WorldWideScience

Sample records for compatible vapor-phase corrosion

  1. Chemical Species in the Vapor Phase of Hanford Double-Shell Tanks: Potential Impacts on Waste Tank Corrosion Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Qafoku, Odeta; Arey, Bruce W.; Boomer, Kayle D.

    2010-09-22

    The presence of corrosive and inhibiting chemicals on the tank walls in the vapor space, arising from the waste supernatant, dictate the type and degree of corrosion that occurs there. An understanding of how waste chemicals are transported to the walls and the affect on vapor species from changing supernatant chemistry (e.g., pH, etc.), are basic to the evaluation of risks and impacts of waste changes on vapor space corrosion (VSC). In order to address these issues the expert panel workshop on double-shell tank (DST) vapor space corrosion testing (RPP-RPT-31129) participants made several recommendations on the future data and modeling needs in the area of DST corrosion. In particular, the drying of vapor phase condensates or supernatants can form salt or other deposits at the carbon steel interface resulting in a chemical composition at the near surface substantially different from that observed directly in the condensates or the supernatants. As a result, over the past three years chemical modeling and experimental studies have been performed on DST supernatants and condensates to predict the changes in chemical composition that might occur as condensates or supernatants equilibrate with the vapor space species and dry at the carbon steel surface. The experimental studies included research on both the chemical changes that occurred as the supernatants dried as well as research on how these chemical changes impact the corrosion of tank steels. The chemical modeling and associated experimental studies were performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the research on tank steel corrosion at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This report presents a summary of the research conducted at PNNL with special emphasis on the most recent studies conducted in FY10. An overall summary of the project results as well as their broader implications for vapor space corrosion of the DST’s is given at the end of this report.

  2. Bonding-Compatible Corrosion Inhibitor for Rinsing Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, C. R.; Wurth, L. A.; Radar, A.

    2005-01-01

    A corrosion-inhibiting mixture of compounds has been developed for addition to the water used to rinse metal parts that have been cleaned with aqueous solutions in preparation for adhesive bonding of the metals to rubber and rubber-like materials. Prior to the development of this corrosion inhibitor, the parts (made, variously, of D6AC steel and 7075-T73 aluminum) were rinsed by deionized water, which caused corrosion in some places on the steel parts especially in such occluded places as sealing surfaces and threaded blind holes. An integral part of the particular cleaning process is the deposition of a thin layer of silicates and silane primers that increase the strength of the adhesive bond. The corrosion inhibitor is formulated, not only to inhibit corrosion of both D6AC steel and 7075- T73 aluminum, but also to either increase or at least not reduce the strength of the adhesive bond to be formed subsequently. The corrosion inhibitor is a mixture of sodium silicate and sodium tetraborate. The sodium silicate functions as both a corrosion inhibitor and a bond-strength promoter in association with the silane primers. The sodium tetraborate buffers the rinse solution at the optimum pH and functions as a secondary corrosion inhibitor for the steel. For a given application, the concentrations of sodium silicate and sodium tetraborate must be chosen in a compromise among the needs to inhibit corrosion of steel, inhibit corrosion of aluminum, and minimize cosmetic staining of both steel and aluminum. Concentrations of sodium silicate in excess of 150 parts of silicon per million parts of solution (ppm Si) have been determined to enhance inhibition of corrosion; unfortunately, because of the alkalinity of sodium silicate, even a small concentration can raise the pH of the rinse solution to such a level that aluminum becomes corroded despite the inhibiting effect. The pH of a solution that contains a high concentration of sodium silicate can be decreased by adding

  3. Vapor phase transformer drying – Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Steeves, Gregory R.

    2016-01-01

    Vapor phase drying is the most effective method for drying transformer insulation in a manufacturing setting. The process does not lend itself well to transformer drying in the field for a variety of reasons, including the difficulty of removing residual kerosene which can cause a potential change in transformer oil flash point. Several techniques are available for transformer insulation drying in both the field and in manufacturing. Vapor phase drying as part of transformer manufacturing is ...

  4. Vapor phase transformer drying – Part I

    OpenAIRE

    Steeves, Gregory R.

    2016-01-01

    Vapor phase drying is the most effective method for drying transformer insulation in a manufacturing setting. The process does not lend itself well to transformer drying in the field for a variety of reasons, including the difficulty of removing residual kerosene which can cause a potential change in transformer oil flash point. Several techniques are available for transformer insulation drying in both the field and in manufacturing. Vapor phase drying as part of transformer manufacturing is ...

  5. Vapor phase lubrication of high temperature alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanyaloglu, B.F.; Graham, E.E.; Oreskovic, T.; Hajj, C.G. [Cleveland State Univ., OH (United States)

    1995-06-01

    In a previous study, it was found that when a nickel-based superalloy IN750 was heated to high temperatures, a passive layer of aluminum oxide formed on the surface, preventing vapor phase lubrication. In this study, two nickel-chrome-iron alloys and a nickel-copper alloy were studied for high temperature lubrication to see if these alloys, which contained small amounts of aluminum, would exhibit similar behavior. It was found that under static conditions, all three alloys formed a lubricious nodular coating when exposed to a vapor of aryl phosphate. Under dynamic sliding conditions at 500{degrees}C, these alloys were successfully lubricated with a coefficient of friction of 0.1 and no detectable wear. In order to explain these results, a direct correlation between successful vapor phase lubrication and the composition of the alloys containing aluminum has been proposed. If the ratio of copper/aluminum or iron/aluminum is greater that 100 vapor phase, lubrication will be successful. If the ratio is less than 10, a passive aluminum oxide layer will prevent vapor phase lubrication. By selecting alloys with a high iron or copper content, vapor phase lubrication can provide excellent lubrication at high temperatures. 14 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Microstructure, corrosion properties and bio-compatibility of calcium zinc phosphate coating on pure iron for biomedical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiyan; Zhang, Erlin; Yang, Ke

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the biocompatibility and the corrosion resistance in the initial stage of implantation, a phosphate (CaZn2(PO4)2·2H2O) coating was obtained on the surface of pure iron by a chemical reaction method. The anti-corrosion property, the blood compatibility and the cell toxicity of the coated pure iron specimens were investigated. The coating was composed of some fine phosphate crystals and the surface of coating was flat and dense enough. The electrochemical data indicated that the corrosion resistance of the coated pure iron was improved with the increase of phosphating time. When the specimen was phosphated for 30min, the corrosion resistance (Rp) increased to 8006 Ω. Compared with that of the naked pure iron, the anti-hemolysis property and cell compatibility of the coated specimen was improved significantly, while the anti-coagulant property became slightly worse due to the existence of element calcium. It was thought that phosphating treatment might be an effective method to improve the biocompatibility of pure iron for biomedical application. © 2013.

  7. Electrochemical, Polarization, and Crevice Corrosion Testing of Nitinol 60, A Supplement to the ECLSS Sustaining Materials Compatibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    In earlier trials, electrochemical test results were presented for six noble metals evaluated in test solutions representative of waste liquids processed in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Subsequently, a seventh metal, Nitinol 60, was added for evaluation and subjected to the same test routines, data analysis, and theoretical methodologies. The previous six test metals included three titanium grades, (commercially pure, 6Al-4V alloy and 6Al-4V low interstitial alloy), two nickel-chromium alloys (Inconel(RegisteredTrademark) 625 and Hastelloy(RegisteredTrademark) C276), and one high-tier stainless steel (Cronidur(RegisteredTrademark) 30). The three titanium alloys gave the best results of all the metals, indicating superior corrosive nobility and galvanic protection properties. For this current effort, the results have clearly shown that Nitinol 60 is almost as noble as titanium, being very corrosion-resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals electrochemically and during long-term exposure. is also quite noble as it is very corrosion resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals from both an electrochemical perspective and long-term crevice corrosion scenario. This was clearly demonstrated utilizing the same techniques for linear, Tafel and cyclic polarization, and galvanic coupling of the metal candidate as was done for the previous study. The high nobility and low corrosion susceptibility for Nitinol 60 appear to be intermediate to the nickel/chromium alloys and the titanium metals with indications that are more reflective of the titanium metals in terms of general corrosion and pitting behavior.

  8. The Inhibition of Vapor-Phase Corrosion. A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    good protection towards steel, grey cast iron, Cu, brass, galvanised iron, and Pb in humid atmosphere 85 . A ternary mixture comprising of...humid atmosphere by Komrova 8 8 on steel, Cu, brass and galvanised iron using dibutyl- phthalate (128), isoamylcinnamate (129), triamylborate (130...protection - towards steel, Cu and brass at relative humidity values up to 98% and of galvanised iron at relative humidity values up to 85%88. Besides the

  9. MRI-compatible Nb-60Ta-2Zr alloy for vascular stents: Electrochemical corrosion behavior in simulated plasma solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-Zhe; Zhao, Xu; Xu, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Using revised simulated body fluid (r-SBF), the electrochemical corrosion behavior of an Nb-60Ta-2Zr alloy for MRI compatible vascular stents was characterized in vitro. As indicated by XPS analysis, the surface passive oxide film of approximately 1.3nm thickness was identified as a mixture of Nb2O5, Ta2O5 and ZrO2 after immersion in the r-SBF. The Nb-60Ta-2Zr alloy manifests a low corrosion rate and high polarization resistance similar to pure Nb and Ta, as shown by the potentiodynamic polarization curves and EIS. Unlike 316L stainless steel and the L605 Co-Cr alloy, no localized corrosion has been detected. Semiconducting property of passive film on the Nb-60Ta-2Zr alloy was identified as the n-type, with growth mechanism of high-field controlled growth. The excellent corrosion resistance in simulated human blood enviroment renders the Nb-60Ta-2Zr alloy promising as stent candidate material. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization, corrosion behavior, cellular response and in vivo bone tissue compatibility of titanium-niobium alloy with low Young's modulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yanjie; Deng, Yi; Zheng, Yunfei; Li, Yongliang; Zhang, Ranran; Lv, Yalin; Zhao, Qiang; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-02-01

    β-Type titanium alloys with a low elastic modulus are a potential strategy to enhance bone remodeling and to mitigate the concern over the risks of osteanabrosis and bone resorption caused by stress shielding, when used to substitute irreversibly impaired hard tissue. Hence, in this study, a Ti-45Nb alloy with low Young's modulus and high strength was developed, and microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion behaviors, cytocompatibility and in vivo osteo-compatibility of the alloy were systematically investigated for the first time. The results of mechanical tests showed that Young's modulus of the Ti-Nb alloy was reduced to about 64.3GPa (close to human cortical bone) accompanied with higher tensile strength and hardness compared with those of pure Ti. Importantly, the Ti-Nb alloy exhibited superior corrosion resistance to Ti in different solutions including SBF, MAS and FAAS (MAS containing NaF) media. In addition, the Ti-Nb alloy produced no deleterious effect to L929 and MG-63 cells, and cells performed excellent cell attachment onto Ti-Nb surface, indicating a good in vitro cytocompatibility. In vivo evaluations indicated that Ti-Nb had comparable bone tissue compatibility to Ti determined from micro-CT and histological evaluations. The Ti-Nb alloy with an elasticity close to human bone, thus, could be suitable for orthopedic/dental applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. ECLSS Universal Waste Management System (UWMS) Metal Materials Compatibility Study- Electrochemical and Crevice Corrosion Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R. E.

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemical and crevice corrosion laboratory test results are presented for three noble metal candidates with possible application on the Universal Waste Management System (UWMS) in support of the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The three metal candidates, which included Inconel 625, Hastelloy C276 and Titanium 6Al-4V, were evaluated in two solutions representative of the acidic pretreatment formulations utilized during processing of waste liquids within the ECLSS. Final test results and data analysis indicated that the passive layer on all three metals provides excellent corrosion protection in both solutions under standard test conditions.

  12. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  13. Advanced Life Support Water Recycling Technologies Case Studies: Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal and Direct Osmotic Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Design for microgravity has traditionally not been well integrated early on into the development of advanced life support (ALS) technologies. NASA currently has a many ALS technologies that are currently being developed to high technology readiness levels but have not been formally evaluated for microgravity compatibility. Two examples of such technologies are the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal Technology and the Direct Osmotic Concentration Technology. This presentation will cover the design of theses two systems and will identify potential microgravity issues.

  14. The liquid to vapor phase transition in excited nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, J.B.; Moretto, L.G.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G.J.; Beaulieu, L.; Breuer, H.; Korteling, R.G.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Lefort, T.; Pienkowski, L.; Ruangma, A.; Viola, V.E.; Yennello, S.J.

    2001-05-08

    For many years it has been speculated that excited nuclei would undergo a liquid to vapor phase transition. For even longer, it has been known that clusterization in a vapor carries direct information on the liquid-vapor equilibrium according to Fisher's droplet model. Now the thermal component of the 8 GeV/c pion + 197 Au multifragmentation data of the ISiS Collaboration is shown to follow the scaling predicted by Fisher's model, thus providing the strongest evidence yet of the liquid to vapor phase transition.

  15. Vapor phase growth of functional pentacene films at atmospheric pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rolin, C.; Vasseur, K.; Niesen, B.; Willegems, M.; Müller, R.; Steudel, S.; Genoe, J.; Heremans, P.

    2012-01-01

    Compared to traditional vacuum evaporation techniques for small organic molecules, organic vapor phase deposition (OVPD) possesses a extra processing parameter: the pressure of process gas Pch. Here, the influence of large Pch variations (from 0.1 mbar to atmospheric pressure) on pentacene thin film

  16. Assessment of radionuclide vapor-phase transport in unsaturated tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.M.; Updegraff, C.D.; Bonano, E.J.; Randall, J.D.

    1986-11-01

    This report describes bounding calculations performed to investigate the possibility of radionuclide migration in a vapor phase associated with the emplacement of high-level waste canister in unsaturated tuff formations. Two potential radionuclide transport mechanisms in the vapor phase were examined: aerosol migration and convection/diffusion of volatile species. The former may have significant impact on the release of radionuclides to the accessible environment as the concentration in the aerosols will be equal to that in the ground water. A conservative analysis of air diffusion in a stagnant liquid film indicated that for all expected repository conditions, aerosol formation is not possible. The migration of volatile species was examined both in the vicinity of a waste canister and outside the thermally disturbed zone. Two-dimensional (radial) and three-dimensional (radial-vertical) coupled heat transfer-gas flow-liquid flow simulations were performed using the TOUGH computer code. The gas flow rate relative to the liquid flow rate predicted from the simulations allowed calculations of mobility ratios due to convection which led to the conclusion that, except for the immediate region near the canister, transport in the liquid phase will be dominant for radionuclides heavier than radon. Near the waste canister, iodine transport may also be important in the vapor phase. Bounding calculations for vertical mobility ratios were carried out as a function of saturation. These calculations are conservative and agree well with the two-dimensional simulations. Based on this analysis, it is clear that vapor-phase transport will not be important for radionuclides such as cesium and heavier species. Vapor transport for iodine may play a role in the overall release scenario depending on the particular repository conditions.

  17. Modeling of Gallium Nitride Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A reactor model for the hydride vapor phase epitaxy of GaN is presented. The governing flow, energy, and species conservation equations are solved in two dimensions to examine the growth characteristics as a function of process variables and reactor geometry. The growth rate varies with GaCl composition but independent of NH3 and H2 flow rates. A change in carrier gas for Ga source from H2 to N2 affects the growth rate and uniformity for a fixed reactor configuration. The model predictions are in general agreement with observed experimental behavior.

  18. Organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Stringfellow, Gerald B

    1989-01-01

    Here is one of the first single-author treatments of organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy (OMVPE)--a leading technique for the fabrication of semiconductor materials and devices. Also included are metal-organic molecular-beam epitaxy (MOMBE) and chemical-beam epitaxy (CBE) ultra-high-vacuum deposition techniques using organometallic source molecules. Of interest to researchers, students, and people in the semiconductor industry, this book provides a basic foundation for understanding the technique and the application of OMVPE for the growth of both III-V and II-VI semiconductor materials and the

  19. Characterization, corrosion behavior, cellular response and in vivo bone tissue compatibility of titanium–niobium alloy with low Young's modulus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Yanjie [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Laboratory of Interdisciplinary Studies, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing 100081 (China); Department of Stomatology, Aviation General Hospital of China Medical University and Beijing Institute of Translational Medicine, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Deng, Yi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Laboratory of Interdisciplinary Studies, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing 100081 (China); Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zheng, Yunfei; Li, Yongliang [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Laboratory of Interdisciplinary Studies, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang, Ranran; Lv, Yalin [Department of Stomatology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100029 (China); Zhao, Qiang, E-mail: 15911025865@139.com [Department of Stomatology, Aviation General Hospital of China Medical University and Beijing Institute of Translational Medicine, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Wei, Shicheng, E-mail: sc-wei@pku.edu.cn [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Laboratory of Interdisciplinary Studies, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing 100081 (China); Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-02-01

    β-Type titanium alloys with a low elastic modulus are a potential strategy to enhance bone remodeling and to mitigate the concern over the risks of osteanabrosis and bone resorption caused by stress shielding, when used to substitute irreversibly impaired hard tissue. Hence, in this study, a Ti–45Nb alloy with low Young's modulus and high strength was developed, and microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion behaviors, cytocompatibility and in vivo osteo-compatibility of the alloy were systematically investigated for the first time. The results of mechanical tests showed that Young's modulus of the Ti–Nb alloy was reduced to about 64.3 GPa (close to human cortical bone) accompanied with higher tensile strength and hardness compared with those of pure Ti. Importantly, the Ti–Nb alloy exhibited superior corrosion resistance to Ti in different solutions including SBF, MAS and FAAS (MAS containing NaF) media. In addition, the Ti–Nb alloy produced no deleterious effect to L929 and MG-63 cells, and cells performed excellent cell attachment onto Ti–Nb surface, indicating a good in vitro cytocompatibility. In vivo evaluations indicated that Ti–Nb had comparable bone tissue compatibility to Ti determined from micro-CT and histological evaluations. The Ti–Nb alloy with an elasticity close to human bone, thus, could be suitable for orthopedic/dental applications. - Highlights: • A β-type Ti–45Nb alloy was developed with low Young's modulus close to human bone. • Ti–Nb alloy had superior corrosion resistance to pure Ti in different solutions. • Ti–Nb alloy displayed good cytocompatibility and in vivo bone tissue compatibility. • Ti–Nb alloy could be suitable for orthopedic/dental application based on the study.

  20. Field demonstration of vapor phase TCE bioreactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-14

    The objective of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), was to demonstrate the effectiveness of a vapor-phase bioreactor system for the destruction of trichloroethylene (TCE) from contaminated groundwater. A field demonstration was per-formed using groundwater at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site contaminated with a complex mixture of organic chemicals. This site is managed and operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. for the Department of Energy (DOE). Analysis of the data generated during the test can be summarized in three major observations. First, TCE was degraded in the presence of all the organics found in the steam strip condensate. This was observed during treatment of both the steam strip condensate and condensate amended with TCE to increase its concentration relative to the other components. The conclusion that TCE was being biodegraded was supported by performing mass balance control experiments with the reactor and by tracking recalcitrant chemicals also present in the steam stripper condensate. Second, there appeared to be an initial lag period of up to 24 hours before onset of TCE degradation in the reactor. The source of this lag was not determined but could be related to either an acclimation of the microorganisms to other chemicals found in the condensate or reversible inhibitory effects on TCE degradation. The duration of TCE degradative activity was relatively short for only 2 to 5 days. compared to previous demonstrations where TCE was the sole contaminant. However, several of the runs were interrupted due to mechanical and not biological issues. Third, other chemical contaminants were also degraded. by the bacteria used in the vapor phase reactor which is consistent with previous work performed both at ENVIROGEN and elsewhere.

  1. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY14 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steven J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-10-01

    observed in solutions with 50 wppm iodine (the actual SHINE process expects 0.1–1 wppm) with the highest corrosion rates (up to ~6 mil/year) observed on specimens exposed in the vapor phase. Lower concentrations of iodine species (5 or 28 wppm) proved much less corrosive, and the planned-interval data indicated that metal corrodibility decreased with time for all immersed exposures and, with one minor exception, all vapor exposures. Little change in susceptibility to corrosion was observed as a result of nitric acid additions to the test environment (simulating radiolysis products). The trend toward reduced corrosion (immersion and vapor phase) with decreasing iodine concentration suggests that, at the expected conditions in the SHINE process, it is unlikely that iodine species will generate a general corrosion concern for the candidate stainless steels.

  2. Vapor phase elemental sulfur amendment for sequestering mercury in contaminated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.; Jackson, Dennis G.

    2014-07-08

    The process of treating elemental mercury within the soil is provided by introducing into the soil a heated vapor phase of elemental sulfur. As the vapor phase of elemental sulfur cools, sulfur is precipitated within the soil and then reacts with any elemental mercury thereby producing a reaction product that is less hazardous than elemental mercury.

  3. Tunnel Junction Development Using Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptak, Aaron J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Simon, John D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schulte, Kevin L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jain, Nikhil [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-18

    We demonstrate for the first time III-V tunnel junctions grown using hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) with peak tunneling currents >8 A/cm2, sufficient for operation of a multijunction device to several hundred suns of concentration. Multijunction solar cells rely on tunneling interconnects between subcells to enable series connection with minimal voltage loss, but tunnel junctions have never been shown using the HVPE growth method. HVPE has recently reemerged as a low-cost growth method for high-quality III-V materials and devices, including the growth of high-efficiency III-V solar cells. We previously showed single-junction GaAs solar cells with conversion efficiencies of ~24% with a path forward to equal or exceed the practical efficiency limits of crystalline Si. Moving to a multijunction device structure will allow for even higher efficiencies with minimal impact on cost, necessitating the development of tunnel interconnects. Here, we demonstrate the performance of both isolated HVPE-grown tunnel junctions, as well as single-junction GaAs solar cell structures with a tunnel junction incorporated into the contact region. We observe no degradation in device performance compared to a structure without the added junction.

  4. Protein purification with vapor-phase carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, M A; Frankel, D Z; Debenedetti, P G; Carey, J; Devaney, M; Przybycien, T M

    1999-02-05

    Gaseous CO2 was used as an antisolvent to induce the fractional precipitation of alkaline phosphatase, insulin, lysozyme, ribonuclease, trypsin, and their mixtures from dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Compressed CO2 was added continuously and isothermally to stationary DMSO solutions (gaseous antisolvent, GAS). Dissolution of CO2 was accompanied by a pronounced, pressure-dependent volumetric expansion of DMSO and a consequent reduction in solvent strength of DMSO towards dissolved proteins. View cell experiments were conducted to determine the pressures at which various proteins precipitate from DMSO. The solubility of each protein in CO2-expanded DMSO was different, illustrating the potential to separate and purify proteins using gaseous antisolvents. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE) was used to quantify the separation of lysozyme from ribonuclease, alkaline phosphatase from insulin, and trypsin from catalase. Lysozyme biological activity assays were also performed to determine the composition of precipitates from DMSO initially containing lysozyme and ribonuclease. SDS-PAGE characterizations suggest that the composition and purity of solid-phase precipitated from a solution containing multiple proteins may be accurately controlled through the antisolvent's pressure. Insulin, lysozyme, ribonuclease, and trypsin precipitates recovered substantial amounts of biological activity upon redissolution in aqueous media. Alkaline phosphatase, however, was irreversibly denaturated. Vapor-phase antisolvents, which are easily separated and recovered from proteins and liquid solvents upon depressurization, appear to be a reliable and effective means of selectively precipitating proteins. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Vaporization behavior of non-stoichiometric refractory carbide materials and direct observations of the vapor phase using laser diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, D.P.; Wantuck, P.J.; Rehse, S.J.; Wallace, T.C. Sr.

    1993-09-01

    Transition metal and actinide carbides, such as ZrC or NbC and UC or ThC, exhibit a wide range of stoichiometry, and therefore vaporize incongruently. At long times, steady state vaporization can be achieved where relative concentrations of atomic species on solid surface equals that in the gas phase. The surface composition under these steady state conditions is termed the congruently vaporizing composition, (CVC). Modeling the vaporization or corrosion behavior of this dynamic process is complex and requires an understanding of how the surface composition changes with time and a knowledge of CVC, which is both temperature and atmosphere dependent. This paper describes vaporization and corrosion behavior of non-stoichiometric refractory carbide materials and, as an example, describes a thermokinetic model that characterizes the vaporization behavior of the complex carbide U{sub x}Zr{sub 1-x}C{sub y} in hydrogen at 2500 to 3200 K. This model demonstrates that steady state corrosion of U{sub x}Zr{sub l-x}C{sub y} is rate limited by gaseous transport of Zr where partial pressure of Zr is determined by CVC. This paper also briefly describes efforts to image and characterize the vapor phase above the surface of ZrC in static and flowing gas environments using planar laser induced fluorescence. We have developed the method for monitoring and controlling the corrosion behavior of nuclear fuels in nuclear thermal rockets. However, the techniques described can be used, to image boundary layers, and could be used verifying corrosion models.

  6. Melt-vapor phase transition in the lead-selenium system at atmospheric and low pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volodin, V. N.; Burabaeva, N. M.; Trebukhov, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    The boiling temperature and the corresponding vapor phase composition in the existence domain of liquid solutions were calculated from the partial pressures of saturated vapor of the components and lead selenide over liquid melts in the lead-selenium system. The phase diagram was complemented with the liquid-vapor phase transition at atmospheric pressure and in vacuum of 100 Pa, which allowed us to judge the behavior of the components during the distillation separation.

  7. Epitaxial Integration of Nanowires in Microsystems by Local Micrometer Scale Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Wacaser, Brent A.; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth

    2008-01-01

    Free-standing epitaxially grown nanowires provide a controlled growth system and an optimal interface to the underlying substrate for advanced optical, electrical, and mechanical nanowire device connections. Nanowires can be grown by vapor-phase epitaxy (VPE) methods such as chemical vapor...

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF AN AIR-TO-LEAF VAPOR PHASE TRANSFER FACTOR FOR DIOXINS AND FURANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results of an experiment in which grass was grown in a greenhouse and outdoors, and in soils of different concentration levels of dioxins and furans, were used in a modeling exercise to derive an air-to-leaf vapor phase transfer factor. The purpose of the experiment was to under...

  9. Inhibition effects of vapor phase thymol and modified atmosphere against Salmonella spp. on raw shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella contamination of shrimp is a food safety concern in the U.S. and other countries. Natural antimicrobial compounds (e.g. essential oils) in vapor phase and modified atmosphere (MA) technology can inhibit the growth potential of Salmonella spp. However, each strategy has its limitations, wh...

  10. Development of vapor phase hydrogenation and of catalysts immune to poison (abstract)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1942-10-16

    The development of catalysts immune to poison and the development of vapor-phase hydrogenation were closely connected and they were considered together. Catalysts used at high thruputs and high partial pressures showed rapid deterioration of their activity caused by deposition and condensation of high-molecular-weight substances on the surface of the catalysts. This phenomenon made it necessary to divide hydrogenation into two phases: the liquid phase and the vapor phase. The first of the vapor-phase operating catalysts was catalyst 3510, which consisted of zinc--magnesium molybdate. Development of catalyst 5058, which consisted of pure tungsten disulfide and was produced by decomposing ammonium--sulfotungstate in H/sub 2/ atmosphere, largely terminated development of vapor-phase catalysts. Maximum activity had been obtained. Compared to 3510, two to three times as much gasoline was produced per hour with a fixed volume of catalyst, besides being able to work at a temperature about 100/sup 0/C lower, and gasification losses were considerably smaller. In order to use 5058 in mass production, the dry catalyst powder had to be compressed into cylindrical shapes 10 mm in diameter. The demands for higher antiknock gasolines in the processing of certain paraffinic raw material could not be met by 5058 because of its strong hydrogenation effect, and the dilute catalyst 6434, consisting of 90% Fullers earth treated with HF and 10% WS/sub 2/, was developed for this. 3 tables.

  11. Improved thermal lattice Boltzmann model for simulation of liquid-vapor phase change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Zhou, P.; Yan, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, an improved thermal lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is proposed for simulating liquid-vapor phase change, which is aimed at improving an existing thermal LB model for liquid-vapor phase change [S. Gong and P. Cheng, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 55, 4923 (2012), 10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2012.04.037]. First, we emphasize that the replacement of ∇ .(λ ∇ T ) /∇.(λ ∇ T ) ρ cV ρ cV with ∇ .(χ ∇ T ) is an inappropriate treatment for diffuse interface modeling of liquid-vapor phase change. Furthermore, the error terms ∂t 0(T v ) +∇ .(T vv ) , which exist in the macroscopic temperature equation recovered from the previous model, are eliminated in the present model through a way that is consistent with the philosophy of the LB method. Moreover, the discrete effect of the source term is also eliminated in the present model. Numerical simulations are performed for droplet evaporation and bubble nucleation to validate the capability of the model for simulating liquid-vapor phase change. It is shown that the numerical results of the improved model agree well with those of a finite-difference scheme. Meanwhile, it is found that the replacement of ∇ .(λ ∇ T ) /∇ .(λ ∇ T ) ρ cV ρ cV with ∇ .(χ ∇ T ) leads to significant numerical errors and the error terms in the recovered macroscopic temperature equation also result in considerable errors.

  12. Recent Advances in Atmospheric Vapor-Phase Deposition of Transparent and Conductive Zinc Oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Poodt, P.; Roozeboom, F.

    2014-01-01

    The industrial need for high-throughput and low-cost ZnO deposition processes has triggered the development of atmospheric vapor-phase deposition techniques which can be easily applied to continuous, in-line manufacturing. While atmospheric CVD is a mature technology, new processes for the growth of

  13. Compact Raman Lidar Measurement of Liquid and Vapor Phase Water Under the Influence of Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiina Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A compact Raman lidar has been developed for studying phase changes of water in the atmosphere under the influence of ionization radiation. The Raman lidar is operated at the wavelength of 349 nm and backscattered Raman signals of liquid and vapor phase water are detected at 396 and 400 nm, respectively. Alpha particles emitted from 241Am of 9 MBq ionize air molecules in a scattering chamber, and the resulting ions lead to the formation of liquid water droplets. From the analysis of Raman signal intensities, it has been found that the increase in the liquid water Raman channel is approximately 3 times as much as the decrease in the vapor phase water Raman channel, which is consistent with the theoretical prediction based on the Raman cross-sections. In addition, the radius of the water droplet is estimated to be 0.2 μm.

  14. In situ, subsurface monitoring of vapor-phase TCE using fiber optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossabi, J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Colston, B. Jr.; Brown, S.; Milanovich, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Lee, L.T. Jr. [Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS (United States). Geotechnical Lab.

    1993-03-05

    A vapor-phase, reagent-based, fiber optic trichloroethylene (TCE) sensor developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was demonstrated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in two configurations. The first incorporated the sensor into a down-well instrument bounded by two inflatable packers capable of sealing an area for discrete depth analysis. The second involved an integration of the sensor into the probe tip of the Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station (WES) cone penetrometry system. Discrete depth measurements of vapor-phase concentrations of TCE in the vadose zone were successfully made using both configurations. These measurements demonstrate the first successful in situ sensing (as opposed to sampling) of TCE at a field site.

  15. Vapor phase epitaxial liftoff of GaAs and silicon single crystal films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, W.; Kao, C.P.; Pike, G.A.; Slone, J.A.; Yablonovitch, E. [Electrical Engineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1594 (United States)

    1999-06-10

    Among the technologies for integrating GaAs devices with Si VLSI chips, epitaxial liftoff (ELO) is conspicuous for maintaining the quality of the single crystal epitaxial GaAs films. Traditionally, ELO is implemented in aqueous HF solution. It would be cleaner and simpler if ELO could be implemented in a vapor process. In this article, we will present the potential improvements in the ELO process by using a vapor phase etch to undercut thin films

  16. Vapor Phase Self-assembled Monolayers for Anti-stiction Applications in MEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhuang, Yanxin; Hansen, Ole; Knieling, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the anti-stiction performance of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) that were grown in vapor phase from six different organosilane precursors: CF3(CF2)5(CH2)2SiCl3 (FOTS), CF3(CF2)5(CH2)2Si(OC2H5)3 (FOTES), CF3(CF2)5(CH2)2Si(CH3)Cl2 (FOMDS), CF3(CF2)5(CH2)2Si(CH3)2Cl (FOMMS), CF3...

  17. High flux diode packaging using passive microscale liquid-vapor phase change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandhauer, Todd; Deri, Robert J.; Elmer, John W.; Kotovsky, Jack; Patra, Susant

    2017-09-19

    A laser diode package includes a heat pipe having a fluid chamber enclosed in part by a heat exchange wall for containing a fluid. Wicking channels in the fluid chamber is adapted to wick a liquid phase of the fluid from a condensing section of the heat pipe to an evaporating section of the heat exchanger, and a laser diode is connected to the heat exchange wall at the evaporating section of the heat exchanger so that heat produced by the laser diode is removed isothermally from the evaporating section to the condensing section by a liquid-to-vapor phase change of the fluid.

  18. Thermodynamics of acetone sorption from vapor phase by Keplerate and toroid polyoxomolybdate nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroushko, A. A.; Adamova, L. V.; Eremina, E. V.; Grzhegorzhevskii, K. V.; Velichko, E. V.; Bogdanov, S. G.; Pirogov, A. N.

    2017-07-01

    The sorption of acetone from the vapor phase by Keplerate polyoxomolybdate (POM) nanoclusters, Mo132 and Mo72Fe30, and Mo138, a POM with a toroid structure, is studied via equilibrium interval sorption (a modification of vapor sorption gravimetry). The highest sorption capacity is registered for Mo132, while the other two show performance an order of magnitude lower. The specific Gibbs energy of the interaction between the POMs and acetone is reported. Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering analysis indicates a considerable difference between the natures of Mo132 and Mo138 surfaces.

  19. Calculation of Liquid Water-Hydrate-Methane Vapor Phase Equilibria from Molecular Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation methods for determining fluid- and crystal-phase chemical potentials are used for the first time to calculate liquid water-methane hydrate-methane vapor phase equilibria from knowledge of atomistic interaction potentials alone. The water and methane molecules are modeled...... potential of the zero-occupancy hydrate system using thermodynamic integration from an Einstein crystal reference state, and (iii) thermodynamic integration to obtain the water and guest molecules' chemical potentials as a function of the hydrate occupancy. The three-phase equilibrium curve is calculated...... value at corresponding conditions. While computationally intensive, simulations such as these are essential to map the thermodynamically stable conditions for hydrate systems....

  20. Vapor Phase Sensing Using Metal Nanorod Thin Films Grown by Cryogenic Oblique Angle Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Shah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the chemical sensing capability of silver nanostructured films grown by cryogenic oblique angle deposition (OAD. For comparison, the films are grown side by side at cryogenic (~100 K and at room temperature (~300 K by e-beam evaporation. Based on the observed structural differences, it was hypothesized that the cryogenic OAD silver films should show an increased surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS sensitivity. COMSOL simulation results are presented to validate this hypothesis. Experimental SERS results of 4-aminobenzenethiol (4-ABT Raman test probe molecules in vapor phase show good agreement with the simulation and indicate promising SERS applications for these nanostructured thin films.

  1. Structural, electrical and luminescent characteristics of ultraviolet light emitting structures grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Y. Polyakov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrical and luminescent properties of near-UV light emitting diode structures (LEDs prepared by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE were studied. Variations in photoluminescence and electroluminescence efficiency observed for LEDs grown under nominally similar conditions could be attributed to the difference in the structural quality (dislocation density, density of dislocations agglomerates of the GaN active layers, to the difference in strain relaxation achieved by growth of AlGaN/AlGaN superlattice and to the presence of current leakage channels in current confining AlGaN layers of the double heterostructure.

  2. Observation of atomic carbon during photodissociation of nitrotoluenes in the vapor phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilers, Hergen; Diez-y-Riega, Helena

    2014-05-01

    We perform laser-induced photodissociation fluorescence spectroscopy on mononitrotoluenes (MNTs) and dinitrotoluenes (DNTs) in the vapor phase and observe the spectrally overlapping fluorescence from nitric oxide (NO) and carbon (C). Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Raman spectroscopy of deposits found in the sample chamber confirm the presence of carbon. By comparing the observed fluorescence intensities with the Franck-Condon factors for NO, we are able to identify the presence or absence of fluorescence from carbon. 2-nitrotoluene and 4- nitrotoluene show carbon fluorescence for gate delays of up to 500 ns, while 2,4-dinitrotolune, 3,4-dinitrotolune, and 2,6-dinitrotolune show carbon fluorescence for gate delays of at least up to 1500 ns. The spectroscopic signal from atomic carbon in the vapor phase is observed at concentrations as low as 10 ppt. Based upon the observed S/N, detection at even lower concentrations appears feasible. Several non-nitrotoluene molecules including nitrobenzene, benzene, toluene, and CO2, are tested under identical conditions, but do not show any carbon emission. The presence of extra NO (simulation of NO pollutants) in the samples improves the S/N ratio for the detection of carbon. Energy transfer from laser-excited molecular nitrogen to NO, multiple decomposition channels in the electronic excited state of the nitrotoluene molecules, and interaction of NO with the excited-state decomposition process of the nitrotoluene molecules may all play a role.

  3. MEMS Lubrication by In-Situ Tribochemical Reactions From the Vapor Phase.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugger, Michael Thomas; Asay, David B.; Kim, Seong H.

    2008-01-01

    Vapor Phase Lubrication (VPL) of silicon surfaces with pentanol has been demonstrated. Two potential show stoppers with respect to application of this approach to real MEMS devices have been investigated. Water vapor was found to reduce the effectiveness of VPL with alcohol for a given alcohol concentration, but the basic reaction mechanism observed in water-free environments is still active, and devices operated much longer in mixed alcohol and water vapor environments than with chemisorbed monolayer lubricants alone. Complex MEMS gear trains were successfully lubricated with alcohol vapors, resulting in a factor of 104 improvement in operating life without failure. Complex devices could be made to fail if operated at much higher frequencies than previously used, and there is some evidence that the observed failure is due to accumulation of reaction products at deeply buried interfaces. However, if hypothetical reaction mechanisms involving heated surfaces are valid, then the failures observed at high frequency may not be relevant to operation at normal frequencies. Therefore, this work demonstrates that VPL is a viable approach for complex MEMS devices in conventional packages. Further study of the VPL reaction mechanisms are recommended so that the vapor composition may be optimized for low friction and for different substrate materials with potential application to conventionally fabricated, metal alloy parts in weapons systems. Reaction kinetics should be studied to define effective lubrication regimes as a function of the partial pressure of the vapor phase constituent, interfacial shear rate, substrate composition, and temperature.

  4. Enhanced Vapor-Phase Diffusion in Porous Media - LDRD Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, C.K.; Webb, S.W.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Sandia National Laboratories, an investigation into the existence of enhanced vapor-phase diffusion (EVD) in porous media has been conducted. A thorough literature review was initially performed across multiple disciplines (soil science and engineering), and based on this review, the existence of EVD was found to be questionable. As a result, modeling and experiments were initiated to investigate the existence of EVD. In this LDRD, the first mechanistic model of EVD was developed which demonstrated the mechanisms responsible for EVD. The first direct measurements of EVD have also been conducted at multiple scales. Measurements have been made at the pore scale, in a two- dimensional network as represented by a fracture aperture, and in a porous medium. Significant enhancement of vapor-phase transport relative to Fickian diffusion was measured in all cases. The modeling and experimental results provide additional mechanisms for EVD beyond those presented by the generally accepted model of Philip and deVries (1957), which required a thermal gradient for EVD to exist. Modeling and experimental results show significant enhancement under isothermal conditions. Application of EVD to vapor transport in the near-surface vadose zone show a significant variation between no enhancement, the model of Philip and deVries, and the present results. Based on this information, the model of Philip and deVries may need to be modified, and additional studies are recommended.

  5. Metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy of AlN on sapphire with low etch pit density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleske, D. D.; Figiel, J. J.; Alliman, D. L.; Gunning, B. P.; Kempisty, J. M.; Creighton, J. R.; Mishima, A.; Ikenaga, K.

    2017-06-01

    Using metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy, methods were developed to achieve AlN films on sapphire with low etch pit density (EPD). Key to this achievement was using the same AlN growth recipe and only varying the pre-growth conditioning of the quartz-ware. After AlN growth, the quartz-ware was removed from the growth chamber and either exposed to room air or moved into the N2 purged glove box and exposed to H2O vapor. After the quartz-ware was exposed to room air or H2O, the AlN film growth was found to be more reproducible, resulting in films with (0002) and (10-12) x-ray diffraction (XRD) rocking curve linewidths of 200 and 500 arc sec, respectively, and EPDs NH3 on the quartz-ware surfaces generated AlN films with higher EPDs. The presence of these residual TMAl/NH3-derived coatings in metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) systems and their impact on the sapphire surface during heating might explain why reproducible growth of AlN on sapphire is difficult.

  6. Mechanistic investigation of non-ideal sorption behavior in natural organic matter. 1. Vapor phase equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Katherine Young; Leboeuf, Eugene J

    2012-06-19

    Results from an experimental and modeling investigation of the influence of thermodynamic properties of highly purified natural organic matter (NOM) on observed equilibrium sorption/desorption behaviors of vapor phase trichloroethylene (TCE) is presented. Identification of glass transition (T(g)) behavior in Leonardite humic acid and Organosolv lignin enabled evaluation of equilibrium and nonequilibrium sorption behavior in glassy and rubbery NOM. Specific differences in vapor phase equilibrium behavior in NOM above and below their T(g) were identified. In the glassy state (below T(g)), sorption of TCE is well-described by micropore models, with enthalpies of sorption characteristic of microporous, glassy macromolecules. Above T(g), sorptive behavior was well-described by Flory-Huggins theory, indicating that the mobility and structural configuration of rubbery NOM materials may be analogous to the characteristic sorption behavior observed in more mobile, rubbery macromolecules, including strong entropic changes during sorption. Results from this work provide further support that, at least for the samples employed in this study, NOM possesses macromolecular characteristics which display sorption behavior similar to synthetic macromolecules-an important assumption in conceptual sorption equilibrium models used in the analysis of the fate and transport of VOCs in the environment.

  7. Comparative Study of Solution Phase and Vapor Phase Deposition of Aminosilanes on Silicon Dioxide Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Amrita R.; Sriram, Rashmi; Carter, Jared A.; Miller, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    The uniformity of aminosilane layers typically used for the modification of hydroxyl bearing surfaces such as silicon dioxide is critical for a wide variety of applications, including biosensors. However, in spite of many studies that have been undertaken on surface silanization, there remains a paucity of easy-to-implement deposition methods reproducibly yielding smooth aminosilane monolayers. In this study, solution- and vapor-phase deposition methods for three aminoalkoxysilanes differing in the number of reactive groups (3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES), 3-aminopropyl methyl diethoxysilane (APMDES) and 3-aminopropyl dimethyl ethoxysilane (APDMES)) were assessed with the aim of identifying methods that yield highly uniform and reproducible silane layers that are resistant to minor procedural variations. Silane film quality was characterized based on measured thickness, hydrophilicity and surface roughness. Additionally, hydrolytic stability of the films was assessed via these thickness and contact angle values following desorption in water. We found that two simple solution-phase methods, an aqueous deposition of APTES and a toluene based deposition of APDMES, yielded high quality silane layers that exhibit comparable characteristics to those deposited via vapor-phase methods. PMID:24411379

  8. A Kinetic Model for GaAs Growth by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, Kevin L.; Simon, John; Jain, Nikhil; Young, David L.; Ptak, Aaron J.

    2016-11-21

    Precise control of the growth of III-V materials by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) is complicated by the fact that the growth rate depends on the concentrations of nearly all inputs to the reactor and also the reaction temperature. This behavior is in contrast to metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE), which in common practice operates in a mass transport limited regime where growth rate and alloy composition are controlled almost exclusively by flow of the Group III precursor. In HVPE, the growth rate and alloy compositions are very sensitive to temperature and reactant concentrations, which are strong functions of the reactor geometry. HVPE growth, particularly the growth of large area materials and devices, will benefit from the development of a growth model that can eventually be coupled with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a specific reactor geometry. In this work, we develop a growth rate law using a Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) analysis, fitting unknown parameters to growth rate data from the literature that captures the relevant kinetic and thermodynamic phenomena of the HVPE process. We compare the L-H rate law to growth rate data from our custom HVPE reactor, and develop quantitative insight into reactor performance, demonstrating the utility of the growth model.

  9. Vapor phase deposition of functional polymers onto paper-based microfluidic devices for advanced unit operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Philip; Gupta, Malancha

    2012-11-20

    Paper-based microfluidic devices have recently received significant attention as a potential platform for low-cost diagnostic assays. However, the number of advanced unit operations, such as separation of analytes and fluid manipulation, that can be applied to these devices has been limited. Here, we use a vapor phase polymerization process to sequentially deposit functional polymer coatings onto paper-based microfluidic devices to integrate multiple advanced unit operations while retaining the fibrous morphology necessary to generate capillary-driven flow. A hybrid grafting process was used to apply hydrophilic polymer coatings with a high surface concentration of ionizable groups onto the surface of the paper fibers in order to passively separate analytes, which allowed a multicomponent mixture to be separated into its anionic and cationic components. Additionally, a UV-responsive polymer was sequentially deposited to act as a responsive switch to control the path of fluid within the devices. This work extends the advanced unit operations available for paper-based microfluidics and allows for more complex diagnostics. In addition, the vapor phase polymerization process is substrate independent, and therefore, these functional coatings can be applied to other textured materials such as membranes, filters, and fabrics.

  10. System Model of Heat and Mass Transfer Process for Mobile Solvent Vapor Phase Drying Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The solvent vapor phase drying process is one of the most important processes during the production and maintenance for large oil-immersed power transformer. In this paper, the working principle, system composition, and technological process of mobile solvent vapor phase drying (MVPD equipment for transformer are introduced in detail. On the basis of necessary simplification and assumption for MVPD equipment and process, a heat and mass transfer mathematical model including 40 mathematical equations is established, which represents completely thermodynamics laws of phase change and transport process of solvent, water, and air in MVPD technological processes and describes in detail the quantitative relationship among important physical quantities such as temperature, pressure, and flux in key equipment units and process. Taking a practical field drying process of 500 KV/750 MVA power transformer as an example, the simulation calculation of a complete technological process is carried out by programming with MATLAB software and some relation curves of key process parameters changing with time are obtained such as body temperature, tank pressure, and water yield. The change trend of theoretical simulation results is very consistent with the actual production record data which verifies the correctness of mathematical model established.

  11. Aluminum Gallium Nitride Alloys Grown via Metalorganic Vapor-Phase Epitaxy Using a Digital Growth Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, L. E.; Korakakis, D.

    2011-04-01

    This work investigates the use of a digital growth technique as a viable method for achieving high-quality aluminum gallium nitride (Al x Ga1- x N) films via metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy. Digital alloys are superlattice structures with period thicknesses of a few monolayers. Alloys with an AlN mole fraction ranging from 0.1 to 0.9 were grown by adjusting the thickness of the AlN layer in the superlattice. High-resolution x-ray diffraction was used to determine the superlattice period and c-lattice parameter of the structure, while reciprocal-space mapping was used to determine the a-lattice parameter and evaluate growth coherency. A comparison of the measured lattice parameter with both the nominal value and also the underlying buffer layer is discussed.

  12. Vapor-phase fabrication and properties of continuous-filament ceramic composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besmann, T M; Sheldon, B W; Lowden, R A; Stinton, D P

    1991-09-06

    The continuous-filament ceramic composite is becoming recognized as necessary for new, high-temperature structural applications. Yet because of the susceptibility of the filaments to damage from traditional methods for the preparation of ceramics, vapor-phase infiltration has become the fabrication method of choice. The chemical vapor infiltration methods for producing these composites are now being studied in earnest, with the complexity of filament weaves and deposition chemistry being merged with standard heat and mass-transport relationships. Two of the most influential effects on the mechanical properties of these materials are the adhesion and frictional force between the fibers and the matrix, which can be controlled by a tailored interface coating. A variety of materials are available for producing these composites including carbide, nitride, boride, and oxide filaments and matrices. Silicon carbide-based materials are by far the most advanced and are already being used in aerospace applications.

  13. Vapor phase polymerization of PEDOT on silicone rubber as flexible large strain sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Giffney

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a flexible large strain sensor made from ethylenedioxythiophene deposited on silicone rubber (Ecoflex® 00-30 via vacuum assisted vapor phase polymerization (VPP process. EDOT was used due to its stability when exposed to the atmosphere. VPP is a very simple process requiring only a vacuum bell jar and a vacuum pump. Ferrite chloride (FeCl3 dissolved in tethrahydrofuran was used as the oxidant to make the resulting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT conductive. THF was used because it swells Ecoflex® for better infusion of oxidant and PEDOT adherence. The sensor performs reliably up to 80% strain with a gauge factor of ~2.4 and small hysteresis.

  14. Vapor-Phase Raman Spectra and the Barrier to Planarity of Cyclohexane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Hye Jin; Ocola, Esther J; Laane, Jaan

    2016-10-06

    The vapor-phase Raman spectra of an atmosphere of cyclohexane vapor heated to 90 and 110 °C collected over a large period of time and utilizing a high laser power of 4 W show hot band series starting at 380.8 cm-1 and corresponding to the v6(A1g) ring-inversion vibration. Fitting this data with a one-dimensional potential energy function allows the barrier to planarity of 8600 cm-1 (24.6 kcal/mol) to be calculated. Ab initio calculations (MP2/cc-pVTZ) predict a value of 10 377 cm-1 (29.7 kcal/mol), while DFT (B3LYP/cc-pVTZ) calculations predict 8804 cm-1 (25.2 kcal/mol).

  15. Procedure 5 Quality Assurance Requirements For Vapor Phase Mercury Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems And Sorbent Trap Monitoring Systems Used For Compliance Determination At Stationary Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promulgated quality assurance Procedure 5 Quality Assurance Requirements For Vapor Phase Mercury Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems And Sorbent Trap Monitoring Systems Used For Compliance Determination At Stationary Sources

  16. Vapor Phase Growth of ZnO Single Crystals/Thin Films and Attempts for p-type Doping

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    The growth of ZnO single crystals and ZnO thin films on Si substrates by an open-system vapor phase method was studied in this thesis. The as-grown ZnO single crystals were investigated by means of photoluminescence (PL). Two unique emissions were observed in virgin and hydrogenated crystals. The up-to-now attempts for the p-type doping of ZnO were summarized and our doping studies were performed using nitrogen and antimony. The seed-free and open-system vapor phase method is a simple and...

  17. Glass fibers and vapor phase components of cigarette smoke as cofactors in experimental respiratory tract carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feron, V.J.; Kuper, C.F.; Spit, B.J.; Reuzel, P.G.; Woutersen, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Syrian golden hamsters were given intratracheal instillations of glass fibers with or without BP suspended in saline, once a fortnight for 52 weeks; the experiment was terminated at week 85. No tumors of the respiratory tract were observed in hamsters treated with glass fibers alone. There was no indication that glass fibers enhanced the development of respiratory tract tumors induced by BP. In another study Syrian golden hamsters were exposed to fresh air or to a mixture of 4 major vapor phase components of cigarette smoke, viz. isoprene (800----700 ppm), methyl chloride (1000----900 ppm), methyl nitrite (200----190 ppm) and acetaldehyde (1400----1200 ppm) for a period of at most 23 months. Some of the animals were also given repeated intratracheal instillations of BP or norharman in saline. Laryngeal tumors were found in 7/31 male and 6/32 female hamsters exposed only to the vapor mixture, whereas no laryngeal tumors occurred in controls. The tumor response of the larynx most probably has to be ascribed entirely to the action of acetaldehyde. Simultaneous treatment with norharman or BP did not affect the tumor response of the larynx. Acetaldehyde may occur in the vapor phase of cigarette smoke at levels up to 2000 ppm. Chronic inhalation exposure of rats to acetaldehyde at levels of 0 (controls), 750, 1500 or 3000----1000 ppm resulted in a high incidence of nasal carcinomas, both squamous cell carcinomas of the respiratory epithelium and adenocarcinomas of the olfactory epithelium. It was discussed that acetaldehyde may significantly contribute to the induction of bronchogenic cancer by cigarette smoke in man.

  18. Treatment of Produced Waters Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn E. Katz; Kerry A. Kinney; R. S. Bowman; E. J. Sullivan

    2004-03-11

    This report summarizes work of this project from October 2003 through March 2004. The major focus of the research was to further investigate BTEX removal from produced water, to quantify metal ion removal from produced water, and to evaluate a lab-scale vapor phase bioreactor (VPB) for BTEX destruction in off-gases produced during SMZ regeneration. Batch equilibrium sorption studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of semi-volatile organic compounds commonly found in produced water on the sorption of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) onto surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) and to examine selected metal ion sorption onto SMZ. The sorption of polar semi-volatile organic compounds and metals commonly found in produced water onto SMZ was also investigated. Batch experiments were performed in a synthetic saline solution that mimicked water from a produced water collection facility in Wyoming. Results indicated that increasing concentrations of semi-volatile organic compounds increased BTEX sorption. The sorption of phenol compounds could be described by linear isotherms, but the linear partitioning coefficients decreased with increasing pH, especially above the pKa's of the compounds. Linear correlations relating partitioning coefficients of phenol compounds with their respective solubilities and octanol-water partitioning coefficients were developed for data collected at pH 7.2. The sorption of chromate, selenate, and barium in synthetic produced water were also described by Langmuir isotherms. Experiments conducted with a lab-scale vapor phase bioreactor (VPB) packed with foam indicated that this system could achieve high BTEX removal efficiencies once the nutrient delivery system was optimized. The xylene isomers and benzene were found to require the greatest biofilter bed depth for removal. This result suggested that these VOCs would ultimately control the size of the biofilter required for the produced water application. The biofilter

  19. Hydride vapor phase epitaxy growth of GaN, InGaN, ScN, and ScAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohnen, T.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD); hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE); gallium nitride (GaN); indium gallium nitride (InGaN); scandium nitride (ScN); scandium aluminum nitride (ScAlN); semiconductors; thin films; nanowires; III nitrides; crystal growth - We studied the HVPE growth of different III

  20. Antimicrobial effects of vapor phase thymol, modified atmosphere and their combination against Salmonella spp. on raw shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella contamination of raw shrimp is a food safety concern in the U.S. and other countries. This research evaluated the effects of vapor phase thymol, modified atmosphere (MA) and their combination against Salmonella spp. on raw shrimp. Growth profiles of a Salmonella spp. cocktail (6 strains),...

