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Sample records for compatibility analysis ii

  1. Genomic analysis identifies class II mismatches in serologically DR-compatible human renal allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushell, A; Wood, K J; Morris, P J

    1988-11-01

    Many studies, including those from our own center, have shown that matching the donor and recipient for HLA-DR antigens has a beneficial effect on the outcome of cadaveric renal transplantation. However, cases of irreversible graft rejection are sometimes seen in patients who have received an HLA-DR-compatible kidney, suggesting that serologic compatibility for HLA-DR may not always ensure reduced alloreactivity toward the graft. We have examined a number of recipients and their serologically DR-compatible cadaveric donors by Southern blotting and hybridization with locus specific HLA class II probes in order to determine whether in these patients there were class II mismatches that had been undetected by serology. The results show that the analysis of DR beta restriction fragment patterns does little more than complement and confirm the serologic identification of HLA-DR. Hybridization with DQ alpha and DQ beta probes, however, significantly extends the number of DQ specificities that can be detected and suggests that DQ mismatches in DR-compatible donor-recipient pairs may be more common than previously supposed, although it is not possible to draw any conclusions on the influence of DQ incompatibilities in the presence of DR compatibility on graft outcome.

  2. Progress of the DUPIC fuel compatibility analysis (II) - thermal-hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joo Hwan; Choi, Hang Bok

    2005-03-01

    Thermal-hydraulic compatibility of the DUPIC fuel bundle with a 713 MWe Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU-6) reactor was studied by using both the single channel and sub-channel analysis methods. The single channel analysis provides the fuel channel flow rate, pressure drop, critical channel power, and the channel exit quality, which are assessed against the thermal-hydraulic design requirements of the CANDU-6 reactor. The single channel analysis by the NUCIRC code showed that the thermal-hydraulic performance of the DUPIC fuel is not different from that of the standard CANDU fuel. Regarding the local flow characteristics, the sub-channel analysis also showed that the uncertainty of the critical channel power calculation for the DUPIC fuel channel is very small. As a result, both the single and sub-channel analyses showed that the key thermal-hydraulic parameters of the DUPIC fuel channel do not deteriorate compared to the standard CANDU fuel channel.

  3. Compatibility analysis of 3D printer resin for biological applications

    KAUST Repository

    Sivashankar, Shilpa

    2016-08-30

    The salient features of microfluidics such as reduced cost, handling small sample and reagent volumes and less time required to fabricate the devices has inspired the present work. The incompatibility of three-dimensional printer resins in their native form and the method to improve their compatibility to many biological processes via surface modification are reported. The compatibility of the material to build microfluidic devices was evaluated in three different ways: (i) determining if the ultraviolet (UV) cured resin inhibits the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), i.e. testing devices for PCR compatibility; (ii) observing agglutination complex formed on the surface of the UV cured resin when anti-C-reactive protein (CRP) antibodies and CRP proteins were allowed to agglutinate; and (iii) by culturing human embryonic kidney cell line cells and testing for its attachment and viability. It is shown that only a few among four in its native form could be used for fabrication of microchannels and that had the least effect on biological molecules that could be used for PCR and protein interactions and cells, whereas the others were used after treating the surface. Importance in building lab-on-chip/micrototal analysis systems and organ-on-chip devices is found.

  4. Electromagnetic compatibility in railways. Analysis and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogunsola, Ade [Parsons Group International, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Mariscotti, Andrea [Genoa Univ. (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    Recent research on electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) applied to railway systems. Focuses on the principles and application of EMC concepts to railway signalling, communications, power/traction and rolling stocks. Written by leading experts in the field. A railway is a complex distributed engineering system: the construction of a new railway or the modernisation of a existing one requires a deep understanding of the constitutive components and their interaction, inside the system itself and towards the outside world. The former covers the various subsystems (featuring a complex mix of high power sources, sensitive safety critical systems, intentional transmitters, etc.) and their interaction, including the specific functions and their relevance to safety. The latter represents all the additional possible external victims and sources of electromagnetic interaction. EMC thus starts from a comprehension of the emissions and immunity characteristics and the interactions between sources and victims, with a strong relationship to electromagnetics and to system modeling. On the other hand, the said functions are achieved and preserved and their relevance for safety is adequately handled, if the related requirements are well posed and managed throughout the process from the beginning. The link is represented by standards and their correct application, as a support to analysis, testing and demonstration.

  5. Analysis II

    CERN Document Server

    Tao, Terence

    2016-01-01

    This is part two of a two-volume book on real analysis and is intended for senior undergraduate students of mathematics who have already been exposed to calculus. The emphasis is on rigour and foundations of analysis. Beginning with the construction of the number systems and set theory, the book discusses the basics of analysis (limits, series, continuity, differentiation, Riemann integration), through to power series, several variable calculus and Fourier analysis, and then finally the Lebesgue integral. These are almost entirely set in the concrete setting of the real line and Euclidean spaces, although there is some material on abstract metric and topological spaces. The book also has appendices on mathematical logic and the decimal system. The entire text (omitting some less central topics) can be taught in two quarters of 25–30 lectures each. The course material is deeply intertwined with the exercises, as it is intended that the student actively learn the material (and practice thinking and writing ri...

  6. Major histocompatibility complex class II compatibility, but not class I, predicts mate choice in a bird with highly developed olfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandh, Maria; Westerdahl, Helena; Pontarp, Mikael; Canbäck, Björn; Dubois, Marie-Pierre; Miquel, Christian; Taberlet, Pierre; Bonadonna, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    Mate choice for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) compatibility has been found in several taxa, although rarely in birds. MHC is a crucial component in adaptive immunity and by choosing an MHC-dissimilar partner, heterozygosity and potentially broad pathogen resistance is maximized in the offspring. The MHC genotype influences odour cues and preferences in mammals and fish and hence olfactory-based mate choice can occur. We tested whether blue petrels, Halobaena caerulea, choose partners based on MHC compatibility. This bird is long-lived, monogamous and can discriminate between individual odours using olfaction, which makes it exceptionally well suited for this analysis. We screened MHC class I and II B alleles in blue petrels using 454-pyrosequencing and quantified the phylogenetic, functional and allele-sharing similarity between individuals. Partners were functionally more dissimilar at the MHC class II B loci than expected from random mating (p = 0.033), whereas there was no such difference at the MHC class I loci. Phylogenetic and non-sequence-based MHC allele-sharing measures detected no MHC dissimilarity between partners for either MHC class I or II B. Our study provides evidence of mate choice for MHC compatibility in a bird with a high dependency on odour cues, suggesting that MHC odour-mediated mate choice occurs in birds.

  7. Maternal HLA class II compatibility in men with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Anne M; Tsao, Betty P; Hahn, Bevra H; Guthrie, Katherine; Lambert, Nathalie C; Porter, Allison J; Tylee, Tracy S; Nelson, J Lee

    2005-09-01

    Maternal-fetal cell transfer during pregnancy can lead to long-lasting microchimerism, which raises the question of whether microchimerism sometimes contributes to autoimmune disease later in life. In an experimental model, transfusion of parental lymphocytes homozygous for major histocompatibility complex alleles results in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We identified male patients with SLE and healthy male subjects and their mothers in order to investigate the mother-son HLA relationship in SLE risk. Male subjects were selected in order to avoid confounding due to fetal microchimerism, which may occur in women. HLA genotyping for DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1 was conducted for sons and their mothers. Thirty men with SLE and their mothers were compared with 76 healthy men and their mothers. Sons with SLE were HLA-identical with their mothers (bidirectionally compatible) for the basic HLA-DRB1 groups encoded by DRB1*01 through DRB1*14 more often than were healthy sons (odds ratio [OR] 5.0, P = 0.006). Each DRB1 group contains multiple allelic variants; male patients with SLE and their mothers often were identical for both DRB1 allelic variants (OR 3.2, P = 0.08). For DQA1 and DQB1, the ORs were 2.3 (P = 0.08) and 2.0 (P = 0.21), respectively. When analysis was limited to male subjects with SLE-associated HLA genes (encoding HLA-DR2 or HLA-DR3), the differences further increased for DRB1 basic groups (OR 7.2, P = 0.01), DRB1 alleles (OR 15.0, P = 0.018), DQA1 6.4 (P = 0.006), and DQB1 (OR 5.7, P = 0.027). No increase in (unidirectional) compatibility of the mother from the son's perspective was observed at any locus. We observed increased bidirectional HLA class II compatibility of male SLE patients and their mothers compared with healthy men and their mothers. This observation implies that maternal microchimerism could sometimes be involved in SLE and therefore merits further investigation.

  8. Progress of the DUPIC Fuel Compatibility Analysis (IV) - Fuel Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Ryu, Ho Jin; Roh, Gyu Hong; Jeong, Chang Joon; Park, Chang Je; Song, Kee Chan; Lee, Jung Won

    2005-10-15

    This study describes the mechanical compatibility of the direct use of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel in Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors (DUPIC) fuel, when it is loaded into a CANDU reactor. The mechanical compatibility can be assessed for the fuel management, primary heat transport system, fuel channel, and the fuel handling system in the reactor core by both the experimental and analytic methods. Because the physical dimensions of the DUPIC fuel bundle adopt the CANDU flexible (CANFLEX) fuel bundle design which has already been demonstrated for a commercial use in CANDU reactors, the experimental compatibility analyses focused on the generation of material property data and the irradiation tests of the DUPIC fuel, which are used for the computational analysis. The intermediate results of the mechanical compatibility analysis have shown that the integrity of the DUPIC fuel is mostly maintained under the high power and high burnup conditions even though some material properties like the thermal conductivity is a little lower compared to the uranium fuel. However it is required to slightly change the current DUPIC fuel design to accommodate the high internal pressure of the fuel element. It is also strongly recommended to perform more irradiation tests of the DUPIC fuel to accumulate a database for the demonstration of the DUPIC fuel performance in the CANDU reactor.

  9. Compatibility analysis of DUPIC fuel (part 3) - radiation physics analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chun Soo; Bae, Dae Seok; Kim, Kyung Su; Park, Byung Yun; Koh, Young Kown

    2000-04-01

    As a part of the compatibility analysis of DUPIC fuel in CANDU reactors, the radiation physics calculations have been performed for the CANDU primary shielding system, thermal shield, radiation damage, transportation cask and storage. At first, the primary shield system was assessed for the DUPIC fuel core, which has shown that the dose rates and heat deposition rates through the primary shield of the DUPIC fuel core are not much different from those of natural uranium core because the power levels on the core periphery are similar for both cores. Secondly, the radiation effects on the critical components and the themal shields were assessed when the DUPIC fuel is loaded in CANDU reactors. Compared with the displacement per atom (DPA) of the critical component for natural uranium core, that for the DUPIC fuel core was increased by -30% for the innermost groove and the weld points and by -10% for the corner of the calandria subshells and annular plates in the calandria, respectivdely. Finally, the feasibility study of the DUPIC fuel handling was performed, which has shown that all handling and inspection of the DUPIC fuel bundles be done remotely and behind a shielding wall. For the transportation of the DUPIC fuel, the preliminary study has shown that there shold be no technical problem th design a transportation cask for the fresh and spent DUPIC fuel bundles. For the storage of the fresh and spent DUPIC fuels, there is no the criticality safety problem unless the fuel bundle geometry is destroyed.

  10. Electromagnetic Compatibility Analysis Group VA-H3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armanda, Carlos A.

    2008-01-01

    During the eight weeks working at NASA, I was fortunate enough to work with the Expendable Launch Vehicle's (ELV) Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) Team, who is responsible for the evaluation and analysis of any EMI risk an ELV mission might face. This group of people concern themselves with practically any form of electromagnetic interference that may risk the safety of a rocket, a mission, or even people. Taking this into consideration, the group investigates natural forms of interference, such as lightning, to manmade interferences, such as antennas.

  11. Carrier Analysis Lab (CAL) – Aircraft/Weapons/Ship Compatibility Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The Carrier Analysis Lab (CAL) - Aircraft/Weapons/Ship Compatibility Lab located at the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, NJ provides...

  12. Characterization of Type-II Acetylated Cellulose Nanocrystals with Various Degree of Substitution and Its Compatibility in PLA Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Dong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to decrease the self-agglomeration and improve the hydrophobic properties of type-II acetylated cellulose nanocrystals (ACNC II, various degree of substitution (DS values of ACNCs were successfully prepared by a single-step method from microcrystalline cellulose with anhydrous phosphoric acid as the solvent, and acetic anhydride as the acetylation reagent, under different reaction temperatures (20–40 °C. To thoroughly investigate the DS values of ACNC II, analyses were performed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, 13C cross polarization-magic angle spinning (CP-MAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. At a reaction temperature of 40°C, the highest DS value was successfully obtained. XRD proved that the crystal structure of ACNC II with various DS values was maintained after acetylation. TEM showed the threadlike shape for ACNC II with various DS values. The ACNC II with various DS values was introduced into a polylactic acid (PLA matrix to produce PLA/ACNC composite films, which showed improved rheological and thermal properties. This improvement was primarily attributed to good dispersion of the ACNC II, and the interfacial compatibility between ACNC II and the PLA matrix. This study aims to analyze the compatibility of ACNC II with various DS values in the PLA matrix by microstructure, crystallization, and rheological and thermal tests.

  13. Numerical analysis II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of; Staff of Research Education Association

    1989-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Numerical Analysis II covers simultaneous linear systems and matrix methods, differential equations, Fourier transformations, partial differential equations, and Monte Carlo methods.

  14. Compatible host/mycorrhizal fungus combinations for micropropagated sea oats: II. Field evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Agely, Abid; Sylvia, David M

    2008-07-01

    Sea oats (Uniola paniculata L.) are the dominant plant in the pioneer coastal dunes of Florida and are widely used for dune restoration. DNA analysis has revealed significant ecotypic variation among Atlantic and Gulf coast populations of sea oats, but little is known about the diversity of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) communities present in the dune systems. In a prior greenhouse study, we evaluated the functional diversity that exists among the AM fungal communities from divergent Florida dunes and selected effective host/AM fungus combinations for further study. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of these compatible combinations on the growth of sea oats planted at Anastasia State Recreation Area (AN) on the Atlantic coast and St. George Island State Park (SG) on the Gulf coast. Micropropagated sea oats from each site were inoculated with AM fungal communities also from AN and SG or a microbial filtrate control. The complete factorial of treatment combinations were grown in the greenhouse for 8 weeks and outplanted to the AN and SG field sites. After 1 year, root colonization was evaluated, and after 2 years, root colonization, shoot and root dry masses, and shoot- and root-P contents were determined. Overall, sea oats planted at AN had greater percent root colonization, shoot dry mass, and shoot-P content than those planted at SG. At AN, the local sea oat ecotype responded more to the fungal community from the same site relative to shoot dry mass and shoot-P content. At SG, the local fungal community produced larger plants with greater P content regardless of the origin of the host. We conclude that sea oat productivity is responsive to AM fungal ecotype as well as host ecotype, and fungal origin should therefore be taken into account when planning sea oat plantings on coastal dunes.

  15. Basic EMC (Electromagnetic Compatibility) Technology Advancement for C3 Systems - Model Revision for IEMCAP (Intrasystem Electromagnetic Compatibility Analysis Program).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    Leviatan and A. T. Adams, The Response of a Two-Wire Transmission Line to Incident Field and Voltage Excitation, Including the Effects of Higher Order Hodes...AFB, NY. [20] W. R. Johnson, A. K. Thomas , et. al., Development of a Space Vehicle Electromagnetic Interference/Compatibility Specification, NASA

  16. IPv4 and IPv6 protocol compatibility options analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Misevičienė

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The popularity of the internet has led to a very rapid growth of IPv4 (Internet Protocol v4 users. This caused a shortage of IP addresses, so it was created a new version – IPv6 (Internet Protocol v6. Currently, there are two versions of IP for IPv4 and IPv6. Due to the large differences in addressing the protocols IPv4 and IPv6 are incompatible. It is therefore necessary to find ways to move from IPv4 to IPv6. To facilitate the transition from one version to another are developed various mechanisms and strategies. Comparative analysis is done for dual stack, 6to4 tunnel and NAT64 mechanisms in this work. It has helped to reveal the shortcomings of these mechanisms and their application in selection of realization decisions.

  17. Level-1 Data Driver Card of the ATLAS New Small Wheel Upgrade Compatible with the Phase II 1 MHz Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Gkountoumis, Panagiotis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Level-1 Data Driver Card (L1DDC) will be designed for the needs of the future upgrades of the innermost stations of the ATLAS end-cap muon spectrometer. The L1DDC is a high speed aggregator board capable of communicating with a large number of front-end electronics. It collects the Level-1 data along with monitoring data and transmits them to a network interface through a single bidirectional fiber link. In addition, the L1DDC board distributes trigger, time and configuration data coming from the network interface to the front-end boards. The L1DDC is fully compatible with the Phase II upgrade where the trigger rate is expected to reach 1 MHz. This paper describes the overall scheme of the data acquisition process and especially the L1DDC board. Finally, the electronics layout on the chamber is also mentioned

  18. COMPATIBILITY AND PHASE BEHAVIOR OF PS/SBR BLENDS Ⅱ. TORSIONAL BRAID ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Yingkun; FENG Zhiliu

    1990-01-01

    The compatibility and phase behavior of PS/SBR blends was studied with torsional braid analysis technique. The technique used in this study for preparation of braids was first developed by one of the authors, which gives more precise phase diagram as compared to other conventional methods.The results obtained are in good agreement with those obtained in our previous work.

  19. Mathematical analysis II

    CERN Document Server

    Canuto, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the volume is to provide a support textbook for a second lecture course on Mathematical Analysis. The contents are organised to suit, in particular, students of Engineering, Computer Science and Physics, all areas in which mathematical tools play a crucial role. The basic notions and methods concerning integral and differential calculus for multivariable functions, series of functions and ordinary differential equations are presented in a manner that elicits critical reading and prompts a hands-on approach to concrete applications. The pedagogical layout echoes the one used in the companion text Mathematical Analysis I. The book’s structure has a specifically-designed modular nature, which allows for great flexibility in the preparation of a lecture course on Mathematical Analysis. The style privileges clarity in the exposition and a linear progression through the theory. The material is organised on two levels. The first, reflected in this book, allows students to grasp the essential ideas, ...

  20. Mating Compatibility and Restriction Analysis of Ganoderma Isolates from Oil Palm and Other Palm Hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Chan Jer; Seman, Idris Abu; Zakaria, Latiffah

    2015-12-01

    Mating compatibility and restriction analyses of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions were performed to determine the relations between Ganoderma boninense, the most common species associated with basal stem rot in oil palm and Ganoderma isolates from infected oil palm, two ornamental palms, sealing wax palm (Cyrtostachys renda) and MacArthur palm (Ptychosperma macarthurii), an isolate from coconut stump (Cocos nucifera), Ganoderma miniatocinctum, Ganoderma zonatum and Ganoderma tornatum. The results showed that G. boninense was compatible with Ganoderma isolates from oil palm, G. miniatocinctum and G. zonatum, Ganoderma isolates from sealing wax palm, MacArthur palm and coconut stump. G. boninense was not compatible with G. tornatum. Therefore, the results suggested that the G. boninense, G. miniatocinctum, G. zonatum, and Ganoderma isolates from oil palm, ornamental palms and coconut stump could represent the same biological species. In performing a restriction analysis of the ITS regions, variations were observed in which five haplotypes were generated from the restriction patterns. An unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages (UPGMA) cluster analysis showed that all the Ganoderma isolates were grouped into five primary groups, and the similarity values of the isolates ranged from 97% to 100%. Thus, a restriction analysis of the ITS regions showed that G. boninense and the Ganoderma isolates from other palm hosts were closely related. On the basis of the mating compatibility test and the restriction analysis of the ITS regions performed in this study, a diverse group of Ganoderma species from oil palm and other palm hosts are closely related, except for G. tornatum and Ganoderma isolates from tea and rubber.

  1. Mathematical analysis II

    CERN Document Server

    Zorich, Vladimir A

    2016-01-01

    This second English edition of a very popular two-volume work presents a thorough first course in analysis, leading from real numbers to such advanced topics as differential forms on manifolds; asymptotic methods; Fourier, Laplace, and Legendre transforms; elliptic functions; and distributions. Especially notable in this course are the clearly expressed orientation toward the natural sciences and the informal exploration of the essence and the roots of the basic concepts and theorems of calculus. Clarity of exposition is matched by a wealth of instructive exercises, problems, and fresh applications to areas seldom touched on in textbooks on real analysis. The main difference between the second and first English editions is the addition of a series of appendices to each volume. There are six of them in the first volume and five in the second. The subjects of these appendices are diverse. They are meant to be useful to both students (in mathematics and physics) and teachers, who may be motivated by different go...

  2. Proteomic analysis of the compatible interaction of wheat and powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Yang, Xiwen; Liu, Xinhao; Yu, Haibo; Du, Congyang; Li, Mengda; He, Dexian

    2017-02-01

    Proteome characteristics of wheat leaves with the powdery mildew pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt) infection were investigated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and tandem MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. We identified 46 unique proteins which were differentially expressed at 24, 48, and 72 h post-inoculation. The functional classification of these proteins showed that most of them were involved in photosynthesis, carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolism, defense responses, and signal transduction. Upregulated proteins included primary metabolism pathways and defense responses, while proteins related to photosynthesis and signal transduction were mostly downregulated. As expected, more antioxidative proteins were activated at the later infection stage than the earlier stage, suggesting that the antioxidative system of host plays a role in maintaining the compatible interaction between wheat and powdery mildew. A high accumulation of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase in infected leaves indicated the regulation of the TCA cycle and pentose phosphate pathway in parallel to the activation of host defenses. The downregulation of MAPK5 could be facilitated for the compatible interaction of wheat plants and Bgt. qRT-PCR analysis supported the data of protein expression profiles. Our results reveal the relevance of primary plant metabolism and defense responses during compatible interaction, and provide new insights into the biology of susceptible wheat in response to Bgt infection.

  3. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of virulence factors in Leptosphaeria maculans during compatible and incompatible interactions with canola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humira Sonah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Leptosphaeria maculans is a hemibiotrophic fungus that causes blackleg of canola (Brassica napus, one of the most devastating diseases of this crop. In the present study, transcriptome profiling of L. maculans was performed in an effort to understand and define the pathogenicity genes that govern both the biotrophic and the necrotrophic phase of the fungus, as well as those that separate a compatible from an incompatible interaction. For this purpose, comparative RNA-seq analyses were performed on L. maculans isolate D5 at four different time points following inoculation on susceptible cultivar Topas-wild or resistant near isogenic line Topas-Rlm2. Analysis of 1.6 billion Illumina reads readily identified differentially expressed genes that were over represented by candidate secretory effector proteins, CAZymes, and other pathogenicity genes. Comparisons between the compatible and incompatible interactions led to the identification of 28 effector proteins whose chronology and level of expression suggested a role in the establishment and maintenance of biotrophy with the plant. These included all known Avr genes of isolate D5 along with eight newly characterized effectors. In addition, another 15 effector proteins were found to be exclusively expressed during the necrotrophic phase of the fungus, which supports the concept that L. maculans has a separate and distinct arsenal contributing to each phase. As for CAZymes, they were often highly expressed at 3 dpi but with no difference in expression between the compatible and incompatible interactions, indicating that other factors were necessary to determine the outcome of the interaction. However, their significantly higher expression at 11 dpi in the compatible interaction confirmed that they contributed to the necrotrophic phase of the fungus. A notable exception was LysM genes whose high expression was singularly observed on the susceptible host at 7 dpi. In the case of TFs, their higher

  4. Molecular genetic studies on the compatibility of HLA class II alleles in patients with unexplained recurrent miscarriage in the Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakuwa, Koichi; Honda, Keisuke; Yokoo, Tomokazu; Hataya, Isao; Tamura, Masaki; Tanaka, Kenichi

    2006-01-01

    It is hypothesized that patients having unexplained recurrent miscarriage lack an appropriate immune reaction against their partner's antigens, which means possible compatibility of HLA antigens between the patient couples. The conclusion, however, has not yet been achieved, so the purpose was to determine whether significant compatibility of HLA class II exists between the couples. The HLA-DRB1 and -DQB1 genotypes were determined using PCR-RFLP method in 91 patient couples and in 72 normal couples. The number of patient couples with zero-allele mismatch was not significantly different compared with that of control couples regarding HLA-DRB1 genotype and phenotype, as well as regarding HLA-DQB1 genotype and phenotype. While the number of patient couples with zero- and one-allele mismatch was significantly higher compared with that in control as to HLA-DR and -DQ phenotype (P=0.029 by Chi-square test). In conclusion, it is suggested that the compatibility of HLA class II antigens between couples might be involved in the genesis of unexplained recurrent miscarriage.

  5. Vegetative compatibility and genetic analysis of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum isolates from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelos, Q L; Souza, E A; Damasceno e Silva, K J

    2011-02-15

    The causal agent of common bean anthracnose, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, has considerable genetic and pathogenic variability, which makes the development of resistant cultivars difficult. We examined variability within and between Brazilian pathotypes of C. lindemuthianum through the identification of vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) and by RAPD analysis. Two hundred and ninety-five nit mutants were obtained from 47 isolates of various pathotypes of the fungus collected from different regions, host cultivars and years. In complementation tests, 45 VCGs were identified. Eighteen RAPD primers were employed in the molecular analyses, producing 111 polymorphic bands. Estimates of genetic similarities, determined from the Sorence-Dice coefficient, ranged from 0.42 to 0.97; the dendrogram obtained by cluster analysis revealed 18 groups of isolates. RAPD and VCG markers presented high genotypic diversity. The number of significant associations (P=0.05) between RAPD, VCG and pathogenicity markers ranged from 0 (VCG) to 80% (pathogenicity). The test of multilocus association (rd) for RAPD markers was significantly different from zero (Plindemuthianum. We found considerable diversity among isolates from the same geographic origin within a short interval; this suggests rapid evolution. There is a need for further studies to elucidate the population structure of this pathogen in agro-ecosystems.

  6. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of ceramic reinforcement materials with niobium aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1990-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with three niobium aluminides, Nb3Al, Nb2Al, and NbAl3, were examined from thermodynamic considerations. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, silicides, and Engel-Brewer compounds. Thermodynamics of the Nb-Al system were reviewed and activities of Nb and Al were derived at desired calculation temperatures. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and Nb-Al compounds have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been identified.

  7. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of several compounds with Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical compatibility between Fe-19.8Cr-4.8Al (weight percent), which is the base composition for the commercial superalloy MA956, and several carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, and silicides was analyzed from thermodynamic considerations. The effect of addition of minor alloying elements, such as Ti, Y, and Y2O3, to the Fe-Cr-Al alloy on chemical compatibility between the alloy and various compounds was also analyzed. Several chemically compatible compounds that can be potential reinforcement materials and/or interface coating materials for Fe-Cr-Al based composites were identified.

  8. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with niobium aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with three niobium aluminides, Nb3Al, Nb2Al, and NbAl3, were examined from thermodynamic considerations. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, silicides, and Engel-Brewer compounds. Thermodynamics of the Nb-Al system were reviewed and activities of Nb and Al were derived at desired calculation temperatures. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and Nb-Al compounds have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been identified.

  9. Comparison of prognostic compatibility between seventh AJCC/TNM of the esophagus and 14th JCGC staging systems in Siewert type II adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Tsutomu; Komatsu, Shuhei; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Kubota, Takeshi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Konishi, Hirotaka; Morimura, Ryo; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Ikoma, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Sakakura, Chohei; Otsuji, Eigo

    2013-08-01

    The Seventh American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC)/TNM classification defined that the classification for adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction (AEG) was included in the esophageal category. However, there still remain various classifications in AEG such as the Seventh AJCC/TNM of the esophagus and the 14th Japanese Classification of Gastric Cancer staging system (JCGC) in Japan. This study was designed to evaluate the compatibility of both the Seventh AJCC/TNM of the esophagus and the 14th JCGC staging systems in Siewert type II adenocarcinoma. Between 1999 and 2011, 47 consecutive patients with Siewert type II adenocarcinoma underwent curative surgery at our Institution. We reviewed their hospital records retrospectively. Overall survival rates at 3 and 5 years were 44.3% and 33.4%, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that the extent of lymph node metastasis was the only independent prognostic factor (p=0.0194, HR=12.927). In the ≤pN2 group by 14th JCGC, deeper tumor depth was significantly correlated with poor prognosis, whereas in the ≥pN3 group, deeper tumor depth did not affect prognosis, suggesting a strong effect of nodal factor on prognosis and more similar prognostic stratification to the Seventh edition of the AJCC/TNM classification of the esophagus. Nodal involvement status might be a more important prognostic factor than tumor depth in patients with Siewert type II adenocaricinoma. The Seventh classification of AJCC/TNM of the esophagus might be more compatible with Siewert type II adenocarcinoma.

  10. Vegetative compatibility and RFLP analysis of Colletotrichum destructivum isolates from alfalfa and red clover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasić Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 17 isolates of Colletotrichum from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. and red clover (Trifolium pratense L. plants with anthracnose symptoms were collected from 11 districts in Serbia during 2005-2010 and tested for variability in vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs and restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP. Nitrate nonutilising (nit mutants were isolated from each of investigated C. destructivum isolates by selecting chlorate-resistant sectors on medium with chlorate. The isolates were grouped in five VCGs while one isolate was self-incompatible. No relationship was found between VCGs and geographical origin of the isolates. Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP analysis of a 900 bp intron of the glutamine synthetase (GS gene revealed a unique polymorphic profile of C. destructivum isolates, distinct from the profiles of other Colletotrichum species. An identical profile was produced for all C. destructivum isolates, regardless of their host and geographical origin. PCR-RFLP failed to detect some the Serbian C. destructivum isolates. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR31057

  11. The transcriptome of compatible and incompatible interactions of potato (Solanum tuberosum with Phytophthora infestans revealed by DeepSAGE analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor Gyetvai

    Full Text Available Late blight, caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, is the most important disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum. Understanding the molecular basis of resistance and susceptibility to late blight is therefore highly relevant for developing resistant cultivars, either by marker-assissted selection or by transgenic approaches. Specific P. infestans races having the Avr1 effector gene trigger a hypersensitive resistance response in potato plants carrying the R1 resistance gene (incompatible interaction and cause disease in plants lacking R1 (compatible interaction. The transcriptomes of the compatible and incompatible interaction were captured by DeepSAGE analysis of 44 biological samples comprising five genotypes, differing only by the presence or absence of the R1 transgene, three infection time points and three biological replicates. 30,859 unique 21 base pair sequence tags were obtained, one third of which did not match any known potato transcript sequence. Two third of the tags were expressed at low frequency (<10 tag counts/million. 20,470 unitags matched to approximately twelve thousand potato transcribed genes. Tag frequencies were compared between compatible and incompatible interactions over the infection time course and between compatible and incompatible genotypes. Transcriptional changes were more numerous in compatible than in incompatible interactions. In contrast to incompatible interactions, transcriptional changes in the compatible interaction were observed predominantly for multigene families encoding defense response genes and genes functional in photosynthesis and CO(2 fixation. Numerous transcriptional differences were also observed between near isogenic genotypes prior to infection with P. infestans. Our DeepSAGE transcriptome analysis uncovered novel candidate genes for plant host pathogen interactions, examples of which are discussed with respect to possible function.

  12. Radiofrequency identification and medical devices: the regulatory framework on electromagnetic compatibility. Part II: active implantable medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Eugenio; Censi, Federica; Triventi, Michele; Bartolini, Pietro; Calcagnini, Giovanni

    2012-05-01

    The number and the types of electromagnetic emitters to which patients with active implantable medical devices (AIMD) are exposed to in their daily activities have proliferated over the last decade. Radiofrequency identification (RFID) is an example of wireless technology applied in many fields. The interaction between RFID emitters and AIMD is an important issue for patients, industry and regulators, because of the risks associated with such interactions. The different AIMDs refer to different standards that address the electromagnetic immunity issue in different ways. Indeed, different test setups, immunity levels and rationales are used to guarantee that AIMDs are immune to electromagnetic nonionizing radiation. In this article, the regulatory framework concerning electromagnetic compatibility between RFID systems and AIMDs is analyzed to understand whether and how the application of the current AIMD standards allows for the effective control of the possible risks associated with RFID technology.

  13. Analysis and Measurement of Electromagnetic Compatibility of High Power Switching Power Supply

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangShu; BaiZhen; YanHuaihai; FengXiuming; YuanZhengdong

    2003-01-01

    Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) is capability that the devices and systems can normally operate within electromagnetic environment itself. It is also an applied technology, which is used to study the compatibility of electrical and electronic devices and systems within the common electromagnetic environment without a degradation of performance. EMC includes two meanings. The first is the device and system should be immune from electromagnetic disturbance. The second is electromagnetic interference should be suppressed not only below limit of disturbance, but also couldn't exceed the degree that anything can endure, that includes the other devices and systems, as well as human being, animal and plant.

  14. Soil Analysis Micro-Mission Concepts Derived from the MSP 2001 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, M. H.; Meloy, T. P.; Anderson, M. S.; Buehler, M. G.; Frant, M. A.; Grannan, S. M.; Fuerstenau, S. D.; Keller, H. U.; Markiewicz, W. J.; Marshall, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) will evaluate the Martian environment for soil and dust-related hazards to human exploration as part of the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Lander. The integrated MECA payload contains a wet-chemistry laboratory, a microscopy station, an electrometer to characterize the electrostatic environment, and arrays of material patches to study abrasion and adhesion. Heritage will be all-important for low cost micro-missions, and adaptations of instruments developed for the Pathfinder, '98 and '01 Landers should be strong contenders for '03 flights. This talk has three objectives: (1) Familiarize the audience with MECA instrument capabilities; (2) present concepts for stand-alone and/or mobile versions of MECA instruments; and (3) broaden the context of the MECA instruments from human exploration to a comprehensive scientific survey of Mars. Due to time limitations, emphasis will be on the chemistry and microscopy experiments. Ion-selective electrodes and related sensors in MECA's wet-chemistry laboratory will evaluate total dissolved solids, redox potential, pH, and the concentration of many soluble ions and gases in wet Martian soil. These electrodes can detect potentially dangerous heavy-metal ions, emitted pathogenic gases, and the soil's corrosive potential, and experiments will include cyclic voltammetry and anodic stripping. For experiments beyond 2001, enhancements could allow multiple use of the cells (for mobile experiments) and reagent addition (for quantitative mineralogical and exobiological analysis). MECA's microscopy station combines optical and atomic-force microscopy (AFM) in an actively focused, controlled illumination environment to image particles from millimeters to nanometers in size. Careful selection of substrates allows controlled experiments in adhesion, abrasion, hardness, aggregation, magnetic and other properties. Special tools allow primitive manipulation (brushing and scraping) of samples

  15. Level-1 Data Driver Card of the ATLAS New Small Wheel Upgrade Compatible with the Phase II 1 MHz Readout Scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Gkountoumis, Panagiotis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Level-1 Data Driver Card (L1DDC) will be designed for the needs of the future upgrades of the innermost stations of the ATLAS end-cap muon spectrometer. The L1DDC is a high speed aggregator board capable of communicating with a large number of front-end electronics. It collects the Level-1 data along with monitoring data and transmits them to a network interface through a single bidirectional fiber link. In addition, the L1DDC board distributes trigger, time and configuration data coming from the network interface to the front-end boards. The L1DDC is fully compatible with the Phase II upgrade where the trigger rate is expected to reach 1 MHz. This paper describes the overall scheme of the data acquisition process and especially the three different L1DDC boards that will be fabricated.

  16. Level-1 Data Driver Card of the ATLAS New Small Wheel Upgrade Compatible with the Phase II 1 MHz Readout Scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Gkountoumis, Panagiotis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Level-1 Data Driver Card (L1DDC) will be fabricated for the needs of the future upgrades of the ATLAS experiment at CERN. Specifically, these upgrades will be performed in the innermost stations of the muon spectrometer end-caps. The L1DDC is a high speed aggregator board capable of communicating with a large number of front-end electronics. It collects the Level-1 along with monitoring data and transmits them to a network interface through a single bidirectional fiber link. Finally, the L1DDC board distributes trigger, time and configuration data coming from the network interface to the front-end boards. The L1DDC is fully compatible with phase II upgrade where the trigger rate is 1 MHz. This paper describes the overall scheme of the data acquisition process and especially the L1DDC board for the upgrade of the New Small Wheel. Finally, the electronics layout on the chamber is also mentioned.

  17. Viscoelastic finite element stress analysis of the thermal compatibility of dental bilayer ceramic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHoff, Paul H; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that viscoelastic finite element analyses can reliably predict the effect of geometry on maximum tensile stresses in bilayer screening tests that are used to determine thermal compatibility. Three-dimensional viscoelastic finite element models of a beam, cylinder, disk, sphere, central incisor crown, molar crown, and posterior three-unit fixed partial denture (FPD) were used to calculate residual stresses after simulated bench cooling. Four compatible and four incompatible systems were evaluated. The highest residual tensile stresses for all material combinations were associated with the three-unit FPD. Residual tensile stresses ranged from 5.4 MPa in the disk for a compatible combination to 262 MPa in the three-unit FPD for an incompatible system. Residual tensile stresses in the three-unit FPD ranged from 16.8 MPa to 44.0 MPa for the compatible systems and from 175 MPa to 262 MPa for the incompatible systems. Based on finite element calculations, it is predicted that all-ceramic dental prostheses with an average thermal contraction mismatch (500 degrees C to 25 degrees C) greater than +/- 1.0 ppm/K will likely exhibit a relatively high percentage of failures in clinical use compared with systems having smaller thermal contraction mismatch between core and veneering ceramics.

  18. Compatibility analysis of DUPIC fuel (part5) - DUPIC fuel cycle economics analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Won Il; Choi, Hang Bok; Yang, Myung Seung

    2000-08-01

    This study examines the economics of the DUPIC fuel cycle using unit costs of fuel cycle components estimated based on conceptual designs. The fuel cycle cost (FCC) was calculated by a deterministic method in which reference values of fuel cycle components are used. The FCC was then analyzed by a Monte Carlo simulation to get the uncertainty of the FCC associated with the unit costs of the fuel cycle components. From the deterministic analysis on the one-batch equilibrium fuel cycle model, the DUPIC FCC was estimated to be 6.55-6.72 mills/kWh for proposed DUPIC fuel options, which is a little smaller than that of the once-through FCC by 0.04-0.28 mills/kWh. Considering the uncertainty (0.45-0.51 mills/kWh) of the FCC estimated by the Monte Carlo simulation method, the cost difference between the DUPIC and once-through fuel cycle is negligible. On the other hand, the material balance calculation has shown that the DUPIC fuel cycle can save natural uranium resources by -20% and reduce the spent fuel arising by -65%, compared with the once-through fuel cycle. In conclusion, the DUPIC fuel cycle possesses a strong advantage over the once-through fuel cycle from the viewpoint of the environmental effect.

  19. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program - Mixing Procedures and Materials Compatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olinger, Becky D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC-IHD), Indian Head, MD (United States); Sorensen, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC-IHD), Indian Head, MD (United States); Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC-IHD), Indian Head, MD (United States); Moran, Jesse S. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC-IHD), Indian Head, MD (United States); Shelley, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Whinnery, LeRoy L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Whipple, Richard E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kashgarian, Michaele [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-01-14

    Three mixing procedures have been standardized for the IDCA proficiency test—solid-solid, solid-liquid, and liquid-liquid. Due to the variety of precursors used in formulating the materials for the test, these three mixing methods have been designed to address all combinations of materials. Hand mixing is recommended for quantities less than 10 grams and Jar Mill mixing is recommended for quantities over 10 grams. Consideration must also be given to the type of container used for the mixing due to the wide range of chemical reactivity of the precursors and mixtures. Eight web site sources from container and chemical manufacturers have been consulted. Compatible materials have been compiled as a resource for selecting containers made of materials stable to the mixtures. In addition, container materials used in practice by the participating laboratories are discussed. Consulting chemical compatibility tables is highly recommended for each operation by each individual engaged in testing the materials in this proficiency test.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Compatibility Effects on Invigorating Blood Circulation for Cyperi Rhizoma Series of Herb Pairs Using Untargeted Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The mutual-assistance compatibility of Cyperi Rhizoma (Xiangfu, XF and Angelicae Sinensis Radix (Danggui, DG, Chuanxiong Rhizoma (Chuanxiong, CX, Paeoniae Radix Alba (Baishao, BS, or Corydalis Rhizoma (Yanhusuo, YH, found in a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM named Xiang-Fu-Si-Wu Decoction (XFSWD, can produce synergistic and promoting blood effects. Nowadays, XFSWD has been proved to be effective in activating blood circulation and dissipating blood stasis. However, the role of the herb pairs synergistic effects in the formula were poorly understood. In order to quantitatively assess the compatibility effects of herb pairs, mass spectrometry-based untargeted metabolomics studies were performed. The plasma and urine metabolic profiles of acute blood stasis rats induced by adrenaline hydrochloride and ice water and administered with Cyperi Rhizoma—Angelicae Sinensis Radix (XD, Cyperi Rhizoma—Chuanxiong Rhizoma (XC, Cyperi Rhizoma—Paeoniae Radix Alba (XB, Cyperi Rhizoma—Corydalis Rhizoma (XY were compared. Relative peak area of identified metabolites was calculated and principal component analysis (PCA score plot from the potential markers was used to visualize the overall differences. Then, the metabolites results were used with biochemistry indicators and genes expression values as parameters to quantitatively evaluate the compatibility effects of XF series of herb pairs by PCA and correlation analysis. The collective results indicated that the four XF herb pairs regulated glycerophospholipid metabolism, steroid hormone biosynthesis and arachidonic acid metabolism pathway. XD was more prominent in regulating the blood stasis during the four XF herb pairs. This study demonstrated that metabolomics was a useful tool to efficacy evaluation and compatibility effects of TCM elucidation.

  1. Thermal behavior and compatibility analysis of the new chemical entity LPSF/FZ4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Salvana Priscylla Manso [Departamento de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (Brazil); Ramos da Silva, Keyla Emanuelle, E-mail: ramos.keyla@gmail.com [Departamento de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (Brazil); Instituto de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Amazonas (Brazil); Rocha de Medeiros, Giovanna Christinne; Rolim, Larissa Araujo; Ferreira de Oliveira, Jamerson [Departamento de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (Brazil); Carmo Alves de Lima, Maria do; Galdino, Suely Lins; Pitta, Ivan da Rocha [Departamento de Antibióticos, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (Brazil); Neto, Pedro Jose Rolim [Departamento de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (Brazil)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: • We determined the thermal behavior of isolated LPSF/FZ4. • We used the isothermal and non-isothermal methods. • We reported the time of the stability of LPSF/FZ4 was measured in 4 months. • We also performed a compatibility study associated with excipients. • We reported the possible interactions of the prototype with lactose. - Abstract: In this study, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry were employed to determine the thermal behavior of LPSF/FZ4 isolated and associated with excipients (amide, β-cyclodextrin, cellulose, lactose, stearate of magnesium, aerosil, sodium lauryl sulfate, polysorbate and polyvinylpyrrolidone). Thus, the purity of the prototype calculated was 98%. Isothermal and non-isothermal methods were used to determine the kinetic parameters of decomposition, finding a first-reaction order and activation energy (A{sub e}) of 98.22 kJ mol{sup −1}. Also, the time of the stability of LPSF/FZ4 was measured in 4 months. The compatibility study showed possible interactions of the prototype with lactose due to a change in its heat of fusion, a reduction of more than 40 °C in its stability and a reduction of approximately 30% in A{sub e} of its decomposition reaction. The study demonstrated the importance of using thermal analytical methods to characterize new drugs to enable the development and quality control of pharmaceutical products.

  2. Summary of CPAS Gen II Parachute Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Aaron L.; Bledsoe, Kristin J.; Fraire, Usbaldo, Jr.; Moore, James W.; Olson, Leah M.; Ray, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The Orion spacecraft is currently under development by NASA and Lockheed Martin. Like Apollo, Orion will use a series of parachutes to slow its descent and splashdown safely. The Orion parachute system, known as the CEV Parachute Assembly System (CPAS), is being designed by NASA, the Engineering and Science Contract Group (ESCG), and Airborne Systems. The first generation (Gen I) of CPAS testing consisted of thirteen tests and was executed in the 2007-2008 timeframe. The Gen I tests provided an initial understanding of the CPAS parachutes. Knowledge gained from Gen I testing was used to plan the second generation of testing (Gen II). Gen II consisted of six tests: three singleparachute tests, designated as Main Development Tests, and three Cluster Development Tests. Gen II required a more thorough investigation into parachute performance than Gen I. Higher fidelity instrumentation, enhanced analysis methods and tools, and advanced test techniques were developed. The results of the Gen II test series are being incorporated into the CPAS design. Further testing and refinement of the design and model of parachute performance will occur during the upcoming third generation of testing (Gen III). This paper will provide an overview of the developments in CPAS analysis following the end of Gen I, including descriptions of new tools and techniques as well as overviews of the Gen II tests.

  3. Analysis and interpretation of the model of a Faraday cage for electromagnetic compatibility testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad V. Munić

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the work of the Laboratory for Electromagnetic Compatibility Testing in the Technical Test Center (TTC, we investigated the influence of the Faraday cage on measurement results. The primary goal of this study is the simulation of the fields in the cage, especially around resonant frequencies, in order to be able to predict results of measurements of devices under test in the anechoic chamber or in any other environment. We developed simulation (computer models of the cage step by step, by using the Wipl-D program and by comparing the numerical results with measurements as well as by resolving difficulties due to the complex structure and imperfections of the cage. The subject of this paper is to present these simulation models and the corresponding results of the computations and measurements. Construction of the cage The cage is made of steel plates with the dimensions 1.25 m x 2.5 m. The base of the cage is a square; the footprint interior dimensions are 3.76 m x 3.76 m, and the height is 2.5 m. The cage ceiling is lowered by plasticized aluminum strips. The strips are loosely attached to the carriers which are screwed to the ceiling. The cage has four ventilation openings (two on the ceiling and two on one wall, made of honeycomb waveguide holes. In one corner of the cage, there is a single door with springs made of beryllium bronze. For frequencies of a few tens of MHz, the skin effect is fully developed in the cage walls. By measuring the input impedance of the wire line parallel to a wall of the cage, we calculated the surface losses of the cage plates. In addition, we used a magnetic probe to detect shield discontinuities. We generated a strong current at a frequency of 106 kHz outside the cage and measured the magnetic field inside the cage at the places of cage shield discontinuities. In this paper, we showed the influence of these places on the measurement results, especially on the qualitative and quantitative

  4. Improved blood compatibility of segmented polyurethane by polymeric additives having phospholipid polar group. II. Dispersion state of the polymeric additive and protein adsorption on the surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, K; Shibata, N; Tanaka, S; Iwasaki, Y; Kurosaki, T; Nakabayashi, N

    1996-11-01

    To improve the blood compatibility of a segmented polyurethane (SPU), phospholipid polymer, i.e., 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) copolymerized with cyclohexyl methacrylate or 2-ethylhexyl methacrylate, was blended into SPU as a polymeric additive. The blending was achieved by a solvent-evaporation technique from a homogeneous solution containing both the SPU and the MPC polymer. Surface analysis of the SPU membrane blended with the MPC polymer (SPU/MPC polymer membrane) revealed that the MPC polymer was concentrated at the surface of the SPU membrane which contacted the substrate, Teflon, compared with that which contacted air during the membrane-formation period. The dispersion state of the MPC polymer in the SPU membrane was evaluated in detail by staining the MPC unit with osmium tetraoxide. When sonication was applied during preparation of the mixed solution containing SPU and the MPC polymer, the dispersion of the MPC polymer in the SPU membrane was different from that without sonication. That is, the size of the domains of the MPC polymer became smaller but the number of the domains increased. The amount of the MPC polymer mixed with SPU affected the dispersion state. Plasma proteins adsorbed on the SPU/MPC polymer membrane surface after contact with human plasma were detected by gold-colloid-labeled immunoassay. Both albumin and fibrinogen were observed on the SPU membrane; however, the amount of these proteins was reduced on the SPU/MPC polymer membrane. Thus it was concluded that the blood compatibility of the SPU was effectively improved by the blending of the MPC polymer.

  5. Derringer desirability and kinetic plot LC-column comparison approach for MS-compatible lipopeptide analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias D’Hondt

    2014-06-01

    In total, the performance of four different C18 columns, including one UPLC column, were evaluated using two parallel approaches. First, a Derringer desirability function was used, whereby six single and multiple chromatographic response values were rescaled into one overall D-value per column. Using this approach, the YMC Pack Pro C18 column was ranked as the best column for general MS-compatible lipopeptide separation. Secondly, the kinetic plot approach was used to compare the different columns at different flow rate ranges. As the optimal kinetic column performance is obtained at its maximal pressure, the length elongation factor λ (Pmax/Pexp was used to transform the obtained experimental data (retention times and peak capacities and construct kinetic performance limit (KPL curves, allowing a direct visual and unbiased comparison of the selected columns, whereby the YMC Triart C18 UPLC and ACE C18 columns performed as best. Finally, differences in column performance and the (disadvantages of both approaches are discussed.

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of European species of Proteocephalus (Cestoda: Proteocephalidea): compatibility of molecular and morphological data, and parasite-host coevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeríková, A; Hypsa, V; Scholz, T V

    2001-08-01

    The phylogeny of European species of the tapeworm genus Proteocephalus was studied, based on partial 18S rDNA and morphological data. The group was found to be monophyletic. The analysis showed a low informative value of available morphological characters in comparison with molecular data. The morphological matrix resulted in a poorly resolved tree which is, however, compatible with the topology (Proteocephalus osculatus (Proteocephalus torulosus (Proteocephalus macrocephalus, Proteocephalus filicollis) (Proteocephalus tetrastomus, Proteocephalus percae, Proteocephalus longicollis))) based on the 18S rDNA data. A comparison performed by the program TreeMap showed a lack of significant congruency between parasite and host phylogenies. Therefore, the distribution of species in their hosts appears to be independent of the phylogeny and it is likely to be a result of host-switching, rather than co-speciation events.

  7. LCLS-II Undulator Tolerance Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuhn, H.-D.; /SLAC; Marks, S.; /LBL, Berkeley; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2012-06-06

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is building a new FEL user facility, LCLS-II, as a major upgrade to the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The upgrade will include two new Free Electron Lasers (FELs), to generate soft (SXR) and hard x-ray (HXR) SASE FEL radiation, based on planar, variable gap hybrid undulators with two different undulator periods (SXU: 55 mm, HXU: 32 mm). An algebraic FEL tolerance analysis for the undulator lines, including tuning, alignment, and phase correction tolerances has been performed. The methods and results are presented in this paper.

  8. Are sweep net sampling and pitfall trapping compatible with molecular analysis of predation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, James D

    2008-08-01

    Molecular analysis of predation enables accurate and reliable elucidation of trophic linkages in complex food webs, but identifying the strength of such interactions can be subject to error. Currently two techniques dominate: monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although the optimization and characterization of these systems ensures their sensitivity and specificity, predator collection protocols such as sweep-netting and vacuum sampling could overestimate feeding rates because of surface-level contamination, yielding positive reactivity or predation within the sampling device. Therefore, two sampling techniques (sweep-net sampling and hand collection) were compared within an alfalfa agroecosystem using a monoclonal antibody-based ELISA to test the hypothesis that cross-contamination is a source of error, i.e., significantly more predators (linyphiid spiders) would test positive for prey (Diptera) proteins. A concurrent study examining the viability of trapping predators into saline solution was also undertaken. No significant differences were found between the proportions of spiders screening positive for Diptera when collected by sweep-net versus hand collection, rejecting the hypothesis that sweep-netting predators for subsequent molecular gut content analysis overestimates predation frequency. ELISA was also capable of detecting prey proteins in predator guts from pitfall traps containing phosphate-buffered saline, indicating the suitability of this approach for the collection and analysis of epigeal predators. Although these results indicate that sweep netting and pitfall trapping into solution is appropriate in this predator-prey and ELISA analysis system, caution should be exercised with other interactions and PCR-based analysis. The likelihood for false-positive reactivity should therefore be considered on a case-by-case basis.

  9. DUPIC fuel compatibility assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Rho, G. H.; Park, J. W. [and others

    2000-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the compatibility of DUPIC(Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel in CANDU Reactors) fuel with the current CANDU 6 reactor, which is one of the technology being developed to utilize the spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors. The phase 1 study of this project includes the feasibility analysis on applicability of the current core design method, the feasibility analysis on operation of the DUPIC fuel core, the compatibility analysis on individual reactor system, the sensitivity analysis on the fuel composition, and the economic analysis on DUPIC fuel cycle. The results of the validation calculations have confirmed that the current core analysis system is acceptable for the feasibility study of the DUPIC fuel compatibility analysis. The results of core simulations have shown that both natural uranium and DUPIC fuel cores are almost the same from the viewpoint of the operational performance. For individual reactor system including reactively devices, the functional requirements of each system are satisfied in general. However, because of the pronounced power flattening in the DUPIC core, the radiation damage on the critical components increases, which should be investigated more in the future. The DUPIC fuel composition heterogeneity dose not to impose any serious effect on the reactor operation if the fuel composition is adjusted. The economics analysis has been performed through conceptual design studies on the DUPIC fuel fabrication, fuel handling in a plant, and spent fuel disposal, which has shown that the DUPIC fuel cycle is comparable to the once-trough fuel cycle considering uncertainties associated with unit costs of the fuel cycle components. The results of Phase 1 study have shown that it is feasible to use the DUPIC fuel in CANDU reactors without major changes in hardware. However further studies are required to confirm the safety of the reactor under accident condition.

  10. Structural analysis of succinoglycan oligosaccharides from Sinorhizobium meliloti strains with different host compatibility phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Senay; Wood, Karl; Reuhs, Bradley L

    2013-05-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti NRG247 has a Fix(+) phenotype on Medicago truncatula A20 and is Fix(-) on M. truncatula A17, and the phenotype is reversed with S. meliloti NRG185. As the succinoglycan was shown to impact host specificity, an analysis of the succinoglycan oligosaccharides produced by each strain was conducted. The symbiotically active succinoglycan trimeric oligosaccharides (STOs) from the two S. meliloti strains were compared by chromatography and mass spectrometry, and the analysis of the S. meliloti NRG247 oligosaccharides showed that this strain produces an abundance of STO trimer 1 (T1), containing no succinate (i.e., three nonsuccinylated repeats), yet the low-molecular-weight pool contained no nonsuccinylated monomers (potential repeats). This showed that STO T1 is likely to be the active signal on M. truncatula A20 and that the biosynthesis of the STOs is not a random polymerization of the monomer population. The results also suggest that the fully succinylated STO T7 is required for the infection of M. truncatula A17.

  11. Sensitivity and Compatibility Analysis of Sulfur and Phosphorus Type Additives in Rapeseed Oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAJiang-bo; HUJun-hong; DINGJin-yuan; MAXian-gui

    2004-01-01

    The effects of sulfur type additives T321 and phosphorous type additives P120 on the EP and AW abilities of rapeseed oil were investigated by a four-ball testing machine using the rapeseed oil as base oil. The effect of T321 ,nixed with P 120 on the tribochemical performance of the rapeseed oil was studied. The result shows that the load carrying, extreme pressure and abrasion capacities of lubricant film can be improved by adding T321and P120 as additives in rapeseed oil, respectively. The SEDX analysis on the surface of steal balls reveals that tribochemical reactions occur during the friction process, the barrier lubricating film is formed containing triglyer-ide and the additives can improve the anti-wear ability and load-carrying capacity.

  12. Development and analysis of an in vivo-compatible metabolic network of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reifman Jaques

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis confronts a generally hostile and nutrient-poor in vivo host environment. Existing models and analyses of M. tuberculosis metabolic networks are able to reproduce experimentally measured cellular growth rates and identify genes required for growth in a range of different in vitro media. However, these models, under in vitro conditions, do not provide an adequate description of the metabolic processes required by the pathogen to infect and persist in a host. Results To better account for the metabolic activity of M. tuberculosis in the host environment, we developed a set of procedures to systematically modify an existing in vitro metabolic network by enhancing the agreement between calculated and in vivo-measured gene essentiality data. After our modifications, the new in vivo network contained 663 genes, 838 metabolites, and 1,049 reactions and had a significantly increased sensitivity (0.81 in predicted gene essentiality than the in vitro network (0.31. We verified the modifications generated from the purely computational analysis through a review of the literature and found, for example, that, as the analysis suggested, lipids are used as the main source for carbon metabolism and oxygen must be available for the pathogen under in vivo conditions. Moreover, we used the developed in vivo network to predict the effects of double-gene deletions on M. tuberculosis growth in the host environment, explore metabolic adaptations to life in an acidic environment, highlight the importance of different enzymes in the tricarboxylic acid-cycle under different limiting nutrient conditions, investigate the effects of inhibiting multiple reactions, and look at the importance of both aerobic and anaerobic cellular respiration during infection. Conclusions The network modifications we implemented suggest a distinctive set of metabolic conditions and requirements faced by M. tuberculosis during

  13. Viscoelastic stress analysis of thermally compatible and incompatible metal-ceramic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHoff, P H; Anusavice, K J

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze transient and residual midpoint deflections and stresses in metal-opaque porcelain-body porcelain systems with matched and mismatched thermal contraction coefficients. Calculations and measurements were made for seven trimaterial strips that covered a wide range of thermal contraction mismatches among constituent materials. Midpoint deflections were measured in a beam-bending viscometer during slow cooling from an initial temperature of 700 degrees C. Linear regression analysis with a correlation coefficient of 0.950 was used to compare measured and calculated residual midpoint deflections. Stress relaxation data were fit to a three-term exponential series by nonlinear regression analyses with correlation ratios ranging from 0.9972 to 0.9999. While finite element analyses correctly predicted the general shape of the deflection behavior as a function of temperature for all combinations, the best agreement between measured mean residual midpoint deflections and calculated values (+250 microns vs. +268 microns) was obtained for strips composed of a Au-Pd alloy (alpha m = 13.5 ppm/ degree C) with a medium expansion opaque porcelain (alpha o = 13.3 ppm/degree C) and a high expansion body porcelain (alpha B = 14.4 ppm/degree C). The highest calculated residual tensile stress of +26 MPa at the surface of body porcelain was associated with the 0.5-mm-thick Ni-Cr-Be alloy strip (alpha m = 15.1 ppm/degree C) with medium expansion porcelains (alpha o = 13.5 ppm/degree C and alpha B = 13.9 ppm/degree C). The smallest measured residual deflection (+10 microns) was also associated with this combination. The results of this study indicated that metal-ceramic strips are sensitive indicators of stress development caused by a thermal contraction mismatch; however, the magnitudes of the residual deflections do not necessarily correlate with the stress magnitudes in the ceramic. Currently there are no U.S. or international standards that define

  14. Multicriteria analysis as a tool to investigate compatibility between conservation and development on Salina Island, Aeolian Archipelago, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodini, Antonio; Giavelli, Giovanni

    1992-09-01

    Several multicriteria evaluation techniques have been developed since the 1970s. The need to compare different territorial policies has justified their introduction into environmental research. These methods are based on the numerical manipulation of heterogeneous information, which varies in terms of reference scale and type of measure (continuous, ordinal, qualitative, binary, etc.). During recent years, diverse investigations have focused on general conditions on Salina, the “green island” of the Aeolian archipelago. Such studies, within an interdisciplinary project, aimed to explore the possibility of implementing conservation strategies that are compatible with human needs, landscape preservation, and sustainable economic development. Three different evaluation techniques are applied, namely multicriteria weighted concordance and discordance analysis and a qualitative procedure. They are used to compare four alternative plans for the socioeconomic development of Salina Island. These plans lie between extreme alternatives: total protection of natural resources and maximizing economic development based on tourism. The plans are compared to each other on the basis of 14 criteria that reflect the socioenvironmental perception of Salina's inhabitants. The approach used in this research seems particularly fruitful because of its flexibility: it offers decision makers the chance to manage heterogeneous data and information that is not easily quantifiable. Such “soft” information helps to evaluate environmental conditions more precisely, and to make a less damaging choice among alternative development plans.

