT) in a medical technology (MT) baccalaureate program. Content of the course was based upon competencies expected of medical technologists at career-entry as defined in the statements adopted in 1976 by the…

  6. Effects of a Competency-Based Professional Development Training on Children's Physical Activity and Staff Physical Activity Promotion in Summer Day Camps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Beets, Michael W.; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Webster, Collin A.; Moore, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The YMCA of the USA serves more than nine million youth in its summer day camping programs nationwide. In spring 2011, the YMCA of Columbia, SC, with support from the University of South Carolina, adopted a competency-based staff-level training approach in an attempt to align staff behaviors with the YMCA of the USA new physical activity standards…

  7. Interdisciplinarity in translation teaching: competence-based education, translation task-based approach, context-based text typology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edelweiss Vitol Gysel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the context of competence-based teaching, this paper draws upon the model of Translation Competence (TC put forward by the PACTE group (2003 to establish a dialogue between cognitive-constructivist paradigms for translation teaching and the model of the Context-based Text Typology (MATTHIESSEN et al., 2007. In this theoretical environment, it proposes a model for the design of a Teaching Unit (TU for the development of the bilingual competence in would-be-translators.To this end, it explores translation as a cognitive, communicative and textual activity (HURTADO ALBIR, 2011 and considers its teaching from the translation task-based approach (HURTADO ALBIR, 1999. This approach is illustrated through the practical example of the design of a TU elaborated for the subject ‘Introduction to Specialized Translation’,part of the curricular grid of the program ‘Secretariado Executivo’ at Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina. Aspects such as the establishment of learning objectives and their alignment with the translation tasks composing the TU are addressed for this specific pedagogical situation. We argue for the development of textual competences by means of the acquisition of strategies derived from the Context-based Text Typology to solve problems arising from the translation of different text types and contextual configurations.

  8. Perspective: Competency-based medical education: a defense against the four horsemen of the medical education apocalypse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Mark; Mejicano, George; Gruppen, Larry

    2008-12-01

    Medical education is facing a convergence of challenges that the authors characterize as the four horsemen of the medical education apocalypse: teaching patient shortages, teacher shortages, conflicting systems, and financial problems. Rapidly expanding class sizes and new medical schools are coming online as medical student access to teaching patients is becoming increasingly difficult because of the decreasing length and increasing intensity of hospital stays, concerns about patient safety, patients who are stressed for time, teaching physician shortages and needs for increasing productivity from those who remain, and increasing emphasis on translational research. Further, medical education is facing reductions in funding from all sources, just as it is mounting its first major expansion in 40 years. The authors contend that medical education is on the verge of crisis and that little outside assistance is forthcoming. If medical education is to avoid a catastrophic decline, it will need to take steps to reinvent itself and make optimum use of all available resources. Curriculum materials developed nationally, increased reliance on simulation and standardized patient experiences, and adoption of quality-control methods such as competency-based education are suggested as ways to keep medical education vital in an environment that is increasingly preoccupied with fending off the four horsemen. The authors conclude with a call for a national dialogue about how the medical education community can address the problems represented by the four horsemen, and they offer some potential ways to maintain the vitality of medical education in the face of such overwhelming problems.

  9. An Evaluation of a Competency-Based Public Health Training Program for Public Health Professionals in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyrah K; Maryman, JʼVonnah; Collins, Tracie

    Less than one-third of the US public health workforce has formal training in public health. Academic-public health agency partnerships aimed at addressing the nation's workforce challenges have shown great promise. To evaluate the effectiveness of a piloted competency-based public health training program formed out of an academic-public health agency partnership. Mixed-methods design using pre- and postworkshop surveys and quizzes, open-ended questions, and document review. Large, urban local health department located in south central Kansas. Participant satisfaction with training, knowledge change, self-report application of new knowledge, and organizational change. Participants reported high satisfaction with the training program and valued the hands-on, practical approach used. Participation increased knowledge and confidence in public health competency areas covered in the program. At 3-month follow-up, 90% of participants reported applying new knowledge and skills in their primary job duties. At the organizational level, 3 major policy changes aimed at sustaining the program were implemented following its launch. Incorporating tailored, theory-driven approaches to trainings and collaborating with health department leadership to identify policy opportunities that help sustain the training program within the agency is recommended. Findings from this evaluation demonstrate the success of an academic-agency partnership's effort to develop and implement at a large, urban local health department.

  10. The significant impact of a competency-based preparatory course for senior medical students entering surgical residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonoff, Mara B; Swanson, Jennifer A; Green, Courtney A; Mann, Barry D; Maddaus, Michael A; D'Cunha, Jonathan

    2012-03-01

    Previous data suggest that formal, structured preparation might improve knowledge and skills of senior medical students (SMSs) as they transition to surgical residency. However, subsequent impact on clinical performance has not been demonstrated. The authors developed a comprehensive course for SMSs entering surgical residencies and studied the impact of the course on the subsequent performance of 2010 graduates (n = 22) compared with matched peers (16 nonparticipant controls at authors' home institution and 24 nonparticipant peer controls at outside institutions; total n = 62). Through pre- and postcourse surveys, knowledge tests, and technical examinations, they measured confidence and skill acquisition in 32 specific, job-related tasks. They followed participants and matched peers into internship and collected performance evaluations from supervising senior residents to determine whether course graduates would display performance advantages in these same tasks. The authors used t tests for all comparisons, α = 0.05. Participants demonstrated marked improvement in task-specific confidence in all 32 tasks from course beginning to end, with improved scores on written and technical skill examinations. Further, course participants outperformed peers in all 32 tasks in July, with their performance advantage predictably dissipating into the third month of residency. There was a marked correlation between confidence and competence in all tasks. Competency-based preparation for surgical internship resulted in objective gains in task-specific confidence and test performance at course conclusion, translating to improved performance and better patient care upon residency matriculation. These data emphasize the significant impact of formally preparing SMSs before graduation.

  11. Creating visual explanations improves learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobek, Eliza; Tversky, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Many topics in science are notoriously difficult for students to learn. Mechanisms and processes outside student experience present particular challenges. While instruction typically involves visualizations, students usually explain in words. Because visual explanations can show parts and processes of complex systems directly, creating them should have benefits beyond creating verbal explanations. We compared learning from creating visual or verbal explanations for two STEM domains, a mechanical system (bicycle pump) and a chemical system (bonding). Both kinds of explanations were analyzed for content and learning assess by a post-test. For the mechanical system, creating a visual explanation increased understanding particularly for participants of low spatial ability. For the chemical system, creating both visual and verbal explanations improved learning without new teaching. Creating a visual explanation was superior and benefitted participants of both high and low spatial ability. Visual explanations often included crucial yet invisible features. The greater effectiveness of visual explanations appears attributable to the checks they provide for completeness and coherence as well as to their roles as platforms for inference. The benefits should generalize to other domains like the social sciences, history, and archeology where important information can be visualized. Together, the findings provide support for the use of learner-generated visual explanations as a powerful learning tool.

  12. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... In Memory In Honor Become a Member En Español Type 1 Type 2 About Us Online Community ... Page Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Create Your Plate Create Your Plate is a ...

  13. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal Planning ... Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans and a Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets ...

  14. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Share: Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Create Your Plate Create Your Plate is a simple and effective way to manage your blood glucose levels and lose weight. With this method, you fill your plate with more non-starchy veggies ...

  15. Creating more effective graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, Naomi B

    2012-01-01

    A succinct and highly readable guide to creating effective graphs The right graph can be a powerful tool for communicating information, improving a presentation, or conveying your point in print. If your professional endeavors call for you to present data graphically, here's a book that can help you do it more effectively. Creating More Effective Graphs gives you the basic knowledge and techniques required to choose and create appropriate graphs for a broad range of applications. Using real-world examples everyone can relate to, the author draws on her years of experience in gr

  16. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Care Professionals Law Enforcement Driver's License For Lawyers Food & Fitness Home Food MyFoodAdvisor Recipes Association Cookbook Recipes Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten ...

  17. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More Oral Health & Hygiene Women A1C Insulin Pregnancy 8 Tips for ... Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart- ...

  18. Create Your Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal ... Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook ...

  19. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal ... Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook ...

  20. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pacific Islanders American Indian/Alaska Native Programs Older Adults Family Link Diabetes EXPO Upcoming Diabetes EXPOs EXPO ... Plate! Click on the plate sections below to add your food choices. Reset Plate Share Create Your ...

  1. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Diabetes Research & Practice Home We Are Research Leaders World's Largest Diabetes Meeting Recent Advances Type 1 ... Your Plate It's simple and effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating your plate lets ...

  2. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Now - match-donate-now.html Match – Donate Now Make your year-end donation today and ... Tour Registration Is Open It starts with you. Sign up to ride in Tour de Cure and create ...

  3. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate It's simple and effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating your plate lets you still choose the foods you want, but changes the portion sizes so you are getting larger ...

  4. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... this interactive tool. The healthy meal combinations are endless! Ready to try it at home? Just follow ... non-starchy vegetables and that your options are endless. Create Your Plate! Click on the plate sections ...

  5. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... and Pacific Islanders American Indian/Alaska Native Programs Older Adults Family Link Diabetes EXPO Upcoming Diabetes EXPOs ... Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans and a Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets ...

  6. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... Plate! Click on the plate sections below to add your food choices. Reset Plate Share Create Your ... your protein. See this list of protein foods . Add a serving of fruit , a serving of dairy ...

  7. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... losing weight. Creating your plate lets you still choose the foods you want, but changes the portion ... dairy or both as your meal plan allows. Choose healthy fats in small amounts. For cooking, use ...

  8. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... Please Join Us in the Fight for a Cure Your tax-deductible gift today can fund critical ... you. Sign up to ride in Tour de Cure and create your team today! More from diabetes. ...

  9. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that your options are endless. Create Your Plate! Click on the plate sections below to add your ... down the middle of the plate. Then on one side, cut it again so you will have ...

  10. Creating unreal audio

    OpenAIRE

    Rudsengen, Mathias Flaten

    2014-01-01

    Creating unreal audio” refers to the act of designing a sound effect that is intended to sound like a completely fictional object. This thesis is a practical venture into digital audio design. During the process of creating a sound effect anchored in a specific thematic framework, I will describe my work process and the challenges and problems faced, showing my personal work process and how modern digital sound effect creation can be undertaken. To provide context, I will also describe and re...

  11. Memory between old and new media. Rethinking storytelling as a performative practice to process, assess and create awareness of change in the world of secondary orality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena LAMBERTI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Storytelling is old, but in our digital age its means are new. When an event of huge cultural significance occurs (such as the sinking of the Costa Concordia, the “Occupy Wall Street” Protest, or the coming of Boat-People to Europe stories ricochet from TV to Internet, from cell phone to text message with a speed and proliferation unknown even a decade ago. We need new and effective ways to understand the making of cultural processes in a multi-media environment in order to learn and develop strategies to make sense of cultural shifts in a reduced and very limited span of time. My essay draws on research in both Memory Studies, Literary Studies and Media Ecology to open up the study of storytelling to old and new media psycho-dynamics so to start to develop a methodology of investigation that will facilitate a deeper understanding of the role of multimedia storytelling in the ways in which both individuals and groups cognitively and emotionally navigate profound cultural shift, as well as in the ways in which they create and preserve their memories through time and technological change.