  1. Vapor phase toxicity of marjoram oil compounds and their related monoterpenoids to Blattella germanica (Orthoptera: Blattellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Young-Su; Yang, Young-Cheol; Choi, Dal-Soon; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2005-10-05

    The toxicity of marjoram, Origanum majorana L., oil, 41 monoterpenoids, and 2 sesquiterpenoids against adult females of the German cockroach, Blattella germanica L., was examined using direct contact and vapor phase toxicity bioassays and compared with those of deltamethrin, dichlorvos, permethrin, and propoxur, four commonly used insecticides. In a filter-paper contact toxicity bioassay, the adulticidal activities of pulegone (0.06 mg/cm2), (+/-)-camphor (0.07 mg/cm2), and verbenone (0.07 mg/cm2) were comparable to that of permethrin (0.05 mg/cm2) but more pronounced than that of propoxur (0.18 mg/cm2), as judged by the 24-h LC50 values. These compounds were less effective than either deltamethrin (0.013 mg/cm2) or dichlorvos (0.007 mg/cm2). The toxicity of marjoram oil, thymol, alpha-terpineol, (-)-alpha-thujone, linalool, 1,8-cineole, (-)-camphor, and (+)-carvone, ranging from 0.08 to 0.18 mg/cm2, was higher than that of propoxur. In vapor phase toxicity tests, verbenone (11.48 mg/L air) was the most toxic compound followed by (-)-alpha-thujone (18.43 mg/L of air), thymol (18.76 mg/L of air), alpha-terpineol (21.89 mg/L of air), (+/-)-camphor (24.59 mg/L of air), linalool (26.20 mg/L of air), and marjoram oil (38.28 mg/L of air) on the basis of the 24-h LC50 values. Dichlorvos (0.07 mg/L of air) was the most potent fumigant. Structure-activity relationships indicate that structural characteristics, such as degrees of saturation and types of functional groups rather than types of carbon skeleton, and hydrophobicity and vapor pressure parameters appear to play a role in determining the monoterpenoid toxicities to adult B. germanica. Marjoram oil and the monoterpenoids described merit further study as potential fumigants or leads for the control of B. germanica.

  2. Carbon-supported bimetallic Pd–Fe catalysts for vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Junming; Karim, Ayman M.; Zhang, He; Kovarik, Libor; Li, Xiaohong Shari; Hensley, Alyssa J.; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Wang, Yong

    2013-10-01

    Abstract Carbon supported metal catalysts (Cu/C, Fe/C, Pd/C, Pt/C, PdFe/C and Ru/C) have been prepared, characterized and tested for vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of guaiacol (GUA) at atmospheric pressure. Phenol was the major intermediate on all catalysts. Over the noble metal catalysts saturation of the aromatic ring was the major pathway observed at low temperature (250 °C), forming predominantly cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol. Substantial ring opening reaction was observed on Pt/C and Ru/C at higher reaction temperatures (e.g., 350 °C). Base metal catalysts, especially Fe/C, were found to exhibit high HDO activity without ring-saturation or ring-opening with the main products being benzene, phenol along with small amounts of cresol, toluene and trimethylbenzene (TMB). A substantial enhancement in HDO activity was observed on the PdFe/C catalysts. Compared with Fe/C, the yield to oxygen-free aromatic products (i.e., benzene/toluene/TMB) on PdFe/C increased by a factor of four at 350 °C, and by approximately a factor of two (83.2% versus 43.3%) at 450 °C. The enhanced activity of PdFe/C is attributed to the formation of PdFe alloy as evidenced by STEM, EDS and TPR.

  3. High Growth Rate Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy at Low Temperature through Use of Uncracked Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, Kevin L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Simon, John D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ptak, Aaron J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Braun, Anna [Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

    2018-01-22

    We demonstrate hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) of GaAs with unusually high growth rates (RG) at low temperature and atmospheric pressure by employing a hydride-enhanced growth mechanism. Under traditional HVPE growth conditions that involve growth from Asx species, RG exhibits a strong temperature dependence due to slow kinetics at the surface, and growth temperatures >750 degrees C are required to obtain RG > 60 um/h. We demonstrate that when the group V element reaches the surface in a hydride, the kinetic barrier is dramatically reduced and surface kinetics no longer limit RG. In this regime, RG is dependent on mass transport of uncracked AsH3 to the surface. By controlling the AsH3 velocity and temperature profile of the reactor, which both affect the degree of AsH3 decomposition, we demonstrate tuning of RG. We achieve RG above 60 um/h at temperatures as low as 560 degrees C and up to 110 um/h at 650 degrees C. We incorporate high-RG GaAs into solar cell devices to verify that the electronic quality does not deteriorate as RG is increased. The open circuit voltage (VOC), which is a strong function of non-radiative recombination in the bulk material, exhibits negligible variance in a series of devices grown at 650 degrees C with RG = 55-110 um/h. The implications of low temperature growth for the formation of complex heterostructure devices by HVPE are discussed.

  4. ZnO Nanowires Synthesized by Vapor Phase Transport Deposition on Transparent Oxide Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Curtis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Zinc oxide nanowires have been synthesized without using metal catalyst seed layers on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO substrates by a modified vapor phase transport deposition process using a double-tube reactor. The unique reactor configuration creates a Zn-rich vapor environment that facilitates formation and growth of zinc oxide nanoparticles and wires (20–80 nm in diameter, up to 6 μm in length, density <40 nm apart at substrate temperatures down to 300°C. Electron microscopy and other characterization techniques show nanowires with distinct morphologies when grown under different conditions. The effect of reaction parameters including reaction time, temperature, and carrier gas flow rate on the size, morphology, crystalline structure, and density of ZnO nanowires has been investigated. The nanowires grown by this method have a diameter, length, and density appropriate for use in fabricating hybrid polymer/metal oxide nanostructure solar cells. For example, it is preferable to have nanowires no more than 40 nm apart to minimize exciton recombination in polymer solar cells.

  5. Vapor-phase polymerization of nanofibrillar poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) for supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, Julio M; El-Kady, Maher F; Khine, Pwint P; Zhang, Linghong; Lee, Sun Hwa; Davis, Nicole R; Liu, David S; Yeung, Michael T; Kim, Sung Yeol; Turner, Christopher L; Lech, Andrew T; Hammond, Paula T; Kaner, Richard B

    2014-02-25

    Nanostructures of the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) with large surface areas enhance the performance of energy storage devices such as electrochemical supercapacitors. However, until now, high aspect ratio nanofibers of this polymer could only be deposited from the vapor-phase, utilizing extrinsic hard templates such as electrospun nanofibers and anodized aluminum oxide. These routes result in low conductivity and require postsynthetic template removal, conditions that stifle the development of conducting polymer electronics. Here we introduce a simple process that overcomes these drawbacks and results in vertically directed high aspect ratio poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) nanofibers possessing a high conductivity of 130 S/cm. Nanofibers deposit as a freestanding mechanically robust film that is easily processable into a supercapacitor without using organic binders or conductive additives and is characterized by excellent cycling stability, retaining more than 92% of its initial capacitance after 10,000 charge/discharge cycles. Deposition of nanofibers on a hard carbon fiber paper current collector affords a highly efficient and stable electrode for a supercapacitor exhibiting gravimetric capacitance of 175 F/g and 94% capacitance retention after 1000 cycles.

  6. Radiation-induced defects in GaN bulk grown by halide vapor phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duc, Tran Thien; Pozina, Galia; Son, Nguyen Tien; Janzén, Erik; Hemmingsson, Carl [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, S-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Ohshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-09-08

    Defects induced by electron irradiation in thick free-standing GaN layers grown by halide vapor phase epitaxy were studied by deep level transient spectroscopy. In as-grown materials, six electron traps, labeled D2 (E{sub C}–0.24 eV), D3 (E{sub C}–0.60 eV), D4 (E{sub C}–0.69 eV), D5 (E{sub C}–0.96 eV), D7 (E{sub C}–1.19 eV), and D8, were observed. After 2 MeV electron irradiation at a fluence of 1 × 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2}, three deep electron traps, labeled D1 (E{sub C}–0.12 eV), D5I (E{sub C}–0.89 eV), and D6 (E{sub C}–1.14 eV), were detected. The trap D1 has previously been reported and considered as being related to the nitrogen vacancy. From the annealing behavior and a high introduction rate, the D5I and D6 centers are suggested to be related to primary intrinsic defects.

  7. Vapor Phase Hydrogenation of Nitrobenzene to Aniline Over Carbon Supported Ruthenium Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanth, Chakravartula S; Kumar, Vanama Pavan; Viswanadham, Balaga; Srikanth, Amirineni; Chary, Komandur V R

    2015-07-01

    A series of Ru/Carbon catalysts (0.5-6.0 wt%) were prepared by impregnation method. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), temperature programmed reduction (TPR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), CO-chemisorption, surface area and pore-size distribution measurements. The catalytic activities were evaluated for the vapor phase hydrogenation of nitrobenzene. The dispersion measured by CO-uptake values suggests that a decrease of dispersion is observed with increasing Ru loading on carbon support. These findings are well supported by the crystallite size measured from XRD measurements. XPS study reveals the formation of Ru0 after reduction at 573 K for 3 h. The catalysts exhibit high conversion/selectivity at 4.5 wt% Ru loading during hydrogenation reaction. The particle size measured from CO-chemisorption and TEM analysis are related to the TOF during the hydrogenation reaction. Ru/C catalysts are found to show higher conversion/selectivities during hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to aniline.

  8. AlN thin film grown on different substrates by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, M. S.; Zhang, J. C.; Huang, J.; Wang, J. F.; Xu, K.

    2016-02-01

    AlN thin films have been grown on GaN/sapphire templates, 6 H-SiC and sapphire by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. The influence of growth conditions and substrates on the crystal qualities and growth mode has been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results showed that the low pressure was favorable for high-quality AlN thin film growth around 1000 °C. The full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of (0002) XRD of 200-nm AlN thin film grown on GaN/sapphire, 6 H-SiC and sapphire are 220, 187 and 260 arc s, respectively. While the corresponding counterparts of (10-12) are 1300, 662 and 2650 arc s, respectively. Both suggested that low dislocation density in AlN grown on 6 H-SiC. The morphology of AlN thin film on sapphire showed islands without coalescence initially, and then changed to be coalescent with atomic steps at 1200 nm. However, those for samples on 6 H-SiC and GaN/sapphire showed smooth surface with clear atomic steps at thickness of 200 nm. The result indicated different growth modes of AlN on different substrates. It was believed that the different lattice mismatchs between AlN and substrates led to the different crystal qualities and growth modes.

  9. Island dynamics and anisotropy during vapor phase epitaxy of m-plane GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, Edith [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; University of Fribourg, Department of Physics and Fribourg Center for Nanomaterials, Chemin du Musée 3, CH-1700 Fribourg, Switzerland; Xu, Dongwei [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Highland, M. J. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Stephenson, G. B. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Zapol, P. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Fuoss, P. H. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Munkholm, A. [Munkholm Consulting, Mountain View, California 94043, USA; Thompson, Carol [Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115, USA

    2017-12-04

    Using in situ grazing-incidence x-ray scattering, we have measured the diffuse scattering from islands that form during layer-by-layer growth of GaN by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy on the (1010) m-plane surface. The diffuse scattering is extended in the (0001) in-plane direction in reciprocal space, indicating a strong anisotropy with islands elongated along [1210] and closely spaced along [0001]. This is confirmed by atomic force microscopy of a quenched sample. Islands were characterized as a function of growth rate F and temperature. The island spacing along [0001] observed during the growth of the first monolayer obeys a power-law dependence on growth rate F-n, with an exponent n = 0:25 + 0.02. The results are in agreement with recent kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, indicating that elongated islands result from the dominant anisotropy in step edge energy and not from surface diffusion anisotropy. The observed power-law exponent can be explained using a simple steady-state model, which gives n = 1/4.

  10. Vapor-Phase Free Radical Polymerization in the Presence of Ionic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Malancha

    2011-03-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have recently attracted significant interest as an environmentally-friendly alternative to traditional volatile organic solvents because ILs are non-volatile, non-flammable, and can be easily recycled. ILs can be exploited in many ways to improve the selectivity and kinetics of chemical reactions, including polymer synthesis. Ionic liquids have negligible vapor pressure and are therefore stable under vacuum. A few studies have investigated ILs as substrates in inorganic vacuum deposition processes, but to our knowledge ILs have not been used in vapor phase polymerization systems. We have recently introduced ionic liquids into the initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) process for the first time. The iCVD polymerization process occurs via a free-radical mechanism, and the deposited polymeric films are compositionally analogous to solution-phase polymers. Despite the wide range of polymers that have been synthesized using iCVD, it has proven difficult to polymerize monomers with low surface concentrations such as styrene and low propagation rates such as methyl methacrylate and it is difficult to produce block copolymers. In this talk, we will show that our novel ILiCVD system can address some of these shortcomings. We will explain the effects of deposition time, temperature, and monomer solubility on the morphology of the polymer and the molecular weight of the polymer chains.

  11. Hydroxylation of phenol over MeAPO molecular sieves synthesized by vapor phase transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hui; Chen, Jingjing; Chen, Xia; Leng, Yixin; Zhong, Jing

    2016-07-01

    In this study, MeAPO-25 (Me = Fe, Cu, Mn) molecular sieves were first synthesized by a vapor phase transport method using tetramethyl guanidine as the template and applied to hydroxylation of phenol. The zeolites were characterized by XRD, SEM, FT-IR, and DR UV-Vis. As a result, MeAPO-21 and MeAPO-15 were synthesized by changing the Me/Al ratio. UV-Visible diffuse reflectance study suggested incorporation of heteroatoms into the framework and FT-IR study also supported these data. Effects of heteroatoms, contents of Me in MeAPO-25, reaction temperature, phenol/H2O2 mole ratios, reaction time and concentration of catalyst on the conversion of phenol, as well as on the selectivity were studied. FeAPO-25 exhibited a high catalytic activity at the mole ratio of FeO and Al2O3 equal to 0.1 in the synthesis gel, giving the phenol conversion of 88.75% and diphenols selectivity of 66.23% at 60°C within 3 h [ n(phenol)/ n(H2O2) = 0.75, m(FeAPO-25)/ m(phenol) = 7.5%]. Experimental results indicated that the FeAPO-25 molecular sieve was a fairly promising candidate for the application in hydroxylation of phenol.

  12. Synthesis of polymer nanoparticles via vapor phase deposition onto liquid substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Patrick D; Gupta, Malancha

    2014-12-01

    In this article, the growth of polymer nanoparticles formed at the liquid-vapor interface via vapor phase polymerization is studied. The particles grow by polymer aggregation, which is driven by the surface tension interaction between the liquid and polymer. It is demonstrated that the mechanism of particle growth is determined by whether polymer particles remain at the liquid-vapor interface or submerge into the liquid. The position of the particles depends on the interaction between the polymer and the liquid. For example, the deposition of poly(n-butyl acrylate) onto poly(dimethyl siloxane) and Krytox liquids leads to the formation of nanoparticles that remain at the liquid-vapor interface. The size of these particles increases as a function of deposition time. The deposition of poly(4-vinylpyridine) onto poly(dimethyl siloxane) and Krytox leads to the formation of nanoparticles that submerge into the liquid. The size of these particles does not significantly change with deposition time. Our study offers a new rapid, one-step synthetic approach for fabricating functional polymer nanoparticles for applications in catalysis, photonics, and drug delivery. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Sulfidic vapor phase catalysts, especially tungsten sulfide, in industrial coal hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pier, M.

    1943-01-01

    The historical development of high-pressure processes of the I. G. Farbenindustrie, from ammonia through methanol and gasoline, and the special case of gasoline production with a fixed-bed catalyst (tungsten sulfide) were discussed. The preparation, properties, and uses of this versatile catalyst were discussed, but it was emphasized that with the sotrmy development of the process, a condition which still existed at the time of this report, and with a great number of practical problems to solve, no extensive study of basic facts had ben possible. This tungsten sulfide catalyst was an especially active vapor-phase catalyst which operated at lower temperatures than the molybdenum catalysts formerly used. It also permitted higher thruputs, even with the oils from bituminous coal that were difficult to split. For certain uses, such as the improvement of the antiknock properties or the saving in tungsten, it was strongly diluted. Studies on using up sulfur in the tungsten sulfide catalyst were in progress at this time and showed there was practically no reduction of it under the conditions of hydrogenation under pressure as long as the raw material contained sulfur.

  14. Development of an acoustic wave based biosensor for vapor phase detection of small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Desmond

    For centuries scientific ingenuity and innovation have been influenced by Mother Nature's perfect design. One of her more elusive designs is that of the sensory olfactory system, an array of highly sensitive receptors responsible for chemical vapor recognition. In the animal kingdom this ability is magnified among canines where ppt (parts per trillion) sensitivity values have been reported. Today, detection dogs are considered an essential part of the US drug and explosives detection schemes. However, growing concerns about their susceptibility to extraneous odors have inspired the development of highly sensitive analytical detection tools or biosensors known as "electronic noses". In general, biosensors are distinguished from chemical sensors in that they use an entity of biological origin (e.g. antibody, cell, enzyme) immobilized onto a surface as the chemically-sensitive film on the device. The colloquial view is that the term "biosensors" refers to devices which detect the presence of entities of biological origin, such as proteins or single-stranded DNA and that this detection must take place in a liquid. Our biosensor utilizes biomolecules, specifically IgG monoclonal antibodies, to achieve molecular recognition of relatively small molecules in the vapor phase.

  15. Development of a Rapid Cell-free Method for Cytotoxicity Assessment of Vapor Phase of Cigarette Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahours X

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, several in vitro tests are widely used to measure toxicological properties of mainstream smoke (Neutral Red Uptake Assay, Micronucleus assay, Ames Test. These tests are necessary to assess cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and mutagenicity, but are time consuming. This is essentially due to the preparation and the handling of cells. It is difficult to use these in vitro tests as screening method for product testing and development. For a better assessment of the cytotoxicity of the vapor phase, a rapid cell-free method has been developed. This paper describes a capillary electrophoresis cell-free method, based on the depletion of an anti-oxidant L-gamma-glutamyl-L-cysteinylglycine (GSH, applied to an aliquot of vapor phase phosphate buffered saline (PBS-trapped cigarette smoke (as recommended for in vitro testing. The correlation between this method and the survival/viability test (Neutral Red cytotoxicity is excellent (coefficient of correlation (r = 0.99.

  16. Hybrid vapor phase-solution phase growth techniques for improved CZT(S,Se) photovoltaic device performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Liang-Yi; Gershon, Talia S.; Haight, Richard A.; Lee, Yun Seog

    2016-12-27

    A hybrid vapor phase-solution phase CZT(S,Se) growth technique is provided. In one aspect, a method of forming a kesterite absorber material on a substrate includes the steps of: depositing a layer of a first kesterite material on the substrate using a vapor phase deposition process, wherein the first kesterite material includes Cu, Zn, Sn, and at least one of S and Se; annealing the first kesterite material to crystallize the first kesterite material; and depositing a layer of a second kesterite material on a side of the first kesterite material opposite the substrate using a solution phase deposition process, wherein the second kesterite material includes Cu, Zn, Sn, and at least one of S and Se, wherein the first kesterite material and the second kesterite material form a multi-layer stack of the absorber material on the substrate. A photovoltaic device and method of formation thereof are also provided.

  17. Aluminum Nitride Micro-Channels Grown via Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy for MEMs Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodak, L.E.; Kuchibhatla, S.; Famouri, P.; Ting, L.; Korakakis, D.

    2008-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) is a promising material for a number of applications due to its temperature and chemical stability. Furthermore, AlN maintains its piezoelectric properties at higher temperatures than more commonly used materials, such as Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) [1, 2], making AlN attractive for high temperature micro and nanoelectromechanical (MEMs and NEMs) applications including, but not limited to, high temperature sensors and actuators, micro-channels for fuel cell applications, and micromechanical resonators. This work presents a novel AlN micro-channel fabrication technique using Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE). AlN easily nucleates on dielectric surfaces due to the large sticking coefficient and short diffusion length of the aluminum species resulting in a high quality polycrystalline growth on typical mask materials, such as silicon dioxide and silicon nitride [3,4]. The fabrication process introduced involves partially masking a substrate with a silicon dioxide striped pattern and then growing AlN via MOVPE simultaneously on the dielectric mask and exposed substrate. A buffered oxide etch is then used to remove the underlying silicon dioxide and leave a free standing AlN micro-channel. The width of the channel has been varied from 5 ìm to 110 ìm and the height of the air gap from 130 nm to 800 nm indicating the stability of the structure. Furthermore, this versatile process has been performed on (111) silicon, c-plane sapphire, and gallium nitride epilayers on sapphire substrates. Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction (RHEED), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and Raman measurements have been taken on channels grown on each substrate and indicate that the substrate is influencing the growth of the AlN micro-channels on the SiO2 sacrificial layer.

  18. Characterization of vapor phase mercury released from concrete processing with baghouse filter dust added cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Hayes, Josh; Wu, Chang-Yu; Townsend, Timothy; Schert, John; Vinson, Tim; Deliz, Katherine; Bonzongo, Jean-Claude

    2014-02-18

    The fate of mercury (Hg) in cement processing and products has drawn intense attention due to its contribution to the ambient emission inventory. Feeding Hg-loaded coal fly ash to the cement kiln introduces additional Hg into the kiln's baghouse filter dust (BFD), and the practice of replacing 5% of cement with the Hg-loaded BFD by cement plants has recently raised environmental and occupational health concerns. The objective of this study was to determine Hg concentration and speciation in BFD as well as to investigate the release of vapor phase Hg from storing and processing BFD-added cement. The results showed that Hg content in the BFD from different seasons ranged from 0.91-1.44 mg/kg (ppm), with 62-73% as soluble inorganic Hg, while Hg in the other concrete constituents were 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than the BFD. Up to 21% of Hg loss was observed in the time-series study while storing the BFD in the open environment by the end of the seventh day. Real-time monitoring in the bench system indicated that high temperature and moisture can facilitate Hg release at the early stage. Ontario Hydro (OH) traps showed that total Hg emission from BFD is dictated by the air exchange surface area. In the bench simulation of concrete processing, only 0.4-0.5% of Hg escaped from mixing and curing BFD-added cement. A follow-up headspace study did not detect Hg release in the following 7 days. In summary, replacing 5% of cement with the BFD investigated in this study has minimal occupational health concerns for concrete workers, and proper storing and mixing of BFD with cement can minimize Hg emission burden for the cement plant.

  19. InGaAsP Solar Cells Grown by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Nikhil; Simon, John; Schulte, Kevin L.; Dippo, Patricia; Young, Michelle; Young, David L.; Ptak, Aaron J.

    2016-11-21

    Hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) has recently reemerged as a low-cost, high-throughput alternative to metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) for the growth of high-efficiency III-V solar cells. Quaternary InGaAsP solar cells in the bandgap range of ~1.7-1.8 eV are promising top-cell candidates for integration in Ill-V/Si tandem cells with projected one-sun efficiencies exceeding 30%. In this work, we report on the development of lattice-matched InGaAsP solar cells grown on GaAs substrates via HVPE at very high growth rates of ~0.7 um/min. We demonstrate prototype 1.7 eV InGaAsP solar cells with an open-circuit voltage of 1.11 V. The short-circuit current is limited by the lack of a window layer in these early stage devices. The photo response of 1.7 InGaAsP solar cell with ~1.1 um thick base layer is found to be nearly insensitive to variation in p-type base doping concentration in the range from Na - 4x1016 to - 1x1017 cm-3, indicating an effective carrier collection length on the order of - 1.1 um or higher in our devices. These initial InGaAsP cell results are encouraging and highlight the viability of HVPE to produce mixed arsenide-phosphide solar cells grown lattice-matched on GaAs.

  20. Fabrication of polyimide shells by vapor phase deposition for use as ICF targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonso, E.L.; Tsai, F.Y.; Chen, S.H.; Gram, R.Q.; Harding, D.R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    1999-03-01

    Hollow polyimide shells, for use as ICF targets, were fabricated by co-depositing monomer precursors from the vapor phase onto bounced spherical mandrels. The process involved two stages: first, the deposited monomers (pyromellitic dianhydride and 4,4{prime}-oxydianiline) reacted on the mandrel surface to form polyamic acid; second, the mandrel was heated to 300 C to imidize the polyamic acid and to decompose the mandrel. During this latter process the decomposed mandrel diffused through the thermally stable coating, leaving a polyimide shell. Depositions were performed under low ({approximately}10{sup {minus}3} Torr) and high ({approximately}10{sup {minus}6} Torr) vacuum. Also, flat witness films of polyimide deposited on Si wafers and NaCl allowed the mechanical properties and chemical composition of the film during the heating cycle to be measured. Polyimide shells with diameters ranging from 700 to 950 {micro}m and wall thicknesses ranging from 2 to 13 {micro}m were produced. The shell`s sphericity was greater than 99%. Burst and buckle pressure tests on these shells yielded the estimated mechanical strength properties. The elastic modulus and tensile strength were {approximately}15 GPa and {approximately}300 MPa, respectively. The permeability of D{sub 2} through polyamic acid at 25 C was 7.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}17} mol{center_dot}m/m{sup 2}{center_dot}Pa{center_dot}s and increased to 6.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}16} mol{center_dot}m/m{sup 2}{center_dot}Pa{center_dot}s at 25 C upon curing the shell to 150 C. The permeability of D{sub 2} at 25 C through vapor-deposited polyimide flat films was measured to be 240 times greater than through the as-deposited polyamic acid, and about 7 times greater than through commercially available solution-cast Kapton.

  1. TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS USING A SURFACTANT MODIFIED ZEOLITE/VAPOR PHASE BIOREACTOR SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn E. Katz; Kerry A. Kinney; R.S. Bowman; E.J. Sullivan

    2003-04-01

    Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. It is by some estimates the largest single waste stream in the country, aside from nonhazardous industrial wastes. Characteristics of produced water include high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component, and chemicals added during the oil-production process. While most of the produced water is disposed via reinjection, some of them must be treated to remove organic constituents before the water is discharged. Current treatment options are successful in reducing the organic content; however, they cannot always meet the levels of current or proposed regulations for discharged water. Therefore, an efficient, cost-effective treatment technology is needed. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been used successfully to treat contaminated ground water for organic and inorganic constituents. In addition, the low cost of natural zeolites makes their use attractive in water-treatment applications. Our previous DOE research work (DE-AC26-99BC15221) demonstrated that SMZ could successfully remove BTEX compounds from the produced water. In addition, SMZ could be regenerated through a simple air sparging process. The primary goal of this project is to develop a robust SMZ/VPB treatment system to efficiently remove the organic constituents from produced water in a cost-effective manner. This report summarizes work of this project from October 2002 to March 2003. In this starting stage of this study, we have continued our investigation of SMZ regeneration from our previous DOE project. Two saturation/stripping cycles have been completed for SMZ columns saturated with BTEX compounds. Preliminary results suggest that BTEX sorption actually increases with the number of saturation/regeneration cycles. Furthermore, the experimental vapor phase bioreactors for this project have been designed and are

  2. Polycrystalline indium phosphide on silicon by indium assisted growth in hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metaferia, Wondwosen; Sun, Yan-Ting, E-mail: yasun@kth.se; Lourdudoss, Sebastian [Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials, Department of Materials and Nano Physics, KTH—Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Pietralunga, Silvia M. [CNR-Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies, P. Leonardo da Vinci, 32 20133 Milano (Italy); Zani, Maurizio; Tagliaferri, Alberto [Department of Physics Politecnico di Milano, P. Leonardo da Vinci, 32 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-07-21

    Polycrystalline InP was grown on Si(001) and Si(111) substrates by using indium (In) metal as a starting material in hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) reactor. In metal was deposited on silicon substrates by thermal evaporation technique. The deposited In resulted in islands of different size and was found to be polycrystalline in nature. Different growth experiments of growing InP were performed, and the growth mechanism was investigated. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy for morphological investigation, Scanning Auger microscopy for surface and compositional analyses, powder X-ray diffraction for crystallinity, and micro photoluminescence for optical quality assessment were conducted. It is shown that the growth starts first by phosphidisation of the In islands to InP followed by subsequent selective deposition of InP in HVPE regardless of the Si substrate orientation. Polycrystalline InP of large grain size is achieved and the growth rate as high as 21 μm/h is obtained on both substrates. Sulfur doping of the polycrystalline InP was investigated by growing alternating layers of sulfur doped and unintentionally doped InP for equal interval of time. These layers could be delineated by stain etching showing that enough amount of sulfur can be incorporated. Grains of large lateral dimension up to 3 μm polycrystalline InP on Si with good morphological and optical quality is obtained. The process is generic and it can also be applied for the growth of other polycrystalline III–V semiconductor layers on low cost and flexible substrates for solar cell applications.

  3. Desalination of water by vapor-phase transport through hydrophobic nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongho; Karnik, Rohit

    2010-08-01

    We propose a new approach to desalination of water whereby a pressure difference across a vapor-trapping nanopore induces selective transport of water by isothermal evaporation and condensation across the pore. Transport of water through a nanopore with saline water on one side and pure water on the other side under a pressure difference was theoretically analyzed under the rarefied gas assumption using a probabilistic framework that accounts for diffuse scattering from the pore walls as well as reflection from the menisci. The analysis revealed that in addition to salinity, temperature, and pressure difference, the nanopore aspect ratio and the probability of condensation of a water molecule incident on a meniscus from the vapor phase, known as the condensation coefficient, are key determinants of flux. The effect of condensation coefficient on mass flux becomes critical when the aspect ratio is small. However, the mass flux becomes independent of the condensation coefficient as the pore aspect ratio increases, converging to the Knudsen flux for long nanopores. For design of a nanopore membrane that can trap vapor, a minimum aspect ratio is derived for which coalescence of the two interfaces on either side of the nanopore remains energetically unfavorable. Based on this design criterion, the analysis suggests that mass flux in the range of 20-70 g/m2 s may be feasible if the system is operated at temperatures in the range of 30-50 °C. The proposed approach further decouples transport properties from material properties of the membrane, which opens the possibility of engineering membranes with appropriate materials that may lead to reverse osmosis membranes with improved flux, better selectivity, and high chlorine resistance.

  4. Simplified efficient phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes by organic vapor phase deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, P.; Beckmann, C.; Stümmler, D.; Sanders, S.; Simkus, G.; Heuken, M.; Vescan, A.; Kalisch, H.

    2017-12-01

    The most efficient phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are comprised of complex stacks with numerous organic layers. State-of-the-art phosphorescent OLEDs make use of blocking layers to confine charge carriers and excitons. On the other hand, simplified OLEDs consisting of only three organic materials have shown unexpectedly high efficiency when first introduced. This was attributed to superior energy level matching and suppressed external quantum efficiency (EQE) roll-off. In this work, we study simplified OLED stacks, manufactured by organic vapor phase deposition, with a focus on charge balance, turn-on voltage (Von), and efficiency. To prevent electrons from leaking through the device, we implemented a compositionally graded emission layer. By grading the emitter with the hole transport material, charge confinement is enabled without additional blocking layers. Our best performing organic stack is composed of only three organic materials in two layers including the emitter Ir(ppy)3 and yields a Von of 2.5 V (>1 cd/m2) and an EQE of 13% at 3000 cd/m2 without the use of any additional light extraction techniques. Changes in the charge balance, due to barrier tuning or adjustments in the grading parameters and layer thicknesses, are clearly visible in the current density-voltage-luminance (J-V-L) measurements. As charge injection at the electrodes and organic interfaces is of great interest but difficult to investigate in complex device structures, we believe that our simplified organic stack is not only a potent alternative to complex state-of-the-art OLEDs but also a well suited test vehicle for experimental studies focusing on the modification of the electrode-organic semiconductor interface.

  5. Adsorptive water removal from dichloromethane and vapor-phase regeneration of a molecular sieve 3A packed bed

    OpenAIRE

    Jovic, S Slavisa; Laxminarayan, Y; Keurentjes, JTF Jos; Schouten, JC Jaap; Schaaf, van der, S.

    2017-01-01

    The drying of dichloromethane with a molecular sieve 3A packed bed process is modeled and experimentally verified. In the process, the dichloromethane is dried in the liquid phase and the adsorbent is regenerated by water desorption with dried dichloromethane product in the vapor phase. Adsorption equilibrium experiments show that dichloromethane does not compete with water adsorption, because of size exclusion; the pure water vapor isotherm from literature provides an accurate representation...

  6. The effect of heated vapor-phase acidification on organic carbon concentrations and isotopic values in geologic rock samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R. Z.; West, A. J.; Yager, J. A.; Rollins, N.; Li, G.; Berelson, W.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon signatures recorded in the modern and geologic rock record can give insight on the Earth's carbon cycle through time. This is especially true for organic carbon (OC), which can help us understand how the biosphere has evolved over Earth's history. However, carbon recorded in rocks is a combination of OC and inorganic carbon (IC) mostly in the form of carbonate minerals. To measure OC, IC must therefore first be removed through a process called "decarbonation." This is often done through a leaching process with hydrochloric acid (HCl). However, three well known problems exist for the decarbonation process: 1) Incomplete removal of IC, 2) Unintentional removal of OC, and 3) Addition of false carbon blank. Currently, vapor (gas) phase removal of OC is preferred to liquid phase treatment because it has been shown that OC is lost to solubilization during liquid phase acidification. Vapor phase treatment is largely thought to avoid the problem of OC loss, but this has not yet been rigorously investigated. This study investigates that assumption and shows that vapor phase treatment can cause unintentional OC loss. We show that vapor phase treatment must be sensitive to rock type and treatment length to produce robust OC isotopic measurements and concentrations.

  7. Simultaneous Determination of Furan and Vinyl Acetate in Vapor Phase of Mainstream Cigarette Smoke by GC-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AIFEI XU

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A simple and sensitive method for simultaneous determination of furan and vinyl acetate (VA in vapor phase of mainstream cigarette smoke with cold trap and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS was developed. A Cambridge filter pad (CFP was placed in front of the impingers of smoking machine to remove the particle phase from cigarette smoke. Furan and VA in vapor phase of mainstream cigarette smoke were collected in two impingers connected in series by filled with methanol at -78°C. The solutions were added with deuterium-labeled furan-d4 and VA-d6 as internal standards and analyzed by GC-MS. The results showed that the calibration curves for furan and VA were linear (r2 > 0.9995 over the studied concentration range. The intra- and inter-day precision values for furan and VA were <7.07% and <9.62%, respectively. The extraction recoveries of furan and VA were in the range of 94.5-97.7% and 92.3-94.9%, respectively. Moreover, the limits of detection for furan and VA were 0.028 µg mL-1 and 1.3 ng mL-1, respectively. The validated method has been successfully applied to determine the emissions of furan and VA in the vapor phase of mainstream cigarette smoke under International Organization for Standardization (ISO and Canadian Intense (CI smoking regimen.

  8. Treatment of Produced Water Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn E. Katz; Kerry A. Kinney; Robert S. Bowman; Enid J. Sullivan; Soondong Kwon; Elaine B. Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Craig R. Altare

    2006-01-31

    Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. Produced waters typically contain a high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component as well as chemicals added during the oil-production process. It has been estimated that a total of 14 billion barrels of produced water were generated in 2002 from onshore operations (Veil, 2004). Although much of this produced water is disposed via reinjection, environmental and cost considerations can make surface discharge of this water a more practical means of disposal. In addition, reinjection is not always a feasible option because of geographic, economic, or regulatory considerations. In these situations, it may be desirable, and often necessary from a regulatory viewpoint, to treat produced water before discharge. It may also be feasible to treat waters that slightly exceed regulatory limits for re-use in arid or drought-prone areas, rather than losing them to reinjection. A previous project conducted under DOE Contract DE-AC26-99BC15221 demonstrated that surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) represents a potential treatment technology for produced water containing BTEX. Laboratory and field experiments suggest that: (1) sorption of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) to SMZ follows linear isotherms in which sorption increases with increasing solute hydrophobicity; (2) the presence of high salt concentrations substantially increases the capacity of the SMZ for BTEX; (3) competitive sorption among the BTEX compounds is negligible; and, (4) complete recovery of the SMZ sorption capacity for BTEX can be achieved by air sparging the SMZ. This report summarizes research for a follow on project to optimize the regeneration process for multiple sorption/regeneration cycles, and to develop and incorporate a vapor phase bioreactor (VPB) system for treatment of the off-gas generated during

  9. Treatment of Produced Waters Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soondong Kwon; Elaine B. Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Lynn E. Katz; Kerry A. Kinney; R. S. Bowman; E. J. Sullivan

    2005-03-11

    second residence time, the GAC bed reduced peak contaminant concentrations by 97%. After the initial peak, the inlet VOC concentration in the SMZ regeneration gas stream drops exponentially with time. During this period, the contaminants on the GAC subsequently desorbed at a nearly steady rate over the next 45 hours resulting in a relatively steady effluent concentration of approximately 25 ppm{sub v}. This lower concentration is readily degradable by a downstream vapor phase biofilter (VPB) and the steady nature of the feed stream will prevent the biomass in the VPB from enduring starvation conditions between SMZ regeneration cycles. Repetitive sorption and desorption cycles that would be expected in the field were also investigated. It was determined that although the GAC initially lost some VOC sorption capacity, the adsorption and desorption profiles stabilized after approximately 6 cycles indicating that a GAC bed should be suitable for continuous operation. In preparation for the pilot field testing of the SMZ/VPB system, design, ''in-house'' construction and testing of the field system were completed during this project period. The design of the SMZ system for the pilot test was based on previous investigations by the PI's in Wyoming, 2002 and on analyses of the produced water at the field site in New Mexico. The field tests are scheduled for summer, 2005. A cost survey, feasibility of application and cost analyses were completed to investigate the long term effectiveness of the SMZ/VPB system as a method of treating produced water for re-use. Several factors were investigated, including: current costs to treat and dispose of produced water, end-use water quality requirements, and state and federal permitting requirements.

  10. Identification of vapor-phase chemical warfare agent simulants and rocket fuels using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stearns, Jaime A.; McElman, Sarah E.; Dodd, James A.

    2010-05-01

    Application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to the identification of security threats is a growing area of research. This work presents LIBS spectra of vapor-phase chemical warfare agent simulants and typical rocket fuels. A large dataset of spectra was acquired using a variety of gas mixtures and background pressures and processed using partial least squares analysis. The five compounds studied were identified with a 99% success rate by the best method. The temporal behavior of the emission lines as a function of chamber pressure and gas mixture was also investigated, revealing some interesting trends that merit further study.

  11. Halogen-free vapor phase epitaxy for high-rate growth of GaN bulk crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Kimura, Taishi; Horibuchi, Kayo

    2017-04-01

    Here, we propose a halogen-free vapor phase epitaxy (HF-VPE) technique to grow bulk GaN single crystals. This technique employs the simplest reaction for GaN synthesis (reaction of Ga vapor with NH3) and can potentially achieve a high growth rate, a prolonged growth duration, a high crystal quality, and a low cost. The analyses of thick HF-VPE-GaN layers grown under optimized growth conditions revealed that high-quality crystals, both in terms of dislocation density and impurity concentration, are obtained at high growth rates of over 100 µm/h.

  12. Growth of Cd0.96Zn0.04Te single crystals by vapor phase gas transport method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Tabatabai Yazdi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available   Cd0.96Zn0.04Te crystals were grown using vapor phase gas transport method (VPGT. The results show that dendritic crystals with grain size up to 3.5 mm can be grown with this technique. X-ray diffraction and Laue back-reflection patterns show that dendritic crystals are single-phase, whose single crystal grains are randomly oriented with respect to the gas-transport axis. Electrical measurements, carried out using Van der Pauw method, show that the as-grown crystals have resistivity of about 104 Ω cm and n-type conductivity.

  13. Growth of low-threading-dislocation-density GaN on graphene by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shunyu; Xu, Yu; Qi, Lin; Li, Zongyao; Cao, Bing; Wang, Chinhua; Zhang, Jicai; Wang, Jianfeng; Xu, Ke

    2017-03-01

    Recently, gallium nitride (GaN) films grown on graphene have been widely studied. Here, we have grown low-threading-dislocation-density GaN films on graphene by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The full widths at half maximum (FWHMs) of X-ray rocking curves (XRCs) of the GaN films were 276 and 350 arcsec at the 0002 and 10\\bar{1}2 reflections, respectively. This shows that the threading dislocation densities are on the order of magnitude of 108 cm-2, which is consistent with the results of cathodoluminescence (CL).

  14. Vapor-Phase Stoichiometry and Heat Treatment of CdTe Starting Material for Physical Vapor Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Sha, Yi-Gao; Lehoczky, S. L.; Liu, Hao-Chieh; Fang, Rei; Brebrick, R. F.

    1998-01-01

    Six batches of CdTe, having total amounts of material from 99 to 203 g and gross mole fraction of Te, X(sub Te), 0.499954-0.500138, were synthesized from pure Cd and Te elements. The vapor-phase stoichiometry of the assynthesized CdTe batches was determined from the partial pressure of Te2, P(sub Te2) using an optical absorption technique. The measured vapor compositions at 870 C were Te-rich for all of the batches with partial pressure ratios of Cd to Te2, P(sub Cd)/P(sub Te2), ranging from 0.00742 to 1.92. After the heat treatment of baking under dynamic vacuum at 870 C for 8 min, the vapor-phase compositions moved toward that of the congruent sublimation, i.e. P(sub Cd)/P(sub Te2) = 2.0, with the measured P(sub Cd)/P(sub Te2) varying from 1.84 to 3.47. The partial pressure measurements on one of the heat-treated samples also showed that the sample remained close to the congruent sublimation condition over the temperature range 800-880 C.

  15. Antibacterial effects of allspice, garlic, and oregano essential oils in tomato films determined by overlay and vapor-phase methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, W-X; Olsen, C W; Avena-Bustillos, R J; McHugh, T H; Levin, C E; Mandrell, R; Friedman, Mendel

    2009-09-01

    Physical properties as well as antimicrobial activities against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes of allspice, garlic, and oregano essential oils (EOs) in tomato puree film-forming solutions (TPFFS) formulated into edible films at 0.5% to 3% (w/w) concentrations were investigated in this study. Antimicrobial activities were determined by 2 independent methods: overlay of the film on top of the bacteria and vapor-phase diffusion of the antimicrobial from the film to the bacteria. The results indicate that the antimicrobial activities against the 3 pathogens were in the following order: oregano oil > allspice oil > garlic oil. Listeria monocytogenes was less resistant to EO vapors, while E. coli O157:H7 was more resistant to EOs as determined by both overlay and vapor-phase diffusion tests. The presence of plant EO antimicrobials reduced the viscosity of TPFFS at the higher shear rates, but did not affect water vapor permeability of films. EOs increased elongation and darkened the color of films. The results of the present study show that the 3 plant-derived EOs can be used to prepare tomato-based antimicrobial edible films with good physical properties for food applications by both direct contact and indirectly by vapors emanating from the films.

  16. Characterization of (211) and (100) CdTe Layers Grown on Si Substrates by Metalorganic Vapor-Phase Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, K.; Niraula, M.; Kojima, M.; Kitagawa, S.; Tsubota, S.; Yamaguchi, T.; Ozawa, J.; Agata, Y.

    2017-11-01

    Single-crystal (211) and (100) CdTe layers have been grown by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy using the same condition on (211) and (100) Si substrates, respectively. Prior to the growth, substrates of both orientations were pretreated using the same pretreatment procedure. The crystal qualities of the grown layers were evaluated by full-width at half-maximum values of double-crystal x-ray rocking curves, and photoluminescence spectra at 4.2 K. (211) CdTe layers showed better crystallinity than (100) layers. The crystal quality of the (100) CdTe layers was also compared with that of layers grown on an epitaxial (100) GaAs layer on Si substrate. The results suggest that (100) CdTe layers with improved crystal quality could be obtained by optimizing the procedure of the Si substrates.

  17. ZnO/Cu(InGa)Se.sub.2 solar cells prepared by vapor phase Zn doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Kannan; Hasoon, Falah S.; Asher, Sarah E.; Dolan, James; Keane, James C.

    2007-02-20

    A process for making a thin film ZnO/Cu(InGa)Se.sub.2 solar cell without depositing a buffer layer and by Zn doping from a vapor phase, comprising: depositing Cu(InGa)Se.sub.2 layer on a metal back contact deposited on a glass substrate; heating the Cu(InGa)Se.sub.2 layer on the metal back contact on the glass substrate to a temperature range between about 100.degree. C. to about 250.degree. C.; subjecting the heated layer of Cu(InGa)Se.sub.2 to an evaporant species from a Zn compound; and sputter depositing ZnO on the Zn compound evaporant species treated layer of Cu(InGa)Se.sub.2.

  18. Significance of vapor phase chemical reactions on CVD rates predicted by chemically frozen and local thermochemical equilibrium boundary layer theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the role played by vapor-phase chemical reactions on CVD rates by comparing the results of two extreme theories developed to predict CVD mass transport rates in the absence of interfacial kinetic barrier: one based on chemically frozen boundary layer and the other based on local thermochemical equilibrium. Both theories consider laminar convective-diffusion boundary layers at high Reynolds numbers and include thermal (Soret) diffusion and variable property effects. As an example, Na2SO4 deposition was studied. It was found that gas phase reactions have no important role on Na2SO4 deposition rates and on the predictions of the theories. The implications of the predictions of the two theories to other CVD systems are discussed.

  19. Biomass-based composites from poly(lactic acid) and wood flour by vapor-phase assisted surface polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghee; Andou, Yoshito; Shirai, Yoshihito; Nishida, Haruo

    2011-02-01

    To prepare biomass-based composites in an environmentally benign manner, vapor-phase assisted surface polymerization (VASP) was applied to prepare the composites from wood flour and poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) without solvent. VASP of l,l-lactide successfully proceeded on the wood flour surfaces, resulting in surface coverage by newly generated PLLA. For obtained PLLA/wood flour composites, it was clarified that grafting of PLLA on wood flour surfaces had occurred to form covalently bonded composites, with the accumulated PLLA layers having crystallized in situ during VASP. Resulting PLLA layers showed very high crystallinity of 79.2% and a high melting point close to the equilibrium melting point. Moreover, thermal degradation behavior of the composites suggested a cooperative degradation manner of the components.

  20. Adsorptive Water Removal from Dichloromethane and Vapor-Phase Regeneration of a Molecular Sieve 3A Packed Bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jović, Slaviša; Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Keurentjes, Jos; Schouten, Jaap; van der Schaaf, John

    2017-05-03

    The drying of dichloromethane with a molecular sieve 3A packed bed process is modeled and experimentally verified. In the process, the dichloromethane is dried in the liquid phase and the adsorbent is regenerated by water desorption with dried dichloromethane product in the vapor phase. Adsorption equilibrium experiments show that dichloromethane does not compete with water adsorption, because of size exclusion; the pure water vapor isotherm from literature provides an accurate representation of the experiments. The breakthrough curves are adequately described by a mathematical model that includes external mass transfer, pore diffusion, and surface diffusion. During the desorption step, the main heat transfer mechanism is the condensation of the superheated dichloromethane vapor. The regeneration time is shortened significantly by external bed heating. Cyclic steady-state experiments demonstrate the feasibility of this novel, zero-emission drying process.

  1. Characteristics of stimulated emission from optically pumped freestanding GaN grown by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, M H; Kim, S T; Chung, S H; Moon, D C

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we observed optically pumped stimulated emission at room temperature in quasi-bulk GaN prepared from thick-film GaN grown on a sapphire substrate by using hydride vapor-phase epitaxy and subsequent mechanical removal of the sapphire substrate. The stimulated emission from the surface and 1-mm-wide-cleaved cavity of the GaN was red-shifted compared to the spontaneous emission by increasing the optical pumping-power density, and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the peak decreased. The stimulated emission was demonstrated to have a highly TE-mode polarized nature, and the super-linear dependence of the integrated emission intensity on the excitation power indicated a threshold pump-power density of I sub t sub h = 2 MW/cm sup 2 for one set of stimulated emissions.

  2. Direct Growth of CdTe on a (211) Si Substrate with Vapor Phase Epitaxy Using a Metallic Cd Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iso, Kenji; Gokudan, Yuya; Shiraishi, Masumi; Murakami, Hisashi; Koukitu, Akinori

    2017-10-01

    We successfully performed epitaxial CdTe growth on a Si (211) substrate with vapor-phase epitaxy using a cost-effective metallic cadmium source as a group-II precursor. The thermodynamic data demonstrate that the combination of metallic Cd and diisopropyl-telluride (DiPTe) with a H2 carrier gas enables the growth of CdTe crystals. A CdTe single crystal with a (422) surface orientation was obtained when a growth temperature between 600°C and 650°C was employed. The surface morphology and crystalline quality were improved with increasing film thickness. The full-width at half-maximum of the x-ray rocking curves with a film thickness of 15.7 μm for the skew-symmetrical (422) and asymmetrical (111) reflection were 528 arcsec and 615 arcsec, respectively.

  3. Growth of GaN on ZrB 2 substrate by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomida, Yoshihito; Nitta, Shugo; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Amano, Hiroshi; Akasaki, Isamu; Otani, Shigeki; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Liu, Rong; Bell, Abigail; Ponce, Fernando A.

    2003-06-01

    Growth of GaN by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) on metallic zirconium diboride (ZrB 2) substrate was investigated. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that cubic ZrB xN 1- x is formed on the surface when ZrB 2 is exposed to ammonia-containing atmosphere, which protects the nucleation of GaN or AlN. We solved the problem by covering ZrB 2 surface with very thin AlN or GaN at low temperature, thereby achieving high-quality GaN growth with a dislocation density less than 10 8 cm -2. Direct conduction was achieved through the back of ZrB 2 and the surface of Si-doped GaN.

  4. Vapor-phase hydrothermal transformation of HTiOF3 intermediates into {001} faceted anatase single-crystalline nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Porun; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Haimin; An, Taicheng; Yang, Huagui; Tang, Zhiyong; Cai, Weiping; Zhao, Huijun

    2012-12-07

    For the first time, a facile, one-pot hydrofluoric acid vapor-phase hydrothermal (HF-VPH) method is demonstrated to directly grow single-crystalline anatase TiO(2) nanosheets with 98.2% of exposed {001} faceted surfaces on the Ti substrate via a distinctive two-stage formation mechanism. The first stage produces a new intermediate crystal (orthorhombic HTiOF(3) ) that is transformed into anatase TiO(2) nanosheets during the second stage. The findings reveal that the HF-VPH reaction environment is unique and differs remarkably from that of liquid-phase hydrothermal processes. The uniqueness of the HF-VPH conditions can be readily used to effectively control the nanostructure growth. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Plastics for corrosion inhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Goldade, Victor A; Makarevich, Anna V; Kestelman, Vladimir N

    2005-01-01

    The development of polymer composites containing inhibitors of metal corrosion is an important endeavour in modern materials science and technology. Corrosion inhibitors can be located in a polymer matrix in the solid, liquid or gaseous phase. This book details the thermodynamic principles for selecting these components, their compatibility and their effectiveness. The various mechanisms of metal protection – barrier, inhibiting and electromechanical – are considered, as are the conflicting requirements placed on the structure of the combined material. Two main classes of inhibited materials (structural and films/coatings) are described in detail. Examples are given of structural plastics used in friction units subjected to mechano-chemical wear and of polymer films/coatings for protecting metal objects against corrosion.

  6. Columnar jointing in vapor-phase-altered, non-welded Cerro Galán Ignimbrite, Paycuqui, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Heather M.; Lesti, Chiara; Cas, Ray A.F.; Porreca, Massimiliano; Viramonte, Jose G.; Folkes, Christopher B.; Giordano, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Columnar jointing is thought to occur primarily in lavas and welded pyroclastic flow deposits. However, the non-welded Cerro Galán Ignimbrite at Paycuqui, Argentina, contains well-developed columnar joints that are instead due to high-temperature vapor-phase alteration of the deposit, where devitrification and vapor-phase crystallization have increased the density and cohesion of the upper half of the section. Thermal remanent magnetization analyses of entrained lithic clasts indicate high emplacement temperatures, above 630°C, but the lack of welding textures indicates temperatures below the glass transition temperature. In order to remain below the glass transition at 630°C, the minimum cooling rate prior to deposition was 3.0 × 10−3–8.5 × 10−2°C/min (depending on the experimental data used for comparison). Alternatively, if the deposit was emplaced above the glass transition temperature, conductive cooling alone was insufficient to prevent welding. Crack patterns (average, 4.5 sides to each polygon) and column diameters (average, 75 cm) are consistent with relatively rapid cooling, where advective heat loss due to vapor fluxing increases cooling over simple conductive heat transfer. The presence of regularly spaced, complex radiating joint patterns is consistent with fumarolic gas rise, where volatiles originated in the valley-confined drainage system below. Joint spacing is a proxy for cooling rates and is controlled by depositional thickness/valley width. We suggest that the formation of joints in high-temperature, non-welded deposits is aided by the presence of underlying external water, where vapor transfer causes crystallization in pore spaces, densifies the deposit, and helps prevent welding.

  7. Indium tin oxide thin-films prepared by vapor phase pyrolysis for efficient silicon based solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simashkevich, Alexei, E-mail: alexeisimashkevich@hotmail.com [Institute of Applied Physics, 5 Academiei str., Chisinau, MD-2028, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Serban, Dormidont; Bruc, Leonid; Curmei, Nicolai [Institute of Applied Physics, 5 Academiei str., Chisinau, MD-2028, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Hinrichs, Volker [Institut für Heterogene Materialsysteme, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Lise-Meitner Campus, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Rusu, Marin [Institute of Applied Physics, 5 Academiei str., Chisinau, MD-2028, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Institut für Heterogene Materialsysteme, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Lise-Meitner Campus, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The vapor phase pyrolysis deposition method was developed for the preparation of indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films with thicknesses ranging between 300 and 400 nm with the sheet resistance of 10–15 Ω/sq. and the transparency in the visible region of the spectrum over 80%. The layers were deposited on the (100) surface of the n-type silicon wafers with the charge carriers concentration of ~ 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3}. The morphology of the ITO layers deposited on Si wafers with different surface morphologies, e.g., smooth (polished), rough (irregularly structured) and textured (by inversed pyramids) was investigated. The as-deposited ITO thin films consist of crystalline columns with the height of 300–400 nm and the width of 50–100 nm. Photovoltaic parameters of mono- and bifacial solar cells of Cu/ITO/SiO{sub 2}/n–n{sup +} Si/Cu prepared on Si (100) wafers with different surface structures were studied and compared. A maximum efficiency of 15.8% was achieved on monofacial solar cell devices with the textured Si surface. Bifacial photovoltaic devices from 100 μm thick Si wafers with the smooth surface have demonstrated efficiencies of 13.0% at frontal illumination and 10% at rear illumination. - Highlights: • ITO thin films prepared by vapor phase pyrolysis on Si (100) wafers with a smooth (polished), rough (irregularly structured) and textured (by inversed pyramids) surface. • Monofacial ITO/SiO2/n-n+Si solar cells with an efficiency of 15.8% prepared and bifacial PV devices with front- and rear-side efficiencies up to 13% demonstrated. • Comparative studies of photovoltaic properties of solar cells with different morphologies of the Si wafer surface presented.

