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Sample records for comparative genomic hybridizations

  1. Comparative genomic hybridization: practical guidelines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeuken, J.W.M.; Sprenger, S.H.; Wesseling, P.

    2002-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a technique used to identify copy number changes throughout a genome. Until now, hundreds of CGH studies have been published reporting chromosomal imbalances in a large variety of human neoplasms. Additionally, technical improvements of specific steps in a

  2. Comparative genomic hybridization in clinical cytogenetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryndorf, T.; Kirchhoff, M.; Rose, H. [and others

    1995-11-01

    We report the results of applying comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) in a cytogenetic service laboratory for (1) determination of the origin of extra and missing chromosomal material in intricate cases of unbalanced aberrations and (2) detection of common prenatal numerical chromosome aberrations. A total of 11 fetal samples were analyzed. Seven cases of complex unbalanced aberrations that could not be identified reliably by conventional cytogenetics were successfully resolved by CGH analysis. CGH results were validated by using FISH with chromosome-specific probes. Four cases representing common prenatal numerical aberrations (trisomy 21, 18, and 13 and monosomy X) were also successfully diagnosed by CGH. We conclude that CGH is a powerful adjunct to traditional cytogenetic techniques that makes it possible to solve clinical cases of intricate unbalanced aberrations in a single hybridization. CGH may also be a useful adjunct to screen for euchromatic involvement in marker chromosomes. Further technical development may render CGH applicable for routine aberration screening. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Comparative genomic hybridization: Detection of segmental aneusomies

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    Cronin, J.E.; Magrane, G.G.; Gray, J.W. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) has been used successfully to detect whole chromosome and segmental aneusomies. However, its sensitivity for detection of segmental aneusomies is still not well known. We present here an analysis of CGH sensitivity with emphasis on detection of abnormalities commonly found during pre-and neo-natal diagnosis. CGH is performed by hybridizing green and red fluorescing test and normal DNA samples, respectively, to normal metaphase spreads and measuring green:red fluorescence ratios along all chromosomes. The ratios are normalized such that 2 copies of a normal chromosome region in the test sample gives a ratio of 1.0. Alterations in test vs. control gene copy number range from 1.5 [trisomy] to 0.5 [monosomy]. Clinical samples analyzed included Wolf Hirschhorn (4p-), Cri du Chat (5p-) and DiGeorge (22q-). In addition, 7 cell lines with chromosome 21 segmental aneusomies were analyzed. These included 3 with terminal duplications, 1 with a terminal deletion, 1 with an interstitial deletion and 2 with interstitial amplifications. The DiGeorge deletion was the only deletion not deleted by CGH. This is not surprising as standard G banding does not routinely detect this 1-2 megabase deletion. The 4p- and 5p- monosomies were detected and breakpoints correctly assigned prospectively. Proximal alterations involving 21q22.11 are unambiguously defined. Specifically, two interstitial aneusomies involving this region are detected. Studies involving late prophase chromosome normal spreads gave identical breakpoints. Thus, analysis of extended chromosomes did not improve the sensitivity of the technique. Taken together, these data suggest that CGH can detect segmental aneusomies greater than 8 megabases in extent. Smaller aneusomies can, at times, be detected. Work is now underway to modify the analysis software to increase sensitivity and to decrease the amount of material needed for analysis.

  4. Genomic alterations detected by comparative genomic hybridization in ovarian endometriomas

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    L.C. Veiga-Castelli

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a complex and multifactorial disease. Chromosomal imbalance screening in endometriotic tissue can be used to detect hot-spot regions in the search for a possible genetic marker for endometriosis. The objective of the present study was to detect chromosomal imbalances by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH in ectopic tissue samples from ovarian endometriomas and eutopic tissue from the same patients. We evaluated 10 ovarian endometriotic tissues and 10 eutopic endometrial tissues by metaphase CGH. CGH was prepared with normal and test DNA enzymatically digested, ligated to adaptors and amplified by PCR. A second PCR was performed for DNA labeling. Equal amounts of both normal and test-labeled DNA were hybridized in human normal metaphases. The Isis FISH Imaging System V 5.0 software was used for chromosome analysis. In both eutopic and ectopic groups, 4/10 samples presented chromosomal alterations, mainly chromosomal gains. CGH identified 11q12.3-q13.1, 17p11.1-p12, 17q25.3-qter, and 19p as critical regions. Genomic imbalances in 11q, 17p, 17q, and 19p were detected in normal eutopic and/or ectopic endometrium from women with ovarian endometriosis. These regions contain genes such as POLR2G, MXRA7 and UBA52 involved in biological processes that may lead to the establishment and maintenance of endometriotic implants. This genomic imbalance may affect genes in which dysregulation impacts both eutopic and ectopic endometrium.

  5. Detection of chromosomal abnormalities by comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, Jean-Michel; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2005-04-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a modified in-situ hybridization technique. In this type of analysis, two differentially labeled genomic DNAs (study and reference) are cohybridized to normal metaphase spreads or to microarray. Chromosomal locations of copy number changes in the DNA segments of the study genome are revealed by a variable fluorescence intensity ratio along each target chromosome. Thus, CGH allows detection and mapping of DNA sequence copy differences between two genomes in a single experiment. Since its development, comparative genomic hybridization has been applied mostly as a research tool in the field of cancer cytogenetics to identify genetic changes in many previously unknown regions. It is also a powerful tool for detection and identification of unbalanced chromosomal abnormalities in prenatal, postnatal and preimplantation diagnostics. The development of comparative genomic hybridization and increase in resolution analysis by using the microarray-based technique offer new information on chromosomal pathologies and thus better management of patients.

  6. Cytogenetic analysis from DNA by comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachdjian, G; Aboura, A; Lapierre, J M; Viguié, F

    2000-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a modified in situ hybridization technique which allows detection and mapping of DNA sequence copy differences between two genomes in a single experiment. In CGH analysis, two differentially labelled genomic DNA (study and reference) are co-hybridized to normal metaphase spreads. Chromosomal locations of copy number changes in the DNA segments of the study genome are revealed by a variable fluorescence intensity ratio along each target chromosome. Since its development, CGH has been applied mostly as a research tool in the field of cancer cytogenetics to identify genetic changes in many previously unknown regions. CGH may also have a role in clinical cytogenetics for detection and identification of unbalanced chromosomal abnormalities.

  7. Comparative genomic in situ hybridization analysis on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2012-04-10

    Apr 10, 2012 ... different parents/ancestors/genomes in hybrid plants to be distinguished ... sequences in common between the two species. Therefore, cGISH ... genomic organization and genome evolution in plants. (Zoller et al., 2001).

  8. A web server for mining Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Ranka, Sanjay; Kahveci, Tamer

    2007-11-01

    Advances in cytogenetics and molecular biology has established that chromosomal alterations are critical in the pathogenesis of human cancer. Recurrent chromosomal alterations provide cytological and molecular markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of disease. They also facilitate the identification of genes that are important in carcinogenesis, which in the future may help in the development of targeted therapy. A large amount of publicly available cancer genetic data is now available and it is growing. There is a need for public domain tools that allow users to analyze their data and visualize the results. This chapter describes a web based software tool that will allow researchers to analyze and visualize Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) datasets. It employs novel data mining methodologies for clustering and classification of CGH datasets as well as algorithms for identifying important markers (small set of genomic intervals with aberrations) that are potentially cancer signatures. The developed software will help in understanding the relationships between genomic aberrations and cancer types.

  9. Human and mouse genome analysis using array comparative genomic hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, Antoine Maria

    2004-01-01

    Almost all human cancers as well as developmental abnormalities are characterized by the presence of genetic alterations, most of which target a gene or a particular genomic locus resulting in altered gene expression and ultimately an altered phenotype. Different types of genetic alterations include

  10. A hybrid computational grid architecture for comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aarti; Chen, Chen; Liu, Weiguo; Mitchell, Wayne; Schmidt, Bertil

    2008-03-01

    Comparative genomics provides a powerful tool for studying evolutionary changes among organisms, helping to identify genes that are conserved among species, as well as genes that give each organism its unique characteristics. However, the huge datasets involved makes this approach impractical on traditional computer architectures leading to prohibitively long runtimes. In this paper, we present a new computational grid architecture based on a hybrid computing model to significantly accelerate comparative genomics applications. The hybrid computing model consists of two types of parallelism: coarse grained and fine grained. The coarse-grained parallelism uses a volunteer computing infrastructure for job distribution, while the fine-grained parallelism uses commodity computer graphics hardware for fast sequence alignment. We present the deployment and evaluation of this approach on our grid test bed for the all-against-all comparison of microbial genomes. The results of this comparison are then used by phenotype--genotype explorer (PheGee). PheGee is a new tool that nominates candidate genes responsible for a given phenotype.

  11. Evolutionary insights into scleractinian corals using comparative genomic hybridizations.

    KAUST Repository

    Aranda, Manuel

    2012-09-21

    Coral reefs belong to the most ecologically and economically important ecosystems on our planet. Yet, they are under steady decline worldwide due to rising sea surface temperatures, disease, and pollution. Understanding the molecular impact of these stressors on different coral species is imperative in order to predict how coral populations will respond to this continued disturbance. The use of molecular tools such as microarrays has provided deep insight into the molecular stress response of corals. Here, we have performed comparative genomic hybridizations (CGH) with different coral species to an Acropora palmata microarray platform containing 13,546 cDNA clones in order to identify potentially rapidly evolving genes and to determine the suitability of existing microarray platforms for use in gene expression studies (via heterologous hybridization).

  12. Array comparative genomic hybridization in retinoma and retinoblastoma tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Katia; Amenduni, Mariangela; Papa, Filomena Tiziana; Katzaki, Eleni; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Marozza, Annabella; Epistolato, Maria Carmela; Toti, Paolo; Lazzi, Stefano; Bruttini, Mirella; De Filippis, Roberta; De Francesco, Sonia; Longo, Ilaria; Meloni, Ilaria; Mari, Francesca; Acquaviva, Antonio; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; Renieri, Alessandra; Ariani, Francesca

    2009-03-01

    In retinoblastoma, two RB1 mutations are necessary for tumor development. Recurrent genomic rearrangements may represent subsequent events required for retinoblastoma progression. Array-comparative genomic hybridization was carried out in 18 eye samples, 10 from bilateral and eight from unilateral retinoblastoma patients. Two unilateral cases also showed areas of retinoma. The most frequent imbalance in retinoblastomas was 6p gain (40%), followed by gains at 1q12-q25.3, 2p24.3-p24.2, 9q22.2, and 9q33.1 and losses at 11q24.3, 13q13.2-q22.3, and 16q12.1-q21. Bilateral cases showed a lower number of imbalances than unilateral cases (P = 0.002). Unilateral cases were divided into low-level ( or = 7) chromosomal instability groups. The first group presented with younger age at diagnosis (mean 511 days) compared with the second group (mean 1606 days). In one retinoma case ophthalmoscopically diagnosed as a benign lesion no rearrangements were detected, whereas the adjacent retinoblastoma displayed seven aberrations. The other retinoma case identified by retrospective histopathological examination shared three rearrangements with the adjacent retinoblastoma. Two other gene-free rearrangements were retinoma specific. One rearrangement, dup5p, was retinoblastoma specific and included the SKP2 gene. Genomic profiling indicated that the first retinoma was a pretumoral lesion, whereas the other represents a subclone of cells bearing 'benign' rearrangements overwhelmed by another subclone presenting aberrations with higher 'oncogenic' potential. In summary, the present study shows that bilateral and unilateral retinoblastoma have different chromosomal instability that correlates with the age of tumor onset in unilateral cases. This is the first report of genomic profiling in retinoma tissue, shedding light on the different nature of lesions named 'retinoma'.

  13. Evolutionary insights into scleractinian corals using comparative genomic hybridizations

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    Aranda Manuel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coral reefs belong to the most ecologically and economically important ecosystems on our planet. Yet, they are under steady decline worldwide due to rising sea surface temperatures, disease, and pollution. Understanding the molecular impact of these stressors on different coral species is imperative in order to predict how coral populations will respond to this continued disturbance. The use of molecular tools such as microarrays has provided deep insight into the molecular stress response of corals. Here, we have performed comparative genomic hybridizations (CGH with different coral species to an Acropora palmata microarray platform containing 13,546 cDNA clones in order to identify potentially rapidly evolving genes and to determine the suitability of existing microarray platforms for use in gene expression studies (via heterologous hybridization. Results Our results showed that the current microarray platform for A. palmata is able to provide biological relevant information for a wide variety of coral species covering both the complex clade as well the robust clade. Analysis of the fraction of highly diverged genes showed a significantly higher amount of genes without annotation corroborating previous findings that point towards a higher rate of divergence for taxonomically restricted genes. Among the genes with annotation, we found many mitochondrial genes to be highly diverged in M. faveolata when compared to A. palmata, while the majority of nuclear encoded genes maintained an average divergence rate. Conclusions The use of present microarray platforms for transcriptional analyses in different coral species will greatly enhance the understanding of the molecular basis of stress and health and highlight evolutionary differences between scleractinian coral species. On a genomic basis, we show that cDNA arrays can be used to identify patterns of divergence. Mitochondrion-encoded genes seem to have diverged faster than

  14. Comparative anatomy of the petioles of different genomic Cydonia × Malus hybrids

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    Elisaveta Onica

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the paper morphological and anatomical structure of the petioles of 15 different genomic hybrids between quince and apple are compared with other hybrids and the initial forms. Specific and common anatomic peculiarities of the petiole for the studied hybrids in comparison to other hybrids and parental forms are given.

  15. Genomic Alterations in Sporadic Synchronous Primary Breast Cancer Using Array and Metaphase Comparative Genomic Hybridization

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    Arezou A. Ghazani

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Synchronous primary breast cancer describes the occurrence of multiple tumors affecting one or both breasts at initial diagnosis. This provides a unique opportunity to identify tissue-specific genomic markers that characterize each tumor while controlling for the individual genetic background of a patient. The aim of this study was to examine the genomic alterations and degree of similarity between synchronous cancers. Using metaphase comparative genomic hybridization and array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH, the genomic alterations of 23 synchronous breast cancers from 10 patients were examined at both chromosomal and gene levels. Synchronous breast cancers, when compared to their matched counterparts, were found to have a common core set of genetic alterations, with additional unique changes present in each. They also frequently exhibited features distinct from the more usual solitary primary breast cancers. The most frequent genomic alterations included chromosomal gains of 1q, 3p, 4q, and 8q, and losses of 11q, 12q, 16q, and 17p. aCGH identified copy number amplification in regions that are present in all 23 tumor samples, including 1p31.3–1p32.3 harboring JAK1. Our findings suggest that synchronous primary breast cancers represent a unique type of breast cancer and, at least in some instances, one tumor may give rise to the other.

  16. Chromosomal imbalances revealed in primary rhabdomyosarcomas by comparative genomic hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qiao-xin; LIU Chun-xia; CHUN Cai-pu; QI Yan; CHANG Bin; LI Xin-xia; CHEN Yun-zhao; NONG Wei-xia; LI Hong-an; LI Feng

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous cytogenetic studies revealed aberrations varied among the throe subtypes of rhabdomyosarcoma. We profiled chromosomal imbalances in the different subtypes and investigated the relationships between clinical parameters and genomic aberrations.Methods Comparative genomic hybridization was used to investigate genomic imbalances in 25 cases of primary rhabdomyosarcomas and two rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines. Specimens were reviewed to determine histological type, pathological grading and clinical staging.Results Changes involving one or more regions of the genome were seen in all rhabdomyosarcomal patients. For rhabdomyosarcoma, DNA sequence gains were most frequently (>30%) seen in chromosomes 2p, 12q, 6p, 9q, 10q, 1p,2q, 6q, 8q, 15q and 18q; losses from 3p, 11p and 6p. In aggressive alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, frequent gains were seen on chromosomes 12q, 2p, 6p, 2q, 4q, 10q and 15q; losses from 3p, 6p, 1q and 5q. For embryonic rhabdomyosarcoma, frequent gains were on 7p, 9q, 2p, 18q, 1p and 8q; losses only from 11p. Frequently gained chromosome arms of translocation associated with rhabdomyosarcoma were 12q, 2, 6, 10q, 4q and 15q; losses from 3p,6p and 5q. The frequently gained chromosome arms of nontranslocation associated with rhabdomyosarcoma were 2p,9q and 18q, while 11p and 14q were the frequently lost chromosome arms. Gains on chromosome 12q were significantly correlated with translocation type. Gains on chromosome 9q were significantly correlated with clinical staging. Conclusions Gains on chromosomes 2p, 12q, 6p, 9q, 10q, 1p, 2q, 6q, 8q, 15q and 18q and losses on chromosomes 3p, 11p and 6p may be related to rhabdomyosarcomal carcinogenesis. Furthermore, gains on chromosome 12q may be correlated with translocation and gains on chromosome 9q with the early stages of rhabdomyosarcoma.

  17. Comparative genome research between maize and rice using genomic in situ hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Using the genomic DNAs of maize and rice as probes respectively,the homology of maize and rice genomes was assessed by genomic in situ hybridization. When rice genomic DNAs were hybridized to maize, all chromosomes displayed many multiple discrete regions, while each rice chromosome delineated a single consecutive chromosomal region after they were hybridized with maize genomic DNAs. The results indicate that the genomes of maize and rice share high homology, and confirm the proposal that maize and rice are diverged from a common ancestor.

  18. Supervised Lowess normalization of comparative genome hybridization data - application to lactococcal strain comparisons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Baerends, Richard J. S.; Zomer, Aldert L.; Karsens, Harma A.; Martin-Requena, Victoria; Trelles, Oswaldo; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Array-based comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) is commonly used to determine the genomic content of bacterial strains. Since prokaryotes in general have less conserved genome sequences than eukaryotes, sequence divergences between the genes in the genomes used for an aCGH experiment

  19. Streptococcus thermophilus core genome: comparative genome hybridization study of 47 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg; Danielsen, Morten; Valina, Ondrej; Garrigues, Christel; Johansen, Eric; Pedersen, Martin Bastian

    2008-08-01

    A DNA microarray platform based on 2,200 genes from publicly available sequences was designed for Streptococcus thermophilus. We determined how single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the 65- to 75-mer oligonucleotide probe sequences affect the hybridization signals. The microarrays were then used for comparative genome hybridization (CGH) of 47 dairy S. thermophilus strains. An analysis of the exopolysaccharide genes in each strain confirmed previous findings that this class of genes is indeed highly variable. A phylogenetic tree based on the CGH data showed similar distances for most strains, indicating frequent recombination or gene transfer within S. thermophilus. By comparing genome sizes estimated from the microarrays and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, the amount of unknown DNA in each strain was estimated. A core genome comprised of 1,271 genes detected in all 47 strains was identified. Likewise, a set of noncore genes detected in only some strains was identified. The concept of an industrial core genome is proposed. This is comprised of the genes in the core genome plus genes that are necessary in an applied industrial context.

  20. Genomic analysis by oligonucleotide array Comparative Genomic Hybridization utilizing formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

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    Savage, Stephanie J; Hostetter, Galen

    2011-01-01

    Formalin fixation has been used to preserve tissues for more than a hundred years, and there are currently more than 300 million archival samples in the United States alone. The application of genomic protocols such as high-density oligonucleotide array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) to formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, therefore, opens an untapped resource of available tissues for research and facilitates utilization of existing clinical data in a research sample set. However, formalin fixation results in cross-linking of proteins and DNA, typically leading to such a significant degradation of DNA template that little is available for use in molecular applications. Here, we describe a protocol to circumvent formalin fixation artifact by utilizing enzymatic reactions to obtain quality DNA from a wide range of FFPE tissues for successful genome-wide discovery of gene dosage alterations in archival clinical samples.

  1. Genomic characterization of some Iranian children with idiopathic mental retardation using array comparative genomic hybridization

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    Farkhondeh Behjati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mental retardation (MR has a prevalence of 1-3% and genetic causes are present in more than 50% of patients. Chromosomal abnormalities are one of the most common genetic causes of MR and are responsible for 4-28% of mental retardation. However, the smallest loss or gain of material visible by standard cytogenetic is about 4 Mb and for smaller abnormalities, molecular cytogenetic techniques such as array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH should be used. It has been shown that 15-25% of idiopathic MR (IMR has submicroscopic rearrangements detectable by array CGH. In this project, the genomic abnormalities were investigated in 32 MR patients using this technique. Materials and Methods: Patients with IMR with dysmorphism were investigated in this study. Karyotype analysis, fragile X and metabolic tests were first carried out on the patients. The copy number variation was then assessed in a total of 32 patients with normal results for the mentioned tests using whole genome oligo array CGH. Multiple ligation probe amplification was carried out as a confirmation test. Results: In total, 19% of the patients showed genomic abnormalities. This is reduced to 12.5% once the two patients with abnormal karyotypes (upon re-evaluation are removed. Conclusion: The array CGH technique increased the detection rate of genomic imbalances in our patients by 12.5%. It is an accurate and reliable method for the determination of genomic imbalances in patients with IMR and dysmorphism.

  2. De Novo Identification of Single Nucleotide Mutations in Caenorhabditis elegans Using Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maydan, Jason S.; Okada, H. Mark; Flibotte, Stephane; Edgley, Mark L.; Moerman, Donald G.

    2009-01-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has been used primarily to detect copy-number variants between two genomes. Here we report using aCGH to detect single nucleotide mutations on oligonucleotide microarrays with overlapping 50-mer probes. This technique represents a powerful method for rapidly detecting novel homozygous single nucleotide mutations in any organism with a sequenced reference genome. PMID:19189945

  3. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization for genome-wide screening of DNA copy number in bladder tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, J.A.; Fridlyand, J.; Pejavar, S.; Olshen, A.B.; Korkola, J.E.; Vries, S. de; Carroll, P.; Kuo, W.L.; Pinkel, D.; Albertson, D.; Cordon-Cardo, C.; Jain, A.N.; Waldman, F.M.

    2003-01-01

    Genome-wide copy number profiles were characterized in 41 primary bladder tumors using array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). In addition to previously identified alterations in large chromosomal regions, alterations were identified in many small genomic regions, some with high-l

  4. Genomic profiling of oral squamous cell carcinoma by array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

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    Shunichi Yoshioka

    Full Text Available We designed a study to investigate genetic relationships between primary tumors of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC and their lymph node metastases, and to identify genomic copy number aberrations (CNAs related to lymph node metastasis. For this purpose, we collected a total of 42 tumor samples from 25 patients and analyzed their genomic profiles by array-based comparative genomic hybridization. We then compared the genetic profiles of metastatic primary tumors (MPTs with their paired lymph node metastases (LNMs, and also those of LNMs with non-metastatic primary tumors (NMPTs. Firstly, we found that although there were some distinctive differences in the patterns of genomic profiles between MPTs and their paired LNMs, the paired samples shared similar genomic aberration patterns in each case. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis grouped together 12 of the 15 MPT-LNM pairs. Furthermore, similarity scores between paired samples were significantly higher than those between non-paired samples. These results suggested that MPTs and their paired LNMs are composed predominantly of genetically clonal tumor cells, while minor populations with different CNAs may also exist in metastatic OSCCs. Secondly, to identify CNAs related to lymph node metastasis, we compared CNAs between grouped samples of MPTs and LNMs, but were unable to find any CNAs that were more common in LNMs. Finally, we hypothesized that subpopulations carrying metastasis-related CNAs might be present in both the MPT and LNM. Accordingly, we compared CNAs between NMPTs and LNMs, and found that gains of 7p, 8q and 17q were more common in the latter than in the former, suggesting that these CNAs may be involved in lymph node metastasis of OSCC. In conclusion, our data suggest that in OSCCs showing metastasis, the primary and metastatic tumors share similar genomic profiles, and that cells in the primary tumor may tend to metastasize after acquiring metastasis-associated CNAs.

  5. Characterization of copy number variation in genomic regions containing STR loci using array comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repnikova, Elena A; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Bailes, Andrea; Weber, Cecilia; Erdman, Linda; McKinney, Aimee; Ramsey, Sarah; Hashimoto, Sayaka; Lamb Thrush, Devon; Astbury, Caroline; Reshmi, Shalini C; Shaffer, Lisa G; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Pyatt, Robert E

    2013-09-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) loci are commonly used in forensic casework, familial analysis for human identification, and for monitoring hematopoietic cell engraftment after bone marrow transplant. Unexpected genetic variation leading to sequence and length differences in STR loci can complicate STR typing, and presents challenges in casework interpretation. Copy number variation (CNV) is a relatively recently identified form of genetic variation consisting of genomic regions present at variable copy numbers within an individual compared to a reference genome. Large scale population studies have demonstrated that likely all individuals carry multiple regions with CNV of 1kb in size or greater in their genome. To date, no study correlating genomic regions containing STR loci with CNV has been conducted. In this study, we analyzed results from 32,850 samples sent for clinical array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis for the presence of CNV at regions containing the 13 CODIS (Combined DNA Index System) STR, and the Amelogenin X (AMELX) and Amelogenin Y (AMELY) loci. Thirty-two individuals with CNV involving STR loci on chromosomes 2, 4, 7, 11, 12, 13, 16, and 21, and twelve with CNV involving the AMELX/AMELY loci were identified. These results were correlated with data from publicly available databases housing information on CNV identified in normal populations and additional clinical cases. These collective results demonstrate the presence of CNV in regions containing 9 of the 13 CODIS STR and AMELX/Y loci. Further characterization of STR profiles within regions of CNV, additional cataloging of these variants in multiple populations, and contributing such examples to the public domain will provide valuable information for reliable use of these loci.

  6. Comparative genomic and in situ hybridization of germ cell tumors of the infantile testis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostert, M; Rosenberg, C; Stoop, H; Schuyer, M; Timmer, A; Oosterhuis, W; Looijenga, L

    2000-01-01

    Chromosomal information on germ cell tumors of the infantile testis, ie, teratomas and yolk sac tumors, is limited and controversial. We studied two teratomas and four yolk sac tumors using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and in situ hybridization. No chromosomal anomalies were found in the

  7. Genome sequence of Cronobacter sakazakii BAA-894 and comparative genomic hybridization analysis with other Cronobacter species.

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    Eva Kucerova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The genus Cronobacter (formerly called Enterobacter sakazakii is composed of five species; C. sakazakii, C. malonaticus, C. turicensis, C. muytjensii, and C. dublinensis. The genus includes opportunistic human pathogens, and the first three species have been associated with neonatal infections. The most severe diseases are caused in neonates and include fatal necrotizing enterocolitis and meningitis. The genetic basis of the diversity within the genus is unknown, and few virulence traits have been identified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report here the first sequence of a member of this genus, C. sakazakii strain BAA-894. The genome of Cronobacter sakazakii strain BAA-894 comprises a 4.4 Mb chromosome (57% GC content and two plasmids; 31 kb (51% GC and 131 kb (56% GC. The genome was used to construct a 387,000 probe oligonucleotide tiling DNA microarray covering the whole genome. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH was undertaken on five other C. sakazakii strains, and representatives of the four other Cronobacter species. Among 4,382 annotated genes inspected in this study, about 55% of genes were common to all C. sakazakii strains and 43% were common to all Cronobacter strains, with 10-17% absence of genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: CGH highlighted 15 clusters of genes in C. sakazakii BAA-894 that were divergent or absent in more than half of the tested strains; six of these are of probable prophage origin. Putative virulence factors were identified in these prophage and in other variable regions. A number of genes unique to Cronobacter species associated with neonatal infections (C. sakazakii, C. malonaticus and C. turicensis were identified. These included a copper and silver resistance system known to be linked to invasion of the blood-brain barrier by neonatal meningitic strains of Escherichia coli. In addition, genes encoding for multidrug efflux pumps and adhesins were identified that were unique to C. sakazakii

  8. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis of benign and invasive male breast neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojopi, Elida Paula Benquique; Cavalli, Luciane Regina; Cavalieri, Luciane Mara Bogline

    2002-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis was performed for the identification of chromosomal imbalances in two benign gynecomastias and one malignant breast carcinoma derived from patients with male breast disease and compared with cytogenetic analysis in two of the three cases. CGH analy...

  9. Application of Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization to Pediatric Neurologic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) is a technique used to analyze quantitative increase or decrease of chromosomes by competitive DNA hybridization of patients and controls. This study aimed to evaluate the benefits and yield of array-CGH in comparison with conventional karyotyping in pediatric neurology patients. Materials and Methods We included 87 patients from the pediatric neurology clinic with at least one of the following features: developmental delay, mental r...

  10. CGHScan: finding variable regions using high-density microarray comparative genomic hybridization data

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    Rajashekara Gireesh

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomic hybridization can rapidly identify chromosomal regions that vary between organisms and tissues. This technique has been applied to detecting differences between normal and cancerous tissues in eukaryotes as well as genomic variability in microbial strains and species. The density of oligonucleotide probes available on current microarray platforms is particularly well-suited for comparisons of organisms with smaller genomes like bacteria and yeast where an entire genome can be assayed on a single microarray with high resolution. Available methods for analyzing these experiments typically confine analyses to data from pre-defined annotated genome features, such as entire genes. Many of these methods are ill suited for datasets with the number of measurements typical of high-density microarrays. Results We present an algorithm for analyzing microarray hybridization data to aid identification of regions that vary between an unsequenced genome and a sequenced reference genome. The program, CGHScan, uses an iterative random walk approach integrating multi-layered significance testing to detect these regions from comparative genomic hybridization data. The algorithm tolerates a high level of noise in measurements of individual probe intensities and is relatively insensitive to the choice of method for normalizing probe intensity values and identifying probes that differ between samples. When applied to comparative genomic hybridization data from a published experiment, CGHScan identified eight of nine known deletions in a Brucella ovis strain as compared to Brucella melitensis. The same result was obtained using two different normalization methods and two different scores to classify data for individual probes as representing conserved or variable genomic regions. The undetected region is a small (58 base pair deletion that is below the resolution of CGHScan given the array design employed in the study

  11. Array comparative genomic hybridization of keratoacanthomas and squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jian; Wang, Kai; Gao, Fei

    2012-01-01

    Keratoacanthoma (KA) is a benign keratinocytic neoplasm that spontaneously regresses after 3-6 months and shares features with squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Furthermore, there are reports of KAs that have metastasized, invoking the question of whether KA is a variant of SCC (Hodak et al., 1993......). To date, no reported criteria are sensitive enough to discriminate reliably between KA and SCC, and consequently there is a clinical need for discriminating markers. Our previous study analyzed 132 KAs and 29 SCCs and revealed significantly different regions of genomic aberrations using chromosomal...

  12. DNA copy number aberrations in breast cancer by array comparative genomic hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, J.; Wang, K.; Li, S.;

    2009-01-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) has been popularly used for analyzing DNA copy number variations in diseases like cancer. In this study, we investigated 82 sporadic samples from 49 breast cancer patients using 1-Mb resolution bacterial artificial chromosome CGH arrays. A number of h...

  13. Comparative genomic hybridization detects novel amplifications in fibroadenomas of the breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojopi, E P; Rogatto, S R; Caldeira, J R

    2001-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization analysis was performed for identification of chromosomal imbalances in 23 samples of fibroadenomas of the breast. Chromosomal gains rather than losses were a feature of these lesions. Only two cases with a familial and/or previous history of breast lesions had gain...

  14. Effect of bone decalcification procedures on DNA in situ hybridization and comparative genomic hybridization. EDTA is highly preferable to a routinely used acid decalcifier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Alers (Janneke); P-J. Krijtenburg (Pieter-Jaap); K.J. Vissers (Kees); H. van Dekken (Herman)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractDecalcification is routinely performed for histological studies of bone-containing tissue. Although DNA in situ hybridization (ISH) and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) have been successfully employed on archival material, little has been reported on

  15. Chromosomal imbalances in nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a meta-analysis of comparative genomic hybridization results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Ping

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a highly prevalent disease in Southeast Asia and its prevalence is clearly affected by genetic background. Various theories have been suggested for its high incidence in this geographical region but to these days no conclusive explanation has been identified. Chromosomal imbalances identifiable through comparative genomic hybridization may shed some light on common genetic alterations that may be of relevance to the onset and progression of NPC. Review of the literature, however, reveals contradictory results among reported findings possibly related to factors associated with patient selection, stage of disease, differences in methodological details etc. To increase the power of the analysis and attempt to identify commonalities among the reported findings, we performed a meta-analysis of results described in NPC tissues based on chromosomal comparative genomic hybridization (CGH. This meta-analysis revealed consistent patters in chromosomal abnormalities that appeared to cluster in specific "hot spots" along the genome following a stage-dependent progression.

  16. Detection of chromosomal aberrations in seminomatous germ cell tumours using comparative genomic hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, A M; Kirchhoff, M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    1997-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was used to evaluate tissue specimens from 16 seminomas in order to elucidate the pathogenesis of germ cell tumours in males. A characteristic pattern of losses and gains within the entire genomes was detected in 94% of the seminomas by comparing the ratio...... was demonstrated in the seminomas by improved detection criteria, which increased specificity and sensitivity. The rare aberrations, which appeared only in tumours in improved detection criteria, which increased specificity and sensitivity. The rare aberrations, which appeared only in tumours in clinical stage II...

  17. Chromosomal imbalances detected in primary bone tumors by comparative genomic hybridization and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    Baruffi Marcelo Razera; Engel Edgard Edward; Squire Jeremy Andrew; Tone Luis Gonzaga; Rogatto Silvia Regina

    2003-01-01

    We applied a combination of comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), to characterize the genetic aberrations in three osteosarcomas (OS) and one Ewing's sarcoma. CGH identified recurrent chromosomal losses at 10p14-pter and gains at 8q22.3-24.1 in OS. Interphase FISH allowed to confirm 8q gain in two cases. A high amplification level of 11q12-qter was detected in one OS. The Ewing's sarcoma showed gain at 1p32-36.1 as the sole chromosome alteratio...

  18. Application of Microarray-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization in Prenatal and Postnatal Settings: Three Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH is a newly emerged molecular cytogenetic technique for rapid evaluation of the entire genome with sub-megabase resolution. It allows for the comprehensive investigation of thousands and millions of genomic loci at once and therefore enables the efficient detection of DNA copy number variations (a.k.a, cryptic genomic imbalances. The development and the clinical application of array CGH have revolutionized the diagnostic process in patients and has provided a clue to many unidentified or unexplained diseases which are suspected to have a genetic cause. In this paper, we present three clinical cases in both prenatal and postnatal settings. Among all, array CGH played a major discovery role to reveal the cryptic and/or complex nature of chromosome arrangements. By identifying the genetic causes responsible for the clinical observation in patients, array CGH has provided accurate diagnosis and appropriate clinical management in a timely and efficient manner.

  19. Comparative genomic hybridization: technical development and cytogenetic aspects for routine use in clinical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, J M; Cacheux, V; Da Silva, F; Collot, N; Hervy, N; Wiss, J; Tachdjian, G

    1998-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) offers a new global approach for detection of chromosomal material imbalances of the entire genome in a single experiment without cell culture. In this paper, we discuss the technical development and the cytogenetic aspects of CGH in a clinical laboratory. Based only on the visual inspection of CGH metaphase spreads, the correct identification of numerical and structural anomalies are reported. No commercial image analysis software was required in these experiments. We have demonstrated that this new technology can be set up easily for routine use in a clinical cytogenetics laboratory.

  20. Array comparative genomic hybridization-based characterization of genetic alterations in pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Voortman, Johannes; Lee, Jih-Hsiang; Killian, Jonathan Keith; Suuriniemi, Miia; Wang, Yonghong; Lucchi, Marco; Smith, William I; Meltzer, Paul; Wang, Yisong; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize and classify pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors based on array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Using aCGH, we performed karyotype analysis of 33 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) tumors, 13 SCLC cell lines, 19 bronchial carcinoids, and 9 gastrointestinal carcinoids. In contrast to the relatively conserved karyotypes of carcinoid tumors, the karyotypes of SCLC tumors and cell lines were highly aberrant. High copy number (CN) gains were detected in ...

  1. Chromosomal imbalances detected in primary bone tumors by comparative genomic hybridization and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baruffi Marcelo Razera

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We applied a combination of comparative genomic hybridization (CGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, to characterize the genetic aberrations in three osteosarcomas (OS and one Ewing's sarcoma. CGH identified recurrent chromosomal losses at 10p14-pter and gains at 8q22.3-24.1 in OS. Interphase FISH allowed to confirm 8q gain in two cases. A high amplification level of 11q12-qter was detected in one OS. The Ewing's sarcoma showed gain at 1p32-36.1 as the sole chromosome alteration. These studies demonstrate the value of molecular cytogenetic methods in the characterization of recurrent genomic alterations in bone tumor tissue.

  2. Identification of cryptic microaberrations in osteosarcoma by high-definition oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvarajah, Shamini; Yoshimoto, Maisa; Maire, Georges; Paderova, Jana; Bayani, Jane; Squire, Jeremy A; Zielenska, Maria

    2007-11-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is an aggressive bone tumor characterized by complex abnormal karyotypes and a high level of genomic instability. Using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), a novel class of localized copy number variations called microaberrations has been detected. These genomic anomalies typically involve DNA imbalances affecting 700 kb to 1 Mb DNA, and are often associated with some type of genetic syndromes. Because the origin of instability in OS is poorly understood, we used aCGH to determine whether microaberrations were a characteristic of four OS cell lines: U-2 OS, HOS, MG-63, and SAOS-2. TP53 is mutated in SAOS-2, a line in which 17 microaberrations were found. In contrast, U-2 OS, which has a wild-type TP53, had only six such anomalies, the lowest incidence. A 500-kb microaberration within a region of gain at 5p15.33 in SAOS-2 was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Significantly, this genomic location is close to the TERT gene, a region of gain in all four cell lines. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic analysis of the incidence of microaberrations in OS. The high levels of these anomalies detected suggest that the instability processes in OS that lead to a highly abnormal karyotypes may also be associated with acquisition of genomic microaberrations.

  3. Using comparative genomic hybridization to survey genomic sequence divergence across species: a proof-of-concept from Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulathinal Rob J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide analysis of sequence divergence among species offers profound insights into the evolutionary processes that shape lineages. When full-genome sequencing is not feasible for a broad comparative study, we propose the use of array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH in order to identify orthologous genes with high sequence divergence. Here we discuss experimental design, statistical power, success rate, sources of variation and potential confounding factors. We used a spotted PCR product microarray platform from Drosophila melanogaster to assess sequence divergence on a gene-by-gene basis in three fully sequenced heterologous species (D. sechellia, D. simulans, and D. yakuba. Because complete genome assemblies are available for these species this study presents a powerful test for the use of aCGH as a tool to measure sequence divergence. Results We found a consistent and linear relationship between hybridization ratio and sequence divergence of the sample to the platform species. At higher levels of sequence divergence (D. melanogaster ~84% of features had significantly less hybridization to the array in the heterologous species than the platform species, and thus could be identified as "diverged". At lower levels of divergence (≥ 97% identity, only 13% of genes were identified as diverged. While ~40% of the variation in hybridization ratio can be accounted for by variation in sequence identity of the heterologous sample relative to D. melanogaster, other individual characteristics of the DNA sequences, such as GC content, also contribute to variation in hybridization ratio, as does technical variation. Conclusions Here we demonstrate that aCGH can accurately be used as a proxy to estimate genome-wide divergence, thus providing an efficient way to evaluate how evolutionary processes and genomic architecture can shape species diversity in non-model systems. Given the increased number of species for which

  4. Comparative genomics among Saccharomyces cerevisiae × Saccharomyces kudriavzevii natural hybrid strains isolated from wine and beer reveals different origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Interspecific hybrids between S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii have frequently been detected in wine and beer fermentations. Significant physiological differences among parental and hybrid strains under different stress conditions have been evidenced. In this study, we used comparative genome hybridization analysis to evaluate the genome composition of different S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii natural hybrids isolated from wine and beer fermentations to infer their evolutionary origins and to figure out the potential role of common S. kudriavzevii gene fraction present in these hybrids. Results Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and ploidy analyses carried out in this study confirmed the presence of individual and differential chromosomal composition patterns for most S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii hybrids from beer and wine. All hybrids share a common set of depleted S. cerevisiae genes, which also are depleted or absent in the wine strains studied so far, and the presence a common set of S. kudriavzevii genes, which may be associated with their capability to grow at low temperatures. Finally, a maximum parsimony analysis of chromosomal rearrangement events, occurred in the hybrid genomes, indicated the presence of two main groups of wine hybrids and different divergent lineages of brewing strains. Conclusion Our data suggest that wine and beer S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii hybrids have been originated by different rare-mating events involving a diploid wine S. cerevisiae and a haploid or diploid European S. kudriavzevii strains. Hybrids maintain several S. kudriavzevii genes involved in cold adaptation as well as those related to S. kudriavzevii mitochondrial functions. PMID:22906207

  5. Efficient high-resolution deletion discovery in Caenorhabditis elegans by array comparative genomic hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maydan, Jason S.; Flibotte, Stephane; Edgley, Mark L.; Lau, Joanne; Selzer, Rebecca R.; Richmond, Todd A.; Pofahl, Nathan J.; Thomas, James H.; Moerman, Donald G.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed array Comparative Genomic Hybridization for Caenorhabditis elegans as a means of screening for novel induced deletions in this organism. We designed three microarrays consisting of overlapping 50-mer probes to annotated exons and micro-RNAs, the first with probes to chromosomes X and II, the second with probes to chromosome II alone, and a third to the entire genome. These arrays were used to reliably detect both a large (50 kb) multigene deletion and a small (1 kb) single-gene deletion in homozygous and heterozygous samples. In one case, a deletion breakpoint was resolved to fewer than 50 bp. In an experiment designed to identify new mutations we used the X:II and II arrays to detect deletions associated with lethal mutants on chromosome II. One is an 8-kb deletion targeting the ast-1 gene on chromosome II and another is a 141-bp deletion in the gene C06A8.1. Others span large sections of the chromosome, up to >750 kb. As a further application of array Comparative Genomic Hybridization in C. elegans we used the whole-genome array to detect the extensive natural gene content variation (almost 2%) between the N2 Bristol strain and the strain CB4856, a strain isolated in Hawaii and JU258, a strain isolated in Madeira. PMID:17267812

  6. A critical assessment of cross-species detection of gene duplicates using comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renn Suzy CP

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparison of genomic DNA among closely related strains or species is a powerful approach for identifying variation in evolutionary processes. One potent source of genomic variation is gene duplication, which is prevalent among individuals and species. Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH has been successfully utilized to detect this variation among lineages. Here, beyond the demonstration that gene duplicates among species can be quantified with aCGH, we consider the effect of sequence divergence on the ability to detect gene duplicates. Results Using the X chromosome genomic content difference between male D. melanogaster and female D. yakuba and D. simulans, we describe a decrease in the ability to accurately measure genomic content (copy number for orthologs that are only 90% identical. We demonstrate that genome characteristics (e.g. chromatin environment and non-orthologous sequence similarity can also affect the ability to accurately measure genomic content. We describe a normalization strategy and statistical criteria to be used for the identification of gene duplicates among any species group for which an array platform is available from a closely related species. Conclusions Array CGH can be used to effectively identify gene duplication and genome content; however, certain biases are present due to sequence divergence and other genome characteristics resulting from the divergence between lineages. Highly conserved gene duplicates will be more readily recovered by aCGH. Duplicates that have been retained for a selective advantage due to directional selection acting on many loci in one or both gene copies are likely to be under-represented. The results of this study should inform the interpretation of both previously published and future work that employs this powerful technique.

  7. Comparative genomic hybridizations reveal absence of large Streptomyces coelicolor genomic islands in Streptomyces lividans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherman David H

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genomes of Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans bear a considerable degree of synteny. While S. coelicolor is the model streptomycete for studying antibiotic synthesis and differentiation, S. lividans is almost exclusively considered as the preferred host, among actinomycetes, for cloning and expression of exogenous DNA. We used whole genome microarrays as a comparative genomics tool for identifying the subtle differences between these two chromosomes. Results We identified five large S. coelicolor genomic islands (larger than 25 kb and 18 smaller islets absent in S. lividans chromosome. Many of these regions show anomalous GC bias and codon usage patterns. Six of them are in close vicinity of tRNA genes while nine are flanked with near perfect repeat sequences indicating that these are probable recent evolutionary acquisitions into S. coelicolor. Embedded within these segments are at least four DNA methylases and two probable methyl-sensing restriction endonucleases. Comparison with S. coelicolor transcriptome and proteome data revealed that some of the missing genes are active during the course of growth and differentiation in S. coelicolor. In particular, a pair of methylmalonyl CoA mutase (mcm genes involved in polyketide precursor biosynthesis, an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase implicated in timing of actinorhodin synthesis and bldB, a developmentally significant regulator whose mutation causes complete abrogation of antibiotic synthesis belong to this category. Conclusion Our findings provide tangible hints for elucidating the genetic basis of important phenotypic differences between these two streptomycetes. Importantly, absence of certain genes in S. lividans identified here could potentially explain the relative ease of DNA transformations and the conditional lack of actinorhodin synthesis in S. lividans.

  8. arrayCGHbase: an analysis platform for comparative genomic hybridization microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreau Yves

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of the human genome sequence as well as the large number of physically accessible oligonucleotides, cDNA, and BAC clones across the entire genome has triggered and accelerated the use of several platforms for analysis of DNA copy number changes, amongst others microarray comparative genomic hybridization (arrayCGH. One of the challenges inherent to this new technology is the management and analysis of large numbers of data points generated in each individual experiment. Results We have developed arrayCGHbase, a comprehensive analysis platform for arrayCGH experiments consisting of a MIAME (Minimal Information About a Microarray Experiment supportive database using MySQL underlying a data mining web tool, to store, analyze, interpret, compare, and visualize arrayCGH results in a uniform and user-friendly format. Following its flexible design, arrayCGHbase is compatible with all existing and forthcoming arrayCGH platforms. Data can be exported in a multitude of formats, including BED files to map copy number information on the genome using the Ensembl or UCSC genome browser. Conclusion ArrayCGHbase is a web based and platform independent arrayCGH data analysis tool, that allows users to access the analysis suite through the internet or a local intranet after installation on a private server. ArrayCGHbase is available at http://medgen.ugent.be/arrayCGHbase/.

  9. PHOTOPROBER® Biotin: An Alternative Method for Labeling Archival DNA for Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Korinth

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH represents a powerful method for screening the entire genome of solid tumors for chromosomal imbalances. Particularly it enabled the molecular cytogenetic analysis of archival, formalin‐fixed, paraffin‐embedded (FFPE tissue. A well‐known dilemma, however, is the poor DNA quality of this material with fragment sizes below 1000 bp. Nick translation, the conventionally used enzymatic DNA labeling method in CGH, leads to even shorter fragments often below a critical limit for successful analysis. In this study we report the alternative application of non‐enzymatic, PHOTOPROBE® biotin labeling for conjugation of the hapten to the DNA prior to in situ hybridization and fluorescence detection. We analyzed 51 FFPE tumor samples mainly from the upper respiratory tract by both labeling methods. In 19 cases, both approaches were successful. The comparison of hybridized metaphases showed a distinct higher fluorescence signal of the PHOTOPROBE® samples sometimes with a discrete cytoplasm background which however did not interfere with specificity and sensitivity of the detected chromosomal imbalances. For further 32 cases characterized by an average DNA fragment size below 1000 bp, PHOTOPROBE® biotin was the only successful labeling technique thus offering a new option for CGH analysis of highly degraded DNA from archival material.

  10. SINGLE CELL DEGENERATE OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PRIMER-PCR AND COMPARATIVE GENOMIC HYBRIDIZATION WITH MODIFIED CONTROL REFERENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    For investigating the possibility of applying degenerate oligonucleotide primer PCR (DOP-PCR) and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) technique to analyses of genomic genetics in a single cell, the whole genomic DNA of a single cell with XX, XY, XO, XXY, +13 or +21 was amplified by DOP-PCR. Single cell DOP-PCR CGHs with conventional and modified control references, the genomic DNA and a single cell DOP-PCR product from normal male, were carried out respectively. The results showed that the average profile of the fluorescence intensity ratio in CGH with the genomic DNA as reference fluctuates much and that the standard deviation in about 30% haploid is beyond the normal limits. False positive hyper-representation was found to exist in X chromosome while trisomy 13 and 21 were not detected. However, the distributions of the mean and the standard deviation of the ratio in the CGH with DOP-PCR product as reference were quite acceptable. The copy number changes of chromosome X,Y,13 and 21 were revealed. Those results suggested that there is unrandom unequal amplification in a single cell DOP-PCR. Using a single DOP-PCR product as reference can decrease its influence on CGH. Single cell DOP-PCR-CGH and its application in the genetic analyses of preimplantation embryo or fetal cell in maternal blood may be possible.

  11. Supervised Lowess normalization of comparative genome hybridization data – application to lactococcal strain comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsens Harma A

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Array-based comparative genome hybridization (aCGH is commonly used to determine the genomic content of bacterial strains. Since prokaryotes in general have less conserved genome sequences than eukaryotes, sequence divergences between the genes in the genomes used for an aCGH experiment obstruct determination of genome variations (e.g. deletions. Current normalization methods do not take into consideration sequence divergence between target and microarray features and therefore cannot distinguish a difference in signal due to systematic errors in the data or due to sequence divergence. Results We present supervised Lowess, or S-Lowess, an application of the subset Lowess normalization method. By using a predicted subset of array features with minimal sequence divergence between the analyzed strains for the normalization procedure we remove systematic errors from dual-dye aCGH data in two steps: (1 determination of a subset of conserved genes (i.e. likely conserved genes, LCG; and (2 using the LCG for subset Lowess normalization. Subset Lowess determines the correction factors for systematic errors in the subset of array features and normalizes all array features using these correction factors. The performance of S-Lowess was assessed on aCGH experiments in which differentially labeled genomic DNA fragments of Lactococcus lactis IL1403 and L. lactis MG1363 strains were hybridized to IL1403 DNA microarrays. Since both genomes are sequenced and gene deletions identified, the success rate of different aCGH normalization methods in detecting these deletions in the MG1363 genome were determined. S-Lowess detects 97% of the deletions, whereas other aCGH normalization methods detect up to only 60% of the deletions. Conclusion S-Lowess is implemented in a user-friendly web-tool accessible from http://bioinformatics.biol.rug.nl/websoftware/s-lowess. We demonstrate that it outperforms existing normalization methods and maximizes

  12. Insertional translocation detected using FISH confirmation of array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sung-Hae L; Shaw, Chad; Ou, Zhishuo; Eng, Patricia A; Cooper, M Lance; Pursley, Amber N; Sahoo, Trilochan; Bacino, Carlos A; Chinault, A Craig; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Patel, Ankita; Lupski, James R; Cheung, Sau Wai

    2010-05-01

    Insertional translocations (ITs) are rare events that require at least three breaks in the chromosomes involved and thus qualify as complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCR). In the current study, we identified 40 ITs from approximately 18,000 clinical cases (1:500) using array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) in conjunction with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) confirmation of the aCGH findings, and parental follow-up studies. Both submicroscopic and microscopically visible IT events were detected. They were divided into three major categories: (1) simple intrachromosomal and interchromosomal IT resulting in pure segmental trisomy, (2) complex IT involving more than one abnormality, (3) deletion inherited from a parent with a balanced IT resulting in pure segmental monosomy. Of the cases in which follow-up parental studies were available, over half showed inheritance from an apparently unaffected parent carrying the same unbalanced rearrangement detected in the propositi, thus decreasing the likelihood that these IT events are clinically relevant. Nevertheless, we identified six cases in which small submicroscopic events were detected involving known disease-associated genes/genomic segments and are likely to be pathogenic. We recommend that copy number gains detected by clinical aCGH analysis should be confirmed using FISH analysis whenever possible in order to determine the physical location of the duplicated segment. We hypothesize that the increased use of aCGH in the clinic will demonstrate that IT occurs more frequently than previously considered but can identify genomic rearrangements with unclear clinical significance.

  13. 1-Mb resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization using a BAC clone set optimized for cancer gene analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greshock, J; Naylor, TL; Margolin, A; Diskin, S; Cleaver, SH; Futreal, PA; deJong, PJ; Zhao, SY; Liebman, M; Weber, BL

    2004-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a recently developed tool for genome-wide determination of DNA copy number alterations. This technology has tremendous potential for disease-gene discovery in cancer and developmental disorders as well as numerous other applications. However, w

  14. Characterization of Deletions of the HBA and HBB Loci by Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabath, Daniel E.; Bender, Michael A.; Sankaran, Vijay G.; Vamos, Esther; Kentsis, Alex; Yi, Hye-Son; Greisman, Harvey A.

    2017-01-01

    Thalassemia is among the most common genetic diseases worldwide. α-Thalassemia is usually caused by deletion of one or more of the duplicated HBA genes on chromosome 16. In contrast, most β-thalassemia results from point mutations that decrease or eliminate expression of the HBB gene on chromosome 11. Deletions within the HBB locus result in thalassemia or hereditary persistence of fetal Hb. Although routine diagnostic testing cannot distinguish thalassemia deletions from point mutations, deletional hereditary persistence of fetal Hb is notable for having an elevated HbF level with a normal mean corpuscular volume. A small number of deletions accounts for most α-thalassemias; in contrast, there are no predominant HBB deletions causing β-thalassemia. To facilitate the identification and characterization of deletions of the HBA and HBB globin loci, we performed array-based comparative genomic hybridization using a custom oligonucleotide microarray. We accurately mapped the breakpoints of known and previously uncharacterized HBB deletions defining previously uncharacterized deletion breakpoints by PCR amplification and sequencing. The array also successfully identified the common HBA deletions --SEA and --FIL. In summary, comparative genomic hybridization can be used to characterize deletions of the HBA and HBB loci, allowing high-resolution characterization of novel deletions that are not readily detected by PCR-based methods. PMID:26612711

  15. [Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder analyzed with array comparative genome hybridization method. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duga, Balázs; Czakó, Márta; Komlósi, Katalin; Hadzsiev, Kinga; Sümegi, Katalin; Kisfali, Péter; Melegh, Márton; Melegh, Béla

    2014-10-05

    One of the most common psychiatric disorders during childhood is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, which affects 5-6% of children worldwide. Symptoms include attention deficit, hyperactivity, forgetfulness and weak impulse control. The exact mechanism behind the development of the disease is unknown. However, current data suggest that a strong genetic background is responsible, which explains the frequent occurrence within a family. Literature data show that copy number variations are very common in patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The authors present a patient with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder who proved to have two approximately 400 kb heterozygous microduplications at 6p25.2 and 15q13.3 chromosomal regions detected by comparative genomic hybridization methods. Both duplications affect genes (6p25.2: SLC22A23; 15q13.3: CHRNA7) which may play a role in the development of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. This case serves as an example of the wide spectrum of indication of the array comparative genome hybridization method.

  16. Chromosomal Localization of DNA Amplifications in Neuroblastoma Tumors Using cDNA Microarray Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Beheshti

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional comparative genomic hybridization (CGH profiling of neuroblastomas has identified many genomic aberrations, although the limited resolution has precluded a precise localization of sequences of interest within amplicons. To map high copy number genomic gains in clinically matched stage IV neuroblastomas, CGH analysis using a 19,200-feature cDNA microarray was used. A dedicated (freely available algorithm was developed for rapid in silico determination of chromosomal localizations of microarray cDNA targets, and for generation of an ideogram-type profile of copy number changes. Using these methodologies, novel gene amplifications undetectable by chromosome CGH were identified, and larger MYCN amplicon sizes (in one tumor up to 6 Mb than those previously reported in neuroblastoma were identified. The genes HPCAL1, LPIN1/KIAA0188, NAG, and NSE1/LOC151354 were found to be coamplified with MYCN. To determine whether stage IV primary tumors could be further subclassified based on their genomic copy number profiles, hierarchical clustering was performed. Cluster analysis of microarray CGH data identified three groups: 1 no amplifications evident, 2 a small MYCN amplicon as the only detectable imbalance, and 3 a large MYCN amplicon with additional gene amplifications. Application of CGH to cDNA microarray targets will help to determine both the variation of amplicon size and help better define amplification-dependent and independent pathways of progression in neuroblastoma.

  17. Evaluation of Apis mellifera syriaca Levant region honeybee conservation using comparative genome hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Nizar Jamal; Batainh, Ahmed; Saini, Deepti; Migdadi, Osama; Aiyaz, Mohamed; Manchiganti, Rushiraj; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh; Al-Shagour, Banan; Brake, Mohammad; Bourgeois, Lelania; De Guzman, Lilia; Rinderer, Thomas; Hamouri, Zayed Mahoud

    2016-06-01

    Apis mellifera syriaca is the native honeybee subspecies of Jordan and much of the Levant region. It expresses behavioral adaptations to a regional climate with very high temperatures, nectar dearth in summer, attacks of the Oriental wasp and is resistant to Varroa mites. The A. m. syriaca control reference sample (CRS) in this study was originally collected and stored since 2001 from "Wadi Ben Hammad", a remote valley in the southern region of Jordan. Morphometric and mitochondrial DNA markers of these honeybees had shown highest similarity to reference A. m. syriaca samples collected in 1952 by Brother Adam of samples collected from the Middle East. Samples 1-5 were collected from the National Center for Agricultural Research and Extension breeding apiary which was established for the conservation of A. m. syriaca. Our objective was to determine the success of an A. m. syriaca honey bee conservation program using genomic information from an array-based comparative genomic hybridization platform to evaluate genetic similarities to a historic reference collection (CRS). Our results had shown insignificant genomic differences between the current population in the conservation program and the CRS indicated that program is successfully conserving A. m. syriaca. Functional genomic variations were identified which are useful for conservation monitoring and may be useful for breeding programs designed to improve locally adapted strains of A. m. syriaca.

  18. Characterization of genomic alterations in radiation-associated breast cancer among childhood cancer survivors, using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH arrays.

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    Xiaohong R Yang

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Epidemiologic studies of radiation-exposed cohorts have been primarily descriptive; molecular events responsible for the development of radiation-associated breast cancer have not been elucidated. In this study, we used array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH to characterize genome-wide copy number changes in breast tumors collected in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS. Array-CGH data were obtained from 32 cases who developed a second primary breast cancer following chest irradiation at early ages for the treatment of their first cancers, mostly Hodgkin lymphoma. The majority of these cases developed breast cancer before age 45 (91%, n = 29, had invasive ductal tumors (81%, n = 26, estrogen receptor (ER-positive staining (68%, n = 19 out of 28, and high proliferation as indicated by high Ki-67 staining (77%, n = 17 out of 22. Genomic regions with low-copy number gains and losses and high-level amplifications were similar to what has been reported in sporadic breast tumors, however, the frequency of amplifications of the 17q12 region containing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 was much higher among CCSS cases (38%, n = 12. Our findings suggest that second primary breast cancers in CCSS were enriched for an "amplifier" genomic subgroup with highly proliferative breast tumors. Future investigation in a larger irradiated cohort will be needed to confirm our findings.

  19. Comprehensive genome characterization of solitary fibrous tumors using high-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertucci, François; Bouvier-Labit, Corinne; Finetti, Pascal; Adélaïde, José; Metellus, Philippe; Mokhtari, Karima; Decouvelaere, Anne-Valérie; Miquel, Catherine; Jouvet, Anne; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Pedeutour, Florence; Chaffanet, Max; Birnbaum, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are rare spindle cell tumors with limited therapeutic options. Their molecular basis is poorly known. No consistent cytogenetic abnormality has been reported. We used high-resolution whole-genome array-based comparative genomic hybridization (Agilent 244K oligonucleotide chips) to profile 47 samples, meningeal in >75% of cases. Few copy number aberrations (CNAs) were observed. Sixty-eight percent of samples did not show any gene CNA after exclusion of probes located in regions with referenced copy number variation (CNV). Only low-level CNAs were observed. The genomic profiles were very homogeneous among samples. No molecular class was revealed by clustering of DNA copy numbers. All cases displayed a "simplex" profile. No recurrent CNA was identified. Imbalances occurring in >20%, such as the gain of 8p11.23-11.22 region, contained known CNVs. The 13q14.11-13q31.1 region (lost in 4% of cases) was the largest altered region and contained the lowest percentage of genes with referenced CNVs. A total of 425 genes without CNV showed copy number transition in at least one sample, but only but only 1 in at least 10% of samples. The genomic profiles of meningeal and extra-meningeal cases did not show any differences.

  20. Experimental analysis of oligonucleotide microarray design criteria to detect deletions by comparative genomic hybridization

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    Moerman Donald G

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH is currently one of the most powerful techniques to measure DNA copy number in large genomes. In humans, microarray CGH is widely used to assess copy number variants in healthy individuals and copy number aberrations associated with various diseases, syndromes and disease susceptibility. In model organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans the technique has been applied to detect mutations, primarily deletions, in strains of interest. Although various constraints on oligonucleotide properties have been suggested to minimize non-specific hybridization and improve the data quality, there have been few experimental validations for CGH experiments. For genomic regions where strict design filters would limit the coverage it would also be useful to quantify the expected loss in data quality associated with relaxed design criteria. Results We have quantified the effects of filtering various oligonucleotide properties by measuring the resolving power for detecting deletions in the human and C. elegans genomes using NimbleGen microarrays. Approximately twice as many oligonucleotides are typically required to be affected by a deletion in human DNA samples in order to achieve the same statistical confidence as one would observe for a deletion in C. elegans. Surprisingly, the ability to detect deletions strongly depends on the oligonucleotide 15-mer count, which is defined as the sum of the genomic frequency of all the constituent 15-mers within the oligonucleotide. A similarity level above 80% to non-target sequences over the length of the probe produces significant cross-hybridization. We recommend the use of a fairly large melting temperature window of up to 10°C, the elimination of repeat sequences, the elimination of homopolymers longer than 5 nucleotides, and a threshold of -1 kcal/mol on the oligonucleotide self-folding energy. We observed very little difference in data

  1. High-resolution comparative genomic hybridization of inflammatory breast cancer and identification of candidate genes.

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    Ismahane Bekhouche

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC is an aggressive form of BC poorly defined at the molecular level. We compared the molecular portraits of 63 IBC and 134 non-IBC (nIBC clinical samples. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Genomic imbalances of 49 IBCs and 124 nIBCs were determined using high-resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization, and mRNA expression profiles of 197 samples using whole-genome microarrays. Genomic profiles of IBCs were as heterogeneous as those of nIBCs, and globally relatively close. However, IBCs showed more frequent "complex" patterns and a higher percentage of genes with CNAs per sample. The number of altered regions was similar in both types, although some regions were altered more frequently and/or with higher amplitude in IBCs. Many genes were similarly altered in both types; however, more genes displayed recurrent amplifications in IBCs. The percentage of genes whose mRNA expression correlated with CNAs was similar in both types for the gained genes, but ∼7-fold lower in IBCs for the lost genes. Integrated analysis identified 24 potential candidate IBC-specific genes. Their combined expression accurately distinguished IBCs and nIBCS in an independent validation set, and retained an independent prognostic value in a series of 1,781 nIBCs, reinforcing the hypothesis for a link with IBC aggressiveness. Consistent with the hyperproliferative and invasive phenotype of IBC these genes are notably involved in protein translation, cell cycle, RNA processing and transcription, metabolism, and cell migration. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest a higher genomic instability of IBC. We established the first repertory of DNA copy number alterations in this tumor, and provided a list of genes that may contribute to its aggressiveness and represent novel therapeutic targets.

  2. Analysis of Chinese women with primary ovarian insufficiency by high resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization

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    LIAO Can; FU Fang; YANG Xin; SUN Yi-min; LI Dong-zhi

    2011-01-01

    Background Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is defined as a primary ovarian defect characterized by absent menarche (primary amenorrhea) or premature depletion of ovarian follicles before the age of 40 years. The etiology of primary ovarian insufficiency in human female patients is still unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential genetic causes in primary amenorrhea patients by high resolution array based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis.Methods Following the standard karyotyping analysis, genomic DNA from whole blood of 15 primary amenorrhea patients and 15 normal control women was hybridized with Affymetrix cytogenetic 2.7M arrays following the standard protocol. Copy number variations identified by array-CGH were confirmed by real time polymerase chain reaction.Results All the 30 samples were negative by conventional karyotyping analysis. Microdeletions on chromosome 17q21.31-q21.32 with approximately 1.3 Mb were identified in four patients by high resolution array-CGH analysis. This included the female reproductive secretory pathway related factor N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) gene.Conclusions The results of the present study suggest that there may be critical regions regulating primary ovarian insufficiency in women with a 17q21.31-q21.32 microdeletion. This effect might be due to the loss of function of the NSF gene/genes within the deleted region or to effects on contiguous genes.

  3. Comparative genomics among Saccharomyces cerevisiae × Saccharomyces kudriavzevii natural hybrid strains isolated from wine and beer reveals different origins

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    Peris David

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interspecific hybrids between S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii have frequently been detected in wine and beer fermentations. Significant physiological differences among parental and hybrid strains under different stress conditions have been evidenced. In this study, we used comparative genome hybridization analysis to evaluate the genome composition of different S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii natural hybrids isolated from wine and beer fermentations to infer their evolutionary origins and to figure out the potential role of common S. kudriavzevii gene fraction present in these hybrids. Results Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH and ploidy analyses carried out in this study confirmed the presence of individual and differential chromosomal composition patterns for most S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii hybrids from beer and wine. All hybrids share a common set of depleted S. cerevisiae genes, which also are depleted or absent in the wine strains studied so far, and the presence a common set of S. kudriavzevii genes, which may be associated with their capability to grow at low temperatures. Finally, a maximum parsimony analysis of chromosomal rearrangement events, occurred in the hybrid genomes, indicated the presence of two main groups of wine hybrids and different divergent lineages of brewing strains. Conclusion Our data suggest that wine and beer S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii hybrids have been originated by different rare-mating events involving a diploid wine S. cerevisiae and a haploid or diploid European S. kudriavzevii strains. Hybrids maintain several S. kudriavzevii genes involved in cold adaptation as well as those related to S. kudriavzevii mitochondrial functions.

  4. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of Trichoderma reesei strains with enhanced cellulase production properties

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    Penttilä Merja

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trichoderma reesei is the main industrial producer of cellulases and hemicellulases that are used to depolymerize biomass in a variety of biotechnical applications. Many of the production strains currently in use have been generated by classical mutagenesis. In this study we characterized genomic alterations in high-producing mutants of T. reesei by high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH. Our aim was to obtain genome-wide information which could be utilized for better understanding of the mechanisms underlying efficient cellulase production, and would enable targeted genetic engineering for improved production of proteins in general. Results We carried out an aCGH analysis of four high-producing strains (QM9123, QM9414, NG14 and Rut-C30 using the natural isolate QM6a as a reference. In QM9123 and QM9414 we detected a total of 44 previously undocumented mutation sites including deletions, chromosomal translocation breakpoints and single nucleotide mutations. In NG14 and Rut-C30 we detected 126 mutations of which 17 were new mutations not documented previously. Among these new mutations are the first chromosomal translocation breakpoints identified in NG14 and Rut-C30. We studied the effects of two deletions identified in Rut-C30 (a deletion of 85 kb in the scaffold 15 and a deletion in a gene encoding a transcription factor on cellulase production by constructing knock-out strains in the QM6a background. Neither the 85 kb deletion nor the deletion of the transcription factor affected cellulase production. Conclusions aCGH analysis identified dozens of mutations in each strain analyzed. The resolution was at the level of single nucleotide mutation. High-density aCGH is a powerful tool for genome-wide analysis of organisms with small genomes e.g. fungi, especially in studies where a large set of interesting strains is analyzed.

