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Sample records for compacted dna nanoparticles

  1. A partial structural and functional rescue of a retinitis pigmentosa model with compacted DNA nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Cai

    Full Text Available Previously we have shown that compacted DNA nanoparticles can drive high levels of transgene expression after subretinal injection in the mouse eye. Here we delivered compacted DNA nanoparticles containing a therapeutic gene to the retinas of a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. Nanoparticles containing the wild-type retinal degeneration slow (Rds gene were injected into the subretinal space of rds(+/- mice on postnatal day 5. Gene expression was sustained for up to four months at levels up to four times higher than in controls injected with saline or naked DNA. The nanoparticles were taken up into virtually all photoreceptors and mediated significant structural and biochemical rescue of the disease without histological or functional evidence of toxicity. Electroretinogram recordings showed that nanoparticle-mediated gene transfer restored cone function to a near-normal level in contrast to transfer of naked plasmid DNA. Rod function was also improved. These findings demonstrate that compacted DNA nanoparticles represent a viable option for development of gene-based interventions for ocular diseases and obviate major barriers commonly encountered with non-viral based therapies.

  2. DNA compaction by azobenzene-containing surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Kopyshev, Alexey; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana; Morozova, Elena; Lysyakova, Ludmila; Kasyanenko, Nina

    2011-01-01

    We report on the interaction of cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant with DNA investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. The properties of the surfactant can be controlled with light by reversible switching of the azobenzene unit, incorporated into the surfactant tail, between a hydrophobic trans (visible irradiation) and a hydrophilic cis (UV irradiation) configuration. The influence of the trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene on the compaction process of DNA molecules and the role of both isomers in the formation and colloidal stability of DNA-surfactant complexes is discussed. It is shown that the trans isomer plays a major role in the DNA compaction process. The influence of the cis isomer on the DNA coil configuration is rather small. The construction of a phase diagram of the DNA concentration versus surfactant/DNA charge ratio allows distancing between three major phases: colloidally stable and unstable compacted globules, and extended coil conformation. There is a critical concentration of DNA above which the compacted globules can be hindered from aggregation and precipitation by adding an appropriate amount of the surfactant in the trans configuration. This is because of the compensation of hydrophobicity of the globules with an increasing amount of the surfactant. Below the critical DNA concentration, the compacted globules are colloidally stable and can be reversibly transferred with light to an extended coil state.

  3. DNA-scaffolded nanoparticle structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoegberg, Bjoern; Olin, Haakan [Department of Engineering Physics and Mathematics, Mid Sweden University, SE-851 70 Sundsvall, Sweden (Sweden)

    2007-03-15

    DNA self-assembly is a powerful route to the production of very small, complex structures. When used in combination with nanoparticles it is likely to become a key technology in the production of nanoelectronics in the future. Previously, demonstrated nanoparticle assemblies have mainly been periodic and highly symmetric arrays, unsuited as building blocks for any complex circuits. With the invention of DNA-scaffolded origami reported earlier this year (Rothemund P W K 2006 Nature 440 (7082) 297-302), a new route to complex nanostructures using DNA has been opened. Here, we give a short review of the field and present the current status of our experiments were DNA origami is used in conjunction with nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles are functionalized with thiolated single stranded DNA. Strands that are complementary to the gold particle strands can be positioned on the self-assembled DNA-structure in arbitrary patterns. This property should allow an accurate positioning of the particles by letting them hybridize on the lattice. We report on our recent experiments on this system and discuss open problems and future applications.

  4. DNA-scaffolded nanoparticle structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegberg, Bjoern; Olin, Haakan

    2007-01-01

    DNA self-assembly is a powerful route to the production of very small, complex structures. When used in combination with nanoparticles it is likely to become a key technology in the production of nanoelectronics in the future. Previously, demonstrated nanoparticle assemblies have mainly been periodic and highly symmetric arrays, unsuited as building blocks for any complex circuits. With the invention of DNA-scaffolded origami reported earlier this year (Rothemund P W K 2006 Nature 440 (7082) 297-302), a new route to complex nanostructures using DNA has been opened. Here, we give a short review of the field and present the current status of our experiments were DNA origami is used in conjunction with nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles are functionalized with thiolated single stranded DNA. Strands that are complementary to the gold particle strands can be positioned on the self-assembled DNA-structure in arbitrary patterns. This property should allow an accurate positioning of the particles by letting them hybridize on the lattice. We report on our recent experiments on this system and discuss open problems and future applications

  5. DNA-guided nanoparticle assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Oleg; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Maye, Mathew; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    In some embodiments, DNA-capped nanoparticles are used to define a degree of crystalline order in assemblies thereof. In some embodiments, thermodynamically reversible and stable body-centered cubic (bcc) structures, with particles occupying <.about.10% of the unit cell, are formed. Designs and pathways amenable to the crystallization of particle assemblies are identified. In some embodiments, a plasmonic crystal is provided. In some aspects, a method for controlling the properties of particle assemblages is provided. In some embodiments a catalyst is formed from nanoparticles linked by nucleic acid sequences and forming an open crystal structure with catalytically active agents attached to the crystal on its surface or in interstices.

  6. Two-stage DNA compaction induced by silver ions suggests a cooperative binding mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen-Yan; Ran, Shi-Yong

    2018-05-01

    The interaction between silver ions and DNA plays an important role in the therapeutic use of silver ions and in related technologies such as DNA sensors. However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully understood. In this study, the dynamics of Ag+-DNA interaction at a single-molecule level was studied using magnetic tweezers. AgNO3 solutions with concentrations ranging from 1 μM to 20 μM led to a 1.4-1.8 μm decrease in length of a single λ-DNA molecule, indicating that Ag+ has a strong binding with DNA, causing the DNA conformational change. The compaction process comprises one linear declining stage and another sigmoid-shaped stage, which can be attributed to the interaction mechanism. Considering the cooperative effect, the sigmoid trend was well explained using a phenomenological model. By contrast, addition of silver nanoparticle solution induced no detectable transition of DNA. The dependence of the interaction on ionic strength and DNA concentration was examined via morphology characterization and particle size distribution measurement. The size of the Ag+-DNA complex decreased with an increase in Ag+ ionic strength ranging from 1 μM to 1 mM. Morphology characterization confirmed that silver ions induced DNA to adopt a compacted globular conformation. At a fixed [AgNO3]:[DNA base pairs] ratio, increasing DNA concentration led to increased sizes of the complexes. Intermolecular interaction is believed to affect the Ag+-DNA complex formation to a large extent.

  7. Global chromatin fibre compaction in response to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Charlotte; Hayward, Richard L.; Gilbert, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Robust KAP1 phosphorylation in response to DNA damage in HCT116 cells. ► DNA repair foci are found in soluble chromatin. ► Biophysical analysis reveals global chromatin fibre compaction after DNA damage. ► DNA damage is accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation. -- Abstract: DNA is protected by packaging it into higher order chromatin fibres, but this can impede nuclear processes like DNA repair. Despite considerable research into the factors required for signalling and repairing DNA damage, it is unclear if there are concomitant changes in global chromatin fibre structure. In human cells DNA double strand break (DSB) formation triggers a signalling cascade resulting in H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX), the rapid recruitment of chromatin associated proteins and the subsequent repair of damaged sites. KAP1 is a transcriptional corepressor and in HCT116 cells we found that after DSB formation by chemicals or ionising radiation there was a wave of, predominantly ATM dependent, KAP1 phosphorylation. Both KAP1 and phosphorylated KAP1 were readily extracted from cells indicating they do not have a structural role and γH2AX was extracted in soluble chromatin indicating that sites of damage are not attached to an underlying structural matrix. After DSB formation we did not find a concomitant change in the sensitivity of chromatin fibres to micrococcal nuclease digestion. Therefore to directly investigate higher order chromatin fibre structures we used a biophysical sedimentation technique based on sucrose gradient centrifugation to compare the conformation of chromatin fibres isolated from cells before and after DNA DSB formation. After damage we found global chromatin fibre compaction, accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation, consistent with fibres being more regularly folded or fibre deformation being stabilized by linker histones. We suggest that following DSB formation, although there is localised chromatin unfolding to

  8. DNA binding and aggregation by carbon nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Hongjie; Liu, Qingdai; Ji, Qiaoli; Jin, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Significant environmental and health risks due to the increasing applications of engineered nanoparticles in medical and industrial activities have been concerned by many communities. The interactions between nanomaterials and genomes have been poorly studied so far. This study examined interactions of DNA with carbon nanoparticles (CNP) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). We experimentally assessed how CNP affect DNA molecule and bacterial growth of Escherichia coli. We found that CNP were bound to the DNA molecules during the DNA replication in vivo. The results revealed that the interaction of DNA with CNP resulted in DNA molecule binding and aggregation both in vivo and in vitro in a dose-dependent manner, and consequently inhabiting the E. coli growth. While this was a preliminary study, our results showed that this nanoparticle may have a significant impact on genomic activities.

  9. DNA nanoparticles with core-shell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Preethi L; Dimitriadis, Emilios K; Lisziewicz, Julianna; Speransky, Vlad; Horkay, Ferenc

    2014-10-14

    Mannobiose-modified polyethylenimines (PEI) are used in gene therapy to generate nanoparticles of DNA that can be targeted to the antigen-presenting cells of the immune system. We report that the sugar modification alters the DNA organization within the nanoparticles from homogenous to shell-like packing. The depth-dependent packing of DNA within the nanoparticles was probed using AFM nano-indentation. Unmodified PEI-DNA nanoparticles display linear elastic properties and depth-independent mechanics, characteristic of homogenous materials. Mannobiose-modified nanoparticles, however, showed distinct force regimes that were dependent on indentation depth, with 'buckling'-like response that is reproducible and not due to particle failure. By comparison with theoretical studies of spherical shell mechanics, the structure of mannobiosylated particles was deduced to be a thin shell with wall thickness in the order of few nanometers, and a fluid-filled core. The shell-core structure is also consistent with observations of nanoparticle denting in altered solution conditions, with measurements of nanoparticle water content from AFM images, and with images of DNA distribution in Transmission Electron Microscopy.

  10. Cationic Polybutyl Cyanoacrylate Nanoparticles for DNA Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinghua Duan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To enhance the intracellular delivery potential of plasmid DNA using nonviral vectors, we used polybutyl cyanoacrylate (PBCA and chitosan to prepare PBCA nanoparticles (NPs by emulsion polymerization and prepared NP/DNA complexes through the complex coacervation of nanoparticles with the DNA. The object of our work is to evaluate the characterization and transfection efficiency of PBCA-NPs. The NPs have a zeta potential of 25.53 mV at pH 7.4 and size about 200 nm. Electrophoretic analysis suggested that the NPs with positive charges could protect the DNA from nuclease degradation and cell viability assay showed that the NPs exhibit a low cytotoxicity to human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2 cells. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of transfection in HepG2 cells by the nanoparticles carrying plasmid DNA encoding for enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP-N1 was done by digital fluorescence imaging microscopy system and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. Qualitative results showed highly efficient expression of GFP that remained stable for up to 96 hours. Quantitative results from FACS showed that PBCA-NPs were significantly more effective in transfecting HepG2 cells after 72 hours postincubation. The results of this study suggested that PBCA-NPs have favorable properties for nonviral delivery.

  11. Engineering of magnetic DNA nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Chen Yiru; He Wenjie; Hong Poda; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Domb, Abraham J.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to engineer novel targeted delivery system composed of magnetic DNA nanoparticles to be effective as an efficient targeted gene therapy vehicle for tumor therapy. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of plasmid DNA-encoded NK4 that acts as an HGF-antagonist and anti-angiogenic regulator for inhibitions of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Spermine (Sm) was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to obtain dextran-Sm. When Fe 2+ solution was added to the mixture of dextran-Sm and a plasmid DNA, homogenous DNA nanoparticles were formed via chemical metal coordination bonding with average size of 230 nm. Characterization of DNA nanoparticles was performed via dynamic light scattering measurement, electrophoretic light scattering measurement, as well as transmission electron microscope. DNA nanoparticles effectively condensed plasmid DNA into nanoparticles and enhanced the stability of DNA, while significantly improved transfection efficiency in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo. In addition, magnetic DNA nanoparticles exhibited high efficiency in antitumor therapy with regards to tumor growth as well as survival of animals evaluated in the presence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the magnetic properties of these DNA nanoparticles would enhance the tracking of non-viral gene delivery systems when administrated in vivo in a test model. These findings suggest that DNA nanoparticles effectively deliver DNA to tumor and thereby inhibiting tumor growth.

  12. Engineering of magnetic DNA nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein, E-mail: hosseinkhani@yahoo.com [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Chen Yiru [National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (China); He Wenjie; Hong Poda [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Yu, Dah-Shyong [Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center (China); Domb, Abraham J. [Institute of Drug Research, The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2013-01-15

    This study aims to engineer novel targeted delivery system composed of magnetic DNA nanoparticles to be effective as an efficient targeted gene therapy vehicle for tumor therapy. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of plasmid DNA-encoded NK4 that acts as an HGF-antagonist and anti-angiogenic regulator for inhibitions of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Spermine (Sm) was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to obtain dextran-Sm. When Fe{sup 2+} solution was added to the mixture of dextran-Sm and a plasmid DNA, homogenous DNA nanoparticles were formed via chemical metal coordination bonding with average size of 230 nm. Characterization of DNA nanoparticles was performed via dynamic light scattering measurement, electrophoretic light scattering measurement, as well as transmission electron microscope. DNA nanoparticles effectively condensed plasmid DNA into nanoparticles and enhanced the stability of DNA, while significantly improved transfection efficiency in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo. In addition, magnetic DNA nanoparticles exhibited high efficiency in antitumor therapy with regards to tumor growth as well as survival of animals evaluated in the presence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the magnetic properties of these DNA nanoparticles would enhance the tracking of non-viral gene delivery systems when administrated in vivo in a test model. These findings suggest that DNA nanoparticles effectively deliver DNA to tumor and thereby inhibiting tumor growth.

  13. A Model of H-NS Mediated Compaction of Bacterial DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joyeux, M.; Vreede, J.

    2013-01-01

    The histone-like nucleoid structuring protein (H-NS) is a nucleoid-associated protein, which is involved in both gene regulation and DNA compaction. H-NS can bind to DNA in two different ways: in trans, by binding to two separate DNA duplexes, or in cis, by binding to different sites on the same

  14. Compaction of Chemically Prepared Amorphous Fe-B nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, P.V.; Bødker, Franz; Mørup, Steen

    1997-01-01

    We report on attempts to compact chemically prepared amorphous iron-boron particles. The praticles have a size of about 100 nm and are pyrophoric. We have made a special die for uniaxial pressing in which the compaction can be performed at elevated temperature without exposing the powder to air...

  15. Preparation of DNA/Gold Nanoparticle Encapsulated in Calcium Phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Ito

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biocompatible DNA/gold nanoparticle complex with a protective calcium phosphate (CaP coating was prepared by incubating DNA/gold nanoparticle complex coated by hyaluronic acid in SBF (simulated body fluid with a Ca concentration above 2 mM. The CaP-coated DNA complex was revealed to have high compatibility with cells and resistance against enzymatic degradation. By immersion in acetate buffer (pH 4.5, the CaP capsule released the contained DNA complex. This CaP capsule including a DNA complex is promising as a sustained-release system of DNA complexes for gene therapy.

  16. ZrO2 nanoparticles' effects on split tensile strength of self compacting concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nazari

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, split tensile strength of self compacting concrete with different amount of ZrO2 nanoparticles has been investigated. ZrO2 nanoparticles with the average particle size of 15 nm were added partially to cement paste (Portland cement together with polycarboxylate superplasticizer and split tensile strength of the specimens has been measured. The results indicate that ZrO2 nanoparticles are able to improve split tensile strength of concrete and recover the negative effects of polycarboxylate superplasticizer. ZrO2 nanoparticle as a partial replacement of cement up to 4 wt. (% could accelerate C-S-H gel formation as a result of increased crystalline Ca(OH2 amount at the early age of hydration. The increased the ZrO2 nanoparticles' content more than 4 wt. (%, causes the reduced the split tensile strength because of unsuitable dispersion of nanoparticles in the concrete matrix.

  17. Interplay between the bacterial nucleoid protein H-NS and macromolecular crowding in compacting DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintraecken, C.H.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation we discuss H-NS and its connection to nucleoid compaction and organization. Nucleoid formation involves a dramatic reduction in coil volume of the genomic DNA. Four factors are thought to influence coil volume: supercoiling, DNA charge neutralization, macromolecular

  18. Anionic solid lipid nanoparticles supported on protamine/DNA complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Jiesheng; Liu Chunxi; Chen Zhijin; Zhang Na; Wang Aihua

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design novel anionic ternary nanoparticles for gene delivery. These ternary nanoparticles were equipped with protamine/DNA binary complexes (150-200 nm) as the support, and the anionic formation was achieved by absorption of anionic solid lipid nanoparticles (≤20 nm) onto the surface of the binary complexes. The small solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were prepared by a modified film dispersion-ultrasonication method, and adsorption of the anionic SLNs onto the binary complexes was typically carried out in water via electrostatic interaction. The formulated ternary nanoparticles were found to be relatively uniform in size (257.7 ± 10.6 nm) with a 'bumpy' surface, and the surface charge inversion from 19.28 ± 1.14 mV to -17.16 ± 1.92 mV could be considered as evidence of the formation of the ternary nanoparticles. The fluorescence intensity measurements from three batches of the ternary nanoparticles gave a mean adsorption efficiency of 96.75 ± 1.13%. Circular dichroism spectra analysis showed that the protamine/DNA complexes had been coated by small SLNs, and that the anionic ternary nanoparticles formed did not disturb the construction of the binary complexes. SYBR Green I analysis suggested that the ternary nanoparticles could protect the DNA from nuclease degradation, and cell viability assay results showed that they exhibit lower cytotoxicity to A549 cells compared with the binary complexes and lipofectamine. The transfection efficiency of the ternary nanoparticles was better than that of naked DNA and the binary complexes, and almost equal to that of lipofectamine/DNA complexes, as revealed by inversion fluorescence microscope observation. These results indicated that the anionic ternary nanoparticles could facilitate gene transfer in cultured cells, and might alleviate the drawbacks of the conventional cationic vector/DNA complexes for gene delivery in vivo

  19. Hydrophobically modified chitosan/gold nanoparticles for DNA delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattarai, Shanta Raj; Remant Bahadur, K.C.; Aryal, Santosh; Bhattarai, Narayan; Kim, Sun Young; Yi, Ho Keun; Hwang, Pyoung Han; Kim, Hak Yong

    2008-01-01

    Present study dealt an application of modified chitosan gold nanoparticles (Nac-6-Au) for the immobilization of necked plasmid DNA. Gold nanoparticles stabilized with N-acylated chitosan were prepared by graft-onto approach. The stabilized gold nanoparticles were characterized by different physico-chemical techniques such as UV-vis, TEM, ELS and DLS. MTT assay was used for in vitro cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles into three different cell lines (NIH 3T3, CT-26 and MCF-7). The formulation of plasmid DNA with the nanoparticles corresponds to the complex forming capacity and in-vitro/in-vivo transfection efficiency was studied via gel electrophoresis and transfection methods, respectively. Results showed the modified chitosan gold nanoparticles were well-dispersed and spherical in shape with average size around 10∼12 nm in triple distilled water at pH 7.4, and showed relatively no cytotoxicity at low concentration. Addition of plasmid DNA on the aqueous solution of the nanoparticles markedly reduced surface potential (50.0∼66.6%) as well as resulted in a 13.33% increase in hydrodynamic diameters of the formulated nanoparticles. Transfection efficiency of Nac-6-Au/DNA was dependent on cell type, and higher β-galactosidase activity was observed on MCF-7 breast cancer cell. Typically, this activity was 5 times higher in 4.5 mg/ml nanoparticles concentration than that achieved by the nanoparticles of other concentrations (and/or control). However, this activity was lower in in-vitro and dramatically higher in in-vivo than that of commercially available transfection kit (Lipofectin (registered) ) and DNA. From these results, it can be expected to develop alternative new vectors for gene delivery

  20. Toward efficient modification of large gold nanoparticles with DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gill, R.; Göeken, Kristian L; Subramaniam, V.

    2014-01-01

    DNA-coated gold nanoparticles are one of the most researched nano-bio hybrid systems. Traditionally their synthesis has been a long and tedious process, involving slow salt addition and long incubation steps. This stems from the fact that both DNA and gold particles are negatively charged, therefore

  1. DNA-Controlled Assembly of Soft Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the emerging topic of DNA nanotechnology and DNA supramolecular chemistry in its broader sense. By taking DNA out of its biological role, this biomolecule has become a very versatile building block in materials chemistry, supramolecular chemistry and bio-nanotechnology. Many nove......-covalent systems, DNA origami, DNA based switches, DNA machines, and alternative structures and templates. This broad coverage is very appealing since it combines both the synthesis of modified DNA as well as designer concepts to successfully plan and make DNA nanostructures....

  2. DNA complexes with Ni nanoparticles: structural and functional properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatarinova, Olga N.; Smirnov, Igor P. [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine of the Federal Medical-Biological Agency of the Russian Federation (Russian Federation); Safenkova, Irina V. [A.N. Bach Institute of Biochemistry (Russian Federation); Varizhuk, Anna M.; Pozmogova, Galina E., E-mail: pozmge@gmail.com [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine of the Federal Medical-Biological Agency of the Russian Federation (Russian Federation)

    2012-10-15

    Supramolecular complexes of biopolymers based on magnetic nanoparticles play an important role in creation of biosensors, implementation of theragnostic and gene therapeutic methods and biosafety evaluation. We investigated the impact of DNA interactions with nanoparticles of nickel (nNi) on the integrity and functionality of DNA. Data obtained by mass spectrometry, electrophoresis, TEM and AFM microscopy techniques, bacterial transformation, and real-time PCR provide evidence that ssDNA and plasmid DNA (pDNA) efficiently form complexes with nNi. AFM data suggest that the complexes are necklace-type structures, in which nanoparticles are randomly distributed along the DNA chains, rather than highly entangled clot-type structures. After desorption, observed DNA characteristics in bioanalytical and biological systems remain unchanged. Only supercoiled pDNA was nicked, but remained, as well as a plasmid-nNi complex, active in expression vector assays. These results are very important for creation of new methods of DNA immobilization and controlled manipulation.

  3. Hybridization thermodynamics of DNA bound to gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) was used to study the thermodynamics of hybridization on DNA-functionalized colloidal gold nanoparticles. When compared to the thermodynamics of hybridization of DNA that is free in solution, the differences in the values of the Gibbs free energy of reaction, Δ r G o , the enthalpy, Δ r H o , and entropy, Δ r S o , were small. The change in Δ r G o between the free and bound states was always positive but with statistical significance outside the 95% confidence interval, implying the free DNA is slightly more stable than when in the bound state. Additionally, ITC was also able to reveal information about the binding stoichiometry of the hybridization reactions on the DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles, and indicates that there is a significant fraction of the DNA on gold nanoparticle surface that is unavailable for DNA hybridization. Furthermore, the fraction of available DNA is dependent on the spacer group on the DNA that is used to span the gold surface from that to the probe DNA.

  4. DNA complexes with Ni nanoparticles: structural and functional properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatarinova, Olga N.; Smirnov, Igor P.; Safenkova, Irina V.; Varizhuk, Anna M.; Pozmogova, Galina E.

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular complexes of biopolymers based on magnetic nanoparticles play an important role in creation of biosensors, implementation of theragnostic and gene therapeutic methods and biosafety evaluation. We investigated the impact of DNA interactions with nanoparticles of nickel (nNi) on the integrity and functionality of DNA. Data obtained by mass spectrometry, electrophoresis, TEM and AFM microscopy techniques, bacterial transformation, and real-time PCR provide evidence that ssDNA and plasmid DNA (pDNA) efficiently form complexes with nNi. AFM data suggest that the complexes are necklace-type structures, in which nanoparticles are randomly distributed along the DNA chains, rather than highly entangled clot-type structures. After desorption, observed DNA characteristics in bioanalytical and biological systems remain unchanged. Only supercoiled pDNA was nicked, but remained, as well as a plasmid–nNi complex, active in expression vector assays. These results are very important for creation of new methods of DNA immobilization and controlled manipulation.

  5. Dielectrophoresis of gold nanoparticles conjugated to DNA origami structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Henning-Knechtel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA nanostructures are promising construction materials to bridge the gap between self-assembly of functional molecules and conventional top-down fabrication methods in nanotechnology. Their positioning onto specific locations of a microstructured substrate is an important task towards this aim. Here we study manipulation and positioning of pristine and of gold nanoparticle-conjugated tubular DNA origami structures using ac dielectrophoresis. The dielectrophoretic behavior was investigated employing fluorescence microscopy. For the pristine origami, a significant dielectrophoretic response was found to take place in the megahertz range, whereas, due to the higher polarizability of the metallic nanoparticles, the nanoparticle/DNA hybrid structures required a lower electrical field strength and frequency for a comparable trapping at the edges of the electrode structure. The nanoparticle conjugation additionally resulted in a remarkable alteration of the DNA structure arrangement. The growth of linear, chain-like structures in between electrodes at applied frequencies in the megahertz range was observed. The long-range chain formation is caused by a local, gold nanoparticle-induced field concentration along the DNA nanostructures, which in turn, creates dielectrophoretic forces that enable the observed self-alignment of the hybrid structures.

  6. Electrochemical DNA biosensors based on platinum nanoparticles combined carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Ningning; Chang Zhu; He Pingang; Fang Yuzhi

    2005-01-01

    Platinum nanoparticles were used in combination with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for fabricating sensitivity-enhanced electrochemical DNA biosensor. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes and platinum nanoparticles were dispersed in Nafion, which were used to fabricate the modification of the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface. Oligonucleotides with amino groups at the 5' end were covalently linked onto carboxylic groups of MWCNTs on the electrode. The hybridization events were monitored by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) measurement of the intercalated daunomycin. Due to the ability of carbon nanotubes to promote electron-transfer reactions, the high catalytic activities of platinum nanoparticles for chemical reactions, the sensitivity of presented electrochemical DNA biosensors was remarkably improved. The detection limit of the method for target DNA was 1.0 x 10 -11 mol l -1

  7. Synthesis of streptavidin-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles for DNA detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Peijun; Peng Zheyang; Wang Yao; Qiao Ru; Mao Weixing; Qian Haisheng; Zhang Mengya; Li Congcong; Shi Shenyuan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report a fabrication of streptavidin-coated magnetic nanoparticles used for DNA detection. Initially, amino-functionalized Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles with high saturation magnetization are prepared by a photopolymerization method using allylamine as monomer. It is followed by covalent immobilization of streptavidin onto the particle surface via a two-step reaction using glutaraldehyde as coupling agent. Streptavidin-coated magnetic nanoparticles are characterized and further tested for their ability to capture DNA target after binding biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. The results show that the products (∼27.2 nm) have a maximum biotin-binding capacity of 0.71 nmol mg −1 when the immobilization reaction is conducted with a mass ratio of streptavidin to magnetic carriers above 0.2 in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4) for 24 h. In addition, highly negative ζ-potential and good magnetic susceptibility of the nanocomposites make them applicable for DNA collection and detection, which is verified by the results from the preliminary application of streptavidin-coated magnetic nanoparticles in DNA detection. Therefore, the magnetic nanoparticles provide a promising approach for rapid collection and detection of gene.

  8. DNA nanostructure-directed assembly of metal nanoparticle superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julin, Sofia; Nummelin, Sami; Kostiainen, Mauri A.; Linko, Veikko

    2018-05-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology provides unique, well-controlled, versatile, and highly addressable motifs and templates for assembling materials at the nanoscale. These methods to build from the bottom-up using DNA as a construction material are based on programmable and fully predictable Watson-Crick base pairing. Researchers have adopted these techniques to an increasing extent for creating numerous DNA nanostructures for a variety of uses ranging from nanoelectronics to drug-delivery applications. Recently, an increasing effort has been put into attaching nanoparticles (the size range of 1-20 nm) to the accurate DNA motifs and into creating metallic nanostructures (typically 20-100 nm) using designer DNA nanoshapes as molds or stencils. By combining nanoparticles with the superior addressability of DNA-based scaffolds, it is possible to form well-ordered materials with intriguing and completely new optical, plasmonic, electronic, and magnetic properties. This focused review discusses the DNA structure-directed nanoparticle assemblies covering the wide range of different one-, two-, and three-dimensional systems.

  9. DNA Nanoparticles: Detection of Long-Term Transgene Activity in Brain using Bioluminescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Yurek

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we used bioluminescence imaging (BLI to track long-term transgene activity following the transfection of brain cells using a nonviral gene therapy technique. Formulations of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA combined with 30-mer lysine polymers (substituted with 10 kDa polyethylene glycol form nanoparticles that transfect brain cells in vivo and produce transgene activity. Here we show that a single intracerebral injection of these DNA nanoparticles (DNPs into the rat cortex, striatum, or substantia nigra results in long-term and persistent luciferase transgene activity over an 8- to 11-week period as evaluated by in vivo BLI analysis, and single injections of DNPs into the mouse striatum showed stable luciferase transgene activity for 1 year. Compacted DNPs produced in vivo signals 7- to 34-fold higher than DNA alone. In contrast, ex vivo BLI analysis, which is subject to less signal quenching from surrounding tissues, demonstrated a DNP to DNA alone ratio of 76- to 280-fold. Moreover, the ex vivo BLI analysis confirmed that signals originated from the targeted brain structures. In summary, BLI permits serial analysis of luciferase transgene activity at multiple brain locations following gene transfer with DNPs. Ex vivo analysis may permit more accurate determination of relative activities of gene transfer vectors.

  10. Divalent cation shrinks DNA but inhibits its compaction with trivalent cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongu, Chika; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Zinchenko, Anatoly; Chen, Ning; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2016-05-28

    Our observation reveals the effects of divalent and trivalent cations on the higher-order structure of giant DNA (T4 DNA 166 kbp) by fluorescence microscopy. It was found that divalent cations, Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), inhibit DNA compaction induced by a trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD(3+)). On the other hand, in the absence of SPD(3+), divalent cations cause the shrinkage of DNA. As the control experiment, we have confirmed the minimum effect of monovalent cation, Na(+) on the DNA higher-order structure. We interpret the competition between 2+ and 3+ cations in terms of the change in the translational entropy of the counterions. For the compaction with SPD(3+), we consider the increase in translational entropy due to the ion-exchange of the intrinsic monovalent cations condensing on a highly charged polyelectrolyte, double-stranded DNA, by the 3+ cations. In contrast, the presence of 2+ cation decreases the gain of entropy contribution by the ion-exchange between monovalent and 3+ ions.

  11. Comparative analysis of DNA nanoparticles and AAVs for ocular gene delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongchao Han

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is a critical tool for the treatment of monogenic retinal diseases. However, the limited vector capacity of the current benchmark delivery strategy, adeno-associated virus (AAV, makes development of larger capacity alternatives, such as compacted DNA nanoparticles (NPs, critical. Here we conduct a side-by-side comparison of self-complementary AAV and CK30PEG NPs using matched ITR plasmids. We report that although AAVs are more efficient per vector genome (vg than NPs, NPs can drive gene expression on a comparable scale and longevity to AAV. We show that subretinally injected NPs do not leave the eye while some of the AAV-injected animals exhibited vector DNA and GFP expression in the visual pathways of the brain from PI-60 onward. As a result, these NPs have the potential to become a successful alternative for ocular gene therapy, especially for the multitude of genes too large for AAV vectors.

  12. Microstructural, thermal, physical and mechanical behavior of the self compacting concrete containing SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazari, Ali, E-mail: alinazari84@aut.ac.ir [Department of Technical and Engineering Sciences, Islamic Azad University (Saveh Branch), Saveh (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Riahi, Shadi [Department of Technical and Engineering Sciences, Islamic Azad University (Saveh Branch), Saveh (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    Research highlights: {yields} TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles effects on flexural strength of self compacting concrete. {yields} Physical and microstructural consideration. {yields} Mechanical tests. {yields} Thermal analysis. {yields} Porosimetry. - Abstract: In the present study, flexural strength, thermal properties and microstructure of self compacting concrete with different amount of SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles has been investigated. SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles with the average particle size of 15 nm were partially added to self compacting concrete and various behaviors of the specimens have been measured. The results indicate that SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are able to improve the flexural strength of self compacting concrete and recover the negative effects of superplasticizer on flexural strength of the specimens. SiO{sub 2} nanoparticle as a partial replacement of cement up to 4 wt% could accelerate C-S-H gel formation as a result of the increased crystalline Ca(OH){sub 2} amount at the early ages of hydration. The increased the SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles' content more than 4 wt%, causes the reduced the flexural strength because of unsuitable dispersion of nanoparticles in the concrete matrix. Accelerated peak appearance in conduction calorimetry tests, more weight loss in thermogravimetric analysis and more rapid appearance of peaks related to hydrated products in X-ray diffraction results, all also indicate that SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles up to 4 wt% could improve the mechanical and physical properties of the specimens. Finally, SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles could improve the pore structure of concrete and shift the distributed pores to harmless and few-harm pores.

  13. Microstructural, thermal, physical and mechanical behavior of the self compacting concrete containing SiO2 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazari, Ali; Riahi, Shadi

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → TiO 2 nanoparticles effects on flexural strength of self compacting concrete. → Physical and microstructural consideration. → Mechanical tests. → Thermal analysis. → Porosimetry. - Abstract: In the present study, flexural strength, thermal properties and microstructure of self compacting concrete with different amount of SiO 2 nanoparticles has been investigated. SiO 2 nanoparticles with the average particle size of 15 nm were partially added to self compacting concrete and various behaviors of the specimens have been measured. The results indicate that SiO 2 nanoparticles are able to improve the flexural strength of self compacting concrete and recover the negative effects of superplasticizer on flexural strength of the specimens. SiO 2 nanoparticle as a partial replacement of cement up to 4 wt% could accelerate C-S-H gel formation as a result of the increased crystalline Ca(OH) 2 amount at the early ages of hydration. The increased the SiO 2 nanoparticles' content more than 4 wt%, causes the reduced the flexural strength because of unsuitable dispersion of nanoparticles in the concrete matrix. Accelerated peak appearance in conduction calorimetry tests, more weight loss in thermogravimetric analysis and more rapid appearance of peaks related to hydrated products in X-ray diffraction results, all also indicate that SiO 2 nanoparticles up to 4 wt% could improve the mechanical and physical properties of the specimens. Finally, SiO 2 nanoparticles could improve the pore structure of concrete and shift the distributed pores to harmless and few-harm pores.

  14. Design and Analysis of Compact DNA Strand Displacement Circuits for Analog Computation Using Autocatalytic Amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tianqi; Garg, Sudhanshu; Mokhtar, Reem; Bui, Hieu; Reif, John

    2018-01-19

    A main goal in DNA computing is to build DNA circuits to compute designated functions using a minimal number of DNA strands. Here, we propose a novel architecture to build compact DNA strand displacement circuits to compute a broad scope of functions in an analog fashion. A circuit by this architecture is composed of three autocatalytic amplifiers, and the amplifiers interact to perform computation. We show DNA circuits to compute functions sqrt(x), ln(x) and exp(x) for x in tunable ranges with simulation results. A key innovation in our architecture, inspired by Napier's use of logarithm transforms to compute square roots on a slide rule, is to make use of autocatalytic amplifiers to do logarithmic and exponential transforms in concentration and time. In particular, we convert from the input that is encoded by the initial concentration of the input DNA strand, to time, and then back again to the output encoded by the concentration of the output DNA strand at equilibrium. This combined use of strand-concentration and time encoding of computational values may have impact on other forms of molecular computation.

  15. Designing Optical Properties in DNA-Programmed Nanoparticle Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Michael Brendan

    A grand challenge of modern science has been the ability to predict and design the properties of new materials. This approach to the a priori design of materials presents a number of challenges including: predictable properties of the material building blocks, a programmable means for arranging such building blocks into well understood architectures, and robust models that can predict the properties of these new materials. In this dissertation, we present a series of studies that describe how optical properties in DNA-programmed nanoparticle superlattices can be predicted prior to their synthesis. The first chapter provides a history and introduction to the study of metal nanoparticle arrays. Chapter 2 surveys and compares several geometric models and electrodynamics simulations with the measured optical properties of DNA-nanoparticle superlattices. Chapter 3 describes silver nanoparticle superlattices (rather than gold) and identifies their promise as plasmonic metamaterials. In chapter 4, the concept of plasmonic metallurgy is introduced, whereby it is demonstrated that concepts from materials science and metallurgy can be applied to the optical properties of mixed metallic plasmonic materials, unveiling rich and tunable optical properties such as color and asymmetric reflectivity. Chapter 5 presents a comprehensive theoretical exploration of anisotropy (non-spherical) in nanoparticle superlattice architectures. The role of anisotropy is discussed both on the nanoscale, where several desirable metamaterial properties can be tuned from the ultraviolet to near-infrared, and on the mesoscale, where the size and shape of a superlattice is demonstrated to have a pronounced effect on the observed far-field optical properties. Chapter 6 builds upon those theoretical data presented in chapter 5, including the experimental realization of size and shape dependent properties in DNA-programmed superlattices. Specifically, nanoparticle spacing is explored as a parameter that

  16. Colorimetric DNA detection of transgenic plants using gold nanoparticles functionalized with L-shaped DNA probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourisaeid, Elham; Mousavi, Amir; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a DNA colorimetric detection system based on gold nanoparticles functionalized with L-shaped DNA probes was prepared and evaluated. We investigated the hybridization efficiency of the L-shaped probes and studied the effect of nanoparticle size and the L-shaped DNA probe length on the performance of the as-prepared system. Probes were attached to the surface of gold nanoparticles using an adenine sequence. An optimal sequence of 35S rRNA gene promoter from the cauliflower mosaic virus, which is frequently used in the development of transgenic plants, and the two complementary ends of this gene were employed as model target strands and probe molecules, respectively. The spectrophotometric properties of the as-prepared systems indicated that the large NPs show better changes in the absorption spectrum and consequently present a better performance. The results of this study revealed that the probe/Au-NPs prepared using a vertical spacer containing 5 thymine oligonucleotides exhibited a stronger spectrophotometric response in comparison to that of larger probes. These results in general indicate the suitable performance of the L-shaped DNA probe-functionalized Au-NPs, and in particular emphasize the important role of the gold nanoparticle size and length of the DNA probes in enhancing the performance of such a system.

  17. A Universal Fast Colorimetric Method for DNA Signal Detection with DNA Strand Displacement and Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA or gene signal detection is of great significance in many fields including medical examination, intracellular molecular monitoring, and gene disease signal diagnosis, but detection of DNA or gene signals in a low concentration with instant visual results remains a challenge. In this work, a universal fast and visual colorimetric detection method for DNA signals is proposed. Specifically, a DNA signal amplification “circuit” based on DNA strand displacement is firstly designed to amplify the target DNA signals, and then thiol modified hairpin DNA strands and gold nanoparticles are used to make signal detection results visualized in a colorimetric manner. If the target DNA signal exists, the gold nanoparticles aggregate and settle down with color changing from dark red to grey quickly; otherwise, the gold nanoparticles’ colloids remain stable in dark red. The proposed method provides a novel way to detect quickly DNA or gene signals in low concentrations with instant visual results. When applied in real-life, it may provide a universal colorimetric method for gene disease signal diagnosis.

  18. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with Pfu DNA polymerase and effect on polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L-P; Wang, S; Zhang, Z-W; Ma, Y-Y; Lai, Y-Q; Weng, J; Zhang, Q-Q

    2011-03-01

    The interaction of gold nanoparticles with Pfu DNA polymerase has been investigated by a number of biological, optical and electronic spectroscopic techniques. Polymerase chain reaction was performed to show gold nanoparticles' biological effect. Ultraviolet-visible and circular dichroism spectra analysis were applied to character the structure of Pfu DNA polymerase after conjugation with gold nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to investigate the bond properties of the polymerase-gold nanoparticles complex. The authors demonstrate that gold nanoparticles do not affect the amplification efficiency of polymerase chain reaction using Pfu DNA polymerase, and Pfu DNA polymerase displays no significant changes of the secondary structure upon interaction with gold nanoparticles. The adsorption of Pfu DNA polymerase to gold nanoparticles is mainly through Au-NH(2) bond and electrostatic interaction. These findings may have important implications regarding the safety issue as gold nanoparticles are widely used in biomedical applications.

  19. DNA-directed self-assembly of gold nanoparticles into binary and ternary nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Hui; Yi Changqing; Tzang Chihung; Zhu Junjie; Yang Mengsu

    2007-01-01

    The assembly and characterization of gold nanoparticle-based binary and ternary structures are reported. Two strategies were used to assemble gold nanoparticles into ordered nanoscale architectures: in strategy 1, gold nanoparticles were functionalized with single-strand DNA (ssDNA) first, and then hybridized with complementary ssDNA-labelled nanoparticles to assemble designed architectures. In strategy 2, the designed architectures were constructed through hybridization between complementary ssDNA first, then by assembling gold nanoparticles to the scaffolding through gold-sulfur bonds. Both TEM measurements and agarose gel electrophoresis confirmed that the latter strategy is more efficient in generating the designed nanostructures

  20. Photoinduced silver nanoparticles/nanorings on plasmid DNA scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianhua; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Yu, Mei; Li, Songmei; Zhang, Jindan

    2012-01-23

    Biological scaffolds are being actively explored for the synthesis of nanomaterials with novel structures and unexpected properties. Toroidal plasmid DNA separated from the Bacillus host is applied as a sacrificial mold for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles and nanorings. The photoirradiation method is applied to reduce Ag(I) on the plasmid. The nanoparticles are obtained by varying the concentration of the Ag(I) ion solution and the exposure time of the plasmid-Ag(I) complex under UV light at 254 nm and room temperature. It is found that the plasmid serves not only as a template but also as a reductant to drive the silver nucleation and deposition. The resulting nanoparticles have a face-centered cubic (fcc) crystal structure and 20-30 nm average diameter. The detailed mechanism is discussed, and other metals or alloys could also be synthesized with this method. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Application of Gold Nanoparticles for Electrochemical DNA Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mishaal Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An electrochemical DNA biosensor was successfully fabricated by using (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES as a linker molecule combined with the gold nanoparticles (GNPs on thermally oxidized SiO2 thin films. The SiO2 thin films surface was chemically modified with a mixture of APTES and GNPs for DNA detection in different time periods of 30 min, 1 hour, 2 hours, and 4 hours, respectively. The DNA immobilization and hybridization were conducted by measuring the differences of the capacitance value within the frequency range of 1 Hz to 1 MHz. The capacitance values for DNA immobilization were 160 μF, 77.8 μF, 70 μF, and 64.6 μF, respectively, with the period of time from 30 min to 4 hours. Meanwhile the capacitance values for DNA hybridization were 44 μF, 54 μF, 55 μF, and 61.5 μF, respectively. The capacitance value of bare SiO2 thin film was 0.42 μF, which was set as a base line for a reference in DNA detection. The differences of the capacitance value between the DNA immobilization and hybridization revealed that the modified SiO2 thin films using APTES and GNPs were successfully developed for DNA detection.

  2. DNA-imprinted polymer nanoparticles with monodispersity and prescribed DNA-strand patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Tuan; Liao, Chenyi; Toader, Violeta; Barłóg, Maciej; Bazzi, Hassan S.; Li, Jianing; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2018-02-01

    As colloidal self-assembly increasingly approaches the complexity of natural systems, an ongoing challenge is to generate non-centrosymmetric structures. For example, patchy, Janus or living crystallization particles have significantly advanced the area of polymer assembly. It has remained difficult, however, to devise polymer particles that associate in a directional manner, with controlled valency and recognition motifs. Here, we present a method to transfer DNA patterns from a DNA cage to a polymeric nanoparticle encapsulated inside the cage in three dimensions. The resulting DNA-imprinted particles (DIPs), which are 'moulded' on the inside of the DNA cage, consist of a monodisperse crosslinked polymer core with a predetermined pattern of different DNA strands covalently 'printed' on their exterior, and further assemble with programmability and directionality. The number, orientation and sequence of DNA strands grafted onto the polymeric core can be controlled during the process, and the strands are addressable independently of each other.

  3. Electrostatic assembly of Cu2O nanoparticles on DNA templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Li; Wei Gang; Qi Bin; Zhou Hualan; Liu Zhiguo; Song Yonghai; Yang Xiurong; Li Zhuang

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a method for highly ordered assembly of cuprous oxide (Cu 2 O) nanoparticles (NPs) by DNA templates was reported. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-capped Cu 2 O NPs were adsorbed onto well-aligned λ-DNA chains to form necklace-like one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures. UV-vis, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the nanostructure. The Cu 2 O nanostructures fabricated with the method are both highly ordered and quite straight

  4. Amine-functionalized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles for DNA separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Wei; Wei, Wei; Li, Junjian; Qi, Xiaoliang; Zuo, Gancheng; Chen, Qi; Pan, Xihao; Dong, Wei, E-mail: weidong@njust.edu.cn

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}@EDPS with uniform size and good dispersity is prepared. • We fabricated MMSN@EDPS with distinct core-shell–shell triple-layer composition. • DNA adsorption capacity of MMSN@EDPS is considerable. - Abstract: We report a modified approach for the functionalized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MMSN) using polymer microspheres incorporated with magnetic nanoparticles in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and the core-shell magnetic silica nanoparticles (MSN). These particles were functionalized with amino groups via the addition of aminosilane directly to the particle sol. We then evaluate their DNA separation abilities and find the capacity of DNA binding significantly increased (210.22 μg/mg) compared with normal magnetic silica spheres (138.44 μg/mg) by using an ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometer (UV). The morphologies, magnetic properties, particle size, pore size, core-shell structure and Zeta potential are characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). This work demonstrates that our MMSN own an excellent potential application in bioseparation and drug delivery.

  5. Stabilization of Pt nanoparticles by single stranded DNA and the binary assembly of Au and Pt nanoparticles without hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J.; Lee, Jim Yang; Too, Heng-Phon; Chow, Gan-Moog; Gan, Leong M.

    2006-01-01

    The non-specific interaction between single stranded DNA (ssDNA) and 12 nm Pt nanoparticles is investigated in this work. The data show a strong and non-specific interaction between the two which can be exploited for the stabilization of Pt nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. Based on the experimental findings, a non-hybridization based protocol to assemble 17 nm Au and Pt nanoparticles (12 nm cubic and 3.6 nm spherical) by single-stranded DNA was developed. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-visible spectroscopy confirmed that Au and Pt nanoparticles could be assembled by the non-specific interaction in an orderly manner. The experimental results also caution against the potential pitfalls in using DNA melting point analysis to infer metal nanoparticle assembly by DNA hybridization

  6. Detection of mitochondrial DNA with the compact bead array sensor system (cBASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvaney, Shawn P.; Ibe, Carol N.; Caldwell, Jane M.; Levine, Jay F.; Whitman, Lloyd J.; Tamanaha, Cy R.

    2009-02-01

    Enteric pathogens are a significant contaminant in surface waters used for recreation, fish and shellfish harvesting, crop irrigation, and human consumption. The need for water monitoring becomes more pronounced when industrial, agricultural, and residential lands are found in close proximity. Fecal contamination is particularly problematic and identification of the pollution source essential to remediation efforts. Standard monitoring for fecal contamination relies on indicator organisms, but the technique is too broad to identify the source of contamination. Instead, real-time PCR of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is an emerging method for identification of the contamination source. Presented herein, we evaluate an alternative technology, the compact Bead Array Sensor System (cBASS®) and its assay approach Fluidic Force Discrimination (FFD), for the detection of mtDNA. Previously, we achieved multiplexed, attomolar detection of toxins and femtomolar detection of nucleic acids in minutes with FFD assays. More importantly, FFD assays are compatible with a variety of complex matrices and therefore potentially applicable for samples where the matrix would interfere with PCR amplification. We have designed a triplex assay for the NADH gene found in human, swine, and bovine mtDNA and demonstrated the specific detection of human mtDNA spiked into a waste water sample.

  7. Structure of DNA-Functionalized Dendrimer Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Mattaparthi Venkata Satish; Maiti, Prabal K

    2012-01-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to reveal the characteristic features of ethylenediamine (EDA) cored protonated poly amido amine (PAMAM) dendrimers of generation 3 (G3) and 4 (G4) that are functionalized with single stranded DNAs (ssDNAs). The four ssDNA strands that are attached via alkythiolate [-S (CH2)6-] linker molecule to the free amine groups on the surface of the PAMAM dendrimers observed to undergo a rapid conformational change during the 25 ns long sim...

  8. Self-organized architectures from assorted DNA-framed nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenyan; Halverson, Jonathan; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, Alexei V.; Gang, Oleg

    2016-09-01

    The science of self-assembly has undergone a radical shift from asking questions about why individual components self-organize into ordered structures, to manipulating the resultant order. However, the quest for far-reaching nanomanufacturing requires addressing an even more challenging question: how to form nanoparticle (NP) structures with designed architectures without explicitly prescribing particle positions. Here we report an assembly concept in which building instructions are embedded into NPs via DNA frames. The integration of NPs and DNA origami frames enables the fabrication of NPs with designed anisotropic and selective interactions. Using a pre-defined set of different DNA-framed NPs, we show it is possible to design diverse planar architectures, which include periodic structures and shaped meso-objects that spontaneously emerge on mixing of the different topological types of NP. Even objects of non-trivial shapes, such as a nanoscale model of Leonardo da Vinci's Vitruvian Man, can be self-assembled successfully.

  9. Effect of gold nanoparticle on stability of the DNA molecule: A study of molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izanloo, Cobra

    2017-09-02

    An understanding of the mechanism of DNA interactions with gold nanoparticles is useful in today medicine applications. We have performed a molecular dynamics simulation on a B-DNA duplex (CCTCAGGCCTCC) in the vicinity of a gold nanoparticle with a truncated octahedron structure composed of 201 gold atoms (diameter ∼1.8 nm) to investigate gold nanoparticle (GNP) effects on the stability of DNA. During simulation, the nanoparticle is closed to DNA and phosphate groups direct the particles into the major grooves of the DNA molecule. Because of peeling and untwisting states that are occur at end of DNA, the nucleotide base lies flat on the surface of GNP. The configuration entropy is estimated using the covariance matrix of atom-positional fluctuations for different bases. The results show that when a gold nanoparticle has interaction with DNA, entropy increases. The results of conformational energy and the hydrogen bond numbers for DNA indicated that DNA becomes unstable in the vicinity of a gold nanoparticle. The radial distribution function was calculated for water hydrogen-phosphate oxygen pairs. Almost for all nucleotide, the presence of a nanoparticle around DNA caused water molecules to be released from the DNA duplex and cations were close to the DNA.

  10. Smart DNA vectors based on cyclodextrin polymers: compaction and endosomal release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintgens, Véronique; Leborgne, Christian; Baconnais, Sonia; Burckbuchler, Virginie; Le Cam, Eric; Scherman, Daniel; Kichler, Antoine; Amiel, Catherine

    2012-02-01

    Neutral β-cyclodextrin polymers (polyβCD) associated with cationic adamantyl derivatives (Ada) can be used to deliver plasmid DNA into cells. In absence of an endosomolytic agent, transfection efficiency remains low because most complexes are trapped in the endosomal compartment. We asked whether addition of an imidazole-modified Ada can increase efficiency of polyβCD/cationic Ada-based delivery system. We synthesized two adamantyl derivatives: Ada5, which has a spacer arm between the Ada moiety and a bi-cationic polar head group, and Ada6, which presents an imidazole group. Strength of association between polyβCD and Ada derivatives was evaluated by fluorimetric titration. Gel mobility shift assay, zeta potential, and dark field transmission electron microscopy experiments demonstrated the system allowed for efficient DNA compaction. In vitro transfection experiments performed on HepG2 and HEK293 cells revealed the quaternary system polyβCD/Ada5/Ada6/DNA has efficiency comparable to cationic lipid DOTAP. We successfully designed fine-tuned DNA vectors based on cyclodextrin polymers combined with two new adamantyl derivatives, leading to significant transfection associated with low toxicity.

  11. Polypyrrole–gold nanoparticle composites for highly sensitive DNA detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spain, Elaine; Keyes, Tia E.; Forster, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    DNA capture surfaces represent a powerful approach to developing highly sensitive sensors for identifying the cause of infection. Electrochemically deposited polypyrrole, PPy, films have been functionalized with electrodeposited gold nanoparticles to give a nanocomposite material, PPy–AuNP. Thiolated capture strand DNA, that is complementary to the sequence from the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus that causes mammary gland inflammation, was then immobilized onto the gold nanoparticles and any of the underlying gold electrode that is exposed. A probe strand, labelled with horse radish peroxidase, HRP, was then hybridized to the target. The concentration of the target was determined by measuring the current generated by reducing benzoquinone produced by the HRP label. Semi-log plots of the pathogen DNA concentration vs. faradaic current are linear from 150 pM to 1 μM and pM concentrations can be detected without the need for molecular, e.g., PCR or NASBA, amplification. The nanocomposite also exhibits excellent selectivity and single base mismatches in a 30 mer sequence can be detected

  12. DNA strand breaks induced by soft X-ray pulses from a compact laser plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei, Daniel; Wiechec, Anna; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Bartnik, Andrzej; Davídková, Marie; Vyšín, Luděk; Juha, Libor; Pina, Ladislav; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2016-03-01

    Application of a compact laser plasma source of soft X-rays in radiobiology studies is demonstrated. The source is based on a laser produced plasma as a result of irradiation of a double-stream gas puff target with nanosecond laser pulses from a commercially available Nd:YAG laser. The source allows irradiation of samples with soft X-ray pulses in the "water window" spectral range (wavelength: 2.3-4.4 nm; photon energy: 280-560 eV) in vacuum or a helium atmosphere at very high-dose rates and doses exceeding the kGy level. Single-strand breaks (SSB) and double-strand breaks (DBS) induced in DNA plasmids pBR322 and pUC19 have been measured. The different conformations of the plasmid DNA were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. An exponential decrease in the supercoiled form with an increase in linear and relaxed forms of the plasmids has been observed as a function of increasing photon fluence. Significant difference between SSB and DSB in case of wet and dry samples was observed that is connected with the production of free radicals in the wet sample by soft X-ray photons and subsequent affecting the plasmid DNA. Therefore, the new source was validated to be useful for radiobiology experiments.

  13. Chitosan-Graft-Polyethylenimine/DNA Nanoparticles as Novel Non-Viral Gene Delivery Vectors Targeting Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Lulu; Zhao, Huiqing

    2014-01-01

    The development of safe and efficient gene carriers is the key to the clinical success of gene therapy. The present study was designed to develop and evaluate the chitosan-graft-polyethylenimine (CP)/DNA nanoparticles as novel non-viral gene vectors for gene therapy of osteoarthritis. The CP/DNA nanoparticles were produced through a complex coacervation of the cationic polymers with pEGFP after grafting chitosan (CS) with a low molecular weight (Mw) PEI (Mw = 1.8 kDa). Particle size and zeta potential were related to the weight ratio of CP:DNA, where decreases in nanoparticle size and increases in surface charge were observed as CP content increased. The buffering capacity of CP was significantly greater than that of CS. The transfection efficiency of CP/DNA nanoparticles was similar with that of the Lipofectamine™ 2000, and significantly higher than that of CS/DNA and PEI (25 kDa)/DNA nanoparticles. The transfection efficiency of the CP/DNA nanoparticles was dependent on the weight ratio of CP:DNA (w/w). The average cell viability after the treatment with CP/DNA nanoparticles was over 90% in both chondrocytes and synoviocytes, which was much higher than that of PEI (25 kDa)/DNA nanoparticles. The CP copolymers efficiently carried the pDNA inside chondrocytes and synoviocytes, and the pDNA was detected entering into nucleus. These results suggest that CP/DNA nanoparticles with improved transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity might be a safe and efficient non-viral vector for gene delivery to both chondrocytes and synoviocytes. PMID:24392152

  14. Multifunctional DNA-gold nanoparticles for targeted doxorubicin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Colleen M; Hamner, Kristen L; Maye, Mathew M; Dabrowiak, James C

    2014-07-16

    In this report we describe the synthesis, characterization, and cytotoxic properties of DNA-capped gold nanoparticles having attached folic acid (FA), a thermoresponsive polymer (p), and/or poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) oligomers that could be used to deliver the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) in chemotherapy. The FA-DNA oligomer used in the construction of the delivery vehicle was synthesized through the reaction of the isolated folic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester with the amino-DNA and the conjugated DNA product was purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This approach ultimately allowed control of the amount of FA attached to the surface of the delivery vehicle. Cytotoxicity studies using SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells with drug loaded delivery vehicles were carried out using a variety of exposure times (1-48 h) and recovery times (1-72 h), and in order to access the effects of varying amounts of attached FA, in culture media deficient in FA. DOX loaded delivery vehicles having 50% of the DNA strands with attached FA were more cytotoxic than when all of the strands contained FA. Since FA stimulates cell growth, the reduced cytotoxicity of vehicles fully covered with FA suggests that the stimulatory effects of FA can more than compensate for the cytotoxic effects of the drug on the cell population. While attachment of hexa-ethylene glycol PEG(18) to the surface of the delivery vehicle had no effect on cytotoxicity, 100% FA plus the thermoresponsive polymer resulted in IC50 = 0.48 ± 0.01 for an exposure time of 24 h and a recovery time of 1 h, which is an order of magnitude more cytotoxic than free DOX. Confocal microscopic studies using fluorescence detection showed that SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells exposed to DOX-loaded vehicles have drug accumulation inside the cell and, in the case of vehicles with attached FA and thermoresponsive polymer, the drug appears more concentrated. Since the biological target of DOX is DNA, the latter

  15. Synthesis of CdS nanoparticles based on DNA network templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Yong; Song Yonghai; Wang Li

    2008-01-01

    CdS nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by using DNA networks as templates. The synthesis was carried out by first dropping a mixture of cadmium acetate and DNA on a mica surface for the formation of the DNA network template and then transferring the sample into a heated thiourea solution. The Cd 2+ reacted with thiourea at high temperature and formed CdS nanoparticles on the DNA network template. UV-vis spectroscopy, photoluminescence, x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to characterize the CdS nanoparticles in detail. AFM results showed that the resulted CdS nanoparticles were directly aligned on the DNA network templates and that the synthesis and assembly of CdS nanoparticles was realized in one step. CdS nanoparticles fabricated with this method were smaller than those directly synthesized in a thiourea solution and were uniformly aligned on the DNA networks. By adjusting the density of the DNA networks and the concentration of Cd 2+ , the size and density of the CdS nanoparticles could be effectively controlled and CdS nanoparticles could grow along the DNA chains into nanowires. The possible growth mechanism has also been discussed in detail

  16. Compact Ag@Fe3O4 Core-shell Nanoparticles by Means of Single-step Thermal Decomposition Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brollo, Maria Eugênia F.; López-Ruiz, Román; Muraca, Diego; Figueroa, Santiago J. A.; Pirota, Kleber R.; Knobel, Marcelo

    2014-10-01

    A temperature pause introduced in a simple single-step thermal decomposition of iron, with the presence of silver seeds formed in the same reaction mixture, gives rise to novel compact heterostructures: brick-like Ag@Fe3O4 core-shell nanoparticles. This novel method is relatively easy to implement, and could contribute to overcome the challenge of obtaining a multifunctional heteroparticle in which a noble metal is surrounded by magnetite. Structural analyses of the samples show 4 nm silver nanoparticles wrapped within compact cubic external structures of Fe oxide, with curious rectangular shape. The magnetic properties indicate a near superparamagnetic like behavior with a weak hysteresis at room temperature. The value of the anisotropy involved makes these particles candidates to potential applications in nanomedicine.