  8. APTS and rGO co-functionalized pyrenated fluorescent nanonets for representative vapor phase nitroaromatic explosive detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Linjuan; Zu, Baiyi; Yang, Zheng; Cao, Hongyu; Zheng, Xuefang; Dou, Xincun

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, flexible PVP/pyrene/APTS/rGO fluorescent nanonets were designed and synthesized via a one-step electrospinning method to detect representative subsaturated nitroaromatic explosive vapor. The functional fluorescent nanonets, which were highly stable in air, showed an 81% quenching efficiency towards TNT vapor (~10 ppb) with an exposure time of 540 s at room temperature. The nice performance of the nanonets was ascribed to the synergistic effects induced by the specific adsorption properties of APTS, the fast charge transfer properties and the effective π-π interaction with pyrene and TNT of rGO. Compared to the analogues of TNT, the PVP/pyrene/APTS/rGO nanonets showed notable selectivity towards TNT and DNT vapors. The explored functionalization method opens up brand new insight into sensitive and selective detection of vapor phase nitroaromatic explosives.For the first time, flexible PVP/pyrene/APTS/rGO fluorescent nanonets were designed and synthesized via a one-step electrospinning method to detect representative subsaturated nitroaromatic explosive vapor. The functional fluorescent nanonets, which were highly stable in air, showed an 81% quenching efficiency towards TNT vapor (~10 ppb) with an exposure time of 540 s at room temperature. The nice performance of the nanonets was ascribed to the synergistic effects induced by the specific adsorption properties of APTS, the fast charge transfer properties and the effective π-π interaction with pyrene and TNT of rGO. Compared to the analogues of TNT, the PVP/pyrene/APTS/rGO nanonets showed notable selectivity towards TNT and DNT vapors. The explored functionalization method opens up brand new insight into sensitive and selective detection of vapor phase nitroaromatic explosives. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Vapor pressure of TNT and its analogues, fluorescence quenching kinetics, fluorescence quenching efficiencies and additional SEM images. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr04960d

  9. Synthesis of highly dispersed platinum particles on carbon nanotubes by an in situ vapor-phase method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercado-Zúñiga, C. [Depto. Ing. Metalurgia y Materiales, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico 07300 D.F. (Mexico); Vargas-García, J.R., E-mail: rvargasga@ipn.mx [Depto. Ing. Metalurgia y Materiales, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico 07300 D.F. (Mexico); Hernández-Pérez, M.A. [Depto. Ing. Metalurgia y Materiales, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico 07300 D.F. (Mexico); Figueroa-Torres, M.Z. [Depto. Eco-Materiales y Energia, Univ. Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); Cervantes-Sodi, F. [Depto. Fisica y Matematicas, Univ. Iberoamericana, Mexico 01209 D.F. (Mexico); Torres-Martínez, L.M. [Depto. Eco-Materiales y Energia, Univ. Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles were prepared on functionalized carbon nanotubes. • A simple and competitive vapor-phase method was employed. • Carbonyl groups were assumed to be responsible for assisted decomposition of Pt-acac. • Pt particles were highly dispersed because carbonyl groups served as reaction sites. • Particles of 2.3 nm in size were highly dispersed even the high loading (27 wt%Pt). - Abstract: Highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles were prepared on functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) using a simple in situ vapor-phase method. The method consisted in two-step procedure in which an initial mixture of Pt precursor (Pt-acac) and f-MWCNTs was heated in a quartz tube reactor, first at 180 °C and then at 400 °C. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR–ATR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to follow the chemical and structural transformations of mixture components during heating steps. The functionalization of MWCNTs with HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution resulted in formation of surface carbonyl groups. The FTIR–ATR and XRD results indicated that individual Pt-acac withstood heating at 180 °C, whereas it was dissociated when heated in contact with f-MWCNTs at the same temperature. Thus, the functional carbonyl groups were found to be responsible for assisted decomposition of Pt-acac at 180 °C. Since carbonyl groups served as reaction sites for decomposition of Pt-acac, the resulting particles were highly and homogeneously dispersed on the surface of MWCNTs even the relatively high metallic loading of 27 wt%. TEM observations revealed that crystalline Pt particles exhibit narrow size distribution with a mean size of 2.3 nm.

  10. Engine Materials Compatibility with Alternate Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, Jeffery K [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2013-05-01

    The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined were accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

  11. Engine Materials Compatability with Alternative Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steve [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Moore, D. [USCAR

    2013-04-05

    The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined were accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

  12. A model for arsenic anti-site incorporation in GaAs grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, K. L.; Kuech, T. F. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-12-28

    GaAs growth by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) has regained interest as a potential route to low cost, high efficiency thin film photovoltaics. In order to attain the highest efficiencies, deep level defect incorporation in these materials must be understood and controlled. The arsenic anti-site defect, As{sub Ga} or EL2, is the predominant deep level defect in HVPE-grown GaAs. In the present study, the relationships between HVPE growth conditions and incorporation of EL2 in GaAs epilayers were determined. Epitaxial n-GaAs layers were grown under a wide range of deposition temperatures (T{sub D}) and gallium chloride partial pressures (P{sub GaCl}), and the EL2 concentration, [EL2], was determined by deep level transient spectroscopy. [EL2] agreed with equilibrium thermodynamic predictions in layers grown under conditions in which the growth rate, R{sub G}, was controlled by conditions near thermodynamic equilibrium. [EL2] fell below equilibrium levels when R{sub G} was controlled by surface kinetic processes, with the disparity increasing as R{sub G} decreased. The surface chemical composition during growth was determined to have a strong influence on EL2 incorporation. Under thermodynamically limited growth conditions, e.g., high T{sub D} and/or low P{sub GaCl}, the surface vacancy concentration was high and the bulk crystal was close to equilibrium with the vapor phase. Under kinetically limited growth conditions, e.g., low T{sub D} and/or high P{sub GaCl}, the surface attained a high GaCl coverage, blocking As adsorption. This competitive adsorption process reduced the growth rate and also limited the amount of arsenic that incorporated as As{sub Ga}. A defect incorporation model which accounted for the surface concentration of arsenic as a function of the growth conditions, was developed. This model was used to identify optimal growth parameters for the growth of thin films for photovoltaics, conditions in which a high growth rate and low [EL2] could be

  13. Effect of gas flow on the selective area growth of gallium nitride via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, L. E.; Kasarla, K. R.; Korakakis, D.

    2007-08-01

    The effect of gas flow on the selective area growth (SAG) of gallium nitride (GaN) grown via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) has been investigated. In this study, the SAG of GaN was carried out on a silicon dioxide striped pattern along the GaN direction. SAG was initiated with the striped pattern oriented parallel and normal to the incoming gas flow in a horizontal reactor. The orientation of the pattern did not impact cross section of the structure after re-growth as both orientations resulted in similar trapezoidal structures bounded by the (0 0 0 1) and {1 1 2¯ n} facets ( n≈1.7-2.2). However, the growth rates were shown to depend on the orientation of the pattern as the normally oriented samples exhibited enhanced vertical and cross-sectional growth rates compared to the parallel oriented samples. All growths occurred under identical conditions and therefore the difference in growth rates must be attributed to a difference in mass transport of species.

  14. Highly Ordered Boron Nitride Nanotube Arrays with Controllable Texture from Ammonia Borane by Template-Aided Vapor-Phase Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting Wang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient approach for the preparation of good-quality boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs is developed. BNNTs with specific texture were prepared from ammonia borane (BH3NH3 by vapor-phase pyrolysis with the aid of a template in two independent temperature-controlled furnaces. Two kinds of BNNTs, 200–300 nm wide ×60 μm long and 70–80 nm wide ×40 μm long, were produced after removal of the templates. The as-produced BNNTs were heated at different temperatures in the range of 1300–1700°C in NH3. FT-IR and XPS results confirmed the formation of BN from BH3NH3. Ordered arrays of BNNTs without cracks on the surface were seen using microstructural observations. The diameter and length of the BNNTs are controlled using templates with different pore sizes and thickness. The wall thickness of the nanotubes was increased by increasing the number of deposition cycles. The crystallinity of the BNNTs was improved by heating at a high temperature (1700°C in NH3.

  15. Self-Catalyzed Growth of Vertically Aligned InN Nanorods by Metal-Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessarek, C; Fladischer, S; Dieker, C; Sarau, G; Hoffmann, B; Bashouti, M; Göbelt, M; Heilmann, M; Latzel, M; Butzen, E; Figge, S; Gust, A; Höflich, K; Feichtner, T; Büchele, M; Schwarzburg, K; Spiecker, E; Christiansen, S

    2016-06-08

    Vertically aligned hexagonal InN nanorods were grown mask-free by conventional metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy without any foreign catalyst. The In droplets on top of the nanorods indicate a self-catalytic vapor-liquid-solid growth mode. A systematic study on important growth parameters has been carried out for the optimization of nanorod morphology. The nanorod N-polarity, induced by high temperature nitridation of the sapphire substrate, is necessary to achieve vertical growth. Hydrogen, usually inapplicable during InN growth due to formation of metallic indium, and silane are needed to enhance the aspect ratio and to reduce parasitic deposition beside the nanorods on the sapphire surface. The results reveal many similarities between InN and GaN nanorod growth showing that the process despite the large difference in growth temperature is similar. Transmission electron microscopy, spatially resolved energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy have been performed to analyze the structural properties. Spatially resolved cathodoluminescence investigations are carried out to verify the optical activity of the InN nanorods. The InN nanorods are expected to be the material of choice for high-efficiency hot carrier solar cells.

  16. Properties of (In,Ga)(As,P)/GaAs interfaces grown under different metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauer, A.; Krispin, P.; Balakrishnan, V. R.; Weyers, M.

    2003-02-01

    The mechanisms for formation of interlayers at the interface of GaAs on (In,Ga)P and In 0.15Ga 0.85As 0.7P 0.3 grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy have been studied by capacitance-voltage profiling of the electron concentration. Shallow In-rich quantum wells (QWs) are formed in (In,Ga)P during growth interruptions under PH 3 stabilization. These QWs are seen in C-V profiles, but not in photoluminescence and X-ray diffraction. Stabilization of (In,Ga)P under AsH 3 yields thin (1-2 nm thick) (In,Ga)(As,P) interlayers, which are observed by X-ray diffraction and capacitance-voltage profiles. Under optimized conditions, these interlayers exhibit negligibly small band offsets. When growing GaAs on quaternary (In,Ga)(As,P), interlayers can be avoided even at high growth temperatures and long growth interruptions. Independent on the chosen growth conditions, the (In,Ga)P and (In,Ga)(As,P) layers as well as the investigated interfaces are practically free of defect levels as determined by deep-level transient Fourier spectroscopy.

  17. Influence of lateral growth on the optical properties of GaN nanowires grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaoteng; Wang, Liancheng; Yi, Xiaoyan; Liu, Zhiqiang; Wei, Tongbo; Yuan, Guodong; Wang, Junxi; Li, Jinmin

    2017-11-01

    GaN nanowires (NWs) are synthesized on Si (111) using vapor-liquid-solid hydride vapor phase epitaxy at low temperature (740-780 °C). We find that the flow rate of the GaCl (HCl) gas has a large impact on the NW lateral growth rate, which affects the NW morphology, axial growth rate, and optical property. Upon increasing the flow rate of GaCl, the uncatalyzed vapor solid lateral growth increases rapidly, leading to variations in NW morphology from wire-like to tower-like and rod-like. The photoluminescence spectrum shows a broad red luminescence (RL) at around 660 nm and a weak near-band-edge luminescence at around 400 nm when lateral growth is at a significant level. Furthermore, spatially resolved cathodoluminescence and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations confirmed that this RL originates from the defective lateral growth. Finally, by inhibiting the lateral growth, GaN NWs with a high aspect ratio and excellent crystal quality (no RL observed at around 660 nm) were successfully synthesized with a rapid growth rate of 170 μm/h.

  18. Using vapor phase tomography to measure the spatial distribution of vapor concentrations and flux for vadose-zone VOC sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainhagu, J; Morrison, C; Brusseau, M L

    2015-01-01

    A test was conducted at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated site in Tucson, AZ, to evaluate the effectiveness of vapor-phase tomography (VPT) for characterizing the distribution of volatile organic contaminants (VOC) in the vadose zone. A soil vapor extraction (SVE) system has been in operation at the site since 2007. Vapor concentration and vacuum pressure were measured at four different depths in each of the four monitoring wells surrounding the extraction well. The test provided a 3D characterization of local vapor concentrations under induced-gradient conditions. Permeability data obtained from analysis of borehole logs were used along with pressure and the vapor-concentration data to determine VOC mass flux within the test domain. A region of higher mass flux was identified in the deepest interval of the S-SW section of the domain, indicating the possible location of a zone with greater contaminant mass. These results are consistent with the TCE-concentration distribution obtained from sediment coring conducted at the site. In contrast, the results of a standard soil gas survey did not indicate the presence of a zone with greater contaminant mass. These results indicate that the VPT test provided a robust characterization of VOC concentration and flux distribution at the site. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Shock-and-Release to the Liquid-Vapor Phase Boundary: Experiments and Applications to Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sarah

    2017-06-01

    Shock-induced vaporization was a common process during the end stages of terrestrial planet formation and transient features in extra-solar systems are attributed to recent giant impacts. At the Sandia Z Machine, my collaborators and I are conducting experiments to study the shock Hugoniot and release to the liquid-vapor phase boundary of major minerals in rocky planets. Current work on forsterite, enstatite and bronzite and previous results on silica, iron and periclase demonstrate that shock-induced vaporization played a larger role during planet formation than previously thought. I will provide an overview of the experimental results and describe how the data have changed our views of planetary impact events in our solar system and beyond. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work is supported by the Z Fundamental Science Program at Sandia National Laboratories, DOE-NNSA Grant DE- NA0002937, NASA Grant # NNX15AH54G, and UC Multicampus-National Lab Collaborative Research and Training Grant #LFR-17-449059.

  20. Investigation of the structural defects in GaN thin films grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.-H.; Lim, S.-J.; Cho, M.-S.; Cho, N.-H.; Chung, S.-J.; Sohn, C.-S.

    2003-02-01

    GaN thin films were prepared on {0001} planes of sapphire substrates by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) techniques. The crystall orgaphic relation between the film and the substrate as well as the structural features of the defects in the film were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Epitaxial relationship was observed in the GaN/sapphire heterostructure prepared in this investigation; (0001) GaN//(0001) sapphire;[ {01bar 10} ] GaN//[ {bar 12bar 10} ] sapphire. Dislocations of Burgers vectorbar b = {1/3} [ {2bar 1bar 10} ] were observed in the film; the propagation behavior of the dislocations exhibits a slip system{ {10bar 10} }< {2bar 1bar 10} rangle is operative in the film. Inversion domain boundary (IDB) facets lying parallel to{ {01bar 10} } and{ {bar 12bar 10} } planes were observed; the type of anti-site bonds (Ga-Ga, N-N) is altemate along these IDB planes, keeping the simple stoichiometry of the compound.

  1. Germanium diffusion with vapor-phase GeAs and oxygen co-incorporation in GaAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Fu Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vapor-phase germanium diffusion has been demonstrated in Zn-doped and semi-insulating GaAs in sealed ampoules with GeAs powders and excess arsenic. Secondary-ion-mass spectroscopy (SIMS profiles indicate the presence of unintentional co-incorporation of oxygen in high densities (>1017/cm3 along with diffused germanium donors whose concentration (>>1018/cm3 determined by electro-chemical capacitance-voltage (ECV profiler shows significant compensation near the surface. The source of oxygen mainly originates from the GeAs powder which contains Ge-O surface oxides. Variable-temperature photoluminescence (PL shows that in GeAs-diffused samples, a broad peak ranging from 0.86-1.38 eV with the peak position around 1.1 eV predominates at low temperatures while the near band-edge luminescence quenches. The broad band is attributed to the GeGa-VGa self-activated (SA centers possibly associated with nearby oxygen-related defect complex, and its luminescence persists up to 400 K. The configurational-coordinate modeling finds that the SA defect complex has a thermal activation energy of 150-180 meV and a vibrational energy 26.8 meV. The presence of oxygen does not much affect the SA emission intensity but may have influenced the peak position, vibration frequency and activation energy as compared to other common donor-VGa defects in GaAs.

  2. Detection of vapor-phase organophosphate threats using wearable conformable integrated epidermal and textile wireless biosensor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rupesh K; Martín, Aida; Nakagawa, Tatsuo; Barfidokht, Abbas; Lu, Xialong; Sempionatto, Juliane R; Lyu, Kay Mengjia; Karajic, Aleksandar; Musameh, Mustafa M; Kyratzis, Ilias L; Wang, Joseph

    2018-03-15

    Flexible epidermal tattoo and textile-based electrochemical biosensors have been developed for vapor-phase detection of organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents. These new wearable sensors, based on stretchable organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) enzyme electrodes, are coupled with a fully integrated conformal flexible electronic interface that offers rapid and selective square-wave voltammetric detection of OP vapor threats and wireless data transmission to a mobile device. The epidermal tattoo and textile sensors display a good reproducibility (with RSD of 2.5% and 4.2%, respectively), along with good discrimination against potential interferences and linearity over the 90-300mg/L range, with a sensitivity of 10.7µA∙cm 3 ∙mg -1 (R 2 = 0.983) and detection limit of 12mg/L in terms of OP air density. Stress-enduring inks, used for printing the electrode transducers, ensure resilience against mechanical deformations associated with textile and skin-based on-body sensing operations. Theoretical simulations are used to estimate the OP air density over the sensor surface. These fully integrated wearable wireless tattoo and textile-based nerve-agent vapor biosensor systems offer considerable promise for rapid warning regarding personal exposure to OP nerve-agent vapors in variety of decentralized security applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Vapor-phase Raman spectra, theoretical calculations, and the vibrational and structural properties of cis- and trans-stilbene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Toru; Shinashi, Kiyoaki; Ueda, Toyotoshi; Ocola, Esther J; Chiang, Whe-Yi; Laane, Jaan

    2014-02-13

    The vapor-phase Raman spectra of cis- and trans-stilbene have been collected at high temperatures and assigned. The low-frequency skeletal modes were of special interest. The molecular structures and vibrational frequencies of both molecules have also been obtained using MP2/cc-pVTZ and B3LYP/cc-pVTZ calculations, respectively. The two-dimensional potential map for the internal rotations around the two Cphenyl-C(═C) bonds of cis-stilbene was generated by using a series of B3LYP/cc-pVTZ calculations. It was confirmed that the molecule has only one conformer with C2 symmetry. The energy level calculation with a two-dimensional Hamiltonian was carried out, and the probability distribution for each level was obtained. The calculation revealed that the "gearing" internal rotation in which the two phenyl rings rotate with opposite directions has a vibrational frequency of 26 cm(-1), whereas that of the "antigearing" internal rotation in which the phenyl rings rotate with the same direction is about 52 cm(-1). In the low vibrational energy region the probability distribution for the gearing internal rotation is similar to that of a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator, and in the higher region the motion behaves like that of a free rotor.

  4. Evaluation of cinnamon essential oil microemulsion and its vapor phase for controlling postharvest gray mold of pears (Pyrus pyrifolia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifei; Zhao, Ruipeng; Yu, Ling; Zhang, Yunbin; He, Yan; Yao, Jie

    2014-03-30

    Essential oil of cinnamon (CM) is a potential alternative to chemical fungicides. Thus this work aimed to investigate the possible effects of CM microemulsions on decay developments and qualitative properties of pears. The decay incidence of samples treated with 500 µg L⁻¹ microemulsion was significantly reduced by 18.7% in comparison to that of 500 µg L⁻¹ non-microemulsion after 4 days' storage at 20 °C. In the vapor phase, the CM microemulsion with the lowest concentration had the best control for decay incidence and lesion diameter. The interval between inoculations also influenced decay development. Pears treated with Botrytis cinerea and immediately followed by CM microemulsion showed the lowest decay incidence. Moreover, in the natural decay experiment, the percentage of rotted pears was 3.8% in the CM microemulsion treatment and 5.8% in the control. CM microemulsion delayed the loss of ascorbic acid, yet it had no significant influence on pear qualities such as firmness and color. CM microemulsion may be an alternative way to control the gray mold of pears without a negative influence on its qualities. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Synthesis of Fe3O4/C/TiO2 Magnetic Photocatalyst via Vapor Phase Hydrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuzhi Shi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A core/multi-shell-structured Fe3O4/C/TiO2 magnetic photocatalyst is prepared via vapor phase hydrolysis process. The as-synthesized core/multi-shell-structured composite is characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, high-resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm analyses, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM, and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. TEM and HRTEM show that well-crystallized anatase TiO2 nanocrystals are immobilized on the surface of as-prepared Fe3O4/C microspheres with dimensions around 200 nm. N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm analysis shows that the obtained photocatalyst exists disorderedly mesoporous structure. The photocatalytic efficiency of the catalyst in degradation of methylene blue is evaluated, and the Fe3O4/C/TiO2 photocatalyst with low TiO2 content (37% has a relatively higher activity than commercial anatase TiO2. The intermediate carbon layer avoids the photodissolution of Fe3O4 effectively, and the recycling property is largely improved due to the existence of magnetic Fe3O4 core.

  6. Migration of carbon nanotubes from liquid phase to vapor phase in the refrigerant-based nanofluid pool boiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Hao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The migration characteristics of carbon nanotubes from liquid phase to vapor phase in the refrigerant-based nanofluid pool boiling were investigated experimentally. Four types of carbon nanotubes with the outside diameters from 15 to 80 nm and the lengths from 1.5 to 10 μm were used in the experiments. The refrigerants include R113, R141b and n-pentane. The oil concentration is from 0 to 10 wt.%, the heat flux is from 10 to 100 kW·m-2, and the initial liquid-level height is from 1.3 to 3.4 cm. The experimental results indicate that the migration ratio of carbon nanotube increases with the increase of the outside diameter or the length of carbon nanotube. For the fixed type of carbon nanotube, the migration ratio decreases with the increase of the oil concentration or the heat flux, and increases with the increase of the initial liquid-level height. The migration ratio of carbon nanotube increases with the decrease of dynamic viscosity of refrigerant or the increase of liquid phase density of refrigerant. A model for predicting the migration ratio of carbon nanotubes in the refrigerant-based nanofluid pool boiling is proposed, and the predictions agree with 92% of the experimental data within a deviation of ±20%.

  7. Coolant Compatibility Studies for Fusion and Fusion-Fission Hybrid Reactor Concepts: Corrosion of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron-Chromium Steels and Tantalum in High Temperature Molten Fluoride Salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, Joseph [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); El-dasher, Bassem [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ferreira, James [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Caro, Magdalena Serrano de [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kimura, Akihiko [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Advanced Energy

    2010-05-04

    Alloys such as 12YWT & 14YWT have exceptional high-temperature strength at temperatures greater than 550 C. This class of materials has also demonstrated relatively little radiation induced swelling at damage levels of at least 75 dpa in sodium-cooled fast reactors. However, corrosion of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels in high temperature molten fluoride salts may limit the life of advanced reactor systems, including some fusion and fusionfission hybrid systems that are now under consideration. This paper reports corrosion studies of ODS steel in molten fluoride salts at temperatures ranging from 600 to 900 C. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to measure the temperature dependence of charge transfer kinetics in situ, while an environmental electron microscope (ESEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was used for postexposure examination of test samples. ODS steel experienced corrosion in the molten fluoride salts at 550 to 900 C, even in carefully controlled glove-box environments with very low levels of oxygen and moisture. The observed rate of attack was found to accelerate dramatically at temperatures above 800 C. Tantalum and tantalum-based alloys such as Ta-1W and Ta-10W have exceptional high temperature strength, far better than ODS steels. Unlike ODS steels, tantalum has been found to exhibit some immunity to corrosive attack by molten fluoride salts at temperatures as high as 900 C, though there is some indication that grain boundary attack may have occurred. Unfortunately, tantalum alloys are known to become brittle during irradiation and exposure to hydrogen, both of which are important in fusion applications.

  8. Corrosion protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2003-05-27

    There has been invented a chemically bonded phosphate corrosion protection material and process for application of the corrosion protection material for corrosion prevention. A slurry of iron oxide and phosphoric acid is used to contact a warm surface of iron, steel or other metal to be treated. In the presence of ferrous ions from the iron, steel or other metal, the slurry reacts to form iron phosphates which form grains chemically bonded onto the surface of the steel.

  9. Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Walker, Larry R [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2011-06-01

    This report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for cladding large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high-power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for cladding inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. An initial evaluation for performed on the quality of nickel claddings processed using the two selected cladding techniques.

  10. Recent Developments on Autonomous Corrosion Protection Through Encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Calle, L. M.; Gillis, M.; Blanton, M.; Hanna, J.; Rawlins, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper concerns recent progress in the development of a multifunctional smart coating, based on microencapsulation, for the autonomous detection and control of corrosion. Microencapsulation has been validated and optimized to incorporate desired corrosion control functionalities, such as early corrosion detection and inhibition, through corrosion-initiated release of corrosion indicators and inhibitors, as well as self-healing agent release triggered by mechanical damage. While proof-of-concept results have been previously reported, more recent research and development efforts have concentrated on improving coating compatibility and synthesis procedure scalability, with a targeted goal of obtaining easily dispersible pigment-grade type microencapsulated materials. The recent progress has resulted in the development of pH-sensitive microparticles as a corrosion-triggered delivery system for corrosion indicators and inhibitors. The synthesis and early corrosion indication results obtained with coating formulations that incorporate these microparticles are reported. The early corrosion indicating results were obtained with color changing and with fluorescent indicators.

  11. A semi-empirical model for the complete orientation dependence of the growth rate for vapor phase epitaxy - Chloride VPE of GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel-Salinas, L. K.; Jones, S. H.; Duva, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    A semi-empirical model has been developed to determine the complete crystallographic orientation dependence of the growth rate for vapor phase epitaxy (VPE). Previous researchers have been able to determine this dependence for a limited range of orientations; however, our model yields relative growth rate information for any orientation. This model for diamond and zincblende structure materials is based on experimental growth rate data, gas phase diffusion, and surface reactions. Data for GaAs chloride VPE is used to illustrate the model. The resulting growth rate polar diagrams are used in conjunction with Wulff constructions to simulate epitaxial layer shapes as grown on patterned substrates. In general, this model can be applied to a variety of materials and vapor phase epitaxy systems.

  12. Control of conductivity type in undoped ZnO thin films grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y.; Du, G. T.; Yang, S. R.; Li, Z. T.; Zhao, B. J.; Yang, X. T.; Yang, T. P.; Zhang, Y. T.; Liu, D. L.

    2004-06-01

    The properties of the ZnO thin films prepared by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy under various oxygen partial pressures were thoroughly studied. It was found that the conduction type in undoped ZnO epilayers could be controlled by adjusting the family VI precursor, oxygen partial pressure during growth. The films were characteristic of n-type conductivity under oxygen partial pressure lower than 45 Pa. With the increase of oxygen content, the crystallinity of the ZnO thin films was degraded to polycrystalline with additional (10-12) orientation and the intrinsic p-type ZnO was produced as the oxygen partial pressure was larger than 55 Pa. The hole concentration and mobility could reach to 1.59×1016 cm-3 and 9.23 cm2 V-1 s-1, and the resistivity was 42.7 Ω cm. The near-band-edge emission and the deep level emission in photoluminescence (PL) spectra at room temperature were influenced strongly by the oxygen partial pressure. Temperature-dependent PL spectra in n-type ZnO films showed a dominant neutral-donor bound exciton emission, while p-ZnO was dominated by neutral-acceptor bound exciton emission. Both peaks increased in intensity with the decrease of the temperature and shifted to the short-wavelength side. The band that originated from zinc vacancies emerged at a temperature lower than 155 K only in the p-type films. The origin of intrinsic p-type conductivity in ZnO thin films might be related to zinc vacancy.

  13. Evaluation of the Antibacterial Potential of Liquid and Vapor Phase Phenolic Essential Oil Compounds against Oral Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong-Hong; Hsia, Shih-Min; Wu, Chi-Hao; Ko, Shun-Yao; Chen, Michael Yuanchien; Shih, Yin-Hua; Shieh, Tzong-Ming; Chuang, Li-Chuan; Wu, Ching-Yi

    The aim of the present study was to determine the antibacterial activities of the phenolic essential oil (EO) compounds hinokitiol, carvacrol, thymol, and menthol against oral pathogens. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus mutans, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and Escherichia. coli were used in this study. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), bacterial growth curves, temperature and pH stabilities, and synergistic effects of the liquid and vapor EO compounds were tested. The MIC/MBC of the EO compounds, ranging from the strongest to weakest, were hinokitiol (40-60 μg/mL/40-100 μg/mL), thymol (100-200 μg/mL/200-400 μg/mL), carvacrol (200-400 μg/mL/200-600 μg/mL), and menthol (500-more than 2500 μg/mL/1000-more than 2500 μg/mL). The antibacterial activities of the four EO phenolic compound based on the agar diffusion test and bacterial growth curves showed that the four EO phenolic compounds were stable under different temperatures for 24 h, but the thymol activity decreased when the temperature was higher than 80°C. The combination of liquid carvacrol with thymol did not show any synergistic effects. The activities of the vaporous carvacrol and thymol were inhibited by the presence of water. Continual violent shaking during culture enhanced the activity of menthol. Both liquid and vaporous hinokitiol were stable at different temperatures and pH conditions. The combination of vaporous hinokitiol with zinc oxide did not show synergistic effects. These results showed that the liquid and vapor phases of hinokitiol have strong anti-oral bacteria abilities. Hinokitiol has the potential to be applied in oral health care products, dental materials, and infection controls to exert antimicrobial activity.

  14. Effect of Gold Dispersion on the Photocatalytic Activity of Mesoporous Titania for the Vapor-Phase Oxidation of Acetone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Awate

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesostructured titanium dioxide photocatalyst, having uniform crystallite size (6–12 nm and average pore diameter of ∼4.2 nm, was synthesized by using a low-temperature nonsurfactant hydrothermal route, employing tartaric acid as a templating agent. Gold additions from 0.5 to 2 wt% were incorporated, either during the hydrothermal process or by postsynthesis wet impregnation. Compared to the impregnation-prepared samples, the samples synthesized hydrothermally contained smaller-size (≤1 nm gold clusters occluded in the pores of the host matrix. Whereas CO2 and H2O were the main reaction products in UV-assisted vapor-phase oxidation of acetone using these catalysts, C2H6 and HCO2CH3 were also produced for higher acetone concentrations in air. The conversion of acetone was found to increase with decrease in the size of both TiO2 and gold particles. In situ IR spectroscopy revealed that titania and gold particles serve as independent adsorption and reaction sites for acetone and oxygen molecules. Acetone molecules adsorb exclusively at TiO2 surface, giving rise to a strongly adsorbed (condensed state as well as to the formation of formate- and methyl formate-type surface species. Hydroxyl groups at titania surface participate directly in these adsorption steps. Nanosize gold particles, on the other hand, were primarily responsible for the adsorption and activation of oxygen molecules. Mechanistic aspects of the photochemical processes are discussed on the basis of these observations.

  15. Position-controlled III-V compound semiconductor nanowire solar cells by selective-area metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Takashi; Yoshimura, Masatoshi; Nakai, Eiji; Tomioka, Katsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate position-controlled III-V semiconductor nanowires (NWs) by using selective-area metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and their application to solar cells. Efficiency of 4.23% is achieved for InP core-shell NW solar cells. We form a 'flexible NW array' without a substrate, which has the advantage of saving natural resources over conventional thin film photovoltaic devices. Four junction NW solar cells with over 50% efficiency are proposed and discussed.

  16. Vapor-phase cristobalite as a durable indicator of magmatic pore structure and halogen degassing: an example from White Island volcano (New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ian Schipper, C.; Mandon, Céline; Maksimenko, Anton; Castro, Jonathan M.; Conway, Chris E.; Hauer, Peter; Kirilova, Martina; Kilgour, Geoff

    2017-10-01

    Vesicles in volcanic rocks are physical records of magmatic degassing; however, the interpretation of their textures is complicated by resorption, coalescence, and collapse. We discuss the textural significance of vesicle-hosted vapor-phase cristobalite (high-T, low-P SiO2 polymorph), and its utility as a complement to textural assessments of magmatic degassing, using a representative dacite bomb erupted from White Island volcano (New Zealand) in 1999. Imaging in 2D (SEM) and 3D (CT) shows the bomb to have 56% bulk porosity, almost all of which is connected ( 99%) and devoid of SiO2 phases. The remaining ( 1%) of porosity is in isolated, sub-spherical vesicles that have corroded walls and contain small (< 30 μm across) prismatic vapor-phase cristobalite crystals (98.4 ± 0.4 wt.% SiO2 with diagnostic laser Raman spectra). Halogen degassing models show vapor-phase cristobalite to be indicative of closed-system chlorine and fluorine partitioning into H2O-rich fluid in isolated pores. At White Island, this occurred during shallow (< 100s of meters) ascent and extensive ( 50%) groundmass crystallization associated with slow cooling in a volcanic plug. Pristine textures in this White Island bomb demonstrate the link between pore isolation and vapor-phase cristobalite deposition. We suggest that because these crystals have higher preservation potential than the bubbles in which they form, they can serve as durable, qualitative textural indicators of halogen degassing and pre-quench bubble morphologies in slowly cooled volcanic rocks (e.g., lava flows and domes), even where emplacement mechanisms have overprinted original bubble textures.

  17. Molecular interactions between organized, surface-confined monolayers and vapor-phase probe molecules. 6. In-situ FTIR external reflectance spectroscopy of monolayer adsorption and reaction chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, C.; Sun, L.; Kepley, L.J.; Crooks, R.M. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque (United States)); Ricco, A.J. (Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1993-08-01

    A new in-situ application of FTIR external reflectance spectroscopy (FTIR-ESR), which is useful for real-time evaluation of monolayer and multilayer adsorption and reaction chemistry at the vapor/solid interface at pressures near 1 atm, is described. The utility and versatility of the method is illustrated by two proof-of-concept experiments. The first experiment involves adsorption of H[sub 2]N(CH[sub 2])[sub 9]CH[sub 3] onto a naked Au substrate from the vapor phase. In-situ FTIR-ERS indicates that the amine forms a stable, ordered monolayer on the Au surface; that is, H[sub 2]N(CH[sub 2])[sub 9]CH[sub 3] self-assembles onto the Au surface from the vapor phase. The second experiment involves vapor-phase adsorption of a HS(C[sub 6]H[sub 5])OH monolayer onto a naked Au surface, followed by an in-situ coupling reaction with [CH[sub 3](CH[sub 2])[sub 7

  18. Application of a Diffusion-denuder Method for the Investigation of the Effects of ‘Smoke pH’ on Vapor-phase Nicotine Yields from Different Types of Cigarettes

    OpenAIRE

    Cochran EW; Joseph MJ; Stinson SS; Summers SS

    2014-01-01

    The potential effects of smoke pH on vapor-phase nicotine, or unprotonated nicotine, were investigated using a diffusion denuder method selected for its ability to quantitatively monitor vapor-phase nicotine in the presence of smoke particulate. For the purpose of this paper, the pH of the water-soluble fraction of mainstream cigarette smoke will be referred to as ‘smoke pH'. In this study, samples with different construction parameters affecting smoke pH were analyzed for percent vapor-phase...

  19. Corrosion inhibition..

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in 3% de-aerated NaCl acidic solution with amine—fatty acid corrosion inhibitor, KI384, .... reduction reaction causing no decrease in the limiting current density of that process. On the .... value when compared to the base solution. This provides a support to the physical ...

  20. Corrosion Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  1. Corrosion sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  2. LABORATORY TESTING TO SIMULATE VAPOR SPACE CORROSION IN RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Gray, J.

    2013-08-30

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 70 years at the Hanford nuclear facility. Vapor space corrosion of the tank walls has emerged as an ongoing challenge to overcome in maintaining the structural integrity of these tanks. The interaction between corrosive and inhibitor species in condensates/supernates on the tank wall above the liquid level, and their interaction with vapor phase constituents as the liquid evaporates from the tank wall influences the formation of corrosion products and the corrosion of the carbon steel. An effort is underway to gain an understanding of the mechanism of vapor space corrosion. Localized corrosion, in the form of pitting, is of particular interest in the vapor space. CPP testing was utilized to determine the susceptibility of the steel in a simulated vapor space environment. The tests also investigated the impact of ammonia gas in the vapor space area on the corrosion of the steel. Vapor space coupon tests were also performed to investigate the evolution of the corrosion products during longer term exposures. These tests were also conducted at vapor space ammonia levels of 50 and 550 ppm NH{sub 3} (0.005, and 0.055 vol.%) in air. Ammonia was shown to mitigate vapor space corrosion.

  3. Surface modification of aramid fiber by plasma induced vapor phase graft polymerization of acrylic acid. I. Influence of plasma conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.X., E-mail: cxwang@mail.dhu.edu.cn [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224003 (China); School of Textile and Clothing, Nantong University, Jiangsu 226019 (China); Du, M. [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Industry Technology, Jiangsu 224000 (China); Lv, J.C.; Zhou, Q.Q. [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224003 (China); Ren, Y. [School of Textile and Clothing, Nantong University, Jiangsu 226019 (China); Liu, G.L.; Gao, D.W. [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224003 (China); Jin, L.M. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201204 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Aramid fiber surface was modified by PIVPGP of AA to improve wettability, adhesion. • Surface modification effect by PIVPGP of AA increased and then decreased with time. • Surface modification effect increased and then stayed unaltered with output power. • Ar plasma was the most effective in PIVPGP of AA on aramid fiber surface. • In studied range, optimum technology of PIVPGP of AA: Ar plasma, 15 min, 300 W. - Abstract: Plasma induced vapor phase graft polymerization (PIVPGP) method was applied to modify aramid fiber surface. In this study, aramid fibers were pretreated under various plasma conditions such as different treatment times, output powers and working gases to see how these plasma processing parameters influenced the PIVPGP of acrylic acid (AA) on aramid fiber surface and its surface structure and properties. The analysis results of atomic force microscope (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) showed the increase of surface roughness and the introduction of O=C−OH, which confirmed that the PIVPGP of AA on aramid fiber surface was achieved. The contact angle and interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of the aramid fibers modified by PIVPGP of AA prominently decreased and increased, respectively, indicating the obvious improvements of surface wettability and adhesion between aramid fiber and matrix. The surface modification effects of aramid fiber by PIVPGP of AA firstly increased and then after 15 min slightly decreased with the increasing plasma treatment time, and but firstly increased and then after 300 W nearly remained unchanged with the increasing output power, respectively. Among different working gases, Ar plasma occupied first place, O{sub 2} plasma and N{sub 2} plasma came second and third in the aspect of PIVPGP of AA on aramid fiber surface, respectively. It could be concluded that the PIVPGP of AA on aramid fiber surface could effectively improve surface wettability and adhesion. Plasma conditions had signally

  4. Conventional and pendeo-epitaxial growth of III-nitride thin films by molecular beam and metalorganic vapor phase techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linthicum, Kevin James

    Reactive gas-source molecular beam epitaxy was employed for the growth of monocrystalline GaN(0001) thin films. On-surface cracking of ammonia at 800°C was the method of choice for obtaining reactive nitrogen-containing species and growth rates of 2500A/hr were achieved. Pendeo-epitaxy, a general form of selective lateral growth, was developed for the organometallic vapor phase epitaxy growth of GaN and AlGaN thin films on GaN/AlN/6H-SiC(0001) substrates. In this technique, selective lateral growth was forced to initiate from the (1120) sidewalls of etched GaN seed forms by incorporating a silicon nitride seed mask atop the forms and employing the SiC substrate as a pseudo-mask. Coalescence over and between the seed forms was achieved. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that all vertically threading defects stemming from the GaN/AlN and AlN/SiC interfaces were contained within the seed forms and that a substantial reduction in the dislocation density of the laterally grown GaN was achieved. To achieve pendeo-epitaxial growth of monocrystalline GaN films on Si(111) substrates, a series of additional process steps was required, including the formation of a SiC chemical/reaction barrier. Single-crystal beta-SiC(111) thin films were obtained via carburization of the near-surface regions of vicinal Si(111). The thickness of the converted layers was approximately 5nm. Thick (500nm), epitaxial 3C-SiC layers grown via atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition were also used in tandem with the carburized silicon substrates. Monocrystalline AlN(0001) layers were grown on the SiC/Si substrates at 1100°C via MOVPE. Single-crystal wurtzitic GaN(0001) seed layers were grown on the AlN(0001) layers. The FWHM of the GaN(0002) x-ray diffraction and the photoluminescence band-edge emission peaks were 1443 arcsec and 19 meV, respectively. Pendeo-epitaxial growth of GaN on GaN/AlN/3C-SiC/Si(111) raised stripes was achieved. Crystallographic tilting of 0.2°(720 arcsec

  5. Fabrication of solid state dye sensitized solar cells utilizing vapor phase polymerized poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) hole conducting layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorenko, Kenneth H.

    There is a need for sustainable and renewable energy sources that can be used in both grid and off-grid structured systems. Photovoltaic devices have been used to generate electrical energy by capturing and converting photons from the sun. Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC) have gained attention due to their consistent energy generation during indirect sunlight. Furthermore, DSSC can be applied as a flexible device and gain benefits from the low cost roll to roll manufacturing. With this in mind, we have taken steps toward optimizing a DSSC device for use as a solid state solar cell using conducting polymers. Typically DSSC use a liquid electrolyte as a hole conducting layer used to direct the separation of electron -- hole pairs. This liquid electrolyte comes with problems that can be subverted using conducting polymers. Poly(3,4 -- ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), is a conducting thiophene that is tailored to have enhanced conductivity. We show that a vapor phase polymerization (VPP) of PEDOT can be used as a hole conducting layer in a solid state DSSC device. To this end we have investigated the electrical properties of the VPP PEDOT films in order to understand how the morphology and conductive domains relate to a polymers conductivity. Using 4 point probe we have measure the sheet resistance of the film, as well as how the films resistance is altered during stress tests. Scanning electron microscopy has been utilized to compare morphologies of different PEDOT films and see how surface morphology impacts the conductance measured. Using conductive atomic force microscopy we can look at the conductive domains between VPP PEDOT and PEDOT:PSS films. We saw that conductive domains of the VPP PEDOT are not only more conductive but also much larger in size and widespread throughout the film. We show that there is formation of PEDOT through optical spectroscopy and structural characterization such as UV/Vis and Raman spectroscopy as well as X-ray diffraction. When

  6. Analysis of Acrylonitrile and alpha-Methacrylonitrile in Vapor Phase of Mainstream Cigarette Smoke Using a Charcoal Trap for Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moldoveanu SC

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A simple procedure for the collection of vapor phase (VP of mainstream cigarette smoke for analysis has been developed. This procedure consists of collecting the VP on a commercial charcoal trap (ORBO™-32 followed by dissolution in acetone. The acetone extract can be analyzed by a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS technique. A qualitative analysis of the collected VP has been performed for 3R4F Kentucky reference cigarette, allowing the identification of 138 compounds, some compounds being present in both VP and in particulate phase (PP of cigarette smoke. A quantitative analysis method for acrylonitrile and α-methacrylonitrile (2-methyl-2-propenenitrile was also developed, and the level of these compounds in 15 different cigarette brands was measured. Acrylonitrile quantitation was selected since this compound in smoke poses significant health related issues. α-Methacrylonitrile quantitation was selected due to the similar structure of this compound with acrylonitrile. The analyzed cigarettes were several Kentucky reference cigarettes including 1R5F, 2R4F, 3R4F, 2R1F, and 1R3F, several King Size (KS commercial cigarettes from the US market including Basic Non Filter (NF, Basic Ultra Lights (UL, Newport, Marlboro (Red, Marlboro Menthol, Camel Filter, Camel Lights, Camel Ultra Lights, and two herbal cigarettes, Ecstasy and Dreams. The results for acrylonitrile were in very good agreement with data reported in the literature for 2R4F and 1R5F cigarettes. The levels of α-methacrylonitrile were not previously reported. The correlation between the levels of acrylonitrile and of α-methacrylonitrile with the (wet total particulate matter (TPM was evaluated. Although the levels of acrylonitrile and of α-methacrylonitrile in mainstream smoke depend on the TPM values, the correlation is not very strong, indicating that the nature of the cigarette blend and possible other factors in cigarette construction also influence their levels in

  7. Recent Developments on Microencapsulation for Autonomous Corrosion Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Fitzpatrick, Lilliana; Jolley, Scott T.; Surma, Jan M.; Pearman, Benjamin P.; Zhang, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    This work concerns recent progress in the development of a multifunctional smart coating based on microencapsulation for the autonomous control of corrosion. Microencapsulation allows the incorporation of desired corrosion control functionalities, such as early corrosion detection and inhibition through corrosion controlled release of corrosion indicators and inhibitors, as well as self-healing agent release when mechanical damage occurs.While proof-of-concept results have been reported previously, more recent efforts have been concentrated in technical developments to improve coating compatibility, synthesis procedure scalability, as well as fine tuning the release property of encapsulated active agents.

  8. Corrosion-Activated Micro-Containers for Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Protective Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, J. W.; Zhang, X.; Johnsey, M. N.; Pearman, B. P.; Jolley, S. T.; Calle, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    indicators, inhibitors and self-healing agents. This allows the incorporation of autonomous corrosion control functionalities, such as corrosion detection and inhibition as well as the self-healing of mechanical damage, into coatings. This paper presents technical details on the characterization of inhibitor-containing particles and their corrosion inhibitive effects using electrochemical and mass loss methods.Three organic environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated in organic microparticles that are compatible with desired coatings. The release of the inhibitors from the microparticles in basic solution was studied. Fast release, for immediate corrosion protection, as well as long-term release for continued protection, was observed.The inhibition efficacy of the inhibitors, incorporated directly and in microparticles, on carbon steel was evaluated. Polarization curves and mass loss measurements showed that, in the case of 2MBT, its corrosion inhibition effectiveness was greater when it was delivered from microparticles.

  9. Microencapsulation Technologies for Corrosion Protective Coating Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry; Jolley, Scott; Calle, Luz; Pearman, Benjamin; Zhang, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Microencapsulation technologies for functional smart Coatings for autonomous corrosion control have been a research area of strong emphasis during the last decade. This work concerns the development of pH sensitive micro-containers (microparticles and microcapsules) for autonomous corrosion control. This paper presents an overview of the state-of-the-art in the field of microencapsulation for corrosion control applications, as well as the technical details of the pH sensitive microcontainer approach, such as selection criteria for corrosion indicators and corrosion inhibitors; the development and optimization of encapsulation methods; function evaluation before and after incorporation of the microcontainers into coatings; and further optimization to improve coating compatibility and performance.

  10. High quality factor whispering gallery modes from self-assembled hexagonal GaN rods grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessarek, C; Sarau, G; Kiometzis, M; Christiansen, S

    2013-02-11

    Self-assembled GaN rods were grown on sapphire by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy using a simple two-step method that relies first on a nitridation step followed by GaN epitaxy. The mask-free rods formed without any additional catalyst. Most of the vertically aligned rods exhibit a regular hexagonal shape with sharp edges and smooth sidewall facets. Cathodo- and microphotoluminescence investigations were carried out on single GaN rods. Whispering gallery modes with quality factors greater than 4000 were measured demonstrating the high morphological and optical quality of the self-assembled GaN rods.

  11. Vapor-phase infrared and Raman spectra and ab-initio calculations of the axial and equatorial forms of cyclohexane-d1 and d11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Hye Jin; Ocola, Esther J.; Laane, Jaan

    2016-11-01

    The vapor-phase infrared and Raman spectra of cyclohexane-d11 in the C-H stretching region show two bands at 2891 and 2921 cm-1 corresponding to the axial and equatorial C-H stretching modes respectively. Similarly, cyclohexane-d1 has two C-D stretching modes at 2145 and 2164 cm-1 (Mátrai and Gal, 1984) corresponding to the two forms. Force constants were calculated for these vibrations and these confirm the theoretical calculations, which show the equatorial bonds to be shorter and stronger. The force constant for the equatorial C-H stretching is 2% higher than for the axial.

  12. Application of a Diffusion-denuder Method for the Investigation of the Effects of ‘Smoke pH’ on Vapor-phase Nicotine Yields from Different Types of Cigarettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cochran EW

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The potential effects of smoke pH on vapor-phase nicotine, or unprotonated nicotine, were investigated using a diffusion denuder method selected for its ability to quantitatively monitor vapor-phase nicotine in the presence of smoke particulate. For the purpose of this paper, the pH of the water-soluble fraction of mainstream cigarette smoke will be referred to as ‘smoke pH'. In this study, samples with different construction parameters affecting smoke pH were analyzed for percent vapor-phase nicotine. The smoke pH values ranged from 5.87 to 7.79. Percent initial vapor-phase nicotine values ranged from 0.4% to 1.5%. The range of the vapor-phase nicotine values for this study was (a independent of smoke pH and (b potentially dependent upon cigarette construction. In a second experiment, cigarettes with the same construction were used to repeat the analysis, thus eliminating construction as a variable. The tobacco was treated with varying levels of urea to give a range in smoke pH from 6.47 to 7.15. The determined initial vapor-phase nicotine values ranged from 0.4% to 2.1% of the total mainstream smoke nicotine. This variation was independent of smoke pH. It was determined in this study that (a the maximum initial vapor-phase nicotine delivered to mainstream smoke was 2.1% of the total nicotine delivered for our cigarette samples and (b the delivery of the unprotonated nicotine to mainstream smoke was not meaningfully affected by changes in smoke pH within the range studied.

  13. Synthesis of TiO2 Nanoparticles from Ilmenite Through the Mechanism of Vapor-Phase Reaction Process by Thermal Plasma Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Sneha

    2017-11-01

    Synthesis of nanoparticles of TiO2 was carried out by non-transferred arc thermal plasma reactor using ilmenite as the precursor material. The powder ilmenite was vaporized at high temperature in plasma flame and converted to a gaseous state of ions in the metastable phase. On cooling, chamber condensation process takes place on recombination of ions for the formation of nanoparticles. The top-to-bottom approach induces the disintegration of complex ilmenite phases into simpler compounds of iron oxide and titanium dioxide phases. The vapor-phase reaction mechanism was carried out in thermal plasma zone for the synthesis of nanoparticles from ilmenite compound in a plasma reactor. The easy separation of iron particles from TiO2 was taken place in the plasma chamber with deposition of light TiO2 particles at the top of the cooling chamber and iron particles at the bottom. The dissociation and combination process of mechanism and synthesis are studied briefly in this article. The product TiO2 nanoparticle shows the purity with a major phase of rutile content. TiO2 nanoparticles produced in vapor-phase reaction process shows more photo-induced capacity.

  14. Effect of the Ammonia Flow on the Formation of Microstructure Defects in GaN Layers Grown by High-Temperature Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchuk, M.; Lukin, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Röder, C.; Motylenko, M.; Pätzold, O.; Heitmann, J.; Kortus, J.; Rafaja, D.

    2017-03-01

    High-temperature vapor phase epitaxy (HTVPE) is a physical vapor transport technology for a deposition of gallium nitride (GaN) layers. However, little is known about the influence of the deposition parameters on the microstructure of the layers. In order to fill this gap, the influence of the ammonia (NH3) flow applied during the HTVPE growth on the microstructure of the deposited GaN layers is investigated in this work. Although the HTVPE technology is intended to grow GaN layers on foreign substrates, the GaN layers under study were grown on GaN templates produced by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy in order to be able to separate the growth defects from the defects induced by the lattice misfit between the foreign substrate and the GaN layer. The microstructure of the layers is characterized by means of high-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence. In samples deposited at low ammonia flow, planar defects were detected, along which the nitrogen atoms are found to be substituted by impurity atoms. The interplay between these planar defects and the threading dislocations is discussed. A combination of XRD and micro-Raman spectroscopy reveals the presence of compressive residual stress in the samples.

  15. The effect of recasting on corrosion of DUCINOX prosthetic alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Klimek

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of recasting, up to two times, Ni-Cr (DUCINOX prosthetic alloy on its corrosion properties was carried out. The corrosion measurements were done in deoxygenated Fusayama Meyer artificial saliva solution at temperature of 37°C. In the study following electrochemical methods were used: measurement of free corrosion potential Ecor in open circuit, measurement of polarization resistance according to Stern-Geary's method and measurement of potentiodynamic characteristic in wide range of anodic polarization. In general, it can be stated that casting number weakly influence on corrosion properties of investigated alloy. At free corrosion potential there is no monotonic dependence of corrosion parameters versus casting number. However, at extreme anodic potentials monotonic changes of corrosion parameters with increasing casting number is observed. Obtained results and drawn conclusions are partially compatible with literature data.

  16. Compatibility of structural materials with liquid bismuth, lead, and mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeks, J.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-06-01

    During the 1950s and 1960s, a substantial program existed at Brookhaven National Laboratory as part of the Liquid Metal Fuel reactor program on the compatibility of bismuth, lead, and their alloys with structural materials. Subsequently, compatibility investigations of mercury with structural materials were performed in support of development of Rankine cycle mercury turbines for nuclear applications. The present talk will review present understanding of the corrosion/mass-transfer reactions of structural materials with these liquid metal coolants. Topics to be discussed include the basic solubility relationships of iron, chromium, nickel, and refractory metals in these liquid metals, the results of inhibition studies, the role of oxygen on the corrosion processes, and specialized topics such as cavitation-corrosion and liquid metal embrittlement. Emphasis will be placed on utilizing the understanding gained in this earlier work on the development of heavy liquid metal targets in spallation neutron sources.