  12. Twelve tips for the implementation of EPAs for assessment and entrustment decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Harm; Holzhausen, Ylva; Boscardin, Christy; Ten Cate, Olle; Chen, H Carrie

    2017-08-01

    The concept of entrustable professional activities (EPAs) reframes the approach to assessment in competency-based medical education. Key to this concept is the linking of assessment to decision making about entrusting learners with clinical responsibilities. Based on recent literature and the authors' experiences with implementing EPAs, this article provides practical recommendations for how to implement EPAs for assessment and entrustment decisions in the workplace. Tips for supervising clinicians include talking to learners about trust, using EPA descriptions to guide learning and teaching, providing learners with greater ad hoc responsibilities, using EPAs to identify/create opportunities for assessment and feedback, including case-based discussions and acknowledging gut feelings about learner readiness for more autonomy. Tips for curriculum leaders entail enabling the trust development, applying trust decisions at all levels of the supervision scale, employing all available information sources for entrustment, empowering learner ownership of the assessment process and using technology for learner tracking and program evaluation.

  13. Creating a learning culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathewson, Karyn

    2014-03-01

    This column describes the efforts of an agency to build a learning culture as part of changing their approach to service delivery, when adopting a focus on psychiatric rehabilitation and recovery. This example of one organization's challenges and successes in workforce development provides an alternative approach to the common single-session staff training that typically fails to change practice. This description draws from published material on communities of practice, technical consultation, and agency experience. Training alone is not enough to create change. An organizational commitment to ongoing quality improvement, along with available and accessible technical assistance for staff, creates an environment where change is anticipated, managed, and celebrated.

  14. Creating Web Pages Simplified

    CERN Document Server

    Wooldridge, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The easiest way to learn how to create a Web page for your family or organization Do you want to share photos and family lore with relatives far away? Have you been put in charge of communication for your neighborhood group or nonprofit organization? A Web page is the way to get the word out, and Creating Web Pages Simplified offers an easy, visual way to learn how to build one. Full-color illustrations and concise instructions take you through all phases of Web publishing, from laying out and formatting text to enlivening pages with graphics and animation. This easy-to-follow visual guide sho

  15. Don’t Use a Hammer When You Need a Screwdriver: How to Use the Right Tools to Create Assessment That Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Turnbow

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Instruction librarians want clear data showing the effectiveness of our workshops as a way of demonstrating our value in education. This article uses instructional design approaches to show how to make specific changes when writing and measuring our learning outcomes to capture what we are doing in our sessions. Unlike classes that develop over the course of several months, we are faced with unique challenges when conducting one-shot instruction sessions. By focusing our attention on student satisfaction and learning, we see ways to improve those sessions for everyone involved. In this essay, we provide examples and discuss how to write effective learning outcomes to answer specific questions about learner satisfaction and what the participants learned. In addition, we suggest ways to reform the evaluation and assessment questions that we use to reinforce our lessons. These methods can be used in both online and face-to-face environments.

  16. Creating a Cadre of Fellowship-Trained Medical Educators, Part II: A Formal Needs Assessment to Structure Postgraduate Fellowships in Medical Education Scholarship and Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jaime; Yarris, Lalena M; Santen, Sally A; Guth, Todd A; Rougas, Steven; Runde, Daniel P; Coates, Wendy C

    2017-08-01

    Education leaders at the 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference on education research proposed that dedicated postgraduate education scholarship fellowships (ESFs) might provide an effective model for developing future faculty as scholars. A formal needs assessment was performed to understand the training gap and inform the development of ESFs. A mixed-methods needs assessment was conducted of four emergency medicine national stakeholder groups in 2013: department chairs; faculty education/research leaders; existing education fellowship directors; and current education fellows/graduates. Descriptive statistics were reported for quantitative data. Qualitative data from semistructured interviews and free-text responses were analyzed using a thematic approach. Participants were 11/15 (73%) education fellowship directors, 13/20 (65%) fellows/graduates, 106/239 (44%) faculty education/research leaders, and a convenience sample of 26 department chairs. Department chairs expected new education faculty to design didactics (85%) and teach clinically (96%). Faculty education/research leaders thought new faculty were inadequately prepared for job tasks (83.7%) and that ESFs would improve the overall quality of education research (91.1%). Fellowship directors noted that ESFs provide skills, mentorship, and protected time for graduates to become productive academicians. Current fellows/graduates reported pursing an ESF to develop skills in teaching and research methodology. Stakeholder groups uniformly perceived a need for training in education theory, clinical teaching, and education research. These findings support dedicated, deliberate training in these areas. Establishment of a structure for scholarly pursuits prior to assuming a full-time position will effectively prepare new faculty. These findings may inform the development, implementation, and curricula of ESFs.

  17. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plate It's simple and effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating your plate lets you still choose the ... Help Enroll in the Living WIth Type 2 Diabetes Program Food & Fitness Food Recipes Planning Meals What Can I Eat Weight Loss Fitness In My Community Calendar of Events ...

  18. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... For Lawyers Food & Fitness Home Food MyFoodAdvisor Recipes Association Cookbook Recipes Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create ... Become a Volunteer American Diabetes Month® American Diabetes Association Alert Day® Become a Member Advocacy Home Take ...

  19. Creating an Interactive PDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branzburg, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    There are many ways to begin a PDF document using Adobe Acrobat. The easiest and most popular way is to create the document in another application (such as Microsoft Word) and then use the Adobe Acrobat software to convert it to a PDF. In this article, the author describes how he used Acrobat's many tools in his project--an interactive…

  20. Creating resilient SMEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlberg, Rasmus; Guay, Fanny

    2015-01-01

    According to the EU, during the past five years, small and medium enterprises (SMEs) have created 85% of new jobs and two-thirds of private sector employment in the region. SMEs are considered the backbone of the economy in Europe and represent more than 95% of enterprises in USA and Australia...

  1. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... meal-planning, In this section Food Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans and a Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods ... your year-end donation today and help fight diabetes. Donate Today We Can Help - we-can-help. ...

  2. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 1 Type 2 About Us Online Community Meal Planning Sign In Search: Search More Sites Search ≡ Are ... Fitness Home Food MyFoodAdvisor Recipes Association Cookbook Recipes Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten ...

  3. Creating snags with explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelyn L. Bull; Arthur D. Partridge; Wayne G. Williams

    1981-01-01

    The tops of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) trees were blown off with dynamite to create nest sites for cavity-nesting wildlife. The procedure included drilling a hole almost through the trunk, inserting the dynamite, and setting the charge with primacord and fuse. Trees were simultaneously innoculated with a decay organism. The average cost was $...

  4. Creating Special Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    deLisle, Lee

    2009-01-01

    "Creating Special Events" is organized as a systematic approach to festivals and events for students who seek a career in event management. This book looks at the evolution and history of festivals and events and proceeds to the nuts and bolts of event management. The book presents event management as the means of planning, organizing, directing,…

  5. Creating White Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLisky, Claire Louise; Carey, Jane

    Vedtagelsen af White Australien som regeringens politik i 1901 viser, at hvidheden var afgørende for den måde, hvorpå den nye nation i Australien blev konstitueret. Og alligevel har historikere i vid udstrækning overset hvidhed i deres studier af Australiens race fortid. 'Creating White Australia...

  6. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal Planning What Can I Eat? ... Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday ... Foods donate en -- Limited Time MATCH Offer - limited- ...

  7. Creating Pupils' Internet Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bognar, Branko; Šimic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an action research, which aimed to improve pupils' literary creativity and enable them to use computers connected to the internet. The study was conducted in a small district village school in Croatia. Creating a pupils' internet magazine appeared to be an excellent way for achieving the educational aims of almost all…

  8. Assessment of thermal effects in a model of the human head implanted with a wireless active microvalve for the treatment of glaucoma creating a filtering bleb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaumburg, F.; Guarnieri, F. A.

    2017-05-01

    A 3D anatomical computational model is developed to assess thermal effects due to exposure to the electromagnetic field required to power a new investigational active implantable microvalve for the treatment of glaucoma. Such a device, located in the temporal superior eye quadrant, produces a filtering bleb, which is included in the geometry of the model, together with the relevant ocular structures. The electromagnetic field source—a planar coil—as well as the microvalve antenna and casing are also included. Exposure to the electromagnetic field source of an implanted and a non-implanted subject are simulated by solving a magnetic potential formulation, using the finite element method. The maximum SAR10 is reached in the eyebrow and remains within the limits suggested by the IEEE and ICNIRP standards. The anterior chamber, filtering bleb, iris and ciliary body are the ocular structures where more absorption occurs. The temperature rise distribution is also obtained by solving the bioheat equation with the finite element method. The numerical results are compared with the in vivo measurements obtained from four rabbits implanted with the microvalve and exposed to the electromagnetic field source.

  9. Concept and benefits of the Inverted Classroom method for a competency-based biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühl, Susanne J; Toberer, Matthias; Keis, Oliver; Tolks, Daniel; Fischer, Martin R; Kühl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medical students often have a problem recognising the relevance of basic science subjects for their later professional work in the pre-clinical stage of their studies. This can lead to a lower motivation to learn biochemical content and dissatisfaction in the courses amongst the students. Alternative teaching methods such as the Inverted Classroom (IC) method can address this deficiency. The goal of this study was: to analyse the motivation and satisfaction of the students in a biochemistry seminar through the use of the e-learning-based IC method, to investigate the acceptance against the IC teaching method in biochemistry, and to compare the learning success achieved using the IC approach with that of a traditional course. We also investigated how a biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies can be successfully organised according to the IC method. Furthermore, we examined the benefits of the IC method over conventional teaching formats. Method: The IC method was implemented in accordance with the guidelines of the GMA committee "New Media" [30] in a biochemistry seminar for two student IC intervention groups with 42 students. A part of the factual knowledge from the on-site phase in the form of teaching videos together with self-learning control tasks were provided online before the seminar for both IC intervention groups. Exporting content to the self-learning phase creates new free time in the on-site phase, during which the content can be critically considered and processed and additional competency-based learning objectives can be taught. Identical biochemistry teaching content was taught in parallel control groups (14 student groups with n=299 students), but no material was handed out beforehand for a self-learning phase. These students only received the materials after the on-site phase. Motivation and satisfaction as well as the acceptance for the teaching methods were recorded by questionnaires, the

  10. Concept and benefits of the Inverted Classroom method for a competency-based biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kühl, Susanne J.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical students often have a problem recognising the relevance of basic science subjects for their later professional work in the pre-clinical stage of their studies. This can lead to a lower motivation to learn biochemical content and dissatisfaction in the courses amongst the students. Alternative teaching methods such as the Inverted Classroom (IC method can address this deficiency. The goal of this study was: We also investigated how a biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies can be successfully organised according to the IC method. Furthermore, we examined the benefits of the IC method over conventional teaching formats. Method: The IC method was implemented in accordance with the guidelines of the GMA committee “New Media” in a biochemistry seminar for two student IC intervention groups with 42 students. A part of the factual knowledge from the on-site phase in the form of teaching videos together with self-learning control tasks were provided online before the seminar for both IC intervention groups. Exporting content to the self-learning phase creates new free time in the on-site phase, during which the content can be critically considered and processed and additional competency-based learning objectives can be taught. Identical biochemistry teaching content was taught in parallel control groups (14 student groups with n=299 students, but no material was handed out beforehand for a self-learning phase. These students only received the materials after the on-site phase. Motivation and satisfaction as well as the acceptance for the teaching methods were recorded by questionnaires, the acquisition of knowledge by MC exams.Results: On a Likert scale from 1 (strongly disagree to 6 (strongly agree, the students in the IC intervention groups could be seen to be much more motivated (5.53 than students in the control group (4.01. Students in the IC intervention groups also recognised the