  17. DNA-nanoparticle superlattices formed from anisotropic building blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew R.; Macfarlane, Robert J.; Lee, Byeongdu; Zhang, Jian; Young, Kaylie L.; Senesi, Andrew J.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2010-11-01

    Directional bonding interactions in solid-state atomic lattices dictate the unique symmetries of atomic crystals, resulting in a diverse and complex assortment of three-dimensional structures that exhibit a wide variety of material properties. Methods to create analogous nanoparticle superlattices are beginning to be realized, but the concept of anisotropy is still largely underdeveloped in most particle assembly schemes. Some examples provide interesting methods to take advantage of anisotropic effects, but most are able to make only small clusters or lattices that are limited in crystallinity and especially in lattice parameter programmability. Anisotropic nanoparticles can be used to impart directional bonding interactions on the nanoscale, both through face-selective functionalization of the particle with recognition elements to introduce the concept of valency, and through anisotropic interactions resulting from particle shape. In this work, we examine the concept of inherent shape-directed crystallization in the context of DNA-mediated nanoparticle assembly. Importantly, we show how the anisotropy of these particles can be used to synthesize one-, two- and three-dimensional structures that cannot be made through the assembly of spherical particles.

  18. DNA hydrogel as a template for synthesis of ultrasmall gold nanoparticles for catalytic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, Anatoly; Miwa, Yasuyuki; Lopatina, Larisa I; Sergeyev, Vladimir G; Murata, Shizuaki

    2014-03-12

    DNA cross-linked hydrogel was used as a matrix for synthesis of gold nanoparticles. DNA possesses a strong affinity to transition metals such as gold, which allows for the concentration of Au precursor inside a hydrogel. Further reduction of HAuCl4 inside DNA hydrogel yields well dispersed, non-aggregated spherical Au nanoparticles of 2-3 nm size. The average size of these Au nanoparticles synthesized in DNA hydrogel is the smallest reported so far for in-gel metal nanoparticles synthesis. DNA hybrid hydrogel containing gold nanoparticles showed high catalytic activity in the hydrogenation reaction of nitrophenol to aminophenol. The proposed soft hybrid material is promising as environmentally friendly and sustainable material for catalytic applications.

  19. Poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) based magnetic nanoparticles for plasmid DNA purification from Escherichia coli lysate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Percin, Is Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I k [Department of Biology, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Karakoc, Veyis [Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry Division, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Akgoel, Sinan [Department of Biochemistry, Ege University, Izmir (Turkey); Aksoez, Erol [Department of Biology, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Denizli, Adil, E-mail: denizli@hacettepe.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry Division, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-(L)-histidine) [PHEMAH] magnetic nanoparticles for plasmid DNA (pDNA) purification from Escherichia coli (E. coli) cell lysate. Magnetic nanoparticles were produced by surfactant free emulsion polymerization. mPHEMAH nanoparticles were characterized by elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), electron spin resonance (ESR), thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Surface area, average particle size and size distribution were also performed. Specific surface area of the mPHEMAH nanoparticles was found to be 1180 m{sup 2}/g. Elemental analysis of MAH for nitrogen was estimated as 0.18 mmol/g polymer. The amount of pDNA adsorbed onto the mPHEMAH nanoparticles first increased and then reached a saturation value at around 1.0 mg/mL of pDNA concentration. Compared with the mPHEMA nanoparticles (50 {mu}g/g polymer), the pDNA adsorption capacity of the mPHEMAH nanoparticles (154 mg/g polymer) was improved significantly due to the MAH incorporation into the polymeric matrix. The maximum pDNA adsorption was achieved at 25 Degree-Sign C. The overall recovery of pDNA was calculated as 92%. The mPHEMAH nanoparticles could be used six times without decreasing the pDNA adsorption capacity significantly. The results indicate that the PHEMAH nanoparticles promise high selectivity for pDNA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic nanoparticles have several advantages over conventional adsorbents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAH acted as the pseudospecific ligand, ligand immobilization step was eliminated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer pDNA adsorption amount was 154 mg/g. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fifty-fold capacity increase was obtained when compared to conventional matrices.

  20. Poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) based magnetic nanoparticles for plasmid DNA purification from Escherichia coli lysate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perçin, Işık; Karakoç, Veyis; Akgöl, Sinan; Aksöz, Erol; Denizli, Adil

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-(L)-histidine) [PHEMAH] magnetic nanoparticles for plasmid DNA (pDNA) purification from Escherichia coli (E. coli) cell lysate. Magnetic nanoparticles were produced by surfactant free emulsion polymerization. mPHEMAH nanoparticles were characterized by elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), electron spin resonance (ESR), thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Surface area, average particle size and size distribution were also performed. Specific surface area of the mPHEMAH nanoparticles was found to be 1180 m 2 /g. Elemental analysis of MAH for nitrogen was estimated as 0.18 mmol/g polymer. The amount of pDNA adsorbed onto the mPHEMAH nanoparticles first increased and then reached a saturation value at around 1.0 mg/mL of pDNA concentration. Compared with the mPHEMA nanoparticles (50 μg/g polymer), the pDNA adsorption capacity of the mPHEMAH nanoparticles (154 mg/g polymer) was improved significantly due to the MAH incorporation into the polymeric matrix. The maximum pDNA adsorption was achieved at 25 °C. The overall recovery of pDNA was calculated as 92%. The mPHEMAH nanoparticles could be used six times without decreasing the pDNA adsorption capacity significantly. The results indicate that the PHEMAH nanoparticles promise high selectivity for pDNA. - Highlights: ► Magnetic nanoparticles have several advantages over conventional adsorbents. ► MAH acted as the pseudospecific ligand, ligand immobilization step was eliminated. ► pDNA adsorption amount was 154 mg/g. ► Fifty-fold capacity increase was obtained when compared to conventional matrices.

  1. Characterization of Plasmid DNA Location within Chitosan/PLGA/pDNA Nanoparticle Complexes Designed for Gene Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hali Bordelon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide- (PLGA-chitosan nanoparticles are becoming an increasingly common choice for the delivery of nucleic acids to cells for various genetic manipulation techniques. These particles are biocompatible, with tunable size and surface properties, possessing an overall positive charge that promotes complex formation with negatively charged nucleic acids. This study examines properties of the PLGA-chitosan nanoparticle/plasmid DNA complex after formation. Specifically, the study aims to determine the optimal ratio of plasmid DNA:nanoparticles for nucleic acid delivery purposes and to elucidate the location of the pDNA within these complexes. Such characterization will be necessary for the adoption of these formulations in a clinical setting. The ability of PLGA-chitosan nanoparticles to form complexes with pDNA was evaluated by using the fluorescent intercalating due OliGreen to label free plasmid DNA. By monitoring the fluorescence at different plasmid: nanoparticle ratios, the ideal plasmid:nanoparticle ration for complete complexation of plasmid was determined to be 1:50. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and gel digest studies suggested that even at these optimal complexation ratios, a portion of the plasmid DNA was located on the outer complex surface. This knowledge will facilitate future investigations into the functionality of the system in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Directional rolling of positively charged nanoparticles along a flexibility gradient on long DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Suehyun; Joo, Heesun; Kim, Jun Soo

    2018-01-31

    Directing the motion of molecules/colloids in any specific direction is of great interest in many applications of chemistry, physics, and biological sciences, where regulated positioning or transportation of materials is highly desired. Using Brownian dynamics simulations of coarse-grained models of a long, double-stranded DNA molecule and positively charged nanoparticles, we observed that the motion of a single nanoparticle bound to and wrapped by the DNA molecule can be directed along a gradient of DNA local flexibility. The flexibility gradient is constructed along a 0.8 kilobase-pair DNA molecule such that local persistence length decreases gradually from 50 nm to 40 nm, mimicking a gradual change in sequence-dependent flexibility. Nanoparticles roll over a long DNA molecule from less flexible regions towards more flexible ones as a result of the decreasing energetic cost of DNA bending and wrapping. In addition, the rolling becomes slightly accelerated as the positive charge of nanoparticles decreases due to a lower free energy barrier of DNA detachment from charged nanoparticle for processive rolling. This study suggests that the variation in DNA local flexibility can be utilized in constructing and manipulating supramolecular assemblies of DNA molecules and nanoparticles in structural DNA nanotechnology.

  3. Prospects of nanoparticle-DNA binding and its implications in medical biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hongjie; Jin, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Bio-nanotechnology is a new interdisciplinary R&D area that integrates engineering and physical science with biology through the development of multifunctional devices and systems, focusing biology inspired processes or their applications, in particular in medical biotechnology. DNA based nanotechnology, in many ways, has been one of the most intensively studied fields in recent years that involves the use and the creation of bio-inspired materials and their technologies for highly selective biosensing, nanoarchitecture engineering and nanoelectronics. Increasing researches have been offered to a fundamental understanding how the interactions between the nanoparticles and DNA molecules could alter DNA molecular structure and its biochemical activities. This minor review describes the mechanisms of the nanoparticle-DNA binding and molecular interactions. We present recent discoveries and research progresses how the nanoparticle-DNA binding could vary DNA molecular structure, DNA detection, and gene therapy. We report a few case studies associated with the application of the nanoparticle-DNA binding devices in medical detection and biotechnology. The potential impacts of the nanoparticles via DNA binding on toxicity of the microorganisms are briefly discussed. The nanoparticle-DNA interactions and their impact on molecular and microbial functionalities have only drown attention in recent a few years. The information presented in this review can provide useful references for further studies on biomedical science and technology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Novel PVA-DNA nanoparticles prepared by ultra high pressure technology for gene delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Okuno, Akira; Miyazaki, Kozo; Furuzono, Tsutomu; Ohya, Yuichi; Ouchi, Tatsuro; Mutsuo, Shingo; Yoshizawa, Hidekazu; Kitamura, Yoshiro; Fujisato, Toshiyta; Kishida, Akio

    2004-01-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-DNA nanoparticles have been developed by ultra high pressure (UHP) technology. Mixture solutions of DNA and PVA having various molecular weights (Mw) and degree of saponifications (DS) were treated under 10,000 atmospheres (981 MPa) condition at 40 deg. C for 10 min. Agarose gel electrophoresis and scanning electron microscope observation revealed that the PVA-DNA nanoparticles with average diameter of about 200 nm were formed. Using PVA of higher Mw and degree of saponifications, the amount of nanoparticles formed increased. The driving force of nanoparticle formation was the hydrogen bonding between DNA and PVA. In order to apply the PVA-DNA nanoparticles for gene delivery, the cytotoxicity and the cellular uptake of them were investigated using Raw264 cell lines. The cell viability was not influenced whether the presence of the PVA-DNA nanoparticles. Further, the nanoparticles internalized into cells were observed by fluorescent microscope. These results indicates that the PVA-DNA nanoparticles prepared by UHP technology showed be useful as drug carrier, especially for gene delivery

  5. Structural mediation on polycation nanoparticles by sulfadiazine to enhance DNA transfection efficiency and reduce toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xingwen; Zhang, Zhihui; Han, Shangcong; Tang, Minjie; Zhou, Junhui; Zhang, Jianhua; Xue, Zhenyi; Li, Yan; Zhang, Rongxin; Deng, Liandong; Dong, Anjie

    2015-04-15

    Reducing the toxicity while maintaining high transfection efficiency is an important issue for cationic polymers as gene carriers in clinical application. In this paper, a new zwitterionic copolymer, polycaprolactone-g-poly(dimethylaminoethyl methyacrylate-co-sulfadiazine methacrylate) (PC-SDZ) with unique pH-sensitivity, was designed and prepared. The incorporation of sulfadiazine into poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) chains successfully mediates the surface properties including compacter shell structure, lower density of positive charges, stronger proton buffer capability, and enhanced hydrophobicity, which lead to reduction in toxicity and enhancements in stability, cellular uptake, endosome escape, and transfection efficiency for the PC-SDZ2 nanoparticles (NPs)/DNA complexes. Excellent transfection efficiency at the optimal N/P ratio of 10 was observed for PC-SDZ2 NPs/DNA complexes, which was higher than that of the commercial reagent-branched polyethylenimine (PEI). The cytotoxicity was evaluated by CCK8 measurement, and the results showed significant reduction in cytotoxicity even at high concentration of complexes after sulfadiazine modification. Therefore, this work may demonstrate a new way of structural mediation of cationic polymer carriers for gene delivery with high efficiency and low toxicity.

  6. Fabrication of DNA nanotubes with an array of exterior magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafati, Adele; Zarrabi, Ali; Gill, Pooria

    2017-10-01

    Described here a methodology for arraying of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) on the surface of DNA nanotubes (DNTs). Positioning of magnetic nanoparticles at exterior surface of DNTs were shaped after self-assembling of oligonucleotide staples within an M13mp18 DNA scaffold via an origami process. The staples were partially labeled with biotin to be arrayed at the surface of DNTs. Gel retardation assay of the DNTs carrying magnetic nanoparticles indicated a reversely behavioral electrophoretic movement in comparison to the nanotubes have been demonstrated previously. Also, high resolution transmission electron microscopy confirmed positioning magnetic nanoparticles at the exterior surface of DNTs, correctly. Ultrastructural characteristics of these DNA nanotubes using atomic force microscopy demonstrated topographic heights on their surfaces formed through positioning of magnetic nanoparticles outside the tubules. This nanoarchitecture would be potential for multiple arraying of nanoparticles that those be useful as functionalized chimeric nanocarriers for developing novel nanodrugs and nanobiosensors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Plasmid DNA loaded chitosan nanoparticles for nasal mucosal immunization against hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Kapil; Goyal, Amit K; Gupta, Prem N; Mishra, Neeraj; Vyas, Suresh P

    2008-04-16

    This work investigates the preparation and in vivo efficacy of plasmid DNA loaded chitosan nanoparticles for nasal mucosal immunization against hepatitis B. Chitosan pDNA nanoparticles were prepared using a complex coacervation process. Prepared nanoparticles were characterized for size, shape, surface charge, plasmid loading and ability of nanoparticles to protect DNA against nuclease digestion and for their transfection efficacy. Nasal administration of nanoparticles resulted in serum anti-HBsAg titre that was less compared to that elicited by naked DNA and alum adsorbed HBsAg, but the mice were seroprotective within 2 weeks and the immunoglobulin level was above the clinically protective level. However, intramuscular administration of naked DNA and alum adsorbed HBsAg did not elicit sIgA titre in mucosal secretions that was induced by nasal immunization with chitosan nanoparticles. Similarly, cellular responses (cytokine levels) were poor in case of alum adsorbed HBsAg. Chitosan nanoparticles thus produced humoral (both systemic and mucosal) and cellular immune responses upon nasal administration. The study signifies the potential of chitosan nanoparticles as DNA vaccine carrier and adjuvant for effective immunization through non-invasive nasal route.

  8. DNA compaction in the early part of the SOS response is dependent on RecN and RecA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odsbu, Ingvild; Skarstad, Kirsten

    2014-05-01

    The nucleoids of undamaged Escherichia coli cells have a characteristic shape and number, which is dependent on the growth medium. Upon induction of the SOS response by a low dose of UV irradiation an extensive reorganization of the nucleoids occurred. Two distinct phases were observed by fluorescence microscopy. First, the nucleoids were found to change shape and fuse into compact structures at midcell. The compaction of the nucleoids lasted for 10-20 min and was followed by a phase where the DNA was dispersed throughout the cells. This second phase lasted for ~1 h. The compaction was found to be dependent on the recombination proteins RecA, RecO and RecR as well as the SOS-inducible, SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes)-like protein RecN. RecN protein is produced in high amounts during the first part of the SOS response. It is possible that the RecN-mediated 'compact DNA' stage at the beginning of the SOS response serves to stabilize damaged DNA prior to recombination and repair.

  9. The effects of ZrO2 nanoparticles on physical and mechanical properties of high strength self compacting concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nazari

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, strength assessments and coefficient of water absorption of high performance self compacting concrete containing different amounts of ZrO2 nanoparticles have been investigated. The results indicate that the strength and the resistance to water permeability of the specimens are improved by adding ZrO2 nanoparticles in the cement paste up to 4.0 wt. (%. ZrO2 nanoparticles, as a result of increased crystalline Ca(OH2 amount especially at the early age of hydration, could accelerate C-S-H gel formation and hence increase the strength of the concrete specimens. In addition, ZrO2 nanoparticles are able to act as nanofillers and recover the pore structure of the specimens by decreasing harmful pores. Several empirical relationships have been presented to predict flexural and split tensile strength of the specimens by means of the corresponding compressive strength at a certain age of curing. Accelerated peak appearance in conduction calorimetry tests, more weight loss in thermogravimetric analysis and more rapid appearance of the peaks related to hydrated products in X-ray diffraction results, all indicate that ZrO2 nanoparticles could improve mechanical and physical properties of the concrete specimens.

  10. The detection of HBV DNA with gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticle gene probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Dong; Luo Xiaoping; Lu Qianghua; Yao Kailun; Liu Zuli; Ning Qin

    2008-01-01

    Gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticle Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA probes were prepared, and their application for HBV DNA measurement was studied. Gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by the citrate reduction of tetra-chloroauric acid in the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles which were added as seeds. With a fluorescence-based method, the maximal surface coverage of hexaethiol 30-mer oligonucleotides and the maximal percentage of hybridization strands on gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were (120 ± 8) oligonucleotides per nanoparticle, and (14 ± 2%), respectively, which were comparable with those of (132 ± 10) and (22 ± 3%) in Au nanoparticle groups. Large network aggregates were formed when gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticle HBV DNA gene probe was applied to detect HBV DNA molecules as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy and the high specificity was verified by blot hybridization. Our results further suggested that detecting DNA with iron oxide nanoparticles and magnetic separator was feasible and might be an alternative effective method

  11. Fluorescent labelling of DNA on superparamagnetic nanoparticles by a perylene bisimide derivative for cell imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltas, Esra, E-mail: maltasesra@gmail.com [Selcuk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, 42075 Konya (Turkey); Malkondu, Sait [Selcuk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, 42075 Konya (Turkey); Uyar, Pembegul [Selcuk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, 42075 Konya (Turkey); Selcuk University, Advanced Technology Research and Application Center, Konya (Turkey); Ozmen, Mustafa [Selcuk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, 42075 Konya (Turkey)

    2015-03-01

    N,N′-Bis[tris-(2-aminoethyl) amine]-3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PBI-TRIS), nonfluorescent dye was used to fluorescent labelling of DNA. For this aim, (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTS) modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were synthesized to provide a suitable surface for binding of DNA. Amine functionalized nanoparticles showed a high immobilization capacity (82.70%) at 25 mg of nanoparticle concentration for Calf thymus DNA. Binding capacity of PBI-TRIS to DNA-SPION was also found as 1.93 μM on 25 mg of nanoparticles by using UV–vis spectroscopy. Binding of PBI-TRIS to DNA onto nanoparticles was also characterized by scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The confocal images of PBI-TRIS labelled DNA-SPION and breast cells were taken at 488 and 561.7 nm of excitation wavelengths. Cell image was also compared with a commercial dye, DAPI at 403.7 nm of excitation wavelength. Results showed that PBI-TRIS can be used for cell staining. - Highlights: • Functionalized SPIONs were synthesized and treated with DNA. • The binding of PBI-TRIS with DNA was studied. • The image of PBI-TRIS labelled DNA-SPION was detected by a confocal microscope.

  12. Fluorescent labelling of DNA on superparamagnetic nanoparticles by a perylene bisimide derivative for cell imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maltas, Esra; Malkondu, Sait; Uyar, Pembegul; Ozmen, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    N,N′-Bis[tris-(2-aminoethyl) amine]-3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PBI-TRIS), nonfluorescent dye was used to fluorescent labelling of DNA. For this aim, (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTS) modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were synthesized to provide a suitable surface for binding of DNA. Amine functionalized nanoparticles showed a high immobilization capacity (82.70%) at 25 mg of nanoparticle concentration for Calf thymus DNA. Binding capacity of PBI-TRIS to DNA-SPION was also found as 1.93 μM on 25 mg of nanoparticles by using UV–vis spectroscopy. Binding of PBI-TRIS to DNA onto nanoparticles was also characterized by scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The confocal images of PBI-TRIS labelled DNA-SPION and breast cells were taken at 488 and 561.7 nm of excitation wavelengths. Cell image was also compared with a commercial dye, DAPI at 403.7 nm of excitation wavelength. Results showed that PBI-TRIS can be used for cell staining. - Highlights: • Functionalized SPIONs were synthesized and treated with DNA. • The binding of PBI-TRIS with DNA was studied. • The image of PBI-TRIS labelled DNA-SPION was detected by a confocal microscope

  13. Label-free DNA biosensor based on resistance change of platinum nanoparticles assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotadis, Evangelos; Voutyras, Konstantinos; Chatzipetrou, Marianneza; Tsekenis, Georgios; Patsiouras, Lampros; Madianos, Leonidas; Chatzandroulis, Stavros; Zergioti, Ioanna; Tsoukalas, Dimitris

    2016-07-15

    A novel nanoparticle based biosensor for the fast and simple detection of DNA hybridization events is presented. The sensor utilizes hybridized DNA's charge transport properties, combining them with metallic nanoparticle networks that act as nano-gapped electrodes. The DNA hybridization events can be detected by a significant reduction in the sensor's resistance due to the conductive bridging offered by hybridized DNA. By modifying the nanoparticle surface coverage, which can be controlled experimentally being a function of deposition time, and the structural properties of the electrodes, an optimized biosensor for the in situ detection of DNA hybridization events is ultimately fabricated. The fabricated biosensor exhibits a wide response range, covering four orders of magnitude, a limit of detection of 1nM and can detect a single base pair mismatch between probe and complementary DNA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Rapid detection of cancer related DNA nanoparticulate biomarkers and nanoparticles in whole blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Michael J.; Krishnan, Raj; Sonnenberg, Avery

    2010-08-01

    The ability to rapidly detect cell free circulating (cfc) DNA, cfc-RNA, exosomes and other nanoparticulate disease biomarkers as well as drug delivery nanoparticles directly in blood is a major challenge for nanomedicine. We now show that microarray and new high voltage dielectrophoretic (DEP) devices can be used to rapidly isolate and detect cfc-DNA nanoparticulates and nanoparticles directly from whole blood and other high conductance samples (plasma, serum, urine, etc.). At DEP frequencies of 5kHz-10kHz both fluorescent-stained high molecular weight (hmw) DNA, cfc-DNA and fluorescent nanoparticles separate from the blood and become highly concentrated at specific DEP highfield regions over the microelectrodes, while blood cells move to the DEP low field-regions. The blood cells can then be removed by a simple fluidic wash while the DNA and nanoparticles remain highly concentrated. The hmw-DNA could be detected at a level of <260ng/ml and the nanoparticles at <9.5 x 109 particles/ml, detection levels that are well within the range for viable clinical diagnostics and drug nanoparticle monitoring. Disease specific cfc-DNA materials could also be detected directly in blood from patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) and confirmed by PCR genotyping analysis.

  15. DNA Modified with Metal Nanoparticles: Preparation and Characterization of Ordered Metal-DNA Nanostructures in a Solution and on a Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Kasyanenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA interaction with silver and aluminum nanoparticles in a solution has been investigated with the AFM, SEM, dynamic light scattering, viscometry, and spectral methods. The comparison of DNA interaction with nanoparticles synthesized by the reduction of Ag+ ions and with nanoparticles obtained by the electric discharge plasma method was done. DNA metallization in a solution and on n-silicon surface with metal nanoparticles or by the reduction of silver ions after their binding to DNA was executed and studied. It was shown that DNA strands with regular location of silver or aluminum nanoparticles can be prepared. The conditions for the formation of silver nanoparticles and silver nanoclusters on DNA were analyzed.

  16. Transfer of molecular recognition information from DNA nanostructures to gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwardson, Thomas G. W.; Lau, Kai Lin; Bousmail, Danny; Serpell, Christopher J.; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2016-02-01

    DNA nanotechnology offers unparalleled precision and programmability for the bottom-up organization of materials. This approach relies on pre-assembling a DNA scaffold, typically containing hundreds of different strands, and using it to position functional components. A particularly attractive strategy is to employ DNA nanostructures not as permanent scaffolds, but as transient, reusable templates to transfer essential information to other materials. To our knowledge, this approach, akin to top-down lithography, has not been examined. Here we report a molecular printing strategy that chemically transfers a discrete pattern of DNA strands from a three-dimensional DNA structure to a gold nanoparticle. We show that the particles inherit the DNA sequence configuration encoded in the parent template with high fidelity. This provides control over the number of DNA strands and their relative placement, directionality and sequence asymmetry. Importantly, the nanoparticles produced exhibit the site-specific addressability of DNA nanostructures, and are promising components for energy, information and biomedical applications.

  17. DNA/Ag Nanoparticles as Antibacterial Agents against Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Takeshima

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Silver (Ag nanoparticles were produced using DNA extracted from salmon milt as templates. Particles spherical in shape with an average diameter smaller than 10 nm were obtained. The nanoparticles consisted of Ag as the core with an outermost thin layer of DNA. The DNA/Ag hybrid nanoparticles were immobilized over the surface of cotton based fabrics and their antibacterial efficiency was evaluated using E. coli as the typical Gram-negative bacteria. The antibacterial experiments were performed according to the Antibacterial Standard of Japanese Association for the Functional Evaluation of Textiles. The fabrics modified with DNA/Ag nanoparticles showed a high enough inhibitory and killing efficiency against E. coli at a concentration of Ag ≥ 10 ppm.

  18. Stwl modifies chromatin compaction and is required to maintain DNA integrity in the presence of perturbed DNA replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yi, X.; Vries, de H.I.; Siudeja, K.; Rana, A.; Lemstra, W.; Brunsting, J.F.; Kok, R.J.M.; Smulders, Y.M.; Schaefer, M.; Dijk, F.; Shang, Y.F.; Eggen, B.J.L.; Kampinga, H.H.; Sibon, O.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyurea, a well-known DNA replication inhibitor, induces cell cycle arrest and intact checkpoint functions are required to survive DNA replication stress induced by this genotoxic agent. Perturbed DNA synthesis also results in elevated levels of DNA damage. It is unclear how organisms prevent

  19. Stwl Modifies Chromatin Compaction and Is Required to Maintain DNA Integrity in the Presence of Perturbed DNA Replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yi, Xia; Vries, Hilda I. de; Siudeja, Katarzyna; Rana, Anil; Lemstra, Willy; Brunsting, Jeanette F.; Kok, Rob M.; Smulders, Yvo M.; Schaefer, Matthias; Dijk, Freark; Shang, Yongfeng; Eggen, Bart J.L.; Kampinga, Harm H.; Sibon, Ody C.M.

    Hydroxyurea, a well-known DNA replication inhibitor, induces cell cycle arrest and intact checkpoint functions are required to survive DNA replication stress induced by this genotoxic agent. Perturbed DNA synthesis also results in elevated levels of DNA damage. It is unclear how organisms prevent

  20. Synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles and their effect on the compressive strength and setting time of self-compacted concrete paste as cementitious composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefi, Mohammad Reza; Rezaei-Zarchi, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete were investigated after the addition of different amounts of ZnO nanoparticles. The zinc oxide nanoparticles, with an average particle size of about 30 nm, were synthesized and their properties studied with the help of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction. The prepared nanoparticles were partially added to self-compacting concrete at different concentrations (0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0%), and the mechanical (flexural and split tensile) strength of the specimens measured after 7, 14, 21 and 28 days, respectively. The present results have shown that the ZnO nanoparticles were able to improve the flexural strength of self-compacting concrete. The increased ZnO content of more than 0.2% could increase the flexural strength, and the maximum flexural and split tensile strength was observed after the addition of 0.5% nanoparticles. Finally, ZnO nanoparticles could improve the pore structure of the self-compacted concrete and shift the distributed pores to harmless and less-harmful pores, while increasing mechanical strength.

  1. Synthesis of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles and Their Effect on the Compressive Strength and Setting Time of Self-Compacted Concrete Paste as Cementitious Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Arefi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete were investigated after the addition of different amounts of ZnO nanoparticles. The zinc oxide nanoparticles, with an average particle size of about 30 nm, were synthesized and their properties studied with the help of a scanning electron microscope (SEM and X-ray diffraction. The prepared nanoparticles were partially added to self-compacting concrete at different concentrations (0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0%, and the mechanical (flexural and split tensile strength of the specimens measured after 7, 14, 21 and 28 days, respectively. The present results have shown that the ZnO nanoparticles were able to improve the flexural strength of self-compacting concrete. The increased ZnO content of more than 0.2% could increase the flexural strength, and the maximum flexural and split tensile strength was observed after the addition of 0.5% nanoparticles. Finally, ZnO nanoparticles could improve the pore structure of the self-compacted concrete and shift the distributed pores to harmless and less-harmful pores, while increasing mechanical strength.

  2. Detection of dopamine in dopaminergic cell using nanoparticles-based barcode DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jeung Hee; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Oh, Byung-Keun; Choi, Jeong Woo

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology-based bio-barcode-amplification analysis may be an innovative approach to dopamine detection. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of this bio-barcode DNA method in detecting dopamine from dopaminergic cells. Herein, a combination DNA barcode and bead-based immunoassay for neurotransmitter detection with PCR-like sensitivity is described. This method relies on magnetic nanoparticles with antibodies and nanoparticles that are encoded with DNA, and antibodies that can sandwich the target protein captured by the nanoparticle-bound antibodies. The aggregate sandwich structures are magnetically separated from solution, and treated in order to remove the conjugated barcode DNA. The DNA barcodes were then identified via PCR analysis. The dopamine concentration in dopaminergic cells can be readily and rapidly detected via the bio-barcode assay method. The bio-barcode assay method is, therefore, a rapid and high-throughput screening tool for the detection of neurotransmitters such as dopamine.

  3. Assessment of Carbon- and Metal-Based Nanoparticle DNA Damage with Microfluidic Electrophoretic Separation Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrand, Amanda M; Powell, Thomas; Robertson, Tiffany; Hussain, Saber M

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we examined the feasibility of extracting DNA from whole cell lysates exposed to nanoparticles using two different methodologies for evaluation of fragmentation with microfluidic electrophoretic separation. Human lung macrophages were exposed to five different carbon- and metal-based nanoparticles at two different time points (2 h, 24 h) and two different doses (5 µg/ml, 100 µg/ml). The primary difference in the banding patterns after 2 h of nanoparticle exposure is more DNA fragmentation at the higher NP concentration when examining cells exposed to nanoparticles of the same composition. However, higher doses of carbon and silver nanoparticles at both short and long dosing periods can contribute to erroneous or incomplete data with this technique. Also comparing DNA isolation methodologies, we recommend the centrifugation extraction technique, which provides more consistent banding patterns in the control samples compared to the spooling technique. Here we demonstrate that multi-walled carbon nanotubes, 15 nm silver nanoparticles and the positive control cadmium oxide cause similar DNA fragmentation at the short time point of 2 h with the centrifugation extraction technique. Therefore, the results of these studies contribute to elucidating the relationship between nanoparticle physicochemical properties and DNA fragmentation results while providing the pros and cons of altering the DNA isolation methodology. Overall, this technique provides a high throughput way to analyze subcellular alterations in DNA profiles of cells exposed to nanomaterials to aid in understanding the consequences of exposure and mechanistic effects. Future studies in microfluidic electrophoretic separation technologies should be investigated to determine the utility of protein or other assays applicable to cellular systems exposed to nanoparticles.

  4. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based lateral flow biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takalkar, Sunitha; Baryeh, Kwaku; Liu, Guodong

    2017-12-15

    We report a fluorescent carbon nanoparticle (FCN)-based lateral flow biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of DNA. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle with a diameter of around 15nm was used as a tag to label a detection DNA probe, which was complementary with the part of target DNA. A capture DNA probe was immobilized on the test zone of the lateral flow biosensor. Sandwich-type hybridization reactions among the FCN-labeled DNA probe, target DNA and capture DNA probe were performed on the lateral flow biosensor. In the presence of target DNA, FCNs were captured on the test zone of the biosensor and the fluorescent intensity of the captured FCNs was measured with a portable fluorescent reader. After systematic optimizations of experimental parameters (the components of running buffers, the concentration of detection DNA probe used in the preparation of FCN-DNA conjugates, the amount of FCN-DNA dispensed on the conjugate pad and the dispensing cycles of the capture DNA probes on the test-zone), the biosensor could detect a minimum concentration of 0.4 fM DNA. This study provides a rapid and low-cost approach for DNA detection with high sensitivity, showing great promise for clinical application and biomedical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Nonviral gene-delivery by highly fluorinated gemini bispyridinium surfactant-based DNA nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisicaro, Emilia; Compari, Carlotta; Bacciottini, Franco; Contardi, Laura; Pongiluppi, Erika; Barbero, Nadia; Viscardi, Guido; Quagliotto, Pierluigi; Donofrio, Gaetano; Krafft, Marie Pierre

    2017-02-01

    Biological and thermodynamic properties of a new homologous series of highly fluorinated bispyridinium cationic gemini surfactants, differing in the length of the spacer bridging the pyridinium polar heads in 1,1' position, are reported for the first time. Interestingly, gene delivery ability is closely associated with the spacer length due to a structural change of the molecule in solution. This conformation change is allowed when the spacer reaches the right length, and it is suggested by the trends of the apparent and partial molar enthalpies vs molality. To assess the compounds' biological activity, they were tested with an agarose gel electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA), MTT proliferation assay and Transient Transfection assays on a human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line. Data from atomic force microscopy (AFM) allow for morphological characterization of DNA nanoparticles. Dilution enthalpies, measured at 298K, enabled the determination of apparent and partial molar enthalpies vs molality. All tested compounds (except that with the longest spacer), at different levels, can deliver the plasmid when co-formulated with 1,2-dioleyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE). The compound with a spacer formed by eight carbon atoms gives rise to a gene delivery ability that is comparable to that of the commercial reagent. The compound with the longest spacer compacts DNA in loosely condensed structures by forming bows, which are not suitable for transfection. Regarding the compounds' hydrogenated counterparts, the tight relationship between the solution thermodynamics data and their biological performance is amazing, making "old" methods the foundation to deeply understanding "new" applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Multi-scale magnetic nanoparticle based optomagnetic bioassay for sensitive DNA and bacteria detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Bo; Zardán Gómez De La Torre, Teresa; Donolato, Marco

    2016-01-01

    nanoparticles (binding to the target) and thus the optomagnetic response of the sample, which is measured by an optomagnetic setup including a 405 nm laser and a photodetector. The limit of detection is mainly set by the lowest measurable concentration of magnetic nanoparticles. Herein, as new results compared...... with the target. We show that the optimization and lowering of the 100 nm magnetic nanoparticle concentration result in a limit of detection of 780 fM of DNA coils formed by rolling circle amplification (size of about 1 μm) and 105 CFU per mL Salmonella (for immunoassay). These values are 15 times lower than...... those reported previously for this readout principle. Finally, we show that the 250 nm magnetic nanoparticles can serve as a second detection label for qualitative biplex detection of DNA coils formed by rolling circle amplification from V. cholerae and E. coli DNA coils using 100 nm and 250 nm magnetic...

  7. UV-Visible Spectroscopy-Based Quantification of Unlabeled DNA Bound to Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldock, Brandi L; Hutchison, James E

    2016-12-20

    DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles have been increasingly applied as sensitive and selective analytical probes and biosensors. The DNA ligands bound to a nanoparticle dictate its reactivity, making it essential to know the type and number of DNA strands bound to the nanoparticle surface. Existing methods used to determine the number of DNA strands per gold nanoparticle (AuNP) require that the sequences be fluorophore-labeled, which may affect the DNA surface coverage and reactivity of the nanoparticle and/or require specialized equipment and other fluorophore-containing reagents. We report a UV-visible-based method to conveniently and inexpensively determine the number of DNA strands attached to AuNPs of different core sizes. When this method is used in tandem with a fluorescence dye assay, it is possible to determine the ratio of two unlabeled sequences of different lengths bound to AuNPs. Two sizes of citrate-stabilized AuNPs (5 and 12 nm) were functionalized with mixtures of short (5 base) and long (32 base) disulfide-terminated DNA sequences, and the ratios of sequences bound to the AuNPs were determined using the new method. The long DNA sequence was present as a lower proportion of the ligand shell than in the ligand exchange mixture, suggesting it had a lower propensity to bind the AuNPs than the short DNA sequence. The ratio of DNA sequences bound to the AuNPs was not the same for the large and small AuNPs, which suggests that the radius of curvature had a significant influence on the assembly of DNA strands onto the AuNPs.

  8. The effects of CuO nanoparticles on properties of self compacting concrete with GGBFS as binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nazari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, strength assessments and percentage of water absorption of high performance self compacting concrete containing different amounts of ground granulated blast furnace slag and CuO nanoparticles as binder have been investigated. Portland cement was replaced by different amounts of ground granulated blast furnace slag and the properties of concrete specimens were investigated. Although it negatively impacts the physical and mechanical properties of concrete at early age of curing, ground granulated blast furnace slag was found to improve the physical and mechanical properties of concrete up to 45 wt. (% at later ages. CuO nanoparticles with the average particle size of 15 nm were partially added to concrete with the optimum content of ground granulated blast furnace slag and physical and mechanical properties of the specimens were measured. CuO nanoparticle as a partial replacement of cement up to 3.0 wt. (% could accelerate C-S-H gel formation as a result of increased crystalline Ca(OH2 amount at the early age of hydration and hence increase strength and improve the resistance to water permeability of concrete specimens. The increased the CuO nanoparticles' content more than 3.0 wt. (%, causes the reduced the split tensile strength because of the decreased crystalline Ca(OH2 content required for C-S-H gel formation. Several empirical relationships have been presented to predict flexural and split tensile strength of the specimens by means of the corresponding compressive strength at a certain age of curing. More rapid appearance of the peaks related to hydrated products in X-ray diffraction results, all indicate that CuO nanoparticles could improve mechanical and physical properties of the concrete specimens.

  9. Development of DNA biosensor based on TiO2 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadzirah, Sh.; Hashim, U.; Rusop, M.

    2018-05-01

    A novel technique of DNA hybridization on the TiO2 nanoparticles film was developed by dropping a single droplet of target DNA onto the surface of TiO2 for the study of various concentrations of target DNA. The surface of TiO2 nanoparticle film was functionalized with APTES and covalently immobilized with 1 µM probe DNA on the silanized TiO2 nanoparticles surface. The effect of silanization, immobilization and hybridization were quantitatively measured by the output current signal obtained using a picoammeter. The 1 µM target DNA was found to be the most effective target towards the 1 µM probe DNA as the output current signal was within range; while the output current signal of the 10 µM target DNA was observed to beyond the range of the probe DNA control due to the excessive concentration as compared to the probe DNA. This approach has several advantages such as rapid, simple, low cost, and sensitive current signal during detection of different target DNA concentrations.

  10. Preparation and Characterization of Cationic PLA-PEG Nanoparticles for Delivery of Plasmid DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Weiwei

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of the present work was to formulate and evaluate cationic poly(lactic acid-poly(ethylene glycol (PLA-PEG nanoparticles as novel non-viral gene delivery nano-device. Cationic PLA-PEG nanoparticles were prepared by nanoprecipitation method. The gene loaded nanoparticles were obtained by incubating the report gene pEGFP with cationic PLA-PEG nanoparticles. The physicochemical properties (e.g., morphology, particle size, surface charge, DNA binding efficiency and biological properties (e.g., integrity of the released DNA, protection from nuclease degradation, plasma stability, in vitro cytotoxicity, and in vitro transfection ability in Hela cells of the gene loaded PLA-PEG nanoparticles were evaluated, respectively. The obtained cationic PLA-PEG nanoparticles and gene loaded nanoparticles were both spherical in shape with average particle size of 89.7 and 128.9 nm, polydispersity index of 0.185 and 0.161, zeta potentials of +28.9 and +16.8 mV, respectively. The obtained cationic PLA-PEG nanoparticles with high binding efficiency (>95% could protect the loaded DNA from the degradation by nuclease and plasma. The nanoparticles displayed sustained-release properties in vitro and the released DNA maintained its structural and functional integrity. It also showed lower cytotoxicity than Lipofectamine 2000 and could successfully transfect gene into Hela cells even in presence of serum. It could be concluded that the established gene loaded cationic PLA-PEG nanoparticles with excellent properties were promising non-viral nano-device, which had potential to make cancer gene therapy achievable.

  11. A Histone-Like Protein Induces Plasmid DNA to Form Liquid Crystals in Vitro and Gene Compaction in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyong Sun

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The liquid crystalline state is a universal phenomenon involving the formation of an ordered structure via a self-assembly process that has attracted attention from numerous scientists. In this study, the dinoflagellate histone-like protein HCcp3 is shown to induce super-coiled pUC18 plasmid DNA to enter a liquid crystalline state in vitro, and the role of HCcp3 in gene condensation in vivo is also presented. The plasmid DNA (pDNA-HCcp3 complex formed birefringent spherical particles with a semi-crystalline selected area electronic diffraction (SAED pattern. Circular dichroism (CD titrations of pDNA and HCcp3 were performed. Without HCcp3, pUC18 showed the characteristic B conformation. As the HCcp3 concentration increased, the 273 nm band sharply shifted to 282 nm. When the HCcp3 concentration became high, the base pair (bp/dimer ratio fell below 42/1, and the CD spectra of the pDNA-HCcp3 complexes became similar to that of dehydrated A-form DNA. Microscopy results showed that HCcp3 compacted the super-coiled gene into a condensed state and that inclusion bodies were formed. Our results indicated that HCcp3 has significant roles in gene condensation both in vitro and in histone-less eukaryotes in vivo. The present study indicates that HCcp3 has great potential for applications in non-viral gene delivery systems, where HCcp3 may compact genetic material to form liquid crystals.

  12. Highly Sensitive DNA Sensor Based on Upconversion Nanoparticles and Graphene Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Cristobal, P; Vilela, P; El-Sagheer, A; Lopez-Cabarcos, E; Brown, T; Muskens, O L; Rubio-Retama, J; Kanaras, A G

    2015-06-17

    In this work we demonstrate a DNA biosensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between NaYF4:Yb,Er nanoparticles and graphene oxide (GO). Monodisperse NaYF4:Yb,Er nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 29.1 ± 2.2 nm were synthesized and coated with a SiO2 shell of 11 nm, which allowed the attachment of single strands of DNA. When these DNA-functionalized NaYF4:Yb,Er@SiO2 nanoparticles were in the proximity of the GO surface, the π-π stacking interaction between the nucleobases of the DNA and the sp(2) carbons of the GO induced a FRET fluorescence quenching due to the overlap of the fluorescence emission of the NaYF4:Yb,Er@SiO2 and the absorption spectrum of GO. By contrast, in the presence of the complementary DNA strands, the hybridization leads to double-stranded DNA that does not interact with the GO surface, and thus the NaYF4:Yb,Er@SiO2 nanoparticles remain unquenched and fluorescent. The high sensitivity and specificity of this sensor introduces a new method for the detection of DNA with a detection limit of 5 pM.

  13. Formation of DNA-network embedding ferromagnetic Cobalt nano-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, Teruo; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Shirakawa, Hideaki; Sacho, Yu; Taniguchi, Masateru; Lee, Hea-Yeon; Kawai, Tomoji; Kang, Nam-Jung; Chen, Jinwoo

    2002-03-01

    Formation of DNA-network embedding ferromagnetic Cobalt nano-particles T. Kanki, Hidekazu. Tanaka, H. Shirakawa, Y. Sacho, M. Taniguchi, H. Lee, T. Kawai The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Japan and Nam-Jung Kang, Jinwoo Chen Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Korea DNA can be regarded as a naturally occurring and highly specific functional biopolymer and as a fine nano-wire. Moreover, it was found that large-scale DNA networks can be fabricated on mica surfaces. By using this network structure, we can expect to construct nano-scale assembly of functional nano particle, for example ferromagnetic Co nano particles, toward nano scale spin-electronics based on DNA circuits. When we formed DNA network by 250mg/ml DNA solution of poly(dG)-poly(dC) including ferromagnetic Co nano particles (diameter of 12nm), we have conformed the DNA network structure embedding Co nano-particles (height of about 12nm) by atomic force microscopy. On the other hand, we used 100mg/ml DNA solution, DNA can not connect each other, and many Co nano-particles exist without being embedded.

  14. Covalently bound DNA on naked iron oxide nanoparticles: Intelligent colloidal nano-vector for cell transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, Massimiliano; Martinello, Tiziana; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Gomiero, Chiara; Baratella, Davide; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Cozza, Giorgio; Patruno, Marco; Zboril, Radek; Vianello, Fabio

    2017-11-01

    Conversely to common coated iron oxide nanoparticles, novel naked surface active maghemite nanoparticles (SAMNs) can covalently bind DNA. Plasmid (pDNA) harboring the coding gene for GFP was directly chemisorbed onto SAMNs, leading to a novel DNA nanovector (SAMN@pDNA). The spontaneous internalization of SAMN@pDNA into cells was compared with an extensively studied fluorescent SAMN derivative (SAMN@RITC). Moreover, the transfection efficiency of SAMN@pDNA was evaluated and explained by computational model. SAMN@pDNA was prepared and characterized by spectroscopic and computational methods, and molecular dynamic simulation. The size and hydrodynamic properties of SAMN@pDNA and SAMN@RITC were studied by electron transmission microscopy, light scattering and zeta-potential. The two nanomaterials were tested by confocal scanning microscopy on equine peripheral blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ePB-MSCs) and GFP expression by SAMN@pDNA was determined. Nanomaterials characterized by similar hydrodynamic properties were successfully internalized and stored into mesenchymal stem cells. Transfection by SAMN@pDNA occurred and GFP expression was higher than lipofectamine procedure, even in the absence of an external magnetic field. A computational model clarified that transfection efficiency can be ascribed to DNA availability inside cells. Direct covalent binding of DNA on naked magnetic nanoparticles led to an extremely robust gene delivery tool. Hydrodynamic and chemical-physical properties of SAMN@pDNA were responsible of the successful uptake by cells and of the efficiency of GFP gene transfection. SAMNs are characterized by colloidal stability, excellent cell uptake, persistence in the host cells, low toxicity and are proposed as novel intelligent DNA nanovectors for efficient cell transfection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Shape-dependent bactericidal activity of copper oxide nanoparticle mediated by DNA and membrane damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laha, Dipranjan; Pramanik, Arindam; Laskar, Aparna; Jana, Madhurya; Pramanik, Panchanan; Karmakar, Parimal

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles were synthesized. • Physical characterizations of these nanoparticles were done by TEM, DLS, XRD, FTIR. • They showed shape dependent antibacterial activity on different bacterial strain. • They induced both membrane damage and ROS mediated DNA damage in bacteria. - Abstract: In this work, we synthesized spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles and their physical characterizations were done by the X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The antibacterial activity of these nanoparticles was determined on both gram positive and gram negative bacterial. Spherical shaped copper oxide nanoparticles showed more antibacterial property on gram positive bacteria where as sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles are more active on gram negative bacteria. We also demonstrated that copper oxide nanoparticles produced reactive oxygen species in both gram negative and gram positive bacteria. Furthermore, they induced membrane damage as determined by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Thus production of and membrane damage are major mechanisms of the bactericidal activity of these copper oxide nanoparticles. Finally it was concluded that antibacterial activity of nanoparticles depend on physicochemical properties of copper oxide nanoparticles and bacterial strain

  16. Shape-dependent bactericidal activity of copper oxide nanoparticle mediated by DNA and membrane damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laha, Dipranjan; Pramanik, Arindam [Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, Jadavpur University, 188, Raja S C Mallick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Laskar, Aparna [CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata 700032 (India); Jana, Madhurya [Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, Jadavpur University, 188, Raja S C Mallick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Pramanik, Panchanan [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Karmakar, Parimal, E-mail: pkarmakar_28@yahoo.co.in [Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, Jadavpur University, 188, Raja S C Mallick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles were synthesized. • Physical characterizations of these nanoparticles were done by TEM, DLS, XRD, FTIR. • They showed shape dependent antibacterial activity on different bacterial strain. • They induced both membrane damage and ROS mediated DNA damage in bacteria. - Abstract: In this work, we synthesized spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles and their physical characterizations were done by the X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The antibacterial activity of these nanoparticles was determined on both gram positive and gram negative bacterial. Spherical shaped copper oxide nanoparticles showed more antibacterial property on gram positive bacteria where as sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles are more active on gram negative bacteria. We also demonstrated that copper oxide nanoparticles produced reactive oxygen species in both gram negative and gram positive bacteria. Furthermore, they induced membrane damage as determined by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Thus production of and membrane damage are major mechanisms of the bactericidal activity of these copper oxide nanoparticles. Finally it was concluded that antibacterial activity of nanoparticles depend on physicochemical properties of copper oxide nanoparticles and bacterial strain.

  17. Engineering nanoparticle-coated bacteria as oral DNA vaccines for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qinglian; Wu, Min; Fang, Chun; Cheng, Changyong; Zhao, Mengmeng; Fang, Weihuan; Chu, Paul K; Ping, Yuan; Tang, Guping

    2015-04-08

    Live attenuated bacteria are of increasing importance in biotechnology and medicine in the emerging field of cancer immunotherapy. Oral DNA vaccination mediated by live attenuated bacteria often suffers from low infection efficiency due to various biological barriers during the infection process. To this end, we herein report, for the first time, a new strategy to engineer cationic nanoparticle-coated bacterial vectors that can efficiently deliver oral DNA vaccine for efficacious cancer immunotherapy. By coating live attenuated bacteria with synthetic nanoparticles self-assembled from cationic polymers and plasmid DNA, the protective nanoparticle coating layer is able to facilitate bacteria to effectively escape phagosomes, significantly enhance the acid tolerance of bacteria in stomach and intestines, and greatly promote dissemination of bacteria into blood circulation after oral administration. Most importantly, oral delivery of DNA vaccines encoding autologous vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by this hybrid vector showed remarkable T cell activation and cytokine production. Successful inhibition of tumor growth was also achieved by efficient oral delivery of VEGFR2 with nanoparticle-coated bacterial vectors due to angiogenesis suppression in the tumor vasculature and tumor necrosis. This proof-of-concept work demonstrates that coating live bacterial cells with synthetic nanoparticles represents a promising strategy to engineer efficient and versatile DNA vaccines for the era of immunotherapy.

  18. Alignment of Gold Nanoparticle-Decorated DNA Origami Nanotubes: Substrate Prepatterning versus Molecular Combing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschome, Bezu; Facsko, Stefan; Gothelf, Kurt V; Keller, Adrian

    2015-11-24

    DNA origami has become an established technique for designing well-defined nanostructures with any desired shape and for the controlled arrangement of functional nanostructures with few nanometer resolution. These unique features make DNA origami nanostructures promising candidates for use as scaffolds in nanoelectronics and nanophotonics device fabrication. Consequently, a number of studies have shown the precise organization of metallic nanoparticles on various DNA origami shapes. In this work, we fabricated large arrays of aligned DNA origami decorated with a high density of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). To this end, we first demonstrate the high-yield assembly of high-density AuNP arrangements on DNA origami adsorbed to Si surfaces with few unbound background nanoparticles by carefully controlling the concentrations of MgCl2 and AuNPs in the hybridization buffer and the hybridization time. Then, we evaluate two methods, i.e., hybridization to prealigned DNA origami and molecular combing in a receding meniscus, with respect to their potential to yield large arrays of aligned AuNP-decorated DNA origami nanotubes. Because of the comparatively low MgCl2 concentration required for the efficient immobilization of the AuNPs, the prealigned DNA origami become mobile and displaced from their original positions, thereby decreasing the alignment yield. This increased mobility, on the other hand, makes the adsorbed origami susceptible to molecular combing, and a total alignment yield of 86% is obtained in this way.

  19. Sequential strand displacement beacon for detection of DNA coverage on functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwoda, Rebecca E; Li, Feng; Reid, Michael S; Lin, Yanwen; Le, X Chris

    2014-06-17

    Functionalizing nanomaterials for diverse analytical, biomedical, and therapeutic applications requires determination of surface coverage (or density) of DNA on nanomaterials. We describe a sequential strand displacement beacon assay that is able to quantify specific DNA sequences conjugated or coconjugated onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Unlike the conventional fluorescence assay that requires the target DNA to be fluorescently labeled, the sequential strand displacement beacon method is able to quantify multiple unlabeled DNA oligonucleotides using a single (universal) strand displacement beacon. This unique feature is achieved by introducing two short unlabeled DNA probes for each specific DNA sequence and by performing sequential DNA strand displacement reactions. Varying the relative amounts of the specific DNA sequences and spacing DNA sequences during their coconjugation onto AuNPs results in different densities of the specific DNA on AuNP, ranging from 90 to 230 DNA molecules per AuNP. Results obtained from our sequential strand displacement beacon assay are consistent with those obtained from the conventional fluorescence assays. However, labeling of DNA with some fluorescent dyes, e.g., tetramethylrhodamine, alters DNA density on AuNP. The strand displacement strategy overcomes this problem by obviating direct labeling of the target DNA. This method has broad potential to facilitate more efficient design and characterization of novel multifunctional materials for diverse applications.

  20. The use of gold nanoparticle aggregation for DNA computing and logic-based biomolecular detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In-Hee; Yang, Kyung-Ae; Zhang, Byoung-Tak; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Park, Ji-Yoon; Chai, Young Gyu; Lee, Jae-Hoon

    2008-01-01

    The use of DNA molecules as a physical computational material has attracted much interest, especially in the area of DNA computing. DNAs are also useful for logical control and analysis of biological systems if efficient visualization methods are available. Here we present a quick and simple visualization technique that displays the results of the DNA computing process based on a colorimetric change induced by gold nanoparticle aggregation, and we apply it to the logic-based detection of biomolecules. Our results demonstrate its effectiveness in both DNA-based logical computation and logic-based biomolecular detection

  1. The combination of gold nanorods and nanoparticles with DNA nanodevices for logic gates construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Dongbao; Song, Tingjie; Xiao, Shiyan; Huang, Fujian; Liang, Haojun; Zheng, Bin

    2015-01-01

    In this work, two DNA nanodevices were constructed utilizing a DNA strand displacement reaction. With the assistance of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and gold nanorods (AuNRs), the autonomous reactions can be reflected from the aggregation states of nanoparticles. By sequence design and the two non-overlapping double hump-like UV–vis spectral peaks of AuNPs and AuNRs, two logic gates with multiple inputs and outputs were successfully run with expected outcomes. This method not only shows how to achieve computing with multiple logic calculations but also has great potential for multiple targets detection. (paper)

  2. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) study of DNA hybridization at single nanoparticle transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, T.; Jahr, N.; Jatschka, J.; Csaki, A.; Stranik, O.; Fritzsche, W.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of DNA–DNA interaction on the localized surface plasmon resonance of single 80 nm gold nanoparticles is studied. Therefore, both the attachment of the capture DNA strands at the particle surface and the sequence-specific DNA binding (hybridization) of analyte DNA to the immobilized capture DNA is subject of investigations. The influence of substrate attachment chemistry, the packing density of DNA as controlled by an assisting layer of smaller molecules, and the distance as increased by a linker on the LSPR efficiency is investigated. The resulting changes in signal can be related to a higher hybridization efficiency of the analyte DNA to the immobilized capture DNA. The subsequent attachment of additional DNA strands to this system is studied, which allows for a multiple step detection of binding and an elucidation of the resulting resonance shifts. The detection limit was determined for the utilized DNA system by incubation with various concentration of analyte DNA. Although the method allows for a marker-free detection, we show that additional markers such as 20 nm gold particle labels increase the signal and thereby the sensitivity significantly. The study of resonance shift for various DNA lengths revealed that the resonance shift per base is stronger for shorter DNA molecules (20 bases) as compared to longer ones (46 bases).