  17. Corrosion, haemocompatibility and bacterial adhesion behaviour of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bacterial adhesion, haemocompatibility and corrosion behaviour of TiZrN coating were examined in order to evaluate the coating's compatibility for ideal implant. Results revealed that TiZrN coatings exhibited less bacterial attachment against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria, negligible platelets ...

  18. Underground pipeline corrosion

    CERN Document Server

    Orazem, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Underground pipelines transporting liquid petroleum products and natural gas are critical components of civil infrastructure, making corrosion prevention an essential part of asset-protection strategy. Underground Pipeline Corrosion provides a basic understanding of the problems associated with corrosion detection and mitigation, and of the state of the art in corrosion prevention. The topics covered in part one include: basic principles for corrosion in underground pipelines, AC-induced corrosion of underground pipelines, significance of corrosion in onshore oil and gas pipelines, n

  19. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY15 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steven J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In the previous report of this series, a literature review was performed to assess the potential for substantial corrosion issues associated with the proposed SHINE process conditions to produce 99Mo. Following the initial review, substantial laboratory corrosion testing was performed emphasizing immersion and vapor-phase exposure of candidate alloys in a wide variety of solution chemistries and temperatures representative of potential exposure conditions. Stress corrosion cracking was not identified in any of the exposures up to 10 days at 80°C and 10 additional days at 93°C. Mechanical properties and specimen fracture face features resulting from slow-strain rate tests further supported a lack of sensitivity of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking. Fluid velocity was found not to be an important variable (0 to ~3 m/s) in the corrosion of candidate alloys at room temperature and 50°C. Uranium in solution was not found to adversely influence potential erosion-corrosion. Potentially intense radiolysis conditions slightly accelerated the general corrosion of candidate alloys, but no materials were observed to exhibit an annualized rate above 10 μm/y.

  20. Testing "Compatibility Testing."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Elliot; Huston, Ted L.

    Most models of marital choice are attempts to explain choices within the field of available eligibles. The essence of compatibility testing is that people select their mates by evaluating the match between psychological characteristics after sorting the available field on the basis of social characteristics. A compatibility model seems to require…

  1. Lattice site location of optical centers in GaN:Eu light emitting diode material grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Lorenz, K.

    2010-09-16

    Eu-doped GaN was grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy at temperatures from 900 to 1100 °C. Eu incorporation is influenced by temperature with the highest concentration found for growth at 1000 °C. In all samples, Eu is incorporated entirely on substitutional Ga sites with a slight displacement which is highest (∼0.2 Å) in the sample grown at 900 °C and mainly directed along the c-axis. The major optical Eu3+ centers are identical for in situdoped and ion-implanted samples after high temperature and pressure annealing. The dominant Eu3+luminescence lines are attributed to isolated, substitutional Eu.

  2. Influence of the interface on growth rates in AlN/GaN short period superlattices via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, L. E.; Korakakis, D.

    2011-11-01

    AlN/GaN short period superlattices are well suited for a number of applications including, but not limited to, digital alloys, intersubband devices, and emitters. In this work, AlN/GaN superlattices with periodicities ranging from 10 to 20 Å have been grown via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy in order to investigate the influence of the interface on the binary alloy growth rates. The GaN growth rate at the interface was observed to decrease with increasing GaN thickness while the AlN growth rate remained constant. This has been attributed to a decrease in the decomposition rate of GaN at the hetero-interface as seen in other III-V hetero-structures.

  3. Surfactant effects of indium on cracking in AlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors grown via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, L. E.; Miller, C. M.; Korakakis, D.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum Nitride (AlN) and Gallium Nitride (GaN) superlattice structures are often characterized by a network of cracks resulting from the large lattice mismatch and difference in thermal expansion coefficients, especially as the thickness of the layers increases. This work investigates the influence of indium as a surfactant on strain and cracking in AlN/GaN DBRs grown via Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE). DBRs with peak reflectivities ranging from 465 nm to 540 nm were grown and indium was introduced during the growth of the AlN layer. Image processing techniques were used to quantify the crack length per square millimeter and it was observed that indium has a significant effect on the crack formation and reduced the total crack length in these structures by a factor of two.

  4. Response of Aspergillus niger Inoculated on Tomatoes Exposed to Vapor Phase Mustard Essential Oil for Short or Long Periods and Sensory Evaluation of Treated Tomatoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Elena Aguilar-González

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitory effect of mustard essential oil (EO in vapor phase against Aspergillus niger was evaluated in vitro and in vivo (in tomatoes. Mold response in tomatoes exposed for short or long periods to selected concentrations of mustard EO was also evaluated. Furthermore, a sensory evaluation was also performed among treated tomatoes and compared with nontreated ones. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC for the studied EO was determined by the inverted Petri dish method. MIC for the in vitro and in vivo tests for mustard EO was of 3.08 μL/Lair. In vitro and in vivo results demonstrate the effectiveness of vapors of mustard EO against A. niger. The studied EO contains highly volatile organic compounds with strong inhibitory effects, even when applied for short periods, and can consequently be considered a good alternative to traditional synthetic antimicrobials without detriment of selected sensory attributes.

  5. Structural and electrical properties of InAs/GaSb superlattices grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy for midwavelength infrared detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arikata, Suguru; Kyono, Takashi [Semiconductor Technologies Laboratory, Sumitomo Electric Industries, LTD., Hyogo (Japan); Miura, Kouhei; Balasekaran, Sundararajan; Inada, Hiroshi; Iguchi, Yasuhiro [Transmission Devices Laboratory, Sumitomo Electric Industries, LTD., Yokohama (Japan); Sakai, Michito [Sensor System Research Group, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Katayama, Haruyoshi [Space Technology Directorate I, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kimata, Masafumi [College of Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, Shiga (Japan); Akita, Katsushi [Sumiden Semiconductor Materials, LTD., Hyogo (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    InAs/GaSb superlattice (SL) structures were fabricated on GaSb substrates by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) toward midwavelength infrared (MWIR) photodiodes. Almost defect-free 200-period SLs with a strain-compensation interfacial layer were successfully fabricated and demonstrate an intense photoluminescence peak centered at 6.1 μm at 4 K and an external quantum efficiency of 31% at 3.5 μm at 20 K. These results indicate that the high-performance MWIR detectors can be fabricated in application with the InAs/GaSb SLs grown by MOVPE as an attractive method for production. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Bulk GaN substrate with overall dislocation density on the order of 105/cm2 fabricated by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubara, Shin; Matsubara, Tohoru; Yukizane, Kota; Arita, Naoki; Fujimoto, Satoru; Ezaki, Tatsuya; Inomoto, Ryo; Yamane, Keisuke; Okada, Narihito; Tadatomo, Kazuyuki

    2017-11-01

    In this study, a combined facet and flattening (FF) growth technique was implemented to fabricate GaN substrates by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. By changing the growth conditions, i.e., the growth temperature and V/III ratio, it was found that facet growth was promoted with a high V/III ratio and low temperature and planar growth was promoted with low V/III ratios and high temperature. We introduce a FF growth technique involving further reduction of the dislocation density using facet growth as the first step and flattening growth of the GaN layer as the second step. To further reduce dislocation density, we also finally demonstrate a multiple-step growth technique based on FF growth and succeeded in producing GaN substrates with overall dislocation densities on the order of 105 cm-2.

  7. Cross-stacked carbon nanotubes assisted self-separation of free-standing GaN substrates by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tongbo; Yang, Jiankun; Wei, Yang; Huo, Ziqiang; Ji, Xiaoli; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Junxi; Li, Jinmin; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-06-01

    We report a novel method to fabricate high quality 2-inch freestanding GaN substrate grown on cross-stacked carbon nanotubes (CSCNTs) coated sapphire by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). As nanoscale masks, these CSCNTs can help weaken the interface connection and release the compressive stress by forming voids during fast coalescence and also block the propagation of threading dislocations (TDs). During the cool-down process, thermal stress-induced cracks are initiated at the CSCNTs interface with the help of air voids and propagated all over the films which leads to full self-separation of FS-GaN substrate. Raman and photoluminescence spectra further reveal the stress relief and crystalline improvement of GaN with CSCNTs. It is expected that the efficient, low cost and mass-producible technique may enable new applications for CNTs in nitride optoelectronic fields.

  8. Halide vapor phase epitaxy of thick GaN films on ScAlMgO4 substrates and their self-separation for fabricating freestanding wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Kazuki; Kanoh, Masaya; Tanikawa, Tomoyuki; Kuboya, Shigeyuki; Mukai, Takashi; Matsuoka, Takashi

    2017-10-01

    Halide vapor phase epitaxy of thick GaN films was demonstrated on ScAlMgO4 (SCAM) substrates, and their self-separation was achieved. The 320-µm-thick GaN film was self-separated from the SCAM substrate during the cooling process after the growth. This separation phenomenon occurred because of both the c-plane cleavability of SCAM and the difference in the thermal-expansion coefficients between GaN and SCAM. The dark-spot densities for the GaN films on the SCAM substrates were approximately 30% lower than those on sapphire substrates. These results indicate that SCAM substrates are promising for fabricating a high-quality freestanding GaN wafer at a low cost.

  9. Alternate methods of applying diffusants to silicon solar cells. [screen printing of thick-film paste materials and vapor phase transport from solid sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, T. W.; Field, M. B.

    1979-01-01

    Low-melting phosphate and borate glasses were screen printed on silicon wafers and heated to form n and p junctions. Data on surface appearance, sheet resistance and junction depth are presented. Similar data are reported for vapor phase transport from sintered aluminum metaphosphate and boron-containing glass-ceramic solid sources. Simultaneous diffusion of an N(+) layer with screen-printed glass and a p(+) layer with screen-printed Al alloy paste was attempted. No p(+) back surface field formation was achieved. Some good cells were produced but the heating in an endless-belt furnace caused a large scatter in sheet resistance and junction depth for three separate lots of wafers.

  10. Occurrence of cubic GaN and strain relaxation in GaN buffer layers grown by low-pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on (0001) sapphire substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lisen; Zhou, Kuan; Zhang, Ze; Zhang, Guoyi; Yang, Zhijian; Tong, Yuzhen

    1999-02-01

    Investigations on GaN buffer layers grown by low-pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on (0001) sapphire substrates indicated that the mechanisms by way of which GaN buffer layers relax stresses introduced by the lattice mismatch and thermal expansion coefficient difference between GaN epilayer and sapphire substrate are related to both the crystallographic structure of GaN and thickness of the buffer layers. Beside forming misfit dislocations, mismatch-induced stresses can also be relaxed by forming stacking faults and microtwin boundaries parallel to (11-1) of GaN near the interface between GaN and sapphire substrate in cubic GaN buffer layers. It was found that, in cubic GaN buffer layers, there exists a critical thickness within which the stacking faults and/or microtwin boundaries parallel to (11-1) of GaN can be formed. This critical value is determined to be 50 nm.

  11. Aircraft Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    au traitement. micaniqus qui provoque une compression de surface - h1l’spplication i1’une double protection comportant oxydation snodique et...primaire anti-corrosion nitrosynthdtique pigmontie au chromate do zinc - une couche do peinture de finition nitrosynthdtique risistant aux huiles ...condition: - Touch-up of concerned fastener holes with chemical oxydation ; - Wet assembly of fasteners; - Application of a strontium chromate primer and

  12. Determination of methane concentrations in water in equilibrium with sI methane hydrate in the absence of a vapor phase by in situ Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    Most submarine gas hydrates are located within the two-phase equilibrium region of hydrate and interstitial water with pressures (P) ranging from 8 to 60 MPa and temperatures (T) from 275 to 293 K. However, current measurements of solubilities of methane in equilibrium with hydrate in the absence of a vapor phase are limited below 20 MPa and 283.15 K, and the differences among these data are up to 30%. When these data were extrapolated to other P-T conditions, it leads to large and poorly known uncertainties. In this study, in situ Raman spectroscopy was used to measure methane concentrations in pure water in equilibrium with sI (structure one) methane hydrate, in the absence of a vapor phase, at temperatures from 276.6 to 294.6 (??0.3) K and pressures at 10, 20, 30 and 40 (??0.4%) MPa. The relationship among concentration of methane in water in equilibrium with hydrate, in mole fraction [X(CH4)], the temperature in K, and pressure in MPa was derived as: X(CH4) = exp [11.0464 + 0.023267 P - (4886.0 + 8.0158 P)/T]. Both the standard enthalpy and entropy of hydrate dissolution at the studied T-P conditions increase slightly with increasing pressure, ranging from 41.29 to 43.29 kJ/mol and from 0.1272 to 0.1330 kJ/K ?? mol, respectively. When compared with traditional sampling and analytical methods, the advantages of our method include: (1) the use of in situ Raman signals for methane concentration measurements eliminates possible uncertainty caused by sampling and ex situ analysis, (2) it is simple and efficient, and (3) high-pressure data can be obtained safely. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Flexible, Low-Power Thin-Film Transistors Made of Vapor-Phase Synthesized High-k, Ultrathin Polymer Gate Dielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Junhwan; Joo, Munkyu; Seong, Hyejeong; Pak, Kwanyong; Park, Hongkeun; Park, Chan Woo; Im, Sung Gap

    2017-06-21

    A series of high-k, ultrathin copolymer gate dielectrics were synthesized from 2-cyanoethyl acrylate (CEA) and di(ethylene glycol) divinyl ether (DEGDVE) monomers by a free radical polymerization via a one-step, vapor-phase, initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) method. The chemical composition of the copolymers was systematically optimized by tuning the input ratio of the vaporized CEA and DEGDVE monomers to achieve a high dielectric constant (k) as well as excellent dielectric strength. Interestingly, DEGDVE was nonhomopolymerizable but it was able to form a copolymer with other kinds of monomers. Utilizing this interesting property of the DEGDVE cross-linker, the dielectric constant of the copolymer film could be maximized with minimum incorporation of the cross-linker moiety. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the synthesis of a cyanide-containing polymer in the vapor phase, where a high-purity polymer film with a maximized dielectric constant was achieved. The dielectric film with the optimized composition showed a dielectric constant greater than 6 and extremely low leakage current densities (thin-film transistors (OTFTs) and oxide TFTs were fabricated, which showed hysteresis-free transfer characteristics with an operating voltage of less than 3 V. Furthermore, the flexible OTFTs retained their low gate leakage current and ideal TFT characteristics even under 2% applied tensile strain, which makes them some of the most flexible OTFTs reported to date. We believe that these ultrathin, high-k organic dielectric films with excellent mechanical flexibility will play a crucial role in future soft electronics.

  14. Corrosion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corrosion Testing Facility is part of the Army Corrosion Office (ACO). It is a fully functional atmospheric exposure site, called the Corrosion Instrumented Test...

  15. Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2011-05-01

    This interim report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for coating large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for coating inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. The final project report will feature an experimental evaluation of the performance of the two selected cladding techniques.

  16. Electromagnetic compatibility engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, Henry W

    2009-01-01

    Praise for Noise Reduction Techniques IN electronic systems ""Henry Ott has literally 'written the book' on the subject of EMC. . . . He not only knows the subject, but has the rare ability to communicate that knowledge to others.""-EE Times Electromagnetic Compatibility Engineering is a completely revised, expanded, and updated version of Henry Ott's popular book Noise Reduction Techniques in Electronic Systems. It reflects the most recent developments in the field of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) and noise reduction¿and their practical applications t

  17. Materials compatibility and aging for flux and cleaner combinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archuleta, Kim M. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Piatt, Rochelle [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A materials study of high reliability electronics cleaning is presented here. In Phase 1, mixed type substrates underwent a condensed contaminants application to view a worst- case scenario for unremoved flux with cleaning agent residue for parts in a silicone oil filled environment. In Phase 2, fluxes applied to copper coupons and to printed wiring boards underwent gentle cleaning then accelerated aging in air at 65% humidity and 30 O C. Both sets were aged for 4 weeks. Contaminants were no-clean (ORL0), water soluble (ORH1 liquid and ORH0 paste), and rosin (RMA; ROL0) fluxes. Defluxing agents were water, solvents, and engineered aqueous defluxers. In the first phase, coupons had flux applied and heated, then were placed in vials of oil with a small amount of cleaning agent and additional coupons. In the second phase, pairs of copper coupons and PWB were hand soldered by application of each flux, using tin-lead solder in a strip across the coupon or a set of test components on the PWB. One of each pair was cleaned in each cleaning agent, the first with a typical clean, and the second with a brief clean. Ionic contamination residue was measured before accelerated aging. After aging, substrates were removed and a visual record of coupon damage made, from which a subjective rank was applied for comparison between the various flux and defluxer combinations; more corrosion equated to higher rank. The ORH1 water soluble flux resulted in the highest ranking in both phases, the RMA flux the least. For the first phase, in which flux and defluxer remained on coupons, the aqueous defluxers led to worse corrosion. The vapor phase cleaning agents resulted in the highest ranking in the second phase, in which there was no physical cleaning. Further study of cleaning and rinsing parameters will be required.

  18. Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    Treaty Organization, Brussels, 1971), p. 449. 14. D. 0. Sprowls, T. J. Summerson, G. M. Ugianski, S. G. Epstein, and H. L. Craig , Jr., in Stress...National Association of Corrosion Engineers Houston, TX, 1972). 22. H. L. Craig , Jr. (ed.), Stress Corrosion-New Approaches, ASTM-STP- 610 (American...62. M. Hishida and H. Nakada, Corrosion 33 (11) 403 (1977). b3. D. C. Deegan and B. E. Wilde, Corrosion 34 (6), 19 (1978). 64. S. Orman, Corrosion Sci

  19. Introduction to electromagnetic compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Clayton R.

    A formal and extensive treatment of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) is presented. Basic principles are reviewed in detail, including reasons for EMC in electronic design. Also discussed are: nonideal behavior of components, signal spectra, radiated emission and susceptibility, conducted emissions and susceptibility, crosstalk, shielding, electrostatic discharge, and system design for EMC.

  20. Electromagnetic compatibility overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, K. C.

    1980-01-01

    An assessment of the electromagnetic compatibility impact of the Satellite Power System is discussed. The discussion is divided into two parts: determination of the emission expected from SPS including their spatial and spectral distributions, and evaluation of the impact of such emissions on electromagnetic systems including considerations of means for mitigating effects.

  1. Nanoselective area growth of GaN by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on 4H-SiC using epitaxial graphene as a mask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puybaret, Renaud; Jordan, Matthew B.; Voss, Paul L.; Ougazzaden, Abdallah, E-mail: aougazza@georgiatech-metz.fr [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); CNRS UMI 2958, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2 Rue Marconi, 57070 Metz (France); Patriarche, Gilles [CNRS, Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Sundaram, Suresh; El Gmili, Youssef [CNRS UMI 2958, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2 Rue Marconi, 57070 Metz (France); Salvestrini, Jean-Paul [Université de Lorraine, CentraleSupélec, LMOPS, EA4423, 57070 Metz (France); Heer, Walt A. de [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Berger, Claire [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); CNRS, Institut Néel, BP166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2016-03-07

    We report the growth of high-quality triangular GaN nanomesas, 30-nm thick, on the C-face of 4H-SiC using nanoselective area growth (NSAG) with patterned epitaxial graphene grown on SiC as an embedded mask. NSAG alleviates the problems of defects in heteroepitaxy, and the high mobility graphene film could readily provide the back low-dissipative electrode in GaN-based optoelectronic devices. A 5–8 graphene-layer film is first grown on the C-face of 4H-SiC by confinement-controlled sublimation of silicon carbide. Graphene is then patterned and arrays of 75-nm-wide openings are etched in graphene revealing the SiC substrate. A 30-nm-thick GaN is subsequently grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. GaN nanomesas grow epitaxially with perfect selectivity on SiC, in the openings patterned through graphene. The up-or-down orientation of the mesas on SiC, their triangular faceting, and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that they are biphasic. The core is a zinc blende monocrystal surrounded with single-crystal wurtzite. The GaN crystalline nanomesas have no threading dislocations or V-pits. This NSAG process potentially leads to integration of high-quality III-nitrides on the wafer scalable epitaxial graphene/silicon carbide platform.

  2. Controlling the polarity of metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy-grown GaP on Si(111) for subsequent III-V nanowire growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paszuk, A.; Steidl, M.; Zhao, W.; Dobrich, A.; Kleinschmidt, P. [Technische Universität Ilmenau, Institut für Physik, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Brückner, S.; Supplie, O.; Hannappel, T. [Technische Universität Ilmenau, Institut für Physik, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Institute for Solar Fuels, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Prost, W. [Center for Semiconductor Technology and Optoelectronics (ZHO), University of Duisburg-Essen, 47057 Duisburg (Germany)

    2015-06-08

    Nanowire growth on heteroepitaxial GaP/Si(111) by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy requires the [-1-1-1] face, i.e., GaP(111) material with B-type polarity. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) allows us to identify the polarity of GaP grown on Si(111), since (2×2) and (1×1) surface reconstructions are associated with GaP(111)A and GaP(111)B, respectively. In dependence on the pre-growth treatment of the Si(111) substrates, we were able to control the polarity of the GaP buffers. GaP films grown on the H-terminated Si(111) surface exhibited A-type polarity, while GaP grown on Si surfaces terminated with arsenic exhibited a (1×1) LEED pattern, indicating B-type polarity. We obtained vertical GaAs nanowire growth on heteroepitaxial GaP with (1×1) surface reconstruction only, in agreement with growth experiments on homoepitaxially grown GaP(111)

  3. High growth rate GaN on 200 mm silicon by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy for high electron mobility transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, M.; Baines, Y.; Bavard, A.; Bouveyron, R.

    2018-02-01

    It is increasingly important to reduce the cycle time of epitaxial growth, in order to reduce the costs of device fabrication, especially for GaN based structures which typically have growth cycles of several hours. We have performed a comprehensive study using metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) investigating the effects of changing GaN growth rates from 0.9 to 14.5 μm/h. Although there is no significant effect on the strain incorporated in the layers, we have seen changes in the surface morphology which can be related to the change in dislocation behaviour and surface diffusion effects. At the small scale, as seen by AFM, increased dislocation density for higher growth rates leads to increased pinning of growth terraces, resulting in more closely spaced terraces. At a larger scale of hundreds of μm observed by optical profiling, we have related the formation of grains to the rate of surface diffusion of adatoms using a random walk model, implying diffusion distances from 30 μm for the highest growth rates up to 100 μm for the lowest. The increased growth rate also increases the intrinsic carbon incorporation which can increase the breakdown voltage of GaN films. Despite an increased threading dislocation density, these very high growth rates of 14.5 μm/hr by MOVPE have been shown to be appealing for reducing epitaxial growth cycle times and therefore costs in High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) structures.

  4. Defect structure of high temperature hydride vapor phase epitaxy-grown epitaxial (0 0 0 1) AlN/sapphire using growth mode modification process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xujun; Zhang, Jicai; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Jinping; Wang, Jianfeng; Xu, Ke

    2017-06-01

    Defect structures were investigated by transmission electron microscopy for AlN/sapphire (0 0 0 1) epilayers grown by high temperature hydride vapor phase epitaxy using a growth mode modification process. The defect structures, including threading dislocations, inversion domains, and voids, were analyzed by diffraction contrast, high-resolution imaging, and convergent beam diffraction. AlN film growth was initiated at 1450 °C with high V/III ratio for 8 min. This was followed by low V/III ratio growth for 12 min. The near-interfacial region shows a high density of threading dislocations and inversion domains. Most of these dislocations have Burgers vector b = 1/3〈1 1 2 0〉 and were reduced with the formation of dislocation loops. In the middle range 400 nm < h < 2 μm, dislocations gradually aggregated and reduced to ∼109 cm-2. The inversion domains have a shuttle-like shape with staggered boundaries that deviate by ∼ ±5° from the c axis. Above 2 μm thickness, the film consists of isolated threading dislocations with a total density of 8 × 108 cm-2. Most of threading dislocations are either pure edge or mixed dislocations. The threading dislocation reduction in these films is associated with dislocation loops formation and dislocation aggregation-interaction during island growth with high V/III ratio.

  5. Electron mobility enhancement in metalorganic-vapor-phase-epitaxy-grown InAlN high-electron-mobility transistors by control of surface morphology of spacer layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Atsushi; Ishiguro, Tetsuro; Kotani, Junji; Nakamura, Norikazu

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrated low-sheet-resistance metalorganic-vapor-phase-epitaxy-grown InAlN high-electron-mobility transistors using AlGaN spacers with excellent surface morphology. We systematically investigated the effects of AlGaN spacer growth conditions on surface morphology and electron mobility. We found that the surface morphology of InAlN barriers depends on that of AlGaN spacers. Ga desorption from AlGaN spacers was suppressed by increasing the trimethylaluminum (TMA) supply rate, resulting in the small surface roughnesses of InAlN barriers and AlGaN spacers. Moreover, we found that an increase in the NH3 supply rate also improved the surface morphologies of InAlN barriers and AlGaN spacers as long as the TMA supply rate was high enough to suppress the degradation of GaN channels. Finally, we realized a low sheet resistance of 185.5 Ω/sq with a high electron mobility of 1210 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 by improving the surface morphologies of AlGaN spacers and InAlN barriers.

  6. In situ synthesis of silver nanoparticles on the cotton fabrics modified by plasma induced vapor phase graft polymerization of acrylic acid for durable multifunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. X.; Ren, Y.; Lv, J. C.; Zhou, Q. Q.; Ma, Z. P.; Qi, Z. M.; Chen, J. Y.; Liu, G. L.; Gao, D. W.; Lu, Z. Q.; Zhang, W.; Jin, L. M.

    2017-02-01

    A practical and ecological method for preparing the multifunctional cotton fabrics with excellent laundering durability was explored. Cotton fabrics were modified by plasma induced vapor phase graft polymerization (PIVPGP) of acrylic acid (AA) and subsequently silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were in situ synthesized on the treated cotton fabrics. The AgNP loaded cotton fabrics were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), antibacterial activity, self-cleaning activity, thermal stability and laundering durability, respectively. SEM observation and EDX, XPS and XRD analysis demonstrated the much more AgNPs deposition on the cotton fabrics modified by PIVPGP of AA. The AgNP loaded cotton fabrics also exhibited better antibacterial activity, self-cleaning activity, thermal stability and laundering durability. It was concluded that the surface modification of the cotton fabrics by PIVPGP of AA could increase the loading efficiency and binding fastness of AgNPs on the treated cotton fabrics, which could fabricate the cotton fabrics with durable multifunction. In addition, the mechanism of in situ synthesis of AgNPs on the cotton fabrics modified by PIVPGP of AA was proposed.

  7. Thermodynamic analysis and synthesis of porous Mo{sub 2}C sponge by vapor-phase condensation and in situ carburization of MoO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cetinkaya, S. [Istanbul University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Avcilar, Istanbul (Turkey); Eroglu, S., E-mail: seref@istanbul.edu.t [Istanbul University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Avcilar, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-01-07

    Spongy porous MoO{sub 3} deposits were grown by vaporization, vapor-phase transportation and condensation of MoO{sub 3} in Ar flow. It was observed that increased source temperature ({>=}1200 K) and temperature gradient ({>=}100 K/cm) favor the formation of spongy deposit owing to high supersaturation of the oxide vapor at {approx}900 K. Spongy Mo{sub 2}C deposits consisting of intermingled platelet crystals with thin walls were synthesized by in situ carburization of the condensed MoO{sub 3} using 0.05-0.1 mol of CH{sub 4} and 1 mol of H{sub 2} at 900 K. Thermodynamic analysis in the Mo-O-C-H system was used as a guide to predict the conditions for the formation of Mo{sub 2}C from the MoO{sub 3}-CH{sub 4}-H{sub 2} reactants at 900 K. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the carburized deposits consisted of single phase Mo{sub 2}C, in agreement with the thermodynamic prediction. The equilibrium analysis was also used to reveal possible reaction pathways to Mo{sub 2}C formation from MoO{sub 3}-CH{sub 4}-H{sub 2} reactants which yielded gaseous products of H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 6} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}.

  8. Strained In1-xGaxAsyP1-y/InP quantum well heterostructures grown by low-pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Jr Wilson de

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the optical and the structural properties of strained In1-xGaxAsyP1-y/InP and strain compensated In1-xGaxAsyP1-y/In1-zGazAsqP1-q/InP multi-quantum well heterostructures grown by low-pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy at different growth conditions. Our results indicate an increase of the compositional fluctuation of quaternary materials as the alloy composition moves from the outer spinodal isotherm into the miscibility gap region. In1-xGaxAsyP1-y layers grown at high tensile strained values exhibit a three-dimensional-like growth mode. Strain compensated structures revealed the presence of a broad photoluminescence emission band below the fundamental quantum well transition, well defined elongated features along the [011] direction and interface undulations. All these effects were found to be strongly dependent on the growth temperature and the number of wells.

  9. High-quality AlN film grown on a nanosized concave-convex surface sapphire substrate by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Akira; Nagatomi, Takaharu; Morishita, Tomohiro; Iwaya, Motoaki; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Akasaki, Isamu

    2017-10-01

    We developed a method for fabricating high-crystal-quality AlN films by combining a randomly distributed nanosized concavo-convex sapphire substrate (NCC-SS) and a three-step growth method optimized for NCC-SS, i.e., a 3-nm-thick nucleation layer (870 °C), a 150-nm-thick high-temperature layer (1250 °C), and a 3.2-μm-thick medium-temperature layer (1110 °C). The NCC-SS is easily fabricated using a conventional metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy reactor equipped with a showerhead plate. The resultant AlN film has a crack-free and single-step surface with a root-mean-square roughness of 0.5 nm. The full-widths at half-maxima of the X-ray rocking curve were 50/250 arcsec for the (0002)/(10-12) planes, revealing that the NCC surface is critical for achieving such a high-quality film. Hexagonal-pyramid-shaped voids at the AlN/NCC-SS interface and confinement of dislocations within the 150-nm-thick high-temperature layer were confirmed. The NCC surface feature and resultant faceted voids play an important role in the growth of high-crystal-quality AlN films, likely via localized and/or disordered growth of AlN at the initial stage, contributing to the alignment of high-crystal-quality nuclei and dislocations.

  10. Nanoselective area growth of GaN by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on 4H-SiC using epitaxial graphene as a mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puybaret, Renaud; Patriarche, Gilles; Jordan, Matthew B.; Sundaram, Suresh; El Gmili, Youssef; Salvestrini, Jean-Paul; Voss, Paul L.; de Heer, Walt A.; Berger, Claire; Ougazzaden, Abdallah

    2016-03-01

    We report the growth of high-quality triangular GaN nanomesas, 30-nm thick, on the C-face of 4H-SiC using nanoselective area growth (NSAG) with patterned epitaxial graphene grown on SiC as an embedded mask. NSAG alleviates the problems of defects in heteroepitaxy, and the high mobility graphene film could readily provide the back low-dissipative electrode in GaN-based optoelectronic devices. A 5-8 graphene-layer film is first grown on the C-face of 4H-SiC by confinement-controlled sublimation of silicon carbide. Graphene is then patterned and arrays of 75-nm-wide openings are etched in graphene revealing the SiC substrate. A 30-nm-thick GaN is subsequently grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. GaN nanomesas grow epitaxially with perfect selectivity on SiC, in the openings patterned through graphene. The up-or-down orientation of the mesas on SiC, their triangular faceting, and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that they are biphasic. The core is a zinc blende monocrystal surrounded with single-crystal wurtzite. The GaN crystalline nanomesas have no threading dislocations or V-pits. This NSAG process potentially leads to integration of high-quality III-nitrides on the wafer scalable epitaxial graphene/silicon carbide platform.

  11. Interruption-free growth of 10 μm-thick GaN film prepared on sputtered AlN/PSS template by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. A.; Kuo, C. H.; Wu, J. P.; Chang, C. W.

    2015-09-01

    GaN films (10 μm-thick) of high crystalline quality were prepared on sputtered AlN/PSS template by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). By introducing the two-step growth method into HVPE, one can reduce the steps in the procedure, realize uninterrupted growth, and improve the crystal quality of the films. The effects of initial GaN growth on the AlN/PSS template by HVPE were also investigated. In this study, 10 μm-thick GaN films prepared on sputtered AlN/PSS template by HVPE showed improved crystal quality using X-ray diffraction and etching pits density. Compared with conventional undoped GaN film grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition, the full width at half maximum of the (0 0 2) and (1 0 2) peaks of GaN decreased from 450 arcsec to 290 arcsec and from 376 arcsec to 344 arcsec, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy results showed that the gaps observed between the convex regions would eventually turn into dislocations during coalescence, because the number of dislocations increased with the number of gaps observed between the convex regions after step-1 growth.

  12. Low-temperature growth of AlN and GaN by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy for polarization engineered water splitting photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Akihiro; Suzuki, Michihiro; Fujii, Katsushi; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Masakazu

    2017-04-01

    Crystal properties of low-temperature grown AlN (LT-AlN) combined with low temperature GaN (LT-GaN) grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) were investigated to obtain a high quality GaN/AlN/GaN structure with a few-nm-thick AlN layer. LT-AlN suppresses unintentional Ga incorporation and can be pseudomorphically grown on GaN with a relatively smooth surface morphology. The lattice of LT-AlN coherent to GaN, however, was found to relax after reactor conditions were changed to grow the subsequent GaN layer at higher temperature. The top GaN layer grown on the relaxed LT-AlN, thus, exhibited a rough surface morphology and a threading dislocation density (TDD) higher than 109 cm-2 estimated from an X-ray diffraction measurement. An LT-GaN capping layer was found to be highly effective for avoiding such lattice relaxation of LT-AlN. The combination of LT-AlN and LT-GaN enables us to obtain a GaN/AlN/GaN junction with high Al content, a low TDD, and abrupt interfaces. As a result, introducing an LT-GaN layer improved the photoelectrochemical (PEC) property of a polarization engineered un-doped GaN/AlN/n-type GaN (u-GaN/AlN/n-GaN) photocathode for water splitting.

  13. Highly c-axis-oriented one-inch square freestanding GaN grown by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy using an AIN deposited on Si

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, M H; Chung, S H; Moon, D C

    1999-01-01

    In this letter, we report on the growth and the properties of freestanding GaN substrates. Large areas of one-inch square with a thickness of a 0.5 mm were grown by the hydride vapor-phase epitaxy (HVPE) method after a thick film of GaN was grown on an AIN buffer layer deposited on a sacrificial Si substrate which was subsequently chemically removed. The GaN substrate showed intensified X-ray diffraction from the (00.2) and the (00.4) planes, and the full width at half maximum of the double-crystal X-ray diffraction curve was as large as 4.2 degrees. The photoluminescence spectra measured at 10 K and at 300 K exhibited a sharp and strong excitonic emission without deep-level emission. They also showed n-type conduction with an electron concentration of approx 1x10 sup 1 sup 8 cm sup - sup 3 and a Hall mobility of 50 cm sup 2 / Vsec. The highly c-axis oriented large-area freestanding GaN prepared using a Si sacrificial substrate by HVPE through this work can be used for homoepitaxial growth of GaN-based optoel...

  14. Influence of incoherent twin boundaries on the electrical properties of β-Ga2O3 layers homoepitaxially grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, A.; Schewski, R.; Baldini, M.; Galazka, Z.; Wagner, G.; Albrecht, M.; Irmscher, K.

    2017-10-01

    We present a quantitative model that addresses the influence of incoherent twin boundaries on the electrical properties in β-Ga2O3. This model can explain the mobility collapse below a threshold electron concentration of 1 × 1018 cm-3 as well as partly the low doping efficiency in β-Ga2O3 layers grown homoepitaxially by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy on (100) substrates of only slight off-orientation. A structural analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals a high density of twin lamellae in these layers. In contrast to the coherent twin boundaries parallel to the (100) plane, the lateral incoherent twin boundaries exhibit one dangling bond per unit cell that acts as an acceptor-like electron trap. Since the twin lamellae are thin, we consider the incoherent twin boundaries to be line defects with a density of 1011-1012 cm-2 as determined by TEM. We estimate the influence of the incoherent twin boundaries on the electrical transport properties by adapting Read's model of charged dislocations. Our calculations quantitatively confirm that the mobility reduction and collapse as well as partly the compensation are due to the presence of twin lamellae.

  15. High-pressure vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation of lignin-derived oxygenates to hydrocarbons by a PtMo bimetallic catalyst: Product selectivity, reaction pathway, and structural characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yohe, Sara L.; Choudhari, Harshavardhan J.; Mehta, Dhairya D.; Dietrich, Paul J.; Detwiler, Michael D.; Akatay, Cem M.; Stach, Eric A.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Agrawal, Rakesh; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-12-01

    High-pressure, vapor-phase, hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reactions of dihydroeugenol (2-methoxy-4-propylphenol), as well as other phenolic, lignin-derived compounds, were investigated over a bimetallic platinum and molybdenum catalyst supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (5%Pt2.5%Mo/MWCNT). Hydrocarbons were obtained in 100% yield from dihydroeugenol, including 98% yield of the hydrocarbon propylcyclohexane. The final hydrocarbon distribution was shown to be a strong function of hydrogen partial pressure. Kinetic analysis showed three main dihydroeugenol reaction pathways: HDO, hydrogenation, and alkylation. The major pathway occurred via Pt catalyzed hydrogenation of the aromatic ring and methoxy group cleavage to form 4-propylcyclohexanol, then Mo catalyzed removal of the hydroxyl group by dehydration to form propylcyclohexene, followed by hydrogenation of propylcyclohexene on either the Pt or Mo to form the propylcyclohexane. Transalkylation by the methoxy group occurred as a minor side reaction. Catalyst characterization techniques including chemisorption, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to characterize the catalyst structure. Catalyst components identified were Pt particles, bimetallic PtMo particles, a Mo carbide-like phase, and Mo oxide phases.

  16. Modelling and numerical simulation of liquid-vapor phase transitions; Modelisation et simulation numerique des transitions de phase liquide-vapeur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, F

    2004-11-15

    This work deals with the modelling and numerical simulation of liquid-vapor phase transition phenomena. The study is divided into two part: first we investigate phase transition phenomena with a Van Der Waals equation of state (non monotonic equation of state), then we adopt an alternative approach with two equations of state. In the first part, we study the classical viscous criteria for selecting weak solutions of the system used when the equation of state is non monotonic. Those criteria do not select physical solutions and therefore we focus a more recent criterion: the visco-capillary criterion. We use this criterion to exactly solve the Riemann problem (which imposes solving an algebraic scalar non linear equation). Unfortunately, this step is quite costly in term of CPU which prevent from using this method as a ground for building Godunov solvers. That is why we propose an alternative approach two equations of state. Using the least action principle, we propose a phase changing two-phase flow model which is based on the second thermodynamic principle. We shall then describe two equilibrium submodels issued from the relaxations processes when instantaneous equilibrium is assumed. Despite the weak hyperbolicity of the last sub-model, we propose stable numerical schemes based on a two-step strategy involving a convective step followed by a relaxation step. We show the ability of the system to simulate vapor bubbles nucleation. (author)

  17. Solution-free and catalyst-free synthesis of ZnO-based nanostructured TCOs by PED and vapor phase growth techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calestani, D.; Pattini, F.; Bissoli, F.; Gilioli, E.; Villani, M.; Zappettini, A.

    2012-05-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is one of the most promising materials for realizing three-dimensional (3D) nanostructured transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) on large scale, because it is cheap, it can be modified with large concentrations of trivalent elements (such Al, Ga or In) and it is characterized by good electron mobility, wide bandgap and visible-range transparency. But, above all, it can be easily obtained in the form of different nanostructures with a large number of growth techniques. A solution-free and catalyst-free approach has been explored here by the vapor phase synthesis of vertically aligned ZnO nanorods on ZnO:Al (AZO) films grown by pulsed electron deposition (PED). The obtained nanostructured TCOs resulted to be homogeneous on large areas and easily patternable by means of mechanical masks. The morphology, crystalline structure, electrical and optical properties of the obtained samples have been characterized in depth. The possible use of such a nanostructured TCO in excitonic (e.g. DSSC) or low-reflectivity traditional solar cells is discussed.

  18. Growth of InGaAs nanowires on Ge(111) by selective-area metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Akinobu; Tomioka, Katsuhiro; Ishizaka, Fumiya; Motohisa, Junichi

    2017-04-01

    We report the growth of InGaAs nanowires (NWs) on Ge(111) substrates using selective-area metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy (SA-MOVPE) for novel InGaAs/Ge hybrid complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) applications. Ge(111) substrates with periodic arrays of mask opening were prepared, and InGaAs was selectively grown on the opening region of Ge(111). A uniform array of InGaAs NWs with a diameter around 100 nm was successfully grown using appropriate preparation of the initial surfaces with an AsH3 thermal treatment and flow-rate modulation epitaxy (FME). We found that optimizing partial pressure of AsH3 and the number of FME cycles improved the yield of vertical InGaAs NWs. Line-scan profile analysis of energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometry showed that the In composition in the InGaAs NW was almost constant from the bottom to the top. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis revealed that the interface between InGaAs NW and Ge had misfit dislocations, but their distance was longer than that expected from the difference in their lattice constants.

  19. Hall-effect measurements of metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy-grown p-type homoepitaxial GaN layers with various Mg concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Masahiro; Takashima, Shinya; Tanaka, Ryo; Matsuyama, Hideaki; Ueno, Katsunori; Edo, Masaharu; Takahashi, Tokio; Shimizu, Mitsuaki; Suda, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Mg-doped p-type gallium nitride (GaN) layers with doping concentrations in the range from 6.5 × 1016 cm-3 (lightly doped) to 3.8 × 1019 cm-3 (heavily doped) were investigated by Hall-effect measurement for the analysis of hole concentration and mobility. p-GaN was homoepitaxially grown on a GaN free-standing substrate by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy. The threading dislocation density of p-GaN was 4 × 106 cm-2 measured by cathodoluminescence mapping. Hall-effect measurements of p-GaN were carried out at a temperature in the range from 130 to 450 K. For the lightly doped p-GaN, the acceptor concentration of 7.0 × 1016 cm-3 and the donor concentration of 3.2 × 1016 cm-3 were obtained, where the compensation ratio was 46%. We also obtained the depth of the Mg acceptor level to be 220 meV. The hole mobilities of 86, 31, 14 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 200, 300, 400 K, respectively, were observed in the lightly doped p-GaN.

  20. Conditions for testing the corrosion rates of ceramics in coal gasification systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.P.; Nowok, J.W. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Coal gasifier operating conditions and gas and ash compositions affect the corrosion rates of ceramics used for construction in three ways: (1) through direct corrosion of the materials, (2) by affecting the concentration and chemical form of the primary corrodents, and (3) by affecting the mass transport rate of the primary corrodents. To perform an accurate corrosion test on a system material, the researcher must include all relevant corrodents and simulate conditions in the gasifier as closely as possible. In this paper, the authors present suggestions for conditions to be used in such corrosion tests. Two main types of corrosion conditions are discussed: those existing in hot-gas cleanup systems where vapor and dry ash may contribute to corrosion and those experienced by high-temperature heat exchangers and refractories where the main corrodent will be coal ash slag. Only the fluidized-bed gasification systems such as the Sierra Pacific Power Company Pinon Pine Power Project system are proposing the use of ceramic filters for particulate cleanup. The gasifier is an air-blown 102-MWe unit employing a Westinghouse{trademark} ceramic particle filter system operating at as high as 1100{degrees}F at 300 psia. Expected gas compositions in the filter will be approximately 25% CO, 15% H{sub 2}, 5% CO{sub 2}, 5% H{sub 2}O, and 50% N{sub 2}. Vapor-phase sodium chloride concentrations are expected to be 10 to 100 times the levels in combustion systems at similar temperatures, but in general the concentrations of the minor primary and secondary corrodents are not well understood. Slag corrosiveness will depend on its composition as well as viscosity. For a laboratory test, the slag must be in a thermodynamically stable form before the beginning of the corrosion test to assure that no inappropriate reactions are allowed to occur. Ideally, the slag would be flowing, and the appropriate atmosphere must be used to assure realistic slag viscosity.

  1. Aircraft electromagnetic compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Clifton A.; Larsen, William E.

    1987-06-01

    Illustrated are aircraft architecture, electromagnetic interference environments, electromagnetic compatibility protection techniques, program specifications, tasks, and verification and validation procedures. The environment of 400 Hz power, electrical transients, and radio frequency fields are portrayed and related to thresholds of avionics electronics. Five layers of protection for avionics are defined. Recognition is given to some present day electromagnetic compatibility weaknesses and issues which serve to reemphasize the importance of EMC verification of equipment and parts, and their ultimate EMC validation on the aircraft. Proven standards of grounding, bonding, shielding, wiring, and packaging are laid out to help provide a foundation for a comprehensive approach to successful future aircraft design and an understanding of cost effective EMC in an aircraft setting.

  2. Aircraft electromagnetic compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Clifton A.; Larsen, William E.

    1987-01-01

    Illustrated are aircraft architecture, electromagnetic interference environments, electromagnetic compatibility protection techniques, program specifications, tasks, and verification and validation procedures. The environment of 400 Hz power, electrical transients, and radio frequency fields are portrayed and related to thresholds of avionics electronics. Five layers of protection for avionics are defined. Recognition is given to some present day electromagnetic compatibility weaknesses and issues which serve to reemphasize the importance of EMC verification of equipment and parts, and their ultimate EMC validation on the aircraft. Proven standards of grounding, bonding, shielding, wiring, and packaging are laid out to help provide a foundation for a comprehensive approach to successful future aircraft design and an understanding of cost effective EMC in an aircraft setting.

  3. Study of the degradation of the external quantum efficiency of UV LEDs based on AlGaN/GaN heterostructures grown by chloride-hydride vapor-phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmidt, N. M.; Usikov, A. S.; Shabunina, E. I.; Chernyakov, A. E.; Sakharov, A. V.; Kurin, S. Yu.; Antipov, A. A.; Barash, I. S.; Roenkov, A. D.; Makarov, Yu. N.; Helava, H.

    2014-07-01

    Final stage of the degradation of the external quantum efficiency of AlGaN/GaN UV light-emitting diodes (LEDs), grown by chloride-hydride vapor-phase epitaxy, and high-power InGaN/GaN blue LEDs, produced by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy, has been comparatively studied. It is shown that one of these processes leading to a decrease in the quantum efficiency for both types of LEDs is the local defect formation involving the Gold-Weisberg mechanism in a system of extended defects. To prolong the service life of AlGaN/GaN UV LEDs to more than 2000 h, it is necessary to improve the nanostructural arrangement of the material of light-emitting structures and determine the contribution from the AlGaN composition disorder to the degradation of the external quantum efficiency.

  4. Corrosion inhibiting organic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasson, E.

    1984-10-16

    A corrosion inhibiting coating comprises a mixture of waxes, petroleum jelly, a hardener and a solvent. In particular, a corrosion inhibiting coating comprises candelilla wax, carnauba wax, microcrystalline waxes, white petrolatum, an oleoresin, lanolin and a solvent.

  5. Critical issues for homoepitaxial GaN growth by molecular beam epitaxy on hydride vapor-phase epitaxy-grown GaN substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, D. F.; Hardy, M. T.; Katzer, D. S.; Nepal, N.; Downey, B. P.; Meyer, D. J.; McConkie, Thomas O.; Zhou, Lin; Smith, David J.

    2016-12-01

    While the heteroepitaxial growth of gallium nitride-based materials and devices on substrates such as SiC, sapphire, and Si has been well-documented, the lack of a cost-effective source of bulk GaN crystals has hindered similar progress on homoepitaxy. Nevertheless, freestanding GaN wafers are becoming more widely available, and there is great interest in growing GaN films and devices on bulk GaN substrates, in order to take advantage of the greatly reduced density of threading dislocations, particularly for vertical devices. However, homoepitaxial GaN growth is far from a trivial task due to the reactivity and different chemical sensitivities of N-polar (0001) and Ga-polar (0001) GaN surfaces, which can affect the microstructure and concentrations of impurities in homoepitaxial GaN layers. In order to achieve high quality, high purity homoepitaxial GaN, it is necessary to investigate the effect of the ex situ wet chemical clean, the use of in situ cleaning procedures, the sensitivity of the GaN surface to thermal decomposition, and the effect of growth temperature. We review the current understanding of these issues with a focus on homoepitaxial growth of GaN by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on c-plane surfaces of freestanding GaN substrates grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE), as HVPE-grown substrates are most widely available. We demonstrate methods for obtaining homoepitaxial GaN layers by plasma-assisted MBE in which no additional threading dislocations are generated from the regrowth interface and impurity concentrations are greatly reduced.

  6. In situ synthesis of silver nanoparticles on the cotton fabrics modified by plasma induced vapor phase graft polymerization of acrylic acid for durable multifunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.X., E-mail: cxwang@mail.dhu.edu.cn [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu, 224003 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Ecological Building, Materials and Environmental Protection Equipments, Jiangsu, 224051 (China); Laboratory for Advanced Technology in Environmental Protection, Jiangsu, 224051 (China); School of Textile and Clothing, Nantong University, Jiangsu, 226019 (China); Ren, Y. [School of Textile and Clothing, Nantong University, Jiangsu, 226019 (China); Lv, J.C.; Zhou, Q.Q.; Ma, Z.P.; Qi, Z.M.; Chen, J.Y.; Liu, G.L.; Gao, D.W. [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu, 224003 (China); Lu, Z.Q. [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu, 224003 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Ecological Building, Materials and Environmental Protection Equipments, Jiangsu, 224051 (China); Laboratory for Advanced Technology in Environmental Protection, Jiangsu, 224051 (China); Zhang, W. [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu, 224003 (China); Jin, L.M. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 201204 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • A new means for multifunctional cotton fabrics by PIVPGP of AA and AgNPs synthesis. • Surface modification by PIVPGP of AA had a positive effect on AgNPs loading. • Antibacterial, self-cleaning and thermal stability were greatly improved. • AgNP loaded cotton fabric exhibited excellent laundering durability. • Mechanism of AgNPs in situ synthesis on cotton fabrics by PIVPGP of AA was proposed. - Abstract: A practical and ecological method for preparing the multifunctional cotton fabrics with excellent laundering durability was explored. Cotton fabrics were modified by plasma induced vapor phase graft polymerization (PIVPGP) of acrylic acid (AA) and subsequently silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were in situ synthesized on the treated cotton fabrics. The AgNP loaded cotton fabrics were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), antibacterial activity, self-cleaning activity, thermal stability and laundering durability, respectively. SEM observation and EDX, XPS and XRD analysis demonstrated the much more AgNPs deposition on the cotton fabrics modified by PIVPGP of AA. The AgNP loaded cotton fabrics also exhibited better antibacterial activity, self-cleaning activity, thermal stability and laundering durability. It was concluded that the surface modification of the cotton fabrics by PIVPGP of AA could increase the loading efficiency and binding fastness of AgNPs on the treated cotton fabrics, which could fabricate the cotton fabrics with durable multifunction. In addition, the mechanism of in situ synthesis of AgNPs on the cotton fabrics modified by PIVPGP of AA was proposed.

  7. Transmission Electron Microscope Observation of Cubic GaN Grown by Metalorganic Vapor Phase Epitaxy with Dimethylhydrazine on (001) GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwano, Noriyuki; Nagatomo, Yoshiyuki; Kobayashi, Kenki; Oki, Kensuke; Miyoshi, Seiro; Yaguchi, Hiroyuki; Onabe, Kentaro; Shiraki, Yasuhiro

    1994-01-01

    Cross-sectional transmission electron microscope observation has been performed on the microstructure of GaN films grown on a (001) GaAs substrate by metalorgahic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) using 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (DMHy) and trimethylgallium (TMG) as the sources of nitrogen and gallium, respectively. Before the deposition, the surface of the substrate was nitrided with DMHy. High-resolution images and electron diffraction patterns confirmed that the GaN films have a zincblende structure (β-GaN) with the lattice constant of a GaN=0.454 nm, and contain bands of stacking faults parallel to {111} planes. The interface between GaN and GaAs is made of {111} facets with no interlayer. Misfit dislocations are found to be inserted on the interface approximately every five atomic planes of GaAs. The nitridation treatment with only DMHy for 130 min is found to form a thick layer of β-GaN on the (001) GaAs substrate. Nuclei of β-GaN formed by the pretreatment of surface nitridation play an important role in growing GaN in a zincblende structure during the supply of DMHy and TMG. The formation of facets on the top surface of GaN and on the interface of GaN/GaAs is explained in terms of the diffusion of arsenic in β-GaN. The characteristics of the structure of GaN films grown at 600 and 650° C are also presented.

  8. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  9. DUPIC fuel compatibility assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Rho, G. H.; Park, J. W. [and others

    2000-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the compatibility of DUPIC(Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel in CANDU Reactors) fuel with the current CANDU 6 reactor, which is one of the technology being developed to utilize the spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors. The phase 1 study of this project includes the feasibility analysis on applicability of the current core design method, the feasibility analysis on operation of the DUPIC fuel core, the compatibility analysis on individual reactor system, the sensitivity analysis on the fuel composition, and the economic analysis on DUPIC fuel cycle. The results of the validation calculations have confirmed that the current core analysis system is acceptable for the feasibility study of the DUPIC fuel compatibility analysis. The results of core simulations have shown that both natural uranium and DUPIC fuel cores are almost the same from the viewpoint of the operational performance. For individual reactor system including reactively devices, the functional requirements of each system are satisfied in general. However, because of the pronounced power flattening in the DUPIC core, the radiation damage on the critical components increases, which should be investigated more in the future. The DUPIC fuel composition heterogeneity dose not to impose any serious effect on the reactor operation if the fuel composition is adjusted. The economics analysis has been performed through conceptual design studies on the DUPIC fuel fabrication, fuel handling in a plant, and spent fuel disposal, which has shown that the DUPIC fuel cycle is comparable to the once-trough fuel cycle considering uncertainties associated with unit costs of the fuel cycle components. The results of Phase 1 study have shown that it is feasible to use the DUPIC fuel in CANDU reactors without major changes in hardware. However further studies are required to confirm the safety of the reactor under accident condition.

