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Sample records for comparison exercise part

  1. Matrix comparison, Part 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Jesper Wiborg; Borlund, Pia

    2007-01-01

    The present two-part article introduces matrix comparison as a formal means for evaluation purposes in informetric studies such as cocitation analysis. In the first part, the motivation behind introducing matrix comparison to informetric studies, as well as two important issues influencing...... such comparisons, matrix generation, and the composition of proximity measures, are introduced and discussed. In this second part, the authors introduce and thoroughly demonstrate two related matrix comparison techniques the Mantel test and Procrustes analysis, respectively. These techniques can compare...... important. Alternatively, or as a supplement, Procrustes analysis compares the actual ordination results without investigating the underlying proximity measures, by matching two configurations of the same objects in a multidimensional space. An advantage of the Procrustes analysis though, is the graphical...

  2. Determination of the Neutron and Photon Dose Equivalent at Work Places in Nuclear Facilities of Sweden. An SSI - EURADOS comparison exercise. Part 1: Measurements and Data Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, H.; Lindborg, L. [eds.

    1995-08-01

    A large-scaled measurement program of neutron and photon dose equivalent rates was organized in 1992 and 1993 at the nuclear power plant at Ringhals and at the Swedish Central Interim Storage Facility for spent fuel elements at Oskarshamn. The aim was to evaluate the uncertainty in these kinds of measurements in realistic radiation fields. For that purpose, groups experienced with different techniques and - in some cases - several groups with a particular technique, were invited to take part. Besides traditional rem counters, the following categories of instruments were involved: Bonner spheres systems, proton recoil detectors, tissue equivalent proportional counters, super heated drop detectors, GM counters and different types of personal dosemeters. Part I reports all initial results as presented by the individual participants as well as a first compilation of the results. A later report, Part II, will give detailed analysis of the results. The conclusions will be published in the journal Radiation Protection Dosimetry. Separate abstracts have been prepared for all 14 papers.

  3. Determination of the neutron and photon dose equivalent at work places in nuclear facilities of Sweden. An SSI - EURADOS comparison exercise. Part 2: Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, D. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom); Drake, P. [Vattenfall AB, Vaeroebacka (Sweden); Lindborg, L. [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Klein, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Schmitz, Th. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Tichy, M

    1999-06-01

    Various mixed neutron-photon fields at workplaces in the containment of pressurised water reactors and in the vicinity of transport containers with spent fuel elements were investigated with spectrometers and dosimeters. The spectral neutron fluences evaluated from measurements with multisphere systems were recommended to be used for the calculation of dosimetric reference values for comparison with the readings of the dosemeters applied simultaneously. It turned out that most of the moderator based area dosemeters overestimated, while the TEPC systems generally underestimated the ambient dose equivalent (DE) values of the rather soft neutron fields encountered at these workplaces. The discrepancies can, however, be explained on the basis of energy dependent responses of the instruments used. The ambient DE values obtained with recently developed area dosemeters based on superheated drop detectors and with track etch based personal dosemeters on phantoms, however, were in satisfying agreement with the reference data. Sets of personal dosemeters simultaneously irradiated on a phantom allowed to roughly estimate the directional dependence of the neutron fluence. Hence, personal and limiting dose equivalent quantities could also be calculated. The personal and ambient DE values were always conservative estimates of the limiting quantities. Unexpectedly, discrepancies were observed for photon DE data measured with GM counters and TEPC systems. The up to 50 % higher readings of the GM counters may be explained by a considerable contribution of high energy photons to the total photon dose equivalent, but photon spectrometry is necessary for final clarification.

  4. Focusing on the Hard parts: A Biomechanics Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingerut, Jonathan; Orbe, Kristina; Flynn, Daniel; Habdas, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    As part of a biomechanics course aimed at both upper-division Biology and Physics majors, this laboratory exercise introduces students to the ingenious ways in which organisms vary the composition and form of support and defensive structures such as bone and shell to maximize their strength while minimizing the energetic cost needed to produce…

  5. Exercise self-identity: interactions with social comparison and exercise behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkooijen, K.T.; de Bruijn, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Possible interactions among exercise self-identity, social comparison and exercise behaviour were explored in a sample of 417 undergraduate students (Mean age = 21.5, SD = 3.0; 73% female). Two models were examined using self-report data; (1) a mediation model which proposed an association between s

  6. Exercise self-identity: interactions with social comparison and exercise behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkooijen, K.T.; de Bruijn, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Possible interactions among exercise self-identity, social comparison and exercise behaviour were explored in a sample of 417 undergraduate students (Mean age = 21.5, SD = 3.0; 73% female). Two models were examined using self-report data; (1) a mediation model which proposed an association between

  7. Exercise self-identity: interactions with social comparison and exercise behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkooijen, K.T.; Bruijn, de G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Possible interactions among exercise self-identity, social comparison and exercise behaviour were explored in a sample of 417 undergraduate students (Mean age¿=¿21.5, SD¿=¿3.0; 73% female). Two models were examined using self-report data; (1) a mediation model which proposed an association between

  8. A Comparison between Prescribed Exercise Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultgren, Philip B.; Burke, Edmund J., Jr.

    This paper compares the methods for prescribing exercise according to various contemporary authorities. The programs are compared as to their goals, the testing modalities and physiological parameters used for prescription of the initial training session, and the methods and the progression of training. Regarding goals, there is a general…

  9. Comparison of methods to quantify volume during resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Jeffrey M; McCaulley, Grant O; Cormie, Prue; Nuzzo, James L; Cavill, Michael J; Triplett, N Travis

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare 4 different methods of calculating volume when comparing resistance exercise protocols of varying intensities. Ten Appalachian State University students experienced in resistance exercise completed 3 different resistance exercise protocols on different days using a randomized, crossover design, with 1 week of rest between each protocol. The protocols included 1) hypertrophy: 4 sets of 10 repetitions in the squat at 75% of a 1-repetition maximum (1RM) (90-second rest periods); 2) strength: 11 sets of 3 repetitions at 90% 1RM (5-minute rest periods); and 3) power: 8 sets of 6 repetitions of jump squats at 0% 1RM (3-minute rest periods). The volume of resistance exercise completed during each protocol was determined with 4 different methods: 1) volume load (VL) (repetitions [no.] x external load [kg]); 2) maximum dynamic strength volume load (MDSVL) (repetitions [no.] x [body mass--shank mass (kg) + external load (kg)]); 3) time under tension (TUT) (eccentric time +milliseconds] + concentric time +milliseconds]); and 4) total work (TW) (force [N] x displacement [m]). The volumes differed significantly (p , 0.05) between hypertrophy and strength in comparison with the power protocol when VL and MDSVL were used to determine the volume of resistance exercise completed. Furthermore, significant differences in TUT existed between all 3 resistance exercise protocols. The TW calculated was not significantly different between the 3 protocols. These data imply that each method examined results in substantially different values when comparing various resistance exercise protocols involving different levels of intensity.

  10. Exercise, vascular wall and cardiovascular diseases: an update (Part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Fung Ping; Yung, Lai Ming; Laher, Ismail; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Zhen Yu; Huang, Yu

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of morbidity and premature mortality in both women and men in most industrialized countries, and has for some time also established a prominent role in developing nations. In fact, obesity, diabetes mellitus and hypertension are now commonplace even in children and youths. Regular exercise is rapidly gaining widespread advocacy as a preventative measure in schools, medical circles and in the popular media. There is overwhelming evidence garnered from a number of sources, including epidemiological, prospective cohort and intervention studies, suggesting that CVD is largely a disease associated with physical inactivity. A rapidly advancing body of human and animal data confirms an important beneficial role for exercise in the prevention and treatment of CVD. In Part 1 of this review we discuss the impact of exercise on CVD, and we highlight the effects of exercise on (i) endothelial function by regulation of endothelial genes mediating oxidative metabolism, inflammation, apoptosis, cellular growth and proliferation, increased superoxide dismutase (SOD)-1, down-regulation of p67phox, changes in intracellular calcium level, increased vascular endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), expression and eNOS Ser-1177 phosphorylation; (ii) vascular smooth muscle function by either an increased affinity of the Ca2+ extrusion mechanism or an augmented Ca2+ buffering system by the superficial sarcoplasmic reticulum to increase Ca2+ sequestration, increase in K+ channel activity and/or expression, and increase in L-type Ca2+ current density; (iii) antioxidant systems by elevation of Mn-SOD, Cu/Zn-SOD and catalase, increases in glutathione peroxidase activity and activation of vascular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate [(NAD(P)H] oxidase and p22phox expression; (iv) heat shock protein (HSP) expression by stimulating HSP70 expression in myocardium, skeletal muscle and even in human leucocytes, probably through heat

  11. Exercise in pregnancy. Part 2: Recommendations for individuals.

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide practical guidelines for family physicians advising exercise in pregnancy. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE search was limited to the English literature between 1987 and 1995 with the key MeSH words exercise and pregnancy. Other sources included the Sports and Fitness Database between 1991 and 1995 and a manual search for relevant articles. MAIN FINDINGS: After contraindications to exercise in pregnancy are excluded, the exercise prescription depends on the level of maternal...

  12. Exercise Guidelines for the Elderly (Part 2 of 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Camp, Steven P.; Boyer, John L.

    1989-01-01

    Presents exercise guidelines for elderly individuals, noting that people of all ages receive physical and emotional benefits from appropriate exercise programs. These programs must be carefully evaluated for each individual's physical limitations; type of exercise, as well as its frequency, duration, and intensity, must be considered. (SM)

  13. Why Exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... editorial staff Home Prevention and Wellness Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Why Exercise? Why Exercise? Share Print Why Exercise? Exercise is an important part of a healthy lifestyle. Exercise prevents health problems, builds strength, boosts energy, ...

  14. Position statement. Part one: Immune function and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, Neil P; Gleeson, Michael; Shephard, Roy J

    2011-01-01

    An ever-growing volume of peer-reviewed publications speaks to the recent and rapid growth in both scope and understanding of exercise immunology. Indeed, more than 95% of all peer-reviewed publications in exercise immunology (currently >2, 200 publications using search terms "exercise" and "immune...... exercise-induced anti-inflammatory mechanisms needs to be understood better. There is consensus that exercise training protects against some types of cancers. Training also enhances aspects of anti-tumour immunity and reduces inflammatory mediators. However, the evidence linking immunological......") have been published since the formation of the International Society of Exercise and Immunology (ISEI) in 1989 (ISI Web of Knowledge). We recognise the epidemiological distinction between the generic term "physical activity" and the specific category of "exercise", which implies activity for a specific...

  15. Position statement. Part one: Immune function and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, Neil P; Gleeson, Michael; Shephard, Roy J

    2011-01-01

    A as a marker of mucosal immunity, but more recently the importance of other antimicrobial proteins in saliva (e.g. alpha-amylase, lactoferrin and lysozyme) has gained greater recognition. Acute bouts of moderate exercise have little impact on mucosal immunity but prolonged exercise and intensified training can...... in acquired immunity with acute exercise and training remains unknown. The production of secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) is the major effector function of the mucosal immune system providing the 'first line of defence' against pathogens. To date, the majority of exercise studies have assessed saliva SIg...... evoke decreases in saliva secretion of SIgA. Mechanisms underlying the alterations in mucosal immunity with acute exercise are probably largely related to the activation of the sympathetic nervous system and its associated effects on salivary protein exocytosis and IgA transcytosis. Depressed secretion...

  16. Metabolic syndrome and hypertension: regular exercise as part of lifestyle management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackland, Daniel T; Voeks, Jenifer H

    2014-11-01

    The incorporation of physical activity and exercise represents a clinically important aspect in the management of metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and diabetes. While the benefit of exercise and active lifestyles is well documented for prevention and risk reduction of cardiovascular and stroke outcomes, the detailed regiment and recommendations are less clear. The components of a prescribed physical activity include consideration of activity type, frequency of an activity, activity duration, and intensity of a specific physical movement. The exercise parameters prescribed as part of the management of metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and elevated blood pressure are most often proposed as separate documents while the general recommendations are similar. The evidence is strong such that physical activity and exercise recommendations in disease management guidelines are considered high quality. The general recommendations for both blood pressure and glycemic management include a regiment of physical activity with moderate- to high-intensity exercise of 30-min bouts on multiple days with a desired goal of a total of 150 min of exercise per week. While additional research is needed to identify the specific exercise/activity mode, frequencies for exercise training, intensity levels, and duration of exercise that achieve maximal blood pressure and glycemic lowering, this general recommendation showed a consistent and significant benefit in risk reduction. Similarly, the current available evidence also indicates that aerobic exercise, dynamic resistance exercise, and isometric exercises can lower blood pressure and improve glycemic control.

  17. Results of a large scale neutron spectrometry and dosimetry comparison exercise at the Cadarache moderator assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, D.J.; Naismith, O.F.; Taylor, G.C. [National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom); Chartier, J.-L.; Posny, F. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire; Klein, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    Eurados Working Group 7 recently organised a large-scale comparison of neutron spectrometry and dosimetry measurements at the IPSN/SDOS laboratory of the CEA Cadarache Research Centre in France. A large number of participants took part with a range of instruments including spectrometers, tissue-equivalent proportional counters, personal dosemeters, and survey instruments. The neutron field used for the exercise was a primarily low energy neutron spectrum similar to those which have been measured recently around nuclear facilities. This paper presents the results of the measurements and attempts to draw conclusions about the accuracy attainable with the various devices, their advantages and drawbacks, and potential problems. (author).

  18. Exercise, vascular wall and cardiovascular diseases: an update (part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Lai Ming; Laher, Ismail; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Zhen Yu; Huang, Yu; Leung, Fung Ping

    2009-01-01

    There is much evidence extolling the virtues of physical activity on cardiovascular disease (CVD). The evidence derives from different population groups where leisure time physical activity reduced the risk of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular mortality in both men and women. Recent meta-analyses have shown that large risk reductions for both ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke can be achieved by moderate or intense physical activity. There are many data from human and animal studies confirming a beneficial role for exercise in the prevention and treatment of CVD. Physical inactivity and obesity/overweight are not only associated with a number of health-related risk factors, but are considered to be independent risk factors for CVD, type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Clinical trials confirm that lifestyle interventions (dietary modification and increased physical activity) reduce the risk of progressing from impaired glucose tolerance to type 2 diabetes. Moreover, epidemiological studies indicate that the risk of hypertension increases by being overweight. Modest increases in exercise intensity and frequency have hypotensive effects in sedentary hypertensive patients. Long-term training improves endothelium-dependent dilatation in the aorta and resistance arteries of the heart, whereas short-term training increases endothelial function in coronary conduit arteries. Overall, more scientific evidence will undoubtedly encourage the widespread advocacy of the clinical benefits of exercise therapy in the prevention and treatment of CVD.

  19. Comparison of morning and afternoon exercise training for asthmatic children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Silva

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Fitness improvement was used to compare morning with afternoon exercise periods for asthmatic children. Children with persistent moderate asthma (according to GINA criteria, 8 to 11 years old, were divided into 3 groups: morning training group (N = 23, afternoon training group (N = 23, and non-training group (N = 23. The program was based on twice a week 90-min sessions for 4 months. We measured the 9-min running distance, resting heart rate and abdominal muscle strength (sit-up number before and after the training. All children took budesonide, 400 µg/day, and an on demand inhaled ß-agonist. The distance covered in 9 min increased (mean ± SEM from 1344 ± 30 m by 248 ± 30 m for the morning group, from 1327 ± 30 m by 162 ± 20 m for the afternoon group, and from 1310 ± 20 m by 2 ± 20 m for the control group (P 0.05 for morning with afternoon comparison. The reduction of resting heart rate from 83 ± 1, 85 ± 2 and 86 ± 1 bpm was 5.1 ± 0.8 bpm in the morning group, 4.4 ± 0.8 bpm in the afternoon group, and -0.2 ± 0.7 bpm in the control group (P > 0.05 for morning with afternoon comparison and P 0.05 for morning with afternoon comparison and P < 0.05 versus control. No statistically significant differences were detected between the morning and afternoon groups in terms of physical training of asthmatic children.

  20. Holistic Treatment Approaches to ADHD: Nutrition, Sleep,and Exercise, Part 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    This article is part of a series exploring Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). In this seventh installment, the author discusses three holistic treatments for children and adults with ADHD: diet and nutrition, sleep, and exercise. These approaches focus and improve the overall health of ADHD patients. (For Part 6 of this series, see…

  1. Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... COPD: Overview COPD: Lifestyle Management COPD: Exercises COPD: Exercises Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... lifelong activity you enjoy. Medication to Help You Exercise People with COPD often use inhaled short acting ...

  2. Comparison of Students Who Exercise with Those Who Do Not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joesting, Joan

    1981-01-01

    Community college students who participated in five or more hours of physical activities weekly were compared with students not participating in any regular exercise. Results showed regular exercisers to have a better self-concept and body image. (Author/GK)

  3. Yoga and physical exercise - a review and comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraj, Ramajayam; Karmani, Sneha; Varambally, Shivarama; Gangadhar, B N

    2016-06-01

    Yoga is a multifaceted spiritual tool with enhanced health and well-being as one of its positive effects. The components of yoga which are very commonly applied for health benefits are asanas (physical postures), pranayama (regulated breathing) and meditation. In the context of asanas, yoga resembles more of a physical exercise, which may lead to the perception that yoga is another kind of physical exercise. This article aims at exploring the commonalities and differences between yoga and physical exercise in terms of concepts, possible mechanisms and effectiveness for health benefits. A narrative review is undertaken based on traditional and contemporary literature for yoga, along with scientific articles available on yoga and exercise including head-to-head comparative trials with healthy volunteers and patients with various disease conditions. Physical exercises and the physical components of yoga practices have several similarities, but also important differences. Evidence suggests that yoga interventions appear to be equal and/or superior to exercise in most outcome measures. Emphasis on breath regulation, mindfulness during practice, and importance given to maintenance of postures are some of the elements which differentiate yoga practices from physical exercises.

  4. Exercise and brain health--implications for multiple sclerosis: Part 1--neuronal growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Lesley J; Castellano, Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    The benefits of regular exercise to promote general health and reduce the risk of hypokinetic diseases associated with sedentary lifestyles are well recognized. Recent studies suggest that exercise may enhance neurobiological processes that promote brain health in aging and disease. A current frontier in the neurodegenerative disorder multiple sclerosis (MS) concerns the role of physical activity for promoting brain health through protective, regenerative and adaptive neural processes. Research on neuromodulation, raises the possibility that regular physical activity may mediate favourable changes in disease factors and symptoms associated with MS, in part through changes in neuroactive proteins. Insulin-like growth factor-I appears to act as a neuroprotective agent and studies indicate that exercise could promote this factor in MS. Neurotrophins, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor likely play roles in neuronal survival and activity-dependent plasticity. Physical activity has also been shown to up-regulate hippocampal BDNF, which may play a role in mood states, learning and memory to lessen the decline in cognitive function associated with MS. In addition, exercise may promote anti-oxidant defences and neurotrophic support that could attenuate CNS vulnerability to neuronal degeneration. Exercise exposure (preconditioning) may serve as a mechanism to enhance stress resistance and thereby may support neuronal survival under heightened stress conditions. Considering that axonal loss and cerebral atrophy occur early in the disease, exercise prescription in the acute stage could promote neuroprotection, neuroregeneration and neuroplasticity and reduce long-term disability. This review concludes with a proposed conceptual model to connect these promising links between exercise and brain health.

  5. COMPARISON OF EFFECTIVENESS OF ISOMETRIC EXERCISES WITH AND WITHOUT STRETCHING EXERCISES IN NON SPECIFIC CERVICAL PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warda Hassan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical pain is a common condition and almost two thirds of population suffers with this condition. Cervical region is the commonest region for non-traumatic neck pain. Neck pain generates many muscular disturbances in the neck region and may result in tightness of muscles of cervical region. Stretching is considered as an effective mean of treating cervical pain. Isometric exercise is used to enhance the performance of muscles because it provides strength required to perform dynamic exercise. Both of the regimens either separately or combined are used in clinical settings to treat nonspecific cervical pain. This study aims to compare the results of cervical isometrics with and without stretching exercises in reducing non-specific cervical pain Methods: A randomized controlled trial research was performed at physiotherapy department of Mayo Hospital Lahore, Pakistan. A convenience sample of 40 participants was divided into two groups. The cervical isometric exercise was applied to group A and stretching plus isometric exercise to group B for 3 weeks. Nonspecific neck pain was analyzed by using visual analogue scale and goniometry for pre and post treatment assessment. Results: Isometric exercises play an effective role in relieving pain (p value is 0.03 and minimizing inability of the body to perform functional activities (p value is 0.004 in contrast to the patients of group A. Isometric exercises were applied to the patients of group A (Level of pain: pain value is 0.172 and (physical inability to perform functional activities has P value 0.201. Conclusion: The result showed that the patients with the complain of non-specific neck discomfort who were treated by cervical isometric alone, showed less improvement in pain relief in contrast to the patients who were treated by the cervical isometric long with stretching.

  6. The Recline Exercise: Comparisons with the Head Lift Exercise in Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Avinash; Rajappa, Akila; Tipton, Elizabeth; Malandraki, Georgia A

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to examine the comparative effectiveness of the new Recline Exercise (RE) and the traditional Head Lift Exercise (Shaker Exercise) on submental muscle activity, tongue strength, and perceived exertion in 40 healthy young adults (mean age = 24.5 years, SD 2.6 years). Both groups participated in a 6-week exercise regimen. Outcome variables evaluated pre- and post-exercise included: duration and peak amplitude of submental muscle activity during swallowing measured via surface electromyography (sEMG); anterior and posterior isometric lingual pressures measured with the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument; and perceived exertion levels measured with the Borg category-ratio scale of perceived exertion. Results indicated no significant pre-post differences within or between groups in swallow duration and peak amplitude. In addition, the RE group demonstrated significant post-treatment increases in anterior and posterior tongue strength [p = 0.009; p swallow duration or amplitude gains, most likely due to the reduced need for such gains in the healthy head/neck musculature for submaximal tasks. Furthermore, the significant lingual strength gains seen with the RE indicate that additional musculature is being engaged during its completion. These results are encouraging; however, future research in older adults and patients with dysphagia with examination of swallowing biomechanics is needed to determine its full potential as a rehabilitative regimen.

  7. COMPARISON OF ACTIVE AND ELECTROSTIMULATED RECOVERY STRATEGIES AFTER FATIGUING EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Vanderthommen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare an electrostimulated to an active recovery strategy after a submaximal isometric fatiguing exercise. Nineteen healthy men completed three sessions (separated by at least 4 weeks which included a knee extensors provocation exercise consisting of 3 sets of 25 isometric contractions. Contraction intensity level was fixed respectively at 60%, 55% and 50% of previously determined maximal voluntary contraction for the first, second and third sets. This provocation exercise was followed by either an active (AR recovery (25 min pedaling on a cycle ergometer, an electrostimulated (ESR recovery (25-min continuous and non-tetanic (5 Hz stimulation of the quadriceps or a strictly passive recovery (PR. Peak torques of knee extensors and subjective perception of muscle pain (VAS, 0-10 were evaluated before (pre-ex, immediately after the provocation exercise (post-ex, after the recovery period (post-rec, as well as 75 minutes (1h15 and one day (24h after the exercise bout. Time course of peak torque was similar among the different recovery modes: ~ 75% of initial values at post-ex, ~ 90% at post-rec and at 1h15. At 24h, peak torque reached a level close to baseline values (PR: 99.1 ± 10.7%, AR: 105.3 ± 12.2%, ESR: 104.4 ± 10.5%. VAS muscle pain scores decreased rapidly between post-ex and post-rec (p < 0.001; there were no significant differences between the three recovery modes (p = 0.64. In conclusion, following a submaximal isometric knee extension exercise, neither electrostimulated nor active recovery strategies significantly improved the time course of muscle function recovery

  8. Electromyographical Comparison of Muscle Activation Patterns Across Three Commonly Performed Kettlebell Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Brian C; Mayo, Jerry J; Tucker, W Steven; Wax, Ben; Hendrix, Russell C

    2017-09-01

    Lyons, BC, Mayo, JJ, Tucker, WS, Wax, B, and Hendrix, RC. Electromyographical comparison of muscle activation patterns across 3 commonly performed kettlebell exercises. J Strength Cond Res 31(9): 2363-2370, 2017-The purpose of this study was to compare the muscle activation patterns of 3 different kettlebell (KB) exercises using electromyography (EMG). Fourteen resistance-trained subjects completed a 1-arm swing (Swing), 1-arm swing style snatch (Snatch), and a 1-arm clean (Clean) using a self-selected 8 to 10 repetition maximum load for each exercise. Trial sessions consisted of subjects performing 5 repetitions of each KB exercise. Mean EMG was used to assess the muscle activation of the biceps brachii, anterior deltoid, posterior deltoid, erector spinae (ES), vastus lateralis (VL), biceps femoris, contralateral external oblique (EO), and gluteus maximus during each lift using surface electrodes. The mean EMG was normalized using maximal voluntary contractions obtained from manual muscle testing. Repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed a significant difference in the muscle activation patterns of the ES (Swing > Snatch), EO (Snatch, Clean > Swing), and VL (Swing > Clean) across the 3 KB exercises. We conclude that although the KB Swing, Snatch, and Clean are total body exercises, they place different demands on the ES, contralateral EO, and the VL. Therefore, KBs represent an authentic alternative for lifters, and the Swing, Snatch, and Clean are not redundant exercises.

  9. Dose and effect of inhaled ozone in resting versus exercising human subjects: comparison with resting rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dose and effect of inhaled ozone in resting versus exercising human subjects: comparison with resting rats Authors: Gary E. Hatch, John McKee, James Brown, Bill McDonnell, Elston Seal, Joleen Soukup, Ralph Slade, Kay Crissman and Robert Devlin, National Health and Environmental...

  10. Case Comparison of Response To Aquatic Exercise: Acute versus Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobily, Kenneth E.; Mobily, Paula R.; Lessard, Kerry A.; Berkenpas, Molly S.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the effects of individualized aquatic exercise programs on people with knee impairments. An adolescent athlete with an acute injury demonstrated significant functional improvement. A 33-year-old with arthritis demonstrated only marginal progress. Comparison of cases relative to valid data collection methods and response to aquatic…

  11. Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Related Conditions Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM) Balo’s Disease HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy (HAM) Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) Schilder's ... a Muscle, Too: The Relationship Between Exercise and Cognition - telelearning brought to you by the National MS ...

  12. Comparison of the effects of exercise participation on psychosocial risk factors and cardiovascular disease in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Sun; Cho, Byung-Jun; Kim, Seon-Rye

    2014-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to research the association of Type D personality with CVD risk factors and psychology through comparison of the association of exercise participation with CVD risk factors and psychological risk factors in women with Type D. [Subjects] This study included 416 middle-aged women. All participants completed the 14-item Type D Scale (DS14) to assess Type D personality. The DS14 consists of two subscales, NA and SI, both of which comprise 7 items. The research subjects were randomly assigned to four groups: Type D+Exercise (n=12), Type D+non-Exercise (n=12), non-Type D+Exercise (n=12), non-Type D+non-Exercise (n=10). The study consisted of 46 participants. [Methods] An aerobic exercise program and meditation were conducted in parallel for 10 months. Stretching was performed for 10 min as a warm-up, and then walking and running were performed on a treadmill at the HRmax 60-70% level for 40 min; this was done three times a week. Blood samples were processed according to standard laboratory procedures. The concentrations of TG and HDL-cholesterol were determined enzymatically on a clinical chemistry analyzer. Blood glucose was measured by the hexokinase method. [Results] Weight, percent fat, social support, and waist circumference showed a significant difference between times in the Exercise groups, and the values were significantly lower than those of the non-Exercise groups. Anxiety and depression showed a significant interaction effect between groups. The average number of CVD risk factors in subjects showed a significant difference between groups. [Conclusion] In conclusion, there were significant differences between groups in terms of CVD risk factors and psychological risk factors in women with Type D personality.

  13. Lidar Inter-Comparison Exercise Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Protat, Alain [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ARM), Northern Territory (Australia). Darwin Site; Young, S. [CSIRO, Western Australia (Australia). Marine and Atmospheric Research

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this IOP was to evaluate the performances of the new Leosphere R-MAN 510 lidar procured by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, by testing it against the MPL and Raman lidars at the Darwin ARM site. This lidar is an eye-safe (355 nm), turn-key mini Raman lidar, which allows for the detection of aerosols and cloud properties, and the retrieval of particulate extinction profiles. To do so, the R-MAN 510 lidar has been operated at the Darwin ARM site, next to the MPL, Raman lidar, and Vaisala ceilometer for three months (from 20 January 2013 to 20 April 2013) in order to collect a good sample for statistical comparisons. The comparisons with the Raman lidar were not performed, since the Raman lidar attenuated backscatter and depolarization ratio product was not available. A new product has just been delivered to the ARM archive as a value-added product, hence this study will continue. Nevertheless we have developed software to match the different space and time resolutions of the other lidars and project the data onto a common grid to permit detailed comparison of the instruments’ performance and an enhanced analysis of clouds and aerosols through the use of composite data products, like the ratios of attenuated backscatters, attenuated scattering ratios and depolarization ratios. Comparisons between the MPL and R-MAN510 lidar data exhibit large differences in total attenuated backscatter at 355 and 532 nm, attenuated scattering ratios, and aerosol volume depolarization ratios. Differences in attenuated backscatter result mainly from the different relative contributions of scattering from molecules and particles at the different wavelengths, but there are some intriguing differences that will require further investigations. The differences in volume depolarization ratios are due to the much larger contribution of molecular returns to the volume depolarization ratio (5 times larger at 355 nm than at 532 nm). The R-MAN510 lidar is also found to be

  14. Comparison of the results of the RESUME-95 exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovgaard, J. [Beredskabsstyrelsen, Birkeroed (Denmark); Scott, M. [Univ. of Glasgow, Dept. of Statistics, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    Within the framework of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research program (NKS), RESUME-95 (Rapid Environmental Surveying using Mobile equipment) took place in Finland in August 1995. Amongst the purposes of the exercise were: to test the ability of existing airborne, car-borne and in-situ instruments to map contaminated areas (in this case from Chernobyl) and; to establish the comparability of results obtained with different systems. Preliminary analysis has shown that major features of the spatial distribution of the contaminants were identified by all teams, but that significant variations in absolute figures were observed. In this paper, we describe some of the quantitative analysis undertaken to assess the comparability of the results and to explore any difference in them. We discuss future actions within a European framework of off-site emergency management to ensure comparability of results and to encourage development of standardisation techniques. Each participating team has already produced reports of their own results, and preliminary analysis has shown that major features of the spatial distribution of the contaminants were identified by all teams, but that variations in absolute figures were observed (some possible explanations for this include the calibrating procedures used and the assumptions concerning the vertical source distribution). In this paper, we describe some of the quantitative analysis undertaken to assess the comparability of the results and to explore any differences in them. In addition, from the experience gained from RESUME-95, we discuss future actions within a European framework of off-site emergency management to ensure comparability of results and to encourage standardisation techniques to be developed. (au).

  15. Lidar Inter-Comparison Exercise Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Protat, A [Australian Bureau of Meterology; Young, S

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this field campaign was to evaluate the performance of the new Leosphere R-MAN 510 lidar, procured by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, by testing it against the MicroPulse Lidar (MPL) and Raman lidars, at the Darwin Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site. This lidar is an eye-safe (355 nm), turn-key mini Raman lidar, which allows for the detection of aerosols and cloud properties, and the retrieval of particulate extinction profiles. To accomplish this evaluation, the R-MAN 510 lidar has been operated at the Darwin ARM site, next to the MPL, Raman lidar, and Vaisala ceilometer (VCEIL) for three months (from 20 January 2013 to 20 April 2013) in order to collect a sufficient sample size for statistical comparisons.

  16. Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; thor Straten, Eivind Per

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that voluntary exercise leads to an influx of immune cells in tumors and a greater than 60% reduction in tumor incidence and growth across several mouse models. Improved immunological control of tumor progression may have important clinical implications in the prevention...

  17. Attenuation of alcohol withdrawal syndrome and blood cortisol level with forced exercise in comparison with diazepam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Motaghinejad

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Relieving withdrawal and post-abstinence syndrome of alcoholism is one of the major strategies in the treatment of alcohol addicted patients. Diazepam, chlordiazepoxide, and topiramate are the approved medications that were used for this object. To assess the role of non-pharmacologic therapy in the management of alcohol withdrawal syndrome, we analyzed effects of forced exercise by treadmill on alcohol dependent mice as an animal model. A total of 60 adult male mice were divided into 5 groups, from which 4 groups became dependent to alcohol (2 g/kg/day for 15 days. From day 16, treatment groups were treated by diazepam (0.5mg/kg, forced exercise, and diazepam (0.5 mg/kg concurrent with forced exercise for two weeks; And the positive control group received same dose of alcohol (2 g/kg/day for two weeks. The negative control group received normal saline for four weeks. Finally, on day 31, all animals were observed for withdrawal signs, and Alcohol Total Withdrawal Score (ATWS was determined. Blood cortisol levels were measured in non-fasting situations as well. Present findings showed that ATWS significantly decrease in all treatment groups in comparison with positive control group (P<0.05 for groups received diazepam and treated by forced exercise and P<0.001 for group under treatment diazepam + forced exercise. Moreover, blood cortisol level significantly decreased in all treatment groups (P<0.001. This study suggested that forced exercise and physical activity can be useful as adjunct therapy in alcoholism and can ameliorate side effects and stress situation of withdrawal syndrome periods.

  18. Attenuation of alcohol withdrawal syndrome and blood cortisol level with forced exercise in comparison with diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Bangash, Mohammad Yasan; Motaghinejad, Ozra

    2015-01-01

    Relieving withdrawal and post-abstinence syndrome of alcoholism is one of the major strategies in the treatment of alcohol addicted patients. Diazepam, chlordiazepoxide, and topiramate are the approved medications that were used for this object. To assess the role of non-pharmacologic therapy in the management of alcohol withdrawal syndrome, we analyzed effects of forced exercise by treadmill on alcohol dependent mice as an animal model. A total of 60 adult male mice were divided into 5 groups, from which 4 groups became dependent to alcohol (2 g/kg/day) for 15 days. From day 16, treatment groups were treated by diazepam (0.5mg/kg), forced exercise, and diazepam (0.5 mg/kg) concurrent with forced exercise for two weeks; And the positive control group received same dose of alcohol (2 g/kg/day) for two weeks. The negative control group received normal saline for four weeks. Finally, on day 31, all animals were observed for withdrawal signs, and Alcohol Total Withdrawal Score (ATWS) was determined. Blood cortisol levels were measured in non-fasting situations as well. Present findings showed that ATWS significantly decrease in all treatment groups in comparison with positive control group (Pdiazepam and treated by forced exercise and Pdiazepam + forced exercise). Moreover, blood cortisol level significantly decreased in all treatment groups (P<0.001). This study suggested that forced exercise and physical activity can be useful as adjunct therapy in alcoholism and can ameliorate side effects and stress situation of withdrawal syndrome periods.

  19. Ozone inhalation effects consequent to continuous exercise in females: comparison to males

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, S.K.; Adams, W.C.

    1985-11-01

    Exposure to ozone (O3) at ambient photochemical smog alert levels has been shown to cause alteration in pulmonary function and exercise response in humans, but there is a paucity of data on females. The initial purpose of the present investigation was to study the effects of O3 inhalation on pulmonary function and selected exercise respiratory metabolism and breathing pattern responses in young adult females. Six female subjects exercised continuously on a bicycle ergometer for 1 h on 10 occasions at one of three intensities, while exposed to 0.0, 0.20, 0.30, or 0.40 ppm O3. Forced expiratory volume and flow rates and residual volume (RV) were measured before and immediately following each protocol. During exercise, expired minute ventilation (VE), respiratory frequency (fR), tidal volume, O2 uptake (VO2), and heart rate (HR) were measured every 10 min. O3 dose-dependent decrements were observed for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1.0), and forced expiratory flow rate during the middle half of FVC, coupled with an increase in RV and altered exercise ventilatory pattern. There was also an increased VE but no significant O3 effect on VO2 or HR. Comparison of the females' responses to those of a group of young adult males (previously studied) at the same total O3 effective dose (i.e., expressed as the simple product of O3 concentration, VE, and exposure time) revealed significantly greater effects on FVC, FEV1.0, and fR for the females. With VE reduced for females as a function of exercise intensity at the same percent of maximum VO2, these differences were considerably attenuated, although not negated.

  20. Comparison of deep and superficial abdominal muscle activity between experienced Pilates and resistance exercise instructors and controls during stabilization exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ji-Hyun; Hong, Sang-Min; Kim, Chang-Won; Shin, Yun-A

    2015-06-01

    Pilates and resistance exercises are used for lumbar stabilization training. However, it is unclear which exercise is more effective for lumbar stabilization. In our study, we aimed to compare surface muscle activity and deep muscle thickness during relaxation and spinal stabilization exercise in experienced Pilates and resistance exercise instructors. This study is a retrospective case control study set in the Exercise Prescription Laboratory and Sports Medicine Center. The participants included Pilates instructors (mean years of experience, 3.20±1.76; n=10), resistance exercise instructors (mean years of experience, 2.53±0.63; n=10), and controls (n=10). The participants performed 4 different stabilization exercises: abdominal drawing-in maneuver, bridging, roll-up, and one-leg raise. During the stabilization exercises, surface muscle activity was measured with electromyography, whereas deep muscle thickness was measured by ultrasound imaging. During the 4 stabilization exercises, the thickness of the transverse abdominis (TrA) was significantly greater in the Pilates-trained group than the other 2 other groups. The internal oblique (IO) thickness was significantly greater in the Pilates- and resistance-trained group than the control group, during the 4 exercises. However, the surface muscle activities were similar between the groups. Both Pilates and resistance exercise instructors had greater activation of deep muscles, such as the TrA and IO, than the control subjects. Pilates and resistance exercise are both effective for increasing abdominal deep muscle thickness.

  1. Body-related envy: a social comparison perspective in sport and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pila, Eva; Stamiris, Angela; Castonguay, Andree; Sabiston, Catherine M

    2014-02-01

    These three studies sought to better understand experiences of body-related envy and to examine the association with motivation and exercise behavior in young adult males and females. In an interview study, participants (N = 11) discussed body-related envy within a framework of social comparison. In Study 2, a thematic content analysis was conducted on self-reported narratives of body-related envy experiences reported by 288 participants. Themes of body-related envy triggers, cognitions, and cognitive and behavioral outcomes were identified. Findings from Studies 1 and 2 highlighted the possible link between body-related envy and exercise motivation and behavior. Study 3 tested these associations with males and females (N = 595) who completed a self-report questionnaire. In the structural equation model, body-related envy was positively associated with external, introjected, and identified regulations, and identified regulation was positively associated with exercise behavior. Taken together, the importance of body-related envy in the experience of cognitive, affective, and behavioral outcomes related to sport and exercise contexts is highlighted.

  2. RSA/Legacy Wind Sensor Comparison. Part 1; Western Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, David A.; Wheeler, Mark M.

    2006-01-01

    This report describes a comparison of data from ultrasonic and cup-and-vane anemometers on 5 wind towers at Vandenberg AFB. The ultrasonic sensors are scheduled to replace the Legacy cup-and-vane sensors under the Range Standardization and Automation (RSA) program. Because previous studies have noted differences between peak wind speeds reported by mechanical and ultrasonic wind sensors, the latter having no moving parts, the 30th and 45th Weather Squadrons wanted to understand possible differences between the two sensor types. The period-of-record was 13-30 May 2005. A total of 153,961 readings of I-minute average and peak wind speed/direction from each sensor type were used. Statistics of differences in speed and direction were used to identify 18 out of 34 RSA sensors having the most consistent performance, with respect to the Legacy sensors. Data from these 18 were used to form a composite comparison. A small positive bias in the composite RSA average wind speed increased from +0.5 kts at 15 kts, to +1 kt at 25 kts. A slightly larger positive bias in the RSA peak wind speed increased from +1 kt at 15 kts, to +2 kts at 30 kts.

  3. Yucca Mountain Project thermal and mechanical codes first benchmark exercise: Part 3, Jointed rock mass analysis; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costin, L.S.; Bauer, S.J.

    1991-10-01

    Thermal and mechanical models for intact and jointed rock mass behavior are being developed, verified, and validated at Sandia National Laboratories for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Benchmarking is an essential part of this effort and is one of the tools used to demonstrate verification of engineering software used to solve thermomechanical problems. This report presents the results of the third (and final) phase of the first thermomechanical benchmark exercise. In the first phase of this exercise, nonlinear heat conduction code were used to solve the thermal portion of the benchmark problem. The results from the thermal analysis were then used as input to the second and third phases of the exercise, which consisted of solving the structural portion of the benchmark problem. In the second phase of the exercise, a linear elastic rock mass model was used. In the third phase of the exercise, two different nonlinear jointed rock mass models were used to solve the thermostructural problem. Both models, the Sandia compliant joint model and the RE/SPEC joint empirical model, explicitly incorporate the effect of the joints on the response of the continuum. Three different structural codes, JAC, SANCHO, and SPECTROM-31, were used with the above models in the third phase of the study. Each model was implemented in two different codes so that direct comparisons of results from each model could be made. The results submitted by the participants showed that the finite element solutions using each model were in reasonable agreement. Some consistent differences between the solutions using the two different models were noted but are not considered important to verification of the codes. 9 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. Comparison of veterinary drugs and veterinary homeopathy: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, P; Pelligand, L; Whiting, M; Chambers, D; Toutain, P-L; Whitehead, M L

    2017-08-12

    For many years after its invention around 1796, homeopathy was widely used in people and later in animals. Over the intervening period (1796-2016) pharmacology emerged as a science from Materia Medica (medicinal materials) to become the mainstay of veterinary therapeutics. There remains today a much smaller, but significant, use of homeopathy by veterinary surgeons. Homeopathic products are sometimes administered when conventional drug therapies have not succeeded, but are also used as alternatives to scientifically based therapies and licensed products. The principles underlying the veterinary use of drug-based and homeopathic products are polar opposites; this provides the basis for comparison between them. This two-part review compares and contrasts the two treatment forms in respect of history, constituents, methods of preparation, known or postulated mechanisms underlying responses, the legal basis for use and scientific credibility in the 21st century. Part 1 begins with a consideration of why therapeutic products actually work or appear to do so. British Veterinary Association.

  5. A comparison of methods of analysing exercise tests for diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Deckers (Jaap); B.J.W.M. Rensing (Benno); J.G.P. Tijssen (Jan); R.V.H. Vinke (Ruud); A.J. Azar (Aida); M.L. Simoons (Maarten)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractThe diagnostic accuracy of the following methods of analysing exercise tests were evaluated: (a) the cumulative area of ST segment depression during exercise normalised for workload and heart rate (exercise score); (b) discriminant analysis of electrocardiographic exercise variables,

  6. A comparison of the motivational factors between CrossFit participants and other resistance exercise modalities: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, James; Sales, Adele; Carlson, Luke; Steele, James

    2017-09-01

    Understanding resistance exercise motives and participation is essential in increasing exercise adherence and reducing comorbidities. CrossFit is a fitness movement that has seen an explosive growth in popularity worldwide; however, little research has investigated the motivational factors within this "niche" resistance exercise environment. The aim of this study was to explore the motivational factors of CrossFit participants in comparison to other resistance exercise participants. Using an independent-group design, quantitative data was collected using exercise motivations inventory-2 (EMI-2) questionnaire, for a total of 314 male and female participants (CrossFit: N.=68, group resistance exercise: N.=55, alone: N.=125, personal trainer: N.=66). The present study suggest that CrossFit participants were more likely to report higher levels of intrinsic motives, such as enjoyment, challenge and affiliation, whereas personal training clients reported higher values for health related motives such as positive health, ill-health avoidance and weight management. The findings suggest that the motivations for engaging in CrossFit may be similar to those seen in sport participation, and therefore may have an influence on facilitating long-term adherence in comparison with other resistance exercise modalities. This article also discusses health related motives as being extrinsic in nature but reflecting intrinsic characteristics, potentially also facilitating long term adherence. The present research helps develop further understanding of motivational variables within differing resistance exercise modalities.

  7. A comparison of low- and high-impact forced exercise: effects of training paradigm on learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennard, John A; Woodruff-Pak, Diana S

    2012-06-25

    In this study we compared two types of forced exercise-a low impact paradigm to minimize stress, which included speeds up to 10 m/min and a stressful high impact paradigm, with speeds up to 21 m/min. 150 male C57BL/6J mice were randomly assigned to the low impact, high impact, or sedentary control conditions and were tested on the rotorod and Morris water maze (MWM) as indices of motor learning and spatial memory. We found that 5 weeks of stressful high speed forced exercise led to significant improvement in rotorod performance, as high impact runners outperformed both low impact runners and controls at 15 and 25 rpm speeds. These differences were the result of improved physical fitness due to exercise and likely do not reflect enhanced learning in these mice. In the MWM, 5 weeks of stressful high impact exercise led to significant impairment in spatial memory acquisition compared to low impact runners and controls. Low impact exercise for 10 weeks significantly improved retention of spatial memory compared to high impact exercise. Results suggested that these two paradigms produced different effects of forced exercise on learning and memory. The low impact paradigm led to some improvements, whereas the stressful high impact program caused significant impairment. Comparison of these two paradigms begins to address the window between the beneficial and detrimental effects of forced exercise, and have suggested a boundary of exercise intensity that leads to impairment in learning.

  8. RSA/Legacy Wind Sensor Comparison. Part 2; Eastern Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, David A.; Wheeler, Mark M.

    2006-01-01

    This report describes a comparison of data from ultrasonic and propeller-and-vane anemometers on 5 wind towers at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The ultrasonic sensors are scheduled to replace the Legacy propeller-and-vane sensors under the Range Standardization and Automation (RSA) program. Because previous studies have noted differences between peak wind speeds reported by mechanical and ultrasonic wind sensors, the latter having no moving parts, the 30th and 45th Weather Squadrons wanted to understand possible differences between the two sensor types. The period-of-record was 13-30 May 2005, A total of 357,626 readings of 1-minute average and peak wind speed/direction from each sensor type were used. Statistics of differences in speed and direction were used to identify 15 out of 19 RSA sensors having the most consistent performance, with respect to the Legacy sensors. RSA average wind speed data from these 15 showed a small positive bias of 0.38 kts. A slightly larger positive bias of 0.94 kts was found in the RSA peak wind speed.

  9. Effects of a virtual reality-based exercise program on functional recovery in stroke patients: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung-Hee

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of a virtual reality exercise program using the Interactive Rehabilitation and Exercise System (IREX) on the recovery of motor and cognitive function and the performance of activities of daily living in stroke patients. [Subjects] The study enrolled 10 patients diagnosed with stroke who received occupational therapy at the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine of Hospital A between January and March 2014. [Methods] The patients took part in the virtual reality exercise program for 30 minutes each day, three times per week, for 4 weeks. Then, the patients were re-evaluated to determine changes in upper extremity function, cognitive function, and performance of activities of daily living 4 weeks after the baseline assessment. [Results] In the experimental group, there were significant differences in the Korea-Mini Mental Status Evaluation, Korean version of the modified Barthel index, and Fugl-Meyer assessment scores between the baseline and endpoint. [Conclusion] The virtual reality exercise program was effective for restoring function in stroke patients. Further studies should develop systematic protocols for rehabilitation training with a virtual reality exercise program.

  10. A comparison of low- and high-impact forced exercise: Effects of training paradigm on learning and memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennard, John A.; Woodruff-Pak, Diana S.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we compared two types of forced exercise—a low impact paradigm to minimize stress, which included speeds up to 10 m/min and a stressful high impact paradigm, with speeds up to 21 m/min. 150 male C57BL/6J mice were randomly assigned to the low impact, high impact, or sedentary control conditions and were tested on the rotorod and Morris water maze (MWM) as indices of motor learning and spatial memory. We found that five weeks of stressful high speed forced exercise led to significant improvement in rotorod performance, as high impact runners outperformed both low impact runners and controls at 15 and 25 RPM speeds. These differences were the result of improved physical fitness due to exercise and likely do not reflect enhanced learning in these mice. In the MWM, five weeks of stressful high impact exercise led to significant impairment in spatial memory acquisition compared to low impact runners and controls. Low impact exercise for 10 weeks significantly improved retention of spatial memory compared to high impact exercise. Results suggested that these two paradigms produced different effects of forced exercise on learning and memory. The low impact paradigm led to some improvements, whereas the stressful high impact program caused significant impairment. Comparison of these two paradigms begins to address the window between the beneficial and detrimental effects of forced exercise, and have suggested a boundary of exercise intensity that leads to impairment in learning. PMID:22402029

  11. Comparison between Specific Lumber Mobilization and Core-Stability Exercises with Core-Stability Exercises Alone in Mechanical low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rafiq; Shakil-Ur-Rehman, Syed; Sibtain, Fozia

    2014-01-01

    To Compare the Specific Lumber Mobilization (SLM) techniques and Core-Stability (CS) Exercises with Core-Stability Exercises Alone in Mechanical low back pain (MLP) Methods: A 6 month pretest-posttest design, quasi experimental study was conducted at department of physiotherapy Khyber Teaching Hospital (KTH) Peshawar, Pakistan. We conveniently selected a sample 40 patients and placed into two groups. The SLM techniques with CS exercises was applied in group A and CS exercises alone in group B for 6 weeks. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Visual analog scale (VAS) for mechanical low back pain were assessment tools assessed for all patients before and after 6 weeks of physical therapy intervention. Data was analyzed by SPSS and statistical test were applied at 95% level of significance determine the efficacy of both the treatments regimes and compared with each other. After comparison between two groups, the group A treated with specific lumber mobilization techniques shows better results in improving pain (p=0.008) and reducing physical disability (p=0.004) as compared to the group B treated with specific lumber mobilization techniques alone (pain intensity: p= 0.172 and physical disability: p=0.201). It is concluded that patients with mechanical low back pain will show more improvement in pain and function while treated by specific lumber mobilization and core stability exercises as compared to those patients who will be treated by specific joint mobilization techniques.

  12. Eccentric exercise inhibits the H reflex in the middle part of the trapezius muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsgaard, Steffen; Nørgaard, Lars Tønners; Korsholm Flaskager, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) investigate the modulation of the H reflex immediately after and 24 h after eccentric exercise in the presence of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and (2) test the reproducibility of the H reflex in trapezius across days. H reflexes were recorded from...... the dominant middle trapezius muscle by electrical stimulation of the C3/4 cervical nerve in ten healthy subjects. DOMS was induced by eccentric exercise of the dominant shoulder. H reflexes were obtained in four sessions: "24 h before", "Pre", "Post", and "24 h after" eccentric exercise. Ratios of maximal H...

  13. Exercise partly reverses the effect of maternal separation on hippocampal proteins in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimatelis, J J; Hendricks, S; Hsieh, J; Vlok, N M; Bugarith, K; Daniels, W M U; Russell, V A

    2013-01-01

    Animals subjected to maternal separation stress during the early stages of development display behavioural, endocrine and growth factor abnormalities that mirror the clinical findings in anxiety/depression. In addition, maternal separation has been shown to exacerbate the behavioural deficits induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. In contrast, voluntary exercise reduced the detrimental effects of 6-OHDA in the rat model. The beneficial effects of exercise appeared to be largely due to compensation in the non-lesioned hemisphere. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether voluntary exercise for 3 weeks could reverse the effects of maternal separation in rats challenged with the neurotoxin 6-OHDA infused into the medial forebrain bundle after 1 week of exercise, at postnatal day 60. The rats were killed 2 weeks later, at postnatal day 74. Their brains were dissected and the hippocampus rapidly removed for proteomic analysis by isobaric tagging (iTRAQ) and quantification of peptides by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS/MS). Maternal separation upregulated hippocampal proteins functionally involved in energy metabolism (nucleoside diphosphate kinase B, enolase and triosephosphate isomerase) and synaptic plasticity (α-synuclein, tenascin-R, Ba1-667, brevican and neurocan core protein) in the non-lesioned hemisphere. Exercise reversed many of these changes by downregulating the levels of hippocampal proteins functionally associated with energy metabolism (nucleoside diphosphate kinase B, enolase and triosephosphate isomerase) and synaptic plasticity (α-synuclein, tenascin-R, Ba1-667, brevican and neurocan core protein) in the non-lesioned hemisphere of rats subjected to maternal separation. Exercise and maternal separation therefore appeared to have opposing effects on the hippocampus in the non-lesioned hemisphere of the rat brain. Exercise seemed partly to reverse the

  14. Comparison of longitudinal sciatic nerve movement with different mobilization exercises: an in vivo study utilizing ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Richard F; Hing, Wayne A; McNair, Peter J

    2012-08-01

    Controlled laboratory study using a single-group, within-subjects comparison. To determine whether different types of neural mobilization exercises are associated with differing amounts of longitudinal sciatic nerve excursion measured in vivo at the posterior midthigh region. Recent research focusing on the upper limb of healthy subjects has shown that nerve excursion differs significantly between different types of neural mobilization exercises. This has not been examined in the lower limb. It is important to initially examine the influence of neural mobilization on peripheral nerve excursion in healthy people to identify peripheral nerve excursion impairments under conditions in which nerve excursion may be compromised. High-resolution ultrasound imaging was used to assess sciatic nerve excursion at the posterior midthigh region. Four different neural mobilization exercises were performed in 31 healthy participants. These neural mobilization exercises used combinations of knee extension and cervical spine flexion and extension. Frame-by-frame cross-correlation analysis of the ultrasound images was used to calculate nerve excursion. A repeated-measures analysis of variance and isolated means comparisons were used for data analysis. Different neural mobilization exercises induced significantly different amounts of sciatic nerve excursion at the posterior midthigh region (Pmobilization exercises. Such nerve excursion supports theories of nerve motion associated with cervical spine and extremity movement, as generalizable to the lower limb.

  15. A comparison of methods of analysing exercise tests for diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Deckers (Jaap); B.J.W.M. Rensing (Benno); J.G.P. Tijssen (Jan); R.V.H. Vinke (Ruud); A.J. Azar (Aida); M.L. Simoons (Maarten)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractThe diagnostic accuracy of the following methods of analysing exercise tests were evaluated: (a) the cumulative area of ST segment depression during exercise normalised for workload and heart rate (exercise score); (b) discriminant analysis of electrocardiographic exercise variables, wor

  16. Exercise and pregnancy in recreational and elite athletes: 2016 evidence summary from the IOC expert group meeting, Lausanne. Part 2-the effect of exercise on the fetus, labour and birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bø, Kari; Artal, Raul; Barakat, Ruben; Brown, Wendy; Dooley, Michael; Evenson, Kelly R; Haakstad, Lene A H; Larsen, Karin; Kayser, Bengt; Kinnunen, Tarja I; Mottola, Michelle F; Nygaard, Ingrid; van Poppel, Mireille; Stuge, Britt; Davies, Gregory A L

    2016-10-12

    This is Part 2 of 5 in the series of evidence statements from the IOC expert committee on exercise and pregnancy in recreational and elite athletes. Part 1 focused on the effects of training during pregnancy and on the management of common pregnancy-related symptoms experienced by athletes. In Part 2, we focus on maternal and fetal perinatal outcomes.

  17. Effect of resistance training using bodyweight in the elderly: Comparison of resistance exercise movement between slow and normal speed movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yuya; Tanimoto, Michiya; Oba, Naoko; Sanada, Kiyoshi; Miyachi, Motohiko; Ishii, Naokata

    2015-12-01

    The present study investigated whether a slow movement protocol can be applied to resistance training using bodyweight. In addition, the intervention program combined plyometric exercise with resistance exercise to improve physical function overall. A total of 39 active elderly adults participated in a 16-week intervention. The program consisted of five resistance exercises and four plyometric exercises using their own bodyweight with a single set for each exercise. Participants were assigned to one of two experimental groups. One group carried out resistance exercise with slow movement and tonic force generation (3-s concentric, 3-s eccentric and 1-s isometric actions with no rest between each repetition). The other group as a movement comparison followed the same regimen, but at normal speed (1-s eccentric and 1-s concentric actions with 1-s rest between each repetition). Muscle size, strength and physical function were measured before and after the intervention period. After the intervention, strengths of upper and lower limbs, and maximum leg extensor power were significantly improved in both groups. Muscle size did not change in either group. There were no significant differences in any of the parameters between groups. The intervention program using only own bodyweight that comprised resistance exercise with slow movement and plyometric exercise can improve physical function in the elderly, even with single sets for each exercise. However, there was no enhanced muscle hypertrophic effect. Further attempts, such as increasing performing multiple sets, would be required to induce muscle hypertrophy. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2015; 15: 1270-1277. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  18. A study of passive weight-bearing lower limb exercise effects on local muscles and whole body oxidative metabolism: a comparison with simulated horse riding, bicycle, and walking exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Kohsuke; Murase, Norio; Osada, Takuya; Kime, Ryotaro; Anjo, Mikiko; Esaki, Kazuki; Shiroishi, Kiyoshi; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2009-11-10

    We have developed an exercise machine prototype for increasing exercise intensity by means of passively exercising lower limb muscles. The purpose of the present study was to compare the passive exercise intensity of our newly-developed machine with the intensities of different types of exercises. We also attempted to measure muscle activity to study how these forms of exercise affected individual parts of the body. Subjects were 14 healthy men with the following demographics: age 30 years, height 171.5 cm, weight 68.3 kg. They performed 4 types of exercise: Passive weight-bearing lower limb exercise (PWLLE), Simulated horse riding exercise (SHRE), Bicycle exercise, and Walking exercise, as described below at an interval of one week or longer. Oxygen uptake, blood pressure, heart rate, and electromyogram (EMG) were measured or recorded during exercise. At rest prior to exercise and immediately after the end of each exercise intensity, the oxygenated hemoglobin levels of the lower limb muscles were measured by near-infrared spectroscopy to calculate the rate of decline. This rate of decline was obtained immediately after exercise as well as at rest to calculate oxygen consumption of the lower limb muscles as expressed as a ratio of a post-exercise rate of decline to a resting one. The heart rate and oxygen uptake observed in PWLLE during maximal intensity were comparable to that of a 20-watt bicycle exercise or 2 km/hr walking exercise. Maximal intensity PWLLE was found to provoke muscle activity comparable to an 80-watt bicycle or 6 km/hr walking exercise. As was the case with the EMG results, during maximal intensity PWLLE, the rectus femoris muscle consumed oxygen in amounts identical to that of an 80-watt bicycle or a 6 km/hr walking exercise. Passive weight-bearing lower limb exercise using our trial machine could provide approximately 3 MET of exercise and the thigh exhibited muscle activity equivalent to that of 80-watt bicycle or 6 km/hr walking exercise

  19. Comparison of dobutamine and exercise using technetium-99m sestamibi imaging for the evaluation of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, S D; LaBresh, K A; Santos-Ocampo, C D; Garber, C E; Barbour, M M; Messinger, D E; Cloutier, D J; Ahlberg, A W; Heller, G V

    1994-01-15

    Studies using dobutamine thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging have suggested a high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of coronary artery disease. However, few data are available comparing dobutamine with exercise stress for the detection and localization of perfusion defects. This study compared the effects of dobutamine and exercise stress using technetium-99m sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomographic imaging in the same patients in a prospective crossover trial. Twenty-four patients with a high likelihood of coronary artery disease underwent tomographic myocardial imaging at rest, after symptom-limited treadmill exercise, and after intravenous dobutamine (maximum 30 micrograms/kg/min). Tomograms of the left ventricle were divided into 20 segments and were interpreted without knowledge of patient identity or stress protocol. Dobutamine was well tolerated by all patients. Segment-by-segment concordance between exercise and dobutamine images was highly significant (kappa = 0.56, p < 0.0001). Global first-order agreement (normal vs abnormal) between exercise and dobutamine studies was 96% (kappa = 0.65, p = 0.02); global second-order agreement (normal vs fixed vs ischemic defect) was 88% (kappa = 0.45, p = 0.02). Regional first- and second-order agreement were 96 and 93%, respectively (p < 0.001 for both). Twenty patients underwent coronary angiography. Comparisons between exercise and angiography and between dobutamine and angiography were similar for both global agreement (95 vs 100%, p = NS) and regional agreement (77 vs 72%, p = NS).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Comparison of MACCS users calculations for the international comparison exercise on probabilistic accident consequence assessment code, October 1989--June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neymotin, L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Over the past several years, the OECD/NEA and CEC sponsored an international program intercomparing a group of six probabilistic consequence assessment (PCA) codes designed to simulate health and economic consequences of radioactive releases into atmosphere of radioactive materials following severe accidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs): ARANO (Finland), CONDOR (UK), COSYMA (CEC), LENA (Sweden), MACCS (USA), and OSCAAR (Japan). In parallel with this effort, two separate groups performed similar calculations using the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Results produced in the MACCS Users Group (Greece, Italy, Spain, and USA) calculations and their comparison are contained in the present report. Version 1.5.11.1 of the MACCS code was used for the calculations. Good agreement between the results produced in the four participating calculations has been reached, with the exception of the results related to the ingestion pathway dose predictions. The main reason for the scatter in those particular results is attributed to the lack of a straightforward implementation of the specifications for agricultural production and counter-measures criteria provided for the exercise. A significantly smaller scatter in predictions of other consequences was successfully explained by differences in meteorological files and weather sampling, grids, rain distance intervals, dispersion model options, and population distributions.

  1. Comparison of oxygen uptake during and after the execution of resistance exercises and exercises performed on ergometers, matched for intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilaça-Alves José

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the values of oxygen uptake (VO2 during and after strength training exercises (STe and ergometer exercises (Ee, matched for intensity and exercise time. Eight men (24 ± 2.33 years performed upper and lower body cycling Ee at the individual’s ventilatory threshold (VE/VCO2. The STe session included half squats and the bench press which were performed with a load at the individual blood lactate concentration of 4 mmol/l. Both sessions lasted 30 minutes, alternating 50 seconds of effort with a 10 second transition time between upper and lower body work. The averaged overall VO2 between sessions was significantly higher for Ee (24.96 ± 3.6 ml·kg·min-1 compared to STe (21.66 ± 1.77 ml·kg·min-1 (p = 0.035, but this difference was only seen for the first 20 minutes of exercise. Absolute VO2 values between sessions did not reveal differences. There were more statistically greater values in Ee compared to STe, regarding VO2 of lower limbs (25.44 ± 3.84 ml·kg·min-1 versus 21.83 ± 2·24 ml·kg·min-1; p = 0.038 and upper limbs (24.49 ± 3.84 ml·kg·min-1 versus 21.54 ± 1.77 ml·kg·min-1; p = 0.047. There were further significant differences regarding the moment effect (p<0.0001 of both STe and Ee sessions. With respect to the moment × session effect, only VO2 5 minutes into recovery showed significant differences (p = 0.017. In conclusion, although significant increases in VO2 were seen following Ee compared to STe, it appears that the load/intensity, and not the material/equipment used for the execution of an exercise, are variables that best influence oxygen uptake.

  2. Comparison of Two Different Modes of Active Recovery on Muscles Performance after Fatiguing Exercise in Mountain Canoeist and Football Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Anna; Oleksy, Łukasz; Kielnar, Renata; Wodka-Natkaniec, Ewa; Twardowska, Magdalena; Kamiński, Kamil; Małek, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to assess if the application of different methods of active recovery (working the same or different muscle groups from those which were active during fatiguing exercise) results in significant differences in muscle performance and if the efficiency of the active recovery method is dependent upon the specific sport activity (training loads). Design A parallel group non-blinded trial with repeated measurements. Methods Thirteen mountain canoeists and twelve football players participated in this study. Measurements of the bioelectrical activity, torque, work and power of the vastus lateralis oblique, vastus medialis oblique, and rectus femoris muscles were performed during isokinetic tests at a velocity of 90°/s. Results Active legs recovery in both groups was effective in reducing fatigue from evaluated muscles, where a significant decrease in fatigue index was observed. The muscles peak torque, work and power parameters did not change significantly after both modes of active recovery, but in both groups significant decrease was seen after passive recovery. Conclusions We suggest that 20 minutes of post-exercise active recovery involving the same muscles that were active during the fatiguing exercise is more effective in fatigue recovery than active exercise using the muscles that were not involved in the exercise. Active arm exercises were less effective in both groups which indicates a lack of a relationship between the different training regimens and the part of the body which is principally used during training. PMID:27706260

  3. Comparison of Two Different Modes of Active Recovery on Muscles Performance after Fatiguing Exercise in Mountain Canoeist and Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Anna; Oleksy, Łukasz; Kielnar, Renata; Wodka-Natkaniec, Ewa; Twardowska, Magdalena; Kamiński, Kamil; Małek, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess if the application of different methods of active recovery (working the same or different muscle groups from those which were active during fatiguing exercise) results in significant differences in muscle performance and if the efficiency of the active recovery method is dependent upon the specific sport activity (training loads). A parallel group non-blinded trial with repeated measurements. Thirteen mountain canoeists and twelve football players participated in this study. Measurements of the bioelectrical activity, torque, work and power of the vastus lateralis oblique, vastus medialis oblique, and rectus femoris muscles were performed during isokinetic tests at a velocity of 90°/s. Active legs recovery in both groups was effective in reducing fatigue from evaluated muscles, where a significant decrease in fatigue index was observed. The muscles peak torque, work and power parameters did not change significantly after both modes of active recovery, but in both groups significant decrease was seen after passive recovery. We suggest that 20 minutes of post-exercise active recovery involving the same muscles that were active during the fatiguing exercise is more effective in fatigue recovery than active exercise using the muscles that were not involved in the exercise. Active arm exercises were less effective in both groups which indicates a lack of a relationship between the different training regimens and the part of the body which is principally used during training.

  4. Comparison of veterinary drugs and veterinary homeopathy: part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, P; Pelligand, L; Whiting, M; Chambers, D; Toutain, P-L; Whitehead, M L

    2017-08-19

    Part 2 of this narrative review outlines the theoretical and practical bases for assessing the efficacy and effectiveness of conventional medicines and homeopathic products. Known and postulated mechanisms of action are critically reviewed. The evidence for clinical efficacy of products in both categories, in the form of practitioner experience, meta-analysis and systematic reviews of clinical trial results, is discussed. The review also addresses problems and pitfalls in assessing data, and the ethical and negative aspects of pharmacology and homeopathy in veterinary medicine. British Veterinary Association.

  5. Methods comparison: assessing agreement of physiological parameters obtained from exercise on two different cycle ergometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedlik, Jake A; Harrison, Grant; Brigman, Robert; Graham, Zachary A; Weir, Joseph P; Gallagher, Philip M; Vardiman, John P

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the agreement of physiological parameters measured during exercise testing on 2 devices at established power outputs (POs). Ten trained male cyclists were recruited. The devices used for comparison were the Lode stationary bicycle ergometer (SBE) (Lode Excalibur) and the PowerTap Pro+ (BPT) (Saris Cycling Group) mobile ergometer. The physiological parameters recorded at established PO (50, 100, 150, 200, 250 W) were heart rate (HR), oxygen consumption ((Equation is included in full-text article.)), pulmonary ventilation (VE), blood lactate, and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE). Subjects were randomized once to the SBE and 3 times to a bicycle equipped with a BPT. After 15 minutes of unloaded pedaling, the trial began with 5 minutes of cycling at 50 W. Intensity increased by 50 W every 5 minutes up to 250 W. Physiological measures were recorded at each PO. Bland-Altman plots were constructed including computation of the ratio of half the range of limits of agreement and the mean of the pairwise means along with bivariate regression calculations for analysis of the linear association between device measurements. Moderate to good agreement was found for HR with agreement improving as PO increased. Comparisons of (Equation is included in full-text article.)found agreement increased as the PO increased. VE, RPE, and lactate did not consistently provide similar measures across trials. The level of agreement between HR and (Equation is included in full-text article.)when comparing the SBE and BPT suggests that the PowerTap Pro+ is a sufficient tool for estimating PO and associated physiological parameters in the field.