  5. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of small supernumerary marker chromosomes in human infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guediche, N; Tosca, L; Kara Terki, A; Bas, C; Lecerf, L; Young, J; Briand-Suleau, A; Tou, B; Bouligand, J; Brisset, S; Misrahi, M; Guiochon-Mantel, A; Goossens, M; Tachdjian, G

    2012-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are structurally abnormal chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by conventional banding cytogenetics. This study describes four patients with sSMC in relation with infertility. Patient 1 had primary infertility. His brother, fertile, carried the same sSMC (patient 2). Patient 3 presented polycystic ovary syndrome and patient 4 primary ovarian insufficiency. Cytogenetic studies, array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and sperm analyses were compared with cases previously reported. sSMC corresponded to the 15q11.2 region (patients 1 and 2), the centromeric chromosome 15 region (patient 3) and the 21p11.2 region (patient 4). Array CGH showed 3.6-Mb gain for patients 1 and 2 and 0.266-Mb gain for patient 4. Sperm fluorescent in-situ hybridization analyses found ratios of 0.37 and 0.30 of sperm nuclei with sSMC(15) for patients 1 and 2, respectively (P < 0.001). An increase of sperm nuclei with disomy X, Y and 18 was noted for patient 1 compared with control and patient 2 (P < 0.001). Among the genes mapped in the unbalanced chromosomal regions, POTE B and BAGE are related to the testis and ovary, respectively. The implication of sSMC in infertility could be due to duplication, but also to mechanical effects perturbing meiosis.

  6. Shared Y chromosome repetitive DNA sequences in stallion and donkey as visualized using whole-genomic comparative hybridization

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    R. Mezzanotte

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The genome of stallion (Spanish breed and donkey (Spanish endemic Zamorano-Leonés were compared using whole comparative genomic in situ hybridization (W-CGH technique, with special reference to the variability observed in the Y chromosome. Results show that these diverging genomes still share some highly repetitive DNA families localized in pericentromeric regions and, in the particular case of the Y chromosome, a sub-family of highly repeated DNA sequences, greatly expanded in the donkey genome, accounts for a large part of the chromatin in the stallion Y chromosome.

  7. Shared Y chromosome repetitive DNA sequences in stallion and donkey as visualized using whole-genomic comparative hybridization

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    J. Gosalvez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The genome of stallion (Spanish breed and donkey (Spanish endemic Zamorano-Leonés were compared using whole comparative genomic in situ hybridization (W-CGH technique, with special reference to the variability observed in the Y chromosome. Results show that these diverging genomes still share some highly repetitive DNA families localized in pericentromeric regions and, in the particular case of the Y chromosome, a sub-family of highly repeated DNA sequences, greatly expanded in the donkey genome, accounts for a large part of the chromatin in the stallion Y chromosome.

  8. Application of Array-based Comparative Genome Hybridization in Children with Developmental Delay or Mental Retardation

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    Jao-Shwann Liang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Children with developmental delay or mental retardation (DD/MR are commonly en countered in child neurology clinics, and establishing an etiologic diagnosis is a challenge for child neurologists. Among the etiologies, chromosomal imbalance is one of the most important causes. However, many of these chromosomal imbalances are submicroscopic and cannot be detected by conventional cytogenetic methods. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH is considered to be superior in the investigation of chromosomal deletions or duplications in children with DD/MR, and has been demonstrated to improve the diagnostic detection rate for these small chromosomal abnormalities. Here, we review the recent studies of array CGH in the evaluation of patients with idiopathic DD/MR.

  9. Characterization of hemizygous deletions in citrus using array-comparative genomic hybridization and microsynteny comparisons with the poplar genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, Gabino; Naranjo, Miguel A; Iglesias, Domingo J; Ruiz-Rivero, Omar; Geraud, Marion; Usach, Antonio; Talón, Manuel

    2008-08-09

    Many fruit-tree species, including relevant Citrus spp varieties exhibit a reproductive biology that impairs breeding and strongly constrains genetic improvements. In citrus, juvenility increases the generation time while sexual sterility, inbreeding depression and self-incompatibility prevent the production of homozygous cultivars. Genomic technology may provide citrus researchers with a new set of tools to address these various restrictions. In this work, we report a valuable genomics-based protocol for the structural analysis of deletion mutations on an heterozygous background. Two independent fast neutron mutants of self-incompatible clementine (Citrus clementina Hort. Ex Tan. cv. Clemenules) were the subject of the study. Both mutants, named 39B3 and 39E7, were expected to carry DNA deletions in hemizygous dosage. Array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (array-CGH) using a Citrus cDNA microarray allowed the identification of underrepresented genes in these two mutants. Subsequent comparison of citrus deleted genes with annotated plant genomes, especially poplar, made possible to predict the presence of a large deletion in 39B3 of about 700 kb and at least two deletions of approximately 100 and 500 kb in 39E7. The deletion in 39B3 was further characterized by PCR on available Citrus BACs, which helped us to build a partial physical map of the deletion. Among the deleted genes, ClpC-like gene coding for a putative subunit of a multifunctional chloroplastic protease involved in the regulation of chlorophyll b synthesis was directly related to the mutated phenotype since the mutant showed a reduced chlorophyll a/b ratio in green tissues. In this work, we report the use of array-CGH for the successful identification of genes included in a hemizygous deletion induced by fast neutron irradiation on Citrus clementina. The study of gene content and order into the 39B3 deletion also led to the unexpected conclusion that microsynteny and local gene colinearity in

  10. Characterization of hemizygous deletions in Citrus using array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization and microsynteny comparisons with the poplar genome

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    Usach Antonio

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many fruit-tree species, including relevant Citrus spp varieties exhibit a reproductive biology that impairs breeding and strongly constrains genetic improvements. In citrus, juvenility increases the generation time while sexual sterility, inbreeding depression and self-incompatibility prevent the production of homozygous cultivars. Genomic technology may provide citrus researchers with a new set of tools to address these various restrictions. In this work, we report a valuable genomics-based protocol for the structural analysis of deletion mutations on an heterozygous background. Results Two independent fast neutron mutants of self-incompatible clementine (Citrus clementina Hort. Ex Tan. cv. Clemenules were the subject of the study. Both mutants, named 39B3 and 39E7, were expected to carry DNA deletions in hemizygous dosage. Array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (array-CGH using a Citrus cDNA microarray allowed the identification of underrepresented genes in these two mutants. Subsequent comparison of citrus deleted genes with annotated plant genomes, especially poplar, made possible to predict the presence of a large deletion in 39B3 of about 700 kb and at least two deletions of approximately 100 and 500 kb in 39E7. The deletion in 39B3 was further characterized by PCR on available Citrus BACs, which helped us to build a partial physical map of the deletion. Among the deleted genes, ClpC-like gene coding for a putative subunit of a multifunctional chloroplastic protease involved in the regulation of chlorophyll b synthesis was directly related to the mutated phenotype since the mutant showed a reduced chlorophyll a/b ratio in green tissues. Conclusion In this work, we report the use of array-CGH for the successful identification of genes included in a hemizygous deletion induced by fast neutron irradiation on Citrus clementina. The study of gene content and order into the 39B3 deletion also led to the unexpected

  11. Identification and characterization of a de novo partial trisomy 10p by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzacken, B; Lapierre, J M; Siffroi, J P; Chalvon, A; Tachdjian, G

    1998-10-01

    We report the characterization of a de novo unbalanced chromosome rearrangement by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) in a 15-day-old child with hypotonia and dysmorphia. We describe the combined use of CGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to identify the origin of the additional chromosomal material on the short arm of chromosome 6. Investigation with FISH revealed that the excess material was not derived from chromosome 6. Identification of unknown unbalanced aberrations that could not be identified by traditional cytogenetics procedures is possible by CGH analysis. Visual analysis of digital images from CGH-metaphase spreads revealed a predominantly green signal on the telomeric region of chromosome 10p. After quantitative digital ratio imaging of 10 CGH-metaphase spreads, a region of gain was found in the chromosome band 10p14-pter. The CGH finding was confirmed by FISH analysis, using a whole chromosome 10 paint probe. These results show the usefulness of CGH for a rapid characterization of de novo unbalanced translocation, unidentifiable by karyotype alone.

  12. Comparative genomic hybridization array study and its utility in detection of constitutional and acquired anomalies.

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    Andrieux, Joris; Sheth, Frenny

    2009-10-01

    The last decade has witnessed an upsurge in the knowledge of cytogenetic disorders and putting the old technology in a new basket with molecular genetics. As conventional cytogenetic can detect the genetic alteration of 10-15 Mb, many of the micro-deletions and micro-duplications are missed. However, with the advent of technology of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), the resolution of genetic aberrations can reach to 3-5 Mb, nonetheless the anomalies smaller than the above, need further precision which has been achieved using comparative genomic hybridization array (CGH-array). Introduction of array-CGH has brought higher sensitivity with automated DNA fragment analyzer and DNA chip for submicroscopic chromosomal anomalies that are missed till date in many of the acquired and constitutional genetic disorders. The resolution of the technology varies from several Kb to 1 Mb depending upon the type of array selected. With the recent improvement in the array-CGH technology, a link between cytogenetic and molecular biology has been established without replacing conventional cytogenetic technique. The wider accessibility of the technology shall certainly provide a clue to the many unidentified/unexplained genetic disorders which shall prove to be a boon to the clinicians.

  13. Unexpected structural complexity of supernumerary marker chromosomes characterized by microarray comparative genomic hybridization

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    Hing Anne V

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMCs are structurally abnormal extra chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by conventional banding techniques. In the past, SMCs have been characterized using a variety of different molecular cytogenetic techniques. Although these techniques can sometimes identify the chromosome of origin of SMCs, they are cumbersome to perform and are not available in many clinical cytogenetic laboratories. Furthermore, they cannot precisely determine the region or breakpoints of the chromosome(s involved. In this study, we describe four patients who possess one or more SMCs (a total of eight SMCs in all four patients that were characterized by microarray comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH. Results In at least one SMC from all four patients, array CGH uncovered unexpected complexity, in the form of complex rearrangements, that could have gone undetected using other molecular cytogenetic techniques. Although array CGH accurately defined the chromosome content of all but two minute SMCs, fluorescence in situ hybridization was necessary to determine the structure of the markers. Conclusion The increasing use of array CGH in clinical cytogenetic laboratories will provide an efficient method for more comprehensive characterization of SMCs. Improved SMC characterization, facilitated by array CGH, will allow for more accurate SMC/phenotype correlation.

  14. Array comparative genomic hybridization-based characterization of genetic alterations in pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voortman, Johannes; Lee, Jih-Hsiang; Killian, Jonathan Keith; Suuriniemi, Miia; Wang, Yonghong; Lucchi, Marco; Smith, William I; Meltzer, Paul; Wang, Yisong; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2010-07-20

    The goal of this study was to characterize and classify pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors based on array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Using aCGH, we performed karyotype analysis of 33 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) tumors, 13 SCLC cell lines, 19 bronchial carcinoids, and 9 gastrointestinal carcinoids. In contrast to the relatively conserved karyotypes of carcinoid tumors, the karyotypes of SCLC tumors and cell lines were highly aberrant. High copy number (CN) gains were detected in SCLC tumors and cell lines in cytogenetic bands encoding JAK2, FGFR1, and MYC family members. In some of those samples, the CN of these genes exceeded 100, suggesting that they could represent driver alterations and potential drug targets in subgroups of SCLC patients. In SCLC tumors, as well as bronchial carcinoids and carcinoids of gastrointestinal origin, recurrent CN alterations were observed in 203 genes, including the RB1 gene and 59 microRNAs of which 51 locate in the DLK1-DIO3 domain. These findings suggest the existence of partially shared CN alterations in these tumor types. In contrast, CN alterations of the TP53 gene and the MYC family members were predominantly observed in SCLC. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the aCGH profile of SCLC cell lines highly resembles that of clinical SCLC specimens. Finally, by analyzing potential drug targets, we provide a genomics-based rationale for targeting the AKT-mTOR and apoptosis pathways in SCLC.

  15. Chromosomal mapping of specific DNA gains and losses in solid tumors using comparative genomic hybridization

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    Schrock, E.; Manoir, S. du; Speicher, M. [National Center for Human Genome Research, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a new molecular cytogenetic technique that is based on two color FISH and quantitative digital imaging microscopy. CGH is used to comprehensively survey tumor genomes for copy number changes and to determine the map position of amplification sites on normal reference chromosomes. CGH was used to analyze 107 different solid tumors, including 16 low grade astrocytomas, 15 recurrent astrocytic tumors, 13 high grade astrocytomas, 13 small cell lung cancers (SCLC), 14 breast cancer samples (7 diploid and 7 aneupoid tumors), 18 chromophobe renal cell carcinomas and 5 seminomas. Tumor DNA was extracted from frozen tissue, autopic material and formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Our results revealed tumor specific gains and losses of certain chromosomes or chromosomal subregions (e.g., chromosomes 7 and 10 in glioblastomas, chromosomes 3 and 5 in SCLC). Numerous DNA-amplifications were mapped on reference metaphase and prometaphase chromosomes. The frequent amplification of the EGFR gene (malignant gliomas), protooncogenes of the myc family (SCLC) and of c-myc, int-2 and c-erbB2 (breast cancer) was confirmed. Many additional amplification sites, however, were mapped that were not described before. The results of CGH analysis were independently confirmed by means of cytogenetic banding analysis, interphase cytogenetics with region specific DNA-clones, Southern-Blot analysis, DNA-cytometry and studies of loss of heterozygosity.

  16. Rapid High Resolution Single Nucleotide Polymorphism–Comparative Genome Hybridization Mapping in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flibotte, Stephane; Edgley, Mark L.; Maydan, Jason; Taylor, Jon; Zapf, Rick; Waterston, Robert; Moerman, Donald G.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a significantly improved and simplified method for high-resolution mapping of phenotypic traits in Caenorhabditis elegans using a combination of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and oligo array comparative genome hybridization (array CGH). We designed a custom oligonucleotide array using a subset of confirmed SNPs between the canonical wild-type Bristol strain N2 and the Hawaiian isolate CB4856, populated with densely overlapping 50-mer probes corresponding to both N2 and CB4856 SNP sequences. Using this method a mutation can be mapped to a resolution of ∼200 kb in a single genetic cross. Six mutations representing each of the C. elegans chromosomes were detected unambiguously and at high resolution using genomic DNA from populations derived from as few as 100 homozygous mutant segregants of mutant N2/CB4856 heterozygotes. Our method completely dispenses with the PCR, restriction digest, and gel analysis of standard SNP mapping and should be easy to extend to any organism with interbreeding strains. This method will be particularly powerful when applied to difficult or hard-to-map low-penetrance phenotypes. It should also be possible to map polygenic traits using this method. PMID:18957702

  17. Microdeletion and microduplication analysis of chinese conotruncal defects patients with targeted array comparative genomic hybridization.

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    Xiaohui Gong

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The current study aimed to develop a reliable targeted array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH to detect microdeletions and microduplications in congenital conotruncal defects (CTDs, especially on 22q11.2 region, and for some other chromosomal aberrations, such as 5p15-5p, 7q11.23 and 4p16.3. METHODS: Twenty-seven patients with CTDs, including 12 pulmonary atresia (PA, 10 double-outlet right ventricle (DORV, 3 transposition of great arteries (TGA, 1 tetralogy of Fallot (TOF and one ventricular septal defect (VSD, were enrolled in this study and screened for pathogenic copy number variations (CNVs, using Agilent 8 x 15K targeted aCGH. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR was performed to test the molecular results of targeted aCGH. RESULTS: Four of 27 patients (14.8% had 22q11.2 CNVs, 1 microdeletion and 3 microduplications. qPCR test confirmed the microdeletion and microduplication detected by the targeted aCGH. CONCLUSION: Chromosomal abnormalities were a well-known cause of multiple congenital anomalies (MCA. This aCGH using arrays with high-density coverage in the targeted regions can detect genomic imbalances including 22q11.2 and other 10 kinds CNVs effectively and quickly. This approach has the potential to be applied to detect aneuploidy and common microdeletion/microduplication syndromes on a single microarray.

  18. Comprehensive embryo analysis of advanced maternal age-related aneuploidies and mosaicism by short comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Mariona; Daina, Gemma; Obradors, Albert; Ramos, Laia; Velilla, Esther; Fernández, Sílvia; Martínez-Passarell, Olga; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2011-01-01

    The short comparative genomic hybridization (short-CGH) method was used to perform a comprehensive cytogenetic study of isolated blastomeres from advanced maternal age embryos, discarded after fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) preimplantation genetic screening (PGS), detecting aneuploidies (38.5% of which corresponded to chromosomes not screened by 9-chromosome FISH), structural aberrations (31.8%), and mosaicism (77.3%). The short-CGH method was subsequently applied in one PGS, achieving a twin pregnancy.

  19. Significance of genomic instability in breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors: analysis of microarray-comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Masahiro; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Miura, Shiro; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2011-12-07

    It has been postulated that ionizing radiation induces breast cancers among atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors. We have reported a higher incidence of HER2 and C-MYC oncogene amplification in breast cancers from A-bomb survivors. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of A-bomb radiation exposure on genomic instability (GIN), which is an important hallmark of carcinogenesis, in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues of breast cancer by using microarray-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Tumor DNA was extracted from FFPE tissues of invasive ductal cancers from 15 survivors who were exposed at 1.5 km or less from the hypocenter and 13 calendar year-matched non-exposed patients followed by aCGH analysis using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray. The total length of copy number aberrations (CNA) was used as an indicator of GIN, and correlation with clinicopathological factors were statistically tested. The mean of the derivative log ratio spread (DLRSpread), which estimates the noise by calculating the spread of log ratio differences between consecutive probes for all chromosomes, was 0.54 (range, 0.26 to 1.05). The concordance of results between aCGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for HER2 gene amplification was 88%. The incidence of HER2 amplification and histological grade was significantly higher in the A-bomb survivors than control group (P = 0.04, respectively). The total length of CNA tended to be larger in the A-bomb survivors (P = 0.15). Correlation analysis of CNA and clinicopathological factors revealed that DLRSpread was negatively correlated with that significantly (P = 0.034, r = -0.40). Multivariate analysis with covariance revealed that the exposure to A-bomb was a significant (P = 0.005) independent factor which was associated with larger total length of CNA of breast cancers. Thus, archival FFPE tissues from A-bomb survivors are useful for genome-wide aCGH analysis. Our results suggested that A

  20. Significance of genomic instability in breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors: analysis of microarray-comparative genomic hybridization

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    Oikawa Masahiro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been postulated that ionizing radiation induces breast cancers among atomic bomb (A-bomb survivors. We have reported a higher incidence of HER2 and C-MYC oncogene amplification in breast cancers from A-bomb survivors. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of A-bomb radiation exposure on genomic instability (GIN, which is an important hallmark of carcinogenesis, in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues of breast cancer by using microarray-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH. Methods Tumor DNA was extracted from FFPE tissues of invasive ductal cancers from 15 survivors who were exposed at 1.5 km or less from the hypocenter and 13 calendar year-matched non-exposed patients followed by aCGH analysis using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray. The total length of copy number aberrations (CNA was used as an indicator of GIN, and correlation with clinicopathological factors were statistically tested. Results The mean of the derivative log ratio spread (DLRSpread, which estimates the noise by calculating the spread of log ratio differences between consecutive probes for all chromosomes, was 0.54 (range, 0.26 to 1.05. The concordance of results between aCGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH for HER2 gene amplification was 88%. The incidence of HER2 amplification and histological grade was significantly higher in the A-bomb survivors than control group (P = 0.04, respectively. The total length of CNA tended to be larger in the A-bomb survivors (P = 0.15. Correlation analysis of CNA and clinicopathological factors revealed that DLRSpread was negatively correlated with that significantly (P = 0.034, r = -0.40. Multivariate analysis with covariance revealed that the exposure to A-bomb was a significant (P = 0.005 independent factor which was associated with larger total length of CNA of breast cancers. Conclusions Thus, archival FFPE tissues from A-bomb survivors are useful for

  1. Comparative genomic hybridization of microdissected samples from different stages in the development of a seminoma and a non-seminoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looijenga, LHJ; Rosenberg, C; van Gurp, RJHLM; Geelen, E; van Echten-Arends, J; de Jong, B; Mostert, M

    2000-01-01

    Human testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) of adolescents and adults, both seminomas and non-seminomas, originate from intratubular germ cell neoplasia (IGCN). Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was applied to microdissected samples from different stages of the development of a seminoma and a m

  2. Comparative genomic hybridization of microdissected samples from different stages in the development of a seminoma and a non-seminoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looijenga, LHJ; Rosenberg, C; van Gurp, RJHLM; Geelen, E; van Echten-Arends, J; de Jong, B; Mostert, M

    Human testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) of adolescents and adults, both seminomas and non-seminomas, originate from intratubular germ cell neoplasia (IGCN). Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was applied to microdissected samples from different stages of the development of a seminoma and a

  3. Using Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization to Diagnose Pallister-Killian Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Na; Lee, Jiwon; Yu, Hee Joon; Lee, Jeehun; Kim, Sun Hee

    2017-01-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a rare multisystem disorder characterized by isochromosome 12p and tissue-limited mosaic tetrasomy 12p. In this study, we diagnosed three pediatric patients who were suspicious of having PKS using array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and FISH analyses performed on peripheral lymphocytes. Patients 1 and 2 presented with craniofacial dysmorphic features, hypotonia, and a developmental delay. Array CGH revealed two to three copies of 12p in patient 1 and three copies in patient 2. FISH analysis showed trisomy or tetrasomy 12p. Patient 3, who had clinical features comparable to those of patients 1 and 2, was diagnosed by using FISH analysis alone. Here, we report three patients with mosaic tetrasomy 12p. There have been only reported cases diagnosed by chromosome analysis and FISH analysis on skin fibroblast or amniotic fluid. To our knowledge, patient 1 was the first case diagnosed by using array CGH performed on peripheral lymphocytes in Korea.

  4. Comparative Genomic Hybridization Selection of Blastocysts for Repeated Implantation Failure Treatment: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Ermanno; Bono, Sara; Ruberti, Alessandra; Lobascio, Anna Maria; Greco, Pierfrancesco; Biricik, Anil; Spizzichino, Letizia; Greco, Alessia; Tesarik, Jan; Minasi, Maria Giulia; Fiorentino, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if the use of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) by array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and transfer of a single euploid blastocyst in patients with repeated implantation failure (RIF) can improve clinical results. Three patient groups are compared: 43 couples with RIF for whom embryos were selected by array CGH (group RIF-PGS), 33 couples with the same history for whom array CGH was not performed (group RIF NO PGS), and 45 good prognosis infertile couples with array CGH selected embryos (group NO RIF PGS). A single euploid blastocyst was transferred in groups RIF-PGS and NO RIF PGS. Array CGH was not performed in group RIF NO PGS in which 1-2 blastocysts were transferred. One monoembryonic sac with heartbeat was found in 28 patients of group RIF PGS and 31 patients of group NO RIF PGS showing similar clinical pregnancy and implantation rates (68.3% and 70.5%, resp.). In contrast, an embryonic sac with heartbeat was only detected in 7 (21.2%) patients of group RIF NO PGS. In conclusion, PGS by array CGH with single euploid blastocyst transfer appears to be a successful strategy for patients with multiple failed IVF attempts. PMID:24779011

  5. Gene expression profiles in squamous cell cervical carcinoma using array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y-W; Bae, S M; Kim, Y-W; Lee, H N; Kim, Y W; Park, T C; Ro, D Y; Shin, J C; Shin, S J; Seo, J-S; Ahn, W S

    2007-01-01

    Our aim was to identify novel genomic regions of interest and provide highly dynamic range information on correlation between squamous cell cervical carcinoma and its related gene expression patterns by a genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). We analyzed 15 cases of cervical cancer from KangNam St Mary's Hospital of the Catholic University of Korea. Microdissection assay was performed to obtain DNA samples from paraffin-embedded cervical tissues of cancer as well as of the adjacent normal tissues. The bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) array used in this study consisted of 1440 human BACs and the space among the clones was 2.08 Mb. All the 15 cases of cervical cancer showed the differential changes of the cervical cancer-associated genetic alterations. The analysis limit of average gains and losses was 53%. A significant positive correlation was found in 8q24.3, 1p36.32, 3q27.1, 7p21.1, 11q13.1, and 3p14.2 changes through the cervical carcinogenesis. The regions of high level of gain were 1p36.33-1p36.32, 8q24.3, 16p13.3, 1p36.33, 3q27.1, and 7p21.1. And the regions of homozygous loss were 2q12.1, 22q11.21, 3p14.2, 6q24.3, 7p15.2, and 11q25. In the high level of gain regions, GSDMDC1, RECQL4, TP73, ABCF3, ALG3, HDAC9, ESRRA, and RPS6KA4 were significantly correlated with cervical cancer. The genes encoded by frequently lost clones were PTPRG, GRM7, ZDHHC3, EXOSC7, LRP1B, and NR3C2. Therefore, array-CGH analyses showed that specific genomic alterations were maintained in cervical cancer that were critical to the malignant phenotype and may give a chance to find out possible target genes present in the gained or lost clones.

  6. Genetic diversity of Streptococcus suis isolates as determined by comparative genome hybridization

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    Thi Hoa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic pathogen that causes infections in young piglets. S. suis is a heterogeneous species. Thirty-three different capsular serotypes have been described, that differ in virulence between as well as within serotypes. Results In this study, the correlation between gene content, serotype, phenotype and virulence among 55 S. suis strains was studied using Comparative Genome Hybridization (CGH. Clustering of CGH data divided S. suis isolates into two clusters, A and B. Cluster A isolates could be discriminated from cluster B isolates based on the protein expression of extracellular factor (EF. Cluster A contained serotype 1 and 2 isolates that were correlated with virulence. Cluster B mainly contained serotype 7 and 9 isolates. Genetic similarity was observed between serotype 7 and serotype 2 isolates that do not express muramidase released protein (MRP and EF (MRP-EF-, suggesting these isolates originated from a common founder. Profiles of 25 putative virulence-associated genes of S. suis were determined among the 55 isolates. Presence of all 25 genes was shown for cluster A isolates, whereas cluster B isolates lacked one or more putative virulence genes. Divergence of S. suis isolates was further studied based on the presence of 39 regions of difference. Conservation of genes was evaluated by the definition of a core genome that contained 78% of all ORFs in P1/7. Conclusions In conclusion, we show that CGH is a valuable method to study distribution of genes or gene clusters among isolates in detail, yielding information on genetic similarity, and virulence traits of S. suis isolates.

  7. Association between chromosomal aberration of COX8C and tethered spinal cord syndrome: array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis

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    Qiu-jiong Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Copy number variations have been found in patients with neural tube abnormalities. In this study, we performed genome-wide screening using high-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization in three children with tethered spinal cord syndrome and two healthy parents. Of eight copy number variations, four were non-polymorphic. These non-polymorphic copy number variations were associated with Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes, and microcephaly. Gene function enrichment analysis revealed that COX8C, a gene associated with metabolic disorders of the nervous system, was located in the copy number variation region of Patient 1. Our results indicate that array-based comparative genomic hybridization can be used to diagnose tethered spinal cord syndrome. Our results may help determine the pathogenesis of tethered spinal cord syndrome and prevent occurrence of this disease.

  8. Stochastic segmentation models for array-based comparative genomic hybridization data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Tze Leung; Xing, Haipeng; Zhang, Nancy

    2008-04-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) is a high throughput, high resolution technique for studying the genetics of cancer. Analysis of array-CGH data typically involves estimation of the underlying chromosome copy numbers from the log fluorescence ratios and segmenting the chromosome into regions with the same copy number at each location. We propose for the analysis of array-CGH data, a new stochastic segmentation model and an associated estimation procedure that has attractive statistical and computational properties. An important benefit of this Bayesian segmentation model is that it yields explicit formulas for posterior means, which can be used to estimate the signal directly without performing segmentation. Other quantities relating to the posterior distribution that are useful for providing confidence assessments of any given segmentation can also be estimated by using our method. We propose an approximation method whose computation time is linear in sequence length which makes our method practically applicable to the new higher density arrays. Simulation studies and applications to real array-CGH data illustrate the advantages of the proposed approach.

  9. New Tools for Embryo Selection: Comprehensive Chromosome Screening by Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

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    Lorena Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH. The study included 1420 CCS cycles for recurrent miscarriage (n=203; repetitive implantation failure (n=188; severe male factor (n=116; previous trisomic pregnancy (n=33; and advanced maternal age (n=880. CCS was performed in cycles with fresh oocytes and embryos (n=774; mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified oocytes (n=320; mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified day-2 embryos (n=235; and mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified day-3 embryos (n=91. Day-3 embryo biopsy was performed and analyzed by aCGH followed by day-5 embryo transfer. Consistent implantation (range: 40.5–54.2% and pregnancy rates per transfer (range: 46.0–62.9% were obtained for all the indications and independently of the origin of the oocytes or embryos. However, a lower delivery rate per cycle was achieved in women aged over 40 years (18.1% due to the higher percentage of aneuploid embryos (85.3% and lower number of cycles with at least one euploid embryo available per transfer (40.3%. We concluded that aneuploidy is one of the major factors which affect embryo implantation.

  10. Custom Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization: the Importance of DNA Quality, an Expert Eye, and Variant Validation

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    Francesca Lantieri

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The presence of false positive and false negative results in the Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH design is poorly addressed in literature reports. We took advantage of a custom aCGH recently carried out to analyze its design performance, the use of several Agilent aberrations detection algorithms, and the presence of false results. Our study provides a confirmation that the high density design does not generate more noise than standard designs and, might reach a good resolution. We noticed a not negligible presence of false negative and false positive results in the imbalances call performed by the Agilent software. The Aberration Detection Method 2 (ADM-2 algorithm with a threshold of 6 performed quite well, and the array design proved to be reliable, provided that some additional filters are applied, such as considering only intervals with average absolute log2ratio above 0.3. We also propose an additional filter that takes into account the proportion of probes with log2ratio exceeding suggestive values for gain or loss. In addition, the quality of samples was confirmed to be a crucial parameter. Finally, this work raises the importance of evaluating the samples profiles by eye and the necessity of validating the imbalances detected.

  11. Comparative BAC-based mapping in the white-throated sparrow, a novel behavioral genomics model, using interspecies overgo hybridization

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    Gonser Rusty A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genomics era has produced an arsenal of resources from sequenced organisms allowing researchers to target species that do not have comparable mapping and sequence information. These new "non-model" organisms offer unique opportunities to examine environmental effects on genomic patterns and processes. Here we use comparative mapping as a first step in characterizing the genome organization of a novel animal model, the white-throated sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis, which occurs as white or tan morphs that exhibit alternative behaviors and physiology. Morph is determined by the presence or absence of a complex chromosomal rearrangement. This species is an ideal model for behavioral genomics because the association between genotype and phenotype is absolute, making it possible to identify the genomic bases of phenotypic variation. Findings We initiated a genomic study in this species by characterizing the white-throated sparrow BAC library via filter hybridization with overgo probes designed for the chicken, turkey, and zebra finch. Cross-species hybridization resulted in 640 positive sparrow BACs assigned to 77 chicken loci across almost all macro-and microchromosomes, with a focus on the chromosomes associated with morph. Out of 216 overgos, 36% of the probes hybridized successfully, with an average number of 3.0 positive sparrow BACs per overgo. Conclusions These data will be utilized for determining chromosomal architecture and for fine-scale mapping of candidate genes associated with phenotypic differences. Our research confirms the utility of interspecies hybridization for developing comparative maps in other non-model organisms.

  12. Chromosomal aberrations in benign and malignant Bilharzia-associated bladder lesions analyzed by comparative genomic hybridization

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    Ibrahim Muntaser

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bilharzia-associated bladder cancer (BAC is a major health problem in countries where urinary schistosomiasis is endemic. Characterization of the genetic alterations in this cancer might enhance our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease but, in contrast to nonbilharzia bladder cancer, BAC has rarely been the object of such scrutiny. In the present study, we aimed to characterize chromosomal imbalances in benign and malignant post-bilharzial lesions, and to determine whether their unique etiology yields a distinct cytogenetic profile as compared to chemically induced bladder tumors. Methods DNAs from 20 archival paraffin-embedded post-bilharzial bladder lesions (6 benign and 14 malignant obtained from Sudanese patients (12 males and 8 females with a history of urinary bilharziasis were investigated for chromosomal imbalances using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH. Subsequent FISH analysis with pericentromeric probes was performed on paraffin sections of the same cases to confirm the CGH results. Results Seven of the 20 lesions (6 carcinomas and one granuloma showed chromosomal imbalances varying from 1 to 6 changes. The most common chromosomal imbalances detected were losses of 1p21-31, 8p21-pter, and 9p and gain of 19p material, seen in three cases each, including the benign lesion. Conclusion Most of the detected imbalances have been repeatedly reported in non-bilharzial bladder carcinomas, suggesting that the cytogenetic profiles of chemical- and bilharzia-induced carcinomas are largely similar. However, loss of 9p seems to be more ubiquitous in BAC than in bladder cancer in industrialized countries.

  13. Interspecies comparative genome hybridization and interspecies representational difference analysis reveal gross DNA differences between humans and great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toder, R; Xia, Y; Bausch, E

    1998-09-01

    Comparative chromosome G-/R-banding, comparative gene mapping and chromosome painting techniques have demonstrated that only few chromosomal rearrangements occurred during great ape and human evolution. Interspecies comparative genome hybridization (CGH), used here in this study, between human, gorilla and pygmy chimpanzee revealed species-specific regions in all three species. In contrast to the human, a far more complex distribution of species-specific blocks was detected with CGH in gorilla and pygmy chimpanzee. Most of these blocks coincide with already described heterochromatic regions on gorilla and chimpanzee chromosomes. Representational difference analysis (RDA) was used to subtract the complex genome of gorilla against human in order to enrich gorilla-specific DNA sequences. Gorilla-specific clones isolated with this technique revealed a 32-bp repeat unit. These clones were mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to the telomeric regions of gorilla chromosomes that had been shown by interspecies CGH to contain species-specific sequences.

  14. Microarray comparative genomic hybridization detection of chromosomal imbalances in uterine cervix carcinoma

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    García José

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH has been applied to all stages of cervical carcinoma progression, defining a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances in this tumor. However, given its limited spatial resolution, chromosomal CGH has offered only general information regarding the possible genetic targets of DNA copy number changes. Methods In order to further define specific DNA copy number changes in cervical cancer, we analyzed 20 cervical samples (3 pre-malignant lesions, 10 invasive tumors, and 7 cell lines, using the GenoSensor microarray CGH system to define particular genetic targets that suffer copy number changes. Results The most common DNA gains detected by array CGH in the invasive samples were located at the RBP1-RBP2 (3q21-q22 genes, the sub-telomeric clone C84C11/T3 (5ptel, D5S23 (5p15.2 and the DAB2 gene (5p13 in 58.8% of the samples. The most common losses were found at the FHIT gene (3p14.2 in 47% of the samples, followed by deletions at D8S504 (8p23.3, CTDP1-SHGC- 145820 (18qtel, KIT (4q11-q12, D1S427-FAF1 (1p32.3, D9S325 (9qtel, EIF4E (eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E, 4q24, RB1 (13q14, and DXS7132 (Xq12 present in 5/17 (29.4% of the samples. Conclusion Our results confirm the presence of a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances in cervical carcinoma and define specific targets that are suffering DNA copy number changes in this neoplasm.

  15. Analysis of comparative genomic hybridization and loss of heterozygosity in 43 primary gastric carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王琦; 王柏秋; 关新元; 高慧; 程慧; 张岂凡; 黄承斌; 李璞; 傅松滨

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate common chromosomal changes and the LOH frequency of microsatellite loci in primary gastric cancer samples in order to locate the deleted regions in which human gastric cancer related genes might exist.Methods Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was used to define global chromosomal aberrations in 43 primary gastric tumors. Based on the results of CGH, analysis of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was performed in chromosome 19 in which the loss was first discovered in the gastric cancers. The PCR-based approach was used to investigate 22 loci, which are spaced at 1.1-10.9 cM intervals throughout chromosome 19. The amplified PCR fragments were subjected to electrophoresis in PAGE gel and analyzed with GenescanTM and GenotyperTM. Results CGH analysis revealed gains in chromosome 3p(8/43), 8q(8/43), 20 [20 (9/43), 20p(7/43), 20q(4/43)], 12q(16/43), 13q(12/43) and losses in 19 [19 (15/43)], 7 [17 (8/43), 17p (10/43)], 16 (10/43) and 1p (11/43). Among the 43 evaluated samples, the most frequent LOH was detected at locus D19S571 (27.81%). Conclusions The tumorigenesis of gastric cancer includes several chromosomal changes. The aberration of chromosome 19 was the first common change founded in gastric cancer. The region near the D19S571 might harbor potential genes related to the tumorigenesis of gastric cancer.

  16. Microarray comparative genomic hybridization detection of chromosomal imbalances in uterine cervix carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Alfredo; Baudis, Michael; Petersen, Iver; Arreola, Hugo; Piña, Patricia; Vázquez-Ortiz, Guelaguetza; Hernández, Dulce; González, José; Lazos, Minerva; López, Ricardo; Pérez, Carlos; García, José; Vázquez, Karla; Alatorre, Brenda; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2005-01-01

    Background Chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) has been applied to all stages of cervical carcinoma progression, defining a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances in this tumor. However, given its limited spatial resolution, chromosomal CGH has offered only general information regarding the possible genetic targets of DNA copy number changes. Methods In order to further define specific DNA copy number changes in cervical cancer, we analyzed 20 cervical samples (3 pre-malignant lesions, 10 invasive tumors, and 7 cell lines), using the GenoSensor microarray CGH system to define particular genetic targets that suffer copy number changes. Results The most common DNA gains detected by array CGH in the invasive samples were located at the RBP1-RBP2 (3q21-q22) genes, the sub-telomeric clone C84C11/T3 (5ptel), D5S23 (5p15.2) and the DAB2 gene (5p13) in 58.8% of the samples. The most common losses were found at the FHIT gene (3p14.2) in 47% of the samples, followed by deletions at D8S504 (8p23.3), CTDP1-SHGC- 145820 (18qtel), KIT (4q11-q12), D1S427-FAF1 (1p32.3), D9S325 (9qtel), EIF4E (eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E, 4q24), RB1 (13q14), and DXS7132 (Xq12) present in 5/17 (29.4%) of the samples. Conclusion Our results confirm the presence of a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances in cervical carcinoma and define specific targets that are suffering DNA copy number changes in this neoplasm. PMID:16004614

  17. [Genomic abnormalities in children with mental retardation and autism: the use of comparative genomic hybridization in situ (HRCGH) and molecular karyotyping with DNA-microchips (array CGH)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorsanova, S G; Iurov, I Iu; Kurinnaia, O S; Voinova, V Iu; Iurov, Iu B

    2013-01-01

    Genomic abnormalities occur with high frequency in children with mental retardation and autistic spectrum disorders (ADS). Molecular karyotyping using DNA microarrays is a new technology for diagnosis of genomic and chromosomal abnormalities in autism implemented in the fields of biological psychiatry and medical genetics. We carried out a comparative analysis of the frequency and spectrum of genome abnormalities in children with mental retardation and autism of unknown etiology using high-resolution comparative genomic methods for hybridization (HRCGH) and molecular karyotyping (array CGH). In a study of 100 children with autism, learning difficulties and congenital malformations by HRCGH, we identified genomic rearrangements in 46% of cases. Using array CGH we examined 50 children with autism. In 44 cases out of 50 (88%), different genomic abnormalities and genomic variations (CNV - copy number variations) were identified. Unbalanced genomic rearrangements, including deletions and duplications, were found in 23 cases out of 44 (52%). These data suggest that genomic abnormalities which are not detectable by common methods of chromosome analysis are often discovered by molecular cytogenetic techniques in children autism spectrum disorders. In addition, 54 children with idiopathic mental retardation and congenital malformations (31 boys and 23 girls) without autism spectrum disorders were examined using molecular karyotyping and microarray containing an increased number of DNA samples for genomic loci of chromosome X. Deletions and duplications affecting different regions of the chromosome X were detected in 11 out of 54 children (20.4%).

  18. Genomic profiling of plasmablastic lymphoma using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH: revealing significant overlapping genomic lesions with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

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    Lu Xin-Yan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmablastic lymphoma (PL is a subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. Studies have suggested that tumors with PL morphology represent a group of neoplasms with clinopathologic characteristics corresponding to different entities including extramedullary plasmablastic tumors associated with plasma cell myeloma (PCM. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the genetic similarities and differences among PL, DLBCL (AIDS-related and non AIDS-related and PCM using array-based comparative genomic hybridization. Results Examination of genomic data in PL revealed that the most frequent segmental gain (> 40% include: 1p36.11-1p36.33, 1p34.1-1p36.13, 1q21.1-1q23.1, 7q11.2-7q11.23, 11q12-11q13.2 and 22q12.2-22q13.3. This correlated with segmental gains occurring in high frequency in DLBCL (AIDS-related and non AIDS-related cases. There were some segmental gains and some segmental loss that occurred in PL but not in the other types of lymphoma suggesting that these foci may contain genes responsible for the differentiation of this lymphoma. Additionally, some segmental gains and some segmental loss occurred only in PL and AIDS associated DLBCL suggesting that these foci may be associated with HIV infection. Furthermore, some segmental gains and some segmental loss occurred only in PL and PCM suggesting that these lesions may be related to plasmacytic differentiation. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, the current study represents the first genomic exploration of PL. The genomic aberration pattern of PL appears to be more similar to that of DLBCL (AIDS-related or non AIDS-related than to PCM. Our findings suggest that PL may remain best classified as a subtype of DLBCL at least at the genome level.

  19. Identification of chromosome aberrations in sporadic microsatellite stable and unstable colorectal cancers using array comparative genomic hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Dyrsø; Li, Jian; Wang, Kai;

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers in Denmark and in the western world in general, and the prognosis is generally poor. According to the traditional molecular classification of sporadic colorectal cancer, microsatellite stable (MSS)/chromosome unstable (CIN) colorectal...... cancers constitute approximately 85% of sporadic cases, whereas microsatellite unstable (MSI) cases constitute the remaining 15%. In this study, we used array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to identify genomic hotspot regions that harbor recurrent copy number changes. The study material...

  20. Comparative Genomics and Characterization of Hybrid Shigatoxigenic and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC/ETEC) Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyholm, Outi; Halkilahti, Jani; Wiklund, Gudrun; Okeke, Uche; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Haukka, Kaisa; Siitonen, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Background Shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) cause serious foodborne infections in humans. These two pathogroups are defined based on the pathogroup-associated virulence genes: stx encoding Shiga toxin (Stx) for STEC and elt encoding heat-labile and/or est encoding heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) for ETEC. The study investigated the genomics of STEC/ETEC hybrid strains to determine their phylogenetic position among E. coli and to define the virulence genes they harbor. Methods The whole genomes of three STEC/ETEC strains possessing both stx and est genes were sequenced using PacBio RS sequencer. Two of the strains were isolated from the patients, one with hemolytic uremic syndrome, and one with diarrhea. The third strain was of bovine origin. Core genome analysis of the shared chromosomal genes and comparison with E. coli and Shigella spp. reference genomes was performed to determine the phylogenetic position of the STEC/ETEC strains. In addition, a set of virulence genes and ETEC colonization factors were extracted from the genomes. The production of Stx and ST were studied. Results The human STEC/ETEC strains clustered with strains representing ETEC, STEC, enteroaggregative E. coli, and commensal and laboratory-adapted E. coli. However, the bovine STEC/ETEC strain formed a remote cluster with two STECs of bovine origin. All three STEC/ETEC strains harbored several other virulence genes, apart from stx and est, and lacked ETEC colonization factors. Two STEC/ETEC strains produced both toxins and one strain Stx only. Conclusions This study shows that pathogroup-associated virulence genes of different E. coli can co-exist in strains originating from different phylogenetic lineages. The possibility of virulence genes to be associated with several E. coli pathogroups should be taken into account in strain typing and in epidemiological surveillance. Development of novel hybrid E. coli strains may cause a new public health risk, which

  1. Comparative Genomics and Characterization of Hybrid Shigatoxigenic and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC/ETEC Strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Outi Nyholm

    Full Text Available Shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC cause serious foodborne infections in humans. These two pathogroups are defined based on the pathogroup-associated virulence genes: stx encoding Shiga toxin (Stx for STEC and elt encoding heat-labile and/or est encoding heat-stable enterotoxin (ST for ETEC. The study investigated the genomics of STEC/ETEC hybrid strains to determine their phylogenetic position among E. coli and to define the virulence genes they harbor.The whole genomes of three STEC/ETEC strains possessing both stx and est genes were sequenced using PacBio RS sequencer. Two of the strains were isolated from the patients, one with hemolytic uremic syndrome, and one with diarrhea. The third strain was of bovine origin. Core genome analysis of the shared chromosomal genes and comparison with E. coli and Shigella spp. reference genomes was performed to determine the phylogenetic position of the STEC/ETEC strains. In addition, a set of virulence genes and ETEC colonization factors were extracted from the genomes. The production of Stx and ST were studied.The human STEC/ETEC strains clustered with strains representing ETEC, STEC, enteroaggregative E. coli, and commensal and laboratory-adapted E. coli. However, the bovine STEC/ETEC strain formed a remote cluster with two STECs of bovine origin. All three STEC/ETEC strains harbored several other virulence genes, apart from stx and est, and lacked ETEC colonization factors. Two STEC/ETEC strains produced both toxins and one strain Stx only.This study shows that pathogroup-associated virulence genes of different E. coli can co-exist in strains originating from different phylogenetic lineages. The possibility of virulence genes to be associated with several E. coli pathogroups should be taken into account in strain typing and in epidemiological surveillance. Development of novel hybrid E. coli strains may cause a new public health risk, which challenges the

  2. Detection of genomic imbalances in microdissected Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma by array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Sylvia; Martin-Subero, José I; Gesk, Stefan; Hüsken, Julia; Giefing, Maciej; Nagel, Inga; Riemke, Jennifer; Chott, Andreas; Klapper, Wolfram; Parrens, Marie; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Küppers, Ralf; Bräuninger, Andreas; Siebert, Reiner; Hansmann, Martin-Leo

    2008-09-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is limited by the low content of the neoplastic Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg cells in the affected tissues. However, available cytogenetic data point to an extreme karyotype complexity. To obtain insights into chromosomal imbalances in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma, we applied array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array comparative genomic hybridization) using DNA from microdissected Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg cells. To avoid biases introduced by DNA amplification for array comparative genomic hybridization, cHL cases rich in Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg cells were selected. DNA obtained from approximately 100,000 microdissected Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg cells of each of ten classical Hodgkin's lymphoma cases was hybridized onto commercial 105 K oligonucleotide comparative genomic hybridization microarrays. Selected imbalances were confirmed by interphase cytogenetics and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and further studied in an independent series of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma. Gains identified in at least five cHL affected 2p12-16, 5q15-23, 6p22, 8q13, 8q24, 9p21-24, 9q34, 12q13-14, 17q12, 19p13, 19q13 and 20q11 whereas losses recurrent in at least five cases involved Xp21, 6q23-24 and 13q22. Copy number changes of selected genes and a small deletion (156 kb) of the CDKN2B (p15) gene were confirmed by interphase cytogenetics and polymerase chain reaction analysis, respectively. Several gained regions included genes constitutively expressed in cHL. Among these, gains of STAT6 (12q13), NOTCH1 (9q34) and JUNB (19p13) were present in additional cHL with the usual low Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg cell content. The present study demonstrates that array comparative genomic hybridization of microdissected Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg cells is suitable for identifying and characterizing chromosomal imbalances. Regions affected by genomic changes in Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg cells recurrently include genes constitutively

  3. Copy number variation in Fayoumi and Leghorn chickens analyzed using array comparative genomic hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abernathy, J.; Li, X.; Jia, X.; Chou, W.; Lamont, S.J.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Zhou, H.

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variation refers to regions along chromosomes that harbor a type of structural variation, such as duplications or deletions. Copy number variants (CNVs) play a role in many important traits as well as in genetic diversity. Previous analyses of chickens using array comparative genomic hyb

  4. An isothermal primer extension method for whole genome amplification of fresh and degraded DNA: applications in comparative genomic hybridization, genotyping and mutation screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheryl I P; Leong, Siew Hong; Png, Adrian E H; Choo, Keng Wah; Syn, Christopher; Lim, Dennis T H; Law, Hai Yang; Kon, Oi Lian

    2006-01-01

    We describe a protocol that uses a bioinformatically optimized primer in an isothermal whole genome amplification (WGA) reaction. Overnight incubation at 37 degrees C efficiently generates several hundred- to several thousand-fold increases in input DNA. The amplified product retains reasonably faithful quantitative representation of unamplified whole genomic DNA (gDNA). We provide protocols for applying this isothermal primer extension WGA protocol in three different techniques of genomic analysis: comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), genotyping at simple tandem repeat (STR) loci and screening for single base mutations in a common monogenic disorder, beta-thalassemia. gDNA extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues can also be amplified with this protocol.

  5. Comparative Genomic Hybridization Analysis of Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Identifies Genetic Traits to Elucidate Their Different Ecologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakkola, Kaisa; Somervuo, Panu; Korkeala, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are both etiological agents for intestinal infection known as yersiniosis, but their epidemiology and ecology bear many differences. Swine are the only known reservoir for Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 strains, which are the most common cause of human disease, while Y. pseudotuberculosis has been isolated from a variety of sources, including vegetables and wild animals. Infections caused by Y. enterocolitica mainly originate from swine, but fresh produce has been the source for widespread Y. pseudotuberculosis outbreaks within recent decades. A comparative genomic hybridization analysis with a DNA microarray based on three Yersinia enterocolitica and four Yersinia pseudotuberculosis genomes was conducted to shed light on the genomic differences between enteropathogenic Yersinia. The hybridization results identified Y. pseudotuberculosis strains to carry operons linked with the uptake and utilization of substances not found in living animal tissues but present in soil, plants, and rotting flesh. Y. pseudotuberculosis also harbors a selection of type VI secretion systems targeting other bacteria and eukaryotic cells. These genetic traits are not found in Y. enterocolitica, and it appears that while Y. pseudotuberculosis has many tools beneficial for survival in varied environments, the Y. enterocolitica genome is more streamlined and adapted to their preferred animal reservoir.

  6. Comparative Genomic Hybridization Analysis of Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Identifies Genetic Traits to Elucidate Their Different Ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaisa Jaakkola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are both etiological agents for intestinal infection known as yersiniosis, but their epidemiology and ecology bear many differences. Swine are the only known reservoir for Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 strains, which are the most common cause of human disease, while Y. pseudotuberculosis has been isolated from a variety of sources, including vegetables and wild animals. Infections caused by Y. enterocolitica mainly originate from swine, but fresh produce has been the source for widespread Y. pseudotuberculosis outbreaks within recent decades. A comparative genomic hybridization analysis with a DNA microarray based on three Yersinia enterocolitica and four Yersinia pseudotuberculosis genomes was conducted to shed light on the genomic differences between enteropathogenic Yersinia. The hybridization results identified Y. pseudotuberculosis strains to carry operons linked with the uptake and utilization of substances not found in living animal tissues but present in soil, plants, and rotting flesh. Y. pseudotuberculosis also harbors a selection of type VI secretion systems targeting other bacteria and eukaryotic cells. These genetic traits are not found in Y. enterocolitica, and it appears that while Y. pseudotuberculosis has many tools beneficial for survival in varied environments, the Y. enterocolitica genome is more streamlined and adapted to their preferred animal reservoir.

  7. Characterization of serogroup C meningococci isolated from 14 provinces of China during 1966—2005 using comparative genomic hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a major cause of bacterial meningitis and septicemia worldwide. In China, serogroup A strains were responsible for over 95% of the cases, while serogroup B strains were mainly the cause of localized outbreaks and sporadic cases. Before 2003, serogroup C strains were only re-covered from a few sporadic cases. However, a sudden increase in the number of cases due to sero-group C strains occurred during 2003—2005 in Anhui Province, China. Many cases were found in other provinces at the same time. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) results indicated that the unique se-quence type 4821 clone meningococci, a new hyper-virulent lineage, was responsible for the serogroup C meningitis outbreaks. We have completed the project of sequencing the whole genome of the Chi-nese N. meningitidis serogroup C representative isolate 053442. We fabricated a whole-genome mi-croarray of N. meningitidis isolate 053442 and analyzed the genome composition differences among 81 serogroup C isolates which were isolated from 14 provinces of China during 1966—2005. The com-parative genomic hybridization (CGH) result shows that the genome compositions of nearly all sero-group C isolates are similar to that of 053442. The products of many absent open reading frames (ORFs) are conserved hypothetical proteins. The results will provide a valuable resource from which one can analyze the genome composition and genetic background of serogroup C meningococci in China.

  8. Characterization of serogroup C meningococci isolated from 14 provinces of China during 1966-2005 using comparative genomic hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG JunPing; ZHANG XiaoBing; YANG E; WANG Jing; YANG Jian; SHAO ZhuJun; JIN Qi

    2007-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a major cause of bacterial meningitis and septicemia worldwide. In China, serogroup A strains were responsible for over 95% of the cases, while serogroup B strains were mainly the cause of localized outbreaks and sporadic cases. Before 2003, serogroup C strains were only recovered from a few sporadic cases. However, a sudden increase in the number of cases due to serogroup C strains occurred during 2003-2005 in Anhui Province, China. Many cases were found in other provinces at the same time. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) results indicated that the unique sequence type 4821 clone meningococci, a new hyper-virulent lineage, was responsible for the serogroup C meningitis outbreaks. We have completed the project of sequencing the whole genome of the Chinese N. meningitidis serogroup C representative isolate 053442. We fabricated a whole-genome microarray of N. meningitidis isolate 053442 and analyzed the genome composition differences among 81 serogroup C isolates which were isolated from 14 provinces of China during 1966-2005. The comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) result shows that the genome compositions of nearly all serogroup C isolates are similar to that of 053442. The products of many absent open reading frames (ORFs) are conserved hypothetical proteins. The results will provide a valuable resource from which one can analyze the genome composition and genetic background of serogroup C meningococci in China.

  9. Copy number analysis of the low-copy repeats at the primate NPHP1 locus by array comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; Liu, Pengfei; Rogers, Jeffrey; Lupski, James R

    2016-06-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has been widely used to detect copy number variants (CNVs) in both research and clinical settings. A customizable aCGH platform may greatly facilitate copy number analyses in genomic regions with higher-order complexity, such as low-copy repeats (LCRs). Here we present the aCGH analyses focusing on the 45 kb LCRs [1] at the NPHP1 region with diverse copy numbers in humans. Also, the interspecies aCGH analysis comparing human and nonhuman primates revealed dynamic copy number transitions of the human 45 kb LCR orthologues during primate evolution and therefore shed light on the origin of complexity at this locus. The original aCGH data are available at GEO under GSE73962.

  10. Prenatal Diagnosis of a Fetus with de novo Supernumerary Ring Chromosome 16 Characterized by Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Cignini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A fetus with de novo ring chromosome 16 is presented. At 20 weeks' gestation, ultrasound examination demonstrated bilateral clubfoot, bilateral renal pyelectasis, hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, and transposition of the great vessel. Amniocentesis was performed. Chromosome analysis identified a ring chromosome 16 [47,XY,r(16] and array comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH demonstrated that the ring included the euchromatic portion 16p11.2. Postmortem examination confirmed prenatal findings. This is the first case of de novo ring chromosome 16 diagnosed prenatally with a new phenotypic pattern and also reinforces the importance of offering amniocentesis with a-CGH if fetal anomalies are detected.

  11. Genetic characterization of dogs via chromosomal analysis and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M H; Reimann-Berg, N; Bullerdiek, J; Murua Escobar, H

    2012-01-01

    The results of cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic investigations revealed similarities in genetic background and biological behaviour between tumours and genetic diseases of humans and dogs. These findings classify the dog a good and accepted model for human cancers such as osteosarcomas, mammary carcinomas, oral melanomas and others. With the appearance of new studies and advances in canine genome sequencing, the number of known homologies in diseases between these species raised and still is expected to increase. In this context, array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) provides a novel tool to rapidly characterize numerical aberrations in canine tumours or to detect copy number aberrations between different breeds. As it is possible to spot probes covering the whole genome on each chip to discover copy number aberrations of all chromosomes simultaneously, this method is time-saving and cost-effective - considering the relation of costs and the amount of data obtained. Complemented with traditional methods like karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses, the aCGH is able to provide new insights into the underlying causes of canine carcinogenesis.

  12. DNA microarrays for comparative genomic hybridization based on DOP-PCR amplification of BAC and PAC clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiegler, Heike; Carr, Philippa; Douglas, Eleanor J; Burford, Deborah C; Hunt, Sarah; Scott, Carol E; Smith, James; Vetrie, David; Gorman, Patricia; Tomlinson, Ian P M; Carter, Nigel P

    2003-04-01

    We have designed DOP-PCR primers specifically for the amplification of large insert clones for use in the construction of DNA microarrays. A bioinformatic approach was used to construct primers that were efficient in the general amplification of human DNA but were poor at amplifying E. coli DNA, a common contaminant of DNA preparations from large insert clones. We chose the three most selective primers for use in printing DNA microarrays. DNA combined from the amplification of large insert clones by use of these three primers and spotted onto glass slides showed more than a sixfold increase in the human to E. coli hybridization ratio when compared to the standard DOP-PCR primer, 6MW. The microarrays reproducibly delineated previously characterized gains and deletions in a cancer cell line and identified a small gain not detected by use of conventional CGH. We also describe a method for the bulk testing of the hybridization characteristics of chromosome-specific clones spotted on microarrays by use of DNA amplified from flow-sorted chromosomes. Finally, we describe a set of clones selected from the publicly available Golden Path of the human genome at 1-Mb intervals and a view in the Ensembl genome browser from which data required for the use of these clones in array CGH and other experiments can be downloaded across the Internet.

  13. Identification of genetic loci in Lactobacillus plantarum that modulate the immune response of dendritic cells using comparative genome hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolein Meijerink

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Probiotics can be used to stimulate or regulate epithelial and immune cells of the intestinal mucosa and generate beneficial mucosal immunomodulatory effects. Beneficial effects of specific strains of probiotics have been established in the treatment and prevention of various intestinal disorders, including allergic diseases and diarrhea. However, the precise molecular mechanisms and the strain-dependent factors involved are poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we aimed to identify gene loci in the model probiotic organism Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 that modulate the immune response of host dendritic cells. The amounts of IL-10 and IL-12 secreted by dendritic cells (DCs after stimulation with 42 individual L. plantarum strains were measured and correlated with the strain-specific genomic composition using comparative genome hybridisation and the Random Forest algorithm. This in silico "gene-trait matching" approach led to the identification of eight candidate genes in the L. plantarum genome that might modulate the DC cytokine response to L. plantarum. Six of these genes were involved in bacteriocin production or secretion, one encoded a bile salt hydrolase and one encoded a transcription regulator of which the exact function is unknown. Subsequently, gene deletions mutants were constructed in L. plantarum WCFS1 and compared to the wild-type strain in DC stimulation assays. All three bacteriocin mutants as well as the transcription regulator (lp_2991 had the predicted effect on cytokine production confirming their immunomodulatory effect on the DC response to L. plantarum. Transcriptome analysis and qPCR data showed that transcript level of gtcA3, which is predicted to be involved in glycosylation of cell wall teichoic acids, was substantially increased in the lp_2991 deletion mutant (44 and 29 fold respectively. CONCLUSION: Comparative genome hybridization led to the identification of gene loci in L

  14. Comparative genomic analysis of single-molecule sequencing and hybrid approaches for finishing the Clostridium autoethanogenum JA1-1 strain DSM 10061 genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Nagaraju, Shilpa [LanzaTech; Utturkar, Sagar M [ORNL; De Tissera, Sashini [LanzaTech; Segovia, Simón [LanzaTech; Mitchell, Wayne [LanzaTech; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Dassanayake, Asela [LanzaTech; Köpke, Michael [LanzaTech

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium autoethanogenum strain JA1-1 (DSM 10061) is an acetogen capable of fermenting CO, CO2 and H2 (e.g. from syngas or waste gases) into biofuel ethanol and commodity chemicals such as 2,3-butanediol. A draft genome sequence consisting of 100 contigs has been published. Results A closed, high-quality genome sequence for C. autoethanogenum DSM10061 was generated using only the latest single-molecule DNA sequencing technology and without the need for manual finishing. It is assigned to the most complex genome classification based upon genome features such as repeats, prophage, nine copies of the rRNA gene operons. It has a low G + C content of 31.1%. Illumina, 454, Illumina/454 hybrid assemblies were generated and then compared to the draft and PacBio assemblies using summary statistics, CGAL, QUAST and REAPR bioinformatics tools and comparative genomic approaches. Assemblies based upon shorter read DNA technologies were confounded by the large number repeats and their size, which in the case of the rRNA gene operons were ~5 kb. CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Paloindromic Repeats) systems among biotechnologically relevant Clostridia were classified and related to plasmid content and prophages. Potential associations between plasmid content and CRISPR systems may have implications for historical industrial scale Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol (ABE) fermentation failures and future large scale bacterial fermentations. While C. autoethanogenum contains an active CRISPR system, no such system is present in the closely related Clostridium ljungdahlii DSM 13528. A common prophage inserted into the Arg-tRNA shared between the strains suggests a common ancestor. However, C. ljungdahlii contains several additional putative prophages and it has more than double the amount of prophage DNA compared to C. autoethanogenum. Other differences include important metabolic genes for central metabolism (as an additional hydrogenase and the absence of a

  15. Familial Case of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disorder Detected by Oligoarray Comparative Genomic Hybridization: Genotype-to-Phenotype Diagnosis

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    Kimia Najafi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD is an X-linked recessive hypomyelinating leukodystrophy characterized by nystagmus, spastic quadriplegia, ataxia, and developmental delay. It is caused by mutation in the PLP1 gene. Case Description. We report a 9-year-old boy referred for oligoarray comparative genomic hybridization (OA-CGH because of intellectual delay, seizures, microcephaly, nystagmus, and spastic paraplegia. Similar clinical findings were reported in his older brother and maternal uncle. Both parents had normal phenotypes. OA-CGH was performed and a 436 Kb duplication was detected and the diagnosis of PMD was made. The mother was carrier of this 436 Kb duplication. Conclusion. Clinical presentation has been accepted as being the mainstay of diagnosis for most conditions. However, recent developments in genetic diagnosis have shown that, in many congenital and sporadic disorders lacking specific phenotypic manifestations, a genotype-to-phenotype approach can be conclusive. In this case, a diagnosis was reached by universal genomic testing, namely, whole genomic array.

  16. Array comparative genomic hybridization profiling analysis reveals deoxyribonucleic acid copy number variations associated with premature ovarian failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboura, Azzedine; Dupas, Claire; Tachdjian, Gérard; Portnoï, Marie-France; Bourcigaux, Nathalie; Dewailly, Didier; Frydman, René; Fauser, Bart; Ronci-Chaix, Nathalie; Donadille, Bruno; Bouchard, Philippe; Christin-Maitre, Sophie

    2009-11-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is defined by amenorrhea of at least 4- to 6-month duration, occurring before 40 yr of age, with two FSH levels in the postmenopausal range. Its etiology remains unknown in more than 80% of cases. Standard karyotypes, having a resolution of 5-10 Mb, have identified critical chromosomal regions, mainly located on the long arm of the X chromosome. Array comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH) analysis is able to detect submicroscopic chromosomal rearrangements with a higher genomic resolution. We searched for copy number variations (CNVs), using a-CGH analysis with a resolution of approximately 0.7 Mb, in a cohort of patients with POF. We prospectively included 99 women. Our study included a conventional karyotype and DNA microarrays comprising 4500 bacterial artificial chromosome clones spread on the entire genome. Thirty-one CNVs have been observed, three on the X chromosome and 28 on autosomal chromosomes. Data have been compared to control populations obtained from the Database of Genomic Variants (http://projects.tcag.ca/variation). Eight statistically significantly different CNVs have been identified in chromosomal regions 1p21.1, 5p14.3, 5q13.2, 6p25.3, 14q32.33, 16p11.2, 17q12, and Xq28. We report the first study of CNV analysis in a large cohort of Caucasian POF patients. In the eight statistically significant CNVs we report, we found five genes involved in reproduction, thus representing potential candidate genes in POF. The current study along with emerging information regarding CNVs, as well as data on their potential association with human diseases, emphasizes the importance of assessing CNVs in cohorts of POF women.

  17. Genetic profiles of gastroesophageal cancer: combined analysis using expression array and tiling array--comparative genomic hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Mats; Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Johansson, Jan;

    2010-01-01

    /losses and gene expression profiles show strong similarity between cancers in the distal esophagus and the gastroesophageal junction with frequent upregulation of CDK6 and EGFR, whereas gastric cancer displays distinct genetic changes. These data suggest that molecular diagnostics and targeted therapies can......15, 13q34, and 12q13, whereas different profiles with gains at 5p15, 7p22, 2q35, and 13q34 characterized gastric cancers. CDK6 and EGFR were identified as putative target genes in cancers of the esophagus and the gastroesophageal junction, with upregulation in one quarter of the tumors. Gains......-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization and 27k oligo gene expression arrays, and putative target genes were validated in an extended series. Adenocarcinomas in the distal esophagus and the gastroesophageal junction showed strong similarities with the most common gains at 20q13, 8q24, 1q21-23, 5p...

  18. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization is more informative than conventional karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization in the analysis of first-trimester spontaneous abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Jinsong

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH is a new technique for detecting submicroscopic deletions and duplications, and can overcome many of the limitations associated with classic cytogenetic analysis. However, its clinical use in spontaneous abortion needs comprehensive evaluation. We used aCGH to investigate chromosomal imbalances in 100 spontaneous abortions and compared the results with G-banding karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. Inconsistent results were verified by quantitative fluorescence PCR. Results Abnormalities were detected in 61 cases. aCGH achieved the highest detection rate (93.4%, 57/61 compared with traditional karyotyping (77%, 47/61 and FISH analysis (68.9%, 42/61. aCGH identified all chromosome abnormalities reported by traditional karyotyping and interphase FISH analysis, with the exception of four triploids. It also detected three additional aneuploidy cases in 37 specimens with ‘normal’ karyotypes, one mosaicism and 10 abnormalities in 14 specimens that failed to grow in vitro. Conclusions aCGH analysis circumvents many limitations in traditional karyotyping or FISH. The accuracy and efficiency of aCGH in spontaneous abortions highlights its clinical usefulness for the future. As aborted tissues have the potential to be contaminated with maternal cells, the threshold value of detection in aCGH should be lowered to avoid false negatives.

