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Sample records for comparing lung-cancer risks

  1. Familial risk for lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kanwal, Madiha; Ding, Xiao-Ji; Cao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer, which has a low survival rate, is a leading cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. Smoking and air pollution are the major causes of lung cancer; however, numerous studies have demonstrated that genetic factors also contribute to the development of lung cancer. A family history of lung cancer increases the risk for the disease in both smokers and never-smokers. This review focuses on familial lung cancer, in particular on the familial aggregation of lung cancer. The deve...

  2. Risk Profiling May Improve Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new modeling study suggests that individualized, risk-based selection of ever-smokers for lung cancer screening may prevent more lung cancer deaths and improve the effectiveness and efficiency of screening compared with current screening recommendations

  3. Risks of Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Cancer Treatment Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Lung ... which also have risks. A biopsy to diagnose lung cancer can cause part of the lung to collapse. Sometimes surgery ...

  4. Bricklayers and lung cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The article ‘Lung cancer risk among bricklayers in a pooled analysis of case–control studies’ in the International Journal of Cancer publishes findings of an epidemiological study (in the frame of a SYNERGY-project) dedicated to the lung cancer risk among bricklayers. The authors conclude that a

  5. Systematic review of the epidemiological evidence comparing lung cancer risk in smokers of mentholated and unmentholated cigarettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Peter N

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background US mentholated cigarette sales have increased considerably over 50 years. Preference for mentholated cigarettes is markedly higher in Black people. While menthol itself is not genotoxic or carcinogenic, its acute respiratory effects might affect inhalation of cigarette smoke. This possibility seems consistent with the higher lung cancer risk in Black men, despite Black people smoking less and starting smoking later than White people. Despite experimental data suggesting similar carcinogenicity of mentholated and non-mentholated cigarettes, the lack of convincing evidence that mentholation increases puffing, inhalation or smoke uptake, and the similarity of lung cancer rates in Black and White females, a review of cigarette mentholation and lung cancer is timely given current regulatory interest in the topic. Methods Epidemiological studies comparing lung cancer risk in mentholated and non-mentholated cigarette smokers were identified from MedLine and other sources. Study details were extracted and strengths and weaknesses assessed. Relative risk estimates were extracted, or derived, for ever mentholated use and for long-term use, overall and by gender, race, and current/ever smoking, and meta-analyses conducted. Results Eight generally good quality studies were identified, with valid cases and controls, and appropriate adjustment for age, gender, race and smoking. The studies afforded good power to detect possible effects. However, only one study presented results by histological type, none adjusted for occupation or diet, and some provided no results by length of mentholated cigarette use. The data do not suggest any effect of mentholation on lung cancer risk. Adjusted relative risk estimates for ever use vary from 0.81 to 1.12, giving a combined estimate of 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.84-1.02, n = 8, with no increase in males (1.01, 0.84-1.22, n = 5, females (0.80, 0.67-0.95, n = 5, White people (0.87, 0.75-1.03, n = 4

  6. Gene variant linked to lung cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    A variation of the gene NFKB1, called rs4648127, is associated with an estimated 44 percent reduction in lung cancer risk. When this information, derived from samples obtained as part of a large NCI-sponsored prevention clinical trial, was compared with d

  7. Risk of lung cancer among white and black relatives of individuals with early-onset lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coté, Michele L; Kardia, Sharon L R; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Ruckdeschel, John C; Schwartz, Ann G

    2005-06-22

    Evidence exists that lung cancer aggregates in families and recent findings of a chromosomal region linked to lung cancer susceptibility support a genetic component to risk. Family studies of early-onset lung cancer patients offer a unique opportunity to evaluate lifetime risk of lung cancer in relatives. To measure lung cancer aggregation and estimate lifetime risk among relatives of early-onset cases and population-based controls. Familial aggregation and cumulative risk estimates from interview data of incident cases and concurrently ascertained controls between 1990 and 2003 in metropolitan Detroit, Mich. The study included 7576 biological mothers, fathers, and siblings of 692 early-onset cases and 773 frequency-matched controls. One third of the population was black. Cumulative lifetime risk of lung cancer, stratified by race and smoking behavior in relatives of early-onset cases and controls. Smokers with a family history of early-onset lung cancer in a first-degree relative had a higher risk of developing lung cancer with increasing age than smokers without a family history. An increase in risk occurs after age 60 years in these individuals, with 17.1% (SE 2.4%) of white case relatives and 25.1% (SE 5.8%) of black case relatives diagnosed with lung cancer by age 70 years. Relatives of black cases were at statistically significant increased risk of lung cancer compared with relatives of white cases (odds ratio, 2.07, 95% confidence interval, 1.29-3.32) after adjusting for age, sex, pack-years, pneumonia, and chronic obstructive lung disease. First-degree relatives of black individuals with early-onset lung cancer have greater risk of lung cancer than their white counterparts, and these risks are further amplified by cigarette smoking. These data provide estimates of lung cancer risk that can be used to offer counseling to family members of patients with early-onset lung cancer.

  8. Is Previous Respiratory Disease a Risk Factor for Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denholm, Rachel; Schüz, Joachim; Straif, Kurt; Stücker, Isabelle; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Brenner, Darren R.; De Matteis, Sara; Boffetta, Paolo; Guida, Florence; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Siemiatycki, Jack; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Zaridze, David; Field, John K.; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Dumitru, Rodica Stanescu; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Kendzia, Benjamin; Peters, Susan; Behrens, Thomas; Vermeulen, Roel; Brüning, Thomas; Kromhout, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Previous respiratory diseases have been associated with increased risk of lung cancer. Respiratory conditions often co-occur and few studies have investigated multiple conditions simultaneously. Objectives: Investigate lung cancer risk associated with chronic bronchitis, emphysema, tuberculosis, pneumonia, and asthma. Methods: The SYNERGY project pooled information on previous respiratory diseases from 12,739 case subjects and 14,945 control subjects from 7 case–control studies conducted in Europe and Canada. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to investigate the relationship between individual diseases adjusting for co-occurring conditions, and patterns of respiratory disease diagnoses and lung cancer. Analyses were stratified by sex, and adjusted for age, center, ever-employed in a high-risk occupation, education, smoking status, cigarette pack-years, and time since quitting smoking. Measurements and Main Results: Chronic bronchitis and emphysema were positively associated with lung cancer, after accounting for other respiratory diseases and smoking (e.g., in men: odds ratio [OR], 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20–1.48 and OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.21–1.87, respectively). A positive relationship was observed between lung cancer and pneumonia diagnosed 2 years or less before lung cancer (OR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.33–4.70 for men), but not longer. Co-occurrence of chronic bronchitis and emphysema and/or pneumonia had a stronger positive association with lung cancer than chronic bronchitis “only.” Asthma had an inverse association with lung cancer, the association being stronger with an asthma diagnosis 5 years or more before lung cancer compared with shorter. Conclusions: Findings from this large international case–control consortium indicate that after accounting for co-occurring respiratory diseases, chronic bronchitis and emphysema continue to have a positive association with lung cancer. PMID:25054566

  9. Lung cancer in never smokers Epidemiology and risk prediction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, William J.; Meza, Rafael; Jeon, Jihyoun; Moolgavkar, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter we review the epidemiology of lung cancer incidence and mortality among never smokers/ nonsmokers and describe the never smoker lung cancer risk models used by CISNET modelers. Our review focuses on those influences likely to have measurable population impact on never smoker risk, such as secondhand smoke, even though the individual-level impact may be small. Occupational exposures may also contribute importantly to the population attributable risk of lung cancer. We examine the following risk factors in this chapter: age, environmental tobacco smoke, cooking fumes, ionizing radiation including radon gas, inherited genetic susceptibility, selected occupational exposures, preexisting lung disease, and oncogenic viruses. We also compare the prevalence of never smokers between the three CISNET smoking scenarios and present the corresponding lung cancer mortality estimates among never smokers as predicted by a typical CISNET model. PMID:22882894

  10. [Risk Factors of Lung Cancer in Xuanwei, Yunnan Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liqun; Wan, Xia; Chen, Gongbo; Ma, Xiangyun; Ning, Bofu; Yang, Gonghuan

    2017-08-20

    Since 1970s, Xuanwei in Yunnan province has been one of the towns with highest lung cancer mortality in China. Moreover, the characters of high female lung cancer mortality and sub-regional clustering high lung cancer mortality have not changed. In this study, we further described the exposure situation of risk factors of lung cancer in Xuanwei nowadays, in order to explore the trend of the distribution of lung cancer there. Firstly we divided the 26 towns of Xuanwei city to high-, median- and low- lung cancer areas by the lung cancer mortality in 2010-2012. We chose 2 towns within each area according to topography and orientation, and randomly picked 4 villages in each town to be our study area. We did a questionnaire about lung cancer related risk factors upon the sample population in the study area. We calculated the exposure percentages of each risk factor, in whole sample population and subgroups, for nowadays and for 10 years ago (only living environmental risk factors), and compared them between areas or time points using standardized rates and the statistical test of standardized rate comparison, or chi-square test. 65%-80% male in the study area has a history of smoking; 60%-90% non-smoker has been exposed to second hand smoke. These situations are worse in high and median lung cancer areas. 50% male in median lung cancer area have coal mining work experience, which is 2 times of the percentages in the other two areas; while 15%-25% people in high lung cancer area have other occupational exposure history to particulate air pollution, which is 3-5 times of the percentages in the other two areas. From ten years ago until nowadays, 80% families in median lung cancer area use 2 tons or more smoky coal per year; more than 90% families burn coal for household heating; more than 60% families suffer from smog in the kitchen during cook; 60% families most frequently use stove in the ground with chimney. Only 20% families in high lung cancer area now use 2 tons or

  11. Risk Factors of Lung Cancer in Xuanwei, Yunnan Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqun LIU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Since 1970s, Xuanwei in Yunnan province has been one of the towns with highest lung cancer mortality in China. Moreover, the characters of high female lung cancer mortality and sub-regional clustering high lung cancer mortality have not changed. In this study, we further described the exposure situation of risk factors of lung cancer in Xuanwei nowadays, in order to explore the trend of the distribution of lung cancer there. Methods Firstly we divided the 26 towns of Xuanwei city to high-, median- and low- lung cancer areas by the lung cancer mortality in 2010-2012. We chose 2 towns within each area according to topography and orientation, and randomly picked 4 villages in each town to be our study area. We did a questionnaire about lung cancer related risk factors upon the sample population in the study area. We calculated the exposure percentages of each risk factor, in whole sample population and subgroups, for nowadays and for 10 years ago (only living environmental risk factors, and compared them between areas or time points using standardized rates and the statistical test of standardized rate comparison, or chi-square test. Results 65%-80% male in the study area has a history of smoking; 60%-90% non-smoker has been exposed to second hand smoke. These situations are worse in high and median lung cancer areas. 50% male in median lung cancer area have coal mining work experience, which is 2 times of the percentages in the other two areas; while 15%-25% people in high lung cancer area have other occupational exposure history to particulate air pollution, which is 3-5 times of the percentages in the other two areas. From ten years ago until nowadays, 80% families in median lung cancer area use 2 tons or more smoky coal per year; more than 90% families burn coal for household heating; more than 60% families suffer from smog in the kitchen during cook; 60% families most frequently use stove in the ground with chimney

  12. Is Previous Respiratory Disease a Risk Factor for Lung Cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denholm, Rachel; Schüz, Joachim; Straif, Kurt; Stücker, Isabelle; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Brenner, Darren R; De Matteis, Sara; Boffetta, Paolo; Guida, Florence; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Siemiatycki, Jack; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Zaridze, David; Field, John K; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Dumitru, Rodica Stanescu; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Kendzia, Benjamin; Peters, Susan; Behrens, Thomas; Vermeulen, Roel; Brüning, Thomas; Kromhout, Hans; Olsson, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Previous respiratory diseases have been associated with increased risk of lung cancer. Respiratory conditions often co-occur and few studies have investigated multiple conditions simultaneously. Objectives: Investigate lung cancer risk associated with chronic bronchitis, emphysema,

  13. Dietary Fat Intake and Lung Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jae Jeong; Yu, Danxia; Takata, Yumie

    2017-01-01

    with lung cancer risk. Methods Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs in each cohort. Study-specific risk estimates were pooled by random- or fixed-effects meta-analysis. The first 2 years of follow-up were excluded to address potential influence of preclinical dietary changes....... Results Among 1,445,850 participants, 18,822 incident cases were identified (mean follow-up, 9.4 years). High intakes of total and saturated fat were associated with an increased risk of lung cancer (for highest v lowest quintile: HR, 1.07 and 1.14, respectively; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.15 and 1.07 to 1.......40, respectively; 95% CI, 1.38 to 1.88 and 1.17 to 1.67, respectively; P for trend for both lung cancer (HR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.87 to 0.98 for highest v lowest...

  14. Risk Stratification for Second Primary Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Summer S; Rivera, Gabriel A; Tammemägi, Martin C; Plevritis, Sylvia K; Gomez, Scarlett L; Cheng, Iona; Wakelee, Heather A

    2017-09-01

    Purpose This study estimated the 10-year risk of developing second primary lung cancer (SPLC) among survivors of initial primary lung cancer (IPLC) and evaluated the clinical utility of the risk prediction model for selecting eligibility criteria for screening. Methods SEER data were used to identify a population-based cohort of 20,032 participants diagnosed with IPLC between 1988 and 2003 and who survived ≥ 5 years after the initial diagnosis. We used a proportional subdistribution hazards model to estimate the 10-year risk of developing SPLC among survivors of lung cancer LC in the presence of competing risks. Considered predictors included age, sex, race, treatment, histology, stage, and extent of disease. We examined the risk-stratification ability of the prediction model and performed decision curve analysis to evaluate the clinical utility of the model by calculating its net benefit in varied risk thresholds for screening. Results Although the median 10-year risk of SPLC among survivors of LC was 8.36%, the estimated risk varied substantially (range, 0.56% to 14.3%) when stratified by age, histology, and extent of IPLC in the final prediction model. The stratification by deciles of estimated risk showed that the observed incidence of SPLC was significantly higher in the tenth-decile group (12.5%) versus the first-decile group (2.9%; P risk thresholds (1% to 11.5%) at which the clinical net benefit of the risk model was larger than those in hypothetical all-screening or no-screening scenarios. Conclusion The risk stratification approach in SPLC can be potentially useful for identifying survivors of LC to be screened by computed tomography. More comprehensive environmental and genetic data may help enhance the predictability and stratification ability of the risk model for SPLC.

  15. Do Lung Cancer Eligibility Criteria Align with Risk among Blacks and Hispanics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Fiscella

    Full Text Available Black patients have higher lung cancer risk despite lower pack years of smoking. We assessed lung cancer risk by race, ethnicity, and sex among a nationally representative population eligible for lung cancer screening based on Medicare criteria.We used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007-2012 to assess lung cancer risk by sex, race and ethnicity among persons satisfying Medicare age and pack-year smoking eligibility criteria for lung cancer screening. We assessed Medicare eligibility based on age (55-77 years and pack-years (≥ 30. We assessed 6-year lung cancer risk using a risk prediction model from Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening trial that was modified in 2012 (PLCOm2012. We compared the proportions of eligible persons by sex, race and ethnicity using Medicare criteria with a risk cut-point that was adjusted to achieve comparable total number of persons eligible for screening.Among the 29.7 million persons aged 55-77 years who ever smoked, we found that 7.3 million (24.5% were eligible for lung cancer screening under Medicare criteria. Among those eligible, Blacks had statistically significant higher (4.4% and Hispanics lower lung cancer risk (1.2% than non-Hispanic Whites (3.2%. At a cut-point of 2.12% risk for lung screening eligibility, the percentage of Blacks and Hispanics showed statistically significant changes. Blacks eligible rose by 48% and Hispanics eligible declined by 63%. Black men and Hispanic women were affected the most. There was little change in eligibility among Whites.Medicare eligibility criteria for lung cancer screening do not align with estimated risk for lung cancer among Blacks and Hispanics. Data are urgently needed to determine whether use of risk-based eligibility screening improves lung cancer outcomes among minority patients.

  16. Nutritional Risk Screening Predicts Tumor Response in Lung Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illa, Petr; Tomiskova, Marcela; Skrickova, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition in cancer patients may be associated with poor tolerance of chemotherapy and lower response rate after oncological treatment. Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS) adapted for oncological patients was used to assess the risk of undernutrition in a group of 188 patients with lung cancer. The risk was evaluated on a 6-point scale according to common signs of nutritional status (weight loss, body mass index, and dietary intake), tumor, and its treatment risk factors. A score of 3 or more (called "nutritional risk") means significant risk of malnutrition and poor outcome. Acceptable NRS score was found in 50.6%, and in 45.3% a score of 3-5 suggested the risk of malnutrition (nutritional risk). Unexpectedly, the toxicity of anticancer treatment was not significantly different between the subgroups (acceptable score vs nutritional risk). The rate of treatment response evaluated by imaging techniques was significantly higher in patients with an acceptable score compared to nutritional risk. Overall survival rate was significantly higher in cytostatically treated patients with lung cancer with an acceptable score. Nutritional risk screening is a significant predictor of tumor response in patients with lung cancer. Early detection of malnutrition is important to determine the prognosis of cancer patients as well as to plan effective supportive care.

  17. Should Never-Smokers at Increased Risk for Lung Cancer Be Screened?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Haaf, Kevin; de Koning, Harry J

    2015-09-01

    Lung cancer in never-smokers ranks among the 10 most common causes of death due to cancer worldwide and in the United States. However, it is unknown whether never-smokers at elevated risk for developing lung cancer may benefit from lung cancer screening. The MIcrosimulation SCreening ANalysis (MISCAN)-Lung microsimulation model was used to assess the effects of lung cancer screening for simulated cohorts of never-smokers at different levels of relative risk (RR) for lung cancer compared with never-smokers at average risk. The benefits and harms of screening were estimated for each cohort and compared with those of a cohort of ever-smokers eligible for lung cancer screening according to the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) criteria. The relative lung cancer mortality reduction in never-smokers was higher than the USPSTF eligible cohort (37% compared with 32%). However, the number of life-years gained per lung cancer death averted was lower (10.4 compared with 11.9) and the proportion of overdiagnosed cancers was higher (9.6% compared with 8.4%) for never-smokers compared with the USPSTF eligible cohort, as never-smokers are diagnosed at a later age. The estimated number of screens per lung cancer death averted ranged from 6162 for never-smokers at average risk to 151 for never-smokers with an RR of 35 compared with 353 for the USPSTF eligible cohort. Never-smokers with RRs of 15 to 35 have similar to better trade-offs between benefits and harms compared with ever-smokers recommended for lung cancer screening by the USPSTF guidelines. For most never-smokers, lung cancer screening is not beneficial.

  18. Factors of lung cancer risks in nuclear mayak pa workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokarshaya, Z. B.; Zhuntova, G. V.; Scott, B. R.; Belyaeva, Z. D.; Khokhryakov, V. F.; Syrchikov, V. A.

    2004-07-01

    Study of the lung cancer incidence in nuclear workers at Mayak Production Association has been continued. The research objective is to compare lung cancer risks after exposure to inhaled compounds of ''239 Pu taken into account possible effect of external g-rays smoking, and chronic non-specific lung diseases. We study 237 cases with lung cancers diagnosed during 1966-2000 with the morphological conformation provided. It is the case-control study of a cohort using the multifactor logistic regression. This report presents research results of the Mayak nuclear workers exposed to insoluble compounds of ''239 Pu. This group includes 28 cases of the lung cancer and 112 control individuals, who had no malignant neoplasms. the control was matched by the gender, age, time of started work at the Mayak PA ''239 PU body burden ranged from 0 to 19.9 kBq; total dose from external g-rays ranged within 0-01 Gy. Distribution of histological tumor types was as follows i. e. adenocarcinoma {approx}50% squamous-cell cancer {approx}25% small-cell cancer {approx} 11% large-cell cancer {approx} 7%, anaplastic cancer {approx} 7%. The frequency of adenocarcinomas in a group of workers exposed to insoluble compounds of ''239 Pu was significantly higher than in the city residents of the same age and gender. (Author)

  19. Risk of lung cancer associated with domestic use of coal in Xuanwei, China: retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barone-Adesi, F.; Chapman, R.S.; Silverman, D.T.; He, X.; Hu, W.; Vermeulen, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Ning, B.; Fraumeni, J.F.; Rothman, N.; Lan, Q.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the risk of lung cancer associated with the use of different types of coal for household cooking and heating. SETTING: Xuanwei County, Yunnan Province, China. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study (follow-up 1976-96) comparing mortality from lung cancer between lifelong users of

  20. Previous Lung Diseases and Lung Cancer Risk: A Pooled Analysis From the International Lung Cancer Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Darren R.; Boffetta, Paolo; Duell, Eric J.; Bickeböller, Heike; Rosenberger, Albert; McCormack, Valerie; Muscat, Joshua E.; Yang, Ping; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Brueske-Hohlfeld, Irene; Schwartz, Ann G.; Cote, Michele L.; Tjønneland, Anne; Friis, Søren; Le Marchand, Loic; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Morgenstern, Hal; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Zaridze, David; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Bencko, Vladimir; Schejbalova, Miriam; Brennan, Paul; Mates, Ioan N.; Lazarus, Philip; Field, John K.; Raji, Olaide; McLaughlin, John R.; Liu, Geoffrey; Wiencke, John; Neri, Monica; Ugolini, Donatella; Andrew, Angeline S.; Lan, Qing; Hu, Wei; Orlow, Irene; Park, Bernard J.; Hung, Rayjean J.

    2012-01-01

    To clarify the role of previous lung diseases (chronic bronchitis, emphysema, pneumonia, and tuberculosis) in the development of lung cancer, the authors conducted a pooled analysis of studies in the International Lung Cancer Consortium. Seventeen studies including 24,607 cases and 81,829 controls (noncases), mainly conducted in Europe and North America, were included (1984–2011). Using self-reported data on previous diagnoses of lung diseases, the authors derived study-specific effect estimates by means of logistic regression models or Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for age, sex, and cumulative tobacco smoking. Estimates were pooled using random-effects models. Analyses stratified by smoking status and histology were also conducted. A history of emphysema conferred a 2.44-fold increased risk of lung cancer (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.64, 3.62 (16 studies)). A history of chronic bronchitis conferred a relative risk of 1.47 (95% CI: 1.29, 1.68 (13 studies)). Tuberculosis (relative risk = 1.48, 95% CI: 1.17, 1.87 (16 studies)) and pneumonia (relative risk = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.22, 2.01 (12 studies)) were also associated with lung cancer risk. Among never smokers, elevated risks were observed for emphysema, pneumonia, and tuberculosis. These results suggest that previous lung diseases influence lung cancer risk independently of tobacco use and that these diseases are important for assessing individual risk. PMID:22986146

  1. Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors increase or decrease the risk of lung cancer. Lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) ... following PDQ summaries for more information about lung cancer: Lung Cancer Prevention Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment ...

  2. Alcohol intake and the risk of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, E; Grønbaek, M; Becker, U

    1999-01-01

    Alcohol consumption has been associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, but the antioxidants in wine may, in theory, provide protection. This association was studied in 28,160 men and women subjects from three prospective studies conducted in 1964-1992 in Copenhagen, Denmark. After...... adjustment for age, smoking, and education, a low to moderate alcohol intake (1-20 drinks per week) was not associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. Men who consumed 21-41 and more than 41 drinks per week had relative risks of 1.23 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.88-1.74) and 1.57 (95% CI 1.......06-2.33), respectively. The risk of lung cancer differed according to the type of alcohol consumed: After abstainers were excluded, drinkers of 1-13 and more than 13 glasses of wine per week had relative risks of 0.78 (95% CI 0.63-0.97) and 0.44 (95% CI 0.22-0.86), respectively, as compared with nondrinkers of wine (p...

  3. Occupational lung cancer risk among men in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preller, L.; Balder, H.F.; Tielemans, E.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To assess male lung cancer risks for industrial sectors in the Netherlands and to estimate the proportion of lung cancer attributed to working in specific industrial sectors. Methods: Associations were studied among men aged 55-69 years (n = 58 279) from the prospective Netherlands

  4. Lung Cancer Screening: Optimization through risk stratification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. ten Haaf (Kevin)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related mortality worldwide. However, results from randomized controlled trials indicate that lung cancer mortality can be reduced by early detection through computed tomography screening. This thesis describes the development of a

  5. Risk of Lung Cancer Associated with COPD Phenotype Based on Quantitative Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Ann G; Lusk, Christine M; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Watza, Donovan; Pandolfi, Stephanie; Mantha, Laura; Cote, Michele L; Soubani, Ayman O; Walworth, Garrett; Wozniak, Antoinette; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Ardisana, Amy A; Flynn, Michael J; Song, Thomas; Spizarny, David L; Kvale, Paul A; Chapman, Robert A; Gadgeel, Shirish M

    2016-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a risk factor for lung cancer. This study evaluates alternative measures of COPD based on spirometry and quantitative image analysis to better define a phenotype that predicts lung cancer risk. A total of 341 lung cancer cases and 752 volunteer controls, ages 21 to 89 years, participated in a structured interview, standardized CT scan, and spirometry. Logistic regression, adjusted for age, race, gender, pack-years, and inspiratory and expiratory total lung volume, was used to estimate the odds of lung cancer associated with FEV1/FVC, percent voxels less than -950 Hounsfield units on the inspiratory scan (HUI) and percent voxels less than -856 HU on expiratory scan (HUE). The odds of lung cancer were increased 1.4- to 3.1-fold among those with COPD compared with those without, regardless of assessment method; however, in multivariable modeling, only percent voxels <-856 HUE as a continuous measure of air trapping [OR = 1.04; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-1.06] and FEV1/FVC < 0.70 (OR = 1.71; 95% CI, 1.21-2.41) were independent predictors of lung cancer risk. Nearly 10% of lung cancer cases were negative on all objective measures of COPD. Measures of air trapping using quantitative imaging, in addition to FEV1/FVC, can identify individuals at high risk of lung cancer and should be considered as supplementary measures at the time of screening for lung cancer. Quantitative measures of air trapping based on imaging provide additional information for the identification of high-risk groups who might benefit the most from lung cancer screening. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(9); 1341-7. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Lung cancer among coal miners, ore miners and quarrymen : smoking-adjusted risk estimates from the synergy pooled analysis of case-control studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taeger, Dirk; Pesch, Beate; Kendzia, Benjamin; Behrens, Thomas; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Dahmann, Dirk; Siemiatycki, Jack; Kromhout, Hans; Vermeulen, Roel; Peters, Susan; Olsson, Ann; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Stücker, Isabelle; Guida, Florence; Tardón, Adonina; Merletti, Franco; Mirabelli, Dario; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Mukeriya, Anush; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Gustavsson, Per; Field, John; Marcus, Michael W; Fabianova, Eleonora; 't Mannetje, Andrea; Pearce, Neil; Rudnai, Peter; Bencko, Vladimir; Janout, Vladimir; Dumitru, Rodica Stanescu; Foretova, Lenka; Forastiere, Francesco; John McLaughlin, John McLaughlin; Paul Demers, Paul Demers; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita; Joachim Schüz, Joachim Schüz; Kurt Straif, Kurt Straif; Brüning, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Working in mines and quarries has been associated with an elevated lung cancer risk but with inconsistent results for coal miners. This study aimed to estimate the smoking-adjusted lung cancer risk among coal miners and compare the risk pattern with lung cancer risks among ore miners and

  7. Risk factors and prognosis of pulmonary embolism in patients with lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Wen, Zhongguang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Malignant tumors are often complicated with venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (PE), particularly in lung cancer. However, owing to the limited data regarding the clinical course about PE in lung cancer patients, the aim of this study is to analyze the risk factors and prognosis of patients with PE and lung cancer. We performed a retrospective case–control study, the clinical data of 90 patients in the First Affiliated Hospital of People's Liberation Army General Hospital between Jan 2010 and Jan 2015 were analyzed, including 30 lung cancer patients with PE (PE group), 60 lung cancer patients without PE (non-PE group), treated during the same period. Logistic regression analysis was applied to explore risk factors of PE. Patient survival was also compared with matched controls via a log-rank test. The multivariate analysis revealed that adenocarcinoma, stage III to IV, high D-dimer, and low PaO2 were independent risk factors. The survival time in patients with PE was remarkably lower than that in patients without PE (P < .0005). Adenocarcinoma, stage III to IV, high D-dimer and low PaO2 are important risk factors for lung cancer patients with PE. PE suggested a poor prognosis in lung cancer patients. PMID:28422863

  8. Lung cancer epidemiology and risk factors in Asia and Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, W.K.; White, N.W.; Chan-Yeung, M.M. [University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2004-07-01

    In Industrialized Countries, lung cancer is the most common form of cancer among males and it is growing among females. For both sexes, rates reflect smoking behaviours. The pattern appears to be different in Asia, particularly in China, where lung cancer rates in men reflect high smoking rates but high rates among non-smoking women appear to be related to other factors. The incidence of lung cancer is low in most African countries, but it is increasing. In addition to tobacco smoking, a number of aetiological factors have been identified for lung cancer: indoor exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, cooking oil vapour, coal burning or radon, outdoor air pollution and occupational exposure to asbestos and other carcinogens. Recent studies have shown that dietary factors may be important, with high consumption of vegetables and fruits being protective, while preserved foods and fatty foods are harmful, and certain infections such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, human papillomavirus and Microsporum canis are associated with a high risk of lung cancer. Among non-smokers, the probable role of genetic predisposition in lung cancer by increasing the individual's susceptibility to environmental carcinogens is currently being studied actively. As the single most important cause for lung cancer is tobacco smoke and, with increased sales, a major epidemic is predicted for both Asia and Africa, all health care professionals, government health authorities and national and international health organizations must join in a concerted effort against tobacco. 135 refs.

  9. High affective risk perception is associated with more lung cancer-specific distress in CT screening for lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunge, Eveline M.; van den Bergh, Karien A. M.; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise; van Klaveren, Rob J.; de Koning, Harry J.

    2008-01-01

    Screening for cancer can cause distress. People who perceive their risk of cancer as high may be more vulnerable to distress. This study evaluated whether participants of a lung cancer Computed Tomography (CT) screening trial with a high affective risk perception of developing lung cancer had a

  10. Differential Serum Cytokine Levels and Risk of Lung Cancer Between African and European Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Sharon R; Mechanic, Leah E; Enewold, Lindsey; Bowman, Elise D; Ryan, Bríd M; Cote, Michele L; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Loffredo, Christopher A; Olivo-Marston, Susan; Chaturvedi, Anil; Caporaso, Neil E; Schwartz, Ann G; Harris, Curtis C

    2016-03-01

    African Americans have a higher risk of developing lung cancer than European Americans. Previous studies suggested that certain circulating cytokines were associated with lung cancer. We hypothesized that variations in serum cytokine levels exist between African Americans and European Americans, and increased circulating cytokine levels contribute to lung cancer differently in the two races. Differences in 10 serum cytokine levels, IL1β, IL4, IL5, IL6, IL8, IL10, IL12, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, IFNγ, and TNFα, between 170 African-American and 296 European-American controls from the National Cancer Institute-Maryland (NCI-MD) case-control study were assessed. Associations of the serum cytokine levels with lung cancer were analyzed. Statistically significant results were replicated in the prospective Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial and the Wayne State University Karmanos Cancer Institute case-control study. Six cytokines, IL4, IL5, IL8, IL10, IFNγ, and TNFα, were significantly higher among European-American as compared with African-American controls. Elevated IL6 and IL8 levels were associated with lung cancer among both races in all three studies. Elevated IL1β, IL10, and TNFα levels were associated with lung cancer only among African Americans. The association between elevated TNFα levels and lung cancer among European Americans was significant after adjustment for additional factors. Serum cytokine levels vary by race and might contribute to lung cancer differently between African Americans and European Americans. Future work examining risk prediction models of lung cancer can measure circulating cytokines to accurately characterize risk within racial groups. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. CLPTM1L polymorphism and lung cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Min; Bian, Xiaonian; Zhao, Qiuliang

    2015-01-01

    The association of Cleft Lip and Palate Transmembrane Protein 1 (CLPTM1L) rs31489 polymorphism with risk of lung cancer has been evaluated in many studies; however, the results from these studies are controversial. Thus, further analysis on association between CLPTM1L rs31489 polymorphism and risk of lung cancer is needed among a larger study population. A literature search in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Science Direct, SpringerLink, EBSCO, Wanfang, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases was carried out to identify studies investigating the association between lung cancer risk and CLPTM1L rs31489 polymorphism. The strength of the association between CLPTM1L rs31489 polymorphism and lung cancer risk was estimated by calculating odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In the overall analysis, there was significant association between CLPTM1L rs31489 polymorphism and lung cancer risk under an allele model (OR = 1.12; 95% CI, 1.06-1.18; P < 0.00001; I(2) = 57%). Subgroup analysis by ethnicity was performed. Stratified analysis by ethnicity showed that a statistically increased cancer risk was found in the Caucasian population (OR = 1.15; 95% CI, 1.10-1.21; P < 0.00001; I(2) = 22%), but there was no significant association between lung cancer risk and CLPTM1L rs31489 polymorphism in the Asian population (OR = 1.03; 95% CI, 0.97-1.08; P = 0.37; I(2) = 15%). In conclusion, this meta-analysis demonstrates that CLPTM1L rs31489 polymorphism significantly modified the risk of lung cancer.

  12. History of allergic diseases and lung cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zein, Mariam; Parent, Marie-Elise; Siemiatycki, Jack; Rousseau, Marie-Claude

    2014-03-01

    The exact nature and direction of the association between a history of allergic diseases and lung cancer risk remain controversial. To examine the association between self-reported history of allergic diseases and lung cancer using data from a population-based case-control study conducted in the Montreal metropolitan area (1996-2002). The study is based on interview data collected from 1,169 incident lung cancer cases and 1,486 controls. Separate logistic regression models were used to estimate the relative risk of lung cancer, using odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), in subjects with vs without asthma, eczema, or hay fever after adjustment for several sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, including smoking. For asthma, the OR was 0.90 (95% CI 0.65-1.24), which decreased to 0.76 (95% CI 0.54-1.08) for subjects whose onset was more than 2 years before lung cancer diagnosis or interview and then to 0.64 (95% CI 0.44-0.93) when restricted to subjects who reported using medication for their asthma. For eczema, the point estimate was 0.73 (95% CI 0.48-1.12), which decreased to 0.63 (95% CI 0.38-1.07) when considering eczema only in those who reported medication use. Hay fever showed the strongest inverse association with lung cancer (OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.24-0.59). All 3 allergic diseases examined were inversely associated with lung cancer, although the strength of the protective effect varied. History of allergic diseases seems to have a protective role in lung cancer incidence, after consideration of potential confounders, including lifetime smoking history. Copyright © 2014 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Occupational lung cancer risk among men in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preller, L; Balder, H F; Tielemans, E; van den Brandt, P A; Goldbohm, R A

    2008-04-01

    To assess male lung cancer risks for industrial sectors in the Netherlands and to estimate the proportion of lung cancer attributed to working in specific industrial sectors. Associations were studied among men aged 55-69 years (n = 58 279) from the prospective Netherlands Cohort Study. 1920 incident lung cancer cases were available after 11.3 years of follow-up. Based on a case-cohort design, and using Cox proportional hazards models, risks were estimated for blue collar workers in 26 industrial sectors. Adjustment for individual smoking habits affected risk estimates for some sectors, but adjustment for fruit/vegetables and alcohol intake did not. Adjusted for confounders, an increased risk of lung cancer was observed for employment for >/=15 years in blue collar jobs in the "electronics and optical instruments" industry (rate ratio (RR) 1.99; 95% CI 1.18 to 3.35), "construction and homebuilding business" (RR 1.64; 95% CI 1.21 to 2.22) and "railway company" (RR 2.40; 95% CI 1.00 to 5.73). The attributable fraction for working for >/=15 years in these three industries was 5%. In three other sectors there was a statistically non-significant elevated RR of >1.5. Male lung cancer risk is increased in several industrial sectors. Approximately 2000 lung cancer cases between 1986 and 1997 in the 55-69-year-old age group in the Netherlands may be attributable to working for >/=15 years in the three sectors with increased risk. In addition, estimates for occupational lung cancer risks for sectors may be biased if no individual information is available on smoking habits.

  14. Tuberculosis, smoking and risk for lung cancer incidence and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seri; Mok, Yejin; Jeon, Christina; Jee, Sun Ha; Samet, Jonathan M

    2016-12-01

    Among the exposures associated with risk for lung cancer, a history of tuberculosis (TB) is one potentially important factor, given the high prevalence of TB worldwide. A prospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the associations of preexisting pulmonary TB with lung cancer incidence and mortality. The cohort consisted of 1,607,710 Korean adults covered by the National Health Insurance System who had a biennial national medical examination during 1997-2000. During up to 16 years of follow-up, there were 12,819 incident cases of lung cancer and 9,562 lung cancer deaths. Using Cox proportional hazards models and controlling for age, cigarette smoking and other covariates, the presence of underlying TB was significantly associated with increased risk for lung cancer incidence (HR 1.37 in men with 95% CI 1.29-1.45; HR 1.49 in women with 95% CI 1.28-1.74) and mortality (HR 1.43 in men with 95% CI 1.34-1.52; HR 1.53 in women with 95% CI 1.28-1.83). We also observed a dose-response relationship between number of cigarettes smoked daily and lung cancer risk. There was no evidence for synergism between a history of TB and smoking. The elevation in risk is relatively modest, particularly in comparison to that from smoking, and a prior history of TB is not likely to be useful risk indicator for clinical purposes. In populations with high prevalence of TB, it can be considered for incorporation into models for lung cancer risk prediction. © 2016 UICC.

  15. Adverse childhood experiences are associated with the risk of lung cancer: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards Valerie J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strong relationships between exposure to childhood traumatic stressors and smoking behaviours inspire the question whether these adverse childhood experiences (ACEs are associated with an increased risk of lung cancer during adulthood. Methods Baseline survey data on health behaviours, health status and exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs were collected from 17,337 adults during 1995-1997. ACEs included abuse (emotional, physical, sexual, witnessing domestic violence, parental separation or divorce, or growing up in a household where members with mentally ill, substance abusers, or sent to prison. We used the ACE score (an integer count of the 8 categories of ACEs as a measure of cumulative exposure to traumatic stress during childhood. Two methods of case ascertainment were used to identify incident lung cancer through 2005 follow-up: 1 hospital discharge records and 2 mortality records obtained from the National Death Index. Results The ACE score showed a graded relationship to smoking behaviors. We identified 64 cases of lung cancer through hospital discharge records (age-standardized risk = 201 × 100,000-1 population and 111 cases of lung cancer through mortality records (age-standardized mortality rate = 31.1 × 100,000-1 person-years. The ACE score also showed a graded relationship to the incidence of lung cancer for cases identified through hospital discharge (P = 0.0004, mortality (P = 0.025, and both methods combined (P = 0.001. Compared to persons without ACEs, the risk of lung cancer for those with ≥ 6 ACEs was increased approximately 3-fold (hospital records: RR = 3.18, 95%CI = 0.71-14.15; mortality records: RR = 3.55, 95%CI = 1.25-10.09; hospital or mortality records: RR = 2.70, 95%CI = 0.94-7.72. After a priori consideration of a causal pathway (i.e., ACEs → smoking → lung cancer, risk ratios were attenuated toward the null, although not completely. For lung cancer identified through hospital

  16. Lung cancer mortality risk among breast cancer patients treated with anti-estrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchardy, Christine; Benhamou, Simone; Schaffar, Robin; Verkooijen, Helena M; Fioretta, Gerald; Schubert, Hyma; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Soria, Jean-Charles; Vlastos, Georges; Rapiti, Elisabetta

    2011-03-15

    The Women's Health Initiative randomized clinical trial reported that menopausal hormone therapy increases lung cancer mortality risk. If this is true, use of anti-estrogens should be associated with decreased lung cancer mortality risk. The authors compared lung cancer incidence and mortality among breast cancer patients with and without anti-estrogen therapy. Our study included all 6655 women diagnosed with breast cancer between 1980 and 2003 and registered at the Geneva Cancer Registry. Among these women, 46% (3066) received anti-estrogens. All women were followed for occurrence and death from lung cancer until December 2007. The authors compared incidence and mortality rates among patients with and without anti-estrogens with those expected in the general population by Standardized Incidence Ratios (SIRs) and Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs). After a total of 57,257 person-years, 40 women developed lung cancer. SIRs for lung cancer were not significantly decreased among breast cancer patients with and without anti-estrogens (0.63, 95% confidence intervals [CI], 0.33-1.10; and 1.12, 95% CI, 0.74-1.62, respectively) while SMR was decreased among women with anti-estrogens (0.13, 95% CI, 0.02-0.47, P<.001) but not for women without anti-estrogens (0.76, 95% CI, 0.43-1.23). Compared with expected outcomes in the general population, breast cancer patients receiving anti-estrogen treatment for breast cancer had lower lung cancer mortality. This study further supports the hypothesis that estrogen therapy modifies lung cancer prognosis. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  17. Reproductive factors and lung cancer risk among women in the Singapore Breast Cancer Screening Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hui Shan; Tan, Min-Han; Chow, Khuan Yew; Chay, Wen Yee; Lim, Wei-Yen

    2015-12-01

    A growing body of literature suggests that female hormones play a role in lung cancer risk. Our study aims to examine the relationship between reproductive factors and lung cancer incidence in a large prospectively enrolled cohort in Singapore. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of lung cancer for each exposure, adjusting for smoking, age at entry, ethnicity and body mass index. Among 28,222 women aged 50-64 years enrolled in the Singapore Breast Cancer Screening Project from October 1994 to February 1997, we identified 311 incident lung cancer cases (253 in non-smokers) over an average of 15.8 years of follow-up to 31 December 2011. Higher parity was associated with decreased lung cancer risk. Compared with nulliparous women, those with 1-2, 3-4, and ≥5 deliveries had a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.56, 0.55 and 0.45, respectively (P(trend)cancer. Our findings add to the existing evidence that parous women have a lower lung cancer risk than nulliparous women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Potentially malignant oral disorders and high-risk habits in liver cirrhosis and lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salarić, I; Povrzanović, I; Brajdić, D; Lukšić, I; Macan, D

    2015-04-01

    To analyze the role of smoking, drinking, and their synergistic effect in the occurrence of potentially malignant oral disorders (PMOD). We examined three groups: 50 patients with lung cancer, 50 patients with liver cirrhosis, and 50 patients with clear medical history. Scores were developed for drinking, smoking, drinking & smoking, and PMOD. All four scores were the lowest in the control group. The lung cancer group showed the highest Smoking, Alcohol & Smoking and Lesions score, while the liver cirrhosis group had the Alcohol score the highest. Compared with the control group, lung cancer group is more likely to develop a PMOD than the liver cirrhosis group (OR = 12.31/OR = 6.71). Statistical significance between the groups was found in the Lesions score (χ(2)  = 15.34; P = 0.001). The patients with lung cancer and liver cirrhosis represent a high-risk group for PMOD. Patients with lung cancer and liver cirrhosis have never, to our knowledge, been categorized as high-risk patients for PMOD. After diagnosed, patients with lung cancer and liver cirrhosis should have a routine oral cavity examination, as they present a high-risk group for PMOD and oral cancer. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Development and validation of a lung cancer risk prediction model for African-Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzel, Carol J; Kachroo, Sumesh; Liu, Mei; D'Amelio, Anthony; Dong, Qiong; Cote, Michele L; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Hong, Waun Ki; Greisinger, Anthony J; Schwartz, Ann G; Spitz, Margaret R

    2008-09-01

    Because existing risk prediction models for lung cancer were developed in white populations, they may not be appropriate for predicting risk among African-Americans. Therefore, a need exists to construct and validate a risk prediction model for lung cancer that is specific to African-Americans. We analyzed data from 491 African-Americans with lung cancer and 497 matched African-American controls to identify specific risks and incorporate them into a multivariable risk model for lung cancer and estimate the 5-year absolute risk of lung cancer. We performed internal and external validations of the risk model using data on additional cases and controls from the same ongoing multiracial/ethnic lung cancer case-control study from which the model-building data were obtained as well as data from two different lung cancer studies in metropolitan Detroit, respectively. We also compared our African-American model with our previously developed risk prediction model for whites. The final risk model included smoking-related variables [smoking status, pack-years smoked, age at smoking cessation (former smokers), and number of years since smoking cessation (former smokers)], self-reported physician diagnoses of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or hay fever, and exposures to asbestos or wood dusts. Our risk prediction model for African-Americans exhibited good discrimination [75% (95% confidence interval, 0.67-0.82)] for our internal data and moderate discrimination [63% (95% confidence interval, 0.57-0.69)] for the external data group, which is an improvement over the Spitz model for white subjects. Existing lung cancer prediction models may not be appropriate for predicting risk for African-Americans because (a) they were developed using white populations, (b) level of risk is different for risk factors that African-American share with whites, and (c) unique group-specific risk factors exist for African-Americans. This study developed and validated a risk prediction model

  20. Ambient air pollution as a risk factor for lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    COHEN AARON J

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic studies over the last 40 years have observed that general ambient air pollution, chiefly due to the by- products of the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, is associated with small relative increases in lung cancer. The evidence derives from studies of lung cancer trends, studies of occupational groups, comparisons of urban and rural populations, and case-control and cohort studies using diverse exposure metrics. Recent prospective cohort studies observed 30-50% increases in the risk of lung cancer in relation to approximately a doubling of respirable particle exposure. While these data reflect the effects of exposures in past decades, and despite some progress in reducing air pollution, large numbers of people in the US continue to be exposed to pollutant mixtures containing known or suspected carcinogens. These observations suggest that the most widely cited estimates of the proportional contribution of air pollution to lung cancer occurrence in the US, based largely on the results of animal experimentation, may be too low. It is important that better epidemiologic research be conducted to allow improved estimates of lung cancer risk from air pollution in the general population. The development and application of new epidemiologic methods, particularly the improved characterization of population-wide exposure to mixtures of air pollutants and the improved design of ecologic studies, could improve our ability to measure accurately the magnitude of excess cancer related to air pollution.

  1. Risk factors of postoperative pneumonia after lung cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Yeon; Jin, Sang-Man; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Byoung Jun; Kang, Chang-Hyun; Yim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Young Tae; Yang, Seok-Chul; Yoo, Chul-Gyu; Han, Sung Koo; Kim, Joo Hyun; Shim, Young Soo; Kim, Young Whan

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors of postoperative pneumonia (POP) after lung cancer surgery. The 417 lung cancer patients who underwent surgical resection in a tertiary referral hospital were included. Clinical, radiological and laboratory data were reviewed retrospectively. Male and female ratio was 267:150 (median age, 65 yr). The incidence of POP was 6.2% (26 of 417) and in-hospital mortality was 27% among those patients. By univariate analysis, age ≥ 70 yr (P POP. Multivariate analysis showed that age ≥ 70 yr (OR = 3.563, P = 0.014), intraoperative RBC transfusion (OR = 4.669, P = 0.033), the presence of postoperative complications other than pneumonia (OR = 3.032, P = 0.046), and FEV(1)/FVC POP. In conclusion, patients with advanced age, intraoperative RBC transfusion, postoperative complications other than pneumonia and a decreased FEV(1)/FVC ratio have a higher risk for pneumonia after lung cancer surgery.

  2. [Genetic polymorphisms and lung cancer risk: a case-control study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Massa, Ana E; Alonso-Sardón, Montserrat; Menacho-Miguel, José Antonio; Mirón-Canelo, José Antonio; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio

    2014-08-04

    The smoke fume, principal factor in the development of lung cancer, causes the expression of certain cytokines, including interleukin 4, 6, 8 and 10, which may act by inhibiting apoptosis and interfere cellular repair mechanisms and angiogenesis. To determine the possible relationship between gene polymorphisms of these cytokines and lung cancer. To achieve this objective we designed a case-control study, which included 400 patients who had come to the consultation for rapid diagnosis of lung cancer at the Pneumology Department, University Hospital of Salamanca, and whose main criterion exclusion was the lack of active contact with smoke fume. Patients were divided into 2 groups, each consisting of 200 patients: cases (patients diagnosed with lung cancer) and controls (patients without lung cancer). A percentage of 62.8 of men were former smokers at diagnosis compared with 55.5% of women, although the former still had a greater cumulative consumption. Squamous cell carcinoma predominated in diagnosis (48.9% of patients) and more than half were in advanced stages (28.5% in stage iiiB and 25.5% in stage iv). No statistical significance was observed by linking the existence of tumor to the prevalence of any of the analyzed polymorphisms. Polymorphisms in the study did not modify the risk of developing lung cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Risk prediction models for selection of lung cancer screening candidates: A retrospective validation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Ten Haaf

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Selection of candidates for lung cancer screening based on individual risk has been proposed as an alternative to criteria based on age and cumulative smoking exposure (pack-years. Nine previously established risk models were assessed for their ability to identify those most likely to develop or die from lung cancer. All models considered age and various aspects of smoking exposure (smoking status, smoking duration, cigarettes per day, pack-years smoked, time since smoking cessation as risk predictors. In addition, some models considered factors such as gender, race, ethnicity, education, body mass index, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emphysema, personal history of cancer, personal history of pneumonia, and family history of lung cancer.Retrospective analyses were performed on 53,452 National Lung Screening Trial (NLST participants (1,925 lung cancer cases and 884 lung cancer deaths and 80,672 Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO ever-smoking participants (1,463 lung cancer cases and 915 lung cancer deaths. Six-year lung cancer incidence and mortality risk predictions were assessed for (1 calibration (graphically by comparing the agreement between the predicted and the observed risks, (2 discrimination (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] between individuals with and without lung cancer (death, and (3 clinical usefulness (net benefit in decision curve analysis by identifying risk thresholds at which applying risk-based eligibility would improve lung cancer screening efficacy. To further assess performance, risk model sensitivities and specificities in the PLCO were compared to those based on the NLST eligibility criteria. Calibration was satisfactory, but discrimination ranged widely (AUCs from 0.61 to 0.81. The models outperformed the NLST eligibility criteria over a substantial range of risk thresholds in decision curve analysis, with a higher sensitivity for all models and a

  4. Welding, a risk factor of lung cancer: the ICARE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrat, Mireille; Guida, Florence; Mattei, Francesca; Cénée, Sylvie; Cyr, Diane; Févotte, Joëlle; Sanchez, Marie; Menvielle, Gwenn; Radoï, Loredana; Schmaus, Annie; Woronoff, Anne-Sophie; Luce, Danièle; Stücker, Isabelle

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between lung cancer and occupational exposure to welding activity in ICARE, a population-based case-control study. Analyses were restricted to men (2276 cases, 2780 controls). Welding exposure was assessed through detailed questionnaires, including lifelong occupational history. ORs were computed using unconditional logistic regression, adjusted for lifelong cigarette smoking and occupational exposure to asbestos. Among the regular welders, welding was associated with a risk of lung cancer (OR=1.7, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.5), which increased with the duration (OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.0 to 3.9 when duration >10 years), and was maximum 10-20 years since last welding. The risk was more pronounced in case of gas welding (OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.3), when the workpiece was covered by paint, grease, or other substances (OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.4) and when it was cleaned with chemical substances before welding. No statistically significant increase in lung cancer risk was observed among occasional welders. Although these results should be confirmed, we showed that type of welding and mode of workpiece preparation are important determinants of the lung cancer risk in regular welders. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Alcohol consumption and lung cancer risk in never smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio García-Lavandeira

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: No clear effect is observed for alcohol consumption. Due to the limited evidence, no conclusion can be drawn for beer or wine consumption. There is little research available on the effect of alcohol on lung cancer risk for people who have never smoked, and more studies are urgently needed on this topic.

  6. Visual assessment of early emphysema and interstitial abnormalities on CT is useful in lung cancer risk analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wille, Mathilde M. W.; Thomsen, Laura H.; Petersen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Screening for lung cancer should be limited to a high-risk-population, and abnormalities in low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening images may be relevant for predicting the risk of lung cancer. Our aims were to compare the occurrence of visually detected emphysema and interstitial...... abnormalities in subjects with and without lung cancer in a screening population of smokers. Methods: Low-dose chest CT examinations (baseline and latest possible) of 1990 participants from The Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial were independently evaluated by two observers who scored emphysema and interstitial...... abnormalities. Emphysema (lung density) was also measured quantitatively. Results: Emphysema was seen more frequently and its extent was greater among participants with lung cancer on baseline (odds ratio (OR), 1.8, p = 0.017 and p = 0.002) and late examinations (OR 2.6, p

  7. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and lung cancer risk in never-smoking postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Song, Xiaoling; Beresford, Shirley A A; Ho, Gloria Y F; Johnson, Karen C; Datta, Mridul; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Qi, Lihong; Neuhouser, Marian L

    2017-10-01

    Vitamin D has been implicated in lowering lung cancer risk, but serological data on the association among never-smoking women are limited. We report results examining the association of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations with lung cancer risk among female never smokers. We also examined whether the association was modified by vitamin D supplementation and serum vitamin A concentrations. In the Women's Health Initiative, including the calcium/vitamin D (CaD) Trial, we selected 298 incident cases [191 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) including 170 adenocarcinoma] and 298 matched controls of never smokers. Baseline serum 25(OH)D was assayed by a chemiluminescent method. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for quartiles and predefined clinical cutoffs of serum 25(OH)D concentrations. Comparing quartiles 4 versus 1 of serum 25(OH)D concentrations, ORs were 1.06 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61-1.84] for all lung cancer, 0.94 (95% CI 0.52-1.69) for NSCLC, and 0.91 (95% CI 0.49-1.68) for adenocarcinoma. Comparing serum 25(OH)D ≥ 75 (high) versus never-smoking postmenopausal women, the results did not support the hypothesis of an association between serum 25(OH)D and lung cancer risk.

  8. A Cohort Study on Risk Factors of Lung Cancer in Yunnan Tin Miners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong JIANG

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Smoking is a major cause of lung cancer. Studies of lung cancer among miners have shown that occupational exposure also played an important role. The aim of this study is to investigate radon, cigarette use and other risk factors of lung cancer in Yunnan tin miners and to provide a scientific basis for the prevention and control of occupational lung cancer. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted among Yunnan tin miners, the associations between potential risk factors for lung cancer were analyzed by multivariate Cox regression model. Effects of age at first radon exposure and radon exposure rate on lung cancer risk were analyzed. The relationship between cumulative working level month and lung cancer was analyzed according to smoking status. The joint effect of tobacco use and cumulative radon exposure was analyzed based on additive and multiplicative models. Results Increased risk of lung cancer was associated with age at enrollment, tobacco use, prior bronchitis, and cumulative arsenic and radon exposure, while higher education level was associated with decreased lung cancer risk. An inverse effect of radon exposure rate was observed. There was no significant association between lung cancer risk and first radon exposure age. There was a significant additive interaction between tobacco use and radon exposure on lung cancer risk. Conclusion Several risk factors may contribute to the high incidence of lung cancer in Yunnan tin miners. Further studies are warranted to evaluate joint effect of different risk factors.

  9. Helicobacter pylori seropositivity and risk of lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Koshiol

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a risk factor for distal stomach cancer, and a few small studies have suggested that H. pylori may be a potential risk factor for lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a study of 350 lung adenocarcinoma cases, 350 squamous cell carcinoma cases, and 700 controls nested within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC cohort of male Finnish smokers. Controls were one-to-one matched by age and date of baseline serum draw. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to detect immunoglobulin G antibodies against H. pylori whole-cell and cytotoxin-associated gene (CagA antigens, we calculated odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs for associations between H. pylori seropositivity and lung cancer risk using conditional logistic regression. H. pylori seropositivity was detected in 79.7% of cases and 78.5% of controls. After adjusting for pack-years and cigarettes smoked per day, H. pylori seropositivity was not associated with either adenocarcinoma (OR: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.75-1.6 or squamous cell carcinoma (OR: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.77-1.7. Results were similar for CagA-negative and CagA-positive H. pylori seropositivity. Despite earlier small studies suggesting that H. pylori may contribute to lung carcinogenesis, H. pylori seropositivity does not appear to be associated with lung cancer.

  10. Serum selenium level and risk of lung cancer mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suadicani, P; Hein, H O; Gyntelberg, F

    2011-01-01

    Serum selenium has been implicated as a risk factor for lung cancer, but the issue remains unsettled. We tested in a cohort of 3,333 males aged 53 to 74 years the hypothesis that a low serum selenium would be associated with an increased risk of lung cancer mortality.During 16 years, 167 subjects(5.......1%) died from lung cancer; 48 males (5.0%) among males with low serum selenium, 0.4-1.0 μmol·l(-1), n=965, 57 males (5.1%) among males with medium serum selenium, 1.1-1.2 μmol·l(-1), n=1,141, and 62 males (5.1%) among males with high serum selenium, 1.3-3.0 μmol·l(-1), n=1,227. After adjustment for age...... (chronic bronchitis and peak flow), referencing the lowest level of serum selenium HRs were 1.17(0.79-1.75), and 1.43(0.96-2.14), respectively. Among heavy smokers a high serum selenium was associated with a significantly increased risk of lung cancer mortality after taking into account all potential...

  11. Smoky coal, tobacco smoking, and lung cancer risk in Xuanwei, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Christopher; Chapman, Robert S.; Hu, Wei; He, Xingzhou; Hosgood, H. Dean; Liu, Larry Z.; Lai, Hong; Chen, Wei; Silverman, Debra T.; Vermeulen, Roel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Tian, Linwei; Bassig, Bryan; Shen, Min; Zhang, Yawei; Ma, Shuangge; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Lung cancer rates in Xuanwei are the highest in China. In-home use of smoky coal has been associated with lung cancer risk, and the association of smoking and lung cancer risk strengthened after stove improvement. Here, we explored the differential association of tobacco use and lung

  12. Alcohol consumption and risk of lung cancer: A pooled analysis of cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freudenheim, J.L.; Ritz, J.; Smith-Warner, S.A.; Albanes, D.; Bandera, E.V.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Colditz, G.; Feskanich, D.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Harnack, L.; Miller, A.B.; Rimm, E.; Rohan, T.E.; Sellers, T.A.; Virtamo, J.; Willett, W.C.; Hunter, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Although smoking is the primary cause of lung cancer, much is unknown about lung cancer etiology, including risk determinants for nonsmokers and modifying factors for smokers. Objective: We hypothesized that alcohol consumption contributes to lung cancer risk. Design: We conducted a

  13. Gender and smoking-related risk of lung cancer. The Copenhagen Center for Prospective Population Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, E; Osler, M; Hein, H O

    1998-01-01

    associated with smoking, with the largest RR seen for squamous cell carcinoma and anaplastic carcinoma. This prospective population-based study does not confirm previous reports from case-control studies of a higher relative risk in women than in men for lung cancer associated with smoking.......Our aim was to compare risk of lung cancer associated with smoking by gender and histologic type. A total of 30,874 subjects, 44% women, from three prospective population-based studies with initial examinations between 1964 and 1992 were followed until 1994 through the National Cancer Registry...... smokers with more than 60 pack-years of tobacco exposure. RRs did not differ much between men and women: adjusted for pack-years, age, and study population, the ratio between female and male smokers' RRs of developing lung cancer was 0.8 (95% confidence interval = 0.3-2.1). All histologic types were...

  14. Identifying high risk individuals for targeted lung cancer screening: Independent validation of the PLCOm2012 risk prediction tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Marianne; Yap, Sarsha; Goldsbury, David; Manners, David; Tammemagi, Martin; Marshall, Henry; Brims, Fraser; McWilliams, Annette; Fong, Kwun; Kang, Yoon Jung; Caruana, Michael; Banks, Emily; Canfell, Karen

    2017-07-15

    Lung cancer screening with computerised tomography holds promise, but optimising the balance of benefits and harms via selection of a high risk population is critical. PLCOm2012 is a logistic regression model based on U.S. data, incorporating sociodemographic and health factors, which predicts 6-year lung cancer risk among ever-smokers, and thus may better predict those who might benefit from screening than criteria based solely on age and smoking history. We aimed to validate the performance of PLCOm2012 in predicting lung cancer outcomes in a cohort of Australian smokers. Predicted risk of lung cancer was calculated using PLCOm2012 applied to baseline data from 95,882 ever-smokers aged ≥45 years in the 45 and Up Study (2006-2009). Predictions were compared to lung cancer outcomes captured to June 2014 via linkage to population-wide health databases; a total of 1,035 subsequent lung cancer diagnoses were identified. PLCOm2012 had good discrimination (area under the receiver-operating-characteristic-curve; AUC 0.80, 95%CI 0.78-0.81) and excellent calibration (mean and 90th percentiles of absolute risk difference between observed and predicted outcomes: 0.006 and 0.016, respectively). Sensitivity (69.4%, 95%CI, 65.6-73.0%) of the PLCOm2012 criteria in the 55-74 year age group for predicting lung cancers was greater than that using criteria based on ≥30 pack-years smoking and ≤15 years quit (57.3%, 53.3-61.3%; p cancer screening using PLCOm2012 might improve the balance of benefits versus harms, and cost-effectiveness of lung cancer screening. © 2017 UICC.

  15. Index-based dietary patterns and risk of lung cancer in the NIH-AARP diet and health study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anic, G M; Park, Y; Subar, A F; Schap, T E; Reedy, J

    2016-01-01

    Dietary pattern analysis considers combinations of food intake and may offer a better measure to assess diet-cancer associations than examining individual foods or nutrients. Although tobacco exposure is the major risk factor for lung cancer, few studies have examined whether dietary patterns, based on preexisting dietary guidelines, influence lung cancer risk. After controlling for smoking, we examined associations between four diet quality indices-Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010), Alternate Healthy Eating Index-2010 (AHEI-2010), alternate Mediterranean Diet score (aMED) and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-and lung cancer risk in the NIH-AARP (National Institutes of Health-American Association of Retired Persons) Diet and Health study. Baseline dietary intake was assessed in 460 770 participants. Over a median of 10.5 years of follow-up, 9272 incident lung cancer cases occurred. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and confidence intervals (CIs). Comparing highest to lowest quintiles, HRs (95% CIs) for lung cancer were as follows: HEI-2010=0.83 (0.77-0.89), AHEI-2010=0.86 (0.80-0.92), aMED=0.85 (0.79-0.91) and DASH=0.84 (0.78-0.90). Among the individual components of the dietary indices, higher consumption of whole grains and fruits was significantly inversely associated with lung cancer risk for several of the diet indices. Total index score analyses stratified by smoking status showed inverse associations with lung cancer for former smokers; however, only HEI-2010 was inversely associated in current smokers and no index score was inversely associated among never smokers. Although smoking is the factor most strongly associated with lung cancer, this study adds to a growing body of evidence that diet may have a modest role in reducing lung cancer risk, especially among former smokers.

  16. Hormone use and risk for lung cancer: a pooled analysis from the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesatori, A C; Carugno, M; Consonni, D; Hung, R J; Papadoupolos, A; Landi, M T; Brenner, H; Müller, H; Harris, C C; Duell, E J; Andrew, A S; McLaughlin, J R; Schwartz, A G; Wenzlaff, A S; Stucker, I

    2013-10-01

    The association between oral contraceptive (OC) use, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and lung cancer risk in women is still debated. We performed a pooled analysis of six case-control studies (1961 cases and 2609 controls) contributing to the International Lung Cancer Consortium. Potential associations were investigated with multivariable unconditional logistic regression and meta-analytic models. Multinomial logistic regressions were performed to investigate lung cancer risk across histologic types. A reduced lung cancer risk was found for OC (odds ratio (OR)=0.81; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.68-0.97) and HRT ever users (OR=0.77; 95% CI: 0.66-0.90). Both oestrogen only and oestrogen+progestin HRT were associated with decreased risk (OR=0.76; 95% CI: 0.61-0.94, and OR=0.66; 95% CI: 0.49-0.88, respectively). No dose-response relationship was observed with years of OC/HRT use. The greatest risk reduction was seen for squamous cell carcinoma (OR=0.53; 95% CI: 0.37-0.76) in OC users and in both adenocarcinoma (OR=0.79; 95% CI: 0.66-0.95) and small cell carcinoma (OR=0.37; 95% CI: 0.19-0.71) in HRT users. No interaction with smoking status or BMI was observed. Our findings suggest that exogenous hormones can play a protective role in lung cancer aetiology. However, given inconsistencies with epidemiological evidence from cohort studies, further and larger investigations are needed for a more comprehensive view of lung cancer development in women.

  17. Visual assessment of early emphysema and interstitial abnormalities on CT is useful in lung cancer risk analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wille, Mathilde M.W.; Dirksen, Asger; Shaker, Saher B. [Gentofte Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hellerup (Denmark); Thomsen, Laura H. [Hvidovre Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hvidovre (Denmark); Petersen, Jens [University of Copenhagen, Department of Computer Science, DIKU, Koebenhavn Oe (Denmark); Bruijne, Marleen de [University of Copenhagen, Department of Computer Science, DIKU, Koebenhavn Oe (Denmark); Erasmus MC -University Medical Center Rotterdam, Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Departments of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pedersen, Jesper H. [Copenhagen University Hospital, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Koebenhavn Oe (Denmark)

    2016-02-15

    Screening for lung cancer should be limited to a high-risk-population, and abnormalities in low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening images may be relevant for predicting the risk of lung cancer. Our aims were to compare the occurrence of visually detected emphysema and interstitial abnormalities in subjects with and without lung cancer in a screening population of smokers. Low-dose chest CT examinations (baseline and latest possible) of 1990 participants from The Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial were independently evaluated by two observers who scored emphysema and interstitial abnormalities. Emphysema (lung density) was also measured quantitatively. Emphysema was seen more frequently and its extent was greater among participants with lung cancer on baseline (odds ratio (OR), 1.8, p = 0.017 and p = 0.002) and late examinations (OR 2.6, p < 0.001 and p < 0.001). No significant difference was found using quantitative measurements. Interstitial abnormalities were more common findings among participants with lung cancer (OR 5.1, p < 0.001 and OR 4.5, p < 0.001).There was no association between presence of emphysema and presence of interstitial abnormalities (OR 0.75, p = 0.499). Even early signs of emphysema and interstitial abnormalities are associated with lung cancer. Quantitative measurements of emphysema - regardless of type - do not show the same association. (orig.)