  6. Measuring skin temperature before, during and after exercise: a comparison of thermocouples and infrared thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Alex de Andrade; Amorim, Paulo Roberto dos Santos; Brito, Ciro José; de Moura, Anselmo Gomes; Moreira, Danilo Gomes; Costa, Carlos Magno Amaral; Sillero-Quintana, Manuel; Marins, João Carlos Bouzas

    2014-02-01

    Measuring skin temperature (TSK) provides important information about the complex thermal control system and could be interesting when carrying out studies about thermoregulation. The most common method to record TSK involves thermocouples at specific locations; however, the use of infrared thermal imaging (IRT) has increased. The two methods use different physical processes to measure TSK, and each has advantages and disadvantages. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the mean skin temperature (MTSK) measurements using thermocouples and IRT in three different situations: pre-exercise, exercise and post-exercise. Analysis of the residual scores in Bland-Altman plots showed poor agreement between the MTSK obtained using thermocouples and those using IRT. The averaged error was -0.75 °C during pre-exercise, 1.22 °C during exercise and -1.16 °C during post-exercise, and the reliability between the methods was low in the pre- (ICC = 0.75 [0.12 to 0.93]), during (ICC = 0.49 [-0.80 to 0.85]) and post-exercise (ICC = 0.35 [-1.22 to 0.81] conditions. Thus, there is poor correlation between the values of MTSK measured by thermocouples and IRT pre-exercise, exercise and post-exercise, and low reliability between the two forms of measurement.

  7. Comparison of Combined Aerobic and High-Force Eccentric Resistance Exercise With Aerobic Exercise Only for People With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus, Robin L.; Smith, Sheldon; Morrell, Glen; Addison, Odessa; Dibble, Leland E.; Wahoff-Stice, Donna; LaStayo, Paul C.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes between a diabetes exercise training program using combined aerobic and high-force eccentric resistance exercise and a program of aerobic exercise only.

  8. Importance of characteristics and modalities of physical activity and exercise in the management of cardiovascular health in individuals with cardiovascular disease (Part III)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanhees, L; Rauch, B; Piepoli, M

    2012-01-01

    Association on Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation are formulated regarding frequency, intensity, time and type of PA, and safety aspects during exercise inpatients with cardiovascular disease. This paper is the third in a series of three papers, all devoted to the same theme: the importance...... of the exercise characteristics in the management of cardiovascular health. Part I is directed to the general population and Part II to individuals with cardiovascular risk factors. In general, PA recommendations and exercise training programmes for patients with coronary artery disease or chronic heart failure...... on type, dosage, and intensity of exercise in some other cardiovascular diseases, such as congenital heart disease, valve disease, cardiomyopathies, channelopathies, and patients with implanted devices....

  9. In-Suit Light Exercise (ISLE) Prebreathe Protocol Peer Review Assessment. Part 2; Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Timothy K.; Polk, James D.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of extravehicular activity (EVA) by National Aeronautics and Space Administration astronauts involves the risk of decompression sickness. This risk has been mitigated by the use of oxygen "prebreathe" to effectively wash out tissue nitrogen prior to each EVA. Now that the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) is being retired, high-pressure oxygen will become a limited resource. The In-Suit Light Exercise (ISLE) Prebreathe Protocol offers several potential benefits including its potential to save 6 pounds of oxygen per EVA. At the request of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center, the peer review convened on October 14, 2010. The major recommendation of the Review Committee was that the ISLE protocol was acceptable for operational use as a prebreathe option prior to EVA. The appendices to Volume I of the report are contained in this document.

  10. Muscle activation and perceived loading during rehabilitation exercises: comparison of dumbbells and elastic resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Christoffer H; Mortensen, Ole S;

    2010-01-01

    High-intensity resistance training plays an essential role in the prevention and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries and disorders. Although resistance exercises with heavy weights yield high levels of muscle activation, the efficacy of more user-friendly forms of exercise needs to be exam......High-intensity resistance training plays an essential role in the prevention and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries and disorders. Although resistance exercises with heavy weights yield high levels of muscle activation, the efficacy of more user-friendly forms of exercise needs...

  11. Comparison of Different Forms of Exercise Training in Patients With Cardiac Disease: Where Does High-Intensity Interval Training Fit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayda, Mathieu; Ribeiro, Paula A B; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil

    2016-04-01

    In this review, we discuss the most recent forms of exercise training available to patients with cardiac disease and their comparison or their combination (or both) during short- and long-term (phase II and III) cardiac rehabilitation programs. Exercise training modalities to be discussed include inspiratory muscle training (IMT), resistance training (RT), continuous aerobic exercise training (CAET), and high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Particular emphasis is placed on HIIT compared or combined (or both) with other forms such as CAET or RT. For example, IMT combined with CAET was shown to be superior to CAET alone for improving functional capacity, ventilatory function, and quality of life in patients with chronic heart failure. Similarly, RT combined with CAET was shown to optimize benefits with respect to functional capacity, muscle function, and quality of life. Furthermore, in recent years, HIIT has emerged as an alternative or complementary (or both) exercise modality to CAET, providing equivalent if not superior benefits to conventional continuous aerobic training with respect to aerobic fitness, cardiovascular function, quality of life, efficiency, safety, tolerance, and exercise adherence in both short- and long-term training studies. Finally, short-interval HIIT was shown to be useful in the initiation and improvement phases of cardiac rehabilitation, whereas moderate- or longer-interval (or both) HIIT protocols appear to be more appropriate for the improvement and maintenance phases because of their high physiological stimulus. We now propose progressive models of exercise training (phases II-III) for patients with cardiac disease, including a more appropriate application of HIIT based on the scientific literature in the context of a multimodal cardiac rehabilitation program.

  12. Comparison of whole-body vibration exercise and plyometric exercise to improve isokinetic muscular strength, jumping performance and balance of female volleyball players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Youn; Park, Si-Eun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of whole-body vibration exercise and plyometric exercise on female volleyball players. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were randomly allocated to two exercise groups (whole-body vibration exercise group and plyometric exercise group). The exercise was conducted three times each week for 8 weeks. Isokinetic muscular strength, jumping performance, and balance were measured before starting the exercise and after finishing the 8 weeks of exercise. [Results] Measurements of isokinetic muscular strength revealed that the whole-body vibration exercise group showed significant increase after the exercise. However, the plyometric exercise group had no significant increase in lumbar flexion, extension, and knee flexion. Measurements of vertical jumping revealed that, the whole-body vibration exercise group had no significant increase after the exercise. However, the plyometric exercise group showed significant increase. Measurements of balance revealed that, the whole-body vibration exercise group showed significant increase. However, the plyometric exercise group showed no significant increase. [Conclusion] Although both whole-body vibration and plyometric exercises are effective intervention methods, the two methods have different effects on the improvement of isokinetic muscular strength, jumping performance, and balance of female volleyball players. PMID:27942136

  13. Muscle activation and perceived loading during rehabilitation exercises: comparison of dumbbells and elastic resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Christoffer H; Mortensen, Ole S;

    2010-01-01

    High-intensity resistance training plays an essential role in the prevention and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries and disorders. Although resistance exercises with heavy weights yield high levels of muscle activation, the efficacy of more user-friendly forms of exercise needs to be exam...

  14. Exercise-induced hypertension among healthy firefighters-a comparison between two different definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiba, Adi; Baur, Dorothee M; Kales, Stefanos N

    2013-01-01

    Different studies have yielded conflicting results regarding the association of hypertensive response to exercise and cardiovascular morbidity. We compared two different definitions of exaggerated hypertensive response to exercise and their association with cardio-respiratory fitness in a population of healthy firefighters. We examined blood pressure response to exercise in 720 normotensive male career firefighters. Fitness was measured as peak metabolic equivalent tasks (METs) achieved during maximal exercise treadmill tests. Abnormal hypertensive response was defined either as systolic blood pressure ≥ 200 mm Hg; or alternatively, as responses falling in the upper tertile of blood pressure change from rest to exertion, divided by the maximal workload achieved. Using the simple definition of a 200 mm Hg cutoff at peak exercise less fit individuals (METs ≤ 12) were protected from an exaggerated hypertensive response (OR 0.45, 95%CI 0.30-0.67). However, using the definition of exercise-induced hypertension that corrects for maximal workload, less fit firefighters had almost twice the risk (OR 1.8, 95%CI 1.3-2.47). Blood pressure change corrected for maximal workload is better correlated with cardiorespiratory fitness. Systolic blood pressure elevation during peak exercise likely represents an adaptive response, whereas elevation out of proportion to the maximal workload may indicate insufficient vasodilation and a maladaptive response. Prospective studies are needed to best define exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise.

  15. Electromyographical Comparison of Four Common Shoulder Exercises in Unstable and Stable Shoulders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Sciascia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines if electromyographic (EMG amplitude differences exist between patients with shoulder instability and healthy controls performing scaption, prone horizontal abduction, prone external rotation, and push-up plus shoulder rehabilitation exercises. Thirty nine subjects were categorized by a single orthopedic surgeon as having multidirectional instability (n=10, anterior instability (n=9, generalized laxity (n=10, or a healthy shoulder (n=10. Indwelling and surface electrodes were utilized to measure EMG activity (reported as a % of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC in various shoulder muscles during 4 common shoulder exercises. The exercises studied effectively activated the primary musculature targeted in each exercise equally among all groups. The serratus anterior generated high activity (50–80% MVIC during a push-up plus, while the infraspinatus and teres major generated moderate-to-high activity (30–80% MVIC during both the prone horizontal and prone external rotation exercises. Scaption exercise generated moderate activity (20–50% MVIC in both rotator cuff and scapular musculature. Clinicians should feel confident in prescribing these shoulder-strengthening exercises in patients with shoulder instability as the activation levels are comparable to previous findings regarding EMG amplitudes and should improve the dynamic stabilization capability of both rotator cuff and scapular muscles using exercises designed to address glenohumeral joint instability.

  16. Comparison of Effects of Running and Playing Exercises on Differential Leucocyte Count in Young Elite Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenikli, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present research are to test the effects of running and playing exercises on leucocyte and differential leucocyte accounts, and to test the possible differences between running and playing exercises in terms of leucocyte accounts. They were thirty two male young soccer players. Participants arrived at the laboratory after a 12-hour…

  17. Comparison of heart and respiratory rate variability measures using an intermittent incremental submaximal exercise model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Ramirez, Juliana; Bravi, Andrea; Green, Geoffrey; Seely, Andrew J; Kenny, Glen P

    2013-11-01

    To better understand the alterations in cardiorespiratory variability during exercise, the present study characterized the patterns of change in heart rate variability (HRV), respiratory rate variability (RRV), and combined cardiorespiratory variability (HRV-RRV) during an intermittent incremental submaximal exercise model. Six males and six females completed a submaximal exercise protocol consisting of an initial baseline resting period followed by three 10-min bouts of exercise at 20%, 40%, and 60% of maximal aerobic capacity (V̇O2max). The R-R interval and interbreath interval variability were measured at baseline rest and throughout the submaximal exercise. A group of 93 HRV, 83 RRV, and 28 HRV-RRV measures of variability were tracked over time through a windowed analysis using a 5-min window size and 30-s window step. A total of 91 HRV measures were able to detect the presence of exercise, whereas only 46 RRV and 3 HRV-RRV measures were able to detect the same stimulus. Moreover, there was a loss of overall HRV and RRV, loss of complexity of HRV and RRV, and loss of parasympathetic modulation of HRV (up to 40% V̇O2max) with exercise. Conflicting changes in scale-invariant structure of HRV and RRV with increases in exercise intensity were also observed. In summary, in this simultaneous evaluation of HRV and RRV, we found more consistent changes across HRV metrics compared with RRV and HRV-RRV.

  18. A comparison between computer-controlled and set work rate exercise based on target heart rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Wanda M.; Siconolfi, Steven F.; Webster, Laurie; Hayes, Judith C.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.; Harris, Bernard A., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Two methods are compared for observing the heart rate (HR), metabolic equivalents, and time in target HR zone (defined as the target HR + or - 5 bpm) during 20 min of exercise at a prescribed intensity of the maximum working capacity. In one method, called set-work rate exercise, the information from a graded exercise test is used to select a target HR and to calculate a corresponding constant work rate that should induce the desired HR. In the other method, the work rate is controlled by a computer algorithm to achieve and maintain a prescribed target HR. It is shown that computer-controlled exercise is an effective alternative to the traditional set work rate exercise, particularly when tight control of cardiovascular responses is necessary.

  19. Trunk muscle activities during abdominal bracing: comparison among muscles and exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeo, Sumiaki; Takahashi, Takumi; Takai, Yohei; Kanehisa, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal bracing is often adopted in fitness and sports conditioning programs. However, there is little information on how muscular activities during the task differ among the muscle groups located in the trunk and from those during other trunk exercises. The present study aimed to quantify muscular activity levels during abdominal bracing with respect to muscle- and exercise-related differences. Ten healthy young adult men performed five static (abdominal bracing, abdominal hollowing, prone, side, and supine plank) and five dynamic (V- sits, curl-ups, sit-ups, and back extensions on the floor and on a bench) exercises. Surface electromyogram (EMG) activities of the rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and erector spinae (ES) muscles were recorded in each of the exercises. The EMG data were normalized to those obtained during maximal voluntary contraction of each muscle (% EMGmax). The % EMGmax value during abdominal bracing was significantly higher in IO (60%) than in the other muscles (RA: 18%, EO: 27%, ES: 19%). The % EMGmax values for RA, EO, and ES were significantly lower in the abdominal bracing than in some of the other exercises such as V-sits and sit-ups for RA and EO and back extensions for ES muscle. However, the % EMGmax value for IO during the abdominal bracing was significantly higher than those in most of the other exercises including dynamic ones such as curl-ups and sit-ups. These results suggest that abdominal bracing is one of the most effective techniques for inducing a higher activation in deep abdominal muscles, such as IO muscle, even compared to dynamic exercises involving trunk flexion/extension movements. Key PointsTrunk muscle activities during abdominal bracing was examined with regard to muscle- and exercise-related differences.Abdominal bracing preferentially activates internal oblique muscles even compared to dynamic exercises involving trunk flexion/extension movements.Abdominal bracing should be

  20. The delivery of injury prevention exercise programmes in professional youth soccer: Comparison to the FIFA 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, James; Young, Warren; Finch, Caroline F

    2017-01-01

    Injury prevention exercise programmes for amateur soccer have gained considerable attention, but little is known about their relevance and adaptability to professional soccer settings. The first aim of this study was to evaluate the delivery and content of injury prevention exercise programmes used by professional youth soccer teams, compared to the industry standard injury prevention exercise programme for soccer, the Fédération Internationale de Football Association's FIFA 11+. The second aim was to document specific challenges to implementing injury prevention exercise programmes in this context. Prospective observational study. The participants were soccer coaches, fitness coaches and physiotherapists (n=18) from four teams in a professional youth soccer academy. Each team's chosen injury prevention exercise programmes were observed weekly across an entire soccer season (160 sessions). The delivery and content of the programmes were documented on a standardised worksheet and compared to the FIFA 11+. Specific implementation challenges were recorded. Fitness coaches were the primary deliverers of injury prevention exercise programmes, with support from physiotherapists. Multiple delivery formats and locations were employed, along with the extensive use of equipment. Across all injury prevention exercise programme sessions, a median of one FIFA 11+ exercise was performed in its original form and a further four in a modified form. Implementation challenges included poor staff communication, competing training priorities and heavy game schedules. Although the basic components of the FIFA 11+ hold relevance for professional youth male teams, the delivery and content of injury prevention exercise programmes require considerable tailoring for this context. Recognising this will inform the development of improved, context-specific injury prevention exercise programmes, along with corresponding strategies to enhance their implementation. Copyright © 2016 Sports

  1. Comparison of Methods for Determining Aerobic Exercise Intensity Using Heart Rate in Acute Leukemia Patients Prior to Induction Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Christina; Bryant, Ashley Leak; Phillips, Brett; Bailey, Charlotte; Shields, Edgar W; Battaglini, Claudio

    2016-07-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET), the gold standard of cardiopulmonary evaluation, is used to determine VO2 levels at different aerobic exercise training intensities; however, it may not be feasible to conduct CPET in all clinical settings. To compare the heart rate reserve (HRR) and percent of 220-age methods for prescribing cycle ergometry exercise intensity using heart rate (HR) against the HRs obtained during a CPET in adults undergoing treatment for acute leukemia (AL). In this exploratory study, part of a larger randomized controlled trial, 14 adults with AL completed CPET on a cycle ergometer with indirect calorimetry within 96 hr of admission to a cancer hospital to determine VO2peak and HR corresponding to low (40% VO2peak), moderate (60% VO2peak), and high (75% VO2peak) exercise intensities. Analyses of variance were used to compare estimated HR for each intensity level using the HRR and percent of 220-age methods with HR determined via VO2peak. HR corresponding to low-intensity exercise differed significantly across all three methods (p ≤ .05). No significant differences were observed between HR estimated via the percent of 220-age method and determined via VO2peak at moderate (100 ± 8 and 113 ± 24 bpm, p = .122) or high intensities (125 ± 10 and 123 ± 25 bpm, p = .994). In adults with AL, HR-based methods for defining aerobic exercise intensities should be used with caution. At low intensity, neither should be used, while at moderate and high intensities, the percent of 220-age equation might serve as an adequate substitute for CPET. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Stress echocardiography in warmblood horses: comparison of dobutamine/atropine with treadmill exercise as cardiac stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlen, Heidrun; Marnette, Silke; Rohn, Karl; Stadler, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the combination of dobutamine and atropine causes cardiac stress equivalent to treadmill exercise. Therefore, electrocardiography and echocardiography were performed on 10 warmblood horses before, during, and after different cardiac stress tests. Stressors consisted of a standardized treadmill exercise and combined administration of dobutamine (7.5 microg/kg/min) and atropine (5 microg/kg). Maxima heart rates were achieved during the treadmill exercise (175 +/- 10 bpm). After exercise, a rapid decrease in heart rate was observed. Subsequently, a stress echocardiography for which a heart rate >100 bpm was required could only be performed within 1 minute after exercise. The mean heart rate during echocardiography was 136 +/- 8 bpm after exercise. The combination of dobutamine and atropine also resulted in a significant increase in heart rate, up to 141 +/- 20 bpm. Maxima heart rate was significantly higher during the treadmill exercise, but the decrease in heart rate was significantly slower after dobutamine and atropine administration. Over a period of 7.9 minutes, the mean heart rate was 123 +/- 8 bpm during dobutamine and atropine administration. Consequently, the combination of both drugs offered sufficient time for detailed examinations. Overall, echocardiographic examination identified a decrease in left ventricular (LV) dimensions, an increase in LV wall thickness, and a decrease in stroke volume after the treadmill exercise and during pharmacologic stress testing compared with baseline. Changes in echocardiographic variables generally were more pronounced during dobutamine and atropine administration. Similar to stress echocardiography in humans, in horses the combination of dobutamine and atropine is useful to produce an increase in heart rate comparable with what is achieved with exercise but without the need of increasing dobutamine dosage.

  3. Comparison of different methods for eliciting exercise-to-music for clients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevasco, Andrea M; Grant, Roy E

    2003-01-01

    Many of the noted problems associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) sometimes can be delayed, retarded, or even reversed with proper exercise and interaction with the environment. An overwhelming body of research efforts has revealed that music activity brings about the greatest degree of responsiveness, including exercise, in clients with AD; yet, specific techniques which elicit the greatest amount of physical responses during the music activities remain unidentified. The purpose of this study was two-fold: comparing two methods of intervention and comparing responses to vocal versus instrumental music during exercise and exercise with instruments. In Experiment 1 the authors compared 2 treatment conditions to facilitate exercise during music activities: (a) verbalizing the movement for each task once, one beat before commencing, followed by visual cueing for the remainder of the task; (b) verbal and visual cueing for each revolution or change in rhythm for the duration of the task. Data collection over 38 sessions consisted of recording the participation of each client at 30-second intervals for the duration of each treatment condition, indicating at each interval whether the client was participating in the designated movement (difficult), participating in exercise approximating the designated movement (easy), or not participating. Results indicated that the continuous verbal cueing/easy treatment elicited significantly greater participation than one verbal cue/difficult treatment, p music, vocal versus instrumental, during types of activities, exercise with and without instruments, were examined. Data were collected over 26 sessions, 52 activities, in the same 2 assisted living facilities as those in Experiment 1, but one year later Results indicated that both the type of activity and the type of music had some effect on participation. Also, data indicated participation in exercise to instrumental music was significantly greater than exercise with instruments

  4. Comparison of sweat rate during graded exercise and the local rate induced by pilocarpine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vimieiro-Gomes A.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Centrally stimulated sweat rate produced by graded exercise until exhaustion was compared to the local sweat rate induced by pilocarpine, often used as a sweating index for healthy individuals. Nine young male volunteers (22 ± 4 years were studied in temperate environment in two situations: at rest and during progressive exercise with 25 W increases every 2 min until exhaustion, on a cycle ergometer. In both situations, sweating was induced on the right forearm with 5 ml 0.5% pilocarpine hydrochloride applied by iontophoresis (1.5 mA, 5 min, with left forearm used as control. Local sweat rate was measured for 15 min at rest. During exercise, whole-body sweat rate was calculated from the body weight variation. Local sweat rate was measured from the time when heart rate reached 150 bpm until exhaustion and was collected using absorbent filter paper. Pharmacologically induced local sweat rate at rest (0.4 ± 0.2 mg cm-2 min-1 and mean exercise-induced whole-body sweat rate (0.4 ± 0.1 mg cm-2 min-1 were the same (P > 0.05 but were about five times smaller than local exercise-induced sweat rate (control = 2.1 ± 1.4; pilocarpine = 2.7 ± 1.2 mg cm-2 min-1, indicating different sudorific mechanisms. Both exercise-induced whole-body sweat rate (P < 0.05 and local sweat rate (P < 0.05 on control forearm correlated positively with pilocarpine-induced local sweat rate at rest. Assuming that exercise-induced sweating was a result of integrated physiological mechanisms, we suggest that local and whole-body sweat rate measured during graded exercise could be a better sweating index than pilocarpine.

  5. Comparison between treadmill and bicycle ergometer exercise tests in mild-to-moderate hypertensive Nigerians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abiodun OO

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Olugbenga O Abiodun, Michael O Balogun, Anthony O Akintomide, Rasaaq A Adebayo, Olufemi E Ajayi, Suraj A Ogunyemi, Valentine N Amadi, Victor O Adeyeye Cardiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex (OAUTHC, Ile-Ife, Osun state, Nigeria Background: Comparative cardiovascular responses to treadmill and bicycle ergometer (bike exercise tests in hypertensive Nigerians are not known. This study compared cardiovascular responses to the two modes of exercise testing in hypertensives using maximal exercise protocols. Methods: One hundred and ten male subjects with mild-to-moderate hypertension underwent maximal treadmill and bike test one after the other at a single visit in a simple random manner. Paired-sampled t-test was used to compare responses to both exercise tests while chi-squared test was used to compare categorical variables. Results: The maximal heart rate (P<0.001, peak systolic blood pressure (P=0.02, rate pressure product (P<0.001, peak oxygen uptake (P<0.001, and exercise capacity (P<0.001 in metabolic equivalents were significantly higher on the treadmill than on the bike. Conclusion: Higher cardiovascular responses on treadmill in Nigerian male hypertensives in this study, similar to findings in non-hypertensives and non-Nigerians in earlier studies, suggest that treadmill may be of better diagnostic utility in our population. Keywords: maximal exercise, treadmill, bicycle ergometer, hypertension, Nigerians

  6. [Chronic low back pain : Comparison of mobilization and core stability exercises].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfuth, M; Cornely, D

    2016-07-01

    For the treatment of chronic low back pain (cLBP), both core stability and mobilization exercises were introduced. The aim of this prospective randomized clinical pilot study was to compare the efficacy of mobilization and core stability exercises with regard to objective and subjective outcome measures in patients with cLBP. After a per-protocol analysis, the data of 27 patients with cLBP, who were randomly allocated to one of the two groups, were analyzed. The intervention group (GM) performed mobilization exercises using the BALLance-Methode®, the control group (GS) carried out core stability exercises for 4 weeks, and continued the exercises for an additional 4 weeks at home. Flexibility, strength endurance of the core stabilizing muscles, pain-induced disability, and pain avoidance behavior were the objective and subjective outcomes that were measured before, 4 weeks after, and 8 weeks after the onset of the intervention. The significance of differences within and between groups was analyzed. During the observation period, only in the GS patients could maintain the prone-plank position and the side-plank position improvements over time (p core stability exercises.

  7. Muscle metabolite accumulation following maximal exercise. A comparison between short-term and prolonged kayak performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesch, P A; Karlsson, J

    1984-01-01

    Five elite flatwater kayak paddlers were studied during indoor simulated 500 and 10,000-m races, with performance times of 2 and 45 min, respectively. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the midportion of m. deltoideus immediately pre and post exercise. Concentrations of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), creatine phosphate (CP), glucose, glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P), glycogen, and lactate were subsequently determined. Short term exercise resulted in statistically significant increases in glucose (P less than 0.001), G-6-P (P less than 0.05) and lactate (P less than 0.01) concentration concomitant with decreased CP (P less than 0.05) and glycogen (P less than 0.01). Following prolonged exercise, a non-significant elevation in glucose and a reduction (P less than 0.01) in glycogen were demonstrated. Evidently the metabolic demands for kayak competitions at 500 and 10,000 m are different. Thus, the energy contribution from glycolytic precursors and the anaerobic component is of greater relative importance in short distances than in exercise of long duration. A generalization of the findings to other athletic events of varying distances is proposed. The present data on arm-exercise is consistent with previous findings obtained in connection with leg exercises.

  8. Comparison of Energy Expenditure During Single-Set vs. Multiple-Set Resistance Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mookerjee, Swapan; Welikonich, Michael J; Ratamess, Nicholas A

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare energy expenditure (EE) of single-set and multiple-set resistance exercise protocols using indirect calorimetry. Twelve men and twelve women (age = 21.4 ± 1.3 years) performed a single-set (SS) and multiple-set (MS) resistance exercise protocol in random order. The subjects performed two protocols at 70% of their 1-repetition maximum. The protocols consisted of 5 upper-body exercises of either 1 or 3 sets per exercise performed in random order. Metabolic and cardiorespiratory data were recorded over the entire exercise session and during 5 minutes of recovery by a portable metabolic measurement system. Gross (167.9 ± 58.7 kcal) and net (88.3 ± 41.6 kcal) EE for the MS protocol were significantly greater (p protocol. Conversely, there was no significant difference in the rate of EE between both protocols. Significant gender differences (p protocols where values in men were higher than women. Heart rate, respiratory rate, relative V[Combining Dot Above]O2, respiratory exchange ratio, and minute ventilation values were significantly higher during the MS than the SS protocol. The results of this study indicated that MS protocols yield greater metabolic and cardiovascular demands than SS protocols when the number of exercises performed is the same.

  9. Comparison of exercise electrocardiography and stress perfusion CMR for the detection of coronary artery disease in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greulich Simon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exercise electrocardiography (ECG is frequently used in the work-up of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD, however the accuracy is reduced in women. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR stress testing can accurately diagnose CAD in women. To date, a direct comparison of CMR to ECG has not been performed. Methods and results We prospectively enrolled 88 consecutive women with chest pain or other symptoms suggestive of CAD. Patients underwent a comprehensive clinical evaluation, exercise ECG, a CMR stress test including perfusion and infarct imaging, and x-ray coronary angiography (CA within 24 hours. CAD was defined as stenosis ≥70% on quantitative analysis of CA. Exercise ECG, CMR and CA was completed in 68 females (age 66.4 ± 8.8 years, number of CAD risk factors 3.5 ± 1.4. The prevalence of CAD on CA was 29%. The Duke treadmill score (DTS in the entire group was −3.0 ± 5.4 and was similar in those with and without CAD (−4.5 ± 5.8 and −2.4 ± 5.1; P = 0.12. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for CAD diagnosis was higher for CMR compared with exercise ECG (sensitivities 85% and 50%, P = 0.02, specificities 94% and 73%, P = 0.01, and accuracies 91% and 66%, P = 0.0007, respectively. Even after applying the DTS the accuracy of CMR was higher compared to exercise ECG (area under ROC curve 0.94 ± 0.03 vs 0.56 ± 0.07; P = 0.0001. Conclusions In women with intermediate-to-high risk for CAD who are able to exercise and have interpretable resting ECG, CMR stress perfusion imaging has higher accuracy for the detection of relevant obstruction of the epicardial coronaries when directly compared to exercise ECG.

  10. Comparison in eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage among four limb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Trevor C; Lin, Kun-Yi; Chen, Hsin-Lian; Lin, Ming-Ju; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2011-02-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that changes in indirect markers of muscle damage following maximal eccentric exercise would be smaller for the knee extensors (KE) and flexors (KF) compared with the elbow flexors (EF) and extensors (EE). A total of 17 sedentary men performed five sets of six maximal isokinetic (90° s(-1)) eccentric contractions of EF (range of motion, ROM: 90°-0°, 0 = full extension), EE (55°-145°), KF (90°-0°), and KE (30°-120°) using a different limb with a 4-5-week interval in a counterbalanced order. Changes in maximal isometric and concentric isokinetic strength, optimum angle, limb circumference, ROM, plasma creatine kinase activity and myoglobin concentration, muscle soreness, and echo-intensity of B-mode ultrasound images before and for 5 days following exercise were compared amongst the four exercises using two-way repeated-measures ANOVA. All variables changed significantly following EF, EE, and KF exercises, but KE exercise did not change the optimum angle, limb circumference, and echo-intensity. Compared with KF and KE, EF and EE showed significantly greater changes in all variables, without significant differences between EF and EE. Changes in all variables were significantly greater for KF than KE. For the same subjects, the magnitude of change in the dependent variables following exercise varied among the exercises. These results suggest that the two arm muscles are equally more susceptible to muscle damage than leg muscles, but KF is more susceptible to muscle damage than KE. The difference in the susceptibility to muscle damage seems to be associated with the use of muscles in daily activities.

  11. Comparison of cardiac output determined by different rebreathing methods at rest and at peak exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Nunan, David; Donovan, Gay; Hodges, Lynette D; Sandercock, Gavin R H; Brodie, David A

    2008-03-01

    Several rebreathing methods are available for cardiac output (Q (T)) measurement. The aims of this study were threefold: first, to compare values for resting Q (T) produced by the equilibrium-CO(2), exponential-CO(2) and inert gas-N(2)O rebreathing methods and, second, to evaluate the reproducibility of these three methods at rest. The third aim was to assess the agreement between estimates of peak exercise Q (T) derived from the exponential and inert gas rebreathing methods. A total of 18 healthy subjects visited the exercise laboratory on different days. Repeated measures of Q (T), measured in a seated position, were separated by a 5 min rest period. Twelve participants performed an incremental exercise test to determine peak oxygen consumption. Two more exercise tests were used to measure Q (T) at peak exercise using the exponential and inert gas rebreathing methods. The exponential method produced significantly higher estimates at rest (averaging 10.9 l min(-1)) compared with the equilibrium method (averaging 6.6 l min(-1)) and the inert gas rebreathing method (averaging 5.1 l min(-1); P < 0.01). All methods were highly reproducible with the exponential method having the largest coefficient of variation (5.3%). At peak exercise, there were non-significant differences between the exponential and inert gas rebreathing methods (P = 0.14). The limits of agreement were -0.49 to 0.79 l min(-1). Due to the ability to evaluate the degree of gas mixing and to estimate intra-pulmonary shunt, we believe that the inert gas rebreathing method has the potential to measure Q (T) more precisely than either of the CO(2) rebreathing methods used in this study. At peak exercise, the exponential and inert gas rebreathing methods both showed acceptable limits of agreement.

  12. Comparison of Nigella sativa- and exercise-induced models of cardiac hypertrophy: structural and electrophysiological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Asoom, Lubna Ibrahim; Al-Shaikh, Basil Abdulrahman; Bamosa, Abdullah Omar; El-Bahai, Mohammad Nabil

    2014-09-01

    Exercise training is employed as supplementary therapeutic intervention for heart failure, due to its ability to induce physiological cardiac hypertrophy. In parallel, supplementation with Nigella sativa (N. sativa) was found to enhance myocardial function and induce cardiac hypertrophy. In this study, we aim to compare the morphological and electrophysiological changes associated with these patterns of cardiac hypertrophy and the possible changes upon administration of N. sativa to exercise-trained animals. Fifty-six adult Wistar rats were divided into: control, Nigella-treated (N), exercise-trained (E), and Nigella-treated-exercise-trained (NE) rats. Daily 800 mg/kg N. sativa was administered orally to N and NE. E and NE ran on treadmill, 2 h/day. At the end of 8 weeks ECG, body weight (BW), heart weight (HW), and left ventricular weight (LVW) were recorded. Hematoxylin and Eosin and periodic acid-Schiff sections were prepared to study the histology of left ventricles and to measure diameter of cardiomyocytes (Cdia). HW/BW, LVW/BW, and mean Cdia were significantly higher in all experimental animals compared to the controls. Histology showed normal cardiomyocytes with no fibrosis. ECG showed significantly lower heart rates, higher QRS amplitude, and ventricular specific potential in NE group compared to control group. Supplementation of N. sativa demonstrated a synergistic effect with exercise training as Nigella-exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy had lower heart rate and well-matched electrical activity of the heart to its mass. Therefore, this model of cardiac hypertrophy might be introduced as a new therapeutic strategy for treatment for heart failure with superior advantages to exercise training.

  13. TRUNK MUSCLE ACTIVITIES DURING ABDOMINAL BRACING: COMPARISON AMONG MUSCLES AND EXERCISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumiaki Maeo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal bracing is often adopted in fitness and sports conditioning programs. However, there is little information on how muscular activities during the task differ among the muscle groups located in the trunk and from those during other trunk exercises. The present study aimed to quantify muscular activity levels during abdominal bracing with respect to muscle- and exercise-related differences. Ten healthy young adult men performed five static (abdominal bracing, abdominal hollowing, prone, side, and supine plank and five dynamic (V- sits, curl-ups, sit-ups, and back extensions on the floor and on a bench exercises. Surface electromyogram (EMG activities of the rectus abdominis (RA, external oblique (EO, internal oblique (IO, and erector spinae (ES muscles were recorded in each of the exercises. The EMG data were normalized to those obtained during maximal voluntary contraction of each muscle (% EMGmax. The % EMGmax value during abdominal bracing was significantly higher in IO (60% than in the other muscles (RA: 18%, EO: 27%, ES: 19%. The % EMGmax values for RA, EO, and ES were significantly lower in the abdominal bracing than in some of the other exercises such as V-sits and sit-ups for RA and EO and back extensions for ES muscle. However, the % EMGmax value for IO during the abdominal bracing was significantly higher than those in most of the other exercises including dynamic ones such as curl-ups and sit-ups. These results suggest that abdominal bracing is one of the most effective techniques for inducing a higher activation in deep abdominal muscles, such as IO muscle, even compared to dynamic exercises involving trunk flexion/extension movements

  14. Despina Hatzifotiadou: ALICE Master Class 2 - Demonstration of the software for the 1st part of the exercise - visual identification of V0s

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    This is the 2nd of 4 short online videos. It contains a demonstration of the software used for the 1st part of the exercise, related to the theory explained in Master Class 1 - visual identification of V0s. More details and related links on this indico event page. In more detail: What is Physics Master Classes Students after morning lectures, run programmes in the afternoon to do measurements. These tutorials are about how to use the software required to do these measurements. Background info and examples  Looking for strange particles with ALICE http://aliceinfo.cern.ch/Public/MasterCL/MasterClassWebpage.html Introduction to first part of the exercise : what are strange particles, V0 decays, invariant mass. Demonstration of the software for the 1st part of the exercise - visual identification of V0s Introduction to second part of the exercise : strangeness enhancement; centrality of lead-lead collisions; explanation of efficiency, yield, background etc Demonstration of the software for the ...

  15. Comparison of Oxygen Consumption in Rats During Uphill (Concentric and Downhill (Eccentric Treadmill Exercise Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien Chavanelle, Pascal Sirvent, Gaël Ennequin, Kévin Caillaud, Christophe Montaurier, Béatrice Morio, Nathalie Boisseau, Ruddy Richard

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of the physiological adaptations of skeletal muscle in response to eccentric (ECC contraction is based on protocols in which exercise intensities are determined relative to the concentric (CON reference exercise (as percentage of the CON maximal oxygen consumption, or VO2max. In order to use similar exercise protocols in rats, we compared the VO2 values during uphill (CON and downhill (ECC running tests. VO2 was measured in 15 Wistar rats during incremental treadmill running exercises with different slopes: level (0%, positive (+15% incline: CON+15% and negative (i15% incline: ECC-15%; and 130% incline: ECC-30%. Similar VO2 values were obtained in the ECC-30% and CON+15% running conditions at the three target speeds (15, 25 and 35 cm/sec. Conversely, VO2 values were lower (p < 0.05 in the ECC-15% than in the CON+15% condition (CON+15% VO2/ECC-15% VO2 ratios ranging from 1.86 to 2.05 at the three target speeds. Thus, doubling the downhill slope gradient in ECC condition leads to an oxygen consumption level that is not significantly different as in CON condition. These findings can be useful for designing animal research protocols to study the effects of ECC and CON exercise in ageing population or subjects suffering from cardiovascular diseases.

  16. A COMPARISON OF UPPER-EXTREMITY REACTION FORCES BETWEEN THE YURCHENKO VAULT AND FLOOR EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Kirk Seeley

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine reaction forces transmitted to the upper extremities of high-level gymnasts during the round-off phase of the Yurchenko vault. A secondary purpose of this study was to compare reaction forces during the Yurchenko vault to reaction forces observed in a tumbling pass during the floor exercise. Ten high-level, female gymnasts volunteered to participate. Conditions of the independent variable were the Yurchenko vault and floor exercise; dependent variables were peak vertical and peak anterior-posterior reaction forces. Each participant performed three trials of both conditions with the trail hand contacting a force platform. Vertical and anterior-posterior reaction forces, normalized to body weight, were greater (p < 0.05 during the round-off phase of the Yurchenko vault (2.38 than during the floor exercise round-off (2.15. Vertical reaction forces during the round-off phase of the Yurchenko vault and floor exercise round-off are similar to reaction forces transmitted to upper extremities during other gymnastic skills and ground reaction forces transmitted to lower extremities while running and walking at various speeds. Results of this study reveal a need for further research considering methods aimed at reducing reaction forces transmitted to the upper extremities during the Yurchenko vault and floor exercise.

  17. Comparison between Specific Lumber Mobilization and Core-Stability Exercises with Core-Stability Exercises Alone in Mechanical low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Rafiq; Shakil-ur-Rehman, Syed; Sibtain, Fozia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To Compare the Specific Lumber Mobilization (SLM) techniques and Core-Stability (CS) Exercises with Core-Stability Exercises Alone in Mechanical low back pain (MLP) Methods: A 6 month pretest-posttest design, quasi experimental study was conducted at department of physiotherapy Khyber Teaching Hospital (KTH) Peshawar, Pakistan. We conveniently selected a sample 40 patients and placed into two groups. The SLM techniques with CS exercises was applied in group A and CS exercises alone...

  18. Attenuation of morphine withdrawal signs, blood cortisol and glucose level with forced exercise in comparison with clonidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Motaghinejad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Morphine withdrawal usually results in undesired outcomes , despite partial benefits of alternative medication such as methadone, because of the lack of mental sedation during the withdrawal period, may not lead to the desired result. In this study, forced exercise by treadmill is used to manage morphine dependence in animal model. Materials and Methods: Forty adult male mice were divided into 5 groups, from which 4 groups became dependent by increasing daily doses of morphine for 6 days (20-45 mg/kg, SC. Afterwards, the animals were treated for 21 days by either of the following protocol: Positive control (dependent received once daily 45 mg/kg of morphine sulfate (SC for 21 day, group under treatment by clonidine (0.4 mg/kg, SC for 21 day group under treatment by forced exercise by treadmill for 21 day, group under treatment by combination of clonidine (0.4 mg/kg, SC and forced exercise by treadmill for 21day and the negative control group(independent received saline injection like other groups. Each of this administration was injected at 8 AM. Finally, in the test day (day 28, all animals received a single dose of naloxone (3 mg/kg, SC at 8 AM and then were observed for withdrawal signs, and Total Withdrawal Score (TWS was determined as described previously. After withdrawal sign evaluation for evaluation of stress level of dependent mice, blood cortisol and glucose level were measured in non-fasting situations well. Results: This study showed that TWS significantly decreased in all treatment groups in comparison with positive control group (P < 0.001. Moreover, blood cortisol and glucose level significantly decreased in group under treatment by clonidine (0.4 mg/kg and group under treatment by combination of clonidine (0.4 mg/kg and forced exercise by treadmill groups in comparison with control positive (dependent (P < 0.05. Conclusion: This study suggested that forced exercise can be useful as adjunct therapy in dependent people

  19. Comparison between two assessment methods for exercise-induced laryngeal obstructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norlander, Katarina; Christensen, Pernille M; Maat, Robert C;

    2016-01-01

    score and EILOMEA. The aim of this study was to investigate the consistency between these methods. Using their respective method, the developers of each method evaluated 60 laryngoscopic recordings from patients with different subtypes and various levels of severity of E-ILOs. The CLE score evaluates......Exercise-induced laryngeal obstructions (E-ILOs) are important differential diagnoses to exercise-induced asthma and are diagnosed by the continuous laryngoscopy exercise (CLE) test. There are two different methods for evaluating the severity of E-ILOs using recordings from the CLE test; the CLE...... reflect a severity of E-ILOs of clinical importance, this lack of the EILOMEA method is not crucial for a correct medical evaluation....

  20. Comparison Among Aerobic Exercise and Other Types of Interventions to Treat Depression: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Moura, Antonio Marcos; Lamego, Murilo Khede; Paes, Flávia; Ferreira Rocha, Nuno Barbosa; Simoes-Silva, Vitor; Rocha, Susana Almeida; de Sá Filho, Alberto Souza; Rimes, Ridson; Manochio, João; Budde, Henning; Wegner, Mirko; Mura, Gioia; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Machado, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a common and disabling disease that affects over 100 million people worldwide and can have a significant impact on physical and mental health, reducing their quality of life. Thus, the aim of this article was to provide information on research results and key chains related to the therapeutic effects of chronic aerobic exercise compared with other types of interventions to treat depression, which may become a useful clinical application in a near future. Researches have shown the effectiveness of alternative treatments, such as physical exercise, minimizing high financial costs and minimizing side effects. In this review, the data analyzed allows us to claim that alternative therapies, such as exercise, are effective on controlling and reducing symptoms. 69.3% of the studies that investigated the antidepressant effects of exercise on depressive were significant, and the other 30.7% of the studies improved only in general physiological aspects, such as increased oxygen uptake, increased use of blood glucose and decreased body fat percentage, with no improvement on symptoms of depression. From the sample analyzed, 71.4% was composed of women, and regarding the severity of symptoms, 85% had mild to moderate depression and only 15% had moderate to severe depression. However, there is still disagreement regarding the effect of exercise compared to the use of antidepressants in symptomatology and cognitive function in depression, this suggests that there is no consensus on the correct intensity of aerobic exercise as to achieve the best dose-response, with intensities high to moderate or moderate to mild.

  1. Health status, physical activity, and orthorexia nervosa: A comparison between exercise science students and business students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmborg, Julia; Bremander, Ann; Olsson, M Charlotte; Bergman, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Orthorexia nervosa is described as an exaggerated fixation on healthy food. It is unclear whether students in health-oriented academic programs, highly focused on physical exercise, are more prone to develop orthorexia nervosa than students in other educational areas. The aim was to compare health status, physical activity, and frequency of orthorexia nervosa between university students enrolled in an exercise science program (n = 118) or a business program (n = 89). The students completed the Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), and ORTO-15, which defines orthorexia nervosa as a sensitive and obsessive behavior towards healthy nutrition. The SF-36 showed that exercise science students scored worse than business students regarding bodily pain (72.8 vs. 82.5; p = 0.001), but better regarding general health (83.1 vs. 77.1; p = 0.006). Of 188 students, 144 (76.6%) had an ORTO-15 score indicating orthorexia nervosa, with a higher proportion in exercise science students than in business students (84.5% vs. 65.4%; p = 0.002). Orthorexia nervosa in combination with a high level of physical activity was most often seen in men in exercise science studies and less often in women in business studies (45.1% vs. 8.3%; p orthorexia nervosa in exercise science students may cause problems in the future, since they are expected to coach others in healthy living. Our findings may be valuable in the development of health-oriented academic programs and within student healthcare services. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Electromyographic comparison of various exercises to improve elbow flexion following intercostal nerve transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalidapong, P; Sananpanich, K; Klaphajone, J

    2006-05-01

    We compared the quantitative electromyographic activity of the elbow flexors during four exercises (forced inspiration, forced expiration, trunk flexion and attempted elbow flexion), following intercostal nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in 32 patients who had sustained root avulsion brachial plexus injuries. Quantitative electromyographic evaluation of the mean and maximum amplitude was repeated three times for each exercise. We found that mean and maximum elbow flexor activity was highest during trunk flexion, followed by attempted elbow flexion, forced inspiration and finally forced expiration. The difference between each group was significant (p intercostal nerve transfer.

  3. Comparison of exercise, dobutamine-atropine and dipyridamole-atropine stress echocardiography in detecting coronary artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedeljkovic, Ivana; Ostojic, Miodrag; Beleslin, Branko; Djordjevic-Dikic, Ana; Stepanovic, Jelena; Nedeljkovic, Milan; Stojkovic, Sinisa; Stankovic, Goran; Saponjski, Jovica; Petrasinovic, Zorica; Giga, Vojislav; Mitrovic, Predrag

    2006-01-01

    Background Dipyridamole and dobutamine stress echocardiography testing are most widely utilized, but their sensitivity remained suboptimal in comparison to routine exercise stress echocardiography. The aim of our study is to compare, head-to-head, exercise, dobutamine and dipyridamole stress echocardiography tests, performed with state-of-the-art protocols in a large scale prospective group of patients. Methods Dipyridamole-atropine (Dipatro: 0.84 mg/kg over 10 min i.v. dipyridamole with addition of up to 1 mg of atropine), dobutamine-atropine (Dobatro: up to 40 mcg/kg/min i.v. dobutamine with addition of up to 1 mg of atropine) and exercise (Ex, Bruce) were performed in 166 pts. Of them, 117 pts without resting wall motion abnormalities were enrolled in study (91 male; mean age 54 ± 10 years; previous non-transmural myocardial infarction in 32 pts, angina pectoris in 69 pts and atypical chest pain in 16 pts). Tests were performed in random sequence, in 3 different days, within 5 day period under identical therapy. All patients underwent coronary angiography. Results Significant coronary artery disease (CAD; ≥50% diameter stenosis) was present in 69 pts (57 pts 1-vessel CAD, 12 multivessel CAD) and absent in 48 pts. Sensitivity (Sn) was 96%, 93% and 90%, whereas specificity (Sp) was 92%, 92% and 87% for Dobatro, Dipatro and Ex, respectively (p = ns). Concomitant beta blocker therapy did not influence peak rate-pressure product and Sn of Dobatro and Dipatro (p = ns). Conclusion When state-of-the-art protocols are used, dipyridamole and dobutamine stress echocardiography have comparable and high diagnostic accuracy, similar to maximal post-exercise treadmill stress echocardiography. PMID:16672046

  4. Comparison of exercise, dobutamine-atropine and dipyridamole-atropine stress echocardiography in detecting coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrasinovic Zorica

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dipyridamole and dobutamine stress echocardiography testing are most widely utilized, but their sensitivity remained suboptimal in comparison to routine exercise stress echocardiography. The aim of our study is to compare, head-to-head, exercise, dobutamine and dipyridamole stress echocardiography tests, performed with state-of-the-art protocols in a large scale prospective group of patients. Methods Dipyridamole-atropine (Dipatro: 0.84 mg/kg over 10 min i.v. dipyridamole with addition of up to 1 mg of atropine, dobutamine-atropine (Dobatro: up to 40 mcg/kg/min i.v. dobutamine with addition of up to 1 mg of atropine and exercise (Ex, Bruce were performed in 166 pts. Of them, 117 pts without resting wall motion abnormalities were enrolled in study (91 male; mean age 54 ± 10 years; previous non-transmural myocardial infarction in 32 pts, angina pectoris in 69 pts and atypical chest pain in 16 pts. Tests were performed in random sequence, in 3 different days, within 5 day period under identical therapy. All patients underwent coronary angiography. Results Significant coronary artery disease (CAD; ≥50% diameter stenosis was present in 69 pts (57 pts 1-vessel CAD, 12 multivessel CAD and absent in 48 pts. Sensitivity (Sn was 96%, 93% and 90%, whereas specificity (Sp was 92%, 92% and 87% for Dobatro, Dipatro and Ex, respectively (p = ns. Concomitant beta blocker therapy did not influence peak rate-pressure product and Sn of Dobatro and Dipatro (p = ns. Conclusion When state-of-the-art protocols are used, dipyridamole and dobutamine stress echocardiography have comparable and high diagnostic accuracy, similar to maximal post-exercise treadmill stress echocardiography.

  5. Sleep, Exercise, and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrelson, Orvis A.; And Others

    The first part of this booklet concerns why sleep and exercise are necessary. It includes a discussion of what occurs during sleep and what dreams are. It also deals with the benefits of exercise, fatigue, posture, and the correlation between exercise and personality. The second part concerns nutrition and the importance of food. This part covers…

  6. Haptic control of a pneumatic muscle actuator to provide resistance for simulated isokinetic exercise; part II: control development and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kara L; Phillips, Chandler A; Reynolds, David B; Mohler, Stanley R; Rogers, Dana B; Neidhard-Doll, Amy T

    2015-01-01

    Pneumatic muscle actuators (PMAs) have a high power to weight ratio and possess unique characteristics which make them ideal actuators for applications involving human interaction. PMAs are difficult to control due to nonlinear dynamics, presenting challenges in system implementation. Despite these challenges, PMAs have great potential as a source of resistance for strength training and rehabilitation. The objective of this work was to control a PMA for use in isokinetic exercise, potentially benefiting anyone in need of optimal strength training through a joint's range of motion. The controller, based on an inverse three-element phenomenological model and adaptive nonlinear control, allows the system to operate as a type of haptic device. A human quadriceps dynamic simulator was developed (as described in Part I of this work) so that control effectiveness and accommodation could be tested prior to human implementation. Tracking error results indicate that the control system is effective at producing PMA displacement and resistance necessary for a scaled, simulated neuromuscular actuator to maintain low-velocity isokinetic movement during simulated concentric and eccentric knee extension.

  7. Comparison of changes in markers of muscle damage induced by eccentric exercise and ischemia/reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Q-S; Zhang, J-G; Dong, R; Hua, B; Sun, J-Z

    2010-10-01

    To examine the effects of eccentric exercise (EE) and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) on the markers of muscle damage, 72 rats were randomly assigned to the EE group, I/R group and control group (C), respectively. The rats in EE ran downhill on a treadmill with a 16 ° inclination at a constant speed for 90 min, and the rats in the I/R group underwent 90 min of four-limb ischemia, followed by 24, 48 and 72 h of reperfusion. Blood and tissue samples were collected immediately, 24, 48 and 72 h after exercise or reperfusion. Quantitative analyses showed that the I/R group had a significantly larger mitochondrial volume at 24 h after reperfusion compared with the C, and there were more disrupted Z-lines in the EE group and more disrupted mitochondria in the I/R group at 24 h after exercise or reperfusion. When compared with the C, a significantly lower total antioxidant capacity and higher interleukin-6 value were observed after exercise or reperfusion. Our data suggest that although EE and I/R result in some similar changes in the muscle damage markers, there are still some differences. The EE- and I/R-induced muscle damage may be due to different mechanisms.

  8. Comparison of manual therapy and exercise therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, H.L.; Dekker, J.; Ronday, H.K.; Heering, A.; Lubbe, N. van der; Vel, C.; Breedveld, F.C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of a manual therapy program compared with an exercise therapy program in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. METHODS: A single-blind, randomized clinical trial of 109 hip OA patients was carried out in the outpatient clinic for physical therapy of

  9. Comparison of abdominal muscle thickness according to feedback method used during abdominal hollowing exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangyong; Han, Seulki; Lee, Daehee

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] This study was intended to examine the most effective feedback method for contracting the musculus transversus abdominis muscle by using basic training, a pressure biofeedback unit, and real-time ultrasonographic imaging during abdominal hollowing exercise training. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects in this study were 30 healthy young students in their twenties. Thirty subjects were divided randomly and equally into the basic training, the pressure biofeedback unit, and real-time ultrasonographic imaging groups. All of the subjects received abdominal hollowing exercise training for 15 minutes. The subjects in the pressure biofeedback unit group were trained by using a pressure biofeedback unit. Those in the real-time ultrasonographic imaging group received training with monitoring of possible contraction of their musculus transversus abdominis muscles on ultrasonography. [Results] In all the three groups, the musculus transversus abdominis became significantly thicker, but more significantly in the real-time ultrasonographic imaging group than in the basic training group. [Conclusion] The feedback method using real-time ultrasonographic imaging may be more effective in thickening the musculus transversus abdominis muscle during exercise than the traditional feedback method with manual contact only. However, it is insufficient in terms of overall qualitative improvement of exercise outcome.

  10. Comparison of manual therapy and exercise therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, H.L.; Dekker, J.; Ronday, H.K.; Heering, A.; Lubbe, N. van der; Vel, C.; Breedveld, F.C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of a manual therapy program compared with an exercise therapy program in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. METHODS: A single-blind, randomized clinical trial of 109 hip OA patients was carried out in the outpatient clinic for physical therapy of

  11. Comparison of oxygen consumption in rats during uphill (concentric) and downhill (eccentric) treadmill exercise tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavanelle, Vivien; Sirvent, Pascal; Ennequin, Gaël; Caillaud, Kévin; Montaurier, Christophe; Morio, Béatrice; Boisseau, Nathalie; Richard, Ruddy

    2014-09-01

    The study of the physiological adaptations of skeletal muscle in response to eccentric (ECC) contraction is based on protocols in which exercise intensities are determined relative to the concentric (CON) reference exercise (as percentage of the CON maximal oxygen consumption, or VO2max). In order to use similar exercise protocols in rats, we compared the VO2 values during uphill (CON) and downhill (ECC) running tests. VO2 was measured in 15 Wistar rats during incremental treadmill running exercises with different slopes: level (0%), positive (+15% incline: CON+15%) and negative (i15% incline: ECC-15%; and 130% incline: ECC-30%). Similar VO2 values were obtained in the ECC-30% and CON+15% running conditions at the three target speeds (15, 25 and 35 cm/sec). Conversely, VO2 values were lower (p < 0.05) in the ECC-15% than in the CON+15% condition (CON+15% VO2/ECC-15% VO2 ratios ranging from 1.86 to 2.05 at the three target speeds). Thus, doubling the downhill slope gradient in ECC condition leads to an oxygen consumption level that is not significantly different as in CON condition. These findings can be useful for designing animal research protocols to study the effects of ECC and CON exercise in ageing population or subjects suffering from cardiovascular diseases. Key PointsVO2 in rats during treadmill race in eccentric and concentric conditions were measured.A novel breath-by-breath device allowing direct access to the animal was used.THREE DIFFERENT SLOPES: +15%, -15% and -30% were used.VO2 values obtained in the -30% eccentric and the +15% concentric conditions were not significantly different.

  12. Comparison of Oxygen Consumption in Rats During Uphill (Concentric) and Downhill (Eccentric) Treadmill Exercise Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavanelle, Vivien; Sirvent, Pascal; Ennequin, Gaël; Caillaud, Kévin; Montaurier, Christophe; Morio, Béatrice; Boisseau, Nathalie; Richard, Ruddy

    2014-01-01

    The study of the physiological adaptations of skeletal muscle in response to eccentric (ECC) contraction is based on protocols in which exercise intensities are determined relative to the concentric (CON) reference exercise (as percentage of the CON maximal oxygen consumption, or VO2max). In order to use similar exercise protocols in rats, we compared the VO2 values during uphill (CON) and downhill (ECC) running tests. VO2 was measured in 15 Wistar rats during incremental treadmill running exercises with different slopes: level (0%), positive (+15% incline: CON+15%) and negative (i15% incline: ECC-15%; and 130% incline: ECC-30%). Similar VO2 values were obtained in the ECC-30% and CON+15% running conditions at the three target speeds (15, 25 and 35 cm/sec). Conversely, VO2 values were lower (p VO2/ECC-15% VO2 ratios ranging from 1.86 to 2.05 at the three target speeds). Thus, doubling the downhill slope gradient in ECC condition leads to an oxygen consumption level that is not significantly different as in CON condition. These findings can be useful for designing animal research protocols to study the effects of ECC and CON exercise in ageing population or subjects suffering from cardiovascular diseases. Key Points VO2 in rats during treadmill race in eccentric and concentric conditions were measured. A novel breath-by-breath device allowing direct access to the animal was used. Three different slopes: +15%, -15% and -30% were used. VO2 values obtained in the -30% eccentric and the +15% concentric conditions were not significantly different. PMID:25177200

  13. Comparison of group-based exercise versus home-based exercise in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: effects on Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Indices, quality of life and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapolat, Hale; Akkoc, Yeşim; Sari, Ismail; Eyigor, Sibel; Akar, Servet; Kirazli, Yeşim; Akkoc, Nurullah

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this non-randomised controlled trial was to evaluate the impact of group-based exercise programme and a home-based exercise programme on Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Indices, depression and quality of life in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Approximately 41 patients in a rehabilitation unit were divided into two groups, either group- or home-based exercise programme. Exercise sessions were performed three times a week for a period of 6 weeks. The patients were compared before and after the rehabilitation programme, with respect to Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Assessment Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and The Nottingham Health Profile (NHP). A statistically significant improvement was observed on BASDAI, BASMI and energy, pain, reaction of emotional and sleep subscores of NHP in both exercise groups after the exercise programme (p exercise groups (p > 0.05). No statistically significant differences were found between the two exercise programmes (p > 0.05). Group and home-based exercise programmes are efficient in improving symptoms and mobility and had an important effect on quality of life in patients with AS. Home-based exercise programme, as it is cheaper, more easily performed and efficient, may be preferable for the management programme in AS.

  14. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Exercise-Induced Asthma KidsHealth > For Parents > Exercise-Induced Asthma A A ... previous continue Tips for Kids With Exercise-Induced Asthma For the most part, kids with exercise-induced ...

  15. Comparison of exercise tests in French trotters under training track, racetrack and treadmill conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couroucé, A; Geffroy, O; Barrey, E; Auvinet, B; Rose, R J

    1999-07-01

    Standardised exercise tests were performed at 2 different tracks and on an uninclined treadmill during the same week to determine the influence of exercise surface on different measured variables such as heart rate (HR), blood lactate concentration, packed cell volume, stride frequency, stride length, gait symmetry and regularity and on different derived physiological variables such as the speed at a HR of 200 beats/min (V200), the speed at a blood lactate concentration of 4 mmol/l (V4), the speed at a maximal HR (VHRmax). Five French Trotters, age 3 years, in training for 3 months prior to the test, performed 3 exercise tests on a training track (Test 1), a racetrack (Test 2) and an uninclined treadmill (Test 3). Test 1 utilised 3 steps each of 3 min at speeds of 490, 560 and 630 m/min. Tests 2 and 3 utilised the same speeds and a fourth step in which the horse was accelerated for 30 s to speed approaching maximal. No significant differences (P < 0.05) were found for the physiological and locomotor variables between the 2 tracks. In contrast, there was a significant difference (P < 0.05) for these variables between the tracks and the treadmill, horses showing lower heart rate and blood lactate response, reduced stride frequency and increased stride length and regularity on the uninclined treadmill. We concluded that this standardised exercise test was repeatable on various tracks even when the surface and geometry vary. In contrast, both physiological and locomotor variables were different when comparing the tracks with the uninclined treadmill.

  16. Attenuation of alcohol withdrawal syndrome and blood cortisol level with forced exercise in comparison with diazepam.

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Relieving withdrawal and post-abstinence syndrome of alcoholism is one of the major strategies in the treatment of alcohol addicted patients. Diazepam, chlordiazepoxide, and topiramate are the approved medications that were used for this object. To assess the role of non-pharmacologic therapy in the management of alcohol withdrawal syndrome, we analyzed effects of forced exercise by treadmill on alcohol dependent mice as an animal model. A total of 60 adult male mice were divided into 5 group...

  17. COMPARISON OF THE SHAKE WEIGHT® MODALITY EXERCISES WHEN COMPARED TO TRADITIONAL DUMBBELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan M. Glenn

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Individuals are continuously looking for faster, more efficient methods with which to develop physical fitness. This has led to the development of products and programs marketed towards increasing physical fitness in minimal time. The Shake Weight® (SW has been advertised to increase muscular strength among other factors in less time than traditional weightlifting. The purpose of this study was to compare the electromyographic (EMG muscle activity of the SW to a traditional dumbbell (DB performing the same exercises. Twelve men (22.9 ± 1.6 years and 13 women (23.0 ± 1.9 years volunteered to participate in this study. Subjects performed the chest shake (CS, biceps shake (BS, and triceps shake (TS using the SW and DW. Maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC were exhibited for all muscles. EMG activity was recorded for the pectoralis major (PM, triceps brachii (TB, biceps brachii (BB, anterior deltoid (AD, trapezius (TR, and rectus abdominus (RA and compared to detect differences between modalities. EMG activity for each muscle group was reported as a percentage of each subject's individual MVIC. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed no significant differences between the SW and DB modalities during each exercise for all muscles except the BB (p < 0.05. During the CS exercise muscle activity was significantly greater for DB in the BB muscle when compared to the SW mode (50.8 ± 28.9%; 35.8 ± 30.8%. The SW did not have any advantage over the DB for any exercise, nor for any muscle group. Further, no muscle group during any of the SW trials exhibited an MVIC over 60%, the level necessary to increase muscular strength

  18. Comparison of Glucose Monitoring Methods during Steady-State Exercise in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L. Pritchett

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Data from Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM systems may help improve overall daily glycemia; however, the accuracy of CGM during exercise remains questionable. The objective of this single group experimental study was to compare CGM-estimated values to venous plasma glucose (VPG and capillary plasma glucose (CPG during steady-state exercise. Twelve recreationally active females without diabetes (aged 21.8 ± 2.4 years, from Central Washington University completed the study. CGM is used by individuals with diabetes, however the purpose of this study was to first validate the use of this device during exercise for anyone. Data were collected between November 2009 and April 2010. Participants performed two identical 45-min steady-state cycling trials (~60% Pmax on non-consecutive days. Glucose concentrations (CGM-estimated, VPG, and CPG values were measured every 5 min. Two carbohydrate gel supplements along with 360 mL of water were consumed 15 min into exercise. A product-moment correlation was used to assess the relationship and a Bland-Altman analysis determined error between the three glucose measurement methods. It was found that the CGM system overestimated mean VPG (mean absolute difference 17.4 mg/dL (0.97 mmol/L and mean CPG (mean absolute difference 15.5 mg/dL (0.86 mmol/L. Bland-Altman analysis displayed wide limits of agreement (95% confidence interval of 44.3 mg/dL (2.46 mmol/L (VPG compared with CGM and 41.2 mg/dL (2.29 mmol/L (CPG compared with CGM. Results from the current study support that data from CGM did not meet accuracy standards from the 15197 International Organization for Standardization (ISO.

  19. Comparison of sympathetic nerve responses to neck and forearm isometric exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, S. L. Jr; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although the autonomic and cardiovascular responses to arm and leg exercise have been studied, the sympathetic adjustments to exercise of the neck have not. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to determine sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric contractions of the neck extensors and 2) to compare sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric exercise of the neck and forearm. METHODS: Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate were measured in nine healthy subjects while performing isometric neck extension (INE) and isometric handgrip (IHG) in the prone position. After a 3-min baseline period, subjects performed three intensities of INE for 2.5 min each: 1) unloaded (supporting head alone), 2) 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and 3) 30% MVC, then subjects performed two intensities (10% and 30% MVC) of IHG for 2.5 min. RESULTS: Supporting the head by itself did not significantly change any of the variables. During [NE, MAP significantly increased by 10 +/- 2 and 31 +/- 4 mm Hg and MSNA increased by 67 +/- 46 and 168 +/- 36 units/30 s for 10% and 30% MVC, respectively. IHG and INE evoked similar responses at 10% MVC, but IHG elicited higher peak MAP and MSNA at 30% MVC (37 +/- 7 mm Hg (P architecture of the neck and forearm are responsible for these differences in peak responses.

  20. Comparison of sympathetic nerve responses to neck and forearm isometric exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, S. L. Jr; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although the autonomic and cardiovascular responses to arm and leg exercise have been studied, the sympathetic adjustments to exercise of the neck have not. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to determine sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric contractions of the neck extensors and 2) to compare sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric exercise of the neck and forearm. METHODS: Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate were measured in nine healthy subjects while performing isometric neck extension (INE) and isometric handgrip (IHG) in the prone position. After a 3-min baseline period, subjects performed three intensities of INE for 2.5 min each: 1) unloaded (supporting head alone), 2) 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and 3) 30% MVC, then subjects performed two intensities (10% and 30% MVC) of IHG for 2.5 min. RESULTS: Supporting the head by itself did not significantly change any of the variables. During [NE, MAP significantly increased by 10 +/- 2 and 31 +/- 4 mm Hg and MSNA increased by 67 +/- 46 and 168 +/- 36 units/30 s for 10% and 30% MVC, respectively. IHG and INE evoked similar responses at 10% MVC, but IHG elicited higher peak MAP and MSNA at 30% MVC (37 +/- 7 mm Hg (P type composition, muscle mass, and/or muscle architecture of the neck and forearm are responsible for these differences in peak responses.

  1. Comparison of sympathetic nerve responses to neck and forearm isometric exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, S. L. Jr; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although the autonomic and cardiovascular responses to arm and leg exercise have been studied, the sympathetic adjustments to exercise of the neck have not. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to determine sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric contractions of the neck extensors and 2) to compare sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric exercise of the neck and forearm. METHODS: Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate were measured in nine healthy subjects while performing isometric neck extension (INE) and isometric handgrip (IHG) in the prone position. After a 3-min baseline period, subjects performed three intensities of INE for 2.5 min each: 1) unloaded (supporting head alone), 2) 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and 3) 30% MVC, then subjects performed two intensities (10% and 30% MVC) of IHG for 2.5 min. RESULTS: Supporting the head by itself did not significantly change any of the variables. During [NE, MAP significantly increased by 10 +/- 2 and 31 +/- 4 mm Hg and MSNA increased by 67 +/- 46 and 168 +/- 36 units/30 s for 10% and 30% MVC, respectively. IHG and INE evoked similar responses at 10% MVC, but IHG elicited higher peak MAP and MSNA at 30% MVC (37 +/- 7 mm Hg (P muscle fiber type composition, muscle mass, and/or muscle architecture of the neck and forearm are responsible for these differences in peak responses.