  15. Load-Sharing Characteristics of Power-Split Transmission System Based on Deformation Compatibility and Loaded Tooth Contact Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to implement the uniform load distribution of the power-split transmission system, a pseudostatic model is built. Based on the loaded tooth contact analysis (LTCA technique, the actual meshing process of each gear pair is simulated and the fitting curve of time-varying mesh stiffness is obtained. And then, the torsional angle deformation compatibility conditions are proposed according to the closed-loop characteristic of power flow, which will be combined with the torque equilibrium conditions and elastic support conditions to calculate the transfer torque of each gear pair. Finally, the load-sharing coefficient of the power-split transmission system is obtained, and the influences of the installation errors are analyzed. The results show that the above-mentioned installation errors comprehensively influence the load-sharing characteristics, and the reduction of only one error could not effectively achieve perfect load-sharing characteristics. Allowing for the spline clearance floating and constrained by the radial spacing ring, the influence of the floating pinion is analyzed. It shows that the floating pinion can improve the load-sharing characteristics. Through the comparison between the theoretical and related experimental data, the reasonability and feasibility of the above-proposed method and model are verified.

  16. Compatibility of cars in The Netherlands : statistical analysis of frontal collisions in the framework of the European research project "Improvement of crash compatibility between cars", Workpackage 2a, project funded by the European Commission DGVII under the Transport RTD Programme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, L.T. van

    2000-01-01

    In this study, compatibility is defined as the capability of vehicles to protect both their own occupants and occupants of opponent vehicles during crashes. Vehicles are called compatible when they offer equal amounts of protection to both their own occupants and to occupants of crash-opponent

  17. The Transcriptome of Compatible and Incompatible Interactions of Potato (Solanum tuberosum) with Phytophthora infestans Revealed by DeepSAGE Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyetvai, Gabor; Sønderkær, Mads; Göbel, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    -assissted selection or by transgenic approaches. Specific P. infestans races having the Avr1 effector gene trigger a hypersensitive resistance response in potato plants carrying the R1 resistance gene (incompatible interaction) and cause disease in plants lacking R1 (compatible interaction). The transcriptomes...

  18. Compatibility between Text Mining and Qualitative Research in the Perspectives of Grounded Theory, Content Analysis, and Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chong Ho; Jannasch-Pennell, Angel; DiGangi, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article is to illustrate that text mining and qualitative research are epistemologically compatible. First, like many qualitative research approaches, such as grounded theory, text mining encourages open-mindedness and discourages preconceptions. Contrary to the popular belief that text mining is a linear and fully automated…

  19. Weyl compatible tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Mantica, Carlo A

    2012-01-01

    The algebraic condition of Riemann compatibility for symmetric tensors generalizes the differential Codazzi condition, but preserves much of the geometric content. The compatibility condition can be extended to other curvature tensors. This paper is about Weyl compatible tensors and vectors. In particular it is shown that the existence of a Weyl compatible vector implies the Weyl tensor to be algebraically special, and it is a necessary and sufficient condition for the magnetic part to vanish. Some theorems (Derdzinski and Shen, Hall) are extended to the broader hypothesis of Weyl or Riemann compatibility. Weyl compatibility includes conditions that were investigated in the literature of general relativity (as McIntosh et al.). Hypersurfaces of pseudo Euclidean spaces provide a simple example of Weyl compatible Ricci tensor.

  20. Content Analysis of "School Psychology International", 1990-2011: An Analysis of Trends and Compatibility with the NASP Practice Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Steven G.; Akin-Little, Angeleque; Lloyd, Keryn

    2011-01-01

    Formal analysis of research publications serves as one indicator of the current status of a profession or a journal. Content analyses provide both practitioners and academicians with information on the status of research in the profession. These types of analyses can also provide information on the concordance between published research and what…

  1. Content Analysis of "School Psychology International", 1990-2011: An Analysis of Trends and Compatibility with the NASP Practice Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Steven G.; Akin-Little, Angeleque; Lloyd, Keryn

    2011-01-01

    Formal analysis of research publications serves as one indicator of the current status of a profession or a journal. Content analyses provide both practitioners and academicians with information on the status of research in the profession. These types of analyses can also provide information on the concordance between published research and what…

  2. TMV-Gate vectors: gateway compatible tobacco mosaic virus based expression vectors for functional analysis of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagale, Sateesh; Uzuhashi, Shihomi; Wigness, Merek; Bender, Tricia; Yang, Wen; Borhan, M Hossein; Rozwadowski, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Plant viral expression vectors are advantageous for high-throughput functional characterization studies of genes due to their capability for rapid, high-level transient expression of proteins. We have constructed a series of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) based vectors that are compatible with Gateway technology to enable rapid assembly of expression constructs and exploitation of ORFeome collections. In addition to the potential of producing recombinant protein at grams per kilogram FW of leaf tissue, these vectors facilitate either N- or C-terminal fusions to a broad series of epitope tag(s) and fluorescent proteins. We demonstrate the utility of these vectors in affinity purification, immunodetection and subcellular localisation studies. We also apply the vectors to characterize protein-protein interactions and demonstrate their utility in screening plant pathogen effectors. Given its broad utility in defining protein properties, this vector series will serve as a useful resource to expedite gene characterization efforts.

  3. Differential analysis of matrix convex functions II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Frank; Tomiyama, Jun

    2009-01-01

    We continue the analysis in [F. Hansen, and J. Tomiyama, Differential analysis of matrix convex functions. Linear Algebra Appl., 420:102--116, 2007] of matrix convex functions of a fixed order defined in a real interval by differential methods as opposed to the characterization in terms of divide...

  4. Automation of dimethylation after guanidination labeling chemistry and its compatibility with common buffers and surfactants for mass spectrometry-based shotgun quantitative proteome analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Andy; Tang, Yanan; Chen, Lu; Li, Liang, E-mail: Liang.Li@ualberta.ca

    2013-07-25

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Dimethylation after guanidination (2MEGA) uses inexpensive reagents for isotopic labeling of peptides. •2MEGA can be optimized and automated for labeling peptides with high efficiency. •2MEGA is compatible with several commonly used cell lysis and protein solubilization reagents. •The automated 2MEGA labeling method can be used to handle a variety of protein samples for relative proteome quantification. -- Abstract: Isotope labeling liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) is a major analytical platform for quantitative proteome analysis. Incorporation of isotopes used to distinguish samples plays a critical role in the success of this strategy. In this work, we optimized and automated a chemical derivatization protocol (dimethylation after guanidination, 2MEGA) to increase the labeling reproducibility and reduce human intervention. We also evaluated the reagent compatibility of this protocol to handle biological samples in different types of buffers and surfactants. A commercially available liquid handler was used for reagent dispensation to minimize analyst intervention and at least twenty protein digest samples could be prepared in a single run. Different front-end sample preparation methods for protein solubilization (SDS, urea, Rapigest™, and ProteaseMAX™) and two commercially available cell lysis buffers were evaluated for compatibility with the automated protocol. It was found that better than 94% desired labeling could be obtained in all conditions studied except urea, where the rate was reduced to about 92% due to carbamylation on the peptide amines. This work illustrates the automated 2MEGA labeling process can be used to handle a wide range of protein samples containing various reagents that are often encountered in protein sample preparation for quantitative proteome analysis.

  5. Proximity Compatibility and Information Display: The Effects of Space and Color on the Analysis of Aircraft Stall Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    is displayed in close prc xiinity (Polson, Wickens, Klapp , & Colle, 1989). Conversely, focused attention performance is best when the information to be...Journal of E-pt i mental Psychology: I-.uman Percc’ ion and Performance 9(3), 380-393. Polst, :, M , Wick1 1is, C. . , Klapp , S. T. , & cal 1, Ii

  6. Automation of dimethylation after guanidination labeling chemistry and its compatibility with common buffers and surfactants for mass spectrometry-based shotgun quantitative proteome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Andy; Tang, Yanan; Chen, Lu; Li, Liang

    2013-07-25

    Isotope labeling liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a major analytical platform for quantitative proteome analysis. Incorporation of isotopes used to distinguish samples plays a critical role in the success of this strategy. In this work, we optimized and automated a chemical derivatization protocol (dimethylation after guanidination, 2MEGA) to increase the labeling reproducibility and reduce human intervention. We also evaluated the reagent compatibility of this protocol to handle biological samples in different types of buffers and surfactants. A commercially available liquid handler was used for reagent dispensation to minimize analyst intervention and at least twenty protein digest samples could be prepared in a single run. Different front-end sample preparation methods for protein solubilization (SDS, urea, Rapigest™, and ProteaseMAX™) and two commercially available cell lysis buffers were evaluated for compatibility with the automated protocol. It was found that better than 94% desired labeling could be obtained in all conditions studied except urea, where the rate was reduced to about 92% due to carbamylation on the peptide amines. This work illustrates the automated 2MEGA labeling process can be used to handle a wide range of protein samples containing various reagents that are often encountered in protein sample preparation for quantitative proteome analysis.

  7. High throughput analysis of drugs of abuse in hair by combining purposely designed sample extraction compatible with immunometric methods used for drug testing in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, R; Civit, E; Svaizer, F; Lotti, A; Gottardi, M; Miozzo, M

    2010-03-20

    Drug testing in hair usually requires a rather complex sample treatment before drugs are amenable to analysis by either immunological and/or chromatographic coupled to mass spectrometry methods. Immunological methods applied are usually dedicated to hair analysis as analytes present in this matrix are not always the same present in urine. Comedical s.a.s. laboratories recently commercialized reagents (VMA-T) purposely designed for hair sample treatment which are compatible with current immunometric methods used for urine drug testing. This is possible as some analytes (6-MAM and cocaine) present in hair after sample treatment are converted to those detected in urine (morphine and benzoylecgonine). A correlation study for several drug classes performed in two laboratories with 32 clinical and 12 spiked drug free (controls) hair samples shows that implementation of the method on clinical chemistry analyzers is easy and that results obtained by different operators and instruments are comparable and reproducible. The main advantage of VMA-T method is the possibility to simultaneously extract from hair main drug classes, in a period of time lower than 2h and its compatibility with immunological methods applied in urine drug testing.

  8. Analysis of the tomato leaf transcriptome during successive hemibiotrophic stages of a compatible interaction with the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuluaga, Andrea P; Vega-Arreguín, Julio C; Fei, Zhangjun; Matas, Antonio J; Patev, Sean; Fry, William E; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2016-01-01

    The infection of plants by hemibiotrophic pathogens involves a complex and highly regulated transition from an initial biotrophic, asymptomatic stage to a later necrotrophic state, characterized by cell death. Little is known about how this transition is regulated, and there are conflicting views regarding the significance of the plant hormones jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) in the different phases of infection. To provide a broad view of the hemibiotrophic infection process from the plant perspective, we surveyed the transcriptome of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) during a compatible interaction with the hemibiotrophic oomycete Phytophthora infestans during three infection stages: biotrophic, the transition from biotrophy to necrotrophy, and the necrotrophic phase. Nearly 10 000 genes corresponding to proteins in approximately 400 biochemical pathways showed differential transcript abundance during the three infection stages, revealing a major reorganization of plant metabolism, including major changes in source-sink relations, as well as secondary metabolites. In addition, more than 100 putative resistance genes and pattern recognition receptor genes were induced, and both JA and SA levels and associated signalling pathways showed dynamic changes during the infection time course. The biotrophic phase was characterized by the induction of many defence systems, which were either insufficient, evaded or suppressed by the pathogen.

  9. Design and integration of a generic disposable array-compatible sensor housing into an integrated disposable indirect microfluidic flow injection analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Bastian E; Schickling, Benjamin; Prokop, Jürgen; Piotter, Volker; Rapp, Michael; Länge, Kerstin

    2011-10-01

    We describe an integration strategy for arbitrary sensors intended to be used as biosensors in biomedical or bioanalytical applications. For such devices ease of handling (by a potential end user) as well as strict disposable usage are of importance. Firstly we describe a generic array compatible polymer sensor housing with an effective sample volume of 1.55 μl. This housing leaves the sensitive surface of the sensor accessible for the application of biosensing layers even after the embedding. In a second step we show how this sensor housing can be used in combination with a passive disposable microfluidic chip to set up arbitrary 8-fold sensor arrays and how such a system can be complemented with an indirect microfluidic flow injection analysis (FIA) system. This system is designed in a way that it strictly separates between disposable and reusable components- by introducing tetradecane as an intermediate liquid. This results in a sensor system compatible with the demands of most biomedical applications. Comparative measurements between a classical macroscopic FIA system and this integrated indirect microfluidic system are presented. We use a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor as an exemplary detector in this work.

  10. HLA class II genes: typing by DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwell, J L; Bidwell, E A; Bradley, B A

    1990-04-01

    A detailed understanding of the structure and function of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has ensued from studies by molecular biologist during the last decade. Virtually all of the HLA genes have now been cloned, and the nucleotide sequences of their different allelic forms have been determined. Typing for these HLA alleles is a fundamental prerequisite for tissue matching in allogeneic organ transplantation. Until very recently, typing procedures have been dominated by serological and cellular methods. The availability of cloned DNA from HLA genes has now permitted the technique of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis to be applied, with remarkable success and advantage, to phenotyping of both HLA Class I and Class II determinants. For the HLA Class II genes DR and DQ, a simple two-stage RFLP analysis permits the accurate identification of all specificities defined by serology, and of many which are defined by cellular typing. At the present time, however, RFLP typing of HLA Class I genes is not as practicable or as informative as that for HLA Class II genes. The present clinical applications of HLA-DR and DQ RFLP typing are predominantly in phenotyping of living donors, including selection of HLA-matched volunteer bone marrow donors, in allograft survival studies, and in studies of HLA Class II-associated diseases. However, the time taken to perform RFLP analysis precludes its use for the typing of cadaveric kidney donors. Nucleotide sequence data for the alleles of HLA Class II genes have now permitted the development of allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) typing, a second category of DNA analysis. This has been greatly facilitated by the ability to amplify specific HLA Class II DNA 'target' sequences using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The accuracy of DNA typing techniques should ensure that this methodology will eventually replace conventional HLA phenotyping.

  11. Decomposition of Copper (II) Sulfate Pentahydrate: A Sequential Gravimetric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Arlo D.; Kalbus, Lee H.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an improved experiment of the thermal dehydration of copper (II) sulfate pentahydrate. The improvements described here are control of the temperature environment and a quantitative study of the decomposition reaction to a thermally stable oxide. Data will suffice to show sequential gravimetric analysis. (Author/SA)

  12. Molecular analysis of pericentrin gene (PCNT) in a series of 24 Seckel/microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, M; Geneviève, D; Borck, G; Baumann, C; Baujat, G; Bieth, E; Edery, P; Farra, C; Gerard, M; Héron, D; Leheup, B; Le Merrer, M; Lyonnet, S; Martin-Coignard, D; Mathieu, M; Thauvin-Robinet, C; Verloes, A; Colleaux, L; Munnich, A; Cormier-Daire, V

    2010-12-01

    Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II, MIM 210720) and Seckel syndrome (SCKL, MIM 210600) belong to the primordial dwarfism group characterised by intrauterine growth retardation, severe proportionate short stature, and pronounced microcephaly. MOPD II is distinct from SCKL by more severe growth retardation, radiological abnormalities, and absent or mild mental retardation. Seckel syndrome is associated with defective ATR dependent DNA damage signalling. In 2008, loss-of-function mutations in the pericentrin gene (PCNT) have been identified in 28 patients, including 3 SCKL and 25 MOPDII cases. This gene encodes a centrosomal protein which plays a key role in the organisation of mitotic spindles. The aim of this study was to analyse PCNT in a large series of SCKL-MOPD II cases to further define the clinical spectrum associated with PCNT mutations. Among 18 consanguineous families (13 SCKL and 5 MOPDII) and 6 isolated cases (3 SCKL and 3 MOPD II), 13 distinct mutations were identified in 5/16 SCKL and 8/8 MOPDII including five stop mutations, five frameshift mutations, two splice site mutations, and one apparent missense mutation affecting the last base of exon 19. Moreover, we demonstrated that this latter mutation leads to an abnormal splicing with a predicted premature termination of translation. The clinical analysis of the 5 SCKL cases with PCNT mutations showed that they all presented minor skeletal changes and clinical features compatible with MOPDII diagnosis. It is therefore concluded that, despite variable severity, MOPDII is a genetically homogeneous condition due to loss-of-function of pericentrin.

  13. Theoretical analysis of BLM system for HLS II

    CERN Document Server

    Yukai, Chen; Lijuan, He; Weimin, Li

    2014-01-01

    Hefei Light Source (HLS) is being upgraded to HLS II. Its emittance will be much lower than before, therefore the Touschek scattering will increase significantly and become the dominant factor of beam loss. So it is necessary to build a new beam loss monitoring (BLM) system differed from the old one to obtain the quantity and position information of lost electrons. This information is useful in the commissioning, troubleshooting and beam lifetime studying for HLS II. This paper analyzes the distribution features of different kinds of lost electrons, introduces the new machine's operation parameters and discusses the way to choose proper monitoring positions. Base on these comprehensive analysis, a new BLM system for HLS II is proposed.

  14. CFD analysis of the ITER first wall 06 panel. Part II: Thermal-hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanino, R.; Bonifetto, R. [Dipartimento Energia, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino (Italy); Cau, F.; Portone, A. [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Savoldi Richard, L., E-mail: laura.savoldi@polito.it [Dipartimento Energia, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2014-04-15

    The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of the FW06 panel of the ITER shielding blanket is presented in two companion papers. In this Part II we concentrate on the thermal-hydraulics of the water coolant, driven by the nuclear volumetric and plasma surface heat loads discussed in Part I. Both the detailed steady state analysis of a single cooling channel and the coarse transient analysis of the whole panel are considered. The compatibility of the hot spots with the maximum recommended temperatures for the different materials is confirmed. The heat transfer coefficient between coolant and walls is obtained post-processing the results of the simulation and compared with the results of available correlations, which may be used for simpler analyses: in the fully developed flow regions of the cooling pipes, it turns out to be well approximated by the Sieder–Tate correlation. The operation margin with respect to the critical heat flux is also computed and turns out to be sufficiently large compared with the design limit.

  15. Optimization of environment compatible analysis methods for mineral hydrocarbons in the soil; Optimierung umweltvertraeglicher Analysenverfahren fuer Mineraloelkohlenwasserstoffe im Boden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flachowsky, J.; Borsdorf, H. [eds.] [UFZ - Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Leipzig (Germany); Loehmannsroeben, H.G.; Roch, T. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany); Leopom, P. [Umweltbundesamt, Berlin (Germany); Reimers, C. [Technische Univ. Hamburg-Harburg, Hamburg (Germany); Matz, G.; Kuebler, J. [MOBILAB GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Christall, B. [SOFIA GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Hahn, M.; Matschiner, H. [Elektrochemie Halle GmbH (Germany); Baermann, A. [Dr. Baermann und Partner Mikroanalytik, Hamburg (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes several analytical methods for the quantitative chemical analysis of mineral oil hydrocarbons in soils. The measuring methods are investigated on accuracy, errors, sample preparation methods, analysis of reference materials and real materials. (SR) [Deutsch] Mit dieser Schrift praesentiert die Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt der Oeffentlichkeit Ergebnisse zu alternativen umweltvertraeglichen Bestimmungsmethoden fuer Mineraloelkohlenwasserstoffe in Boeden. Es war in erster Linie das Ziel aller beteiligten Forscher und Entwickler, die heute noch in der Anwendung befindliche Vorschrift nach DIN 38409 H18 zur Analytik von Mineraloelkohlenwasserstoffen durch eine sowohl umweltfreundliche als auch insgesamt aussagekraeftige Methode zu substituieren. (orig.)

  16. Quantitative Indicators for Defense Analysis. Volume II. Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-01

    34*"WTOiw«* piB ^ r- ••’ ’ ’■’.WH""" - "«.JH QUAURANT II Hot War JIoL ]War land i Cold I |Criscs War iThreaten ed - Crisis 1...34The Political Analysis of Negotiations," World Politics 26. 3 (April). ^(1971) The Politics of Trade Negotiations Between Africa and the EEC

  17. Aircraft electromagnetic compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Clifton A.; Larsen, William E.

    1987-06-01

    Illustrated are aircraft architecture, electromagnetic interference environments, electromagnetic compatibility protection techniques, program specifications, tasks, and verification and validation procedures. The environment of 400 Hz power, electrical transients, and radio frequency fields are portrayed and related to thresholds of avionics electronics. Five layers of protection for avionics are defined. Recognition is given to some present day electromagnetic compatibility weaknesses and issues which serve to reemphasize the importance of EMC verification of equipment and parts, and their ultimate EMC validation on the aircraft. Proven standards of grounding, bonding, shielding, wiring, and packaging are laid out to help provide a foundation for a comprehensive approach to successful future aircraft design and an understanding of cost effective EMC in an aircraft setting.

  18. Hydrodynamic Analysis of the Spherical Underwater Robot SUR-II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunfeng Yue

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper describes the development of the second-generation Spherical Underwater Robot (SUR-II. The new SUR-II has an improved propulsion system structure, resulting in better performance compared with the original design. This paper focuses on the characteristics of the water-jet thruster and the spherical hull of the SUR-II. To analyse its hydrodynamic characteristics, the main hydrodynamic parameters of the SUR-II were estimated based on two reasonable assumptions and a reasonable dynamic equation was proposed to describe the relationship between force and velocity. Drag coefficients were calculated separately for vertical and horizontal motions due to the fin on the robot's equator and the holes in the robot's hull. The holes had a particularly adverse effect on the horizontal drag coefficient. A hydrodynamic analysis using computational fluid dynamics was then carried out to verify the estimated parameters. The velocity vectors, pressure contours and drag coefficient for each state of motion were obtained. Finally, the propulsive force was determined experimentally to verify the theoretical calculations and simulation results.

  19. Automatically produced FRP beams with embedded FOS in complex geometry: process, material compatibility, micromechanical analysis, and performance tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabler, Markus; Tkachenko, Viktoriya; Küppers, Simon; Kuka, Georg G.; Habel, Wolfgang R.; Milwich, Markus; Knippers, Jan

    2012-04-01

    The main goal of the presented work was to evolve a multifunctional beam composed out of fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) and an embedded optical fiber with various fiber Bragg grating sensors (FBG). These beams are developed for the use as structural member for bridges or industrial applications. It is now possible to realize large scale cross sections, the embedding is part of a fully automated process and jumpers can be omitted in order to not negatively influence the laminate. The development includes the smart placement and layout of the optical fibers in the cross section, reliable strain transfer, and finally the coupling of the embedded fibers after production. Micromechanical tests and analysis were carried out to evaluate the performance of the sensor. The work was funded by the German ministry of economics and technology (funding scheme ZIM). Next to the authors of this contribution, Melanie Book with Röchling Engineering Plastics KG (Haren/Germany; Katharina Frey with SAERTEX GmbH & Co. KG (Saerbeck/Germany) were part of the research group.

  20. A comparative proteomic analysis of the early response to compatible symbiotic bacteria in the roots of a supernodulating soybean variety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavati, Afshin; Bushehri, Ali Akbar Shahnejat; Taleei, Alireza; Hiraga, Susumu; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2012-01-04

    To reveal the processes involved in the early stages of symbiosis between soybean plants and root nodule bacteria, we conducted a proteomic analysis of the response to bacterial inoculation in the roots of supernodulating (En-b0-1) and non-nodulating (En1282) varieties, and their parental normal-nodulating variety (Enrei). A total of 56 proteins were identified from 48 differentially expressed protein spots in normal-nodulating variety after bacterial inoculation. Among 56 proteins, metabolism- and energy production-related proteins were upregulated in supernodulating and downregulated in non-nodulating varieties compared to normal-nodulating variety. The supernodulating and non-nodulating varieties responded oppositely to bacterial inoculation with respect to the expression of 11 proteins. Seven proteins of these proteins was downregulated in supernodulating varieties compared to non-nodulating variety, but expression of proteasome subunit alpha type 6, gamma glutamyl hydrolase, glucan endo-1,3-beta glucosidase, and nodulin 35 was upregulated. The expression of seven proteins mirrored the degree of nodule formation. At the transcript level, expression of stem 31kDa glycoprotein, leucine aminopeptidase, phosphoglucomutase, and peroxidase was downregulated in the supernodulating variety compared to the non-nodulating variety, and their expression in the normal-nodulating variety was intermediate. These results suggest that suppression of the autoregulatory mechanism in the supernodulating variety might be due to negative regulation of defense and signal transduction-related processes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of Hemoglobin Glycation Using Microfluidic CE-MS: A Rapid, Mass Spectrometry Compatible Method for Assessing Diabetes Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Erin A; Ramos-Payan, Maria; Mellors, J Scott; Ramsey, J Michael

    2016-05-17

    to provide a more complete picture of a patient's glycemic control in the months leading up to blood collection. The results presented here demonstrate that the microfluidic CE-MS method is capable of rapidly assessing Hb and HSA glycation from low volumes of whole blood with minimal sample preparation and has the potential to provide more information in a single analysis step than current technologies.

  2. Difference Image Analysis of the OGLE-II bulge data. II. Microlensing events

    CERN Document Server

    Wozniak, P R; Szymanski, M H; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Zebrun, K

    2001-01-01

    We present a sample of microlensing events discovered in the Difference Image Analysis (DIA) of the OGLE-II images collected during 3 observing seasons, 1997--1999. 4424 light curves pass our criteria on the presence of a brightening episode on top of a constant baseline. Among those, 512 candidate microlensing events were selected visually. We designed an automated procedure, which unambiguously selects up to 237 best events. Including 8 candidate events recovered by other means, a total of 520 light curves are presented in this work. In addition to microlensing events, the larger sample contains certain types of transients, but is also strongly contaminated by artifacts. All 4424 light curves in the weakly filtered group are available electronically, with the intent of showing the gray zone between microlensing events and variable stars, as well as artifacts, to some extent inevitable in massive data reductions. We welcome suggestions for improving the selection process before the full analysis of complete ...

  3. Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis. Phase II final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Through the Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis (UIICSA), the City of Chicago embarked upon an ambitious effort to identify the measure the overall industrial cogeneration market in the city and to evaluate in detail the most promising market opportunities. This report discusses the background of the work completed during Phase II of the UIICSA and presents the results of economic feasibility studies conducted for three potential cogeneration sites in Chicago. Phase II focused on the feasibility of cogeneration at the three most promising sites: the Stockyards and Calumet industrial areas, and the Ford City commercial/industrial complex. Each feasibility case study considered the energy load requirements of the existing facilities at the site and the potential for attracting and serving new growth in the area. Alternative fuels and technologies, and ownership and financing options were also incorporated into the case studies. Finally, site specific considerations such as development incentives, zoning and building code restrictions and environmental requirements were investigated.

  4. cDNA-AFLP analysis reveals differential gene expression in compatible interaction of wheat challenged with Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Lili

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici is a fungal pathogen causing stripe rust, one of the most important wheat diseases worldwide. The fungus is strictly biotrophic and thus, completely dependent on living host cells for its reproduction, which makes it difficult to study genes of the pathogen. In spite of its economic importance, little is known about the molecular basis of compatible interaction between the pathogen and wheat host. In this study, we identified wheat and P. striiformis genes associated with the infection process by conducting a large-scale transcriptomic analysis using cDNA-AFLP. Results Of the total 54,912 transcript derived fragments (TDFs obtained using cDNA-AFLP with 64 primer pairs, 2,306 (4.2% displayed altered expression patterns after inoculation, of which 966 showed up-regulated and 1,340 down-regulated. 186 TDFs produced reliable sequences after sequencing of 208 TDFs selected, of which 74 (40% had known functions through BLAST searching the GenBank database. Majority of the latter group had predicted gene products involved in energy (13%, signal transduction (5.4%, disease/defence (5.9% and metabolism (5% of the sequenced TDFs. BLAST searching of the wheat stem rust fungus genome database identified 18 TDFs possibly from the stripe rust pathogen, of which 9 were validated of the pathogen origin using PCR-based assays followed by sequencing confirmation. Of the 186 reliable TDFs, 29 homologous to genes known to play a role in disease/defense, signal transduction or uncharacterized genes were further selected for validation of cDNA-AFLP expression patterns using qRT-PCR analyses. Results confirmed the altered expression patterns of 28 (96.5% genes revealed by the cDNA-AFLP technique. Conclusion The results show that cDNA-AFLP is a reliable technique for studying expression patterns of genes involved in the wheat-stripe rust interactions. Genes involved in compatible interactions between wheat and the

  5. Comparative transcriptome analysis of self-incompatible flower stigmas and self-compatible bud stigmas following self-pollination in broccoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H F; Wang, J S; Sheng, X G; Zhao, Z Q; Qi, Z R; Gu, H H

    2017-03-30

    DH07 is a DH line of Class I S-haplotype in broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica), in which stigmas of flowers show self-incompatibility (SI) and stigmas of buds show self-compatibility (SC). The molecular mechanisms that lead to stigmas at different developmental stages having different responses to self-pollination are yet unknown. In the present study, comparative transcriptome profiling of the stigmas of flowers and buds before and after self-pollination was performed by RNA-sequencing using an Illumina HiSeq(TM) 2000. A total of 80,102,897 reads were generated for further analysis in four libraries. Comparisons of the transcriptome profiles before and after self-pollination revealed 579 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the stigmas of buds (SBs); of these, 431 DEGs showed increased and 148 DEGs showed decreased transcript abundance after self-pollination in SBs. There were a total of 686 DEGs between unpollinated stigmas of flowers (SFs) and pollinated SFs, among which, 517 DEGs were up regulated and 169 DEGs were down regulated. Following the self-pollination, 379 identified DEGs were common in both SBs and SFs. It was found that ARR7-like and oxysterol-binding family protein related DEGs could play key roles in SI or SC signal transduction. The results obtained in this study would form the foundation for further studies on investigating the molecular mechanisms of SI and SC in Brassica.

  6. ANALYSIS OF THE EXTERNAL QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF CLINICAL BLOOD TRANSFUSION COMPATIBILITY%临床输血相容性室间质评分析体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔姝; 胡同平

    2011-01-01

    [目的]通过室间质评来完善实验方法和提高检测水平,使实验结果更加可靠,为临床输血提供安全保障.[方法]依据卫生部临床检验中心对临床输血相容性室间质评的要求,每年3次,每次5个项目包括ABO血型正反定型和Rh(D)血型鉴定、受血者和献血者抗体筛检及交叉配血实验,每个项目有5个被检测标本;对影响检测质量的标本、检测方法、试剂、操作过程及结果分析等诸多因素进行评估.[结果]2008年081批次结果较差,仅ABO正定型,Rh(D)血型鉴定两项为100%;082批次交叉配血较差为40%.2008年083批次及2009年091、092、093批次结果较为满意.[结论]临床输血相容性室间质控工作是临床输血质量管理体系中的重要环节,室间质评可增加临床实践经验,增强鉴别判断能力,规范临床输血相容性检测工作,达到安全输血的目的.%[Objective]To improve the experimental methods and detection level through the external quality assessment so that to provide more reliable and security results for the clinical transfusion.[Methods]According to the requirements of the Ministry of Health Clinical Laboratory Centre for external quality assessment of clinical blood transfusion compatibility: 3 times per year and 5 items each time including ABO blood group typing and reversed typing, Rh (D) group identification, recipient and donor antibody screening and cross-matching test.Each item had five specimens.Impact of testing on the quality of the specimens, test methods, reagents, process of operation, results analysis and other factors were assessed.[Results]081 batches had poor results in 2008, only positive-type ABO group, Rh (D) blood group identification were 100%.082 batches of cross matching was 40%.083 batches of 2008 and 091, 092, 093 batches of 2009 had satisfactory results.[Conclusion]The external quality assessment (EQC) of clinical blood transfusion compatibility is an important part of the

  7. THE SPECTRUM AND TERM ANALYSIS OF V II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorne, A. P.; Pickering, J. C.; Semeniuk, J. I., E-mail: j.pickering@imperial.ac.uk [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15

    The spectrum and extended term analysis of V II are presented. Fourier transform spectrometry was used to record high resolution spectra of singly ionized vanadium in the region 1492-5800 A (67020-17260 cm{sup -1}) with vanadium-neon and vanadium-argon hollow cathode lamps as sources. The wavenumber uncertainty for the center of gravity of the strongest lines is typically 0.002 cm{sup -1}, an improvement of an order of magnitude over previous measurements. Most of the lines exhibit partly resolved hyperfine structure. The V II energy levels in the 1985 compilation of Sugar and Corliss have been confirmed and revised, with the exception of the high-lying 4f levels and eight of the lower levels. Thirty-nine of the additional eighty-five high levels published by Iglesias et al. have also been confirmed and revised, and three of their missing levels have been found. The energy uncertainty of the revised levels has been reduced by about an order of magnitude. In total, 176 even levels and 233 odd levels are presented. Wavenumbers and classifications are given for 1242 V II lines.

  8. Heat exchanger analysis on a Microvax II/GPX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haught, Alan F.

    1988-12-01

    The finite element code FIDAP was used to examine the fluid flow path within a flat plate tube/fin heat exchanger and the resulting heat transfer from the fins and tube walls. The mathematical formulation, mesh development and analysis procedure are presented, and the results obtained are compared with experimental observations of the fluid flow and measurements of the fluid heating. This problem illustrates the capabilities of finite element techniques for analyzing complex three-dimensional convection-dominated heat transfer, and demonstrates the scope of problems which can be addressed on a Micro VAX II/GPX workstation.

  9. Final Safety Analysis Addenda to Hazards Summary Report, Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II): upgrading of plant protection system. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, N. L.; Keeton, J. M.; Sackett, J. I. [comps.

    1980-06-01

    This report is the second in a series of compilations of the formal Final Safety Analysis Addenda (FSAA`s) to the EBR-II Hazard Summary Report and Addendum. Sections 2 and 3 are edited versions of the original FSAA`s prepared in support of certain modifications to the reactor-shutdown-system portion of the EBR-II plant-protection system. Section 4 is an edited version of the original FSAA prepared in support of certain modifications to a system classified as an engineered safety feature. These sections describe the pre- and postmodification system, the rationale for the modification, and required supporting safety analysis. Section 5 provides an updated description and analysis of the EBR-II emergency power system. Section 6 summarizes all significant modifications to the EBR-II plant-protection system to date.

  10. SHEFEX II Flight Instrumentation And Preparation Of Post Flight Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Thomas; Siebe, Frank; Gulhan, Ali

    2011-05-01

    A main disadvantage of modern TPS systems for re- entry vehicles is the expensive manufacturing and maintenance process due to the complex geometry of these blunt nose configurations. To reduce the costs and to improve the aerodynamic performance the German Aerospace Center (DLR) is following a different approach using TPS structures consisting of flat ceramic tiles. To test these new sharp edged TPS structures the SHEFEX I flight experiment was designed and successfully performed by DLR in 2005. To further improve the reliability of the sharp edged TPS design at even higher Mach numbers, a second flight experiment SHEFEX II will be performed in September 2011. In comparison to SHEFEX I the second flight experiment has a fully symmetrical shape and will reach a maximum Mach number of about 11. Furthermore the vehicle has an active steering system using four canards to control the flight attitude during re-entry, e.g. roll angle, angle of attack and sideslip. After a successful flight the evaluation of the flight data will be performed using a combination of numerical and experimental tools. The data will be used for the improvement of the present numerical analysis tools and to get a better understanding of the aerothermal behaviour of sharp TPS structures. This paper presents the flight instrumentation of the SHEFEX II TPS. In addition the concept of the post flight analysis is presented.

  11. Influence of different mineral and Organic pesticide treatments on Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) contents determined by derivative potentiometric stripping analysis in Italian white and red wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Francesco; La Pera, Lara; Di Bella, Giuseppa; Nicotina, Mariano; Dugo, Giacomo

    2003-02-12

    This paper deals with the use of derivative potentiometric stripping analysis (dPSA) as a rapid and precise method to determine Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) levels in red and white wine samples from Sicily, Campania, and Tuscany and to investigate the possible connection between the content of these metals and the pesticide treatments used in vine-growing to control plant diseases and pests. dPSA allowed direct quantitation of heavy metals in acidified wines without any sample pretreatment. Mean recoveries of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) ranged from 95.5 to 99.2% for white wine samples and from 96.1 to 100.0% for red wine samples. The obtained results showed that Cd(II) was not found in any sample and that Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) levels were always lower than the toxicity limits in both fungicide- and water-treated wines. Nevertheless, the contents of metals were increased in samples from organic and inorganic pesticides treatment with respect to the water-treated samples. In particular, quinoxyfen, dinocap-penconazole, and dinocap applications considerably increased Cu(II) and Zn(II) contents in white and red wines. The levels of lead were significantly raised by azoxystrobin and sulfur treatments.

  12. Maximum Likelihood Analysis of Low Energy CDMS II Germanium Data

    CERN Document Server

    Agnese, R; Balakishiyeva, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Fritts, M; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Graham, M; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Leder, A; Loer, B; Asamar, E Lopez; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Moore, D C; Nelson, R H; Oser, S M; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Rogers, H E; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2014-01-01

    We report on the results of a search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) signal in low-energy data of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS~II) experiment using a maximum likelihood analysis. A background model is constructed using GEANT4 to simulate the surface-event background from $^{210}$Pb decay-chain events, while using independent calibration data to model the gamma background. Fitting this background model to the data results in no statistically significant WIMP component. In addition, we perform fits using an analytic ad hoc background model proposed by Collar and Fields, who claimed to find a large excess of signal-like events in our data. We confirm the strong preference for a signal hypothesis in their analysis under these assumptions, but excesses are observed in both single- and multiple-scatter events, which implies the signal is not caused by WIMPs, but rather reflects the inadequacy of their background model.

  13. Central receiver solar thermal power system. Phase 1. CDRL item 2; Pilot Plant preliminary design report. Volume II. System decription and system analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

    1977-10-01

    An active system analysis and integration effort has been maintained. These activities have included the transformation of initial program requirements into a preliminary system design, the evolution of subsystem requirements which lay the foundation for subsystem design and test activity, and the overseeing of the final preliminary design effort to ensure that the subsystems are operationally compatible and capable of producing electricity at the lowest possible cost per unit of energy. Volume II of the Preliminary Design Report presents the results of the overall system effort that went on during this contract. The effort is assumed to include not only the total system definition and design but also all subsystem interactions.

  14. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

  15. Tank 241-SY-102 January 2000 Compatibility Grab Samples Analytical Results for the Final Report [SEC 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BELL, K.E.

    2000-05-11

    This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-SY-102 (SY-102) grab samples taken in January 2000 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank SY-102 samples were performed as directed in Comparability Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 2000 (Sasaki 1999). No notification limits were exceeded. Preliminary data on samples 2SY-99-5, -6, and -7 were reported in ''Format II Report on Tank 241-SY-102 Waste Compatibility Grab Samples Taken in January 2000'' (Lockrem 2000). The data presented here represent the final results.

  16. Mutation and biochemical analysis in carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II (CPT II) deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olpin, S E; Afifi, A; Clark, S

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II (CPT II) deficiency has three basic phenotypes, late-onset muscular (mild), infantile/juvenile hepatic (intermediate) and severe neonatal. We have measured fatty acid oxidation and CPT II activity and performed mutation studies in 24 symptomatic patients......, the implication being that they may significantly influence the manifestation of clinical disease and could therefore potentially be considered as a susceptibility variants. Among myopathic individuals, males comprised 88% of patients, suggesting increased susceptibility to clinical disease. A small number...

  17. HESS II Data Analysis with ImPACT

    CERN Document Server

    Parsons, R D; Murach, T

    2015-01-01

    The High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) very high energy gamma-ray telescope array has added a fifth telescope of 600 m$^{2}$ mirror area to the centre of the 4 existing telescopes, lowering its energy threshold to the sub-100 GeV range and becoming the first operational IACT array using multiple telescope designs. In order to properly access this low-energy range however, some adaptation must be made to the existing event analysis. We present an adaptation of the high-performance event reconstruction algorithm, Image Pixelwise fit for Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (ImPACT), for performing mono and stereo event reconstruction with the H.E.S.S. II array. The reconstruction algorithm is based around the likelihood fitting of camera pixel amplitudes to an expected image template, directly generated from Monte Carlo simulations. This advanced reconstruction is combined with a multi variate analysis based background rejection scheme to provide a sensitive and stable analysis scheme in the sub-100 GeV gam...

  18. Exploring Interpersonal Compatibility in Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyton, Joann

    This study investigated William Schutz's three-dimensional theory of interpersonal behavior and compatibility (FIRO) to determine its validity as a group measure of compatibility. Data were collected from 248 students enrolled in a multi-section course in small group communications at a large midwestern university. Subjects self-selected…

  19. Compatibility of conditionally specified models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua Yun

    2010-04-01

    A conditionally specified joint model is convenient to use in fields such as spatial data modeling, Gibbs sampling, and missing data imputation. One potential problem with such an approach is that the conditionally specified models may be incompatible, which can lead to serious problems in applications. We propose an odds ratio representation of a joint density to study the issue and derive conditions under which conditionally specified distributions are compatible and yield a joint distribution. Our conditions are the simplest to verify compared with those proposed in the literature. The proposal also explicitly construct joint densities that are fully compatible with the conditionally specified densities when the conditional densities are compatible, and partially compatible with the conditional densities when they are incompatible. The construction result is then applied to checking the compatibility of the conditionally specified models. Ways to modify the conditionally specified models based on the construction of the joint models are also discussed when the conditionally specified models are incompatible.

  20. Proteomic analysis of pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs) induced by compatible and incompatible interactions of pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) in Capsicum chinense L3 plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvira, Maria Isabel; Galdeano, Myriam Molina; Gilardi, Patricia; García-Luque, Isabel; Serra, Maria Teresa

    2008-01-01

    Resistance conferred by the L(3) gene is active against most of the tobamoviruses, including the Spanish strain (PMMoV-S), a P(1,2) pathotype, but not against certain strains of pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV), termed P(1,2,3) pathotype, such as the Italian strain (PMMoV-I). Both viruses are nearly identical at their nucleotide sequence level (98%) and were used to challenge Capsicum chinense PI159236 plants harbouring the L(3) gene in order to carry out a comparative proteomic analysis of PR proteins induced in this host in response to infection by either PMMoV-S or PMMoV-I. PMMoV-S induces a hypersensitive reaction (HR) in C. chinense PI159236 plant leaves with the formation of necrotic local lesions and restriction of the virus at the primary infection sites. In this paper, C. chinense PR protein isoforms belonging to the PR-1, beta-1,3-glucanases (PR-2), chitinases (PR-3), osmotin-like protein (PR-5), peroxidases (PR-9), germin-like protein (PR-16), and PRp27 (PR-17) have been identified. Three of these PR protein isoforms were specifically induced during PMMoV-S-activation of C. chinense L(3) gene-mediated resistance: an acidic beta-1,3-glucanase isoform (PR-2) (M(r) 44.6; pI 5.1), an osmotin-like protein (PR-5) (M(r) 26.8; pI 7.5), and a basic PR-1 protein isoform (M(r) 18; pI 9.4-10.0). In addition, evidence is presented for a differential accumulation of C. chinense PR proteins and mRNAs in the compatible (PMMoV-I)-C. chinense and incompatible (PMMoV-S)-C. chinense interactions for proteins belonging to all PR proteins detected. Except for an acidic chitinase (PR-3) (M(r) 30.2; pI 5.0), an earlier and higher accumulation of PR proteins and mRNAs was detected in plants associated with HR induction. Furthermore, the accumulation rates of PR proteins and mRNA did not correlate with maximal accumulation levels of viral RNA, thus indicating that PR protein expression may reflect the physiological status of the plant.

  1. Data analysis of photon beam position at PLS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, J.; Shin, S., E-mail: tlssh@postech.ac.kr; Huang, Jung-Yun; Kim, D.; Kim, C.; Kim, Ilyou; Lee, T.-Y.; Park, C.-D.; Kim, K. R. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-834 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Moohyun [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-834 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-27

    In the third generation light source, photon beam position stability is critical issue on user experiment. Generally photon beam position monitors have been developed for the detection of the real photon beam position and the position is controlled by feedback system in order to keep the reference photon beam position. In the PLS-II, photon beam position stability for front end of particular beam line, in which photon beam position monitor is installed, has been obtained less than rms 1μm for user service period. Nevertheless, detail analysis for photon beam position data in order to demonstrate the performance of photon beam position monitor is necessary, since it can be suffers from various unknown noises. (for instance, a back ground contamination due to upstream or downstream dipole radiation, undulator gap dependence, etc.) In this paper, we will describe the start to end study for photon beam position stability and the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) analysis to demonstrate the reliability on photon beam position data.

  2. Compatible quantum theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, R; Hohenberg, P C

    2014-09-01

    Formulations of quantum mechanics (QM) can be characterized as realistic, operationalist, or a combination of the two. In this paper a realistic theory is defined as describing a closed system entirely by means of entities and concepts pertaining to the system. An operationalist theory, on the other hand, requires in addition entities external to the system. A realistic formulation comprises an ontology, the set of (mathematical) entities that describe the system, and assertions, the set of correct statements (predictions) the theory makes about the objects in the ontology. Classical mechanics is the prime example of a realistic physical theory. A straightforward generalization of classical mechanics to QM is hampered by the inconsistency of quantum properties with classical logic, a circumstance that was noted many years ago by Birkhoff and von Neumann. The present realistic formulation of the histories approach originally introduced by Griffiths, which we call 'compatible quantum theory (CQT)', consists of a 'microscopic' part (MIQM), which applies to a closed quantum system of any size, and a 'macroscopic' part (MAQM), which requires the participation of a large (ideally, an infinite) system. The first (MIQM) can be fully formulated based solely on the assumption of a Hilbert space ontology and the noncontextuality of probability values, relying in an essential way on Gleason's theorem and on an application to dynamics due in large part to Nistico. Thus, the present formulation, in contrast to earlier ones, derives the Born probability formulas and the consistency (decoherence) conditions for frameworks. The microscopic theory does not, however, possess a unique corpus of assertions, but rather a multiplicity of contextual truths ('c-truths'), each one associated with a different framework. This circumstance leads us to consider the microscopic theory to be physically indeterminate and therefore incomplete, though logically coherent. The completion of the theory

  3. Compatible quantum theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, R.; Hohenberg, P. C.

    2014-09-01

    Formulations of quantum mechanics (QM) can be characterized as realistic, operationalist, or a combination of the two. In this paper a realistic theory is defined as describing a closed system entirely by means of entities and concepts pertaining to the system. An operationalist theory, on the other hand, requires in addition entities external to the system. A realistic formulation comprises an ontology, the set of (mathematical) entities that describe the system, and assertions, the set of correct statements (predictions) the theory makes about the objects in the ontology. Classical mechanics is the prime example of a realistic physical theory. A straightforward generalization of classical mechanics to QM is hampered by the inconsistency of quantum properties with classical logic, a circumstance that was noted many years ago by Birkhoff and von Neumann. The present realistic formulation of the histories approach originally introduced by Griffiths, which we call ‘compatible quantum theory (CQT)’, consists of a ‘microscopic’ part (MIQM), which applies to a closed quantum system of any size, and a ‘macroscopic’ part (MAQM), which requires the participation of a large (ideally, an infinite) system. The first (MIQM) can be fully formulated based solely on the assumption of a Hilbert space ontology and the noncontextuality of probability values, relying in an essential way on Gleason's theorem and on an application to dynamics due in large part to Nistico. Thus, the present formulation, in contrast to earlier ones, derives the Born probability formulas and the consistency (decoherence) conditions for frameworks. The microscopic theory does not, however, possess a unique corpus of assertions, but rather a multiplicity of contextual truths (‘c-truths’), each one associated with a different framework. This circumstance leads us to consider the microscopic theory to be physically indeterminate and therefore incomplete, though logically coherent. The

  4. Strong and weak compatibility of services interacting under a specific environment and its reachable analysis%给定环境下服务接口交互的强弱相容性及可达性检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈波

    2011-01-01

    组合服务的接口交互行为的分析和检测是服务计算领域的一个重要课题。本文以接口自动机为组合服务接口模型,引入组合环境的因素,提出了在给定的组合环境下服务接口交互强弱相容性的概念,并给出了相容性判定的判据表达式。通过遍历组合服务接口模型进行可达性分析,并通过检测判据表达式是否满足来判定服务接口交互的相容性,同时实现了服务与环境交互相容性的判定。%Analysis and verification of composite services interacting with an interface is an important issue in service computing.The interface automata are taken as the model of composite services interacting in this paper.By introducing an environment factor into analysis,the concept of strong and weak compatibility of service interacting under specific environment is proposed,and the expression of criterion for compatibility checking is presented.In order to check the compatibility of service interfaces,the interacting model of composite services is traversed with the reachable analysis,and the compatibility of service with environment has been checked.

  5. Analysis to Compatibility and Clinical Application of Lizhong Decoction%理中汤的气味配伍及临床应用分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁瑞红

    2009-01-01

    理中汤首载于,主治伤寒太阳病下利不止,或寒性霍乱.该方用药简练、配伍精当、疗效显著,现就理中汤的气味配伍及临床应用做一简要分析.%Lizhong decoction was first recorded in the book "Treatise on Febrile Diseases" and was used to treat constant diarrhea of Taiyang disease and cold cholera. Lizhong decoction has the features of composing few medicines, enabling appropriate compatibility, and exerting obvious therapeutic effects. In this article, the compatibility and clinical application of this formula was briefly analyzed.

  6. Compatible Spatial Discretizations for Partial Differential Equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Douglas, N, ed.

    2004-11-25

    simulations. + Identification and design of compatible spatial discretizations of PDEs, their classification, analysis, and relations. + Relationships between different compatible spatial discretization methods and concepts which have been developed; + Impact of compatible spatial discretizations upon physical fidelity, verification and validation of simulations, especially in large-scale, multiphysics settings. + How solvers address the demands placed upon them by compatible spatial discretizations. This report provides information about the program and abstracts of all the presentations.

  7. Solar Electric Generating System II finite element analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohner, J.L.; Anderson, J.R.

    1994-04-01

    On June 2, 1992, Landers` earthquake struck the Solar Electric Generating System II, located in Daggett, California. The 30 megawatt power station, operated by the Daggett Leasing Corporation (DLC), suffered substantial damage due to structural failures in the solar farm. These failures consisted of the separation of sliding joints supporting a distribution of parabolic glass mirrors. At separation, the mirrors fell to the ground and broke. It was the desire of the DLC and the Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and to redesign these joints so that, in the event of future quakes, costly breakage will be avoided. To accomplish this task, drawings of collector components were developed by the STDAC, from which a detailed finite element computer model of a solar collector was produced. This nonlinear dynamic model, which consisted of over 8,560 degrees of freedom, underwent model reduction to form a low order nonlinear dynamic model containing only 40 degrees of freedom. This model was then used as a design tool to estimate joint dynamics. Using this design tool, joint configurations were modified, and an acceptable joint redesign determined. The results of this analysis showed that the implementation of metal stops welded to support shafts for the purpose of preventing joint separation is a suitable joint redesign. Moreover, it was found that, for quakes of Landers` magnitude, mirror breakage due to enhanced vibration in the trough assembly is unlikely.

  8. Intelligent control of HVAC systems. Part II: perceptron performance analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan URSU

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This is the second part of a paper on intelligent type control of Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning (HVAC systems. The whole study proposes a unified approach in the design of intelligent control for such systems, to ensure high energy efficiency and air quality improving. In the first part of the study it is considered as benchmark system a single thermal space HVAC system, for which it is assigned a mathematical model of the controlled system and a mathematical model(algorithm of intelligent control synthesis. The conception of the intelligent control is of switching type, between a simple neural network, a perceptron, which aims to decrease (optimize a cost index,and a fuzzy logic component, having supervisory antisaturating role for neuro-control. Based on numerical simulations, this Part II focuses on the analysis of system operation in the presence only ofthe neural control component. Working of the entire neuro-fuzzy system will be reported in a third part of the study.

  9. Analysis of responses to angiotensin II in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinity J Bivalacqua

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Responses to angiotensin II (Ang II were investigated in anaesthetised CD1 mice. Injections of Ang II caused dose-related increases in systemic arterial pressure that were antagonised by candesartan. Responses to Ang II were not altered by PD 123319. At the lowest dose studied (20 µg/kg i.v., the inhibitory effects of candesartan were competitive, whereas at the highest dose (100 µg/kg i.v., the dose-response curve for Ang II was shifted to the right in a non-parallel manner. The inhibitory effects of candesartan were selective and were similar in animals pretreated with enalaprilat to reduce endogenous Ang II production. Pressor responses to Ang II were not altered by propranolol, phentolamine or atropine, but were enhanced by hexamethonium. Increases in total peripheral resistance were inhibited by the AT1-receptor antagonist (ARB but were not altered by AT2-receptor, alpha- or beta-receptor antagonists. These results suggest that pressor responses to Ang II are mediated by AT 1-receptors, are buffered by the baroreceptors, are not modulated by effects on AT2receptors, and that activation of the sympathetic nervous system plays little role in mediating rapid haemodynamic responses to the peptide in anaesthetised mice.

  10. Quantificational analysis of NPT-II protein from genetically modified ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-06-07

    Jun 7, 2010 ... ... (MRS-2), enzyme conjugates (NPT-II monoclonal antibody and polyclonal antibody), ... CdEN18 followed the same process described above, except for ..... inhibitors of NPT-II protein detection, characterizing low. pH and ...

  11. COMPATIBILITY OF BENTONITE AND DNAPLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The compatibility of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), trichloroethylene (TCE), methylene chloride (MC), and creosote with commercially available sodium bentonite pellets was evaluated using stainless steel, double-ring, falling-head permeameters. The Hydraulic conductiv...

  12. Análise da obra Kurze Schatten II de Brian Ferneyhough Analysis of Brian Ferneyhough's Kurze Schatten II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Merker Castellani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Análise dos três primeiros movimentos da obra Kurze Schatten II para violão solo de Brian Ferneyhough, na qual são discutidos aspectos de sua técnica composicional, além de conceitos importantes na obra do compositor.Analysis of the first three movements of Brian Ferneyhough's Kurze Schatten II for solo guitar. It discusses compositional techniques and strategies used by the composer. It also includes concepts and structures typical of the composer's musical language.

  13. Reference manual for generation and analysis of Habitat Time Series: version II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhous, Robert T.; Bartholow, John M.; Updike, Marlys A.; Moos, Alan R.

    1990-01-01

    by the Aquatic Systems Branch of the National Ecology Research Center. For more information about the TSLIB software, refer to the Memorandum of Understanding. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology and TSLIB. Other chapters in this manual provide information on the different aspects of using the models. The information contained in the other chapters includes (2) acquisition, entry, manipulation, and listing of streamflow data; (3) entry, manipulation, and listing of the habitat-versus-streamflow function; (4) transferring streamflow data; (5) water resources systems analysis; (6) generation and analysis of daily streamflow and habitat values; (7) generation of the time series of monthly habitats; (8) manipulation, analysis, and display of month time series data; and (9) generation, analysis, and display of annual time series data. Each section includes documentation for the programs therein with at least one page of information for each program, including a program description, instructions for running the program, and sample output. The Appendixes contain the following: (A) sample file formats; (B) descriptions of default filenames; (C) alphabetical summary of batch-procedure files; (D) installing and running TSLIB on a microcomputer; (E) running TSLIB on a CDC Cyber computer; (F) using the TSLIB user interface program (RTSM); and (G) running WATSTORE on the USGS Amdahl mainframe computer. The number for this version of TSLIB--Version II-- is somewhat arbitrary, as the TSLIB programs were collected into a library some time ago; but operators tended to use and manage them as individual programs. Therefore, we will consider the group of programs from the past that were only on the CDC Cyber computer as Version 0; the programs from the past that were on both the Cyber and the IBM-compatible microcomputer as Version I; and the programs contained in this reference manual as Version II.