  18. Racial differences in cancer risk among relatives of patients with early onset lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naff, Jessica L; Coté, Michele L; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Schwartz, Ann G

    2007-05-01

    Relatives of patients with early onset lung cancer are at increased risk for lung cancer, and this risk varies by race. This study evaluates whether first-degree relatives of patients with early onset lung cancer are at increased risk for cancer at sites other than lung. Family histories were ascertained from 673 lung cancer patients < 50 years of age identified from the Metropolitan Detroit Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results program, and 773 age-, race-, and sex-matched control subjects were obtained via random-digit dialing. Data were collected for 3,556 case relatives (mothers, fathers, and siblings) and 3,943 control relatives, and unconditional logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Among case relatives, African Americans were 2.44-fold more likely to have head and neck cancers and 1.86-fold more likely to have any tobacco-related cancer compared to white case relatives (95% CI, 1.04 to 5.69% and 95% CI, 1.25 to 2.76, respectively). African-American case relatives were at increased risk for head and neck cancers (OR, 13.42; 95% CI, 1.65 to 109.01), all tobacco-related cancers (OR, 3.77; 95% CI, 2.16 to 6.55), tobacco-related cancers other than lung (OR, 4.10; 95% CI, 1.56 to 10.79), and cancer at any site (OR, 1.45, 95% CI, 1.04 to 2.02) compared to African-American control relatives. These results can be used to counsel family members of patients with early onset lung cancer, and suggest target populations for preventive strategies, including smoking cessation and appropriate screening.

  19. Association between GSTM1 Genetic Polymorphism and Lung Cancer Risk by SYBR Green I Real-time PCR Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua ZHOU

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1 is an important phase II metabolic enzyme gene which involves metabolism of various carcinogens in human body. Many studies showed that GSTM1 genetic polymorphism was associated with lung cancer risk. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between GSTM1 genetic polymorphism and lung cancer risk among Han nationality population in Tianjin district. Methods GSTM1 genetic polymorphism was detected by melting curve analysis of SYBR green I real-time PCR assay. Two hundred and sixty-five histological confirmed lung cancer patients and 307 health controls were recruited in this case-control study and the relationship between GSTM1 genetic polymorphism and lung cancer risk was investigated. Results (1 The frequency of the GSTM1(- in lung cancer and control groups was 56.6% and 57.0% respectively, and no significant difference was found between the distribution of the GSTM1(- genotype in the two groups (χ2=0.831, P=0.362. (2 When considered the GSTM1(+ genotype as reference, there was no overall statistically increased lung cancer risk for carriers with the GSTM1(- genotype adjusted by age, gender and smoking status (OR=0.840, 95%CI: 0.578-1.221, P=0.362. (3 The frequency of the GSTM1(- genotype for squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, SCLC and other histological types was 65.8%, 48.5%, 47.8% and 52.2% respectively, compared with the control group, no statistically increased lung cancer risk was observed (P>0.05. Conclusion No evidence is found between GSTM1 genetic polymorphism and lung cancer risk among Han nationality population in Tianjin district.

  20. Interaction of cytochrome P4501A1 genotypes with other risk factors and susceptibility to lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Parag P.; Singh, Arvind P.; Singh, Madhu; Mathur, Neeraj [Developmental Toxicology Division, Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, P.O. Box 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India); Pant, Mohan C. [Department of Radiotherapy, King George' s Medical University, Shahmina Road, Lucknow 226001 (India); Mishra, Bhartendu N. [Department of Biotechnology, IET, Sitapur Road, Lucknow 226021 (India); Parmar, Devendra [Developmental Toxicology Division, Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, P.O. Box 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India)], E-mail: parmar_devendra@hotmail.com

    2008-03-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of death throughout the world with cigarette smoking being established as the major etiological factor in lung cancer. Since not much information is available regarding the polymorphism in drug metabolizing enzymes and lung cancer risk in the Indian population, the present case-control study attempted to investigate the association of polymorphisms in cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and glutathione-S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) with risk to squamous cell carcinoma of lung malignancy. Patients suffering from lung cancer (n = 200) and visiting OPD facility of Department of Radiotherapy, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, were included in the study. Equal number (n = 200) of age and sex matched healthy individuals were also enrolled in the study. Our data revealed that the variant genotypes of CYP1A1*2A, CYP1A1*2C and CYP1A1*4 were found to be over represented in the lung cancer patients when compared to controls. CYP1A1*2A variant genotypes (combined heterozygous and mutant genotypes) revealed significant association towards the lung cancer risk (OR: 1.93, 95%CI: 1.28-2.89, p = 0.002). Likewise, GSTM1 null genotypes were found to be over represented in patients when compared to controls. Haplotype analysis revealed that CYP1A1 haplotype, C-G-C increased the lung cancer risk (OR: 3.90, 95%CI: 1.00-15.04, p = 0.025) in the patients. The lung cancer risk was increased several two-to fourfold in the patients carrying the genotype combinations of CYP1A1*2A and GSTM1 suggesting the role of gene-gene interaction in lung cancer. Cigarette smoking or tobacco chewing or alcohol consumption was also found to interact with CYP1A1 genotypes in increasing the risk to lung cancer further demonstrating the role of gene-environment interaction in development of lung cancer.

  1. Sleep duration and risk of lung cancer in the physicians' health study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Owais; Petrone, Andrew B; Aleem, Sohaib; Manzoor, Kamran; Gaziano, John M; Djousse, Luc

    2014-09-20

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer and cancer related cause of death worldwide. However, the association between sleep duration and incident lung cancer has not been investigated in a prospective cohort study. We prospectively examined the association between sleep duration and incident lung cancer in a cohort of 21,026 United States (US) male physicians. Self-reported sleep duration was ascertained during 2002 annual follow-up questionnaire. Incident lung cancer was ascertained through yearly follow-up questionnaires. Cox regression was used to estimate relative risk of incident lung cancer. The average age at baseline was 68.3±8.8 yr. During a mean follow up of 7.5 (±2.2) yr, 150 cases of lung cancer occurred. Using 7 h of sleep as the reference group, multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (95%CI) for lung cancer were 1.18 (0.77-1.82), 1.0 (ref), and 0.97 (0.67-1.41) from lowest to the highest category of sleep duration (P for quadratic trend 0.697), respectively. In a secondary analysis, smoking status did not modify the sleep duration-lung cancer association (P=0.78). There was no evidence for an interaction between sleep duration and sleep apnea on the risk of lung cancer either (P=0.65). Our data failed to show a higher risk of lung cancer in association with altered sleep duration among US male physicians.

  2. Obesity, metabolic factors and risk of different histological types of lung cancer : a Mendelian randomization study

    OpenAIRE

    Carreras-Torres, R.; Johansson, M.; Haycock, P.C.; Wade, K.H.; Relton, C. L.; Martin, R. M.; Davey Smith, G.; Albanes, D.; Aldrich, M.C.; Andrew, A; Arnold, S. M.; Bickeböller, H; Bojesen, S. E.; Brunnström, H.; Manjer, J.

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundAssessing the relationship between lung cancer and metabolic conditions is challenging because of the confounding effect of tobacco. Mendelian randomization (MR), or the use of genetic instrumental variables to assess causality, may help to identify the metabolic drivers of lung cancer.Methods and findingsWe identified genetic instruments for potential metabolic risk factors and evaluated these in relation to risk using 29,266 lung cancer cases (including 11,273 adenocarcinomas, 7,4...

  3. CHRNA5 Risk Variant Predicts Delayed Smoking Cessation and Earlier Lung Cancer Diagnosis—A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Rayjean J.; Baker, Timothy; Horton, Amy; Culverhouse, Rob; Saccone, Nancy; Cheng, Iona; Deng, Bo; Han, Younghun; Hansen, Helen M.; Horsman, Janet; Kim, Claire; Lutz, Sharon; Rosenberger, Albert; Aben, Katja K.; Andrew, Angeline S.; Breslau, Naomi; Chang, Shen-Chih; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Dienemann, Hendrik; Frederiksen, Brittni; Han, Jiali; Hatsukami, Dorothy K.; Johnson, Eric O.; Pande, Mala; Wrensch, Margaret R.; McLaughlin, John; Skaug, Vidar; van der Heijden, Henricus F.; Wampfler, Jason; Wenzlaff, Angela; Woll, Penella; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh; Bickeböller, Heike; Brenner, Hermann; Duell, Eric J.; Haugen, Aage; Heinrich, Joachim; Hokanson, John E.; Hunter, David J.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Lazarus, Philip; Le Marchand, Loic; Liu, Geoffrey; Mayordomo, Jose; Risch, Angela; Schwartz, Ann G.; Teare, Dawn; Wu, Xifeng; Wiencke, John K.; Yang, Ping; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Spitz, Margaret R.; Kraft, Peter; Amos, Christopher I.; Bierut, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent meta-analyses show strong evidence of associations among genetic variants in CHRNA5 on chromosome 15q25, smoking quantity, and lung cancer. This meta-analysis tests whether the CHRNA5 variant rs16969968 predicts age of smoking cessation and age of lung cancer diagnosis. Methods: Meta-analyses examined associations between rs16969968, age of quitting smoking, and age of lung cancer diagnosis in 24 studies of European ancestry (n = 29 072). In each dataset, we used Cox regression models to evaluate the association between rs16969968 and the two primary phenotypes (age of smoking cessation among ever smokers and age of lung cancer diagnosis among lung cancer case patients) and the secondary phenotype of smoking duration. Heterogeneity across studies was assessed with the Cochran Q test. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: The rs16969968 allele (A) was associated with a lower likelihood of smoking cessation (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.91 to 0.98, P = .0042), and the AA genotype was associated with a four-year delay in median age of quitting compared with the GG genotype. Among smokers with lung cancer diagnoses, the rs16969968 genotype (AA) was associated with a four-year earlier median age of diagnosis compared with the low-risk genotype (GG) (HR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.12, P = 1.1*10–5). Conclusion: These data support the clinical significance of the CHRNA5 variant rs16969968. It predicts delayed smoking cessation and an earlier age of lung cancer diagnosis in this meta-analysis. Given the existing evidence that this CHRNA5 variant predicts favorable response to cessation pharmacotherapy, these findings underscore the potential clinical and public health importance of rs16969968 in CHRNA5 in relation to smoking cessation success and lung cancer risk. PMID:25873736

  4. Tobacco and estrogen metabolic polymorphisms and risk of non-small cell lung cancer in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, Michele L; Yoo, Wonsuk; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Prysak, Geoffrey M; Santer, Susan K; Claeys, Gina B; Van Dyke, Alison L; Land, Susan J; Schwartz, Ann G

    2009-04-01

    To explore the potential role for estrogen in lung cancer susceptibility, candidate single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) in tobacco and estrogen metabolism genes were evaluated. Population-based cases (n = 504) included women aged 18-74, diagnosed with NSCLC in metropolitan Detroit between November 2001 and October 2005. Population-based controls (n = 527) were identified through random digit dialing and matched on race and age. Eleven SNPs in 10 different genes were examined in relation to risk: CYP1A1 Msp1, CYP1A1 Ile462Val, CYP1B1 Leu432Val, CYP17, CYP19A1, XRCC1 Gln399Arg, COMT Val158Met, NQO1 Pro187Ser, GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 Ile105Val. Lung cancer risk associated with individual SNPs was seen for GSTP1 [A allele; odds ratio (OR) = 1.85; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04-3.27] and XRCC1 (A/A genotype; OR = 1.68; 95% CI, 1.01-2.79) in white women and CYP1B1 (G allele; OR = 11.1; 95% CI, 1.18-104) in black women smokers. White women smokers carrying two risk genotypes at the following loci were at increased risk of lung cancer compared with individuals not carrying risk alleles at these loci: CYP17 and GSTM1, COMT and GSTM1, CYP17 and GSTT1, XRCC1 and GSTP1, CYP1B1 and XRCC1 and COMT and XRCC1. The most parsimonious model of lung cancer risk in white smoking women included age, family history of lung cancer, history of chronic lung disease, pack-years, body mass index, XRCC1 A/A genotype, GSTM1 null and COMT A/G or G/G genotype. These findings support the need for continued study of estrogen in relation to lung cancer risk. Polymorphisms in the tobacco metabolism, estrogen metabolism and DNA repair pathways will be useful in developing more predictive models of individual risk.

  5. Attitudes towards Lung Cancer Screening in an Australian High-Risk Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra E. Flynn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To determine whether persons at high risk of lung cancer would participate in lung cancer screening test if available in Australia and to elicit general attitudes towards cancer screening and factors that might affect participation in a screening program. Methods. We developed a 20-item written questionnaire, based on two published telephone interview scripts, addressing attitudes towards cancer screening, perceived risk of lung cancer, and willingness to be screened for lung cancer and to undertake surgery if lung cancer were detected. The questionnaire was given to 102 current and former smokers attending the respiratory clinic and pulmonary rehabilitation programmes. Results. We gained 90 eligible responses (M:F, 69:21. Mean [SD] age was 63 [11] and smoking history was 32 [21] pack years. 95% of subjects would participate in a lung cancer screening test, and 91% of these would consider surgery if lung cancer was detected. 44% of subjects considered that they were at risk of lung cancer. This was lower in ex-smokers than in current smokers. Conclusions. There is high willingness for lung cancer screening and surgical treatment. There is underrecognition of risk among ex-smokers. This misperception could be a barrier to a successful screening or case-finding programme in Australia.

  6. Lung cancer risks in the vicinity of uranium tailings sites. [UMTRA Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, V.C.; Sandquist, G.M. (Rogers and Associates Engineering Corp., Salt Lake City, UT (USA))

    1982-04-01

    Lung cancer mortality data have been assembled for many counties of interest to the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program (UMTRAP). The counties generally either contain UMTRAP tailings sites or are adjacent to them. The lung cancer rates of nearly all counties are less than the US average rate. In addition, some of the many factors associated with lung cancer are identified as are cancer risk estimators for radon daughters. 17 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Risk of lung cancer in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease: a population-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Kuei Hsu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This large-scale, controlled cohort study estimated the risks of lung cancer in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD in Taiwan. We conducted this population-based study using data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan during the period from 1997 to 2010. Patients with GERD were diagnosed using endoscopy, and controls were matched to patients with GERD at a ratio of 1:4. We identified 15,412 patients with GERD and 60,957 controls. Compared with the controls, the patients with GERD had higher rates of osteoporosis, diabetes mellitus, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia, bronchiectasis, depression, anxiety, hypertension, dyslipidemia, chronic liver disease, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, stroke, chronic kidney disease, and coronary artery disease (all P < .05. A total of 85 patients had lung cancer among patients with GERD during the follow-up of 42,555 person-years, and the rate of lung cancer was 0.0020 per person-year. By contrast, 232 patients had lung cancer among patients without GERD during the follow-up of 175,319 person-years, and the rate of lung cancer was 0.0013 per person-year. By using stepwise Cox regression model, the overall incidence of lung cancer remained significantly higher in the patients with GERD than in the controls (hazard ratio, 1.53; 95% CI [1.19–1.98]. The cumulative incidence of lung cancer was higher in the patients with GERD than in the controls (P = .0012. In conclusion, our large population-based cohort study provides evidence that GERD may increase the risk of lung cancer in Asians.

  8. Coffee consumption and the risk of lung cancer: an updated meta-analysis of epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y; Qin, J; Nan, G; Huang, S; Wang, Z; Su, Y

    2016-02-01

    Coffee is one of the most popularly consumed beverages worldwide. Many epidemiological studies have investigated the association between coffee consumption and lung cancer risk, but the results are inconsistent. Hence, we conducted a systematic analysis of relevant population-based studies to examine this association and derive a more precise estimation. The Cochrane library, PubMed and Embase databases were searched to identify studies published through Mar 2015 that met the predetermined inclusion criterion. Seventeen studies (5 cohort and 12 case-control studies) involving 12 276 cases and 102 516 controls were included. The summary odds ratio (OR) of lung cancer was 1.17 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-1.33) for coffee drinkers compared with nondrinkers and 1.31 (95% CI: 1.11-1.55) for the highest category of coffee consumption compared with the lowest category. Compared with nondrinkers, the pooled ORs for lung cancer were 1.10 (95% CI: 0.92-1.31) for ⩽1 cup per day, 1.10 (95% CI: 0.93-1.30) for 2-3 cups per day and 1.20 (95% CI: 1.02-1.39) for ⩾3 cups per day. Further analysis showed that the ORs for hospital-based case-control studies, population-based case-control studies and prospective cohort studies were 1.36 (95% CI: 1.10-1.69), 0.99 (95% CI: 0.77-1.28) and 1.59 (95% CI: 1.26-2.00), respectively. Significant associations for high coffee intake with increased risk of lung cancer were observed in men (OR=1.41 95% CI: 1.21-1.63), but not in women (OR=1.16, 95% CI: 0.86-1.56), in American (OR=1.34 95% CI: 1.08-1.65) and Asian populations (OR=1.49 95% CI: 1.28-1.74), but not in European populations (OR=1.12, 95% CI: 0.74-1.67), and in smokers (OR=1.24, 95% CI: 1.00-1.54), but not in nonsmokers (OR=0.85, 95% CI: 0.64-1.11). Particularly over the last 5 years, studies have consistently indicated that lung cancer risk is significantly increased by 47% in the population with the highest category intake of coffee compared with that with the lowest

  9. Gene by Environment Investigation of Incident Lung Cancer Risk in African-Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Sean P; Wang, Ange; Kapphahn, Kristopher; Hedlin, Haley; Desai, Manisha; Henderson, Michael; Yang, Lingyao; Walsh, Kyle M; Schwartz, Ann G; Wiencke, John K; Spitz, Margaret R; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Wrensch, Margaret R; Eaton, Charles B; Furberg, Helena; Mark Brown, W; Goldstein, Benjamin A; Assimes, Themistocles; Tang, Hua; Kooperberg, Charles L; Quesenberry, Charles P; Tindle, Hilary; Patel, Manali I; Amos, Christopher I; Bergen, Andrew W; Swan, Gary E; Stefanick, Marcia L

    2016-02-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified polymorphisms linked to both smoking exposure and risk of lung cancer. The degree to which lung cancer risk is driven by increased smoking, genetics, or gene-environment interactions is not well understood. We analyzed associations between 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously associated with smoking quantity and lung cancer in 7156 African-American females in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI), then analyzed main effects of top nominally significant SNPs and interactions between SNPs, cigarettes per day (CPD) and pack-years for lung cancer in an independent, multi-center case-control study of African-American females and males (1078 lung cancer cases and 822 controls). Nine nominally significant SNPs for CPD in WHI were associated with incident lung cancer (corrected p-values from 0.027 to 6.09 × 10(-5)). CPD was found to be a nominally significant effect modifier between SNP and lung cancer for six SNPs, including CHRNA5 rs2036527[A](betaSNP*CPD = - 0.017, p = 0.0061, corrected p = 0.054), which was associated with CPD in a previous genome-wide meta-analysis of African-Americans. These results suggest that chromosome 15q25.1 variants are robustly associated with CPD and lung cancer in African-Americans and that the allelic dose effect of these polymorphisms on lung cancer risk is most pronounced in lighter smokers.

  10. A Novel Pathway-Based Approach Improves Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Using Germline Genetic Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, David C; Han, Younghun; Byun, Jinyoung; Shin, Hae Ri; Hung, Rayjean J; McLaughlin, John R; Landi, Maria Teresa; Seminara, Daniela; Amos, Christopher I

    2016-08-01

    Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many genetic variants that are strongly associated with lung cancer, these variants have low penetrance and serve as poor predictors of lung cancer in individuals. We sought to increase the predictive value of germline variants by considering their cumulative effects in the context of biologic pathways. For individuals in the Environment and Genetics in Lung Cancer Etiology study (1,815 cases/1,971 controls), we computed pathway-level susceptibility effects as the sum of relevant SNP variant alleles weighted by their log-additive effects from a separate lung cancer GWAS meta-analysis (7,766 cases/37,482 controls). Logistic regression models based on age, sex, smoking, genetic variants, and principal components of pathway effects and pathway-smoking interactions were trained and optimized in cross-validation and further tested on an independent dataset (556 cases/830 controls). We assessed prediction performance using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Compared with typical binomial prediction models that have epidemiologic predictors (AUC = 0.607) in addition to top GWAS variants (AUC = 0.617), our pathway-based smoking-interactive multinomial model significantly improved prediction performance in external validation (AUC = 0.656, P approach demonstrated a larger increase in AUC over nongenetic counterpart models relative to previous approaches that incorporate variants. This model is the first of its kind to evaluate lung cancer prediction using subtype-stratified genetic effects organized into pathways and interacted with smoking. We propose pathway-exposure interactions as a potentially powerful new contributor to risk inference. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(8); 1208-15. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Lung cancer risk among bricklayers in a pooled analysis of case-control studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Consonni, Dario; De Matteis, Sara; Pesatori, Angela C; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Olsson, Ann C; Kromhout, Hans; Peters, Susan; Vermeulen, Roel Ch; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas; Kendzia, Benjamin; Behrens, Thomas; Stücker, Isabelle; Guida, Florence; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Brüske, Irene; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil E; Gustavsson, Per; Plato, Nils; Tse, Lap Ah; Yu, Ignatius Tak-Sun; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Merletti, Franco; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Simonato, Lorenzo; Forastiere, Francesco; Siemiatycki, Jack; Parent, Marie-Élise; Tardón, Adonina; Boffetta, Paolo; Zaridze, David; Chen, Ying; Field, John K; 't Mannetje, Andrea; Pearce, Neil; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Lissowska, Jolanta; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Rudnai, Peter; Fabiánová, Eleonóra; Stanescu Dumitru, Rodica; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Schüz, Joachim; Straif, Kurt

    Bricklayers may be exposed to several lung carcinogens, including crystalline silica and asbestos. Previous studies that analysed lung cancer risk among these workers had several study design limitations. We examined lung cancer risk among bricklayers within SYNERGY, a large international pooled

  12. Smoky coal, tobacco smoking, and lung cancer risk in Xuanwei, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Christopher; Chapman, Robert S.; Hu, Wei; He, Xingzhou; Hosgood, H. Dean; Liu, Larry Z.; Lai, Hong; Chen, Wei; Silverman, Debra T.; Vermeulen, Roel; Tian, Linwei; Bassig, Bryan; Shen, Min; Zhang, Yawei; Ma, Shuangge; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Lung cancer rates in Xuanwei are the highest in China. In-home use of smoky coal was associated with lung cancer risk, and the association of smoking and lung cancer risk strengthens after stove improvement. Here, we explored the differential association of tobacco use and lung cancer risk by the intensity, duration, and type of coal used. Materials and Methods We conducted a population-based case–control study of 260 male lung cancer cases and 260 age-matched male controls. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for tobacco use was calculated by conditional logistic regression. Results Use of smoky coal was significantly associated with an increased risk of lung cancer risk, and tobacco use was weakly and non-significantly associated with lung cancer risk. When the association was assessed by coal use, the cigarette-lung cancer risk association was null in hazardous coal users and elevated in less hazardous smoky coal users and non-smoky coal users. The risk of lung cancer per cigarette per day decreased as annual use of coal increased (>0-3 tons: OR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.03-1.17; >3 tons: OR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.95-1.03). Among more hazardous coal users, attenuation occurs at even low levels of usage (>0-3 tons: OR: 1.02; 95% CI: 0.91-1.14; >3 tons: OR: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.97-1.03). Conclusion We found evidence that smoky coal attenuated the tobacco and lung cancer risk association in males that lived in Xuanwei, particularly among users of hazardous coal where even low levels of smoky coal attenuated the association. Our results suggest that the adverse effects of tobacco may become more apparent as China's population continues to switch to using cleaner fuels for the home, underscoring the urgent need for smoking cessation in China and elsewhere. PMID:24506909

  13. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) promoter genotypes are associated with lung cancer risk in Taiwan males and smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Chang, Wen-Shin; Liang, Shinn-Jye; Chen, Wei-Chun; Tu, Chih-Yen; Chen, Hung-Jen; Yang, Mei-Due; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Hsu, Chin-Mu; Tsai, Chang-Hai; Bau, Da-Tian

    2014-12-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an immunosuppressive cytokine involved in carcinogenesis via immune escape. The present study aimed at evaluating the contribution of IL-10 promoter A-1082G (rs1800896), T-819C (rs3021097), A-592C (rs1800872) genetic polymorphisms to the risk of lung cancer in Taiwan. Associations of three IL-10 polymorphic genotypes with lung cancer risk were investigated among 358 lung cancer patients and 716 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. In addition, the genetic-lifestyle interaction was also examined. The results showed that the percentages of TT, TC and CC for IL-10 T-819C genotypes were differentially represented as 59.2%, 35.8% and 5.0% in the lung-cancer patient group and 52.0%, 37.0% and 11.0% in the non-cancer control group, respectively (p for trend=0.0025). The CC genotype carriers were of lower risk for lung cancer (OR=0.4, 95% CI=0.23-0.69, p=0.0005). Further stratification of the population by gender and smoking behavior showed that the IL-10 T-819C genotype conducted a protective effect on lung cancer susceptibility, which was obvious among males and smokers (p=0.0003 and 0.0004, respectively). The CC and TC genotypes of IL-10 T-819C compared to the TT genotype may have a protective effect on lung cancer risk in Taiwan, particularly among males and smokers. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Gene by Environment Investigation of Incident Lung Cancer Risk in African-Americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P. David

    2016-02-01

    Interpretation: These results suggest that chromosome 15q25.1 variants are robustly associated with CPD and lung cancer in African-Americans and that the allelic dose effect of these polymorphisms on lung cancer risk is most pronounced in lighter smokers.

  15. Occupational exposure to silica and lung cancer risk in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preller, L.; Bosch, L.M.C. van den; Brandt, P.A. van den; Kauppinen, T.; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The lung cancer carcinogenicity of crystalline silica dust remains the subject of discussion. Epidemiological evidence is based on occupational cohort studies and population-based case-control studies. The aim of this study was to assess associations between male lung cancer risk and

  16. A comprehensive analysis of clinical outcomes in lung cancer patients harboring a MET exon 14 skipping mutation compared to other driver mutations in an East Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Chien-Hung; Hsieh, Min-Shu; Wu, Shang-Gin; Shih, Jin-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent somatic splice-site alterations at MET exon 14 (MET(Δ14)), which result in exon skipping and MET proto-oncogene, receptor tyrosine kinase (MET) activation, have been characterised. However, their demographic features and clinical outcomes in East Asian lung cancer patients have yet to be determined. A one-step reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), using RNA samples from 850 East Asian lung cancer patients, was performed in order to detect MET(Δ14) and five other major driver mutations, including those in the EGFR, KRAS, ALK, HER2, and ROS1 genes. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to confirm the overexpression of MET in patients harbouring the MET(Δ14) mutation. We analysed the demographic data and clinical outcomes of MET(Δ14) mutation positive lung cancer patients and compared them to those of MET(Δ14) mutation negative lung cancer patients. In total, 27 lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) patients and 1 squamous cell carcinoma patient with the MET(Δ14) mutation were identified. The overall incidence was 3.3% for lung cancer and 4.0% for lung ADC. IHC demonstrated that the majority of lung cancer patients harboring a MET(Δ14) mutation exhibited a strong cytoplasmic expression of MET. MET(Δ14) mutation positive patients were generally quite elderly individuals. Stage IV MET(Δ14) mutation positive lung cancer patients receiving no specific anti-MET therapy were observed to have a similar overall survival (OS) compared to patients in the all negative group (P>0.05). In the multivariate analysis, mutation status was found not to be a major risk factor for OS in lung cancer patients without appropriate tyrosine kinase inhibitors treatment. The OS of MET(Δ14) mutation positive lung cancer patients is comparable to that of the major driver gene mutation negative lung cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Lung cancer among coal miners, ore miners and quarrymen: smoking-adjusted risk estimates from the synergy pooled analysis of case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taeger, Dirk; Pesch, Beate; Kendzia, Benjamin; Behrens, Thomas; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Dahmann, Dirk; Siemiatycki, Jack; Kromhout, Hans; Vermeulen, Roel; Peters, Susan; Olsson, Ann; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Stücker, Isabelle; Guida, Florence; Tardón, Adonina; Merletti, Franco; Mirabelli, Dario; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Mukeriya, Anush; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Gustavsson, Per; Field, John; Marcus, Michael W; Fabianova, Eleonora; 't Mannetje, Andrea; Pearce, Neil; Rudnai, Peter; Bencko, Vladimir; Janout, Vladimir; Dumitru, Rodica Stanescu; Foretova, Lenka; Forastiere, Francesco; McLaughlin, John; Paul Demers, Paul Demers; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Schüz, Joachim; Straif, Kurt; Brüning, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Working in mines and quarries has been associated with an elevated lung cancer risk but with inconsistent results for coal miners. This study aimed to estimate the smoking-adjusted lung cancer risk among coal miners and compare the risk pattern with lung cancer risks among ore miners and quarrymen. We estimated lung cancer risks of coal and ore miners and quarrymen among 14 251 lung cancer cases and 17 267 controls from the SYNERGY pooled case-control study, controlling for smoking and employment in other at-risk occupations. Ever working as miner or quarryman (690 cases, 436 controls) was associated with an elevated odds ratio (OR) of 1.55 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.34-1.79] for lung cancer. Ore miners (53 cases, 24 controls) had a higher OR (2.34, 95% CI 1.36-4.03) than quarrymen (67 cases, 39 controls; OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.21-3.05) and coal miners (442 cases, 297 controls; OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.18-1.67), but CI overlapped. We did not observe trends by duration of exposure or time since last exposure. This pooled analysis of population-based studies demonstrated an excess lung cancer risk among miners and quarrymen that remained increased after adjustment for detailed smoking history and working in other at-risk occupations. The increase in risk among coal miners were less pronounced than for ore miners or quarrymen.

  18. Role of Select Genetic Variants in Lung Cancer Risk in African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, Margaret R.; Amos, Christopher I.; Land, Susan; Wu, Xifeng; Dong, Qiong; Wenzlaff, Angela S.; Schwartz, Ann G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Black/white disparities in lung cancer incidence and mortality mandate an evaluation of underlying biological differences. We have previously shown higher risks of lung cancer associated with prior emphysema in African American compared with white lung cancer patients. Methods We therefore evaluated a panel of 1440 inflammatory gene variants in a two phase analysis (discovery and replication), added top GWAS lung cancer hits from Caucasian populations, and 28 SNPs from a published gene panel. The discovery set (477 self-designated African Americans cases, 366 controls matched on age, ethnicity, and gender) were from Houston, Texas. The external replication set (330 cases, 342 controls) was from the EXHALE study at Wayne State University. Results In discovery, 154 inflammation SNPs were significant (P<0.05) on univariate analysis, as was one of the gene panel SNPs (rs308738 in REV1, P=0.0013), and three GWAS hits, rs16969968 P=0.0014 and rs10519203 P=0.0003 in the 15q locus and rs2736100, the HTERT locus, P=0.0002. One inflammation SNP, rs950286, was successfully replicated with a concordant odds ratio of 1.46(1.14-1.87) in discovery, 1.37(1.05-1.77) in replication, and a combined OR of 1.40 (1.17-1.68). This SNP is intergenic between IRF4 and EXOC2 genes. We also constructed and validated epidemiologic and extended risk prediction models. The AUC for the epidemiologic discovery model was 0.77 and 0.80 for the extended model. For the combined datasets, the AUC values were 0.75 and 0.76, respectively. Conclusion As has been reported for other cancer sites and populations, incorporating top genetic hits into risk prediction models, provides little improvement in model performance and no clinical relevance. PMID:23454887

  19. Role of selected genetic variants in lung cancer risk in African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, Margaret R; Amos, Christopher I; Land, Susan; Wu, Xifeng; Dong, Qiong; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Schwartz, Ann G

    2013-04-01

    Black/white disparities in lung cancer incidence and mortality mandate an evaluation of underlying biological differences. We have previously shown higher risks of lung cancer associated with prior emphysema in African American compared with white patients with lung cancer. We therefore evaluated a panel of 1440 inflammatory gene variants in a two-phase analysis (discovery and replication), added top genome-wide association studies (GWAS) lung cancer hits from white populations, and 28 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from a published gene panel. The discovery set (477 self-designated African Americans cases, 366 controls matched on age, ethnicity, and gender) were from Houston, Texas. The external replication set (330 cases and 342 controls) was from the EXHALE study at Wayne State University. In discovery, 154 inflammation SNPs were significant (p < 0.05) on univariate analysis, as was one of the gene panel SNPs (rs308738 in REV1, p = 0.0013), and three GWAS hits, rs16969968 p = 0.0014 and rs10519203 p = 0.0003 in the 15q locus and rs2736100, in the HTERT locus, p = 0.0002. One inflammation SNP, rs950286, was successfully replicated with a concordant odds ratio of 1.46 (1.14-1.87) in discovery, 1.37 (1.05-1.77) in replication, and a combined odds ratio of 1.40 (1.17-1.68). This SNP is intergenic between IRF4 and EXOC2 genes. We also constructed and validated epidemiologic and extended risk prediction models. The area under the curve (AUC) for the epidemiologic discovery model was 0.77 and 0.80 for the extended model. For the combined datasets, the AUC values were 0.75 and 0.76, respectively. As has been reported for other cancer sites and populations, incorporating top genetic hits into risk prediction models, provides little improvement in model performance and no clinical relevance.

  20. Air pollution from traffic and risk for lung cancer in three Danish cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Bak, Helle; Sørensen, Mette

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Air pollution is suspected to cause lung cancer. The purpose was to investigate whether the concentration of nitrogen oxides (NOx) at the residence, used as an indicator of air pollution from traffic, is associated with risk for lung cancer. METHODS: We identified 679 lung cancer cases...... ratio per 100 microg/m3 NOx. The results showed no significant heterogeneity in the incidence rate ratio for lung cancer between cohorts or between strata defined by gender, educational level, or smoking status. CONCLUSION: The study showed a modest association between air pollution from traffic...... and the risk for lung cancer. IMPACT: This study points at traffic as a source of carcinogenic air pollution and stresses the importance of strategies for reduction of population exposure to traffic-related air pollution....

  1. Molecular Epidemiology Study in Xuanwei: the Relationship among
Coal Type, Genotype and Lung Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihua LI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that the lung cancer mortality rate in Xuanwei County, China was among the highest in the country and has been associated with exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. This risk may be modified by variation in genetic polymorphisms and coal subtypes. Our objective was to use molecular epidemiological techniques to investigate the relationship among genetic polymorphisms, coal subtype and lung cancer risk in Xuanwei County. Methods On the basis of two population-based case-control studies in residents of Xuanwei County, China, questionnaires covering demographic information, smoking history, family and personal medical history, and information on other variables were administered and buccal cells and sputum samples were collected separately from each subject enrolled to extract DNA. GST superfamily, AKR1C3 superfamily, OGG1 superfamily and other genotype were scanned by useing PCR method. ORs and 95%CIs were used to estimate the association between genotypes, coal subtypes and lung cancer risk factors by conditional Logistic regression using Statistical Analysis Software. Results Compared with subjects who using smokeless coal or wood, smoky coal use was statistically significantly associated with lung cancer risk (OR=7.7, 95%CI: 4.5-13.3. There was marked heterogeneity in risk estimates for specific subtypes of smoky coal. Estimates were highest for coal from the Laibin (OR=24.8, Longtan (OR=11.6 and Baoshan (OR=6.0 coal types, and lower for coal from other types; the risk within the same subtype of coal in male and female were similar. The GSTM1-null genotype, the AKR1C3 (Ex1-70C>G, OGG1 (Ex6-315C>G genotypes were closely associated with increased risk of lung cancer in Xuanwei County, and their odds ratios (95%CI were 2.3 (1.3-4.2, 1.8 (1.0-3.5 and 1.9 (1.1-3.3, respectively. Compared to subjects who with GSTM1-positive and used less than

  2. Causes of death and competing risk analysis of the associated factors for non-small cell lung cancer using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shenhai; Tian, Jintao; Song, Xiaoping; Wu, Bingqun; Liu, Limin

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the probability of death (POD) from any causes by time after diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the factors associated with survival for NSCLC patients. A total of 202,914 patients with NSCLC from 2004 to 2013 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. The overall survival (OS) and lung cancer-specific survival (LCSS) were calculated and POD from any causes at different time periods after diagnosis was explored. The predictive factors for OS, LCSS and survival from non-lung cancer deaths were investigated using multivariate analysis with Cox proportional hazards regression and competing risk regression analysis. The 5- and 10-year OS were 20.4% and 11.5%, accordingly that for LCSS were 25.5% and 18.4%, respectively. Lung cancer contributed 88.3% (n = 128,402) of the deaths. The POD from lung cancer decreased with time after diagnosis. In multivariate analysis, advanced age and advanced stage of NSCLC were associated with decreased OS and LCSS. Comparing to no surgery, any kind of resection conferred lower risk of death from lung cancer and higher risk of dying from non-lung cancer conditions except lobectomy or bilobectomy, which was associated with lower risk of death from both lung cancer and non-lung cancer conditions. Most of the patients with NSCLC died from lung cancer. Rational surveillance and treatment policies should be made for them. Early stage and lobectomy or bilobectomy were associated with improved OS and LCSS. It is reasonable to focus on early detection and optimal surgical treatment for NSCLC.

  3. Vitamin D and Lung Cancer Risk: A Comprehensive Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqun Zhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Vitamin D has been suggested to have important roles against cancer development. There were several published studies on the association between vitamin D and lung cancer risk, but not conclusive results were available. Methods: To clarify the role of vitamin D in lung carcinogenesis, we performed a comprehensive review of the literature and a meta-analysis to evaluate the association of serum vitamin D levels and dietary vitamin D intake with lung cancer risk. Twelve studies (9 prospective cohort and 3 nested case-control studies with a total of 288,778 individuals were included. The summary relative risk (RR with 95% confidence interval (CI was used to assess lung cancer risk. Results: Meta-analysis of total 12 studies showed that RR for the association of high vitamin D status with lung cancer was 0.84 (95%CI 0.78-0.90, P Conclusion: Current data suggest an inverse association between serum vitamin D and lung cancer risk. Further studies are needed to investigate the effect of vitamin D intake on lung cancer risk and to evaluate whether vitamin D supplementation can prevent lung cancer.

  4. Comparing histone deacetylase inhibitor responses in genetically engineered mouse lung cancer models and a window of opportunity trial in patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tian; Galimberti, Fabrizio; Erkmen, Cherie P; Memoli, Vincent; Chinyengetere, Fadzai; Sempere, Lorenzo; Beumer, Jan H; Anyang, Bean N; Nugent, William; Johnstone, David; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Kurie, Jonathan M; Li, Hua; Direnzo, James; Guo, Yongli; Freemantle, Sarah J; Dragnev, Konstantin H; Dmitrovsky, Ethan

    2013-08-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi; vorinostat) responses were studied in murine and human lung cancer cell lines and genetically engineered mouse lung cancer models. Findings were compared with a window of opportunity trial in aerodigestive tract cancers. In human (HOP62, H522, and H23) and murine transgenic (ED-1, ED-2, LKR-13, and 393P, driven, respectively, by cyclin E, degradation-resistant cyclin E, KRAS, or KRAS/p53) lung cancer cell lines, vorinostat reduced growth, cyclin D1, and cyclin E levels, but induced p27, histone acetylation, and apoptosis. Other biomarkers also changed. Findings from transgenic murine lung cancer models were integrated with those from a window of opportunity trial that measured vorinostat pharmacodynamic responses in pre- versus posttreatment tumor biopsies. Vorinostat repressed cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression in murine transgenic lung cancers and significantly reduced lung cancers in syngeneic mice. Vorinostat also reduced cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression, but increased p27 levels in post- versus pretreatment human lung cancer biopsies. Notably, necrotic and inflammatory responses appeared in posttreatment biopsies. These depended on intratumoral HDACi levels. Therefore, HDACi treatments of murine genetically engineered lung cancer models exert similar responses (growth inhibition and changes in gene expression) as observed in lung cancer cell lines. Moreover, enhanced pharmacodynamic responses occurred in the window of opportunity trial, providing additional markers of response that can be evaluated in subsequent HDACi trials. Thus, combining murine and human HDACi trials is a strategy to translate preclinical HDACi treatment outcomes into the clinic. This study uncovered clinically tractable mechanisms to engage in future HDACi trials.

  5. Comparing Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Responses in Genetically Engineered Mouse Lung Cancer Models and a Window of Opportunity Trial in Lung Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tian; Galimberti, Fabrizio; Erkmen, Cherie P.; Memoli, Vincent; Chinyengetere, Fadzai; Sempere, Lorenzo; Beumer, Jan H.; Anyang, Bean N.; Nugent, William; Johnstone, David; Tsongalis, Gregory J.; Kurie, Jonathan M.; Li, Hua; DiRenzo, James; Guo, Yongli; Freemantle, Sarah J.; Dragnev, Konstantin H.; Dmitrovsky, Ethan

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi, vorinostat) responses were studied in murine and human lung cancer cell lines and genetically-engineered mouse lung cancer models. Findings were compared with a window of opportunity trial in aerodigestive tract cancers. In human (HOP62, H522 and H23) and murine transgenic (ED-1, ED-2, LKR-13, and 393P, driven respectively by cyclin E, degradation-resistant cyclin E, KRAS, or KRAS/p53) lung cancer cell lines vorinostat reduced growth, cyclin D1 and cyclin E levels, but induced p27, histone acetylation and apoptosis. Other biomarkers also changed. Findings from transgenic murine lung cancer models were integrated with those from a window of opportunity trial that measured vorinostat pharmacodynamic responses in pre- versus post-treatment tumor biopsies. Vorinostat repressed cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression in murine transgenic lung cancers and significantly reduced lung cancers in syngeneic mice. Vorinostat also reduced cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression, but increased p27 levels in post- versus pre-treatment human lung cancer biopsies. Notably, necrotic and inflammatory responses appeared in post-treatment biopsies. These depended on intratumoral HDACi levels. Therefore, HDACi treatments of murine genetically-engineered lung cancer models exert similar responses (growth inhibition and changes in gene expression) as observed in lung cancer cell lines. Moreover, enhanced pharmacodynamic responses occurred in the window of opportunity trial, providing additional markers of response that can be evaluated in subsequent HDACi trials. Thus, combining murine and human HDACi trials is a strategy to translate preclinical HDACi treatment outcomes into the clinic. This study uncovered clinically-tractable mechanisms to engage in future HDACi trials. PMID:23686769

  6. Results of the Randomized Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial with Focus on High-Risk Profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    M. W. Wille, Mathilde; Dirksen, Asger; Ashraf, Haseem

    2016-01-01

    RATIONALE: As of April 2015, participants in the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial had been followed for at least 5 years since their last screening. OBJECTIVES: Mortality, causes of death, and lung cancer findings are reported to explore the effect of computed tomography (CT) screening. METHODS......, lung cancer diagnosis, cancer stage, and histology was obtained from national registries. No differences between the two groups in lung cancer mortality (hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 0.66-1.6; P = 0.888) or all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-1.27; P......; P = 0.025), this difference was statistically significant, indicating an absolute stage shift. Older participants, those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and those with more than 35 pack-years of smoking had a significantly increased risk of death due to lung cancer, with nonsignificantly...

  7. Lung Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that living in areas with higher levels of air pollution increases the risk of lung cancer. Beta carotene supplements in heavy smokers Taking beta carotene supplements (pills) increases the risk of lung cancer, especially in ...

  8. Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, and Lung Cancer Risk in Non-Hispanic Whites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melkonian, Stephanie C; Daniel, Carrie R.; Ye, Yuanqing; Pierzynski, Jeanne A.; Roth, Jack A.; Wu, Xifeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Postprandial glucose (PPG) and insulin responses play a role in carcinogenesis. We evaluated the association between dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL), markers of carbohydrate intake and PPG, and lung cancer risk in non-Hispanic whites. Methods GL and GI were assessed among 1,905 newly diagnosed lung cancer cases recruited from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas and 2,413 healthy controls recruited at Kelsey-Seybold Clinics in Houston. We assessed associations between quintiles of GI/GL and lung cancer risk and effect modification by various risk factors. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression. Results We observed a significant association between GI (5th vs 1st quintile (Q)) OR = 1.49, 95% CI: 1.21–1.83, P-trend glycemic index and other lung cancer risk factors may jointly and independently influence lung cancer etiology. Impact Understanding the role of glycemic index in lung cancer could inform prevention strategies and elucidate biological pathways related to lung cancer risk. PMID:26944871

  9. [Epidemiology, prevention and risk morbidity factors for lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radziszewska, Aneta; Karczmarek-Borowska, Bożenna; Grądalska-Lampart, Monika; Filip, Agata A

    2015-02-01

    Lung cancer incidence kept increasing dynamically in male population until the late 90s and then there was a sudden drop in the cases and this tendency has been maintained up till now. What seems upsetting, however, is the fact that for female population there is a constant growth in the lung cancer morbidity. Needless to say, Poland still belongs to the countries with high lung cancer incidence and lung cancer mortality. In 2011 the standardized morbidity rate in Poland accounted for 50,0/100 000 in male population and 17,3/100 000 in female population. In Podkarpacie Voivodeship it was 43,6/100 000 for males and 11,8/100 000 for females respectively. Lung cancer incidence and lung cancer mortality seem to increase together with age, and for people 65 and more this type of cancer accounts for approximately 50% of all cancer cases and cancer caused deaths. In spite of various research conducted and great medical progress little can be done to cure lung cancer. The percentage of 5-year survivals increased for males from 10,8% in years 2000-2002 to 11,9% in years 2003-2005, and for females from 15,7% to 16,9%. The main cause of lung cancer is certainly active and passive smoking. It is highly possible that environmental factors are also responsible for lung cancer cases. Among the most devastating are such factors as asbestos, arsenic, aromatic hydrocarbons, individual lifestyle and nutrition, genetic predisposition and finally the pollution, particularly of the air. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  10. Chronic obstructive lung diseases and risk of non-small cell lung cancer in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Ann G; Cote, Michele L; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Van Dyke, Alison; Chen, Wei; Ruckdeschel, John C; Gadgeel, Shirish; Soubani, Ayman O

    2009-03-01

    The link between lung cancer and chronic obstructive lung diseases (COPD) has not been well studied in women even though lung cancer and COPD account for significant and growing morbidity and mortality among women. We evaluated the relationship between COPD and non-small cell lung cancer in a population-based case-control study of women and constructed a time course of chronic lung diseases in relation to onset of lung cancer. Five hundred sixty-two women aged 18 to 74, diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer and 564 population-based controls matched on race and age participated. Multivariable unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate risk associated with a history of COPD, chronic bronchitis, or emphysema. Lung cancer risk increased significantly for white women with a history of COPD (odds ratios [OR] = 1.85; 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.21-2.81), but this was not seen in African American women. Risk associated with a history of chronic bronchitis was strongest when diagnosed at age 25 or earlier (OR = 2.35, 95% CI: 1.17-4.72); emphysema diagnosed within 9 years of lung cancer was also associated with substantial risk (OR = 6.36, 95% CI: 2.36-17.13). Race, pack-years of smoking, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke as an adult, childhood asthma, and exposure to asbestos were associated with a history of COPD among lung cancer cases. In women, COPD is associated with risk of lung cancer differentially by race. Untangling whether COPD is in the causal pathway or simply shares risk factors will require future studies to focus on specific COPD features, while exploring underlying genetic susceptibility to these diseases.

  11. A lung cancer risk classifier comprising genome maintenance genes measured in normal bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Jiyoun; Crawford, Erin L; Zhang, Xiaolu; Khuder, Sadik; Chen, Tian; Levin, Albert; Blomquist, Thomas M; Willey, James C

    2017-05-02

    Annual low dose CT (LDCT) screening of individuals at high demographic risk reduces lung cancer mortality by more than 20%. However, subjects selected for screening based on demographic criteria typically have less than a 10% lifetime risk for lung cancer. Thus, there is need for a biomarker that better stratifies subjects for LDCT screening. Toward this goal, we previously reported a lung cancer risk test (LCRT) biomarker comprising 14 genome-maintenance (GM) pathway genes measured in normal bronchial epithelial cells (NBEC) that accurately classified cancer (CA) from non-cancer (NC) subjects. The primary goal of the studies reported here was to optimize the LCRT biomarker for high specificity and ease of clinical implementation. Targeted competitive multiplex PCR amplicon libraries were prepared for next generation sequencing (NGS) analysis of transcript abundance at 68 sites among 33 GM target genes in NBEC specimens collected from a retrospective cohort of 120 subjects, including 61 CA cases and 59 NC controls. Genes were selected for analysis based on contribution to the previously reported LCRT biomarker and/or prior evidence for association with lung cancer risk. Linear discriminant analysis was used to identify the most accurate classifier suitable to stratify subjects for screening. After cross-validation, a model comprising expression values from 12 genes (CDKN1A, E2F1, ERCC1, ERCC4, ERCC5, GPX1, GSTP1, KEAP1, RB1, TP53, TP63, and XRCC1) and demographic factors age, gender, and pack-years smoking, had Receiver Operator Characteristic area under the curve (ROC AUC) of 0.975 (95% CI: 0.96-0.99). The overall classification accuracy was 93% (95% CI 88%-98%) with sensitivity 93.1%, specificity 92.9%, positive predictive value 93.1% and negative predictive value 93%. The ROC AUC for this classifier was significantly better (p < 0.0001) than the best model comprising demographic features alone. The LCRT biomarker reported here displayed high accuracy and ease

  12. Fruits, vegetables and lung cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, A R; Abar, L; Vingeliene, S; Chan, D S M; Aune, D; Navarro-Rosenblatt, D; Stevens, C; Greenwood, D; Norat, T

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death. Fruits and vegetables containing carotenoids and other antioxidants have been hypothesized to decrease lung cancer risk. As part of the World Cancer Research Fund International Continuous Update Project, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies. We searched PubMed and several databases up to December 2014 for prospective studies. We conducted meta-analyses comparing the highest and lowest intakes and dose-response meta-analyses to estimate summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and examine possible non-linear associations. We combined results from the Pooling Project with the studies we identified to increase the statistical power of our analysis. When comparing the highest with the lowest intakes, the summary RR estimates were 0.86 [95% CI 0.78-0.94; n (studies) = 18] for fruits and vegetables, 0.92 (95% CI 0.87-0.97; n = 25) for vegetables and 0.82 (95% CI 0.76-0.89; n = 29) for fruits. The association with fruit and vegetable intake was marginally significant in current smokers and inverse but not significant in former or never smokers. Significant inverse dose-response associations were observed for each 100 g/day increase: for fruits and vegetables [RR: 0.96; 95% CI 0.94-0.98, I(2) = 64%, n = 14, N (cases) = 9609], vegetables (RR: 0.94; 95% CI 0.89-0.98, I(2) = 48%, n = 20, N = 12 563) and fruits (RR: 0.92; 95% CI 0.89-0.95, I(2) = 57%, n = 23, N = 14 506). Our results were consistent among the different types of fruits and vegetables. The strength of the association differed across locations. There was evidence of a non-linear relationship (P fruit and vegetable intake and lung cancer risk showing that no further benefit is obtained when increasing consumption above ∼400 g per day. Eliminating tobacco smoking is the best strategy to prevent lung cancer. Although residual confounding by smoking cannot be ruled out, the current evidence from

  13. Forecasting Model of Risk of Cancer in Lung Cancer Pedigree in a Case-control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan LIN

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Annual lung screening using spiral computed tomography (CT, has a high sensitivity of detecting early lung cancer (LC, but its high rates of false-positive often lead to unnecessary surgery. The aim of this study is to create a forecasting model of high risk individuals to lung cancer. Methods The pathologic diagnoses of LC in Guangdong Lung Cancer Institute were consecutively chosen as the probands. All the members of the first-degree relatives of probands' and their spouses' were enrolled in this study. These pedigrees consisted of 633 probands' pedigrees and 565 spouses' pedigrees. Unless otherwise stated, analyses were performed using the SPSS 17.0 statistical software package. Results Compared with the control, a family history of carcinoma in first-degree relatives was significantly associated with LC risk (OR=1.71, P<0.001, the sub-group of either one infected individual or more than two infected individuals in first-degree relatives showed significantly statistical differences (P=0.005, P=0.002. In the forecasting model, the risk compared to that in Chinese population was from 0.38 to 63.08 folds. In the population whose risk was more than 10 times to the Chinese population, the accuracy rate of prediction was 88.1%. Conclusion A family history of carcinoma in first-degree relatives was significantly associated with increased LC risk. The more infected individuals exist in first-degree relatives, the more risk was showed. In the forecasting model, smokers especially heavy ones whose risk were more than 10 times to the Chinese population should be receive annual screening. The population are positive at least any two conditions which including male, lung disease history, occupation expose and history of cancer in first-degree relative.

  14. Participant selection for lung cancer screening by risk modelling (the Pan-Canadian Early Detection of Lung Cancer [PanCan] study): a single-arm, prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammemagi, Martin C; Schmidt, Heidi; Martel, Simon; McWilliams, Annette; Goffin, John R; Johnston, Michael R; Nicholas, Garth; Tremblay, Alain; Bhatia, Rick; Liu, Geoffrey; Soghrati, Kam; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Hwang, David M; Laberge, Francis; Gingras, Michel; Pasian, Sergio; Couture, Christian; Mayo, John R; Nasute Fauerbach, Paola V; Atkar-Khattra, Sukhinder; Peacock, Stuart J; Cressman, Sonya; Ionescu, Diana; English, John C; Finley, Richard J; Yee, John; Puksa, Serge; Stewart, Lori; Tsai, Scott; Haider, Ehsan; Boylan, Colm; Cutz, Jean-Claude; Manos, Daria; Xu, Zhaolin; Goss, Glenwood D; Seely, Jean M; Amjadi, Kayvan; Sekhon, Harmanjatinder S; Burrowes, Paul; MacEachern, Paul; Urbanski, Stefan; Sin, Don D; Tan, Wan C; Leighl, Natasha B; Shepherd, Frances A; Evans, William K; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Lam, Stephen

    2017-11-01

    Results from retrospective studies indicate that selecting individuals for low-dose CT lung cancer screening on the basis of a highly predictive risk model is superior to using criteria similar to those used in the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST; age, pack-year, and smoking quit-time). We designed the Pan-Canadian Early Detection of Lung Cancer (PanCan) study to assess the efficacy of a risk prediction model to select candidates for lung cancer screening, with the aim of determining whether this approach could better detect patients with early, potentially curable, lung cancer. We did this single-arm, prospective study in eight centres across Canada. We recruited participants aged 50-75 years, who had smoked at some point in their life (ever-smokers), and who did not have a self-reported history of lung cancer. Participants had at least a 2% 6-year risk of lung cancer as estimated by the PanCan model, a precursor to the validated PLCOm2012 model. Risk variables in the model were age, smoking duration, pack-years, family history of lung cancer, education level, body-mass index, chest x-ray in the past 3 years, and history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Individuals were screened with low-dose CT at baseline (T0), and at 1 (T1) and 4 (T4) years post-baseline. The primary outcome of the study was incidence of lung cancer. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00751660. 7059 queries came into the study coordinating centre and were screened for PanCan risk. 15 were duplicates, so 7044 participants were considered for enrolment. Between Sept 24, 2008, and Dec 17, 2010, we recruited and enrolled 2537 eligible ever-smokers. After a median follow-up of 5·5 years (IQR 3·2-6·1), 172 lung cancers were diagnosed in 164 individuals (cumulative incidence 0·065 [95% CI 0·055-0·075], incidence rate 138·1 per 10 000 person-years [117·8-160·9]). There were ten interval lung cancers (6% of lung cancers and 6% of individuals with cancer

  15. Dietary Boron and Hormone Replacement Therapy as Risk Factors for Lung Cancer in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabir, S.; Spitz, M. R.; Barrera, S. L.; Dong, Y. Q.; Eastham, C.; Forman, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may reduce lung cancer risk. Dietary boron may have actions similar to those of HRT; however, no previous study has reported the associations between dietary boron intake and lung cancer risk or the joint effects of boron intake and HRT use on lung cancer risk. The authors examined the associations between boron intake and the joint effects of boron intake and HRT on lung cancer risk in women. In an ongoing case-control study in Houston, Texas (July 1995 through April 2005, end date for this analysis), 763 women were diagnosed with lung cancer, and 838 were matched healthy controls with data on both diet and HRT. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the associations between dietary boron and HRT with lung cancer risk. After adjustment for potential confounders, the odds ratios for lung cancer with decreasing quartiles of dietary boron intake were 1.0, 1.39 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02, 1.90), 1.64 (95% CI: 1.20, 2.24), and 1.95 (95% CI: 1.42, 2.68) mg/day, respectively, for all women (ptrend boron intake who used HRT, the odds ratio for lung cancer for low dietary boron intake and no HRT use was 2.07 (95% CI: 1.53, 2.81). Boron intake was inversely associated with lung cancer in women, whereas women who consumed low boron and did not use HRT were at substantial increased odds. PMID:18343880

  16. Effect of single nucleotide polymorphism Rs189037 in ATM gene on risk of lung cancer in Chinese: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    Full Text Available Accumulated evidence has indicated that ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM gene polymorphisms are closely related to lung cancer. We aimed to explore the prognostic value of rs189037 (G>A, one of ATM single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and detect whether it involves in the risk of lung cancer in Chinese Han people.In this hospital-based matched case-control study, 852 lung cancer patients and 852 healthy controls have been put into comparison to analyze the association between rs189037 and lung cancer risk in Chinese. The single nucleotide polymorphisms were determined by TaqMan real-time PCR and we used SPSS software to perform the statistical analyses.Individuals carrying variant AA genotype of rs189037 had higher lung cancer risk (adjusted OR: 1.56 than those carrying GG genotype. After analyzing data respectively from different groups divided by genders and smoking status, we observed that the risk effect of AA genotype on the lung cancer was significant in females, non-smokers and female non-smokers, as well as the risk effect of GA genotype in male smokers. Compared with non-smokers carrying GG genotype, smokers carrying at least one A allele had higher risk of developing lung cancer than those with GG genotype (adjusted OR: 3.52 vs. adjusted OR: 2.53.This study suggested that rs189037 (G>A polymorphism is associated with lung cancer risk in Chinese Han population. AA genotype and A allele may be dangerous lung cancer signals in Chinese and make contribution to diagnostic and treatment value.

  17. Residential Radon Exposure and Risk of Lung Cancer in Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    A case-control study of lung cancer and residential radon exposure in which investigators carried out both standard year-long air measurements and CR-39 alpha detector measurements (call surface monitors)

  18. Occupational exposure to endotoxins and lung cancer risk: results of the ICARE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khedher, Soumaya; Neri, Monica; Guida, Florence; Matrat, Mireille; Cenée, Sylvie; Sanchez, Marie; Menvielle, Gwenn; Molinié, Florence; Luce, Danièle; Stücker, Isabelle

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the role of occupational exposure to endotoxins in lung cancer in a French population-based case-control study (ICARE (Investigation of occupational and environmental causes of respiratory cancers)). Detailed information was collected on the occupational history and smoking habits from 2926 patients with histologically confirmed lung cancer and 3555 matched controls. We evaluated each subject's endotoxin exposure after cross referencing International Standard Classification of Occupations (ISCO) codes (for job tasks) and Nomenclature d'Activités Françaises (NAF) codes (for activity sectors). Endotoxin exposure levels were attributed to each work environment based on literature reports. ORs and 95% CIs were estimated using unconditional logistic regression models and controlled for main confounding factors. An inverse association between exposure to endotoxins and lung cancer was found (OR=0.80, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.95). Negative trends were shown with duration and cumulative exposure, and the risk was decreased decades after exposure cessation (all statistically significant). Lung cancer risk was particularly reduced among workers highly exposed (eg, in dairy, cattle, poultry, pig farms), but also in those weakly exposed (eg, in waste treatment). Statistically significant interactions were shown with smoking, and never/light smokers were more sensitive to an endotoxin effect than heavy smokers (eg, OR=0.14, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.32 and OR=0.80, 95% CI 0.45 to 1.40, respectively, for the quartiles with the highest cumulative exposure, compared with those never exposed). Pronounced inverse associations were shown with adenocarcinoma histological subtype (OR=0.37, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.55 in the highly exposed). Our findings suggest that exposure to endotoxins, even at a low level, reduces the risk of lung cancer. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is

  19. Additive Synergism between Asbestos and Smoking in Lung Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwadee Ngamwong

    Full Text Available Smoking and asbestos exposure are important risks for lung cancer. Several epidemiological studies have linked asbestos exposure and smoking to lung cancer. To reconcile and unify these results, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to provide a quantitative estimate of the increased risk of lung cancer associated with asbestos exposure and cigarette smoking and to classify their interaction. Five electronic databases were searched from inception to May, 2015 for observational studies on lung cancer. All case-control (N = 10 and cohort (N = 7 studies were included in the analysis. We calculated pooled odds ratios (ORs, relative risks (RRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs using a random-effects model for the association of asbestos exposure and smoking with lung cancer. Lung cancer patients who were not exposed to asbestos and non-smoking (A-S- were compared with; (i asbestos-exposed and non-smoking (A+S-, (ii non-exposure to asbestos and smoking (A-S+, and (iii asbestos-exposed and smoking (A+S+. Our meta-analysis showed a significant difference in risk of developing lung cancer among asbestos exposed and/or smoking workers compared to controls (A-S-, odds ratios for the disease (95% CI were (i 1.70 (A+S-, 1.31-2.21, (ii 5.65; (A-S+, 3.38-9.42, (iii 8.70 (A+S+, 5.8-13.10. The additive interaction index of synergy was 1.44 (95% CI = 1.26-1.77 and the multiplicative index = 0.91 (95% CI = 0.63-1.30. Corresponding values for cohort studies were 1.11 (95% CI = 1.00-1.28 and 0.51 (95% CI = 0.31-0.85. Our results point to an additive synergism for lung cancer with co-exposure of asbestos and cigarette smoking. Assessments of industrial health risks should take smoking and other airborne health risks when setting occupational asbestos exposure limits.

  20. Lung cancer risk perception and distress: difference by smoking status, and role of physical activity and race among US population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Mathur

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: cigarette smoking is the greatest known risk factor for lung cancer, and people with different smoking status may process risk information differently. While psychological distress has been linked with smoking status, little is known about the impact of distress on lung cancer perception or the moderating role of physical activity and race. This study explores the association of lung cancer perception and distress and investigates the effects of physical activity and race on that association.Methods: the study uses a national, biennial survey (the Health Information National Trends Survey that was designed to collect nationally representative data on the American public’s need for, access to, and use of cancer-related information using a cross-sectional, complex sample survey design. Out of 5 586 participants, 1 015 were current smokers, 1 599 were former smokers, 2 877 were never smokers. Of the sample, 1 765 participants answered the lung cancer risk perception question and had no personal history of lung cancer. Statistical analysis contrasts smokers, former smokers, and never smokers to examine the association of lung cancer perception and distress and the moderating role of physical activity and race.Results: distress and lung cancer risk perception were significantly positively associated (p value < 0.001. Respondents who were current smokers and were distressed had very high odds of agreeing that they have a somewhat high chance (odds ratio=900.8, CI: 94.23, 8 611.75; p value < 0.001 or a very high chance (odds ratio=500.44 CI: 56.53, 4 430.02, p value < 0.001 of developing lung cancer in the future as compared to not distressed never smokers. However, race and physical activity status did not significantly affect perception of risk. Perceptions of risk are important precursors of health change.Conclusions: elevated distress level and higher perceived risk, in addition to physical activity status and race, could potentially

  1. Combinations of glutathione S-transferase genotypes and risk of early-onset lung cancer in Caucasians and African Americans: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, M L; Kardia, S L R; Wenzlaff, A S; Land, S J; Schwartz, A G

    2005-04-01

    Polymorphisms in GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 genes in humans are associated with the reduction of enzymatic activity toward several substrates, including those in tobacco smoke. To investigate the potential role these polymorphisms have, as modulators of early-onset lung cancer risk, a population-based case-control study involving early-onset lung cancer cases was performed. Biological samples were available for 350 individuals diagnosed <50 years of age identified from the metropolitan Detroit Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program and 410 cases of age, race and sex-matched controls ascertained through random digit dialing. African Americans carrying at least one G allele at the GSTP1 locus were 2.9-fold more likely to have lung cancer compared with African Americans without a G allele after adjustment for age, sex, pack years of smoking and history of lung cancer in a first-degree relative (95% CI 1.29-6.20). African Americans with either one or two risk genotypes at the GSTM1 and GSTP1 loci were at increased risk of having lung cancer compared with those having fully functional GSTM1 and GSTP1 genes (OR = 2.8, 95% CI 1.1-7.2 and OR = 4.0, 95% CI 1.3-12.2, respectively). No significant single gene associations between GSTM1, GSTT1 or GSTP1 and early-onset lung cancer were identified in Caucasians, after adjusting for age, sex, pack years and family history of lung cancer. However, our results suggest that specific combinations of glutathione S-transferase polymorphisms increase the risk of early-onset of lung cancer. Joint analysis of these genotypes may identify individuals who are at a higher risk of developing early-onset lung cancer with a greater certainty than single gene studies.