  2. Comparison between two assessment methods for exercise-induced laryngeal obstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlander, Katarina; Christensen, Pernille M; Maat, Robert C; Halvorsen, Thomas; Heimdal, John Helge; Morén, Staffan; Rasmussen, Niels; Nordang, Leif

    2016-02-01

    Exercise-induced laryngeal obstructions (E-ILOs) are important differential diagnoses to exercise-induced asthma and are diagnosed by the continuous laryngoscopy exercise (CLE) test. There are two different methods for evaluating the severity of E-ILOs using recordings from the CLE test; the CLE score and EILOMEA. The aim of this study was to investigate the consistency between these methods. Using their respective method, the developers of each method evaluated 60 laryngoscopic recordings from patients with different subtypes and various levels of severity of E-ILOs. The CLE score evaluates glottic and supraglottic obstructions on a 4-grade scale. EILOMEA uses software to calculate the obstruction severity on continuous scales from a still frame of the larynx during maximal obstruction giving three parameters reflecting glottic and supraglottic obstruction. The means of the EILOMEA measures differed significantly for CLE score 1 vs. 2 and 2 vs. 3, but not for 0 vs. 1 for glottic as well as supraglottic obstructions. The EILOMEA method does not distinguish between CLE score 0 and 1, but otherwise the methods correlate. Since previous studies have suggested that only CLE scores of 2 and 3 reflect a severity of E-ILOs of clinical importance, this lack of the EILOMEA method is not crucial for a correct medical evaluation.

  3. Duration of action of sodium cromoglycate on exercise induced asthma: comparison of 2 formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Yishay, E; Gur, I; Levy, M; Volozni, D; Godfrey, S

    1983-01-01

    Thirteen asthmatic children aged 9-14 years participated in a double blind randomised trial to compare the effectiveness and duration of action of 2 formulations of sodium cromoglycate; one a 20 mg capsule of powdered sodium cromoglycate delivered by turbo inhaler (spinhaler), and the other 1 mg of aerosolised sodium cromoglycate delivered by pressurised cannister inhaler (aerosol). The children performed exercise tests on each of 3 days in a 10 day period--15 minutes, 2 hours, and 6 hours after inhalation of powder, aerosol, or a placebo. Two patients were not protected from exercise induced asthma by either formulation of sodium cromoglycate. Among the remaining patients both formulations gave good protection from exercise induced asthma 15 minutes after inhalation, and the effect of both wore off steadily over the next 6 hours. The spinhaler gave appreciably better protection than the aerosol at 15 minutes after inhalation, and was the only formulation to provide good protection at 2 hours and 6 hours. The more limited effectiveness of the aerosol may be explained by the lower dose of sodium cromoglycate and the more complicated inhalation technique required. PMID:6412638

  4. Head to head comparison of short-term treatment with the NAD+ precursor nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN and six weeks of exercise in obese female mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golam Mezbah Uddin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is well known to be a major cause of several chronic metabolic diseases, which can be partially counteracted by exercise. This is due, in part, to an upregulation of mitochondrial activity through increased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+. Recent studies have shown that NAD+ levels can be increased by using the NAD+ precursor, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN leading to the suggestion that NMN could be a useful intervention in diet related metabolic disorders. In this study we compared the metabolic, and especially mitochondrial-associated, effects of exercise and NMN in ameliorating the consequences of high-fat diet (HFD induced obesity in mice. Sixty female 5 week old C57BL6/J mice were allocated across 5 interventions: Chow sedentary: CS; Chow exercise: CEX; HFD sedentary: HS; HFD NMN: HNMN; HFD exercise: HEX (12/group. After 6 weeks of diet, exercise groups underwent treadmill exercise (15 m/min for 45 minutes, 6 days per week for 6 weeks. NMN or vehicle (500 mg/kg body weight was injected (i.p. daily for the last 17 days. No significant alteration in body weight was observed in response to exercise or NMN. The HFD significantly altered adiposity, glucose tolerance, plasma insulin, NADH levels and citrate synthase activity in muscle and liver. HEX and HNMN groups both showed significantly improved glucose tolerance compared to the HS group. NAD+ levels were increased significantly both in muscle and liver by NMN whereas exercise increased NAD+ only in muscle. Both NMN and exercise ameliorated the HFD-induced reduction in liver citrate synthase activity. However, exercise, but not NMN, ameliorated citrate synthase activity in muscle. Overall these data suggest that while exercise and NMN-supplementation can induce similar reversal of the glucose intolerance induced by obesity, they are associated with tissue-specific effects and differential alterations to mitochondrial function in muscle and liver.

  5. Comparison of cardiac output determined by bioimpedance and bioreactance methods at rest and during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Moore, Sarah; Hallsworth, Kate; Fattakhova, Gulnar; Thoma, Christian; Trenell, Michael I

    2012-04-01

    Bioreactance is a novel non-invasive method for cardiac output measurement that involves the analysis of blood flow-dependent changes in the phase shifts of electrical currents applied across the chest. The present study (1) compared resting and exercise cardiac outputs determined by bioreactance and bioimpedance methods and those estimated from measured oxygen consumption, (2) determined the relationship between cardiac output and oxygen consumption, and (3) assessed the agreement between the bioreactance and bioimpedance methods. Twelve healthy subjects (aged 30 ± 4 years) performed graded cardiopulmonary exercise test on a recumbent cycle ergometer on two occasions, 1 week apart. Cardiac output was monitored at rest, at 30, 50, 70, 90, 150 W and at peak exercise intensity by bioreactance and bioimpedance and expired gases collected. Resting cardiac output was not significantly different between the bioreactance and bioimpedance methods (6.2 ± 1.4 vs. 6.5 ± 1.4 l min(-1), P = 0.42). During exercise cardiac outputs were correlated with oxygen uptake for both bioreactance (r = 0.84, P bioimpedance techniques (r = 0.82, P bioimpedance estimated significantly lower cardiac outputs than both bioreactance and theoretically calculated cardiac output (14.3 ± 2.6 vs. 17.5 ± 5.2 vs. 16.9 ± 4.9 l min(-1), P bioimpedance method reported ~1.5 l min(-1) lower cardiac output than bioreactance with lower and upper limits of agreement of -2.98 to 5.98 l min(-1). Bioimpedance and bioreactance methods provide different cardiac output estimates, particularly at high exercise intensity, and therefore the two methods cannot be used interchangeably. In contrast with bioimpedance, bioreactance cardiac outputs are similar to those estimated from measured oxygen consumption.

  6. Materials Comparison of Cutting Tools Functional Parts for Cutting of Electrical Engineering Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan ZLÁMALÍK

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Paper concerns the comparison of functional materials parts of cutting tools used for the production of stator and rotor sheets in the electrical industry from point of view of their life. Alternatives and the properties of metal used for the production of stator and rotor components in electrical rotating machines are analysed. The main factors affecting the life of cutting tools of functional parts are analysed, one of the most important is the cutting tool functional parts material itself. Comparison of three variants of the cuttong tool funkcional parts material – 19 436 tool steel (chrome steel according to the Czech State Standard 41 9436, 19 830 high speed steel according to the Czech State Standard 41 9830 and a special powder metallurgy product – ledeburite tool steel Vanadis 10. Useful lifes of the functional components of individual cutting tools performances can be calculated from the theoretical lifes by their multiplying the coefficients of the tool design and the cutting edges shape complexity.

  7. Electromyographic Comparison Of Barbell Deadlift, Hex Bar Deadlift And Hip Thrust Exercises: A Cross-Over Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Vidar; Fimland, Marius Steiro; Mo, Dag-Andrè; Iversen, Vegard Moe; Vederhus, Torbjørn; Rockland Hellebø, Lars Richard; Nordaune, Kristina Isabel; Saeterbakken, Atle Hole

    2017-01-30

    The aim of the study was to compare the muscle activation level of the gluteus maximus, biceps femoris and erector spinae in the hip thrust, barbell deadlift and hex bar deadlift; each of which are compound resisted hip-extension exercises. After two familiarization sessions, 13 resistance-trained men performed a 1-RM in all three exercises in one session, in randomized and counterbalanced order. The whole ascending movement (concentric phase), as well as its lower and upper part (whole movement divided in two), were analyzed. The hip thrust induced greater activation of the gluteus maximus compared to the hex bar deadlift in the whole (16%, p=0.025) and the upper part (26%, p=0.015) of the movement. For the whole movement, the biceps femoris was more activated during barbell deadlift compared to both the hex bar deadlift (28%, pthrust (20%, p=0.005). In the lower part of the movement, biceps femoris activation was respectively 48% and 26% higher for the barbell deadlift (pthrust. Biceps femoris activation in the upper part of the movement was 39% higher for the barbell deadlift compared to the hex bar deadlift (p=0.001) and 34% higher for the hip thrust compared to the hex bar deadlift (p=0.002). No differences were displayed for erector spinae activation (p=0.312-0.859). In conclusion, the barbell deadlift was clearly superior in activating the biceps femoris compared to the hex bar deadlift and hip thrust, whereas the hip thrust provided the highest gluteus maximus activation.

  8. Diagnostic performance of exercise bicycle testing and single-photon emission computed tomography: Comparison with 64-slice computed tomography coronary angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Weustink (Annick); L.A.E. Neefjes (Lisan); A. Rossi (Alexia); W.B. Meijboom (Willem Bob); K. Nieman (Koen); E. Capuano (Ermanno); H. Boersma (Eric); N.R.A. Mollet (Nico); G.P. Krestin (Gabriel); P.J. de Feyter (Pim)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractTo conduct a comparison of the diagnostic performance of exercise bicycle testing and singlephoton emission computed tomography (SPECT) with computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for the detection of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with stable angina. 376

  9. An inter-comparison exercise on the capabilities of CFD models to predict the short and long term distribution and mixing of hydrogen in a garage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venetsanos, A.G.; Papanikolaou, E.; Delichatsios, M.; Garcia, J.; Hansen, O.R.; Heitsch, M.; Huser, A.; Jahn, W.; Jordan, T.; Lacome, J.-M.; Ledin, H.S.; Makarov, D.; Middha, P.; Studer, E.; Tchouvelev, A.V.; Teodorczyk, A.; Verbecke, F.; Voort, M.M. van der

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the CFD inter-comparison exercise SBEP-V3, performed within the activity InsHyde, internal project of the HySafe network of excellence, in the framework of evaluating the capability of various CFD tools and modelling approaches in predicting the short and long term

  10. GHEP-ISFG collaborative simulated exercise for DVI/MPI: Lessons learned about large-scale profile database comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vullo, Carlos M; Romero, Magdalena; Catelli, Laura; Šakić, Mustafa; Saragoni, Victor G; Jimenez Pleguezuelos, María Jose; Romanini, Carola; Anjos Porto, Maria João; Puente Prieto, Jorge; Bofarull Castro, Alicia; Hernandez, Alexis; Farfán, María José; Prieto, Victoria; Alvarez, David; Penacino, Gustavo; Zabalza, Santiago; Hernández Bolaños, Alejandro; Miguel Manterola, Irati; Prieto, Lourdes; Parsons, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The GHEP-ISFG Working Group has recognized the importance of assisting DNA laboratories to gain expertise in handling DVI or missing persons identification (MPI) projects which involve the need for large-scale genetic profile comparisons. Eleven laboratories participated in a DNA matching exercise to identify victims from a hypothetical conflict with 193 missing persons. The post mortem database was comprised of 87 skeletal remain profiles from a secondary mass grave displaying a minimal number of 58 individuals with evidence of commingling. The reference database was represented by 286 family reference profiles with diverse pedigrees. The goal of the exercise was to correctly discover re-associations and family matches. The results of direct matching for commingled remains re-associations were correct and fully concordant among all laboratories. However, the kinship analysis for missing persons identifications showed variable results among the participants. There was a group of laboratories with correct, concordant results but nearly half of the others showed discrepant results exhibiting likelihood ratio differences of several degrees of magnitude in some cases. Three main errors were detected: (a) some laboratories did not use the complete reference family genetic data to report the match with the remains, (b) the identity and/or non-identity hypotheses were sometimes wrongly expressed in the likelihood ratio calculations, and (c) many laboratories did not properly evaluate the prior odds for the event. The results suggest that large-scale profile comparisons for DVI or MPI is a challenge for forensic genetics laboratories and the statistical treatment of DNA matching and the Bayesian framework should be better standardized among laboratories.

  11. Exercise for Stress and Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Thrive Managing Anxiety Exercise for Stress and Anxiety The physical benefits of exercise — improving physical condition ... stimulate anti-anxiety effects. Relationship of Exercise to Anxiety Disorders Stress and anxiety are a normal part ...

  12. Comparisons in the Recovery Response from Resistance Exercise between Young and Middle-Aged Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Joseph A; Hoffman, Jay R; Arroyo, Eliott; Varanoske, Alyssa N; Coker, Nicholas A; Gepner, Yftach; Wells, Adam J; Stout, Jeffrey R; Fukuda, David H

    2017-08-29

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a bout of high-volume isokinetic resistance exercise (HVP) on lower-body strength and markers of inflammation and muscle damage during recovery between young and middle-aged men. Nineteen recreationally-trained men were classified as either a young adult (YA: 21.8 ± 2.0 y; 90.7 ± 11.6 kg) or middle-aged adult (MA: 47.0 ± 4.4 y; 96.0 ± 21.5 kg) group. The HVP consisted of 8 sets of 10 repetitions, with one minute of rest between each set, performed on an isokinetic dynamometer at 60°·sec. Maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) and isokinetic peak (PKT) and average (AVGT) torque (measured at 240° and 60°·sec) were assessed at baseline (BL), immediately-post (IP), 120-min (120P), 24-hr (24H) and 48-hr (48H) following HVP. Blood was obtained at BL, IP, 30-min, 60-min, 120-min, 24H and 48H following HVP to assess muscle damage and inflammation. All performance data were analyzed using repeated-measures ANCOVA, while all inflammatory and muscle damage markers were analyzed using a two-way (time x group) repeated-measures ANOVA. Results revealed no between-group differences for PKT, AVGT, or rate of torque development at 200ms (RTD200). No between-group differences in myoglobin, creatine kinase, C-reactive protein, or interleukin-6 were observed. Although baseline differences in muscle performance were observed between YA and MA, no between group differences were noted in performance recovery measures from high-volume isokinetic exercise in recreationally-trained men. These results also indicate that the inflammatory and muscle damage response from high-volume isokinetic exercise is similar between recreationally-trained, young and middle-aged adult men.

  13. COMPARISON OF OSCILLATIONS OF SKIN BLOOD FLOW AND DEOXYGENATION IN VASTUS LATERALIS IN LIGHT EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yano

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to compare oscillation of skin blood flow with that of deoxygenation in muscle during light exercise in order to determine the physiological significance of oscillations in deoxygenation. Prolonged exercise with 50% of peak oxygen uptake was performed for 60 min. Skin blood flow (SBF was measured using a laser blood flow meter on the right vastus lateralis muscle. Deoxygenated haemoglobin/myoglobin (DHb/Mb concentration in the left vastus lateralis were measured using a near-infrared spectroscopy system. SBF and DHb/Mb during exercise were analysed by fast Fourier transform. We classified frequency bands according to previous studies (Kvernmo et al. 1999, Kvandal et al. 2006 into phase I (0.005-0.0095 and 0.0095-0.02 Hz, phase II (0.02-0.06 Hz: phase II and phase III (0.06-0.16 Hz. The first peak of power spectra density (PSD in SBF appeared at 0.0078 Hz in phase I. The second peak of PSD in SBF appeared at 0.035 Hz. The third peak of PSD in SBF appeared at 0.078 Hz. The first peak of PSD in DHb/Mb appeared at 0.0039 Hz, which was out of phase I. The second peak of PSD in DHb/Mb appeared at 0.016 Hz. The third peak of PSD in DHb/Mb appeared at 0.035 Hz. The coefficient of cross correlation was very low. Cross power spectra density showed peaks of 0.0039, 0.016 and 0.035 Hz. It is concluded that a peak of 0.016 Hz in oscillations of DHb/Mb observed in muscle during exercise is associated with endothelium-dependent vasodilation (phase I and that a peak of 0.035 Hz in DHb/Mb is associated with sympathetic nerve activity (phase II. It is also confirmed that each peak of SBF oscillations is observed in each phase.

  14. Comparison of Trunk Stabilization Exercises Using a Gym Ball and Conventional Back Care Exercises for Patients With Chronic Lower Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background The trunk muscles are vital for the maintenance of spinal stability. Training of specific muscles surrounding the lumbar spine, which provide dynamic and segmental stability, is one of the major goals in the management of patients with chronic low back pain (LBP. However, more investigation of lumbar stabilization training using a ball is required before making any strong conclusions about its efficacy. Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the effect of trunk stabilization exercises and conventional back care exercises for patients with chronic LBP. Patients and Methods Thirty male subjects with chronic LBP were randomly assigned to two groups. The experimental group received trunk stabilization exercise using a gym ball whereas the control group received conventional back care exercises for six weeks. The abdominal muscle endurance, pain intensity, and functional disability were measured using pressure biofeedback, visual analogue scale (VAS, and modified Oswestry disability questionnaire (MODQ, respectively. All the measurements were taken at baseline and during week two, four and six. Results The results of the study demonstrated significant improvements in abdominal muscle endurance and reduction in VAS and MODQ score of both groups (P = 0.001. The trunk stabilization exercise group showed greater gains in abdominal muscle endurance during weeks two to six compared to the conventional back care exercise group (P < 0.05. In addition, the trunk stabilization exercise group showed greater reduction in the VAS score (P = 0.035 and MODQ score (P = 0.001 at week six compared to the conventional back care exercise group. Conclusions The trunk stabilization exercises are more effective than conventional back care exercises in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic LBP.

  15. Inter-comparison exercises on dissolved gases for groundwater dating (GDAT 2012) : analytical uncertainties, apparent ages and other derived parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labasque, Thierry; Aquilina, Luc; Visser, Ate; Vergnaud, Virginie

    2014-05-01

    An inter-laboratory comparison exercise dedicated to environmental tracers used for groundwater dating was organized in 2012 in France. The goal was to compare sampling and analytical protocols through results obtained by the community of groundwater dating laboratories. Sampling and analytical protocols were compared through three different exercises on various supports : (1) on groundwater from a homogeneous aquifer, (2) on groundwater from a fractured heterogeneous aquifer and (3) on an air standard. The two tests allowed 31 Laboratories from 14 countries to compare their protocols for both sampling and analyses. It allows discussing the uncertainties related to sampling protocols issuing from each laboratory methods. The results show a good agreement between laboratories on the aquifers and the air standard. The dispersion of SF6 results in air standard is low (rsd 2%) compared to CFCs (rsd 3 to 7%), even if its concentration is two orders of magnitude lower. Results obtained in recent groundwater (recharge after 1980) show that the uncertainty on groundwater dating with SF6 is between 3 and 4 years. This large uncertainty is mainly due to sampling and/or analytical problems. For CFCs, uncertainties obtained over all the laboratories are less than 2 years for groundwater with recharge between 1965 and 1996. The goal of the inter-laboratory comparison exercise was also to quantify the analytical uncertainty of the 3H and noble gas measurements and to assess whether they meet the requirements for 3H/3He dating and noble gas paleotemperature reconstruction. The reproducibility of the tritium measurements was 13.5%. The reproducibility of the 3He/4He ratio and 4He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe concentrations was 1.4%, 1.8%, 1.5%, 2.2%, 2.9%, and 2.4%. The propagated uncertainty of the tritium and noble gas measurements meets the desired precision for typical 3H/3He dating applications. However, the measurement uncertainties for the noble gas concentrations are insufficient to

  16. Comparison of the eight weeks of supplementation Creatine and Glutamine consumption along with resistance exercise on the level of ALP in female mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A eskandari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: in recent years, in order to improve power, speed, the increase in the volume of the musculature, preventing sports injuries and maintain the muscle performance athletes use from different resistance exercises and food supplements. In this regard, present study has been conducted with the aim of comparison the influence of an 8 week period consumption of creatine (2 gr.kg-1.day-1 in 1st week and 0.48 gr.kg-1.day-1during 2nd to 8th weeks and glutamine (1 gr.kg-1.day-1 from first to eighth weeks along with resistance exercise on level of ALP of female mice. Materials and methods: This experimental study was done on 80 Small adult female mice of Surrey species (28 ± 5 gram. The animals were randomly divided into 8 groups of: resistance exercise, resistance exercise + creatine, resistance exercise + glutamine, resistance exercise + glutamine + creatine, creatine, glutamine, creatine + glutamine and control groups (N= 10. Resistance exercise (5 days a week was including: climbing (4 sets, 5 times repetition with two minutes rest between the sets from a ladder (with the height of one meter and including 26 steps and bearing 30 percent of the weight of the Mouse body (hanging from tail in the first week and the increasing it up to 200 percent of body weight till the last week of the experiment. During 48 hours after the last practice session of resistance exercise, the blood sample was taken and the the level of ALP has been measured. Findings:The results showed that the level of ALP enzyme in creatine + glutamine + resistance exercise groug had been increased in comparison with the control group (144.3 ± 15.86 in comparison with 234.7 ± 25.69 U.L-1 P < 0.05. Conclusion: The results of this research indicate Creatine and Glutamine supplementation consumption along with resistance exercise increases in the level of ALP enzyme in the liver of mice.

  17. A Comparison of the Physiology and Mechanics of Exercise in LBNP and Upright Gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda, W. L.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Ballard, R. E.; Chang, D.; Looft-Wilson, R.; Hargens, A. R.

    1996-01-01

    Bone, muscular strength, aerobic capacity, and normal fluid pressure gradients within the body are lost during bed rest and spaceflight. Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) exercise may create musculoskeletal and cardiovascular strains equal to a greater than those experienced on Earth and elucidate some of the mechanisms for maintaining bone integrity. LBNP exercise simulates gravity during supine posture by using negative pressure to pull subjects inward against a treadmill generating footward forces and increasing transmural pressures. Footward forces are generated which equal the product of the pressure differential and the cross-sectional area of the LBNP waist seal. Subjects lie supine within the chamber with their legs suspended from one another via cuffs, bungee cords, and pulleys, such that each leg acts as a counterweight to the other leg during the gait cycle. The subjects then walk or run on a treadmill which is positioned vertically within the chamber. Supine orientation allows only footward force production due to the negative pressure within the chamber. The purpose of this study was to determine if the kinematics, kinetics, and metabolic rate during supine walking and slow running on a vertical treadmill within LBNP are similar to those on a treadmill in 1-g environment in an upright posture.

  18. Where does HIT fit? An examination of the affective response to high-intensity intervals in comparison to continuous moderate- and continuous vigorous-intensity exercise in the exercise intensity-affect continuum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E Jung

    Full Text Available Affect experienced during an exercise session is purported to predict future exercise behaviour. Compared to continuous moderate-intensity exercise (CMI, the affective response to continuous vigorous-intensity exercise (CVI has consistently been shown to be more aversive. The affective response, and overall tolerability to high-intensity interval training (HIT, is less studied. To date, there has yet to be a comparison between HIT, CVI, and CMI. The purpose of this study was to compare the tolerability and affective responses during HIT to CVI and CMI. This study utilized a repeated measures, randomized, counter-balanced design. Forty-four participants visited the laboratory on four occasions. Baseline fitness testing was conducted to establish peak power output in Watts (W peak. Three subsequent visits involved a single bout of a HIT, corresponding to 1-minute at ∼ 100% W peak and 1-minute at ∼ 20% W peak for 20 minutes, b CMI, corresponding to ∼ 40% W peak for 40 minutes, and c CVI, corresponding to ∼ 80% W peak for 20 minutes. The order of the sessions was randomized. Affective responses were measured before, during and after each session. Task self-efficacy, intentions, enjoyment and preference were measured after sessions. Participants reported greater enjoyment of HIT as compared to CMI and CVI, with over 50% of participants reporting a preference to engage in HIT as opposed to either CMI or CVI. HIT was considered more pleasurable than CVI after exercise, but less pleasurable than CMI at these times. Despite this participants reported being just as confident to engage in HIT as they were CMI, but less confident to engage in CVI. This study highlights the utility of HIT in inactive individuals, and suggests that it may be a viable alternative to traditionally prescribed continuous modalities of exercise for promoting self-efficacy and enjoyment of exercise.

  19. Comparison of rainfall-runoff models for flood forecasting. Part 2: Calibration and evaluation of models

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, V. A.; Carrington, D.S.; Moore, R J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the project “Comparison of Rainfall-Runoff Models for Flood Forecasting” is to provide guidance to the Environment Agency on the choice of rainfall-runoff model for use in different catchments for flood forecasting purposes. A literature review of models presented in the Part 1 Report recognised that whilst there is a plethora of “brand-name” models there is much similarity between many of them. A rather small set of model functions is common to many models and they differ in t...

  20. Physiological responses to a tap dance choreography: comparisons with graded exercise test and prescription recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Samantha M L; Simões, Herbert G; Moreira, Sergio R; Lima, Ricardo M; Almeida, Jeeser A; Ribeiro, Fabiana M R; Puga, Guilherme M; Campbell, Carmen S G

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the physiological responses to a tap dance choreography and to compare with those observed during a maximal treadmill exercise test, in tap dancers. Eight women (19.6 +/- 2.4 years; 162.3 +/- 4.4 cm; 54.0 +/- 2.3 kg; 20.5 +/- 1.4 kg.m; and 5.1 +/- 2.6 years of tap dance training) were submitted to the following procedures: (a) graded exercise test (GXT) on a treadmill until volitional exhaustion with 0.8 km.h of increment at each 3 and 1 minute of interval between stages and (b) tap dance choreography (TAP)-"The Shim Sham Shimmy"-consisting of 9 stages of 3 minutes with 1-minute rest between stages. Expired gas analyses were performed in all experimental sessions, providing breath-by-breath values for respiratory exchange rate (RER), oxygen uptake (VO(2)), and carbon dioxide production (CO2). Heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were also measured. During the rest period between stages, blood samples (25 microl) were collected from the ear lobe for lactate threshold (LT) determination. It was observed that at the end of the TAP, subjects achieved an average of 83.8 +/- 6.2% of the HRmax and 68.9 +/- 11.3% of the VO(2)max, both previously identified in the GXT. The choreography demanded 204.7 +/- 31.3 kcal, an average RER of 0.88 +/- 0.05 and mean RPE of 13 +/- 2. The VO(2), HR, and RPE values did not significantly differ from those at the LT intensity identified during the GTX. Based on the present results, it was concluded that the TAP performance in the "The Shim Sham Shimmy" choreography elicited acute physiologic responses similar to those observed at the LT intensity, thus suggesting that Tap Dance constitutes a useful exercise modality for aerobic fitness and cardiovascular health improvements.

  1. The SCEC-USGS Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Comparison Exercise - Simulations of Large Earthquakes and Strong Ground Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R.

    2015-12-01

    I summarize the progress by the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Dynamic Rupture Code Comparison Group, that examines if the results produced by multiple researchers' earthquake simulation codes agree with each other when computing benchmark scenarios of dynamically propagating earthquake ruptures. These types of computer simulations have no analytical solutions with which to compare, so we use qualitative and quantitative inter-code comparisons to check if they are operating satisfactorily. To date we have tested the codes against benchmark exercises that incorporate a range of features, including single and multiple planar faults, single rough faults, slip-weakening, rate-state, and thermal pressurization friction, elastic and visco-plastic off-fault behavior, complete stress drops that lead to extreme ground motion, heterogeneous initial stresses, and heterogeneous material (rock) structure. Our goal is reproducibility, and we focus on the types of earthquake-simulation assumptions that have been or will be used in basic studies of earthquake physics, or in direct applications to specific earthquake hazard problems. Our group's goals are to make sure that when our earthquake-simulation codes simulate these types of earthquake scenarios along with the resulting simulated strong ground shaking, that the codes are operating as expected. For more introductory information about our group and our work, please see our group's overview papers, Harris et al., Seismological Research Letters, 2009, and Harris et al., Seismological Research Letters, 2011, along with our website, scecdata.usc.edu/cvws.

  2. Comparison of exogenous adenosine and voluntary exercise on human skeletal muscle perfusion and perfusion heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka H.A.; Kemppainen, Jukka; Kaskinoro, Kimmo;

    2010-01-01

    femoral artery infusion of adenosine (1 mg * min(-1) * litre thigh volume(-1)), which has previously been shown to induce maximal whole thigh blood flow of ~8 L/min. This response was compared to the blood flow induced by moderate-high intensity one-leg dynamic knee extension exercise. Adenosine increased...... muscle. Additionally, it remains to be determined what proportion of adenosine-induced flow elevation is specifically directed to muscle only. In the present study we measured thigh muscle capillary nutritive blood flow in nine healthy young men using positron emission tomography at rest and during...... muscle blood flow on average to 40 +/- 7 ml. min(-1) per 100g(-1) of muscle and an aggregate value of 2.3 +/- 0.6 L * min(-1) for the whole thigh musculature. Adenosine also induced a substantial change in blood flow distribution within individuals. Muscle blood flow during adenosine infusion...

  3. Comparison between perceived exertion threshold and indicators of maximal lactate steady state in intermittent exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Gustavo Simões

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O limiar de esforço percebido contínuo (LEPc pode ser considerado como ponto de transição metabólica entre os domínios intenso e severo, pois se relaciona com a potência crítica. Dessa forma, os objetivos do presente estudo foram: (1 verifi car a possibilidade de estimativa do LEP e de um indicador de máximo estado estável de lactato em exercício intermitente (LEPi e MEELINDIC, (2 comparar o LEPi e MEELINDIC com o máximo estado estável de lactato intermitente (MEELi, e (3 verifi car a relação entre a PSE e as respostas de lactato sangüíneo ([La] em esforços intermitentes de alta intensidade. Dez participantes foram submetidos a sessões de familiarização, teste de esforço progressivo, testes preditivos intermitentes e determinação do MEELi. O LEPi e o MEELINDIC foram estimados a partir dos testes preditivos, e o MEELi foi determinado a partir de testes de 30 minutos. As correlações entre as taxas de aumento da PSE e [La] (r=0,77, e os valores absolutos de PSE e [La] (r=0,78 foram moderadas. Os altos valores de R2 das taxas de aumento da PSE e [La] e das regressões lineares para a estimativa do LEPi e do MEELINDIC sugerem que essas variáveis podem ser estimadas de forma acurada. As intensidades do LEPi, MEELINDIC e MEELi não foram diferentes entre si. O LEPi e MEELINDIC apresentaram altas correlações com o MEELi (r=0,90 e r=0,80, respectivamente. Portanto, a relação entre a PSE e [La] é moderada, e tanto o LEPi quanto o MEELINDIC podem ser estimados e utilizados como indicadores de capacidade aeróbia. ABSTRACT The continuous perceived exertion threshold (PETc is considered as a metabolic transition point between the heavy and severe domain, since it is related with critical power. Thus, the aims of this study were: (1 to verify the possibility to estimate PET and maximal lactate steady state index in intermittent exercises (PETi and MLSSINDEX, (2 compare the PETi and MLSSINDEX with intermittent exercise maximal

  4. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You ... activity campaign from the National Institute on Aging. Exercise or Physical Activity? Some people may wonder what ...

  5. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can ... yourself. Studies have shown that exercise provides many health benefits and that older adults can gain a ...

  6. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A-Z > Exercise: Benefits of Exercise: Health Benefits In This Topic Health Benefits Benefits for Everyday Life ... Try Exercise: How to Stay Active The information in this topic was provided by the National Institute ...

  7. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exercise can improve or maintain some aspects of cognitive function, such as your ability to shift quickly ... activity, and ignore irrelevant information. For more on cognitive function and exercise, see "Do Exercise and Physical ...

  8. Technical recommendations for bilateral comparison in diagnosis radiology: part 2; Protocolo tecnico da comparacao bilateral em radiologia diagnostica: parte 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peixoto, J.G.P., E-mail: guilherm@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Almeida, C.E.V. de [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (LCR/IBRAG/UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas

    2015-07-01

    The conventional radiology (≈70%), mammography(≈4%) and Computer Tomography (≈2%) will be in charge of this bilateral comparison. We could found the users ionization chambers, reference and radiations conditions, agenda and the comparison budget. The partial results will be presentation at metrology and medical physics congress. (author)

  9. The Isolation of Invertase from Baker's Yeast: A Four-Part Exercise in Protein Purification and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timerman, Anthony P.; Fenrick, Angela M.; Zamis, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    A sequence of exercises for the isolation and characterization of invertase (E.C. 3.1.2.26) from baker's yeast obtained from a local grocery store is outlined. Because the enzyme is colorless, the use of colored markers and the sequence of purification steps are designed to "visualize" the process by which a colorless protein is selectively…

  10. The Isolation of Invertase from Baker's Yeast: A Four-Part Exercise in Protein Purification and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timerman, Anthony P.; Fenrick, Angela M.; Zamis, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    A sequence of exercises for the isolation and characterization of invertase (E.C. 3.1.2.26) from baker's yeast obtained from a local grocery store is outlined. Because the enzyme is colorless, the use of colored markers and the sequence of purification steps are designed to "visualize" the process by which a colorless protein is selectively…

  11. Promoting Exercise as Part of a Physiotherapy-Led Falls Pathway Service for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Service Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Jennifer; Finlayson, Janet; Skelton, Dawn A.; Miller, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disabilities experience high rates of falls. Balance and gait problems are common in people with intellectual disabilities, increasing the likelihood of falls; thus, tailored exercise interventions to improve gait and balance are recommended. The present authors set up a physiotherapy-led falls pathway service…

  12. Comparison Between Pre-Exhaustion and Traditional Exercise Order on Muscle Activation and Performance in Trained Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Gori Soares, Lee E. Brown, Willy Andrade Gomes, Daniel Alves Corrêa, Érica Paes Serpa, Josinaldo Jarbas da Silva, Guanis de Barros Vilela Junior, Gustavo zorzi Fioravanti, Marcelo Saldanha Aoki, Charles Ricardo Lopes, Paulo Henrique Marchetti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to measure the acute effects of pre-exhaustion vs. traditional exercise order on neuromuscular performance and sEMG in trained men. Fourteen young, healthy, resistance trained men (age: 25.5 ± 4.0 years, height: 174.9 ± 4.1 cm, and total body mass: 80.0 ± 11.1 kg took part of this study. All tests were randomized and counterbalanced for all subjects and experimental conditions. Volunteers attended one session in the laboratory. First, they performed ten repetition maximum (10RM tests for each exercise (bench press and triceps pushdown separately. Secondly, they performed all three conditions at 10RM: pre-test (bench press and triceps pushdown, separately, pre-exhaustion (triceps pushdown+bench press, PE and traditional (bench press+triceps pushdown, TR, and rested 30 minutes between conditions. Results showed that pre-test was significantly greater than PE (p = 0.031 but not different than TR, for total volume load lifted. There was a significant difference between the pre-test and the time-course of lactate measures (p = 0.07. For bench press muscle activity of the pectoralis major, the last repetition was significantly greater than the first repetition (pre-test: p = 0.006, PE: p = 0.016, and TR: p = 0.005. Also, for muscle activity of the triceps brachii, the last repetition was significantly greater than the first repetition (pre-test: p = 0.001, PE: p = 0.005, and TR: p = 0.006. For triceps pushdown, muscle activity of the triceps brachii, the last repetition was significantly greater than the first repetition (pre-test: p = 0.006, PE: p = 0.016, and TR: p = 0.005. For RPE, there were no significant differences between PE and TR (p = 0.15. Our results suggest that exercise order decreases repetitions performed, however, neuromuscular fatigue, lactate, and RPE are not impacted. The lack of difference in total volume load lifted between PE and TR might explain, at least in part, the similar metabolic and

  13. Comparison of EMG activity on abdominal muscles during plank exercise with unilateral and bilateral additional isometric hip adduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Yong; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Eui-Ryong; Jung, In-Gui; Seo, Eun-Young; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of additional isometric hip adduction during the plank exercise on the abdominal muscles. Twenty healthy young men participated in this study. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to monitor the activity of the bilateral rectus abdominis (RA), the internal oblique (IO), and the external oblique (EO) muscles. The participants performed three types of plank exercise; the standard plank exercise, the plank exercise with bilateral isometric hip adduction, and the plank exercise with unilateral isometric hip adduction. All abdominal muscle activity was significantly increased during the plank exercise combined with the bilateral and unilateral isometric hip adduction compared with the standard plank exercise (pmuscle activity was significantly increased during the unilateral isometric hip adduction compared with the bilateral isometric hip adduction (pabdominal muscle activity. In particular, the unilateral isometric hip adduction is a more beneficial exercise than the bilateral isometric hip adduction.

  14. Exertional-induced bronchoconstriction: Comparison between cardiopulmonary exercise test and methacholine challenging test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Ghanei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Exertional-induced bronchoconstriction is a condition in which the physical activity causes constriction of airways in patients with airway hyper- responsiveness. In this study, we tried to study and evaluate any relationship between the findings of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET and the response to methacholine challenge test (MCT in patients with dyspnea after activity. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with complaints of dyspnea following activity referred to "Lung Clinic" of Baqiyatallah Hospital but not suffering from asthma were entered into the study. The subjects were excluded from the study if: Suffering from any other pulmonary diseases, smoking more than 1 cigarette a week in the last year, having a history of smoking more than 10 packets of cigarettes/year, having respiratory infection in the past 4 weeks, having abnormal chest X-ray or electrocardiogram, and cannot discontinue the use of medicines interfering with bronchial provocation. Baseline spirometry was performed for all the patients, and the values of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC, and FEV/FVC were recorded. The MCT and then the CPET were performed on all patients. Results: The mean VO 2 (volume oxygen in patients with positive methacholine test (20.45 mL/kg/min was significantly lower than patients with negative MCT (28.69 mL/kg/min (P = 0.000. Respiratory rates per minute (RR and minute ventilation in the group with positive MCT (38.85 and 1.636 L were significantly lower than the group with negative methacholine test (46.78 and 2.114 L (P < 0.05. Also, the O 2 pulse rate in the group with negative methacholine test (116.27 mL/beat was significantly higher than the group with positive methacholine test (84.26 mL/beat (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Pulmonary response to exercise in patients with positive methacholine test is insufficient. The dead space ventilation in these patients has increased. Also, dynamic

  15. Thermoregulation During Extended Exercise in the Heat: Comparisons of Fluid Volume and Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailes, Walter S; Cuddy, John S; Cochrane, Kyle; Ruby, Brent C

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the physiological and thermoregulatory responses of individuals exercising in the heat (US military red flag conditions, wet-bulb globe temperature 31.5-32.2ºC) while consuming varied volumes of ambient temperature water and ice slurry. Participants (N = 12) walked on a treadmill for 3 hours at approximately 40% peak aerobic capacity in a hot environment while consuming ambient temperature (35.5°C) water (W), ice slurry (0°C, two-thirds shaved ice and one-third water) at a ratio of 2 g·kg(-1) body mass every 10 minutes (FS), and reduced volume ice slurry as described at a rate of 1 g·kg(-1) body mass every 10 minutes (HS). Trials were completed at least 14 days apart, in a randomized, repeated measures design. Percent body weight loss was higher during the HS trial (1.8 ± 0.01%) compared with FS (0.5 ± 0.01%; P thermoregulation and other physiological responses for extended work in hot environments. Copyright © 2016 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The measurement of lactate threshold in resistance exercise: a comparison of methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Nuno Manuel Frade; Magosso, Rodrigo Ferro; Pereira, Guilherme Borges; Leite, Richard Diego; Arakelian, Vivian Maria; Montagnolli, Arlindo Neto; Perez, Sérgio Andrade; Baldissera, Vilmar

    2011-09-01

    Resistance incremental tests (IT) make it possible to determine critical metabolic and cardiovascular changes, such as the lactate threshold (LT). Different methods are frequently used to improve the exactness of LT identification. The objective of the study was to identify LT by four different methods (visual inspection, log-log, algorithmic adjustment and QLac) during resistance exercise and to evaluate which methods present more precision. Twelve men performed a maximal IT on the leg press at relative intensities of 10%, 20%, 25%, 30%, 35%, 40%, 50%, 60%, 70%, 80% and 90% of 1RM with 1-min stages. During the 2-min interval between stages, capillary blood was collected for blood lactate analysis. LT was detected using each of the four methods. The intensity of LT by visual inspection method was 26·9 (5·2)% of 1RM, adjustment algorithmic method was 27·8 (3·6)% of 1RM, log-log method was 23·3 (3·5)% of 1RM and QLac method was 31·6 (9·8)% of 1RM, with significant difference only between log-log and QLac methods. Bland and Altman analysis shows better concordance for visual inspection versus adjustment algorithmic methods. The visual inspection, algorithmic and log-log methods detected the LT at the same intensity. The mathematical models, specially the algorithmic method, provide more precision. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging © 2011 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  17. Comparison of Veteran experiences of low-cost, home-based diet and exercise interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bree Holtz, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a significant health problem among Veterans who receive care from the Department of Veterans Affairs, as it is for so many other Americans. Veterans from Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF experience a myriad of chronic conditions, which can make it difficult to maintain a physically active lifestyle. This pilot study tested the feasibility and user satisfaction with three low-cost, home-based diet and exercise programs, as well as point-of-decision prompts among these Veterans. The three programs target mechanisms that have been shown to improve healthy behavior change, including (1 online mediated social support, (2 objective monitoring of physical activity, and (3 structured high-intensity workouts. This was a randomized crossover trial; each participant used two of the three programs, and all used the point-of-decision prompts. Our qualitative results identified five overall themes related to social support, objective monitoring, structured activity, awareness and understanding, and the point-of-decision prompts. In general, participants were satisfied with and lost weight with each of the interventions. This study demonstrated that these low-cost interventions could be successful with the OIF/OEF Veteran population. A larger and longer study is planned to further investigate the effectiveness of these interventions.

  18. Technical recommendations for bilateral comparison in diagnosis radiology: part 1; Protocolo tecnico da comparacao bilateral em radiologia diagnostica: parte 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peixoto, J.G.P., E-mail: guilherm@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Almeida, C.E.V. de [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (LCR/IBRAG/UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas

    2015-07-01

    By data from www.datasus.gov.br, then need each diagnostic quality dissemination should be periodically verify, therefore the bilateral comparison between calibration laboratory will be mandatory to quality services guarantee. (author)

  19. A comparison of field methods to assess cardiorespiratory fitness among neophyte exercisers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alonzo, Karen T; Marbach, Kate; Vincent, Linda

    2006-07-01

    There is evidence to suggest that aerobic fitness levels among adults have declined markedly over the past 2 to 3 decades. Submaximal field measures of aerobic fitness, such as step tests, may now be seen as aversive by contemporary neophyte exercisers. In this study, a single-factor within-subjects (repeated measures) factorial design was used to compare three field measures of cardiorespiratory fitness among sedentary women: (a) the Queen's College step test (QCST), (b) the Rockport 1-mile walk (RW), and (c) a nonexercise estimation of VO(2) max (NE). The sample consisted of 31 racially and ethnically diverse female college students (mean age of 24.8 years). No significant within-subjects differences were found in the three measures of V0(2) max (F = 1.89, p = .17) among Black, Hispanic, White non-Hispanic, or Asian women, but relative perceived exertion scores were significantly higher for the QCST than for the RW (t = 9.79, p < .001) for all groups. The mean calculated VO(2) max for the QCST was 35.90 ml/kg/min for the subset of women ages 18 to 25 and 31.85 for those ages 26 to 46. These values represent a "poor" to "below average" score for aerobic capacity among women in both age groups. Data from this preliminary study suggest that both the RW test and the NE test are comparable to the QCST as valid and reliable field measures of aerobic fitness and appear to be good alternatives to step testing among sedentary individuals.

  20. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... show that people with arthritis, heart disease, or diabetes benefit from regular exercise. Exercise also helps people ... or difficulty walking. To learn about exercise and diabetes, see "Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes" from Go4Life®, ...

  1. A systematic review into the efficacy of static stretching as part of a warm-up for the prevention of exercise-related injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Katie; Mc Naughton, Lars; Matthews, Martyn

    2008-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to assess the efficacy of static stretching as part of the warm-up for the prevention of exercise-related injuries. Computer-aided literature search for articles post-1990 and pre-January 2008 related to static stretching and injury prevention using MEDLINE, SPORT Discus, PubMed, and ScienceDirect databases. All relevant randomised clinical trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) satisfying inclusion/exclusion criteria were evaluated by methodological assessment to score the studies using accredited criteria. Seven out of 364 studies met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. All four RCTs concluded that static stretching was ineffective in reducing the incidence of exercise-related injury, and only one of the three CCTs concluded that static stretching did reduce the incidence of exercise-related injury. Three out of the seven studies noted significant reductions in musculotendinous and ligament injuries following a static stretching protocol despite nonsignificant reductions in the all-injury risk. All RCTs scored over 50 points (maximum possible score = 100), whereas all CCTs scored under 45 points. There is moderate to strong evidence that routine application of static stretching does not reduce overall injury rates. There is preliminary evidence, however, that static stretching may reduce musculotendinous injuries.

  2. Comparison of Effectiveness of Supervised Exercise Program and Cyriax Physiotherapy in Patients with Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajadurai Viswas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the effectiveness of supervised exercise program and Cyriax physiotherapy in the treatment of tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis. Design. Randomized clinical trial. Setting. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation centre. Subjects. This study was carried out with 20 patients, who had tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis. Intervention. Group A (=10 had received supervised exercise program. Group B (=10 was treated with Cyriax physiotherapy. All patients received three treatment sessions per week for four weeks (12 treatment sessions. Outcome measures. Pain was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS, and functional status was evaluated by completion of the Tennis Elbow Function Scale (TEFS which were recorded at base line and at the end of fourth week. Results. Both the supervised exercise program and Cyriax physiotherapy were found to be significantly effective in reduction of pain and in the improvement of functional status. The supervised exercise programme resulted in greater improvement in comparison to those who received Cyriax physiotherapy. Conclusion. The results of this clinical trial demonstrate that the supervised exercise program may be the first treatment choice for therapist in managing tennis elbow.

  3. Effects of the training status on the hormonal response and recovery from high-intensity isokinetic exercise: comparisons between endurance-trained athletes and sedentary subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minetto, M A; Paccotti, P; Borrione, P; Massazza, G; Ventura, M; Termine, A; Di Luigi, L; Pigozzi, F; Angeli, A

    2006-09-01

    Aims of the study were: to determine the differences in the mechanical, hormonal and lactate responses to a high-intensity isokinetic exercise in two groups of endurance-trained athletes (EA, n = 11) and sedentary subjects (SED, n = 11); to evaluate the relationships between the hormonal and lactate responses; to evaluate the effects of the training status on the pituitary responsiveness to the exercise. EA and SED completed, for each leg, 4 sets of 20 maximal concentric contractions of the knee extensor muscle groups at 180 degrees s-1 angular velocity. Blood and saliva for hormonal and lactate determinations were sampled before, immediately after the test and during the subsequent recovery of 2 hours. The exercise was completed by all subjects and elicited significant mechanical and biochemical responses both in EA and in SED subjects. No differences were found between the two groups both in the mechanical performances and in the increases of lactate and hormones of the pituitary-adrenal axis or in the comparison of the slopes of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, and dehydroepiandrosterone recovery after the peak. The correlation analyses showed significant positive relationships between lactate peak values and percentages of change for ACTH (r2 = 0.16, P training status on the pituitary responsiveness to exercise was evident, as it was indirectly confirmed by no abnormalities in the rates of hormonal recovery after the exercise session.

  4. Why Exercise Is Wise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... each day. Here are some of the reasons: Exercise benefits every part of the body, including the mind. ... conditions may affect how — and how much — you exercise. Doctors know that most people benefit from regular exercise, even those with disabilities or ...

  5. Transcriptional profile of isoproterenol-induced cardiomyopathy and comparison to exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy and human cardiac failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McIver Lauren J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy in mice has been used in a number of studies to model human cardiac disease. In this study, we compared the transcriptional response of the heart in this model to other animal models of heart failure, as well as to the transcriptional response of human hearts suffering heart failure. Results We performed microarray analyses on RNA from mice with isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy and mice with exercise-induced physiological hypertrophy and identified 865 and 2,534 genes that were significantly altered in pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy models, respectively. We compared our results to 18 different microarray data sets (318 individual arrays representing various other animal models and four human cardiac diseases and identified a canonical set of 64 genes that are generally altered in failing hearts. We also produced a pairwise similarity matrix to illustrate relatedness of animal models with human heart disease and identified ischemia as the human condition that most resembles isoproterenol treatment. Conclusion The overall patterns of gene expression are consistent with observed structural and molecular differences between normal and maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy and support a role for the immune system (or immune cell infiltration in the pathology of stress-induced hypertrophy. Cross-study comparisons such as the results presented here provide targets for further research of cardiac disease that might generally apply to maladaptive cardiac stresses and are also a means of identifying which animal models best recapitulate human disease at the transcriptional level.

  6. Comparison of arbutamine stress and treadmill exercise thallium-201 SPECT: Hemodynamics, safety profile and diagnostic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiat, H.; Berman, D.S. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Centre, Los Angeles, California, LA (United States)

    1998-02-01

    Full text: Arbutamine (ARB), a new pharmacologic stress agent with enhanced chronotropic property compared to dobutamine, was compared with treadmill (TM) exercise testing (Ex) in a multicenter study using thallium-201 (Tl) SPECT. Of the total of 184 patients who underwent ARB, 69 also had TM stress and quantitative coronary angiography. Fifty-eight patients with a low pretest likelihood of CAD also underwent ARB study for evaluation of test specificity (normalcy rate). Tl scans were scored by a central laboratory using a 20 segment (seg)/scan visual analysis (5 point system: 0=normal, 4-absent uptake). Maximum heart rate (HR) by ARB and Ex was 122 vs 141 bpm (p<0.05). Mean %HR change from baseline was similar (79% vs 82%, respectively, p=ns). Maximum systolic BP for ARB and Ex was 173 vs 175 mmHg, and mean % change from baseline was 24% vs 28% (p=ns). Sensitivity for detecting CAD (270% stenosis) by ARB Tl was 94% and 97% by Ex Tl (p=ns). Stress Tl SPECT segmental agreement for presence of defect between ARB and Ex was 92% (kappa=0.8, p<0.001). Exact segmental stress Tl score (0-4 grading) agreement was 83 % (kappa=0.7, p<0.001). Among 346 segs with stress defects by both ARB and Ex defect reversibility agreement was 86% (kappa=0.7, p<0.001). The normalcy rate for ARB TI-SPECT among patients with a low likelihood of CAD was 90%. Adverse events were mostly mild (tremor: 23%, flushing: 10%, headache: 10%, paraesthesia: 8%, dizziness: 8%, hot flushes: 4%). Arrhythimia of clinical concern occurred in 8% (10/122) of ARB patients who had cardiac catheterisation and in 1.4% (1/69) of patients who had stress Tl. Of all 184 patients with ARB stress, ARB was discontinued due to arrhythmia in 7(5%) and 1 patient had IV Metoprolol for frequent ventricular couplets. Sustained arrhythmias were not observed

  7. Exercise for people with hip or knee osteoarthritis: a comparison of land-based and aquatic interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann E Rahmann

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ann E RahmannDivision of Physiotherapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: Expert opinion considers the referral of people with osteoarthritis (OA for physiotherapy to be a core component of managing the functional disability and pain of the disease. Clinical guidelines for the physiotherapy management of people with OA focus on three main areas: exercise, pain relief, and specific manual therapy techniques. Land-based group and individual physiotherapy exercise programs, as well as manual therapy, have demonstrated a distinct benefit in favor of physiotherapy intervention. Similarly, both general and specific aquatic physiotherapy exercise programs have shown positive outcomes for people with OA. This review will focus primarily on therapeutic exercise to improve strength and fitness and reduce pain in people with hip or knee OA. An overview of the principles of hydrodynamics relevant to aquatic exercise is also included to facilitate an understanding of effective aquatic exercise programs. The issue of compliance with exercise programs will also be discussed. Clinicians will, therefore, gain an understanding of the benefits of land-based and aquatic exercise for people with OA.Keywords: exercise, physical therapy, aquatic therapy, hip and knee osteoarthritis, strength, pain, aerobic exercise

  8. Comparison of Predicted Exercise Capacity Equations and the Effect of Actual versus Ideal Body Weight among Subjects Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Reza Ahmadian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oxygen uptake at maximal exercise (VO2 max is considered the best available index for assessment of exercise capacity. The purpose of this study is to determine if the use of actual versus ideal body weight in standard regression equations for predicted VO2 max results in differences in predicted VO2 max. Methods. This is a retrospective chart review of patients who were predominantly in active military duty with complaints of dyspnea or exercise tolerance and who underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET from 2007 to 2009. Results. A total of 230 subjects completed CPET on a bicycle ergometer with a male predominance (62% and an average age of 37 ± 15 years. There was significant discordance between the measured VO2 max and predicted VO2 max when measured by the Hansen and Wasserman reference equations (P<0.001. Specifically, there was less overestimation when predicted VO2 max was based on ideal body weight as opposed to actual body weight. Conclusion. Our retrospective analysis confirmed the wide variations in predicted versus measured VO2 max based on varying prediction equations and showed the potential advantage of using ideal body weight as opposed to actual body weight in order to further standardize reference norms.

  9. Comparison of Predicted Exercise Capacity Equations and the Effect of Actual versus Ideal Body Weight among Subjects Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian, H Reza; Sclafani, Joseph J; Emmons, Ethan E; Morris, Michael J; Leclerc, Kenneth M; Slim, Ahmad M

    2013-01-01

    Background. Oxygen uptake at maximal exercise (VO2 max) is considered the best available index for assessment of exercise capacity. The purpose of this study is to determine if the use of actual versus ideal body weight in standard regression equations for predicted VO2 max results in differences in predicted VO2 max. Methods. This is a retrospective chart review of patients who were predominantly in active military duty with complaints of dyspnea or exercise tolerance and who underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) from 2007 to 2009. Results. A total of 230 subjects completed CPET on a bicycle ergometer with a male predominance (62%) and an average age of 37 ± 15 years. There was significant discordance between the measured VO2 max and predicted VO2 max when measured by the Hansen and Wasserman reference equations (P VO2 max was based on ideal body weight as opposed to actual body weight. Conclusion. Our retrospective analysis confirmed the wide variations in predicted versus measured VO2 max based on varying prediction equations and showed the potential advantage of using ideal body weight as opposed to actual body weight in order to further standardize reference norms.

  10. Technical recommendations for bilateral comparison in diagnosis radiology: part 3; Protocolo tecnico da comparacao bilateral em radiologia diagnostica: parte 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peixoto, J.G.P., E-mail: guilherm@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Almeida, C.E.V. de [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (LCR/IBRAG/UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas

    2015-07-01

    Uncertainty and results homogeneity need to following the technical procedure to bilateral comparison, then we select the equipment used, reference conditions and the data file to be used for all participant laboratory. The partial results will be presentation at metrology and medical physics congress. (author)

  11. Midregional pro-adrenomedullin and copeptin: exercise kinetics and association with the cardiopulmonary exercise response in comparison to B-type natriuretic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Marzena; Maeder, Micha T; Brutsche, Martin H; Lüthi, Adrian; Twerenbold, Raphael; Freese, Michael; Rickli, Hans; Mueller, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Midregional pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM) and C-terminal pro-vasopressin (copeptin) are novel biomarkers providing prognostic information in various settings. We aimed to (1) assess the kinetics of MR-proADM and copeptin during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET); (2) assess the relationship of MR-proADM and copeptin measured at rest with peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) and other key CPET parameters; (3) compare this relationship to that of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP). In 162 patients undergoing symptom-limited CPET for evaluation of exercise intolerance, MR-proADM, copeptin, and BNP were measured at rest and peak exercise. There was a significant rise in copeptin and BNP (p exercise. MR-proADM (r = -0.57; p heart rate achieved and peak oxygen pulse and directly related to the peak ventilation/carbon dioxide production relationship, the physiological dead space-to-tidal volume ratio, and the alveolo-arterial oxygen gradient (p ≤ 0.01 for all), and these associations were at least as strong as for BNP. In contrast, copeptin was not significantly related to any of these parameters (p > 0.05 for all). In contrast to BNP and copeptin, MR-proADM is not immediately affected by a maximal exercise test. MR-proADM but not copeptin is at least as good an indicator of low peak VO2 and CPET parameters reflecting an impaired cardiac output reserve, ventilatory efficiency and diffusion capacity as BNP, and thereby a global cardiopulmonary stress marker.

  12. Comparison of Electromyographic Activity of the Superior and Inferior Portions of the Gluteus Maximus Muscle During Common Therapeutic Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkowitz, David M; Beneck, George J; Powers, Christopher M

    2016-09-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study, repeated-measures design. Background Previous studies have reported that the superior and inferior portions of the gluteus maximus have different functional roles. Knowledge of how the different portions of the gluteus maximus are activated during therapeutic exercise may lead to more specific exercise prescription. Objective To compare muscle activation of the superior and inferior portions of the gluteus maximus during commonly used therapeutic exercises. Methods Twenty healthy persons participated. Electromyographic (EMG) signals were obtained from the superior and inferior portions of the gluteus maximus using fine-wire electrodes. Normalized EMG signal amplitudes were compared between the superior and inferior gluteus maximus across 11 exercises using a 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results The superior portion of the gluteus maximus had significantly greater relative EMG activity than the inferior portion of the gluteus maximus during exercises that incorporated elements of hip abduction and/or external rotation (5 of 11 exercises evaluated). There was no significant difference in activation between the superior and inferior portions of the gluteus maximus during the remaining 6 exercises. Conclusion The results of the present study demonstrate preferential activation of the superior portion of the gluteus maximus during exercises that incorporate elements of hip abduction and/or external rotation. In contrast, exercises that primarily involve hip extension target both portions of the gluteus maximus to a similar extent. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):794-799. Epub 5 Aug 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6493.

  13. A Comparison of Myocardial Oxygen Consumption during Three Modes of Sub-maximal Exercise Testing among Patients with Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olayemi Fehintola Awopeju

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Every individual would benefit from a well planned programme of exercise, asthmatics inclusive. The aim of this study is to compare the myocardial oxygen consumption of three exercise protocols in asthmatics Methods: Forty eight consecutive asthmatics were recruited between December 2005 and December 2006; each asthmatic performed the 3 exercise protocols (Cycle ergometer, step test and free running in random order within a week. The systolic blood pressure (SBP and heart rate (HR were measured pre and post exercise. Rate pressure product (RPP was used as a measure of myocardial oxygen consumption Results: The mean age of the patients was 24 .1±4.97 with equal number of females and males. There was no significant difference in HR, SBP and RPP, among the 3 exercise protocols at pre exercise phase. The post exercise RPP means results were; 21679.2±2741.3, 21993.3±3636.2, 20205.8±2922.4 free running, step test, cycle ergometer respectively. There was significant difference in the post exercise RPP (F=4.479 p=0.013 of the 3 exercise protocols with step test having the highest myocardial oxygen consumption. RPP in step test was significantly higher than that of free running and cycle ergometer (p 0.05. Conclusion: Step test was found to increase myocardial oxygen consumption more than free running and cycle ergometer [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(5.000: 559-564

  14. Comparison of human erythrocyte purine nucleotide metabolism and blood purine and pyrimidine degradation product concentrations before and after acute exercise in trained and sedentary subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzinska, Wioleta; Suska, M; Lubkowska, A; Jakubowska, K; Olszewska, M; Safranow, K; Chlubek, D

    2017-04-21

    This study aimed at evaluating the concentration of erythrocyte purine nucleotides (ATP, ADP, AMP, IMP) in trained and sedentary subjects before and after maximal physical exercise together with measuring the activity of purine metabolism enzymes as well as the concentration of purine (hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid) and pyrimidine (uridine) degradation products in blood. The study included 15 male elite rowers [mean age 24.3 ± 2.56 years; maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) 52.8 ± 4.54 mL/kg/min; endurance and strength training 8.2 ± 0.33 h per week for 6.4 ± 2.52 years] and 15 sedentary control subjects (mean age 23.1 ± 3.41 years; VO2max 43.2 ± 5.20 mL/kg/min). Progressive incremental exercise testing until refusal to continue exercising was conducted on a bicycle ergometer. The concentrations of ATP, ADP, AMP, IMP and the activities of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT), hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) and phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase (PRPP-S) were determined in erythrocytes. The concentrations of hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid and uridine were determined in the whole blood before exercise, after exercise, and 30 min after exercise testing. The study demonstrated a significantly higher concentration of ATP in the erythrocytes of trained subjects which, in part, may be explained by higher metabolic activity on the purine re-synthesis pathway (significantly higher PRPP-S, APRT and HGPRT activities). The ATP concentration, just as the ATP/ADP ratio, as well as an exercise-induced increase in this ratio, correlates with the VO2max level in these subjects which allows them to be considered as the important factors characterising physical capacity and exercise tolerance. Maximal physical exercise in the group of trained subjects results not only in a lower post-exercise increase in the concentration of hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid but also in that of uridine. This indicates the possibility of

  15. Comparison of Two Independent Mapping Exercises in the Primeiras and Segundas Archipelago, Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of coral reef habitat maps from high spatial resolution multispectral imagery is common practice and benefits from standardized accuracy assessment methods and many informative studies on the merits of different processing algorithms. However, few studies consider the full production workflow, including factors such as operator influence, visual interpretation and a-priori knowledge. An end-user might justifiably ask: Given the same imagery and field data, how consistent would two independent production efforts be? This paper is a post-study analysis of a project in which two teams of researchers independently produced maps of six coral reef systems of the archipelago of the Primeiras and Segundas Environmental Protected Area (PSEPA, Mozambique. Both teams used the same imagery and field data, but applied different approaches—pixel based vs. object based image analysis—and used independently developed classification schemes. The results offer a unique perspective on the map production process. Both efforts resulted in similar merged classes accuracies, averaging at 63% and 64%, but the maps were distinct in terms of scale of spatial patterns, classification disparities, and in other aspects where the mapping process is reliant on visual interpretation. Despite the difficulty in aligning the classification schemes clear patterns of correspondence and discrepancy were identified. The maps were consistent with respect to geomorphological level mapping (17 out of 30 paired comparisons at more than 75% agreement, and also agreed in the extent of coral containing areas within a difference of 16% across the archipelago. However, more detailed benthic habitat level classes were inconsistent. Mapping of deep benthic cover was the most subjective result and dependent on operator visual interpretation, yet this was one of the results of highest interest for the PSEPA management since it revealed a continuity of benthos between the islands

  16. Comparison the effects of one session aerobic exercise and resistance training on some of the coagulation markers of healthy young women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Habibian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical training is a useful method to reduce disease of cardiovascular, but the effect of exercise on the coagulation system is under investigation. The aim of this study was to determine the response of one bout exhaustive aerobic exercise and resistance training on some of coagulation markers in healthy young women.Materials and Method: This quasi-experimental research was performed in 2009. Twenty trained volunteer female students of physical education Sari Azad university were selected objectively and availability. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups of aerobic (n=10 and resistance training (n=10. Aerobic group performed an exhaustive workout program on treadmill intensity 65 to75% Vo2max on treadmill. The resistance group completed three sets of 5-7 repetitions of six exercises at an intensity corresponding to 80% of 1RM. Following 12 to 14 hours of nightly fasting, venous blood samples (5 cc were collected pre, immediately after exercise and after 60 min of recovery and analyzed for PT, aPTT and fibrinogen. Participants were matched according to anthropometric measurements, age and Vo2max. Hypothesizes were tested by using independent t, repeated measures and post-hoc test (p 0.05. Results: Both the aerobic and resistance training groups, PT time (p<0.001 and aPTT time significantly decreased (p=0.006, p<0.001 respectively times between the two groups and the effect of resistant training on fibrinogen level immediately after exercise. Also aPTT time higher increased after recovery in comparison with baseline levels in aerobic (p=0.006 and resistance training groups (p<0.001. There were no significant differences in PT and aPTT was higher than aerobic training (p=0.0035.Conclusion: The results show that both of acute aerobic and or anaerobic exercise lead to small and transit coagulation system and increase in coagulation times

  17. Entrenamiento físico y educación como parte de la rehabilitación pulmonar en pacientes con EPOC Exercise training and education as part of pulmonary rehabilitation for COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KATHERINE MARÍN D

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available La rehabilitación pulmonar es un recurso terapéutico no farmacológico dirigido a pacientes con EPOC, sus principales objetivos son: reducir los síntomas, mejorar la calidad de vida y aumentar la participación física y emocional de los pacientes en las actividades cotidianas. Los pacientes con EPOC en todos los estadios de la enfermedad se benefician con los programas de entrenamiento, que mejoran tanto la tolerancia al ejercicio como la sensación de disnea y fatiga. La educación al paciente se incluye con el objetivo de optimizar sus habilidades, su capacidad de sobrellevar la enfermedad y para mejorar su estado de salud, además de la cesación del hábito tabáquico. A continuación se presenta una revisión bibliográfica acerca del entrenamiento físico y la educación como parte de un programa de rehabilitación pulmonar.Pulmonary rehabilitation is a non-pharmacological therapeutic resort for COPD patients. Its main goals are to reduce symptoms, improve quality of life, and increase physical and emotional involvement in everyday activities. COPD patients at all stages ofthe disease benefit from exercise training programs, as ihey improve both exercise tolerance and symptoms of dyspnea and fatigue. Patient 's education is included so that it helps improving skills, ability to cope with illness, and health status, as well as smoking cessation. We present a bibliographical review about exercise training and education as part of a pulmonary rehabilitation program.

  18. Exercise gaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smaerup, M.; Grönvall, E.; Larsen, S. B.;

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to identify possible reasons for a modest level of exercise compliance during computer-assisted training for vestibular rehabilitation. Method Qualitative design and analysis of 14 semi-structured interviews with seven participants before and after a period......, but their knowledge and understanding of the training programme were insufficient. The participants asked for a greater variation in the exercises and asked for closer contact with the physiotherapist. When Mitii is used for vestibular rehabilitation, the system has some limitations. Conclusions The modest level...... understanding of the training programme with supplying information on the parts of the vestibular system addressed by the training. Implications for Rehabilitation Computer-assisted technologies should generate feedback on the quality of user performance and inform the patient of the relevance of the exercise...

  19. Exercise for people with hip or knee osteoarthritis: a comparison of land-based and aquatic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmann, Ann E

    2010-07-23

    Expert opinion considers the referral of people with osteoarthritis (OA) for physiotherapy to be a core component of managing the functional disability and pain of the disease. Clinical guidelines for the physiotherapy management of people with OA focus on three main areas: exercise, pain relief, and specific manual therapy techniques. Land-based group and individual physiotherapy exercise programs, as well as manual therapy, have demonstrated a distinct benefit in favor of physiotherapy intervention. Similarly, both general and specific aquatic physiotherapy exercise programs have shown positive outcomes for people with OA. This review will focus primarily on therapeutic exercise to improve strength and fitness and reduce pain in people with hip or knee OA. An overview of the principles of hydrodynamics relevant to aquatic exercise is also included to facilitate an understanding of effective aquatic exercise programs. The issue of compliance with exercise programs will also be discussed. Clinicians will, therefore, gain an understanding of the benefits of land-based and aquatic exercise for people with OA.