  11. Concept and benefits of the Inverted Classroom method for a competency-based biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühl, Susanne J.; Toberer, Matthias; Keis, Oliver; Tolks, Daniel; Fischer, Martin R.; Kühl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medical students often have a problem recognising the relevance of basic science subjects for their later professional work in the pre-clinical stage of their studies. This can lead to a lower motivation to learn biochemical content and dissatisfaction in the courses amongst the students. Alternative teaching methods such as the Inverted Classroom (IC) method can address this deficiency. The goal of this study was: to analyse the motivation and satisfaction of the students in a biochemistry seminar through the use of the e-learning-based IC method, to investigate the acceptance against the IC teaching method in biochemistry, and to compare the learning success achieved using the IC approach with that of a traditional course. We also investigated how a biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies can be successfully organised according to the IC method. Furthermore, we examined the benefits of the IC method over conventional teaching formats. Method: The IC method was implemented in accordance with the guidelines of the GMA committee “New Media” [30] in a biochemistry seminar for two student IC intervention groups with 42 students. A part of the factual knowledge from the on-site phase in the form of teaching videos together with self-learning control tasks were provided online before the seminar for both IC intervention groups. Exporting content to the self-learning phase creates new free time in the on-site phase, during which the content can be critically considered and processed and additional competency-based learning objectives can be taught. Identical biochemistry teaching content was taught in parallel control groups (14 student groups with n=299 students), but no material was handed out beforehand for a self-learning phase. These students only received the materials after the on-site phase. Motivation and satisfaction as well as the acceptance for the teaching methods were recorded by questionnaires

  12. Creating big data from small: using semantic web technology to facilitate the aggregation of diverse European contaminant data for regulatory assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R.; Kokkinaki, A.; Lowry, R. K.

    2016-12-01

    The European Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) requires evidence-based reporting to assess the quality of European seas by member states to determine whether they are achieving Good Ecological Status by 2020. One descriptor addresses contaminants; fertilizers, pesticides, antifoulants, heavy metals, etc. There are large amounts of contaminant data available to support this process: >600000 data granules identified, ingested and made available from 303 organizations in 38 countries through the EU funded EMODNet Chemistry program, built on the SeaDataNet (SDN) infrastructure. However when marked up consistently with SDN vocabularies the number of unique parameters available is huge (>3000). While many parameters might superficially appear similar the concentrations reported cannot always be considered equivalent, particularly in sediment and biota. The planned regional-scale data products risked being limited to localized patterns. The strategy adopted to make meaningful aggregations for data product development was to capture the knowledge of domain experts about what could be considered equivalent and publish this knowledge as a thesaurus (or SKOS schema) through the NERC Vocabulary Server (NVS). Of the >3000 parameters identified, so far 1095 have been mapped to 222 aggregated terms. This "captured domain knowledge" has been used to harmonize the data granules into aggregated data collections. The publication of this knowledge through NVS allows transparency and reproducibility of the aggregation process. Gridded data products are derived from the data collection with visualizations available as products generated from the gridded data collections: currently 140 products available either as WFS visualization or netCDF file download. This approach shows how small data sets integrated into larger-scale products, some of which can be targeted at non-scientists, have much greater value than envisaged when the data were originally collected.

  13. Rapid Evidence Assessment of the Literature (REAL(©)): streamlining the systematic review process and creating utility for evidence-based health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Cindy; Boyd, Courtney; Jain, Shamini; Khorsan, Raheleh; Jonas, Wayne

    2015-11-02

    Systematic reviews (SRs) are widely recognized as the best means of synthesizing clinical research. However, traditional approaches can be costly and time-consuming and can be subject to selection and judgment bias. It can also be difficult to interpret the results of a SR in a meaningful way in order to make research recommendations, clinical or policy decisions, or practice guidelines. Samueli Institute has developed the Rapid Evidence Assessment of the Literature (REAL) SR process to address these issues. REAL provides up-to-date, rigorous, high quality SR information on health care practices, products, or programs in a streamlined, efficient and reliable manner. This process is a component of the Scientific Evaluation and Review of Claims in Health Care (SEaRCH™) program developed by Samueli Institute, which aims at answering the question of "What works?" in health care. The REAL process (1) tailors a standardized search strategy to a specific and relevant research question developed with various stakeholders to survey the available literature; (2) evaluates the quantity and quality of the literature using structured tools and rulebooks to ensure objectivity, reliability and reproducibility of reviewer ratings in an independent fashion and; (3) obtains formalized, balanced input from trained subject matter experts on the implications of the evidence for future research and current practice. Online tools and quality assurance processes are utilized for each step of the review to ensure a rapid, rigorous, reliable, transparent and reproducible SR process. The REAL is a rapid SR process developed to streamline and aid in the rigorous and reliable evaluation and review of claims in health care in order to make evidence-based, informed decisions, and has been used by a variety of organizations aiming to gain insight into "what works" in health care. Using the REAL system allows for the facilitation of recommendations on appropriate next steps in policy, funding

  14. Creating bulk nanocrystalline metal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredenburg, D. Anthony (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Saldana, Christopher J. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Gill, David D.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Roemer, Timothy John (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Yang, Pin

    2008-10-01

    Nanocrystalline and nanostructured materials offer unique microstructure-dependent properties that are superior to coarse-grained materials. These materials have been shown to have very high hardness, strength, and wear resistance. However, most current methods of producing nanostructured materials in weapons-relevant materials create powdered metal that must be consolidated into bulk form to be useful. Conventional consolidation methods are not appropriate due to the need to maintain the nanocrystalline structure. This research investigated new ways of creating nanocrystalline material, new methods of consolidating nanocrystalline material, and an analysis of these different methods of creation and consolidation to evaluate their applicability to mesoscale weapons applications where part features are often under 100 {micro}m wide and the material's microstructure must be very small to give homogeneous properties across the feature.

  15. Creating organizational cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouton, Nicolaas T.O.; Just, Sine Nørholm; Gabrielsen, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to re-conceptualize the relations between rhetorical strategies and material practices in the processes whereby leaders create or change organizational cultures. Design/methodology/approach – The authors compare and contrast two broad perspectives on cultural...... insights. The authors propose an integrated perspective in which material practices and rhetorical strategies are seen as two analytical sides of the same ontological coin. This enables a fuller and more detailed explanation of how organizational cultures are created or changed. A brief illustration...... is provided of the merits of this approach by revisiting the case of Enron. Originality/value – The paper constitutes an initial exploration of how social scientific and rhetorical perspectives on organizational change may be brought closer together. It may provide the first step towards the development...

  16. Can Computers Create Art?

    OpenAIRE

    Hertzmann, Aaron

    2018-01-01

    This paper discusses whether computers, using Artifical Intelligence (AI), could create art. The first part concerns AI-based tools for assisting with art making. The history of technologies that automated aspects of art is covered, including photography and animation. In each case, we see initial fears and denial of the technology, followed by a blossoming of new creative and professional opportunities for artists. The hype and reality of Artificial Intelligence (AI) tools for art making is ...

  17. Creating product line architectures

    OpenAIRE

    Bayer, J.; Flege, O.; Gacek, C.

    2000-01-01

    The creation and validation of product line software architectures are inherently more complex than those of software architectures for single systems. This paper compares a process for creating and evaluating a traditional, one-of-a- kind software architecture with one for a reference software architecture. The comparison is done in the context of PuLSE-DSSA, a customizable process that integrates both product line architecture creation and evaluation.

  18. Creating flat design websites

    CERN Document Server

    Pratas, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    This book contains practical, step-by-step tutorials along with plenty of explanation about designing your flat website. Each section is introduced sequentially, building up your web design skills and completing your website.Creating Flat Design Websites is ideal for you if you are starting on your web development journey, but this book will also benefit seasoned developers wanting to start developing in flat.

  19. Creating Geoscience Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskop, J.; Buskop, W.

    2013-12-01

    The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization recognizes 21 World Heritage in the United States, ten of which have astounding geological features: Wrangell St. Elias National Park, Olympic National Park, Mesa Verde National Park, Chaco Canyon, Glacier National Park, Carlsbad National Park, Mammoth Cave, Great Smokey Mountains National Park, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, and Everglades National Park. Created by a student frustrated with fellow students addicted to smart phones with an extreme lack of interest in the geosciences, one student visited each World Heritage site in the United States and created one e-book chapter per park. Each chapter was created with original photographs, and a geological discovery hunt to encourage teen involvement in preserving remarkable geological sites. Each chapter describes at least one way young adults can get involved with the geosciences, such a cave geology, glaciology, hydrology, and volcanology. The e-book describes one park per chapter, each chapter providing a geological discovery hunt, information on how to get involved with conservation of the parks, geological maps of the parks, parallels between archaeological and geological sites, and how to talk to a ranger. The young author is approaching UNESCO to publish the work as a free e-book to encourage involvement in UNESCO sites and to prove that the geosciences are fun.

  20. Creating sustainable performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreitzer, Gretchen; Porath, Christine

    2012-01-01

    What makes for sustainable individual and organizational performance? Employees who are thriving-not just satisfied and productive but also engaged in creating the future. The authors found that people who fit this description demonstrated 16% better overall performance, 125% less burnout, 32% more commitment to the organization, and 46% more job satisfaction than their peers. Thriving has two components: vitality, or the sense of being alive and excited, and learning, or the growth that comes from gaining knowledge and skills. Some people naturally build vitality and learning into their jobs, but most employees are influenced by their environment. Four mechanisms, none of which requires heroic effort or major resources, create the conditions for thriving: providing decision-making discretion, sharing information about the organization and its strategy, minimizing incivility, and offering performance feedback. Organizations such as Alaska Airlines, Zingerman's, Quicken Loans, and Caiman Consulting have found that helping people grow and remain energized at work is valiant on its own merits-but it can also boost performance in a sustainable way.

  1. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... Safely Get And Stay Fit Types of Activity Weight Loss Assess Your Lifestyle Getting Started Food Choices In ... Food Recipes Planning Meals What Can I Eat Weight Loss Fitness In My Community Calendar of Events Local ...

  2. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... Index Low-Calorie Sweeteners Sugar and Desserts Fitness Exercise & Type 1 Diabetes Get Started Safely Get And Stay Fit Types of Activity Weight Loss Assess Your Lifestyle Getting Started Food Choices In ...

  3. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To ... Started Safely Get And Stay Fit Types of Activity Weight Loss Assess Your Lifestyle Getting Started Food ...

  4. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... Activity Weight Loss Assess Your Lifestyle Getting Started Food Choices In My Community Home Find Your Local Office Find your local diabetes education program Calendar of Events Wellness Lives Here Awareness ...

  5. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... Get And Stay Fit Types of Activity Weight Loss Assess Your Lifestyle Getting Started Food Choices In ... Recipes Planning Meals What Can I Eat Weight Loss Fitness In My Community Calendar of Events Local ...