  2. Obesity, metabolic factors and risk of different histological types of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carreras-Torres, Robert; Johansson, Mattias; Haycock, Philip C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessing the relationship between lung cancer and metabolic conditions is challenging because of the confounding effect of tobacco. Mendelian randomization (MR), or the use of genetic instrumental variables to assess causality, may help to identify the metabolic drivers of lung cancer....... METHODS AND FINDINGS: We identified genetic instruments for potential metabolic risk factors and evaluated these in relation to risk using 29,266 lung cancer cases (including 11,273 adenocarcinomas, 7,426 squamous cell and 2,664 small cell cases) and 56,450 controls. The MR risk analysis suggested.......1x10-3), providing novel evidence that a genetic susceptibility to obesity influences smoking patterns. There was also evidence that low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was inversely associated with lung cancer overall risk (OR [95%CI] = 0.90 [0.84-0.97] per SD of 38 mg/dl), while fasting insulin...

  3. Adverse childhood experiences are associated with the risk of lung cancer: A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W. Brown (David); R.F. Anda (Robert); V.J. Felitti (Vincent); V.J. Edwards (Valerie); A.M. Malarcher (Ann Marie); J.B. Croft (Janet); W.H. Giles (Wayne)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Strong relationships between exposure to childhood traumatic stressors and smoking behaviours inspire the question whether these adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with an increased risk of lung cancer during adulthood. Methods. Baseline survey data on health

  4. Systematic Review of Studies of Workplace Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke and Lung Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinzhuo WANG

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been reported that there was a close relationship between lung cancer risk and environmental tobacco smoke at workplace. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between workplace environmental tobacco smoke exposure and lung cancer risk among non-smoking subjects. Methods By searching Medline, CENTRAL (the Cochrane central register of controlledtrials, EMBASE, CBM, CNKI and VIP et al, we collected both domestic and overseas published documents on workplace environmental tobacco smoke exposure and lung cancer risk. Random or fixed effect models were applied to conduct systematic review on the study results, the combined odds ratio (OR and the 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated as well. Results 22 reports were included into the combined analysis, which indicated that 25% lung cancer risk was increased by exposing to workplace environment tobacco smoke (OR=1.25, 95%CI: 1.13-1.39, P < 0.001. For female the increased risk was 22% (OR=1.22, 95%CI: 1.05-1.42, P=0.011. For male the increased risk was 54%, but it does not reach the statistical significance (OR=1.54, 95%CI: 0.74-3.18, P=0.247. Conclusion Workplace environmental tobacco smoke exposure is an important risk factor of lung cancer risk among non-smoking subjects. Especially for non-smoking women who expose to workplace environment tobacco smoke have a close relationship with lung cancer.

  5. Immunodeficiency, AIDS-related pneumonia, and risk of lung cancer among HIV-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Julia L; Leyden, Wendy A; Chao, Chun R; Horberg, Michael A; Klein, Daniel B; Quesenberry, Charles P; Towner, William J; Silverberg, Michael J

    2017-04-24

    The objective is to clarify the role of immunodeficiency and pneumonia in elevated lung cancer risk among HIV-infected individuals. Cohort study of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected adults in a large integrated healthcare system in California during 1996-2011. We used Poisson models to obtain rate ratios for lung cancer associated with HIV infection, overall and stratified by recent CD4 cells/μl (HIV-uninfected as reference group), with χ tests for trends across CD4 strata. Fully adjusted models included demographics, cancer risk factors (smoking, drug/alcohol abuse, overweight/obesity), and prior pneumonia. Among 24 768 HIV-infected and 257 600 HIV-uninfected individuals, the lung cancer rate per 100 000 person-years was 66 (n = 80 events) for HIV-infected and 33 (n = 506 events) for HIV-uninfected individuals [rate ratio 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.7-2.2]. Overall, HIV-infected individuals were at increased risk of lung cancer after adjustment for demographics and cancer risk factors (rate ratio 1.4, 95% CI: 1.1-1.7), but not after additional adjustment for pneumonia (rate ratio 1.2, 95% CI: 0.9-1.6). Lower CD4 cell counts were associated with higher risk of lung cancer in unadjusted and demographics-adjusted models (P HIV-uninfected individuals, HIV-infected individuals with CD4 less than 200 cells/μl were not at increased risk of lung cancer in fully adjusted models. The increased lung cancer risk among HIV patients is attributable to differences in demographics, risk factors such as smoking, and history of pneumonia. Immunodeficiency does not appear to have an independent effect on lung cancer risk.

  6. Asthma and the risk of lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yan-Liang; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Li-Xin; Wu, Chun-Min; Chu, Ai-Jie; Wen, Bao-Lei; Ma, Chao; Yan, Xu-Yan; Zhang, Xin; Wang, De-Ming; Lv, Xin; Hou, Shu-Jian

    2017-02-14

    Some studies found that there was a significant association between asthma and the risk of lung cancer. However, the results are inconclusive. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis. We searched the electronic databases for all relevant articles. Odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to calculate the strength of the association between asthma and lung cancer risk. Asthma was significantly associated with the increased risk of lung cancer (OR = 1.44; 95% CI 1.31-1.59; P risk. In the subgroup analysis of race and gender, Caucasians, Asians, male, and female patients with asthma showed the increased risk of lung cancer. However, asthma was not significantly associated with lung adenocarcinoma risk. In the stratified analysis by asthma definition, significant associations were found between asthma and lung cancer in self-reported subgroup, questionnaire subgroup, and register databases subgroup. However, no significant association was observed in physician-diagnosed asthma subgroup. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggested that asthma might be significantly associated with lung cancer risk.

  7. Calculation of lifetime lung cancer risks associated with radon exposure, based on various models and exposure scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Nezahat; Muirhead, Colin R; Bochicchio, Francesco; Haylock, Richard G E

    2015-09-01

    The risk of lung cancer mortality up to 75 years of age due to radon exposure has been estimated for both male and female continuing, ex- and never-smokers, based on various radon risk models and exposure scenarios. We used risk models derived from (i) the BEIR VI analysis of cohorts of radon-exposed miners, (ii) cohort and nested case-control analyses of a European cohort of uranium miners and (iii) the joint analysis of European residential radon case-control studies. Estimates of the lifetime lung cancer risk due to radon varied between these models by just over a factor of 2 and risk estimates based on models from analyses of European uranium miners exposed at comparatively low rates and of people exposed to radon in homes were broadly compatible. For a given smoking category, there was not much difference in lifetime lung cancer risk between males and females. The estimated lifetime risk of radon-induced lung cancer for exposure to a concentration of 200 Bq m(-3) was in the range 2.98-6.55% for male continuing smokers and 0.19-0.42% for male never-smokers, depending on the model used and assuming a multiplicative relationship for the joint effect of radon and smoking. Stopping smoking at age 50 years decreases the lifetime risk due to radon by around a half relative to continuing smoking, but the risk for ex-smokers remains about a factor of 5-7 higher than that for never-smokers. Under a sub-multiplicative model for the joint effect of radon and smoking, the lifetime risk of radon-induced lung cancer was still estimated to be substantially higher for continuing smokers than for never smokers. Radon mitigation-used to reduce radon concentrations at homes-can also have a substantial impact on lung cancer risk, even for persons in their 50 s; for each of continuing smokers, ex-smokers and never-smokers, radon mitigation at age 50 would lower the lifetime risk of radon-induced lung cancer by about one-third. To maximise risk reductions, smokers in high

  8. Study of epidemiological risk of lung cancer in Mexico due indoor radon exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ángeles, A.; Espinosa, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this work the lifetime relative risks (LRR) of lung cancer due to exposure to indoor 222Rn on the Mexican population is calculated. Cigarette smoking is the number one risk factor for lung cancer (LC), because that, to calculate the number of cases of LC due to exposure to 222Rn is necessary considers the number of cases of LC for smoking cigarette. The lung cancer mortality rates published by the "Secretaría de Salud" (SSA), the mexican population data published by the "Consejo Nacional de Población" (CONAPO), smoking data in the mexican population, published by the "Comisión Nacional Contra las Adicciones" (CONADIC), the "Organización Panamericana de la Salud" (OPS) and indoor 222Rn concentrations in Mexico published in several recent studies are used. To calculate the lifetime relative risks (LRR) for different segments of the Mexican population, firstly the Excess Relative Risk (ERR) is calculated using the method developed by the BEIR VI committee and subsequently modified by the USEPA and published in the report "EPA Assessment of Risks from Radon in Homes". The excess relative risks were then used to calculate the corresponding lifetime relative risks, again using the method developed by the BEIR VI committee. The lifetime relative risks for Mexican male and female eversmokers and Mexican male and female never-smokers were calculated for radon concentrations spanning the range found in recent studies of indoor radon concentrations in Mexico. The lifetime relative risks of lung cancer induced by lifetime exposure to the mexican average indoor radon concentration were estimated to be 1.44 and 1.40 for never-smokers mexican females and males respectively, and 1.19 and 1.17 for ever-smokers Mexican females and males respectively. The Mexican population LRR values obtained in relation to the USA and Canada LRR published values in ever-smokers for both gender are similar with differences less than 4%, in case of never-smokers in relation with Canada

  9. A meta-analysis of the association between Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and lung cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua-Feng, X; Yue-Ming, W; Hong, L; Junyi, D

    2015-12-01

    The association between Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and lung cancer risk was not clear with small number of cases in each study. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the correlation between pneumonia infection and lung cancer risk by pooling the open published papers. We searched the electronic databases of Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases for publications related to the association between pneumonia infection and lung cancer risk. Odds ratio (OR) and its 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was used to assess the correlation. The data were pooled by Stata 11.0 software (Stata Corporation, College Station, TX, USA). Thirteen publications, involving 2549 lung cancer patients and 2764 controls were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled results indicated that the C. pneumoniae infection significant increased the risk of lung cancer OR = 2.07 (95% CI: 1.43-2.99) by random effect model. And for serum IgG, 12 publications reported the IgG positive rate in lung cancer patients and relative healthy controls. The pooled OR was 2.22 (95% CI: 1.41-3.50) by using the random effects model which indicated that the IgG positive rate was significantly higher in lung cancer patients than that of healthy controls. The sensitivity analysis indicated the pooled OR was not sensitive to a single study. However, Begger's funnel plot and Egger's line regression analysis indicated significant publications bias for this meta-analysis. According to the present published data, C. pneumoniae infection may increase the risk of lung cancer. However, for its significant publications and heterogeneity among the included studies, the conclusion should be interpreted cautiously.

  10. Metformin and lung cancer risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2017-06-20

    This study evaluated whether metformin might reduce lung cancer risk. The reimbursement database of the Taiwan's National Health Insurance was used. A sample of 15414 never users and 280159 ever users of metformin (original sample) and a 1:1 matched-pairs of ever and never users (n=15414 in each group, matched sample) were recruited from patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus during 1999-2005. They were followed until December 31, 2011. Cox regression incorporated with the inverse probability of treatment weighting using propensity score was used to estimate hazard ratios. Results showed that the respective incidence of lung cancer in ever and never users was 173.36 and 292.65 per 100000 person-years in the original sample; and was 211.71 and 292.65, respectively, in the matched sample. The overall hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of 0.586 (0.509-0.674) in the original sample and 0.717 (0.584-0.881) in the matched sample suggested a significantly lower risk among metformin users. Hazard ratios comparing the first (46.67 months) tertile of cumulative duration of metformin use to never users was 1.163 (1.005-1.348), 0.612 (0.526-0.711) and 0.176 (0.148-0.210), respectively, in the original sample; and was 1.465 (1.131-1.897), 0.758 (0.566-1.016) and 0.228 (1.460-0.357) in the respective tertile of the matched sample. Sensitivity analyses after excluding patients with certain risk factors of cancer and subgroup analyses supported a favorable effect of metformin. In conclusion,metformin use may reduce lung cancer risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  11. Blood lipids profile and lung cancer risk in a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaojing; Lu, Lei; Liu, Lingli; Wei, Siyu; He, Yunyun; Chang, Jing; Lian, Xuemei

    Emerging evidence has connected lipid metabolism disturbance with lung diseases, but the relationship between blood lipid profile and lung cancer risk is controversial and inconclusive. We conducted a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to evaluate the relationship between blood lipids profile and lung cancer incidence. Relevant studies were identified by searching PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, EBSCO, Ovid, CNKI, VIP, and WANGFANG MED through August 2016. Nine prospective cohort studies were included in the meta-analysis, and fixed or random effects model was used to calculate pooled relative risk (RRs). The RR was calculated using either highest vs lowest categories, or upper quantile vs lowest quantile. The thresholds were determined by the authors of each original publication, based on either predefined cut-offs or the distributions within their study population. Analysis of 18,111 lung cancer cases among 1,832,880 participants showed that serum total cholesterol levels were inverse associated with lung cancer risk (RR = 0.93, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.85-1.03). Further analysis considered the lag time and excluded the effects of preclinical cancer, with totally 1,239,948 participants and 14,052 lung cancer cases, found a significantly inverse association between total cholesterol and lung cancer risk (RR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.83-0.94). Analysis of 3067 lung cancer cases among 59,242 participants found that the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (RR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.59-0.97) was negatively associated with lung cancer risk and 4673 lung cancer cases among 685,852 participants showed that the total triglyceride (RR = 1.68, 95% CI: 1.44-1.96) was positively associated with lung cancer risk. Cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism might present different and specific mechanism on lung cancer etiology and needs further elucidation. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Periodontal Disease and Incident Lung Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xian-Tao; Xia, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Yong-Gang; Li, Sheng; Leng, Wei-Dong; Kwong, Joey S W

    2016-10-01

    Periodontal disease is linked to a number of systemic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus. Recent evidence has suggested periodontal disease might be associated with lung cancer. However, their precise relationship is yet to be explored. Hence, this study aims to investigate the association of periodontal disease and risk of incident lung cancer using a meta-analytic approach. PubMed, Scopus, and ScienceDirect were searched up to June 10, 2015. Cohort and nested case-control studies investigating risk of lung cancer in patients with periodontal disease were included. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated, as were their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a fixed-effect inverse-variance model. Statistical heterogeneity was explored using the Q test as well as the I(2) statistic. Publication bias was assessed by visual inspection of funnel plots symmetry and Egger's test. Five cohort studies were included, involving 321,420 participants in this meta-analysis. Summary estimates based on adjusted data showed that periodontal disease was associated with a significant risk of lung cancer (HR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.13 to 1.36; I(2) = 30%). No publication bias was detected. Subgroup analysis indicated that the association of periodontal disease and lung cancer remained significant in the female population. Evidence from cohort studies suggests that patients with periodontal disease are at increased risk of developing lung cancer.

  13. CHRNA5 risk variant predicts delayed smoking cessation and earlier lung cancer diagnosis--a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Shiun; Hung, Rayjean J; Baker, Timothy; Horton, Amy; Culverhouse, Rob; Saccone, Nancy; Cheng, Iona; Deng, Bo; Han, Younghun; Hansen, Helen M; Horsman, Janet; Kim, Claire; Lutz, Sharon; Rosenberger, Albert; Aben, Katja K; Andrew, Angeline S; Breslau, Naomi; Chang, Shen-Chih; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Dienemann, Hendrik; Frederiksen, Brittni; Han, Jiali; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Johnson, Eric O; Pande, Mala; Wrensch, Margaret R; McLaughlin, John; Skaug, Vidar; van der Heijden, Henricus F; Wampfler, Jason; Wenzlaff, Angela; Woll, Penella; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh; Bickeböller, Heike; Brenner, Hermann; Duell, Eric J; Haugen, Aage; Heinrich, Joachim; Hokanson, John E; Hunter, David J; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Lazarus, Philip; Le Marchand, Loic; Liu, Geoffrey; Mayordomo, Jose; Risch, Angela; Schwartz, Ann G; Teare, Dawn; Wu, Xifeng; Wiencke, John K; Yang, Ping; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Spitz, Margaret R; Kraft, Peter; Amos, Christopher I; Bierut, Laura J

    2015-05-01

    Recent meta-analyses show strong evidence of associations among genetic variants in CHRNA5 on chromosome 15q25, smoking quantity, and lung cancer. This meta-analysis tests whether the CHRNA5 variant rs16969968 predicts age of smoking cessation and age of lung cancer diagnosis. Meta-analyses examined associations between rs16969968, age of quitting smoking, and age of lung cancer diagnosis in 24 studies of European ancestry (n = 29 072). In each dataset, we used Cox regression models to evaluate the association between rs16969968 and the two primary phenotypes (age of smoking cessation among ever smokers and age of lung cancer diagnosis among lung cancer case patients) and the secondary phenotype of smoking duration. Heterogeneity across studies was assessed with the Cochran Q test. All statistical tests were two-sided. The rs16969968 allele (A) was associated with a lower likelihood of smoking cessation (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.91 to 0.98, P = .0042), and the AA genotype was associated with a four-year delay in median age of quitting compared with the GG genotype. Among smokers with lung cancer diagnoses, the rs16969968 genotype (AA) was associated with a four-year earlier median age of diagnosis compared with the low-risk genotype (GG) (HR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.12, P = 1.1*10(-5)). These data support the clinical significance of the CHRNA5 variant rs16969968. It predicts delayed smoking cessation and an earlier age of lung cancer diagnosis in this meta-analysis. Given the existing evidence that this CHRNA5 variant predicts favorable response to cessation pharmacotherapy, these findings underscore the potential clinical and public health importance of rs16969968 in CHRNA5 in relation to smoking cessation success and lung cancer risk. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms and interaction with smoking and alcohol consumption in lung cancer risk: a case-control study in a Japanese population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is an established risk factor of lung cancer development while the current epidemiological evidence is suggestive of an increased lung cancer risk associated with alcohol consumption. Dietary folate, which is present in a wide range of fresh fruits and vegetables, may be a micronutrient that has a beneficial impact on lung carcinogenesis. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) plays a crucial role in regulating folate metabolism, which affects both DNA synthesis/repair and methylation. We examined if smoking or alcohol consumption modify associations between MTHFR polymorphisms and lung cancer risk. Methods We evaluated the role of the MTHFR C677T (rs1801133) and A1298C (rs1801131) polymorphisms in a case-control study comprised of 462 lung cancer cases and 379 controls in a Japanese population. Logistic regression was used to assess the adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Results The TT genotype of the C677T polymorphism was significantly associated with an increased risk of lung cancer (OR = 2.27, 95% CI = 1.42 - 3.62, P A1298C polymorphism was not associated with lung cancer risk. The minor alleles of both polymorphisms behaved in a recessive fashion. The highest risks were seen for 677TT-carriers with a history of smoking or excessive drinking (OR = 6.16, 95% CI = 3.48 - 10.9 for smoking; OR = 3.09, 95% CI = 1.64 - 5.81 for drinking) compared with C-carriers without a history of smoking or excessive drinking, but no interactions were seen. The 1298CC genotype was only associated with increased risk among non-smokers (P A1298C polymorphism and drinking (P A1298C polymorphism was not associated with lung cancer risk, a significant interaction with drinking was observed. Future studies incorporating data on folate intake may undoubtedly lead to a more thorough understanding of the role of the MTHFR polymorphisms in lung cancer development. PMID:22024018

  15. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms and interaction with smoking and alcohol consumption in lung cancer risk: a case-control study in a Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyohara, Chikako; Horiuchi, Takahiko; Takayama, Koichi; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2011-10-25

    Cigarette smoking is an established risk factor of lung cancer development while the current epidemiological evidence is suggestive of an increased lung cancer risk associated with alcohol consumption. Dietary folate, which is present in a wide range of fresh fruits and vegetables, may be a micronutrient that has a beneficial impact on lung carcinogenesis. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) plays a crucial role in regulating folate metabolism, which affects both DNA synthesis/repair and methylation. We examined if smoking or alcohol consumption modify associations between MTHFR polymorphisms and lung cancer risk. We evaluated the role of the MTHFR C677T (rs1801133) and A1298C (rs1801131) polymorphisms in a case-control study comprised of 462 lung cancer cases and 379 controls in a Japanese population. Logistic regression was used to assess the adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). The TT genotype of the C677T polymorphism was significantly associated with an increased risk of lung cancer (OR = 2.27, 95% CI = 1.42 - 3.62, P A1298C polymorphism was not associated with lung cancer risk. The minor alleles of both polymorphisms behaved in a recessive fashion. The highest risks were seen for 677TT-carriers with a history of smoking or excessive drinking (OR = 6.16, 95% CI = 3.48 - 10.9 for smoking; OR = 3.09, 95% CI = 1.64 - 5.81 for drinking) compared with C-carriers without a history of smoking or excessive drinking, but no interactions were seen. The 1298CC genotype was only associated with increased risk among non-smokers (P A1298C polymorphism and drinking (P A1298C polymorphism was not associated with lung cancer risk, a significant interaction with drinking was observed. Future studies incorporating data on folate intake may undoubtedly lead to a more thorough understanding of the role of the MTHFR polymorphisms in lung cancer development.

  16. Lung cancer in symptomatic patients presenting in primary care: a systematic review of risk prediction tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Hansen, Mia; Berendse, Sabine; Hamilton, Willie; Baldwin, David R

    2017-06-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths. Around 70% of patients first presenting to specialist care have advanced disease, at which point current treatments have little effect on survival. The issue for primary care is how to recognise patients earlier and investigate appropriately. This requires an assessment of the risk of lung cancer. The aim of this study was to systematically review the existing risk prediction tools for patients presenting in primary care with symptoms that may indicate lung cancer DESIGN AND SETTING: Systematic review of primary care data. Medline, PreMedline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and ISI Proceedings (1980 to March 2016) were searched. The final list of included studies was agreed between two of the authors, who also appraised and summarised them. Seven studies with between 1482 and 2 406 127 patients were included. The tools were all based on UK primary care data, but differed in complexity of development, number/type of variables examined/included, and outcome time frame. There were four multivariable tools with internal validation area under the curves between 0.88 and 0.92. The tools all had a number of limitations, and none have been externally validated, or had their clinical and cost impact examined. There is insufficient evidence for the recommendation of any one of the available risk prediction tools. However, some multivariable tools showed promising discrimination. What is needed to guide clinical practice is both external validation of the existing tools and a comparative study, so that the best tools can be incorporated into clinical decision tools used in primary care. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  17. MMP1-1607(1G>2G polymorphism and the risk of lung cancer in Lebanon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Fakhoury

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are a family of enzymes that degrade various components of the extracellular matrix and are involved in the development and progression of cancer. Lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in Lebanon. MMP1 is responsible for degrading stromal collagens, which enhance the ability of neoplastic cells to cross basal membrane of both the endothelium and the vascular endothelium. A recent meta-analysis has suggested that the MMP1-1607 2G allele may be associated with an increased risk for certain types of cancers. Aim: This study was undertaken to investigate the association between guanine insertion polymorphism in the MMP1 promoter and the susceptibility to lung cancer in the Lebanese population. Settings and Design: This case-control study was conducted on 41 patients with lung cancer and 51 age-matched healthy controls, recruited from different regions of Lebanon. Methods: Cases were histologically confirmed lung cancer patients obtained from different hospitals in Lebanon. Controls were healthy unrelated individuals with no history of cancer or genetic diseases. All subjects were genotyped for MMP1 -1607(1G>2G polymorphism using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method (PCR-RFLP. Results: No statistically significant differences were found when genotype and allele distribution of MMP1 -1607(1G>2G polymorphism were compared between patients with lung cancer and controls [P= 0.6 by chi-squared test on a 3x2 contingency table; allelic P=0.61, OR (95% CI = 1.18 (0.60-2.31]. Conclusion: Our data shows that MMP1 promoter polymorphism is not associated with lung cancer susceptibility in the Lebanese population.

  18. [Estimation of the excess of lung cancer mortality risk associated to environmental tobacco smoke exposure of hospitality workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, M José; Nebot, Manel; Juárez, Olga; Ariza, Carles; Salles, Joan; Serrahima, Eulàlia

    2006-01-14

    To estimate the excess lung cancer mortality risk associated with environmental tobacco (ETS) smoke exposure among hospitality workers. The estimation was done using objective measures in several hospitality settings in Barcelona. Vapour phase nicotine was measured in several hospitality settings. These measurements were used to estimate the excess lung cancer mortality risk associated with ETS exposure for a 40 year working life, using the formula developed by Repace and Lowrey. Excess lung cancer mortality risk associated with ETS exposure was higher than 145 deaths per 100,000 workers in all places studied, except for cafeterias in hospitals, where excess lung cancer mortality risk was 22 per 100,000. In discoteques, for comparison, excess lung cancer mortality risk is 1,733 deaths per 100,000 workers. Hospitality workers are exposed to ETS levels related to a very high excess lung cancer mortality risk. These data confirm that ETS control measures are needed to protect hospital workers.

  19. Particulate matter air pollution components and risk for lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaschou-Nielsen, O.; Beelen, R.; Wang, M.; Hoek, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413650944; Andersen, Z. J.; Hoffmann, B.; Stafoggia, M.; Samoli, E.; Weinmayr, G.; Dimakopoulou, K.; Nieuwenhuijsen, M.; Xun, W. W.; Fischer, P.; Eriksen, K. T.; Sørensen, M.; Tjønneland, A.; Ricceri, F.; de Hoogh, K.; Key, T.; Eeftens, M.; Peeters, P. H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074099655; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06929528X; Meliefste, K.; Oftedal, B.; Schwarze, P. E.; Nafstad, P.; Galassi, C.; Migliore, E.; Ranzi, A.; Cesaroni, G.; Badaloni, C.; Forastiere, F.; Penell, J.; De Faire, U.; Korek, M.; Pedersen, N.; Östenson, C. G.; Pershagen, G.; Fratiglioni, L.; Concin, H.; Nagel, G.; Jaensch, A.; Ineichen, A.; Naccarati, A.; Katsoulis, M.; Trichpoulou, A.; Keuken, M.; Jedynska, A.; Kooter, I. M.; Kukkonen, J.; Brunekreef, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067548180; Sokhi, R. S.; Katsouyanni, K.; Vineis, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Particulate matter (PM) air pollution is a human lung carcinogen; however, the components responsible have not been identified. We assessed the associations between PM components and lung cancer incidence. Methods: We used data from 14 cohort studies in eight European countries. We

  20. Lung cancer risk prediction method based on feature selection and artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Nan-Nan; Hu, Liang; Li, Tai-Hui

    2014-01-01

    A method to predict the risk of lung cancer is proposed, based on two feature selection algorithms: Fisher and ReliefF, and BP Neural Networks. An appropriate quantity of risk factors was chosen for lung cancer risk prediction. The process featured two steps, firstly choosing the risk factors by combining two feature selection algorithms, then providing the predictive value by neural network. Based on the method framework, an algorithm LCRP (lung cancer risk prediction) is presented, to reduce the amount of risk factors collected in practical applications. The proposed method is suitable for health monitoring and self-testing. Experiments showed it can actually provide satisfactory accuracy under low dimensions of risk factors.

  1. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Malcolm V.; Ford, Jean G.; Samet, Jonathan M.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ever since a lung cancer epidemic emerged in the mid-1900s, the epidemiology of lung cancer has been intensively investigated to characterize its causes and patterns of occurrence. This report summarizes the key findings of this research. Methods: A detailed literature search provided the basis for a narrative review, identifying and summarizing key reports on population patterns and factors that affect lung cancer risk. Results: Established environmental risk factors for lung cancer include smoking cigarettes and other tobacco products and exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke, occupational lung carcinogens, radiation, and indoor and outdoor air pollution. Cigarette smoking is the predominant cause of lung cancer and the leading worldwide cause of cancer death. Smoking prevalence in developing nations has increased, starting new lung cancer epidemics in these nations. A positive family history and acquired lung disease are examples of host factors that are clinically useful risk indicators. Risk prediction models based on lung cancer risk factors have been developed, but further refinement is needed to provide clinically useful risk stratification. Promising biomarkers of lung cancer risk and early detection have been identified, but none are ready for broad clinical application. Conclusions: Almost all lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking, underscoring the need for ongoing efforts at tobacco control throughout the world. Further research is needed into the reasons underlying lung cancer disparities, the causes of lung cancer in never smokers, the potential role of HIV in lung carcinogenesis, and the development of biomarkers. PMID:23649439

  2. Predictive Accuracy of the PanCan Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Model -External Validation based on CT from the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler Wille, Mathilde M.; van Riel, Sarah J.; Saghir, Zaigham

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Lung cancer risk models should be externally validated to test generalizability and clinical usefulness. The Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial (DLCST) is a population-based prospective cohort study, used to assess the discriminative performances of the PanCan models. Methods: From...... the DLCST database, 1,152 nodules from 718 participants were included. Parsimonious and full PanCan risk prediction models were applied to DLCST data, and also coefficients of the model were recalculated using DLCST data. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves and area under the curve (AUC) were...... used to evaluate risk discrimination. Results: AUCs of 0.826–0.870 were found for DLCST data based on PanCan risk prediction models. In the DLCST, age and family history were significant predictors (p = 0.001 and p = 0.013). Female sex was not confirmed to be associated with higher risk of lung cancer...

  3. Genetic variation in BCL2 3'-UTR was associated with lung cancer risk and prognosis in male Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Xu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Bcl-2 is a critical apoptosis inhibitor with established carcinogenic potential, and can confer cancer cell resistance to therapeutic treatments by activating anti-apoptotic cellular defense. We hypothesized that genetic variants of BCL2 gene may be associated with lung cancer susceptibility and prognosis. METHODS: Three selected tagSNPs of BCL2 (rs2279115, rs1801018, and rs1564483 were genotyped in 1017 paired male Chinese lung cancer cases and controls by TaqMan assay. The associations of these variants with risk of lung cancer and overall survival of 242 male advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients were separately investigated. RESULTS: Compared with the BCL2 3'UTR rs1564483GG genotype, the rs1564483GA, AA, and GA+AA genotypes were associated with significantly decreased susceptibilities of lung cancer in male Chinese (adjusted OR = 0.78, 0.73, and 0.76, P = 0.016, 0.038, and 0.007, respectively, while rs1564483A allele has a inverse dose-response relationship with lung cancer risk (P trend = 0.010. These effects were more evident in the elders, smokers, and subjects without family history of cancer (P trend = 0.017, 0.043 and 0.005, respectively. Furthermore, advanced NSCLC males carrying BCL2 rs1564483 GA+AA genotypes had significantly longer median survival time (Long-rank P = 0.036 and decreased death risk (adjusted HR = 0.69, P = 0.027 than patients with rs1564483GG genotype. These effects were more obvious in patients with smoking, stage IIIA, and in patients without surgery but underwent chemotherapy or radiotherapy (adjusted HR = 0.68, 0.49, 0.67, 0.69, 0.50, respectively, all P<0.05. CONCLUSION: The BCL2 3'UTR rs1564483A allele was associated with a decreased lung cancer risk and better survival for advanced NSCLC in male Chinese, which may offer a novel biomarker for identifying high-risk population and predicting clinical outcomes.

  4. Dairy consumption and lung cancer risk: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Y

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Yi Yu,1,* Hui Li,1,* Kaiwu Xu,2,* Xin Li,1 Chunlin Hu,1 Hongyan Wei,1 Xiaoyun Zeng,1 Xiaoli Jing1 1Emergency Department, 2Gastrointestinal Surgery Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Lung cancer risk is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship between dairy consumption and lung cancer risk. Methods: The databases included EMBASE, Medline (PubMed, and Web of Science. The relationship between dairy consumption and lung cancer risk was analyzed by relative risk or odds ratio estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. We identified eight prospective cohort studies, which amounted to 10,344 cases and 61,901 participants. Results: For milk intake, relative risk was 0.95 (95% CI: 0.76–1.15; heterogeneity was 70.2% (P=0.003. For total dairy product intake, relative risk was 0.96 (95% CI: 0.89–1.03, heterogeneity was 68.4% (P=0.004. Conclusion: There was no significant association between dairy consumption and lung cancer risk. Keywords: lung cancer, meta-analysis, milk, dairy products

  5. Radon, smoking and HPV as lung cancer risk factors in ecological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinovsky, Georgy; Yarmoshenko, Ilia; Zhukovsky, Michael

    2017-11-02

    Cohen's ecological analyses revealed negative correlation between the lung cancer mortality and average indoor radon concentration in the US counties, that contradicts to linear non-threshold (LNT) model and is inconsistent with results of case-control studies. The aim of the study was to analyze dependence between radon exposure and lung cancer mortality rate taking into account more complete data on smoking and new findings on association of the lung cancer with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Information on the cancer rates in the US counties and Russian oblasts, smoking prevalence and indoor radon concentration was found in literature. The cervix cancer incidence rate was used as surrogate of the HPV infection prevalence. The analysis included calculation of the coefficients of linear dependence between radon exposure and lung cancer mortality rate with adjustment to smoking and HPV infection prevalence. After adjustment for the most relevant data on smoking and HPV infection, correlation between the lung cancer mortality and indoor radon was found to be consistent with results of the case control studies. Analysis of geographically aggregated data on the lung cancer mortality and radon concentration in dwellings with adjustment to the significant risk factors confirms both the linear non-threshold dependency and results obtained in studies with individual accounting for the smoking and radon.

  6. Occupational exposure to crystalline silica and the risk of lung cancer in Canadian men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachuri, Linda; Villeneuve, Paul J; Parent, Marie-Élise; Johnson, Kenneth C; Harris, Shelley A

    2014-07-01

    Crystalline silica is a recognized carcinogen, but the association with lung cancer at lower levels of exposure has not been well characterized. This study investigated the relationship between occupational silica exposure and lung cancer and the combined effects of cigarette smoking and silica exposure on lung cancer risk. A population-based case-control study was conducted in eight Canadian provinces between 1994 and 1997. Self-reported questionnaires were used to obtain a lifetime occupational history and information on other risk factors. Occupational hygienists assigned silica exposures to each job based on concentration, frequency and reliability. Data from 1681 incident lung cancer cases and 2053 controls were analyzed using logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Models included adjustments for cigarette smoking, lifetime residential second-hand smoke and occupational exposure to diesel and gasoline engine emissions. Relative to the unexposed, increasing duration of silica exposure at any concentration was associated with a significant trend in lung cancer risk (OR ≥ 30 years: 1.67, 1.21-2.24; ptrend  = 0.002). The highest tertile of cumulative silica exposure was associated with lung cancer (OR = 1.81, 1.34-2.42; ptrend  = 0.004) relative to the lowest. Men exposed to silica for ≥30 years with ≥40 cigarette pack-years had the highest risk relative to those unexposed with silica is a risk factor for lung cancer, independently from active and passive smoking, as well as from exposure to other lung carcinogens. © 2013 UICC.

  7. Functional genetic polymorphisms in PP2A subunit genes confer increased risks of lung cancer in southern and eastern Chinese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongrong Yang

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A is one of the major cellular serine-threonine phosphatases and functions as a tumor suppressor that negatively regulates the activity of some oncogenic kinases. Recent studies have reported that PP2A expression was suppressed during lung carcinogenesis, we there hypothesized that the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in PP2A subunit genes may affect PP2A function and thus contribute to lung cancer susceptibility. In a two-stage case-control study with a total of 1559 lung cancer patients and 1679 controls, we genotyped eight putative functional SNPs and one identified functional SNP (i.e., rs11453459 in seven major PP2A subunits (i.e., PPP2R1A, PPP2R1B, PPP2CA, PPP2R2A, PPP2R2B, PPP2R5C, PPP2R5E in southern and eastern Chinese. We found that rs11453459G (-G/GG variant genotypes of PPP2R1A and the rs1255722AA variant genotype of PPP2R5E conferred increased risks of lung cancer (rs11453459, -G/GG vs. -: OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.13-1.51; rs1255722, AA vs.OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.07-1.51. After combined the two variants, the number of the adverse genotypes was positively associated with lung cancer risk in a dose-response manner (P trend = 5.63 × 10(-6. Further functional assay showed that lung cancer tissues carrying rs1255722AA variant genotype had a significantly lower mRNA level of PPP2R5E compared with tissues carrying GG/GA genotypes. However, such effect was not observed for the other SNPs and other combinations. Our findings suggested that the two functional variants in PPP2R1A and PPP2R5E and their combination are associated with lung cancer risk in Chinese, which may be valuable biomarkers to predict risk of lung cancer.

  8. Pulmonary tuberculosis and lung cancer risk in current smokers: the Seoul Male Cancer Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jong-Myon; Li, Zhong-Min; Shin, Myung-Hee; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Moo-Song; Ahn, Yoon-Ok

    2013-06-01

    Authors evaluated pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) history as a risk factor for lung cancer in current male smokers in a prospective, population-based cohort study. The subjects were the 7,009 males among the participants in the Seoul Male Cancer Cohort Study for whom there was full information on PTB history and smoking habits. With a 16-yr follow-up, 93 cases of lung cancer occurred over the 99,965 person-years of the study. The estimated relative risk (RR) of PTB history of current smokers in lung cancer after adjusting for three confounders - intake of coffee and tomatoes, and age at entry - was 1.85 (95% CI: 1.08-3.19). The observed joint RRs and attributable risks (ARs) across strata of three confounders were greater than the expected, indicating a positive interaction. Thus a history of PTB in current smokers may be another risk factor for lung cancer. Based on a synergic interaction, a heavy male smoker with a PTB history would be expected to belong to the group at high risk of lung cancer.

  9. Dietary intake of B vitamins and methionine and risk of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, J K; Hodge, A M; English, D R; Baglietto, L; Hopper, J L; Giles, G G; Severi, G

    2012-02-01

    B vitamins and related enzymes involved in one-carbon metabolism are necessary for DNA replication, DNA repair and regulation of gene expression. Disruption of one-carbon mechanism may affect cancer risk. We investigated prospectively the relationship between dietary intakes of methionine, B vitamins associated with one-carbon metabolism and risk of lung cancer. The Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study recruited 41,514 men and women aged 40-69 years between 1990 and 1994. During follow-up of 14,595 men and 22,451 women for an average of 15 years, we ascertained 348 incident lung cancers. Dietary intake of B vitamins and methionine was estimated from a 121-item food frequency questionnaire. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cox regression. In current smokers, dietary intake of riboflavin was inversely associated with lung cancer risk (HR=0.53; 95% CI: 0.29-0.94, fifth versus first quintile; P-linear trend=0.01). No associations were found for former or never smokers or for dietary intake of any of the other B vitamins or methionine. Overall, we found little evidence of an association between B vitamins or methionine and lung cancer risk. The weak inverse association between riboflavin and lung cancer risk in current smokers needs further investigation.

  10. Dietary factors and lung cancer risk in Japanese: with special reference to fish consumption and adenocarcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezaki, T; Hirose, K; Inoue, M; Hamajima, N; Yatabe, Y; Mitsudomi, T; Sugiura, T; Kuroishi, T; Tajima, K

    2001-01-01

    To investigate risk modification for lung cancer with diet in Japanese, we conducted a hospital-based case–control study and evaluated variation in influence with the histological type. We recruited 367 male and 240 female cases with adenocarcinomas, and 381 male and 57 female cases with squamous cell and small cell carcinomas. Controls comprised 2964 male and 1189 female cancer-free outpatients matched for sex and age with the cases. Odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for lung cancer were calculated with adjustment for potential confounding factors, using an unconditional logistic model. We found decreased ORs for adenocarcinomas in both males (OR = 0.51, 95% CI 0.31–0.84) and females (OR = 0.48, 95% CI 0.24–0.94) who consumed cooked/raw fish, but not dried/salted fish at the highest quartile frequency, compared with the lowest. Soybean curd consumption was associated with a decreased OR for female adenocarcinomas. Decreased ORs for squamous cell and small cell carcinomas were observed in males with frequent consumption of raw and green vegetables, fruit and milk, but consumption of carrot, pumpkin, egg and coffee was associated with increased ORs. This study suggests cooked/raw fish consumption lowers the risk of adenocarcinoma of the lung in Japanese. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11336471

  11. Occupational exposures to leaded and unleaded gasoline engine emissions and lung cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mengting; Siemiatycki, Jack; Lavoué, Jérôme; Pasquet, Romain; Pintos, Javier; Rousseau, Marie-Claude; Richardson, Lesley; Ho, Vikki

    2017-12-21

    To determine whether occupational exposure to gasoline engine emissions (GEE) increased the risk of lung cancer and more specifically whether leaded or unleaded GEE increased the risk. Two population-based case-control studies were conducted in Montreal, Canada. The first was conducted in the early 1980s and included many types of cancer including lung cancer. The second was conducted in the late 1990s and focused on lung cancer. Population controls were used in both studies. Altogether, there were 1595 cases and 1432 population controls. A comprehensive expert-based exposure assessment procedure was implemented and exposure was assessed for 294 agents, including unleaded GEE, leaded GEE and diesel engine emissions (DEE). Logistic regression analyses were conducted to estimate ORs between various metrics of GEE exposure and lung cancer, adjusting for smoking, DEE and other potential confounders. About half of all controls were occupationally exposed to GEE. Irrespective of the metrics of exposure (any exposure, duration of exposure and cumulative exposure) and the type of lung cancer, and the covariates included in models, none of the point estimates of the ORs between occupational exposure to leaded or unleaded GEE and lung cancer were above 1.0. Pooling two studies, the OR for any exposure to leaded GEE was 0.82 (0.68-1.00). Our results do not support the hypothesis that occupational exposure to GEE increases the risk of lung cancer. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Risk factors associated with treatment refusal in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Won Na; Kong, Kyoung Ae; Han, Yeji; Kim, Soo Jung; Lee, Su Hwan; Ryu, Yon Ju; Lee, Jin Hwa; Shim, Sung Shine; Kim, Yookyung; Chang, Jung Hyun

    2017-09-01

    The incidence of lung cancer is increasing with longer life expectancy. Refusal of active treatment for cancer is prone to cause patients to experience more severe symptoms and shorten survival. The purpose of this study was to define the factors related to refusal or abandonment of active therapy in lung cancer. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 617 patients from medical records from 2010 to 2014. Two groups were formed: 149 patients who refused anti-cancer treatment and allowed only palliative care were classified into the non-treatment group, while the remaining 468 who received anti-cancer treatment were classified into the treatment group. The groups differed significantly in age, employment, relationship status, number of offspring, educational status, body mass index, presence of chest and systemic symptoms, Charlson Comorbidity Index, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score, and tumor node metastasis stage ( P refusal of cancer treatment. Individual factors, such as old age, low educational status, low weight, and poor performance status can influence refusal of cancer treatment in patients with lung cancer, and should be considered prior to consultation with patients. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Particulate matter air pollution components and risk for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaschou-Nielsen, O.; Beelen, Rob; Wang, M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Particulate matter (PM) air pollution is a human lung carcinogen; however, the components responsible have not been identified. We assessed the associations between PM components and lung cancer incidence. METHODS: We used data from 14 cohort studies in eight European countries. We...... geocoded baseline addresses and assessed air pollution with land-use regression models for eight elements (Cu, Fe, K, Ni, S, Si, V and Zn) in size fractions of PM2.5 and PM10. We used Cox regression models with adjustment for potential confounders for cohort-specific analyses and random effect models.......59; 1.12-2.26 per 2ng/m(3)) and PM10 K (1.17; 1.02-1.33 per 100ng/m(3)). In two-pollutant models, associations between PM10 and PM2.5 and lung cancer were largely explained by PM2.5 S. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that the association between PM in air pollution and lung cancer can be attributed...

  14. Relationship between cyclooxygenase 8473T>C polymorphism and the risk of lung cancer: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Young

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 plays an important role in the development of lung cancer. DNA sequence variations in the COX-2 gene may lead to altered COX-2 production and/or activity, and so they cause inter-individual differences in the susceptibility to lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the association between the 8473T>C polymorphism in the 3'-untranslated region of the COX-2 gene and the risk of lung cancer in a Korean population. Methods The COX-2 genotypes were determined using PCR-based primer-introduced restriction analysis in 582 lung cancer patients and in 582 healthy controls that were frequency-matched for age and gender. Results The distribution of the COX-2 8473T>C genotypes was not significantly different between the overall lung cancer cases and the controls. However, when the cases were categorized by the tumor histology, the combined 8473 TC + CC genotype was associated with a significantly decreased risk of adenocarcinoma as compared with the 8473 TT genotype (adjusted OR = 0.64; 95% CI = 0.46–0.90, P = 0.01. On the stratification analysis, the protective effect of the combined 8473 TC + CC genotype against adenocarcinoma was statistically significant in the males, older individuals and ever-smokers (adjusted OR = 0.59; 95% CI = 0.39–0.91, P = 0.02; adjusted OR = 0.55; 95% CI = 0.33–0.93, P = 0.03; and adjusted OR = 0.57; 95% CI = 0.37–0.87, P = 0.01, respectively. Conclusion These findings suggest that the COX-2 8473T>C polymorphism could be used as a marker for the genetic susceptibility to adenocarcinoma of the lung.

  15. Alcohol and lung cancer risk among never smokers: A pooled analysis from the international lung cancer consortium and the SYNERGY study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehringer, Gordon; Brenner, Darren R; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Lan, Qing; Vineis, Paolo; Johansson, Mattias; Overvad, Kim; Riboli, Elio; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Stucker, Isabelle; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Christiani, David C; Hong, Yun-Chul; Landi, Maria Teresa; Morgenstern, Hal; Schwartz, Ann G; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Rennert, Gad; McLaughlin, John R; Harris, Curtis C; Olivo-Marston, Susan; Orlow, Irene; Park, Bernard J; Zauderer, Marjorie; Barros Dios, Juan M; Ruano Raviña, Alberto; Siemiatycki, Jack; Koushik, Anita; Lazarus, Philip; Fernández-Somoano, Ana; Tardon, Adonina; Le Marchand, Loic; Brenner, Hermann; Saum, Kai-Uwe; Duell, Eric J; Andrew, Angeline S; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Zaridze, David; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Mates, Dana; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Bencko, Vladimir; Holcatova, Ivana; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Consonni, Dario; Olsson, Ann; Straif, Kurt; Hung, Rayjean J

    2017-05-01

    It is not clear whether alcohol consumption is associated with lung cancer risk. The relationship is likely confounded by smoking, complicating the interpretation of previous studies. We examined the association of alcohol consumption and lung cancer risk in a large pooled international sample, minimizing potential confounding of tobacco consumption by restricting analyses to never smokers. Our study included 22 case-control and cohort studies with a total of 2548 never-smoking lung cancer patients and 9362 never-smoking controls from North America, Europe and Asia within the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO) and SYNERGY Consortium. Alcohol consumption was categorized into amounts consumed (grams per day) and also modelled as a continuous variable using restricted cubic splines for potential non-linearity. Analyses by histologic sub-type were included. Associations by type of alcohol consumed (wine, beer and liquor) were also investigated. Alcohol consumption was inversely associated with lung cancer risk with evidence most strongly supporting lower risk for light and moderate drinkers relative to non-drinkers (>0-4.9 g per day: OR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.70-0.90; 5-9.9 g per day: OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.69-0.99; 10-19.9 g per day: OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.65-0.96). Inverse associations were found for consumption of wine and liquor, but not beer. The results indicate that alcohol consumption is inversely associated with lung cancer risk, particularly among subjects with low to moderate consumption levels, and among wine and liquor drinkers, but not beer drinkers. Although our results should have no relevant bias from the confounding effect of smoking we cannot preclude that confounding by other factors contributed to the observed associations. Confounding in relation to the non-drinker reference category may be of particular importance. © 2017 UICC.

  16. Polymorphisms in folate metabolic genes and lung cancer risk in Xuan Wei, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, M.; Rothman, N.; Berndt, S.I.; He, X.Z.; Yeager, M.; Welch, R.; Chanock, S.; Caporaso, N.; Lan, Q. [DHHS, Bethesda, MD (United States). Occupational & Environmental Epidemiology Branch

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of genetic polymorphisms in twelve folate metabolism genes on the risk of lung cancer in Xuan Wei, China, where the lung cancer mortality rate is among the highest and is mainly caused by indoor smoky coal emissions. A total of 122 incident primary lung cancer cases and 122 matched controls were enrolled. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms were associated with increased risk of lung cancer including homozygotes of the C allele of CBS Ala360Ala (OR: 4.02; 95% CI: 1.64-9.87), the 222Val allele of MTHFR (OR: 2.32; 95% CI: 1.34-4.03), and the C allele of SLC19A1 PrO{sub 2}32Pro (OR: 1.83; 95% CI: 1.02-3.28). The distribution of CBS and MTHFR haplotypes differed between cases and controls (P=0.002 and P=0.07, respectively). In summary, three genetic variants in folate metabolism genes are associated with an increased risk of lung cancer in Xuan Wei, China.

  17. Lung cancer screening: Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyea Young [Dept. of Radiology, Center for Lung Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide as well as in Korea. A recent National Lung Screening Trial in U.S. revealed that low-dose CT (LDCT) screening reduced lung cancer specific mortality by 20% in high risk individuals as compared to chest radiograph screening. Based on this evidence, several expert societies in U.S. and Korean multisociety collaborative committee developed guidelines for recommendation of lung cancer screening using annual LDCT in high risk populations. In most of the societies high risk groups are defined as persons aged 55 to 74 years, who are current smokers with history of smoking of more than 30 packs per year or ex-smokers, who quit smoking up to 15 or more years ago. The benefits of LDCT screening are modestly higher than the harms in high risk individuals. The harms included a high rate of false-positive findings, over-diagnosis and radiation-related deaths. Invasive diagnostic procedure due to false positive findings may lead to complications. LDCT should be performed in qualified hospitals and interpreted by expert radiologists. Recently, the American College of Radiology released the current version of Lung cancer CT screening Reporting and Data Systems. Education and actions to stop smoking must be offered to current smokers.

  18. Discovery and Evaluation of Polymorphisms in the and Promoter Regions for Risk of Korean Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Sook Sung

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available AKT is a signal transduction protein that plays a central role in the tumorigenesis. There are 3 mammalian isoforms of this serine/threonine protein kinase-AKT1, AKT2, and AKT3-showing a broad tissue distribution. We first discovered 2 novel polymorphisms (AKT2 -9826 C/G and AKT3 -811 A/G, and we confirmed 6 known polymorphisms (AKT2 -9473 C/T, AKT2 -9151 C/T, AKT2 -9025 C/T, AKT2 -8618G/A, AKT3 -675 A/-, and AKT3 -244 C/T of the AKT2 and AKT3 promoter region in 24 blood samples of Korean lung cancer patients using direct sequencing. To evaluate the role of AKT2 and AKT3 polymorphisms in the risk of Korean lung cancer, genotypes of the AKT2 and AKT3 polymorphisms (AKT2 -9826 C/G, AKT2 -9473 C/T, AKT2 -9151 C/T, AKT2 -9025 C/T, AKT2 -8618G/A, and AKT3 -675 A/- were determined in 360 lung cancer patients and 360 normal controls. Statistical analyses revealed that the genotypes and haplotypes in the AKT2 and AKT3 promoter regions were not significantly associated with the risk of lung cancer in the Korean population. These results suggest that polymorphisms of the AKT2 and AKT3 promoter regions do not contribute to the genetic susceptibility to lung cancer in the Korean population.

  19. Abdominal Obesity and Lung Cancer Risk: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, Khemayanto; Du, Xuan; Chen, Guochong; Shi, Minhua; Shi, Bimin

    2016-12-15

    Several meta-analyses of observational studies have been performed to examine the association between general obesity, as measured by body mass index (BMI), and lung cancer. These meta-analyses suggest an inverse relation between high BMI and this cancer. In contrast to general obesity, abdominal obesity appears to play a role in the development of lung cancer. However, the association between abdominal obesity (as measured by waist circumference (WC) (BMI adjusted) and waist to hip ratio (WHR)) and lung cancer is not fully understood due to sparse available evidence regarding this association. PubMed and Web of Science databases were searched for studies assessing the association between abdominal obesity and lung cancer up to October 2016. The summary relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated with a random-effects model. Six prospective cohort studies with 5827 lung cancer cases among 831,535 participants were included in our meta-analysis. Each 10 cm increase in WC and 0.1 unit increase in WHR were associated with 10% (RR 1.10; 95% CI 1.04, 1.17; I² = 27.7%, p-heterogeneity = 0.198) and 5% (RR 1.05; 95% CI 1.00, 1.11; I² = 25.2%, p-heterogeneity = 0.211) greater risks of lung cancer, respectively. According to smoking status, greater WHR was only positively associated with lung cancer among former smokers (RR 1.11; 95% CI 1.00, 1.23). In contrast, greater WC was associated with increased lung cancer risk among never smokers (RR 1.11; 95% CI 1.00, 1.23), former smokers (RR 1.12; 95% CI 1.03, 1.22) and current smokers (RR 1.16; 95% CI 1.08, 1.25). The summary RRs for highest versus lowest categories of WC and WHR were 1.32 (95% CI 1.13, 1.54; I² = 18.2%, p-heterogeneity = 0.281) and 1.10 (95% CI 1.00, 1.23; I² = 24.2%, p-heterogeneity = 0.211), respectively. In summary, abdominal obesity may play an important role in the development of lung cancer.

  20. Modeling lung cancer risks in laboratory dogs exposed to inhaled plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, E.S.; Park, J.F.; Buschbom, R.L.

    1990-06-01

    These analyses are based on data from a lifespan study of beagle dogs exposed to inhaled plutonium being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. An important goal of this study is to increase understanding of health risk resulting from this exposure, with particular attention to lung cancer risks. Data on humans exposed to plutonium are inadequate for achieving this goal.

  1. Risk prediction models for selection of lung cancer screening candidates: A retrospective validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. ten Haaf (Kevin); J. Jeon (Jihyoun); M.C. Tammemagi (Martin); S.S. Han (Summer); C.Y. Kong (Chung Yin); S.K. Plevritis (Sylvia); E. Feuer (Eric); H.J. de Koning (Harry); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout W.); R. Meza (Rafael)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Selection of candidates for lung cancer screening based on individual risk has been proposed as an alternative to criteria based on age and cumulative smoking exposure (pack-years). Nine previously established risk models were assessed for their ability to identify those most

  2. Poor self-rated health associated with an increased risk of subsequent development of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riise, Hilde Kristin Refvik; Riise, Trond; Natvig, Gerd Karin; Daltveit, Anne Kjersti

    2014-02-01

    Self-rated health has shown to be a strong predictor of mortality and some major chronic diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether poor self-rated health also was related to an increased risk of subsequent development of cancer. Information on self-rated health, life-style factors, and other health-related risk factors was ascertained in a cohort of 25,532 persons participating in the Hordaland Health Study in 1997-1999. Information on development of cancer during 10 years of follow-up was obtained from the Norwegian Cancer Registry. The relationship between self-rated health and development of cancer was examined using Cox regression analysis adjusting for smoking and other life-style factors. Respondents reporting a poor health showed a non-significant increased risk of overall cancer. Sub-analysis of the four most common types of cancer showed a statistically significant association between self-rated health and lung cancer. The adjusted hazard ratio was 3.88 (95% CI; 0.99, 15.8) for those rating their health as poor compared to very good (p for trend = 0.038). For the other types of cancer, we found a non-significant elevated risk associated with poor self-rated health. Respondents who perceive their health as poor had an increased risk of developing lung cancer also after adjusting for smoking. This suggests that self-rated health reflects a broad range of factors important for development of this cancer type. Nevertheless, due to the explorative analysis of the specific cancer types, these findings need to be repeated before elaborate interpretations can be made.

  3. Risk factors for lung cancer in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, I; Hamada, G S; Zamboni, M M; Cordeiro, P de B; Watanabe, S; Tsugane, S

    1994-09-01

    The association between the risk of lung cancer and tobacco smoking, dietary factors and occupational exposures was examined in a hospital-based case-control study. The study involved 123 consecutive cases and 123 controls, matched by age (+/- 3), sex, and race. In this first study of lung cancer risk in Brazil, we found that tobacco smoking is the strongest risk factor with an odds ratio (OR) for current and former smokers of 22 (CI, 6.5-76) and 7.7 (CI, 2.2-27), respectively. An OR of 2.8 (CI, 1.0-7.7) was found for users of black tobacco in the form of hand-rolled cigarettes) in combination with conventional cigarettes, after adjustment for life-time consumption of any kind of tobacco; users of conventional cigarettes only were considered as a reference group. Cessation of smoking had an important influence in reducing the lung cancer risk, whereas early initiation of smoking increased the risk. Among dietary factors, frequent consumption of meat (P study confirmed the association of lung cancer with smoking as the most important predictor of risk. It also indicates the increase in risk associated with the use of black tobacco in combination with conventional cigarettes.

  4. Increased risk of lung cancer in individuals with a family history of the disease: A pooled analysis from the International Lung Cancer Consortium.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cote, M.L.; Liu, M.; Bonassi, S.; Neri, M.; Schwartz, A.G.; Christiani, D.C.; Spitz, M.R.; Muscat, J.E.; Rennert, G.; Aben, K.K.H.; Andrew, A.S.; Bencko, V.; Bickeboller, H.; Boffetta, P.; Brennan, P.; Brenner, H.; Duell, E.J.; Fabianova, E.; Field, J.K.; Foretova, L.; Friis, S.; Harris, C.C.; Holcatova, I.; Hong, Y.C.; Isla, D.; Janout, V.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Kiyohara, C.; Lan, Q.; Lazarus, P.; Lissowska, J.; Marchand, L. le; Mates, D.; Matsuo, K.; Mayordomo, J.I.; McLaughlin, J.R.; Morgenstern, H.; Mueller, H.; Orlow, I.; Park, B.J.; Pinchev, M.; Raji, O.Y.; Rennert, H.S.; Rudnai, P.; Seow, A.; Stucker, I.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N.; Teare, M.D.; Tjonnelan, A.; Ugolini, D.; Heijden, E. van der; Wichmann, E.; Wiencke, J.K.; Woll, P.J.; Yang, P.; Zaridze, D.; Zhang, Z.F.; Etzel, C.J.; Hung, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND METHODS: Familial aggregation of lung cancer exists after accounting for cigarette smoking. However, the extent to which family history affects risk by smoking status, histology, relative type and ethnicity is not well described. This pooled analysis included 24 case-control studies

  5. Risks for heart disease and lung cancer from passive smoking by workers in the catering industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley, Anthony J; McGhee, Sarah M; Repace, James L; Wong, Lai-Chin; Yu, Marcus Y S; Wong, Tze-Wai; Lam, Tai-Hing

    2006-04-01

    Workers in the catering industry are at greater risk of exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) when smoke-free workplace policies are not in force. We determined the exposure of catering workers to SHS in Hong Kong and their risk of death from heart disease and lung cancer. Nonsmoking catering workers were provided with screening at their workplaces and at a central clinic. Participants reported workplace, home, and leisure time exposure to SHS. Urinary cotinine was estimated by enzyme immunoassay. Catering facilities were classified into three types: nonsmoking, partially restricted smoking (with nonsmoking areas), and unrestricted smoking. Mean urinary cotinine levels ranged from 3.3 ng/ml in a control group of 16 university staff through 6.4 ng/ml (nonsmoking), 6.1 ng/ml (partially restricted), and 15.9 ng/ml (unrestricted smoking) in 104 workers who had no exposures outside of work. Workers in nonsmoking facilities had exposures to other smoking staff. We modeled workers' mortality risks using average cotinine levels, estimates of workplace respirable particulates, risk data for cancer and heart disease from cohort studies, and national (US) and regional (Hong Kong) mortality for heart disease and lung cancer. We estimated that deaths in the Hong Kong catering workforce of 200,000 occur at the rate of 150 per year for a 40-year working-lifetime exposure to SHS. When compared with the current outdoor air quality standards for particulates in Hong Kong, 30% of workers exceeded the 24-h and 98% exceeded the annual air quality objectives due to workplace SHS exposures.

  6. Hormonal Replacement Therapy and the Risk of Lung Cancer in Women: An Adaptive Meta-analysis of Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jong-Myon; Kim, Eun Hee

    2015-11-01

    Approximately 10% to 15% of lung cancer cases occur in never-smokers. Hormonal factors have been suggested to lead to an elevated risk of lung cancer in women. This systematic review (SR) aimed to investigate the association between hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) and the risk of lung cancer in women using cohort studies. We first obtained previous SR articles on this topic. Based on these studies we made a list of refereed, cited, and related articles using the PubMed and Scopus databases. All cohort studies that evaluated the relative risk of HRT exposure on lung cancer occurrence in women were selected. Estimate of summary effect size (sES) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. A total of 14 cohort studies were finally selected. A random effect model was applied due to heterogeneity (I-squared, 64.3%). The sES of the 14 articles evaluating the impact of HRT exposure on lung cancer occurrence in women indicated no statistically significant increase in lung cancer risk (sES, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.09). These results showed that HRT history had no effect on the risk of lung cancer in women, even though the sES of case-control studies described in previous SR articles indicated that HRT had a protective effect against lung cancer. It is necessary to conduct a pooled analysis of cohort studies.

  7. Hormonal Replacement Therapy and the Risk of Lung Cancer in Women: An Adaptive Meta-analysis of Cohort Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jong-Myon; Kim, Eun Hee

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Approximately 10% to 15% of lung cancer cases occur in never-smokers. Hormonal factors have been suggested to lead to an elevated risk of lung cancer in women. This systematic review (SR) aimed to investigate the association between hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) and the risk of lung cancer in women using cohort studies. Methods: We first obtained previous SR articles on this topic. Based on these studies we made a list of refereed, cited, and related articles using the PubMed and Scopus databases. All cohort studies that evaluated the relative risk of HRT exposure on lung cancer occurrence in women were selected. Estimate of summary effect size (sES) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Results: A total of 14 cohort studies were finally selected. A random effect model was applied due to heterogeneity (I-squared, 64.3%). The sES of the 14 articles evaluating the impact of HRT exposure on lung cancer occurrence in women indicated no statistically significant increase in lung cancer risk (sES, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.09). Conclusions: These results showed that HRT history had no effect on the risk of lung cancer in women, even though the sES of case-control studies described in previous SR articles indicated that HRT had a protective effect against lung cancer. It is necessary to conduct a pooled analysis of cohort studies. PMID:26639742

  8. Indoor air pollution and risk of lung cancer among Chinese female non-smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Lina; Liu, Li; Niu, Rungui; Zhao, Baoxing; Shi, Jianping; Li, Yanli; Swanson, Mya; Scheider, William; Su, Jia; Chang, Shen-Chih; Yu, Shunzhang; Zhang, Zuo-Feng

    2013-03-01

    To investigate indoor particulate matter (PM) level and various indoor air pollution exposure, and to examine their relationships with risk of lung cancer in an urban Chinese population, with a focus on non-smoking women. We conducted a case-control study in Taiyuan, China, consisting of 399 lung cancer cases and 466 controls, of which 164 cases and 218 controls were female non-smokers. Indoor PM concentrations, including PM(1), PM(2.5), PM(7), PM(10), and TSP, were measured using a particle mass monitor. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals after adjusting for age, education, annual income, and smoking. Among non-smoking women, lung cancer was strongly associated with multiple sources of indoor air pollution 10 years ago, including heavy exposure to environmental tobacco smoke at work (aOR = 3.65), high frequency of cooking (aOR = 3.30), and solid fuel usage for cooking (aOR = 4.08) and heating (aOR(coal stove) = 2.00). Housing characteristics related to poor ventilation, including single-story, less window area, no separate kitchen, no ventilator, and rarely having windows open, are associated with lung cancer. Indoor medium PM(2.5) concentration was 68 μg/m(3), and PM(10) was 230 μg/m(3). PM levels in winter are strongly correlated with solid fuel usage for cooking, heating, and ventilators. PM(1) levels in cases are more than 3 times higher than that in controls. Every 10 μg/m(3) increase in PM(1) is associated with 45 % increased risk of lung cancer. Indoor air pollution plays an important role in the development of lung cancer among non-smoking Chinese women.

  9. Ataxia Telangiectasia-Mutated (ATMPolymorphisms and Risk of Lung Cancer in a Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay A. Myneni

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM gene has a key role in DNA repair including activation and stabilization of p53, which implicates the importance of ATM polymorphisms in the development of cancer. This study aims to investigate the association of two ATM single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with lung cancer, as well as their potential interaction with p53 gene and other known risk factors of lung cancer.MethodsA population-based case–control study was conducted in Taiyuan city, China with 399 cases and 466 controls matched on the distribution of age and sex of cases. The two ATM gene SNPs, ATMrs227060 and ATMrs228589 as well as p53 gene SNP, p53rs1042522 were genotyped using Sequenom platform. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate crude and adjusted odds ratios (aOR and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Adjusted models controlled for age, sex, and smoking status.ResultsThe study showed that TT genotype of ATMrs227060 (aOR = 1.58, 95% CI: 1.06–2.35 and AA genotype of ATMrs228589 were significantly associated with lung cancer (aOR = 1.50, 95% CI: 1.08–2.08 in a recessive model. Additionally, carrying variant genotypes of ATMrs227060 (TT, ATMrs228589 (AA, and p53rs1042522 (CC concomitantly was associated with much higher risk (aOR = 3.68, 95% CI: 1.43–9.45 of lung cancer than carrying variant genotypes of any one of the above three SNPs. We also found multiplicative and additive interaction between tea drinking and ATMrs227060 in association with lung cancer.ConclusionThis study indicates that ATM gene variants might be associated with development of lung cancer in Chinese population. These results need to be validated in larger and different population samples.