  10. Management of Reinforcement Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küter, André; Geiker, Mette Rica; Møller, Per

    Reinforcement corrosion is the most important cause for deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, both with regard to costs and consequences. Thermodynamically consistent descriptions of corrosion mechanisms are expected to allow the development of innovative concepts for the management...... of reinforcement corrosion....

  11. Elastomer Compatible With Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jon W.

    1987-01-01

    Artificial rubber resists ignition on impact and seals at low temperatures. Filled fluoroelastomer called "Katiflex" developed for use in seals of vessels holding cold liquid and gaseous oxygen. New material more compatible with liquid oxygen than polytetrafluoroethylene. Provides dynamic seal at -196 degrees C with only 4 times seal stress required at room temperature. In contrast, conventional rubber seals burn or explode on impact in high-pressure oxygen, and turn hard or even brittle at liquid-oxygen temperatures, do not seal reliably, also see (MFS-28124).

  12. Integrated environmentally compatible soldering technologies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosking, F.M.; Frear, D.R.; Iman, R.L.; Keicher, D.M.; Lopez, E.P.; Peebles, H.C.; Sorensen, N.R.; Vianco, P.T.

    1994-05-01

    Chemical fluxes are typically used during conventional electronic soldering to enhance solder wettability. Most fluxes contain very reactive, hazardous constituents that require special storage and handling. Corrosive flux residues that remain on soldered parts can severely degrade product reliability. The residues are removed with chlorofluorocarbon (CFC), hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC), or other hazardous solvents that contribute to ozone depletion, release volatile organic compounds into the atmosphere, or add to the solvent waste stream. Alternative materials and processes that offer the potential for the reduction or elimination of cleaning are being developed to address these environmental issues. Timing of the effort is critical, since the targeted chemicals will soon be heavily taxed or banned. DOE`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (DOE/EM) has supported Sandia National Laboratories` Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Integrated Demonstration (ECMID). Part of the ECM program involves the integration of several environmentally compatible soldering technologies for assembling electronics devices. Fluxless or {open_quotes}low-residue/no clean{close_quotes} soldering technologies (conventional and ablative laser processing, controlled atmospheres, ultrasonic tinning, protective coatings, and environmentally compatible fluxes) have been demonstrated at Sandia (SNL/NM), the University of California at Berkeley, and Allied Signal Aerospace-Kansas City Division (AS-KCD). The university demonstrations were directed under the guidance of Sandia staff. Results of the FY93 Soldering ID are presented in this report.

  13. Corrosion in Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan; Gudla, Helene Virginie Conseil; Verdingovas, Vadimas

    2017-01-01

    and high density packing combined with the use of several materials, which can undergo electrochemical corrosion in the presence of water film formed due to humidity exposure and bias conditions on the PCBA surface. This article provides a short review of the corrosion reliability issues of electronics due...... to the use of electronics under varying humidity conditions. Important PCBA aspects, which are fundamental to the corrosion cell formation under humid conditions, are discussed. Effect of hygroscopic residues from the process and service and their role in assisting water film build up and corrosion...... is presented. Various failure modes resulting from the corrosion and influence factors are discussed including humid and gaseous conditions....

  14. Compatibility Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, James Allen

    2016-01-01

    In support of ground system development for the Space Launch System (SLS), engineers are tasked with building immense engineering models of extreme complexity. The various systems require rigorous analysis of pneumatics, hydraulic, cryogenic, and hypergolic systems. There are certain standards that each of these systems must meet, in the form of pressure vessel system (PVS) certification reports. These reports can be hundreds of pages long, and require many hours to compile. Traditionally, each component is analyzed individually, often utilizing hand calculations in the design process. The objective of this opportunity is to perform these analyses in an integrated fashion with the parametric CADCAE environment. This allows for systems to be analyzed on an assembly level in a semi-automated fashion, which greatly improves accuracy and efficiency. To accomplish this, component specific parameters were stored in the Windchill database to individual Creo Parametric models based on spec control drawings. These parameters were then accessed by using the Prime Analysis within Creo Parametric. MathCAD Prime spreadsheets were created that automatically extracted these parameters, performed calculations, and generated reports. The reports described component compatibility based on local conditions such as pressure, temperature, density, and flow rates. The reports also determined component pairing compatibility, such as properly sizing relief valves with regulators. The reports stored the input conditions that were used to determine compatibility to increase traceability of component selection. The desired workflow for using this tool would begin with a Creo Schematics diagram of a PVS system. This schematic would store local conditions and locations of components. The schematic would then populate an assembly within Creo Parametric, using Windchill database parts. These parts would have their attributes already assigned, and the MathCAD spreadsheets could begin running

  15. Authorized Limit Evaluation of Spent Granular Activated Carbon Used for Vapor-Phase Remediation at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devany, R; Utterback, T

    2007-01-11

    This report provides a technical basis for establishing radiological release limits for granular activated carbon (GAC) containing very low quantities of tritium and radon daughter products generated during environmental remediation activities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This evaluation was conducted according to the Authorized Limit procedures specified in United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (DOE, 1993) and related DOE guidance documents. The GAC waste is currently being managed by LLNL as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) mixed waste. Significant cost savings can be achieved by developing an Authorized Limit under DOE Order 5400.5 since it would allow the waste to be safely disposed as a hazardous waste at a permitted off-site RCRA treatment and disposal facility. LLNL generates GAC waste during vapor-phase soil remediation in the Trailer 5475 area. While trichloroethylene and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are the primary targets of the remedial action, a limited amount of tritium and radon daughter products are contained in the GAC at the time of disposal. As defined in DOE Order 5400.5, an Authorized Limit is a level of residual radioactive material that will result in an annual public dose of 100 milliroentgen-equivalent man per year (mrem/year) or less. In 1995, DOE issued additional release requirements for material sent to a landfill that is not an authorized low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. Per guidance, the disposal site will be selected based on a risk/benefit assessment under the As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable (ALARA) process while ensuring that individual doses to the public are less than 25 mrem in a year, ground water is protected, the release would not necessitate further remedial action for the disposal site, and the release is coordinated with all appropriate authorities. The 1995 release requirements also state

  16. Growth of gallium nitride based devices on silicon(001) substrates by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy; Wachstum von Galliumnitrid-basierten Bauelementen auf Silizium(001)-Substraten mittels metallorganischer Gasphasenepitaxie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiher, Fabian

    2009-02-25

    The main topic of this thesis is to investigate GaN-based layer systems grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on Si(001) substrates. A temperature shift up to 45 K is measured for a complete device structure on a 2-inch silicon substrate. By using a 40 nm thin LT-AlN-seed layer (680 C), the GaN crystallites on Si(001) substrates are almost oriented with their GaN(10 anti 12)-planes parallel to the Si(001)-plane. A four-fold azimuthal symmetry occurs for these layers, with the GaN[10 anti 11]-direction is aligned parallel to one of the four equivalent left angle 110 right angle -directions, respectively. However, a mono-crystalline and fully coalesced GaN-layer with this crystallographic orientation could not yet been obtained. If a deposition temperature of more than 1100 C is used for the AlN-seed layer, solely the GaN[0001]- growth direction of crystallites occurs in the main GaN layer on Si(001) substrates. These c-axis oriented GaN columns feature two opposite azimuthal alignments that are rotated by 90 with respect to each other and with GaN[11 anti 20] parallel Si[110] and GaN[10 anti 10] parallel Si[110], respectively. By using 4 off-oriented substrates towards the Si[110]-direction, one certain azimuthal texture component can be selected. The critical value of the miscut angle corresponds to theoretical calculations predicting the occurrence of atomic double steps on the Si(001) surface. The achieved crystallographic quality of the GaN layers on Si(001) is characterized by having a tilt of FWHM=0.27 and a twist of FWHM=0.8 of the crystallites, determined by X-ray diffraction. A completely crack-free, up to 2.5 {mu}m thick, and mono-crystalline GaN-template can be realized on Si(001), integrating 4 or 5 LT-AlN-interlayers in the GaN buffer structure. Based on this structure, the first successful implementation of an (InGaN/GaN)-LED on Si(001) is achieved. Furthermore, the possible fabrication of GaN-based FET-structures is demonstrated with a fully

  17. Structural properties of ZnSy Se1-yZnSe/GaAs (001) heterostructures grown by photoassisted metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. G.; Kalisetty, S.; Robinson, J.; Zhao, G.; Parent, D. W.; Ayers, J. E.; Jain, F. C.

    1997-06-01

    ZnSySe1-yZnSe/GaAs (001) heterostructures have been grown by photoassisted metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy, using the sources dimethylzinc, dimethylselenium, diethylsulfur, and irradiation by a Hg arc lamp. The solid phase composition vs gas phase composition characteristics have been determined for ZnSyySe1-y grown with different mole fractions of dimethylselenium and different temperatures. Although the growth is not mass-transport controlled with respect to the column VI precursors, the solid phase composition vs gas phase composition characteristics are sufficiently gradual so that good compositional control and lattice matching to GaAs substrates can be readily achieved by photoassisted growth in the temperature range 360°C ≤ T ≤ 400°C. ZnSe/GaAs (001) single heterostructures were grown by a two-step process with ZnSe thicknesses in the range from 54 nm to 776 nm. Based on 004 x-ray rocking curve full width at half maximums (FWHMs), we have determined that the critical layer thickness is hc ≤200 nm. Using the classical method involving strain, lattice relaxation is undetectable in layers thinner than 270 nm for the growth conditions used here. Therefore, the rocking curve FWHM is a more sensitive indicator of lattice relaxation than the residual strain. For ZnSySe1-y layers grown on ZnSe buffers at 400°C, the measured dislocation density-thickness product Dh increases monotonically with the room temperature mismatch. Lower values of the Dh product are obtained for epitaxy on 135 nm buffers compared to the case of 270 nm buffers. This difference is due to the fact that the 135 nm ZnSe buffers are pseudomorphic as deposited. For ZnSySe1-y layers grown on 135 nm ZnSe buffers at 360°C, the minimum dislocation density corresponds approximately to room-temperature lattice matching (y ˜ 5.9%), rather than growth temperature lattice matching (y ˜ 7.6%). Epitaxial layers with lower dislocation densities demonstrated superior optical quality, as judged by

  18. 219-S CORROSION STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DIVINE JR; PARSONS GL

    2008-12-01

    A minor leak was detected in a drain line for Hood 2B located in the 222-S Laboratory. The line transfers radioactive waste, spent analytical standards, and chemicals used in various analytical procedures. Details are in the report provided by David Comstock, 2B NDE June 2008, work package LAB-WO-07-2012. Including the noted leak, the 222-S Laboratory has experienced two drain line leaks in approximately the last two years of operation. As a consequence, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) requested the support of ChemMet, Ltd., PC (ChemMet) at the Hanford Site 222-S Laboratory. The corrosion expertise from ChemMet was required prior to preparation of a compatibility assessment for the 222-S Laboratory waste transfer system to assure the expected life of the piping system is extended as much as practicable. The system includes piping within the 222-S Laboratory and the 219-S Waste Storage and Transfer Facility and Operations Process. The ChemMet support was required for an assessment by 222-S staff to analyze what improvements to operational activities may be implemented to extend the tank/piping system life. This assessment will include a summary of the various material types, age, and locations throughout the facility. The assessment will also include a discussion of materials that are safe for drain line disposal on a regular basis, materials that are safe for disposal on a case-by-case basis including specific additional requirements such as flushing, neutralization to a specific pH, and materials prohibited from disposal. The assessment shall include adequate information for 222-S Laboratory personnel to make informed decisions in the future disposal of specific material types by discussing types of compatibility of system materials and potential wastes. The assessment is expected to contain some listing of acceptable waste materials but is not anticipated to be a complete or comprehensive list. Finally the assessment will encompass a brief discussion of

  19. Fertilization compatibility of spawning corals

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set includes experimental results of fertilization assays to characterize genetic compatibility between individual parental genotypes. Targeted species...

  20. Monitoring Microbially Influenced Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    Abstract Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel may occur in media with microbiological activity of especially sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The applicability and reliability of a number of corrosion monitoring techniques for monitoring MIC has been evaluated in experiments...... and diffusional effects and unreliable corrosion rates, when biofilm and ferrous sulphide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 by electrochemical techniques. Weight loss coupons and ER are recommended as necessary basic monitoring techniques....... EIS might be used for detection of MIC as the appearance of very large capacitances can be attributed to the combined ferrous sulphide and biofilm formation. Capacitance correlates directly with sulphide concentration in sterile sulphide media. Keywords: Corrosion monitoring, carbon steel, MIC, SRB...

  1. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-05

    inCluding oil and gas, from to 2011 [2]. Over that period of time approximately of all releases were attributed to corrosion . National ;sociati<Jn...c>fComJsicmEngineers (NACE) International [3] the cost of corrosion for onshore gas and liquid nsn1ission pipelines was $7 billion. However, there...are no statistics related to microbiologically influenced (MIC) of low alloy steel pipelines. Russian inves- [4] estimated that 30% of the corrosion

  2. Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The mission of the Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory is to develop and analyze the effectiveness of innovative coatings test procedures while evaluating the...

  3. Optimization of the freezing process for hematopoietic progenitor cells: effect of precooling, initial dimethyl sulfoxide concentration, freezing program, and storage in vapor-phase or liquid nitrogen on in vitro white blood cell quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra-Tiekstra, Margriet J; Setroikromo, Airies C; Kraan, Marcha; Gkoumassi, Effimia; de Wildt-Eggen, Janny

    2014-12-01

    Adding dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) causes an exothermic reaction, potentially affecting their viability. The freezing method might also influence this. The aim was to investigate the effect of 1) precooling of DMSO and plasma (D/P) and white blood cell (WBC)-enriched product, 2) DMSO concentration of D/P, 3) freezing program, and 4) storage method on WBC quality. WBC-enriched product without CD34+ cells was used instead of HPCs. This was divided into six or eight portions. D/P (20 or 50%; precooled or room temperature [RT]) was added to the WBC-enriched product (precooled or RT), resulting in 10% DMSO, while monitoring temperature. The product was frozen using controlled-rate freezing ("fast-rate" or "slow-rate") and placed in vapor-phase or liquid nitrogen. After thawing, WBC recovery and viability were determined. Temperature increased most for precooled D/P to precooled WBC-enriched product, without influence of 20 or 50% D/P, but remained for all variations below 30°C. WBC recovery for both freezing programs was more than 95%. Recovery of WBC viability was higher for slow-rate freezing compared to fast-rate freezing (74% vs. 61%; p Effect of precooling D/P or WBC-enriched product and of storage in vapor-phase or liquid nitrogen was marginal. Based on these results, precooling is not necessary. Fifty percent D/P is preferred over 20% D/P. Slow-rate freezing is preferred over fast-rate freezing. For safety reasons storage in vapor-phase nitrogen is preferred over storage in liquid nitrogen. Additional testing using real HPCs might be necessary. © 2014 AABB.

  4. Corrosion in the oil industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brondel, D. (Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France)); Edwards, R. (Schlumberger Well Services, Columbus, OH (United States)); Hayman, A. (Etudes et Productions Schlumberger, Clamart (France)); Hill, D. (Schlumberger Dowell, Tulsa, OK (United States)); Mehta, S. (Schlumberger Dowell, St. Austell (United Kingdom)); Semerad, T. (Mobil Oil Indonesia, Inc., Sumatra (Indonesia))

    1994-04-01

    Corrosion costs the oil industry billions of dollars a year, a fact that makes the role of the corrosion engineer an increasingly important one. Attention is paid to how corrosion affects every aspect of exploration and production, from offshore rigs to casing. Also the role of corrosion agents such as drilling and production fluids is reviewed. Methods of control and techniques to monitor corrosion are discussed, along with an explanation of the chemical causes of corrosion. 21 figs., 32 refs.

  5. In situ-Raman studies on thermally induced structural changes of porous MoO{sub 3} prepared in vapor phase under He and H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Droguett, D.E., E-mail: dodiaz@fis.puc.cl [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); El Far, R. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Fuenzalida, V.M. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Cabrera, A.L. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-06-15

    The structural transformations induced by heating on MoO{sub 3} mesoporous samples grown in vapor-phase under helium and hydrogen were studied by in situ Raman spectroscopy. The samples were continuously irradiated by a He-Ne laser of 5.5 mW for 105 min and Raman spectra were dynamically acquired every 5 min, in order to evaluate the laser effects. The He-grown sample did not undergo structural transformations due to the laser irradiation while the H{sub 2}-grown sample underwent changes after just 10 min of irradiation. On the other hand, each type of sample was heated in air from room temperature up to 450 Degree-Sign C using a heating rate of 5 Degree-Sign C min{sup -1} and Raman spectra were recorded each 25 Degree-Sign C. The He-grown sample remained structural unchanged up to 250 Degree-Sign C revealing a high temperature state of its amorphous matrix whereas the H{sub 2}-grown sample exhibited changes around 70 Degree-Sign C. These changes were attributed to the crystallization onset of its amorphous matrix to {beta}-MoO{sub 3}. However, this same transition was detected between 250 Degree-Sign C and 275 Degree-Sign C for the He-grown sample. A second transformation was detected in both samples in a temperature range more similar associated to the transition of the formed {beta}-MoO{sub 3} phase to {alpha}-MoO{sub 3}. After the heat treatment, the oxide of both samples was slightly reduced, as revealed by XPS analysis. The metastability at low temperatures of the amorphous phase of the H{sub 2}-grown sample could be associated to release of hydrogen trapped inside the compound and to the break of weak bonds between Mo and OH groups. At high temperatures, above 225 Degree-Sign C, the rapid conversion to {beta}-MoO{sub 3} of the amorphous matrix of the H{sub 2}-grown sample occurred due to the dehydration of the sample. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Porous MoO{sub 3} grown in He or H{sub 2} showed structural differences by heating effects. Black

  6. Long Term Field Development of a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System for Treatment of Produced Waters for Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn Katz; Kerry Kinney; Robert Bowman; Enid Sullivan; Soondong Kwon; Elaine Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Craig Altare

    2007-12-31

    The main goal of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using a combined physicochemical/biological treatment system to remove the organic constituents present in saline produced water. In order to meet this objective, a physical/chemical adsorption process was developed and two separate biological treatment techniques were investigated. Two previous research projects focused on the development of the surfactant modified zeolite adsorption process (DE-AC26-99BC15221) and development of a vapor phase biofilter (VPB) to treat the regeneration off-gas from the surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorption system (DE-FC26-02NT15461). In this research, the SMZ/VPB was modified to more effectively attenuate peak loads and to maintain stable biodegradation of the BTEX constituents from the produced water. Specifically, a load equalization system was incorporated into the regeneration flow stream. In addition, a membrane bioreactor (MBR) system was tested for its ability to simultaneously remove the aromatic hydrocarbon and carboxylate components from produced water. The specific objectives related to these efforts included the following: (1) Optimize the performance VPBs treating the transient loading expected during SMZ regeneration: (a) Evaluate the impact of biofilter operating parameters on process performance under stable operating conditions. (b) Investigate how transient loads affect biofilter performance, and identify an appropriate technology to improve biological treatment performance during the transient regeneration period of an SMZ adsorption system. (c) Examine the merits of a load equalization technology to attenuate peak VOC loads prior to a VPB system. (d) Evaluate the capability of an SMZ/VPB to remove BTEX from produced water in a field trial. (2) Investigate the feasibility of MBR treatment of produced water: (a) Evaluate the biodegradation of carboxylates and BTEX constituents from synthetic produced water in a laboratory-scale MBR. (b

  7. Fabrication and characterization of freestanding GaAs/AlGaAs core-shell nanowires and AlGaAs nanotubes by using selective-area metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Noborisaka, J.; Motohisa, J.; S. Hara; Fukui, T.

    2005-01-01

    We fabricated GaAs/AlGaAs core-shell nanowires by using selective-area metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. First, GaAs nanowires were selectively grown on partially masked GaAs (111)B substrates; then AlGaAs was grown to form freestanding heterostructured nanowires. Investigation of nanowire diameter as a function of AlGaAs growth time suggested that the AlGaAs was grown on the sidewalls of the GaAs nanowires, forming GaAs/AlGaAs core-shell structures. Microphotoluminescence measurements of GaA...

  8. Compatible quantum theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, R; Hohenberg, P C

    2014-09-01

    Formulations of quantum mechanics (QM) can be characterized as realistic, operationalist, or a combination of the two. In this paper a realistic theory is defined as describing a closed system entirely by means of entities and concepts pertaining to the system. An operationalist theory, on the other hand, requires in addition entities external to the system. A realistic formulation comprises an ontology, the set of (mathematical) entities that describe the system, and assertions, the set of correct statements (predictions) the theory makes about the objects in the ontology. Classical mechanics is the prime example of a realistic physical theory. A straightforward generalization of classical mechanics to QM is hampered by the inconsistency of quantum properties with classical logic, a circumstance that was noted many years ago by Birkhoff and von Neumann. The present realistic formulation of the histories approach originally introduced by Griffiths, which we call 'compatible quantum theory (CQT)', consists of a 'microscopic' part (MIQM), which applies to a closed quantum system of any size, and a 'macroscopic' part (MAQM), which requires the participation of a large (ideally, an infinite) system. The first (MIQM) can be fully formulated based solely on the assumption of a Hilbert space ontology and the noncontextuality of probability values, relying in an essential way on Gleason's theorem and on an application to dynamics due in large part to Nistico. Thus, the present formulation, in contrast to earlier ones, derives the Born probability formulas and the consistency (decoherence) conditions for frameworks. The microscopic theory does not, however, possess a unique corpus of assertions, but rather a multiplicity of contextual truths ('c-truths'), each one associated with a different framework. This circumstance leads us to consider the microscopic theory to be physically indeterminate and therefore incomplete, though logically coherent. The completion of the theory

  9. Corrosion evaluation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Uh Chul; Han, Jeong Ho; Nho, Kye Ho; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Hong Pyo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng; Kim, Kyung Mo

    1997-09-01

    A multifrequency ACPD system was assembled which can measure very small crack. Stress corrosion cracking test system with SSRT operating high temperature was installed. Stress corrosion cracking test of newly developed alloy 600 and existing alloy 600 was carried out in steam atmosphere of 400 deg C. No crack was observed in both materials within a test period of 2,000 hrs. Corrosion fatigue test system operating at high temperature was installed in which fatigue crack was measured by CDPD. Lead enhanced the SCC of the Alloy 600 in high temperature water, had a tendency to modify a cracking morphology from intergranular to transgranular. Pit initiation preferentially occurred at Ti-rich carbide. Resistance to pit initiation decreased with increasing temperature up to 300 deg C. Test loop for erosion corrosion was designed and fabricated. Thin layer activation technique was very effective in measuring erosion corrosion. Erosion corrosion of a part of secondary side pipe was evaluated by the Check Family Codes of EPRI. Calculated values of pipe thickness by Check Family Codes coincided with the pipe thickness measured by UT with an error of {+-} 20%. Literature review on turbine failure showed that failure usually occurred in low pressure turbine rotor disc and causes of failure are stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. (author). 12 refs., 20 tabs., 77 figs.

  10. Monitoring corrosion rates and localised corrosion in low conductivity water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring of low corrosion rates and localised corrosion in a media with low conductivity is a challenge. In municipal district heating, quality control may be improved by implementing on-line corrosion monitoring if a suitable technique can be identified to measure both uniform and localised...... corrosion. Electrochemical techniques (LPR, EIS, crevice corrosion current) as well as direct measurement techniques (high-sensitive electrical resistance, weight loss) have been applied in operating plants. Changes in the corrosion processes are best monitored in non-aggressive, low conductivity media...... with sensitive electrical resistance technique and crevice corrosion current measurements....

  11. Hydrogen generation by metal corrosion in simulated Waste Isolation Pilot Plant environments. Progress report for the period November 1989 through December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telander, M.R.; Westerman, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    The corrosion and gas-generation characteristics of three material types: low-carbon steel (the current waste packaging material for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), Cu-base materials, and Ti-base materials were determined in both the liquid and vapor phase of Brine A, a brine representative of an intergranular Salado Formation brine. Test environments included anoxic brine and anoxic brine with overpressures of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}. Low-carbon steel reacted at a slow, measurable rate with anoxic brine, liberating H{sub 2} on an equimolar basis with Fe reacted. Presence of CO{sub 2} caused the initial reaction to proceed more rapidly, but CO{sub 2}-induced passivation stopped the reaction if the CO{sub 2} were present in sufficient quantities. Low-carbon steel immersed in brine with H{sub 2}S showed no reaction, apparently because of passivation of the steel by formation of a protective iron sulfide reaction product. Cu- and Ti-base materials showed essentially no corrosion when exposed to brine and overpressures of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}S except for the rapid and complete reaction between Cu-base materials and H{sub 2}S. No significant reaction took place on any material in any environment in the vapor-phase exposures.

  12. Automated Methods Of Corrosion Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Reeve, John Ch

    1997-01-01

    The chapter describes the following automated measurements: Corrosion Measurements by Titration, Imaging Corrosion by Scanning Probe Microscopy, Critical Pitting Temperature and Application of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Permeation Cell.......The chapter describes the following automated measurements: Corrosion Measurements by Titration, Imaging Corrosion by Scanning Probe Microscopy, Critical Pitting Temperature and Application of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Permeation Cell....

  13. Compatibility of refractory metals and beryllium with molten Pb-17Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feuerstein, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany); Graebner, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany); Oschinski, J. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany); Horn, S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany)

    1996-10-01

    The compatibility of V, Nb, Ta, Mo, W and Re with static eutectic mixture Pb-17Li was investigated experimentally. All these metals are very stable in the eutectic up to 600 C. Dissolution rates as well as solubilities are low. Below 600 C, a chemical reaction zone caused by initiation of an intergranular corrosion was observed. There was a strong isothermal mass transfer to the crucible wall. Diffusion coefficients for vanadium were calculated. They are in the expected range. The behaviour of beryllium is included in this paper for comparison. Diffusion coefficients were determined. In spite of low dissolution rates a strong intergranular corrosion causes destruction of this metal. (orig.).

  14. Compatibility of materials with liquid metal targets for SNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiStefano, J.R.; Pawel, S.J.; DeVan, J.H.

    1996-06-01

    Several heavy liquid metals are candidates as the target in a spallation neutron source: Hg, Pb, Bi, and Pb-Bi eutectic. Systems with these liquid metals have been used in the past and a data-base on compatibility already exists. Two major compatibility issues have been identified when selecting a container material for these liquid metals: temperature gradient mass transfer and liquid metal embrittlement or LME. Temperature gradient mass transfer refers to dissolution of material from the high temperature portions of a system and its deposition in the lower temperature areas. Solution and deposition rate constants along with temperature, {Delta}T, and velocity are usually the most important parameters. For most candidate materials mass transfer corrosion has been found to be proportionately worse in Bi compared with Hg and Pb. For temperatures to {approx}550{degrees}C, ferritic/martensitic steels have been satisfactory in Pb or Hg systems and the maximum temperature can be extended to {approx}650{degrees}C with additions of inhibitors to the liquid metal, e.g. Mg, Ti, Zr. Above {approx}600{degrees}C, austenitic stainless steels have been reported to be unsatisfactory, largely because of the mass transfer of nickel. Blockage of flow from deposition of material is usually the life-limiting effect of this type of corrosion. However, mass transfer corrosion at lower temperatures has not been studied. At low temperatures (usually < 150{degrees}C), LME has been reported for some liquid metal/container alloy combinations. Liquid metal embrittlement, like hydrogen embrittlement, results in brittle fracture of a normally ductile material.

  15. The vapor-phase multi-stage CMD test for characterizing contaminant mass discharge associated with VOC sources in the vadose zone: Application to three sites in different lifecycle stages of SVE operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusseau, M L; Mainhagu, J; Morrison, C; Carroll, K C

    2015-08-01

    Vapor-phase multi-stage contaminant mass discharge (CMD) tests were conducted at three field sites to measure mass discharge associated with contaminant sources located in the vadose zone. The three sites represent the three primary stages of the soil vapor extraction (SVE) operations lifecycle-pre/initial-SVE, mid-lifecycle, and near-closure. A CMD of 32g/d was obtained for a site at which soil vapor SVE has been in operation for approximately 6years, and for which mass removal is currently in the asymptotic stage. The contaminant removal behavior exhibited for the vapor extractions conducted at this site suggests that there is unlikely to be a significant mass of non-vapor-phase contaminant (e.g., DNAPL, sorbed phase) remaining in the advective domains, and that most remaining mass is likely located in poorly accessible domains. Given the conditions for this site, this remaining mass is hypothesized to be associated with the low-permeability (and higher water saturation) region in the vicinity of the saturated zone and capillary fringe. A CMD of 25g/d was obtained for a site wherein SVE has been in operation for several years but concentrations and mass-removal rates are still relatively high. A CMD of 270g/d was obtained for a site for which there were no prior SVE operations. The behavior exhibited for the vapor extractions conducted at this site suggest that non-vapor-phase contaminant mass (e.g., DNAPL) may be present in the advective domains. Hence, the asymptotic conditions observed for this site most likely derive from a combination of rate-limited mass transfer from DNAPL (and sorbed) phases present in the advective domain as well as mass residing in lower-permeability ("non-advective") regions. The CMD values obtained from the tests were used in conjunction with a recently developed vapor-discharge tool to evaluate the impact of the measured CMDs on groundwater quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Carbon Dioxide Corrosion:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2008-01-01

    consists mainly of CO2-Na2CO3-NaHCO3-MEG-H2O. Sodium is injected in the pipelines as NaOH in order to pH-stabilize the pipeline to avoid corrosion and MEG is injected in order to prevent gas hydrates. There are a great number of models available in the literature which may predict CO2 corrosion...

  17. Compatibility Studies of Hydrogen Peroxide and a New Hypergolic Fuel Blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, Jennifer; Villegas, Yvonne

    2002-01-01

    Several preliminary materials compatibility studies have been conducted to determine the practicality of a new hypergolic fuel system. Hypergolic fuel ignites spontaneously as the oxidizer decomposes and releases energy in the presence of the fuel. The bipropellant system tested consists of high-test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) and a liquid fuel blend consisting of a hydrocarbon fuel, an ignition enhancer and a transition metal catalyst. In order for further testing of the new fuel blend to take place, some basic materials compatibility and HTP decomposition studies must be accomplished. The thermal decomposition rate of HTP was tested using gas evolution and isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC). Materials were analyzed for compatibility with hydrogen peroxide including a study of the affect welding has on stainless steel elemental composition and its relation to HTP decomposition. Compatibility studies of valve materials in the fuel blend were performed to determine the corrosion resistance of the materials.

  18. Corrosion on spinal implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, John S; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna; Beck, Preston; Lemons, Jack

    2005-06-01

    Modular spine implants are used as an aid to obtaining fusion, but fretting and corrosion occur between modular components in a biologic environment. Forty-eight spinal implant constructs manufactured by a variety of companies were retrieved from 47 patients and were subjected to surface analysis stereomicroscopy. Stainless-steel implants (n = 23) had either semirigid constructs with mild or no surface alteration (n = 7) or rigid constructs with moderate or severe alteration (n = 16). Surface damage was consistent with previously observed mechanically assisted crevice corrosion phenomena. Titanium alloy implants (n = 25) showed no significant corrosion but had three constructs with fatigue failure of anchoring screws. One cobalt alloy construct showed no evidence of corrosion. Long-term effects of fretting and corrosion are unclear, and minimization of these phenomena seems justified. Selection of modular components with similar materials and surface finish may help the surgeon minimize localized changes over time. Stainless-steel implants with rigid interconnections and those with different surface finishes between rods and connectors are most susceptible to corrosion.

  19. Low-resistivity m-plane freestanding GaN substrate with very low point-defect concentrations grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy on a GaN seed crystal synthesized by the ammonothermal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kazunobu; Tsukada, Yusuke; Furukawa, Erika; Saito, Makoto; Mikawa, Yutaka; Kubo, Shuichi; Ikeda, Hirotaka; Fujito, Kenji; Uedono, Akira; Chichibu, Shigefusa F.

    2015-09-01

    An m-plane freestanding GaN substrate satisfying both low resistivity (ρ = 8.5 × 10-3 Ω·cm) and a low point-defect concentration, being applicable to vertically conducting power-switching devices, was grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy on a nearly bowing-free bulk GaN seed wafer synthesized by the ammonothermal method in supercritical ammonia using an acidic mineralizer. Its threading dislocation and basal-plane staking-fault densities were approximately 104 cm-2 and lower than 100 cm-1, respectively. A record-long fast-component photoluminescence lifetime of 2.07 ns at room temperature was obtained for the near-band-edge emission, reflecting a significantly low concentration of nonradiative recombination centers composed of Ga vacancies.

  20. High-temperature corrosion resistance of ceramics and ceramic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-06-01

    Ceramics and ceramic composites offer the potential to operate fossil energy systems at the higher temperatures necessary for improved energy efficiency and better environmental control. However, because many fossil fuel-derived processes contain sulfur, chlorine, and carbon, as well as oxygen, degradation from high-temperature corrosion and environmental effects arising from reactions of solids with gases and condensable products is a common life-determining factor in operating systems. Ceramic-based products are not immune to such degradation; adequate corrosion resistance must be assured to exploit the technical and economic potential of such materials. This is normally accomplished by using stable, sound oxides that exist in their bulk form, that naturally grow as surface layers upon exposure to an oxidizing environment, or that are deposited as a coating on a susceptible material. It is therefore important to examine the critical issues with respect to more environmental stability of ceramics that have the potential to be corrosion resistant in particular fossil environments. Key aspects include not only chemical compatibility, but the influence of the environment on the mechanical behavior of the ceramic materials. In addition, for coatings, the mechanical reliability of the ceramic is a key issue in that an otherwise corrosion-resistant surface layer must remain sound and adherent in order to provide protection to the underlying substrate. The purpose of this work is to support the development of advanced ceramics and ceramic composites for applications in fossil environments by examining critical issues related to high-temperature corrosion resistance. More specifically, the overall objective of this task is to examine the chemical compatibility and reliability of potentially corrosion-resistant ceramics being developed as protective overcoats and/or structural materials as parts of other work elements funded by the AR&TD Program.

  1. Modelling reinforcement corrosion in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    A physio-chemical model for the simulation of reinforcement corrosion in concrete struc-tures was developed. The model allows for simulation of initiation and subsequent propaga-tion of reinforcement corrosion. Corrosion is assumed to be initiated once a defined critical chloride threshold...... is reached causing the formation of anodic and cathodic regions along the reinforcement. Critical chloride thresholds, randomly distributed along the reinforcement sur-face, link the initiation and propagation phase of reinforcement corrosion. To demonstrate the potential use of the developed model......, a numerical example is pre-sented, that illustrates the formation of corrosion cells as well as propagation of corrosion in a reinforced concrete structure....

  2. Influence of the V/III ratio in the gas phase on thin epitaxial AlN layers grown on (0001) sapphire by high temperature hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claudel, A., E-mail: arnaud.claudel@grenoble-inp.org [ACERDE, 354 Voie Magellan — Alpespace, 73800 Ste Hélène du Lac (France); Fellmann, V. [ACERDE, 354 Voie Magellan — Alpespace, 73800 Ste Hélène du Lac (France); Science et Ingénierie des Matériaux et des Procédés, Grenoble INP-CNRS-UJF, BP 75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Gélard, I. [ACERDE, 354 Voie Magellan — Alpespace, 73800 Ste Hélène du Lac (France); Coudurier, N. [ACERDE, 354 Voie Magellan — Alpespace, 73800 Ste Hélène du Lac (France); Science et Ingénierie des Matériaux et des Procédés, Grenoble INP-CNRS-UJF, BP 75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Sauvage, D. [ACERDE, 354 Voie Magellan — Alpespace, 73800 Ste Hélène du Lac (France); Balaji, M. [ACERDE, 354 Voie Magellan — Alpespace, 73800 Ste Hélène du Lac (France); Science et Ingénierie des Matériaux et des Procédés, Grenoble INP-CNRS-UJF, BP 75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Crystal Growth Center, Anna University, Chennai 600025 (India); and others

    2014-12-31

    Thin (0001) epitaxial aluminum nitride (AlN) layers were grown on c-plane sapphire using high temperature hydride vapor phase epitaxy. The experimental set-up consists of a vertical cold-wall quartz reactor working at low pressure in which the reactions take place on a susceptor heated by induction. The reactants used are ammonia and aluminum chlorides in situ formed via hydrogen chloride reaction with high purity aluminum pellets. As-grown AlN layers have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopies. The influence of the V/III ratio in the gas phase, from 1.5 to 15, on growth rate, surface morphology, roughness and crystalline quality is investigated in order to increase the quality of thin epitaxial AlN layers grown at high temperature. Typical growth rates of around 0.45 μm/h were obtained for such thin epitaxial AlN layers. The growth rate was unaffected by the V/III ratio. An optimum for roughness, crystalline quality and optical properties seems to exist at V/III = 7.5. As a matter of fact, for a V/III ratio of 7.5, best root mean square roughness and crystalline quality — measured on 0002 symmetric reflection — as low as 6.9 nm and 898 arcsec were obtained, respectively. - Highlights: • Growth of thin epitaxial AlN layers by high temperature hydride vapor phase epitaxy • Influence of V/III ratio on growth rate, morphology and crystalline quality • The effect of surface morphology on strain state and crystal quality is established.

  3. Compatibility of sodium with ceramic oxides employed in nuclear reactors; Compatibilidad del sodio con oxidos ceramicos utilizados en reactores nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acena Moreno, V.

    1981-07-01

    This work is a review of experiments carried out up to the present time on the corrosion and compatibility of ceramic oxides with liquid sodium at temperatures corresponding to those in fast breeder reactors. The review also includes the results of a thermo-dynamic/liquid sodium reactions. The exercise has been conducted with a view to effecting experimental studies in the future. (Author)

  4. Atuarfitsialak: Greenland's Cultural Compatible Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Tasha R.

    2012-01-01

    In 2002, Greenlandic reform leaders launched a comprehensive, nation-wide reform to create culturally compatible education. Greenland's reform work spans the entire educational system and includes preschool through higher education. To assist their efforts, reform leaders adopted the Standards for Effective Pedagogy developed at the Center for…

  5. Compatibility of Ohio trail users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger E. McCay; George H. Moeller

    1976-01-01

    Compatibility indexes show how Ohio trail users feel about meeting each other on the trail. All four of the major types of trail users-hikers, horseback riders, bicycle riders, and motorcycle riders-enjoy meeting their own kind. But they also feel antagonism toward the faster, more mechanized trail users; e.g., everyone likes hikers, but few like motorcycle riders....

  6. Design optimization for car compatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nastic, T.; Schoofs, A.J.G.; Mooi, H.G.

    1999-01-01

    Nowadays traffic safety and occupant protection get a lot of attention due to the large number of fatalities and injuries in car accidents. The occupant protection in two-vehicle crashes can be improved by car-to-car compatibility, which means well balanced crashworthiness characteristics of both

  7. Electromagnetic compatibility in power electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Costa , François; Revol , Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Scientists largely attribute the recent deterioration of the electromagnetic environment to power electronics. This realization has spurred the study of methodical approaches to electromagnetic compatibility designs as explored in this text. The book addresses major challenges, such as handling numerous parameters vital to predicting electro magnetic effects and achieving compliance with line-harmonics norms, while proposing potential solutions.

  8. pH Sensitive Microcapsules for Delivery of Corrosion Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Calle, Luz M.

    2006-01-01

    A considerable number of corrosion problems can be solved by coatings. However, even the best protective coatings can fail by allowing the slow diffusion of oxygen and moisture to the metal surface. Corrosion accelerates when a coating delaminates. Often, the problems start when microscopic nicks or pits on the surface develop during manufacturing or through wear and tear. This problem can be solved by the incorporation of a self-healing function into the coating. Several new concepts are currently under development to incorporate this function into a coating. Conductive polymers, nanoparticles, and microcapsules are used to release corrosion-inhibiting ions at a defect site. The objective of this investigation is to develop a smart coating for the early detection and inhibition of corrosion. The dual function of this new smart coating system is performed by pH-triggered release microcapsules. The microcapsules can be used to deliver healing agents to terminate the corrosion process at its early stage or as corrosion indicators by releasing dyes at the localized corrosion sites. The dyes can be color dyes or fluorescent dyes, with or without pH sensitivity. Microcapsules were formed through the interfacial polymerization process. The average size of the microcapsules can be adjusted from 1 to 100 micron by adjusting the emulsion formula and the microcapsule forming conditions. A typical microcapsule size is around 10 microns with a narrow size distribution. The pH sensitivity of the microcapsule can also be controlled by adjusting the emulsion formula and the polymerization reaction time. Both corrosion indicator (pH indicator) and corrosion inhibitor containing microcapsules were formed and incorporated into paint systems. Test panels of selected steels and aluminum alloys were painted using these paints. Testing of compatibility between the microcapsule system and different paint systems are in progress. Initial experiments with the microcapsule containing paint

  9. pitting corrosion susceptibility pitting corrosion susceptibility of aisi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Abstract. The susceptibility of austenitic (AISI 301) stainless steel to pitting corrosion was evaluated in sodium chloride. (NaCl) solutions ... AISI 301 steel suffers from pitting corrosion in all the investigated solutions. AISI 301 steel suffers from ..... [1] Ijeomah, M.N.C. Elements of Corrosion and Protection. Theory, Auto Century ...

  10. Hydrogen generation by metal corrosion in simulated Waste Isolation Pilot Plant environments. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telander, M.R.; Westerman, R.E. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    The corrosion and gas-generation characteristics of four material types: low-carbon steel (the current waste packaging material for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), Cu-base and Ti-base (alternative packaging) materials, and Al-base (simulated waste) materials were determined in both the liquid and vapor phase of Brine A, a brine representative of an intergranular Salado Formation brine. Test environments consisted primarily of anoxic brine with overpressures of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}. Limited tests of low-carbon steel were also performed in simulated-backfill environments and in brine environments with pH values ranging from 3 to 11. Low-carbon steel reacted at a slow, measurable rate with anoxic brine, liberating H{sub 2} on an equimolar basis with Fe reacted. Presence of CO{sub 2} caused the initial reaction to proceed more rapidly, but CO{sub 2}-induced passivation stopped the reaction if the CO{sub 2} were present in sufficient quantities. Addition of H{sub 2}S to a CO{sub 2}-passivated system caused reversal of the passivation. Low-carbon steel immersed in brine with H{sub 2}S showed no reaction, apparently because of passivation of the steel by formation of FeS. Addition of CO{sub 2} to an H{sub 2}S-passivated system did not reverse the passivation. Cu- and Ti-base materials showed essentially no corrosion when exposed to brine and overpressures of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}S except for the rapid and complete reaction between Cu-base materials and H{sub 2}S. The Al-base materials reacted at approximately the same rate as low-carbon steel when immersed in anoxic Brine A; considerably more rapidly in the presence of CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S; and much more rapidly when iron was present in the system as a brine contaminant. High-purity Al was much more susceptible to corrosion than the 6061 alloy. No significant reaction took place on any material in any environment in the vapor-phase exposures.

  11. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi [Wading River, NY

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  12. Atmospheric corrosion of mild steel

    OpenAIRE

    Morcillo, M.; de la Fuente, D.; Díaz, I.; Cano, H.

    2011-01-01

    The atmospheric corrosion of mild steel is an extensive topic that has been studied by many authors in different regions throughout the world. This compilation paper incorporates relevant publications on the subject, in particular about the nature of atmospheric corrosion products, mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion and kinetics of the atmospheric corrosion process, paying special attention to two matters upon which relatively less information has been published: a) the morphology of steel c...

  13. Atmospheric corrosion of mild steel

    OpenAIRE

    Morcillo, Manuel; Fuente, Daniel de la; Díaz, Iván; Cano, H.

    2011-01-01

    The atmospheric corrosion of mild steel is an extensive topic that has been studied by many authors in different regions throughout the world. This compilation paper incorporates relevant publications on the subject, in particular about the nature of atmospheric corrosion products, mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion and kinetics of the atmospheric corrosion process, paying special attention to two matters upon which relatively less information has been published: a) the morpholog...

  14. Thin film corrosion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raut, M.K.

    1980-06-01

    Corrosion of chromium/gold (Cr/Au) thin films during photolithography, prebond etching, and cleaning was evaluated. Vapors of chromium etchant, tantalum nitride etchant, and especially gold etchant were found to corrosively attack chromium/gold films. A palladium metal barrier between the gold and chromium layers was found to reduce the corrosion from gold etchant.

  15. Multiparty Compatibility for Concurrent Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roly Perera

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objects and actors are communicating state machines, offering and consuming different services at different points in their lifecycle. Two complementary challenges arise when programming such systems. When objects interact, their state machines must be "compatible", so that services are requested only when they are available. Dually, when objects refine other objects, their state machines must be "compliant", so that services are honoured whenever they are promised. In this paper we show how the idea of multiparty compatibility from the session types literature can be applied to both of these problems. We present an untyped language in which concurrent objects are checked automatically for compatibility and compliance. For simple objects, checking can be exhaustive and has the feel of a type system. More complex objects can be partially validated via test cases, leading to a methodology closer to continuous testing. Our proof-of-concept implementation is limited in some important respects, but demonstrates the potential value of the approach and the relationship to existing software development practices.

  16. Corrosion of bio implants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemical stability, mechanical behaviour and biocompatibility in body fluids and tissues are the basic requirements for successful application of implant materials in bone fractures and replacements. Corrosion is one of the major processes affecting the life and service of orthopaedic devices made of metals and alloys used ...

  17. Smart Coatings for Corrosion Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Li, Wendy; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Johnsey, Marissa N.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. It is essential to detect corrosion when it occurs, and preferably at its early stage, so that action can be taken to avoid structural damage or loss of function. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it.

  18. Compatibility Determination : [Crescent Lake NWR 2003 hunting

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Compatibility Determination states that hunting deer and upland birds at Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge is compatible with Refuge purposes.

  19. [Compatibility determinations Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document provides two compatibility determinations; one stated that the proposed agricultural practices (row crop farming) are compatible with Refuge objectives...

  20. Effect of Flow and Dissolved Oxygen on the Compatibility of Pongamia pinnata Biodiesel with Common Construction Materials Used in Storage and Transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. N. Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The compatibility of Pongamia pinnata biodiesel (PBD and its NaCl blends on aluminium, brass, copper, carbon steel, and mild steel has been studied by static mass loss and rotating cage methods. The effects of dissolved oxygen and flow on the metal corrosion in PBD were also observed. This study confirmed that the copper strip test alone is not enough to determine the fuel property since the corrosion of ferrous metal was found to be high in PBD compared to other metals. The least corrosion rate of aluminium was confirmed by surface morphology and elemental analysis.

  1. Standard guide for formats for collection and compilation of corrosion data for metals for computerized database input

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1995-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers the data categories and specific data elements (fields) considered necessary to accommodate desired search strategies and reliable data comparisons in computerized corrosion databases. The data entries are designed to accommodate data relative to the basic forms of corrosion and to serve as guides for structuring multiple source database compilations capable of assessing compatibility of metals and alloys for a wide range of environments and exposure conditions.

  2. Community–groundwater compatibility assessments: An approach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data processing and analyses include the statistical processing of the collected data to assess the comprehensive measure of groundwater compatibility per area, and the individual indicators of the groundwater-compatibility index are given a relative score. This enables the different indicators for groundwater compatibility ...

  3. Electromagnetic compatibility principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Weston, David A

    2001-01-01

    This totally revised and expanded reference/text provides comprehensive, single-source coverage of the design, problem solving, and specifications of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) into electrical equipment/systems-including new information on basic theories, applications, evaluations, prediction techniques, and practical diagnostic options for preventing EMI through cost-effective solutions. Offers the most recent guidelines, safety limits, and standards for human exposure to electromagnetic fields! Containing updated data on EMI diagnostic verification measurements, as well as over 900 drawings, photographs, tables, and equations-500 more than the previous edition

  4. Microstructural characterization and chemical compatibility of pulsed laser deposited yttria coatings on high density graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sure, Jagadeesh [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Mishra, Maneesha [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603 102 (India); Tarini, M. [SRM University, Kattankulathur-603 203 (India); Shankar, A. Ravi; Krishna, Nanda Gopala [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Kuppusami, P. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603 102 (India); Mallika, C. [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Mudali, U. Kamachi, E-mail: kamachi@igcar.gov.in [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India)

    2013-10-01

    Yttria coatings were deposited on high density (HD) graphite substrate by pulsed laser deposition method and subsequently annealing in vacuum at 1373 K was carried out to evaluate the thermal stability of the coatings. Yttria deposited on HD graphite samples were exposed to molten LiCl–KCl salt at 873 K for 3 h to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the coating for the purpose of pyrochemical reprocessing applications. The microstructure and the corrosion behavior of the yttria coating deposited on HD graphite in molten LiCl–KCl salt were evaluated by several characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction and Laser Raman patterns confirmed the presence of cubic phase of yttria in the coating. The surface morphology of yttria coating on HD graphite examined by scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy revealed the agglomeration of oxide particles and formation of clusters. After annealing at 1373 K, no appreciable grain growth of yttria particles could be observed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis was carried out for elemental analysis before and after chemical compatibility test of the coated samples in molten LiCl–KCl salt to identify the corrosive elements present on the yttria coatings. The chemical compatibility and thermal stability of the yttria coating on HD graphite in molten LiCl–KCl salt medium have been established. - Highlights: • Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was deposited on graphite by pulsed laser deposition method. • Chemical compatibility of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating in LiCl–KCl salt at 873 K was studied. • Gibbs free energy change was positive for Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} reaction with Cl{sub 2}, U and UCl{sub 3}. • Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating exhibited better corrosion performance in molten LiCl–KCl salt.

  5. Corrosion Evaluation and Corrosion Control of Steam Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeng, W. Y.; Kim, U. C.; Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Lee, Y. H.; Lee, D. H.; Kim, K. M

    2008-06-15

    Corrosion damage significantly influences the integrity and efficiency of steam generator. Corrosion problems of steam generator are unsolved issues until now even though much effort is made around world. Especially the stress corrosion cracking of heat exchange materials is the first issue to be solved. The corrosion protection method of steam generator is important and urgent for the guarantee of nuclear plant's integrity. The objectives of this study are 1) to evaluate the corrosion properties of steam generator materials, 2) to optimize the water chemistry of steam generator and 3) to develop the corrosion protection method of primary and secondary sides of steam generator. The results will be reflected to the water chemistry guideline for improving the integrity and efficiency of steam generator in domestic power plants.

  6. Electronic and optical characteristics of an m-plane GaN single crystal grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy on a GaN seed synthesized by the ammonothermal method using an acidic mineralizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kazunobu; Tsukada, Yusuke; Furukawa, Erika; Saito, Makoto; Mikawa, Yutaka; Kubo, Shuichi; Ikeda, Hirotaka; Fujito, Kenji; Uedono, Akira; Chichibu, Shigefusa F.

    2016-05-01

    Fundamental electronic and optical properties of a low-resistivity m-plane GaN single crystal, which was grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy on a bulk GaN seed crystal synthesized by the ammonothermal method in supercritical ammonia using an acidic mineralizer, were investigated. The threading dislocation and basal-plane staking-fault densities of the crystal were around 104 cm-2 and less than 100 cm-1, respectively. Oxygen doping achieved a high electron concentration of 4 × 1018 cm-3 at room temperature. Accordingly, a photoluminescence (PL) band originating from the recombination of hot carriers was observed at low temperatures, even under weak excitation conditions. The simultaneous realization of low-level incorporation of Ga vacancies (VGa) less than 1016 cm-3 was confirmed by using the positron annihilation technique. Consistent with our long-standing claim that VGa complexes are the major nonradiative recombination centers in GaN, the fast-component PL lifetime of the near-band-edge emission at room temperature longer than 2 ns was achieved.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of a liquid Eu precursor (EuCp{sup pm}{sub 2}) allowing for valence control of Eu ions doped into GaN by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Brandon, E-mail: bmitchell@wcupa.edu [Department of Physics, West Chester University, West Chester, PA, 19383 (United States); Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Koizumi, Atsushi; Nunokawa, Takumi; Wakamatsu, Ryuta; Lee, Dong-gun; Saitoh, Yasuhisa; Timmerman, Dolf [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Kuboshima, Yoshinori; Mogi, Takayuki; Higashi, Shintaro; Kikukawa, Kaoru [Kojundo Chemical Laboratory Co., Ltd., 5-1-28 Chiyoda, Sakado, Saitama, 350-0284 (Japan); Ofuchi, Hironori; Honma, Tetsuo [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI/SPring-8), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo, 679-5198 (Japan); Fujiwara, Yasufumi, E-mail: fujiwara@mat.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan)

    2017-06-01

    A liquid Eu precursor, bis(normal-propyl-tetramethylcyclopentadienyl)europium has been synthesized. This precursor exists as a liquid at temperatures higher than 49 °C, has a moderately high vapor pressure, contains no oxygen in its molecular structure, and can be distilled to high purity. These properties make it ideal for doping using a chemical vapor or atomic layer deposition method, and provide a degree of control previously unavailable. As a precursor the Eu exists in the divalent valance state, however, once doped into GaN by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy, the room-temperature photoluminescence of the Eu-doped GaN exhibited the typical red emission due to the intra-4f shell transition of trivalent Eu. After variation of the growth temperature, it was found that divalent Eu could be stabilized in the GaN matrix. By tuning the Fermi level through donor doping, the ratio of Eu{sup 2+} to Eu{sup 3+} could be controlled. The change in valence state of the Eu ions was confirmed using X-ray absorption near-edge structure. - Highlights: • A liquid Eu precursor was synthesized and its properties were characterized. • Precursor has a low melting point and a moderately high vapor pressure. • Does not contain oxygen in its molecular structure. • Eu can changed its valance state when incorporated into GaN. • Valence state of Eu in GaN can be controlled by donor doping.

  8. Effect of growth conditions on the Al composition and optical properties of Al x Ga 1−x N layers grown by atmospheric-pressure metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Soltani, S.