  6. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... Meal Planning What Can I Eat? Making Healthy Food Choices Diabetes Superfoods Non-starchy Vegetables Grains and Starchy ... Activity Weight Loss Assess Your Lifestyle Getting Started Food Choices In My Community Home Find Your Local Office ...

  7. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... Planning What Can I Eat? Making Healthy Food Choices Diabetes Superfoods Non-starchy Vegetables Grains and Starchy ... Weight Loss Assess Your Lifestyle Getting Started Food Choices In My Community Home Find Your Local Office ...

  8. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... Safely Get And Stay Fit Types of Activity Weight Loss Assess Your Lifestyle Getting Started Food Choices In ... way to manage your blood glucose levels and lose weight. With this method, you fill your plate with ...

  9. Tourist-created Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munar, Ana Maria

    2011-01-01

    study of social media sites and destination brands, relying on qualitative research methods, content analysis and field research. Findings – Tourists are largely contributing to destination image formation, while avoiding the use of the formal elements of the brands. The most popular strategies used...... by destination management organizations exhibit some crucial weaknesses. However, a strategy based on analytics brings new opportunities for destination branding. Originality/value – The study provides an innovative analysis of tourist-created content and its impact on destination branding and presents......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyze the relationship between tourists' user-generated content on the web and destination branding, as well as to discuss the online strategies used by destination management organizations. Design/methodology/approach – The research adopts an exploratory...

  10. Creating nanostars with buckyballs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Young K., E-mail: ykbae@ykbcorp.com

    2013-12-17

    We report creating superradiant quantum nanoplasmas (nanostars) by impacting buckyballs at hypervelocities (v>100 km/s) in an innovative tabletop apparatus. The nanostars are estimated to have ∼10 TPa transient pressures and convert ∼35% of impact energy into soft-X-ray energy. The ultrahigh-efficiency conversion is proposed to result from Dicke Superradiance of Metastable Innershell Molecular State, originally discovered by the author and his colleagues in 1994. The usage of buckyballs and successful orders-of-magnitude scaling down of the apparatus size and complexity establish an innovative tabletop method for generating, studying, and utilizing matter in planetary or stellar interiors and open doors to numerous unprecedented applications.

  11. Creating Griffith Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Griffith Observatory has been the iconic symbol of the sky for southern California since it began its public mission on May 15, 1935. While the Observatory is widely known as being the gift of Col. Griffith J. Griffith (1850-1919), the story of how Griffith’s gift became reality involves many of the people better known for other contributions that made Los Angeles area an important center of astrophysics in the 20th century. Griffith began drawing up his plans for an observatory and science museum for the people of Los Angeles after looking at Saturn through the newly completed 60-inch reflector on Mt. Wilson. He realized the social impact that viewing the heavens could have if made freely available, and discussing the idea of a public observatory with Mt. Wilson Observatory’s founder, George Ellery Hale, and Director, Walter Adams. This resulted, in 1916, in a will specifying many of the features of Griffith Observatory, and establishing a committee managed trust fund to build it. Astronomy popularizer Mars Baumgardt convinced the committee at the Zeiss Planetarium projector would be appropriate for Griffith’s project after the planetarium was introduced in Germany in 1923. In 1930, the trust committee judged funds to be sufficient to start work on creating Griffith Observatory, and letters from the Committee requesting help in realizing the project were sent to Hale, Adams, Robert Millikan, and other area experts then engaged in creating the 200-inch telescope eventually destined for Palomar Mountain. A Scientific Advisory Committee, headed by Millikan, recommended that Caltech Physicist Edward Kurth be put in charge of building and exhibit design. Kurth, in turn, sought help from artist Russell Porter. The architecture firm of John C. Austin and Fredrick Ashley was selected to design the project, and they adopted the designs of Porter and Kurth. Philip Fox of the Adler Planetarium was enlisted to manage the completion of the Observatory and become its

  12. Creating the living brand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendapudi, Neeli; Bendapudi, Venkat

    2005-05-01

    It's easy to conclude from the literature and the lore that top-notch customer service is the province of a few luxury companies and that any retailer outside that rarefied atmosphere is condemned to offer mediocre service at best. But even companies that position themselves for the mass market can provide outstanding customer-employee interactions and profit from them, if they train employees to reflect the brand's core values. The authors studied the convenience store industry in depth and focused on two that have developed a devoted following: QuikTrip (QT) and Wawa. Turnover rates at QT and Wawa are 14% and 22% respectively, much lower than the typical rate in retail. The authors found six principles that both firms embrace to create a strong culture of customer service. Know what you're looking for: A focus on candidates' intrinsic traits allows the companies to hire people who will naturally bring the right qualities to the job. Make the most of talent: In mass-market retail, talent is generally viewed as a commodity, but that outlook becomes a self-fulfilling prophesy. Create pride in the brand: Service quality depends directly on employees' attachment to the brand. Build community: Wawa and QT have made concerted efforts to build customer loyalty through a sense of community. Share the business context: Employees need a clear understanding of how their company operates and how it defines success. Satisfy the soul: To win an employee's passionate engagement, a company must meet his or her needs for security, esteem, and justice.

  13. A competency-based approach to nurses' continuing education for clinical reasoning and leadership through reflective practice in a care situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudreau, Johanne; Pepin, Jacinthe; Larue, Caroline; Dubois, Sylvie; Descôteaux, Renée; Lavoie, Patrick; Dumont, Katia

    2015-11-01

    Newly graduated nurses need to demonstrate high levels of competencies when they enter the workplace. A competency-based approach to their education is recommended to ensure patients' needs are met. A continuing education intervention consistent with the competency-based approach to education was designed and implemented in eight care units in two teaching hospitals. It consists of a series of 30-min reflective practice groups on clinical events that newly graduated nurses encountered in their practice. It was evaluated using a descriptive longitudinal evaluative research design, combining individual and group interviews with stakeholders, the analysis of facilitators' journal entries, and a research assistant's field notes. The results suggest that issues associated with the implementation of the continuing education intervention revolved around leadership for managers, flexibility for nursing staff, and role shifting for the facilitators. Newly graduated nurses who participated in the study noted that the reflective practice sessions contributed to the development of both clinical reasoning and leadership. Nursing managers stated the advantages of the intervention on nurses' professional development and for the quality and safety of care. Following the end of the study, participants from two units managed to pursue the activity during their work time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Create Your Plate

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  15. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... Count Glycemic Index Low-Calorie Sweeteners Sugar and Desserts Fitness Exercise & Type 1 Diabetes Get Started Safely Get And Stay Fit Types of Activity Weight Loss Assess Your Lifestyle Getting Started Food Choices In My Community Home Find Your Local ...

  16. Creating alternatives in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Traditional scientist training at the PhD level does not prepare students to be competitive in biotechnology or other non-academic science careers. Some universities have developed biotechnology-relevant doctoral programmes, but most have not. Forming a life science career club makes a statement to university administrators that it is time to rework the curriculum to include biotechnology-relevant training. A career club can supplement traditional PhD training by introducing students to available career choices, help them develop a personal network and teach the business skills that they will need to be competitive in science outside of academia. This paper is an instructional guide designed to help students create a science career club at their own university. These suggestions are based on the experience gained in establishing such a club for the Graduate School at the University of Colorado Denver. We describe the activities that can be offered, the job descriptions for the offices required and potential challenges. With determination, a creative spirit, and the guidance of this paper, students should be able to greatly increase awareness of science career options, and begin building the skills necessary to become competitive in non-academic science. PMID:20161069

  17. Creating an open mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Duncan

    2011-07-01

    Duncan Monaghan is 33 years old and in his second year of an Arts degree in Creative Writing. He is a published poet and is currently producing a music CD. Duncan has a history of bipolar disorder which was diagnosed when he was nineteen: "It worried me at first a lot. It played on my mind constantly. I felt different from everybody else--I did not understand what was happening to me." Drawing on his life experiences, Duncan has been enhancing his recovery through creativity--in poetry, lyrics, music and story. "Life for me was a constant battle of relying on medication and appointments with my case manager...until I realized I could combine my recovery with my passions as a tool to use as an outlet to many of the "mind traps" I so often found hindering my own recovery." Duncan is Aboriginal and has experience of the mental health systems in most states and territories and now lives in Brisbane. This is a shortened version of his presentation at Creating Futures 2010.

  18. Using a CAS Self-Study to Teach Assessment Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Brian

    2017-01-01

    There are likely as many approaches to teaching assessment as there are people teaching assessment. Graduate courses on assessment can be structured with a singular focus, such as learning outcomes assessment, or along a competencies-based framework. Such frameworks include the Assessment Skills and Knowledge (ASK) Standards developed by College…

  19. Technical skills assessment toolbox: a review using the unitary framework of validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Iman; Manji, Farouq; Park, Yoon Soo; Juul, Dorthea; Ott, Michael; Harris, Ilene; Farrell, Timothy M

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a technical skills assessment toolbox for 35 basic and advanced skills/procedures that comprise the American College of Surgeons (ACS)/Association of Program Directors in Surgery (APDS) surgical skills curriculum and to provide a critical appraisal of the included tools, using contemporary framework of validity. Competency-based training has become the predominant model in surgical education and assessment of performance is an essential component. Assessment methods must produce valid results to accurately determine the level of competency. A search was performed, using PubMed and Google Scholar, to identify tools that have been developed for assessment of the targeted technical skills. A total of 23 assessment tools for the 35 ACS/APDS skills modules were identified. Some tools, such as Operative Performance Rating System (OSATS) and Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (OPRS), have been tested for more than 1 procedure. Therefore, 30 modules had at least 1 assessment tool, with some common surgical procedures being addressed by several tools. Five modules had none. Only 3 studies used Messick's framework to design their validity studies. The remaining studies used an outdated framework on the basis of "types of validity." When analyzed using the contemporary framework, few of these studies demonstrated validity for content, internal structure, and relationship to other variables. This study provides an assessment toolbox for common surgical skills/procedures. Our review shows that few authors have used the contemporary unitary concept of validity for development of their assessment tools. As we progress toward competency-based training, future studies should provide evidence for various sources of validity using the contemporary framework.

  20. The Effects of Performance-Based Assessment Criteria on Student Performance and Self-Assessment Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastre, Greet Mia Jos; van der Klink, Marcel R.; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of performance-based versus competence-based assessment criteria on task performance and self-assessment skills among 39 novice secondary vocational education students in the domain of nursing and care. In a performance-based assessment group students are provided with a preset list of performance-based…

  1. Introducing point-of-care ultrasound through competency-based simulation education using a fractured chicken bone model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan L Haas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Audience: Medical students and interns. Introduction: Integration of point-of-care ultrasound (PoCUS into undergraduate medical education has many potential benefits, including reinforcing core anatomic and physiologic concepts, demonstrating clinical correlates to pathology, and aiding in learning of the physical examination. Patients, standardized patients, commercial training models, or cadavers are typically required for training students on PoCUS, and are associated with substantial costs to educators and medical schools. Objectives: To introduce medical students to PoCUS with an inexpensive, reproducible, and educationally effective model using fractured chicken bones set in gelatin, and to assess medical students’ abilities to identify simulated long-bone fractures using PoCUS. Methods: Medical students are pre-tested with an affective style questionnaire, a multiple-choice knowledge test, and a hands-on skill test pertaining to PoCUS and assessment of long-bone fractures. The hands-on skill test consists of PoCUS evaluation of 16 chicken tibias (half of which are fractured set in an opaque gelatin solution. Subjects undergo a standardized educational intervention consisting of a video and deliberate practice on clear gelatin models until a predetermined performance standard is met. The investigators defined the performance standard as successful identification of the presence or absence of fracture in five consecutive clear gelatin modules using correct technique. Subjects are post-tested using an affective style questionnaire, a multiple-choice knowledge test, and a hands-on skill test, and these are repeated eight weeks later to assess retention.