  14. A Compatibility Analysis of Tourism Undergraduate Education and Vocational Needs%旅游本科教育与职业需求的契合性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯晓兵; 宋子千

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of low employment rate and high churn rate within the tourism industry of tourism management students has gradually caused the attention of scholars and the industry. Based on the compatibility of tourism undergraduate education and vocational needs and 12 domestic universities as the research object, the article analyzes three aspects of tourism undergraduate education including the professional setting, training objectives and curriculum. It is found that the generalized tourism management is the main major of undergraduate education of tourism. Tourism management undergraduate programs focus on fostering tourism enterprises and industry management personnel. Tourism management undergraduate courses are relatively complete and give priority to theoretical knowledge. While taking the recruitment manual of typical tourist enterprises as the object, the research sums up the tour occupational demand characteristics of the tourism industry. It is found that tourism industry emphasizes the work experience, specific operational knowledge and ability, comprehensive knowledge and ability, and the understanding of the latest industry practice. At last, the article has a comparative analysis between tourism undergraduate education and vocational needs, discusses the tourism undergraduate education and the demand of professional practice in particular, and puts forward the suggestions on the inadaptability between tourism undergraduate education and vocational needs.%旅游行业内较为严重的旅游专业学生行业就业率低且流失率高的现象,已逐渐受到学者和业界人士的关注。以旅游本科教育和职业需求的契合性为出发点,以国内12所旅游学科发展较有特色的高等院校为研究对象,从旅游本科教育的专业设置、培养目标和课程安排三个方面进行分析,发现笼统的旅游管理是旅游本科教育最主要的专业,旅游管理本科专业以培

  15. Interfacial Compatibility in Microelectronics Moving Away from the Trial and Error Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Laurila, Tomi; Paulasto-Kröckel, Mervi; Turunen, Markus; Mattila, Toni T; Kivilahti, Jorma

    2012-01-01

    Interfaces between dissimilar materials are met everywhere in microelectronics and microsystems. In order to ensure faultless operation of these highly sophisticated structures, it is mandatory to have fundamental understanding of materials and their interactions in the system. In this difficult task, the “traditional” method of trial and error is not feasible anymore; it takes too much time and repeated efforts. In Interfacial Compatibility in Microelectronics, an alternative approach is introduced. In this revised method four fundamental disciplines are combined: i) thermodynamics of materials ii) reaction kinetics iii) theory of microstructures and iv) stress and strain analysis. The advantages of the method are illustrated in Interfacial Compatibility in Microelectronics which includes: •solutions to several common reliability issues in microsystem technology, •methods to understand and predict failure mechanisms at interfaces between dissimilar materials and •an approach to DFR based on deep un...

  16. 无人机机载通信设备间的射频电磁兼容预测分析%Analysis of RF Electromagnetic Compatibility Prediction Among UAV Airborne Communication Equipments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵翌池; 宋祖勋; 李恒博

    2012-01-01

    由于无人机的内部空间狭小,设备安装拥挤,使得无人机系统内电磁环境相当复杂,恶劣的电磁环境导致设备间产生严重的干扰问题.因此,要保证无人机机载通信设备间的电磁兼容性,电磁兼容预测是一种非常有效的手段.本文根据无人机的特点,提出一种适用于无人机机载通信设备间射频电磁兼容性预测的干扰余量分析法.通过对设备进行频率预测和幅度预测,验证这种方法的有效性,从而为分析机载通信设备间的射频电磁兼容性提供一套有效方案.%As the internal space of UAV is limited and the equipments are closely installed, the electromagnetic environment of UAV system is fairly complex and the deteriorative electromagnetic environment causes serious interferences among different e-quipments. Therefore, electromagnetic compatibility prediction is a very effective means to ensure the electromagnetic compatibility among the UAV airborne communication equipments. According to the characteristics of UAV, an interference margin analysis method is proposed, which is fit for the RF electromagnetic compatibility prediction among the UAV airborne communication e-quipments. The effectiveness of this method is verified by the mathematical model of the airborne equipments about frequency and amplitude forecasting, which provides an effective solution for analyzing the RF electromagnetic compatibility among airborne communication equipments.

  17. Synthesis, characterization and thermogravimetric analysis of Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II and Zn(II complexes supported by ONNO tetradentate Schiff base ligand derived from hydrazino benzoxazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kavitha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new series of Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II and Zn(II metal complexes of a novel ligand 3-(2-(1-(2,4-DihydroxyPhenylethylidenehydrazinyl-2H-benzo[b][1,4]oxazin-2-one, (DPE-HBO were prepared and characterized. Microwave synthesis of the ligand was also carried out which gave a high increase in its yield within very short time. 3D molecular modeling structure of the ligand is obtained by using ArgusLab software. The nature of bonding and the stereochemistry of the complexes have been deduced from elemental analysis, thermal, infrared, electronic spectra, magnetic moments and conductivity measurements. ESR spectrum of Cu(II complex is studied. All the complexes show subnormal magnetic moments. ONNO donor atoms participate in coordination with Cu(II and Zn(II complexes exhibiting octahedral geometry. Co(II and Ni(II complexes behave differently with ONNO donor atoms showing two types of geometries i.e., octahedral and square planar within the same complex.

  18. Analysis of the compatibility of prescriptions depending on nature and flavor of drug in Detailed Analysis of Epidemic Warm Diseases%《温病条辨》咸寒苦甘法应用浅析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周晓平; 杨进

    2012-01-01

    咸寒苦甘法源于《黄帝内经》.在明清温病学家著述中,记载甚多.《温病条辨》中应用咸寒苦甘法之用在于清心络以开窍闭;清血络以散瘀热;泻结热以存阴液;清阴络以透余邪;补肝肾以救真阴.其病机关键在于邪伏较深,且阴液耗伤明显.分析可见咸寒苦甘法所主病证大多有伤及真阴之险,应以咸寒苦甘法固护真阴为重心,苦寒之品用以泄热存阴,甘寒甘苦法的应用主在留津气.%The compatibility of prescriptions depending onnature and flavor of drug derived from Huangdi Neijing.ln masters of Epidemic Febrile Disease's works, there are many records of that.In Detailed Analysis of Epidemic Warm Diseases, the compatibility aboutcold nature and the tastes: salty, sweet, bitter have the function of dispelling blood stasis andheat, assisting resuscitation, promoting the flow of Qi and blood inmeridians, purgation and saving the body fluid, clearing away heatin Yin collaterals and expelling pathogenic factors, filling liver and kidney and nourishing really Yin. In pathological mechanism we must catch key factors: deep evil and Yin fluid consumption injury obviously. Most diseases due to salty, cold, bitter and sweet may hurt kidney-Yin. So in treatment, salty-cold method should be used to protect kidney-Yin, bitter and cold are used to release heat and keep Yin, and the use of sweet-cold-sweet-bitter method is to storefunctional activities of the body fluid.

  19. Pitchfork Analysis of Class II Correction using Forsus FRD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu Goel

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: The FRD protocol led to a successful correction of Class II malocclusion with more of skeletal than dental correction. However, more parameters are required to assess the mandibular growth and remodeling of the glenoid fossa.

  20. Design and analysis of a tendon-based computed tomography-compatible robot with remote center of motion for lung biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunpeng; Jiang, Shan; Yang, Zhiyong; Yuan, Wei; Dou, Huaisu; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Daguang; Bian, Yuan

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, biopsy is a decisive method of lung cancer diagnosis, whereas lung biopsy is time-consuming, complex and inaccurate. So a computed tomography-compatible robot for rapid and precise lung biopsy is developed in this article. According to the actual operation process, the robot is divided into two modules: 4-degree-of-freedom position module for location of puncture point is appropriate for patient's almost all positions and 3-degree-of-freedom tendon-based orientation module with remote center of motion is compact and computed tomography-compatible to orientate and insert needle automatically inside computed tomography bore. The workspace of the robot surrounds patient's thorax, and the needle tip forms a cone under patient's skin. A new error model of the robot based on screw theory is proposed in view of structure error and actuation error, which are regarded as screw motions. Simulation is carried out to verify the precision of the error model contrasted with compensation via inverse kinematics. The results of insertion experiment on specific phantom prove the feasibility of the robot with mean error of 1.373 mm in laboratory environment, which is accurate enough to replace manual operation.

  1. Macromolecular unfolding properties in presence of compatible solutes

    CERN Document Server

    Smiatek, Jens; Heuer, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    We present Molecular Dynamics simulations of Chymotrypsin inhibitor II and PEO in presence of compatible solutes. Our results indicate that the the native compact state of the studied macromolecules is stabilized in presence of hydroxyectoine. We are able to explain the corresponding mechanism by a variation of the solvent properties for higher hydroxyectoine concentrations. Our results are validated by detailed free energy calculations.

  2. DFT analysis and bioactivity of 2-((E-(4-methoxybenzyliminomethylphenol and its Ni(II and Pd(II complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalina Mohd Tajuddin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the synthesis, characterisation and DFT analysis of an N,O bidentate Schiff base, ((E-(4-methoxybenzyliminomethylphenol, (L1c and its Ni(II and Pd(II complexes. The structures were elucidated via elemental analysis, UV–Visible, NMR, IR and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Complexation of L1c with Ni(II and Pd(II was observed to induce different degrees of bathochromic effect on n → π∗ and π → π∗ electronic transitions. A comparison of the experimental data of UV–Visible, NMR, IR and X-ray with those calculated using DFT and TD-DFT methods where five hybrid functionals were tested in gas, IEF-PCM and SS-PCM models was also carried out. The results show that the reproduction of maximum absorption bands n → π∗ and π → π∗ is strongly related to the tested hybrid functionals and solvatochromic effects. Relatively good concordance was obtained between experimental and calculated NMR chemical shifts, IR and X-ray parameters. A bioactivity evaluation against HCT116 and Escherichia coli displayed that the parent ligand L1c is a more superior anticancer and antibacterial agent than the positive controls of 5FU and gentamicin respectively. However, both complexes showed poor activity as anticancer agent and no activity observed against tested bacteria.

  3. Handbook of electromagnetic compatibility

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This""know-how""book gives readers a concise understanding of the fundamentals of EMC, from basic mathematical and physical concepts through present, computer-age methods used in analysis, design, and tests. With contributions from leading experts in their fields, the text provides a comprehensive overview. Fortified with information on how to solve potential electromagnetic interference (EMI) problems that may arise in electronic design, practitioners will be betterable to grasp the latest techniques, trends, and applications of this increasingly important engineering discipline.Handbook of E

  4. Advanced Microgravity Compatible, Integrated Laundry System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Advanced Microgravity Compatible, Integrated Laundry (AMCIL) is a microgravity compatible liquid / liquid vapor, two-phase laundry system with water jet...

  5. Theoretical analysis of BLM system for HLS II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Kai; Li, Yu-Xiong; Li, Wei-Min; He, Li-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Hefei Light Source (HLS) is being upgraded to HLS II. Its emittance will be much lower than before, therefore the Touschek scattering will increase significantly and become the dominant factor of beam loss. So it is necessary to build a new beam loss monitoring (BLM) system that, in contrast to the old one, is able to obtain the quantity and position information of lost electrons. This information is useful in the commissioning, troubleshooting, and beam lifetime studying for HLS II. This paper analyzes the distribution features of different kinds of lost electrons, introduces the operation parameters of the new machine and discusses how to choose proper monitoring positions. Based on these comprehensive analyses, a new BLM system for HLS II is proposed.

  6. Analysis on Mechanisms of Activating Blood Circulation and Compatible Regularity of Cinnamon Twig%桂枝活血机理及配伍规律探析*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐慕鸽; 魏凯峰(通讯作者)

    2013-01-01

    This paper states the function of activating blood circulation in Cinnamon Twig, as well as the compatible regularity. The function on activating blood circulation of Cinnamon Twig is resulted from regulating body's blood, Qi and fluid. We should use it flexibly according to rational combination with blood-activating drugs, blood-enriching drugs and Qi-tonifying drugs in clinical practice.%阐述了桂枝功能与活血的关系,以及相关的配伍。认为桂枝的活血功效是通过调节机体血、气、水发挥,根据证候配伍活血药、养血药、温里药、理气药、补气药而在临床灵活使用。

  7. Spatial compatibility and affordance compatibility in patients with chronic schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Yu; Sato, Fumiyasu; Hiraoka, Yuya; Suzuki, Shingo; Niyama, Yoshitsugu

    2016-12-01

    A deterioration in information-processing performance is commonly recognized in patients with chronic schizophrenia. Although the enhancement of cognitive skills in patients with schizophrenia is important, the types of external stimuli that influence performance have not received much attention. The aim of present study was to clarify the effects of spatial and affordance compatibility in patients with schizophrenia, compared with those in healthy people. The subjects (25 patients with schizophrenia and 25 healthy controls) participated in two experiment examining the effects of the spatial location of stimuli and the action-relevance of objects. The results showed that the effect of spatial compatibility was similar in both the patients and the controls, whereas the influence of action-relevant objects was not highlighted in either patients with chronic schizophrenia or healthy controls. These findings provide important evidence of a normal spatial compatibility effect in patients with chronic schizophrenia. However, further research examining the affordance compatibility effect is needed, taking into consideration the symptomatology and the severity of the social functioning level in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Inheritance of self-compatibility in almond: breeding strategies to assure self-compatibility in the progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, E; Dicenta, F

    2003-03-01

    To assure self-compatibility in the progenies, three different crosses were conducted for the first time in an almond breeding programme: self-pollination (266 descendants from 30 families), crosses between parents sharing an S-allele (108 descendants from five families) and crosses with homozygous self-compatible parents (62 descendants from five families). Depending on the cross, self-compatibility in the progenies was determined by observing pollen tube growth (by means of fluorescence microscopy), stylar S-RNases analysis or allele-specific PCR. The results obtained fit with the accepted hypothesis of inheritance of self-compatibility and the three crossing strategies used ensured 100% of self-compatible descendants. These strategies increase the efficiency of the breeding programme and avoid the laborious task of evaluating this characteristic. From the breeding point of view, self-fertilisation and crosses between relatives tend to produce inbreeding. Furthermore, these methods reduce the possibilities of choosing the parental combination. The use of homozygous self-compatible parents does not have any of these disadvantages. As far as we know, this is the first time that allele-specific PCR has been used for early selection of self-compatible seedlings. The advantages and disadvantages of the three methodologies used to determine self-compatibility are discussed.

  9. An ICF-CY-Based Content Analysis of the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Kara; Coster, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Background: The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), and its version for children and youth (ICF-CY), has been increasingly adopted as a system to describe function and disability. A content analysis of the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-II (VABS-II) was conducted to examine congruence with the functioning…

  10. Improved cosmological constraints from a joint analysis of the SDSS-II and SNLS supernova samples

    CERN Document Server

    Betoule, M; Guy, J; Mosher, J; Hardin, D; Biswas, R; Astier, P; El-Hage, P; Konig, M; Kuhlmann, S; Marriner, J; Pain, R; Regnault, N; Balland, C; Bassett, B A; Brown, P J; Campbell, H; Carlberg, R G; Cellier-Holzem, F; Cinabro, D; Conley, A; D'Andrea, C B; DePoy, D L; Doi, M; Ellis, R S; Fabbro, S; Filippenko, A V; Foley, R J; Frieman, J A; Fouchez, D; Galbany, L; Goobar, A; Gupta, R R; Hill, G J; Hlozek, R; Hogan, C J; Hook, I M; Howell, D A; Jha, S W; Guillou, L Le; Leloudas, G; Lidman, C; Marshall, J L; Möller, A; Mourão, A M; Neveu, J; Nichol, R; Olmstead, M D; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Perlmutter, S; Prieto, J L; Pritchet, C J; Richmond, M; Riess, A G; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Sako, M; Schahmaneche, K; Schneider, D P; Smith, M; Sollerman, J; Sullivan, M; Walton, N A; Wheeler, C J

    2014-01-01

    We present cosmological constraints from a joint analysis of type Ia supernova (SN Ia) observations obtained by the SDSS-II and SNLS collaborations. The data set includes several low-redshift samples (z<0.1), all 3 seasons from the SDSS-II (0.05 < z < 0.4), and 3 years from SNLS (0.2

  11. Experimental analysis of the mechanism of chromatin remodeling by RNA polymerase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaykalova, Daria A.; Kulaeva, Olga I.; Pestov, Nikolai A.; Hsieh, Fu-Kai; Studitsky, Vasily M.

    2014-01-01

    The vital process of transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) occurs in chromatin environment in eukaryotic cells; in fact, moderately transcribed genes retain nucleosomal structure. Recent studies suggest that chromatin structure presents a strong barrier for transcribing Pol II in vitro, and that DNA-histone interactions are only partially and transiently disrupted during transcript elongation on moderately active genes. Furthermore, elongating Pol II complex is one of the major targets during gene regulation. Below we describe a highly purified, defined experimental system that recapitulates many important properties of transcribed chromatin in vitro and allows detailed analysis of the underlying mechanisms. PMID:22910212

  12. Sorption selectivity of birnessite particle edges: a d-PDF analysis of Cd(ii) and Pb(ii) sorption by δ-MnO2 and ferrihydrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Genuchten, Case M; Peña, Jasquelin

    2016-08-10

    Birnessite minerals (layer-type MnO2), which bear both internal (cation vacancies) and external (particle edges) metal sorption sites, are important sinks of contaminants in soils and sediments. Although the particle edges of birnessite minerals often dominate the total reactive surface area, especially in the case of nanoscale crystallites, the metal sorption reactivity of birnessite particle edges remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the sorption selectivity of birnessite particle edges by combining Cd(ii) and Pb(ii) adsorption isotherms at pH 5.5 with surface structural characterization by differential pair distribution function (d-PDF) analysis. We compared the sorption reactivity of δ-MnO2 to that of the nanomineral, 2-line ferrihydrite, which exhibits only external surface sites. Our results show that, whereas Cd(ii) and Pb(ii) both bind to birnessite layer vacancies, only Pb(ii) binds extensively to birnessite particle edges. For ferrihydrite, significant Pb(ii) adsorption to external sites was observed (roughly 20 mol%), whereas Cd(ii) sorption was negligible. These results are supported by bond valence calculations that show comparable degrees of saturation of oxygen atoms on birnessite and ferrihydrite particle edges. Therefore, we propose that the sorption selectivity of birnessite edges follows the same order of that reported previously for ferrihydrite: Ca(ii) < Cd(ii) < Ni(ii) < Zn(ii) < Cu(ii) < Pb(ii).

  13. High-throughput engineering and analysis of peptide binding to class II MHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Boder, Eric T

    2010-07-27

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) proteins govern stimulation of adaptive immunity by presenting antigenic peptides to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Many allelic variants of MHC-II exist with implications in peptide presentation and immunity; thus, high-throughput experimental tools for rapid and quantitative analysis of peptide binding to MHC-II are needed. Here, we present an expression system wherein peptide and MHC-II are codisplayed on the surface of yeast in an intracellular association-dependent manner and assayed by flow cytometry. Accordingly, the relative binding of different peptides and/or MHC-II variants can be assayed by genetically manipulating either partner, enabling the application of directed evolution approaches for high-throughput characterization or engineering. We demonstrate the application of this tool to map the side-chain preference for peptides binding to HLA-DR1 and to evolve novel HLA-DR1 mutants with altered peptide-binding specificity.

  14. Electromagnetic compatibility in power electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Costa , François; Revol , Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Scientists largely attribute the recent deterioration of the electromagnetic environment to power electronics. This realization has spurred the study of methodical approaches to electromagnetic compatibility designs as explored in this text. The book addresses major challenges, such as handling numerous parameters vital to predicting electro magnetic effects and achieving compliance with line-harmonics norms, while proposing potential solutions.

  15. Atuarfitsialak: Greenland's Cultural Compatible Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Tasha R.

    2012-01-01

    In 2002, Greenlandic reform leaders launched a comprehensive, nation-wide reform to create culturally compatible education. Greenland's reform work spans the entire educational system and includes preschool through higher education. To assist their efforts, reform leaders adopted the Standards for Effective Pedagogy developed at the Center for…

  16. Compatibility optimization of passenger cars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nastic, T.; Schoofs, A.J.G.; Mooi, H.G.

    1999-01-01

    Nowadays traffic safety and occupant protection get a lot of attention due to the large number of fatalities and injuries in car accidents. The occupant protection in two-vehicle crashes can be improved by car-to-car compatibility, which means well balanced crashworthiness characteristics of both

  17. Design optimization for car compatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nastic, T.; Schoofs, A.J.G.; Mooi, H.G.

    1999-01-01

    Nowadays traffic safety and occupant protection get a lot of attention due to the large number of fatalities and injuries in car accidents. The occupant protection in two-vehicle crashes can be improved by car-to-car compatibility, which means well balanced crashworthiness characteristics of both

  18. NMR STUDY ON THE COMPATIBILITY OF ACR/PVC BLENDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaoqing; QIU Lingshi; WANG Dongsheng; WANG Yuanshen

    1988-01-01

    A 300MHz solid NMR study on the compatibility of ACR (poly (methyl methacrylate-co-methacrylate),in the ratio of 1:1)-PVC (poly (vinyl chloride)) blends is reported. Spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2)relaxation time of ACR, PVC and their blends are recorded in the temperature range from 215K to 355K.Experimental results indicate that ACR and PVC are compatible with each other and the domain size is smaller than 25 nm, but heterogeneities of molecular dimensions still exist. Some problems of mechanism of compatibility and data analysis are also discussed.

  19. SPATIAL COMPATIBLE USER GROUPING ALGORITHM FOR MULTIUSER MIMO SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Lei; Niu Zhisheng

    2007-01-01

    A spatial compatible user grouping algorithm is proposed to reduce CoChannel Interference (CCI) in Space Division Multiple Access (SDMA) multiuser Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO)systems. We evaluate the interferences among users by use of distances between row spaces spanned by users' channel matrixes, then control frequency sharing according to the compatible user grouping algorithm. Results show that the row space distance algorithm outperforms others because it can fully utilize the information from users' channel matrixes, especially the matrix structure information. The results also prove that the algorithm based on channel matrix structure analysis is a better candidate for spatial compatibility approximation.

  20. Association analysis of urotensin II gene (UTS2 and flanking regions with biochemical parameters related to insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E Sáez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Urotensin II (UII is a potent vasoconstrictor peptide, which signals through a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR known as GPR14 or urotensin receptor (UTR. UII exerts a broad spectrum of actions in several systems such as vascular cell, heart muscle or pancreas, where it inhibits insulin release. OBJECTIVE: Given the reported role of UII in insulin secretion, we have performed a genetic association analysis of the UTS2 gene and flanking regions with biochemical parameters related to insulin resistance (fasting glucose, glucose 2 hours after a glucose overload, fasting insulin and insulin resistance estimated as HOMA. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: We have identified several polymorphisms associated with the analysed clinical traits, not only at the UTS2 gene, but also in thePER3 gene, located upstream from UTS2. Our results are compatible with a role for UII in glucose homeostasis and diabetes although we cannot rule out the possibility that PER3 gene may underlie the reported associations.

  1. A new and efficient Solid Phase Microextraction approach for analysis of high fat content food samples using a matrix-compatible coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grazia, Selenia; Gionfriddo, Emanuela; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2017-05-15

    The current work presents the optimization of a protocol enabling direct extraction of avocado samples by a new Solid Phase Microextraction matrix compatible coating. In order to further extend the coating life time, pre-desorption and post-desorption washing steps were optimized for solvent type, time, and degree of agitation employed. Using optimized conditions, lifetime profiles of the coating related to extraction of a group of analytes bearing different physical-chemical properties were obtained. Over 80 successive extractions were carried out to establish coating efficiency using PDMS/DVB 65µm commercial coating in comparison with the PDMS/DVB/PDMS. The PDMS/DVB coating was more prone to irreversible matrix attachment on its surface, with consequent reduction of its extractive performance after 80 consecutive extractions. Conversely, the PDMS/DVB/PDMS coating showed enhanced inertness towards matrix fouling due to its outer smooth PDMS layer. This work represents the first step towards the development of robust SPME methods for quantification of contaminants in avocado as well as other fatty-based matrices, with minimal sample pre-treatment prior to extraction. In addition, an evaluation of matrix components attachment on the coating surface and related artifacts created by desorption of the coating at high temperatures in the GC-injector port, has been performed by GCxGC-ToF/MS.

  2. Nonlinear Scaling Laws for Parametric Receiving Arrays. Part II. Numerical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-30

    8217" " .’Ml’.1 ’.■■’: ■ ’ ^ t- Nonlinear Scaling Laws for Parametric Receiving Arrays Part II Numerical Analysis » - m • o prepared ...8217 ’ ■ — Nonlinear Scaling Laws for Parametric Receiving Arrays » z Part II. Numerical Analysis prepared under: A ——^ N0ÖJ339- 7 5 - C -J02 59, //V-ARPA Order...IF ’IP ,6T, 10 .HNO. IR .I_E. £0> riELTI = LiELTrJ IF ’IP .GT. 3 0 .HMD. IP .LE. 3 0;. [ IELT I = IiELT3 IF

  3. Phenotype characterization and DSPP mutational analysis of three Brazilian dentinogenesis imperfecta type II families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, A C; Santos, L J S; Paula, L M; Dong, J; MacDougall, M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform phenotype analysis and dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) mutational analysis on 3 Brazilian families diagnosed with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DGI-II) attending the Dental Anomalies Clinic in Brasilia, Brazil. Physical and oral examinations, as well as radiographic and histopathological analyses, were performed on 28 affected and unaffected individuals. Clinical, radiographic and histopathological analyses confirmed the diagnosis of DGI-II in 19 individuals. Pulp stones were observed in ground sections of several teeth in 2 families, suggesting that obliteration of pulp chambers and root canals results from the growth of these nodular structures. Mutational DSPP gene analysis of representative affected family members revealed 7 various non-disease-causing alterations in exons 1-4 within the dentin sialoprotein domain. Further longitudinal studies are necessary to elucidate the progression of pulpal obliteration in the DGI-II patients studied as well as the molecular basis of their disease.

  4. An analytical and experimental stress analysis of a practical mode II fracture-test specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, D. B.; Jones, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    A boundary collocation method has been employed to determine the Mode II stress intensity factors for a pair of through-the-thickness edge cracks in a finite isotropic plate. An elastostatic analysis has been carried out in terms of the complete Williams stress function employing both even and odd components. The results of the numerical analysis were verified by a two-step procedure whereby the symmetric and antisymmetric portions of the solution were independently compared with existing solutions. The complete solution was verified by comparison with a photoelastic analysis. A compact shear specimen (CSS) of Hysol epoxy resin was loaded in a photoelastic experiment designed to study the isochromatic fringe patterns resulting from the Mode II crack tip stress distribution. The experiment verified that a pure Mode II stress distribution existed in the neighborhood of the crack tips and confirmed the accuracy of the boundary collocation solution for the Mode II stress intensity factors.

  5. Compatibility and kidney transplantation: the way to go.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doxiadis, Ilias I N

    2012-01-01

    Long lasting debates in the past questioned the relevance of any sort of compatibility in post mortal kidney transplantation. It is for no say that fully compatible transplants have the highest chances for a long patient and graft survival. In the present report the use of HLA-DR as a representative of the Major Histocompatibility Complex class II genes in the allocation of organs is discussed. The major arguments are the easiness to offer to patients a compatible graft in a relatively short waiting time, an increase in graft survival, the less sensitization during the transplantation period, and the lower waiting time for a retransplant. Even if the number of organ donors remains the same a lowering of the mean waiting time is expected because of the longer period of graft survival.

  6. The analysis of the immobilization mechanism of Ni(II) on Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaohong; Chen, Zhi; Cheng, Yangjian; Pan, Danmei; Yin, Shungao; Huang, Feng; Guan, Xiong; Lin, Zhang

    2011-04-01

    This work focused on the identification of biosorption mechanism of Ni(II) by living Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) based on batch experiments and a variety of microscopic equipments. The adsorption equilibrium reached rapidly in 2 h and the maximum nickel adsorption capability of B. cereus was 17.7 mg x g(-1) (dry weight). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis showed that the bacterial surface roughness increased from 7.9 +/- 0.5 nm to 12.6 +/- 1.6 nm during this process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation confirmed that there was Ni(II) on the bacterial surface. However, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) thin section analysis coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) revealed that Ni(II) could also be found in the inner portions of the bacteria. Inductive coupled plasma emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) quantitative analysis elucidated that over 70% of the immobilized Ni(II) was binding on the surface of bacteria. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed that the Ni(II) collected by the bacteria was amorphous. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis indicated that amides and carboxylation functional groups might be involved in the coordination of Ni(II).

  7. Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol intravenous infusion formulation optimization, stability and compatibility testing: A case study to overcome polysorbate 80 interference in chromatographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Inas A; Hammell, Dana C; Hassan, Hazem E; Stinchcomb, Audra L

    2016-06-01

    Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol is a progestin/estrogen combination hormonal contraceptive indicated for the prevention of pregnancy in women. The very poor solubility and wettability of these drugs, along with their high potency (adsorption issues), give rise to difficulties in designing intravenous (IV) formulations to assess absolute bioavailability of products containing both drugs. The purpose of this study was to develop an IV formulation, evaluate its stability under different conditions and evaluate its compatibility with IV sets for potential use in absolute bioavailability studies in humans. Also, a selective high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for quantification of ethinyl estradiol and norelgestromin in polysorbate 80 matrix was developed and validated. Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol IV solution was prepared using sterile water for injection with 2.5% ethanol and 2.5% polysorbate 80 as a cosolvent/surfactant system to obtain a final drug solution of 25μg ethinyl estradiol and 252μg norelgestromin from a concentrated stock drug solution. The stabilities of the concentrated stock and IV solutions were assessed after storing them in the refrigerator (3.7±0.6°C) and at room temperature (19.5±0.5°C), respectively. Additional studies were conducted to examine the stability of the IV solution using an Alarias(®) low sorbing IV administration set with and without an inline filter. The solution was allowed to drip at 1mL/min over a 60min period. Samples were obtained at the beginning, middle and end of the 60min duration. The chemical stability was evaluated for up to 10 days. Norelgestromin and ethinyl estradiol concentration, purity, and degradant levels were determined using the HPLC method. The norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol IV formulation met the chemical stability criteria when tested on day 1 through day 9 (216h). Norelgestromin concentrations assayed in stock and IV solutions were in the range of 90.0-98.5% and 90

  8. Genetic Analysis of the Aspergillus flavus Vegetative Compatibility Group to Which a Biological Control Agent That Limits Aflatoxin Contamination in U.S. Crops Belongs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubisha, Lisa C; Cotty, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Some filamentous fungi in Aspergillus section Flavi produce carcinogenic secondary compounds called aflatoxins. Aflatoxin contamination is routinely managed in commercial agriculture with strains of Aspergillus flavus that do not produce aflatoxins. These non-aflatoxin-producing strains competitively exclude aflatoxin producers and reshape fungal communities so that strains with the aflatoxin-producing phenotype are less frequent. This study evaluated the genetic variation within naturally occurring atoxigenic A. flavus strains from the endemic vegetative compatibility group (VCG) YV36. AF36 is a strain of VCG YV36 and was the first fungus used in agriculture for aflatoxin management. Genetic analyses based on mating-type loci, 21 microsatellite loci, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the aflC gene were applied to a set of 237 YV36 isolates collected from 1990 through 2005 from desert legumes and untreated fields and from fields previously treated with AF36 across the southern United States. One haplotype dominated across time and space. No recombination with strains belonging to VCGs other than YV36 was detected. All YV36 isolates carried the SNP in aflC that prevents aflatoxin biosynthesis and the mat1-2 idiomorph at the mating-type locus. These results suggest that VCG YV36 has a clonal population structure maintained across both time and space. These results demonstrate the genetic stability of atoxigenic strains belonging to a broadly distributed endemic VCG in both untreated populations and populations where the short-term frequency of VCG YV36 has increased due to applications of a strain used to competitively exclude aflatoxin producers. This work supports the hypothesis that strains of this VCG are not involved in routine genetic exchange with aflatoxin-producing strains. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Design and Analysis of CMOS-Compatible III-V Compound Electron-Hole Bilayer Tunneling Field-Effect Transistor for Ultra-Low-Power Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Yoon; Seo, Jae Hwa; Yoon, Young Jun; Lee, Ho-Young; Lee, Seong Min; Cho, Seongjae; Kang, In Man

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we design and analyze complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible III-V compound electron-hole bilayer (EHB) tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs) by using two-dimensional (2D) technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulations. A recently proposed EHB TFET exploits a bias-induced band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) across the electron-hole bilayer by an electric field from the top and bottom gates. This is in contrast to conventional planar p(+)-p(-)-n TFETs, which utilize BTBT across the source-to-channel junction. We applied III-V compound semiconductor materials to the EHB TFETs in order to enhance the current drivability and switching performance. Devices based on various compound semiconductor materials have been designed and analyzed in terms of their primary DC characteristics. In addition, the operational principles were validated by close examination of the electron concentrations and energy-band diagrams under various operation conditions. The simulation results of the optimally designed In0.533Ga0.47As EHB TFET show outstanding performance, with an on-state current (Ion) of 249.5 μA/μm, subthreshold swing (S) of 11.4 mV/dec, and threshold voltage (Vth) of 50 mV at VDS = 0.5 V. Based on the DC-optimized InGaAs EHB TFET, the CMOS inverter circuit was simulated in views of static and dynamic behaviors of the p-channel device with exchanges between top and bottom gates or between source and drain electrodes maintaining the device structure.

  10. Analysis of root proteome unravels differential molecular responses during compatible and incompatible interaction between chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri Race1 (Foc1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Moniya; Gupta, Sumanti; Bhar, Anirban; Chakraborti, Dipankar; Basu, Debabrata; Das, Sampa

    2014-11-03

    Vascular wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri Race 1 (Foc1) is a serious disease of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) accounting for approximately 10-15% annual crop loss. The fungus invades the plant via roots, colonizes the xylem vessels and prevents the upward translocation of water and nutrients, finally resulting in wilting of the entire plant. Although comparative transcriptomic profiling have highlighted some important signaling molecules, but proteomic studies involving chickpea-Foc1 are limited. The present study focuses on comparative root proteomics of susceptible (JG62) and resistant (WR315) chickpea genotypes infected with Foc1, to understand the mechanistic basis of susceptibility and/or resistance. The differential and unique proteins of both genotypes were identified at 48 h, 72 h, and 96 h post Foc1 inoculation. 2D PAGE analyses followed by MALDI-TOF MS and MS/MS identified 100 differentially (>1.5 fold<, p<0.05) or uniquely expressed proteins. These proteins were further categorized into 10 functional classes and grouped into GO (gene ontology) categories. Network analyses of identified proteins revealed intra and inter relationship of these proteins with their neighbors as well as their association with different defense signaling pathways. qRT-PCR analyses were performed to correlate the mRNA and protein levels of some proteins of representative classes. The differential and unique proteins identified indicate their involvement in early defense signaling of the host. Comparative analyses of expression profiles of obtained proteins suggest that albeit some common components participate in early defense signaling in both susceptible and resistant genotypes, but their roles and regulation differ in case of compatible and/or incompatible interactions. Thus, functional characterization of identified PR proteins (PR1, BGL2, TLP), Trypsin protease inhibitor, ABA responsive protein, cysteine protease, protein disulphide isomerase, ripening

  11. Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab: a sensor array for chemical analysis of the Martian soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounaves, Samuel P.; Lukow, Stefan R.; Comeau, Brian P.; Hecht, Michael H.; Grannan-Feldman, Sabrina M.; Manatt, Ken; West, Steven J.; Wen, Xiaowen; Frant, Martin; Gillette, Tim

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) instrument was designed, built, and flight qualified for the now canceled MSP (Mars Surveyor Program) '01 Lander. The MECA package consisted of a microscope, electrometer, material patch plates, and a wet chemistry laboratory (WCL). The primary goal of MECA was to analyze the Martian soil (regolith) for possible hazards to future astronauts and to provide a better understanding of Martian regolith geochemistry. The purpose of the WCL was to analyze for a range of soluble ionic chemical species and electrochemical parameters. The heart of the WCL was a sensor array of electrochemically based ion-selective electrodes (ISE). After 20 months storage at -23 degrees C and subsequent extended freeze/thawing cycles, WCL sensors were evaluated to determine both their physical durability and analytical responses. A fractional factorial calibration of the sensors was used to obtain slope, intercept, and all necessary selectivity coefficients simultaneously for selected ISEs. This calibration was used to model five cation and three anion sensors. These data were subsequently used to determine concentrations of several ions in two soil leachate simulants (based on terrestrial seawater and hypothesized Mars brine) and four actual soil samples. The WCL results were compared to simulant and soil samples using ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The results showed that flight qualification and prolonged low-temperature storage conditions had minimal effects on the sensors. In addition, the analytical optimization method provided quantitative and qualitative data that could be used to accurately identify the chemical composition of the simulants and soils. The WCL has the ability to provide data that can be used to "read" the chemical, geological, and climatic history of Mars, as well as the potential habitability of its regolith.

  12. Assessing hybrid sterility in Oryza glaberrima x O. sativa hybrid progenies by PCR marker analysis and crossing with wide compatibility varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Sigrid; Miézan, Kouamé M

    2003-09-01

    Interspecific crossing of the African indigenous rice Oryza glaberrima with Oryza sativa cultivars is hindered by crossing barriers causing 100% spikelet sterility in F(1) hybrids. Since hybrids are partially female fertile, fertility can be restored by back crossing (BC) to a recurrent male parent. Distinct genetic models on spikelet sterility have been developed predicting, e.g., the existence of a gamete eliminator and/or a pollen killer. Linkage of sterility to the waxy starch synthase gene and the chromogen gene C, both located on chromosome 6, have been demonstrated. We selected a segregating BC(2)F(3) population of semi-sterile O. glaberrima x O. sativa indica hybrid progenies for analyses with PCR markers located at the respective chromosome-6 region. These analyses revealed that semi-sterile plants were heterozygous for a marker (OSR25) located in the waxy promoter, whereas fertile progenies were homozygous for the O. glaberrima allele. Adjacent markers showed no linkage to spikelet sterility. Semi-sterility of hybrid progenies was maintained at least until the F(4) progeny generation, suggesting the existence of a pollen killer in this plant material. Monitoring of reproductive plant development showed that spikelet sterility was at least partially due to an arrest of pollen development at the microspore stage. In order to address the question whether genes responsible for F(1) sterility in intraspecific hybrids ( O. sativa indica x japonica) also cause spikelet sterility in interspecific hybrids, crossings with wide compatibility varieties (WCV) were performed. WCV accessions possess "neutral" S-loci ( S(n)) improving fertility in intraspecific hybrids. This experiment showed that the tested S(n)-loci had no fertility restoring effect in F(1) interspecific hybrids. Pollen development was completely arrested at the microspore stage and grains were never obtained after selfing. This suggests that distinct or additional S-loci are responsible for sterility

  13. A Coupled Calculation Suite for Atucha II Operational Transients Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Mazzantini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While more than a decade ago reactor and thermal hydraulic calculations were tedious and often needed a lot of approximations and simplifications that forced the designers to take a very conservative approach, computational resources available nowadays allow engineers to cope with increasingly complex problems in a reasonable time. The use of best-estimate calculations provides tools to justify convenient engineering margins, reduces costs, and maximises economic benefits. In this direction, a suite of coupled best-estimate specific calculation codes was developed to analyse the behaviour of the Atucha II nuclear power plant in Argentina. The developed tool includes three-dimensional spatial neutron kinetics, a channel-level model of the core thermal hydraulics with subcooled boiling correlations, a one-dimensional model of the primary and secondary circuits including pumps, steam generators, heat exchangers, and the turbine with all their associated control loops, and a complete simulation of the reactor control, limitation, and protection system working in closed-loop conditions as a faithful representation of the real power plant. In the present paper, a description of the coupling scheme between the codes involved is given, and some examples of their application to Atucha II are shown.

  14. Compatibility of Segments of Thermoelectric Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Ursell, Tristan

    2009-01-01

    A method of calculating (usually for the purpose of maximizing) the power-conversion efficiency of a segmented thermoelectric generator is based on equations derived from the fundamental equations of thermoelectricity. Because it is directly traceable to first principles, the method provides physical explanations in addition to predictions of phenomena involved in segmentation. In comparison with the finite-element method used heretofore to predict (without being able to explain) the behavior of a segmented thermoelectric generator, this method is much simpler to implement in practice: in particular, the efficiency of a segmented thermoelectric generator can be estimated by evaluating equations using only hand-held calculator with this method. In addition, the method provides for determination of cascading ratios. The concept of cascading is illustrated in the figure and the definition of the cascading ratio is defined in the figure caption. An important aspect of the method is its approach to the issue of compatibility among segments, in combination with introduction of the concept of compatibility within a segment. Prior approaches involved the use of only averaged material properties. Two materials in direct contact could be examined for compatibility with each other, but there was no general framework for analysis of compatibility. The present method establishes such a framework. The mathematical derivation of the method begins with the definition of reduced efficiency of a thermoelectric generator as the ratio between (1) its thermal-to-electric power-conversion efficiency and (2) its Carnot efficiency (the maximum efficiency theoretically attainable, given its hot- and cold-side temperatures). The derivation involves calculation of the reduced efficiency of a model thermoelectric generator for which the hot-side temperature is only infinitesimally greater than the cold-side temperature. The derivation includes consideration of the ratio (u) between the

  15. Physics-compatible numerical methods

    OpenAIRE

    Barry, Koren; Abgrall, Remi; Pavel, Bochev; Jason, Frank; Blair, Perrot

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Physics-compatible numerical methods are methods that aim to preserve key mathematical and physical properties of continuum physics models in their finite-dimensional algebraic representations. They include methods which preserve properties such as energy, monotonicity, maximum principles, symmetries, and involutions of the continuum models. Examples are mimetic methods for spatial discretizations, variational and geometric integrators, conservative finite-volume and f...

  16. Study of Electromagnetism Compatibility of Bleeper Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Transmitted power will decrease, cross-modulate distortion and inter-modulate distortion will be caused and antenna pattern will shift if transmitted antennas are fixed together. All these will lead to the alteration of area coverage. According to the basic theory of electromagnetism compatibility a computer model is established. We do some quantitative analysis of the problems above and give total number, arrangement mode and distance between antennas of bleeper station that operate at 150 MHz. The relation of these factors above are also given. All these are basis of the arrangement of antenna group of bleeper station.

  17. Multiparty Compatibility for Concurrent Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roly Perera

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objects and actors are communicating state machines, offering and consuming different services at different points in their lifecycle. Two complementary challenges arise when programming such systems. When objects interact, their state machines must be "compatible", so that services are requested only when they are available. Dually, when objects refine other objects, their state machines must be "compliant", so that services are honoured whenever they are promised. In this paper we show how the idea of multiparty compatibility from the session types literature can be applied to both of these problems. We present an untyped language in which concurrent objects are checked automatically for compatibility and compliance. For simple objects, checking can be exhaustive and has the feel of a type system. More complex objects can be partially validated via test cases, leading to a methodology closer to continuous testing. Our proof-of-concept implementation is limited in some important respects, but demonstrates the potential value of the approach and the relationship to existing software development practices.

  18. COMPATIBLE EXTENSIONS OF FUZZY RELATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Irina GEORGESCU

    2003-01-01

    In 1930 Szpilrajn proved that any strict partial order can be embedded in a strict linear order.This theorem was later refined by Dushnik and Miller (1941), Hansson (1968), Suzumura (1976),Donaldson and Weymark (1998), Bossert (1999). Particularly Suzumura introduced the important concept of compatible extension of a (crisp) relation. These extension theorems have an important role in welfare economics. In particular Szpilrajn theorem is the main tool for proving a known theorem of Richter that establishes the equivalence between rational and congruous consumers. In 1999 Duggan proved a general extension theorem that contains all these results. In this paper we introduce the notion of compatible extension of a fuzzy relation and we prove an extension theorem for fuzzy relations. Our result generalizes to fuzzy set theory the main part of Duggan's theorem. As applications we obtain fuzzy versions of the theorems of Szpilrajn, Hansson and Suzumura. We also prove that an asymmetric and transitive fuzzy relation has a compatible extension that is total, asymmetric and transitive.Our results can be useful in the theory of fuzzy consumers. We can prove that any rational fuzzyconsumer is congruous, extending to a fuzzy context a part of Richter's theorem. To prove that acongruous fuzzy consumer is rational remains an open problem. A proof of this result can somehowuse a fuzzy version of Szpilrajn theorem.

  19. Compatibility of technologies with regulations in the waste management of H-3, I-129, C-14, and Kr-85. Part II. Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevorrow, L.E.; Kolba, V.M.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Steindler, M.J.

    1983-11-01

    Waste forms of /sup 3/H, /sup 129/I, /sup 14/C, and /sup 85/Kr separated from fuel reprocessing streams and procedures for managing them were analyzed regarding compliance with regulations. Transportation of these wastes in certain DOT-specification packagings would be permissible, but some of these packagings may not be acceptable in some disposal situations. Transportation of gaseous /sup 85/Kr in a currently certified cylinder is possible, but a fuel reprocessor may wish to ship larger quantities per package. Disposal of tritium using a package designed by a DOE contractor and shallow land burial, in accord with the regulations of 10 CFR 61, seems practicable. Although 10 CFR 61 permits shallow land burial of /sup 129/I, the concentration limit requires distribution in a volume that may seem impractical to commercial fuel reprocessors. The concentration limit of 10 CFR 61 for shallow land burial of /sup 14/C requires distribution in a lesser, although still large, volume. For both /sup 129/I and /sup 14/C, management as high-level waste offers the advantage of smaller volumes. Similar advantages may be offered by greater confinement or non-near surface concepts for disposal. The concrete waste forms developed for these nuclides may not meet technical criteria being formulated for geologic disposal. The lack of accommodation of /sup 85/Kr at disposal facilities makes storage of the gaseous form at the fuel reprocessing plant, followed by dispersal after partial decay, seem attractive. Ocean disposal of /sup 129/I and /sup 14/C by the rules of the International Atomic Energy Agency-London Ocean Dumping Convention offers advantages over shallow land burial: higher allowed concentrations, resulting in smaller volumes and fewer packages. These rules, however, thwart ocean disposal of /sup 85/Kr since gaseous forms are banned, and for solid forms, concentration limits would require distribution of radioactivity in very large volumes. 80 references.

  20. Performance Analysis of Electromagnetic Compatibility of Wireless Electric Field Measuring Instrument%无线电场测量仪电磁兼容性能分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛恩承; 袁海文; 陆家榆; 崔勇; 吕建勋; 刘鸿宇

    2016-01-01

    To research the electromagnetic environment of ultra high-voltage direct-current(HVDC) transmission lines, we developed a wireless electric field measuring instrument.Moreover, we selected 30 prototypes to test the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) performance of electric measuring instrument, and analyzed the test results of electric measuring instrument's EMC performance in detail.Combining electromagnetic working environment with interference routes of the electric measuring instrument, some important factors which were susceptible to electromagnetic interference (EMI) in testing and the corresponding improvement measures were proposed.Test results show that the most obvious faults occur in the radiated, radio-frequency, electromagnetic field immunity test and surge immunity test.But the faults of electromagnetic radiation and surge harassment can be conquered by increasing the thickness of the sheet copper inside the equipment and adding transient suppression diodes and filter at the device power supply port.%为了研究特高压直流传输线下的电磁环境,研制了1种无线电场测量系统.为了检测电场测量仪的电磁兼容性能,在30台样机上进行了试验.分析了电场测量仪电磁兼容性能检测的测试结果,并结合电场测量仪的工作环境和干扰途径对电场测量仪电磁兼容中易受干扰的环节进行了相应的改进.研究结果表明:电磁兼容试验项目中故障率最高的为射频电磁场辐射抗扰度试验和浪涌抗扰度试验,通过增加设备内部铜片的厚度,在设备电源端口增加瞬态抑制二极管和滤波器,可有效抑制电磁辐射和浪涌骚扰所产生的电磁干扰.

  1. Modeling and Analysis of NGC System using Ptolemy II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Sreekumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Model based system design has been used in real time embedded systems for validating and testing during the development lifecycle. Computation models - synchronous dataflow model (SDF and Discrete Event (DE have been used and finite state machine has been integrated with SDF and Discrete Event (DE modeling domains for simulating the functionalities in the system. Here a case study of resource augmented Navigation, Guidance and Control unit of onboard computers in satellite launch vehicle has been selected as a frame work and fault tolerant algorithm has been modeled and simulated with Ptolemy II. Feasibility of the scheduling of the fault tolerant algorithm has been analyzed and dependencies existing between different components and processes in the system have been investigated. The future work consists of modeling original functionality of NGC units inside each state of FSM and can be validated for the correct performance. Non-deterministic communication and clock drifts can be accounted into the model.

  2. Using phase II data for the analysis of phase III studies: An application in rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandel, Simon; Neuenschwander, Beat; Röver, Christian; Friede, Tim

    2017-06-01

    Clinical research and drug development in orphan diseases are challenging, since large-scale randomized studies are difficult to conduct. Formally synthesizing the evidence is therefore of great value, yet this is rarely done in the drug-approval process. Phase III designs that make better use of phase II data can facilitate drug development in orphan diseases. A Bayesian meta-analytic approach is used to inform the phase III study with phase II data. It is particularly attractive, since uncertainty of between-trial heterogeneity can be dealt with probabilistically, which is critical if the number of studies is small. Furthermore, it allows quantifying and discounting the phase II data through the predictive distribution relevant for phase III. A phase III design is proposed which uses the phase II data and considers approval based on a phase III interim analysis. The design is illustrated with a non-inferiority case study from a Food and Drug Administration approval in herpetic keratitis (an orphan disease). Design operating characteristics are compared to those of a traditional design, which ignores the phase II data. An analysis of the phase II data reveals good but insufficient evidence for non-inferiority, highlighting the need for a phase III study. For the phase III study supported by phase II data, the interim analysis is based on half of the patients. For this design, the meta-analytic interim results are conclusive and would justify approval. In contrast, based on the phase III data only, interim results are inconclusive and require further evidence. To accelerate drug development for orphan diseases, innovative study designs and appropriate methodology are needed. Taking advantage of randomized phase II data when analyzing phase III studies looks promising because the evidence from phase II supports informed decision-making. The implementation of the Bayesian design is straightforward with public software such as R.

  3. High ramp rate thermogravimetric analysis of zirconium(II) hydride and titanium(II) hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licavoli, Joseph J., E-mail: jjlicavo@mtu.edu; Sanders, Paul G., E-mail: sanders@mtu.edu

    2015-09-20

    Highlights: • A unique arc image device has been proposed for high ramp rate thermogravimetry. • Powder oxidation influences decomposition kinetics at temperatures below 933 K. • Particle size has a negligible effect on TiH{sub 2} decomposition behavior. • Improvements to the device are required to conduct accurate kinetic analysis. - Abstract: Zirconium and titanium hydride are utilized in liquid phase metal foam processing techniques. This application results in immediate exposure to molten metal and almost immediate decomposition at high temperatures. Most decomposition characterization techniques utilize slow heating rates and are unable to capture the decomposition behavior of hydrides under foam processing conditions. In order to address this issue a specialized high ramp rate thermogravimetric analyzer was created from a xenon arc image refiner. In addition to thermogravimetry, complimentary techniques including X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize hydride decomposition and compare the results to literature. Hydrides were partially oxidized and separated into particles size ranges to evaluate the influence of these factors on decomposition. Oxidizing treatments were found to decrease decomposition rate only at temperatures below 933 K (660 °C) while particle size effects appeared to be negligible. Several improvements to the unique TGA apparatus presented in the current work are suggested to allow reliable kinetic modeling and analysis.

  4. Educational Cost Analysis in Action: Case Studies for Planners -- II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Philip H.; Hallak, Jacques

    This document is the second in a series of three documents, which together contain 27 case studies on the uses of cost analysis in educational planning. The case studies are presented to help planners and administrators see how cost analysis can be used to improve the efficiency of their educational systems, or to get the best value existing…

  5. [Compatibility determinations Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document provides two compatibility determinations; one stated that the proposed agricultural practices (row crop farming) are compatible with Refuge...

  6. Counterparty risk analysis using Merton's structural model under Solvency II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Otero González

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The new solvency regulation in the European insurance sector, denominated Solvency II, will completely transform the system of capital requirements estimation. Recently it has introduced the latest quantitative impact study (QIS5, which provides the calculation method in the internal model for the determination of capital requirements. The aim of this paper is to analyze the adequacy of the calibration of the counterparty credit risk by the models proposed in recent quantitative impact reports (fourth and fifth. To do this we compare capital requirements obtained by the two alternatives, against which that results from applying a simulation model based on the structural approach. The results shows that the use of probabilities based on the methodology of Merton, which can be used in an internal model, compared to those based on ratings (standard model result in substantially higher capital requirements. In addition, the model proposed in QIS4 based on Vasicek distribution is not appropriate when the number of counterparties is reduced, a common situation in the European insurance sector. Moreover, the new proposal (QIS5 or Ter Berg model is more versatile and suitable than its predecessor but requires further research in order to improve the calibration hypothesis and, thus, to better approximate estimates to the risk actually assumed.

  7. Optical and Infrared Analysis of Type II SN 2006BC

    CERN Document Server

    Gallagher, Joseph S; Clayton, Geoffrey C; Andrews, J E; Clem, J; Barlow, M J; Ercolano, B; Fabbri, J; Otsuka, M; Wesson, R; Meixner, M

    2012-01-01

    We present nebular phase optical imaging and spectroscopy and near/mid-IR imaging of the Type II SN 2006bc. Observations reveal the central wavelength of the symmetric H$\\alpha$ line profile to be red-shifted with respect to the host galaxy H$\\alpha$ emission by day 325. Such an phenomenon has been argued to result from an asymmetric explosion in the iron-peak elements resulting in a larger mass of $^{56}$Ni and higher excitation of hydrogen on the far side of the SN explosion. We also observe a gradual blue-shifting of this H$\\alpha$ peak which is indicative of dust formation in the ejecta. Although showing a normal peak brightness, V $\\sim$ -17.2, for a core-collapse SN, 2006bc fades by $\\sim$6 mag during the first 400 days suggesting either a relatively low $^{56}$Ni yield, an increase in extinction due to new dust, or both. A short duration flattening of the light curve is observed from day 416 to day 541 suggesting an optical light echo. Based on the narrow time window of this echo, we discuss implicatio...

  8. Perturbation analysis of the TRIGA Mark II reactor Vienna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, R. [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan); Villa, M.; Stummer, T.; Boeck, H. [Vienna Univ. of Technology (Austria). Atominstitut; Saeedbadshah [International Islamic Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-04-15

    The safety design of a nuclear reactor needs to maintain the steady state operation at desired power level. The safe and reliable reactor operation demands the complete knowledge of the core multiplication and its changes during the reactor operation. Therefore it is frequently of interest to compute the changes in core multiplication caused by small disturbances in the field of reactor physics. These disturbances can be created either by geometry or composition changes of the core. Fortunately if these changes (or perturbations) are very small, one does not have to repeat the reactivity calculations. This article focuses the study of small perturbations created in the Central Irradiation Channel (CIC) of the TRIGA mark II core to investigate their reactivity influences on the core reactivity. For this purpose, 3 different kinds of perturbations are created by inserting 3 different samples in the CIC. The cylindrical void (air), heavy water (D2O) and Cadmium (Cd) samples are inserted into the CIC separately to determine their neutronics behavior along the length of the core. The Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code (MCNP) is applied to simulate these perturbations in the CIC. The MCNP theoretical predictions are verified by the experiments performed on the current reactor core. The behavior of void in the whole core and its dependence on position and water fraction is also presented in this article. (orig.)

  9. Transient Particle Transport Analysis on TJ-II Stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eguilior, S.; Castejon, F.; Guasp, J.; Estrada, T.; Medina, F.; Tabares, F.L.; Branas, B.

    2006-12-18

    Particle diffusivity and convective velocity have been determined in ECRH plasmas confined in the stellarator TJ-II by analysing the evolving density profile. This is obtained from an amplitude modulation reflectometry system in addition to an X-ray tomographic reconstruction. The source term, which is needed as an input for transport equations, is obtained using EIRENE code. In order to discriminate between the diffusive and convective contributions, the dynamics of the density evolution has been analysed in several perturbative experiments. This evolution has been considered in discharges with injection of a single pulse of H2 as well as in those that present a spontaneous transition to an enhanced confinement mode and whose confinement properties are modified by inducing an ohmic current. The pinch velocity and diffusivity are parameterized by different expressions in order to fit the experimental time evolution of density profile. The profile evolution is very different from one case to another due to the different values of convective velocities and diffusivities, besides the different source terms. (Author) 19 refs.

  10. 21 CFR 606.151 - Compatibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compatibility testing. 606.151 Section 606.151 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Compatibility testing. Standard operating procedures for compatibility testing shall include the following:...

  11. Electromagnetic compatibility principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Weston, David A

    2001-01-01

    This totally revised and expanded reference/text provides comprehensive, single-source coverage of the design, problem solving, and specifications of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) into electrical equipment/systems-including new information on basic theories, applications, evaluations, prediction techniques, and practical diagnostic options for preventing EMI through cost-effective solutions. Offers the most recent guidelines, safety limits, and standards for human exposure to electromagnetic fields! Containing updated data on EMI diagnostic verification measurements, as well as over 900 drawings, photographs, tables, and equations-500 more than the previous edition

  12. Constructing Pairs of Compatible Characters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mathias Kratzer

    2003-01-01

    Given a finite group X such that both the conjugacy of elements in X and the length of any conjugacy class in X can be decided/computed efficiently,the first algorithm described in this article constructs a uniquely determined sequence of representatives for all the conjugacy classes of X. In particular, based on this sequence, any two characters of different groups isomorphic to X become comparable against each other which is utilized by a second algorithm designed to construct so-called compatible characters of given finite groups G and H having isomorphic subgroups U ≤ G and V ≤ H, respectively.

  13. Forensic discrimination of dyed hair color: II. Multivariate statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Julie A; Siegel, Jay A; Goodpaster, John V

    2011-01-01

    This research is intended to assess the ability of UV-visible microspectrophotometry to successfully discriminate the color of dyed hair. Fifty-five red hair dyes were analyzed and evaluated using multivariate statistical techniques including agglomerative hierarchical clustering (AHC), principal component analysis (PCA), and discriminant analysis (DA). The spectra were grouped into three classes, which were visually consistent with different shades of red. A two-dimensional PCA observations plot was constructed, describing 78.6% of the overall variance. The wavelength regions associated with the absorbance of hair and dye were highly correlated. Principal components were selected to represent 95% of the overall variance for analysis with DA. A classification accuracy of 89% was observed for the comprehensive dye set, while external validation using 20 of the dyes resulted in a prediction accuracy of 75%. Significant color loss from successive washing of hair samples was estimated to occur within 3 weeks of dye application.