  10. Evaluation of the lung cancer risks at which to screen ever- and never-smokers: screening rules applied to the PLCO and NLST cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin C Tammemägi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung cancer risks at which individuals should be screened with computed tomography (CT for lung cancer are undecided. This study's objectives are to identify a risk threshold for selecting individuals for screening, to compare its efficiency with the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF criteria for identifying screenees, and to determine whether never-smokers should be screened. Lung cancer risks are compared between smokers aged 55-64 and ≥ 65-80 y. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Applying the PLCO(m2012 model, a model based on 6-y lung cancer incidence, we identified the risk threshold above which National Lung Screening Trial (NLST, n = 53,452 CT arm lung cancer mortality rates were consistently lower than rates in the chest X-ray (CXR arm. We evaluated the USPSTF and PLCO(m2012 risk criteria in intervention arm (CXR smokers (n = 37,327 of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO. The numbers of smokers selected for screening, and the sensitivities, specificities, and positive predictive values (PPVs for identifying lung cancers were assessed. A modified model (PLCOall2014 evaluated risks in never-smokers. At PLCO(m2012 risk ≥ 0.0151, the 65th percentile of risk, the NLST CT arm mortality rates are consistently below the CXR arm's rates. The number needed to screen to prevent one lung cancer death in the 65th to 100th percentile risk group is 255 (95% CI 143 to 1,184, and in the 30th to 15 y, 8.5% had PLCO(m2012 risk ≥ 0.0151. None of 65,711 PLCO never-smokers had PLCO(m2012 risk ≥ 0.0151. Risks and lung cancers were significantly greater in PLCO smokers aged ≥ 65-80 y than in those aged 55-64 y. This study omitted cost-effectiveness analysis. CONCLUSIONS: The USPSTF criteria for CT screening include some low-risk individuals and exclude some high-risk individuals. Use of the PLCO(m2012 risk ≥ 0.0151 criterion can improve screening efficiency. Currently, never-smokers should not be screened

  11. Associations between beer, wine, and liquor consumption and lung cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chun

    2007-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that the effect on lung cancer risk may be different for beer, wine, and liquor. We conducted dose-specific meta-analyses and dose-response meta-regression to summarize findings from the current literature on the association between consumption of beer, wine, or liquor and lung cancer risk. Average beer consumption of one drink or greater per day was associated with an increased risk of lung cancer [relative risk (RR), 1.23; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.06-1.41]. This association was observed in both men and women, although it was only significant in men. A J-shaped dose-response curve was suggested for beer intake. An inverse association was observed for both average wine consumption of less than one drink per day (RR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.59-1.00) and one drink or greater per day (RR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.60-1.02) in the drinking range incurred in the source studies. Average liquor consumption of one drink or greater per day was found to be associated with increased risk in men (RR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.10-1.62). No association was observed for liquor drinking in women. The presence of heterogeneity between studies was detected. Study design, country, gender, adjustment factors, and lung cancer histologic type were not significant predictors of the heterogeneity. The results from this meta-analysis suggest that high consumption of beer and liquors may be associated with increased lung cancer risk, whereas modest wine consumption may be inversely associated with risk. More research with improved control of confounding is needed to confirm these findings and to establish the dose-response relationship, particularly risk at high consumption levels.

  12. Risk analysis of lung cancer and effects of stress level on cancer risk through neuro-fuzzy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Atınç; Arı, Seçkin; Kocabıçak, Ümit

    2016-12-01

    A significant number of people pass away due to limited medical resources for the battle with cancer. Fatal cases can be reduced by using the computational techniques in the medical and health system. If the cancer is diagnosed early, the chance of successful treatment increases. In this study, the risk of getting lung cancer will be obtained and patients will be provided with directions to exterminate the risk. After calculating the risk value for lung cancer, status of the patient's susceptibility and resistance to stress is used in determining the effects of stress to disease. In order to resolve the problem, the neuro-fuzzy logic model has been presented. When encouraging results are obtained from the study; the system will form a pre-diagnosis for the people who possibly can have risk of getting cancer due to working conditions or living standards. Therefore, this study will enable these people to take precautions to prevent the risk of cancer. In this study a new t-norm operator has been utilized in the problem. Finally, the performance of the proposed method has been compared to other methods. Beside this, the contribution of neuro-fuzzy logic model in the field of health and topics of artificial intelligence will also be examined in this study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Study finds stronger nicotine dependency associated with higher risk of lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI headed study finds people who are highly addicted to nicotine -- those who smoke their first cigarette within five minutes after awakening -- are at higher risk of developing lung cancer than those who wait for an hour or more to smoke.

  14. A prospective cohort study on antioxidant and folate intake and male lung cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorrips, L.E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brants, H.A.M.; Poppel, G.A.F.C. van; Sturmans, F.; Hermus, R.J.J.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2000-01-01

    Many studies have reported inverse associations between vegetable and fruit consumption and lung cancer risk. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of several antioxidants and folate in this relationship. In the Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer, 58,279 men of ages 55-69

  15. Dietary Carotenoids and Risk of Lung Cancer in a Pooled Analysis of Seven Cohort Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Männistö, S.; Smith-Warner, S.A.; Spiegelman, D.; Albanes, D.; Anderson, K.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Cerhan, J.R.; Colditz, G.; Feskanich, D.; Freudenheim, J.L.; Giovannucci, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Graham, S.; Miller, A.B.; Rohan, T.E.; Virtamo, J.; Willett, W.C.; Hunter, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Intervention trials with supplemental β-carotene have observed either no effect or a harmful effect on lung cancer risk. Because food composition databases for specific carotenoids have only become available recently, epidemiological evidence relating usual dietary levels of these carotenoids with

  16. Occupational exposure to organic dust increases lung cancer risk in the general population.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304822930; Kromhout, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224; Olsson, A.C.; Wichmann, H.E.; Bruske, I.; Consonni, D.; Landi, M.T.; Caporaso, N.; Siemiatycki, J.; Richiardi, L.; Mirabelli, D.; Simonato, L.; Gustavsson, P.; Plato, N.; Jockel, K.H.; Ahrens, W.; Pohlabeln, H.; Boffetta, P.; Brennan, P.; Zaridze, D.; Cassidy, A.; Lissowska, J; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N.; Rudnai, P.; Fabianova, E.; Forastiere, F.; Bencko, V.; Foretova, L.; Janout, V.; Stucker, I.; Dumitru, R.S.; Benhamou, S.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, B.; Kendzia, B.; Pesch, B.; Straif, K.; Bruning, T.; Vermeulen, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Organic dust is a complex mixture of particulate matter from microbial, plant or animal origin. Occupations with exposure to animal products have been associated with an increased lung cancer risk, while exposure to microbial components (eg, endotoxin) has been associated with a

  17. Authors' response: 'Lung cancer risk in subjects exposed to organic dust'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, S.; Kromhout, H.; Olsson, A.; Straif, K.; Vermeulen, R.

    2012-01-01

    Response to: Mastrangelo, G., Rylander, R., Cegolon, L. & Lange, J.H. (2012). Lung cancer risk in subjects exposed to organic dust: an unexpected and surprising story. Thorax 67(12), 1112–1112. Original article: Peters, S., Kromhout, H., Olsson, A.C., Wichmann, H.-E., Brüske, I., Consonni, D.,

  18. The MDM2 T309G polymorphism and risk of lung cancer: an updated meta-analysis of 10,186 cases and 14,155 controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaodong; Wang, Bo; Guo, Juntang; Liu, Xi; Zhang, Tao; Liang, Chaoyang; Zhou, Naikang; Hou, Xiaobin; Ma, Yongfu; Yu, Hua; Chen, Lei; Ren, Zhipeng; Fan, Kaijie; Tian, Qing

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to assess the relationship between MDM2 (mouse double minute 2 homolog) T309G polymorphism and the risk and prognosis of lung cancer. We did a systematic review of relevant articles from EBSCO, EMBASE, Web of science, PubMed, springer link, science direct, weipu database and CNKI (Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure) databases up to January 7, 2016. Seventeen case-control studies and 5 cases prognosis were included. The results indicated that the MDM2 T309G polymorphism was associated with lung cancer risk. Subgroup analysis by ethnicity also showed that associations are significant in Asian. Five prognosis studies were also included. Patients with TT genotype had a higher survival rate at 20-months-follow-up compared with those who carried TG or GG genotype (TT vs. TG+GG: OR=0.34, 95% CI: 0.12-0.99, P<0.05). MDM2 T309G polymorphism is associated with risk and prognosis of lung cancer. TT or T genotype may be associated with the reduced risk of lung cancer, especially in Asians. Meanwhile, TT genotype is also associated with the improved prognosis of the lung cancer.

  19. Cannabis Smoking and Risk of Lung Cancer - A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    khalid BOUTI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cannabis is the illicit psychoactive substance the most consumed in the world. Little is known about the association between the use of cannabis and the risk of lung cancer.Objective:The objective of this meta-analysis is to determine whether use of cannabis is a risk factor for lung cancer.Methods: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analyses of all languages articles using relevant computerised databases. MEDLINE (online PubMed, Web of knowledge, Embase, EBSCO CINAHL, ScienceDirect, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and Directory of Open Access Journals were searched to September 2014 for cohorts and case-control studies that assessed the risk of lung cancer associated with cannabis smoking.  The literature search was performed with a combination of medical subject headings terms, "cannabis" and "lung neoplasms". Data extraction: Two investigators independently analysed and extracted results from eligible studies.Our study's registration number on PROSPERO is  CRD42014008872.Results: The search strategy identified 2476 citations. 13 studies were eligible for inclusion: 2 pooled analysis of 9 case-control studies, one case-control study and 3 cohorts.The cumulative analysis for all the studies under a fixed-effects model showed that cannabis smoking determined an increased risk of developing lung cancer in the future (relative risk 1.22, 95% confidence interval 0.999–1.5; p=0.051, with no evidence of heterogeneity across the studies (I2: 34%; p¼0.01.Conclusions: The use of cannabis with or without tobacco smoking is associated with an increased risk for lung cancer.

  20. XRCC3 Thr241Met gene polymorphisms and lung cancer risk: a meta-analysis

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    Zhan Ping

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many studies have examined the association between the XRCC3 Thr241Met gene polymorphism and lung cancer risk in various populations, but their results have been inconsistent. To assess this relationship more precisely, a meta-analysis was performed. The PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and CNKI database was searched for case–control studies published up to July 2012. Data were extracted and pooled odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated. Ultimately, 17 studies, comprising 4123 lung cancer cases and 5597 controls were included. Overall, for T allele carriers (TC + TT versus the wild-type homozygotes (CC, the pooled OR was 0.95 (95% CI = 0.87-1.04 P = 0.228 for heterogeneity, for TT versus CC the pooled OR was 0.99 (95% CI = 0.86-1.15 P = 0.315 for heterogeneity. In the stratified analysis by ethnicity, histological types of lung cancer and smoking status, no any significantly risks were found for (C/T + T/T vs C/C or T/T vs C/C. No publication bias was found by using the funnel plot and Egger's test. Overall, there is no evidence showing a significant correlation between XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphism and lung cancer risk stratified analysis by ethnicity, histology and smoking status.

  1. Obesity, metabolic factors and risk of different histological types of lung cancer: A Mendelian randomization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras-Torres, Robert; Johansson, Mattias; Haycock, Philip C; Wade, Kaitlin H; Relton, Caroline L; Martin, Richard M; Davey Smith, George; Albanes, Demetrius; Aldrich, Melinda C; Andrew, Angeline; Arnold, Susanne M; Bickeböller, Heike; Bojesen, Stig E; Brunnström, Hans; Manjer, Jonas; Brüske, Irene; Caporaso, Neil E; Chen, Chu; Christiani, David C; Christian, W Jay; Doherty, Jennifer A; Duell, Eric J; Field, John K; Davies, Michael P A; Marcus, Michael W; Goodman, Gary E; Grankvist, Kjell; Haugen, Aage; Hong, Yun-Chul; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; van der Heijden, Erik H F M; Kraft, Peter; Johansson, Mikael B; Lam, Stephen; Landi, Maria Teresa; Lazarus, Philip; Le Marchand, Loïc; Liu, Geoffrey; Melander, Olle; Park, Sungshim L; Rennert, Gad; Risch, Angela; Haura, Eric B; Scelo, Ghislaine; Zaridze, David; Mukeriya, Anush; Savić, Milan; Lissowska, Jolanta; Swiatkowska, Beata; Janout, Vladimir; Holcatova, Ivana; Mates, Dana; Schabath, Matthew B; Shen, Hongbing; Tardon, Adonina; Teare, M Dawn; Woll, Penella; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Wu, Xifeng; Yuan, Jian-Min; Hung, Rayjean J; Amos, Christopher I; McKay, James; Brennan, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Assessing the relationship between lung cancer and metabolic conditions is challenging because of the confounding effect of tobacco. Mendelian randomization (MR), or the use of genetic instrumental variables to assess causality, may help to identify the metabolic drivers of lung cancer. We identified genetic instruments for potential metabolic risk factors and evaluated these in relation to risk using 29,266 lung cancer cases (including 11,273 adenocarcinomas, 7,426 squamous cell and 2,664 small cell cases) and 56,450 controls. The MR risk analysis suggested a causal effect of body mass index (BMI) on lung cancer risk for two of the three major histological subtypes, with evidence of a risk increase for squamous cell carcinoma (odds ratio (OR) [95% confidence interval (CI)] = 1.20 [1.01-1.43] and for small cell lung cancer (OR [95%CI] = 1.52 [1.15-2.00]) for each standard deviation (SD) increase in BMI [4.6 kg/m2]), but not for adenocarcinoma (OR [95%CI] = 0.93 [0.79-1.08]) (Pheterogeneity = 4.3x10-3). Additional analysis using a genetic instrument for BMI showed that each SD increase in BMI increased cigarette consumption by 1.27 cigarettes per day (P = 2.1x10-3), providing novel evidence that a genetic susceptibility to obesity influences smoking patterns. There was also evidence that low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was inversely associated with lung cancer overall risk (OR [95%CI] = 0.90 [0.84-0.97] per SD of 38 mg/dl), while fasting insulin was positively associated (OR [95%CI] = 1.63 [1.25-2.13] per SD of 44.4 pmol/l). Sensitivity analyses including a weighted-median approach and MR-Egger test did not detect other pleiotropic effects biasing the main results. Our results are consistent with a causal role of fasting insulin and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in lung cancer etiology, as well as for BMI in squamous cell and small cell carcinoma. The latter relation may be mediated by a previously unrecognized effect of obesity on smoking behavior.

  2. Knowledge of the signs and symptoms and risk factors of lung cancer in Australia: mixed methods study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Crane

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in Australia. There is potential that health promotion about the risks and warning signs of lung cancer could be used to reduce delays in symptom presentation when symptoms are first detected. This study investigated knowledge, attitudes and beliefs which might impact help-seeking behaviour and could provide insight into possible public health interventions in New South Wales (NSW. Methods A convergent mixed method study design was used wherein data from 16 qualitative focus groups of residents (40+ years, purposefully recruited and stratified by smoking status, age and geography (metropolitan/regional, were compared with a CATI administered population-wide telephone survey (n = 1,000 using the Cancer Research UK cancer awareness measure (LungCAM. Qualitative findings were analysed thematically using NVIVO. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate predictors of symptom knowledge in STATA. Findings were integrated using triangulation techniques. Results Across focus groups, haemoptysis was the only symptom creating a sense of medical urgency. Life experiences evoked a ‘wait and see’ attitude to any health deterioration. Perceived risk was low amongst those at risk with current smokers preferring to deny their risk while former smokers were generally unaware of any ongoing risk. The quantitative sample consisted of females (62 %, 40–65 years (53 %, low SES (53 %, former (46 % and current smokers (14 %. In quantitative findings, haemoptysis and dyspnoea were the most recognised symptoms across the sample population. Age (<65 years, sex (female and high socio-economic status contributed to a higher recognition of symptoms. Smoking was recognised as a cause of lung cancer, yet ever-smokers were less likely to recognise the risk of lung cancer due to second-hand smoke (OR 0.7 95 % CI 0.5–0.9. Conclusion While there was some recognition of risk factors

  3. Integrative genomic analysis reveals extended germline homozygosity with lung cancer risk in the PLCO cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed S Orloff

    Full Text Available Susceptibility to common cancers is multigenic resulting from low-to-high penetrance predisposition-factors and environmental exposure. Genomic studies suggest germline homozygosity as a novel low-penetrance factor contributing to common cancers. We hypothesized that long homozygous regions (tracts-of-homozygosity [TOH] harbor tobacco-dependent and independent lung-cancer predisposition (or protection genes. We performed in silico genome-wide SNP-array-based analysis of lung-cancer patients of European-ancestry from the PLCO screening-trial cohort to identify TOH regions amongst 788 cancer-cases and 830 ancestry-matched controls. Association analyses was then performed between presence of lung cancer and common(cTOHs (operationally defined as 10 or more subjects sharing ≥100 identical homozygous calls, aTOHs (allelically-matched groups within a cTOH, demographics and tobacco-exposure. Finally, integration of significant c/aTOH with transcriptome was performed to functionally-map lung-cancer risk-genes. After controlling for demographics and smoking, we identified 7 cTOHs and 5 aTOHs associated with lung cancer (adjusted p<0.01. Three cTOHs were over-represented in cases over controls (OR = 1.75-2.06, p = 0.007-0.001, whereas 4 were under-represented (OR = 0.28-0.69, p = 0.006-0.001. Interaction between smoking status and cTOH3/aTOH2 (2p16.3-2p16.1 was observed (adjusted p<0.03. The remaining significant aTOHs have ORs 0.23-0.50 (p = 0.004-0.006 and 2.95-3.97 (p = 0.008-0.001. After integrating significant cTOH/aTOHs with publicly-available lung-cancer transcriptome datasets followed by filtering based on lung cancer and its relevant pathways revealed 9 putative predisposing genes (p<0.0001. In conclusion, differentially-distributed cTOH/aTOH genomic variants between cases and controls harbor sets of plausible differentially-expressed genes accounting for the complexity of lung-cancer predisposition.

  4. Occupational exposure to textile dust and lung cancer risk: Results from the ICARE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khedher, Soumaya; Neri, Monica; Guida, Florence; Matrat, Mireille; Cenée, Sylvie; Sanchez, Marie; Radoi, Loredana; Menvielle, Gwenn; Marrer, Emilie; Luce, Danièle; Stücker, Isabelle

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the association of lung cancer with occupational exposure to textile dust and specifically to cotton dust in the population-based case-control study ICARE. Lifelong occupational history of 2926 cases and 3555 controls was collected using standardized questionnaires, with specific questions for textile dust exposure. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression models controlling for confounding factors including smoking and asbestos exposure. An inverse association between textile dust exposure and lung cancer was found among workers exposed ≥5% of their work time (OR = 0.80, 95%CI = 0.58-1.09), more pronounced for distant exposures (40+ years; up to a 56% reduced risk, statistically significant). The OR of lung cancer was significantly decreased among workers exposed to cotton fibers (OR = 0.70, 95%CI = 0.48-0.97). Our results provide some evidence of a decreased risk of lung cancer associated with exposure to textile dust, particularly cotton. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Occupational asbestos exposure and risk of pleural mesothelioma, lung cancer, and laryngeal cancer in the prospective Netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offermans, Nadine S M; Vermeulen, Roel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Burdorf, Alex; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; Kauppinen, Timo; Kromhout, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224; van den Brandt, Piet a

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the association between occupational asbestos exposure and pleural mesothelioma, lung cancer, and laryngeal cancer, specifically addressing risk associated with the lower end of the exposure distribution, risk of cancer subtypes, and the interaction between asbestos and

  6. Occupational asbestos exposure and risk of pleural mesothelioma, lung cancer, and laryngeal cancer in the prospective netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offermans, N.S.M.; Vermeulen, R.; Burdorf, A.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Kauppinen, T.; Kromhout, H.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: To study the association between occupational asbestos exposure and pleural mesothelioma, lung cancer, and laryngeal cancer, specifically addressing risk associated with the lower end of the exposure distribution, risk of cancer subtypes, and the interaction between asbestos and smoking.

  7. Results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Link Vitamin B6 Catabolism and Lung Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Hui; Ueland, Per M; Midttun, Øivind; Vollset, Stein E; Tell, Grethe S; Theofylaktopoulou, Despoina; Travis, Ruth C; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Fournier, Agnès; Severi, Gianluca; Kvaskoff, Marina; Boeing, Heiner; Bergmann, Manuela M; Fortner, Renée T; Kaaks, Rudolf; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Lagiou, Pagona; Palli, Domenico; Sieri, Sabina; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Peeters, Petra H; Grankvist, Kjell; Johansson, Mikael; Agudo, Antonio; Garcia, Jose Ramon Quiros; Larranaga, Nerea; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Chirlaque, Maria Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Gallo, Valentina; Brennan, Paul; Johansson, Mattias; Ulvik, Arve

    2018-01-01

    Circulating pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) has been linked to lung cancer risk. The PAr index, defined as the ratio 4-pyridoxic acid/(pyridoxal + PLP), reflects increased vitamin B6 catabolism during inflammation. PAr has been defined as a marker of lung cancer risk in a prospective cohort study, but analysis of a larger numbers of cases are needed to deepen the significance of this study. Here, we conducted a nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC, n = 521,330), which included 892 incident lung cancer cases and 1,748 controls matched by center, gender, date of blood collection, and date of birth. The association of PAr with risk of lung cancer was evaluated by using conditional logistic regression. Study participants with elevated PAr experienced higher risk of lung cancer in a dose-response fashion, with a doubling in PAr levels associated with 52% higher odds of lung cancer after adjustment for tobacco smoking, serum cotinine levels, educational attainment, and BMI [OR, 1.52; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.27-1.81; P < 0.001]. Additional adjustment for intake of vegetables and fruits and physical activity did not materially affect risk association. The association of PAr with lung cancer risk was similar in both genders but slightly stronger in former smokers and in participants diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma. This study provides robust evidence that increased vitamin B6 catabolism is independently associated with a higher risk of future lung cancer. Significance: This large cohort study firmly establishes an association between an index of vitamin B6 levels with lung cancer risk. Cancer Res; 78(1); 302-8. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Intakes of Fruits, Vegetables, and Related Vitamins and Lung Cancer Risk: Results from the Shanghai Men's Health Study (2002–2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Yumie; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yang, Gong; Li, Honglan; Gao, Jing; Cai, Hui; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2013-01-01

    Most epidemiological studies evaluating the association of fruit and vegetable intakes on lung cancer risk were conducted in North American and European countries. We investigated the association of intakes of fruits, vegetables, dietary vitamins A and C, and folate with lung cancer risk among 61,491 Chinese adult men who were recruited to the Shanghai Men's Health Study, a population-based, prospective cohort study. Baseline dietary intake was assessed through a validated food frequency questionnaire during in-home visits. Multivariate Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of lung cancer risk associated with dietary intakes. During a median follow-up of 5.5 years, 359 incident lung cancer cases accrued after the first year of follow-up and 68.8% of them were current smokers. Intakes of green leafy vegetables, β-carotene-rich vegetables, watermelon, vitamin A, and carotenoids were inversely associated with lung cancer risk; the corresponding HR (95% CI) comparing the highest with the lowest quartiles were 0.72 (0.53–0.98), 0.69 (0.51–0.94), 0.65 (0.47–0.90), 0.63 (0.44–0.88), and 0.64 (0.46–0.88). Intake of all fruits and vegetables combined was marginally associated with lower risk. Our study suggests that the consumption of carotenoid-rich vegetables is inversely associated with lung cancer risk. PMID:23368913

  9. How are lung cancer risk perceptions and cigarette smoking related?-testing an accuracy hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei-Shih; Kaphingst, Kimberly A; Tseng, Tung-Sung; Zhao, Shixi

    2016-10-01

    Subjective risk perception is an important theoretical construct in the field of cancer prevention and control. Although the relationship between subjective risk perception and health behaviors has been widely studied in many health contexts, the causalities and associations between the risk perception of developing lung cancer and cigarette smoking have been inconsistently reported among studies. Such inconsistency may be from discrepancies between study designs (cross-sectional versus longitudinal designs) and the three hypotheses (i.e., the behavior motivation hypothesis, the risk reappraisals hypothesis, and the accuracy hypothesis) testing different underlying associations between risk perception and cigarette-smoking behaviors. To clarify this issue, as an initial step, we examined the association between absolute and relative risk perceptions of developing lung cancer and cigarette-smoking behaviors among a large, national representative sample of 1,680 U.S. adults by testing an accuracy hypothesis (i.e., people who smoke accurately perceived a higher risk of developing lung cancer). Data from the U.S. Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) were analyzed using logistic regression and multivariate linear regression to examine the associations between risk perception and cigarette-smoking behaviors among 1,680 U.S. adults. Findings from this cross-sectional survey suggest that absolute and relative risk perceptions were positively and significantly correlated with having smoked >100 cigarettes during lifetime and the frequency of cigarette smoking. Only absolute risk perception was significantly associated with the number of cigarettes smoked per day among current smokers. Because both absolute and relative risk perceptions are positively related to most cigarette-smoking behaviors, this study supports the accuracy hypothesis. Moreover, absolute risk perception might be a more sensitive measurement than relative risk perception for perceived lung

  10. Association of the XRCC1 c.1178G>A genetic polymorphism with lung cancer risk in Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Lin, Yong; Qi, Cong-Cong; Sheng, Bao-Wei; Fu, Tian

    2014-01-01

    The X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 protein (XRCC1) plays important roles in the DNA base excision repair pathway which may influence the development of lung cancer. This study aimed to evaluate the potential association of the XRCC1 c.1178G>A genetic polymorphism with lung cancer risk. The created restriction site-polymerase chain reaction (CRS-PCR) and DNA sequencing methods were utilized to evaluate the XRCC1 c.1178G>A genetic polymorphism among 376 lung cancer patients and 379 controls. Associations between the genetic polymorphism and lung cancer risk were determined with an unconditional logistic regression model. Our data suggested that the distribution of allele and genotype in lung cancer patients was significantly different from that of controls. The XRCC1 c.1178G>A genetic polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of lung cancer (AA vs GG: OR=2.91, 95%CI 1.70-4.98, pA genetic polymorphism is statistically associated with lung cancer risk in the Chinese population.

  11. Lung cancer in shipbuilding and related industries in Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, M S; Stedman, R B

    1979-09-01

    The relationship between shipbuilding and related industries and risk of fatal lung cancer (1960-1975) is described for selected Louisiana parishes. Deaths from lung cancer were matched to deaths not caused by cancer. Shipbuilders had a significantly increased risk (greater than twofold) of dying of lung cancer as compared with other causes. The risk of dying of lung cancer in related occupations (seamen and longshoremen) was also increased. Information on laterality of lung cancer was not supportive of particulate substances contributing to causality due to the large number of unspecified cases. The preponderance of deaths appears to be occurring in men with a greater number of years of exposure to this industry and in those aged 20 to 34 years in 1940. These common occupations in Louisiana could contribute to the high rate of lung cancer.

  12. Lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it is called metastatic cancer to the lung . Causes Lung cancer is the deadliest type of cancer for both ... under age 45. Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  13. Hormonal Replacement Therapy and the Risk of Lung Cancer in Women: An Adaptive Meta-analysis of Cohort Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Jong-Myon; Kim, Eun Hee

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Approximately 10% to 15% of lung cancer cases occur in never-smokers. Hormonal factors have been suggested to lead to an elevated risk of lung cancer in women. This systematic review (SR) aimed to investigate the association between hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) and the risk of lung cancer in women using cohort studies. Methods: We first obtained previous SR articles on this topic. Based on these studies we made a list of refereed, cited, and related articles using the PubMed...

  14. A Healthy Dietary Pattern Reduces Lung Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlai Sun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diet and nutrients play an important role in cancer development and progress; a healthy dietary pattern has been found to be associated with several types of cancer. However, the association between a healthy eating pattern and lung cancer risk is still unclear. Objective: Therefore, we conducted a systematic review with meta-analysis to evaluate whether a healthy eating pattern might reduce lung cancer risk. Methods: We identified relevant studies from the PubMed and Embase databases up to October 2015, and the relative risks were extracted and combined by the fixed-effects model when no substantial heterogeneity was observed; otherwise, the random-effects model was employed. Subgroup and publication bias analyses were also performed. Results: Finally, eight observational studies were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled relative risk of lung cancer for the highest vs. lowest category of healthy dietary pattern was 0.81 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.75–0.86, and no significant heterogeneity was detected. The relative risks (RRs for non-smokers, former smokers and current smokers were 0.89 (95% CI: 0.63–1.27, 0.74 (95% CI: 0.62–0.89 and 0.86 (95% CI: 0.79–0.93, respectively. The results remained stable in subgroup analyses by other confounders and sensitivity analysis. Conclusions: The results of our meta-analysis suggest that a healthy dietary pattern is associated with a lower lung cancer risk, and they provide more beneficial evidence for changing the diet pattern in the general population.

  15. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  16. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Acute Pulmonary Embolism in Patients with Lung Cancer Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Ping; Shen, Lei; Huang, Wei; Hu, Xue-Fei; Xie, Dong; Yang, Jian; Song, Xiao; Zhao, Yan-Feng; Zhou, Chao-Jie; Jiang, Ge-Ning

    2018-01-10

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is one of the serious complications with high mortality after thoracic surgery. The authors aimed to determine the prevalence of PE events and evaluate additional risk factors for PE in patients with lung cancer surgery. Patients underwent lung cancer resections during January 2012 to July 2015 and had 30-day postoperative follow-up were included. Those with incomplete or miscoded data were excluded. The number of postoperative PE events was recorded retrospectively. Analyses were used to evaluate risk factors of PE during the hospitalization. The authors reviewed 11,474 patients who underwent surgery for lung cancer. The overall 30-day incidence of PE after thoracic surgery at their institution was 0.53%. The 30-day PE incidence without chemical prophylaxis was 0.57% (55/9,726) and the mortality rate was 10%. Multivariate analyses revealed that age over 66 (odds ratio [OR]: 1.09, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-1.12, p < 0.001), more extensive surgery than lobectomy (OR: 2.34, 95% CI: 1.28-4.25, p = 0.006) and stage IV of lung cancer (OR: 4.22, 95% CI: 1.50-11.9, p = 0.007) were associated with an increased risk of PE. Using these additional risk factors, based on readily available clinical characteristics, can help to risk-stratify patients and warrant extended chemical prophylaxis for patients to reduce the incidence of acute PE. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Investigating the Association Between Sociodemographic Factors and Lung Cancer Risk Using Cyber Informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hong-Jun; Tourassi, Georgia

    2016-02-01

    Openly available online sources can be very valuable for executing in silico case-control epidemiological studies. Adjustment of confounding factors to isolate the association between an observing factor and disease is essential for such studies. However, such information is not always readily available online. This paper suggests natural language processing methods for extracting socio-demographic information from content openly available online. Feasibility of the suggested method is demonstrated by performing a case-control study focusing on the association between age, gender, and income level and lung cancer risk. The study shows stronger association between older age and lower socioeconomic status and higher lung cancer risk, which is consistent with the findings reported in traditional cancer epidemiology studies.

  18. NELSON lung cancer screening study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Zhao (Yingru); X. Xie (Xueqian); H.J. de Koning (Harry); W.P. Mali (Willem); R. Vliegenthart (Rozemarijn); M. Oudkerk (Matthijs)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe Dutch-Belgian Randomized Lung Cancer Screening Trial (Dutch acronym: NELSON study) was designed to investigate whether screening for lung cancer by low-dose multidetector computed tomography (CT) in high-risk subjects will lead to a decrease in 10-year lung cancer mortality of at

  19. Meat consumption, meat cooking and risk of lung cancer among Uruguayan men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stefani, Eduardo; Ronco, Alvaro L; Boffetta, Paolo; Deneo-Pellegrini, Hugo; Acosta, Gisele; Mendilaharsu, María

    2010-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted in Uruguay, including 876 male cases of lung cancer and 876 male hospitalized controls, frequency matched for age (ten-year intervals), residence and hospital. The following explanatory variables were included in the study: fried red meat, barbecued red meat, boiled red meat, and salted red meat. These items were log transformed and energy-adjusted by the residuals method. The following potential confounders were included into the models: age, residence, hospital, education, family history of lung cancer, body mass index, smoking index, alcohol drinking, mate consumption, total energy intake, non-meat fatty foods and total fruits. The main objective was to estimate the odds ratios associated with lung cancer risk. Whereas fried meat, barbecued meat, and salted meat were positively associated with risk (OR of the highest quartile of salted meat versus the lowest, 2.90, 95 % CI 1.99-4.25, p-value for trendmeat was mainly protective. We conclude that salted meat was the main risk factor. The mechanisms could be related to the content of N-nitroso compounds in salted meat.

  20. [A comparative study on the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer between mediastinoscopy and EBUS-TBNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Mao, Feng; Cai, Minghui; Shen-Tu, Yang

    2013-06-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has been gradually universal application, but its value in the preoperative staging of lung cancer and mediastinal mass biopsy remains to be explored. The aim of this study is to evaluate the value of clinical application between mediastinoscopy and EBUS-TBNA, desiring to provide an objective basis for the rational choice applications. Between July 2009 and December 2012, mediastinoscopy patients with 361 cases accepted biopsy, including 199 cases of lung cancer and 162 cases of mediastinal mass of unknown origin, EBUS-TBNA patients with 348 cases accepted biopsy, including 216 cases of lung cancer and 132 cases of mediastinal mass. Comparing the diagnostic results and related indicators of two methods, this article analyzed the clinical value both the preoperative staging of lung cancer and the diagnosis of mediastinal mass. Taking pathology diagnosis as the gold standard, the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of mediastinoscopy and EBUS-TBNA are 98.33%, 98.17%, 100% and 90.80%, 90.00%, 100%. Two techniques in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer have not statistically significant (P>0.05), but in the diagnosis of mediastinal mass have statistical significance (Pdiagnosis and staging of lung cancer; but mediastinoscopy for mediastinal mass is superior to EBUS-TBNA.

  1. Chemoprevention of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Eva; Mao, Jenny T.; Lam, Stephen; Reid, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor. Former smokers are at a substantially increased risk of developing lung cancer compared with lifetime never smokers. Chemoprevention refers to the use of specific agents to reverse, suppress, or prevent the process of carcinogenesis. This article reviews the major agents that have been studied for chemoprevention. Methods: Articles of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention trials were reviewed and summarized to obtain recommendations. Results: None of the phase 3 trials with the agents β-carotene, retinol, 13-cis-retinoic acid, α-tocopherol, N-acetylcysteine, acetylsalicylic acid, or selenium has demonstrated beneficial and reproducible results. To facilitate the evaluation of promising agents and to lessen the need for a large sample size, extensive time commitment, and expense, surrogate end point biomarker trials are being conducted to assist in identifying the most promising agents for later-stage chemoprevention trials. With the understanding of important cellular signaling pathways and the expansion of potentially important targets, agents (many of which target inflammation and the arachidonic acid pathway) are being developed and tested which may prevent or reverse lung carcinogenesis. Conclusions: By integrating biologic knowledge, additional early-phase trials can be performed in a reasonable time frame. The future of lung cancer chemoprevention should entail the evaluation of single agents or combinations that target various pathways while working toward identification and validation of intermediate end points. PMID:23649449

  2. Risk of lung cancer according to mild steel and stainless steel welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anita Rath; Thulstrup, Ane Marie; Hansen, Johnni

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Whether the elevated risk of lung cancer observed among welders is caused by welding emissions or by confounding from smoking or asbestos exposure is still not resolved. This question was addressed in a cohort with a long follow-up and quantified estimates of individual exposure...... to welding fume particulates. METHODS: Male metal workers employed at least 1 year at one or more Danish stainless or mild steel industrial companies from 1964 through 1984 were enrolled in a cohort. Data on occupational and smoking history were obtained by questionnaire in 1986. Welders in the cohort who...... started welding in 1960 or later (N=4539) were followed from April 1968 until December 2003, when information on cancer diagnosis was obtained from the Danish Cancer Registry. During the follow-up, 75 cases of primary lung cancer were identified. Lifetime accumulated exposure to welding fume particulates...

  3. Residential Mobility and Lung Cancer Risk: Data-Driven Exploration Using Internet Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hong-Jun [ORNL; Tourassi, Georgia [ORNL; Xu, Songhua [New Jersey Insitute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    Frequent relocation has been linked to health decline, particularly with respect to emotional and psychological wellbeing. In this paper we investigate whether there is an association between frequent relocation and lung cancer risk. For the initial investigation we leverage two online data sources to collect cancer and control subjects using web crawling and tailored text mining. The two data sources share different strengths and weaknesses in terms of the amount of detail, population representation, and sample size. One data source includes online obituaries. The second data source includes augmented LinkedIn profiles. For each data source, the subjects spatiotemporal history is reconstructed from the available information provided in the obituaries and from the education and work experience provided in the LinkedIn profiles. The study shows that lung cancer subjects have higher mobility frequency than the control group. This trend is consistent for both data sources.

  4. Regular adult aspirin use decreases the risk of non-small cell lung cancer among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyke, Alison L; Cote, Michele L; Prysak, Geoffrey; Claeys, Gina B; Wenzlaff, Angie S; Schwartz, Ann G

    2008-01-01

    Prior studies indicate that use of aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) is associated with a decreased risk of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); however, results have been contradictory in part because of variation in study design. Few studies have examined the use of aspirin or other NSAIDs on risk of NSCLC in women. Through a case-control study of African American and Caucasian women with and without NSCLC, we examined the relationship between use of aspirin, NSAIDs, and acetaminophen and risk of NSCLC. Risk was estimated by calculating odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for ever/never use, duration of use, and duration of use category (never, 1-5 years, >5 years) after adjusting for major risk factors for lung cancer. Risk estimates were stratified by race, age, smoking history, and body mass index. Every use of adult-strength aspirin was associated with a significant reduction in risk of NSCLC (odds ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval, 0.46-0.94). Additionally, there was a significant trend toward a reduced risk of NSCLC in adult-strength aspirin users with increasing duration of use (P(trend) = 0.02). In stratified analyses, aspirin use was associated with a significantly reduced risk of lung cancer among Caucasians and 55- to 64-year-olds. Baby aspirin and NSAID use was associated with a significant reduction in risk of NSCLC only among 65- to 74-year-olds. Our results suggest that long-term use of adult-strength aspirin may reduce the risk of NSCLC in women.

  5. A prospective study of immune and inflammation markers and risk of lung cancer among female never smokers in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiels, Meredith S; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Chaturvedi, Anil K; Gao, Yu-Tang; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Cai, Qiuyin; Hu, Wei; Shelton, Gloriana; Ji, Bu-Tian; Pinto, Ligia A; Kemp, Troy J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zheng, Wei; Hildesheim, Allan; Lan, Qing

    2017-10-01

    There is a paucity of data on risk factors for lung cancer among never smokers. Here, we have carried out the first large study of circulating inflammation markers and lung cancer risk among female never smokers in Shanghai. A study of 248 lung cancer cases in female never smokers and 263 controls was nested within the Shanghai Women's Health Study (n = 75221), matched by dates of birth and blood collection (mean follow-up time = 7.5 years). Prediagnostic plasma levels of 65 inflammation markers were measured using a Luminex bead-based assay. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated with multivariable logistic regression. Nine of 61 evaluable markers were statistically significantly associated with lung cancer risk among never smoking Chinese women (P-trend across categories 7.5 years prior to diagnosis. Markers involved in various aspects of the immune response were associated with subsequent lung cancer risk, implicating inflammation in the etiology of lung cancer among female never smokers. Published by Oxford University Press 2017.

  6. LIFETIME LUNG CANCER RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH INDOOR RADON EXPOSURE BASED ON VARIOUS RADON RISK MODELS FOR CANADIAN POPULATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing

    2017-04-01

    This study calculates and compares the lifetime lung cancer risks associated with indoor radon exposure based on well-known risk models in the literature; two risk models are from joint studies among miners and the other three models were developed from pooling studies on residential radon exposure from China, Europe and North America respectively. The aim of this article is to make clear that the various models are mathematical descriptions of epidemiologically observed real risks in different environmental settings. The risk from exposure to indoor radon is real and it is normal that variations could exist among different risk models even when they were applied to the same dataset. The results show that lifetime risk estimates vary significantly between the various risk models considered here: the model based on the European residential data provides the lowest risk estimates, while models based on the European miners and Chinese residential pooling with complete dosimetry give the highest values. The lifetime risk estimates based on the EPA/BEIR-VI model lie within this range and agree reasonably well with the averages of risk estimates from the five risk models considered in this study. © Crown copyright 2016.

  7. Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Model Incorporating Lung Function: Development and Validation in the UK Biobank Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, David C; Johansson, Mattias; Brennan, Paul

    2017-03-10

    Purpose Several lung cancer risk prediction models have been developed, but none to date have assessed the predictive ability of lung function in a population-based cohort. We sought to develop and internally validate a model incorporating lung function using data from the UK Biobank prospective cohort study. Methods This analysis included 502,321 participants without a previous diagnosis of lung cancer, predominantly between 40 and 70 years of age. We used flexible parametric survival models to estimate the 2-year probability of lung cancer, accounting for the competing risk of death. Models included predictors previously shown to be associated with lung cancer risk, including sex, variables related to smoking history and nicotine addiction, medical history, family history of lung cancer, and lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]). Results During accumulated follow-up of 1,469,518 person-years, there were 738 lung cancer diagnoses. A model incorporating all predictors had excellent discrimination (concordance (c)-statistic [95% CI] = 0.85 [0.82 to 0.87]). Internal validation suggested that the model will discriminate well when applied to new data (optimism-corrected c-statistic = 0.84). The full model, including FEV1, also had modestly superior discriminatory power than one that was designed solely on the basis of questionnaire variables (c-statistic = 0.84 [0.82 to 0.86]; optimism-corrected c-statistic = 0.83; pFEV1 = 3.4 × 10-13). The full model had better discrimination than standard lung cancer screening eligibility criteria (c-statistic = 0.66 [0.64 to 0.69]). Conclusion A risk prediction model that includes lung function has strong predictive ability, which could improve eligibility criteria for lung cancer screening programs.

  8. Evaluation of the Lung Cancer Risks at Which to Screen Ever- and Never-Smokers: Screening Rules Applied to the PLCO and NLST Cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammemägi, Martin C.; Church, Timothy R.; Hocking, William G.; Silvestri, Gerard A.; Kvale, Paul A.; Riley, Thomas L.; Commins, John; Berg, Christine D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Lung cancer risks at which individuals should be screened with computed tomography (CT) for lung cancer are undecided. This study's objectives are to identify a risk threshold for selecting individuals for screening, to compare its efficiency with the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) criteria for identifying screenees, and to determine whether never-smokers should be screened. Lung cancer risks are compared between smokers aged 55–64 and ≥65–80 y. Methods and Findings Applying the PLCOm2012 model, a model based on 6-y lung cancer incidence, we identified the risk threshold above which National Lung Screening Trial (NLST, n = 53,452) CT arm lung cancer mortality rates were consistently lower than rates in the chest X-ray (CXR) arm. We evaluated the USPSTF and PLCOm2012 risk criteria in intervention arm (CXR) smokers (n = 37,327) of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO). The numbers of smokers selected for screening, and the sensitivities, specificities, and positive predictive values (PPVs) for identifying lung cancers were assessed. A modified model (PLCOall2014) evaluated risks in never-smokers. At PLCOm2012 risk ≥0.0151, the 65th percentile of risk, the NLST CT arm mortality rates are consistently below the CXR arm's rates. The number needed to screen to prevent one lung cancer death in the 65th to 100th percentile risk group is 255 (95% CI 143 to 1,184), and in the 30th to risk group is 963 (95% CI 291 to −754); the number needed to screen could not be estimated in the risk group because of absence of lung cancer deaths. When applied to PLCO intervention arm smokers, compared to the USPSTF criteria, the PLCOm2012 risk ≥0.0151 threshold selected 8.8% fewer individuals for screening (prisks below the threshold PLCOm2012 risk ≥0.0151. Of PLCO former smokers with quit time >15 y, 8.5% had PLCOm2012 risk ≥0.0151. None of 65,711 PLCO never-smokers had PLCOm2012 risk ≥0.0151. Risks and

  9. The Relationship between FHIT Gene Promoter Methylation and Lung Cancer Risk: 
a Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichang SUN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Tumor-suppressor gene promoter DNA methylation in tumor cells is associated with its reduced expression. FHIT (fragile histindine triad was one of the important tumor suppressor genes which was found hypermethylated in the promoter region in most of tumors. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between FIHT gene promother methylation and lung cancer risk by meta-analysis. Methods By searching Pubmed, CNKI and Wanfang, the open published articles related to FHIT gene promoter methylation and lung carcinoma risk were collected. The odds ratio (OR and range of FHIT gene of cancer tissue of lung cancer patients compared with normal lung tissue, plasma and the bronchial lavage fluid were pooled by statistical software Stata 11.0. Results Eleven studies were finally included in this meta-analysis. The median methylation rate were Pmedian=40.0% (0-68.3%, Pmedian=8.7% (0-35.0%, Pmedian=33.3% (17.1%-38.3% and Pmedian=35.9% (31.1%-50.8% in cancer tissue, NLT, BALF and plasm respectively. The pooled results showed the methylation rate in tumor tissue was much higer than that of NLT OR=5.82 (95%CI: 3.74-9.06, P0.05 and plasma OR=1.41 (95%CI: 0.90-2.20, P>0.05. Conclusion Hypermethylation of FHIT gene promoter region was found more frequent in cancer tissue than that of NLT which may demonstrated association between lung cancer risk and FHIT gene promoter methylation.

  10. Cruciferous vegetable intake is inversely associated with lung cancer risk among smokers: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Li; Zirpoli, Gary R; Jayaprakash, Vijayvel; Reid, Mary E; McCann, Susan E; Nwogu, Chukwumere E; Zhang, Yuesheng; Ambrosone, Christine B; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2010-04-27

    Inverse associations between cruciferous vegetable intake and lung cancer risk have been consistently reported. However, associations within smoking status subgroups have not been consistently addressed. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study with lung cancer cases and controls matched on smoking status, and further adjusted for smoking status, duration, and intensity in the multivariate models. A total of 948 cases and 1743 controls were included in the analysis. Inverse linear trends were observed between intake of fruits, total vegetables, and cruciferous vegetables and risk of lung cancer (ORs ranged from 0.53-0.70, with P for trend vegetables with lung cancer among never smokers. Conversely, significant inverse associations with cruciferous vegetable intake were observed primarily among smokers, in particular former smokers, although significant interactions were not detected between smoking and intake of any food group. Of four lung cancer histological subtypes, significant inverse associations were observed primarily among patients with squamous or small cell carcinoma - the two subtypes more strongly associated with heavy smoking. Our findings are consistent with the smoking-related carcinogen-modulating effect of isothiocyanates, a group of phytochemicals uniquely present in cruciferous vegetables. Our data support consumption of a diet rich in cruciferous vegetables may reduce the risk of lung cancer among smokers.

  11. Rare variants of large effect in BRCA2 and CHEK2 affect risk of lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yufei; McKay, James D.; Rafnar, Thorunn; Wang, Zhaoming; Timofeeva, Maria; Broderick, Peter; Zong, Xuchen; Laplana, Marina; Wei, Yongyue; Han, Younghun; Lloyd, Amy; Delahaye-Sourdeix, Manon; Chubb, Daniel; Gaborieau, Valerie; Wheeler, William; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Sulem, Patrick; Liu, Geoffrey; Kaaks, Rudolf; Henrion, Marc; Kinnersley, Ben; Vallée, Maxime; LeCalvez-Kelm, Florence; Stevens, Victoria L.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Chen, Wei V.; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonilia; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Mates, Dana; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Krokan, Hans E.; Gabrielsen, Maiken Elvestad; Skorpen, Frank; Vatten, Lars; Njølstad, Inger; Chen, Chu; Goodman, Gary; Benhamou, Simone; Vooder, Tonu; Valk, Kristjan; Nelis, Mari; Metspalu, Andres; Lener, Marcin; Lubiński, Jan; Johansson, Mattias; Vineis, Paolo; Agudo, Antonio; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.Bas; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Johansson, Mikael; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Tjønneland, Anne; Riboli, Elio; Lathrop, Mark; Scelo, Ghislaine; Albanes, Demetrius; Caporaso, Neil E.; Ye, Yuanqing; Gu, Jian; Wu, Xifeng; Spitz, Margaret R.; Dienemann, Hendrik; Rosenberger, Albert; Su, Li; Matakidou, Athena; Eisen, Timothy; Stefansson, Kari; Risch, Angela; Chanock, Stephen J.; Christiani, David C.; Hung, Rayjean J.; Brennan, Paul; Landi, Maria Teresa; Houlston, Richard S.; Amos, Christopher I.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted imputation to the 1000 Genomes Project of four genome-wide association studies of lung cancer in populations of European ancestry (11,348 cases and 15,861 controls) and genotyped an additional 10,246 cases and 38,295 controls for follow-up. We identified large-effect genome-wide associations for squamous lung cancer with the rare variants of BRCA2-K3326X (rs11571833; odds ratio [OR]=2.47, P=4.74×10−20) and of CHEK2-I157T (rs17879961; OR=0.38 P=1.27×10−13). We also showed an association between common variation at 3q28 (TP63; rs13314271; OR=1.13, P=7.22×10−10) and lung adenocarcinoma previously only reported in Asians. These findings provide further evidence for inherited genetic susceptibility to lung cancer and its biological basis. Additionally, our analysis demonstrates that imputation can identify rare disease-causing variants having substantive effects on cancer risk from pre-existing GWAS data. PMID:24880342

  12. Residential radon exposure, histologic types, and lung cancer risk. A case-control study in Galicia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros-Dios, Juan Miguel; Ruano-Ravina, Alberto; Pérez-Ríos, Mónica; Castro-Bernárdez, Margarita; Abal-Arca, Jose; Tojo-Castro, Marta

    2012-06-01

    Lung cancer is an important public health problem, and tobacco is the main risk factor followed by residential radon exposure. Recommended exposure levels have been progressively lowered. Galicia, the study area, has high residential radon concentrations. We aim (i) to assess the risk of lung cancer linked to airborne residential radon exposure, (ii) to ascertain whether tobacco modifies radon risk, and (iii) to know whether there is a lung cancer histologic type more susceptible to radon. A hospital-based case-control design was conducted in two Spanish hospitals. Consecutive cases with histologic diagnosis of lung cancer and controls undergoing trivial surgery not tobacco-related were included. Residential radon was measured using standard procedures. Results were obtained using logistic regression. Three hundred and forty-nine cases and 513 controls were included. Radon exposure posed a risk even with a low exposure, with those exposed to 50 to 100 Bq/m(3) having an OR of 1.87 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.21-2.88] and of 2.21 (95% CI, 1.33-3.69) for those exposed to 148 Bq/m(3) or more. Tobacco increased appreciably the risk posed by radon, with an OR of 73 (95% CI, 19.88-268.14) for heavy smokers exposed to more than 147 Bq/m(3). Less frequent histologic types (including large cell carcinomas), followed by small cell lung cancer, had the highest risk associated with radon exposure. The presence of airborne radon even at low concentrations poses a risk of developing lung cancer, with tobacco habit increasing considerably this risk. Public health initiatives should address the higher risk of lung cancer for smokers exposed to radon.

  13. Anthropometric Measures and Physical Activity and the Risk of Lung Cancer in Never-Smokers: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Tram Kim; Moore, Steve C.; Brinton, Louise A.; Smith, Llewellyn; Hollenbeck, Albert R.; Gierach, Gretchen L.; Freedman, Neal D.

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, lung cancer in never-smokers is ranked the seventh most common cause of cancer death; however, the etiology of lung cancer in never-smokers is unclear. We investigated associations for body mass index (BMI) at various ages, waist circumference, hip circumference, and physical activity with lung cancer in 158,415 never-smokers of the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Multivariable hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated from Cox proportional hazards models. Over 11 years of follow-up, 532 lung cancer cases occurred. The risk estimate for obese (BMI≥30 kg/m2) participants at baseline was 1.21 (95%CI = 0.95–1.53) relative to those with a normal BMI between 18.5≤BMInever smokers. If anything, we observed some evidence for positive associations with a larger BMI or waist circumference. PMID:23940620

  14. Long-Term, Supplemental, One-Carbon Metabolism-Related Vitamin B Use in Relation to Lung Cancer Risk in the Vitamins and Lifestyle (VITAL) Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasky, Theodore M; White, Emily; Chen, Chi-Ling

    2017-10-20

    Purpose Inconsistent findings have been reported of a link between the use of one-carbon metabolism-related B vitamins and lung cancer risk. Because of the high prevalence of supplemental vitamin B use, any possible increased association warrants further investigation. We examined the association between long-term use of supplemental B vitamins on the one-carbon metabolism pathway and lung cancer risk in the Vitamins and Lifestyle (VITAL) cohort, which was designed specifically to look at supplement use relative to cancer risk. Methods A total of 77,118 participants of the VITAL cohort, 50 to 76 years of age, were recruited between October 2000 and December 2002 and included in this analysis. Incident, primary, invasive lung cancers (n = 808) were ascertained by prospectively linking the participants to a population-based cancer registry. The 10-year average daily dose from individual and multivitamin supplements were the exposures of primary interest. Results Use of supplemental vitamins B 6 , folate, and B 12 was not associated with lung cancer risk among women. In contrast, use of vitamin B 6 and B 12 from individual supplement sources, but not from multivitamins, was associated with a 30% to 40% increase in lung cancer risk among men. When the 10-year average supplement dose was evaluated, there was an almost two-fold increase in lung cancer risk among men in the highest categories of vitamin B 6 (> 20 mg/d; hazard ratio, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.25 to 2.65) and B 12 (> 55µg/d; hazard ratio, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.32 to 2.97) compared with nonusers. For vitamin B 6 and B 12 , the risk was even higher among men who were smoking at baseline. In addition, the B 6 and B 12 associations were apparent in all histologic types except adenocarcinoma, which is the type less related to smoking. Conclusion This sex- and source-specific association provides further evidence that vitamin B supplements are not chemopreventive for lung cancer and may be harmful.

  15. Predicting death from surgery for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Dowd, Emma L; Lüchtenborg, Margreet; Baldwin, David R

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Current British guidelines advocate the use of risk prediction scores such as Thoracoscore to estimate mortality prior to radical surgery for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A recent publication used the National Lung Cancer Audit (NLCA) to produce a score to predict 90day mortality...... (NLCA score). The aim of this study is to validate the NLCA score, and compare its performance with Thoracoscore. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed an internal validation using 2858 surgical patients from NLCA and an external validation using 3191 surgical patients from the Danish Lung Cancer Registry...... by procedure type, age and performance status. CONCLUSIONS: Neither score performs well enough to be advocated for individual risk stratification prior to lung cancer surgery. It may be that additional physiological parameters are required; however this is a further project. In the interim we propose the use...

  16. Cytokine and cytokine receptor single-nucleotide polymorphisms predict risk for non-small cell lung cancer among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyke, Alison L; Cote, Michele L; Wenzlaff, Angie S; Chen, Wei; Abrams, Judith; Land, Susan; Giroux, Craig N; Schwartz, Ann G

    2009-06-01

    Studies on the relationships between inflammatory pathway genes and lung cancer risk have not included African-Americans and have only included a handful of genes. In a population-based case-control study on 198 African-American and 744 Caucasian women, we examined the association between 70 cytokine and cytokine receptor single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals in a dominant model adjusting for major risk factors for lung cancer. Separate analyses were conducted by race and by smoking history and history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among Caucasians. Random forest analysis was conducted by race. On logistic regression analysis, IL6 (interleukin 6), IL7R, IL15, TNF (tumor necrosis factor), and IL10 SNP were associated with risk of non-small cell lung cancer among African-Americans; IL7R and IL10 SNPs were also associated with risk of lung cancer among Caucasians. Although random forest analysis showed IL7R and IL10 SNPs as being associated with risk for lung cancer among African-Americans, it also identified TNFRSF10A SNP as an important predictor. On random forest analysis, an IL1A SNP was identified as an important predictor of lung cancer among Caucasian women. Inflammatory SNPs differentially predicted risk for NSCLC according to race, as well as based on smoking history and history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among Caucasian women. Pathway analysis results are presented. Inflammatory pathway genotypes may serve to define a high risk group; further exploration of these genes in minority populations is warranted.

  17. Cytokine and Cytokine Receptor Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Predict Risk for Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer among Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyke, Alison L.; Cote, Michele L.; Wenzlaff, Angie S.; Chen, Wei; Abrams, Judith; Land, Susan; Giroux, Craig N.; Schwartz, Ann G.

    2013-01-01

    Studies on the relationships between inflammatory pathway genes and lung cancer risk have not included African-Americans and have only included a handful of genes. In a population-based case-control study on 198 African-American and 744 Caucasian women, we examined the association between 70 cytokine and cytokine receptor single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals in a dominant model adjusting for major risk factors for lung cancer. Separate analyses were conducted by race and by smoking history and history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among Caucasians. Random forest analysis was conducted by race. On logistic regression analysis, IL6 (interleukin 6), IL7R, IL15, TNF (tumor necrosis factor), and IL10 SNP were associated with risk of non–small cell lung cancer among African-Americans; IL7R and IL10 SNPs were also associated with risk of lung cancer among Caucasians. Although random forest analysis showed IL7R and IL10 SNPs as being associated with risk for lung cancer among African-Americans, it also identified TNFRSF10A SNP as an important predictor. On random forest analysis, an IL1A SNP was identified as an important predictor of lung cancer among Caucasian women. Inflammatory SNPs differentially predicted risk for NSCLC according to race, as well as based on smoking history and history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among Caucasian women. Pathway analysis results are presented. Inflammatory pathway genotypes may serve to define a high risk group; further exploration of these genes in minority populations is warranted. PMID:19505916

  18. Systematic review with meta-analysis of the epidemiological evidence relating FEV1 decline to lung cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fry John S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reduced FEV1 is known to predict increased lung cancer risk, but previous reviews are limited. To quantify this relationship more precisely, and study heterogeneity, we derived estimates of β for the relationship RR(diff = exp(βdiff, where diff is the reduction in FEV1 expressed as a percentage of predicted (FEV1%P and RR(diff the associated relative risk. We used results reported directly as β, and as grouped levels of RR in terms of FEV1%P and of associated measures (e.g. FEV1/FVC. Methods Papers describing cohort studies involving at least three years follow-up which recorded FEV1 at baseline and presented results relating lung cancer to FEV1 or associated measures were sought from Medline and other sources. Data were recorded on study design and quality and, for each data block identified, on details of the results, including population characteristics, adjustment factors, lung function measure, and analysis type. Regression estimates were converted to β estimates where appropriate. For results reported by grouped levels, we used the NHANES III dataset to estimate mean FEV1%P values for each level, regardless of the measure used, then derived β using regression analysis which accounted for non-independence of the RR estimates. Goodness-of-fit was tested by comparing observed and predicted lung cancer cases for each level. Inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis allowed derivation of overall β estimates and testing for heterogeneity by factors including sex, age, location, timing, duration, study quality, smoking adjustment, measure of FEV1 reported, and inverse-variance weight of β. Results Thirty-three publications satisfying the inclusion/exclusion criteria were identified, seven being rejected as not allowing estimation of β. The remaining 26 described 22 distinct studies, from which 32 independent β estimates were derived. Goodness-of-fit was satisfactory, and exp(β, the RR increase per one unit FEV1%P

  19. GSTT1 null genotype contributes to lung cancer risk in asian populations: a meta-analysis of 23 studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic variation in glutathione S-transferases (GSTs may contribute to lung cancer risk. Many studies have investigated the correlation between the Glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1 null genotype and lung cancer risk in Asian population but yielded inconclusive results. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a meta-analysis of 23 studies including 4065 cases and 5390 controls. We assessed the strength of the association of GSTT1 with lung cancer risk and performed sub-group analyses by source of controls, smoking status, histological types, and sample size. A statistically significant correlation between GSTT1 null genotype and lung cancer in Asian population was observed (OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.10, 1.49; Pheterogeneity<0.001 and I(2 = 62.0%. Sub-group analysis revealed there was a statistically increased lung cancer risk in ever-smokers who carried the GSTT1 null genotype (OR = 1.94, 95% CI = 1.27, 2.96; P heterogeneity = 0.02 and I(2 = 58.1%. It was also indicated that GSTT1 null genotype could increase lung cancer risk among population-based studies (OR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.04, 1.50; Pheterogeneity = 0.003 and I(2 = 56.8%. The positive association was also found in studies of sample size (≤500 participants (OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.10, 1.62; Pheterogeneity<0.001 and I(2 = 65.4%. CONCLUSIONS: These meta-analysis results suggest that GSTT1 null genotype is associated with a significantly increased risk of lung cancer in Asian population.

  20. Methylation analysis in spontaneous sputum for lung cancer diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubers, A.J.; Drift, M.A. van der; Prinsen, C.F.M.; Witte, B.I.; Wang, Y.; Shivapurkar, N.; Stastny, V.; Bolijn, A.S.; Hol, B.E.; Feng, Z.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Gazdar, A.F.; Thunnissen, E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Lung cancer is the most fatal cancer in the developed world due to presence of metastases at time of diagnosis. The aim of this study is to examine DNA hypermethylation in sputum compared to sputum cytology for the diagnosis of lung cancer. A novel risk analysis is introduced, using the

  1. Lung cancer attributable to indoor radon exposure in France using different risk models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catelinois, O.C.; Laurier, D.L.; Rogel, A.R.; Billon, S.B.; Tirmarche, M.T. [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Hemon, Dh. [INSERM -U170-IFR69, 94 - Villejuif (France); Verger, P.V. [Regional Health Observatory Provence Alpes Cote d' Azur, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Radon exposure is omnipresent for the general public, but at variable levels, because radon mainly comes from granitic and volcanic subs oils as well as from certain construction materials. Inhalation of radon is the main source of exposure to radioactivity in the general population of most countries. In 1988, the International Agency for Research on Cancer declared radon to be carcinogenic for humans (lung cancer): radon is classed in the group 1. The exposure of the overall general population to a carcinogenic component led scientists to assess the lung cancer risk associated to indoor radon. The aim of this work is to provide the first lung cancer risk assessment associated with indoor radon exposure in France, using all available epidemiological results and performing an uncertainty analysis. The number of lung cancer deaths potentially associated with radon in houses is estimated for the year 1999 according to several dose-response relationships which come from either cohorts of miners or joint analysis of residential case-controls studies. The variability of indoor radon exposure in France and uncertainties related to each of the dose-response relationships are considered. The assessment of lung cancer risk associated with domestic radon exposure considers 10 dose-response relationships resulting from miners cohorts and case-control studies in the general population. A critical review of available data on smoking habits has been performed and allowed to consider the interaction between radon and tobacco. The exposure data come from measurements campaigns carried out since the beginning of the 1980's by the Institute for Radiation protection and Nuclear Safety and the Health General Directory in France. The French lung cancer mortality data are provided by the INSERM. Estimates of the number of attributable cancers are carried out for the whole country, stratified by 8 large regions and b y 96 departments for the year

  2. Genetic Risk Can Be Decreased: Quitting Smoking Decreases and Delays Lung Cancer for Smokers With High and Low CHRNA5 Risk Genotypes - A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Shiun; Baker, Timothy; Hung, Rayjean J; Horton, Amy; Culverhouse, Robert; Hartz, Sarah; Saccone, Nancy; Cheng, Iona; Deng, Bo; Han, Younghun; Hansen, Helen M; Horsman, Janet; Kim, Claire; Rosenberger, Albert; Aben, Katja K; Andrew, Angeline S; Chang, Shen-Chih; Saum, Kai-Uwe; Dienemann, Hendrik; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Johnson, Eric O; Pande, Mala; Wrensch, Margaret R; McLaughlin, John; Skaug, Vidar; van der Heijden, Erik H; Wampfler, Jason; Wenzlaff, Angela; Woll, Penella; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh; Bickeböller, Heike; Brenner, Hermann; Duell, Eric J; Haugen, Aage; Brüske, Irene; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Lazarus, Philip; Le Marchand, Loic; Liu, Geoffrey; Mayordomo, Jose; Risch, Angela; Schwartz, Ann G; Teare, M Dawn; Wu, Xifeng; Wiencke, John K; Yang, Ping; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Spitz, Margaret R; Amos, Christopher I; Bierut, Laura J

    2016-09-01

    Recent meta-analyses show that individuals with high risk variants in CHRNA5 on chromosome 15q25 are likely to develop lung cancer earlier than those with low-risk genotypes. The same high-risk genetic variants also predict nicotine dependence and delayed smoking cessation. It is unclear whether smoking cessation confers the same benefits in terms of lung cancer risk reduction for those who possess CHRNA5 risk variants versus those who do not. Meta-analyses examined the association between smoking cessation and lung cancer risk in 15 studies of individuals with European ancestry who possessed varying rs16969968 genotypes (N=12,690 ever smokers, including 6988 cases of lung cancer and 5702 controls) in the International Lung Cancer Consortium. Smoking cessation (former vs. current smokers) was associated with a lower likelihood of lung cancer (OR=0.48, 95%CI=0.30-0.75, p=0.0015). Among lung cancer patients, smoking cessation was associated with a 7-year delay in median age of lung cancer diagnosis (HR=0.68, 95%CI=0.61-0.77, p=4.9∗10 -10 ). The CHRNA5 rs16969968 risk genotype (AA) was associated with increased risk and earlier diagnosis for lung cancer, but the beneficial effects of smoking cessation were very similar in those with and without the risk genotype. We demonstrate that quitting smoking is highly beneficial in reducing lung cancer risks for smokers regardless of their CHRNA5 rs16969968 genetic risk status. Smokers with high-risk CHRNA5 genotypes, on average, can largely eliminate their elevated genetic risk for lung cancer by quitting smoking- cutting their risk of lung cancer in half and delaying its onset by 7years for those who develop it. These results: 1) underscore the potential value of smoking cessation for all smokers, 2) suggest that CHRNA5 rs16969968 genotype affects lung cancer diagnosis through its effects on smoking, and 3) have potential value for framing preventive interventions for those who smoke. Copyright © 2016

  3. Women Epidemiology Lung Cancer (WELCA study: reproductive, hormonal, occupational risk factors and biobank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Stücker

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer aetiology and clinical aspects have been mainly studied in men, although specific risk factors probably exist in women. Here we present the rationale, design and organization of the WELCA study (Women Epidemiology Lung CAncer that has been launched to investigate lung cancer in women, focusing particularly on hormonal and occupational factors. Methods/Design WELCA is a population based case-control study and planned to recruit 1000 cases and 1000 controls in three years, based on study power calculation. Eligible cases are female patients newly diagnosed with lung cancer, living in Paris and the Ile de France area and aged up to 75 years. Almost all Parisian pneumology and oncology clinical departments are involved. The control group is a random sample of the population living in the same area, frequency-matched on age and additionally stratified on the distribution of socio-professional categories of women residing there. After acquisition of written consent, research nurses administer standardized computer assisted questionnaires to all the subjects in face-to-face interviews and acquire anthropometric measures. Besides usual socio-demographic characteristics, information is gathered about menstrual and reproductive factors, hormonal treatments, lifestyle and leisure characteristics, occupational history, personal and familial medical history. Biological samples are also collected, in order to establish a biobank for molecular epidemiology studies. Molecular characteristics of the tumours will be obtained and patients will be followed up for five years. Discussion The WELCA study aims to answer key questions in lung cancer aetiology and clinical characteristics specifically in women. The role of hormonal impregnation is investigated, and the interactions with cigarette smoking or body mass index (BMI will be analyzed in detail. The occupational history of the subjects is carefully reconstructed, focusing in

  4. Effect of smoking reduction on lung cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godtfredsen, Nina S; Prescott, Eva; Osler, Merete

    2005-01-01

    Many smokers are unable or unwilling to completely quit smoking. A proposed means of harm reduction is to reduce the number of cigarettes smoked per day. However, it is not clear whether this strategy decreases the risk for tobacco-related diseases.......Many smokers are unable or unwilling to completely quit smoking. A proposed means of harm reduction is to reduce the number of cigarettes smoked per day. However, it is not clear whether this strategy decreases the risk for tobacco-related diseases....