  20. Exercise for people with hip or knee osteoarthritis: a comparison of land-based and aquatic interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmann, Ann E

    2010-01-01

    Expert opinion considers the referral of people with osteoarthritis (OA) for physiotherapy to be a core component of managing the functional disability and pain of the disease. Clinical guidelines for the physiotherapy management of people with OA focus on three main areas: exercise, pain relief, and specific manual therapy techniques. Land-based group and individual physiotherapy exercise programs, as well as manual therapy, have demonstrated a distinct benefit in favor of physiotherapy intervention. Similarly, both general and specific aquatic physiotherapy exercise programs have shown positive outcomes for people with OA. This review will focus primarily on therapeutic exercise to improve strength and fitness and reduce pain in people with hip or knee OA. An overview of the principles of hydrodynamics relevant to aquatic exercise is also included to facilitate an understanding of effective aquatic exercise programs. The issue of compliance with exercise programs will also be discussed. Clinicians will, therefore, gain an understanding of the benefits of land-based and aquatic exercise for people with OA. PMID:24198550

  1. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can Do Like most people, ... active on a regular basis is one of the healthiest things you can do for yourself. Studies ...

  2. Swimmer’s Shoulder in Athletes: Comparison between Efficacy of Aquatic versus Dry-land Concentric-Eccentric Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Shah

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to examine the level of pain gets reduced whether by dry-land based concentric-eccentric exercises or by the equivalent type of aquatic exercises in the elite swimmers complaining of chronic shoulder pain. Elite swimmers from India of both genders with an age group of 16-30 years were chosen having pain rated as ≤7 on visual analog scale with an exception of Bak’s Grade E provided with an absence of past shoulder surgeries and acute injuries. 46 of swimmer’s shoulder athletes were randomly divided in a group of two. 23 in each group were provided with respective sets of dry-land and aquatic concentric-eccentric exercises for 3 times/week for a period of 4 weeks. Outcome was measured using three parameters which included visual analog scale (VAS, 50m freestyle sprint and shoulder pain and disability index (SPADI scoring before and after the treatment in relation to freestyle and backstroke pattern of swimming. In results, the descriptive statistics of swimmers with aquatic and dry-land exercises; for VAS 0 sessions to the 12th session were measured. The swimmers with dry-land exercises had the higher mean values than the swimmers with aquatic exercises, showing statistically significant differences (p≤ 0.05-0.001. Whereas in case of before and after 50 metre sprint, no significant differences were there between these two sets of populations. In case of before and after SPADI scoring, swimmers with aquatic exercises had the lower mean values than those with the dry-land exercises, showing statistically significant differences (p ≤ 0.001. In conclusion, it may be stated that the aquatic concentric-eccentric exercises proved to be efficient for swimmers suffering from swimmer’s shoulder condition and early prognosis can be brought with aquatic rehabilitation as compared to the dry-land concentric-eccentric exercises.

  3. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and renal response to exercise: a comparison of indomethacin and nabumetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, N V; Jensen, N G; Hansen, J M; Christensen, N J; Fogh-Andersen, N; Kanstrup, I L

    1999-10-01

    Nabumetone, a newer non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) which preferentially blocks cyclo-oxygenase-2 activity, may be less nephrotoxic than indomethacin. This study tested whether nabumetone has effects different from those of indomethacin on exercise-induced changes in renal function and the renin-aldosterone system. In a randomized fashion, ten subjects were studied after indomethacin (100 mg), nabumetone (1 g) or no medication (control) administered orally at 22.00 hours on the day before each study day, and again at 8.00 hours upon arrival at the laboratory. Renal function was studied at baseline, during graded 20-min exercise sessions at 25%, 50% and 75% of the maximal oxygen uptake rate, and subsequently during two 1-h recovery periods. Heart rate, arterial blood pressure, cardiac output and plasma catecholamines at rest and during exercise were not altered by indomethacin or nabumetone. Indomethacin decreased urinary rates of excretion of 6-oxo-prostaglandin F(1alpha) (6-oxo-PGF(1alpha)) and thromboxane B(2) in all study periods. Nabumetone decreased 6-oxo-PGF(1alpha) excretion during and after exercise. Excretion rates for PGE(2) did not change. Neither indomethacin nor nabumetone changed baseline values or exercise-induced decreases in renal plasma flow or glomerular filtration rate. Indomethacin, but not nabumetone, decreased sodium excretion, urine flow rate and free water clearance. The renal response to exercise, however, remained unchanged. In contrast with nabumatone, indomethacin decreased the plasma renin concentration. Thus, during exercise, nabumetone may decrease the excretion of 6-oxo-PGF(1alpha) by inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase-1 or by inhibition of specific exercise-induced activation of cyclo-oxygenase-2, or both. None of the drugs changed the renal response to exercise. Inhibition by indomethacin of angiotensin II and thromboxane A(2) synthesis may, during exercise, counterbalance renal vasoconstriction caused by blockade of

  4. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can Do ... can do for yourself. Studies have shown that exercise provides many health benefits and that older adults can gain a lot ...

  5. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can Do ... can do for yourself. Studies have shown that exercise provides many health benefits and that older adults can gain a lot ...

  6. A Trimodality Comparison of Volumetric Bone Imaging Technologies. Part I: Short-term Precision and Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Andy K. O.; Beattie, Karen A.; Min, Kevin K. H.; Webber, Colin E.; Gordon, Christopher L.; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Cheung, Angela M. W.; Adachi, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) and peripheral magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI) modalities can measure apparent bone microstructure at resolutions 200 μm or higher. However, validity and in vivo test-retest reproducibility of apparent bone microstructure have yet to be determined on 1.0 T pMRI (196 μm) and pQCT (200 μm). This study examined 67 women with a mean age of 74 ± 9 yr and body mass index of 27.65 ± 5.74 kg/m2, demonstrating validity for trabecular separation from pMRI, cortical thickness, and bone volume fraction from pQCT images compared with high-resolution pQCT (hr-pQCT), with slopes close to unity. However, because of partial volume effects, cortical and trabecular thickness of bone derived from pMRI and pQCT images matched hr-pQCT more only when values were small. Short-term reproducibility of bone outcomes was highest for bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and densitometric variables and lowest for trabecular outcomes measuring microstructure. Measurements at the tibia for pQCT images were more precise than at the radius. In part I of this 3-part series focused on trimodality comparisons of precision and validity, it is shown that pQCT images can yield valid and reproducible apparent bone structural outcomes, but because of longer scan time and potential for more motion, the pMRI protocol examined here remains limited in achieving reliable values. PMID:25129405

  7. Friction Sensitivity of Nitramines. Part Ⅲ:Comparison with Detonation Performance%Friction Sensitivity of Nitramines.Part Ⅲ: Comparison with Detonation Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Svatopluk Zeman; Marcela Jungová; Adéla Husarová

    2011-01-01

    The friction sensitivities (FS) of five linear and eight cyclic nitramines have been determined.These FS values were compared with the respective detonation velocities,D,and with the dimensionless ratio created by relating the heat of explosion,Qreal,to the activation energy,Ea,of non-autocatalyzed thermal decomposition of the explosives concerned.For the nitramaines studied,these comparisons show a general trend of FS decreasing with increasing energy content.%The friction sensitivities (FS) of five linear and eight cyclic nitramines have been determined. These FS values were compared with the respective detonation velocities, D, and with the dimensionless ratio created by relating the heat of explosion, Qreaf, to the activation energy, Ea , of non-autocatalyzed thermal decomposition of the explosives concerned. For the nitramaines studied, these comparisons show a general trend of FS decreasing with increasing energy content.

  8. Comparison of high pressure transient PVT measurements and model predictions. Part I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.; Winters, William Stanley, Jr.

    2010-07-01

    A series of experiments consisting of vessel-to-vessel transfers of pressurized gas using Transient PVT methodology have been conducted to provide a data set for optimizing heat transfer correlations in high pressure flow systems. In rapid expansions such as these, the heat transfer conditions are neither adiabatic nor isothermal. Compressible flow tools exist, such as NETFLOW that can accurately calculate the pressure and other dynamical mechanical properties of such a system as a function of time. However to properly evaluate the mass that has transferred as a function of time these computational tools rely on heat transfer correlations that must be confirmed experimentally. In this work new data sets using helium gas are used to evaluate the accuracy of these correlations for receiver vessel sizes ranging from 0.090 L to 13 L and initial supply pressures ranging from 2 MPa to 40 MPa. The comparisons show that the correlations developed in the 1980s from sparse data sets perform well for the supply vessels but are not accurate for the receivers, particularly at early time during the transfers. This report focuses on the experiments used to obtain high quality data sets that can be used to validate computational models. Part II of this report discusses how these data were used to gain insight into the physics of gas transfer and to improve vessel heat transfer correlations. Network flow modeling and CFD modeling is also discussed.

  9. Comparison of two-hand kettlebell exercise and graded treadmill walking: effectiveness as a stimulus for cardiorespiratory fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, James F; Larson, Kurtis L; Hollander, Daniel B; Kraemer, Robert R

    2014-04-01

    Prevailing interest in the use of kettlebell (KB) exercises for rehabilitation and improvement of muscular strength has led to several recent studies, some suggesting that KB exercise may be useful for improvement of cardiorespiratory fitness. The purpose of this study was to determine whether KB exercise would produce similar cardiovascular stress to that of walking and thus provide an additional exercise mode for the improvement of cardiorespiratory fitness. It was hypothesized that a moderate-intensity, continuous KB protocol, would produce similar metabolic and cardiorespiratory responses as a brisk bout of graded treadmill (TM) walking, but greater rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Ten novice volunteers (5 men, 5 women) completed a preliminary session to determine body composition and VO2max and to familiarize participants with standardized KB exercise technique. Subsequently, they completed a 30-minute KB session that included 3 continuous 10-minute sets of 10 KB swings followed by 10 sumo deadlifts, with 3-minute rests between 10-minute exercise periods. The third session was a 30-minute TM regimen that began at the walking speed and 4% grade that matched the VO2 from the KB session and included 3-minute rest intervals after 10-minute TM exercise periods. VO2, respiratory exchange ratio, kcal·min, and blood pressure were similar for KB and moderate-intensity TM exercise, but RPE and heart rate were greater during KB exercise. Data indicate that a KB routine consisting of 2-hand swings and sumo deadlifts with 3-minute rest periods produces similar metabolic responses to those of a moderate-intensity TM walking protocol designed for the improvement of aerobic fitness.

  10. Comparison of Watermelon and Carbohydrate Beverage on Exercise-Induced Alterations in Systemic Inflammation, Immune Dysfunction, and Plasma Antioxidant Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Andrew Shanely

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Consuming carbohydrate- and antioxidant-rich fruits during exercise as a means of supporting and enhancing both performance and health is of interest to endurance athletes. Watermelon (WM contains carbohydrate, lycopene, l-citrulline, and l-arginine. WM may support exercise performance, augment antioxidant capacity, and act as a countermeasure to exercise-induced inflammation and innate immune changes. Trained cyclists (n = 20, 48 ± 2 years participated in a randomized, placebo controlled, crossover study. Subjects completed two 75 km cycling time trials after either 2 weeks ingestion of 980 mL/day WM puree or no treatment. Subjects drank either WM puree containing 0.2 gm/kg carbohydrate or a 6% carbohydrate beverage every 15 min during the time trials. Blood samples were taken pre-study and pre-, post-, 1 h post-exercise. WM ingestion versus no treatment for 2-weeks increased plasma l-citrulline and l-arginine concentrations (p < 0.0125. Exercise performance did not differ between WM puree or carbohydrate beverage trials (p > 0.05, however, the rating of perceived exertion was greater during the WM trial (p > 0.05. WM puree versus carbohydrate beverage resulted in a similar pattern of increase in blood glucose, and greater increases in post-exercise plasma antioxidant capacity, l-citrulline, l-arginine, and total nitrate (all p < 0.05, but without differences in systemic markers of inflammation or innate immune function. Daily WM puree consumption fully supported the energy demands of exercise, and increased post-exercise blood levels of WM nutritional components (l-citrulline and l-arginine, antioxidant capacity, and total nitrate, but without an influence on post-exercise inflammation and changes in innate immune function.

  11. Health-promoting lifestyles and exercise: a comparison of older African American women above and below poverty level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, B; Nies, M A

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the health-promoting behaviors and exercise behaviors of older African American women above and below poverty level. Fifty-eight African American women completed a demographic form and the Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile (HPLP). Results indicated that African American women living above the poverty level had higher overall scores on the total HPLP and higher scores on the exercise subscale of the HPLP than women living below poverty level. Implications include teaching culturally specific, practical, and inexpensive exercise activities in primary care and community settings.

  12. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen Your Core! Stretching/Flexibility Aerobic Exercise Cervical Exercise Strength Training for the Elderly Other Back Pack Safety ...

  13. Quality control of CarboEurope flux data - Part 2: Inter-comparison of eddy-covariance software

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauder, M.; Foken, T.; Clement, R.; Elbers, J.A.; Eugster, W.; Grunwald, T.; Heusinkveld, B.G.; Kolle, O.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the quality assurance and quality control activities within the CarboEurope-IP network, a comparison of eddy-covariance software was conducted. For four five-day datasets, CO2 flux estimates were calculated by seven commonly used software packages to assess the uncertainty of CO2 flux est

  14. [Comparison of the psychological effects of standard exercises with those of space exercises in autogenic training: from the perspective of passive concentration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Ikuyo; Koshikawa, Fusako

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the psychological effects of the heaviness and the warmth Standard Exercises (SE) with those of the first Space Exercises (SP) in Autogenic Training (AT) on college students. This study was conducted by the repeated practice of two experimental groups (SE, SP) and one control group (CT). The participants in the experimental groups practiced once a week, for three weeks. All the participants were assessed with State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Trait Anxiety (STAI-T), Autogenic Training Clinical Effectiveness Scale (ATCES), and Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale. The results showed that the SE group showed more decreases in STAI-T and more increases in ATCES than the SP group, while the more neurotic, showed more increases in self-esteem in both the SE and SP groups. It is possible that non-clinical adults with high neuroticism might be able to enhance their STAI-T and ATCES in the SE group than in the SP group if their SE trainers respected their bodily abilities in readily responding to changes in sensations.

  15. Comparison of Valsalva manoeuvre and exercise in echocardiographic evaluation of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Krogh; Havndrup, Ole; Pecini, Redi;

    2010-01-01

    Several methods are used to induce latent left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) gradients in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We compared LVOT gradients induced by Valsalva manoeuvre (VM) and exercise echocardiography (EE) in patients with HCM treated with percutaneous translumina...

  16. Comparison of electromyographic activities of lumbar iliocostalis and lumbar multifidus muscles during stabilization exercises in prone, quadruped, and sitting positions

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Marie; Jacobs, Dee; Wooten, Mary E.; Edeer, Ayse Ozcan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purposes of this study were: 1) describe a hierarchy of electromyographic activity production, using percentage maximum voluntary contraction of lumbar iliocostalis and lumbar multifidus muscles during prone, quadruped and sitting exercises; and 2) identify optimal recruitment exercises for both lumbar iliocostalis as a global multi-segmental stabilizer and lumbar multifidus as a segmental stabilizer. [Subjects] Twelve healthy volunteers (six male and six female) aged 24 to 45 p...

  17. Do Exercises Suitable To Yourself

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    IF You Are Thin—Choose fast, bursting exercises to build up your muscles. Take such exercises for 20 minutes everyday or 50 minutes every other day. For example, weight training and working particularly on isolated parts of your body. If You Are Stout—Choose slow, low intensity endurance exercises. Continue such exercises for a long time and you can effectively mobilize the fat stored in your body to participate in the supply of consumed energy; besides slow exercises can help

  18. Comparison of effectiveness of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Kinesio Taping added to exercises in patients with myofascial pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azatcam, Gokmen; Atalay, Nilgun Simsir; Akkaya, Nuray; Sahin, Fusun; Aksoy, Sibel; Zincir, Ozge; Topuz, Oya

    2017-01-01

    Although there are several studies of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) and exercise in myofascial pain syndrome, there are no studies comparing the effectiveness of Kinesio Taping (KT) and TENS in myofascial pain syndrome patients. To compare the early and late effects of TENS and KT on pain, disability and range of motion in myofascial pain syndrome patients. Sixty-nine patients were divided into three groups randomly as TENS+Exercise, KT+Exercise and exercise groups. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), pain threshold, Neck Disability Index and cervical contralateral lateral flexion were employed in the evaluation of the patients performed before treatment, after treatment and 3rd month after treatment. The VAS, pain threshold, Neck Disability Index and contralateral lateral flexion values were improved in all groups both in after treatment and 3rd month after treatment (pmyofascial pain syndrome patients. Addition of TENS or KT to the exercise therapy resulted in more significant improvement compared to exercise therapy alone with a more pronounced improvement in KT group compared to the TENS group in the early period. Because KT was found to be more effective in decreasing the pain and had the advantage of being used in every 3 days, it seems to be beneficial in acute painful periods in myofascial pain syndrome patients.

  19. Comparison of intramuscular and venous blood pH, PCO(2) and PO(2) during rhythmic handgrip exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, Babs R; Hagan, R Donald; Shear, Michael; Walz, J Matthias; Landry, Michelle; Anunciacion, Dulce; Orquiola, Alan; Heard, Stephen O

    2007-06-01

    Oxygen and acid-base status during exercise is well established for the lungs, large arteries and veins. However, values for these parameters in exercising muscle are less frequently reported. In this study we examined the relationship between intramuscular PO(2), pH, PCO(2) and the comparable venous values during rhythmic isometric handgrip exercise at target levels of 15%, 30% and 45% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). A small fiber optic sensor was inserted into the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) muscle for continuous measurement of intramuscular (IM) PO(2), pH and PCO(2). Venous blood samples were taken from the forearm every minute during each exercise bout. IM pH and PCO(2) were similar to their venous counterparts at baseline, but the difference between IM and venous values increased when exercise exceeded 30% MVC. During exercise at 15% MVC and greater, venous PO(2) declined from 40 to 21 Torr (approximately 5.3 to 2.8 kPa). IM PO(2) declined from 24 to 8 Torr with 15% MVC, and approached 0 Torr at 30% MVC and 45% MVC. IM pH declined rapidly when IM PO(2) reached 10 Torr and continued to decrease with increasing exertion, despite an IM PO(2) near 0 Torr.

  20. Comparison of stage-matched and unmatched interventions to promote exercise behaviour in the primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, P J; Simmonds, G; Riddoch, C; Velleman, G; Turton, P

    1999-10-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of stages of change-based counselling for exercise delivered by nurses in four primary care centres. Two-hundred and ninety-four subjects enrolled, recruited from patients attending 30-min health checks. The average age of participants was 42.4 years (SD = 15.1) and 77% were female. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing stage of exercise adoption, self-efficacy and exercise levels. Each centre was assigned to either one of three experimental conditions or to a control condition. Participants were counselled accordingly, receiving either stage-oriented exercise materials with counselling (stage plus counselling), stage-oriented materials without counselling (stage no counselling), non-staged materials with counselling (counselling only) or the current level of advice (control). Sixty-one percent (n = 180) returned follow-up questionnaires. When baseline differences in self-efficacy, age and gender were controlled for, there was no significant group or interaction effect for stage. There was a significant time effect (F = 3.55, P = 0.031). Post hoc analyses showed that significant differences were between baseline and 2 (t = -3.02, P = 0.003) and 6 months (t = -2.67, P = 0.009). No changes in self-efficacy and exercise levels were observed. Stage-based interventions were not superior to the other interventions. All single-contact interventions, while having no impact on exercise behaviour and self-efficacy, did enhance motivation to change.

  1. Comparison of the Effect of Exercise Therapy with Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Improvement of Pain and Function in Patients with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Akbari

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: One of the most common disorders of the knee joint in adult is patellofemoral pain syndrome. Sometimes it becomes chronic and causes activity limitation. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of exercise therapy with Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on improvement of pain intensity, knee function, muscle atrophy and range of knee flexion. Materials & Methods: This double-blind, randomized clinical trial was carried out in Zahedan Razmejo-Moghadam Physiotherapy Clinic, in 2007. Thirty-two patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome were recruited through simple non-probability sampling. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the equal groups, exercise therapy (including hip, knee, and leg muscles strengthening and stretching exercises or electrical stimulation group. Before and after intervention, we assessed pain through Visual Analog Scale (VAS (ordinal, function (ordinal with Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS, thigh circumference with tape measure (centimeter and range of knee flexion with goniometer (degree. A 10 session treatment program, three sessions per week and one hour per session was performed for both groups. Independent t-test or Mann-Whitney U and paired t-test or Wilcoxon were used for comparison between the pretreatment and post treatment results between groups and within groups, in SPSS software, respectively. Results: The mean total score of knee function increased from 100.53±19.25 to 130.87±18.25 in the electrical stimulation group and from 107.67±22.69 to 131.47±15.11 in the exercise therapy group (p=0.001. The mean score of knee function subscales including symptoms, pain, functional limitation, recreational activity, and life style improved in both groups (p<0.05. The pain score and range of knee flexion improved in both groups (p<0.05. After treatment, range of knee flexion significantly increased in the exercise group compared with the electrical

  2. Comparison of Two Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems, Dexcom G4 Platinum and Medtronic Paradigm Veo Enlite System, at Rest and During Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleb, Nadine; Emami, Ali; Suppere, Corinne; Messier, Virginie; Legault, Laurent; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Haidar, Ahmad

    2016-09-01

    Despite technological advances, the accuracy of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems may not always be satisfactory with rapidly changing glucose levels, as is notable during exercise. We compare the performance of two current and widely used CGM systems, Dexcom G4 Platinum (Dexcom) and Medtronic Paradigm Veo Enlite system (Enlite), during both rest and exercise in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Paired sensor and plasma glucose (PG) values (total of 431 data pairs for Dexcom and 425 for Enlite) were collected from 17 adults (37.3 ± 13.6 years) with T1D. To evaluate and compare the accuracy of sensor readings, criteria involving sensor bias (sensor minus PG levels), absolute relative difference (ARD), and percentage of readings meeting International Organization for Standardization (ISO) criteria were considered. Both Dexcom and Enlite performed equally well during the rest period, with respective mean/median biases of -0.12/-0.02 mmol/L versus -0.18/-0.40 (P = 0.78, P = 0.66) mmol/L and ARDs of 13.77/13.34% versus 12.38/11.95% (P = 0.53, P = 0.70). During exercise, sensor bias means/medians were -0.40/-0.21 mmol versus -0.26/-0.24 mmol/L (P = 0.67, P = 0.62) and ARDs were 22.53/15.13% versus 20.44/14.11% (P = 0.58, P = 0.68) for Dexcom and Enlite, respectively. Both sensors demonstrated significantly lower performance during exercise; median ARD comparison at rest versus exercise for both Dexcom and Enlite showed a P = 0.02. More data pairs met the ISO criteria for Dexcom and Enlite at rest, 73.6% and 76.9% compared with exercise 48.2% and 53.9%. Dexcom and Enlite demonstrated comparable overall performances during rest and physical activity. However, a lower accuracy was observed during exercise for both sensors, necessitating a fine-tuning of their performance with physical activity.

  3. Exercise Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sides of the head in most cases Secondary exercise headaches These headaches may cause: The same symptoms ... exercise dilates blood vessels inside the skull. Secondary exercise headaches Secondary exercise headaches are caused by an ...

  4. Light exercise heart rate on-kinetics: a comparison of data fitted with sigmoidal and exponential functions and the impact of fitness and exercise intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trounson, Karl M; Roberts, Spencer; Balloch, Aaron; Warmington, Stuart A

    2017-06-01

    This study examined the suitability of sigmoidal (SIG) and exponential (EXP) functions for modeling HR kinetics at the onset of a 5-min low-intensity cycling ergometer exercise test (5MT). The effects of training status, absolute and relative workloads, and high versus low workloads on the accuracy and reliability of these functions were also examined. Untrained participants (UTabs; n = 13) performed 5MTs at 100W. One group of trained participants (n = 10) also performed 5MTs at 100W (ETabs). Another group of trained participants (n = 9) performed 5MTs at 45% and 60% V˙O2 max (ET45 and ET60, respectively). SIG and EXP functions were fitted to HR data from 5MTs. A 30-s lead-in time was included when fitting SIG functions. Functions were compared using the standard error of the regression (SER), and test-retest reliability of curve parameters. SER for EXP functions was significantly lower than for SIG functions across all groups. When residuals from the 30-s lead-in time were omitted, EXP functions only outperformed SIG functions in ET60 (EXP, 2.7 ± 1.2 beats·min(-1); SIG, 3.1 ± 1.1 beats·min(-1): P functions fitted to 5MTs performed by trained participants at a high and relative workload, while functions fitted to data from untrained participants exercising at a low and absolute workload were less accurate and reliable. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  5. Comparison of microstickies measurement methods. Part I, sample preparation and measurement methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendra R. Doshi; Angeles Blanco; Carlos Negro; Gilles M. Dorris; Carlos C. Castro; Axel Hamann; R. Daniel Haynes; Carl Houtman; Karen Scallon; Hans-Joachim Putz; Hans Johansson; R.A. Venditti; K. Copeland; H.-M. Chang

    2003-01-01

    Recently, we completed a project on the comparison of macrostickies measurement methods. Based on the success of the project, we decided to embark on this new project on comparison of microstickies measurement methods. When we started this project, there were some concerns and doubts principally due to the lack of an accepted definition of microstickies. However, we...

  6. Effectiveness of Artificial Gravity and Ergometric Exercise as a Countermeasure-Comparison between Everyday and Every Other Day Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Satoshi; Sugenoya, Junichi; Sato, Maki; Shimizu, Yuuki; Kanikowska, Dominika; Nishimura, Nooki; Takada, Hiroki; Takada, Masumi; Mano, Tadaki; Ishida, Koji; Akima, Hiroshi; Katayama, Keisho; Hirayanagi, Kaname; Shiozawa, Tomoki; Yajima, Katzuyoshi; Watanabe, Yoriko; Suzuki, Satomi; Fukunnaga, Tetsuo; Masuo, Yoshihisa

    2008-06-01

    Effectiveness of centrifuge-induced artificial gravity and ergometric exercise as a countermeasure to space deconditioning, including cardiovascular deconditioning, myatrophy, and osteoporosis, induced by 20 days of head-down bedrest., was examined in 12 healthy men in 2006, and 8 healthy men in 2007. Bedrest was performed with 2300 kcal of diet. Water intake was recommended more than the urine volume in a previous day. A new protocol for artificial gravity with ergometric exercise was adopted, with 1.6 G of artificial gravity at heart level and 60 W of exercise every day in 2006, and every other day in 2007. The load was suspended when subjects complained all-out, and was continued until 30 min cumulative total load time. Gravity was stepped up by 0.2 G or exercise load was stepped up by 15 W alternately when the subject endured the load for 5 min. Gravity tolerance was examined by using centrifuge, and anti-G score was determined before and after the bedrest. Not all result has been analyzed, however, effectiveness of artificial gravity with ergometric exercise was evidenced in orthostatic tolerance, physical fitness, cardiac function, myatrophy, and bone metabolism in everyday protocol, but not in every other day protocol. We concluded this everyday protocol was effective in cardiovascular deconditioning myatrophy, and bone metabolism.

  7. Comparison between dopaminergic agents and physical exercise as treatment for periodic limb movements in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mello, M T; Esteves, A M; Tufik, S

    2004-04-01

    Randomized controlled trial of physical exercise and dopaminergic agonist in persons with spinal cord injury and periodic leg movement (PLM). The objective of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of physical exercise and of a dopaminergic agonist in reducing the frequency of PLM. Centro de Estudos em Psicobiologia e Exercício. Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Brazil. A total of 13 volunteers (mean age: 31.6+/-8.3 years) received L-DOPA (200 mg) and benserazide (50 mg) 1 h before sleeping time for 30 days and were then submitted to a physical exercise program on a manual bicycle ergometer for 45 days (3 times a week). Both L-DOPA administration (35.11-19.87 PLM/h, P<0.03) and physical exercise (35.11-18.53 PLM/h, P<0.012) significantly reduced PLM; however, no significant difference was observed between the two types of treatment. The two types of treatment were found to be effective in the reduction of PLM; however, physical exercise is indicated as the first treatment approach, while dopaminergic agonists or other drugs should only be recommended for patients who do not respond to this type of treatment.

  8. Teaching baroreflex physiology to medical students: a comparison of quiz-based and conventional teaching strategies in a laboratory exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Plovsing, Ronni R; Damgaard, Morten

    2012-06-01

    Quiz-based and collaborative teaching strategies have previously been found to be efficient for the improving meaningful learning of physiology during lectures. These approaches have, however, not been investigated during laboratory exercises. In the present study, we compared the impact of solving quizzes individually and in groups with conventional teaching on the immediate learning during a laboratory exercise. We implemented two quizzes in a mandatory 4-h laboratory exercise on baroreflex physiology. A total of 155 second-year medical students were randomized to solve quizzes individually (intervention group I, n = 57), in groups of three to four students (intervention group II, n = 56), or not to perform any quizzes (control; intervention group III, n = 42). After the laboratory exercise, all students completed an individual test, which encompassed two recall questions, two intermediate questions, and two integrated questions. The integrated questions were of moderate and advanced difficulty, respectively. Finally, students completed an evaluation form. Intervention group I reached the highest total test scores and proved best at answering the integrated question of advanced difficulty. Moreover, there was an overall difference between groups for student evaluations of the quality of the teaching, which was highest for intervention group II. In conclusion, solving quizzes individually during a laboratory exercise may enhance learning, whereas solving quizzes in groups is associated with higher student satisfaction.

  9. A comparison of the physiological exercise intensity differences between shod and barefoot submaximal deep-water running at the same cadence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killgore, Garry L; Coste, Sarah C; O' Meara, Susan E; Konnecke, Cristina J

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify whether physiological exercise intensity differed with the use of aquatic training shoes (ATS) during deep-water running (DWR) compared to using a barefoot condition. Eight male intercollegiate (National Collegiate Athletic Association Division III [NCAA III]) varsity distance runners were videotaped from the right sagittal view while running on a treadmill (TR) and while barefoot in deep water at 60-70% of their TR VO2max for 30 minutes. Based on the stride rate of the barefoot DWR trial, a subsequent 30-minute session was completed while wearing ATS. Variables of interest were energy expenditure, oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate, respiratory exchange ratio (RER), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Multivariate omnibus tests revealed statistically significant differences for energy expenditure (p barefoot and shod DWR conditions for energy expenditure (p barefoot. These comparisons also revealed significantly higher RPE and RER values while DWR than those found in TR. Wearing the ATS may be recommended as a method of statistically significantly increasing the exercise intensity while running in deep water as compared to not wearing a shoe. Shod compared to TR yields very small differences, which indicates that the shoes may help better match land-based running exercise intensities.

  10. 《牛津小学英语》6B Unit2 More exercise PartA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董鑫

    2011-01-01

    本单元PartA语篇延续第一单元,继续围绕两种事物的比较展开讨论。通过Jim和hisdad之间的闲聊引出本单元的主要语言项目:形容词比较级。主要单词和短语有:begoodat,strong,faster,higher,dowellin,earlier,jog;日常交际用语及句型:

  11. Importance of characteristics and modalities of physical activity and exercise in defining the benefits to cardiovascular health within the general population: recommendations from the EACPR (Part I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhees, L; De Sutter, J; GeladaS, N; Doyle, F; Prescott, E; Cornelissen, V; Kouidi, E; Dugmore, D; Vanuzzo, D; Börjesson, M; Doherty, P

    2012-08-01

    Over the last decades, more and more evidence is accumulated that physical activity (PA) and exercise interventions are essential components in primary and secondary prevention for cardiovascular disease. However, it is less clear whether and which type of PA and exercise intervention (aerobic exercise, dynamic resistive exercise, or both) or characteristic of exercise (frequency, intensity, time or duration, and volume) would yield more benefit in achieving cardiovascular health. The present paper, as the first of a series of three, will make specific recommendations on the importance of these characteristics for cardiovascular health in the population at large. The guidance offered in this series of papers is aimed at medical doctors, health practitioners, kinesiologists, physiotherapists and exercise physiologists, politicians, public health policy makers, and the individual member of the public. Based on previous and the current literature, recommendations from the European Association on Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation are formulated regarding type, volume, and intensity of PA and exercise.

  12. Model based control for run-of-river system. Part 2: Comparison of control structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liubomyr Vytvytskyi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Optimal operation and control of a run-of-river hydro power plant depend on good knowledge of the elements of the plant in the form of models. Both the control architecture of the system, i.e. the choice of inputs and outputs, and to what degree a model is used, will affect the achievable control performance. Here, a model of a river reach based on the Saint Venant equations for open channel flow illustrates the dynamics of the run-of-river system. The hyperbolic partial differential equations are discretized using the Kurganov-Petrova central upwind scheme - see Part I for details. A comparison is given of achievable control performance using two alternative control signals: the inlet or the outlet volumetric flow rates to the system, in combination with a number of different control structures such as PI control, PI control with Smith predictor, and predictive control. The control objective is to keep the level just in front of the dam as high as possible, and with little variation in the level to avoid overflow over the dam. With a step change in the volumetric inflow to the river reach (disturbance and using the volumetric outflow as the control signal, PI control gives quite good performance. Model predictive control (MPC gives superior control in the sense of constraining the variation in the water level, at a cost of longer computational time and thus constraints on possible sample time. Details on controller tuning are given. With volumetric inflow to the river reach as control signal and outflow (production as disturbance, this introduces a considerable time delay in the control signal. Because of nonlinearity in the system (varying time delay, etc., it is difficult to achieve stable closed loop performance using a simple PI controller. However, by combining a PI controller with a Smith predictor based on a simple integrator + fixed time delay model, stable closed loop operation is possible with decent control performance. Still, an MPC

  13. Acute, intermediate intensity exercise, and speed and accuracy in working memory tasks: a meta-analytical comparison of effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMorris, Terry; Sproule, John; Turner, Anthony; Hale, Beverley J

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare, using meta-analytic techniques, the effect of acute, intermediate intensity exercise on the speed and accuracy of performance of working memory tasks. It was hypothesized that acute, intermediate intensity exercise would have a significant beneficial effect on response time and that effect sizes for response time and accuracy data would differ significantly. Random-effects meta-analysis showed a significant, beneficial effect size for response time, g=-1.41 (peffect size, g=0.40 (peffect sizes (Z(diff)=3.85, pexercise has a strong beneficial effect on speed of response in working memory tasks but a low to moderate, detrimental one on accuracy. There was no support for a speed-accuracy trade-off. It was argued that exercise-induced increases in brain concentrations of catecholamines result in faster processing but increases in neural noise may negatively affect accuracy.

  14. Comparison of spinal stability following motor control and general exercises in nonspecific chronic low back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsi, MohammadBagher; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Jamshidi, Aliashraf; Arjmand, Navid; Ghezelbash, Farshid

    2017-10-01

    Motor control exercise was claimed to improve spinal stability in patients with chronic non-specific back pain, but to investigate the effectiveness of this exercise, other outcome measures have been used rather than spinal stability itself. The aim of our study is to assess motor control exercise effects on spinal stability using a biomechanical model. Fifty-one patients were assigned to either motor control or general exercises. Before and after trainings, participants were tested for spinal stability at seven isometric tasks. Electromyography signals were recorded from ten superficial muscles, and a hybrid EMG-driven musculoskeletal model estimated spinal stability indices at each task. Pain and disability significantly decreased in both groups. After trainings, patients had both increase and decrease in stability depending on the task, and stability did not increase/decrease uniformly in all patients. In the motor control group, stability increased at all positions but reached to significance only at right lateral pulling. In the general exercise group, except for pulling the trunk backward, stability decreased at other positions and reached to statistical significance only at pulling the trunk forward. No significant difference between groups was found in changing stability after the intervention. Interventions yielded no significant difference in disability, pain and stability index between two groups. Significant increase of stability in the motor control group at right lateral pulling may be attributed to more activity of abdominal muscles, and significant decrease of stability in the general exercise group at forward pulling may be attributed to more optimal activity of back muscles. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Effect of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease on Body Composition Parameters and Exercise Capacity by Comparison with Age Matched Healthy Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Randeep

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Nutritional abnormalities are frequent systemic manifestation associated with COPD. The purpose of the present study was to compare the body composition parameters and exercise capacity between stable COPD patients and healthy controls, and to find the strength of association between exercise capacity, FMI and FFMI. Methods: 100 subjects were recruited, and divided into two groups. Group I included stable COPD patients, and Group II consisted of age matched healthy controls respectively. The spirometric parameters recorded were FEV1 (Litres, FVC (Litres, FEV1/FVC ratio (% predicted, FEF 25%75% (Litres/sec. Anthrometric measurements included Body Weight, Height and BMI measurements. Body composition was assessed by four-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (BODY STAT, QUAD SCAN, USA. The following parameters were calculated: FFM, FFMI, FM and FMI. The exercise capacity was assessed by the six-minute walking distance test (6MWD. All the recordings were compared between groups and correlation was also computed between 6MWD, FMI and FFMI within groups. Results were analyzed using SPSS, version 16 and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: We found that COPD patients showed lower FFM, FFMI and exercise capacity as compared to healthy controls. And, great strength of association was found between FFMI and exercise capacity. Conclusions: Thus, our study indicates that with COPD there is preferential loss of lean body mass evident from lower FFMI leading to decreased walking distance in these patients. Hence, it is prudent to include nutritional and exercise capacity assessment in patients of COPD, to better manage these patients and improve their quality of life. [Natl J Med Res 2014; 4(1.000: 53-57

  16. Swimmer’s Shoulder in Athletes: Comparison between Efficacy of Aquatic versus Dry-land Concentric-Eccentric Exercises

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, P.K.; Koley, S.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the level of pain gets reduced whether by dry-land based concentric-eccentric exercises or by the equivalent type of aquatic exercises in the elite swimmers complaining of chronic shoulder pain. Elite swimmers from India of both genders with an age group of 16-30 years were chosen having pain rated as ≤7 on visual analog scale with an exception of Bak’s Grade E provided with an absence of past shoulder surgeries and acute injuries...

  17. Labeling exercise fat-burning increases post-exercise food consumption in self-imposed exercisers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenzl, Navina; Bartsch, Katja; Koenigstorfer, Joerg

    2014-10-01

    The goal of the study was to determine whether the label given to an exercise bout affects immediate post-exercise food intake. The authors hypothesized that explicitly labeling an exercise bout 'fat-burning' (vs. labeling an exercise bout 'endurance' exercise) would increase post-exercise food intake in individuals who self-impose physical activity, because they are more likely to see the label as signal of activated fat metabolism and license to reward oneself. No such effect was expected for individuals who do not self-impose physical activity but consider exercise enjoyable. Ninety-six participants took part in an experiment manipulating the label given to an exercise bout (fat-burning exercise or endurance exercise) between participants. They cycled on an ergometer for 20 minutes at a consistent work rate (55-65% of predicted VO2 max) and were offered ad libitum food (i.e., pretzel pieces) after the exercise bout. The results showed that self-imposed exercisers, that is, individuals with low behavioral regulation and individuals with high psychological distress, high fatigue levels, and low positive well-being when exercising, ate more food after exercise when the bout was labeled fat-burning exercise rather than endurance exercise. The results help develop health interventions, indicating that the tendency to compensate for energy expended following physical activity depends on both the label given to the exercise bout and the degree to which individuals self-impose physical activity.

  18. Comparison of results at area 1 and area 2 between different Swedish in-situ teams in the RESUME-95 exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeaef, C.L. [Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Lund Univ., Dept. of Radiation Physics (Sweden)

    1997-12-31

    In the beginning of 1996 the Department of Radiation Physics in Malmoe was commissioned by the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute to perform a compilation of the results obtained by the Swedish in-situ teams that participated in the RESUME-95 exercise. The aim of this survey is to study the coherence in the reported activity data between the groups. It is not the purpose to see this comparison as a performance ranking of individual laboratories. Any such comparison must be made with precaution since the teams generally have collected their data with different equipment and by different methods. In this work, all in-situ teams have been given code-names, where each team has been labelled a number from 1 to 5. For more details, the interested reader is referred to the internal reports made by each team that (supposedly) also are to be included in the major compilation of the in-situ gamma spectrometry in the RESUME-95 exercise by Danish Emergency Management Agency. (au).

  19. Despina Hatzifotiadou: ALICE Master Class 4 - Demonstration of the software for the 2nd part of the exercise - invariant mass spectra - background subtraction and calculation of number of Kaons, Lambdas, antiLambdas.

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    This is the 4th of 4 short online videos. It contains a demonstration of the software for the 2nd part of the exercise, related to invariant mass spectra - background subtraction and calculation of number of Kaons, Lambdas, antiLambdas. More details and related links on this indico event page. In more detail: What is Physics Master Classes Students after morning lectures, run programmes in the afternoon to do measurements. These tutorials are about how to use the software required to do these measurements. Background info and examples  Looking for strange particles with ALICE http://aliceinfo.cern.ch/Public/MasterCL/MasterClassWebpage.html Introduction to first part of the exercise : what are strange particles, V0 decays, invariant mass. Demonstration of the software for the 1st part of the exercise - visual identification of V0s Introduction to second part of the exercise : strangeness enhancement; centrality of lead-lead collisions; explanation of efficiency, yield, background etc Demonstr...

  20. Teaching Baroreflex Physiology to Medical Students: A Comparison of Quiz-Based and Conventional Teaching Strategies in a Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Ronan M. G.; Plovsing, Ronni R.; Damgaard, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Quiz-based and collaborative teaching strategies have previously been found to be efficient for the improving meaningful learning of physiology during lectures. These approaches have, however, not been investigated during laboratory exercises. In the present study, we compared the impact of solving quizzes individually and in groups with…

  1. Comparison of mannitol and methacholine to predict exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and a clinical diagnosis of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spector Sheldon L

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma can be difficult to diagnose, but bronchial provocation with methacholine, exercise or mannitol is helpful when used to identify bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR, a key feature of the disease. The utility of these tests in subjects with signs and symptoms of asthma but without a clear diagnosis has not been investigated. We investigated the sensitivity and specificity of mannitol to identify exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB as a manifestation of BHR; compared this with methacholine; and compared the sensitivity and specificity of mannitol and methacholine for a clinician diagnosis of asthma. Methods 509 people (6–50 yr were enrolled, 78% were atopic, median FEV1 92.5% predicted, and a low NAEPPII asthma score of 1.2. Subjects with symptoms of seasonal allergy were excluded. BHR to exercise was defined as a ≥ 10% fall in FEV1 on at least one of two tests, to methacholine a PC20 ≤ 16 mg/ml and to mannitol a 15% fall in FEV1 at ≤ 635 mg or a 10% fall between doses. The clinician diagnosis of asthma was made on examination, history, skin tests, questionnaire and response to exercise but they were blind to the mannitol and methacholine results. Results Mannitol and methacholine were therapeutically equivalent to identify EIB, a clinician diagnosis of asthma, and prevalence of BHR. The sensitivity/specificity of mannitol to identify EIB was 59%/65% and for methacholine it was 56%/69%. The BHR was mild. Mean EIB % fall in FEV1 in subjects positive to exercise was 19%, (SD 9.2, mannitol PD15 158 (CI:129,193 mg, and methacholine PC20 2.1(CI:1.7, 2.6mg/ml. The prevalence of BHR was the same: for exercise (43.5%, mannitol (44.8%, and methacholine (41.6% with a test agreement between 62 & 69%. The sensitivity and specificity for a clinician diagnosis of asthma was 56%/73% for mannitol and 51%/75% for methacholine. The sensitivity increased to 73% and 72% for mannitol and methacholine when two exercise tests were

  2. Internal medicine specialists' attitudes towards working part-time: a comparison between 1996 and 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Jong Judith D

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although medical specialists traditionally hold negative views towards working part-time, the practice of medicine has evolved. Given the trend towards more part-time work and that there is no evidence that it compromises the quality of care, attitudes towards part-time work may have changed as well in recent years. The aim of this paper was to examine the possible changes in attitudes towards part-time work among specialists in internal medicine between 1996 and 2004. Moreover, we wanted to determine whether these attitudes were associated with individual characteristics (age, gender, investments in work and whether attitudes of specialists within a partnership showed more resemblance than specialists' attitudes from different partnerships. Methods Two samples were used in this study: data of a survey conducted in 1996 and in 2004. After selecting internal medicine specialists working in general hospitals in The Netherlands, the sample consisted of 219 specialists in 1996 and 363 specialists in 2004. They were sent a questionnaire, including topics on the attitudes towards part-time work. Results Internal medicine specialists' attitudes towards working part-time became slightly more positive between 1996 and 2004. Full-time working specialists in 2004 still expressed concerns regarding the investments of part-timers in overhead tasks, the flexibility of task division, efficiency, communication and continuity of care. In 1996 gender was the only predictor of the attitude, in 2004 being a full- or a part-timer, age and the time invested in work were associated with this attitude. Furthermore, specialists' attitudes were not found to cluster much within partnerships. Conclusion In spite of the increasing number of specialists working or preferring to work part-time, part-time practice among internal medicine specialists seems not to be fully accepted. The results indicate that the attitudes are no longer gender based, but are

  3. 32 CFR Appendix C to Part 169a - Simplified Cost Comparison and Direct Conversion of CAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 169a—Simplified Cost Comparison and Direct Conversion of CAs A. This appendix provides guidance on... available. The type of employee appointment (e.g., career, career-conditional, etc., or change from... Act requirements. C. The following provides general guidance for completion of a simplified cost...

  4. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or delay many diseases and disabilities. In some cases, exercise is an effective treatment for many chronic conditions. For example, studies show that people with arthritis, heart disease, or ...

  5. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... use of medicines for a variety of illnesses. Prevent or Delay Disease Scientists have found that staying physically active and exercising regularly can help prevent or delay many diseases and disabilities. In some ...

  6. A Comparison of the Deep Cervical Flexor Muscle Thicknesses in Subjects with and without Neck Pain during Craniocervical Flexion Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Ilsub; Kim, Kyoung

    2013-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the amount of change in the thicknesses of the deep cervical flexor (DCF) and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles in subjects with neck pain and subjects without neck pain during craniocervical flexion exercise (CCFE). [Subjects] The total number of subjects was 40, comprising 20 in the no-pain group (males 11, females 9) and 20 in the pain group (males 8, females 12). [Methods] Muscle images were obtained using ultrasound, and the thicknesses of the individual muscles were measured using the NIH ImageJ software. [Results] During CCFE, as pressure increased, the no-pain group recruited the DCF more than the pain group, while the pain group recruited the SCM more. [Conclusion] Selective DCF contraction exercises are considered very useful in the treatment of patients with neck pain.

  7. A comparison of eating, exercise, shape, and weight related symptomatology in males with muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Stuart B; Rieger, Elizabeth; Hildebrandt, Tom; Karlov, Lisa; Russell, Janice; Boon, Evelyn; Dawson, Robert T; Touyz, Stephen W

    2012-03-01

    In the context of the lack of nosological clarity surrounding muscle dysmorphia, this paper aims to compare the symptomatic profile of muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa in males whilst using measures sensitive to indexing male body image concerns. Twenty-one male muscle dysmorphia patients, 24 male anorexia nervosa patients, and 15 male gym-using controls completed the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire, the Muscle Dysmorphia Disorder Inventory, the Compulsive Exercise Test, and a measure of appearance-enhancing substance use. Men with muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa demonstrated widespread symptomatic similarities spanning the domains of disturbed body image, disordered eating, and exercise behaviour, whilst differences were consistent with the opposing physiques pursued in each condition. Furthermore, correlational analyses revealed significant associations between scores on muscle dysmorphia and eating disorder measures. The present findings provide moderate support for the notion that muscle dysmorphia may be nosologically similar to anorexia nervosa.

  8. Exercise for people with hip or knee osteoarthritis: a comparison of land-based and aquatic interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Ann E Rahmann

    2010-01-01

    Ann E RahmannDivision of Physiotherapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: Expert opinion considers the referral of people with osteoarthritis (OA) for physiotherapy to be a core component of managing the functional disability and pain of the disease. Clinical guidelines for the physiotherapy management of people with OA focus on three main areas: exercise, pain relief, and specific manual therapy techniques. La...

  9. Comparison of different cooling regimes within a shortened liquid cooling/warming garment on physiological and psychological comfort during exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Gloria R.; Koscheyev, Victor S.; Coca, Aitor; List, Nathan

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of different cooling regime intensities to maintain physiological and subjective comfort during physical exertion levels comparable to that engaged in during extravehicular activities (EVA) in space. We studied eight subjects (six males, two females) donned in our newly developed physiologically based shortened liquid cooling/warming garment (SLCWG). Rigorous (condition 1) and mild (condition 2) water temperature cooling regimes were compared at physical exertion levels comparable to that performed during EVA to ascertain the effectiveness of a lesser intensity of cooling in maintaining thermal comfort, thus reducing energy consumption in the portable life support system. Exercise intensity was varied across stages of the session. Finger temperature, rectal temperature, and subjective perception of overall body and hand comfort were assessed. Finger temperature was significantly higher in the rigorous cooling condition and showed a consistent increase across exercise stages, likely due to the restriction of heat extraction because of the intensive cold. In the mild cooling condition, finger temperature exhibited an overall decline with cooling, indicating greater heat extraction from the body. Rectal temperature was not significantly different between conditions, and showed a steady increase over exercise stages in both rigorous and mild cooling conditions. Ratings of overall comfort were 30% higher (more positive) and more stable in mild cooling (p<0.001). The mild cooling regime was more effective than rigorous cooling in allowing the process of heat exchange to occur, thus maintaining thermal homeostasis and subjective comfort during physical exertion.

  10. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A SPECIALIST Prevention Strengthening Exercise Committee Exercise Committee Core Strengthening Many popular forms of exercise focus on ... acute pain, you should stop doing it. Transverse Core Strengthening This strengthens the muscles that cross from ...

  11. A COMPARISON OF THE TENSILE STRENGTH OF PLASTIC PARTS PRODUCED BY A FUSED DEPOSITION MODELING DEVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraj Beniak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid Prototyping systems are nowadays increasingly used in many areas of industry, not only for producing design models but also for producing parts for final use. We need to know the properties of these parts. When we talk about the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM technique and FDM devices, there are many possible settings for devices and models which could influence the properties of a final part. In addition, devices based on the same principle may use different operational software for calculating the tool path, and this may have a major impact. The aim of this paper is to show the tensile strength value for parts produced from different materials on the Fused Deposition Modeling device when the horizontal orientation of the specimens is changed.

  12. A comparison of different Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis (Rhodophyta) parts in biochemical characteristics, protoplast formation and regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongxia; Sui, Zhenghong; Hu, Yiyi; Zhang, Si; Pan, Yulong; Ju, Hongri

    2014-08-01

    Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis is a commercially exploited alga. Its filaceous thallus can be divided into three parts, holdfast, middle segment and tip. The growth and branch forming trend and agar content of these three parts were analyzed, respectively, in this study. The results showed that the tip had the highest growth rate and branched most, although it was the last part with branch forming ability. The holdfast formed branches earliest but slowly. Holdfast had the highest agar content. We also assessed the difference in protoplast formation and regeneration among three parts. The middle segment displayed the shortest enzymolysis time and the highest protoplast yield; whereas the tip had the strongest vitality of protoplasts formation. Juvenile plants were only obtained from the protoplasts generated from the tip. These results suggested that the differentiation and function of G. lemaneiformis was different.

  13. Skin temperature evaluation by infrared thermography: Comparison of two image analysis methods during the nonsteady state induced by physical exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formenti, Damiano; Ludwig, Nicola; Rossi, Alessio; Trecroci, Athos; Alberti, Giampietro; Gargano, Marco; Merla, Arcangelo; Ammer, Kurt; Caumo, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    The most common method to derive a temperature value from a thermal image in humans is the calculation of the average of the temperature values of all the pixels confined within a demarcated boundary defined region of interest (ROI). Such summary measure of skin temperature is denoted as Troi in this study. Recently, an alternative method for the derivation of skin temperature from the thermal image has been developed. Such novel method (denoted as Tmax) is based on an automated (software-driven) selection of the warmest pixels within the ROI. Troi and Tmax have been compared under basal, steady-state conditions, resulting very well correlated and characterized by a bias of approximately 1 °C (Tmax > Troi). Aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between Tmax and Troi under the nonsteady-state conditions induced by physical exercise. Thermal images of quadriceps of 13 subjects performing a squat exercise were recorded for 120 s before (basal steady state) and for 480 s after the initiation of the exercise (nonsteady state). The thermal images were then analysed to extract Troi and Tmax. Troi and Tmax changed almost in parallel during the nonstead -state. At a closer inspection, it was found that during the nonsteady state the bias between the two methods slightly increased (from 0.7 to 1.1 °C) and the degree of association between them slightly decreased (from Pearson's r = 0.96 to 0.83). Troi and Tmax had different relationships with the skin temperature histogram. Whereas Tmax was the mean, which could be interpreted as the centre of gravity of the histogram, Tmax was related with the extreme upper tail of the histogram. During the nonsteady state, the histogram increased its spread and became slightly more asymmetric. As a result, Troi deviated a little from the 50th percentile, while Tmax remained constantly higher than the 95th percentile. Despite their differences, Troi and Tmax showed a substantial agreement in assessing the changes in skin

  14. Preliminary Comparison of Properties between Ni-electroplated Stainless Steel Parts Fabricated with Laser Additive Manufacturing and Conventional Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Mika; Jauhiainen, Eeva; Matilainen, Ville-Pekka; Riihimäki, Jaakko; Ritvanen, Jussi; Piili, Heidi; Salminen, Antti

    Laser additive manufacturing (LAM) is a fabrication technology, which enables production of complex parts from metallic materials with mechanical properties comparable to those of conventionally machined parts. These LAM parts are manufactured via melting metallic powder layer by layer with laser beam. Aim of this study is to define preliminarily the possibilities of using electroplating to supreme surface properties. Electrodeposited nickel and chromium as well as electroless (autocatalytic) deposited nickel was used to enhance laser additive manufactured and machined parts properties, like corrosion resistance, friction and wearing. All test pieces in this study were manufactured with a modified research AM equipment, equal to commercial EOS M series. The laser system used for tests was IPG 200 W CW fiber laser. The material used in this study for additive manufacturing was commercial stainless steel powder grade named SS316L. This SS316L is not equal to AISI 316L grade, but commercial name of this kind of powder is widely known in additive manufacturing as SS316L. Material used for fabrication of comparison test pieces (i.e. conventionally manufactured) was AISI 316L stainless steel bar. Electroplating was done in matrix cell and electroless was done in plastic sink properties of plated parts were tested within acetic acid salt spray corrosion chamber (AASS, SFS-EN-ISO 9227 standard). Adhesion of coating, friction and wearing properties were tested with Pin-On-Rod machine. Results show that in these preliminary tests, LAM parts and machined parts have certain differences due to manufacturing route and surface conditions. These have an effect on electroplated and electroless parts features on adhesion, corrosion, wearing and friction. However, further and more detailed studies are needed to fully understand these phenomena.

  15. An Experimental Investigation on Transpiration Cooling Part II: Comparison of Cooling Methods and Media

    OpenAIRE

    Wang J; Messner J.; Stetter H.

    2004-01-01

    This article attempts to provide a cooling performance comparison of various mass transfer cooling methods and different cooling media through two experiments. In the first experiment, pressurized air was used as a cooling medium and two different circular tubes were used as specimens. One is made of impermeable solid material with four rows of discrete holes to simulate film cooling, and the other consists of sintered porous material to create a porous transpiration cooling effect. The...

  16. Geologic Interpretation of Data Sets Collected by Planetary Analog Geology Traverses and by Standard Geologic Field Mapping. Part 1; A Comparison Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppler, Dean B.; Bleacher, Jacob F.; Evans, Cynthia A.; Feng, Wanda; Gruener, John; Hurwitz, Debra M.; Skinner, J. A., Jr.; Whitson, Peggy; Janoiko, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Geologic maps integrate the distributions, contacts, and compositions of rock and sediment bodies as a means to interpret local to regional formative histories. Applying terrestrial mapping techniques to other planets is challenging because data is collected primarily by orbiting instruments, with infrequent, spatiallylimited in situ human and robotic exploration. Although geologic maps developed using remote data sets and limited "Apollo-style" field access likely contain inaccuracies, the magnitude, type, and occurrence of these are only marginally understood. This project evaluates the interpretative and cartographic accuracy of both field- and remote-based mapping approaches by comparing two 1:24,000 scale geologic maps of the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF), north-central Arizona. The first map is based on traditional field mapping techniques, while the second is based on remote data sets, augmented with limited field observations collected during NASA Desert Research & Technology Studies (RATS) 2010 exercises. The RATS mission used Apollo-style methods not only for pre-mission traverse planning but also to conduct geologic sampling as part of science operation tests. Cross-comparison demonstrates that the Apollo-style map identifies many of the same rock units and determines a similar broad history as the field-based map. However, field mapping techniques allow markedly improved discrimination of map units, particularly unconsolidated surficial deposits, and recognize a more complex eruptive history than was possible using Apollo-style data. Further, the distribution of unconsolidated surface units was more obvious in the remote sensing data to the field team after conducting the fieldwork. The study raises questions about the most effective approach to balancing mission costs with the rate of knowledge capture, suggesting that there is an inflection point in the "knowledge capture curve" beyond which additional resource investment yields progressively

  17. A Comparison of Frontal Theta Activity During Shooting among Biathletes and Cross-Country Skiers before and after Vigorous Exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Luchsinger

    Full Text Available Previous studies using electroencephalography (EEG to monitor brain activity have linked higher frontal theta activity to more focused attention and superior performance in goal-directed precision tasks. In biathlon, shooting performance requires focused attention after high-intensity cross-country skiing.To compare biathletes (serving as experts and cross-country skiers (novices and examine the effect of vigorous exercise on frontal theta activity during shooting.EEG frontal theta (4-7 Hz activity was compared between nine biathletes and eight cross-country skiers at comparable skiing performance levels who fired 100 shots on a 5-m indoor shooting range in quiescent condition followed by 20 shots after each of five 6-min high-intensity roller skiing sessions in the skating technique on a treadmill.Biathletes hit 80±14% and 81±10% before and after the roller skiing sessions, respectively. For the cross-country skiers these values were significantly lower than for the biathletes and amounted to 39±13% and 44±11% (p<0.01. Biathletes had on average 6% higher frontal theta activity during shooting as compared to cross-country skiers (F1,15 = 4.82, p = 0.044, but no significant effect of vigorous exercise on frontal theta activity in either of the two groups were found (F1,15 = 0.14, p = 0.72.Biathletes had significantly higher frontal theta activity than cross-country skiers during shooting, indicating higher focused attention in biathletes. Vigorous exercise did not decrease shooting performance or frontal theta activity during shooting in biathletes and cross-country skiers.

  18. Measurement of micro moulded parts by Computed Tomography and comparison to optical and tactile techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yagüe, J.A.; Tosello, Guido; Carmignato, S

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on dimensional verification of two micro-injection moulded components, selected from actual industrial productions, using CT metrological tools. In addition to CT scanning, also a tactile Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) with sub-micrometer uncertainty and an Optical Coordinate...... Measuring Machine (OCMM) allowing fast measurements suitable for in-line quality control were employed as validation instruments. The experimental work carried out and the analysis of the results provide valuable conclusions about the advantages and drawbacks of using CT metrology in comparison with CMM...

  19. Disposition and metabolic profile of the weak androgen Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) following administration as part of a nutritional supplement to exercised horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knych, H K; Arthur, R M; Stanley, S D; McKemie, D S

    2015-01-01

    In order to ensure the welfare of performance horses and riders as well as the integrity of the sport, the use of both therapeutic and illegal agents in horse racing is tightly regulated. While Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is not specifically banned from administration to racehorses in the United States and no screening limit or threshold concentration exists, the metabolic conversion of DHEA to testosterone make its presence in nutritional supplements a regulatory concern. The recommended regulatory threshold for total testosterone in urine is 55 and 20 ng/mL for mares and geldings, respectively. In plasma, screening and confirmation limits for free testosterone (mares and geldings), of no greater than 0.1 and 0.025 ng/mL, respectively are recommended. DHEA was administered orally, as part of a nutritional supplement, to 8 exercised female thoroughbred horses and plasma and urine samples collected at pre-determined times post administration. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), plasma and urine samples were analyzed for DHEA, DHEA-sulfate, testosterone, testosterone-sulfate, pregnenolone, androstenedione, and androstenediol. DHEA was rapidly absorbed with maximal plasma concentrations reaching 52.0 ± 43.8 ng/mL and 32.1 ± 12.9 ng/mL for DHEA and DHEA sulfate, respectively. Free testosterone was not detected in plasma or urine samples at any time. Maximum sulfate conjugated testosterone plasma concentrations were 0.98 ± 1.09 ng/mL. Plasma testosterone-sulfate concentrations did not fall below 0.1 ng/mL and urine testosterone-sulfate below 55 ng/mL until 24-36 h post DHEA administration. Urine testosterone sulfate concentrations remained slightly above baseline levels at 48 h for most of the horses studied. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Reference data for distal blood pressure in healthy elderly and middle-aged individuals measured with the strain gauge technique. Part II: Distal blood pressure after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arveschoug, Anne Kirstine; Vammen, Birthe; Yoshinaka, Emmy

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Distal blood pressure (DBP) determination after an exercise test is used on suspicion of arterial peripheral vascular disease (apvd). In our department. the average age of these patients is about 60 years. The usual reference values for pressures after exercise were based on data...... collected in the early 1970s from healthy individuals in the age range 21-26 years. Our aims were to collect new reference data for DBP at ankle level after exercise based on older populations, and to compare between reference data for different age groups to find out whether the normal values are dependent...... on age. Material and methods. DBP after exercise was measured using the strain-gauge technique on individuals in two groups: group I comprising 25 healthy persons aged between 61 and 82 years, and group II 14 healthy persons aged between 45 and 58 years. Strict rules of inclusion were followed. Results...

  1. Confidence limits, error bars and method comparison in molecular modeling. Part 2: comparing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, A

    2016-02-01

    The calculation of error bars for quantities of interest in computational chemistry comes in two forms: (1) Determining the confidence of a prediction, for instance of the property of a molecule; (2) Assessing uncertainty in measuring the difference between properties, for instance between performance metrics of two or more computational approaches. While a former paper in this series concentrated on the first of these, this second paper focuses on comparison, i.e. how do we calculate differences in methods in an accurate and statistically valid manner. Described within are classical statistical approaches for comparing widely used metrics such as enrichment, area under the curve and Pearson's product-moment coefficient, as well as generic measures. These are considered of over single and multiple sets of data and for two or more methods that evince either independent or correlated behavior. General issues concerning significance testing and confidence limits from a Bayesian perspective are discussed, along with size-of-effect aspects of evaluation.

  2. System dynamics comparison of three inventory management models in an automotive parts supply chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andries Botha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The automotive parts supply chain measures its success in terms of parts availability and stock required to achieve the availability target, measured as allocation fill rate (AFR. The supply chain strives to achieve an AFR target of 95.5% while maintaining low levels of stock.Objective: The first objective of this study is to evaluate the current inventory management approach, namely the maximum inventory position (MIP method, to understand the difference between the theoretical derivation and the actual implementation. The second objective is to develop and compare the performance of a new stock target setting (STS method relative to the MIP methods.Method: The theoretical and actual equations behind the MIP and STS methods are derived for steady state as well as stochastic conditions. A system dynamics simulation model (SDSM was developed to describe both the local and imported supply chains. The SDSM was used to simulate and confirm the parameters for the STS method. It was also used to compare the three inventory management methods against a theoretical environment and actual data sets.Results: The STS method requires a damping factor (DF to ensure it does not cause the bullwhip effect. The SDSM was used to determine that a value equal to the lead time ensures effective damping. In the theoretical environment, the MIPTheory method requires the lowest stock, but also has the lowest AFR. MIPActual achieves the highest AFR, but with significantly higher stock holding. The STS method improves on the AFR achieved by the MIPTheory method, with lower stock holding than the MIPActual method. With the actual demand data sets, the results vary by parts movement type. With fast moving parts, all methods achieve the AFR target, the MIPActual method has a higher stock holding for all cases, and the STS method results in reduced stock holding for 7 of 12 cases. With medium moving parts, the MIPActual method improves on the AFR in all 15 cases

  3. An evaluation of the performance of chemistry transport models, Part 2: detailed comparison with two selected campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Brunner

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available This is the second part of a rigorous model evaluation study involving five global Chemistry-Transport and two Chemistry-Climate Models operated by different groups in Europe. Simulated trace gas fields were interpolated to the exact times and positions of the observations to account for the actual weather conditions and hence for the specific histories of the sampled air masses. In this part of the study we focus on a detailed comparison with two selected campaigns, PEM-Tropics A and SONEX, contrasting the clean environment of the tropical Pacific with the more polluted North Atlantic region. The study highlights the different strengths and weaknesses of the models in accurately simulating key processes in the UT/LS region including stratosphere-troposphere-exchange, rapid convective transport, lightning emissions, radical chemistry and ozone production. Model simulated Radon, which was used as an idealized tracer for continental influence, was occasionally much better correlated with measured CO than simulated CO pointing towards deficiencies in the used biomass burning emission fields. The abundance and variability of HOx radicals is in general well represented in the models as inferred directly from the comparison with measured OH and HO2 and indirectly from the comparison with hydrogen peroxide concentrations. Components of the NOy family such as PAN, HNO3 and NO were found to compare less favorably. Interestingly, models showing good agreement with observations in the case of PEM-Tropics A often failed in the case of SONEX and vice versa. A better description of NOx and NOy emissions, chemistry and sinks is thought to be key to future model improvements with respect to the representation of chemistry in the UT/LS region.