  2. Competency in Chaos: Lifesaving Performance of Care Providers Utilizing a Competency-Based, Multi-Actor Emergency Preparedness Training Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lancer A.; Swartzentruber, Derrick A.; Davis, Christopher Ashby; Maddux, P. Tim; Schnellman, Jennifer; Wahlquist, Amy E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Providing comprehensive emergency preparedness training (EPT) to care providers is important to the future success of disaster operations in the US. Few EPT programs possess both competency-driven goals and metrics to measure performance during a multi-patient simulated disaster. Methods A 1-day (8-hour) EPT course for care providers was developed to enhance provider knowledge, skill, and comfort necessary to save lives during a simulated disaster. Nine learning objectives, 18 competencies, and 34 performance objectives were developed. During the 2-year demonstration of the curriculum, 24 fourth-year medical students and 17 Veterans Hospital Administration (VHA) providers were recruited and volunteered to take the course (two did not fully complete the research materials). An online pre-test, two post-tests, course assessment, didactic and small group content, and a 6-minute clinical casualty scenario were developed. During the scenario, trainees working in teams were confronted with three human simulators and 10 actor patients simultaneously. Unless appropriate performance objectives were met, the simulators “died” and the team was exposed to “anthrax.” After the scenario, team members participated in a facilitator-led debriefing using digital video and then repeated the scenario. Results Trainees (N = 39) included 24 (62%) medical students; seven (18%) physicians; seven (18%) nurses; and one (3%) emergency manager. Forty-seven percent of the VHA providers reported greater than 16 annual hours of disaster training, while 15 (63%) of the medical students reported no annual disaster training. The mean (SD) score for the pre-test was 12.3 (3.8), or 51% correct, and after the training, the mean (SD) score was 18.5 (2.2), or 77% (P <.01). The overall rating for the course was 96 out of 100. Trainee self-assessment of “Overall Skill” increased from 63.3 out of 100 to 83.4 out of 100 and “Overall Knowledge” increased from 49.3 out of 100 to 78

  3. Creating Self-Portraits. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redekopp, Dave E.; And Others

    Creating Self-Portraits is an individual and/or group career development tool designed to assess without testing. Researchers have found that testing can be counter-productive; once clients were labelled, they frequently stopped self-examination. A tool was needed that would help people understand themselves in a way that would encourage further…

  4. Faculty Development for Small-Group-Teaching with Simulated Patients (SP) - Design and Evaluation of a Competency-based Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzer, Henrike; Freytag, Julia; Sonntag, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The introduction of innovative teaching formats and methods in medical education requires a specific didactic training for teachers to use complicated formats effectively. This paper describes preliminary considerations, design, implementation and evaluation of a skills-based workshop (7,5 hours long) for teaching with simulated patients. The aim is to describe the essential components for a lasting effect of the workshop so that the concept can be adapted to other contexts. Method: We present the theoretical framework, the objectives, the didactic methodology and the implementation of the workshop. The evaluation of the workshop was carried out using questionnaires. First the participants (teachers of the faculty of medicine, clinical and science subjects) were asked to estimate how well they felt prepared for small group teaching immediately after workshop. Later, after some teaching experience of their own, they gave feedback again as a part of the general evaluation of the semester. Results: In the course of three years 27 trainings were conducted and evaluated with a total of 275 participants. In the context of semester evaluation 452 questionnaires were evaluated on the quality of training. Conclusion: The evaluation shows that participants appreciate the concept of the workshop and also feel sufficiently well prepared. As a limitation it must be said that this is so far only the lecturers' self-assessment. Nevertheless, it can be stated that even a one-day workshop with a stringent teaching concept shows long term results regarding innovative teaching methods.

  5. Competency-based (CanMEDS) residency training programme in radiology: systematic design procedure, curriculum and success factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jippes, Erik; van Engelen, Jo M L; Brand, Paul L P; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2010-04-01

    Based on the CanMEDS framework and the European Training Charter for Clinical Radiology a new radiology curriculum was designed in the Netherlands. Both the development process and the resulting new curriculum are presented in this paper. The new curriculum was developed according to four systematic design principles: discursiveness, hierarchical decomposition, systematic variation and satisficing (satisficing is different from satisfying; in this context, satisficing means searching for an acceptable solution instead of searching for an optimal solution). The new curriculum is organ based with integration of radiological diagnostic techniques, comprises a uniform national common trunk followed by a 2-year subspecialisation, is competency outcome based with appropriate assessment tools and techniques, and is based on regional collaboration among radiology departments. The application of the systematic design principles proved successful in producing a new curriculum approved by all authorities. The principles led to a structured, yet flexible, development process in which creative solutions could be generated and adopters (programme directors, supervisors and residents) were highly involved. Further research is needed to empirically test the components of the new curriculum.

  6. Curriculation and Competence Based Education Training (CBET in Tanzania: A Critical Assessment of Public Administration and Management (PAM Curricula at Tanzania Public Service College (TPSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadhani Marijani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article directs the discourse in Public Administration and Management (PAM curricula at Tanzania Public Service College. The motive for this attempt is based on the fact that Public Administration (PA is itself recognized as a profession whose teaching aims at producing competent professionals and therefore needs constant review to conform to the current work complexities. Five big questions and content analysis are used as the basis for directing the discourse. The findings indicate that curriculation for PAM is complex and dynamic. Moreover, the findings indicate that the two curricula are more vocational than educational as there is little weight allocated for occupational course modules (36 out of 360 in PA and (126 out of 360 in HRM. This may pose the danger of “pourtpouri” problem in curriculum design. The article proposes rethinking interventions on curriculation for PAM at TPSC to benefit from Public Administration discipline.

  7. SHAREPOINT SITE CREATING AND SETTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr V. Tebenko

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Tools for sites building that offer users the ability to work together, an actual theme in information society and modern Web technologies. This article considers the SharePoint system, which enables to create sites of any complexity, including large portals with a complex structure of documents. Purpose of this article is to consider the main points of site creating and its setting with tools of SharePoint system, namely: a site template creating and configuring, web application environment to create and configure Web applications, change of existing and creation of new theme site, a web part setting.

  8. Creating a family health history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Family health history; Create a family health history; Family medical history ... include your: Genes Diet and exercise habits Environment Family members tend to share certain behaviors, genetic traits, ...

  9. Creating collaborative learning environments for transforming primary care practices now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William L; Cohen-Katz, Joanne

    2010-12-01

    The renewal of primary care waits just ahead. The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) movement and a refreshing breeze of collaboration signal its arrival with demonstration projects and pilots appearing across the country. An early message from this work suggests that the development of collaborative, cross-disciplinary teams may be essential for the success of the PCMH. Our focus in this article is on training existing health care professionals toward being thriving members of this transformed clinical care team in a relationship-centered PCMH. Our description of the optimal conditions for collaborative training begins with delineating three types of teams and how they relate to levels of collaboration. We then describe how to create a supportive, safe learning environment for this type of training, using a different model of professional socialization, and tools for building culture. Critical skills related to practice development and the cross-disciplinary collaborative processes are also included. Despite significant obstacles in readying current clinicians to be members of thriving collaborative teams, a few next steps toward implementing collaborative training programs for existing professionals are possible using competency-based and adult learning approaches. Grasping the long awaited arrival of collaborative primary health care will also require delivery system and payment reform. Until that happens, there is an abundance of work to be done envisioning new collaborative training programs and initiating a nation-wide effort to motivate and reeducate our colleagues. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Creating Our Own Online Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela TUTUNEA

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Creating our own online community is easy to do, by welcoming those who have an active presence online; first of all, we must have a well developed strategy of our own "empire", starting from the idea of creating the final benefit for our cyber-consumers.

  11. Adult Competency Education Kit. Basic Skills in Speaking, Math, and Reading for Employment. Part J. ACE Competency Based Job Descriptions: Sales Core Job Description; #36--Sales, Automotive Parts; #37--Sales, Retail; #38--Salesperson, Garden & Housewares; #39--Salesperson, Women's Garments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Mateo County Office of Education, Redwood City, CA. Career Preparation Centers.

    This seventh of fifteen sets of Adult Competency Education (ACE) Competency Based Job Descriptions in the ACE kit contains job descriptions for Salesperson, Automotive Parts; Sales Clerk, Retail; Salesperson, Garden and Housewares; and Salesperson, Women's Garments. Each begins with a fact sheet that includes this information: occupational title,…

  12. Adult Competency Education Kit. Basic Skills in Speaking, Math, and Reading for Employment. Part R. ACE Competency Based Job Descriptions: #95--Bus Driver; #98--General Loader; #99--Forklift Operator; #100--Material Handler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Mateo County Office of Education, Redwood City, CA. Career Preparation Centers.

    This fifteenth of fifteen sets of Adult Competency Education (ACE) Competency Based Job Descriptions in the ACE kit contains job descriptions for Bus Driver, General Loader, Forklift Operator, and Material Handler. Each begins with a fact sheet that includes this information: occupational title, D.O.T. code, ACE number, career ladder, D.O.T.…

  13. Medical teachers' perception of professional roles in the framework of the German National Competence-Based Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM)-A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griewatz, Jan; Wiechers, Steffen; Ben-Karacobanim, Hadiye; Lammerding-Koeppel, Maria

    2016-11-01

    Based on CanMEDS and others, the German National Competence-Based Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM) were recently consented. International studies recommend integrating national and cultural context when transferring a professional roles framework in different countries. Teachers' misconceptions may establish barriers in role understanding and implementation. The aim is to analyze medical teachers' rating and perception of NKLM roles in order to reveal differences to official definitions. A two-step sequential mixed methods design was used including a survey and focus groups with N = 80 medical teachers from four German universities. Most of the teachers highly valued the importance of the role "Medical Expert" and understood comprehensively. The Communicator and the Collaborator were rated fairly and perceived to a large extent. Other intrinsic roles like Health Advocate and Scholar showed more deficits in perception and less importance by the participants. This was seen generally problematic and should be considered carefully. Manager and professional showed one-sided weaknesses either in importance or perception. Medical teachers considered NKLM roles relevant for medical practice, although their role perception differed considerably. The value and risk matrix visualizes the specific role profile and offers strategic implications for NKLM communication and handling, thus supporting change management.