  3. DNA base pair resolution measurements using resonance energy transfer efficiency in lanthanide doped nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Delplanque

    Full Text Available Lanthanide-doped nanoparticles are of considerable interest for biodetection and bioimaging techniques thanks to their unique chemical and optical properties. As a sensitive luminescence material, they can be used as (bio probes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET where trivalent lanthanide ions (La3+ act as energy donors. In this paper we present an efficient method to transfer ultrasmall (ca. 8 nm NaYF4 nanoparticles dispersed in organic solvent to an aqueous solution via oxidation of the oleic acid ligand. Nanoparticles were then functionalized with single strand DNA oligomers (ssDNA by inducing covalent bonds between surface carboxylic groups and a 5' amine modified-ssDNA. Hybridization with the 5' fluorophore (Cy5 modified complementary ssDNA strand demonstrated the specificity of binding and allowed the fine control over the distance between Eu3+ ions doped nanoparticle and the fluorophore by varying the number of the dsDNA base pairs. First, our results confirmed nonradiative resonance energy transfer and demonstrate the dependence of its efficiency on the distance between the donor (Eu3+ and the acceptor (Cy5 with sensitivity at a nanometre scale.

  4. DNA base pair resolution measurements using resonance energy transfer efficiency in lanthanide doped nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delplanque, Aleksandra; Wawrzynczyk, Dominika; Jaworski, Pawel; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Pawlik, Krzysztof; Buckle, Malcolm; Nyk, Marcin; Nogues, Claude; Samoc, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Lanthanide-doped nanoparticles are of considerable interest for biodetection and bioimaging techniques thanks to their unique chemical and optical properties. As a sensitive luminescence material, they can be used as (bio) probes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) where trivalent lanthanide ions (La3+) act as energy donors. In this paper we present an efficient method to transfer ultrasmall (ca. 8 nm) NaYF4 nanoparticles dispersed in organic solvent to an aqueous solution via oxidation of the oleic acid ligand. Nanoparticles were then functionalized with single strand DNA oligomers (ssDNA) by inducing covalent bonds between surface carboxylic groups and a 5' amine modified-ssDNA. Hybridization with the 5' fluorophore (Cy5) modified complementary ssDNA strand demonstrated the specificity of binding and allowed the fine control over the distance between Eu3+ ions doped nanoparticle and the fluorophore by varying the number of the dsDNA base pairs. First, our results confirmed nonradiative resonance energy transfer and demonstrate the dependence of its efficiency on the distance between the donor (Eu3+) and the acceptor (Cy5) with sensitivity at a nanometre scale.

  5. The effect of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles on water permeability and thermal and mechanical properties of high strength self-compacting concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazari, Ali, E-mail: alinazari84@aut.ac.ir [Department of Technical and Engineering Sciences, Islamic Azad University (Saveh Branch), Saveh (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Riahi, Shadi [Department of Technical and Engineering Sciences, Islamic Azad University (Saveh Branch), Saveh (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Research highlights: {yields} TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles effects on self-compacting concrete. {yields} Strength assessments. {yields} Water permeability. {yields} Thermal properties. {yields} Pore structure. {yields} Microstructure evaluations. - Abstract: In this work, strength assessments and coefficient of water absorption of high performance self-compacting concrete containing different amounts of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles have been investigated. The results indicate that the strength and the resistance to water permeability of the specimens are improved by adding TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles in the cement paste up to 4.0 wt%. TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, as a result of increased crystalline Ca(OH){sub 2} amount especially at the early age of hydration, could accelerate C-S-H gel formation and hence increase the strength of the concrete specimens. In addition, TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are able to act as nanofillers and recover the pore structure of the specimens by decreasing harmful pores. Several empirical relationships have been presented to predict flexural and split tensile strength of the specimens by means of the corresponding compressive strength at a certain age of curing. Accelerated peak appearance in conduction calorimetry tests, more weight loss in thermogravimetric analysis and more rapid appearance of the peaks related to hydrated products in X-ray diffraction results, all indicate that TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles could improve mechanical and physical properties of the concrete specimens.

  6. The effect of TiO2 nanoparticles on water permeability and thermal and mechanical properties of high strength self-compacting concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazari, Ali; Riahi, Shadi

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → TiO 2 nanoparticles effects on self-compacting concrete. → Strength assessments. → Water permeability. → Thermal properties. → Pore structure. → Microstructure evaluations. - Abstract: In this work, strength assessments and coefficient of water absorption of high performance self-compacting concrete containing different amounts of TiO 2 nanoparticles have been investigated. The results indicate that the strength and the resistance to water permeability of the specimens are improved by adding TiO 2 nanoparticles in the cement paste up to 4.0 wt%. TiO 2 nanoparticles, as a result of increased crystalline Ca(OH) 2 amount especially at the early age of hydration, could accelerate C-S-H gel formation and hence increase the strength of the concrete specimens. In addition, TiO 2 nanoparticles are able to act as nanofillers and recover the pore structure of the specimens by decreasing harmful pores. Several empirical relationships have been presented to predict flexural and split tensile strength of the specimens by means of the corresponding compressive strength at a certain age of curing. Accelerated peak appearance in conduction calorimetry tests, more weight loss in thermogravimetric analysis and more rapid appearance of the peaks related to hydrated products in X-ray diffraction results, all indicate that TiO 2 nanoparticles could improve mechanical and physical properties of the concrete specimens.

  7. DNA adsorption characteristics of hollow spherule allophane nano-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Yoko; Iyoda, Fumitoshi; Arakawa, Shuichi; John, Baiju; Okamoto, Masami; Hayashi, Hidetomo

    2013-01-01

    To understand the propensity of natural allophane to adsorb the DNA molecules, the adsorption characteristics were assessed against natural allophane (AK70), using single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) and adenosine 5′-monophosphate (5′-AMP) as a reference molecule. The adsorption capacity of ss-DNA on AK70 exhibited one order of magnitude lower value as compared with that of 5′-AMP. The adsorption capacity of ss-DNA decreased with increasing pH due to the interaction generated between phosphate groups of ss-DNA and functional Al–OH groups on the wall perforations through deprotonating, associated with higher energy barrier for the adsorption of ss-DNA. The adsorption morphologies consisting of the individual ss-DNA with mono-layer coverage of the clustered allophane particle were observed successfully through transmission electron microscopy analysis. - Highlights: • The interaction between phosphate groups of ss-DNA and Al–OH groups • Higher energy barrier for the adsorption of ss-DNA • The individual ss-DNA with mono-layer coverage of the allophane clustered particle

  8. Electrostatic assembly of CTAB-capped silver nanoparticles along predefined λ-DNA template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Gang; Wang Li; Zhou Hualan; Liu Zhiguo; Song Yonghai; Li Zhuang

    2005-01-01

    Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-capped positively-charged silver nanoparticles synthesized in water-ethanol system was electrostatic assembled on predefined aligned λ-DNA template. Silver nanowire can be obtained by changing the reaction time and the particles concentration. In our work, the length of the silver nanowire obtained is about 10 μm, and the dimension of the wires is about 20 nm. AFM data reveal that the assembly of CTAB-capped silver nanoparticles on DNA is ordered, but there is space between two particles absorbed on the DNA template. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was applied to characterize the linear silver clusters, which provides an additional proof that the silver particles were assembled onto DNA template with fine order

  9. Efficient production of retroviruses using PLGA/bPEI-DNA nanoparticles and application for reprogramming somatic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Jin Seo

    Full Text Available Reprogramming of somatic cells to pluripotent cells requires the introduction of factors driving fate switches. Viral delivery has been the most efficient method for generation of induced pluripotent stem cells. Transfection, which precedes virus production, is a commonly-used process for delivery of nucleic acids into cells. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of PLGA/ bPEI nanoparticles in transfection and virus production. Using a modified method of producing PLGA nanoparticles, PLGA/bPEI-DNA nanoparticles were examined for transfection efficiency and virus production yield in comparison with PLGA-DNA, bPEI-DNA nanoparticles or liposome-DNA complexes. After testing various ratios of PLGA, bPEI, and DNA, the ratio of 6:3:1 (PLGA:bPEI:DNA, w/w/w was determined to be optimal, with acceptable cellular toxicity. PLGA/bPEI-DNA (6:3:1 nanoparticles showed superior transfection efficiency, especially in multiple gene transfection, and viral yield when compared with liposome-DNA complexes. The culture supernatants of HEK293FT cells transfected with PLGA/bPEI-DNA of viral constructs containing reprogramming factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, or c-Myc successfully and more efficiently generated induced pluripotent stem cell colonies from mouse embryonic fibroblasts. These results strongly suggest that PLGA/bPEI-DNA nanoparticles can provide significant advantages in studying the effect of multiple factor delivery such as in reprogramming or direct conversion of cell fate.

  10. In situ AFM analysis investigating disassembly of DNA nanoparticles and nano-films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yi; Wan, Lei; Blacklock, Jenifer; Oupicky, David; Mao, Guangzhao

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic vector-based gene delivery systems continue to gain strength as viable alternatives to viral vectors due to safety and other concerns. DNA release dynamics is key to the understanding and control of gene delivery from nano-systems. Here we describe atomic force microscope application to the understanding of DNA release dynamics from bioreducible polycation-based nano-systems. The two nano-systems are polyplex nanoparticles and layer-by-layer films.

  11. Targeted Gene Transfer to the Brain via the Delivery of Brain-Penetrating DNA Nanoparticles with Focused Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Brian P.; Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Suk, Jung Soo; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Hanes, Justin; Price, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of many pathologies of the central nervous system (CNS), including brain tumors and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the delivery of systemically administered gene carriers to the CNS is hindered by both the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the nanoporous and electrostatically charged brain extracelluar matrix (ECM), which acts as a steric and adhesive barrier. We have previously shown that these physiological barriers may be overcome by, respectively, opening the BBB with MR image-guided focused ultrasound (FUS) and microbubbles and using highly compact “brain penetrating” nanoparticles (BPN) coated with a dense polyethylene glycol corona that prevents adhesion to ECM components. Here, we tested whether this combined approach could be utilized to deliver systemically administered DNA-bearing BPN (DNA-BPN) across the BBB and mediate localized, robust, and sustained transgene expression in the rat brain. Systemically administered DNA-BPN delivered through the BBB with FUS led to dose-dependent transgene expression only in the FUS-treated region that was evident as early as 24 h post administration and lasted for at least 28 days. In the FUS-treated region ~42% of all cells, including neurons and astrocytes, were transfected, while less than 6% were transfected in the contralateral non-FUS treated hemisphere. Importantly, this was achieved without any sign of toxicity or astrocyte activation. We conclude that the image-guided delivery of DNA-BPN with FUS and microbubbles constitutes a safe and non-invasive strategy for targeted gene therapy to the brain. PMID:26732553

  12. DNA-templated synthesis of Pt nanoparticles on single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lifeng

    2009-11-18

    A series of electron microscopy characterizations demonstrate that single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (ssDNA) can bind to nanotube surfaces and disperse bundled single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) into individual tubes. The ssDNA molecules on the nanotube surfaces demonstrate various morphologies, such as aggregated clusters and spiral wrapping around a nanotube with different pitches and spaces, indicating that the morphology of the SWCNT/DNA hybrids is not related solely to the base sequence of the ssDNA or the chirality or the diameter of the nanotubes. In addition to serving as a non-covalent dispersion agent, the ssDNA molecules bonded to the nanotube surface can provide addresses for localizing Pt(II) complexes along the nanotubes. The Pt nanoparticles obtained by a reduction of the Pt2+-DNA adducts are crystals with a size of direct ethanol/methanol fuel cells and nanoscale electronics.

  13. DNA-encapsulated magnesium phosphate nanoparticles elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajadhar Bhakta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of pEGFP (plasmid expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein-encapsulated PEGylated (meaning polyethylene glycol coated magnesium phosphate nanoparticles (referred to as MgPi-pEGFP nanoparticles for the induction of immune responses was investigated in a mouse model. MgPi-pEGFP nanoparticles induced enhanced serum antibody and antigen-specific T-lymphocyte responses, as well as increased IFN-γ and IL-12 levels compared to naked pEGFP when administered via intravenous, intraperitoneal or intramuscular routes. A significant macrophage response, both in size and activity, was also observed when mice were immunized with the nanoparticle formulation. The response was highly specific for the antigen, as the increase in interaction between macrophages and lymphocytes as well as lymphocyte proliferation took place only when they were re-stimulated with recombinant green fluorescence protein (rGFP. Thus the nanoparticle formulation elicited both humoral as well as cellular responses. Cytokine profiling revealed the induction of Th-1 type responses. The results suggest DNA-encapsulated magnesium phosphate (MgPi nanoparticles may constitute a safer, more stable and cost-efficient DNA vaccine formulation.

  14. Transferrin-mediated PEGylated nanoparticles for delivery of DNA/PLL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Wangwen; Xu Zhenghong; Gao Yu; Chen Lingli; Li Yaping

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the stability of pDNA/poly(L-lysine) complex (DNA/PLL) during microencapsulation, prepare transferrin (TF) conjugated PEGylated nanoparticles (TF-PEG-NP) loading DNA/PLL, and assess its physicochemical characteristics and in vitro transfection efficiency. The DNA/PLL was prepared by mixing plasmid DNA (pDNA) in deionized water with various amounts of PLL. PEGylated nanoparticles (PEG-NP) loading DNA/PLL were prepared by a water-oil-water double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. TF-PEG-NP was prepared by coupling TF with PEG-NP. The physicochemical characteristics of TF-PEG-NP and in vitro transfection efficiency on K562 cells were measured. The results showed that free pDNA reserved its double supercoiled form (dsDNA) for only on average 25.7% after sonification, but over 70% of dsDNA was reserved after pDNA was contracted with PLL. The particle size range of TF-PEG-NP loading DNA/PLL was 150-450 nm with entrapment efficiency over 70%. TF-PEG-NP exhibited the low burst effect (<10%) within 1 day. After the first phase, DNA/PLL displayed a sustained release. The amount of cumulated DNA/PLL release from TF-PEG-NP with 2% polymer over 7 days was 85.4% for DNA/PLL (1:0.3 mass ratio), 59.8% and 43.1% for DNA/PLL (1:0.6) and DNA/PLL (1:1.0), respectively. To TF-PEG-NP loading DNA/PLL without chloroquine, the percentage of EGFP expressing cells was 28.9% for complexes consisting of DNA/PLL (1:0.3), 38.5% and 39.7% for DNA/PLL (1:0.6) and DNA/PLL (1:1.0), respectively. In TF-PEG-NP loading DNA/PLL with chloroquine, more cells were transfected, the percentage of positive cells was 37.6% (DNA/PLL, 1:0.3), 47.1% (DNA/PLL, 1:0.6) and 45.8% (DNA/PLL, 1:1.0), which meant that the transfection efficiency of pDNA was increased by over 50 times when PLL and TF-PEG-NP were jointly used as a plasmid DNA carrier, in particular, the maximal percentage of positive cells (47.1%) from TF-PEG-NP loading DNA/PLL (1:0.6) was about 70 times the

  15. Oral Vaccination Based on DNA-Chitosan Nanoparticles against Schistosoma mansoni Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina R. Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a vaccine would be essential for the control of schistosomiasis, which is recognized as the most important human helminth infection in terms of morbidity and mortality. A new approach of oral vaccination with DNA-chitosan nanoparticles appears interesting because of their great stability and the ease of target accessibility, besides chitosan immunostimulatory properties. Here we described that chitosan nanoparticles loaded with plasmid DNA encoding Rho1-GTPase protein of Schistosoma mansoni, prepared at different molar ratios of primary amines to DNA phosphate anion (N/P, were able to complex electrostatically with DNA and condense it into positively charged nanostructures. Nanoparticles were able to maintain zeta potential and size characteristics in media that simulate gastric (SGF and intestinal fluids (SIF. Further in vivo studies showed that oral immunization was not able to induce high levels of specific antibodies but induced high levels of the modulatory cytokine IL-10. This resulted in a significative reduce of liver pathology, although it could not protect mice of infection challenge with S. mansoni worms. Mice immunized only with chitosan nanoparticles presented 47% of protection against parasite infection, suggesting an important role of chitosan in inducing a protective immune response against schistosomiasis, which will be more explored in further studies.

  16. Photoelectrochemical Sensors for the Rapid Detection of DNA Damage Induced by Some Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jamaluddin Ahmed

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Photoelectrochemcal sensors were developed for the rapid detection of oxidative DNA damage induced by titanium dioxide and polystyrene nanoparticles. Each sensor is a multilayer film prepared on a tin oxide nanoparticle electrode using layer- by-layer self assembly and is composed of separate layer of a photoelectrochemical indicator, DNA. The organic compound and heavy metals represent genotoxic chemicals leading two major damaging mechanisms, DNA adduct formation and DNA oxidation. The DNA damage is detected by monitoring the change of photocurrent of the indicator. In one sensor configuration, a DNA intercalator, Ru(bpy2 (dppz2+ [bpy=2, 2′ -bipyridine, dppz=dipyrido( 3, 2-a: 2′ 3′-c phenazine], was employed as the photoelectrochemical indicator. The damaged DNA on the sensor bound lesser Ru(bpy2 (dppz2+ than the intact DNA, resulting in a drop in photocurrent. In another configuration, ruthenium tris(bipyridine was used as the indicator and was immobilized on the electrode underneath the DNA layer. After oxidative damage, the DNA bases became more accessible to photoelectrochemical oxidation than the intact DNA, producing a rise in photocurrent. Both sensors displayed substantial photocurrent change after incubation in titanium dioxide / polystyrene solution in a time – dependent manner. According to the data, damage of the DNA film was completed in 1h in titanium dioxide / polystyrene solution. In addition, the titanium dioxide induced much more sever damage than polysterene. The results were verified independently by gel electrophoresis and UV-Vis absorbance experiments. The photoelectrochemical reaction can be employed as a new and inexpensive screening tool for the rapid assessment of the genotoxicity of existing and new chemicals.

  17. Photoelectrochemical sensors for the rapid detection of DNA damage Induced by some nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.J.; Zhang, B.T.; Guo, L.H.

    2010-01-01

    Photoelectrochemical sensors were developed for the rapid detection of oxidative DNA damage induced by titanium dioxide and polystyrene nanoparticles. Each sensor is a multilayer film prepared on a tin oxide nanoparticle electrode using layer- by-layer self assembly and is composed of separate layer of a photoelectrochemical indicator, DNA. The organic compound and heavy metals represent genotoxic chemicals leading two major damaging mechanisms, DNA adduct formation and DNA oxidation. The DNA damage is detected by monitoring the change of photocurrent of the indicator. In one sensor configuration, a DNA intercalator, Ru(bpy)2 (dppz)2+ [bpy=2, 2' -bipyridine, dppz=dipyrido (3, 2-a: 2' 3'-c) phenazine], was employed as the photoelectrochemical indicator. The damaged DNA on the sensor bound lesser Ru(bpy)2 (dppz)2+ than the intact DNA, resulting in a drop in photocurrent. In another configuration, ruthenium tris(bipyridine) was used as the indicator and was immobilized on the electrode underneath the DNA layer. After oxidative damage, the DNA bases became more accessible to photoelectrochemical oxidation than the intact DNA, producing a rise in photocurrent. Both sensors displayed substantial photocurrent change after incubation in titanium dioxide / polystyrene solution in a time . dependent manner. According to the data, damage of the DNA film was completed in 1h in titanium dioxide / polystyrene solution. In addition, the titanium dioxide induced much more sever damage than polystyrene. The results were verified independently by gel electrophoresis and UV-Vis absorbance experiments. The photoelectrochemical reaction can be employed as a new and inexpensive screening tool for the rapid assessment of the genotoxicity of existing and new chemicals. (author)

  18. In-vitro nanodiagnostic platform through nanoparticles and DNA-RNA nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ki; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-04-01

    Nanocomposites containing nanoparticles or nanostructured domains exhibit an even higher degree of material complexity that leads to an extremely high variability of nanostructured materials. This review introduces analytical concepts and techniques for nanomaterials and derives recommendations for a qualified selection of characterization techniques for specific types of samples, and focuses the characterization of nanoparticles and their agglomerates or aggregates. In addition, DNA nanotechnology and the more recent newcomer RNA nanotechnology have achieved almost an advanced status among nanotechnology researchers¸ therefore, the core features, potential, and significant challenges of DNA nanotechnology are also highlighted as a new discipline. Moreover, nanobiochips made by nanomaterials are rapidly emerging as a new paradigm in the area of large-scale biochemical analysis. The use of nanoscale components enables higher precision in diagnostics while considerably reducing the cost of the platform that leads this review to explore the use of nanoparticles, nanomaterials, and other bionanotechnologies for its application to nanodiagnostics in-vitro.

  19. Compact solar autoclave based on steam generation using broadband light-harvesting nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Oara; Feronti, Curtis; Neumann, Albert D; Dong, Anjie; Schell, Kevin; Lu, Benjamin; Kim, Eric; Quinn, Mary; Thompson, Shea; Grady, Nathaniel; Nordlander, Peter; Oden, Maria; Halas, Naomi J

    2013-07-16

    The lack of readily available sterilization processes for medicine and dentistry practices in the developing world is a major risk factor for the propagation of disease. Modern medical facilities in the developed world often use autoclave systems to sterilize medical instruments and equipment and process waste that could contain harmful contagions. Here, we show the use of broadband light-absorbing nanoparticles as solar photothermal heaters, which generate high-temperature steam for a standalone, efficient solar autoclave useful for sanitation of instruments or materials in resource-limited, remote locations. Sterilization was verified using a standard Geobacillus stearothermophilus-based biological indicator.

  20. Compact solar autoclave based on steam generation using broadband light-harvesting nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Oara; Feronti, Curtis; Neumann, Albert D.; Dong, Anjie; Schell, Kevin; Lu, Benjamin; Kim, Eric; Quinn, Mary; Thompson, Shea; Grady, Nathaniel; Nordlander, Peter; Oden, Maria; Halas, Naomi J.

    2013-01-01

    The lack of readily available sterilization processes for medicine and dentistry practices in the developing world is a major risk factor for the propagation of disease. Modern medical facilities in the developed world often use autoclave systems to sterilize medical instruments and equipment and process waste that could contain harmful contagions. Here, we show the use of broadband light-absorbing nanoparticles as solar photothermal heaters, which generate high-temperature steam for a standalone, efficient solar autoclave useful for sanitation of instruments or materials in resource-limited, remote locations. Sterilization was verified using a standard Geobacillus stearothermophilus-based biological indicator. PMID:23836642

  1. Selective DNA-Mediated Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles on Electroded Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    might use the Watson - Crick base-pairing of DNA as a means for ultrahigh-precision engineering is well- known.5,6 The idea is to use the highly specific...Selective DNA -Mediated Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles on Electroded Substrates K. E. Sapsford,†,‡,∇ D. Park,§ E. R. Goldman,‡ E. E. Foos,| S. A...electrodes via DNA hybridization. Protocols are demonstrated for maximizing selectivity and coverage using 15mers as the active binding agents. Detailed

  2. Intelligent layered nanoflare: ``lab-on-a-nanoparticle'' for multiple DNA logic gate operations and efficient intracellular delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Kang, Li-Ping; Huang, Zhi-Mei; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin; Tan, Weihong

    2014-07-01

    DNA strand displacement cascades have been engineered to construct various fascinating DNA circuits. However, biological applications are limited by the insufficient cellular internalization of naked DNA structures, as well as the separated multicomponent feature. In this work, these problems are addressed by the development of a novel DNA nanodevice, termed intelligent layered nanoflare, which integrates DNA computing at the nanoscale, via the self-assembly of DNA flares on a single gold nanoparticle. As a ``lab-on-a-nanoparticle'', the intelligent layered nanoflare could be engineered to perform a variety of Boolean logic gate operations, including three basic logic gates, one three-input AND gate, and two complex logic operations, in a digital non-leaky way. In addition, the layered nanoflare can serve as a programmable strategy to sequentially tune the size of nanoparticles, as well as a new fingerprint spectrum technique for intelligent multiplex biosensing. More importantly, the nanoflare developed here can also act as a single entity for intracellular DNA logic gate delivery, without the need of commercial transfection agents or other auxiliary carriers. By incorporating DNA circuits on nanoparticles, the presented layered nanoflare will broaden the applications of DNA circuits in biological systems, and facilitate the development of DNA nanotechnology.DNA strand displacement cascades have been engineered to construct various fascinating DNA circuits. However, biological applications are limited by the insufficient cellular internalization of naked DNA structures, as well as the separated multicomponent feature. In this work, these problems are addressed by the development of a novel DNA nanodevice, termed intelligent layered nanoflare, which integrates DNA computing at the nanoscale, via the self-assembly of DNA flares on a single gold nanoparticle. As a ``lab-on-a-nanoparticle'', the intelligent layered nanoflare could be engineered to perform a variety of

  3. Development of a sensitive electrochemical DNA sensor by 4-aminothiophenol self-assembled on electrodeposited nanogold electrode coupled with Au nanoparticles labeled reporter ssDNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guangjiu; Liu Lihua; Qi Xiaowei; Guo Yaqing; Sun Wei; Li Xiaolin

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: A novel and sensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor was fabricated by using the 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) self-assembled on electrodeposited gold nanoparticles (NG) modified electrode to anchor capture ssDNA sequences and Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) labeled with reporter ssDNA sequences, which were further coupled with electroactive indicator of hexaammineruthenium (III) ([Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ] 3+ ) to amplify the electrochemical signal of hybridization reaction. Different modified electrodes were prepared and characterized by cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscope and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. By using a sandwich model for the capture of target ssDNA sequences, which was based on the shorter probe ssDNA and AuNPs label reporter ssDNA hybridized with longer target ssDNA, the electrochemical behavior of [Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ] 3+ was monitored by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The fabricated electrochemical DNA sensor exhibited good distinguish capacity for the complementary ssDNA sequence and two bases mismatched ssDNA. The dynamic detection range of the target ssDNA sequences was from 1.4 × 10 −11 to 2.0 × 10 −9 mol/L with the detection limit as 9.5 × 10 −12 mol/L (3σ). So in this paper a new electrochemical DNA sensor was designed with gold nanoparticles as the immobilization platform and the signal amplifier simultaneously.

  4. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce oxidative stress and DNA-adduct formation but not DNA-breakage in human lung cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schins Roel PF

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Titanium dioxide (TiO2, also known as titanium (IV oxide or anatase, is the naturally occurring oxide of titanium. It is also one of the most commercially used form. To date, no parameter has been set for the average ambient air concentration of TiO2 nanoparticles (NP by any regulatory agency. Previously conducted studies had established these nanoparticles to be mainly non-cyto- and -genotoxic, although they had been found to generate free radicals both acellularly (specially through photocatalytic activity and intracellularly. The present study determines the role of TiO2-NP (anatase, ∅ in vitro. For comparison, iron containing nanoparticles (hematite, Fe2O3, ∅ 2-NP did not induce DNA-breakage measured by the Comet-assay in both cell types. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS was measured acellularly (without any photocatalytic activity as well as intracellularly for both types of particles, however, the iron-containing NP needed special reducing conditions before pronounced radical generation. A high level of DNA adduct formation (8-OHdG was observed in IMR-90 cells exposed to TiO2-NP, but not in cells exposed to hematite NP. Our study demonstrates different modes of action for TiO2- and Fe2O3-NP. Whereas TiO2-NP were able to generate elevated amounts of free radicals, which induced indirect genotoxicity mainly by DNA-adduct formation, Fe2O3-NP were clastogenic (induction of DNA-breakage and required reducing conditions for radical formation.

  5. Dendritic cell targeted chitosan nanoparticles for nasal DNA immunization against SARS CoV nucleocapsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuwanshi, Dharmendra; Mishra, Vivek; Das, Dipankar; Kaur, Kamaljit; Suresh, Mavanur R

    2012-04-02

    This work investigates the formulation and in vivo efficacy of dendritic cell (DC) targeted plasmid DNA loaded biotinylated chitosan nanoparticles for nasal immunization against nucleocapsid (N) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) as antigen. The induction of antigen-specific mucosal and systemic immune response at the site of virus entry is a major challenge for vaccine design. Here, we designed a strategy for noninvasive receptor mediated gene delivery to nasal resident DCs. The pDNA loaded biotinylated chitosan nanoparticles were prepared using a complex coacervation process and characterized for size, shape, surface charge, plasmid DNA loading and protection against nuclease digestion. The pDNA loaded biotinylated chitosan nanoparticles were targeted with bifunctional fusion protein (bfFp) vector for achieving DC selective targeting. The bfFp is a recombinant fusion protein consisting of truncated core-streptavidin fused with anti-DEC-205 single chain antibody (scFv). The core-streptavidin arm of fusion protein binds with biotinylated nanoparticles, while anti-DEC-205 scFv imparts targeting specificity to DC DEC-205 receptor. We demonstrate that intranasal administration of bfFp targeted formulations along with anti-CD40 DC maturation stimuli enhanced magnitude of mucosal IgA as well as systemic IgG against N protein. The strategy led to the detection of augmented levels of N protein specific systemic IgG and nasal IgA antibodies. However, following intranasal delivery of naked pDNA no mucosal and systemic immune responses were detected. A parallel comparison of targeted formulations using intramuscular and intranasal routes showed that the intramuscular route is superior for induction of systemic IgG responses compared with the intranasal route. Our results suggest that targeted pDNA delivery through a noninvasive intranasal route can be a strategy for designing low-dose vaccines.

  6. Direct colorimetric detection of unamplified pathogen DNA by dextrin-capped gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baetsen-Young, Amy M; Vasher, Matthew; Matta, Leann L; Colgan, Phil; Alocilja, Evangelyn C; Day, Brad

    2018-03-15

    The interaction between gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and nucleic acids has facilitated a variety of diagnostic applications, with further diversification of synthesis match bio-applications while reducing biotoxicity. However, DNA interactions with unique surface capping agents have not been fully defined. Using dextrin-capped AuNPs (d-AuNPs), we have developed a novel unamplified genomic DNA (gDNA) nanosensor, exploiting dispersion and aggregation characteristics of d-AuNPs, in the presence of gDNA, for sequence-specific detection. We demonstrate that d-AuNPs are stable in a five-fold greater salt concentration than citrate-capped AuNPs and the d-AuNPs were stabilized by single stranded DNA probe (ssDNAp). However, in the elevated salt concentrations of the DNA detection assay, the target reactions were surprisingly further stabilized by the formation of a ssDNAp-target gDNA complex. The results presented herein lead us to propose a mechanism whereby genomic ssDNA secondary structure formation during ssDNAp-to-target gDNA binding enables d-AuNP stabilization in elevated ionic environments. Using the assay described herein, we were successful in detecting as little as 2.94 fM of pathogen DNA, and using crude extractions of a pathogen matrix, as few as 18 spores/µL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Light-Triggered Release of DNA from Plasmon-Resonant Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huschka, Ryan

    Plasmon-resonant nanoparticle complexes show promising potential for lighttriggered, controllable delivery of deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) for research and therapeutic purposes. For example, the approach of RNA interference (RNAi) . using antisense DNA or RNA oligonucleotides to silence activity of a specific pathogenic gene transcript and reduce expression of the encoded protein . is very useful in dissecting genetic function and holds promise as a molecular therapeutic. Herein, we investigate the mechanism and probe the in vitro therapeutic potential of DNA light-triggered release from plasmonic nanoparticles. First, we investigate the mechanism of light-triggered release by dehybridizing double-stranded (dsDNA) via laser illumination from two types of nanoparticle substrates: gold (Au) nanoshells and Au nanorods. Both light-triggered and thermally induced releases are distinctly observable from nanoshell-based complexes. Surprisingly, no analogous measurable light-triggered release was observable from nanorod-based complexes below the DNA melting temperature. These results suggest that a nonthermal mechanism may play a role in light-triggered DNA release. Second, we demonstrate the in vitro light-triggered release of molecules noncovalently attached within dsDNA bound to the Au nanoshell surface. DAPI (4',6- diamidino-2-phenylindole), a bright blue fluorescent molecule that binds reversibly to double-stranded DNA, was chosen to visualize this intracellular light-induced release process. Illumination through the cell membrane of the nanoshell-dsDNA-DAPI complexes dehybridizes the DNA and releases the DAPI molecules within living cells. The DAPI molecules diffuse to the nucleus and associate with the cell's endogenous DNA. This work could have future applications towards drug delivery of molecules that associate with dsDNA. Finally, we demonstrate an engineered Au nanoshell (AuNS)-based therapeutic oligonucleotide delivery vehicle, designed to release its cargo on

  8. DNA-mediated dimerization on a compact sequence signature controls enhancer engagement and regulation by FOXA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuecong; Srivastava, Yogesh; Jankowski, Aleksander; Malik, Vikas; Wei, Yuanjie; Del Rosario, Ricardo C H; Cojocaru, Vlad; Prabhakar, Shyam; Jauch, Ralf

    2018-04-14

    FOXA1 is a transcription factor capable to bind silenced chromatin to direct context-dependent cell fate conversion. Here, we demonstrate that a compact palindromic DNA element (termed 'DIV' for its diverging half-sites) induces the homodimerization of FOXA1 with strongly positive cooperativity. Alternative structural models are consistent with either an indirect DNA-mediated cooperativity or a direct protein-protein interaction. The cooperative homodimer formation is strictly constrained by precise half-site spacing. Re-analysis of chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data indicates that the DIV is effectively targeted by FOXA1 in the context of chromatin. Reporter assays show that FOXA1-dependent transcriptional activity declines when homodimeric binding is disrupted. In response to phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase inhibition DIV sites pre-bound by FOXA1 such as at the PVT1/MYC locus exhibit a strong increase in accessibility suggesting a role of the DIV configuration in the chromatin closed-open dynamics. Moreover, several disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms map to DIV elements and show allelic differences in FOXA1 homodimerization, reporter gene expression and are annotated as quantitative trait loci. This includes the rs541455835 variant at the MAPT locus encoding the Tau protein associated with Parkinson's disease. Collectively, the DIV guides chromatin engagement and regulation by FOXA1 and its perturbation could be linked to disease etiologies.

  9. Role of noble metal nanoparticles in DNA base damage and catalysis: a radiation chemical investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Geeta K.

    2011-01-01

    In the emerging field of nanoscience and nanotechnology, tremendous focus has been made by researcher to explore the applications of nanomaterials for human welfare by converting the findings into technology. Some of the examples have been the use of nanoparticles in the field of opto-electronic, fuel cells, medicine and catalysis. These wide applications and significance lies in the fact that nanoparticles possess unique physical and chemical properties very different from their bulk precursors. Numerous methods for the synthesis of noble nanoparticles with tunable shape and size have been reported in literature. The goal of our group is to use different methods of synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles (Au, Ag, Pt and Pd) and test their protective/damaging role towards DNA base damage induced by ionizing radiation (Au and Ag) and to test the catalytic activity of nanoparticles (Pt and Pd) in certain known organic synthesis/electron transfer reactions. Using radiation chemical techniques such as pulse radiolysis and steady state radiolysis complemented by the product analysis using HPLC/LC-MS, a detailed mechanism for the formation of transient species, kinetics leading to the formation of stable end products is studied in the DNA base damage induced by ionizing radiation in presence and absence of Au and Ag nanoparticles. Unraveling the complex interaction between catalysts and reactants under operando conditions is a key step towards gaining fundamental insight in catalysis. The catalytic activity of Pt and Pd nanoparticles in electron transfer and Suzuki coupling reactions has been determined. Investigations are currently underway to gain insight into the interaction between catalysts and reactants using time resolved spectroscopic measurements. These studies will be detailed during the presentation. (author)

  10. Absolute and direct microRNA quantification using DNA-gold nanoparticle probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degliangeli, Federica; Kshirsagar, Prakash; Brunetti, Virgilio; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Fiammengo, Roberto

    2014-02-12

    DNA-gold nanoparticle probes are implemented in a simple strategy for direct microRNA (miRNA) quantification. Fluorescently labeled DNA-probe strands are immobilized on PEGylated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). In the presence of target miRNA, DNA-RNA heteroduplexes are formed and become substrate for the endonuclease DSN (duplex-specific nuclease). Enzymatic hydrolysis of the DNA strands yields a fluorescence signal due to diffusion of the fluorophores away from the gold surface. We show that the molecular design of our DNA-AuNP probes, with the DNA strands immobilized on top of the PEG-based passivation layer, results in nearly unaltered enzymatic activity toward immobilized heteroduplexes compared to substrates free in solution. The assay, developed in a real-time format, allows absolute quantification of as little as 0.2 fmol of miR-203. We also show the application of the assay for direct quantification of cancer-related miR-203 and miR-21 in samples of extracted total RNA from cell cultures. The possibility of direct and absolute quantification may significantly advance the use of microRNAs as biomarkers in the clinical praxis.

  11. Charge reversible gold nanoparticles for high efficient absorption and desorption of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Can; Zhuang Jiaqi; Jiang Shan; Li Jun; Yang Wensheng, E-mail: wsyang@jlu.edu.cn [Jilin University, State Key Laboratory of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, College of Chemistry (China)

    2012-10-15

    Mercaptoundecylamine and mercaptoundecanoic acid co-modified Au nanoparticles were prepared by two-step ligand exchange of 6-mercaptohexanoic acid modified gold nanoparticles. Such particles terminated by appropriate ratios of the amine and carboxyl groups (R{sub N/C}) were identified to show reversible charge on their surface, which were switchable by pH of the solution. The isoelectric point (IEP) of the particles is tunable by changing the ratios of the amine and carboxyl groups on the particle surfaces. The particles can absorb DNA effectively at pH lower than the IEP driven by the direct electrostatic interactions between DNA and the particle surface. When pH of the solutions was elevated to be higher than the IEP, the absorbed DNA can be released almost completely due to the electrostatic repulsion between the particle surface and DNA. With appropriate R{sub N/C} ratios of 0.8, the absorption and desorption efficiencies of DNA were 97 and 98%, respectively, corresponding an extraction efficiency of 95 %. Such particles with reversible surface charges allow the high efficient extraction of DNA by simply changing pH instead of by changing salt concentration in the conventional salt bridge method.Graphical Abstract.

  12. Dielectrophoretic trapping of DNA-coated gold nanoparticles on silicon based vertical nanogap devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Sebastian; Sperling, Ralph A; Fenk, Bernhard; Parak, Wolfgang J; Tornow, Marc

    2011-06-07

    We report on the successful dielectrophoretic trapping and electrical characterization of DNA-coated gold nanoparticles on vertical nanogap devices (VNDs). The nanogap devices with an electrode distance of 13 nm were fabricated from Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) material using a combination of anisotropic reactive ion etching (RIE), selective wet chemical etching and metal thin-film deposition. Au nanoparticles (diameter 40 nm) coated with a monolayer of dithiolated 8 base pairs double stranded DNA were dielectrophoretically trapped into the nanogap from electrolyte buffer solution at MHz frequencies as verified by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM) analysis. First electrical transport measurements through the formed DNA-Au-DNA junctions partially revealed an approximately linear current-voltage characteristic with resistance in the range of 2-4 GΩ when measured in solution. Our findings point to the importance of strong covalent bonding to the electrodes in order to observe DNA conductance, both in solution and in the dry state. We propose our setup for novel applications in biosensing, addressing the direct interaction of biomolecular species with DNA in aqueous electrolyte media.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA interaction with metallic nanoparticles and TiO2 surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kholmurodov, Kh.T.; Krasavin, E.A.; Dushanov, E.B.; Hassan, H.K.; Galal, A.; ElHabashy, H.A.; Sweilam, N.H.; Yasuoka, K.

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of the mechanism of DNA interactions and binding with metallic nanoparticles (NPs) and surfaces represents a great interest in today's medicine applications due to diagnostic and treatment of oncology diseases. Recent experimental and simulation studies involve the DNA interaction with highly localized proton beams or metallic NPs (such as Ag, Au, etc.), aimed at targeted cancer therapy through the injection of metal micro- or nanoparticles into the tumor tissue with consequent local microwave or laser heating. The effects of mutational structure changes in DNA and protein structures could result in destroying of native chemical (hydrogen) bonds or, on the contrary, creating of new bonds that do not normally exist there. The cause of such changes might be the alteration of one or several nucleotides (in DNA) or the substitution of specific amino acid residues (in proteins) that can lead to the essential structural destabilization or unfolding. At the atomic or molecular level, the replacement of one nucleotide by another (in DNA double helices) or replacement of one amino acid residue by another (in proteins) cause essential modifications of the molecular force fields of the environment that break locally important hydrogen bonds underlying the structural stability of the biological molecules. In this work, the molecular dynamics(MD) simulations were performed for four DNA models and the flexibilities of the purine and pyrimidine nucleotides during the interaction process with the metallic NPs and TiO 2 surface were clarified

  14. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles activate the ATM-Chk2 DNA damage response in human dermal fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Raju Y.; Chastain, Paul D.; Nikolaishvili-Feinberg, Nana; Smeester, Lisa M.; Kaufmann, William K.; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2013-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles in consumer products increases their prevalence in the environment and the potential risk to human health. Although recent studies have shown in vivo and in vitro toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2), a more detailed view of the underlying mechanisms of this response needs to be established. Here the effects of nano-TiO2 on the DNA damage response and DNA replication dynamics were investigated in human dermal fibroblasts. Specifically, the relationship between nano-TiO2 and the DNA damage response pathways regulated by ATM/Chk2 and ATR/Chk1 were examined. The results show increased phosphorylation of H2AX, ATM, and Chk2 after exposure. In addition, nano-TiO2 inhibited the overall rate of DNA synthesis and frequency of replicon initiation events in DNA combed fibers. Taken together, these results demonstrate that exposure to nano-TiO2 activates the ATM/Chk2 DNA damage response pathway. PMID:22770119

  15. Fast and automated DNA assays on a compact disc (CD)-based microfluidic platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Guangyao

    Nucleic acid-based molecular diagnostics offers enormous potential for the rapid and accurate diagnosis of infectious diseases. However, most of the existing commercial tests are time-consuming and technically complicated, and are thus incompatible with the need for rapid identification of infectious agents. We have successfully developed a CD-based microfluidic platform for fast and automated DNA array hybridization and a low cost, disposable plastic microfluidic platform for polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These platforms have proved to be a promising approach to meet the requirements in terms of detection speed and operational convenience in diagnosis of infectious diseases. In the CD-based microfluidic platform for DNA hybridization, convection is introduced to the system to enhance mass transport so as to accelerate the hybridization rate since DNA hybridization is a diffusion limited reaction. Centrifugal force is utilized for sample propulsion and surface force is used for liquid gating. Standard microscope glass slides are used as the substrates for capture probes owing to their compatibility with commercially available instrumentation (e.g. laser scanners) for detection. Microfabricated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) structures are used to accomplish the fluidic functions required by the protocols for DNA hybridization. The assembly of the PDMS structure and the glass slide forms a flow-through hybridization unit that can be accommodated onto the CD platform for reagent manipulation. The above scheme has been validated with oligonucleotides as the targets using commercially available enzyme-labeled fluorescence (ELF 97) for detection of the hybridization events, and tested with amplicons of genomic staphylococcus DNA labeled with Cy dye. In both experiments, significantly higher fluorescence intensities were observed in the flow-through hybridization unit compared to the passive assays. The CD fluidic scheme was also adapted to the immobilization of

  16. Sex determination based on amelogenin DNA by modified electrode with gold nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazloum-Ardakani, Mohammad; Rajabzadeh, Nooshin; Benvidi, Ali; Heidari, Mohammad Mehdi

    2013-12-15

    We have developed a simple and renewable electrochemical biosensor based on carbon paste electrode (CPE) for the detection of DNA synthesis and hybridization. CPE was modified with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), which are helpful for immobilization of thiolated bioreceptors. AuNPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of thiolated single-stranded DNA (SH-ssDNA) of the amelogenin gene was formed on CPE. The immobilization of the probe and its hybridization with the target DNA was optimized using different experimental conditions. The modified electrode was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The electrochemical response of ssDNA hybridization and DNA synthesis was measured using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) with methylene blue (MB) as an electroactive indicator. The new biosensor can distinguish between complementary and non-complementary strands of amelogenin ssDNA. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood and was detected based on changes in the MB reduction signal. These results demonstrated that the new biosensor could be used for sex determination. The proposed biosensor in this study could be used for detection and discrimination of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products of amelogenin DNA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The impact of arginine-modified chitosan-DNA nanoparticles on the function of macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Lanxia; Bai Yuanyuan; Song Chunni; Zhu Dunwan; Song Liping; Zhang Hailing; Dong Xia; Leng Xigang, E-mail: lengxg@bme.org.c [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Laboratory of Bioengineering (China)

    2010-06-15

    It has been demonstrated that incorporation of arginine moieties into chitosan significantly elevates the transgenic efficacy of the chitosan. However, little is known about the impact of arginine-modified chitosan on the function of macrophages, which play a vitally important role in the inflammatory response of the body to foreign substances, especially particulate substances. This study was designed to investigate the impact of arginine-modified chitosan/DNA nanoparticles on the function of the murine macrophage through observation of phagocytic activity and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1{beta}, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and TNF-{alpha}). Results showed that both chitosan/DNA nanoparticles and arginine-modified chitosan/DNA nanoparticles, containing 20 {mu}g/mL DNA, were internalized by almost all the macrophages in contact. This led to no significant changes, compared to the non-exposure group, in production of cytokines and phagocytic activity of the macrophages 24 h post co-incubation, whereas exposure to LPS induced obviously elevated cytokine production and phagocytic activity, suggesting that incorporation of arginine moieties into chitosan does not have a negative impact on the function of the macrophages.

  18. Detection of tyrosine hydroxylase in dopaminergic neuron cell using gold nanoparticles-based barcode DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jeung Hee; Oh, Byung-Keun; Choi, Jeong Woo

    2013-04-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme of catecholamine biosysthesis, is predominantly expressed in several cell groups within the brain, including the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. We evaluated the efficacy of this protein-detection method in detecting tyrosine hydroxylase in normal and oxidative stress damaged dopaminergic cells. In this study, a coupling of DNA barcode and bead-based immnunoassay for detecting tyrosine hydroxylaser with PCR-like sensitivity is reported. The method relies on magnetic nanoparticles with antibodies and nanoparticles that are encoded with DNA and antibodies that can sandwich the target protein captured by the nanoparticle-bound antibodies. The aggregate sandwich structures are magnetically separated from solution, and treated to remove the conjugated barcode DNA. The DNA barcodes were identified by PCR analysis. The concentration of tyrosine hydroxylase in dopaminergic cell can be easily and rapidly detected using bio-barcode assay. The bio-barcode assay is a rapid and high-throughput screening tool to detect of neurotransmitter such as dopamine.

  19. Modified surface of titanium dioxide nanoparticles-based biosensor for DNA detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadzirah, Sh.; Hashim, U.; Rusop, M.

    2018-05-01

    A new technique was used to develop a simple and selective picoammeter DNA biosensor for identification of E. coli O157:H7. This biosensor was fabricated from titanium dioxide nanoparticles that was synthesized by sol-gel method and spin-coated on silicon dioxide substrate via spinner. 3-Aminopropyl triethoxy silane (APTES) was used to modify the surface of TiO2. Simple surface modification approach has been applied; which is single dropping of APTES onto the TiO2 nanoparticles surface. Carboxyl modified probe DNA has been bind onto the surface of APTES/TiO2 without any amplifier element. Electrical signal has been used as the indicator to differentiate each step (surface modification of TiO2 and probe DNA immobilization). The I-V measurements indicate extremely low current (pico-ampere) flow through the device which is 2.8138E-10 A for pure TiO2 nanoparticles, 2.8124E-10 A after APTES modification and 3.5949E-10 A after probe DNA immobilization.

  20. Non-covalent interactions of cadmium sulphide and gold nanoparticles with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atay, Z.; Biver, T.; Corti, A.; Eltugral, N.; Lorenzini, E.; Masini, M.; Paolicchi, A.; Pucci, A.; Ruggeri, G.; Secco, F.; Venturini, M.

    2010-08-01

    Mercaptoethanol-capped CdS nanoparticles (CdSnp) and monohydroxy-(1-mercaptoundec-11-yl)tetraethylene-glycol-capped Au nanoparticles (Aunp) were synthesised, characterised and their interactions with DNA were investigated. Aunp are stable in different aqueous solvents, whereas CdSnp do precipitate in 0.1 M NaCl and form two different cluster types in 0.1 M NaNO3. As regards the CdSnp/DNA interaction, absorbance and fluorescence titrations, ethidium bromide displacement assays and gel electrophoresis experiments indicate that a non-covalent interaction between DNA and the CdSnp external surface does take place. The binding constant was evaluated to be equal to (2.2 ± 0.5) × 105 M-1. On the contrary, concerning Aunp, no direct interaction with DNA could be observed. Possible interaction with serum albumin was also checked, but no effects could be observed for either CdSnp or Aunp. Finally, short-time exposure of cultured cells to nanoparticles revealed the ability of CdSnp to enter the cells and allocate both in cytosol and nucleus, thus promoting cell proliferation at low concentration ( p resulted in a significant inhibition of cell growth, accompanied by apoptotic cell death. Aunp neither enter the cells, nor do affect cell proliferation. In conclusion, our data indicate that CdSnp can strongly interact with living cells and nucleic acid while no effects or interactions were observed for Aunp.

  1. DNA strand breaks induced by soft X-ray pulses from a compact laser plasma source

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adjei, D.; Wiechec, A.; Wachulak, P.; Ayele, M. G.; Lekki, J.; Kwiatek, W. M.; Bartnik, A.; Davídková, Marie; Vyšín, Luděk; Juha, Libor; Pina, L.; Fiedorowicz, H.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 120, MAR (2016), s. 17-25 ISSN 0969-806X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-28721S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : laser-produced plasma * soft X-rays * radiobiology * gas puff target * water window * DNA strand break Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.315, year: 2016

  2. NanoPCR observation: different levels of DNA replication fidelity in nanoparticle-enhanced polymerase chain reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Cenchao; Yang Wenjuan; Ji Qiaoli; Zhang Zhizhou; Maki, Hisaji; Dong Anjie

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticle-assisted PCR (polymerase chain reaction) technology is getting more and more attention recently. It is believed that some of the DNA recombinant technologies will be upgraded by nanotechnology in the near future, among which DNA replication is one of the core manipulation techniques. So whether or not the DNA replication fidelity is compromised in nanoparticle-assisted PCR is a question. In this study, a total of 16 different metallic and non-metallic nanoparticles (NPs) were tested for their effects on DNA replication fidelity in vitro and in vivo. Sixteen types of nanomaterials were distinctly different in enhancing the PCR efficiency, and their relative capacity to retain DNA replication fidelity was largely different from each other based on rpsL gene mutation assay. Generally speaking, metallic nanoparticles induced larger error rates in DNA replication fidelity than non-metallic nanoparticles, and non-metallic nanomaterials such as carbon nanopowder or nanotubes were still safe as PCR enhancers because they did not compromise the DNA replication fidelity in the Taq DNA polymerase-based PCR system.

  3. Ebola Vaccination Using a DNA Vaccine Coated on PLGA-PLL/γPGA Nanoparticles Administered Using a Microneedle Patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hung-Wei; Ye, Ling; Guo, Xin Dong; Yang, Chinglai; Compans, Richard W; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2017-01-01

    Ebola DNA vaccine is incorporated into PLGA-PLL/γPGA nanoparticles and administered to skin using a microneedle (MN) patch. The nanoparticle delivery system increases vaccine thermostability and immunogenicity compared to free vaccine. Vaccination by MN patch produces stronger immune responses than intramuscular administration. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Building superlattices from individual nanoparticles via template-confined DNA-mediated assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Qing-Yuan; Mason, Jarad A.; Li, Zhongyang; Zhou, Wenjie; O’Brien, Matthew N.; Brown, Keith A.; Jones, Matthew R.; Butun, Serkan; Lee, Byeongdu; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Aydin, Koray; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2018-01-18

    DNA programmable assembly has been combined with top-down lithography to construct superlattices of discrete, reconfigurable nanoparticle architectures on a gold surface over large areas. Specifically, individual colloidal plasmonic nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes are assembled with ‘locked” nucleic acids in polymer pores into oriented architectures that feature tunable arrangements and independently controllable distances at both nanometer and micrometer length scales. These structures, which would be difficult to construct via other common assembly methods, provide a platform to systematically study and control light-matter interactions in nanoparticle-based optical materials. The generality and potential of this approach is explored by identifying a broadband absorber with a solvent polarity response that allows dynamic tuning of the wavelength response and amplitude of visible light absorption.

  5. Building superlattices from individual nanoparticles via template-confined DNA-mediated assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qing-Yuan; Mason, Jarad A.; Li, Zhongyang; Zhou, Wenjie; O’Brien, Matthew N.; Brown, Keith A.; Jones, Matthew R.; Butun, Serkan; Lee, Byeongdu; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Aydin, Koray; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2018-02-01

    DNA programmable assembly has been combined with top-down lithography to construct superlattices of discrete, reconfigurable nanoparticle architectures on a gold surface over large areas. Specifically, the assembly of individual colloidal plasmonic nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes is controlled by oligonucleotides containing “locked” nucleic acids and confined environments provided by polymer pores to yield oriented architectures that feature tunable arrangements and independently controllable distances at both nanometer- and micrometer-length scales. These structures, which would be difficult to construct by other common assembly methods, provide a platform to systematically study and control light-matter interactions in nanoparticle-based optical materials. The generality and potential of this approach are explored by identifying a broadband absorber with a solvent polarity response that allows dynamic tuning of visible light absorption.

  6. DNA-nanoparticle assemblies go organic: Macroscopic polymeric materials with nanosized features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mentovich Elad D

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the goals in the field of structural DNA nanotechnology is the use of DNA to build up 2- and 3-D nanostructures. The research in this field is motivated by the remarkable structural features of DNA as well as by its unique and reversible recognition properties. Nucleic acids can be used alone as the skeleton of a broad range of periodic nanopatterns and nanoobjects and in addition, DNA can serve as a linker or template to form DNA-hybrid structures with other materials. This approach can be used for the development of new detection strategies as well as nanoelectronic structures and devices. Method Here we present a new method for the generation of unprecedented all-organic conjugated-polymer nanoparticle networks guided by DNA, based on a hierarchical self-assembly process. First, microphase separation of amphiphilic block copolymers induced the formation of spherical nanoobjects. As a second ordering concept, DNA base pairing has been employed for the controlled spatial definition of the conjugated-polymer particles within the bulk material. These networks offer the flexibility and the diversity of soft polymeric materials. Thus, simple chemical methodologies could be applied in order to tune the network's electrical, optical and mechanical properties. Results and conclusions One- two- and three-dimensional networks have been successfully formed. Common to all morphologies is the integrity of the micelles consisting of DNA block copolymer (DBC, which creates an all-organic engineered network.

  7. DNA-nanoparticle assemblies go organic: macroscopic polymeric materials with nanosized features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentovich, Elad D; Livanov, Konstantin; Prusty, Deepak K; Sowwan, Mukules; Richter, Shachar

    2012-05-30

    One of the goals in the field of structural DNA nanotechnology is the use of DNA to build up 2- and 3-D nanostructures. The research in this field is motivated by the remarkable structural features of DNA as well as by its unique and reversible recognition properties. Nucleic acids can be used alone as the skeleton of a broad range of periodic nanopatterns and nanoobjects and in addition, DNA can serve as a linker or template to form DNA-hybrid structures with other materials. This approach can be used for the development of new detection strategies as well as nanoelectronic structures and devices. Here we present a new method for the generation of unprecedented all-organic conjugated-polymer nanoparticle networks guided by DNA, based on a hierarchical self-assembly process. First, microphase separation of amphiphilic block copolymers induced the formation of spherical nanoobjects. As a second ordering concept, DNA base pairing has been employed for the controlled spatial definition of the conjugated-polymer particles within the bulk material. These networks offer the flexibility and the diversity of soft polymeric materials. Thus, simple chemical methodologies could be applied in order to tune the network's electrical, optical and mechanical properties. One- two- and three-dimensional networks have been successfully formed. Common to all morphologies is the integrity of the micelles consisting of DNA block copolymer (DBC), which creates an all-organic engineered network.