  4. Comparison of the effects of electrical stimulation and cold-water immersion on muscle soreness after resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jajtner, Adam R; Hoffman, Jay R; Gonzalez, Adam M; Worts, Phillip R; Fragala, Maren S; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2015-05-01

    Resistance training is a common form of exercise for competitive and recreational athletes. Enhancing recovery from resistance training may improve the muscle-remodeling processes, stimulating a faster return to peak performance. To examine the effects of 2 different recovery modalities, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) and cold-water immersion (CWI), on performance and biochemical and ultrasonographic measures. Thirty resistance-trained men (23.1 ± 2.9 y, 175.2 ± 7.1 cm, 82.1 ± 8.4 kg) were randomly assigned to NMES, CWI, or control (CON). All participants completed a high-volume lower-body resistance-training workout on d 1 and returned to the human performance laboratory 24 (24H) and 48 h (48 H) postexercise for follow-up testing. Blood samples were obtained preexercise (PRE) and immediately (IP), 30 min (30 P), 24 h (24H), and 48 h (48 H) post. Subjects were examined for performance changes in the squat exercise (total repetitions and average power per repetition), biomarkers of inflammation, and changes in cross-sectional area and echo intensity (EI) of the rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis muscles. No differences between groups were observed in the number of repetitions (P = .250; power: P = .663). Inferential-based analysis indicated that increases in C-reactive protein concentrations were likely increased by a greater magnitude after CWI compared with CON, while NMES possibly decreased more than CON from IP to 24H. Increases in interleukin-10 concentrations between IP and 30 P were likely greater in CWI than NMES but not different from CON. Inferential-based analysis of RF EI indicated a likely decrease for CWI between IP and 48 H. No other differences between groups were noted in any other muscle-architecture measures. Results indicated that CWI induced greater increases in pro- and anti-inflammatory markers, while decreasing RF EI, suggesting that CWI may be effective in enhancing short-term muscle recovery after high-volume bouts of

  5. Comparison of the effects of growth hormone on acylated ghrelin and following acute intermittent exercise in two levels of obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Gholipour

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of obesity has risen enormously over the past few decad-es. Both food intake (Appetite and energy expenditure can influence body weight. Acylated ghrelin enhances appetite, and its plasma level is suppressed by growth horm-one. The present study, examines the effects of an intermittent exercise with progress-ive intensities on acylated ghrelin, appetite, and growth hormone in inactive male students with two levels of obesity.Methods: Eleven inactive males were allocated into two groups on the basis of their body mass index (BMI. Six subjects in group one, BMI= 31.18±0.92 kg/m2, and five subjects in group two, BMI= 36.94±2.25 kg/m2, ran on the treadmill with progressive intensities of 50, 60, 70 and 80% of VO2max for 10, 10, 5, and 2 min respectively. Blood samples were collected before the exercise (as the resting values, after each workload (during the exercise, and at 30, 60, and 120 min (during recovery.Results: Plasma acylated ghrelin concentrations and hunger ratings in two groups were decreased and remained significantly lower than resting values (P=0.008 and P=0.002 respectively at the end of the trial and there was no significant differences between groups. Growth hormone levels in two groups were increased and remained significant-ly higher than resting values (groups one P=0.012, group two P=0.005 at the end of the trial and there was no significant differences between groups. In addition, there were no significant differences between area under the curves (AUC values over total periods for acylated ghrelin, hunger ratings, and growth hormone in two groups.Conclusion: These findings indicate that individuals with two levels of obesity have the same response to the different intensities of treadmill running and two hours thereafter during recovery period, which can be considered for designing a more effective weighting loss training program.

  6. Mutagenicity testing with transgenic mice. Part I: Comparison with the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test

    OpenAIRE

    Wahnschaffe U; Bitsch A; Kielhorn J; Mangelsdorf I

    2005-01-01

    Abstract As part of a larger literature study on transgenic animals in mutagenicity testing, test results from the transgenic mutagenicity assays (lacI model; commercially available as the Big Blue® mouse, and the lacZ model; commercially available as the Muta™Mouse), were compared with the results on the same substances in the more traditional mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. 39 substances were found which had been tested in the micronucleus assay and in the above transgenic mouse system...

  7. Adaptive search techniques for problems in vehicle routing, part II: A numerical comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kritzinger Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Research in the field of vehicle routing often focused on finding new ideas and concepts in the development of fast and efficient algorithms for an improved solution process. Early studies introduce static tailor-made strategies, but trends show that algorithms with generic adaptive policies - which emerged in the past years - are more efficient to solve complex vehicle routing problems. In this first part of the survey, we present an overview of recent literature dealing with adaptive or guided search techniques for problems in vehicle routing.

  8. Low heart rate response of children with autism spectrum disorders in comparison to controls during physical exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Marion; Bricout, Véronique-Aurélie

    2015-03-15

    The objective of the study was to investigate how the heart rate adjusts during different physical tests. Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) do indeed have a lower cardiac response to specific tests. Twenty children including 10 subjects with ASD diagnosis and 10 control subjects were evaluated using the Eurofit Physical Fitness Test Battery. During the evaluation, the heart rate was monitored continuously. In parallel, their parents were completed the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales. Both groups show the same trend of heart rate increase (during exercise and also during the maximum effort). However, children with ASD presented a significant lower heart rate compared to the control population (pheart rate decrease of the ASD group during physical test could be due to an alteration of the cardiac response. In addition, the scores obtained by children with ASD on physical tests confirmed the lack of motor abilities such as balance and executive functions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Contextual effects on the perceived health benefits of exercise: the exercise rank hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltby, John; Wood, Alex M; Vlaev, Ivo; Taylor, Michael J; Brown, Gordon D A

    2012-12-01

    Many accounts of social influences on exercise participation describe how people compare their behaviors to those of others. We develop and test a novel hypothesis, the exercise rank hypothesis, of how this comparison can occur. The exercise rank hypothesis, derived from evolutionary theory and the decision by sampling model of judgment, suggests that individuals' perceptions of the health benefits of exercise are influenced by how individuals believe the amount of exercise ranks in comparison with other people's amounts of exercise. Study 1 demonstrated that individuals' perceptions of the health benefits of their own current exercise amounts were as predicted by the exercise rank hypothesis. Study 2 demonstrated that the perceptions of the health benefits of an amount of exercise can be manipulated by experimentally changing the ranked position of the amount within a comparison context. The discussion focuses on how social norm-based interventions could benefit from using rank information.

  10. Comparison of physical activity, sedentary behavior and physical fitness between fulltime and part-time students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waynne Ferreira de Faria

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare physical activity, sedentary behavior and physical fitness between full-time and part-time students. The sample consisted of 72 students (9 to 12 years, 34 of them studying full time. The subjects answered a questionnaire about physical activity, sedentary behavior, and sociodemographic characteristics. Data regarding sexual maturation, body composition and physical fitness were also collected. The results showed that girls studying full time spent less time per day in sedentary behavior compared to part-time girls (p<0.05. Analysis of anthropometric variables showed a significantly lower body fat percentage in boys studying full time. With respect to the physical fitness tests, significant differences were identified in the sit and reach test, horizontal jump, medicine ball throw and agility, with the observation of higher performance in full-time students. Similarly, girls studying full time exhibited significantly higher performance in the horizontal jump and agility tests compared to their peers. It can be concluded that full-time students spend less time in sedentary behavior and exhibit better physical fitness indices in most of the tests used, irrespective of gender.

  11. A comparison of attitudes towards animals between the German- and French-speaking part of Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehlbaum, B; Waiblinger, E; Turner, D C

    2010-06-01

    A comparison of attitudes towards animals between German- and French-speaking Swiss adults is of particular interest, given the often invoked cultural barrier, the . We sent questionnaires to 3000 randomly chosen Swiss adults in both language regions. 319 German and 293 French questionnaires were returned. Participants had to express their opinion regarding 29 statements on nature conservation, wild animals, farm animals, meat eating, animal feelings and cognition, and pets. In 19 items we found a significant difference in responses between the German- and the French-speaking participants. It is important to note that the direction of the responses was identical in all cases, the only difference being the degree of agreement. In general, the Swiss agreed that nature conservation is important. They agreed also that animals have feelings, but that these are different from the feelings of humans. Pets were viewed as beneficial to humans. Both cats and dogs were seen as likeable animals, and there was agreement that dogs need more time to care for than cats. Strays were not viewed as a problem in Switzerland, despite the fact that there are numerous stray cat colonies.

  12. Patterns of youth injury: a comparison across the northern territories and other parts of Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Jessica; King, Nathan; Hawe, Penelope; Peters, Paul; Pickett, William; Davison, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Background Injury is the leading cause of death for young people in Canada. For those living in the northern territories (Yukon, Nunavut, and the Northwest Territories), injury represents an even greater problem, with higher rates of injury for people of all ages in northern areas compared with the rest of Canada; however, no such comparative studies have focussed specifically on non-fatal injury in youth. Objectives To profile and examine injuries and their potential causes among youth in the northern territories as compared with other parts of Canada. Design Cross-sectional data from the 2009/2010 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey (youth aged 11–15 years) were examined for the Canadian northern territories and the provinces (n=26,078). Individual survey records were linked to community-level data to profile injuries and then study possible determinants via multilevel regression modelling. Results The prevalence of injury reported by youth was similar in northern populations and other parts of Canada. There were some minimal differences by injury type: northern youth experienced a greater percentage of neighbourhood (p<0.001) and fighting (p=0.02) injuries; youth in the Canadian provinces had a greater proportion of sport-related injuries (p=0.01). Among northern youth, female sex (RR=0.87, 95% CI 0.81–0.94), average (RR=0.88, 95% CI 0.80–0.97) or above-average affluence (RR=0.84, 95% CI 0.76–0.91), not being drunk in the past 12 months (RR=0.77, 95% CI 0.69–0.85), not riding an all-terrain vehicle (RR=0.81, 95% CI 0.68–0.97) and not having permanent road access (RR=0.89, 95% CI 0.80–0.98) were protective against injury; sport participation increased risk (RR=1.45, 95% CI 1.33–1.59). Conclusions Patterns of injury were similar across youth from the North and other parts of Canada. Given previous research, this was unexpected. When implementing injury prevention initiatives, individual and community-level risk factors are essential to

  13. Patterns of youth injury: a comparison across the northern territories and other parts of Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Byrnes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Injury is the leading cause of death for young people in Canada. For those living in the northern territories (Yukon, Nunavut, and the Northwest Territories, injury represents an even greater problem, with higher rates of injury for people of all ages in northern areas compared with the rest of Canada; however, no such comparative studies have focussed specifically on non-fatal injury in youth. Objective: To profile and examine injuries and their potential causes among youth in the northern territories as compared with other parts of Canada. Design: Cross-sectional data from the 2009/2010 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey (youth aged 11–15 years were examined for the Canadian northern territories and the provinces (n=26,078. Individual survey records were linked to community-level data to profile injuries and then study possible determinants via multilevel regression modelling. Results: The prevalence of injury reported by youth was similar in northern populations and other parts of Canada. There were some minimal differences by injury type: northern youth experienced a greater percentage of neighbourhood (p<0.001 and fighting (p=0.02 injuries; youth in the Canadian provinces had a greater proportion of sport-related injuries (p=0.01. Among northern youth, female sex (RR=0.87, 95% CI 0.81–0.94, average (RR=0.88, 95% CI 0.80–0.97 or above-average affluence (RR=0.84, 95% CI 0.76–0.91, not being drunk in the past 12 months (RR=0.77, 95% CI 0.69–0.85, not riding an all-terrain vehicle (RR=0.81, 95% CI 0.68–0.97 and not having permanent road access (RR=0.89, 95% CI 0.80–0.98 were protective against injury; sport participation increased risk (RR=1.45, 95% CI 1.33–1.59. Conclusions: Patterns of injury were similar across youth from the North and other parts of Canada. Given previous research, this was unexpected. When implementing injury prevention initiatives, individual and community-level risk factors are

  14. 青海高原女性参加体育锻炼状况调查与分析%Qinghai Plateau Women Take Part in Physical Exercises Condition Investigation and Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    母爱梅; 代玲

    2011-01-01

    Method of literature,questionnaire,qinghai plateau women participate in sports exercise situation survey and analysis.The result shows: the urban women qinghai plateau taking part in physical exercise is not high,the proportion of exercising accounts for only 22.7%,and not to participate in exercise rates as high as 77.3%.One is to take part in physical exercises consciousness quite good enough;2 it is cultural degree is lower,the percentage of junior below for 76.6%;Three is due to the special climate environment of the plateau influence,the cold winter weather,the extent that restricted the sports activities;Four is agriculture herdsman to non-profit sports reliance is higher;Sports consumption idea is not strong;Science fitness concepts backward fitness centers,combined with the lack of qinghai and plateau as the actual situation of female physical exercise,find women qinghai plateau physical exercise activities the existing problems and insufficiency.%采用文献资料、问卷调查等方法,对青海高原女性参与体育锻炼状况进行调查与分析。结果显示:青海高原城镇女性参与体育锻炼的比例不高,参加锻炼只占22.7%,不参加锻炼比例高达77.3%。之所以这样,一是人们参加体育锻炼的意识还不够强;二是文化程度较低;三是由于高原的特殊气候环境的影响;四是体育消费观念不强,健身场馆严重缺乏等。文章结合青海高原女性体育锻炼的实际情况就提高青海高原女性体育锻炼提出相应对策。

  15. Comparison of two models of a Double Inlet Miniature Pulse Tube Refrigerator - Part B Electrical Analogy

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Y; Bailly, Yannick; Nika, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    The design of a Double Inlet Pulse Tube Refrigerator is investigated by means of an analogy with an electric circuit. The results obtained with the electric scheme are compared with both those of the thermodynamic model (Part A) and experiments. The basic formulation of equivalent electronic components is discussed and a few improvements are proposed to adjust the theoretical expressions of the electrical impedances of capillaries and regenerator in order to consider additional effects such pressure drops due to geometrical singularities at different internal flow regimes. A simplified formulation for the regenerator inefficiency is deduced from considerations on its harmonic functioning. The main purpose of this analysis considers especially the design of miniature cryocoolers dedicated to electronic applications. These models are applied to a commercial miniature refrigerator. A discussion of their relevance is achieved and a few suggestions on the refrigerator design are proposed to improve the cooling pro...

  16. Exercise addiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichtenstein, Mia Beck; Christiansen, Erik; Elklit, Ask

    2014-01-01

    Exercise addiction is characterized by excessive exercise patterns with potential negative consequences such as overuse injuries. The aim of this study was to compare eating disorder symptoms, quality of life, personality traits and attachments styles in exercisers with and without indications...... of exercise addiction. A case-control study with 121 exercisers was conducted. The exercisers were categorized into an addiction group (n=41) or a control group (n=80) on the basis of their responses to the Exercise Addiction Inventory. The participants completed the Eating Disorder Inventory 2, the Short...... of excitement-seeking and achievement striving whereas scores on straightforwardness and compliance were lower than in the exercise control group. The addiction group reported more bodily pain and injuries. This study supports the hypothesis that exercise addiction is separate to an eating disorder, but shares...

  17. Comparison of AMOS computer code wakefield real part impedances with analytic results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayhall, D J; Nelson, S D

    2000-11-30

    We have performed eleven AMOS (Azimuthal Mode Simulator)[1] code runs with a simple, right circular cylindrical accelerating cavity inserted into a circular, cylindrical, lossless beam pipe to calculate the real part of the n = 1(dipole) transverse wakefield impedance of this structure. We have compared this wakefield impedance in units of ohms/m(Wm) over the frequency range of 0-1 GHz to analytic predictions from Equation (2.3.8) of Briggs et al[2]. The results from Equation (2.3.8) were converted from the CGS units of statohms to the MKS units of ohms({Omega}) and then multiplied by (2{pi}f)/c = {Omega}/c = 2{pi}/{lambda}, where f is the frequency in Hz, c is the speed of light in vacuum in m/sec, {omega} is the angular frequency in radians/sec, and {lambda} is the wavelength in m. The dipole transverse wakefield impedance written to file from AMOS must be multiplied by c/o to convert it from units of {Omega}/m to units of {Omega}. The agreement between the AMOS runs and the analytic predictions are excellent for computational grids with square cells (dz = dr) and good for grids with rectangular cells (dz < dr). The quantity dz is the fixed-size axial grid spacing, and dr is the fixed-size radial grid spacing. We have also performed one AMOS run for the same geometry to calculate the real part of the n = 0(monopole) longitudinal wakefield impedance of this structure. We have compared this wakefield impedance in units of {Omega} with analytic predictions from Equation (1.4.8) of Briggs et al[1] converted to the MKS units of {Omega}. The agreement between the two results is excellent in this case. For the monopole longitudinal wakefield impedance written to file from AMOS, nothing must be done to convert the results to units of {Omega}. In each case, the computer calculations were carried out to 50 nsec of simulation time.

  18. Comparison of yoga versus stretching for chronic low back pain: protocol for the Yoga Exercise Self-care (YES trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawkes Rene J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Back pain, one of the most prevalent conditions afflicting American adults, is the leading reason for using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies. Yoga is an increasingly popular "mind-body" CAM therapy often used for relieving back pain and several small studies have found yoga effective for this condition. This study will assess whether yoga is effective for treating chronic low back pain compared with self care and exercise and will explore the mechanisms responsible for any observed benefits. Methods/Design A total of 210 participants with low back pain lasting at least 3 months will be recruited from primary care clinics of a large healthcare system based in Seattle. They will be randomized in a 2:2:1 ratio to receive 12 weekly yoga classes, 12 weekly conventional therapeutic exercise classes of comparable physical exertion, or a self-care book. Interviewers masked to participants' treatment group will assess outcomes at baseline and 6, 12 and 26 weeks after randomization. Primary outcomes will be back-related dysfunction and symptom bothersomeness. In addition, data will be collected on physical measurements (e.g., flexion at baseline and 12 weeks and saliva samples will be obtained at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Information will be collected on specific physical, psychological, and physiological factors to allow exploration of possible mechanisms of action through which yoga could relieve back pain and dysfunction. The effectiveness of yoga will be assessed using analysis of covariance (using general estimating equations - GEE within an intention-to-treat context. If yoga is found effective, further analyses will explore whether yoga's benefits are attributable to physical, psychological and/or physiological factors. Conclusions This study will provide the clearest evidence to date about the value of yoga as a therapeutic option for treating chronic back pain, and if the results are positive, will help

  19. Exercise training on chronotropic response and exercise capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Li; Min, Gao; Wei, Chen; Min, He; Jie,Zhou

    2017-01-01

    The study was designed to observe the effects and relationship of exercise on chronotropic response (CR) and exercise capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 30 patients with T2DM underwent symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) after excluding contraindication. For each subject individualized exercise prescription was formulated, and they received 12 weeks of exercise training after CPET retest to complete the comparison of CR indicators, includ...

  20. Mutagenicity testing with transgenic mice. Part I: Comparison with the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahnschaffe U

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As part of a larger literature study on transgenic animals in mutagenicity testing, test results from the transgenic mutagenicity assays (lacI model; commercially available as the Big Blue® mouse, and the lacZ model; commercially available as the Muta™Mouse, were compared with the results on the same substances in the more traditional mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. 39 substances were found which had been tested in the micronucleus assay and in the above transgenic mouse systems. Although, the transgenic animal mutation assay is not directly comparable with the micronucleus test, because different genetic endpoints are examined: chromosome aberration versus gene mutation, the results for the majority of substances were in agreement. Both test systems, the transgenic mouse assay and the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test, have advantages and they complement each other. However, the transgenic animal assay has some distinct advantages over the micronucleus test: it is not restricted to one target organ and detects systemic as well as local mutagenic effects.

  1. Comparison of Gene and Protein Expressions in Rats Residing in Standard Cages with Those Having Access to an Exercise Wheel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helaine M. Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lifelong physical inactivity is associated with morbidity in adulthood, possibly influenced by changes in gene and protein expressions occurring earlier in life. mRNA (Affymetrix gene array and proteomic (2D-DIGE MALDI-TOF/MS analyses were determined in cardiac tissue of young (3 months and old (16 months Sprague-Dawley rats housed with no access to physical activity (SED versus an exercise wheel (EX. Unfavorable phenotypes for body weight, dyslipidemia, and tumorogenesis appeared more often in adult SED versus EX. No differentially expressed genes (DEGs occurred between groups at 3 or 16 months. Within groups, SED and EX shared 215 age-associated DEGs. In SED, ten unique DEGs occurred with age; three had cell adhesion functions (fn1, lgals3, ncam2. In EX, five unique DEGs occurred with age; two involved hypothalamic, pituitary, and gonadal hormone axis (nrob2, xpnpep2. Protein expression involved in binding, sugar metabolic processes, and vascular regulation declined with age in SED (KNT1, ALBU, GPX1, PYGB, LDHB, G3P, PYGM, PGM1, ENOB. Protein expression increased with age in EX for ATP metabolic processes (MYH6, MYH7, ATP5J, ATPA and vascular function (KNT1, ALBU, GPX1. Differences in select gene and protein expressions within sedentary and active animals occurred with age and contributed to distinct health-related phenotypes in adulthood.

  2. Resistance exercise improves metabolic parameters and changes adipocyte-derived leptin: a comparison between genders in untrained adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Ribeiro da Mota

    Full Text Available Abstract This study examined gender differences after resistance exercise (RE by measuring fasting plasma levels of creatine kinase, lipid profile, blood glucose, adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and leptin. Thirteen women (23.6 ± 7.3 years and 11 men (29.5 ± 9 years were enrolled in the study. Two bouts of RE were performed on two different occasions separated by 48 h each. Blood samples were collected and analyzed at baseline and 15 h after the last RE session. Increased creatine kinase levels and improvements in lipid profile and blood glucose were found for both genders. No changes in adiponectin and TNF-α levels were observed for both genders, but leptin levels were reduced (p < 0.05 only for women after RE. Collectively, our findings clearly show that RE was effective in lowering blood glucose and that this effect was not accompanied by changes in adiponectin levels in healthy subjects, indicating that RE is still an important tool for the prevention of metabolic diseases. Furthermore, two sessions of RE promoted a reduction in leptin levels in women, even though no changes in body weight were found, showing that RE is an interesting approach to study obese patients and metabolic regulation.

  3. Simulation Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, Pat

    1976-01-01

    Describes five simulation exercises: a problem for a student teacher, an industrial relations game, a series of student problems; an international relations crisis, and a sociological exercise on public and private opinions. (LS)

  4. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... provide well-rounded core strengthening programs. Simple exercises can be done at home as well. Some specific ... benefit from this exercise... Sagittal Core Strengthening You can stretch and strengthen the low back muscles that ...

  5. Efficient pricing of Asian options under Lévy processes based on Fourier cosine expansions. Part II. Early-exercise features and GPU implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, B.; Van der Weide, J.A.M.; Oosterlee, C.W.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we propose an efficient pricing method for Asian options with early–exercise features. It is based on a two–dimensional integration and a backward recursion of the Fourier coefficients, in which several numerical techniques, like Fourier cosine expansions, Clenshaw–Curtis quadrature

  6. Efficient pricing of Asian options under Lévy processes based on Fourier cosine expansions. Part II. Early-exercise features and GPU implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, B.; Van der Weide, J.A.M.; Oosterlee, C.W.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we propose an efficient pricing method for Asian options with early–exercise features. It is based on a two–dimensional integration and a backward recursion of the Fourier coefficients, in which several numerical techniques, like Fourier cosine expansions, Clenshaw–Curtis quadrature

  7. A Ground-Based Comparison of the Muscle Atrophy Research and Exercise System (MARES) and a Standard Isokinetic Dynamometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, K. J.; English, K. L.; Redd, E.; DeWitt, J. K.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: 1) To compare the test-to-test reliability of Muscle Atrophy Research and Exercise System (MARES) with a standard laboratory isokinetic dynamometer (ISOK DYN) and; 2) to determine if measures of peak torque and total work differ between devices. METHODS: Ten subjects (6M, 4F) completed two trials on both MARES and an ISOK DYN in a counterbalanced order. Peak torque values at 60 deg & 180 deg / s were obtained from five maximal repetitions of knee extension (KE) and knee flexion (KF). Total work at 180 deg / s was determined from the area under the torque vs. displacement curve during twenty maximal repetitions of KE and KF. Reliability of measures within devices was interpreted from the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and compared between devices using the ratio of the within-device standard deviations. Indicators of agreement for the two devices were evaluated from: 1) a calculation of concordance (rho) and; 2) the correlation between the mean of measures versus the delta difference between measures (m u vs delta). RESULTS: For all outcome measures ICCs were high for both the ISOK DYN (0.95-0.99) and MARES (0.90-0.99). However, ratios of the within-device standard deviation were 1.3 to 4.3 times higher on MARES. On average, a wide range (3.3 to 1054 Nm) of differences existed between the values obtained. Only KE peak torque measured at 60 deg & 180 deg / s showed similarities between devices (rho = 0.91 & 0.87; Pearson's r for m u vs delta = -0.22 & -0.37, respectively). CONCLUSION: Although MARES was designed for use in microgravity it was quite reliable during ground-based testing. However, MARES was consistently more variable than an ISOK DYN. Future longitudinal studies evaluating a change in isokinetic peak torque or total work should be limited within one device.

  8. A ground-based comparison of the Muscle Atrophy Research and Exercise System (MARES) and a commercially available isokinetic dynamometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Kirk L.; Hackney, Kyle J.; De Witt, John K.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Goetchius, Elizabeth L.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2013-11-01

    IntroductionInternational Space Station (ISS) crewmembers perform muscle strength and endurance testing pre- and postflight to assess the physiologic adaptations associated with long-duration exposure to microgravity. However, a reliable and standardized method to document strength changes in-flight has not been established. To address this issue, a proprietary dynamometer, the Muscle Atrophy Research and Exercise System (MARES) has been developed and flown aboard the ISS. The aims of this ground-based investigation were to: (1) evaluate the test-retest reliability of MARES and (2) determine its agreement with a commercially available isokinetic dynamometer previously used for pre- and postflight medical testing. MethodsSix males (179.5±4.7 cm; 82.0±8.7 kg; 31.3±4.0 yr) and four females (163.2±7.3 cm; 63.2±1.9 kg; 32.3±6.8 yr) completed two testing sessions on a HUMAC NORM isokinetic dynamometer (NORM) and two sessions on MARES using a randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over design. Peak torque values at 60° and 180° s-1 were calculated from five maximal repetitions of knee extension (KE) and knee flexion (KF) for each session. Total work at 180° s-1 was determined from the area under the torque versus displacement curve during 20 maximal repetitions of KE and KF. ResultsIntraclass correlation coefficients were relatively high for both devices (0.90-0.99). Only one dependent measure, KE peak torque at 60° s-1 exhibited good concordance between devices (ρ=0.92) and a small average difference (0.9±17.3 N m). ConclusionMARES demonstrated acceptable test-retest reliability and thus should serve as a good tool to monitor in-flight strength changes. However, due to poor agreement with NORM, it is not advisable to compare absolute values obtained on these devices.

  9. Interlaboratory comparison exercise for the determination of As, Cd, Ni and Pb in PM 10 in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerboles, M.; Buzica, D.; Brown, R. J. C.; Yardley, R. E.; Hanus-Illnar, A.; Salfinger, M.; Vallant, B.; Adriaenssens, E.; Claeys, N.; Roekens, E.; Sega, K.; Jurasović, J.; Rychlik, S.; Rabinak, E.; Tanet, G.; Passarella, R.; Pedroni, V.; Karlsson, V.; Alleman, L.; Pfeffer, U.; Gladtke, D.; Olschewski, A.; O'Leary, B.; O'Dwyer, M.; Pockeviciute, D.; Biel-Ćwikowska, J.; Turšič, J.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the results of an intercomparison exercise for the determination of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni) and lead (Pb) in PM 10, which are regulated by the European Directives for ambient air quality. Thirteen laboratories participated, generally using the European reference methods of measurement which consist of a microwave digestion followed by analysis with either ICP-MS or GFAAS. Each participant was asked to analyse five test samples: a liquid Certified Reference Material (CRM), two sub-samples of a NIST dust CRM (one already-digested and one to be digested by the participants) and two loaded filters (one already-digested and one to be digested by the participants). Participants were able to meet the Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) of the European Directives (expanded uncertainties of 25% for Pb and 40% for As, Cd and Ni) for 93% of all test samples, except for the loaded filter that were digested by the participants. In fact, only 76% of DQOs were met for this test sample, the closest to a routine sample analysis in the laboratory. The difficulties in analysing this test sample came mainly from digestion and contamination processes. Satisfactory results were also obtained using other digestion techniques (Soxhlet extraction and high pressure methods) and analytical methods (ICP-OES for Cd, Ni and Pb, EDXRF for Pb and Ni and Voltammetry for As, Ni, and Pb). Participants claimed uncertainties of about 10% for Pb and between 15 and 20% for As, Cd and Ni. These uncertainties were confirmed for 77% of results. The reproducibility of the methods of measurement was between 41 and 54% while repeatability remained between 5 and 12% except for the analysis of As on filters which was up to 20%. The majority of participant results showed higher between-day variability (14 ± 11%) than within-day variability (6.0 ± 5.3%).

  10. Exercise blood pressure response during assisted circulatory support: comparison of the total artificial [corrected] heart with a left ventricular assist device during rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Harajeshwar S; Canada, Justin; Arena, Ross; Tang, Daniel G; Peberdy, Mary Ann; Harton, Suzanne; Flattery, Maureen; Doolin, Kelly; Katlaps, Gundars J; Hess, Michael L; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Shah, Keyur B

    2011-11-01

    The total artificial heart (TAH) consists of two implantable pneumatic pumps that replace the heart and operate at a fixed ejection rate and ejection pressure. We evaluated the blood pressure (BP) response to exercise and exercise performance in patients with a TAH compared to those with a with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD). We conducted a single-center, retrospective study of 37 patients who received a TAH and 12 patients implanted with an LVAD. We measured the BP response during exercise, exercise duration and change in tolerated exercise workload over an 8-week period. In patients with a TAH, baseline BP was 120/69 ± 13/13, exercise BP was 118/72 ± 15/10 and post-exercise BP was 120/72 ± 14/12. Mean arterial BP did not change with exercise in patients with a TAH (88 ± 10 vs 88 ± 11; p = 0.8), but increased in those with an LVAD (87 ± 8 vs 95 ± 13; p exercise, the association was not statistically significant (β = -0.1, p = 0.4). MAP correlated positively with METs achieved in patients with LVADs (MAP: β = 0.26, p = 0.04). Despite the abnormal response to exercise, patients with a TAH participated in physical therapy (median: 5 days; interquartile range [IQR] 4 to 7 days) and treadmill exercise (19 days; IQR: 13 to 35 days) early after device implantation, with increased exercise intensity and duration over time. During circulatory support with a TAH, the BP response to exercise was blunted. However, aerobic exercise training early after device implantation was found to be safe and feasible in a supervised setting. 2011 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. All rights reserved.

  11. [Effectiveness of nifedipine on exercise tolerance in patients with angina pectoris. Comparison with a nitroderivative and a beta-blocking agent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ponti, C; Mauri, F; Fiorista, F; Ciliberto, G R; Carù, B; Rovelli, F

    1977-01-01

    The effect of nifedipine on effort angina was investigated by means of exercise tests with bycicle ergometer and compared, in the same patients, with the effects of a nitroderivative and a betablocking agent. Five patients with stable effort angina entered the study, after an hemodynamic and contrasto-graphic control. According to the protocol of a latin square 5 X 5, all the patients received in a random sequence the following treatments: placebo, 1 c. orally; isosorbide dinitrate, 5 mg sublingually; propranolol, 40 mg orally; nifedipine, 10 mg sublingually; nifedipine, 10 mg orally. No significant change of any of the considered parameters was observed after the placebo. Isosorbide dinitrate and nifedipine produced significant increases of the duration of work before appearance of pain and EKG positivity, and of total work performed before anginal pain. Only the duration of work before EKG positivity was improved by propranolol. The comparisons between treatments showed no significant difference of the effects of the administered doses of isosorbide dinitrate and nifedipine. The improvements observed after propranolol were significantly lower than that observed after isosorbide dinitrate and oral nifedipine. On the basis of the observed changes of cardiac rate, maximal arterial pressure, ejection time index and triple product, the authors evaluate the possible mechanism of action of nifedipine.

  12. A comparison of the EEG of the exercisers who exercised Taijiquan at different speeds%太极拳不同速度练习者的脑电比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宁

    2014-01-01

    In order to reveal the characteristics of EEG activity during Taijiquan exercising at different speeds, the author carried out the experiment and research by selecting 6 strictly trained and screened testees who had no sig-nificant differences in Taijiquan cognition and exercising characteristics. The results indicate that intentionally re-ducing Taijiquan exercising speed at one time cannot enhance, but on the contrary, will weaken the original effect of cerebral cortex neurons synchronization activity in the process of Taijiquan exercising. Moreover, since it is one time exercising without the accumulation of exercising effect, and the exercising time is not long, the change of neural activity during exercising at two speeds cannot last up to the eyes closed still sitting process after exercising.%为了揭示不同速度练习太极拳的脑电活动特点,对经严格训练和筛选的在太极拳的认知和练习特点无明显差异的6名被试者进行实验研究,结果表明:一次性的故意减慢太极拳练习的速度,不但不能增强,反而减弱太极拳练习过程原有的大脑皮层神经元同步化活动效果,降低太极拳练习的神经作用。同时,由于是一次性练习,没有练习效果的积累,加上练习时间不长,两种速度练习时的神经活动的变化,不能延续到练习后的闭眼静坐过程。

  13. Pronounced effects of acute endurance exercise on gene expression in resting and exercising human skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milène Catoire

    Full Text Available Regular physical activity positively influences whole body energy metabolism and substrate handling in exercising muscle. While it is recognized that the effects of exercise extend beyond exercising muscle, it is unclear to what extent exercise impacts non-exercising muscles. Here we investigated the effects of an acute endurance exercise bouts on gene expression in exercising and non-exercising human muscle. To that end, 12 male subjects aged 44-56 performed one hour of one-legged cycling at 50% W(max. Muscle biopsies were taken from the exercising and non-exercising leg before and immediately after exercise and analyzed by microarray. One-legged cycling raised plasma lactate, free fatty acids, cortisol, noradrenalin, and adrenalin levels. Surprisingly, acute endurance exercise not only caused pronounced gene expression changes in exercising muscle but also in non-exercising muscle. In the exercising leg the three most highly induced genes were all part of the NR4A family. Remarkably, many genes induced in non-exercising muscle were PPAR targets or related to PPAR signalling, including PDK4, ANGPTL4 and SLC22A5. Pathway analysis confirmed this finding. In conclusion, our data indicate that acute endurance exercise elicits pronounced changes in gene expression in non-exercising muscle, which are likely mediated by changes in circulating factors such as free fatty acids. The study points to a major influence of exercise beyond the contracting muscle.

  14. Conducting Indirect-Treatment-Comparison and Network-Meta-Analysis Studies : Report of the ISPOR Task Force on Indirect Treatment Comparisons Good Research Practices: Part 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoaglin, David C.; Hawkins, Neil; Jansen, Jeroen P.; Scott, David A.; Itzler, Robbin; Cappelleri, Joseph C.; Boersma, Cornelis; Thompson, David; Larholt, Kay M.; Diaz, Mireya; Barrett, Annabel

    Evidence-based health care decision making requires comparison of all relevant competing interventions. In the absence of randomized controlled trials involving a direct comparison of all treatments of interest, indirect treatment comparisons and network meta-analysis provide useful evidence for

  15. Conducting Indirect-Treatment-Comparison and Network-Meta-Analysis Studies : Report of the ISPOR Task Force on Indirect Treatment Comparisons Good Research Practices: Part 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoaglin, David C.; Hawkins, Neil; Jansen, Jeroen P.; Scott, David A.; Itzler, Robbin; Cappelleri, Joseph C.; Boersma, Cornelis; Thompson, David; Larholt, Kay M.; Diaz, Mireya; Barrett, Annabel

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based health care decision making requires comparison of all relevant competing interventions. In the absence of randomized controlled trials involving a direct comparison of all treatments of interest, indirect treatment comparisons and network meta-analysis provide useful evidence for jud

  16. Systems Analysis of Technologies for Energy Recovery from Waste. Part I. Gasification followed by Catalytic Combustion, PEM Fuel Cells and Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for Stationary Applications in Comparison with Incineration. Part - II. Catalytic combustion - Experimental part

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assefa, Getachew; Frostell, Bjoern [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Industrial Ecology; Jaeraas, Sven; Kusar, Henrik [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Chemical Technology

    2005-02-01

    This project is entitled 'Systems Analysis: Energy Recovery from waste, catalytic combustion in comparison with fuel cells and incineration'. Some of the technologies that are currently developed by researchers at the Royal Institute of Technology include catalytic combustion and fuel cells as downstream units in a gasification system. The aim of this project is to assess the energy turnover as well as the potential environmental impacts of biomass/waste-to-energy technologies. In second part of this project economic analyses of the technologies in general and catalytic combustion and fuel cell technologies in particular will be carried out. Four technology scenarios are studied: (1) Gasification followed by Low temperature fuel cells (Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells) (2) Gasification followed by high temperature fuel cells (Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) (3) Gasification followed by catalytic combustion and (4) Incineration with energy recovery. The waste used as feedstock is an industrial waste containing parts of household waste, paper waste, wood residues and poly ethene. In the study compensatory district heating is produced by combustion of biofuel. The power used for running the processes in the scenarios will be supplied by the waste-to-energy technologies themselves while compensatory power is assumed to be produced from natural gas. The emissions from the system studied are classified and characterised using methodology from Life Cycle Assessment in to the following environmental impact categories: Global Warming Potential, Acidification Potential, Eutrophication Potential and finally Formation of Photochemical Oxidants. Looking at the result of the four technology chains in terms of the four impact categories with impact per GWh electricity produced as a unit of comparison and from the perspective of the rank each scenario has in all the four impact categories, SOFC appears to be the winner technology followed by PEM and CC as second

  17. Exercise HIMALAYAN SERPENT: feedback article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, K; Mellor, A

    2015-01-01

    Exercise HIMALAYAN SERPENT was open to junior doctors from the United Kingdom (UK) Armed Forces and aimed to educate potential expedition doctors on aspects of high altitude and wilderness medicine as well as conducting adventurous training (AT) and medical research. This was the first time such an exercise had been undertaken and this article explores the views of those junior doctors taking part to assess whether the exercise met the aims and objectives it set out.

  18. Evaluation of the field comparison exercise for PM10 and PM2.5 Ispra, February 13th – April 9th, 2015 - European Commission harmonization program for air quality measurements

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    An inter-laboratory comparison exercise (IE) for the determination of PM mass concentration with the reference gravimetric method (EN 12341:2014) was organised for the first time at European level in 2015. Such an IE comprises the comparison between the samplers used by the various participants. Samplers shall therefore be co-located for several days so that the number of test samples is large enough for statistical analyses. Thanks to the great interest for this type of IE and to the commitm...

  19. Exercise addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landolfi, Emilio

    2013-02-01

    This article examines the nature of exercise addiction. It presents a broad, congruent and discerning narrative literature review with the aim of providing a deeper understanding of the condition 'exercise addiction', including symptoms and options for treatment. In addition, guidelines are provided with respect to 'healthy' levels of exercise. Criteria used for determining the eligibility of studies evaluated in the review included the provision of relevant information in studies identified using pertinent search terms. The review highlights some of the key distinctions between healthy levels of exercise and exercise addiction. The findings suggest that an individual who is addicted to exercise will continue exercising regardless of physical injury, personal inconvenience or disruption to other areas of life including marital strain, interference with work and lack of time for other activities. 'Addicted' exercisers are more likely to exercise for intrinsic rewards and experience disturbing deprivation sensations when unable to exercise. In contrast, 'committed' exercisers engage in physical activity for extrinsic rewards and do not suffer severe withdrawal symptoms when they cannot exercise. Exercisers must acquire a sense of life-balance while embracing an attitude conducive to sustainable long-term physical, psychological and social health outcomes. Implementation of recommendations by the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology, which states that all apparently healthy adults between 18 and 64 years of age should accumulate at least 150 minutes of moderate (5 or 6 on a scale of 0-10) to vigorous (7 or 8 on a scale of 0-10) intensity aerobic physical activity per week in bouts of 10 minutes or more, also expressed as 30 minutes per day distributed over 5 days per week, would be a good start.

  20. Combinatorial problems and exercises

    CERN Document Server

    Lovász, László

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of this book is to provide help in learning existing techniques in combinatorics. The most effective way of learning such techniques is to solve exercises and problems. This book presents all the material in the form of problems and series of problems (apart from some general comments at the beginning of each chapter). In the second part, a hint is given for each exercise, which contains the main idea necessary for the solution, but allows the reader to practice the techniques by completing the proof. In the third part, a full solution is provided for each problem. This book w

  1. Exercise and age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is never too late to start exercising. Exercise has benefits at any age. Don't worry if you ... to tie your shoes Alternative Names Age and exercise Images Benefit of regular exercise Flexibility exercise Exercise and age ...

  2. Exercise and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobf, M Tish; Winters-Stone, Kerri

    2013-01-01

    There are an estimated 13.7 million cancer survivors in the United States. Persistent and late effects of cancer therapy have contributed to an increased risk for co-morbid illness and higher all-cause mortality. Physical exercise is a targeted rehabilitative intervention following cancer therapy and a health promotion risk reduction intervention for patients as they transition into survivorship. This chapter provides a brief overview of the research on exercise and cancer survivor outcomes with a specific focus on randomized controlled trials (RCT) on the effects of exercise on body composition and bone health. There were 17 RCT trials that were identified with body composition outcomes. There was no change in weight in 16/17 trials, 4 reported decreases in percent fat mass and 2 reported increases in lean mass. Eight exercise trials were identified with bone outcomes, two of which had pharmacologic comparison arms. These trials demonstrated preservation of bone in the intervention group compared with loss in the usual care or placebo control group. The majority of trials were with breast cancer survivors, the largest survivor group. Many are overweight or obese at diagnosis; weight gain continues to increase after therapy; and treatment is associated with bone loss. The findings of the 25 trials reviewed suggest that exercise maintains weight and bone mass in a high risk population. However, differences in design, measurement of body composition and bone mass and lack of targeted exercise to the specific outcomes warrants additional research to improve the quality of life for survivors.

  3. Comparison of the effects of acute exercise after overnight fasting and breakfast on energy substrate and hormone levels in obese men

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We compared the effects of acute aerobic exercise following overnight fasting and breakfast on energy substrate and hormone levels in obese male college students. [Subjects and Methods] This crossover study recruited 10 obese male college students with a body mass index >25 kg/m2 or >20% body fat. One week post-recruitment, the subjects exercised in the morning after an overnight fast. At 2 weeks, they exercised post-breakfast. Energy substrate (glucose, free fatty acid) and metabol...

  4. Comparison of the effects of knee and hip and single knee muscles strengthening/ stretching exercises on pain intensity and function in athletes with patellofemoral pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Mazloum

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS is a common musculoskeletal condition among athletes. The evidence emphasizes on the importance of hip musculature strengthening exercises for such patients. Objective: To investigate the effects of strengthening-stretching knee muscles exercises and hip posterolateral musculature exercises in athletes with PFPS. Methods: In this clinical trial, 28 athletes with age average of 22.7±2.4 years with PFPS were allocated into conventional knee muscles exercises (CKME (n=14 and posterolateral hip muscles exercises (PHME (n=14. The subjects of both groups performed the supervised exercise protocols in 12 sessions. The Visual Analogue Scale and 6-minute walking tests were administrated respectively to evaluate pain intensity and function. The data were analyzed using Shapiro-wilk test, Independent-sample t test, and Repeated Measure ANOVA test. Findings: Demographic, pain intensity, and physical function data were similar between groups at baseline. Both groups significantly improved in pain intensity and function following a 4-week exercise program. Additionally, the athletes in PHME group had higher level of decreased pain intensity and improved function in follow-up assessment than the subjects in CKME group. Conclusion: Using hip posterolateral musculature exercises in addition to the knee conventional exercises is more effective for athletes with PFPS.

  5. Predictions of U.K. regulated power station contributions to regional air pollution and deposition: a model comparison exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemel, Charles; Sokhi, Ranjeet S; Dore, Anthony J; Sutton, Paul; Vincent, Keith J; Griffiths, Stephen J; Hayman, Garry D; Wright, Raymond D; Baggaley, Matthew; Hallsworth, Stephen; Prain, H Douglas; Fisher, Bernard E A

    2011-11-01

    Contributions of the emissions from a U.K. regulated fossil-fuel power station to regional air pollution and deposition are estimated using four air quality modeling systems for the year 2003. The modeling systems vary in complexity and emphasis in the way they treat atmospheric and chemical processes, and include the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system in its versions 4.6 and 4.7, a nested modeling system that combines long- and short-range impacts (referred to as TRACK-ADMS [Trajectory Model with Atmospheric Chemical Kinetics-Atmospheric Dispersion Modelling System]), and the Fine Resolution Atmospheric Multi-pollutant Exchange (FRAME) model. An evaluation of the baseline calculations against U.K. monitoring network data is performed. The CMAQ modeling system version 4.6 data set is selected as the reference data set for the model footprint comparison. The annual mean air concentration and total deposition footprints are summarized for each modeling system. The footprints of the power station emissions can account for a significant fraction of the local impacts for some species (e.g., more than 50% for SO2 air concentration and non-sea-salt sulfur deposition close to the source) for 2003. The spatial correlation and the coefficient of variation of the root mean square error (CVRMSE) are calculated between each model footprint and that calculated by the CMAQ modeling system version 4.6. The correlation coefficient quantifies model agreement in terms of spatial patterns, and the CVRMSE measures the magnitude of the difference between model footprints. Possible reasons for the differences between model results are discussed. Finally, implications and recommendations for the regulatory assessment of the impact of major industrial sources using regional air quality modeling systems are discussed in the light of results from this case study.

  6. Physical exercises and massage influence on the organism of school age children with violations of carriage in a frontal plane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruzhylo Galina Grigor'evna

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientific researches results on the subject of efficiency evaluation of the physical exercises and massage influence on the carriage of school age (7 - 14years children are adduced. School age children total number of 20 (10 girls and 10 boys with backbone scoliotic curvatures of I - II degree took part in the experiment. There were applied: physical exercises (forming of carriage, unloading of spine, trunk muscles endurance development, exercises in an equilibrium, classic and segmentary massage. It is well-proven that a neat rehabilitation complex rendered effective influence on a carriage probed experimental group by comparison to the children of control group.

  7. Gravimetric geoid of a part of south India and its comparison with global geopotential models and GPS-levelling data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Srinivas; V M Tiwari; J S Tarial; S Prajapti; A E Meshram; B Singh; B Nagarajan

    2012-08-01

    Precise information of geoid undulations is essential for obtaining the orthometric heights from Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements over any region; apart from providing the information of subsurface density distribution. This paper presents computation of geoid undulations over a part of southern Indian region from terrestrial gravity and elevation data using remove–restore technique that involves spherical Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to compute ‘Stokes’ coefficients. Computed geoid undulations are compared with geoid obtained from global geopotential models such as EGM2008 and EIGENGRACE02S and measured GPS-levelling records at 67 locations. Statistical analysis of comparison suggests that the computed gravimetric geoid model has a good match with the geoid determined from GPS-levelling with rms of 0.1 m whereas EGM2008 has 0.46 m. The differences of GPS-levelling with EGM2008 at majority of stations fall in the range of ± 0.5 m, which indicates that EGM2008 may be used for orthometric height determination with an accuracy of > 0.5 m in the south Indian region and offers a reasonably good transformation platform from ellipsoid to local datum. However, local determination of geoid is necessary for better accuracy of orthometric height from GPS. The gravimetric geoid calculated from the available gravity data shows considerable improvement to the global model and can be used to achieve orthometric height with an accuracy of 0.1 m.

  8. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Healthiest Things You Can Do Like most people, you've probably heard that physical activity ... that "taking it easy" is risky. For the most part, when older people lose their ability to ...

  9. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have special equipment. Yet, studies show that "taking it easy" is risky. For the most part, when ... their ability to do things on their own, it doesn't happen just because they've aged. ...

  10. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Exercises Electrothermal Modalities Ergonomic Changes Hydrotherapy Manual Therapy Physical Therapy Postural Training Traction Watchful Waiting and Education Injection Treatments for ...

  11. [Selective cervical dorsal root cutting off part of the vertebral lateral mass fixation combined with exercise therapy for treating spastic cerebral paralysis of the upper limbs caused by cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Hu, Wei; Cao, Xu; Xu, Shi-gang; Li, De-kui; Xu, Lin

    2009-10-01

    To explore the feasibility and the result for the surgical treatment of spastic cerebral paralysis of the upper limbs in patients who underwent the selective cervical dorsal root cutting off part of the vertebral lateral mass fixation combined with exercise therapy. From March 2004 to April 2008, 27 patients included 19 boys and 8 girls, aging 13-21 years with an average of 15 years underwent selective cervical dorsal root cutting off part of the vertebral lateral mass fixation with exercise therapy. The AXIS 8 holes titanium plate was inserted into the lateral mass of spinous process through guidance of the nerve stimulator, choosed fasciculus of low-threshold nerve dorsal root and cut off its 1.5 cm. After two weeks, training exercise therapy was done in patients. Training will include lying position, turning body, sitting position, crawling, kneeling and standing position, walking and so on. Spastic Bobath inhibiting abnormal pattern was done in the whole process of training. The muscular tension, motor function (GMFM), functional independence (WeeFIM) were observed after treatment. All patients were followed up from 4 to 16 months with an average of 6 months. Muscular tension score were respectively 3.30 +/- 0.47 and 1.25 +/- 0.44 before and after treatment;GMFM score were respectively 107.82 +/- 55.17 and 131.28 +/- 46.45; WeeFIM score were respectively 57.61 +/- 25.51 and 87.91 +/- 22.39. There was significant improvement before and after treatment (P cerebral paralysis of the upper limbs is safe and effective method, which can decrease muscular tension and improve motor function, which deserves more wide use.

  12. Comparison of selective electromyographic activity of the superficial lumbar multifidus between prone trunk extension and four-point kneeling arm and leg lift exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Seok; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Jang, Jun-Hyeok; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the selective electromyographic activity of the lumbar paraspinal muscles in healthy male and female subjects in the prone trunk extension (PTE) and four-point kneeling arm and leg lift (FPKAL) exercises to determine the most beneficial exercise for selective activation of the lumbar multifidus (LM). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy male and female subjects participated in this study. Surface electromyographic data were collected from the left-side lumbar erector spinae (LES) and LM muscles during PTE and FPKAL exercises. [Results] The LM/LES ratio related to selective activation of the lumbar paraspinal muscles during the FPKAL exercise was higher than that during PTE. [Conclusion] FPKAL exercise is safe and effective for the selective activation of the LM muscle.

  13. Relations between cardiopulmonary function during exercise and exercise tolerance in patients with COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Cuypers, Maarten; Vos, Tine

    2015-01-01

    Methods: In part 1, a cross-sectional study took place. Sixty COPD patients performed a spirometry and a cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET). Predictors of exercise tolerance were examined. In part 2, a longitudinal observational study took place. Twelve COPD patients completed an exercise training intervention. A study on relations between changes in cardiopulmonary function and changes in exercise tolerance was performed. Results: Significant predictors of VO2peak are peak carbon d...

  14. Comparison of energy supplements during prolonged exercise for maintenance of cardiac function: carbohydrate only versus carbohydrate plus whey or casein hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosthuyse, Tanja; Millen, Aletta M E

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac function is often suppressed following prolonged strenuous exercise and this may occur partly because of an energy deficit. This study compared left ventricular (LV) function by 2-dimensional echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) before and after ∼2.5 h of cycling (2-h steady-state 60% peak aerobic power output plus 16 km time trial) in 8 male cyclists when they ingested either placebo, carbohydrate-only (CHO-only), carbohydrate-casein hydrolysate (CHO-casein), or carbohydrate-whey hydrolysate (CHO-whey). No treatment-by-time interactions occurred, but pre-to-postexercise time effects occurred selectively. Although diastolic function measured by pulsed-wave Doppler early-to-late (E/A) transmitral blood flow velocity was suppressed in all trials from pre- to postexercise (mean change post-pre exercise: -0.53 (95% CI -0.15 to -0.91)), TDI early-to-late (e'/a') tissue velocity was significantly suppressed pre- to postexercise only with placebo, CHO-only, and CHO-whey (septal and lateral wall e'/a' average change: -0.62 (95% CI -1.12 to -0.12); -0.69 (95% CI -1.19 to -0.20); and -0.79 (95% CI -1.28 to -0.29), respectively) but not with CHO-casein (-0.40 (95% CI -0.90 to 0.09)). LV contractility was, or tended to be, significantly reduced pre- to postexercise with placebo, CHO-only, and CHO-whey (systolic blood pressure/end systolic volume change, mm Hg·mL(-1): -0.8 (95% CI -1.2 to -0.4), p = 0.0003; -0.5 (95% CI -0.9 to -0.02), p = 0.035; and -0.4 (95% CI -0.8 to 0.04), p = 0.086, respectively), but not with CHO-casein (-0.3 (95% CI -0.8 to 0.1), p = 0.22). However, ejection fraction (EF) and ventricular-arterial coupling were significantly reduced pre- to postexercise only with placebo (placebo change: EF, -4.6 (95% CI -8.4 to -0.7)%; stroke volume/end systolic volume, -0.3 (95% CI -0.6 to -0.04)). Despite no treatment-by-time interactions, pre-to-postexercise time effects observed with specific beverages may be meaningful for athletes

  15. Prognostic value of plasma catecholamines, plasma renin activity, and plasma atrial natriuretic peptide at rest and during exercise in congestive heart failure: comparison with clinical evaluation, ejection fraction, and exercise capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, B K; Keller, N; Christiansen, E

    1995-01-01

    carried significant, independent prognostic information in a multivariate analysis: left ventricular ejection fraction (P = .03), plasma noradrenaline at rest (P = .009), New York Heart Association class III + IV (P = .005), increase in heart rate during exercise ... creatinine > 121 mumol/L (P = .004), and serum urea > 7.6 mmol/L (P = .007). Patients with congestive heart failure have a poor survival despite intensive medical treatment. Plasma catecholamines and plasma atrial natriuretic peptide are elevated at rest and rises further during exercise; the increase......Survival in congestive heart failure is related to plasma catecholamines and atrial natriuretic peptide at rest, but the prognostic importance of changes during exercise is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of catecholamines and atrial natriuretic peptide at rest...

  16. Comparison of the Effects of Resistance Exercise Orders on Number of Repetitions, Serum IGF-1, Testosterone and Cortisol Levels in Normal-Weight and Obese Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikholeslami-Vatani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Exercise order affects repetition performance and acute hormonal responses to resistance training (RT programs. Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of two different resistance exercise orders (REO on number of repetitions and serum Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1, testosterone and cortisol levels in normal-weight and obese men. Materials and Methods 25 untrained college-aged men were assigned to either obese (n = 11 or normal-weight (n = 15 groups. Subjects performed two REO protocols in 2 exercise groups. In the first group subjects began with large-muscle group and progressed to small-muscle group (Protocol A, while in the other group subjects performed the same exercise but in reverse sequence (Protocol B. Each activity was performed in 3 consecutive sets of 10 repetitions maximum to near fatigue. Results REOs did not affect number of repetitions in none of the groups. The average rating of perceived exertion was higher for protocol B in both groups. IGF-1 and testosterone increased immediately post exercise for both protocols and in both groups, however immediately post exercise increase in IGF-1 and testosterone were lower in obese group. Cortisol response to REO was weaker in obese group. Conclusions Performing large muscle group exercises first in RE training and progressing to small muscle group produced greater anabolic hormonal response relative to reverse sequence in normal-weight young adult men. Anabolic hormonal response to REOs was blunted in the obese group.

  17. Comparison between the effect of 6 weeks of morning or evening aerobic exercise on appetite and anthropometric indices: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Z; Younespour, S; Rajabian Tabesh, M; Haghravan, S

    2017-03-26

    Several studies have shown that exercise is directly related to creating negative energy balance and changes in appetite. However, few studies have examined the effect of exercise time during the day on these factors. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the effect of 6 weeks of morning and evening aerobic exercise on appetite and anthropometric indices. A total of 48 overweight females were recruited to this clinical trial. By the time of exercise, they were divided into two groups (morning or evening) and performed 6 weeks of exercise with a target heart rate on the ventilatory threshold. Appetite change, calorie intake and anthropometric indices were assessed. Consistent changes in appetite scores were not found during the 6 weeks (P > 0.05). Calorie consumption of the morning group decreased significantly more than that of the evening group (P = 0.02) during the 6 weeks. In addition, significant changes in body weight, body mass index, abdominal skin fold thickness and abdominal circumference were seen in the morning group. It appears that moderate- to high-intensity aerobic exercise in the morning could be considered a more effective programme than evening exercise on appetite control, calorie intake and weight loss in inactive overweight women. However, the limitations of the study, such as short-term duration, should be noticed.

  18. Exertional dyspnea associated with chest wall strapping is reduced when external dead space substitutes for part of the exercise stimulus to ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garske, Luke Albert; Lal, Ravin; Stewart, Ian Braidwood; Morris, Norman R; Cross, Troy James; Adams, Lewis

    2017-02-02

    Chest wall strapping has been used to assess mechanisms of dyspnea with restrictive lung disease. This study examined the hypothesis that dyspnea with restriction depends principally on the degree of reflex ventilatory stimulation. We compared dyspnea at the same (iso-)ventilation when added dead space provided a component of the ventilatory stimulus during constant work exercise. Eleven healthy males undertook a randomized controlled cross-over trial which compared four constant work exercise conditions (i) CTRL: unrestricted breathing at 90% Gas Exchange Threshold (GET), (ii) CTRL+DS: unrestricted breathing with 0.6 L dead space, at iso-ventilation to CTRL, (iii) CWS: chest strapping at 90% GET, (iv) CWS+DS: chest strapping with 0.6 L dead space, at iso-ventilation to CWS. Dead space was associated with reduced exercise intensity, and chest strapping reduced FVC by 30.4±2.2% (mean ± SE). Dyspnea at iso-ventilation was unchanged with CTRL+DS compared to CTRL (1.93±0.49 and 2.17±0.43, 0-10 numeric rating scale, respectively, P=0.244). Dyspnea was lower with CWS+DS compared to CWS (3.40±0.52 and 4.51±0.53 respectively, P=0.003). Perceived leg fatigue was reduced with CTRL+DS compared to CTRL (2.36±0.48 and 2.86±0.59 respectively, P=0.049) and lower with CWS+DS compared to CWS (1.86±0.30 and 4.00±0.79 respectively, P=0.006). With unrestricted breathing, dead space did not change dyspnea at iso-ventilation, inferring that dyspnea does not depend on the mode of reflex ventilatory stimulation in healthy individuals. With chest strapping, dead space presented a less potent stimulus to dyspnea. This suggests that dyspnea associated with chest strapping depends on the contribution of leg muscle work to ventilatory stimulation.

  19. Determination of (fluoro)quinolone antibiotic residues in pig kidney using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Part II: intercomparison exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, B; Chedin, M; Vincent, U; Bordin, G; Rodriguez, A R

    2005-09-23

    A recently in-house validated method for the liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) determination of eleven (fluoro)quinolone antibiotics (FQs) in pig kidney has been fully validated through an intercomparison exercise. This ring trial involved eight European laboratories and was based on the Commission Decision 2002/657/CE for validation of method and on the IUPAC protocol for method-performances studies. The laboratories data were submitted to a one-way analysis of variance. Satisfactory results were obtained for each FQ with regards to within- and between-laboratory reproducibility and accuracy. The method was validated for the simultaneous qualitative and quantitative determination of the eleven FQs in pig kidney around their maximum residue limit (MRL) as defined in the European Council Regulation 2377/90/EEC.

  20. Comparison of the effects of Crataegus oxyacantha extract, aerobic exercise and their combination on the serum levels of ICAM-1 and E-Selectin in patients with stable angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalaly, Leila; Sharifi, Gholamreza; Faramarzi, Mohammad; Nematollahi, Alireza; Rafieian-kopaei, Mahmoud; Amiri, Masoud; Moattar, Fariborz

    2015-12-19

    Adhesion molecules play an important role in the development and progression of coronary atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was comparing the effect of Cratagol herbal tablet, aerobic exercise and their combination on the serum levels of Intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and E-Selectin in patients with stable angina pectoris. Eighty stable angina pectoris patients aged between 45 and 65 years, were randomly divided into four groups including three experimental groups and one control group: aerobic exercise (E), Crataegus oxyacantha extract (S), aerobic exercise and Crataegus oxyacantha extract (S+E), and control (C). Blood sampling was taken 24 h before and after 12 weeks of aerobic exercise and Crataegus oxyacantha extract consumption. The results of serum levels of ICAM-1 and E-selectin were compared. Intergroup comparison of the data revealed a significant reduction (P <0.01) in serum levels of ICAM-1 and E-selectin in experimental groups. Analysis of data showed that the serum levels of ICAM-1 had significant difference when group S+E was compared with groups S and C, but not group E (P = 0.021, P = 0.000 and P = 0.068, respectively). Also the difference between the levels of E-selectin was significant comparing S+E and S but not E with group C (P = 0.021, P = 0.000 and P = 0.052, respectively). Twelve weeks effects of aerobic exercise and Crataegus oxyacantha extract consuming is an effective complementary strategy to significantly lower the risk of atherosclerosis and heart problems.

  1. Comparison of Effectiveness of Supervised Exercise Program and Cyriax Physiotherapy in Patients with Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis): A Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Rajadurai Viswas; Rejeeshkumar Ramachandran; Payal Korde Anantkumar

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To compare the effectiveness of supervised exercise program and Cyriax physiotherapy in the treatment of tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis). Design. Randomized clinical trial. Setting. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation centre. Subjects. This study was carried out with 20 patients, who had tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis). Intervention. Group A ( = 1 0 ) had received supervised exercise program. Group B ( = 1 0 ) was treated with Cyriax physiotherapy. All patients received ...

  2. Comparison of impacts of friction massage, stretching exercises and analgesics on pain relief in primary fibromyalgia syndrome: a randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Amanollahi A; Khatibi A; MT Hollisaz; Shamseddini AR

    2013-01-01

    Background: Stretching exercises and massage therapy are both suggested for pain relief in fibromyalgia syndrome. Previous studies have not proved their superiority over each other. This study compared the therapeutic effects of friction massage, stretching exercises, and analgesics on pain relief in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome.Methods: We evaluated 129 female patients with the diagnosis of primary fibromyalgia visited at the physical medicine clinics of Baqiyatallah Hospital in Tehra...

  3. Comparison of selective electromyographic activity of the superficial lumbar multifidus between prone trunk extension and four-point kneeling arm and leg lift exercises

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jun-Seok; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Jang, Jun-Hyeok; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the selective electromyographic activity of the lumbar paraspinal muscles in healthy male and female subjects in the prone trunk extension (PTE) and four-point kneeling arm and leg lift (FPKAL) exercises to determine the most beneficial exercise for selective activation of the lumbar multifidus (LM). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy male and female subjects participated in this study. Surface electromyographic data were collected from the left-side lumbar er...

  4. A Comparison of the Effects of Aerobic and Intense Exercise on the Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Risk Marker Adipokines, Adiponectin and Retinol Binding Protein-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Phillips

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With a more sedentary population comes growing rates of obesity and increased type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM risk. Exercise generally induces positive changes in traditional T2DM risk markers such as lipids, glucose tolerance, and insulin sensitivity; however alterations in concentrations of many circulating cytokines and their respective receptors are also becoming apparent. These cytokines may be early-response health risk factors otherwise overlooked in traditional T2DM risk marker analysis. Plasma levels of two adipocyte-originating cytokines, adiponectin and retinol binding protein 4 (RBP-4, alter following exercise. Adiponectin has anti-inflammatory, anti-atherosclerotic, and anti-insulin resistance roles and its secretion increases with physical activity, whilst elevated RBP-4 leads to increased insulin resistance, and secretion decreases with increasing physical activity; thus these plasma adipokine levels alter favourably following exercise. Although current data are limited, they do suggest that the more intense the exercise, the greater the positive effect on plasma RBP-4 levels, whilst lower intensity aerobic exercise may positively improve adiponectin concentrations. Therefore short-duration, high intensity training may provide a time-efficient alternative to the recommended 150 min moderate aerobic exercise per week in providing positive changes in RBP-4 and other traditional T2DM risk markers and due to increased compliance give greater health benefits over the longer term.

  5. Effects of eccentric exercise on systemic concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin (E2): comparison between young and postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Miguel Soares; Libardi, Cleiton Augusto; Nogueira, Felipe Romano Damas; Bonganha, Valéria; Gáspari, Arthur Fernandes; Chacon-Mikahil, Mara Patrícia Traina; Cavaglieri, Cláudia Regina; Madruga, Vera Aparecida

    2012-09-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the magnitude of muscle damage and inflammatory responses induced by eccentric exercise in young (YW) and postmenopausal women (PMW). Seventeen healthy women (nine YW, 23.89 ± 2.03 years; and eight PMW, 51.13 ± 5.08 years) performed five sets of six maximal eccentric actions of the elbow flexors. Changes in isometric strength, range of motion, muscle soreness, and upper-arm circumference were evaluated pre, post, 24, 48, and 72 h following eccentric exercise. Changes in creatine kinase activity, interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) were measured pre, 24, 48, and 72 h following eccentric exercise. For intra and inter-group analysis, a two-way repeated measures ANOVA was applied followed by a Tukey's post hoc test. Pearson's correlation was used to analyze the correlations between variables. It was observed no differences between groups for the markers of muscle damage, although significant modifications (p eccentric exercise compared to pre. Further, IL-10 was higher for YW than PMW 72 h post-eccentric exercise. Significant correlations (p eccentric exercise compared to PMW.

  6. Multivariate statistics exercises and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Härdle, Wolfgang Karl

    2015-01-01

    The authors present tools and concepts of multivariate data analysis by means of exercises and their solutions. The first part is devoted to graphical techniques. The second part deals with multivariate random variables and presents the derivation of estimators and tests for various practical situations. The last part introduces a wide variety of exercises in applied multivariate data analysis. The book demonstrates the application of simple calculus and basic multivariate methods in real life situations. It contains altogether more than 250 solved exercises which can assist a university teacher in setting up a modern multivariate analysis course. All computer-based exercises are available in the R language. All R codes and data sets may be downloaded via the quantlet download center  www.quantlet.org or via the Springer webpage. For interactive display of low-dimensional projections of a multivariate data set, we recommend GGobi.

  7. Effects of Pilates core stability exercises on the balance abilities of archers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Min; Hyun, Gwang-Suk; Jee, Yong-Seok

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to provide fundamental data contributing to archery performance improvement and stabilization of shooting posture in archers by examining the influence of Pilates core stability (PCS) exercises on dynamic and static balance. The study was conducted from December 2015 to March 2016 on high school archers who were registered as archers in the Korea Archery Association with 5 or more years of archery experience. Twenty voluntary subjects (exercise group n=10; control group n=10) with an understanding toward the aims of this study were selected and their body composition, static and dynamic balance abilities, before and after the PCS program, were measured. As for the static balance ability, there were no significant differences between pre- and postvalues in the exercise group after completing the PCS program. Similarly, these results were also represented in the control group. In the aspect of comparisons between postvalues in both groups, there were significant improvements in only the exercise group. As for the dynamic balance ability, there were significant differences between pre- and postvalues in the exercise group, except for up-right and left postures, whereas, there were no changes or decreases between pre- and postvalues in the control group after completing the PCS program. Meanwhile, in the aspect of comparisons between postvalues in both groups, there were significant improvements in up, and up right, and down right part and overall dynamic scores of the exercise groups.