  19. Comparative genomic hybridization of germ cell tumors of the adult testis : Confirmation of karyotypic findings and identification of a 12p-amplicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostert, MMC; vandePol, M; Weghuis, DO; Suijkerbuijk, RF; vanKessel, AG; vanEchten, J; Looijenga, LHJ

    1996-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was carried out on 15 primary testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) of adolescents and adults and two metastatic residual tumors after chemotherapeutic treatment. The results were compared with karyotypic data obtained form the same tumor specimens after direct h

  20. Spectrum of Cytogenomic Abnormalities Revealed by Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization on Products of Conception Culture Failure and Normal Karyotype Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qinghua; Wu, Shen-Yin; Amato, Katherine; DiAdamo, Autumn; Li, Peining

    2016-03-20

    Approximately 30% of pregnancies after implantation end up in spontaneous abortions, and 50% of them are caused by chromosomal abnormalities. However, the spectrum of genomic copy number variants (CNVs) in products of conception (POC) and the underlying gene-dosage-sensitive mechanisms causing spontaneous abortions remain largely unknown. In this study, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis was performed as a salvage procedure for 128 POC culture failure (POC-CF) samples and as a supplemental procedure for 106 POC normal karyotype (POC-NK) samples. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 10% of POC-CF and pathogenic CNVs were detected in 3.9% of POC-CF and 5.7% of POC-NK samples. Compiled results from this study and relevant case series through a literature review demonstrated an abnormality detection rate (ADR) of 35% for chromosomal abnormalities in POC-CF samples, 3.7% for pathogenic CNVs in POC-CF samples, and 4.6% for pathogenic CNVs in POC-NK samples. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was performed on the genes from pathogenic CNVs found in POC samples. The denoted primary gene networks suggested that apoptosis and cell proliferation pathways are involved in miscarriage. In summary, a similar spectrum of cytogenomic abnormalities was observed in POC culture success and POC-CF samples. A threshold effect correlating the number of dosage-sensitive genes in a chromosome with the observed frequency of autosomal trisomy is proposed. A rationalized approach using firstly fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) testing with probes of chromosomes X/Y/18, 13/21, and 15/16/22 for common aneuploidies and polyploidies and secondly aCGH for other cytogenomic abnormalities is recommended for POC-CF samples.

  1. Recurrent chromosomal aberrations in intravenous leiomyomatosis of the uterus: high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buza, Natalia; Xu, Fang; Wu, Weiqing; Carr, Ryan J; Li, Peining; Hui, Pei

    2014-09-01

    Uterine intravenous leiomyomatosis (IVL) is a distinct smooth muscle neoplasm with a potential of clinical aggressiveness due to its ability to extend into intrauterine and extrauterine vasculature. In this study, chromosomal alterations analyzed by oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization were performed in 9 cases of IVL. The analysis was informative in all cases with multiple copy number losses and/or gains observed in each tumor. The most frequent recurrent loss of 22q12.3-q13.1 was observed in 6 tumors (66.7%), followed by losses of 22q11.23-q13.31, 1p36.13-p33, 2p25.3-p23.3, and 2q24.2-q32.2 and gains of 6p22.2, 2q37.3 and 10q22.2-q22.3, in decreasing order of frequency. Copy number variants were identified at 14q11.2, 15q11.1-q11.2, and 15q26.2. Genes mapping to the regions of loss include CHEK2, EWS, NF2, PDGFB, and MAP3K7IP1 on chromosome 22q, HEI10 on chromosome 14q, and succinate dehydrogenase subunit B, E2F2, ARID1A KPNA6, EIF3S2 , PTCH2, and PIK3R3 on chromosome 1p. Regional losses on chromosomes 22q and 1p and gains on chromosomes 12q showed overlaps with those previously observed in uterine leiomyosarcomas. In addition, presence of multiple chromosomal aberrations implies a higher level of genetic instability. Follow-up polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequencing analysis of MED12 gene revealed absence of G> A transition at nucleotides c.130 or c.131 in all 9 cases, a frequent mutation found in uterine leiomyoma and its variants. In conclusion, this is the first report of high-resolution, genome-wide investigation of IVL by oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization. The presence of high frequencies of recurrent regional loss involving several chromosomes is an important finding and likely related to the pathogenesis of the disease.

  2. Genome-wide comparative analysis reveals similar types of NBS genes in hybrid Citrus sinensis genome and original Citrus clementine genome and provides new insights into non-TIR NBS genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunsheng Wang

    Full Text Available In this study, we identified and compared nucleotide-binding site (NBS domain-containing genes from three Citrus genomes (C. clementina, C. sinensis from USA and C. sinensis from China. Phylogenetic analysis of all Citrus NBS genes across these three genomes revealed that there are three approximately evenly numbered groups: one group contains the Toll-Interleukin receptor (TIR domain and two different Non-TIR groups in which most of proteins contain the Coiled Coil (CC domain. Motif analysis confirmed that the two groups of CC-containing NBS genes are from different evolutionary origins. We partitioned NBS genes into clades using NBS domain sequence distances and found most clades include NBS genes from all three Citrus genomes. This suggests that three Citrus genomes have similar numbers and types of NBS genes. We also mapped the re-sequenced reads of three pomelo and three mandarin genomes onto the C. sinensis genome. We found that most NBS genes of the hybrid C. sinensis genome have corresponding homologous genes in both pomelo and mandarin genomes. The homologous NBS genes in pomelo and mandarin suggest that the parental species of C. sinensis may contain similar types of NBS genes. This explains why the hybrid C. sinensis and original C. clementina have similar types of NBS genes in this study. Furthermore, we found that sequence variation amongst Citrus NBS genes were shaped by multiple independent and shared accelerated mutation accumulation events among different groups of NBS genes and in different Citrus genomes. Our comparative analyses yield valuable insight into the structure, organization and evolution of NBS genes in Citrus genomes. Furthermore, our comprehensive analysis showed that the non-TIR NBS genes can be divided into two groups that come from different evolutionary origins. This provides new insights into non-TIR genes, which have not received much attention.

  3. Genome-wide comparative analysis reveals similar types of NBS genes in hybrid Citrus sinensis genome and original Citrus clementine genome and provides new insights into non-TIR NBS genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunsheng; Zhou, Lijuan; Li, Dazhi; Dai, Liangying; Lawton-Rauh, Amy; Srimani, Pradip K; Duan, Yongping; Luo, Feng

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we identified and compared nucleotide-binding site (NBS) domain-containing genes from three Citrus genomes (C. clementina, C. sinensis from USA and C. sinensis from China). Phylogenetic analysis of all Citrus NBS genes across these three genomes revealed that there are three approximately evenly numbered groups: one group contains the Toll-Interleukin receptor (TIR) domain and two different Non-TIR groups in which most of proteins contain the Coiled Coil (CC) domain. Motif analysis confirmed that the two groups of CC-containing NBS genes are from different evolutionary origins. We partitioned NBS genes into clades using NBS domain sequence distances and found most clades include NBS genes from all three Citrus genomes. This suggests that three Citrus genomes have similar numbers and types of NBS genes. We also mapped the re-sequenced reads of three pomelo and three mandarin genomes onto the C. sinensis genome. We found that most NBS genes of the hybrid C. sinensis genome have corresponding homologous genes in both pomelo and mandarin genomes. The homologous NBS genes in pomelo and mandarin suggest that the parental species of C. sinensis may contain similar types of NBS genes. This explains why the hybrid C. sinensis and original C. clementina have similar types of NBS genes in this study. Furthermore, we found that sequence variation amongst Citrus NBS genes were shaped by multiple independent and shared accelerated mutation accumulation events among different groups of NBS genes and in different Citrus genomes. Our comparative analyses yield valuable insight into the structure, organization and evolution of NBS genes in Citrus genomes. Furthermore, our comprehensive analysis showed that the non-TIR NBS genes can be divided into two groups that come from different evolutionary origins. This provides new insights into non-TIR genes, which have not received much attention.

  4. High-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization of chromosome 8q: evaluation of putative progression markers for gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duin, M; van Marion, R; Vissers, K J; Hop, W C J; Dinjens, W N M; Tilanus, H W; Siersema, P D; van Dekken, H

    2007-01-01

    Amplification of 8q is frequently found in gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. It is usually detected in high-grade, high-stage GEJ adenocarcinomas. Moreover, it has been implicated in tumor progression in other cancer types. In this study, a detailed genomic analysis of 8q was performed on a series of GEJ adenocarcinomas, including 22 primary adenocarcinomas, 13 cell lines and two xenografts, by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) with a whole chromosome 8q contig array. Of the 37 specimens, 21 originated from the esophagus and 16 were derived from the gastric cardia. Commonly overrepresented regions were identified at distal 8q, i.e. 124-125 Mb (8q24.13), at 127-128 Mb (8q24.21), and at 141-142 Mb (8q24.3). From these regions six genes were selected with putative relevance to cancer: ANXA13, MTSS1, FAM84B (alias NSE2), MYC, C8orf17 (alias MOST-1) and PTK2 (alias FAK). In addition, the gene EXT1 was selected since it was found in a specific amplification in cell line SK-GT-5. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of these seven genes was subsequently performed on a panel of 24 gastroesophageal samples, including 13 cell lines, two xenografts and nine normal stomach controls. Significant overexpression was found for MYC and EXT1 in GEJ adenocarcinoma cell lines and xenografts compared to normal controls. Expression of the genes MTSS1, FAM84B and C8orf17 was found to be significantly decreased in this set of cell lines and xenografts. We conclude that, firstly, there are other genes than MYC involved in the 8q amplification in GEJ cancer. Secondly, the differential expression of these genes contributes to unravel the biology of GEJ adenocarcinomas.

  5. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis shows different epidemiology of chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-carrying Clostridium perfringens type A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Päivi Lahti

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens, one of the most common causes of food poisonings, can carry the enterotoxin gene, cpe, in its chromosome or on a plasmid. C. perfringens food poisonings are more frequently caused by the chromosomal cpe-carrying strains, while the plasmid-borne cpe-positive genotypes are more commonly found in the human feces and environmental samples. Different tolerance to food processing conditions by the plasmid-borne and chromosomal cpe-carrying strains has been reported, but the reservoirs and contamination routes of enterotoxin-producing C. perfringens remain unknown. A comparative genomic hybridization (CGH analysis with a DNA microarray based on three C. perfringens type A genomes was conducted to shed light on the epidemiology of C. perfringens food poisonings caused by plasmid-borne and chromosomal cpe-carrying strains by comparing chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-positive and cpe-negative C. perfringens isolates from human, animal, environmental, and food samples. The chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-positive C. perfringens genotypes formed two distinct clusters. Variable genes were involved with myo-inositol, ethanolamine and cellobiose metabolism, suggesting a new epidemiological model for C. perfringens food poisonings. The CGH results were complemented with growth studies, which demonstrated different myo-inositol, ethanolamine, and cellobiose metabolism between the chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-carrying strains. These findings support a ubiquitous occurrence of the plasmid-borne cpe-positive strains and their adaptation to the mammalian intestine, whereas the chromosomal cpe-positive strains appear to have a narrow niche in environments containing degrading plant material. Thus the epidemiology of the food poisonings caused by two populations appears different, the plasmid-borne cpe-positive strains probably contaminating foods via humans and the chromosomal strains being connected to plant material.

  6. Detection and precise mapping of germline rearrangements in BRCA1, BRCA2, MSH2, and MLH1 using zoom-in array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staaf, Johan; Törngren, Therese; Rambech, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Disease-predisposing germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes may consist of large genomic rearrangements that are challenging to detect and characterize using standard PCR-based mutation screening methods. Here, we describe a custom-made zoom-in microarray comparative genomic...... hybridization (CGH) platform of 60mer oligonucleotides. The 4 x 44 K array format provides high-resolution coverage (200-300 bp) of 400-700 kb genomic regions surrounding six cancer susceptibility genes. We evaluate its performance to accurately detect and precisely map earlier described or novel large germline...

  7. Chromosomal Aberrations in ETV6/RUNX1-positive Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia using 244K Oligonucleotide Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria Zubaidah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a heterogeneous form of hematological cancer consisting of various subtypes. We are interested to study the genetic aberration in precursor B-cell ALL with specific t(12;21 translocation in childhood ALL patients. A high resolution 244K array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (array-CGH was used to study eleven ETV6/RUNX1-positive childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients. Result 155 chromosomal aberrations (119 losses, 36 gains were reported in the array findings, corresponding to 76.8% deletions and 23.2% amplifications. The ETV6 gene deletion occurred in 4 of the patients, corresponding to 45% of the sample. The most common alterations above 1 Mb were deletion 6q (13%, 12p (12% and 9p (8%, and duplication 4q (6% and Xq (4%. Other genes important in ALL were also identified in this study including RUNX1, CDKN2A, FHIT, and PAX5. The array-CGH technique was able to detect microdeletion as small as 400 bp. Conclusion The results demonstrate the usefulness of high resolution array-CGH as a complementary tool in the investigation of ALL.

  8. Aneuploidy screening by array comparative genomic hybridization improves success rates of in vitro fertilization: A multicenter Indian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Kotdawala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the usefulness of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective, multicenter study including 235 PGS cycles following intracytoplasmic sperm injection performed at six different infertility centers from September 2013 to June 2015. Patients were divided as per maternal age in several groups (40 years and as per indication for undergoing PGS. Indications for performing PGS were recurrent miscarriage, repetitive implantation failure, severe male factor, previous trisomic pregnancy, and advanced maternal age (≥35. Day 3 embryo biopsy was performed and analyzed by aCGH followed by day 5 embryo transfer in the same cycle or the following cycle. Outcomes such as pregnancy rates (PRs/transfer, implantation rates, miscarriage rates, percentage of abnormal embryos, and number of embryos with more than one aneuploidy and chaotic patterns were recorded for all the treated subjects based on different age and indication groups. Results: aCGH helped in identifying aneuploid embryos, thus leading to consistent implantation (range: 33.3%-42.9% and PRs per transfer (range: 31.8%-54.9% that were obtained for all the indications in all the age groups, after performing PGS. Conclusion: Aneuploidy is one of the major factors which affect embryo implantation. aCGH can be successfully employed for screening of aneuploid embryos. When euploid embryos are transferred, an increase in PRs can be achieved irrespective of the age or the indication.

  9. Chromosomal aberrations in human hepatocellular carcinomas associated with hepatitis C virus infection detected by comparative genomic hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakura, C; Hagiwara, A; Taniguchi, H; Yamaguchi, T; Yamagishi, H; Takahashi, T; Koyama, K; Nakamura, Y; Abe, T; Inazawa, J

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-five hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) were analysed by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), to screen for changes in copy-number of DNA sequences. Chromosomal losses were noted in 1p34–36 (37%), 4q12–21 (48%), 5q13–21 (35%), 6q13–16 (23%), 8p21–23 (28%), 13q (20%), 16q (33%) and 17p13 (37%). Gains were noted in 1q (46%), 6p (20%), 8q21–24 (31%) and 17q (43%). High level gains indicative of gene amplifications were found in 7q31 (3%), 11q13 (3%), 14q12 (6%) and 17q12 (3%); amplification at 14q12 may be characteristic for HCCs. No significant difference in chromosomal aberrations was noted between carcinomas associated with HCV-infection in our study and those reported earlier in HCCs infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), indicating that both HBV- and HCV-related carcinomas may progress through a similar cascade of molecular events. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10471057

  10. Establishment of a new human pleomorphic malignant fibrous histiocytoma cell line, FU-MFH-2: molecular cytogenetic characterization by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isayama Teruto

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pleomorphic malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH is one of the most frequent malignant soft tissue tumors in adults. Despite the considerable amount of research on MFH cell lines, their characterization at a molecular cytogenetic level has not been extensively analyzed. Methods and results We established a new permanent human cell line, FU-MFH-2, from a metastatic pleomorphic MFH of a 72-year-old Japanese man, and applied multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH, Urovysion™ FISH, and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH for the characterization of chromosomal aberrations. FU-MFH-2 cells were spindle or polygonal in shape with oval nuclei, and were successfully maintained in vitro for over 80 passages. The histological features of heterotransplanted tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency mice were essentially the same as those of the original tumor. Cytogenetic and M-FISH analyses displayed a hypotriploid karyotype with numerous structural aberrations. Urovysion™ FISH revealed a homozygous deletion of the p16INK4A locus on chromosome band 9p21. CGH analysis showed a high-level amplification of 9q31-q34, gains of 1p12-p34.3, 2p21, 2q11.2-q21, 3p, 4p, 6q22-qter, 8p11.2, 8q11.2-q21.1, 9q21-qter, 11q13, 12q24, 15q21-qter, 16p13, 17, 20, and X, and losses of 1q43-qter, 4q32-qter, 5q14-q23, 7q32-qter, 8p21-pter, 8q23, 9p21-pter, 10p11.2-p13, and 10q11.2-q22. Conclusion The FU-MFH-2 cell line will be a particularly useful model for studying molecular pathogenesis of human pleomorphic MFH.

  11. Ebolavirus comparative genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jun, Se-Ran; Leuze, Michael R.; Nookaew, Intawat

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the largest documented for this virus. To examine the dynamics of this genome, we compare more than 100 currently available ebolavirus genomes to each other and to other viral genomes. Based on oligomer frequency analysis, the family Filoviridae forms...

  12. A three-step workflow procedure for the interpretation of array-based comparative genome hybridization results in patients with idiopathic mental retardation and congenital anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poot, Martin; Hochstenbach, Ron

    2010-08-01

    One of the aims of clinical genetics is to identify gene mutations or genomic rearrangements that may underlie complex presentations of phenotypic features, such as multiple congenital malformations and mental retardation. During the decade after publication of the first article on array-based comparative genome hybridization, this technique has supplemented karyotyping as the prime genome-wide screening method in patients with idiopathic multiple congenital malformations and mental retardation. The use of this novel, discovery-based, approach has dramatically increased the detection rate of genomic imbalances. Array-based comparative genome hybridization detects copy number changes in the genome of patients and healthy subjects, some of which may represent phenotypically neutral copy number variations. This prompts the need for properly distinguishing between those copy number changes that may contribute to the clinical phenotype amid a pool of neutral copy number variations. We briefly review the characteristics of copy number changes in relation to their clinical relevance. Second, we discuss several published workflow schemes to identify copy number changes putatively contributing to the phenotype, and third, we propose a three-step procedure aiming to rapidly evaluate copy number changes on a case-by-case basis as to their potential contribution to the phenotype of patients with idiopathic multiple congenital malformations and mental retardation. This workflow is gene-centered and should aid in identification of disease-related candidate genes and in estimating the recurrence risk for the disorder in the family.

  13. Cluster Analysis of Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH Data Using Self-Organizing Maps: Application to Prostate Carcinomas

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    Torsten Mattfeldt

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH is a modern genetic method which enables a genome‐wide survey of chromosomal imbalances. For each chromosome region, one obtains the information whether there is a loss or gain of genetic material, or whether there is no change at that region. Usually it is not possible to evaluate all 46 chromosomes of a metaphase, therefore several (up to 20 or more metaphases are analyzed per individual, and expressed as average. Mostly one does not study one individual alone but groups of 20–30 individuals. Therefore, large amounts of data quickly accumulate which must be put into a logical order. In this paper we present the application of a self‐organizing map (Genecluster as a tool for cluster analysis of data from pT2N0 prostate cancer cases studied by CGH. Self‐organizing maps are artificial neural networks with the capability to form clusters on the basis of an unsupervised learning rule, i.e., in our examples it gets the CGH data as only information (no clinical data. We studied a group of 40 recent cases without follow‐up, an older group of 20 cases with follow‐up, and the data set obtained by pooling both groups. In all groups good clusterings were found in the sense that clinically similar cases were placed into the same clusters on the basis of the genetic information only. The data indicate that losses on chromosome arms 6q, 8p and 13q are all frequent in pT2N0 prostatic cancer, but the loss on 8p has probably the largest prognostic importance.

  14. High-resolution mapping of genotype-phenotype relationships in cridu chat syndrome using array comparative genomic hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Snijders, Antoine; Segraves, Richard; Zhang,Xiuqing; Niebuhr, Anita; Albertson, Donna; Yang, Huanming; Gray, Joe; Niebuhr, Erik; Bolund, Lars; Pinkel, Dan

    2007-07-03

    We have used array comparative genomic hybridization to map DNA copy-number changes in 94 patients with cri du chat syndrome who had been carefully evaluated for the presence of the characteristic cry, speech delay, facial dysmorphology, and level of mental retardation (MR). Most subjects had simple deletions involving 5p (67 terminal and 12 interstitial). Genotype-phenotype correlations localized the region associated with the cry to 1.5 Mb in distal 5p15.31, between bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) containing markers D5S2054 and D5S676; speech delay to 3.2 Mb in 5p15.32-15.33, between BACs containing D5S417 and D5S635; and the region associated with facial dysmorphology to 2.4 Mb in 5p15.2-15.31, between BACs containing D5S208 and D5S2887. These results overlap and refine those reported in previous publications. MR depended approximately on the 5p deletion size and location, but there were many cases in which the retardation was disproportionately severe, given the 5p deletion. All 15 of these cases, approximately two-thirds of the severely retarded patients, were found to have copy-number aberrations in addition to the 5p deletion. Restriction of consideration to patients with only 5p deletions clarified the effect of such deletions and suggested the presence of three regions, MRI-III, with differing effect on retardation. Deletions including MRI, a 1.2-Mb region overlapping the previously defined cri du chat critical region but not including MRII and MRIII, produced a moderate level of retardation. Deletions restricted to MRII, located just proximal to MRI, produced a milder level of retardation, whereas deletions restricted to the still-more proximal MRIII produced no discernible phenotype. However, MR increased as deletions that included MRI extended progressively into MRII and MRIII, and MR became profound when all three regions were deleted.

  15. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis of genetic aberrations associated with development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Henan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Ru Qin; Li-Dong Wang; Zong-Min Fan; Dora Kwong; Xin-Yuan Guan

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To characterize cytogenetic alterations in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and its metastasis.METHODS: A total of 37 cases of primary ESCC and 15 pairs of primary ESCC tumors and their matched metastatic lymph nodes cases were enrolled from Linzhou, the high incidence area for ESCC in Henan, northern China. The comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was applied to determine the chromosomal aberrations on the DNA extracted from the frozen ESCC and metastatic lymph node samples from these patients.RESULTS: CGH showed chromosomal aberrations in all the cases. In 37 cases of primary ESCC, chromosomal profile of DNA copy number was characterized by frequently detected gains at 8q (29/37, 78%), 3q (24/37, 65%), 5p (19/37, 51%); and frequently detected losses at 3p (21/37, 57%), 8p and 9q (14/37, 38%). In 15 pairs of primary ESCC tumors and their matched metastatic lymph node cases, the majority of the chromosomal aberrations in both primary tumor and metastatic lymph node lesions were consistent with the primary ESCC cases, but new candidate regions of interest were also detected. The most significant finding is the gains of chromosome 6p with a minimum high-level amplification region at 6pl2-6ql2 in 7 metastatic lymph nodes but only in 2 corresponding primary tumors (P = 0.05) and 20p with a minimum high-level amplification region at 20pl2 in 11 metastatic lymph nodes but only in 5 corresponding primary tumors (P < 0.05). Another interesting finding is the loss of chromosome 10p and 10q in 8 and 7 metastatic lymph nodes but only in 2 corresponding primary tumors (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: Using the CGH technique to detect chromosomal aberrations in both the primary tumor and its metastatic lymph nodes of ESCC, gains of 8q, 3q and 5p and loss of 3p, 8p, 9q and 13q were specifically implicated in ESCC in Linzhou population. Gains of 6p and 20p and loss of 10pq may contribute to the lymph node metastasis of ESCC. These findings suggest that the gains and losses

  16. Combined array-comparative genomic hybridization and single-nucleotide polymorphism-loss of heterozygosity analysis reveals complex genetic alterations in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenter Gemma G

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical carcinoma develops as a result of multiple genetic alterations. Different studies investigated genomic alterations in cervical cancer mainly by means of metaphase comparative genomic hybridization (mCGH and microsatellite marker analysis for the detection of loss of heterozygosity (LOH. Currently, high throughput methods such as array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH, single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP array and gene expression arrays are available to study genome-wide alterations. Integration of these 3 platforms allows detection of genomic alterations at high resolution and investigation of an association between copy number changes and expression. Results Genome-wide copy number and genotype analysis of 10 cervical cancer cell lines by array CGH and SNP array showed highly complex large-scale alterations. A comparison between array CGH and SNP array revealed that the overall concordance in detection of the same areas with copy number alterations (CNA was above 90%. The use of SNP arrays demonstrated that about 75% of LOH events would not have been found by methods which screen for copy number changes, such as array CGH, since these were LOH events without CNA. Regions frequently targeted by CNA, as determined by array CGH, such as amplification of 5p and 20q, and loss of 8p were confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH. Genome-wide, we did not find a correlation between copy-number and gene expression. At chromosome arm 5p however, 22% of the genes were significantly upregulated in cell lines with amplifications as compared to cell lines without amplifications, as measured by gene expression arrays. For 3 genes, SKP2, ANKH and TRIO, expression differences were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. Conclusion This study showed that copy number data retrieved from either array CGH or SNP array are comparable and that the integration of genome-wide LOH, copy number and gene

  17. Comparative genomics of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan-Jiang Dong; Qing Wang; Ying-Nin Xin; Ni Li; Shi-Ying Xuan

    2009-01-01

    Genomic sequences have been determined for a number of strains of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) and related bacteria.With the development of microarray analysis and the wide use of subtractive hybridization techniques,comparative studies have been carried out with respect to the interstrain differences between H pylori and inter-species differences in the genome of related bacteria.It was found that the core genome of H pylori constitutes 1111 genes that are determinants of the species properties.A great pool of auxillary genes are mainly from the categories of cag pathogenicity islands,outer membrane proteins,restriction-modification system and hypothetical proteins of unknown function.Persistence of H pylori in the human stomach leads to the diversification of the genome.Comparative genomics suggest that a host jump has occurs from humans to felines.Candidate genes specific for the development of the gastric diseases were identified.With the aid of proteomics,population genetics and other molecular methods,future comparative genomic studies would dramatically promote our understanding of the evolution,pathogenesis and microbiology of H pylori.

  18. Comparative genome analysis of Lactococcus garvieae using a suppression subtractive hybridization library: discovery of novel DNA signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wonyong; Park, Hee Kuk; Thanh, Hien Dang; Lee, Bo-Young; Shin, Jong Wook; Shin, Hyoung-Shik

    2011-12-01

    Lactococcus garvieae, the pathogenic species in the genus Lactococcus, is recognized as an emerging pathogen in fish, animals, and humans. Despite the widespread distribution and emerging clinical significance of L. garvieae, little is known about the genomic content of this microorganism. Suppression subtractive hybridization was performed to identify the genomic differences between L. garvieae and Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, its closest phylogenetic neighbor, and the type species of the genus Lactococcus. Twenty-seven clones were specific to L. garvieae and were highly different from Lactococcus lactis in their nucleotide and protein sequences. Lactococcus garvieae primer sets were subsequently designed for two of these clones corresponding to a pyrH gene and a novel DNA signature for application in the specific detection of L. garvieae. The primer specificities were evaluated relative to three previously described 16S rRNA gene-targeted methods using 32 Lactococcus and closely related strains. Both newly designed primer sets were highly specific to L. garvieae and performed better than did the existing primers. Our findings may be useful for developing more stable and accurate tools for the discrimination of L. garvieae from other closely related species.

  19. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis detects frequent over-representation of DNA sequences at 3q, 7p, 8q and 18q in head and neck carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergamo, N A; Rogatto, S R; Poli-Frederico, R C;

    2000-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was used to identify chromosomal imbalances in 19 samples of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). The chromosome arms most often over-represented were 3q (48%), 8q (42%), and 7p (32%); in many cases, these changes were observed at high copy...... and 2q material were detected in patients exhibiting a clinical history of recurrence and/or metastasis followed by terminal disease. This association suggests that gain of 1q and 2q may be a new marker of head and neck tumors with a refractory clinical response....

  20. A predictive factor of the quality of microarray comparative genomic hybridization analysis for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Kenjiro; Oikawa, Masahiro; Arai, Junichi; Mussazhanova, Zhanna; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Shichijo, Kazuko; Nakashima, Masahiro; Hayashi, Tomayoshi; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro; Hatachi, Toshiko; Nagayasu, Takeshi

    2013-09-01

    Utilizing formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) archival tissue, the most common form of tissue preservation in routine practice, for cytogenetic analysis using microarray comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) remains challenging. We searched for a predictive factor of the performance of FFPE DNA in aCGH analysis. DNA was extracted from 63 FFPE archival tissue samples of various tissue types (31 breast cancers, 24 lung cancers, and 8 thyroid tumors), followed by aCGH analysis using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays. Tumor DNA from matched frozen samples and from FFPE samples after whole-genome amplification were also analyzed in 2 and 4 case, respectively. The derivative log ratio spread (DLRSpread) was used to assess the overall quality of each aCGH result. The DLRSpread correlated significantly with the double-stranded DNA ratio of tumor DNA, storage time, and the degree of labeling with Cy5 (Parchival tissue samples can be utilized for aCGH analysis.

  1. Comprehensive meiotic segregation analysis of a 4-breakpoint t(1;3;6) complex chromosome rearrangement using single sperm array comparative genomic hybridization and FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornak, Miroslav; Vozdova, Miluse; Musilova, Petra; Prinosilova, Petra; Oracova, Eva; Linkova, Vlasta; Vesela, Katerina; Rubes, Jiri

    2014-10-01

    Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCR) represent rare structural chromosome abnormalities frequently associated with infertility. In this study, meiotic segregation in spermatozoa of an infertile normospermic carrier of a 4-breakpoint t(1;3;6) CCR was analysed. A newly developed array comparative genomic hybridization protocol was used, and all chromosomes in 50 single sperm cells were simultaneously examined. Three-colour FISH was used to analyse chromosome segregation in 1557 other single sperm cells. It was also used to measure an interchromosomal effect; sperm chromatin structure assay was used to measure chromatin integrity. A high-frequency of unbalanced spermatozoa (84%) was observed, mostly arising from the 3:3 symmetrical segregation mode. Array comparative genomic hybridization was used to detect additional aneuploidies in two out of 50 spermatozoa (4%) in chromosomes not involved in the complex chromosome rearrangement. Significantly increased rates of diploidy and XY disomy were found in the CCR carrier compared with the control group (P < 0.001). Defective condensation of sperm chromatin was also found in 22.7% of spermatozoa by sperm chromatin structure assay. The results indicate that the infertility in the man with CCR and normal spermatozoa was caused by a production of chromosomally unbalanced, XY disomic and diploid spermatozoa and spermatozoa with defective chromatin condensation.

  2. Comparative genomics of Eukaryotes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, Vera van

    2007-01-01

    This thesis focuses on developing comparative genomics methods in eukaryotes, with an emphasis on applications for gene function prediction and regulatory element detection. In the past, methods have been developed to predict functional associations between gene pairs in prokaryotes. The challenge

  3. From amplification to gene in thyroid cancer: A high-resolution mapped bacterial-artificial-chromosome resource for cancer chromosome aberrations guides gene discovery after comparative genome hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X.N.; Gonsky, R.; Korenberg, J.R. [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Cedars-Sinai Research Inst.; Knauf, J.A.; Fagin, J.A. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Div. of Endocrinology/Metabolism; Wang, M.; Lai, E.H. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Pharmacology; Chissoe, S. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States). Genome Sequencing

    1998-08-01

    Chromosome rearrangements associated with neoplasms provide a rich resource for definition of the pathways of tumorigenesis. The power of comparative genome hybridization (CGH) to identify novel genes depends on the existence of suitable markers, which are lacking throughout most of the genome. The authors now report a general approach that translates CGH data into higher-resolution genomic-clone data that are then used to define the genes located in aneuploid regions. They used CGH to study 33 thyroid-tumor DNAs and two tumor-cell-line DNAs. The results revealed amplifications of chromosome band 2p21, with less-intense amplification on 2p13, 19q13.1, and 1p36 and with least-intense amplification on 1p34, 1q42, 5q31, 5q33-34, 9q32-34, and 14q32. To define the 2p21 region amplified, a dense array of 373 FISH-mapped chromosome 2 bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) was constructed, and 87 of these were hybridized to a tumor-cell line. Four BACs carried genomic DNA that was amplified in these cells. The maximum amplified region was narrowed to 3--6 Mb by multicolor FISH with the flanking BACs, and the minimum amplicon size was defined by a contig of 420 kb. Sequence analysis of the amplified BAC 1D9 revealed a fragment of the gene, encoding protein kinase C epsilon (PKC{epsilon}), that was then shown to be amplified and rearranged in tumor cells. In summary, CGH combined with a dense mapped resource of BACs and large-scale sequencing has led directly to the definition of PKC{epsilon} as a previously unmapped candidate gene involved in thyroid tumorigenesis.

  4. Genomic networks of hybrid sterility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie M Turner

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid dysfunction, a common feature of reproductive barriers between species, is often caused by negative epistasis between loci ("Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities". The nature and complexity of hybrid incompatibilities remain poorly understood because identifying interacting loci that affect complex phenotypes is difficult. With subspecies in the early stages of speciation, an array of genetic tools, and detailed knowledge of reproductive biology, house mice (Mus musculus provide a model system for dissecting hybrid incompatibilities. Male hybrids between M. musculus subspecies often show reduced fertility. Previous studies identified loci and several X chromosome-autosome interactions that contribute to sterility. To characterize the genetic basis of hybrid sterility in detail, we used a systems genetics approach, integrating mapping of gene expression traits with sterility phenotypes and QTL. We measured genome-wide testis expression in 305 male F2s from a cross between wild-derived inbred strains of M. musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus. We identified several thousand cis- and trans-acting QTL contributing to expression variation (eQTL. Many trans eQTL cluster into eleven 'hotspots,' seven of which co-localize with QTL for sterility phenotypes identified in the cross. The number and clustering of trans eQTL-but not cis eQTL-were substantially lower when mapping was restricted to a 'fertile' subset of mice, providing evidence that trans eQTL hotspots are related to sterility. Functional annotation of transcripts with eQTL provides insights into the biological processes disrupted by sterility loci and guides prioritization of candidate genes. Using a conditional mapping approach, we identified eQTL dependent on interactions between loci, revealing a complex system of epistasis. Our results illuminate established patterns, including the role of the X chromosome in hybrid sterility. The integrated mapping approach we employed is

  5. Genomic networks of hybrid sterility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Leslie M; White, Michael A; Tautz, Diethard; Payseur, Bret A

    2014-02-01

    Hybrid dysfunction, a common feature of reproductive barriers between species, is often caused by negative epistasis between loci ("Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities"). The nature and complexity of hybrid incompatibilities remain poorly understood because identifying interacting loci that affect complex phenotypes is difficult. With subspecies in the early stages of speciation, an array of genetic tools, and detailed knowledge of reproductive biology, house mice (Mus musculus) provide a model system for dissecting hybrid incompatibilities. Male hybrids between M. musculus subspecies often show reduced fertility. Previous studies identified loci and several X chromosome-autosome interactions that contribute to sterility. To characterize the genetic basis of hybrid sterility in detail, we used a systems genetics approach, integrating mapping of gene expression traits with sterility phenotypes and QTL. We measured genome-wide testis expression in 305 male F2s from a cross between wild-derived inbred strains of M. musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus. We identified several thousand cis- and trans-acting QTL contributing to expression variation (eQTL). Many trans eQTL cluster into eleven 'hotspots,' seven of which co-localize with QTL for sterility phenotypes identified in the cross. The number and clustering of trans eQTL-but not cis eQTL-were substantially lower when mapping was restricted to a 'fertile' subset of mice, providing evidence that trans eQTL hotspots are related to sterility. Functional annotation of transcripts with eQTL provides insights into the biological processes disrupted by sterility loci and guides prioritization of candidate genes. Using a conditional mapping approach, we identified eQTL dependent on interactions between loci, revealing a complex system of epistasis. Our results illuminate established patterns, including the role of the X chromosome in hybrid sterility. The integrated mapping approach we employed is applicable in a broad

  6. Ebolavirus comparative genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Se-Ran; Leuze, Michael R.; Nookaew, Intawat; Uberbacher, Edward C.; Land, Miriam; Zhang, Qian; Wanchai, Visanu; Chai, Juanjuan; Nielsen, Morten; Trolle, Thomas; Lund, Ole; Buzard, Gregory S.; Pedersen, Thomas D.; Wassenaar, Trudy M.; Ussery, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the largest documented for this virus. To examine the dynamics of this genome, we compare more than 100 currently available ebolavirus genomes to each other and to other viral genomes. Based on oligomer frequency analysis, the family Filoviridae forms a distinct group from all other sequenced viral genomes. All filovirus genomes sequenced to date encode proteins with similar functions and gene order, although there is considerable divergence in sequences between the three genera Ebolavirus, Cuevavirus and Marburgvirus within the family Filoviridae. Whereas all ebolavirus genomes are quite similar (multiple sequences of the same strain are often identical), variation is most common in the intergenic regions and within specific areas of the genes encoding the glycoprotein (GP), nucleoprotein (NP) and polymerase (L). We predict regions that could contain epitope-binding sites, which might be good vaccine targets. This information, combined with glycosylation sites and experimentally determined epitopes, can identify the most promising regions for the development of therapeutic strategies. This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes. The Department of Energy will provide public access to these results of federally sponsored research in accordance with the DOE Public Access Plan (http://energy.gov/downloads/doe-public-access-plan). PMID:26175035

  7. Population structure and comparative genome hybridization of European flor yeast reveal a unique group of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with few gene duplications in their genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Erny, Claude; Charpentier, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    Wine biological aging is a wine making process used to produce specific beverages in several countries in Europe, including Spain, Italy, France, and Hungary. This process involves the formation of a velum at the surface of the wine. Here, we present the first large scale comparison of all European flor strains involved in this process. We inferred the population structure of these European flor strains from their microsatellite genotype diversity and analyzed their ploidy. We show that almost all of these flor strains belong to the same cluster and are diploid, except for a few Spanish strains. Comparison of the array hybridization profile of six flor strains originating from these four countries, with that of three wine strains did not reveal any large segmental amplification. Nonetheless, some genes, including YKL221W/MCH2 and YKL222C, were amplified in the genome of four out of six flor strains. Finally, we correlated ICR1 ncRNA and FLO11 polymorphisms with flor yeast population structure, and associate the presence of wild type ICR1 and a long Flo11p with thin velum formation in a cluster of Jura strains. These results provide new insight into the diversity of flor yeast and show that combinations of different adaptive changes can lead to an increase of hydrophobicity and affect velum formation.

  8. Population structure and comparative genome hybridization of European flor yeast reveal a unique group of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with few gene duplications in their genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc Legras

    Full Text Available Wine biological aging is a wine making process used to produce specific beverages in several countries in Europe, including Spain, Italy, France, and Hungary. This process involves the formation of a velum at the surface of the wine. Here, we present the first large scale comparison of all European flor strains involved in this process. We inferred the population structure of these European flor strains from their microsatellite genotype diversity and analyzed their ploidy. We show that almost all of these flor strains belong to the same cluster and are diploid, except for a few Spanish strains. Comparison of the array hybridization profile of six flor strains originating from these four countries, with that of three wine strains did not reveal any large segmental amplification. Nonetheless, some genes, including YKL221W/MCH2 and YKL222C, were amplified in the genome of four out of six flor strains. Finally, we correlated ICR1 ncRNA and FLO11 polymorphisms with flor yeast population structure, and associate the presence of wild type ICR1 and a long Flo11p with thin velum formation in a cluster of Jura strains. These results provide new insight into the diversity of flor yeast and show that combinations of different adaptive changes can lead to an increase of hydrophobicity and affect velum formation.

  9. Rodent malaria parasites : genome organization & comparative genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Taco W.A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the genome organization of rodent malaria parasites (RMPs) and compare the organization and gene content of the genomes of RMPs and the human malaria parasite P. falciparum. The release of the complete genome sequence of P. falciparu

  10. Rodent malaria parasites : genome organization & comparative genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Taco W.A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the genome organization of rodent malaria parasites (RMPs) and compare the organization and gene content of the genomes of RMPs and the human malaria parasite P. falciparum. The release of the complete genome sequence of P.

  11. Sticky Genomes: Using NGS Evidence to Test Hybrid Speciation Hypotheses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Morgan-Richards

    Full Text Available Hypotheses of hybrid origin are common. Here we use next generation sequencing to test a hybrid hypothesis for a non-model insect with a large genome. We compared a putative hybrid triploid stick insect species (Acanthoxyla geisovii with its putative paternal diploid taxon (Clitarchus hookeri, a relationship that provides clear predictions for the relative genetic diversity within each genome. The parental taxon is expected to have comparatively low allelic diversity that is nested within the diversity of the hybrid daughter genome. The scale of genome sequencing required was conveniently achieved by extracting mRNA and sequencing cDNA to examine expressed allelic diversity. This allowed us to test hybrid-progenitor relationships among non-model organisms with large genomes and different ploidy levels. Examination of thousands of independent loci avoids potential problems produced by the silencing of parts of one or other of the parental genomes, a phenomenon sometimes associated with the process of stabilisation of a hybrid genome. Transcript assembles were assessed for evidence of paralogs and/or alternative splice variants before proceeding. Comparison of transcript assemblies was not an appropriate measure of genetic variability, but by mapping reads back to clusters derived from each species we determined levels of allelic diversity. We found greater cDNA sequence diversity among alleles in the putative hybrid species (Acanthoxyla geisovii than the non-hybrid. The allelic diversity within the putative paternal species (Clitachus hookeri nested within the hybrid-daughter genome, supports the current view of a hybrid-progenitor relationship for these stick insect species. Next generation sequencing technology provides opportunities for testing evolutionary hypotheses with non-model organisms, including, as here, genomes that are large due to polyploidy.

  12. Microarray based comparative genomic hybridization testing in deletion bearing patients with Angelman syndrome: genotype-phenotype correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, T; Peters, S U; Madduri, N S; Glaze, D G; German, J R; Bird, L M; Barbieri-Welge, R; Bichell, T J; Beaudet, A L; Bacino, C A

    2006-06-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by severe mental retardation, dysmorphic features, ataxia, seizures, and typical behavioural characteristics, including a happy sociable disposition. AS is caused by maternal deficiency of UBE3A (E6 associated protein ubiquitin protein ligase 3A gene), located in an imprinted region on chromosome 15q11-q13. Although there are four different molecular types of AS, deletions of the 15q11-q13 region account for approximately 70% of the AS patients. These deletions are usually detected by fluorescence in situ hybridisation studies. The deletions can also be subclassified based on their size into class I and class II, with the former being larger and encompassing the latter. We studied 22 patients with AS due to microdeletions using a microarray based comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH) assay to define the deletions and analysed their phenotypic severity, especially expression of the autism phenotype, in order to establish clinical correlations. Overall, children with larger, class I deletions were significantly more likely to meet criteria for autism, had lower cognitive scores, and lower expressive language scores compared with children with smaller, class II deletions. Children with class I deletions also required more medications to control their seizures than did those in the class II group. There are four known genes (NIPA1, NIPA2, CYFIP1, & GCP5) that are affected by class I but not class II deletions, thus raising the possibility of a role for these genes in autism as well as the development of expressive language skills.

  13. Chromosome deletion of 14q32.33 detected by array comparative genomic hybridization in a patient with features of dubowitz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcy, Diana C; Rosenthal, Scott; Wallerstein, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    We report a 4-year-old girl of Mexican origins with a clinical diagnosis of Dubowitz syndrome who carries a de novo terminal deletion at the 14q32.33 locus identified by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Dubowitz syndrome is a rare condition characterized by a constellation of features including growth retardation, short stature, microcephaly, micrognathia, eczema, telecanthus, blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, round-tipped nose, mild to moderate developmental delay, and high-pitched hoarse voice. This syndrome is thought to be autosomal recessive; however, the etiology has not been determined. This is the first report of this deletion in association with this phenotype; it is possible that this deletion may be causal for a Dubowitz phenocopy.

  14. Chromosome Deletion of 14q32.33 Detected by Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization in a Patient with Features of Dubowitz Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana C. Darcy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 4-year-old girl of Mexican origins with a clinical diagnosis of Dubowitz syndrome who carries a de novo terminal deletion at the 14q32.33 locus identified by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH. Dubowitz syndrome is a rare condition characterized by a constellation of features including growth retardation, short stature, microcephaly, micrognathia, eczema, telecanthus, blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, round-tipped nose, mild to moderate developmental delay, and high-pitched hoarse voice. This syndrome is thought to be autosomal recessive; however, the etiology has not been determined. This is the first report of this deletion in association with this phenotype; it is possible that this deletion may be causal for a Dubowitz phenocopy.

  15. Phytozome Comparative Plant Genomics Portal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodstein, David; Batra, Sajeev; Carlson, Joseph; Hayes, Richard; Phillips, Jeremy; Shu, Shengqiang; Schmutz, Jeremy; Rokhsar, Daniel

    2014-09-09

    The Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Institute is a genomics user facility supporting DOE mission science in the areas of Bioenergy, Carbon Cycling, and Biogeochemistry. The Plant Program at the JGI applies genomic, analytical, computational and informatics platforms and methods to: 1. Understand and accelerate the improvement (domestication) of bioenergy crops 2. Characterize and moderate plant response to climate change 3. Use comparative genomics to identify constrained elements and infer gene function 4. Build high quality genomic resource platforms of JGI Plant Flagship genomes for functional and experimental work 5. Expand functional genomic resources for Plant Flagship genomes

  16. Genome Mapping in Plant Comparative Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Lindsay; Sharp, Aaron R; Evans, Carrie R; Udall, Joshua A

    2016-09-01

    Genome mapping produces fingerprints of DNA sequences to construct a physical map of the whole genome. It provides contiguous, long-range information that complements and, in some cases, replaces sequencing data. Recent advances in genome-mapping technology will better allow researchers to detect large (>1kbp) structural variations between plant genomes. Some molecular and informatics complications need to be overcome for this novel technology to achieve its full utility. This technology will be useful for understanding phenotype responses due to DNA rearrangements and will yield insights into genome evolution, particularly in polyploids. In this review, we outline recent advances in genome-mapping technology, including the processes required for data collection and analysis, and applications in plant comparative genomics.

  17. Metabolic and evolutionary insights into the closely-related species Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans deduced from high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison Marcus

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whilst being closely related to the model actinomycete Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2, S. lividans 66 differs from it in several significant and phenotypically observable ways, including antibiotic production. Previous comparative gene hybridization studies investigating such differences have used low-density (one probe per gene PCR-based spotted arrays. Here we use new experimentally optimised 104,000 × 60-mer probe arrays to characterize in detail the genomic differences between wild-type S. lividans 66, a derivative industrial strain, TK24, and S. coelicolor M145. Results The high coverage and specificity (detection of three nucleotide differences of the new microarrays used has highlighted the macroscopic genomic differences between two S. lividans strains and S. coelicolor. In a series of case studies we have validated the microarray and have identified subtle changes in genomic structure which occur in the Asp-activating adenylation domains of CDA non-ribosomal peptide synthetase genes which provides evidence of gene shuffling between these domains. We also identify single nucleotide sequence inter-species differences which exist in the actinorhodin biosynthetic gene cluster. As the glyoxylate bypass is non-functional in both S. lividans strains due to the absence of the gene encoding isocitrate lyase it is likely that the ethylmalonyl-CoA pathway functions as the alternative mechanism for the assimilation of C2 compounds. Conclusions This study provides evidence for widespread genetic recombination, rather than it being focussed at 'hotspots', suggesting that the previously proposed 'archipelago model' of genomic differences between S. coelicolor and S. lividans is unduly simplistic. The two S. lividans strains investigated differ considerably in genetic complement, with TK24 lacking 175 more genes than its wild-type parent when compared to S. coelicolor. Additionally, we confirm the presence of bldB in S. lividans and

  18. Risk assessment models in genetics clinic for array comparative genomic hybridization: Clinical information can be used to predict the likelihood of an abnormal result in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, Rachel M; Mercurio, Laura; Kanter, Rebecca; Doyle, Richard; Abuelo, Dianne; Morrow, Eric M; Shur, Natasha

    2013-03-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) testing can diagnose chromosomal microdeletions and duplications too small to be detected by conventional cytogenetic techniques. We need to consider which patients are more likely to receive a diagnosis from aCGH testing versus patients that have lower likelihood and may benefit from broader genome wide scanning. We retrospectively reviewed charts of a population of 200 patients, 117 boys and 83 girls, who underwent aCGH testing in Genetics Clinic at Rhode Island hospital between 1 January/2008 and 31 December 2010. Data collected included sex, age at initial clinical presentation, aCGH result, history of seizures, autism, dysmorphic features, global developmental delay/intellectual disability, hypotonia and failure to thrive. aCGH analysis revealed abnormal results in 34 (17%) and variants of unknown significance in 24 (12%). Patients with three or more clinical diagnoses had a 25.0% incidence of abnormal aCGH findings, while patients with two or fewer clinical diagnoses had a 12.5% incidence of abnormal aCGH findings. Currently, we provide families with a range of 10-30% of a diagnosis with aCGH testing. With increased clinical complexity, patients have an increased probability of having an abnormal aCGH result. With this, we can provide individualized risk estimates for each patient.

  19. Clinical and cytogenetic features of a patient with partial trisomy 8q and partial monosomy 13q delineated by array comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Young Bae; Yun, Jun No; Park, Sang-Jin; Park, Moon Sung; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jang Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Partial trisomy 8q is rare and has distinctive clinical features, including severe mental retardation, growth impairment, dysmorphic facial appearances, cleft palate, congenital heart disease, and urogenital anomalies. Partial monosomy 13q is a rare genetic disorder displaying a variety of phenotypic characteristics including mental retardation, dysmorphic facial features, and congenital anomalies. Here, we describe for the first time clinical observations and cytogenetic analysis of a patient with a concomitant occurrence of partial trisomy of 8q (8q21.3→qter) and partial monosomy 13q(13q34→qter). The patient was a female neonate with facial dysmorphia, agenesis of the corpus callosum, cleft palate, and congenital heart disease. G-band standard karyotype was 46,XX,add(13)(q34). To determine the origin of additional genomic gain in chromosome 13, array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was performed. Array CGH showed a 56.8 Mb sized gain on chromosome 8q and a 0.28 Mb sized loss on chromosome 13q. Therefore, the final karyotype of the patient was defined as 46,XX, der(13)t(8;13)(q21.3;q34). In conclusion, we described the clinical and cytogenetic analysis of the patient with concomitant occurrence of partial trisomy 8q and partial monosomy 13q delineated by array CGH. This report suggests that the array CGH would be a valuable diagnostic tool for identifying the origin of small additional genetic materials.

  20. Microalterations of inherently unstable genomic regions in rat mammary carcinomas as revealed by long oligonucleotide array-based comparative genomic hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adamovic, T.; McAllister, D.; Guryev, V.; Wang, X.; Andrae, J.W.; Cuppen, E.; Jacob, H.; Sugg, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    The presence of copy number variants in normal genomes poses a challenge to identify small genuine somatic copy number changes in high-resolution cancer genome profiling studies due to the use of unpaired reference DNA. Another problem is the well-known rearrangements of immunoglobulin and T-cell

  1. Microalterations of inherently unstable genomic regions in rat mammary carcinomas as revealed by long oligonucleotide array-based comparative genomic hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adamovic, T.; McAllister, D.; Guryev, V.; Wang, X.; Andrae, J.W.; Cuppen, E.; Jacob, H.; Sugg, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    The presence of copy number variants in normal genomes poses a challenge to identify small genuine somatic copy number changes in high-resolution cancer genome profiling studies due to the use of unpaired reference DNA. Another problem is the well-known rearrangements of immunoglobulin and T-cell re

  2. Microalterations of Inherently Unstable Genomic Regions in Rat Mammary Carcinomas as Revealed by Long Oligonucleotide Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adamovic, Tatjana; McAllister, Donna; Guryev, Victor; Wang, Xujing; Andrae, Jaime Wendt; Cuppen, Edwin; Jacob, Howard J.; Sugg, Sonia L.

    2009-01-01

    The presence of copy number variants in normal genomes poses a challenge to identify small genuine somatic copy number changes in high-resolution cancer genome profiling studies due to the use of unpaired reference DNA. Another problem is the well-known rearrangements of immunoglobulin and T-cell re

  3. High-resolution genome-wide array-based comparative genome hybridization reveals cryptic chromosome changes in AML and MDS cases with trisomy 8 as the sole cytogenetic aberration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsson, K; Heidenblad, M; Strömbeck, B; Staaf, J; Jönsson, G; Borg, A; Fioretos, T; Johansson, B

    2006-05-01

    Although trisomy 8 as the sole chromosome aberration is the most common numerical abnormality in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), little is known about its pathogenetic effects. Considering that +8 is a frequent secondary change in AML/MDS, cryptic--possibly primary--genetic aberrations may occur in cases with trisomy 8 as the apparently single anomaly. However, no such hidden anomalies have been reported. We performed a high-resolution genome-wide array-based comparative genome hybridization (array CGH) analysis of 10 AML/MDS cases with isolated +8, utilizing a 32K bacterial artificial chromosome array set, providing >98% coverage of the genome with a resolution of 100 kb. Array CGH revealed intrachromosomal imbalances, not corresponding to known genomic copy number polymorphisms, in 4/10 cases, comprising nine duplications and hemizygous deletions ranging in size from 0.5 to 2.2 Mb. A 1.8 Mb deletion at 7p14.1, which had occurred prior to the +8, was identified in MDS transforming to AML. Furthermore, a deletion including ETV6 was present in one case. The remaining seven imbalances involved more than 40 genes. The present results show that cryptic genetic abnormalities are frequent in trisomy 8-positive AML/MDS cases and that +8 as the sole cytogenetic aberration is not always the primary genetic event.

  4. Matrix-comparative genomic hybridization from multicenter formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded colorectal cancer tissue blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Köhne Claus-Henning

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of genomic signatures of colorectal cancer for risk stratification requires the study of large series of cancer patients with an extensive clinical follow-up. Multicentric clinical studies represent an ideal source of well documented archived material for this type of analyses. Methods To verify if this material is technically suitable to perform matrix-CGH, we performed a pilot study using macrodissected 29 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples collected within the framework of the EORTC-GI/PETACC-2 trial for colorectal cancer. The scientific aim was to identify prognostic genomic signatures differentiating locally restricted (UICC stages II-III from systemically advanced (UICC stage IV colorectal tumours. Results The majority of archived tissue samples collected in the different centers was suitable to perform matrix-CGH. 5/7 advanced tumours displayed 13q-gain and 18q-loss. In locally restricted tumours, only 6/12 tumours showed a gain on 13q and 7/12 tumours showed a loss on 18q. Interphase-FISH and high-resolution array-mapping of the gain on 13q confirmed the validity of the array-data and narrowed the chromosomal interval containing potential oncogenes. Conclusion Archival, paraffin-embedded tissue samples collected in multicentric clinical trials are suitable for matrix-CGH analyses and allow the identification of prognostic signatures and aberrations harbouring potential new oncogenes.

  5. Genetic profiles of gastroesophageal cancer: combined analysis using expression array and tiling array--comparative genomic hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Johansson, Jan; Ohlsson, Mattias

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to characterize the genomic profiles of adenocarcinomas in the gastroesophageal junction in relation to cancers in the esophagus and the stomach. Profiles of gains/losses as well as gene expression profiles were obtained from 27 gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas by means of 32k high......15, 13q34, and 12q13, whereas different profiles with gains at 5p15, 7p22, 2q35, and 13q34 characterized gastric cancers. CDK6 and EGFR were identified as putative target genes in cancers of the esophagus and the gastroesophageal junction, with upregulation in one quarter of the tumors. Gains....../losses and gene expression profiles show strong similarity between cancers in the distal esophagus and the gastroesophageal junction with frequent upregulation of CDK6 and EGFR, whereas gastric cancer displays distinct genetic changes. These data suggest that molecular diagnostics and targeted therapies can...

  6. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis reveals chromosomal copy number aberrations associated with clinical outcome in canine diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Aricò

    Full Text Available Canine Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (cDLBCL is an aggressive cancer with variable clinical response. Despite recent attempts by gene expression profiling to identify the dog as a potential animal model for human DLBCL, this tumor remains biologically heterogeneous with no prognostic biomarkers to predict prognosis. The aim of this work was to identify copy number aberrations (CNAs by high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH in 12 dogs with newly diagnosed DLBCL. In a subset of these dogs, the genetic profiles at the end of therapy and at relapse were also assessed. In primary DLBCLs, 90 different genomic imbalances were counted, consisting of 46 gains and 44 losses. Two gains in chr13 were significantly correlated with clinical stage. In addition, specific regions of gains and losses were significantly associated to duration of remission. In primary DLBCLs, individual variability was found, however 14 recurrent CNAs (>30% were identified. Losses involving IGK, IGL and IGH were always found, and gains along the length of chr13 and chr31 were often observed (>41%. In these segments, MYC, LDHB, HSF1, KIT and PDGFRα are annotated. At the end of therapy, dogs in remission showed four new CNAs, whereas three new CNAs were observed in dogs at relapse compared with the previous profiles. One ex novo CNA, involving TCR, was present in dogs in remission after therapy, possibly induced by the autologous vaccine. Overall, aCGH identified small CNAs associated with outcome, which, along with future expression studies, may reveal target genes relevant to cDLBCL.

  7. Skin Barrier Function Is Not Impaired and Kallikrein 7 Gene Polymorphism Is Frequently Observed in Korean X-linked Ichthyosis Patients Diagnosed by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization and Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Noo Ri; Yoon, Na Young; Jung, Minyoung; Kim, Ji-Yun; Seo, Seong Jun; Wang, Hye-Young; Lee, Hyeyoung; Sohn, Young Bae; Choi, Eung Ho

    2016-08-01

    X-linked ichthyosis (XLI) is a recessively inherited ichthyosis. Skin barrier function of XLI patients reported in Western countries presented minimally abnormal or normal. Here, we evaluated the skin barrier properties and a skin barrier-related gene mutation in 16 Korean XLI patients who were diagnosed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and array comparative genomic hybridization analysis. Skin barrier properties were measured, cytokine expression levels in the stratum corneum (SC) were evaluated with the tape stripped specimen from skin surface, and a genetic test was done on blood. XLI patients showed significantly lower SC hydration, but normal basal trans-epidermal water loss and skin surface pH as compared to a healthy control group. Histopathology of ichthyosis epidermis showed no acanthosis, and levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines in the corneal layer did not differ between control and lesional/non-lesional skin of XLI patients. Among the mutations in filaggrin (FLG), kallikrein 7 (KLK7), and SPINK5 genes, the prevalence of KLK7 gene mutations was significantly higher in XLI patients (50%) than in controls (0%), whereas FLG and SPINK5 prevalence was comparable. Korean XLI patients exhibited unimpaired skin barrier function and frequent association with the KLK7 gene polymorphism, which may differentiate them from Western XLI patients.

  8. Genome-Wide Comparative Analysis Reveals Similar Types of NBS Genes in Hybrid Citrus sinensis Genome and Original Citrus clementine Genome and Provides New Insights into Non-TIR NBS Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Yunsheng Wang; Lijuan Zhou; Dazhi Li; Liangying Dai; Amy Lawton-Rauh; Pradip K. Srimani; Yongping Duan; Feng Luo

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we identified and compared nucleotide-binding site (NBS) domain-containing genes from three Citrus genomes (C. clementina, C. sinensis from USA and C. sinensis from China). Phylogenetic analysis of all Citrus NBS genes across these three genomes revealed that there are three approximately evenly numbered groups: one group contains the Toll-Interleukin receptor (TIR) domain and two different Non-TIR groups in which most of proteins contain the Coiled Coil (CC) domain. Motif anal...

  9. Genomic Prediction of Barley Hybrid Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Philipp

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid breeding in barley ( L. offers great opportunities to accelerate the rate of genetic improvement and to boost yield stability. A crucial requirement consists of the efficient selection of superior hybrid combinations. We used comprehensive phenotypic and genomic data from a commercial breeding program with the goal of examining the potential to predict the hybrid performances. The phenotypic data were comprised of replicated grain yield trials for 385 two-way and 408 three-way hybrids evaluated in up to 47 environments. The parental lines were genotyped using a 3k single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array based on an Illumina Infinium assay. We implemented ridge regression best linear unbiased prediction modeling for additive and dominance effects and evaluated the prediction ability using five-fold cross validations. The prediction ability of hybrid performances based on general combining ability (GCA effects was moderate, amounting to 0.56 and 0.48 for two- and three-way hybrids, respectively. The potential of GCA-based hybrid prediction requires that both parental components have been evaluated in a hybrid background. This is not necessary for genomic prediction for which we also observed moderate cross-validated prediction abilities of 0.51 and 0.58 for two- and three-way hybrids, respectively. This exemplifies the potential of genomic prediction in hybrid barley. Interestingly, prediction ability using the two-way hybrids as training population and the three-way hybrids as test population or vice versa was low, presumably, because of the different genetic makeup of the parental source populations. Consequently, further research is needed to optimize genomic prediction approaches combining different source populations in barley.

  10. Prenatal diagnosis of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome confirmed by comparative genomic hybridization array: report of two cases and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sifakis Stavros

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS is a well known genetic condition caused by a partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 4. The great variability in the extent of the 4p deletion and the possible contribution of additional genetic rearrangements lead to a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. The majority of the reports of prenatally diagnosed WHS cases are associated with large 4p deletions identified by conventional chromosome analysis; however, the widespread clinical use of novel molecular techniques such as array comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH has increased the detection rate of submicroscopic chromosomal aberrations associated with WHS phenotype. We provide a report of two fetuses with WHS presenting with intrauterine growth restriction as an isolated finding or combined with oligohydramnios and abnormal Doppler waveform in umbilical artery and uterine arteries. Standard karyotyping demonstrated a deletion on chromosome 4 in both cases [del(4(p15.33 and del(4(p15.31, respectively] and further application of a-CGH confirmed the diagnosis and offered a precise characterization of the genetic defect. A detailed review of the currently available literature on the prenatal diagnostic approach of WHS in terms of fetal sonographic assessment and molecular cytogenetic investigation is also provided.

  11. An Xq22.3 duplication detected by comparative genomic hybridization microarray (Array-CGH) defines a new locus (FGS5) for FG syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehee, Fernanda Sarquis; Rosenberg, Carla; Krepischi-Santos, Ana Cristina; Kok, Fernando; Knijnenburg, Jeroen; Froyen, Guy; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M; Opitz, John M; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2005-12-15

    FG syndrome is an X-linked multiple congenital anomalies (MCA) syndrome. It has been mapped to four distinct loci FGS1-4, through linkage analysis (Xq13, Xp22.3, and Xp11.4-p11.3) and based on the breakpoints of an X chromosome inversion (Xq11:Xq28), but so far no gene has been identified. We describe a boy with FG syndrome who has an inherited duplication at band Xq22.3 detected by comparative genomic hybridization microarray (Array-CGH). These duplication maps outside all four loci described so far for FG syndrome, representing therefore a new locus, which we propose to be called FGS5. MID2, a gene closely related to MID1, which is known to be mutated in Opitz G/BBB syndrome, maps within the duplicated segment of our patient. Since FG and Opitz G/BBB syndromes share many manifestations we considered MID2 a candidate gene for FG syndrome. We also discuss the involvement of other potential genes within the duplicated segment and its relationship with clinical symptoms of our patient, as well as the laboratory abnormalities found in his mother, a carrier of the duplication.

  12. Targeted array comparative genomic hybridization--a new diagnostic tool for the detection of large copy number variations in nemaline myopathy-causing genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiiski, K; Laari, L; Lehtokari, V-L; Lunkka-Hytönen, M; Angelini, C; Petty, R; Hackman, P; Wallgren-Pettersson, C; Pelin, K

    2013-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) constitutes a heterogeneous group of congenital myopathies. Mutations in the nebulin gene (NEB) are the main cause of recessively inherited NM. NEB is one of the most largest genes in human. To date, 68 NEB mutations, mainly small deletions or point mutations have been published. The only large mutation characterized is the 2.5 kb deletion of exon 55 in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. To investigate any copy number variations in this enormous gene, we designed a novel custom comparative genomic hybridization microarray, NM-CGH, targeted towards the seven known genes causative for NM. During the validation of the NM-CGH array we identified two novel deletions in two different families. The first is the largest deletion characterized in NEB to date, (∼53 kb) encompassing 24 exons. The second deletion (1 kb) covers two exons. In both families, the copy number change was the second mutation to be characterized and shown to have been inherited from one of the healthy carrier parents. In addition to these novel mutations, copy number variation was identified in four samples in three families in the triplicate region of NEB. We conclude that this method appears promising for the detection of copy number variations in NEB. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. In Silico Genomic Fingerprints of the Bacillus anthracis Group Obtained by Virtual Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaimes-Díaz, Hueman; Larios-Serrato, Violeta; Lloret-Sánchez, Teresa; Olguín-Ruiz, Gabriela; Sánchez-Vallejo, Carlos; Carreño-Durán, Luis; Maldonado-Rodríguez, Rogelio; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    In this study we evaluate the capacity of Virtual Hybridization to identify between highly related bacterial strains. Eight genomic fingerprints were obtained by virtual hybridization for the Bacillus anthracis genome set, and a set of 15,264 13-nucleotide short probes designed to produce genomic fingerprints unique for each organism. The data obtained from each genomic fingerprint were used to obtain hybridization patterns simulating a DNA microarray. Two virtual hybridization methods were used: the Direct and the Extended method to identify the number of potential hybridization sites and thus determine the minimum sensitivity value to discriminate between genomes with 99.9% similarity. Genomic fingerprints were compared using both methods and phylogenomic trees were constructed to verify that the minimum detection value is 0.000017. Results obtained from the genomic fingerprints suggest that the distribution in the trees is correct, as compared to other taxonomic methods. Specific virtual hybridization sites for each of the genomes studied were also identified. PMID:27600214

  14. Comparative Microbial Genomics and Forensics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Steven E

    2016-08-01

    Forensic science concerns the application of scientific techniques to questions of a legal nature and may also be used to address questions of historical importance. Forensic techniques are often used in legal cases that involve crimes against persons or property, and they increasingly may involve cases of bioterrorism, crimes against nature, medical negligence, or tracing the origin of food- and crop-borne disease. Given the rapid advance of genome sequencing and comparative genomics techniques, we ask how these might be used to address cases of a forensic nature, focusing on the use of microbial genome sequence analysis. Such analyses rely on the increasingly large numbers of microbial genomes present in public databases, the ability of individual investigators to rapidly sequence whole microbial genomes, and an increasing depth of understanding of their evolution and function. Suggestions are made as to how comparative microbial genomics might be applied forensically and may represent possibilities for the future development of forensic techniques. A particular emphasis is on the nascent field of genomic epidemiology, which utilizes rapid whole-genome sequencing to identify the source and spread of infectious outbreaks. Also discussed is the application of comparative microbial genomics to the study of historical epidemics and deaths and how the approaches developed may also be applicable to more recent and actionable cases.