  8. Gold Nanoparticles for the Detection of DNA Adducts as Biomarkers of Exposure to Acrylamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larguinho, Miguel Angelo Rodrigues

    The main objective of this thesis was the development of a gold nanoparticle-based methodology for detection of DNA adducts as biomarkers, to try and overcome existing drawbacks in currently employed techniques. For this objective to be achieved, the experimental work was divided in three components: sample preparation, method of detection and development of a model for exposure to acrylamide. Different techniques were employed and combined for de-complexation and purification of DNA samples (including ultrasonic energy, nuclease digestion and chromatography), resulting in a complete protocol for sample treatment, prior to detection. The detection of alkylated nucleotides using gold nanoparticles was performed by two distinct methodologies: mass spectrometry and colorimetric detection. In mass spectrometry, gold nanoparticles were employed for laser desorption/ionisation instead of the organic matrix. Identification of nucleotides was possible by fingerprint, however no specific mass signals were denoted when using gold nanoparticles to analyse biological samples. An alternate method using the colorimetric properties of gold nanoparticles was employed for detection. This method inspired in the non-cross-linking assay allowed the identification of glycidamide-guanine adducts and DNA adducts generated in vitro. For the development of a model of exposure, two different aquatic organisms were studies: a goldfish and a mussel. Organisms were exposed to waterborne acrylamide, after which mortality was recorded and effect concentrations were estimated. In goldfish, both genotoxicity and metabolic alterations were assessed and revealed dose-effect relationships of acrylamide. Histopathological alterations were verified primarily in pancreatic cells, but also in hepatocytes. Mussels showed higher effect concentrations than goldfish. Biomarkers of oxidative stress, biotransformation and neurotoxicity were analysed after prolonged exposure, showing mild oxidative stress in

  9. DNA compaction by poly (amido amine) dendrimers of ammonia cored and ethylene diamine cored

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamhieh, K.; Al-Shawwa, J.

    2017-06-01

    The complexes build-up of DNA and soft particles poly amidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers of ammonia cored of generations (G1-G6) and ethylenediamine cored of generations (G1-G10) have been studied, using a new theoretical model developed by Qamhieh and coworkers. The model describes the interaction between linear polyelectrolyte (LPE) chain and ion-penetrable spheres. Many factors affecting LPE/dendrimer complex have been investigated such as dendrimer generation, the Bjerrum length, salt concentration, and rigidity of the LPE chain represented by the persistence length. It is found that the wrapping chain length around dendrimer increases by increasing dendrimer`s generation, Bjerrum length, and salt concentration, while decreases by increasing the persistence length of the LPE chain. Also we can conclude that the wrapping length of LPE chain around ethylenediamine cored dendrimers is larger than its length around ammonia cored dendrimers.

  10. DNA nanomapping using CRISPR-Cas9 as a programmable nanoparticle

    OpenAIRE

    Mikheikin, Andrey; Olsen, Anita; Leslie, Kevin; Russell-Pavier, Freddie; Yacoot, Andrew; Picco, Loren; Payton, Oliver; Toor, Amir; Chesney, Alden; Gimzewski, James K.; Mishra, Bud; Reed, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Progress in whole-genome sequencing using short-read (e.g., <150 bp), next-generation sequencing technologies has reinvigorated interest in high-resolution physical mapping to fill technical gaps that are not well addressed by sequencing. Here, we report two technical advances in DNA nanotechnology and single-molecule genomics: (1) we describe a labeling technique (CRISPR-Cas9 nanoparticles) for high-speed AFM-based physical mapping of DNA and (2) the first successful demonstration of usin...

  11. Gold nanoparticle-based probes for the colorimetric detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganareal, Thenor Aristotile Charles S; Balbin, Michelle M; Monserate, Juvy J; Salazar, Joel R; Mingala, Claro N

    2018-02-12

    Gold nanoparticle (AuNP) is considered to be the most stable metal nanoparticle having the ability to be functionalized with biomolecules. Recently, AuNP-based DNA detection methods captured the interest of researchers worldwide. Paratuberculosis or Johne's disease, a chronic gastroenteritis in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), was found to have negative effect in the livestock industry. In this study, AuNP-based probes were evaluated for the specific and sensitive detection of MAP DNA. AuNP-based probe was produced by functionalization of AuNPs with thiol-modified oligonucleotide and was confirmed by Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. UV-Vis spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize AuNPs. DNA detection was done by hybridization of 10 μL of DNA with 5 μL of probe at 63 °C for 10 min and addition of 3 μL salt solution. The method was specific to MAP with detection limit of 103 ng. UV-Vis and SEM showed dispersion and aggregation of the AuNPs for the positive and negative results, respectively, with no observed particle growth. This study therefore reports an AuNP-based probes which can be used for the specific and sensitive detection of MAP DNA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fluorescence bio-barcode DNA assay based on gold and magnetic nanoparticles for detection of Exotoxin A gene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Bahram; Kamali, Mehdi; Salouti, Mojtaba; Yaghmaei, Parichehreh

    2017-06-15

    Bio-barcode DNA based on gold nanoparticle (bDNA-GNPs) as a new generation of biosensor based detection tools, holds promise for biological science studies. They are of enormous importance in the emergence of rapid and sensitive procedures for detecting toxins of microorganisms. Exotoxin A (ETA) is the most toxic virulence factor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. ETA has ADP-ribosylation activity and decisively affects the protein synthesis of the host cells. In the present study, we developed a fluorescence bio-barcode technology to trace P. aeruginosa ETA. The GNPs were coated with the first target-specific DNA probe 1 (1pDNA) and bio-barcode DNA, which acted as a signal reporter. The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were coated with the second target-specific DNA probe 2 (2pDNA) that was able to recognize the other end of the target DNA. After binding the nanoparticles with the target DNA, the following sandwich structure was formed: MNP 2pDNA/tDNA/1pDNA-GNP-bDNA. After isolating the sandwiches by a magnetic field, the DNAs of the probes which have been hybridized to their complementary DNA, GNPs and MNPs, via the hydrogen, electrostatic and covalently bonds, were released from the sandwiches after dissolving in dithiothreitol solution (DTT 0.8M). This bio-barcode DNA with known DNA sequence was then detected by fluorescence spectrophotometry. The findings showed that the new method has the advantages of fast, high sensitivity (the detection limit was 1.2ng/ml), good selectivity, and wide linear range of 5-200ng/ml. The regression analysis also showed that there was a good linear relationship (∆F=0.57 [target DNA]+21.31, R 2 =0.9984) between the fluorescent intensity and the target DNA concentration in the samples. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Synthesis of water soluble CdS nanoparticles and study of their DNA damage activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Suranjit Prasad

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study reports a novel method for preparation of water soluble CdS nanoparticles using leaf extract of a plant, Asparagus racemosus. The extract of the leaf tissue which worked as a stabilizing and capping agent, assisted the formation of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were characterized using a UV–vis spectrophotometer, Photoluminescence, TEM, EDAX, XRD and FT-IR. Transmission electron microscopy followed by selected area electron diffraction pattern analysis indicated the formation of spherical, polydispersed, crystalline, CdS of diameter ranging from 2 to 8 nm. X-ray diffraction studies showed the formation of 111, 220 and 311 planes of face-centered cubic (fcc CdS. EDAX analysis confirmed the presence of Cd and S in nanosphere. The cytotoxicity test using MTT assay as well as DNA damage analysis using comet assay revealed that synthesized nano CdS quantum dots (QDs caused less DNA damage and cell death of lymphocytes than pure CdS nanoparticles.

  14. Dendritic Cell Targeted Chitosan Nanoparticles for Nasal DNA Immunization against SARS CoV Nucleocapsid Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Raghuwanshi, Dharmendra; Mishra, Vivek; Das, Dipankar; Kaur, Kamaljit; Suresh, Mavanur R.

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the formulation and in vivo efficacy of dendritic cell (DC) targeted plasmid DNA loaded biotinylated chitosan nanoparticles for nasal immunization against nucleocapsid (N) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) as antigen. The induction of antigen-specific mucosal and systemic immune response at the site of virus entry is a major challenge for vaccine design. Here, we designed a strategy for non-invasive receptor mediated gene delivery to na...

  15. Efficient self-assembly of DNA-functionalized fluorophores and gold nanoparticles with DNA functionalized silicon surfaces: the effect of oligomer spacers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, James A.; Patole, Samson; Yin, Huabing; Xiao, Qiang; Brown, Tom; Melvin, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Although strategies for the immobilization of DNA oligonucleotides onto surfaces for bioanalytical and top-down bio-inspired nanobiofabrication approaches are well developed, the effect of introducing spacer molecules between the surface and the DNA oligonucleotide for the hybridization of nanoparticle–DNA conjugates has not been previously assessed in a quantitative manner. The hybridization efficiency of DNA oligonucleotides end-labelled with gold nanoparticles (1.4 or 10 nm diameter) with DNA sequences conjugated to silicon surfaces via hexaethylene glycol phosphate diester oligomer spacers (0, 1, 2, 6 oligomers) was found to be independent of spacer length. To quantify both the density of DNA strands attached to the surfaces and hybridization with the surface-attached DNA, new methodologies have been developed. Firstly, a simple approach based on fluorescence has been developed for determination of the immobilization density of DNA oligonucleotides. Secondly, an approach using mass spectrometry has been created to establish (i) the mean number of DNA oligonucleotides attached to the gold nanoparticles and (ii) the hybridization density of nanoparticle–oligonucleotide conjugates with the silicon surface–attached complementary sequence. These methods and results will be useful for application with nanosensors, the self-assembly of nanoelectronic devices and the attachment of nanoparticles to biomolecules for single-molecule biophysical studies. PMID:23361467

  16. Proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Fuyi; Yao, Yao; Luo, Jianjun; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Dengyang; Gao, Fenglei; Wang, Po

    2017-01-01

    Novel hybridization proximity-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly strategy has been proposed for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles as signal label. The DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles were characterized with atomic force microscopic and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The highly efficient electrocatalysis by DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles for NaBH 4 oxidation produced an intense detection signal. The label-free electrochemical method achieved the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) with a linear range from 10 −15 to 10 −11  g mL −1 and a detection limit of 0.43 × 10 −15  g mL −1 . Through introducing a supersandwich reaction to increase the DNA length, the electrochemical signal was further amplified, leading to a detection limit of 0.52 × 10 −16  g mL −1 . And it rendered satisfactory analytical performance for the determination of CEA in serum samples. Furthermore, it exhibited good reproducibility and stability; meanwhile, it also showed excellent specificity due to the specific recognition of antigen by antibody. Therefore, the DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles based signal amplification approach has great potential in clinical applications and is also suitable for quantification of biomarkers at ultralow level. - Graphical abstract: A novel label-free and enzyme-free electrochemical immunoassay based on proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assemblies for recycling of the CEA. - Highlights: • A novel enzyme-free electrochemical immunosensor was developed for detection of CEA. • The signal amplification was based on catalytic DNA hairpin assembly and DNA-template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles. • The biosensor could detect CEA down to 0.52 × 10 −16  g mL −1 level with a dynamic range spanning 5 orders of magnitude.

  17. Toxic effect of silica nanoparticles on endothelial cells through DNA damage response via Chk1-dependent G2/M checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junchao Duan

    Full Text Available Silica nanoparticles have become promising carriers for drug delivery or gene therapy. Endothelial cells could be directly exposed to silica nanoparticles by intravenous administration. However, the underlying toxic effect mechanisms of silica nanoparticles on endothelial cells are still poorly understood. In order to clarify the cytotoxicity of endothelial cells induced by silica nanoparticles and its mechanisms, cellular morphology, cell viability and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release were observed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs as assessing cytotoxicity, resulted in a dose- and time- dependent manner. Silica nanoparticles-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation caused oxidative damage followed by the production of malondialdehyde (MDA as well as the inhibition of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px. Both necrosis and apoptosis were increased significantly after 24 h exposure. The mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP decreased obviously in a dose-dependent manner. The degree of DNA damage including the percentage of tail DNA, tail length and Olive tail moment (OTM were markedly aggravated. Silica nanoparticles also induced G2/M arrest through the upregulation of Chk1 and the downregulation of Cdc25C, cyclin B1/Cdc2. In summary, our data indicated that the toxic effect mechanisms of silica nanoparticles on endothelial cells was through DNA damage response (DDR via Chk1-dependent G2/M checkpoint signaling pathway, suggesting that exposure to silica nanoparticles could be a potential hazards for the development of cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Global DNA methylation and oxidative stress biomarkers in workers exposed to metal oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liou, Saou-Hsing; Wu, Wei-Te; Liao, Hui-Yi [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chao-Yu; Tsai, Cheng-Yen; Jung, Wei-Ting [Department of Chemistry, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Lee, Hui-Ling, E-mail: huilinglee3573@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China)

    2017-06-05

    Highlights: • Global methylation and oxidative DNA damage levels in nanomaterial handling workers were assessed. • 8-isoprostane in exhaled breath condensate of workers exposed to nanoparticles was higher. • 8-OHdG was negatively correlated with global methylation. • Exposure to metal oxide nanoparticles may lead to global methylation and DNA oxidative damage. - Abstract: This is the first study to assess global methylation, oxidative DNA damage, and lipid peroxidation in workers with occupational exposure to metal oxide nanomaterials (NMs). Urinary and white blood cell (WBC) 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and exhaled breath condensate (EBC) 8-isoprostane were measured as oxidative stress biomarkers. WBC global methylation was measured as an epigenetic alteration. Exposure to TiO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2,} and indium tin oxide (ITO) resulted in significantly higher oxidative biomarkers such as urinary 8-OHdG and EBC 8-isoprostane. However, significantly higher WBC 8-OHdG and lower global methylation were only observed in ITO handling workers. Significant positive correlations were noted between WBC and urinary 8-OHdG (Spearman correlation r = 0.256, p = 0.003). Furthermore, a significant negative correlation was found between WBC 8-OHdG and global methylation (r = −0.272, p = 0.002). These results suggest that exposure to metal oxide NMs may lead to global methylation, DNA oxidative damage, and lipid peroxidation.

  19. A novel gold nanoparticle-DNA aptamer-based plasmonic chip for rapid and sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Yi; Phuoc Long, Truong; Wolff, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-based biosensors are emerging technologies for rapid detection of pathogens. However, it is very challenging to develop chip-based AuNP-biosensors for whole cells. This paper describes a novel AuNPs-DNA aptamer-based plasmonic assay which allows DNA aptamers...

  20. DNA nanomapping using CRISPR-Cas9 as a programmable nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheikin, Andrey; Olsen, Anita; Leslie, Kevin; Russell-Pavier, Freddie; Yacoot, Andrew; Picco, Loren; Payton, Oliver; Toor, Amir; Chesney, Alden; Gimzewski, James K; Mishra, Bud; Reed, Jason

    2017-11-21

    Progress in whole-genome sequencing using short-read (e.g., <150 bp), next-generation sequencing technologies has reinvigorated interest in high-resolution physical mapping to fill technical gaps that are not well addressed by sequencing. Here, we report two technical advances in DNA nanotechnology and single-molecule genomics: (1) we describe a labeling technique (CRISPR-Cas9 nanoparticles) for high-speed AFM-based physical mapping of DNA and (2) the first successful demonstration of using DVD optics to image DNA molecules with high-speed AFM. As a proof of principle, we used this new "nanomapping" method to detect and map precisely BCL2-IGH translocations present in lymph node biopsies of follicular lymphoma patents. This HS-AFM "nanomapping" technique can be complementary to both sequencing and other physical mapping approaches.

  1. Gold-nanoparticle-mediated jigsaw-puzzle-like assembly of supersized plasmonic DNA origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Guangbao; Li, Jiang; Chao, Jie; Pei, Hao; Liu, Huajie; Zhao, Yun; Shi, Jiye; Huang, Qing; Wang, Lianhui; Huang, Wei; Fan, Chunhai

    2015-03-02

    DNA origami has rapidly emerged as a powerful and programmable method to construct functional nanostructures. However, the size limitation of approximately 100 nm in classic DNA origami hampers its plasmonic applications. Herein, we report a jigsaw-puzzle-like assembly strategy mediated by gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to break the size limitation of DNA origami. We demonstrated that oligonucleotide-functionalized AuNPs function as universal joint units for the one-pot assembly of parent DNA origami of triangular shape to form sub-microscale super-origami nanostructures. AuNPs anchored at predefined positions of the super-origami exhibited strong interparticle plasmonic coupling. This AuNP-mediated strategy offers new opportunities to drive macroscopic self-assembly and to fabricate well-defined nanophotonic materials and devices. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Rolling up gold nanoparticle-dressed DNA origami into three-dimensional plasmonic chiral nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xibo; Song, Chen; Wang, Jinye; Shi, Dangwei; Wang, Zhengang; Liu, Na; Ding, Baoquan

    2012-01-11

    Construction of three-dimensional (3D) plasmonic architectures using structural DNA nanotechnology is an emerging multidisciplinary area of research. This technology excels in controlling spatial addressability at sub-10 nm resolution, which has thus far been beyond the reach of traditional top-down techniques. In this paper, we demonstrate the realization of 3D plasmonic chiral nanostructures through programmable transformation of gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-dressed DNA origami. AuNPs were assembled along two linear chains on a two-dimensional rectangular DNA origami sheet with well-controlled positions and particle spacing. By rational rolling of the 2D origami template, the AuNPs can be automatically arranged in a helical geometry, suggesting the possibility of achieving engineerable chiral nanomaterials in the visible range. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  3. Metallization of DNA hydrogel: application of soft matter host for preparation and nesting of catalytic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, Anatoly; Che, Yuxin; Taniguchi, Shota; Lopatina, Larisa I.; G. Sergeyev, Vladimir; Murata, Shizuaki

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) of Au, Ag, Pt, Pd, Cu and Ni of 2-3 nm average-size and narrow-size distributions were synthesized in DNA cross-linked hydrogels by reducing corresponding metal precursors by sodium borohydride. DNA hydrogel plays a role of a universal reactor in which the reduction of metal precursor results in the formation of 2-3 nm ultrafine metal NPs regardless of metal used. Hydrogels metallized with various metals showed catalytic activity in the reduction of nitroaromatic compounds, and the catalytic activity of metallized hydrogels changed as follows: Pd > Ag ≈ Au ≈ Cu > Ni > Pt. DNA hydrogel-based "soft catalysts" elaborated in this study are promising for green organic synthesis in aqueous media as well as for biomedical in vivo applications.

  4. Metal Nanoparticles/Porous Silicon Microcavity Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance Fluorescence for the Detection of DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajia Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A porous silicon microcavity (PSiMC with resonant peak wavelength of 635 nm was fabricated by electrochemical etching. Metal nanoparticles (NPs/PSiMC enhanced fluorescence substrates were prepared by the electrostatic adherence of Au NPs that were distributed in PSiMC. The Au NPs/PSiMC device was used to characterize the target DNA immobilization and hybridization with its complementary DNA sequences marked with Rhodamine red (RRA. Fluorescence enhancement was observed on the Au NPs/PSiMC device substrate; and the minimum detection concentration of DNA ran up to 10 pM. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR of the MC substrate; which is so well-positioned to improve fluorescence enhancement rather the fluorescence enhancement of the high reflection band of the Bragg reflector; would welcome such a highly sensitive in biosensor.

  5. Metal Nanoparticles/Porous Silicon Microcavity Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance Fluorescence for the Detection of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiajia; Jia, Zhenhong

    2018-02-23

    A porous silicon microcavity (PSiMC) with resonant peak wavelength of 635 nm was fabricated by electrochemical etching. Metal nanoparticles (NPs)/PSiMC enhanced fluorescence substrates were prepared by the electrostatic adherence of Au NPs that were distributed in PSiMC. The Au NPs/PSiMC device was used to characterize the target DNA immobilization and hybridization with its complementary DNA sequences marked with Rhodamine red (RRA). Fluorescence enhancement was observed on the Au NPs/PSiMC device substrate; and the minimum detection concentration of DNA ran up to 10 pM. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the MC substrate; which is so well-positioned to improve fluorescence enhancement rather the fluorescence enhancement of the high reflection band of the Bragg reflector; would welcome such a highly sensitive in biosensor.

  6. Non-covalent interactions of cadmium sulphide and gold nanoparticles with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atay, Z. [Bogazici University, Department of Chemistry (Turkey); Biver, T., E-mail: tarita@dcci.unipi.i [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale (Italy); Corti, A. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Patologia Sperimentale BMIE (Italy); Eltugral, N. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale (Italy); Lorenzini, E.; Masini, M.; Paolicchi, A. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Patologia Sperimentale BMIE (Italy); Pucci, A.; Ruggeri, G.; Secco, F.; Venturini, M. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    Mercaptoethanol-capped CdS nanoparticles (CdS{sub np}) and monohydroxy-(1-mercaptoundec-11-yl)tetraethylene-glycol-capped Au nanoparticles (Au{sub np}) were synthesised, characterised and their interactions with DNA were investigated. Au{sub np} are stable in different aqueous solvents, whereas CdS{sub np} do precipitate in 0.1 M NaCl and form two different cluster types in 0.1 M NaNO{sub 3}. As regards the CdS{sub np}/DNA interaction, absorbance and fluorescence titrations, ethidium bromide displacement assays and gel electrophoresis experiments indicate that a non-covalent interaction between DNA and the CdS{sub np} external surface does take place. The binding constant was evaluated to be equal to (2.2 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1}. On the contrary, concerning Au{sub np}, no direct interaction with DNA could be observed. Possible interaction with serum albumin was also checked, but no effects could be observed for either CdS{sub np} or Au{sub np}. Finally, short-time exposure of cultured cells to nanoparticles revealed the ability of CdS{sub np} to enter the cells and allocate both in cytosol and nucleus, thus promoting cell proliferation at low concentration (p < 0.005), while longer-time exposure resulted in a significant inhibition of cell growth, accompanied by apoptotic cell death. Au{sub np} neither enter the cells, nor do affect cell proliferation. In conclusion, our data indicate that CdS{sub np} can strongly interact with living cells and nucleic acid while no effects or interactions were observed for Au{sub np}.

  7. Single plasmonic nanoparticles for ultrasensitive DNA sensing: From invisible to visible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Longhua; Chen, Lichan; Hong, Seungpyo; Kim, Dong-Hwan

    2016-05-15

    The background signal is a major factor that restricts the limit of detection of biosensors. Herein, we present a zero-background DNA-sensing approach that utilizes enzyme-guided gold nanoparticle (AuNP) enlargement. This sensing strategy is based on the finding that small nanoparticles are invisible under a darkfield optical microscope, thus completely eliminating the background signal. In the event of target binding, Ag deposition is triggered and enlarges the AuNP beyond its optical diffraction limit, thereby making the invisible AuNP visible. Because the plasmon scattering of Ag is stronger than that of Au, only a thin layer of Ag is required to greatly enhance the scattering intensity of the AuNPs. Our investigation revealed that a target DNA concentration as low as 5.0×10(-21)M can transform the darkfield image of the nanoparticle from completely dark (invisible) to a blue dot (visible). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of the impact of chitosan/DNA nanoparticles on the differentiation of human naive CD4{sup +} T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Lanxia; Bai Yuanyuan; Zhu Dunwan; Song Liping; Wang Hai; Dong Xia; Zhang Hailing; Leng Xigang, E-mail: lengxg@bme.org.cn [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Lab of Bioengineering, Institute of Biomedical Engineering (China)

    2011-06-15

    Chitosan (CS) is one of the most widely studied polymers in non-viral gene delivery since it is a cationic polysaccharide that forms nanoparticles with DNA and hence protects the DNA against digestion by DNase. However, the impact of CS/DNA nanoparticle on the immune system still remains poorly understood. Previous investigations did not found CS/DNA nanoparticles had any significant impact on the function of human and murine macrophages. To date, little is known about the interaction between CS/DNA nanoparticles and naive CD4{sup +} T cells. This study was designed to investigate whether CS/DNA nanoparticles affect the initial differentiation direction of human naive CD4{sup +} T cells. The indirect impact of CS/DNA nanoparticles on naive CD4{sup +} T cell differentiation was investigated by incubating the nanoparticles with human macrophage THP-1 cells in one chamber of a transwell co-incubation system, with the enriched human naive CD4{sup +} T cells being placed in the other chamber of the transwell. The nanoparticles were also co-incubated with the naive CD4{sup +} T cells to explore their direct impact on naive CD4{sup +} T cell differentiation by measuring the release of IL-4 and IFN-{gamma} from the cells. It was demonstrated that CS/DNA nanoparticles induced slightly elevated production of IL-12 by THP-1 cells, possibly owing to the presence of CpG motifs in the plasmid. However, this macrophage stimulating activity was much less significant as compared with lipopolysaccharide and did not impact on the differentiation of the naive CD4{sup +} T cells. It was also demonstrated that, when directly exposed to the naive CD4{sup +} T cells, the nanoparticles induced neither the activation of the naive CD4{sup +} T cells in the absence of recombinant cytokines (recombinant human IL-4 or IFN-{gamma}) that induce naive CD4{sup +} T cell polarization, nor any changes in the differentiation direction of naive CD4{sup +} T cells in the presence of the corresponding

  9. Evaluation of the impact of chitosan/DNA nanoparticles on the differentiation of human naive CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lanxia; Bai, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Dunwan; Song, Liping; Wang, Hai; Dong, Xia; Zhang, Hailing; Leng, Xigang

    2011-06-01

    Chitosan (CS) is one of the most widely studied polymers in non-viral gene delivery since it is a cationic polysaccharide that forms nanoparticles with DNA and hence protects the DNA against digestion by DNase. However, the impact of CS/DNA nanoparticle on the immune system still remains poorly understood. Previous investigations did not found CS/DNA nanoparticles had any significant impact on the function of human and murine macrophages. To date, little is known about the interaction between CS/DNA nanoparticles and naive CD4+ T cells. This study was designed to investigate whether CS/DNA nanoparticles affect the initial differentiation direction of human naive CD4+ T cells. The indirect impact of CS/DNA nanoparticles on naive CD4+ T cell differentiation was investigated by incubating the nanoparticles with human macrophage THP-1 cells in one chamber of a transwell co-incubation system, with the enriched human naive CD4+ T cells being placed in the other chamber of the transwell. The nanoparticles were also co-incubated with the naive CD4+ T cells to explore their direct impact on naive CD4+ T cell differentiation by measuring the release of IL-4 and IFN-γ from the cells. It was demonstrated that CS/DNA nanoparticles induced slightly elevated production of IL-12 by THP-1 cells, possibly owing to the presence of CpG motifs in the plasmid. However, this macrophage stimulating activity was much less significant as compared with lipopolysaccharide and did not impact on the differentiation of the naive CD4+ T cells. It was also demonstrated that, when directly exposed to the naive CD4+ T cells, the nanoparticles induced neither the activation of the naive CD4+ T cells in the absence of recombinant cytokines (recombinant human IL-4 or IFN-γ) that induce naive CD4+ T cell polarization, nor any changes in the differentiation direction of naive CD4+ T cells in the presence of the corresponding cytokines.

  10. Evaluation of the impact of chitosan/DNA nanoparticles on the differentiation of human naive CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lanxia; Bai Yuanyuan; Zhu Dunwan; Song Liping; Wang Hai; Dong Xia; Zhang Hailing; Leng Xigang

    2011-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) is one of the most widely studied polymers in non-viral gene delivery since it is a cationic polysaccharide that forms nanoparticles with DNA and hence protects the DNA against digestion by DNase. However, the impact of CS/DNA nanoparticle on the immune system still remains poorly understood. Previous investigations did not found CS/DNA nanoparticles had any significant impact on the function of human and murine macrophages. To date, little is known about the interaction between CS/DNA nanoparticles and naive CD4 + T cells. This study was designed to investigate whether CS/DNA nanoparticles affect the initial differentiation direction of human naive CD4 + T cells. The indirect impact of CS/DNA nanoparticles on naive CD4 + T cell differentiation was investigated by incubating the nanoparticles with human macrophage THP-1 cells in one chamber of a transwell co-incubation system, with the enriched human naive CD4 + T cells being placed in the other chamber of the transwell. The nanoparticles were also co-incubated with the naive CD4 + T cells to explore their direct impact on naive CD4 + T cell differentiation by measuring the release of IL-4 and IFN-γ from the cells. It was demonstrated that CS/DNA nanoparticles induced slightly elevated production of IL-12 by THP-1 cells, possibly owing to the presence of CpG motifs in the plasmid. However, this macrophage stimulating activity was much less significant as compared with lipopolysaccharide and did not impact on the differentiation of the naive CD4 + T cells. It was also demonstrated that, when directly exposed to the naive CD4 + T cells, the nanoparticles induced neither the activation of the naive CD4 + T cells in the absence of recombinant cytokines (recombinant human IL-4 or IFN-γ) that induce naive CD4 + T cell polarization, nor any changes in the differentiation direction of naive CD4 + T cells in the presence of the corresponding cytokines.

  11. The role of SiO2 nanoparticles and ground granulated blast furnace slag admixtures on physical, thermal and mechanical properties of self compacting concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazari, Ali; Riahi, Shadi

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Nanoparticles in concrete. → Ground granulated blast furnace slag as concrete's binder. → Mechanical properties of concrete specimens by non-traditional admixtures. - Abstract: In this work, strength assessments and percentage of water absorption of self compacting concrete containing ground granulated blast furnace slag and SiO 2 nanoparticles as binder have been investigated. Portland cement was replaced by different amounts of ground granulated blast furnace slag and the properties of concrete specimens were investigated. Although it negatively impacts the physical and mechanical properties of concrete at early ages of curing, ground granulated blast furnace slag was found to improve the physical and mechanical properties of concrete up to 45 wt% at later ages. SiO 2 nanoparticles with the average particle size of 15 nm were added partially to concrete with the optimum content of ground granulated blast furnace slag and physical and mechanical properties of the specimens were measured. SiO 2 nanoparticle as a partial replacement of cement up to 3.0 wt% could accelerate C-S-H gel formation as a result of increased crystalline Ca(OH) 2 amount at the early ages and hence increase strength and improve the resistance to water permeability of concrete specimens. The increased SiO 2 nanoparticles' content by more than 3.0 wt%, causes the reduced strength because of the decreased crystalline Ca(OH) 2 content required for C-S-H gel formation. Several empirical relationships have been presented to predict flexural and split tensile strength of the specimens by means of the corresponding compressive strength at a certain age of curing. Accelerated peak appearance in conduction calorimetry tests, more weight loss in thermogravimetric analysis and more rapid appearance of the peaks related to hydrated products in X-ray diffraction results, all indicate that SiO 2 nanoparticles could improve mechanical and physical properties of the concrete

  12. Cellular uptake of fluorophore-labeled glyco-DNA-gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witten, Katrin G.; Ruff, Julie [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Mohr, Anne; Goertz, Dieter; Recker, Tobias; Rinis, Natalie [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University Hospital Aachen (Germany); Rech, Claudia; Elling, Lothar [RWTH Aachen University, Laboratory for Biomaterials, Institute of Biotechnology and Helmholtz-Institute for Biomedical Engineering (Germany); Mueller-Newen, Gerhard [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University Hospital Aachen (Germany); Simon, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.simon@ac.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNP-DNA) were hybridized with complementary di-N-acetyllactosamine-(di-LacNAc, [3Gal({beta}1-4)GlcNAc({beta}1-]2)-modified oligonucleotides to form glycol-functionalized particles, AuNP-DNA-di-LacNAc. While AuNP-DNA are known to be taken up by cells via scavenger receptors, glycol-functionalized particles have shown to be taken up via asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGP-R). In this work, the interaction of these new particles with HepG2 cells was analyzed, which express scavenger receptors class B type I (SR-BI) and ASGP-R. To study the contribution of these receptors as potential mediators for cellular uptake, receptor-blocking experiments were performed with d-lactose, a ligand for ASGP-R, Fucoidan, a putative ligand for SR-BI, and a SR-BI blocking antibody. Labeling with Cy5-modified DNA ligands enabled us to monitor the particle uptake by confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, in order to discriminate the two putative pathways by competitive binding studies. While SR-BI-antibody and d-lactose had no inhibiting effects on particle uptake Fucoidan led to a complete inhibition. Thus, a receptor-mediated uptake by the two receptors studied could not be proven and therefore other uptake mechanisms have to be considered.

  13. Electronic cigarette aerosols and copper nanoparticles induce mitochondrial stress and promote DNA fragmentation in lung fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerner, Chad A.; Rutagarama, Pierrot; Ahmad, Tanveer; Sundar, Isaac K.; Elder, Alison; Rahman, Irfan, E-mail: irfan_rahman@urmc.rochester.edu

    2016-09-02

    Oxidants or nanoparticles have recently been identified as constituents of aerosols released from various styles of electronic cigarettes (E-cigs). Cells in the lung may be directly exposed to these constituents and harbor reactive properties capable of incurring acute cell injury. Our results show mitochondria are sensitive to both E-cig aerosols and aerosol containing copper nanoparticles when exposed to human lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) using an Air-Liquid Interface culture system, evident by elevated levels of mitochondrial ROS (mtROS). Increased mtROS after aerosol exposure is associated with reduced stability of OxPhos electron transport chain (ETC) complex IV subunit and nuclear DNA fragmentation. Increased levels of IL-8 and IL-6 in HFL-1 conditioned media were also observed. These findings reveal both mitochondrial, genotoxic, and inflammatory stresses are features of direct cell exposure to E-cig aerosols which are ensued by inflammatory duress, raising a concern on deleterious effect of vaping. - Graphical abstract: Oxidants and possibly reactive properties of metal particles in E-cig aerosols impart mitochondrial oxidative stress and DNA damage. These biological effects accompany inflammatory response which may raise concern regarding long term E-cig use. Mitochondria may be particularly sensitive to reactive properties of E-cig aerosols in addition to the potential for them to induce genotoxic stress by generating increased ROS. - Highlights: • Mitochondria are sensitive to both E-cig aerosols and metal nanoparticles. • Increased mtROS by E-cig aerosol is associated with disrupted mitochondrial energy. • E-cig causes nuclear DNA fragmentation. • E-cig aerosols induce pro-inflammatory response in human fibroblasts.

  14. Electronic cigarette aerosols and copper nanoparticles induce mitochondrial stress and promote DNA fragmentation in lung fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerner, Chad A.; Rutagarama, Pierrot; Ahmad, Tanveer; Sundar, Isaac K.; Elder, Alison; Rahman, Irfan

    2016-01-01

    Oxidants or nanoparticles have recently been identified as constituents of aerosols released from various styles of electronic cigarettes (E-cigs). Cells in the lung may be directly exposed to these constituents and harbor reactive properties capable of incurring acute cell injury. Our results show mitochondria are sensitive to both E-cig aerosols and aerosol containing copper nanoparticles when exposed to human lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) using an Air-Liquid Interface culture system, evident by elevated levels of mitochondrial ROS (mtROS). Increased mtROS after aerosol exposure is associated with reduced stability of OxPhos electron transport chain (ETC) complex IV subunit and nuclear DNA fragmentation. Increased levels of IL-8 and IL-6 in HFL-1 conditioned media were also observed. These findings reveal both mitochondrial, genotoxic, and inflammatory stresses are features of direct cell exposure to E-cig aerosols which are ensued by inflammatory duress, raising a concern on deleterious effect of vaping. - Graphical abstract: Oxidants and possibly reactive properties of metal particles in E-cig aerosols impart mitochondrial oxidative stress and DNA damage. These biological effects accompany inflammatory response which may raise concern regarding long term E-cig use. Mitochondria may be particularly sensitive to reactive properties of E-cig aerosols in addition to the potential for them to induce genotoxic stress by generating increased ROS. - Highlights: • Mitochondria are sensitive to both E-cig aerosols and metal nanoparticles. • Increased mtROS by E-cig aerosol is associated with disrupted mitochondrial energy. • E-cig causes nuclear DNA fragmentation. • E-cig aerosols induce pro-inflammatory response in human fibroblasts.

  15. A colorimetric platform for sensitively differentiating telomere DNA with different lengths, monitoring G-quadruplex and dsDNA based on silver nanoclusters and unmodified gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Fei; Chen, Zeqiu; You, Jinmao; Song, Cuihua

    2018-05-01

    Human telomere DNA plays a vital role in genome integrity control and carcinogenesis as an indication for extensive cell proliferation. Herein, silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) templated by polymer and unmodified gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are designed as a new colorimetric platform for sensitively differentiating telomere DNA with different lengths, monitoring G-quadruplex and dsDNA. Ag NCs can produce the aggregation of Au NPs, so the color of Au NPs changes to blue and the absorption peak moves to 700 nm. While the telomere DNA can protect Au NPs from aggregation, the color turns to red again and the absorption band blue shift. Benefiting from the obvious color change, we can differentiate the length of telomere DNA by naked eyes. As the length of telomere DNA is longer, the variation of color becomes more noticeable. The detection limits of telomere DNA containing 10, 22, 40, 64 bases are estimated to be 1.41, 1.21, 0.23 and 0.22 nM, respectively. On the other hand, when telomere DNA forms G-quadruplex in the presence of K+, or dsDNA with complementary sequence, both G-quadruplex and dsDNA can protect Au NPs better than the unfolded telomere DNA. Hence, a new colorimetric platform for monitoring structure conversion of DNA is established by Ag NCs-Au NPs system, and to prove this type of application, a selective K+ sensor is developed.

  16. Facilitating the indirect detection of genomic DNA in an electrochemical DNA biosensor using magnetic nanoparticles and DNA ligase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roozbeh Hushiarian

    2015-12-01

    This technique was found to be reliably repeatable. The indirect detection of genomic DNA using this method is significantly improved and showed high efficiency in small amounts of samples with the detection limit of 5.37 × 10−14 M.

  17. Anionic magnetite nanoparticle conjugated with pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid for DNA base discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khadsai, Sudarat; Rutnakornpituk, Boonjira [Naresuan University, Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence in Biomaterials, Faculty of Science (Thailand); Vilaivan, Tirayut [Chulalongkorn University, Department of Chemistry, Organic Synthesis Research Unit, Faculty of Science (Thailand); Nakkuntod, Maliwan [Naresuan University, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science (Thailand); Rutnakornpituk, Metha, E-mail: methar@nu.ac.th [Naresuan University, Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence in Biomaterials, Faculty of Science (Thailand)

    2016-09-15

    Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were surface modified with anionic poly(N-acryloyl glycine) (PNAG) and streptavidin for specific interaction with biotin-conjugated pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (PNA). Hydrodynamic size (D{sub h}) of PNAG-grafted MNPs varied from 334 to 496 nm depending on the loading ratio of the MNP to NAG in the reaction. UV–visible and fluorescence spectrophotometries were used to confirm the successful immobilization of streptavidin and PNA on the MNPs. About 291 pmol of the PNA/mg MNP was immobilized on the particle surface. The PNA-functionalized MNPs were effectively used as solid supports to differentiate between fully complementary and non-complementary/single-base mismatch DNA using the PNA probe. These novel anionic MNPs can be efficiently applicable for use as a magnetically guidable support for DNA base discrimination.Graphical Abstract.

  18. Contribution of gold nanoparticles to the catalytic DNA strand displacement in leakage reduction and signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bei; Zhou, Xiang; Yao, Dongbao; Sun, Xianbao; He, Miao; Wang, Xiaojing; Yin, Xue; Liang, Haojun

    2017-10-03

    A new model using a gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-DNA system to constrain leakage and improve efficiency of catalytic toehold-mediated strand displacement reactions was outlined. A 10-bp spacer on AuNPs and fourfold amount of fuels were determined for good performance of this model with an optimized toehold strategy. After the reaction at 25 °C for 10 h, a 258 pM target could be identified, which is a remarkable improvement compared with the traditional AuNP-DNA system without fuel. Moreover, this model was also studied to differentiate specific single nucleotide polymorphism on target with superior selection factors. This model may help by introducing a proposition of target detection to guide further investigation.

  19. Anionic magnetite nanoparticle conjugated with pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid for DNA base discrimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadsai, Sudarat; Rutnakornpituk, Boonjira; Vilaivan, Tirayut; Nakkuntod, Maliwan; Rutnakornpituk, Metha

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were surface modified with anionic poly(N-acryloyl glycine) (PNAG) and streptavidin for specific interaction with biotin-conjugated pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (PNA). Hydrodynamic size (D h ) of PNAG-grafted MNPs varied from 334 to 496 nm depending on the loading ratio of the MNP to NAG in the reaction. UV–visible and fluorescence spectrophotometries were used to confirm the successful immobilization of streptavidin and PNA on the MNPs. About 291 pmol of the PNA/mg MNP was immobilized on the particle surface. The PNA-functionalized MNPs were effectively used as solid supports to differentiate between fully complementary and non-complementary/single-base mismatch DNA using the PNA probe. These novel anionic MNPs can be efficiently applicable for use as a magnetically guidable support for DNA base discrimination.Graphical Abstract

  20. Age and lesion-induced increases of GDNF transgene expression in brain following intracerebral injections of DNA nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurek, D M; Hasselrot, U; Cass, W A; Sesenoglu-Laird, O; Padegimas, L; Cooper, M J

    2015-01-22

    In previous studies that used compacted DNA nanoparticles (DNP) to transfect cells in the brain, we observed higher transgene expression in the denervated striatum when compared to transgene expression in the intact striatum. We also observed that long-term transgene expression occurred in astrocytes as well as neurons. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that the higher transgene expression observed in the denervated striatum may be a function of increased gliosis. Several aging studies have also reported an increase of gliosis as a function of normal aging. In this study we used DNPs that encoded for human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (hGDNF) and either a non-specific human polyubiquitin C (UbC) or an astrocyte-specific human glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter. The DNPs were injected intracerebrally into the denervated or intact striatum of young, middle-aged or aged rats, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) transgene expression was subsequently quantified in brain tissue samples. The results of our studies confirmed our earlier finding that transgene expression was higher in the denervated striatum when compared to intact striatum for DNPs incorporating either promoter. In addition, we observed significantly higher transgene expression in the denervated striatum of old rats when compared to young rats following injections of both types of DNPs. Stereological analysis of GFAP+ cells in the striatum confirmed an increase of GFAP+ cells in the denervated striatum when compared to the intact striatum and also an age-related increase; importantly, increases in GFAP+ cells closely matched the increases in GDNF transgene levels. Thus neurodegeneration and aging may lay a foundation that is actually beneficial for this particular type of gene therapy while other gene therapy techniques that target neurons are actually targeting cells that are decreasing as the disease progresses. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by

  1. Two-dimensional self-assembly of DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Hagen, Noah; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Akinc, Mufit; Travesset, Alex; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2D superlattices of nanoparticles (NPs) are promising candidates for nano-devices. It is still challenging to develop a simple yet efficient protocol to assemble NPs in a controlled manner. Here, we report on formation of 2D Gibbs monolayers of single-stranded DNA-coated gold nanoparticles (ssDNA-AuNPs) at the air-water interface by manipulation of salts contents. MgCl2 and CaCl2 in solutions facilitate the accumulation of the non-complementary ssDNA-AuNPs on aqueous surfaces. Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and X-ray reflectivity show that the surface AuNPs assembly forms a mono-particle layer and undergoes a transformation from short-range to long-range (hexagonal) order above a threshold of [MgCl2] or [CaCl2]. For solutions that include two kinds of ssDNA-AuNPs with complementary base-pairing, the surface AuNPs form a thicker film and only in-plane short-range order is observed. By using other salts (NaCl or LaCl3) at concentrations of similar ionic strength to those of MgCl2 or CaCl2, we find that surface adsorbed NPs lack any orders. X-ray fluorescence measurements provide direct evidence of surface enrichment of AuNPs and divalent ions (Ca2 +) . The work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, USDOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 and DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  2. DNA intercalation studies and antimicrobial activity of Ag@ZrO{sub 2} core–shell nanoparticles in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhanalekshmi, K.I., E-mail: dhanamveni88@gmail.com; Meena, K.S.

    2016-02-01

    Ag@ZrO{sub 2} core–shell nanoparticles were prepared by one pot simultaneous reduction of AgNO{sub 3} and hydrolysis of zirconium (IV) isopropoxide. The formation of core–shell nanoparticles was confirmed by absorption, XRD, and HR-TEM techniques. The antibacterial activity of Ag@ZrO{sub 2} core–shell nanoparticles against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and the antifungal properties against Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus were examined by the agar diffusion method. DNA intercalation studies were carried out in CT-DNA. As a result ZrO{sub 2} supported on the surface of AgNPs not only prevented aggregation, but also proved to have enhanced antimicrobial activity and DNA intercalation than the Ag nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Ag@ZrO{sub 2} core–shell nanoparticles were prepared by one pot synthesis. • The ZrO{sub 2} coated AgNPs prevent aggregation and enhanced stability. • The surfaced modified AgNPs showed higher antimicrobial activity. • DNA intercalation studies show better binding affinity of core–shell NPs.

  3. DNA intercalation studies and antimicrobial activity of Ag@ZrO2 core–shell nanoparticles in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhanalekshmi, K.I.; Meena, K.S.

    2016-01-01

    Ag@ZrO 2 core–shell nanoparticles were prepared by one pot simultaneous reduction of AgNO 3 and hydrolysis of zirconium (IV) isopropoxide. The formation of core–shell nanoparticles was confirmed by absorption, XRD, and HR-TEM techniques. The antibacterial activity of Ag@ZrO 2 core–shell nanoparticles against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and the antifungal properties against Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus were examined by the agar diffusion method. DNA intercalation studies were carried out in CT-DNA. As a result ZrO 2 supported on the surface of AgNPs not only prevented aggregation, but also proved to have enhanced antimicrobial activity and DNA intercalation than the Ag nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Ag@ZrO 2 core–shell nanoparticles were prepared by one pot synthesis. • The ZrO 2 coated AgNPs prevent aggregation and enhanced stability. • The surfaced modified AgNPs showed higher antimicrobial activity. • DNA intercalation studies show better binding affinity of core–shell NPs.

  4. Polymeric nanoparticles as cancer-specific DNA delivery vectors to human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Camila G; Kozielski, Kristen L; Vaughan, Hannah J; Nakata, Maisa M; Kim, Jayoung; Higgins, Luke J; Pomper, Martin G; Green, Jordan J

    2017-10-10

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third most deadly cancer in the US, with a meager 5-year survival rate of effective and cancer-specific DNA delivery to human HCC using biodegradable poly(beta-amino ester) (PBAE) nanoparticles (NPs). Varied PBAE NP formulations were evaluated for transfection efficacy and cytotoxicity to a range of human HCC cells as well as healthy human hepatocytes. To address HCC heterogeneity, nine different sources of human HCC cells were utilized. The polymeric NPs composed of 2-((3-aminopropyl)amino) ethanol end-modified poly(1,5-pentanediol diacrylate-co-3-amino-1-propanol) ('536') at a 25 polymer-to-DNA weight-to-weight ratio led to high transfection efficacy to all of the liver cancer lines, but not to hepatocytes. Each individual HCC line had a significantly higher percentage of exogenous gene expression than the healthy liver cells (Peffective DNA transfection in vivo. PBAE-based NPs enabled high and preferential DNA delivery to HCC cells, sparing healthy hepatocytes. These biodegradable and liver cancer-selective NPs are a promising technology to deliver therapeutic genes to liver cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Gold nanoparticles for the bare-eye based and spectrophotometric detection of proteins, polynucleotides and DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepoitevin, Mathilde; Lemouel, Marie; Bechelany, Mikhael; Janot, Jean-Marc; Balme, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    We have explored the potential of using gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) in optical and bare-eye discrimination of (a) proteins (such as bovine serum albumin and lysozyme), (b) homo-polynucleotides (such as poly-adenylic acid, poly-cytidylic acid, poly-uridylic acid and poly-inosinic acid), and (c) long chain DNA (from salmon, herring and thym). Such biomacromolecules can be detected and discriminated due to their ability to prevent the formation of blue aggregates from red (non-aggregated) citrate capped Au-NPs on addition of NaCl. The effect of these biomacromolecules on the aggregation was investigated by colorimetry and UV–vis spectrometry. The results show that the two proteins can be differentiated by colorimetry, and also salmon ssDNA and dsDNA. The Au-NPs can also discriminate the dsDNAs of salmon and herring. We conclude that the use of Au-NPs represent a viable candidate to future methods of DNA analysis on the basis of visual testing, particularly in the area of food analysis. (author)

  6. Solid lipid nanoparticles mediate non-viral delivery of plasmid DNA to dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penumarthi, Alekhya; Parashar, Deepti; Abraham, Amanda N.; Dekiwadia, Chaitali; Macreadie, Ian; Shukla, Ravi; Smooker, Peter M.

    2017-06-01

    There is an increasing demand for novel DNA vaccine delivery systems, mainly for the non-viral type as they are considered relatively safe. Therefore, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were investigated for their suitability as a non-viral DNA vaccine delivery system. SLNs were synthesised by a modified solvent-emulsification method in order to study their potential to conjugate with plasmid DNA and deliver them in vitro to dendritic cells using eGFP as the reporter plasmid. The DNA-SLN complexes were characterised by electron microscopy, gel retardation assays and dynamic light scattering. The cytotoxicity assay data supported their biocompatibility and was used to estimate safe threshold concentration resulting in high transfection rate. The transfection efficiency of these complexes in a dendritic cell line was shown to increase significantly compared to plasmid alone, and was comparable to that mediated by lipofectamine. Transmission electron microscopy studies delineated the pathway of cellular uptake. Endosomal escape was observed supporting the mechanism of transfection.

  7. DNA-linked NanoParticle Lattices with Diamond Symmetry: Stability, Shape and Optical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamy, Hamed; Tkachenko, Alexei; Gang, Oleg; Starr, Francis

    The linking of nanoparticles (NP) by DNA has been proven to be an effective means to create NP lattices with specific order. Lattices with diamond symmetry are predicted to offer novel photonic properties, but self-assembly of such lattices has proven to be challenging due to the low packing fraction, sensitivity to bond orientation, and local heterogeneity. Recently, we reported an approach to create diamond NP lattices based on the association between anisotropic particles with well-defined tetravalent DNA binding topology and isotropically functionalized NP. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate the Gibbs free energy of these lattices, and thereby determine the stability of these lattices as a function of NP size and DNA stiffness. We also predict the equilibrium shape for the cubic diamond crystallite using the Wulff construction method. Specifically, we predict the equilibrium shape using the surface energy for different crystallographic planes. We evaluate surface energy directly form molecular dynamics simulation, which we correlate with theoretical estimates from the expected number of broken DNA bonds along a facet. Furthermore we study the optical properties of this structure, e.g optical bandgap.

  8. Silver nanoparticle induced cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and DNA damage in CHO cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awasthi, Kumud Kant [University of Rajasthan, Department of Zoology (India); Awasthi, Anjali; Kumar, Narender; Roy, Partha [Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Department of Biotechnology (India); Awasthi, Kamlendra, E-mail: kamlendra.awasthi@gmail.com [Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (India); John, P. J., E-mail: placheriljohn@yahoo.com [University of Rajasthan, Department of Zoology (India)

    2013-09-15

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are being used increasingly in wound dressings, catheters, and in various household products due to their antimicrobial activity. The present study reports the toxicity evaluation of synthesized and well characterized Ag NPs using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The UV-Vis spectroscopy reveals the formation of silver nanoparticles by exhibiting the typical surface plasmon absorption maxima at 408-410 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the average diameter of silver nanoparticles is about 5.0 {+-} 1.0 nm and that they have spherical shape. Cell visibility and cell viability percentage show dose-dependent cellular toxicity of Ag NPs. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) for CHO cells is 68.0 {+-} 2.65 {mu}g/ml after 24 h Ag NPs exposure. Toxicity evaluations, including cellular morphology, mitochondrial function (MTT assay), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and DNA fragmentation assay (Ladder pattern) were assessed in unexposed CHO cells (control) and the cells exposed to Ag NPs concentrations of 15, 30, and 60 {mu}g/ml for 24 h. The findings may assist in the designing of Ag NPs for various applications and provide insights into their toxicity.

  9. Intracellular responsive dual delivery by endosomolytic polyplexes carrying DNA anchored porous silicon nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Almeida, Patrick Vingadas; Correia, Alexandra; Herranz-Blanco, Barbara; Shrestha, Neha; Mäkilä, Ermei; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A

    2017-03-10

    Bioresponsive cytosolic nanobased multidelivery has been emerging as an enormously challenging novel concept due to the intrinsic protective barriers of the cells and hardly controllable performances of nanomaterials. Here, we present a new paradigm to advance nano-in-nano integration technology amenable to create multifunctional nanovehicles showing considerable promise to overcome restrictions of intracellular delivery, solve impediments of endosomal localization and aid effectual tracking of nanoparticles. A redox responsive intercalator chemistry comprised of cystine and 9-aminoacridine is designed as a cross-linker to cap carboxylated porous silicon nanoparticles with DNA. These intelligent nanocarriers are then encapsulated within novel one-pot electrostatically complexed nano-networks made of a zwitterionic amino acid (cysteine), an anionic bioadhesive polymer (poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic acid)) and a cationic endosomolytic polymer (polyethyleneimine). This combined nanocomposite is successfully tested for the co-delivery of hydrophobic (sorafenib) or hydrophilic (calcein) molecules loaded within the porous core, and an imaging agent covalently integrated into the polyplex shell by click chemistry. High loading capacity, low cyto- and hemo-toxicity, glutathione responsive on-command drug release, and superior cytosolic delivery are shown as achievable key features of the proposed formulation. Overall, formulating drug molecules, DNA and imaging agents, without any interference, in a physico-chemically optimized carrier may open a path towards broad applicability of these cost-effective multivalent nanocomposites for treating different diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Protection of cisplatin-induced spermatotoxicity, DNA damage and chromatin abnormality by selenium nano-particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Ali [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza [Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Biotechnology Research Centre, Faculty of Pharmacy, TUMS, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadi, Abbas [Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Urmia University, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baeeri, Maryam; Mohammadirad, Azadeh [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: mohammad.abdollahi@utoronto.ca [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-02-01

    Cisplatin (CIS), an anticancer alkylating agent, induces DNA adducts and effectively cross links the DNA strands and so affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. The present study investigated the cellular/biochemical mechanisms underlying possible protective effect of selenium nano-particles (Nano-Se) as an established strong antioxidant with more bioavailability and less toxicity, on reproductive toxicity of CIS by assessment of sperm characteristics, sperm DNA integrity, chromatin quality and spermatogenic disorders. To determine the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of CIS gonadotoxicity, the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and peroxynitrite (ONOO) as a marker of nitrosative stress (NS) and testosterone (T) concentration as a biomarker of testicular function were measured in the blood and testes. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were equally divided into four groups. A single IP dose of CIS (7 mg/kg) and protective dose of Nano-Se (2 mg/kg/day) were administered alone or in combination. The CIS-exposed rats showed a significant increase in testicular and serum LPO and ONOO level, along with a significant decrease in enzymatic antioxidants levels, diminished serum T concentration and abnormal histologic findings with impaired sperm quality associated with increased DNA damage and decreased chromatin quality. Coadministration of Nano-Se significantly improved the serum T, sperm quality, and spermatogenesis and reduced CIS-induced free radical toxic stress and spermatic DNA damage. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Nano-Se may be useful to prevent CIS-induced gonadotoxicity through its antioxidant potential. Highlights: ► Cisplatin (CIS) affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. ► Effect of Nano-Se on CIS-induced spermatotoxicity was investigated. ► CIS-exposure induces oxidative sperm DNA damage

  11. ZnO Nanoparticles Protect RNA from Degradation Better than DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayden McCall

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy and RNA delivery require a nanoparticle (NP to stabilize these nucleic acids when administered in vivo. The presence of degradative hydrolytic enzymes within these environments limits the nucleic acids’ pharmacologic activity. This study compared the effects of nanoscale ZnO and MgO in the protection afforded to DNA and RNA from degradation by DNase, serum or tumor homogenate. For double-stranded plasmid DNA degradation by DNase, our results suggest that the presence of MgO NP can protect DNA from DNase digestion at an elevated temperature (65 °C, a biochemical activity not present in ZnO NP-containing samples at any temperature. In this case, intact DNA was remarkably present for MgO NP after ethidium bromide staining and agarose gel electrophoresis where these same stained DNA bands were notably absent for ZnO NP. Anticancer RNA, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C is now considered an anti-metastatic RNA targeting agent and as such there is great interest in its delivery by NP. For it to function, the NP must protect it from degradation in serum and the tumor environment. Surprisingly, ZnO NP protected the RNA from degradation in either serum-containing media or melanoma tumor homogenate after gel electrophoretic analysis, whereas the band was much more diminished in the presence of MgO. For both MgO and ZnO NP, buffer-dependent rescue from degradation occurred. These data suggest a fundamental difference in the ability of MgO and ZnO NP to stabilize nucleic acids with implications for DNA and RNA delivery and therapy.

  12. A simple gold nanoparticle-mediated immobilization method to fabricate highly homogeneous DNA microarrays having higher capacities than those prepared by using conventional techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Cheulhee; Mun, Hyo Young; Li, Taihua; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2009-01-01

    A simple, highly efficient immobilization method to fabricate DNA microarrays, that utilizes gold nanoparticles as the mediator, has been developed. The fabrication method begins with electrostatic attachment of amine-modified DNA to gold nanoparticles. The resulting gold-DNA complexes are immobilized on conventional amine or aldehyde functionalized glass slides. By employing gold nanoparticles as the immobilization mediator, implementation of this procedure yields highly homogeneous microarrays that have higher binding capacities than those produced by conventional methods. This outcome is due to the increased three-dimensional immobilization surface provided by the gold nanoparticles as well as the intrinsic effects of gold on emission properties. This novel immobilization strategy gives microarrays that produce more intense hybridization signals for the complementary DNA. Furthermore, the silver enhancement technique, made possible only in the case of immobilized gold nanoparticles on the microarrays, enables simple monitoring of the integrity of the immobilized DNA probe.