    2017-02-17

    The effect of growth conditions on the Al composition and optical properties of AlxGa1-xN layers grown by atmospheric-pressure metal organic vapor phase epitaxy is investigated. The Al content of the samples is varied between 3.0% and 9.3% by changing the gas flow rate of either trimethylaluminum (TMA) or trimethylgallium (TMG) while other growth parameters are kept constant. The optical properties of the AlxGa1-xN layers are studied by photoreflectance and time-resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL) spectroscopies. A degeneration in the material quality of the samples is revealed when the Al content is increased by increasing the TMA flow rate. When the TMG flow rate is decreased with a fixed TMA flow rate, the Al content of the AlxGa1-xN layers is increased and, furthermore, an improvement in the optical properties corresponding with an increase in the PL decay time is observed. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Compatibility of CLAM steel weldments with static LiPb alloy at 550 Degree-Sign C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xizhang, E-mail: kernel.chen@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Shen Zheng; Li Peng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Madigan, Bruce [Montana Tech. of University of Montana, Butte, MT 59701 (United States); Huang Yuming; Lei Yucheng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Huang Qunying [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 031 (China); Zhou Jianzhong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corrosion extent of weld zone is higher than that of HAZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thick martensite lath and large residual stress lead to higher corrosion rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cr on the surface of weld zone decreases by about 50%, W increases slightly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After 500 h and 1000 h of corrosion, weight losses are 0.272 mg/cm{sup 2} and 0.403 mg/cm{sup 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With the increasing of corrosion time, the corrosion rate decreases significantly. - Abstract: CLAM steel is considered as a structural material to be used in the Test Blanket Module as a barrier or blanket adjacent to liquid LiPb in fusion reactors. In this paper, CLAM steel is welded by tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, and the compatibility of the weldment with liquid LiPb is tested. Specimens were corroded in static liquid LiPb, with corrosion times of 500 h and 1000 h, at 550 Degree-Sign C, and the corresponding weight losses are 0.272 mg/cm{sup 2} and 0.403 mg/cm{sup 2} respectively. Also the corrosion rate decreases with increased corrosion time. In the as-welded condition, corrosion resistance of the weld zone is higher than that of the HAZ (Heat Affected Zone). Likely, thick martensite lath and large residual stresses at the welding zone result in higher corrosion rates. The compatibility of CLAM steel weld joints with high temperature liquid LiPb can be improved to some extent through a post-weld tempering process. The surface of the as-welded CLAM steel is uniformly corroded and the concentration of Cr on the surface decreases by about 50% after corrosion. Penetration of LiPb into the matrix is observed for neither the as-welded nor the as-tempered conditions. Influenced by thick martensite lath and large residual stresses, the welded area, especially the weld zone, is easily corroded, therefore it is of primary importance to protect the welded area in the solid blanket of the fusion reactor.

  10. DWPF corrosion study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, C.L.

    1986-12-17

    Corrosion of candidate alloys for the DWPF SRAT, SME, and melter was tested in the large (1/3 scale) SRAT/SME, the 200th scale SRAT/SME, and the LSFM. Flat or twisted coupons with or without a weld bead and U-bend specimens (specimens bent into a ''U'' shape and bolted together at the ends to stress the bend area) were installed on racks that ensured electrical isolation to avoid galvanic effects. Teflon/reg sign/ washers isolated the low temperature exposure racks and ceramic washers isolated the high temperature exposure racks. Serrated washers simulated crevices, but crevice corrosion did not result. 9 refs., 9 tabs.

  11. Corrosion studies with pixe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar Chaudhri, M.; Crawford, A.

    1981-03-01

    To investigate the possible causes of corrosion of some of the tooth paste tubes of a major international cosmetic product manufacturer, the elemental compositions of corroded and clean unused tubes were compared, using PIXE. It was observed that some of the corroded tubes contained much higher amounts of Ti, Fe, Ga and Zn than the clean tubes, while the concentrations of Cr and Ni showed no significant difference between the two types of tubes. Only certain regions of one of the tubes were found to contain higher concentrations of Cu. Those regions were badly corroded and had the highest concentrations of Ti, Fe, Ga and Zn, too. It is suggested that the presence of higher amounts of Ti, Fe, Ga and Zn, and especially of Cu, in the aluminium sheets used to manufacture the tooth paste tubes, may be one of the reasons for the corrosion of some of the tooth paste tubes.

  12. Corrosion Protection of Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, R. S.; Nelson, W. B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred.

  13. Automated methods of corrosion measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Reeve, John Ch

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of corrosion rates and other parameters connected with corrosion processes are important, first as indicators of the corrosion resistance of metallic materials and second because such measurements are based on general and fundamental physical, chemical, and electrochemical relations....... Hence improvements and innovations in methods applied in corrosion research are likeliy to benefit basic disciplines as well. A method for corrosion measurements can only provide reliable data if the beckground of the method is fully understood. Failure of a method to give correct data indicates a need...... to revise assumptions regarding the basis of the method, which sometimes leads to the discovery of as-yet unnoticed phenomena. The present selection of automated methods for corrosion measurements is not motivated simply by the fact that a certain measurement can be performed automatically. Automation...

  14. Nuclear corrosion science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Understanding corrosion mechanisms, the systems and materials they affect, and the methods necessary for accurately measuring their incidence is of critical importance to the nuclear industry for the safe, economic and competitive running of its plants. This book reviews the fundamentals of nuclear corrosion. Corrosion of nuclear materials, i.e. the interaction between these materials and their environments, is a major issue for plant safety as well as for operation and economic competitiveness. Understanding these corrosion mechanisms, the systems and materials they affect, and the methods to accurately measure their incidence is of critical importance to the nuclear industry. Combining assessment techniques and analytical models into this understanding allows operators to predict the service life of corrosion-affected nuclear plant materials, and to apply the most appropriate maintenance and mitigation options to ensure safe long term operation. This book critically reviews the fundamental corrosion mechani...

  15. Corrosion in supercritical fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propp, W.A.; Carleson, T.E.; Wai, Chen M.; Taylor, P.R.; Daehling, K.W.; Huang, Shaoping; Abdel-Latif, M.

    1996-05-01

    Integrated studies were carried out in the areas of corrosion, thermodynamic modeling, and electrochemistry under pressure and temperature conditions appropriate for potential applications of supercritical fluid (SCF) extractive metallurgy. Carbon dioxide and water were the primary fluids studied. Modifiers were used in some tests; these consisted of 1 wt% water and 10 wt% methanol for carbon dioxide and of sulfuric acid, sodium sulfate, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium nitrate at concentrations ranging from 0.00517 to 0.010 M for the aqueous fluids. The materials studied were Types 304 and 316 (UNS S30400 and S31600) stainless steel, iron, and AISI-SAE 1080 (UNS G10800) carbon steel. The thermodynamic modeling consisted of development of a personal computer-based program for generating Pourbaix diagrams at supercritical conditions in aqueous systems. As part of the model, a general method for extrapolating entropies and related thermodynamic properties from ambient to SCF conditions was developed. The experimental work was used as a tool to evaluate the predictions of the model for these systems. The model predicted a general loss of passivation in iron-based alloys at SCF conditions that was consistent with experimentally measured corrosion rates and open circuit potentials. For carbon-dioxide-based SCFs, measured corrosion rates were low, indicating that carbon steel would be suitable for use with unmodified carbon dioxide, while Type 304 stainless steel would be suitable for use with water or methanol as modifiers.

  16. Corrosion Chemistry in Inhibited HDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-30

    Section 3 3.1 JM West, Corrosion and Electrodeposition Processes, Van Nostrand, 1970. 3.2 M Pourbaix, Atlas of Electrochemical Equilibria , Pergamon...potential inhibitors of aluminium and stainless steel corrosion in HDA has been studied by n.m.r. spectroscopy, electrochemical techniques, X-ray...Polarisation theory 24 (c) Estimation of corrosion rate 27 (d) Passivation 30 (e) Film breakdown 33 3.2 Electrochemical Instrumentation 35 The potentiostat 35

  17. Automated Methods of Corrosion Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    1997-01-01

    electrochemical measurements as well as elemental analysis look very promising for elucidating corrosion reaction mechanisms. The study of initial surface reactions at the atomic or submicron level is becoming an important field of research in the understanding of corrosion processes. At present, mainly two...... scanning microscope techniques are employed investigating corrosion processes, and usually in situ: in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (in situ STM) and in situ scanning force microscopy (in situ AFM). It is these techniques to which attention is directed here....

  18. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion: an Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    of ALWC. Gu67 demon- strated that starved (no organic carbon in the medium) SRB biofilms were more aggressive towards carbon steel than the same SRB...31. K. Ito, R. Matasuhashi, M. Kato, O. Miki, H. Kihira, K. Wantanabe and P. Baker: ‘Potential ennoblement of stainless steel by marine biofilm ...corrosion than in the presence of oxidisable carbon. Non-corrosive biofilms can become corrosive with subtle changes in the environment, e.g., addition of

  19. Corrosion Monitors for Embedded Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Alex L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pfeifer, Kent B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Casias, Adrian L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorensen, Neil R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Missert, Nancy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    We have developed and characterized novel in-situ corrosion sensors to monitor and quantify the corrosive potential and history of localized environments. Embedded corrosion sensors can provide information to aid health assessments of internal electrical components including connectors, microelectronics, wires, and other susceptible parts. When combined with other data (e.g. temperature and humidity), theory, and computational simulation, the reliability of monitored systems can be predicted with higher fidelity.

  20. Panel report on corrosion in energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-06-01

    Corrosion problems in high-temperature (non aqueous) energy systems, corrosion in aqueous energy systems and institutional problems inhibiting the development of corrosion science and engineering are discussed. (FS)

  1. Settlement-Compatible Lunar Transporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthaler, G.

    Over the past few years we have published papers in this forum identifying, characterizing and advocating settlement-compatible transportation architectures for Mars. In the present paper, we do the same for the Moon and show evolutionary potentials for growth of lunar architectures into Mars architectures of the types discussed in our previous papers. The essence of a settlement-compatible architecture is that it yields a low recurring transportation cost and that the elements of the architecture are enduring, i.e., fully reusable with lifetimes on the order of Earth-based capital investments. Our previous papers have shown that extension of human habitation to other bodies in our Solar System is probably unaffordable with any other approach. The design of a settlement-compatible architecture begins with Earth launch. In our prior papers, we simply identified the Earth launch option as a fully reusable system with roughly Shuttle (or Atlas 5 or Delta 4 or Sea Launch or Ariane 5) capability, i.e. about 20 metric t. to low Earth orbit and a payload bay of dimensions about 5 m diameter x 15 to 20 m length. This is what the commercial market needs; this is where the traffic demand is; this is approximately the design point for a next-generation (after Shuttle) reusable launch vehicle. We continue in that vein for the present paper. Human mission advocates may argue it isn't big enough; that they need 80 metric t. payload to orbit. We answer that to achieve our cost criteria, there isn't much of a choice, and that the savings in launch cost will far outweigh the added expense for on-orbit assembly. Lunar transportation is considerably less demanding than Mars transportation. The main difference is in trip time. Because lunar trips are short, the crew habitat can be small, a la the Apollo Command Module, and the propulsion system to move it is also small by comparison. We analyze and depict a lunar transportation system based on crew elements adapted from the

  2. Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Preventative Compounds for Ground Support Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery Eliza L.; Calle, Luz, Marina; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    The need to use environmentally friendly technologies throughout future space-related launch programs prompted a study aimed at replacing current petroleum and solvent-based Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) with environmentally friendly alternatives. The work in this paper focused on the identification and evaluation of environmentally friendly CPCs for use in protecting flight hardware and ground support equipment from atmospheric corrosion. CPCs are used as temporary protective coatings and must survive in the aggressive coastal marine environment that exists throughout the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The different protection behaviors of fifteen different oily film CPCs, both common petroleum-based and newer environmentally friendly types, were evaluated on various steel and aluminum substrates. CPC and substrate systems were subjected to atmospheric testing at the Kennedy Space Center's Beachside Atmospheric Corrosion Test Site, as well as cyclic accelerated corrosion testing. Each CPC also underwent physical characterization and launch-related compatibility testing. The results for the fifteen CPC systems are presented in this paper.

  3. Mechanisms of metal dusting corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo

    In this thesis the early stages of metal dusting corrosion is addressed; the development of carbon expanded austenite, C, and the decomposition hereof into carbides. Later stages of metal dusting corrosion are explored by a systematic study of stainless steel foils exposed to metal dusting...... influence of oxygen and carbon on the metal dusting corrosion is explored. The results indicate that exposure to metal dusting conditions have a detrimental effect on the resistance against oxidation and, conversely, that exposure to oxidation has a detrimental effect on the resistance towards metal dusting....... Consequently, a combination of carburizing and oxidizing conditions has a strong mutual catalyzing effect on the metal dusting corrosion....

  4. Report on sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, M.; Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Rink, D.L.; Soppet, W.K.; Listwan, J.T. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-07-09

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials. The report is a deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030403), under the Work Package A-11AN040304, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Structural Materials' performed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing corrosion and tensile data from the standpoint of sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. The scope of work involves exposure of advanced structural alloys such as G92, mod.9Cr-1Mo (G91) ferritic-martensitic steels and HT-UPS austenitic stainless steels to a flowing sodium environment with controlled impurity concentrations. The exposed specimens are analyzed for their corrosion performance, microstructural changes, and tensile behavior. Previous reports examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design, fabrication, and construction of a forced convection sodium loop for sodium compatibility studies of advanced materials. This report presents the results on corrosion performance, microstructure, and tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic and austenitic alloys exposed to liquid sodium at 550 C for up to 2700 h and at 650 C for up to 5064 h in the forced convection sodium loop. The oxygen content of sodium was controlled by the cold-trapping method to achieve {approx}1 wppm oxygen level. Four alloys were examined, G92 in the normalized and tempered condition (H1 G92), G92 in the cold-rolled condition (H2 G92), G91 in the normalized and tempered condition, and hot-rolled HT-UPS. G91 was included as a reference to compare with advanced alloy, G92. It was found that all four alloys showed weight loss after sodium exposures at 550 and 650 C. The weight loss of the

  5. Electromagnetic compatibility and interference metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, M. T.; Kanda, M.

    1986-07-01

    The material included in the report is intended for a short course on electromagnetic compatibility/interference (EMC/EM) metrology. The entire course is presented in nine chapters with the introductory part given as Chapter 1. The particular measurement topics to be covered are: (1) open sites (Chapters 2 and 6), (2) transverse electromagnetic cells (Chapter 3), (3) techniques for measuring the electromagnetic shielding of materials (Chapter 4), (4) anechoic chambers (Chapter 5), and (5) reverberating chambers (Chapter 8). In addition, since small probe antennas play an important role in some of the EMC/EMI measurements discussed, a separate chapter on various probe systems developed at NBS is given in Chapter 7. Selected contemporary EMI topics such as the characterization and measurement of a complex EM environment, interferences in the form of out-of-band receptions to an antenna, and some conducted EMI problems are also briefly discussed (Chapter 9).

  6. Evaluation of steel corrosion by numerical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahigashi, Tatsuo

    2017-01-01

    Recently, various non-destructive and numerical methods have been used and many cases of steel corrosion are examined. For example, methods of evaluating corrosion through various numerical methods and evaluating macrocell corrosion and micro-cell corrosion using measurements have been proposed. However, there are few reports on estimating of corrosion loss with distinguishing the macro-cell and micro-cell corrosion and with resembling an actuality phenomenon. In this study, for distinguishin...

  7. A materials compatibility study in FM-1, a liquid component of a paste extrudable explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goods, S.H.; Shepodd, T.J.; Mills, B.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, P. [Mason and Hanger-Silas Mason Co., Inc., Amarillo, TX (United States). Pantex Plant

    1993-09-01

    The chemical compatibility of various metallic and organic containment materials with a constituent of a paste extrudable explosive (PEX) has been examined through a series of long-term exposures. Corrosion coupons and mechanical test specimens (polymers only) were exposed to FM-1, a principal liquid component of PEX, at 74{degree}C. RX-08-FK is the LLNL designator for this formulation. Compatibility was determined by measuring changes in weight, physical dimensions, and mechanical properties, by examining the coupons for discoloration, surface attack, and corrosion products, and by analyzing for dissolved metals in the FM-1. Of the metals and alloys examined, none of the 300 series stainless steels exhibited adequate corrosion resistance after 74 days of exposure. Copper showed evidence of severe uniform surface attack. Monel 400 also exhibited signs of chemical attack. Nickel and tantalum showed less evidence of attack, although neither, was immune to the liquid. Gold coupons developed a ``tarnish`` film. The gold along with an aluminum alloy, 6061 (in the T6 condition) performed the most satisfactorily. A wide range of polymers were tested for 61 days at 74{degree}C. The materials that exhibited the most favorable response in terms of weight change, dimensional stability, and mechanical properties were Kalrez, PTFE Teflon, and polyethylene.

  8. phytochemicals as green corrosion inhibitors in various corrosive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    replace toxic inhibitors used for mitigation of corrosion of various metals and alloys in aqueous solutions. Plants represent a class of ... structures causing economic consequences in terms of repair, replacement, product ... Buchweishaija – Physicochemicals as green corrosion inhibitors … 78 rather complex molecular ...

  9. Facilities Corrosion Impacts: When Corrosion Wins, the Mission Ends

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    Product/Results - Technology demonstrations and implementations at DoD Installations. - Cost and performance reports. - Recommendations for design ...guidance updates– ACSIM Installation Design Standards Payoff Service life extension of aging mission critical utilities and structures. Reduction in...corrosion.  Technology- Microcapsules in the form of microscopic spheres on the order of 50 to 150 microns in diameter containing corrosion-inhibiting

  10. Archaeological analogs and corrosion; Analogues archeologiques et corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, D

    2008-07-01

    In the framework of the high level and long life radioactive wastes disposal deep underground, the ANDRA built a research program on the material corrosion. In particular they aim to design containers for a very long time storage. Laboratory experiments are in progress and can be completed by the analysis of metallic archaeological objects and their corrosion after hundred years. (A.L.B.)

  11. Phytochemicals as Green Corrosion Inhibitors in Various Corrosive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is an intensive effort underway to develop new plant origin corrosion inhibitors for metal subjected to various environmental conditions. These efforts have been motivated by the desire to replace toxic inhibitors used for mitigation of corrosion of various metals and alloys in aqueous solutions. Plants represent a class ...

  12. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.G. Mon

    2004-10-01

    The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

  13. Low temperature vapor phase digestion of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-04-18

    A method for digestion and gasification of graphite for removal from an underlying surface is described. The method can be utilized to remove graphite remnants of a formation process from the formed metal piece in a cleaning process. The method can be particularly beneficial in cleaning castings formed with graphite molding materials. The method can utilize vaporous nitric acid (HNO.sub.3) or vaporous HNO.sub.3 with air/oxygen to digest the graphite at conditions that can avoid damage to the underlying surface.

  14. Wafer-scale controlled exfoliation of metal organic vapor phase epitaxy grown InGaN/GaN multi quantum well structures using low-tack two-dimensional layered h-BN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayari, Taha; Li, Xin; Voss, Paul L.; Ougazzaden, Abdallah, E-mail: aougazza@georgiatech-metz.fr [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Georgia Tech Lorraine, UMI 2958, Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Sundaram, Suresh; El Gmili, Youssef [Georgia Tech Lorraine, UMI 2958, Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Salvestrini, Jean Paul [Georgia Tech Lorraine, UMI 2958, Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Université de Lorraine, LMOPS, EA 4423, 57070 Metz (France)

    2016-04-25

    Recent advances in epitaxial growth have led to the growth of III-nitride devices on 2D layered h-BN. This advance has the potential for wafer-scale transfer to arbitrary substrates, which could improve the thermal management and would allow III-N devices to be used more flexibly in a broader range of applications. We report wafer scale exfoliation of a metal organic vapor phase epitaxy grown InGaN/GaN Multi Quantum Well (MQW) structure from a 5 nm thick h-BN layer that was grown on a 2-inch sapphire substrate. The weak van der Waals bonds between h-BN atomic layers break easily, allowing the MQW structure to be mechanically lifted off from the sapphire substrate using a commercial adhesive tape. This results in the surface roughness of only 1.14 nm on the separated surface. Structural characterizations performed before and after the lift-off confirm the conservation of structural properties after lift-off. Cathodoluminescence at 454 nm was present before lift-off and 458 nm was present after. Electroluminescence near 450 nm from the lifted-off structure has also been observed. These results show that the high crystalline quality ultrathin h-BN serves as an effective sacrificial layer—it maintains performance, while also reducing the GaN buffer thickness and temperature ramps as compared to a conventional two-step growth method. These results support the use of h-BN as a low-tack sacrificial underlying layer for GaN-based device structures and demonstrate the feasibility of large area lift-off and transfer to any template, which is important for industrial scale production.

  15. Fabrication of large flat gallium nitride templates with extremely low dislocation densities in the 106 cm-2 range by novel two-side hydride vapor-phase epitaxial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikura, Hajime; Konno, Taichiro

    2017-10-01

    Large GaN templates with high flatness (i.e., negligible wafer bowing and smooth as-grown surfaces) and low threading dislocation densities (TTDs) were fabricated by a novel two-side hydride vapor-phase epitaxial (HVPE) growth, beginning with deposition of polycrystalline GaN on the rear side of the wafer. Appropriate gas-flow management realized by our homemade HVPE system permitted the growth of a GaN layer with a smooth as-grown surface and excellent thickness uniformity on the front surfaces of 4- or 6-inch patterned sapphire substrates (PSSs). However, when the grown thickness exceeded 20 μm, single-side HVPE-growth induced fractures in GaN crystals. The fracture resistance of the GaN increased markedly when it was in a cleavage-resistant polycrystalline form (poly-GaN), permitting its growth to a thickness of 100 μm. In the presence of a back-side poly-GaN layer, extremely thick GaN crystal layers could be grown on the front side without fractures. An 80-μm-thick GaN template fabricated by two-side growth on a 4-inch PSS had a device-quality surface, negligible bowing, and low TDD (7 × 106 cm-2). Issues of high fabrication costs, unavailability of large-size wafers, and large off-angle variations associated with native GaN wafers could be overcome by using our high-quality GaN templates as alternative substrates.

  16. Growth and coalescence control of inclined c-axis polar and semipolar GaN multilayer structures grown on Si(111), Si(112), and Si(115) by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymański, Tomasz, E-mail: tomasz.szymanski@pwr.edu.pl; Wośko, Mateusz; Paszkiewicz, Bartłomiej; Paszkiewicz, Bogdan; Paszkiewicz, Regina [The Faculty of Microsystem Electronics and Photonics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wroclaw (Poland); Sankowska, Iwona [The Institute of Electron Technology, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland)

    2016-09-15

    Herein, silicon substrates in alternative orientations from the commonly used Si(111) were used to enable the growth of polar and semipolar GaN-based structures by the metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy method. Specifically, Si(112) and Si(115) substrates were used for the epitaxial growth of nitride multilayer structures, while the same layer schemes were also deposited on Si(111) for comparison purposes. Multiple approaches were studied to examine the influence of the seed layers and the growth process conditions upon the final properties of the GaN/Si(11x) templates. Scanning electron microscope images were acquired to examine the topography of the deposited samples. It was observed that the substrate orientation and the process conditions allow control to produce an isolated GaN block growth or a coalesced layer growth, resulting in inclined c-axis GaN structures under various forms. The angles of the GaN c-axis inclination were determined by x-ray diffraction measurements and compared with the results obtained from the analysis of the atomic force microscope (AFM) images. The AFM image analysis method to determine the structure tilt was found to be a viable method to estimate the c-axis inclination angles of the isolated blocks and the not-fully coalesced layers. The quality of the grown samples was characterized by the photoluminescence method conducted at a wide range of temperatures from 77 to 297 K, and was correlated with the sample degree of coalescence. Using the free-excitation peak positions plotted as a function of temperature, analytical Bose-Einstein model parameters were fitted to obtain further information about the grown structures.

  17. DPC materials and corrosion environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Bryan, Charles R.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest

    2014-10-01

    After an exposition of the materials used in DPCs and the factors controlling material corrosion in disposal environments, a survey is given of the corrosion rates, mechanisms, and products for commonly used stainless steels. Research needs are then identified for predicting stability of DPC materials in disposal environments. Stainless steel corrosion rates may be low enough to sustain DPC basket structural integrity for performance periods of as long as 10,000 years, especially in reducing conditions. Uncertainties include basket component design, disposal environment conditions, and the in-package chemical environment including any localized effects from radiolysis. Prospective disposal overpack materials exist for most disposal environments, including both corrosion allowance and corrosion resistant materials. Whereas the behavior of corrosion allowance materials is understood for a wide range of corrosion environments, demonstrating corrosion resistance could be more technically challenging and require environment-specific testing. A preliminary screening of the existing inventory of DPCs and other types of canisters is described, according to the type of closure, whether they can be readily transported, and what types of materials are used in basket construction.

  18. corrosion inhibitor for carbon steels

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    potentiodynamic polarisation techniques. It was found that. CNSL reduces the extent of the electrochemical processes taking place on carbon steel undergoing corrosion. The corrosion rate of the carbon steel was reduced by over 92 % when only 300 ppm of CNSL was applied. This indicates that. CNSL is a potential ...

  19. Polymeric materials for corrosion control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickie, R.A.; Floyd, F.L. (eds.)

    1986-01-01

    This volume of 31 typescript chapters is concerned with polymeric coatings. The papers originated in a symposium held in Chicago in 1985 and are divided into three categories: Evaluation of Material Performance; Adhesion and Interfacial Aspects of Corrosion Protection; and Materials for Corrosion Protection. An extensive subject index is included.

  20. Tensammetric Studies on Corrosion Inhibitors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The extent of polarization follows the same order as corrosion inhibition data. Both sodium nitrite and dicyclohexylamine nitrite polarise to the same extent, cyclohexylamine to a lesser extent and morpholine to a still lesser extent. (c) Corrosion inhibition data.-The period for which complete protection is given by the different ...

  1. Agricultural Polymers as Corrosion Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural polymers were composed of extra-cellular polysaccharides secreted by Leuconostoc mesenteroides have been shown to inhibit corrosion on corrosion-sensitive metals. The substantially pure exopolysaccharide has a general structure consisting of alpha(1-6)-linked D-glucose backbone and appr...

  2. Vacuum Compatible Percussive Dynamic Cone Penetrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Honeybee Robotics proposes to develop a vacuum compatible percussive dynamic cone penetrometer (PDCP), for establishing soil bin characteristics, with the ultimate...

  3. Avionics Corrosion Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    contact with-caustic soda , washing soda , or lime. One of the most har:iiful materials when In contact with aluminum is mercury or any of its salts. Mercury...used with weaker acids such as vinegar . lemon juice, etc. In general, aluminum and its alloys exhibit a wide range of corrosive attack, varying front...SM-43) -(TT-1-7435) 6850-X.13-1544 San-Del #2 Technical Cleaner Baking SoaM. P. Odell Co. Armor (’ 1348) $950-29)2-9611 1169-A Insulating Lacquer Base

  4. Corrosion damage of rivet joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Černý

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The work describes the effect of the atmospheric corrosion upon the mechanical properties of blind rivets. The subject of given research is: corrosion of metal materials, system resistance, design modification and others means of prevention against the corrosion attack. The problem of blind rivets, blind rivet setting, setting equipment, terminology and definitions, characteristic, and special blind rivet setting is also analysed. The experiment itself, the experimental method and the evaluation of the test are described. Mechanism of riveted joint damage produced by galvanic corrosion is proposed. Considerable corrosion damage occurred at combination of the joint members and connected materials with different electrochemical potentials. Exposition to the corroding environment produces release of rivet clam, together with decrease of rivet stiffness. The proof of these mechanisms is documented by functional dependence F – ∆L and metallographic tests.

  5. Fatigue and Corrosion in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Milella, Pietro Paolo

    2013-01-01

    This textbook, suitable for students, researchers and engineers, gathers the experience of more than 20 years of teaching fracture mechanics, fatigue and corrosion to professional engineers and running experimental tests and verifications to solve practical problems in engineering applications. As such, it is a comprehensive blend of fundamental knowledge and technical tools to address the issues of fatigue and corrosion. The book initiates with a systematic description of fatigue from a phenomenological point of view, since the early signs of submicroscopic damage in few surface grains and continues describing, step by step, how these precursors develop to become mechanically small cracks and, eventually, macrocracks whose growth is governed by fracture mechanics. But fracture mechanics is also introduced to analyze stress corrosion and corrosion assisted fatigue in a rather advanced fashion. The author dedicates a particular attention to corrosion starting with an electrochemical treatment that mechanical e...

  6. Tone compatibility between HDR displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bist, Cambodge; Cozot, Rémi; Madec, Gérard; Ducloux, Xavier

    2016-09-01

    High Dynamic Range (HDR) is the latest trend in television technology and we expect an in ux of HDR capable consumer TVs in the market. Initial HDR consumer displays will operate on a peak brightness of about 500-1000 nits while in the coming years display peak brightness is expected to go beyond 1000 nits. However, professionally graded HDR content can range from 1000 to 4000 nits. As with Standard Dynamic Range (SDR) content, we can expect HDR content to be available in variety of lighting styles such as low key, medium key and high key video. This raises concerns over tone-compatibility between HDR displays especially when adapting to various lighting styles. It is expected that dynamic range adaptation between HDR displays uses similar techniques as found with tone mapping and tone expansion operators. In this paper, we survey simple tone mapping methods of 4000 nits color-graded HDR content for 1000 nits HDR displays. We also investigate tone expansion strategies when HDR content graded in 1000 nits is displayed on 4000 nits HDR monitors. We conclude that the best tone reproduction technique between HDR displays strongly depends on the lighting style of the content.

  7. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  8. Cleaning and materials compatibility test results for elimination of flammable solvents in wipe applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Edwin Paul

    2005-06-01

    In recent years, efforts have been made within the nuclear weapons complex (National Nuclear Security Administration) of the Department of Energy (DOE) to replace Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated solvents (i.e., flammable, toxic, corrosive, and reactive) and ozone-depleting chemicals (ODC) with more benign alternatives. Within the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Department of Defense (DoD) sectors, these solvents are used for cleaning hardware during routine maintenance operations. A primary goal of this study is to replace flammable solvents used in wiping applications. Two cleaners, including a hydrofluoroether (HFE) and an azeotrope of the HFE and isopropyl alcohol (IPA), have been studied as potential replacements for flammable solvents. Cleaning efficacy, short-term and long-term materials compatibility, corrosion, drying times, flammability, environment, safety and health (ES&H) and accelerated aging issues were among the experiments used to screen candidate solvents by the interagency team performing this work. This report presents cleaning efficacy results as determined by the contact angle Goniometer as well as materials compatibility results of various metal alloys and polymers. The results indicate that IPA (baseline cleaner) and the HFE/IPA azeotrope are roughly equivalent in their ability to remove fluorinated grease, silicone grease, and a simulated finger print contaminant from various metal alloys. All of the ASTM sandwich and immersion corrosion tests with IPA, HFE or the HFE/IPA azeotrope on metal alloys showed no signs of corrosion. Furthermore, no deleterious effects were noted for polymeric materials immersed in IPA, HFE, or the HFE/IPA azeotrope.

  9. Surface modification techniques for increased corrosion tolerance of zirconium fuel cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, James Patrick, IV

    Corrosion is a major issue in applications involving materials in normal and severe environments, especially when it involves corrosive fluids, high temperatures, and radiation. Left unaddressed, corrosion can lead to catastrophic failures, resulting in economic and environmental liabilities. In nuclear applications, where metals and alloys, such as steel and zirconium, are extensively employed inside and outside of the nuclear reactor, corrosion accelerated by high temperatures, neutron radiation, and corrosive atmospheres, corrosion becomes even more concerning. The objectives of this research are to study and develop surface modification techniques to protect zirconium cladding by the incorporation of a specific barrier coating, and to understand the issues related to the compatibility of the coatings examined in this work. The final goal of this study is to recommend a coating and process that can be scaled-up for the consideration of manufacturing and economic limits. This dissertation study builds on previous accident tolerant fuel cladding research, but is unique in that advanced corrosion methods are tested and considerations for implementation by industry are practiced and discussed. This work will introduce unique studies involving the materials and methods for accident tolerant fuel cladding research by developing, demonstrating, and considering materials and processes for modifying the surface of zircaloy fuel cladding. This innovative research suggests that improvements in the technique to modify the surface of zirconium fuel cladding are likely. Three elements selected for the investigation of their compatibility on zircaloy fuel cladding are aluminum, silicon, and chromium. These materials are also currently being investigated at other labs as alternate alloys and coatings for accident tolerant fuel cladding. This dissertation also investigates the compatibility of these three elements as surface modifiers, by comparing their microstructural and

  10. Corrosion detection of nanowires by magnetic sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jürgen

    2017-10-05

    Disclosed are various embodiments related to a corrosion detection device for detecting corrosive environments. A corrosion detection device comprises a magnetic sensor and at least one magnetic nanowire disposed on the magnetic sensor. The magnetic sensor is configured to detect corrosion of the one or more magnetic nanowires based at least in part on a magnetic field of the one or more magnetic nanowires.

  11. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott t.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of existing microcapsulation designs, the corrosion controlled release function that triggers the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand, only when and where needed. Microencapsulation of self-healing agents for autonomous repair of mechanical damage to the coating is also being pursued. Corrosion indicators, corrosion inhibitors, as well as self-healing agents, have been encapsulated and dispersed into several paint systems to test the corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing properties of the coating. Key words: Corrosion, coating, autonomous corrosion control, corrosion indication, corrosion inhibition, self-healing coating, smart coating, multifunctional coating, microencapsulation.

  12. Recognition and Analysis of Corrosion Failure Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Suess

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion has a vast impact on the global and domestic economy, and currently incurs losses of nearly $300 billion annually to the U.S. economy alone. Because of the huge impact of corrosion, it is imperative to have a systematic approach to recognizing and mitigating corrosion problems as soon as possible after they become apparent. A proper failure analysis includes collection of pertinent background data and service history, followed by visual inspection, photographic documentation, material evaluation, data review and conclusion procurement. In analyzing corrosion failures, one must recognize the wide range of common corrosion mechanisms. The features of any corrosion failure give strong clues as to the most likely cause of the corrosion. This article details a proven approach to properly determining the root cause of a failure, and includes pictographic illustrations of the most common corrosion mechanisms, including general corrosion, pitting, galvanic corrosion, dealloying, crevice corrosion, microbiologically-influenced corrosion (MIC, corrosion fatigue, stress corrosion cracking (SCC, intergranular corrosion, fretting, erosion corrosion and hydrogen damage.

  13. 32 CFR 552.95 - Compatible use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Compatible use. 552.95 Section 552.95 National... CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Fort Lewis Land Use Policy § 552.95 Compatible use. (a... closed. (4) Motorized infantry operations that will use the majority of the road net in a training area...

  14. Common fixed points for weakly compatible maps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The purpose of this paper is to prove a common fixed point theorem, from the class of compatible continuous maps to a larger class of maps having weakly compatible maps without appeal to continuity, which generalized the results of Jungck [3], Fisher [1], Kang and Kim [8], Jachymski [2], and Rhoades [9].

  15. Is Religious Education Compatible with Science Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahner, Martin; Bunge, Mario

    1996-01-01

    Addresses the problem of the compatibility of science and religion, and its bearing on science and religious education, challenges the popular view that science and religion are compatible or complementary. Discusses differences at the doctrinal, metaphysical, methodological, and attitudinal levels. Argues that religious education should be kept…

  16. Some peculiarities of corrosion of wheel steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander SHRAMKO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion mechanism and rate of different chemical composition and structural condition of wheel steel were investigated. It was shown that “white layers”, variation in grain size and banding of wheel steel structure results in corrosion rate. Microstructure of steel from different elements of railway wheels after operation with corrosion was investigated. Wheel steel with addition of vanadium corroded more quickly than steel without vanadium. Non-metallic inclusions are the centre of corrosion nucleation and their influence on corrosion depends on type of inclusion. Mechanism of corrosion of wheel steel corrosion was discussed.

  17. Corrosion behavior of duplex coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Raghu Ram Mohan Reddy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The titanium alloys are used in defense, aerospace, automobile, chemical plants and biomedical applications due to their very high strength and lightweight properties. However, corrosion is a life-limiting factor when Ti alloys are exposed to different chemical environments at high temperatures. In the present paper, duplex NiCrAlY/WC–Co coating is coated onto Ti6Al4V substrate to investigate the corrosion behavior of both coated samples and the substrate. The duplex coating was performed with NiCrAlY as the intermediate coat of 200 μm thickness deposited by HVOF process and WC–Co ceramic top coat with varying thicknesses of 250 μm, 350 μm and 450 μm deposited by DS process. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were employed to investigate the corrosion performance of duplex coated samples and substrate in Ringer’s solution at 37 °C and pH value was set to 5.7. Finally the results reveal that 350 μm thick coated samples showed highest corrosion resistance compared to 250 μm thick samples as well as bare substrate. However, the 450 μm thick coated sample showed poor corrosion resistance compared to the substrate. The scale formed on the samples upon corrosion was characterized by using SEM analysis to understand the degree of corrosion behavior.

  18. Atmospheric corrosion of mild steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morcillo, M.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric corrosion of mild steel is an extensive topic that has been studied by many authors in different regions throughout the world. This compilation paper incorporates relevant publications on the subject, in particular about the nature of atmospheric corrosion products, mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion and kinetics of the atmospheric corrosion process, paying special attention to two matters upon which relatively less information has been published: a the morphology of steel corrosion products and corrosion product layers; and b long-term atmospheric corrosion ( > 10 years.

    La corrosión atmosférica del acero suave es un tema de gran amplitud que ha sido tratado por muchos autores en numerosas regiones del mundo. Este artículo de compilación incorpora publicaciones relevantes sobre esta temática, en particular sobre la naturaleza de los productos de corrosión atmosférica, mecanismos y cinética de los procesos de corrosión atmosférica, prestando una atención especial a dos aspectos sobre los que la información publicada ha sido menos abundante: a morfología de los productos de corrosión del acero y capas de productos de corrosión, y b corrosión atmosférica a larga duración (> 10 años.

  19. Corrosion protection and control using nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, R

    2012-01-01

    This book covers the use of nanomaterials to prevent corrosion. The first section deals with the fundamentals of corrosion prevention using nanomaterials. Part two includes a series of case studies and applications of nanomaterials for corrosion control.$bCorrosion is an expensive and potentially dangerous problem in many industries. The potential application of different nanostructured materials in corrosion protection, prevention and control is a subject of increasing interest. Corrosion protection and control using nanomaterials explores the potential use of nanotechnology in corrosion control. The book is divided into two parts. Part one looks at the fundamentals of corrosion behaviour and the manufacture of nanocrystalline materials. Chapters discuss the impact of nanotechnology in reducing corrosion cost, and investigate the influence of various factors including thermodynamics, kinetics and grain size on the corrosion behaviour of nanocrystalline materials. There are also chapters on electrodeposition ...

  20. The Behavior of Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Preventative Compounds in an Aggressive Coastal Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran Jerome C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    The shift to use environmentally friendly technologies throughout future space-related launch programs prompted a study aimed at replacing current petroleum and solvent-based Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) with environmentally friendly alternatives. The work in this paper focused on the identification and evaluation of environmentally friendly CPCs for use in protecting flight hardware and ground support equipment from atmospheric corrosion. The CPCs, while a temporary protective coating, must survive in the aggressive coastal marine environment that exists throughout the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The different protection behaviors of fifteen different soft film CPCs, both common petroleum-based and newer environmentally friendly types, were evaluated on various steel and aluminum substrates. The CPC and substrate systems were subjected to atmospheric testing at the Kennedy Space Center's Beachside Atmospheric Corrosion Test Site, as well as cyclic accelerated corrosion testing. Each CPC also underwent physical characterization and launch-related compatibility testing . The initial results for the fifteen CPC systems are reported : Key words: corrosion preventive compound, CPC, spaceport, environmentally friendly, atmospheric exposure, marine, carbon steel, aluminum alloy, galvanic corrosion, wire on bolt.

  1. A Theoretical Model for Metal Corrosion Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    David V. Svintradze; Pidaparti, Ramana M.

    2010-01-01

    Many aluminum and stainless steel alloys contain thin oxide layers on the metal surface which greatly reduce the corrosion rate. Pitting corrosion, a result of localized breakdown of such films, results in accelerated dissolution of the underlying metal through pits. Many researchers have studied pitting corrosion for several decades and the exact governing equation for corrosion pit degradation has not been obtained. In this study, the governing equation for corrosion degradation due to pitt...

  2. Model-based prognosis for intergranular corrosion

    OpenAIRE

    Lishchuk, Sergey; Akid, R.; Worden, K.

    2008-01-01

    Among the advantages of Aluminium-based alloys for structural use is their corrosion resistance. However, while Aluminium alloys are highly resistant to uniform (general) corrosion, they are much more susceptible to types of localised corrosion, especially intergranular corrosion, which is a localised attack along the grain boundaries which leaves the grains themselves largely unaffected. In order to estimate the progress of such corrosion in a given sample, it is considered possible to gener...

  3. Cracking and corrosion recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suik, H. [Tallinn Technical University, Horizon Pulp and Paper, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The corrosion of heat surfaces and the cracking the drums are the main problems of the recovery boiler. These phenomena have been appeared during long-term operation of boiler `Mitsubishi - 315` erected at 1964. Depth of the crack is depending on the number of shutdowns and on operation time. Corrosion intensity of different heat surfaces is varying depend on the metal temperature and the conditions at place of positioning of tube. The lowest intensity of corrosion is on the bank tubes and the greatest is on the tubes of the second stage superheater and on the tubes at the openings of air ports. (orig.) 5 refs.

  4. Corrosion-resistant coating development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinton, D.P.; Kupp, D.M.; Martin, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    SiC-based heat exchangers have been identified as the prime candidate material for use as heat exchangers in advanced combined cycle power plants. Unfortunately, hot corrosion of the SiC-based materials created by alkali metal salts present in the combustion gases dictates the need for corrosion-resistant coatings. The well-documented corrosion resistance of CS-50 combined with its low (and tailorable) coefficient of thermal expansion and low modulus makes CS-50 an ideal candidate for this application. Coatings produced by gelcasting and traditional particulate processing have been evaluated.

  5. Greener Approach towards Corrosion Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Patni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion control of metals is technically, economically, environmentally, and aesthetically important. The best option is to use inhibitors for protecting metals and alloys against corrosion. As organic corrosion inhibitors are toxic in nature, so green inhibitors which are biodegradable, without any heavy metals and other toxic compounds, are promoted. Also plant products are inexpensive, renewable, and readily available. Tannins, organic amino acids, alkaloids, and organic dyes of plant origin have good corrosion-inhibiting abilities. Plant extracts contain many organic compounds, having polar atoms such as O, P, S, and N. These are adsorbed on the metal surface by these polar atoms, and protective films are formed, and various adsorption isotherms are obeyed. Various types of green inhibitors and their effect on different metals are mentioned in the paper.

  6. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jor-Shan [El Cerrito, CA; Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA; Lee, Chuck K [Hayward, CA; Walker, Jeffrey [Gaithersburg, MD; Russell, Paige [Las Vegas, NV; Kirkwood, Jon [Saint Leonard, MD; Yang, Nancy [Lafayette, CA; Champagne, Victor [Oxford, PA

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  7. ECLSS Sustaining Metal Materials Compatibility Final Report, Electrochemical and Crevice Corrosion Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical test results are presented for six noble metals evaluated in two acidic test solutions which are representative of waste liquids processed in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The two test solutions consisted of fresh waste liquid which had been modified with a proposed or alternate pretreatment formulation and its associated brine concentrate. The six test metals included three titanium grades, (Commercially Pure, 6Al-4V alloy and 6Al-4V Low Interstitial alloy), two nickel-chromium alloys (Inconel® 625 and Hastelloy® C276), and one high tier stainless steel (Cronidur® 30).

  8. DOD Offshore Wind Mission Compatibility Assessments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set represents the results of analyses conducted by the Department of Defense to assess the compatibility of offshore wind development with military assets...

  9. Morgantown People Mover Electromagnetic Compatibility Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) of a transit system is the absence of interference between all parts of the system, and between the system and the community which it serves. This report documents the EMC experience obtained during the design and ...

  10. Advanced Microgravity Compatible, Integrated Laundry System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An Advanced Microgravity Compatible, Integrated laundry System (AMCILS) is proposed that uses a two phase water / water vapor system to allow good agitation of...

  11. Compatibility tests of steels in flowing liquid lead-bismuth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbier, F.; Benamati, G. E-mail: benamati@brasimone.enea.it; Fazio, C.; Rusanov, A

    2001-06-01

    The behaviour of steels exposed to flowing Pb-55Bi was evaluated. The materials tested are the two austenitic steels AISI 316L and 1.4970, and the six martensitic steels Optifer IVc, T91, Batman 27, Batman 28, EP823 and EM10 which were exposed to flowing Pb-55Bi for 1000, 2000 and 3000 h and at two temperatures (573 and 743 K). The corrosion tests were conducted in the non-isothermal loop of IPPE-Obninsk under a controlled oxygen level (10{sup -6} wt%). The compatibility study showed that at a lower temperature, a very thin oxide layer (<1 {mu}m) was formed on the steels. At higher temperature, austenitic steels also exhibited a thin oxide layer sufficient to prevent their dissolution in the melt. A thicker oxide, which grew according to a parabolic law, was observed on the surface of the martensitic steels. The oxidation resistance behaviour of the martensitic steels was correlated with their alloying elements.

  12. Electromagnetic theory for electromagnetic compatibility engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Toh, Tze-Chuen

    2013-01-01

    Engineers and scientists who develop and install electronic devices and circuits need to have a solid understanding of electromagnetic theory and the electromagnetic behavior of devices and circuits. In particular, they must be well-versed in electromagnetic compatibility, which minimizes and controls the side effects of interconnected electric devices. Designed to entice the practical engineer to explore some worthwhile mathematical methods, and to reorient the theoretical scientist to industrial applications, Electromagnetic Theory for Electromagnetic Compatibility Engineers is based on the

  13. Psychological compatibility of women's handball team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalar O.G.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The results of study of psychological compatibility of womanish handball commands are presented. The psychological climate of command is investigational. Certain and adapted methods of estimation of psychological compatibility in the command playing types of sport. Psychological tests allow to expose the strong and weak sides of psychology of sportsmen. These information can be used for more effective program of psychological preparation of sportsmen development. It is necessary to improve determination of separate individual qualities of personality of sportsmen.

  14. Compatibility studies for the waste packaging program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullam, H.T.

    1969-03-01

    A program is now underway by Battelle-Northwest to develop the technology required for a waste packaging plant. Cesium chloride and strontium fluoride have been selected as the prime candidates for packaging. Cesium diuranate and strontium pyrophosphate have been selected as backup compounds for packaging in case either or both of the prime candidates should be rejected for any reason. No detailed studies of CsCl compatibility have been reported and long term data are needed. As in the case with CsCl, no detailed studies have been made on SrF{sub 2} compatibility. As a result of the lack of pertinent compatibility data, it is readily apparent that detailed studies are required on CsCl and SrF{sub 2} compatibility and at least scouting studies must be made on the compatibility of the backup packaging compounds. This report summarizes the compatibility studies that are underway at PNL using non-radioactive compounds. Capsule fabrication procedures and tests schedules are outlined.

  15. Solutions of corrosion Problems in advanced Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Karlsson, Asger

    1999-01-01

    Austenitic and ferritic steels were exposed in the superheater area of a straw-fired CHP plant. The specimens were exposed for 1400 hours at 450-600°C. The rate of corrosion was assessed based on unattacked metal remaining. The corrosion products and course of corrosion for the various steel types...... were investigated using light optical and scanning electron microscopy. The ferritic steels suffered from corrosion mainly via material loss. The austenitic steels suffered from predominantly selective corrosion resulting in chromium depletion from the alloy. A clear trend was observed that selective...... corrosion increased with increasing chromium content of the alloy....

  16. A Theoretical Model for Metal Corrosion Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David V. Svintradze

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many aluminum and stainless steel alloys contain thin oxide layers on the metal surface which greatly reduce the corrosion rate. Pitting corrosion, a result of localized breakdown of such films, results in accelerated dissolution of the underlying metal through pits. Many researchers have studied pitting corrosion for several decades and the exact governing equation for corrosion pit degradation has not been obtained. In this study, the governing equation for corrosion degradation due to pitting corrosion behavior was derived from solid-state physics and some solutions and simulations are presented and discussed.

  17. Corrosion Inhibition of Stress Corrosion Cracking and Localized Corrosion of Turbo-Expander Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavarian, Behzad; Zhang, Jia; Reiner, Lisa

    Stress corrosion cracking of 7050 aluminum alloy in the turbo expander and steam/gas turbine industry can cause catastrophic failures, especially for turbo machinery systems performing in hostile, corrosive environments. Commercially available inhibitors were investigated for their effectiveness in reducing and controlling the corrosion susceptibility. Inhibitor effectiveness was confirmed with electrochemical corrosion techniques. Polarization resistance increased with concentration of corrosion inhibitor due to film formation and displacement of water molecules. Cyclic polarization behavior for samples in the 1.0% to 10.0% inhibitor concentration showed a shift in the passive film breakdown potential. The substantial increase in the passive range has positive consequences for neutralizing pitting and crevice corrosion cell chemistry. The strain to failure and tensile strength determined from slow strain rate studies for the aluminum alloy showed pronounced improvement resulting from the inhibitors ability to mitigate SCC. Additionally, the fractographic analysis showed a changed morphology with ductile overload as the primary failure mode instead of transgranular or intergranular cracking.

  18. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Hua

    2004-09-16

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

  19. Report on accelerated corrosion studies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mowry, Curtis Dale; Glass, Sarah Jill; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2011-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted accelerated atmospheric corrosion testing for the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to help further the understanding of the development of corrosion products on conductor materials in household electrical components exposed to environmental conditions representative of homes constructed with problem drywall. The conditions of the accelerated testing were chosen to produce corrosion product growth that would be consistent with long-term exposure to environments containing humidity and parts per billion (ppb) levels of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) that are thought to have been the source of corrosion in electrical components from affected homes. This report documents the test set-up, monitoring of electrical performance of powered electrical components during the exposure, and the materials characterization conducted on wires, screws, and contact plates from selected electrical components. No degradation in electrical performance (measured via voltage drop) was measured during the course of the 8-week exposure, which was approximately equivalent to 40 years of exposure in a light industrial environment. Analyses show that corrosion products consisting of various phases of copper sulfide, copper sulfate, and copper oxide are found on exposed surfaces of the conductor materials including wires, screws, and contact plates. The morphology and the thickness of the corrosion products showed a range of character. In some of the copper wires that were observed, corrosion product had flaked or spalled off the surface, exposing fresh metal to the reaction with the contaminant gasses; however, there was no significant change in the wire cross-sectional area.

  20. Compatibility of SiC and SiC Composites with Molten Lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H Tunison

    2006-03-07

    The choice of structural material candidates to contain Lead at 1000 C are limited in number. Silicon carbide composites comprise one choice of possible containment materials. Short term screening studies (120 hours) were undertaken to study the behavior of Silicon Carbide, Silicon Nitride, elemental Silicon and various Silicon Carbide fiber composites focusing mainly on melt infiltrated composites. Isothermal experiments at 1000 C utilized graphite fixtures to contain the Lead and material specimens under a low oxygen partial pressure environment. The corrosion weight loss values (grams/cm{sup 2} Hr) obtained for each of the pure materials showed SiC (monolithic CVD or Hexoloy) to have the best materials compatibility with Lead at this temperature. Increased weight loss values were observed for pure Silicon Nitride and elemental Silicon. For the SiC fiber composite samples those prepared using a SiC matrix material performed better than Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} as a matrix material. Composites prepared using a silicon melt infiltration process showed larger corrosion weight loss values due to the solubility of silicon in lead at these temperatures. When excess silicon was removed from these composite samples the corrosion performance for these material improved. These screening studies were used to guide future long term exposure (both isothermal and non-isothermal) experiments and Silicon Carbide composite fabrication work.

  1. Compatibility of potential containment materials with molten lithium hydride at 800°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawel, S. J.

    1993-12-01

    A series of compatibility experiments has been performed for several stainless steels, carbon steels, and a nickel-base alloy in molten lithium hydride at 800°C for comparison with previous experiments on type 304L stainless steel. The results indicate that the mechanism of corrosion is the same for each of 304L, 304, 316L, and 309 stainless steel and that very similar corrosion in molten LiH is expected for each stainless alloy. Deviation from parabolic kinetics at extended exposure time for each stainless alloy is attributed in part to weight gains associated with lithium penetration. Stabilized (Nb and Ti) low carbon (steels are observed to be essentially inert in LiH at 800°C with stable carbides and no grain growth. Mild steel (type 1020) is decarburized rapidly and exhibits extensive grain growth in LiH at 800°C. Both steels exhibit weight gains during exposure to molten LiH that are also related in part to lithium penetration. Alloy X (UNS N06002) exhibits extreme corrosion with essentially linear kinetics and dissolution of nickel sufficient to form subsurface voids.

  2. The role of intermetallic phases in the corrosion of magnesium-rare earth alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Campos, Maria del Rosario

    2016-07-25

    A new concept to develop a RE based Mg alloy with improved corrosion resistance was followed in the current work. Based on subsequent characterisation steps to eliminate less suitable RE elements the best microstructure for improved corrosion resistance was identified. At first, the corrosion properties of selected RE elements were determined. Based on these results RE elements that have a potential to enhance the corrosion resistance of Mg-RE alloys were selected. Two aspects of RE elements were important for the selection: the electrochemical properties and the solid solubility in Mg. If the solubility limit of RE elements in the Mg matrix is exceeded, they form intermetallic phases with Mg. By performing galvanic coupling measurements the compatibility between Mg matrix and intermetallic phases were estimated. At that point three binary Mg-RE alloys systems remained (Mg-Ce, Mg-La, and Mg-Gd). To evaluate the influence of composition (amount of intermetallic phases) on the corrosion behaviour, four concentrations were cast with 1, 5, 10 and 15 wt. % of RE. Ce and La have a lower solid solubility in Mg matrix generating higher volume fraction of the secondary phases, thus higher dissolution rates in the binary Mg-RE alloys. While Gd with higher solid solubility shows a different behaviour. Additions of up to 10 wt. % Gd resulted in similar behaviour compared to 1 wt. % Gd addition. The most promising results were obtained for the Mg-Gd system with 10 wt. % Gd. Thus, the microstructure of this alloy was further modified by heat treatments to understand the influence of microstructural changes on corrosion behaviour. A ternary element was used to attempt further optimisation of the corrosion performance. Additions of Al, Zn, Ga and Y did not show any improvement in the corrosion resistance of Mg10Gd. This is due to increasing volume fractions of critical more noble phases and the microstructure dominated by eutectic phase formation. Thus galvanic effects became much

  3. Quantitative measures of corrosion and prevention: application to corrosion in agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, J.C.; Gellings, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The corrosion protection factor (c.p.f.) and the corrosion condition (c.c.) are simple instruments for the study and evaluation of the contribution and efficiency of several methods of corrosion prevention and control. The application of c.p.f. and c.c. to corrosion and prevention in agriculture in

  4. Combining hygrothermal and corrosion models to predict corrosion of metal fasteners embedded in wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Dominique Derome; Samuel V. Glass

    2011-01-01

    A combined heat, moisture, and corrosion model is presented and used to simulate the corrosion of metal fasteners embedded in solid wood exposed to the exterior environment. First, the moisture content and temperature at the wood/fastener interface is determined at each time step. Then, the amount of corrosion is determined spatially using an empirical corrosion rate...