  15. Cloud computing for comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Dennis P; Kudtarkar, Parul; Fusaro, Vincent A; Pivovarov, Rimma; Patil, Prasad; Tonellato, Peter J

    2010-05-18

    Large comparative genomics studies and tools are becoming increasingly more compute-expensive as the number of available genome sequences continues to rise. The capacity and cost of local computing infrastructures are likely to become prohibitive with the increase, especially as the breadth of questions continues to rise. Alternative computing architectures, in particular cloud computing environments, may help alleviate this increasing pressure and enable fast, large-scale, and cost-effective comparative genomics strategies going forward. To test this, we redesigned a typical comparative genomics algorithm, the reciprocal smallest distance algorithm (RSD), to run within Amazon's Elastic Computing Cloud (EC2). We then employed the RSD-cloud for ortholog calculations across a wide selection of fully sequenced genomes. We ran more than 300,000 RSD-cloud processes within the EC2. These jobs were farmed simultaneously to 100 high capacity compute nodes using the Amazon Web Service Elastic Map Reduce and included a wide mix of large and small genomes. The total computation time took just under 70 hours and cost a total of $6,302 USD. The effort to transform existing comparative genomics algorithms from local compute infrastructures is not trivial. However, the speed and flexibility of cloud computing environments provides a substantial boost with manageable cost. The procedure designed to transform the RSD algorithm into a cloud-ready application is readily adaptable to similar comparative genomics problems.

  16. The database of chromosome imbalance regions and genes resided in lung cancer from Asian and Caucasian identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Fang-Yi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer-related genes show racial differences. Therefore, identification and characterization of DNA copy number alteration regions in different racial groups helps to dissect the mechanism of tumorigenesis. Methods Array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH was analyzed for DNA copy number profile in 40 Asian and 20 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Three methods including MetaCore analysis for disease and pathway correlations, concordance analysis between array-CGH database and the expression array database, and literature search for copy number variation genes were performed to select novel lung cancer candidate genes. Four candidate oncogenes were validated for DNA copy number and mRNA and protein expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH, reverse transcriptase-qPCR (RT-qPCR, and immunohistochemistry (IHC in more patients. Results We identified 20 chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 459 genes for Caucasian and 17 regions containing 476 genes for Asian lung cancer patients. Seven common chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 117 genes, included gain on 3p13-14, 6p22.1, 9q21.13, 13q14.1, and 17p13.3; and loss on 3p22.2-22.3 and 13q13.3 were found both in Asian and Caucasian patients. Gene validation for four genes including ARHGAP19 (10q24.1 functioning in Rho activity control, FRAT2 (10q24.1 involved in Wnt signaling, PAFAH1B1 (17p13.3 functioning in motility control, and ZNF322A (6p22.1 involved in MAPK signaling was performed using qPCR and RT-qPCR. Mean gene dosage and mRNA expression level of the four candidate genes in tumor tissues were significantly higher than the corresponding normal tissues (PP=0.06. In addition, CISH analysis of patients indicated that copy number amplification indeed occurred for ARHGAP19 and ZNF322A genes in lung cancer patients. IHC analysis of paraffin blocks from Asian Caucasian patients demonstrated that the frequency of

  17. In vitro concurrent endothelial and osteogenic commitment of adipose-derived stem cells and their genomical analyses through comparative genomic hybridization array: novel strategies to increase the successful engraftment of tissue-engineered bone grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardin, Chiara; Bressan, Eriberto; Ferroni, Letizia; Nalesso, Elisa; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Stellini, Edoardo; Pinton, Paolo; Sivolella, Stefano; Zavan, Barbara

    2012-03-20

    In the field of tissue engineering, adult stem cells are increasingly recognized as an important tool for in vitro reconstructed tissue-engineered grafts. In the world of cell therapies, undoubtedly, mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow or adipose tissue are the most promising progenitors for tissue engineering applications. In this setting, adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are generally similar to those derived from bone marrow and are most conveniently extracted from tissue removed by elective cosmetic liposuction procedures; they also show a great potential for endothelization. The aim of the present work was to investigate how the cocommitment into a vascular and bone phenotype of ASCs could be a useful tool for improving the in vitro and in vivo reconstruction of a vascularized bone graft. Human ASCs obtained from abdominoplasty procedures were loaded in a hydroxyapatite clinical-grade scaffold, codifferentiated, and tested for proliferation, cell distribution, and osteogenic and vasculogenic gene expression. The chromosomal stability of the cultures was investigated using the comparative genomic hybridization array for 3D cultures. ASC adhesion, distribution, proliferation, and gene expression not only demonstrated a full osteogenic and vasculogenic commitment in vitro and in vivo, but also showed that endothelization strongly improves their osteogenic commitment. In the end, genetic analyses confirmed that no genomical alteration in long-term in vitro culture of ASCs in 3D scaffolds occurs.

  18. 3D Genome Tuner: Compare Multiple Circular Genomes in a 3D Context

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Wang; Qun Liang; Xiuqing Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Circular genomes, being the largest proportion of sequenced genomes, play an important role in genome analysis. However, traditional 2D circular map only provides an overview and annotations of genome but does not offer feature-based comparison. For remedying these shortcomings, we developed 3D Genome Tuner, a hybrid of circular map and comparative map tools. Its capability of viewing comparisons between multiple circular maps in a 3D space offers great benefits to the study of comparative genomics. The program is freely available(under an LGPL licence)at http://sourceforge.net/projects/dgenometuner.

  19. Application of Genomic In Situ Hybridization in Horticultural Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Ramzan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular cytogenetic techniques, such as in situ hybridization methods, are admirable tools to analyze the genomic structure and function, chromosome constituents, recombination patterns, alien gene introgression, genome evolution, aneuploidy, and polyploidy and also genome constitution visualization and chromosome discrimination from different genomes in allopolyploids of various horticultural crops. Using GISH advancement as multicolor detection is a significant approach to analyze the small and numerous chromosomes in fruit species, for example, Diospyros hybrids. This analytical technique has proved to be the most exact and effective way for hybrid status confirmation and helps remarkably to distinguish donor parental genomes in hybrids such as Clivia, Rhododendron, and Lycoris ornamental hybrids. The genome characterization facilitates in hybrid selection having potential desirable characteristics during the early hybridization breeding, as this technique expedites to detect introgressed sequence chromosomes. This review study epitomizes applications and advancements of genomic in situ hybridization (GISH techniques in horticultural plants.

  20. Enhancer Identification through Comparative Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visel, Axel; Bristow, James; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2006-10-01

    With the availability of genomic sequence from numerousvertebrates, a paradigm shift has occurred in the identification ofdistant-acting gene regulatory elements. In contrast to traditionalgene-centric studies in which investigators randomly scanned genomicfragments that flank genes of interest in functional assays, the modernapproach begins electronically with publicly available comparativesequence datasets that provide investigators with prioritized lists ofputative functional sequences based on their evolutionary conservation.However, although a large number of tools and resources are nowavailable, application of comparative genomic approaches remains far fromtrivial. In particular, it requires users to dynamically consider thespecies and methods for comparison depending on the specific biologicalquestion under investigation. While there is currently no single generalrule to this end, it is clear that when applied appropriately,comparative genomic approaches exponentially increase our power ingenerating biological hypotheses for subsequent experimentaltesting.

  1. Comparative genomics of Dothideomycete fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgt, van der A.

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are a diverse group of eukaryotic micro-organisms particularly suited for comparative genomics analyses. Fungi are important to industry, fundamental science and many of them are notorious pathogens of crops, thereby endangering global food supply. Dozens of fungi have been sequenced in the la

  2. Genome composition of 'Elatior'-begonias hybrids analyzed by genomic in situ hybridisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marasek Ciolakowska, A.R.; Ramanna, M.S.; Laak, W.A.; Tuyl, van J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization of various tuberous Begonia species hybrids with Begonia socotrana results in so-called 'Elatior'-begonias hybrids (B. x hiemalis Fotsch). In our study, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) has been employed to assess the genome composition in eleven 'Elatior'-begonias

  3. Comparative genomics of Lactobacillus and other LAB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wassenaar, Trudy M.; Lukjancenko, Oksana

    2014-01-01

    The genomes of 66 LABs, belonging to five different genera, were compared for genome size and gene content. The analyzed genomes included 37 Lactobacillus genomes of 17 species, six Lactococcus lactis genomes, four Leuconostoc genomes of three species, six Streptococcus genomes of two species......, twelve Enterococcus genomes of four species and a single Weissella genome. Genomes of pathogenic strains or species were not included. Since the gene density in these genomes is relatively constant, genome size is a measure of gene content. The genomes of Enterococcus were significantly larger than...... that of the others, with the two Streptococcus species having the shortest genomes. The widest distribution in genome content was observed for Lactobacillus. The number of tRNA and rRNA gene copies varied considerably, with exceptional high numbers observed for Lb. delbrueckii, while these numbers were relatively...

  4. Comparative Genome Analysis and Genome Evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, Berend

    2002-01-01

    This thesis described a collection of bioinformatic analyses on complete genome sequence data. We have studied the evolution of gene content and find that vertical inheritance dominates over horizontal gene trasnfer, even to the extent that we can use the gene content to make genome phylogenies. Usi

  5. Comparative Genome Analysis and Genome Evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, Berend

    2003-01-01

    This thesis described a collection of bioinformatic analyses on complete genome sequence data. We have studied the evolution of gene content and find that vertical inheritance dominates over horizontal gene trasnfer, even to the extent that we can use the gene content to make genome phylogenies. Usi

  6. Ancient hybridization and genomic stabilization in a swordtail fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumer, Molly; Cui, Rongfeng; Powell, Daniel L; Rosenthal, Gil G; Andolfatto, Peter

    2016-06-01

    A rapidly increasing body of work is revealing that the genomes of distinct species often exhibit hybrid ancestry, presumably due to postspeciation hybridization between closely related species. Despite the growing number of documented cases, we still know relatively little about how genomes evolve and stabilize following hybridization, and to what extent hybridization is functionally relevant. Here, we examine the case of Xiphophorus nezahualcoyotl, a teleost fish whose genome exhibits significant hybrid ancestry. We show that hybridization was relatively ancient and is unlikely to be ongoing. Strikingly, the genome of X. nezahualcoyotl has largely stabilized following hybridization, distinguishing it from examples such as human-Neanderthal hybridization. Hybridization-derived regions are remarkably distinct from other regions of the genome, tending to be enriched in genomic regions with reduced constraint. These results suggest that selection has played a role in removing hybrid ancestry from certain functionally important regions. Combined with findings in other systems, our results raise many questions about the process of genomic stabilization and the role of selection in shaping patterns of hybrid ancestry in the genome. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Characterization of Interspecific Hybrids Between Oryza sativa L. and Three Wild Rice Species of China by Genomic In Situ Hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Xuan Tan; Zhi-Yong Xiong; Hua-Jun Jin; Gang Li; Li-Li Zhu; Li-Hui Shu; Guang-Cun He

    2006-01-01

    In the genus Oryza, interspecific hybrids are useful bridges for transferring the desired genes from wild species to cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.). In the present study, hybrids between O. sativa (AA genome)and three Chinese wild rices, namely O. rufipogon (AA genome), O. officinalis (CC genome), and O. meyeriana (GG genome), were produced. Agricultural traits of the F1 hybrids surveyed were intermediate between their parents and appreciably resembled wild rice parents. Except for the O. sativa × O. rufipogon hybrid,the other F1 hybrids were completely sterile. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) was used for hybrid verification. Wild rice genomic DNAs were used as probes and cultivated rice DNA was used as a block. With the exception of O. rufipogon chromosomes, this method distinguished the other two wild rice and cultivated rice chromosomes at the stage of mitotic metaphase with different blocking ratios. The results suggest that a more distant phylogenetic relationship exists between O. meyeriana and O. sativa and that O. rufipogon and O. sativa share a high degree of sequence homology. The average mitotic chromosome length of O. officinalis and O. meyeriana was 1.25- and 1.51-fold that of O. sativa, respectively. 4',6'-Diamidino2-phenylindole staining showed that the chromosomes of O. officinalis and O. meyeriana harbored more heterochromatin, suggesting that the C and G genomes were amplified with repetitive sequences compared with the A genome. Although chromocenters formed by chromatln compaction were detected with wild rice-specific signals corresponding to the C and G genomes in discrete domains of the F1 hybrid interphase nuclei, the size and number of O. meyeriana chromocenters were bigger and greater than those of O. officinalis. The present results provide an important understanding of the genomic relationships and a tool for the transfer of useful genes from three native wild rice species in China to cultivars.

  8. Interpopulation hybrid breakdown maps to the mitochondrial genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Christopher K; Burton, Ronald S

    2008-03-01

    Hybrid breakdown, or outbreeding depression, is the loss of fitness observed in crosses between genetically divergent populations. The role of maternally inherited mitochondrial genomes in hybrid breakdown has not been widely examined. Using laboratory crosses of the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus, we report that the low fitness of F(3) hybrids is completely restored in the offspring of maternal backcrosses, where parental mitochondrial and nuclear genomic combinations are reassembled. Paternal backcrosses, which result in mismatched mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, fail to restore hybrid fitness. These results suggest that fitness loss in T. californicus hybrids is completely attributable to nuclear-mitochondrial genomic interactions. Analyses of ATP synthetic capacity in isolated mitochondria from hybrid and backcross animals found that reduced ATP synthesis in hybrids was also largely restored in backcrosses, again with maternal backcrosses outperforming paternal backcrosses. The strong fitness consequences of nuclear-mitochondrial interactions have important, and often overlooked, implications for evolutionary and conservation biology.

  9. Evolution of a transposon in Daphnia hybrid genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vergilino Roland

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transposable elements play a major role in genome evolution. Their capacity to move and/or multiply in the genome of their host may have profound impacts on phenotypes, and may have dramatic consequences on genome structure. Hybrid and polyploid clones have arisen multiple times in the Daphnia pulex complex and are thought to reproduce by obligate parthenogenesis. Our study examines the evolution of a DNA transposable element named Pokey in the D. pulex complex. Results Portions of Pokey elements inserted in the 28S rRNA genes from various Daphnia hybrids (diploids and polyploids were sequenced and compared to sequences from a previous study to understand the evolutionary history of the elements. Pokey sequences show a complex phylogenetic pattern. We found evidence of recombination events in numerous Pokey alleles from diploid and polyploid hybrids and also from non-hybrid diploids. The recombination rate in Pokey elements is comparable to recombination rates previously estimated for 28S rRNA genes in the congener, Daphnia obtusa. Some recombinant Pokey alleles were encountered in Daphnia isolates from multiple locations and habitats. Conclusions Phylogenetic and recombination analyses showed that recombination is a major force that shapes Pokey evolution. Based on Pokey phylogenies, reticulation has played and still plays an important role in shaping the diversity of the D. pulex complex. Horizontal transfer of Pokey seems to be rare and hybrids often possess Pokey elements derived from recombination among alleles encountered in the putative parental species. The insertion of Pokey in hotspots of recombination may have important impacts on the diversity and fitness of this transposable element.

  10. Comparative genomics of Listeria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, P; Frangeul, L; Buchrieser, C; Rusniok, C; Amend, A; Baquero, F; Berche, P; Bloecker, H; Brandt, P; Chakraborty, T; Charbit, A; Chetouani, F; Couvé, E; de Daruvar, A; Dehoux, P; Domann, E; Domínguez-Bernal, G; Duchaud, E; Durant, L; Dussurget, O; Entian, K D; Fsihi, H; García-del Portillo, F; Garrido, P; Gautier, L; Goebel, W; Gómez-López, N; Hain, T; Hauf, J; Jackson, D; Jones, L M; Kaerst, U; Kreft, J; Kuhn, M; Kunst, F; Kurapkat, G; Madueno, E; Maitournam, A; Vicente, J M; Ng, E; Nedjari, H; Nordsiek, G; Novella, S; de Pablos, B; Pérez-Diaz, J C; Purcell, R; Remmel, B; Rose, M; Schlueter, T; Simoes, N; Tierrez, A; Vázquez-Boland, J A; Voss, H; Wehland, J; Cossart, P

    2001-10-26

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen with a high mortality rate that has also emerged as a paradigm for intracellular parasitism. We present and compare the genome sequences of L. monocytogenes (2,944,528 base pairs) and a nonpathogenic species, L. innocua (3,011,209 base pairs). We found a large number of predicted genes encoding surface and secreted proteins, transporters, and transcriptional regulators, consistent with the ability of both species to adapt to diverse environments. The presence of 270 L. monocytogenes and 149 L. innocua strain-specific genes (clustered in 100 and 63 islets, respectively) suggests that virulence in Listeria results from multiple gene acquisition and deletion events.

  11. In Silico Genomic Fingerprints of the Bacillus anthracis Group Obtained by Virtual Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hueman Jaimes-Díaz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study we evaluate the capacity of Virtual Hybridization to identify between highly related bacterial strains. Eight genomic fingerprints were obtained by virtual hybridization for the Bacillus anthracis genome set, and a set of 15,264 13-nucleotide short probes designed to produce genomic fingerprints unique for each organism. The data obtained from each genomic fingerprint were used to obtain hybridization patterns simulating a DNA microarray. Two virtual hybridization methods were used: the Direct and the Extended method to identify the number of potential hybridization sites and thus determine the minimum sensitivity value to discriminate between genomes with 99.9% similarity. Genomic fingerprints were compared using both methods and phylogenomic trees were constructed to verify that the minimum detection value is 0.000017. Results obtained from the genomic fingerprints suggest that the distribution in the trees is correct, as compared to other taxonomic methods. Specific virtual hybridization sites for each of the genomes studied were also identified.

  12. Gramene database: navigating plant comparative genomics resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramene (http://www.gramene.org) is an online, open source, curated resource for plant comparative genomics and pathway analysis designed to support researchers working in plant genomics, breeding, evolutionary biology, system biology, and metabolic engineering. It exploits phylogenetic relationship...

  13. Designing hybrid grass genomes to control runoff generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, C.; Binley, A.; Humphreys, M.; King, I. P.; O'Donovan, S.; Papadopoulos, A.; Turner, L. B.; Watts, C.; Whalley, W. R.; Haygarth, P.

    2010-12-01

    Sustainable management of water in landscapes requires balancing demands of agricultural production whilst moderating downstream effects like flooding. Pasture comprises 69% of global agricultural areas and is essential for producing food and fibre alongside environmental goods and services. Thus there is a need to breed forage grasses that deliver multiple benefits through increased levels of productivity whilst moderating fluxes of water. Here we show that a novel grass hybrid that combines the entire genomes of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne - the grass of choice for Europe’s forage agriculture) and meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis) has a significant role in flood prevention. Field plot experiments established differences in runoff generation with the hybrid cultivar reducing runoff by 50% compared to perennial ryegrass cultivar, and by 35% compared to a meadow fescue cultivar (34 events over two years, replicated randomized-block design, statistically significant differences). This important research outcome was the result of a project that combined plant genetics, soil physics and plot scale hydrology to identify novel grass genotypes that can reduce runoff from grassland systems. Through a coordinated series of experiments examining effects from the gene to plot scale, we have identified that the rapid growth and then turnover of roots in the L. perenne x F. pratensis hybrid is likely to be a key mechanism in reducing runoff generation. More broadly this is an exciting first step to realizing the potential to design grass genomes to achieve both food production, and to deliver flood control, a key ecosystem service.

  14. Cocoa/Cotton Comparative Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    With genome sequence from two members of the Malvaceae family recently made available, we are exploring syntenic relationships, gene content, and evolutionary trajectories between the cacao and cotton genomes. An assembly of cacao (Theobroma cacao) using Illumina and 454 sequence technology yielded ...

  15. Genomic comparison of Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis by combination of suppression subtractive hybridization and DNA microarray

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiaoyi; Zhou, Dongsheng; Qin, Long

    2006-01-01

    a combination of suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and comparative genomic hybridization with DNAs from a diverse panel of Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis strains. SSH followed by BLAST analysis revealed 112 SSH fragments specific to strain ATCC29833, compared to the genomic sequence data of Y...

  16. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization facilitates identification of breakpoints of a novel der(1)t(1;18)(p36.3;q23)dn in a child presenting with mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, P A; Cooper, M L; Curtis, M A; Lim, C; Ou, Z; Patel, A; Cheung, S W; Bacino, C A

    2006-06-01

    Monosomy of distal 1p36 represents the most common terminal deletion in humans and results in one of the most frequently diagnosed mental retardation syndromes. This deletion is considered a contiguous gene deletion syndrome, and has been shown to vary in deletion sizes that contribute to the spectrum of phenotypic anomalies seen in patients with monosomy 1p36. We report on an 8-year-old female with characteristics of the monosomy 1p36 syndrome who demonstrated a novel der(1)t(1;18)(p36.3;q23). Initial G-banded karyotype analysis revealed a deleted chromosome 1, with a breakpoint within 1p36.3. Subsequent FISH and array-based comparative genomic hybridization not only confirmed and partially characterized the deletion of chromosome 1p36.3, but also uncovered distal trisomy for 18q23. In this patient, the duplicated 18q23 is translocated onto the deleted 1p36.3 region, suggesting telomere capture. Molecular characterization of this novel der(1)t(1;18)(p36.3;q23), guided by our clinical array-comparative genomic hybridization, demonstrated a 3.2 Mb terminal deletion of chromosome 1p36.3 and a 200 kb duplication of 18q23 onto the deleted 1p36.3, presumably stabilizing the deleted chromosome 1. DNA sequence analysis around the breakpoints demonstrated no homology, and therefore this telomere capture of distal 18q is apparently the result of a non-homologous recombination. Partial trisomy for 18q23 has not been previously reported. The importance of mapping the breakpoints of all balanced and unbalanced translocations found in the clinical laboratory, when phenotypic abnormalities are found, is discussed.

  17. Comparative Genomics Reveals High Genomic Diversity in the Genus Photobacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Henrique; Gram, Lone

    2017-01-01

    Vibrionaceae is a large marine bacterial family, which can constitute up to 50% of the prokaryotic population in marine waters. Photobacterium is the second largest genus in the family and we used comparative genomics on 35 strains representing 16 of the 28 species described so far, to understand...... the genomic diversity present in the Photobacterium genus. Such understanding is important for ecophysiology studies of the genus. We used whole genome sequences to evaluate phylogenetic relationships using several analyses (16S rRNA, MLSA, fur, amino-acid usage, ANI), which allowed us to identify two...... misidentified strains. Genome analyses also revealed occurrence of higher and lower GC content clades, correlating with phylogenetic clusters. Pan-and core-genome analysis revealed the conservation of 25% of the genome throughout the genus, with a large and open pan-genome. The major source of genomic diversity...

  18. Circos: an information aesthetic for comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzywinski, Martin; Schein, Jacqueline; Birol, Inanç; Connors, Joseph; Gascoyne, Randy; Horsman, Doug; Jones, Steven J; Marra, Marco A

    2009-09-01

    We created a visualization tool called Circos to facilitate the identification and analysis of similarities and differences arising from comparisons of genomes. Our tool is effective in displaying variation in genome structure and, generally, any other kind of positional relationships between genomic intervals. Such data are routinely produced by sequence alignments, hybridization arrays, genome mapping, and genotyping studies. Circos uses a circular ideogram layout to facilitate the display of relationships between pairs of positions by the use of ribbons, which encode the position, size, and orientation of related genomic elements. Circos is capable of displaying data as scatter, line, and histogram plots, heat maps, tiles, connectors, and text. Bitmap or vector images can be created from GFF-style data inputs and hierarchical configuration files, which can be easily generated by automated tools, making Circos suitable for rapid deployment in data analysis and reporting pipelines.

  19. Optional Endoreplication and Selective Elimination of Parental Genomes during Oogenesis in Diploid and Triploid Hybrid European Water Frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedukh, Dmitry; Litvinchuk, Spartak; Rosanov, Juriy; Mazepa, Glib; Saifitdinova, Alsu; Shabanov, Dmitry; Krasikova, Alla

    2015-01-01

    Incompatibilities between parental genomes decrease viability of interspecific hybrids; however, deviations from canonical gametogenesis such as genome endoreplication and elimination can rescue hybrid organisms. To evaluate frequency and regularity of genome elimination and endoreplication during gametogenesis in hybrid animals with different ploidy, we examined genome composition in oocytes of di- and triploid hybrid frogs of the Pelophylax esculentus complex. Obtained results allowed us to suggest that during oogenesis the endoreplication involves all genomes occurring before the selective genome elimination. We accepted the hypothesis that only elimination of one copied genome occurs premeiotically in most of triploid hybrid females. At the same time, we rejected the hypothesis stating that the genome of parental species hybrid frogs co-exist with is always eliminated during oogenesis in diploid hybrids. Diploid hybrid frogs demonstrate an enlarged frequency of deviations in oogenesis comparatively to triploid hybrids. Typical for hybrid frogs deviations in gametogenesis increase variability of produced gametes and provide a mechanism for appearance of different forms of hybrids.

  20. Comparative genomics of Neisseria meningitidis: core genome, islands of horizontal transfer and pathogen-specific genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning Hotopp, Julie C; Grifantini, Renata; Kumar, Nikhil; Tzeng, Yih Ling; Fouts, Derrick; Frigimelica, Elisabetta; Draghi, Monia; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Rappuoli, Rino; Stephens, David S; Grandi, Guido; Tettelin, Hervé

    2006-12-01

    To better understand Neisseria meningitidis genomes and virulence, microarray comparative genome hybridization (mCGH) data were collected from one Neisseria cinerea, two Neisseria lactamica, two Neisseria gonorrhoeae and 48 Neisseria meningitidis isolates. For N. meningitidis, these isolates are from diverse clonal complexes, invasive and carriage strains, and all major serogroups. The microarray platform represented N. meningitidis strains MC58, Z2491 and FAM18, and N. gonorrhoeae FA1090. By comparing hybridization data to genome sequences, the core N. meningitidis genome and insertions/deletions (e.g. capsule locus, type I secretion system) related to pathogenicity were identified, including further characterization of the capsule locus, bioinformatics analysis of a type I secretion system, and identification of some metabolic pathways associated with intracellular survival in pathogens. Hybridization data clustered meningococcal isolates from similar clonal complexes that were distinguished by the differential presence of six distinct islands of horizontal transfer. Several of these islands contained prophage or other mobile elements, including a novel prophage and a transposon carrying portions of a type I secretion system. Acquisition of some genetic islands appears to have occurred in multiple lineages, including transfer between N. lactamica and N. meningitidis. However, island acquisition occurs infrequently, such that the genomic-level relationship is not obscured within clonal complexes. The N. meningitidis genome is characterized by the horizontal acquisition of multiple genetic islands; the study of these islands reveals important sets of genes varying between isolates and likely to be related to pathogenicity.

  1. Comparative Genomics Reveals High Genomic Diversity in the Genus Photobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Henrique; Gram, Lone

    2017-01-01

    Vibrionaceae is a large marine bacterial family, which can constitute up to 50% of the prokaryotic population in marine waters. Photobacterium is the second largest genus in the family and we used comparative genomics on 35 strains representing 16 of the 28 species described so far, to understand the genomic diversity present in the Photobacterium genus. Such understanding is important for ecophysiology studies of the genus. We used whole genome sequences to evaluate phylogenetic relationships using several analyses (16S rRNA, MLSA, fur, amino-acid usage, ANI), which allowed us to identify two misidentified strains. Genome analyses also revealed occurrence of higher and lower GC content clades, correlating with phylogenetic clusters. Pan- and core-genome analysis revealed the conservation of 25% of the genome throughout the genus, with a large and open pan-genome. The major source of genomic diversity could be traced to the smaller chromosome and plasmids. Several of the physiological traits studied in the genus did not correlate with phylogenetic data. Since horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is often suggested as a source of genetic diversity and a potential driver of genomic evolution in bacterial species, we looked into evidence of such in Photobacterium genomes. Genomic islands were the source of genomic differences between strains of the same species. Also, we found transposase genes and CRISPR arrays that suggest multiple encounters with foreign DNA. Presence of genomic exchange traits was widespread and abundant in the genus, suggesting a role in genomic evolution. The high genetic variability and indications of genetic exchange make it difficult to elucidate genome evolutionary paths and raise the awareness of the roles of foreign DNA in the genomic evolution of environmental organisms.

  2. Deletion of 14q24.1 approximately q24.3 in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a hidden chromosomal anomaly detected by array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weihong; Lu, Xianglan; Kim, YoungMi; Luo, Ying; Martin, Mallory; Mulvihill, John J; Li, Shibo

    2008-08-01

    A 4-year-old patient, who was newly diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), was referred to us for cytogenetic evaluation. He had a normal karyotype by G-banded chromosome analysis, and a deletion of the ETV6 (alias TEL) gene was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis using DNA probes specific for t(12;21), which leads to ETV6/RUNX1 (alias TEL/AML1) gene fusion, but no translocation was found between the two genes. To find out if there were possibly additional subtle chromosomal changes undetectable by routine cytogenetics, high-density 385K oligo array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) assay was performed. Besides the confirmation of the 12p deletion, a deletion of a 12-megabase (Mb) chromosomal segment on 14q24.1 approximately q24.3 was also detected. Within the deleted 12-Mb region, there were a total of 155 genes and at least 28 of these were cancer-related genes. A similar approach by array CGH in patients with ALL, especially in those patients with 12p deletion, could help to determine the significance of this rare event.

  3. Genomic behavior of hybrid combinations between elephant grass and pearl millet

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Ferreira Leão; Lisete Chamma Davide; José Marcello Salabert de Campos; Antonio Vander Pereira; Fernanda de Oliveira Bustamante

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the genomic behavior of hybrid combinations between elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum) and pearl millet (P. glaucum). Tetraploid (AAA'B) and pentaploid (AA'A'BB) chromosome races resulting from the backcross of the hexaploid hybrid to its parents elephant grass (A'A'BB) and pearl millet (AA) were analyzed as to chromosome number and DNA content. Genotypes of elephant grass, millet, and triploid and hexaploid induced hybrids were compared. Pentaplo...

  4. A gene-based high-resolution comparative radiation hybrid map as a framework for genome sequence assembly of a bovine chromosome 6 region associated with QTL for growth, body composition, and milk performance traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Pascal

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of different quantitative trait loci (QTL for various phenotypic traits, including milk production, functional, and conformation traits in dairy cattle as well as growth and body composition traits in meat cattle, have been mapped consistently in the middle region of bovine chromosome 6 (BTA6. Dense genetic and physical maps and, ultimately, a fully annotated genome sequence as well as their mutual connections are required to efficiently identify genes and gene variants responsible for genetic variation of phenotypic traits. A comprehensive high-resolution gene-rich map linking densely spaced bovine markers and genes to the annotated human genome sequence is required as a framework to facilitate this approach for the region on BTA6 carrying the QTL. Results Therefore, we constructed a high-resolution radiation hybrid (RH map for the QTL containing chromosomal region of BTA6. This new RH map with a total of 234 loci including 115 genes and ESTs displays a substantial increase in loci density compared to existing physical BTA6 maps. Screening the available bovine genome sequence resources, a total of 73 loci could be assigned to sequence contigs, which were already identified as specific for BTA6. For 43 loci, corresponding sequence contigs, which were not yet placed on the bovine genome assembly, were identified. In addition, the improved potential of this high-resolution RH map for BTA6 with respect to comparative mapping was demonstrated. Mapping a large number of genes on BTA6 and cross-referencing them with map locations in corresponding syntenic multi-species chromosome segments (human, mouse, rat, dog, chicken achieved a refined accurate alignment of conserved segments and evolutionary breakpoints across the species included. Conclusion The gene-anchored high-resolution RH map (1 locus/300 kb for the targeted region of BTA6 presented here will provide a valuable platform to guide high-quality assembling and

  5. Pure partial monosomy 3p (3p25.3 → pter: Prenatal diagnosis and array comparative genomic hybridization characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: In this case, aCGH has characterized a 3p deleted region with haploinsufficiency of the neurodevelopmental genes associated with cognitive deficit and mental retardation but without involvement of the congenital heart disease susceptibility locus, and QF-PCR has determined a paternal origin of the deletion. aCGH and QF-PCR help to delineate the genomic imbalance in prenatally detected de novo chromosome aberration, and the information acquired is useful for genetic counseling.

  6. Comparative Genomics Reveals High Genomic Diversity in the Genus Photobacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Henrique Machado; Lone Gram

    2017-01-01

    Vibrionaceae is a large marine bacterial family, which can constitute up to 50% of the prokaryotic population in marine waters. Photobacterium is the second largest genus in the family and we used comparative genomics on 35 strains representing 16 of the 28 species described so far, to understand the genomic diversity present in the Photobacterium genus. Such understanding is important for ecophysiology studies of the genus. We used whole genome sequences to evaluate phylogenetic relationship...

  7. Comparative Reannotation of 21 Aspergillus Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamov, Asaf; Riley, Robert; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2013-03-08

    We used comparative gene modeling to reannotate 21 Aspergillus genomes. Initial automatic annotation of individual genomes may contain some errors of different nature, e.g. missing genes, incorrect exon-intron structures, 'chimeras', which fuse 2 or more real genes or alternatively splitting some real genes into 2 or more models. The main premise behind the comparative modeling approach is that for closely related genomes most orthologous families have the same conserved gene structure. The algorithm maps all gene models predicted in each individual Aspergillus genome to the other genomes and, for each locus, selects from potentially many competing models, the one which most closely resembles the orthologous genes from other genomes. This procedure is iterated until no further change in gene models is observed. For Aspergillus genomes we predicted in total 4503 new gene models ( ~;;2percent per genome), supported by comparative analysis, additionally correcting ~;;18percent of old gene models. This resulted in a total of 4065 more genes with annotated PFAM domains (~;;3percent increase per genome). Analysis of a few genomes with EST/transcriptomics data shows that the new annotation sets also have a higher number of EST-supported splice sites at exon-intron boundaries.

  8. Genome instability in Novel Lolium multiflorum x L. arundinaceum hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have identified a method whereby Lolium multiflorum (Lm) or L. arundinaceum (Fa) genomes are preferentially eliminated through a mitotic loss behavior in interspecific Lm x Fa F1 hybrids,generating either dihaploid Lm lines or Fa lines. The genome instability has been visualized phenotypically an...

  9. A translocation t(6;14) in two cases of leiomyosarcoma: Molecular cytogenetic and array-based comparative genomic hybridization characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaff, Marieke A; de Jong, Daniëlle; Briaire-de Bruijn, Inge H; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Bovée, Judith V M G; Szuhai, Károly

    2015-11-01

    Leiomyosarcomas are malignant mesenchymal tumors that recapitulate smooth muscle cell differentiation. Tumors are characterized by a genetic heterogeneity with complex karyotypes without a tumor-specific genetic aberration. Their pathobiology is still poorly understood and no specific targeted treatment is currently available for these aggressive tumors. For six leiomyosarcomas, cells were cultured and analyzed by combined binary ratio labeling fluorescence in situ hybridization (COBRA-FISH) karyotyping. A t(6;14) was identified in two cases. FISH breakpoint mapping of case L1339 reveals a breakpoint at chromosome 6p21.31 close to HMGA1, and a small deletion was observed on the distal side of the gene. A small homozygous deletion was also found in the breakpoint region of chromosome 14q24.1 involving ACTN1. The second case revealed a der(6)t(6;14)(p21.1;q21.3), with a duplication adjacent to the breakpoint at chromosome 6. Confirmatory FISH revealed a second leiomyosarcoma with an aberration at 14q24.1. Alterations at this locus were found in 5% (2 of 39) of the leiomyosarcomas in this study. The other identified breakpoints appeared to be non-recurrent, because they were not detected in other leiomyosarcomas, uterine leiomyomas, undifferentiated spindle cell sarcomas, or undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcomas.

  10. Comparative genomics and phylogenetic analysis of S. dysenteriae subgroup

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; E; BIN; Wen; PENG; Junping; ZHANG; Xiaobing; WANG; Ji

    2005-01-01

    Genomic compositions of representatives of thirteen S. Dysenteriae serotypes were investigated by performing comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) with microarray containing the whole genomic ORFs (open reading frames, ORFs) of E. Coli K12 strain MG1655 and specific ORFs of S. Dysenteriae A1 strain Sd51197. The CGH results indicated the genomes of the serotypes contain 2654 conserved ORFs originating from E. Coli. However, 219 intrinsic genes of E. Coli including those prophage genes, molecular chaperones, synthesis of specific O antigen and so on were absent. Moreover, some specific genes such as type II secretion system associated components, iron transport related genes and some others as well were acquired through horizontal transfer. According to phylogenic trees based on genetic composition, it was demonstrated that A1, A2, A8, A10 were distinct from the other S. Dysenteriae serotypes. Our results in this report may provide new insights into the physiological process, pathogenicity and evolution of S. Dysenteriae.

  11. Direct measurement of recombination frequency in interspecific hybrids between Hordeum vulgare and H. bulbosum using genomic in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Pickering, R; Murray, B

    1999-09-01

    Two different genotypes of diploid Hordeum vulgare x H. bulbosum hybrids, which differ in their pattern of meiotic metaphase pairing behaviour, were investigated at MI and AI by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). One hybrid, 102C2, showed a high frequency of bivalents at metaphase I whereas the other, 103K5, showed a high frequency of univalents. The GISH analysis of both hybrids established that pairing occurred only between chromosomes of different parental genomes and revealed that pairing frequency greatly exceeded recombination. Hybrid 102C2 had a significantly higher recombination frequency than 103K5, but in both hybrids recombination involved only distal chromosome regions. However, an interesting finding is that the ratio of recombination to pairing frequency in 103K5 (1:8.9) is twice as high compared with 102C2 (1:17). The hybrids also differed in chromosome stability; little chromosome elimination occurred in 102C2 but 103K5 showed extensive chromosome loss. It appears that the high frequency of bound arms at MI favours retention of H. bulbosum chromosomes and maintains stability of chromosome numbers in PMCs. Various ideas are put forward to explain the discrepancy between meiotic pairing frequency and recombination in these hybrids.

  12. Hybridization and genome evolution I: The role of contingency during hybrid speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice EROUKHMANOFF, Richard I. BAILEY, Glenn-Peter SæTRE

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Homoploid hybrid speciation (HHS involves the recombination of two differentiated genomes into a novel, functional one without a change in chromosome number. Theoretically, there are numerous ways for two parental genomes to recombine. Hence, chance may play a large role in the formation of a hybrid species. If these genome combinations can evolve rapidly following hybridization and sympatric situations are numerous, recurrent homoploid hybrid speciation is a possibility. We argue that three different, but not mutually exclusive, types of contingencies could influence this process. First, many of these “hopeful monsters” of recombinant parent genotypes would likely have low fitness. Only specific combinations of parental genomic contributions may produce viable, intra-fertile hybrid species able to accommodate potential constraints arising from intragenomic conflict. Second, ecological conditions (competition, geography of the contact zones or the initial frequency of both parent species might favor different outcomes ranging from sympatric coexistence to the formation of hybrid swarms and ultimately hybrid speciation. Finally, history may also play an important role in promoting or constraining recurrent HHS if multiple hybridization events occur sequentially and parental divergence or isolation differs along this continuum. We discuss under which conditions HHS may occur multiple times in parallel and to what extent recombination and selection may fuse the parent genomes in the same or different ways. We conclude by examining different approaches that might help to solve this intriguing evolutionary puzzle [Current Zoology 59 (5: 667-674, 2013]. 

  13. Comparative Genomics of Green Sulfur Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Davenport, C; Tümmler, B

    2010-01-01

    Eleven completely sequenced Chlorobi genomes were compared in oligonucleotide usage, gene contents, and synteny. The green sulfur bacteria (GSB) are equipped with a core genome that sustains their anoxygenic phototrophic lifestyle by photosynthesis, sulfur oxidation, and CO(2) fixation. Whole...... weight of 10(6), and are probably instrumental for the bacteria to generate their own intimate (micro)environment....

  14. Comparative genomic analysis of esophageal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caygill, Christine P J; Gatenby, Piers A C; Herceg, Zdenko; Lima, Sheila C S; Pinto, Luis F R; Watson, Anthony; Wu, Ming-Shiang

    2014-09-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on comparative genomic analysis of esophageal cancers: genomic polymorphisms, the genetic and epigenetic drivers in esophageal cancers, and the collection of data in the UK Barrett's Oesophagus Registry.

  15. Comparative genomics of vesicomyid clam (Bivalvia: Mollusca chemosynthetic symbionts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girguis Peter R

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Vesicomyidae (Bivalvia: Mollusca are a family of clams that form symbioses with chemosynthetic gamma-proteobacteria. They exist in environments such as hydrothermal vents and cold seeps and have a reduced gut and feeding groove, indicating a large dependence on their endosymbionts for nutrition. Recently, two vesicomyid symbiont genomes were sequenced, illuminating the possible nutritional contributions of the symbiont to the host and making genome-wide evolutionary analyses possible. Results To examine the genomic evolution of the vesicomyid symbionts, a comparative genomics framework, including the existing genomic data combined with heterologous microarray hybridization results, was used to analyze conserved gene content in four vesicomyid symbiont genomes. These four symbionts were chosen to include a broad phylogenetic sampling of the vesicomyid symbionts and represent distinct chemosynthetic environments: cold seeps and hydrothermal vents. Conclusion The results of this comparative genomics analysis emphasize the importance of the symbionts' chemoautotrophic metabolism within their hosts. The fact that these symbionts appear to be metabolically capable autotrophs underscores the extent to which the host depends on them for nutrition and reveals the key to invertebrate colonization of these challenging environments.

  16. Characterization of the Arachis (Leguminosae D genome using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH chromosome markers and total genome DNA hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Robledo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome markers were developed for Arachis glandulifera using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH of the 5S and 45S rRNA genes and heterochromatic 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI positive bands. We used chromosome landmarks identified by these markers to construct the first Arachis species ideogram in which all the homologous chromosomes were precisely identified. The comparison of this ideogram with those published for other Arachis species revealed very poor homeologies with all A and B genome taxa, supporting the special genome constitution (D genome of A. glandulifera. Genomic affinities were further investigated by dot blot hybridization of biotinylated A. glandulifera total DNA to DNA from several Arachis species, the results indicating that the D genome is positioned between the A and B genomes.

  17. Genomic behavior of hybrid combinations between elephant grass and pearl millet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Ferreira Leão

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the genomic behavior of hybrid combinations between elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum and pearl millet (P. glaucum. Tetraploid (AAA'B and pentaploid (AA'A'BB chromosome races resulting from the backcross of the hexaploid hybrid to its parents elephant grass (A'A'BB and pearl millet (AA were analyzed as to chromosome number and DNA content. Genotypes of elephant grass, millet, and triploid and hexaploid induced hybrids were compared. Pentaploid and tetraploid genomic combinations showed high level of mixoploidy, in discordance with the expected somatic chromosome set. The pentaploid chromosome number ranged from 20 to 34, and the tetraploid chromosome number from 16 to 28. Chromosome number variation was higher in pentaploid genomic combinations than in tetraploid, and mixoploidy was observed among hexaploids. Genomic combinations 4x and 5x are mixoploid, and the variation of chromosome number within chromosomal race 5x is greater than in 4x.

  18. Analysis of the genome content of Lactococcus garvieae by genomic interspecies microarray hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibello Alicia

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactococcus garvieae is a bacterial pathogen that affects different animal species in addition to humans. Despite the widespread distribution and emerging clinical significance of L. garvieae in both veterinary and human medicine, there is almost a complete lack of knowledge about the genetic content of this microorganism. In the present study, the genomic content of L. garvieae CECT 4531 was analysed using bioinformatics tools and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH experiments. Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL1403 and Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4 were used as reference microorganisms. Results The combination and integration of in silico analyses and in vitro CGH experiments, performed in comparison with the reference microorganisms, allowed establishment of an inter-species hybridization framework with a detection threshold based on a sequence similarity of ≥ 70%. With this threshold value, 267 genes were identified as having an analogue in L. garvieae, most of which (n = 258 have been documented for the first time in this pathogen. Most of the genes are related to ribosomal, sugar metabolism or energy conversion systems. Some of the identified genes, such as als and mycA, could be involved in the pathogenesis of L. garvieae infections. Conclusions In this study, we identified 267 genes that were potentially present in L. garvieae CECT 4531. Some of the identified genes could be involved in the pathogenesis of L. garvieae infections. These results provide the first insight into the genome content of L. garvieae.

  19. Analysis of infant isolates of Bifidobacterium breve by comparative genome hybridization indicates the existence of new subspecies with marked infant specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, R.; Schuren, F.; Wind, R.D.; Knol, J.; Vos, W.M. de

    2011-01-01

    A total of 20 Bifidobacterium strains were isolated from fecal samples of 4 breast- and bottle-fed infants and all were characterized as Bifidobacterium breve based on 16S rRNA gene sequence and metabolic analysis. These isolates were further characterized and compared to the type strains of B. brev

  20. Molecular Dissection Using Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization and Clinical Evaluation of An Infertile Male Carrier of An Unbalanced Y;21 Translocation: A Case Report and Review of The Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrico, Alfredo; Marseglia, Giuseppina; Pescucci, Chiara; Cortesi, Ambra; Piomboni, Paola; Giansanti, Andrea; Gerundino, Francesca; Ponchietti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal defects are relatively frequent in infertile men however, translocations between the Y chromosome and autosomes are rare and less than 40 cases of Y-autosome translocation have been reported. In particular, only three individuals has been described with a Y;21 translocation, up to now. We report on an additional case of an infertile man in whom a Y;21 translocation was associated with the deletion of a large part of the Y chromosome long arm. Applying various techniques, including conventional cytogenetic procedures, fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) analysis and array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) studies, we identified a derivative chromosome originating from a fragment of the short arm of the chromosome Y translocated on the short arm of the 21 chromosome. The Y chromosome structural rearrangement resulted in the intactness of the entire short arm, including the sex-determining region Y (SRY) and the short stature homeobox (SHOX) loci, although translocated on the 21 chromosome, and the loss of a large part of the long arm of the Y chromosome, including azoospermia factor-a (AZFa), AZFb, AZFc and Yq heterochromatin regions. This is the first case in which a (Yp;21p) translocation has been ascertained using an array-CGH approach, thus reporting details of such a rearrangement at higher resolution.

  1. Homology-independent metrics for comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Tarcisio José Domingos; Franco, Glória Regina; Lobo, Francisco Pereira

    2015-01-01

    A mainstream procedure to analyze the wealth of genomic data available nowadays is the detection of homologous regions shared across genomes, followed by the extraction of biological information from the patterns of conservation and variation observed in such regions. Although of pivotal importance, comparative genomic procedures that rely on homology inference are obviously not applicable if no homologous regions are detectable. This fact excludes a considerable portion of "genomic dark matter" with no significant similarity - and, consequently, no inferred homology to any other known sequence - from several downstream comparative genomic methods. In this review we compile several sequence metrics that do not rely on homology inference and can be used to compare nucleotide sequences and extract biologically meaningful information from them. These metrics comprise several compositional parameters calculated from sequence data alone, such as GC content, dinucleotide odds ratio, and several codon bias metrics. They also share other interesting properties, such as pervasiveness (patterns persist on smaller scales) and phylogenetic signal. We also cite examples where these homology-independent metrics have been successfully applied to support several bioinformatics challenges, such as taxonomic classification of biological sequences without homology inference. They where also used to detect higher-order patterns of interactions in biological systems, ranging from detecting coevolutionary trends between the genomes of viruses and their hosts to characterization of gene pools of entire microbial communities. We argue that, if correctly understood and applied, homology-independent metrics can add important layers of biological information in comparative genomic studies without prior homology inference.

  2. A white paper on nematode comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, David McK; Blaxter, Mark L; McCarter, James P; Mitreva, Makedonka; Sternberg, Paul W; Thomas, W Kelley

    2005-12-01

    In response to the new opportunities for genome sequencing and comparative genomics, the Society of Nematology (SON) formed a committee to develop a white paper in support of the broad scientific needs associated with this phylum and interests of SON members. Although genome sequencing is expensive, the data generated are unique in biological systems in that genomes have the potential to be complete (every base of the genome can be accounted for), accurate (the data are digital and not subject to stochastic variation), and permanent (once obtained, the genome of a species does not need to be experimentally re-sampled). The availability of complete, accurate, and permanent genome sequences from diverse nematode species will underpin future studies into the biology and evolution of this phylum and the ecological associations (particularly parasitic) nematodes have with other organisms. We anticipate that upwards of 100 nematode genomes will be solved to varying levels of completion in the coming decade and suggest biological and practical considerations to guide the selection of the most informative taxa for sequencing.

  3. Comparative genomic analysis of eutherian kallikrein genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Premzl

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study made attempts to update and revise eutherian kallikrein genes implicated in major physiological and pathological processes and in medical molecular diagnostics. Using eutherian comparative genomic analysis protocol and free available genomic sequence assemblies, the tests of reliability of eutherian public genomic sequences annotated most comprehensive curated third party data gene data set of eutherian kallikrein genes including 121 complete coding sequences among 335 potential coding sequences. The present analysis first described 13 major gene clusters of eutherian kallikrein genes, and explained their differential gene expansion patterns. One updated classification and nomenclature of eutherian kallikrein genes was proposed, as new framework of future experiments.

  4. Preimplantation genetic screening for all 24 chromosomes by microarray comparative genomic hybridization significantly increases implantation rates and clinical pregnancy rates in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization with poor prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Majumdar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: A majority of human embryos produced in vitro are aneuploid, especially in couples undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF with poor prognosis. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS for all 24 chromosomes has the potential to select the most euploid embryos for transfer in such cases. AIM: To study the efficacy of PGS for all 24 chromosomes by microarray comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH in Indian couples undergoing IVF cycles with poor prognosis. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A retrospective, case–control study was undertaken in an institution-based tertiary care IVF center to compare the clinical outcomes of twenty patients, who underwent 21 PGS cycles with poor prognosis, with 128 non-PGS patients in the control group, with the same inclusion criterion as for the PGS group. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Single cells were obtained by laser-assisted embryo biopsy from day 3 embryos and subsequently analyzed by array CGH for all 24 chromosomes. Once the array CGH results were available on the morning of day 5, only chromosomally normal embryos that had progressed to blastocyst stage were transferred. RESULTS: The implantation rate and clinical pregnancy rate (PR per transfer were found to be significantly higher in the PGS group than in the control group (63.2% vs. 26.2%, P = 0.001 and 73.3% vs. 36.7%, P = 0.006, respectively, while the multiple PRs sharply declined from 31.9% to 9.1% in the PGS group. CONCLUSIONS: In this pilot study, we have shown that PGS by array CGH can improve the clinical outcome in patients undergoing IVF with poor prognosis.

  5. Gramene database: Navigating plant comparative genomics resources

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    Parul Gupta

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Gramene (http://www.gramene.org is an online, open source, curated resource for plant comparative genomics and pathway analysis designed to support researchers working in plant genomics, breeding, evolutionary biology, system biology, and metabolic engineering. It exploits phylogenetic relationships to enrich the annotation of genomic data and provides tools to perform powerful comparative analyses across a wide spectrum of plant species. It consists of an integrated portal for querying, visualizing and analyzing data for 44 plant reference genomes, genetic variation data sets for 12 species, expression data for 16 species, curated rice pathways and orthology-based pathway projections for 66 plant species including various crops. Here we briefly describe the functions and uses of the Gramene database.

  6. The CGView Server: a comparative genomics tool for circular genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jason R; Stothard, Paul

    2008-07-01

    The CGView Server generates graphical maps of circular genomes that show sequence features, base composition plots, analysis results and sequence similarity plots. Sequences can be supplied in raw, FASTA, GenBank or EMBL format. Additional feature or analysis information can be submitted in the form of GFF (General Feature Format) files. The server uses BLAST to compare the primary sequence to up to three comparison genomes or sequence sets. The BLAST results and feature information are converted to a graphical map showing the entire sequence, or an expanded and more detailed view of a region of interest. Several options are included to control which types of features are displayed and how the features are drawn. The CGView Server can be used to visualize features associated with any bacterial, plasmid, chloroplast or mitochondrial genome, and can aid in the identification of conserved genome segments, instances of horizontal gene transfer, and differences in gene copy number. Because a collection of sequences can be used in place of a comparison genome, maps can also be used to visualize regions of a known genome covered by newly obtained sequence reads. The CGView Server can be accessed at http://stothard.afns.ualberta.ca/cgview_server/

  7. Mitochondrial Genome Variation after Hybridization and Differences in the First and Second Generation Hybrids of Bream Fishes.

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    Wei-Zhuo Zhang

    Full Text Available Hybridization plays an important role in fish breeding. Bream fishes contribute a lot to aquaculture in China due to their economically valuable characteristics and the present study included five bream species, Megalobrama amblycephala, Megalobrama skolkovii, Megalobrama pellegrini, Megalobrama terminalis and Parabramis pekinensis. As maternal inheritance of mitochondrial genome (mitogenome involves species specific regulation, we aimed to investigate in which way the inheritance of mitogenome is affected by hybridization in these fish species. With complete mitogenomes of 7 hybrid groups of bream species being firstly reported in the present study, a comparative analysis of 17 mitogenomes was conducted, including representatives of these 5 bream species, 6 first generation hybrids and 6 second generation hybrids. The results showed that these 17 mitogenomes shared the same gene arrangement, and had similar gene size and base composition. According to the phylogenetic analyses, all mitogenomes of the hybrids were consistent with a maternal inheritance. However, a certain number of variable sites were detected in all F1 hybrid groups compared to their female parents, especially in the group of M. terminalis (♀ × M. amblycephala (♂ (MT×MA, with a total of 86 variable sites between MT×MA and its female parent. Among the mitogenomes genes, the protein-coding gene nd5 displayed the highest variability. The number of variation sites was found to be related to phylogenetic relationship of the parents: the closer they are, the lower amount of variation sites their hybrids have. The second generation hybrids showed less mitogenome variation than that of first generation hybrids. The non-synonymous and synonymous substitution rates (dN/dS were calculated between all the hybrids with their own female parents and the results indicated that most PCGs were under negative selection.

  8. Sub-megabase resolution tiling (SMRT array-based comparative genomic hybridization profiling reveals novel gains and losses of chromosomal regions in Hodgkin Lymphoma and Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma cell lines

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    Lam Wan L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hodgkin lymphoma (HL and Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL, are forms of malignant lymphoma defined by unique morphologic, immunophenotypic, genotypic, and clinical characteristics, but both overexpress CD30. We used sub-megabase resolution tiling (SMRT array-based comparative genomic hybridization to screen HL-derived cell lines (KMH2 and L428 and ALCL cell lines (DEL and SR-786 in order to identify disease-associated gene copy number gains and losses. Results Significant copy number gains and losses were observed on several chromosomes in all four cell lines. Assessment of copy number alterations with 26,819 DNA segments identified an average of 20 genetic alterations. Of the recurrent minimally altered regions identified, 11 (55% were within previously published regions of chromosomal alterations in HL and ALCL cell lines while 9 (45% were novel alterations not previously reported. HL cell lines L428 and KMH2 shared gains in chromosome cytobands 2q23.1-q24.2, 7q32.2-q36.3, 9p21.3-p13.3, 12q13.13-q14.1, and losses in 13q12.13-q12.3, and 18q21.32-q23. ALCL cell lines SR-786 and DEL, showed gains in cytobands 5p15.32-p14.3, 20p12.3-q13.11, and 20q13.2-q13.32. Both pairs of HL and ALCL cell lines showed losses in 18q21.32-18q23. Conclusion This study is considered to be the first one describing HL and ALCL cell line genomes at sub-megabase resolution. This high-resolution analysis allowed us to propose novel candidate target genes that could potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of HL and ALCL. FISH was used to confirm the amplification of all three isoforms of the trypsin gene (PRSS1/PRSS2/PRSS3 in KMH2 and L428 (HL and DEL (ALCL cell lines. These are novel findings that have not been previously reported in the lymphoma literature, and opens up an entirely new area of research that has not been previously associated with lymphoma biology. The findings raise interesting possibilities about the role of signaling

  9. Sequencing and comparing whole mitochondrial genomes ofanimals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boore, Jeffrey L.; Macey, J. Robert; Medina, Monica

    2005-04-22

    Comparing complete animal mitochondrial genome sequences is becoming increasingly common for phylogenetic reconstruction and as a model for genome evolution. Not only are they much more informative than shorter sequences of individual genes for inferring evolutionary relatedness, but these data also provide sets of genome-level characters, such as the relative arrangements of genes, that can be especially powerful. We describe here the protocols commonly used for physically isolating mtDNA, for amplifying these by PCR or RCA, for cloning,sequencing, assembly, validation, and gene annotation, and for comparing both sequences and gene arrangements. On several topics, we offer general observations based on our experiences to date with determining and comparing complete mtDNA sequences.

  10. Comparative genomics in chicken and Pekin duck using FISH mapping and microarray analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skinner, M.; Robertson, L.B.; Tempest, H.G.; Langley, E.J.; Ioannou, D.; Fowler, K.E.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The availability of the complete chicken (Gallus gallus) genome sequence as well as a large number of chicken probes for fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) and microarray resources facilitate comparative genomic studies between chicken and other bird species. In a previous study, w

  11. VISTA - computational tools for comparative genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Pachter, Lior; Poliakov, Alexander; Rubin,Edward M.; Dubchak, Inna

    2004-01-01

    Comparison of DNA sequences from different species is a fundamental method for identifying functional elements in genomes. Here we describe the VISTA family of tools created to assist biologists in carrying out this task. Our first VISTA server at http://www-gsd.lbl.gov/VISTA/ was launched in the summer of 2000 and was designed to align long genomic sequences and visualize these alignments with associated functional annotations. Currently the VISTA site includes multiple comparative genomics tools and provides users with rich capabilities to browse pre-computed whole-genome alignments of large vertebrate genomes and other groups of organisms with VISTA Browser, submit their own sequences of interest to several VISTA servers for various types of comparative analysis, and obtain detailed comparative analysis results for a set of cardiovascular genes. We illustrate capabilities of the VISTA site by the analysis of a 180 kilobase (kb) interval on human chromosome 5 that encodes for the kinesin family member3A (KIF3A) protein.

  12. The draft genome of MD-2 pineapple using hybrid error correction of long reads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwan, Raimi M.; Saidin, Akzam; Kumar, S. Vijay

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the elite pineapple variety, MD-2, has caused a significant market shift in the pineapple industry. Better productivity, overall increased in fruit quality and taste, resilience to chilled storage and resistance to internal browning are among the key advantages of the MD-2 as compared with its previous predecessor, the Smooth Cayenne. Here, we present the genome sequence of the MD-2 pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) by using the hybrid sequencing technology from two highly reputable platforms, i.e. the PacBio long sequencing reads and the accurate Illumina short reads. Our draft genome achieved 99.6% genome coverage with 27,017 predicted protein-coding genes while 45.21% of the genome was identified as repetitive elements. Furthermore, differential expression of ripening RNASeq library of pineapple fruits revealed ethylene-related transcripts, believed to be involved in regulating the process of non-climacteric pineapple fruit ripening. The MD-2 pineapple draft genome serves as an example of how a complex heterozygous genome is amenable to whole genome sequencing by using a hybrid technology that is both economical and accurate. The genome will make genomic applications more feasible as a medium to understand complex biological processes specific to pineapple. PMID:27374615

  13. Comparative genomics of Shiga toxin encoding bacteriophages

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    Smith Darren L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stx bacteriophages are responsible for driving the dissemination of Stx toxin genes (stx across their bacterial host range. Lysogens carrying Stx phages can cause severe, life-threatening disease and Stx toxin is an integral virulence factor. The Stx-bacteriophage vB_EcoP-24B, commonly referred to as Ф24B, is capable of multiply infecting a single bacterial host cell at a high frequency, with secondary infection increasing the rate at which subsequent bacteriophage infections can occur. This is biologically unusual, therefore determining the genomic content and context of Ф24B compared to other lambdoid Stx phages is important to understanding the factors controlling this phenomenon and determining whether they occur in other Stx phages. Results The genome of the Stx2 encoding phage, Ф24B was sequenced and annotated. The genomic organisation and general features are similar to other sequenced Stx bacteriophages induced from Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC, however Ф24B possesses significant regions of heterogeneity, with implications for phage biology and behaviour. The Ф24B genome was compared to other sequenced Stx phages and the archetypal lambdoid phage, lambda, using the Circos genome comparison tool and a PCR-based multi-loci comparison system. Conclusions The data support the hypothesis that Stx phages are mosaic, and recombination events between the host, phages and their remnants within the same infected bacterial cell will continue to drive the evolution of Stx phage variants and the subsequent dissemination of shigatoxigenic potential.

  14. The Genomic Aftermath of Hybridization in the Opportunistic Pathogen Candida metapsilosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryszcz, Leszek P.; Németh, Tibor; Saus, Ester; Ksiezopolska, Ewa; Hegedűsová, Eva; Nosek, Jozef; Wolfe, Kenneth H.; Gacser, Attila; Gabaldón, Toni

    2015-01-01

    Candida metapsilosis is a rarely-isolated, opportunistic pathogen that belongs to a clade of pathogenic yeasts known as the C. parapsilosis sensu lato species complex. To gain insight into the recent evolution of C. metapsilosis and the genetic basis of its virulence, we sequenced the genome of 11 clinical isolates from various locations, which we compared to each other and to the available genomes of the two remaining members of the complex: C. orthopsilosis and C. parapsilosis. Unexpectedly, we found compelling genomic evidence that C. metapsilosis is a highly heterozygous hybrid species, with all sequenced clinical strains resulting from the same past hybridization event involving two parental lineages that were approximately 4.5% divergent in sequence. This result indicates that the parental species are non-pathogenic, but that hybridization between them formed a new opportunistic pathogen, C. metapsilosis, that has achieved a worldwide distribution. We show that these hybrids are diploid and we identified strains carrying loci for both alternative mating types, which supports mating as the initial mechanism for hybrid formation. We trace the aftermath of this hybridization at the genomic level, and reconstruct the evolutionary relationships among the different strains. Recombination and introgression -resulting in loss of heterozygosis- between the two subgenomes have been rampant, and includes the partial overwriting of the MTLa mating locus in all strains. Collectively, our results shed light on the recent genomic evolution within the C. parapsilosis sensu lato complex, and argue for a re-definition of species within this clade, with at least five distinct homozygous lineages, some of which having the ability to form hybrids. PMID:26517373

  15. The Genomic Aftermath of Hybridization in the Opportunistic Pathogen Candida metapsilosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszek P Pryszcz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Candida metapsilosis is a rarely-isolated, opportunistic pathogen that belongs to a clade of pathogenic yeasts known as the C. parapsilosis sensu lato species complex. To gain insight into the recent evolution of C. metapsilosis and the genetic basis of its virulence, we sequenced the genome of 11 clinical isolates from various locations, which we compared to each other and to the available genomes of the two remaining members of the complex: C. orthopsilosis and C. parapsilosis. Unexpectedly, we found compelling genomic evidence that C. metapsilosis is a highly heterozygous hybrid species, with all sequenced clinical strains resulting from the same past hybridization event involving two parental lineages that were approximately 4.5% divergent in sequence. This result indicates that the parental species are non-pathogenic, but that hybridization between them formed a new opportunistic pathogen, C. metapsilosis, that has achieved a worldwide distribution. We show that these hybrids are diploid and we identified strains carrying loci for both alternative mating types, which supports mating as the initial mechanism for hybrid formation. We trace the aftermath of this hybridization at the genomic level, and reconstruct the evolutionary relationships among the different strains. Recombination and introgression -resulting in loss of heterozygosis- between the two subgenomes have been rampant, and includes the partial overwriting of the MTLa mating locus in all strains. Collectively, our results shed light on the recent genomic evolution within the C. parapsilosis sensu lato complex, and argue for a re-definition of species within this clade, with at least five distinct homozygous lineages, some of which having the ability to form hybrids.

  16. DNAVis: interactive visualization of comparative genome annotations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiers, M.W.E.J.; Wetering, van de H.; Peeters, T.H.J.M.; Wijk, van J.J.; Nap, J.P.H.

    2006-01-01

    The software package DNAVis offers a fast, interactive and real-time visualization of DNA sequences and their comparative genome annotations. DNAVis implements advanced methods of information visualization such as linked views, perspective walls and semantic zooming, in addition to the display of he

  17. Introgressive hybridization as a promoter of genome reshuffling in natural homoploid fish hybrids (Cyprinidae, Leuciscinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, C S A; Aboim, M A; Ráb, P; Collares-Pereira, M J

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying diversification and speciation by introgressive hybridization is currently one of the major challenges in evolutionary biology. Here, the analysis of hybridization between two pairs of Iberian Leuciscinae provided new data on independent hybrid zones involving Achondrostoma oligolepis (AOL) and Pseudochondrostoma duriense (PDU), and confirmed the occurrence of hybrids between AOL and Pseudochondrostoma polylepis (PPO). A multilevel survey combining morphological, genetic and cytogenomic markers on a vast population screening successfully sorted the selected fishes as admixed. Results were similar in both AOL × PDU and AOL × PPO systems. Overall, hybrid morphotypes, cytogenomic data and genetic profiling indicated preferential backcrossing and suggested AOL as a major genomic contributor. Moreover, results implied AOL as more permissive to introgression than PDU or PPO. Although PDU- and PPO-like individuals appeared more resilient to genome modifications, AOL appeared to be more involved and affected by the ongoing hybridization events, as chromosomal translocations were only found in AOL-like individuals. All hybrids analysed evidenced extensive ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymorphism that was not found in parental species, but usually seen falling within the range of possible parental combinations. Yet, transgressive phenotypes that cannot be explained by normal recombination, including more rDNA clusters than expected or the occurrence of syntenic rDNAs, were also detected. Present results proved rapid genomic evolution providing the genetic novelty for species to persist. In addition, although the ultimate consequences of such apparently extensive and recurrent events remain unknown, modern genome-wide methodologies are of great promise towards answering questions concerning the causes, dynamics and impacts of hybridization.

  18. Genome sequence of the lager brewing yeast, an interspecies hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Yoshihiro; Kanamori, Takeshi; Itoh, Takehiko; Kodama, Yukiko; Rainieri, Sandra; Nakamura, Norihisa; Shimonaga, Tomoko; Hattori, Masahira; Ashikari, Toshihiko

    2009-04-01

    This work presents the genome sequencing of the lager brewing yeast (Saccharomyces pastorianus) Weihenstephan 34/70, a strain widely used in lager beer brewing. The 25 Mb genome comprises two nuclear sub-genomes originating from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus and one circular mitochondrial genome originating from S. bayanus. Thirty-six different types of chromosomes were found including eight chromosomes with translocations between the two sub-genomes, whose breakpoints are within the orthologous open reading frames. Several gene loci responsible for typical lager brewing yeast characteristics such as maltotriose uptake and sulfite production have been increased in number by chromosomal rearrangements. Despite an overall high degree of conservation of the synteny with S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus, the syntenies were not well conserved in the sub-telomeric regions that contain lager brewing yeast characteristic and specific genes. Deletion of larger chromosomal regions, a massive unilateral decrease of the ribosomal DNA cluster and bilateral truncations of over 60 genes reflect a post-hybridization evolution process. Truncations and deletions of less efficient maltose and maltotriose uptake genes may indicate the result of adaptation to brewing. The genome sequence of this interspecies hybrid yeast provides a new tool for better understanding of lager brewing yeast behavior in industrial beer production.