  13. Proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Fuyi [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Yao, Yao; Luo, Jianjun; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Dengyang [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Gao, Fenglei, E-mail: jsxzgfl@sina.com [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Wang, Po, E-mail: wangpo@jsnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China)

    2017-05-29

    Novel hybridization proximity-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly strategy has been proposed for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles as signal label. The DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles were characterized with atomic force microscopic and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The highly efficient electrocatalysis by DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles for NaBH{sub 4} oxidation produced an intense detection signal. The label-free electrochemical method achieved the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) with a linear range from 10{sup −15} to 10{sup −11} g mL{sup −1} and a detection limit of 0.43 × 10{sup −15} g mL{sup −1}. Through introducing a supersandwich reaction to increase the DNA length, the electrochemical signal was further amplified, leading to a detection limit of 0.52 × 10{sup −16} g mL{sup −1}. And it rendered satisfactory analytical performance for the determination of CEA in serum samples. Furthermore, it exhibited good reproducibility and stability; meanwhile, it also showed excellent specificity due to the specific recognition of antigen by antibody. Therefore, the DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles based signal amplification approach has great potential in clinical applications and is also suitable for quantification of biomarkers at ultralow level. - Graphical abstract: A novel label-free and enzyme-free electrochemical immunoassay based on proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assemblies for recycling of the CEA. - Highlights: • A novel enzyme-free electrochemical immunosensor was developed for detection of CEA. • The signal amplification was based on catalytic DNA hairpin assembly and DNA-template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles. • The biosensor could detect CEA down to 0.52 × 10{sup −16} g mL{sup −1} level with a dynamic range spanning 5 orders of magnitude.

  14. A signal amplification assay for HSV type 1 viral DNA detection using nanoparticles and direct acoustic profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammond Richard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleic acid based recognition of viral sequences can be used together with label-free biosensors to provide rapid, accurate confirmation of viral infection. To enhance detection sensitivity, gold nanoparticles can be employed with mass-sensitive acoustic biosensors (such as a quartz crystal microbalance by either hybridising nanoparticle-oligonucleotide conjugates to complimentary surface-immobilised ssDNA probes on the sensor, or by using biotin-tagged target oligonucleotides bound to avidin-modified nanoparticles on the sensor. We have evaluated and refined these signal amplification assays for the detection from specific DNA sequences of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV type 1 and defined detection limits with a 16.5 MHz fundamental frequency thickness shear mode acoustic biosensor. Results In the study the performance of semi-homogeneous and homogeneous assay formats (suited to rapid, single step tests were evaluated utilising different diameter gold nanoparticles at varying DNA concentrations. Mathematical models were built to understand the effects of mass transport in the flow cell, the binding kinetics of targets to nanoparticles in solution, the packing geometries of targets on the nanoparticle, the packing of nanoparticles on the sensor surface and the effect of surface shear stiffness on the response of the acoustic sensor. This lead to the selection of optimised 15 nm nanoparticles that could be used with a 6 minute total assay time to achieve a limit of detection sensitivity of 5.2 × 10-12 M. Larger diameter nanoparticles gave poorer limits of detection than smaller particles. The limit of detection was three orders of magnitude lower than that observed using a hybridisation assay without nanoparticle signal amplification. Conclusions An analytical model was developed to determine optimal nanoparticle diameter, concentration and probe density, which allowed efficient and rapid optimisation of assay parameters

  15. DNA@Mn3(PO4)2 Nanoparticles Supported with Graphene Oxide as Photoelectrodes for Photoeletrocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lixia; Xie, Jiale; Ma, Xiaoqing; Li, Man; Yu, Ling

    2017-01-01

    A novel deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA)-based photoelectrode consisting of DNA@Mn3(PO4)2 nanoparticles on graphene oxide (GO) sheets was successfully fabricated for photoelectrocatalysis. DNA served as a soft template to guide the nucleation and growth of Mn3(PO4)2 nanoparticles in the synthesis of Mn3(PO4)2 nanoparticles. More importantly, the DNA also serves as semiconductor materials to adjust charge transport. Under UV light irradiation (180-420 nm, 15 mW/cm2), the photocurrent density of DNA@ Mn3(PO4)2/GO electrodes reached 9 μA/cm2 at 0.7 V bias (vs. SCE). An applied bias photon-to-current efficiency (ABPE) of 0.18% can be achieved, which was much higher than that of other control electrodes (<0.04%). In this DNA-based photoelectrode, well-matched energy levels can efficiently improve charge transfer and reduce the recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs.

  16. Nanoparticle sensor for label free detection of swine DNA in mixed biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, M E; Hashim, U [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INNE), Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Lot 104-108, Tingkat 1, Block A, Taman Pertiwi Indah, Jalan Kangar-Alor Star, Seriab, 01000 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Mustafa, S; Che Man, Y B; Yusop, M H M [Halal Products Research Institute, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Bari, M F [School of Materials Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, Seriab 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Islam, Kh N [Department of Preclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Hasan, M F, E-mail: uda@unimap.edu.my [Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-05-13

    We used 40 {+-} 5 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect swine-specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in PCR-amplified and non-amplified mitochondrial DNA mixtures to authenticate species. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish-red to gray-purple in 2 mM PBS. Visually observed results were clearly reflected by the dramatic reduction of surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and the appearance of new features in the 620-800 nm regions in their absorption spectra. The particles were stabilized against salt-induced aggregation upon the adsorption of single-stranded DNA. The PCR products, without any additional processing, were hybridized with a 17-base probe prior to exposure to GNPs. At a critical annealing temperature (55 {sup 0}C) that differentiated matched and mismatched base pairing, the probe was hybridized to pig PCR product and dehybridized from the deer product. The dehybridized probe stuck to GNPs to prevent them from salt-induced aggregation and retained their characteristic red color. Hybridization of a 27-nucleotide probe to swine mitochondrial DNA identified them in pork-venison, pork-shad and venison-shad binary admixtures, eliminating the need of PCR amplification. Thus the assay was applied to authenticate species both in PCR-amplified and non-amplified heterogeneous biological samples. The results were determined visually and validated by absorption spectroscopy. The entire assay (hybridization plus visual detection) was performed in less than 10 min. The LOD (for genomic DNA) of the assay was 6 {mu}g ml{sup -1} swine DNA in mixed meat samples. We believe the assay can be applied for species assignment in food analysis, mismatch detection in genetic screening and homology studies between closely related species.

  17. Nanoparticle sensor for label free detection of swine DNA in mixed biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M E; Hashim, U; Mustafa, S; Che Man, Y B; Yusop, M H M; Bari, M F; Islam, Kh N; Hasan, M F

    2011-01-01

    We used 40 ± 5 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect swine-specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in PCR-amplified and non-amplified mitochondrial DNA mixtures to authenticate species. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish-red to gray-purple in 2 mM PBS. Visually observed results were clearly reflected by the dramatic reduction of surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and the appearance of new features in the 620-800 nm regions in their absorption spectra. The particles were stabilized against salt-induced aggregation upon the adsorption of single-stranded DNA. The PCR products, without any additional processing, were hybridized with a 17-base probe prior to exposure to GNPs. At a critical annealing temperature (55 0 C) that differentiated matched and mismatched base pairing, the probe was hybridized to pig PCR product and dehybridized from the deer product. The dehybridized probe stuck to GNPs to prevent them from salt-induced aggregation and retained their characteristic red color. Hybridization of a 27-nucleotide probe to swine mitochondrial DNA identified them in pork-venison, pork-shad and venison-shad binary admixtures, eliminating the need of PCR amplification. Thus the assay was applied to authenticate species both in PCR-amplified and non-amplified heterogeneous biological samples. The results were determined visually and validated by absorption spectroscopy. The entire assay (hybridization plus visual detection) was performed in less than 10 min. The LOD (for genomic DNA) of the assay was 6 μg ml -1 swine DNA in mixed meat samples. We believe the assay can be applied for species assignment in food analysis, mismatch detection in genetic screening and homology studies between closely related species.

  18. DNA-labeled micro- and nanoparticles: a new approach to study contaminant transport in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNew, C.; Wang, C.; Kocis, T. N.; Murphy, N. P.; Dahlke, H. E.

    2017-12-01

    Though our understanding of contaminant behavior in the subsurface has improved, our ability to measure and predict complex contaminant transport pathways at hillslope to watershed scales is still lacking. By utilizing bio-molecular nanotechnology developed for nano-medicines and drug delivery, we are able to produce DNA-labeled micro- and nanoparticles for use in a myriad of environmental systems. Control of the fabrication procedure allows us to produce particles of custom size, charge, and surface functionality to mimic the transport properties of the particulate contaminant or colloid of interest. The use of custom sequenced DNA allows for the fabrication of an enormous number of unique particle labels (approximately 1.61 x 1060 unique sequences) and the ability to discern between varied spatial and temporal applications, or the transport effect of varied particle size, charge, or surface properties. To date, this technology has been utilized to study contaminant transport from lab to field scales, including surface and open channel flow applications, transport in porous media, soil retention, and even subglacial flow pathways. Here, we present the technology for production and detection of the DNA-labeled particles along with the results from a current hillslope study at the Sierra Foothills Research and Extension Center (SFREC). This field study utilizes spatial and temporal variations in DNA-labeled particle applications to identify subsurface pollutant transport pathways through the four distinct soil horizons present at the SFREC site. Results from this and previous studies highlight the tremendous potential of the DNA-labeled particle technology for studying contaminant transport through the subsurface.

  19. Synthesis of titanium oxide nanoparticles using DNA-complex as template for solution-processable hybrid dielectric composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, J.C. [Center for Sustainable Materials Chemistry, 153 Gilbert Hall, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Mejia, I.; Murphy, J.; Quevedo, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States); Garcia, P.; Martinez, C.A. [Engineering and Technology Institute, Autonomous University of Ciudad Juarez, Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • We developed a synthesis method to produce TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles using a DNA complex. • The nanoparticles were anatase phase (~6 nm diameter), and stable in alcohols. • Composites showed a k of 13.4, 4.6 times larger than the k of polycarbonate. • Maximum processing temperature was 90 °C. • Low temperature enables their use in low-voltage, low-cost, flexible electronics. - Abstract: We report the synthesis of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles prepared by the hydrolysis of titanium isopropoxide (TTIP) in the presence of a DNA complex for solution processable dielectric composites. The nanoparticles were incorporated as fillers in polycarbonate at low concentrations (1.5, 5 and 7 wt%) to produce hybrid dielectric films with dielectric constant higher than thermally grown silicon oxide. It was found that the DNA complex plays an important role as capping agent in the formation and suspension stability of nanocrystalline anatase phase TiO{sub 2} at room temperature with uniform size (∼6 nm) and narrow distribution. The effective dielectric constant of spin-cast polycarbonate thin-films increased from 2.84 to 13.43 with the incorporation of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles into the polymer host. These composites can be solution processed with a maximum temperature of 90 °C and could be potential candidates for its application in low-cost macro-electronics.

  20. Thiomers and thiomer-based nanoparticles in protein and DNA drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptstein, Sabine; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    Thanks to advances in biotechnology, more and more highly efficient protein- and DNA-based drugs have been developed. Unfortunately, these kinds of drugs underlie poor non-parental bioavailability. To overcome hindrances like low mucosal permeability and enzymatic degradation polymeric excipients are utilized as drug carrier whereat thiolated excipients showed several promising qualities in comparison to the analogical unmodified polymer. The article deals with the comparatively easy modification of well-established polymers like chitosan or poly(acrylates) to synthesize thiomers. Further, the recently developed "next generation" thiomers e.g. preactivated or S-protected thiomers are introduced. Designative properties like mucoadhesion, uptake and permeation enhancement, efflux pump inhibition and protection against enzymatic degradation will be discussed and differences between first and next generation thiomers will be pointed out. Additionally, nanoparticles prepared with thiomers will be dealt with regarding to protein and DNA drug delivery as thiomers seem to be a promising approach to avoid parenteral application. Properties of thiomers per se and results of in vivo studies carried out so far for peptide and DNA drugs demonstrate their potential as multifunctional excipients. However, further investigations and optimizations have to be done before establishing a carrier system ready for clinical approval.

  1. DNA-Catalytically Active Gold Nanoparticle Conjugates-Based Colorimetric Multidimensional Sensor Array for Protein Discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiangcong; Chen, Zhengbo; Tan, Lulu; Lou, Tianhong; Zhao, Yan

    2017-01-03

    A series of single-strand oligonucleotides functionalized catalytically active gold nanoparticle (AuNPs) as nonspecific receptors have been designed to build a protein sensing array. We take advantage of the correlation between the catalytic activity and the exposed surface area of AuNPs, i.e., DNA-proteins interactions mask the surface area of AuNPs, leading to poor catalytic performance of AuNPs. As the number of DNA-bound proteins increases, the surfaces of AuNPs become more masked; thus, the time of 4- nitrophenol/NaBH 4 reaction for color change (yellow → colorless) of the solution increases. Taking advantage of three nonspecific SH-labeled DNA sequences (A15, C15, and T15) as array sensing elements and the color-change time (CCT) of the solution as signal readout, colorimetric response patterns can be obtained on the array and identified via linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Eleven proteins have been completely distinguished with 100% accuracy with the naked eye at the 30 nM level. Remarkably, two similar proteins (bovine serum albumin and human serum albumin), two different proteins (bovine serum albumin and concanavalin) at the same concentration, and the mixtures of the two proteins with different molar ratios have been discriminated with 100%. The practicability of this sensor array is further validated by high accuracy (100%) identification of 11 proteins in human serum samples.

  2. Identification of genetically modified DNA found in Roundup Ready soybean using gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Huisoo; Kwak, Cheol Hwan; Kim, Gibum; Kim, Sun Min; Huh, Yun Suk; Jeon, Tae-Joon

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe an SPR sensor chip coated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) that enables highly sensitive determination of genetically modified (GM) crops. Detection is based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) with its known sensitivity to even minute changes in refractive index. The device consists of a halogen light source, a light detector, and a cuvette cell that contains a sensor chip coated with AuNPs. It is operated in the transmission mode of the optical path to enhance the plasmonic signal. The sample solution containing target DNA (e.g. from the GM crop) is introduced into the cuvette with the sensor chip whose surface was functionalized with a capture DNA. Following a 30-min hybridization, the changes of the signal are recorded at 540 nm. The chip responds to target DNA in the 1 to 100 nM concentration range and has a 1 nM detection limit. Features of this sensor chip include a short reaction time, ease of handling, and portability, and this enables on-site detection and in-situ testing. (author)

  3. The role of SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and ground granulated blast furnace slag admixtures on physical, thermal and mechanical properties of self compacting concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazari, Ali, E-mail: alinazari84@aut.ac.ir [Department of Technical and Engineering Sciences, Islamic Azad University (Saveh Branch), Felestin Sq., Saveh (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Riahi, Shadi [Department of Technical and Engineering Sciences, Islamic Azad University (Saveh Branch), Felestin Sq., Saveh (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Nanoparticles in concrete. {yields} Ground granulated blast furnace slag as concrete's binder. {yields} Mechanical properties of concrete specimens by non-traditional admixtures. - Abstract: In this work, strength assessments and percentage of water absorption of self compacting concrete containing ground granulated blast furnace slag and SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles as binder have been investigated. Portland cement was replaced by different amounts of ground granulated blast furnace slag and the properties of concrete specimens were investigated. Although it negatively impacts the physical and mechanical properties of concrete at early ages of curing, ground granulated blast furnace slag was found to improve the physical and mechanical properties of concrete up to 45 wt% at later ages. SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles with the average particle size of 15 nm were added partially to concrete with the optimum content of ground granulated blast furnace slag and physical and mechanical properties of the specimens were measured. SiO{sub 2} nanoparticle as a partial replacement of cement up to 3.0 wt% could accelerate C-S-H gel formation as a result of increased crystalline Ca(OH){sub 2} amount at the early ages and hence increase strength and improve the resistance to water permeability of concrete specimens. The increased SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles' content by more than 3.0 wt%, causes the reduced strength because of the decreased crystalline Ca(OH){sub 2} content required for C-S-H gel formation. Several empirical relationships have been presented to predict flexural and split tensile strength of the specimens by means of the corresponding compressive strength at a certain age of curing. Accelerated peak appearance in conduction calorimetry tests, more weight loss in thermogravimetric analysis and more rapid appearance of the peaks related to hydrated products in X-ray diffraction results, all indicate that SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles could

  4. Screening the sequence selectivity of DNA-binding molecules using a gold nanoparticle-based colorimetric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Sarah J; Han, Min Su; Lytton-Jean, Abigail K R; Mirkin, Chad A

    2007-09-15

    We have developed a novel competition assay that uses a gold nanoparticle (Au NP)-based, high-throughput colorimetric approach to screen the sequence selectivity of DNA-binding molecules. This assay hinges on the observation that the melting behavior of DNA-functionalized Au NP aggregates is sensitive to the concentration of the DNA-binding molecule in solution. When short, oligomeric hairpin DNA sequences were added to a reaction solution consisting of DNA-functionalized Au NP aggregates and DNA-binding molecules, these molecules may either bind to the Au NP aggregate interconnects or the hairpin stems based on their relative affinity for each. This relative affinity can be measured as a change in the melting temperature (Tm) of the DNA-modified Au NP aggregates in solution. As a proof of concept, we evaluated the selectivity of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindone (an AT-specific binder), ethidium bromide (a nonspecific binder), and chromomycin A (a GC-specific binder) for six sequences of hairpin DNA having different numbers of AT pairs in a five-base pair variable stem region. Our assay accurately and easily confirmed the known trends in selectivity for the DNA binders in question without the use of complicated instrumentation. This novel assay will be useful in assessing large libraries of potential drug candidates that work by binding DNA to form a drug/DNA complex.

  5. A sensitive DNA biosensor fabricated from gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and zinc oxide nanowires on a glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jie; Li Shuping; Zhang Yuzhong

    2010-01-01

    We outline here the fabrication of a sensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor for the detection of sequence-specific target DNA. Zinc oxide nanowires (ZnONWs) were first immobilized on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with carboxyl groups were then dropped onto the surface of the ZnONWs. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were subsequently introduced to the surface of the MWNTs/ZnONWs by electrochemical deposition. A single-stranded DNA probe with a thiol group at the end (HS-ssDNA) was covalently immobilized on the surface of the AuNPs by forming an Au-S bond. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) were used to investigate the film assembly process. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used to monitor DNA hybridization by measuring the electrochemical signals of [Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ] 3+ bounding to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The incorporation of ZnONWs and MWCNTs in this sensor design significantly enhances the sensitivity and the selectivity. This DNA biosensor can detect the target DNA quantitatively in the range of 1.0 x 10 -13 to 1.0 x 10 -7 M, with a detection limit of 3.5 x 10 -14 M (S/N = 3). In addition, the DNA biosensor exhibits excellent selectivity, even for single-mismatched DNA detection.

  6. Characterization of PEI-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for transfection: Size distribution, colloidal properties and DNA interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steitz, Benedikt [Laboratory of Powder Technology, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Hofmann, Heinrich [Laboratory of Powder Technology, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Kamau, Sarah W. [Institute of Veterinary Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Zuerich, Zurich (Switzerland); Hassa, Paul O. [Institute of Veterinary Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Zuerich, Zurich (Switzerland); Hottiger, Michael O. [Institute of Veterinary Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Zuerich, Zurich (Switzerland); Rechenberg, Brigitte von [Musculoskeletal Research Unit, Equine Hospital, Vetsuisse Faculty Zurich, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr. 260, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Hofmann-Amtenbrink, Magarethe [MatSearch, Chemin Jean Pavillard 14, 1009 Pully (Switzerland); Petri-Fink, Alke [Laboratory of Powder Technology, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland)]. E-mail: alke.fink@epfl.ch

    2007-04-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were coated with polyethylenimine. Here, we briefly describe the synthesis as well as DNA:PEI:SPION complexes and the characterization of the compounds according to their particle size, {zeta}-potential, morphology, DNA complexing ability, magnetic sedimentation, and colloidal stability. PEI coating of SPIONs led to colloidally stable beads even in high salt concentrations over a wide pH range. DNA plasmids and PCR products encoding for green fluorescent protein were associated with the described beads. The complexes were added to cells and exposed to permanent and pulsating magnetic fields. Presence of these magnetic fields significantly increased the transfection efficiency.

  7. Characterization of PEI-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for transfection: Size distribution, colloidal properties and DNA interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steitz, Benedikt; Hofmann, Heinrich; Kamau, Sarah W.; Hassa, Paul O.; Hottiger, Michael O.; Rechenberg, Brigitte von; Hofmann-Amtenbrink, Magarethe; Petri-Fink, Alke

    2007-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were coated with polyethylenimine. Here, we briefly describe the synthesis as well as DNA:PEI:SPION complexes and the characterization of the compounds according to their particle size, ζ-potential, morphology, DNA complexing ability, magnetic sedimentation, and colloidal stability. PEI coating of SPIONs led to colloidally stable beads even in high salt concentrations over a wide pH range. DNA plasmids and PCR products encoding for green fluorescent protein were associated with the described beads. The complexes were added to cells and exposed to permanent and pulsating magnetic fields. Presence of these magnetic fields significantly increased the transfection efficiency

  8. A Novel DNA Nanosensor Based on CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots and Synthesized Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roozbeh Hushiarian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Although nanoparticle-enhanced biosensors have been extensively researched, few studies have systematically characterized the roles of nanoparticles in enhancing biosensor functionality. This paper describes a successful new method in which DNA binds directly to iron oxide nanoparticles for use in an optical biosensor. A wide variety of nanoparticles with different properties have found broad application in biosensors because their small physical size presents unique chemical, physical, and electronic properties that are different from those of bulk materials. Of all nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles are proving to be a versatile tool, an excellent case in point being in DNA bioassays, where magnetic nanoparticles are often used for optimization of the hybridization and separation of target DNA. A critical step in the successful construction of a DNA biosensor is the efficient attachment of biomolecules to the surface of magnetic nanoparticles. To date, most methods of synthesizing these nanoparticles have led to the formation of hydrophobic particles that require additional surface modifications. As a result, the surface to volume ratio decreases and nonspecific bindings may occur so that the sensitivity and efficiency of the device deteriorates. A new method of large-scale synthesis of iron oxide (Fe3O4 nanoparticles which results in the magnetite particles being in aqueous phase, was employed in this study. Small modifications were applied to design an optical DNA nanosensor based on sandwich hybridization. Characterization of the synthesized particles was carried out using a variety of techniques and CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots were used as the reporter markers in a spectrofluorophotometer. We showed conclusively that DNA binds to the surface of ironoxide nanoparticles without further surface modifications and that these magnetic nanoparticles can be efficiently utilized as biomolecule carriers in biosensing devices.

  9. Photoresponsive Bridged Silsesquioxane Nanoparticles with Tunable Morphology for Light-Triggered Plasmid DNA Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Fatieiev, Yevhen; Croissant, Jonas G.; Alsaiari, Shahad K.; Moosa, Basem; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2015-01-01

    Bridged silsesquioxane nanocomposites with tunable morphologies incorporating o-nitrophenylene-ammonium bridges are described. The systematic screening of the sol-gel parameters allowed the material to reach the nanoscale –unlike most reported bridged silsesquioxane materials– with controlled dense and hollow structures of 100 to 200 nm. The hybrid composition of silsesquioxanes with 50% of organic content homogenously distributed in the nanomaterials endowed them with photoresponsive properties. Light irradiation was performed to reverse the surface charge of nanoparticles from +46 to -39 mV via the photoreaction of the organic fragments within the particles, as confirmed by spectroscopic monitorings. Furthermore, such NPs were ap-plied for the first time for the on-demand delivery of plasmid DNA in HeLa cancer cells via light actuation.

  10. Photoresponsive Bridged Silsesquioxane Nanoparticles with Tunable Morphology for Light-Triggered Plasmid DNA Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Fatieiev, Yevhen

    2015-09-25

    Bridged silsesquioxane nanocomposites with tunable morphologies incorporating o-nitrophenylene-ammonium bridges are described. The systematic screening of the sol-gel parameters allowed the material to reach the nanoscale –unlike most reported bridged silsesquioxane materials– with controlled dense and hollow structures of 100 to 200 nm. The hybrid composition of silsesquioxanes with 50% of organic content homogenously distributed in the nanomaterials endowed them with photoresponsive properties. Light irradiation was performed to reverse the surface charge of nanoparticles from +46 to -39 mV via the photoreaction of the organic fragments within the particles, as confirmed by spectroscopic monitorings. Furthermore, such NPs were ap-plied for the first time for the on-demand delivery of plasmid DNA in HeLa cancer cells via light actuation.

  11. Aneuploidogenic effects and DNA oxidation induced in vitro by differently sized gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Bucchianico S

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sebastiano Di Bucchianico,1 Maria Rita Fabbrizi,1 Silvia Cirillo,1 Chiara Uboldi,1 Douglas Gilliland,2 Eugenia Valsami-Jones,3,4 Lucia Migliore11Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, Medical Genetics Unit, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; 2European Commission-Joint Research Centre, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, NanoBioSciences Unit, Ispra, Italy; 3School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK; 4Earth Sciences, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London, UKAbstract: Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs are used in many fields, including biomedical applications; however, no conclusive information on their potential cytotoxicity and genotoxicity mechanisms is available. For this reason, experiments in human primary lymphocytes and murine macrophages (Raw264.7 were performed exposing cells to spherical citrate-capped Au NPs with two different nominal diameters (5 nm and 15 nm. The proliferative activity, mitotic, apoptotic, and necrotic markers, as well as chromosomal damage were assessed by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with human and murine pancentromeric probes was applied to distinguish between clastogenic and aneuploidogenic effects. Our results indicate that 5 nm and 15 nm Au NPs are able to inhibit cell proliferation by apoptosis and to induce chromosomal damage, in particular chromosome mis-segregation. DNA strand breaks were detected by comet assay, and the modified protocol using endonuclease-III and formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase restriction enzymes showed that pyrimidines and purines were oxidatively damaged by Au NPs. Moreover, we show a size-independent correlation between the cytotoxicity of Au NPs and their tested mass concentration or absolute number, and genotoxic effects which were more severe for Au NP 15 nm compared to Au NP 5 nm. Results indicate that

  12. An active nano-supported interface designed from gold nanoparticles embedded on ionic liquid for depositing DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Liping; Kang Tianfang; Cheng Shuiyuan; Guo Xiurui

    2009-01-01

    The use of an active nano-interface designed from gold nanoparticles embedded on ionic liquid for DNA damage resulted from formalehyde (HCHO) is reported in this article. The active nano-interface was fabricated by depositing gold nanoparticles on the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluroborate ([bmim][BF 4 ]). A glassy carbon electrode modified by this composite film was fabricated to immobilize DNA for probing into the damage resulted from HCHO. The modifying process was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and electrochemistry involving electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It was found that the modified film performs effectively in studying the DNA damage by electrocatalytic activity toward HCHO oxidation.

  13. DNA-length-dependent quenching of fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticles with gold, graphene oxide and MoS2 nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcioglu, Mustafa; Rana, Muhit; Robertson, Neil; Yigit, Mehmet V

    2014-08-13

    We controlled the fluorescence emission of a fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticle using three different nanomaterials with ultraefficient quenching capabilities. The control over the fluorescence emission was investigated via spacing introduced by the surface-functionalized single-stranded DNA molecules. DNA molecules were conjugated on different templates, either on the surface of the fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticles or gold and nanographene oxide. The efficiency of the quenching was determined and compared with various fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticle and nanoquencher combinations using DNA molecules with three different lengths. We have found that the template for DNA conjugation plays significant role on quenching the fluorescence emission of the fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticles. We have observed that the size of the DNA controls the quenching efficiency when conjugated only on the fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticles by setting a spacer between the surfaces and resulting change in the hydrodynamic size. The quenching efficiency with 12mer, 23mer and 36mer oligonucleotides decreased to 56%, 54% and 53% with gold nanoparticles, 58%, 38% and 32% with nanographene oxide, 46%, 38% and 35% with MoS2, respectively. On the other hand, the presence, not the size, of the DNA molecules on the other surfaces quenched the fluorescence significantly with different degrees. To understand the effect of the mobility of the DNA molecules on the nanoparticle surface, DNA molecules were attached to the surface with two different approaches. Covalently immobilized oligonucleotides decreased the quenching efficiency of nanographene oxide and gold nanoparticles to ∼22% and ∼21%, respectively, whereas noncovalently adsorbed oligonucleotides decreased it to ∼25% and ∼55%, respectively. As a result, we have found that each nanoquencher has a powerful quenching capability against a fluorescent nanoparticle, which can be

  14. A RNA-DNA Hybrid Aptamer for Nanoparticle-Based Prostate Tumor Targeted Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Leach

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The side effects of radio- and chemo-therapy pose long-term challenges on a cancer patient’s health. It is, therefore, highly desirable to develop more effective therapies that can specifically target carcinoma cells without damaging normal and healthy cells. Tremendous efforts have been made in the past to develop targeted drug delivery systems for solid cancer treatment. In this study, a new aptamer, A10-3-J1, which recognizes the extracellular domain of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA, was designed. A super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-aptamer-doxorubicin (SPIO-Apt-Dox was fabricated and employed as a targeted drug delivery platform for cancer therapy. This DNA RNA hybridized aptamer antitumor agent was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of targeted cells while minimizing collateral damage to non-targeted cells. This SPIO-Apt-Dox nanoparticle has specificity to PSMA+ prostate cancer cells. Aptamer inhibited nonspecific uptake of membrane-permeable doxorubic to the non-target cells, leading to reduced untargeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake while enhancing targeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake. The experimental results indicate that the drug delivery platform can yield statistically significant effectiveness being more cytotoxic to the targeted cells as opposed to the non-targeted cells.

  15. FRET enhancement close to gold nanoparticles positioned in DNA origami constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aissaoui, Nesrine; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Käll, Mikael; Johansson, Peter; Wilhelmsson, L Marcus; Albinsson, Bo

    2017-01-05

    Here we investigate the energy transfer rates of a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) pair positioned in close proximity to a 5 nm gold nanoparticle (AuNP) on a DNA origami construct. We study the distance dependence of the FRET rate by varying the location of the donor molecule, D, relative to the AuNP while maintaining a fixed location of the acceptor molecule, A. The presence of the AuNP induces an alteration in the spontaneous emission of the donor (including radiative and non-radiative rates) which is strongly dependent on the distance between the donor and AuNP surface. Simultaneously, the energy transfer rates are enhanced at shorter D-A (and D-AuNP) distances. Overall, in addition to the direct influence of the acceptor and AuNP on the donor decay there is also a significant increase in decay rate not explained by the sum of the two interactions. This leads to enhanced energy transfer between donor and acceptor in the presence of a 5 nm AuNP. We also demonstrate that the transfer rate in the three "particle" geometry (D + A + AuNP) depends approximately linearly on the transfer rate in the donor-AuNP system, suggesting the possibility to control FRET process with electric field induced by 5 nm AuNPs close to the donor fluorophore. It is concluded that DNA origami is a very versatile platform for studying interactions between molecules and plasmonic nanoparticles in general and FRET enhancement in particular.

  16. Formulation, characterization, and expression of a recombinant MOMP Chlamydia trachomatis DNA vaccine encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cambridge CD

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chino D Cambridge, Shree R Singh, Alain B Waffo, Stacie J Fairley, Vida A DennisCenter for NanoBiotechnology Research (CNBR, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL, USAAbstract: Chlamydia trachomatis is a bacterial sexually transmitted infection affecting millions of people worldwide. Previous vaccination attempts have employed the recombinant major outer membrane protein (MOMP of C. trachomatis nonetheless, with limited success, perhaps, due to stability, degradation, and delivery issues. In this study we cloned C. trachomatis recombinant MOMP DNA (DMOMP and encapsulated it in chitosan nanoparticles (DMCNP using the complex coacervation technique. Physiochemical characterizations of DMCNP included transmission and scanning electron microcopy, Fourier transform infrared and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and zeta potential. Encapsulated DMOMP was 167–250 nm, with a uniform spherical shape and homogenous morphology, and an encapsulation efficiency > 90%. A slow release pattern of encapsulated DMOMP, especially in acidic solution, was observed over 7 days. The zeta potential of DMCNP was ~8.80 mV, which indicated that it was highly stable. Toxicity studies of DMCNP (25–400 µg/mL to Cos-7 cells using the MTT assay revealed minimal toxicity over 24–72 hours with >90% viable cells. Ultra-violet visible (UV-vis spectra indicated encapsulated DMOMP protection by chitosan, whereas agarose gel electrophoresis verified its protection from enzymatic degradation. Expression of MOMP protein in DMCNP-transfected Cos-7 cells was demonstrated via Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Significantly, intramuscular injection of BALB/c mice with DMCNP confirmed the delivery of encapsulated DMOMP, and expression of the MOMP gene transcript in thigh muscles and spleens. Our data show that encapsulation of DMOMP in biodegradable chitosan nanoparticles imparts stability and protection from enzymatic digestion, and enhances delivery and

  17. Sensitive DNA impedance biosensor for detection of cancer, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, based on gold nanoparticles/gold modified electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Taei, M.; Rahmani, H.R.; Khayamian, T.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Chronic lymphocytic leukemia causes an increase in the number of white blood cells. → We introduced a highly sensitive biosensor for the detection of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. → A suitable 25-mer ssDNA probe was immobilized on the surface of the gold nanoparticles. → We used electrochemical impedance spectroscopy as a suitable tool for the detection. → Detection of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in blood sample was checked using the sensor. - Abstract: A simple and sensitive DNA impedance sensor was prepared for the detection of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The DNA electrochemical biosensor is worked based on the electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) detection of the sequence-specific DNA related to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The ssDNA probe was immobilized on the surface of the gold nanoparticles. Compared to the bare gold electrode, the gold nanoparticles-modified electrode could improve the density of the probe DNA attachment and hence the sensitivity of the DNA sensor greatly. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were performed in a solution containing 1.0 mmol L -1 K 3 [Fe(CN) 6 ]/K 4 [Fe(CN) 6 ] and 50 mmol L -1 phosphate buffer saline pH 6.87 plus 50 mmol L -1 KCl. In the CV studied, the potential was cycled from 0.0 to +0.65 V with a scan rate of 50 mV s -1 . Using EIS, the difference of the electron transfer resistance (ΔR et ) was linear with the logarithm of the complementary oligonucleotides sequence concentrations in the range of 7.0 x 10 -12 -2.0 x 10 -7 mol L -1 , with a detection limit of 1.0 x 10 -12 mol L -1 . In addition, the DNA sensor showed a good reproducibility and stability during repeated regeneration and hybridization cycles.

  18. Terahertz acoustic phonon detection from a compact surface layer of spherical nanoparticles powder mixture of aluminum, alumina and multi-walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouelsayed, A.; Ebrahim, M. R.; El hotaby, W.; Hassan, S. A.; Al-Ashkar, Emad

    2017-10-01

    We present terahertz spectroscopy study on spherical nanoparticles powder mixture of aluminum, alumina, and MWCNTs induced by surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) of aluminum substrates. Surface alloying of AL, Al2O3 0.95% and MWCNTs 0.05% powder mixture was produced during SMAT process, where a compact surface layer of about 200 μm due to ball bombardment was produced from the mixture. Al2O3 alumina powder played a significant role in MWCNTs distribution on surface, those were held in deformation surface cites of micro-cavities due to SMAT process of Al. The benefits are the effects on resulted optical properties of the surface studied at the terahertz frequency range due to electrical isolation confinement effects and electronic resonance disturbances exerted on Al electronic resonance at the same range of frequencies. THz acoustic phonon around 0.53-0.6 THz (17-20 cm-1) were observed at ambient conditions for the spherical nanoparticles powder mixture of Al, Al2O3 and MWCNTs. These results suggested that the presence of Al2O3 and MWCNTs during SMAT process leads to the optically detection of such acoustic phonon in the THz frequency range.

  19. In vitro transcription and translation inhibition via DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conde, J; Baptista, P V; De la Fuente, J M

    2010-01-01

    The use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been gaining momentum as vectors for gene silencing strategies, combining the AuNPs' ease of functionalization with DNA and/or siRNA, high loading capacity and fast uptake by target cells. Here, we used AuNP functionalized with thiolated oligonucleotides to specifically inhibit transcription in vitro, demonstrating the synergetic effect between AuNPs and a specific antisense sequence that blocks the T7 promoter region. Also, AuNPs efficiently protect the antisense oligonucleotide against nuclease degradation, which can thus retain its inhibitory potential. In addition, we demonstrate that AuNPs functionalized with a thiolated oligonucleotide complementary to the ribosome binding site and the start codon, effectively shut down in vitro translation. Together, these two approaches can provide for a simple yet robust experimental set up to test for efficient gene silencing of AuNP-DNA conjugates. What is more, these results show that appropriate functionalization of AuNPs can be used as a dual targeting approach to an enhanced control of gene expression-inhibition of both transcription and translation.

  20. In vitro transcription and translation inhibition via DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conde, J; Baptista, P V [Centro de Investigacao em Genetica Molecular Humana (CIGMH), Departamento de Ciencias da Vida, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); De la Fuente, J M, E-mail: pmvb@fct.unl.pt [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2010-12-17

    The use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been gaining momentum as vectors for gene silencing strategies, combining the AuNPs' ease of functionalization with DNA and/or siRNA, high loading capacity and fast uptake by target cells. Here, we used AuNP functionalized with thiolated oligonucleotides to specifically inhibit transcription in vitro, demonstrating the synergetic effect between AuNPs and a specific antisense sequence that blocks the T7 promoter region. Also, AuNPs efficiently protect the antisense oligonucleotide against nuclease degradation, which can thus retain its inhibitory potential. In addition, we demonstrate that AuNPs functionalized with a thiolated oligonucleotide complementary to the ribosome binding site and the start codon, effectively shut down in vitro translation. Together, these two approaches can provide for a simple yet robust experimental set up to test for efficient gene silencing of AuNP-DNA conjugates. What is more, these results show that appropriate functionalization of AuNPs can be used as a dual targeting approach to an enhanced control of gene expression-inhibition of both transcription and translation.

  1. Multiplexed colorimetric detection of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus and Bartonella DNA using gold and silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Matthew; Jiang, Li; Cesarman, Ethel; Erickson, David

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is an infectious cancer occurring most commonly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients and in endemic regions, such as Sub-Saharan Africa, where KS is among the top four most prevalent cancers. The cause of KS is the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, also called HHV-8), an oncogenic herpesvirus that while routinely diagnosed in developed nations, provides challenges to developing world medical providers and point-of-care detection. A major challenge in the diagnosis of KS is the existence of a number of other diseases with similar clinical presentation and histopathological features, requiring the detection of KSHV in a biopsy sample. In this work we develop an answer to this challenge by creating a multiplexed one-pot detection system for KSHV DNA and DNA from a frequently confounding disease, bacillary angiomatosis. Gold and silver nanoparticle aggregation reactions are tuned for each target and a multi-color change system is developed capable of detecting both targets down to levels between 1 nM and 2 nM. The system developed here could later be integrated with microfluidic sample processing to create a final device capable of solving the two major challenges in point-of-care KS detection.

  2. Assembling high activity phosphotriesterase composites using hybrid nanoparticle peptide-DNA scaffolded architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breger, Joyce C.; Buckhout-White, Susan; Walper, Scott A.; Oh, Eunkeu; Susumu, Kimihiro; Ancona, Mario G.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2017-06-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) display potentially offers a new way to both stabilize and, in many cases, enhance enzyme activity over that seen for native protein in solution. However, the large, globular and sometimes multimeric nature of many enzymes limits their ability to attach directly to the surface of NPs, especially when the latter are colloidally stabilized with bulky PEGylated ligands. Engineering extended protein linkers into the enzymes to achieve direct attachment through the PEG surface often detrimentally alters the enzymes catalytic ability. Here, we demonstrate an alternate, hybrid biomaterials-based approach to achieving directed enzyme assembly on PEGylated NPs. We self-assemble a unique architecture consisting of a central semiconductor quantum dot (QD) scaffold displaying controlled ratios of extended peptide-DNA linkers which penetrate through the PEG surface to directly couple enzymes to the QD surface. As a test case, we utilize phosphotriesterase (PTE), an enzyme of bio-defense interest due to its ability to hydrolyze organophosphate nerve agents. Moreover, this unique approach still allows PTE to maintain enhanced activity while also suggesting the ability of DNA to enhance enzyme activity in and of itself.

  3. Oral Gene Application Using Chitosan-DNA Nanoparticles Induces Transferable Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensminger, Stephan M.; Spriewald, Bernd M.

    2012-01-01

    Oral tolerance is a promising approach to induce unresponsiveness to various antigens. The development of tolerogenic vaccines could be exploited in modulating the immune response in autoimmune disease and allograft rejection. In this study, we investigated a nonviral gene transfer strategy for inducing oral tolerance via antigen-encoding chitosan-DNA nanoparticles (NP). Oral application of ovalbumin (OVA)-encoding chitosan-DNA NP (OVA-NP) suppressed the OVA-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response and anti-OVA antibody formation, as well as spleen cell proliferation following OVA stimulation. Cytokine expression patterns following OVA stimulation in vitro showed a shift from a Th1 toward a Th2/Th3 response. The OVA-NP-induced tolerance was transferable from donor to naïve recipient mice via adoptive spleen cell transfer and was mediated by CD4+CD25+ T cells. These findings indicate that nonviral oral gene transfer can induce regulatory T cells for antigen-specific immune modulation. PMID:22933401

  4. Lipofection of plasmid DNA into human mast cell lines using lipid nanoparticles generated by microfluidic mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguay, Brett A; Huang, Kate Wei-Chen; Kulka, Marianna

    2018-04-18

    Mast cells are important immune cells that have significant roles in mediating allergy and asthma. Therefore, studying the molecular mechanisms regulating these and other processes in mast cells is important to elucidate. Methods such as lipofection, transduction, and electroporation are often employed to dissect these mechanisms by disrupting gene expression in mast cell lines. However, as with other leukocytes, human mast cells (HMCs) are often refractory to the delivery of plasmids by lipofection. In this study, we investigated the utility of lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) containing the ionizable cationic lipids 1,2-dioleoyloxy-3-dimethylaminopropane, 1,2-dioleyloxy-3-dimethylaminopropane, or 2,2-dilinoleyl-4-(2-dimethylaminoethyl)-[1,3]-dioxolane for the delivery of plasmid DNA into HMC lines. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time the use of LNPs to achieve significant and reproducible levels of plasmid DNA transfection in HMC-1.2 and laboratory of allergic diseases 2 (LAD2) cells. These levels reached 53.2% and 16.0% in HMC-1.2 and LAD2 cells, respectively; and outperformed Lipofectamine 3000 in both cases. Moreover, cell viability in the transfected cells remained above 65% for all LNP conditions tested. Together, these observations illustrate the efficacy of this technique for mast cell researchers and further support the use of LNPs for nucleic acid delivery into leukocytes. ©2018 Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  5. Nanoparticle-mediated rhodopsin cDNA but not intron-containing DNA delivery causes transgene silencing in a rhodopsin knockout model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Min; Mitra, Rajendra N; Filonov, Nazar A; Han, Zongchao

    2016-03-01

    Previously, we compared the efficacy of nanoparticle (NP)-mediated intron-containing rhodopsin (sgRho) vs. intronless cDNA in ameliorating retinal disease phenotypes in a rhodopsin knockout (RKO) mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. We showed that NP-mediated sgRho delivery achieved long-term expression and phenotypic improvement in RKO mice, but not NP housing cDNA. However, the protein level of the NP-sgRho construct was only 5-10% of wild-type at 8 mo postinjection. To have a better understanding of the reduced levels of long-term expression of the vectors, in the present study, we evaluated the epigenetic changes of subretinal delivering NP-cDNA vs. NP-sgRho in the RKO mouse eyes. Following the administration, DNA methylation and histone status of specific regions (bacteria plasmid backbone, promoter, rhodopsin gene, and scaffold/matrix attachment region) of the vectors were evaluated at various time points. We documented that epigenetic transgene silencing occurred in vector-mediated gene transfer, which were caused by the plasmid backbone and the cDNA of the transgene, but not the intron-containing transgene. No toxicity or inflammation was found in the treated eyes. Our results suggest that cDNA of the rhodopsin transgene and bacteria backbone interfered with the host defense mechanism of DNA methylation-mediated transgene silencing through heterochromatin-associated modifications. © FASEB.

  6. DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticle-based fluorescence polarization for the sensitive detection of silver ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gongke; Wang, Shuangli; Yan, Changling; Bai, Guangyue; Liu, Yufang

    2018-04-05

    Despite their practical applications, Ag + ions are environmental pollutants and affect human health. So the effective detection methods of Ag + ions are imperative. Herein, we developed a simple, sensitive, selective, and cost-effective fluorescence polarization sensor for Ag + detection in aqueous solution using thiol-DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). In this sensing strategy, Ag + ions can specifically interact with a cytosine-cytosine (CC) mismatch in DNA duplexes and form stable metal-mediated cytosine-Ag + -cytosine (C-Ag + -C) base pairs. The formation of the C-Ag + -C complex results in evident changes in the molecular volume and fluorescence polarization signal. To achieve our aims, we prepared two complementary DNA strands containing C-base mismatches (probe A: 5'-SH-A 10 -TACCACTCCTCAC-3' and probe B: 5'-TCCTCACCAGTCCTA-FAM-3'). The stable hybridization between probe A and probe B occurs with the formation of the C-Ag + -C complex in the presence of Ag + ions, leading to obvious fluorescence quenching in comparison to the system without AuNP enhancement. The assay can be used to identify nanomolar levels of Ag + within 6 min at room temperature, and has extremely high specificity for Ag + , even in the presence of higher concentrations of interfering metal ions. Furthermore, the sensor was successfully applied to the detection of Ag + ions in environmental water samples and showed excellent selectivity and high sensitivity, implying its promising application in the future. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Nanotechnology in plant disease management: DNA-directed silver nanoparticles on graphene oxide as an antibacterial against Xanthomonas perforans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocsoy, Ismail; Paret, Mathews L; Ocsoy, Muserref Arslan; Kunwar, Sanju; Chen, Tao; You, Mingxu; Tan, Weihong

    2013-10-22

    Bacterial spot caused by Xanthomonas perforans is a major disease of tomatoes, leading to reduction in production by 10-50%. While copper (Cu)-based bactericides have been used for disease management, most of the X. perforans strains isolated from tomatoes in Florida and other locations worldwide are Cu-resistant. We have developed DNA-directed silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) grown on graphene oxide (GO). These Ag@dsDNA@GO composites effectively decrease X. perforans cell viability in culture and on plants. At the very low concentration of 16 ppm of Ag@dsDNA@GO, composites show excellent antibacterial capability in culture with significant advantages in improved stability, enhanced antibacterial activity, and stronger adsorption properties. Application of Ag@dsDNA@GO at 100 ppm on tomato transplants in a greenhouse experiment significantly reduced the severity of bacterial spot disease compared to untreated plants, giving results similar to those of the current grower standard treatment, with no phytotoxicity.

  8. Differential effects of silver nanoparticles on DNA damage and DNA repair gene expression in Ogg1-deficient and wild type mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallanthighal, Sameera; Chan, Cadia; Murray, Thomas M; Mosier, Aaron P; Cady, Nathaniel C; Reliene, Ramune

    2017-10-01

    Due to extensive use in consumer goods, it is important to understand the genotoxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and identify susceptible populations. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1) excises 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2-deoxyguanine (8-oxoG), a pro-mutagenic lesion induced by oxidative stress. To understand whether defects in OGG1 is a possible genetic factor increasing an individual's susceptibly to AgNPs, we determined DNA damage, genome rearrangements, and expression of DNA repair genes in Ogg1-deficient and wild type mice exposed orally to 4 mg/kg of citrate-coated AgNPs over a period of 7 d. DNA damage was examined at 3 and 7 d of exposure and 7 and 14 d post-exposure. AgNPs induced 8-oxoG, double strand breaks (DSBs), chromosomal damage, and DNA deletions in both genotypes. However, 8-oxoG was induced earlier in Ogg1-deficient mice and 8-oxoG levels were higher after 7-d treatment and persisted longer after exposure termination. AgNPs downregulated DNA glycosylases Ogg1, Neil1, and Neil2 in wild type mice, but upregulated Myh, Neil1, and Neil2 glycosylases in Ogg1-deficient mice. Neil1 and Neil2 can repair 8-oxoG. Thus, AgNP-mediated downregulation of DNA glycosylases in wild type mice may contribute to genotoxicity, while upregulation thereof in Ogg1-deficient mice could serve as an adaptive response to AgNP-induced DNA damage. However, our data show that Ogg1 is indispensable for the efficient repair of AgNP-induced damage. In summary, citrate-coated AgNPs are genotoxic in both genotypes and Ogg1 deficiency exacerbates the effect. These data suggest that humans with genetic polymorphisms and mutations in OGG1 may have increased susceptibility to AgNP-mediated DNA damage.

  9. Molecular beacon based biosensor for the sequence-specific detection of DNA using DNA-capped gold nanoparticles-streptavidin conjugates for signal amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Xian; Jiang, Wei; Han, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yuzhong

    2013-01-01

    We describe a highly sensitive and selective molecular beacon-based electrochemical impedance biosensor for the sequence-specific detection of DNA. DNA-capped conjugates between gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) and streptavidin are used for signal amplification. The molecular beacon was labeled with a thiol at its 5′ end and with biotin at its 3′ end, and then immobilized on the surface of a bare gold electrode through the formation of Au-S bonds. Initially, the molecular beacon is present in the “closed” state, and this shields the biotin from being approached by streptavidin due to steric hindrance. In the presence of the target DNA, the target DNA molecules hybridize with the loop and cause a conformational change that moves the biotin away from the surface of the electrode. The biotin thereby becomes accessible for the reporter (the DNA-streptavidin capped Au-NPs), and this results in a distinct increase in electron transfer resistance. Under optimal conditions, the increase in resistance is linearly related to the logarithm of the concentration of complementary target DNA in the range from 1.0 fM to 0.1 μM, with a detection limit of 0.35 fM (at an S/N of 3). This biosensor exhibits good selectivity, and acceptable stability and reproducibility. (author)

  10. Development and application of compact and on-chip electron linear accelerators for dynamic tracking cancer therapy and DNA damage/repair analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesaka, M.; Demachi, K.; Fujiwara, T.; Dobashi, K.; Fujisawa, H.; Chhatkuli, R. B.; Tsuda, A.; Tanaka, S.; Matsumura, Y.; Otsuki, S.; Kusano, J.; Yamamoto, M.; Nakamura, N.; Tanabe, E.; Koyama, K.; Yoshida, M.; Fujimori, R.; Yasui, A.

    2015-06-01

    We are developing compact electron linear accelerators (hereafter linac) with high RF (Radio Frequency) frequency (9.3 GHz, wavelength 32.3 mm) of X-band and applying to medicine and non-destructive testing. Especially, potable 950 keV and 3.95 MeV linac X-ray sources have been developed for on-site transmission testing at several industrial plants and civil infrastructures including bridges. 6 MeV linac have been made for pinpoint X-ray dynamic tracking cancer therapy. The length of the accelerating tube is ∼600 mm. The electron beam size at the X-ray target is less than 1 mm and X-ray spot size at the cancer is less than 3 mm. Several hardware and software are under construction for dynamic tracking therapy for moving lung cancer. Moreover, as an ultimate compact linac, we are designing and manufacturing a laser dielectric linac of ∼1 MeV with Yr fiber laser (283 THz, wavelength 1.06 pm). Since the wavelength is 1.06 μm, the length of one accelerating strcture is tens pm and the electron beam size is in sub-micro meter. Since the sizes of cell and nuclear are about 10 and 1 μm, respectively, we plan to use this “On-chip” linac for radiation-induced DNA damage/repair analysis. We are thinking a system where DNA in a nucleus of cell is hit by ∼1 μm electron or X-ray beam and observe its repair by proteins and enzymes in live cells in-situ.

  11. A duplex DNA-gold nanoparticle probe composed as a colorimetric biosensor for sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Junho; Choi, Yeonweon; Lee, Ae-Ree; Lee, Joon-Hwa; Jung, Jong Hwa

    2016-03-21

    Using duplex DNA-AuNP aggregates, a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein, SQUAMOSA Promoter-binding-Like protein 12 (SPL-12), was directly determined by SPL-12-duplex DNA interaction-based colorimetric actions of DNA-Au assemblies. In order to prepare duplex DNA-Au aggregates, thiol-modified DNA 1 and DNA 2 were attached onto the surface of AuNPs, respectively, by the salt-aging method and then the DNA-attached AuNPs were mixed. Duplex-DNA-Au aggregates having the average size of 160 nm diameter and the maximum absorption at 529 nm were able to recognize SPL-12 and reached the equivalent state by the addition of ∼30 equivalents of SPL-12 accompanying a color change from red to blue with a red shift of the maximum absorption at 570 nm. As a result, the aggregation size grew to about 247 nm. Also, at higher temperatures of the mixture of duplex-DNA-Au aggregate solution and SPL-12, the equivalent state was reached rapidly. On the contrary, in the control experiment using Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA), no absorption band shift of duplex-DNA-Au aggregates was observed.

  12. DNA-dependent protein kinase modulates the anti-cancer properties of silver nanoparticles in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hui Kheng; Gurung, Resham Lal; Hande, M Prakash

    2017-12-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-np) were reported to be toxic to eukaryotic cells. These potentially detrimental effects of Ag-np can be advantageous in experimental therapeutics. They are currently being employed to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of cancer drugs. In this study, we demonstrate that Ag-np treatment trigger the activation of DNA-PKcs and JNK pathway at selected doses, presumably as a physiologic response to DNA damage and repair in normal and malignant cells. Ag-np altered the telomere dynamics by disrupting the shelterin complex located at the telomeres and telomere lengths. The genotoxic effect of Ag-np was not restricted to telomeres but the entire genome as Ag-np induced γ-H2AX foci formation, an indicator of global DNA damage. Inhibition of DNA-PKcs activity sensitised the cancer cells towards the cytotoxicity of Ag-np and substantiated the damaging effect of Ag-np at telomeres in human cancer cells. Abrogation of JNK mediated DNA repair and extensive damage of telomeres led to greater cell death following Ag-np treatment in DNA-PKcs inhibited cancer cells. Collectively, this study suggests that improved anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effects of Ag-np treatment in cancer cells can be achieved by the inhibition of DNA-PKcs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. DNA Three-Way Junction for Differentiation of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms with Fluorescent Copper Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feifei; You, Ying; Liu, Jie; Song, Quanwei; Shen, Xiaotong; Na, Na; Ouyang, Jin

    2017-05-23

    A label- and enzyme-free fluorescent sensor for the detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at room temperature is proposed, using new copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) as fluorescent reporters. The CuNPs were constructed by using a DNA three-way junction (3WJ) template. In this assay, two complementary adenine/thymine-rich probes can hybridize with the wild-type target simultaneously to construct a 3WJ structure, serving as an efficient scaffold for the generation of CuNPs. However, the CuNPs produce weak fluorescence when the probes bind with a mutant-type target. SNPs can be identified by the difference in fluorescence intensity of the CuNPs. This SNPs detection strategy is straightforward, cost-effective, and avoids the complicated procedures of labeling or enzymatic reactions. The fluorescent sensor is versatile and can be applied to all types of mutation because the probes are programmable. Moreover, the sensor exhibits good detection performance in biological samples. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Visual detection of Brucella in bovine biological samples using DNA-activated gold nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dheeraj Pal

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a bacterial disease, which, although affecting cattle primarily, has been associated with human infections, making its detection an important challenge. The existing gold standard diagnosis relies on the culture of bacteria which is a lengthy and costly process, taking up to 45 days. New technologies based on molecular diagnosis have been proposed, either through dip-stick, immunological assays, which have limited specificity, or using nucleic acid tests, which enable to identify the pathogen, but are impractical for use in the field, where most of the reservoir cases are located. Here we demonstrate a new test based on hybridization assays with metal nanoparticles, which, upon detection of a specific pathogen-derived DNA sequence, yield a visual colour change. We characterise the components used in the assay with a range of analytical techniques and show sensitivities down to 1000 cfu/ml for the detection of Brucella. Finally, we demonstrate that the assay works in a range of bovine samples including semen, milk and urine, opening up the potential for its use in the field, in low-resource settings.