  5. Effect of smoking reduction on lung cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godtfredsen, Nina S; Prescott, Eva; Osler, Merete

    2005-01-01

    Many smokers are unable or unwilling to completely quit smoking. A proposed means of harm reduction is to reduce the number of cigarettes smoked per day. However, it is not clear whether this strategy decreases the risk for tobacco-related diseases....

  6. Lung cancer risk in relation to dietary acrylamide intake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogervorst, J.G.F.; Schouten, L.J.; Konings, E.J.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2009-01-01

    Background : Acrylamide is a probable human carcinogen that is present in several heat-treated foods. In epidemiological studies, positive associations between dietary acrylamide intake and the risks of endometrial, ovarian, estrogen receptor-positive breast, and renal cell cancers have been

  7. Association of 12 polymorphic variants conferring genetic risk to lung cancer in Indian population: An extensive meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Debmalya; Guha, Udayan; Bhattacharjee, Samsiddhi; Sengupta, Mainak

    2017-12-01

    Candidate gene as well as genome-wide association studies identified several polymorphic variants to be associated with lung cancer worldwide including in India. However, contradictory results have failed to estimate the overall effect of the polymorphic variants on the disease. Textmining was conducted on PubMed following specific search strings to gather all the publications related to genetic association with lung cancer in India. Out of 211 PubMed hits only 30 studies were selected for meta-analysis following specific inclusion criteria. Heterogeneity between studies was calculated by Cochran's Q-test (P associated with lung cancer. However, after multiple testing correction, only rs1048943 was found to be significantly associated (P value = 0.0321) with lung cancer. None of the polymorphic variants showed any evidence of heterogeneity between studies or of publication bias. Our meta-analysis revealed strong association of rs1048943 in CYP1A1, but a suggestive association of deletion polymorphisms in GSTT1 and GSTM1 with lung cancer, which provides a comprehensive insight on the overall effect of the polymorphic variants, reported in various case-control studies on Indian population, on the risk of lung cancer development. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:688-700, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Risk Estimation for Lung Cancer in Libya: Analysis Based on Standardized Morbidity Ratio, Poisson-Gamma Model, BYM Model and Mixture Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhdiri, Maryam Ahmed; Samat, Nor Azah; Mohamed, Zulkifley

    2017-03-01

    Cancer is the most rapidly spreading disease in the world, especially in developing countries, including Libya. Cancer represents a significant burden on patients, families, and their societies. This disease can be controlled if detected early. Therefore, disease mapping has recently become an important method in the fields of public health research and disease epidemiology. The correct choice of statistical model is a very important step to producing a good map of a disease. Libya was selected to perform this work and to examine its geographical variation in the incidence of lung cancer. The objective of this paper is to estimate the relative risk for lung cancer. Four statistical models to estimate the relative risk for lung cancer and population censuses of the study area for the time period 2006 to 2011 were used in this work. They are initially known as Standardized Morbidity Ratio, which is the most popular statistic, which used in the field of disease mapping, Poisson-gamma model, which is one of the earliest applications of Bayesian methodology, Besag, York and Mollie (BYM) model and Mixture model. As an initial step, this study begins by providing a review of all proposed models, which we then apply to lung cancer data in Libya. Maps, tables and graph, goodness-of-fit (GOF) were used to compare and present the preliminary results. This GOF is common in statistical modelling to compare fitted models. The main general results presented in this study show that the Poisson-gamma model, BYM model, and Mixture model can overcome the problem of the first model (SMR) when there is no observed lung cancer case in certain districts. Results show that the Mixture model is most robust and provides better relative risk estimates across a range of models. Creative Commons Attribution License

  9. High-risk older smokers' perceptions, attitudes, and beliefs about lung cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Janine K

    2016-04-01

    The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends that smokers aged 55-80 should be screened annually with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT). This study identified demographics, smoking history, health risk perceptions, knowledge, and attitudes factors of older smokers (≥55 years) related to LDCT agreement. Using binary logistic regression, a predictive model of factors to explain LDCT agreement was produced. This is a cross-sectional, national, online survey of 338 older smokers (≥55 years) with a ≥30 pack-year smoking history. Over 82% of the sample believed that a person who continues to smoke after the age of 40 has at least a 25% chance of developing lung cancer and 77.3% would "agree to a LDCT today". Using chi-square analyses, six variables that were significant at the 0.10 level were selected for inclusion in model development. Four of the independent variables made a unique statistically significant contribution to the model: perceives accuracy of the LDCT as an important factor in the decision to have a LDCT scan; believes that early detection of LC will result in a good prognosis; believes that they are at high risk for lung cancer; and is not afraid of CT scans. Of note, only 10.9% believed that a negative CT scan result would mean that they could continue to smoke. Older smokers are aware of the risks of smoking, are interested in smoking cessation, and most are interested in and positive about LDCT. Cognitive aspects of participation in screening are key to increasing the uptake of lung cancer screening among high-risk smokers. © 2016 The Author. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Combinations of cytochrome P-450 genotypes and risk of early-onset lung cancer in Caucasians and African Americans: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, M L; Wenzlaff, A S; Bock, C H; Land, S J; Santer, S K; Schwartz, D R; Schwartz, A G

    2007-03-01

    Polymorphisms in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 genes in humans are associated with reduction of enzymatic activity towards several substrates, including those found in tobacco smoke. To investigate the potential role these polymorphisms have as modulators of early-onset lung cancer risk, a population-based case-control study involving early-onset lung cancer cases was performed. Biological samples were available for 383 individuals diagnosed prior to 50 years of age identified from the metropolitan Detroit Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program and 449 age, race and sex-matched controls ascertained through random digit dialing. Genotype frequencies varied significantly by race for CYP1A1 Ile(462)Val and CYP1B1 Leu(432)Val genotypes, so all analyses were stratified by race. No association was seen between lung cancer risk and polymorphisms in CYP1A1 Msp1 or CYP1B1 Leu(432)Val for Caucasians or African Americans, after adjusting for age at diagnosis, sex, pack years of smoking and family history of lung cancer. In Caucasians, those with the IIe/Val genotype at CYP1A1 Ile(462)Val locus were at decreased risk of having lung cancer compared to those with the lle/lle genotype, after adjusting for age at diagnosis, sex, pack years of smoking and family history of cancer (OR=0.41 95% Cl 0.19-0.90). These results were not replicated among the African American population, nor were they modified by amount of smoking.

  11. Global lung cancer risk from PAH exposure highly depends on emission sources and individual susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Huizhong; Tao, Shu; Liu, Junfeng; Huang, Ye; Chen, Han; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yanyan; Chen, Yuanchen; Su, Shu; Lin, Nan; Xu, Yinyin; Li, Bengang; Wang, Xilong; Liu, Wenxin

    2014-10-01

    The health impacts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the most concerning organic pollutants, depend not only on the locations and strengths of emission sources, but also on individual susceptibility. Moreover, trans-boundary transport makes them a global concern. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the global health impacts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ambient air is presented. Model resolution is critical in exposure modelling. Globally, incremental lifetime lung cancer risk (ILCR) induced by ambient PAH exposure is 3.1 × 10-5. If the individual susceptibility was not taken into consideration, the overall risk would be underestimated by 55% and the proportion of highly vulnerable population would be underestimated by more than 90%. Emphasizing on individual susceptibility, our study provides an instrumental revision of current risk assessment methodology. In terms of lung cancer risk, the most important sources are combustion of biomass fuels (40%) and fossil fuels (14%) in the residential/commercial sector, coke (13%) and aluminium (12%) production, and motor vehicles (9%). PAHs can travel long distance globally especially within the Eurasian continent. Still, the risk is dominantly contributed by local.

  12. Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  13. Lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Neville, Alan J

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women, with 80-90% of cases caused by smoking. Small cell lung cancer accounts for 20% of all cases, and is usually treated with chemotherapy. Adenocarcinoma is the main non-small cell pathology, and is treated initially with surgery.

  14. Lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Neville, Alan J; Kuruvilla, Mridula Sara

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women, with 80% to 90% of cases caused by smoking. Small cell lung cancer accounts for 20% of all cases, and is usually treated with chemotherapy. Adenocarcinoma is the main non-small cell pathology, and is treated initially with surgery.

  15. Diagnostic Imaging of Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Kara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer related death in men and women. It is frequently seen among men than in women and male-female ratio is 1.5:1. Common epidemiological factors that increase risk of lung cancer is smoking. Early age to start smoking, high number of smoking cigarettes per a day and depth of inhalation increase risk of lung cancer. 25% of patients with lung cancer are nonsmokers that passively exposed to cigarette smoke. Occupational exposure to substances such as asbestos, arsenic, nickel, beryllium, mustard gas increases the risk of lung cancer. The well defined risk factor is exposure to asbestos. In addition advanced age, diffuse pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and genetic predisposition are the risk factors that increases lung cancer. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(6.000: 749-756

  16. Exposure to titanium dioxide and risk of lung cancer in a population-based study from Montreal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffetta, P; Gaborieau, V; Nadon, L; Parent, M F; Weiderpass, E; Siemiatycki, J

    2001-08-01

    This study assessed the lung cancer risk from exposure to titanium dioxide, an important pigment with limited evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals but sparse data for humans. The risk of lung cancer among residents in Montreal, Canada, was analyzed, including 857 histologically confirmed cases of lung cancer diagnosed during 1979-1985 among men aged 35-70 years and a group of referents comprising 533 randomly selected, healthy residents and 533 persons with cancer in organs other than the lung. Exposure to titanium dioxide and other titanium compounds was assessed by a team of industrial hygienists on the basis of a detailed occupational questionnaire. Thirty-three cases and 43 referents were classified as exposed to titanium dioxide. The odds ratio was 0.9 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.5-1.5]. No trend was apparent according to the estimated frequency, level, or duration of exposure. The odds ratio was 1.0 (95% CI 0.3-2.7) for medium or high exposure for at least 5 years. Few subjects were classified as exposed to titanium dioxide fumes or to other titanium compounds, but the risk of lung cancer was nonsignificantly increased for exposure to these agents. Although misclassification of exposure and low exposure prevalence might have resulted in false negative results, this study does not suggest that occupational exposure to titanium dioxide increases the risk of lung cancer.

  17. Lung Cancer Risk Associated with Regulated and Unregulated Chrysotile Asbestos Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamra, Ghassan B; Richardson, David B; Dement, John; Loomis, Dana

    2017-03-01

    Regulation of asbestos fibers in the workplace is partly determined by which fibers can be visually counted. However, a majority of fibers are too short and thin to count this way and are, consequently, not subject to regulation. We estimate lung cancer risk associated with asbestos fibers of varying length and width. We apply an order-constrained prior both to leverage external information from toxicological studies of asbestos health effects. This prior assumes that risk from asbestos fibers increases with increasing length and decreases with increasing width. When we apply a shared mean for the effect of all asbestos fiber exposure groups, the rate ratios for each fiber group per unit exposure appear mostly equal. Rate ratio estimates for fibers of diameter fibers 20-40 and >40 μm in the thinnest fiber group are similar in magnitude to estimates of risk associated with long fibers in the regulated fraction of airborne asbestos fibers. Rate ratio estimates for longer fibers are larger than those for shorter fibers, but thicker and thinner fibers do not differ as the toxicologically derived prior had expected. Credible intervals for fiber size-specific risk estimates overlap; thus, we cannot conclude that there are substantial differences in effect by fiber size. Nonetheless, our results suggest that some unregulated asbestos fibers may be associated with increased incidence of lung cancer.

  18. Bridging the etiologic and prognostic outlooks in individualized assessment of absolute risk of an illness: application in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Igor; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Leffondré, Karen; Siemiatycki, Jack

    2016-11-01

    Assessment of individual risk of illness is an important activity in preventive medicine. Development of risk-assessment models has heretofore relied predominantly on studies involving follow-up of cohort-type populations, while case-control studies have generally been considered unfit for this purpose. To present a method for individualized assessment of absolute risk of an illness (as illustrated by lung cancer) based on data from a 'non-nested' case-control study. We used data from a case-control study conducted in Montreal, Canada in 1996-2001. Individuals diagnosed with lung cancer (n = 920) and age- and sex-matched lung-cancer-free subjects (n = 1288) completed questionnaires documenting life-time cigarette-smoking history and occupational, medical, and family history. Unweighted and weighted logistic models were fitted. Model overfitting was assessed using bootstrap-based cross-validation and 'shrinkage.' The discriminating ability was assessed by the c-statistic, and the risk-stratifying performance was assessed by examination of the variability in risk estimates over hypothetical risk-profiles. In the logistic models, the logarithm of incidence-density of lung cancer was expressed as a function of age, sex, cigarette-smoking history, history of respiratory conditions and exposure to occupational carcinogens, and family history of lung cancer. The models entailed a minimal degree of overfitting ('shrinkage' factor: 0.97 for both unweighted and weighted models) and moderately high discriminating ability (c-statistic: 0.82 for the unweighted model and 0.66 for the weighted model). The method's risk-stratifying performance was quite high. The presented method allows for individualized assessment of risk of lung cancer and can be used for development of risk-assessment models for other illnesses.

  19. Incidence and survival from lung cancer in Greenland is comparable to survival in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelvan, Allan; Risum, Signe; Langer, Seppo W

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Oncological treatment of lung cancer has been available in Greenland since 2004. We evaluated patient characteristics and survival rates for the first six years of local lung cancer treatment. METHODS: From September 2004 to August 2010, a total of 173 patients with lung cancer were...... referred to treatment at Queen Ingrid's Hospital. On 1 February 2014, treatment results, survival, and prognostic variables were analysed. RESULTS: The mean age at diagnosis was 63 years. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was diagnosed in 145 patients (84%); 56% had squamous cell carcinoma, 34% had...... adenocarcinoma, 2% had large cell carcinoma and 8% had NSCLC not otherwise specified (NOS). In all, 28 (16%) had small cell lung cancer. A total of 142 patients (82%) received treatment; 20 underwent surgery (ten stage Ib, one stage IIa, five stage IIb, four stage IIIa); palliative chemotherapy was given to 122...

  20. Immunological and infectious risk factors for lung cancer in US veterans with HIV: a longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigel, Keith; Wisnivesky, Juan; Crothers, Kristina; Gordon, Kirsha; Brown, Sheldon T; Rimland, David; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C; Gibert, Cynthia; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Bedimo, Roger; Park, Lesley S; Dubrow, Robert

    2017-02-01

    HIV infection is independently associated with risk of lung cancer, but few data exist for the relation between longitudinal measurements of immune function and lung-cancer risk in people living with HIV. We followed up participants with HIV from the Veterans Aging Cohort Study for a minimum of 3 years between Jan 1, 1998, and Dec 31, 2012, and used cancer registry data to identify incident cases of lung cancer. The index date for each patient was the later of the date HIV care began or Jan 1, 1998. We excluded patients with less than 3 years' follow-up, prevalent diagnoses of lung cancer, or incomplete laboratory data. We used Cox regression models to investigate the relation between different time-updated lagged and cumulative exposures (CD4 cell count, CD8 cell count, CD4/CD8 ratio, HIV RNA, and bacterial pneumonia) and risk of lung cancer. Models were adjusted for age, race or ethnicity, smoking, hepatitis C virus infection, alcohol use disorders, drug use disorders, and history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and occupational lung disease. We identified 277 cases of incident lung cancer in 21 666 participants with HIV. In separate models for each time-updated 12 month lagged, 24 month simple moving average cumulative exposure, increased risk of lung cancer was associated with low CD4 cell count (p trend=0·001), low CD4/CD8 ratio (p trend=0·0001), high HIV RNA concentration (p=0·004), and more cumulative bacterial pneumonia episodes (12 month lag only; p trend=0·0004). In a mutually adjusted model including these factors, CD4/CD8 ratio and cumulative bacterial pneumonia episodes remained significant (p trends 0·003 and 0·004, respectively). In our large HIV cohort in the antiretroviral therapy era, we found evidence that dysfunctional immune activation and chronic inflammation contribute to the development of lung cancer in the setting of HIV infection. These findings could be used to target lung-cancer prevention measures to high-risk groups

  1. Association between 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine excretion and risk of lung cancer in a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Steffen; Svoboda, Peter; Kawai, Kazuaki

    2011-01-01

    in the steady state. The aim of this study was to investigate urinary 8-oxoGua as a risk factor for lung cancer. In a nested case-cohort design we examined associations between urinary excretion of 8-oxoGua and risk of lung cancer as well as potential interaction with the OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism...... detection. There was no significant effect of smoking or OGG1 genotype on the excretion of 8-oxoGua. Overall the incidence rate ratio (IRR) (95% confidence interval) of lung cancer was 1.06 (0.97-1.15) per doubling of 8-oxoGua excretion. The association between lung cancer risk and 8-oxoGua excretion...... in a population-based cohort of 25,717 men and 27,972 women aged 50-64 years with 3-7 years follow-up. We included 260 cases with lung cancer and a subcohort of 263 individuals matched on sex, age, and smoking duration for comparison. Urine collected at entry was analysed for 8-oxoGua by HPLC with electrochemical...

  2. Genetic Variation in GSTP1, Lung Function, Risk of Lung Cancer, and Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Marianne S.; Dahl, Morten; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Glutathione S-transferase pi 1 metabolizes carcinogens from tobacco smoke in the lung. We tested whether genetically altered glutathione S-transferase pi 1 activity affects lung function and risk for tobacco-related cancer and mortality in the general population. Methods We genotyped......Val was associated with increased lung function, reduced risk for lung cancer and tobacco-related cancer, and reduced all-cause mortality in the general population.......Introduction Glutathione S-transferase pi 1 metabolizes carcinogens from tobacco smoke in the lung. We tested whether genetically altered glutathione S-transferase pi 1 activity affects lung function and risk for tobacco-related cancer and mortality in the general population. Methods We genotyped...... 66,069 individuals from the white general population for two common functional variants in the glutathione S-transferase pi 1 gene (GSTP1)—amino acid isoleucine 105 changed to a valine (Ile105Val) and amino acid alanine 114 changed to a valine (Ala114Val)—and recorded lung function, lung cancer...

  3. Risk of lung cancer and consumption of vegetables and fruit in Japanese: A pooled analysis of cohort studies in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakai, Kenji; Sugawara, Yumi; Tsuji, Ichiro; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Shimazu, Taichi; Matsuo, Keitaro; Nagata, Chisato; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Keitaro; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Sasazuki, Shizuka

    2015-01-01

    International reviews have concluded that consumption of fruit and vegetables might decrease the risk of lung cancer. However, the relevant epidemiological evidence still remains insufficient in Japan. Therefore, we performed a pooled analysis of data from four population-based cohort studies in Japan with >200 000 participants and >1700 lung cancer cases. We computed study-specific hazard ratios by quintiles of vegetable and fruit consumption as assessed by food frequency questionnaires. Summary hazard ratios were estimated by pooling the study-specific hazard ratios with a fixed-effect model. In men, we found inverse associations between fruit consumption and the age-adjusted and area-adjusted risk of mortality or incidence of lung cancer. However, the associations were largely attenuated after adjustment for smoking and energy intake. The significant decrease in risk among men remained only for a moderate level of fruit consumption; the lowest summary hazard ratios were found in the third quintile of intake (mortality: 0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.60–0.84; incidence: 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.70–0.98). This decrease in risk was mainly detected in ever smokers. Conversely, vegetable intake was positively correlated with the risk of incidence of lung cancer after adjustment for smoking and energy intake in men (trend P, 0.024); the summary hazard ratio for the highest quintile was 1.26 (95% confidence interval 1.05–1.50). However, a similar association was not detected for mortality from lung cancer. In conclusion, a moderate level of fruit consumption is associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer in men among the Japanese population. PMID:26033436

  4. Lung Cancer Risk from Radon in Marcellus Shale Gas in Northeast U.S. Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Austin L; Griffin, W Michael; Casman, Elizabeth A

    2016-11-01

    The amount of radon in natural gas varies with its source. Little has been published about the radon from shale gas to date, making estimates of its impact on radon-induced lung cancer speculative. We measured radon in natural gas pipelines carrying gas from the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Radon concentrations ranged from 1,520 to 2,750 Bq/m3 (41-74 pCi/L), and the throughput-weighted average was 1,983 Bq/m3 (54 pCi/L). Potential radon exposure due to the use of Marcellus Shale gas for cooking and space heating using vent-free heaters or gas ranges in northeastern U.S. homes and apartments was assessed. Though the measured radon concentrations are higher than what has been previously reported, it is unlikely that exposure from natural gas cooking would exceed 1.2 Bq/m3 (gas appliances is similar. Individuals using unvented gas appliances to provide primary heating may face lifetime risks as high as 3.9×10-3 . Under current housing stock and gas consumption assumptions, expected levels of residential radon exposure due to unvented combustion of Marcellus Shale natural gas in the Northeast United States do not result in a detectable change in the lung cancer death rates. © 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.

  5. Leisure time activities related to carcinogen exposure and lung cancer risk in never smokers. A case-control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruano-Ravina, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.ruano@usc.es [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública CIBERESP, Barcelona (Spain); García-Lavandeira, José Antonio [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Department of Preventive Medicine, A Coruña University Hospital Complex, Coruña (Spain); Torres-Durán, María [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Service of Neumology, University Hospital Complex of Vigo, Vigo (Spain); Prini-Guadalupe, Luciana [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Parente-Lamelas, Isaura [Service of Neumology, Ourense Hospital Complex, Ourense (Spain); Leiro-Fernández, Virginia [Service of Neumology, University Hospital Complex of Vigo, Vigo (Spain); Montero-Martínez, Carmen [Service of Neumology, University Hospital Complex of A Coruña, Coruña (Spain); González-Barcala, Francisco Javier; Golpe-Gómez, Antonio [Service of Neumology, Santiago de Compostela University Clinic Hospital, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Martínez, Cristina [National Institute of Silicosis, University Hospital of Asturias, Oviedo, Asturias (Spain); Castro-Añón, Olalla [Service of Neumology, Hospital Lucus Augusti, Lugo (Spain); Mejuto-Martí, María José [Service of Neumology, Hospital Arquitecto Marcide, Ferrol (Spain); and others

    2014-07-15

    We aim to assess the relationship between leisure time activities related to exposure to carcinogenic substances and lung cancer risk in a hospital-based case-control study performed in never smokers. We included never smoking cases with anatomopathologically confirmed lung cancer and never smoking controls undergoing trivial surgery, at 8 Spanish hospitals. The study was conducted between January 2011 and June 2013. Participants were older than 30 and had no previous neoplasms. All were personally interviewed focusing on lifestyle, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, occupational history and leisure time activities (including duration of such activities). Results were analyzed through logistic regression and adjusted also by residential radon and education level. We included 513 never smokers, 191 cases and 322 controls. The OR for those performing the studied leisure time activities was 1.43 (95%CI 0.78–2.61). When we restricted the analysis to those performing do-it-yourself activities for more than 10 years the OR was 2.21 (95%CI 0.93–5.27). Environmental tobacco smoke exposure did not modify this association. The effect for the different lung cancer histological types was very close to significance for adenocarcinoma but only when these activities were performed for more than 10 years. We encourage health professionals to recommend protective measures for those individuals while performing these hobbies to reduce the risk of lung cancer. - Highlights: • Some leisure time activities are associated with the exposure to carcinogenic substances. • These activities are model-making, painting (artistic or not), furniture refinishing or wood working. • Few studies have assessed lung cancer risk due to these hobbies and none in never-smokers. • Leisure activities related to exposure to carcinogenic substances present higher lung cancer risk. • The risk is higher when these activities are performed for more than 10 years.

  6. Genetic Risk Can Be Decreased: Quitting Smoking Decreases and Delays Lung Cancer for Smokers With High and Low CHRNA5 Risk Genotypes — A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Shiun Chen

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: We demonstrate that quitting smoking is highly beneficial in reducing lung cancer risks for smokers regardless of their CHRNA5 rs16969968 genetic risk status. Smokers with high-risk CHRNA5 genotypes, on average, can largely eliminate their elevated genetic risk for lung cancer by quitting smoking- cutting their risk of lung cancer in half and delaying its onset by 7 years for those who develop it. These results: 1 underscore the potential value of smoking cessation for all smokers, 2 suggest that CHRNA5 rs16969968 genotype affects lung cancer diagnosis through its effects on smoking, and 3 have potential value for framing preventive interventions for those who smoke.

  7. Influence of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Polymorphism on the Risk of Lung Cancer and the Clinical Response to Platinum-Based Chemotherapy for Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Updated Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ning; Gong, Yi; He, Jian; Xia, Jingwen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) has been implicated in lung cancer risk and response to platinum-based chemotherapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the results are controversial. We performed meta-analysis to investigate the effect of MTHFR C677T polymorphism on lung cancer risk and response to platinum-based chemotherapy in advanced NSCLC. Materials and Methods The databases of PubMed, Ovid, Wanfang and Chinese Biomedicine were searched for eligible studies. Nineteen studies on MTHFR C677T polymorphism and lung cancer risk and three articles on C677T polymorphism and response to platinum-based chemotherapy in advanced NSCLC, were identified. Results The results indicated that the allelic contrast, homozygous contrast and recessive model of the MTHFR C677T polymorphism were associated significantly with increased lung cancer risk. In the subgroup analysis, the C677T polymorphism was significantly correlated with an increased risk of NSCLC, with the exception of the recessive model. The dominant model and the variant T allele showed a significant association with lung cancer susceptibility of ever smokers. Male TT homozygote carriers had a higher susceptibility, but the allelic contrast and homozygote model had a protective effect in females. No relationship was observed for SCLC in any comparison model. In addition, MTHFR 677TT homozygote carriers had a better response to platinum-based chemotherapy in advanced NSCLC in the recessive model. Conclusion The MTHFR C677T polymorphism might be a genetic marker for lung cancer risk or response to platinum-based chemotherapy in advanced NSCLC. However, our results require further verification. PMID:24142642

  8. Temporal Patterns of Lung Cancer Risk from Radon, Smoking and their Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasek, L.; Urban, S.; Kubik, A.; Zatloukal, P.

    2004-07-01

    Studies of uranium miners conducted since the late 1960s demonstrated that the risk depends on cumulated exposure in terms of working level months (WLM) integrating both duration of exposure and concentration of radon. It has been also demonstrated that the risk from radon decreases with time since exposure. The objective of the work is to study temporal patterns of lung cancer risk from occupational and residential radon and from smoking. The present analysis of temporal changes of relative risk is based on a model, where the total individual exposure is partitioned into components in dependence on time. Exposure to radon is studied in a cohort of 9411 Czech uranium miners with 766 cases of lung cancer and in a residential study of 1 803 inhabitants exposed to radon in houses with 218 cases. Temporal patterns of smoking are analyzed in a case-control study of patients from a major Prague hospital including 566 cases. for both carcinogens, the relative risk decreases with time since exposure. In comparison to period with exposure before 5-19 years, the risk from exposures before 20-34 years is 36% and 34% for smoking and randon, respectively. The effect of exposures from more distant periods 35-49 is only 5% for smoking and 14% for radon in comparison to 5-19 years. Combined effect of smoking and radon is studied by a nested case-control approach including 434 cases and 962 controls. Analyses of the joint effects of smoking and radon, conducted in the occupational and the residential studies, suggest a sub-multiplicative interaction. The relative risk from radon among non-smokers is higher by a factor of 2-3 in comparison to smokers, suggesting different patterns of lung deposition and clearance among smokers and non-smokers. (Author) 13 refs.

  9. Metabolomics analysis of exhaled breath condensate for discrimination between lung cancer patients and risk factor individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralbo-Molina, A; Calderón-Santiago, M; Priego-Capote, F; Jurado-Gámez, B; Luque de Castro, M D

    2016-02-11

    The search for new clinical tests aimed at diagnosing chronic respiratory diseases is a current research line motivated by the lack of efficient screening tools and the severity of some of these pathologies. Alternative biological samples can open the door to new screening tools. A promising biofluid that is rarely used for diagnostic purposes is exhaled breath condensate (EBC), the composition of which has been inadequately studied. In this research, untargeted analysis of EBC using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry has been applied to a cohort of patients with lung cancer (n  =  48), risk factor individuals (active smokers and ex-smokers, n  =  130) and control healthy individuals (non-smokers without respiratory diseases, n  =  61). An identical protocol was applied to the two EBC fractions provided by the sampling device (upper and central airways and distal airway) from each individual, which allowed the compositional differences between the two EBC fractions to be detected. Tentative compounds that contribute to discrimination between the three groups were identified, and a relevant role for lipids such as monoacylglycerols and squalene was found. These results could support the ability of metabolomics to go inside the study of lung cancer.

  10. Radiation-induced heart disease in lung cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Yang, Chengwen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ping; Deng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD), which affects the patients’ prognosis with both acute and late side effects, has been published extensively in the radiotherapy of breast cancer, lymphoma and other benign diseases. Studies on RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy, however, are less extensive and clear even though the patients with lung cancer are delivered with higher doses to the heart during radiation treatment. Methods: In this article, after extensive literature search and analysis, we reviewed the current evidence on RIHD in lung cancer patients after their radiation treatments and investigated the potential risk factors for RIHD as compared to other types of cancers. Result: Cardiac toxicity has been found highly relevant in lung cancer radiotherapy. So far, the crude incidence of cardiac complications in the lung cancer patients after radiotherapy has been up to 33%. Conclusion: The dose to the heart, the lobar location of tumor, the treatment modality, the history of heart and pulmonary disease and smoking were considered as potential risk factors for RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy. As treatment techniques improve over the time with better prognosis for lung cancer survivors, an improved prediction model can be established to further reduce the cardiac toxicity in lung cancer radiotherapy. PMID:27741117

  11. Raw Garlic Consumption and Lung Cancer in a Chinese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Ajay A; Chang, Shen-Chih; Niu, Rungui; Liu, Li; Swanson, Mya K; Li, Jiawei; Su, Jia; Giovino, Gary A; Yu, Shunzhang; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Mu, Lina

    2016-04-01

    Evidence of anticancer properties of garlic for different cancer sites has been reported previously in in vitro and in vivo experimental studies but there is limited epidemiologic evidence on the association between garlic and lung cancer. We examined the association between raw garlic consumption and lung cancer in a case-control study conducted between 2005 and 2007 in Taiyuan, China. Epidemiologic data was collected by face-to-face interviews from 399 incident lung cancer cases and 466 healthy controls. We used unconditional logistic regression models to estimate crude and adjusted ORs (aOR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Adjusted models controlled for age, sex, average annual household income 10 years ago, smoking, and indoor air pollution. Compared with no intake, raw garlic intake was associated with lower risk of development of lung cancer with a dose-response pattern (aOR for garlic consumption with indoor air pollution and with any supplement use in association with lung cancer. The results of the current study suggest that raw garlic consumption is associated with reduced risk of lung cancer in a Chinese population. This study contributes to the limited research in human population on the association between garlic and lung cancer and advocates further investigation into the use of garlic in chemoprevention of lung cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(4); 624-33. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Radon in homes and risk of lung cancer: collaborative analysis of individual data from 13 European case-control studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, S; Hill, D; Auvinen, A; Barros-Dios, J M; Baysson, H; Bochicchio, F; Deo, H; Falk, R; Forastiere, F; Hakama, M; Heid, I; Kreienbrock, L; Kreuzer, M; Lagarde, F; Mäkeläinen, I; Muirhead, C; Oberaigner, W; Pershagen, G; Ruano-Ravina, A; Ruosteenoja, E; Rosario, A Schaffrath; Tirmarche, M; Tomášek, L; Whitley, E; Wichmann, H-E; Doll, R

    2005-01-01

    Objective To determine the risk of lung cancer associated with exposure at home to the radioactive disintegration products of naturally occurring radon gas Design Collaborative analysis of individual data from 13 case-control studies of residential radon and lung cancer. Setting Nine European countries. Subjects 7148 cases of lung cancer and 14 208 controls. Main outcome measures Relative risks of lung cancer and radon gas concentrations in homes inhabited during the previous 5-34 years measured in becquerels (radon disintegrations per second) per cubic metre (Bq/m3) of household air. Results The mean measured radon concentration in homes of people in the control group was 97 Bq/m3, with 11% measuring > 200 and 4% measuring > 400 Bq/m3. For cases of lung cancer the mean concentration was 104 Bq/m3. The risk of lung cancer increased by 8.4% (95% confidence interval 3.0% to 15.8%) per 100 Bq/m3 increase in measured radon (P = 0.0007). This corresponds to an increase of 16% (5% to 31%) per 100 Bq/m3 increase in usual radon—that is, after correction for the dilution caused by random uncertainties in measuring radon concentrations. The dose-response relation seemed to be linear with no threshold and remained significant (P = 0.04) in analyses limited to individuals from homes with measured radon radon concentrations of 0, 100, and 400 Bq/m3 would be about 0.4%, 0.5%, and 0.7%, respectively, for lifelong non-smokers, and about 25 times greater (10%, 12%, and 16%) for cigarette smokers. Conclusions Collectively, though not separately, these studies show appreciable hazards from residential radon, particularly for smokers and recent ex-smokers, and indicate that it is responsible for about 2% of all deaths from cancer in Europe. PMID:15613366

  13. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms and interaction with smoking and alcohol consumption in lung cancer risk: a case-control study in a Japanese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayama Koichi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cigarette smoking is an established risk factor of lung cancer development while the current epidemiological evidence is suggestive of an increased lung cancer risk associated with alcohol consumption. Dietary folate, which is present in a wide range of fresh fruits and vegetables, may be a micronutrient that has a beneficial impact on lung carcinogenesis. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR plays a crucial role in regulating folate metabolism, which affects both DNA synthesis/repair and methylation. We examined if smoking or alcohol consumption modify associations between MTHFR polymorphisms and lung cancer risk. Methods We evaluated the role of the MTHFR C677T (rs1801133 and A1298C (rs1801131 polymorphisms in a case-control study comprised of 462 lung cancer cases and 379 controls in a Japanese population. Logistic regression was used to assess the adjusted odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. Results The TT genotype of the C677T polymorphism was significantly associated with an increased risk of lung cancer (OR = 2.27, 95% CI = 1.42 - 3.62, P Conclusions The C677T polymorphism was significantly associated with lung cancer risk. Although the A1298C polymorphism was not associated with lung cancer risk, a significant interaction with drinking was observed. Future studies incorporating data on folate intake may undoubtedly lead to a more thorough understanding of the role of the MTHFR polymorphisms in lung cancer development.

  14. Occupational risks and lung cancer burden for Chinese men: a population-based case-referent study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Lap Ah; Yu, Ignatius Tak-Sun; Qiu, Hong; Au, Joseph Siu Kai; Wang, Xiao-Rong

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to fill in the gap of knowledge on the lung cancer burden resulting from occupational exposures among Chinese men through a population-based case-referent study. Detailed information on lifestyle and full occupational histories of 1,208 male lung cancer incident cases and 1,069 age-matched male community referents were obtained through interviews during 2004-2006. The associations between lung cancer risk and exposures to specific or group of agents that were confirmed or suspected occupational carcinogens were analyzed. After adjustment of smoking and other potential confounding factors, significant odds ratio of lung cancer was observed for workers employed in major industrial divisions of "construction" (1.37, 95% CI: 1.00-1.89) and "financing, insurance, real estate, and business services" (0.48, 95% CI: 0.23-0.97), as well as in the occupational groups of "bricklayers, carpenters, and other construction workers" (1.49, 95% CI: 1.07-2.06). Significantly elevated odds ratios were found for occupational exposures to silica dust (1.75, 95% CI: 1.16-2.62), welding fumes (1.74, 95% CI: 1.13-2.68), diesel exhaust (2.18, 95% CI: 1.23-3.84), and man-made mineral fibers (7.45, 95% CI: 1.63-34.00), while a significantly reduced risk (OR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.47-0.95) was linked to cotton dust. The population attributable fraction of lung cancer was 3.2% (95% CI: 0.1-7.3%) for construction workers and 9.5% (95% CI: 4.8-15.1%) for the four significant specific exposures. Our study indicates that previous exposure to occupational carcinogens remains an important determinant of lung cancer burden for Hong Kong Chinese men. However, results obtained from this study should be confirmed by future analyses based on job exposure matrix.

  15. Lung cancer risk in the electroplating industry in Lombardy, Italy, using the Italian occupational cancer monitoring (OCCAM) information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizza, Celestino; Bai, Edoardo; Oddone, Enrico; Scaburri, Alessandra; Massari, Stefania; Modonesi, Carlo; Contiero, Paolo; Marinaccio, Alessandro; Crosignani, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Occupational Cancer Monitoring (OCCAM) is an Italian organization that monitors occupational cancers, by area and industrial sector, by retrieving cases and employment history from official databases. OCCAM previously estimated a relative risk (RR) of lung cancer of about 1.32 among "metal treatment" workers in Lombardy, northern Italy, potentially exposed to chrome and nickel. In the present study, lung cancer risk was estimated among electroplating workers only. Lombardy electroplating companies were identified from descriptions in Social Security files. Lung cancer risk was evaluated from 2001 to 2008 incident cases identified from hospital discharge records. The RR for lung cancer among electroplating workers was 2.03 (90% CI 1.33-3.10, 18 cases) for men; 3.00 (90% CI 1.38-9.03, 4 cases) for women. Electroplaters had higher risks than "metal treatment" workers. Although the risks were due to past exposure, case histories and recent acute effects indicate a present carcinogenic hazard in some Lombardy electroplating factories. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Robust Intratumor Partitioning to Identify High-Risk Subregions in Lung Cancer: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jia; Gensheimer, Michael F.; Dong, Xinzhe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Rubin, Daniel L. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics Research), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Napel, Sandy [Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Li, Ruijiang, E-mail: rli2@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To develop an intratumor partitioning framework for identifying high-risk subregions from {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and computed tomography (CT) imaging and to test whether tumor burden associated with the high-risk subregions is prognostic of outcomes in lung cancer. Methods and Materials: In this institutional review board–approved retrospective study, we analyzed the pretreatment FDG-PET and CT scans of 44 lung cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. A novel, intratumor partitioning method was developed, based on a 2-stage clustering process: first at the patient level, each tumor was over-segmented into many superpixels by k-means clustering of integrated PET and CT images; next, tumor subregions were identified by merging previously defined superpixels via population-level hierarchical clustering. The volume associated with each of the subregions was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis regarding its prognostic capability in predicting overall survival (OS) and out-of-field progression (OFP). Results: Three spatially distinct subregions were identified within each tumor that were highly robust to uncertainty in PET/CT co-registration. Among these, the volume of the most metabolically active and metabolically heterogeneous solid component of the tumor was predictive of OS and OFP on the entire cohort, with a concordance index or CI of 0.66-0.67. When restricting the analysis to patients with stage III disease (n=32), the same subregion achieved an even higher CI of 0.75 (hazard ratio 3.93, log-rank P=.002) for predicting OS, and a CI of 0.76 (hazard ratio 4.84, log-rank P=.002) for predicting OFP. In comparison, conventional imaging markers, including tumor volume, maximum standardized uptake value, and metabolic tumor volume using threshold of 50% standardized uptake value maximum, were not predictive of OS or OFP, with CI mostly below 0.60 (log-rank P>.05). Conclusion: We propose a robust

  17. Estimated radiation pneumonitis risk after photon versus proton therapy alone or combined with chemotherapy for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogelius, Ivan R.; Westerly, David C; Aznar, Marianne Camille

    2011-01-01

    Background. Traditionally, radiation therapy plans are optimized without consideration of chemotherapy. Here, we model the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in the presence of a possible interaction between chemotherapy and radiation dose distribution. Material and methods. Three alternative...... highly conformal photon techniques may become relevant for lung toxicity when radiation is combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy as shown here. Proton therapy allows highly conformal delivery while minimizing the low dose bath potentially interacting with chemotherapy. Thus, intensive drug-radiation...... treatment plans are compared in 18 non-small cell lung cancer patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy; the tomotherapy plan, an intensity modulated proton therapy plan (IMPT) and a three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan. All plans are optimized without consideration...

  18. MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF POTENTIALLY MALIGNANT PULMONARY NODULES IN HIGH-RISK MALE SMOKERS DETECTED IN LUNG CANCER SCREENING TRIAL IN CRACOW, POLAND

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiszka, Kinga; Rudnicka-Sosin, Lucyna; Tomaszewska, Romana; Urbanczyk-Zawadzka, Malgorzata; Krupinski, Maciej; Pikul, Patrycja; Podsiadlo, Kaja; Pasowicz, Mieczyslaw; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Miszalski-Jamka, Tomasz

    The purpose of this paper was to present morphological characteristics of potentially malignant nodules revealed in a group of male smokers aged 50-74 with a very high risk for developing lung cancer estimated in the study for lung cancer screening in Cracow (Poland). Nine hundred male smokers aged

  19. Screening for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzone, Peter J.; Naidich, David P.; Bach, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is by far the major cause of cancer deaths largely because in the majority of patients it is at an advanced stage at the time it is discovered, when curative treatment is no longer feasible. This article examines the data regarding the ability of screening to decrease the number of lung cancer deaths. Methods: A systematic review was conducted of controlled studies that address the effectiveness of methods of screening for lung cancer. Results: Several large randomized controlled trials (RCTs), including a recent one, have demonstrated that screening for lung cancer using a chest radiograph does not reduce the number of deaths from lung cancer. One large RCT involving low-dose CT (LDCT) screening demonstrated a significant reduction in lung cancer deaths, with few harms to individuals at elevated risk when done in the context of a structured program of selection, screening, evaluation, and management of the relatively high number of benign abnormalities. Whether other RCTs involving LDCT screening are consistent is unclear because data are limited or not yet mature. Conclusions: Screening is a complex interplay of selection (a population with sufficient risk and few serious comorbidities), the value of the screening test, the interval between screening tests, the availability of effective treatment, the risk of complications or harms as a result of screening, and the degree with which the screened individuals comply with screening and treatment recommendations. Screening with LDCT of appropriate individuals in the context of a structured process is associated with a significant reduction in the number of lung cancer deaths in the screened population. Given the complex interplay of factors inherent in screening, many questions remain on how to effectively implement screening on a broader scale. PMID:23649455

  20. Society of Behavioral Medicine supports implementation of high quality lung cancer screening in high-risk populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Karriem S; Blok, Amanda C; Buscemi, Joanna; Molina, Yamile; Fitzgibbon, Marian; Simon, Melissa A; Williams, Lance; Matthews, Kameron; Studts, Jamie L; Lillie, Sarah E; Ostroff, Jamie S; Carter-Harris, Lisa; Winn, Robert A

    2016-12-01

    The Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM) supports the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation of low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening of the chest for eligible populations to reduce lung cancer mortality. Consistent with efforts to translate research findings into real-world settings, SBM encourages health-care providers and health-care systems to (1) integrate evidence-based tobacco treatment as an essential component of LDCT-based lung cancer screening, (2) examine the structural barriers that may impact screening uptake, and (3) incorporate shared decision-making as a clinical platform to facilitate consultations and engagement with individuals at high risk for lung cancer about the potential benefits and harms associated with participation in a lung cancer screening program. We advise policy makers and legislators to support screening in high-risk populations by continuing to (1) expand access to high quality LDCT-based screening among underserved high-risk populations, (2) enhance cost-effectiveness by integrating evidence-based tobacco treatments into screening in high-risk populations, and (3) increase funding for research that explores implementation science and increased public awareness and access of diverse populations to participate in clinical and translational research.

  1. Sleep Duration across the Adult Lifecourse and Risk of Lung Cancer Mortality : A Cohort Study in Xuanwei, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, Jason Y Y; Bassig, Bryan A.; Vermeulen, Roel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Hu, Wei; Ning, Bofu; Seow, Wei Jie; Ji, Bu Tian; Downward, George S|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412435667; Katki, Hormuzd A; Barone-Adesi, Francesco; Rothman, Nathaniel; Chapman, Robert S.; Lan, Qing

    Sufficient sleep duration is crucial for maintaining normal physiological function and has been linked to cancer risk; however, its contribution to lung cancer mortality is unclear. Therefore, we evaluated the relationship between average sleep duration in various age-periods across the adult

  2. A structural equation modelling approach to explore the role of B vitamins and immune markers in lung cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltar, V.T.; Xun, W.W.; Johansson, M.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, B.; Boshuizen, H.C.; Gils, van C.H.; Onland-Moret, C.N.

    2013-01-01

    The one-carbon metabolism (OCM) is considered key in maintaining DNA integrity and regulating gene expression, and may be involved in the process of carcinogenesis. Several B-vitamins and amino acids have been implicated in lung cancer risk, via the OCM directly as well as immune system activation.

  3. Lung Cancer Among Firefighters: Smoking-Adjusted Risk Estimates in a Pooled Analysis of Case-Control Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bigert, C; Gustavsson, P; Straif, K; Taeger, D; Pesch, B; Kendzia, B; Schuz, J; Stucker, I; Guida, F; Bruske, I; Wichmann, H E; Pesatori, A C; Landi, M T; Caporaso, N; Tse, L A; Yu, I T; Siemiatycki, J; Lavoue, J; Richiardi, L; Mirabelli, D; Simonato, L; Jockel, K H; Ahrens, W; Pohlabeln, H; Tardon, A; Zaridze, D; Field, J K; t Mannetje, A; Pearce, N; McLaughlin, J; Demers, P; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Lissowska, J; Rudnai, P; Fabianova, E; Stanescu Dumitru, R; Bencko, V; Foretova, L; Janout, V; Boffetta, P; Peters, S|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304822930; Vermeulen, R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Kromhout, H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224; Bruning, T; Olsson, A C

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore lung cancer risk among firefighters, with adjustment for smoking. METHODS: We used pooled information from the SYNERGY project including 14 case-control studies conducted in Europe, Canada, New Zealand, and China, with lifetime work histories and

  4. European position statement on lung cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oudkerk, Matthijs; Devaraj, Anand; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer screening with low-dose CT can save lives. This European Union (EU) position statement presents the available evidence and the major issues that need to be addressed to ensure the successful implementation of low-dose CT lung cancer screening in Europe. This statement identified...... specific actions required by the European lung cancer screening community to adopt before the implementation of low-dose CT lung cancer screening. This position statement recommends the following actions: a risk stratification approach should be used for future lung cancer low-dose CT programmes...... need to set a timeline for implementing lung cancer screening....

  5. Promoting Help-Seeking in Response to Symptoms amongst Primary Care Patients at High Risk of Lung Cancer: A Mixed Method Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Wagland

    Full Text Available Lung cancer symptoms are vague and difficult to detect. Interventions are needed to promote early diagnosis, however health services are already pressurised. This study explored symptomology and help-seeking behaviours of primary care patients at 'high-risk' of lung cancer (≥50 years old, recent smoking history, to inform targeted interventions.Mixed method study with patients at eight general practitioner (GP practices across south England. Study incorporated: postal symptom questionnaire; clinical records review of participant consultation behaviour 12 months pre- and post-questionnaire; qualitative participant interviews (n = 38 with a purposive sample.A small, clinically relevant group (n = 61/908, 6.7% of primary care patients was identified who, despite reporting potential symptoms of lung cancer in questionnaires, had not consulted a GP ≥12 months. Of nine symptoms associated with lung cancer, 53.4% (629/1172 of total respondents reported ≥1, and 35% (411/1172 reported ≥2. Most participants (77.3%, n = 686/908 had comorbid conditions; 47.8%, (n = 414/908 associated with chest and respiratory symptoms. Participant consulting behaviour significantly increased in the 3-month period following questionnaire completion compared with the previous 3-month period (p = .002, indicating questionnaires impacted upon consulting behaviour. Symptomatic non-consulters were predominantly younger, employed, with higher multiple deprivation scores than their GP practice mean. Of symptomatic non-consulters, 30% (18/61 consulted ≤1 month post-questionnaire, with comorbidities subsequently diagnosed for five participants. Interviews (n = 39 indicated three overarching differences between the views of consulting and non-consulting participants: concern over wasting their own as well as GP time; high tolerance threshold for symptoms; a greater tendency to self-manage symptoms.This first study to examine symptoms and consulting behaviour amongst a

  6. Does a more refined assessment of exposure to bitumen fume and confounders alter risk estimates from a nested case-control study of lung cancer among European asphalt workers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agostini, Michela; Ferro, Gilles; Burstyn, Igor

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether a refined assessment of exposure to bitumen fume among workers in the European asphalt industry within a nested case-control study resulted in a different interpretation pertaining to risk of lung cancer mortality compared with the cohort study.......To investigate whether a refined assessment of exposure to bitumen fume among workers in the European asphalt industry within a nested case-control study resulted in a different interpretation pertaining to risk of lung cancer mortality compared with the cohort study....

  7. Pilot study on use of home telephoning to identify and recruit high-risk individuals for lung cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Giulia; Colombo, Paolo; Novellis, Pierluigi; Crepaldi, Alessandro; Lutman, Romano Fabio; Dieci, Elisa; Profili, Manuel; Siracusano, Licia; Alloisio, Marco

    2017-03-01

    Widespread lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography is urgently needed in Europe to identify lung cancers early and reduce lung cancer deaths. The most effective method of identifying high-risk individuals and recruiting them for screening has not been determined. In the present pilot study we investigated direct telephoning to families as a way of identifying high risk individuals and recruiting them to a screening/smoking cessation program, that avoided the selection bias of voluntary screening. Families in the province of Milan, Italy, were contacted by telephone at their homes and asked about family members over 50 years who were heavy smokers (30 or more pack-years). Persons meeting these criteria were contacted and asked to participate in the program. Those who agreed were given an appointment to undergo screening and receive smoking cessation counseling. Among the 1000 contacted families, involving 2300 persons, 44 (1.9%) were eligible for LDCT screening, and 12 (27%) of these participated in the program. The cost of this recruitment strategy pilot study was around 150 euro per screened subject. We obtained useful information on the proportion of the general population eligible for lung cancer screening and the proportion of those who responded. However the cost of home telephone calling is probably too high to be practicable as a method of recruiting high risk persons for screening. Alternative recruitment methods, possibly involving family physicians practitioners, need to be investigated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Obesity, metabolic factors and risk of different histological types of lung cancer: A Mendelian randomization study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carreras-Torres, R.; Johansson, M.; Haycock, P.C.; Wade, K.H.; Relton, C.L.; Martin, R.M.; Smith, G.; Albanes, D.; Aldrich, M.C.; Andrew, A.; Arnold, S.M.; Bickeboller, H.; Bojesen, S.E.; Brunnstrom, H.; Manjer, J.; Bruske, I.; Caporaso, N.E.; Chen, C.; Christiani, D.C.; Christian, W.J.; Doherty, J.A.; Duell, E.J.; Field, J.K.; Davies, M.P.; Marcus, M.W.; Goodman, G.E.; Grankvist, K.; Haugen, A.; Hong, Y.C.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Heijden, E.H.F.M. van der; Kraft, P.; Johansson, M.B.; Lam, S.; Landi, M.T.; Lazarus, P.; Marchand, L. Le; Liu, G.; Melander, O.; Park, S.L.; Rennert, G.; Risch, A.; Haura, E.B.; Scelo, G.; Zaridze, D.; Mukeriya, A.; Savic, M.; Lissowska, J.; Swiatkowska, B.; Janout, V.; Holcatova, I.; Mates, D.; Schabath, M.B.; Shen, H.; Tardon, A.; Teare, M.D.; Woll, P.; Tsao, M.S.; Wu, X.; Yuan, J.M.; Hung, R.J.; Amos, C.I.; McKay, J.; Brennan, P.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessing the relationship between lung cancer and metabolic conditions is challenging because of the confounding effect of tobacco. Mendelian randomization (MR), or the use of genetic instrumental variables to assess causality, may help to identify the metabolic drivers of lung cancer.

  9. Spirometry: a predictor of lung cancer among asbestos workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świątkowska, Beata; Szeszenia-Dąbrowska, Neonila

    2017-01-01

    The significance of lung function as an independent risk factor for lung cancer remains unclear. The objective of the study is to answer the question if spirometry can identify patients at risk for lung cancer among people occupationally exposed to asbestos dust in the past. In order to identify a group of individuals with the highest risk of lung cancer incidence based on lung function levels of FEV 1 % predicted value, we examined 6882 subjects enrolled in the health surveillance program for asbestos related diseases over the years 2000-2014. We found a total of 110 cases confirmed as primary lung cancer. Using Cox's proportional hazards model after adjustment for age, gender, number of cigarettes, duration of smoking and cumulative asbestos exposure, we estimated that compared with the subjects with FEV 1 ≥90% pred, the HR of lung cancer was 1.40 (95%CI: 0.94-2.08) for the subjects with FEV 1 less than 90% and 1.95 (HR = 1.86; 95%CI: 1.12-3.08) for those with FEV 1 less than 70%. In addition, probability of the occurrence of lung cancer for FEV 1 spirometry and cancer diagnosis was three years or less. The results strongly support the hypothesis that spirometry can identify patients at a risk of lung cancer development. Regular spirometry should be offered to all patients with a history of asbestos exposure, at least once every three years.

  10. Post-bronchoscopy pneumonia in patients suffering from lung cancer: Development and validation of a risk prediction score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiguchi, Hiroto; Hayama, Naoki; Oguma, Tsuyoshi; Harada, Kazuki; Sato, Masako; Horio, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Jun; Tomomatsu, Hiromi; Tomomatsu, Katsuyoshi; Takihara, Takahisa; Niimi, Kyoko; Nakagawa, Tomoki; Masuda, Ryota; Aoki, Takuya; Urano, Tetsuya; Iwazaki, Masayuki; Asano, Koichiro

    2017-05-01

    The incidence, risk factors, and consequences of pneumonia after flexible bronchoscopy in patients with lung cancer have not been studied in detail. We retrospectively analyzed the data from 237 patients with lung cancer who underwent diagnostic bronchoscopy between April 2012 and July 2013 (derivation sample) and 241 patients diagnosed between August 2013 and July 2014 (validation sample) in a tertiary referral hospital in Japan. A score predictive of post-bronchoscopy pneumonia was developed in the derivation sample and tested in the validation sample. Pneumonia developed after bronchoscopy in 6.3% and 4.1% of patients in the derivation and validation samples, respectively. Patients who developed post-bronchoscopy pneumonia needed to change or cancel their planned cancer therapy more frequently than those without pneumonia (56% vs. 6%, ppneumonia, which we added to develop our predictive score. The incidence of pneumonia associated with scores=0, 1, and ≥2 was 0, 3.7, and 13.4% respectively in the derivation sample (p=0.003), and 0, 2.9, and 9.7% respectively in the validation sample (p=0.016). The incidence of post-bronchoscopy pneumonia in patients with lung cancer was not rare and associated with adverse effects on the clinical course. A simple 3-point predictive score identified patients with lung cancer at high risk of post-bronchoscopy pneumonia prior to the procedure. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Heterogeneity in coal composition and implications for lung cancer risk in Xuanwei and Fuyuan counties, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downward, George S; Hu, Wei; Large, David; Veld, Harry; Xu, Jun; Reiss, Boris; Wu, Guoping; Wei, Fusheng; Chapman, Robert S; Rothman, Nat; Qing, Lan; Vermeulen, Roel

    2014-07-01

    Xuanwei and Fuyuan counties in Yunnan Province, China have among the highest lung cancer rates in the country. This has been associated with the domestic combustion of bituminous coal (referred to as "smoky" coal). Additionally, significant geographical variation in cancer rates among smoky coal users has been observed, suggesting heterogeneity in fuel source composition and/or combustion characteristics. Research thus far has indicated that smoky coal emits high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and contains high concentrations of fine grained crystalline quartz, however, much of this research is limited in terms of sample size and geographic scope. In order to more fully characterise geochemical and elemental compositions of smoky and smokeless coal use in Xuanwei and Fuyuan, we carried out a large exposure assessment study in households in this region. Fuel samples representing smoky and "smokeless" (anthracite, the major alternative coal type in the region) coals were collected from 137 homes in Xuanwei and Fuyuan. Rock-Eval, Leco-CS, XRF analysis and electron microscopy were used to establish hydrocarbon content (to represent volatile organic compounds), major and trace element composition and mineral composition respectively. Heterogeneity in coal characteristics between and within coal types was assessed by the Kruskal-Wallis test. 145 coal samples (116 smoky and 29 smokeless coals) were analysed. Statistically significant differences between smoky and smokeless coals with regard to hydrocarbon content, sulfur, trace elements and mineral composition were observed. Of note, smoky coal contained between 5 and 15 times the amount of volatile organic matter and twice the amount of quartz (including respirable quartz) than smokeless coal. Smoky coal generally had lower levels of trace elements (plus aluminium) than smokeless coal. Significant variation was also observed between smoky coal samples from different geographical areas with regard to

  12. MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms and risk of lung cancer: a comprehensive evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Yang, L J; Deng, M Z; Luo, Y Y; Wu, S; Xiong, L; Wang, D; Liu, Y; Liu, H

    2016-04-07

    Results from previous studies on the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms C677T and A1298C and lung cancer have been conflicting. The aim of this meta-analysis was to clarify the effect of MTHFR polymorphisms on the risk of lung cancer. An electronic search of PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane library, and the China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database for papers on C677T and A1298C and susceptibility to lung cancer was performed. The STATA software (Version 13.0) was used for statistical analysis. Statistical heterogeneity, tests of publication bias, and a sensitivity analysis were performed. Twenty-six studies on C677T (12,324 cases and 12,532 controls) and thirteen studies on A1298C (6773 cases and 8207 controls) were included in the meta-analysis. The MTHFR C677T polymorphism showed significant pooled ORs for the homozygote comparison (TT versus CC: OR = 1.518, 95%CI = 1.220-1.890), heterozygote comparison (CT versus CC: OR = 1.053, 95%CI = 0.940-1.179), dominant model (CT + TT versus CC: OR = 1.143, 95%CI = 1.013-1.291), recessive model (TT versus CT + CC: OR = 1.435, 95%CI = 1.190-1.730), and additive model (T versus C: OR = 1.176, 95%CI = 1.066-1.298). In summary, our meta-analysis showed that the MTHFR C677T polymorphism is associated with a significant increase in lung cancer risk in Asian and overall populations, but not in Caucasian populations. However, no significant association between the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism and lung cancer risk was found in either the Caucasian or Asian group with any genetic models.

  13. Increased mean lung density: Another independent predictor of lung cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverzellati, Nicola, E-mail: nicola.sverzellati@unipr.it [Department of Department of Surgical Sciences, Section of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Parma, Padiglione Barbieri, University Hospital of Parma, V. Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Randi, Giorgia, E-mail: giorgia.randi@marionegri.it [Department of Epidemiology, Mario Negri Institute, Via La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Spagnolo, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.spagnolo@unimore.it [Respiratory Disease Unit, Center for Rare Lung Disease, Department of Oncology, Hematology and Respiratory Disease, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via del Pozzo 71, 44124 Modena (Italy); Marchianò, Alfonso, E-mail: alfonso.marchiano@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Radiology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan (Italy); Silva, Mario, E-mail: mac.mario@hotmail.it [Department of Department of Surgical Sciences, Section of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Parma, Padiglione Barbieri, University Hospital of Parma, V. Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin, E-mail: Jan-Martin.Kuhnigk@mevis.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer MEVIS, Universitaetsallee 29, 28359 Bremen (Germany); La Vecchia, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.lavecchia@marionegri.it [Department of Occupational Health, University of Milan, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan (Italy); Zompatori, Maurizio, E-mail: maurizio.zompatori@unibo.it [Department of Radiology, Cardio-Thoracic Section, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Via Albertoni 15, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Pastorino, Ugo, E-mail: ugo.pastorino@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Surgery, Section of Thoracic Surgery, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between emphysema phenotype, mean lung density (MLD), lung function and lung cancer by using an automated multiple feature analysis tool on thin-section computed tomography (CT) data. Methods: Both emphysema phenotype and MLD evaluated by automated quantitative CT analysis were compared between outpatients and screening participants with lung cancer (n = 119) and controls (n = 989). Emphysema phenotype was defined by assessing features such as extent, distribution on core/peel of the lung and hole size. Adjusted multiple logistic regression models were used to evaluate independent associations of CT densitometric measurements and pulmonary function test (PFT) with lung cancer risk. Results: No emphysema feature was associated with lung cancer. Lung cancer risk increased with decreasing values of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1}) independently of MLD (OR 5.37, 95% CI: 2.63–10.97 for FEV{sub 1} < 60% vs. FEV{sub 1} ≥ 90%), and with increasing MLD independently of FEV{sub 1} (OR 3.00, 95% CI: 1.60–5.63 for MLD > −823 vs. MLD < −857 Hounsfield units). Conclusion: Emphysema per se was not associated with lung cancer whereas decreased FEV{sub 1} was confirmed as being a strong and independent risk factor. The cross-sectional association between increased MLD and lung cancer requires future validations.

  14. Use of an artificial neural network to predict risk factors of nosocomial infection in lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Pan, Qin-Shi; Hong, Wan-Dong; Pan, Jingye; Zhang, Wen-Hui; Xu, Gang; Wang, Yu-Min

    2014-01-01

    Statistical methods to analyze and predict the related risk factors of nosocomial infection in lung cancer patients are various, but the results are inconsistent. A total of 609 patients with lung cancer were enrolled to allow factor comparison using Student's t-test or the Mann-Whitney test or the Chi-square test. Variables that were significantly related to the presence of nosocomial infection were selected as candidates for input into the final ANN model. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) was used to evaluate the performance of the artificial neural network (ANN) model and logistic regression (LR) model. The prevalence of nosocomial infection from lung cancer in this entire study population was 20.1% (165/609), nosocomial infections occurring in sputum specimens (85.5%), followed by blood (6.73%), urine (6.0%) and pleural effusions (1.82%). It was shown that long term hospitalization (≥ 22 days, P= 0.000), poor clinical stage (IIIb and IV stage, P=0.002), older age (≥ 61 year old, P=0.023), and use the hormones were linked to nosocomial infection and the ANN model consisted of these four factors .The artificial neural network model with variables consisting of age, clinical stage, time of hospitalization, and use of hormones should be useful for predicting nosocomial infection in lung cancer cases.