  19. Comparative genomics of chondrichthyan Hoxa clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulley, John F; Zhong, Ying-Fu; Holland, Peter Wh

    2009-09-02

    The chondrichthyan or cartilaginous fish (chimeras, sharks, skates and rays) occupy an important phylogenetic position as the sister group to all other jawed vertebrates and as an early lineage to diverge from the vertebrate lineage following two whole genome duplication events in vertebrate evolution. There have been few comparative genomic analyses incorporating data from chondrichthyan fish and none comparing genomic information from within the group. We have sequenced the complete Hoxa cluster of the Little Skate (Leucoraja erinacea) and compared to the published Hoxa cluster of the Horn Shark (Heterodontus francisci) and to available data from the Elephant Shark (Callorhinchus milii) genome project. A BAC clone containing the full Little Skate Hoxa cluster was fully sequenced and assembled. Analyses of coding sequences and conserved non-coding elements reveal a strikingly high level of conservation across the cartilaginous fish, with twenty ultraconserved elements (100%,100 bp) found between Skate and Horn Shark, compared to three between human and marsupials. We have also identified novel potential non-coding RNAs in the Skate BAC clone, some of which are conserved to other species. We find that the Little Skate Hoxa cluster is remarkably similar to the previously published Horn Shark Hoxa cluster with respect to sequence identity, gene size and intergenic distance despite over 180 million years of separation between the two lineages. We suggest that the genomes of cartilaginous fish are more highly conserved than those of tetrapods or teleost fish and so are more likely to have retained ancestral non-coding elements. While useful for isolating homologous DNA, this complicates bioinformatic approaches to identify chondrichthyan-specific non-coding DNA elements.

  20. Comparative genomics of chondrichthyan Hoxa clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Ying-Fu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chondrichthyan or cartilaginous fish (chimeras, sharks, skates and rays occupy an important phylogenetic position as the sister group to all other jawed vertebrates and as an early lineage to diverge from the vertebrate lineage following two whole genome duplication events in vertebrate evolution. There have been few comparative genomic analyses incorporating data from chondrichthyan fish and none comparing genomic information from within the group. We have sequenced the complete Hoxa cluster of the Little Skate (Leucoraja erinacea and compared to the published Hoxa cluster of the Horn Shark (Heterodontus francisci and to available data from the Elephant Shark (Callorhinchus milii genome project. Results A BAC clone containing the full Little Skate Hoxa cluster was fully sequenced and assembled. Analyses of coding sequences and conserved non-coding elements reveal a strikingly high level of conservation across the cartilaginous fish, with twenty ultraconserved elements (100%,100 bp found between Skate and Horn Shark, compared to three between human and marsupials. We have also identified novel potential non-coding RNAs in the Skate BAC clone, some of which are conserved to other species. Conclusion We find that the Little Skate Hoxa cluster is remarkably similar to the previously published Horn Shark Hoxa cluster with respect to sequence identity, gene size and intergenic distance despite over 180 million years of separation between the two lineages. We suggest that the genomes of cartilaginous fish are more highly conserved than those of tetrapods or teleost fish and so are more likely to have retained ancestral non-coding elements. While useful for isolating homologous DNA, this complicates bioinformatic approaches to identify chondrichthyan-specific non-coding DNA elements

  1. Comparative Analysis on Genomes from Oryza alta and Oryza latifolia by C0t-1 DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG De-bin; WANG Yang; WU Qi; ZHAO Hou-ming; LI Gang; QIN Rui; WANG Chun-tai; LIU Hong

    2010-01-01

    In order to reveal the origin and evolutionary relationship between two CCDD genome species, Oryza alta and Oryza latifolia, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was adopted to analyze the genomes of the two species with C0t-1 DNA from O. alta as a probe. Karyotype was also comparatively analyzed between O. alta and O. latifolia based on their similar band patterns of the hybridization signals. There were a high homology and close relationship between O. alta and O. latifolia, however, the distinction between the hybridization signals was also clear. C0t-1 DNA was proved to be species- and genome type-specific. It is suggested that C0t-1 DNA-FISH could be more efficient to analyze the genomic relationship between different species. According to the comparative analysis of highly and moderately repetitive DNA sequences between the two allotetraploidy species, O. alta and O. latifolia, the possible origin and evolutionary mechanism of allotetraploidy of Oryza were discussed.

  2. Genomics for greater efficiency in pigeonpea hybrid breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachit K Saxena

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic genic male sterility based hybrid technology has demonstrated its immense potential in increasing the productivity of various crops, including pigeonpea. This technology has shown promise for breaking the long-standing yield stagnation in pigeonpea. There are difficulties in commercial hybrid seed production due to non-availability of field-oriented technologies such as time-bound assessment of genetic purity of hybrid seeds. Besides this, there are other routine breeding activities which are labour oriented and need more resources. These include breeding and maintenance of new fertility restorers and maintainer lines, diversification of cytoplasm, and incorporation of biotic and abiotic stress resistances. The recent progress in genomics research could accelerate the existing traditional efforts to strengthen the hybrid breeding technology. Marker based seed purity assessment, identification of heterotic groups; selection of new fertility restorers are few areas which have already been initiated. In this paper efforts have been made to identify critical areas and opportunities where genomics can play a leading role and assist breeders in accelerating various activities related to breeding and commercialization of pigeonpea hybrids.

  3. Comparative genomics of brain size evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang eEnard

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Which genetic changes took place during mammalian, primate and human evolution to build a larger brain? To answer this question, one has to correlate genetic changes with brain size changes across a phylogeny. Such a comparative genomics approach provides unique information to better understand brain evolution and brain development. However, its statistical power is limited for example due to the limited number of species, the presumably complex genetics of brain size evolution and the large search space of mammalian genomes. Hence, it is crucial to add functional information, for example by limiting the search space to genes and regulatory elements known to play a role in the relevant cell types during brain development. Similarly, it is crucial to experimentally follow up on hypotheses generated by such a comparative approach. Recent progress in understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of mammalian brain development, in genome sequencing and in genome editing, promises to make a close integration of evolutionary and experimental methods a fruitful approach to better understand the genetics of mammalian brain size evolution.

  4. Whole-genome sequencing for comparative genomics and de novo genome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjak, Andrej; Sala, Claudia; Hartkoorn, Ruben C

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies for whole-genome sequencing of mycobacteria are rapidly becoming an attractive alternative to more traditional sequencing methods. In particular this technology is proving useful for genome-wide identification of mutations in mycobacteria (comparative genomics) as well as for de novo assembly of whole genomes. Next-generation sequencing however generates a vast quantity of data that can only be transformed into a usable and comprehensible form using bioinformatics. Here we describe the methodology one would use to prepare libraries for whole-genome sequencing, and the basic bioinformatics to identify mutations in a genome following Illumina HiSeq or MiSeq sequencing, as well as de novo genome assembly following sequencing using Pacific Biosciences (PacBio).

  5. A stable hybrid containing haploid genomes of two obligate diploid Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Uttara; Mohamed, Aiyaz; Kakade, Pallavi; Mugasimangalam, Raja C; Sadhale, Parag P; Sanyal, Kaustuv

    2013-08-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are diploid, predominantly asexual human-pathogenic yeasts. In this study, we constructed tetraploid (4n) strains of C. albicans of the same or different lineages by spheroplast fusion. Induction of chromosome loss in the tetraploid C. albicans generated diploid or near-diploid progeny strains but did not produce any haploid progeny. We also constructed stable heterotetraploid somatic hybrid strains (2n + 2n) of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis by spheroplast fusion. Heterodiploid (n + n) progeny hybrids were obtained after inducing chromosome loss in a stable heterotetraploid hybrid. To identify a subset of hybrid heterodiploid progeny strains carrying at least one copy of all chromosomes of both species, unique centromere sequences of various chromosomes of each species were used as markers in PCR analysis. The reduction of chromosome content was confirmed by a comparative genome hybridization (CGH) assay. The hybrid strains were found to be stably propagated. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays with antibodies against centromere-specific histones (C. albicans Cse4/C. dubliniensis Cse4) revealed that the centromere identity of chromosomes of each species is maintained in the hybrid genomes of the heterotetraploid and heterodiploid strains. Thus, our results suggest that the diploid genome content is not obligatory for the survival of either C. albicans or C. dubliniensis. In keeping with the recent discovery of the existence of haploid C. albicans strains, the heterodiploid strains of our study can be excellent tools for further species-specific genome elimination, yielding true haploid progeny of C. albicans or C. dubliniensis in future.

  6. Microarray-based whole-genome hybridization as a tool for determining procaryotic species relatedness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, L.; Liu, X.; Fields, M.W.; Thompson, D.K.; Bagwell, C.E.; Tiedje, J. M.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2008-01-15

    The definition and delineation of microbial species are of great importance and challenge due to the extent of evolution and diversity. Whole-genome DNA-DNA hybridization is the cornerstone for defining procaryotic species relatedness, but obtaining pairwise DNA-DNA reassociation values for a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of procaryotes is tedious and time consuming. A previously described microarray format containing whole-genomic DNA (the community genome array or CGA) was rigorously evaluated as a high-throughput alternative to the traditional DNA-DNA reassociation approach for delineating procaryotic species relationships. DNA similarities for multiple bacterial strains obtained with the CGA-based hybridization were comparable to those obtained with various traditional whole-genome hybridization methods (r=0.87, P<0.01). Significant linear relationships were also observed between the CGA-based genome similarities and those derived from small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequences (r=0.79, P<0.0001), gyrB sequences (r=0.95, P<0.0001) or REP- and BOX-PCR fingerprinting profiles (r=0.82, P<0.0001). The CGA hybridization-revealed species relationships in several representative genera, including Pseudomonas, Azoarcus and Shewanella, were largely congruent with previous classifications based on various conventional whole-genome DNA-DNA reassociation, SSU rRNA and/or gyrB analyses. These results suggest that CGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization could serve as a powerful, high-throughput format for determining species relatedness among microorganisms.

  7. Comparative genomics of brain size evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Enard, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Which genetic changes took place during mammalian, primate and human evolution to build a larger brain? To answer this question, one has to correlate genetic changes with brain size changes across a phylogeny. Such a comparative genomics approach provides unique information to better understand brain evolution and brain development. However, its statistical power is limited for example due to the limited number of species, the presumably complex genetics of brain size evolution and the large ...

  8. Comparative genomics of brain size evolution

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Which genetic changes took place during mammalian, primate and human evolution to build a larger brain? To answer this question, one has to correlate genetic changes with brain size changes across a phylogeny. Such a comparative genomics approach provides unique information to better understand brain evolution and brain development. However, its statistical power is limited for example due to the limited number of species, the presumably complex genetics of brain size evolution and the large ...

  9. Comparative genome analysis of Basidiomycete fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Henrissat, Bernard; Nagy, Laszlo; Brown, Daren; Held, Benjamin; Baker, Scott; Blanchette, Robert; Boussau, Bastien; Doty, Sharon L.; Fagnan, Kirsten; Floudas, Dimitris; Levasseur, Anthony; Manning, Gerard; Martin, Francis; Morin, Emmanuelle; Otillar, Robert; Pisabarro, Antonio; Walton, Jonathan; Wolfe, Ken; Hibbett, David; Grigoriev, Igor

    2013-08-07

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes symbionts, pathogens, and saprotrophs including the majority of wood decaying and ectomycorrhizal species. To better understand the genetic diversity of this phylum we compared the genomes of 35 basidiomycetes including 6 newly sequenced genomes. These genomes span extremes of genome size, gene number, and repeat content. Analysis of core genes reveals that some 48percent of basidiomycete proteins are unique to the phylum with nearly half of those (22percent) found in only one organism. Correlations between lifestyle and certain gene families are evident. Phylogenetic patterns of plant biomass-degrading genes in Agaricomycotina suggest a continuum rather than a dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay. Based on phylogenetically-informed PCA analysis of wood decay genes, we predict that that Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea have properties similar to white rot species, although neither has typical ligninolytic class II fungal peroxidases (PODs). This prediction is supported by growth assays in which both fungi exhibit wood decay with white rot-like characteristics. Based on this, we suggest that the white/brown rot dichotomy may be inadequate to describe the full range of wood decaying fungi. Analysis of the rate of discovery of proteins with no or few homologs suggests the value of continued sequencing of basidiomycete fungi.

  10. Comparative genomics of Enterococcus faecalis from healthy Norwegian infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nes Ingolf F

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterococcus faecalis, traditionally considered a harmless commensal of the intestinal tract, is now ranked among the leading causes of nosocomial infections. In an attempt to gain insight into the genetic make-up of commensal E. faecalis, we have studied genomic variation in a collection of community-derived E. faecalis isolated from the feces of Norwegian infants. Results The E. faecalis isolates were first sequence typed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST and characterized with respect to antibiotic resistance and properties associated with virulence. A subset of the isolates was compared to the vancomycin resistant strain E. faecalis V583 (V583 by whole genome microarray comparison (comparative genomic hybridization (CGH. Several of the putative enterococcal virulence factors were found to be highly prevalent among the commensal baby isolates. The genomic variation as observed by CGH was less between isolates displaying the same MLST sequence type than between isolates belonging to different evolutionary lineages. Conclusion The variations in gene content observed among the investigated commensal E. faecalis is comparable to the genetic variation previously reported among strains of various origins thought to be representative of the major E. faecalis lineages. Previous MLST analysis of E. faecalis have identified so-called high-risk enterococcal clonal complexes (HiRECC, defined as genetically distinct subpopulations, epidemiologically associated with enterococcal infections. The observed correlation between CGH and MLST presented here, may offer a method for the identification of lineage-specific genes, and may therefore add clues on how to distinguish pathogenic from commensal E. faecalis. In this work, information on the core genome of E. faecalis is also substantially extended.

  11. Population genomics of parallel hybrid zones in the mimetic butterflies, H. melpomene and H. erato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Mayté; Salazar, Patricio; Counterman, Brian; Medina, Jose Alejandro; Ortiz-Zuazaga, Humberto; Morrison, Anna; Papa, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid zones can be valuable tools for studying evolution and identifying genomic regions responsible for adaptive divergence and underlying phenotypic variation. Hybrid zones between subspecies of Heliconius butterflies can be very narrow and are maintained by strong selection acting on color pattern. The comimetic species, H. erato and H. melpomene, have parallel hybrid zones in which both species undergo a change from one color pattern form to another. We use restriction-associated DNA sequencing to obtain several thousand genome-wide sequence markers and use these to analyze patterns of population divergence across two pairs of parallel hybrid zones in Peru and Ecuador. We compare two approaches for analysis of this type of data—alignment to a reference genome and de novo assembly—and find that alignment gives the best results for species both closely (H. melpomene) and distantly (H. erato, ∼15% divergent) related to the reference sequence. Our results confirm that the color pattern controlling loci account for the majority of divergent regions across the genome, but we also detect other divergent regions apparently unlinked to color pattern differences. We also use association mapping to identify previously unmapped color pattern loci, in particular the Ro locus. Finally, we identify a new cryptic population of H. timareta in Ecuador, which occurs at relatively low altitude and is mimetic with H. melpomene malleti. PMID:24823669

  12. Genome comparison of Candida orthopsilosis clinical strains reveals the existence of hybrids between two distinct subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryszcz, Leszek P; Németh, Tibor; Gácser, Attila; Gabaldón, Toni

    2014-05-01

    The Candida parapsilosis species complex comprises a group of emerging human pathogens of varying virulence. This complex was recently subdivided into three different species: C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. metapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis. Within the latter, at least two clearly distinct subspecies seem to be present among clinical isolates (Type 1 and Type 2). To gain insight into the genomic differences between these subspecies, we undertook the sequencing of a clinical isolate classified as Type 1 and compared it with the available sequence of a Type 2 clinical strain. Unexpectedly, the analysis of the newly sequenced strain revealed a highly heterozygous genome, which we show to be the consequence of a hybridization event between both identified subspecies. This implicitly suggests that C. orthopsilosis is able to mate, a so-far unanswered question. The resulting hybrid shows a chimeric genome that maintains a similar gene dosage from both parental lineages and displays ongoing loss of heterozygosity. Several of the differences found between the gene content in both strains relate to virulent-related families, with the hybrid strain presenting a higher copy number of genes coding for efflux pumps or secreted lipases. Remarkably, two clinical strains isolated from distant geographical locations (Texas and Singapore) are descendants of the same hybrid line, raising the intriguing possibility of a relationship between the hybridization event and the global spread of a virulent clone.

  13. Comparative genomics and evolution of eukaryotic phospholipidbiosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lykidis, Athanasios

    2006-12-01

    Phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes produce diverse molecular structures and are often present in multiple forms encoded by different genes. This work utilizes comparative genomics and phylogenetics for exploring the distribution, structure and evolution of phospholipid biosynthetic genes and pathways in 26 eukaryotic genomes. Although the basic structure of the pathways was formed early in eukaryotic evolution, the emerging picture indicates that individual enzyme families followed unique evolutionary courses. For example, choline and ethanolamine kinases and cytidylyltransferases emerged in ancestral eukaryotes, whereas, multiple forms of the corresponding phosphatidyltransferases evolved mainly in a lineage specific manner. Furthermore, several unicellular eukaryotes maintain bacterial-type enzymes and reactions for the synthesis of phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin. Also, base-exchange phosphatidylserine synthases are widespread and ancestral enzymes. The multiplicity of phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes has been largely generated by gene expansion in a lineage specific manner. Thus, these observations suggest that phospholipid biosynthesis has been an actively evolving system. Finally, comparative genomic analysis indicates the existence of novel phosphatidyltransferases and provides a candidate for the uncharacterized eukaryotic phosphatidylglycerol phosphate phosphatase.

  14. Genome-wide disruption of gene expression in allopolyploids but not hybrids of rice subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chunming; Bai, Yan; Lin, Xiuyun; Zhao, Na; Hu, Lanjuan; Gong, Zhiyun; Wendel, Jonathan F; Liu, Bao

    2014-05-01

    Hybridization and polyploidization are prominent processes in plant evolution. Hybrids and allopolyploids typically exhibit radically altered gene expression patterns relative to their parents, a phenomenon termed "transcriptomic shock." To distinguish the effects of hybridization from polyploidization on coregulation of divergent alleles, we analyzed expression of parental copies (homoeologs) of 11,608 genes using RNA-seq-based transcriptome profiling in reciprocal hybrids and tetraploids constructed from subspecies japonica and indica of Asian rice (Oryza sativa L.). The diploid hybrids and their derived allopolyploids differ dramatically in morphology, despite having the same suite of genes and genic proportions. Allelic and homoeolog-specific transcripts were unequivocally diagnosed in the hybrids and tetraploids based on parent-specific SNPs. Compared with the in silico hybrid (parental mix), the range of progenitor expression divergence was significantly reduced in both reciprocally generated F1 hybrids, presumably due to the ameliorating effects of a common trans environment on divergent cis-factors. In contrast, parental expression differences were greatly elaborated at the polyploid level, which we propose is a consequence of stoichiometric disruptions associated with the numerous chromosomal packaging and volumetric changes accompanying nascent polyploidy. We speculate that the emergent property of "whole genome doubling" has repercussions that reverberate throughout the transcriptome and downstream, ultimately generating altered phenotypes. This perspective may yield insight into the nature of adaptation and the origin of evolutionary novelty accompanying polyploidy.

  15. [Comparative molecular cytogenetic characterization of partial wheat-wheatgrass hybrids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupin, P Yu; Divashuk, M G; Belov, V I; Glukhova, L I; Aleksandrov, O S; Karlov, G I

    2011-04-01

    The chromosomal composition of the Zernokormovaya 169, Istra 1, Ostankinskaya, and Otrastayushchaya 38 cultivars of octoploid partial wheat-wheatgrass hybrids was studied using genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). Differentiation of wheatgrass chromosomes by the distribution of the GISH signal along the chromosome was revealed. The wheatgrass chromosomes of the hybrid cultivars studied in the work differed in the type of differentiation, centromeric index, and absolute size. The cytogenetic distinctions of these chromosomes revealed by us can be used in making crosses and in studying the transmission through gametes of additional wheatgrass chromosomes.

  16. Genetic Segregation and Genomic Hybridization Patterns Support an Allotetraploid Structure and Disomic Inheritance for Salix Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Barcaccia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Salix alba L. (white willow—Salix fragilis L. (crack willow complex includes closely related polyploid species, mainly tetraploid (2n = 4x = 76, which are dioecious and hence obligate allogamous. Because little is known about the genome constitution and chromosome behavior of these pure willow trees, genetic analysis of their naturally occurring interspecific polyploid hybrids is still very difficult. A two-way pseudo-testcross strategy was exploited using single-dose AFLP markers in order to assess the main inheritance patterns of tetraploid biotypes (disomy vs. tetrasomy in segregating populations stemmed from S. alba × S. fragilis crosses and reciprocals. In addition, a genomic in situ hybridization (GISH technology was implemented in willow to shed some light on the genome structure of S. alba and S. fragilis species, and their hybrids (allopolyploidy vs. autopolyploidy. The frequency of S. alba-specific molecular markers was almost double compared to that of S. fragilis-specific ones, suggesting the phylogenetic hypothesis of S. fragilis as derivative species from S. alba-like progenitors. Cytogenetic observations at pro-metaphase revealed about half of the chromosome complements being less contracted than the remaining ones, supporting an allopolyploid origin of both S. alba and S. fragilis. Both genetic segregation and genomic hybridization data are consistent with an allotetraploid nature of the Salix species. In particular, the vast majority of the AFLP markers were inherited according to disomic patterns in S. alba × S. fragilis populations and reciprocals. Moreover, in all S. alba against S. fragilis hybridizations and reciprocals, GISH signals were observed only on the contracted chromosomes whereas the non-contracted chromosomes were never hybridized. In conclusion, half of the chromosomes of the pure species S. alba and S. fragilis are closely related and they could share a common diploid ancestor, while the rest of

  17. Genome size as a key to evolutionary complex aquatic plants: polyploidy and hybridization in Callitriche (Plantaginaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Prančl

    Full Text Available Despite their complex evolutionary histories, aquatic plants are highly underrepresented in contemporary biosystematic studies. Of them, the genus Callitriche is particularly interesting because of such evolutionary features as wide variation in chromosome numbers and pollination systems. However, taxonomic difficulties have prevented broader investigation of this genus. In this study we applied flow cytometry to Callitriche for the first time in order to gain an insight into evolutionary processes and genome size differentiation in the genus. Flow cytometry complemented by confirmation of chromosome counts was applied to an extensive dataset of 1077 Callitriche individuals from 495 localities in 11 European countries and the USA. Genome size was determined for 12 taxa. The results suggest that many important processes have interacted in the evolution of the genus, including polyploidization and hybridization. Incongruence between genome size and ploidy level, intraspecific variation in genome size, formation of autotriploid and hybridization between species with different pollination systems were also detected. Hybridization takes place particularly in the diploid-tetraploid complex C. cophocarpa-C. platycarpa, for which the triploid hybrids were frequently recorded in the area of co-occurrence of its parents. A hitherto unknown hybrid (probably C. hamulata × C. cophocarpa with a unique chromosome number was discovered in the Czech Republic. However, hybridization occurs very rarely among most of the studied species. The main ecological preferences were also compared among the taxa collected. Although Callitriche taxa often grow in mixed populations, the ecological preferences of individual species are distinctly different in some cases. Anyway, flow cytometry is a very efficient method for taxonomic delimitation, determination and investigation of Callitriche species, and is even able to distinguish homoploid taxa and identify introduced

  18. Detection of choromosomal aberration in sporadic colorectal cancer with comparative genomic hybridization%比较基因组杂交检测散发性结直肠癌染色体变异的临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈寅波; 鞠海星; 张苏展; 彭佳萍; 李德川

    2009-01-01

    目的 了解散发性结直肠癌(SCRC)的染色体变异及其与SCRC临床病理特征的关系.方法 采用比较基因组杂交(CGH)技术检测40 例SCRC的染色体变异情况,分析其与临床病理特征的关系.结果 40 例SCRC患者CGH检测结果显示,所有病例均有不同程度的染色体臂发生扩增或丢失.平均每例变异数为7.55,扩增数为4.73,丢失数为2.83.染色体扩增区域有20 q、12 q、13 q、7 P、7 q和16 q;缺失区域有18 q、5 q、4 q、8 P和17 P.结直肠癌TNM分期中Ⅲ、Ⅳ期患者的染色体总变异数和扩增数、缺失数均高于Ⅰ、Ⅱ期患者.本组患者染色体总变异数、扩增数和丢失数在不同的肿瘤部位、组织学类型和分化程度间比较,差异均无统计学意义.20 q的扩增与TNM分期有关.结论 染色体变异在SCRC中普遍存在,SCRC的染色体变异数及20 q的扩增与TNM分期有关.%Objective To investigate the choromosomal aberration in sporadic colorectal carcinoma and its association with clinieopathologieal features. Methods Comparative genomic hybridization(CGH) was used to screen the changes in the number of DNA sequence copies in 40 sporadic coloreetal cancer patients in order to identify regions that contain genes important for the development and progression of colorectal cancer. Results In 40 sporadic colorectal cancer, frequent gain at 20 q, 12 q, 13 q, 7 p, 7 q and 16 q were found, while loss was also found at 18 q, 5 q, 4 q, 8 pand 17 p. The number of choromosomal aberration was closely associated with tumor stage (P<0.05).No significant association was found between the number of choromosomal aberration and tumor site, histopathologic type and histologic grade. Conclusions Choromosomal aberration exists generally in sporadic colorectal carcinoma. The number of choremosomal aberration and gain of 20q are closely associated with tumor stage.

  19. Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Human NPHP1 Locus Reveal Complex Genomic Architecture and Its Regional Evolution in Primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yuan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Many loci in the human genome harbor complex genomic structures that can result in susceptibility to genomic rearrangements leading to various genomic disorders. Nephronophthisis 1 (NPHP1, MIM# 256100 is an autosomal recessive disorder that can be caused by defects of NPHP1; the gene maps within the human 2q13 region where low copy repeats (LCRs are abundant. Loss of function of NPHP1 is responsible for approximately 85% of the NPHP1 cases-about 80% of such individuals carry a large recurrent homozygous NPHP1 deletion that occurs via nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR between two flanking directly oriented ~45 kb LCRs. Published data revealed a non-pathogenic inversion polymorphism involving the NPHP1 gene flanked by two inverted ~358 kb LCRs. Using optical mapping and array-comparative genomic hybridization, we identified three potential novel structural variant (SV haplotypes at the NPHP1 locus that may protect a haploid genome from the NPHP1 deletion. Inter-species comparative genomic analyses among primate genomes revealed massive genomic changes during evolution. The aggregated data suggest that dynamic genomic rearrangements occurred historically within the NPHP1 locus and generated SV haplotypes observed in the human population today, which may confer differential susceptibility to genomic instability and the NPHP1 deletion within a personal genome. Our study documents diverse SV haplotypes at a complex LCR-laden human genomic region. Comparative analyses provide a model for how this complex region arose during primate evolution, and studies among humans suggest that intra-species polymorphism may potentially modulate an individual's susceptibility to acquiring disease-associated alleles.

  20. Nuclear and cytoplasmic genome composition of Solanum bulbocastanum (+) S. tuberosum somatic hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovene, Marina; Savarese, Salvatore; Cardi, Teodoro; Frusciante, Luigi; Scotti, Nunzia; Simon, Philipp W; Carputo, Domenico

    2007-05-01

    Somatic hybrids between the wild incongruent species Solanum bulbocastanum (2n = 2x = 24) and S. tuberosum haploids (2n = 2x = 24) have been characterized for their nuclear and cytoplasmic genome composition. Cytologic observations revealed the recovery of 8 (near-)tetraploid and 3 hexaploid somatic hybrids. Multicolor genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) analysis was carried out to study the genomic dosage of the parental species in 5 somatic hybrids with different ploidy. The GISH procedure used was effective in discriminating parental genomes in the hybrids; most chromosomes were unambiguously colored. Two (near-)tetraploid somatic hybrids showed the expected 2:2 cultivated-to-wild genomic dosage; 2 hexaploids revealed a 4:2 cultivated-to-wild genomic dosage, and 1 hexaploid had a 2:4 cultivated-to-wild genomic dosage. Characterization of hybrid cytoplasmic genomes was performed using gene-specific primers that detected polymorphisms between the fusion parents in the intergenic regions. The analysis showed that most of the somatic hybrids inherited the plastidial and mitochondrial DNA of the cultivated parent. A few hybrids, with a rearranged mitochondrial genome (showing fragments derived from both parents), were also identified. These results confirmed the potential of somatic hybridization in producing new variability for genetic studies and breeding.

  1. Approaches for Comparative Genomics in Aspergillus and Penicillium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jane Lind Nybo; Theobald, Sebastian; Brandl, Julian

    2016-01-01

    The number of available genomes in the closely related fungal genera Aspergillus and Penicillium is rapidly increasing. At the time of writing, the genomes of 62 species are available, and an even higher number is being prepared. Fungal comparative genomics is thus becoming steadily more powerful...... and applicable for many types of studies. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of comparative genomics in these fungi, along with recommended methods. The chapter describes databases for fungal comparative genomics. Based on experience, we suggest strategies for multiple types...... of comparative genomics, ranging from analysis of single genes, over gene clusters and CaZymes to genome-scale comparative genomics. Furthermore, we have examined published comparative genomics papers to summarize the preferred bioinformatic methods and parameters for a given type of analysis, highly useful...

  2. Comparative Genomics of Ten Solanaceous Plastomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpreet Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Availability of complete plastid genomes of ten solanaceous species, Atropa belladonna, Capsicum annuum, Datura stramonium, Nicotiana sylvestris, Nicotiana tabacum, Nicotiana tomentosiformis, Nicotiana undulata, Solanum bulbocastanum, Solanum lycopersicum, and Solanum tuberosum provided us with an opportunity to conduct their in silico comparative analysis in depth. The size of complete chloroplast genomes and LSC and SSC regions of three species of Solanum is comparatively smaller than that of any other species studied till date (exception: SSC region of A. belladonna. AT content of coding regions was found to be less than noncoding regions. A duplicate copy of trnH gene in C. annuum and two alternative tRNA genes for proline in D. stramonium were observed for the first time in this analysis. Further, homology search revealed the presence of rps19 pseudogene and infA genes in A. belladonna and D. stramonium, a region identical to rps19 pseudogene in C. annum and orthologues of sprA gene in another six species. Among the eighteen intron-containing genes, 3 genes have two introns and 15 genes have one intron. The longest insertion was found in accD gene in C. annuum. Phylogenetic analysis using concatenated protein coding sequences gave two clades, one for Nicotiana species and another for Solanum, Capsicum, Atropa, and Datura.

  3. [Sotos syndrome diagnosed by comparative genomic hybridisation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldarriaga, Wilmar; Molina-Barrera, Laura Camila; Ramírez-Cheyne, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Sotos Syndrome (SS) is a genetic disease with an autosomal dominant pattern caused by haplo-insufficiency of NSD1 gene secondary to point mutations or microdeletion of the 5q35 locus where the gene is located. It is a rare syndrome, occurring in 7 out of every 100,000 births. The objective of this report is to present the case of a 4 year-old patient with a global developmental delay, as well as specific physical findings suggesting a syndrome of genetic origin. Female patient, 4 years of age, thinning hair, triangular facie, long palpebral fissure, arched palate, prominent jaw, winged scapula and clinodactilia of the fifth finger both hands. The molecular test comparative genomic hybridisation test by microarray was subsequently performed, with the result showing 5q35.2 q35.3 region microdeletion of 2,082 MB, including the NSD1 gene. Finally, this article also proposes the performing of comparative genomic hybridisation as the first diagnostic option in cases where clinical findings are suggestive of SS. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Disaggregating polyploidy, parental genome dosage and hybridity contributions to heterosis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fort, Antoine; Ryder, Peter; Mckeown, P.C.; Wijnen, Cris; Aarts, M.G.; Sulpice, Ronan; Spillane, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Heterosis is the phenomenon whereby hybrid offspring of genetically divergent parents display superior characteristics compared with their parents. Although hybridity and polyploidy can influence heterosis in hybrid plants, the differential contributions of hybridity vs polyploidy to heterosis ef

  5. Genome-scale DNA sequence recognition by hybridization to short oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosavljević, A; Savković, S; Crkvenjakov, R; Salbego, D; Serrato, H; Kreuzer, H; Gemmell, A; Batus, S; Grujić, D; Carnahan, S; Tepavcević, J

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed hybridization technology (Drmanac et al. 1994) enables economical large-scale detection of short oligomers within DNA fragments. The newly developed recognition method (Milosavljević 1995b) enables comparison of lists of oligomers detected within DNA fragments against known DNA sequences. We here describe an experiment involving a set of 4,513 distinct genomic E.coli clones of average length 2kb, each hybridized with 636 randomly selected short oligomer probes. High hybridization signal with a particular probe was used as an indication of the presence of a complementary oligomer in the particular clone. For each clone, a list of oligomers with highest hybridization signals was compiled. The database consisting of 4,513 oligomer lists was then searched using known E.coli sequences as queries in an attempt to identify the clones that match the query sequence. Out of a total of 11 clones that were recognized at highest significance level by our method, 8 were single-pass sequenced from both ends. The single-pass sequenced ends were then compared against the query sequences. The sequence comparisons confirmed 7 out of the total of 8 examined recognitions. This experiment represents the first successful example of genome-scale sequence recognition based on hybridization data.

  6. Comparative genomics of bifidobacterium, lactobacillus and related probiotic genera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Ussery, David; Wassenaar, Trudy M.

    2012-01-01

    Six bacterial genera containing species commonly used as probiotics for human consumption or starter cultures for food fermentation were compared and contrasted, based on publicly available complete genome sequences. The analysis included 19 Bifidobacterium genomes, 21 Lactobacillus genomes, 4...... Lactococcus and 3 Leuconostoc genomes, as well as a selection of Enterococcus (11) and Streptococcus (23) genomes. The latter two genera included genomes from probiotic or commensal as well as pathogenic organisms to investigate if their non-pathogenic members shared more genes with the other probiotic......- and core genome of each genus were compared. In addition, it was investigated whether pathogenic genomes contain different COG classes compared to the probiotic or fermentative organisms, again comparing their pan- and core genomes. The obtained results were compared with published data from the literature...

  7. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Omani Lime (Citrus aurantiifolia) and Comparative Analysis within the Rosids

    OpenAIRE

    Huei-Jiun Su; Hogenhout, Saskia A.; Al-Sadi, Abdullah M.; Chih-Horng Kuo

    2014-01-01

    The genus Citrus contains many economically important fruits that are grown worldwide for their high nutritional and medicinal value. Due to frequent hybridizations among species and cultivars, the exact number of natural species and the taxonomic relationships within this genus are unclear. To compare the differences between the Citrus chloroplast genomes and to develop useful genetic markers, we used a reference-assisted approach to assemble the complete chloroplast genome of Omani lime (C....

  8. Comparative Genome Analysis in the Integrated Microbial Genomes(IMG) System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Markowitz, Victor M.

    2006-03-01

    Comparative genome analysis is critical for the effectiveexploration of a rapidly growing number of complete and draft sequencesfor microbial genomes. The Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system(img.jgi.doe.gov) has been developed as a community resource thatprovides support for comparative analysis of microbial genomes in anintegrated context. IMG allows users to navigate the multidimensionalmicrobial genome data space and focus their analysis on a subset ofgenes, genomes, and functions of interest. IMG provides graphicalviewers, summaries and occurrence profile tools for comparing genes,pathways and functions (terms) across specific genomes. Genes can befurther examined using gene neighborhoods and compared with sequencealignment tools.

  9. Comparative genomics reveals insights into avian genome evolution and adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guojie; Li, Cai; Li, Qiye

    2014-01-01

    Birds are the most species-rich class of tetrapod vertebrates and have wide relevance across many research fields. We explored bird macroevolution using full genomes from 48 avian species representing all major extant clades. The avian genome is principally characterized by its constrained size, ...

  10. Comparative genomic analysis of sixty mycobacteriophage genomes: Genome clustering, gene acquisition and gene size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfull, Graham F.; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Lawrence, Jeffrey G.; Pope, Welkin H.; Russell, Daniel A.; Ko, Ching-Chung; Weber, Rebecca J.; Patel, Manisha C.; Germane, Katherine L.; Edgar, Robert H.; Hoyte, Natasha N.; Bowman, Charles A.; Tantoco, Anthony T.; Paladin, Elizabeth C.; Myers, Marlana S.; Smith, Alexis L.; Grace, Molly S.; Pham, Thuy T.; O'Brien, Matthew B.; Vogelsberger, Amy M.; Hryckowian, Andrew J.; Wynalek, Jessica L.; Donis-Keller, Helen; Bogel, Matt W.; Peebles, Craig L.; Cresawn, Steve G.; Hendrix, Roger W.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacteriophages are viruses that infect mycobacterial hosts. Expansion of a collection of sequenced phage genomes to a total of sixty – all infecting a common bacterial host – provides further insight into their diversity and evolution. Of the sixty phage genomes, 55 can be grouped into nine clusters according to their nucleotide sequence similarities, five of which can be further divided into subclusters; five genomes do not cluster with other phages. The sequence diversity between genomes within a cluster varies greatly; for example, the six genomes in cluster D share more than 97.5% average nucleotide similarity with each other. In contrast, similarity between the two genomes in Cluster I is barely detectable by diagonal plot analysis. The total of 6,858 predicted ORFs have been grouped into 1523 phamilies (phams) of related sequences, 46% of which possess only a single member. Only 18.8% of the phams have sequence similarity to non-mycobacteriophage database entries and fewer than 10% of all phams can be assigned functions based on database searching or synteny. Genome clustering facilitates the identification of genes that are in greatest genetic flux and are more likely to have been exchanged horizontally in relatively recent evolutionary time. Although mycobacteriophage genes exhibit smaller average size than genes of their host (205 residues compared to 315), phage genes in higher flux average only ∼100 amino acids, suggesting that the primary units of genetic exchange correspond to single protein domains. PMID:20064525

  11. Approaches for Comparative Genomics in Aspergillus and Penicillium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jane Lind Nybo; Theobald, Sebastian; Brandl, Julian

    2016-01-01

    of comparative genomics, ranging from analysis of single genes, over gene clusters and CaZymes to genome-scale comparative genomics. Furthermore, we have examined published comparative genomics papers to summarize the preferred bioinformatic methods and parameters for a given type of analysis, highly useful...... for new fungal geneticists. Moreover, the chapter contains a detailed overview of comparative genomics studies of key fungal traits such as primary metabolism, secondary metabolism, and secretome analysis. Finally, we gaze into a possible future of the field by comparing the current state of fungal......The number of available genomes in the closely related fungal genera Aspergillus and Penicillium is rapidly increasing. At the time of writing, the genomes of 62 species are available, and an even higher number is being prepared. Fungal comparative genomics is thus becoming steadily more powerful...

  12. Comparative genomics of emerging human ehrlichiosis agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie C Dunning Hotopp

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Anaplasma (formerly Ehrlichia phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia chaffeensis, and Neorickettsia (formerly Ehrlichia sennetsu are intracellular vector-borne pathogens that cause human ehrlichiosis, an emerging infectious disease. We present the complete genome sequences of these organisms along with comparisons to other organisms in the Rickettsiales order. Ehrlichia spp. and Anaplasma spp. display a unique large expansion of immunodominant outer membrane proteins facilitating antigenic variation. All Rickettsiales have a diminished ability to synthesize amino acids compared to their closest free-living relatives. Unlike members of the Rickettsiaceae family, these pathogenic Anaplasmataceae are capable of making all major vitamins, cofactors, and nucleotides, which could confer a beneficial role in the invertebrate vector or the vertebrate host. Further analysis identified proteins potentially involved in vacuole confinement of the Anaplasmataceae, a life cycle involving a hematophagous vector, vertebrate pathogenesis, human pathogenesis, and lack of transovarial transmission. These discoveries provide significant insights into the biology of these obligate intracellular pathogens.

  13. Genome Sequence of Desulfurella amilsii Strain TR1 and Comparative Genomics of Desulfurellaceae Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florentino, Anna P; Stams, Alfons J M; Sánchez-Andrea, Irene

    2017-01-01

    The acidotolerant sulfur reducer Desulfurella amilsii was isolated from sediments of Tinto River, an extremely acidic environment. Its ability to grow in a broad range of pH and to tolerate certain heavy metals offers potential for metal recovery processes. Here we report its high-quality draft genome sequence and compare it to the available genome sequences of other members of Desulfurellaceae family: D. acetivorans. D. multipotens, Hippea maritima. H. alviniae, H. medeae, and H. jasoniae. For most species, pairwise comparisons for average nucleotide identity (ANI) and in silico DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) revealed ANI values from 67.5 to 80% and DDH values from 12.9 to 24.2%. D. acetivorans and D. multipotens, however, surpassed the estimated thresholds of species definition for both DDH (98.6%) and ANI (88.1%). Therefore, they should be merged to a single species. Comparative analysis of Desulfurellaceae genomes revealed different gene content for sulfur respiration between Desulfurella and Hippea species. Sulfur reductase is only encoded in D. amilsii, in which it is suggested to play a role in sulfur respiration, especially at low pH. Polysulfide reductase is only encoded in Hippea species; it is likely that this genus uses polysulfide as electron acceptor. Genes encoding thiosulfate reductase are present in all the genomes, but dissimilatory sulfite reductase is only present in Desulfurella species. Thus, thiosulfate respiration via sulfite is only likely in this genus. Although sulfur disproportionation occurs in Desulfurella species, the molecular mechanism behind this process is not yet understood, hampering a genome prediction. The metabolism of acetate in Desulfurella species can occur via the acetyl-CoA synthetase or via acetate kinase in combination with phosphate acetyltransferase, while in Hippea species, it might occur via the acetate kinase. Large differences in gene sets involved in resistance to acidic conditions were not detected among the

  14. The bonobo genome compared with the chimpanzee and human genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüfer, Kay; Munch, Kasper; Hellmann, Ines; Akagi, Keiko; Miller, Jason R.; Walenz, Brian; Koren, Sergey; Sutton, Granger; Kodira, Chinnappa; Winer, Roger; Knight, James R.; Mullikin, James C.; Meader, Stephen J.; Ponting, Chris P.; Lunter, Gerton; Higashino, Saneyuki; Hobolth, Asger; Dutheil, Julien; Karakoç, Emre; Alkan, Can; Sajjadian, Saba; Catacchio, Claudia Rita; Ventura, Mario; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Eichler, Evan E.; André, Claudine; Atencia, Rebeca; Mugisha, Lawrence; Junhold, Jörg; Patterson, Nick; Siebauer, Michael; Good, Jeffrey M.; Fischer, Anne; Ptak, Susan E.; Lachmann, Michael; Symer, David E.; Mailund, Thomas; Schierup, Mikkel H.; Andrés, Aida M.; Kelso, Janet; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Two African apes are the closest living relatives of humans: the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and the bonobo (Pan paniscus). Although they are similar in many respects, bonobos and chimpanzees differ strikingly in key social and sexual behaviours1–4, and for some of these traits they show more similarity with humans than with each other. Here we report the sequencing and assembly of the bonobo genome to study its evolutionary relationship with the chimpanzee and human genomes. We find that more than three per cent of the human genome is more closely related to either the bonobo or the chimpanzee genome than these are to each other. These regions allow various aspects of the ancestry of the two ape species to be reconstructed. In addition, many of the regions that overlap genes may eventually help us understand the genetic basis of phenotypes that humans share with one of the two apes to the exclusion of the other. PMID:22722832

  15. The bonobo genome compared with the chimpanzee and human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüfer, Kay; Munch, Kasper; Hellmann, Ines; Akagi, Keiko; Miller, Jason R; Walenz, Brian; Koren, Sergey; Sutton, Granger; Kodira, Chinnappa; Winer, Roger; Knight, James R; Mullikin, James C; Meader, Stephen J; Ponting, Chris P; Lunter, Gerton; Higashino, Saneyuki; Hobolth, Asger; Dutheil, Julien; Karakoç, Emre; Alkan, Can; Sajjadian, Saba; Catacchio, Claudia Rita; Ventura, Mario; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Eichler, Evan E; André, Claudine; Atencia, Rebeca; Mugisha, Lawrence; Junhold, Jörg; Patterson, Nick; Siebauer, Michael; Good, Jeffrey M; Fischer, Anne; Ptak, Susan E; Lachmann, Michael; Symer, David E; Mailund, Thomas; Schierup, Mikkel H; Andrés, Aida M; Kelso, Janet; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-06-28

    Two African apes are the closest living relatives of humans: the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and the bonobo (Pan paniscus). Although they are similar in many respects, bonobos and chimpanzees differ strikingly in key social and sexual behaviours, and for some of these traits they show more similarity with humans than with each other. Here we report the sequencing and assembly of the bonobo genome to study its evolutionary relationship with the chimpanzee and human genomes. We find that more than three per cent of the human genome is more closely related to either the bonobo or the chimpanzee genome than these are to each other. These regions allow various aspects of the ancestry of the two ape species to be reconstructed. In addition, many of the regions that overlap genes may eventually help us understand the genetic basis of phenotypes that humans share with one of the two apes to the exclusion of the other.

  16. Comparative genomics in chicken and Pekin duck using FISH mapping and microarray analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fowler Katie E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of the complete chicken (Gallus gallus genome sequence as well as a large number of chicken probes for fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH and microarray resources facilitate comparative genomic studies between chicken and other bird species. In a previous study, we provided a comprehensive cytogenetic map for the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo and the first analysis of copy number variants (CNVs in birds. Here, we extend this approach to the Pekin duck (Anas platyrhynchos, an obvious target for comparative genomic studies due to its agricultural importance and resistance to avian flu. Results We provide a detailed molecular cytogenetic map of the duck genome through FISH assignment of 155 chicken clones. We identified one inter- and six intrachromosomal rearrangements between chicken and duck macrochromosomes and demonstrated conserved synteny among all microchromosomes analysed. Array comparative genomic hybridisation revealed 32 CNVs, of which 5 overlap previously designated "hotspot" regions between chicken and turkey. Conclusion Our results suggest extensive conservation of avian genomes across 90 million years of evolution in both macro- and microchromosomes. The data on CNVs between chicken and duck extends previous analyses in chicken and turkey and supports the hypotheses that avian genomes contain fewer CNVs than mammalian genomes and that genomes of evolutionarily distant species share regions of copy number variation ("CNV hotspots". Our results will expedite duck genomics, assist marker development and highlight areas of interest for future evolutionary and functional studies.

  17. Simultaneous visualization of different genomes (J, JSt and St) in a Thinopyrum intermedium × Thinopyrum ponticum synthetic hybrid (Poaceae) and in its parental species by multicolour genomic in situ hybridization (mcGISH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruppa, Klaudia; Molnár-Láng, Márta

    2016-01-01

    Multicolour genomic in situ hybridization (mcGISH) using total genomic DNA probes from Thinopyrum bessarabicum (Săvulescu & Rayss, 1923) Á. Löve, 1984 (genome J(b) or E(b), 2n = 14), and Pseudoroegneria spicata (Pursh, 1814) Á. Löve, 1980 (genome St, 2n = 14) was used to characterize the mitotic metaphase chromosomes of a synthetic hybrid of Thinopyrum intermedium (Host, 1805) Barkworth & D.R. Dewey, 1985 and Thinopyrum ponticum (Podpěra, 1902) Z.-W. Liu et R.-C.Wang, 1993 named "Agropyron glael" and produced by N.V. Tsitsin in the former Soviet Union. The mcGISH pattern of this synthetic hybrid was compared to its parental wheatgrass species. Hexaploid Thinopyrum intermedium contained 19 J, 9 J(St) and 14 St chromosomes. The three analysed Thinopyrum ponticum accessions had different chromosome compositions: 43 J + 27 J(St) (PI531737), 40 J + 30 J(St) (VIR-44486) and 38 J + 32 J(St) (D-3494). The synthetic hybrid carried 18 J, 28 J(St) and 8 St chromosomes, including one pair of J-St translocation and/or decreased fluorescent intensity, resulting in unique hybridization patterns. Wheat line Mv9kr1 was crossed with the Thinopyrum intermedium × Thinopyrum ponticum synthetic hybrid in Hungary in order to transfer its advantageous agronomic traits (leaf rust and yellow rust resistance) into wheat. The chromosome composition of a wheat/A.glael F1 hybrid was 21 wheat + 28 wheatgrass (11 J + 14 J(St)+ 3 S). In the present study, mcGISH involving the simultaneous use of St and J genomic DNA as probes provided information about the type of Thinopyrum chromosomes in a Thinopyrum intermedium/Thinopyrum ponticum synthetic hybrid called A. glael.

  18. Comparative genomics of Streptomyces avermitilis, Streptomyces cattleya, Streptomyces maritimus and Kitasatospora aureofaciens using a Streptomyces coelicolor microarray system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsiao, Nai-hua; Kirby, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    DNA/DNA microarray hybridization was used to compare the genome content of Streptomyces avermitilis, Streptomyces cattleya, Streptomyces maritimus and Kitasatospora aureofaciens with that of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). The array data showed an about 93% agreement with the genome sequence data ava

  19. Establishment of a Multi-color Genomic in situ Hybridization Technique to Simultaneously Discriminate the Three Interspecific Hybrid Genomes in Gossypium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Guan; Kai Wang; Bao-Liang Zhou; Wang-Zhen Guo; Tian-Zhen Zhang

    2008-01-01

    To identify alien chromosomes in recipient progenies and to analyze genome components in polyploidy, a genomic In situ hybridization (GISH) technique that is suitable for cotton was developed using increased stringency conditions. The increased stringency conditions were a combination of the four factors in the following optimized state: 100:1 ratio of blocking DNA to probe, 60% formamide wash solution, 43 =C temperature wash and a 13 min wash. Under these specific conditions using gDNA from Gossypium sturtianurn (C1C1) as a probe, strong hybridization signals were only observed on chromosomes from the C1 genome in somatic cells of the hybrid F1 (G. hirsutum×G. sturtianum) (AtDtC1). Therefore, GISH was able to discriminate parental chromosomes in the hybrid. Further, we developed a multi-color GISH to simultaneously discriminate the three genomes of the above hybrid. The results repeatedly displayed the three genomes, At, Dt, and C1, and each set of chromosomes with a unique color, making them easy to identify. The power of the multi-color GISH was proven by analysis of the hexaploid hybrid F1 (G. hirsutum × G. australe) (AtAtDtDtG2G2). We believe that the powerful multi-color GISH technique could be applied extensively to analyze the genome component in polyploidy and to identify alien chromosomes in the recipient progenies.

  20. Genome-Wide Gene Expressions Respond Differently to A-subgenome Origins in Brassica napus Synthetic Hybrids and Natural Allotetraploid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dawei; Pan, Qi; Tan, Chen; Zhu, Bin; Ge, Xianhong; Shao, Yujiao; Li, Zaiyun

    2016-01-01

    The young allotetraploid Brassica napus (2n = 38, AACC) is one of models to study genomic responses to allopolyploidization. The extraction of AA component from natural B. napus and then restitution of progenitor B. rapa should provide a unique opportunity to reveal the genome interplay for gene expressions during the evolution. Herein, B. napus hybrids (2n = 19, AC) between the extracted and extant B. rapa (2n = 20, AA) and the same B. oleracea genotype (2n = 18, CC) were studied by RNA-seq and compared with natural B. napus donor, to reveal the gene expression changes from hybridization and domestication and the effects of A genome with different origins. Upon the initial merger of two diploid genomes, additive gene expression was prevalent in these two hybrids, for non-additively expressed genes only represented a small portion of total expressed genes. A high proportion of genes exhibited expression level dominance, with no preference to either of the parental genomes. Comparison of homoeolog expressions also showed no bias toward any genomes and the parental expression patterns were often maintained in the hybrids and natural allotetraploids. Although, the overall patterns of gene expression were highly conserved between two hybrids, the extracted B. rapa responded less and appeared more compatible for hybridization than the extant B. rapa. Our results suggested that expression level dominance and homoeolog expressions bias were balanced at the initial stage of genome merger, and such balance were largely maintained during the domestication of B. napus, despite the increased extent over time. PMID:27790227

  1. Comparative genomic characterization of citrus-associated Xylella fastidiosa strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunes Luiz R

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The xylem-inhabiting bacterium Xylella fastidiosa (Xf is the causal agent of Pierce's disease (PD in vineyards and citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC in orange trees. Both of these economically-devastating diseases are caused by distinct strains of this complex group of microorganisms, which has motivated researchers to conduct extensive genomic sequencing projects with Xf strains. This sequence information, along with other molecular tools, have been used to estimate the evolutionary history of the group and provide clues to understand the capacity of Xf to infect different hosts, causing a variety of symptoms. Nonetheless, although significant amounts of information have been generated from Xf strains, a large proportion of these efforts has concentrated on the study of North American strains, limiting our understanding about the genomic composition of South American strains – which is particularly important for CVC-associated strains. Results This paper describes the first genome-wide comparison among South American Xf strains, involving 6 distinct citrus-associated bacteria. Comparative analyses performed through a microarray-based approach allowed identification and characterization of large mobile genetic elements that seem to be exclusive to South American strains. Moreover, a large-scale sequencing effort, based on Suppressive Subtraction Hybridization (SSH, identified 290 new ORFs, distributed in 135 Groups of Orthologous Elements, throughout the genomes of these bacteria. Conclusion Results from microarray-based comparisons provide further evidence concerning activity of horizontally transferred elements, reinforcing their importance as major mediators in the evolution of Xf. Moreover, the microarray-based genomic profiles showed similarity between Xf strains 9a5c and Fb7, which is unexpected, given the geographical and chronological differences associated with the isolation of these microorganisms. The newly

  2. An evaluation of Comparative Genome Sequencing (CGS by comparing two previously-sequenced bacterial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herring Christopher D

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the development of new technology, it has recently become practical to resequence the genome of a bacterium after experimental manipulation. It is critical though to know the accuracy of the technique used, and to establish confidence that all of the mutations were detected. Results In order to evaluate the accuracy of genome resequencing using the microarray-based Comparative Genome Sequencing service provided by Nimblegen Systems Inc., we resequenced the E. coli strain W3110 Kohara using MG1655 as a reference, both of which have been completely sequenced using traditional sequencing methods. CGS detected 7 of 8 small sequence differences, one large deletion, and 9 of 12 IS element insertions present in W3110, but did not detect a large chromosomal inversion. In addition, we confirmed that CGS also detected 2 SNPs, one deletion and 7 IS element insertions that are not present in the genome sequence, which we attribute to changes that occurred after the creation of the W3110 lambda clone library. The false positive rate for SNPs was one per 244 Kb of genome sequence. Conclusion CGS is an effective way to detect multiple mutations present in one bacterium relative to another, and while highly cost-effective, is prone to certain errors. Mutations occurring in repeated sequences or in sequences with a high degree of secondary structure may go undetected. It is also critical to follow up on regions of interest in which SNPs were not called because they often indicate deletions or IS element insertions.

  3. DNA Microarrays in Comparative Genomics and Transcriptomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni

    2007-01-01

    of each method’s ability to analyze DNA copy number data. Moreover, our study shows that analysis methods developed for cancer research may also successfully be applied to DNA copy number profiles from bacterial genomes. However, here the purpose is to characterize variations in the gene content...... to verify predictions of highly expressed genes. Moreover, the codon bias of microbial genomes was found to constitute an environmental signature. For example, soil bacteria have very similar codon bias....

  4. Reassessment of the Genome Size in Elaeis guineensis and Elaeis oleifera, and Its Interspecific Hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camillo, Julceia; Leão, André P; Alves, Alexandre A; Formighieri, Eduardo F; Azevedo, Ana Ls; Nunes, Juliana D; de Capdeville, Guy; de A Mattos, Jean K; Souza, Manoel T

    2014-01-01

    Aiming at generating a comprehensive genomic database on Elaeis spp., our group is leading several R&D initiatives with Elaeis guineensis (African oil palm) and Elaeis oleifera (American oil palm), including the whole-genome sequencing of the last. Genome size estimates currently available for this genus are controversial, as they indicate that American oil palm genome is about half the size of the African oil palm genome and that the genome of the interspecific hybrid is bigger than both the parental species genomes. We estimated the genome size of three E. guineensis genotypes, five E. oleifera genotypes, and two interspecific hybrids genotypes. On average, the genome size of E. guineensis is 4.32 ± 0.173 pg, while that of E. oleifera is 4.43 ± 0.018 pg. This indicates that both genomes are similar in size, even though E. oleifera is in fact bigger. As expected, the hybrid genome size is around the average of the two genomes, 4.40 ± 0.016 pg. Additionally, we demonstrate that both species present around 38% of GC content. As our results contradict the currently available data on Elaeis spp. genome sizes, we propose that the actual genome size of the Elaeis species is around 4 pg and that American oil palm possesses a larger genome than African oil palm.

  5. Phytozome: a comparative platform for green plant genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Goodstein, David M.; Shu, Shengqiang; Howson, Russell; Neupane, Rochak; Hayes, Richard D.; Fazo, Joni; Mitros, Therese; Dirks, William; Hellsten, Uffe; Putnam, Nicholas ; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2011-01-01

    The number of sequenced plant genomes and associated genomic resources is growing rapidly with the advent of both an increased focus on plant genomics from funding agencies, and the application of inexpensive next generation sequencing. To interact with this increasing body of data, we have developed Phytozome (http://www.phytozome.net), a comparative hub for plant genome and gene family data and analysis. Phytozome provides a view of the evolutionary history of every plant gene at the level ...

  6. Comparative genomics of Streptomyces avermitilis, Streptomyces cattleya, Streptomyces maritimus and Kitasatospora aureofaciens using a Streptomyces coelicolor microarray system

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    DNA/DNA microarray hybridization was used to compare the genome content of Streptomyces avermitilis, Streptomyces cattleya, Streptomyces maritimus and Kitasatospora aureofaciens with that of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). The array data showed an about 93% agreement with the genome sequence data available for S. avermitilis and also showed a number of trends in the genome structure for Streptomyces and closely related Kitasatospora. A core central region was well conserved, which might be pre...

  7. Comparative genomics and genome biology of invasive Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarp, C P A; Akinrinade, O; Nilsson, A J E; Ellström, P; Myllykangas, S; Rautelin, H

    2015-11-25

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major pathogen in bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide and can cause bacteremia in severe cases. C. jejuni is highly structured into clonal lineages of which the ST677CC lineage has been overrepresented among C. jejuni isolates derived from blood. In this study, we characterized the genomes of 31 C. jejuni blood isolates and 24 faecal isolates belonging to ST677CC in order to study the genome biology related to C. jejuni invasiveness. We combined the genome analyses with phenotypical evidence on serum resistance which was associated with phase variation of wcbK; a GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase involved in capsular biosynthesis. We also describe the finding of a Type III restriction-modification system unique to the ST-794 sublineage. However, features previously considered to be related to pathogenesis of C. jejuni were either absent or disrupted among our strains. Our results refine the role of capsule features associated with invasive disease and accentuate the possibility of methylation and restriction enzymes in the potential of C. jejuni to establish invasive infections. Our findings underline the importance of studying clinically relevant well-characterized bacterial strains in order to understand pathogenesis mechanisms important in human infections.

  8. Comparative genomics of Cluster O mycobacteriophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven G Cresawn

    Full Text Available Mycobacteriophages--viruses of mycobacterial hosts--are genetically diverse but morphologically are all classified in the Caudovirales with double-stranded DNA and tails. We describe here a group of five closely related mycobacteriophages--Corndog, Catdawg, Dylan, Firecracker, and YungJamal--designated as Cluster O with long flexible tails but with unusual prolate capsids. Proteomic analysis of phage Corndog particles, Catdawg particles, and Corndog-infected cells confirms expression of half of the predicted gene products and indicates a non-canonical mechanism for translation of the Corndog tape measure protein. Bioinformatic analysis identifies 8-9 strongly predicted SigA promoters and all five Cluster O genomes contain more than 30 copies of a 17 bp repeat sequence with dyad symmetry located throughout the genomes. Comparison of the Cluster O phages provides insights into phage genome evolution including the processes of gene flux by horizontal genetic exchange.

  9. 基于微阵列芯片的比较基因组杂交技术在临床实验室产前诊断中的应用%Prenatal diagnosis by array-based comparative genomic hybridization in the clinical laboratory setting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amy M. BREMAN; 毕为民; 张秀慧

    2009-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH), a method used to detect gains or losses of genetic material, has recently been applied to prenatal diagnosis of genomic imbalance in the clinical laboratory setting. This new and exciting diagnostic tool represents a major technological step forward in cytogenetic testing and addresses many of the limitations of current cytogenetic methods.Conventional chromosome analysis, the current gold standard in prenatal diagnosis, focuses primarily on the detection of common aneuploidies and is limited by its capacity to detect only those copy number changes that are large enough to be microscopically visible (typically 5-6 Mb in size at the 500 band level). In contrast, array CGH analysis simultaneously evaluates regions across the entire genome and al-lows for detection of unbalanced structural and numerical chromosome abnormalities of less than one hun-dred kb. Array CGH analysis also overcomes some of the limitations of chromosome analysis, such as the requirement for cell culture and longer reporting time, by using direct uncultured fetal specimens. With many diagnostic laboratories now embracing this technology, the past year has seen tremendous growth in the use of array CGH analysis for prenatal diagnosis. This review aims to summarize array CGH methodology and its current applications in prenatal diagnosis.

  10. Genome evolution in alpine oat-like grasses through homoploid hybridization and polyploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterfeld, Grit; Wölk, Alexandra; Röser, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Hybridization and polyploidization can radically impact genome organization from sequence level to chromosome structure. As a result, often in response to environmental change and species isolation, the development of novel traits can arise and will tend to result in the formation of homoploid or polyploid hybrid species. In this study we focus on evidence of hybridization and polyploidization by ascertaining the species parentage of the endemic alpine Helictotrichon parlatorei group. This group comprises five taxa; the diploids H. parlatorei, Helictotrichon setaceum subsp. setaceum and subsp. petzense, their putative hybrid Helictotrichon ×krischae and the hexaploid Helictotrichon sempervirens. For molecular analyses, cloned nuclear Topoisomerase VI genes of H. sempervirens and H. ×krischae were sequenced and compared with sequences of the diploids to estimate the evolutionary history in this group. In addition, detailed chromosome studies were carried out including fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S and 45S ribosomal and satellite DNA probes, and fluorochrome staining with chromomycin and DAPI. Two distinct types of Topoisomerase VI sequences were identified. One of them (SET) occurs in both subspecies of H. setaceum, the other (PAR) in H. parlatorei. Both types were found in H. ×krischae and H. sempervirens Karyotypes of H. parlatorei and H. setaceum could be distinguished by chromosomes with a clearly differentiated banding pattern of ribosomal DNAs. Both patterns occurred in the hybrid H. ×krischae Hexaploid H. sempervirens shares karyotype features with diploid H. parlatorei, but lacks the expected chromosome characteristics of H. setaceum, possibly an example of beginning diploidization after polyploidization. The geographic origin of the putative parental species and their hybrids and the possible biogeographical spread through the Alps are discussed.

  11. Heterogeneous genome divergence, differential introgression, and the origin and structure of hybrid zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Richard G; Larson, Erica L

    2016-06-01

    Hybrid zones have been promoted as windows on the evolutionary process and as laboratories for studying divergence and speciation. Patterns of divergence between hybridizing species can now be characterized on a genomewide scale, and recent genome scans have focused on the presence of 'islands' of divergence. Patterns of heterogeneous genomic divergence may reflect differential introgression following secondary contact and provide insights into which genome regions contribute to local adaptation, hybrid unfitness and positive assortative mating. However, heterogeneous genome divergence can also arise in the absence of any gene flow, as a result of variation in selection and recombination across the genome. We suggest that to understand hybrid zone origins and dynamics, it is essential to distinguish between genome regions that are divergent between pure parental populations and regions that show restricted introgression where these populations interact in hybrid zones. The latter, more so than the former, reveal the likely genetic architecture of reproductive isolation. Mosaic hybrid zones, because of their complex structure and multiple contacts, are particularly good subjects for distinguishing primary intergradation from secondary contact. Comparisons among independent hybrid zones or transects that involve the 'same' species pair can also help to distinguish between divergence with gene flow and secondary contact. However, data from replicate hybrid zones or replicate transects do not reveal consistent patterns; in a few cases, patterns of introgression are similar across independent transects, but for many taxa, there is distinct lack of concordance, presumably due to variation in environmental context and/or variation in the genetics of the interacting populations.

  12. Comparative genomics of the Bifidobacterium breve taxon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottacini, Francesca; O'Connell Motherway, Mary; Kuczynski, Justin; O'Connell, Kerry Joan; Serafini, Fausta; Duranti, Sabrina; Milani, Christian; Turroni, Francesca; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Zomer, Aldert; Zhurina, Daria; Riedel, Christian; Ventura, Marco; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bifidobacteria are commonly found as part of the microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of a broad range of hosts, where their presence is positively correlated with the host's health status. In this study, we assessed the genomes of thirteen representatives of Bifidobacterium br

  13. Microbes Online: an integrated portal for comparative functional genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-01-01

    Since 2003, MicrobesOnline (http://www.microbesonline.org) has been providing a community resource for comparative and functional genome analysis. The portal includes over 1000 complete genomes of bacteria, archaea and fungi, as well as 1000s of viruses and plasmids. In addition to standard comparative genomic analysis, including gene prediction, sequence homology, domain identification, gene family assignments and functional annotations from E.C. and GO, MicrobesOnline integrates data from ...

  14. Comparative Genomics of Symbiotic Bacteria in Earthworm Nephridia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup; Pinel, Nicolas; Lund, Marie Braad

    sequencing along with two of its closest relatives; the plant pathogenic Acidovorax avena subsp. citrulli and the free-living Acidovorax sp. JS42. In addition, the genome of the nephridial symbiont of the earthworm Aporrectodea tuberculata was partially sequenced. In order to resolve the functional...... and evolutionary basis of the symbiosis we annotated and compared the genomes. The genomes ranged in size from 4.4 to 5.6 Mbp, the E. fetida symbiont genome being the largest. The symbiont genomes showed no evidence of gene-loss related to any particular type of functional gene category. In contrast, genes...

  15. A comparative hybridization analysis of yeast DNA with Paramecium parafusin- and different phosphoglucomutase-specific probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyroba, E; Satir, B H

    2000-01-01

    Molecular probes designed for the parafusin (PFUS), the Paramecium exocytic-sensitive phosphoglycoprotein, gave distinct hybridization patterns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic DNA when compared with different phosphoglucomutase specific probes. These include two probes identical to segments of yeast phosphoglucomutase (PGM) genes 1 and 2. Neither of the PGM probes revealed the 7.4 and 5.9 kb fragments in Bgl II-cut yeast DNA digest detected with the 1.6 kb cloned PFUS cDNA and oligonucleotide constructed to the PFUS region (insertion 3--I-3) not found in other species. PCR amplification with PFUS-specific primers generated yeast DNA-species of the predicted molecular size which hybridized to the I-3 probe. A search of the yeast genome database produced an unassigned nucleotide sequence that showed 55% identity to parafusin gene and 37% identity to PGM2 (the major isoform of yeast phosphoglucomutase) within the amplified region.

  16. Whole genome comparative studies between chicken and turkey and their implications for avian genome evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griffin, D.K.; Robertson, L.B.; Tempest, H.G.; Vignal, A.; Fillon, V.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Deryusheva, S.; Gaginskaya, E.; Carre, W.; Waddington, D.; Talbot, R.; Völker, M.; Masabanda, J.S.; Burt, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    Background Comparative genomics is a powerful means of establishing inter-specific relationships between gene function/location and allows insight into genomic rearrangements, conservation and evolutionary phylogeny. The availability of the complete sequence of the chicken genome has initiated the d

  17. Human-mouse comparative genomics: successes and failures to reveal functional regions of the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Baroukh, Nadine; Rubin, Edward M.