  15. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the chlorophycean green alga Scenedesmus obliquus reveals a compact gene organization and a biased distribution of genes on the two DNA strands

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cambiaire, Jean-Charles; Otis, Christian; Lemieux, Claude; Turmel, Monique

    2006-01-01

    Background The phylum Chlorophyta contains the majority of the green algae and is divided into four classes. While the basal position of the Prasinophyceae is well established, the divergence order of the Ulvophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae and Chlorophyceae (UTC) remains uncertain. The five complete chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) sequences currently available for representatives of these classes display considerable variability in overall structure, gene content, gene density, intron content and gene order. Among these genomes, that of the chlorophycean green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has retained the least ancestral features. The two single-copy regions, which are separated from one another by the large inverted repeat (IR), have similar sizes, rather than unequal sizes, and differ radically in both gene contents and gene organizations relative to the single-copy regions of prasinophyte and ulvophyte cpDNAs. To gain insights into the various changes that underwent the chloroplast genome during the evolution of chlorophycean green algae, we have sequenced the cpDNA of Scenedesmus obliquus, a member of a distinct chlorophycean lineage. Results The 161,452 bp IR-containing genome of Scenedesmus features single-copy regions of similar sizes, encodes 96 genes, i.e. only two additional genes (infA and rpl12) relative to its Chlamydomonas homologue and contains seven group I and two group II introns. It is clearly more compact than the four UTC algal cpDNAs that have been examined so far, displays the lowest proportion of short repeats among these algae and shows a stronger bias in clustering of genes on the same DNA strand compared to Chlamydomonas cpDNA. Like the latter genome, Scenedesmus cpDNA displays only a few ancestral gene clusters. The two chlorophycean genomes share 11 gene clusters that are not found in previously sequenced trebouxiophyte and ulvophyte cpDNAs as well as a few genes that have an unusual structure; however, their single-copy regions differ

  16. Rapid colorimetric assay for detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food samples using LAMP formation of DNA concatemers and gold nanoparticle-DNA probe complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachiralurpan, Sirirat; Sriyapai, Thayat; Areekit, Supatra; Sriyapai, Pichapak; Augkarawaritsawong, Suphitcha; Santiwatanakul, Somchai; Chansiri, Kosum

    2018-04-01

    ABSTRACT Listeria monocytogenes is a major foodborne pathogen of global health concern. Herein, the rapid diagnosis of L. monocytogenes has been achieved using loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) based on the phosphatidylcholine-phospholipase C gene (plcB). Colorimetric detection was then performed through the formation of DNA concatemers and a gold nanoparticle/DNA probe complex (GNP/DNA probe). The overall detection process was accomplished within approximately 1 h with no need for complicated equipment. The limits of detection for L. monocytogenes in the forms of purified genomic DNA and pure culture were 800 fg and 2.82 CFU mL-1, respectively. No cross reactions were observed from closely related bacteria species. The LAMP-GNP/DNA probe assay was applied to the detection of 200 raw chicken meat samples and compared to routine standard methods. The data revealed that the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy were 100%, 90.20% and 97.50%, respectively. The present assay was 100% in conformity with LAMP-agarose gel electrophoresis assay. Five samples that were negative by both assays appeared to have the pathogen at below the level of detection. The assay can be applied as a rapid direct screening method for L. monocytogenes.

  17. Graphene oxide directed in-situ deposition of electroactive silver nanoparticles and its electrochemical sensing application for DNA analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Ningning [College of Chemistry and Environment, Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Modern Analytical Science and Separation Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou, 363000 (China); Gao, Feng, E-mail: fgao1981@mnnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Environment, Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Modern Analytical Science and Separation Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou, 363000 (China); Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Shimane University, 1060 Nishikawatsu, Matsue, Shimane, 690-8504 (Japan); He, Suyu; Zhu, Qionghua; Huang, Jiafu [College of Chemistry and Environment, Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Modern Analytical Science and Separation Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou, 363000 (China); Tanaka, Hidekazu [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Shimane University, 1060 Nishikawatsu, Matsue, Shimane, 690-8504 (Japan); Wang, Qingxiang, E-mail: axiang236@126.com [College of Chemistry and Environment, Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Modern Analytical Science and Separation Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou, 363000 (China)

    2017-01-25

    The development of high-performance biosensing platform is heavily dependent on the recognition property of the sensing layer and the output intensity of the signal probe. Herein, we present a simple and highly sensitive biosensing interface for DNA detection on the basis of graphene oxide nanosheets (GONs) directed in-situ deposition of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The fabrication process and electrochemical properties of the biosensing interface were probed by electrochemical techniques and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that GONs can specifically adsorb at the single-stranded DNA probe surface, and induces the deposition of highly electroactive AgNPs. Upon hybridization with complementary oligonucleotides to generate the duplex DNA on the electrode surface, the GONs with the deposited AgNPs will be liberated from the sensing interface due to the inferior affinity of GONs and duplex DNA, resulting in the reduction of the electrochemical signal. Such a strategy combines the superior recognition of GONs toward single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA, and the strong electrochemical response of in-situ deposited AgNPs. Under optimal conditions, the biosensor can detect target DNA over a wide range from 10 fM to 10 nM with a detection limit of 7.6 fM. Also, the developed biosensor shows outstanding discriminating ability toward oligonucleotides with different mismatching degrees. - Highlights: • An novel DNA biosensor was constructed based on GONs with deposited AgNPs. • GONs catalyze the in-situ deposition of AgNPs on the sensing interface. • Unique π-stacking of GONs with probe DNA contributes high selectivity of the biosensor. • High electroactivity of AgNPs leads to low detection limit (7.6 fM) for target DNA.

  18. Topical Administration Is a Promising Inoculating Route versus Intramuscular Inoculation for the Nanoparticle-Carried DNA Vaccine to Prevent Corneal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kai; Malla, Tejsu; Zhai, Yujia; Dong, Lili; Tang, Ru

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the comparative effect of topical versus intramuscular administration of nanoparticle-carried DNA vaccine in preventing corneal herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. Nanoparticle [polyethylenimine (PEI)-Fe3O4]-carried DNA vaccine (PEI-Fe3O4-pRSC-gD-IL-21) or DNA vaccine (pRSC-gD-IL-21) alone were topically versus intramuscularly inoculated into one eye each of mice on days 0, 14 and 28. Three weeks after the final immunization, the specific immune responses and clinical degrees of primary herpes simplex keratitis were evaluated. Topical inoculation of nanoparticle-carried DNA vaccine induced mice to generate similar levels of specific HSV-1-neutralizing antibody, IFN-γ and IL-4 in serum and specific killing (cytotoxicity) and proliferative activities of the splenic lymphocytes, but a significantly higher level of secretory IgA in tears compared to those of intramuscular inoculation. More importantly, the mice inoculated topically showed a significantly decreased herpes simplex keratitis severity than the mice inoculated intramuscularly after HSV-1 challenge on the corneas of the mice. Topical inoculation of nanoparticle-carried DNA vaccine elicits a stronger specific local immune response and more effectively inhibits herpes simplex keratitis as compared to intramuscular inoculation in an HSV-1 ocular challenge mouse model. Thus, topical administration may be a promising inoculating route for the nanoparticle-carried DNA vaccine to prevent corneal infections. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Chamomile flower extract-directed CuO nanoparticle formation for its antioxidant and DNA cleavage properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duman, Fatih, E-mail: fduman@erciyes.edu.tr [Erciyes University, Science Faculty, Biology Department, Kayseri 38039, Kayseri (Turkey); Ocsoy, Ismail [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Erciyes University, 38039, Kayseri (Turkey); Erciyes University, Nanotechnology Research Center, 38039, Kayseri (Turkey); Kup, Fatma Ozturk [Erciyes University, Science Faculty, Biology Department, Kayseri 38039, Kayseri (Turkey)

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we report the synthesis of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) using a medicinal plant (Matricaria chamomilla) flower extract as both reducing and capping agent and investigate their antioxidant activity and interaction with plasmid DNA (pBR322).The CuO NPs were characterized using Uv–Vis spectroscopy, FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), DLS (dynamic light scattering), XRD (X-ray diffraction), EDX (energy-dispersive X-ray) spectroscopy and SEM (scanning electron microscopy). The CuO NPs exhibited nearly mono-distributed and spherical shapes with diameters of 140 nm size. UV–Vis absorption spectrum of CuO NPs gave a broad peak around 285 and 320 nm. The existence of functional groups on the surface of CuO NPs was characterized with FT-IR analysis. XRD pattern showed that the NPs are in the form of a face-centered cubic crystal. Zeta potential value was measured as − 20 mV due to the presence of negatively charged functional groups in plant extract. Additionally, we demonstrated concentration-dependent antioxidant activity of CuO NPs and their interaction with plasmid DNA. We assumed that the CuO NPs both cleave and break DNA double helix structure. - Highlights: • The synthesis of microwave assisted green synthesis of CuO nanoparticles • The synthesized nanoparticles were analyzed by FT-IR, DLS, XRD, EDX and SEM. • Concentration-dependent antioxidant activity of CuO NPs was determined. • CuO NPs cause both cleavage in the DNA double helix structure and breaks as well.

  20. Characterization of coal fly ash nanoparticles and induced oxidative DNA damage in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Ali, Al-Yousef Sulaiman; Musarrat, Javed

    2012-01-01

    The nano-sized particles present in coal fly ash (CFA) were characterized through the X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM, SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses. The XRD data revealed the average crystallite size of the CFA nanoparticles (CFA-NPs) as 14 nm. TEM and SEM imaging demonstrated predominantly spherical and some polymorphic structures in the size range of 11 to 25 nm. The amount of heavy metal associated with CFA particles (μg/g) were determined as Fe (34160.0 ± 1.38), Ni (150.8 ± 0.78), Cu (99.3 ± 0.56) and Cr (64.0 ± 0.86). However, the bioavailability of heavy metals in terms of percent release was in the order as Cr > Ni > Cu > Fe in CFA-dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) extract. The comet and cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assays revealed substantial genomic DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMN) cells treated with CFA-NPs in Aq and DMSO extracts. About 1.8 and 3.6 strand breaks per unit of DNA were estimated through alkaline unwinding assay at 1:100 DNA nucleotide/CFA ppm ratios with the Aq and DMSO extracts, respectively. The DNA and mitochondrial damage was invariably greater with CFA-DMSO extract vis-à-vis -Aq extract. Generation of superoxide anions (O 2 • − ) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) through metal redox-cycling, alteration in mitochondrial potential and 8-oxodG production elucidated CFA-NPs induced oxidative stress as a plausible mechanism for CFA-induced genotoxicity. -- Highlights: ► CFA consists of spherical crystalline nanoparticles in size range of 11–25 nm. ► Alkaline unwinding assay revealed single-strandedness in CFA treated ctDNA. ► CFA nanoparticles exhibited the ability to induce ROS and oxidative DNA damage. ► Comet and CBMN assays revealed DNA and chromosomal breakage in PBMN cells. ► CFA-NPs resulted in mitochondrial membrane damage in PBMN cells.

  1. Characterization of coal fly ash nanoparticles and induced oxidative DNA damage in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A. [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Ali, Al-Yousef Sulaiman [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Applied Medical Science, University of Dammam, P.O. Box 1683, Hafr Al Batin-31991 (Saudi Arabia); Musarrat, Javed, E-mail: musarratj1@yahoo.com [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Agricultural Microbiology, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, AMU, Aligarh202002 (India)

    2012-10-15

    The nano-sized particles present in coal fly ash (CFA) were characterized through the X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM, SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses. The XRD data revealed the average crystallite size of the CFA nanoparticles (CFA-NPs) as 14 nm. TEM and SEM imaging demonstrated predominantly spherical and some polymorphic structures in the size range of 11 to 25 nm. The amount of heavy metal associated with CFA particles ({mu}g/g) were determined as Fe (34160.0 {+-} 1.38), Ni (150.8 {+-} 0.78), Cu (99.3 {+-} 0.56) and Cr (64.0 {+-} 0.86). However, the bioavailability of heavy metals in terms of percent release was in the order as Cr > Ni > Cu > Fe in CFA-dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) extract. The comet and cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assays revealed substantial genomic DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMN) cells treated with CFA-NPs in Aq and DMSO extracts. About 1.8 and 3.6 strand breaks per unit of DNA were estimated through alkaline unwinding assay at 1:100 DNA nucleotide/CFA ppm ratios with the Aq and DMSO extracts, respectively. The DNA and mitochondrial damage was invariably greater with CFA-DMSO extract vis-a-vis -Aq extract. Generation of superoxide anions (O{sub 2} Bullet {sup -}) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) through metal redox-cycling, alteration in mitochondrial potential and 8-oxodG production elucidated CFA-NPs induced oxidative stress as a plausible mechanism for CFA-induced genotoxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFA consists of spherical crystalline nanoparticles in size range of 11-25 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkaline unwinding assay revealed single-strandedness in CFA treated ctDNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFA nanoparticles exhibited the ability to induce ROS and oxidative DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comet and CBMN assays revealed DNA and chromosomal

  2. Adiabatic differential scanning calorimetric study of divalent cation induced DNA - DPPC liposome formulation compacted for gene delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Süleymanoglu

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Complexes between nucleic acids and phospholipid vesicles have been developed as stable non-viral gene delivery vehicles. Currently employed approach uses positively charged lipid species and a helper zwitterionic lipid, the latter being applied for the stabilization of the whole complex. However, besides problematic steps during their preparation, cationic lipids are toxic for cells. The present work describes some energetic issues pertinent to preparation and use of neutral lipid-DNA self-assemblies, thus avoiding toxicity of lipoplexes. Differential scanning calorimetry data showed stabilization of polynucleotide helix upon its interaction with liposomes in the presence of divalent metal cations. It is thus possible to suggest this self-assembly as an improved formulation for use in gene delivery.

  3. Gold surface supported spherical liposome-gold nano-particle nano-composite for label free DNA sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvana, M; Narayanan, J Shankara; Dharuman, V; Teng, W; Hahn, J H; Jayakumar, K

    2013-03-15

    Immobilization of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) liposome-gold nano-particle (DOPE-AuNP) nano-composite covalently on 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) on gold surface is demonstrated for the first time for electrochemical label free DNA sensing. Spherical nature of the DOPE on the MPA monolayer is confirmed by the appearance of sigmoidal voltammetric profile, characteristic behavior of linear diffusion, for the MPA-DOPE in presence of [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-) and [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+) redox probes. The DOPE liposome vesicle fusion is prevented by electroless deposition of AuNP on the hydrophilic amine head groups of the DOPE. Immobilization of single stranded DNA (ssDNA) is made via simple gold-thiol linkage for DNA hybridization sensing in the presence of [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-). The sensor discriminates the hybridized (complementary target hybridized), un-hybridized (non-complementary target hybridized) and single base mismatch target hybridized surfaces sensitively and selectively without signal amplification. The lowest target DNA concentration detected is 0.1×10(-12)M. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance (EIS), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) techniques are used for DNA sensing on DOPE-AuNP nano-composite. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV) spectroscopic techniques are used to understand the interactions between the DOPE, AuNP and ssDNA. The results indicate the presence of an intact and well defined spherical DOPE-AuNP nano-composite on the gold surface. The method could be applied for fabrication of the surface based liposome-AuNP-DNA composite for cell transfection studies at reduced reagents and costs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Enhancing the Sensitivity of DNA Microarray Using Dye-Doped Silica Nanoparticles: Detection of Human Papilloma Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enrichi, F.; Riccò, R.; Meneghello, A.; Pierobon, R.; Canton, G.; Cretaio, E.

    2010-10-01

    DNA microarray is a high-throughput technology used for detection and quantification of nucleic acid molecules and others of biological interest. The analysis is based on the specific hybridization between probe sequences deposited in array and a target ss-DNA amplified by PCR and functionalized by a fluorescent dye. Organic labels have well known disadvantages like photobleaching and low signal intensities, which put a limitation to the lower amount of DNA material that can be detected. Therefore for trace analysis the development of more efficient biomarkers is required. With this aim we present in this paper the synthesis and application of alternative hybrid nanosystems obtained by incorporating standard fluorescent molecules into monodisperse silica nanoparticles. Efficient application to the detection of Human Papilloma Virus is demonstrated. This virus is associated to the formation of cervical cancer, a leading cause of death by cancer for women worldwide. It is shown that the use of the novel biomarkers increases the optical signal of about one order of magnitude with respect to the free dyes or quantum dots in conventional instruments. This is due to the high number of molecules that can be accommodated into each nanoparticle, to the reduced photobleaching and to the improved environmental protection of the dyes when encapsulated in the silica matrix. The cheap and easy synthesis of these luminescent particles, the stability in water, the surface functionalizability and bio-compatibility make them very promising for present and future bio-labeling and bio-imaging applications.

  5. Constructing of DNA vectors with controlled nanosize and single dispersion by block copolymer coating gold nanoparticles as template assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Junbo, E-mail: Lijunbo@haust.edu.cn [Henan University of Science and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmaceutics (China); Wu, Wenlan [Henan University of Science and Technology, School of Medicine (China); Gao, Jiayu; Liang, Ju; Zhou, Huiyun; Liang, Lijuan [Henan University of Science and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmaceutics (China)

    2017-03-15

    Synthesized vectors with nanoscale size and stable colloid dispersion are highly desirable for improving gene delivery efficiency. Here, a core-shell template particle was constructed with polyethylene glycol-b-poly1-(3-aminopropyl)-3-(2-methacryloyloxy propylimidazolium bromine) (PEG-b-PAMPImB) coating gold nanoparticles (PEG-b-PAMPImB-@-Au NPs) for loading DNA and delivering in vitro. Data from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) suggest that these nanoplexes, by forming an electrostatic complex with DNA at the inner PAMPImB shell, offer steric protection for the outer PEG corona leading to single dispersion and small size. Notably, higher colloid stability and lower cytotoxicity were achieved with these nanoplexes when compared with PAMPImB monolayer-coated gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Confocal laser scanning microscopy and intracellular trafficking TEM further indicate that the nanoplexes can translocate across the cell membrane and partly enter the nucleus for high efficient expression. Thus, template assembly represents a promising approach to control the size and colloid stability of gene vectors and ensure safety and efficiency of DNA delivery.

  6. Constructing of DNA vectors with controlled nanosize and single dispersion by block copolymer coating gold nanoparticles as template assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junbo; Wu, Wenlan; Gao, Jiayu; Liang, Ju; Zhou, Huiyun; Liang, Lijuan

    2017-03-01

    Synthesized vectors with nanoscale size and stable colloid dispersion are highly desirable for improving gene delivery efficiency. Here, a core-shell template particle was constructed with polyethylene glycol- b-poly1-(3-aminopropyl)-3-(2-methacryloyloxy propylimidazolium bromine) (PEG- b-PAMPImB) coating gold nanoparticles (PEG- b-PAMPImB-@-Au NPs) for loading DNA and delivering in vitro. Data from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) suggest that these nanoplexes, by forming an electrostatic complex with DNA at the inner PAMPImB shell, offer steric protection for the outer PEG corona leading to single dispersion and small size. Notably, higher colloid stability and lower cytotoxicity were achieved with these nanoplexes when compared with PAMPImB monolayer-coated gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Confocal laser scanning microscopy and intracellular trafficking TEM further indicate that the nanoplexes can translocate across the cell membrane and partly enter the nucleus for high efficient expression. Thus, template assembly represents a promising approach to control the size and colloid stability of gene vectors and ensure safety and efficiency of DNA delivery.

  7. PEGylated composite nanoparticles of PLGA and polyethylenimine for safe and efficient delivery of pDNA to lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolte, Atul; Patil, Sushilkumar; Lesimple, Pierre; Hanrahan, John W; Misra, Ambikanandan

    2017-05-30

    Achieving stable, efficient and non-toxic pulmonary gene delivery is most challenging requirement for successful gene therapy to lung. Composite nanoparticles (NPs) of the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and cationic polymer polyethyleneimine (PEI) is an efficient alternative to viral and liposomal vectors for the pulmonary delivery of pDNA. NPs with different weight ratios (0-12.5%w/w) of PLGA/PEI were prepared and characterized for size, morphology, surface charge, pDNA loading and in vitro release. The in vitro cell uptake and transfection studies in the CFBE41o-cell line revealed that NPs with 10% w/w PEI were more efficient but they exhibited significant cytotoxicity in MTT assays, challenging the safety of this formulation. Surface modifications of these composite NPs through PEGylation reduced toxicity and enhanced cellular uptake and pDNA expression. PEGylation improved diffusion of NPs through the mucus barrier and prevented uptake by pulmonary macrophages. Finally, PEGylated composite NPs were converted to DPI by lyophilization and combined with lactose carrier particles, which resulted in improved aerosolization properties and lung deposition, without affecting pDNA bioactivity. This study demonstrates that a multidisciplinary approach may enable the local delivery of pDNA to lung tissue for effective treatment of deadly lung diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficient Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer between Quantum Dots and Gold Nanoparticles Based on Porous Silicon Photonic Crystal for DNA Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyan; Lv, Jie; Jia, Zhenhong

    2017-05-10

    A novel assembled biosensor was prepared for detecting 16S rRNA, a small-size persistent specific for Actinobacteria. The mechanism of the porous silicon (PS) photonic crystal biosensor is based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between quantum dots (QDs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) through DNA hybridization, where QDs act as an emission donor and AuNPs serve as a fluorescence quencher. Results showed that the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of PS photonic crystal was drastically increased when the QDs-conjugated probe DNA was adhered to the PS layer by surface modification using a standard cross-link chemistry method. The PL intensity of QDs was decreased when the addition of AuNPs-conjugated complementary 16S rRNA was dropped onto QDs-conjugated PS. Based on the analysis of different target DNA concentration, it was found that the decrease of the PL intensity showed a good linear relationship with complementary DNA concentration in a range from 0.25 to 10 μM, and the detection limit was 328.7 nM. Such an optical FRET biosensor functions on PS-based photonic crystal for DNA detection that differs from the traditional FRET, which is used only in liquid. This method will benefit the development of a new optical FRET label-free biosensor on Si substrate and has great potential in biochips based on integrated optical devices.

  9. Inhibition of Xenograft tumor growth by gold nanoparticle-DNA oligonucleotide conjugates-assisted delivery of BAX mRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hyun Yeom

    Full Text Available Use of non-biological agents for mRNA delivery into living systems in order to induce heterologous expression of functional proteins may provide more advantages than the use of DNA and/or biological vectors for delivery. However, the low efficiency of mRNA delivery into live animals, using non-biological systems, has hampered the use of mRNA as a therapeutic molecule. Here, we show that gold nanoparticle-DNA oligonucleotide (AuNP-DNA conjugates can serve as universal vehicles for more efficient delivery of mRNA into human cells, as well as into xenograft tumors generated in mice. Injections of BAX mRNA loaded on AuNP-DNA conjugates into xenograft tumors resulted in highly efficient mRNA delivery. The delivered mRNA directed the efficient production of biologically functional BAX protein, a pro-apoptotic factor, consequently inhibiting tumor growth. These results demonstrate that mRNA delivery by AuNP-DNA conjugates can serve as a new platform for the development of safe and efficient gene therapy.

  10. A novel electrochemical approach for nuclear factor kappa B detection based on triplex DNA and gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Min; Yang Mei; Li Hao; Liang Zhiqiang; Li Genxi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A simple, selective, and sensitive electrochemical NF-κB sensor was presented. ► NF-κB was precisely qualified by chronocoulometry with a detection limit of 0.13 nM. ► NF-κB was also successfully detected in contaminated samples by our approach. - Abstract: The transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is always a standard for inducible transcription factors, while nearly all NF-κB studies require the measurement of the level of activated NF-κB in cells. Herein we report a novel electrochemical approach for accurate detection of NF-κB with the help of triplex DNA and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Firstly, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules are self-assembled on the surface of a gold electrode. Then, AuNPs are functionalized with triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO). Since TFO may act with the dsDNA to form triplex DNA, the TFO functionalized on the AuNPs surfaces will bind with the dsDNA immobilized on the electrode surface, bringing large amounts of electrochemical compounds [Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ] 3+ close to the electrode to generate an intense electrochemical signal. However, in the presence of NF-κB, the protein will capture and bind with the dsDNA to replace TFO–AuNPs, resulting in significant decrease of electrochemical signal of [Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ] 3+ . By using this “on-off” strategy, NF-κB has been quantified in the range from 0.4 to 12.0 nM, with a detection limit of 0.13 nM. This approach has also been successfully used to detect NF-κB in contaminated samples with high specificity.

  11. Preclinical detection of porcine circovirus type 2 infection using an ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Huang

    Full Text Available Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 has emerged as one of the most important pathogens affecting swine production globally. Preclinical identification of PCV2 is very important for effective prophylaxis of PCV2-associated diseases. In this study, we developed an ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay (UNDP-PCR for PCV2 detection. Magnetic microparticles coated with PCV2 specific DNA probes were used to enrich PCV2 DNA from samples, then gold nanoparticles coated with PCV2 specific oligonucleotides were added to form a sandwich nucleic acid-complex. After the complex was formed, the oligonucleotides were released and characterized by PCR. This assay exhibited about 500-fold more sensitive than conventional PCR, with a detection limit of 2 copies of purified PCV2 genomic DNA and 10 viral copies of PCV2 in serum. The assay has a wide detection range for all of PCV2 genotypes with reliable reproducibility. No cross-reactivity was observed from the samples of other related viruses including porcine circovirus type 1, porcine parvovirus, porcine pseudorabies virus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and classical swine fever virus. The positive detection rate of PCV2 specific UNDP-PCR in 40 preclinical field samples was 27.5%, which appeared greater than that by conventional and real-time PCR and appeared application potency in evaluation of the viral loads levels of preclinical infection samples. The UNDP-PCR assay reported here can reliably rule out false negative results from antibody-based assays, provide a nucleic acid extraction free, specific, ultrasensitive, economic and rapid diagnosis method for preclinical PCV2 infection in field, which may help prevent large-scale outbreaks.

  12. A nonviral DNA delivery system based on surface modified silica-nanoparticles can efficiently transfect cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneuer, C; Sameti, M; Bakowsky, U; Schiestel, T; Schirra, H; Schmidt, H; Lehr, C M

    2000-01-01

    Diverse polycationic polymers have been used as nonviral transfection agents. Here we report the ability of colloidal silica particles with covalently attached cationic surface modifications to transfect plasmid DNA in vitro and make an attempt to describe the structure of the resulting transfection complexes. In analogy to the terms lipoplex and polyplex, we propose to describe the nanoparticle-DNA complexes by the term "nanoplex". Three batches, Si10E, Si100E, and Si26H, sized between 10 and 100 nm and with zeta potentials ranging from +7 to +31 mV at pH 7.4 were evaluated. The galactosidase expression plasmid DNA pCMVbeta was immobilized on the particle surface and efficiently transfected Cos-1 cells. The transfection activity was accompanied by very low cytotoxicity, with LD(50) values in the milligrams per milliliter range. The most active batch, Si26H, was produced by modification of commercially available silica particles with N-(6-aminohexyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane, yielding spherical nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 26 nm and a zeta potential of +31 mV at pH 7.4. Complexes of Si26H and pCMVbeta plasmid DNA formed at w/w ratios of 10 were most effective in promoting transfection of Cos-1 cells in the absence of serum. At this ratio, >90% of the DNA was associated with the particles, yielding nanoplexes with a net negative surface charge. When the transfection medium was supplemented with 10% serum, maximum gene expression was observed at a w/w ratio of 30, at which the resulting particle-DNA complexes possessed a positive surface charge. Transfection was strongly increased in the presence of 100 microM chloroquine in the incubation medium and reached approximately 30% of the efficiency of a 60 kDa polyethylenimine. In contrast to polyethylenimine, no toxicity was observed at the concentrations required. Atomic force microscopy of Si26H-DNA complexes revealed a spaghetti-meatball-like structure. The surface of complexes prepared at a w/w ratio of

  13. Multiplex electrochemiluminescence DNA sensor for determination of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus based on multicolor quantum dots and Au nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Linlin; Wang, Xinyan; Ma, Qiang; Lin, Zihan; Chen, Shufan; Li, Yang [Department of Analytical Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun, 130012 (China); Lu, Lehui [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130022 (China); Qu, Hongping [Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science, Jilin Normal University, Siping, 136000 (China); Su, Xingguang, E-mail: suxg@jlu.edu.cn [Department of Analytical Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun, 130012 (China)

    2016-04-15

    In this work, a novel multiplex electrochemiluminescence (ECL) DNA sensor has been developed for determination of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) based on multicolor CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs) and Au nanoparticles (Au NPs). The electrochemically synthesized graphene nanosheets (GNs) were selected as conducting bridge to anchor CdTe QDs{sub 551}-capture DNA{sub HBV} and CdTe QDs{sub 607}-capture DNA{sub HCV} on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Then, different concentrations of target DNA{sub HBV} and target DNA{sub HCV} were introduced to hybrid with complementary CdTe QDs-capture DNA. Au NPs-probe DNA{sub HBV} and Au NPs-probe DNA{sub HCV} were modified to the above composite film via hybrid with the unreacted complementary CdTe QDs-capture DNA. Au NPs could quench the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) intensity of CdTe QDs due to the inner filter effect. Therefore, the determination of target DNA{sub HBV} and target DNA{sub HCV} could be achieved by monitoring the ECL DNA sensor based on Au NPs-probe DNA/target DNA/CdTe QDs-capture DNA/GNs/GCE composite film. Under the optimum conditions, the ECL intensity of CdTe QDs{sub 551} and CdTe QDs{sub 607} and the concentration of target DNA{sub HBV} and target DNA{sub HCV} have good linear relationship in the range of 0.0005–0.5 nmol L{sup −1} and 0.001–1.0 nmol L{sup −1} respectively, and the limit of detection were 0.082 pmol L{sup −1} and 0.34 pmol L{sup −1} respectively (S/N = 3). The DNA sensor showed good sensitivity, selectivity, reproducibility and acceptable stability. The proposed DNA sensor has been employed for the determination of target DNA{sub HBV} and target DNA{sub HCV} in human serum samples with satisfactory results. - Highlights: • A novel electrochemiluminescence DNA sensor has been developed for the determination of target DNA{sub HBV} and target DNA{sub HCV}. • The DNA sensor shows good sensitivity, reproducibility and stability. • The ECL provided a

  14. Preparation of Calcium Phosphate/pDNA Nanoparticles for Exogenous Gene Delivery by Co-Precipitation Method: Optimization of Formulation Variables Using Box-Behnken Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenpan; Zhang, Xirui; Jing, Shasha; Xin, Xiu; Chen, Kang; Chen, Dawei; Hu, Haiyang

    2017-08-01

    This research focused on optimizing the preparations of pDNA-loaded calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoparticles by employing a 3-factor, 3-level Box-Behnken design. Results indicated that a Ca/P ratio of 189.56, pH of 7.82, and a stirring speed of 528.83 rpm were the optimum conditions for preparation of the nanoparticles. The size of the optimized CaP/pDNA nanoparticles was 61.3 ± 3.64 nm, with a polydispersity index of 0.341 and an encapsulation efficiency of up to 92.11%. The optimized CaP/pDNA nanoparticles had high transfection efficiency and demonstrated good biocompatibility in vitro. Therefore, the Box-Behnken design method was successful in providing desirable CaP nanoparticle pDNA delivery systems by optimizing the experimental factors. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Physics Based Investigations of DNA Supercoiling and of Plasmonic Nanoparticles for Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Kamilla

    into subcutaneous tumor xenografts in mice. To better understand the photo-physical properties, the plasmonic heating of the resonant and non-resonant nanoparticles was also compared using an in vitro temperature sensitive assay. This assay enabled measurements of the heat generation of single NIR irradiated...... nanoparticles and con rmed that the resonant silica-gold nanoshells were superior to the non-resonant nanoparticles. These ndings were in agreement with numerical photo-absorption calculations. The presented comparative study is a novel strategy to quantify the photothermal e ect at a single particle level...

  16. A large-scale association study for nanoparticle C60 uncovers mechanisms of nanotoxicity disrupting the native conformations of DNA/RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xue; Wang, Xia; Li, Yan; Wang, Yonghua; Yang, Ling

    2012-09-01

    Nano-scale particles have attracted a lot of attention for its potential use in medical studies, in particular for the diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. However, the toxicity and other side effects caused by the undesired interaction between nanoparticles and DNA/RNA are not clear. To address this problem, a model to evaluate the general rules governing how nanoparticles interact with DNA/RNA is demanded. Here by, use of an examination of 2254 native nucleotides with molecular dynamics simulation and thermodynamic analysis, we demonstrate how the DNA/RNA native structures are disrupted by the fullerene (C60) in a physiological condition. The nanoparticle was found to bind with the minor grooves of double-stranded DNA and trigger unwinding and disrupting of the DNA helix, which indicates C60 can potentially inhibit the DNA replication and induce potential side effects. In contrast to that of DNA, C60 only binds to the major grooves of RNA helix, which stabilizes the RNA structure or transforms the configuration from stretch to curl. This finding sheds new light on how C60 inhibits reverse transcription as HIV replicates. In addition, the binding of C60 stabilizes the structures of RNA riboswitch, indicating that C60 might regulate the gene expression. The binding energies of C60 with different genomic fragments varies in the range of -56 to -10 kcal mol(-1), which further verifies the role of nanoparticle in DNA/RNA damage. Our findings reveal a general mode by which C60 causes DNA/RNA damage or other toxic effects at a systematic level, suggesting it should be cautious to handle these nanomaterials in various medical applications.

  17. DNA-nanoparticle assemblies go organic : Macroscopic polymeric materials with nanosized features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mentovich, Elad D.; Livanov, Konstantin; Prusty, Deepak K.; Sowwan, Mukules; Richter, Shachar

    2012-01-01

    Background: One of the goals in the field of structural DNA nanotechnology is the use of DNA to build up 2- and 3-D nanostructures. The research in this field is motivated by the remarkable structural features of DNA as well as by its unique and reversible recognition properties. Nucleic acids can

  18. DNA-transporting nanoparticles : design and in vitro evaluation of DNA and formulation for non-viral gene delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gaal, E.V.B.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of gene therapy is to treat, cure or prevent a disease by replacing defective genes, introducing new genes or changing the expression of a person’s genes. Success of gene therapy is dependent on successful delivery of DNA from the site of administration into cell nuclei. Naturally occurring

  19. Improving DNA double-strand repair inhibitor KU55933 therapeutic index in cancer radiotherapy using nanoparticle drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xi; Lara, Haydee; Wagner, Kyle T.; Saripalli, Srinivas; Hyder, Syed Nabeel; Foote, Michael; Sethi, Manish; Wang, Edina; Caster, Joseph M.; Zhang, Longzhen; Wang, Andrew Z.

    2015-11-01

    Radiotherapy is a key component of cancer treatment. Because of its importance, there has been high interest in developing agents and strategies to further improve the therapeutic index of radiotherapy. DNA double-strand repair inhibitors (DSBRIs) are among the most promising agents to improve radiotherapy. However, their clinical translation has been limited by their potential toxicity to normal tissue. Recent advances in nanomedicine offer an opportunity to overcome this limitation. In this study, we aim to demonstrate the proof of principle by developing and evaluating nanoparticle (NP) formulations of KU55933, a DSBRI. We engineered a NP formulation of KU55933 using nanoprecipitation method with different lipid polymer nanoparticle formulation. NP KU55933 using PLGA formulation has the best loading efficacy as well as prolonged drug release profile. We demonstrated that NP KU55933 is a potent radiosensitizer in vitro using clonogenic assay and is more effective as a radiosensitizer than free KU55933 in vivo using mouse xenograft models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Western blots and immunofluorescence showed NP KU55933 exhibited more prolonged inhibition of DNA repair pathway. In addition, NP KU55933 leads to lower skin toxicity than KU55933. Our study supports further investigations using NP to deliver DSBRIs to improve cancer radiotherapy treatment.

  20. Spectrophotometric, colorimetric and visually detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ETA gene based gold nanoparticles DNA probe and endonuclease enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Bahram; Kamali, Mehdi; Salouti, Mojtaba; Yaghmaei, Parichehreh

    2018-06-01

    Colorimetric DNA detection is preferred over other methods for clinical molecular diagnosis because it does not require expensive equipment. In the present study, the colorimetric method based on gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and endonuclease enzyme was used for the detection of P. aeruginosa ETA gene. Firstly, the primers and probe for P. aeruginosa exotoxin A (ETA) gene were designed and checked for specificity by the PCR method. Then, GNPs were synthesized using the citrate reduction method and conjugated with the prepared probe to develop the new nano-biosensor. Next, the extracted target DNA of the bacteria was added to GNP-probe complex to check its efficacy for P. aeruginosa ETA gene diagnosis. A decrease in absorbance was seen when GNP-probe-target DNA cleaved into the small fragments of BamHI endonuclease due to the weakened electrostatic interaction between GNPs and the shortened DNA. The right shift of the absorbance peak from 530 to 562 nm occurred after adding the endonuclease. It was measured using a UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy that indicates the existence of the P. aeruginosa ETA gene. Sensitivity was determined in the presence of different concentrations of target DNA of P. aeruginosa. The results obtained from the optimized conditions showed that the absorbance value has linear correlation with concentration of target DNA (R: 0.9850) in the range of 10-50 ng mL-1 with the limit detection of 9.899 ng mL-1. Thus, the specificity of the new method for detection of P. aeruginosa was established in comparison with other bacteria. Additionally, the designed assay was quantitatively applied to detect the P. aeruginosa ETA gene from 103 to 108 CFU mL-1 in real samples with a detection limit of 320 CFU mL-1.

  1. Reduction of DNA damage induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles through Nrf2 in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Zhiqin [Department of Toxicology, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang (China); Department of Laboratory Diagnosis, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang (China); Niu, Yujie [Department of Occupational Health and Environmental Health, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang (China); Wang, Qian [Department of Toxicology, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang (China); Shi, Lei [Department of Occupational Health and Environmental Health, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang (China); Guo, Huicai; Liu, Yi; Zhu, Yue [Department of Toxicology, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang (China); Liu, Shufeng; Liu, Chao [Hebei Keylab of Laboratory Animal Science, Shijiazhuang (China); Chen, Xin [Xiumen Community Health Service Centre, Shijiazhuang (China); Zhang, Rong, E-mail: rongzhang@hebmu.edu.cn [Department of Toxicology, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang (China); Hebei Keylab of Laboratory Animal Science, Shijiazhuang (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Nrf2 signals were partly responsible for the DNA damage induced by Nano-TiO{sub 2}. • Nrf2 loss could aggravate the DNA damage induced by Nano-TiO{sub 2}. • Acquired Nrf2 decreased the susceptibility to DNA damage induced by Nano-TiO{sub 2}. - Abstract: Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (Nano-TiO{sub 2}) are widely used to additives in cosmetics, pharmaceutical, paints and foods. Recent studies have demonstrated that Nano-TiO{sub 2} induces DNA damage and increased the risk of cancer and the mechanism might relate with oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Nuclear factor erythroid 2 (NF-E2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2), an anti-oxidative mediator, on DNA damage induced by Nano-TiO{sub 2}. Wildtype, Nrf2 knockout (Nrf2(-/-)) and tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) pre-treated HepG2 cells and mice were treated with Nano-TiO{sub 2}. And then the oxidative stress and DNA damage were evaluated. Our data showed that DNA damage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and MDA content in Nano-TiO{sub 2} exposed cells were significantly increased than those of control in dose dependent manners. Nrf2/ARE droved the downstream genes including NAD(P)H dehydrogenase [quinine] 1(NQO1), heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC) expression were significantly higher in wildtype HepG2 cells after Nano-TiO{sub 2} treatment. After treatment with Nano-TiO{sub 2}, the DNA damages were significantly increased in Nrf(-/-) cells and mice whereas significantly decreased in tBHQ pre-treatment cells and mice, compared with the wildtype HepG2 cells and mice, respectively. Our results indicated that the acquired of Nrf2 leads to a decreased susceptibility to DNA damages induction by Nano-TiO{sub 2} and decreasing of risk of cancer which would provide a strategy for a more efficacious sensitization of against of Nano-TiO{sub 2} toxication.

  2. Synthesis of PLGA nanoparticles of tea polyphenols and their strong in vivo protective effect against chemically induced DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava AK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Amit Kumar Srivastava,1 Priyanka Bhatnagar,2 Madhulika Singh,1 Sanjay Mishra,1 Pradeep Kumar,2 Yogeshwer Shukla,1 Kailash Chand Gupta1,2 1Proteomics Laboratory, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR, Lucknow, India; 2Nucleic Acid Research Laboratory, Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology (CSIR, Delhi University Campus, India Abstract: In spite of proficient results of several phytochemicals in preclinical settings, the conversion rate from bench to bedside is not very encouraging. Many reasons are attributed to this limited success, including inefficient systemic delivery and bioavailability under in vivo conditions. To achieve improved efficacy, polyphenolic constituents of black (theaflavin [TF] and green (epigallocatechin-3-gallate [EGCG] tea in poly(lactide-co-glycolide nanoparticles (PLGA-NPs were entrapped with entrapment efficacy of ~18% and 26%, respectively. Further, their preventive potential against 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA-induced DNA damage in mouse skin using DNA alkaline unwinding assay was evaluated. Pretreatment (topically of mouse skin with either TF or EGCG (100 µg/mouse doses exhibits protection of 45.34% and 28.32%, respectively, against DMBA-induced DNA damage. However, pretreatment with TF-loaded PLGA-NPs protects against DNA damage 64.41% by 1/20th dose of bulk, 71.79% by 1/10th dose of bulk, and 72.46% by 1/5th dose of bulk. Similarly, 51.28% (1/20th of bulk, 57.63% (1/10th of bulk, and 63.14% (1/5th of bulk prevention was noted using EGCG-loaded PLGA-NP doses. These results showed that tea polyphenol-loaded PLGA-NPs have ~30-fold dose-advantage than bulk TF or EGCG doses. Additionally, TF- or EGCG-loaded PLGA-NPs showed significant potential for induction of DNA repair genes (XRCC1, XRCC3, and ERCC3 and suppression of DNA damage responsive genes (p53, p21, MDM2, GADD45α, and COX-2 as compared with respective bulk TF or EGCG doses. Taken together, TF- or EGCG-loaded PLGA-NPs showed a superior

  3. Visual detection of STAT5B gene expression in living cell using the hairpin DNA modified gold nanoparticle beacon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jianpeng; Shan, Lingling; Chen, Haiyan; Li, Yang; Zhu, Hongyan; Deng, Dawei; Qian, Zhiyu; Achilefu, Samuel; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-03-15

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5B (STAT5B) is an important protein in JAK-STAT signaling pathway that is responsible for the metastasis and proliferation of tumor cells. Determination of the STAT5B messenger Ribonucleic Acid (mRNA) relating to the STAT5B expression provides insight into the mechanism of tumor progression. In this study, we designed and used a special hairpin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for human STAT5B mRNA to functionalize gold nanoparticles, which served as a beacon for detecting human STAT5B expression. Up to 90% quenching efficiency was achieved. Upon hybridizing with the target mRNA, the hairpin DNA modified gold nanoparticle beacons (hDAuNP beacons) release the fluorophores attached at 5' end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The fluorescence properties of the beacon before and after the hybridization with the complementary DNA were confirmed in vitro. The stability of hDAuNP beacons against degradation by DNase I and GSH indicated that the prepared beacon is stable inside cells. The detected fluorescence in MCF-7 cancer cells correlates with the specific STAT5B mRNA expression, which is consistent with the result from PCR measurement. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the hDAuNP beacons internalized in cells without using transfection agents, with intracellular distribution in the cytoplasm rather than the nucleus. The results demonstrated that this beacon could directly provide quantitative measurement of the intracellular STAT5B mRNA in living cells. Compared to the previous approaches, this beacon has advantages of higher target to background ratio of detection and an increased resistance to nuclease degradation. The strategy reported in this study is a promising approach for the intracellular measurement of RNA or protein expression in living cells, and has great potential in the study of drug screening and discovery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Ultra-small rhenium nanoparticles immobilized on DNA scaffolds: An excellent material for surface enhanced Raman scattering and catalysis studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaj, S; Sakthikumar, K; Elangovan, Ayyapan; Ravi, G; Karthik, T; Kundu, Subrata

    2016-12-01

    Highly Sensitive and ultra-small Rhenium (Re) metal nanoparticles (NPs) were successfully stabilized in water by the staging and fencing action of the versatile biomolecule DNA that resulted in two distinct aggregated chain-like morphologies with average grain sizes of 1.1±0.1nm and 0.7±0.1nm for the very first time within a minute of reaction time. Re NPs are formed by the borohydride reduction of ammonium perrhenate (NH4ReO4) in the presence of DNA at room temperature (RT) under stirring. The morphologies were controlled by carefully monitoring the molar ratio of NH4ReO4 and DNA. The synthesized material was employed in two potential applications: as a substrate for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies and as a catalyst for the reduction of aromatic nitro compounds. SERS study was carried out by taking methylene blue (MB) as the probe and the highest SERS enhancement factor (EF) of 2.07×10(7) was found for the aggregated chain-like having average grain size of 0.7±0.1nm. Catalytic reduction of 4-nitro phenol (4-NP), 2-nitro phenol (2-NP) and 4-nitroaniline (4-NA) with a rate constant value of 6×10(-2)min(-1), 33.83×10(-2)min(-1) and 37.4×10(-2)min(-1) have testified the excellent catalytic performance of our Re NPs immobilized on DNA. The overall study have revealed the capability of DNA in stabilizing the highly reactive Re metal at nanoscale and made them applicable in practice. The present route can also be extended to prepare one dimensional (1-D), self-assembled NPs of other reactive metals, mixed metals or even metal oxides for specific applications in water based solutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gene Transfer into the Lung by Nanoparticle Dextran-Spermine/Plasmid DNA Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahril Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel cationic polymer, dextran-spermine (D-SPM, has been found to mediate gene expression in a wide variety of cell lines and in vivo through systemic delivery. Here, we extended the observations by determining the optimal conditions for gene expression of D-SPM/plasmid DNA (D-SPM/pDNA in cell lines and in the lungs of BALB/c mice via instillation delivery. In vitro studies showed that D-SPM could partially protect pDNA from degradation by nuclease and exhibited optimal gene transfer efficiency at D-SPM to pDNA weight-mixing ratio of 12. In the lungs of mice, the levels of gene expression generated by D-SPM/pDNA are highly dependent on the weight-mixing ratio of D-SPM to pDNA, amount of pDNA in the complex, and the assay time postdelivery. Readministration of the complex at day 1 following the first dosing showed no significant effect on the retention and duration of gene expression. The study also showed that there was a clear trend of increasing size of the complexes as the amount of pDNA was increased, where the sizes of the D-SPM/pDNA complexes were within the nanometer range.

  6. Modulating chromatin structure and DNA accessibility by deacetylase inhibition enhances the anti-cancer activity of silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igaz, Nóra; Kovács, Dávid; Rázga, Zsolt; Kónya, Zoltán; Boros, Imre M; Kiricsi, Mónika

    2016-10-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are considered as novel therapeutic agents inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death in various cancer cells. Inhibition of deacetylase activity results in a relaxed chromatin structure thereby rendering the genetic material more vulnerable to DNA targeting agents that could be exploited by combinational cancer therapy. The unique potential of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in tumor therapy relies on the generation of reactive radicals which trigger oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis in cancer cells. The revolutionary application of AgNPs as chemotherapeutical drugs seems very promising, nevertheless the exact molecular mechanisms of AgNP action in combination with other anti-cancer agents have yet to be elucidated in details before clinical administrations. As a step towards this we investigated the combinational effect of HDAC inhibition and AgNP administration in HeLa cervical cancer cells. We identified synergistic inhibition of cancer cell growth and migration upon combinational treatments. Here we report that the HDAC inhibitor Trichostatin A enhances the DNA targeting capacity and apoptosis inducing efficacy of AgNPs most probably due to its effect on chromatin condensation. These results point to the potential benefits of combinational application of HDAC inhibitors and AgNPs in novel cancer medication protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Preparation of carboxyl group-modified palladium nanoparticles in an aqueous solution and their conjugation with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhifei; Li, Hongying; Zhen, Shuang; He, Nongyue

    2012-05-01

    The use of nanomaterials in biomolecular labeling and their corresponding detection has been attracting much attention, recently. There are currently very few studies on palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) due to their lack of appropriate surface functionalities for conjugation with DNA. In this paper, we thus firstly present an approach to prepare carboxyl group-modified Pd NPs (with an average size of 6 nm) by the use of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUDA) as a stabilizer in the aqueous solution. The effect of the various reducing reaction conditions on the morphology of the Pd NPs was investigated. The particles were further characterized by TEM, UV-vis, FT-IR and XPS techniques. DNA was finally covalently conjugated to the surface of the Pd NPs through the activation of the carboxyl group, which was confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis and fluorescence analysis. The resulting Pd NPs-DNA conjugates show high single base pair mismatch discrimination capabilities. This work therefore sets a good foundation for further applications of Pd NPs in bio-analytical research.

  8. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensor for DNA detection on nanoparticle island substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Ho, Ho Pui; Lee, Rebecca K.Y.

    2009-01-01

    We present a study on the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) properties of Ag nanoparticle island substrates (NIS) and their applications for target oligonucleotide (OND) detection. It has been found that the surface nanostructure of NIS samples can be controlled with a good degree of repro......We present a study on the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) properties of Ag nanoparticle island substrates (NIS) and their applications for target oligonucleotide (OND) detection. It has been found that the surface nanostructure of NIS samples can be controlled with a good degree...

  9. Polarizability of DNA Block Copolymer Nanoparticles Observed by Electrostatic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sowwan, Mukhles; Faroun, Maryam; Mentovich, Elad; Ibrahim, Imad; Haboush, Shayma; Alemdaroglu, Fikri Emrah; Kwak, Minseok; Richter, Shachar; Herrmann, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    In this study, DNA block copolymer (DBC) micelles with a polystyrene (PS) core and a single-stranded (ss) DNA shell were doped with ferrocene (Fc) molecules. Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology of the doped and undoped block copolymer aggregates. We show that

  10. Nanoparticles for cytosolic delivery of important biomolecular drugs such as DNA, RNA, peptides, and proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlák, M.; Koňák, Čestmír; Dybal, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2010 (2010), s. 87-90 ISSN 2210-2892 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : cytosolic delivery * nanoparticle carriers * poly(ethylacrylic acid) Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry http://benthamopen.com/ABSTRACT/TOPROCJ-1-87

  11. Cationic solid-lipid nanoparticles can efficiently bind and transfect plasmid DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olbrich, C; Bakowsky, U; Muller, RH; Kneuer, C

    2001-01-01

    The suitability of cationically modified solid-lipid nanoparticles (SLN) as a novel transfection agent was investigated. SLN were produced by hot homogenisation using either Compritol ATO 888 or paraffin as matrix lipid, a mixture of Tween 80 and Span 85 as tenside and either EQ1

  12. DNA impedance biosensor for detection of cancer, TP53 gene mutation, based on gold nanoparticles/aligned carbon nanotubes modified electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayazfar, H; Afshar, A; Dolati, M; Dolati, A

    2014-07-11

    For the first time, a new platform based on electrochemical growth of Au nanoparticles on aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (A-MWCNT) was developed for sensitive lable-free DNA detection of the TP53 gene mutation, one of the most popular genes in cancer research. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to monitor the sequence-specific DNA hybridization events related to TP53 gene. Compared to the bare Ta or MWCNT/Ta electrodes, the synergistic interactions of vertically aligned MWCNT array and gold nanoparticles at modified electrode could improve the density of the probe DNA attachment and resulting the sensitivity of the DNA sensor greatly. Using EIS, over the extended DNA concentration range, the change of charge transfer resistance was found to have a linear relationship in respect to the logarithm of the complementary oligonucleotides sequence concentrations in the wide range of 1.0×10(-15)-1.0×10(-7)M, with a detection limit of 1.0×10(-17)M (S/N=3). The prepared sensor also showed good stability (14 days), reproducibility (RSD=2.1%) and could be conveniently regenerated via dehybridization in hot water. The significant improvement in sensitivity illustrates that combining gold nanoparticles with the on-site fabricated aligned MWCNT array represents a promising platform for achieving sensitive biosensor for fast mutation screening related to most human cancer types. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence using a biosensor design based on Ceria nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide and Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafari, Safiye [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faridbod, Farnoush, E-mail: faridbodf@khayam.ut.ac.ir [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology & Metabolism Molecular and Cellular Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Norouzi, Parviz [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology & Metabolism Molecular and Cellular Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dezfuli, Amin Shiralizadeh [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ajloo, Davood [School of Chemistry, Damghan University, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh [Department of Microbial Biotechnology, School of Biology and Center of Excellence in Phylogeny of Living Organisms, College of Science, University of Tehran, 14155-6455 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ganjali, Mohammad Reza [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology & Metabolism Molecular and Cellular Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-10-01

    A new strategy was introduced for ssDNA immobilization on a modified glassy carbon electrode. The electrode surface was modified using polyaniline and chemically reduced graphene oxide decorated cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO{sub 2}NPs-RGO). A single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe was immobilized on the modified electrode surface. Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry (FFT-SWV) was applied as detection technique and [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+/3+} redox signal was used as electrochemical marker. The hybridization of ssDNA with its complementary target caused a dramatic decrease in [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+/3+} FFT-SW signal. The proposed electrochemical biosensor was able to detect Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence encoding aerolysin protein. Under optimal conditions, the biosensor showed excellent selectivity toward complementary sequence in comparison with noncomplementary and two-base mismatch sequences. The dynamic linear range of this electrochemical DNA biosensor for detecting 20-mer oligonucleotide sequence of A. hydrophila was from 1 × 10{sup −15} to 1 × 10{sup −8} mol L{sup −1}. The proposed biosensor was successfully applied for the detection of DNA extracted from A. hydrophila in fish pond water up to 0.01 μg mL{sup −1} with RSD of 5%. Besides, molecular docking was applied to consider the [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+/3+} interaction with ssDNA before and after hybridization. - Highlights: • New DNA biosensor is designed for sub-femtomolar detection of Aeromonas hydrophila DNA sequence. • Reduced graphene oxide decorated Ceria nanoparticles was used as a new immobilization platform. • Biosensor was successfully used to detect A. hydrophila DNA sequence in fish pond water.

  14. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence using a biosensor design based on Ceria nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide and Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafari, Safiye; Faridbod, Farnoush; Norouzi, Parviz; Dezfuli, Amin Shiralizadeh; Ajloo, Davood; Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    A new strategy was introduced for ssDNA immobilization on a modified glassy carbon electrode. The electrode surface was modified using polyaniline and chemically reduced graphene oxide decorated cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO_2NPs-RGO). A single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe was immobilized on the modified electrode surface. Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry (FFT-SWV) was applied as detection technique and [Ru(bpy)_3]"2"+"/"3"+ redox signal was used as electrochemical marker. The hybridization of ssDNA with its complementary target caused a dramatic decrease in [Ru(bpy)_3]"2"+"/"3"+ FFT-SW signal. The proposed electrochemical biosensor was able to detect Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence encoding aerolysin protein. Under optimal conditions, the biosensor showed excellent selectivity toward complementary sequence in comparison with noncomplementary and two-base mismatch sequences. The dynamic linear range of this electrochemical DNA biosensor for detecting 20-mer oligonucleotide sequence of A. hydrophila was from 1 × 10"−"1"5 to 1 × 10"−"8 mol L"−"1. The proposed biosensor was successfully applied for the detection of DNA extracted from A. hydrophila in fish pond water up to 0.01 μg mL"−"1 with RSD of 5%. Besides, molecular docking was applied to consider the [Ru(bpy)_3]"2"+"/"3"+ interaction with ssDNA before and after hybridization. - Highlights: • New DNA biosensor is designed for sub-femtomolar detection of Aeromonas hydrophila DNA sequence. • Reduced graphene oxide decorated Ceria nanoparticles was used as a new immobilization platform. • Biosensor was successfully used to detect A. hydrophila DNA sequence in fish pond water.

  15. Ru(II)-polypyridyl surface functionalised gold nanoparticles as DNA targeting supramolecular structures and luminescent cellular imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Orange, Kim N; Elmes, Robert B P; la Cour Poulsen, Bjørn; Williams, D Clive; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur

    2016-01-07

    The development of Ru(II) functionalized gold nanoparticles 1–3·AuNP is described. These systems were found to be mono-disperse with a hydrodynamic radius of ca. 15 nm in water but gave rise to the formation of higher order structures in buffered solution. The interaction of 1–3·AuNP with DNA was also studied by spectroscopic and microscopic methods and suggested the formation of large self-assembly structures in solution. The uptake of 1–3·AuNP by cancer cells was studied using both confocal fluorescence as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), with the aim of investigating their potential as tools for cellular biology. These systems displaying a non-toxic profile with favourable photophysical properties may have application across various biological fields including diagnostics and therapeutics.

  16. Plasmid DNA linearization in the antibacterial action of a new fluorescent Ag nanoparticle-paracetamol dimer composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Amaresh Kumar; Sk, Md Palashuddin; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2011-10-01

    Herein, we report the generation of a composite comprised of p-hydroxyacetanilide dimer and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) by reaction of AgNO3 and p-hydroxyacetanilide. The formation of the composite was established by UV-vis, FTIR and NMR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction along with substantiation by mass spectrometry. Interestingly, the composite exhibited an emission spectrum with a peak at 435 nm when excited by light of wavelength 320 nm. The composite showed superior antimicrobial activity with respect to its individual components against a wide range of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria at relatively low concentrations of Ag NPs and at which there was no apparent cytotoxicity against mammalian cells. Our results suggest that the composite strongly interacted with the bacterial cell walls leading to cell bursting. Interestingly, enhancement in the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in bacteria was observed in the presence of the composite. It is proposed that the ROS generation led to oxidation of the dimer to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). The generated NAPQI acted as a DNA gyrase inhibitor causing cell death following linearization of DNA.Herein, we report the generation of a composite comprised of p-hydroxyacetanilide dimer and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) by reaction of AgNO3 and p-hydroxyacetanilide. The formation of the composite was established by UV-vis, FTIR and NMR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction along with substantiation by mass spectrometry. Interestingly, the composite exhibited an emission spectrum with a peak at 435 nm when excited by light of wavelength 320 nm. The composite showed superior antimicrobial activity with respect to its individual components against a wide range of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria at relatively low concentrations of Ag NPs and at which there was no apparent cytotoxicity against mammalian cells. Our results suggest that the

  17. Interactions between Al₁₂X (X = Al, C, N and P) nanoparticles and DNA nucleobases/base pairs: implications for nanotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng; Chen, Yongsheng; Zhang, Shengbai B; Chen, Zhongfang

    2012-02-01

    The interactions between neutral Al(12)X(I ( h )) (X = Al, C, N and P) nanoparticles and DNA nucleobases, namely adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G) and cytosine (C), as well as the Watson-Crick base pairs (BPs) AT and GC, were investigated by means of density functional theory computations. The Al(12)X clusters can tightly bind to DNA bases and BPs to form stable complexes with negative binding Gibbs free energies at room temperature, and considerable charge transfers occur between the bases/BPs and the Al(12)X clusters. These strong interactions, which are also expected for larger Al nanoparticles, may have potentially adverse impacts on the structure and stability of DNA and thus cause its dysfunction.