  14. Final Report: Posttest Analysis of Omega II Optical Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newlander, C D; Fisher, J H

    2007-01-30

    Preliminary posttest analyses have been completed on optical specimens exposed during the Omega II test series conducted on 14 July 2006. The Omega Facility, located at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester was used to produce X-ray environments through the interaction of intense pulsed laser radiation upon germanium-loaded silica aerogels. The optical specimen testing was supported by GH Systems through experiment design, pre- and post-test analyses, specimen acquisition, and overall technical experience. The test specimens were fabricated and characterized by Surface Optics Corporation (SOC), San Diego, CA and were simple protected gold coatings on silica substrates. Six test specimens were exposed, five filtered with thin beryllium foil filters, and one unfiltered which was exposed directly to the raw environment. The experimental objectives were: (1) demonstrate that tests of optical specimens could be performed at the Omega facility; (2) evaluate the use and survivability of beryllium foil filters as a function of thickness; (3) obtain damage data on optical specimens which ranged from no damage to damage; (4) correlate existing thermal response models with the damage data; (5) evaluate the use of the direct raw environment upon the specimen response and the ability/desirability to conduct sensitive optical specimen tests using the raw environment; and (6) initiate the development of a protocol for performing optical coatings/mirror tests. This report documents the activities performed by GH Systems in evaluating and using the environments provided by LLNL, the PUFFTFT analyses performed using those environments, and the calculated results compared to the observed and measured posttest data.

  15. Spinoza II: Conceptual Case-Based Natural Language Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schank, Roger C.; And Others

    This paper presents the theoretical changes that have developed in Conceptual Dependency Theory and their ramifications in computer analysis of natural language. The major items of concern are: the elimination of reliance on "grammar rules" for parsing with the emphasis given to conceptual rule based parsing; the development of a conceptual case…

  16. Topics in Finance: Part II--Financial Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Judy

    2010-01-01

    The second article in a series designed to supplement the introductory financial management course, this essay addresses financial statement analysis, including its impact on stock valuation, disclosure, and managerial behavior. [For "Topics in Finance Part I--Introduction and Stockholder Wealth Maximization," see EJ1060345.

  17. Detergent-compatible bacterial amylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyonzima, Francois N; More, Sunil S

    2014-10-01

    Proteases, lipases, amylases, and cellulases are enzymes used in detergent formulation to improve the detergency. The amylases are specifically supplemented to the detergent to digest starchy stains. Most of the solid and liquid detergents that are currently manufactured contain alkaline enzymes. The advantages of using alkaline enzymes in the detergent formulation are that they aid in removing tough stains and the process is environmentally friendly since they reduce the use of toxic detergent ingredients. Amylases active at low temperature are preferred as the energy consumption gets reduced, and the whole process becomes cost-effective. Most microbial alkaline amylases are used as detergent ingredients. Various reviews report on the production, purification, characterization, and application of amylases in different industry sectors, but there is no specific review on bacterial or fungal alkaline amylases or detergent-compatible amylases. In this mini-review, an overview on the production and property studies of the detergent bacterial amylases is given, and the stability and compatibility of the alkaline bacterial amylases in the presence of the detergents and the detergent components are highlighted.

  18. FOOD SECURITY IN A WATER-SCARCE WORLD: MAKING VIRTUAL WATER COMPATIBLE WITH CROP WATER USE AND FOOD TRADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Oscar YAWSON

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Virtual water has been proposed as a mechanism with potential to reduce the effects of water scarcity on food security. To evaluate the role of virtual water in reducing the effect of water scarcity on food security, all components of the available water resource in agricultural areas must be quantified to provide a basis for evaluating food imports driven by water scarcity. We refer to this situation as ‘agri-compatible connections’ among water scarcity, virtual water, and food security. To date, this has not been captured in the literature on water scarcity, virtual water flows and food security. The lack of agri-compatibility has rendered the virtual water concept seemingly inconsistent with trade theories and water-food security policy needs. We propose two requirements for achieving agri-compatible connections: (i the limit of crop production imposed by water scarcity should be captured by quantifying all components of the water available to satisfy specific crop water requirement in the importing economy, and (ii food import should satisfy ‘water-dependent food security’ need, which is the actual or potential food security gap created by insufficient available water from all sources for crop production (all other things being equal. Further, we propose that agri-compatible water scarcity should capture three key elements: (i a reflection of aridity or drought potential, (ii quantification of all the components of water resource available to a given crop at a given locality and time, and (iii use of crop- and catchment-specific water scarcity factors to evaluate the effect of crop production and virtual water on water scarcity. In this paper, we show the conceptual outlines for the proposed agri-compatible connections. Achieving agri-compatible connections among water scarcity, virtual water and food security will enhance the analysis and understanding of the role of virtual water for food security in the importing economy and water

  19. Rewiring World Trade. Part II: A Weighted Network Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Squartini, Tiziano; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2011-01-01

    In this sequel to a companion paper, we complement our analysis of the binary projections of the International Trade Network (ITN) by considering its weighted representations. We show that, unlike the binary case, all possible weighted representations of the ITN (directed/undirected, aggregated/disaggregated) cannot be traced back to local structural properties, which are therefore of limited informativeness. Our results highlight that any topological property representing only partial information (e.g., degree sequences) cannot in general be obtained from the corresponding weighted property (e.g., strength sequences). Therefore the expectation that weighted structural properties offer a more complete description than purely topological ones is misleading. Our analysis of the ITN detects indirect effects that are not captured by traditional macroeconomic analyses focused only on weighted first-order country-specific properties, and highlights the limitations of models and theories that overemphasize the need ...

  20. Water Ingress Failure Analysis of Whistler II Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    be addressed to reduce the risk of water ingress. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Failure Analysis, Water Ingress, Ingress Protection, Rain Test 16. SECURITY...conversion coated and should not have been subject to corrosion with exposure to ordinary rain water . The batteries were highly corroded, and some...steel/chromate conversion coated. Corrosion of the star washers was greater than would be expected by normal rain water at normal temperatures

  1. Is religious education compatible with science education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahner, Martin; Bunge, Mario

    1996-04-01

    This paper tackles a highly controversial issue: the problem of the compatibility of science and religion, and its bearing on science and religious education respectively. We challenge the popular view that science and religion are compatible or even complementary. In order to do so, we give a brief characterization of our conceptions of science and religion. Conspicuous differences at the doctrinal, metaphysical, methodological and attitudinal level are noted. Regarding these aspects, closer examination reveals that science and religion are not only different but in fact incompatible. Some consequences of our analysis for education as well as for education policy are explored. We submit that a religious education, particularly at an early age, is an obstacle to the development of a scientific mentality. For this and other reasons, religious education should be kept away from public schools and universities. Instead of promoting a religious world view, we should teach our children what science knows about religion, i.e., how science explains the existence of religion in historical, biological, psychological and sociological terms.

  2. Cogeneration from Poultry Industry Wastes -- Part II: Economic Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bianchi, M.; Cherubini, F.; Pascale, A. D.

    2003-01-01

    of a Indirectly Fired Gas Turbine (Part I). Moreover a Steam Turbine Plant or a simplified system for the supply of the only technological steam are investigated and compared. Thermodynamic and economic analysis have been carried out for the examined configurations in order to outline the basic differences...... an existing poultry industry as fuel. Different plant configurations have been considered in order to make use of the oil and of the meat and bone meal, which are the by-products of the chicken cooking process. In particular, the process plant can be integrated with an energy supply plant which can consist...

  3. FEBEX II Project Post-mortem analysis EDZ assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazargan Sabet, B.; Shao, H.; Autio, J.; Elorza, F. J.

    2004-07-01

    Within the framework of the FEBEX II project a multidisciplinary team studied the mechanisms of creation of the potential damaged zone around the test drift. The research program includes laboratory and in situ investigations as well as the numerical modelling of the observed phenomena. Where laboratory investigations are concerned, the 14C-PMMA technique was applied to study the spatial distribution of porosity in the samples taken from the test drift wall. In addition complementary microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies were performed to make qualitative investigations on the pore apertures and minerals in porous regions. The results obtained with the PMMA method have not shown any clear increased porosity zone adjacent to the tunnel wall. The total porosity of the samples varied between 0.6-1.2%. The samples of unplugged region did not differ from the samples of plugged region. A clear increase in porosity to depths of 10-15 mm from the tunnel wall was detected in lamprophyre samples. According to the SEM/EDX analyses the excavation-disturbed zone in the granite matrix extended to depths of 1-3 mm from the wall surface. A few quartz grains were crushed and some micro fractures were found. Gas permeability tests were carried out on two hollow cylinder samples of about 1m long each taken on the granite wall perpendicular to the drift axis. The first sample was cored in the service area far from the heated zone and the second one at the level of the heater. The tests were performed at constant gas pressure by setting a steady state radial flow through a section of 1cm wide isolated by means of four mini-packers. The profile of the gas permeability according to the core length has been established. The results obtained for both considered samples have shown permeability ranging between 3.5 10-18 and 8.4 10-19m2, pointing out the absence of a marked damage. Acoustic investigations have been carried out with the objective of quantifying the

  4. Electromagnetic compatibility in the practice. Design analysis - Interpretation of the regulations - Evaluation of the test results; Elektromagnetische Vertraeglichkeit in der Praxis. Design-Analyse - Interpretation der Normen - Bewertung der Prueferergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stotz, Dieter

    2013-05-01

    The author of the book under consideration gives an intuitive feeling for the electromagnetically compatible product development. The fundamentals of electromagnetic compatibility are explained simply and clearly. Clear criteria for test measurements and analyses are developed. The author also deals with the measurement and evaluation of the electromagnetic interference.

  5. Morphometric MRI analysis improves detection of focal cortical dysplasia type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jan; Weber, Bernd; Urbach, Horst; Elger, Christian E; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen

    2011-10-01

    Focal cortical dysplasias type II (FCD II) are highly epileptogenic lesions frequently causing pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Detection of these lesions on MRI is still challenging as FCDs may be very subtle in appearance and might escape conventional visual analysis. Morphometric MRI analysis is a voxel-based post-processing method based on algorithms of the statistical parametric mapping software (SPM5). It creates three dimensional feature maps highlighting brain areas with blurred grey-white matter junction and abnormal gyration, and thereby may help to detect FCD. In this study, we evaluated the potential diagnostic value of morphometric analysis as implemented in a morphometric analysis programme, compared with conventional visual analysis by an experienced neuroradiologist in 91 patients with histologically proven FCD II operated on at the University Hospital of Bonn between 2000 and 2010 (FCD IIa, n = 17; IIb, n = 74). All preoperative MRI scans were evaluated independently (i) based on conventional visual analysis by an experienced neuroradiologist and (ii) using morphometric analysis. Both evaluators had the same clinical information (electroencephalography and semiology), but were blinded to each other's results. The detection rate of FCD using morphometric analysis was superior to conventional visual analysis in the FCD IIa subgroup (82% versus 65%), while no difference was found in the FCD IIb subgroup (92% versus 91%). However, the combination of conventional visual analysis and morphometric analysis provided complementary information and detected 89 out of all 91 FCDs (98%). The combination was significantly superior to conventional visual analysis alone in both subgroups resulting in a higher diagnostic sensitivity (94% versus 65%, P = 0.031 for FCD IIa; 99% versus 91%, P = 0.016 for FCD IIb). In conclusion, the additional application of morphometric MRI analysis increases the diagnostic sensitivity for FCD II in comparison with conventional visual

  6. Settlement-Compatible Lunar Transporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthaler, G.

    Over the past few years we have published papers in this forum identifying, characterizing and advocating settlement-compatible transportation architectures for Mars. In the present paper, we do the same for the Moon and show evolutionary potentials for growth of lunar architectures into Mars architectures of the types discussed in our previous papers. The essence of a settlement-compatible architecture is that it yields a low recurring transportation cost and that the elements of the architecture are enduring, i.e., fully reusable with lifetimes on the order of Earth-based capital investments. Our previous papers have shown that extension of human habitation to other bodies in our Solar System is probably unaffordable with any other approach. The design of a settlement-compatible architecture begins with Earth launch. In our prior papers, we simply identified the Earth launch option as a fully reusable system with roughly Shuttle (or Atlas 5 or Delta 4 or Sea Launch or Ariane 5) capability, i.e. about 20 metric t. to low Earth orbit and a payload bay of dimensions about 5 m diameter x 15 to 20 m length. This is what the commercial market needs; this is where the traffic demand is; this is approximately the design point for a next-generation (after Shuttle) reusable launch vehicle. We continue in that vein for the present paper. Human mission advocates may argue it isn't big enough; that they need 80 metric t. payload to orbit. We answer that to achieve our cost criteria, there isn't much of a choice, and that the savings in launch cost will far outweigh the added expense for on-orbit assembly. Lunar transportation is considerably less demanding than Mars transportation. The main difference is in trip time. Because lunar trips are short, the crew habitat can be small, a la the Apollo Command Module, and the propulsion system to move it is also small by comparison. We analyze and depict a lunar transportation system based on crew elements adapted from the

  7. Analysis of a model for the dynamics of prions II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, Hans; Pruss, Jan; Webb, Glenn F.

    2006-12-01

    A new mathematical model for the dynamics of prion proliferation involving an ordinary differential equation coupled with a partial integro-differential equation is analyzed, continuing the work in [J. Pruss, L. Pujo-Menjouet, G.F. Webb, R. Zacher, Analysis of a model for the dynamics of prions, Discrete Contin. Dyn. Syst. 6 (2006) 225-235]. We show the well-posedness of this problem in its natural phase space , i.e., there is a unique global semiflow on Z+ associated to the problem. A theorem of threshold type is derived for this model which is typical for mathematical epidemics. If a certain combination of kinetic parameters is below or at the threshold, there is a unique steady state, the disease-free equilibrium, which is globally asymptotically stable in Z+; above the threshold it is unstable, and there is another unique steady state, the disease equilibrium, which inherits that property.

  8. Caprine plasma proteinase inhibitors--II. Genetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vankan, D M; Bell, K

    1993-01-01

    1. Analysis of the inheritances of the variants of five caprine plasma proteinase inhibitor systems in families demonstrated a genetic control of codominant alleles at five loci. 2. The PIA, B, C, D and E proteins are controlled by four (PIA1,2,3,4), three (PIB1,4,0), three (PIC2,3,0), five (PID1,2,3,4,0) and two (PIE1,2) alleles respectively. Null alleles were postulated for the PIB, PIC and PID systems. 3. The frequencies of the alleles differed substantially between the Australian and Texan Angoras and Cashmere breeds of goats. 4. The combined exclusion probability for the five PI systems was as high as 0.82 in the Cashmere breed, indicating the potential of the proteinase inhibitor proteins for parentage control purposes.

  9. Empirical Analysis II: Business Cycles and Inward FDI in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Sharahili

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well-known that the current speeding-up of globalization has been, on one hand, spreading macro economic effects around the world, while, on the other, fueling firms’ activities of crossing national borders. Then, are there any links between these two influences? As we have concluded in previous research that inward FDI and business cycle development do pro-cyclically relate on Granger base, this paper will further discuss “how do they react to each other?” Again, we chose China as subject and employed the 1983~2004 authorized annual statistic data. By constructing an Endogenous Growth model, we, after processing Correlation Analysis and testing the coefficient significance of each variable, found out the original momentum of Chinese economic growth and explored whether there exist some long-term relationship through Johansen Co-integration Test.

  10. Barley leaf transcriptome and metabolite analysis reveals new aspects of compatibility and Piriformospora indica-mediated systemic induced resistance to powdery mildew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molitor, Alexandra; Zajic, Doreen; Voll, Lars M; Pons-K Hnemann, Jorn; Samans, Birgit; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Waller, Frank

    2011-12-01

    Colonization of barley roots with the basidiomycete fungus Piriformospora indica (Sebacinales) induces systemic resistance against the biotrophic leaf pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (B. graminis). To identify genes involved in this mycorrhiza-induced systemic resistance, we compared the leaf transcriptome of P. indica-colonized and noncolonized barley plants 12, 24, and 96 h after challenge with a virulent race of B. graminis. The leaf pathogen induced specific gene sets (e.g., LRR receptor kinases and WRKY transcription factors) at 12 h postinoculation (hpi) (prepenetration phase) and vesicle-localized gene products 24 hpi (haustorium establishment). Metabolic analysis revealed a progressing shift of steady state contents of the intermediates glucose-1-phosphate, uridinediphosphate-glucose, and phosphoenolpyruvate 24 and 96 hpi, indicating that B. graminis shifts central carbohydrate metabolism in favor of sucrose biosynthesis. Both B. graminis and P. indica increased glutamine and alanine contents, whereas substrates for starch and nitrogen assimilation (adenosinediphosphate- glucose and oxoglutarate) decreased. In plants that were more B. graminis resistant due to P. indica root colonization, 22 transcripts, including those of pathogenesis-related genes and genes encoding heat-shock proteins, were differentially expressed ?twofold in leaves after B. graminis inoculation compared with non-mycorrhized plants. Detailed expression analysis revealed a faster induction after B. graminis inoculation between 8 and 16 hpi, suggesting that priming of these genes is an important mechanism of P. indica-induced systemic disease resistance.

  11. Analysis of silicon nanocrystals in silicon-rich SiO II synthesized by CO II laser annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Jung; Lin, Gong-Ru; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Chou, Li-Jen

    2005-11-01

    The localized synthesis of 4.2-5.6 nm-Si nanocrystals (nc-Si) in Si-rich SiO II (SRSO) by CO 2 laser annealing at laser intensity of below ablation-threshold (6 kW/cm2) is demonstrated. Since the SRSO exhibits a high absorption coefficient of up to 0.102 cm -1 at wavelength of 10.6 μm, a direct-writing CO II laser annealing system with focusing spot size of 0.2 mm2 is used to locally anneal the SRSO and precipitate the nc-Si. A thermophysical model reveals that the surface temperature of SRSO ranging from 130 °C to 3350 °C is achieved by varying the laser power densities from 1.5 to 13.5 kW/cm2. The CO II laser-ablation-threshold power density is about 6 kW/cm2, corresponding to the optimized annealing temperature 1285 °C at the ablation threshold. The CO IIlaser annealing is capable of the precise control on power density and spot size, which benefits from the in-situ and localized annealing temperature control of SRSO film, and also prevents from the eternal damage of the other electronic devices nearby the annealing site. The nc-Si dependent photoluminescence (PL) were observed at 806 nm or longer, whereas the laser-ablation damaged SRSO film exhibits significant blue PL at 410 nm due to the oxygen-related structural defects. The refractive index of the lasertreated SRSO film is increasing from 1.57 to 2.31 as the laser intensity increases from 1.5 to 6.0 kW/cm2 which is mainly attributed to the increasing density of nc-Si embedded in SRSO. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analysis reveals that the average size of nc-Si embedded in SRSO film is about 5.3 nm, which correlates well with the theoretical prediction of a corresponding PL at 806 nm. The HRTEM estimated square density of the nc-Si in SRSO film under the laser intensity of 6 kW/cm2 is about 10 18 cm -3.

  12. A primer for biomedical scientists on how to execute model II linear regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludbrook, John

    2012-04-01

    1. There are two very different ways of executing linear regression analysis. One is Model I, when the x-values are fixed by the experimenter. The other is Model II, in which the x-values are free to vary and are subject to error. 2. I have received numerous complaints from biomedical scientists that they have great difficulty in executing Model II linear regression analysis. This may explain the results of a Google Scholar search, which showed that the authors of articles in journals of physiology, pharmacology and biochemistry rarely use Model II regression analysis. 3. I repeat my previous arguments in favour of using least products linear regression analysis for Model II regressions. I review three methods for executing ordinary least products (OLP) and weighted least products (WLP) regression analysis: (i) scientific calculator and/or computer spreadsheet; (ii) specific purpose computer programs; and (iii) general purpose computer programs. 4. Using a scientific calculator and/or computer spreadsheet, it is easy to obtain correct values for OLP slope and intercept, but the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) are inaccurate. 5. Using specific purpose computer programs, the freeware computer program smatr gives the correct OLP regression coefficients and obtains 95% CI by bootstrapping. In addition, smatr can be used to compare the slopes of OLP lines. 6. When using general purpose computer programs, I recommend the commercial programs systat and Statistica for those who regularly undertake linear regression analysis and I give step-by-step instructions in the Supplementary Information as to how to use loss functions.

  13. Spiral structure in nearby galaxies II. comparative analysis and conclusions

    CERN Document Server

    Kendall, S; Kennicutt, R C

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed analysis of two-armed spiral structure in a sample of galax- ies from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS), with particular focus on the relationships between the properties of the spiral pattern in the stellar disc and the global struc- ture and environment of the parent galaxies. Following Paper I we have used a combination of Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared imaging and visible multi-colour imaging to isolate the spiral pattern in the underlying stellar discs, and we examine the systematic behaviours of the observed amplitudes and shapes (pitch angles) of these spirals. In general, spiral morphology is found to correlate only weakly at best with morphological parameters such as stellar mass, gas fraction, disc/bulge ratio, and vflat. In contrast to weak correlations with galaxy structure a strong link is found between the strength of the spiral arms and tidal forcing from nearby companion galaxies. This appears to support the longstanding suggestion that ei...

  14. The Quintuplet Cluster II. Analysis of the WN stars

    CERN Document Server

    Liermann, A; Oskinova, L M; Todt, H; Butler, K; 10.1051/0004-6361/200912612

    2010-01-01

    Based on $K$-band integral-field spectroscopy, we analyze four Wolf-Rayet stars of the nitrogen sequence (WN) found in the inner part of the Quintuplet cluster. All WN stars (WR102d, WR102i, WR102hb, and WR102ea) are of spectral subtype WN9h. One further star, LHO110, is included in the analysis which has been classified as Of/WN? previously but turns out to be most likely a WN9h star as well. The Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) models for expanding atmospheres are used to derive the fundamental stellar and wind parameters. The stars turn out to be very luminous, $\\log{(L/L_\\odot)} > 6.0$, with relatively low stellar temperatures, $T_* \\approx$ 25--35\\,kK. Their stellar winds contain a significant fraction of hydrogen, up to $X_\\mathrm{H} \\sim 0.45$ (by mass). We discuss the position of the Galactic center WN stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and find that they form a distinct group. In this respect, the Quintuplet WN stars are similar to late-type WN stars found in the Arches cluster and elsewhere in the Ga...

  15. THE CARNEGIE-IRVINE GALAXY SURVEY. II. ISOPHOTAL ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zhaoyu [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ho, Luis C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Barth, Aaron J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-4575 (United States); Peng, Chien Y. [NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2011-12-01

    The Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey (CGS) is a comprehensive investigation of the physical properties of a complete, representative sample of 605 bright (B{sub T} {<=} 12.9 mag) galaxies in the southern hemisphere. This contribution describes the isophotal analysis of the broadband (BVRI) optical imaging component of the project. We pay close attention to sky subtraction, which is particularly challenging for some of the large galaxies in our sample. Extensive crosschecks with internal and external data confirm that our calibration and sky subtraction techniques are robust with respect to the quoted measurement uncertainties. We present a uniform catalog of one-dimensional radial profiles of surface brightness and geometric parameters, as well as integrated colors and color gradients. Composite profiles highlight the tremendous diversity of brightness distributions found in disk galaxies and their dependence on Hubble type. A significant fraction of S0 and spiral galaxies exhibit non-exponential profiles in their outer regions. We perform Fourier decomposition of the isophotes to quantify non-axisymmetric deviations in the light distribution. We use the geometric parameters, in conjunction with the amplitude and phase of the m = 2 Fourier mode, to identify bars and quantify their size and strength. Spiral arm strengths are characterized using the m = 2 Fourier profiles and structure maps. Finally, we utilize the information encoded in the m = 1 Fourier profiles to measure disk lopsidedness. The databases assembled here and in Paper I lay the foundation for forthcoming scientific applications of CGS.

  16. Mars Hybrid Propulsion System Trajectory Analysis. Part II; Cargo Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Patrick R.; Merrill, Raymond G.; Qu, Min

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Human Spaceflight Architecture Team is developing a reusable hybrid transportation architecture in which both chemical and electric propulsion systems are used to send crew and cargo to Mars destinations such as Phobos, Deimos, the surface of Mars, and other orbits around Mars. By combining chemical and electrical propulsion into a single spaceship and applying each where it is more effective, the hybrid architecture enables a series of Mars trajectories that are more fuel-efficient than an all chemical architecture without significant increases in flight times. This paper shows the feasibility of the hybrid transportation architecture to pre-deploy cargo to Mars and Phobos in support of the Evolvable Mars Campaign crew missions. The analysis shows that the hybrid propulsion stage is able to deliver all of the current manifested payload to Phobos and Mars through the first three crew missions. The conjunction class trajectory also allows the hybrid propulsion stage to return to Earth in a timely fashion so it can be reused for additional cargo deployment. The 1,100 days total trip time allows the hybrid propulsion stage to deliver cargo to Mars every other Earth-Mars transit opportunity. For the first two Mars surface mission in the Evolvable Mars Campaign, the short trip time allows the hybrid propulsion stage to be reused for three round-trip journeys to Mars, which matches the hybrid propulsion stage's designed lifetime for three round-trip crew missions to the Martian sphere of influence.

  17. National Aviation Fuel Scenario Analysis Program (NAFSAP). Volume I. Model Description. Volume II. User Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    TESI CHART NATIONAI RUREAt (F ANDA[)Rt 1V4 A NATIONAL. AVIATION ~ FUEL SCENARIO.. ANALYSIS PROGRAM 49!! VOLUM I: MODEL DESCRIA~v 4<C VOLUME II: tr)ER...executes post processor which translates results of the graphics program to machine readable code used by the pen plotter) cr (depressing the carriage

  18. Aircraft-Pavement Compatibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-09-01

    Airplane Airpor* Norma ] Range 15.83 Extended Range 3.333 Normal Range 0.721 Extended Range Chicago (O’Hare) UOU 1.017 Atlanta 8.030 3U6...8217’-’."^.: II «IE! ’S 3SS 3 S S 5S 5ii n 5s 3 s 1 1 Isi • M S ^ « » al* •* «-< IA 2S « m H 1 sl St* iff 1 S S gs si! O s« ^ § 1 a

  19. Hollow cathode modeling: II. Physical analysis and parametric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sary, Gaétan; Garrigues, Laurent; Boeuf, Jean-Pierre

    2017-05-01

    A numerical emissive hollow cathode model which couples plasma and thermal aspects of the NASA NSTAR cathode has been presented in a companion paper and simulation results obtained using the plasma model were compared to experimental data. We now compare simulation results with measurements using the full coupled model. Inside the cathode, the simulated plasma density profile agrees with the experimental data up to the ±50% experimental uncertainty while the simulated emitter temperature differs from measurements by at most 5 K. We then proceed to an analysis of the cathode discharge both inside the cathode where electron emission is dominant and outside in the near plume where electron transport instabilities are important. As observed previously in the literature, the total emitted electron current is much larger (34 {{A}}) than the set discharge current collected at the anode (13 {{A}}) while ionization plays a negligible role. Extracted electrons are emitted from a region much shorter than the full emitter (0.9 {{cm}} versus 2.5 {{cm}}). The influence of an applied axial magnetic field in the plume is also assessed and we observe that it leads to a 10-fold increase of the plasma density 1 cm downstream of the orifice entrance while the simulated discharge potential at the anode is increased from 10 {{V}} up to 35.5 {{V}}. Lastly, we perform a parametric study on both the operating point (discharge current, mass flow rate) and design (inner radius) of the cathode. The simulated useful operating envelope is shown to be limited at low discharge current mostly because of the probable ion sputtering of the emitter and at high discharge current because of emitter evaporation, plasma oscillations and sputtering of the keeper electrode. The behavior of the cathode is also analyzed w.r.t. its internal radius and simulation results show that the useful emitter length scales linearly with the cathode radius.

  20. Molecular cloning, sequencing, and expression analysis of cDNA encoding metalloprotein II (MP II) induced by single and combined metals (Cu(II), Cd(II)) in polychaeta Perinereis aibuhitensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dazuo; Zhou, Yibing; Zhao, Huan; Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Sun, Na; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Xiutang

    2012-11-01

    We amplified and analyzed the complete cDNA of metalloprotein II (MP II) from the somatic muscle of the polychaete Perinereis aibuhitensis, the full length cDNA is 904 bp encoding 119 amino acids. The MP II cDNA sequence was subjected to BLAST searching in NCBI and was found to share high homology with hemerythrin of other worms. MP II expression of P. aibuhitensis exposed to single and combined metals (Cu(II), Cd(II)) was analyzed using real time-PCR. MP II mRNA expression increased at the start of Cu(II) exposure, then decreased and finally return to the normal level. Expression pattern of MP II under Cd(II) exposure was time- and dose-dependent. MP II expression induced by a combination of Cd(II) and Cu(II) was similar to that induced by Cd(II) alone.

  1. Retrospective analysis of idiopathic scoliosis medical records coming from one out-patient clinic for compatibility with Scoliosis Research Society criteria for brace treatment studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Korbel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background First author attempted to analyse medical records of patients with idiopathic scoliosis for compliance with the Scoliosis Research Society brace studies criteria. A retrospective analysis of medical records of 2705 girls treated from 1989 to 2002 was carried out. Methods Age, Cobb, Risser and menarchal status were analyzed for compliance with the Scoliosis Research Society brace studies criteria: a age ≥10 years, b Risser 0–2, c 25–40° Cobb angle, d no earlier treatment, e patients before first menses or not more than one year from first menses. Results It has been found that 183 girls out of 2705 were ≥10 years old and in the range 25–40° Cobb angle. One hundred two out of 2705 patients revealed eligible for brace effectiveness study according to SRS 2005 criteria. 120 out of 2705 patients revealed eligible for brace brace effectiveness study according to SRS-SOSORT 2014 criteria. Conclusion The excluded patients revealed too old or with too significant Cobb angles. This indicates the changing criteria for scoliosis brace treatment over the time. Direct comparison of current results of brace treatment with historical series of cases turns out to be very difficult.

  2. Compatibility of embryonic stem cells with biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschel, Jörg; Berr, Karin; Depprich, Rita; Naujoks, Christian; Kübler, Norbert R; Meyer, Ulrich; Ommerborn, Michelle; Lammers, Lydia

    2009-05-01

    Periodontal bone defects and atrophy of the jaws in an aging population are of special concern. Tissue engineering using embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and biomaterials may offer new therapeutic options. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the compatibility of ESCs with biomaterials and the influence of biomaterials on the osteogenic gene expression profile.Therefore, ESCs are cultured with various biomaterials. The cytocompatibility of murine ESCs is measured regarding the proliferation of the cells on the materials by CyQUANT assay, the morphology by scanning electron microscopy, and the influence on the gene expression by real time PCR.The results show that insoluble collagenous bone matrix, followed by beta-tricalciumphosphate, is most suitable for bone tissue engineering regarding cell proliferation, and phenotype. The gene expression analysis indicates that biomaterials do influence the gene expression of ESCs.Our results provide new insight into the cytocompatibility of ESCs on different scaffolds.

  3. Role of value compatibility in IT adoption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunker, Deborah; Kautz, Karlheinz; Nguyen, Anne Luu Thanh

    2007-01-01

    Compatibility has been recognised as an important element in the adoption of IT innovations in organisations but as a concept it has been generally limited to technical or functional factors. Compatibility is also significant, however, with regard to value compatibility between the organisation......, and the adopted IT innovation. We propose a framework to determine value compatibility analysing the organisation's and information system's structure, practices and culture, and explore the value compatibility of an organisation with its adopted self-service computer-based information system. A case study...... was conducted to determine the congruence of an organisation's value and IT value compatibility. This study found that there was a high correspondence in the organisational structure and practice dimensions; however, there were organisational culture disparities. The cultural disparities reflected the self...

  4. Incentive-Compatible Sovereign Debt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bersem, Mario R. C.

    repudiation costs. I derive the optimal loan contract, which I call “repudiation-proof debt,” and show how it saves on costly verification and avoids repudiation. Repudiation-proof debt can explain several key facts of sovereign borrowing: (i) why governments issue bonds in the first place; (ii) why strategic...

  5. Analysis of prescriptions compatibility law for treatment coronary disease in uyghur medicines%维吾尔药治疗冠心病方剂的组方配伍规律分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    买买提依力·努尔买提; 艾尼瓦尔·塔力甫; 吐尔洪·阿西木; 阿布都瓦尔·阿布拉克

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To analysize prescriptions compatibility law for treatment coronary disease,discuss pathogenesis and therapy characteristics.Methods:To collect effective prescriptions of treatment for palpitation,cardiodynia,chest pain,choking sensation in chest,analysize the medical classification and using frequency,utilizing screen function of the Microsoft Excel to set up database and have a statistic analysis.Results:According to using frequency,cardiotonic drug was used at most,then mature drugs of abnormal body fluid,tonifying brain,kidney and invigorating stomach and cathartic drugs in sequence.Conclusion:The results suggest that cardiotonic drug is the main group of in prescriptions,compatibility of tonifying brain,kidney,stomach and boosting natural force drugs in the treatment of coronary disease.Its statistical analysis reveals the coronary disease prescription drug laws,and has important theoretical and clinical significance.%目的:分析冠心病用药的组方配伍规律,探讨其病机和治法特点.方法:具有以卡伏绀(心悸)、心痛、胸痛、胸闷为主治的有效方剂进行收集、整理、汇总,利用Mcirosotf Exce1建立资料数据表,通过数据筛选功能对药物分类、使用频数进行统计分析.结果:按照使用频次排列强心药最多,27味,537次,其次为异常体液成熟药、补脑药、补肾和健胃顺肠药.讨论:以强心药为主,配伍异常体液成熟药、补脑药、补肾药、健胃顺肠药及增强自然力的药,揭示了冠心病用药的组方配伍规律,具有重要的理论与临床意义.

  6. 基因芯片研究蟾酥急性毒性及配伍减毒机制%Acute Toxicity of Venenum Bufonis and Compatibility of Heart Musk Protecting Pills by Microarray Expression Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨爱文; 范雪梅; 李雪; 梁琼麟; 王义明; 罗国安

    2011-01-01

    利用基因芯片技术研究了蟾酥对大鼠心脏的急性毒性及其组方成麝香保心丸后的配伍减毒机制.通过表达谱芯片检测了药物作用后的基因表达差异,对差异表达基因进行了牛物信息学研究并结合实时荧光定量PCR分析.结果表明,低剂量蟾酥可以通过干扰离子稳态和肌动蛋白构建来影响心脏的收缩,同时还会导致心脏细胞的抗凋亡和脂类代谢等应激反应;高剂量蟾酥除进一步干扰离子稳态和肌动蛋白构建外,还会引发铁离子蓄积,最终可能导致细胞凋亡;且蟾酥对心脏的影响具有剂量依赖性.当蟾酥组方成麝香保心丸后,上述影响均不明显,主要影响血压调节和心肌修复等作用,体现了中药配伍的减毒作用.%The differentially expressed genes involved in acute toxicity and compatibility of Heart Musk Pro tecting Pills(HMP) via cDNA microarray were investigated in this paper. Then the GO and KEGG pathway enrichment analysis were performed as well as the functional analysis and RT-PCR validation of two important genes. The results indicated that the ion homeostasis and actin organization were affected in the low dosage group for Venenum Bufonis. Meanwhile, regulation of anti-apoptosis and fatty acid metabolism could be in duced within 2 h; the myocardial contraction was finally disturbed. The ion homeostasis and actin organization could also be disturbed more quickly in the high dosage group. In addition, the iron accumulation could lead to oxidation reduction and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. For HMP, there were some clinical functions, such as blood pressure regulation and myocardial structure organization. However, the related acute toxicity of Vene num Bufonis was not shown. This paper could provide a novel research strategy in the compatibility study of traditional Chinese medicine( TCM ).

  7. 77 FR 59702 - Promoting U.S. EC Regulatory Compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... Promoting U.S. EC Regulatory Compatibility AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative. ACTION... greater transatlantic regulatory compatibility generally. Concrete ideas on how greater compatibility... and EC invite your views on how to promote greater transatlantic regulatory compatibility...

  8. Results from a Low-Energy Analysis of the CDMS II Germanium Data

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Z; Arrenberg, S; Bailey, C N; Balakishiyeva, D; Baudis, L; Bauer, D A; Brink, P L; Bruch, T; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cooley, J; Cushman, P; Daal, M; DeJongh, F; Dragowsky, M R; Duong, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Filippini, J; Fritts, M; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Hennings-Yeomans, R; Hertel, S A; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Kamaev, O; Kiveni, M; Kos, M; Leman, S W; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moore, D; Nelson, H; Ogburn, R W; Phipps, A; Pyle, M; Qiu, X; Ramberg, E; Rau, W; Reisetter, A; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schnee, R W; Seitz, D N; Serfass, B; Sundqvist, K M; Tarka, M; Wikus, P; Yellin, S; Yoo, J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2010-01-01

    We report results from a reanalysis of data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. Data taken between October 2006 and September 2008 using eight germanium detectors are reanalyzed with a lowered, 2 keV recoil-energy threshold, to give increased sensitivity to interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses below ~10 GeV/c^2. This analysis provides stronger constraints than previous CDMS II results for WIMP masses below 9 GeV/c^2 and excludes parameter space associated with possible low-mass WIMP signals from the DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT experiments.

  9. A Characterization of P-Compatible Varieties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ivan Chajda; Klaus Denecke; Shelly L. Wismath

    2007-01-01

    P-Compatibility is a hereditary property of identities which generalizes the properties of normality and externality of identitiesChajda characterized the normalization of a variety by an algebraic construction called a choice algebraIn this paper, we generalize this characterization to the least P-compatible variety P(V) determined by a variety V for any partition P using P-choice algebrasWe also study the clone of (strongly) P-compatible n-ary terms of a variety V, and relate identities of this clone to (strongly) P-compatible hyperidentities of the variety V.

  10. Vacuum Compatible Percussive Dynamic Cone Penetrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Honeybee Robotics proposes to develop a vacuum compatible percussive dynamic cone penetrometer (PDCP), for establishing soil bin characteristics, with the ultimate...

  11. Sensitivity Test for Benchmark Analysis of EBR-II SHRT-17 using MARS-LMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chiwoong; Ha, Kwiseok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    This study was conducted as a part of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP), 'Benchmark Analyses of an EBR-II Shutdown Heat Removal Test (SHRT)'. EBR-II SHRT 17 (Loss of flow) was analyzed with MARS-LMR, which is a safety analysis code for a Prototype GEN-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (PGSFR) has developed in KAERI. The current stage of the CRP is comparing blind test results with opened experimental data. Some influential parameters are selected for the sensitivity test of the EBR-II SHRT-17. The major goal of this study is to understand the behaviors of physical parameters and to make the modeling strategy for better estimation.

  12. Tone compatibility between HDR displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bist, Cambodge; Cozot, Rémi; Madec, Gérard; Ducloux, Xavier

    2016-09-01

    High Dynamic Range (HDR) is the latest trend in television technology and we expect an in ux of HDR capable consumer TVs in the market. Initial HDR consumer displays will operate on a peak brightness of about 500-1000 nits while in the coming years display peak brightness is expected to go beyond 1000 nits. However, professionally graded HDR content can range from 1000 to 4000 nits. As with Standard Dynamic Range (SDR) content, we can expect HDR content to be available in variety of lighting styles such as low key, medium key and high key video. This raises concerns over tone-compatibility between HDR displays especially when adapting to various lighting styles. It is expected that dynamic range adaptation between HDR displays uses similar techniques as found with tone mapping and tone expansion operators. In this paper, we survey simple tone mapping methods of 4000 nits color-graded HDR content for 1000 nits HDR displays. We also investigate tone expansion strategies when HDR content graded in 1000 nits is displayed on 4000 nits HDR monitors. We conclude that the best tone reproduction technique between HDR displays strongly depends on the lighting style of the content.

  13. A Wide-Field View of Leo II -- A Structural Analysis Using the SDSS

    CERN Document Server

    Coleman, Matthew G; Rix, Hans-Walter; Grebel, Eva K; Koch, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Using SDSS I data, we have analysed the stellar distribution of the Leo II dwarf spheroidal galaxy (distance of 233 kpc) to search for evidence of tidal deformation. The existing SDSS photometric catalogue contains gaps in regions of high stellar crowding, hence we filled the area at the centre of Leo II using the DAOPHOT algorithm applied to the SDSS images. The combined DAOPHOT-SDSS dataset contains three-filter photometry over a 4x4 square degree region centred on Leo II. By defining a mask in three-filter colour-magnitude space, we removed the majority of foreground field stars. We have measured the following Leo II structural parameters: a core radius of r_c = 2.64 +/- 0.19 arcmin (178 +/- 13 pc), a tidal radius of r_t = 9.33 +/- 0.47 arcmin (632 +/- 32 pc) and a total V-band luminosity of L_V = (7.4 +/- 2.0) times 10^5 L_sun (M_V = -9.9 +/- 0.3). Our comprehensive analysis of the Leo II structure did not reveal any significant signs of tidal distortion. The internal structure of this object contains onl...

  14. Electromagnetic Compatibility in Railways Analysis and Management

    CERN Document Server

    Ogunsola, Ade

    2013-01-01

    A railway is a complex distributed engineering system: the construction of a new railway or the modernisation of a existing one requires a deep understanding of the constitutive components and their interaction, inside the system itself and towards the outside world. The former covers the various subsystems (featuring a complex mix of high power sources, sensitive safety critical systems, intentional transmitters, etc.) and their interaction, including the specific functions and their relevance to safety. The latter represents all the additional possible external victims and sources of electromagnetic interaction. EMC thus starts from a comprehension of the emissions and immunity characteristics and the interactions between sources and victims, with a strong relationship to electromagnetics and to system modeling. On the other hand, the said functions are achieved and preserved and their relevance for safety is adequately handled, if the related requirements are well posed and managed throughout the process f...

  15. Is Religious Education Compatible with Science Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahner, Martin; Bunge, Mario

    1996-01-01

    Addresses the problem of the compatibility of science and religion, and its bearing on science and religious education, challenges the popular view that science and religion are compatible or complementary. Discusses differences at the doctrinal, metaphysical, methodological, and attitudinal levels. Argues that religious education should be kept…

  16. Common Fixed Points for Weakly Compatible Maps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Renu Chugh; Sanjay Kumar

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to prove a common fixed point theorem, from the class of compatible continuous maps to a larger class of maps having weakly compatible maps without appeal to continuity, which generalized the results of Jungck [3], Fisher [1], Kang and Kim [8], Jachymski [2], and Rhoades [9].

  17. 40 CFR 280.32 - Compatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compatibility. 280.32 Section 280.32 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) TECHNICAL...) General Operating Requirements § 280.32 Compatibility. Owners and operators must use an UST system made...

  18. New Commitment Options: Compatibility with Emissions Trading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This paper considers different options for quantitative greenhouse gas emission commitments from the standpoint of their technical compatibility with emissions trading. These are dynamic targets, binding targets with price caps, non-binding targets, sector-wide targets/mechanisms, action targets, allowances and endowments, and long-term permits. This paper considers these options from the standpoint of their compatibility with emissions trading.

  19. Tank Farm Waste Transfer Compatibility Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOWLER, K.D.

    2000-07-12

    The compatibility program described in this document formalizes the process for determining waste compatibility. The primary goal of the program is to ensure that sufficient controls are in place to prevent the formation of incompatible mixtures during future operations. The process described involves characterizing waste, comparing characteristics with criteria, resolving potential incompatibilities and documenting the process.

  20. Assessing shelf aggregate environmental compatibility and suitability for beach nourishment: a case study for Tuscany (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigongiari, Nicola; Cipriani, Luigi E; Pranzini, Enzo; Renzi, Monia; Vitale, Giovanni

    2015-04-15

    Beach nourishment practices are a key aspect in coastal management plans for stakeholders and communities. Stemming from a concrete case-study (Tuscany), this research analyzes: (i) principal problems of current law regulating dredging, (ii) gaps in technical guidelines, (iii) advantages of integrated approaches to the decision-making process, (iv) possible applicable nourishment options and their costs and benefits. Our results show that sand compatibility is driven mainly by grain-size stability due to the occurrence of lower pollution levels in off-shore deposits than in threatened beaches, thus current laws and guidelines should be improved to fill the evident gap in the evaluation process and to include a more complete approach to data evaluation and an integrated approach to ecotoxicity evaluation, which is relevant in cases of geochemical anomalies. The cost-benefit analysis performed indicates that only dredging intended to manage more than 1 million m(3) of aggregates would represent a real advantage for local communities.

  1. The use of MAVIS II to integrate the modeling and analysis of explosive valve interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, R.; Kwon, D.M.

    1998-12-31

    The MAVIS II computer program provides for the modeling and analysis of explosive valve interactions. This report describes the individual components of the program and how MAVIS II is used with other available tools to integrate the design and understanding of explosive valves. The rationale and model used for each valve interaction is described. Comparisons of the calculated results with available data have demonstrated the feasibility and accuracy of using MAVIS II for analytical studies of explosive valve interactions. The model used for the explosive or pyrotechnic used as the driving force in explosive valves is the most critical to be understood and modeled. MAVIS II is an advanced version that incorporates a plastic, as well as elastic, modeling of the deformations experienced when plungers are forced into a bore. The inclusion of a plastic model has greatly expanded the use of MAVIS for all categories (opening, closure, or combined) of valves, especially for the closure valves in which the sealing operation requires the plastic deformation of either a plunger or bore over a relatively large area. In order to increase its effectiveness, the use of MAVIS II should be integrated with the results from available experimental hardware. Test hardware such as the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) and Velocity Generator test provide experimental data for accurate comparison of the actual valve functions. Variable Explosive Chamber (VEC) and Constant Explosive Volume (CEV) tests are used to provide the proper explosive equation-of-state for the MAVIS calculations of the explosive driving forces. The rationale and logistics of this integration is demonstrated through an example. A recent valve design is used to demonstrate how MAVIS II can be integrated with experimental tools to provide an understanding of the interactions in this valve.

  2. A tensor analysis to evaluate the effect of high-pull headgear on Class II malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngan, P; Scheick, J; Florman, M

    1993-03-01

    The inaccuracies inherent in cephalometric analysis of treatment effects are well known. The objective of this article is to present a more reliable research tool in the analysis of cephalometric data. Bookstein introduced a dilation function by means of a homogeneous deformation tensor as a method of describing changes in cephalometric data. His article gave an analytic description of the deformation tensor that permits the rapid and highly accurate calculation of it on a desktop computer. The first part of this article describes the underlying ideas and mathematics. The second part uses the tensor analysis to analyze the cephalometric results of a group of patients treated with high-pull activator (HPA) to demonstrate the application of this research tool. Eight patients with Class II skeletal open bite malocclusions in the mixed dentition were treated with HPA. A control sample consisting of eight untreated children with Class II who were obtained from The Ohio State University Growth Study was used as a comparison group. Lateral cephalograms taken before and at the completion of treatment were traced, digitized, and analyzed with the conventional method and tensor analysis. The results showed that HPA had little or no effect on maxillary skeletal structures. However, reduction in growth rate was found with the skeletal triangle S-N-A, indicating a posterior tipping and torquing of the maxillary incisors. The treatment also induced additional deformation on the mandible in a downward and slightly forward direction. Together with the results from the conventional cephalometric analysis, HPA seemed to provide the vertical and rotational control of the maxilla during orthopedic Class II treatment by inhibiting the downward and forward eruptive path of the upper posterior teeth. The newly designed computer software permits rapid analysis of cephalometric data with the tensor analysis on a desktop computer. This tool may be useful in analyzing growth changes for

  3. The effectiveness of the Herbst appliance for patients with Class II malocclusion: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Zhu, Yafen; Long, Hu; Zhou, Yang; Jian, Fan; Ye, Niansong; Gao, Meiya

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective: To systematically investigate review in literature the effects of the Herbst appliance for patients with Class II malocclusion patients. Method: We performed a comprehensive literature survey on PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, CENTRAL, SIGLE, and ClinicalTrial.gov up to December 2014. The selection criteria: randomized controlled trials or clinical controlled trials; using any kind of Herbst appliances to correct Class II division 1 malocclusions; skeletal and/or dental changes evaluated through lateral cephalograms. And the exclusion criteria: syndromic patients; individual case reports and series of cases; surgical interventions. Article screening, data extraction, assessment of risk of bias, and evaluation of evidence quality through GRADE were conducted independently by two well-trained orthodontic doctors. Consensus was made via group discussion of all authors when there is inconsistent information from the two. After that, sensitivity analysis and subgroup analysis were performed to evaluate the robustness of the meta-analysis. Results: Twelve clinical controlled trials meet the above-mentioned criteria, and were included in this analysis. All included studies have eleven measures taken during both active treatment effect and long term effect periods, including four angular ones (i.e., SNA, SNB, ANB, mandibular plane angle) and seven linear ones (i.e. Co-Go, Co-Gn, overjet, overbite, molar relationship, A point-OLp, Pg-OLp) during active treatment effect period were statistically pooled. Meta-analysis and sensitivity analysis demonstrated that all these measures showed consistent results except for SNA, ANB, and overbite. Subgroup analysis showed significant changes in SNA, overbite, and Pg-OLp. Publication bias was detected in SNB, mandibular plane angle, and A point-OLp. Conclusion: The Herbst appliance is effective for patients with Class II malocclusion in active treatment period. Especially, there are obvious changes on dental

  4. Construction and analysis of the transgenic carrot and celery plants expressing the recombinant thaumatin II protein

    OpenAIRE

    Luchakivska Yu. S.; Komarnytskii I. K.; Kurchenko I. M.; Yurieva O. M.; Zhytkevich N. V.; Kuchuk M. V.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To obtain the transgenic carrot and celery plants able to express recombinant thaumatin II in order to increase plant stress tolerance. Methods. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of the carrot and celery seedlings was used for obtaining the transgenic plants. Presence and transcription of the transgene in plant tissues were proved by PCR and RT-PCR analysis. The plants were tested for the biotic stress tolerance by in vitro antifungal and antibacterial activity assays and for the sali...

  5. Microstructural analysis of the type-II boundary region in Alloy 152 weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seung Chang; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The weld metals are more susceptible to SCC growth and that most cracks are blunted by the fusion boundary. However, they also found that some cracking occurs along the fusion boundary, often in an area with high hardness. Nelson et al. investigated a DMW of Monel 409 stainless steel and American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 1080 alloy and found a type-II boundary, which exists parallel to the fusion boundary in the dilution zone. They conclude that the type-II boundary is a potential path for crack growth. While there are several theories for the mechanisms of the type-II boundary formation, they conclude that the type-II boundary forms from the allotropic δ-γ transformation at the base metal in the elevated austenitic temperature range. As the operation time of nuclear power plants using DMWs of Alloy 152 and A533 Gr. B increases, these DMWs must be evaluated for their resistance to SCC for long-term operations. However, only few studies have investigated the thermal aging effects induced by long-term operations at high temperature. Type-II boundary is known as a potential crack path from the results of crack growth test at DMW without any heat treatment. So the analysis about type-II boundary with applying heat treatment could be helpful to evaluate the susceptibility to SCC of structural materials. The objective of this study is to analyze the detailed microstructure of the type-II boundary region in the DMW of Alloy 152 and A533 Gr. B, after applying heat treatment simulating thermal aging effect of a nuclear power plant operation condition to evaluate the susceptibility of this region to SCC. The microstructure of the type-II boundary region in the DMW of Alloy 152 and A533 Gr. B were analyzed with an energy dispersive x-ray spectroscope attached to a scanning electron microscope (SEM-EDS), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and a nanoindentation test. Microstructural, grain boundary orientation, nanohardness analysis were conducted in the type-II

  6. Solid state compatibility studies with tablet excipients using non thermal methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liltorp, Karin; Larsen, Trine Gorm; Willumsen, Birgitte; Holm, René

    2011-06-01

    Compatibility between two new active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) and several pharmaceutical excipients used in solid formulations has been investigated by FT-IR and HPLC following storage under two different conditions. Compatibility was investigated by storage at isothermal stress conditions for (i) 3days and subsequently analysed by FT-IR and (ii) 12weeks of storage and analysis by HPLC. For the majority of the examined excipients a large degradation measured by HPLC after 12weeks storage was also detected by FT-IR following storage at isothermal stress conditions for 3days, i.e. there was a general agreement between the results obtained by the two protocols. Further, the FT-IR method showed clear incompatibility with three excipients where no degradation products were detected by HPLC, but where a significant decrease in the API quantified by the HPLC assay, was observed. The accelerated method thus showed a clear advantage: incompatibility found after 12weeks using HPLC was seen after 3days with FT-IR. Furthermore, FT-IR provides an insight into structural changes not seen with HPLC. This is exemplified by the desalting of a hydrogen bromide salt of one of the two compounds, which might lead to changes of the intrinsic dissolution rate and potentially affect the bioavailability of the API.

  7. Study on the Compatibility of SMA and Composite Materials by Holographic Interferometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhimin

    2000-01-01

    With the help of holographic interferometry a study is conducted on the compatibility of SMA (shape memory alloy) and epoxy resin composite material. The paper gives experiment results and analysis which show that after coupling SMA with the composite material, the flexural rigidity of composite material is somewhat reinforced. Under certain conditions, SMA and the epoxy resin composite material are compatible.

  8. Structure analysis of interstellar clouds: II. Applying the Delta-variance method to interstellar turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ossenkopf, V; Stutzki, J

    2008-01-01

    The Delta-variance analysis is an efficient tool for measuring the structural scaling behaviour of interstellar turbulence in astronomical maps. In paper I we proposed essential improvements to the Delta-variance analysis. In this paper we apply the improved Delta-variance analysis to i) a hydrodynamic turbulence simulation with prominent density and velocity structures, ii) an observed intensity map of rho Oph with irregular boundaries and variable uncertainties of the different data points, and iii) a map of the turbulent velocity structure in the Polaris Flare affected by the intensity dependence on the centroid velocity determination. The tests confirm the extended capabilities of the improved Delta-variance analysis. Prominent spatial scales were accurately identified and artifacts from a variable reliability of the data were removed. The analysis of the hydrodynamic simulations showed that the injection of a turbulent velocity structure creates the most prominent density structures are produced on a sca...

  9. The Physical Conditions of Intermediate Redshift MgII Absorbing Clouds from Voigt Profile Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Churchill, C W; Charlton, J; Churchill, Chris; Vogt, Steven; Charlton, Jane

    2003-01-01

    [Slightly Abridged] We present a detailed statistical analysis of the column densities, N, and Doppler parameters, b, of MgII absorbing clouds at redshifts 0.4~5 km/s for MgII and FeII and ~7 km/s for MgI. The clouds are consistent with being thermally broadened, with temperatures in the 30-40,000K range. (4) A two-component Gaussian model to the velocity two-point correlation function yielded velocity dispersions of 54 km/s and 166 km/s. The narrow component has roughly twice the amplitude of the broader component. The width and amplitude of the broader component decreases as equivalent width increases. (5) From photoionization models we find that the column density ratios are most consistent with photoionization by the extragalactic background, as opposed to stars. Based upon N(MgI)/N(MgII), it appears that at least two-phase ionization models are required to explain the data.

  10. Full genome analysis of a novel type II feline coronavirus NTU156.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chao-Nan; Chang, Ruey-Yi; Su, Bi-Ling; Chueh, Ling-Ling

    2013-04-01

    Infections by type II feline coronaviruses (FCoVs) have been shown to be significantly correlated with fatal feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). Despite nearly six decades having passed since its first emergence, different studies have shown that type II FCoV represents only a small portion of the total FCoV seropositivity in cats; hence, there is very limited knowledge of the evolution of type II FCoV. To elucidate the correlation between viral emergence and FIP, a local isolate (NTU156) that was derived from a FIP cat was analyzed along with other worldwide strains. Containing an in-frame deletion of 442 nucleotides in open reading frame 3c, the complete genome size of NTU156 (28,897 nucleotides) appears to be the smallest among the known type II feline coronaviruses. Bootscan analysis revealed that NTU156 evolved from two crossover events between type I FCoV and canine coronavirus, with recombination sites located in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and M genes. With an exchange of nearly one-third of the genome with other members of alphacoronaviruses, the new emerging virus could gain new antigenicity, posing a threat to cats that either have been infected with a type I virus before or never have been infected with FCoV.

  11. Re-analysis of the Radio Luminosity Function of Galactic H II Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladini, R.; De Zotti, G.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S. J.

    2009-09-01

    We have re-analyzed continuum and recombination lines radio data available in the literature in order to derive the luminosity function (LF) of Galactic H II regions. The study is performed by considering the first and fourth Galactic quadrants independently. We estimate the completeness level of the sample in the fourth quadrant at 5 Jy, and the one in the first quadrant at 2 Jy. We show that the two samples (fourth or first quadrant) include, as well as giant and supergiant H II regions, a significant number of subgiant sources. The LF is obtained, in each Galactic quadrant, with a generalized Schmidt's estimator using an effective volume derived from the observed spatial distribution of the considered H II regions. The re-analysis also takes advantage of recently published ancillary absorption data allowing to solve the distance ambiguity for several objects. A single power-law fit to the LFs retrieves a slope equal to -2.23 ± 0.07 (fourth quadrant) and to -1.85 ± 0.11 (first quadrant). We also find marginal evidence of a luminosity break at L knee = 1023.45 erg s-1 Hz-1 for the LF in the fourth quadrant. We convert radio luminosities into equivalent Hα and Lyman continuum luminosities to facilitate comparisons with extragalactic studies. We obtain an average total H II regions Lyman continuum luminosity of 0.89 ± 0.23 × 1053 s-1, corresponding to 30% of the total ionizing luminosity of the Galaxy.

  12. Project on restaurant energy performance: end-use monitoring and analysis. Appendixes I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claar, C.N.; Mazzucchi, R.P.; Heidell, J.A.

    1985-05-01

    This is the second volume of the report, ''The Porject on Restaurant Energy Performance - End-Use Monitoring and Analysis''. The first volume (PNL-5462) contains a summary and analysis of the metered energy performance data collected by the Project on Restaurant Energy Performance (PREP). Appendix I, presented here, contains monitoring site descriptions, measurement plans, and data summaries for the seven restaurants metered for PREP. Appendix II, also in this volume, is a description of the PREP computer system.

  13. Proceedings of the first analysis meeting on JUPITER-II Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiradata, Keisho; Yamamoto, Masaaki [comps.

    1984-12-31

    The JUPITER-II Program is the Joint Physics Large Heterogeneous Core Critical Experiments Program between the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) and PNC, Japan. The experiments began in May 1982 and ended in April 1984, as a part of the ZPPR-13 program. The ZPPR-13 is a series of critical assemblies designed to study the fundamental neutronic behavior of large, radially-heterogeneous LMFBR cores. This report describes the results of analysis of ZPPR-13A and preliminary analysis of ZPPR-13B, and some topics of recent activities in fast reactor physics.

  14. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 37 (TOWNTH00290037) on Town Highway 29, crossing Mill Brook, Townshend, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, R.L.; Medalie, Laura

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure TOWNTH00290037 on Town Highway 29 crossing Mill Brook, Townshend, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D.