    2003-05-15

    Deciphering the genetic code embedded within the human genome remains a significant challenge despite the human genome consortium's recent success at defining its linear sequence (Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001). While useful strategies exist to identify a large percentage of protein encoding regions, efforts to accurately define functional sequences in the remaining {approx}97 percent of the genome lag. Our primary interest has been to utilize the evolutionary relationship and the universal nature of genomic sequence information in vertebrates to reveal functional elements in the human genome. This has been achieved through the combined use of vertebrate comparative genomics to pinpoint highly conserved sequences as candidates for biological activity and transgenic mouse studies to address the functionality of defined human DNA fragments. Accordingly, we describe strategies and insights into functional sequences in the human genome through the use of comparative genomics coupled wit h functional studies in the mouse.

  18. Oxford Nanopore sequencing, hybrid error correction, and de novo assembly of a eukaryotic genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Sara; Gurtowski, James; Ethe-Sayers, Scott; Deshpande, Panchajanya; Schatz, Michael C; McCombie, W Richard

    2015-11-01

    Monitoring the progress of DNA molecules through a membrane pore has been postulated as a method for sequencing DNA for several decades. Recently, a nanopore-based sequencing instrument, the Oxford Nanopore MinION, has become available, and we used this for sequencing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. To make use of these data, we developed a novel open-source hybrid error correction algorithm Nanocorr specifically for Oxford Nanopore reads, because existing packages were incapable of assembling the long read lengths (5-50 kbp) at such high error rates (between ∼5% and 40% error). With this new method, we were able to perform a hybrid error correction of the nanopore reads using complementary MiSeq data and produce a de novo assembly that is highly contiguous and accurate: The contig N50 length is more than ten times greater than an Illumina-only assembly (678 kb versus 59.9 kbp) and has >99.88% consensus identity when compared to the reference. Furthermore, the assembly with the long nanopore reads presents a much more complete representation of the features of the genome and correctly assembles gene cassettes, rRNAs, transposable elements, and other genomic features that were almost entirely absent in the Illumina-only assembly.

  19. AcCNET (Accessory Genome Constellation Network): comparative genomics software for accessory genome analysis using bipartite networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Val F; Baquero, Fernando; de la Cruz, Fernando; Coque, Teresa M

    2017-01-15

    AcCNET (Accessory genome Constellation Network) is a Perl application that aims to compare accessory genomes of a large number of genomic units, both at qualitative and quantitative levels. Using the proteomes extracted from the analysed genomes, AcCNET creates a bipartite network compatible with standard network analysis platforms. AcCNET allows merging phylogenetic and functional information about the concerned genomes, thus improving the capability of current methods of network analysis. The AcCNET bipartite network opens a new perspective to explore the pangenome of bacterial species, focusing on the accessory genome behind the idiosyncrasy of a particular strain and/or population.

  20. Comparative genomics of the lactic acid bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, K.; Slesarev, A.; Wolf, Y.; Sorokin, A.; Mirkin, B.; Koonin, E.; Pavlov, A.; Pavlova, N.; Karamychev, V.; Polouchine, N.; Shakhova, V.; Grigoriev, I.; Lou, Y.; Rokhsar, D.; Lucas, S.; Huang, K.; Goodstein, D. M.; Hawkins, T.; Plengvidhya, V.; Welker, D.; Hughes, J.; Goh, Y.; Benson, A.; Baldwin, K.; Lee, J. -H.; Diaz-Muniz, I.; Dosti, B.; Smeianov, V; Wechter, W.; Barabote, R.; Lorca, G.; Altermann, E.; Barrangou, R.; Ganesan, B.; Xie, Y.; Rawsthorne, H.; Tamir, D.; Parker, C.; Breidt, F.; Broadbent, J.; Hutkins, R.; O' Sullivan, D.; Steele, J.; Unlu, G.; Saier, M.; Klaenhammer, T.; Richardson, P.; Kozyavkin, S.; Weimer, B.; Mills, D.

    2006-06-01

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria are associated with various plant and animal niches and play a key role in the production of fermented foods and beverages. We report nine genome sequences representing the phylogenetic and functional diversity of these bacteria. The small genomes of lactic acid bacteria encode a broad repertoire of transporters for efficient carbon and nitrogen acquisition from the nutritionally rich environments they inhabit and reflect a limited range of biosynthetic capabilities that indicate both prototrophic and auxotrophic strains. Phylogenetic analyses, comparison of gene content across the group, and reconstruction of ancestral gene sets indicate a combination of extensive gene loss and key gene acquisitions via horizontal gene transfer during the coevolution of lactic acid bacteria with their habitats.

  1. Comparative genomic analysis of soybean flowering genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chol-Hee Jung

    Full Text Available Flowering is an important agronomic trait that determines crop yield. Soybean is a major oilseed legume crop used for human and animal feed. Legumes have unique vegetative and floral complexities. Our understanding of the molecular basis of flower initiation and development in legumes is limited. Here, we address this by using a computational approach to examine flowering regulatory genes in the soybean genome in comparison to the most studied model plant, Arabidopsis. For this comparison, a genome-wide analysis of orthologue groups was performed, followed by an in silico gene expression analysis of the identified soybean flowering genes. Phylogenetic analyses of the gene families highlighted the evolutionary relationships among these candidates. Our study identified key flowering genes in soybean and indicates that the vernalisation and the ambient-temperature pathways seem to be the most variant in soybean. A comparison of the orthologue groups containing flowering genes indicated that, on average, each Arabidopsis flowering gene has 2-3 orthologous copies in soybean. Our analysis highlighted that the CDF3, VRN1, SVP, AP3 and PIF3 genes are paralogue-rich genes in soybean. Furthermore, the genome mapping of the soybean flowering genes showed that these genes are scattered randomly across the genome. A paralogue comparison indicated that the soybean genes comprising the largest orthologue group are clustered in a 1.4 Mb region on chromosome 16 of soybean. Furthermore, a comparison with the undomesticated soybean (Glycine soja revealed that there are hundreds of SNPs that are associated with putative soybean flowering genes and that there are structural variants that may affect the genes of the light-signalling and ambient-temperature pathways in soybean. Our study provides a framework for the soybean flowering pathway and insights into the relationship and evolution of flowering genes between a short-day soybean and the long-day plant

  2. Comparative genomics using data mining tools

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tannistha Nandi; Chandrika B-Rao; Srinivasan Ramachandran

    2002-02-01

    We have analysed the genomes of representatives of three kingdoms of life, namely, archaea, eubacteria and eukaryota using data mining tools based on compositional analyses of the protein sequences. The representatives chosen in this analysis were Methanococcus jannaschii, Haemophilus influenzae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have identified the common and different features between the three genomes in the protein evolution patterns. M. jannaschii has been seen to have a greater number of proteins with more charged amino acids whereas S. cerevisiae has been observed to have a greater number of hydrophilic proteins. Despite the differences in intrinsic compositional characteristics between the proteins from the different genomes we have also identified certain common characteristics. We have carried out exploratory Principal Component Analysis of the multivariate data on the proteins of each organism in an effort to classify the proteins into clusters. Interestingly, we found that most of the proteins in each organism cluster closely together, but there are a few ‘outliers’. We focus on the outliers for the functional investigations, which may aid in revealing any unique features of the biology of the respective organisms.

  3. Comparative genome analysis of Bacillus cereus group genomes with Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Iain; Sorokin, Alexei; Kapatral, Vinayak; Reznik, Gary; Bhattacharya, Anamitra; Mikhailova, Natalia; Burd, Henry; Joukov, Victor; Kaznadzey, Denis; Walunas, Theresa; D'Souza, Mark; Larsen, Niels; Pusch, Gordon; Liolios, Konstantinos; Grechkin, Yuri

    2005-01-01

    Genome features of the Bacillus cereus group genomes (representative strains of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis sub spp israelensis) were analyzed and compared with the Bacillus subtilis genome. A core set of 1,381 protein families among the four Bacillus genomes, with an additional set of 933 families common to the B. cereus group, was identified. Differences in signal transduction pathways, membrane transporters, cell surface structures, cell wall, and S-...

  4. GenColors-based comparative genome databases for small eukaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Marius; Romualdi, Alessandro; Petzold, Andreas; Platzer, Matthias; Sühnel, Jürgen; Glöckner, Gernot

    2013-01-01

    Many sequence data repositories can give a quick and easily accessible overview on genomes and their annotations. Less widespread is the possibility to compare related genomes with each other in a common database environment. We have previously described the GenColors database system (http://gencolors.fli-leibniz.de) and its applications to a number of bacterial genomes such as Borrelia, Legionella, Leptospira and Treponema. This system has an emphasis on genome comparison. It combines data from related genomes and provides the user with an extensive set of visualization and analysis tools. Eukaryote genomes are normally larger than prokaryote genomes and thus pose additional challenges for such a system. We have, therefore, adapted GenColors to also handle larger datasets of small eukaryotic genomes and to display eukaryotic gene structures. Further recent developments include whole genome views, genome list options and, for bacterial genome browsers, the display of horizontal gene transfer predictions. Two new GenColors-based databases for two fungal species (http://fgb.fli-leibniz.de) and for four social amoebas (http://sacgb.fli-leibniz.de) were set up. Both new resources open up a single entry point for related genomes for the amoebozoa and fungal research communities and other interested users. Comparative genomics approaches are greatly facilitated by these resources.

  5. Integrating cytogenetics and genomics in comparative evolutionary studies of cichlid fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazzuchelli Juliana

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of a large number of recently sequenced vertebrate genomes opens new avenues to integrate cytogenetics and genomics in comparative and evolutionary studies. Cytogenetic mapping can offer alternative means to identify conserved synteny shared by distinct genomes and also to define genome regions that are still not fine characterized even after wide-ranging nucleotide sequence efforts. An efficient way to perform comparative cytogenetic mapping is based on BAC clones mapping by fluorescence in situ hybridization. In this report, to address the knowledge gap on the genome evolution in cichlid fishes, BAC clones of an Oreochromis niloticus library covering the linkage groups (LG 1, 3, 5, and 7 were mapped onto the chromosomes of 9 African cichlid species. The cytogenetic mapping data were also integrated with BAC-end sequences information of O. niloticus and comparatively analyzed against the genome of other fish species and vertebrates. Results The location of BACs from LG1, 3, 5, and 7 revealed a strong chromosomal conservation among the analyzed cichlid species genomes, which evidenced a synteny of the markers of each LG. Comparative in silico analysis also identified large genomic blocks that were conserved in distantly related fish groups and also in other vertebrates. Conclusions Although it has been suggested that fishes contain plastic genomes with high rates of chromosomal rearrangements and probably low rates of synteny conservation, our results evidence that large syntenic chromosome segments have been maintained conserved during evolution, at least for the considered markers. Additionally, our current cytogenetic mapping efforts integrated with genomic approaches conduct to a new perspective to address important questions involving chromosome evolution in fishes.

  6. GenoSets: visual analytic methods for comparative genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora A Cain

    Full Text Available Many important questions in biology are, fundamentally, comparative, and this extends to our analysis of a growing number of sequenced genomes. Existing genomic analysis tools are often organized around literal views of genomes as linear strings. Even when information is highly condensed, these views grow cumbersome as larger numbers of genomes are added. Data aggregation and summarization methods from the field of visual analytics can provide abstracted comparative views, suitable for sifting large multi-genome datasets to identify critical similarities and differences. We introduce a software system for visual analysis of comparative genomics data. The system automates the process of data integration, and provides the analysis platform to identify and explore features of interest within these large datasets. GenoSets borrows techniques from business intelligence and visual analytics to provide a rich interface of interactive visualizations supported by a multi-dimensional data warehouse. In GenoSets, visual analytic approaches are used to enable querying based on orthology, functional assignment, and taxonomic or user-defined groupings of genomes. GenoSets links this information together with coordinated, interactive visualizations for both detailed and high-level categorical analysis of summarized data. GenoSets has been designed to simplify the exploration of multiple genome datasets and to facilitate reasoning about genomic comparisons. Case examples are included showing the use of this system in the analysis of 12 Brucella genomes. GenoSets software and the case study dataset are freely available at http://genosets.uncc.edu. We demonstrate that the integration of genomic data using a coordinated multiple view approach can simplify the exploration of large comparative genomic data sets, and facilitate reasoning about comparisons and features of interest.

  7. Analysis of plastome and chondriome genome types in potato somatic hybrids from Solanum tuberosum × Solanum etuberosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Jagesh K; Chandel, Poonam; Singh, Bir Pal; Bhardwaj, Vinay

    2014-01-01

    Cytoplasm types of the potato somatic hybrids from Solanum tuberosum × Solanum etuberosum were analysed using chloroplast (cp) and mitochondrial (mt) organelle genomes-specific markers. Of the 29 markers (15 cpDNA and 14 mtDNA) amplified in the 26 genotypes, 5 cpDNA (H3, NTCP4, NTCP8, NTCP9, and ALC1/ALC3) and 13 mtDNA markers showed polymorphism. The cluster analysis based on the mtDNA markers detected higher diversity compared with the cpDNA markers. Presence of new mtDNA fragments of the markers, namely, T11-2, Nsm1, pumD, Nsm3, and Nsm4, were observed, while monomorphic loci revealed highly conserved genomic regions in the somatic hybrids. The study revealed that the somatic hybrids had diverse cytoplasm types consisting predominantly of T-, W-, and C-, with a few A- and S-type cp genomes; and α-, β-, and γ-type mt genomes. Somatic hybridization has unique potential to widen the cytoplasm types of the cultivated gene pools from wild species through introgression by breeding methods.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence and Comparative Genomics of a Novel Myxobacterium Myxococcus hansupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Narwani, Tarun; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Myxobacteria, a group of Gram-negative aerobes, belong to the class δ-proteobacteria and order Myxococcales. Unlike anaerobic δ-proteobacteria, they exhibit several unusual physiogenomic properties like gliding motility, desiccation-resistant myxospores and large genomes with high coding density. Here we report a 9.5 Mbp complete genome of Myxococcus hansupus that encodes 7,753 proteins. Phylogenomic and genome-genome distance based analysis suggest that Myxococcus hansupus is a novel member of the genus Myxococcus. Comparative genome analysis with other members of the genus Myxococcus was performed to explore their genome diversity. The variation in number of unique proteins observed across different species is suggestive of diversity at the genus level while the overrepresentation of several Pfam families indicates the extent and mode of genome expansion as compared to non-Myxococcales δ-proteobacteria.

  9. Microbial NAD metabolism: lessons from comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzaniga, Francesca; Stebbins, Rebecca; Chang, Sheila Z; McPeek, Mark A; Brenner, Charles

    2009-09-01

    NAD is a coenzyme for redox reactions and a substrate of NAD-consuming enzymes, including ADP-ribose transferases, Sir2-related protein lysine deacetylases, and bacterial DNA ligases. Microorganisms that synthesize NAD from as few as one to as many as five of the six identified biosynthetic precursors have been identified. De novo NAD synthesis from aspartate or tryptophan is neither universal nor strictly aerobic. Salvage NAD synthesis from nicotinamide, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide riboside, and nicotinic acid riboside occurs via modules of different genes. Nicotinamide salvage genes nadV and pncA, found in distinct bacteria, appear to have spread throughout the tree of life via horizontal gene transfer. Biochemical, genetic, and genomic analyses have advanced to the point at which the precursors and pathways utilized by a microorganism can be predicted. Challenges remain in dissecting regulation of pathways.

  10. Comparative genomic data of the Avian Phylogenomics Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guojie; Li, Bo; Li, Cai;

    2014-01-01

    , which include 38 newly sequenced avian genomes plus previously released or simultaneously released genomes of Chicken, Zebra finch, Turkey, Pigeon, Peregrine falcon, Duck, Budgerigar, Adelie penguin, Emperor penguin and the Medium Ground Finch. We hope that this resource will serve future efforts...... in an average N50 scaffold size of about 50 kb. Repetitive elements comprised 4%-22% of the bird genomes. The assembled scaffolds allowed the homology-based annotation of 13,000 ~ 17000 protein coding genes in each avian genome relative to chicken, zebra finch and human, as well as comparative and sequence...

  11. High resolution microarray comparative genomic hybridisation analysis using spotted oligonucleotides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, B; Ouwerkerk, E; Meijer, G.A.; Ylstra, B.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Currently, comparative genomic hybridisation array (array CGH) is the method of choice for studying genome wide DNA copy number changes. To date, either amplified representations of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs)/phage artificial chromosomes (PACs) or cDNAs have been spotted as

  12. Genome-wide mapping in a house mouse hybrid zone reveals hybrid sterility loci and Dobzhansky-Muller interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Leslie M; Harr, Bettina

    2014-12-09

    Mapping hybrid defects in contact zones between incipient species can identify genomic regions contributing to reproductive isolation and reveal genetic mechanisms of speciation. The house mouse features a rare combination of sophisticated genetic tools and natural hybrid zones between subspecies. Male hybrids often show reduced fertility, a common reproductive barrier between incipient species. Laboratory crosses have identified sterility loci, but each encompasses hundreds of genes. We map genetic determinants of testis weight and testis gene expression using offspring of mice captured in a hybrid zone between M. musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus. Many generations of admixture enables high-resolution mapping of loci contributing to these sterility-related phenotypes. We identify complex interactions among sterility loci, suggesting multiple, non-independent genetic incompatibilities contribute to barriers to gene flow in the hybrid zone.

  13. Phytozome: a comparative platform for green plant genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodstein, David M; Shu, Shengqiang; Howson, Russell; Neupane, Rochak; Hayes, Richard D; Fazo, Joni; Mitros, Therese; Dirks, William; Hellsten, Uffe; Putnam, Nicholas; Rokhsar, Daniel S

    2012-01-01

    The number of sequenced plant genomes and associated genomic resources is growing rapidly with the advent of both an increased focus on plant genomics from funding agencies, and the application of inexpensive next generation sequencing. To interact with this increasing body of data, we have developed Phytozome (http://www.phytozome.net), a comparative hub for plant genome and gene family data and analysis. Phytozome provides a view of the evolutionary history of every plant gene at the level of sequence, gene structure, gene family and genome organization, while at the same time providing access to the sequences and functional annotations of a growing number (currently 25) of complete plant genomes, including all the land plants and selected algae sequenced at the Joint Genome Institute, as well as selected species sequenced elsewhere. Through a comprehensive plant genome database and web portal, these data and analyses are available to the broader plant science research community, providing powerful comparative genomics tools that help to link model systems with other plants of economic and ecological importance.

  14. Genome composition of triploid lily cultivars derived from sexual polyploidization of Longiflorum x Asiatic hybrids (Lilium)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shujun Zhou,; Ramanna, M.S.; Visser, R.G.F.; Tuyl, van J.M.

    2008-01-01

    About 19 cultivars, which had originated from backcrosses between F1 LA (Longiflorum × Asiatic) hybrids (2n = 2x = 24) as female parents and Asiatic cultivars as male parents (2n = 2x = 24), were analyzed with genomic in situ hybridization. 17 of them were triploid (2n = 3x = 36), and two aneuploid

  15. Sinbase: an integrated database to study genomics, genetics and comparative genomics in Sesamum indicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linhai; Yu, Jingyin; Li, Donghua; Zhang, Xiurong

    2015-01-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is an ancient and important oilseed crop grown widely in tropical and subtropical areas. It belongs to the gigantic order Lamiales, which includes many well-known or economically important species, such as olive (Olea europaea), leonurus (Leonurus japonicus) and lavender (Lavandula spica), many of which have important pharmacological properties. Despite their importance, genetic and genomic analyses on these species have been insufficient due to a lack of reference genome information. The now available S. indicum genome will provide an unprecedented opportunity for studying both S. indicum genetic traits and comparative genomics. To deliver S. indicum genomic information to the worldwide research community, we designed Sinbase, a web-based database with comprehensive sesame genomic, genetic and comparative genomic information. Sinbase includes sequences of assembled sesame pseudomolecular chromosomes, protein-coding genes (27,148), transposable elements (372,167) and non-coding RNAs (1,748). In particular, Sinbase provides unique and valuable information on colinear regions with various plant genomes, including Arabidopsis thaliana, Glycine max, Vitis vinifera and Solanum lycopersicum. Sinbase also provides a useful search function and data mining tools, including a keyword search and local BLAST service. Sinbase will be updated regularly with new features, improvements to genome annotation and new genomic sequences, and is freely accessible at http://ocri-genomics.org/Sinbase/.

  16. Distribution and evolution of repeated sequences in genomes of Triatominae (Hemiptera-Reduviidae inferred from genomic in situ hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Pita

    Full Text Available The subfamily Triatominae, vectors of Chagas disease, comprises 140 species characterized by a highly homogeneous chromosome number. We analyzed the chromosomal distribution and evolution of repeated sequences in Triatominae genomes by Genomic in situ Hybridization using Triatoma delpontei and Triatoma infestans genomic DNAs as probes. Hybridizations were performed on their own chromosomes and on nine species included in six genera from the two main tribes: Triatomini and Rhodniini. Genomic probes clearly generate two different hybridization patterns, dispersed or accumulated in specific regions or chromosomes. The three used probes generate the same hybridization pattern in each species. However, these patterns are species-specific. In closely related species, the probes strongly hybridized in the autosomal heterochromatic regions, resembling C-banding and DAPI patterns. However, in more distant species these co-localizations are not observed. The heterochromatic Y chromosome is constituted by highly repeated sequences, which is conserved among 10 species of Triatomini tribe suggesting be an ancestral character for this group. However, the Y chromosome in Rhodniini tribe is markedly different, supporting the early evolutionary dichotomy between both tribes. In some species, sex chromosomes and autosomes shared repeated sequences, suggesting meiotic chromatin exchanges among these heterologous chromosomes. Our GISH analyses enabled us to acquire not only reliable information about autosomal repeated sequences distribution but also an insight into sex chromosome evolution in Triatominae. Furthermore, the differentiation obtained by GISH might be a valuable marker to establish phylogenetic relationships and to test the controversial origin of the Triatominae subfamily.

  17. Genomic species are ecological species as revealed by comparative genomics in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassalle, Florent; Campillo, Tony; Vial, Ludovic; Baude, Jessica; Costechareyre, Denis; Chapulliot, David; Shams, Malek; Abrouk, Danis; Lavire, Céline; Oger-Desfeux, Christine; Hommais, Florence; Guéguen, Laurent; Daubin, Vincent; Muller, Daniel; Nesme, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    The definition of bacterial species is based on genomic similarities, giving rise to the operational concept of genomic species, but the reasons of the occurrence of differentiated genomic species remain largely unknown. We used the Agrobacterium tumefaciens species complex and particularly the genomic species presently called genomovar G8, which includes the sequenced strain C58, to test the hypothesis of genomic species having specific ecological adaptations possibly involved in the speciation process. We analyzed the gene repertoire specific to G8 to identify potential adaptive genes. By hybridizing 25 strains of A. tumefaciens on DNA microarrays spanning the C58 genome, we highlighted the presence and absence of genes homologous to C58 in the taxon. We found 196 genes specific to genomovar G8 that were mostly clustered into seven genomic islands on the C58 genome-one on the circular chromosome and six on the linear chromosome-suggesting higher plasticity and a major adaptive role of the latter. Clusters encoded putative functional units, four of which had been verified experimentally. The combination of G8-specific functions defines a hypothetical species primary niche for G8 related to commensal interaction with a host plant. This supports that the G8 ancestor was able to exploit a new ecological niche, maybe initiating ecological isolation and thus speciation. Searching genomic data for synapomorphic traits is a powerful way to describe bacterial species. This procedure allowed us to find such phenotypic traits specific to genomovar G8 and thus propose a Latin binomial, Agrobacterium fabrum, for this bona fide genomic species.

  18. Dyneins across eukaryotes: a comparative genomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickstead, Bill; Gull, Keith

    2007-12-01

    Dyneins are large minus-end-directed microtubule motors. Each dynein contains at least one dynein heavy chain (DHC) and a variable number of intermediate chains (IC), light intermediate chains (LIC) and light chains (LC). Here, we used genome sequence data from 24 diverse eukaryotes to assess the distribution of DHCs, ICs, LICs and LCs across Eukaryota. Phylogenetic inference identified nine DHC families (two cytoplasmic and seven axonemal) and six IC families (one cytoplasmic). We confirm that dyneins have been lost from higher plants and show that this is most likely because of a single loss of cytoplasmic dynein 1 from the ancestor of Rhodophyta and Viridiplantae, followed by lineage-specific losses of other families. Independent losses in Entamoeba mean that at least three extant eukaryotic lineages are entirely devoid of dyneins. Cytoplasmic dynein 2 is associated with intraflagellar transport (IFT), but in two chromalveolate organisms, we find an IFT footprint without the retrograde motor. The distribution of one family of outer-arm dyneins accounts for 2-headed or 3-headed outer-arm ultrastructures observed in different organisms. One diatom species builds motile axonemes without any inner-arm dyneins (IAD), and the unexpected conservation of IAD I1 in non-flagellate algae and LC8 (DYNLL1/2) in all lineages reveals a surprising fluidity to dynein function.

  19. Different selective pressures lead to different genomic outcomes as newly-formed hybrid yeasts evolve

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Interspecific hybridization occurs in every eukaryotic kingdom. While hybrid progeny are frequently at a selective disadvantage, in some instances their increased genome size and complexity may result in greater stress resistance than their ancestors, which can be adaptively advantageous at the edges of their ancestors' ranges. While this phenomenon has been repeatedly documented in the field, the response of hybrid populations to long-term selection has not often been explored in the lab. To fill this knowledge gap we crossed the two most distantly related members of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto group, S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum, and established a mixed population of homoploid and aneuploid hybrids to study how different types of selection impact hybrid genome structure. Results As temperature was raised incrementally from 31°C to 46.5°C over 500 generations of continuous culture, selection favored loss of the S. uvarum genome, although the kinetics of genome loss differed among independent replicates. Temperature-selected isolates exhibited greater inherent and induced thermal tolerance than parental species and founding hybrids, and also exhibited ethanol resistance. In contrast, as exogenous ethanol was increased from 0% to 14% over 500 generations of continuous culture, selection favored euploid S. cerevisiae x S. uvarum hybrids. Ethanol-selected isolates were more ethanol tolerant than S. uvarum and one of the founding hybrids, but did not exhibit resistance to temperature stress. Relative to parental and founding hybrids, temperature-selected strains showed heritable differences in cell wall structure in the forms of increased resistance to zymolyase digestion and Micafungin, which targets cell wall biosynthesis. Conclusions This is the first study to show experimentally that the genomic fate of newly-formed interspecific hybrids depends on the type of selection they encounter during the course of evolution, underscoring the importance of

  20. Different selective pressures lead to different genomic outcomes as newly-formed hybrid yeasts evolve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotrowski Jeff S

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interspecific hybridization occurs in every eukaryotic kingdom. While hybrid progeny are frequently at a selective disadvantage, in some instances their increased genome size and complexity may result in greater stress resistance than their ancestors, which can be adaptively advantageous at the edges of their ancestors' ranges. While this phenomenon has been repeatedly documented in the field, the response of hybrid populations to long-term selection has not often been explored in the lab. To fill this knowledge gap we crossed the two most distantly related members of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto group, S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum, and established a mixed population of homoploid and aneuploid hybrids to study how different types of selection impact hybrid genome structure. Results As temperature was raised incrementally from 31°C to 46.5°C over 500 generations of continuous culture, selection favored loss of the S. uvarum genome, although the kinetics of genome loss differed among independent replicates. Temperature-selected isolates exhibited greater inherent and induced thermal tolerance than parental species and founding hybrids, and also exhibited ethanol resistance. In contrast, as exogenous ethanol was increased from 0% to 14% over 500 generations of continuous culture, selection favored euploid S. cerevisiae x S. uvarum hybrids. Ethanol-selected isolates were more ethanol tolerant than S. uvarum and one of the founding hybrids, but did not exhibit resistance to temperature stress. Relative to parental and founding hybrids, temperature-selected strains showed heritable differences in cell wall structure in the forms of increased resistance to zymolyase digestion and Micafungin, which targets cell wall biosynthesis. Conclusions This is the first study to show experimentally that the genomic fate of newly-formed interspecific hybrids depends on the type of selection they encounter during the course of evolution

  1. Comparative genomics reveals mobile pathogenicity chromosomes in Fusarium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, L.-J.; van der Does, H.C.; Borkovich, K.A.; Coleman, J.J.; Daboussi, M.J.; Di Pietro, A.; Dufresne, M.; Freitag, M.; Grabherr, M.; Henrissat, B.; Houterman, P.M.; Kang, S.; Shim, W.B.; Woloshuk, C.; Xie, X.; Xu, J.-R; Antoniw, J.; Baker, S.E.; Bluhm, B.H.; Breakspear, A.; Brown, D.W.; Butchko, R.A.E.; Chapman, S.; Coulson, R.; Coutinho, P.M.; Danchin, E.G.J.; Diener, A.; Gale, L.R.; Gardiner, D.M.; Goff, S.; Hammond-Kosack, K.E.; Hilburn, K.; Hua-Van, A.; Jonkers, W.; Kazan, K.; Kodira, C.D.; Koehrsen, M.; Kumar, L.; Lee, Y.H.; Li, L.; Manners, J.M.; Miranda-Saavedra, D.; Mukherjee, M.; Park, G.; Park, J.; Park, S.Y.; Proctor, R.H.; Regev, A.; Ruiz-Roldan, M.C.; Sain, D.; Sakthikumar, S.; Sykes, S.; Schwartz, D.C.; Gillian Turgeon, B.; Wapinski, I.; Yoder, O.; Young, S.; Zeng, Q.; Zhou, S.; Galagan, J.; Cuomo, C.A.; Kistler, H.C.; Rep, M.

    2010-01-01

    Fusarium species are among the most important phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi. To understand the molecular underpinnings of pathogenicity in the genus Fusarium, we compared the genomes of three phenotypically diverse species: Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium oxysporum

  2. A high-resolution radiation hybrid map of the human genome draft sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, M; Aggarwal, A; Allen, J; Almendras, A A; Bajorek, E S; Beasley, E M; Brady, S D; Bushard, J M; Bustos, V I; Chu, A; Chung, T R; De Witte, A; Denys, M E; Dominguez, R; Fang, N Y; Foster, B D; Freudenberg, R W; Hadley, D; Hamilton, L R; Jeffrey, T J; Kelly, L; Lazzeroni, L; Levy, M R; Lewis, S C; Liu, X; Lopez, F J; Louie, B; Marquis, J P; Martinez, R A; Matsuura, M K; Misherghi, N S; Norton, J A; Olshen, A; Perkins, S M; Perou, A J; Piercy, C; Piercy, M; Qin, F; Reif, T; Sheppard, K; Shokoohi, V; Smick, G A; Sun, W L; Stewart, E A; Fernando, J; Tejeda; Tran, N M; Trejo, T; Vo, N T; Yan, S C; Zierten, D L; Zhao, S; Sachidanandam, R; Trask, B J; Myers, R M; Cox, D R

    2001-02-16

    We have constructed a physical map of the human genome by using a panel of 90 whole-genome radiation hybrids (the TNG panel) in conjunction with 40,322 sequence-tagged sites (STSs) derived from random genomic sequences as well as expressed sequences. Of 36,678 STSs on the TNG radiation hybrid map, only 3604 (9.8%) were absent from the unassembled draft sequence of the human genome. Of 20,030 STSs ordered on the TNG map as well as the assembled human genome draft sequence and the Celera assembled human genome sequence, 36% of the STSs had a discrepant order between the working draft sequence and the Celera sequence. The TNG map order was identical to one of the two sequence orders in 60% of these discrepant cases.

  3. Exploring the origin of the D genome of oat by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaomei; Zhang, Haiqin; Kang, Houyang; Fan, Xing; Wang, Yi; Sha, Lina; Zhou, Yonghong

    2014-09-01

    Further understanding of the origin of cultivated oat would accelerate its genetic improvement. In particular, it would be useful to clarify which diploid progenitor contributed the D genome of this allohexaploid species. In this study, we demonstrate that the landmarks produced by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of species of Avena using probes derived from Avena sativa can be used to explore the origin of the D genome. Selected sets of probes were hybridized in several sequential experiments performed on exactly the same chromosome spreads, with multiple probes of cytological preparations. Probes pITS and A3-19 showed there might be a similar distribution of pITS between the Ac and D genomes. These results indicated that the Ac genome is closely related to the D genome, and that Avena canariensis (AcAc) could be the D-genome donor of cultivated oat.

  4. Construction of whole genome radiation hybrid panels and map of chromosome 5A of wheat using asymmetric somatic hybridization.

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    Chuanen Zhou

    Full Text Available To explore the feasibility of constructing a whole genome radiation hybrid (WGRH map in plant species with large genomes, asymmetric somatic hybridization between wheat (Triticum aestivum L. and Bupleurum scorzonerifolium Willd. was performed. The protoplasts of wheat were irradiated with ultraviolet light (UV and gamma-ray and rescued by protoplast fusion using B. scorzonerifolium as the recipient. Assessment of SSR markers showed that the radiation hybrids have the average marker retention frequency of 15.5%. Two RH panels (RHPWI and RHPWII that contained 92 and 184 radiation hybrids, respectively, were developed and used for mapping of 68 SSR markers in chromosome 5A of wheat. A total of 1557 and 2034 breaks were detected in each panel. The RH map of chromosome 5A based on RHPWII was constructed. The distance of the comprehensive map was 2103 cR and the approximate resolution was estimated to be ∼501.6 kb/break. The RH panels evaluated in this study enabled us to order the ESTs in a single deletion bin or in the multiple bins cross the chromosome. These results demonstrated that RH mapping via protoplast fusion is feasible at the whole genome level for mapping purposes in wheat and the potential value of this mapping approach for the plant species with large genomes.

  5. Molecular verification of the integration of Tripsacum dactyloides DNA into wheat genome through wide hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    RAPD and RFLP analyses of double haploid lines which derived from hybridization between hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.2n=42) and eastern gamagrass (Tripsacum dactyloides L.2n=4x=72) are reported.Two of the 340 Operon primers have been screened,which stably amplified Tripsacum dactyloides (male parent) specific bands in the double haploid lines.These results confirm the fact that Tripsacum dactyloides DNA has been integrated into wheat genome by sexual hybridization at molecular level.This idea has been further testified by RFLP analysis.Application and potentials of transferring Tripsacum dactyloides DNA into wheat genome by sexual hybridization in wheat breeding are discussed.

  6. The perennial ryegrass GenomeZipper: targeted use of genome resources for comparative grass genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Matthias; Martis, Mihaela; Asp, Torben; Mayer, Klaus F X; Lübberstedt, Thomas; Byrne, Stephen; Frei, Ursula; Studer, Bruno

    2013-02-01

    Whole-genome sequences established for model and major crop species constitute a key resource for advanced genomic research. For outbreeding forage and turf grass species like ryegrasses (Lolium spp.), such resources have yet to be developed. Here, we present a model of the perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) genome on the basis of conserved synteny to barley (Hordeum vulgare) and the model grass genome Brachypodium (Brachypodium distachyon) as well as rice (Oryza sativa) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). A transcriptome-based genetic linkage map of perennial ryegrass served as a scaffold to establish the chromosomal arrangement of syntenic genes from model grass species. This scaffold revealed a high degree of synteny and macrocollinearity and was then utilized to anchor a collection of perennial ryegrass genes in silico to their predicted genome positions. This resulted in the unambiguous assignment of 3,315 out of 8,876 previously unmapped genes to the respective chromosomes. In total, the GenomeZipper incorporates 4,035 conserved grass gene loci, which were used for the first genome-wide sequence divergence analysis between perennial ryegrass, barley, Brachypodium, rice, and sorghum. The perennial ryegrass GenomeZipper is an ordered, information-rich genome scaffold, facilitating map-based cloning and genome assembly in perennial ryegrass and closely related Poaceae species. It also represents a milestone in describing synteny between perennial ryegrass and fully sequenced model grass genomes, thereby increasing our understanding of genome organization and evolution in the most important temperate forage and turf grass species.

  7. What constitutes an Arabian Helicobacter pylori? Lessons from comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Narender; Albert, M John; Al Abkal, Hanan; Siddique, Iqbal; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2017-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori, the human gastric pathogen, causes a variety of gastric diseases ranging from mild gastritis to gastric cancer. While the studies on H. pylori are dominated by those based on either East Asian or Western strains, information regarding H. pylori strains prevalent in the Middle East remains scarce. Therefore, we carried out whole-genome sequencing and comparative analysis of three H. pylori strains isolated from three native Arab, Kuwaiti patients. H. pylori strains were sequenced using Illumina platform. The sequence reads were filtered and draft genomes were assembled and annotated. Various pathogenicity-associated regions and phages present within the genomes were identified. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out to determine the genetic relatedness of Kuwaiti strains to various lineages of H. pylori. The core genome content and virulence-related genes were analyzed to assess the pathogenic potential. The three genomes clustered along with HpEurope strains in the phylogenetic tree comprising various H. pylori lineages. A total of 1187 genes spread among various functional classes were identified in the core genome analysis. The three genomes possessed a complete cagPAI and also retained most of the known outer membrane proteins as well as virulence-related genes. The cagA gene in all three strains consisted of an AB-C type EPIYA motif. The comparative genomic analysis of Kuwaiti H. pylori strains revealed a European ancestry and a high pathogenic potential. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Comparative Genomics Reveals the Core and Accessory Genomes of Streptomyces Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Nu; Kim, Yeonbum; Jeong, Yujin; Roe, Jung-Hye; Kim, Byung-Gee; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2015-10-01

    The development of rapid and efficient genome sequencing methods has enabled us to study the evolutionary background of bacterial genetic information. Here, we present comparative genomic analysis of 17 Streptomyces species, for which the genome has been completely sequenced, using the pan-genome approach. The analysis revealed that 34,592 ortholog clusters constituted the pan-genome of these Streptomyces species, including 2,018 in the core genome, 11,743 in the dispensable genome, and 20,831 in the unique genome. The core genome was converged to a smaller number of genes than reported previously, with 3,096 gene families. Functional enrichment analysis showed that genes involved in transcription were most abundant in the Streptomyces pan-genome. Finally, we investigated core genes for the sigma factors, mycothiol biosynthesis pathway, and secondary metabolism pathways; our data showed that many genes involved in stress response and morphological differentiation were commonly expressed in Streptomyces species. Elucidation of the core genome offers a basis for understanding the functional evolution of Streptomyces species and provides insights into target selection for the construction of industrial strains.

  9. IMGD: an integrated platform supporting comparative genomics and phylogenetics of insect mitochondrial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Kyongyong

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequences and organization of the mitochondrial genome have been used as markers to investigate evolutionary history and relationships in many taxonomic groups. The rapidly increasing mitochondrial genome sequences from diverse insects provide ample opportunities to explore various global evolutionary questions in the superclass Hexapoda. To adequately support such questions, it is imperative to establish an informatics platform that facilitates the retrieval and utilization of available mitochondrial genome sequence data. Results The Insect Mitochondrial Genome Database (IMGD is a new integrated platform that archives the mitochondrial genome sequences from 25,747 hexapod species, including 112 completely sequenced and 20 nearly completed genomes and 113,985 partially sequenced mitochondrial genomes. The Species-driven User Interface (SUI of IMGD supports data retrieval and diverse analyses at multi-taxon levels. The Phyloviewer implemented in IMGD provides three methods for drawing phylogenetic trees and displays the resulting trees on the web. The SNP database incorporated to IMGD presents the distribution of SNPs and INDELs in the mitochondrial genomes of multiple isolates within eight species. A newly developed comparative SNU Genome Browser supports the graphical presentation and interactive interface for the identified SNPs/INDELs. Conclusion The IMGD provides a solid foundation for the comparative mitochondrial genomics and phylogenetics of insects. All data and functions described here are available at the web site http://www.imgd.org/.

  10. Comparative genomic paleontology across plant kingdom reveals the dynamics of TE-driven genome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Baidouri, Moaine; Panaud, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Long terminal repeat-retrotransposons (LTR-RTs) are the most abundant class of transposable elements (TEs) in plants. They strongly impact the structure, function, and evolution of their host genome, and, in particular, their role in genome size variation has been clearly established. However, the dynamics of the process through which LTR-RTs have differentially shaped plant genomes is still poorly understood because of a lack of comparative studies. Using a new robust and automated family classification procedure, we exhaustively characterized the LTR-RTs in eight plant genomes for which a high-quality sequence is available (i.e., Arabidopsis thaliana, A. lyrata, grapevine, soybean, rice, Brachypodium dystachion, sorghum, and maize). This allowed us to perform a comparative genome-wide study of the retrotranspositional landscape in these eight plant lineages from both monocots and dicots. We show that retrotransposition has recurrently occurred in all plant genomes investigated, regardless their size, and through bursts, rather than a continuous process. Moreover, in each genome, only one or few LTR-RT families have been active in the recent past, and the difference in genome size among the species studied could thus mostly be accounted for by the extent of the latest transpositional burst(s). Following these bursts, LTR-RTs are efficiently eliminated from their host genomes through recombination and deletion, but we show that the removal rate is not lineage specific. These new findings lead us to propose a new model of TE-driven genome evolution in plants.

  11. Comparative Genomics of the Bacterial Genus Streptococcus Illuminates Evolutionary Implications of Species Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiao-Yang; Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Li, Hong-Wei; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Li, Wen-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Streptococcus within the phylum Firmicutes are among the most diverse and significant zoonotic pathogens. This genus has gone through considerable taxonomic revision due to increasing improvements of chemotaxonomic approaches, DNA hybridization and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. It is proposed to place the majority of streptococci into “species groups”. However, the evolutionary implications of species groups are not clear presently. We use comparative genomic approaches to yield a better understanding of the evolution of Streptococcus through genome dynamics, population structure, phylogenies and virulence factor distribution of species groups. Genome dynamics analyses indicate that the pan-genome size increases with the addition of newly sequenced strains, while the core genome size decreases with sequential addition at the genus level and species group level. Population structure analysis reveals two distinct lineages, one including Pyogenic, Bovis, Mutans and Salivarius groups, and the other including Mitis, Anginosus and Unknown groups. Phylogenetic dendrograms show that species within the same species group cluster together, and infer two main clades in accordance with population structure analysis. Distribution of streptococcal virulence factors has no obvious patterns among the species groups; however, the evolution of some common virulence factors is congruous with the evolution of species groups, according to phylogenetic inference. We suggest that the proposed streptococcal species groups are reasonable from the viewpoints of comparative genomics; evolution of the genus is congruent with the individual evolutionary trajectories of different species groups. PMID:24977706

  12. Comparative genomics of the bacterial genus Streptococcus illuminates evolutionary implications of species groups.

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    Xiao-Yang Gao

    Full Text Available Members of the genus Streptococcus within the phylum Firmicutes are among the most diverse and significant zoonotic pathogens. This genus has gone through considerable taxonomic revision due to increasing improvements of chemotaxonomic approaches, DNA hybridization and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. It is proposed to place the majority of streptococci into "species groups". However, the evolutionary implications of species groups are not clear presently. We use comparative genomic approaches to yield a better understanding of the evolution of Streptococcus through genome dynamics, population structure, phylogenies and virulence factor distribution of species groups. Genome dynamics analyses indicate that the pan-genome size increases with the addition of newly sequenced strains, while the core genome size decreases with sequential addition at the genus level and species group level. Population structure analysis reveals two distinct lineages, one including Pyogenic, Bovis, Mutans and Salivarius groups, and the other including Mitis, Anginosus and Unknown groups. Phylogenetic dendrograms show that species within the same species group cluster together, and infer two main clades in accordance with population structure analysis. Distribution of streptococcal virulence factors has no obvious patterns among the species groups; however, the evolution of some common virulence factors is congruous with the evolution of species groups, according to phylogenetic inference. We suggest that the proposed streptococcal species groups are reasonable from the viewpoints of comparative genomics; evolution of the genus is congruent with the individual evolutionary trajectories of different species groups.

  13. Mycobacterial species as case-study of comparative genome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakham, F; Belayachi, L; Ussery, D; Akrim, M; Benjouad, A; El Aouad, R; Ennaji, M M

    2011-02-08

    The genus Mycobacterium represents more than 120 species including important pathogens of human and cause major public health problems and illnesses. Further, with more than 100 genome sequences from this genus, comparative genome analysis can provide new insights for better understanding the evolutionary events of these species and improving drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics tools for controlling Mycobacterial diseases. In this present study we aim to outline a comparative genome analysis of fourteen Mycobacterial genomes: M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis K—10, M. bovis AF2122/97, M. bovis BCG str. Pasteur 1173P2, M. leprae Br4923, M. marinum M, M. sp. KMS, M. sp. MCS, M. tuberculosis CDC1551, M. tuberculosis F11, M. tuberculosis H37Ra, M. tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis KZN 1435 , M. ulcerans Agy99,and M. vanbaalenii PYR—1, For this purpose a comparison has been done based on their length of genomes, GC content, number of genes in different data bases (Genbank, Refseq, and Prodigal). The BLAST matrix of these genomes has been figured to give a lot of information about the similarity between species in a simple scheme. As a result of multiple genome analysis, the pan and core genome have been defined for twelve Mycobacterial species. We have also introduced the genome atlas of the reference strain M. tuberculosis H37Rv which can give a good overview of this genome. And for examining the phylogenetic relationships among these bacteria, a phylogenic tree has been constructed from 16S rRNA gene for tuberculosis and non tuberculosis Mycobacteria to understand the evolutionary events of these species.

  14. Comparative genetics of hybrid incompatibility: sterility in two Solanum species crosses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Leonie C; Nakazato, Takuya

    2008-07-01

    The genetic basis of hybrid sterility can provide insight into the genetic and evolutionary origins of species barriers. We examine the genetics of hybrid incompatibility between two diploid plant species in the plant clade Solanum sect. Lycopersicon. Using a set of near-isogenic lines (NILs) representing the wild species Solanum pennellii (formerly Lycopersicon pennellii) in the genetic background of the cultivated tomato S. lycopersicum (formerly L. esculentum), we found that hybrid pollen and seed infertility are each based on a modest number of loci, male (pollen) and other (seed) incompatibility factors are roughly comparable in number, and seed-infertility QTL act additively or recessively. These findings are remarkably consistent with our previous analysis in a different species pair, S. lycopersicum x S. habrochaites. Data from both studies contrast strongly with data from Drosophila. Finally, QTL for pollen and seed sterility from the two Solanum studies were chromosomally colocalized, indicating a shared evolutionary history for these QTL, a nonrandom genomic distribution of loci causing sterility, and/or a proclivity of certain genes to be involved in hybrid sterility. We show that comparative mapping data can delimit the probable timing of evolution of detected QTL and discern which sterility loci likely evolved earliest among species.

  15. Hybridization and mitochondrial genome introgression between Rana chensinensis and R. kukunoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yin; Lu, Bin; Gao, Haiyan; Hu, Ping; Fu, Jinzhong

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondrial genome (mito-genome) introgression among metazoans is commonplace, and several biological processes may promote such introgression. We examined two proposed processes for the mito-genome introgression between Rana chensinensis and R. kukunoris: natural hybridization and sex-biased dispersal. We sampled 477 individuals from 28 sites in the potential hybrid zone in the western Tsinling Mountains. Mitochondrial gene (cyt-b) trees were used to examine the introgression events. Microsatellite DNA loci, cyt-b and morphological data were used to identify hybrids and to examine the extent of natural hybridization. We detected rampant bidirectional introgressions, both ancient and recent, between the two species. Furthermore, we found a wide hybrid zone, and frequent and asymmetric hybridization. The hybrid zone cline analysis revealed a clear mitochondrial-nuclear discordance; while most nuclear markers displayed similar and steep clines, cyt-b had a displaced cline centre and a more gradual and wider cline. We also detected strong and asymmetric historical maternal gene flow across the hybrid zone. This widespread hybridization and detected low mito-nuclear conflicts may, at least partially, explain the high frequency of introgression. Lastly, microsatellite data and population genetic methods were used to assess sex-biased dispersal. A weak pattern of female-biased dispersal was detected in both species, suggesting it may not play an important role in the observed introgression. Our data are consistent with the hybridization hypothesis, but support for the sex-biased dispersal hypothesis is weak. We further suggest that selective advantages of the R. kukunoris-type mito-genome in thermal adaptation may also contribute to the introgression between the two species. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. SNUGB: a versatile genome browser supporting comparative and functional fungal genomics

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    Kim Seungill

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the full genome sequences of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were released in 1996, genome sequences of over 90 fungal species have become publicly available. The heterogeneous formats of genome sequences archived in different sequencing centers hampered the integration of the data for efficient and comprehensive comparative analyses. The Comparative Fungal Genomics Platform (CFGP was developed to archive these data via a single standardized format that can support multifaceted and integrated analyses of the data. To facilitate efficient data visualization and utilization within and across species based on the architecture of CFGP and associated databases, a new genome browser was needed. Results The Seoul National University Genome Browser (SNUGB integrates various types of genomic information derived from 98 fungal/oomycete (137 datasets and 34 plant and animal (38 datasets species, graphically presents germane features and properties of each genome, and supports comparison between genomes. The SNUGB provides three different forms of the data presentation interface, including diagram, table, and text, and six different display options to support visualization and utilization of the stored information. Information for individual species can be quickly accessed via a new tool named the taxonomy browser. In addition, SNUGB offers four useful data annotation/analysis functions, including 'BLAST annotation.' The modular design of SNUGB makes its adoption to support other comparative genomic platforms easy and facilitates continuous expansion. Conclusion The SNUGB serves as a powerful platform supporting comparative and functional genomics within the fungal kingdom and also across other kingdoms. All data and functions are available at the web site http://genomebrowser.snu.ac.kr/.

  17. Population genomics of sexual and asexual lineages in fissiparous ribbon worms (Lineus, Nemertea): hybridization, polyploidy and the Meselson effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament-Velásquez, S L; Figuet, E; Ballenghien, M; Zattara, E E; Norenburg, J L; Fernández-Álvarez, F A; Bierne, J; Bierne, N; Galtier, N

    2016-07-01

    Comparative population genetics in asexual vs. sexual species offers the opportunity to investigate the impact of asexuality on genome evolution. Here, we analyse coding sequence polymorphism and divergence patterns in the fascinating Lineus ribbon worms, a group of marine, carnivorous nemerteans with unusual regeneration abilities, and in which asexual reproduction by fissiparity is documented. The population genomics of the fissiparous L. pseudolacteus is characterized by an extremely high level of heterozygosity and unexpectedly elevated πN /πS ratio, in apparent agreement with theoretical expectations under clonal evolution. Analysis of among-species allele sharing and read-count distribution, however, reveals that L. pseudolacteus is a triploid hybrid between Atlantic populations of L. sanguineus and L. lacteus. We model and quantify the relative impact of hybridity, polyploidy and asexuality on molecular variation patterns in L. pseudolacteus and conclude that (i) the peculiarities of L. pseudolacteus population genomics result in the first place from hybridization and (ii) the accumulation of new mutations through the Meselson effect is more than compensated by processes of heterozygosity erosion, such as gene conversion or gene copy loss. This study illustrates the complexity of the evolutionary processes associated with asexuality and identifies L. pseudolacteus as a promising model to study the first steps of polyploid genome evolution in an asexual context. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Comparative rates of evolution in endosymbiotic nuclear genomes

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    Keeling Patrick J

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nucleomorphs associated with secondary plastids of cryptomonads and chlorarachniophytes are the sole examples of organelles with eukaryotic nuclear genomes. Although not as widespread as their prokaryotic equivalents in mitochondria and plastids, nucleomorph genomes share similarities in terms of reduction and compaction. They also differ in several aspects, not least in that they encode proteins that target to the plastid, and so function in a different compartment from that in which they are encoded. Results Here, we test whether the phylogenetically distinct nucleomorph genomes of the cryptomonad, Guillardia theta, and the chlorarachniophyte, Bigelowiella natans, have experienced similar evolutionary pressures during their transformation to reduced organelles. We compared the evolutionary rates of genes from nuclear, nucleomorph, and plastid genomes, all of which encode proteins that function in the same cellular compartment, the plastid, and are thus subject to similar selection pressures. Furthermore, we investigated the divergence of nucleomorphs within cryptomonads by comparing G. theta and Rhodomonas salina. Conclusion Chlorarachniophyte nucleomorph genes have accumulated errors at a faster rate than other genomes within the same cell, regardless of the compartment where the gene product functions. In contrast, most nucleomorph genes in cryptomonads have evolved faster than genes in other genomes on average, but genes for plastid-targeted proteins are not overly divergent, and it appears that cryptomonad nucleomorphs are not presently evolving rapidly and have therefore stabilized. Overall, these analyses suggest that the forces at work in the two lineages are different, despite the similarities between the structures of their genomes.

  19. Comparative Genomics of a Parthenogenesis-Inducing Wolbachia Symbiont

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    Amelia R. I. Lindsey

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Wolbachia is an intracellular symbiont of invertebrates responsible for inducing a wide variety of phenotypes in its host. These host-Wolbachia relationships span the continuum from reproductive parasitism to obligate mutualism, and provide a unique system to study genomic changes associated with the evolution of symbiosis. We present the genome sequence from a parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia strain (wTpre infecting the minute parasitoid wasp Trichogramma pretiosum. The wTpre genome is the most complete parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia genome available to date. We used comparative genomics across 16 Wolbachia strains, representing five supergroups, to identify a core Wolbachia genome of 496 sets of orthologous genes. Only 14 of these sets are unique to Wolbachia when compared to other bacteria from the Rickettsiales. We show that the B supergroup of Wolbachia, of which wTpre is a member, contains a significantly higher number of ankyrin repeat-containing genes than other supergroups. In the wTpre genome, there is evidence for truncation of the protein coding sequences in 20% of ORFs, mostly as a result of frameshift mutations. The wTpre strain represents a conversion from cytoplasmic incompatibility to a parthenogenesis-inducing lifestyle, and is required for reproduction in the Trichogramma host it infects. We hypothesize that the large number of coding frame truncations has accompanied the change in reproductive mode of the wTpre strain.

  20. An HMM-based comparative genomic framework for detecting introgression in eukaryotes.

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    Kevin J Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available One outcome of interspecific hybridization and subsequent effects of evolutionary forces is introgression, which is the integration of genetic material from one species into the genome of an individual in another species. The evolution of several groups of eukaryotic species has involved hybridization, and cases of adaptation through introgression have been already established. In this work, we report on PhyloNet-HMM-a new comparative genomic framework for detecting introgression in genomes. PhyloNet-HMM combines phylogenetic networks with hidden Markov models (HMMs to simultaneously capture the (potentially reticulate evolutionary history of the genomes and dependencies within genomes. A novel aspect of our work is that it also accounts for incomplete lineage sorting and dependence across loci. Application of our model to variation data from chromosome 7 in the mouse (Mus musculus domesticus genome detected a recently reported adaptive introgression event involving the rodent poison resistance gene Vkorc1, in addition to other newly detected introgressed genomic regions. Based on our analysis, it is estimated that about 9% of all sites within chromosome 7 are of introgressive origin (these cover about 13 Mbp of chromosome 7, and over 300 genes. Further, our model detected no introgression in a negative control data set. We also found that our model accurately detected introgression and other evolutionary processes from synthetic data sets simulated under the coalescent model with recombination, isolation, and migration. Our work provides a powerful framework for systematic analysis of introgression while simultaneously accounting for dependence across sites, point mutations, recombination, and ancestral polymorphism.

  1. Comparative cytogenetic analysis of Avena macrostachya and diploid C-genome Avena species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badaeva, Ekaterina D; Shelukhina, Olga Yu; Diederichsen, Axel; Loskutov, Igor G; Pukhalskiy, Vitaly A

    2010-02-01

    The chromosome set of Avena macrostachya Balansa ex Coss. et Durieu was analyzed using C-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization with 5S and 18S-5.8S-26S rRNA gene probes, and the results were compared with the C-genome diploid Avena L. species. The location of major nucleolar organizer regions and 5S rDNA sites on different chromosomes confirmed the affiliation of A. macrostachya with the C-genome group. However, the symmetric karyotype, the absence of "diffuse heterochromatin" and the location of large C-band complexes in proximal chromosome regions pointed to an isolated position of A. macrostachya from other Avena species. Based on the distribution of rDNA loci on the C-genome chromosomes of diploid and polyploid Avena species, we propose a model of the chromosome alterations that occurred during the evolution of oat species.

  2. Comparative genomic analysis of eutherian interferon-γ-inducible GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premzl, Marko

    2012-11-01

    The interferon-γ-inducible GTPases, IFGGs, are intracellular proteins involved in immune response against pathogens. A comprehensive comparative genomic review and analysis of eutherian IFGGs was carried out using public genomic sequences. The 64 eutherian IFGG genes were examined in detail and annotated. The eutherian IFGG promoter types were first catalogued followed by a phylogenetic analysis of eutherian IFGGs, which described five major IFGG clusters. The patterns of differential gene expansions and protein regions that may regulate IFGG catalytic features suggested a new classification of eutherian IFGGs. This mini-review has also provided new tests of reliability of public genomic sequences as well as tests of protein molecular evolution.

  3. Arabidopsis transcription factors: genome-wide comparative analysis among eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechmann, J L; Heard, J; Martin, G; Reuber, L; Jiang, C; Keddie, J; Adam, L; Pineda, O; Ratcliffe, O J; Samaha, R R; Creelman, R; Pilgrim, M; Broun, P; Zhang, J Z; Ghandehari, D; Sherman, B K; Yu, G

    2000-12-15

    The completion of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence allows a comparative analysis of transcriptional regulators across the three eukaryotic kingdoms. Arabidopsis dedicates over 5% of its genome to code for more than 1500 transcription factors, about 45% of which are from families specific to plants. Arabidopsis transcription factors that belong to families common to all eukaryotes do not share significant similarity with those of the other kingdoms beyond the conserved DNA binding domains, many of which have been arranged in combinations specific to each lineage. The genome-wide comparison reveals the evolutionary generation of diversity in the regulation of transcription.

  4. Comparative Genome Analysis of Basidiomycete Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Morin, Emmanuelle; Nagy, Laszlo; Manning, Gerard; Baker, Scott; Brown, Daren; Henrissat, Bernard; Levasseur, Anthony; Hibbett, David; Martin, Francis; Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-19

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes the mushrooms, wood rots, symbionts, and plant and animal pathogens. To better understand the diversity of phenotypes in basidiomycetes, we performed a comparative analysis of 35 basidiomycete fungi spanning the diversity of the phylum. Phylogenetic patterns of lignocellulose degrading genes suggest a continuum rather than a sharp dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay. Patterns of secondary metabolic enzymes give additional insight into the broad array of phenotypes found in the basidiomycetes. We suggest that the profile of an organism in lignocellulose-targeting genes can be used to predict its nutritional mode, and predict Dacryopinax sp. as a brown rot; Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea as white rots.

  5. Genomic and comparative genomic analyses of Rickettsia heilongjiangensis provide insight into its evolution and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Changsong; Xiong, Xiaolu; Qi, Yong; Gong, Wenping; Jiao, Jun; Wen, Bohai

    2014-08-01

    Rickettsia heilongjiangensis, the causative agent of far eastern spotted fever, is an obligate intracellular gram-negative bacterium that belongs to the spotted fever group rickettsiae. To understand the evolution and pathogenesis of R. heilongjiangensis, we analyzed its genome and compared it with other rickettsial genomes available in GenBank. The R. heilongjiangensis chromosome contains 1333 genes, including 1297 protein coding genes and 36 RNA coding genes. The genome also contains 121 pseudogenes, 54 insertion sequences, and 39 tandem repeats. Sixteen genes encoding the major components of the type IV secretion systems were identified in the R. heilongjiangensis genome. In total, 37 β-barrel outer membrane proteins were predicted in the genome, eight of which have been previously confirmed to be outer membrane proteins. In addition, 266 potential virulence factor genes, seven partially deleted antibiotic resistance genes, and a genomic island were identified in the genome. The codon usage in the genome is compatible with its low GC content, and the amino acid usage shows apparent bias. A comparative genomic analysis showed that R. heilongjiangensis and R. japonica share one unique fragment that may be a target sequence for a diagnostic assay. The orthologs of 37 genes of R. heilongjiangensis were found in pathogenic R. rickettsii str. Sheila Smith but not in non-pathogenic R. rickettsii str. Iowa, which may explain why R. heilongjiangensis is pathogenic. Pan-genome analysis showed that R. heilongjiangensis and 42 other rickettsiae strains share 693 core genes with a pan-genome size of 4837 genes. The pan-genome-based phylogeny showed that R. heilongjiangensis was closely related to R. japonica.

  6. Lactobacillus paracasei comparative genomics: towards species pan-genome definition and exploitation of diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smokvina, Tamara; Wels, Michiel; Polka, Justyna; Chervaux, Christian; Brisse, Sylvain; Boekhorst, Jos; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E T; Siezen, Roland J

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus paracasei is a member of the normal human and animal gut microbiota and is used extensively in the food industry in starter cultures for dairy products or as probiotics. With the development of low-cost, high-throughput sequencing techniques it has become feasible to sequence many different strains of one species and to determine its "pan-genome". We have sequenced the genomes of 34 different L. paracasei strains, and performed a comparative genomics analysis. We analysed genome synteny and content, focussing on the pan-genome, core genome and variable genome. Each genome was shown to contain around 2800-3100 protein-coding genes, and comparative analysis identified over 4200 ortholog groups that comprise the pan-genome of this species, of which about 1800 ortholog groups make up the conserved core. Several factors previously associated with host-microbe interactions such as pili, cell-envelope proteinase, hydrolases p40 and p75 or the capacity to produce short branched-chain fatty acids (bkd operon) are part of the L. paracasei core genome present in all analysed strains. The variome consists mainly of hypothetical proteins, phages, plasmids, transposon/conjugative elements, and known functions such as sugar metabolism, cell-surface proteins, transporters, CRISPR-associated proteins, and EPS biosynthesis proteins. An enormous variety and variability of sugar utilization gene cassettes were identified, with each strain harbouring between 25-53 cassettes, reflecting the high adaptability of L. paracasei to different niches. A phylogenomic tree was constructed based on total genome contents, and together with an analysis of horizontal gene transfer events we conclude that evolution of these L. paracasei strains is complex and not always related to niche adaptation. The results of this genome content comparison was used, together with high-throughput growth experiments on various carbohydrates, to perform gene-trait matching analysis, in order to link

  7. Comparative Genomics via Wavelet Analysis for Closely Related Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiuzhou Song

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative genomics has been a valuable method for extracting and extrapolating genome information among closely related bacteria. The efficiency of the traditional methods is extremely influenced by the software method used. To overcome the problem here, we propose using wavelet analysis to perform comparative genomics. First, global comparison using wavelet analysis gives the difference at a quantitative level. Then local comparison using keto-excess or purine-excess plots shows precise positions of inversions, translocations, and horizontally transferred DNA fragments. We firstly found that the level of energy spectra difference is related to the similarity of bacteria strains; it could be a quantitative index to describe the similarities of genomes. The strategy is described in detail by comparisons of closely related strains: S.typhi CT18, S.typhi Ty2, S.typhimurium LT2, H.pylori 26695, and H.pylori J99.

  8. Comparative Genomics via Wavelet Analysis for Closely Related Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiuzhou; Ware, Tony; Liu, Shu-Lin; Surette, M.

    2004-12-01

    Comparative genomics has been a valuable method for extracting and extrapolating genome information among closely related bacteria. The efficiency of the traditional methods is extremely influenced by the software method used. To overcome the problem here, we propose using wavelet analysis to perform comparative genomics. First, global comparison using wavelet analysis gives the difference at a quantitative level. Then local comparison using keto-excess or purine-excess plots shows precise positions of inversions, translocations, and horizontally transferred DNA fragments. We firstly found that the level of energy spectra difference is related to the similarity of bacteria strains; it could be a quantitative index to describe the similarities of genomes. The strategy is described in detail by comparisons of closely related strains: S.typhi CT18, S.typhi Ty2, S.typhimurium LT2, H.pylori 26695, and H.pylori J99.

  9. Sputnik: a database platform for comparative plant genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Stephen; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Mayer, Klaus F X

    2003-01-01

    Two million plant ESTs, from 20 different plant species, and totalling more than one 1000 Mbp of DNA sequence, represents a formidable transcriptomic resource. Sputnik uses the potential of this sequence resource to fill some of the information gap in the un-sequenced plant genomes and to serve as the foundation for in silicio comparative plant genomics. The complexity of the individual EST collections has been reduced using optimised EST clustering techniques. Annotation of cluster sequences is performed by exploiting and transferring information from the comprehensive knowledgebase already produced for the completed model plant genome (Arabidopsis thaliana) and by performing additional state of-the-art sequence analyses relevant to today's plant biologist. Functional predictions, comparative analyses and associative annotations for 500 000 plant EST derived peptides make Sputnik (http://mips.gsf.de/proj/sputnik/) a valid platform for contemporary plant genomics.

  10. PSAT: A web tool to compare genomic neighborhoods of multiple prokaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasnick Michael

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The conservation of gene order among prokaryotic genomes can provide valuable insight into gene function, protein interactions, or events by which genomes have evolved. Although some tools are available for visualizing and comparing the order of genes between genomes of study, few support an efficient and organized analysis between large numbers of genomes. The Prokaryotic Sequence homology Analysis Tool (PSAT is a web tool for comparing gene neighborhoods among multiple prokaryotic genomes. Results PSAT utilizes a database that is preloaded with gene annotation, BLAST hit results, and gene-clustering scores designed to help identify regions of conserved gene order. Researchers use the PSAT web interface to find a gene of interest in a reference genome and efficiently retrieve the sequence homologs found in other bacterial genomes. The tool generates a graphic of the genomic neighborhood surrounding the selected gene and the corresponding regions for its homologs in each comparison genome. Homologs in each region are color coded to assist users with analyzing gene order among various genomes. In contrast to common comparative analysis methods that filter sequence homolog data based on alignment score cutoffs, PSAT leverages gene context information for homologs, including those with weak alignment scores, enabling a more sensitive analysis. Features for constraining or ordering results are designed to help researchers browse results from large numbers of comparison genomes in an organized manner. PSAT has been demonstrated to be useful for helping to identify gene orthologs and potential functional gene clusters, and detecting genome modifications that may result in loss of function. Conclusion PSAT allows researchers to investigate the order of genes within local genomic neighborhoods of multiple genomes. A PSAT web server for public use is available for performing analyses on a growing set of reference genomes through any

  11. Genetic Relationships Among Five Basic Genomes St, E, A, B and D in Triticeae Revealed by Genomic Southern and in situ Hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The St and E are two important basic genomes in the perennial tribe Triticeae (Poaceae). They exist in many perennial species and are very closely related to the A, B and D genomes of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Genomic Southern hybridization and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) were used to analyze the genomic relationships between the two genomes (St and E) and the three basic genomes (A, B and D) of T. aestivum. The semi-quantitative analysis of the Southern hybridization suggested that both St and E genomes are most closely related to the D genome, then the A genome, and relatively distant to the B genome. GISH analysis using St and E genomic DNA as probes further confirmed the conclusion.St and E are the two basic genomes of Thinopyrum ponticum (StStEeEbEx) and Th. intermedium (StEeEb), two perennial species successfully used in wheat improvement. Therefore, this paper provides a possible answer as to why most of the spontaneous wheat- Thinopyrum translocations and substitutions usually happen in the D genome, some in the A genome and rarely in the B genome. This would develop further use of alien species for wheat improvement, especially those containing St or E in their genome components.