  8. Comparison of coconut water and a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink on measures of hydration and physical performance in exercise-trained men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalman Douglas S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sport drinks are ubiquitous within the recreational and competitive fitness and sporting world. Most are manufactured and artificially flavored carbohydrate-electrolyte beverages. Recently, attention has been given to coconut water, a natural alternative to manufactured sport drinks, with initial evidence indicating efficacy with regard to maintaining hydration. We compared coconut water and a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink on measures of hydration and physical performance in exercise-trained men. Methods Following a 60-minute bout of dehydrating treadmill exercise, 12 exercise-trained men (26.6 ± 5.7 yrs received bottled water (BW, pure coconut water (VitaCoco®: CW, coconut water from concentrate (CWC, or a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink (SD [a fluid amount based on body mass loss during the dehydrating exercise] on four occasions (separated by at least 5 days in a random order, single blind (subject and not investigators, cross-over design. Hydration status (body mass, fluid retention, plasma osmolality, urine specific gravity and performance (treadmill time to exhaustion; assessed after rehydration were determined during the recovery period. Subjective measures of thirst, bloatedness, refreshed, stomach upset, and tiredness were also determined using a 5-point visual analog scale. Results Subjects lost approximately 1.7 kg (~2% of body mass during the dehydrating exercise and regained this amount in a relatively similar manner following consumption of all conditions. No differences were noted between coconut water (CW or CWC and SD for any measures of fluid retention (p > 0.05. Regarding exercise performance, no significant difference (p > 0.05 was noted between BW (11.9 ± 5.9 min, CW (12.3 ± 5.8 min, CWC (11.9 ± 6.0 min, and SD (12.8 ± 4.9 min. In general, subjects reported feeling more bloated and experienced greater stomach upset with the CW and CWC conditions. Conclusion All tested beverages are

  9. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 15 repetitions at a slow and controlled pace... Resistance Training Resistance training is exercise done against something providing resistance. It can be done with weights (hand-held ...

  10. Compulsive Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... needs rest. Overexercising can lead to injuries like stress fractures and muscle strains. Are You a Healthy Exerciser? Fitness experts recommend that teens do at least 60 minutes of moderate to ...

  11. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or causes acute pain, you should stop doing it. Transverse Core Strengthening This strengthens the muscles that ... training is exercise done against something providing resistance. It can be done with weights (hand-held or ...

  12. Compulsive exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichtenstein, Mia Beck; Hinze, Cecilie Juul; Emborg Jannsen, Bolette

    2017-01-01

    with cognitive behavioral therapy. This review summarizes and discusses findings on links/comorbidity, risks/negative consequences, and treatment challenges. We suggest that future studies should pay attention to both prevention and counseling in sports settings, where compulsive exercise appears......Compulsive exercise is a condition described since 1970s. It is characterized by a craving for physical training, resulting in uncontrollable excessive exercise behavior with harmful consequences, such as injuries and impaired social relations. It has not been accepted as a mental disorder...... found that compulsive exercise is associated with eating disorder pathology, perfectionism, neuroticism, narcissism, and obsessive compulsive traits. The most prominent negative consequences were injuries, social impairment, and depression, but more research is needed to uncover the potential...

  13. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disc Replacement (ADR) Bone Graft Alternatives Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMP) Cervical Disc Replacement Cervical Laminoplasty Lumbar (Open) ... home as well. Some specific core strengthening exercises are described below. If any of the following suggested ...

  14. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to side. Repeat 10 times. Check with your physician; if you are able to use progressively heavier ... be used instead of hand weights. Ask your doctor or physical therapist to prescribe an exercise program ...

  15. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pain Other Scoliosis Back Pain and Emotional Distress Muscle Spasms Pinched Nerve Discitis Degenerative Conditions Bulge vs ... exercise focus on core strengthening, or building the muscles that provide support for your body. Pilates, yoga ...

  16. Draft forecast of the final report for the comparison to 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart B, for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertram-Howery, S.G.; Marietta, M.G.; Anderson, D.R.; Gomez, L.S.; Rechard, R.P. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Brinster, K.F.; Guzowski, R.V. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The United States Department of Energy is planning to dispose of transuranic wastes, which have been generated by defense programs, at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The WIPP Project will assess compliance with the requirements of the United States Environmental Protection Agency. This report forecasts the planned 1992 document, Comparison to 40 CFR, Part 191, Subpart B, for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). 130 refs., 36 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Vibrotactile Stimulation as an Instructor for Mimicry-Based Physical Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jani Lylykangas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present aim was to investigate functionality of vibrotactile stimulation in mimicry-based behavioral regulation during physical exercise. Vibrotactile stimuli communicated instructions from an instructor to an exerciser to perform lower extremity movements. A wireless prototype was tested first in controlled laboratory conditions (Study 1 and was followed by a user study (Study 2 that was conducted in a group exercise situation for elderly participants with a new version of the system with improved construction and extended functionality. The results of Study 1 showed that vibrotactile instructions were successful in both supplementing and substituting visual knee lift instructions. Vibrotactile stimuli were accurately recognized, and exercise with the device received affirmative ratings. Interestingly, tactile stimulation appeared to stabilize acceleration magnitude of the knee lifts in comparison to visual instructions. In Study 2 it was found that user experience of the system was mainly positive by both the exercisers and their instructors. For example, exercise with vibrotactile instructions was experienced as more motivating than conventional exercise session. Together the results indicate that tactile instructions could increase possibilities for people having difficulties in following visual and auditory instructions to take part in mimicry-based group training. Both studies also revealed development areas that were primarily related to a slight delay in triggering the vibrotactile stimulation.

  18. Comparison of Muscle Onset Activation Sequences between a Golf or Tennis Swing and Common Training Exercises Using Surface Electromyography: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Vasudevan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The purpose of this pilot study is to use surface electromyography to determine an individual athlete’s typical muscle onset activation sequence when performing a golf or tennis forward swing and to use the method to assess to what degree the sequence is reproduced with common conditioning exercises and a machine designed for this purpose. Methods. Data for 18 healthy male subjects were collected for 15 muscles of the trunk and lower extremities. Data were filtered and processed to determine the average onset of muscle activation for each motion. A Spearman correlation estimated congruence of activation order between the swing and each exercise. Correlations of each group were pooled with 95% confidence intervals using a random effects meta-analytic strategy. Results. The averaged sequences differed among each athlete tested, but pooled correlations demonstrated a positive association between each exercise and the participants’ natural muscle onset activation sequence. Conclusion. The selected training exercises and Turning Point™ device all partially reproduced our athletes’ averaged muscle onset activation sequences for both sports. The results support consideration of a larger, adequately powered study using this method to quantify to what degree each of the selected exercises is appropriate for use in both golf and tennis.

  19. A comparison of water-based and land-based core stability exercises in patients with lumbar disc herniation: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktar, Deniz; Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Lambeck, Johan; Yazici, Gokhan; Aykol, Sukru; Demirci, Harun

    2016-01-01

    To determine and compare the effects of core stability exercise programs performed in two different environments in lumbar disc herniation (LDH) patients. Thirty-one patients who were diagnosed with LDH and were experiencing pain or functional disability for at least 3 months were randomly divided into two groups as land-based exercises or water specific therapy. Also, 15 age-sex-matched healthy individuals were recruited as healthy controls. Both groups underwent an 8-week (3 times/week) core stabilization exercise program. Primary outcomes were pain, trunk muscle static endurance and perceived disability level. The secondary outcome was health-related quality of life. Level of static endurance of trunk muscles was found to be lower in the patients compared to the controls at baseline (p 0.05). After the treatment, static endurance of trunk muscles of the LDH patients became similar to controls (p > 0.05). According to these results, core stabilization exercise training performed on land or in water both could be beneficial in LDH patients and there is no difference between the environments. An 8-week core stabilization program performed in water or on land decrease pain level and improve functional status in LDH patients. Both programs seem beneficial to increase health-related quality of life and static endurance of trunk muscles. Core stability exercises could be performed in water as well, no differences were found between methods due to environment.

  20. Comparison of Muscle Onset Activation Sequences between a Golf or Tennis Swing and Common Training Exercises Using Surface Electromyography: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, John M; Logan, Andrew; Shultz, Rebecca; Koval, Jeffrey J; Roh, Eugene Y; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this pilot study is to use surface electromyography to determine an individual athlete's typical muscle onset activation sequence when performing a golf or tennis forward swing and to use the method to assess to what degree the sequence is reproduced with common conditioning exercises and a machine designed for this purpose. Methods. Data for 18 healthy male subjects were collected for 15 muscles of the trunk and lower extremities. Data were filtered and processed to determine the average onset of muscle activation for each motion. A Spearman correlation estimated congruence of activation order between the swing and each exercise. Correlations of each group were pooled with 95% confidence intervals using a random effects meta-analytic strategy. Results. The averaged sequences differed among each athlete tested, but pooled correlations demonstrated a positive association between each exercise and the participants' natural muscle onset activation sequence. Conclusion. The selected training exercises and Turning Point™ device all partially reproduced our athletes' averaged muscle onset activation sequences for both sports. The results support consideration of a larger, adequately powered study using this method to quantify to what degree each of the selected exercises is appropriate for use in both golf and tennis.

  1. 校外人员进校参加体育锻炼意外伤害的归责分析%Imputation Analysis of Accident Harm on External People to School Taking Part in Physical Exercise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱小强

    2014-01-01

    For mass sports in China is serious shortage of sports facilities , so the state encourages institutions , schools and other units within the cultural and sports facilities open to the public .In this context , in the school sports teaching training , a large number of outside school personnel will pour into the school , use the school sports facilities take part in physical exercise , and sport is risky , accident damage is inevitable .This paper analyzes the external personnel to school take part in physical exercise injury of some theoretical problems , their own conclusions , the school also have an obligation to school for school personnel to participate in physical exercise to provide a safe sports facilities , and if the damage caused by unsafe sports facilities , and will not apply the risk theory .%我国用于群众体育的体育场馆设施严重不足,所以国家提倡鼓励机关、学校等单位内部的文化体育设施面向公众开放。在这样的背景下,在学校的体育教学训练之余,大量的校外人员会涌进学校,利用学校的体育场馆设施参加体育锻炼,而体育运动是有风险的,发生意外伤害在所难免。本文分析了校外人员进校参加体育锻炼意外伤害的一些理论问题,得出自己的结论,即学校同样有义务为校外人员进校参加体育锻炼提供安全的体育场馆设施,并且如果因不安全的体育场馆设施引起的伤害,将不适用自承风险理论。

  2. The Justifications for War and Peace in World Religions. Part III: Comparison of Scriptures from Seven World Religions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    religions of Indic origin (Part II: Buddhism, Hinduism , Jainism and Sikhism). The important scriptures from each religion were briefly introduced and the...Judaism), and four Indic-origin religions (Part II covers Buddhism, Hinduism , Jainism, and Sikhism). Each set of scriptures was introduced and the...the previous report (Part II): Raj Balkaran, Raoul Bedi, Seth Feldman, and Stephen Gucciardi who worked on the scriptures of Hinduism , Jainism

  3. Comparison of the electromyographic activity, quadriceps: hamstring coactivation ratio and strength changes of dominant leg muscles in collegiate football and volleyball players during different forms of exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanzila Taj

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The preliminary study was aimed to compare Electromyographic (EMG activity, Quadriceps: Hamstring coactivation (Q: H ratio and 1- Repetition maximum (RM squat changes of dominant leg muscles in collegiate football and volleyball players during different forms of exercises. Surface EMG analysis was carried out in 24 university level trained male players, football (n=12 and volleyball (n=12 while performing the following exercises: unilateral bridges, lunges, lateral step up to a 20.32 cm (8 inch platform, quadruped arm/ lower extremity lift in the first session. The EMG activities of vastus medialis obliquus (VMO and hamstrings muscles of dominant leg of the players of both groups were recorded using Power Lab EMG system (Lab Chart, AD instruments, ML-818, Australia. On the next session, 1-RM squat tests were also performed on the same players of both groups. In footballers, the lateral step-up, lunges and quadruped arm/ lower extremity lift and in volleyball players, only lunges produced EMG levels greater than 45% maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC in the VMO, which suggests that they may be beneficial for strengthening that muscle. All the exercises produced EMG levels less than 45% MVIC in hamstrings in both groups of players, so they may be more beneficial for training endurance and stabilization. The study also revealed smallest Q: H coactivation ratio in all exercises in volleyball players suggesting more hamstring activity than quadriceps but in footballers, moderate Q:H coactivation ratios were obtained establishing the quadriceps dominant activation in all these exercises. The 1- RM squat testing also showed significantly greater value (p=0.00 in football players than volleyball players. The findings in this study may be used to select specific exercises to enhance a core training program depending on the individual needs of an athlete or as per the requirement of the specific sport.

  4. Comparison of the Effects of Aerobic Exercise on Pulmonary Function and Levels of Inflammatory Mediators in Men With Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Saki

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Insufficient pulmonary function is a complication of type 2 diabetes coordinating with poor blood sugar management and promoting an inflammatory condition. Our objective was to assess the effects of consistent aerobic exercises on pulmonary function and levels of some inflammatory cytokines in males with type 2 diabetes. Methods: In the present semi-experimental study, 20 men with type 2 diabetes were selected using purposive sampling method. The recruited patients were randomly assigned into one of the aerobic exercise or control groups. The exercises continued for 8 weeks, 3 sessions per week, and each session consisted 45-60 minutes of aerobic exercise with intensity of 50%-70% heart rate reserve (HRR. Spirometry and hematologic parameters were both measured at 48 hours prior and 72 hours subsequent to the intervention. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS v. 22.0 statistical software. Independent and paired sample t test were used for inferential analysis with P≤0.05 regarded as statistically significant. Results: A significant reduction was observed in serum levels of fasting blood sugar (FBS, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, C-reactive protein (CRP, and interleukin 6 (IL-6 in aerobic exercise group (P<0.05. On the other hand, forced vital capacity (FVC, and forced expiratory volume (FEV1 levels showed a significant elevation in the experimental group relative to the control. Conclusion: Considering our findings, it seems that aerobic exercise can improve pulmonary function in type 2 diabetes patients. This may be in some levels mediated by stabilizing blood glucose levels and subsiding systemic inflammatory condition in these patients.

  5. Prevalence of exercise and non-exercise physical activity in Chinese adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    McManus Alison M; Lo Wing-Sze; Ho Sai-Yin; Mak Kwok-Kei; Lam Tai-Hing

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Non-exercise physical activity (NEPA) is an important part of energy expenditure. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of exercise and NEPA among adolescents. In the HKSOS project 2006-2007, the proportions of Hong Kong Chinese adolescents (N = 32,005) achieving 60-minute exercise and 60-minute NEPA per day were analyzed. Exercise was defined as structured and planned physical activities, and NEPA was defined as unstructured and unplanned physical activities including walki...

  6. Left ventricular filling pressure estimation at rest and during exercise in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis: comparison of echocardiographic and invasive measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Pecini, Redi;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Doppler index of left ventricular (LV) filling (E/e') is recognized as a noninvasive measure for LV filling pressure at rest but has also been suggested as a reliable measure of exercise-induced changes. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in LV filling pressure......, measured invasively as pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), at rest and during exercise to describe the relation with E/e' in patients with severe aortic stenosis. METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with an aortic valve areas

  7. A comparison of the diagnostic performance of the ST/HR hysteresis with cardiopulmonary stress testing parameters in detecting exercise-induced myocardial ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimarino, Marco; Barnabei, Luca; Madonna, Rosalinda; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Radico, Francesco; Tatasciore, Alfonso; Bellisarii, Francesco Iachini; Perrucci, Gianni Mauro; Corazzini, Alessandro; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2013-09-30

    Because ST segment depression has limited diagnostic performance at exercise electrocardiography (ECG), ST segment depression/heart rate (ST/HR) hysteresis and cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET)-derived parameters have been proposed as alternatives to diagnose exercise-induced myocardial ischemia. We compared the diagnostic performance of such parameters. We studied 56 subjects (45 men, 11 women, age 59.7 ± 13.6 years) referred for suspected exercise-induced myocardial ischemia with an equivocal ECG exercise test. All subjects serially underwent CPET and a myocardial single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) perfusion imaging (as the gold standard for ischemia). Maximum ST depression at peak exercise (ST-max), the ST/HR hysteresis, ΔVO2/ΔWR b-b1 slope, ΔVO2/ΔWR (aa1-bb1), VO2/HR flattening duration and other CPET parameters were derived in all subjects. On the basis of SPECT, 23 subjects (41%) were considered ischemic and 33 subjects (59%) non-ischemic. ST/HR hysteresis was higher (0.026 mV; 95% CI: 0.003 to 0.049 vs -0.016 mV; 95% CI: -0.031 to -0.001 mV) and ST-max was lower (-0.105 mV; 95% CI: -0.158 to -0.052 vs 0.032 mV; 95% CI: -0.001 to -0.066 mV) in ischemic vs non-ischemic subjects (P=0.004 and P=0.001, respectively). Among CPET parameters, ΔVO2/ΔWR b-b(1) slope was lower (9.4 ± 3.8) and ΔVO2/ΔWR (aa(1)-bb(1)) was higher (2.1 ± 2.6) in ischemic vs non-ischemic subjects (11.4 ± 2.3, P=0.005, and 1.1 ± 1.5, P=0.001, respectively). The ST/HR hysteresis had the highest area under the curve value, better (Ptested, thus showing the highest overall diagnostic performance. The ST/HR hysteresis is superior to CPET-derived parameters for detecting exercise-induced myocardial ischemia in patients with equivocal ECG exercise test results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of measurements from optical CMM and focus-variation microscope of a μPIM mechanical part

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quagliotti, Danilo; Salaga, Jacek; Tosello, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Two sets of 5 green and 5 sintered mechanical parts, manufactured by micro powder injection moulding (μPIM), were measured using an optical coordinate measuring machine (OCMM) and a focus-variation microscope (FVM). The examined features of size, including diameter, radii and distances, span...... in the range of (10-1–101) mm. Comparing the corresponding measurements from the two instruments, a relative maximum deviation of 8 % was found for the linear dimensions of the green parts and a relative maximum deviation of 6 % for the ones of the sintered parts. The maximum relative deviation of the radii...... was 17 % for the green parts and 30 % for the sintered parts (relative deviations have been evaluated considering focus-variation measurements as reference).OCMM showed some problems in the detection of the smallest dimensional features (above all radii) where the presence of defects on the edges, quite...

  9. Proprioception exercises in medical rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryła, Wanda; Pogorzała, Adam M; Stępień, Justyna

    2013-01-03

    Proprioception, or kinesthesia, is the sense of orientation responsible for perception of body and relative position of its parts. Kinaesthesia is received by receptors located in muscles and tendons. In this study a set of proprioception developing exercises was presented. Proprioception should be restored in case of musculoskeletal and neurological disorders. Proprioception training can also be used as a prophylaxis before starting various sporting activities. Proprioception developing exercises have significant meaning for the elderly, who are at risk of balance disorders. These exercises help developing motor memory and at the same time protect from falls.

  10. Coronal Partings

    CERN Document Server

    Nikulin, Igor F

    2015-01-01

    The basic observational properties of the 'coronal partings'--the special type of the coronal magnetic structures, identified by a comparison of the coronal X-ray images and solar magnetograms--are considered. They represent channels inside the unipolar large-scale magnetic fields, formed by the rows of magnetic arcs directed to the neighboring fields of opposite polarity. The most important characteristics of the partings are revealed. It is found that--from the evolutionary and spatial point of view--the partings can transform to the coronal holes and visa versa. The classes of global, intersecting, and complex partings are identified.

  11. A comparison of three design tree based search algorithms for the detection of engineering parts constructed with CATIA V5 in large databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Roj

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents three different search engines for the detection of CAD-parts in large databases. The analysis of the contained information is performed by the export of the data that is stored in the structure trees of the CAD-models. A preparation program generates one XML-file for every model, which in addition to including the data of the structure tree, also owns certain physical properties of each part. The first search engine is specializes in the discovery of standard parts, like screws or washers. The second program uses certain user input as search parameters, and therefore has the ability to perform personalized queries. The third one compares one given reference part with all parts in the database, and locates files that are identical, or similar to, the reference part. All approaches run automatically, and have the analysis of the structure tree in common. Files constructed with CATIA V5, and search engines written with Python have been used for the implementation. The paper also includes a short comparison of the advantages and disadvantages of each program, as well as a performance test.

  12. Application of A Physiological Strain Index in Evaluating Responses to Exercise Stress – A Comparison Between Endurance and High Intensity Intermittent Trained Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żebrowska, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The study evaluated differences in response to exercise stress between endurance and high-intensity intermittent trained athletes in a thermoneutral environment using a physiological strain index (PSI). Thirty-two subjects participated in a running exercise under normal (23°C, 50% RH) conditions. The group included nine endurance trained athletes (middle-distance runners - MD), twelve high-intensity intermittent trained athletes (soccer players - HIIT) and eleven students who constituted a control group. The exercise started at a speed of 4 km·h–1 which was increased every 3 min by 2 km·h–1 to volitional exhaustion. The heart rate was recorded with a heart rate monitor and aural canal temperature was measured using an aural canal temperature probe. The physiological strain index (PSI) and the contribution of the circulatory and thermal components to the overall physiological strain were calculated from the heart rate and aural canal temperature. The physiological strain index differed between the study and control participants, but not between the MD and HIIT groups. The physiological strain in response to exercise stress in a thermoneutral environment was mainly determined based on the circulatory strain (MD group - 73%, HIIT group – 70%). The contribution of the circulatory and thermal components to the physiological strain did not differ significantly between the trained groups (MD and HIIT) despite important differences in morphological characteristics and training-induced systemic cardiovascular and thermoregulatory adaptations. PMID:28149347

  13. Application of A Physiological Strain Index in Evaluating Responses to Exercise Stress – A Comparison Between Endurance and High Intensity Intermittent Trained Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokora Ilona

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluated differences in response to exercise stress between endurance and high-intensity intermittent trained athletes in a thermoneutral environment using a physiological strain index (PSI. Thirty-two subjects participated in a running exercise under normal (23°C, 50% RH conditions. The group included nine endurance trained athletes (middle-distance runners - MD, twelve high-intensity intermittent trained athletes (soccer players - HIIT and eleven students who constituted a control group. The exercise started at a speed of 4 km·h–1 which was increased every 3 min by 2 km·h–1 to volitional exhaustion. The heart rate was recorded with a heart rate monitor and aural canal temperature was measured using an aural canal temperature probe. The physiological strain index (PSI and the contribution of the circulatory and thermal components to the overall physiological strain were calculated from the heart rate and aural canal temperature. The physiological strain index differed between the study and control participants, but not between the MD and HIIT groups. The physiological strain in response to exercise stress in a thermoneutral environment was mainly determined based on the circulatory strain (MD group - 73%, HIIT group – 70%. The contribution of the circulatory and thermal components to the physiological strain did not differ significantly between the trained groups (MD and HIIT despite important differences in morphological characteristics and training-induced systemic cardiovascular and thermoregulatory adaptations.

  14. Prediction of Exercise in Patients across Various Stages of Bariatric Surgery: A Comparison of the Merits of the Theory of Reasoned Action versus the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Hillary R.; Gross, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is a world-wide health concern approaching epidemic proportions. Successful long-term treatment involves a combination of bariatric surgery, diet, and exercise. Social cognitive models, such as the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) and the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), are among the most commonly tested theories utilized in the…

  15. Prediction of Exercise in Patients across Various Stages of Bariatric Surgery: A Comparison of the Merits of the Theory of Reasoned Action versus the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Hillary R.; Gross, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is a world-wide health concern approaching epidemic proportions. Successful long-term treatment involves a combination of bariatric surgery, diet, and exercise. Social cognitive models, such as the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) and the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), are among the most commonly tested theories utilized in the…

  16. Comparison of the effect of multiple short-duration with single long-duration exercise sessions on glucose homeostasis in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, L; Dahl-Petersen, I; Haugaard, Steen B

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We evaluated and compared the effects on glycaemic control of two different exercise protocols in elderly men with type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: Eighteen patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus carried out home-based bicycle training for 5 weeks. Patients were randomly assigned...

  17. A comparison of respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, activities of daily living and physical fitness in patients with cystic fibrosis and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Hulya; Yatar, İlker; Calik-Kutukcu, Ebru; Aribas, Zeynep; Saglam, Melda; Vardar-Yagli, Naciye; Savci, Sema; Inal-Ince, Deniz; Ozcelik, Ugur; Kiper, Nural

    2015-01-01

    There are limited reports that compare muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, activities of daily living (ADL) and parameters of physical fitness of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with healthy peers in the literature. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, ADL and physical fitness in patients with CF and healthy subjects. Nineteen patients with CF (mean forced expiratory volume in one second-FEV1: 86.56±18.36%) and 20 healthy subjects were included in this study. Respiratory (maximal inspiratory pressure-MIP and maximal expiratory pressure-MEP) and peripheral muscle strength (quadriceps, shoulder abductors and hand grip strength) were evaluated. Functional exercise capacity was determined with 6min walk test (6MWT). ADL was assessed with Glittre ADL test and physical fitness was assessed with Munich fitness test (MFT). There were not any statistically significant difference in MIP, %MIP, MEP and %MEP values between two groups (p>0.05). %Peripheral muscle strength (% quadriceps and shoulder abductors strength), 6MWT distance and %6MWT distance were significantly lower in patients with CF than those of healthy subjects (pmuscle strength, functional exercise capacity, ADL performance and speed, coordination, endurance and power components of physical fitness are adversely affected in mild-severe patients with CF compared to healthy peers. Evaluations must be done in comprehensive manner in patients with CF with all stages.

  18. Comparison of aerobic exercise, diet or both on lipids and lipoproteins in adults: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Given that previous studies have reached conflicting conclusions regarding the effects of diet (D), aerobic exercise (E) or both (DE) on blood lipid and lipoprotein concentrations in adults, the meta-analytic approach was used to address this issue. Data Sources: Nine electronic databases, cross-ref...

  19. Comparison of transient arterial occlusion and muscle exercise provocation for assessment of perfusion reserve in skeletal muscle with real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krix, Martin, E-mail: martin.krix@kabelbw.de [German Cancer Research Center, Research Program Imaging and Radiooncology, Department of Radiology, INF 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bracco Imaging Germany, Max-Stromeyer-Str. 116, D-78467 Konstanz (Germany); Krakowski-Roosen, Holger [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Translational Oncology, INF 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Armarteifio, Erick [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, INF 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Fuerstenberger, Susanne [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Vascular Surgery, INF 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Delorme, Stefan [German Cancer Research Center, Research Program Imaging and Radiooncology, Department of Radiology, INF 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-Andre [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, INF 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Objective: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is able to quantify muscle perfusion and changes in perfusion due to muscle exercise in real-time. However, reliable measurement of standardized muscle exercise is difficult to perform in clinical examinations. We compared perfusion reserve assessed by CEUS after transient arterial occlusion and exercise to find the most suitable measurement for clinical application. Methods: Contrast pulse sequencing (7 MHz) during continuous IV infusion of SonoVue (4.8 mL/300 s) was used in 8 healthy volunteers to monitor muscle perfusion of the gastrocnemius muscle during transient (1 min) arterial occlusion produced by a thigh cuff of a venous occlusion plethysmograph. Isometric muscle exercise (50% of individual maximum strength for 20 s) was subsequently performed during the same examination, and several CEUS parameters obtained from ultrasound-signal-intensity-time curves and its calculation errors were compared. Results: The mean maximum local blood volume after occlusion was 13.9 [{approx}mL] (range, 4.5-28.8 [{approx}mL]), and similar values were measured after sub-maximum exercise 13.8 [{approx}mL], (range, 4.6-22.2 [{approx}mL]. The areas under the curve during reperfusion vs. recovery were also similar (515.2 {+-} 257.5 compared to 482.2 {+-} 187.5 [{approx}mL s]) with a strong correlation (r = 0.65), as were the times to maximum (15.3 s vs. 15.9 s), with a significantly smaller variation for the occlusion method ({+-}2.1 s vs. {+-}9.0 s, p = 0.03). The mean errors for all calculated CEUS parameters were lower for the occlusion method than for the exercise test. Conclusions: CEUS muscle perfusion measurements can be easily performed after transient arterial occlusion. It delivers data which are comparable to CEUS measurements after muscle exercise but with a higher robustness. This method can be easily applied in clinical examination of patients with e.g. PAOD or diabetic microvessel diseases to assess perfusion reserve.

  20. Comparison of Diaphragmatic Breathing Exercise, Volume and Flow Incentive Spirometry, on Diaphragm Excursion and Pulmonary Function in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopala Krishna Alaparthi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effects of diaphragmatic breathing exercises and flow and volume-oriented incentive spirometry on pulmonary function and diaphragm excursion in patients undergoing laparoscopic abdominal surgery. Methodology. We selected 260 patients posted for laparoscopic abdominal surgery and they were block randomization as follows: 65 patients performed diaphragmatic breathing exercises, 65 patients performed flow incentive spirometry, 65 patients performed volume incentive spirometry, and 65 patients participated as a control group. All of them underwent evaluation of pulmonary function with measurement of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC, Forced Expiratory Volume in the first second (FEV1, Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR, and diaphragm excursion measurement by ultrasonography before the operation and on the first and second postoperative days. With the level of significance set at p<0.05. Results. Pulmonary function and diaphragm excursion showed a significant decrease on the first postoperative day in all four groups (p<0.001 but was evident more in the control group than in the experimental groups. On the second postoperative day pulmonary function (Forced Vital Capacity and diaphragm excursion were found to be better preserved in volume incentive spirometry and diaphragmatic breathing exercise group than in the flow incentive spirometry group and the control group. Pulmonary function (Forced Vital Capacity and diaphragm excursion showed statistically significant differences between volume incentive spirometry and diaphragmatic breathing exercise group (p<0.05 as compared to that flow incentive spirometry group and the control group. Conclusion. Volume incentive spirometry and diaphragmatic breathing exercise can be recommended as an intervention for all patients pre- and postoperatively, over flow-oriented incentive spirometry for the generation and sustenance of pulmonary function and diaphragm excursion in the management of

  1. Comparison of impacts of friction massage, stretching exercises and analgesics on pain relief in primary fibromyalgia syndrome: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanollahi A

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stretching exercises and massage therapy are both suggested for pain relief in fibromyalgia syndrome. Previous studies have not proved their superiority over each other. This study compared the therapeutic effects of friction massage, stretching exercises, and analgesics on pain relief in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome.Methods: We evaluated 129 female patients with the diagnosis of primary fibromyalgia visited at the physical medicine clinics of Baqiyatallah Hospital in Tehran, Iran during 2010- 2011. Patients were randomly divided into three groups: the first group received 400 mg ibuprofen P.O. (3 times per day and 25 mg nortriptyline (daily P.O. as analgesic, the second group was treated by friction massage and the third group performed stretching exercises. Patients were assessed three times (initially, after one and four weeks by visual analogue scale (VAS.Results: The mean age of participants was 60.46 years. The mean age in each treatment group was 46.66 years in medication group, 46.73 years in stretching group and 46.65 years in friction massage group. Changes in VAS score over 4 weeks were 2.4, 3.1 and 1.9, in the first, second, and third groups, respectively. The changes in VAS were significantly different in the first and second groups rather than the controls (P<0.05.Conclusion: The effect of stretch exercise on pain relief was similar to analgesics, but it was more effective than friction massage. Moreover, the therapeutic effect of stretching exercise on pain relief upon four weeks was more permanent than friction massage but it was similar to analgesics.

  2. PILATES EXERCISES-A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvi Shah

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a theoretical basis for techniques of physical exercises developed by Joseph Pilates. Themethod, as a part of the so-called Body Mind Exercises group, first gained recognition among professionaldancers, actors and choreographers but has become more popular and is now regularly applied in sport, fitnessand physiotherapy.Pilates is a uniquely precise and intelligent approach to exercise and body-conditioning,which gives you a leaner, suppler, more toned body and a calmer, more relaxed mind.The initial part of thepaper presents historical background, principles of performing exercises and benefits using the Pilates Method.Pilates is a gentle, non-aerobic exercise method, which lengthens and strengthens the muscles, and improvesposture, without stressing the joints or the heart. The Pilates method incorporates both physical and mentalelements. The technique focuses on the ‘‘power house’’ or what is known today as the core; in Pilates, thisincludes the abdominal, gluteal, and paraspinal muscles in particular.The final part of the article includesdetailed pilates mat exercise programme (basic, intermediate, advanced and evidence for the use of pilatesexercises. The author hopes to encourage the environment of physiotherapists to enhance their professionalskills with elements of Pilates’ method

  3. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  4. Exercise at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Insights Exercise & Weight Exercise at Home Exercise at Home Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... with the movement and contact your provider. Posture Exercises Better posture means better breathing and movement. Axial ...

  5. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... management of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction: A practice parameter. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. 2010;105:S1. Krafczyk ... up exercise on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2012;44:383. Asthma ...

  6. Exercise during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Exercise During Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Exercise During Pregnancy ... Pregnancy FAQ119, May 2016 PDF Format Exercise During Pregnancy Pregnancy Is it safe to exercise during pregnancy? ...

  7. Proximal Humeral Fractures: A Biomechanical Comparison of Locking Plate Constructs in a Cadaveric 3-Part Fracture Model

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to biomechanically compare, under cyclic loading conditions, fracture site motion, humeral head collapse, and intra-articular hardware penetration in simulated 3-part osteoporotic proximal humeral fractures stabilized with 1 of 2 locking-plate constructs. We performed fixation on simulated 3-part proximal humeral fractures in 10 pairs of cadaveric osteoporotic humeri with a Hand Innovations S3 Proximal Humerus Plate (S3 plate) or an LCP Proximal Humerus Plate (LCP...

  8. Effect of exercise intensity on exercise and post exercise energy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of exercise intensity on exercise and post exercise energy expenditure in ... treadmill at 57% of maximum heart rate, as well as for 4 hours post exercise. ... in order to increase energy expenditure as well as enhance the oxidation of fat ...

  9. Bilateral comparison of 1 V and 10 V standards between the INM (Romania) and the BIPM, August to October 2013 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solve, S.; Chayramy, R.; Stock, M.; Simionescu, M.; Cîrneanu, L.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b, a comparison of the 1 V and 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and the Institut National de Metrologie (INM), Bucharest, Romania, was carried out from August to October 2013. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards (Fluke 732B), BIPM_7 (Z7) and BIPM_8 (Z8), were transported by freight to INM. At INM, the reference standard for DC voltage is a Josephson Voltage Standard. The output EMF (electromotive force) of each travelling standard was measured by direct comparison with the primary standard. At the BIPM, the travelling standards were calibrated, before and after the measurements at INM, with the Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages of the Zener standards on internal temperature and ambient atmospheric pressure. The final result of the comparison is presented as the difference between the values assigned to DC voltage standards by INM, at the level of 1.018 V and 10 V, at INM, UINM, and those assigned by the BIPM, at the BIPM, UBIPM, at the reference date of 6 September 2013. UINM - UBIPM = -0.014 µV uc = 0.051 µV, at 1 V UINM - UBIPM = -0.43 µV uc = 0.34 µV, at 10 V where uc is the combined standard uncertainty associated with the measured difference, including the uncertainty of the representation of the volt at the BIPM and at INM, based on KJ-90, and the uncertainty related to the comparison. These are satisfactory results. The comparison results show that the voltage standards maintained by INM and the BIPM were equivalent, within the comparison uncertainty, on the mean date of the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual

  10. Response of right ventricular size, function, and pressure to supine exercise: a comparison of patients with chronic obstructive lung disease and normal subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slutsky, R.; Hooper, W.; Ackerman, W.; Moser, K.

    1982-12-01

    The response of right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) and right ventricular end-diastolic volume (RVEDV) to exercise was studied in 11 patients with severe (FEV/sub 25/sub(%)sub(-)/sub 75/sub(%)=0.32+-0.13, mean+-SD) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using gated radionuclide cardiac blood pool imaging techniques, the response of the patients with COPD was compared with that of 15 control subjects. Arterial blood gases, pulmonary arterial pressures, wedge pressure, and right ventricular pressures also were monitored in patients with COPD. The resting RVEF was lower and the resting RVEDV was higher in patients with COPD than in normals (both, P<0.01). Two of the 11 COPD patients had a RVEF during rest that was below lower limits, while 10 of 11 patients had RV dilation. Right ventricular end-diastolic pressure, measured during rest in patients with COPD, was normal (6.1+-2.1 mm Hg) and cardiac index was within normal limits (3.55+-0.82 l/min/m/sup 2/). With exercise this cardiac index rose to 5.52+-1.7/min/m/sup 2/(P<0.01) due to the increase in heart rate (83+-18 to 125+-25 beats/min; P<0.01) while stroke volume did not significantly change. During exercise, normal subjects showed an increase in RVEF while RVEDV did not change; in patients with COPD, the RVEF fell and the RVEDV increased. In the patients with COPD, mild resting arterial hypoxemia and hypercapnia were both exaggerated during exercise; and mild resting pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAm=24.3+-7.65 mm Hg) also worsened with exercise (PAm=41+-19 mm Hg, P<0.01). Correlation between change in RVEF and PAm was -0.58, and between change in RVEDV and PAm was 0.63. We conclude that patients with severe COPD often have right ventricular dilation at rest and commonly respond to supine exercise with a fall in FV ejection fraction and further dilation of the right ventricle.

  11. Comparison of neuromuscular and quadriceps strengthening exercise in the treatment of varus malaligned knees with medial knee osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennell Kim L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis of the knee involving predominantly the medial tibiofemoral compartment is common in older people, giving rise to pain and loss of function. Many people experience progressive worsening of the disease over time, particularly those with varus malalignment and increased medial knee joint load. Therefore, interventions that can reduce excessive medial knee loading may be beneficial in reducing the risk of structural progression. Traditional quadriceps strengthening can improve pain and function in people with knee osteoarthritis but does not appear to reduce medial knee load. A neuromuscular exercise program, emphasising optimal alignment of the trunk and lower limb joints relative to one another, as well as quality of movement performance, while dynamically and functionally strengthening the lower limb muscles, may be able to reduce medial knee load. Such a program may also be superior to traditional quadriceps strengthening with respect to improved pain and physical function because of the functional and dynamic nature. This randomised controlled trial will investigate the effect of a neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint loading, pain and function in individuals with medial knee joint osteoarthritis. We hypothesise that the neuromuscular program will reduce medial knee load as well as pain and functional limitations to a greater extent than a traditional quadriceps strengthening program. Methods/Design 100 people with medial knee pain, radiographic medial compartment osteoarthritis and varus malalignment will be recruited and randomly allocated to one of two 12-week exercise programs: quadriceps strengthening or neuromuscular exercise. Each program will involve 14 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist plus four unsupervised sessions per week at home. The primary outcomes are medial knee load during walking (the peak external knee adduction moment from 3D gait analysis, pain, and self

  12. The Comparison of Two Methods of Exercise (intense interval training and concurrent resistance- endurance training on Fasting Sugar, Insulin and Insulin Resistance in Women with Mellitus Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Bazyar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Exercise is an important component of health and an integral approach to the management of diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of intense interval training and concurrent resistance- endurance training on fasting sugar, insulin and insulin resistance in women with mellitus diabetes.   Methods: Fifty-two overweight female diabetic type 2 patients (aged 45-60 years old with fasting blood glucose≥ 126 mg/dl were selected to participate in the present study. Participants were assigned to intense interval training group (N=17, concurrent resistance- endurance training group (N=17 and control group (N=18. The exercises incorporated 10 weeks of concurrent resistance- endurance training and intense interval training. Fasting blood sugar, serum insulin concentrations levels were measured. Concurrent training group trained eight weeks, three times a week of endurance training at 60% of maximum heart rate (MHR and two resistance training sessions per week with 70% of one repetition maximum (1-RM. Intense interval training group trained for eight weeks, three sessions per week for 4 to 10 repeats Wingate test on the ergometer 30s performed with maximum effort. The control group did no systematic exercise. At the end of experiment 42 subjects were succeed and completed the study period, and 10 subjects were removed due to illness and absence in the exercise sessions. Fasting blood sugar and insulin levels 24 hours before and 48 hours after the last training session was measured.   Results: The findings indicated that in periodic fasting, the blood sugar in intensive training group had a marked decrease (p= 0.000 however, the fasting blood sugar of exercise and power stamina groups reduced significantly (p=0.062. The results showed no significant difference between the groups (171/0 p =0.171. Fasting insulin (p <0.001 and insulin resistance (0001/0 = p=0.001 in periodic intensive training group were

  13. Compulsive Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of workouts completed and the effort put into training is never satisfied with his or her own physical achievements It's important, too, to recognize the types of athletes who are more prone to compulsive exercise because their sports place a particular emphasis on being thin. Ice ...

  14. [Exercise addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, A; Lejoyeux, M

    2013-01-01

    Socially valorised, sport like other forms of behaviour, can take on an addictive aspect. A review of the English and French literatures from 1979 to 2012 was conducted, using PubMed, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and PsycInfo, using the following key words alone or combined :sport, dependence, exercise, addiction. Exercise dependence is defined as a craving for physical activity that leads to extreme exercise intensity and generates physiological and psychological symptoms. Measurement scales have been proposed to make the diagnosis. No epidemiological studies have examined the prevalence of exercise dependence in the general population, although some studies suggest a frequency ranging from 10 to 80%. Disorders begin with a search for pleasure in physical effort, which then gives way to an obsession for sport resulting in a need to practice a sport more and more frequently and intensely. This addiction is more common among alcohol and illicit drug addicts than among the general population, while the rate of eating disorders can reach 40%. Personality traits most often associated are perfectionism, extraversion, and sensation seeking, while possible links between sporting activity and intensive doping will be discussed.

  15. Eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Michael; Heinemeier, Katja Maria

    2014-01-01

    Eccentric exercise can influence tendon mechanical properties and matrix protein synthesis. mRNA for collagen and regulatory factors thereof are upregulated in animal tendons, independent of muscular contraction type, supporting the view that tendon, compared with skeletal muscle, is less sensitive...

  16. Investigation of sodium arsenite, thioacetamide, and diethanolamine in the alkaline comet assay: Part of the JaCVAM comet validation exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beevers, Carol; Henderson, Debbie; Lillford, Lucinda

    2015-07-01

    As part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiative international validation study of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay (comet assay), we examined sodium arsenite, thioacetamide, and diethanolamine. Using the JaCVAM approved study protocol version 14.2, each chemical was tested in male rats up to maximum tolerated dose levels and DNA damage in the liver and stomach was assessed approximately 3h after the final administration by gavage. Histopathology assessments of liver and stomach sections from the same animals were also examined for evidence of cytotoxicity or necrosis. No evidence of DNA damage was observed in the stomach of animals treated with sodium arsenite at 7.5, 15, or 30 mg/kg/day. However, equivocal findings were found in the liver, where increases in DNA migration were observed in two independent experiments, but not in all treated animals and not at the same dose levels. Thioacetamide caused an increase in DNA migration in the stomach of rats treated at 19, 38, and 75 mg/kg/day, but not in the liver, despite evidence of marked hepatotoxicity following histopathology assessments. No evidence of DNA damage was observed in the stomach or liver of animals treated with diethanolamine at 175, 350, or 700 mg/kg/day.

  17. Comparison of usefulness of exercise testing versus coronary computed tomographic angiography for evaluation of patients suspected of having coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovrehus, Kristian A; Jensen, Jesper K; Mickley, Hans;

    2010-01-01

    In patients suspected of having coronary artery disease (CAD), we compared the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of exercise testing using ST-segment changes alone and ST-segment changes, angina pectoris, and hemodynamic variables compared to coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA...... performance of CTA for the detection and exclusion of significant CAD might favor CTA as the first-line diagnostic test in patients suspected of having CAD....

  18. Single beat 3D echocardiography for the assessment of right ventricular dimension and function after endurance exercise: Intraindividual comparison with magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schattke Sebastian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our study compares new single beat 3D echocardiography (sb3DE to cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR for the measurement of right ventricular (RV dimension and function immediately after a 30 km run. This is to validate sb3DE against the "gold standard" CMR and to bring new insights into acute changes of RV dimension and function after endurance exercise. Methods 21 non-elite male marathon runners were examined by sb3DE (Siemens ACUSON SC2000, matrix transducer 4Z1c, volume rates 10-29/s, CMR (Siemens Magnetom Avanto, 1,5 Tesla and blood tests before and immediately after each athlete ran 30 km. The runners were not allowed to rehydrate after the race. The order of sb3DE and CMR examination was randomized. Results Sb3DE for the acquisition of RV dimension and function was feasible in all subjects. The decrease in mean body weight and the significant increase in hematocrit indicated dehydration. RV dimensions measured by CMR were consistently larger than measured by sb3DE. Neither sb3DE nor CMR showed a significant difference in the RV ejection fraction before and after exercise. CMR demonstrated a significant decrease in RV dimensions. Measured by sb3DE, this decrease of RV volumes was not significant. Conclusion First, both methods agree well in the acquisition of systolic RV function. The dimensions of the RV measured by CMR are larger than measured by sb3DE. After exercise, the RV volumes decrease significantly when measured by CMR compared to baseline. Second, endurance exercise seems not to induce acute RV dysfunction in athletes without rehydration.

  19. A comparison of the Endurance Shuttle Walk test and the Six Minute Walk test for assessment of exercise capacity in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witham, Miles D; Sugden, Jacqui A; Sumukadas, Deepa; Dryburgh, Moira; McMurdo, Marion E T

    2012-04-01

    The six minute walk test is widely used to measure aerobic exercise capacity in older people, but lack responsiveness to change. We aimed to compare the reliability, responsiveness and completion rates of the six minute walk with a new test of aerobic exercise capacity - the endurance shuttle walk test. Two groups were studied: 18 patients from a Medicine for the Elderly Day Hospital (study 1) receiving physiotherapy, and 15 community dwelling older people (study 2) receiving caffeine or placebo in a crossover study, followed by a weekly exercise programme. Six minute walk test and endurance shuttle walk test were performed at baseline and after interventions. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated for reliability, and Cohen's effect sizes were calculated to characterize responsiveness. 6/18 of patients in study 1 completed the baseline shuttle walk successfully. For those completing baseline and week one shuttle walk, similar intraclass correlation coefficients were seen (shuttle walk 0.97; six minute walk 0.90). In study 2, all attendees completed baseline and follow-up shuttle walk. 7/15 managed the maximum shuttle walk time at baseline. Effect sizes for caffeine intervention (0.29 for six minute walk, 0.01 for shuttle walk) and for exercise intervention (0.15 for six minute walk, 0.24 for shuttle walk) were similarly low for both tests. The endurance shuttle walk is no more responsive to change than the six minute walk in older people, is limited by ceiling effects, and cannot be performed successfully by very frail older people.

  20. Management of Hypertrophic Burn Scar: A Comparison between the Efficacy of Exercise-Physiotherapy and Pressure Garment-Silicone on Hypertrophic Scar

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Our study aims to investigate the effectiveness of other treatment methods for burn related scarring and to determine the possibility of their routine administration in similar clinical settings. Methods Through a prospective study, 66 patients were enrolled to receive either the conventional pressure garment therapy (PGT) and Silicone (control group) or exercise and physiotherapy (case group). Patients were visited regularly to be examined for the status of their scars’ regression, l...

  1. A comparison of blood gases and acid-base measurements in arterial, arterialized venous, and venous blood during short-term maximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linderman, J; Fahey, T D; Lauten, G; Brooker, A S; Bird, D; Dolinar, B; Musselman, J; Lewis, S; Kirk, L

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between blood gases and acid-base measurements in arterial, arterialized venous, and venous blood measured simultaneously during short-term maximal exercise. Ten well-trained male cyclists performed a graded maximal exercise test on a cycle ergometer to determine the power output corresponding to their peak oxygen consumption (test I), and a short-term maximal test on a cycle ergometer at peak power output (test II). During test II arterial, arterialized venous and venous blood were sampled simultaneously for determination of partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide, pH, bicarbonate (HCO3-), base excess (BE), and lactate (La). Samples were taken at rest, the end of 1 min of exercise (1 ME), at the end of exercise (EE), and at 2 min of recovery (REC). During test II, subjects maintained a peak power output of 370.6 (62.1) W [mean (SD)] for 4.5, SD 1.6 min. Except at rest venous and arterialized venous measurements tended to be the same at all sampling intervals, but differed significantly from measurements in arterial blood (P less than 0.05). BE was the only variable that rendered consistently significant correlations between arterial and arterialized venous blood at each sampling interval. The pooled correlation coefficient between arterial and arterialized venous BE was r = 0.83 [regression equation: BEa = (0.84 BEav)-0.51]. Arterial La was significantly higher than venous La at 1 ME (2.8, 0.7 vs 0.8, 0.3 mmol.l-1) and higher than both venous and arterialized venous La at EE.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Comparison of Substrate Oxidation and Energy Expenditure During Acute Aerobic Exercise With Moderate and High Intensity in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezaei Nasab

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Type 2 diabetes and obesity are related to other metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance, high blood pressure, visceral obesity increase and metabolic syndrome with high danger of cardiovascular disease expansion. Objectives This study aimed to determine whether in patients with type 2 diabetes, substrate oxidation and energy expenditure were affected by the type of intensity of acute aerobic exercise they were provided. Materials and Methods Nine men with type 2 diabetes (Mean ± SD; age 52.6 ± 0.36 years, Body Mass Index (BMI = 30.3 ± 2.4 and 9 obese control group (Mean ± SD; age 49.1 ± 1.4 years, BMI = 31.3 ± 1.8 were participated in this study. In the first session, anthropometric measurements, body composition and maximum oxygen uptake (VO2 peak were measured in all subjects. In the next sessions, subjects completed two acute aerobic exercises on separate days in a crossover design. The two exercise trials performed at intensity of 60% and 80% VO2 peak after fasting for at least 10 hours. Means of volume of oxygen (VO2 and Volume of Carbon dioxide (VCO2 were calculated during 30 minutes for measuring the rates of fat oxidation, carbohydrate oxidation and energy expenditure at each intensity. Results The results showed that substrate oxidation and energy expenditure were lower in the diabetic group (P < 0.05 compared to the control one. Also, the results revealed that carbohydrate oxidation and energy expenditure were statistically increased by providing high intensity rather than moderate intensity; however, fat oxidation was statistically increased by providing moderate intensity rather than high intensity (P < 0.05. Conclusions According to the results of the present study, aerobic exercise at moderate intensity and proper time can be considered as a special treatment to prevent diabetes complications and related disorders, particularly obesity.

  3. Northern high-latitude climate change between the mid and late Holocene – Part 2: Model-data comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Nilsson

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The solar orbital forcing induced changes in insolation at the mid-Holocene compared to the late Holocene, which causes an amplification of the seasonal cycle in the Northern Hemisphere in the earlier period. The climate response over northern high latitudes, to this change in forcing has been investigated in three types of PMIP (Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project simulations with different complexity of the climate system. The model results have also been compared with available reconstructions from temperature proxy data. Both the reconstructions and the PMIP2 models show a warm response in annual mean temperature, as well as in summer and winter temperature. The model-model comparisons indicate the importance of including the different physical feedbacks (ocean, sea-ice, vegetation in the climate model. An objective selection method is applied in the model-data comparison to evaluate the capability of the climate model in reproducing the spatial response pattern. The comparisons between the reconstructions and the best-fit selected simulations show that over the northern high latitudes, summer temperature change follows closely to the insolation and shows a common feature with strong warming over land and relatively weak warming over ocean. A pronounced warming centre is found over Barents Sea in winter in model simulations, which is also supported by the nearby northern Eurasian continental reconstructions. The warming over Barents Sea corresponds to a positive North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO. The strengthened sea level pressure gradient may have caused a northward shift of the Atlantic storm track. It results in enhanced westerlies towards the northern Eurasia, which may be responsible for the winter warming over northern Fennoscandia and northern Siberia.

  4. Climate change between the mid and late Holocene in northern high latitudes – Part 2: Model-data comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Holmgren

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The climate response over northern high latitudes to the mid-Holocene orbital forcing has been investigated in three types of PMIP (Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project simulations with different complexity of the modelled climate system. By first undertaking model-data comparison, an objective selection method has been applied to evaluate the capability of the climate models to reproduce the spatial response pattern seen in proxy data. The possible feedback mechanisms behind the climate response have been explored based on the selected model simulations. Subsequent model-model comparisons indicate the importance of including the different physical feedbacks in the climate models. The comparisons between the proxy-based reconstructions and the best fit selected simulations show that over the northern high latitudes, summer temperature change follows closely the insolation change and shows a common feature with strong warming over land and relatively weak warming over ocean at 6 ka compared to 0 ka. Furthermore, the sea-ice-albedo positive feedback enhances this response. The reconstructions of temperature show a stronger response to enhanced insolation in the annual mean temperature than winter and summer temperature. This is verified in the model simulations and the behaviour is attributed to the larger contribution from the large response in autumn. Despite a smaller insolation during winter at 6 ka, a pronounced warming centre is found over Barents Sea in winter in the simulations, which is also supported by the nearby northern Eurasian continental and Fennoscandian reconstructions. This indicates that in the Arctic region, the response of the ocean and the sea ice to the enhanced summer insolation is more important for the winter temperature than the synchronous decrease of the insolation.

  5. Friction Sensitivity of Nitramines.Part Ⅰ : Comparison with Impact Sensitivity and Heat of Fusion%Friction Sensitivity of Nitramines. Part Ⅰ:Comparison with Impact Sensitivity and Heat of Fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcela Jungová; Svatopluk Zeman; Adéla Husarová

    2011-01-01

    Fractions of β-HMX (β-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane) have been used to demonstrate the mutual relationship between friction and impact sensitivities.Inclusion of an additional twelve nitramines into this scenario resulted in a series of partial relationships,which were determined from the molecular structure of these substances.It was also found that there is a relation between increasing heats of fusion of the nitramines studied and their decreasing friction sensitivities.Comparison of friction sensitivity with heats of fusion,ΔHm,tr of the studied nitramines shows that the increase in ΔHm,tr values is more or less connected with a decrease in friction sensitivity.

  6. The influence of hemoglobin concentration on exercise cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedson, P S

    1981-05-01

    Two experiments were performed to study the cardiac output (Q) vs. hemoglobin concentration (Hb) relationship during constant load submaximum eexercise. The first experiment examined the relationship between submaximum exercise Q and Hb in 28 females. A correlation of r = -0.83 (P less than 0.05) was observed between Q and Hb during xercise at 88 W (mean Q = 11.04 l . min-1) and 118 W (mean Q = 13.10 l . min-1) (mean steady rate VO2 = 1.40 l . min-1 and 1.79 l . min-1, respectively). By removing the influence of stroke volume (SV) from Q (part correlation analyses), the relationship between Q and Hb is compromised (r = -0.29, P greater than 0.05, 88 W and r = -0.33, P greater than 0.05, 118 W). The second experiment compared the VO2 max and submaximum exercise (118 W) Q responses in six males before and after blood donation. Experimentally reducing Hb 18.6% (P less than 0.05) caused a 6.2% decrease (P less than 0.05) in VO2 max. Additionally, submaximum exercise Q increased 12% (P less than 0.05) 6 days following hemodilution., The Q remained elevated 11 days (10% higher, P less than 0.05) and 16 days (9% higher, P less than 0.05) post-blood donation and progressively returned to pre-donation levels by 21 days post-withdrawal. The higher Q's during submaximum exercise were ascribed primarily to an 8% (P less than 0.05) higher SV in comparison to pre-donation levels. collectively, the data from the two experiments indicate that individual differences in submaximum exercise Q are due, in part, to individual differences in Hb concentration. Furthermore, it is suggested that the stimulus for the SV-induced Q vs. Hb association is related to maintaining maximal myocardial efficiency.

  7. Microstructure and Wear Properties of Electron Beam Melted Ti-6Al-4V Parts: A Comparison Study against As-Cast Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Quan Toh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64 parts of varying thicknesses were additively manufactured (AM by the powder-bed-based electron beam melting (EBM technique. Microstructure and wear properties of these EBM-built Ti-6Al-4V parts have been investigated in comparison with conventionally cast Ti64 samples. Sliding wear tests were conducted using a ball-on-disc micro-tribometer under ambient conditions. Experimental results reveal that EBM-built Ti64 samples exhibited higher microhardness and an overall larger coefficient of friction as compared to the as-cast counterpart. Of interest is that the corresponding specific wear volumes were lower for EBM-built Ti64 samples, while the as-cast Ti64 showed the poorest wear resistance despite its lower coefficient of friction. Wear mechanisms were provided in terms of quantitative microstructural characterization and detailed analysis on coefficient of friction (COF curves.

  8. Integration core exercises elicit greater muscle activation than isolation exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschall, Jinger S; Mills, Jackie; Hastings, Bryce

    2013-03-01

    The American College of Sports Medicine and the United States Department of Health and Human Services advocate core training as a means to improve stability, reduce injury, and maintain mobility. There are countless exercises that target the primary core trunk muscles (abdominal and lumbar) with the aim of providing these benefits. However, it is unknown as to which exercises elicit the greatest activation thereby maximizing functional gains and peak performance. Thus, our purpose was to determine whether integration core exercises that require activation of the distal trunk muscles (deltoid and gluteal) elicit greater activation of primary trunk muscles in comparison with isolation core exercises that only require activation of the proximal trunk muscles. Twenty participants, 10 men and 10 women, completed 16 randomly assigned exercises (e.g., crunch, upper body extension, and hover variations). We measured muscle activity with surface electromyography of the anterior deltoid, rectus abdominus, external abdominal oblique, lumbar erector spinae, thoracic erector spinae, and gluteus maximus. Our results indicate that the activation of the abdominal and lumbar muscles was the greatest during the exercises that required deltoid and gluteal recruitment. In conclusion, when completing the core strength guidelines, an integrated routine that incorporates the activation of distal trunk musculature would be optimal in terms of maximizing strength, improving endurance, enhancing stability, reducing injury, and maintaining mobility.

  9. Bilateral comparison of 10 V standards between the NSAI-NML (Ireland) and the BIPM, January to February 2013 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, O.; Chayramy, R.; Solve, S.; Stock, M.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b, a comparison of the 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and the National Standards Authority of Ireland-National Metrology Laboratory (NSAI-NML), Dublin, Ireland, was carried out from January to February 2013. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards (Fluke 732B), BIPM_8 (Z8) and BIPM_9 (Z9), were transported by freight to NSAI-NML. At NSAI-NML, the reference standard for DC voltage at the 10 V level consists of a group of characterized Zener diode-based electronic voltage standards. The output EMF (electromotive force) of each travelling standard was measured by direct comparison with the group standard. At the BIPM the travelling standards were calibrated, before and after the measurements at NSAI-NML, with the Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages of the Zener standards on internal temperature and ambient atmospheric pressure. The final result of the comparison is presented as the difference between the value assigned to DC voltage standard by NSAI-NML, at the level of 10 V, at NSAI-NML, UNML, and that assigned by the BIPM, at the BIPM, UBIPM, at the reference date of 5 February 2013. UNML - UBIPM = -0.63 µV uc = 1.31 µV, at 10 V where uc is thecombined standard uncertainty associated with the measured difference, including the uncertainty of the representation of the volt at the BIPM and at NSAI-NML,based on KJ-90, and the uncertainty related to the comparison. The comparison results show that the voltage standards maintained by NSAI-NML and the BIPM were equivalent, within their stated standard uncertainties, on the mean date of the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according

  10. Bilateral Comparison of 1 V and 10 V Standards between the NIS (Egypt) and the BIPM, August to September 2014 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solve, S.; Chayramy, R.; Stock, M.; Abdel Mageed, Hala M.; Aladdin, Omar M.; Raouf, M. Helmy A.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b, a comparison of the 1 V and 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and the National Institute for Standards (NIS), Giza, Egypt, was carried out from August to September 2014. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards (Fluke 732B), BIPMB (ZB) and BIPMC (ZC), were transported as hand luggage on board an airplane to NIS and back to BIPM. At NIS, the reference standard for DC voltage is a Josephson Voltage Standard. The output EMF (Electromotive Force) of each travelling standard was measured by direct comparison with the primary standard. At the BIPM, the travelling standards were calibrated, before and after the measurements at NIS, with the Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages of the Zener standards on internal temperature and ambient atmospheric pressure. The final result of the comparison is presented as the difference between the values assigned to DC voltage standards by NIS, at the level of 1.018 V and 10 V, at NIS, UNIS, and those assigned by the BIPM, at the BIPM, UBIPM, at the reference date of the 7 September 2014. UNIS - UBIPM = 0.09 µV uc = 0.08 µV, at 1 V UNIS - UBIPM = 0.22 µV uc = 0.14 µV, at 10 V where uc is the combined standard uncertainty associated with the measured difference, including the uncertainty of the representation of the volt at the BIPM and at NIS, based on KJ-90, and the uncertainty related to the comparison. This is a satisfactory result. The comparison result shows that the voltage standards maintained by NIS and the BIPM were equivalent, within their stated standard uncertainties, on the mean date of the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM

  11. Bilateral comparison of 10 V standards between the NSAI-NML (Ireland) and the BIPM, March 2014 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solve, S.; Chayramy, R.; Power, O.; Stock, M.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b, a comparison of the 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and the National Standards Authority of Ireland-National Metrology Laboratory (NSAI-NML), Dublin, Ireland, was carried out in February and March 2014. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards (Fluke 732B), BIPM_4 (Z4) and BIPM_5 (Z5), were transported by freight to NSAI-NML. At NSAI-NML, the reference standard for DC voltage at the 10 V level consists of a group of characterized Zener diode-based electronic voltage standards. The output EMF (Electromotive Force) of each travelling standard was measured by direct comparison with the group standard. At the BIPM the travelling standards were calibrated, before and after the measurements at NSAI-NML, with the Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages of the Zener standards on internal temperature and ambient atmospheric pressure. The final result of the comparison is presented as the difference between the value assigned to DC voltage standard by NSAI-NML, at the level of 10 V, at NSAI-NML, UNML, and that assigned by the BIPM, at the BIPM, UBIPM, at the reference date of 10 March 2014. UNML - UBIPM = -0.64 µV uc = 1.35 µV, at 10 V where uc is thecombined standard uncertainty associated with the measured difference, including the uncertainty of the representation of the volt at the BIPM and at NSAI-NML,based on KJ-90, and the uncertainty related to the comparison. The comparison results show that the voltage standards maintained by NSAI-NML and the BIPM were equivalent, within their stated standard uncertainties, on the mean date of the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to

  12. A comparison of the reproducibility and the sensitivity to change of visual analogue scales, Borg scales, and Likert scales in normal subjects during submaximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, S; Aitchison, T; Henderson, E; Christie, J; Zare, S; McMurray, J; Dargie, H

    1999-11-01

    To assess which subjective scale, the visual analogue scale (VAS), the Borg CR10 (Borg) scale, or the Likert scale (LS), if any, is decidedly more reproducible and sensitive to change in the assessment of symptoms. Prospective clinical study. Exercise laboratory. Twenty-three physically active male subjects (mean +/- SD age of 30 +/- 4 years old) were recruited. Each subject attended the exercise laboratory on four occasions at intervals of 1 week. Three subjective scales were used: (1) the VAS (continuous scale); (2) the Borg scale (12 fixed points); and (3) the Likert scale (LS; 5 fixed points). Four identical submaximal tests were given (2 min at 60% maximum oxygen uptake [VO(2)max] and 6 min at 70% VO(2)max). Two tests were undertaken to assess the reproducibility of scores that were obtained with each subjective scale. Two other tests were undertaken to assess the sensitivity of each scale to a change in symptom perception: a double-blind treatment with propranolol, 80 mg, (ie, active therapy; to increase the sensation of breathlessness and general fatigue during exercise) or matching placebo. The subjective scale scores were measured at 1 min 30 s, 5 min 30 s, and 7 min 15 s of exercise. Reproducibility was defined as the proportion of total variance (ie, between-subject plus within-subject variance) explained by the between-subject variance given as a percentage. Sensitivity was defined as the effect of the active drug therapy over the variation within subjects. Overall, the VAS performed best in terms of reproducibility for breathlessness and general fatigue, with reproducibility coefficients as high as 78%. For sensitivity, the VAS was best for breathlessness (ratio, 2.7) and the Borg scale was most sensitive for general fatigue (ratio, 3.0). The relationships between the respective psychological and physiologic variables were reasonably stable throughout the testing procedure, with overall typical correlations of 0.73 to 0.82 This study suggests that

  13. Adoption of information technology in primary care physician offices in New Zealand and Denmark, part 5: final comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Protti

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This is the last in a series of five papers about the use of computing technology in general practitioner (GP practices in Denmark and New Zealand. This paper introduces a unique comparison instrument developed for this study using the best evidence available namely data was pulled from centralised databases and was indisputable (e.g. percentage of primary care physicians who send medication prescriptions electronically to pharmacies. Where the data was simply not available, estimates were made. Since the reliability of the data on the use of computers by primary care physicians is so variable and in some case simply not available, the authors also introduce the use of a Cochrane-like confidence factor (CF to each comparison measure. The paper draws particular attention to the fact that both countries have a highly visible central unifying body or what might be called a Health System Integrator; though Denmark s Medcom is a pseudo government agency New Zealand's HealthLink is a private company, both play critical roles in the success story of these two countries.

  14. Comparison of Residual Stresses in Inconel 718 Simple Parts Made by Electron Beam Melting and Direct Laser Metal Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochalski-Kolbus, L. M.; Payzant, E. A.; Cornwell, P. A.; Watkins, T. R.; Babu, S. S.; Dehoff, R. R.; Lorenz, M.; Ovchinnikova, O.; Duty, C.

    2015-03-01

    Residual stress profiles were mapped using neutron diffraction in two simple prism builds of Inconel 718: one fabricated with electron beam melting (EBM) and the other with direct laser metal sintering. Spatially indexed stress-free cubes were obtained by electrical discharge machining (EDM) equivalent prisms of similar shape. The (311) interplanar spacings from the EDM sectioned sample were compared to the interplanar spacings calculated to fulfill stress and moment balance. We have shown that applying stress and moment balance is a necessary supplement to the measurements for the stress-free cubes with respect to accurate stress calculations in additively manufactured components. In addition, our work has shown that residual stresses in electron beam melted parts are much smaller than that of direct laser metal sintered parts most likely due to the powder preheating step in the EBM process.

  15. Comfortable, healthy and intelligent buildings. Part 1. Comparison of buildings in the Netherlands and Germany; Comfortabele, gezonde en intelligente gebouwen. Deel 1. Nederlandse en Duitse gebouwen vergeleken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lony, R.J.M. [Deerns raadgevende ingenieurs, Rijswijk (Netherlands); Molenaar, D.J.; Rietkerk, J.; Schuiling, D.J.B.W.; Zeiler, W. [Installatietechnologie, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2006-07-15

    A comparison was made between four buildings in Germany and four buildings in the Netherlands. In this part 1 attention is paid to the first two comparisons. In part 2, which will be published in this magazine in October the remaining two sets of buildings are compared. The basis of the comparison is the module Keyfactors, developed by the University of Reading in the UK, in which six aspects are compared: site, skin, shell, services, space plan, and stuff (e.g. furniture) [Dutch] De Technische Universiteit Eindhoven heeft een vergelijking gemaakt tussen vier Duitse en vier Nederlandse gebouwen. In dit artikel worden de eerste twee vergelijkingen behandeld, evenals de basis van de vergelijking. De basis voor het vergelijkingsonderzoek, is de module Keyfactors van de Universiteit van Reading. Deze module is gebaseerd op het vergelijken van gebouwen op zes aspecten (de 6 S-vergelijking). Dit zijn site (Iocatie), skin (gevel), shell (constructieopzet), services (installaties), space plan (ruimtelijke opzet) en stuff (meubilair). Gebaseerd op deze zes aspecten kan een vergelijking worden gemaakt tussen gebouwen. In het onderzoek van de TU/E zijn in totaal acht gebouwen paarsgewijs bekeken: de Hoftoren in Den Haag met de Post Tower in Bonn, her Thermostaete-gebouw in Bodegraven met de Landesvertretung in Berlijn (deze vier zijn in het eerste deel besproken). In het tweede en afsluitende artikel, dat wordt gepubliceerd in het oktober-nurnmer van dit tijdschrift, worden de laatste twee vergelijkingen beschreven het Forum-gebouw in Amsterdam met het Spherion in Dusseldorf en het Rijnlandhuis in Leiden met het Energieforum in Berlijn. De Duitse gebouwen zijn doorgaans innovatiever, maar de Nederlandse hebben een betere prijs-kwaliteitverhouding.