  15. Level II scour analysis for bridge 2 (WODFTH00010002) on Town Highway 1, crossing Hell Hollow Brook, Woodford, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Ronda L.; Degnan, James R.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WODFTH00010002 on Town Highway 1 crossing Hell Hollow Brook, Woodford, Vermont (figures 1-8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D.

  16. EMC of Electrical Systems - Electromagnetic Coupling ( Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOVACOVA, I.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the general analysis of one part of the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC problem - the electromagnetic coupling applied in the field of power electrical systems. The verification simulation analyses and practical measurements of the electromagnetic coupling, which are confirming the correctness of results obtained from theoretical analyses (part I., are presented in part II. So they can be used for predictive stating of EMC quality of individual new electrotechnical products.

  17. [Survey of research on acupoints compatibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-Ren

    2010-05-01

    The research papers that meet the criteria of evidence-based medicine and randomized controlled trial were retrieved in Chinese journals data bases (CNKI knowledge network) from 1992 to 2009. Twenty-five papers indicate that acupoints compatibility rules are closely related to organism regional anatomy, nerve, the blood vessel and the endocrine gland; acupoints compatibility rules produce synergism, inhibit or antagonistic effect that affect the clinical effectiveness. The acupoints compatibility rules based on experimental researches are applied to clinic practice is the key to improve the acupuncture clinical effectiveness.

  18. Physico-mechanical analysis data in support of compatibility of chitosan/κ-carrageenan polyelectrolyte films achieved by ascorbic acid, and the thermal degradation theory of κ-carrageenan influencing the properties of its blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdiyar Shahbazi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the complementary data regarding compatibilization of chitosan/κ-carrageenan polyelectrolyte complex for synthesizing of a soft film using ascorbic acid. It includes the thermal-theory for estimating the degradation of κ-carrageenan, as reflected in alteration of the structural properties of the blend. The data has been provided to demonstrate that the blend solution based on chitosan, a polycation, and κ-carrageenan, a polyanion polymer, produces an incompatible polyelectrolyte composite, susceptible to coaservative phase separation. We present further data on water resistance, water barrier property, mechanical parameters, scanning electron micrograph, as well as contact angle image dataset of the chitosan/κ-carrageenan film. The physical data were collected by water solubility and water permeability assays, with a view to elucidate the role of ascorbic acid in the compatibility of polyelectrolyte blends. The mechanical data is obtained from a stress–strain curve for evaluation of tensile strength and elongation at break point of the chitosan/κ-carrageenan film. The microstructure observations were performed using scanning electron micrograph. These dataset confirm fabrication of a soft film in the presence of ascorbic acid, with reduced heterogeneities in the polyelectrolyte film structure. The κ-carrageenan was also treated by a thermal process, prior to inclusion into the chitosan solution, to investigate the impact of this on the mechanical and structural features of the resulting blend. We present the required data and the theoretical analysis supporting the thermal chain degradation of a polymer and its effects on behavior of the film. Additional information, characterizing the hydrophobicity of the surface of the blend layers is obtained by measuring water contact angles using a contact anglemeter.

  19. Physico-mechanical analysis data in support of compatibility of chitosan/κ-carrageenan polyelectrolyte films achieved by ascorbic acid, and the thermal degradation theory of κ-carrageenan influencing the properties of its blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Mahdiyar; Ettelaie, Rammile; Rajabzadeh, Ghadir

    2016-12-01

    This article presents the complementary data regarding compatibilization of chitosan/κ-carrageenan polyelectrolyte complex for synthesizing of a soft film using ascorbic acid. It includes the thermal-theory for estimating the degradation of κ-carrageenan, as reflected in alteration of the structural properties of the blend. The data has been provided to demonstrate that the blend solution based on chitosan, a polycation, and κ-carrageenan, a polyanion polymer, produces an incompatible polyelectrolyte composite, susceptible to coaservative phase separation. We present further data on water resistance, water barrier property, mechanical parameters, scanning electron micrograph, as well as contact angle image dataset of the chitosan/κ-carrageenan film. The physical data were collected by water solubility and water permeability assays, with a view to elucidate the role of ascorbic acid in the compatibility of polyelectrolyte blends. The mechanical data is obtained from a stress-strain curve for evaluation of tensile strength and elongation at break point of the chitosan/κ-carrageenan film. The microstructure observations were performed using scanning electron micrograph. These dataset confirm fabrication of a soft film in the presence of ascorbic acid, with reduced heterogeneities in the polyelectrolyte film structure. The κ-carrageenan was also treated by a thermal process, prior to inclusion into the chitosan solution, to investigate the impact of this on the mechanical and structural features of the resulting blend. We present the required data and the theoretical analysis supporting the thermal chain degradation of a polymer and its effects on behavior of the film. Additional information, characterizing the hydrophobicity of the surface of the blend layers is obtained by measuring water contact angles using a contact anglemeter.

  20. The 12-item World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS II: a nonparametric item response analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez Ana

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have analyzed the psychometric properties of the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS II using classical omnibus measures of scale quality. These analyses are sample dependent and do not model item responses as a function of the underlying trait level. The main objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the WHO-DAS II items and their options in discriminating between changes in the underlying disability level by means of item response analyses. We also explored differential item functioning (DIF in men and women. Methods The participants were 3615 adult general practice patients from 17 regions of Spain, with a first diagnosed major depressive episode. The 12-item WHO-DAS II was administered by the general practitioners during the consultation. We used a non-parametric item response method (Kernel-Smoothing implemented with the TestGraf software to examine the effectiveness of each item (item characteristic curves and their options (option characteristic curves in discriminating between changes in the underliying disability level. We examined composite DIF to know whether women had a higher probability than men of endorsing each item. Results Item response analyses indicated that the twelve items forming the WHO-DAS II perform very well. All items were determined to provide good discrimination across varying standardized levels of the trait. The items also had option characteristic curves that showed good discrimination, given that each increasing option became more likely than the previous as a function of increasing trait level. No gender-related DIF was found on any of the items. Conclusions All WHO-DAS II items were very good at assessing overall disability. Our results supported the appropriateness of the weights assigned to response option categories and showed an absence of gender differences in item functioning.

  1. Reevaluation of Stratospheric Ozone Trends From SAGE II Data Using a Simultaneous Temporal and Spatial Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damadeo, R. P.; Zawodny, J. M.; Thomason, L. W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper details a new method of regression for sparsely sampled data sets for use with time-series analysis, in particular the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II ozone data set. Non-uniform spatial, temporal, and diurnal sampling present in the data set result in biased values for the long-term trend if not accounted for. This new method is performed close to the native resolution of measurements and is a simultaneous temporal and spatial analysis that accounts for potential diurnal ozone variation. Results show biases, introduced by the way data is prepared for use with traditional methods, can be as high as 10%. Derived long-term changes show declines in ozone similar to other studies but very different trends in the presumed recovery period, with differences up to 2% per decade. The regression model allows for a variable turnaround time and reveals a hemispheric asymmetry in derived trends in the middle to upper stratosphere. Similar methodology is also applied to SAGE II aerosol optical depth data to create a new volcanic proxy that covers the SAGE II mission period. Ultimately this technique may be extensible towards the inclusion of multiple data sets without the need for homogenization.

  2. Construction and analysis of the transgenic carrot and celery plants expressing the recombinant thaumatin II protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luchakivska Yu. S.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim To obtain the transgenic carrot and celery plants able to express recombinant thaumatin II in order to increase plant stress tolerance. Methods. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of the carrot and celery seedlings was used for obtaining the transgenic plants. Presence and transcription of the transgene in plant tissues were proved by PCR and RT-PCR analysis. The plants were tested for the biotic stress tolerance by in vitro antifungal and antibacterial activity assays and for the salinity and osmotic stress tolerance by plant survival test in presence of NaCl and PEG in different concentrations. Results. Transgenic plants able to express recombinant thaumatin II gene (transcription proved for 60–100 % were obtained by agrobacterial transformation. The transgenic carrot plant extracts inhibited the growth of the studied phytopathogenic bacteria strains but exhibited no antifungal activity. Survival level of transgenic plants under the salinity and osmotic stress effect was definitely higher comparing to the untransgenic ones. The analysis of the photosynthetic pigment content in the transgenic carrot plants showed no significant difference of this parameter under salinity stress that may indicate a possible protective activity of the recombinant protein. Conclusions. The obtained in our study transgenic carrot and celery plants able to express the recombinant thaumatin II gene were characterized by antibacterial activity and increased tolerance to salinity and osmotic stress factors.

  3. TTF3 power coupler thermal analysis for LCLS-II CW operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, L. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS); Adolphsen, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS); Li, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS); Nantista, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS); Raubenheimer, T. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS); Solyak, N. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Gonin, I. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-05-13

    The TESLA 9-cell SRF cavity design has been adopted for use in the LCLS-II SRF Linac. Its TTF3 coaxial fundamental power coupler (FPC), optimized for pulsed operation in European XFEL and ILC, requires modest changes to make it suitable for LCLS-II continuous-wave (CW) operation. For LCLS-II it must handle up to 7 kW of power, fully reflected, with the maximum temperature around 450 K, the coupler bake temperature. In order to improve TTF3 FPC cooling, an increased copper plating thickness will be used on the inner conductor of the ‘warm’ section of the coupler. Also, the antenna will be shortened to achieve higher cavity Qext values. Fully 3D FPC thermal analysis has been performed using the SLAC-developed parallel finite element code suite ACE3P, which includes electromagnetic codes and an integrated electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical multi-physics code. In this paper, we present TTF3 FPC thermal analysis simulation results obtained using ACE3P as well as a comparison with measurement results.

  4. Synthesis, Characterization and Thermal Analysis of a New Acetic Acid (2-Hydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazide and its Complexes with Hg(II) and Pd(II)

    OpenAIRE

    Sahebalzamani, Hajar; GHAMMAMY, Shahriare; Dexhkam, Shaghayegh; Moghadam, Alireza Hemati; Siavoshifar, Farhod

    2011-01-01

    The new complexes have been synthesized by the reaction of Hg(II) and Pd(II) with acetic acid(2-hydroxy-benzylidene)- hydrazide (L). These new complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, H NMR spectroscopy and UV spectral techniques. The changes observed between the FT-IR, H NMR and UV-Vis spectra of the ligands and of the complexes allowed us to establish the coordination mode of the metal in complexes. Thermal properties, TG-DTA of these complexes were studied. TG- DTA and other...

  5. An Angiotensin II type 1 receptor activation switch patch revealed through Evolutionary Trace analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Yao, Rong; Ma, Jian-Nong

    2010-01-01

    in the cytoplasmic parts of TM2, TM3, and TM6 to form an activation switch that is common to all family A 7TM receptors. We tested this hypothesis in the rat Angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1a (AT1a) receptor. The receptor has important roles in the cardiovascular system, but has also frequently been applied as a model......) displayed phenotypes associated with changed activation state, such as increased agonist affinity or basal activity, promiscuous activation, or constitutive internalization highlighting the importance of testing different signaling pathways. We conclude that this evolutionary important patch mediates...... to be completely resolved. Evolutionary Trace (ET) analysis is a computational method, which identifies clusters of functionally important residues by integrating information on evolutionary important residue variations with receptor structure. Combined with known mutational data, ET predicted a patch of residues...

  6. High-Redshift Superwinds as the Source of the Strongest Mg II Absorbers A Feasibility Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, N A; Charlton, J C; Vogt, S S

    2001-01-01

    We present HIRES/Keck profiles of four extremely strong (W_r > 1.8 A) Mg II absorbers at 1 1.8 A evolve away from z = 2 to the present. We propose that a substantial fraction of these very strong absorbers are due to superwinds and that their evolution is related to the redshift evolution of star-forming galaxies. Based on the observed redshift number density of W_r > 1.8 A Mg II absorbers at 1 < z < 2, we explore whether it is realistic that superwinds from starbursting galaxies could give rise to these absorbers. Finally, we do an analysis of the superwind connection to damped Lya absorbers (DLAs). DLAs and superwinds evolve differently and usually have different kinematic structure, indicating that superwinds probably do not give rise to the majority of DLAs.

  7. Progress in accident analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, S; Latkowski, J F; Gomez del Rio, J; Sanz, J

    2000-10-11

    The present work continues our effort to perform an integrated safety analysis for the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant design. Recently we developed a base case for a severe accident scenario in order to calculate accident doses for HYLIFE-II. It consisted of a total loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in which all the liquid flibe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) was lost at the beginning of the accident. Results showed that the off-site dose was below the limit given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for public protection in case of accident, and that his dose was dominated by the tritium released during the accident.

  8. Compatibility Effects and Preference Reversals,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-21

    34 psychometric paradigm ," exploring the ability of psychophysical scaling methods and multivariate analysis techniques to produce meaningful...emerging. Researchers exploring the psychometric paradigm have typically asked -. people to judge the current riskiness (or safety) of diverse sets of

  9. Campylobacter jejuni fatty acid synthase II: Structural and functional analysis of [beta]-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase (FabZ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew S.; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Choi, Kyoung-Jae; Yeo, Hye-Jeong; (Houston)

    2009-08-14

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is crucial for all living cells. In contrast to higher organisms, bacteria use a type II fatty acid synthase (FAS II) composed of a series of individual proteins, making FAS II enzymes excellent targets for antibiotics discovery. The {beta}-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase (FabZ) catalyzes an essential step in the FAS II pathway. Here, we report the structure of Campylobacter jejuni FabZ (CjFabZ), showing a hexamer both in crystals and solution, with each protomer adopting the characteristic hot dog fold. Together with biochemical analysis of CjFabZ, we define the first functional FAS II enzyme from this pathogen, and provide a framework for investigation on roles of FAS II in C. jejuni virulence

  10. Analysis of a collagen II degradation protein C2C and a collagen II formation protein CP II in serum of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgallon, Conor P; Larsen, Scott; Wong, Alice; Yellowley, Clare

    2015-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is a major cause of chronic lameness in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in captivity worldwide. Radiology and other imaging technologies are of limited use in the early diagnosis of this condition in elephants. Collagen II is a major component of articular cartilage. The degradation and formation of collagen II can be monitored by the measurement of specific biomarkers in biologic fluids such as serum. It is possible that these biomarkers could also prove useful in identifying disease in elephants. In this study two commercially available immunoassays which measure a marker of collagen II degradation (C2C) and a marker of collagen II formation (CPII) were evaluated in Asian elephants. The ability of the assays to detect and measure C2C and CPII in the serum of Asian elephants was confirmed. Median serum concentration of C2C was 148 ng/L in nonlame elephants (n=33) and 91.2 ng/L in lame elephants (n=7). The difference was statistically significant (P=0.0002). Median serum concentration of CPII was 519.3 ng/L in nonlame elephants and 318.7 ng/L in lame elephants. The difference was also statistically significant (P=0.039). Whereas CPII concentrations in lame elephants mirrored findings from human and animal osteoarthritis studies, C2C concentrations did not. Further studies which evaluate these and other similar biomarkers are necessary to elucidate their usefulness in the diagnosis of osteoarthritis in proboscidae.

  11. Waste compatibility safety issues and final results for tank 241-SY-102 grab samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-08-14

    Three grab samples (2SY-96-1, 2SY-96-2, and 2SY-96-3) were taken from Riser 1A of Tank 241-SY 102 on January 14, 1997, and received by 222-S Laboratory on January 14, 1997. These samples were analyzed in accordance with Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farm Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) in support of the Waste Compatibility Program. No notifications were required based on sample results. Acetone analysis was not performed in accordance with Cancellation of Acetone Analysis for Tank 241-SY-102 Grab Samples.

  12. DOD Offshore Wind Mission Compatibility Assessments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set represents the results of analyses conducted by the Department of Defense to assess the compatibility of offshore wind development with military assets...

  13. Advanced Microgravity Compatible, Integrated Laundry System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An Advanced Microgravity Compatible, Integrated laundry System (AMCILS) is proposed that uses a two phase water / water vapor system to allow good agitation of...

  14. The evolution of polymorphic compatibility molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, R.J. de

    1995-01-01

    Several primitive colonial organisms distinguish self from nonself by means of polymorphic compatibility molecules bearing similarity to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The evolution of such polymorphisms is generally explained in terms of resistance to parasites. Ignoring parasites, I d

  15. Osmotically induced synthesis of the compatible solute hydroxyectoine is mediated by an evolutionarily conserved ectoine hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursy, Jan; Pierik, Antonio J; Pica, Nathalie; Bremer, Erhard

    2007-10-26

    By using natural abundance (13)C NMR spectroscopy, we investigated the types of compatible solutes synthesized in a variety of Bacilli under high salinity growth conditions. Glutamate, proline, and ectoine were the dominant compatible solutes synthesized by the various Bacillus species. The majority of the inspected Bacilli produced the tetrahydropyrimidine ectoine in response to high salinity stress, and a subset of these also synthesized a hydroxylation derivative of ectoine, 5-hydroxyectoine. In Salibacillus salexigens, a representative of the ectoine- and 5-hydroxyectoine-producing species, ectoine production was linearly correlated with the salinity of the growth medium and dependent on an ectABC biosynthetic operon. The formation of 5-hydroxyectoine was primarily a stationary growth phase phenomenon. The enzyme responsible for ectoine hydroxylation (EctD) was purified from S. salexigens to apparent homogeneity. The EctD protein was shown in vitro to directly hydroxylate ectoine in a reaction dependent on iron(II), molecular oxygen, and 2-oxoglutarate. We identified the structural gene (ectD) for the ectoine hydroxylase in S. salexigens. Northern blot analysis showed that the transcript levels of the ectABC and ectD genes increased as a function of salinity. Many EctD-related proteins can be found in data base searches in various Bacteria. Each of these bacterial species also contains an ectABC ectoine biosynthetic gene cluster, suggesting that 5-hydroxyectoine biosynthesis strictly depends on the prior synthesis of ectoine. Our data base searches and the biochemical characterization of the EctD protein from S. salexigens suggest that the EctD-related ectoine hydroxylases are members of a new subfamily within the non-heme-containing, iron(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily (EC 1.14.11).

  16. CMOS Compatible Ultra-Compact Modulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Kinsey, Nathaniel; Naik, Gururaj V.

    2014-01-01

    A planar layout for an ultra-compact plasmonic modulator is proposed and numerically investigated. Our device utilizes potentially CMOS compatible materials and can achieve 3-dB modulation in just 65nm and insertion loss <1dB at telecommunication wavelengths.......A planar layout for an ultra-compact plasmonic modulator is proposed and numerically investigated. Our device utilizes potentially CMOS compatible materials and can achieve 3-dB modulation in just 65nm and insertion loss

  17. Electromagnetic theory for electromagnetic compatibility engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Toh, Tze-Chuen

    2013-01-01

    Engineers and scientists who develop and install electronic devices and circuits need to have a solid understanding of electromagnetic theory and the electromagnetic behavior of devices and circuits. In particular, they must be well-versed in electromagnetic compatibility, which minimizes and controls the side effects of interconnected electric devices. Designed to entice the practical engineer to explore some worthwhile mathematical methods, and to reorient the theoretical scientist to industrial applications, Electromagnetic Theory for Electromagnetic Compatibility Engineers is based on the

  18. Joint SatOPS Compatibility Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Danford

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) participation in the interagency cooperation committee, the Joint SatOps Compatibility Committee (JSCC), and the compatible Sat 2 efforts. Part of GSFC's participation in the JSCC is to work with the Goddard Mission Systems Evolution Center (GMSEC) to provides a publish/subscribe framework to enable rapid integration of commercially available satellite control products.

  19. [Safety and electromagnetic compatibility in sanitary field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bini, M; Feroldi, P; Ferri, C; Ignesti, A; Olmi, R; Priori, S; Riminesi, C; Tobia, L

    2012-01-01

    In sanitary field and especially in a hospital, multiple sources of non ionizing radiation are used for diagnostic and therapeutic aims. In sanitary sector both workers and users are present at the same time, and in some cases general population could need higher protection than workers in relationship to the exposition to electromagnetic fields. In order to protect health and safety of patients, general population and workers of hospitals and with the aim to identify, analyze, evaluate and study its level of significance, electrical, magnetic and electromagnetic sources Research Italian project Si.C.E.O. (Safety And Electromagnetic Compatibility In Sanitary Field) was instituted. Target of our research project was to deepen risk of exposition elements with analysis of outdoor (e.g. power lines, transmission cabinets) and indoor (e.g. equipment for physical therapy) sources, located in sanitary structures and to verify the level exposition of workers and common population end the respect of specific regulation, and finally to define technical and organizational measures really useful for protection and reduction of risk.

  20. Fermi Bubbles under Dark Matter Scrutiny Part II: Particle Physics Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Wei-Chih; Xue, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of the gamma-ray photons collected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope reveals, after removal of astrophysical background, the existence of an excess towards the Galactic center. This excess peaks around few GeV, and its origin is compatible with the gamma-ray flux originating from Dark Matter annihilation. In this work we take a closer look on this interpretation; we investigate which kind of Dark Matter, and which type of interactions with the Standard Model fields are able to reproduce the observed signal. The structure of the paper is twofold. In the first part, we follow an effective field theory approach considering both fermionic and scalar Dark Matter. The computation of the relic density, the constraint imposed from the null result of direct searches, and the reliability of the effective field theory description allow us to single out only two viable dim-6 operators in the case of fermionic Dark Matter. In the second part, we analyze some concrete models. In particular, we find that the sc...

  1. Fermi Bubbles under Dark Matter Scrutiny Part II: Particle Physics Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Wei-Chih; Urbano, Alfredo [SISSA, via Bonomea 265, Trieste, I-34136 (Italy); Xue, Wei, E-mail: whuang@sissa.it, E-mail: alfredo.urbano@sissa.it, E-mail: wxue@sissa.it [INFN, sezione di Trieste, Trieste, I-34136 (Italy)

    2014-04-01

    The analysis of the gamma-ray photons collected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope reveals, after removal of astrophysical background, the existence of an excess towards the Galactic center. This excess peaks around few GeV, and its origin is compatible with the gamma-ray flux originating from Dark Matter annihilation. In this work we take a closer look on this interpretation; we investigate which kind of Dark Matter, and which type of interactions with the Standard Model fields are able to reproduce the observed signal. The structure of the paper is twofold. In the first part, we follow an effective field theory approach considering both fermionic and scalar Dark Matter. The computation of the relic density, the constraint imposed from the null result of direct searches, and the reliability of the effective field theory description allow us to single out only two viable dim-6 operators in the case of fermionic Dark Matter. In the second part, we analyze some concrete models. In particular, we find that the scalar Higgs portal can provide a simple, concrete and realistic scenario able to explain the GeV excess under scrutiny.

  2. Structural analysis and physico-chemical characterization of mononuclear manganese(II) and polynuclear copper(II) complexes with pyridine-based alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zienkiewicz-Machnik, Małgorzata; Masternak, Joanna; Kazimierczuk, Katarzyna; Barszcz, Barbara

    2016-12-01

    Two novel manganese(II) and copper(II) complexes, mononuclear [Mn(H2O)2(2-(CH2)2OHpy)2](NO3)2 (1) and polynuclear [Cu(SO4)(2-(CH2)2OHpy)2]n (2), based on 2-(hydroxyethyl)pyridine (2-(CH2)2OHpy) were synthesised and fully characterised using X-ray structure analysis as well as spectroscopic, magnetic and thermal methods. Both central metal ions Mn(1) and Cu(1) are coordinated by two N,O-donor 2-(CH2)2OHpy ligands and possess an almost perfect octahedral geometry (a chromophore of {MN2O4} type). The coordination sphere of Mn(II) is completed by two molecules of water, whereas, in polynuclear complex 2, Cu(II) atoms are linked along the a crystallographic direction by bridging sulfate ligands in a μ2-κ2 binding mode to form chains. The intermolecular interactions in 1 and 2 have been interpreted in view of the 3D Hirshfeld surface analysis and associated 2D fingerprint plots. Furthermore, the complexes have been tested with ABTSrad + assay in order to assess their antioxidant activity. In addition, the IC50 values calculated for 1 and 2 revealed that the complexes show a higher antioxidant activity than corresponding ligand.

  3. Multi-reverse flow injection analysis integrated with multi-optical sensor for simultaneous determination of Mn(II), Fe(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III) in natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngvises, Napaporn; Suwannasaroj, Kittigan; Jakmunee, Jaroon; AlSuhaimi, Awadh

    2017-05-01

    Multi-reverse flow injection analysis (Mr-FIA) integrated with multi-optical sensor was developed and optimized for the simultaneous determination of multi ions; Mn(II), Fe(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III) in water samples. The sample/standard solutions were propelled making use of a four channels peristaltic pump whereas 4 colorimetric reagents specific for the metal ions were separately injected in sample streams using multi-syringe pump. The color zones that formed in the individual mixing coils were then streamed into multi-channels spectrometer, which comprised of four flows through cell and four pairs of light emitting diode and photodiode, whereby signals were measured concurrently. The linearity range (along with detection limit, µgL(-1)) was 0.050-3.0(16), 0.30-2.0 (11), 0.050-1.0(12) and 0.10-1.0(50)mgL(-1), for Mn(II), Fe(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III), respectively. In the interim, the correlation coefficients were 0.9924-0.9942. The percentages relative standard deviation was less than 3. The proposed system was applied successfully to determine targeted metal ions simultaneously in natural water with high sample throughput and low reagent consumption, thus it satisfies the criteria of Green Analytical Chemistry (GAC) and its goals.

  4. Analysis of Solar Neutrino Data from Super-Kamiokande I and II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans J. Haubold

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We are going back to the roots of the original solar neutrino problem: the analysis of data from solar neutrino experiments. The application of standard deviation analysis (SDA and diffusion entropy analysis (DEA to the Super-Kamiokande I and II data reveals that they represent a non-Gaussian signal. The Hurst exponent is different from the scaling exponent of the probability density function, and both the Hurst exponent and scaling exponent of the probability density function of the Super-Kamiokande data deviate considerably from the value of 0.5, which indicates that the statistics of the underlying phenomenon is anomalous. To develop a road to the possible interpretation of this finding, we utilize Mathai’s pathway model and consider fractional reaction and fractional diffusion as possible explanations of the non-Gaussian content of the Super-Kamiokande data.

  5. Development and characterisation of disposable gold electrodes, and their use for lead(II) analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Mohd F. M. [Cranfield University, Cranfield Health, Silsoe (United Kingdom); Institute for Medical Research, Toxicology and Pharmacology Unit, Herbal Medicine Research Centre, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Tothill, Ibtisam E. [Cranfield University, Cranfield Health, Silsoe (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15

    There is an increasing need to assess the harmful effects of heavy-metal-ion pollution on the environment. The ability to detect and measure toxic contaminants on site using simple, cost effective, and field-portable sensors is an important aspect of environmental protection and facilitating rapid decision making. A screen-printed gold sensor in a three-electrode configuration has been developed for analysis of lead(II) by square-wave stripping voltammetry (SWSV). The working electrode was fabricated with gold ink deposited by use of thick-film technology. Conditions affecting the lead stripping response were characterised and optimized. Experimental data indicated that chloride ions are important in lead deposition and subsequent analysis with this type of sensor. A linear concentration range of 10-50 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 25-300 {mu}g L{sup -1} with detection limits of 2 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 5.8 {mu}g L{sup -1} were obtained for lead(II) for measurement times of four and two minutes, respectively. The electrodes can be reused up to 20 times after cleaning with 0.5 mol L{sup -1} sulfuric acid. Interference of other metals with the response to lead were also examined to optimize the sensor response for analysis of environmental samples. The analytical utility of the sensor was demonstrated by applying the system to a variety of wastewater and soil sample extracts from polluted sites. The results are sufficient evidence of the feasibility of using these screen-printed gold electrodes for the determination of lead(II) in wastewater and soil extracts. For comparison purposes a mercury-film electrode and ICP-MS were used for validation. (orig.)

  6. Spectrophotometric investigation of famotidine-Pd(II complex and its analytical application in drug analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DRAGICA MINIC

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available By using different spectrophotometric methods, it was found that famotidine and palladium(II ions form a complex, Pd(II : famotidine = 1:1, which has an absorption maximum at 345 nm. The formation of the complex between famotidine and palladium(II chloride in Britton–Robinson buffer solution in the pH range 2.23–8.50 was studied. The conditional stability constant of the complex at the optimum pH 2.62 and ionic strength 0.5 M was found to be log K’ = 3.742 ± 0.025. The Beer’s law was verified over the famotidine concentration range from 5×10-5 – 6×10-4 M. The proposed method was found to be suitable for accurate and sensitive analysis of famotidine both as the substance (RSD = 1.02–1.80 % and its dosage forms (RSD = 1.75–1.83 %.

  7. Analysis of solvation and structural contributions in spectral characteristics of dipyrrin Zn(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfin, Yu S; Rumyantsev, E V

    2014-09-15

    Photophysical characteristics of several alkylated dipyrrin Zn(II) complexes in organic solvents were analyzed. Relations between spectral properties of complexes and physical-chemical parameters of solvents were determined with the use of linear regression analysis method. Each solvent parameter contribution in investigated spectral characteristics was estimated. Spectral properties of complexes under study depend on the specific interactions of zinc with the solvent molecules by specific axial coordination. Increasing of alkyl substitution lead to the bathochromic shifts in spectra due to the positive induction effect of alkyl groups.

  8. Synthesis, Characterization and Thermal Analysis of New Cu(II) Complexes with Hydrazide Ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Saber Rajaei; Shahriare Ghammamy; Kheyrollah Mehrani; Hajar Sahebalzamani

    2010-01-01

    A number of new complexes have been synthesized by reaction of novel ligands acetic acid(4-methyl-benzylidene)hydrazide (L1) and acetic acid(naphthalen-1-ylmethylene)hydrazide (L2) with copper(II) nitrate. These new compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, TG, DTA, IR spectroscopy, UV spectral techniques. The changes observed between the FT-IR and UV-Vis spectra of the ligands and of the complexes allowed us to establish the coordination mode of the metal in complexes. The results ...

  9. Analysis of solvation and structural contributions in spectral characteristics of dipyrrin Zn(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfin, Yu. S.; Rumyantsev, E. V.

    2014-09-01

    Photophysical characteristics of several alkylated dipyrrin Zn(II) complexes in organic solvents were analyzed. Relations between spectral properties of complexes and physical-chemical parameters of solvents were determined with the use of linear regression analysis method. Each solvent parameter contribution in investigated spectral characteristics was estimated. Spectral properties of complexes under study depend on the specific interactions of zinc with the solvent molecules by specific axial coordination. Increasing of alkyl substitution lead to the bathochromic shifts in spectra due to the positive induction effect of alkyl groups.

  10. Stability of Class II fixed functional appliance therapy—a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bremen, Julia; Ruf, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives: To systematically search for scientific evidence concerning the stability of treatment (Tx) results achieved by means of Class II fixed functional appliance therapy and to assess possible differences between appliances. Search Methods: An electronic search of databases and orthodontic journals was carried out (until December 2013), with supplemental hand searching. In addition to the names of all identified appliances, the term fixed functional was used in combination with each of the following search terms: long-term, post-Tx, relapse, retention, stability. Selection Criteria: To be included in the review, the articles had to contain clear data on: Class II Tx with a fixed functional appliance (>5 patients), post-Tx period ≥ 1 year, assessment of ANB angle, Wits appraisal, molar relationship, soft-tissue profile convexity excluding the nose, overjet and/or overbite. Data Collection and Analysis: The literature search revealed 20 scientific investigations which corresponded to only two of the 76 identified appliances (Herbst and Twin Force Bite Corrector). As only one publication was found for the Twin Force Bite Corrector, a meta-analysis could only be performed for Herbst Tx. The data were extracted, pooled and weighted according to the number of patients in each study. Results: The mean values for post-Tx relapse (percentages relative to the Tx changes) were: ANB angle 0.2 degrees (12.4 per cent), Wits appraisal 0.5mm (19.5 per cent), sagittal molar relationship 1.2mm/0.1 cusp widths (21.8 per cent /6.5 per cent); soft-tissue profile convexity excluding nose less than 0.1 degrees (1.0 per cent), overjet 1.8mm (26.2 per cent), overbite Class II:1 1.4mm (44.7 per cent), overbite Class II:2 1.0mm (22.2 per cent). Conclusions: The scientific evidence concerning the stability of Tx results is inexistent for most fixed functional appliances for Class II correction except for Herbst appliance Tx. Even if the evidence level of most included studies

  11. HYDRA-II: A hydrothermal analysis computer code: Volume 3, Verification/validation assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, R.A.; Lowery, P.S.

    1987-10-01

    HYDRA-II is a hydrothermal computer code capable of three-dimensional analysis of coupled conduction, convection, and thermal radiation problems. This code is especially appropriate for simulating the steady-state performance of spent fuel storage systems. The code has been evaluated for this application for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. HYDRA-II provides a finite difference solution in cartesian coordinates to the equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. A cylindrical coordinate system may also be used to enclose the cartesian coordinate system. This exterior coordinate system is useful for modeling cylindrical cask bodies. The difference equations for conservation of momentum are enhanced by the incorporation of directional porosities and permeabilities that aid in modeling solid structures whose dimensions may be smaller than the computational mesh. The equation for conservation of energy permits modeling of orthotropic physical properties and film resistances. Several automated procedures are available to model radiation transfer within enclosures and from fuel rod to fuel rod. The documentation of HYDRA-II is presented in three separate volumes. Volume I - Equations and Numerics describes the basic differential equations, illustrates how the difference equations are formulated, and gives the solution procedures employed. Volume II - User's Manual contains code flow charts, discusses the code structure, provides detailed instructions for preparing an input file, and illustrates the operation of the code by means of a model problem. This volume, Volume III - Verification/Validation Assessments, provides a comparison between the analytical solution and the numerical simulation for problems with a known solution. This volume also documents comparisons between the results of simulations of single- and multiassembly storage systems and actual experimental data. 11 refs., 55 figs., 13 tabs.

  12. Run II Analysis Framework and Intial Validation Studies for $H \\rightarrow ZZ^{*} \\rightarrow 4\\ell$ Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Abidi, Syed Haider

    This undergraduate thesis focuses on the development of a user analysis framework for the ATLAS Run 2 $H \\rightarrow ZZ^{*} \\rightarrow 4\\ell$ analysis. The Run 1 analysis model is investigated and requirements and constraints for a new model are derived. Based on these and the new ATLAS software upgrades, the design of a new code base is outlined and implemented. Initial validation studies using this framework are also presented.

  13. Evaluating the compatibility of multi-functional and intensive urban land uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleai, M.; Sharifi, A.; Sliuzas, R.; Mesgari, M.

    2007-12-01

    This research is aimed at developing a model for assessing land use compatibility in densely built-up urban areas. In this process, a new model was developed through the combination of a suite of existing methods and tools: geographical information system, Delphi methods and spatial decision support tools: namely multi-criteria evaluation analysis, analytical hierarchy process and ordered weighted average method. The developed model has the potential to calculate land use compatibility in both horizontal and vertical directions. Furthermore, the compatibility between the use of each floor in a building and its neighboring land uses can be evaluated. The method was tested in a built-up urban area located in Tehran, the capital city of Iran. The results show that the model is robust in clarifying different levels of physical compatibility between neighboring land uses. This paper describes the various steps and processes of developing the proposed land use compatibility evaluation model (CEM).

  14. A Hybrid Grey Relational Analysis and Nondominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm-II for Project Portfolio Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshad Faezy Razi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Project selection and formation of an optimal portfolio of selected projects are among the main challenges of project management. For this purpose, several factors and indicators are simultaneously examined considering the terms and conditions of the decision problem. Obviously, both qualitative and quantitative factors may influence the formation of a portfolio of projects. In this study, the projects were first ranked using grey relational analysis to form an optimal portfolio of projects and to create an expert system for the final project selection. Because of the fuzzy nature of the environmental risk of each project, the environmental risk was predicted and analyzed using the fuzzy inference system and failure mode and effect analysis based on fuzzy rules. Then, the rank and risk of each project were optimized using a two-objective zero-one mathematical programming model considering the practical constraints of the decision problem through the nondominated sorting genetic algorithm-II (NSGA-II. A case study was used to discuss the practical methodology for selecting a portfolio of projects.

  15. Analysis of Early Severe Accident Initiated by LBLOCA for Qinshan Phase II Nuclear Power Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Xing-Wei

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to simulate an early Severe Accident (SA scenario more detail through transferring the thermal-hydraulic status of the plant predicted by RELAP5 computer code to SA Program (SAP. Based on the criterion of date extract time, the RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic calculation data is extracted to form a file for SAP input card at 1477K of cladding surface. Relying on the thermal-hydraulic boundary parameters calculated by RELAP5 code, analysis of early SA initiated by the Large Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LBLOCA without mitigation measures for Qinshan Phase II Nuclear Power Plant (QSP-II performed by SAP through finding the key events of accident sequence, estimating the amount of hydrogen generation and oxidation behavior of the cladding and evaluating the relocation order of the materials collapsed in the central region of the core. The results of this study are expected to improve the SA analysis methodology more detail through analyzing early SA scenario.

  16. Genome-wide analysis of KAP1, the 7SK snRNP complex, and RNA polymerase II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P. McNamara

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The transition of RNA polymerase II (Pol II from transcription initiation into productive elongation in eukaryotic cells is regulated by the P-TEFb kinase, which phosphorylates the C-terminal domain of paused Pol II at promoter-proximal regions. Our recent study found that P-TEFb (in an inhibited state bound to the 7SK snRNP complex interacts with the KAP1/TRIM28 transcriptional regulator, and that KAP1 and the 7SK snRNP co-occupy most gene promoters containing paused Pol II. Here we provide a detailed experimental description and analysis of the ChIP-seq datasets that have been deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO: GS72622, so that independent groups can replicate and expand upon these findings. We propose these datasets would provide valuable information for researchers studying mechanisms of transcriptional regulation including Pol II pausing and pause release.

  17. Synthesis, Characterization and Thermal Analysis of New Cu(II Complexes with Hydrazide Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber Rajaei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of new complexes have been synthesized by reaction of novel ligands acetic acid(4-methyl-benzylidenehydrazide (L1 and acetic acid(naphthalen-1-ylmethylenehydrazide (L2 with copper(II nitrate. These new compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, TG, DTA, IR spectroscopy, UV spectral techniques. The changes observed between the FT-IR and UV-Vis spectra of the ligands and of the complexes allowed us to establish the coordination mode of the metal in complexes. The results suggest that the Schiff bases L1 and L2 coordinate as univalent anions with their bidentate N,O donors derived from the carbonyl and azomethine nitrogen. Also the probing of thermal analysis complexes can detect which complex has excellent thermal stability.

  18. Polarization Analysis Equipment in SANS-J-II: Study of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane for Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Yohei; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Putra, Ananda; Koizumi, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Yoshifumi; Oku, Takayuki; Suzuki, Jun-ichi

    In small angle neutron scattering spectrometer, SANS-J-II at Japan Research Reactor No. 3 (JRR-3), a polarization analysis setup has been equipped, which is composed of transmission-type supermirror polarizer, radial-bender-type supermirror analyzer, π flipper, and solenoids for generating guide magnetic field. This setup was applied to the structural study of polymer electrolyte membrane, Nafion under water-swollen state. The sample is known to exhibit several characteristic peaks at wide angle region, which is related to water transporting channels. By use of polarization analysis technique, the coherent and incoherent contributions were successfully separated. Consequently, we obtained reliable information about decaying power law of ionic cluster peak and the shape of the broad peak, relating to ordering with short distance (5.6 Å).

  19. Stability of Class II fixed functional appliance therapy--a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Niko C; von Bremen, Julia; Ruf, Sabine

    2016-04-01

    To systematically search for scientific evidence concerning the stability of treatment (Tx) results achieved by means of Class II fixed functional appliance therapy and to assess possible differences between appliances. An electronic search of databases and orthodontic journals was carried out (until December 2013), with supplemental hand searching. In addition to the names of all identified appliances, the term fixed functional was used in combination with each of the following search terms: long-term, post-Tx, relapse, retention, stability. To be included in the review, the articles had to contain clear data on: Class II Tx with a fixed functional appliance (>5 patients), post-Tx period ≥ 1 year, assessment of ANB angle, Wits appraisal, molar relationship, soft-tissue profile convexity excluding the nose, overjet and/or overbite. The literature search revealed 20 scientific investigations which corresponded to only two of the 76 identified appliances (Herbst and Twin Force Bite Corrector). As only one publication was found for the Twin Force Bite Corrector, a meta-analysis could only be performed for Herbst Tx. The data were extracted, pooled and weighted according to the number of patients in each study. The mean values for post-Tx relapse (percentages relative to the Tx changes) were: ANB angle 0.2 degrees (12.4 per cent), Wits appraisal 0.5mm (19.5 per cent), sagittal molar relationship 1.2mm/0.1 cusp widths (21.8 per cent /6.5 per cent); soft-tissue profile convexity excluding nose less than 0.1 degrees (1.0 per cent), overjet 1.8mm (26.2 per cent), overbite Class II:1 1.4mm (44.7 per cent), overbite Class II:2 1.0mm (22.2 per cent). The scientific evidence concerning the stability of Tx results is inexistent for most fixed functional appliances for Class II correction except for Herbst appliance Tx. Even if the evidence level of most included studies is rather low, good dentoskeletal stability without clinically relevant changes was found for most

  20. Materials Compatibility in High Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostowski, Rudy

    1999-01-01

    Previous ratings of the compatibility of high test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) with materials are not adequate for current needs. The goal of this work was to develop a new scheme of evaluation of compatibility of HTP with various materials. Procedures were developed to enrich commercially available hydrogen peroxide to 90% concentration and to assay the product. Reactivity testing, accelerated aging of materials and calorimetry studies were done on HTP with representative metallic and non-metallic materials. It was found that accelerated aging followed by concentration determination using refractive index effectively discriminated between different Class 2 metallic materials. Preliminary experiments using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) suggest that a calorimetry experiment is the most sensitive means to assay the compatibility of HTP with materials.

  1. Batch Processing of CMOS Compatible Feedthroughs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, F.E.; Heschel, M.; Hansen, Ole

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a technique for batch fabrication of electrical feedthroughs in CMOS wafers. The presented process is designed with specific attention on industrial applicability. The electrical feedthroughs are processed entirely by low temperature, CMOS compatible processes. Hence, the proc......This paper presents a technique for batch fabrication of electrical feedthroughs in CMOS wafers. The presented process is designed with specific attention on industrial applicability. The electrical feedthroughs are processed entirely by low temperature, CMOS compatible processes. Hence....... The feedthrough technology employs a simple solution to the well-known CMOS compatibility issue of KOH by protecting the CMOS side of the wafer using sputter deposited TiW/Au. The fabricated feedthroughs exhibit excellent electrical performance having a serial resistance of 40 mOmega and a parasitic capacitance...

  2. Physics Metacognition Inventory Part II: Confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Bailey, MarLynn; Farley, John

    2015-11-01

    The Physics Metacognition Inventory was developed to measure physics students' metacognition for problem solving. In one of our earlier studies, an exploratory factor analysis provided evidence of preliminary construct validity, revealing six components of students' metacognition when solving physics problems including knowledge of cognition, planning, monitoring, evaluation, debugging, and information management. The college students' scores on the inventory were found to be reliable and related to students' physics motivation and physics grade. However, the results of the exploratory factor analysis indicated that the questionnaire could be revised to improve its construct validity. The goal of this study was to revise the questionnaire and establish its construct validity through a confirmatory factor analysis. In addition, a Rasch analysis was applied to the data to better understand the psychometric properties of the inventory and to further evaluate the construct validity. Results indicated that the final, revised inventory is a valid, reliable, and efficient tool for assessing student metacognition for physics problem solving.

  3. Multi- Physics analysis of the RFQ for the Injector Scheme II of CADS Driver Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Jing, Wang; Yuan, He; Xiao-Qi, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    A 162.5 MHz, 2.1 MeV Radio Frequency Quadruples (RFQ) structure is being designed for the Injector Scheme II of China Accelerator Driver System (CADS) driver linac. The RFQ will operate at continuous wave (CW) mode as required. For the CW normal conducting machine, the heat management will be one of the most important issues, since the temperature fluctuation may cause cavity deformation and leading to the resonant frequency shift. Therefor a detailed multi-physics analysis is necessary to ensure that the cavity can be stably worked at the required power level. The multi-physics analysis process includes RF Electromagnetic analysis, Thermal analysis, Mechnical analysis, and this process will be iterated for several cycles until the satisfied solution can be found. As one of the widely accepted measures, the cooling water system is used for frequency fine tunning, so the tunning capability of the cooling water system is also studied at different conditions. The results indicate that with the cooling water syst...

  4. Study of the influence of PPO in the compatibility of the system PA6/PC/PPO through nuclear magnetic resonance II - Composition changes in the PA6/PC/PPO system; Estudo da afluencia do PPo na compatibilidade do sistema PA6/PC/PPO atraves de espectrometria de resonancia magnetica nuclear. II - Mudanca na composicao do sistema PA6/PC/PPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Dilma Alves; Oliveira, Clara Marize F.; Tavares, Maria Ines Bruno [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas; Menezes, Sonia M.C. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisa

    1997-12-31

    This work aims to study the influence in the quantities of poly(propylene oxide) in the miscibility of the system 6-poly-amide/ poly - carbonate / poly (propylene oxide). NMR was used as chemical instrumental technique for the analysis. Results are presented 15 refs.

  5. Analysis of the dynamic response in the railway vehicles to the track vertical irregularities. Part II: The numerical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dumitriu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the dynamic response of a two-bogie vehicle to the symmetrical and antisymmetrical excitations, due to bounce and pitch of the axles’ planes, derived from the track vertical irregularities. Part I introduced the theoretical model and the response functions of the vehicle, as well as the theoretical elements required for the analysis of the dynamic response of the vehicle to the track stochastic irregularities. Part II comprises the results of the numerical analysis of the vehicle dynamic response in three reference points of the carbody, based on which a series of properties of the vertical vibrations behaviour of the railway vehicle is pointed out at. The excitation modes that trigger the carbody response in its reference points are identified. Hence, the influence of the geometrical filtering effect of the excitation modes upon the ride quality and ride comfort is established.

  6. Compatibility Between Electric Components in Wind Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdyk, Andrzej; Holbøll, Joachim; Arana Aristi, Iván

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes a method for investigation of the compatibility between electric components in wind farms by identifying critical resonances at different points of an offshore wind farm (OWF), based on systematic variation of critical parameters. In this way, the design of future OWF can...... be improved at a very early stage of the process. It is also revealed what parameters are the most important ones when considering compatibility. It was observed that a change of capacitance in the collection grid shifts the resonance peaks. A change in WT transformer capacitances influences the admittance...

  7. Compatibility and testing of electronic components

    CERN Document Server

    Jowett, C E

    2013-01-01

    Compatibility and Testing of Electronic Components outlines the concepts of component part life according to thresholds of failure; the advantages that result from identifying such thresholds; their identification; and the various tests used in their detection. The book covers topics such as the interconnection of miniature passive components; the integrated circuit compatibility and its components; the semiconductor joining techniques; and the thin film hybrid approach in integrated circuits. Also covered are topics such as thick film resistors, conductors, and insulators; thin inlays for el

  8. Final safety analysis addendum to hazard summary report, experimental breeder reactor No. II (EBR-II): the EBR-II cover-gas cleanup system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryer, R M; Monson, L R; Price, C C; Hooker, D W

    1979-04-01

    This report evaluates abnormal and accident conditions postulated for the EBR-II cover-gas cleanup system (CGCS). Major considerations include loss of CGCS function with a high level of cover-gas activity, loss of the liquid-nitrogen coolant required for removing fission products from the cover gas, contamination of the cover gas from sources other than the reactor, and loss of system pressure boundary. Calculated exposures resulting from the maximum hypothetical accident (MHA) are less than 2% of the 25-Rem limit stipulated in U.S. Regulation 10 CFR 100; i.e., a person standing at any point on an exclusion boundary (area radius of 600 m) for 2 h following onset of the postulated release would receive less than 0.45 Rem whole-body dose. The on-site whole-body dose (10 m from the source) would be less than 16 Rem.

  9. HYDRA-II: A hydrothermal analysis computer code: Volume 2, User's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, R.A.; Lowery, P.S.; Lessor, D.L.

    1987-09-01

    HYDRA-II is a hydrothermal computer code capable of three-dimensional analysis of coupled conduction, convection, and thermal radiation problems. This code is especially appropriate for simulating the steady-state performance of spent fuel storage systems. The code has been evaluated for this application for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. HYDRA-II provides a finite-difference solution in cartesian coordinates to the equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. A cylindrical coordinate system may also be used to enclose the cartesian coordinate system. This exterior coordinate system is useful for modeling cylindrical cask bodies. The difference equations for conservation of momentum incorporate directional porosities and permeabilities that are available to model solid structures whose dimensions may be smaller than the computational mesh. The equation for conservation of energy permits modeling of orthotropic physical properties and film resistances. Several automated methods are available to model radiation transfer within enclosures and from fuel rod to fuel rod. The documentation of HYDRA-II is presented in three separate volumes. Volume 1 - Equations and Numerics describes the basic differential equations, illustrates how the difference equations are formulated, and gives the solution procedures employed. This volume, Volume 2 - User's Manual, contains code flow charts, discusses the code structure, provides detailed instructions for preparing an input file, and illustrates the operation of the code by means of a sample problem. The final volume, Volume 3 - Verification/Validation Assessments, provides a comparison between the analytical solution and the numerical simulation for problems with a known solution. 6 refs.

  10. Spectral energy distribution analysis of class I and class II FU Orionis stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gramajo, Luciana V.; Gómez, Mercedes [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina, Laprida 854, 5000 Córdoba (Argentina); Rodón, Javier A., E-mail: luciana@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: mercedes@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: jrodon@eso.org [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile)

    2014-06-01

    FU Orionis stars (FUors) are eruptive pre-main sequence objects thought to represent quasi-periodic or recurring stages of enhanced accretion during the low-mass star-forming process. We characterize the sample of known and candidate FUors in a homogeneous and consistent way, deriving stellar and circumstellar parameters for each object. We emphasize the analysis in those parameters that are supposed to vary during the FUor stage. We modeled the spectral energy distributions of 24 of the 26 currently known FUors, using the radiative transfer code of Whitney et al. We compare our models with those obtained by Robitaille et al. for Taurus class II and I sources in quiescence periods by calculating the cumulative distribution of the different parameters. FUors have more massive disks: we find that ∼80% of the disks in FUors are more massive than any Taurus class II and I sources in the sample. Median values for the disk mass accretion rates are ∼10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} versus ∼10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for standard young stellar objects (YSOs) and FUors, respectively. While the distributions of envelope mass accretion rates for class I FUors and standard class I objects are similar, FUors, on average, have higher envelope mass accretion rates than standard class II and class I sources. Most FUors (∼70%) have envelope mass accretion rates above 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. In contrast, 60% of the classical YSO sample has an accretion rate below this value. Our results support the current scenario in which changes experimented by the circumstellar disk explain the observed properties of these stars. However, the increase in the disk mass accretion rate is smaller than theoretically predicted, although in good agreement with previous determinations.

  11. Synthesis, Characterization and Thermal Analysis of a New Acetic Acid (2-Hydroxy-benzylidene-hydrazide and its Complexes with Hg(II and Pd(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Sahebalzamani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The new complexes have been synthesized by the reaction of Hg(II and Pd(II with acetic acid(2-hydroxy-benzylidene- hydrazide (L. These new complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, H NMR spectroscopy and UV spectral techniques. The changes observed between the FT-IR, H NMR and UV-Vis spectra of the ligands and of the complexes allowed us to establish the coordination mode of the metal in complexes. Thermal properties, TG-DTA of these complexes were studied. TG- DTA and other analytical methods have been applied to the investigation of the thermal behavior and structure of the compounds [M(L2]Cl2 M= Hg, Pd. Thermal decomposition of these compounds is multi-stage processes.

  12. Computational analysis of the MCoTI-II plant defence knottin reveals a novel intermediate conformation that facilitates trypsin binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter M.; George, Anthony M.

    2016-03-01

    MCoTI-I and II are plant defence proteins, potent trypsin inhibitors from the bitter gourd Momordica cochinchinensis. They are members of the Knottin Family, which display exceptional stability due to unique topology comprising three interlocked disulfide bridges. Knottins show promise as scaffolds for new drug development. A crystal structure of trypsin-bound MCoTI-II suggested that loop 1, which engages the trypsin active site, would show decreased dynamics in the bound state, an inference at odds with an NMR analysis of MCoTI-I, which revealed increased dynamics of loop 1 in the presence of trypsin. To investigate this question, we performed unrestrained MD simulations of trypsin-bound and free MCoTI-II. This analysis found that loop 1 of MCoTI-II is not more dynamic in the trypsin-bound state than in the free state. However, it revealed an intermediate conformation, transitional between the free and bound MCoTI-II states. The data suggest that MCoTI-II binding involves a process in which initial interaction with trypsin induces transitions between the free and intermediate conformations, and fluctuations between these states account for the increase in dynamics of loop 1 observed for trypsin-bound MCoTI-I. The MD analysis thus revealed new aspects of the inhibitors’ dynamics that may be of utility in drug design.

  13. Supramolecular architectures in luminescent Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes containing imidazole derivatives: Crystal structures, vibrational and thermal properties, Hirshfeld surface analysis and electrostatic potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Santo, Alejandro; Echeverría, Gustavo A.; Piro, Oscar E.; Pérez, Hiram; Ben Altabef, Aida; Gil, Diego M.

    2017-04-01

    Three novel zinc and cadmium complexes with 1-methylimidazole and 2-methylimidazole as ligands, mono-nuclear dichloro-bis(1-methylimidazole) zinc(II) and dibromo-bis(2-methylimidazole)cadmium(II) monohydrate complexes, and poly-nuclear bis(1-methylimidazole)-di-(μ2-bromo)cadmium(II) complex, namely, compounds 1-3, respectively, have been synthesized. The complexes were characterized by IR and Raman spectroscopies, thermal analysis and fluorescence. All the compounds exhibit interesting luminescent properties in solid state originated from intra-ligand (π→π*) transitions. Crystal structures of 1-3 were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 crystallizes in P21/n space group, the Zn(II) ion lies at a crystal general position in a tetrahedral environment, and the mono-nuclear units are weakly bonded to one another by Csbnd H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds. Compound 2 crystallizes in Pnma space group, and mirror-related tetrahedral units around Cd(II) ion are H-bonded through a water molecule. Compound 3 crystallizes in P21/c space group, and the Cd(II) ion presents a centrosymmetric octahedral coordination. Neighboring and equatorial edge-sharing octahedra conform a polymeric arrangement that extends along the crystal a-axis. Weak hydrogen bonds are the major driving forces in the crystal packing of the three complexes. Hirshfeld surface analysis reveals a detailed scrutiny of intermolecular interactions experienced by each complex. The surfaces mapped over dnorm property highlight the X···H (X = Cl, Br) as the main intermolecular contacts for the three complexes, being also relevant the presence of O⋯H contacts for complex 2. The surfaces mapped over Shape index and curvedness properties for the two Cd complexes allow identify π … π stacking interactions which are absent in the Zn complex. 2D fingerprint plots have been used to quantify the relative contribution of the intermolecular contacts to crystal stability of compounds, showing

  14. 14 CFR 150.23 - Noise compatibility programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Noise compatibility programs. 150.23... (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT NOISE COMPATIBILITY PLANNING Development of Noise Exposure Maps and Noise Compatibility Programs § 150.23 Noise compatibility programs. (a) Any airport operator who has submitted...

  15. 47 CFR 76.1622 - Consumer education program on compatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Consumer education program on compatibility. 76... compatibility. Cable system operators shall provide a consumer education program on compatibility matters to..., cable system operators shall briefly explain, the types of channel compatibility problems that...

  16. 46 CFR 150.150 - Exceptions to the compatibility chart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exceptions to the compatibility chart. 150.150 Section... CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.150 Exceptions to the compatibility chart. The Commandant (G-MSO... 1, the Compatibility Chart....

  17. Physics Metacognition Inventory Part Ii: Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Rasch Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Bailey, MarLynn; Farley, John

    2015-01-01

    The Physics Metacognition Inventory was developed to measure physics students' metacognition for problem solving. In one of our earlier studies, an exploratory factor analysis provided evidence of preliminary construct validity, revealing six components of students' metacognition when solving physics problems including knowledge of cognition,…

  18. Physics Metacognition Inventory Part Ii: Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Rasch Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Bailey, MarLynn; Farley, John

    2015-01-01

    The Physics Metacognition Inventory was developed to measure physics students' metacognition for problem solving. In one of our earlier studies, an exploratory factor analysis provided evidence of preliminary construct validity, revealing six components of students' metacognition when solving physics problems including knowledge of cognition,…

  19. The Tracking Meteogram, an AWIPS II Tool for Time-Series Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Jason Eric; Sperow, Ken

    2015-01-01

    A new tool has been developed for the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) II through collaboration between NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) and the NWS Meteorological Development Laboratory (MDL). Referred to as the "Tracking Meteogram", the tool aids NWS forecasters in assessing meteorological parameters associated with moving phenomena. The tool aids forecasters in severe weather situations by providing valuable satellite and radar derived trends such as cloud top cooling rates, radial velocity couplets, reflectivity, and information from ground-based lightning networks. The Tracking Meteogram tool also aids in synoptic and mesoscale analysis by tracking parameters such as the deepening of surface low pressure systems, changes in surface or upper air temperature, and other properties. The tool provides a valuable new functionality and demonstrates the flexibility and extensibility of the NWS AWIPS II architecture. In 2014, the operational impact of the tool was formally evaluated through participation in the NOAA/NWS Operations Proving Ground (OPG), a risk reduction activity to assess performance and operational impact of new forecasting concepts, tools, and applications. Performance of the Tracking Meteogram Tool during the OPG assessment confirmed that it will be a valuable asset to the operational forecasters. This presentation reviews development of the Tracking Meteogram tool, performance and feedback acquired during the OPG activity, and future goals for continued support and extension to other application areas.