  12. MicrobesOnline: an integrated portal for comparative functional genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Joachimiak, Marcin P.

    2014-01-01

    The Virtual Institute for Microbial Stress and Survival (VIMSS, http://vimss.lbl.gov/) funded by the Dept. of Energy's Genomics:GTL Program, is dedicated to using integrated environmental, functional genomic, and comparative sequence and phylogeny data to understand mechanisms by which microbes and microbial communities survive in uncertain environments while carrying out processes of interest for bioremediation and energy generation. To support this work, VIMSS has developed a Web portal, al...

  13. Comparative genomic assessment of Multi-Locus Sequence Typing: rapid accumulation of genomic heterogeneity among clonal isolates of Campylobacter jejuni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nash John HE

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST has emerged as a leading molecular typing method owing to its high ability to discriminate among bacterial isolates, the relative ease with which data acquisition and analysis can be standardized, and the high portability of the resulting sequence data. While MLST has been successfully applied to the study of the population structure for a number of different bacterial species, it has also provided compelling evidence for high rates of recombination in some species. We have analyzed a set of Campylobacter jejuni strains using MLST and Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH on a full-genome microarray in order to determine whether recombination and high levels of genomic mosaicism adversely affect the inference of strain relationships based on the analysis of a restricted number of genetic loci. Results Our results indicate that, in general, there is significant concordance between strain relationships established by MLST and those based on shared gene content as established by CGH. While MLST has significant predictive power with respect to overall genome similarity of isolates, we also found evidence for significant differences in genomic content among strains that would otherwise appear to be highly related based on their MLST profiles. Conclusion The extensive genomic mosaicism between closely related strains has important implications in the context of establishing strain to strain relationships because it suggests that the exact gene content of strains, and by extension their phenotype, is less likely to be "predicted" based on a small number of typing loci. This in turn suggests that a greater emphasis should be placed on analyzing genes of clinical interest as we forge ahead with the next generation of molecular typing methods.

  14. The chloroplast genome of the hexaploid Spartina maritima (Poaceae, Chloridoideae): Comparative analyses and molecular dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau-Gueutin, M; Bellot, S; Martin, G E; Boutte, J; Chelaifa, H; Lima, O; Michon-Coudouel, S; Naquin, D; Salmon, A; Ainouche, K; Ainouche, M

    2015-12-01

    The history of many plant lineages is complicated by reticulate evolution with cases of hybridization often followed by genome duplication (allopolyploidy). In such a context, the inference of phylogenetic relationships and biogeographic scenarios based on molecular data is easier using haploid markers like chloroplast genome sequences. Hybridization and polyploidization occurred recurrently in the genus Spartina (Poaceae, Chloridoideae), as illustrated by the recent formation of the invasive allododecaploid S. anglica during the 19th century in Europe. Until now, only a few plastid markers were available to explore the history of this genus and their low variability limited the resolution of species relationships. We sequenced the complete chloroplast genome (plastome) of S. maritima, the native European parent of S. anglica, and compared it to the plastomes of other Poaceae. Our analysis revealed the presence of fast-evolving regions of potential taxonomic, phylogeographic and phylogenetic utility at various levels within the Poaceae family. Using secondary calibrations, we show that the tetraploid and hexaploid lineages of Spartina diverged 6-10 my ago, and that the two parents of the invasive allopolyploid S. anglica separated 2-4 my ago via long distance dispersal of the ancestor of S. maritima over the Atlantic Ocean. Finally, we discuss the meaning of divergence times between chloroplast genomes in the context of reticulate evolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The genomic trajectory of hybrid swarms: outcomes of repeated crosses between populations of Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Victoria L; Edmands, Suzanne

    2013-03-01

    Introgressive hybridization between genetically divergent populations is an important evolutionary process. The degree to which repeated hybridization events between the same parental taxa lead to similar genomic outcomes is unknown. This study addressed this question by following genomic trajectories of replicate hybrid swarms of the copepod Tigriopus californicus over many generations of free mating. Swarm composition was determined both by differential reproductive success of founder individuals and subsequent selection on hybrid genotypes. For one cross, between two populations showing differential fitness in the laboratory and no hybrid breakdown, the genetic trajectory was highly repeatable: replicates rapidly became dominated by alleles from the fitter parent. In a second cross, between two populations showing similar fitness and significant F2 hybrid breakdown, alleles from alternative populations dominated different replicates. Swarms exhibited a general temporal trend of decreasing cytonuclear mismatch. Some patterns of differential introgression across the genome were strikingly congruent amongst swarm replicates, both within and between cross types, and reflected patterns of segregation distortion previously observed within controlled crosses between the same parental populations. Differences in heterozygosity between the sexes, and evidence for a previously suspected sex-distortion locus, suggest that complex interactions between sex and genotype influence hybrid swarm outcome.

  16. The Rice Genome Knowledgebase (RGKbase): an annotation database for rice comparative genomics and evolutionary biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dapeng; Xia, Yan; Li, Xinna; Hou, Lixia; Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, genomes of cultivated rice cultivars and their wild counterparts have been sequenced although most efforts are focused on genome assembly and annotation of two major cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) subspecies, 93-11 (indica) and Nipponbare (japonica). To integrate information from genome assemblies and annotations for better analysis and application, we now introduce a comparative rice genome database, the Rice Genome Knowledgebase (RGKbase, http://rgkbase.big.ac.cn/RGKbase/). RGKbase is built to have three major components: (i) integrated data curation for rice genomics and molecular biology, which includes genome sequence assemblies, transcriptomic and epigenomic data, genetic variations, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and the relevant literature; (ii) User-friendly viewers, such as Gbrowse, GeneBrowse and Circos, for genome annotations and evolutionary dynamics and (iii) Bioinformatic tools for compositional and synteny analyses, gene family classifications, gene ontology terms and pathways and gene co-expression networks. RGKbase current includes data from five rice cultivars and species: Nipponbare (japonica), 93-11 (indica), PA64s (indica), the African rice (Oryza glaberrima) and a wild rice species (Oryza brachyantha). We are also constantly introducing new datasets from variety of public efforts, such as two recent releases-sequence data from ∼1000 rice varieties, which are mapped into the reference genome, yielding ample high-quality single-nucleotide polymorphisms and insertions-deletions.

  17. Comparative Genomic and Phylogenomic Analyses Reveal a Conserved Core Genome Shared by Estuarine and Oceanic Cyanopodoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sijun; Zhang, Si; Jiao, Nianzhi; Chen, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Podoviruses are among the major viral groups that infect marine picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus. Here, we reported the genome sequences of five Synechococcus podoviruses isolated from the estuarine environment, and performed comparative genomic and phylogenomic analyses based on a total of 20 cyanopodovirus genomes. The genomes of all the known marine cyanopodoviruses are highly syntenic. A pan-genome of 349 clustered orthologous groups was determined, among which 15 were core genes. These core genes make up nearly half of each genome in length, reflecting the high level of genome conservation among this cyanophage type. The whole genome phylogenies based on concatenated core genes and gene content were highly consistent and confirmed the separation of two discrete marine cyanopodovirus clusters MPP-A and MPP-B. The genomes within cluster MPP-B grouped into subclusters mainly corresponding to Prochlorococcus or Synechococcus host types. Auxiliary metabolic genes tend to occur in a specific phylogenetic group of these cyanopodoviruses. All the MPP-B phages analyzed here encode the photosynthesis gene psbA, which are absent in all the MPP-A genomes thus far. Interestingly, all the MPP-B and two MPP-A Synechococcus podoviruses encode the thymidylate synthase gene thyX, while at the same genome locus all the MPP-B Prochlorococcus podoviruses encode the transaldolase gene talC. Both genes are hypothesized to have the potential to facilitate the biosynthesis of deoxynucleotide for phage replication. Inheritance of specific functional genes could be important to the evolution and ecological fitness of certain cyanophage genotypes. Our analyses demonstrate that cyanopodoviruses of estuarine and oceanic origins share a conserved core genome and suggest that accessory genes may be related to environmental adaptation. PMID:26569403

  18. Comparative Genomic and Phylogenomic Analyses Reveal a Conserved Core Genome Shared by Estuarine and Oceanic Cyanopodoviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijun Huang

    Full Text Available Podoviruses are among the major viral groups that infect marine picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus. Here, we reported the genome sequences of five Synechococcus podoviruses isolated from the estuarine environment, and performed comparative genomic and phylogenomic analyses based on a total of 20 cyanopodovirus genomes. The genomes of all the known marine cyanopodoviruses are highly syntenic. A pan-genome of 349 clustered orthologous groups was determined, among which 15 were core genes. These core genes make up nearly half of each genome in length, reflecting the high level of genome conservation among this cyanophage type. The whole genome phylogenies based on concatenated core genes and gene content were highly consistent and confirmed the separation of two discrete marine cyanopodovirus clusters MPP-A and MPP-B. The genomes within cluster MPP-B grouped into subclusters mainly corresponding to Prochlorococcus or Synechococcus host types. Auxiliary metabolic genes tend to occur in a specific phylogenetic group of these cyanopodoviruses. All the MPP-B phages analyzed here encode the photosynthesis gene psbA, which are absent in all the MPP-A genomes thus far. Interestingly, all the MPP-B and two MPP-A Synechococcus podoviruses encode the thymidylate synthase gene thyX, while at the same genome locus all the MPP-B Prochlorococcus podoviruses encode the transaldolase gene talC. Both genes are hypothesized to have the potential to facilitate the biosynthesis of deoxynucleotide for phage replication. Inheritance of specific functional genes could be important to the evolution and ecological fitness of certain cyanophage genotypes. Our analyses demonstrate that cyanopodoviruses of estuarine and oceanic origins share a conserved core genome and suggest that accessory genes may be related to environmental adaptation.

  19. Prenatal diagnosis and array comparative genomic hybridization characterization of interstitial deletions of 8q23.3-q24.11 and 8q24.13 associated with Langer-Giedion syndrome, Cornelia de Lange syndrome and haploinsufficiency of TRPS1, RAD21 and EXT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Lin, Ming-Huei; Chen, Yi-Yung; Chern, Schu-Rern; Chen, Yen-Ni; Wu, Peih-Shan; Pan, Chen-Wen; Lee, Meng-Shan; Wang, Wayseen

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this research was to present prenatal diagnosis of Langer-Giedion syndrome (LGS/TRPS type II) and Cornelia de Lange syndrome-4 (CDLS4). A 36-year-old woman underwent amniocentesis at 17 weeks of gestation because of advanced maternal age. Conventional cytogenetic analysis of amniocentesis revealed an interstitial deletion of chromosome 8q or del(8)(q23.3q24.13). Level II prenatal ultrasound examination revealed craniofacial dysmorphism. The pregnancy was terminated, and a malformed fetus was delivered with characteristic craniofacial dysmorphism of LGS/TRPS type II and CDLS4. Whole-genome array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) on the DNA extracted from cultured amniocytes was performed. The analysis by aCGH revealed a result of arr 8q23.3q24.11 (116,087,006-118,969,399)×1, 8q24.13 (123,086,851-124,470,847)×1 (NCBI build 37) with a 2.88-Mb deletion of 8q23.3-q24.11 encompassing six OMIM genes, TRPS1, EIF3H, RAD21, SLC30A8, MED30, and EXT1, and a 1.383-Mb deletion of 8q24.13 encompassing four OMIM genes, ZHX2, DERL1, ZHX1, and ATAD2. In the present case, the conventional cytogenetic analysis of cultured amniocytes revealed del(8)(q23.3q24.13), whereas aCGH analysis of cultured amniocytes showed the deletions of 8q23.3-q24.11 and 8q24.13 with the presence of the segment 8q24.12. Therefore, aCGH provides the advantage of better understanding of the nature of interstitial deletion and genotype-phenotype correlation in this case. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Genomic markers reveal introgressive hybridization in the Indo-West Pacific mangroves: a case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Sun

    Full Text Available Biodiversity of mangrove ecosystems is difficult to assess, at least partly due to lack of genetic verification of morphology-based documentation of species. Natural hybridization, on the one hand, plays an important role in evolution as a source of novel gene combinations and a mechanism of speciation. However, on the other hand, recurrent introgression allows gene flow between species and could reverse the process of genetic differentiation among populations required for speciation. To understand the dynamic evolutionary consequences of hybridization, this study examines genomic structure of hybrids and parental species at the population level. In the Indo-West Pacific, Bruguiera is one of the dominant mangrove genera and species ranges overlap extensively with one another. Morphological intermediates between sympatric Bruguiera gymnorrhiza and Bruguiera sexangula have been reported as a variety of B. sexangula or a new hybrid species, B. × rhynchopetala. However, the direction of hybridization and extent of introgression are unclear. A large number of species-specific inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR markers were found in B. gymnorrhiza and B. sexangula, and the additive ISSR profiling of B. × rhynchopetala ascertained its hybrid status and identified its parental origin. The varying degree of scatterness among hybrid individuals in Principal Coordinate Analysis and results from NewHybrids analysis indicate that B. × rhynchopetala comprises different generations of introgressants in addition to F(1s. High genetic relatedness between B. × rhynchopetala and B. gymnorrhiza based on nuclear and chloroplast sequences suggests preferential hybrid backcrosses to B. gymnorrhiza. We conclude that B. × rhynchopetala has not evolved into an incipient hybrid species, and its persistence can be explained by recurrent hybridization and introgression. Genomic data provide insights into the hybridization dynamics of mangrove plants. Such information

  1. DCODE.ORG Anthology of Comparative Genomic Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, G G; Ovcharenko, I

    2005-01-11

    Comparative genomics provides the means to demarcate functional regions in anonymous DNA sequences. The successful application of this method to identifying novel genes is currently shifting to deciphering the noncoding encryption of gene regulation across genomes. To facilitate the use of comparative genomics to practical applications in genetics and genomics we have developed several analytical and visualization tools for the analysis of arbitrary sequences and whole genomes. These tools include two alignment tools: zPicture and Mulan; a phylogenetic shadowing tool: eShadow for identifying lineage- and species-specific functional elements; two evolutionary conserved transcription factor analysis tools: rVista and multiTF; a tool for extracting cis-regulatory modules governing the expression of co-regulated genes, CREME; and a dynamic portal to multiple vertebrate and invertebrate genome alignments, the ECR Browser. Here we briefly describe each one of these tools and provide specific examples on their practical applications. All the tools are publicly available at the http://www.dcode.org/ web site.

  2. Comparative bacterial proteomics: analysis of the core genome concept.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Callister

    Full Text Available While comparative bacterial genomic studies commonly predict a set of genes indicative of common ancestry, experimental validation of the existence of this core genome requires extensive measurement and is typically not undertaken. Enabled by an extensive proteome database developed over six years, we have experimentally verified the expression of proteins predicted from genomic ortholog comparisons among 17 environmental and pathogenic bacteria. More exclusive relationships were observed among the expressed protein content of phenotypically related bacteria, which is indicative of the specific lifestyles associated with these organisms. Although genomic studies can establish relative orthologous relationships among a set of bacteria and propose a set of ancestral genes, our proteomics study establishes expressed lifestyle differences among conserved genes and proposes a set of expressed ancestral traits.

  3. Comparative Bacterial Proteomics: Analysis of the Core Genome Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callister, Stephen J.; McCue, Lee Ann; Turse, Josh E.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2008-02-06

    Comparative bacterial genomic studies commonly predict a set of genes indicative of common ancestry. Experimental validation of the existence of this core genome requires extensive measurement and is not typically undertaken. Enabled by an extensive proteome database development over a six year period, we experimentally verified the expression of proteins predicted from genomic ortholog comparisons among 17 environmental and pathogenic bacteria. More exclusive relationships were observed among the expressed protein content of phenotypically related bacteria, which is indicative of the specific lifestyles associated with these organisms. While genomic studies establish relative orthologous relationships among a set of bacteria and propose a set of ancestral genes, our proteomics study establishes expressed lifestyle differences among conserved genes and proposes a set of expressed ancestral traits.

  4. Comparative genomics of toxigenic and non-toxigenic Staphylococcus hyicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Pamp, Sünje Johanna; Andresen, Lars Ole;

    2016-01-01

    The most common causative agent of exudative epidermitis (EE) in pigs is Staphylococcus hyicus. S. hyicus can be grouped into toxigenic and non-toxigenic strains based on their ability to cause EE in pigs and specific virulence genes have been identified. A genome wide comparison between non......-toxigenic and toxigenic strains has never been performed. In this study, we sequenced eleven toxigenic and six non-toxigenic S. hyicus strains and performed comparative genomic and phylogenetic analysis. Our analyses revealed two genomic regions encoding genes that were predominantly found in toxigenic strains...... (polymorphic toxin) and was associated with the gene encoding ExhA. A clear differentiation between toxigenic and non-toxigenic strains based on genomic and phylogenetic analyses was not apparent. The results of this study support the observation that exfoliative toxins of S. hyicus and S. aureus are located...

  5. Assigning protein functions by comparative genome analysis protein phylogenetic profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Matteo; Marcotte, Edward M.; Thompson, Michael J.; Eisenberg, David; Grothe, Robert; Yeates, Todd O.

    2003-05-13

    A computational method system, and computer program are provided for inferring functional links from genome sequences. One method is based on the observation that some pairs of proteins A' and B' have homologs in another organism fused into a single protein chain AB. A trans-genome comparison of sequences can reveal these AB sequences, which are Rosetta Stone sequences because they decipher an interaction between A' and B. Another method compares the genomic sequence of two or more organisms to create a phylogenetic profile for each protein indicating its presence or absence across all the genomes. The profile provides information regarding functional links between different families of proteins. In yet another method a combination of the above two methods is used to predict functional links.

  6. Comparative Bacterial Proteomics: Analysis of the Core Genome Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, Stephen J.; McCue, Lee Ann; Turse, Joshua E.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2008-01-01

    While comparative bacterial genomic studies commonly predict a set of genes indicative of common ancestry, experimental validation of the existence of this core genome requires extensive measurement and is typically not undertaken. Enabled by an extensive proteome database developed over six years, we have experimentally verified the expression of proteins predicted from genomic ortholog comparisons among 17 environmental and pathogenic bacteria. More exclusive relationships were observed among the expressed protein content of phenotypically related bacteria, which is indicative of the specific lifestyles associated with these organisms. Although genomic studies can establish relative orthologous relationships among a set of bacteria and propose a set of ancestral genes, our proteomics study establishes expressed lifestyle differences among conserved genes and proposes a set of expressed ancestral traits. PMID:18253490

  7. SyntenyTracker: a tool for defining homologous synteny blocks using radiation hybrid maps and whole-genome sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Harris A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent availability of genomic sequences and BAC libraries for a large number of mammals provides an excellent opportunity for identifying comparatively-anchored markers that are useful for creating high-resolution radiation-hybrid (RH and BAC-based comparative maps. To use these maps for multispecies genome comparison and evolutionary inference, robust bioinformatic tools are required for the identification of chromosomal regions shared between genomes and to localize the positions of evolutionary breakpoints that are the signatures of chromosomal rearrangements. Here we report an automated tool for the identification of homologous synteny blocks (HSBs between genomes that tolerates errors common in RH comparative maps and can be used for automated whole-genome analysis of chromosome rearrangements that occur during evolution. Findings We developed an algorithm and software tool (SyntenyTracker that can be used for automated definition of HSBs using pair-wise RH or gene-based comparative maps as input. To verify correct implementation of the underlying algorithm, SyntenyTracker was used to identify HSBs in the cattle and human genomes. Results demonstrated 96% agreement with HSBs defined manually using the same set of rules. A comparison of SyntenyTracker with the AutoGRAPH synteny tool was performed using identical datasets containing 14,380 genes with 1:1 orthology in human and mouse. Discrepancies between the results using the two tools and advantages of SyntenyTracker are reported. Conclusion SyntenyTracker was shown to be an efficient and accurate automated tool for defining HSBs using datasets that may contain minor errors resulting from limitations in map construction methodologies. The utility of SyntenyTracker will become more important for comparative genomics as the number of mapped and sequenced genomes increases.

  8. SyntenyTracker: a tool for defining homologous synteny blocks using radiation hybrid maps and whole-genome sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donthu, Ravikiran; Lewin, Harris A; Larkin, Denis M

    2009-07-23

    The recent availability of genomic sequences and BAC libraries for a large number of mammals provides an excellent opportunity for identifying comparatively-anchored markers that are useful for creating high-resolution radiation-hybrid (RH) and BAC-based comparative maps. To use these maps for multispecies genome comparison and evolutionary inference, robust bioinformatic tools are required for the identification of chromosomal regions shared between genomes and to localize the positions of evolutionary breakpoints that are the signatures of chromosomal rearrangements. Here we report an automated tool for the identification of homologous synteny blocks (HSBs) between genomes that tolerates errors common in RH comparative maps and can be used for automated whole-genome analysis of chromosome rearrangements that occur during evolution. We developed an algorithm and software tool (SyntenyTracker) that can be used for automated definition of HSBs using pair-wise RH or gene-based comparative maps as input. To verify correct implementation of the underlying algorithm, SyntenyTracker was used to identify HSBs in the cattle and human genomes. Results demonstrated 96% agreement with HSBs defined manually using the same set of rules. A comparison of SyntenyTracker with the AutoGRAPH synteny tool was performed using identical datasets containing 14,380 genes with 1:1 orthology in human and mouse. Discrepancies between the results using the two tools and advantages of SyntenyTracker are reported. SyntenyTracker was shown to be an efficient and accurate automated tool for defining HSBs using datasets that may contain minor errors resulting from limitations in map construction methodologies. The utility of SyntenyTracker will become more important for comparative genomics as the number of mapped and sequenced genomes increases.

  9. Comparative Genomics of Erwinia amylovora and Related Erwinia Species—What do We Learn?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youfu Zhao

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight disease of apples and pears, is one of the most important plant bacterial pathogens with worldwide economic significance. Recent reports on the complete or draft genome sequences of four species in the genus Erwinia, including E. amylovora, E. pyrifoliae, E. tasmaniensis, and E. billingiae, have provided us near complete genetic information about this pathogen and its closely-related species. This review describes in silico subtractive hybridization-based comparative genomic analyses of eight genomes currently available, and highlights what we have learned from these comparative analyses, as well as genetic and functional genomic studies. Sequence analyses reinforce the assumption that E. amylovora is a relatively homogeneous species and support the current classification scheme of E. amylovora and its related species. The potential evolutionary origin of these Erwinia species is also proposed. The current understanding of the pathogen, its virulence mechanism and host specificity from genome sequencing data is summarized. Future research directions are also suggested.

  10. Comparative genomics and proteomics of 13 Porphyromonas gingivalis strains

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    Tsute Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available At the current time, genome sequences of a total of 13 Porphyromonas gingivalis strains are available, including five completed genomes (strains ATCC 33277, HG66, TDC60, JCVISC001, and W83 and eight high-coverage draft sequences (F0185, F0566, F0568, F0569, F0570, SJD2, W4087, and W50 that are assembled into fewer than 300 contigs. This study compared these genomes at both nucleotide and protein sequence levels in order to understand their phylogenetic and functional relatedness. There are four copies of 16S rRNA gene sequences in each of the strains of ATCC 33277, HG66, TDC60, and W83 and one copy in the other nine genomes. These 25 16S rRNA sequences represent only 13 unique sequences. The five copies in W83 and W50 are identical and the three copies in HG66 are identical to the four copies in ATCC 33277, suggesting close evolutionary lineage between W83 and W50, as well as HG66 and ATCC 33277. Genome-wide comparison based on “Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology” (RAST also showed that for the overall biological functions of the genomes, W83 is closer to W50, and HG66 to ATCC33277, than to other genomes. The comparison of the RAST subsystems identified biological functions that are unique to individual, shared by some, or by all genomes. Functions unique to individual genomes include: a tetracycline resistance protein TetQ, DNA metabolism gene YcfH, and DNA repair gene exonuclease SbcC (only in SJD2; very-short-patch mismatch repair endonuclease and a phage packaging terminase similar to Bacteroides phage B124-14 (in W4087; an internalin similar to a Listeria surface virulence protein (W83; a Type I restriction-modification system (F0569; an iron acquisition/heme transport protein (F0566; colicin I receptor and carbamoylputrescine amidase (W50; L-serine dehydratase (TDC60; and spermidine synthase and ribokinase (JCVISC001. The results also identified biological functions that are missing in individual or several genomes. For

  11. Low-pass sequencing for microbial comparative genomics

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    Kennedy Sean

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We studied four extremely halophilic archaea by low-pass shotgun sequencing: (1 the metabolically versatile Haloarcula marismortui; (2 the non-pigmented Natrialba asiatica; (3 the psychrophile Halorubrum lacusprofundi and (4 the Dead Sea isolate Halobaculum gomorrense. Approximately one thousand single pass genomic sequences per genome were obtained. The data were analyzed by comparative genomic analyses using the completed Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 genome as a reference. Low-pass shotgun sequencing is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid approach that can readily be performed on any cultured microbe. Results As expected, the four archaeal halophiles analyzed exhibit both bacterial and eukaryotic characteristics as well as uniquely archaeal traits. All five halophiles exhibit greater than sixty percent GC content and low isoelectric points (pI for their predicted proteins. Multiple insertion sequence (IS elements, often involved in genome rearrangements, were identified in H. lacusprofundi and H. marismortui. The core biological functions that govern cellular and genetic mechanisms of H. sp. NRC-1 appear to be conserved in these four other halophiles. Multiple TATA box binding protein (TBP and transcription factor IIB (TFB homologs were identified from most of the four shotgunned halophiles. The reconstructed molecular tree of all five halophiles shows a large divergence between these species, but with the closest relationship being between H. sp. NRC-1 and H. lacusprofundi. Conclusion Despite the diverse habitats of these species, all five halophiles share (1 high GC content and (2 low protein isoelectric points, which are characteristics associated with environmental exposure to UV radiation and hypersalinity, respectively. Identification of multiple IS elements in the genome of H. lacusprofundi and H. marismortui suggest that genome structure and dynamic genome reorganization might be similar to that previously observed in the

  12. On the Approximability of Comparing Genomes with Duplicates

    CERN Document Server

    Angibaud, Sébastien; Rusu, Irena; Thevenin, Annelyse; Vialette, Stéphane

    2008-01-01

    A central problem in comparative genomics consists in computing a (dis-)similarity measure between two genomes, e.g. in order to construct a phylogeny. All the existing measures are defined on genomes without duplicates. However, we know that genes can be duplicated within the same genome. One possible approach to overcome this difficulty is to establish a one-to-one correspondence (i.e. a matching) between genes of both genomes, where the correspondence is chosen in order to optimize the studied measure. In this paper, we are interested in three measures (number of breakpoints, number of common intervals and number of conserved intervals) and three models of matching (exemplar, intermediate and maximum matching models). We prove that, for each model and each measure M, computing a matching between two genomes that optimizes M is APX-hard. We also study the complexity of the following problem: is there an exemplarization (resp. an intermediate/maximum matching) that induces no breakpoint? We prove the problem...

  13. Evolution of cancer suppression as revealed by mammalian comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollis, Marc; Schiffman, Joshua D; Boddy, Amy M

    2017-02-02

    Cancer suppression is an important feature in the evolution of large and long-lived animals. While some tumor suppression pathways are conserved among all multicellular organisms, others mechanisms of cancer resistance are uniquely lineage specific. Comparative genomics has become a powerful tool to discover these unique and shared molecular adaptations in respect to cancer suppression. These findings may one day be translated to human patients through evolutionary medicine. Here, we will review theory and methods of comparative cancer genomics and highlight major findings of cancer suppression across mammals. Our current knowledge of cancer genomics suggests that more efficient DNA repair and higher sensitivity to DNA damage may be the key to tumor suppression in large or long-lived mammals.

  14. Comparative genomics of oral isolates of Streptococcus mutans by in silico genome subtraction does not reveal accessory DNA associated with severe early childhood caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argimón, Silvia; Konganti, Kranti; Chen, Hao; Alekseyenko, Alexander V; Brown, Stuart; Caufield, Page W

    2014-01-01

    Comparative genomics is a popular method for the identification of microbial virulence determinants, especially since the sequencing of a large number of whole bacterial genomes from pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains has become relatively inexpensive. The bioinformatics pipelines for comparative genomics usually include gene prediction and annotation and can require significant computer power. To circumvent this, we developed a rapid method for genome-scale in silico subtractive hybridization, based on blastn and independent of feature identification and annotation. Whole genome comparisons by in silico genome subtraction were performed to identify genetic loci specific to Streptococcus mutans strains associated with severe early childhood caries (S-ECC), compared to strains isolated from caries-free (CF) children. The genome similarity of the 20 S. mutans strains included in this study, calculated by Simrank k-mer sharing, ranged from 79.5% to 90.9%, confirming this is a genetically heterogeneous group of strains. We identified strain-specific genetic elements in 19 strains, with sizes ranging from 200 to 39 kb. These elements contained protein-coding regions with functions mostly associated with mobile DNA. We did not, however, identify any genetic loci consistently associated with dental caries, i.e., shared by all the S-ECC strains and absent in the CF strains. Conversely, we did not identify any genetic loci specific with the healthy group. Comparison of previously published genomes from pathogenic and carriage strains of Neisseria meningitidis with our in silico genome subtraction yielded the same set of genes specific to the pathogenic strains, thus validating our method. Our results suggest that S. mutans strains derived from caries active or caries free dentitions cannot be differentiated based on the presence or absence of specific genetic elements. Our in silico genome subtraction method is available as the Microbial Genome Comparison (MGC) tool

  15. Radiation hybrid maps of D-genome of Aegilops tauschii and their application in sequence assembly of large and complex plant genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The large and complex genome of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L., ~17 Gb) requires high-resolution genome maps saturated with ordered markers to assist in anchoring and orienting BAC contigs/ sequence scaffolds for whole genome sequence assembly. Radiation hybrid (RH) mapping has proven to be an e...

  16. CFGP: a web-based, comparative fungal genomics platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jongsun; Park, Bongsoo; Jung, Kyongyong; Jang, Suwang; Yu, Kwangyul; Choi, Jaeyoung; Kong, Sunghyung; Park, Jaejin; Kim, Seryun; Kim, Hyojeong; Kim, Soonok; Kim, Jihyun F; Blair, Jaime E; Lee, Kwangwon; Kang, Seogchan; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2008-01-01

    Since the completion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome sequencing project in 1996, the genomes of over 80 fungal species have been sequenced or are currently being sequenced. Resulting data provide opportunities for studying and comparing fungal biology and evolution at the genome level. To support such studies, the Comparative Fungal Genomics Platform (CFGP; http://cfgp.snu.ac.kr), a web-based multifunctional informatics workbench, was developed. The CFGP comprises three layers, including the basal layer, middleware and the user interface. The data warehouse in the basal layer contains standardized genome sequences of 65 fungal species. The middleware processes queries via six analysis tools, including BLAST, ClustalW, InterProScan, SignalP 3.0, PSORT II and a newly developed tool named BLASTMatrix. The BLASTMatrix permits the identification and visualization of genes homologous to a query across multiple species. The Data-driven User Interface (DUI) of the CFGP was built on a new concept of pre-collecting data and post-executing analysis instead of the 'fill-in-the-form-and-press-SUBMIT' user interfaces utilized by most bioinformatics sites. A tool termed Favorite, which supports the management of encapsulated sequence data and provides a personalized data repository to users, is another novel feature in the DUI.

  17. Species origin of genomic factors in Nicotiana nudicaulis Watson controlling hybrid lethality in interspecific hybrids between N. nudicaulis Watson and N. tabacum L.

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    Hongshuo Liu

    Full Text Available Hybrid lethality is expressed at 28°C in the cross Nicotiana nudicaulis × N. tabacum. The S subgenome of N. tabacum has been identified as controlling this hybrid lethality. To clarify the responsible genomic factor(s of N. nudicaulis, we crossed N. trigonophylla (paternal progenitor of N. nudicaulis with N. tabacum, because hybrids between N. sylvestris (maternal progenitor of N. nudicaulis and N. tabacum are viable when grown in a greenhouse. In the cross N. trigonophylla×N. tabacum, approximately 50% of hybrids were vitrified, 20% were viable, and 20% were nonviable at 28°C. To reveal which subgenome of N. tabacum was responsible for these phenotypes, we crossed N. trigonophylla with two progenitors of N. tabacum, N. sylvestris (SS and N. tomentosiformis (TT. In the cross N. sylvestris × N. trigonophylla, we confirmed that over half of hybrids of N. sylvestris × N. trigonophylla were vitrified, and none of the hybrids of N. trigonophylla × N. tomentosiformis were. The results imply that the S subgenome, encoding a gene or genes inducing hybrid lethality in the cross between N. nudicaulis and N. tabacum, has one or more genomic factors that induce vitrification. Furthermore, in vitrified hybrids of N. trigonophylla × N. tabacum and N. sylvestris × N. trigonophylla, we found that nuclear fragmentation, which progresses during expression of hybrid lethality, was accompanied by vitrification. This observation suggests that vitrification has a relationship to hybrid lethality. Based on these results, we speculate that when N. nudicaulis was formed approximately 5 million years ago, several causative genomic factors determining phenotypes of hybrid seedlings were inherited from N. trigonophylla. Subsequently, genome downsizing and various recombination-based processes took place. Some of the causative genomic factors were lost and some became genomic factor(s controlling hybrid lethality in extant N. nudicaulis.

  18. Species origin of genomic factors in Nicotiana nudicaulis Watson controlling hybrid lethality in interspecific hybrids between N. nudicaulis Watson and N. tabacum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongshuo; Marubashi, Wataru

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid lethality is expressed at 28°C in the cross Nicotiana nudicaulis × N. tabacum. The S subgenome of N. tabacum has been identified as controlling this hybrid lethality. To clarify the responsible genomic factor(s) of N. nudicaulis, we crossed N. trigonophylla (paternal progenitor of N. nudicaulis) with N. tabacum, because hybrids between N. sylvestris (maternal progenitor of N. nudicaulis) and N. tabacum are viable when grown in a greenhouse. In the cross N. trigonophylla×N. tabacum, approximately 50% of hybrids were vitrified, 20% were viable, and 20% were nonviable at 28°C. To reveal which subgenome of N. tabacum was responsible for these phenotypes, we crossed N. trigonophylla with two progenitors of N. tabacum, N. sylvestris (SS) and N. tomentosiformis (TT). In the cross N. sylvestris × N. trigonophylla, we confirmed that over half of hybrids of N. sylvestris × N. trigonophylla were vitrified, and none of the hybrids of N. trigonophylla × N. tomentosiformis were. The results imply that the S subgenome, encoding a gene or genes inducing hybrid lethality in the cross between N. nudicaulis and N. tabacum, has one or more genomic factors that induce vitrification. Furthermore, in vitrified hybrids of N. trigonophylla × N. tabacum and N. sylvestris × N. trigonophylla, we found that nuclear fragmentation, which progresses during expression of hybrid lethality, was accompanied by vitrification. This observation suggests that vitrification has a relationship to hybrid lethality. Based on these results, we speculate that when N. nudicaulis was formed approximately 5 million years ago, several causative genomic factors determining phenotypes of hybrid seedlings were inherited from N. trigonophylla. Subsequently, genome downsizing and various recombination-based processes took place. Some of the causative genomic factors were lost and some became genomic factor(s) controlling hybrid lethality in extant N. nudicaulis.

  19. A genome assembly-integrated dog 1 Mb BAC microarray: a cytogenetic resource for canine cancer studies and comparative genomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R; Duke, S E; Karlsson, E K; Evans, A; Ellis, P; Lindblad-Toh, K; Langford, C F; Breen, M

    2008-01-01

    Molecular cytogenetic studies have been instrumental in defining the nature of numerical and structural chromosome changes in human cancers, but their significance remains to be fully understood. The emergence of high quality genome assemblies for several model organisms provides exciting opportunities to develop novel genome-integrated molecular cytogenetic resources that now permit a comparative approach to evaluating the relevance of tumor-associated chromosome aberrations, both within and between species. We have used the dog genome sequence assembly to identify a framework panel of 2,097 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones, selected at intervals of approximately one megabase. Each clone has been evaluated by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to confirm its unique cytogenetic location in concordance with its reported position in the genome assembly, providing new information on the organization of the dog genome. This panel of BAC clones also represents a powerful cytogenetic resource with numerous potential applications. We have used the clone set to develop a genome-wide microarray for comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis, and demonstrate its application in detection of tumor-associated DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs) including single copy deletions and amplifications, regional aneuploidy and whole chromosome aneuploidy. We also show how individual clones selected from the BAC panel can be used as FISH probes in direct evaluation of tumor karyotypes, to verify and explore CNAs detected using aCGH analysis. This cytogenetically validated, genome integrated BAC clone panel has enormous potential for aiding gene discovery through a comparative approach to molecular oncology.

  20. Comparative Whole-Genome Mapping To Determine Staphylococcus aureus Genome Size, Virulence Motifs, and Clonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantrang, Madhulatha; Stahl, Buffy; Briska, Adam M.; Stemper, Mary E.; Wagner, Trevor K.; Zentz, Emily B.; Callister, Steven M.; Lovrich, Steven D.; Henkhaus, John K.; Dykes, Colin W.

    2012-01-01

    Despite being a clonal pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus continues to acquire virulence and antibiotic-resistant genes located on mobile genetic elements such as genomic islands, prophages, pathogenicity islands, and the staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) by horizontal gene transfer from other staphylococci. The potential virulence of a S. aureus strain is often determined by comparing its pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) or multilocus sequence typing profiles to that of known epidemic or virulent clones and by PCR of the toxin genes. Whole-genome mapping (formerly optical mapping), which is a high-resolution ordered restriction mapping of a bacterial genome, is a relatively new genomic tool that allows comparative analysis across entire bacterial genomes to identify regions of genomic similarities and dissimilarities, including small and large insertions and deletions. We explored whether whole-genome maps (WGMs) of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) could be used to predict the presence of methicillin resistance, SCCmec type, and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-producing genes on an S. aureus genome. We determined the WGMs of 47 diverse clinical isolates of S. aureus, including well-characterized reference MRSA strains, and annotated the signature restriction pattern in SCCmec types, arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME), and PVL-carrying prophage, PhiSa2 or PhiSa2-like regions on the genome. WGMs of these isolates accurately characterized them as MRSA or methicillin-sensitive S. aureus based on the presence or absence of the SCCmec motif, ACME and the unique signature pattern for the prophage insertion that harbored the PVL genes. Susceptibility to methicillin resistance and the presence of mecA, SCCmec types, and PVL genes were confirmed by PCR. A WGM clustering approach was further able to discriminate isolates within the same PFGE clonal group. These results showed that WGMs could be used not only to genotype S. aureus but also to

  1. Comparative Genomics of Escherichia coli Strains Causing Urinary Tract Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria; Schembri, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    The virulence determinants of uropathogenic Escherichia coli have been studied extensively over the years, but relatively little is known about what differentiates isolates causing various types of urinary tract infections. In this study, we compared the genomic profiles of 45 strains from a range...

  2. Complete chloroplast genome sequence of Omani lime (Citrus aurantiifolia and comparative analysis within the rosids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Jiun Su

    Full Text Available The genus Citrus contains many economically important fruits that are grown worldwide for their high nutritional and medicinal value. Due to frequent hybridizations among species and cultivars, the exact number of natural species and the taxonomic relationships within this genus are unclear. To compare the differences between the Citrus chloroplast genomes and to develop useful genetic markers, we used a reference-assisted approach to assemble the complete chloroplast genome of Omani lime (C. aurantiifolia. The complete C. aurantiifolia chloroplast genome is 159,893 bp in length; the organization and gene content are similar to most of the rosids lineages characterized to date. Through comparison with the sweet orange (C. sinensis chloroplast genome, we identified three intergenic regions and 94 simple sequence repeats (SSRs that are potentially informative markers with resolution for interspecific relationships. These markers can be utilized to better understand the origin of cultivated Citrus. A comparison among 72 species belonging to 10 families of representative rosids lineages also provides new insights into their chloroplast genome evolution.

  3. Complete chloroplast genome sequence of Omani lime (Citrus aurantiifolia) and comparative analysis within the rosids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Huei-Jiun; Hogenhout, Saskia A; Al-Sadi, Abdullah M; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2014-01-01

    The genus Citrus contains many economically important fruits that are grown worldwide for their high nutritional and medicinal value. Due to frequent hybridizations among species and cultivars, the exact number of natural species and the taxonomic relationships within this genus are unclear. To compare the differences between the Citrus chloroplast genomes and to develop useful genetic markers, we used a reference-assisted approach to assemble the complete chloroplast genome of Omani lime (C. aurantiifolia). The complete C. aurantiifolia chloroplast genome is 159,893 bp in length; the organization and gene content are similar to most of the rosids lineages characterized to date. Through comparison with the sweet orange (C. sinensis) chloroplast genome, we identified three intergenic regions and 94 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) that are potentially informative markers with resolution for interspecific relationships. These markers can be utilized to better understand the origin of cultivated Citrus. A comparison among 72 species belonging to 10 families of representative rosids lineages also provides new insights into their chloroplast genome evolution.

  4. Comparative genomics of Escherichia coli isolated from patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria; Petersen, Andreas M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is used to describe a state of idiopathic, chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The two main phenotypes of IBD are Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). The major cause of IBD-associated mortality is colorectal cancer. Although...... both host-genetic and exogenous factors have been found to be involved, the aetiology of IBD is still not well understood. In this study we characterized thirteen Escherichia coli strains from patients with IBD by comparative genomic hybridization employing a microarray based on 31 sequenced E. coli...

  5. Restauro-G: A Rapid Genome Re-Annotation System for Comparative Genomics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satoshi Tamaki; Kazuharu Arakawa; Nobuaki Kono; Masaru Tomita

    2007-01-01

    Annotations of complete genome sequences submitted directly from sequencing projects are diverse in terms of annotation strategies and update frequencies. These inconsistencies make comparative studies difficult. To allow rapid data preparation of a large number of complete genomes, automation and speed are important for genome re-annotation. Here we introduce an open-source rapid genome re-annotation software system, Restauro-G, specialized for bacterial genomes. Restauro-G re-annotates a genome by similarity searches utilizing the BLAST-Like Alignment Tool, referring to protein databases such as UniProt KB, NCBI nr, NCBI COGs, Pfam, and PSORTb. Re-annotation by Restauro-G achieved over 98% accuracy for most bacterial chromosomes in comparison with the original manually curated annotation of EMBL releases. Restauro-G was developed in the generic bioinformatics workbench G-language Genome Analysis Environment and is distributed at http://restauro-g.iab.keio.ac.jp/ under the GNU General Public License.

  6. Determining and comparing protein function in Bacterial genome sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Tammi Camilla

    annotation of genes – the descriptions assigned to genes that describe the likely function of the encoded proteins. This process is limited by several factors, including the definition of a function which can be more or less specific as well as how many genes can actually be assigned a function based...... of this class have very little homology to other known genomes making functional annotation based on sequence similarity very difficult. Inspired in part by this analysis, an approach for comparative functional annotation was created based public sequenced genomes, CMGfunc. Functionally related groups...

  7. USE OF COMPETITIVE GENOMIC HYBRIDIZATION TO ENRICH FOR GENOME-SPECIFIC DIFFERENCES BETWEEN TWO CLOSELY RELATED HUMAN FECAL INDICATOR BACTERIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enterococci are frequently used as indicators of fecal pollution in surface waters. To accelerate the identification of Enterococcus faecalis-specific DNA sequences, we employed a comparative genomic strategy utilizing a positive selection process to compare E. faec...

  8. Lactobacillus paracasei comparative genomics: towards species pan-genome definition and exploitation of diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Smokvina

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus paracasei is a member of the normal human and animal gut microbiota and is used extensively in the food industry in starter cultures for dairy products or as probiotics. With the development of low-cost, high-throughput sequencing techniques it has become feasible to sequence many different strains of one species and to determine its "pan-genome". We have sequenced the genomes of 34 different L. paracasei strains, and performed a comparative genomics analysis. We analysed genome synteny and content, focussing on the pan-genome, core genome and variable genome. Each genome was shown to contain around 2800-3100 protein-coding genes, and comparative analysis identified over 4200 ortholog groups that comprise the pan-genome of this species, of which about 1800 ortholog groups make up the conserved core. Several factors previously associated with host-microbe interactions such as pili, cell-envelope proteinase, hydrolases p40 and p75 or the capacity to produce short branched-chain fatty acids (bkd operon are part of the L. paracasei core genome present in all analysed strains. The variome consists mainly of hypothetical proteins, phages, plasmids, transposon/conjugative elements, and known functions such as sugar metabolism, cell-surface proteins, transporters, CRISPR-associated proteins, and EPS biosynthesis proteins. An enormous variety and variability of sugar utilization gene cassettes were identified, with each strain harbouring between 25-53 cassettes, reflecting the high adaptability of L. paracasei to different niches. A phylogenomic tree was constructed based on total genome contents, and together with an analysis of horizontal gene transfer events we conclude that evolution of these L. paracasei strains is complex and not always related to niche adaptation. The results of this genome content comparison was used, together with high-throughput growth experiments on various carbohydrates, to perform gene-trait matching analysis

  9. An initial comparative map of copy number variations in the goat (Capra hircus genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casadio Rita

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goat (Capra hircus represents one of the most important farm animal species. It is reared in all continents with an estimated world population of about 800 million of animals. Despite its importance, studies on the goat genome are still in their infancy compared to those in other farm animal species. Comparative mapping between cattle and goat showed only a few rearrangements in agreement with the similarity of chromosome banding. We carried out a cross species cattle-goat array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH experiment in order to identify copy number variations (CNVs in the goat genome analysing animals of different breeds (Saanen, Camosciata delle Alpi, Girgentana, and Murciano-Granadina using a tiling oligonucleotide array with ~385,000 probes designed on the bovine genome. Results We identified a total of 161 CNVs (an average of 17.9 CNVs per goat, with the largest number in the Saanen breed and the lowest in the Camosciata delle Alpi goat. By aggregating overlapping CNVs identified in different animals we determined CNV regions (CNVRs: on the whole, we identified 127 CNVRs covering about 11.47 Mb of the virtual goat genome referred to the bovine genome (0.435% of the latter genome. These 127 CNVRs included 86 loss and 41 gain and ranged from about 24 kb to about 1.07 Mb with a mean and median equal to 90,292 bp and 49,530 bp, respectively. To evaluate whether the identified goat CNVRs overlap with those reported in the cattle genome, we compared our results with those obtained in four independent cattle experiments. Overlapping between goat and cattle CNVRs was highly significant (P Conclusions We describe a first map of goat CNVRs. This provides information on a comparative basis with the cattle genome by identifying putative recurrent interspecies CNVs between these two ruminant species. Several goat CNVs affect genes with important biological functions. Further studies are needed to evaluate the

  10. The Perennial Ryegrass GenomeZipper – Targeted Use of Genome Resources for Comparative Grass Genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, Matthias; Martis, Mihaela; Asp, Torben;

    2013-01-01

    to establish the chromosomal arrangement of syntenic genes from model grass species. This scaffold revealed a high degree of synteny and macrocollinearity and was then utilized to anchor a collection of perennial ryegrass genes in silico to their predicted genome positions. This resulted in the unambiguous...

  11. Chromogenic in situ hybridization: a multicenter study comparing silver in situ hybridization with FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, J M S; Campbell, Fiona M; Ibrahim, Merdol; Wencyk, Peter; Ellis, Ian; Kay, Elaine; Connolly, Yvonne; O'Grady, Anthony; Di Palma, Silvana; Starczynski, Jane; Morgan, John M; Jasani, Bharat; Miller, Keith

    2009-10-01

    Our purposes were to perform a robust assessment of a new HER2 chromogenic in situ hybridization test and report on concordance of silver in situ hybridization (SISH) data with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) data and on intraobserver and interlaboratory scoring consistency. HER2 results were scored from 45 breast cancers in 7 laboratories using the Ventana (Tucson, AZ) INFORM HER-2 SISH assay and in 1 central laboratory using a standard FISH assay. Overall, 94.8% of cases were successfully analyzed by SISH across the 6 participating laboratories that reported data. Concordance for diagnosis of HER2 amplification by SISH compared with FISH was high (96.0% overall). Intraobserver variability (8.0%) and intersite variability (12.66%) of absolute HER2/chromosome 17 ratios appear to be tightly controlled across all 6 participating laboratories. The Ventana INFORM HER-2 SISH assay is robust and reproducible, shows good concordance with a standard FISH assay, and complies with requirements in national guidelines for performance of diagnostic tests.

  12. Phylogeny and comparative genome analysis of a Basidiomycete fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert W.; Salamov, Asaf; Grigoriev, Igor; Hibbett, David

    2011-03-14

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota, make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important from the perspectives of forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes the mushrooms, wood rots, plant pathogenic rusts and smuts, and some human pathogens. To better understand these important fungi, we have undertaken a comparative genomic analysis of the Basidiomycetes with available sequenced genomes. We report a phylogeny that sheds light on previously unclear evolutionary relationships among the Basidiomycetes. We also define a `core proteome? based on protein families conserved in all Basidiomycetes. We identify key expansions and contractions in protein families that may be responsible for the degradation of plant biomass such as cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Finally, we speculate as to the genomic changes that drove such expansions and contractions.

  13. CyanoClust: comparative genome resources of cyanobacteria and plastids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Naobumi V; Sato, Naoki

    2010-01-01

    Cyanobacteria, which perform oxygen-evolving photosynthesis as do chloroplasts of plants and algae, are one of the best-studied prokaryotic phyla and one from which many representative genomes have been sequenced. Lack of a suitable comparative genomic database has been a problem in cyanobacterial genomics because many proteins involved in physiological functions such as photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation are not catalogued in commonly used databases, such as Clusters of Orthologous Proteins (COG). CyanoClust is a database of homolog groups in cyanobacteria and plastids that are produced by the program Gclust. We have developed a web-server system for the protein homology database featuring cyanobacteria and plastids. Database URL: http://cyanoclust.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp/.

  14. The Chlamydia psittaci genome: a comparative analysis of intracellular pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Voigt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chlamydiaceae are a family of obligate intracellular pathogens causing a wide range of diseases in animals and humans, and facing unique evolutionary constraints not encountered by free-living prokaryotes. To investigate genomic aspects of infection, virulence and host preference we have sequenced Chlamydia psittaci, the pathogenic agent of ornithosis. RESULTS: A comparison of the genome of the avian Chlamydia psittaci isolate 6BC with the genomes of other chlamydial species, C. trachomatis, C. muridarum, C. pneumoniae, C. abortus, C. felis and C. caviae, revealed a high level of sequence conservation and synteny across taxa, with the major exception of the human pathogen C. trachomatis. Important differences manifest in the polymorphic membrane protein family specific for the Chlamydiae and in the highly variable chlamydial plasticity zone. We identified a number of psittaci-specific polymorphic membrane proteins of the G family that may be related to differences in host-range and/or virulence as compared to closely related Chlamydiaceae. We calculated non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rate ratios for pairs of orthologous genes to identify putative targets of adaptive evolution and predicted type III secreted effector proteins. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first detailed analysis of the Chlamydia psittaci genome sequence. It provides insights in the genome architecture of C. psittaci and proposes a number of novel candidate genes mostly of yet unknown function that may be important for pathogen-host interactions.

  15. Comparative analysis of methods for genome-wide nucleosome cartography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintales, Luis; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Nucleosomes contribute to compacting the genome into the nucleus and regulate the physical access of regulatory proteins to DNA either directly or through the epigenetic modifications of the histone tails. Precise mapping of nucleosome positioning across the genome is, therefore, essential to understanding the genome regulation. In recent years, several experimental protocols have been developed for this purpose that include the enzymatic digestion, chemical cleavage or immunoprecipitation of chromatin followed by next-generation sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments. Here, we compare the performance and resolution of these methods from the initial biochemical steps through the alignment of the millions of short-sequence reads to a reference genome to the final computational analysis to generate genome-wide maps of nucleosome occupancy. Because of the lack of a unified protocol to process data sets obtained through the different approaches, we have developed a new computational tool (NUCwave), which facilitates their analysis, comparison and assessment and will enable researchers to choose the most suitable method for any particular purpose. NUCwave is freely available at http://nucleosome.usal.es/nucwave along with a step-by-step protocol for its use. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Sequencing and comparative genome analysis of two pathogenic Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies: genome plasticity, adaptation and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Hsuan Lin

    Full Text Available Streptococcus gallolyticus infections in humans are often associated with bacteremia, infective endocarditis and colon cancers. The disease manifestations are different depending on the subspecies of S. gallolyticus causing the infection. Here, we present the complete genomes of S. gallolyticus ATCC 43143 (biotype I and S. pasteurianus ATCC 43144 (biotype II.2. The genomic differences between the two biotypes were characterized with comparative genomic analyses. The chromosome of ATCC 43143 and ATCC 43144 are 2,36 and 2,10 Mb in length and encode 2246 and 1869 CDS respectively. The organization and genomic contents of both genomes were most similar to the recently published S. gallolyticus UCN34, where 2073 (92% and 1607 (86% of the ATCC 43143 and ATCC 43144 CDS were conserved in UCN34 respectively. There are around 600 CDS conserved in all Streptococcus genomes, indicating the Streptococcus genus has a small core-genome (constitute around 30% of total CDS and substantial evolutionary plasticity. We identified eight and five regions of genome plasticity in ATCC 43143 and ATCC 43144 respectively. Within these regions, several proteins were recognized to contribute to the fitness and virulence of each of the two subspecies. We have also predicted putative cell-surface associated proteins that could play a role in adherence to host tissues, leading to persistent infections causing sub-acute and chronic diseases in humans. This study showed evidence that the S. gallolyticus still possesses genes making it suitable in a rumen environment, whereas the ability for S. pasteurianus to live in rumen is reduced. The genome heterogeneity and genetic diversity among the two biotypes, especially membrane and lipoproteins, most likely contribute to the differences in the pathogenesis of the two S. gallolyticus biotypes and the type of disease an infected patient eventually develops.

  17. Whole genome comparative studies between chicken and turkey and their implications for avian genome evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carré Wilfrid

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomics is a powerful means of establishing inter-specific relationships between gene function/location and allows insight into genomic rearrangements, conservation and evolutionary phylogeny. The availability of the complete sequence of the chicken genome has initiated the development of detailed genomic information in other birds including turkey, an agriculturally important species where mapping has hitherto focused on linkage with limited physical information. No molecular study has yet examined conservation of avian microchromosomes, nor differences in copy number variants (CNVs between birds. Results We present a detailed comparative cytogenetic map between chicken and turkey based on reciprocal chromosome painting and mapping of 338 chicken BACs to turkey metaphases. Two inter-chromosomal changes (both involving centromeres and three pericentric inversions have been identified between chicken and turkey; and array CGH identified 16 inter-specific CNVs. Conclusion This is the first study to combine the modalities of zoo-FISH and array CGH between different avian species. The first insight into the conservation of microchromosomes, the first comparative cytogenetic map of any bird and the first appraisal of CNVs between birds is provided. Results suggest that avian genomes have remained relatively stable during evolution compared to mammalian equivalents.

  18. Prenatal diagnosis of a fetus with partial trisomy 8p resulting from a balanced maternal translocation by array-based comparative genomic hybridization%微阵列比较基因组杂交技术产前诊断母源性8p部分三体胎儿一例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭彩琴; 王峻峰; 赵丽; 刘俊; 王俊; 肖建平

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the karyotype of a fetus with transverse aortic arch hypoplasia,and to investigate the feasibility of array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) for molecular genetic diagnosis.Methods G-banding was performed to analyze the karyotypes of the fetus and its parents,and array CGH was applied to identify the chromosomal abnormality of the fetus.Results G-banding analysis revealed that the pregnant woman has carried a balanced translocation 46,XX,t(8;16) (p21;q24),while the fetus has carried an unbalanced translocation 46,XX,der(16)t(8;16)(p21;q24)mat.Array-CGH analysis suggested that the derivative chromosomal fragment has originated from 8p with breakpoints in 8p23.3 p21.3.Conclusion Trisomy 8p23.3-p21.3 may have predisposed to transverse aortic arch hypoplasia in the fetus.Parental karyotype analysis could help to characterize the translocation and evaluate the recurrent risk.Compared with routine karyotype analysis,aCGH has a higher resolution and greater accuracy for mapping chromosomal aberrations.%目的 确定1例主动脉横弓发育不良胎儿的染色体核型,探讨微阵列比较基因组杂交(array based comparative genomic hybridization,array-CGH)技术在分子遗传学及产前诊断中的应用及优越性.方法 应用G显带分析胎儿及其父母的染色体核型,用array-CGH技术明确胎儿衍生染色体片段的来源和区域.结果 G显带染色体分析显示孕妇为46,XX,t(8;16)(p21;q24)平衡易位携带者,胎儿携带46,XX,der(16)t(8;16) (p21;q24)mat的非平衡易位.array-CGH检测证实胎儿衍生染色体片段源自8号染色体短臂,患儿为8p23.3 p21.3三体患儿.结论 胎儿的异常表型(主动脉横弓发育不良)与8p23.3p21.3三体密切相关,父母染色体分析可帮助明确易位性质及来源,从而有利于评估再发风险.array-CGH在染色体异常分析中具有更高的分辨率和准确性.

  19. Interpopulation hybridization results in widespread viability selection across the genome in Tigriopus californicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zieba Jennifer T

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic interactions within hybrids influence their overall fitness. Understanding the details of these interactions can improve our understanding of speciation. One experimental approach is to investigate deviations from Mendelian expectations (segregation distortion in the inheritance of mapped genetic markers. In this study, we used the copepod Tigriopus californicus, a species which exhibits high genetic divergence between populations and a general pattern of reduced fitness in F2 interpopulation hybrids. Previous studies have implicated both nuclear-cytoplasmic and nuclear-nuclear interactions in causing this fitness reduction. We identified and mapped population-diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and used these to examine segregation distortion across the genome within F2 hybrids. Results We generated a linkage map which included 45 newly elucidated SNPs and 8 population-diagnostic microsatellites used in previous studies. The map, the first available for the Copepoda, was estimated to cover 75% of the genome and included markers on all 12 T. californicus chromosomes. We observed little segregation distortion in newly hatched F2 hybrid larvae (fewer than 10% of markers at p Conclusion Adult male F2 hybrids between two populations of T. californius exhibit dramatic segregation distortion across the genome. Distorted loci are clustered within specific linkage groups, and the direction of distortion differs between chromosomes. This segregation distortion is due to selection acting between hatching and adulthood.

  20. Comparative genomics reveals diversity among xanthomonads infecting tomato and pepper

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Potnis, Neha

    2011-03-11

    Abstract Background Bacterial spot of tomato and pepper is caused by four Xanthomonas species and is a major plant disease in warm humid climates. The four species are distinct from each other based on physiological and molecular characteristics. The genome sequence of strain 85-10, a member of one of the species, Xanthomonas euvesicatoria (Xcv) has been previously reported. To determine the relationship of the four species at the genome level and to investigate the molecular basis of their virulence and differing host ranges, draft genomic sequences of members of the other three species were determined and compared to strain 85-10. Results We sequenced the genomes of X. vesicatoria (Xv) strain 1111 (ATCC 35937), X. perforans (Xp) strain 91-118 and X. gardneri (Xg) strain 101 (ATCC 19865). The genomes were compared with each other and with the previously sequenced Xcv strain 85-10. In addition, the molecular features were predicted that may be required for pathogenicity including the type III secretion apparatus, type III effectors, other secretion systems, quorum sensing systems, adhesins, extracellular polysaccharide, and lipopolysaccharide determinants. Several novel type III effectors from Xg strain 101 and Xv strain 1111 genomes were computationally identified and their translocation was validated using a reporter gene assay. A homolog to Ax21, the elicitor of XA21-mediated resistance in rice, and a functional Ax21 sulfation system were identified in Xcv. Genes encoding proteins with functions mediated by type II and type IV secretion systems have also been compared, including enzymes involved in cell wall deconstruction, as contributors to pathogenicity. Conclusions Comparative genomic analyses revealed considerable diversity among bacterial spot pathogens, providing new insights into differences and similarities that may explain the diverse nature of these strains. Genes specific to pepper pathogens, such as the O-antigen of the lipopolysaccharide cluster

  1. Comparative genomics reveals diversity among xanthomonads infecting tomato and pepper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koebnik Ralf

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial spot of tomato and pepper is caused by four Xanthomonas species and is a major plant disease in warm humid climates. The four species are distinct from each other based on physiological and molecular characteristics. The genome sequence of strain 85-10, a member of one of the species, Xanthomonas euvesicatoria (Xcv has been previously reported. To determine the relationship of the four species at the genome level and to investigate the molecular basis of their virulence and differing host ranges, draft genomic sequences of members of the other three species were determined and compared to strain 85-10. Results We sequenced the genomes of X. vesicatoria (Xv strain 1111 (ATCC 35937, X. perforans (Xp strain 91-118 and X. gardneri (Xg strain 101 (ATCC 19865. The genomes were compared with each other and with the previously sequenced Xcv strain 85-10. In addition, the molecular features were predicted that may be required for pathogenicity including the type III secretion apparatus, type III effectors, other secretion systems, quorum sensing systems, adhesins, extracellular polysaccharide, and lipopolysaccharide determinants. Several novel type III effectors from Xg strain 101 and Xv strain 1111 genomes were computationally identified and their translocation was validated using a reporter gene assay. A homolog to Ax21, the elicitor of XA21-mediated resistance in rice, and a functional Ax21 sulfation system were identified in Xcv. Genes encoding proteins with functions mediated by type II and type IV secretion systems have also been compared, including enzymes involved in cell wall deconstruction, as contributors to pathogenicity. Conclusions Comparative genomic analyses revealed considerable diversity among bacterial spot pathogens, providing new insights into differences and similarities that may explain the diverse nature of these strains. Genes specific to pepper pathogens, such as the O-antigen of the

  2. Genome differentiation in Magonoliaceae as revealed from meiotic pairing in interspecific and intergeneric hybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shou-Zhou ZHANG; Ya-Ling WANG; Zi-Can HE; Erland EJDER

    2011-01-01

    The cross compatibility within and between Yulania Spach and Michelia L.(Magnoliaceae) is relatively good and various such hybrids,obtained by conventional artificial hybridization,are available.The aim of the present study was to determine the extent of genome differentiation between the species involved in these crosses through the observation of chromosome pairing during meiosis in pollen mother cells (PMCs) of the hybrids.Chromosome pairing behavior was studied in five species (2n =38) and two interspecific hybrids of Michelia,eight species (2n =38,76 and 114) and 10 interspecific hybrids of Yulania,and three intergeneric hybrids between Michelia and Yulania.The results showed that chromosome pairing was normal with bivalent formation in diploid parental species and in interspecific hybrids.In addition to bivalents,multivalents were encountered in polyploid parental species and polyploid interspecific hybrids.In the intergeneric hybrids between a tetraploid Yulania and two diploid Michelia,19 chromosomes,most likely originating from Michelia,were unable to synapse from zygotene to metaphase I.Meiotic chromosome pairing indicated a high degree of homology between species within Michelia and Yulania and less homology between the genomes of these two genera.The differentiation of morphological characters and the distinctness of natural distribution also support the conclusion that these two genera are likely independent monophyletic groups.This suggests that the two genera were split at early evolution of Magnoliaceae and the overlapping characteristics in external morphology and internal structures of the two genera may be the result of parallel evolution or ancient common ancestry.

  3. Comparative genomics of transcriptional regulation of methionine metabolism in Proteobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semen A Leyn

    Full Text Available Methionine metabolism and uptake genes in Proteobacteria are controlled by a variety of RNA and DNA regulatory systems. We have applied comparative genomics to reconstruct regulons for three known transcription factors, MetJ, MetR, and SahR, and three known riboswitch motifs, SAH, SAM-SAH, and SAM_alpha, in ∼ 200 genomes from 22 taxonomic groups of Proteobacteria. We also identified two novel regulons: a SahR-like transcription factor SamR controlling various methionine biosynthesis genes in the Xanthomonadales group, and a potential RNA regulatory element with terminator-antiterminator mechanism controlling the metX or metZ genes in beta-proteobacteria. For each analyzed regulator we identified the core, taxon-specific and genome-specific regulon members. By analyzing the distribution of these regulators in bacterial genomes and by comparing their regulon contents we elucidated possible evolutionary scenarios for the regulation of the methionine metabolism genes in Proteobacteria.

  4. Inference of self-regulated transcriptional networks by comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Joseph P; Matthews, Fialelei; Thomas, Julien R; Erill, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The assumption of basic properties, like self-regulation, in simple transcriptional regulatory networks can be exploited to infer regulatory motifs from the growing amounts of genomic and meta-genomic data. These motifs can in principle be used to elucidate the nature and scope of transcriptional networks through comparative genomics. Here we assess the feasibility of this approach using the SOS regulatory network of Gram-positive bacteria as a test case. Using experimentally validated data, we show that the known regulatory motif can be inferred through the assumption of self-regulation. Furthermore, the inferred motif provides a more robust search pattern for comparative genomics than the experimental motifs defined in reference organisms. We take advantage of this robustness to generate a functional map of the SOS response in Gram-positive bacteria. Our results reveal definite differences in the composition of the LexA regulon between Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, and confirm that regulation of cell-division inhibition is a widespread characteristic of this network among Gram-positive bacteria.

  5. hybriddetective: a workflow and package to facilitate the detection of hybridization using genomic data in R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wringe, Brendan F; Stanley, Ryan R E; Jeffery, Nicholas W; Anderson, Eric C; Bradbury, Ian R

    2017-08-04

    The ability to detect and characterize hybridization in nature has long been of interest to many fields of biology and often has direct implications for wildlife management and conservation. The capacity to identify the presence of hybridization, and quantify the numbers of individuals belonging to different hybrid classes, permits inference on the magnitude of, and time scale over which, hybridization has been, or is occurring. Here we present an R package and associated workflow developed for the detection, with estimates of efficiency and accuracy, of multi-generational hybrid individuals using genetic or genomic data in conjunction with the program NEWHYBRIDS. This package includes functions for the identification and testing of diagnostic panels of markers, the simulation of multi-generational hybrids, and the quantification and visualization of the efficiency and accuracy with which hybrids can be detected. Overall, this package delivers a streamlined hybrid analysis platform, providing improvements in speed, ease of use and repeatability over current ad hoc approaches. The latest version of the package and associated documentation are available on GitHub (https://github. com/bwringe/hybriddetective). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of the hybrid genomes of brewing yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolat, I.