  18. Reactive oxygen species mediated DNA damage in human lung alveolar epithelial (A549) cells from exposure to non-cytotoxic MFI-type zeolite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Kunal; Naha, Pratap C; Naydenova, Izabela; Mintova, Svetlana; Byrne, Hugh J

    2012-12-17

    Increasing utilization of engineered nanoparticles in the field of electronics and biomedical applications demands an assessment of risk associated with deliberate or accidental exposure. Metal based nanoparticles are potentially most important of all the nanoparticles in terms of health risks. Microporous alumino-silicates and pure silicates named as zeolites and zeo-type materials with variety of structures, chemical compositions, particle sizes and morphologies have a significant number of industrial uses such as in catalysis, sorption and ion-exchange processes. In particular, the nanosized particles due to their unique properties are used in hybrid organic-inorganic materials for photography, photonics, electronics, labeling, imaging, and sensing. The aim of the current study is to investigate pure silica MFI-type zeolites nanoparticles with sizes of 50nm and 100nm (samples MFI-50 and MFI-100) under suspended conditions and their toxicological effects on human lung alveolar (A549) cells under in vitro conditions. Live cell imaging showed that the nanoparticles precipitated from the colloidal suspension of cell culture media as large agglomerates, coming in contact with the cell surface through sedimentation. A cellular proliferative capacity test showed the zeolite nanoparticles to exhibit no significant cytotoxicity below a concentration of 100μg/ml. However, both the MFI-50 and MFI-100 nanoparticles induced high intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and elevated mitochondrial membrane potential in the A549 cells over the measured time period of 12h and at concentrations up to ≤50μg/ml. DNA fragmentation analysis using the comet assay showed that the MFI-50 and MFI-100 nanoparticles cause genotoxicity in a concentration dependent manner. Furthermore, the rate at which maximum genomic damage was caused by MFI-100 nanoparticles in the A549 cells was found to be high as compared to the MFI-50 nanoparticles. However, the damage caused by the

  19. nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Cabedo, Patricia; Mondragon, Rosa; Hernandez, Leonor; Martinez-Cuenca, Raul; Cabedo, Luis; Julia, J. Enrique

    2014-10-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) is extremely important in concentrated solar power (CSP) plants since it represents the main difference and advantage of CSP plants with respect to other renewable energy sources such as wind, photovoltaic, etc. CSP represents a low-carbon emission renewable source of energy, and TES allows CSP plants to have energy availability and dispatchability using available industrial technologies. Molten salts are used in CSP plants as a TES material because of their high operational temperature and stability of up to 500°C. Their main drawbacks are their relative poor thermal properties and energy storage density. A simple cost-effective way to improve thermal properties of fluids is to dope them with nanoparticles, thus obtaining the so-called salt-based nanofluids. In this work, solar salt used in CSP plants (60% NaNO3 + 40% KNO3) was doped with silica nanoparticles at different solid mass concentrations (from 0.5% to 2%). Specific heat was measured by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A maximum increase of 25.03% was found at an optimal concentration of 1 wt.% of nanoparticles. The size distribution of nanoparticle clusters present in the salt at each concentration was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image processing, as well as by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS). The cluster size and the specific surface available depended on the solid content, and a relationship between the specific heat increment and the available particle surface area was obtained. It was proved that the mechanism involved in the specific heat increment is based on a surface phenomenon. Stability of samples was tested for several thermal cycles and thermogravimetric analysis at high temperature was carried out, the samples being stable.

  20. Selenium nanoparticles synthesized in aqueous extract of Allium sativum perturbs the structural integrity of Calf thymus DNA through intercalation and groove binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezhuthupurakkal, Preedia Babu; Polaki, Lokeswara Rao; Suyavaran, Arumugam; Subastri, Ariraman; Sujatha, Venugopal; Thirunavukkarasu, Chinnasamy

    2017-01-01

    Biomedical application of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) demands the eco-friendly composite for synthesis of SeNPs. The present study reports an aqueous extract of Allium sativum (AqEAS) plug-up the current need. Modern spectroscopic, microscopic and gravimetric techniques were employed to characterize the synthesized nanoparticles. Characterization studies revealed the formation of crystalline spherical shaped SeNPs. FTIR spectrum brings out the presence of different functional groups in AqEAS, which influence the SeNPs formation and stabilization. Furthermore the different aspects of the interaction between SeNPs and CT-DNA were scrutinized by various spectroscopic and cyclic voltametric studies. The results reveals the intercalation and groove binding mode of interaction of SeNPs with stacked base pair of CT-DNA. The Stern–Volmer quenching constant (K SV ) were found to be 7.02 × 10 6 Mˉ 1 (ethidium bromide), 4.22 × 10 6 Mˉ 1 (acridine orange) and 7.6 × 10 6 Mˉ 1 (Hoechst) indicating strong binding of SeNPs with CT–DNA. The SeNPs - CT-DNA interactions were directly visualized by atomic force microscopy. The present study unveils the cost effective, innocuous, highly stable SeNPs intricate mechanism of DNA interaction, which will be a milestone in DNA targeted chemotherapy. - Graphical abstract: Highly stable, innocuous, biocompatible SeNPs nanoparticle has been synthesized using Allium sativum (garlic) extract as reductant. The purity and crystallinity were characterized, further divulge the base pare interaction with Calf –Thymus DNA through various spectroscopic methods and atomic force microscopy. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Synthesis of SeNPs in aqueous extract of Allium sativum. • Characterization of synthesized SeNPs using high throughput techniques. • SeNPs directly interact with CT-DNA through intercalation and groove binding.

  1. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle-Based Interdigitated Electrodes: A Novel Current to Voltage DNA Biosensor Recognizes E. coli O157:H7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Nadzirah

    Full Text Available Nanoparticle-mediated bio-sensing promoted the development of novel sensors in the front of medical diagnosis. In the present study, we have generated and examined the potential of titanium dioxide (TiO2 crystalline nanoparticles with aluminium interdigitated electrode biosensor to specifically detect single-stranded E.coli O157:H7 DNA. The performance of this novel DNA biosensor was measured the electrical current response using a picoammeter. The sensor surface was chemically functionalized with (3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES to provide contact between the organic and inorganic surfaces of a single-stranded DNA probe and TiO2 nanoparticles while maintaining the sensing system's physical characteristics. The complement of the target DNA of E. coli O157:H7 to the carboxylate-probe DNA could be translated into electrical signals and confirmed by the increased conductivity in the current-to-voltage curves. The specificity experiments indicate that the biosensor can discriminate between the complementary sequences from the base-mismatched and the non-complementary sequences. After duplex formation, the complementary target sequence can be quantified over a wide range with a detection limit of 1.0 x 10(-13M. With target DNA from the lysed E. coli O157:H7, we could attain similar sensitivity. Stability of DNA immobilized surface was calculated with the relative standard deviation (4.6%, displayed the retaining with 99% of its original response current until 6 months. This high-performance interdigitated DNA biosensor with high sensitivity, stability and non-fouling on a novel sensing platform is suitable for a wide range of biomolecular interactive analyses.

  2. Selenium nanoparticles synthesized in aqueous extract of Allium sativum perturbs the structural integrity of Calf thymus DNA through intercalation and groove binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezhuthupurakkal, Preedia Babu; Polaki, Lokeswara Rao; Suyavaran, Arumugam; Subastri, Ariraman [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Pondicherry University, Puducherry 605 014 (India); Sujatha, Venugopal [Department of Chemistry, Periyar University, Salem 636011 (India); Thirunavukkarasu, Chinnasamy, E-mail: tchinnasamy@hotmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Pondicherry University, Puducherry 605 014 (India)

    2017-05-01

    Biomedical application of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) demands the eco-friendly composite for synthesis of SeNPs. The present study reports an aqueous extract of Allium sativum (AqEAS) plug-up the current need. Modern spectroscopic, microscopic and gravimetric techniques were employed to characterize the synthesized nanoparticles. Characterization studies revealed the formation of crystalline spherical shaped SeNPs. FTIR spectrum brings out the presence of different functional groups in AqEAS, which influence the SeNPs formation and stabilization. Furthermore the different aspects of the interaction between SeNPs and CT-DNA were scrutinized by various spectroscopic and cyclic voltametric studies. The results reveals the intercalation and groove binding mode of interaction of SeNPs with stacked base pair of CT-DNA. The Stern–Volmer quenching constant (K{sub SV}) were found to be 7.02 × 10{sup 6} Mˉ{sup 1} (ethidium bromide), 4.22 × 10{sup 6} Mˉ{sup 1} (acridine orange) and 7.6 × 10{sup 6} Mˉ{sup 1} (Hoechst) indicating strong binding of SeNPs with CT–DNA. The SeNPs - CT-DNA interactions were directly visualized by atomic force microscopy. The present study unveils the cost effective, innocuous, highly stable SeNPs intricate mechanism of DNA interaction, which will be a milestone in DNA targeted chemotherapy. - Graphical abstract: Highly stable, innocuous, biocompatible SeNPs nanoparticle has been synthesized using Allium sativum (garlic) extract as reductant. The purity and crystallinity were characterized, further divulge the base pare interaction with Calf –Thymus DNA through various spectroscopic methods and atomic force microscopy. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Synthesis of SeNPs in aqueous extract of Allium sativum. • Characterization of synthesized SeNPs using high throughput techniques. • SeNPs directly interact with CT-DNA through intercalation and groove binding.

  3. Polyethylenimine-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles effectively quench fluorescent DNA, which can be developed as a novel platform for protein detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Long; Sun, Nana; Zhang, Jinyan; Tu, Chunhao; Cao, Xiuqi; Duan, Demin; Diao, Aipo; Man, Shuli

    2017-11-23

    We report a novel assembly of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-coated Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles (NPs) with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), and the fluorescence of the dye labeled in the DNA is remarkably quenched. In the presence of a target protein, the protein-DNA aptamer mutual interaction releases the ssDNA from this assembly and hence restores the fluorescence. This feature could be adopted to develop an aptasensor for protein detection. As a proof-of-concept, for the first time, we have used this proposed sensing strategy to detect thrombin selectively and sensitively. Furthermore, simultaneous multiple detection of thrombin and lysozyme in a complex protein mixture has been proven to be possible.

  4. Oral DNA vaccination of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), against infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus using PLGA [Poly(D,L-Lactic-Co-Glycolic Acid)] nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adomako, M; St-Hilaire, S; Zheng, Y; Eley, J; Marcum, R D; Sealey, W; Donahower, B C; Lapatra, S; Sheridan, P P

    2012-03-01

    A DNA vaccine against infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is effective at protecting rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, against disease, but intramuscular injection is required and makes the vaccine impractical for use in the freshwater rainbow trout farming industry. Poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved polymer that can be used to deliver DNA vaccines. We evaluated the in vivo absorption of PLGA nanoparticles containing coumarin-6 when added to a fish food pellet. We demonstrated that rainbow trout will eat PLGA nanoparticle coated feed and that these nanoparticles can be detected in the epithelial cells of the lower intestine within 96 h after feeding. We also detected low levels of gene expression and anti-IHNV neutralizing antibodies when fish were fed or intubated with PLGA nanoparticles containing IHNV G gene plasmid. A virus challenge evaluation suggested a slight increase in survival at 6 weeks post-vaccination in fish that received a high dose of the oral vaccine, but there was no difference when additional fish were challenged at 10 weeks post-vaccination. The results of this study suggest that it is possible to induce an immune response using an orally delivered DNA vaccine, but the current system needs improvement. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Reactive oxygen species-mediated DNA damage and apoptosis in human skin epidermal cells after exposure to nickel nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarifi, Saud; Ali, Daoud; Alakhtani, Saad; Al Suhaibani, Entissar S; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed A

    2014-01-01

    Nickel nanoparticles (NiNPs) are increasingly used in various applications due to their unique properties. However, there is little information concerning the toxicity of NiNPs in the human skin cell (A431). The present study was designed to investigate the cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and DNA damage due to NiNPs in A431 cells. A cellular proliferative capacity test showed that NiNPs induce significant cytotoxicity in a dose- and time-dependent manner. NiNPs were also found to induce oxidative stress evidenced by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of glutathione (GSH). Further, co-treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) mitigated the ROS generation due to NiNPs, suggesting the potential mechanism of oxidative stress. NiNPs also induced significant elevation of lipid peroxidation, catalase, and superoxide dismutase and caspase-3 activity in A431 cells. In addition, NAC suppressed NiNP-induced caspase-3 activity. DNA fragmentation analysis using the comet assay showed that the NiNPs cause genotoxicity in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Therefore, the study points out the capability of the NiNPs to induce oxidative stress resulting in apoptosis and genotoxicity. This study warrants more careful assessment of NiNPs before their industrial applications.

  6. Mimicking Retention and Transport of Rotavirus and Adenovirus in Sand Media Using DNA-labeled, Protein-coated Silica Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Liping; Farkas, Kata; Bennett, Grant; Varsani, Arvind; Easingwood, Richard; Tilley, Richard; Nowostawska, Urszula; Lin, Susan

    2014-05-01

    Rotavirus (RoV) and adenovirus (AdV) are important viral pathogens for the risk analysis of drinking water. Despite this, little is known about their retention and transport behaviors in porous media (e.g. sand filtered used for water treatment and groundwater aquifers due to a lack of representative surrogates. In this study, we developed RoV and AdV surrogates by covalently coating 70-nm sized silica nanoparticles with specific proteins and a DNA marker for sensitive detection. Filtration experiments using beach sand columns demonstrated the similarity of the surrogates' concentrations, attachment, and filtration efficiencies to the target viruses. The surrogates showed the same magnitude of concentration reduction as the viruses. Conversely, MS2 phage (a traditional virus model) over predicted concentrations of AdV and RoV by 1- and 2-orders of magnitude, respectively. The surrogates remained stable in size, surface charge and DNA concentration for at least one year. They can be easily and rapidly detected at concentrations down to one particle per PCR reaction and are readily detectable in natural waters and even in effluent. With up-scaling validation in pilot trials, the surrogates can be a useful cost-effective new tool for studying virus retention and transport in porous media, e.g. for assessing filter efficiency in water and wastewater treatment, tracking virus migration in groundwater after effluent land disposal, and establishing safe setback distances for groundwater protection.

  7. Cobalt oxide nanoparticles aggravate DNA damage and cell death in eggplant via mitochondrial swelling and NO signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Mohammad; Saquib, Quaiser; Alatar, Abdulrahman A; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Ahmed, Mukhtar; Ansari, Sabiha M; Alwathnani, Hend A; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Musarrat, Javed; Praveen, Shelly

    2016-03-18

    Despite manifold benefits of nanoparticles (NPs), less information on the risks of NPs to human health and environment has been studied. Cobalt oxide nanoparticles (Co3O4-NPs) have been reported to cause toxicity in several organisms. In this study, we have investigated the role of Co3O4-NPs in inducing phytotoxicity, cellular DNA damage and apoptosis in eggplant (Solanum melongena L. cv. Violetta lunga 2). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on Co3O4-NPs showing phytotoxicity in eggplant. The data revealed that eggplant seeds treated with Co3O4-NPs for 2 h at a concentration of 1.0 mg/ml retarded root length by 81.5 % upon 7 days incubation in a moist chamber. Ultrastructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated the uptake and translocation of Co3O4-NPs into the cytoplasm. Intracellular presence of Co3O4-NPs triggered subcellular changes such as degeneration of mitochondrial cristae, abundance of peroxisomes and excessive vacuolization. Flow cytometric analysis of Co3O4-NPs (1.0 mg/ml) treated root protoplasts revealed 157, 282 and 178 % increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), membrane potential (ΔΨm) and nitric oxide (NO), respectively. Besides, the esterase activity in treated protoplasts was also found compromised. About 2.4-fold greater level of DNA damage, as compared to untreated control was observed in Comet assay, and 73.2 % of Co3O4-NPs treated cells appeared apoptotic in flow cytometry based cell cycle analysis. This study demonstrate the phytotoxic potential of Co3O4-NPs in terms of reduction in seed germination, root growth, greater level of DNA and mitochondrial damage, oxidative stress and cell death in eggplant. The data generated from this study will provide a strong background to draw attention on Co3O4-NPs environmental hazards to vegetable crops.

  8. Selenium nanoparticles synthesized in aqueous extract of Allium sativum perturbs the structural integrity of Calf thymus DNA through intercalation and groove binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezhuthupurakkal, Preedia Babu; Polaki, Lokeswara Rao; Suyavaran, Arumugam; Subastri, Ariraman; Sujatha, Venugopal; Thirunavukkarasu, Chinnasamy

    2017-05-01

    Biomedical application of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) demands the eco-friendly composite for synthesis of SeNPs. The present study reports an aqueous extract of Allium sativum (AqEAS) plug-up the current need. Modern spectroscopic, microscopic and gravimetric techniques were employed to characterize the synthesized nanoparticles. Characterization studies revealed the formation of crystalline spherical shaped SeNPs. FTIR spectrum brings out the presence of different functional groups in AqEAS, which influence the SeNPs formation and stabilization. Furthermore the different aspects of the interaction between SeNPs and CT-DNA were scrutinized by various spectroscopic and cyclic voltametric studies. The results reveals the intercalation and groove binding mode of interaction of SeNPs with stacked base pair of CT-DNA. The Stern-Volmer quenching constant (K SV ) were found to be 7.02×10 6 M- 1 (ethidium bromide), 4.22×10 6 M- 1 (acridine orange) and 7.6×10 6 M- 1 (Hoechst) indicating strong binding of SeNPs with CT-DNA. The SeNPs - CT-DNA interactions were directly visualized by atomic force microscopy. The present study unveils the cost effective, innocuous, highly stable SeNPs intricate mechanism of DNA interaction, which will be a milestone in DNA targeted chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Lycopene loaded gelatin nanoparticles induces internucleosmal DNA fragmentation and apoptosis in human breast adenocarcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preetha, K. Mary Anne; Devasena, T.

    2018-06-01

    The complex disease, cancer is caused by genetic uncertainty and various molecular alterations. Due to the present ineffective diagnostic and prognostic classifications, the complete heterogeneity of a tumor is not revealed which in turn affects the selection of suitable treatment and patient outcome. Cancer nanotechnology is an emerging interdisciplinary research field that covers important aspects of chemistry, engineering, biology and medicine, leading to the advancement of cancer diagnosis and treatment. Hence the main aim of this study is to develop lycopene loaded gelatin nanoparticles and evaluate its in vitro anticancer activity using breast adenocarcinoma cells.

  10. Femtomolar detection of single mismatches by discriminant analysis of DNA hybridization events using gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xingyi; Sim, Sang Jun

    2013-03-21

    Even though DNA-based nanosensors have been demonstrated for quantitative detection of analytes and diseases, hybridization events have never been numerically investigated for further understanding of DNA mediated interactions. Here, we developed a nanoscale platform with well-designed capture and detection gold nanoprobes to precisely evaluate the hybridization events. The capture gold nanoprobes were mono-laid on glass and the detection probes were fabricated via a novel competitive conjugation method. The two kinds of probes combined in a suitable orientation following the hybridization with the target. We found that hybridization efficiency was markedly dependent on electrostatic interactions between DNA strands, which can be tailored by adjusting the salt concentration of the incubation solution. Due to the much lower stability of the double helix formed by mismatches, the hybridization efficiencies of single mismatched (MMT) and perfectly matched DNA (PMT) were different. Therefore, we obtained an optimized salt concentration that allowed for discrimination of MMT from PMT without stringent control of temperature or pH. The results indicated this to be an ultrasensitive and precise nanosensor for the diagnosis of genetic diseases.

  11. Multiplex electrochemiluminescence DNA sensor for determination of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus based on multicolor quantum dots and Au nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Linlin; Wang, Xinyan; Ma, Qiang; Lin, Zihan; Chen, Shufan; Li, Yang; Lu, Lehui; Qu, Hongping; Su, Xingguang

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a novel multiplex electrochemiluminescence (ECL) DNA sensor has been developed for determination of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) based on multicolor CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs) and Au nanoparticles (Au NPs). The electrochemically synthesized graphene nanosheets (GNs) were selected as conducting bridge to anchor CdTe QDs_5_5_1-capture DNA_H_B_V and CdTe QDs_6_0_7-capture DNA_H_C_V on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Then, different concentrations of target DNA_H_B_V and target DNA_H_C_V were introduced to hybrid with complementary CdTe QDs-capture DNA. Au NPs-probe DNA_H_B_V and Au NPs-probe DNA_H_C_V were modified to the above composite film via hybrid with the unreacted complementary CdTe QDs-capture DNA. Au NPs could quench the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) intensity of CdTe QDs due to the inner filter effect. Therefore, the determination of target DNA_H_B_V and target DNA_H_C_V could be achieved by monitoring the ECL DNA sensor based on Au NPs-probe DNA/target DNA/CdTe QDs-capture DNA/GNs/GCE composite film. Under the optimum conditions, the ECL intensity of CdTe QDs_5_5_1 and CdTe QDs_6_0_7 and the concentration of target DNA_H_B_V and target DNA_H_C_V have good linear relationship in the range of 0.0005–0.5 nmol L"−"1 and 0.001–1.0 nmol L"−"1 respectively, and the limit of detection were 0.082 pmol L"−"1 and 0.34 pmol L"−"1 respectively (S/N = 3). The DNA sensor showed good sensitivity, selectivity, reproducibility and acceptable stability. The proposed DNA sensor has been employed for the determination of target DNA_H_B_V and target DNA_H_C_V in human serum samples with satisfactory results. - Highlights: • A novel electrochemiluminescence DNA sensor has been developed for the determination of target DNA_H_B_V and target DNA_H_C_V. • The DNA sensor shows good sensitivity, reproducibility and stability. • The ECL provided a convenient, low-cost, sensitive, and specific method for target DNA

  12. Compact NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemich, Bernhard; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Zia, Wasif [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie (ITMC)

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  13. Compact vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M.A.; Zafalan, I. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Fisica, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Menezes, R. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Rio Tinto, PB (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Departamento de Fisica, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2017-02-15

    We study a family of Maxwell-Higgs models, described by the inclusion of a function of the scalar field that represent generalized magnetic permeability. We search for vortex configurations which obey first-order differential equations that solve the equations of motion. We first deal with the asymptotic behavior of the field configurations, and then implement a numerical study of the solutions, the energy density and the magnetic field. We work with the generalized permeability having distinct profiles, giving rise to new models, and we investigate how the vortices behave, compared with the solutions of the corresponding standard models. In particular, we show how to build compact vortices, that is, vortex solutions with the energy density and magnetic field vanishing outside a compact region of the plane. (orig.)

  14. Compact stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevez-Delgado, Gabino; Estevez-Delgado, Joaquin

    2018-05-01

    An analysis and construction is presented for a stellar model characterized by two parameters (w, n) associated with the compactness ratio and anisotropy, respectively. The reliability range for the parameter w ≤ 1.97981225149 corresponds with a compactness ratio u ≤ 0.2644959374, the density and pressures are positive, regular and monotonic decrescent functions, the radial and tangential speed of sound are lower than the light speed, moreover, than the plausible stability. The behavior of the speeds of sound are determinate for the anisotropy parameter n, admitting a subinterval where the speeds are monotonic crescent functions and other where we have monotonic decrescent functions for the same speeds, both cases describing a compact object that is also potentially stable. In the bigger value for the observational mass M = 2.05 M⊙ and radii R = 12.957 Km for the star PSR J0348+0432, the model indicates that the maximum central density ρc = 1.283820319 × 1018 Kg/m3 corresponds to the maximum value of the anisotropy parameter and the radial and tangential speed of the sound are monotonic decrescent functions.

  15. Finding a facile way for the bacterial DNA transformation by biosynthesized gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Madhuree; Pandey, Shipra; Mishra, Aradhana; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2017-07-03

    The major problem encountered during genetic manipulation of bacteria is the inability to get transformed because of their natural non-competency. In this study, to overcome this problem, a cost-effective method was developed by combining the properties of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and the Yoshida effect. Various parameters, including GNP:plasmid ratio, pH and time, were optimized for stability of the GNP-plasmid conjugate. With non-competent Gram-negative cells, the efficiency ranged between 0.1 and 0.45 × 104 transformants μg-1, while the range was (0.02-0.2) × 104 transformants μg-1 with Gram-positive bacteria. GNPs can serve efficiently as a vehicle for better transformation in bacteria. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Molecular beam epitaxial growth of oriented and uniform Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} nanoparticles with compact dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Beining; Sun, Yu; Wu, Jie; Yuan, Long; Wu, Xiaofeng; Huang, Keke; Feng, Shouhua, E-mail: shfeng@jlu.edu.cn [Jilin University, State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, College of Chemistry (China)

    2017-02-15

    The scaling-down of phase change memory cell is critical to achieve high-performance and high-density memory devices. Herein, we report that Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} nanoparticles along the [1 1 1] direction were synthesized without templates or etching in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Under non-stoichiometric Ge:Sb:Te beam ratio condition, the growth of high-density Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} nanoparticles was achieved by Zn-doping. The average diameter of the nanoparticles is 8 nm, and the full width at half maximum of the size distribution is 2.7 nm. Our results suggest that the size and shape modifications of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} nanoparticles could be induced by Zn-doping which influences the nucleation in the growth process. In addition, the bonding states of Zn and Te verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy proved that Zn atoms located in the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} matrix. This approach exemplified here can be applied to the sub-20 nm phase change memory devices and may also be extendable to be served in the design and development of more materials with phase transitions.

  17. DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles based colorimetric assay to assess helicase activity: a novel route to screen potential helicase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Jashmini; Mojumdar, Aditya; Parisse, Pietro; Onesti, Silvia; Casalis, Loredana

    2017-03-01

    Helicase are essential enzymes which are widespread in all life-forms. Due to their central role in nucleic acid metabolism, they are emerging as important targets for anti-viral, antibacterial and anti-cancer drugs. The development of easy, cheap, fast and robust biochemical assays to measure helicase activity, overcoming the limitations of the current methods, is a pre-requisite for the discovery of helicase inhibitors through high-throughput screenings. We have developed a method which exploits the optical properties of DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles (AuNP) and meets the required criteria. The method was tested with the catalytic domain of the human RecQ4 helicase and compared with a conventional FRET-based assay. The AuNP-based assay produced similar results but is simpler, more robust and cheaper than FRET. Therefore, our nanotechnology-based platform shows the potential to provide a useful alternative to the existing conventional methods for following helicase activity and to screen small-molecule libraries as potential helicase inhibitors.

  18. Hybridization State Detection of DNA-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles Using Hyperspectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Murdock

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral imaging has the unique ability of capturing spectral data for multiple wavelengths at each pixel in an image. This gives the ability to distinguish, with certainty, different nanomaterials and/or distinguish nanomaterials from biological materials. In this study, 4 nm and 13 nm gold nanoparticles (Au NPs were synthesized, functionalized with complimentary oligonucleotides, and hybridized to form large networks of NPs. Scattering spectra were collected from each sample (unfunctionalized, functionalized, and hybridized and evaluated. The spectra showed unique peaks for each size of Au NP sample and also exhibited narrowing and intensifying of the spectra as the NPs were functionalized and then subsequently hybridized. These spectra are different from normal aggregation effects where the LSPR and reflected spectrum broaden and are red-shifted. Rather, this appears to be dependent on the ability to control the interparticle distance through oligonucleotide length, which is also investigated through the incorporation of a poly-A spacer. Also, hybridized Au NPs were exposed to cells with no adverse effects and retained their unique spectral signatures. With the ability to distinguish between hybridization states at nearly individual NP levels, this could provide a new method of tracking the intracellular actions of nanomaterials as well as extracellular biosensing applications.

  19. Detection of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin DNA from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by resistive pulse sensing and loop-mediated isothermal amplification with gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Alice Kar Lai; Lu, Haifei; Wu, Shu Yuen; Kwok, Ho Chin; Ho, Ho Pui; Yu, Samuel; Cheung, Anthony Ka Lun; Kong, Siu Kai

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A novel diagnostic assay is developed to detect the MRSA's Panton-Valentine Leukocidin toxin. •Detection is based on target DNA amplification at one single temperature at 65 °C by LAMP. •Amplicons are then hybridized with 2 Au-nanoparticles with specific DNA probes for sensing. •The supra-assemblies are subsequently sensed by resistive pulse sensing. •Detection limit: ∼200 copies of DNA; time for detection: completed within 2 h. -- Abstract: This report describes a novel diagnostic assay for rapid detection of the Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) toxin of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) utilizing resistive pulse sensing (RPS), loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification (LAMP) in combination with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The PVL DNA from MRSA was specifically amplified by LAMP using four primers at one temperature (65 °C). The DNA products with biotin were then conjugated to a first AuNP1 (55 ± 2 nm) through biotin–avidin binding. A second AuNP2 (30 ± 1.5 nm) coated with a specific DNA probe hybridized with the LAMP DNA products at the loop region to enhance assay sensitivity and specificity, to generate supra-AuNP1-DNA-AuNP2 assemblies. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the presence of these supra-assemblies. Using RPS, detection and quantitation of the agglomerated AuNPs were performed by a tunable fluidic nanopore sensor. The results demonstrate that the LAMP-based RPS sensor is sensitive and rapid for detecting the PVL DNA. This technique could achieve a limit of detection (LOD) up to about 500 copies of genomic DNA from the bacteria MRSA MW2 and the detection can be completed within two hours with a straightforward signal-to-readout setup. It is anticipated that this LAMP-based AuNP RPS may become an effective tool for MRSA detection and a potential platform in clinical laboratory to report the presence or absence of other types of infectious agents

  20. Efficient systemic DNA delivery to the tumor by self-assembled nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hailin; Xie, Xinhua; Guo, Jiaoli; Wei, Weidong; Wu, Minqing; Liu, Peng; Kong, Yanan; Yang, Lu; Hung, Mien-Chie; Xie, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    There are few delivery agents that could deliver gene with high efficiency and low toxicity, especially for animal experiments. Therefore, creating vectors with good delivery efficiency and safety profile is a meaningful work. We have developed a self-assembled gene delivery system (XM001), which can more efficiently deliver DNA to multiple cell lines and breast tumor, as compared to commercial delivery agents. In addition, systemically administrated XM001-BikDD (BikDD is a mutant form of proapoptotic gene Bik) significantly inhibited the growth of human breast cancer cells and prolonged the life span in implanted nude mice. This study demonstrates that XM001 is an efficient and widespread transfection agent, which could be a promising tumor delivery vector for cancer targeted therapy.

  1. Effects of prenatal exposure to nanoparticles titanium dioxide and carbon black on female germline DNA stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anne Mette Zenner

    Particulate air pollution has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer in humans. Air pollution may also adversely affect pregnancy outcome and the integrity of sperm cells DNA. Animal studies have shown that inhalation of air particulates can induce mutations...... in premeiotic sperm cells. The investigation of potential mutagenic risk is of outmost importance, as it may lead to cancer. Furthermore, heritable mutations may be passed on to descendents and thereby pose a permanent genetic risk to the population. The nanosized fraction of particulate air pollution has...... are needed. Expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) loci in mice are sensitive markers of mutagenic effects resulting from environmental exposures; Studies on adult mice have revealed that while particulate air pollution induced ESTR mutations in premeiotic sperm cells, the female germline was not affected...

  2. A method of layer-by-layer gold nanoparticle hybridization in a quartz crystal microbalance DNA sensing system used to detect dengue virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S-H; Chuang, Y-C; Lu, Y-C; Lin, H-C; Yang, Y-L; Lin, C-S

    2009-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is nowadays the most important arthropod-spread virus affecting humans existing in more than 100 countries worldwide. A rapid and sensitive detection method for the early diagnosis of infectious dengue virus urgently needs to be developed. In the present study, a circulating-flow quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensing method combining oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (i.e. AuNP probes) used to detect DENV has been established. In the DNA-QCM method, two kinds of specific AuNP probes were linked by the target sequences onto the QCM chip to amplify the detection signal, i.e. oscillatory frequency change (ΔF) of the QCM sensor. The target sequences amplified from the DENV genome act as a bridge for the layer-by-layer AuNP probes' hybridization in the method. Besides being amplifiers of the detection signal, the specific AuNP probes used in the DNA-QCM method also play the role of verifiers to specifically recognize their target sequences in the detection. The effect of four AuNP sizes on the layer-by-layer hybridization has been evaluated and it is found that 13 nm AuNPs collocated with 13 nm AuNPs showed the best hybridization efficiency. According to the nanoparticle application, the DNA-QCM biosensing method was able to detect dengue viral RNA in virus-contaminated serum as plaque titers being 2 PFU ml -1 and a linear correlation (R 2 = 0.987) of ΔF versus virus titration from 2 x 10 0 to 2 x 10 6 PFU ml -1 was found. The sensitivity and specificity of the present DNA-QCM method with nanoparticle technology showed it to be comparable to the fluorescent real-time PCR methods. Moreover, the method described herein was shown to not require expensive equipment, was label-free and highly sensitive.

  3. A DNA biosensor based on gold nanoparticle decorated on carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes for gender determination of Arowana fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedfar, Kasra; Heng, Lee Yook; Chiang, Chew Poh

    2017-12-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were modified to design a new DNA biosensor. Functionalized MWCNTs were equipped with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) (~15nm) (GNP-MWCNTCOOH) to construct DNA biosensors based on carbon-paste screen-printed (SPE) electrodes. GNP attachment onto functionalized MWCNTs was carried out by microwave irradiation and was confirmed by spectroscopic studies and surface analysis. DNA biosensors based on differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were constructed by immobilizing thiolated single-stranded DNA probes onto GNP-MWCNTCOOH. Ruthenium (III) chloride hexaammoniate [Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ,2Cl - ] (RuHex) was used as hybridization redox indicator. RuHex and MWCNT interaction was low in compared to other organic redox hybridization indicators. The linear response range for DNA determination was 1×10 -21 to 1×10 -9 M with a lower detection limit of 1.55×10 -21 M. Thus, the attachment of GNPs onto functionalized MWCNTs yielded sensitive DNA biosensor with low detection limit and stability more than 30days. Constructed electrode was used to determine gender of arowana fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nanoparticle-mediated knockdown of DNA repair sensitizes cells to radiotherapy and extends survival in a genetic mouse model of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kievit, Forrest M; Wang, Kui; Ozawa, Tatsuya; Tarudji, Aria W; Silber, John R; Holland, Eric C; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Zhang, Miqin

    2017-10-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) remains incurable, and recurrent tumors rarely respond to standard-of-care radiation and chemo-therapies. Therefore, strategies that enhance the effects of these therapies should provide significant benefits to GBM patients. We have developed a nanoparticle delivery vehicle that can stably bind and protect nucleic acids for specific delivery into brain tumor cells. These nanoparticles can deliver therapeutic siRNAs to sensitize GBM cells to radiotherapy and improve GBM treatment via systemic administration. We show that nanoparticle-mediated knockdown of the DNA repair protein apurinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1) sensitizes GBM cells to radiotherapy and extend survival in a genetic mouse model of GBM. Specific knockdown of Ape1 activity by 30% in brain tumor tissue doubled the extended survival achieved with radiotherapy alone. Ape1 is a promising target for increasing the effectiveness of radiotherapy, and nanoparticle-mediated delivery of siRNA is a promising strategy for tumor specific knockdown of Ape1. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Comparison of Dissolved Nickel and Nickel Nanoparticles Toxicity in Larval Zebrafish in Terms of Gene Expression and DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boran, Halis; Şaffak, Savaş

    2018-01-01

    With the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in many industrial activities and consumer products, it is important to evaluate the effects of their release into the environment. Metal NPs (e.g., Ni-NPs or Cu-NPs) can release metal ions that are toxic to aquatic organisms; however, whether the toxicity is from metal ions rather than unique "nano-scale" effects of the NPs is unresolved. This research investigated Ni-NP toxicity in zebrafish Danio rerio larvae to clarify whether toxic effects are attributable to release of Ni ions. First, the acute (96-h lethal) toxicity of Ni-NPs was determined in comparison to aqueous Ni in fish exposed to Ni(II) by water-soluble NiCl 2 . Subsequently, sublethal experiments with Ni-NPs and Ni(II) were conducted to assess changes in expression of stress-related genes (mt2, rad51, and p53) by quantitative PCR. Acute toxicity of Ni in fish exposed to Ni(II) was higher (96-h LC 50  = 32.6 mg/L) than for fish exposed to Ni-NPs (96-h LC 50  = 122.2 mg/L). Also, DNA strand breaks were higher in Ni(II)- than Ni-NPs-exposed larvae. Induction of stress-related genes in larvae was complex and was not directly related to Ni-NPs and Ni(II) concentration, although there was a significant induction in the mt2 and p53 gene of the larvae exposed to Ni-NPs and Ni(II) relative to controls. Results indicated that while Ni-NPs induced gene expression (presumably by the release of Ni ions), the differences in concentration relationships of gene expression between Ni-NPs and Ni(II) suggest that factors in addition to the release of Ni ions from Ni-NPs influence acute toxicity of Ni-NPs.

  6. Self-catalytic growth of unmodified gold nanoparticles as conductive bridges mediated gap-electrical signal transduction for DNA hybridization detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Nie, Huagui; Wu, Zhan; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Lijie; Xu, Xiangju; Huang, Shaoming

    2014-01-21

    A simple and sensitive gap-electrical biosensor based on self-catalytic growth of unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as conductive bridges has been developed for amplifying DNA hybridization events. In this strategy, the signal amplification degree of such conductive bridges is closely related to the variation of the glucose oxidase (GOx)-like catalytic activity of AuNPs upon interaction with single- and double-stranded DNA (ssDNA and dsDNA), respectively. In the presence of target DNA, the obtained dsDNA product cannot adsorb onto the surface of AuNPs due to electrostatic interaction, which makes the unmodified AuNPs exhibit excellent GOx-like catalytic activity. Such catalytic activity can enlarge the diameters of AuNPs in the glucose and HAuCl4 solution and result in a connection between most of the AuNPs and a conductive gold film formation with a dramatically increased conductance. For the control sample, the catalytic activity sites of AuNPs are fully blocked by ssDNA due to the noncovalent interaction between nucleotide bases and AuNPs. Thus, the growth of the assembled AuNPs will not happen and the conductance between microelectrodes will be not changed. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the developed strategy exhibited a sensitive response to target DNA with a high signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, this strategy was also demonstrated to provide excellent differentiation ability for single-nucleotide polymorphism. Such performances indicated the great potential of this label-free electrical strategy for clinical diagnostics and genetic analysis under real biological sample separation.

  7. Hydroxyl radicals (·OH) are associated with titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticle-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative DNA damage in fish cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, James F.; Davies, Simon J.; Dodd, Nicholas J.F.; Jha, Awadhesh N.

    2008-01-01

    TiO 2 nanoparticles ( 2 nanoparticles on goldfish skin cells (GFSk-S1), either alone or in combination with UVA. Whilst neutral red retention (NRR) assay (a measure of lysosomal membrane integrity) was used to evaluate cell viability, a modified Comet assay using bacterial lesion-specific repair endonucleases (Endo-III, Fpg) was employed to specifically target oxidative DNA damage. Additionally, electron spin resonance (ESR) studies with different spin traps were carried out for qualitative analysis of free radical generation. For cell viability, TiO 2 alone (0.1-1000 μg ml -1 ) had little effect whereas co-exposure with UVA (0.5-2.0 kJ m -2 ) caused a significant dose-dependent decrease which was dependent on both the concentration of TiO 2 and the dose of UVA administered. For the Comet assay, doses of 1, 10 and 100 μg ml -1 in the absence of UVA caused elevated levels of Fpg-sensitive sites, indicating the oxidation of purine DNA bases (i.e. guanine) by TiO 2 . UVA irradiation of TiO 2 -treated cells caused further increases in DNA damage. ESR studies revealed that the observed toxic effects of nanoparticulate TiO 2 were most likely due to hydroxyl radical (·OH) formation

  8. A new optimized formulation of cationic solid lipid nanoparticles intended for gene delivery: development, characterization and DNA binding efficiency of TCERG1 expression plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fàbregas, Anna; Sánchez-Hernández, Noemí; Ticó, Josep Ramon; García-Montoya, Encarna; Pérez-Lozano, Pilar; Suñé-Negre, Josep M; Hernández-Munain, Cristina; Suñé, Carlos; Miñarro, Montserrat

    2014-10-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are being considered as a new approach for therapeutics for many known diseases. In addition to drug delivery, their use as non-viral vectors for gene delivery can be achieved by the inclusion of cationic lipids, which provide a positive surface potential that favours binding to the DNA backbone. This work is based on the idea that the optimization of the components is required as the first step in simplifying the qualitative and quantitative composition of SLNs as much as possible without affecting the essential properties that define SLNs as optimal non-viral vectors for gene delivery. We selected the best lipids and surfactants in terms of particle size and zeta potential and characterized the properties of the resulting nanoparticles using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The SLNs had a particle size of approximately 120 nm and a positive surface charge of 42 mV. In addition, we analysed the main physicochemical characteristics of the bulk components of the nanoparticles using X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and mass spectrometry (MS). The suitability of the optimized SLNs for DNA binding was evaluated after the lyophilisation process using a carboxyl-terminal region of the TCERG1 gene, a human factor that has been implicated in several diseases. We show that the SLNs presented high efficiency in the binding of DNA, and importantly, they presented no toxicity when assayed in an in vivo system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydroxyl radicals ({center_dot}OH) are associated with titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticle-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative DNA damage in fish cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, James F.; Davies, Simon J.; Dodd, Nicholas J.F. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Jha, Awadhesh N. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: a.jha@plymouth.ac.uk

    2008-04-02

    TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (<100 nm diameter) have been reported to cause oxidative stress related effects, including inflammation, cytotoxicity and genomic instability, either alone or in the presence of UVA irradiation in mammalian studies. Despite the fact that the aquatic environment is often the ultimate recipient of all contaminants there is a paucity of data pertaining to the potential detrimental effects of nanoparticles on aquatic organisms. Therefore, these investigations aimed to evaluate the potential cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles on goldfish skin cells (GFSk-S1), either alone or in combination with UVA. Whilst neutral red retention (NRR) assay (a measure of lysosomal membrane integrity) was used to evaluate cell viability, a modified Comet assay using bacterial lesion-specific repair endonucleases (Endo-III, Fpg) was employed to specifically target oxidative DNA damage. Additionally, electron spin resonance (ESR) studies with different spin traps were carried out for qualitative analysis of free radical generation. For cell viability, TiO{sub 2} alone (0.1-1000 {mu}g ml{sup -1}) had little effect whereas co-exposure with UVA (0.5-2.0 kJ m{sup -2}) caused a significant dose-dependent decrease which was dependent on both the concentration of TiO{sub 2} and the dose of UVA administered. For the Comet assay, doses of 1, 10 and 100 {mu}g ml{sup -1} in the absence of UVA caused elevated levels of Fpg-sensitive sites, indicating the oxidation of purine DNA bases (i.e. guanine) by TiO{sub 2}. UVA irradiation of TiO{sub 2}-treated cells caused further increases in DNA damage. ESR studies revealed that the observed toxic effects of nanoparticulate TiO{sub 2} were most likely due to hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) formation.

  10. Pharmaceutical powder compaction technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Çelik, Metin

    2011-01-01

    ... through the compaction formulation process and application. Compaction of powder constituents both active ingredient and excipients is examined to ensure consistent and reproducible disintegration and dispersion profiles...

  11. Geant4-DNA track-structure simulations for gold nanoparticles: The importance of electron discrete models in nanometer volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Dousatsu; Kyriakou, Ioanna; Okada, Shogo; Tran, Hoang N; Lampe, Nathanael; Guatelli, Susanna; Bordage, Marie-Claude; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Murakami, Koichi; Sasaki, Takashi; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris; Incerti, Sebastien

    2018-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are known to enhance the absorbed dose in their vicinity following photon-based irradiation. To investigate the therapeutic effectiveness of GNPs, previous Monte Carlo simulation studies have explored GNP dose enhancement using mostly condensed-history models. However, in general, such models are suitable for macroscopic volumes and for electron energies above a few hundred electron volts. We have recently developed, for the Geant4-DNA extension of the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit, discrete physics models for electron transport in gold which include the description of the full atomic de-excitation cascade. These models allow event-by-event simulation of electron tracks in gold down to 10 eV. The present work describes how such specialized physics models impact simulation-based studies on GNP-radioenhancement in a context of x-ray radiotherapy. The new discrete physics models are compared to the Geant4 Penelope and Livermore condensed-history models, which are being widely used for simulation-based NP radioenhancement studies. An ad hoc Geant4 simulation application has been developed to calculate the absorbed dose in liquid water around a GNP and its radioenhancement, caused by secondary particles emitted from the GNP itself, when irradiated with a monoenergetic electron beam. The effect of the new physics models is also quantified in the calculation of secondary particle spectra, when originating in the GNP and when exiting from it. The new physics models show similar backscattering coefficients with the existing Geant4 Livermore and Penelope models in large volumes for 100 keV incident electrons. However, in submicron sized volumes, only the discrete models describe the high backscattering that should still be present around GNPs at these length scales. Sizeable differences (mostly above a factor of 2) are also found in the radial distribution of absorbed dose and secondary particles between the new and the existing Geant4

  12. Comparison of DNA Damage and Apoptosis Induced By Silver Nanoparticle-containing Dressing Materials During Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Suk; Gwak, Heui-Chul; Park, Jae Keun; Lim, Ji Yun; Yeo, Eui Dong; Park, Eunseok; Kim, Junyong; Lee, Young Koo

    2018-04-13

    Silver nanoparticle (AgNP)-containing dressings are used worldwide for the treatment of wounds; however, many studies have indicated that AgNPs are toxic to humans and cause cell death, primarily via apoptosis. In this study, the investigators compare the apoptotic effects of various AgNP dressing materials, with the hypothesis that nanosilver would be less toxic than ionic silver. For the in vivo experiments, Sprague-Dawley (SD) and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats were treated with 5 dressing materials: Aquacel Ag (product A, silver ion; ConvaTec, Berkshire, UK), Acticoat (product B, AgNP; Smith & Nephew, Fort Worth, TX), Medifoam Silver (product C, silver ion; Genewel Science Co Ltd, Seongnam, South Korea), PolyMem Silver (product D, AgNP; Ferris Mfg Corp, Fort Worth, TX), and Vaseline-impregnated dressing gauze (control; Unilever, London, UK). All treatments were applied 3 times per week. After 14 days of treatment, the SD and STZ rats were euthanized, and wound samples were examined for apoptosis. The analysis included immunohistochemistry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, Western blotting, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for a semiquantitative evaluation of apoptosis. The AgNP-containing dressing materials were more cytotoxic than the silver dressings. Compared with the AgNP dressing materials, no significant levels of apoptotic factors were observed in the silver dressing-treated wounds. The TUNEL staining showed that product C-dressed wounds contained the most apoptotic cells, while some apoptotic cells were observed in product B-dressed wounds. Moreover, apoptotic gene expression was altered, including a decline in B-cell lymphoma-2 and activation of caspase-3. This was most evident in wounds treated with product C. Interestingly, apoptotic gene expression was not induced in product A-treated wounds. Finally, product D had a relatively lower silver concentration and was less toxic

  13. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for the detection of Trichoderma harzianum based on a gold electrode modified with a composite membrane made from an ionic liquid, ZnO nanoparticles and chitosan, and by using acridine orange as a redox indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiquee, S.; Yusof, N.A.; Salleh, A.B.; Tan, S.G.; Bakar, F.A.

    2011-01-01

    An electrochemical DNA biosensor was developed that is based on a gold electrode modified with a nanocomposite membrane made from an ionic liquid, ZnO nanoparticles and chitosan. A single-stranded DNA probe was immobilized on this electrode. Acridine orange was used as the hybridization probe for monitoring the hybridization of the target DNA. The biosensor was capable of detecting target DNA in the concentration range from 1.0 x 10 -14 to 1.8 x 10 -4 mol L -1 , with a detection limit of 1.0 x 10 -15 mol L -1 . The approach towards constructing a DNA biosensor allows studies on the hybridization even with crude DNA fragments and also to analyze sample obtained from real samples. The results show that the DNA biosensor has the potential for sensitive detection of a specific sequence of the Trichoderma harzianum gene and provides a quick, sensitive and convenient method for the study of microorganisms. (author)

  14. Analysis of 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP)-gold nanoparticles behaviour in solution and of their interaction with calf thymus DNA and living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biver, T., E-mail: tarita@dcci.unipi.it [University of Pisa, Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry Department (Italy); Corti, A. [University of Pisa, Experimental Pathology Department BMIE (Italy); Eltugral, N. [University of Pisa, Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry Department (Italy); Lorenzini, E.; Masini, M.; Paolicchi, A. [University of Pisa, Experimental Pathology Department BMIE (Italy); Pucci, A.; Ruggeri, G.; Secco, F.; Venturini, M. [University of Pisa, Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry Department (Italy)

    2012-02-15

    4-(Dimethylamino)pyridine-coated gold nanoparticles (DMAP-Au NPs) were synthesized, characterised and their interaction with DNA and living cells was analysed. Concerning the interaction of the DMAP-Au NPs with DNA, absorbance titrations indicate that a non-covalent interaction between DNA and the external surface of the NPs does take place. The binding constant was evaluated to be (2.8 {+-} 0.8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sup -1}. Exposure of cultured cells to NPs revealed a dose-dependent effect on cell proliferation which was increased or reduced in dependence of DMAP-Au NPs concentrations. Subcellular localisation by transmission electron microscopy showed mitochondrial and nuclear localisations of NPs, thus suggesting their direct involvement in the mitochondrial alterations observed and a possible direct interaction with cell DNA. These findings clearly indicate that DMAP-Au NPs can strongly interact with living cells and confirm the importance of systematic evaluations of NPs properties, also in the perspective of their arising diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  15. Utilizing ultrathin DNA/poly-lysine multilayer films to create liquid/liquid interfaces: spectroscopic characterization, interfacial reactions and nanoparticle adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hye Jin; Wark, Alastair W; Corn, Robert M [Department of Chemistry, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2007-09-19

    Alternating electrostatic multilayer adsorption of poly-L-lysine (pLys) and DNA is used to create well-defined biopolymer multilayers for use as an ultrathin aqueous phase in liquid-liquid interfacial measurements. The molecular structure and thickness of the polyelectrolyte multilayers are determined using a combination of polarization modulation FT-IR reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-FTIRRAS) and FT-surface plasmon resonance (FT-SPR) thickness measurements. Electroactive species such as ferri/ferrocyanide ions can be incorporated into the DNA/pLys polyelectrolyte multilayers. The ion transport activity of these electroactive films when in contact with 1,2-dichoroethane is verified by electrochemical measurements. Micron-sized patterns of these multilayers are created by either photopatterning, vapour-deposited spot patterning or microfluidic stencil processing, and are used in conjunction with fluorescence and surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) to monitor (i) the intercalation of dye molecules into DNA/pLys ultrathin films, (ii) the electrostatic adsorption of gold nanoparticles onto DNA/pLys multilayers and (iii) the spatially controlled incorporation and reaction of enzymes into patterned biopolymer multilayers.

  16. Highly sensitive colorimetric detection of glucose in a serum based on DNA-embeded Au@Ag core–shell nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Fei; Xu, Kun; Hou, Xiangshu

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is a key energy substance in diverse biology and closely related to the life activities of the organism. To develop a simple and sensitive method for glucose detection is extremely urgent but still remains a key challenge. Herein, we report a colorimetric glucose sensor in a homogeneous system based on DNA-embedded core–shell Au@Ag nanoparticles. In this assay, a glucose substrate was first catalytically oxidized by glucose oxidase to produce H 2 O 2 which would further oxidize and gradually etch the outer silver shell of Au@Ag nanoparticles. Afterwards, the solution color changed from yellow to red and the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band of Au@Ag nanoparticles declined and red-shifted from 430 to 516 nm. Compared with previous silver-based glucose colorimetric detection strategies, the distinctive SPR band change is superior to the color variation, which is critical to the high sensitivity of this assay. Benefiting from the outstanding optical property, robust stability and well-dispersion of the core–shell Au@AgNPs hybrid, this colorimetric assay obtained a detection limit of glucose as low as 10 nM, which is at least a 10-fold improvement over other AgNPs-based procedures. Moreover, this optical biosensor was successfully employed to the determination of glucose in fetal bovine serum. (paper)

  17. Current characteristics of λ-DNA molecules/polystyrene nanoparticles in TBE buffer solution through micro/nanofluidic capillaries under DC electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yifei; Zhao, Wei; Xue, Jing; Sun, Dan; Wang, Kaige; Wang, Guiren; Li, Junjie; Bai, Jintao; Gu, Changzhi

    2017-03-01

    In practical applications of biochips and bio-sensors, electrokinetic mechanisms are commonly employed to manipulate single bio-molecules and analyze their characteristics. To accurately and flexibly control the movement of single-molecule within micro/nanofluidic channels which are the basic components of Lab-chips, the current signals in micro/nanocapillaries filled with solutions of DNA molecules or polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles are systematically studied. Experimental results indicate that the current response along the micro/nanocapillaries can be significantly influenced by the diameter of the capillaries and the pH value of the solutions. Specifically, when there is only a pure (TBE) solution, the electric conductance does not monotonically decrease with decreasing the diameter of the capillaries, but slightly increases with decreasing the capillary diameter. When λ-DNA molecules or PS nanoparticles are added into the TBE buffer, the size effect on the electric conductance of the solutions are quite different. Although in the former, the electric conductance behaves differently from that in the pure TBE solution and decreases with the decreasing diameter, in the latter, the change is similar to that in the pure TBE solution. Besides, an abnormal ‘falling’ of the electric conductance is observed in a capillary with diameter of 200 nm. The investigation will significantly enhance the understanding on the electric properties of the solutions of biomolecules and particles in micro/nanofluidics. This is especially helpful for designing functional Lab-chip devices.