  15. Susceptibility loci of CNOT6 in the general mRNA degradation pathway and lung cancer risk-A re-analysis of eight GWASs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fei; Wang, Yanru; Liu, Hongliang; Ready, Neal; Han, Younghun; Hung, Rayjean J; Brhane, Yonathan; McLaughlin, John; Brennan, Paul; Bickeböller, Heike; Rosenberger, Albert; Houlston, Richard S; Caporaso, Neil; Landi, Maria Teresa; Brüske, Irene; Risch, Angela; Ye, Yuanqing; Wu, Xifeng; Christiani, David C; Goodman, Gary; Chen, Chu; Amos, Christopher I; Wei, Qingyi

    2017-04-01

    mRNA degradation is an important regulatory step for controlling gene expression and cell functions. Genetic abnormalities involved in mRNA degradation genes were found to be associated with cancer risks. Therefore, we systematically investigated the roles of genetic variants in the general mRNA degradation pathway in lung cancer risk. Meta-analyses were conducted using summary data from six lung cancer genome-wide association studies (GWASs) from the Transdisciplinary Research in Cancer of the Lung and additional two GWASs from Harvard University and deCODE in the International Lung Cancer Consortium. Expression quantitative trait loci analysis (eQTL) was used for in silico functional validation of the identified significant susceptibility loci. This pathway-based analysis included 6816 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 68 genes in 14 463 lung cancer cases and 44 188 controls. In the single-locus analysis, we found that 20 SNPs were associated with lung cancer risk with a false discovery rate threshold of lung cancer risk (odds ratio = 1.11, 95% confidence interval = 1.04-1.18) in the eight GWASs. In the eQTL analysis, we found that levels of CNOT6 mRNA expression were significantly correlated with the rs2453176 T allele, which provided additional biological basis for the observed positive association. The CNOT6 rs2453176 SNP may be a new functional susceptible locus for lung cancer risk. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Estimated intake of vitamin D and its interaction with vitamin A on lung cancer risk among smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Goodman, Gary E; Thornquist, Mark D; Barnett, Matt J; Beresford, Shirley A A; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Zheng, Yingye; Neuhouser, Marian L

    2014-11-01

    Data are very limited on vitamin D and lung cancer prevention in high-risk populations. The authors investigated whether estimated vitamin D intake was associated with lung cancer risk and whether effect modification by vitamin A existed among current/former heavy smokers and workers with occupational exposure to asbestos. A case-cohort study selected 749 incident lung cancers and 679 noncases from the Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET), 1988-2005. The active intervention was supplementation of 30 mg β-carotene + 25,000 IU retinyl palmitate/day. Baseline total intake including both diet (from food frequency questionnaire) and personal supplements (from brand names linked to the labeled potencies) was assessed. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated by Cox proportional hazard models. No significant association of total vitamin D intake with lung cancer was observed overall. However, total vitamin D intake ≥600 versus cancer among former smokers [HR = 0.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.13-0.96]. Total vitamin D intake ≥400 versus cancer among participants who received the CARET active intervention (HR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.32-0.99) and among those who had total vitamin A intake ≥1,500 µg/day retinol activity equivalent (RAE; HR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.23-0.91). The beneficial associations were attenuated among those who did not receive the CARET active intervention or who had total vitamin A intake vitamin A may assist vitamin D in preventing lung cancer among smokers. © 2014 UICC.

  17. Lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H H; Rørth, M

    1999-01-01

    The results of the many clinical trials published in 1997 had only modest impact on the treatment results using either cytostatic agents alone or combined with radiotherapy in lung cancer. In SCLC, combination chemotherapy including platin-compounds (cisplatin, carboplatin) and the podophyllotoxins...

  18. Bullous lung diseases as a risk factor for lung cancer: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagorni-Obradović Ljudmila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A possible association between lung cancer and bullous lung disease has been suggested and recently supported by the results of genetic studies. Case report. A previously healthy 43-year-old man, smoker, was diagnosed with bullous lung disease at the age of 31 years. He was followed up for 12 years when lung cancer (adenocarcinoma was found at the site. In the meantime, he was treated for recurrent respiratory infections. Conclusion. There is the need for active approach in following up the patients with pulmonary bulla for potential development of lung cancer.

  19. Smoking status in Danish lung cancer patients compared to the general population, 2005 - 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels-Christian Gerner; Christensen, Anders; Laursen, Christian B.

    2016-01-01

    The Danish Health Authority (DHA) publishes the smoking status for the general Danish population every year. Smoking status is not recorded by the Danish Lung Cancer Registry (DLCR) - only tobacco consumption (pack years). To study the smoking status of lung cancer patients at the time of diagnosis.......2%39.8%40.9%24.0%31.9%35.0%Never-smokers2.5%2.6%2.4%6.0%4.9%7.1%ExpectedCurrent smokers33.8%23.5%21.6%24.5%22.2%19.0%Ex-smokers45.5%53.6%53.3%34.8%45.0%43.5%Never-smokers20.7%22.9%25.1%40.7%32.8%37.6%Conclusion: The majority of Danish male and female lung cancer patients are current smokers at the time of diagnosis...... as current smokers. It was possible to characterize the smoking status of 97.9% of the 3737 lung cancer patients in the analysis.MenWomen2005 - 20072008 - 20102011 - 20132005 - 20072008 - 20102011 - 2013Observedn597611657517614663Current smokers65.3%57.6%56.6%70.0%63.2%57.9%Ex-smokers32...

  20. The epidemiology of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M D; Sandler, A B

    2001-01-01

    Lung cancer continues to be the leader in cancer deaths in the United States. The incidence of lung cancer in men has slowly decreased since the late 1980s, but has just now begun to plateau in women at the end of this decade. Despite modest advances in chemotherapy for treating lung cancer, it remains a deadly disease with overall 5-yr survival rates having not increased significantly over the last 25 years, remaining at approximately 14%. Tobacco smoking causes approximately 85-90% of bronchogenic carcinoma. Environmental tobacco exposure or a second-hand smoke also may cause lung cancer in life-long non-smokers. Certain occupational agents such as arsenic, asbestos, chromium, nickel and vinyl chloride increase the relative risk for lung cancer. Smoking has an additive or multiplicative effect with some of these agents. Familial predisposition for lung cancer is an area with advancing research. Developments in molecular biology have led to growing interest in investigation of biological markers, which may increase predisposition to smoking-related carcinogenesis. Hopefully, in the future we will be able to screen for lung cancer by using specific biomarkers. Finally, dietary factors have also been proposed as potential risk modulators, with vitamins A, C and E proposed as having a protective effect. Despite the slow decline of smoking in the United States, lung cancer will likely continue its devastation for years to come.

  1. Pleural mesothelioma and lung cancer risks in relation to occupational history and asbestos lung burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilham, Clare; Rake, Christine; Burdett, Garry; Nicholson, Andrew G; Davison, Leslie; Franchini, Angelo; Carpenter, James; Hodgson, John; Darnton, Andrew; Peto, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Background We have conducted a population-based study of pleural mesothelioma patients with occupational histories and measured asbestos lung burdens in occupationally exposed workers and in the general population. The relationship between lung burden and risk, particularly at environmental exposure levels, will enable future mesothelioma rates in people born after 1965 who never installed asbestos to be predicted from their asbestos lung burdens. Methods Following personal interview asbestos fibres longer than 5 µm were counted by transmission electron microscopy in lung samples obtained from 133 patients with mesothelioma and 262 patients with lung cancer. ORs for mesothelioma were converted to lifetime risks. Results Lifetime mesothelioma risk is approximately 0.02% per 1000 amphibole fibres per gram of dry lung tissue over a more than 100-fold range, from 1 to 4 in the most heavily exposed building workers to less than 1 in 500 in most of the population. The asbestos fibres counted were amosite (75%), crocidolite (18%), other amphiboles (5%) and chrysotile (2%). Conclusions The approximate linearity of the dose–response together with lung burden measurements in younger people will provide reasonably reliable predictions of future mesothelioma rates in those born since 1965 whose risks cannot yet be seen in national rates. Burdens in those born more recently will indicate the continuing occupational and environmental hazards under current asbestos control regulations. Our results confirm the major contribution of amosite to UK mesothelioma incidence and the substantial contribution of non-occupational exposure, particularly in women. PMID:26715106

  2. Occupational exposure to silica dust and risk of lung cancer: an updated meta-analysis of epidemiological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satiavani Poinen-Rughooputh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Crystalline silica is considered as one of the most common and serious occupational hazards to workers’ health. Although its association with lung cancer has been studied for many decades, the conclusion remains somewhat controversial. Our objectives are to review and summarize the epidemiological evidence on the relationship between occupational silica exposure and risk of lung cancer and to provide an update on this major occupational health concern. Methods Eligible studies up to 29 April 2016 were identified. Pooled effect estimates were calculated according to the reported outcome and the study design. Cohort, case control and proportional mortality studies were examined separately. Studies reporting results according to silicotic status were grouped together and analyzed. Due to the significant amount of heterogeneity expected, random effects models were implemented. Subgroup and meta-regression analyses (both univariate and multivariate were performed in an attempt to explain heterogeneity. Studies which had adequate exposure characterization were selected to find out whether there was an exposure-response relationship between silica and lung cancer. Results The risk of lung cancer was found to be elevated in both silicotics and non-silicotics. The pooled standardized mortality ratio (SMR was 2.32 with a 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI of 1.91–2.81 and 1.78 (95 % CI 1.07–2.96 respectively. The pooled standardized incidence ratio (SIR was 2.49 (95 % CI 1.87–3.33 and 1.18 (95 % CI 0.86–1.62 respectively. Subgroup analysis showed that workers in the mining industry had the highest risk of lung cancer with a pooled SMR of 1.48 (95 % CI 1.18–1.86 and the weakest association was seen in potteries with a pooled SMR of 1.14 (95 % CI 1.05–1.23. A positive exposure-response relation was found between cumulative silica exposure and risk of lung cancer. Conclusion The results of our meta-analysis supported

  3. Phase III trial comparing vinflunine with docetaxel in second-line advanced non-small-cell lung cancer previously treated with platinum-containing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krzakowski, Maciej; Ramlau, Rodryg; Jassem, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    To compare vinflunine (VFL) to docetaxel in patients with stage IIIB/IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have experienced treatment failure with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy.......To compare vinflunine (VFL) to docetaxel in patients with stage IIIB/IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have experienced treatment failure with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy....

  4. Comparative study between computed tomography and bronchoscopy in the diagnosis of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Christopher; Saraiva, Antonio, E-mail: asaraiva@estescoimbra.p [Escola Superior de Tecnologia da Saude de Coimbra (ESTeSC), Coimbra (Portugal)

    2010-07-15

    Objective: to analyze the role of computed tomography and bronchoscopy in the diagnosis of lung cancer, evaluating the effectiveness of these techniques in the presence of this disease. Parameters such as age, gender, smoking habits, histological types, staging and treatment were also analyzed. Materials and methods: the sample of the present study included 70 patients assisted at the Department of Pneumology of Hospital Distrital da Figueira da Foz, Coimbra, Portugal, who were submitted to both diagnostic methods, namely, computed tomography and bronchoscopy, to confirm the presence or the absence of lung cancer. Results: thirty-seven patients (23 men and 14 women) were diagnosed with lung cancer. Histologically 40.54% were adenocarcinoma, followed by squamous carcinoma (32.43% cases) and small-cell lung cancer (18.92%). Staging showed 6.70% stage IB disease, 23.30% stage IIIA and 36.70% stage IIIB, and 33.30% stage IV. Chemotherapy alone was the first treatment of choice for 75.7% of patients. Bronchoscopy sensitivity was 83.8%, specificity 81.8%, and accuracy 82.8%. Computed tomography sensitivity was 81.1%, specificity 63.6%, and accuracy 72.8%. Conclusion: bronchoscopy results corroborated the relevance of the method in the diagnosis of lung cancer, considering its dependence on the anatomopathological study of tissue or cells obtained through different biopsy techniques. Computed tomography presented good sensitivity (81.1%), however the specificity of only 63.6% is related to the rate of false-positive results (36.4%). (author)

  5. Modeling of lung cancer risk due to radon exhalation of granite stone in dwelling houses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Abbasi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The estimated numbers of lung cancer deaths attributable to indoor radon due to granite stones in 2013 were 145 (3.33% and 103 (2.37% for poor and normal ventilation systems, respectively. According to our estimations, the values of 3.33% and 2.37% of lung cancer deaths in 2013 are attributed to radon exhalation of granite stones with poor and normal ventilation systems, respectively.

  6. Genetic variants associated with longer telomere length are associated with increased lung cancer risk among never-smoking women in Asia : a report from the female lung cancer consortium in Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machiela, Mitchell J; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Seow, Wei Jie; Wang, Zhaoming; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hong, Yun-Chul; Seow, Adeline; Wu, Chen; Hosgood, H Dean; Chen, Kexin; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wen, Wanqing; Cawthon, Richard; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Hu, Wei; Caporaso, Neil E; Park, Jae Yong; Chen, Chien-Jen; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Landi, Maria Teresa; Shen, Hongbing; Lawrence, Charles; Burdett, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Chang, I-Shou; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Kim, Hee Nam; Chang, Gee-Chen; Bassig, Bryan A; Tucker, Margaret; Wei, Fusheng; Yin, Zhihua; An, She-Juan; Qian, Biyun; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Lu, Daru; Liu, Jianjun; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Sung, Jae Sook; Kim, Jin Hee; Gao, Yu-Tang; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Jung, Yoo Jin; Guo, Huan; Hu, Zhibin; Hutchinson, Amy; Wang, Wen-Chang; Klein, Robert J; Chung, Charles C; Oh, In-Jae; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Berndt, Sonja I; Wu, Wei; Chang, Jiang; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Zheng, Hong; Wang, Junwen; Zhao, Xueying; Li, Yuqing; Choi, Jin Eun; Su, Wu-Chou; Park, Kyong Hwa; Sung, Sook Whan; Chen, Yuh-Min; Liu, Li; Kang, Chang Hyun; Hu, Lingmin; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Pao, William; Kim, Young-Chul; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Xu, Jun; Guan, Peng; Tan, Wen; Su, Jian; Wang, Chih-Liang; Li, Haixin; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Zhao, Zhenhong; Chen, Ying; Choi, Yi Young; Hung, Jen-Yu; Kim, Jun Suk; Yoon, Ho-Il; Cai, Qiuyin; Lin, Chien-Chung; Park, In Kyu; Xu, Ping; Dong, Jing; Kim, Christopher; He, Qincheng; Perng, Reury-Perng; Kohno, Takashi; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Chen, Chih-Yi; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Wu, Junjie; Lim, Wei-Yen; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Chow, Wong-Ho; Ji, Bu-Tian; Chan, John K C; Chu, Minjie; Li, Yao-Jen; Yokota, Jun; Li, Jihua; Chen, Hongyan; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yu, Chong-Jen; Kunitoh, Hideo; Wu, Guoping; Jin, Li; Lo, Yen-Li; Shiraishi, Kouya; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Lin, Hsien-Chih; Wu, Tangchun; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Yi-Long; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Zhou, Baosen; Shin, Min-Ho; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Dongxin; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence from several relatively small nested case-control studies in prospective cohorts shows an association between longer telomere length measured phenotypically in peripheral white blood cell (WBC) DNA and increased lung cancer risk. We sought to further explore this relationship by

  7. Human Lung Cancer Risks from Radon – Part I - Influence from Bystander Effects - A Microdose Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Bobby E.; Thompson, Richard E.; Beecher, Georgia C.

    2010-01-01

    Since the publication of the BEIR VI report in 1999 on health risks from radon, a significant amount of new data has been published showing various mechanisms that may affect the ultimate assessment of radon as a carcinogen, at low domestic and workplace radon levels, in particular the Bystander Effect (BE) and the Adaptive Response radio-protection (AR). We analyzed the microbeam and broadbeam alpha particle data of Miller et al. (1995, 1999), Zhou et al. (2001, 2003, 2004), Nagasawa and Little (1999, 2002), Hei et al. (1999), Sawant et al. (2001a) and found that the shape of the cellular response to alphas is relatively independent of cell species and LET of the alphas. The same alpha particle traversal dose response behavior should be true for human lung tissue exposure to radon progeny alpha particles. In the Bystander Damage Region of the alpha particle response, there is a variation of RBE from about 10 to 35. There is a transition region between the Bystander Damage Region and Direct Damage Region of between one and two microdose alpha particle traversals indicating that perhaps two alpha particle “hits” are necessary to produce the direct damage. Extrapolation of underground miners lung cancer risks to human risks at domestic and workplace levels may not be valid. PMID:21731539

  8. Lung cancer risk and welding--preliminary results from an ongoing case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jöckel, K H; Ahrens, W; Bolm-Audorff, U

    1994-06-01

    In a hospital-based case-control study, 391 male cases or primary lung cancer and the same number of controls--matched by sex, age, and region--were personally interviewed for their job and smoking histories. The data reported reflect the midpoint of a study aiming at a total of 1,000 cases. One objective of the study was to assess confounding by asbestos exposure in what was thought to be a welding-associated risk. While the odds ratios (OR) increased steeply with cumulative exposure to tobacco smoke and were raised also for lifelong asbestos exposure of over 4,100 working hours (OR = 1.91), the effect of welding exposure was reduced after adjustment for smoking and exposure to asbestos. Furthermore, no consistent dose-response relationship could be shown in relation to welding hours. Therefore the present study supports the hypothesis that some, if not all, of the excess risk of welders observed in the literature may be due to the exposure to asbestos. The finding that the subgroup of employees in the aircraft industry showed an increased odds ratio of 2.14 after adjustment for smoking and exposure to asbestos deserves further attention. This suggests the need for further research on the role of berryllium-containing alloys, which has been suggested by other authors.

  9. Prognostic Factors in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Less Than 3 Centimeters: Actuarial Analysis, Accumulative Incidence and Risk Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñalver Cuesta, Juan C; Jordá Aragón, Carlos; Mancheño Franch, Nuria; Cerón Navarro, José A; de Aguiar Quevedo, Karol; Arrarás Martínez, Miguel; Vera Sempere, Francisco J; Padilla Alarcón, Jose D

    2015-09-01

    In TNM classification, factors determining the tumor (T) component in non-small cell lung cancer have scarcely changed over time and are still based solely on anatomical features. Our objective was to study the influence of these and other morphopathological factors on survival. A total of 263 patients undergoing lung resection due to stage I non-small cell lung cancer ≤3cm in diameter were studied. A survival analysis and competing-risk estimate study was made on the basis of clinical, surgical and pathological variables using actuarial analysis and accumulative incidence methods, respectively. A risk model was then generated from the results. Survival at 5 and 10 years was 79.8 and 74.3%, respectively. The best prognostic factors were presence of symptoms, smoking habit and FEV1>60%, number of resected nodes>7, squamous histology, absence of vascular invasion, absence of visceral pleural invasion and presence of invasion more proximal than the lobar bronchus. All these were statistically significant according to the actuarial method. The factor "age60%. Pleural invasion and vascular invasion determine survival or risk of death due to non-small cell lung cancer ≤3cm and can be used for generating a predictive risk model. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery lobectomy for lung cancer is associated with a lower 30-day morbidity compared with lobectomy by thoracotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Lykke Østergaard; Petersen, René Horsleben; Hansen, Henrik Jessen

    2016-01-01

    . Consequently, our aim was to compare the 30-day morbidity and mortality for lung cancer patients operated by VATS lobectomy or lobectomy by OT. METHOD: Data were obtained from prospective national and regional databases, including patients who underwent lobectomy for lung cancer in the eastern part of Denmark...... from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2011. All patients operated before 2009 were re-staged according to the latest International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer lung cancer classification. Patient characteristics, comorbidities, pathology and operative data were assessed using an independent...... samples t-test, Pearson's χ(2), Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney test. Morbidity was assessed using multinomial logistic regression adjusted for gender, age, cancer stage, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), year of surgery and Charlson comorbidity score. RESULTS: In total, 1379 patients underwent...

  11. Methylation analysis in spontaneous sputum for lung cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubers, A Jasmijn; van der Drift, Miep A; Prinsen, Clemens F M; Witte, Birgit I; Wang, Yinghui; Shivapurkar, Narayan; Stastny, Victor; Bolijn, Anne S; Hol, Bernard E A; Feng, Ziding; Dekhuijzen, P N Richard; Gazdar, Adi F; Thunnissen, Erik

    2014-05-01

    Lung cancer is the most fatal cancer in the developed world due to presence of metastases at time of diagnosis. The aim of this study is to examine DNA hypermethylation in sputum compared to sputum cytology for the diagnosis of lung cancer. A novel risk analysis is introduced, using the distinction between diagnostic and risk markers. Two independent sets were randomly composed from a prospectively collected sputum bank (Set 1: n = 98 lung cancer patients, n = 90 controls; Set 2: n = 60 lung cancer patients, n = 445 controls). Sputum cytology was performed for all samples. The following DNA hypermethylation markers were tested in both sets: RASSF1A, APC and cytoglobin (CYGB). Two statistical analyses were conducted: multivariate logistic regression and a risk classification model based on post-test probabilities. In multivariate analysis, RASSF1A was the best of the three markers in discriminating lung cancer cases from controls in both sets (sensitivity 41-52%, specificity 94-96%). The risk model showed that 36% of lung cancer patients were defined as "high risk" (≥ 60% chance on lung cancer) based on RASSF1A hypermethylation in Set 1. The model was reproducible in Set 2. Risk markers (APC, CYGB) have less diagnostic value. Sensitivity of cytology for lung cancer diagnosis was 22%. RASSF1A hypermethylation yielded a sensitivity of 45%. The combined sensitivity for RASSF1A with cytological diagnosis increased to 52% with similar specificity (94%). In a diagnostic setting, hypermethylation analysis in sputum is possible when a diagnostic marker is used. However, risk markers are insufficient for this purpose. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical and quality of life outcomes following anatomical lung resection for lung cancer in high-risk patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Henrietta; Gammon, David; Routledge, Tom; Harrison-Phipps, Karen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surgery remains the gold standard for patients with resectable nonsmall cell lung cancer. Current guidance identifies patients with poor pulmonary reserve to fall within a high-risk cohort. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical and quality of life outcomes of anatomical lung resection in patients deemed high risk based on pulmonary function measurements. METHODS: A retrospective review of patients undergoing anatomical lung resection for nonsmall cell lung cancer between January 2013 and January 2015 was performed. All patients with limited pulmonary reserve defined as predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 s or transfer factor of the lung for carbon monoxide of <40% were included in the study. Postoperative complications, admission to the Intensive Care Unit, length of stay, and 30-day in-hospital mortality were recorded. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaire lung cancer 13 questionnaire was used to assess quality of life outcomes. RESULTS: Fifty-three patients met the inclusion criteria. There was no in-hospital mortality, and 30-day mortality was 1.8%. No complications were seen in 64% (n = 34), minor complications occurred in 26% (n = 14), while 9% had a major complication (n = 5). Quality of life outcomes were above the reference results for patients with early stage lung cancer. CONCLUSION: Anatomical lung resection can be performed safely in selected high-risk patients based on pulmonary function without significant increase in morbidity or mortality and with acceptable quality of life outcomes. Given that complications following lung resection are multifactorial, fitness for surgery should be thoroughly assessed in all patients with resectable disease within a multidisciplinary setting. High operative risk by pulmonary function tests alone should not preclude surgical resection. PMID:28469717

  13. Genetic Risk Can Be Decreased: Quitting Smoking Decreases and Delays Lung Cancer for Smokers With High and Low CHRNA5 Risk Genotypes - A Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, L.S.; Baker, T.; Hung, R.J.; Horton, A.; Culverhouse, R.; Hartz, S.; Saccone, N.; Cheng, I.; Deng, B.; Han, Y.; Hansen, H.M.; Horsman, J.; Kim, C.; Rosenberger, A.; Aben, K.K.H.; Andrew, A.S.; Chang, S.C.; Saum, K.U.; Dienemann, H.; Hatsukami, D.K.; Johnson, E.O.; Pande, M.; Wrensch, M.R.; McLaughlin, J.; Skaug, V.; Heijden, E.H.F.M. van der; Wampfler, J.; Wenzlaff, A.; Woll, P.; Zienolddiny, S.; Bickeboller, H.; Brenner, H.; Duell, E.J.; Haugen, A.; Bruske, I.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Lazarus, P.; Marchand, L. Le; Liu, G.; Mayordomo, J.; Risch, A.; Schwartz, A.G.; Teare, M.D.; Wu, X.; Wiencke, J.K.; Yang, P.; Zhang, Z.F.; Spitz, M.R.; Amos, C.I.; Bierut, L.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent meta-analyses show that individuals with high risk variants in CHRNA5 on chromosome 15q25 are likely to develop lung cancer earlier than those with low-risk genotypes. The same high-risk genetic variants also predict nicotine dependence and delayed smoking cessation. It is unclear

  14. [Lung cancer surgery and cirrhosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, C; Chevalier, B; Fabre, E; Pricopi, C; Badia, A; Arame, A; Foucault, C; Dujon, A; Le Pimpec Barthes, F; Riquet, M

    2015-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death by cancer and cirrhosis is the fourteenth, all causes included. Surgery increases postoperative risks in cirrhotic patients. Our purpose was to analyze this point in lung cancer surgery. We collected, among 7162 patients, the data concerning those operated for lung cancer (n=6105) and compared patients with hepatic disease (n=448) to those presenting other medical disorder (n=2587). We analyzed cirrhotic patients' characteristics (n=49). Five-year survival of patients with hepatic disease was lower (n=5657/6105): 35.3% versus 43.8% for patients with no hepatic disease, P=0.0021. Survival of cirrhotic patients was not statistically different from the one of patients with other hepatic disorder, but none survived beyond 10 years (0% versus 26.4%). Surgery in cirrhotic patients consisted in one explorative thoracotomy, three wedges resections, two segmentectomies, 33 lobectomies and 10 pneumonectomies. Postoperative mortality (8.2%; 4/49) was not different for patients without hepatic disease (4.2%; 239/5657) (P=0.32), as well as the rate of complications (40.8%; 20/49 and 24.8%; 1404/5657, P=0.11). Only one postoperative death was associated to a hepatic failure. Multivariate analysis pointed age, histological subtype of the tumour and stage of disease as independent prognosis factors. When cirrhosis is well compensated, surgical resection of lung cancer can be performed with acceptable postoperative morbidity and satisfactory rates of survival. Progressive potential of this disease is worse after five years. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of cardiovascular calcifications on the detrimental effect of continued smoking on cardiovascular risk in male lung cancer screening participants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpa M Jairam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current smokers have an increased cardiovascular disease (CVD risk compared to ex-smokers due to reversible as well as irreversible effects of smoking. We investigated if current smokers remain to have an increased CVD risk compared to ex-smokers in subjects with a long and intense smoking history. We in addition studied if the effect of smoking continuation on CVD risk is independent of or modified by the presence of cardiovascular calcifications. METHODS: The cohort used comprised a sample of 3559 male lung cancer screening trial participants. We conducted a case-cohort study using all CVD cases and a random sample of 10% (n = 341 from the baseline cohort (subcohort. A weighted Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the hazard ratios for current smoking status in relation to CVD events. RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 2.6 years (max. 3.7 years, 263 fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events (cases were identified. Age, packyears and cardiovascular calcification adjusted hazard ratio of current smokers compared to former smokers was 1.33 (95% confidence interval 1.00-1.77. In additional analyses that incorporated multiplicative interaction terms, neither coronary nor aortic calcifications modified the association between smoking status and cardiovascular risk (P = 0.08. CONCLUSIONS: Current smokers have an increased CVD risk compared to former smokers even in subjects with a long and intense smoking history. Smoking exerts its hazardous effects on CVD risk by pathways partly independent of cardiovascular calcifications.

  16. Lung cancer in younger patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasowa, Leda; Madsen, Poul Henning

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lung cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death. The incidence increases with age and the occurrence in young patients is relatively low. The clinicopathological features of lung cancer in younger patients have not been fully explored previously. METHODS: To assess the age...... differences in the clinical characteristics of lung cancer, we conducted a retrospective analysis comparing young patients ≤ 65 years of age with an elderly group > 65 years of age. Among 1,232 patients evaluated due to suspicion of lung cancer in our fast-track setting from January-December 2013, 312 newly...... diagnosed lung cancer patients were included. RESULTS: Patients ≤ 65 years had a significantly higher representation of females (p = 0.0021), more frequent familial cancer aggregation (p = 0.028) and a lower incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (p = 0.0133). When excluding pure carcinoid tumours...

  17. Beliefs about smoking-related lung cancer risk among low socioeconomic individuals: the role of smoking experience and interpersonal communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekalu, Mesfin Awoke; Minsky, Sara; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2017-11-01

    Previous research has documented that smoking prevalence is generally high among low socioeconomic groups and that tobacco industries continue to target these population groups. However, little research has investigated the beliefs of individuals with low socioeconomic position (SEP) about the association between smoking and cancer risks. In this study, we examined beliefs about smoking-related lung cancer risk and the role of smoking experience, mass media exposure and health-related interpersonal communication among a sample of low SEP population. Data were gathered from 324 urban poor recruited from adult education centers in the greater Boston area, Massachusetts, USA as part of a larger project called Click to Connect. While we collected a variety of data at baseline and follow-up, the data for this study come from the baseline survey alone. We found that individuals with smoking experience tend to be better than those without in perceiving the lung cancer risks of smoking. Moreover, we found that health-related interpersonal communication with friends and family members is positively associated with beliefs about the link between smoking and lung cancer. Our findings suggest that low SEP individuals with smoking experience might be more exposed to anti-tobacco messages than are low SEP individuals without smoking experience. This could suggest that anti-tobacco interventions thus far may have done very little in raising the awareness of low SEP nonsmokers about the dangers of smoking and that they may have little potential to avert the initiation of smoking in this population.

  18. Pollution Level, Sources, and Lung Cancer Risk of PM10-Bound Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs in Summer in Nanjing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiqi Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study concentrated on the pollution level, sources, and lung cancer risk of PM10-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in summer in Nanjing, China. PM10 samples were collected in summer of the year 2015 in Nanjing. 16 USEPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency priority PAHs were extracted and analyzed after sampling. The mean concentrations of PAHs and BaPeq were 7.49±2.60 and 1.21±0.24 ng/m3, respectively, being in a middle level among results from regions worldwide. According to the results of diagnostic ratios, PAHs originated mainly from traffic exhaust, especially diesel vehicle emissions. Owing to the inhalation exposure, the median values of incremental lung cancer risk (ILCR were estimated to be 3.36×10-8, 2.50×10-8, 1.69×10-7, 2.54×10-8, 1.38×10-7, 1.18×10-7, 1.27×10-7, and 1.11×10-7 for boys, male adolescents, male adults, male seniors, girls, female adolescents, female adults, and female seniors, respectively, indicating low potential lung cancer risk.

  19. Fruits and vegetables consumption and the risk of histological subtypes of lung cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchner, F L; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Linseisen, J; Boshuizen, H C; Kiemeney, L A L M; Ros, M M; Overvad, K; Hansen, L; Tjonneland, A; Raaschou-Nielsen, O; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Boutron-Ruault, M-C; Touillaud, M; Kaaks, R; Rohrmann, S; Boeing, H; Nöthlings, U; Trichopoulou, A; Zylis, D; Dilis, V; Palli, D; Sieri, S; Vineis, P; Tumino, R; Panico, S; Peeters, P H M; van Gils, C H; Lund, E; Gram, I T; Braaten, T; Martinez, C; Agudo, A; Arriola, L; Ardanaz, E; Navarro, C; Rodríguez, L; Manjer, J; Wirfält, E; Hallmans, G; Rasmuson, T; Key, T J; Roddam, A W; Bingham, S; Khaw, K-T; Slimani, N; Bofetta, P; Byrnes, G; Norat, T; Michaud, D; Riboli, E

    2010-03-01

    To examine the association between fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of different histological subtypes of lung cancer among participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to analyze the data. A calibration study in a subsample was used to reduce dietary measurement errors. During a mean follow-up of 8.7 years, 1,830 incident cases of lung cancer (574 adenocarcinoma, 286 small cell, 137 large cell, 363 squamous cell, 470 other histologies) were identified. In line with our previous conclusions, we found that after calibration a 100 g/day increase in fruit and vegetables consumption was associated with a reduced lung cancer risk (HR 0.94; 95% CI 0.89-0.99). This was also seen among current smokers (HR 0.93; 95% CI 0.90-0.97). Risks of squamous cell carcinomas in current smokers were reduced for an increase of 100 g/day of fruit and vegetables combined (HR 0.85; 95% CI 0.76-0.94), while no clear effects were seen for the other histological subtypes. We observed inverse associations between the consumption of vegetables and fruits and risk of lung cancer without a clear effect on specific histological subtypes of lung cancer. In current smokers, consumption of vegetables and fruits may reduce lung cancer risk, in particular the risk of squamous cell carcinomas.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Clinical Epidemiology and Pathological Characteristics of 908 Patients with Primary Lung Cancer of Hunan Province in 1997 and 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxia ZHU

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Epidemiology of lung cancer will be changed along with time and region. The aim of this study is to acknowledge the tendency of primary lung cancer in hunan province in recent years by comparing and analyzing the distribution of gender, age, area, smoking and pathology of patients who were initial diagnosed lung cancer and ancestral or permanent residence of hunan province in 1997 and 2007. Methods Clinical data of 908 patients with primary lung cancer hospitalized in Xiangya hospital were collected and evaluated. Results Compared patients in 2007 with those in 1997, ratio between male and female dropped from 3.8:1 to 2.98:1, while the proportion of young patients who were under 40 years old raised from 4.4% to 8.6% (χ2=4.465, P=0.035, patients living in the county raised from 19.9% to 40.1% (χ2=30.670, P < 0.001, smoking rate of patients from county raised from 16.9% to 39.9% (χ2= 24.939, P < 0.01. In addition, the proportion of rare histological types of lung cancer were also increased from 1.3% to 4.5% (χ2= 5.142, P=0.023. Conclusion Female patients, young patients, rural patients and rare histological types of lung cancer may have a tendency of increase in hunan province in recent years, whereas smoking cessation education should be strengthened.

  1. Polymorphisms in GEMIN4 and AGO1 Genes Are Associated with the Risk of Lung Cancer: A Case-Control Study in Chinese Female Non-Smokers

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    Xue Fang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNA biosynthesis genes can affect the regulatory effect of global microRNAs to target mRNA and hence influence the genesis and development of human cancer. Here, we selected five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs (rs7813, rs2740349, rs2291778, rs910924, rs595961 in two key microRNA biosynthesis genes (GEMIN4 and AGO1 and systematically evaluated the association between these SNPs, the gene-environment interaction and lung cancer risk. To control the impact of cigarette smoking on lung cancer, we recruited Chinese female non-smokers for the study. The total number of lung cancer cases and cancer-free controls were 473 and 395 in the case-control study. Four SNPs showed statistically significant associations with lung cancer risk. After Bonferroni correction, rs7813 and rs595961 were evidently still associated with lung cancer risk. In the stratified analysis, our results revealed that all five SNPs were associated with the risk of lung adenocarcinoma; after Bonferroni correction, significant association was maintained for rs7813, rs910924 and rs595961. Haplotype analysis showed GEMIN4 haplotype C-A-G-T was a protective haplotype for lung cancer. In the combined unfavorable genotype analysis, with the increasing number of unfavorable genotypes, a progressively increased gene-dose effect was observed in lung adenocarcinoma. We also found that individuals exposed to cooking oil fumes showed a relatively high risk of lung cancer, but no interactions were found between cooking oil fume exposure or passive smoking exposure with these SNPs, either on an additive scale or a multiplicative scale. Overall, this is the first study showing that rs7813 and rs595961 could be meaningful as genetic markers for lung cancer risk.

  2. Indoor air pollution from solid fuels and risk of hypopharyngeal/laryngeal and lung cancers: a multicentric case-control study from India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapkota, A.; Gajalakshmi, V.; Jetly, D.H.; Roychowdhury, S.; Dikshit, R.P.; Brennan, P.; Hashibe, M.; Boffetta, P. [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France)

    2008-04-15

    A recent monograph by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has identified indoor air pollution from coal usage as a known human carcinogen, while that from biomass as a probable human carcinogen. Although as much as 74 of the Indian population relies on solid fuels for cooking, very little information is available on cancer risk associated with these fuels in India. Using data from a multicentric case control study of 799 lung and 1062 hypopharyngeal/laryngeal cancer cases, and 718 controls, we investigated indoor air pollution from various solid fuels as risk factors for these cancers in India. Compared with never users, individuals who always used coal had an increased risk of lung cancer (odds ratio (OR) 3.76, 95 confidence interval (CI) 1.648.63). Long duration of coal usage (50 years) was a risk factor for hypopharyngeal (OR 3.47, CI 0.9512.69) and laryngeal (OR 3.65, CI 1.1111.93) cancers. An increased risk of hypopharyngeal cancer was observed among lifelong users of wood (OR 1.62, CI 1.142.32), however this was less apparent among never-smokers. Increasing level of smokiness inside the home was associated with an increasing risk of hypopharyngeal and lung cancer (P-trend < 0.05). Our findings suggest that reducing indoor air pollution from solid fuels may contribute to prevention of these cancers in India, in addition to tobacco and alcohol control programs.

  3. Nutrition for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Do I Stay Healthy Share this page: Nutrition for Lung Cancer Patients Key Points There is ... lung cancer symptoms, making them worse or better. Nutrition Goals Each person's nutritional needs during lung cancer ...

  4. Lung Cancer: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... professional support team today. Learn More . Find more lung cancer resources. Learn More Donate Today! What is Lung ... to Give How Your Support Helps Events Lung Cancer Awareness © Lung Cancer Alliance. The information presented in this website ...

  5. What Is Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shareable Graphics Infographics “African-American Men and Lung Cancer” “Lung Cancer Is the Biggest Cancer Killer in Both ... starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may spread ...

  6. Mood disorders and risk of lung cancer in the EAGLE case-control study and in the U.S. Veterans Affairs inpatient cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E Capo-Ramos

    Full Text Available Mood disorders may affect lung cancer risk. We evaluated this hypothesis in two large studies.We examined 1,939 lung cancer cases and 2,102 controls from the Environment And Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE case-control study conducted in Italy (2002-2005, and 82,945 inpatients with a lung cancer diagnosis and 3,586,299 person-years without a lung cancer diagnosis in the U.S. Veterans Affairs Inpatient Cohort (VA study, composed of veterans with a VA hospital admission (1969-1996. In EAGLE, we calculated odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI, with extensive adjustment for tobacco smoking and multiple lifestyle factors. In the VA study, we estimated lung cancer relative risks (RRs and 95% CIs with time-dependent Poisson regression, adjusting for attained age, calendar year, hospital visits, time within the study, and related previous medical diagnoses. In EAGLE, we found decreased lung cancer risk in subjects with a personal history of mood disorders (OR: 0.59, 95% CI: 0.44-0.79, based on 121 lung cancer incident cases and 192 controls and family history of mood disorders (OR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.50-0.77, based on 223 lung cancer cases and 345 controls. The VA study analyses yielded similar results (RR: 0.74, 95% CI: 0.71-0.77, based on 2,304 incident lung cancer cases and 177,267 non-cancer person-years in men with discharge diagnoses for mood disorders. History of mood disorders was associated with nicotine dependence, alcohol and substance use and psychometric scales of depressive and anxiety symptoms in controls for these studies.The consistent finding of a relationship between mood disorders and lung cancer risk across two large studies calls for further research into the complex interplay of risk factors associated with these two widespread and debilitating diseases. Although we adjusted for smoking effects in EAGLE, residual confounding of the results by smoking cannot be ruled out.

  7. Awareness of Risk Factors among Persons at Risk for Lung Cancer, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Sleep Apnea: A Canadian Population-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon L Walker

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess awareness among persons at risk for lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and sleep apnea regarding symptoms and risk factors of the disease, and their attitudes regarding the disease and toward those who are affected.

  8. [Quantitative assessment of the risk of lung cancer and pleural mesothelioma among automobile mechanics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbernon, E; Marchand, J-L; Garras, L; Goldberg, M

    2005-11-01

    A quantitative assessment of the risk of lung cancer and pleural mesothelioma among mechanics exposed to dust released from automobile asbestos-containing parts was performed. The population of automobile mechanics in France, according to profession and industrial sectors codes, was estimated from the data of the 1999 census. Risks were computed for a total male population of 242,360 automobile mechanics aged 16 to 60 years. Exposure to asbestos among these workers comes from maintenance tasks involving asbestos-containing parts produced before 1997 (date of the asbestos ban in France). Airborne asbestos concentration data available from the literature were highly variable. No data reporting the distribution of time spent for such tasks over a typical week of work were available. Therefore, different weekly exposure profiles were simulated, based on data from the 1994 SUMER survey. Risk models were those used for assessing asbestos health effects by all national and international agencies. Exposure scenarios mixed different levels of exposure, periods of time, proportions of exposed workers and dates of the "natural" disappearance of the automobile fleet built before asbestos was banned in brakes and other parts. The most realistic scenario hypothesizes that all automobile mechanics were exposed to asbestos, that the exposure levels ranged from 0.06 and 0.25 fibers/liter per week for the period before 1997, and between 0.01 and 0.06 fibers/liter per week afterwards until 2010. According to this scenario, the number of lifelong cancer deaths (lung and pleura) induced by asbestos exposure in this population is estimated at 602 "unavoidable" cases, due to exposure experienced before 2003; 43 other cases will occur if asbestos is not removed from existing automobiles.

  9. Lung cancer mortality (1950-1999 among Eldorado uranium workers: a comparison of models of carcinogenesis and empirical excess risk models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Eidemüller

    Full Text Available Lung cancer mortality after exposure to radon decay products (RDP among 16,236 male Eldorado uranium workers was analyzed. Male workers from the Beaverlodge and Port Radium uranium mines and the Port Hope radium and uranium refinery and processing facility who were first employed between 1932 and 1980 were followed up from 1950 to 1999. A total of 618 lung cancer deaths were observed. The analysis compared the results of the biologically-based two-stage clonal expansion (TSCE model to the empirical excess risk model. The spontaneous clonal expansion rate of pre-malignant cells was reduced at older ages under the assumptions of the TSCE model. Exposure to RDP was associated with increase in the clonal expansion rate during exposure but not afterwards. The increase was stronger for lower exposure rates. A radiation-induced bystander effect could be a possible explanation for such an exposure response. Results on excess risks were compared to a linear dose-response parametric excess risk model with attained age, time since exposure and dose rate as effect modifiers. In all models the excess relative risk decreased with increasing attained age, increasing time since exposure and increasing exposure rate. Large model uncertainties were found in particular for small exposure rates.

  10. A semi-parametric approach to estimate risk functions associated with multi-dimensional exposure profiles: application to smoking and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, David I; Liverani, Silvia; Azizi, Lamiae; Richardson, Sylvia; Stücker, Isabelle

    2013-10-23

    A common characteristic of environmental epidemiology is the multi-dimensional aspect of exposure patterns, frequently reduced to a cumulative exposure for simplicity of analysis. By adopting a flexible Bayesian clustering approach, we explore the risk function linking exposure history to disease. This approach is applied here to study the relationship between different smoking characteristics and lung cancer in the framework of a population based case control study. Our study includes 4658 males (1995 cases, 2663 controls) with full smoking history (intensity, duration, time since cessation, pack-years) from the ICARE multi-centre study conducted from 2001-2007. We extend Bayesian clustering techniques to explore predictive risk surfaces for covariate profiles of interest. We were able to partition the population into 12 clusters with different smoking profiles and lung cancer risk. Our results confirm that when compared to intensity, duration is the predominant driver of risk. On the other hand, using pack-years of cigarette smoking as a single summary leads to a considerable loss of information. Our method estimates a disease risk associated to a specific exposure profile by robustly accounting for the different dimensions of exposure and will be helpful in general to give further insight into the effect of exposures that are accumulated through different time patterns.

  11. Mercapturic Acids Derived from the Toxicants Acrolein and Crotonaldehyde in the Urine of Cigarette Smokers from Five Ethnic Groups with Differing Risks for Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungshim L Park

    Full Text Available The Multiethnic Cohort epidemiology study has clearly demonstrated that, compared to Whites and for the same number of cigarettes smoked, African Americans and Native Hawaiians have a higher risk for lung cancer whereas Latinos and Japanese Americans have a lower risk. Acrolein and crotonaldehyde are two important constituents of cigarette smoke which have well documented toxic effects and could play a role in lung cancer etiology. Their urinary metabolites 3-hydroxypropylmercapturic acid (3-HPMA and 3-hydroxy-1-methylpropylmercapturic acid (HMPMA, respectively, are validated biomarkers of acrolein and crotonaldehyde exposure. We quantified levels of 3-HPMA and HMPMA in the urine of more than 2200 smokers from these five ethnic groups, and also carried out a genome wide association study using blood samples from these subjects. After adjusting for age, sex, creatinine, and total nicotine equivalents, geometric mean levels of 3-HPMA and HMPMA were significantly different in the five groups (P < 0.0001. Native Hawaiians had the highest and Latinos the lowest geometric mean levels of both 3-HPMA and HMPMA. Levels of 3-HPMA and HMPMA were 3787 and 2759 pmol/ml urine, respectively, in Native Hawaiians and 1720 and 2210 pmol/ml urine in Latinos. These results suggest that acrolein and crotonaldehyde may be involved in lung cancer etiology, and that their divergent levels may partially explain the differing risks of Native Hawaiian and Latino smokers. No strong signals were associated with 3-HPMA in the genome wide association study, suggesting that formation of the glutathione conjugate of acrolein is mainly non-enzymatic, while the top significant association with HMPMA was located on chromosome 12 near the TBX3 gene, but its relationship to HMPMA excretion is not clear.

  12. Role of a serum-based biomarker panel in the early diagnosis of lung cancer for a cohort of high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Da-Wei; Zhang, Yong; Hong, Qun-Ying; Hu, Jie; Li, Chun; Pan, Bai-Shen; Wang, Qun; Ding, Fei-Hong; Ou, Jia-Xian; Liu, Fang-Lei; Zhang, Dan; Zhou, Jie-Bai; Song, Yuan-Lin; Bai, Chun-Xue

    2015-09-01

    This study applied a combined cancer biomarker panel to clinically identify small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a high-risk population. The serum levels of 4 biomarkers (progastrin-releasing peptide [ProGRP], carcinoembryonic antigen [CEA], squamous cell carcinoma antigen [SCC], and cytokeratin 19 fragment [CYFRA21-1]) were determined in 153 patients with a high risk of lung cancer (12 with a new diagnosis of SCLC, 52 with NSCLC, and 89 without lung cancer). Information about diagnosis delays was collected through interviews of all participants. Significantly higher serum levels of ProGRP (P lung cancer patients with a false-negative computed tomography (CT) result, the diagnostic panel detected 8 additional cancers. This panel increased the diagnostic specificity for high-risk subjects (those with renal failure being excluded), and auxiliary to a CT scan, it increased the sensitivity for patients with lung cancer. These results might be applied to shorten the diagnosis delay at health care institutions in China. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  13. Genome-wide interaction study of smoking behavior and non-small cell lung cancer risk in Caucasian population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yafang; Xiao, Xiangjun; Han, Younghun

    2017-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer. Both environmental and genetic risk factors contribute to lung carcinogenesis. We conducted a genome-wide interaction analysis between SNPs and smoking status (never vs ever smokers) in a European-descent population. We...... adopted a two-step analysis strategy in the discovery stage: we first conducted a case-only interaction analysis to assess the relationship between SNPs and smoking behavior using 13,336 NSCLC cases. Candidate SNPs with p-value less than 0.001 were further analyzed using a standard case...... of smoking with rs4751674 was identified in squamous cell lung carcinoma with an odds ratio of 0.58 and p-value of 8.12x10-7. This study is by far the largest genome-wide SNP-smoking interaction analysis reported for lung cancer. The three identified novel SNPs provide potential candidate biomarkers for lung...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Lung cancer Lung cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... Lung Cancer Additional NIH Resources (3 links) National Cancer Institute: Lung Cancer Overview National Cancer Institute: Lung Cancer Prevention ...

  15. The SNP rs402710 in 5p15.33 is associated with lung cancer risk: a replication study in Chinese population and a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuzai Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, rs402710, located in 5p15.33, was firstly identified to be associated with the lung cancer risk in a genome-wide association study. However, some following replication studies yielded inconsistent results. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: A case-control study of 611 cases and 1062 controls in a Chinese population was conducted, and then a meta-analysis integrating the current and previously published studies with a total 31811 cases and 36333 controls was performed to explore the real effect of rs402710 on lung cancer susceptibility. Significant associations between the SNP rs402710 and lung cancer risk were observed in both case-control study and meta-analysis, with ORs equal to 0.77 (95%CI = 0.63-0.95 and 0.83 (95%CI = 0.81-0.86 in dominant model, respectively. By stratified analysis of our case-control study, the associations were also observed in never smoker group and non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC group with ORs equal to 0.71 (95%CI = 0.53-0.95 and 0.69 (95%CI = 0.55-0.87, which was remarkable that larger effect of the minor allele T was seen in the two groups than that in overall lung cancer. Besides, the sensitive and cumulative analysis indicated the robust stability of the current results of meta-analysis. CONCLUSION: The results from our replication study and the meta-analysis provided firm evidence that rs402710 T allele significantly contributed to decreased lung cancer risk, and the case-control study implied that the variant may yield stronger effect on NSCLC and never smokers. However, the mechanism underlying the polymorphism conferring susceptibility to lung cancer is warranted to clarify in the follow-up studies.

  16. Lung cancer risk and cancer-specific mortality in subjects undergoing routine imaging test when stratified with and without identified lung nodule on imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Saez, Noemi [Miguel Hernandez University, Public Health, History of Science and Ginecology Department, Alicante (Spain); Hernandez-Aguado, Ildefonso; Pastor Valero, Maria; Parker, Lucy Anne; Lumbreras, Blanca [Miguel Hernandez University, Public Health, History of Science and Ginecology Department, Alicante (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica, Madrid (Spain); Vilar, Jose; Domingo, Maria Luisa [Peset Hospital, Radiodiagnostic Department, Valencia (Spain); Gonzalez-Alvarez, Isabel; Lorente, Maria Fermina [San Juan Hospital, Radiodiagnostic Department, San Juan de Alicante (Spain)

    2015-12-15

    To assess the risk of lung cancer and specific mortality rate in patients with and without solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN) on chest radiograph and CT. This prospective study included 16,078 patients ≥35 years old (893 of them had an SPN detected with either chest radiograph or CT) and 15,185 without SPN. Patients were followed up for 18 months or until being diagnosed with lung cancer. Risk and mortality lung cancer were calculated in both groups with Poisson regression. In patients with SPN, incidence of lung cancer was 8.3 % (95 % CI 6.0-11.2) on radiograph and 12.4 % (95 % CI 9.3-15.9) on CT. A chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with radiographs (odds ratio 2.62; 95 % CI 1.03, 6.67) and smoking habit (odds ratio 20.63; 95 % CI 3.84, 110.77) in patients with CT were associated with a higher probability of lung cancer. Large nodule size and spiculated edge were associated with lung cancer on both CT and radiograph. Lung cancer-specific mortality was lower in patients with SPN than in those without SPN (1.73/1000 person-years, 95 % CI 1.08-2.88 vs. 2.15/1000 person-years, 95 % CI 1.25-3.96). The risk of lung cancer for patients with SPN is higher in clinical populations than in screening studies. Moreover, patients with SPN showed lower mortality than those without SPN. (orig.)

  17. Correlation between familial cancer history and epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in Taiwanese never smokers with non-small cell lung cancer: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Po-Chung; Cheng, Yun-Chung

    2015-03-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. Cigarette smoking remains a prominent risk factor, but lung cancer incidence has been increasing in never smokers. Genetic abnormalities including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations predominate in never smoking lung cancer patients. Furthermore, familial aggregations of patients with these mutations reflect heritable susceptibility to lung cancer. The correlation between familial cancer history and EGFR mutations in never smokers with lung cancer requires investigation. This was a retrospective case-control study that evaluated the prevalence of EGFR mutations in lung cancer patients with familial cancer history. Never smokers with lung cancer treated at a hospital in Taiwan between April 2012 and May 2014 were evaluated. Inclusion criteria were never smokers with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Exclusion criteria involved patients without records of familial cancer history or tumor genotype. This study included 246 never smokers with lung cancer. The study population mainly involved never smoking women with a mean age of 60 years, and the predominant tumor histology was adenocarcinoma. Lung cancer patients with familial cancer history had an increased prevalence of EGFR mutations compared to patients without family history [odds ratio (OR): 5.9; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.3-10.6; Pnever smoking lung cancer patients with familial cancer history. Moreover, a sizable proportion of never smoking cancer patients harbored these mutations. These observations have implications for the treatment of lung cancer in never smokers.

  18. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Anti-Cancer Mechanism by Periplocin Treatment in Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zejun Lu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periplocin is used for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, reinforcement of bones and tendons, palpitations or shortness of breath and lower extremity edema in traditional medicine. Our previous findings suggested that periplocin could inhibit the growth of lung cancer both in vitro and in vivo. But the biological processes and molecular pathways by which periplocin induces these beneficial effects remain largely undefined. Methods: To explore the molecular mechanisms of periplocin involved in anti-cancer activity, in the present study the protein profile changes of human lung cancer cell lines A549 in response to periplocin treatment were investigated using the proteomics approaches (2-DE combined with MS/MS. Western blot was employed to verify the changed proteins. Interactions between changed proteins were analyzed by STRING. Results: 29 down-regulated protein species named GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran (RAN, Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1 (ARHGDIA, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A-1 (EIF5A and Profilin-1(PFN1, and 10 up-regulated protein species named Heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein (HSPA8,10 kDa heat shock protein (HSPE1, and Cofilin-1(CFL-1 were identified. Among them, GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran (RAN and Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1 (ARHGDIA were the most significantly changed (over tenfold. The proteasome subunit beta type-6 (PSMB6, ATP synthase ecto-α-subunit (ATP5A1, Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1 and EIF5A were verified by immunoblot assays to be dramatically down-regulated. By STRING bioinformatics analysis revealing interactions and signaling networks it became apparent that the proteins changed they are primarily involved in transcription and proteolysis. Conclusion: Periplocin inhibited growth of lung cancer by down-regulating proteins, such as ATP5A1, EIF5A, ALDH1 and PSMB6. These findings may improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-cancer effects of

  19. Global long-range transport and lung cancer risk from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons shielded by coatings of organic aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Lou, Sijia; Zelenyuk-Imre, Alla; Easter, Richard C.; Corley, Richard A.; Thrall, Brian D.; Rasch, Philip J.; Fast, Jerome D.; Massey Simonich, Staci L.; Shen, Huizhong; Tao, Shu

    2017-01-23

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have toxic impacts on ecosystems and human health. Laboratory measurements show that one of the most carcinogenic PAHs, benzo(a)pyrene, which is adsorbed on surfaces of soot particles, reacts very quickly with atmospheric oxidants like ozone within ~2 hours. Yet, field observations indicate that it actually persists for much longer periods in the atmosphere, and this large discrepancy is not well understood. Driven by novel experimental understanding, we develop a new modelling approach, whereby particle-bound BaP is shielded from oxidation by a coating of viscous organic aerosol (OA). We show that application of this new approach in a global climate model leads to higher atmospheric BaP concentrations that agree much better with measurements, compared to the default model, as well as stronger long-range transport and greater deposition fluxes. This new approach also predicts elevated lung-cancer risk from PAHs. Predicted oxidation of BaP is highest over a tropical belt where OA is liquid-like.

  20. Association between Th17-related cytokines and risk of non-small cell lung cancer among patients with or without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chen; Yu, Zu-Bin; Meng, Gang; Wang, Li; Liu, Qing-Yun; Chen, Liu-Tong; Feng, Shuang-Shuang; Tu, Hong-Bo; Li, Ya-Fei; Bai, Li

    2015-09-01

    CD4 (+) T helper 17 (Th17) cells play critical roles in inflammation and tumor development. The involvement of Th17 cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-type inflammation-associated lung cancer has also been confirmed in animal models. However, to the authors' knowledge, it is unknown whether the role of Th17 cells is different in patients with lung cancer complicated with COPD compared with those without COPD. In the current study, the authors attempted to determine the association between the circulating levels of Th17-related cytokines and the clinical characteristics of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients with or without COPD. The authors designed a matched case-control study that included 70 patients with NSCLC with COPD, 148 patients with NSCLC without COPD, and 148 healthy controls. The data regarding the clinicopathological features of these participants were collected. Circulating levels of Th17-related cytokines, including interleukin (IL) 23 (IL-23), IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22, and tumor necrosis factor-α, were measured. The circulating levels of IL-23, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22, and tumor necrosis factor-α were found to be significantly higher in the patients with NSCLC compared with the healthy controls (Pdisease compared with those with stage IIIB to stage IV disease (P<.05). In addition, the 5 Th17-related cytokines demonstrated pairwise correlations, with Spearman rank correlation coefficients of 0.646 to 0.888 (P<.05). The results of the current study indicate a clear association between the Th17-related cytokine profile and the risk of NSCLC complicated by the presence or absence of COPD. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  1. Risk-stratifying capacity of PET/CT metabolic tumor volume in stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkle, Joshua H; Jo, Stephanie Y; Ferguson, Mark K; Liu, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Chenpeng; Zhu, Xuee; Yuan, Cindy; Pu, Yonglin

    2017-08-01

    Stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is heterogeneous in tumor burden, and its treatment is variable. Whole-body metabolic tumor volume (MTVWB) has been shown to be an independent prognostic index for overall survival (OS). However, the potential of MTVWB to risk-stratify stage IIIA NSCLC has previously been unknown. If we can identify subgroups within the stage exhibiting significant OS differences using MTVWB, MTVWB may lead to adjustments in patients' risk profile evaluations and may, therefore, influence clinical decision making regarding treatment. We estimated the risk-stratifying capacity of MTVWB in stage IIIA by comparing OS of stratified stage IIIA with stage IIB and IIIB NSCLC. We performed a retrospective review of 330 patients with clinical stage IIB, IIIA, and IIIB NSCLC diagnosed between 2004 and 2014. The patients' clinical TNM stage, initial MTVWB, and long-term survival data were collected. Patients with TNM stage IIIA disease were stratified by MTVWB. The optimal MTVWB cutoff value for stage IIIA patients was calculated using sequential log-rank tests. Univariate and multivariate cox regression analyses and Kaplan-Meier OS analysis with log-rank tests were performed. The optimal MTVWB cut-point was 29.2 mL for the risk-stratification of stage IIIA. We identified statistically significant differences in OS between stage IIB and IIIA patients (p capacity of MTVWB was observed in a large range of cutoff values from 15 to 55 mL in stage IIIA patients. Using MTVWB cutoff points ranging from 15 to 55 mL with an optimal value of 29.2 mL, stage IIIA NSCLC may be effectively stratified into subgroups with no significant survival difference from stages IIB or IIIB NSCLC. This may result in more accurate survival estimation and more appropriate risk adapted treatment selection in stage IIIA NSCLC.

  2. Dietary patterns associated with male lung cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balder, H.F.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this article was to study the association between dietary patterns and lung cancer incidence in the Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer. The baseline measurement of this prospective case cohort study that was completed by 58,279 men in 1986 included a self-administered

  3. Heterogeneity in coal composition and implications for lung cancer risk in Xuanwei and Fuyuan counties, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Downward, George S.; Hu, Wei; Large, David; Veld, Harry; Xu, Jun; Reiss, Boris; Wu, Guoping; Wei, Fusheng; Chapman, Robert S.; Rothman, Nat; Qing, Lan; Vermeulen, Roel

    2014-01-01

    Background: Xuanwei and Fuyuan counties in Yunnan Province, China have among the highest lung cancer rates in the country. This has been associated with the domestic combustion of bituminous coal (referred to as "smoky" coal). Additionally, significant geographical variation in cancer rates among

  4. Tumour auto-contouring on 2d cine MRI for locally advanced lung cancer: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Martin F; Eiben, Björn; Menten, Martin J; Wetscherek, Andreas; Hawkes, David J; McClelland, Jamie R; Oelfke, Uwe

    2017-10-10

    Radiotherapy guidance based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently becoming a clinical reality. Fast 2d cine MRI sequences are expected to increase the precision of radiation delivery by facilitating tumour delineation during treatment. This study compares four auto-contouring algorithms for the task of delineating the primary tumour in six locally advanced (LA) lung cancer patients. Twenty-two cine MRI sequences were acquired using either a balanced steady-state free precession or a spoiled gradient echo imaging technique. Contours derived by the auto-contouring algorithms were compared against manual reference contours. A selection of eight image data sets was also used to assess the inter-observer delineation uncertainty. Algorithmically derived contours agreed well with the manual reference contours (median Dice similarity index: ⩾0.91). Multi-template matching and deformable image registration performed significantly better than feature-driven registration and the pulse-coupled neural network (PCNN). Neither MRI sequence nor image orientation was a conclusive predictor for algorithmic performance. Motion significantly degraded the performance of the PCNN. The inter-observer variability was of the same order of magnitude as the algorithmic performance. Auto-contouring of tumours on cine MRI is feasible in LA lung cancer patients. Despite large variations in implementation complexity, the different algorithms all have relatively similar performance. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Reproductive factors, hormone use, estrogen receptor expression and risk of non small-cell lung cancer in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Ann G; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Prysak, Geoffrey M; Murphy, Valerie; Cote, Michele L; Brooks, Sam C; Skafar, Debra F; Lonardo, Fulvio

    2007-12-20

    Estrogen receptor (ER) expression in lung tumors suggests that estrogens may play a role in the development of lung cancer. We evaluated the role of hormone-related factors in determining risk of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in women. We also evaluated whether risk factors were differentially associated with cytoplasmic ER-alpha and/or nuclear ER-beta expression-defined NSCLC in postmenopausal women. Population-based participants included women aged 18 to 74 years diagnosed with NSCLC in metropolitan Detroit between November 1, 2001 and October 31, 2005. Population-based controls were identified through random digit dialing, matched to patient cases on race and 5-year age group. Interview data were analyzed for 488 patient cases (241 with tumor ER results) and 498 controls. Increased duration of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use in quartiles was associated with decreased risk of NSCLC in postmenopausal women (odds ratio = 0.88; 95% CI, 0.78 to 1.00; P = .04), adjusting for age, race, pack-years, education, family history of lung cancer, current body mass index, years exposed to second-hand smoke in the workplace, and obstructive lung disease history. Among postmenopausal women, ever using HRT, increasing HRT duration of use in quartiles, and increasing quartiles of estrogen use were significant predictors of reduced risk of NSCLC characterized as ER-alpha and/or ER-beta positive. None of the hormone-related variables were associated with nuclear ER-alpha- or ER-beta-negative NSCLC. These findings suggest that postmenopausal hormone exposures are associated with reduced risk of ER-alpha- and ER-beta-expressing NSCLC. Understanding tumor characteristics may direct development of targeted treatment for this disease.

  6. Germline Genetic Variants and Lung Cancer Survival in African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Carissa C; Bush, William S; Crawford, Dana C; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Schwartz, Ann G; Wiencke, John K; Wrensch, Margaret R; Blot, William J; Chanock, Stephen J; Grogan, Eric L; Aldrich, Melinda C

    2017-08-01

    Background: African Americans have the highest lung cancer mortality in the United States. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of germline variants influencing lung cancer survival have not yet been conducted with African Americans. We examined five previously reported GWAS catalog variants and explored additional genome-wide associations among African American lung cancer cases. Methods: Incident non-small cell lung cancer cases ( N = 286) in the Southern Community Cohort Study were genotyped on the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for overall mortality. Two independent African American studies ( N = 316 and 298) were used for replication. Results: One previously reported variant, rs1878022 on 12q23.3, was significantly associated with mortality (HR = 0.70; 95% CI: 0.54-0.92). Replication findings were in the same direction, although attenuated (HR = 0.87 and 0.94). Meta-analysis had a HR of 0.83 (95% CI, 0.71-0.97). Analysis of common variants identified an association between chromosome 6q21.33 and mortality (HR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.33-0.66). Conclusions: We identified an association between rs1878022 in CMKLR1 and lung cancer survival. However, our results in African Americans have a different direction of effect compared with a prior study in European Americans, suggesting a different genetic architecture or presence of gene-environment interactions. We also identified variants on chromosome 6 within the gene-rich HLA region, which has been previously implicated in lung cancer risk and survival. Impact: We found evidence that inherited genetic risk factors influence lung cancer survival in African Americans. Replication in additional populations is necessary to confirm potential genetic differences in lung cancer survival across populations. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(8); 1288-95. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Analysis of intervention strategies for inhalation exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and associated lung cancer risk based on a Monte Carlo population exposure assessment model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhou

    Full Text Available It is difficult to evaluate and compare interventions for reducing exposure to air pollutants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, a widely found air pollutant in both indoor and outdoor air. This study presents the first application of the Monte Carlo population exposure assessment model to quantify the effects of different intervention strategies on inhalation exposure to PAHs and the associated lung cancer risk. The method was applied to the population in Beijing, China, in the year 2006. Several intervention strategies were designed and studied, including atmospheric cleaning, smoking prohibition indoors, use of clean fuel for cooking, enhancing ventilation while cooking and use of indoor cleaners. Their performances were quantified by population attributable fraction (PAF and potential impact fraction (PIF of lung cancer risk, and the changes in indoor PAH concentrations and annual inhalation doses were also calculated and compared. The results showed that atmospheric cleaning and use of indoor cleaners were the two most effective interventions. The sensitivity analysis showed that several input parameters had major influence on the modeled PAH inhalation exposure and the rankings of different interventions. The ranking was reasonably robust for the remaining majority of parameters. The method itself can be extended to other pollutants and in different places. It enables the quantitative comparison of different intervention strategies and would benefit intervention design and relevant policy making.

  8. Staging of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LUNG CANCER MINI-SERIES #2 Staging of Lung Cancer Once your lung cancer is diagnosed, staging tells you and your health care provider about ... at it under a microscope. The stages of lung cancer are listed as I, II, III, and IV ...