    2016-01-01

    One of the best guarded secrets of brewers is represented by the brewing yeast employed in beer fermentation, due to its profound impact upon the specific flavour profile of the final product. The current research tackles the genome diversity of lager brewing strains as well as their impact on

  7. A hybrid approach for the automated finishing of bacterial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Ali; Klammer, Aaron A; Robins, William P; Chin, Chen-Shan; Webster, Dale; Paxinos, Ellen; Hsu, David; Ashby, Meredith; Wang, Susana; Peluso, Paul; Sebra, Robert; Sorenson, Jon; Bullard, James; Yen, Jackie; Valdovino, Marie; Mollova, Emilia; Luong, Khai; Lin, Steven; LaMay, Brianna; Joshi, Amruta; Rowe, Lori; Frace, Michael; Tarr, Cheryl L; Turnsek, Maryann; Davis, Brigid M; Kasarskis, Andrew; Mekalanos, John J; Waldor, Matthew K; Schadt, Eric E

    2012-07-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing technology have improved our ability to characterize most genomic diversity. However, accurate resolution of large structural events is challenging because of the short read lengths of second-generation technologies. Third-generation sequencing technologies, which can yield longer multikilobase reads, have the potential to address limitations associated with genome assembly. Here we combine sequencing data from second- and third-generation DNA sequencing technologies to assemble the two-chromosome genome of a recent Haitian cholera outbreak strain into two nearly finished contigs at >99.9% accuracy. Complex regions with clinically relevant structure were completely resolved. In separate control assemblies on experimental and simulated data for the canonical N16961 cholera reference strain, we obtained 14 scaffolds of greater than 1 kb for the experimental data and 8 scaffolds of greater than 1 kb for the simulated data, which allowed us to correct several errors in contigs assembled from the short-read data alone. This work provides a blueprint for the next generation of rapid microbial identification and full-genome assembly.

  8. Analysis of the hybrid genomes of brewing yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolat, I.

    2016-01-01

    One of the best guarded secrets of brewers is represented by the brewing yeast employed in beer fermentation, due to its profound impact upon the specific flavour profile of the final product. The current research tackles the genome diversity of lager brewing strains as well as their impact on impor

  9. A Web-Based Comparative Genomics Tutorial for Investigating Microbial Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Strong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available As the number of completely sequenced microbial genomes continues to rise at an impressive rate, it is important to prepare students with the skills necessary to investigate microorganisms at the genomic level. As a part of the core curriculum for first-year graduate students in the biological sciences, we have implemented a web-based tutorial to introduce students to the fields of comparative and functional genomics. The tutorial focuses on recent computational methods for identifying functionally linked genes and proteins on a genome-wide scale and was used to introduce students to the Rosetta Stone, Phylogenetic Profile, conserved Gene Neighbor, and Operon computational methods. Students learned to use a number of publicly available web servers and databases to identify functionally linked genes in the Escherichia coli genome, with emphasis on genome organization and operon structure. The overall effectiveness of the tutorial was assessed based on student evaluations and homework assignments. The tutorial is available to other educators at http://www.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/~strong/m253.php.

  10. Floral gene resources from basal angiosperms for comparative genomics research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiaohong

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Floral Genome Project was initiated to bridge the genomic gap between the most broadly studied plant model systems. Arabidopsis and rice, although now completely sequenced and under intensive comparative genomic investigation, are separated by at least 125 million years of evolutionary time, and cannot in isolation provide a comprehensive perspective on structural and functional aspects of flowering plant genome dynamics. Here we discuss new genomic resources available to the scientific community, comprising cDNA libraries and Expressed Sequence Tag (EST sequences for a suite of phylogenetically basal angiosperms specifically selected to bridge the evolutionary gaps between model plants and provide insights into gene content and genome structure in the earliest flowering plants. Results Random sequencing of cDNAs from representatives of phylogenetically important eudicot, non-grass monocot, and gymnosperm lineages has so far (as of 12/1/04 generated 70,514 ESTs and 48,170 assembled unigenes. Efficient sorting of EST sequences into putative gene families based on whole Arabidopsis/rice proteome comparison has permitted ready identification of cDNA clones for finished sequencing. Preliminarily, (i proportions of functional categories among sequenced floral genes seem representative of the entire Arabidopsis transcriptome, (ii many known floral gene homologues have been captured, and (iii phylogenetic analyses of ESTs are providing new insights into the process of gene family evolution in relation to the origin and diversification of the angiosperms. Conclusion Initial comparisons illustrate the utility of the EST data sets toward discovery of the basic floral transcriptome. These first findings also afford the opportunity to address a number of conspicuous evolutionary genomic questions, including reproductive organ transcriptome overlap between angiosperms and gymnosperms, genome-wide duplication history, lineage

  11. Floral gene resources from basal angiosperms for comparative genomics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Victor A; Soltis, Douglas E; Carlson, John E; Farmerie, William G; Wall, P Kerr; Ilut, Daniel C; Solow, Teri M; Mueller, Lukas A; Landherr, Lena L; Hu, Yi; Buzgo, Matyas; Kim, Sangtae; Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Frohlich, Michael W; Perl-Treves, Rafael; Schlarbaum, Scott E; Bliss, Barbara J; Zhang, Xiaohong; Tanksley, Steven D; Oppenheimer, David G; Soltis, Pamela S; Ma, Hong; dePamphilis, Claude W; Leebens-Mack, James H

    2005-01-01

    Background The Floral Genome Project was initiated to bridge the genomic gap between the most broadly studied plant model systems. Arabidopsis and rice, although now completely sequenced and under intensive comparative genomic investigation, are separated by at least 125 million years of evolutionary time, and cannot in isolation provide a comprehensive perspective on structural and functional aspects of flowering plant genome dynamics. Here we discuss new genomic resources available to the scientific community, comprising cDNA libraries and Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) sequences for a suite of phylogenetically basal angiosperms specifically selected to bridge the evolutionary gaps between model plants and provide insights into gene content and genome structure in the earliest flowering plants. Results Random sequencing of cDNAs from representatives of phylogenetically important eudicot, non-grass monocot, and gymnosperm lineages has so far (as of 12/1/04) generated 70,514 ESTs and 48,170 assembled unigenes. Efficient sorting of EST sequences into putative gene families based on whole Arabidopsis/rice proteome comparison has permitted ready identification of cDNA clones for finished sequencing. Preliminarily, (i) proportions of functional categories among sequenced floral genes seem representative of the entire Arabidopsis transcriptome, (ii) many known floral gene homologues have been captured, and (iii) phylogenetic analyses of ESTs are providing new insights into the process of gene family evolution in relation to the origin and diversification of the angiosperms. Conclusion Initial comparisons illustrate the utility of the EST data sets toward discovery of the basic floral transcriptome. These first findings also afford the opportunity to address a number of conspicuous evolutionary genomic questions, including reproductive organ transcriptome overlap between angiosperms and gymnosperms, genome-wide duplication history, lineage-specific gene duplication and

  12. Comparative analysis of Acinetobacters: three genomes for three lifestyles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vallenet

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is the source of numerous nosocomial infections in humans and therefore deserves close attention as multidrug or even pandrug resistant strains are increasingly being identified worldwide. Here we report the comparison of two newly sequenced genomes of A. baumannii. The human isolate A. baumannii AYE is multidrug resistant whereas strain SDF, which was isolated from body lice, is antibiotic susceptible. As reference for comparison in this analysis, the genome of the soil-living bacterium A. baylyi strain ADP1 was used. The most interesting dissimilarities we observed were that i whereas strain AYE and A. baylyi genomes harbored very few Insertion Sequence elements which could promote expression of downstream genes, strain SDF sequence contains several hundred of them that have played a crucial role in its genome reduction (gene disruptions and simple DNA loss; ii strain SDF has low catabolic capacities compared to strain AYE. Interestingly, the latter has even higher catabolic capacities than A. baylyi which has already been reported as a very nutritionally versatile organism. This metabolic performance could explain the persistence of A. baumannii nosocomial strains in environments where nutrients are scarce; iii several processes known to play a key role during host infection (biofilm formation, iron uptake, quorum sensing, virulence factors were either different or absent, the best example of which is iron uptake. Indeed, strain AYE and A. baylyi use siderophore-based systems to scavenge iron from the environment whereas strain SDF uses an alternate system similar to the Haem Acquisition System (HAS. Taken together, all these observations suggest that the genome contents of the 3 Acinetobacters compared are partly shaped by life in distinct ecological niches: human (and more largely hospital environment, louse, soil.

  13. Genome analysis and comparative genomics of a Giardia intestinalis assemblage E isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersson Jan O

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Giardia intestinalis is a protozoan parasite that causes diarrhea in a wide range of mammalian species. To further understand the genetic diversity between the Giardia intestinalis species, we have performed genome sequencing and analysis of a wild-type Giardia intestinalis sample from the assemblage E group, isolated from a pig. Results We identified 5012 protein coding genes, the majority of which are conserved compared to the previously sequenced genomes of the WB and GS strains in terms of microsynteny and sequence identity. Despite this, there is an unexpectedly large number of chromosomal rearrangements and several smaller structural changes that are present in all chromosomes. Novel members of the VSP, NEK Kinase and HCMP gene families were identified, which may reveal possible mechanisms for host specificity and new avenues for antigenic variation. We used comparative genomics of the three diverse Giardia intestinalis isolates P15, GS and WB to define a core proteome for this species complex and to identify lineage-specific genes. Extensive analyses of polymorphisms in the core proteome of Giardia revealed differential rates of divergence among cellular processes. Conclusions Our results indicate that despite a well conserved core of genes there is significant genome variation between Giardia isolates, both in terms of gene content, gene polymorphisms, structural chromosomal variations and surface molecule repertoires. This study improves the annotation of the Giardia genomes and enables the identification of functionally important variation.

  14. Classical Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes: A Comparative Genomics Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxana K. Pickeral

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available We have curated a reference set of cancer-related genes and reanalyzed their sequences in the light of molecular information and resources that have become available since they were first cloned. Homology studies were carried out for human oncogenes and tumor suppressors, compared with the complete proteome of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, and partial proteomes of mouse and rat and the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Our results demonstrate that simple, semi-automated bioinformatics approaches to identifying putative functionally equivalent gene products in different organisms may often be misleading. An electronic supplement to this article1 provides an integrated view of our comparative genomics analysis as well as mapping data, physical cDNA resources and links to published literature and reviews, thus creating a “window” into the genomes of humans and other organisms for cancer biology.

  15. Whole-genome sequence of the Tibetan frog Nanorana parkeri and the comparative evolution of tetrapod genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan-Bo; Xiong, Zi-Jun; Xiang, Xue-Yan; Liu, Shi-Ping; Zhou, Wei-Wei; Tu, Xiao-Long; Zhong, Li; Wang, Lu; Wu, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Bao-Lin; Zhu, Chun-Ling; Yang, Min-Min; Chen, Hong-Man; Li, Fang; Zhou, Long; Feng, Shao-Hong; Huang, Chao; Zhang, Guo-Jie; Irwin, David; Hillis, David M; Murphy, Robert W; Yang, Huan-Ming; Che, Jing; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-03-17

    The development of efficient sequencing techniques has resulted in large numbers of genomes being available for evolutionary studies. However, only one genome is available for all amphibians, that of Xenopus tropicalis, which is distantly related from the majority of frogs. More than 96% of frogs belong to the Neobatrachia, and no genome exists for this group. This dearth of amphibian genomes greatly restricts genomic studies of amphibians and, more generally, our understanding of tetrapod genome evolution. To fill this gap, we provide the de novo genome of a Tibetan Plateau frog, Nanorana parkeri, and compare it to that of X. tropicalis and other vertebrates. This genome encodes more than 20,000 protein-coding genes, a number similar to that of Xenopus. Although the genome size of Nanorana is considerably larger than that of Xenopus (2.3 vs. 1.5 Gb), most of the difference is due to the respective number of transposable elements in the two genomes. The two frogs exhibit considerable conserved whole-genome synteny despite having diverged approximately 266 Ma, indicating a slow rate of DNA structural evolution in anurans. Multigenome synteny blocks further show that amphibians have fewer interchromosomal rearrangements than mammals but have a comparable rate of intrachromosomal rearrangements. Our analysis also identifies 11 Mb of anuran-specific highly conserved elements that will be useful for comparative genomic analyses of frogs. The Nanorana genome offers an improved understanding of evolution of tetrapod genomes and also provides a genomic reference for other evolutionary studies.

  16. Comparative Omics-Driven Genome Annotation Refinement: Application across Yersiniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Jones, Marcus B.; Chauhan, Sadhana; Purvine, Samuel O.; Sanford, James; Monroe, Matthew E.; Brewer, Heather M.; Payne, Samuel H.; Ansong, Charles; Frank, Bryan C.; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott; Motin, Vladimir L.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2012-03-27

    Genome sequencing continues to be a rapidly evolving technology, yet most downstream aspects of genome annotation pipelines remain relatively stable or are even being abandoned. To date, the perceived value of manual curation for genome annotations is not offset by the real cost and time associated with the process. In order to balance the large number of sequences generated, the annotation process is now performed almost exclusively in an automated fashion for most genome sequencing projects. One possible way to reduce errors inherent to automated computational annotations is to apply data from 'omics' measurements (i.e. transcriptional and proteomic) to the un-annotated genome with a proteogenomic-based approach. This approach does require additional experimental and bioinformatics methods to include omics technologies; however, the approach is readily automatable and can benefit from rapid developments occurring in those research domains as well. The annotation process can be improved by experimental validation of transcription and translation and aid in the discovery of annotation errors. Here the concept of annotation refinement has been extended to include a comparative assessment of genomes across closely related species, as is becoming common in sequencing efforts. Transcriptomic and proteomic data derived from three highly similar pathogenic Yersiniae (Y. pestis CO92, Y. pestis pestoides F, and Y. pseudotuberculosis PB1/+) was used to demonstrate a comprehensive comparative omic-based annotation methodology. Peptide and oligo measurements experimentally validated the expression of nearly 40% of each strain's predicted proteome and revealed the identification of 28 novel and 68 previously incorrect protein-coding sequences (e.g., observed frameshifts, extended start sites, and translated pseudogenes) within the three current Yersinia genome annotations. Gene loss is presumed to play a major role in Y. pestis acquiring its niche as a virulent

  17. Ecology of marine Bacteroidetes: a comparative genomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Gómez, Beatriz; Richter, Michael; Schüler, Margarete; Pinhassi, Jarone; Acinas, Silvia G; González, José M; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2013-05-01

    Bacteroidetes are commonly assumed to be specialized in degrading high molecular weight (HMW) compounds and to have a preference for growth attached to particles, surfaces or algal cells. The first sequenced genomes of marine Bacteroidetes seemed to confirm this assumption. Many more genomes have been sequenced recently. Here, a comparative analysis of marine Bacteroidetes genomes revealed a life strategy different from those of other important phyla of marine bacterioplankton such as Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria. Bacteroidetes have many adaptations to grow attached to particles, have the capacity to degrade polymers, including a large number of peptidases, glycoside hydrolases (GHs), glycosyl transferases, adhesion proteins, as well as the genes for gliding motility. Several of the polymer degradation genes are located in close association with genes for TonB-dependent receptors and transducers, suggesting an integrated regulation of adhesion and degradation of polymers. This confirmed the role of this abundant group of marine bacteria as degraders of particulate matter. Marine Bacteroidetes had a significantly larger number of proteases than GHs, while non-marine Bacteroidetes had equal numbers of both. Proteorhodopsin containing Bacteroidetes shared two characteristics: small genome size and a higher number of genes involved in CO2 fixation per Mb. The latter may be important in order to survive when floating freely in the illuminated, but nutrient-poor, ocean surface.

  18. Bamboo Flowering from the Perspective of Comparative Genomics and Transcriptomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Prasun; Chakraborty, Sukanya; Dutta, Smritikana; Pal, Amita; Das, Malay

    2016-01-01

    Bamboos are an important member of the subfamily Bambusoideae, family Poaceae. The plant group exhibits wide variation with respect to the timing (1-120 years) and nature (sporadic vs. gregarious) of flowering among species. Usually flowering in woody bamboos is synchronous across culms growing over a large area, known as gregarious flowering. In many monocarpic bamboos this is followed by mass death and seed setting. While in sporadic flowering an isolated wild clump may flower, set little or no seed and remain alive. Such wide variation in flowering time and extent means that the plant group serves as repositories for genes and expression patterns that are unique to bamboo. Due to the dearth of available genomic and transcriptomic resources, limited studies have been undertaken to identify the potential molecular players in bamboo flowering. The public release of the first bamboo genome sequence Phyllostachys heterocycla, availability of related genomes Brachypodium distachyon and Oryza sativa provide us the opportunity to study this long-standing biological problem in a comparative and functional genomics framework. We identified bamboo genes homologous to those of Oryza and Brachypodium that are involved in established pathways such as vernalization, photoperiod, autonomous, and hormonal regulation of flowering. Additionally, we investigated triggers like stress (drought), physiological maturity and micro RNAs that may play crucial roles in flowering. We also analyzed available transcriptome datasets of different bamboo species to identify genes and their involvement in bamboo flowering. Finally, we summarize potential research hurdles that need to be addressed in future research.

  19. Sequencing and comparative analysis of the gorilla MHC genomic sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilming, Laurens G; Hart, Elizabeth A; Coggill, Penny C; Horton, Roger; Gilbert, James G R; Clee, Chris; Jones, Matt; Lloyd, Christine; Palmer, Sophie; Sims, Sarah; Whitehead, Siobhan; Wiley, David; Beck, Stephan; Harrow, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes play a critical role in vertebrate immune response and because the MHC is linked to a significant number of auto-immune and other diseases it is of great medical interest. Here we describe the clone-based sequencing and subsequent annotation of the MHC region of the gorilla genome. Because the MHC is subject to extensive variation, both structural and sequence-wise, it is not readily amenable to study in whole genome shotgun sequence such as the recently published gorilla genome. The variation of the MHC also makes it of evolutionary interest and therefore we analyse the sequence in the context of human and chimpanzee. In our comparisons with human and re-annotated chimpanzee MHC sequence we find that gorilla has a trimodular RCCX cluster, versus the reference human bimodular cluster, and additional copies of Class I (pseudo)genes between Gogo-K and Gogo-A (the orthologues of HLA-K and -A). We also find that Gogo-H (and Patr-H) is coding versus the HLA-H pseudogene and, conversely, there is a Gogo-DQB2 pseudogene versus the HLA-DQB2 coding gene. Our analysis, which is freely available through the VEGA genome browser, provides the research community with a comprehensive dataset for comparative and evolutionary research of the MHC.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Genomes in Oryza sativa, O.officinalis, and O. meyeriana with C0t-1 DNA and Genomic DNA of Cultivated Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) were applied to somatic chromosomes preparations of Oryza sativa, O. officinalis, and O. meyeriana with labeled probes of C0t-1 DNA and genomic DNA from the cultivated rice. The coverage percentage (%) and size (Mb) of C0t-1 DNA in O. sativa, O. officinalis, and O. meyeriana were 47.1 ±0.16, 38.61 ±0.13, 44.38±0.13, and 212.33± 1.21,269.42 ± 0.89, 532.56± 1.68 Mb, respectively. The coverage percentage and size of genomic DNA from O. sativa in O. officinalis and O. meyeriana were 91.0, 93.6% and 634, 1 123 Mb, respectively, in which 365 and 591 Mb in O. officinalis and O. meyeriana were from O. sativa genomic DNA, but not from repetitive sequences of O. sativa, and the uncoverage genome size in O. officinalis and O. meyeriana were 64 and 78 Mb, respectively. In addition, karyotype analysis was conducted based on the signal bands of C0t-1 DNA in O. sativa, O. officinalis, and O. meyeriana. The results showed that highly and moderately repetitive sequences in Oryza genus were conserved as the functional genes during evolution. The repetitive sequences reduplication may be one of the important causes of the genome enlargement of O. officinalis and O. meyeriana, and O. officinalis genome enlarged more slowly when compared with O. meyeriana. Based on the above results, it is concluded that O. officinalis and O. meyeriana were formed by reduplication, rearrangement, and gene selective loss during the evolution process.

  1. Comparative genomic and proteomic analysis of high grade glioma primary cultures and matched tumor in situ.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Howley, R

    2012-10-15

    Developing targeted therapies for high grade gliomas (HGG), the most common primary brain tumor in adults, relies largely on glioma cultures. However, it is unclear if HGG tumorigenic signaling pathways are retained under in-vitro conditions. Using array comparative genomic hybridization and immunohistochemical profiling, we contrasted the epidermal and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (EGFR\\/PDGFR) in-vitro pathway status of twenty-six primary HGG cultures with the pathway status of their original HGG biopsies. Genomic gains or amplifications were lost during culturing while genomic losses were more likely to be retained. Loss of EGFR amplification was further verified immunohistochemically when EGFR over expression was decreased in the majority of cultures. Conversely, PDGFRα and PDGFRβ were more abundantly expressed in primary cultures than in the original tumor (p<0.05). Despite these genomic and proteomic differences, primary HGG cultures retained key aspects of dysregulated tumorigenic signaling. Both in-vivo and in-vitro the presence of EGFR resulted in downstream activation of P70s6K while reduced downstream activation was associated with the presence of PDGFR and the tumor suppressor, PTEN. The preserved pathway dysregulation make this glioma model suitable for further studies of glioma tumorigenesis, however individual culture related differences must be taken into consideration when testing responsiveness to chemotherapeutic agents.

  2. Microarray comparative genomic hybridisation analysis incorporating genomic organisation, and application to enterobacterial plant pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leighton Pritchard

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Microarray comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH provides an estimate of the relative abundance of genomic DNA (gDNA taken from comparator and reference organisms by hybridisation to a microarray containing probes that represent sequences from the reference organism. The experimental method is used in a number of biological applications, including the detection of human chromosomal aberrations, and in comparative genomic analysis of bacterial strains, but optimisation of the analysis is desirable in each problem domain.We present a method for analysis of bacterial aCGH data that encodes spatial information from the reference genome in a hidden Markov model. This technique is the first such method to be validated in comparisons of sequenced bacteria that diverge at the strain and at the genus level: Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043 (Pba1043 and Dickeya dadantii 3937 (Dda3937; and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL1403 and L. lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363. In all cases our method is found to outperform common and widely used aCGH analysis methods that do not incorporate spatial information. This analysis is applied to comparisons between commercially important plant pathogenic soft-rotting enterobacteria (SRE Pba1043, P. atrosepticum SCRI1039, P. carotovorum 193, and Dda3937.Our analysis indicates that it should not be assumed that hybridisation strength is a reliable proxy for sequence identity in aCGH experiments, and robustly extends the applicability of aCGH to bacterial comparisons at the genus level. Our results in the SRE further provide evidence for a dynamic, plastic 'accessory' genome, revealing major genomic islands encoding gene products that provide insight into, and may play a direct role in determining, variation amongst the SRE in terms of their environmental survival, host range and aetiology, such as phytotoxin synthesis, multidrug resistance, and nitrogen fixation.

  3. Characterization of the Arachis (Leguminosae) D genome using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome markers and total genome DNA hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    Germán Robledo; Guillermo Seijo

    2008-01-01

    Chromosome markers were developed for Arachis glandulifera using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of the 5S and 45S rRNA genes and heterochromatic 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) positive bands. We used chromosome landmarks identified by these markers to construct the first Arachis species ideogram in which all the homologous chromosomes were precisely identified. The comparison of this ideogram with those published for other Arachis species revealed very poor homeologies with a...

  4. The genome sequence of Caenorhabditis briggsae: a platform for comparative genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lincoln D Stein

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The soil nematodes Caenorhabditis briggsae and Caenorhabditis elegans diverged from a common ancestor roughly 100 million years ago and yet are almost indistinguishable by eye. They have the same chromosome number and genome sizes, and they occupy the same ecological niche. To explore the basis for this striking conservation of structure and function, we have sequenced the C. briggsae genome to a high-quality draft stage and compared it to the finished C. elegans sequence. We predict approximately 19,500 protein-coding genes in the C. briggsae genome, roughly the same as in C. elegans. Of these, 12,200 have clear C. elegans orthologs, a further 6,500 have one or more clearly detectable C. elegans homologs, and approximately 800 C. briggsae genes have no detectable matches in C. elegans. Almost all of the noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs known are shared between the two species. The two genomes exhibit extensive colinearity, and the rate of divergence appears to be higher in the chromosomal arms than in the centers. Operons, a distinctive feature of C. elegans, are highly conserved in C. briggsae, with the arrangement of genes being preserved in 96% of cases. The difference in size between the C. briggsae (estimated at approximately 104 Mbp and C. elegans (100.3 Mbp genomes is almost entirely due to repetitive sequence, which accounts for 22.4% of the C. briggsae genome in contrast to 16.5% of the C. elegans genome. Few, if any, repeat families are shared, suggesting that most were acquired after the two species diverged or are undergoing rapid evolution. Coclustering the C. elegans and C. briggsae proteins reveals 2,169 protein families of two or more members. Most of these are shared between the two species, but some appear to be expanding or contracting, and there seem to be as many as several hundred novel C. briggsae gene families. The C. briggsae draft sequence will greatly improve the annotation of the C. elegans genome. Based on similarity to C

  5. Diversity of Pseudomonas Genomes, Including Populus-Associated Isolates, as Revealed by Comparative Genome Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Se-Ran; Wassenaar, Trudy M; Nookaew, Intawat; Hauser, Loren; Wanchai, Visanu; Land, Miriam; Timm, Collin M; Lu, Tse-Yuan S; Schadt, Christopher W; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Pelletier, Dale A; Ussery, David W

    2015-10-30

    The Pseudomonas genus contains a metabolically versatile group of organisms that are known to occupy numerous ecological niches, including the rhizosphere and endosphere of many plants. Their diversity influences the phylogenetic diversity and heterogeneity of these communities. On the basis of average amino acid identity, comparative genome analysis of >1,000 Pseudomonas genomes, including 21 Pseudomonas strains isolated from the roots of native Populus deltoides (eastern cottonwood) trees resulted in consistent and robust genomic clusters with phylogenetic homogeneity. All Pseudomonas aeruginosa genomes clustered together, and these were clearly distinct from other Pseudomonas species groups on the basis of pangenome and core genome analyses. In contrast, the genomes of Pseudomonas fluorescens were organized into 20 distinct genomic clusters, representing enormous diversity and heterogeneity. Most of our 21 Populus-associated isolates formed three distinct subgroups within the major P. fluorescens group, supported by pathway profile analysis, while two isolates were more closely related to Pseudomonas chlororaphis and Pseudomonas putida. Genes specific to Populus-associated subgroups were identified. Genes specific to subgroup 1 include several sensory systems that act in two-component signal transduction, a TonB-dependent receptor, and a phosphorelay sensor. Genes specific to subgroup 2 contain hypothetical genes, and genes specific to subgroup 3 were annotated with hydrolase activity. This study justifies the need to sequence multiple isolates, especially from P. fluorescens, which displays the most genetic variation, in order to study functional capabilities from a pangenomic perspective. This information will prove useful when choosing Pseudomonas strains for use to promote growth and increase disease resistance in plants.

  6. Rapid hybrid de novo assembly of a microbial genome using only short reads: Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis I19 as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdeira, Louise Teixeira; Carneiro, Adriana Ribeiro; Ramos, Rommel Thiago Jucá; de Almeida, Sintia Silva; D'Afonseca, Vivian; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz; Baumbach, Jan; Tauch, Andreas; McCulloch, John Anthony; Azevedo, Vasco Ariston Carvalho; Silva, Artur

    2011-08-01

    Due to the advent of the so-called Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies the amount of monetary and temporal resources for whole-genome sequencing has been reduced by several orders of magnitude. Sequence reads can be assembled either by anchoring them directly onto an available reference genome (classical reference assembly), or can be concatenated by overlap (de novo assembly). The latter strategy is preferable because it tends to maintain the architecture of the genome sequence the however, depending on the NGS platform used, the shortness of read lengths cause tremendous problems the in the subsequent genome assembly phase, impeding closing of the entire genome sequence. To address the problem, we developed a multi-pronged hybrid de novo strategy combining De Bruijn graph and Overlap-Layout-Consensus methods, which was used to assemble from short reads the entire genome of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain I19, a bacterium with immense importance in veterinary medicine that causes Caseous Lymphadenitis in ruminants, principally ovines and caprines. Briefly, contigs were assembled de novo from the short reads and were only oriented using a reference genome by anchoring. Remaining gaps were closed using iterative anchoring of short reads by craning to gap flanks. Finally, we compare the genome sequence assembled using our hybrid strategy to a classical reference assembly using the same data as input and show that with the availability of a reference genome, it pays off to use the hybrid de novo strategy, rather than a classical reference assembly, because more genome sequences are preserved using the former.

  7. Comparative analysis of copy number detection by whole-genome BAC and oligonucleotide array CGH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bejjani Bassem A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH is a powerful diagnostic tool for the detection of DNA copy number gains and losses associated with chromosome abnormalities, many of which are below the resolution of conventional chromosome analysis. It has been presumed that whole-genome oligonucleotide (oligo arrays identify more clinically significant copy-number abnormalities than whole-genome bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC arrays, yet this has not been systematically studied in a clinical diagnostic setting. Results To determine the difference in detection rate between similarly designed BAC and oligo arrays, we developed whole-genome BAC and oligonucleotide microarrays and validated them in a side-by-side comparison of 466 consecutive clinical specimens submitted to our laboratory for aCGH. Of the 466 cases studied, 67 (14.3% had a copy-number imbalance of potential clinical significance detectable by the whole-genome BAC array, and 73 (15.6% had a copy-number imbalance of potential clinical significance detectable by the whole-genome oligo array. However, because both platforms identified copy number variants of unclear clinical significance, we designed a systematic method for the interpretation of copy number alterations and tested an additional 3,443 cases by BAC array and 3,096 cases by oligo array. Of those cases tested on the BAC array, 17.6% were found to have a copy-number abnormality of potential clinical significance, whereas the detection rate increased to 22.5% for the cases tested by oligo array. In addition, we validated the oligo array for detection of mosaicism and found that it could routinely detect mosaicism at levels of 30% and greater. Conclusions Although BAC arrays have faster turnaround times, the increased detection rate of oligo arrays makes them attractive for clinical cytogenetic testing.

  8. The genome sequence of Blochmannia floridanus: Comparative analysis of reduced genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Rosario; Silva, Francisco J.; Zientz, Evelyn; Delmotte, François; González-Candelas, Fernando; Latorre, Amparo; Rausell, Carolina; Kamerbeek, Judith; Gadau, Jürgen; Hölldobler, Bert; van Ham, Roeland C. H. J.; Gross, Roy; Moya, Andrés

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial symbioses are widespread among insects, probably being one of the key factors of their evolutionary success. We present the complete genome sequence of Blochmannia floridanus, the primary endosymbiont of carpenter ants. Although these ants feed on a complex diet, this symbiosis very likely has a nutritional basis: Blochmannia is able to supply nitrogen and sulfur compounds to the host while it takes advantage of the host metabolic machinery. Remarkably, these bacteria lack all known genes involved in replication initiation (dnaA, priA, and recA). The phylogenetic analysis of a set of conserved protein-coding genes shows that Bl. floridanus is phylogenetically related to Buchnera aphidicola and Wigglesworthia glossinidia, the other endosymbiotic bacteria whose complete genomes have been sequenced so far. Comparative analysis of the five known genomes from insect endosymbiotic bacteria reveals they share only 313 genes, a number that may be close to the minimum gene set necessary to sustain endosymbiotic life. PMID:12886019

  9. Diversity Suppression-Subtractive Hybridization Array for Profiling Genomic DNA Polymorphisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Genomic DNA polymorphisms are very useful for tracing genetic traits and studying biological diversity among species. Here, we present a method we call the "diversity suppression-subtractive hybridization array" for effectively profiling genomic DNA polymorphisms. The method first obtains the subtracted gDNA fragments between any two species by suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH) to establish a subtracted gDNA library,from which diversity SSH arrays are created with the selected subtracted clones. The diversity SSH array hybridizes with the DIG-labeled genomic DNA of the organism to be assayed. Six closely related Dendrobium species were studied as model samples. Four Dendrobium species as testers were used to perform SSH. A total of 617 subtracted positive clones were obtained from four Dendrobium species, and the average ratio of positive clones was 80.3%. We demonstrated that the average percentage of polymorphic fragments of pairwise comparisons of four Dendrobium species was up to 42.4%. A dendrogram of the relatedness of six Dendrobium species was produced according to their polymorphic profiles. The results revealed that the diversity SSH array is a highly effective platform for profiling genomic DNA polymorphisms and dendrograms.

  10. The Whole Genome Assembly and Comparative Genomic Research of Thellungiella parvula (Extremophile Crucifer Mitochondrion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelin Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The complete nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial (mt genome of an extremophile species Thellungiella parvula (T. parvula have been determined with the lengths of 255,773 bp. T. parvula mt genome is a circular sequence and contains 32 protein-coding genes, 19 tRNA genes, and three ribosomal RNA genes with a 11.5% coding sequence. The base composition of 27.5% A, 27.5% T, 22.7% C, and 22.3% G in descending order shows a slight bias of 55% AT. Fifty-three repeats were identified in the mitochondrial genome of T. parvula, including 24 direct repeats, 28 tandem repeats (TRs, and one palindromic repeat. Furthermore, a total of 199 perfect microsatellites have been mined with a high A/T content (83.1% through simple sequence repeat (SSR analysis and they were distributed unevenly within this mitochondrial genome. We also analyzed other plant mitochondrial genomes’ evolution in general, providing clues for the understanding of the evolution of organelles genomes in plants. Comparing with other Brassicaceae species, T. parvula is related to Arabidopsis thaliana whose characters of low temperature resistance have been well documented. This study will provide important genetic tools for other Brassicaceae species research and improve yields of economically important plants.

  11. Reduction and expansion in microsporidian genome evolution: new insights from comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakjang, Sirintra; Williams, Tom A; Heinz, Eva; Watson, Andrew K; Foster, Peter G; Sendra, Kacper M; Heaps, Sarah E; Hirt, Robert P; Martin Embley, T

    2013-01-01

    Microsporidia are an abundant group of obligate intracellular parasites of other eukaryotes, including immunocompromised humans, but the molecular basis of their intracellular lifestyle and pathobiology are poorly understood. New genomes from a taxonomically broad range of microsporidians, complemented by published expression data, provide an opportunity for comparative analyses to identify conserved and lineage-specific patterns of microsporidian genome evolution that have underpinned this success. In this study, we infer that a dramatic bottleneck in the last common microsporidian ancestor (LCMA) left a small conserved core of genes that was subsequently embellished by gene family expansion driven by gene acquisition in different lineages. Novel expressed protein families represent a substantial fraction of sequenced microsporidian genomes and are significantly enriched for signals consistent with secretion or membrane location. Further evidence of selection is inferred from the gain and reciprocal loss of functional domains between paralogous genes, for example, affecting transport proteins. Gene expansions among transporter families preferentially affect those that are located on the plasma membrane of model organisms, consistent with recruitment to plug conserved gaps in microsporidian biosynthesis and metabolism. Core microsporidian genes shared with other eukaryotes are enriched in orthologs that, in yeast, are highly expressed, highly connected, and often essential, consistent with strong negative selection against further reduction of the conserved gene set since the LCMA. Our study reveals that microsporidian genome evolution is a highly dynamic process that has balanced constraint, reductive evolution, and genome expansion during adaptation to an extraordinarily successful obligate intracellular lifestyle.

  12. Comparative genome analysis of Bacillus cereus group genomes withBacillus subtilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain; Sorokin, Alexei; Kapatral, Vinayak; Reznik, Gary; Bhattacharya, Anamitra; Mikhailova, Natalia; Burd, Henry; Joukov, Victor; Kaznadzey, Denis; Walunas, Theresa; D' Souza, Mark; Larsen, Niels; Pusch,Gordon; Liolios, Konstantinos; Grechkin, Yuri; Lapidus, Alla; Goltsman,Eugene; Chu, Lien; Fonstein, Michael; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Overbeek, Ross; Kyrpides, Nikos; Ivanova, Natalia

    2005-09-14

    Genome features of the Bacillus cereus group genomes (representative strains of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis sub spp israelensis) were analyzed and compared with the Bacillus subtilis genome. A core set of 1,381 protein families among the four Bacillus genomes, with an additional set of 933 families common to the B. cereus group, was identified. Differences in signal transduction pathways, membrane transporters, cell surface structures, cell wall, and S-layer proteins suggesting differences in their phenotype were identified. The B. cereus group has signal transduction systems including a tyrosine kinase related to two-component system histidine kinases from B. subtilis. A model for regulation of the stress responsive sigma factor sigmaB in the B. cereus group different from the well studied regulation in B. subtilis has been proposed. Despite a high degree of chromosomal synteny among these genomes, significant differences in cell wall and spore coat proteins that contribute to the survival and adaptation in specific hosts has been identified.

  13. Predicting Hybrid Performances for Quality Traits through Genomic-Assisted Approaches in Central European Wheat

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Guozheng

    2016-07-06

    Bread-making quality traits are central targets for wheat breeding. The objectives of our study were to (1) examine the presence of major effect QTLs for quality traits in a Central European elite wheat population, (2) explore the optimal strategy for predicting the hybrid performance for wheat quality traits, and (3) investigate the effects of marker density and the composition and size of the training population on the accuracy of prediction of hybrid performance. In total 135 inbred lines of Central European bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and 1,604 hybrids derived from them were evaluated for seven quality traits in up to six environments. The 135 parental lines were genotyped using a 90k single-nucleotide polymorphism array. Genome-wide association mapping initially suggested presence of several quantitative trait loci (QTLs), but cross-validation rather indicated the absence of major effect QTLs for all quality traits except of 1000-kernel weight. Genomic selection substantially outperformed marker-assisted selection in predicting hybrid performance. A resampling study revealed that increasing the effective population size in the estimation set of hybrids is relevant to boost the accuracy of prediction for an unrelated test population.

  14. Predicting Hybrid Performances for Quality Traits through Genomic-Assisted Approaches in Central European Wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guozheng Liu

    Full Text Available Bread-making quality traits are central targets for wheat breeding. The objectives of our study were to (1 examine the presence of major effect QTLs for quality traits in a Central European elite wheat population, (2 explore the optimal strategy for predicting the hybrid performance for wheat quality traits, and (3 investigate the effects of marker density and the composition and size of the training population on the accuracy of prediction of hybrid performance. In total 135 inbred lines of Central European bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L. and 1,604 hybrids derived from them were evaluated for seven quality traits in up to six environments. The 135 parental lines were genotyped using a 90k single-nucleotide polymorphism array. Genome-wide association mapping initially suggested presence of several quantitative trait loci (QTLs, but cross-validation rather indicated the absence of major effect QTLs for all quality traits except of 1000-kernel weight. Genomic selection substantially outperformed marker-assisted selection in predicting hybrid performance. A resampling study revealed that increasing the effective population size in the estimation set of hybrids is relevant to boost the accuracy of prediction for an unrelated test population.

  15. Genome-wide dissection of hybrid sterility in Drosophila confirms a polygenic threshold architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morán, Tomás; Fontdevila, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    To date, different studies about the genetic basis of hybrid male sterility (HMS), a postzygotic reproductive barrier thoroughly investigated using Drosophila species, have demonstrated that no single major gene can produce hybrid sterility without the cooperation of several genetic factors. Early work using hybrids between Drosophila koepferae (Dk) and Drosophila buzzatii (Db) was consistent with the idea that HMS requires the cooperation of several genetic factors, supporting a polygenic threshold (PT) model. Here we present a genome-wide mapping strategy to test the PT model, analyzing serially backcrossed fertile and sterile males in which the Dk genome was introgressed into the Db background. We identified 32 Dk-specific markers significantly associated with hybrid sterility. Our results demonstrate 1) a strong correlation between the number of segregated sterility markers and males' degree of sterility, 2) the exchangeability among markers, 3) their tendency to cluster into low-recombining chromosomal regions, and 4) the requirement for a minimum number (threshold) of markers to elicit sterility. Although our findings do not contradict a role for occasional major hybrid-sterility genes, they conform more to the view that HMS primarily evolves by the cumulative action of many interacting genes of minor effect in a complex PT architecture.

  16. A process for analysis of microarray comparative genomics hybridisation studies for bacterial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woodward Martin J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray based comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH experiments have been used to study numerous biological problems including understanding genome plasticity in pathogenic bacteria. Typically such experiments produce large data sets that are difficult for biologists to handle. Although there are some programmes available for interpretation of bacterial transcriptomics data and CGH microarray data for looking at genetic stability in oncogenes, there are none specifically to understand the mosaic nature of bacterial genomes. Consequently a bottle neck still persists in accurate processing and mathematical analysis of these data. To address this shortfall we have produced a simple and robust CGH microarray data analysis process that may be automated in the future to understand bacterial genomic diversity. Results The process involves five steps: cleaning, normalisation, estimating gene presence and absence or divergence, validation, and analysis of data from test against three reference strains simultaneously. Each stage of the process is described and we have compared a number of methods available for characterising bacterial genomic diversity, for calculating the cut-off between gene presence and absence or divergence, and shown that a simple dynamic approach using a kernel density estimator performed better than both established, as well as a more sophisticated mixture modelling technique. We have also shown that current methods commonly used for CGH microarray analysis in tumour and cancer cell lines are not appropriate for analysing our data. Conclusion After carrying out the analysis and validation for three sequenced Escherichia coli strains, CGH microarray data from 19 E. coli O157 pathogenic test strains were used to demonstrate the benefits of applying this simple and robust process to CGH microarray studies using bacterial genomes.

  17. Beyond the thale: comparative genomics and genetics of Arabidopsis relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Daniel; Weigel, Detlef

    2015-05-01

    For decades a small number of model species have rightly occupied a privileged position in laboratory experiments, but it is becoming increasingly clear that our knowledge of biology is greatly improved when informed by a broader diversity of species and evolutionary context. Arabidopsis thaliana has been the primary model organism for plants, benefiting from a high-quality reference genome sequence and resources for reverse genetics. However, recent studies have made a group of species also in the Brassicaceae family and closely related to A. thaliana a focal point for comparative molecular, genomic, phenotypic and evolutionary studies. In this Review, we emphasize how such studies complement continued study of the model plant itself, provide an evolutionary perspective and summarize our current understanding of genetic and phenotypic diversity in plants.

  18. A comparative encyclopedia of DNA elements in the mouse genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Feng; Cheng, Yong; Breschi, Alessandra; Vierstra, Jeff; Wu, Weisheng; Ryba, Tyrone; Sandstrom, Richard; Ma, Zhihai; Davis, Carrie; Pope, Benjamin D; Shen, Yin; Pervouchine, Dmitri D; Djebali, Sarah; Thurman, Robert E; Kaul, Rajinder; Rynes, Eric; Kirilusha, Anthony; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine; Antoshechkin, Igor; DeSalvo, Gilberto; See, Lei-Hoon; Fastuca, Meagan; Drenkow, Jorg; Zaleski, Chris; Dobin, Alex; Prieto, Pablo; Lagarde, Julien; Bussotti, Giovanni; Tanzer, Andrea; Denas, Olgert; Li, Kanwei; Bender, M A; Zhang, Miaohua; Byron, Rachel; Groudine, Mark T; McCleary, David; Pham, Long; Ye, Zhen; Kuan, Samantha; Edsall, Lee; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Rasmussen, Matthew D; Bansal, Mukul S; Kellis, Manolis; Keller, Cheryl A; Morrissey, Christapher S; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Dogan, Nergiz; Harris, Robert S; Cayting, Philip; Kawli, Trupti; Boyle, Alan P; Euskirchen, Ghia; Kundaje, Anshul; Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Jansen, Camden; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Erickson, Drew T; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Sloan, Cricket A; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Lacerda de Sousa, Beatriz; Beal, Kathryn; Pignatelli, Miguel; Flicek, Paul; Lian, Jin; Kahveci, Tamer; Lee, Dongwon; Kent, W James; Ramalho Santos, Miguel; Herrero, Javier; Notredame, Cedric; Johnson, Audra; Vong, Shinny; Lee, Kristen; Bates, Daniel; Neri, Fidencio; Diegel, Morgan; Canfield, Theresa; Sabo, Peter J; Wilken, Matthew S; Reh, Thomas A; Giste, Erika; Shafer, Anthony; Kutyavin, Tanya; Haugen, Eric; Dunn, Douglas; Reynolds, Alex P; Neph, Shane; Humbert, Richard; Hansen, R Scott; De Bruijn, Marella; Selleri, Licia; Rudensky, Alexander; Josefowicz, Steven; Samstein, Robert; Eichler, Evan E; Orkin, Stuart H; Levasseur, Dana; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Chang, Kai-Hsin; Skoultchi, Arthur; Gosh, Srikanta; Disteche, Christine; Treuting, Piper; Wang, Yanli; Weiss, Mitchell J; Blobel, Gerd A; Cao, Xiaoyi; Zhong, Sheng; Wang, Ting; Good, Peter J; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B; Zhou, Xiao-Qiao; Pazin, Michael J; Feingold, Elise A; Wold, Barbara; Taylor, James; Mortazavi, Ali; Weissman, Sherman M; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael P; Guigo, Roderic; Gingeras, Thomas R; Gilbert, David M; Hardison, Ross C; Beer, Michael A; Ren, Bing

    2014-11-20

    The laboratory mouse shares the majority of its protein-coding genes with humans, making it the premier model organism in biomedical research, yet the two mammals differ in significant ways. To gain greater insights into both shared and species-specific transcriptional and cellular regulatory programs in the mouse, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium has mapped transcription, DNase I hypersensitivity, transcription factor binding, chromatin modifications and replication domains throughout the mouse genome in diverse cell and tissue types. By comparing with the human genome, we not only confirm substantial conservation in the newly annotated potential functional sequences, but also find a large degree of divergence of sequences involved in transcriptional regulation, chromatin state and higher order chromatin organization. Our results illuminate the wide range of evolutionary forces acting on genes and their regulatory regions, and provide a general resource for research into mammalian biology and mechanisms of human diseases.

  19. A Comparative Encyclopedia of DNA Elements in the Mouse Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Feng; Cheng, Yong; Breschi, Alessandra; Vierstra, Jeff; Wu, Weisheng; Ryba, Tyrone; Sandstrom, Richard; Ma, Zhihai; Davis, Carrie; Pope, Benjamin D.; Shen, Yin; Pervouchine, Dmitri D.; Djebali, Sarah; Thurman, Bob; Kaul, Rajinder; Rynes, Eric; Kirilusha, Anthony; Marinov, Georgi K.; Williams, Brian A.; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine; Antoshechkin, Igor; DeSalvo, Gilberto; See, Lei-Hoon; Fastuca, Meagan; Drenkow, Jorg; Zaleski, Chris; Dobin, Alex; Prieto, Pablo; Lagarde, Julien; Bussotti, Giovanni; Tanzer, Andrea; Denas, Olgert; Li, Kanwei; Bender, M. A.; Zhang, Miaohua; Byron, Rachel; Groudine, Mark T.; McCleary, David; Pham, Long; Ye, Zhen; Kuan, Samantha; Edsall, Lee; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Rasmussen, Matthew D.; Bansal, Mukul S.; Keller, Cheryl A.; Morrissey, Christapher S.; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Dogan, Nergiz; Harris, Robert S.; Cayting, Philip; Kawli, Trupti; Boyle, Alan P.; Euskirchen, Ghia; Kundaje, Anshul; Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Jansen, Camden; Malladi, Venkat S.; Cline, Melissa S.; Erickson, Drew T.; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Sloan, Cricket A.; Rosenbloom, Kate R.; de Sousa, Beatriz Lacerda; Beal, Kathryn; Pignatelli, Miguel; Flicek, Paul; Lian, Jin; Kahveci, Tamer; Lee, Dongwon; Kent, W. James; Santos, Miguel Ramalho; Herrero, Javier; Notredame, Cedric; Johnson, Audra; Vong, Shinny; Lee, Kristen; Bates, Daniel; Neri, Fidencio; Diegel, Morgan; Canfield, Theresa; Sabo, Peter J.; Wilken, Matthew S.; Reh, Thomas A.; Giste, Erika; Shafer, Anthony; Kutyavin, Tanya; Haugen, Eric; Dunn, Douglas; Reynolds, Alex P.; Neph, Shane; Humbert, Richard; Hansen, R. Scott; De Bruijn, Marella; Selleri, Licia; Rudensky, Alexander; Josefowicz, Steven; Samstein, Robert; Eichler, Evan E.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Levasseur, Dana; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Chang, Kai-Hsin; Skoultchi, Arthur; Gosh, Srikanta; Disteche, Christine; Treuting, Piper; Wang, Yanli; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Blobel, Gerd A.; Good, Peter J.; Lowdon, Rebecca F.; Adams, Leslie B.; Zhou, Xiao-Qiao; Pazin, Michael J.; Feingold, Elise A.; Wold, Barbara; Taylor, James; Kellis, Manolis; Mortazavi, Ali; Weissman, Sherman M.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Snyder, Michael P.; Guigo, Roderic; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Gilbert, David M.; Hardison, Ross C.; Beer, Michael A.; Ren, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Summary As the premier model organism in biomedical research, the laboratory mouse shares the majority of protein-coding genes with humans, yet the two mammals differ in significant ways. To gain greater insights into both shared and species-specific transcriptional and cellular regulatory programs in the mouse, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium has mapped transcription, DNase I hypersensitivity, transcription factor binding, chromatin modifications, and replication domains throughout the mouse genome in diverse cell and tissue types. By comparing with the human genome, we not only confirm substantial conservation in the newly annotated potential functional sequences, but also find a large degree of divergence of other sequences involved in transcriptional regulation, chromatin state and higher order chromatin organization. Our results illuminate the wide range of evolutionary forces acting on genes and their regulatory regions, and provide a general resource for research into mammalian biology and mechanisms of human diseases. PMID:25409824

  20. Two molecular markers based on mitochondrial genomes for varieties identification of the northern snakehead (Channa argus) and blotched snakehead (Channa maculata) and their reciprocal hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xincheng, Zhang; Kunci, Chen; Xinping, Zhu; Jian, Zhao; Qing, Luo; Xiaoyou, Hong; Wei, Li; Fengfang, Xiao

    2015-08-01

    The northern snakehead (Channa argus) and blotched snakehead (Channa maculata) and their reciprocal hybrids have played important roles in the Chinese freshwater aquaculture industry, with an annual production in China exceeding 400 thousand tons. While these are popular aquaculture breeds in China, it is not easy to identify northern snakehead, blotched snakehead, and their hybrids. Thus, a method should be developed to identify these varieties. To distinguish between the reciprocal hybrids (C. argus ♀ × C. maculata ♂ and C. maculata ♀ × C. argus ♂), the mitochondrial genome sequences of northern snakehead and blotched snakehead and their reciprocal hybrids were compared. Following the alignment and analysis of mtDNA sequences of northern snakehead, blotched snakehead and their hybrids, two pairs of specific primers were designed based on identified differences ranging from 12S rRNA to 16S rRNA gene. The BY1 primers amplified the same bands in the blotched snakehead and the hybrid (C. maculata ♀ × C. argus ♂), while producing no products in northern snakehead and the hybrid (C. argus ♀ × C. maculata ♂). Amplification with WY1 yielded the opposite results. Then, 30 individuals per fish were randomized to verify the primers, and the results showed that the primers were specific for breeds, as intended. The specific primers can not only simply distinguish between two kinds of hybrids, but also rapidly identify the two parents. This study provides a method of molecular marker identification to identify reciprocal hybrids.

  1. Comparative Genomics of the Ubiquitous, Hydrocarbon-degrading Genus Marinobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, E.; Webb, E.; Edwards, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    The genus Marinobacter is amongst the most ubiquitous in the global oceans and strains have been isolated from a wide variety of marine environments, including offshore oil-well heads, coastal thermal springs, Antarctic sea water, saline soils and associations with diatoms and dinoflagellates. Many strains have been recognized to be important hydrocarbon degraders in various marine habitats presenting sometimes extreme pH or salinity conditions. Analysis of the genome of M. aquaeolei revealed enormous adaptation versatility with an assortment of strategies for carbon and energy acquisition, sensation, and defense. In an effort to elucidate the ecological and biogeochemical significance of the Marinobacters, seven Marinobacter strains from diverse environments were included in a comparative genomics study. Genomes were screened for metabolic and adaptation potential to elucidate the strategies responsible for the omnipresence of the Marinobacter genus and their remedial action potential in hydrocarbon-polluted waters. The core genome predominantly encodes for key genes involved in hydrocarbon degradation, biofilm-relevant processes, including utilization of external DNA, halotolerance, as well as defense mechanisms against heavy metals, antibiotics, and toxins. All Marinobacter strains were observed to degrade a wide spectrum of hydrocarbon species, including aliphatic, polycyclic aromatic as well as acyclic isoprenoid compounds. Various genes predicted to facilitate hydrocarbon degradation, e.g. alkane 1-monooxygenase, appear to have originated from lateral gene transfer as they are located on gene clusters of 10-20% lower GC-content compared to genome averages and are flanked by transposases. Top ortholog hits are found in other hydrocarbon degrading organisms, e.g. Alcanivorax borkumensis. Strategies for hydrocarbon uptake encoded by various Marinobacter strains include cell surface hydrophobicity adaptation via capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis and attachment

  2. Comparative genomics of Serratia spp.: two paths towards endosymbiotic life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Manzano-Marín

    Full Text Available Symbiosis is a widespread phenomenon in nature, in which insects show a great number of these associations. Buchnera aphidicola, the obligate endosymbiont of aphids, coexists in some species with another intracellular bacterium, Serratia symbiotica. Of particular interest is the case of the cedar aphid Cinara cedri, where B. aphidicola BCc and S. symbiotica SCc need each other to fulfil their symbiotic role with the insect. Moreover, various features seem to indicate that S. symbiotica SCc is closer to an obligate endosymbiont than to other facultative S. symbiotica, such as the one described for the aphid Acirthosyphon pisum (S. symbiotica SAp. This work is based on the comparative genomics of five strains of Serratia, three free-living and two endosymbiotic ones (one facultative and one obligate which should allow us to dissect the genome reduction taking place in the adaptive process to an intracellular life-style. Using a pan-genome approach, we have identified shared and strain-specific genes from both endosymbiotic strains and gained insight into the different genetic reduction both S. symbiotica have undergone. We have identified both retained and reduced functional categories in S. symbiotica compared to the Free-Living Serratia (FLS that seem to be related with its endosymbiotic role in their specific host-symbiont systems. By means of a phylogenomic reconstruction we have solved the position of both endosymbionts with confidence, established the probable insect-pathogen origin of the symbiotic clade as well as the high amino-acid substitution rate in S. symbiotica SCc. Finally, we were able to quantify the minimal number of rearrangements suffered in the endosymbiotic lineages and reconstruct a minimal rearrangement phylogeny. All these findings provide important evidence for the existence of at least two distinctive S. symbiotica lineages that are characterized by different rearrangements, gene content, genome size and branch lengths.

  3. High resolution radiation hybrid maps of bovine chromosomes 19 and 29: comparison with the bovine genome sequence assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Womack James E

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High resolution radiation hybrid (RH maps can facilitate genome sequence assembly by correctly ordering genes and genetic markers along chromosomes. The objective of the present study was to generate high resolution RH maps of bovine chromosomes 19 (BTA19 and 29 (BTA29, and compare them with the current 7.1X bovine genome sequence assembly (bovine build 3.1. We have chosen BTA19 and 29 as candidate chromosomes for mapping, since many Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL for the traits of carcass merit and residual feed intake have been identified on these chromosomes. Results We have constructed high resolution maps of BTA19 and BTA29 consisting of 555 and 253 Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP markers respectively using a 12,000 rad whole genome RH panel. With these markers, the RH map of BTA19 and BTA29 extended to 4591.4 cR and 2884.1 cR in length respectively. When aligned with the current bovine build 3.1, the order of markers on the RH map for BTA19 and 29 showed inconsistencies with respect to the genome assembly. Maps of both the chromosomes show that there is a significant internal rearrangement of the markers involving displacement, inversion and flips within the scaffolds with some scaffolds being misplaced in the genome assembly. We also constructed cattle-human comparative maps of these chromosomes which showed an overall agreement with the comparative maps published previously. However, minor discrepancies in the orientation of few homologous synteny blocks were observed. Conclusion The high resolution maps of BTA19 (average 1 locus/139 kb and BTA29 (average 1 locus/208 kb presented in this study suggest that by the incorporation of RH mapping information, the current bovine genome sequence assembly can be significantly improved. Furthermore, these maps can serve as a potential resource for fine mapping QTL and identification of causative mutations underlying QTL for economically important traits.

  4. Genome-wide mapping of copy number variation in humans: comparative analysis of high resolution array platforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajini R Haraksingh

    Full Text Available Accurate and efficient genome-wide detection of copy number variants (CNVs is essential for understanding human genomic variation, genome-wide CNV association type studies, cytogenetics research and diagnostics, and independent validation of CNVs identified from sequencing based technologies. Numerous, array-based platforms for CNV detection exist utilizing array Comparative Genome Hybridization (aCGH, Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP genotyping or both. We have quantitatively assessed the abilities of twelve leading genome-wide CNV detection platforms to accurately detect Gold Standard sets of CNVs in the genome of HapMap CEU sample NA12878, and found significant differences in performance. The technologies analyzed were the NimbleGen 4.2 M, 2.1 M and 3×720 K Whole Genome and CNV focused arrays, the Agilent 1×1 M CGH and High Resolution and 2×400 K CNV and SNP+CGH arrays, the Illumina Human Omni1Quad array and the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array. The Gold Standards used were a 1000 Genomes Project sequencing-based set of 3997 validated CNVs and an ultra high-resolution aCGH-based set of 756 validated CNVs. We found that sensitivity, total number, size range and breakpoint resolution of CNV calls were highest for CNV focused arrays. Our results are important for cost effective CNV detection and validation for both basic and clinical applications.

  5. Comparative genomics of Toll-like receptor signalling in five species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Chunhua

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last decade, several studies have identified quantitative trait loci (QTL affecting variation of immune related traits in mammals. Recent studies in humans and mice suggest that part of this variation may be caused by polymorphisms in genes involved in Toll-like receptor (TLR signalling. In this project, we used a comparative approach to investigate the importance of TLR-related genes in comparison with other immunologically relevant genes for resistance traits in five species by associating their genomic location with previously published immune-related QTL regions. Results We report the genomic localisation of TLR1-10 and ten associated signalling molecules in sheep and pig using in-silico and/or radiation hybrid (RH mapping techniques and compare their positions with their annotated homologues in the human, cattle and mouse whole genome sequences. We also report medium-density RH maps for porcine chromosomes 8 and 13. A comparative analysis of the positions of previously published relevant QTLs allowed the identification of homologous regions that are associated with similar health traits in several species and which contain TLR related and other immunologically relevant genes. Additional evidence was gathered by examining relevant gene expression and association studies. Conclusion This comparative genomic approach identified eight genes as potentially causative genes for variations of health related traits. These include susceptibility to clinical mastitis in dairy cattle, general disease resistance in sheep, cattle, humans and mice, and tolerance to protozoan infection in cattle and mice. Four TLR-related genes (TLR1, 6, MyD88, IRF3 appear to be the most likely candidate genes underlying QTL regions which control the resistance to the same or similar pathogens in several species. Further studies are required to investigate the potential role of polymorphisms within these genes.

  6. Complete genome sequence of Enterococcus faecium strain TX16 and comparative genomic analysis of Enterococcus faecium genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Xiang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterococci are among the leading causes of hospital-acquired infections in the United States and Europe, with Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium being the two most common species isolated from enterococcal infections. In the last decade, the proportion of enterococcal infections caused by E. faecium has steadily increased compared to other Enterococcus species. Although the underlying mechanism for the gradual replacement of E. faecalis by E. faecium in the hospital environment is not yet understood, many studies using genotyping and phylogenetic analysis have shown the emergence of a globally dispersed polyclonal subcluster of E. faecium strains in clinical environments. Systematic study of the molecular epidemiology and pathogenesis of E. faecium has been hindered by the lack of closed, complete E. faecium genomes that can be used as references. Results In this study, we report the complete genome sequence of the E. faecium strain TX16, also known as DO, which belongs to multilocus sequence type (ST 18, and was the first E. faecium strain ever sequenced. Whole genome comparison of the TX16 genome with 21 E. faecium draft genomes confirmed that most clinical, outbreak, and hospital-associated (HA strains (including STs 16, 17, 18, and 78, in addition to strains of non-hospital origin, group in the same clade (referred to as the HA clade and are evolutionally considerably more closely related to each other by phylogenetic and gene content similarity analyses than to isolates in the community-associated (CA clade with approximately a 3–4% average nucleotide sequence difference between the two clades at the core genome level. Our study also revealed that many genomic loci in the TX16 genome are unique to the HA clade. 380 ORFs in TX16 are HA-clade specific and antibiotic resistance genes are enriched in HA-clade strains. Mobile elements such as IS16 and transposons were also found almost exclusively in HA strains

  7. Comparative genomics of flatworms (platyhelminthes) reveals shared genomic features of ecto- and endoparastic neodermata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Christoph; Fromm, Bastian; Bachmann, Lutz

    2014-05-01

    The ectoparasitic Monogenea comprise a major part of the obligate parasitic flatworm diversity. Although genomic adaptations to parasitism have been studied in the endoparasitic tapeworms (Cestoda) and flukes (Trematoda), no representative of the Monogenea has been investigated yet. We present the high-quality draft genome of Gyrodactylus salaris, an economically important monogenean ectoparasite of wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). A total of 15,488 gene models were identified, of which 7,102 were functionally annotated. The controversial phylogenetic relationships within the obligate parasitic Neodermata were resolved in a phylogenomic analysis using 1,719 gene models (alignment length of >500,000 amino acids) for a set of 16 metazoan taxa. The Monogenea were found basal to the Cestoda and Trematoda, which implies ectoparasitism being plesiomorphic within the Neodermata and strongly supports a common origin of complex life cycles. Comparative analysis of seven parasitic flatworm genomes identified shared genomic features for the ecto- and endoparasitic lineages, such as a substantial reduction of the core bilaterian gene complement, including the homeodomain-containing genes, and a loss of the piwi and vasa genes, which are considered essential for animal development. Furthermore, the shared loss of functional fatty acid biosynthesis pathways and the absence of peroxisomes, the latter organelles presumed ubiquitous in eukaryotes except for parasitic protozoans, were inferred. The draft genome of G. salaris opens for future in-depth analyses of pathogenicity and host specificity of poorly characterized G. salaris strains, and will enhance studies addressing the genomics of host-parasite interactions and speciation in the highly diverse monogenean flatworms.

  8. Comparative Genomics of Flatworms (Platyhelminthes) Reveals Shared Genomic Features of Ecto- and Endoparastic Neodermata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Christoph; Fromm, Bastian; Bachmann, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    The ectoparasitic Monogenea comprise a major part of the obligate parasitic flatworm diversity. Although genomic adaptations to parasitism have been studied in the endoparasitic tapeworms (Cestoda) and flukes (Trematoda), no representative of the Monogenea has been investigated yet. We present the high-quality draft genome of Gyrodactylus salaris, an economically important monogenean ectoparasite of wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). A total of 15,488 gene models were identified, of which 7,102 were functionally annotated. The controversial phylogenetic relationships within the obligate parasitic Neodermata were resolved in a phylogenomic analysis using 1,719 gene models (alignment length of >500,000 amino acids) for a set of 16 metazoan taxa. The Monogenea were found basal to the Cestoda and Trematoda, which implies ectoparasitism being plesiomorphic within the Neodermata and strongly supports a common origin of complex life cycles. Comparative analysis of seven parasitic flatworm genomes identified shared genomic features for the ecto- and endoparasitic lineages, such as a substantial reduction of the core bilaterian gene complement, including the homeodomain-containing genes, and a loss of the piwi and vasa genes, which are considered essential for animal development. Furthermore, the shared loss of functional fatty acid biosynthesis pathways and the absence of peroxisomes, the latter organelles presumed ubiquitous in eukaryotes except for parasitic protozoans, were inferred. The draft genome of G. salaris opens for future in-depth analyses of pathogenicity and host specificity of poorly characterized G. salaris strains, and will enhance studies addressing the genomics of host–parasite interactions and speciation in the highly diverse monogenean flatworms. PMID:24732282

  9. The complete genome sequence and comparative genome analysis of the high pathogenicity Yersinia enterocolitica strain 8081.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas R Thomson

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The human enteropathogen, Yersinia enterocolitica, is a significant link in the range of Yersinia pathologies extending from mild gastroenteritis to bubonic plague. Comparison at the genomic level is a key step in our understanding of the genetic basis for this pathogenicity spectrum. Here we report the genome of Y. enterocolitica strain 8081 (serotype 0:8; biotype 1B and extensive microarray data relating to the genetic diversity of the Y. enterocolitica species. Our analysis reveals that the genome of Y. enterocolitica strain 8081 is a patchwork of horizontally acquired genetic loci, including a plasticity zone of 199 kb containing an extraordinarily high density of virulence genes. Microarray analysis has provided insights into species-specific Y. enterocolitica gene functions and the intraspecies differences between the high, low, and nonpathogenic Y. enterocolitica biotypes. Through comparative genome sequence analysis we provide new information on the evolution of the Yersinia. We identify numerous loci that represent ancestral clusters of genes potentially important in enteric survival and pathogenesis, which have been lost or are in the process of being lost, in the other sequenced Yersinia lineages. Our analysis also highlights large metabolic operons in Y. enterocolitica that are absent in the related enteropathogen, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, indicating major differences in niche and nutrients used within the mammalian gut. These include clusters directing, the production of hydrogenases, tetrathionate respiration, cobalamin synthesis, and propanediol utilisation. Along with ancestral gene clusters, the genome of Y. enterocolitica has revealed species-specific and enteropathogen-specific loci. This has provided important insights into the pathology of this bacterium and, more broadly, into the evolution of the genus. Moreover, wider investigations looking at the patterns of gene loss and gain in the Yersinia have highlighted common

  10. Insights into the Dekkera bruxellensis genomic landscape: comparative genomics reveals variations in ploidy and nutrient utilisation potential amongst wine isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R Borneman

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Dekkera bruxellensis is a major contaminant of industrial fermentations, such as those used for the production of biofuel and wine, where it outlasts and, under some conditions, outcompetes the major industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In order to investigate the level of inter-strain variation that is present within this economically important species, the genomes of four diverse D. bruxellensis isolates were compared. While each of the four strains was shown to contain a core diploid genome, which is clearly sufficient for survival, two of the four isolates have a third haploid complement of chromosomes. The sequences of these additional haploid genomes were both highly divergent from those comprising the diploid core and divergent between the two triploid strains. Similar to examples in the Saccharomyces spp. clade, where some allotriploids have arisen on the basis of enhanced ability to survive a range of environmental conditions, it is likely these strains are products of two independent hybridisation events that may have involved multiple species or distinct sub-species of Dekkera. Interestingly these triploid strains represent the vast majority (92% of isolates from across the Australian wine industry, suggesting that the additional set of chromosomes may confer a selective advantage in winery environments that has resulted in these hybrid strains all-but replacing their diploid counterparts in Australian winery settings. In addition to the apparent inter-specific hybridisation events, chromosomal aberrations such as strain-specific insertions and deletions and loss-of-heterozygosity by gene conversion were also commonplace. While these events are likely to have affected many phenotypes across these strains, we have been able to link a specific deletion to the inability to utilise nitrate by some strains of D. bruxellensis, a phenotype that may have direct impacts in the ability for these strains to compete with S

  11. Insights into the Dekkera bruxellensis genomic landscape: comparative genomics reveals variations in ploidy and nutrient utilisation potential amongst wine isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borneman, Anthony R; Zeppel, Ryan; Chambers, Paul J; Curtin, Chris D

    2014-02-01

    The yeast Dekkera bruxellensis is a major contaminant of industrial fermentations, such as those used for the production of biofuel and wine, where it outlasts and, under some c