  14. Can Physical Examination Create a Stener Lesion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankachandra, Manesha; Eggers, John P; Bogener, James W; Hutchison, Richard L

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether a Stener lesion can be created while testing stability of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of the thumb. Testing was performed in a manner that reproduced clinical examination. Six fresh frozen hand and forearm specimens underwent sequential sectioning of the accessory UCL, the proper UCL, and the ulnar sagittal band. Measurements of radial deviation of the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint were taken with the thumb in neutral rotation, pronation and supination, both with 0 degrees and with 30 degrees of flexion of the MCP joint. Visual examination was performed to assess the presence of a Stener lesion. No Stener lesion was created in any position as long as the fascial origin of the ulnar sagittal band at the adductor pollicis longus remained intact. After creating a defect in the ulnar sagittal band, a Stener lesion was created in two specimens, but only when the thumb was flexed and supinated. Pronation provided more stability, and supination provided less stability, with one or both components cut, especially when testing at 30° of flexion. Compared to both components cut without flexion or rotation, there was a statistically significant difference in angulation with the 30 degrees of MCP joint flexion in both neutral rotation in supination. Performing a physical examination to assess the amount of instability of an ulnar collateral ligament injury did not create a Stener lesion if the exam was performed in a controlled, gentle manner with the thumb held without rotation. If the thumb is held in neutral rotation during the exam, an iatrogenic Stener lesion should not be created.

  15. Literacy competence based on fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broström, Stig

    tool towards children's general Bildung and more specific development of literacy competence in the first years of school, in 2007 we carried out an investigation about fiction as a part of mother-tongue teaching and the process of children's learning to read. Via the investigation and general studies...

  16. Industrial Engineering: creating a network!

    OpenAIRE

    Prado-Prado, José Carlos

    2016-01-01

    [EN] This paper presents a brief history of the Industrial Engineering Conference (CIO), and specially reinforces the role of the CIOs as a forum for building a network and creating log-term relationships Prado-Prado, JC. (2016). Industrial Engineering: creating a network!. International Journal of Production Management and Engineering. 4(2):41-42. doi:10.4995/ijpme.2016.5964. 41 42 4 2

  17. Teaching leadership in trauma resuscitation: Immediate feedback from a real-time, competency-based evaluation tool shows long-term improvement in resident performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Shea C; Heffernan, Daithi S; Connolly, Michael D; Stephen, Andrew H; Leuckel, Stephanie N; Harrington, David T; Machan, Jason T; Adams, Charles A; Cioffi, William G

    2016-10-01

    Limited data exist on how to develop resident leadership and communication skills during actual trauma resuscitations. An evaluation tool was developed to grade senior resident performance as the team leader during full-trauma-team activations. Thirty actions that demonstrated the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies were graded on a Likert scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (exceptional). These actions were grouped by their respective core competencies on 5 × 7-inch index cards. In Phase 1, baseline performance scores were obtained. In Phase 2, trauma-focused communication in-services were conducted early in the academic year, and immediate, personalized feedback sessions were performed after resuscitations based on the evaluation tool. In Phase 3, residents received only evaluation-based feedback following resuscitations. In Phase 1 (October 2009 to April 2010), 27 evaluations were performed on 10 residents. In Phase 2 (April 2010 to October 2010), 28 evaluations were performed on nine residents. In Phase 3 (October 2010 to January 2012), 44 evaluations were performed on 13 residents. Total scores improved significantly between Phases 1 and 2 (p = 0.003) and remained elevated throughout Phase 3. When analyzing performance by competency, significant improvement between Phases 1 and 2 (p communication and professionalism" (p = 0.56). Statistically similar scores were observed between Phases 2 and 3 in all competencies with the exception of "medical knowledge," which showed ongoing significant improvement (p = 0.003). Directed resident feedback sessions utilizing data from a real-time, competency-based evaluation tool have allowed us to improve our residents' abilities to lead trauma resuscitations over a 30-month period. Given pressures to maximize clinical educational opportunities among work-hour constraints, such a model may help decrease the need for costly simulation-based training. Therapeutic study, level III.

  18. The C.R.E.A.T.E. Approach to Primary Literature Shifts Undergraduates' Self-Assessed Ability to Read and Analyze Journal Articles, Attitudes about Science, and Epistemological Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, Sally G.; Lopatto, David; Stevens, Leslie M.

    2011-01-01

    The C.R.E.A.T.E. (Consider, Read, Elucidate hypotheses, Analyze and interpret data, Think of the next Experiment) method uses intensive analysis of primary literature in the undergraduate classroom to demystify and humanize science. We have reported previously that the method improves students' critical thinking and content integration abilities,…

  19. The Use of a Formative Assessment in Progressive Leader Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ira H.; Goulet, Laurel; Martin, JennyMae K.; Owens, Jake

    2015-01-01

    As institutions continue to place value on developing leaders, it becomes increasingly important to effectively assess students' leadership skills. The development and subsequent use of a formative competency based leader assessment was used with (N = 124) sophomore students at a small military college in the Northeast United States with a mission…

  20. An assessment innovation as flywheel for changing teaching and learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulikers, Judith T.M.; Runhaar, Piety; Mulder, Martin

    2017-01-01

    This contribution shows an example of how an assessment innovation can serve as a flywheel for changing teaching and learning. This article first explains the development of an authentic, competence-based performance assessment in pre-vocational secondary education (pre-VET). Using these

  1. Creating an Innovative Learning Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how to create an innovative learning (iLearning) organization. It begins by discussing the life cycle of knowledge in an organization, followed by a description of the theoretical foundation for iLearning. Next, the article presents an example of iLearning, followed by a description of the distributed nature of work, the…

  2. On Creating and Sustaining Alternatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyng, Morten

    2015-01-01

    (PD) as well as from innovation theory and software ecosystems. Last, but not least, the ongoing debate on public finances/economy versus tax evasion by major private companies has been an important element in shaping the vision and creating support for the initiative. This vision is about democratic...

  3. SPECIAL REPORT: Creating Conference Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel F. Peden

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Capturing video at a conference is easy. Doing it so the product is useful is another matter. Many subtle problems come into play so that video and audio obtained can be used to create a final product. This article discusses what the author learned in the two years of shooting and editing video for Code4Lib conference.

  4. Creating Space for Children's Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Frank

    2011-01-01

    As teachers struggle to balance the needs of their students with the requirements of commercial reading materials, educators need to consider how teachers will create space for children's literature in today's classrooms. In this article, 10 practical recommendations for incorporating children's literature in the reading instructional framework…

  5. We create our own reality

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    " Yes, we create our own reality. This is one of the most fundamental tenets of the ancient oriental religions, such as Buddhism. And during the last century, modern particle physics or quantum mechanics has discovered exactly the same thing" (1 page).

  6. Creating legitimacy across international contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Houman; Rask, Morten

    2014-01-01

    in Denmark, Israel, Canada, and Australia using expert interviews as well as content analysis of newspaper articles and other secondary sources. Storytelling, which is found to be central to the legitimacy-creating efforts of international business ventures, interacts with existing discourses in the diverse...

  7. Creating Presentations on ICT Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchis, Iuliana

    2010-01-01

    The article focuses on the creation of presentations on ICT classes. The first part highlights the most important steps when creating a presentation. The main idea is, that the computer presentation shouldn't consist only from the technological part, i.e. the editing of the presentation in a computer program. There are many steps before and after…

  8. Creating speech-synchronized animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Scott A; Parent, Richard E

    2005-01-01

    We present a facial model designed primarily to support animated speech. Our facial model takes facial geometry as input and transforms it into a parametric deformable model. The facial model uses a muscle-based parameterization, allowing for easier integration between speech synchrony and facial expressions. Our facial model has a highly deformable lip model that is grafted onto the input facial geometry to provide the necessary geometric complexity needed for creating lip shapes and high-quality renderings. Our facial model also includes a highly deformable tongue model that can represent the shapes the tongue undergoes during speech. We add teeth, gums, and upper palate geometry to complete the inner mouth. To decrease the processing time, we hierarchically deform the facial surface. We also present a method to animate the facial model over time to create animated speech using a model of coarticulation that blends visemes together using dominance functions. We treat visemes as a dynamic shaping of the vocal tract by describing visemes as curves instead of keyframes. We show the utility of the techniques described in this paper by implementing them in a text-to-audiovisual-speech system that creates animation of speech from unrestricted text. The facial and coarticulation models must first be interactively initialized. The system then automatically creates accurate real-time animated speech from the input text. It is capable of cheaply producing tremendous amounts of animated speech with very low resource requirements.

  9. Creating Learning Outcomes for a TESOL Teacher Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrichsen, Lynn; Tanner, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This article shares the results of a multisemester effort to create learning outcomes and related assessment measures for a graduate-level teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) teacher preparation program. It starts by explaining what learning outcomes are, why they are important, and how to create them. It then describes the…

  10. Creating interdisciplinary education within monodisciplinary structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvig, Katrine; Lyall, Catherine; R. Meagher, Laura

    2017-01-01

    to the processes of creating interdisciplinary education initiatives within traditional monodisciplinary universities. In this study, we thus explore how interdisciplinary education and teaching emerge and develop within universities that have little or no established infrastructure to support interdisciplinarity......The literature on interdisciplinary higher education is influenced by two overall trends: one looks at the institutional level of specially designed interdisciplinary institutions, while the other assesses individual interdisciplinary educational activities. Much less attention is given....... Using qualitative data from a multi-part case study, we examine the development of diverse interdisciplinary educational efforts within a traditional faculty-structured university in order to map the ways in which interdisciplinary educational elements have been created, supported, challenged or even...

  11. Creating a climate for excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, J

    1985-01-01

    Some people are motivated to achieve in a manner consistent with the goals of their organization while others pursue individual goals. The attitudes people hold determine their behavior. Therefore, the manager is charged with creating an environment that fosters employee commitment to organizational goals. To create a climate for achievement, managers must recognize that all employees want recognition. Employees perform more effectively when they understand the goals of the organization, know what is expected of them, and are part of a system that includes feedback and reinforcement. Generally, people perform more effectively in an environment with minimal threat and punishment; individual responsibility should be encouraged, rewards based on results, and a climate of trust and open communication should prevail.

  12. Creating advanced health informatics certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadd, Cynthia S; Williamson, Jeffrey J; Steen, Elaine B; Fridsma, Douglas B

    2016-07-01

    In 2005, AMIA leaders and members concluded that certification of advanced health informatics professionals would offer value to individual practitioners, organizations that hire them, and society at large. AMIA's work to create advanced informatics certification began by leading a successful effort to create the clinical informatics subspecialty for American Board of Medical Specialties board-certified physicians. Since 2012, AMIA has been working to establish advanced health informatics certification (AHIC) for all health informatics practitioners regardless of their primary discipline. In November 2015, AMIA completed the first of 3 key tasks required to establish AHIC, with the AMIA Board of Directors' endorsement of proposed eligibility requirements. This AMIA Board white paper describes efforts to establish AHIC, reports on the current status of AHIC components, and provides a context for the proposed AHIC eligibility requirements. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Validation of a scenario-based assessment of critical thinking using an externally validated tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buur, Jennifer L; Schmidt, Peggy; Smylie, Dean; Irizarry, Kris; Crocker, Carlos; Tyler, John; Barr, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    With medical education transitioning from knowledge-based curricula to competency-based curricula, critical thinking skills have emerged as a major competency. While there are validated external instruments for assessing critical thinking, many educators have created their own custom assessments of critical thinking. However, the face validity of these assessments has not been challenged. The purpose of this study was to compare results from a custom assessment of critical thinking with the results from a validated external instrument of critical thinking. Students from the College of Veterinary Medicine at Western University of Health Sciences were administered a custom assessment of critical thinking (ACT) examination and the externally validated instrument, California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST), in the spring of 2011. Total scores and sub-scores from each exam were analyzed for significant correlations using Pearson correlation coefficients. Significant correlations between ACT Blooms 2 and deductive reasoning and total ACT score and deductive reasoning were demonstrated with correlation coefficients of 0.24 and 0.22, respectively. No other statistically significant correlations were found. The lack of significant correlation between the two examinations illustrates the need in medical education to externally validate internal custom assessments. Ultimately, the development and validation of custom assessments of non-knowledge-based competencies will produce higher quality medical professionals.