  20. Analysis of the interaction of deuterium plasmas with tungsten in the Fuego-Nuevo II device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Gonzalo; Castillo, Fermín; Nieto, Martín; Martínez, Marco; Rangel, José; Herrera-Velázquez, Julio

    2012-10-01

    Tungsten is one of the main candidate materials for plasma-facing components in future fusion power plants. The Fuego-Nuevo II, a plasma focus device, which can produce dense magnetized helium and deuterium plasmas, has been adapted to address plasma-facing materials questions. In this paper we present results of tungsten targets exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Fuego Nuevo II device, using different experimental conditions. The plasma generated and accelerated in the coaxial gun is expected to have, before the pinch, energies of the order of hundreds eV and velocities of the order of 40,000 m s-1. At the pinch, the ions are reported to have energies of the order of 1.5 keV at most. The samples, analysed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in cross section show a damage profile to depths of the order of 580 nm, which are larger than those expected for ions with 1.5 keV, and may be evidence of ion acceleration. An analysis with the SRIM (Stopping Range of Ions in Matter) package calculations is shown.

  1. SED analysis of class I and class II FU Orionis stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gramajo, Luciana V; Gómez, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    FU Orionis stars (FUORS) are eruptive pre-main sequence objects thought to represent quasi-periodic or recurring stages of enhanced accretion during the low-mass star-forming process. We characterize the sample of known and candidate FUORS in an homogeneous and consistent way, deriving stellar and circumstellar parameters for each object. We emphasize the analysis in those parameters that are supposed to vary during the FUORS stage. We modeled the SEDs of 24 of the 26 currently known FUORS, using the radiative transfer code of Whitney et al (2003b). We compare our models with those obtained by Robitaille et al. (2007) for Taurus class II and I sources in quiescence periods, by calculating the cumulative distribution of the different parameters. FUORS have more massive disks: we find that $\\sim80\\%$ of the disks in FUORS are more massive than any Taurus class II and I sources in the sample. Median values for the disk mass accretion rates are ~ 1.e-7 Msun/yr vs ~ 1.e-5 Msun/yr for standard YSOs (young stellar o...

  2. Synthesis, Spectroscopy, Thermal Analysis, Magnetic Properties and Biological Activity Studies of Cu(II and Co(II Complexes with Schiff Base Dye Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Amani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Three azo group-containing Schiff base ligands, namely 1-{3-[(3-hydroxy-propyliminomethyl]-4-hydroxyphenylazo}-4-nitrobenzene (2a, 1-{3-[(3-hydroxypropyl-iminomethyl]-4-hydroxyphenylazo}-2-chloro-4-nitrobenzene (2b and 1-{3-[(3-hydroxy-propyliminomethyl]-4-hydroxyphenylazo}-4-chloro-3-nitrobenzene (2c were prepared. The ligands were characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, 13C- and 1H-NMR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Next the corresponding copper(II and cobalt(II metal complexes were synthesized and characterized by the physicochemical and spectroscopic methods of elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, magnetic moment measurements, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and (DSC. The room temperature effective magnetic moments of complexes are 1.45, 1.56, 1.62, 2.16, 2.26 and 2.80 B.M. for complexes 3a, 3b, 3c, 4a 4b, and 4c, respectively, indicating that the complexes are paramagnetic with considerable electronic communication between the two metal centers.

  3. Synthesis, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, magnetic properties and biological activity studies of Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes with Schiff base dye ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Raziyeh Arab; Amani, Saeid

    2012-05-29

    Three azo group-containing Schiff base ligands, namely 1-{3-[(3-hydroxypropylimino) methyl]-4-hydroxyphenylazo}-4-nitrobenzene (2a), 1-{3-[(3-hydroxypropylimino) methyl]-4-hydroxyphenylazo}-2-chloro-4-nitrobenzene (2b) and 1-{3-[(3-hydroxypropylimino) methyl]-4-hydroxyphenylazo}-4-chloro-3-nitrobenzene (2c) were prepared. The ligands were characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, ¹³C- and ¹H-NMR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Next the corresponding copper(II) and cobalt(II) metal complexes were synthesized and characterized by the physicochemical and spectroscopic methods of elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, magnetic moment measurements, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and (DSC). The room temperature effective magnetic moments of complexes are 1.45, 1.56, 1.62, 2.16, 2.26 and 2.80 B.M. for complexes 3a, 3b, 3c, 4a 4b, and 4c, respectively, indicating that the complexes are paramagnetic with considerable electronic communication between the two metal centers.

  4. Damage diagnosis and compatible repair mortars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van

    1999-01-01

    Mortars for repair and maintenance of historic masonry have to meet specific requirements. Several authors have made contributions, however many cases of failure show that there still is quite a lack of knowledge on the compatibility of repair mortars for historic masonry. The diagnosis of the cause

  5. 9 CFR 3.7 - Compatible grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compatible grouping. 3.7 Section 3.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Dogs...

  6. The mitonuclear compatibility hypothesis of sexual selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Geoffrey E.; Johnson, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Why females assess ornaments when choosing mates remains a central question in evolutionary biology. We hypothesize that the imperative for a choosing female to find a mate with nuclear oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) genes that are compatible with her mitochondrial OXPHOS genes drives the evolution of ornaments. Indicator traits are proposed to signal the efficiency of OXPHOS function thus enabling females to select mates with nuclear genes that are compatible with maternal mitochondrial genes in the formation of OXPHOS complexes. Species-typical pattern of ornamentation is proposed to serve as a marker of mitochondrial type ensuring that females assess prospective mates with a shared mitochondrial background. The mitonuclear compatibility hypothesis predicts that the production of ornaments will be closely linked to OXPHOS pathways, and that sexual selection for compatible mates will be strongest when genes for nuclear components of OXPHOS complexes are Z-linked. The implications of this hypothesis are that sexual selection may serve as a driver for the evolution of more efficient cellular respiration. PMID:23945683

  7. A low-cost MRI compatible keyboard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Snejbjerg; Heggli, Ole Adrian; Alves da Mota, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    , presenting a challenging environment for playing an instrument. Here, we present an MRI-compatible polyphonic keyboard with a materials cost of 850 $, designed and tested for safe use in 3T (three Tesla) MRI-scanners. We describe design considerations, and prior work in the field. In addition, we provide...

  8. 36 CFR 1193.51 - Compatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compatibility. 1193.51 Section 1193.51 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE... user to easily turn any microphone on and off to allow the user to intermix speech with TTY use. (e...

  9. Component-compatibility in historical biogeography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandee, M.; Roos, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    -The problems of reconstructing historical relationships for areas of endemism from distributional data for groups of taxa and the cladistic relationships among the members of those groups can be solved by applying the two principles of parsimony and mutual inclusion or exclusion (compatibility) of

  10. Compositionality and Compatibility of Service Contracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okika, Joseph C.; Ravn, Anders Peter

    2007-01-01

    goal is to add a representation and support for the functional aspects of service contracts to the existing non-functional aspects. Further, we investigate how to analyze, verify and validate service contracts laying emphasis on the compositionality and compatibility of service contracts....

  11. Plasmonic Modulator Using CMOS Compatible Material Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Kinsey, Nathaniel; Naik, Gururaj V.;

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a design of ultra-compact plasmonic modulator is proposed and numerically analyzed. The device l ayout utilizes alternative plas monic materials such as tr ansparent conducting oxides and titanium nitride which potentially can be applied for CMOS compatible process. The modulation...

  12. Compatibility testing of energetic materials, which technique?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerk, W.P.C. de; Schrader, M.A.; Steen, A.C. van der

    1999-01-01

    Compatibility is an important safety aspect related to the production and storage of energetic materials. To test different combinations of materials a simple test method with clear criteria is advisable. At the last ESTAC the use of microcalorimetry and the vacuum stability test for the

  13. Energetic materials standards – Chemical compatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuukkanen, I.M.; Bouma, R.H.B.

    2014-01-01

    Subgroup A Energetic Materials Team, SG/A (EMT), develops and maintains standards that are relevant to all life-cycle phases of ammunition/weapon systems. STANAG 4147 is the standard regarding chemical compatibility of explosives with munition components, and is a document of prime importance.

  14. A Note on (In)Compatibility Relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sequoiah-Grayson, Sebastian; Pelis, M; Puncochar,

    2011-01-01

    Non-symmetric incompatibility relations, or non-symmetric compatibility relations, are a standard method for introducing a split negation pair on a frame. Another standard method is to reject commutation for the frame. The first task is to examine the relationship between non-symmetric incompatibili

  15. [MRI compatibility of deep brain stimulator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujing

    2013-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy develops rapidly in clinical application. The structures of deep brain stimulator and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment are introduced, the interactions are analyzed, and the two compatible problems of radio frequency (RF) heating and imaging artifact are summarized in this paper.

  16. Catholic Educator Perceptions about Brain Compatible Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenen, Amie

    2009-01-01

    This document reports the findings of a doctoral project regarding the perceptions held by administrators and teachers of comprehensive Catholic schools in one Midwestern diocese. With the recent explosion of research in the area of the brain and brain compatible instruction it is valuable to know and understand the perceptions held by current…

  17. 60-Day waste compatibility safety issues and final results for AY-102 grab samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-01-31

    Four grab samples (2AY-96-15, 2AY-96-16, 2AY-96-17, and 2AY-96-18) were taken from Riser 15D of Tank 241-AY-102 on October 8, 1996, and received by 222-S Laboratory on October 8, 1996. These samples were analyzed in accordance with Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) in support of the Waste Compatibility Program. No notifications were required based on sample results.

  18. Studies in astronomical time series analysis. II - Statistical aspects of spectral analysis of unevenly spaced data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scargle, J. D.

    1982-12-01

    Detection of a periodic signal hidden in noise is frequently a goal in astronomical data analysis. This paper does not introduce a new detection technique, but instead studies the reliability and efficiency of detection with the most commonly used technique, the periodogram, in the case where the observation times are unevenly spaced. This choice was made because, of the methods in current use, it appears to have the simplest statistical behavior. A modification of the classical definition of the periodogram is necessary in order to retain the simple statistical behavior of the evenly spaced case. With this modification, periodogram analysis and least-squares fitting of sine waves to the data are exactly equivalent. Certain difficulties with the use of the periodogram are less important than commonly believed in the case of detection of strictly periodic signals. In addition, the standard method for mitigating these difficulties (tapering) can be used just as well if the sampling is uneven. An analysis of the statistical significance of signal detections is presented, with examples

  19. fMRI-compatible rehabilitation hand device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzika Aria

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has been widely used in studying human brain functions and neurorehabilitation. In order to develop complex and well-controlled fMRI paradigms, interfaces that can precisely control and measure output force and kinematics of the movements in human subjects are needed. Optimized state-of-the-art fMRI methods, combined with magnetic resonance (MR compatible robotic devices for rehabilitation, can assist therapists to quantify, monitor, and improve physical rehabilitation. To achieve this goal, robotic or mechatronic devices with actuators and sensors need to be introduced into an MR environment. The common standard mechanical parts can not be used in MR environment and MR compatibility has been a tough hurdle for device developers. Methods This paper presents the design, fabrication and preliminary testing of a novel, one degree of freedom, MR compatible, computer controlled, variable resistance hand device that may be used in brain MR imaging during hand grip rehabilitation. We named the device MR_CHIROD (Magnetic Resonance Compatible Smart Hand Interfaced Rehabilitation Device. A novel feature of the device is the use of Electro-Rheological Fluids (ERFs to achieve tunable and controllable resistive force generation. ERFs are fluids that experience dramatic changes in rheological properties, such as viscosity or yield stress, in the presence of an electric field. The device consists of four major subsystems: a an ERF based resistive element; b a gearbox; c two handles and d two sensors, one optical encoder and one force sensor, to measure the patient induced motion and force. The smart hand device is designed to resist up to 50% of the maximum level of gripping force of a human hand and be controlled in real time. Results Laboratory tests of the device indicate that it was able to meet its design objective to resist up to approximately 50% of the maximum handgrip force. The detailed

  20. A Zeroth Law Compatible Model to Kerr Black Hole Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor G. Czinner

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We consider the thermodynamic and stability problem of Kerr black holes arising from the nonextensive/nonadditive nature of the Bekenstein–Hawking entropy formula. Nonadditive thermodynamics is often criticized by asserting that the zeroth law cannot be compatible with nonadditive composition rules, so in this work we follow the so-called formal logarithm method to derive an additive entropy function for Kerr black holes also satisfying the zeroth law’s requirement. Starting from the most general, equilibrium compatible, nonadditive entropy composition rule of Abe, we consider the simplest non-parametric approach that is generated by the explicit nonadditive form of the Bekenstein–Hawking formula. This analysis extends our previous results on the Schwarzschild case, and shows that the zeroth law-compatible temperature function in the model is independent of the mass–energy parameter of the black hole. By applying the Poincaré turning point method, we also study the thermodynamic stability problem in the system.

  1. [Bonding compatibility between adhesive systems and composite resins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giachetti, L; Scaminaci Russo, D; Landi, D

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyse bonding compatibility between photo- and self-polymerising composite resins ad two-step total-etch (one component) adhesive systems with a different activation method. Thirty healthy extracted molars were cut transversally to obtain sixty flat dentin surfaces. The acid conditioned surfaces were bonded with Scotchbond 1 (3M), Excite (Vivadent) or Excite DSC (Vivadent). A cylinder of composite resin (3 mm diameter and 4 mm height) was constructed on each adhesive layer using photopolymerised Tetric Ceram (Vivadend) and dual Luxacore (DMG) but activated only chemically. The samples were subjected to the shear bond test. The fracture surfaces obtained were classified by type and site in the stereomicroscope. Twelve samples representing each group were further prepared for the SEM. The data obtained from the test, the microscopic investigation and statistical analysis (ANOVA and Bonferroni) seem to confirm the presence of a reduced bonding compatibility between one-component adhesive systems and self-polymerising composites. This incompatibility is evident for the adhesive Scotchbond 1 and limited for Excite, while it seems to be overcome by Excite DSC which appears to bond well with both Tetric Ceram and Luxacore. Adhesive-composite incompatibility seems to depend on the activation method of the composite as well as on that of the adhesive system. The chemical compatibility bet-ween these two materials is influenced not only by the chemical composition of the adhesive, but also by that of the composite.

  2. Assessment of DUPIC fuel compatibility with CANDU-6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, H. B.; Roh, G. H.; Jeong, C. J.; Rhee, B. W.; Choi, J. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The compatibility of DUPIC fuel with the existing CANDU reactor was assessed. The technical issues of DUPIC fuel compatibility were chosen based on the CANDU physics design requirements and inherent characteristics of DUPIC fuel. The compatibility was assessed for the reference DUPIC fuel composition which was determined to reduce the composition heterogeneity and improve the spent PWR fuel utilization. Preliminary studies on a CANDU core loaded with DUPIC fuel have shown that the nominal power distribution is flatter than that of a natural uranium core when a 2-bundle shift refueling scheme is used, which reduces the reactivity worths of devices in the core and, therefore, the performance of reactivity devices was assessed. The safety of the core was assessed by a LOCA simulation and it was found that the power pulse upon LOCA can be maintained below that in the natural uranium core when a poison material is used in the DUPIC fuel. For the feasibility of handling DUPIC fuel in the plant, it will be necessary to introduce new equipment to load the DUPIC fuel in the refueling magazine. The radiation effect of DUPIC fuel on both the reactor hardware and the environment will require a quantitative analysis later. (author).

  3. Eco-Anthropic Compatibility - a Multidisciplinary Model in Urban Ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIANO L. BIANCA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I propose a multidisciplinary model of urban development which goes beyond the notion of ecological sustainability, by building on the concept of eco-anthropic compatibility. First of all I will sketch the historical development of human aggregations and I will underline the difference between ancient and modern aggregations. On the basis of this analysis, I will take into consideration the notion of sustainability and its possible application to present conurbations. I will underline several limits of the notion of sustainable development and I will propose a multidisciplinary model grounded on a broader and new notion: the eco-anthropic compatibility. Using this notion, which includes the idea of sustainability, it is possible to handle, within the model, the human factors and human living conditions inside an urban aggregation. Finally, I will state that the actual urban model is decaying and therefore, sooner or later, we will have to face the end of urban civilization; for this reason we can start imagining new future ways for human aggregations on the planet based on the notion of eco-anthropic compatibility.

  4. 影响海勤人员夫妻性格相容性的多因素分析%Multi-factor Analysis of Influence Factors of Husband-wife Personality Compatibility of Shipboard Naval Personnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢天娇; 董丽洁; 牟杰; 熊波; 齐翠; 斯银平; 孙敬翔

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To explore the relation of husband‐wife personality compatibility of shipboard naval per‐sonnel with psychology ,personality ,and environmental factors ,and to provide guidance for carrying out marriage counseling for shipboard naval personnel .Methods Personality Compatibility Subscale (PC) of Olson Marital Qual‐ity Questionnaire ,Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire of Cattell (16PF) ,Symptom Checklist (SCL‐90) ,Per‐ceived Social Support Scale (SSRS) ,Life Events Scale (LES) ,Trait Coping Style Questionnaire (TCSQ) were ap‐plied to carry out the evaluation on 375 couples .Results The husband‐wife personality compatibility of shipboard naval personnel could be affected by psychosocial factors of oneself and spouse ,and was significantly associated with personality ,mental health ,social support ,life events and coping styles (P<0 .05 ) .In the multiple regression e‐quation ,personality ,mental health ,life events ,part factors of social support contributed greatly (Beta=‐4 .557~0 .695) to the personality compatibility of the husband ,while personality ,mental health ,part factors of social sup‐port contributed greatly (Beta=‐0 .253 ~ 0 .109) to the personality compatibility of the wife .Conclusions In order to improve the marriage quality of shipboard naval personnel ,the personality compatibility should be improved from society ,life and psychology .%目的:探讨海勤人员夫妻性格相容性与心理、个性、环境因素的相关性,为开展为海勤人员的家庭婚姻咨询提供指导。方法采用Olson婚姻质量问卷中性格相容性分量表(PC)、卡特尔16项人格因素问卷(16PF)、症状自评量表(SCL‐90)、领悟社会支持量表(SSRS)、生活事件量表(LES)、特质应对问卷(TCSQ)对375对海勤人员夫妻双方均进行评定。结果海勤人员夫妻双方性格相容性既受到自身也受配偶的心理社会等因素交互影响,与个性、心理

  5. Dipole model analysis of the new HERA I+II data

    CERN Document Server

    Luszczak, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    We use the dipole model to analyze the inclusive DIS cross section data, obtained from the HERA I+II measurements \\cite{Abramowicz:2015mha}. We show that these combined data are very well described within the dipole model framework, which is complemented with a valence quark structure functions. Our motivation is to investigate the gluon density with the BGK dipole model \\cite{BGK} as an alternative to the PDF approach. BGK dipole model uses for evolution the DGLAP mechanism in the $kt$ factorization scheme (in contrast to the collinear factorization for PDFs). We confirm our results from the previous paper \\cite{Luszczak:2013rxa} with old HERA data \\cite{HERA2010}. In addition we also performed a first, preliminary investigation of saturation. The analysis was done in the xFitter framework \\cite{xFitter,xFitter2,xFitter3,xFitter4,xFitter5}.}

  6. JUPITER-II Program: ANL analysis of ZPPR-13A and ZPPR-13B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, P.J.; Brumbach, S.B. (comps.)

    1984-08-09

    The ZPPR-13 experiments provide basic physics data for radial-heterogeneous LMFBR cores of approximately 700 MWe size. Assemblies ZPPR-13A, ZPPR-13B and ZPPR-13C comprised the JUPITER-II cooperative program between US-DOE and PNC of Japan. The measurements were made between August 1982 and April 1984. This report describes in detail the results of the ANL analyses of phases 13A and 13B/1 and includes preliminary results for the later assemblies of phase 13B. The data were compiled primarily for discussions at the Third Jupiter Analysis Meeting to be held at ANL-West between September 11th and 14th, 1984.

  7. Integrated safety analysis of rolapitant with coadministered drugs from phase II/III trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbour, S; Smit, T.; Wang, X

    2017-01-01

    for treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and treatment-emergent serious adverse events (TESAEs) during cycle 1 were pooled across the four studies and summarized in the overall population and by concomitant use/non-use of CYP2D6 or BCRP substrate drugs. Results: In the integrated safety population, 828...... cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, but it does inhibit CYP2D6 and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). To analyze potential drug-drug interactions between rolapitant and concomitant medications, this integrated safety analysis of four double-blind, randomized phase II or III studies of rolapitant examined...... the safety of rolapitant as part of an antiemetic triple-drug regimen in patients receiving emetogenic chemotherapy, including those administered concomitant medications that are substrates of CYP2D6 or BCRP, such as ondansetron, docetaxel, or irinotecan....

  8. Exergetic performance analysis of a Dora II geothermal power plant in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganjehsarabi, Hadi; Gungor, Ali [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ege University (Turkey); Dincer, Ibrahim [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In the energy sector there is an urgent need to produce energy from renewable energy sources due to the rising demand, the depletion of fossil fuels and their effects on the environment. Geothermal power is a well-established energy resource and the aim of this research was to examine the energetic performance of a geothermal power plant. The studied power plant, Dora II, has a 9.5 MW power output and is situated in Aydin, Turkey. An evaluation of the plant's performance was carried out using an exergy analysis method on each of the plant's components. Results showed that the highest exergy destruction occurs in brine re-injection while the preheater had the best exergy efficiency; the plant had an overall exergetic efficiency of 29.6%. This study highlighted the components where significant exergy destructions take place so actions could be taken to improve the overall efficiency.

  9. Use of ELVIS II platform for random process modelling and analysis of its probability density function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslennikova, Yu. S.; Nugmanov, I. S.

    2016-08-01

    The problem of probability density function estimation for a random process is one of the most common in practice. There are several methods to solve this problem. Presented laboratory work uses methods of the mathematical statistics to detect patterns in the realization of random process. On the basis of ergodic theory, we construct algorithm for estimating univariate probability density distribution function for a random process. Correlational analysis of realizations is applied to estimate the necessary size of the sample and the time of observation. Hypothesis testing for two probability distributions (normal and Cauchy) is used on the experimental data, using χ2 criterion. To facilitate understanding and clarity of the problem solved, we use ELVIS II platform and LabVIEW software package that allows us to make the necessary calculations, display results of the experiment and, most importantly, to control the experiment. At the same time students are introduced to a LabVIEW software package and its capabilities.

  10. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program - RDX Type II Class 5 Standard, Data Set 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollard, Colin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Sorenson, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Moran, Jesse S. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Shelley, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Applied Research Associates, Inc., Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Whipple, Richard E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-04-11

    This document describes the results of the first reference sample material—RDX Type II Class 5—examined in the proficiency study for small-scale safety and thermal (SSST) testing of explosive materials for the Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program. The IDCA program is conducting proficiency testing on homemade explosives (HMEs). The reference sample materials are being studied to establish the accuracy of traditional explosives safety testing for each performing laboratory. These results will be used for comparison to results from testing HMEs. This effort, funded by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), ultimately will put the issues of safe handling of these materials in perspective with standard military explosives. The results of the study will add SSST testing results for a broad suite of different HMEs to the literature, potentially suggest new guidelines and methods for HME testing, and possibly establish what are the needed accuracies in SSST testing to develop safe handling practices. Described here are the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and scanning calorimetry analysis of a reference sample of RDX Type II Class 5. The results from each participating testing laboratory are compared using identical test material and preparation methods wherever possible. Note, however, the test procedures differ among the laboratories. These results are then compared to historical data from various sources. The performers involved are Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Air Force Research Laboratory/ RXQL (AFRL), Indian Head Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center, (IHD-NSWC), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). These tests are conducted as a proficiency study in order to establish some consistency in test protocols, procedures, and experiments and to understand how to compare results when test protocols are not identical.

  11. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II from Sitophilus zeamais.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chang-Liang; Wang, Jing-Bo; Wu, Hua; Liu, Jia-Yu; Ma, Zhi-Qing; Feng, Jun-Tao; Zhang, Xing

    2016-09-30

    Cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COX II) containing a dual core CuA active site is one of the core subunits of mitochondrial Cytochrome c oxidase (Cco), which plays a significant role in the physiological process. In this report, the full-length cDNA of COXII gene was cloned from Sitophilus zeamais, which had an open reading frame (ORF) of 684 bp encoding 227 amino acids residues. The predicted COXII protein had a molecular mass of 26.2 kDa with pI value of 6.37. multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis indicated that Sitophilus zeamais COXII had high sequence identity with the COXII of other insect species. The gene was subcloned into the expression vector pET-32a, and induced by isopropyl β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) in E. coli Transetta (DE3) expression system. Finally the recombinant COXII with 6-His tag was purified using affinity chromatography with Ni(2+)-NTA agarose. Western Blotting (WB) showed the recombinant protein was about 44 kD, and the concentration of fusion protein was 50 μg/mL. UV-spectrophotometer and infrared spectrometer analysis showed that recombinant COXII could catalyze the oxidation of substrate Cytochrome C (Cyt c), and influenced by allyl isothiocyanate (AITC). By using molecular docking method, It was found that a sulfur atom of AITC structure could form a length of 2.9 Å hydrogen bond with Leu-31. These results suggested that tag-free COXII was functional and one of the action sites of AITC, which will be helpful to carry out a point mutation in binding sites for the future research.

  12. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 46 (NORWTH00030046) Town Highway 3 (VT132) crossing the Ompompanoosuc River, Norwich, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NORWTH00030046 on town highway 3, which is also Vermont State Route 132 crossing the Ompompanoosuc River, Norwich, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, available from VTAOT files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D.

  13. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 37 (BARTTH00080037) on Town Highway 8, crossing Willoughby River, Barton, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayotte, Joseph D.; Boehmler, Erick M.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BARTTH00080037 on town highway 8 crossing the Willoughby River, Barton, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province

  14. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 22 (WALDTH00180022) on Town Highway 18, crossing Coles Brook, Walden, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striker, Lora K.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WALDTH00180022 on Town Highway 18 crossing Coles Brook also known as Joes Brook, Walden, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  15. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 21 (WALDTH00450021) on Town HIghway 45, crossing Joes Brook, Walden, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WALDTH00450021 on Town Highway 45 crossing Joes Brook, Walden, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The VTAOT files state that the stream is Coles Brook, both the USGS and the VTAOT maps state that it is Joes Brook.

  16. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 30, (HUNTTH00220030), on Town Highway 22, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00220030 on Town Highway 22 crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  17. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 46 (BRNETH00610046) on Town Highway 61, crossing East Peacham Brook, Barnet, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRNETH00610046 on Town Highway 61 crossing East Peacham Brook, Barnet, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 50 (STARTH00250050) on Town Highway 25, crossing Lewis Creek, Starksboro, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Ronda L.; Boehmler, Erick M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure STARTH00250050 on Town Highway 25 crossing Lewis Creek, Starksboro, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 27 (STJOTH00080027) on Town Highway 8, crossing the Sleepers River, St. Johnsbury, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure STJOTH00080027 on Town Highway 8 crossing the Sleepers River, St. Johnsbury, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  20. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 39 (PEACTH00620039) on Town Highway 62, crossing South Peacham Brook, Peacham, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Ronda L.; Degnan, James R.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure PEACTH00620039 on Town Highway 62 crossing South Peacham Brook, Peacham, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  1. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 16 (GROTTH00170016) on Town Highway 17, crossing the Wells River, Groton, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striker, L.K.; Ivanoff, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure GROTTH00170016 on Town Highway 17 crossing the Wells River, Groton, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  2. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 34 (CONCTH00110034) on Town Highway 11, crossing Miles Stream, Concord, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Ronda L.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CONCTH00110034 on Town Highway 11 crossing Miles Stream, Concord, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  3. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 39 (TOPSTH00510039) on Town Highway 51, crossing Tabor Branch Waits River, Topsham, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striker, Lora K.; Severance, Tim

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure TOPSTH00510039 on Town Highway 51 crossing the Tabor Branch Waits River, Topsham, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  4. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 37, (BRNETH00740037) on Town Highway 74, crossing South Peacham Brook, Barnet, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Ronda L.; Severance, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRNETH00740037 on Town Highway 74 crossing South Peacham Brook, Barnet, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  5. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 17 (SHEFTH00380017) on Town Highway 38, crossing Miller Run, Sheffield, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striker, Lora K.; Degnan, James R.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure SHEFTH00380017 on Town Highway 38 crossing Miller Run, Sheffield, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  6. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 5 (MORRTH00060005) on Town Highway 6, crossing Bedell Brook, Morristown, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Degnan, James R.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure MORRTH00060005 on Town Highway 6 crossing Bedell Brook, Morristown, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  7. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 6 (BRISVT01160006) on State Highway 116, crossing Little Notch Brook, Bristol, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRISVT01160006 on State Route 116 crossing the Little Notch Brook, Bristol, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  8. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 65 (NEWBTH00500065) on Town Highway 50, crossing Peach Brook, Newbury, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, R.L.; Severance, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NEWBTH00500065 on Town Highway 50 crossing Peach Brook, Newbury, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  9. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 16, (NEWBTH00500016) on Town Highway 50, crossing Halls Brook, Newbury, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Ronda L.; Degnan, James R.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NEWBTH00500016 on Town Highway 50 crossing Halls Brook, Newbury, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  10. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 8 (ATHETH00090008) on Town Highway 9, crossing Bull Creek, Athens, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ATHETH00090008 on Town Highway 9 crossing Bull Creek in Athens, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  11. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 39 (STOWTH00160039) on Town Highway 16, crossing Moss Glen Brook, Stowe, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure STOWTH00160039 on Town Highway 16 crossing Moss Glen Brook, Stowe, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  12. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 71 (WODSTH00050071) on Town Highway 5, crossing Kedron Brook, Woodstock, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, S.A.; Ayotte, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WODSTH00050071 on Town Highway 5 crossing Kedron Brook, Woodstock, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  13. Level II scour analysis for brigde 5 (STOCTH00360005) on Town Highway 36, crossing Stony Brook, Stockridge, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striker, Lora K.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure STOCTH00360005 on Town Highway 36 crossing Stony Brook, Stockbridge, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D.

  14. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (DANVTH00610025) on Town Highway 61, crossing Water Andric Brook, Danville, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Robert H.; Severance, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure DANVTH00610025 on Town Highway 61 crossing Water Andric Brook, Danville, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  15. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 8, (MANCTH00060008) on Town Highway 6, crossing Bourn Brook, Manchester, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Ronda L.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure MANCTH00060008 on Town Highway 6 crossing Bourn Brook, Manchester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  16. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 37 (CABOTH00410037) on Town Highway 41, crossing the Winooski River, Cabot, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Robert H.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CABOTH00410037 on Town Highway 41 crossing the Winooski River (also referred to as Coit’s Pond Brook), Cabot, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  17. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 4 (RYEGTH00050004) on Town Highway 5, crossing the Wells River, Ryegate, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure RYEGTH00050004 on Town Highway 5 crossing the Wells River, Ryegate, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 53 (CHESTH01180053) on Town Highway 118, crossing the Williams River, Chester, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striker, Lora K.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CHESTH01180053 on Town Highway 118 crossing the Williams River, Chester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 8 (WELLTH00020008) on Town Highway 2, crossing Wells Brook, Wells, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striker, Lora K.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WELLTH00020008 on Town Highway 2 crossing the Wells Brook, Wells, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  20. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 13 (IRAVT013300133) on State Route 133, crossing an Ira Brook Tributary, Ira, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmler, Erick M.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure IRA-VT01330013 on State Route 133 crossing an Ira Brook Tributary, Ira, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  1. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 23 (WEELTH00210023) on Town Highway 21, crossing Miller Run, Wheelock, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Robert H.; Boehmler, Erick M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WEELTH00210023 on Town Highway 21 crossing Miller Run, Wheelock, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  2. Source term derivation and radiological safety analysis for the TRICO II research reactor in Kinshasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muswema, J.L., E-mail: jeremie.muswem@unikin.ac.cd [Faculty of Science, University of Kinshasa, P.O. Box 190, KIN XI (Congo, The Democratic Republic of the); Ekoko, G.B. [Faculty of Science, University of Kinshasa, P.O. Box 190, KIN XI (Congo, The Democratic Republic of the); Lukanda, V.M. [Faculty of Science, University of Kinshasa, P.O. Box 190, KIN XI (Congo, The Democratic Republic of the); Democratic Republic of the Congo' s General Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box AE1 (Congo, The Democratic Republic of the); Lobo, J.K.-K. [Faculty of Science, University of Kinshasa, P.O. Box 190, KIN XI (Congo, The Democratic Republic of the); Darko, E.O. [Radiation Protection Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG 80, Legon, Accra (Ghana); Boafo, E.K. [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe St. North, Oshawa, ONL1 H7K4 (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Atmospheric dispersion modeling for two credible accidents of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Kinshasa (TRICO II) was performed. • Radiological safety analysis after the postulated initiating events (PIE) was also carried out. • The Karlsruhe KORIGEN and the HotSpot Health Physics codes were used to achieve the objectives of this study. • All the values of effective dose obtained following the accident scenarios were below the regulatory limits for reactor staff members and the public, respectively. - Abstract: The source term from the 1 MW TRIGA Mark II research reactor core of the Democratic Republic of the Congo was derived in this study. An atmospheric dispersion modeling followed by radiation dose calculation were performed based on two possible postulated accident scenarios. This derivation was made from an inventory of peak radioisotope activities released in the core by using the Karlsruhe version of isotope generation code KORIGEN. The atmospheric dispersion modeling was performed with HotSpot code, and its application yielded to radiation dose profile around the site using meteorological parameters specific to the area under study. The two accident scenarios were picked from possible accident analyses for TRIGA and TRIGA-fueled reactors, involving the case of destruction of the fuel element with highest activity release and a plane crash on the reactor building as the worst case scenario. Deterministic effects of these scenarios are used to update the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) of the reactor, and for its current version, these scenarios are not yet incorporated. Site-specific meteorological conditions were collected from two meteorological stations: one installed within the Atomic Energy Commission and another at the National Meteorological Agency (METTELSAT), which is not far from the site. Results show that in both accident scenarios, radiation doses remain within the limits, far below the recommended maximum effective

  3. A model of the immune-compatibility using the install problem in computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Felipe

    2014-05-01

    We simulate the immune compatibility using the Install Problem: The idea is to define a Boolean variable for each antibody. This variable is true if the antibody must be in the immune system. The Install Problem refers to the incompatibility that some programs may have with an specific operative system making it impossible to be installed. The analysis was implemented using SMT-solvers, specifically Z3, and the code was wrote using the commands "DependsOn", "Conflict" and "Compatibility_check", making it possible to check the antibody compatibility. The programming languages used to build up the code were Z3-Python and Z3-SMT-Lib. The results can be used in systems biology and in the analysis of immunological therapies. As future line of research it could be developed a more complex algorithm to verify the immunological compatibility.

  4. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Brian J.; Hood, Megan M.; Nackers, Lisa M.; Azarbad, Leila; Ivan, Iulia; Corsica, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Screening for depression is an integral part of psychological evaluations conducted prior to bariatric surgery. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is the most commonly used measure of depression in these treatment evaluations. The reliability and validity of the BDI-II has not yet been evaluated within bariatric surgery-seeking samples,…

  5. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Brian J.; Hood, Megan M.; Nackers, Lisa M.; Azarbad, Leila; Ivan, Iulia; Corsica, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Screening for depression is an integral part of psychological evaluations conducted prior to bariatric surgery. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is the most commonly used measure of depression in these treatment evaluations. The reliability and validity of the BDI-II has not yet been evaluated within bariatric surgery-seeking samples,…

  6. Surface complexation and precipitate geometry for aqueous Zn(II) sorption on ferrihydrite: II. XANES analysis and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waychunas, G.A.; Fuller, C.C.; Davis, J.A.; Rehr, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis of sorption complexes has the advantages of high sensitivity (10- to 20-fold greater than extended X-ray absorption fine structure [EXAFS] analysis) and relative ease and speed of data collection (because of the short k-space range). It is thus a potentially powerful tool for characterization of environmentally significant surface complexes and precipitates at very low surface coverages. However, quantitative analysis has been limited largely to "fingerprint" comparison with model spectra because of the difficulty of obtaining accurate multiple-scattering amplitudes for small clusters with high confidence. In the present work, calculations of the XANES for 50- to 200-atom clusters of structure from Zn model compounds using the full multiple-scattering code Feff 8.0 accurately replicate experimental spectra and display features characteristic of specific first-neighbor anion coordination geometry and second-neighbor cation geometry and number. Analogous calculations of the XANES for small molecular clusters indicative of precipitation and sorption geometries for aqueous Zn on ferrihydrite, and suggested by EXAFS analysis, are in good agreement with observed spectral trends with sample composition, with Zn-oxygen coordination and with changes in second-neighbor cation coordination as a function of sorption coverage. Empirical analysis of experimental XANES features further verifies the validity of the calculations. The findings agree well with a complete EXAFS analysis previously reported for the same sample set, namely, that octahedrally coordinated aqueous Zn2+ species sorb as a tetrahedral complex on ferrihydrite with varying local geometry depending on sorption density. At significantly higher densities but below those at which Zn hydroxide is expected to precipitate, a mainly octahedral coordinated Zn2+ precipitate is observed. An analysis of the multiple scattering paths contributing to the XANES

  7. Stability Analysis of the EBR-I Mark-II Core Meltdown Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jae-Yong; Kang, Chang Mu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the stability of the EBR-I core meltdown accident using the NuSTAB code. The result of NuSTAB analysis is compared with previous stability analysis by Sandmeier using the root locus method. The Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-1) at Argonne National Laboratory was designed to demonstrate fast reactor breeding and to prove the use of liquid-metal coolant for power production and reached criticality in August 1951. The EBR-I reactor was undergoing a series of physics experiments and the Mark-II core was melted accidentally on Nov. 29, 1955. The experiment was going to increase core temperature to 500C to see if the reactor loses reactivity, and scram when the power reached 1500 kW or doubling of fission rate per second. However the operator scrammed with a slow moving control and missed the shutdown by two seconds and caused the core meltdown. The NuSTAB code has an advantage of analyzing space-dependent fast reactors and predicting regional oscillations compared to the point kinetics. Also, NuSTAB can be useful when the coupled neutronic-thermal-hydraulic codes cannot be used for stability analysis. Future work includes analyses of the PGSFR for various operating conditions as well as further validation of the NuSTAB calculations against SFR stability experiments when such experiments become available.

  8. Synthesis, thermogravimetric analysis, infrared, electronic and mass spectra of Mn(II), Co(II) and Fe(III) norfloxacin complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeek, Sadeek A.

    2005-10-01

    The interactions of manganese acetate, ferric chloride and cobalt sulphate with norfloxacin (NOR) in acetone or methanol were studied. The isolated solid complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared, electronic, mass spectra and thermal analysis. The results support the formation of complexes of the formula [Fe(NOR) 3]Cl 3·12H 2O and [M(NOR) 2]X 2·8H 2O (M=Mn(II) or Co(II) and X=(CH 3COO -) or SO4-2). The infrared spectra of the isolated solid complexes suggested, indicated that NOR act as bidentate ligands through one of the oxygen atoms of the carboxylic group and the ring carbonyl oxygen atom. The interpretation, mathematical analysis and evaluation of kinetic parameters of thermogravimetric (TGA) and its differential (DTG), such as entropy of activation, pre-exponential factors, activation energy evaluated by using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger equations for two complexes are carried out. General mechanisms describing the decomposition of the solid complexes are suggested.

  9. Compatibility of Extex with tetryl by thermal methods. Quarterly report, October--December, 1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, L.C.

    1971-12-31

    A final report is given on the study of the compatibility of Extex and tetryl. The 100 C coupon test samples were discarded after 8 weeks because of excessive decomposition. The 80 C coupon test evaluations have been completed and an analysis of the data made. There is no indication of a compatibility problem of Extex with tetryl as long as they are in a solid phase.

  10. Is automatic imitation a specialized form of stimulus-response compatibility? Dissociating imitative and spatial compatibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Ty W; Longo, Matthew R; Bertenthal, Bennett I

    2012-03-01

    In recent years research on automatic imitation has received considerable attention because it represents an experimental platform for investigating a number of interrelated theories suggesting that the perception of action automatically activates corresponding motor programs. A key debate within this research centers on whether automatic imitation is any different than other long-term S-R associations, such as spatial stimulus-response compatibility. One approach to resolving this issue is to examine whether automatic imitation shows similar response characteristics as other classes of stimulus-response compatibility. This hypothesis was tested by comparing imitative and spatial compatibility effects with a two alternative forced-choice stimulus-response compatibility paradigm. The stimulus on each trial was a left or right hand with either the index or middle finger tapping down. Speeded responses were performed with the index or middle finger of the right hand in response to the identity or the left-right spatial position of the stimulus finger. Two different tasks were administered: one that involved responding to the stimulus (S-R) and one that involved responding to the opposite stimulus (OS-R; i.e., the one not presented on that trial). Based on previous research and a connectionist model, we predicted standard compatibility effects for both spatial and imitative compatibility in the S-R task, and a reverse compatibility effect for spatial compatibility, but not for imitative compatibility, in the OS-R task. The results from the mean response times, mean percentage of errors, and response time distributions all converged to support these predictions. A second noteworthy result was that the recoding of the finger identity in the OS-R task required significantly more time than the recoding of the left-right spatial position, but the encoding time for the two stimuli in the S-R task was equivalent. In sum, this evidence suggests that the processing of spatial

  11. The compatibility of telehealth with health-care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuononvirta, Tiina; Timonen, Markku; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Timonen, Olavi; Ylitalo, Kirsti; Kanste, Outi; Taanila, Anja

    2011-01-01

    There is no clear understanding about the concept of technology adoption in the health-care environment. Compatibility is one of the factors affecting telehealth adoption. We investigated the key factors of telehealth's compatibility with health centre activities. Qualitative research was carried out in 2007-2009, with 55 interviews in seven health centres and in one special care hospital. The people interviewed were physicians, nurses and physiotherapists. After analysing the interview material, we concluded that compatibility has three aspects: individual, process and organizational compatibility. Individual compatibility was manifested in four different ways: from the viewpoints of professionals, patients, communication and cooperation. Three aspects of process compatibility were introduced: scheduling, resources and complexity of processes. Modest organizing efforts with telehealth and even a lack of interest can be expressions of organizational compatibility. Functional and user-friendly technology is a basic precondition for telehealth compatibility. With thorough organizing, most of the compatibility challenges can be solved.

  12. Accident consequences analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, S.; Latkowski, J. F.; Gomez del Rio, J.; Sanz, J.

    2001-05-01

    Previous studies of the safety and environmental aspects of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design have used simplistic assumptions in order to estimate radioactivity releases under accident conditions. Conservatisms associated with these traditional analyses can mask the actual behavior of the plant and have revealed the need for more accurate modeling and analysis of accident conditions and radioactivity mobilization mechanisms. In the present work, computer codes traditionally used for magnetic fusion safety analyses (CHEMCON, MELCOR) have been applied for simulating accident conditions in a simple model of the HYLIFE-II IFE design. Here we consider a severe loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in conjunction with simultaneous failures of the beam tubes (providing a pathway for radioactivity release from the vacuum vessel towards the confinement) and of the two barriers surrounding the chamber (inner shielding and confinement building itself). Even though confinement failure would be a very unlikely event it would be needed in order to produce significant off-site doses. CHEMCON code allows calculation of long-term temperature transients in fusion reactor first wall, blanket, and shield structures resulting from decay heating. MELCOR is used to simulate a wide range of physical phenomena including thermal-hydraulics, heat transfer, aerosol physics and fusion product transport and release. The results of these calculations show that the estimated off-site dose is less than 5 mSv (0.5 rem), which is well below the value of 10 mSv (1 rem) given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for protection of the public from exposure to radiation during off-normal conditions.

  13. Contribution to growth and increment analysis on the Italian CONECOFOR Level II Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio AMORINI

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the "Estimation of growth and yield" included in the National Programme on Intensive Monitoring of Forest Ecosystems CONECOFOR Aims of the paper are: i to outline the composition and design of Level II PMPs network, also examining the structural characteristics of forest stands; ii to describe the contents of mensurational surveys carried out in winter 1996/97 and 1999/00; iii to analyse the growth rates in progress at each PMP using selected descriptors. Stand origin (11 high forests and 13 stored coppices and transitory crops and the number of forest types tested are focused as the main discriminants of the PMPs network. This composition, together with irregular forestry practice, results in a number of consequences (prevailing age classes, tree densities and related stand structures, growth patterns which cause a high in-and-between variability of all growth parameters. For the purposes of this analysis, the network of the plots was divided into three main sets: broadleaved high forest (i.e. beech stands, 6 PMPs; coniferous forest (i.e. Norway spruce stands, 5 PMPs; coppice forest (i.e. deciduous and evergreen oaks, beech and hardbeam stands, 13 PMPs. The measurement of basic growth variables (dbh and tree height was used to describe the tree populations in each PMP; the calculation of basal area, mean and top dbh, mean and top height, provided the reference dataset at each inventory. The assessment of social class according to Kraft gave information on vertical stand structure and made it possible to analyse growth according to tree layers. Data comparison provided increments in the interval 1997-2000. The occurrence of natural mortality and ingrowth was also assessed to take into account their combined effect on tree population dynamics. No trend was found, due to limited data availability, but it was possible to have a detailed overview of the stand situation and growth rates in PMPs.

  14. Accident consequences analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, S; Gomez del Rio, J; Sanz, J

    2000-02-23

    Previous studies of the safety and environmental (S and E) aspects of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant design have used simplistic assumptions in order to estimate radioactivity releases under accident conditions. Conservatisms associated with these traditional analyses can mask the actual behavior of the plant and have revealed the need for more accurate modeling and analysis of accident conditions and radioactivity mobilization mechanisms. In the present work a set of computer codes traditionally used for magnetic fusion safety analyses (CHEMCON, MELCOR) has been applied for simulating accident conditions in a simple model of the HYLIFE-II IFE design. Here the authors consider a severe lost of coolant accident (LOCA) producing simultaneous failures of the beam tubes (providing a pathway for radioactivity release from the vacuum vessel towards the containment) and of the two barriers surrounding the chamber (inner shielding and containment building it self). Even though containment failure would be a very unlikely event it would be needed in order to produce significant off-site doses. CHEMCON code allows calculation of long-term temperature transients in fusion reactor first wall, blanket, and shield structures resulting from decay heating. MELCOR is used to simulate a wide range of physical phenomena including thermal-hydraulics, heat transfer, aerosol physics and fusion product release and transport. The results of these calculations show that the estimated off-site dose is less than 6 mSv (0.6 rem), which is well below the value of 10 mSv (1 rem) given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for protection of the public from exposure to radiation during off-normal conditions.

  15. CMOS compatible nanoscale nonvolatile resistance switching memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sung Hyun; Lu, Wei

    2008-02-01

    We report studies on a nanoscale resistance switching memory structure based on planar silicon that is fully compatible with CMOS technology in terms of both materials and processing techniques employed. These two-terminal resistance switching devices show excellent scaling potential well beyond 10 Gb/cm2 and exhibit high yield (99%), fast programming speed (5 ns), high on/off ratio (10(3)), long endurance (10(6)), retention time (5 months), and multibit capability. These key performance metrics compare favorably with other emerging nonvolatile memory techniques. Furthermore, both diode-like (rectifying) and resistor-like (nonrectifying) behaviors can be obtained in the device switching characteristics in a controlled fashion. These results suggest that the CMOS compatible, nanoscale Si-based resistance switching devices may be well suited for ultrahigh-density memory applications.

  16. Coating for components requiring hydrogen peroxide compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefiani, Ali (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a heretofore-unknown use for zirconium nitride as a hydrogen peroxide compatible protective coating that was discovered to be useful to protect components that catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide or corrode when exposed to hydrogen peroxide. A zirconium nitride coating of the invention may be applied to a variety of substrates (e.g., metals) using art-recognized techniques, such as plasma vapor deposition. The present invention further provides components and articles of manufacture having hydrogen peroxide compatibility, particularly components for use in aerospace and industrial manufacturing applications. The zirconium nitride barrier coating of the invention provides protection from corrosion by reaction with hydrogen peroxide, as well as prevention of hydrogen peroxide decomposition.

  17. Paleogeographical reconstructions compatible with Earth dilatation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Scalera

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The present research concerns the study of the possibility of an increase in the size of the Earthbecause of a still unknown process. After a previous recognition of the existence in the Pacific of shape conformities in a number of pairs of continental and oceanic boundaries (Scalera, 1991, 1993a, a search for compatibility of these results with independent data sets, paleomagnetic and geological and paleontological was undertaken. The conclusion is that the Earth's dilatation is compatible with the used data, while nothing can be affirmed with certainty about the dilatation process or its continuity or discontinuity through geological time. A tentative model of the evolution of the trench-arc-backarc systems has been provided, tuning it in agreement with a dilatational planet.

  18. Polarized light scanning cryomacroscopy, part II: Thermal modeling and analysis of experimental observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feig, Justin S G; Solanki, Prem K; Eisenberg, David P; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-10-01

    This study aims at developing thermal analysis tools and explaining experimental observations made by means of polarized-light cryomacroscopy (Part I). Thermal modeling is based on finite elements analysis (FEA), where two model parameters are extracted from thermal measurements: (i) the overall heat transfer coefficient between the cuvette and the cooling chamber, and (ii) the effective thermal conductivity within the cryoprotective agent (CPA) at the upper part of the cryogenic temperature range. The effective thermal conductivity takes into account enhanced heat transfer due to convection currents within the CPA, creating the so-called Bénard cells. Comparison of experimental results with simulation data indicates that the uncertainty in simulations due to the propagation of uncertainty in measured physical properties exceeds the uncertainty in experimental measurements, which validates the modeling approach. It is shown in this study that while a cavity may form in the upper-center portion of the vitrified CPA, it has very little effect on estimating the temperature distribution within the domain. This cavity is driven by thermal contraction of the CPA, with the upper-center of the domain transitioning to glass last. Finally, it is demonstrated in this study that additional stresses may develop within the glass transition temperature range due to nonlinear behavior of the thermal expansion coefficient. This effect is reported here for the first time in the context of cryobiology, using the capabilities of polarized-light cryomacroscopy.

  19. Analysis and control of the photon beam position at PLS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, J.; Kim, I.-Y.; Kim, C.; Kim, D.-T.; Huang, J.-Y.; Shin, S., E-mail: tlssh@postech.ac.kr [POSTECH, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-18

    The variation of the photon beam position in a beamline, which is a critical issue for user experiments, is analyzed and corrected through the correlation link with the electron beam position in the storage ring. At third-generation light sources, the photon beam position stability is a critical issue for user experiments. In general, photon beam position monitors are developed to detect the real photon beam position, and the position is controlled by a feedback system in order to maintain the reference photon beam position. At Pohang Light Source II, a photon beam position stability of less than 1 µm r.m.s. was achieved for a user service period in the beamline, where the photon beam position monitor is installed. Nevertheless, a detailed analysis of the photon beam position data was necessary in order to ensure the performance of the photon beam position monitor, since it can suffer from various unknown types of noise, such as background contamination due to upstream or downstream dipole radiation, and undulator gap dependence. This paper reports the results of a start-to-end study of the photon beam position stability and a singular value decomposition analysis to confirm the reliability of the photon beam position data.

  20. Testing and Analysis of a Composite Non-Cylindrical Aircraft Fuselage Structure . Part II; Severe Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Rouse, Marshall; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.

    2016-01-01

    The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project aimed to develop aircraft technologies enabling significant fuel burn and community noise reductions. Small incremental changes to the conventional metallic alloy-based 'tube and wing' configuration were not sufficient to achieve the desired metrics. One airframe concept identified by the project as having the potential to dramatically improve aircraft performance was a composite-based hybrid wing body configuration. Such a concept, however, presented inherent challenges stemming from, among other factors, the necessity to transfer wing loads through the entire center fuselage section which accommodates a pressurized cabin confined by flat or nearly flat panels. This paper discusses a finite element analysis and the testing of a large-scale hybrid wing body center section structure developed and constructed to demonstrate that the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure concept can meet these challenging demands of the next generation airframes. Part II of the paper considers the final test to failure of the test article in the presence of an intentionally inflicted severe discrete source damage under the wing up-bending loading condition. Finite element analysis results are compared with measurements acquired during the test and demonstrate that the hybrid wing body test article was able to redistribute and support the required design loads in a severely damaged condition.

  1. Analysis of lip print and fingerprint patterns in patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjusha, P; Sudha, S; Shameena, PM; Chandni, R; Varma, Sujatha; Pandiar, Deepak

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Globally, the prevalence of diabetes is soaring high in the recent times. There is an ardent search in the scientific community for a reliable and cheap early predictor which can serve the purpose of mass screening of a genetically vulnerable population. Hence, the present study was conducted to assess the predictive role of cheiloscopy on type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Several studies have established the association of dermatoglyphics with diabetes. However, results are still far from satisfaction. Thus, we also evaluated fingerprint analysis along with cheiloscopy. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 100 uncontrolled T2DM patients and 50 healthy controls. Lip prints were obtained using lipstick and cellophane paper analyzed and classified using Suzuki and Tsuchihashi's classification. Fingerprints were obtained using kajal stick, analyzed and classified using Henry's system of classification. Results: Type IV pattern of lip prints was found significantly more in the diabetic patients. Howbeit, fingerprint analysis did not reveal any significant association with diabetes. Conclusion: The present study showed a ray of hope for application of cheiloscopy as a potential biomarker in the early diagnosis of T2DM which can be used in mass screening. Further studies are warranted to confirm the findings. PMID:28932046

  2. New Gateway-compatible vectors for a high-throughput protein-protein interaction analysis by a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay in plants and their application to a plant clathrin structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Kohji; Ishikawa, Syouta; Matsunami, Erika; Yamauchi, Junji; Homma, Keiichi; Faulkner, Christine; Oparka, Karl; Jisaka, Mitsuo; Nagaya, Tsutomu; Yokota, Kazushige; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) play key roles in various biological processes. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay is an excellent tool for routine PPI analyses in living cells. We developed new Gateway vectors for a high-throughput BiFC analysis of plants, adopting a monomeric Venus split just after the tenth β-strand, and analyzed the interaction between Arabidopsis thaliana coated vesicle coatmers, the clathrin heavy chain (CHC), and the clathrin light chain (CLC). In competitive BiFC tests, CLC interacted with CHC through a coiled-coil motif in the middle section of CLC. R1340, R1448, and K1512 in CHC and W94 in CLC are potentially key amino acids underlying the inter-chain interaction, consistent with analyses based on homology modeling. Our Gateway BiFC system, the V10-BiFC system, provides a useful tool for a PPI analysis in living plant cells. The CLC-CHC interaction identified may facilitate clathrin triskelion assembly needed for cage formation.

  3. Migration and sustainability - compatible or contradictory?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    2006-01-01

    When the migration issue is discussed in a sustainability perspective, two questions are vital: 1) What is the relationship between migration and the global population growth? 2) What is the relationship between migration and consumption growth, and how does migration influence the distribution o...... of consumption possibilities both between and within industrialized and developing countries? Based on responses to these questions, it is argued that reasonably managed migration will be compatible with sustainable development....

  4. Ofloxacin intravenous. Compatibility with other antibacterial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janknegt, R; Stratermans, T; Cilissen, J; Lohman, J J; Hooymans, P M

    1991-10-18

    The physical and chemical compatibility of ofloxacin (infusion solution 100 ml = 200 mg) with amoxicillin, amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, flucloxacillin, tobramycin, gentamicin, clindamycin, vancomycin, ceftazidime and piperacillin was investigated. Upon admixture with flucloxacillin a precipitate formed between 7 and 24 hours. No other physical or chemical incompatibilities were observed with any of the other combinations. Ofloxacin may be safely combined with the tested antimicrobial drugs, except for flucloxacillin.

  5. Making nonlocal reality compatible with relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolic, H.

    2010-01-01

    It is often argued that hypothetic nonlocal reality responsible for nonlocal quantum correlations between entangled particles cannot be consistent with relativity. I review the most frequent arguments of that sort, explain how they can all be circumvented, and present an explicit Bohmian model of nonlocal reality (compatible with quantum phenomena) that fully obeys the principle of relativistic covariance and does not involve a preferred Lorentz frame.

  6. fMRI-compatible rehabilitation hand device

    OpenAIRE

    Tzika Aria; Astrakas Loukas; Weinberg Brian; Triantafyllou Christina; Muto Andrew; Khanicheh Azadeh; Mavroidis Constantinos

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used in studying human brain functions and neurorehabilitation. In order to develop complex and well-controlled fMRI paradigms, interfaces that can precisely control and measure output force and kinematics of the movements in human subjects are needed. Optimized state-of-the-art fMRI methods, combined with magnetic resonance (MR) compatible robotic devices for rehabilitation, can assist therapists to quantify, mo...

  7. Microwave spectrum compatibility in planetary research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmeth, A. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of solar system exploration, basic functions of the Deep Space Network (DSN), deep space microwave links, space research compatibility problems, and DSN's interference susceptibility. To maintain the operational integrity of competing radio systems using the microwave spectrum, the technology must extend to make possible the shared use of the spectral ranges without the ill effects of interferences. Suggestions are given which are only examples of many possible techniques that can eliminate or reduce interferences.

  8. High Pressure Hydrogen Materials Compatibility of Piezoelectric Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Shutthanandan, V.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Bonham, Charles C.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Pitman, Stan G.; Dahl, Michael E.; Henager, Charles H.

    2010-12-02

    Abstract: Hydrogen is being considered as a next-generation clean burning fuel. However, hydrogen has well known materials issues, including blistering and embrittlement in metals. Piezoelectric materials are used as actuators in hydrogen fuel technology. We present studies of materials compatibility of piezoelectric films in a high pressure hydrogen environment. Absorption of high pressure hydrogen was studied with Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) in lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and barium titanate (BTO) thin films. Hydrogen surface degradation in the form of blistering and Pb mixing was also observed.

  9. Double Retort System for Materials Compatibility Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Munne; EV Carelli

    2006-02-23

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) there was a need to investigate compatibility between the various materials to be used throughout the SNPP. Of particular interest was the transport of interstitial impurities from the nickel-base superalloys, which were leading candidates for most of the piping and turbine components to the refractory metal alloys planned for use in the reactor core. This kind of contamination has the potential to affect the lifetime of the core materials. This letter provides technical information regarding the assembly and operation of a double retort materials compatibility testing system and initial experimental results. The use of a double retort system to test materials compatibility through the transfer of impurities from a source to a sink material is described here. The system has independent temperature control for both materials and is far less complex than closed loops. The system is described in detail and the results of three experiments are presented.

  10. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Justin A., E-mail: jabriggs@stanford.edu [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Naik, Gururaj V.; Baum, Brian K.; Dionne, Jennifer A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Petach, Trevor A.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David [Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing.

  11. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Justin A.; Naik, Gururaj V.; Petach, Trevor A.; Baum, Brian K.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Dionne, Jennifer A.