  9. High lung cancer surgical procedure volume is associated with shorter length of stay and lower risks of re-admission and death: National cohort analysis in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Henrik; Riaz, Sharma P; Holmberg, Lars; Jakobsen, Erik; Lagergren, Jesper; Page, Richard; Peake, Michael D; Pearce, Neil; Purushotham, Arnie; Sullivan, Richard; Vedsted, Peter; Luchtenborg, Margreet

    2016-09-01

    It is debated whether treating cancer patients in high-volume surgical centres can lead to improvement in outcomes, such as shorter length of hospital stay, decreased frequency and severity of post-operative complications, decreased re-admission, and decreased mortality. The dataset for this analysis was based on cancer registration and hospital discharge data and comprised information on 15,738 non-small-cell lung cancer patients resident and diagnosed in England in 2006-2010 and treated by surgical resection. The number of lung cancer resections was computed for each hospital in each calendar year, and patients were assigned to a hospital volume quintile on the basis of the volume of their hospital. Hospitals with large lung cancer surgical resection volumes were less restrictive in their selection of patients for surgical management and provided a higher resection rate to their geographical population. Higher volume hospitals had shorter length of stay and the odds of re-admission were 15% lower in the highest hospital volume quintile compared with the lowest quintile. Mortality risks were 1% after 30 d and 3% after 90 d. Patients from hospitals in the highest volume quintile had about half the odds of death within 30 d than patients from the lowest quintile. Variations in outcomes were generally small, but in the same direction, with consistently better outcomes in the larger hospitals. This gives support to the ongoing trend towards centralisation of clinical services, but service re-organisation needs to take account of not only the size of hospitals but also referral routes and patient access. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Metabolomics provide new insights on lung cancer staging and discrimination from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deja, Stanislaw; Porebska, Irena; Kowal, Aneta; Zabek, Adam; Barg, Wojciech; Pawelczyk, Konrad; Stanimirova, Ivana; Daszykowski, Michal; Korzeniewska, Anna; Jankowska, Renata; Mlynarz, Piotr

    2014-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are widespread lung diseases. Cigarette smoking is a high risk factor for both the diseases. COPD may increase the risk of developing lung cancer. Thus, it is crucial to be able to distinguish between these two pathological states, especially considering the early stages of lung cancer. Novel diagnostic and monitoring tools are required to properly determine lung cancer progression because this information directly impacts the type of the treatment prescribed. In this study, serum samples collected from 22 COPD and 77 lung cancer (TNM stages I, II, III, and IV) patients were analyzed. Then, a collection of NMR metabolic fingerprints was modeled using discriminant orthogonal partial least squares regression (OPLS-DA) and further interpreted by univariate statistics. The constructed discriminant models helped to successfully distinguish between the metabolic fingerprints of COPD and lung cancer patients (AUC training=0.972, AUC test=0.993), COPD and early lung cancer patients (AUC training=1.000, AUC test=1.000), and COPD and advanced lung cancer patients (AUC training=0.983, AUC test=1.000). Decreased acetate, citrate, and methanol levels together with the increased N-acetylated glycoproteins, leucine, lysine, mannose, choline, and lipid (CH3-(CH2)n-) levels were observed in all lung cancer patients compared with the COPD group. The evaluation of lung cancer progression was also successful using OPLS-DA (AUC training=0.811, AUC test=0.904). Based on the results, the following metabolite biomarkers may prove useful in distinguishing lung cancer states: isoleucine, acetoacetate, and creatine as well as the two NMR signals of N-acetylated glycoproteins and glycerol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of induction chemotherapy on estimated risk of radiation pneumonitis in bulky non–small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Neha P., E-mail: npamin@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University and Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, MI (United States); Miften, Moyed; Thornton, Dale; Ryan, Nicole; Kavanagh, Brian; Gaspar, Laurie E [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Patients with bulky non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may be at a high risk for radiation pneumonitis (RP) if treated with up-front concurrent chemoradiation. There is limited information about the effect of induction chemotherapy on the volume of normal lung subsequently irradiated. This study aims to estimate the reduction in risk of RP in patients with NSCLC after receiving induction chemotherapy. Between 2004 and 2009, 25 patients with Stage IV NSCLC were treated with chemotherapy alone (no surgery or radiation therapy [RT]) and had computed tomography (CT) scans before and after 2 cycles of chemotherapy. Simulated RT plans were created for the prechemotherapy and postchemotherapy scans so as to deliver 60 Gy to the thoracic disease in patients who had either a >20% volumetric increase or decrease in gross tumor volume (GTV) from chemotherapy. The prechemotherapy and postchemotherapy scans were analyzed to compare the percentage of lung volume receiving≥20 Gy (V20), mean lung dose (MLD), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Eight patients (32%) had a GTV reduction >20%, 2 (8%) had GTV increase >20%, and 15 (60%) had stable GTV. In the 8 responders, there was an absolute median GTV decrease of 88.1 cc (7.3 to 351.6 cc) or a 48% (20% to 62%) relative reduction in tumor burden. One had >20% tumor progression during chemotherapy, yet had an improvement in dosimetric parameters postchemotherapy. Among these 9 patients, the median decrease in V20, MLD, and NTCP was 2.6% (p<0.01), 2.1 Gy (p<0.01), and 5.6% (p<0.01), respectively. Less than one-third of patients with NSCLC obtain >20% volumetric tumor reduction from chemotherapy alone. Even with that amount of volumetric reduction, the 5% reduced risk of RP was only modest and did not convert previously ineligible patients to safely receive definitive thoracic RT.

  12. Occupational exposure to radon for underground tourist routes in Poland: Doses to lung and the risk of developing lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Katarzyna; Olszewski, Jerzy; Politański, Piotr; Zmyślony, Marek

    2017-07-14

    Radon concentrations for 31 Polish underground tourist routes were analyzed. The equivalent dose to the lung, the effective dose and the relative risk were calculated for employees of the analyzed routes on the grounds of information on radon concentrations, work time, etc. The relative risk for lung cancers was calculated using the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VI Committee model. Equivalent doses to the lungs of workers were determined using the coefficients calculated by the Kendall and Smith. The conversion coefficient proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in the report No. 33 was used for estimating the effective doses. In 13 routes, the effective dose was found to be above 1 mSv/year, and in 3 routes, it exceeded 6 mSv/year. For 5 routes, the equivalent dose to lungs was higher than 100 mSv/year, and in 1 case it was as high as 490 mSv/year. In 22.6% of underground workplaces the risk of developing lung cancer among employees was about 2 times higher than that for the general population, and for 1 tourist route it was about 5 times higher. The geometric mean of the relative risk of lung cancer for all workers of underground tourist routes was 1.73 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.6-1.87). Routes were divided into: caves, mines, post-military underground constructions and urban underground constructions. The difference between levels of the relative risk of developing lung cancer for all types of underground tourist routes was not found to be significant. If we include the professional group of the employees of underground tourist routes into the group of occupational exposure, the number of persons who are included in the Category A due to occupational exposure may increase by about 3/4. The professional group of the employees of underground tourist routes should be monitored for their exposure to radon. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(5):687-694.

  13. Occupational exposure to radon for underground tourist routes in Poland: Doses to lung and the risk of developing lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Walczak

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Radon concentrations for 31 Polish underground tourist routes were analyzed. The equivalent dose to the lung, the effective dose and the relative risk were calculated for employees of the analyzed routes on the grounds of information on radon concentrations, work time, etc. Material and Methods: The relative risk for lung cancers was calculated using the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR VI Committee model. Equivalent doses to the lungs of workers were determined using the coefficients calculated by the Kendall and Smith. The conversion coefficient proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA in the report No. 33 was used for estimating the effective doses. Results: In 13 routes, the effective dose was found to be above 1 mSv/year, and in 3 routes, it exceeded 6 mSv/year. For 5 routes, the equivalent dose to lungs was higher than 100 mSv/year, and in 1 case it was as high as 490 mSv/year. In 22.6% of underground workplaces the risk of developing lung cancer among employees was about 2 times higher than that for the general population, and for 1 tourist route it was about 5 times higher. The geometric mean of the relative risk of lung cancer for all workers of underground tourist routes was 1.73 (95% confidence interval (CI: 1.6–1.87. Routes were divided into: caves, mines, post-military underground constructions and urban underground constructions. Conclusions: The difference between levels of the relative risk of developing lung cancer for all types of underground tourist routes was not found to be significant. If we include the professional group of the employees of underground tourist routes into the group of occupational exposure, the number of persons who are included in the Category A due to occupational exposure may increase by about 3/4. The professional group of the employees of underground tourist routes should be monitored for their exposure to radon. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(5:687

  14. Occupational exposure to diesel engine emissions and risk of lung cancer: evidence from two case-control studies in Montreal, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintos, Javier; Parent, Marie-Elise; Richardson, Lesley; Siemiatycki, Jack

    2012-11-01

    To examine the risk of lung cancer among men associated with exposure to diesel engine emissions incurred in a wide range of occupations and industries. 2 population-based lung cancer case-control studies were conducted in Montreal. Study I (1979-1986) comprised 857 cases and 533 population controls; study II (1996-2001) comprised 736 cases and 894 population controls. A detailed job history was obtained, from which we inferred lifetime occupational exposure to 294 agents, including diesel engine emissions. ORs were estimated for each study and in the pooled data set, adjusting for socio-demographic factors, smoking history and selected occupational carcinogens. While it proved impossible to retrospectively estimate absolute exposure concentrations, there were estimates and analyses by relative measures of cumulative exposure. Increased risks of lung cancer were found in both studies. The pooled analysis showed an OR of lung cancer associated with substantial exposure to diesel exhaust of 1.80 (95% CI 1.3 to 2.6). The risk associated with substantial exposure was higher for squamous cell carcinomas (OR 2.09; 95% CI 1.3 to 3.2) than other histological types. Joint effects between diesel exhaust exposure and tobacco smoking are compatible with a multiplicative synergistic effect. Our findings provide further evidence supporting a causal link between diesel engine emissions and risk of lung cancer. The risk is stronger for the development of squamous cell carcinomas than for small cell tumours or adenocarcinomas.

  15. Pollution characteristics, sources and lung cancer risk of atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a new urban district of Nanjing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Xia, Zhonghuan; Wu, Minmin; Zhang, Qianqian; Sun, Shiqi; Yin, Jing; Zhou, Yanchi; Yang, Hao

    2017-05-01

    This paper focused on the pollution characteristics, sources and lung cancer risk of atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a new urban district of Nanjing, China. Gaseous and aerosol PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5μm) samples were collected in spring of 2015. Sixteen PAHs were extracted and analyzed after sampling. Firstly, arithmetic mean concentrations of PAHs and BaPeq (benzo[a]pyrene equivalent) were calculated. The mean concentrations of PAHs were 29.26±14.13, 18.14±5.37 and 48.47±16.03ng/m3 in gas phase, particle phase and both phases, respectively. The mean concentrations of BaPeq were 0.87±0.51, 2.71±2.17 and 4.06±2.31ng/m3 in gas phase, particle phase and both phases, respectively. Secondly, diagnostic ratios and principal component analysis were adopted to identify the sources of PAHs and the outcomes were the same: traffic exhaust was the predominant source followed by fuel combustion and industrial process. Finally, incremental lung cancer risk (ILCR) induced by whole year inhalation exposure to PAHs for population groups of different age and gender were estimated based on a Monte Carlo simulation. ILCR values caused by particle phase PAHs were greater than those caused by gas phase PAHs. ILCR values for adults were greater than those for other age groups. ILCR values caused by total (gas+particle) PAHs for diverse groups were all greater than the significant level (l0-6), indicating high potential lung cancer risk. Sensitivity analysis results showed that cancer slope factor for BaP inhalation exposure and BaPeq concentration had greater impact than body weight and inhalation rate on the ILCR. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Risk of intracranial hemorrhage and cerebrovascular accidents in non-small cell lung cancer brain metastasis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Geetika; Rana, Vishal; Wallace, Suzy; Taylor, Sarah; Debnam, Matthew; Feng, Lei; Suki, Dima; Karp, Daniel; Stewart, David; Oh, Yun

    2009-03-01

    Brain metastases confer significant morbidity and a poorer survival in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted antiangiogenic therapies (AAT) have demonstrated benefit for patients with metastatic NSCLC and are expected to directly inhibit the pathophysiology and morbidity of brain metastases, yet patients with brain metastases have been excluded from most clinical trials of AAT for fear of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). The underlying risk of ICH from NSCLC brain metastases is low, but needs to be quantitated to plan clinical trials of AAT for NSCLC brain metastases. Data from MD Anderson Cancer Center Tumor Registry and electronic medical records from January 1998 to March 2006 was interrogated. Two thousand one hundred forty-three patients with metastatic NSCLC registering from January 1998 to September 2005 were followed till March 2006. Seven hundred seventy-six patients with and 1,367 patients without brain metastases were followed till death, date of ICH, or last date of study, whichever occurred first. The incidence of ICH seemed to be higher in those with brain metastasis compared with those without brain metastases, in whom they occurred as result of cerebrovascular accidents. However, the rates of symptomatic ICH were not significantly different. All ICH patients with brain metastasis had received radiation therapy for them and had been free of anticoagulation. Most of the brain metastasis-associated ICH's were asymptomatic, detected during increased radiologic surveillance. The rates of symptomatic ICH, or other cerebrovascular accidents in general were similar and not significantly different between the two groups. In metastatic NSCLC patients, the incidence of spontaneous ICH appeared to be higher in those with brain metastases compared with those without, but was very low in both groups without a statistically significant difference. These data suggest a minimal risk of clinically significant ICH for NSCLC

  17. The Risk of Schizophrenia and Child Psychiatric Disorders in Offspring of Mothers with Lung Cancer and Other Types of Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benros, Michael Eriksen; Laursen, Thomas Munk; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg

    2013-01-01

    neurodevelopmental disorders. Therefore, we investigated if children of mothers with cancer might be at higher risk of developing psychiatric disorders, with particular focus on small-cell lung cancer, which is known to induce production of antibodies binding to CNS elements.......Maternal immune responses and brain-reactive antibodies have been proposed as possible causal mechanisms for schizophrenia and some child psychiatric disorders. According to this hypothesis maternal antibodies may cross the placenta and interact with the developing CNS of the fetus causing future...

  18. Linking the generation of DNA adducts to lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceppi, Marcello; Munnia, Armelle; Cellai, Filippo; Bruzzone, Marco; Peluso, Marco E M

    2017-09-01

    Worldwide, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death. DNA adducts are considered a reliable biomarker that reflects carcinogen exposure to tobacco smoke, but the central question is what is the relationship of DNA adducts and cancer? Therefore, we investigated this relationship by a meta-analysis of twenty-two studies with bronchial adducts for a total of 1091 subjects, 887 lung cancer cases and 204 apparently healthy individuals with no evidence of lung cancer. Our study shows that these adducts are significantly associated to increase lung cancer risk. The value of Mean Ratiolung-cancer (MR) of bronchial adducts resulting from the random effects model was 2.64, 95% C.I. 2.00-3.50, in overall lung cancer cases as compared to controls. The significant difference, with lung cancer patients having significant higher levels of bronchial adducts than controls, persisted after stratification for smoking habits. The MRlung-cancer value between lung cancer patients and controls for smokers was 2.03, 95% C.I. 1.42-2.91, for ex-smokers 3.27, 95% C.I. 1.49-7.18, and for non-smokers was 3.81, 95% C.I. 1.85-7.85. Next, we found that the generation of bronchial adducts is significantly related to inhalation exposure to tobacco smoke carcinogens confirming its association with volatile carcinogens. The MRsmoking estimate of bronchial adducts resulting from meta-regression was 2.28, 95% Confidence Interval (C.I.) 1.10-4.73, in overall smokers in respect to non-smokers. The present work provides strengthening of the hypothesis that bronchial adducts are not simply relate to exposure, but are a cause of chemical-induced lung cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Evolutionary selected Tibetan variants of HIF pathway and risk of lung cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Láníková, Lucie; Reading, N. S.; Hu, H.; Tashi, T.; Burjanivova, T.; Shestakova, A.; Siwakoti, B.; Thakur, B.K.; Pun, C.B.; Sapkota, A.; Abdelaziz, S.; Feng, B.J.; Huff, C.D.; Hashibe, M.; Prchal, J.T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 7 (2017), s. 11739-11747 ISSN 1949-2553 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ15-18046Y; GA MŠk(CZ) LH15223 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : hypoxia * ENGL1/HD2 * EPAS1/HIF-2a * high-altitude adaptation * lung cancer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.168, year: 2016

  20. The functional polymorphism of NBS1 p.Glu185Gln is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer in Chinese populations: Case–control and a meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Wenxiang; Qiu, Fuman; Zhang, Lisha [The State Key Lab of Respiratory Disease, The Institute for Chemical Carcinogenesis, Collaborative Innovation Center for Environmental Toxicity, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China); Deng, Jieqiong [Soochow University Laboratory of Cancer Molecular Genetics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Environmental Toxicity, Medical College of Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zhang, Haibo [Department of Cardio-thoracic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Yang, Lei [The State Key Lab of Respiratory Disease, The Institute for Chemical Carcinogenesis, Collaborative Innovation Center for Environmental Toxicity, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China); Zhou, Yifeng [Soochow University Laboratory of Cancer Molecular Genetics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Environmental Toxicity, Medical College of Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Lu, Jiachun, E-mail: jcLu@gzhmu.edu.cn [The State Key Lab of Respiratory Disease, The Institute for Chemical Carcinogenesis, Collaborative Innovation Center for Environmental Toxicity, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • NBS1 rs1805794G>C polymorphism conferred an adverse role on lung cancer risk in a two centers case–control study. • Rs1805794C variants had more chromatid breaks and higher DNA damage induced by X-ray radiation. • Meta analysis result confirmed the association between the variant rs1805794G>C and lung cancer risk. - Abstract: NBS1 plays pivotal roles in maintaining genomic stability and cancer development. The exon variant rs1805794G>C (p.Glu185Gln) of NBS1 has been frequently studied in several association studies. However, the results were conflicting. Also, the function of this variant has never been well studied. In the current study, we performed a two centers case–control study and function assays to investigate the effect of the variant rs1805794G>C on lung cancer risk in Chinese, and a meta-analysis to summarize the data on the association between rs1805794G>C and cancer risk. We found that compared with the rs1805794GG genotype, the C genotypes (CG/CC) conferred a significantly increased risk of lung cancer in Chinese (OR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.21–1.62) and interacted with medical ionizing radiation exposure on increasing cancer risk (P{sub interaction} = 0.015). The lymphocyte cells from the C genotype individuals developed more chromatid breaks than those from the GG genotype carriers after the X-ray radiation (P = 0.036). Moreover, the rs1805794C allele encoding p.185Gln attenuated NBS1's ability to repair DNA damage as the cell lines transfected with NBS1 cDNA expression vector carrying rs1805794C allele had significantly higher DNA breaks than those transfected with NBS1 cDNA expression vector carrying rs1805794G allele (P < 0.05). The meta-analysis further confirmed the association between the variant rs1805794G>C and lung cancer risk, that compared with the GG genotype, the carriers of C genotypes had a 1.30-fold risk of cancer (95% CI = 1.14–1.49, P = 8.49 × 10{sup −5}). These findings suggest that the rs1805794G

  1. Consumption of tea and coffee and the risk of lung cancer in cigarette-smoking men: a case-control study in Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendilaharsu, M; De Stefani, E; Deneo-Pellegrini, H; Carzoglio, J C; Ronco, A

    1998-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of drinking tea or coffee on the lung cancer risk of male cigarette smokers in a case-control in Uruguay. Four hundred and twenty-seven lung cancer cases were frequency matched on age and residence with 428 hospitalized controls suffering from conditions unrelated to tobacco smoking and diet. Whereas coffee drinking had no effect on the lung cancer risk of the cigarette-smoking men in this study, black tea consumption decreased this risk. Heavy drinkers of tea (two or more cups of tea per day) were associated with a reduced risk of 0.34 (95% CI 0.14-0.84). This protective effect was more evident among Kreyberg I tumors (squamous cell and small cell) and among light smokers. Possible sources of bias and mechanisms of action are discussed.

  2. A Systematic Review and Meta-Regression Analysis of Lung Cancer Risk and Inorganic Arsenic in Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Steven H.; Ferdosi, Hamid; Dissen, Elisabeth K.; Li, Ji; Ahn, Jaeil

    2015-01-01

    High levels (> 200 µg/L) of inorganic arsenic in drinking water are known to be a cause of human lung cancer, but the evidence at lower levels is uncertain. We have sought the epidemiological studies that have examined the dose-response relationship between arsenic levels in drinking water and the risk of lung cancer over a range that includes both high and low levels of arsenic. Regression analysis, based on six studies identified from an electronic search, examined the relationship between the log of the relative risk and the log of the arsenic exposure over a range of 1–1000 µg/L. The best-fitting continuous meta-regression model was sought and found to be a no-constant linear-quadratic analysis where both the risk and the exposure had been logarithmically transformed. This yielded both a statistically significant positive coefficient for the quadratic term and a statistically significant negative coefficient for the linear term. Sub-analyses by study design yielded results that were similar for both ecological studies and non-ecological studies. Statistically significant X-intercepts consistently found no increased level of risk at approximately 100–150 µg/L arsenic. PMID:26690190

  3. A structural equation modelling approach to explore the role of B vitamins and immune markers in lung cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltar, Valéria Troncoso; Xun, Wei W; Johansson, Mattias; Ferrari, Pietro; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Relton, Caroline; Ueland, Per Magne; Midttun, Øivind; Slimani, Nadia; Jenab, Mazda; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Fagherazzi, Guy; Kaaks, Rudolf; Rohrmann, Sabine; Boeing, Heiner; Weikert, Cornelia; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Boshuizen, Hendriek; van Gils, Carla H; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Agudo, Antonio; Barricarte, Aurelio; Navarro, Carmen; Rodríguez, Laudina; Castaño, José Maria Huerta; Larrañaga, Nerea; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Allen, Naomi E; Crowe, Francesca; Gallo, Valentina; Norat, Teresa; Krogh, Vittorio; Masala, Giovanna; Panico, Salvatore; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Tumino, Rosario; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Rasmuson, Torgny; Hallmans, Göran; Roswall, Nina; Tjønneland, Anne; Riboli, Elio; Brennan, Paul; Vineis, Paolo

    2013-08-01

    The one-carbon metabolism (OCM) is considered key in maintaining DNA integrity and regulating gene expression, and may be involved in the process of carcinogenesis. Several B-vitamins and amino acids have been implicated in lung cancer risk, via the OCM directly as well as immune system activation. However it is unclear whether these factors act independently or through complex mechanisms. The current study applies structural equations modelling (SEM) to further disentangle the mechanisms involved in lung carcinogenesis. SEM allows simultaneous estimation of linear relations where a variable can be the outcome in one equation and the predictor in another, as well as allowing estimation using latent variables (factors estimated by correlation matrix). A large number of biomarkers have been analysed from 891 lung cancer cases and 1,747 controls nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Four putative mechanisms in the OCM and immunity were investigated in relation to lung cancer risk: methionine-homocysteine metabolism, folate cycle, transsulfuration, and mechanisms involved in inflammation and immune activation, all adjusted for tobacco exposure. The hypothesized SEM model confirmed a direct and protective effect for factors representing methionine-homocysteine metabolism (p = 0.020) and immune activation (p = 0.021), and an indirect protective effect of folate cycle (p = 0.019), after adjustment for tobacco smoking. In conclusion, our results show that in the investigation of the involvement of the OCM, the folate cycle and immune system in lung carcinogenesis, it is important to consider complex pathways (by applying SEM) rather than the effects of single vitamins or nutrients (e.g. using traditional multiple regression). In our study SEM were able to suggest a greater role of the methionine-homocysteine metabolism and immune activation over other potential mechanisms.

  4. The risk of schizophrenia and child psychiatric disorders in offspring of mothers with lung cancer and other types of cancer: a Danish nationwide register study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Eriksen Benros

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Maternal immune responses and brain-reactive antibodies have been proposed as possible causal mechanisms for schizophrenia and some child psychiatric disorders. According to this hypothesis maternal antibodies may cross the placenta and interact with the developing CNS of the fetus causing future neurodevelopmental disorders. Therefore, we investigated if children of mothers with cancer might be at higher risk of developing psychiatric disorders, with particular focus on small-cell lung cancer, which is known to induce production of antibodies binding to CNS elements. METHODS: Nationwide population-based registers were linked, including the Danish Psychiatric Central Register and The Danish Cancer Registry. Data were analyzed as a cohort study using survival analysis techniques. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs and accompanying 95% confidence intervals (CIs were used as measures of relative risk. RESULTS: In general, parental cancer was not associated with schizophrenia in the offspring (IRR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.95-1.01. Furthermore, we found no temporal associations with maternal cancer in general; neither around the pregnancy period. However, maternal small-cell lung cancer increased the risk of early-onset schizophrenia and maternal small-cell lung cancer diagnosed within 20 years after childbirth increased the risk of schizophrenia. Parental cancer was not associated with child psychiatric disorders (IRR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.98-1.05 except for the smoking related cancers. There was a significantly increased risk of child psychiatric disorders in offspring of both mothers (IRR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.16-1.58 and fathers (IRR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.30-1.66 with lung cancer of all types. CONCLUSIONS: In general, parental cancer did not increase the risk of schizophrenia nor of child psychiatric disorders. However, maternal small-cell lung cancer increased the risk of schizophrenia in subgroups; and lung cancer in general increased the risk of child

  5. The Risk of Schizophrenia and Child Psychiatric Disorders in Offspring of Mothers with Lung Cancer and Other Types of Cancer: A Danish Nationwide Register Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benros, Michael Eriksen; Laursen, Thomas Munk; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Nordentoft, Merete; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2013-01-01

    Background Maternal immune responses and brain-reactive antibodies have been proposed as possible causal mechanisms for schizophrenia and some child psychiatric disorders. According to this hypothesis maternal antibodies may cross the placenta and interact with the developing CNS of the fetus causing future neurodevelopmental disorders. Therefore, we investigated if children of mothers with cancer might be at higher risk of developing psychiatric disorders, with particular focus on small-cell lung cancer, which is known to induce production of antibodies binding to CNS elements. Methods Nationwide population-based registers were linked, including the Danish Psychiatric Central Register and The Danish Cancer Registry. Data were analyzed as a cohort study using survival analysis techniques. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and accompanying 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used as measures of relative risk. Results In general, parental cancer was not associated with schizophrenia in the offspring (IRR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.95-1.01). Furthermore, we found no temporal associations with maternal cancer in general; neither around the pregnancy period. However, maternal small-cell lung cancer increased the risk of early-onset schizophrenia and maternal small-cell lung cancer diagnosed within 20 years after childbirth increased the risk of schizophrenia. Parental cancer was not associated with child psychiatric disorders (IRR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.98-1.05) except for the smoking related cancers. There was a significantly increased risk of child psychiatric disorders in offspring of both mothers (IRR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.16-1.58) and fathers (IRR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.30-1.66) with lung cancer of all types. Conclusions In general, parental cancer did not increase the risk of schizophrenia nor of child psychiatric disorders. However, maternal small-cell lung cancer increased the risk of schizophrenia in subgroups; and lung cancer in general increased the risk of child psychiatric disorders

  6. The risk of schizophrenia and child psychiatric disorders in offspring of mothers with lung cancer and other types of cancer: a Danish nationwide register study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benros, Michael Eriksen; Laursen, Thomas Munk; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Nordentoft, Merete; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2013-01-01

    Maternal immune responses and brain-reactive antibodies have been proposed as possible causal mechanisms for schizophrenia and some child psychiatric disorders. According to this hypothesis maternal antibodies may cross the placenta and interact with the developing CNS of the fetus causing future neurodevelopmental disorders. Therefore, we investigated if children of mothers with cancer might be at higher risk of developing psychiatric disorders, with particular focus on small-cell lung cancer, which is known to induce production of antibodies binding to CNS elements. Nationwide population-based registers were linked, including the Danish Psychiatric Central Register and The Danish Cancer Registry. Data were analyzed as a cohort study using survival analysis techniques. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and accompanying 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used as measures of relative risk. In general, parental cancer was not associated with schizophrenia in the offspring (IRR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.95-1.01). Furthermore, we found no temporal associations with maternal cancer in general; neither around the pregnancy period. However, maternal small-cell lung cancer increased the risk of early-onset schizophrenia and maternal small-cell lung cancer diagnosed within 20 years after childbirth increased the risk of schizophrenia. Parental cancer was not associated with child psychiatric disorders (IRR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.98-1.05) except for the smoking related cancers. There was a significantly increased risk of child psychiatric disorders in offspring of both mothers (IRR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.16-1.58) and fathers (IRR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.30-1.66) with lung cancer of all types. In general, parental cancer did not increase the risk of schizophrenia nor of child psychiatric disorders. However, maternal small-cell lung cancer increased the risk of schizophrenia in subgroups; and lung cancer in general increased the risk of child psychiatric disorders, which could be due to risk factors

  7. Radiation-induced heart disease in lung cancer radiotherapy: A dosimetric update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Yang, Chengwen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ping; Deng, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD), which affects the patients' prognosis with both acute and late side effects, has been published extensively in the radiotherapy of breast cancer, lymphoma and other benign diseases. Studies on RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy, however, are less extensive and clear even though the patients with lung cancer are delivered with higher doses to the heart during radiation treatment. In this article, after extensive literature search and analysis, we reviewed the current evidence on RIHD in lung cancer patients after their radiation treatments and investigated the potential risk factors for RIHD as compared to other types of cancers. Cardiac toxicity has been found highly relevant in lung cancer radiotherapy. So far, the crude incidence of cardiac complications in the lung cancer patients after radiotherapy has been up to 33%. The dose to the heart, the lobar location of tumor, the treatment modality, the history of heart and pulmonary disease and smoking were considered as potential risk factors for RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy. As treatment techniques improve over the time with better prognosis for lung cancer survivors, an improved prediction model can be established to further reduce the cardiac toxicity in lung cancer radiotherapy.

  8. Prevalence of and risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications after lung cancer surgery in patients with early-stage COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Sun; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Chang Hyun; Park, In Kyu; Bae, Won; Choi, Sun Mi; Lee, Jinwoo; Park, Young Sik; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Min; Yim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Yoo, Chul-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether the prevalence of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is even higher in the early stages of COPD than in such patients with normal lung function and to verify the usefulness of symptom- or quality of life (QoL)-based scores in predicting risk for PPCs. Patients undergoing pulmonary resection for NSCLC between July 2012 and October 2014 were prospectively enrolled. Preoperative measurements of lung function, dyspnea, and QoL, operative characteristics, PPCs, duration of postoperative hospitalization, and in-hospital mortality were assessed. Among 351 consecutive patients with NSCLC, 343 patients with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) ≥70% of predicted value were enrolled. At least one PPC occurred in 57 (16.6%) patients. Prevalence of PPC was higher in patients with COPD (30.1%) than in those with normal spirometry (10.0%; Pprevalence of PPC was not different in patients with FEV1 ≥70% compared to those with FEV1 chronic Obstructive Lung Disease 2011 guidelines. In patients with COPD, body mass index (odds ratio [OR]: 0.80, P=0.007), carbon monoxide diffusing capacity of the lung (DLCO), % predicted value (OR: 0.97, P=0.024), and operation time (OR: 1.01, P=0.003), but not COPD assessment test or St George Respiratory Questionnaire scores, were significantly associated with PPCs. Even in patients with early-stage COPD, the prevalence of PPCs is higher than in patients with NSCLC with normal spirometry. However, this rate is not different between group A and group B patients with COPD. In accordance with this, scores based on symptoms or QoL are not predictors of risk of PPCs in patients with early-stage COPD.

  9. Occupational radon exposure and lung cancer mortality: estimating intervention effects using the parametric G formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jessie K.; McGrath, Leah J.; Buckley, Jessie P.; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K.; Cole, Stephen R.; Richardson, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditional regression analysis techniques used to estimate associations between occupational radon exposure and lung cancer focus on estimating the effect of cumulative radon exposure on lung cancer, while public health interventions are typically based on regulating radon concentration rather than workers’ cumulative exposure. Moreover, estimating the direct effect of cumulative occupational exposure on lung cancer may be difficult in situations vulnerable to the healthy worker survivor bias. Methods Workers in the Colorado Plateau Uranium Miners cohort (N=4,134) entered the study between 1950 and 1964 and were followed for lung cancer mortality through 2005. We use the parametric g-formula to compare the observed lung cancer mortality to the potential lung cancer mortality had each of 3 policies to limit monthly radon exposure been in place throughout follow-up. Results There were 617 lung cancer deaths over 135,275 person-years of follow-up. With no intervention on radon exposure, estimated lung cancer mortality by age 90 was 16%. Lung cancer mortality was reduced for all interventions considered, and larger reductions in lung cancer mortality were seen for interventions with lower monthly radon exposure limits. The most stringent guideline, the Mine Safety and Health Administration standard of 0.33 working level months, reduced lung cancer mortality from 16% to 10% (risk ratio 0.67; 95% confidence interval 0.61, 0.73). Conclusions This work illustrates the utility of the parametric g-formula for estimating the effects of policies regarding occupational exposures, particularly in situations vulnerable to the healthy worker survivor bias. PMID:25192403

  10. Evaluation of lung cancer risk from radon in homes. Smoking plays the important part; Bewertung des Lungenkrebsrisikos durch Wohnungsradon. Lungenkrebsrisiko ausschliesslich durch Rauchen verursacht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuettmann, W.

    1999-07-01

    Studies of lung cancer risk from the beginning of the century until today are investigated and evaluated. The result shows that the risk in homes with Radon exposure is determined exclusively by the amount of smoking. Further studies of the lung cancer risk from Radon therefore should exclusively treat with non-smokers. (orig.) [German] Studien zum Lungenkrebsrisiko durch Radon vom Anfang dieses Jahrhunderts bis heute werden untersucht und bewertet. Das Ergebnis zeigt, dass das Lungenkrebsrisiko in Wohnungen mit Radonexpositionen ausschliesslich durch den Umfang des Zigarettenrauchens bestimmt wird. Untersuchungen zur Bewertung des Lungenkrebsrisikos durch Radon sollten daher ausschliesslich bei Nichtrauchern durchgefuehrt werden. (orig.)

  11. NQO1 T allele associated with decreased risk of later age at diagnosis lung cancer among never smokers: results from a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, C H; Wenzlaff, A S; Cote, M L; Land, S J; Schwartz, A G

    2005-02-01

    The NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 gene, NQO1, contains a C to T transition at amino acid codon 187, which results in very low enzymatic activity. Previous studies of the association between NQO1 genotype and lung cancer have had mixed findings. This population-based case control study examines the association between NQO1 genotype and lung cancer in the largest sample of never smokers (/=50 years, C/T and T/T genotyped individuals had 0.48 times lower lung cancer risk than individuals with C/C genotype (95% CI: 0.27-0.87). There was a non-significant suggestion of a protective effect associated with the T allele among those with a history of environmental tobacco smoke exposure (OR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.32-1.03) but not among those without (OR = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.41-2.38). Sex, race, family history of lung cancer and histologic type did not modify the effect of NQO1 genotype on lung cancer risk. The observed risk reductions may be attributable to the greatly reduced procarcinogen activating of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 in individuals with at least one copy of the T allele.

  12. Clustering of multi-parametric functional imaging to identify high-risk subvolumes in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, Aniek J G; Reymen, Bart; La Fontaine, Matthew D; Das, Marco; Mottaghy, Felix M; Belderbos, José S A; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Lambin, Philippe; van Elmpt, Wouter

    2017-12-01

    We aimed to identify tumour subregions with characteristic phenotypes based on pre-treatment multi-parametric functional imaging and correlate these subregions to treatment outcome. The subregions were created using imaging of metabolic activity (FDG-PET/CT), hypoxia (HX4-PET/CT) and tumour vasculature (DCE-CT). 36 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients underwent functional imaging prior to radical radiotherapy. Kinetic analysis was performed on DCE-CT scans to acquire blood flow (BF) and volume (BV) maps. HX4-PET/CT and DCE-CT scans were non-rigidly co-registered to the planning FDG-PET/CT. Two clustering steps were performed on multi-parametric images: first to segment each tumour into homogeneous subregions (i.e. supervoxels) and second to group the supervoxels of all tumours into phenotypic clusters. Patients were split based on the absolute or relative volume of supervoxels in each cluster; overall survival was compared using a log-rank test. Unsupervised clustering of supervoxels yielded four independent clusters. One cluster (high hypoxia, high FDG, intermediate BF/BV) related to a high-risk tumour type: patients assigned to this cluster had significantly worse survival compared to patients not in this cluster (p = 0.035). We designed a subregional analysis for multi-parametric imaging in NSCLC, and showed the potential of subregion classification as a biomarker for prognosis. This methodology allows for a comprehensive data-driven analysis of multi-parametric functional images. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Variety in fruit and vegetable consumption and the risk of lung cancer in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchner, Frederike L; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Ros, Martine M; Overvad, Kim; Dahm, Christina C; Hansen, Louise; Tjønneland, Anne; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Touillaud, Marina; Kaaks, Rudolf; Rohrmann, Sabine; Boeing, Heiner; Nöthlings, Ute; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Zylis, Dimosthenis; Dilis, Vardis; Palli, Domenico; Sieri, Sabina; Vineis, Paolo; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Peeters, Petra H M; van Gils, Carla H; Lund, Eiliv; Gram, Inger T; Braaten, Tonje; Sánchez, María-José; Agudo, Antonio; Larrañaga, Nerea; Ardanaz, Eva; Navarro, Carmen; Argüelles, Marcial V; Manjer, Jonas; Wirfält, Elisabet; Hallmans, Göran; Rasmuson, Torgny; Key, Tim J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Slimani, Nadia; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Xun, Wei W; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; Riboli, Elio

    2010-09-01

    We investigated whether a varied consumption of vegetables and fruits is associated with lower lung cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. After a mean follow-up of 8.7 years, 1,613 of 452,187 participants with complete information were diagnosed with lung cancer. Diet diversity scores (DDS) were used to quantify the variety in fruit and vegetable consumption. Multivariable proportional hazards models were used to assess the associations between DDS and lung cancer risk. All models were adjusted for smoking behavior and the total consumption of fruit and vegetables. With increasing variety in vegetable subgroups, risk of lung cancer decreases [hazard ratios (HR), 0.77; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.64-0.94 highest versus lowest quartile; P trend = 0.02]. This inverse association is restricted to current smokers (HR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.57-0.93 highest versus lowest quartile; P trend = 0.03). In continuous analyses, in current smokers, lower risks were observed for squamous cell carcinomas with more variety in fruit and vegetable products combined (HR/two products, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.82-0.95), vegetable subgroups (HR/subgroup, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.79-0.97), vegetable products (HR/two products, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.79-0.96), and fruit products (HR/two products, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.72-0.97). Variety in vegetable consumption was inversely associated with lung cancer risk among current smokers. Risk of squamous cell carcinomas was reduced with increasing variety in fruit and/or vegetable consumption, which was mainly driven by the effect in current smokers. Independent from quantity of consumption, variety in fruit and vegetable consumption may decrease lung cancer risk. (c)2010 AACR.

  14. Estimated radiation pneumonitis risk after photon versus proton therapy alone or combined with chemotherapy for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogelius, Ivan R.; Aznar, Marianne C. (Radiation Medicine Research Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital (Denmark)), e-mail: vogelius@gmail.com; Westerly, David C.; Cannon, George M.; Mackie, Thomas R.; Bentzen, Soeren M. (Dept. of Human Oncology, Univ. of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison (United States)); Korreman, Stine S. (Radiation Medicine Research Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital (Denmark); Dept. of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde Univ., Roskilde (Denmark)); Mehta, Minesh P. (Northwestern Univ., Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago (United States))

    2011-08-15

    Background. Traditionally, radiation therapy plans are optimized without consideration of chemotherapy. Here, we model the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in the presence of a possible interaction between chemotherapy and radiation dose distribution. Material and methods. Three alternative treatment plans are compared in 18 non-small cell lung cancer patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy; the tomotherapy plan, an intensity modulated proton therapy plan (IMPT) and a three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan. All plans are optimized without consideration of the chemotherapy effect. The effect of chemotherapy is modeled as an independent cell killing process using a uniform chemotherapy equivalent radiation dose (CERD) added to the entire organ at risk. We estimate the risk of grade 3 or higher RP (G3RP) using the critical volume model. Results. The mean risk of clinical G3RP at zero CERD is 5% for tomotherapy (range: 1-18 %) and 14% for 3D-CRT (range 2-49%). When the CERD exceeds 9 Gy, however, the risk of RP with the tomotherapy plans become higher than the 3D-CRT plans. The IMPT plans are less toxic both at zero CERD (mean 2%, range 1-5%) and at CERD = 10 Gy (mean 7%, range 1-28%). Tomotherapy yields a lower risk of RP than 3D-CRT for 17/18 patients at zero CERD, but only for 7/18 patients at CERD = 10 Gy. IMPT gives the lowest risk of all plans for 17/18 patients at zero CERD and for all patients with CERD = 10 Gy. Conclusions. The low dose bath from highly conformal photon techniques may become relevant for lung toxicity when radiation is combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy as shown here. Proton therapy allows highly conformal delivery while minimizing the low dose bath potentially interacting with chemotherapy. Thus, intensive drug-radiation combinations could be an interesting indication for selecting patients for proton therapy. It is likely that the IMRT plans would perform better if the CERD was accounted for during

  15. GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 polymorphisms, environmental tobacco smoke exposure and risk of lung cancer among never smokers: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzlaff, A S; Cote, M L; Bock, C H; Land, S J; Schwartz, A G

    2005-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferases detoxify polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons found in tobacco smoke by glutathione conjugation. Polymorphisms within the GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 genes, coding for enzymes with deficient or reduced activity, have been studied as potential modifiers of lung cancer risk. It is hypothesized that risk associated with potential susceptibility gene polymorphisms might be most evident at low levels of exposure. Never smokers developing lung cancer represent a highly susceptible subset of the population, exposed to tobacco carcinogens only through environmental tobacco smoke. This population-based case-control study examines the association between GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 genotypes and lung cancer in one of the largest samples of never smokers to date. Cases (n = 166) were identified through the metropolitan Detroit Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program and age- and race-matched population-based controls (n = 181) were identified using random digit dialing. Overall, there was no significant association between single or combinations of genotypes at GSTM1, GSTT1 or GSTP1 and lung cancer risk after adjustment for age, race, sex and household ETS exposure in years. However, in never smokers exposed to 20 or more years of household ETS, carrying the GSTM1 null genotype was associated with a 2.3-fold increase in risk [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-5.13]. Individuals in this high ETS exposure category carrying the GSTM1 null and the GSTP1 Val allele were at over 4-fold increased risk of developing lung cancer (OR = 4.56, 95% CI: 1.21-17.21). These findings suggest that in the presence of ETS, the GSTM1 genotype both alone and in combination with the GSTP1 genotype alters the risk of developing lung cancer among never smokers.

  16. A Cross-sectional Investigation on Risk Factors of Lung Cancer for Residents over 40 Years Old in Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojiang CHEN

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective In the previous studies, we have designed the Self-evaluation Scoring Questionnaire for High-risk Individuals of Lung Cancer. In order to make a better understanding of the status of risk factors of lung cancer for residents in Chengdu, we carried out the investigation from June 2009 to December 2009. Methods With the stratified random sampling method, eligible residents were included and their risk factors of lung cancer were collected with the Self-evaluation Scoring Questionnaire for High-risk Individuals of Lung Cancer. Results According to the criteria of the questionnaire, 21.34% of the population were at high risk of lung cancer. The smoking rate for male was 48.58%, higher than that of 2.65% for female. About 5.39% of male smokers began smoking before 15 years old. The average daily tobacco consumption in the most population was less than 20 pieces, with a duration between 20 to 40 years. However, there were 11.34% of all women suffered from passive smoking, and another 15.30% and 5.86% of residents were exposed to cooking fumes, minerals or asbestos. As for the previous illness history, 0.77%-18.08% of individuals have connective tissue diseases, pulmonary tuberculosis, emphysema and others. Finally, 4.91% of residents endured the long-term mental depression, and 7.24% had a positive family history of tumors. Conclusion The status of risk factors for lung cancer among residents in Chengdu was not optimistic. It should be paid more attention to tobacco control and environmental improvement to improve people's health.

  17. Genome-wide gene-asbestos exposure interaction association study identifies a common susceptibility variant on 22q13.31 associated with lung cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-yu; Stücker, Isabelle; Chen, Chu; Goodman, Gary; McHugh, Michelle K.; D’Amelio, Anthony M.; Etzel, Carol J.; Li, Su; Lin, Xihong; Christiani, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Occupational asbestos exposure has been found to increase lung cancer risk in epidemiological studies. Methods We conducted an asbestos exposure-gene interaction analyses among several Caucasian populations who were current or ex-smokers. The discovery phase included 833 Caucasian cases and 739 Caucasian controls, and used a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with gene-asbestos interaction effects. The top ranked SNPs from the discovery phase were replicated within the International Lung and Cancer Consortium (ILCCO). First, in silico replication was conducted in those groups that had GWAS and asbestos exposure data, including 1,548 cases and 1,527 controls. This step was followed by de novo genotyping to replicate the results from the in silico replication, and included 1,539 cases and 1,761 controls. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess the SNP-asbestos exposure interaction effects on lung cancer risk. Results We observed significantly increased lung cancer risk among MIRLET7BHG (MIRLET7B host gene located at 22q13.31) polymorphisms rs13053856, rs11090910, rs11703832, and rs12170325 heterozygous and homozygous variant allele(s) carriers [pasbestos exposure score was associated with age-, sex-, smoking status- and center-adjusted ORs of 1.34 (95%CI=1.18–1.51), 1.24 (95%CI=1.14–1.35), 1.28 (95%CI=1.17–1.40), and 1.26 (95%CI=1.15–1.38), respectively for lung cancer risk. Conclusion Our findings suggest that MIRLET7BHG polymorphisms may be important predictive markers for asbestos exposure-related lung cancer. Impact To our knowledge, our study is the first report using a systematic genome-wide analysis in combination with detailed asbestos exposure data and replication to evaluate asbestos-associated lung cancer risk. PMID:26199339

  18. Whole-exome sequencing reveals genetic variability among lung cancer cases subphenotyped for emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Christine M; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Dyson, Greg; Purrington, Kristen S; Watza, Donovan; Land, Susan; Soubani, Ayman O; Gadgeel, Shirish M; Schwartz, Ann G

    2016-02-01

    Lung cancer continues to be a major public health challenge in the United States despite efforts to decrease the prevalence of smoking; outcomes are especially poor for African-American patients compared to other races/ethnicities. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) co-occurs with lung cancer frequently, but not always, suggesting both shared and distinct risk factors for these two diseases. To identify germline genetic variation that distinguishes between lung cancer in the presence and absence of emphysema, we performed whole-exome sequencing on 46 African-American lung cancer cases (23 with and 23 without emphysema frequency matched on age, sex, histology and pack years). Using conditional logistic regression, we found 6305 variants (of 168 150 varying sites) significantly associated with lung cancer subphenotype (P ≤ 0.05). Next, we validated 10 of these variants in an independent set of 612 lung cancer cases (267 with emphysema and 345 without emphysema) from the same population of inference as the sequenced cases. We found one variant that was significantly associated with lung cancer subphenotype in the validation sample. These findings contribute to teasing apart shared genetic factors from independent genetic factors for lung cancer and COPD. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is almost always due to smoking. TREATING LUNG CANCER Lung cancer treatment depends on several factors, including the ... org TARGETING CANCER CARE Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in ...

  20. Comparative Proteomics Study on Human High-metastatic Large Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines Before and After Transfecting with nm23-H1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei GAO

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective As a tumor metastasis suppressor gene, the functions of nm23-H1 gene are still unclear. The aim of this study is to better understand the mechanism of lung cancer metastasis and to find new biomarkers for early diagnosis and new target for therapy by conducting comparative proteomics between the human high-metastatic large cell lung cancer cell lines (L9981 and L9981-nm23-H1 (constructed with transfecting nm23-H1 gene into the L9981 cell line. Methods The total proteins of L9981 and L9981-nm23-H1 were separated by immobilized pH gradient (IPG-based 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE; the significantly differently expressed proteins were examined by mass spectrometry and analyzed by bioinformatics. Results It was observed that nm23-H1 gene transfection caused remarkable changes of the proteome of L9981 compared with L9981-nm23-H1 cells: 5 proteins were deleted, 9 proteins appeared, 16 proteins downregulated, and 12 proteins up-regulated. These proteins are involved in cell framework, signal transduction, metabolism, proliferation and metastasis. Conclusion After nm23-H1 gene is transfected into L9981, proteome in L9981 is remarkably changed. These changes of the proteome could serve as a basis for reversing the invasive and metastatic phenotype in lung cancer and elucidating the machanisms of the metastasis of lung cancer.

  1. DNA methylation changes measured in pre-diagnostic peripheral blood samples are associated with smoking and lung cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglietto, Laura; Ponzi, Erica; Haycock, Philip; Hodge, Allison; Bianca Assumma, Manuela; Jung, Chol-Hee; Chung, Jessica; Fasanelli, Francesca; Guida, Florence; Campanella, Gianluca; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Grankvist, Kjell; Johansson, Mikael; Ala, Ugo; Provero, Paolo; Wong, Ee Ming; Joo, Jihoon; English, Dallas R; Kazmi, Nabila; Lund, Eiliv; Faltus, Christian; Kaaks, Rudolf; Risch, Angela; Barrdahl, Myrto; Sandanger, Torkjel M; Southey, Melissa C; Giles, Graham G; Johansson, Mattias; Vineis, Paolo; Polidoro, Silvia; Relton, Caroline L; Severi, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation changes are associated with cigarette smoking. We used the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 array to determine whether methylation in DNA from pre-diagnostic, peripheral blood samples is associated with lung cancer risk. We used a case-control study nested within the EPIC-Italy cohort and a study within the MCCS cohort as discovery sets (a total of 552 case-control pairs). We validated the top signals in 429 case-control pairs from another 3 studies. We identified six CpGs for which hypomethylation was associated with lung cancer risk: cg05575921 in the AHRR gene (p-valuepooled  = 4 × 10-17 ), cg03636183 in the F2RL3 gene (p-valuepooled  = 2 × 10 - 13 ), cg21566642 and cg05951221 in 2q37.1 (p-valuepooled  = 7 × 10-16 and 1 × 10-11 respectively), cg06126421 in 6p21.33 (p-valuepooled  = 2 × 10-15 ) and cg23387569 in 12q14.1 (p-valuepooled  = 5 × 10-7 ). For cg05951221 and cg23387569 the strength of association was virtually identical in never and current smokers. For all these CpGs except for cg23387569, the methylation levels were different across smoking categories in controls (p-valuesheterogeneity  ≤ 1.8 x10 - 7 ), were lowest for current smokers and increased with time since quitting for former smokers. We observed a gain in discrimination between cases and controls measured by the area under the ROC curve of at least 8% (p-values ≥ 0.003) in former smokers by adding methylation at the 6 CpGs into risk prediction models including smoking status and number of pack-years. Our findings provide convincing evidence that smoking and possibly other factors lead to DNA methylation changes measurable in peripheral blood that may improve prediction of lung cancer risk. © 2016 UICC.

  2. A simple model for predicting lung cancer occurrence in a lung cancer screening program: The Pittsburgh Predictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David O; Weissfeld, Joel

    2015-07-01

    A user-friendly method for assessing lung cancer risk may help standardize selection of current and former smokers for screening. We evaluated a simple 4-factor model, the Pittsburgh Predictor, against two well-known, but more complicated models for predicting lung cancer risk. Trained against outcomes observed in the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), the Pittsburgh Predictor used four risk factors, duration of smoking, smoking status, smoking intensity, and age, to predict 6-year lung cancer incidence. After calibrating the Bach and PLCOM2012 models to outcomes observed in the low-dose computed tomography arm of the NLST, we compared model calibration, discrimination, and clinical usefulness (net benefit) in the NLST and Pittsburgh Lung Screening Study (PLuSS) populations. The Pittsburgh Predictor, Bach, and PLCOM2012 represented risk equally well, except for the tendency of PLCOM2012 to overestimate risk in subjects at highest risk. Relative to the Pittsburgh Predictor, Bach and PLCOM2012 increased the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve by 0.007-0.009 and 0.012-0.021 units, respectively, depending on study population. Across a clinically relevant span of 6-year lung cancer risk thresholds (0.01-0.05), Bach and PLCOM2012 increased net benefit by less than 0.1% in NLST and 0.3% in PLuSS. In exchange for a small reduction in prediction accuracy, a simpler lung cancer risk prediction model may facilitate standardized procedures for advising and selecting patients with respect to lung cancer screening. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Combination of IL-6, IL-10, and MCP-1 with traditional serum tumor markers in lung cancer diagnosis and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y W; Zhou, Z G; Wang, M; Dong, J Q; Du, K P; Li, S; Liu, Y L; Lv, P J; Gao, J B

    2016-11-03

    Early detection and treatment is critically important for lung cancer patients. Inflammatory mediators such as IL-6, IL-10, and MCP-1 participate in lung cancer regulation. CEA, CA125, and ProGRP are commonly used serum tumor markers for lung cancer. In this study, we assessed the sensitivity and specificity of CEA, CA125, and ProGRP when used in combination with IL-6, IL-10, and MCP in lung cancer diagnosis. Serum from three different groups (healthy controls, individuals with high risk for lung cancer, and lung cancer patients) was collected. Electrochemiluminescence was used to detect expressions of CEA, CA125, and ProGRP; ELISA was used to examine serum levels of IL-6, IL-10, and MCP-1. Specificity and sensitivity of single as well as combination markers in lung cancer diagnosis were determined. Results indicated that CEA, CA125, ProGRP, and MCP-1 were significantly up-regulated in lung cancer patients as compared to those in controls and high risk individuals. Higher IL-6 and IL-10 levels were observed in both lung cancer patients and high-risk individuals as compared to those in controls. Highest sensitivity (95.2%) in cancer diagnosis was achieved when all six markers were used. This was followed by a combination of IL-6, IL-10, CEA, CA125, and ProGRP (92.6%). The most sensitive (88.6%). Four-marker combination was composed of IL-6, CEA, CA125, and ProGRP. As the combined usage of CEA, CA125, ProGRP, IL-6, IL-10, and MCP-1 significantly improved sensitivity of lung cancer detection; this biomarker arrangement may be beneficial for early diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of lung cancer.

  4. acetyltransferases: Influence on Lung Cancer Susceptibility

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lung cancer remains a major health challenge in the world. It is the commonest cause of cancer mortality in men, it has been suggested that genetic susceptibility may contribute to the major risk factor, with increasing prevalence of smoking. Lung cancer has reached epidemic proportions in India. Recently indoor air ...

  5. Risk of Lung Cancer in Workers Exposed to Benzidine and/or Beta-Naphthylamine: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimiko Tomioka

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Benzidine (BZ and beta-naphthylamine (BNA have been classified as definite human carcinogens for bladder cancer by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. However, the epidemiological evidence for an association between exposure to BZ and/or BNA and lung cancer has been inconclusive. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the risk for lung cancer among workers exposed to BZ/BNA. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify studies that had reported occupational BZ/BNA exposure and the outcome of interest (lung cancer death and/or incidence. Meta-analyses were performed using random effects models to combine standardized mortality ratios (SMRs or standardized incidence ratios (SIRs. We identified 23 retrospective cohort studies including 1745 cases of lung cancer; only one study reported smoking-adjusted lung cancer risk. A significantly increased lung cancer risk (pooled SMR/SIR 1.28; 95% CI, 1.14–1.43 was observed by combining all studies, with significant heterogeneity among studies (I2 = 64.1%, P < 0.001. Effect estimates were higher for studies with direct BZ/BNA exposure (ie, dyestuff and manufacturing industries (pooled SMR/SIR 1.58; 95% CI, 1.31–1.89, and studies that identified BZ/BNA-associated bladder cancer with SMR/SIR ≥4.7 (pooled SMR/SIR 1.68; 95% CI, 1.35–2.09. Effect estimates were similar for studies with and without concomitant occupational exposure to chromium, asbestos, arsenic, or bis(chloromethyl ether. The cumulative meta-analysis showed that the evidence of association between occupational BZ/BNA exposure and lung cancer has been stable since 1995. Although the results of this meta-analysis have the potential for confounding by smoking and heterogeneity, our findings suggest that a finding of lung cancer following occupational BZ/BNA exposure should be considered to be a potential occupational disease.

  6. Population inhalation exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and associated lung cancer risk in Beijing region: Contributions of indoor and outdoor sources and exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Zhao, Bin

    2012-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are among the most toxic air pollutants in China. Efforts in assessing population inhalation exposure to PAHs, and its contribution to lung cancer risk for Chinese residents, have been limited due to insufficient data on measured indoor concentrations. A mass-balance model to predict indoor PAH concentrations was developed, along with estimated exposures and attributable lung cancer risks for residents in the Beijing region in 2006, with a 2-stage Monte Carlo simulation framework. The exposures and risks were split into three parts, based on the sources and places of exposure, to estimate the contributions of indoor and outdoor PAH sources and exposures, in order to better understand the source and place pattern of PAH exposure. PAHs bring considerable lung cancer risk to the population of Beijing region. The population attributable fraction (PAF) of lung cancer for Beijing's overall population is 2.99% [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.71%-4.26%]. Median contribution of indoor exposure to outdoor-originated PAHs (OUT-in) is 78% (CI: 73%-81%) in the overall population, for 97% (CI: 94%-99%) of whom OUT-in is the largest contributor. Rural residents are facing considerable exposure to indoor-originated PAHs (IN-in), which dominates the total exposure in 12% (CI: 2%-24%) of the rural population. This model framework could be used in quantitative comparison of different interventions on exposure to PAHs as well as other airborne pollutants.

  7. Polymorphisms associated with the risk of lung cancer in a healthy Mexican Mestizo population: application of the additive model for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Pérez-Morales

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in Mexico and worldwide. In the past decade, there has been an increase in the number of lung cancer cases in young people, which suggests an important role for genetic background in the etiology of this disease. In this study, we genetically characterized 16 polymorphisms in 12 low penetrance genes (AhR, CYP1A1, CYP2E1, EPHX1, GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTPI, XRCC1, ERCC2, MGMT, CCND1 and TP53 in 382 healthy Mexican Mestizos as the first step in elucidating the genetic structure of this population and identifying high risk individuals. All of the genotypes analyzed were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, but different degrees of linkage were observed for polymorphisms in the CYP1A1 and EPHX1 genes. The genetic variability of this population was distributed in six clusters that were defined based on their genetic characteristics. The use of a polygenic model to assess the additive effect of low penetrance risk alleles identified combinations of risk genotypes that could be useful in predicting a predisposition to lung cancer. Estimation of the level of genetic susceptibility showed that the individual calculated risk value (iCRV ranged from 1 to 16, with a higher iCRV indicating a greater genetic susceptibility to lung cancer.

  8. Morphological characteristics of potentially malignant pulmonary nodules in high-risk male smokers detected in lung cancer screening trial in Cracow, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiszka, K; Rudnicka-Sosin, L; Tomaszewska, R; Urbańczyk-Zawadzka, M; Krupiński, M; Pikul, P; Podsiadło, K; Pasowicz, M; Vliegenthart, R; Oudkerk, M; Miszalski-Jamka, T

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this paper was to present morphological characteristics of potentially malignant nodules revealed in a group of male smokers aged 50-74 with a very high risk for developing lung cancer estimated in the study for lung cancer screening in Cracow (Poland). Nine hundred male smokers aged 50 to 74 years were invited to the study and were asked in questionnaires about e.g. smoking exposure history. Exclusion criteria included e.g. positive cancer history and chest computed tomography (CT) examination in the previous year. Based on CT results and characteristics of pulmonary nodules subjects were classified to group A (low risk), group B (indeterminate) and group C (high-risk individuals - required work-up). Final diagnosis was based on pathological results of postoperative material. Thirty-nine males of mean age 63.4 (standard deviation (SD): 6.69 years) revealed 41 potentially malignant pulmonary nodules in baseline screening. In 14 subjects 16 type C pulmonary nodules were histologically proved. Nine nodules were found to be benign lesions, while 7 nodules revealed malignant lung cancer: 5 cases of adenocarcinoma and 2 cases of adenosquamous carcinoma. We determined morphological characteristics of potentially malignant pulmonary nodules in 39 high-risk male smokers and proved lung cancer in 7 subjects.

  9. Polymorphisms associated with the risk of lung cancer in a healthy Mexican Mestizo population: Application of the additive model for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Morales, Rebeca; Méndez-Ramírez, Ignacio; Castro-Hernández, Clementina; Martínez-Ramírez, Ollin C.; Gonsebatt, María Eugenia; Rubio, Julieta

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in Mexico and worldwide. In the past decade, there has been an increase in the number of lung cancer cases in young people, which suggests an important role for genetic background in the etiology of this disease. In this study, we genetically characterized 16 polymorphisms in 12 low penetrance genes (AhR, CYP1A1, CYP2E1, EPHX1, GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTPI, XRCC1, ERCC2, MGMT, CCND1 and TP53) in 382 healthy Mexican Mestizos as the first step in elucidating the genetic structure of this population and identifying high risk individuals. All of the genotypes analyzed were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, but different degrees of linkage were observed for polymorphisms in the CYP1A1 and EPHX1 genes. The genetic variability of this population was distributed in six clusters that were defined based on their genetic characteristics. The use of a polygenic model to assess the additive effect of low penetrance risk alleles identified combinations of risk genotypes that could be useful in predicting a predisposition to lung cancer. Estimation of the level of genetic susceptibility showed that the individual calculated risk value (iCRV) ranged from 1 to 16, with a higher iCRV indicating a greater genetic susceptibility to lung cancer. PMID:22215955

  10. Variety in fruit and vegetable consumption and the risk of lung cancer in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchner, F.L.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Ros, M.M.; Overvad, K.; Dahm, C.C.; Hansen, L.; Tjonneland, A.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Touillaud, M.; Kaaks, R.; Rohrmann, S.; Boeing, H.; Nothlings, U.; Trichopoulou, A.; Zylis, D.; Dilis, V.; Palli, D.; Sieri, S.; Vineis, P.; Tumino, R.; Panico, S.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Gils, C.H. van; Lund, E.; Gram, I.T.; Braaten, T.; Sanchez, M.J.; Agudo, A.; Larranaga, N.; Ardanaz, E.; Navarro, C.; Arguelles, M.V.; Manjer, J.; Wirfalt, E.; Hallmans, G.; Rasmuson, T.; Key, T.J.; Khaw, K.T.; Wareham, N.; Slimani, N.; Vergnaud, A.C.; Xun, W.W.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Riboli, E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We investigated whether a varied consumption of vegetables and fruits is associated with lower lung cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. METHODS: After a mean follow-up of 8.7 years, 1,613 of 452,187 participants with complete information

  11. Racial differences in the association between SNPs on 15q25.1, smoking behavior, and risk of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Ann G; Cote, Michele L; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Land, Susan; Amos, Christopher I

    2009-10-01

    Three genome-wide association studies identified a region on chromosome 15q25.1 associated with lung cancer and measures of nicotine addiction. This region includes nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit genes CHRNA3 and CHRNA5. These studies were conducted in European or European American populations and do not provide risk estimates for African Americans. The goal of this study was to determine whether recently identified genetic variation in 3 SNPs (rs1051730, rs931794, rs8034191) on chromosome 15q25.1 contributes to risk of lung cancer in African Americans. Data were derived from three case-control studies. Participants included 1058 population-based non-small cell lung cancer cases selected from the Detroit area SEER registry and 1314 controls matched within study by age, race, and sex. Thirty-nine percent of participants were African American. Risk associated with rs1051730 (odds ratio 1.59; 95% confidence interval 1.16-2.19) and rs931794 (odds ratio 1.39; 95% confidence interval 1.09-1.78) increased in ever smoking African Americans adjusting for cigarettes smoked per day. Among white cases, the number of cigarettes smoked varied by genotype at all three SNPs, and when smoking quantity was included in the models, risk was not significantly associated with any of the three SNPs. These findings suggest that SNPs in the CHRNA3 and CHRNA5 region contribute to lung cancer risk, and while variant alleles are less frequent in African Americans, risk in this group may be greater than in whites and less likely to reflect an indirect effect on lung cancer risk through nicotine dependence.