  14. Leadership Networking Connect, Collaborate, Create

    CERN Document Server

    (CCL), Center for Creative Leadership; Baldwin, David

    2011-01-01

    Networking is essential to effective leadership in today's organizations. Leaders who are skilled networkers have access to people, information, and resources to help solve problems and create opportunities. Leaders who neglect their networks are missing out on a critical component of their role as leaders. This book will help leaders take a new view of networking and provide insight into how to enhance their networks and become effective at leadership networking.

  15. Creating a Mobile Library Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutshall, Tom C.; Blake, Lindsay; Bandy, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    The overwhelming results were iPhones and Android devices. Since the library wasn't equipped technologically to develop an in-house application platform and because we wanted the content to work across all mobile platforms, we decided to focus on creating a mobile web-based platform. From the NLM page of mobile sites we chose the basic PubMed/…

  16. Creating and Sustaining Competitive Advantage

    OpenAIRE

    Lage Hansen, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    The paper provides a general framework for examining how governance choice affects competitive advantage. I argue that firms rely on assets for competing, and that these assets can be accessed by different governance structures (i.e., they can be in- or outsourced). The transaction cost economics framework is used to expose strengths and weaknesses of governance structures with respect to creating and sustaining competitive advantage. The result is a tradeoff to consider when choosing how to ...

  17. Assessment of Multiple Physician Competencies in Postgraduate Training: Utility of the Structured Oral Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, Ann; Simmons, Brian; Ng, Eugene; Skidmore, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Competency based medical education involves assessing physicians-in-training in multiple roles. Training programs are challenged by the need to introduce appropriate yet feasible assessment methods. We therefore examined the utility of a structured oral examination (SOE) in the assessment of the 7 CanMEDS roles (Medical Expert, Communicator,…

  18. Preventive Indicators for Creating Brownfields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Burinskienė

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the problem of brownfields in urban territories is successfully limited, it is a negative phenomenon of a sustainable city. Moreover, the number of recently created brownfield territories has become higher than that of the regenerated ones. Such territories reduce the quality of the social and economic setting of a city as well as visually and physically affect the life quality of city residents. Unfortunately, methods for the revitalization of brownfield land have been applied to deal with the consequences of the problem rather than to limit the problem itself. The authors of the article have investigated the aspects to be avoided to not create brownfields. The indicators that enable predicting the probability of a territory becoming a brownfield have been analyzed in this paper. Countries develop and exist under different social and economic conditions. Therefore, there is no uniform and universally accepted system of indicators for brownfield prevention that can be applied in any country or city. The authors have attempted to implement a recently developed idea of indicators for prevention under Lithuanian conditions and have selected those facilitating the identification of brownfields with an aim of identifying the most significant ones warning about the potential harm from the creation of brownfields in Lithuania. The selected indicators have been grouped, taking into account social, economic, natural, building and infrastructure settings of the city and ranked by a group of experts in urban planning. The established hierarchy of indicators in the groups of urban setting has allowed the authors to select the most significant preventive indicators for brownfields. The created system of indicators could be applied in practice as a basis for monitoring pertinent data and tracking their change.

  19. Creating a digital medical illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    This paper covers the steps required to complete a medical illustration in a digital format using Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop. The project example is the surgical procedure for the release of the glenohumeral joint for the condition known as 'frozen shoulder'. The purpose is to demonstrate one method which an artist can use within digital media to create a colour illustration such as the release of the glenohumeral joint. Included is a general overview as how to deal with the administration of a medical illustration commission through the experience of a professional freelance artist.

  20. Learning theories and tools for the assessment of core nursing competencies in simulation: A theoretical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Patrick; Michaud, Cécile; Bélisle, Marilou; Boyer, Louise; Gosselin, Émilie; Grondin, Myrian; Larue, Caroline; Lavoie, Stéphan; Pepin, Jacinthe

    2018-02-01

    To identify the theories used to explain learning in simulation and to examine how these theories guided the assessment of learning outcomes related to core competencies in undergraduate nursing students. Nurse educators face the challenge of making explicit the outcomes of competency-based education, especially when competencies are conceptualized as holistic and context dependent. Theoretical review. Research papers (N = 182) published between 1999-2015 describing simulation in nursing education. Two members of the research team extracted data from the papers, including theories used to explain how simulation could engender learning and tools used to assess simulation outcomes. Contingency tables were created to examine the associations between theories, outcomes and tools. Some papers (N = 79) did not provide an explicit theory. The 103 remaining papers identified one or more learning or teaching theories; the most frequent were the National League for Nursing/Jeffries Simulation Framework, Kolb's theory of experiential learning and Bandura's social cognitive theory and concept of self-efficacy. Students' perceptions of simulation, knowledge and self-confidence were the most frequently assessed, mainly via scales designed for the study where they were used. Core competencies were mostly assessed with an observational approach. This review highlighted the fact that few studies examined the use of simulation in nursing education through learning theories and via assessment of core competencies. It also identified observational tools used to assess competencies in action, as holistic and context-dependent constructs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Creating your own leadership brand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, Karlene

    2002-01-01

    Building equity in a brand happens through many encounters. The initial attraction must be followed by the meeting of expectations. This creates a loyalty that is part of an emotional connection to that brand. This is the same process people go through when they first meet a leader and decide if this is a person they want to buy into. People will examine your style, your competence, and your standards. If you fail on any of these fronts, your ability to lead will be severely compromised. People expect more of leaders now, because they know and recognize good leaders. And, predictably, people are now more cynical of leaders because of the well-publicized excess of a few leaders who advanced their own causes at the expense of their people and their financial future. This will turn out to be a good thing, because it will create a higher standard of leadership that all must aspire to achieve. When the bar is raised for us, our standards of performance are also raised.

  2. OPPOSITIONS CREATING HOMOUR IN JOKES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umral Deveci

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Human beings, who perceive the reality of death however who do not know when it will happen, begin their life with this deficiency. Therefore, throughout their lives, they struggle to consummate and make up for the things that they perceive as deficiency or shortcomings through different ways. Humor is one of these means. The fact that deficiencies are eliminated results in superiority and relaxation. The sense of humor and relaxation simultaneously provide laughter. When theories of humor such as superiority, incongruous and relief are taken into consideration, it seems that these theories are related and support each other. Each text is whole with its form and content, which should be evaluated as a whole as much as possible. Hence this study dwells on shortcomings in jokes and in the lights of these shortcomings and theories of humor, it is intended tomake humor in stories, in terms of structural and semantic context, more concrete. Five stories/jokes randomly selected through samples are analyzed in this article. There are two basic types of opposition. The firstone is opposition that creates situation, the second one is thatcreates laughter. The first opposition depicts the shortcomings of knowledge, skill, patience arrogance and jealousyand prepares the second opposition. The opposition that creates laughter make up for shortcomings through cause and effect relationship and laughter comes out.

  3. Can the Universe create itself?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gott, J. Richard, III; Li, Li-Xin

    1998-07-01

    The question of first-cause has troubled philosophers and cosmologists alike. Now that it is apparent that our universe began in a big bang explosion, the question of what happened before the big bang arises. Inflation seems like a very promising answer, but as Borde and Vilenkin have shown, the inflationary state preceding the big bang could not have been infinite in duration-it must have had a beginning also. Where did it come from? Ultimately, the difficult question seems to be how to make something out of nothing. This paper explores the idea that this is the wrong question-that that is not how the Universe got here. Instead, we explore the idea of whether there is anything in the laws of physics that would prevent the Universe from creating itself. Because spacetimes can be curved and multiply connected, general relativity allows for the possibility of closed timelike curves (CTCs). Thus, tracing backwards in time through the original inflationary state we may eventually encounter a region of CTCs-giving no first-cause. This region of CTCs may well be over by now (being bounded toward the future by a Cauchy horizon). We illustrate that such models-with CTCs-are not necessarily inconsistent by demonstrating self-consistent vacuums for Misner space and a multiply connected de Sitter space in which the renormalized energy-momentum tensor does not diverge as one approaches the Cauchy horizon and solves Einstein's equations. Some specific scenarios (out of many possible ones) for this type of model are described. For example, a metastable vacuum inflates producing an infinite number of (big-bang-type) bubble universes. In many of these, either by natural causes or by action of advanced civilizations, a number of bubbles of metastable vacuum are created at late times by high energy events. These bubbles will usually collapse and form black holes, but occasionally one will tunnel to create an expanding metastable vacuum (a baby universe) on the other side of the

  4. Assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gehan Elassal; Mona Elsheikh; Abdel Gawad Abu Zeid

    2014-01-01

    .... Subjects and methods: 80 COPD patients were assessed using SCID for establishing psychiatric diagnosis, Beck depression inventory for assessment of the severity of depressive symptoms, Hamilton anxiety scale...

  5. Creating Interdisciplinarity within Monodisciplinary Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvig, Katrine

    The objectives of the PhD project were to explore the linkages between interdisciplinary research and education, and to follow the concrete development and execution of interdisciplinary educational activities. In order to meet these objectives, an extensive literature study and a two......-year ethnographic fieldwork were conducted. The PhD project was part of the development project ‘Interdisciplinary education at UCPH’, with the aim of improving and supporting interdisciplinary teaching and learning at the University of Copenhagen (UCPH). The findings of the PhD study point towards wide...... discrepancies in the use of the term interdisciplinarity, which have repercussions for the practices and incentives of creating interdisciplinary education, research and collaboration. Overall, the thesis shows that interdisciplinary teaching and learning practices have to engage in a continuous balancing...

  6. Creating Genetic Resistance to HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, John C.; Zaia, John A.; Rossi, John J.

    2012-01-01

    HIV/AIDS remains a chronic and incurable disease, in spite of the notable successes of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Gene therapy offers the prospect of creating genetic resistance to HIV that supplants the need for antiviral drugs. In sight of this goal, a variety of anti-HIV genes have reached clinical testing, including gene-editing enzymes, protein-based inhibitors, and RNA-based therapeutics. Combinations of therapeutic genes against viral and host targets are designed to improve the overall antiviral potency and reduce the likelihood of viral resistance. In cell-based therapies, therapeutic genes are expressed in gene modified T lymphocytes or in hematopoietic stem cells that generate an HIV-resistant immune system. Such strategies must promote the selective proliferation of the transplanted cells and the prolonged expression of therapeutic genes. This review focuses on the current advances and limitations in genetic therapies against HIV, including the status of several recent and ongoing clinical studies. PMID:22985479

  7. Expertise in Performance Assessment: Assessors' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berendonk, Christoph; Stalmeijer, Renée E.; Schuwirth, Lambert W. T.