  16. Bilateral comparison of 1 V and 10 V standards between the DMDM (Serbia) and the BIPM, January to March 2014 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solve, S.; Chayramy, R.; Stock, M.; Pantelic-Babic, J.; Sofranac, Z.; Zivkovic, V.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b, a comparison of the 1 V and 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and the Directorate of Measures and Precious Metals (DMDM), Beograd, Serbia, was carried out from January to March 2014. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards (Fluke 732B), BIPM6 (Z6) and BIPMA (ZA), were transported by freight to DMDM. At DMDM, the reference standard for DC voltage is a Josephson Voltage Standard. The output electromotive force of each travelling standard was measured by direct comparison with the primary standard. At the BIPM, the travelling standards were calibrated, before and after the measurements at DMDM, with the Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages of the Zener standards on internal temperature and ambient atmospheric pressure. The final result of the comparison is presented as the difference between the values assigned to DC voltage standards by DMDM, at the level of 1.018 V and 10 V, at DMDM, UDMDM, and those assigned by the BIPM, at the BIPM, UBIPM, at the reference date of the 13 February 2014. UDMDM - UBIPM = 0.094 µV uc = 0.072 µV, at 1 V UDMDM - UBIPM = 0.39 µV uc = 0.12 µV, at 10 V where uc is the combined standard uncertainty associated with the measured difference, including the uncertainty of the representation of the volt at the BIPM and at DMDM, based on KJ-90, and the uncertainty related to the comparison. The results at the 10 V level are not covered by the uncertainties with a coverage factor of 2. After the distribution of the Draft A, the DMDM discovered that the pressure gauge was defective. Some considerations on the correction to apply on the comparison result and the corresponding uncertainties are presented in the report. Nevertheless, the above results fully cover the CMCs of DMDM which are significantly larger. No corrections for temperature and pressure are applied in calibrations for

  17. A comparison of 2H2O and phenylalanine flooding dose to investigate muscle protein synthesis with acute exercise in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasier, Heath G.; Riechman, Steven E.; Wiggs, Michael P.; Previs, Stephen F.; Fluckey, James D.

    2009-01-01

    The primary objective of this investigation was to determine whether 2H2O and phenylalanine (Phe) flooding dose methods yield comparable fractional rates of protein synthesis (FSR) in skeletal muscle following a single bout of high-intensity resistance exercise (RE). Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned by body mass to either 4-h control (CON 4 h; n = 6), 4-h resistance exercise (RE 4 h; n = 6), 24-h control (CON 24 h; n = 6), or 24-h resistance exercise (RE 24 h; n = 6). The RE groups were operantly conditioned to engage in a single bout of high-intensity, “squat-like” RE. All rats were given an intraperitoneal injection of 99.9% 2H2O and provided 4.0% 2H2O drinking water for either 24 (n = 12) or 4 h (n = 12) prior to receiving a flooding dose of l-[2,3,4,5,6-3H]Phe 16 h post-RE. Neither method detected an effect of RE on FSR in the mixed gastrocnemius, plantaris, or soleus muscle. Aside from the qualitative similarities between methods, the 4-h 2H2O FSR measurements, when expressed in percent per hour, were quantitatively greater than the 24-h 2H2O and Phe flooding in all muscles (P < 0.001), and the 24-h 2H2O was greater than the Phe flooding dose in the mixed gastrocnemius and plantaris (P < 0.05). In contrast, the actual percentage of newly synthesized protein was significantly higher in the 24- vs. 4-h 2H2O and Phe flooding dose groups (P < 0.001). These results suggest that the methodologies provide “qualitatively” similar results when a perturbation such as RE is studied. However, due to potential quantitative differences between methods, the experimental question should determine what approach should be used. PMID:19366878

  18. Intensity and physiological responses to the 6-minute walk test in middle-aged and older adults: a comparison with cardiopulmonary exercise testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.F. Sperandio

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The 6-minute walk test (6MWT is a simple field test that is widely used in clinical settings to assess functional exercise capacity. However, studies with healthy subjects are scarce. We hypothesized that the 6MWT might be useful to assess exercise capacity in healthy subjects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate 6MWT intensity in middle-aged and older adults, as well as to develop a simple equation to predict oxygen uptake (V˙O2 from the 6-min walk distance (6MWD. Eighty-six participants, 40 men and 46 women, 40-74 years of age and with a mean body mass index of 28±6 kg/m2, performed the 6MWT according to American Thoracic Society guidelines. Physiological responses were evaluated during the 6MWT using a K4b2 Cosmed telemetry gas analyzer. On a different occasion, the subjects performed ramp protocol cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET on a treadmill. Peak V˙O2 in the 6MWT corresponded to 78±13% of the peak V˙O2 during CPET, and the maximum heart rate corresponded to 80±23% of that obtained in CPET. Peak V˙O2 in CPET was adequately predicted by the 6MWD by a linear regression equation: V˙O2 mL·min-1·kg-1 = -2.863 + (0.0563×6MWDm (R2=0.76. The 6MWT represents a moderate-to-high intensity activity in middle-aged and older adults and proved to be useful for predicting cardiorespiratory fitness in the present study. Our results suggest that the 6MWT may also be useful in asymptomatic individuals, and its use in walk-based conditioning programs should be encouraged.

  19. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure: Prognostic Comparison from Peak VO2 and VE/VCO2 Slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarullo, Filippo Maria; Fazio, Giovanni; Brusca, Ignazio; Fasullo, Sergio; Paterna, Salvatore; Licata, Pamela; Novo, Giuseppina; Novo, Salvatore; Di Pasquale, Pietro

    2010-05-26

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing with ventilatory expired gas analysis (CPET) has proven to be a valuable tool for assessing patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). The maximal oxygen uptake (peak V02) is used in risk stratification of patients with CHF. The minute ventilation-carbon dioxide production relationship (VE/VCO2 slope) has recently demonstrated prognostic significance in patients with CHF. Between January 2006 and December 2007 we performed CPET in 184 pts (146 M, 38 F, mean age 59.8 +/- 12.9 years), with stable CHF (96 coronary artery disease, 88 dilated cardiomyopathy), in NYHA functional class II (n.107) - III (n.77), with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) /= 35.6 and 25% in those with VE/VCO2 slope 12.2 ml/kg/min (log rank chi2: 50.98, p /= 32.5 and 23% in those with VE/VCO2 slope 12.3 ml/kg/min (log rank chi2: 72.86, p < 0.0001). The VE/VCO2 slope was demonstrated with receiver operating characteristic curve analysis to be equivalent to peak VO2 in predicting cardiac-related mortality (0.89 vs. 0.89). Although area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the VE/VCO2 slope was greater than peak VO2 in predicting cardiac-related hospitalization (0.88 vs 0.82), the difference was no statistically significant (p = 0.13). These results add to the present body of knowledge supporting the use of CPET in CHF patients. The VE/VCO2 slope, as an index of ventilatory response to exercise, is an excellent prognostic parameter and improves the risk stratification of CHF patients. It is easier to obtain than parameters of maximal exercise capacity and is of equivalent prognostic importance than peak VO2.

  20. How Well Do Randomized Controlled Trials Reflect Standard Care: A Comparison between Scientific Research Data and Standard Care Data in Patients with Intermittent Claudication undergoing Supervised Exercise Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Dörenkamp

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to assess the degree and impact of patient selection of patients with intermittent claudication undergoing supervised exercise therapy in Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs by describing commonly used exclusion criteria, and by comparing baseline characteristics and treatment response measured as improvement in maximum walking distance of patients included in RCTs and patients treated in standard care.We compared data from RCTs with unselected standard care data. First, we systematically reviewed RCTs that investigated the effect of supervised exercise therapy in patients with intermittent claudication. For each of the RCTs, we extracted and categorized the eligibility criteria and their justifications. To assess whether people in RCTs (n = 1,440 differed from patients treated in daily practice (n = 3,513, in terms of demographics, comorbidity and walking capacity, we assessed between group-differences using t-tests. To assess differences in treatment response, we compared walking distances at three and six months between groups using t-tests. Differences of ≥15% were set as a marker for a clinically relevant difference.All 20 included RCTs excluded large segments of patients with intermittent claudication. One-third of the RCTs eligibility criteria were justified. Despite, the numerous eligibility criteria, we found that baseline characteristics were largely comparable. A statistically significant and (borderline clinically relevant difference in treatment response after three and six months between trial participants and standard care patients was found. Improvements in maximum walking distance after three and six months were significantly and clinically less in trial participants.The finding that baseline characteristics of patients included in RCTs and patients treated in standard care were comparable, may indicate that RCT eligibility criteria are used implicitly by professionals when referring patients to

  1. Comparison of muscle functional electrical stimulation to conventional bicycle exercise on endothelium and functional status indices in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Kossyvakis, Charalampos; Kaoukis, Andreas; Driva, Metaxia; Pappas, Loukas; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Ntzouvara, Olga; Karavidas, Apostolos; Pyrgakis, Vlasios; Rentoukas, Ilias; Aggeli, Constadina; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this prospective, open-label, cohort study was to compare the effect of muscle functional electrical stimulation (FES) on endothelial function to that of conventional bicycle training. Eligible patients were those with New York Heart Association class II or III heart failure symptoms and ejection fractions ≤ 0.35. Two physical conditioning programs were delivered: FES of the muscles of the lower limbs and bicycle training, each lasting for 6 weeks, with a 6-week washout period between them. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and other parameters were assessed before and after FES and the bicycle training program. FES resulted in a significant improvement in FMD, which increased from 5.9 ± 0.5% to 7.7 ± 0.5% (95% confidence interval for the difference 1.5% to 2.3%, p Bicycle training also resulted in a substantial improvement of endothelial function. FMD increased from 6.2 ± 0.4% to 9.2 ± 0.4% (95% confidence interval for the difference 2.5% to 3.5%, p bicycle exercise (95% confidence interval for the difference between the relative changes 1.2% to 30.5%, p = 0.034). This resulted in attaining a significantly higher FMD value after bicycle training compared to FES (9.2 ± 0.4% vs 7.7 ± 0.5%, p < 0.001). In conclusion, the effect of muscle FES in patients with heart failure on endothelial function, although not equivalent to that of conventional exercise, is substantial. Muscle FES protocols may prove very useful in the treatment of patients with heart failure who cannot or will not adhere to conventional exercise programs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison between Steroid Injection and Stretching Exercise on the Scalene of Patients with Upper Extremity Paresthesia: Randomized Cross-Over Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yong Wook; Yoon, Seo Yeon; Park, Yongbum; Chang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Sang Chul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the therapeutic effects on upper extremity paresthesia of intra-muscular steroid injections into the scalene muscle with those of stretching exercise only. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with upper extremity paresthesia who met the criteria were recruited to participate in this single-blind, crossover study. Fourteen of 20 patients were female. The average age was 45.0±10.5 years and duration of symptom was 12.2±8.7 months. Each participant completed one injection an...

  3. Comparison of measures of physiologic stress during treadmill exercise in a patient with 20% lower extremity burn injuries and healthy matched and nonmatched individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, J L; Giuffrida, C; Petrazzi, A; Schlanser, J; McDowell-Montini, C; Pietrzyk, C; Landry, V L

    2000-01-01

    Patients with burn injuries are referred for rehabilitation within days after the injuries to encourage early ambulation and functional training. Many of these patients are hypermetabolic at rest. Metabolic demands of activity are added to the already hypermetabolic state and elevate total energy requirements and some physiologic measures. Reports on the physiologic stress imposed by therapeutic activities for patients with burn injuries are limited to low levels of metabolic demand (burn injuries. The purpose of this study was to report the clinical measures of myocardial and physiologic stress in a patient with 20% lower extremity total body surface area burns during an exercise challenge equivalent to stair climbing. Physiologic measures were assessed before and during a treadmill activity (5 METS) for a 40-year-old obese man 3 weeks after he had lower extremity burn injuries. These measures were compared with mean values for 62 healthy counterparts and 6 healthy subjects matched for age, gender, and fitness level. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, rate pressure product, and the rating of perceived exertion for the patient with burn injuries were higher at baseline and during exercise than the mean values for the 62 healthy individuals and the 6 matched subjects. The steady state exercise values for heart rate, systolic blood pressure, rate pressure product, and rating of perceived exertion at 6 minutes were 189 beats per minute, 190 mm Hg, 3591, and 17, respectively, for the patient with burn injuries and were 111.3 beats per minute, 149 mm Hg, 1680, and 11.7, respectively, for the 6 matched subjects. Ventilation during exercise also increased for the patient with burn injuries more than for the matched subjects (3/4 vs 1/4). Pain experienced by the patient with burn injuries decreased with activity (9.8 vs 7.3 on a 15-cm scale). Treadmill walking produced near maximal responses for most physiologic measures for this patient who was hypermetabolic at rest

  4. A comparison of the genetic and clinical profile of men that respond and do not respond to the immediate antihypertensive effects of aerobic exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda S Pescatello

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Linda S Pescatello1, Bruce E Blanchard2, Gregory J Tsongalis3, Ann A O’Connell4, Heather Gordish-Dressman5, Carl M Maresh1, Paul D Thompson61Department of Kinesiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA; 2Department of Pathology; 3Department of Pathology, Dartmouth Medical School and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, USA; 4School of Educational Policy and Leadership, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA; 5Research Center for Genetic Medicine, Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA; 6Division of Cardiology, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT, USAAbstract: We compared the genetic and clinical profile of men who lower and do not lower blood pressure (BP after acute aerobic exercise. Volunteers were 45 men (Mean ± SEM, 43.5 ± 1.5 yr with high BP (145.7 ± 1.5/85.7 ± 1.1 mmHg. They completed three experiments: nonexercise control and two cycle exercise sessions at 40% and 60% peak oxygen consumption, and were then instrumented to an ambulatory BP monitor. Logistic regression determined the genetic and clinical profile of men who lowered BP after exercise (responders [ExR n = 36]; and those who did not (nonresponders [ExNR n = 9]. ExR had higher C-reactive protein (CRP, high-density lipoprotein (HDL, the metabolic syndrome, family history of hypertension, more renin-angiotensin system (RAS common alleles, and α-adducin Trp460 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (ENOS C786 risk alleles. ExNR had lower CRP and HDL, did not have the metabolic syndrome and a family history of hypertension, had more RAS risk alleles, and had the α-adducin Gly460Gly and ENOS T786T genotypes. This model had a sensitivity of 97.1%, specificity of 75.0%, and accounted for 46.3%–74.4% of the BP response. These results suggest genetic and clinical information may eventually be used to characterize people who do and do not respond to exercise as antihypertensive therapy.Keywords: blood pressure, genetics, hypertension

  5. Physical exercise : effects in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuis, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Physical exercise plays an important role in cancer prevention as well as in the prevention and treatment of cancer related fatigue during and after treatment. Some of these effects are presented in the thesis of M.J. Velthuis. In Part I effects of physical exercise on anthropometric measurements ar

  6. Comparison of measurements from optical CMM and focus-variation microscope of a μPIM mechanical part

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quagliotti, Danilo; Salaga, Jacek; Tosello, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Two sets of 5 green and 5 sintered mechanical parts, manufactured by micro powder injection moulding (μPIM), were measured using an optical coordinate measuring machine (OCMM) and a focus-variation microscope (FVM). The examined features of size, including diameter, radii and distances, span...... geometrical features, such as surface texture and flatness, may depict FVM measurements as more attractive. However, measurements should be suitable for in-line quality control, in a production environment, where fast cycle time is required and measuring times are more compatible to those of the OCMM....

  7. Proximal humeral fractures: a biomechanical comparison of locking plate constructs in a cadaveric 3-part fracture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, David M; Sutter, Edward G; Mears, Simon C; Gupta, Rohit R; Belkoff, Stephen M

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of our study was to biomechanically compare, under cyclic loading conditions, fracture site motion, humeral head collapse, and intra-articular hardware penetration in simulated 3-part osteoporotic proximal humeral fractures stabilized with 1 of 2 locking-plate constructs. We performed fixation on simulated 3-part proximal humeral fractures in 10 pairs of cadaveric osteoporotic humeri with a Hand Innovations S3 Proximal Humerus Plate (S3 plate) or an LCP Proximal Humerus Plate (LCP plate; 1 each for each pair). The specimens were potted, mounted on a materials testing machine, and subjected to 5000 cycles of abduction in the scapular plane, loading through the supraspinatus tendon. Interfragmentary displacement at 2 virtual points (the most medial aspect of the calcar and the most superior aspect of the osteotomy line between the greater tuberosity and humeral head) was measured using an optical tracking system. Humeral head rotation was also measured. We used a generalized linear latent and mixed model to check for an effect of cyclic loading and treatment on the parameters of interest (significance, P fracture site motion, it is unknown whether the magnitude of the motion is clinically significant.

  8. Comparison o f Level of Anger between Male and Female Athletes Took Part in Eliminations for Adults Taekwondo National Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muammer CANBAZ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the level of anger of the athletes taking part in A dults N at ional T eam eliminations. The sample group consists of 52 female s , 115 male s , total ly 167 elite athletes took part in the eliminations . The average of age for female s was 20 , 38 , and 20, 99 for male s . In order to identify the level, Spielberg ’s fou r - dimensional Sc hedule whose validity and reliability for our country was adapted to by Özer in 1994, developed by S pielberg in 1983 was used. As a result of analysis made, no outstanding difference of anger level was found between males and females in te rms of permanent anger factor (p=0, 579; similarly no significant difference was discovered in respect to sub factor of anger - out (p=0,315. Also in analysis of anger - in (p=0.673 and anger - out (p=0.290 sub scales, important difference wasn’t pointed out b etween male and female athletes.

  9. Treatment of waste water from textile Finishing mills (Part 7). Comparison and combination of treatment methods on actual waste water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widayat; Winiati, W.; Indarto; Amirdin; Kusno, P.; Jufri, R.; Higashi, Kunishige; Hagiwara, Kazuyoshi; Saito, Toshihide; Honda, Shigeru

    1987-03-25

    Comparison of coagulative precipitation treatment, activated sludge treatment, and active carbon adsorption treatment was studied on the actual waste water from two dyeing factories (A and B) located in Bandung City, Indonesia. Quality of waste waters was evaluated by the measurement of pH, COD, BOD, and absorption spectrum. The waste water A had COD value of 180 mg/l, and the ratio of BOD to COD was 1.2. Biological oxidation, therefore, looks effective for this waste water. The COD removals became 67% and 83% by coagulative precipitation method and activated sludge respectively. The coagulative precipitation treatment followed by the activated sludge treatment made COD removal to 100%. The waste water B had COD value of 1005 mg/l, and the ratio of BOD to COD was 0.20. THe COD removal became 58% and 72% by coagulative method and the coagulation method followed by the activated sludge method respectively. For removing dyestuff in the waste water, both coagulative precipitation method and activated carbon absorption treatment were effective. (4 figs, 4 tabs, 3 refs)

  10. Simulating aerosol microphysics with the ECHAM/MADE GCM Part I: Model description and comparison with observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, A.; Hendricks, J.; Ackermann, I.; Schell, B.; Hass, H.; Metzger, S.

    2005-09-01

    The aerosol dynamics module MADE has been coupled to the general circulation model ECHAM4 to simulate the chemical composition, number concentration, and size distribution of the global submicrometer aerosol. The present publication describes the new model system ECHAM4/MADE and presents model results in comparison with observations. The new model is able to simulate the full life cycle of particulate matter and various gaseous precursors including emissions of primary particles and trace gases, advection, convection, diffusion, coagulation, condensation, nucleation of sulfuric acid vapor, aerosol chemistry, cloud processing, and size-dependent dry and wet deposition. Aerosol components considered are sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), black carbon (BC), particulate organic matter (POM), sea salt, mineral dust, and aerosol liquid water. The model is numerically efficient enough to allow long term simulations, which is an essential requirement for application in general circulation models. In order to evaluate the results obtained with this new model system, calculated mass concentrations, particle number concentrations, and size distributions are compared to observations. The intercomparison shows, that ECHAM4/MADE is able to reproduce the major features of the geographical patterns, seasonal cycle, and vertical distributions of the basic aerosol parameters. In particular, the model performs well under polluted continental conditions in the northern hemispheric lower and middle troposphere. However, in comparatively clean remote areas, e.g. in the upper troposphere or in the southern hemispheric marine boundary layer, the current model version tends to underestimate particle number concentrations.

  11. Limited influence of aspirin intake on mast cell activation in patients with food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis: comparison using skin prick and histamine release tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Atsushi; Shimizu, Hideki; Tanaka, Mami; Kikuzawa, Ayuko; Tsujimoto, Mariko; Sekimukai, Akiko; Yamashita, Junji; Horikawa, Tatsuya; Nishigori, Chikako

    2012-09-01

    Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) is a severe systemic syndrome induced by physical exercise after ingesting causative food. Aspirin is a well-known trigger for anaphylaxis in patients with FDEIA. Possible mechanisms by which symptoms are aggravated by aspirin include enhanced antigen absorption and mast cell activation. The aim of this study was to determine whether aspirin intake has an influence on mast cell/basophil activation in patients with FDEIA. Provocation tests revealed that adding aspirin to the causative food challenge in 7 of 9 (77.8%) patients with FDEIA provoked symptoms. In most cases, pretreatment with aspirin did not enhance skin tests (71.4%) or histamine release tests (88.9%) with food allergen challenges. The study confirms that histamine release and skin prick tests can be adjunctive tools for diagnosing FDEIA. In addition, our results suggest that exacerbation of FDEIA symptoms by aspirin is not mediated by direct effects of aspirin on mast cell/basophil activation.

  12. Spinal postural training: Comparison of the postural and mobility effects of electrotherapy, exercise, biofeedback trainer in addition to postural education in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelenay, Şeyda Toprak; Kaya, Derya Özer; Özüdoğru, Anıl

    2015-01-01

    Spinal posture and mobility are significant for protecting spine. The aim was to compare effects of different postural training interventions on spinal posture and mobility. Ninety-six university students (ages: 18–25 years) were allocated into Electrical Stimulation (ES) (n = 24), Exercise (n = 24), Biofeedback Posture Trainer (Backtone) (n = 24), and Postural Education (n = 24, Controls) groups. All the groups got postural education. The interventions were carried out 3 days a week for 8 weeks. Spinal Mouse device (Idiag, Fehraltorf, Switzerland) was used to detect thoracic and lumbar curvatures and mobility (degrees) in standing and sitting positions. Paired Student’s t-test, one-way ANOVA, and pairwise post-hoc tests were used. ES decreased thoracic curvature, the exercise decreased thoracic and lumbar curvature and increased thoracic mobility in standing position between pre-post training (p mobility increased compared to all groups (p mobility among university students. ES decreased thoracic curve. Biofeedback posture trainer improved sitting posture. A prospective randomized controlled trial, Level 1.

  13. A Comparison of Gluteus Maximus, Biceps Femoris, and Vastus Lateralis Electromyographic Activity in the Back Squat and Barbell Hip Thrust Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Bret; Vigotsky, Andrew D; Schoenfeld, Brad J; Beardsley, Chris; Cronin, John

    2015-12-01

    The back squat and barbell hip thrust are both popular exercises used to target the lower body musculature; however, these exercises have yet to be compared. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of the upper and lower gluteus maximus, biceps femoris, and vastus lateralis between the back squat and barbell hip thrust. Thirteen trained women (n = 13; age = 28.9 years; height = 164 cm; mass = 58.2 kg) performed estimated 10-repetition maximums (RM) in the back squat and barbell hip thrust. The barbell hip thrust elicited significantly greater mean (69.5% vs 29.4%) and peak (172% vs 84.9%) upper gluteus maximus, mean (86.8% vs 45.4%) and peak (216% vs 130%) lower gluteus maximus, and mean (40.8% vs 14.9%) and peak (86.9% vs 37.5%) biceps femoris EMG activity than the back squat. There were no significant differences in mean (99.5% vs 110%) or peak (216% vs 244%) vastus lateralis EMG activity. The barbell hip thrust activates the gluteus maximus and biceps femoris to a greater degree than the back squat when using estimated 10RM loads. Longitudinal training studies are needed to determine if this enhanced activation correlates with increased strength, hypertrophy, and performance.

  14. Effect of antecedent moderate-intensity exercise on the glycemia-increasing effect of a 30-sec maximal sprint: a sex comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Tara D; Hammer, Greta L; Davey, Raymond J; Paramalingam, Nirubasini; Guelfi, Kym J; Lewis, Lynley; Davis, Elizabeth A; Jones, Timothy W; Fournier, Paul A

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated whether a prior bout of moderate-intensity exercise attenuates the glycemia-increasing effect of a maximal 30-sec sprint. A secondary aim was to determine whether the effect of antecedent exercise on the glucoregulatory response to sprinting is affected by sex. Participants (men n = 8; women n = 7) were tested on two occasions during which they either rested (CON) or cycled for 60-min at a moderate intensity of ~65% V ˙ O 2 peak (EX) before performing a 30-sec maximal cycling effort 195 min later. In response to the sprint, blood glucose increased to a similar extent between EX and CON trials, peaking at 10 min of recovery, with no difference between sexes (P > 0.05). Blood glucose then declined at a faster rate in EX, and this was associated with a glucose rate of disappearance (R d) that exceeded the glucose rate of appearance (R a) earlier in EX compared with CON, although the overall glucose R a and R d profile was higher in men compared with women (P women compared with men (P women compared with men (P sprint; however, the subsequent decline in blood glucose is more rapid. This blood glucose response is similar between men and women, despite less pronounced changes in glucose R a and R d, and a lower response of plasma catecholamines and growth hormone to sprinting in women.

  15. Physical exercise and functional fitness in independently living vs institutionalized elderly women: a comparison of 60- to 79-year-old city dwellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Hélio L; Sousa, Nelson; Simão, Roberto; Pereira, Fabio Dutra; Vilaça-Alves, José

    2015-01-01

    To compare functional fitness (FF) levels among independent-living (IL) and day care (DC) elderly women of different age groups and to analyze changes in FF after 8 months of participation in an exercise program intervention for the IL elderly women. A total of 674 elderly women were divided into four IL groups with age in the range of 60-64 years (IL60-64, n=149), 65-69 years (IL65-69, n=138), 70-74 years (IL70-74, n=135), and 75-79 years (IL75-79, n=83), and four DC groups with age in the range of 60-64 years (DC60-64, n=35), 65-69 years (DC65-69, n=34), 70-74 years (DC70-74, n=47), and 75-79 years (DC75-79, n=53). The intervention consisted of a multimodal exercise training, 3 days per week for 8 months. Senior Fitness Test battery performances were obtained at baseline and after 8-month intervention. Significant differences were identified between all IL groups and DC groups in all FF tests (Pelderly women. The multimodal training was effective in improving all FF components related to daily living activities, in all age groups. In contrast, institutionalized elderly showed a clear tendency to worsen their FF over the time.

  16. Exercise and Compulsive Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polivy, Janet; Clendenen, Vanessa

    Although reports on the positive effects of fitness and exercise predominate in the exercise literature, some researchers describe frequent exercise as compulsive or addictive behavior. This paper addresses these "negative addictions" of exercise. As early as 1970, researchers recognized the addictive qualities of exercise. Short-term…

  17. Exercise training on chronotropic response and exercise capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Li; Min, Gao; Wei, Chen; Min, He; Jie, Zhou

    2017-03-01

    The study was designed to observe the effects and relationship of exercise on chronotropic response (CR) and exercise capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 30 patients with T2DM underwent symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) after excluding contraindication. For each subject individualized exercise prescription was formulated, and they received 12 weeks of exercise training after CPET retest to complete the comparison of CR indicators, including the ratio of maximum exercise heart rate to predicted maximum heart rate value (rHR), heart rate reserve rate (HRRes), heart rate recovery (HRR) of 1-6 min after exercise termination (HRR1-6), exercise capacity (peak VO2/kg) and other indicators. The results showed that after 12 weeks of exercise treatment, rHR, HRRes, HRR1-6, and peak VO2/kg were significantly higher than before (Pexercise training can improve cardiac dysfunction, abnormal HRR, enhance exercise capacity and adaptability of the cardiovascular system to exercise stress in T2DM patients.

  18. Effect of water immersion methods on post-exercise recovery from simulated team sport exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Jeremy; Dawson, Brian; Goodman, Carmel; Wallman, Karen; Beilby, John

    2009-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the efficacy of hot/cold contrast water immersion (CWI), cold-water immersion (COLD) and no recovery treatment (control) as post-exercise recovery methods following exhaustive simulated team sports exercise. Repeated sprint ability, strength, muscle soreness and inflammatory markers were measured across the 48-h post-exercise period. Eleven male team-sport athletes completed three 3-day testing trials, each separated by 2 weeks. On day 1, baseline measures of performance (10 m x 20 m sprints and isometric strength of quadriceps, hamstrings and hip flexors) were recorded. Participants then performed 80 min of simulated team sports exercise followed by a 20-m shuttle run test to exhaustion. Upon completion of the exercise, and 24h later, participants performed one of the post-exercise recovery procedures for 15 min. At 48 h post-exercise, the performance tests were repeated. Blood samples and muscle soreness ratings were taken before and immediately after post-exercise, and at 24h and 48 h post-exercise. In comparison to the control and CWI treatments, COLD resulted in significantly lower (pCOLD also facilitated a more rapid return to baseline repeated sprint performances. The only benefit of CWI over control was a significant reduction in muscle soreness 24h post-exercise. This study demonstrated that COLD following exhaustive simulated team sports exercise offers greater recovery benefits than CWI or control treatments.

  19. Hypertension. Part 2: The Role of Medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanji, Jeffrey L.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the differences between exercise alone and exercise with medication (e.g., diuretics, beta blockers, and ACE inhibitors) for treating hypertensive patients. Guidelines are presented for physicians wanting to change the therapeutic regimen or to step down from medical therapy, noting exercise must always be part of the program. (SM)

  20. Electronic apex locator: A comprehensive literature review - Part I: Different generations, comparison with other techniques and different usages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Mosleh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To compare electronic apex locators (EAL with others root canal determination techniques and evaluate other usage of this devices. Materials and Methods: "Tooth apex," "Dental instrument," "Odontometry," "Electronic medical," and "Electronic apex locator" were searched as primary identifiers via Medline/PubMed, Cochrane library, and Scopus data base up to 30 July 2013. Original articles that fulfilled the inclusion criteria were selected and reviewed. Results: Out of 402 relevant studies, 183 were selected based on the inclusion criteria. In this part, 108 studies are presented. Under the same conditions, no significant differences could be seen between different EALs of one generation. The application of EALs can result in lower patient radiation exposure, exact diagnosing of fractures, less perforation, and better retreatment. Conclusions: EALs were more accurate than other techniques in root canal length determination.

  1. Fluid balance and exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rabindarjeet

    2003-03-01

    Major sporting events in Malaysia are commonly staged in hot environments where the average daytime temperature is generally in the range of 29 to 31°C with the average relative humidity ranging from 80 to 95%. Exercise capacity and exercise performance are reduced when the ambient temperature is high and it has major implications for competitors as well as for spectators and officials. Prolonged exercise leads to progressive water and electrolyte loss from the body as sweat is secreted to promote heat loss. The rate of sweating depends on many factors and increases in proportion to work rate and environmental temperature and humidity. Sweat rates are highly variable and can exceed 2L.h-1 for prolonged periods in high heat. Since dehydration will impair exercise capacity and can pose a risk to health, the intake of fluid during exercise to offset sweat losses is important. Carbohydrate-electrolyte fluid ingestion during exercise has the dual role of providing a source of carbohydrate fuel to supplement the body's limited stores and of supplying water and electrolytes to replace the losses incurred by sweating. The composition of the drinks to be taken will be influenced by the relative importance of the need to supply fuel and water which, in turn depends on the intensity and duration of exercise activity, the ambient temperature, and humidity. Carbohydrate-electrolyte solutions appear to be more effective in improving performance than plain water. There is no advantage to fluid intake during exercise of less than 30-minute duration. Complete restoration of fluid balance after exercise is an important part of the recovery process and becomes even more important in hot, humid conditions. If a second bout of exercise has to be performed after a relatively short interval, the speed of rehydration becomes of crucial importance. Rehydration after exercise requires not only replacement of volume losses, but also replacement of some electrolytes, primarily sodium

  2. Comparison of Onsite Versus Online Chart Reviews as Part of the American College of Radiation Oncology Accreditation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T; Heron, Dwight E; Mundt, Arno J; Yashar, Catheryn; Feigenberg, Steven; Koltis, Gordon; Regine, William F; Prasad, Dheerendra; Patel, Shilpen; Sharma, Navesh; Hebert, Mary; Wallis, Norman; Kuettel, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Accreditation based on peer review of professional standards of care is essential in ensuring quality and safety in administration of radiation therapy. Traditionally, medical chart reviews have been performed by a physical onsite visit. The American College of Radiation Oncology Accreditation Program has remodeled its process whereby electronic charts are reviewed remotely. Twenty-eight radiation oncology practices undergoing accreditation had three charts per practice undergo both onsite and online review. Onsite review was performed by a single reviewer for each practice. Online review consisted of one or more disease site-specific reviewers for each practice. Onsite and online reviews were blinded and scored on a 100-point scale on the basis of 20 categories. A score of less than 75 was failing, and a score of 75 to 79 was marginal. Any failed charts underwent rereview by a disease site team leader. Eighty-four charts underwent both onsite and online review. The mean scores were 86.0 and 86.9 points for charts reviewed onsite and online, respectively. Comparison of onsite and online reviews revealed no statistical difference in chart scores ( P = .43). Of charts reviewed, 21% had a marginal (n = 8) or failing (n = 10) score. There was no difference in failing charts ( P = .48) or combined marginal and failing charts ( P = .13) comparing onsite and online reviews. The American College of Radiation Oncology accreditation process of online chart review results in comparable review scores and rate of failing scores compared with traditional on-site review. However, the modern online process holds less potential for bias by using multiple reviewers per practice and allows for greater oversight via disease site team leader rereview.

  3. Simulating aerosol microphysics with the ECHAM/MADE GCM – Part I: Model description and comparison with observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lauer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol dynamics module MADE has been coupled to the general circulation model ECHAM4 to simulate the chemical composition, number concentration, and size distribution of the global submicrometer aerosol. The present publication describes the new model system ECHAM4/MADE and presents model results in comparison with observations. The new model is able to simulate the full life cycle of particulate matter and various gaseous particle precursors including emissions of primary particles and trace gases, advection, convection, diffusion, coagulation, condensation, nucleation of sulfuric acid vapor, aerosol chemistry, cloud processing, and size-dependent dry and wet deposition. Aerosol components considered are sulfate (SO4, ammonium (NH4, nitrate (NO3, black carbon (BC, particulate organic matter (POM, sea salt, mineral dust, and aerosol liquid water. The model is numerically efficient enough to allow long term simulations, which is an essential requirement for application in general circulation models. Since the current study is focusing on the submicrometer aerosol, a coarse mode is not being simulated. The model is run in a passive mode, i.e. no feedbacks between the MADE aerosols and clouds or radiation are considered yet. This allows the investigation of the effect of aerosol dynamics, not interfered by feedbacks of the altered aerosols on clouds, radiation, and on the model dynamics. In order to evaluate the results obtained with this new model system, calculated mass concentrations, particle number concentrations, and size distributions are compared to observations. The intercomparison shows, that ECHAM4/MADE is able to reproduce the major features of the geographical patterns, seasonal cycle, and vertical distributions of the basic aerosol parameters. In particular, the model performs well under polluted continental conditions in the northern hemispheric lower and middle troposphere. However, in comparatively clean remote areas, e

  4. Simulating aerosol microphysics with the ECHAM/MADE GCM - Part I: Model description and comparison with observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, A.; Hendricks, J.; Ackermann, I.; Schell, B.; Hass, H.; Metzger, S.

    2005-12-01

    The aerosol dynamics module MADE has been coupled to the general circulation model ECHAM4 to simulate the chemical composition, number concentration, and size distribution of the global submicrometer aerosol. The present publication describes the new model system ECHAM4/MADE and presents model results in comparison with observations. The new model is able to simulate the full life cycle of particulate matter and various gaseous particle precursors including emissions of primary particles and trace gases, advection, convection, diffusion, coagulation, condensation, nucleation of sulfuric acid vapor, aerosol chemistry, cloud processing, and size-dependent dry and wet deposition. Aerosol components considered are sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), black carbon (BC), particulate organic matter (POM), sea salt, mineral dust, and aerosol liquid water. The model is numerically efficient enough to allow long term simulations, which is an essential requirement for application in general circulation models. Since the current study is focusing on the submicrometer aerosol, a coarse mode is not being simulated. The model is run in a passive mode, i.e. no feedbacks between the MADE aerosols and clouds or radiation are considered yet. This allows the investigation of the effect of aerosol dynamics, not interfered by feedbacks of the altered aerosols on clouds, radiation, and on the model dynamics. In order to evaluate the results obtained with this new model system, calculated mass concentrations, particle number concentrations, and size distributions are compared to observations. The intercomparison shows, that ECHAM4/MADE is able to reproduce the major features of the geographical patterns, seasonal cycle, and vertical distributions of the basic aerosol parameters. In particular, the model performs well under polluted continental conditions in the northern hemispheric lower and middle troposphere. However, in comparatively clean remote areas, e.g. in the upper

  5. Bilateral Comparison of 1 V and 10 V Standards between the SMD (Belgium) and the BIPM October to December 2014 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solve, S.; Chayramy, R.; Stock, M.; Vlad, D.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b, a comparison of the 1 V and 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and the Service Métrologie—Metrologische Dienst (SMD), Brussel, Belgium, was carried out from October to November 2014. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards (Fluke 732B), BIPM4 (Z4) and BIPM5 (Z5), were transported by freight to SMD and also back to BIPM. At SMD, the reference standard for DC voltage is a Josephson Voltage Standard (JVS). The output EMF (Electromotive Force) of each travelling standard was measured by direct comparison with the primary standard. At the BIPM, the travelling standards were calibrated, before and after the measurements at SMD, with the Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages of the Zener standards on internal temperature and ambient atmospheric pressure. The final result of the comparison is presented as the difference between the values assigned toDC voltage standards by SMD, at the level of 1.018 V and 10 V, at SMD, USMD, and those assigned by the BIPM, at the BIPM, UBIPM, at the reference date of 5 November 2014. USMD - UBIPM = 0.14 mV; uc = 0.07 mV, at 1 V USMD - UBIPM = 0.09 mV; uc = 0.49 mV , at 10 V where uc is the combined standard uncertainty associated with the measured difference, including the uncertainty of the representation of the volt at the BIPM and at SMD, based on KJ-90, and the uncertainty related to the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  6. Bilateral Comparison of 1 V and 10 V Standards between the JV (Norway) and the BIPM, January to February 2015 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solve, S.; Chayramy, R.; Stock, M.; Sengebush, F.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b, a comparison of the 1 V and 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and the Justervesenet (JV), Kjeller, Norway, was carried out from January to February 2015. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards (Fluke 732B), BIPM4 (Z4) and BIPM5 (Z5), were transported by freight to JV and also back to BIPM. At JV, the reference standard for DC voltage is a Josephson Voltage Standard. The output EMF (Electromotive Force) of each travelling standard was measured by direct comparison with the primary standard. At the BIPM, the travelling standards were calibrated, before and after the measurements at JV, withthe Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages of the Zener standards on internal temperature and ambient atmospheric pressure. The final result of the comparison is presented as the difference between the values assigned toDC voltage standards by JV, at the level of 1.018 V and 10 V, at JV, UJV, and those assigned by the BIPM, at the BIPM, UBIPM, at the reference date of 28 January 2015. UJV - UBIPM = 0.23 mV; uc = 0.03 mV , at 1 V UJV - UBIPM = 0.63 mV; uc = 0.28 mV, at 10 V where uc is the combined standard uncertainty associated with the measured difference, including the uncertainty of the representation of the volt at the BIPM and at JV, based on KJ-90, and the uncertainty related to the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  7. Bilateral Comparison of 10 V Standards between the NSAI - NML (Ireland) and the BIPM, March 2015 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solve, S.; Chayramy, R.; Stock, M.; Power, O.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b, a comparison of the 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and the National Standards Authority of Ireland - National Metrology Laboratory (NSAI - NML), Dublin, Ireland, was carried out in February and March 2015. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards (Fluke 732B), BIPM6 (Z6) and BIPMC (ZC), were transported by freight to NSAI-NML. At NSAI-NML, the reference standard for DC voltage at the 10 V level consists of a group of characterized Zener diode-based electronic voltage standards. The output EMF (Electromotive Force) of each travelling standard was measured by direct comparison with the group standard. At the BIPM the travelling standards were calibrated, before and after the measurements at NSAI-NML, with the Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages of the Zener standards on internal temperature and ambient atmospheric pressure. The final resultof the comparison is presented as the difference between the values assigned to DC voltage standards by NSAI - NML, at the level of 10 V,at NSAI - NML, UNML, and those assigned by the BIPM, at the BIPM, UBIPM, at the reference date of 24 February 2015. UNML - UBIPM = - 0.82 mV; uc = 1.35 mV , at 10 V where uc is the combined standard uncertainty associated with the measured difference, including the uncertainty of the representation of the volt at the BIPM and at NSAI-NML, based on KJ-90, and the uncertainty related to the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  8. Bilateral Comparison of 1 V and 10 V Standards between the NIMT (Thailand) and the BIPM October to December 2014 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solve, S.; Chayramy, R.; Stock, M.; Pimsut, S.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b, a comparison of the 1 V and 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and the National Institute of Metrology (Thailand), NIMT, was carried out from October to December 2014. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards (Fluke 732B), BIPMA (ZA) and BIPM6 (Z6), were transported by freight to NIMT and back to BIPM. At NIMT, the reference standard for DC voltage is a Josephson Voltage Standard. The output EMF (Electromotive Force) of each travelling standard was measured by direct comparison with the primary standard. At the BIPM, the travelling standards were calibrated, before and after the measurements at NIMT, with the Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages of the Zener standards on internal temperature and ambient atmospheric pressure. The final result of the comparison is presented as the difference between the values assigned toDC voltage standards by NIMT, at the level of 1.018 V and 10 V, at NIMT, UNIMT, and those assigned by the BIPM, at the BIPM, UBIPM, at the reference date of 23 November 2014. UNIMT - UBIPM = 0.16 mV; uc = 0.14 mV, at 1 V UNIMT - UBIPM = - 0.03 mV; uc = 0.11 mV, at 10 V where uc is the combined standard uncertainty associated with the measured difference, including the uncertainty of the representation of the volt at the BIPM and at NIMT, based on KJ-90, and the uncertainty related to the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  9. Bilateral comparison of 1 V and 10 V standards between the DEFNAT (Tunisia) and the BIPM February to March 2016 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solve, S.; Chayramy, R.; Ben Salah, B.; Mallat, A.; Abene, L.; Stock, M.

    2016-01-01

    As part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b, a comparison of the 1 V and 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and the Laboratoire de Métrologie Electrique, DEFNAT (Tunisia), was carried out from February to March 2016. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards (Fluke 732B), BIPMC (ZC) and BIPM6 (Z6), were transported by freight to DEFNAT and back to BIPM. In order to keep the Zeners powered during their transportation phase, a BIPM in-house voltage stabiliser was connected in parallel to the internal battery. The voltage stabiliser consists of a set of two batteries, electrically protected from surcharge-discharge, easy to recharge and is designed to power two transfer standards for 10 consecutive days. At DEFNAT, the reference standard for DC voltage is a Josephson Voltage Standard. The output EMF (Electromotive Force) of each travelling standard was measured by direct comparison with the primary standard. At the BIPM, the travelling standards were calibrated, before and after the measurements at DEFNAT, with the Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages of the Zener standards on internal temperature and ambient atmospheric pressure. The final result of the comparison is presented as the difference between the values assigned to DC voltage standards by DEFNAT, at the level of 1.018 V and 10 V, at DEFNAT, UDEFNAT, and those assigned by the BIPM, at the BIPM, UBIPM, at the reference date of the 26th of February 2016. UDEFNAT - UBIPM = + 0.07 μV uc = 0.04 μV, at 1.018 V UDEFNAT - UBIPM = + 0.38 μV uc = 0.10 μV, at 10 V where uc is the combined standard uncertainty associated with the measured difference, including the uncertainty of the representation of the volt at the BIPM and at NSAI-NML, based on KJ-90, and the uncertainty related to the comparison. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which

  10. Bilateral comparison of 10 V standards between the NSAI - NML (Ireland) and the BIPM, February 2016 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solve, S.; Chayramy, R.; Power, O.; Stock, M.

    2016-01-01

    As part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b, a comparison of the 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and the National Standards Authority of Ireland - National Metrology Laboratory (NSAI - NML), Dublin, Ireland, was carried out in January and February 2016. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards (Fluke 732B), BIPM7 (Z7) and BIPM9 (Z9), were transported by freight to NSAI-NML. At NSAI-NML, the reference standard for DC voltage at the 10 V level consists of a group of characterized Zener diode-based electronic voltage standards. The output EMF (Electromotive Force) of each travelling standard was measured by direct comparison with the group standard. At the BIPM the travelling standards were calibrated, before and after the measurements at NSAI-NML, with the Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages of the Zener standards on internal temperature and ambient atmospheric pressure. The final result of the comparison is presented as the difference between the values assigned to DC voltage standards by NSAI - NML, at the level of 10 V, at NSAI - NML, UNML, and those assigned by the BIPM, at the BIPM, UBIPM, at the reference date of the 31 of January 2016. UNML - UBIPM = + 0.22 μV uc = 1.35 μV , at 10 V where uc is the combined standard uncertainty associated with the measured difference, including the uncertainty of the representation of the volt at the BIPM and at NSAI-NML, based on KJ-90, and the uncertainty related to the comparison. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  11. 14 CFR 61.2 - Exercise of Privilege.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... medical recency requirements of this part, specific to the operation or activity. (2) Exercise privileges... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exercise of Privilege. 61.2 Section 61.2... CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS General § 61.2 Exercise of Privilege. (a...

  12. Comparison between whole-body vibration, light-emitting diode, and cycling warm-up on high-intensity physical performance during sprint bicycle exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, Maria C; Fonseca, Ivana A T; Martins, Jeanne B; de Carvalho, Marielle M; Xavier, Murilo; Costa, Sidney J; de Avelar, Núbia C P; Ribeiro, Vanessa G C; Salvador, Fabiano S; Augusto, Leonardo; Mendonça, Vanessa A; Lacerda, Ana C R

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of light-emitting diode (LED) irradiation and whole-body vibration (WBV) delivered either in isolation or combination (LED + WBV), warm-up (WU), and a control (C) treatment on performance during a sprint bicycle exercise. Ten cyclists performed a 30-second sprint cycle test under these conditions. The LED light was applied at 4 points bilaterally. Whole-body vibration consisted of 5 minutes of squats associated with WBV. LED + WBV consisted of WBV followed by LED therapy. Warm-up consisted of 17 minutes of moderate-intensity bicycle exercise. Control consisted of 10 minutes at rest. Blood lactate (BL) and ammonia (BA) levels and skin temperature (ST) were determined. Peak power (842 ± 117 vs. 800 ± 106 vs. 809 ± 128 W [p = 0.02 and p = 0.01]), relative power (12.1 ± 1.0 vs. 11.5 ± 0.9 vs. 11.6 ± 1.0 W·kg [p = 0.02 and p = 0.02]), and relative work (277 ± 23 vs. 263 ± 24 vs. 260 ± 23 J·kg [p = 0.02 and p = 0.003]) were higher in the WU group compared with the control and LED groups. In the LED + WBV group, peak (833 ± 115 vs. 800 ± 106 W [p = 0.02]) and relative (11.9 ± 0.9 vs. 11.5 ± 0.9 W·kg [p = 0.02]) power were higher than those in the control group, and relative work (272 ± 22 vs. 260 ± 23 J·kg [p = 0.02]) were improved compared with the LED group. There were no differences for BL, BA, and ST. The findings of this study confirmed the effectiveness of a warm-up as a preparatory activity and demonstrated that LED + WBV and WBV were as effective as WU in improving cyclist performance during a sprint bicycle exercise.

  13. Benefits of Exercise Training in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motl, Robert W; Sandroff, Brian M

    2015-09-01

    Exercise training represents a behavioral approach for safely managing many of the functional, symptomatic, and quality of life consequences of multiple sclerosis (MS). This topical review paper summarizes evidence from literature reviews and meta-analyses, supplemented by recent individual studies, indicating that exercise training can yield small but important improvements in walking, balance, cognition, fatigue, depression, and quality of life in MS. The paper highlights limitations of research on exercise training and its consequences and future research directions and provides an overview for promotion of exercise training in MS based on recent prescriptive guidelines. Collectively, the evidence for the benefits of exercise training in MS suggests that the time is ripe for the promotion of exercise by healthcare providers, particularly neurologists as a central part of the clinical care and management of MS patients.

  14. Benefits of Exercise in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K. Cooney

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to highlight the importance of exercise in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and to demonstrate the multitude of beneficial effects that properly designed exercise training has in this population. RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune disease characterised by decrements to joint health including joint pain and inflammation, fatigue, increased incidence and progression of cardiovascular disease, and accelerated loss of muscle mass, that is, “rheumatoid cachexia”. These factors contribute to functional limitation, disability, comorbidities, and reduced quality of life. Exercise training for RA patients has been shown to be efficacious in reversing cachexia and substantially improving function without exacerbating disease activity and is likely to reduce cardiovascular risk. Thus, all RA patients should be encouraged to include aerobic and resistance exercise training as part of routine care. Understanding the perceptions of RA patients and health professionals to exercise is key to patients initiating and adhering to effective exercise training.

  15. Kinematic analysis of the posterior cruciate ligament, part 2: a comparison of anatomic single- versus double-bundle reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdicks, Coen A; Kennedy, Nicholas I; Goldsmith, Mary T; Devitt, Brian M; Michalski, Max P; Årøen, Asbjørn; Engebretsen, Lars; LaPrade, Robert F

    2013-12-01

    A more thorough understanding of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) has led to an increase in awareness and treatment of complex PCL injuries. Controversy exists about whether PCL reconstruction (PCLR) using an anatomic single-bundle (aSB) or anatomic double-bundle (aDB) technique is the most effective. An aDB PCLR provides significantly better anterior-posterior and rotatory knee stability compared with an aSB PCLR and more closely recreates normal knee kinematics. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 18 match-paired, cadaveric knees (mean age, 54.8 years; range, 51-59 years; 5 male and 4 female pairs) were used to evaluate the kinematics of an intact PCL, an aSB and aDB PCLR, and a complete sectioned PCL. A 6 degrees of freedom robotic system was used to assess knee stability with a 134-N applied posterior tibial load, 5-N·m external and internal rotation torques, 10-N·m valgus and varus rotation torques, and a coupled 100-N posterior tibial load and 5-N·m external rotation torque at 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, 90°, 105°, and 120°. The aDB PCLR had significantly less posterior translation than the aSB PCLR at all flexion angles of 15° and greater. The largest difference in posterior translation was seen at 105° of flexion, where the aSB PCLR had 5.3 mm (P = .017) more posterior translation than the aDB PCLR. The aDB PCLR also had significantly less internal rotation than the aSB PCLR at all tested angles of 90° and greater. Neither reconstruction was able to fully restore native knee kinematics. An aDB PCLR more closely approximated native knee kinematics when compared with an aSB PCLR. Specifically, the aDB PCLR demonstrated significantly more restraint to posterior translation at flexion angles between 15° and 120° and less internal rotational laxity at high flexion angles 90° to 120°. Comparison of the 2 reconstruction techniques illustrates the time-zero kinematic advantage imparted by the addition of the posteromedial bundle

  16. Analysis of landslide development using aerial photographs and DEMs comparison, along part of the Chacoura River valley, Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévy, S.; Locat, J.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Demers, D.; Loye, A.

    2009-04-01

    The large plains of Eastern Canada sensitive clays are cut by numerous rivers, in a way that their slopes have been and are still affected by landslides. They play an important role in the modelling of the landscape of these regions. Hence, the role of erosion as a trigger of landslides is important. On the Chacoura River, north of Louiseville (Quebec), several large landslides scars, more or less recent, are visible. A first inventory of areas of erosion, slides and landslides clay was carried out by Locat et al. (1984) on some series of aerial photographs covering a period from 1948 to 1979. This study is based on a detailed analysis of aerial photographs, dating from 1948 to 1997 and an airborne LiDAR digital elevation model (DEM-LiDAR), dating from 2007, in a GIS environment, using two different approaches: (1) a map of the phenomena was drawn by identifying various elements such as land movements, limits of the slope, position of the river, the area covered by forest and agricultural drainage structures, e.g., and (2) the comparison of DEMs was performed to estimate slipped and eroded volumes, the rate of erosion on a section of the river (about 6 km) and the spatial distribution of movements. The results show that the location of landslides is directly linked to the presence of some characteristic topographical features, such as (1) the shape of the meandering river, (2) the flow of agricultural drainage, or (3) the erosion at the toe of the slope. Finally, the study of landslides over a period of 60 years shows that the major landslide scars in this area could be in fact the sum of several events of lesser importance. For example, a large landslide (around 13'000 m2) occurred in 1976 at the same place where a first landslide of 1500 m2 in 1964. Locat, J., Demers, D., Lebuis, J. and Rissmann, P. (1984), Prédiction des Glissements de Terrain; Application aux Argiles Sensibles, Rivière Chacoura, Québec, Canada, the IV International Symposium on Landslides

  17. OH and HO2 radical chemistry during PROPHET 2008 and CABINEX 2009 – Part 1: Measurements and model comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Griffith

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyl (OH and hydroperoxyl (HO2 radicals are key species driving the oxidation of volatile organic compounds that can lead to the production of ozone and secondary organic aerosols. Previous measurements of these radicals in forest environments with high isoprene, low NOx conditions have shown serious discrepancies with modeled concentrations, bringing into question the current understanding of isoprene oxidation chemistry in these environments. During the summers of 2008 and 2009, OH and peroxy radical concentrations were measured using a laser-induced fluorescence instrument as part of the PROPHET (Program for Research on Oxidants: PHotochemistry, Emissions, and Transport and CABINEX (Community Atmosphere-Biosphere INteractions EXperiment campaigns at a forested site in northern Michigan. Supporting measurements of photolysis rates, volatile organic compounds, NOx (NO + NO2 and other inorganic species were used to constrain a zero-dimensional box model based on the Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism, modified to include the Mainz Isoprene Mechanism (RACM-MIM. The CABINEX model OH predictions were in good agreement with the measured OH concentrations, with an observed-to-modeled ratio near one (0.70 ± 0.31 for isoprene mixing ratios between 1–2 ppb on average. The measured peroxy radical concentrations, reflecting the sum of HO2 and isoprene-based peroxy radicals, were generally lower than predicted by the box model in both years.

  18. Non-standard coupled extensional and bending bias tests for planar pantographic lattices. Part II: comparison with experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Emilio; Barcz, Katarzyna; Rizzi, Nicola Luigi

    2016-10-01

    In dell'Isola et al. (Zeitschrift für Angewandte Math und Physik 66(6):3473-3498, 2015, Proc R Soc Lond A Math Phys Eng Sci 472(2185):1-23, 2016) pantographic sheets are proposed as a basic constituent for a novel metamaterial. In Part I, see Turco et al. (Zeitschrift für Angewandte Math und Physik, doi: 10.1007/s00033-016-0713-4, 2016), two different numerical models are applied in order to design an experimental setup aimed to prove the effectiveness of introduced concept. The aim of this paper is to prove that the Hencky-type model introduced for planar pantographic sheets allows for the correct prediction, in a large range of imposed displacements, of the experimental measurements concerning specimens undergoing coupled bending and extensional deformations. The four-parameter numerical model introduced is shown to have a large range of applicability: Indeed without changing the values of the material parameters previously attributed in simple extensional tests to a specific specimen by a best-fit procedure, it is possible to forecast its behavior in all the considered type of imposed deformations. The measurements performed include the determination of reactive forces exerted by used hard devices, and the numerical modeling is able to predict very carefully quantitatively and qualitatively also this complex aspect of phenomenology, where previously attempted models seem to have failed.

  19. Preliminary comparison with 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart B for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertram-Howery, S.G.; Marietta, M.G.; Rechard, R.P.; Anderson, D.R. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Swift, P.N. (Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Baker, B.L. (Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Bean, J.E. Jr.; McCurley, R.D.; Rudeen, D.K. (New Mexico Engineering Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Beyeler, W.; Brinster, K.F.; Guzowski, R.V.; Sch

    1990-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is planned as the first mined geologic repository for transuranic (TRU) wastes generated by defense programs of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Before disposing of waste at the WIPP, the DOE must evaluate compliance with the United states Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Standard, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR Part 191, US EPA, 1985). Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is evaluating long-term performance against criteria in Subpart B of the Standard. Performance assessment'' as used in this report includes analyses for the Containment Requirements ({section} 191.13(a)) and the Individual Protection Requirements ({section} 191.15). Because proving predictions about future human actions or natural events is not possible, the EPA expects compliance to be determined on the basis of specified quantitative analyses and informed, qualitative judgment. The goal of the WIPP performance-assessment team at SNL is to provide as detailed and thorough a basis as practical for the quantitative aspects of that decision. This report summarizes SNL's late-1990 understanding of the WIPP Project's ability to evaluate compliance with Subpart B. 245 refs., 88 figs., 23 tabs.

  20. Learn to love exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevention - learn to love exercise; Wellness - learn to love exercise ... With so many options for exercise, there is no need to suffer through a workout you do not like. Be true to yourself. Look for activities that ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease: Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learn More > Español In Your Area NPF Shop Exercise Make Text Smaller Make Text Larger You are ... Emory University School of Medicine. Next >> 4th level - Exercise Medications for Motor Symptoms Surgical Treatment Options Exercise ...

  2. Exercise After Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Exercise After Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Exercise After Pregnancy ... Pregnancy FAQ131, June 2015 PDF Format Exercise After Pregnancy Labor, Delivery, and Postpartum Care What are some ...

  3. Rotator Cuff Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: Exercise and Fitness, Injury Rehabilitation, Prevention and WellnessTags: Exercise Prescription, prevention, Shoulder Problems, sports medicine, treatment Exercise and Fitness, Injury Rehabilitation, Prevention ...

  4. Why Exercise Is Cool

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Puberty Train Your Temper Why Exercise Is Cool KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Exercise Is ... day and your body will thank you later! Exercise Makes Your Heart Happy You may know that ...

  5. Strength and Balance Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Strength and Balance Exercises Updated:Sep 8,2016 If ... Be Safe While Being Active - Stretching & Flexibility Exercises - Strength & Balance Exercises - Problems & Solutions for Being Active - FAQs ...

  6. A comparison of substrate oxidation during prolonged exercise in men at terrestrial altitude and normobaric normoxia following the coingestion of 13C glucose and 13C fructose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, John P; Woods, David R; Mellor, Adrian; Boos, Christopher; Gallagher, Liam; Tsakirides, Costas; Arjomandkhah, Nicola C; Holdsworth, David A; Cooke, Carlton B; Morrison, Douglas J; Preston, Thomas; King, Roderick Fgj

    2017-01-01

    This study compared the effects of coingesting glucose and fructose on exogenous and endogenous substrate oxidation during prolonged exercise at altitude and sea level, in men. Seven male British military personnel completed two bouts of cycling at the same relative workload (55% Wmax) for 120 min on acute exposure to altitude (3375 m) and at sea level (~113 m). In each trial, participants ingested 1.2 g·min(-1) of glucose (enriched with (13)C glucose) and 0.6 g·min(-1) of fructose (enriched with (13)C fructose) directly before and every 15 min during exercise. Indirect calorimetry and isotope ratio mass spectrometry were used to calculate fat oxidation, total and exogenous carbohydrate oxidation, plasma glucose oxidation, and endogenous glucose oxidation derived from liver and muscle glycogen. Total carbohydrate oxidation during the exercise period was lower at altitude (157.7 ± 56.3 g) than sea level (286.5 ± 56.2 g, P = 0.006, ES = 2.28), whereas fat oxidation was higher at altitude (75.5 ± 26.8 g) than sea level (42.5 ± 21.3 g, P = 0.024, ES = 1.23). Peak exogenous carbohydrate oxidation was lower at altitude (1.13 ± 0.2 g·min(-1)) than sea level (1.42 ± 0.16 g·min(-1), P = 0.034, ES = 1.33). There were no differences in rates, or absolute and relative contributions of plasma or liver glucose oxidation between conditions during the second hour of exercise. However, absolute and relative contributions of muscle glycogen during the second hour were lower at altitude (29.3 ± 28.9 g, 16.6 ± 15.2%) than sea level (78.7 ± 5.2 g (P = 0.008, ES = 1.71), 37.7 ± 13.0% (P = 0.016, ES = 1.45). Acute exposure to altitude reduces the reliance on muscle glycogen and increases fat oxidation during prolonged cycling in men compared with sea level. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  7. Effects of exercise dose on endogenous estrogens in postmenopausal women: a randomized trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friedenreich, Christine M; Neilson, Heather K; Wang, Qinggang; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Yasui, Yutaka; Duha, Aalo; MacLaughlin, Sarah; Kallal, Ciara; Forbes, Cynthia C; Courneya, Kerry S

    2015-01-01

    Exercise dose comparison trials with biomarker outcomes can identify the amount of exercise required to reduce breast cancer risk and also strengthen the causal inference between physical activity and breast cancer...

  8. Comparison of exercise-rest-reinjection Tl-201 imaging and rest sublingual isosorbide dinitrate Tc-99m MIBI imaging for the assessment of myocardial viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günel, Seval Erhamamci; Akgun, Ayşegul

    2009-07-01

    Nitrate administration has been proposed to enhance the detection of myocardial viability when performing myocardial perfusion imaging. In this study, we aimed to compare Tl-201 exercise-rest-reinjection protocol with rest isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN)-Tc99m MIBI study in the same population examined for the myocardial viability. Twenty-six patients with coronary artery disease who had fixed segmental defects on exercise-rest-Tl-201 imaging were studied. All of them underwent Tl-201 reinjection study. Within 1 week of Tl-201 imaging, rest-Tc99m MIBI imaging was performed after sublingual 5 mg ISDN administration (2-day protocol). For each study, tomograms were divided into 20 segments based on three short-axis slices, one vertical long-axis representing the totality of the left ventricle and regional tracer uptake was quantitatively analyzed. Regional tracer uptake was evaluated in 20 myocardial segments for all patients. Viability was defined as presence of tracer uptake >/=50% of peak activity on each study. A total 520 myocardial segments were assessed by semi quantitative analysis. On the baseline rest Tl-201 studies, 211 segments of the 520 segments that were analyzed had Tl-201 imaging and 55 segments (27%) described as viable on the rest ISDN-Tc99m MIBI imaging. There was 89% concordance between the ISDN-Tc99m MIBI study and Tl-201 reinjection study regarding viable myocardial segments. Of the 23 segments with discordant results, 18 were irreversible on Tl-201 reinjection study, but showed >/=50% uptake on ISDN-Tc99m MIBI. Observation of good agreement between Tl-201 reinjection and ISDN-Tc99m MIBI study studies led us to suggest the use of ISDN enhanced imaging in the evaluation of myocardial viability.

  9. A comparison of classroom and online asynchronous problem-based learning for students undertaking statistics training as part of a Public Health Masters degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, N; Verstegen, D M L; Tan, F E S; O'Connor, S J

    2013-05-01

    This case-study compared traditional, face-to-face classroom-based teaching with asynchronous online learning and teaching methods in two sets of students undertaking a problem-based learning module in the multilevel and exploratory factor analysis of longitudinal data as part of a Masters degree in Public Health at Maastricht University. Students were allocated to one of the two study variants on the basis of their enrolment status as full-time or part-time students. Full-time students (n = 11) followed the classroom-based variant and part-time students (n = 12) followed the online asynchronous variant which included video recorded lectures and a series of asynchronous online group or individual SPSS activities with synchronous tutor feedback. A validated student motivation questionnaire was administered to both groups of students at the start of the study and a second questionnaire was administered at the end of the module. This elicited data about student satisfaction with the module content, teaching and learning methods, and tutor feedback. The module coordinator and problem-based learning tutor were also interviewed about their experience of delivering the experimental online variant and asked to evaluate its success in relation to student attainment of the module's learning outcomes. Student examination results were also compared between the two groups. Asynchronous online teaching and learning methods proved to be an acceptable alternative to classroom-based teaching for both students and staff. Educational outcomes were similar for both groups, but importantly, there was no evidence that the asynchronous online delivery of module content disadvantaged part-time students in comparison to their full-time counterparts.