  12. A qualitative analysis of smokers' perceptions about lung cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressard, Lindsay; DeGroff, Amy S; Richards, Thomas B; Melillo, Stephanie; Kish-Doto, Julia; Heminger, Christina L; Rohan, Elizabeth A; Allen, Kristine Gabuten

    2017-06-21

    In 2013, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) began recommending lung cancer screening for high risk smokers aged 55-80 years using low-dose computed tomography (CT) scan. In light of these updated recommendations, there is a need to understand smokers' knowledge of and experiences with lung cancer screening in order to inform the design of patient education and tobacco cessation programs. The purpose of this study is to describe results of a qualitative study examining smokers' perceptions around lung cancer screening tests. In 2009, prior to the release of the updated USPSTF recommendations, we conducted 12 120-min, gender-specific focus groups with 105 current smokers in Charlotte, North Carolina and Cincinnati, Ohio. Focus group facilitators asked participants about their experience with three lung cancer screening tests, including CT scan, chest x-ray, and sputum cytology. Focus group transcripts were transcribed and qualitatively analyzed using constant comparative methods. Participants were 41-67 years-old, with a mean smoking history of 38.9 pack-years. Overall, 34.3% would meet the USPSTF's current eligibility criteria for screening. Most participants were unaware of all three lung cancer screening tests. The few participants who had been screened recalled limited information about the test. Nevertheless, many participants expressed a strong desire to pursue lung cancer screening. Using the social ecological model for health promotion, we identified potential barriers to lung cancer screening at the 1) health care system level (cost of procedure, confusion around results), 2) cultural level (fatalistic beliefs, distrust of medical system), and 3) individual level (lack of knowledge, denial of risk, concerns about the procedure). Although this study was conducted prior to the updated USPSTF recommendations, these findings provide a baseline for future studies examining smokers' perceptions of lung cancer screening. We recommend clear and patient

  13. A qualitative analysis of smokers’ perceptions about lung cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Gressard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2013, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF began recommending lung cancer screening for high risk smokers aged 55–80 years using low-dose computed tomography (CT scan. In light of these updated recommendations, there is a need to understand smokers’ knowledge of and experiences with lung cancer screening in order to inform the design of patient education and tobacco cessation programs. The purpose of this study is to describe results of a qualitative study examining smokers’ perceptions around lung cancer screening tests. Methods In 2009, prior to the release of the updated USPSTF recommendations, we conducted 12 120-min, gender-specific focus groups with 105 current smokers in Charlotte, North Carolina and Cincinnati, Ohio. Focus group facilitators asked participants about their experience with three lung cancer screening tests, including CT scan, chest x-ray, and sputum cytology. Focus group transcripts were transcribed and qualitatively analyzed using constant comparative methods. Results Participants were 41–67 years-old, with a mean smoking history of 38.9 pack-years. Overall, 34.3% would meet the USPSTF’s current eligibility criteria for screening. Most participants were unaware of all three lung cancer screening tests. The few participants who had been screened recalled limited information about the test. Nevertheless, many participants expressed a strong desire to pursue lung cancer screening. Using the social ecological model for health promotion, we identified potential barriers to lung cancer screening at the 1 health care system level (cost of procedure, confusion around results, 2 cultural level (fatalistic beliefs, distrust of medical system, and 3 individual level (lack of knowledge, denial of risk, concerns about the procedure. Although this study was conducted prior to the updated USPSTF recommendations, these findings provide a baseline for future studies examining smokers

  14. Early diagnosis of early stage lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Debeljak

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: For the detection of premalignant changes of bronchial mucosa and early stages of lung cancer frequent chest X-ray, spiral low dose computed tomography, fluorescence bronchoscopy, sputum cytology (also with automated systems with genetic and molecular changes in the sputum cells and bronchial mucosa were used. These screening methods of the high-risk groups for lung cancer achieved: earlier diagnosis of lung cancer in lower stage, higher operability, longer 5-year survival, but without mortality reduction.Conclusions: In the clinical practice we can examine higher risk groups for lung cancer in randomised control trials with multimodality approach: frequent chest low-dose fast spiral computed tomography, sputum cytology with genetic and molecular examinations and fluorescence bronchoscopy. Smoking cessation remains the best means to achieve mortality reduction from lung cancer.

  15. Risk of lung cancer by radon, disagreement in international regulation; Riesgo de cancer pulmonar por radon, discordancia en reglamentacion internacional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcazar, M.; Pena, P.; Villamares, A.; Avelar, J. R., E-mail: miguel.balcazar@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    Diverse international organizations have evaluated the risk of lung cancer starting from epidemic studies in miners of uranium mines, where the corresponding effective dose was determined relating with the dose received by the population during Hiroshima and Nagasaki events. Alternately, the equivalent dose has been calculated by means of based models on the energy deposited by the breathable radon fractions and its decay products in the breathing ducts. A unique factor agreed by the diverse organizations that allows converting radon concentration to effective dose does not exist. Neither an agreement exists among the different countries on which duty to be the value of the maximum concentration of radon, in interiors starting from which an intervention is required and if this intervention is standardized, recommended or nonexistent. In this work study cases in Mexico are presented and their interpretation alternative based on the international agreements absence. (Author)

  16. Investigating multiple candidate genes and nutrients in the folate metabolism pathway to detect genetic and nutritional risk factors for lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Swartz

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Folate metabolism, with its importance to DNA repair, provides a promising region for genetic investigation of lung cancer risk. This project investigates genes (MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, CBS, SHMT1, TYMS, folate metabolism related nutrients (B vitamins, methionine, choline, and betaine and their gene-nutrient interactions. METHODS: We analyzed 115 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and 15 nutrients from 1239 and 1692 non-Hispanic white, histologically-confirmed lung cancer cases and controls, respectively, using stochastic search variable selection (a Bayesian model averaging approach. Analyses were stratified by current, former, and never smoking status. RESULTS: Rs6893114 in MTRR (odds ratio [OR] = 2.10; 95% credible interval [CI]: 1.20-3.48 and alcohol (drinkers vs. non-drinkers, OR = 0.48; 95% CI: 0.26-0.84 were associated with lung cancer risk in current smokers. Rs13170530 in MTRR (OR = 1.70; 95% CI: 1.10-2.87 and two SNP*nutrient interactions [betaine*rs2658161 (OR = 0.42; 95% CI: 0.19-0.88 and betaine*rs16948305 (OR = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.30-0.91] were associated with lung cancer risk in former smokers. SNPs in MTRR (rs13162612; OR = 0.25; 95% CI: 0.11-0.58; rs10512948; OR = 0.61; 95% CI: 0.41-0.90; rs2924471; OR = 3.31; 95% CI: 1.66-6.59, and MTHFR (rs9651118; OR = 0.63; 95% CI: 0.43-0.95 and three SNP*nutrient interactions (choline*rs10475407; OR = 1.62; 95% CI: 1.11-2.42; choline*rs11134290; OR = 0.51; 95% CI: 0.27-0.92; and riboflavin*rs8767412; OR = 0.40; 95% CI: 0.15-0.95 were associated with lung cancer risk in never smokers. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified possible nutrient and genetic factors related to folate metabolism associated with lung cancer risk, which could potentially lead to nutritional interventions tailored by smoking status to reduce lung cancer risk.

  17. Investigating multiple candidate genes and nutrients in the folate metabolism pathway to detect genetic and nutritional risk factors for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Michael D; Peterson, Christine B; Lupo, Philip J; Wu, Xifeng; Forman, Michele R; Spitz, Margaret R; Hernandez, Ladia M; Vannucci, Marina; Shete, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Folate metabolism, with its importance to DNA repair, provides a promising region for genetic investigation of lung cancer risk. This project investigates genes (MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, CBS, SHMT1, TYMS), folate metabolism related nutrients (B vitamins, methionine, choline, and betaine) and their gene-nutrient interactions. We analyzed 115 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 15 nutrients from 1239 and 1692 non-Hispanic white, histologically-confirmed lung cancer cases and controls, respectively, using stochastic search variable selection (a Bayesian model averaging approach). Analyses were stratified by current, former, and never smoking status. Rs6893114 in MTRR (odds ratio [OR] = 2.10; 95% credible interval [CI]: 1.20-3.48) and alcohol (drinkers vs. non-drinkers, OR = 0.48; 95% CI: 0.26-0.84) were associated with lung cancer risk in current smokers. Rs13170530 in MTRR (OR = 1.70; 95% CI: 1.10-2.87) and two SNP*nutrient interactions [betaine*rs2658161 (OR = 0.42; 95% CI: 0.19-0.88) and betaine*rs16948305 (OR = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.30-0.91)] were associated with lung cancer risk in former smokers. SNPs in MTRR (rs13162612; OR = 0.25; 95% CI: 0.11-0.58; rs10512948; OR = 0.61; 95% CI: 0.41-0.90; rs2924471; OR = 3.31; 95% CI: 1.66-6.59), and MTHFR (rs9651118; OR = 0.63; 95% CI: 0.43-0.95) and three SNP*nutrient interactions (choline*rs10475407; OR = 1.62; 95% CI: 1.11-2.42; choline*rs11134290; OR = 0.51; 95% CI: 0.27-0.92; and riboflavin*rs8767412; OR = 0.40; 95% CI: 0.15-0.95) were associated with lung cancer risk in never smokers. This study identified possible nutrient and genetic factors related to folate metabolism associated with lung cancer risk, which could potentially lead to nutritional interventions tailored by smoking status to reduce lung cancer risk.

  18. CHRNA5 risk variant predicts delayed smoking cessation and earlier lung cancer diagnosis--a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, L.S.; Hung, R.J.; Baker, T.; Horton, A.; Culverhouse, R.; Saccone, N.; Cheng, I.; Deng, B.; Han, Y.; Hansen, H.M.; Horsman, J.; Kim, C.; Lutz, S.; Rosenberger, A.; Aben, K.K.H.; Andrew, A.S.; Breslau, N.; Chang, S.C.; Dieffenbach, A.K.; Dienemann, H.; Frederiksen, B.; Han, J.; Hatsukami, D.K.; Johnson, E.O.; Pande, M.; Wrensch, M.R.; McLaughlin, J.; Skaug, V.; Heijden, H.F. van der; Wampfler, J.; Wenzlaff, A.; Woll, P.; Zienolddiny, S.; Bickeboller, H.; Brenner, H.; Duell, E.J.; Haugen, A.; Heinrich, J.; Hokanson, J.E.; Hunter, D.J.; Kiemeney, B.; Lazarus, P.; Marchand, L. Le; Liu, G.; Mayordomo, J.; Risch, A.; Schwartz, A.G.; Teare, D.; Wu, X.; Wiencke, J.K.; Yang, P.; Zhang, Z.F.; Spitz, M.R.; Kraft, P.; Amos, C.I.; Bierut, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent meta-analyses show strong evidence of associations among genetic variants in CHRNA5 on chromosome 15q25, smoking quantity, and lung cancer. This meta-analysis tests whether the CHRNA5 variant rs16969968 predicts age of smoking cessation and age of lung cancer diagnosis. METHODS:

  19. Lung cancer in persons with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigel, Keith; Makinson, Alain; Thaler, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is emerging as a leading cause of death in HIV-infected persons. This review will discuss the latest scientific evidence regarding the mechanisms driving lung cancer risk in HIV infection, the clinical presentation of lung cancer in HIV-infected persons and recent data regarding the outcomes, treatment and prevention of lung cancer in this group. Increased risk of lung cancer in HIV-infected persons is primarily due to higher smoking rates, but emerging evidence also implicates immunosuppression and inflammatory processes. Lung cancer outcomes may be worse in HIV-infected persons in the antiretroviral era, but this may stem, in part, from treatment disparities. Early detection of lung cancer using chest computed tomography (CT) is being increasingly adopted for smokers in the general population, and recent studies suggest that it may be safe and efficacious in HIV-infected smokers. Lung cancer is an important complication associated with chronic HIV infection. It is associated with unique HIV-related causal mechanisms, and may be associated with worse outcomes in some HIV-infected persons. Smoking cessation and early cancer detection with chest CT are likely to benefit HIV-infected smokers.

  20. [Classification and Risk-factor Analysis of Postoperative Cardio-pulmonary 
Complications after Lobectomy in Patients with Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yutian; Su, Jianhua; Wang, Mingming; Zhou, Kun; Du, Heng; Huang, Jian; Che, Guowei

    2016-05-20

    There are incresing lung cancer patients detected and diagnosed at the intermediate stage when the pre-malignant or early lesions are amenable to resection and cure, owing to the progress of medical technology, the renewal of detection methods, the popularity of medical screening and the improvement of social health consciousness. The aim of this study is to investigate the risk factors of the occurrence of postoperative cardio-pulmonary complications in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, based on routine laboratory tests, basic characteristics, and intraoperative variables in hospital. The 421 patients after lobectomy in patients with stage I NSCLC at the West China Hospital of Sichuan University from January 2012 to December 2013 were included into the study and stratified into complication group and non-complication group, according to whether to occur postoperative cardio-pulmonary complications after lobectomy in 30 days. Of them, 64 (15.2%) patients were finally identified and selected into the complication group, compared with 357 (84.8%) in non-complication group: pneumonia (8.8%, 37/421) was the primary complication, and other main complications included atelectasis (5.9%, 25/421), pleural effusion (≥middle) (5.0%, 21/421), persistent air leak (3.6%, 15/421); The operation time (P=0.007), amount of blood loss (P=0.034), preoperative chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (P=0.027), white blood cell (WBC) count (Pcardio-pulmonary complications. Among an array of clinical variables in hospital, operation time, preoperative white blood cell count, preoperative COPD, may be the independent risk factors of the occurrence of postoperative cardio-pulmonary complications.

  1. Parakeets, canaries, finches, parrots and lung cancer: no association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabia, A.; Stellman, S.; Lumey, L. H.; Wynder, E. L.

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between pet bird keeping and lung cancer according to exposure to tobacco smoking was investigated in a case-control study in hospitals of New York City and Washington, DC, USA. Newly diagnosed lung cancer cases (n = 887) aged 40-79 years were compared with 1350 controls with diseases not related to smoking, of the same age, gender and date of admission as the cases. The prevalence of pet bird keeping was 12.5% in men and 19.1% in women. There was no association between ever keeping a pet bird and lung cancer in never smokers (men adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.15-3.17; women, 1.32, 95% CI 0.65-2.70), or in smokers and non-smokers combined, after adjustment for ever smoking (men: 1.28, 95% CI 0.88-1.86; women: 1.17, 95% CI 0.83-1.64; all: 1.21, 95% CI 0.95-1.56). Risk did not increase in relation to duration of pet bird keeping. Cases and controls kept similar types of birds. There was a tenfold increase of lung cancer risk associated with smoking among non-bird keepers (adjusted OR = 9.15). There was no indication of a synergism, either additive or multiplicative, between smoking and pet bird keeping with respect to lung cancer risk. Either alone or in conjunction with smoking, keeping parakeets, canaries, finches or parrots is not a risk factor for lung cancer among hospital patients in New York and in Washington, DC. PMID:9472651

  2. Exposure to welding fumes increases lung cancer risk among light smokers but not among heavy smokers: evidence from two case-control studies in Montreal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallières, Eric; Pintos, Javier; Lavoué, Jérôme; Parent, Marie-Élise; Rachet, Bernard; Siemiatycki, Jack

    2012-08-01

    We investigated relationships between occupational exposure to gas and arc welding fumes and the risk of lung cancer among workers exposed to these agents throughout the spectrum of industries. Two population-based case-control studies were conducted in Montreal. Study I (1979-1986) included 857 cases and 1066 controls, and Study II (1996-2001) comprised 736 cases and 894 controls. Detailed job histories were obtained by interview and evaluated by an expert team of chemist-hygienists to estimate degree of exposure to approximately 300 substances for each job. Gas and arc welding fumes were among the agents evaluated. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of lung cancer using logistic regression, adjusting for smoking history and other covariates. The two studies provided similar results, so a pooled analysis was conducted. Among all subjects, no significant association was found between lung cancer and gas welding fumes (OR = 1.1; 95% CI = 0.9-1.4) or arc welding fumes (OR = 1.0; 95% CI = 0.8-1.2). However, when restricting attention to light smokers, there was an increased risk of lung cancer in relation to gas welding fumes (OR = 2.9; 95% CI = 1.7-4.8) and arc welding fumes (OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.3-3.8), with even higher OR estimates among workers with the highest cumulative exposures. In conclusion, there was no detectable excess risk of lung cancer due to welding fumes among moderate to heavy smokers; but among light smokers we found an excess risk related to both types of welding fumes.

  3. Exposure to welding fumes increases lung cancer risk among light smokers but not among heavy smokers: evidence from two case–control studies in Montreal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallières, Eric; Pintos, Javier; Lavoué, Jérôme; Parent, Marie-Élise; Rachet, Bernard; Siemiatycki, Jack

    2012-01-01

    We investigated relationships between occupational exposure to gas and arc welding fumes and the risk of lung cancer among workers exposed to these agents throughout the spectrum of industries. Two population-based case–control studies were conducted in Montreal. Study I (1979–1986) included 857 cases and 1066 controls, and Study II (1996–2001) comprised 736 cases and 894 controls. Detailed job histories were obtained by interview and evaluated by an expert team of chemist–hygienists to estimate degree of exposure to approximately 300 substances for each job. Gas and arc welding fumes were among the agents evaluated. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of lung cancer using logistic regression, adjusting for smoking history and other covariates. The two studies provided similar results, so a pooled analysis was conducted. Among all subjects, no significant association was found between lung cancer and gas welding fumes (OR = 1.1; 95% CI = 0.9–1.4) or arc welding fumes (OR = 1.0; 95% CI = 0.8–1.2). However, when restricting attention to light smokers, there was an increased risk of lung cancer in relation to gas welding fumes (OR = 2.9; 95% CI = 1.7–4.8) and arc welding fumes (OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.3–3.8), with even higher OR estimates among workers with the highest cumulative exposures. In conclusion, there was no detectable excess risk of lung cancer due to welding fumes among moderate to heavy smokers; but among light smokers we found an excess risk related to both types of welding fumes. PMID:23342253

  4. The opinion of the Italian Society of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene (SIMLII) on silica-exposure and lung cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piolatto, G; Pira, E

    2011-01-01

    The Italian Society of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene (SIMLII) began a thorough overview of the silica-silicosis-lung cancer question starting in 2005. The body of informa tion obtained from a number of epidemiological studies, meta-analyses and reviews following the decision of the IARC to classify Respirable Crystalline Silica (RCS) as a human carcinogen (Group 1) led to different conclusions, which can be summarized as follows: basically an increased risk of developing lung cancer is demonstrated and generally accepted for silicotics; the association of lung cancer and exposure to silica per se is controversial, with some studies in favour of an association and some leading to contrary conclusions. Due to methodological problems affecting most studies and the difficulty in identifying the mechanism of action, we agree that the silica-lung cancer association is still unclear. The UE approach is more practical than scientific, in that it recommended the use of "good practices" subject to an agreement with the social partners, without any need to classify RCS as a human carcinogen. However, in 2008 the UE asked the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) in Edinburgh to assess, as a primary objective, the impact of introducing a system for setting Occupational Exposure Limits (OELs) based on objective risk criteria. In the present state of the art SIMLII's conclusions are: a) There is no need to label RCS with phrase H350i (ex R.49); b) It is of utmost importance to enforce compliance with current OELs; c) Future guidelines specific for silicosis risk should include adequate health surveillance; d) For legal medicine purposes, only lung cancer cases with an unquestionable diagnosis of silicosis should be recognised as an occupational disease.

  5. Canadian population risk of radon induced lung cancer: a re-assessment based on the recent cross-Canada radon survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Moir, D.; Whyte, J.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to indoor radon has been determined to be the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking. Canadian population risk of radon induced lung cancer was assessed in 2005 with the radon distribution characteristics determined from a radon survey carried out in the late 1970s in 19 cities. In that survey, a grab sampling method was used to measure radon levels. The observed radon concentration in 14 000 Canadian homes surveyed followed a log–normal distribution with a geometric mean (GM) of 11.2 Bq m–3 and a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 3.9. Based on the information from that survey, it was estimated that ∼10 % of lung cancers in Canada resulted from indoor radon exposure. To gain a better understanding of radon concentrations in homes across the country, a national residential radon survey was launched in April 2009. In the recent survey, long-term (3 month or longer) indoor radon measurements were made in roughly 14 000 homes in 121 health regions across Canada. The observed radon concentrations follow, as expected, a log–normal distribution with a GM of 41.9 Bq m–3 and a GSD of 2.8. Based on the more accurate radon distribution characteristics obtained from the recent cross-Canada radon survey, a re-assessment of Canadian population risk for radon induced lung cancer was undertaken. The theoretical estimates show that 16 % of lung cancer deaths among Canadians are attributable to indoor radon exposure. These results strongly suggest the ongoing need for the Canadian National Radon Program. In particular, there is a need for a focus on education and awareness by all levels of government, and in partnership with key stakeholders, to encourage Canadians to take action to reduce the risk from indoor radon exposure. PMID:22874897

  6. A functional single nucleotide polymorphism at the promoter region of cyclin A2 is associated with increased risk of colon, liver, and lung cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Duk-Hwan; Park, Seong-Eun; Kim, Minseung; Ji, Yong Ick; Kang, Mi Yeon; Jung, Eun Hyun; Ko, Eunkyung; Kim, Yujin; Kim, Sung; Shim, Young Mog; Park, Joobae

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this was to identify functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and cyclins that are associated with risk of human cancer. First, 45 SNPs in CDKs and cyclins were analyzed in 106 lung cancers and 108 controls for a pilot study. One SNP (reference SNP [rs] 769236, +1 guanine to adenine [G→A]) at the promoter region of cyclin A2 (CCNA2) also was analyzed in 1989 cancers (300 breast cancers, 450 colorectal cancers, 450 gastric cancers, 367 hepatocellular carcinomas, and 422 lung cancers) and in 1096 controls. Genotyping was performed using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Transcriptional activity of the SNP according to the cell cycle was analyzed by using a luciferase reporter assay and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis in NIH3T3 cells. In the pilot study, the SNP (rs769236) was associated significantly with the risk of lung cancer. In the expanded study, multivariate logistic regression indicated that the AA homozygous variant of the SNP was associated significantly with the development of lung cancer (P hepatocellular carcinoma (P = .02) but not with breast cancer or gastric cancer. The luciferase activity of a 300-base pair construct that contained the A allele was 1.5-fold greater than the activity of a construct with the G allele in NIH3T3 cells. The high luciferase activity of constructs that contained the A allele did not change with cell cycle progression. The current results suggested that an SNP (rs769236) at the promoter of CCNA2 may be associated significantly with increased risk of colon, liver, and lung cancers. Cancer 2011 © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  7. Nutritional knowledge, diet quality and breast or lung cancer risk: a case-control study of adults from Warmia and Mazury region in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawrysz, Iwona; Krusińska, Beata; Słowińska, Małgorzata Anna; Wądołowska, Lidia; Czerwińska, Anna; Biernacki, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge on proper nutrition favours the creation of pro-healthy nutritional behaviours of people. Studies related to the nutritional knowledge of adults, diet quality and incidence of breast or lung cancers are limited. Analysis of the relationship between the level of nutritional knowledge, diet quality and risk of breast cancer in women or lung cancer in men from the Warmia and Mazury region in Poland. The study was carried out in 202 subjects aged 23-80 years, including 107 women (17 cases of breast cancer) and 95 men (54 cases of lung cancer) from the Warmia and Mazury region in Poland. Nutritional knowledge was evaluated with the Questionnaire of Eating Behaviours (QEB), including 25 statements. Based on the frequency of the consumption of 16 food items, two diet quality indices were created: the pro-Healthy-Diet-Index-8 (pHDI-8) and the non-Healthy-Diet-Index-8 (nHDI-8). The values of pHDI-8 and nHDI-8 were calculated on the basis of the sum of the daily frequency of consumption of the selected food items and expressed as times/day. The Odds Ratio (OR) of both breast cancer or lung cancer in relation to the level of nutritional knowledge was calculated based on a logistic regression analysis. The incidence of breast or lung cancer in the bottom, middle and upper tertile of nutritional knowledge was 57.6%, 32.6% and 15.8%, respectively. As nutritional knowledge grew in the subsequent tertiles, pHDI-8 was on the increase (2.63 vs. 3.78 vs. 4.22 times/day) and n-HDI-8 was on the decrease (1.32 vs. 1.21 vs. 0.94 times/day). In the upper tertile of nutritional knowledge, the Odds Ratio for the incidence of breast or lung cancers varied from 0.06 (95% CI: 0.02; 0.17; pcancer type and age) to 0.17 (95% CI: 0.04; 0.69; pcancers varied from 0.27 (95% CI: 0.12; 0.62, pcancer type and age) to 0.35 (95% CI: 0.18; 0.71, pdiet and lower risk of breast cancer in women or lung cancer in men. In contrast, a lower level of nutritional knowledge was associated with a lower

  8. CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 polymorphisms and risk of lung cancer among never smokers: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzlaff, A S; Cote, M L; Bock, C H; Land, S J; Santer, S K; Schwartz, D R; Schwartz, A G

    2005-12-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily of enzymes catalyse one of the first steps in the metabolism of carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, nitroaromatics and arylamines. Polymorphisms within the CYP1A1 gene have been shown to be associated with lung cancer risk, predominantly among Asian populations. Despite functional evidence of a possible role of CYP1B1 in lung cancer susceptibility, only a few studies have evaluated polymorphisms in this gene in relation to lung cancer susceptibility. This population-based study evaluates polymorphisms in both of these CYP genes within never smokers, most of whom had environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure. Cases (n = 160) were identified through the metropolitan Detroit Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results program, and age, sex and race-matched population-based controls (n = 181) were identified using random digit dialing. Neither CYP1A1 MspI nor CYP1A1 Ile(462)Val was associated with lung cancer susceptibility among Caucasians or African-Americans. Among Caucasians, however, CYP1B1 Leu(432)Val was significantly associated with lung cancer susceptibility odds ratio (OR) for at least one valine allele = 2.87 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.63-5.07]. Combinations of this Phase I enzyme polymorphism along with selected Phase II enzyme polymorphisms (GSTM1 null, GSTP1 Ile(105)Val and NQO1 C(609)T) were evaluated. The combination of CYP1B1 Leu(432)Val and NQO1 C(609)T appeared to be associated with the highest risk of lung cancer (OR = 4.14, 95% CI 1.60-10.74), although no combinations differed significantly from the risk associated with CYP1B1 Leu(432)Val alone. When individuals were stratified by household ETS exposure (yes/no), CYP1B1 Leu(432)Val alone and in combination with Phase II enzyme polymorphisms was more strongly associated with increased lung cancer susceptibility among those with at least some household ETS exposure. Additional studies will be required to further validate these findings

  9. Yin Yang gene expression ratio signature for lung cancer prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Xu

    Full Text Available Many studies have established gene expression-based prognostic signatures for lung cancer. All of these signatures were built from training data sets by learning the correlation of gene expression with the patients' survival time. They require all new sample data to be normalized to the training data, ultimately resulting in common problems of low reproducibility and impracticality. To overcome these problems, we propose a new signature model which does not involve data training. We hypothesize that the imbalance of two opposing effects in lung cancer cells, represented by Yin and Yang genes, determines a patient's prognosis. We selected the Yin and Yang genes by comparing expression data from normal lung and lung cancer tissue samples using both unsupervised clustering and pathways analyses. We calculated the Yin and Yang gene expression mean ratio (YMR as patient risk scores. Thirty-one Yin and thirty-two Yang genes were identified and selected for the signature development. In normal lung tissues, the YMR is less than 1.0; in lung cancer cases, the YMR is greater than 1.0. The YMR was tested for lung cancer prognosis prediction in four independent data sets and it significantly stratified patients into high- and low-risk survival groups (p = 0.02, HR = 2.72; p = 0.01, HR = 2.70; p = 0.007, HR = 2.73; p = 0.005, HR = 2.63. It also showed prediction of the chemotherapy outcomes for stage II & III. In multivariate analysis, the YMR risk factor was more successful at predicting clinical outcomes than other commonly used clinical factors, with the exception of tumor stage. The YMR can be measured in an individual patient in the clinic independent of gene expression platform. This study provided a novel insight into the biology of lung cancer and shed light on the clinical applicability.

  10. Risk-stratifying capacity of PET/CT metabolic tumor volume in stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkle, Joshua H.; Jo, Stephanie Y.; Yuan, Cindy; Pu, Yonglin [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ferguson, Mark K. [University of Chicago, Department of Surgery, Chicago, IL (United States); Liu, Hai-Yan [First Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China); Zhang, Chenpeng [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, RenJi Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Xuee [Nanjing Medical University, Department of Radiology, BenQ Medical Center, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2017-08-15

    Stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is heterogeneous in tumor burden, and its treatment is variable. Whole-body metabolic tumor volume (MTV{sub WB}) has been shown to be an independent prognostic index for overall survival (OS). However, the potential of MTV{sub WB} to risk-stratify stage IIIA NSCLC has previously been unknown. If we can identify subgroups within the stage exhibiting significant OS differences using MTV{sub WB}, MTV{sub WB} may lead to adjustments in patients' risk profile evaluations and may, therefore, influence clinical decision making regarding treatment. We estimated the risk-stratifying capacity of MTV{sub WB} in stage IIIA by comparing OS of stratified stage IIIA with stage IIB and IIIB NSCLC. We performed a retrospective review of 330 patients with clinical stage IIB, IIIA, and IIIB NSCLC diagnosed between 2004 and 2014. The patients' clinical TNM stage, initial MTV{sub WB}, and long-term survival data were collected. Patients with TNM stage IIIA disease were stratified by MTV{sub WB}. The optimal MTV{sub WB} cutoff value for stage IIIA patients was calculated using sequential log-rank tests. Univariate and multivariate cox regression analyses and Kaplan-Meier OS analysis with log-rank tests were performed. The optimal MTV{sub WB} cut-point was 29.2 mL for the risk-stratification of stage IIIA. We identified statistically significant differences in OS between stage IIB and IIIA patients (p < 0.01), between IIIA and IIIB patients (p < 0.01), and between the stage IIIA patients with low MTV{sub WB} (below 29.2 mL) and the stage IIIA patients with high MTV{sub WB} (above 29.2 mL) (p < 0.01). There was no OS difference between the low MTV{sub WB} stage IIIA and the cohort of stage IIB patients (p = 0.485), or between the high MTV{sub WB} stage IIIA patients and the cohort of stage IIIB patients (p = 0.459). Similar risk-stratification capacity of MTV{sub WB} was observed in a large range of cutoff values from 15 to 55 mL in

  11. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE RADIATION EXPOSURE ON THE TARGET AND CRITICAL ORGANS WITH 2D AND 3D PLANNING OF RADIATION THERAPY FOR LUNG CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Gulidov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate feasibility, safety and efficacy of radiotherapy for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Various radiotherapy planning methods have been proposed to decrease normal tissue toxicity. We compared 2D-RT with 3D-RT for NSCLC. Parameters assessed included dose to PTV and organ-at-risk (OAR, multiple conformity and homogeneity indices. Material and methods. Initial and re-simulation CT images from 52 consecutive patients with IIB – IIIB NSCLC were used to quantify dosimetric differences between 2D and 3D conformal radiotherapy. Contouring was performed on both CTs, and plans (n=104 plans and dose-volume histograms were generated. Results. All plans provided comparable PTV coverage. Compared with 2D-RT, 3D-RT significantly reduced the maximum dose to heart (p<0.01, spinal cord (p<0.01, whole lung (p<0.01, esophagus (p<0.02 – Wilcoxon test.

  12. Lung cancer and occupation in nonsmokers: a multicenter case-control study in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeka, Ariana; Mannetje, Andrea't; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Rudnai, Peter; Lissowska, Jolanta; Fabiánová, Eleonóra; Mates, Dana; Bencko, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Cassidy, Adrian; Janout, Vladimir; Travier, Noemie; Fevotte, Joelle; Fletcher, Tony; Brennan, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo

    2006-11-01

    Tobacco smoking is the main cause for lung cancer worldwide, making it difficult to examine the carcinogenic role of other risk factors because of possible confounding by smoking. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the association between lung cancer and occupation independent of smoking. A case-control study of lung cancer was carried out between March 1998 and January 2002 in 16 centers from 7 European countries, including 223 never-smoking cases and 1039 controls. Information on lifestyle and occupation was obtained through detailed questionnaires. Job and industries were classified as entailing exposure to known or suspected carcinogens; in addition, expert assessment provided exposure estimates to specific agents. The odds ratio of lung cancer among women employed for more than 12 years in suspected high-risk occupations was 1.75 (95% confidence interval = 0.63-4.85). A comparable increase in risk was not detected for employment in established high-risk occupations or among men. Increased risk of lung cancer was suggested among individuals exposed to nonferrous metal dust and fumes, crystalline silica, and organic solvents. Occupations were found to play a limited role in lung cancer risk among never-smokers. Jobs entailing exposure to suspected lung carcinogens should receive priority in future studies among women. Nonferrous metal dust and fumes and silica may exert a carcinogenic effect independently from smoking.

  13. Impact of Increasing Age on Cause-Specific Mortality and Morbidity in Patients With Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Competing Risks Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Takashi; Bains, Sarina; Lee, Ming-Ching; Tan, Kay See; Hristov, Boris; Buitrago, Daniel H; Bains, Manjit S; Downey, Robert J; Huang, James; Isbell, James M; Park, Bernard J; Rusch, Valerie W; Jones, David R; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2017-01-20

    Purpose To perform competing risks analysis and determine short- and long-term cancer- and noncancer-specific mortality and morbidity in patients who had undergone resection for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods Of 5,371 consecutive patients who had undergone curative-intent resection of primary lung cancer at our institution (2000 to 2011), 2,186 with pathologic stage I NSCLC were included in the analysis. All preoperative clinical variables known to affect outcomes were included in the analysis, specifically, Charlson comorbidity index, predicted postoperative (ppo) diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide, and ppo forced expiratory volume in 1 second. Cause-specific mortality analysis was performed with competing risks analysis. Results Of 2,186 patients, 1,532 (70.1%) were ≥ 65 years of age, including 638 (29.2%) ≥ 75 years of age. In patients lung cancer-specific cumulative incidence of death (CID) was 7.5%, 10.7%, and 13.2%, respectively (overall, 10.4%); noncancer-specific CID was 1.8%, 4.9%, and 9.0%, respectively (overall, 5.3%). In patients ≥ 65 years of age, for up to 2.5 years after resection, noncancer-specific CID was higher than lung cancer-specific CID; the higher noncancer-specific, early-phase mortality was enhanced in patients ≥ 75 years of age than in those 65 to 74 years of age. Multivariable analysis showed that low ppo diffusing capacity of lung for carbon monoxide was an independent predictor of severe morbidity ( P lung cancer-specific mortality ( P = .002). Conclusion In patients who undergo curative-intent resection of stage I NSCLC, noncancer-specific mortality is a significant competing event, with an increasing impact as patient age increases.

  14. CYP1A1 gene polymorphisms increase lung cancer risk in a high-incidence region of Spain: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San Jose Carmen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A rural region in south-west Spain has one of the highest lung cancer incidence rates of the country, as revealed by a previous epidemiological 10-year follow-up study. The present work was undertaken to ascertain the role of CYP1A1 gene polymorphisms and their interaction with tobacco smoking in the development of the disease in this location. Methods One-hundred-and-three cases of lung cancer and 265 controls participated in the study. The participants were screened for the presence of four CYP1A1 polymorphisms, namely MspI, Ile462Val, T3205C, and Thr461Asn. Lung cancer risk was estimated as odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI using unconditional logistic regression models adjusting for age, sex, and smoking. Results The distribution of the variant CYP1A1 alleles was different from that described for other Caucasian populations, with CYP1A1*2A showing an uncommonly high frequency (p CYP1A1*2B allele (carrying MspI and Ile462Val mutations was strongly associated with high lung cancer risk (OR = 4.59, CI:1.4-12.6, p p p = 0.04. Moreover, the Thr461Asn polymorphism was found to be associated with SCLC in a Caucasian population for the first time to our knowledge (OR = 8.33, CI: 1.3-15.2, p = 0.04. Conclusion The results suggest that CYP1A1 polymorphisms contribute to increase lung cancer susceptibility in an area with an uncommon high incidence rate.

  15. Association between atherosclerosis and female lung cancer--a Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Lene; Prescott, Eva; Gyntelberg, Finn

    2003-01-01

    of Cox proportional hazard regression models. Atherosclerotic women had a significant RR of lung cancer of 3.26 (95% CI: 1.95-5.46) compared to non-atherosclerotic women after adjustment for age, calendar period, study population, smoking habits, school education and alcohol consumption. No significant...... hypothesize that oxidative stress due to episodes of ischemia/reperfusion increases the risk of lung cancer in atherosclerotic females because of a gender specific susceptibility to oxidative DNA damage....

  16. Polonium and Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Zagà

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The alpha-radioactive polonium 210 (Po-210 is one of the most powerful carcinogenic agents of tobacco smoke and is responsible for the histotype shift of lung cancer from squamous cell type to adenocarcinoma. According to several studies, the principal source of Po-210 is the fertilizers used in tobacco plants, which are rich in polyphosphates containing radio (Ra-226 and its decay products, lead 210 (Pb-210 and Po-210. Tobacco leaves accumulate Pb-210 and Po-210 through their trichomes, and Pb-210 decays into Po-210 over time. With the combustion of the cigarette smoke becomes radioactive and Pb-210 and Po-210 reach the bronchopulmonary apparatus, especially in bifurcations of segmental bronchi. In this place, combined with other agents, it will manifest its carcinogenic activity, especially in patients with compromised mucous-ciliary clearance. Various studies have confirmed that the radiological risk from Po-210 in a smoker of 20 cigarettes per day for a year is equivalent to the one deriving from 300 chest X-rays, with an autonomous oncogenic capability of 4 lung cancers per 10000 smokers. Po-210 can also be found in passive smoke, since part of Po-210 spreads in the surrounding environment during tobacco combustion. Tobacco manufacturers have been aware of the alpha-radioactivity presence in tobacco smoke since the sixties.

  17. Prevalence of and risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications after lung cancer surgery in patients with early-stage COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim ES

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Eun Sun Kim,1 Young Tae Kim,2 Chang Hyun Kang,2 In Kyu Park,2 Won Bae,1 Sun Mi Choi,1 Jinwoo Lee,1 Young Sik Park,1 Chang-Hoon Lee,1 Sang-Min Lee,1 Jae-Joon Yim,1 Young Whan Kim,1 Sung Koo Han,1 Chul-Gyu Yoo1 1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Purpose: This study aimed to investigate whether the prevalence of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is even higher in the early stages of COPD than in such patients with normal lung function and to verify the usefulness of symptom- or quality of life (QoL-based scores in predicting risk for PPCs.Patients and methods: Patients undergoing pulmonary resection for NSCLC between July 2012 and October 2014 were prospectively enrolled. Preoperative measurements of lung function, dyspnea, and QoL, operative characteristics, PPCs, duration of postoperative hospitalization, and in-hospital mortality were assessed.Results: Among 351 consecutive patients with NSCLC, 343 patients with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 ≥70% of predicted value were enrolled. At least one PPC occurred in 57 (16.6% patients. Prevalence of PPC was higher in patients with COPD (30.1% than in those with normal spirometry (10.0%; P<0.001. However, in patients with COPD, the prevalence of PPC was not different in patients with FEV1 ≥70% compared to those with FEV1 <70% and between group A (low risk and less symptoms and group B (low risk and more symptoms patients with COPD, based on the new Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease 2011 guidelines. In patients with COPD, body mass index (odds ratio [OR]: 0.80, P=0.007, carbon monoxide diffusing capacity of the lung (DLCO, % predicted value (OR: 0.97, P=0.024, and operation time (OR: 1.01, P=0.003, but not COPD assessment test or St

  18. Feasibility of using an epigenetic marker of risk for lung cancer, methylation of p16, to promote smoking cessation among US veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shofer, Scott; Beyea, Matthew; Li, Sufeng; Bastian, Lori A; Wahidi, Momen M; Kelley, Michael; Lipkus, Isaac M

    2014-01-01

    Providing smokers feedback using epigenetic markers of lung cancer risk has yet to be tested as a strategy to motivate smoking cessation. Epigenetic modification of Rb-p16 (p16) due to tobacco exposure is associated with increased risk of developing lung cancer. This study examined the acceptance of testing for methylated p16 and the understanding of test results in smokers at risk for development of lung cancer. Thirty-five current smokers with airways obstruction viewed an educational presentation regarding p16 function followed by testing for the presence of methylated p16 in sputum. Participants were offered smoking cessation assistance and asked to complete surveys at the time of enrolment regarding their understanding of the educational material, perception of risk associated with smoking and desire to quit. Participants were notified of their test result and follow-up surveys were administered 2 and 10 weeks after notification of their test result. Twenty per cent of participants had methylated p16. Participants showed high degree of understanding of educational materials regarding the function and risk associated with p16 methylation. Sixty-seven per cent and 57% of participants with low-risk and high-risk test results, respectively, reported that the information was more likely to motivate them to quit smoking. Smoking cessation rates were similar between methylated and non-methylated participants. Testing for an epigenetic marker of lung cancer risk is accepted and understood by active smokers. A low-risk test result does not decrease motivation to stop smoking. NCT01038492.

  19. Diet and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, P; Lange, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cigarette smoking is of key importance, factors such as diet also play a role in the development of lung cancer. MedLine and Embase were searched with diet and lung cancer as the key words. Recently published reviews...... and large well designed original articles were preferred to form the basis for the present article. A diet rich in fruit and vegetables reduces the incidence of lung cancer by approximately 25%. The reduction is of the same magnitude in current smokers, ex-smokers and never smokers. Supplementation...... with vitamins A, C and E and beta-carotene offers no protection against the development of lung cancer. On the contrary, beta-carotene supplementation has, in two major randomised intervention trials, resulted in an increased mortality. Smoking remains the leading cause of lung cancer. The adverse effects...

  20. Lung Cancer Risk from Occupational and Environmental Radon and Role of Smoking in Two Czech Nested Case-Control Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Tomasek

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the risk of lung cancer from combined exposure to radon and smoking. Methodologically, it is based on case-control studies nested within two Czech cohort studies of nearly 11,000 miners followed-up for mortality in 1952–2010 and nearly 12,000 inhabitants exposed to high levels of radon in homes, with mortality follow-up in 1960–2010. In addition to recorded radon exposure, these studies use information on smoking collected from the subjects or their relatives. A total of 1,029 and 370 cases with smoking information have been observed in the occupational and environmental (residential studies, respectively. Three or four control subjects have been individually matched to cases according to sex, year of birth, and age. The combined effect from radon and smoking is analyzed in terms of geometric mixture models of which the additive and multiplicative models are special cases. The resulting models are relatively close to the additive interaction (mixing parameter 0.2 and 0.3 in the occupational and residential studies, respectively. The impact of the resulting model in the residential radon study is illustrated by estimates of lifetime risk in hypothetical populations of smokers and non-smokers. In comparison to the multiplicative risk model, the lifetime risk from the best geometric mixture model is considerably higher, particularly in the non-smoking population.

  1. Long-term survival outcomes by smoking status in surgical and nonsurgical patients with non-small cell lung cancer: comparing never smokers and current smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguid, Robert A; Hooker, Craig M; Harris, James; Xu, Li; Westra, William H; Sherwood, J Timothy; Sussman, Marc; Cattaneo, Stephen M; Shin, James; Cox, Solange; Christensen, Joani; Prints, Yelena; Yuan, Nance; Zhang, Jennifer; Yang, Stephen C; Brock, Malcolm V

    2010-09-01

    Survival outcomes of never smokers with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who undergo surgery are poorly characterized. This investigation compared surgical outcomes of never and current smokers with NSCLC. This investigation was a single-institution retrospective study of never and current smokers with NSCLC from 1975 to 2004. From an analytic cohort of 4,546 patients with NSCLC, we identified 724 never smokers and 3,822 current smokers. Overall, 1,142 patients underwent surgery with curative intent. For survival analysis by smoking status, hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard modeling and then further adjusted by other covariates. Never smokers were significantly more likely than current smokers to be women (P cancer diagnosis has little impact on the long-term survival of patients with NSCLC, especially after curative surgery. Despite different etiologies between lung cancer in never and current smokers the prognosis is equally dismal.

  2. Apoptosis-Related Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and the Risk of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Anand; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Hyland, Paula L; Cote, Michele L; Keele, Greg R; Land, Susan; Boulton, Matthew L; Schwartz, Ann G

    2014-01-01

    Germline apoptosis-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been shown to contribute to the risk of developing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, very few studies have looked specifically at apoptosis-related SNPs in a racially-stratified analysis of white and African-American women. We examined the risk of developing NSCLC associated with 98 germline SNPs in 32 apoptosis-related genes among women in a population-based case-control study from the Detroit metropolitan area. We examined 453 cases of NSCLC and 478 control subjects. We used an unconditional logistic regression with a dominant model, stratified by race, and adjusted for age, pack-years smoked, ever/never smoking status, family history of lung cancer, history of COPD, BMI and education. Our logistic regression identified 3 significant apoptosis-related SNPs in whites ( APAF-1, rs1007573; CD40 rs3765459, and CD40 rs1535045), and 7 significant SNPs ( ATM, rs1801516; BAK1, rs513349; TNF, rs1800629; TP63, rs6790167; TP63, rs7613791, TP63, rs35592567 and TP63, rs3856775 ) in African-Americans. In a downstream analysis, these SNPs were further prioritized utilizing the False Positive Report Percentage (FPRP) methodology and backwards elimination. In whites, APAF-1 ( rs1007573), CD40 ( rs3765459) and CD40 (rs1535045) were all found to be significant by FPRP. In African-Americans, TP63 SNPs rs6790167 and rs7613791 were found to have a significant FPRP. In parallel, a backward elimination procedure was used on the 3 significant SNPs in whites and 7 significant SNPs in African-Americans. This procedure identified APAF-1 rs1007573 (OR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.17-2.95) and CD40 rs1535045 (OR=0.58, 95% CI: 0.40-0.84) as significant independent predictors of risk among whites, and ATM rs1801516 (OR=24.15, 95% CI: 3.50-166.55), TNF rs1800629 (OR= 0.42, 95% CI: 0.18-0.99) and TP63 rs6790167 (OR: 2.85, 95% CI: 1.33-6.09) as significant, independent predictors in African-Americans. In whites, only SNPs APAF-1

  3. Diet and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, P; Lange, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cigarette smoking is of key importance, factors such as diet also play a role in the development of lung cancer. MedLine and Embase were searched with diet and lung cancer as the key words. Recently published reviews...... and large well designed original articles were preferred to form the basis for the present article. A diet rich in fruit and vegetables reduces the incidence of lung cancer by approximately 25%. The reduction is of the same magnitude in current smokers, ex-smokers and never smokers. Supplementation...... are only ameliorated to a minor degree by a healthy diet....

  4. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... carcinoma Small cell carcinoma Squamous cell carcinoma Secondhand smoke and lung cancer Normal lungs and alveoli Respiratory system Smoking hazards Bronchoscope References Horn L, Eisenberg R, ...

  5. Reflections on the Implementation of Low-Dose Computed Tomography Screening in Individuals at High Risk of Lung Cancer in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Pilar; Sánchez, Marcelo; Belda Sanchis, José; Moreno Mata, Nicolás; Artal, Ángel; Gayete, Ángel; Matilla González, José María; Galbis Caravajal, José Marcelo; Isla, Dolores; Paz-Ares, Luis; Seijo, Luis M

    2017-10-01

    Lung cancer (LC) is a major public health issue. Despite recent advances in treatment, primary prevention and early diagnosis are key to reducing the incidence and mortality of this disease. A recent clinical trial demonstrated the efficacy of selective screening by low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in reducing the risk of both lung cancer mortality and all-cause mortality in high-risk individuals. This article contains the reflections of an expert group on the use of LDCT for early diagnosis of LC in high-risk individuals, and how to evaluate its implementation in Spain. The expert group was set up by the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR), the Spanish Society of Thoracic Surgery (SECT), the Spanish Society of Radiology (SERAM) and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM). Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Prognosis, Prediction and Risk Assessment in the Prevention and Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sandelin, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer causes more deaths than any other cancer. Smoking causes roughly 90% of lung cancer cases. Concurrent chemoradiation therapy is the standard of care for stage IIIb patients with performance status (PS) 0-1. A less toxic approach is warranted for less fit patients. To optimize care, the understanding of common clinical variables such as haematological responses to inflammation could be much improved. Adherence to guidelines for proper clinical work-up is vital to ensure...

  7. The Risk of Neutropenia and Leukopenia in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Erlotinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian-Guo; Tian, Xu; Cheng, Long; Zhou, Quan; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Yu; Bai, Yu-ju; Ma, Hu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) are a critical member of systemic therapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Erlotinib is the first-generation EGFR-TKIs, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines recommend it as a first-line agent in patients with sensitizing EGFR mutations. However, the safety of erlotinib plus chemotherapy (CT) or erlotinib alone for advanced NSCLC remains controversial. We carried out a systematic meta-analysis to determine the overall risk of neutropenia and leukopenia associated with erlotinib. PubMed, EMBASE, CBM, CNKI, WanFang database, The Cochrane library, Web of Science, as well as abstracts presented at ASCO conferences and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched to identify relevant studies. RR with 95% CIs for neutropenia and leukopenia were all extracted. The random-effects model was used to calculate pooled RRs and 95% CIs. Power calculation was performed using macro embedded in SAS software after all syntheses were conducted. We identified 12 eligible studies involving 3932 patients. Erlotinib plus CT or alone relative to CT is associated with significantly decreased risks of neutropenia and leukopenia in patients with advanced NSCLC (RR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.21–0.71; P = 0.00; incidence: 9.9 vs. 35.2%) and (RR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.11–0.93; P = 0.04; incidence: 3.5 vs. 11.6%), respectively. The subgroup analysis by erlotinb with or without CT showed that erlotinib combine with CT have no significance decrease the relative risks of neutropenia or leukopenia (RR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.78–1.23; P = 0.87; incidence: 26.2 vs. 30.5%) and (RR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.34–1.95; P = 0.64; incidence: 6.5 vs. 9.3%), respectively. However, erlotinib alone could decrease incidence of neutropenia (RR, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.07–0.27; P = 0.00; incidence: 3.7 vs. 40.8%) or leukopenia (RR, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.01–0.45; P = 0.01; incidence: 0.8 vs. 15.7%). The power analysis

  8. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next three ...

  9. A systematic literature review comparing the psychological care needs of patients with mesothelioma and advanced lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Hannah; Moore, Sally; Leary, Alison

    2016-12-01

    Psychological distress which adversely affects a person's experience of cancer has been shown to be highly prevalent in patients with mesothelioma. Historically, the assumption has been made that the evidence guiding the supportive care needs for lung cancer is relevant to those with mesothelioma. The objective of the study was to evaluate if the psychological care needs differ between patients with pleural mesothelioma and those with advanced lung cancer. A search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycARTICLES, Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection, PsycINFO databases, grey literature and the Cochrane Library of Systematic Reviews identified 17 studies meeting a predefined inclusion criteria. These were critically appraised for quality. Data relating to psychological experiences was extracted which was then synthesised narratively and through a process of meta ethnography. Common themes identified across the studies created 10 key concepts. These were uncertainty, normality, hope/hopelessness, stigma/blame/guilt, family/carer concern, physical symptoms, experience of diagnosis, iatrogenic distress, financial/legal and death and dying. Key similarities and differences were identified between the mesothelioma and lung cancer evidence. There is limited research exploring the lived experiences of those with mesothelioma and lung cancer, with the majority of them having methodological and/or reporting concerns compromising the conclusions made. However, reoccurring themes in the evidence were found suggesting a number of areas where the psychological experience of mesothelioma differs from that of advanced lung cancer. These findings warrant further research to explore further and if proven, the need for the provision of specialist mesothelioma care services is affirmed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. American Cancer Society Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wender, Richard; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Barrera, Ermilo; Colditz, Graham A.; Church, Timothy R.; Ettinger, David S.; Etzioni, Ruth; Flowers, Christopher R.; Gazelle, G. Scott; Kelsey, Douglas K.; LaMonte, Samuel J.; Michaelson, James S.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Sullivan, Daniel C.; Travis, William; Walter, Louise; Wolf, Andrew M. D.; Brawley, Otis W.; Smith, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Findings from the National Cancer Institute’s National Lung Screening Trial established that lung cancer mortality in specific high-risk groups can be reduced by annual screening with low-dose computed tomography. These findings indicate that the adoption of lung cancer screening could save many lives. Based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the American Cancer Society is issuing an initial guideline for lung cancer screening. This guideline recommends that clinicians with access to high-volume, high-quality lung cancer screening and treatment centers should initiate a discussion about screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 years to 74 years who have at least a 30-pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. A process of informed and shared decision-making with a clinician related to the potential benefits, limitations, and harms associated with screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography should occur before any decision is made to initiate lung cancer screening. Smoking cessation counseling remains a high priority for clinical attention in discussions with current smokers, who should be informed of their continuing risk of lung cancer. Screening should not be viewed as an alternative to smoking cessation. PMID:23315954

  11. Risk factors of brain metastases in completely resected pathological stage IIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Xiao

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain metastases (BM is one of the most common failures of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC after combined-modality therapy. The outcome of trials on prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI has prompted us to identify the highest-risk subset most likely to benefit from PCI. Focusing on patients with completely resected pathological stage IIIA-N2 (pIIIA-N2 NSCLC, we aimed to assess risk factors of BM and to define the highest-risk subset. Methods Between 2003 and 2005, the records of 217 consecutive patients with pIIIA-N2 NSCLC in our institution were reviewed. The cumulative incidence of BM was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method, and differences between the groups were analyzed using log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was applied to assess risk factors of BM. Results Fifty-three (24.4 % patients developed BM at some point during their clinical course. On multivariate analysis, non-squamous cell cancer (relative risk [RR]: 4.13, 95 % CI: 1.86–9.19; P = 0.001 and the ratio of metastatic to examined nodes or lymph node ratio (LNR ≥ 30 % (RR: 3.33, 95 % CI: 1.79–6.18; P = 0.000 were found to be associated with an increased risk of BM. In patients with non-squamous cell cancer and LNR ≥ 30 %, the 5-year actuarial risk of BM was 57.3 %. Conclusions In NSCLC, patients with completely resected pIIIA-N2 non-squamous cell cancer and LNR ≥ 30 % are at the highest risk for BM, and are most likely to benefit from PCI. Further studies are warranted to investigate the effect of PCI on this subset of patients.

  12. Primary lung cancer in Assiut University Hospitals: Pattern of presentation within four years (January 2011: December 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amany Omar

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: Knowing that the incidence of lung cancer increased globally in both male and female, the relatively lower male to female ratio when compared with other studies, may reflect at least an increasing in the lung cancer rates among female. Smoking still remains the major risk factor in pathogenesis of primary lung cancer. COPD could be considered an important respiratory disorder that tied to bronchogenic carcinoma risk. Interestingly, the incidence of adenocarcinoma surpassed that of squamous cell carcinoma. Unfortunately, presentation of the patient at later stages of illness was common.

  13. Dynamics of the risk of smoking-induced lung cancer: a compartmental hidden Markov model for longitudinal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Guihenneuc-Jouyaux, Chantal; Campanella, Gianluca; Richardson, Sylvia; Vermeulen, Roel; De Iorio, Maria; Galea, Sandro; Vineis, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    To account for the dynamic aspects of carcinogenesis, we propose a compartmental hidden Markov model in which each person is healthy, asymptomatically affected, diagnosed, or deceased. Our model is illustrated using the example of smoking-induced lung cancer. The model was fitted on a case-control study nested in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study, including 757 incident cases and 1524 matched controls. Estimation was done through a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm, and simulations based on the posterior estimates of the parameters were used to provide measures of model fit. We performed sensitivity analyses to assess robustness of our findings. After adjusting for its impact on exposure duration, age was not found to independently drive the risk of lung carcinogenesis, whereas age at starting smoking in ever-smokers and time since cessation in former smokers were found to be influential. Our data did not support an age-dependent time to diagnosis. The estimated time between onset of malignancy and clinical diagnosis ranged from 2 to 4 years. Our approach yielded good performance in reconstructing individual trajectories in both cases (sensitivity >90%) and controls (sensitivity >80%). Our compartmental model enabled us to identify time-varying predictors of risk and provided us with insights into the dynamics of smoking-induced lung carcinogenesis. Its flexible and general formulation enables the future incorporation of disease states, as measured by intermediate markers, into the modeling of the natural history of cancer, suggesting a large range of applications in chronic disease epidemiology.

  14. Geographical Correlations between Indoor Radon Concentration and Risks of Lung Cancer, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, and Leukemia during 1999-2008 in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Mina; Hwang, Seung-Sik; Kang, Sungchan; Park, No-Wook; Chang, Byung-Uck; Kim, Yongjae

    2017-03-24

    Indoor radon is the second most important risk factor for lung cancer and may also be a risk factor for hematopoietic cancers, particularly in children and adolescents. The present study measured indoor radon concentration nationwide at 5553 points during 1989-2009 and spatially interpolated using lognormal kriging. The incidences of lung cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), and leukemia, stratified by sex and five-year age groups in each of the 234 administrative regions in the country during 1999-2008, were obtained from the National Cancer Registry and used to calculate the standardized incidence ratios. After considering regional deprivation index values and smoking rates by sex in each region as confounding variables, the cancer risks were estimated based on Bayesian hierarchical modeling. We found that a 10 Bq/m³ increase in indoor radon concentration was associated with a 1% increase in the incidence of lung cancer in male and a 7% increase in NHL in female children and adolescents in Korea aged less than 20 years. Leukemia was not associated with indoor radon concentration. The increase in NHL risk among young women requires confirmation in future studies, and the radon control program should consider children and adolescents.

  15. Exposure to secondhand smoke and excess lung cancer mortality risk among workers in the "5 B's": bars, bowling alleys, billiard halls, betting establishments, and bingo parlours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, M; Skeer, M

    2003-09-01

    To review existing data on exposure to secondhand smoke in bars, bowling alleys, billiard halls, betting establishments, and bingo parlours (the "5 B's") as assessed by ambient nicotine air concentration measurements and to estimate the excess lung cancer mortality risk associated with this exposure. Using the Medline, Toxline, and Toxnet databases, the internet, and bibliographies of relevant articles, we identified studies that reported measurements of ambient nicotine concentrations in the 5 B's. Studies were included if they reported a mean concentration of ambient nicotine measured in at least one of the 5 B's. We calculated a weighted average of nicotine concentrations in each of the 5 B's. We then estimated the working lifetime excess lung cancer mortality risk associated with this exposure, as well as with exposure at the upper and lower limits of the range of mean exposures reported in all of the studies in each establishment category. Nicotine concentrations in the 5 B's were 2.4 to 18.5 times higher than in offices or residences, and 1.5 to 11.7 times higher than in restaurants. At these exposure levels, estimated working lifetime excess lung cancer mortality risk from secondhand smoke exposure for workers in the 5 B's is between 1.0-4.1/1000, which greatly exceeds the typical de manifestis risk level of 0.3/1000. Workers in the 5 B's have high levels of occupational exposure to secondhand smoke and must be included in workplace smoking regulations.

  16. The Danish randomized lung cancer CT screening trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper H; Ashraf, Haseem; Dirksen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lung cancer screening with low dose computed tomography (CT) has not yet been evaluated in randomized clinical trials, although several are underway. METHODS: In The Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial, 4104 smokers and previous smokers from 2004 to 2006 were randomized to either...... lung cancer. Ten of these had stage I disease. Eleven of 17 lung cancers at baseline were treated surgically, eight of these by video assisted thoracic surgery resection. CONCLUSIONS: Screening may facilitate minimal invasive treatment and can be performed with a relatively low rate of false......-positive screen results compared with previous studies on lung cancer screening....

  17. Silica dust and lung cancer in the German stone, quarrying, and ceramics industries: results of a case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulm, K; Waschulzik, B; Ehnes, H; Guldner, K; Thomasson, B; Schwebig, A; Nuss, H

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—A work force based case-control study of lung cancer was performed in non-silicotic subjects exposed to crystalline silica to investigate the association between silica dust and lung cancer excluding the influence of silicosis.
METHODS—Two hundred and forty seven patients with lung cancer and 795 control subjects were enrolled, all of whom had been employed in the German stone, quarrying, or ceramics industries. Smoking was used as a matching criterion. Exposure to silica was quantified by measurements, if available, or otherwise by industrial hygienists. Several indices (peak, average and cumulative exposure) were used to analyse the relationship between the level of exposure and risk of lung cancer as odds ratios (OR).
RESULTS—The risk of lung cancer is associated with the year of and age at first exposure to silica, duration of exposure, and latency. All odds ratios were adjusted for these factors. Considering the peak exposure, the OR for workers exposed to high levels (⩾0.15 mg/m3 respirable silica dust which is the current occupational threshold value for Germany) compared with those exposed to low levels (silica and lung cancer. The exclusion of subjects with silicosis may have led to dilution with respect to the level of exposure and therefore reduced the power to detect a small risk. Alternatively, the risk of getting lung cancer may be restricted to subjects with silicosis and is not directly linked to silica dust.

 PMID:10092697

  18. Lung cancer and cigarette smoking in women: a case-control study in Barcelona (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo, A; Barnadas, A; Pallares, C; Martinez, I; Fabregat, X; Rosello, J; Estape, J; Planas, J; Gonzalez, C A

    1994-10-15

    A case-control study on lung cancer and the habit of cigarette smoking was carried out in Barcelona (Spain). Cases were 103 women newly diagnosed with primary lung cancer in 10 hospitals from the study area. Histologic confirmation was given in 101 cases, of which 53 were adenocarcinoma, 19 squamous-cell carcinoma, 9 small-cell carcinoma and 20 other types. Two controls per case were selected, matched by age, residence and hospital. Compared with the never-smokers, the odds ratios (OR), with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI), were 1.61 (0.4 to 6.9) for ex-smokers and 3.61 (1.6 to 8.3) for current smokers. The risk of lung cancer showed a good dose-response relationship with duration of the habit, average number of cigarettes smoked daily and cumulative cigarette consumption. The risk of lung cancer increased by 62% for each 10 pack-years. Depth of inhalation also showed a remarkable effect, independently of the intensity of the habit. Although mortality and incidence rates of lung cancer among women in Spain are lower than in other developed countries, the risk of lung cancer is that which would be expected according to the pattern of the smoking habit in Spanish women.

  19. A practical approach to radiological evaluation of CT lung cancer screening examinations

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Xueqian; Heuvelmans, Marjolein A.; van Ooijen, Peter M.A.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. The Dutch-Belgian Randomized Lung Cancer Screening Trial (Dutch acronym: NELSON) was launched to investigate whether screening for lung cancer by low-dose multidetector computed tomography (CT) in high-risk patients will lead to a decrease in lung cancer mortality. The NELSON lung nodule management is based on nodule volumetry and volume doubling time assessment. Evaluation of CT examinations in lung cancer sc...

  20. Screening for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Infante, Maurizio V; Pedersen, Jesper H

    2010-01-01

    In lung cancer screening with low-dose spiral computed tomography (LDCT), the proportion of stage I disease is 50-85%, and the survival rate for resected stage I disease can exceed 90%, but proof of real benefit in terms of lung cancer mortality reduction must come from the several randomized tri...

  1. Screening for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Infante, Maurizio V; Pedersen, Jesper H

    2010-01-01

    In lung cancer screening with low-dose spiral computed tomography (LDCT), the proportion of stage I disease is 50-85%, and the survival rate for resected stage I disease can exceed 90%, but proof of real benefit in terms of lung cancer mortality reduction must come from the several randomized...

  2. Diet and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, P; Lange, Peter

    2003-01-01

    with vitamins A, C and E and beta-carotene offers no protection against the development of lung cancer. On the contrary, beta-carotene supplementation has, in two major randomised intervention trials, resulted in an increased mortality. Smoking remains the leading cause of lung cancer. The adverse effects...

  3. Screening for lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prosch, H.; Schaefer-Prokop, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the current data about low-dose computed tomography (LD-CT) lung cancer screening.The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) was the first study that provided statistical evidence that LD-CT screening for lung cancer significantly reduces lung

  4. Lung Cancer Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shareable Graphics Infographics “African-American Men and Lung Cancer” “Lung Cancer Is the Biggest Cancer Killer in Both ... Cancer Breast Cervical Colorectal (Colon) Ovarian Prostate Skin Cancer Home Lung Cancer Trends Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ...

  5. Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experience complications from follow-up tests. For this reason, lung cancer screening is offered to people who are in ... is more likely to be cancerous. For that reason, you might be referred to a lung ... problems. Your lung cancer screening test may detect other lung and heart ...

  6. A meta-analysis: is low-dose computed tomography a superior method for risky lung cancers screening population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Cuiping; Liu, Zilong; Zhu, Fen; Li, Shanqun; Jiang, Liyan

    2016-05-01

    Low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) has been proposed to be a new screening method to discover lung cancers in an early stage, especially those patients who are in a high risk of lung cancer. The primary objective of this meta-analysis is to systematically review the effect of LDCT on screening for lung cancers among the risky population who are older than 49 years old and with smoking exposure. We searched randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) about comparing LDCT and chest X-ray or usual caring from MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library, Web of Knowledge and SpringerLink databases (January 1994 to September 2013). Nine RCTs met criteria for inclusion. Screening for lung cancer using LDCT resulted in a significantly higher number of stage I lung cancers [odds ratio (OR) 2.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.88-2.47], higher number of total lung cancers (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.20-1.43) than the control. Four of the nine studies indicated that the screening method did not decrease all-cause mortality (OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.90-1.02), but decreased lung cancer-specific mortality (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.74-0.96). Five studies showed that LDCT had higher false-positive rates (OR 8.7, 95% CI 7.43-10.19) than the group of control. Among the risky population, LDCT screening find out more stage I lung cancers and total lung cancers compared with chest X-ray or no screening, and also shows advantages in decreasing lung cancer-specific mortality, but the screening method does not decrease all-cause mortality and have a higher false-positive rates in diagnosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Lung cancer in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Rodriguez, Raúl; Morales-Fuentes, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Recent biological advances in tumor research provide clear evidence that lung cancer in females is different from that in males. These differences appear to have a direct impact on the clinical presentation, histology, and outcomes of lung cancer. Women are more likely to present with lung adenocarcinoma, tend to receive a diagnosis at an earlier age, and are more likely to be diagnosed with localized disease. Women may also be more predisposed to molecular aberrations resulting from the carcinogenic effects of tobacco, but do not appear to be more susceptible than men to developing lung cancer. The gender differences found in female lung cancer make it mandatory that gender stratification is used in clinical trials in order to improve the survival rates of patients with lung cancer. PMID:28210127

  8. Polymorphisms of the centrosomal gene (FGFR1OP) and lung cancer risk: a meta-analysis of 14,463 cases and 44,188 controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiaozheng; Liu, Hongliang; Onaitis, Mark W; Liu, Zhensheng; Owzar, Kouros; Han, Younghun; Su, Li; Wei, Yongyue; Hung, Rayjean J; Brhane, Yonathan; McLaughlin, John; Brennan, Paul; Bickeböller, Heike; Rosenberger, Albert; Houlston, Richard S; Caporaso, Neil; Landi, Maria Teresa; Heinrich, Joachim; Risch, Angela; Wu, Xifeng; Ye, Yuan