    2013-01-01

    The recent rise of interest among the medical education community in individual faculty making subjective judgments about medical trainee performance appears to be directly related to the introduction of notions of integrated competency-based education and assessment for learning. Although it is known that assessor expertise plays an important…

  8. Creating and Recreating. Microcomputing Working Paper Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arms, Valarie

    This document describes a software program, CREATE, which was developed at Drexel University to guide students in creating English compositions. A second program, ReCREATE, guides students in reading their finished papers and making global revisions. CREATE asks 20 questions that a teacher might ask a student in a pre-writing conference. Unlike…

  9. Creating responsible partnerships in tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Spitzer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available RQ: Organisations do not provide sufficient time and effort to seek out companies for partners that would, with the assistance of responsible cooperation, contribute to better quality offers and consequently to increased income and the good reputation of both companies. Responsibilities and ethics is where organizations on bothsides would take on and accept their own norms, tasks, obligations and be aware that in a relationship there is a need to give explanations and justify one’s actions, such partnerships will be long and prosperous. This requires a great deal of knowledge and maturity together with a very important personal characteristic that is care. This study examines whether the creation of long term partnerships through responsible and more personal (friendlyrelations brings the organization to greater success.Purpose: The purpose of this research is to determine how important it is for organizations in the tourism industry to build long term relationships, what it should be based on and whether companies are willing to change the current methods of operations.Method: The method of research was an interview with individuals that had a certain position within a tourism company and had contacts with partners and were obligated to see out new ones. A paradigm model was built and the responses analysed.Results: The survey results are encouraging. The interviews showed that respondents were aware that it is necessary to have long term and responsible partnerships. They recognized that in today’s world there is a lack of collaboration that is based on understanding andthat there should be more relations on a personal level. It isrequired that this changes in the future. The participants specifically highlight financial irresponsibility in many companies that destroys collaboration.Organization: With the help of this study, the author attempts to contribute ideas to organizations on how to create solid collaboration with partners, as

  10. Adolescents and HIV: creating partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, S

    1998-05-01

    Despite the President's directive on youth and HIV in 1997 to focus the nation's attention on adolescents and the battle against AIDS, prevention programs continue to be ineffective. The number of seropositive youth, ages 13 to 24 years old, is unclear due to inconsistent definitions of age ranges and inadequate access to testing. Youth have not sought testing for many reasons, including failing to perceive their vulnerability to HIV, confidentiality concerns, and not realizing the effectiveness of early treatment. Adolescents are creating independence, establishing relationships, and learning about drugs and alcohol. Young gay and bisexual men, drug-using youth, and youth of color are at high risk of HIV transmission. Identifying the population involved in risk-taking behavior and eliminating the behavior is an ineffective strategy for adolescent HIV prevention programs. Complicating the issue further, the goals and expectations of adolescents differ from the adults who design and deliver prevention programs. HIV education and prevention efforts need to address solutions to hopelessness, isolation, and violence, rather than focusing on the negative effects risky behaviors will have in the future. Effective programs combine a youth/adult partnership to take advantage of the strengths of each individual. Strategies for implementing prevention programs that address the specific needs of adolescents are suggested.

  11. Creating healthy and just bioregions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzoli, Keith; Leiter, Robert Allen

    2016-03-01

    Dramatic changes taking place locally, regionally, globally, demand that we rethink strategies to improve public health, especially in disadvantaged communities where the cumulative impacts of toxicant exposure and other environmental and social stressors are most damaging. The emergent field of Sustainability Science, including a new bioregionalism for the 21st Century, is giving rise to promising place-based (territorially rooted) approaches. Embedded in this bioregional approach is an integrated planning framework (IPF) that enables people to map and develop plans and strategies that cut across various scales (e.g. from regional to citywide to neighborhood scale) and various topical areas (e.g. urban land use planning, water resource planning, food systems planning and "green infrastructure" planning) with the specific intent of reducing the impacts of toxicants to public health and the natural environment. This paper describes a case of bioregionally inspired integrated planning in San Diego, California (USA). The paper highlights food-water-energy linkages and the importance of "rooted" community-university partnerships and knowledge-action collaboratives in creating healthy and just bioregions.

  12. Laser Created Relativistic Positron Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Meyerhofer, D D; Bonlie, J; Chen, C D; Chen, S N; Courtois, C; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Kruer, W; Landoas, O; Mithen, J; Murphy, C; Nilson, P; Price, D; Scheider, M; Shepherd, R; Stoeckl, C; Tabak, M; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorder, P

    2009-10-08

    Electron-positron jets with MeV temperature are thought to be present in a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena such as active galaxies, quasars, gamma ray bursts and black holes. They have now been created in the laboratory in a controlled fashion by irradiating a gold target with an intense picosecond duration laser pulse. About 10{sup 11} MeV positrons are emitted from the rear surface of the target in a 15 to 22-degree cone for a duration comparable to the laser pulse. These positron jets are quasi-monoenergetic (E/{delta}E {approx} 5) with peak energies controllable from 3-19 MeV. They have temperatures from 1-4 MeV in the beam frame in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Positron production has been studied extensively in recent decades at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science, positron emission tomography, basic antimatter science such as antihydrogen experiments, Bose-Einstein condensed positronium, and basic plasma physics. However, the experimental tools to produce very high temperature positrons and high-flux positron jets needed to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. The MeV temperature jets of positrons and electrons produced in our experiments offer a first step to evaluate the physics models used to explain some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe.

  13. Creating experimental color harmony map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamaret, Christel; Urban, Fabrice; Lepinel, Josselin

    2014-02-01

    Starting in the 17th century with Newton, color harmony is a topic that did not reach a consensus on definition, representation or modeling so far. Previous work highlighted specific characteristics for color harmony on com- bination of color doublets or triplets by means of a human rating on a harmony scale. However, there were no investigation involving complex stimuli or pointing out how harmony is spatially located within a picture. The modeling of such concept as well as a reliable ground-truth would be of high value for the community, since the applications are wide and concern several communities: from psychology to computer graphics. We propose a protocol for creating color harmony maps from a controlled experiment. Through an eye-tracking protocol, we focus on the identification of disharmonious colors in pictures. The experiment was composed of a free viewing pass in order to let the observer be familiar with the content before a second pass where we asked "to search for the most disharmonious areas in the picture". Twenty-seven observers participated to the experiments that was composed of a total of 30 different stimuli. The high inter-observer agreement as well as a cross-validation confirm the validity of the proposed ground-truth.

  14. Creating the Medical Schools of the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skochelak, Susan E; Stack, Steven J

    2017-01-01

    Despite wide consensus on needed changes in medical education, experts agree that the gap continues to widen between how physicians are trained and the future needs of our health care system. A new model for medical education is needed to create the medical school of the future. The American Medical Association (AMA) is working to support innovative models through partnerships with medical schools, educators, professional organizations, and accreditors. In 2013, the AMA designed an initiative to support rapid innovation among medical schools and disseminate the ideas being tested to additional medical schools. Awards of $1 million were made to 11 medical schools to redesign curricula for flexible, individualized learning pathways, measure achievement of competencies, develop new assessment tools to test readiness for residency, and implement new models for clinical experiences within health care systems. The medical schools have partnered with the AMA to create the AMA Accelerating Change in Medical Education Consortium, working together to share prototypes and participate in a national evaluation plan. Most of the schools have embarked on major curriculum revisions, replacing as much as 25% of the curriculum with new content in health care delivery and health system science in all four years of training. Schools are developing new certification in quality and patient safety and population management. In 2015, the AMA invited 21 additional schools to join the 11 founding schools in testing and disseminating innovation through the consortium and beyond.

  15. Developing an Objective Structured Clinical Examination to Assess Work-Integrated Learning in Exercise Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Fiona; Moore, Keri; Mildon, Sally; Jones, Philip

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to develop a valid method to assess the key competencies of the exercise physiology profession acquired through work-integrated learning (WIL). In order to develop a competency-based assessment, the key professional tasks needed to be identified and the test designed so students' competency in different tasks and settings could be…

  16. A theory of improvement for teachers' professional development in assessment for learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benthum, N.; Gulikers, J.T.M.; Jong, de F.; Mulder, M.

    2012-01-01

    To strengthen the practice of Competence-based Education (CBE) it’s needed to realise the potential of Assessment for Learning (AfL). However, teachers are usually not trained in designing assessment practices in CBE and professionalization in AfL is complicated. It’s needed to design a Theory of

  17. Proposals for Improving Assessment Systems in Higher Education: An Approach from the Model "Working with People"

    Science.gov (United States)

    de los Ríos-Carmenado, I.; Sastre-Merino, Susana; Fernández Jiménez, Consuelo; Núñez del Río, Mª Cristina; Reyes Pozo, Encarnación; García Arjona, Noemi

    2016-01-01

    The European Higher Education Area (EHEA) represents a challenge to university teachers to adapt their assessment systems, directing them towards continuous assessment. The integration of competence-based learning as an educational benchmark has also led to a perspective more focused on student and with complex learning situations closer to…

  18. India creates social marketing organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    India, in a major policy shift toward reversible birth controls methods, will form a new organization to promote private sector contraceptive sales. The government, through a recently signed agreement with the Agency for International Development (AID), plans to establish a private nonprofit Contraceptive Marketing Organization (CMO) in fiscal year 1984. This momentous move marks a full circle return to a 1969 proposal by AID and Ford Foundation consultants. Funded at about $500 million over a 7 year period, the CMO will function as a semi-autonomous entity run by a board of governors representing government and such public and public sectors as health, communications, management, manufacturing, marketing, advertising, and market research. According to the agreement called the India Family Planning Communications and Marketing Plan, the CMO's activities will cover procurement and distribution of condoms, oral contraceptives (OCs), and other yet to be determined contraceptive methods. Of the $500 million in funds, the government of India has pledged 2/3, AID roughly $50 million in grants and loans, with the balance expected from such sources as the UN Fund for Population Activities. The CMO's goal is a marked increase in contraceptive use by married couples of reproductive age from the current 6% rate to 20% by 1990. As of 1982, India has 122 million such couples, with 1% purchasing commercial products, 2% buying Nirodh Marketing Program condoms and 3% relying on free government contraceptives. Besides creating the CMO, the India/AID pact outlines intensified public sector family planning promotions and activities. Some Indian health experts believe the government's decision to expand social marketing's role rests with a significant decade long decline in the popularity of such permanent birth control measures as vasectomy and tubal ligation.

  19. Creating a Sustainability Scorecard as a predictive tool for measuring the complex social, economic and environmental impacts of industries, a case study: assessing the viability and sustainability of the dairy industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buys, L; Mengersen, K; Johnson, S; van Buuren, N; Chauvin, A

    2014-01-15

    Sustainability is a key driver for decisions in the management and future development of industries. The World Commission on Environment and Development (WCED, 1987) outlined imperatives which need to be met for environmental, economic and social sustainability. Development of strategies for measuring and improving sustainability in and across these domains, however, has been hindered by intense debate between advocates for one approach fearing that efforts by those who advocate for another could have unintended adverse impacts. Studies attempting to compare the sustainability performance of countries and industries have also found ratings of performance quite variable depending on the sustainability indices used. Quantifying and comparing the sustainability of industries across the triple bottom line of economy, environment and social impact continues to be problematic. Using the Australian dairy industry as a case study, a Sustainability Scorecard, developed as a Bayesian network model, is proposed as an adaptable tool to enable informed assessment, dialogue and negotiation of strategies at a global level as well as being suitable for developing local solutions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Creating Shared Value by Combatting Corruption

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Philip M Nichols

    2016-01-01

      Creating Shared Value The creating shared value strategy is similar to corporate social responsibility and to social impact in that it focusses on the intersection between business and the rest of society...