  5. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly.

  6. Graphene: corrosion-inhibiting coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Dhiraj; Tuberquia, Juan Carlos; Harl, Robert R; Jennings, G Kane; Rogers, Bridget R; Bolotin, Kirill I

    2012-02-28

    We report the use of atomically thin layers of graphene as a protective coating that inhibits corrosion of underlying metals. Here, we employ electrochemical methods to study the corrosion inhibition of copper and nickel by either growing graphene on these metals, or by mechanically transferring multilayer graphene onto them. Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that the graphene coating effectively suppresses metal oxidation and oxygen reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements suggest that while graphene itself is not damaged, the metal under it is corroded at cracks in the graphene film. Finally, we use Tafel analysis to quantify the corrosion rates of samples with and without graphene coatings. These results indicate that copper films coated with graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition are corroded 7 times slower in an aerated Na(2)SO(4) solution as compared to the corrosion rate of bare copper. Tafel analysis reveals that nickel with a multilayer graphene film grown on it corrodes 20 times slower while nickel surfaces coated with four layers of mechanically transferred graphene corrode 4 times slower than bare nickel. These findings establish graphene as the thinnest known corrosion-protecting coating.

  7. Microencapsulation of Corrosion Indicators for Smart Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.; Calle, Luz M.; Hanna,Joshua S.; Rawlins, James W.

    2011-01-01

    A multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous detection, indication, and control of corrosion is been developed based on microencapsulation technology. This paper summarizes the development, optimization, and testing of microcapsules specifically designed for early detection and indication of corrosion when incorporated into a smart coating. Results from experiments designed to test the ability of the microcapsules to detect and indicate corrosion, when blended into several paint systems, show that these experimental coatings generate a color change, indicative of spot specific corrosion events, that can be observed with the naked eye within hours rather than the hundreds of hours or months typical of the standard accelerated corrosion test protocols.. Key words: smart coating, corrosion detection, microencapsulation, microcapsule, pH-sensitive microcapsule, corrosion indicator, corrosion sensing paint

  8. Rail base corrosion and cracking prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Rail base corrosion combined with fatigue or damage can significantly reduce rail life. Studies were done to examine the relative contribution of damage, corrosion, and fatigue on rail life. The combined effects can be separated into constituent fact...

  9. Corrosion control under thermal insulation and fireproofing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delahunt, J.F.

    1982-02-01

    Corrosion occurring on carbon steel which is protected by thermal insulation (mineral wool, fiberglass, foam glass, calcium silicate, phenolics, and polyurethanes) or by fireproofing material (concrete or gunite) is discussed. Examples are given and illustrated of corrosion in refineries, petrochemical plants, and pipelines which have been thermally insulated or fireproofed. Four corrosion mechanisms have been identified and are discussed. The promoting action of chlorides as well as the pH effect or corrosion are described and it is concluded that the corrosion under thermal insulation follows two patterns. Further, organic cellular foams (polyurethanes and phenolics) are shown to accelerate corrosive action. Stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel under thermal insulation is described and the effect of improper design/application is stressed. Specific measures to control corrosion are discussed for concrete fireproofing and thermal insulation. (MJJ)

  10. Cracking of SHCC due to reinforcement corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savija, B.; Lukovic, M.; Pacheco Farias, J.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; Saouma, V.; Bolander, J.; Landis, E.

    2016-01-01

    Reinforcement corrosion is the most important deterioration mechanism affecting reinforced concrete infrastructures. After corrosion starts, expansive pressures are exerted onto the surrounding concrete, causing cracking and spalling of the cover concrete. The amount of cover cracking can possibly

  11. Smart Coatings for Launch Site Corrosion Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.

    2014-01-01

    Smart, environmentally friendly paint system for early corrosion detection, mitigation, and healing that will enable supportability in KSC launch facilities and ground systems through their operational life cycles. KSC's Corrosion Technology Laboratory is developing a smart, self-healing coating that can detect and repair corrosion at an early stage. This coating is being developed using microcapsules specifically designed to deliver the contents of their core when corrosion starts.

  12. Corrosion of metals by hydrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, E. A.; Moran, C. M.; Distefano, S.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism of corrosion of metals by hydrazine has been studied by means of coupons in sealed ampoules and by electrochemical techniques. The variables considered were temperature, CO2 impurity level, alloy composition and microcrystalline structure. The coupon studies, to date, verify that increasng temperature and the presence of CO2 does increase the corrosion rate as expected. The presence of molybdenum in stainless steels to the 3 percent level is not necessarily deleterious, contrary to published reports. The influence of microcrystalline structure and surface characteristics are more dominant effects. However, with Ti-6Al-4V, two different microcrystalline structures showed no significant differences. Corrosion rates of CRES 304 L in hydrazine have also been measured by several electrochemical techniques such as Tafel plots, polarization resistance and A. C. Impedance. This is the first documented work to show that A. C. Impedance can be used with non-aqueous solvents. Preliminary data correlated satisfactorily with the results of the coupon studies.

  13. Corrosion inhibitor testing in archaeological conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Faltermeier

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Metal objects from archaeological contexts often suffer serious damage by corrosion. Various methods for inhibiting corrosion have been developed, but their effects need to be evaluated. Here new research is described on how treatments to inhibit the corrosion of copper and copper-alloy artefacts may be tested.

  14. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion is a destructive process that often causes failure in metallic components and structures. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of other existing microcapsules designs, the corrosion controlled release function that allows the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand only when and where they are needed. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into the microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection efficacy.

  15. Corrosion and chemical resistant masonry materials handbook

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sheppard, Walter Lee

    1986-01-01

    ... and other equipment. But few other than chemists and chemical engineers identify "corrosion" as chemical degradation or destruction of a material, and therefore, something that can happen to nonmetals (concrete, plastics, brick, timber, etc.) as well as to nletals. The National Association of Corrosion Engineers so defined "corrosion" over thirty years ago but this f...

  16. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or reliability...

  17. Fastener corrosion : testing, research, and design considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas R. Rammer; Samuel L. Zelinka; Philip Line

    2006-01-01

    In 2004, the voluntary removal of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) from residential wood construction raised concern about corrosion of metal fasteners in wood treated with replacement preservatives. Replacement preservatives contain more copper, which may increase corrosion, and do not contain chromates or arsenates, which are known corrosion inhibitors. This paper is...

  18. 7 CFR 2902.44 - Corrosion preventatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corrosion preventatives. 2902.44 Section 2902.44... Items § 2902.44 Corrosion preventatives. (a) Definition. Products designed to prevent the deterioration (corrosion) of metals. (b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a minimum...

  19. Corrosion-Inhibitor Efficiency Control: Comparison by Means of Different Portable Corrosion Rate Meters

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez Sierra, Isabel; Andrade Perdrix, Maria del Carmen; Rebolledo Ramos, Nuria; Luo, L.; De Schutter, G.

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion-inhibiting substances have been applied to suppress corrosion mainly on bare steel, but when corrosion is progressing, suppression can be achieved if anodic and cathodic reactions are avoided, which is not an easy objective, particularly if the bare metal is surrounded by concrete. In the present article, several corrosion inhibitors are studied to identify their inhibition efficiency in concrete. The percentage of reduction of the corrosion rate without and with inhibitor is named ...

  20. Electrochemical Studies of Atmospheric Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    1 A 0 A063 922 ROCKwELL INTERNATIONAL THOUSAND OAKS CALIF SCIENCE ——ETC F/S 11/6 ELECTROC HEMICAL STUDIES OF ATMOSPHERIC CORROSION. (U) JAN 19 F S...reduction increased linearly with inverse film thickness. Similar experiments in wh i ch corrosion kinetics were determined DO JAN ~~ 1473 EDITION OF I...the ACM and In the design for two- and three-electrode systems . The basic principle of the ACM was first discussed by Tomashov (S)1 and Kucera and

  1. Corrosion Reliability of Electronic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan; Jensen, Stine G.; Møller, Per

    2008-01-01

    Inherently two factors namely multi-material usage and potential bias makes electronic devices susceptible to corrosion if exposed to humid conditions. The problem is compounded today due to miniaturization and contamination effects. The reduction in size of the components and close spacing...... on a Printed Circuit Board (PCB) for high density packing has greatly increased the risk of corrosion under humid conditions. An important issue is the failures due to electrolytic metal migration. This paper describes an investigation of the electrolytic migration of Sn-Pb solder lines on PCBs in humid...

  2. High temperature corrosion in gasifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wate Bakker

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Several commercial scale coal gasification combined cycle power plants have been built and successfully operated during the last 5-10 years. Supporting research on materials of construction has been carried out for the last 20 years by EPRI and others. Emphasis was on metallic alloys for heat exchangers and other components in contact with hot corrosive gases at high temperatures. In this paper major high temperature corrosion mechanisms, materials performance in presently operating gasifiers and future research needs will be discussed.

  3. Electromagnetic Compatibility for the Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Space Shuttle electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). It includes an overview of the design of the shuttle with the areas that are of concern for the electromagnetic compatibility. It includes discussion of classical electromagnetic interference (EMI) and the work performed to control the electromagnetic interference. Another area of interest is electrostatic charging and the threat of electrostatic discharge and the attempts to reduce damage to the Shuttle from these possible hazards. The issue of electrical bonding is als reviewed. Lastly the presentation reviews the work performed to protect the shuttle from lightning, both in flight and on the ground.

  4. Compatible Spatial Discretizations for Partial Differential Equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Douglas, N, ed.

    2004-11-25

    From May 11--15, 2004, the Institute for Mathematics and its Applications held a hot topics workshop on Compatible Spatial Discretizations for Partial Differential Equations. The numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDE) is a fundamental task in science and engineering. The goal of the workshop was to bring together a spectrum of scientists at the forefront of the research in the numerical solution of PDEs to discuss compatible spatial discretizations. We define compatible spatial discretizations as those that inherit or mimic fundamental properties of the PDE such as topology, conservation, symmetries, and positivity structures and maximum principles. A wide variety of discretization methods applied across a wide range of scientific and engineering applications have been designed to or found to inherit or mimic intrinsic spatial structure and reproduce fundamental properties of the solution of the continuous PDE model at the finite dimensional level. A profusion of such methods and concepts relevant to understanding them have been developed and explored: mixed finite element methods, mimetic finite differences, support operator methods, control volume methods, discrete differential forms, Whitney forms, conservative differencing, discrete Hodge operators, discrete Helmholtz decomposition, finite integration techniques, staggered grid and dual grid methods, etc. This workshop seeks to foster communication among the diverse groups of researchers designing, applying, and studying such methods as well as researchers involved in practical solution of large scale problems that may benefit from advancements in such discretizations; to help elucidate the relations between the different methods and concepts; and to generally advance our understanding in the area of compatible spatial discretization methods for PDE. Particular points of emphasis included: + Identification of intrinsic properties of PDE models that are critical for the fidelity of numerical

  5. Compatibility and testing of electronic components

    CERN Document Server

    Jowett, C E

    2013-01-01

    Compatibility and Testing of Electronic Components outlines the concepts of component part life according to thresholds of failure; the advantages that result from identifying such thresholds; their identification; and the various tests used in their detection. The book covers topics such as the interconnection of miniature passive components; the integrated circuit compatibility and its components; the semiconductor joining techniques; and the thin film hybrid approach in integrated circuits. Also covered are topics such as thick film resistors, conductors, and insulators; thin inlays for el

  6. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, L. M.; Hintze, P. E.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Jolley, S. T.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the effects of corrosion on various structures at the Kennedy Space Center, and the work to discover a corrosion control coating that will be autonomous and will indicate corrosion at an early point in the process. Kennedy Space Center has many environmental conditions that are corrosive: ocean salt spray, heat, humidity, sunlight and acidic exhaust from the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs). Presented is a chart which shows the corrosion rates of carbon steel at various locations. KSC has the highest corrosion rates with 42.0 mils/yr, leading the next highest Galeta Point Beach, in the Panama Canal Zone with 27 mils/yr corrosion. A chart shows the changes in corrosion rate with the distance from the ocean. The three types of corrosion protective coatings are described: barrier (passive), Barrier plus active corrosion inhibiting components, and smart. A smart coating will detect and respond actively to changes in its environment in a functional and predictable manner and is capable of adapting its properties dynamically. The smart coating uses microcapsules, particles or liquid drops coated in polymers, that can detect and control the corrosion caused by the environment. The mechanism for a pH sensitive microcapsule and the hydrophobic core microcapsule are demonstrated and the chemistry is reviewed. When corrosion begins, the microcapsule will release the contents of the core (indicator, inhibitor, and self healing agent) in close proximity to the corrosion. The response to a pH increase is demonstrated by a series of pictures that show the breakdown of the microcapsule and the contents release. An example of bolt corrosion is used, as an example of corrosion in places that are difficult to ascertain. A comparison of various coating systems is shown.

  7. Assessing Level and Effectiveness of Corrosion Education in the UAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwee Ling Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of corrosion can be minimized by an engineering workforce well trained in corrosion fundamentals and management. Since the United Arab Emirates incurs the second highest cost of corrosion after Saudi Arabia, this paper examined the quality of corrosion education in the UAE. Surveys with academia and industry respondents showed that dedicated corrosion courses and engineering courses that integrated corrosion into the curricula were available in UAE universities, but graduates had insufficient knowledge of corrosion engineering and superficial understanding of corrosion in real-life design contexts. The effectiveness of corrosion education is determined by both competence in corrosion knowledge/skills and availability of resources (faculty and research. Though most departments would not hire new corrosion-specialist faculty, department research efforts and industry partnerships in corrosion research were present. The paper concluded with recommendations for improving knowledge and skills of future engineers in corrosion and enhancing corrosion instruction to better meet industry needs.

  8. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    2000-01-28

    Alloy 22 is an extremely Corrosion Resistant Material, with a very stable passive film. Based upon exposures in the LTCTF, the GC rates of Alloy 22 are typically below the level of detection, with four outliers having reported rates up to 0.75 #mu#m per year. In any event, over the 10,000 year life of the repository, GC of the Alloy 22 (assumed to be 2 cm thick) should not be life limiting. Because measured corrosion potentials are far below threshold potentials, localized breakdown of the passive film is unlikely under plausible conditions, even in SSW at 120 deg C. The pH in ambient-temperature crevices formed from Alloy 22 have been determined experimentally, with only modest lowering of the crevice pH observed under plausible conditions. Extreme lowering of the crevice pH was only observed under situations where the applied potential at the crevice mouth was sufficient to result in catastrophic breakdown of the passive film above the threshold potential in non-buffered conditions not characteristic of the Yucca Mountain environment. In cases where naturally ocurring buffers are present in the crevice solution, little or no lowering of the pH was observed, even with significant applied potential. With exposures of twelve months, no evidence of crevice corrosion has been observed in SDW, SCW and SAW at temperatures up to 90 deg C. An abstracted model has been presented, with parameters determined experimentally, that should enable performance assessment to account for the general and localized corrosion of this material. A feature of this model is the use of the materials specification to limit the range of corrosion and threshold potentials, thereby making sure that substandard materials prone to localized attack are avoided. Model validation will be covered in part by a companion SMR on abstraction of this model.

  9. 46 CFR 150.150 - Exceptions to the compatibility chart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exceptions to the compatibility chart. 150.150 Section... CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.150 Exceptions to the compatibility chart. The Commandant (G-MSO... 1, the Compatibility Chart. ...

  10. Nodular Corrosion Characteristics of Zirconium Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Gil; Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, D. J

    2003-01-15

    This study was reported the effect of the nodular corrosion on the nuclear reactor environmental along with metallurgical influence, also suggested experimental scheme related to evaluate nodular corrosion characteristics of Zr-1 Nb alloy. Remedial strategies against the nodular corrosion should firstly develop plan to assess the effect of the water quality condition (Oxygen, Hydrogen) as well as the boiling on the nodular corrosion, secondarily establish plan to control heat treatment process to keep a good resistance on nodular corrosion in Zr-1Nb alloy as former western reactor did.

  11. Corrosion of Metal-Matrix Composites with Aluminium Alloy Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bobic

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of MMCs with aluminium alloy matrix was presented. The corrosion characteristics of boron-, graphite-, silicon carbide-, alumina- and mica- reinforced aluminium MMCs were reviewed. The reinforcing phase influence on MMCs corrosion rate as well as on various corrosion forms (galvanic, pitting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatique, tribocorrosion was discussed. Some corrosion protection methods of aluminium based MMCs were described

  12. The dual role of microbes in corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion. PMID:25259571

  13. Compatibility Between Electric Components in Wind Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdyk, Andrzej; Holbøll, Joachim; Arana Aristi, Iván

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes a method for investigation of the compatibility between electric components in wind farms by identifying critical resonances at different points of an offshore wind farm (OWF), based on systematic variation of critical parameters. In this way, the design of future OWF can...

  14. Globalisation and international compatibility - a challenge to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The contexts of institutions for higher education are in flux with consequent learning challenges. One of these challenges is that of globalisation and the need for international compatibility. Another challenge is that Mode 2 learning programmes, material and methods need to be relevant to the specific context in which they ...

  15. Screening for attractants compatible with entomopathogenic fungus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several thrips attractants were screened for compatibility with Metarhizium anisopliae (Metchnikoff) Sorokin (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) and a subset of these for attraction to Megalurothrips sjostedti Trybom (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Conidial germination and germ tube length of M. anisopliae were used as indicators of ...

  16. Electromagnetic compatibility design guideline for STADAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowdell, R. B.; Hill, J. S.; Senn, J. C.; Shifman, J. C.; Skaggs, J. W.

    1971-01-01

    Procedures for achieving electromagnetic compatibility in electronic and electrical equipment for aerospace ground stations are investigated. The application of shielding theory to good design is treated and standards of good practice are outlined for bonding, grounding, wiring, and cabling. Some aspects of filter design are explained, and suggestions are given for the application of filters to electronic and electrical equipment.

  17. Plasmonic Modulator Using CMOS Compatible Material Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Kinsey, Nathaniel; Naik, Gururaj V.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a design of ultra-compact plasmonic modulator is proposed and numerically analyzed. The device l ayout utilizes alternative plas monic materials such as tr ansparent conducting oxides and titanium nitride which potentially can be applied for CMOS compatible process. The modulation...

  18. Energetic materials standards – Chemical compatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuukkanen, I.M.; Bouma, R.H.B.

    2014-01-01

    Subgroup A Energetic Materials Team, SG/A (EMT), develops and maintains standards that are relevant to all life-cycle phases of ammunition/weapon systems. STANAG 4147 is the standard regarding chemical compatibility of explosives with munition components, and is a document of prime importance.

  19. Compatibility of Motion Facilitates Visuomotor Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hove, Michael J.; Spivey, Michael J.; Krumhansl, Carol L.

    2010-01-01

    Prior research indicates that synchronized tapping performance is very poor with flashing visual stimuli compared with auditory stimuli. Three finger-tapping experiments compared flashing visual metronomes with visual metronomes containing a spatial component, either compatible, incompatible, or orthogonal to the tapping action. In Experiment 1,…

  20. Catholic Educator Perceptions about Brain Compatible Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenen, Amie

    2009-01-01

    This document reports the findings of a doctoral project regarding the perceptions held by administrators and teachers of comprehensive Catholic schools in one Midwestern diocese. With the recent explosion of research in the area of the brain and brain compatible instruction it is valuable to know and understand the perceptions held by current…

  1. Improvement of crash compatibility between cars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huibers, J.A.H.M.; Faerber, E.; Cesari, D.; Hobbs, A.C.; Kampen, B. van; Paez, J.; Wykes, N.J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the research work of the European Enhanced Vehicle-safety Committee (EEVC) in the field of crash compatibility between passenger cars. Since July 1997 the EC Commission is partly funding the research work of EEVC. The running period of this project will be two

  2. Improvement of crash compatibility between cars.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faerber, E. Cesari, D. Hobbs, A.C. Huibers, J. Kampen, B. van Paez, J. & Wykes, N.J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the research work of the European Enhanced Vehicle-safety Committee (EEVC) in the field of crash compatibility between passenger cars. Since July 1997 the EC Commission is partly funding the research work of EEVC. The running period of this project will be two

  3. Are Naturalism and Moral Realism Compatible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peels, H.D.

    2014-01-01

    In a recent paper, Alvin Plantinga has argued that there is good reason to think that naturalism and moral realism are incompatible. He has done so by arguing that the most important argument for the compatibility of these two theses, which has been provided by Frank Jackson, fails and that any

  4. The Construal (In)compatibility Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaojing; Ringberg, Torsten; Mao, Huifang

    2011-01-01

    incompatible with their mental construal, while ad claims construed at a level compatible with consumers' mental construal are more effective for those who possess a less creative mindset. We document that such differences in persuasion are driven by the fact that consumers with a creative (less creative) mind...

  5. Compatibility of Calamus deerratus and Lacosperma secundiflorum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An investigation was conducted to determine the optimum water to cement ratio for a locally manufactured Portland cement for use in wood composites. The effects of pre-processing and calcium chloride (CaCl2) on the compatibility of two rattan canes (Calamus deerratus and Lacosperma secundiflorum) with cement were ...

  6. CORROSION RESISTANT JACKETED METAL BODY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugmann, E.W.

    1958-08-26

    Reactor faul elements of the elongated cylindrical type which are jacketed in a corrosion resistant material are described. Each feel element is comprised of a plurality of jacketed cylinders of fissionable material in end to end abutting relationship, the jackets being welded together at their adjoining ends to retain the individual segments together and seat the interior of the jackets.

  7. Hot Corrosion in Gas Turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-27

    in hot corrosion under some circumstances, because its role seems to be principally through reduction of NagSO, or erosion by pyrolytic graphite...same morphology could be produced either by spray -coating with NaxSO, or by diffusing NIS into the cut- edge region under argon at temperature and then

  8. Hydrogen effects in corrosion: discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopher, Miles A.; Simpson, E. Luke

    2017-06-01

    This session contained talks on the characterization of hydrogen-enhanced corrosion of steels and nickel-based alloys, emphasizing the different observations across length scales, from atomic-scale spectrographic to macro-scale fractographic examinations. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  9. Evolutionary Computation Techniques for Predicting Atmospheric Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Marref

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion occurs in many engineering structures such as bridges, pipelines, and refineries and leads to the destruction of materials in a gradual manner and thus shortening their lifespan. It is therefore crucial to assess the structural integrity of engineering structures which are approaching or exceeding their designed lifespan in order to ensure their correct functioning, for example, carrying ability and safety. An understanding of corrosion and an ability to predict corrosion rate of a material in a particular environment plays a vital role in evaluating the residual life of the material. In this paper we investigate the use of genetic programming and genetic algorithms in the derivation of corrosion-rate expressions for steel and zinc. Genetic programming is used to automatically evolve corrosion-rate expressions while a genetic algorithm is used to evolve the parameters of an already engineered corrosion-rate expression. We show that both evolutionary techniques yield corrosion-rate expressions that have good accuracy.

  10. Predicting the Performance of Organic Corrosion Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Winkler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The withdrawal of effective but toxic corrosion inhibitors has provided an impetus for the discovery of new, benign organic compounds to fill that role. Concurrently, developments in the high-throughput synthesis of organic compounds, the establishment of large libraries of available chemicals, accelerated corrosion inhibition testing technologies, and the increased capability of machine learning methods have made discovery of new corrosion inhibitors much faster and cheaper than it used to be. We summarize these technical developments in the corrosion inhibition field and describe how data-driven machine learning methods can generate models linking molecular properties to corrosion inhibition that can be used to predict the performance of materials not yet synthesized or tested. We briefly summarize the literature on quantitative structure–property relationships models of small organic molecule corrosion inhibitors. The success of these models provides a paradigm for rapid discovery of novel, effective corrosion inhibitors for a range of metals and alloys in diverse environments.

  11. High Temperature Corrosion on Biodust Firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi

    The high content of alkali metals and chlorine in biomass gives rise to fouling/slagging and corrosion of heat exchange components, such as superheaters, in biomass fired power plants. Increasing the lifetime of these components, and in addition, preventing unwarranted plant shutdowns due...... to their failure, requires understanding of the complex corrosion mechanisms, as well as development of materials that are resistant to corrosion under biomass firing conditions, thereby motivating the current work. To understand the mechanisms of corrosion attack, comprehensive analysis of corrosion products...... was necessary. In the present work, two complementary methodologies based on analysis of cross sections and plan views were applied to achieve comprehensive characterization of corrosion products. The suitability of these methods for both laboratory scale and full scale corrosion investigations was demonstrated...

  12. Corrosion Control in the Aerospace Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Johnsey, Marissa N.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. It is essential to detect corrosion when it occurs, and preferably at its early stage, so that action can be taken to avoid structural damage or loss of function. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it..

  13. Corrosion Rate Monitoring in District Heating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo; Andersen, A.

    2005-01-01

    Quality control in district heating systems to keep uniform corrosion rates low and localized corrosion minimal is based on water quality control. Side-stream units equipped with carbon steel probes for online monitoring were mounted in district heating plants to investigate which techniques would...... be applicable, and if on-line monitoring could improve the quality control. Water quality monitoring was applied as well as corrosion rate monitoring with linear polarization resistance (LPR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), electrical resistance (ER) technique, mass loss and a crevice corrosion...... cell for localized corrosion risk estimation. Important variations in corrosion rate due to changes in make-up water quality were detected with the continuous monitoring provided by ER and crevice cell, while LPR gave unreliable corrosion rates. The acquisition time of two-three days for EIS...

  14. Corrosion mechanism applicable to biodegradable magnesium implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atrens, Andrej, E-mail: Andrejs.Atrens@uq.edu.au [University of Queensland, Division of Materials, Brisbane, Qld 4072 (Australia); Liu Ming; Zainal Abidin, Nor Ishida [University of Queensland, Division of Materials, Brisbane, Qld 4072 (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    Much of our understanding of the Mg corrosion mechanism is based on research using aggressive chloride based solutions like 3% NaCl, which are appropriate for understand the corrosion for applications such as auto construction. The chloride ions tend to cause break down of the partly protective surface film on the Mg alloy surface. The corrosion rate increases with exposure time until steady state is reached, which may take several weeks. An overview is provided of the aspects which determine the corrosion of Mg alloys: (i) measurement details; (ii) impurity elements Fe, Ni, Cu and Co; (iii) second phases; (iv) surface films and surface condition and (v) stress corrosion cracking (SCC). This understanding is used to help understand Mg corrosion for Mg as a biodegradable implant for medical applications. Solutions that elucidate these applications tend to form surface films and the corrosion rate tends to decrease with immersion time.

  15. fMRI-compatible rehabilitation hand device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzika Aria

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has been widely used in studying human brain functions and neurorehabilitation. In order to develop complex and well-controlled fMRI paradigms, interfaces that can precisely control and measure output force and kinematics of the movements in human subjects are needed. Optimized state-of-the-art fMRI methods, combined with magnetic resonance (MR compatible robotic devices for rehabilitation, can assist therapists to quantify, monitor, and improve physical rehabilitation. To achieve this goal, robotic or mechatronic devices with actuators and sensors need to be introduced into an MR environment. The common standard mechanical parts can not be used in MR environment and MR compatibility has been a tough hurdle for device developers. Methods This paper presents the design, fabrication and preliminary testing of a novel, one degree of freedom, MR compatible, computer controlled, variable resistance hand device that may be used in brain MR imaging during hand grip rehabilitation. We named the device MR_CHIROD (Magnetic Resonance Compatible Smart Hand Interfaced Rehabilitation Device. A novel feature of the device is the use of Electro-Rheological Fluids (ERFs to achieve tunable and controllable resistive force generation. ERFs are fluids that experience dramatic changes in rheological properties, such as viscosity or yield stress, in the presence of an electric field. The device consists of four major subsystems: a an ERF based resistive element; b a gearbox; c two handles and d two sensors, one optical encoder and one force sensor, to measure the patient induced motion and force. The smart hand device is designed to resist up to 50% of the maximum level of gripping force of a human hand and be controlled in real time. Results Laboratory tests of the device indicate that it was able to meet its design objective to resist up to approximately 50% of the maximum handgrip force. The detailed

  16. fMRI-compatible rehabilitation hand device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanicheh, Azadeh; Muto, Andrew; Triantafyllou, Christina; Weinberg, Brian; Astrakas, Loukas; Tzika, Aria; Mavroidis, Constantinos

    2006-10-06

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used in studying human brain functions and neurorehabilitation. In order to develop complex and well-controlled fMRI paradigms, interfaces that can precisely control and measure output force and kinematics of the movements in human subjects are needed. Optimized state-of-the-art fMRI methods, combined with magnetic resonance (MR) compatible robotic devices for rehabilitation, can assist therapists to quantify, monitor, and improve physical rehabilitation. To achieve this goal, robotic or mechatronic devices with actuators and sensors need to be introduced into an MR environment. The common standard mechanical parts can not be used in MR environment and MR compatibility has been a tough hurdle for device developers. This paper presents the design, fabrication and preliminary testing of a novel, one degree of freedom, MR compatible, computer controlled, variable resistance hand device that may be used in brain MR imaging during hand grip rehabilitation. We named the device MR_CHIROD (Magnetic Resonance Compatible Smart Hand Interfaced Rehabilitation Device). A novel feature of the device is the use of Electro-Rheological Fluids (ERFs) to achieve tunable and controllable resistive force generation. ERFs are fluids that experience dramatic changes in rheological properties, such as viscosity or yield stress, in the presence of an electric field. The device consists of four major subsystems: a) an ERF based resistive element; b) a gearbox; c) two handles and d) two sensors, one optical encoder and one force sensor, to measure the patient induced motion and force. The smart hand device is designed to resist up to 50% of the maximum level of gripping force of a human hand and be controlled in real time. Laboratory tests of the device indicate that it was able to meet its design objective to resist up to approximately 50% of the maximum handgrip force. The detailed compatibility tests demonstrated that there is

  17. NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center: Anticipating, Managing, and Preventing Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2015-01-01

    The marine environment at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in North America. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pads were rendered even more severe by the highly corrosive hydrochloric acid (HCl) generated by the solid rocket boosters (SRBs). Numerous failures at the launch pads are caused by corrosion. The structural integrity of ground infrastructure and flight hardware is critical to the success, safety, cost, and sustainability of space missions. NASA has over fifty years of experience dealing with unexpected failures caused by corrosion and has developed expertise in corrosion control in the launch and other environments. The Corrosion Technology Laboratory at KSC evolved, from what started as an atmospheric exposure test site near NASAs launch pads, into a capability that provides technical innovations and engineering services in all areas of corrosion for NASA, external partners, and customers.This paper provides a chronological overview of NASAs role in anticipating, managing, and preventing corrosion in highly corrosive environments. One important challenge in managing and preventing corrosion involves the detrimental impact on humans and the environment of what have been very effective corrosion control strategies. This challenge has motivated the development of new corrosion control technologies that are more effective and environmentally friendly. Strategies for improved corrosion protection and durability can have a huge impact on the economic sustainability of human spaceflight operations.

  18. Blood compatibility of zinc-calcium phosphate conversion coating on Mg-1.33Li-0.6Ca alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yu-Hong; Zeng, Rong-Chang; Wang, Qing-Zhao; Liu, Li-Jun; Xu, Qian-Qian; Wang, Chuang; Liu, Zhi-Wei

    2016-09-01

    Magnesium alloys as a new class of biomaterials possess biodegradability and biocompatibility in comparison with currently used metal implants. However, their rapid corrosion rates are necessary to be manipulated by appropriate coatings. In this paper, a new attempt was used to develop a zinc-calcium phosphate (Zn-Ca-P) conversion coating on Mg-1.33Li-0.6Ca alloys to increase the biocompatibility and improve the corrosion resistance. In vitro blood biocompatibility of the alloy with and without the Zn-Ca-P coating was investigated to determine its suitability as a degradable medical biomaterial. Blood biocompatibility was assessed from the hemolysis test, the dynamic cruor time test, blood cell count and SEM observation of the platelet adhesion to membrane surface. The results showed that the Zn-Ca-P coating on Mg-1.33Li-0.6Ca alloys had good blood compatibility, which is in accordance with the requirements for medical biomaterials.

  19. Corrosion Cost and Corrosion Map of Korea - Based on the Data from 2005 to 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. S.; Lim, H. K. [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J. J. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, W. S. [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Y. S. [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Corrosion of metallic materials occurs by the reaction with corrosive environment such as atmosphere, marine, soil, urban, high temperature etc. In general, reduction of thickness and cracking and degradation are resulted from corrosion. Corrosion in all industrial facilities and infrastructure causes large economic losses as well as a large number of accidents. Economic loss by corrosion has been reported to be nearly 1-6% of GNP or GDP. In order to reduce corrosion damage of industrial facilities, corrosion map as well as a systematic investigation of the loss of corrosion in each industrial sector is needed. The Corrosion Science Society of Korea in collaboration with 15 universities and institutes has started to survey on the cost of corrosion and corrosion map of Korea since 2005. This work presents the results of the survey on cost of corrosion by Uhlig, Hoar, and input-output methods, and the evaluation of atmospheric corrosion rate of carbon steel, weathering steel, galvanized steel, copper, and aluminum in Korea. The total corrosion cost was estimated in terms of the percentage of the GDP of industry sectors and the total GDP of Korea. According to the result of Input/output method, corrosion cost of Korea was calculated as 2.9% to GDP (2005). Time of wetness was shown to be categories 3 to 4 in all exposure areas. A definite seasonal difference was observed in Korea. In summer and fall, time of wetness was higher than in other seasons. Because of short exposure period (12 months), significant corrosion trends depending upon materials and exposure corrosion environments were not revealed even though increased mass loss and decreased corrosion rate by exposure time.

  20. Microencapsulation Technology for Corrosion Mitigation by Smart Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrow, Jerry; Li, Wenyan; Jolley, Scott; Calle, Luz M.

    2011-01-01

    A multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion is being developed based on micro-encapsulation technology. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection effectiveness. This paper summarizes the development, optimization, and testing of microcapsules specifically designed to be incorporated into a smart coating that will deliver corrosion inhibitors to mitigate corrosion autonomously. Key words: smart coating, corrosion inhibition, microencapsulation, microcapsule, pH sensitive microcapsule, corrosion inhibitor, corrosion protection pain

  1. Electrochemical study on metal corrosion in chemical mechanical planarization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Seiichi; Ichige, Yasuhiro; Otsuka, Yuya

    2017-07-01

    Typical metal corrosions caused by the chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process are discussed in this review paper. By categorizing them into seven kinds of corrosion, namely, chemical corrosion, crevice corrosion, crystal-orientation-dependent corrosion, narrow trench corrosion, photocorrosion, galvanic corrosion, and electrostatic-charge induced corrosion, we discuss their mechanisms and how to suppress them on the basis of electrochemical studies. Moreover, we demonstrate the usefulness of three-dimensional pH-potential diagrams for predicting corrosion issues in an actual CMP process.

  2. Corrosion Product Film-Induced Stress Facilitates Stress Corrosion Cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Zhiliang; Ren, Xuechong; Guan, Yongjun; Su, Yanjing

    2015-06-11

    Finite element analyses were conducted to clarify the role of corrosion product films (CPFs) in stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Flat and U-shaped edge-notched specimens were investigated in terms of the CPF-induced stress in the metallic substrate and the stress in the CPF. For a U-shaped edge-notched specimen, the stress field in front of the notch tip is affected by the Young's modulus of the CPF and the CPF thickness and notch geometry. The CPF-induced tensile stress in the metallic substrate is superimposed on the applied load to increase the crack tip strain and facilitate localized plasticity deformation. In addition, the stress in the CPF surface contributes to the rupture of the CPFs. The results provide physical insights into the role of CPFs in SCC.

  3. Corrosion product behavior in VVER secondary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurmanov, V.A.; Velikopolsky, S.V.; Yurmanov, E.V. [N.A. Dollezhal Research and Development Inst. of Power Engineering (NIKIET), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    Accumulation of corrosion products lead to some problems during long-term operation of VVER plants, such as secondary system component degradation including crud-induced local corrosion and corrosion cracking. Corrosion sludge and deposit removal from steam generators and other equipment is costly and time-consuming and leads to additional waste production. This problem is vital in the case of plant life extension. Appropriate solutions of the problem could be developed based on both Russian and international experience of the VVER fleet. Recommendations on how to mitigate corrosion product accumulation in VVER secondary systems were developed based on comparative analysis of available long-term data on corrosion product behavior in all the operating VVER plants, such as the following: Sludge and deposit accumulation in inner surfaces of secondary piping and components; Corrosion rate measurements using in-situ specimen testing at operated VVER plants; Efficiency of corrosion product removal from secondary system water by means of condensate polishers and steam generator blowdown cleanup systems; Sludge and deposit removal from steam generators during chemical cleaning; Secondary piping and components conservation efficiency during long outages. Comparative data analysis of corrosion product behavior has shown different corrosion product accumulation rates in Novovoronezh, Kola, Kalinin, Balakovo and Rostov NPPs. The said difference is due to different design and operation peculiarities. (author)

  4. Development of green vapour corrosion inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmara, Y. P.; Suraj, V.; Siregar, J. P.; Kurniawan, T.; Bachtiar, D.; Mohamed, N. M. Z. N.

    2017-10-01

    Corrosion control using inhibitor is an effective method to protect carbon steel from corrosion. Due to environmental toxicity of chemical inorganic corrosion inhibitors (synthetic), green inhibitors are potentially to develop. In atmospheric conditions, green vapour corrosion inhibitors are the best solutions to replace the uses of inorganic corrosion inhibitors. This research used chemical acid extraction from the key lime (citrus aurantiifolia) leaves and seeds. They are used as the main ingredients to produce this effective green corrosion inhibitor. The experiments investigated effects of corrosion inhibition on corrosion rate of low carbon steel in 3% NaCl solution using both fog salt chamber and electrochemical cell. Using salt fog chamber to represent atmospheric conditions, and corrosion rates are evaluated visually and calculated using weight loss methods. Corrosion rate on electrochemical cell were calculated using linear polarization resistance (LPR) methods. All of the experiments were set in natural conditions at pH 7. Using weight loss for three days exposure time, the efficiency of the inhibitor reached 82.39%.

  5. Corrosion Protection of Electrically Conductive Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Song

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The basic function of the electrically conductive surface of electrical contacts is electrical conduction. The electrical conductivity of contact materials can be largely reduced by corrosion and in order to avoid corrosion, protective coatings must be used. Another phenomenon that leads to increasing contact resistance is fretting corrosion. Fretting corrosion is the degradation mechanism of surface material, which causes increasing contact resistance. Fretting corrosion occurs when there is a relative movement between electrical contacts with surfaces of ignoble metal. Avoiding fretting corrosion is therefore extremely challenging in electronic devices with pluggable electrical connections. Gold is one of the most commonly used noble plating materials for high performance electrical contacts because of its high corrosion resistance and its good and stable electrical behavior. The authors have investigated different ways to minimize the consumption of gold for electrical contacts and to improve the performance of gold plating. Other plating materials often used for corrosion protection of electrically conductive surfaces are tin, nickel, silver and palladium. This paper will deal with properties and new research results of different plating materials in addition to other means used for corrosion protection of electrically conductive surfaces and the testing of corrosion resistance of electrically conductive surfaces.

  6. 49 CFR 192.477 - Internal corrosion control: Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal corrosion control: Monitoring. 192.477... Control § 192.477 Internal corrosion control: Monitoring. If corrosive gas is being transported, coupons... internal corrosion. Each coupon or other means of monitoring internal corrosion must be checked two times...

  7. 49 CFR 192.491 - Corrosion control records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Corrosion control records. 192.491 Section 192.491... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.491 Corrosion... detail to demonstrate the adequacy of corrosion control measures or that a corrosive condition does not...

  8. One-Way Compatibility, Two-Way Compatibility and Entry in Network Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Fabio Maria Manenti; Ernesto Somma

    2002-01-01

    We study the strategic choice of compatibility between two initially incompatible network goods in a two-stage game played by an incumbent and an entrant firm. Compatibility may be achieved by means of a converter. We derive a number of results under different assumptions about the nature of the converter (one-way vs two-way), the existence of property rights and the possibility of side payments. With incompatibility, entry deterrence occurs for sufficiently strong network effects. In the cas...

  9. Corrosion behaviour and in vitro/in vivo biocompatibility of surface-modified AZ31 alloy; Comportamiento frente a la corrosion y biocompatibilidad in vitrolin vivo de la aleacion AZ31 modificada superficialmente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carboneras, M.; Iglesias, C.; Perez-Maceda, B. T.; Valle, J. A. de; Garcia-Alonso, M. C.; Alobera, M. A.; Clemente, C.; Rubio, J. C.; Escudero, M. I.; Lozano, R. M.

    2011-07-01

    The present work evaluates the corrosion behaviour and the in vitro/in vivo biocompatibility of the AZ31 magnesium alloy, which fulfills the mechanical requirements of bone. The corrosion kinetic of as-received AZ31 alloy was not compatible with the cell growth. To improve its performance, the AZ31 alloy was surface modified by a chemical conversion treatment in hydrofluoric acid. The magnesium fluoride layer generated by the surface treatment of AZ31 alloy enhances its corrosion behaviour, allowing the in vitro growth of osteoblastic cells over the surface and the in vivo formation of a highly compact layer of new bone tissue. These results lead to consider the magnesium fluoride coating as necessary for potential use of the AZ31 alloy as biodegradable and absorbable implant for bone repair. (Author) 18 refs.

  10. Automation of electromagnetic compatability (EMC) test facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    Efforts to automate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center are discussed. The present facility is used to accomplish a battery of nine standard tests (with limited variations) deigned to certify EMC of Shuttle payload equipment. Prior to this project, some EMC tests were partially automated, but others were performed manually. Software was developed to integrate all testing by means of a desk-top computer-controller. Near real-time data reduction and onboard graphics capabilities permit immediate assessment of test results. Provisions for disk storage of test data permit computer production of the test engineer's certification report. Software flexibility permits variation in the tests procedure, the ability to examine more closely those frequency bands which indicate compatibility problems, and the capability to incorporate additional test procedures.

  11. Paleogeographical reconstructions compatible with Earth dilatation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Scalera

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The present research concerns the study of the possibility of an increase in the size of the Earthbecause of a still unknown process. After a previous recognition of the existence in the Pacific of shape conformities in a number of pairs of continental and oceanic boundaries (Scalera, 1991, 1993a, a search for compatibility of these results with independent data sets, paleomagnetic and geological and paleontological was undertaken. The conclusion is that the Earth's dilatation is compatible with the used data, while nothing can be affirmed with certainty about the dilatation process or its continuity or discontinuity through geological time. A tentative model of the evolution of the trench-arc-backarc systems has been provided, tuning it in agreement with a dilatational planet.

  12. System design description of forced-convection molten-salt corrosion loops MSR-FCL-3 and MSR-FCL-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntley, W.R.; Silverman, M.D.

    1976-11-01

    Molten-salt corrosion loops MSR-FCL-3 and MSR-FCL-4 are high-temperature test facilities designed to evaluate corrosion and mass transfer of modified Hastelloy N alloys for future use in Molten-Salt Breeder Reactors. Salt is circulated by a centrifugal sump pump to evaluate material compatibility with LiF-BeF/sub 2/-ThF/sub 4/-UF/sub 4/ fuel salt at velocities up to 6 m/s (20 fps) and at salt temperatures from 566 to 705/sup 0/C (1050 to 1300/sup 0/F). The report presents the design description of the various components and systems that make up each corrosion facility, such as the salt pump, corrosion specimens, salt piping, main heaters, salt coolers, salt sampling equipment, and helium cover-gas system, etc. The electrical systems and instrumentation and controls are described, and operational procedures, system limitations, and maintenance philosophy are discussed.

  13. Migration and sustainability - compatible or contradictory?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    2006-01-01

    When the migration issue is discussed in a sustainability perspective, two questions are vital: 1) What is the relationship between migration and the global population growth? 2) What is the relationship between migration and consumption growth, and how does migration influence the distribution o...... of consumption possibilities both between and within industrialized and developing countries? Based on responses to these questions, it is argued that reasonably managed migration will be compatible with sustainable development....

  14. Group Discounts Compatible with Buyer Privacy

    OpenAIRE

    Domingo-Ferrer, Josep; Blanco-Justicia, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We show how group discounts can be offered without forcing buyers to surrender their anonymity, as long as buyers can use their own computing devices (e.g. smartphone, tablet or computer) to perform a purchase. Specifically, we present a protocol for privacy-preserving group discounts. The protocol allows a group of buyers to prove how many they are without disclosing their identities. Coupled with an anonymous payment system, this makes group discounts compatible with buyer privacy (that is,...

  15. Prediction of microsegregation and pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel welds by modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilpas, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Materials and Structural Integrity

    1999-07-01

    solidification, the dendrite cores were predicted to be the weakest link with respect to weld pitting corrosion resistance. In primary ferritic solidification, the second phase austenite in the vicinity of d/g interfaces was predicted to show lowest pitting corrosion resistance. Solidification parameters used in the modelling were verified by cooling rate and dendrite arm spacing measurements as well as by analytical calculations. Experimental investigations using electron probe microanalyses (EPMA, CMA), electron microscopy (SEM, FEG-STEM), microstructural investigations and pitting corrosion tests were used in assessing the calculated microsegregation and CPT-temperatures and showed a reasonably good compatibility with the results of modelling. (orig.)

  16. Hybrid nanostructured coatings for corrosion protection of base metals: a sustainability perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Robert V.; Patil, Vikas; Andrews, Justin L.; Aldinger, Jeffrey P.; Yadav, Ganapati D.; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2015-03-01

    In this topical review article, we attempt to capture recent advances in the development of sustainable hybrid nanocomposite coatings for the corrosion inhibition of structural metals. Spurred primarily by the urgent imperative of replacing hexavalent chromium but also driven by concerns regarding the environmental impact of organic solvents, materials criticality considerations, the need to maintain structural integrity and function under extreme environments, and a renewed impetus towards lightweighting, the design of new coating concepts has seen an explosion of activity. We discuss varying modes of corrosion inhibition and the drive towards multicomponent nanostructured coatings that synergistically unite multiple modes of corrosion inhibition within a single coating system. Nanocomposite coatings in which nanoparticles of one phase are dispersed within a continuous phase, usually a polymeric matrix, provide a modular design approach to multifunctional coatings provided fundamental challenges such as dispersion and compatibility can be resolved. By dint of their high surface-to-volume ratios, the incorporation of nanoparticles profoundly modifies the adjacent polymeric matrix, giving rise to an ‘interphase’ region with modified properties, at relatively low filler loadings. The implications of incorporating metallic, porous metal oxide, and carbon nanomaterials (graphene and carbon nanotubes) within polymeric matrices are explored with an emphasis on active corrosion inhibition. The availability of high-quality nanoparticles that are either electroactive (e.g., metals, graphene, carbon nanotubes, etc.) or are capable of serving as reservoirs for active corrosion inhibitors (e.g., porous silicon oxide, layered double hydroxides, halloysite) provides unprecedented functionality and opportunities for multifunctional coatings. The review emphasizes mechanistic considerations where these have been elucidated with a view towards developing systematic design

  17. Oxygen Compatibility Testing of Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Neil A.; Hudgins, Richard J.; McBain, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The development of polymer composite liquid oxygen LO2 tanks is a critical step in creating the next generation of launch vehicles. Future launch vehicles need to minimize the gross liftoff weight (GLOW), which is possible due to the 25%-40% reduction in weight that composite materials could provide over current aluminum technology. Although a composite LO2 tank makes these weight savings feasible, composite materials have not historically been viewed as "LO2 compatible." To be considered LO2 compatible, materials must be selected that will resist any type of detrimental, combustible reaction when exposed to usage environments. This is traditionally evaluated using a standard set of tests. However, materials that do not pass the standard tests can be shown to be safe for a particular application. This paper documents the approach and results of a joint NASA/Lockheed Martin program to select and verify LO2 compatible composite materials for liquid oxygen fuel tanks. The test approach developed included tests such as mechanical impact, particle impact, puncture, electrostatic discharge, friction, and pyrotechnic shock. These tests showed that composite liquid oxygen tanks are indeed feasible for future launch vehicles.

  18. An MR-compatible neonatal incubator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, M N J; Hart, A R; Lait, M; Griffiths, P D

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To develop a neonatal MR-compatible incubator for transporting babies between a neonatal intensive care unit and an MRI unit that is within the same hospital but geographically separate. Methods The system was strapped to a standard MR-compatible patient trolley, which provides space for resuscitation outside the incubator. A constant-temperature exothermic heat pad was used to maintain temperature together with a logging fluoro-optic temperature monitor and alarm system. The system has been designed to accommodate standard knee-sized coils from the major MR manufacturers. The original incubator was constructed from carbon fibre, but this required modification to prevent radiofrequency shading artefacts due to the conducting properties of the carbon fibre. A high-tensile polyester material was used, which combined light weight with high impact strength. The system could be moved onto the patient bed with the coils and infant in place by one technologist. Results Studies in eight neonatal patients produced high quality 1.5 T MR images with low motion artefacts. The incubator should also be compatible with imaging in 3 T MR systems, although further work is required to establish this. Images were acquired using both rapid and high-resolution sequences, including three-dimensional volumes, proton spectra and diffusion weighting. Conclusion The incubator provides a safe, quiet environment for neonates during transport and imaging, at low cost. PMID:22167517

  19. Double Retort System for Materials Compatibility Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Munne; EV Carelli

    2006-02-23

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) there was a need to investigate compatibility between the various materials to be used throughout the SNPP. Of particular interest was the transport of interstitial impurities from the nickel-base superalloys, which were leading candidates for most of the piping and turbine components to the refractory metal alloys planned for use in the reactor core. This kind of contamination has the potential to affect the lifetime of the core materials. This letter provides technical information regarding the assembly and operation of a double retort materials compatibility testing system and initial experimental results. The use of a double retort system to test materials compatibility through the transfer of impurities from a source to a sink material is described here. The system has independent temperature control for both materials and is far less complex than closed loops. The system is described in detail and the results of three experiments are presented.

  20. Space Shuttle Corrosion Protection Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Cris E.

    2007-01-01

    The reusable Manned Space Shuttle has been flying into Space and returning to earth for more than 25 years. The launch pad environment can be corrosive to metallic substrates and the Space Shuttles are exposed to this environment when preparing for launch. The Orbiter has been in service well past its design life of 10 years or 100 missions. As part of the aging vehicle assessment one question under evaluation is how the thermal protection system and aging protective coatings are performing to insure structural integrity. The assessment of this cost resources and time. The information is invaluable when minimizing risk to the safety of Astronauts and Vehicle. This paper will outline a strategic sampling plan and some operational improvements made by the Orbiter Structures team and Corrosion Control Review Board.

  1. Corrosion: how to control it?

    OpenAIRE

    Hidalgo Serra, Ernest; Legrand, Erika; Toenders, Frank

    2009-01-01

    PFC presentat a Oslo University College and Oslo Heart Center Established in 1989, Oslo Heart Centre (OHC) is located in downtown Oslo, Norway. The hospital is a non-profit cardiac surgical clinic. To control the temperature in the hospital during the summer months, an air-conditioning system is installed. The ten years old air-conditioning system suffers from corrosion problems, inside and outside stainless steel pipes. The aim of this project is to find solutions in order to ...

  2. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Meng, W.J.; Swathirajan, S.; Harris, S.J.; Doll, G.L.

    1997-04-29

    The present invention contemplates a PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements (including bipolar plates/septums) comprising a titanium nitride coated light weight metal (e.g., Al or Ti) core, having a passivating, protective metal layer intermediate the core and the titanium nitride. The protective layer forms a barrier to further oxidation/corrosion when exposed to the fuel cell`s operating environment. Stainless steels rich in Cr, Ni, and Mo are particularly effective protective interlayers. 6 figs.

  3. Electrochemical corrosion testing of metal waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, D. P.; Peterson, J. J.; Katyal, H. K.; Keiser, D. D.; Hilton, B. A.

    1999-12-14

    Electrochemical corrosion tests have been conducted on simulated stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) metal waste form (MWF) samples. The uniform aqueous corrosion behavior of the samples in various test solutions was measured by the polarization resistance technique. The data show that the MWF corrosion rates are very low in groundwaters representative of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Galvanic corrosion measurements were also conducted on MWF samples that were coupled to an alloy that has been proposed for the inner lining of the high-level nuclear waste container. The experiments show that the steady-state galvanic corrosion currents are small. Galvanic corrosion will, hence, not be an important mechanism of radionuclide release from the MWF alloys.

  4. Time Dependent Development of Aluminium Pitting Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E. Melchers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium alloys have excellent corrosion resistance to a wide variety of exposure conditions. Usually they corrode by pitting rather than by uniform corrosion. For infrastructure applications long-term corrosion behaviour is of interest. The relatively limited long-term pitting data that is available shows that maximum and average pit depths do not follow the power law function as conventionally assumed but tend to follow a bimodal trend with exposure time. This is consistent with the bimodal trends observed previously for corrosion mass loss of aluminium alloys. Most likely it is the result of the accumulation of corrosion products over the pit mouths, leading to the gradual development of localised anoxic conditions within pits. In turn this permits the development within the pits of anoxic autocatalytic conditions, consistent with established theory for pitting corrosion of aluminium. It also is consistent with observations of hydrogen evolution from pits. The implications of this for practical applications are discussed.