  10. Nontargeted metabolomic analysis and "commercial-homophyletic" comparison-induced biomarkers verification for the systematic chemical differentiation of five different parts of Panax ginseng.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shi; Yang, Wen-Zhi; Yao, Chang-Liang; Qiu, Zhi-Dong; Shi, Xiao-Jian; Zhang, Jing-Xian; Hou, Jin-Jun; Wang, Qiu-Rong; Wu, Wan-Ying; Guo, De-An

    2016-07-01

    A key segment in authentication of herbal medicines is the establishment of robust biomarkers that embody the intrinsic metabolites difference independent of the growing environment or processing technics. We present a strategy by nontargeted metabolomics and "Commercial-homophyletic" comparison-induced biomarkers verification with new bioinformatic vehicles, to improve the efficiency and reliability in authentication of herbal medicines. The chemical differentiation of five different parts (root, leaf, flower bud, berry, and seed) of Panax ginseng was illustrated as a case study. First, an optimized ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight-MS(E) (UPLC/QTOF-MS(E)) approach was established for global metabolites profiling. Second, UNIFI™ combined with search of an in-house library was employed to automatically characterize the metabolites. Third, pattern recognition multivariate statistical analysis of the MS(E) data of different parts of commercial and homophyletic samples were separately performed to explore potential biomarkers. Fourth, potential biomarkers deduced from commercial and homophyletic root and leaf samples were cross-compared to infer robust biomarkers. Fifth, discriminating models by artificial neutral network (ANN) were established to identify different parts of P. ginseng. Consequently, 164 compounds were characterized, and 11 robust biomarkers enabling the differentiation among root, leaf, flower bud, and berry, were discovered by removing those structurally unstable and possibly processing-related ones. The ANN models using the robust biomarkers managed to exactly discriminate four different parts and root adulterant with leaf as well. Conclusively, biomarkers verification using homophyletic samples conduces to the discovery of robust biomarkers. The integrated strategy facilitates authentication of herbal medicines in a more efficient and more intelligent manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparação das respostas cardiorrespiratórias de um exercício de hidroginástica com e sem deslocamento horizontal nos meios terrestre e aquático Comparisons of cardiorrespiratory responses in a hydrogymnastics exercise with and without horizontal movement on land and in aquatic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Kanitz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi comparar as respostas cardiorrespiratórias de um exercício de hidroginástica (corrida estacionária realizado com e sem deslocamento horizontal no meio terrestre (MT, em piscina funda (PF e em piscina rasa (PR. Seis mulheres jovens realizaram os exercícios durante 4 min numa cadência de 80 bpm. O exercício consistia em flexão e extensão de quadril com os braços simulando um movimento de corrida. A frequência cardíaca (FC e o consumo de oxigênio (VO2 foram coletados no último minuto de exercício e a percepção de esforço (PE foi coletada ao término do exercício. Para a comparação das variáveis utilizou-se ANOVA two-way para medidas repetidas com fatores meio e forma de execução (p The aim of the study was to compare the cardiorespiratory responses during an hydrogymnastics exercise performed with and without horizontal movement on land environment (LE and in a deep (DS and in a shallow swimming pool (SS. Six YOUNG women performed the exercise during four minutes in each environment (LE, DS and SS and situation (with and without horizontal movement in a cadence of 80 bpm. The exercise consisted in a hip flexion/extension while the arms simulating a running movement. The heart rate (HR and oxygen uptake (VO2 were veriefied during the last minute in each exercise and the rate of perceived exertion (RPE was collected in the ending of the exercise. To variables comparisons was used ANOVA two-way for repeated measures with factors environment and situation (p < 0,05. For all cardiorespiratory variables analyzed, SS exercise were lower than that found on LE. Although, no difference was observed in the exercise performed on LE or in DS, except for the HR, that was lower during DS. Acording to the different situations, higher HR value was found during the exercise with horizontal movement when compared with the exercise without horizontal movement in the DS. These findings suggest the possibility to perform

  12. Comfortable, healthy and intelligent buildings. Part 2. Comparison of buildings in the Netherlands and Germany; Comfortabele, gezonde en intelligente gebouwen. Deel 2. Nederlandse en Duitse gebouwen vergeleken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lony, R.J.M. [Deerns raadgevende ingenieurs, Rijswijk (Netherlands); Molenaar, D.J.; Rietkerk, J.; Schuiling, D.J.B.W.; Zeiler, W. [Installatietechnologie, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2006-10-15

    A comparison was made between four buildings in Germany and four buildings in the Netherlands. In part 1, published in this magazine in July-August, attention was paid to the first two comparisons. In this article the remaining two sets of buildings are compared. The basis of the comparison is the module Keyfactors, developed by the University of Reading in the UK, in which six aspects are compared: site, skin, shell, services, space plan, and stuff (e.g. furniture) [Dutch] De Technische Universiteit Eindhoven heeft een vergelijking gemaakt tussen vier Duitse en vier Nederlandse gebouwen. In het eerste artikel, dat is gepubliceerd in het juli-augustus-nurnmer van dit tijdschrift, zijn de eerste twee vergelijkingen behandeld, evenals de basis van de vergelijking. De basis voor het vergelijkingsonderzoek, is de module Keyfactors van de Universiteit van Reading. Deze module is gebaseerd op het vergelijken van gebouwen op zes aspecten (de 6 S-vergelijking). Dit zijn site (Iocatie), skin (gevel), shell (constructieopzet), services (installaties), space plan (ruimtelijke opzet) en stuff (meubilair). Gebaseerd op deze zes aspecten kan een vergelijking worden gemaakt tussen gebouwen. In het onderzoek van de TU/E zijn in totaal acht gebouwen paarsgewijs bekeken: de Hoftoren in Den Haag met de Post Tower in Bonn, her Thermostaete-gebouw in Bodegraven met de Landesvertretung in Berlijn (deze vier zijn in het eerste deel besproken), . In dit tweede en afsluitende artikel worden de laatste twee vergelijkingen beschreven het Forum-gebouw in Amsterdam met het Spherion in Dusseldorf en het Rijnlandhuis in Leiden met het Energieforum in Berlijn. De Duitse gebouwen zijn doorgaans innovatiever, maar de Nederlandse hebben een betere prijs-kwaliteitverhouding.

  13. [Exercise, physical activity and diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canabal Torres, M Y

    1992-02-01

    Vigorous regular exercise is a recommended inclusion in the management of diabetes of persons with diabetes of both types, regardless of age. Benefits can be identified in the physiological (improved cardiovascular fitness, flexibility and muscle toning; in the metabolic and hormonal processes for energy production), as well as psychosocial realms (self-esteem, stress management, socialization opportunities). Considerations of the risks (hyper or hypoglicemia, ketoacidosis, neuropathies or complications os cardiac risks), and contraindications (unplanned weight training in cases with proliferative retinopathy, hypertensión, uncontrolled diabetes) must be part of the exercise prescription and implemmentation. Exercise programs must be fun, varied and comply with exercise physiology principles such as gradual progression in intensity or target heart rate, recommended frequency and duration, regular hydration, and warm-ups and cooling routines. Regular vigorous physical education, sports, regular exercise and active recreational activities can be part of a healthy lifestyle of persons with diabetes.

  14. The representation of solar cycle signals in stratospheric ozone - Part 1: A comparison of recently updated satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maycock, Amanda C.; Matthes, Katja; Tegtmeier, Susann; Thiéblemont, Rémi; Hood, Lon

    2016-08-01

    Changes in incoming solar ultraviolet radiation over the 11-year solar cycle affect stratospheric ozone abundances. It is important to quantify the magnitude, structure, and seasonality of the associated solar-ozone response (SOR) to understand the impact of the 11-year solar cycle on climate. Part 1 of this two-part study uses multiple linear regression analysis to extract the SOR in a number of recently updated satellite ozone datasets covering different periods within the epoch 1970 to 2013. The annual mean SOR in the updated version 7.0 (v7.0) Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II number density dataset (1984-2004) is very consistent with that found in the previous v6.2. In contrast, we find a substantial decrease in the magnitude of the SOR in the tropical upper stratosphere in the SAGE II v7.0 mixing ratio dataset (˜ 1 %) compared to the v6.2 (˜ 4 %). This difference is shown to be largely attributable to the change in the independent stratospheric temperature dataset used to convert SAGE II ozone number densities to mixing ratios. Since these temperature records contain substantial uncertainties, we suggest that datasets based on SAGE II number densities are currently most reliable for evaluating the SOR. We further analyse three extended ozone datasets that combine SAGE II v7.0 number densities with more recent GOMOS (Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars) or OSIRIS (Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imager System) measurements. The extended SAGE-OSIRIS dataset (1984-2013) shows a smaller and less statistically significant SOR across much of the tropical upper stratosphere compared to the SAGE II data alone. In contrast, the two SAGE-GOMOS datasets (1984-2011) show SORs that are in closer agreement with the original SAGE II data and therefore appear to provide a more reliable estimate of the SOR. We also analyse the SOR in the recent Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Instrument (SBUV) Merged Ozone Dataset (SBUVMOD) version 8.6 (VN8

  15. Color Vision and the Railways: Part 3. Comparison of FaLant, OPTEC 900, and Railway LED Lantern Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dain, Stephen J; Casolin, Armand; Long, Jennifer

    2015-02-01

    The Farnsworth Lantern (FaLant) and the OPTEC 900 are nominated in the Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage (CIE) Color Vision Standard 2. Neither test uses the railway signal color code of red, yellow, and green, and only the OPTEC 900 is commercially available. The Railway LED Lantern Test (RLLT) is based on railway signaling practices in New South Wales, Australia, and is nominated in the Australian railway medical standard. The objective of this study is to compare the performance of the three lantern tests. The RLLT, FaLant, and OPTEC 900 were administered to 46 color vision-normal and 37 color vision-deficient (CVD) subjects. The pattern of errors on the RLLT was different from that of the FaLant and OPTEC 900. This may be accounted for, at least in part, by the different colors and the use of blank presentations in the RLLT. The three lanterns showed agreement in failing 21 and passing 6 of the CVD subjects (72.9%). The lanterns gave different results for 10 CVD subjects (27.9%): n = 5 passed only the RLLT and n = 3 passed only the FaLant; n = 1 failed only the FaLant and n = 1 failed only the RLLT. The overall failure rate by CVD for each lantern was 67.6% (RLLT), 73.0% (FaLant), and 78.4% (OPTEC 900). Despite the different construction principles, the pass/fail levels of the RLLT, FaLant, and OPTEC 900 are comparable and consistent with the performance of other lanterns listed by the CIE for Color Vision Standard 2. The RLLT may be a little easier to pass and is based on the signal color code used and actual signaling practice. We propose that the RLLT is also an appropriate lantern for CIE Color Vision Standard 2.

  16. Representation of tropical deep convection in atmospheric models – Part 1: Meteorology and comparison with satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Russo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fast convective transport in the tropics can efficiently redistribute water vapour and pollutants up to the upper troposphere. In this study we compare tropical convection characteristics for the year 2005 in a range of atmospheric models, including numerical weather prediction (NWP models, chemistry transport models (CTMs, and chemistry-climate models (CCMs. The model runs have been performed within the framework of the SCOUT-O3 (Stratospheric-Climate Links with Emphasis on the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere project. The characteristics of tropical convection, such as seasonal cycle, land/sea contrast and vertical extent, are analysed using satellite observations as a benchmark for model simulations. The observational datasets used in this work comprise precipitation rates, outgoing longwave radiation, cloud-top pressure, and water vapour from a number of independent sources, including ERA-Interim analyses. Most models are generally able to reproduce the seasonal cycle and strength of precipitation for continental regions but show larger discrepancies with observations for the Maritime Continent region. The frequency distribution of high clouds from models and observations is calculated using highly temporally-resolved (up to 3-hourly cloud top data. The percentage of clouds above 15 km varies significantly between the models. Vertical profiles of water vapour in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere (UTLS show large differences between the models which can only be partly attributed to temperature differences. If a convective plume reaches above the level of zero net radiative heating, which is estimated to be ~15 km in the tropics, the air detrained from it can be transported upwards by radiative heating into the lower stratosphere. In this context, we discuss the role of tropical convection as a precursor for the transport of short-lived species into the lower stratosphere.

  17. Contemporary changes in precipitation extremes in Poland in comparison to changes in other parts of Baltic Sea Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibig, Joanna; Jędruszkiewicz, Joanna

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the paper is detection and attribution of changes in precipitation extremes in Poland on the ground of similar changes in the rest of Baltic Sea Basin. The indices defined by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI) are computed for a number of stations from Poland and surrounding countries. Among them are: Monthly maximum 1-day precipitation (Rx1day), monthly maximum consecutive 5-day precipitation (Rx5day), pricipitation intensity index(RRw,) annual number of days with daily precipitation ≥ 10mm and ≥ 20mm (R10mm and R20mm), maximum length of dry spell (CDD), maximum length of wet spell (CWD), annual total from days when daily total is equal at least 95 percentile and 99 percentile calculated in reference period 1961-1990 from daily totals equal at leat 1 mm (R95pTOT and R99pTOT). The daily precipitation records from more than hundred stations from the period 1951-2012 were used. The changes in annual values and their variability are analysed. The regions of similar changes are distinguished both for Poland and for the whole Baltic Sea Region. In the second part of the paper the attribution of large scale mechanisms causing detected changes is planned. The set of possible large scale predictors is prepared. Among them are indices of atmospheric and oceanic circulation in the European-North Atlantic Region: the North Atlantic Oscillation index, The Scandinavian index, the East Atlantic index, and the Atlantic Multiannual Oscillation. Additionally the large scale fields of sea level pressure and humidity and temperature from low troposphere are used. The records of indices were taken from NCDC (http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/data/teledoc). The large scale fields data were taken from NCAR/NCEP Reanalysis. Among the methodologies used to detect the mechanisms of precipitation extreme changes are: correlation analysis, composites and Canonical Correlation Analysis. The work is supported by grant 2012/05/B/ST10/00945 founded by

  18. Laughing: a demanding exercise for trunk muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Heiko; Rehmes, Ulrich; Kohle, Daniel; Puta, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Social, psychological, and physiological studies have provided evidence indicating that laughter imposes an increased demand on trunk muscles. It was the aim of this study to quantify the activation of trunk muscles during laughter yoga in comparison with crunch and back lifting exercises regarding the mean trunk muscle activity. Muscular activity during laughter yoga exercises was measured by surface electromyography of 5 trunk muscles. The activation level of internal oblique muscle during laughter yoga is higher compared to the traditional exercises. The multifidus, erector spinae, and rectus abdominis muscles were nearly half activated during laughter yoga, while the activation of the external oblique muscle was comparable with the crunch and back lifting exercises. Our results indicate that laughter yoga has a positive effect on trunk muscle activation. Thus, laughter seems to be a good activator of trunk muscles, but further research is required whether laughter yoga is a good exercise to improve neuromuscular recruitment patterns for spine stability.

  19. Can exercise mimetics substitute for exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Kiens, Bente; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Exercise leads to changes in muscle phenotype with important implications for exercise performance and health. A recent paper in Cell by Narkar et al. (2008) shows that many of the adaptations in muscle phenotype elicited by exercise can be mimicked by genetic manipulation and drug treatment...

  20. Comparison of three development approaches for Stationary Phase Optimised Selectivity Liquid Chromatography based screening methods Part II: A group of structural analogues (PDE-5 inhibitors in food supplements).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deconinck, E; Ghijs, L; Kamugisha, A; Courselle, P

    2016-02-01

    Three approaches for the development of a screening method to detect adulterated dietary supplements, based on Stationary Phase Optimised Selectivity Liquid Chromatography were compared for their easiness/speed of development and the performance of the optimal method obtained. This comparison was performed for a heterogeneous group of molecules, i.e. slimming agents (Part I) and a group of structural analogues, i.e. PDE-5 inhibitors (Part II). The first approach makes use of primary runs at one isocratic level, the second of primary runs in gradient mode and the third of primary runs at three isocratic levels to calculate the optimal combination of segments of stationary phases. In each approach the selection of the stationary phase was followed by a gradient optimisation. For the PDE-5 inhibitors, the group of structural analogues, only the method obtained with the third approach was able to differentiate between all the molecules in the development set. Although not all molecules are baseline separated, the method allows the identification of the selected adulterants in dietary supplements using only diode array detection. Though, due to the mobile phases used, the method could also be coupled to mass spectrometry. The method was validated for its selectivity following the guidelines as described for the screening of pesticide residues and residues of veterinary medicines in food.

  1. The effect of coupled mass transport and internal reforming on modeling of solid oxide fuel cells part I: Channel-level model development and steady-state comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Kevin J.; Braun, Robert J.

    2016-02-01

    Dynamic modeling and analysis of solid oxide fuel cell systems can provide insight towards meeting transient response application requirements and enabling an expansion of the operating envelope of these high temperature systems. SOFC modeling for system studies are accomplished with channel-level interface charge transfer models, which implement dynamic conservation equations coupled with additional submodels to capture the porous media mass transport and electrochemistry of the cell. Many of these models may contain simplifications in order to decouple the mass transport, fuel reforming, and electrochemical processes enabling the use of a 1-D model. The reforming reactions distort concentration profiles of the species within the anode, where hydrogen concentration at the triple-phase boundary may be higher or lower than that of the channel altering the local Nernst potential and exchange current density. In part one of this paper series, the modeling equations for the 1-D and 'quasi' 2-D models are presented, and verified against button cell electrochemical and channel-level reforming data. Steady-state channel-level modeling results indicate a 'quasi' 2-D SOFC model predicts a more uniform temperature distribution where differences in the peak cell temperature and maximum temperature gradient are experienced. The differences are most prominent for counter-flow cell with high levels of internal reforming. The transient modeling comparison is discussed in part two of this paper series.

  2. Effect of carbohydrate- and protein-rich meals on exercise-induced activation of lipolysis in obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, J; Tholl, S; Schusdziarra, V

    2010-04-01

    Exercise is an important part of obesity treatment concepts to support fat mobilisation from adipose tissue and also fat oxidation nolich is impaired in obese subjects. In normal weight subjects it is well known that stimulation of plasma insulin levels by a carbohydrate meal can inhibit lipolysis and subsequent fat oxidation. Since obese subjects frequently have elevated basal and postprandial insulin levels the effect of carbohydrate- and protein-rich test meals on exercise-induced activation of lipolysis is of special interest. Twenty obese subjects performed bicycle exercise for 30 min in the fasted state, 30 min after a carbohydrate-or a protein-rich meal, and 120 min after the carbohydrate meal (n=12), respectively, at low intensity. Activation of lipolysis was assessed by plasma glycerol levels. In addition, plasma insulin, glucose, and lactate concentrations were determined. In comparison to the fasted state, the carbohydrate meal suppressed activation of lipolysis. Following the protein meal, exercise led to an attenuated but significant increase of glycerol levels. A similar rise was observed when the carbohydrate meal was ingested 2 h prior to the exercise bout. To improve exercise-induced lipolysis and subsequent fat oxidation during low-intensity exercise obese subjects should not ingest carbohydrates immediately before exercise. Hunger sensations should be satisfied with protein-rich food. When carbohydrates are consumed 2 h prior to exercise its lipolytic effect is comparable to the protein meal. These data are useful in every day dietary counselling and might help to improve weight loss during obesity treatment. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  3. Comparison of V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak and Achievement of V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak Criteria in Three Modes of Exercise in Female Triathletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoza, Colleen T; Berg, Kris E; Slivka, Dustin R

    2016-10-01

    Snoza, CT, Berg, KE, and Slivka, DR. Comparison of V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak and achievement of V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak criteria in three modes of exercise in female triathletes. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2816-2822, 2016-The purpose of this study was to compare peak aerobic capacity in female triathletes in 3 modes of exercise: treadmill, cycle, and arm ergometer. A second purpose was to determine the extent that physiologic criteria for achieving V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak were reached in each mode of exercise. Six criteria were examined: V[Combining Dot Above]O2 plateau, heart rate (HR), blood lactate concentration (BLC), respiratory exchange ratio, oxygen saturation, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Twelve recreational level female triathletes completed maximal tests on the treadmill, stationary bike, and arm ergometer. Results indicated V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak (ml·kg·min) is highest on a treadmill (46.8 ± 2.1), intermediate in cycling (40.7 ± 5.0), and lowest in arm ergometry (28.2 ± 3.3) with mean differences being significant (p ≤ 0.05). Blood lactate concentration and RPE criteria were met by the highest number of subjects across the 3 modes of testing while the HR criterion was not achieved in any participant in arm ergometry and only 2 in cycling. It was concluded that in moderately trained recreational level triathletes, V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak is highest in running and lowest in arm ergometry. Criteria for achieving V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak most frequently were blood lactate level and RPE. Coaches and researchers should appreciate that V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak values of moderately trained triathletes differ considerably in contrast to elite triathletes and tend to be highest on the treadmill and lowest in arm ergometry. Also, criteria used to determine achievement of V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak should be carefully selected and seem to be best achieved using BLC and RPE.

  4. Comparison of High-Intensity Interval Training and Moderate-to-Vigorous Continuous Training for Cardiometabolic Health and Exercise Enjoyment in Obese Young Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaowei Kong

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 5-week high-intensity interval training (HIIT and moderate-to-vigorous intensity continuous training (MVCT on cardiometabolic health outcomes and enjoyment of exercise in obese young women.A randomized controlled experiment was conducted that involved thirty-one obese females (age range of 18-30 randomly assigned to either HIIT or MVCT five-week training programs. Participants in HIIT condition performed 20 min of repeated 8 s cycling interspersed with 12 s rest intervals, and those in MVCT condition cycled continuously for 40 min at 60-80% of peak oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]O2peak, both for four days in a week. Outcomes such as [Formula: see text]O2peak, body composition estimated by bioimpedance analysis, blood lipids, and serum sexual hormones were measured at pre-and post-training. The scores of Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PAES were collected during the intervention.After training, [Formula: see text]O2peak increased significantly for both training programs (9.1% in HIIT and 10.3% in MVCT (p = 0.010, η2 = 0.41. Although MVCT group had a significant reduction in total body weight (TBW, -1.8%, p = 0.034, fat mass (FM, - 4.7%, p = 0.002 and percentage body fat (PBF, -2.9%, p = 0.016, there were no significant between-group differences in the change of the pre- and post-measures of these variables. The HIIT group had a higher score on PAES than the MVCT group during the intervention. For both conditions, exercise training led to a decline in resting testosterone and estradiol levels, but had no significant effect on blood lipids.Both HIIT and MVCT are effective in improving cardiorespiratory fitness and in reducing sexual hormones in obese young women; however, HIIT is a more enjoyable and time-efficient strategy. The mild-HIIT protocol seems to be useful for at least maintaining the body weight among sedentary individuals.

  5. Physical exercise and functional fitness in independently living vs institutionalized elderly women: a comparison of 60- to 79-year-old city dwellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Hélio L; Sousa, Nelson; Simão, Roberto; Pereira, Fabio Dutra; Vilaça-Alves, José

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare functional fitness (FF) levels among independent-living (IL) and day care (DC) elderly women of different age groups and to analyze changes in FF after 8 months of participation in an exercise program intervention for the IL elderly women. Materials and methods A total of 674 elderly women were divided into four IL groups with age in the range of 60–64 years (IL60–64, n=149), 65–69 years (IL65–69, n=138), 70–74 years (IL70–74, n=135), and 75–79 years (IL75–79, n=83), and four DC groups with age in the range of 60–64 years (DC60–64, n=35), 65–69 years (DC65–69, n=34), 70–74 years (DC70–74, n=47), and 75–79 years (DC75–79, n=53). The intervention consisted of a multimodal exercise training, 3 days per week for 8 months. Senior Fitness Test battery performances were obtained at baseline and after 8-month intervention. Results Significant differences were identified between all IL groups and DC groups in all FF tests (P<0.001), except between IL70–74 and DC70–74 in the chair sit-and-reach. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) identified significant improvements in all FF tests between pre- and posttests in the IL groups (P<0.001), except in the chair sit-and-reach for the IL70–74. ANCOVA also showed a significant declining performance in all FF tests for DC groups (P<0.001), except in the chair sit-and-reach for the DC70–74 and DC75–79. Conclusion IL women are more fit than institutionalized DC elderly women. The multimodal training was effective in improving all FF components related to daily living activities, in all age groups. In contrast, institutionalized elderly showed a clear tendency to worsen their FF over the time. PMID:25941443

  6. Comparison of High-Intensity Interval Training and Moderate-to-Vigorous Continuous Training for Cardiometabolic Health and Exercise Enjoyment in Obese Young Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Zhaowei; Fan, Xitao; Sun, Shengyan; Song, Lili; Shi, Qingde; Nie, Jinlei

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 5-week high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and moderate-to-vigorous intensity continuous training (MVCT) on cardiometabolic health outcomes and enjoyment of exercise in obese young women. A randomized controlled experiment was conducted that involved thirty-one obese females (age range of 18-30) randomly assigned to either HIIT or MVCT five-week training programs. Participants in HIIT condition performed 20 min of repeated 8 s cycling interspersed with 12 s rest intervals, and those in MVCT condition cycled continuously for 40 min at 60-80% of peak oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]O2peak), both for four days in a week. Outcomes such as [Formula: see text]O2peak, body composition estimated by bioimpedance analysis, blood lipids, and serum sexual hormones were measured at pre-and post-training. The scores of Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PAES) were collected during the intervention. After training, [Formula: see text]O2peak increased significantly for both training programs (9.1% in HIIT and 10.3% in MVCT) (p = 0.010, η2 = 0.41). Although MVCT group had a significant reduction in total body weight (TBW, -1.8%, p = 0.034), fat mass (FM, - 4.7%, p = 0.002) and percentage body fat (PBF, -2.9%, p = 0.016), there were no significant between-group differences in the change of the pre- and post-measures of these variables. The HIIT group had a higher score on PAES than the MVCT group during the intervention. For both conditions, exercise training led to a decline in resting testosterone and estradiol levels, but had no significant effect on blood lipids. Both HIIT and MVCT are effective in improving cardiorespiratory fitness and in reducing sexual hormones in obese young women; however, HIIT is a more enjoyable and time-efficient strategy. The mild-HIIT protocol seems to be useful for at least maintaining the body weight among sedentary individuals.

  7. Comparison of cardiac power output and exercise performance in patients with left ventricular assist devices, explanted (recovered) patients, and those with moderate to severe heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G; George, Robert S; Donovan, Gay; Nunan, David; Henderson, Keiran; Bougard, Robert S; Yacoub, Magdi H; Birks, Emma J; Brodie, David A

    2010-06-15

    Peak cardiac power output (CPO), as a direct measurement of overall cardiac function, has been shown to be a most powerful predictor of prognosis for patients with chronic heart failure. The present study assessed CPO and exercise performance in patients implanted with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD), those explanted due to myocardial recovery, and those with moderate to severe heart failure. Hemodynamic and respiratory gas exchange measurements were undertaken at rest and at peak graded exercise. These were performed in 54 patients-20 with moderate to severe heart failure, 18 with implanted LVADs, and 16 with explanted LVADs. At rest there was a nonsignificant difference in CPO among groups (p >0.05). Peak CPO was significantly higher in the explanted LVAD than in the heart failure and implanted LVAD groups (heart failure 1.90 +/- 0.45 W, implanted LVAD 2.37 +/- 0.55 W, explanted LVAD 3.39 +/- 0.61 W, p <0.01) as was peak cardiac output (heart failure 9.1 +/- 2.1 L/min, implanted LVAD 12.4 +/- 2.2 L/min, explanted LVD 14.6 +/- 2.9 L/min, p <0.01). Peak oxygen consumption was higher in the explanted LVAD than in the heart failure and implanted LVAD groups (heart failure 15.8 +/- 4.1 ml/kg/min, implanted LVAD 19.8 +/- 5.8 ml/kg/min, explanted LVAD 28.2 +/- 5.0 ml/kg/min, p <0.05) as was anaerobic threshold (heart failure 11.2 +/- 1.9 ml/kg/min, implanted LVAD 14.7 +/- 4.9 ml/kg/min, explanted LVAD 21.4 +/- 5.0 ml/kg/min, p <0.05). In conclusion, peak CPO differentiates well during cardiac restoration using LVADs and emphasizes the benefits of this therapy. CPO has the potential to be a key physiologic marker of heart failure severity and can guide management of patients with LVAD.

  8. Heart rate and metabolic responses to moderate-intensity aerobic exercise: a comparison of graded walking and ungraded jogging at a constant perceived exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Marcus W; Kraemer, Robert R; Quigley, Edward J; Mears, Jennifer L; Powers, Jeremy M; Dedea, Anthony J; Ferrer, Nicholas F

    2009-03-01

    In this study, we assessed how ungraded jogging and graded walking at the same rating of perceived exertion (RPE) affect heart rate and oxygen consumption ([Vdot]O(2)). Twenty untrained participants completed a treadmill test to determine peak [Vdot]O(2) (mean = 40.3 +/- 6.3 ml . kg(-1) . min(-1)). Participants completed separate 30-min trials of moderate exercise (RPE of 13 on the Borg 6-20 scale) in random order on the treadmill: graded walking and ungraded jogging. Treadmill speed or grade was adjusted throughout the trial by the experimenter based on participant responses to maintain an RPE of 13. The jogging trial produced a significantly higher heart rate (161 +/- 18 vs. 142 +/- 24 beats . min(-1)) and [Vdot]O(2) (7.4 +/- 1.8 vs. 5.8 +/- 1.5 METs) (P jogging trial (5.2 +/- 1.0 miles . h(-1) to 5.0 +/- 0.9 miles . h(-1)) (P > 0.05), in an effort to maintain constant RPE. These findings provide evidence that similar perceptions of effort during graded walking and ungraded jogging do not produce similar cardiovascular and metabolic responses. The results indicate that, for a given prescribed perceived effort, jogging provides a greater stimulus for fitness benefits and caloric expenditure.

  9. The comparison of cold-water immersion and cold air therapy on maximal cycling performance and recovery markers following strength exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kane J. Hayter

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of cold-water immersion (CWI and cold air therapy (CAT on maximal cycling performance (i.e. anaerobic power and markers of muscle damage following a strength training session. Twenty endurance-trained but strength-untrained male (n = 10 and female (n = 10 participants were randomised into either: CWI (15 min in 14 °C water to iliac crest or CAT (15 min in 14 °C air immediately following strength training (i.e. 3 sets of leg press, leg extensions and leg curls at 6 repetition maximum, respectively. Creatine kinase, muscle soreness and fatigue, isometric knee extensor and flexor torque and cycling anaerobic power were measured prior to, immediately after and at 24 (T24, 48 (T48 and 72 (T72 h post-strength exercises. No significant differences were found between treatments for any of the measured variables (p > 0.05. However, trends suggested recovery was greater in CWI than CAT for cycling anaerobic power at T24 (10% ± 2%, ES = 0.90, T48 (8% ± 2%, ES = 0.64 and T72 (8% ± 7%, ES = 0.76. The findings suggest the combination of hydrostatic pressure and cold temperature may be favourable for recovery from strength training rather than cold temperature alone.

  10. Comparison of the usefulness of heart rate variability versus exercise stress testing for the detection of myocardial ischemia in patients without known coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldkorn, Ronen; Naimushin, Alexey; Shlomo, Nir; Dan, Ariella; Oieru, Dan; Moalem, Israel; Rozen, Eli; Gur, Ilan; Levitan, Jacob; Rosenmann, David; Mogilewsky, Yakov; Klempfner, Robert; Goldenberg, Ilan

    2015-06-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been shown to be attenuated in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and may, therefore, be possibly used for the early detection of myocardial ischemia. We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic yield of a novel short-term HRV algorithm for the detection of myocardial ischemia in subjects without known CAD. We prospectively enrolled 450 subjects without known CAD who were referred to tertiary medical centers for exercise stress testing (EST) with single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). All subjects underwent 1-hour Holter testing with subsequent HRV analysis before EST with MPI. The diagnostic yield of HRV analysis was compared with EST, using MPI as the gold standard for the noninvasive detection of myocardial ischemia. All subjects had intermediate pretest probability for CAD. Mean age was 62 years, 38% were women, 51% had hypertension, and 25% diabetes mellitus. HRV analysis showed superior sensitivity (77%) compared with standard EST (27%). After multivariate adjustment, HRV was independently associated with an 8.4-fold (p coronary angiography, the respective sensitivities of HRV and EST for the detection of significant CAD were 73% versus 26%. Our data suggest that HRV can be used as an important noninvasive technique for the detection of myocardial ischemia in subjects without known CAD, providing superior sensitivity to conventional EST in this population.

  11. Learning While Exercising for Science Education in Augmented Reality among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Kuei-Fang; Chen, Nian-Shing; Huang, Shih-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Because of a shortage of physical exercise, concerns about adolescents have recently been raised in Taiwan. In educational environments where student exercise has been limited by scheduling constraints and the lack of physical exercise has become a vital problem, "learning while exercising" may be part of a possible solution. This study developed…

  12. Exercise and Fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ament, Wim; Verkerke, Gijsbertus J.

    2009-01-01

    Physical exercise affects the equilibrium of the internal environment. During exercise the contracting muscles generate force or power and heat. So physical exercise is in fact a form of mechanical energy. This generated energy will deplete the energy stocks within the body. During exercise, metabol

  13. Benefits, Consequences, and Uncertainties of Conventional (Exercise) Countermeasure Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will review the pros, cons, and uncertainties of using exercise countermeasures in hypothetical long duration exploration missions. The use of artificial gravity and exercise will be briefly discussed. One benefit to continued use of exercise is related to our extensive experience with spaceflight exercise hardware and programming. Exercise has been a part of each space mission dating back to the 1960's when simple isometric and bungee exercises were performed in the Gemini capsule. Over the next 50 years, exercise hardware improved cumulating in today's ISS suite of exercise equipment: Cycle Ergometer with Vibration Isolation and Stabilization System (CEVIS), Treadmill (T2) and Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED). Today's exercise equipment is the most robust ever to be flown in space and allows the variety and intensity of exercise that might reasonably be expected to maintain muscle mass and function, bone density and cardiovascular fitness. A second benefit is related to the large body of research literature on exercise training. There is a considerable body of supporting research literature including >40,000 peer reviewed research articles on exercise training in humans. A third benefit of exercise is its effectiveness. With the addition of T2 and ARED to our ISS exercise suite, crew member outcomes on standard medical tests have improved. Additionally exercise has other positive side effects such as stress relief, possible improvement of immune function, improved sleep, etc. Exercise is not without its consequences. The major cons to performance of in-flight exercise are the time and equipment required. Currently crew are scheduled 2.5 hrs/day for exercise and there is considerable cost to develop, fly and maintain exercise hardware. While no major injuries have been reported on ISS, there is always some risk of injury with any form of exercise There are several uncertainties going forward; these relate mostly to the development of

  14. A twin-sibling study on the relationship between exercise attitudes and exercise behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppertz, Charlotte; Bartels, Meike; Jansen, Iris E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Moor, Marleen H M; de Geus, Eco J C

    2014-01-01

    Social cognitive models of health behavior propose that individual differences in leisure time exercise behavior are influenced by the attitudes towards exercise. At the same time, large scale twin-family studies show a significant influence of genetic factors on regular exercise behavior. This twin-sibling study aimed to unite these findings by demonstrating that exercise attitudes can be heritable themselves. Secondly, the genetic and environmental cross-trait correlations and the monozygotic (MZ) twin intrapair differences model were used to test whether the association between exercise attitudes and exercise behavior can be causal. Survey data were obtained from 5,095 twins and siblings (18-50 years). A genetic contribution was found for exercise behavior (50 % in males, 43 % in females) and for the six exercise attitude components derived from principal component analysis: perceived benefits (21, 27 %), lack of skills, support and/or resources (45, 48 %), time constraints (25, 30 %), lack of energy (34, 44 %), lack of enjoyment (47, 44 %), and embarrassment (42, 49 %). These components were predictive of leisure time exercise behavior (R(2) = 28 %). Bivariate modeling further showed that all the genetic (0.36 < |rA| < 0.80) and all but two unique environmental (0.00 < |rE| < 0.27) correlations between exercise attitudes and exercise behavior were significantly different from zero, which is a necessary condition for the existence of a causal effect driving the association. The correlations between the MZ twins' difference scores were in line with this finding. It is concluded that exercise attitudes and exercise behavior are heritable, that attitudes and behavior are partly correlated through pleiotropic genetic effects, but that the data are compatible with a causal association between exercise attitudes and behavior.

  15. The Chemistry Exercise for a Students Cognitive Development

    OpenAIRE

    Līvija Tomiņa

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Chemistry Exercise for a Student’s Cognitive Development. Tomina L., supervisor Dr. Chem., doc. Krumina A. A. The aim of this doctoral work is the study of chemistry exercises as part of a student’s cognitive development during his chemistry education at school. Our preliminary research showed us that during the last 10 – 13 years student interest in solving chemistry exercises has diminished dramatically. As part of our work we have conceptualized an approach to solving ch...

  16. A kinematic comparison of alterations to knee and ankle angles from resting measures to active pedaling during a graded exercise protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peveler, Willard W; Shew, Brandy; Johnson, Samantha; Palmer, Thomas G

    2012-11-01

    Saddle height is one of the most researched areas of bike fit. The current accepted method for adjusting saddle height involves the use of a goniometer to adjust saddle height so that a knee angle between 25° and 35° is obtained. This measurement is taken while the cyclist maintains a static position with the pedal at the 6-o'-clock position. However, the act of pedaling is dynamic, and angles may alter during movement. The purpose of this study was to examine the alterations to knee and ankle angle occurring from static measures to active pedaling across intensities experienced by cyclists during a graded exercise protocol. Thirty-four recreational to highly trained cyclists were evaluated using 2D analysis of stationary position and 3 active levels (level 1, respiratory exchange ratio of 1.00, and max). Dependent measures were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance (p = 0.05). When examining the results, it is evident that significant alterations to pedal stroke occur from stationary measures to active pedaling and as intensity increases toward maximal. Plantar flexion increased when moving from stationary measures to active pedaling, which resulted in an increase in knee angle. Although still greater than stationary measures, less plantar flexion occurred at higher intensities when compared with lower intensity cycling. Less plantar flexion at higher intensities is most likely a result of application of a larger downward torque occurring because of greater power requirements at higher intensities. There appeared to be greater variability in angle when examining novice cyclists in relation to more experienced cyclists. Although stationary measures are where a bike fit session will begin, observation during the pedal cycle may be needed to fine-tune the riders' fit.

  17. The Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Neuroplasticity within the Motor Cortex following Stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Murdoch

    Full Text Available Aerobic exercise is associated with enhanced plasticity in the motor cortex of healthy individuals, but the effect of aerobic exercise on neuroplasticity following a stroke is unknown.The aim of this study was to compare corticomotoneuronal excitability and neuroplasticity in the upper limb cortical representation following a single session of low intensity lower limb cycling, or a rest control condition.We recruited chronic stroke survivors to take part in three experimental conditions in a randomised, cross-over design. Corticomotoneuronal excitability was examined using transcranial magnetic stimulation to elicit motor evoked potentials in the affected first dorsal interosseus muscle. Following baseline measures, participants either cycled on a stationary bike at a low exercise intensity for 30 minutes, or remained resting in a seated position for 30 minutes. Neuroplasticity within the motor cortex was then examined using an intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS paradigm. During the third experimental condition, participants cycled for the 30 minutes but did not receive any iTBS.Twelve participants completed the study. We found no significant effect of aerobic exercise on corticomotoneuronal excitability when compared to the no exercise condition (P > 0.05 for all group and time comparisons. The use of iTBS did not induce a neuroplastic-like response in the motor cortex with or without the addition of aerobic exercise.Our results suggest that following a stroke, the brain may be less responsive to non-invasive brain stimulation paradigms that aim to induce short-term reorganisation, and aerobic exercise was unable to induce or improve this response.

  18. Comparação entre a prescrição de intensidade de treinamento físico baseada na avaliação ergométrica convencional e na ergoespirométrica Comparison between exercise intensity prescription based on a standard exercise test and cardiopulmonary exercise test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Urbana Pinto Brandão Rondon

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar os limites inferiores (L.inf. e superiores (L.sup. da prescrição de treinamento físico aeróbio determinada pelo teste ergométrico convencional (60-70% do VO2máx estimado ou 70-85% da FCmáx atingida, com a prescrição obtida pelo teste ergoespirométrico [limiar anaeróbio (LA e ponto de compensação respiratória (PCR]. MÉTODOS: Realizaram teste ergoespirométrico progressivo até a exaustão 47 homens (30±5 anos, divididos em subgrupos, de acordo com a velocidade da esteira durante o teste (4 ou 5mph e a capacidade física medida [baixa (BCF e moderada (MCF]. RESULTADOS: Os L.inf. de prescrição indireta apresentaram valores de VO2 e FC significantemente maiores que os valores de VO2 e FC no LA (4mph= 34,4±4,5 vs 19,6±4,6 e 5mph= 28,9±2 vs 18,9±5,4, e BCF= 32,0±4,1 vs 17,2±2,8 e MCF= 31,6±4,9 vs 21,1±5,7(mlO2.kg-1.min-1 e (4mph = 128,9±7,8 vs 113,1± 15,6 e 5mph= 130,3±5,2 vs 114,1± 18,9, e BCF= 127,6±7,2 vs 109,3±13,2 e MCF= 131,2± 5,7 vs 117,4± 19,2bpm. Os L.sup. de prescrição indireta no grupo de 4mph e BCF apresentaram valores de VO2 significantemente maiores que os valores medidos no PCR (40,1±5,3 vs 32,2±4,3 e 37,4±4,8 vs 30,6±2,5 mlO2.kg-1.min-1, respectivamente, e valores de FC semelhantes aos medidos no PCR. CONCLUSÃO: Os L.inf. da prescrição indireta de treinamento físico superestimam o LA, enquanto os L.sup. parecem adequados somente para indivíduos ativos com MCF.PURPOSE: To compare the lower (LL and upper limits (UL of exercise intensity prescription based on standard exercise test (60-70% of estimated VO2max or 70-85% of HRmax measured with exercise intensity prescription based on cardiopulmonary exercise test [anaerobic threshold (AT and respiratory compensation point (RCP]. METHODS: Fourty seven men (30±5 years who were submitted to a progressive cardiopulmonary exercise test until exhaustion were divided in subgroups according to treadmill speed during exercise test (4

  19. Hypotensive Response Magnitude and Duration in Hypertensives: Continuous and Interval Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Santos Teodoro de Carvalho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although exercise training is known to promote post-exercise hypotension, there is currently no consistent argument about the effects of manipulating its various components (intensity, duration, rest periods, types of exercise, training methods on the magnitude and duration of hypotensive response. Objective: To compare the effect of continuous and interval exercises on hypotensive response magnitude and duration in hypertensive patients by using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM. Methods: The sample consisted of 20 elderly hypertensives. Each participant underwent three ABPM sessions: one control ABPM, without exercise; one ABPM after continuous exercise; and one ABPM after interval exercise. Systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, mean arterial pressure (MAP, heart rate (HR and double product (DP were monitored to check post-exercise hypotension and for comparison between each ABPM. Results: ABPM after continuous exercise and after interval exercise showed post-exercise hypotension and a significant reduction (p < 0.05 in SBP, DBP, MAP and DP for 20 hours as compared with control ABPM. Comparing ABPM after continuous and ABPM after interval exercise, a significant reduction (p < 0.05 in SBP, DBP, MAP and DP was observed in the latter. Conclusion: Continuous and interval exercise trainings promote post-exercise hypotension with reduction in SBP, DBP, MAP and DP in the 20 hours following exercise. Interval exercise training causes greater post-exercise hypotension and lower cardiovascular overload as compared with continuous exercise.

  20. Registered nurses' beliefs of the benefits of exercise, their exercise behaviour and their patient teaching regarding exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Eileen M; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2011-08-01

    Recommendations by experts have been in place for > 10 years encouraging every adult to participate in ≥ 30 min of daily moderate-intensity physical activity. Despite extensive research supporting the value of physical activity, only about one-third of all adults meet physical activity recommendations. Using Pender's Health Promotion Theory as the framework, this study was focused on the relationships between nurses' beliefs regarding the benefits of exercise, their exercise behaviour and their recommendation of exercise for health promotion or as part of a treatment plan. Results showed positive correlations between exercise benefits, physical activity and recommendation of exercise to patients. Nurses who believe in health promotion and embrace healthy behaviours are more likely to be positive role models and teach healthy behaviours to their patients. Recommendations for practice and future research are included.

  1. The effect of morning exercise on mental health of female police employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassani Mohammad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available       Background & Aims of the Study: According to the report of world health, organization mental disorder is one of the important causes of disability in the world and it can result in decrease in the success and advancement of employees. Thus, the purpose of this research is evaluation and comparison of mental health status and its related factors in female employees who take part in morning exercise and who are exempt in one of the police units. This is a descriptive-analytic and cross sectional study. Materials & Methods: The population of this research included 85 female employees who took part in morning exercise as one group and the other group included 65 inactive people who were ill and exempt from exercise. The measurement tool in the research was the Goldberg and Hiller questionnaire of mental health that was consisted of 28 questions. Various studies in the world and in Iran suggest the high validity and reliability of the GHQ-28 questionnaire. The validity of the questionnaire has been approved in more than 70 countries and its reliability has been estimated to be between 82% and 92% in different researches and in different social groups. The data were analyzed using the descriptive statistics (frequency, mean and standard of deviation and deduction statistics (independent t-test in SPSS 16 software. Results: Analysis of the research hypotheses at significant level (p<0.05 showed that morning exercise had significant effect on mental health and its subscales such as physical complaint, anxiety, social dysfunction and depression in employees. Moreover, a significant difference was observed by comparing the active and inactive groups in relation to mental health and its subscales. Conclusions: The results of the research show that the effect of exercise and physical activities on mental health can't be denied. According to the researches that have been done, exercise is effective in two aspects of physical and mental.       

  2. The Effect of Exercise in PCOS Women Who Exercise Regularly

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    Khademi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To determine the prevalence of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS in women who exercise regularly. Methods All women under age 45 from an industrial company who had past history of exercising more than 6 months enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Prevalence of PCOS and comparison of BMI between PCOS and non-PCOS subgroups was done. The diagnosis of PCOS was based on the revised 2003 Rotterdam ESHRE/ASRM consensus criteria and exclusion of related disorders. Results The prevalence of PCOS in was 8.8%; 95% CI: 8.5%-9.1%. In obese subjects, mean BMI differed significantly between PCOS and non-PCOS women (29.3 ±3.3 kg/m2 vs. 27.8 ± 2 kg/m2, P=0.03. In lean subjects, there was no statistically significant difference in terms of BMI between PCOS and non-PCOS women (21.4 ± 1.9 kg/m2 vs. 21.2 ± 2 kg/m2, P>0.05. Conclusion Obese PCOS patients show more difficulty in losing weight by exercise than lean PCOS patients. The role of hormonal alterations and PCOS per se in the responsiveness of weight loss to exercise remains to be determined.

  3. Focus on Exercise: Client and Clinician Perspectives on Exercise in Individuals with Serious Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Julia; Mihas, Paul; Penn, David L

    2016-05-01

    The health benefits of exercise are well established, yet individuals with serious mental illness (SMI) have a shorter life expectancy due in large part to physical health complications associated with poor diet and lack of exercise. There is a paucity of research examining exercise in this population with the majority of studies having examined interventions with limited feasibility and sustainability. Before developing an intervention, a thorough exploration of client and clinician perspectives on exercise and its associated barriers is warranted. Twelve clients and fourteen clinicians participated in focus groups aimed at examining exercise, barriers, incentives, and attitudes about walking groups. Results indicated that clients and clinicians identified walking as the primary form of exercise, yet barriers impeded consistent participation. Distinct themes arose between groups; however, both clients and clinicians reported interest in a combination group/pedometer based walking program for individuals with SMI. Future research should consider examining walking programs for this population.

  4. Exercise Addiction in Athletes and Leisure Exercisers: The Moderating Role of Passion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Vega, Ricardo; Parastatidou, Irini S; Ruíz-Barquín, Roberto; Szabo, Attila

    2016-06-01

    Background and aims Recently, empirical research has linked obsessive passion to the etiology of exercise addiction, and the conceptual reason behind the fact that the latter is more prevalent in athletes than leisure exercisers has been challenged. The aim of this study was to determine the link between exercise addiction and harmonious passion, obsessive passion, and dedication to sports, in the context of athletic levels. Method A sample comprised of low- and high-level competitive athletes and non-competitive leisure exercisers (n = 313) was examined, in a cross-sectional design, in which participants completed the Spanish validated versions of the Exercise Addiction Inventory (Sicilia, Alías-García, Ferriz, & Moreno-Murcia, 2013) and Passion Scale (Chamarro et al., 2015). Results Obsessive passion and dedication to sports emerged as strong predictors of exercise addiction. Competitive athletes scored higher than leisure exercisers on all measures. Athletes competing at low and high levels only differed in dedication to their sports from each other. Team-sports athletes reported greater harmonious and obsessive passions, and dedication to sports, but not different exercise addictions, than people taking part in individual sports. Conclusions The concept of exercise addiction is not a plain and independent construct and may not reflect a psychological dysfunction in the athletic population. Athletes could interpret exercise addiction screening-items differently from non-athletes. Athletes in team sports report greater passion and dedication than those practicing individual sports.

  5. Viewing television shows containing ideal and neutral body images while exercising: does type of body image content influence exercise performance and body image in women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Eric E; Baird, Seanna A; Gilbert, Danielle N; Miller, Paul C; Bixby, Walter R

    2011-09-01

    This study examined how exposure to media containing different body image content while exercising influenced exercise performance and feelings concerning appearance. 41 females completed two sessions of cycling (30 minutes). During exercise, participants viewed a television show that contained either media-portrayed ideal or neutral female body images. There were no differences in exercise performance between conditions. Physical appearance state anxiety (PASA) decreased post-exercise. After viewing ideal bodies, participants scored higher on appearance and comparison processing. The high internalization group scored higher on appearance and comparison processing and PASA increased following ideal body image content while the low internalization group decreased.

  6. Exercise, natural immunity, and tumor metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman-Goetz, L

    1994-02-01

    Exercise has been shown to reduce the growth of primary tumors and to enhance certain aspects of host natural immunity. The question of whether these are independent phenomena or are casually related has not been systematically evaluated. This paper presents information concerning the methodological difficulties in studying proposed relationships between exercise and cancer, focusing specifically on tumor metastasis, the process by which malignant cells disseminate to distant organs and establish new colonies. This paper also focuses on how natural immune processes and tumor cells exert bidirectional influences on each other. It is suggested that the direction of the impact of exercise on the control of metastatic spread of neoplastic cells will reflect, in part, the sensitivity of the specific tumor to cytolysis by natural immune mechanisms, the route of dissemination, the timing of exercise relative to tumor exposure, and whether exercise acts as a distress or eustress state.

  7. Does treatment of subsyndromal depression improve depression and diabetes related outcomes: protocol for a randomised controlled comparison of psycho-education, physical exercise and treatment as usual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovrenčić Marijana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of mood difficulties in persons with diabetes is approximately twice that in the general population, affecting the health outcomes and patients' quality of life in an undesirable way. Although subsyndromal depression is an important predictor of a more serious clinical depression, it is often overlooked. This study aims to compare the effects of two non-pharmacological interventions for subsyndromal depression, psychoeducation and physical exercise, with diabetes treatment as usual on mood- and diabetes-related outcomes. Methods and Design Type 2 diabetic patients aged 18-65 yrs. who report mood difficulties and the related need for help in a mail survey will be potential participants. After giving informed consent, they will be randomly assigned to one of the three groups (psychoeducation, physical activity, treatment as usual. Depressive symptoms, diabetes distress, health-related quality of life and diabetes self-care activities will be assessed at baseline, at 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months. A structured clinical interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I will be performed at baseline and at one-year follow-up in order to determine the clinical significance of the patients' depressive symptoms. Disease-related data will be collected from patients' files and from additional physical examinations and laboratory tests. The two interventions will be comparable in terms of format (small group work, duration (six sessions and approach (interactive learning; supporting the participants' active roles. The group treated as usual will be informed about their screening results and about the importance of treating depression. They will be provided with brief re-education on diabetes and written self-help instructions to cope with mood difficulties. Primary outcomes will be depressive symptoms. Secondary outcomes will be glycaemic control, diabetes-related distress, self-management of diabetes and health

  8. Priming for Improved Hand Strength in Persons with Chronic Tetraplegia: A Comparison of Priming-Augmented Functional Task Practice, Priming Alone, and Conventional Exercise Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Osman, Joyce; Tibbett, Jacqueline A.; Poe, Brandon P.; Field-Fote, Edelle C.

    2017-01-01

    Many everyday tasks cannot be accomplished without adequate grip strength, and corticomotor drive to the spinal motoneurons is a key determinant of grip strength. In persons with tetraplegia, damage to spinal pathways limits transmission of signals from motor cortex to spinal motoneurons. Corticomotor priming, which increases descending drive, should increase corticospinal transmission through the remaining spinal pathways resulting in increased grip strength. Since the motor and somatosensory cortices share reciprocal connections, corticomotor priming may also have potential to influence somatosensory function. The purpose of this study was to assess changes in grip (precision, power) force and tactile sensation associated with two different corticomotor priming approaches and a conventional training approach and to determine whether baseline values can predict responsiveness to training. Participants with chronic (≥1 year) tetraplegia (n = 49) were randomized to one of two corticomotor priming approaches: functional task practice plus peripheral nerve somatosensory stimulation (FTP + PNSS) or PNSS alone, or to conventional exercise training (CET). To assess whether baseline corticospinal excitability (CSE) is predictive of responsiveness to training, in a subset of participants, we assessed pre-intervention CSE of the thenar muscles. Participants were trained 2 h daily, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Thirty-seven participants completed the study. Following intervention, significant improvements in precision grip force were observed in both the stronger and weaker hand in the FTP + PNSS group (effect size: 0.51, p = 0.04 and 0.54, p = 0.03, respectively), and significant improvements in weak hand precision grip force were associated with both PNSS and CET (effect size: 0.54, p = 0.03 and 0.75, p = 0.02, respectively). No significant changes were observed in power grip force or somatosensory scores in any group. Across all groups

  9. Priming for Improved Hand Strength in Persons with Chronic Tetraplegia: A Comparison of Priming-Augmented Functional Task Practice, Priming Alone, and Conventional Exercise Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Osman, Joyce; Tibbett, Jacqueline A; Poe, Brandon P; Field-Fote, Edelle C

    2016-01-01

    Many everyday tasks cannot be accomplished without adequate grip strength, and corticomotor drive to the spinal motoneurons is a key determinant of grip strength. In persons with tetraplegia, damage to spinal pathways limits transmission of signals from motor cortex to spinal motoneurons. Corticomotor priming, which increases descending drive, should increase corticospinal transmission through the remaining spinal pathways resulting in increased grip strength. Since the motor and somatosensory cortices share reciprocal connections, corticomotor priming may also have potential to influence somatosensory function. The purpose of this study was to assess changes in grip (precision, power) force and tactile sensation associated with two different corticomotor priming approaches and a conventional training approach and to determine whether baseline values can predict responsiveness to training. Participants with chronic (≥1 year) tetraplegia (n = 49) were randomized to one of two corticomotor priming approaches: functional task practice plus peripheral nerve somatosensory stimulation (FTP + PNSS) or PNSS alone, or to conventional exercise training (CET). To assess whether baseline corticospinal excitability (CSE) is predictive of responsiveness to training, in a subset of participants, we assessed pre-intervention CSE of the thenar muscles. Participants were trained 2 h daily, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Thirty-seven participants completed the study. Following intervention, significant improvements in precision grip force were observed in both the stronger and weaker hand in the FTP + PNSS group (effect size: 0.51, p = 0.04 and 0.54, p = 0.03, respectively), and significant improvements in weak hand precision grip force were associated with both PNSS and CET (effect size: 0.54, p = 0.03 and 0.75, p = 0.02, respectively). No significant changes were observed in power grip force or somatosensory scores in any group. Across all groups

  10. Perceived exercise benefits and barriers among power wheelchair soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, J P; Malone, Laurie A

    2013-01-01

    Lack of exercise is a major risk factor for secondary conditions among persons dependent upon motorized wheelchairs. Power wheelchair soccer is a unique exercise opportunity for this population, and understanding factors that influence exercise decision-making is necessary for clinicians to help those in motorized chairs reduce their secondary risk. Therefore, this study examined differences in perceived benefits and barriers to exercise among power wheelchair soccer players using a mixed-methods analysis. The most common perceived benefit to exercise was "Exercising lets me have contact with friends and persons I enjoy." Post hoc comparisons of quantitative data indicated that persons with muscular dystrophy perceived exercise to be significantly less important than did other disability groups (p wheelchair users.

  11. δ18O water isotope in the iLOVECLIM model (version 1.0 – Part 3: A palaeo-perspective based on present-day data–model comparison for oxygen stable isotopes in carbonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Caley

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen stable isotopes (δ18O are among the most useful tools in palaeoclimatology/palaeoceanography. Simulation of oxygen stable isotopes allows testing how the past variability of these isotopes in water can be interpreted. By modelling the proxy directly in the model, the results can also be directly compared with the data. Water isotopes have been implemented in the global three-dimensional model of intermediate complexity iLOVECLIM, allowing fully coupled atmosphere–ocean simulations. In this study, we present the validation of the model results for present-day climate against the global database for oxygen stable isotopes in carbonates. The limitation of the model together with the processes operating in the natural environment reveal the complexity of use the continental calcite-δ18O signal of speleothems for a global quantitative data–model comparison exercise. On the contrary, the reconstructed surface ocean calcite-δ18O signal in iLOVECLIM does show a very good agreement with the late Holocene database (foraminifers at the global and regional scales. Our results indicate that temperature and the isotopic composition of the seawater are the main control on the fossil-δ18O signal recorded in foraminifer shells when all species are grouped together. Depth habitat, seasonality and other ecological effects play a more significant role when individual species are considered. We argue that a data–model comparison for surface ocean calcite δ18O in past climates, such as the Last Glacial Maximum (≈ 21 000 yr, could constitute an interesting tool for mapping the potential shifts of the frontal systems and circulation changes throughout time. Similarly, the potential changes in intermediate oceanic circulation systems in the past could be documented by a data (benthic foraminifers-model comparison exercise whereas future investigations are necessary in order to quantitatively compare the results with data for the deep ocean.

  12. Isometric exercise and chronic heart failure

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    Efthimia Zerva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The resistance exercise is an important part of all rehabilitation programs in patients with chronic heart failure. Among several kinds of resistance exercises, the one mainly applied is isotonic exercise, whereas, in the contrary, isometric is not heavily used although it affects the daily lives of patients who, trying to look after themselves (moving, walking, lifting objects, twitch in an isometric way their peripheral muscles due to reduced cardiovascular endurance. Purpose: The purpose of the present review was to present the data available so far for isometric exercise in cardiovascular patients and to examine the importance of applying this kind of exercise in rehabilitation programs in the context of, firstly, evaluation, and secondly therapeutic intervention. Material - Methods: The methodology followed included searching inquiries and reviews from international databases (Pubmed, Medline, Scopus on the effects of isometric exercise in patients with chronic heart failure. The progress and development of the studies are of particular importance to this work and, to this end, the literature refers to the entire range of time in the last three decades, from 1985 to 2012 according the key words noted. Results: In rehabilitation programs for patients with chronic heart failure, resistance exercise if applied in an isotonic way helps improve hemodynamic and functional parameters. In contrast, resistance exercise applied in an isometric way requires further investigation because most findings are related to hemodynamic disturbances. The data which is encouraging for isometric exercise programs are few and, therefore, it cannot be directly recommended as a proper way to exercise. Conclusions: Isometric exercise has an important place in the evaluation of patients with chronic heart failure, and limits should be "placed" in its application as a therapeutic tool to prevent complications.

  13. RESPIRATORY RESPONSES TO EXERCISE IN PREGNANCY

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    Anitha

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pregnancy is a naturally occurring physiological process, where in most control systems of the body are transitorily modified in an attempt to maintain the homeostasis. Exercise is another physiological state in which the bodily systems undergo adaptations, more so in pregnant women. There are many advantages of exercise in pregnant women as in any other individual; from the sense of well-being to prevention of hypertension and diabetes. There are not many studies done on Indian women to know the effect of exercise on the pulmonary function tests. OBJECTIVES: To study the effect of moderate exercise on the respiratory functions in pregnant women. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 50 healthy pregnant women in their 2nd trimester of pregnancy were taken as subjects. Minute Ventilation (MV, Forced Vital Capacity (FVC & Forced Expiratory Volume in 1st second were measured in pregnant women who were then compared with age- matched controls. Respiratory parameters were recorded using a computerized spirometry (Medspiror. It was done at two instances once at rest and other after subjecting them to moderate exercise on a motorized treadmill. RESULTS: At rest, Minute ventilation was more in the pregnant group when compared to controls. Increase in MV after exercise was more in the pregnant women. FVC was not statistically different from those of controls at rest, though exercise increased FVC to greater value in pregnant women as compared to controls. Resting FEV1 was less in pregnant women. It decreased after exercise in both the groups; the percentage decrease was not much different between the two groups. CONCLUSION: In our study, changes in respiratory functions to exercise in pregnant women were towards positive side giving the advantage of hyperventilation to the woman and the fetus. Keeping in mind the tremendous advantages of exercise, all healthy pregnant women should be encouraged to make exercise an integral part of their ante-natal care.

  14. Comparison of adaptive pacing therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, graded exercise therapy, and specialist medical care for chronic fatigue syndrome (PACE): a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, P D; Goldsmith, K A; Johnson, A L; Potts, L; Walwyn, R; DeCesare, J C; Baber, H L; Burgess, M; Clark, L V; Cox, D L; Bavinton, J; Angus, B J; Murphy, G; Murphy, M; O'Dowd, H; Wilks, D; McCrone, P; Chalder, T; Sharpe, M

    2011-03-05

    Trial findings show cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and graded exercise therapy (GET) can be effective treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome, but patients' organisations have reported that these treatments can be harmful and favour pacing and specialist health care. We aimed to assess effectiveness and safety of all four treatments. In our parallel-group randomised trial, patients meeting Oxford criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome were recruited from six secondary-care clinics in the UK and randomly allocated by computer-generated sequence to receive specialist medical care (SMC) alone or with adaptive pacing therapy (APT), CBT, or GET. Primary outcomes were fatigue (measured by Chalder fatigue questionnaire score) and physical function (measured by short form-36 subscale score) up to 52 weeks after randomisation, and safety was assessed primarily by recording all serious adverse events, including serious adverse reactions to trial treatments. Primary outcomes were rated by participants, who were necessarily unmasked to treatment assignment; the statistician was masked to treatment assignment for the analysis of primary outcomes. We used longitudinal regression models to compare SMC alone with other treatments, APT with CBT, and APT with GET. The final analysis included all participants for whom we had data for primary outcomes. This trial is registered at http://isrctn.org, number ISRCTN54285094. We recruited 641 eligible patients, of whom 160 were assigned to the APT group, 161 to the CBT group, 160 to the GET group, and 160 to the SMC-alone group. Compared with SMC alone, mean fatigue scores at 52 weeks were 3·4 (95% CI 1·8 to 5·0) points lower for CBT (p = 0·0001) and 3·2 (1·7 to 4·8) points lower for GET (p = 0·0003), but did not differ for APT (0·7 [-0·9 to 2·3] points lower; p = 0·38). Compared with SMC alone, mean physical function scores were 7·1 (2·0 to 12·1) points higher for CBT (p = 0·0068) and 9·4 (4·4 to 14·4) points higher

  15. Exercise in weight management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, B M; Szymanski, L

    1997-11-01

    Exercise is integral to successful weight loss and maintenance. When talking to patients about exercise, consider their readiness, and address the barriers that prevent exercise. Physicians can help those patients who already exercise by encouraging them to continue and helping them anticipate, and recover from, lapses. Providing resource material to patients on behavioral strategies for exercise adoption and weight management can supplement the physician's efforts. Overall, patients need to hear that any regular exercise, be it step-aerobics, walking, or taking the stairs, will benefit them.

  16. Neurophysiological effects of exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelands, B; De Pauw, K; Meeusen, R

    2015-06-01

    Fatigue during prolonged exercise is a multifactorial phenomenon. The complex interplay between factors originating from both the periphery and the brain will determine the onset of fatigue. In recent years, electrophysiological and imaging tools have been fine-tuned, allowing for an improved understanding of what happens in the brain. In the first part of the review, we present literature that studied the changes in electrocortical activity during and after exercise in normal and high ambient temperature. In general, exercise in a thermo-neutral environment or at light to moderate intensity increases the activity in the β frequency range, while exercising at high intensity or in the heat reduces β activity. In the second part, we review literature that manipulated brain neurotransmission, through either pharmacological or nutritional means, during exercise in the heat. The dominant outcomes were that manipulations changing brain dopamine concentration have the potential to delay fatigue, while the manipulation of serotonin had no effect and noradrenaline reuptake inhibition was detrimental for performance in the heat. Research on the effects of neurotransmitter manipulations on brain activity during or after exercise is scarce. The combination of brain imaging techniques with electrophysiological measures presents one of the major future challenges in exercise physiology/neurophysiology.

  17. Core Muscle Activation in Suspension Training Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugliari, Giovanni; Boccia, Gennaro

    2017-02-01

    A quantitative observational laboratory study was conducted to characterize and classify core training exercises executed in a suspension modality on the base of muscle activation. In a prospective single-group repeated measures design, seventeen active male participants performed four suspension exercises typically associated with core training (roll-out, bodysaw, pike and knee-tuck). Surface electromyographic signals were recorded from lower and upper parts of rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, lower and upper parts of erector spinae muscles using concentric bipolar electrodes. The average rectified values of electromyographic signals were normalized with respect to individual maximum voluntary isometric contraction of each muscle. Roll-out exercise showed the highest activation of rectus abdominis and oblique muscles compared to the other exercises. The rectus abdominis and external oblique reached an activation higher than 60% of the maximal voluntary contraction (or very close to that threshold, 55%) in roll-out and bodysaw exercises. Findings from this study allow the selection of suspension core training exercises on the basis of quantitative information about the activation of muscles of interest. Roll-out and bodysaw exercises can be considered as suitable for strength training of rectus abdominis and external oblique muscles.

  18. Exercise addiction- diagnosis, bio-psychological mechanisms and treatment issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Aviv; Weinstein, Yitzhak

    2014-01-01

    Exercise and sports activity are beneficial both physically and psychologically but excessive exercise may have adverse physiological and psychological effects. There are methodological issues in the definition, diagnosis and etiology of exercise addiction. Several questionnaires and diagnostic tools have been developed and validated and they show high validity and reliability. Exercise addiction has been suggested as having an obsessive-compulsive dimension as well as rewarding aspects that may include it among the behavioral addictions. Biological studies show that in rodents, exercise such as wheel running activates the dopamine reward system and thus contributing to stress reduction. Further evidence suggests that running is associated with endorphins and cannabinoids thus explaining the "runners high" or euphoric feelings that may lead to exercise addiction. Genetic studies suggest that genes which control preference for drugs also control the preference for naturally rewarding behaviors such as exercise. Psychological studies also explain exercise addiction in terms of reward, habituation, social support, stress-relief, avoidance of withdrawal and reduction of anxiety. It has been suggested that exercise addiction is a part of a continuum of sportive activity that develops in stages from the recreational exercise to at-risk exercise, problematic exercise and finally into exercise addiction. Assessment and treatment should take into account the various stages of exercise addiction development, its comorbidity with other psychiatric disorders such as eating disorders or substance use and alcohol disorders. Treatment approaches for exercise addiction are based on the cognitive-behavioral approach but little is known about their effectiveness. A single-case study shows promise of pharmacological treatment for exercise addiction and further studies are required. This review summarizes diagnostic and phenomenology of exercise addiction with emphasis on

  19. Exercise for laboratory comparison of calibration coefficient in {sup 137}Cs beam, radiation protection - 2013/2014; Exercicio de comparacao laboratorial do coeficiente de calibracao em feixe de Cesio-137, radioprotecao - 2013/2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, T.S. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Potiens, M.P.A., E-mail: tschirn@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Soares, C.M.A. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Silveira, R.R. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Khoury, H. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Fernandes, E. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas; Cardoso, W.F. [Eletrobras Termonuclear S.A. (Eletronuclear), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Borges, J.C. [MRA Comercio de Instrumentos Eletronicos Ltda., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This work deals with the preliminary results of the second exercise of comparing the radiation monitors calibration laboratories in Brazil. The exercise involved eight laboratories and the measured quantity is the air kerma in a beam of {sup 137}Cs for radioprotection. The exercise was conducted by the LNMRI/IRD, in a star shaped arrangement from October 2013 to July 2015. The largest deviation was 2% of the calibration coefficient that is acceptable for applications in radioprotection. (author)

  20. How to prescribe physical exercise in rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Maddali Bongi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Physical exercise, aiming to improve range of movement, muscle strength and physical well being, lately substituted the immobilization previously prescribed in rheumatic diseases. International guidelines, recommendations of Scientific Societies, and structured reviews regard physical exercise as of pivotal importance in treating rheumatoid arthr