    2016-02-01

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing.

  12. Analysis of the utilization history and the planning and the participation profiles of the shaft plant Asse II. Final report; Analyse der Nutzungsgeschichte und der Planungs- und Beteiligungsformen der Schachtanlage Asse II. Endbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipsen, Detlev; Kost, Susanne; Weichler, Holger

    2010-03-08

    The report on the utilization history of Asse II covers the following issues: Historical facts of the purchase of the shaft plant Asse II, decision sequences and line of arguments, research mine or final repository? Emplacement of radioactive materials (inventory), stability of the mine layout and water ingress, risk assessment - accident analysis, communication and public information, conclusions and recommendations.

  13. America in World War II: An Analysis of History Textbooks from England, Japan, Sweden, and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Stuart; Nicholls, Jason

    2005-01-01

    This study examined how textbooks from England, Japan, Sweden, and the United States portray America's role in World War II. Analysis of the central story lines revealed that historical information purveyed to students in different nations varies considerably. Accordingly, U.S. textbooks emphasize the significant and pre-eminent role that the…

  14. On the ancestral compatibility of two phylogenetic trees with nested taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llabrés, Mercè; Rocha, Jairo; Rosselló, Francesc; Valiente, Gabriel

    2006-09-01

    Compatibility of phylogenetic trees is the most important concept underlying widely-used methods for assessing the agreement of different phylogenetic trees with overlapping taxa and combining them into common supertrees to reveal the tree of life. The notion of ancestral compatibility of phylogenetic trees with nested taxa was recently introduced. In this paper we analyze in detail the meaning of this compatibility from the points of view of the local structure of the trees, of the existence of embeddings into a common supertree, and of the joint properties of their cluster representations. Our analysis leads to a very simple polynomial-time algorithm for testing this compatibility, which we have implemented and is freely available for download from the BioPerl collection of Perl modules for computational biology.

  15. 《医学衷中参西录》中龙骨牡蛎配伍运用浅析%Analysis on Compatibility Application of Bone Fossil of Big Mammals and Oyster Shell in Yixue Zhongzhong Canxilu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马少丹; 杨桢; 李冀

    2016-01-01

    Zhang Xichun is a famous Chinese medicine expert in the period of late Qing Dynasty .Yixue Zhongzhong Canxilu is his representative work .He is good at using bone fossil of big mammals and oyster shell compatibility in the treatment of various diseases .The functions are as following:convergence zhenyin and astringent yuanqi with dogwood fruit and radix paeoniae alba , astringing for stranguria with Chinese yam and radix paeoniae alba , convergence heart qi and tranquilization with heavy material with Longan , Wild Jujube and Seman Platycladi, hemostasis with astringents and compatibility Os Sepiae and Radix Rubiae , descending adverse qi for expelling phlegm with Pinellia Tuber;nourishing yin and suppressing hyperactive yang with Radix Achyranthis Bidentatae and Hematite .%《医学衷中参西录》是张锡纯一生治学临证经验和心得的汇集,受到临床医家的推崇,其善用龙骨、牡蛎配伍收敛固涩以治疗各种病证。集中体现在以下方面:收敛真阴、固涩元气,多和山萸肉、生杭白芍配伍;收涩止淋,多和山药、芍药配伍;收敛心气、重镇安神,多和龙眼肉、酸枣仁、柏子仁配伍;收敛止血,多和海螵蛸、茜草配伍;降逆祛痰、安神定志,多和清半夏配伍;重镇降逆、滋阴潜阳,多和怀牛膝、赭石配伍。

  16. prognova compatibility mifepristone and misoprostol treatment missed abortion 150 cases analysis%补佳乐配伍米非司酮、米索前列醇治疗稽留流产150例分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘静; 张清华

    2012-01-01

      Objective To analyzes prognova compatibility mifepristone and misoprostol on the curative effect of missed abortion. Methods 150 cases of missed abortion patients oral prognova 3 mg three times a day, and at the same time, graded and clothing mifepristone 50 mg a day secondary x3 day, a total of 300 mg, The fourth day meal suit misoprostol 600 ug, after observation abdominal pain, bleeding, organization content discharge and the qing dynasty palace, etc.Results Complete abortion rate 93.07%, incomplete abortion rate 4.6%, not abortion is 2.3%.Conclusion prognova compatibility mifepristone and misoprostol for missed abortion patients safe, effective, convenient.%  目的:探讨补佳乐配伍米非司酮、米索前列醇对稽留流产的疗效.方法:150例稽留流产患者口服补佳乐3 mg 一日三次,同时分次加服米非司酮50 mg 一日二次 x3天,共计300mg,第4天顿服米索前列醇600ug,用药后观察腹痛、出血、组织物排出及清宫等情况.结果:完全流产率93.07%,不全流产率4.6%,未流产者占2.3%.结论:补佳乐配伍米非司酮、米索前列醇对稽留流产患者安全、有效、方便.

  17. Analysis of Class II human leucocyte antigens in Italian and Spanish systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, Lorenzo; Rueda, Blanca; Marchini, Maurizio; Santaniello, Alessandro; Simeón, Carmen P; Fonollosa, Vicente; Caronni, Monica; Rios-Fernandez, Raquel; Carreira, Patricia; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Moreno, Antonia; López-Nevot, Miguel A; Escalera, Ana; González-Escribano, Maria F; Martin, Javier; Scorza, Raffaella

    2012-01-01

    To determine the role of Class II HLAs in SSc patients from Italy and Spain and in SSc patients of Caucasian ancestry. Nine hundred and forty-four SSc patients (Italy 392 patients; Spain 452 patients) and 1320 ethnically matched healthy controls (Italy 398 patients; Spain 922 patients) were genotyped up to the fourth digit by PCR with sequence-specific oligonucleotides for HLA-DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 loci. Patients included 390 ACA-positive and 254 anti-topo I-positive subjects. Associations between SSc or SSc-specific antibodies and HLA alleles or HLA haplotypes were sought via the chi-square test after 10 000-fold permutation testing. A meta-analysis including this study cohort and other Caucasoids samples was also conducted. In both the cohorts, the strongest association was observed between the HLA-DRB1*1104 allele and SSc or anti-topo I antibodies. The HLA-DRB1*1104 -DQA1*0501 -DQB1*0301 haplotype was overrepresented in Italian [odds ratio (OR) = 2.069, 95% asymptotic CIs (CI(95)) 1.486, 2.881; P < 0.001] and in Spanish patients (OR = 6.707, CI(95) 3.974, 11.319; P < 0.001) as well as in anti-topo-positive patients: Italy (OR = 2.642, CI(95) 1.78, 3.924; P < 0.001) and Spain (OR = 20.625, CI(95) 11.536, 36.876; P < 0.001). In both the populations we also identified an additional risk allele (HLA-DQB1*03) and a protective allele (HLA-DQB1*0501) in anti-topo-positive patients. The meta-analysis showed different statistically significant associations, the most interesting being the differential association between HLA-DRB1*01 alleles and ACAs (OR = 1.724, CI(95) 1.482, 2.005; P < 0.001) or topo I antibodies (OR = 0.5, CI(95) 0.384, 0.651; P < 0.001). We describe multiple robust associations between SSc and HLA Class II antigens in Caucasoids that may help to understand the genetic architecture of SSc.

  18. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) complexes of N, N' – ... temperature and coordinated water were determined ... indicating fairly stable complex compounds (Table 1). The complex compounds are insoluble [Table 2] in water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in ...

  19. SWOT Analysis of King Abdullah II School for Information Technology at University of Jordan According to Quality Assurance Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna Naser Eddeen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Many books and research papers have defined and referred to the term SWOT Analysis. SWOT Analysis can be defines as "strategic planning method used to evaluate the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats involved in a project or in a business venture". It's used to assess internal and external environmental factors which affect on the business. This paper analyze the main SWOT factors at King Abdullah II School for Information Technology.

  20. Deleterious impact of feto-maternal MHC compatibility on the success of pregnancy in a macaque model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnink, Alice; Mee, Edward T; Savy, Nicolas; Congy-Jolivet, Nicolas; Rose, Nicola J; Blancher, Antoine

    2014-02-01

    The impact of feto-maternal histocompatibility on reproduction has inspired long-lasting debates. However, after the review of numerous articles, the impact of HLA allele sharing within couples on fecundity remains questionable. We decided to explore the impact of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) feto-maternal compatibility on reproduction in a cynomolgus macaque facility composed of animals of Mauritian descent. The Mauritian-derived macaque population presents a very restricted MHC polymorphism (only seven founding haplotypes) due to a strong founding bottleneck effect. The MHC polymorphism was investigated in 237 trios (male, female and offspring) using 17 microsatellite markers distributed across the MHC. Haplotypes were confirmed by segregation analysis. We evaluated the relative frequencies of MHC-compatible and MHC-semi-compatible offspring with the mothers. Among the 237 trios, we selected 42 trios for which the identity of the father is certain and for which the theoretical probabilities of fully compatible and semi-compatible offspring were equal. We found 11 offspring fully compatible and 31 offspring semi-compatible with their respective mother. The observed proportions were clearly outside the interval of confidence of 99 % and therefore most probably resulted from a selection of the semi-compatible offspring during pregnancy. We concluded that MHC fully compatible cynomolgus macaque offspring have a selective survival disadvantage in comparison with offspring inheriting a paternal MHC haplotype differing from maternal haplotypes.

  1. Synthesis, Spectroscopy, Thermal Analysis, Electrochemistry and Superoxide Scavenging Activity of a New Bimetallic Copper(II Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Sarma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new bimetallic copper(II complex has been synthesized with ligand obtained by the condensation of salicylaldehyde and the amine derived from reduction of nitration product of benzil. The ligand was characterized by 1H NMR and mass spectra, and the binuclear Copper(II complex was characterized by vibrational and electronic spectra, EPR spectra, and magnetic moment measurement. Thermogravimetric analysis study and electrochemical study of the complex were also done. The complex was found to show superoxide dismutase activity.

  2. Synergistic interaction of levetiracetam with gabapentin in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model – a type II isobolographic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wlaz Aleksandra; Kondrat-Wrobel Maria W.; Zaluska Katarzyna; Kochman Ewelina; Rekas Anna R.; Luszczki Jarogniew J.

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed at characterizing the anticonvulsant effects of levetiracetam in combination with gabapentin, in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model. Herein, psychomotor seizures were evoked in male albino Swiss mice by a current (32 mA, 6 Hz, 3 s stimulus duration) delivered via ocular electrodes. Type II isobolographic analysis was used to characterize the anticonvulsant interactions between the drugs in combination, for fixed-ratios of 1:1, 1:2, 1:5 and 1:10. The type II isobolog...

  3. [Miscellaneous Compatibility Determinations : Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR : 2017

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Linked through this record are compatibility determinations from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal between the years 2005 and 2014. Included is a 2005 Compatibility...

  4. Area 3, SRC-II coal slurry preheater studies report for the technical data analysis program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-08-01

    This report reviews the raw data gathered from the Preheater B test runs at Ft. Lewis, and also the Preheater B results presented in the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) Process Final Report, Volumes 1 and 2 of Slurry Preheater Design, SRC-II Process and the Ft. Lewis Slurry Preheater Data Analysis, 1 1/2 Inch Coil by Gulf Science and Technology Corporation of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. attempts were made to correlate several variables not previously considered with slurry viscosity and thermal conductivity. Only partial success was realized. However, in the process of attempting to correlate these variables an understanding of why some variables could not be correlated was achieved. An attempt was also made, using multiple linear regression, to correlate coal slurry viscosity and thermal conductivity with several independent variables among which were temperature, coal concentration, total solids, coal type, slurry residence time, shear rate, and unit size. The final correlations included some, but not all, of these independent variables. This report is not a stand alone document and should be considered a supplement to work already done. It should be read in conjunction with the reports referenced above.

  5. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 2, Rev. 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This appendix determines the effective G values for payload shipping categories of contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste materials, based on the radiolytic G values for waste materials that are discussed in detail in Appendix 3.6.8 of the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package. The effective G values take into account self-absorption of alpha decay energy inside particulate contamination and the fraction of energy absorbed by nongas-generating materials. As described in Appendix 3.6.8, an effective G value, G{sub eff}, is defined by: G{sub eff} - {Sigma}{sub M} (F{sub M} x G{sub M}) F{sub M}-fraction of energy absorbed by material maximum G value for a material where the sum is over all materials present inside a waste container. The G value itself is determined primarily by the chemical properties of the material and its temperature. The value of F is determined primarily by the size of the particles containing the radionuclides, the distribution of radioactivity on the various materials present inside the waste container, and the stopping distance of alpha particles in air, in the waste materials, or in the waste packaging materials.

  6. Analysis of blue-shifted emission peaks in type II supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, J P; Gutierrez, C P; Hamuy, M; Morrell, N I; Phillips, M; Folatelli, G; Stritzinger, M D; Freedman, W L; González-Gaitán, S; McCarthy, P; Suntzeff, N; Thomas-Osip, J

    2014-01-01

    In classical P-Cygni profiles, theory predicts emission to peak at zero rest velocity. However, supernova spectra exhibit emission that is generally blue shifted. While this characteristic has been reported in many supernovae, it is rarely discussed in any detail. Here we present an analysis of H-alpha emission-peaks using a dataset of 95 type II supernovae, quantifying their strength and time evolution. Using a post-explosion time of 30d, we observe a systematic blueshift of H-alpha emission, with a mean value of -2000 kms-1. This offset is greatest at early times but vanishes as supernovae become nebular. Simulations of Dessart et al. (2013) match the observed behaviour, reproducing both its strength and evolution in time. Such blueshifts are a fundamental feature of supernova spectra as they are intimately tied to the density distribution of ejecta, which falls more rapidly than in stellar winds. This steeper density structure causes line emission/absorption to be much more confined; it also exacerbates th...

  7. Analysis of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COX2) gene in giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, S S; Zhu, Y; Lan, D; Li, D S; Pang, H Z; Wang, Y; Li, D Y; Wei, R P; Zhang, H M; Wang, C D; Hu, Y D

    2017-01-23

    The giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca (Ursidae), has a unique bamboo-based diet; however, this low-energy intake has been sufficient to maintain the metabolic processes of this species since the fourth ice age. As mitochondria are the main sites for energy metabolism in animals, the protein-coding genes involved in mitochondrial respiratory chains, particularly cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COX2), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in electron transfer, could play an important role in giant panda metabolism. Therefore, the present study aimed to isolate, sequence, and analyze the COX2 DNA from individuals kept at the Giant Panda Protection and Research Center, China, and compare these sequences with those of the other Ursidae family members. Multiple sequence alignment showed that the COX2 gene had three point mutations that defined three haplotypes, with 60% of the sequences corresponding to haplotype I. The neutrality tests revealed that the COX2 gene was conserved throughout evolution, and the maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis, using homologous sequences from other Ursidae species, showed clustering of the COX2 sequences of giant pandas, suggesting that this gene evolved differently in them.

  8. Update on the Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II: statistical analysis plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregson Barbara A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies had suggested that the outcome for patients with spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH and no intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH might be improved with early evacuation of the haematoma. The Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II set out to establish whether a policy of earlier surgical evacuation of the haematoma in selected patients with spontaneous lobar ICH would improve outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. It is an international, multi-centre, prospective randomised parallel group trial of early surgery in patients with spontaneous lobar ICH. Outcome is measured at six months via a postal questionnaire. Results Recruitment to the study began on 27 November 2006 and closed on 15 August 2012 by which time 601 patients had been recruited. The protocol was published in Trials (http://www.trialsjournal.com/content/12/1/124/. This update presents the analysis plan for the study without reference to the unblinded data. The trial data will not be unblinded until after follow-up is completed in early 2013. The main trial results will be presented in spring 2013 with the aim to publish in a peer-reviewed journal at the same time. Conclusion The data from the trial will provide evidence on the benefits and risks of early surgery in patients with lobar ICH. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN22153967

  9. Elastodynamic analysis of a gear pump. Part II: Meshing phenomena and simulation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucchi, E.; Dalpiaz, G.; Rivola, A.

    2010-10-01

    A non-linear lumped kineto-elastodynamic model for the prediction of the dynamic behaviour of external gear pumps is presented. It takes into account the most important phenomena involved in the operation of this kind of machines. Two main sources of noise and vibration can be considered: pressure and gear meshing. Fluid pressure distribution on gears, which is time-varying, is computed and included as a resultant external force and torque acting on the gears. Parametric excitations due to time-varying meshing stiffness, the tooth profile errors (obtained by a metrological analysis), the backlash effects between meshing teeth, the lubricant squeeze and the possibility of tooth contact on both lines of action were also included. Finally, the torsional stiffness and damping of the driving shaft and the non-linear behaviour of the hydrodynamic journal bearings were also taken into account. Model validation was carried out on the basis of experimental data concerning case accelerations and force reactions. The model can be used in order to analyse the pump dynamic behaviour and to identify the effects of modifications in design and operation parameters, in terms of vibration and dynamic forces. Part I is devoted to the calculation of the gear eccentricity in the steady-state condition as result of the balancing between mean pressure loads, mean meshing force and bearing reactions, while in Part II the meshing phenomena are fully explained and the main simulation results are presented.

  10. SRC-II slurry preheater technical uncertainties. Report for the technical data analysis program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-06-01

    This report reviews the performance, and draws conclusions therefrom, the coal slurry preheaters of the Ft. Lewis, Washington, Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) Pilot Plant in the following areas: Coking, Erosion Corrosion, Heat transfer and pressure drop effects. Using prudent engineering judgement it postulates how such conclusions should affect the design and operability of large preheaters in future commercial scale plants. Also a recommendation is made for a small scale research and development effort that should result in a much firmer preheater design for any future facility. This report should be read in conjunction with the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) Final Report, and volumes 1 and 2 of Slurry Preheater Design, SRC-II Process and also Ft. Lewis Slurry Preheater Data Analysis, 1-1/2 Inch Coil by Gulf Science and Technology Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co.'s background is based primarily on a racetrack shaped up-flow coil and these comments pertain specifically to a commercial heater of that type of design. 5 references, 12 figures, 1 table.

  11. Multimodal image analysis of the retina in Hunter syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis type II): Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvucci, Isadora Darriba Macedo; Finzi, Simone; Oyamada, Maria Kiyoko; Kim, Chong Ae; Pimentel, Sérgio Luis Gianotti

    2017-08-18

    We report a case of retinal and posterior ocular findings in a 33-year-old man diagnosed with Hunter syndrome (Mucopolysaccharidosis type II) in a multimodal imaging way. Our patient was complaining of blurred night vision for the past 3 years. He had not received any systemic treatment for Hunter syndrome. Vision acuity was 20/20 in both eyes and corneas were clear. Fundus examination revealed bilateral crowded and hyperemic optic nerve heads (elevated in the ocular ultrasound) and areas of subretinal hypopigmentation. There was hyperautofluorescence at the central fovea and perifovea, and a diffuse bilateral choroidal fluorescence in angiography. Macular SD-OCT showed a thinning of the external retina at the perifovea in both eyes. Visual field testing showed a bilateral ring scotoma. The full field ERG was subnormal, with a negative response in the scotopic phase. Visual Evoked Potencial test and cranial MRI were normal. Our multimodal analysis reported here attempted to contribute to the knowledge of the natural history of GAG deposition in the eye, focusing on the retina and retinal pigment epithelium. Defining this natural history is essential for a proper comparison with Hunter patients receiving systemic treatment, thus determining if it can or cannot improve retinal function in humans with this disorder.

  12. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 1 (BLOOTH00020001) on Town Highway 2, crossing Mill Brook, Bloomfield, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayotte, Joseph D.; Medalie, Laura

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BLOOTH00020001 on town highway 2 crossing Mill Brook, Bloomfield, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the White Mountain section of the New England Upland physiographic province of north-east Vermont in the town of Bloomfield. The 4.85-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the banks have dense woody vegetation coverage. In the study area, Mill Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 28 ft and an average channel depth of 4 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobbles (D50 is 57.3 mm or 0.188 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 6, 1995,

  13. Optical glass compatibility for the design of apochromatic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gruescu C.; Nicoara I.; Popov D.; Bodea R.; Hora H.

    2008-01-01

    The design of apochromatic systems is difficult because of two problems: the glass sorts compatibility and the c1/ca arbitrary input ratio. The optical glass manufacturers offer a wide range of sorts, so that the choice of triplet compatible glasses becomes itself an important separate problem. The paper provides a solution of mathematical modeling for the glass compatibility and, practically, analyses the sorts presented by Schott GmbH. The original software provided 22 compatible glass trip...

  14. Transepithelial corneal collagen crosslinking for keratoconus: qualitative investigation by in vivo HRT II confocal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporossi, Aldo; Mazzotta, Cosimo; Baiocchi, Stefano; Caporossi, Tomaso; Paradiso, Anna Lucia

    2012-01-01

    This was a qualitative investigation of corneal microstructural modifications in keratoconic patients undergoing experimental transepithelial crosslinking (TE CXL). Ten patients with keratoconus intolerant to gas-permeable rigid contact lenses were enrolled. Corneal thickness was in the range 350-390 µm at the thinnest point measured by Visante AC optical coherence tomography system (Zeiss, Jena, Germany). All patients underwent TE CXL with 0.1% riboflavin-15% dextran solution supplemented with TRIS plus sodium EDTA (Ricrolin TE, Sooft Italia) according to Siena protocol. In vivo Heidelberg retinal tomograph II laser scanning confocal analysis (Rostock Cornea Module, Heidelberg, Germany) was performed with the following follow-up: preoperative and postoperative assessments at 1, 3, and 6 months. The following morphologic parameters were evaluated: epithelium, subepithelial, and anterior stroma nerve plexi, keratocytes apoptosis, stromal changes, and the endothelium. After TE CXL, epithelial cells showed apoptosis, with mosaic alterations gradually disappearing. Keratocytes apoptosis was variable, superficial, and uneven, with a maximum depth of penetration at about 140 µm, measured from the surface of epithelium. Treatment respected subepithelial and stromal nerves that did not disappear. No variation in cell count or endothelial mosaic was observed. In vivo confocal analysis of corneal modifications induced by TE CXL showed a limited apoptotic affect of this treatment, about one-third of classic epi-off crosslinking procedure. The TE CXL respected sub-basal and anterior stroma nerve fibers, resulting safe for corneal endothelium. According to limited penetration, its mid- to long-term efficacy needs to be determined in different clinical settings related to patient age and keratoconus progression.

  15. Model based design and analysis of phase II HIV-1 trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekić, Dinko; Röshammar, Daniel; Simonsson, Ulrika S H

    2013-08-01

    This work explores the advantages of a model based drug development (MBDD) approach for the design and analysis of antiretroviral phase II trials. Two different study settings were investigated: (1) a 5-arm placebo-controlled parallel group dose-finding/proof of concept (POC) study and (2) a comparison of investigational drug and competitor. Studies were simulated using a HIV-1 dynamics model in NONMEM. The Monte-Carlo Mapped Power method determined the sample size required for detecting a dose-response relationship and a significant difference in effect compared to the competitor using a MBDD approach. Stochastic simulation and re-estimation were used for evaluation of model parameter precision and bias given different sample sizes. Results were compared to those from an unpaired, two-sided t test and ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05). In all scenarios, the MBDD approach resulted in smaller study sizes and more precisely estimated treatment effect than conventional statistical analysis. Using a MBDD approach, a sample size of 15 patients could be used to show POC and estimate ED50 with a good precision (relative standard error, 25.7 %). A sample size of 10 patients per arm was needed using the MBDD approach for detecting a difference in treatment effect of ≥20 % at 80 % power, a 3.4-fold reduction in sample size compared to a t test. The MBDD approach can be used to achieve more precise dose-response characterization facilitating decision making and dose selection. If necessitated, the sample size needed to reach a desired power can potentially be reduced compared to traditional statistical analyses. This may allow for comparison against competitors already in early clinical studies.

  16. Genomic association analysis identifies multiple loci influencing antihypertensive response to an angiotensin II receptor blocker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Stephen T; Bailey, Kent R; Schwartz, Gary L; Chapman, Arlene B; Chai, High Seng; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2012-06-01

    To identify genes influencing blood pressure response to an angiotensin II receptor blocker, single nucleotide polymorphisms identified by genome-wide association analysis of the response to candesartan were validated by opposite direction associations with the response to a thiazide diuretic, hydrochlorothiazide. We sampled 198 white and 193 blacks with primary hypertension from opposite tertiles of the race-sex-specific distributions of age-adjusted diastolic blood pressure response to candesartan. There were 285 polymorphisms associated with the response to candesartan at P<10(-4) in whites. A total of 273 of the 285 polymorphisms, which were available for analysis in a separate sample of 196 whites, validated for opposite direction associations with the response to hydrochlorothiazide (Fisher χ(2) 1-sided P=0.02). Among the 273 polymorphisms, those in the chromosome 11q21 region were the most significantly associated with response to candesartan in whites (eg, rs11020821 near FUT4, P=8.98 × 10(-7)), had the strongest opposite direction associations with response to hydrochlorothiazide (eg, rs3758785 in GPR83, P=7.10 × 10(-3)), and had the same direction associations with response to candesartan in the 193 blacks (eg, rs16924603 near FUT4, P=1.52 × 10(-2)). Also notable among the 273 polymorphisms was rs11649420 on chromosome 16 in the amiloride-sensitive sodium channel subunit SCNN1G involved in mediating renal sodium reabsorption and maintaining blood pressure when the renin-angiotensin system is inhibited by candesartan. These results support the use of genomewide association analyses to identify novel genes predictive of opposite direction associations with blood pressure responses to inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin and renal sodium transport systems.

  17. Isobolographic analysis of the interaction between cadmium (II) and sodium sulphate: toxicological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mera, Roi; Torres, Enrique; Abalde, Julio

    2016-02-01

    Sulphate is an essential nutrient for autotrophic organisms and has been shown to have important implications in certain processes of tolerance to cadmium toxicity. Sodium sulphate is the main salt of sulphate in the natural environments. The concentration of this salt is increasing in the aquatic environments due to environmental pollution. The aim of this study was to investigate, using an analysis of isobolograms, the type and the degree of the interaction between Cd(II) and sodium sulphate in the freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas moewusii. Two blocks of experiments were performed, one at sub-optimal sodium sulphate concentrations (14.2 mg/L). Three fixed ratios (2:1, 1:1, and 1:2) of the individual EC50 for cadmium and sodium sulphate were used within each block. The isobolographic analysis of interaction at sub-optimal concentrations showed a stronger antagonistic effect with values of interaction index (γ) between 1.46 and 3.4. However, the isobologram with sodium sulphate at supra-optimal concentrations revealed a slight but significant synergistic effect between both chemicals with an interaction index between 0.54 and 0.64. This synergic effect resulted in the potentiation of the toxic effects of cadmium, synergy that was related to the increase of the ionic strength and of two species of cadmium, CdSO4 (aq), and Cd(SO4)2(2-) , in the medium. Results of the current study suggest that sodium sulphate is able to perform a dual antagonist/synergist effect on cadmium toxicity. This role was concentration dependent.

  18. Structural analysis of Golgi alpha-mannosidase II inhibitors identified from a focused glycosidase inhibitor screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Douglas A; Tarling, Chris A; Withers, Stephen G; Rose, David R

    2008-09-23

    The N-glycosylation pathway is a target for pharmaceutical intervention in a number of pathological conditions including cancer. Golgi alpha-mannosidase II (GMII) is the final glycoside hydrolase in the pathway and has been the target for a number of synthetic efforts aimed at providing more selective and effective inhibitors. Drosophila GMII (dGMII) has been extensively studied due to the ease of obtaining high resolution structural data, allowing the observation of substrate distortion upon binding and after formation of a trapped covalent reaction intermediate. However, attempts to find new inhibitor leads by high-throughput screening of large commercial libraries or through in silico docking were unsuccessful. In this paper we provide a kinetic and structural analysis of five inhibitors derived from a small glycosidase-focused library. Surprisingly, four of these were known inhibitors of beta-glucosidases. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the dGMII:inhibitor complexes highlights the ability of the zinc-containing GMII active site to deform compounds, even ones designed as conformationally restricted transition-state mimics of beta-glucosidases, into binding entities that have inhibitory activity. Although these deformed conformations do not appear to be on the expected conformational itinerary of the enzyme, and are thus not transition-state mimics of GMII, they allow positioning of the three vicinal hydroxyls of the bound gluco-inhibitors into similar locations to those found with mannose-containing substrates, underlining the importance of these hydrogen bonds for binding. Further, these studies show the utility of targeting the acid-base catalyst using appropriately positioned positively charged nitrogen atoms, as well as the challenges associated with aglycon substitutions.

  19. Development of hazard-compatible building fragility and vulnerability models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, E.; Luco, N.

    2008-01-01

    We present a methodology for transforming the structural and non-structural fragility functions in HAZUS into a format that is compatible with conventional seismic hazard analysis information. The methodology makes use of the building capacity (or pushover) curves and related building parameters provided in HAZUS. Instead of the capacity spectrum method applied in HAZUS, building response is estimated by inelastic response history analysis of corresponding single-degree-of-freedom systems under a large number of earthquake records. Statistics of the building response are used with the damage state definitions from HAZUS to derive fragility models conditioned on spectral acceleration values. Using the developed fragility models for structural and nonstructural building components, with corresponding damage state loss ratios from HAZUS, we also derive building vulnerability models relating spectral acceleration to repair costs. Whereas in HAZUS the structural and nonstructural damage states are treated as if they are independent, our vulnerability models are derived assuming "complete" nonstructural damage whenever the structural damage state is complete. We show the effects of considering this dependence on the final vulnerability models. The use of spectral acceleration (at selected vibration periods) as the ground motion intensity parameter, coupled with the careful treatment of uncertainty, makes the new fragility and vulnerability models compatible with conventional seismic hazard curves and hence useful for extensions to probabilistic damage and loss assessment.

  20. X-Ray Crystallographic Analysis, EPR Studies, and Computational Calculations of a Cu(II) Tetramic Acid Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiadis, Dimitrios; Tsironis, Dimitrios; Stefanou, Valentina; Igglessi–Markopoulou, Olga; McKee, Vickie; Sanakis, Yiannis; Lazarou, Katerina N.

    2017-01-01

    In this work we present a structural and spectroscopic analysis of a copper(II) N-acetyl-5-arylidene tetramic acid by using both experimental and computational techniques. The crystal structure of the Cu(II) complex was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction and shows that the copper ion lies on a centre of symmetry, with each ligand ion coordinated to two copper ions, forming a 2D sheet. Moreover, the EPR spectroscopic properties of the Cu(II) tetramic acid complex were also explored and discussed. Finally, a computational approach was performed in order to obtain a detailed and precise insight of product structures and properties. It is hoped that this study can enrich the field of functional supramolecular systems, giving place to the formation of coordination-driven self-assembly architectures. PMID:28316540

  1. 47 CFR 76.1621 - Equipment compatibility offer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment compatibility offer. 76.1621 Section... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1621 Equipment compatibility offer. Cable system... individual compatibility problems. (d) Cable operators shall provide such equipment at the request...

  2. 49 CFR 175.78 - Stowage compatibility of cargo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage compatibility of cargo. 175.78 Section 175... Loading, Unloading and Handling § 175.78 Stowage compatibility of cargo. (a) For stowage on an aircraft..., Compatibility Group S, explosives are permitted to be transported aboard a passenger aircraft. Only...

  3. 46 CFR Figure 1 to Part 150 - Compatibility Chart

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compatibility Chart 1 Figure 1 to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 150—Compatibility Chart EC02FE91.079...

  4. 14 CFR Appendix B to Part 150 - Noise Compatibility Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Noise Compatibility Programs B Appendix B... (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT NOISE COMPATIBILITY PLANNING Pt. 150, App. B Appendix B to Part 150—Noise Compatibility Programs Sec. B150.1Scope and purpose. Sec. B150.3Requirement for noise map. Sec....

  5. Are Automatic Imitation and Spatial Compatibility Mediated by Different Processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Richard P.; Catmur, Caroline; Heyes, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Automatic imitation or "imitative compatibility" is thought to be mediated by the mirror neuron system and to be a laboratory model of the motor mimicry that occurs spontaneously in naturalistic social interaction. Imitative compatibility and spatial compatibility effects are known to depend on different stimulus dimensions--body…

  6. Proteomic analysis of cPKCβII-interacting proteins involved in HPC-induced neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Xiangning; Zhang, Nan; Yang, Xuan; Liu, Yanyan; Du, Jianli; Liang, Jing; Xu, Qunyuan; Li, Junfa

    2011-04-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning (HPC) initiates intracellular signaling pathway to provide protection against subsequent cerebral ischemic injuries, and its mechanism may provide molecular targets for therapy in stroke. According to our study of conventional protein kinase C βII (cPKCβII) activation in HPC, the role of cPKCβII in HPC-induced neuroprotection and its interacting proteins were determined in this study. The autohypoxia-induced HPC and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced cerebral ischemia mouse models were prepared as reported. We found that HPC reduced 6 h MCAO-induced neurological deficits, infarct volume, edema ratio and cell apoptosis in peri-infarct region (penumbra), but cPKCβII inhibitors Go6983 and LY333531 blocked HPC-induced neuroprotection. Proteomic analysis revealed that the expression of four proteins in cytosol and eight proteins in particulate fraction changed significantly among 49 identified cPKCβII-interacting proteins in cortex of HPC mice. In addition, HPC could inhibit the decrease of phosphorylated collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP-2) level and increase of CRMP-2 breakdown product. TAT-CRMP-2 peptide, which prevents the cleavage of endogenous CRMP-2, could inhibit CRMP-2 dephosphorylation and proteolysis as well as the infarct volume of 6 h MCAO mice. This study is the first to report multiple cPKCβII-interacting proteins in HPC mouse brain and the role of cPKCβII-CRMP-2 in HPC-induced neuroprotection against early stages of ischemic injuries in mice.

  7. Analysis of paired end Pol II ChIP-seq and short capped RNA-seq in MCF-7 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Scheidegger

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available While a role of promoter-proximal RNA Polymerase II (Pol II pausing in regulation of eukaryotic gene expression is implied, the mechanisms and dynamics of this process are poorly understood. We performed genome-wide analysis of short capped RNAs (scRNAs and Pol II chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells to better understand Pol II pausing (Samarakkody, A., Abbas, A., Scheidegger, A., Warns, J., Nnoli, O., Jokinen, B., Zarns, K., Kubat, B., Dhasarathy, A. and Nechaev, S. (2015 RNA polymerase II pausing can be retained or acquired during activation of genes involved in the epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Nucleic Acids Res 43, 3938–3949. The data are available at the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE67041. For both ChIP and scRNA samples, we used paired end sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq instrument. For ChIP-seq, the use of paired end sequencing allowed us to avoid ambiguities in center-read definition. For scRNA seq, this allowed us to identify both the 5′-end and the 3′-end in the same run that represent, respectively, the transcription start sites and the locations of Pol II pausing. The sharpening of Pol II ChIP-seq metagene profiles when aligned against 5′-ends of scRNAs indicates that these RNAs can be used to define the start sites for the majority of mRNA transcription events.

  8. Interaction and compatibility of ADN with compositions of propellant by thermal analysis method%热分析法研究ADN与推进剂组分的相互作用及相容性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟; 邵重斌; 刘芳莉; 樊学忠; 谢五喜; 庞维强; 闫宁; 刘小刚; 刘春; 姬月萍

    2014-01-01

    用高压差示扫描量热法( PDSC),研究了ADN(二硝酰胺铵)与推进剂的粘合剂、固化剂、增塑剂和高能填料的相互作用及相容性。结果表明,ADN与PEG、TDI和HDI二元混合物的分解温度比ADN的分解峰温低16.3~26.9℃,混合体系相互作用危险,相容性差;ADN与NG-BTTN、TEGDN、Bu-NENA和HMX二元混合物的分解温度略高于ADN的分解峰温0.5~7.5℃,对应混合物的分解温度比NG-BTTN、TEGDN、Bu-NENA和HMX的分解温度低5.9~14.4℃,混合体系的相互作用较为敏感;ADN与GAP、PBT、PET、IPDI、N-100、NG、TMETN、BDNPA-F和Al二元混合物的分解温度与各单组分分解温度差小于2℃,上述组分相容。%The interaction and compatibility of ADN with various main compositions of propellant, including binders, curing a-gents, plasticizers and energetic fillers, were investigated by means of PDSC.Results show that Tp(decomposition temperature) of ADN-PEG,-TDI and -HDI dual mixing system is 16.3~26.9℃ lower than Tp of ADN.The interactions between them are dangerous and ADN is incompatible with PEG, TDI and HDI;Tp of ADN-NG/BTTN,-TEGDN,-Bu-NENA and-HMX dual mixing system is 0.5~7.5 ℃ higher than Tp of ADN and 5.9~14.4℃ lower than those of corresponding compositions(NG/BTTN, TEGDN, Bu-NE-NA and HMX), thus the interactions between them are sensitive;ΔTp(difference of decomposition temperature) of ADN-GAP, -PBT,-PET,-IPDI,-N-100,-NG,-TMETN,-BDNPA-F and -Al dual mixing system with the corresponding compositions is less than 2 ℃, and ADN is found to be compatible with compositions mentioned above.

  9. Compatibility testing of vacuum seal materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, P. A.; Rodin, W. A.

    1993-05-01

    Small scale materials compatibility testing was conducted for three elastomers considered for use as vacuum seal materials: Adiprene MOCA-cured; Adiprene Cyanacured; and Sylgard silastic rubber. The tests were conducted using orthogonal array designed experiments for each of the elastomers placed in contact with three materials commonly used during weapon disassembly operations: Duxseal, Sylgard 186 grease, and 2-propyl alcohol. The test results indicated that only the 2-propyl alcohol had a significant effect on the elastomer hardness and physical properties. The alcohol had the largest effect on the two Adiprene materials, and the silastic rubber was the least affected.

  10. Compatible Relaxation and Coarsening in Algebraic Multigrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brannick, J J; Falgout, R D

    2009-09-22

    We introduce a coarsening algorithm for algebraic multigrid (AMG) based on the concept of compatible relaxation (CR). The algorithm is significantly different from standard methods, most notably because it does not rely on any notion of strength of connection. We study its behavior on a number of model problems, and evaluate the performance of an AMG algorithm that incorporates the coarsening approach. Lastly, we introduce a variant of CR that provides a sharper metric of coarse-grid quality and demonstrate its potential with two simple examples.

  11. The Construal (In)compatibility Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaojing; Ringberg, Torsten; Mao, Huifang

    2011-01-01

    This research examines how consumers with a creative mind-set are persuaded by advertising claims construed at different levels (i.e., abstract vs. concrete ad claims). Across four experiments, we show that consumers with a creative mindset are more persuaded by ad claims construed at a level...... incompatible with their mental construal, while ad claims construed at a level compatible with consumers' mental construal are more effective for those who possess a less creative mindset. We document that such differences in persuasion are driven by the fact that consumers with a creative (less creative) mind...

  12. Cloning and sequence analysis of putative type II fatty acid synthase genes from Arachis hypogaea L.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meng-Jun Li; Ai-Qin Li; Han Xia; Chuan-Zhi Zhao; Chang-Sheng Li; Shu-Bo Wan; Yu-Ping Bi; Xing-Jun Wang

    2009-06-01

    The cultivated peanut is a valuable source of dietary oil and ranks fifth among the world oil crops. Plant fatty acid biosynthesis is catalysed by type II fatty acid synthase (FAS) in plastids and mitochondria. By constructing a full-length cDNA library derived from immature peanut seeds and homology-based cloning, candidate genes of acyl carrier protein (ACP), malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase, -ketoacyl-ACP synthase (I, II, III), -ketoacyl-ACP reductase, -hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydrase and enoyl-ACP reductase were isolated. Sequence alignments revealed that primary structures of type II FAS enzymes were highly conserved in higher plants and the catalytic residues were strictly conserved in Escherichia coli and higher plants. Homologue numbers of each type II FAS gene expressing in developing peanut seeds varied from 1 in KASII, KASIII and HD to 5 in ENR. The number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was quite different in each gene. Peanut type II FAS genes were predicted to target plastids except ACP2 and ACP3. The results suggested that peanut may contain two type II FAS systems in plastids and mitochondria. The type II FAS enzymes in higher plants may have similar functions as those in E. coli.

  13. Cloning and sequence analysis of putative type II fatty acid synthase genes from Arachis hypogaea L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng-Jun; Li, Ai-Qin; Xia, Han; Zhao, Chuan-Zhi; Li, Chang-Sheng; Wan, Shu-Bo; Bi, Yu-Ping; Wang, Xing-Jun

    2009-06-01

    The cultivated peanut is a valuable source of dietary oil and ranks fifth among the world oil crops. Plant fatty acid biosynthesis is catalysed by type II fatty acid synthase (FAS) in plastids and mitochondria. By constructing a full-length cDNA library derived from immature peanut seeds and homology-based cloning, candidate genes of acyl carrier protein (ACP), malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase, beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase (I, II, III), beta-ketoacyl-ACP reductase, beta-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydrase and enoyl-ACP reductase were isolated. Sequence alignments revealed that primary structures of type II FAS enzymes were highly conserved in higher plants and the catalytic residues were strictly conserved in Escherichia coli and higher plants. Homologue numbers of each type II FAS gene expressing in developing peanut seeds varied from 1 in KASII, KASIII and HD to 5 in ENR. The number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was quite different in each gene. Peanut type II FAS genes were predicted to target plastids except ACP2 and ACP3. The results suggested that peanut may contain two type II FAS systems in plastids and mitochondria. The type II FAS enzymes in higher plants may have similar functions as those in E. coli.

  14. [Implementing a “Health Promoting Workplace”: compatible organizational practices in university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilterys, Robert; Dedobbeleer, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    In 2006, a University Hospital in Quebec decided to implement the Health Promoting Hospital project (HPH). A study was conducted on the internal context of the HPH Project implementation, and more particularly on one of its dimensions, the “health promoting workplace”. Compatibility is an important factor of the internal context, but has been rarely studied. The objective of this paper is to examine whether there are any organizational practices compatible with those of a health promoting workplace for nurses. A questionnaire was administered, interviews were conducted with strategic actors and a document analysis was performed.The results show various levels of compatibility with the criteria of a health promoting workplace. Thus, compatibility was very high for criteria related to the development of a learning and efficient organization, the strategies to ensure a healthy and safe workplace, and healthy lifestyles. However, poor compatibility was observed for criteria related to the adoption of a health promotion policy and no compatibility was observed for nurses’ participation in the decision-making process.The study identified strengths and weaknesses in the “Health Promoting Workplace” Subproject implementation process. It also emphasized the importance of the adaptation of tools to local conditions. In this case, it is the WHO assessment tool for hospitals wishing to assess their health promotion practices and to stimulate their development.

  15. The Multiple Resonance Probe: A Novel Device for Industry Compatible Plasma Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Storch, Robert; Lapke, Martin; Oberrath, Jens; Schulz, Christian; Styrnoll, Tim; Zietz, Christian; Awakowicz, Peter; Musch, Thomas; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Rolfes, Ilona

    2012-10-01

    To be useful for the supervision or control of technical plasmas, a diagnostic method must be i) robust and stable, ii) insensitive to perturbation by the process, iii) itself not perturbing the process, iv) clearly and easily interpretable without the need for calibration, v) compliant with the requirements of process integration, and, last but not least, vi) economical in terms of investment, footprint, and maintenance. Plasma resonance spectroscopy, exploiting the natural ability of plasmas to resonate on or near the electron plasma frequency, provides a good basis for such an ``industry compatible'' plasma diagnostics. The contribution will describe the general idea of active plasma resonance spectroscopy and introduce a mathematical formalism for its analysis. It will then focus on the novel multipole resonance probe (MRP), where the excited resonances can be classified explicitly and the connection between the probe response and the desired electron density can be cast as a simple formula. The current state of the MRP project will be described, including the experimental characterization of a prototype in comparison with Langmuir probes, and the development of a specialized measurement circuit.

  16. [Functional analysis of transforming growth factor-beta type II dominant negative receptor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarada, M

    1996-06-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is a multifunctional homodimeric protein with an apparent molecular weight of 25 KDa. TGF-beta transduces signals by forming heteromeric complexes of their type-I (T beta R-I) and type-II (T beta R-II) serin/threonine kinase receptors. TGF-beta binds first to T beta R-II receptor, and then the ligand in this complex is recognized by T beta R-I, resulting in formation of a heteromeric receptor complex composed of T beta R-I and T beta R-II. Once received, T beta R-I becomes phosphorylated in the GS domain by the associated constitutively active T beta R-II and transmits the downstream signal. It has been reported that formation of the heteromeric complex is indispensible at least in epithelial cells for growth inhibition and extracellular matrix production induced by TGF-beta. In this study, the functional role of T beta R-II for the TGF-beta-induced signals in osteoblastic cells was investigated by using a dominant negative type of T beta R-II mutant receptors (T beta RIIDNR). ROS 17/2.8 and MG 63 cells were found to express T beta R-I, T beta R-II, and T beta R-III, and their cell growth was inhibited by TGF-beta, whereas alkaline phosphatase activity was stimulated. Cells that were stably transfected with the T beta RIIDNR plasmid showed decreased response to TGF-beta during growth and alkaline phosphatase activity. These results indicate that the intracellular serine/threonine kinase domain of T beta R-II is essential for signal transduction of the TGF-beta-induced alkaline phosphatase activity as well as growth inhibition.

  17. Analysis of the Sherlock II tip location system for inserting peripherally inserted central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelkes, Valdis; Kumar, Abhishek; Shukla, Pratik A; Contractor, Sohail; Rutan, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are frequently placed at the bedside. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of the Sherlock II tip location system (Bard Access Systems, Salt Lake City, UT), which offers electromagnetic detection of the PICC tip to assist the operator in guiding the tip to a desired location. We performed a retrospective review of patients who had a bedside PICC using the Sherlock II tip location system. Three hundred seventy-five of 384 patients (97.7%) had the catheter tip positioned appropriately. Our results suggest that the Sherlock II tip location system is an efficacious system for bedside PICC placement.

  18. Substitution of aspartic acid for glycine at position 310 in type II collagen produces achondrogenesis II, and substitution of serine at position 805 produces hypochondrogenesis: analysis of genotype-phenotype relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventure, J; Cohen-Solal, L; Ritvaniemi, P; Van Maldergem, L; Kadhom, N; Delezoide, A L; Maroteaux, P; Prockop, D J; Ala-Kokko, L

    1995-01-01

    Two different mutations were found in two unrelated probands with lethal chondrodysplasias, one with achondrogenesis type II and the other with the less severe phenotype of hypochondrogenesis. The mutations in the COL2A1 gene were identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of genomic DNA followed by dideoxynucleotide sequencing and restriction site analysis. The proband with achondrogenesis type II had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted aspartate for glycine at position 310 of the alpha 1(II) chain of type II procollagen. The proband with hypochondrogenesis had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted serine for glycine at position 805. Type II collagen extracted from cartilage from the probands demonstrated the presence of type I collagen and a delayed electrophoretic mobility, indicating post-translational overmodifications. Analysis of CNBr peptides showed that, in proband 1, the entire peptides were overmodified. Examination of chondrocytes cultured in agarose or alginate indicated that there was a delayed secretion of type II procollagen. In addition, type II collagen synthesized by cartilage fragments from the probands demonstrated a decreased thermal stability. The melting temperature of the type II collagen containing the aspartate-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 4 degrees C, and that of the collagen containing the serine-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 2 degrees C. Electron microscopy of the extracellular matrix from the chondrocyte cultures showed a decreased density of matrix and the presence of unusually short and thin fibrils. Our results indicate that glycine substitutions in the N-terminal region of the type II collagen molecule can produce more severe phenotypes than mutations in the C-terminal region. The aspartate-for-glycine substitution at position 310, which was associated with defective secretion and a probable increased degradation of collagen, is the most destabilizing

  19. Electromagnetic Compatibility of Matrix Converter System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fligl

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper deals with matrix converters pulse width modulation strategies design with emphasis on the electromagnetic compatibility. Matrix converters provide an all-silicon solution to the problem of converting AC power from one frequency to another, offering almost all the features required of an ideal static frequency changer. They possess many advantages compared to the conventional voltage or current source inverters. A matrix converter does not require energy storage components as a bulky capacitor or an inductance in the DC-link, and enables the bi-directional power flow between the power supply and load. The most of the contemporary modulation strategies are able to provide practically sinusoidal waveforms of the input and output currents with negligible low order harmonics, and to control the input displacement factor. The perspective of matrix converters regarding EMC in comparison with other types of converters is brightly evident because it is no need to use any equipment for power factor correction and current and voltage harmonics reduction. Such converter with proper control is properly compatible both with the supply mains and with the supplied load. A special digital control system was developed for the realized experimental test bed which makes it possible to achieve greater throughput of the digital control system and its variability.

  20. Cesium chloride compatibility testing program: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, G.H.

    1989-11-01

    The US Department of Energy is considering the geologic disposal of the doubly encapsulated cesium chloride (CsCl) produced at the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). Reliable estimates of long-term corrosion of the inner capsule material by the CsCl under repository storage conditions are needed to assess the hazards associated with geologic disposal of the fission product Cs. The Cesium Chloride Compatibility Program was carried out at PNL to obtain the short-term corrosion data required to accurately estimate long-term attack. In the compatibility tests six standard WESF CsCl capsules were placed vertically in individual insulated containers and allowed to self-heat to a nominal maximum 316L SS/CsCl interface temperature of 450{degree}C. The capsules were held at temperature for times ranging from 0.25 to 6 years. When a test was completed, the capsule was removed from the container and sectioned. Four samples were cut from the inner capsule at prescribed locations and subjected to metallographic examination. Corrosion was determined from photomicrographs of the samples. 16 refs., 41 figs., 16 tabs.

  1. Integrated environmentally compatible soldering technologies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosking, F.M.; Frear, D.R.; Iman, R.L.; Keicher, D.M.; Lopez, E.P.; Peebles, H.C.; Sorensen, N.R.; Vianco, P.T.

    1994-05-01

    Chemical fluxes are typically used during conventional electronic soldering to enhance solder wettability. Most fluxes contain very reactive, hazardous constituents that require special storage and handling. Corrosive flux residues that remain on soldered parts can severely degrade product reliability. The residues are removed with chlorofluorocarbon (CFC), hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC), or other hazardous solvents that contribute to ozone depletion, release volatile organic compounds into the atmosphere, or add to the solvent waste stream. Alternative materials and processes that offer the potential for the reduction or elimination of cleaning are being developed to address these environmental issues. Timing of the effort is critical, since the targeted chemicals will soon be heavily taxed or banned. DOE`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (DOE/EM) has supported Sandia National Laboratories` Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Integrated Demonstration (ECMID). Part of the ECM program involves the integration of several environmentally compatible soldering technologies for assembling electronics devices. Fluxless or {open_quotes}low-residue/no clean{close_quotes} soldering technologies (conventional and ablative laser processing, controlled atmospheres, ultrasonic tinning, protective coatings, and environmentally compatible fluxes) have been demonstrated at Sandia (SNL/NM), the University of California at Berkeley, and Allied Signal Aerospace-Kansas City Division (AS-KCD). The university demonstrations were directed under the guidance of Sandia staff. Results of the FY93 Soldering ID are presented in this report.

  2. Electromagnetic Compatibility Design for Powertrain Control Module

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yu-ming; CUI Tao; LIU Bo-lan; ZHANG Fu-jun

    2009-01-01

    In order to improve the electromaagnetic compatibility of powertrain control module (PCM),a system procedure of vehicular PCM electromagnetic alteration is presented in this paper.First of all,the box of the PCM is divided into different cabins to eliminate interferences between power supply circuit,analog circuit and digital circuit.Secondly,the working principle and electromagnetic (EM) characters of all the signals adopted by a typical PCM are analyzed.Then according to specific electromagnetic characters,different measures are adopted in corresponding signal process circuits or signal transfer cables,such as ground layout designing,power supply protecting,signal shielding and drive cable interference suppressing.Finally,further improvement may also needed regarding to practical electromagnetic compatibility test effects.The final test shows that,with all the measures mentioned above,the conducted emission of a PCM can be reduced by 20 dB;meanwhile,the radiated emission can be reduced by 30 dB comparing to the original system.

  3. Tubal sterilization and breast cancer incidence: results from the cancer prevention study II nutrition cohort and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Patel, Alpa V; Sun, Juzhong; Teras, Lauren R; Gapstur, Susan M

    2013-03-15

    Tubal sterilization is a common form of contraception in the United States and is hypothesized to be associated with a lower risk of breast cancer. However, prior observational studies have reported inconsistent results. We investigated the association between tubal sterilization and breast cancer risk among 77,249 postmenopausal, cancer-free women in the Cancer Prevention Study II (CPS-II) Nutrition Cohort, enrolled in 21 states in the United States during 1992-1993. During 15 years of follow-up through June 30, 2007, 4,084 invasive breast cancer cases were diagnosed. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. A meta-analysis including the CPS-II Nutrition Cohort results with other published results from 4 case-control studies and 3 prospective studies was conducted to provide a summary estimate for the association between tubal sterilization and breast cancer risk. In the CPS-II Nutrition Cohort, tubal sterilization was not associated with breast cancer incidence (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio = 1.08, 95% confidence interval: 0.97, 1.20). Associations stratified by year of tubal sterilization, age, and time since surgery were also null. The meta-analysis also found no association between tubal sterilization and breast cancer risk (odds ratio = 0.97, 95% confidence interval: 0.84, 1.09). Tubal sterilization does not appear to be associated with breast cancer risk.

  4. Complete coding sequence, sequence analysis and transmembrane topology modelling of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense putative oligosaccharyl transferase (TbOST II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baticados, Waren N; Inoue, Noboru; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Nagasawa, Hideyuki; Baticados, Abigail M

    2011-01-01

    The partial nucleotide sequence of putative Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense oligosaccharyl transferase gene was previously reported. Here, we describe the determination of its full-length nucleotide sequence by Inverse PCR (IPCR), subsequent biological sequence analysis and transmembrane topology modelling. The full-length DNA sequence has an Open Reading Frame (ORF) of 2406 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 801 amino acid residues. Protein and DNA sequence analyses revealed that homologues within the genome of other kinetoplastid and various origins exist. Protein topology analysis predicted that Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense putative oligosaccharyl transferase clone II (TbOST II) is a transmembrane protein with transmembrane helices in probably an N(cytosol)-C(cytosol) orientation. Data from the GenBank database assembly and sequence analyses in general clearly state that TbOST II is the STT3 subunit of OST in T.b. rhodesiense that necessitates further characterisation and functional studies with RNAi. TbOST II sequence had been deposited in the GenBank (accession number GU245937).

  5. Synthesis and Isomeric Analysis of Ru(II) Complexes Bearing Pentadentate Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Sepulcre, Marcos; Axelson, Jordan C; Aguiló, Joan; Solà-Hernández, Lluís; Francàs, Laia; Poater, Albert; Blancafort, Lluís; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi; Guirado, Gonzalo; Escriche, Lluís; Llobet, Antoni; Bofill, Roger; Sala, Xavier

    2016-11-07

    A Ru(II)-pentadentate polypyridyl complex [Ru(II)(κ-N(5)-bpy2PYMe)Cl](+) (1(+), bpy2PYMe = 1-(2-pyridyl)-1,1-bis(6-2,2'-bipyridyl)ethane) and its aqua derivative [Ru(II)(κ-N(5)-bpy2PYMe)(H2O)](2+) (2(2+)) were synthesized and characterized by experimental and computational methods. In MeOH, 1(+) exists as two isomers in different proportions, cis (70%) and trans (30%), which are interconverted under thermal and photochemical conditions by a sequence of processes: chlorido decoordination, decoordination/recoordination of a pyridyl group, and chlorido recoordination. Under oxidative conditions in dichloromethane, trans-1(2+) generates a [Ru(III)(κ-N(4)-bpy2PYMe)Cl2](+) intermediate after the exchange of a pyridyl ligand by a Cl(-) counterion, which explains the trans/cis isomerization observed when the system is taken back to Ru(II). On the contrary, cis-1(2+) is in direct equilibrium with trans-1(2+), with absence of the κ-N(4)-bis-chlorido Ru(III)-intermediate. All these equilibria were modeled by density functional theory calculations. Interestingly, the aqua derivative is obtained as a pure trans-[Ru(II)(κ-N(5)-bpy2PYMe)(H2O)](2+) isomer (trans-2(2+)), while the addition of a methyl substituent to a single bpy of the pentadentate ligand leads to the formation of a single cis isomer for both chlorido and aqua derivatives [Ru(II)(κ-N(5)-bpy(bpyMe)PYMe)Cl](+) (3(+)) and [Ru(II)(κ-N(5)-bpy(bpyMe)PYMe)(H2O)](2+) (4(2+)) due to the steric constraints imposed by the modified ligand. This system was also structurally and electrochemically compared to the previously reported [Ru(II)(PY5Me2)X](n+) system (X = Cl, n = 1 (5(+)); X = H2O, n = 2 (6(2+))), which also contains a κ-N(5)-Ru(II) coordination environment, and to the newly synthesized [Ru(II)(PY4Im)X](n+) complexes (X = Cl, n = 1 (7(+)); X = H2O, n = 2 (8(2+))), which possess an electron-rich κ-N(4)C-Ru(II) site due to the replacement of a pyridyl group by an imidazolic carbene.

  6. Assignment of PolyProline II conformation and analysis of sequence--structure relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansiaux, Yohann; Joseph, Agnel Praveen; Gelly, Jean-Christophe; de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2011-03-31

    Secondary structures are elements of great importance in structural biology, biochemistry and bioinformatics. They are broadly composed of two repetitive structures namely α-helices and β-sheets, apart from turns, and the rest is associated to coil. These repetitive secondary structures have specific and conserved biophysical and geometric properties. PolyProline II (PPII) helix is yet another interesting repetitive structure which is less frequent and not usually associated with stabilizing interactions. Recent studies have shown that PPII frequency is higher than expected, and they could have an important role in protein-protein interactions. A major factor that limits the study of PPII is that its assignment cannot be carried out with the most commonly used secondary structure assignment methods (SSAMs). The purpose of this work is to propose a PPII assignment methodology that can be defined in the frame of DSSP secondary structure assignment. Considering the ambiguity in PPII assignments by different methods, a consensus assignment strategy was utilized. To define the most consensual rule of PPII assignment, three SSAMs that can assign PPII, were compared and analyzed. The assignment rule was defined to have a maximum coverage of all assignments made by these SSAMs. Not many constraints were added to the assignment and only PPII helices of at least 2 residues length are defined. The simple rules designed in this study for characterizing PPII conformation, lead to the assignment of 5% of all amino as PPII. Sequence-structure relationships associated with PPII, defined by the different SSAMs, underline few striking differences. A specific study of amino acid preferences in their N and C-cap regions was carried out as their solvent accessibility and contact patterns. Thus the assignment of PPII can be coupled with DSSP and thus opens a simple way for further analysis in this field.