  5. Evaluation of corrosion attack of chimney liners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blahetová M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The case study of chimney liner corrosion addresses three specific cases of damage of chimney systems from of stainless steels. These systems were used for flue of gas arising from the combustion of brown coal in small automatic boilers, which are used for heating. Detailed analyzes implied that the cause of devastating corrosion of the steel AISI 316 and 304 steel (CSN 17349, 17241 was particularly high content of halides (chlorides and fluorides, which caused a severe pitting corrosion, which led up to the perforation of the liner material. Simultaneous reduction of the thickness of the used sheets was due to by the general corrosion, which was caused by the sulfur in the solid fuel. The condensation then led to acid environment and therefore the corrosion below the dew point of the sulfuric acid has occurred. All is documented by metallographic analysis and microanalysis of the corrosion products.

  6. Corrosion Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldingh, Jakob; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the corrosion properties of laser welded AISI 316L stainless steel are examined. A number of different welds has been performed to test the influence of the weld parameters of the resulting corrosion properties. It has been chosen to use the potential independent critical pitting...... temperature (CPT) test as corrosion test. The following welding parameters are varied: Welding speed, lsser power, focus point position and laser operation mode (CW or pulsed)....

  7. Optimising corrosion monitoring in district heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Andersen, A.

    2002-01-01

    A three-year project - financially supported by the Nordic Industrial Fund - on monitoring of corrosion in district heating systems has been initiated with participation of researchers and industrial partners in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The primary objective of the project...... is to improve the quality control in district heating systems by corrosion monitoring. In Danish systems electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarisation resistance (LPR), high-sensitive electrical resistance (ER) technology, crevice corrosion probes, as well as weight loss coupons...

  8. Recognition and Analysis of Corrosion Failure Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Suess

    2006-01-01

    Corrosion has a vast impact on the global and domestic economy, and currently incurs losses of nearly $300 billion annually to the U.S. economy alone. Because of the huge impact of corrosion, it is imperative to have a systematic approach to recognizing and mitigating corrosion problems as soon as possible after they become apparent. A proper failure analysis includes collection of pertinent background data and service history, followed by visual inspection, photographic documentation, materi...

  9. Some peculiarities of corrosion of wheel steel

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander SHRAMKO; Alfred KOZLOWSKY; Elena BELAJA; Yuriy PROIDAK; Sofia PINCHUK; Svetlana GUBENKO

    2009-01-01

    Corrosion mechanism and rate of different chemical composition and structural condition of wheel steel were investigated. It was shown that “white layers”, variation in grain size and banding of wheel steel structure results in corrosion rate. Microstructure of steel from different elements of railway wheels after operation with corrosion was investigated. Wheel steel with addition of vanadium corroded more quickly than steel without vanadium. Non-metallic inclusions are the centre of corrosi...

  10. Corrosive acid injury of the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijeratne, T; Ratnatunga, C; Dharrmapala, A; Samarasinghe, T

    2015-03-01

    Ingestion of corrosives with accidental or suicidal intent is a common problem in Sri Lanka. Management options and outcomes of corrosive injuries on stomach are not well documented in our setting. The clinical presentation, complications and management outcomes of nine patients with corrosive injury to stomach are presented. Gastric outlet obstruction seen in majority, was managed with bypass procedure (n=5) or resection (n=4). The outcomes of management were successful with both methods.

  11. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  12. Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Progress Report for Period: 1 SEP 2015-31 MAR 2016 John Keith Department of...25 March 2016 Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Annual Summary Report: FY16 PI: John Keith, 412-624-7016,jakeith...elements on the kinetics of oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed on titanium oxide in order to develop new approaches for controlling galvanic corrosion

  13. Assessment of Mortar Corrosion by Sulphuric Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahigashi, Tatsuo

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the corrosion mechanisms of water-cement system, cement mortar specimens were immersed in the sulphuric acid solution. Over the periods, changes to the roughened surfaces, mass change and neutralization depth were observed. Corrosion of cement mortar progressed through chemical reaction of sulphuric acid and ion transport in mortar. Relations between the environment operation of sulphuric acid and the corrosion (summation of chemical erosion and neutralization depth) of test...

  14. Corrosion problems and solutions in oil refining and petrochemical industry

    CERN Document Server

    Groysman, Alec

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses corrosion problems and their solutions at facilities in the oil refining and petrochemical industry, including cooling water and boiler feed water units. Further, it describes and analyzes corrosion control actions, corrosion monitoring, and corrosion management. Corrosion problems are a perennial issue in the oil refining and petrochemical industry, as they lead to a deterioration of the functional properties of metallic equipment and harm the environment – both of which need to be protected for the sake of current and future generations. Accordingly, this book examines and analyzes typical and atypical corrosion failure cases and their prevention at refineries and petrochemical facilities, including problems with: pipelines, tanks, furnaces, distillation columns, absorbers, heat exchangers, and pumps. In addition, it describes naphthenic acid corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen damages, sulfidic corrosion, microbiologically induced corrosion, erosion-corrosion, and corrosion...

  15. Propagation of steel corrosion in concrete: Experimental and numerical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Otieno, M.; Stang, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on experimental and numerical investigations of the propagation phase of reinforcement corrosion to determine anodic and cathodic Tafel constants and exchange current densities, from corrosion current density and corrosion potential measurements. The experimental program includ...

  16. Corrosion and wear resistant metallic layers produced by electrochemical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Lasse; Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1999-01-01

    Corrosion and wear-corrosion properties of novel nickel alloy coatings with promising production characteristics have been compared with conventional bulk materials and hard platings. Corrosion properties in neutral and acidic environments have been investigated with electrochemical methods...

  17. Electrochemical investigation of powder coatings and their application to magnesium-rich primers for corrosion protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgon, Casey Roy

    Corrosion is the decomposition of metal and metal alloys which threatens the integrity of man-made structures. One of the more efficient methods of delaying the corrosion process in metals is by coatings. In this work, the durability of two polyester powder coatings were investigated for corrosion protection of AA-2024-T3. Polyester powder coatings crosslinked by either triglycidyl isocyanurate (TGIC) or beta-hydroxyalkyl amide (HAA) compounds were prepared and investigated for barrier protection of metal substrates by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Polyester-TGIC coatings were found to provide better long-term protection, which can be attributed to the increased mechanical strength and higher concentration of crosslinking in the coating films. Additionally, the polyester powder coatings, along with a fusion bonded epoxy (FBE) were investigated for their compatibility as a topcoat for magnesium-rich primers (MgRP). Under proper application conditions, powder topcoats were successfully applied to cured MgRP while corrosion protection mechanisms of each system were maintained.

  18. Real time corrosion monitoring in atmosphere using automated battery driven corrosion loggers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prosek, T.; Kouril, M.; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2008-01-01

    diminishes due to corrosion. Zinc, iron, copper and nickel sensors at several thicknesses are available. Sensitivity of the corrosion measurement varies from 1 to 10 nm depending on the type and thickness of the sensor. Changes in the air corrosivity can be thus detected within hours or even tens of minutes...

  19. Corrosion Fatigue in District Heating Water Tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1996-01-01

    Three candidate materials for construction of buffer tanks for district heating water have been tested for corrosion fatigue properties in a district heating water environment. The investigation included Slow Strain Rate Testing of plain tensile specimens, crack initiation testing by corrosion...... fatigue of plain tensile specimens and crack growth rate determination for Compact Tensile Specimens under corrosion fatigue conditions. The three materials are equal with respect to stress corrosion sensibility and crack initiation. Crack growth rate is increased with a factor of 4-6 relative to an inert...

  20. New corrosion issues in gas sweetening plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G. (CLI International and Asperger Technologies, Houston, TX (United States))

    Gas treating plants are experiencing corrosion problems which impact on efficiency and safety. While general corrosion is not particularly hazardous in the gas processing industry, local corrosion is very dangerous since it has several different mechanisms, all of which have dangerously high rates, and it occurs at locations which are hard to find and hard to predict. A newly discovered, velocity-dependent type of corrosion is reported. It is related to yet-undefined species which cause excessively high corrosion in areas of turbulence. This accelerated corrosion is not due to erosion or cavitation, but to a diffusion-limited reaction accelerated by turbulence. A full-flow test loop was built to evaluate the corrosiveness of gas plant solutions at their normal temperature and flow rates. Test runs were conducted with Co[sub 2]-loaded amine solutions for periods of 12 days. Carbon steel specimens mounted in the test loop were examined and corrosion rates calculated. Chromium alloys were shown to be attacked by corrodents in the low-velocity part of the loop and very aggressively attacked in the high-velocity part. The tests demonstrate the need for rigorous monitoring of corrosion in areas of higher velocity such as piping elbows and other points of turbulence. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Emerging Corrosion Inhibitors for Interfacial Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Taghavikish

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion is a deterioration of a metal due to reaction with environment. The use of corrosion inhibitors is one of the most effective ways of protecting metal surfaces against corrosion. Their effectiveness is related to the chemical composition, their molecular structures and affinities for adsorption on the metal surface. This review focuses on the potential of ionic liquid, polyionic liquid (PIL and graphene as promising corrosion inhibitors in emerging coatings due to their remarkable properties and various embedment or fabrication strategies. The review begins with a precise description of the synthesis, characterization and structure-property-performance relationship of such inhibitors for anti-corrosion coatings. It establishes a platform for the formation of new generation of PIL based coatings and shows that PIL corrosion inhibitors with various heteroatoms in different form can be employed for corrosion protection with higher barrier properties and protection of metal surface. However, such study is still in its infancy and there is significant scope to further develop new structures of PIL based corrosion inhibitors and coatings and study their behaviour in protection of metals. Besides, it is identified that the combination of ionic liquid, PIL and graphene could possibly contribute to the development of the ultimate corrosion inhibitor based coating.

  2. Fouling corrosion in aluminum heat exchangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Jingxin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fouling deposits on aluminum heat exchanger reduce the heat transfer efficiency and cause corrosion to the apparatus. This study focuses on the corrosive behavior of aluminum coupons covered with a layer of artificial fouling in a humid atmosphere by their weight loss, Tafel plots, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, and scanning electron microscope (SEM observations. The results reveal that chloride is one of the major elements found in the fouling which damages the passive film and initiates corrosion. The galvanic corrosion between the metal and the adjacent carbon particles accelerates the corrosive process. Furthermore, the black carbon favors the moisture uptake, and gives the dissolved oxygen greater chance to migrate through the fouling layer and form a continuous diffusive path. The corrosion rate decreasing over time is conformed to electrochemistry measurements and can be verified by Faraday’s law. The EIS results indicate that the mechanism of corrosion can be interpreted by the pitting corrosion evolution mechanism, and that pitting was observed on the coupons by SEM after corrosive exposure.

  3. Influence of corrosion layers on quantitative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denker, A.; Bohne, W.; Opitz-Coutureau, J.; Rauschenberg, J.; Röhrich, J.; Strub, E.

    2005-09-01

    Art historians and restorers in charge of ancient metal objects are often reluctant to remove the corrosion layer evolved over time, as this would change the appearance of the artefact dramatically. Therefore, when an elemental analysis of the objects is required, this has to be done by penetrating the corrosion layer. In this work the influence of corrosion was studied on Chinese and Roman coins, where removal of oxidized material was possible. Measurements on spots with and without corrosion are presented and the results discussed.

  4. FLiNaK compatibility studies with Inconel 600 and silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder, Graydon L., E-mail: yodergljr@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Bldg. 5700, MS 6167 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Heatherly, Dennis; Wilson, Dane [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Bldg. 5700, MS 6167 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Caja, Mario [Electrochemical Systems, Inc. (ESI), 9320 Collingwood Rd., Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • A versatile experimental design has been developed to examine liquid fluoride salt materials compatibility behavior. • Samples of silicon carbide and a grafoil/nickel spiral wound gasket were exposed to FLiNaK salt at 700 °C for 90 days and showed no degradation. • Alloy 600 showed material effects penetrating up to 300 μm below the salt interface after exposure to the salt for 90 days at 700 °C. • Comparison of the Alloy 600 corrosion results with existing data indicated that results were comparable to the few corrosion results available for Alloy 600. • Sapphire viewing windows incorporated in the experiment showed fogging by condensed salt components at the highest test temperatures. - Abstract: A small liquid fluoride salt test apparatus has been constructed and testing has been conducted to examine the compatibility of silicon carbide (SiC), Inconel 600 and a spiral wound gasket material in FLiNaK, the ternary eutectic alkaline metal fluoride salt mixture. These tests were conducted to evaluate materials and sealing systems that could be used in fluoride salt systems. Three months of testing at 700 °C was conducted to assure that these materials and seals would be acceptable when operating under prototypic operating conditions. The SiC specimens showed little or no change over the test period, while the spiral wound gasket material did not show any degradation except that salt might have been seeping into the outermost spirals of the gasket. The Inconel 600 specimens showed regions of voiding which penetrated the specimen surface to about 250 μm in depth. Analysis indicated that the salt had leached chrome from the Inconel surface, as was expected for this material.

  5. [Miscellaneous Compatibility Determinations : Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR : 2017

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Linked through this record are compatibility determinations from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal between the years 2005 and 2014. Included is a 2005 Compatibility...

  6. Impact of glycolate anion on aqueous corrosion in DWPF and downstream facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J. I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-12-15

    Glycolic acid is being evaluated as an alternate reductant in the preparation of high level waste for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). During processing, the glycolic acid may not be completely consumed with small quantities of the glycolate anion being carried forward to other high level waste (HLW) facilities. The impact of the glycolate anion on the corrosion of the materials of construction (MoC) throughout the waste processing system has not been previously evaluated. A literature review had revealed that corrosion data were not available for the MoCs in glycolic-bearing solutions applicable to SRS systems. Data on the material compatibility with only glycolic acid or its derivative products were identified; however, data were limited for solutions containing glycolic acid or the glycolate anion.

  7. Initiation and Growth of Corrosion Pit and Its Effect on Corrosion Fatigue Strength in 12Cr Stainless Steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    HAYASHI, Makoto; AMANO, Kazuo; UEYAMA, Yoshiharu

    2017-01-01

    .... The corrosion fatigue cracks often initiate from the pits. In order to prevent the corrosion fatigue failure, 12Cr stainless steel is employed for the components used in the corrosive environments...

  8. Corrosion protection performance of corrosion inhibitors and epoxy-coated reinforcing steel in a simulated concrete pore water solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-01

    We used a simulated concrete pore water solution to evaluate the corrosion protection performance of concrete corrosion-inhibiting admixtures and epoxy-coated reinforcing bars (ECR). We evaluated three commercial corrosion inhibitors, ECR from three ...

  9. The effect of organic matter associated with the corrosion products on the corrosion of mild steel in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Wagh, A.B.

    the corrosion of mild steel and the temperature and dissolved oxygen of seawater. In contrast to this, the corrosion and mild steel was inversely related to the organic carbon and water extractable carbohydrates associated with the corrosion products of mild...

  10. 46 CFR Figure 1 to Part 150 - Compatibility Chart

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compatibility Chart 1 Figure 1 to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 150—Compatibility Chart EC02FE91.079 ...

  11. 47 CFR 68.4 - Hearing aid-compatible telephones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... if it provides internal means for effective use with hearing aids that are designed to be compatible... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hearing aid-compatible telephones. 68.4 Section... (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK General § 68.4 Hearing aid-compatible...

  12. The Effect of Birth Order on Roommate Compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, John H.; Williams, Ondre J.

    1977-01-01

    A group of students were matched on the basis of compatible birth order; another was matched on the basis of conflicting birth order. After a month's experience in a residence hall their compatibility was examined. Students with conflicting birth order were more compatible than those with the same birth order. (Author)

  13. Civil Engineering Corrosion Control. Volume 1. Corrosion Control - General

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Cathodic Protection 3 3-1 Schematic Diagrama of Atoms, Molecules, Ions lb 3-2 The Basic Corrosion Cell 20 3-3 Effect of Moisture Content on Resistivity of...when examined immedi- ately after excavation - a gray " frost " covers the black"paste". When the paste is washed from steel with water, shiny bright...concrete structures are encountered where frost prevails, in sea water, in sulfate-bearing environ- ments, in acid soils and waters, with sugar waters

  14. Improving Corrosion Resistance and Biocompatibility of Magnesium Alloy by Sodium Hydroxide and Hydrofluoric Acid Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Jiang Pan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Owing to excellent mechanical property and biodegradation, magnesium-based alloys have been widely investigated for temporary implants such as cardiovascular stent and bone graft; however, the fast biodegradation in physiological environment and the limited surface biocompatibility hinder their clinical applications. In the present study, magnesium alloy was treated by sodium hydroxide (NaOH and hydrogen fluoride (HF solutions, respectively, to produce the chemical conversion layers with the aim of improving the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. The results of attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS indicated that the chemical conversion layers of magnesium hydroxide or magnesium fluoride were obtained successfully. Sodium hydroxide treatment can significantly enhance the surface hydrophilicity while hydrogen fluoride treatment improved the surface hydrophobicity. Both the chemical conversion layers can obviously improve the corrosion resistance of the pristine magnesium alloy. Due to the hydrophobicity of magnesium fluoride, HF-treated magnesium alloy showed the relative better corrosion resistance than that of NaOH-treated substrate. According to the results of hemolysis assay and platelet adhesion, the chemical surface modified samples exhibited improved blood compatibility as compared to the pristine magnesium alloy. Furthermore, the chemical surface modified samples improved cytocompatibility to endothelial cells, the cells had better cell adhesion and proliferative profiles on the modified surfaces. Due to the excellent hydrophilicity, the NaOH-treated substrate displayed better blood compatibility and cytocompatibility to endothelial cells than that of HF-treated sample. It was considered that the method of the present study can be used for the surface modification of the magnesium alloy to enhance the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility.

  15. High Temperature Corrosion under Laboratory Conditions Simulating Biomass-Firing: A Comprehensive Characterization of Corrosion Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    characterization of the corrosion products. The corrosion products consisted of three layers: i) the outermost layer consisting of a mixed layer of K2SO4 and FexOy on a partly molten layer of the initial deposit, ii) the middle layer consists of spinel (FeCr2O4) and Fe2O3, and iii) the innermost layer is a sponge......-like Ni3S2 containing layer. At the corrosion front, Cl-rich protrusions were observed. Results indicate that selective corrosion of Fe and Cr by Cl, active oxidation and sulphidation attack of Ni are possible corrosion mechanisms....

  16. A low-cost MRI compatible keyboard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Snejbjerg; Heggli, Ole Adrian; Alves da Mota, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Neuroimaging is a powerful tool to explore how and why humans engage in music. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has allowed us to identify brain networks and regions implicated in a range of cognitive tasks including music perception and performance. However, MRI-scanners are noisy and cramped......, presenting a challenging environment for playing an instrument. Here, we present an MRI-compatible polyphonic keyboard with a materials cost of 850 $, designed and tested for safe use in 3T (three Tesla) MRI-scanners. We describe design considerations, and prior work in the field. In addition, we provide...

  17. Rate-Compatible Protograph LDPC Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy V. (Inventor); Nosratinia, Aria (Inventor); Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Digital communication coding methods resulting in rate-compatible low density parity-check (LDPC) codes built from protographs. Described digital coding methods start with a desired code rate and a selection of the numbers of variable nodes and check nodes to be used in the protograph. Constraints are set to satisfy a linear minimum distance growth property for the protograph. All possible edges in the graph are searched for the minimum iterative decoding threshold and the protograph with the lowest iterative decoding threshold is selected. Protographs designed in this manner are used in decode and forward relay channels.

  18. Detection of corrosion in submerged reinforced concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carney, R.F.A.; Lawrence, P.F.; Wilkins, N.J.M. [UKAEA Harwell Lab. (United Kingdom). Materials Development Div.

    1990-12-31

    Steel reinforcement in concrete is not usually subject to corrosion when it is under water and not exposed to air. However, research carried out within the Concrete in the Oceans Programme has produced evidence that localised corrosion can occur at cracks which intersect the reinforcing bars even though the concrete is fully immersed in seawater. The problem with underwater corrosion is that, although the corrosion products migrate out of the crack and slight rust staining appears, these are not easy to see. In contrast, when reinforced concrete is exposed to air, then corrosion is marked by expansive rust deposits and spalling concrete. The principal objective of this report was to define the conditions of crack geometry, electrochemical potential and rate of seawater flow, under which there would be no external visible signs of corrosion. A further objective was to define, on a concrete offshore platform, where this type of unseen corrosion is most likely to occur. At seawater flowrates of 0.25 metres per second or less, localised corrosion occurring at cracks in the concrete which intersected the reinforcing bars was only visible as rust staining or deposits near the crack. At higher flowrates there was no clear visual evidence of corrosion. Visual inspection is therefore not a reliable method of checking on the presence of corrosion in underwater concrete structures. It is also concluded than an overall underwater potential of -700 mV Ag/AgCl or more negative is required in order to dismiss the possibility of localized corrosion occurring at cracks. (author)

  19. Field corrosion characterization of soil corrosion of X70 pipeline steel in a red clay soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengrong Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of X70 pipeline steel buried in red soil environment has been studied. The surface morphology and elemental distribution were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM,energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The corrosion kinetics was evaluated by weight loss measurement. The results show that in red soil, the corrosion rate of X70 steel decreases with time, and follows the exponential decay law. General corrosion with non-uniform and localized pitting occurred on the steel surface. α-FeOOH was the dominate products during corrosion in whole buried periods, and the corrosion products exhibited well protective properties. The potentiodynamic polarization tests revealed that icorr decreased with time, indicating the improvement of corrosion resistance. The results of Electrochemical impendence spectroscopy (EIS are consistent with potentiodynamic polarization tests.

  20. Electromagnetic Compatibility of Matrix Converter System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fligl

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper deals with matrix converters pulse width modulation strategies design with emphasis on the electromagnetic compatibility. Matrix converters provide an all-silicon solution to the problem of converting AC power from one frequency to another, offering almost all the features required of an ideal static frequency changer. They possess many advantages compared to the conventional voltage or current source inverters. A matrix converter does not require energy storage components as a bulky capacitor or an inductance in the DC-link, and enables the bi-directional power flow between the power supply and load. The most of the contemporary modulation strategies are able to provide practically sinusoidal waveforms of the input and output currents with negligible low order harmonics, and to control the input displacement factor. The perspective of matrix converters regarding EMC in comparison with other types of converters is brightly evident because it is no need to use any equipment for power factor correction and current and voltage harmonics reduction. Such converter with proper control is properly compatible both with the supply mains and with the supplied load. A special digital control system was developed for the realized experimental test bed which makes it possible to achieve greater throughput of the digital control system and its variability.

  1. Is religious education compatible with science education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahner, Martin; Bunge, Mario

    1996-04-01

    This paper tackles a highly controversial issue: the problem of the compatibility of science and religion, and its bearing on science and religious education respectively. We challenge the popular view that science and religion are compatible or even complementary. In order to do so, we give a brief characterization of our conceptions of science and religion. Conspicuous differences at the doctrinal, metaphysical, methodological and attitudinal level are noted. Regarding these aspects, closer examination reveals that science and religion are not only different but in fact incompatible. Some consequences of our analysis for education as well as for education policy are explored. We submit that a religious education, particularly at an early age, is an obstacle to the development of a scientific mentality. For this and other reasons, religious education should be kept away from public schools and universities. Instead of promoting a religious world view, we should teach our children what science knows about religion, i.e., how science explains the existence of religion in historical, biological, psychological and sociological terms.

  2. Electromagnetic compatibility management for fast diagnostic design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimbourg, J.

    2004-10-01

    This article presents an overview of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) management for fast diagnostic design. We will present and detail the classical approach in EMC. This approach can be successfully applied for installations where a single engineering entity has the authority to prescribe and enforce a certain compatibility level. Most of the time, strict application of generic standards is required for fast diagnostics. Nethertheless, the pulse perturbation must be synchronized to the fast diagnostic operation. Some "traditional" techniques, such as star-earthing and bonding cable screens at one end, have been shown to be inadequate for fast diagnostic design. Our laser facility, the LIL, will be able to focus up to 60 kJ into a volume of less than 1 mm3. We have to evaluate the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) where diagnostics, cables, and oscilloscopes will be installed. We performed electromagnetic measurements inside and outside the OMEGA target chamber. The electromagnetic pulse generated by the target chamber contains very high frequency components above 1 GHz. The electric field is around a few kV/m outside and goes up to 20 kV/m inside the target. We designed a specific electromagnetic probe for pulse measurement with a rise time down to 100 ps. An ultrashort rise time EMP bench test was built to test apparatus before installation around a target chamber. It produces an electric field higher than 5 kV/m with a rise time under 100 ps.

  3. Study for determination of industrial water corrosivity in Kashan Fajre Sepahan Galvanizing Mills during 2005-2006 Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, D; Miranzadeh, M B; Motlagh, A Ahmadi

    2008-01-01

    This research was carried out in Kashan Fajre Sepahan Galvanizing mills (KFSGM) for evaluation of water corrosivity during 2005-2006. A total of 18 samples were taken from various points of the water supply system for testing the specific parameters and calculation Langelier Index (LI), Ryznar Index (RI) and Pukorious Index (PI). This research showed that in raw water (sand filter effluent) LI were positive as well as RI and PI were lower than 7 which means that mentioned water is not corrosive. Also LI in treated water by reverse osmosis process was negative and RI and PI were higher than 7, so, this water has corrosive properties. Finally, calculated indexes indicate that according to LI, conditioned water is not corrosive but based on RI and P. this water tend to corrosivity which this findings is compatible with literature review statement. So it is recommended that, for water conditioning addition of preservative chemicals to be continued but at the same time another alternatives such as pH adjustment, air stripping and deoxygenating, control of carbonate concentration and split flow treatment should be studied.

  4. Corrosion avoidance with new wood preservatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2006-01-01

    The increased use of alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ) and copper azole (CuAz) as wood preservatives for residential construction has led to concerns about the corrosion performance of fasteners. Information on the effects of these preservatives on the corrosion rate is limited, although Simpson Strong Tie has published a technical bulletin indicating that both ACQ and...

  5. Threshold Corrosion Fatigue of Welded Shipbuilding Steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    8. J. C. Walter, E. Olbjorn, 0. Allstad and G. Elde, "Safety Against Corrosion Fatigue Offshore," Publication No. 94, Det Norske Ventas , Horik...Offshore. Publication No;. 94;, Det Norske Ventas , Horik, Norway, April 1976. 18. C. E. Jaske, D. Broek, J. E. Slater, W. E. Anderson. Corrosion Fatigue

  6. Corrosion of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Potentiodynamic polarization studies indicated that the intermetallics exhibited active–passive behaviour in an acidic solution of pH = 1, whereas they exhibited stable passivity in a buffer solution of pH 8.4. Corrosion rates were also obtained by immersion testing. The variation of corrosion rate as a function of time was ...

  7. Corrosion Behaviour of New Zr Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolksdorf, E.

    1974-01-01

    Corrosion studies have indicated that the most promising replacements for Zicaloy-2 are ZrCrFe, ZrVFe and probably ZrNbTa, provided they are in their optimized condition. These alloys are conventionally manufactured alloys. An internally oxidized ZrMgO alloy is even superior, from the corrosion...

  8. Ampicillin potentials as Corrosion Inhibitor: fukui function ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inhibition and adsorption potentials of ampicillin for the corrosion of mild steel in solutions of HCl have been investigated using empirical and computational approach. The experimental study was carried out using gravimetric and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy methods of monitoring corrosion while the ...

  9. Electrochemical corrosion measurements on noble electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Lasse; Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1998-01-01

    Novel electrodeposits are compared with hard chrome and electroless Ni-P with respect to production, corrosion resistance and hardness.......Novel electrodeposits are compared with hard chrome and electroless Ni-P with respect to production, corrosion resistance and hardness....

  10. Internal Corrosion Detection in Liquids Pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    PHMSA project DTRS56-05-T-0005 "Development of ICDA for Liquid Petroleum Pipelines" led to the development of a Direct Assessment (DA) protocol to prioritize locations of possible internal corrosion. The underlying basis LP-ICDA is simple; corrosion ...

  11. The dual role of microbes in corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kip, D.J.; Van Veen, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced

  12. The Corrosivity of the Mauritian Atmosphere

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nafiisah

    technology. Atmospheric corrosion is the major contributor to this cost (Natesan et.al, 2005). To prevent such losses in Mauritius, it has become important to classify the corrosivity of the Mauritian atmosphere in order to facilitate the task of selecting materials, protection systems, maintenance intervals, e.t.c. Therefore,.

  13. Geothermal drill pipe corrosion test plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, B.C.; Copass, K.S.

    1980-12-01

    Plans are presented for conducting a field test of drill pipe corrosion, comparing air and nitrogen as drilling fluids. This test will provide data for evaluating the potential of reducing geothermal well drilling costs by extending drill pipe life and reducing corrosion control costs. The 10-day test will take place during fall 1980 at the Baca Location in Sandoval County, New Mexico.

  14. Vibrational Spectroscopy in Studies of Atmospheric Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saman Hosseinpour

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational spectroscopy has been successfully used for decades in studies of the atmospheric corrosion processes, mainly to identify the nature of corrosion products but also to quantify their amounts. In this review article, a summary of the main achievements is presented with focus on how the techniques infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy can be used in the field. Several different studies have been discussed where these instruments have been used to assess both the nature of corrosion products as well as the properties of corrosion inhibitors. Some of these techniques offer the valuable possibility to perform in-situ measurements in real time on ongoing corrosion processes, which allows the kinetics of formation of corrosion products to be studied, and also minimizes the risk of changing the surface properties which may occur during ex-situ experiments. Since corrosion processes often occur heterogeneously over a surface, it is of great importance to obtain a deeper knowledge about atmospheric corrosion phenomena on the nano scale, and this review also discusses novel vibrational microscopy techniques allowing spectra to be acquired with a spatial resolution of 20 nm.

  15. Factors affecting the corrosivity of pulping liquors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazlewood, Patrick Evan

    Increased equipment failures and the resultant increase in unplanned downtime as the result of process optimization programs continue to plague pulp mills. The failures are a result of a lack of understanding of corrosion in the different pulping liquors, specifically the parameters responsible for its adjustment such as the role and identification of inorganic and organic species. The current work investigates the role of inorganic species, namely sodium hydroxide and sodium sulfide, on liquor corrosivity at a range of process conditions beyond those currently experienced in literature. The role of sulfur species, in the activation of corrosion and the ability of hydroxide to passivate carbon steel A516-Gr70, is evaluated with gravimetric and electrochemical methods. The impact of wood chip weathering on process corrosion was also evaluated. Results were used to identify black liquor components, depending on the wood species, which play a significant role in the activation and inhibition of corrosion for carbon steel A516-Gr70 process equipment. Further, the effect of black liquor oxidation on liquor corrosivity was evaluated. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking performance of selected materials provided information on classes of materials that may be reliably used in aggressive pulping environments.

  16. Aircraft Integral Fuel Tank Corrosion Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-15

    biology of Amorphoteca resinae . Materials und Organismen, 6, (3), p. 161, (1971). 8. D. Cabral. Corrosion by microorganisms of jet aircraft integral fuel...the mycelium of the fungus Hormoconis resinae in the MIC of Al alloys. Proc. XI Int. Corrosion Congress, Houston, USA, 5B, p. 3773, (1993). 14. M

  17. Corrosion effects on soda lime glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, F.A.; Rodichev, Y.M.

    2010-01-01

    Although soda lime glass is the most common used transparent material in architecture, little is known about the corrosion effects on long term strength and the interaction between corrosion and defects. Extensive testing on soda lime bars under different environmental conditions and different

  18. Corrosion problems with aqueous coolants, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diegle, R B; Beavers, J A; Clifford, J E

    1980-04-11

    The results of a one year program to characterize corrosion of solar collector alloys in aqueous heat-transfer media are summarized. The program involved a literature review and a laboratory investigation of corrosion in uninhibited solutions. It consisted of three separate tasks, as follows: review of the state-of-the-art of solar collector corrosion processes; study of corrosion in multimetallic systems; and determination of interaction between different waters and chemical antifreeze additives. Task 1 involved a comprehensive review of published literature concerning corrosion under solar collector operating conditions. The reivew also incorporated data from related technologies, specifically, from research performed on automotive cooling systems, cooling towers, and heat exchangers. Task 2 consisted of determining the corrosion behavior of candidate alloys of construction for solar collectors in different types of aqueous coolants containing various concentrations of corrosive ionic species. Task 3 involved measuring the degradation rates of glycol-based heat-transfer media, and also evaluating the effects of degradation on the corrosion behavior of metallic collector materials.

  19. A Course in Electrochemical and Corrosion Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zee, John

    1985-01-01

    Describes a course designed to show similarities between electrochemistry and corrosion engineering and to show graduate students that electrochemical and corrosion engineering can be accomplished by extending their knowledge of chemical engineering models. Includes course outline, textbooks selected, and teaching methods used. (JN)

  20. Microbiologically influenced corrosion in ship ballast tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyer, A.

    2013-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is known to be a dangerous process in ship tanks due to its rapid and yet unpredictable occurrence, leading to extremely fast local corrosion, possibly jeopardizing the structural integrity, in a relatively short time. This project focuses on a

  1. Computer-Aided Corrosion Program Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowell, Louis

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews Computer-Aided Corrosion Program Management at John F. Kennedy Space Center. The contents include: 1) Corrosion at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC); 2) Requirements and Objectives; 3) Program Description, Background and History; 4) Approach and Implementation; 5) Challenges; 6) Lessons Learned; 7) Successes and Benefits; and 8) Summary and Conclusions.

  2. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Hua; K. Mon

    2003-06-24

    The recommended waste package (WP) design is described in BSC (2001a). The design includes a double-wall WP underneath a protective drip shield (DS) (BSC 2003a). The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation (DOX), general corrosion (GC) and localized corrosion (LC) of the DS plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. The DS design also includes structural supports fabricated from Ti Grade 24. Degradation of Ti Grade 24 is not considered in this report. The DS provides protection for the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. This Model Report (MR) serves as a feed to the Integrated Waste Package Degradation Model (IWPD) analyses, and was developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (BSC 2002a). The models contained in this report serve as a basis to determine whether or not the performance requirements for the DS can be met.

  3. CORROSION RATE OF STEELS DX51D AND S220GD IN DIFFERENT CORROSION ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Crina CIUBOTARIU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion in the marine environment is an important issue because the costs causes by marine corrosion increased year upon year. It is necessary a correctly approach to materials selection, protection and corrosion control to reduce this burden of wasted materials, wasted energy and wasted money. Many different types of corrosion attack can be observed to structures, ships and other equipment used in sea water service. Shipping containers are exposed to various corrosive mediums like as airborne salt, industrial pollutants, rain and saltwater. Transport damage during loading onto and unloading off trucks, train beds and ships breaches the paint coating which further contributes to corrosion. The result is shortened container life and high costs for container repair or replacement. The paper intends to evaluate, by gravimetric method, the corrosion rate and corrosion penetration rate of two types of carbon steel DX51D and S220GD. Carbon steel DX51D and hot-dip galvanized steel S220GD are used in marine and industrial applications for buildings cargo vessels, container ships and oil tankers. For testing it was used different corrosive environments: 5% NaOH solution; 5% HCL solution and 0.5M NaCl solution. The samples were immersed in 400mL of testing solution for exposure period of 28 days. Periodically at 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, 21 days and 28 days was measured de mass loss and evaluate the corrosion rate and corrosion stability coefficient. The steel DX51D was stable in 5% NaOH solution for 28 days, the values of corrosion stability coefficient was 7 after 3 days and 6 after 28 days of immersion in corrosive medium. In 5% HCL solution steels DX51D and S220GD was completely corroded in 21 days with a corrosion stability coefficient equal with 9 for 7 days and 8 for 21 days of immersion in corrosive solution. It was observed a good resistance for 3 days in 0.5M NaCl solution with a corrosion stability coefficient equal with 5, but after that

  4. [Microbiological corrosion of aluminum alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, V F; Belov, D V; Sokolova, T N; Kuzina, O V; Kartashov, V R

    2008-01-01

    Biological corrosion of ADO quality aluminum and aluminum-based construction materials (alloys V65, D16, and D16T) was studied. Thirteen microscopic fungus species and six bacterial species proved to be able to attack aluminum and its alloys. It was found that biocorrosion of metals by microscopic fungi and bacteria was mediated by certain exometabolites. Experiments on biocorrosion of the materials by the microscopic fungus Alternaria alternata, the most active biodegrader, demonstrated that the micromycete attack started with the appearance of exudate with pH 8-9 on end faces of the samples.

  5. Corrosion-Resistant Acrylic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-31

    amount of a corrosion-inhibiting pigment system consisting essentially of critical amounts of at least one zinc phosphate , zinc molybdate and at least... phosphate , zinc , moiybdate and at least one zinc salt of a benzoic acid. 15 Claims, No Drawings 5,100,942 1 2 moDAcinv DrcicT.vT . -™v...8217VT’ T Z^ doned ’ by weight of at leas« one zinc phosphate , 40 «o 260 pans by weigh» of zinc molybdate, and 1 to 30 pans by BACKGROUND OF THE

  6. Corrosion-Resistant Alkyd Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-18

    a corrosion-inhibiting pigment consisting essentially of critical amounts of at least one zinc phosphate , zinc molybdate and at least one zinc salt...of at leajt one 2inc phosphate , continuationi of application 07/211.026 filed June 16, 40 to 260 pans by weight cf zinc molybdate. and 1 to 30 1988... phosphate , zinc molybdate and a. tions of this invention, however, are resistant to harsh lea$t one zmc »•« of a benzoic acid. weather conditions and

  7. Microbial Influenced Corrosion (MIC) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    corrosion morphology (i e tunneling suggests MIC) . ., Inner Surfaces BUSINESS SENSITIVE 6 Outer Surfaces Outer Surfaces Microbial Influenced...environmental conditions expected within areas of aircraft −Identify and assess the effect of possible short- and long- term mitigation technologies...DAY 28 Chrome Conversion Coating  Coupon Type: A    Alodine  1200 (Henkel)  Non‐Chrome Treatment  Coupon Type: E    Prekote® (Pantheon Chemical

  8. Launch Pad Coatings for Smart Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Bucherl, Cori N.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Curran, Jerome P.; Whitten, Mary C.

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion is the degradation of a material as a result of its interaction with the environment. The environment at the KSC launch pads has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in the US. The 70 tons of highly corrosive hydrochloric acid that are generated by the solid rocket boosters during a launch exacerbate the corrosiveness of the environment at the pads. Numerous failures at the pads are caused by the pitting of stainless steels, rebar corrosion, and the degradation of concrete. Corrosion control of launch pad structures relies on the use of coatings selected from the qualified products list (QPL) of the NASA Standard 5008A for Protective Coating of Carbon Steel, Stainless Steel, and Aluminum on Launch Structures, Facilities, and Ground Support Equipment. This standard was developed to establish uniform engineering practices and methods and to ensure the inclusion of essential criteria in the coating of ground support equipment (GSE) and facilities used by or for NASA. This standard is applicable to GSE and facilities that support space vehicle or payload programs or projects and to critical facilities at all NASA locations worldwide. Environmental regulation changes have dramatically reduced the production, handling, use, and availability of conventional protective coatings for application to KSC launch structures and ground support equipment. Current attrition rate of qualified KSC coatings will drastically limit the number of commercial off the shelf (COTS) products available for the Constellation Program (CxP) ground operations (GO). CxP GO identified corrosion detection and control technologies as a critical, initial capability technology need for ground processing of Ares I and Ares V to meet Constellation Architecture Requirements Document (CARD) CxP 70000 operability requirements for reduced ground processing complexity, streamlined integrated testing, and operations phase affordability

  9. Steam generator corrosion 2007; Dampferzeugerkorrosion 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Born, M. (ed.)

    2007-07-01

    Between 8th and 9th November, 2007, SAXONIA Standortentwicklungs- und -verwertungsgesellschaft GmbH (Freiberg, Federal Republic of Germany) performed the 3rd Freiberger discussion conference ''Fireside boiler corrosion''. The topics of the lectures are: (a) Steam generator corrosion - an infinite history (Franz W. Alvert); (b) CFD computations for thermal waste treatment plants - a contribution for the damage recognition and remedy (Klaus Goerner, Thomas Klasen); (c) Experiences with the use of corrosion probes (Siegfried R. Horn, Ferdinand Haider, Barbara Waldmann, Ragnar Warnecke); (d) Use of additives for the limitation of the high temperature chlorine corrosion as an option apart from other measures to the corrosion protection (Wolfgang Spiegel); (e) Current research results and aims of research with respect to chlorine corrosion (Ragnar Warnecke); (f) Systematics of the corrosion phenomena - notes for the enterprise and corrosion protection (Thomas Herzog, Wolfgang Spiegel, Werner Schmidl); (g) Corrosion protection by cladding in steam generators of waste incinerators (Joerg Metschke); (h) Corrosion protection and wear protection by means of thermal spraying in steam generators (Dietmar Bendix); (i) Review of thick film nickelized components as an effective protection against high-temperature corrosion (Johann-Wilhelm Ansey); (j) Fireproof materials for waste incinerators - characteristics and profile of requirement (Johannes Imle); (k) Service life-relevant aspects of fireproof linings in the thermal recycling of waste (Till Osthoevener and Wolfgang Kollenberg); (l) Alternatives to the fireproof material in the heating space (Heino Sinn); (m) Cladding: Inconal 625 contra 686 - Fundamentals / applications in boiler construction and plant construction (Wolfgang Hoffmeister); (n) Thin films as efficient corrosion barriers - thermal spray coating in waste incinerators and biomass firing (Ruediger W. Schuelein, Steffen Hoehne, Friedrich

  10. Numerical Study of Corrosion Crack Opening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    for the corrosion crack opening. Experiments and theoretical analysis by a numerical method, FEM, support that the relation between the reduction of the reinforcement bar diameter due to corrosion and the corresponding increase in crack width for a given time interval, measured on the surface of a concrete specimen...... is proportional. More recently, the constant of proportionality, the so-called crack-corrosion index, has been studied further with respect to its dependence on the diameter of the reinforcement and the concrete cover. In the present paper the above-mentioned work is presented and extended with more realistic 3D......-models of the cracked concrete beam. The crack-corrosion index is evaluated for a variation of different parameters, i.e. bar diameter, concrete cover, crack length and type of corrosion product. This paper is an extended version of a paper by Thoft-Christensen et al. (2005) presented at the IFIP WG 7.5 Conference...

  11. Modeling of Corrosion-induced Concrete Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Anna Emilie A.; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper a finite element model is introduced to simulate corrosion-induced damage in concrete. The model takes into account the penetration of corrosion products into the concrete as well as non-uniform formation of corrosion products around the reinforcement. To ac-count for the non......-uniform formation of corrosion products at the concrete/reinforcement interface, a deterministic approach is used. The model gives good estimates of both deformations in the con-crete/reinforcement interface and crack width when compared to experimental data. Further, it is shown that non-uniform deposition...... of corrosion products affects both the time-to cover cracking and the crack width at the concrete surface....

  12. Corrosion protection with eco-friendly inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Muhammad

    2011-12-01

    Corrosion occurs as a result of the interaction of a metal with its environment. The extent of corrosion depends on the type of metal, the existing conditions in the environment and the type of aggressive ions present in the medium. For example, CO3-2 and NO-3 produce an insoluble deposit on the surface of iron, resulting in the isolation of metal and consequent decrease of corrosion. On the other hand, halide ions are adsorbed selectively on the metal surface and prevent formation of the oxide phase on the metal surface, resulting in continuous corrosion. Iron, aluminum and their alloys are widely used, both domestically and industrially. Linear alkylbenzene and linear alkylbenzene sulfonate are commonly used as detergents. They have also been found together in waste water. It is claimed that these chemicals act as inhibitors for stainless steel and aluminum. Release of toxic gases as a result of corrosion in pipelines may lead in certain cases to air pollution and possible health hazards. Therefore, there are two ways to look at the relationship between corrosion and pollution: (i) corrosion of metals and alloys due to environmental pollution and (ii) environmental pollution as a result of corrosion protection. This paper encompasses the two scenarios and possible remedies for various cases, using 'green' inhibitors obtained either from plant extracts or from pharmaceutical compounds. In the present study, the effect of piperacillin sodium as a corrosion inhibitor for mild steel was investigated using a weight-loss method as well as a three-electrode dc electrochemical technique. It was found that the corrosion rate decreased as the concentration of the inhibitor increased up to 9×10-4 M 93% efficiency was exhibited at this concentration.

  13. Corrosion performance of advanced structural materials in sodium.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Li, M.; Rink, D.L. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-05-16

    This report gives a description of the activities in design, fabrication, construction, and assembling of a pumped sodium loop for the sodium compatibility studies on advanced structural materials. The work is the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) portion of the effort on the work project entitled, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials,' and is a part of Advanced Materials Development within the Reactor Campaign. The objective of this project is to develop information on sodium corrosion compatibility of advanced materials being considered for sodium reactor applications. This report gives the status of the sodium pumped loop at Argonne National Laboratory, the specimen details, and the technical approach to evaluate the sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. This report is a deliverable from ANL in FY2010 (M2GAN10SF050302) under the work package G-AN10SF0503 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials.' Two reports were issued in 2009 (Natesan and Meimei Li 2009, Natesan et al. 2009) which examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design specifications for the ANL pumped loop for testing advanced structural materials. Available information was presented on solubility of several metallic and nonmetallic elements along with a discussion of the possible mechanisms for the accumulation of impurities in sodium. That report concluded that the solubility of many metals in sodium is low (<1 part per million) in the temperature range of interest in sodium reactors and such trace amounts would not impact the mechanical integrity of structural materials and components. The earlier report also analyzed the solubility and transport mechanisms of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen in laboratory sodium loops and in reactor systems such as Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, Fast Flux

  14. Comparison of galvanic corrosion potential of metal injection molded brackets to that of conventional metal brackets with nickel-titanium and copper nickel-titanium archwire combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, D Praveen Kumar; Chidambaram, S; Reddy, K Baburam; Vijay, M; Ravindranath, D; Prasad, M Rajendra

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the galvanic corrosion potential of metal injection molding (MIM) brackets to that of conventional brackets under similar in vitro conditions with nickel-titanium and copper nickel-titanium archwires. Twenty-five maxillary premolar MIM stainless steel brackets and 25 conventional stainless steel brackets and archwires, 0.16 inch, each 10 mm length, 25 nickeltitanium wires, 25 copper nickel-titanium wires were used. They were divided into four groups which had five samples each. Combination of MIM bracket with copper nickel-titanium wire, MIM bracket with nickel-titanium wire and conventional stainless steel brackets with copper nickel-titanium wire and conventional stainless steel brackets with nickel-titanium wires which later were suspended in 350 ml of 1 M lactic acid solution media. Galvanic corrosion potential of four groups were analyzed under similar in vitro conditions. Precorrosion and postcorrosion elemental composition of MIM and conventional stainless steel bracket by scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscope (EDS) was done. MIM bracket showed decreased corrosion susceptibility than conventional bracket with copper nickeltitanium wire. Both MIM and conventional bracket showed similar corrosion resistance potential in association with nickel-titanium archwires. It seems that both brackets are more compatible with copper nickel-titanium archwires regarding the decrease in the consequences of galvanic reaction. The EDS analysis showed that the MIM brackets with copper nickel-titanium wires released less metal ions than conventional bracket with copper nickeltitanium wires. MIM brackets showed decreased corrosion susceptibility, copper nickel-titanium archwires are compatible with both the brackets than nickel-titanium archwires. Clinically MIM and conventional brackets behaved more or less similarly in terms of corrosion resistance. In order to decrease the corrosion potential of MIM

  15. Pipeline corrosion prevention by pH stabilization or corrosion inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyborg, Rolf [Institute for Energy Technology, Oslo (Norway)

    2009-07-01

    In many offshore oil and gas projects the pipeline costs are a considerable part of the investment and can become prohibitively high if the corrosivity of the fluid necessitates the use of corrosion resistant alloys instead of carbon steel. Development of more robust and reliable methods for internal corrosion control can increase the application range of carbon steel and therefore have a large economic impact. Corrosion control of carbon steel pipelines has traditionally often been managed by the use of corrosion inhibitors. The pH stabilization technique has been successfully used for corrosion control of several large wet gas pipelines in the last years. This method has advantages over film forming corrosion inhibitors when no or little formation water is produced. The use of corrosion inhibitors in multiphase pipelines implies several challenges which are not fully accounted for in traditional corrosion inhibitor testing procedures. Specialized test procedures have been developed to take account for the presence of emulsions dispersions and sand and clay particles in corrosion inhibitor testing. (author)

  16. Toward Clinically Compatible Phase-Contrast Mammography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Scherer

    Full Text Available Phase-contrast mammography using laboratory X-ray sources is a promising approach to overcome the relatively low sensitivity and specificity of clinical, absorption-based screening. Current research is mostly centered on identifying potential diagnostic benefits arising from phase-contrast and dark-field mammography and benchmarking the latter with conventional state-of-the-art imaging methods. So far, little effort has been made to adjust this novel imaging technique to clinical needs. In this article, we address the key points for a successful implementation to a clinical routine in the near future and present the very first dose-compatible and rapid scan-time phase-contrast mammograms of both a freshly dissected, cancer-bearing mastectomy specimen and a mammographic accreditation phantom.

  17. Fuel System Compatibility Issues for Prometheus-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DC Noe; KB Gibbard; MH Krohn

    2006-01-20

    Compatibility issues for the Prometheus-1 fuel system have been reviewed based upon the selection of UO{sub 2} as the reference fuel material. In particular, the potential for limiting effects due to fuel- or fission product-component (cladding, liner, spring, etc) chemical interactions and clad-liner interactions have been evaluated. For UO{sub 2}-based fuels, fuel-component interactions are not expected to significantly limit performance. However, based upon the selection of component materials, there is a potential for degradation due to fission products. In particular, a chemical liner may be necessary for niobium, tantalum, zirconium, or silicon carbide-based systems. Multiple choices exist for the configuration of a chemical liner within the cladding; there is no clear solution that eliminates all concerns over the mechanical performance of a clad/liner system. A series of tests to evaluate the performance of candidate materials in contact with real and simulated fission products is outlined.

  18. fMRI-Compatible Electromagnetic Haptic Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riener, R; Villgrattner, T; Kleiser, R; Nef, T; Kollias, S

    2005-01-01

    A new haptic interface device is suggested, which can be used for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. The basic component of this 1 DOF haptic device are two coils that produce a Lorentz force induced by the large static magnetic field of the MR scanner. A MR-compatible optical angular encoder and a optical force sensor enable the implementation of different control architectures for haptic interactions. The challenge was to provide a large torque, and not to affect image quality by the currents applied in the device. The haptic device was tested in a 3T MR scanner. With a current of up to 1A and a distance of 1m to the focal point of the MR-scanner it was possible to generate torques of up to 4 Nm. Within these boundaries image quality was not affected.

  19. Internal corrosion of EK164 and CHS68 fuel pin cladding steels of uranium dioxide fast power reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Kinev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic chromium-nickel steel EK-164 is the promising material for manufacturing claddings of fuel pins of fast nuclear reactors. Physical and chemical compatibility with typical nuclear fuel compositions on the basis of uranium dioxide pellets is an important aspect of ensuring fuel cladding operability. Post-irradiation examination of irradiated combined fuel assembly with maximum burnup 9.1% FIMA and damaging dose of 77.3dpa equipped with fuel pins with claddings made of CHS-68 and EK-164 steels in cold-worked state was performed. Gamma-scanning, electric potential resistometry and optical metallography methods were applied in the examination. According to the gamma-scanning and resistometry data high-temperature sections of fuel pins are the potential centers of development of fuel pin cladding corrosion. Comparative analysis of internal corrosion of fuel pin claddings made of EK-164 and CHS-68 steels along the reactor core height was performed. In the section with maximum power density at operational temperatures below 540°С depth of corrosion of CHS-68 steel from the side of fuel did not exceed 15µm. On similar sections of fuel pin cladding made of EK-164 steel depth of internal corrosion amounted to 10µm. Maximum of corrosion damage for both steel types was registered at temperatures in the range from 600°С to 650°С. In this case depth of corrosion damages in the form of intercrystalline and general corrosion did not exceed 20µm. No significant differences in the corrosion mechanism between the steels were found. Local exacerbation of corrosion at the junctions between fuel pellets and in places of concentration of cesium fission fragments was detected. And contrariwise in place of narrowing residual gap between fuel and cladding, where cesium is not present, corrosion of EK-164 steel is minimal. Maximum thinning of cladding of the investigated fuel pins with maximum burnup of 9% FIMA amounted to not more than 5% of the

  20. Developing 2 C-compatible investment criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeser, Frauke [NewClimate - Institute for Climate Policy and Global Sustainability gGmbH, Bonn (Germany); Weischer, Lutz [Germanwatch e.V., Koeln (Germany); Thomae, Jakob [2degrees Investing Initiative, New York, NY (United States); Hoehne, Niklas; Hagemann, Markus; El Alaoui, Alexander; Bals, Christoph; Eckstein, David; Kreft, Soenke; Rosse, Morten

    2015-11-30

    This report studies the development of criteria for assessing the compatibility of financial investments with the international goal to limit global temperature increase to below 2 C above pre-industrial levels. The findings are intended as a starting point and a key input for a longer term process to develop consensus-based 2 C investing criteria. The focus here is placed on investments in projects and physical assets, in particular of development and climate finance organisations. In order to limit global temperature increase to 2 C, global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions will have to be reduced significantly, eventually to zero, during the course of this century. This requires shifting capital from high to low carbon investments as well as significant capital mobilisation for investments in 2 C-compatible infrastructure. Given the long lifetime of physical assets, and the urgency of decarbonisation over the coming decades, this needs to begin today. Public financial institutions can play a prominent role in contributing to aligning investment flows with the 2 C limit, as well as in closing the current infrastructure investment gap, responding to their explicit or implicit climate mandates and leadership role in the finance sector. The majority of international financial institutions integrate climate considerations into their finance decisions to some degree, and are familiar with different types of criteria, including positive and negative lists, qualitative and quantitative benchmarks, and the use of shadow carbon pricing. However, current approaches do not link to the 2 C limit. 2 C investment criteria are therefore needed to guide investors in this regard. Such criteria may also support other purposes, including an understanding of climate risks and improved reporting and accountability.