  7. Assignment of PolyProline II Conformation and Analysis of Sequence – Structure Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelly, Jean-Christophe; de Brevern, Alexandre G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Secondary structures are elements of great importance in structural biology, biochemistry and bioinformatics. They are broadly composed of two repetitive structures namely α-helices and β-sheets, apart from turns, and the rest is associated to coil. These repetitive secondary structures have specific and conserved biophysical and geometric properties. PolyProline II (PPII) helix is yet another interesting repetitive structure which is less frequent and not usually associated with stabilizing interactions. Recent studies have shown that PPII frequency is higher than expected, and they could have an important role in protein – protein interactions. Methodology/Principal Findings A major factor that limits the study of PPII is that its assignment cannot be carried out with the most commonly used secondary structure assignment methods (SSAMs). The purpose of this work is to propose a PPII assignment methodology that can be defined in the frame of DSSP secondary structure assignment. Considering the ambiguity in PPII assignments by different methods, a consensus assignment strategy was utilized. To define the most consensual rule of PPII assignment, three SSAMs that can assign PPII, were compared and analyzed. The assignment rule was defined to have a maximum coverage of all assignments made by these SSAMs. Not many constraints were added to the assignment and only PPII helices of at least 2 residues length are defined. Conclusions/Significance The simple rules designed in this study for characterizing PPII conformation, lead to the assignment of 5% of all amino as PPII. Sequence – structure relationships associated with PPII, defined by the different SSAMs, underline few striking differences. A specific study of amino acid preferences in their N and C-cap regions was carried out as their solvent accessibility and contact patterns. Thus the assignment of PPII can be coupled with DSSP and thus opens a simple way for further analysis in this field. PMID

  8. Shared HLA Class II in Six Autoimmune Diseases in Latin America: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Cruz-Tapias

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence and genetic susceptibility of autoimmune diseases (ADs may vary depending on latitudinal gradient and ethnicity. The aims of this study were to identify common human leukocyte antigen (HLA class II alleles that contribute to susceptibility to six ADs in Latin Americans through a meta-analysis and to review additional clinical, immunological, and genetic characteristics of those ADs sharing HLA alleles. DRB1∗03:01 (OR: 4.04; 95%CI: 1.41–11.53 was found to be a risk factor for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, Sjögren's syndrome (SS, and type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D. DRB1∗04:05 (OR: 4.64; 95%CI: 2.14–10.05 influences autoimmune hepatitis (AIH, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, and T1D; DRB1∗04:01 (OR: 3.86; 95%CI: 2.32–6.42 is a susceptibility factor for RA and T1D. Opposite associations were found between multiple sclerosis (MS and T1D. DQB1∗06:02 and DRB1∗15 alleles were risk factors for MS but protective factors for T1D. Likewise, DQB1∗06:03 allele was a risk factor for AIH but a protective one for T1D. Several common autoantibodies and clinical associations as well as additional shared genes have been reported in these ADs, which are reviewed herein. These results indicate that in Latin Americans ADs share major loci and immune characteristics.

  9. Genomic Analysis and Isolation of RNA Polymerase II Dependent Promoters from Spodoptera frugiperda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleckmann, Maren; Fritz, Markus H-Y; Bhuju, Sabin; Jarek, Michael; Schürig, Margitta; Geffers, Robert; Benes, Vladimir; Besir, Hüseyin; van den Heuvel, Joop

    2015-01-01

    The Baculoviral Expression Vector System (BEVS) is the most commonly used method for high expression of recombinant protein in insect cells. Nevertheless, expression of some target proteins--especially those entering the secretory pathway--provides a severe challenge for the baculovirus infected insect cells, due to the reorganisation of intracellular compounds upon viral infection. Therefore, alternative strategies for recombinant protein production in insect cells like transient plasmid-based expression or stable expression cell lines are becoming more popular. However, the major bottleneck of these systems is the lack of strong endogenous polymerase II dependent promoters, as the strong baculoviral p10 and polH promoters used in BEVS are only functional in presence of the viral transcription machinery during the late phase of infection. In this work we present a draft genome and a transcriptome analysis of Sf21 cells for the identification of the first known endogenous Spodoptera frugiperda promoters. Therefore, putative promoter sequences were identified and selected because of high mRNA level or in analogy to other strong promoters in other eukaryotic organism. The chosen endogenous Sf21 promoters were compared to early viral promoters for their efficiency to trigger eGFP expression using transient plasmid based transfection in a BioLector Microfermentation system. Furthermore, promoter activity was not only shown in Sf21 cells but also in Hi5 cells. The novel endogenous Sf21 promoters were ranked according to their activity and expand the small pool of available promoters for stable insect cell line development and transient plasmid expression in insect cells. The best promoter was used to improve plasmid based transient transfection in insect cells substantially.

  10. GPS-MBA: computational analysis of MHC class II epitopes in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ruikun; Liu, Zexian; Ren, Jian; Ma, Chuang; Gao, Tianshun; Zhou, Yanhong; Yang, Qing; Xue, Yu

    2012-01-01

    As a severe chronic metabolic disease and autoimmune disorder, type 1 diabetes (T1D) affects millions of people world-wide. Recent advances in antigen-based immunotherapy have provided a great opportunity for further treating T1D with a high degree of selectivity. It is reported that MHC class II I-A(g7) in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse and human HLA-DQ8 are strongly linked to susceptibility to T1D. Thus, the identification of new I-A(g7) and HLA-DQ8 epitopes would be of great help to further experimental and biomedical manipulation efforts. In this study, a novel GPS-MBA (MHC Binding Analyzer) software package was developed for the prediction of I-A(g7) and HLA-DQ8 epitopes. Using experimentally identified epitopes as the training data sets, a previously developed GPS (Group-based Prediction System) algorithm was adopted and improved. By extensive evaluation and comparison, the GPS-MBA performance was found to be much better than other tools of this type. With this powerful tool, we predicted a number of potentially new I-A(g7) and HLA-DQ8 epitopes. Furthermore, we designed a T1D epitope database (TEDB) for all of the experimentally identified and predicted T1D-associated epitopes. Taken together, this computational prediction result and analysis provides a starting point for further experimental considerations, and GPS-MBA is demonstrated to be a useful tool for generating starting information for experimentalists. The GPS-MBA is freely accessible for academic researchers at: http://mba.biocuckoo.org.

  11. Determinants of Employee Performance Analysis in Installation Dok II Hospital Nutrition Jayapura Papua 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Andrianto, Fery; Noor, Noer Bahry; Rantetampang, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Performance is a means to get better results than organizations, teams, and individuals with the means to understand and manage the performance in terms of objectives, standards, and requirements agreed attributes. The purpose of this study were 1) to analyze the influence of leadership on employee performance in the Installation Nutrition Hospital Dok II Jayapura, 2) to analyze the influence of human resources the performance of employees in the Installation Nutrition Hospital Dok II Jayapur...

  12. Using phase II data for the analysis of phase III studies: an application in rare diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wandel, Simon; Neuenschwander, Beat; Friede, Tim; Röver, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research and drug development in orphan diseases is challenging, since large-scale randomized studies are difficult to conduct. Formally synthesizing the evidence is therefore of great value, yet this is rarely done in the drug approval process. Phase III designs that make better use of phase II data can facilitate drug development in orphan diseases. A Bayesian meta-analytic approach is used to inform the phase III study with phase II data. It is particularly attractive, since uncer...

  13. Molecular analysis of iduronate -2- sulfatase gene in Tunisian patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chkioua Latifa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II, Hunter syndrome is X-linked recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from the defective activity of the enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS. Hunter disease can vary from mild to severe, depending on the level of enzyme deficiency. We report the IDS mutation and polymorphisms causing the Hunter syndrome in patients from one family in Tunisia Patients and methods A preliminary diagnosis was made by qualitative detection of urinary glycosaminoglycans of the suspected MPS II probands. The IDS mutation and polymorphisms were determined on these probands and their family members by amplifying and sequencing each of the exons and intron-exon junctions of IDS gene. Results The studied probands were homoallelic for p.R88P mutation. In addition, three known polymorphisms/sequence variants: IVS3-16 (c.419-16 delT, T214M (c.641C > T, T146T (c.438 C > T, IVS5-87(c.709-87G > A and one previously unknown: IVS7+38(c.1006+38T > C were identified in the MPS II patients. These are the first Tunisian MPS II patients to be genotyped. Conclusion The identification of these mutation and polymorphisms and their genotype-phenotype correlation should facilitate prenatal diagnosis and counseling for MPS II in Tunisia, where a very high rate of consanguinity exists.

  14. Quality control for quantitative PCR based on amplification compatibility test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichopad, Ales; Bar, Tzachi; Pecen, Ladislav; Kitchen, Robert R; Kubista, Mikael; Pfaffl, Michael W

    2010-04-01

    Quantitative qPCR is a routinely used method for the accurate quantification of nucleic acids. Yet it may generate erroneous results if the amplification process is obscured by inhibition or generation of aberrant side-products such as primer dimers. Several methods have been established to control for pre-processing performance that rely on the introduction of a co-amplified reference sequence, however there is currently no method to allow for reliable control of the amplification process without directly modifying the sample mix. Herein we present a statistical approach based on multivariate analysis of the amplification response data generated in real-time. The amplification trajectory in its most resolved and dynamic phase is fitted with a suitable model. Two parameters of this model, related to amplification efficiency, are then used for calculation of the Z-score statistics. Each studied sample is compared to a predefined reference set of reactions, typically calibration reactions. A probabilistic decision for each individual Z-score is then used to identify the majority of inhibited reactions in our experiments. We compare this approach to univariate methods using only the sample specific amplification efficiency as reporter of the compatibility. We demonstrate improved identification performance using the multivariate approach compared to the univariate approach. Finally we stress that the performance of the amplification compatibility test as a quality control procedure depends on the quality of the reference set.

  15. Angiotensin II and FCCP mobilizes calcium from different intracellular pools in adrenal glomerulosa cells; analysis of calcium fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balla, T; Szebeny, M; Kanyar, B; Spät, A

    1985-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of angiotensin II on the different pools of exchangeable Ca2+ in isolated rat adrenal glomerulosa cells. On the basis of steady state analysis of 45Ca exchange curves at least three kinetically distinct Ca2+ compartments are present in these cells. The most rapidly exchangeable compartment was regarded as Ca2+ loosely bound to the glycocalyx and the other compartments were considered to be intracellular Ca2+ pools. The effect of angiotensin II on different intracellular compartments was examined by adding the hormone at different phases of Ca2+ washout. Angiotensin increased the rate of 45Ca efflux within 1.5 min when added at the beginning of the washout. This effect, however, could not be detected when the hormone was added at the 30th min of washout, indicating that at least one hormone sensitive pool had lost most of its radioactivity by this time. In contrast to angiotensin II, the mitochondrial uncoupler FCCP mobilized almost the same quantity of 45Ca irrespective of the time of its addition during the washout. This latter finding suggests that this presumably mitochondrial Ca2+ pool has a slow rate of exchange and thus differs from the pool initially mobilized by angiotensin II. The initial Ca2+ mobilizing effect of angiotensin II was also observed in a Ca2+-free media which contained EGTA, indicating that this effect is not triggered by increased Ca2+ influx. In the present study we demonstrate in the intact glomerulosa cell that angiotensin II mobilizes Ca2+ from an intracellular Ca2+ store which appears to be distinct from the FCCP-sensitive store.

  16. Sensitivity Analysis of Uncertainty Parameter based on MARS-LMR Code on SHRT-45R of EBR II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seok-Ju; Kang, Doo-Hyuk; Seo, Jae-Seung [System Engineering and Technology Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sung-Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hae-Yong [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In order to assess the uncertainty quantification of the MARS-LMR code, the code has been improved by modifying the source code to accommodate calculation process required for uncertainty quantification. In the present study, a transient of Unprotected Loss of Flow(ULOF) is selected as typical cases of as Anticipated Transient without Scram(ATWS) which belongs to DEC category. The MARS-LMR input generation for EBR II SHRT-45R and execution works are performed by using the PAPIRUS program. The sensitivity analysis is carried out with Uncertainty Parameter of the MARS-LMR code for EBR-II SHRT-45R. Based on the results of sensitivity analysis, dominant parameters with large sensitivity to FoM are picked out. Dominant parameters selected are closely related to the development process of ULOF event.

  17. Analysis of the wake field effects in the PEP-II storage rings with extremely high currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novokhatski, A., E-mail: novo@slac.stanford.edu; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.

    2014-01-21

    We present the history and analysis of different wake field effects throughout the operational life of the PEP-II SLAC B-factory. Although the impedance of the high and low energy rings is small, the intense high-current beams generated a lot of power. The effects from these wake fields are: heating and damage of vacuum beam chamber elements like RF seals, vacuum valves, shielded bellows, BPM buttons and ceramic tiles; vacuum spikes, vacuum instabilities and high detector background; and beam longitudinal and transverse instabilities. We also discuss the methods used to eliminate these effects. Results of this analysis and the PEP-II experience may be very useful in the design of new storage rings and light sources.

  18. Analysis of the wake field effects in the PEP-II storage rings with extremely high currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present the history and analysis of different wake field effects throughout the operational life of the PEP-II SLAC B-factory. Although the impedance of the high and low energy rings is small, the intense high-current beams generated a lot of power. The effects from these wake fields are: heating and damage of vacuum beam chamber elements like RF seals, vacuum valves, shielded bellows, BPM buttons and ceramic tiles; vacuum spikes, vacuum instabilities and high detector background; and beam longitudinal and transverse instabilities. We also discuss the methods used to eliminate these effects. Results of this analysis and the PEP-II experience may be very useful in the design of new storage rings and light sources.

  19. Alcohol use disorder diagnoses in the criminal justice system: an analysis of the compatibility of current DSM-IV, proposed DSM-5.0, and DSM-5.1 diagnostic criteria in a correctional sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopak, Albert M; Metze, Amanda V; Hoffmann, Norman G

    2014-06-01

    This study explored the compatibility between the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR) diagnostic criteria for alcohol abuse and dependence with the initial (DSM-5.0) and most recent (DSM-5.1) proposed diagnostic criteria. Data drawn from a structured clinical interview used in the assessment of 6,871 male and 801 female state prison inmates were analyzed according to the existing and proposed diagnostic formulations. The greatest congruence was observed in cases that received no diagnosis according to the DSM-IV-TR because these also received no diagnosis in the DSM-5.1. Most cases with a current dependence diagnosis received a severe designation according to the proposed criteria. However, those with an abuse diagnosis were divided across various DSM-5.1 severity levels. Some diagnostic criteria were nearly universally endorsed among those classified with the highest severity levels, which indicated that some criteria may serve as cardinal indicators of a severe alcohol use disorder (SAUD). Additional diagnostic criteria not yet suggested for inclusion in the DSM (i.e., preoccupation with alcohol use and alcohol use to relieve emotional distress) were also evaluated. Evidence demonstrated these two criteria served as functional indicators of alcohol use disorder (AUD). This assessment approach can be used to establish appropriate treatment objectives based on the severity of diagnosed AUDs. Meeting these treatment objectives, especially in a correctional population, may have important implications for future offending. Recommendations are made for prospective research in this area.

  20. Type IA supernova spectroscopy analysis of Sloan Digital Sky Survey II - Supernova Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chen

    2009-06-01

    Supernovae (SNe) have played an important role in the recent dramatic development of observational cosmology. They possess homogeneous observable properties, and thus approximate "standard candles", allowing them to be precise, luminosity distance indicators. Over the last decade, the observed sample of supernovae (SNe) has increased by more than an order of magnitude. Further advances will no longer be limited by statistical errors, but rather by the control of systematic uncertainties, associated with source diversity and evolution. Over 500 SNe Ia have been discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) -- II SN Survey during the three fall seasons from 2005 to 2007. We combine spectroscopic and photometric data to explore reducing these systematic errors. One challenge is to remove accurately the host galaxy light from the observed spectra. We have developed an effective host-subtraction tool using a composite color-constrained PCA+template-fitting program. We have applied this technique to more than 700 spectra from SNe with redshifts up to 0.4 obtained from the SDSS-II SN Survey and more than 200 spectra from low-z SNe at redshifts less than 0.01 obtained from the Center for Astrophysics (CfA) SN archive. We have also developed an automatic method to quantify spectral features of SNe Ia and applied it to the CfA and SDSS-II samples. By comparing the time series of the spectral features between these two samples, we have found no sign of cosmological evolution. We have, however, found evidence for luminosity-dependent differences in the Mg II 4300, Si II 4000, Si II 5800, and Si II 6150 lines. This should be useful for cosmological studies.

  1. Technical Analysis of the Hydrogen Energy Station Concept, Phase I and Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TIAX, LLC

    2005-05-04

    patterns would be most viable for an energy station, TIAX developed several criteria for selecting a representative set of technology configurations. TIAX applied these criteria to all possible technology configurations to determine an optimized set for further analysis, as shown in Table ES-1. This analysis also considered potential energy station operational scenarios and their impact upon hydrogen and power production. For example, an energy station with a 50-kWe reformer could generate enough hydrogen to serve up to 12 vehicles/day (at 5 kg/fill) or generate up to 1,200 kWh/day, as shown in Figure ES-1. Buildings that would be well suited for an energy station would utilize both the thermal and electrical output of the station. Optimizing the generation and utilization of thermal energy, hydrogen, and electricity requires a detailed look at the energy transfer within the energy station and the transfer between the station and nearby facilities. TIAX selected the Baseline configuration given in Table ES-1 for an initial analysis of the energy and mass transfer expected from an operating energy station. Phase II The purpose of this technical analysis was to analyze the development of a hydrogen-dispensing infrastructure for transportation applications through the installation of a 50-75 kW stationary fuel cell-based energy station at federal building sites. The various scenarios, costs, designs and impacts of such a station were quantified for a hypothetical cost-shared program that utilizes a natural gas reformer to provide hydrogen fuel for both the stack(s) and a limited number of fuel cell powered vehicles, with the possibility of using cogeneration to support the building heat load.

  2. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 7 (WALDTH00020007) on Town Highway 2, crossing Coles Brook, Walden, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striker, Lora K.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WALDTH00020007 on Town Highway 2 crossing Coles Brook, Walden, Vermont (figures 1–8). Coles Brook is also referred to as Joes Brook. A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in north-eastern Vermont. The 12.8-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is predominantly shrub and brushland. In the study area, Coles Brook has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.005 ft/

  3. Genetic differentiation among sexually compatible relatives of Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pipan Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of gene flow between Brassica napus L. and its sexually compatible relatives that could be found in the wild in Slovenia was performed by microsatellite analysis using fifteen selected primer pairs. Genotypes included in the study were obtained from the field survey of sexually compatible relatives of B. napus in natural habitats around Slovenia and from reference collections. Two different wild species of all the presented sexually compatible relatives of B. napus were found in Slovenia, B. rapa and Sinapis arvensis. The reference genotypes included varieties and wild forms from internal collections as marketable seeds or from gene banks. Reference genotypes were represented by the following species and subspecies: B. napus ssp. napobrassica, B. napus ssp. napus, B. nigra, B. oleracea, B. rapa ssp. oleifera, Diplotaxis muralis; D. tenuifolia, Raphanus raphanistrum, R. sativus, R. sativus var. oleiformis, Rapistrum rugosum, S. alba and S. arvensis. Estimation of gene flow described by average number of migrants was 0.72 followed by 0.20 migrants. Due to the observed gene migrations, genetic drift and selection, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was not met. The mean number of alleles over all loci was 16.9, the average polymorphic information content was 0.43. We found four highly divergent and polymorphic loci (Na12-C08, Na10-A08, Ni3-G04b and BRMS-050 at statistically significant level (p<0.05 of gene flow detected. Over all gene diversity intra-individual among populations (0.55 was lower than inter-individual among population (0.77. The results of genetic linkages based standard genetic distance and unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean clustering method, generally divided the genotypes in three divergent groups. Similar results were obtained by principal coordinate analysis where three main groups were constructed according to three factors. A real number of genetic clusters demonstrated a clear separation between populations

  4. Fuel System Compatibility Issues for Prometheus-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DC Noe; KB Gibbard; MH Krohn

    2006-01-20

    Compatibility issues for the Prometheus-1 fuel system have been reviewed based upon the selection of UO{sub 2} as the reference fuel material. In particular, the potential for limiting effects due to fuel- or fission product-component (cladding, liner, spring, etc) chemical interactions and clad-liner interactions have been evaluated. For UO{sub 2}-based fuels, fuel-component interactions are not expected to significantly limit performance. However, based upon the selection of component materials, there is a potential for degradation due to fission products. In particular, a chemical liner may be necessary for niobium, tantalum, zirconium, or silicon carbide-based systems. Multiple choices exist for the configuration of a chemical liner within the cladding; there is no clear solution that eliminates all concerns over the mechanical performance of a clad/liner system. A series of tests to evaluate the performance of candidate materials in contact with real and simulated fission products is outlined.

  5. Engine Materials Compatibility with Alternate Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, Jeffery K [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2013-05-01

    The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined were accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

  6. Engine Materials Compatability with Alternative Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steve [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Moore, D. [USCAR

    2013-04-05

    The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined were accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

  7. Catalytic nanoarchitectonics for environmentally compatible energy generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Abe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmentally compatible energy management is one of the biggest challenges of the 21st century. Low-temperature conversion of chemical to electrical energy is of particular importance to minimize the impact to the environment while sustaining the consumptive economy. In this review, we shed light on one of the most versatile energy-conversion technologies: heterogeneous catalysts. We establish the integrity of structural tailoring in heterogeneous catalysts at different scales in the context of an emerging paradigm in materials science: catalytic nanoarchitectonics. Fundamental backgrounds of energy-conversion catalysis are first provided together with a perspective through state-of-the-art energy-conversion catalysis including catalytic exhaust remediation, fuel-cell electrocatalysis and photosynthesis of solar fuels. Finally, the future evolution of catalytic nanoarchitectonics is overviewed: possible combinations of heterogeneous catalysts, organic molecules and even enzymes to realize reaction-selective, highly efficient and long-life energy conversion technologies which will meet the challenge we face.

  8. Ensuring Query Compatibility with Evolving XML Schemas

    CERN Document Server

    Genevès, Pierre; Quint, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    During the life cycle of an XML application, both schemas and queries may change from one version to another. Schema evolutions may affect query results and potentially the validity of produced data. Nowadays, a challenge is to assess and accommodate the impact of theses changes in rapidly evolving XML applications. This article proposes a logical framework and tool for verifying forward/backward compatibility issues involving schemas and queries. First, it allows analyzing relations between schemas. Second, it allows XML designers to identify queries that must be reformulated in order to produce the expected results across successive schema versions. Third, it allows examining more precisely the impact of schema changes over queries, therefore facilitating their reformulation.

  9. Hydrogen compatibility handbook for stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1983-06-01

    This handbook compiles data on the effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of stainless steels and discusses this data within the context of current understanding of hydrogen compatibility of metals. All of the tabulated data derives from continuing studies of hydrogen effects on materials that have been conducted at the Savannah River Laboratory over the past fifteen years. Supplementary data from other sources are included in the discussion. Austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, and precipitation hardenable stainless steels have been studied. Damage caused by helium generated from decay of tritium is a distinctive effect that occurs in addition to the hydrogen isotopes protium and deuterium. The handbook defines the scope of our current knowledge of hydrogen effects in stainless steels and serves as a guide to selection of stainless steels for service in hydrogen.

  10. Developing 2 C-compatible investment criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeser, Frauke [NewClimate - Institute for Climate Policy and Global Sustainability gGmbH, Bonn (Germany); Weischer, Lutz [Germanwatch e.V., Koeln (Germany); Thomae, Jakob [2degrees Investing Initiative, New York, NY (United States); Hoehne, Niklas; Hagemann, Markus; El Alaoui, Alexander; Bals, Christoph; Eckstein, David; Kreft, Soenke; Rosse, Morten

    2015-11-30

    This report studies the development of criteria for assessing the compatibility of financial investments with the international goal to limit global temperature increase to below 2 C above pre-industrial levels. The findings are intended as a starting point and a key input for a longer term process to develop consensus-based 2 C investing criteria. The focus here is placed on investments in projects and physical assets, in particular of development and climate finance organisations. In order to limit global temperature increase to 2 C, global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions will have to be reduced significantly, eventually to zero, during the course of this century. This requires shifting capital from high to low carbon investments as well as significant capital mobilisation for investments in 2 C-compatible infrastructure. Given the long lifetime of physical assets, and the urgency of decarbonisation over the coming decades, this needs to begin today. Public financial institutions can play a prominent role in contributing to aligning investment flows with the 2 C limit, as well as in closing the current infrastructure investment gap, responding to their explicit or implicit climate mandates and leadership role in the finance sector. The majority of international financial institutions integrate climate considerations into their finance decisions to some degree, and are familiar with different types of criteria, including positive and negative lists, qualitative and quantitative benchmarks, and the use of shadow carbon pricing. However, current approaches do not link to the 2 C limit. 2 C investment criteria are therefore needed to guide investors in this regard. Such criteria may also support other purposes, including an understanding of climate risks and improved reporting and accountability.

  11. CMOS-compatible spintronic devices: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Alexander; Windbacher, Thomas; Sverdlov, Viktor; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2016-11-01

    For many decades CMOS devices have been successfully scaled down to achieve higher speed and increased performance of integrated circuits at lower cost. Today’s charge-based CMOS electronics encounters two major challenges: power dissipation and variability. Spintronics is a rapidly evolving research and development field, which offers a potential solution to these issues by introducing novel ‘more than Moore’ devices. Spin-based magnetoresistive random-access memory (MRAM) is already recognized as one of the most promising candidates for future universal memory. Magnetic tunnel junctions, the main elements of MRAM cells, can also be used to build logic-in-memory circuits with non-volatile storage elements on top of CMOS logic circuits, as well as versatile compact on-chip oscillators with low power consumption. We give an overview of CMOS-compatible spintronics applications. First, we present a brief introduction to the physical background considering such effects as magnetoresistance, spin-transfer torque (STT), spin Hall effect, and magnetoelectric effects. We continue with a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art spintronic devices for memory applications (STT-MRAM, domain wall-motion MRAM, and spin-orbit torque MRAM), oscillators (spin torque oscillators and spin Hall nano-oscillators), logic (logic-in-memory, all-spin logic, and buffered magnetic logic gate grid), sensors, and random number generators. Devices with different types of resistivity switching are analyzed and compared, with their advantages highlighted and challenges revealed. CMOS-compatible spintronic devices are demonstrated beginning with predictive simulations, proceeding to their experimental confirmation and realization, and finalized by the current status of application in modern integrated systems and circuits. We conclude the review with an outlook, where we share our vision on the future applications of the prospective devices in the area.

  12. The resupply interface mechanism RMS compatibility test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Stewart W.; Gallo, Frank G.

    1990-01-01

    Spacecraft on-orbit servicing consists of exchanging components such as payloads, orbital replacement units (ORUs), and consumables. To accomplish the exchange of consumables, the receiving vehicle must mate to the supplier vehicle. Mating can be accomplished by a variety of docking procedures. However, these docking schemes are mission dependent and can vary from shuttle bay berthing to autonomous rendezvous and docking. Satisfying the many docking conditions will require use of an innovative docking device. The device must provide fluid, electrical, pneumatic and data transfer between vehicles. Also, the proper stiffness must be obtained and sustained between the vehicles. A device to accomplish this, the resupply interface mechanism (RIM), was developed. The RIM is a unique device because it grasps the mating vehicle, draws the two vehicles together, simultaneously mates all connectors, and rigidizes the mating devices. The NASA-Johnson Manipulator Development Facility was used to study how compatible the RIM is to on orbit docking and berthing. The facility contains a shuttle cargo bay mockup with a remote manipulator system (RMS). This RMS is used to prepare crew members for shuttle missions involving spacecraft berthing operations. The MDF proved to be an excellant system for testing the RIM/RMS compatibility. The elements examined during the RIM JSC test were: RIM gross and fine alignment; berthing method sequence; visual cuing aids; utility connections; and RIM overall performance. The results showed that the RIM is a good device for spacecraft berthing operations. Mating was accomplished during every test run and all test operators (crew members) felt that the RIM is an effective device. The purpose of the JSC RIM test and its results are discussed.

  13. Probability of success for phase III after exploratory biomarker analysis in phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götte, Heiko; Kirchner, Marietta; Sailer, Martin Oliver

    2017-02-23

    The probability of success or average power describes the potential of a future trial by weighting the power with a probability distribution of the treatment effect. The treatment effect estimate from a previous trial can be used to define such a distribution. During the development of targeted therapies, it is common practice to look for predictive biomarkers. The consequence is that the trial population for phase III is often selected on the basis of the most extreme result from phase II biomarker subgroup analyses. In such a case, there is a tendency to overestimate the treatment effect. We investigate whether the overestimation of the treatment effect estimate from phase II is transformed into a positive bias for the probability of success for phase III. We simulate a phase II/III development program for targeted therapies. This simulation allows to investigate selection probabilities and allows to compare the estimated with the true probability of success. We consider the estimated probability of success with and without subgroup selection. Depending on the true treatment effects, there is a negative bias without selection because of the weighting by the phase II distribution. In comparison, selection increases the estimated probability of success. Thus, selection does not lead to a bias in probability of success if underestimation due to the phase II distribution and overestimation due to selection cancel each other out. We recommend to perform similar simulations in practice to get the necessary information about the risk and chances associated with such subgroup selection designs.

  14. Analysis of Software Development Methodologies to Build Safety Software Applications for the SATEX-II: A Mexican Experimental Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar Cisneros, Jorge; Vargas Martinez, Hector; Pedroza Melendez, Alejandro; Alonso Arevalo, Miguel

    2013-09-01

    Mexico is a country where the experience to build software for satellite applications is beginning. This is a delicate situation because in the near future we will need to develop software for the SATEX-II (Mexican Experimental Satellite). SATEX- II is a SOMECyTA's project (the Mexican Society of Aerospace Science and Technology). We have experienced applying software development methodologies, like TSP (Team Software Process) and SCRUM in other areas. Then, we analyzed these methodologies and we concluded: these can be applied to develop software for the SATEX-II, also, we supported these methodologies with SSP-05-0 Standard in particular with ESA PSS-05-11. Our analysis was focusing on main characteristics of each methodology and how these methodologies could be used with the ESA PSS 05-0 Standards. Our outcomes, in general, may be used by teams who need to build small satellites, but, in particular, these are going to be used when we will build the on board software applications for the SATEX-II.

  15. Supernova 2014J at M82: II. Direct Analysis of Spectra Obtained with Isaac Newton and William Herschel Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Vallely, Patrick; Baron, E; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Dominguez, I; Galbany, Lluis; Hernandez, J I Gonzalez; Mendez, J; Hamuy, M; Lopez-Sanchez, A R; Catalan, S; Cooke, E; Farina, C; Genova-Santos, R; Karjalainen, R; Lietzen, H; McCormac, J; Riddick, F; Rubino-Martin, J A; Tudor, I Skillen V; Vaduvescu, O

    2015-01-01

    We analyze a time series of optical spectra of SN 2014J from almost two weeks prior to maximum to nearly four months after maximum. We perform our analysis using the SYNOW code, which is well suited to track the distribution of the ions with velocity in the ejecta. We show that almost all of the spectral features during the entire epoch can be identified with permitted transitions of the common ions found in normal SNe Ia in agreement with previous studies. We show that 2014J is a relatively normal SN Ia. At early times the spectral features are dominated by Si II, S II, Mg II, and Ca II. These ions persist to maximum light with the appearance of Na I and Mg I. At later times iron-group elements also appear, as expected in the stratified abundance model of the formation of normal type Ia SNe. We do not find significant spectroscopic evidence for oxygen, until 100 days after maximum light, which also indicates that there is not significant mixing of Ni56 to higher velocities. The +100 day identification of oxy...

  16. Trace analysis of cefotaxime at carbon paste electrode modified with novel Schiff base Zn(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Preeti; Mohan, Swati; Kundu, Subir; Prakash, Rajiv

    2009-02-15

    Cefotaxime a third generation cephalosporin drug estimation in nanomolar concentration range is demonstrated for the first time in aqueous and human blood samples using novel Schiff base octahedral Zn(II) complex. The cefotaxime electrochemistry is studied over graphite paste and Zn(II) complex modified graphite paste capillary electrodes in H(2)SO(4) (pH 2.3) using cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. Cefotaxime enrichment is observed over Zn(II) complex modified graphite paste electrode probably due to interaction of functional groups of cefotaxime with Zn(II) complex. Possible interactions between metal complex and cefotaxime drug is examined by UV-vis and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) techniques and further supported by voltammetric analysis. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) with modified electrode is applied for the determination of cefotaxime in acidified aqueous and blood samples. Cefotaxime estimation is successfully demonstrated in the range of 1-500 nM for aqueous samples and 0.1-100 microM in human blood samples. Reproducibility, accuracy and repeatability of the method are checked by triplicate reading for large number of samples. The variation in the measurements is obtained less than 10% without any interference of electrolyte or blood constituents.

  17. TARGET ANALYSIS OF SUZHOU CREEK REHABILITATION PROJECT STAGE II:BASED ON WATER QUALITY MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Zhen-liang; XU Zu-xin

    2004-01-01

    The Suzhou Creek is a seriously polluted tidal river in Shanghai. The Suzhou Creek Rehabilitation Project was launched in 1998, and the total investment will surpass 10 billion yuan RMB. It is important to assess the effectiveness of the project and ascertain its targets. In this study, by analyzing the achievements of Suzhou Creek Rehabilitation Project (Stage I) and its remaining problems, the main tasks of the Project Stage II are proposed. These works are wastewater interception, sediment dredging, bidirectional water diversion, and reconstruction of municipal pump stations. The water quality model established with USEPA's WASP is employed to analyze the quantitative targets of the Project Stage II. In the Project Stage II, the water quality of mainstream and tributaries will be improved continuously, the valus of CODCr, BOD5, DO in the mainstream will steadily attain Class IV according to the National Surface Water Quality Standard, and the ecological environment of Suzhou Creek with continuously recover.

  18. TBscore II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Frauke; Lemvik, Grethe; Abate, Ebba;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: The TBscore, based on simple signs and symptoms, was introduced to predict unsuccessful outcome in tuberculosis patients on treatment. A recent inter-observer variation study showed profound variation in some variables. Further, some variables depend on a physician assessing...... them, making the score less applicable. The aim of the present study was to simplify the TBscore. Methods: Inter-observer variation assessment and exploratory factor analysis were combined to develop a simplified score, the TBscore II. To validate TBscore II we assessed the association between start...

  19. Column dynamic studies and breakthrough curve analysis for Cd(II) and Cu(II) ions adsorption onto palm oil boiler mill fly ash (POFA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Abdul Shukor Abdul; Manaf, Latifah Abd; Man, Hasfalina Che; Kumar, Nadavala Siva

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the adsorption characteristics of palm oil boiler mill fly ash (POFA) derived from an agricultural waste material in removing Cd(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solution via column studies. The performance of the study is described through the breakthrough curves concept under relevant operating conditions such as column bed depths (1, 1.5, and 2 cm) and influent metal concentrations (5, 10, and 20 mg/L). The Cd(II) and Cu(II) uptake mechanism is particularly bed depth- and concentration-dependant, favoring higher bed depth and lower influent metal concentration. The highest bed capacity of 34.91 mg Cd(II)/g and 21.93 mg Cu(II)/g of POFA was achieved at 20 mg/L of influent metal concentrations, column bed depth of 2 cm, and flow rate of 5 mL/min. The whole breakthrough curve simulation for both metal ions were best described using the Thomas and Yoon–Nelson models, but it is apparent that the initial region of the breakthrough for Cd(II) was better described using the BDST model. The results illustrate that POFA could be utilized effectively for the removal of Cd(II) and Cu(II) ions from aqueous solution in a fixed-bed column system.

  20. Novel zinc(II) and copper(II) complexes of a Mannich base derived from lawsone: Synthesis, single crystal X-ray analysis, ab initio density functional theory calculations and vibrational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Amanda P; Vargas, Maria D; Téllez Soto, Claudio A; Ramos, Joanna M; Visentin, Lorenzo do C; Pinheiro, Carlos B; Mangrich, Antônio S; de Rezende, Edivaltrys I P

    2012-08-01

    Zinc(II) and copper(II) complexes of a tridentate Mannich base L1 derived from 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, pyridinecarboxyaldehyde and 2-aminomethylpyridine, [ZnL1Cl(2)]·H(2)O 1 and [CuL1Cl(2)]·2H(2)O 2, have been synthesized and fully characterized. The structure of complex 1 has been elucidated by a single crystal X-ray diffraction study: the zinc atom is pentacoordinate and the coordination geometry is a distorted square base pyramid, with a geometric structural parameter τ equal to 0.149. Vibrational spectroscopy and ab initio DFT calculations of both compounds have confirmed that the two complexes exhibit similar structures. Full assignment of the vibrational spectra was also supported by careful analysis of the distorted geometries generated by the normal modes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of Learning of Contents Related to Astronomy in Elementary Education II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelzke, Marcos Rincon; de Moraes e Poffo, Roberta Izabella

    2012-11-01

    The Curriculum Proposal of the State of São Paulo presents in the discipline of Physical and Biological Sciences contents related to Earth and Universe, which are covered by the subject of Astronomy in the Elementary Education II (aged between 11 and 14). During the school year 2010, in a public school in Santo André, São Paulo, 89 pupils of the sixth year of an elementary school answered a questionnaire with ten open questions related to Astronomy to perform an analysis of the learning success of these concepts before and after the approach of the contents. With this work it is possible to compare the previous knowledge, mainly if there was an improvement in learning after imparting the concepts. In this way, it is possible to conclude what contents may be considered appropriate for this age and how to enhance the conveyance of astronomical contents in this step. With respect to learning the concepts by analysing the questionnaires, one can draw the following conclusions. In the first phase: The results generally indicate a lack of specific knowledge related to the subject Astronomy. Few pupils were able to say what a star is and had difficulties in citing constellations, and most could not identify the Milky Way. In the second phase: the results show a significant improvement in the pupils' performance in general. All groups showed a good level in conceptualizing and associating the discussed topics. It could be observed that it still proved as a difficulty for most of the pupils to conceptualize a star, to explain what it is, but on the other hand, one of the issues with greater correctness was precisely the one with respect to the sun. They do not exactly define a star but know that the Sun is one, and that is really good because there was an association. With respect to learning, it is concluded that it was significant and efficient, considering that most learners progressed better at the end of the school year with respect to the concepts.

  2. Angiotensin II receptor blockers improve peripheral endothelial function: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE(S: Several studies have assessed the effect of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs on peripheral endothelial dysfunction as measured by flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD, a widely-used indicator for endothelial function. We conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the effect in comparison to placebo or no treatment and other antihypertensives. METHODS: MEDLINE, Cochrane library and EMBASE were searched to September 2013 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs that assessed the effect of ARBs versus placebo or no treatment and other antihypertensives (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs, calcium channel blockers (CCBs, β-blockers, diuretics by forearm FMD. Furthermore, we also use meta-regression to analyze the relationship between the endothelial function and the duration of ARBs treatments. RESULTS: In 11 trials including 590 patients, ARBs (n = 315 significantly improved FMD (1.36%, 95% confidence internal [CI]:1.28 to 1.44 versus placebo or no treatment (n = 275. In 16 trials that included 1028 patients, ARBs (n = 486 had a significant effect (0.59%, 95% CI: 0.25 to 0.94 on FMD when compared with other antihypertensives (n = 542. In 8 trials, ARBs (n = 174 had no significant effect (-0.14%, 95% CI: -0.32 to 0.03 compared with ACEI (n = 173. Compared with others, the benefits of ARBs, respectively, were 1.67% (95% CI: 0.65 to 0.93 in 7 trials with CCBs, 0.79% (95% CI: 0.42 to 1.01 with β-blockers in 3 trials and 0.9% (95% CI: 0.77 to 1.03 with diuretics in 3 trials. Importantly, we found ARBs were less effective in a long time span (95% CI: -1.990 to -0.622 than the first 6 months (95% CI: -0.484 to 0.360. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that ARBs improve peripheral endothelial function and are superior to CCBs, β-blockers and diuretics. However, the effect couldn't be maintained for a long time. In addition, there was no significant difference between ARBs and ACEI.

  3. A genetic analysis of Plasmodium falciparum RNA polymerase II subunits in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazoume, Adonis; Naderi, Kambiz; Candolfi, Ermanno; Kedinger, Claude; Chatton, Bruno; Vigneron, Marc

    2011-04-01

    RNA polymerase II is an essential nuclear multi subunit enzyme that transcribes nearly the whole genome. Its inhibition by the alpha-amanitin toxin leads to cell death. The enzyme of Plasmodium falciparum remains poorly characterized. Using a complementation assay in yeast as a genetic test, we demonstrate that five Plasmodium putative RNA polymerase subunits are indeed functional in vivo. The active site of this enzyme is built from the two largest subunits. Using site directed mutagenesis we were able to modify the active site of the yeast RNA polymerase II so as to introduce Plasmodium or human structural motifs. The resulting strains allow the screening of chemical libraries for potential specific inhibitors.

  4. Enhanced blood compatibility of polyurethane functionalized with sulfobetaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiang; Lin, Sicong; Shen, Jian

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a biocompatible polyurethane surface by the tailoring of sulfobetaine. The polyurethane film was first grafted polymerization with acrylic acid by ozonization, followed by immobilizing sulfobetaine via two routes: (i) synthesize primary amine group terminated sulfobetaine and then couple onto the surface of polyurethane using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC); (ii) couple the primary amine group terminated tertiary amine onto the surface of polyurethane primarily using EDC and then form sulfobetaine through a ring-opening reaction between tertiary amine and 1,3-propanesultone (PS). The reaction process was monitored with attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The blood compatibility was evaluated by a hemolytic test and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) adhesion experiment. Little hemolysis took place on the surface of polyurethane grafted with sulfobetaine. Platelets adhering on the surface of grafted polyurethane decreased greatly as compared to the original after 1 and 3h of incubation with PRP.

  5. Materials and processing approaches for foundry-compatible transient electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jan-Kai; Fang, Hui; Bower, Christopher A.; Song, Enming; Yu, Xinge; Rogers, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Foundry-based routes to transient silicon electronic devices have the potential to serve as the manufacturing basis for “green” electronic devices, biodegradable implants, hardware secure data storage systems, and unrecoverable remote devices. This article introduces materials and processing approaches that enable state-of-the-art silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) foundries to be leveraged for high-performance, water-soluble forms of electronics. The key elements are (i) collections of biodegradable electronic materials (e.g., silicon, tungsten, silicon nitride, silicon dioxide) and device architectures that are compatible with manufacturing procedures currently used in the integrated circuit industry, (ii) release schemes and transfer printing methods for integration of multiple ultrathin components formed in this way onto biodegradable polymer substrates, and (iii) planarization and metallization techniques to yield interconnected and fully functional systems. Various CMOS devices and circuit elements created in this fashion and detailed measurements of their electrical characteristics highlight the capabilities. Accelerated dissolution studies in aqueous environments reveal the chemical kinetics associated with the underlying transient behaviors. The results demonstrate the technical feasibility for using foundry-based routes to sophisticated forms of transient electronic devices, with functional capabilities and cost structures that could support diverse applications in the biomedical, military, industrial, and consumer industries. PMID:28652373

  6. Materials and processing approaches for foundry-compatible transient electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jan-Kai; Fang, Hui; Bower, Christopher A.; Song, Enming; Yu, Xinge; Rogers, John A.

    2017-07-01

    Foundry-based routes to transient silicon electronic devices have the potential to serve as the manufacturing basis for “green” electronic devices, biodegradable implants, hardware secure data storage systems, and unrecoverable remote devices. This article introduces materials and processing approaches that enable state-of-the-art silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) foundries to be leveraged for high-performance, water-soluble forms of electronics. The key elements are (i) collections of biodegradable electronic materials (e.g., silicon, tungsten, silicon nitride, silicon dioxide) and device architectures that are compatible with manufacturing procedures currently used in the integrated circuit industry, (ii) release schemes and transfer printing methods for integration of multiple ultrathin components formed in this way onto biodegradable polymer substrates, and (iii) planarization and metallization techniques to yield interconnected and fully functional systems. Various CMOS devices and circuit elements created in this fashion and detailed measurements of their electrical characteristics highlight the capabilities. Accelerated dissolution studies in aqueous environments reveal the chemical kinetics associated with the underlying transient behaviors. The results demonstrate the technical feasibility for using foundry-based routes to sophisticated forms of transient electronic devices, with functional capabilities and cost structures that could support diverse applications in the biomedical, military, industrial, and consumer industries.

  7. Energetics and Compatibility of Plasticizers in Composite Solid Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rm. Muthiah

    1989-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a comparative analysis on the energetics of ester type plasticizers such as dioctyl adipate (DOA, dioctyl phthalate (DOP,dibutyl sebacate (DBS, isodecyl pelargonate (IDP, trioctylphosphate (TOF, diethyl phthalate (DEP, tricresyl phosphate (TCPand dibutyl phthalate (DBP and hydrocarbon type plasticizers such as polybutene (PB, spindle oil, naphthenic oil, polymer extender oil(PEO and poly isobutylene (PIB and the impact of some of the plasticizers on the work ability, pot life and mechanical properties of propellants based on two selected polymeric binders namely polybutadiene-acrylic acid-acrylonitrile (PBAN ter polymer andhydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB have been reported. The compatibility of all the plasticizers on HTPB binder was also studied at different concentration levels and temperatures using Brookfield viscometer and reported. The mechanism of plasticization is also reviewed.

  8. Molecular evidence and sequence analysis of a natural reassortant between cucumber mosaic virus subgroup IA and II strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanfei; Chen, Jishuang; Zhang, Huarong; Tang, Xiangshan; Du, Zhiyou

    2007-10-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is a tripartite RNA virus and has been divided into three subgroups, named IA, IB, and II. Some studies have found a few natural reassortants between CMV subgroups, although reassortment between CMV subgroups is infrequent. In our present work, a CMV reassortant, named CMV-Tsh, was obtained from a tomato plant. The complete sequence of CMV-Tsh genomic RNAs has been determined and analyzed. The results of sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses revealed that CMV-Tsh RNAs 1 and 3 are derived from one or two CMV subgroup II strain(s), while RNA2 is derived from a CMV subgroup IA strain. A PCR and restriction enzyme analysis-based method was developed to analyze the possibility of mixed infection by CMV strains of different subgroup in the CMV-Tsh-infected tomato plant. The results of the restriction enzyme analysis proved that CMV-Tsh is the unique strain in the tomato plant. Taken together, CMV-Tsh is a natural reassortant having CMV subgroup IA RNA2 and subgroup II RNAs 1 and 3.

  9. [Analysis of prognostic factors after radical resection in 628 patients with stage II or III colon cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qiong; Yang, Lin; Zhou, Ai-ping; Sun, Yong-kun; Song, Yan; DU, Feng; Wang, Jin-wan

    2013-03-01

    To analyze the clinicopathologic factors related to recurrence and metastasis of stage II or III colon cancer after radical resection. The clinical and pathological data of 628 patients with stage II or III colon cancer after radical resection from Jan. 2005 to Dec. 2008 in our hospital were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The overall recurrence and metastasis rate was 28.5% (179/628). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 70.3% and 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 78.5%. Univariate analysis showed that age, smoking intensity, depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, gross classification, histological differentiation, blood vessel tumor embolus, tumor gross pathology, multiple primary tumors, preoperative and postoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9, and the regimen of adjuvant chemotherapy were correlated to recurrence and metastasis of colon cancer after radical resection. Multivariate analysis showed that regional lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, the regimen of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, and preoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9 were independent factors affecting the prognosis of colon cancer patients. Regional lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, elevated preoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9, the regimen of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with single fluorouracil type drug are independent risk factors of recurrence and metastasis in patients with stage II-III colon cancer after radical resection.

  10. Winning the War: A Historical Analysis of the FFA during World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Kattlyn J.; Connors, James J.

    2009-01-01

    The United States' participation in World War II affected millions of men, women, and children, both at home and around the world. The war effort also affected the Future Farmers of America (FFA). FFA members, agriculture teachers, and national FFA officers all volunteered to serve their country during the war. Local FFA chapters and individual…

  11. An analysis of the secondary structure of spider spidroins I and II belonging to different species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ragulina, LE; Makeev, VY; Esipova, NG; Tumanyan, VG; Vlasov, PK; Bogush, VG; Debabov, VG

    2004-01-01

    We have analyzed the secondary structure of spidroin proteins of I and II types, related to spiders of different species. We used standard methods of secondary structure prediction NNPREDICT and JPRED and also analyzed the occurrences of oligopeptides with a preferred secondary structure with the

  12. An analysis of the secondary structure of spider spidroins I and II belonging to different species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ragulina, LE; Makeev, VY; Esipova, NG; Tumanyan, VG; Vlasov, PK; Bogush, VG; Debabov, VG

    2004-01-01

    We have analyzed the secondary structure of spidroin proteins of I and II types, related to spiders of different species. We used standard methods of secondary structure prediction NNPREDICT and JPRED and also analyzed the occurrences of oligopeptides with a preferred secondary structure with the he

  13. Implementation of a Proficiency-Based Diploma System in Maine: Phase II--District Level Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvernail, David L.; Stump, Erika K.; McCafferty, Anita Stewart; Hawes, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the findings from Phase II of a study of Maine's implementation of a proficiency-based diploma system. At the request of the Joint Standing Committee on Education and Cultural Affairs of the Maine Legislature, the Maine Policy Research Institute (MEPRI) has conducted a two-phased study of the implementation of Maine law…

  14. Surface engineering of polycaprolactone by biomacromolecules and their blood compatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandwekar, Anand P; Patil, Deepak P; Shouche, Yogesh; Doble, Mukesh

    2011-08-01

    Improving blood compatibility of biodegradable polymers is an area of intensive research in blood contacting devices. In this study, curdlan sulphate and heparin-modified poly (caprolactone) (PCL) hybrids were developed by physically entrapping these molecules on the PCL surface. This modification technique was performed by reversible gelation of the PCL surface region following exposure to a solvent and nonsolvent mixture. The presence of these biomacromolecules on the PCL surface was verified by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDAX) analysis, while wettability of the films was investigated by dynamic contact angle measurements. The blood compatibilities of the surface-modified films were examined using in vitro platelet and leukocyte adhesion and thrombus formation. Mouse RAW 264.7 macrophage cells were used to assess the cell adhesion and inflammatory response to the modified surface by quantifying mRNA expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines namely TNF-α and IL-1β using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A lower platelet and leukocyte adhesion and activation was observed on the modified films incubated with whole human blood for 2 h. The thrombus formation on the PCL was significantly decreased upon immobilization of both curdlan sulphate (39%, *pcompatibility was obtained by surface entrapment of both curdlan sulphate (CURS) and heparin (HEP) onto PCL films. Both PCL-CURS and PCL-HEP films reduced RAW 264.7 macrophage cell adhesion (*pcompatibility and reduced inflammatory host response for its future blood contacting applications.

  15. Computer codes application to evaluate comparative analysis of environmental compatibility between waste treatment plants and site characterization of Matera (southern Italy); Applicazioni del codice di calcolo SITEVAL per l'analisi della compatibilita' ambientale degli impianti di smaltimento e recupero dei rifiuti alle discariche non controllate presenti nella provincia di Matera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cautilli, F.; Musmeci, F.; Tassoni, E. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1998-07-01

    The report presents the software SITEVAL aimed at tackling the comparative analysis of environmental compatibility between waste treatment plants and hosting areas. The SITEVAL application for non-monitored urban waste landfills in the province of Matera (southern Italy) is showed with the objective to identify the more relevant environmental components in such landfills. [Italian] L'articolo illustra il codice di calcolo SITEVAL utilizzato per analisi comparative di compatibilita' ambientale di impianti di smaltimento di rifiuti con i siti che li ospitano e poi riporta l'applicazione del codice nella situazione della provincia di Matera riguardo allo smaltimento non controllato di rifiuti solidi urbani e alla individuazione delle componenti ambientali piu' sensibili alla presenza di tali discariche nel territorio. Il codice ha permesso di stilare graduatorie di compatibilita' delle discariche non controllate e di definire l'interdipendenza dei risultati dalla scelta dei parametri di input del programma.

  16. Estudio de compatibilidad química del extracto seco de Rhizophora mangle L. y diferentes excipientes farmacéuticos por análisis térmico Study of chemical compatibility of Rhizophora mangle L. dry extract and of different pharmaceutical excipients using thermal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Pérez Bueno

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se aplicó una de las técnicas más representativas que conforman el análisis térmico, la calorimetría diferencial de barrido, para estudiar la compatibilidad entre el extracto seco de Rhizophora mangle L. y distintos excipientes preseleccionados para la obtención de formulaciones a partir de esta especie vegetal. Se obtuvo como resultado la no interacción química entre el extracto vegetal seco y los excipientes.In present paper authors applied one of the more representative techniques conforming the thermal analysis, the differential scanning clometry to study the compatibility among the Rhizophora mangle L. dry extract and different excipients selected to obtain the formulae from this vegetal species. As result, it was possible to obtain the non-chemical interaction between the dry vegeral extract and the excipients ones.

  17. The Electromagnetic Compatibility Design of the Wireless Sensor Network Node

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>This paper is concerned with the sensor nodes’ hardware design of the wireless sensor network.We focus on the electromagnetic compatibility design of the printed circuit board.In this paper,we will give a schematic diagram first,and then,according to the layout,wiring rules and the knowledge of electromagnetic compatibility, we will present the design of the printed circuit board which has a good characteristic of electromagnetic compatibility.

  18. Analysis of serum from type II diabetes mellitus and diabetic complication using surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, H. W.; Yan, X. L.; Dong, R. X.; Ban, G.; Li, K.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we show surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) of serums from type II diabetes mellitus and diabetic complication (coronary disease, glaucoma and cerebral infarction), and analyze the SERS through the multivariate statistical methods of principal component analysis (PCA). In particular, we find that there exist many adenines in these serums, which maybe come from DNA (RNA) damage. The relative intensity of the band at 725±2 cm-1 assigned to adenine is higher for patients than for the healthy volunteers; therefore, it can be used as an important ‘fingerprint’ in order to diagnose these diseases. It is also shown that serums from type II diabetes mellitus group, diabetic complication group and healthy volunteers group can be discriminated by PCA.

  19. Bipolar I and II Disorders; A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis on Differences in Comorbid Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerio, Andrea; Stubbs, Brendon; Odone, Anna; Tonna, Matteo; Marchesi, Carlo; Nassir Ghaemi, S.

    2016-01-01

    Context More than half of the bipolar disorder (BD) cases have an additional diagnosis; one of the most difficult to manage is obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Although some authors recently investigated the co-occurrence of anxiety and BD, the topic remains insufficiently studied. The current study aimed to investigate differences in comorbid OCD between BD-I and BD-II. Evidence Acquisition A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted on the prevalence and predictors of comorbid BD-I/BD-II and OCD. Relevant papers published until June 30, 2015 were identified searching the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Library. Results Fourteen articles met the inclusion criteria. The pooled prevalence of BD-I in OCD was 3.9% (95% confidence interval (CI), 2.4 to 6.4, I2 = 83%, Q = 56) while that of BD-II in OCD was 13.5% (95% CI, 9.3 to 19.3, I2 = 89%, Q = 91). The pooled prevalence of OCD in BD-I was 21.7 (95% CI, 4.8 to 60.3, I2 = 84%, Q = 95). With regard to OCD-BD predictors, mean age and rate of males did not predict the prevalence of BD-I (β = 0.0731, 95% CI, -0.1097 to 0.256, z = 0.78; β = 0.035, 95% CI, -0.2356 to 0.1656, z = 0.34) and BD-II (β = 0.0577, 95% CI, -0.1942 to 0.0788, z = 0.83; β = -0.0317, 95% CI, -0.1483 to 0.085, z = 0.53) in OCD. The mean age explained some of the observed heterogeneity (R2 = 0.13; R2 = 0.08). Conclusions This first systematic review and meta-analysis of the prevalence and predictors of comorbid BD-I/BD-II and OCD suggests that BD-OCD comorbidity is a common condition in psychiatry. However, the available evidence does not allow to assess whether BD-I or BD-II are more common in patients with OCD. PMID:27826323

  20. Polyurethane Organosilicate Nanocomposites as Blood Compatible Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson H. Y. Chung

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Polymer clay nanocomposites (NCs show remarkable potential in the field of drug delivery due to their enhanced barrier properties. It is hypothesised that well dispersed clay particles within the polymer matrix create a tortuous pathway for diffusing therapeutic molecules, thereby resulting in more sustained release of the drug. As coatings for medical devices, these materials can simultaneously modulate drug release and improve the mechanical performance of an existing polymer system without introducing additional materials with new chemistries that can lead to regulatory concerns. In this study, polyurethane organosilicate nanocomposites (PUNCs coated onto stainless steel wires were evaluated for their feasibility as blood compatible coatings and as drug delivery systems. Heparin was selected as the model drug to examine the impact of silicate loading and modifier chain length in modulating release. Findings revealed that better dispersion was achieved from samples with lower clay loadings and longer alkyl chains. The blood compatibility of PUNCs as assessed by thrombin generation assays showed that the addition of silicate particles did not significantly decrease the thrombin generation lag time (TGT, p = 0.659 or the peak thrombin (p = 0.999 of polyurethane (PU. PUNC coatings fabricated in this research were not cytotoxic as examined by the cell growth inhibition assay and were uniformly intact, but had slightly higher growth inhibition compared to PU possibly due to the presence of organic modifiers (OM. The addition of heparin into PUNCs prolonged the TGT, indicating that heparin was still active after the coating process. Cumulative heparin release profiles showed that the majority of heparin released was from loosely attached residues on the surface of coils. The addition of heparin further prolonged the TGT as compared to coatings without added heparin, but a slight decrease in heparin activity was observed in the NCs