  18. Current characteristics of λ -DNA molecules/polystyrene nanoparticles in TBE buffer solution through micro/nanofluidic capillaries under DC electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Yifei; Zhao, Wei; Xue, Jing; Sun, Dan; Wang, Kaige; Wang, Guiren; Bai, Jintao; Li, Junjie; Gu, Changzhi

    2017-01-01

    In practical applications of biochips and bio-sensors, electrokinetic mechanisms are commonly employed to manipulate single bio-molecules and analyze their characteristics. To accurately and flexibly control the movement of single-molecule within micro/nanofluidic channels which are the basic components of Lab-chips, the current signals in micro/nanocapillaries filled with solutions of DNA molecules or polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles are systematically studied. Experimental results indicate that the current response along the micro/nanocapillaries can be significantly influenced by the diameter of the capillaries and the pH value of the solutions. Specifically, when there is only a pure (TBE) solution, the electric conductance does not monotonically decrease with decreasing the diameter of the capillaries, but slightly increases with decreasing the capillary diameter. When λ -DNA molecules or PS nanoparticles are added into the TBE buffer, the size effect on the electric conductance of the solutions are quite different. Although in the former, the electric conductance behaves differently from that in the pure TBE solution and decreases with the decreasing diameter, in the latter, the change is similar to that in the pure TBE solution. Besides, an abnormal ‘falling’ of the electric conductance is observed in a capillary with diameter of 200 nm. The investigation will significantly enhance the understanding on the electric properties of the solutions of biomolecules and particles in micro/nanofluidics. This is especially helpful for designing functional Lab-chip devices. (paper)

  19. Chondroitin sulfate-polyethylenimine copolymer-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as an efficient magneto-gene carrier for microRNA-encoding plasmid DNA delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yu-Lun; Chou, Han-Lin; Liao, Zi-Xian; Huang, Shih-Jer; Ke, Jyun-Han; Liu, Yu-Sheng; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Wang, Li-Fang

    2015-04-01

    MicroRNA-128 (miR-128) is an attractive therapeutic molecule with powerful glioblastoma regulation properties. However, miR-128 lacks biological stability and leads to poor delivery efficacy in clinical applications. In our previous study, we demonstrated two effective transgene carriers, including polyethylenimine (PEI)-decorated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as well as chemically-conjugated chondroitin sulfate-PEI copolymers (CPs). In this contribution, we report optimized conditions for coating CPs onto the surfaces of SPIONs, forming CPIOs, for magneto-gene delivery systems. The optimized weight ratio of the CPs and SPIONs is 2 : 1, which resulted in the formation of a stable particle as a good transgene carrier. The hydrodynamic diameter of the CPIOs is ~136 nm. The gel electrophoresis results demonstrate that the weight ratio of CPIO/DNA required to completely encapsulate pDNA is >=3. The in vitro tests of CPIO/DNA were done in 293 T, CRL5802, and U87-MG cells in the presence and absence of an external magnetic field. The magnetofection efficiency of CPIO/DNA was measured in the three cell lines with or without fetal bovine serum (FBS). CPIO/DNA exhibited remarkably improved gene expression in the presence of the magnetic field and 10% FBS as compared with a gold non-viral standard, PEI/DNA, and a commercial magnetofection reagent, PolyMag/DNA. In addition, CPIO/DNA showed less cytotoxicity than PEI/DNA and PolyMag/DNA against the three cell lines. The transfection efficiency of the magnetoplex improved significantly with an assisted magnetic field. In miR-128 delivery, a microRNA plate array and fluorescence in situ hybridization were used to demonstrate that CPIO/pMIRNA-128 indeed expresses more miR-128 with the assisted magnetic field than without. In a biodistribution test, CPIO/Cy5-DNA showed higher accumulation at the tumor site where an external magnet is placed nearby.MicroRNA-128 (miR-128) is an attractive therapeutic molecule

  20. Role of cerium oxide nanoparticle-induced autophagy as a safeguard to exogenous H2O2-mediated DNA damage in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhu, Abhishek; Ghosh, Ilika; Moriyasu, Yuji; Mukherjee, Anita; Bandyopadhyay, Maumita

    2018-04-13

    The effect of cerium oxide nanoparticle (CeNP) in plants has elicited substantial controversy. While some investigators have reported that CeNP possesses antioxidant properties, others observed CeNP to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS). In spite of considerable research carried out on the effects of CeNP in metazoans, fundamental studies that can unveil its intracellular consequences linking ROS production, autophagy and DNA damage are lacking in plants. To elucidate the impact of CeNP within plant cells, tobacco BY-2 cells were treated with 10, 50 and 250 µg ml-1 CeNP (Ce10, Ce50 and Ce250), for 24 h. Results demonstrated concentration-dependent accumulation of Ca2+ and ROS at all CeNP treatment sets. However, significant DNA damage and alteration in antioxidant defence systems were noted prominently at Ce50 and Ce250. Moreover, Ce50 and Ce250 induced DNA damage, analysed by comet assay and DNA diffusion experiments, complied with the concomitant increase in ROS. Furthermore, to evaluate the antioxidant property of CeNP, treated cells were washed after 24 h (to minimise CeNP interference) and challenged with H2O2 for 3 h. Ce10 did not induce genotoxicity and H2O2 exposure to Ce10-treated cells showed lesser DNA breakage than cells treated with H2O2 only. Interestingly, Ce10 provided better protection over N-acetyl-L-cysteine against exogenous H2O2 in BY-2 cells. CeNP exposure to transgenic BY-2 cells expressing GFP-Atg8 fusion protein exhibited formation of autophagosomes at Ce10. Application of vacuolar protease inhibitor E-64c and fluorescent basic dye acridine orange, further demonstrated accumulation of particulate matters in the vacuole and occurrence of acidic compartments, the autophagolysosomes, respectively. BY-2 cells co-treated with CeNP and autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine exhibited increased DNA damage in Ce10 and cell death at all assessed treatment sets. Thus, current results substantiate an alternative autophagy-mediated, antioxidant and

  1. Chitosan-coated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticles as an efficient delivery system for Newcastle disease virus DNA vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao K

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Kai Zhao,1,* Yang Zhang,1,2,* Xiaoyan Zhang,1,* Ci Shi,1,2 Xin Wang,1 Xiaohua Wang,1 Zheng Jin,3 Shangjin Cui2 1Laboratory of Microbiology, School of Life Science, Heilongjiang University, 2Division of Swine Infectious Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Harbin Veterinary Research Institute, 3Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering Process and Technology for High-efficiency Conversion, Heilongjiang University, Harbin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: We determined the efficacy and safety of chitosan (CS-coated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles (NPs as a delivery system for a vaccine to protect chickens against Newcastle disease virus (NDV. The newly constructed vaccine contained DNA (the F gene of NDV. The Newcastle disease virus (NDV F gene deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA plasmid (pFDNA-CS/PLGA-NPs were spherical (diameter =699.1±5.21 nm [mean ± ­standard deviation] and smooth, with an encapsulation efficiency of 98.1% and a Zeta potential of +6.35 mV. An in vitro release assay indicated that CS controlled the burst release of plasmid DNA, such that up to 67.4% of the entire quantity of plasmid DNA was steadily released from the pFDNA-CS/PLGA-NPs. An in vitro expression assay indicated that the expression of nanoparticles (NPs was maintained in the NPs. In an immunization test with specific pathogen-free chickens, the pFDNA-CS/PLGA-NPs induced stronger cellular, humoral, and mucosal immune responses than the plasmid DNA vaccine alone. The pFDNA-CS/PLGA-NPs did not harm 293T cells in an in vitro assay and did not harm chickens in an in vivo assay. Overall, the results indicated that CS-coated PLGA NPs can serve as an efficient and safe mucosal immune delivery system for NDV DNA vaccine.Keywords: mucosal immune delivery system, immune effect

  2. Determination of DNA by solid substrate room temperature phosphorescence enhancing method based on the Morin.SiO2 luminescent nanoparticles-Pd system as a phosphorescence probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiaming; Yang Tianlong; Gao Fei; Hu Lixiang; He Hangxia; Liu Qinying; Liu Zhenbo; Huang Xiaomei; Zhu Guohui

    2006-01-01

    Sodium carbonate (Na 2 SiO 3 ) as the precursor, was mixed with Morin organic dye to synthesize silicon dioxide luminescent nanoparticles containing Morin (Morin.SiO 2 ) by sol-gel method. The particle sizes of SiO 2 .nH 2 O and Morin.SiO 2 were both 50 nm, measured with TEM (transmission electron microscope). Morin.SiO 2 modified by HS-CH 2 COOH could be dissolved by water. In the HMTA (hexamethylenetetramine)-HCl buffer solution, Pd 2+ could coordinate with Morin in Morin.SiO 2 to form complex Pd 2+ -Morin.SiO 2 , which could emit phosphorescence on polyamide membrane. And DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) could cause a sharp enhancement of the room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) intensity of complex Pd 2+ -Morin.SiO 2 . Thus a new method of solid substrate room temperature phosphorescence (SS-RTP) enhancing for the determination of DNA was established based on the Morin.SiO 2 luminescent nanoparticles-Pd system as a phosphorescence probe. The ΔIp is directly proportional to the content of DNA in the range of 4.00-1000.0 fg spot -1 (corresponding concentration: 0.010-2.50 ng ml -1 ). The regression equation of working curve was ΔIp = 21.13 + 0.2076m DNA (fg spot -1 ) (r = 0.9990) and the detection limit was 0.61 fg spot -1 (corresponding concentration: 1.5 pg ml -1 ). This method had a wide linear range, high sensitivity, convenience, rapidity and only a little sample was needed. Samples containing 0.10 and 25.0 ng ml -1 DNA were measured repeatedly for 11 times and RSDs were 3.2 and 4.1% (n = 11), respectively, which indicated that the method had a good repeatability. Disturbance of common ions, such as Mg 2+ , K + , and Ca 2+ , was small, and there was no disturbance in the presence of protein and RNA. This method has been applied to the determination of DNA in nectar successfully

  3. A method of layer-by-layer gold nanoparticle hybridization in a quartz crystal microbalance DNA sensing system used to detect dengue virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S-H; Chuang, Y-C; Lu, Y-C; Lin, H-C; Yang, Y-L; Lin, C-S [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: lincs@mail.nctu.edu.tw

    2009-05-27

    Dengue virus (DENV) is nowadays the most important arthropod-spread virus affecting humans existing in more than 100 countries worldwide. A rapid and sensitive detection method for the early diagnosis of infectious dengue virus urgently needs to be developed. In the present study, a circulating-flow quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensing method combining oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (i.e. AuNP probes) used to detect DENV has been established. In the DNA-QCM method, two kinds of specific AuNP probes were linked by the target sequences onto the QCM chip to amplify the detection signal, i.e. oscillatory frequency change ({delta}F) of the QCM sensor. The target sequences amplified from the DENV genome act as a bridge for the layer-by-layer AuNP probes' hybridization in the method. Besides being amplifiers of the detection signal, the specific AuNP probes used in the DNA-QCM method also play the role of verifiers to specifically recognize their target sequences in the detection. The effect of four AuNP sizes on the layer-by-layer hybridization has been evaluated and it is found that 13 nm AuNPs collocated with 13 nm AuNPs showed the best hybridization efficiency. According to the nanoparticle application, the DNA-QCM biosensing method was able to detect dengue viral RNA in virus-contaminated serum as plaque titers being 2 PFU ml{sup -1} and a linear correlation (R{sup 2} = 0.987) of {delta}F versus virus titration from 2 x 10{sup 0} to 2 x 10{sup 6} PFU ml{sup -1} was found. The sensitivity and specificity of the present DNA-QCM method with nanoparticle technology showed it to be comparable to the fluorescent real-time PCR methods. Moreover, the method described herein was shown to not require expensive equipment, was label-free and highly sensitive.

  4. An evidence on G2/M arrest, DNA damage and caspase mediated apoptotic effect of biosynthesized gold nanoparticles on human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeyaraj, M.; Arun, R.; Sathishkumar, G.; MubarakAli, D.; Rajesh, M.; Sivanandhan, G.; Kapildev, G.; Manickavasagam, M.; Thajuddin, N.; Ganapathi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been synthesized using Podophyllum hexandrum L. • AuNPs induces the oxidative stress to cell death in human cervical carcinoma cells. • It activates the caspase-cascade to cellular death. • It is actively blocks G2/M phase of cell cycle. - Abstract: Current prospect of nanobiotechnology involves in the greener synthesis of nanostructured materials particularly noble metal nanoparticles for various biomedical applications. In this study, biologically (Podophyllum hexandrum L.) synthesized crystalline gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with the size range between 5 and 35 nm were screened for its anticancereous potential against human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa). Stoichiometric proportion of the reaction mixture and conditions were optimized to attain stable nanoparticles with narrow size range. Different high throughput techniques like transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV–vis spectroscopy were adopted for the physio-chemical characterization of AuNPs. Additionally, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study revealed that the water soluble fractions present in the plant extract solely influences the reduction of AuNPs. Sublimely, synthesized AuNPs exhibits an effective in vitro anticancer activity against HeLa cells via induction of cell cycle arrest and DNA damage. Furthermore, it was evidenced that AuNPs treated cells are undergone apoptosis through the activation of caspase cascade which subsequently leads to mitochondrial dysfunction. Thereby, this study proves that biogenic colloidal AuNPs can be developed as a promising drug candidature for human cervical cancer therapy

  5. SOXE transcription factors form selective dimers on non-compact DNA motifs through multifaceted interactions between dimerization and high-mobility group domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong-Heng; Jankowski, Aleksander; Cheah, Kathryn S E; Prabhakar, Shyam; Jauch, Ralf

    2015-05-27

    The SOXE transcription factors SOX8, SOX9 and SOX10 are master regulators of mammalian development directing sex determination, gliogenesis, pancreas specification and neural crest development. We identified a set of palindromic SOX binding sites specifically enriched in regulatory regions of melanoma cells. SOXE proteins homodimerize on these sequences with high cooperativity. In contrast to other transcription factor dimers, which are typically rigidly spaced, SOXE group proteins can bind cooperatively at a wide range of dimer spacings. Using truncated forms of SOXE proteins, we show that a single dimerization (DIM) domain, that precedes the DNA binding high mobility group (HMG) domain, is sufficient for dimer formation, suggesting that DIM : HMG rather than DIM:DIM interactions mediate the dimerization. All SOXE members can also heterodimerize in this fashion, whereas SOXE heterodimers with SOX2, SOX4, SOX6 and SOX18 are not supported. We propose a structural model where SOXE-specific intramolecular DIM:HMG interactions are allosterically communicated to the HMG of juxtaposed molecules. Collectively, SOXE factors evolved a unique mode to combinatorially regulate their target genes that relies on a multifaceted interplay between the HMG and DIM domains. This property potentially extends further the diversity of target genes and cell-specific functions that are regulated by SOXE proteins.

  6. SOXE transcription factors form selective dimers on non-compact DNA motifs through multifaceted interactions between dimerization and high-mobility group domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong-Heng; Jankowski, Aleksander; Cheah, Kathryn S. E.; Prabhakar, Shyam; Jauch, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The SOXE transcription factors SOX8, SOX9 and SOX10 are master regulators of mammalian development directing sex determination, gliogenesis, pancreas specification and neural crest development. We identified a set of palindromic SOX binding sites specifically enriched in regulatory regions of melanoma cells. SOXE proteins homodimerize on these sequences with high cooperativity. In contrast to other transcription factor dimers, which are typically rigidly spaced, SOXE group proteins can bind cooperatively at a wide range of dimer spacings. Using truncated forms of SOXE proteins, we show that a single dimerization (DIM) domain, that precedes the DNA binding high mobility group (HMG) domain, is sufficient for dimer formation, suggesting that DIM : HMG rather than DIM:DIM interactions mediate the dimerization. All SOXE members can also heterodimerize in this fashion, whereas SOXE heterodimers with SOX2, SOX4, SOX6 and SOX18 are not supported. We propose a structural model where SOXE-specific intramolecular DIM:HMG interactions are allosterically communicated to the HMG of juxtaposed molecules. Collectively, SOXE factors evolved a unique mode to combinatorially regulate their target genes that relies on a multifaceted interplay between the HMG and DIM domains. This property potentially extends further the diversity of target genes and cell-specific functions that are regulated by SOXE proteins. PMID:26013289

  7. Epigenetic modulation upon exposure of lung fibroblasts to TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles: alterations in DNA methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil NA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nayana A Patil,1,2 WN Gade,2 Deepti D Deobagkar1 1Department of Zoology, Molecular Biology Research Laboratory, Centre of Advanced Studies, 2Department of Biotechnology, Proteomic Research Laboratory, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune, India Abstract: Titanium dioxide (TiO2 and zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticles (NPs are promising candidates for numerous applications in consumer products. This will lead to increased human exposure, thus posing a threat to human health. Both these types of NPs have been studied for their cell toxicity, immunotoxicity, and genotoxicity. However, effects of these NPs on epigenetic modulations have not been studied. Epigenetics is an important link in the genotype and phenotype modulation and misregulation can often lead to lifestyle diseases. In this study, we have evaluated the DNA methylation-based epigenetic changes upon exposure to various concentrations of NPs. The investigation was designed to evaluate global DNA methylation, estimating the corresponding methyltransferase activity and expression of Dnmt gene using lung fibroblast (MRC5 cell line as lungs are the primary route of entry and target of occupational exposure to TiO2 and ZnO NPs. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based immunochemical assay revealed dose-related decrease in global DNA methylation and DNA methyltransferase activity. We also found direct correlation between the concentration of NPs, global methylation levels, and expression levels of Dnmt1, 3A, and 3B genes upon exposure. This is the first study to investigate effect of exposure to TiO2 and ZnO on DNA methylation levels in MRC5 cells. Epigenetic processes are known to play an important role in reprogramming and adaptation ability of an organism and can have long-term consequences. We suggest that changes in DNA methylation can serve as good biomarkers for early exposure to NPs since they occur at concentrations well below the sublethal levels. Our results demonstrate a clear

  8. Green Synthesized Zinc Oxide (ZnO Nanoparticles Induce Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage in Lathyrus sativus L. Root Bioassay System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal K. Panda

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONP-GS were synthesised from the precursor zinc acetate (Zn(CH3COO2 through the green route using the milky latex from milk weed (Calotropis gigantea L. R. Br by alkaline precipitation. Formation of the ZnONP-GS was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy followed by characterization and confirmation by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and X-ray diffraction (XRD. Both the ZnONP-GS and the commercially available ZnONP-S (Sigma-Aldrich and cationic Zn2+ from Zn(CH3COO2 were tested in a dose range of 0–100 mg·L−1 for their potency (i to induce oxidative stress as measured by the generation reactive oxygen species (ROS: O2•−, H2O2 and •OH, cell death, and lipid peroxidation; (ii to modulate the activities of antioxidant enzymes: catalase (CAT, superoxide dismutase (SOD, guaiacol peroxidase (GPX, and ascorbate peroxidase (APX; and (iii to cause DNA damage as determined by Comet assay in Lathyrus sativus L. root bioassay system. Antioxidants such as Tiron and dimethylthiourea significantly attenuated the ZnONP-induced oxidative and DNA damage, suggesting the involvement of ROS therein. Our study demonstrated that both ZnONP-GS and ZnONP-S induced oxidative stress and DNA damage to a similar extent but were significantly less potent than Zn2+ alone.

  9. Green Synthesized Zinc Oxide (ZnO) Nanoparticles Induce Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage in Lathyrus sativus L. Root Bioassay System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Kamal K; Golari, Dambaru; Venugopal, A; Achary, V Mohan M; Phaomei, Ganngam; Parinandi, Narasimham L; Sahu, Hrushi K; Panda, Brahma B

    2017-05-18

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONP-GS) were synthesised from the precursor zinc acetate (Zn(CH₃COO)₂) through the green route using the milky latex from milk weed ( Calotropis gigantea L. R. Br) by alkaline precipitation. Formation of the ZnONP-GS was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy followed by characterization and confirmation by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Both the ZnONP-GS and the commercially available ZnONP-S (Sigma-Aldrich) and cationic Zn 2+ from Zn(CH₃COO)₂ were tested in a dose range of 0-100 mg·L -1 for their potency (i) to induce oxidative stress as measured by the generation reactive oxygen species (ROS: O₂ •- , H₂O₂ and • OH), cell death, and lipid peroxidation; (ii) to modulate the activities of antioxidant enzymes: catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX); and (iii) to cause DNA damage as determined by Comet assay in Lathyrus sativus L. root bioassay system. Antioxidants such as Tiron and dimethylthiourea significantly attenuated the ZnONP-induced oxidative and DNA damage, suggesting the involvement of ROS therein. Our study demonstrated that both ZnONP-GS and ZnONP-S induced oxidative stress and DNA damage to a similar extent but were significantly less potent than Zn 2+ alone.

  10. Silica-coated La.sub.0.75./sub.Sr.sub.0.25./sub.MnO.sub.3./sub. nanoparticles for magnetically driven DNA isolation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trachtová, Š.; Kaman, Ondřej; Španová, A.; Veverka, Pavel; Pollert, Emil; Rittich, B.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 21 (2011), s. 3077-3082 ISSN 1615-9306 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200200651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : DNA isolation * lanthanum manganese perovskite * nanoparticles Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.733, year: 2011

  11. Correction: One-step coelectrodeposition-assisted layer-by-layer assembly of gold nanoparticles and reduced graphene oxide and its self-healing three-dimensional nanohybrid for an ultrasensitive DNA sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Kumarasamy; Camarada, María Belén; Dharuman, Venkataraman; Ju, Huangxian; Dey, Ramendra Sundar; Wen, Yangping

    2018-02-01

    Correction for 'One-step coelectrodeposition-assisted layer-by-layer assembly of gold nanoparticles and reduced graphene oxide and its self-healing three-dimensional nanohybrid for an ultrasensitive DNA sensor' by Jayakumar Kumarasamy, et al., Nanoscale, 2018, DOI: 10.1039/c7nr06952a.

  12. Magnetic Actuation of Self-Assembled DNA Hinges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauback, S.; Mattioli, K.; Armstrong, M.; Miller, C.; Pease, C.; Castro, C.; Sooryakumar, R.

    DNA nanotechnology offers a broad range of applications spanning from the creation of nanoscale devices, motors and nanoparticle templates to the development of precise drug delivery systems. Central to advancing this technology is the ability to actuate or reconfigure structures in real time, which is currently achieved primarily by DNA strand displacement yielding slow actuation times (about 1-10min). Here we exploit superparamagnetic beads to magnetically actuate DNA structures which also provides a system to measure forces associated with molecular interactions. DNA nanodevices are folded using DNA origami, whereby a long single-stranded DNA is folded into a precise compact geometry using hundreds of short oligonucleotides. Our DNA nanodevice is a nanohinge from which rod shaped DNA nanostructures are polymerized into micron-scale filaments forming handles for actuation. By functionalizing one arm of the hinge and the filament ends, the hinge can be attached to a surface while still allowing an arm to rotate and the filaments can be labeled with magnetic beads enabling the hinge to be actuated almost instantaneously by external magnetic fields. These results lay the groundwork to establish real-time manipulation and direct force application of DNA constructs.

  13. Effects of Laser Printer–Emitted Engineered Nanoparticles on Cytotoxicity, Chemokine Expression, Reactive Oxygen Species, DNA Methylation, and DNA Damage: A Comprehensive in Vitro Analysis in Human Small Airway Epithelial Cells, Macrophages, and Lymphoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirela, Sandra V.; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Lu, Xiaoyan; Castranova, Vincent; Thomas, Treye; Qian, Yong; Bello, Dhimiter; Kobzik, Lester; Koturbash, Igor; Demokritou, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Background Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) incorporated into toner formulations of printing equipment become airborne during consumer use. Although information on the complex physicochemical and toxicological properties of both toner powders and printer-emitted particles (PEPs) continues to grow, most toxicological studies have not used the actual PEPs but rather have primarily used raw toner powders, which are not representative of current exposures experienced at the consumer level during printing. Objectives We assessed the biological responses of a panel of human cell lines to PEPs. Methods Three physiologically relevant cell lines—small airway epithelial cells (SAECs), macrophages (THP-1 cells), and lymphoblasts (TK6 cells)—were exposed to PEPs at a wide range of doses (0.5–100 μg/mL) corresponding to human inhalation exposure durations at the consumer level of 8 hr or more. Following treatment, toxicological parameters reflecting distinct mechanisms were evaluated. Results PEPs caused significant membrane integrity damage, an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine release in different cell lines at doses equivalent to exposure durations from 7.8 to 1,500 hr. Furthermore, there were differences in methylation patterns that, although not statistically significant, demonstrate the potential effects of PEPs on the overall epigenome following exposure. Conclusions The in vitro findings obtained in this study suggest that laser printer–emitted engineered nanoparticles may be deleterious to lung cells and provide preliminary evidence of epigenetic modifications that might translate to pulmonary disorders. Citation Pirela SV, Miousse IR, Lu X, Castranova V, Thomas T, Qian Y, Bello D, Kobzik L, Koturbash I, Demokritou P. 2016. Effects of laser printer–emitted engineered nanoparticles on cytotoxicity, chemokine expression, reactive oxygen species, DNA methylation, and DNA damage: a comprehensive in

  14. DNA Damage Following Pulmonary Exposure by Instillation to Low Doses of Carbon Black (Printex 90) Nanoparticles in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyjovska, Zdenka O.; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Saber, Anne T.

    2015-01-01

    of 0.67, 2, 6, and 162 mu g Printex 90 NPCB and vehicle. Cellular composition and protein concentration was evaluated in BAL fluid as markers of inflammatory response and cell damage. DNA strand breaks in BAL cells, lung, and liver tissue were assessed using the alkaline comet assay. The pulmonary...... the comet assay. We interpret the increased DNA strand breaks occurring following these low exposure doses of NPCB as DNA damage caused by primary genotoxicity in the absence of substantial inflammation, cell damage, and acute phase response. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 56:41-49, 2015. (c) 2014 The Authors...

  15. EGFR-targeted plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles suppress lung tumor growth by abrogating G2/M cell-cycle arrest and inducing DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroda S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Shinji Kuroda,1 Justina Tam,2 Jack A Roth,1 Konstantin Sokolov,2 Rajagopal Ramesh3–5 1Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 2Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 3Department of Pathology, 4Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences, 5Stephenson Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA Background: We have previously demonstrated the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-targeted hybrid plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles (225-NP produce a therapeutic effect in human lung cancer cell lines in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of 225-NP-mediated antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo using the EGFR-mutant HCC827 cell line. Methods: The growth inhibitory effect of 225-NP on lung tumor cells was determined by cell viability and cell-cycle analysis. Protein expression related to autophagy, apoptosis, and DNA-damage were determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. An in vivo efficacy study was conducted using a human lung tumor xenograft mouse model. Results: The 225-NP treatment markedly reduced tumor cell viability at 72 hours compared with the cell viability in control treatment groups. Cell-cycle analysis showed the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase was reduced when treated with 225-NP, with a concomitant increase in the number of cells in Sub-G1 phase, indicative of cell death. Western blotting showed LC3B and PARP cleavage, indicating 225-NP-treatment activated both autophagy- and apoptosis-mediated cell death. The 225-NP strongly induced γH2AX and phosphorylated histone H3, markers indicative of DNA damage and mitosis, respectively. Additionally, significant γH2AX foci formation was observed in 225-NP-treated cells compared with control treatment groups, suggesting 225-NP induced cell death by triggering DNA damage. The 225-NP-mediated DNA damage involved abrogation of the

  16. Real-time monitoring of mycobacterium genomic DNA with target-primed rolling circle amplification by a Au nanoparticle-embedded SPR biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yang; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Huang, Qing; Zheng, Junsong; Fu, Weiling

    2015-04-15

    In this study, we developed a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) DNA biosensor array based on target-primed rolling circle amplification (RCA) for isothermal and rapid detection of two pathogenic mycobacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC).The species-specific padlock probe (PLP) was designed to target the sequence in 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS). After ligation, the circularized PLP could be primed by the target sequence to initial RCA. The RCA performed simultaneously with the cleavage reaction to produce small fragments of single strand DNA which immediately hybridized with the probe immobilized on the sensor chip without denaturation. This process caused SPR angle changes on the chip surface, which made the detection for analysis from the solution achievable, and dynamic real-time RCA monitoring of mycobacterium possible. Besides, Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) were directly assembled onto the surface of the sensor chip via hexanedithiol (HDT) for the enhancement of sensitivity as a label-free detection system. Experimental results show that the signal enhancement by the target-primed RCA together with AuNPs-embedded surface caused at least10-fold increased sensitivity as compared with conventional RCA on bare SPR chip method. Within 40min amplification duration as low as 20amol of synthetic targets and 10(4)CFUmL(-1) of genomic DNA from clinical samples can be detected. The proposed method not only provides a simple design idea for liquid-phase amplification monitoring, but also apply it in clinical pathogen detection, which holds great promise in ultrasensitive bioassay in the future. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Development of a free-solution SERS-based assay for point-of-care oral cancer biomarker detection using DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sungyub; Locke, Andrea K.; Oaks, Luke A.; Cheng, Yi-Shing Lisa; Coté, Gerard L.

    2018-02-01

    It is estimated that the number of new cases of oral cancers worldwide is 529,000 and more than 300,000 deaths each year. The five-year survival rate remains about 50%, and the low survival rate is believed to be due to delayed detection. The primary detection method is through a comprehensive clinical examination by a dentist followed by a biopsy of suspicious lesions. Systematic review and meta-analysis have revealed that clinical examination alone may not be sufficient to cause the clinician to perform a biopsy or refer for biopsy for early detection of OSCC. Therefore, a non-invasive, point-of-Care (POC) detection with high sensitivity and specificity for early detection would be urgently needed, and using salivary biomarkers would be an ideal technology for it. S100 calcium binding protein P (S100P) mRNA presenting in saliva is a potential biomarker for detection of oral cancer. Further, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been shown to be a promising POC diagnostic technique. In this research, a SERS-based assay using oligonucleotide strains was developed for the sensitive and rapid detection of S100P. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as a SERS substrate were used for the conjugation with one of two unique 24 base pair oligonucleotides, referred to as left and right DNA probes. A Raman reporter molecule, malachite green isothiocyanate (MGITC), was bound to left-probe-conjugated AuNPs. UV-vis spectroscopy was employed to monitor the conjugation of DNA probes to AuNPs. The hybridization of S100P target to DNA-conjugated AuNPs in sandwich-assay format was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and shown to yield and R2 of 0.917 across the range of 0-200 nM and a limit of detection of 3 nM.

  18. DNA origami based Au–Ag-core–shell nanoparticle dimers with single-molecule SERS sensitivity† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional information about materials and methods, designs of DNA origami templates, height profiles, additional SERS spectra, assignment of DNA bands, SEM images, additional AFM images, FDTD simulations, additional reference spectra for Cy3 and detailed description of EF estimation, simulated absorption and scattering spectra. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08674d Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, J.; Heck, C.; Ellerik, L.; Merk, V.

    2016-01-01

    DNA origami nanostructures are a versatile tool to arrange metal nanostructures and other chemical entities with nanometer precision. In this way gold nanoparticle dimers with defined distance can be constructed, which can be exploited as novel substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We have optimized the size, composition and arrangement of Au/Ag nanoparticles to create intense SERS hot spots, with Raman enhancement up to 1010, which is sufficient to detect single molecules by Raman scattering. This is demonstrated using single dye molecules (TAMRA and Cy3) placed into the center of the nanoparticle dimers. In conjunction with the DNA origami nanostructures novel SERS substrates are created, which can in the future be applied to the SERS analysis of more complex biomolecular targets, whose position and conformation within the SERS hot spot can be precisely controlled. PMID:26892770

  19. A nonviral DNA delivery system based on surface modified silica-nanoparticles can efficiently transfect cells in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneuer, C; Sameti, M; Bakowsky, U; Schiestel, T; Schirra, H

    2000-01-01

    Diverse polycationic polymers have been used as nonviral transfection agents. Here we report the ability of colloidal silica particles with covalently attached cationic surface modifications to transfect plasmid DNA in vitro and make an attempt to describe the structure of the resulting transfection

  20. Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Okamura, Hajime; Ouchi, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete was first developed in 1988 to achieve durable concrete structures. Since then, various investigations have been carried out and this type of concrete has been used in practical structures in Japan, mainly by large construction companies. Investigations for establishing a rational mix-design method and self-compactability testing methods have been carried out from the viewpoint of making self-compacting concrete a standard concrete.

  1. Functionalized gold nanoparticles for the binding, stabilization, and delivery of therapeutic DNA, RNA, and other biological macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K DeLong

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Robert K DeLong1, Christopher M Reynolds1, Yaneika Malcolm1, Ashley Schaeffer1, Tiffany Severs2, Adam Wanekaya21Department of Biomedical Science (Cell and Molecular Biology Program, 2Department of Chemistry, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO, USAAbstract: Nanotechnology has virtually exploded in the last few years with seemingly limitless opportunity across all segments of our society. If gene and RNA therapy are to ever realize their full potential, there is a great need for nanomaterials that can bind, stabilize, and deliver these macromolecular nucleic acids into human cells and tissues. Many researchers have turned to gold nanomaterials, as gold is thought to be relatively well tolerated in humans and provides an inert material upon which nucleic acids can attach. Here, we review the various strategies for associating macromolecular nucleic acids to the surface of gold nanoparticles (GNPs, the characterization chemistries involved, and the potential advantages of GNPs in terms of stabilization and delivery.Keywords: gold, nanoparticles, nanomaterials, RNA, nucleic acid

  2. Compact Polarimetry Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Loi, My-Linh; Dubois-Fernandez, Pascale; Pottier, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to show the potential of a compact-pol SAR system for vegetation applications. Compact-pol concept has been suggested to minimize the system design while maximize the information and is declined as the ?/4, ?/2 and hybrid modes. In this paper, the applications such as biomass and vegetation height estimates are first presented, then, the equivalence between compact-pol data simulated from full-pol data and compact-pol data processed from raw data as such is shown. Finally, a calibration procedure using external targets is proposed.

  3. Pharmaceutical powder compaction technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Çelik, Metin

    2011-01-01

    "Revised to reflect modern pharmaceutical compacting techniques, this Second Edition guides pharmaceutical engineers, formulation scientists, and product development and quality assurance personnel...

  4. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  5. DNA nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Nadrian C.; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2018-01-01

    DNA is the molecule that stores and transmits genetic information in biological systems. The field of DNA nanotechnology takes this molecule out of its biological context and uses its information to assemble structural motifs and then to connect them together. This field has had a remarkable impact on nanoscience and nanotechnology, and has been revolutionary in our ability to control molecular self-assembly. In this Review, we summarize the approaches used to assemble DNA nanostructures and examine their emerging applications in areas such as biophysics, diagnostics, nanoparticle and protein assembly, biomolecule structure determination, drug delivery and synthetic biology. The introduction of orthogonal interactions into DNA nanostructures is discussed, and finally, a perspective on the future directions of this field is presented.

  6. Gene expression profiles in primary duodenal chick cells following transfection with avian influenza virus H5 DNA plasmid encapsulated in silver nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jazayeri SD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Seyed Davoud Jazayeri,1 Aini Ideris,1,2 Kamyar Shameli,3 Hassan Moeini,1 Abdul Rahman Omar1,21Institute of Bioscience, 2Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 3Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, MalaysiaAbstract: In order to develop a systemically administered safe and effective nonviral gene delivery system against avian influenza virus (AIV that induced cytokine expression, the hemagglutinin (H5 gene of AIV, A/Ck/Malaysia/5858/04 (H5N1 and green fluorescent protein were cloned into a coexpression vector pIRES (pIREGFP-H5 and formulated using green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs with poly(ethylene glycol and transfected into primary duodenal cells taken from 18-day-old specific-pathogen-free chick embryos. The AgNPs were prepared using moderated temperature and characterized for particle size, surface charge, ultraviolet-visible spectra, DNA loading, and stability. AgNPs and AgNP-pIREGFP-H5 were prepared in the size range of 13.9 nm and 25 nm with a positive charge of +78 ± 0.6 mV and +40 ± 6.2 mV, respectively. AgNPs with a positive surface charge could encapsulate pIREGFP-H5 efficiently. The ultraviolet-visible spectra for AgNP-pIREGFP-H5 treated with DNase I showed that the AgNPs were able to encapsulate pIREGFP-H5 efficiently. Polymerase chain reaction showed that AgNP-pIREGFP-H5 entered into primary duodenal cells rapidly, as early as one hour after transfection. Green fluorescent protein expression was observed after 36 hours, peaked at 48 hours, and remained stable for up to 60 hours. In addition, green fluorescent protein expression generally increased with increasing DNA concentration and time. Cells were transfected using Lipocurax in vitro transfection reagent as a positive control. A multiplex quantitative mRNA gene expression assay in the transfected primary duodenal cells via the transfection reagent and AgNPs with pIREGFP-H5 revealed expression of interleukin (IL-18, IL-15, and IL-12

  7. Uniaxial backfill block compaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskinen, V.

    2012-05-01

    The main parts of the project were: to make a literature survey of the previous uniaxial compaction experiments; do uniaxial compaction tests in laboratory scale; and do industrial scale production tests. Object of the project was to sort out the different factors affecting the quality assurance chain of the backfill block uniaxial production and solve a material sticking to mould problem which appeared during manufacturing the blocks of bentonite and cruched rock mixture. The effect of mineralogical and chemical composition on the long term functionality of the backfill was excluded from the project. However, the used smectite-rich clays have been tested for mineralogical consistency. These tests were done in B and Tech OY according their SOPs. The objective of the Laboratory scale tests was to find right material- and compaction parameters for the industrial scale tests. Direct comparison between the laboratory scale tests and industrial scale tests is not possible because the mould geometry and compaction speed has a big influence for the compaction process. For this reason the selected material parameters were also affected by the previous compaction experiments. The industrial scale tests were done in summer of 2010 in southern Sweden. Blocks were done with uniaxial compaction. A 40 tons of the mixture of bentonite and crushed rock blocks and almost 50 tons of Friedland-clay blocks were compacted. (orig.)

  8. Compaction properties of isomalt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, Gerad K.; Engelhart, Jeffrey J. P.; Eissens, Anko C.

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of

  9. Model Compaction Equation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The currently proposed model compaction equation was derived from data sourced from the. Niger Delta and it relates porosity to depth for sandstones under hydrostatic pressure condition. The equation is useful in predicting porosity and compaction trend in hydrostatic sands of the. Niger Delta. GEOLOGICAL SETTING OF ...

  10. Comparative assessment of plasmid DNA delivery by encapsulation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To compare the gene delivery effectiveness of plasmid DNA (pDNA) encapsulated within poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles with that adsorbed on PLGA nanoparticles. Methods: PLGA nanoparticles were prepared using solvent-evaporation method. To encapsulate pDNA within the particles, ...

  11. Stabilization of compactible waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Part II: Functional delivery of a neurotherapeutic gene to neural stem cells using minicircle DNA and nanoparticles: Translational advantages for regenerative neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Alinda R; Chari, Divya M

    2016-09-28

    Both neurotrophin-based therapy and neural stem cell (NSC)-based strategies have progressed to clinical trials for treatment of neurological diseases and injuries. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in particular can confer neuroprotective and neuro-regenerative effects in preclinical studies, complementing the cell replacement benefits of NSCs. Therefore, combining both approaches by genetically-engineering NSCs to express BDNF is an attractive approach to achieve combinatorial therapy for complex neural injuries. Current genetic engineering approaches almost exclusively employ viral vectors for gene delivery to NSCs though safety and scalability pose major concerns for clinical translation and applicability. Magnetofection, a non-viral gene transfer approach deploying magnetic nanoparticles and DNA with magnetic fields offers a safe alternative but significant improvements are required to enhance its clinical application for delivery of large sized therapeutic plasmids. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of using minicircles with magnetofection technology to safely engineer NSCs to overexpress BDNF. Primary mouse NSCs overexpressing BDNF generated increased daughter neuronal cell numbers post-differentiation, with accelerated maturation over a four-week period. Based on our findings we highlight the clinical potential of minicircle/magnetofection technology for therapeutic delivery of key neurotrophic agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mouse Embryo Compaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M D; Bissiere, S; Alvarez, Y D; Plachta, N

    2016-01-01

    Compaction is a critical first morphological event in the preimplantation development of the mammalian embryo. Characterized by the transformation of the embryo from a loose cluster of spherical cells into a tightly packed mass, compaction is a key step in the establishment of the first tissue-like structures of the embryo. Although early investigation of the mechanisms driving compaction implicated changes in cell-cell adhesion, recent work has identified essential roles for cortical tension and a compaction-specific class of filopodia. During the transition from 8 to 16 cells, as the embryo is compacting, it must also make fundamental decisions regarding cell position, polarity, and fate. Understanding how these and other processes are integrated with compaction requires further investigation. Emerging imaging-based techniques that enable quantitative analysis from the level of cell-cell interactions down to the level of individual regulatory molecules will provide a greater understanding of how compaction shapes the early mammalian embryo. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Green Solvent Induced DNA Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpathi, Sagar; Sengupta, Abhigyan; Hridya, V. M.; Gavvala, Krishna; Koninti, Raj Kumar; Roy, Bibhisan; Hazra, Partha

    2015-03-01

    Mechanistic details of DNA compaction is essential blue print for gene regulation in living organisms. Many in vitro studies have been implemented using several compaction agents. However, these compacting agents may have some kinds of cytotoxic effects to the cells. To minimize this aspect, several research works had been performed, but people have never focused green solvent, i.e. room temperature ionic liquid as DNA compaction agent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ever report where we have shown that guanidinium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate (Gua-IL) acts as a DNA compacting agent. The compaction ability of Gua-IL has been verified by different spectroscopic techniques, like steady state emission, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering and UV melting. Notably, we have extensively probed this compaction by Gua-IL through field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and fluorescence microscopy images. We also have discussed the plausible compaction mechanism process of DNA by Gua-IL. Our results suggest that Gua-IL forms a micellar kind of self aggregation above a certain concentration (>=1 mM), which instigates this compaction process. This study divulges the specific details of DNA compaction mechanism by a new class of compaction agent, which is highly biodegradable and eco friendly in nature.

  15. Small Valdivia compact spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kubi's, W; Kubi\\'s, Wieslaw; Michalewski, Henryk

    2005-01-01

    We prove a preservation theorem for the class of Valdivia compact spaces, which involves inverse sequences of ``simple'' retractions. Consequently, a compact space of weight $\\loe\\aleph_1$ is Valdivia compact iff it is the limit of an inverse sequence of metric compacta whose bonding maps are retractions. As a corollary, we show that the class of Valdivia compacta of weight at most $\\aleph_1$ is preserved both under retractions and under open 0-dimensional images. Finally, we characterize the class of all Valdivia compacta in the language of category theory, which implies that this class is preserved under all continuous weight preserving functors.

  16. DNA controlled assembly of liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stefan; Jakobsen, Ulla; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2009-01-01

    DNA-encoding of solid nanoparticles requires surfacechemistry, which is often tedious and not generally applicable. In the present study non-covalently attached DNA are used to assemble soft nanoparticles (liposomes) in solution. This process displays remarkably sharp thermal transitions from...... assembled to disassembled state for which reason this method allows easy and fast detection of polynucleotides (e.g. DNA or RNA), including single nucleotide polymorphisms as well as insertions and deletions....

  17. A fusion of minicircle DNA and nanoparticle delivery technologies facilitates therapeutic genetic engineering of autologous canine olfactory mucosal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Alexander M; Adams, Christopher F; Fernandes, Alinda R; Al-Shakli, Arwa F; Sen, Jon; Carwardine, Darren R; Granger, Nicolas; Chari, Divya M

    2017-06-29

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) promote axonal regeneration and improve locomotor function when transplanted into the injured spinal cord. A recent clinical trial demonstrated improved motor function in domestic dogs with spinal injury following autologous OEC transplantation. Their utility in canines offers promise for human translation, as dogs are comparable to humans in terms of clinical management and genetic/environmental variation. Moreover, the autologous, minimally invasive derivation of OECs makes them viable for human spinal injury investigation. Genetic engineering of transplant populations may augment their therapeutic potential, but relies heavily on viral methods which have several drawbacks for clinical translation. We present here the first proof that magnetic particles deployed with applied magnetic fields and advanced DNA minicircle vectors can safely bioengineer OECs to secrete a key neurotrophic factor, with an efficiency approaching that of viral vectors. We suggest that our alternative approach offers high translational potential for the delivery of augmented clinical cell therapies.

  18. Compact turbidity meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschberg, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Proposed monitor that detects back-reflected infrared radiation makes in situ turbidity measurements of lakes, streams, and other bodies of water. Monitor is compact, works well in daylight as at night, and is easily operated in rough seas.

  19. Polymer crowding and shape distributions in polymer-nanoparticle mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Wei Kang; Denton, Alan R., E-mail: alan.denton@ndsu.edu [Department of Physics, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota 58108-6050 (United States)

    2014-09-21

    Macromolecular crowding can influence polymer shapes, which is important for understanding the thermodynamic stability of polymer solutions and the structure and function of biopolymers (proteins, RNA, DNA) under confinement. We explore the influence of nanoparticle crowding on polymer shapes via Monte Carlo simulations and free-volume theory of a coarse-grained model of polymer-nanoparticle mixtures. Exploiting the geometry of random walks, we model polymer coils as effective penetrable ellipsoids, whose shapes fluctuate according to the probability distributions of the eigenvalues of the gyration tensor. Accounting for the entropic cost of a nanoparticle penetrating a larger polymer coil, we compute the crowding-induced shift in the shape distributions, radius of gyration, and asphericity of ideal polymers in a theta solvent. With increased nanoparticle crowding, we find that polymers become more compact (smaller, more spherical), in agreement with predictions of free-volume theory. Our approach can be easily extended to nonideal polymers in good solvents and used to model conformations of biopolymers in crowded environments.

  20. Polymer crowding and shape distributions in polymer-nanoparticle mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Wei Kang; Denton, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Macromolecular crowding can influence polymer shapes, which is important for understanding the thermodynamic stability of polymer solutions and the structure and function of biopolymers (proteins, RNA, DNA) under confinement. We explore the influence of nanoparticle crowding on polymer shapes via Monte Carlo simulations and free-volume theory of a coarse-grained model of polymer-nanoparticle mixtures. Exploiting the geometry of random walks, we model polymer coils as effective penetrable ellipsoids, whose shapes fluctuate according to the probability distributions of the eigenvalues of the gyration tensor. Accounting for the entropic cost of a nanoparticle penetrating a larger polymer coil, we compute the crowding-induced shift in the shape distributions, radius of gyration, and asphericity of ideal polymers in a theta solvent. With increased nanoparticle crowding, we find that polymers become more compact (smaller, more spherical), in agreement with predictions of free-volume theory. Our approach can be easily extended to nonideal polymers in good solvents and used to model conformations of biopolymers in crowded environments

  1. Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles in Listeria innocua Dps (DNA-binding protein from starved cells): a study with the wild-type protein and a catalytic centre mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceci, Pierpaolo; Chiancone, Emilia; Kasyutich, Oksana; Bellapadrona, Giuliano; Castelli, Lisa; Fittipaldi, Maria; Gatteschi, Dante; Innocenti, Claudia; Sangregorio, Claudio

    2010-01-11

    A comparative analysis of the magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles grown in the cavity of the DNA-binding protein from starved cells of the bacterium Listeria innocua, LiDps, and of its triple-mutant lacking the catalytic ferroxidase centre, LiDps-tm, is presented. TEM images and static and dynamic magnetic and electron magnetic resonance (EMR) measurements reveal that, under the applied preparation conditions, namely alkaline pH, high temperature (65 degrees C), exclusion of oxygen, and the presence of hydrogen peroxide, maghemite and/or magnetite nanoparticles with an average diameter of about 3 nm are mineralised inside the cavities of both LiDps and LiDps-tm. The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) thus formed show similar magnetic properties, with superparamagnetic behaviour above 4.5 K and a large magnetic anisotropy. Interestingly, in the EMR spectra an absorption at half-field is observed, which can be considered as a manifestation of the quantum behaviour of the MNPs. These results indicate that Dps proteins can be advantageously used for the production of nanomagnets at the interface between molecular clusters and traditional MNPs and that the presence of the ferroxidase centre, though increasing the efficiency of nanoparticle formation, does not affect the nature and fine structure of the MNPs. Importantly, the self-organisation of MNP-containing Dps on HRTEM grids suggests that Dps-enclosed MNPs can be deposited on surfaces in an ordered fashion.

  2. Compaction of FGD-gypsum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoop, B.T.J.; Larbi, J.A.; Heijnen, W.M.M.

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that it is possible to produce compacted gypsum with a low porosity and a high strength on a laboratory scale by uniaxial compaction of flue gas desulphurization (FGD-) gypsum powder. Compacted FGD-gypsum cylinders were produced at a compaction pres-sure between 50 and 500 MPa yielding

  3. Physically detached 'compact groups'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernquist, Lars; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, David H.

    1995-01-01

    A small fraction of galaxies appear to reside in dense compact groups, whose inferred crossing times are much shorter than a Hubble time. These short crossing times have led to considerable disagreement among researchers attempting to deduce the dynamical state of these systems. In this paper, we suggest that many of the observed groups are not physically bound but are chance projections of galaxies well separated along the line of sight. Unlike earlier similar proposals, ours does not require that the galaxies in the compact group be members of a more diffuse, but physically bound entity. The probability of physically separated galaxies projecting into an apparent compact group is nonnegligible if most galaxies are distributed in thin filaments. We illustrate this general point with a specific example: a simulation of a cold dark matter universe, in which hydrodynamic effects are included to identify galaxies. The simulated galaxy distribution is filamentary and end-on views of these filaments produce apparent galaxy associations that have sizes and velocity dispersions similar to those of observed compact groups. The frequency of such projections is sufficient, in principle, to explain the observed space density of groups in the Hickson catalog. We discuss the implications of our proposal for the formation and evolution of groups and elliptical galaxies. The proposal can be tested by using redshift-independent distance estimators to measure the line-of-sight spatial extent of nearby compact groups.

  4. Generation of Nanoparticles by Spark Discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salman Tabrizi, N.

    2009-01-01

    Spark discharge is a method for producing nanoparticles from conductive materials. Besides the general advantages of nanoparticle synthesis in the gas phase, the method offers additional advantages like simplicity, compactness and versatility. The synthesis process is continuous and is performed at

  5. Synthesis of amorphous acid iron phosphate nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, E.; Leret, P.; Fernández, J. F.; Aza, A. H. De; Rodríguez, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    A simple method to precipitate nanoparticles of iron phosphate with acid character has been developed in which the control of pH allows to obtain amorphous nanoparticles. The acid aging of the precipitated amorphous nanoparticles favored the P–O bond strength that contributes to the surface reordering, the surface roughness and the increase of the phosphate acid character. The thermal behavior of the acid iron phosphate nanoparticles has been also studied and the phosphate polymerization at 400 °C produces strong compacts of amorphous nanoparticles with interconnected porosity.

  6. Inhomogeneous compact extra dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronnikov, K.A. [Center of Gravity and Fundamental Metrology, VNIIMS, 46 Ozyornaya st., Moscow 119361 (Russian Federation); Budaev, R.I.; Grobov, A.V.; Dmitriev, A.E.; Rubin, Sergey G., E-mail: kb20@yandex.ru, E-mail: buday48@mail.ru, E-mail: alexey.grobov@gmail.com, E-mail: alexdintras@mail.ru, E-mail: sergeirubin@list.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-10-01

    We show that an inhomogeneous compact extra space possesses two necessary features— their existence does not contradict the observable value of the cosmological constant Λ{sub 4} in pure f ( R ) theory, and the extra dimensions are stable relative to the 'radion mode' of perturbations, the only mode considered. For a two-dimensional extra space, both analytical and numerical solutions for the metric are found, able to provide a zero or arbitrarily small Λ{sub 4}. A no-go theorem has also been proved, that maximally symmetric compact extra spaces are inconsistent with 4D Minkowski space in the framework of pure f ( R ) gravity.

  7. A novel probe density controllable electrochemiluminescence biosensor for ultra-sensitive detection of Hg2+ based on DNA hybridization optimization with gold nanoparticles array patterned self-assembly platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenhua; Zhang, An; Chen, Yunsheng; Chen, Zixuan; Chen, Yaowen; Lu, Fushen; Chen, Zhanguang

    2013-11-15

    Biosensor based on DNA hybridization holds great potential to get higher sensitivity as the optimal DNA hybridization efficiency can be achieved by controlling the distribution and orientation of probe strands on the transducer surface. In this work, an innovative strategy is reported to tap the sensitivity potential of current electrochemiluminescence (ECL) biosensing system by dispersedly anchoring the DNA beacons on the gold nanoparticles (GNPs) array which was electrodeposited on the glassy carbon electrode surface, rather than simply sprawling the coil-like strands onto planar gold surface. The strategy was developed by designing a "signal-on" ECL biosensing switch fabricated on the GNPs nanopatterned electrode surface for enhanced ultra-sensitivity detection of Hg(2+). A 57-mer hairpin-DNA labeled with ferrocene as ECL quencher and a 13-mer DNA labeled with Ru(bpy)3(2+) as reporter were hybridized to construct the signal generator in off-state. A 31-mer thymine (T)-rich capture-DNA was introduced to form T-T mismatches with the loop sequence of the hairpin-DNA in the presence of Hg(2+) and induce the stem-loop open, meanwhile the ECL "signal-on" was triggered. The peak sensitivity with the lowest detection limit of 0.1 nM was achieved with the optimal GNPs number density while exorbitant GNPs deposition resulted in sensitivity deterioration for the biosensor. We expect the present strategy could lead the renovation of the existing probe-immobilized ECL genosensor design to get an even higher sensitivity in ultralow level of target detection such as the identification of genetic diseases and disorders in basic research and clinical application. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of ceramic powder compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanai, K.; Ishimoto, S.; Kubo, T.; Ito, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Hayashi, H.

    1995-01-01

    UO 2 and Al 2 O 3 powder packing structures in cylindrical powder compacts are observed by scanning electron microscopy using polished cross sections of compacts fixed by low viscosity epoxy resin. Hard aggregates which are not destroyed during powder compaction are observed in some of the UO 2 powder compacts. A technique to measure local density in powder compacts is developed based on counting characteristic X-ray intensity by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The local density of the corner portion of the powder compact fabricated by double-acting dry press is higher than that of the inner portion. ((orig.))

  9. Weakly compact operators and interpolation

    OpenAIRE

    Maligranda, Lech

    1992-01-01

    The class of weakly compact operators is, as well as the class of compact operators, a fundamental operator ideal. They were investigated strongly in the last twenty years. In this survey, we have collected and ordered some of this (partly very new) knowledge. We have also included some comments, remarks and examples. The class of weakly compact operators is, as well as the class of compact operators, a fundamental operator ideal. They were investigated strongly in the last twenty years. I...

  10. Shelterin Protects Chromosome Ends by Compacting Telomeric Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandaria, Jigar N.; Qin, Peiwu; Berk, Veysel; Chu, Steven; Yildiz, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Telomeres, repetitive DNA sequences at chromosome ends, are shielded against the DNA damage response (DDR) by the shelterin complex. To understand how shelterin protects telomere ends, we investigated the structural organization of telomeric chromatin in human cells using super-resolution microscopy. We found that telomeres form compact globular structures through a complex network of interactions between shelterin subunits and telomeric DNA, and not by DNA methylation, histone deacetylation or histone trimethylation at telomeres and subtelomeric regions. Mutations that abrogate shelterin assembly or removal of individual subunits from telomeres cause up to a 10-fold increase in telomere volume. Decompacted telomeres become more accessible to telomere-associated proteins and accumulate DDR signals. Recompaction of telomeric chromatin using an orthogonal method displaces DDR signals from telomeres. These results reveal the chromatin remodeling activity of shelterin and demonstrate that shelterin-mediated compaction of telomeric chromatin provides robust protection of chromosome ends against the DDR machinery. PMID:26871633

  11. Silicalite nanoparticles that promote transgene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, Megan E; Mai, Hoang Q; Salem, Aliasger K; Lee, Namhoon; Larsen, Sarah C

    2008-01-01

    Here, we report on a new zeolite-based silicalite nanoparticle that can enhance the transfection efficiencies generated by poly ethylene imine-plasmid DNA (PEI-pDNA) complexes via a sedimentation mechanism and can enhance the transfection efficiencies of pDNA alone when surface functionalized with amine groups. The silicalite nanoparticles have a mean size of 55 nm. Functionalizing the silicalite nanoparticles with amine groups results in a clear transition in zeta potential from -25.9 ± 2.3 mV (pH 7.4) for unfunctionalized silicalite nanoparticles to 4.9 ± 0.7 mV (pH 7.4) for amine functionalized silicalite nanoparticles. We identify that silicalite nanoparticles used to promote non-viral vector acceleration to the cell surface are found in acidic vesicles or the cytoplasm but not the nucleus. An MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay showed that the silicalite nanoparticles were non-toxic at the concentrations tested for transfection. We show that surface functionalization of silicalite nanoparticles with amine groups results in a significant (230%) increase in transfection efficiency of pDNA when compared to unfunctionalized silicalite nanoparticles. Silicalite nanoparticles enhanced pDNA-PEI induced transfection of human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells by over 150%

  12. Synthesis, characterization, and immune efficacy of layered double hydroxide@SiO2 nanoparticles with shell-core structure as a delivery carrier for Newcastle disease virus DNA vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao K

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Kai Zhao,1,* Guangyu Rong,1,2,* Chen Guo,1 Xiaomei Luo,1 Hong Kang,1 Yanwei Sun,1,3 Chunxiao Dai,4 Xiaohua Wang,1 Xin Wang,1 Zheng Jin,4 Shangjin Cui,3 Qingshen Sun1 1Key Laboratory of Microbiology, School of Life Science, Heilongjiang University, Harbin, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Avian Infectious Disease, Shanghai Veterinary Research Institute of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Division of Swine Infectious Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Harbin Veterinary Research Institute of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin, People’s Republic of China; 4Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering Process and Technology for High-efficiency Conversion, Heilongjiang University, Harbin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Layered double hydroxide (LDH@SiO2 nanoparticles were developed as a delivery carrier for the plasmid DNA expressing the Newcastle disease virus F gene. The LDH was hydrotalcite-like materials. The plasmid DNA encapsulated in the LDH@SiO2 nanoparticles (pFDNA-LDH@SiO2-NPs was prepared by the coprecipitation method, and the properties of pFDNA-LDH@SiO2-NPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, zeta potential analyzer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The results demonstrated that the pFDNA-LDH@SiO2-NPs had a regular morphology and high stability with a mean diameter of 371.93 nm, loading capacity of 39.66%±0.45%, and a zeta potential of +31.63 mV. A release assay in vitro showed that up to 91.36% of the total plasmid DNA could be sustainably released from the pFDNA-LDH@SiO2-NPs within 288 hours. The LDH@SiO2 nanoparticles had very low toxicity. Additionally, their high transfection efficiency in vitro was detected by fluorescent microscopy. Intranasal immunization of specific pathogen-free chickens with pFDNA-LDH@SiO2-NPs

  13. Compact stellarators as reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.; Valanju, P.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Hirshman, S.; Spong, D.A.; Strickler, D.; Williamson, D.E.; Ware, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two types of compact stellarators are examined as reactors: two- and three-field-period (M=2 and 3) quasi-axisymmetric devices with volume-average =4-5% and M=2 and 3 quasi-poloidal devices with =10-15%. These low-aspect-ratio stellarator-tokamak hybrids differ from conventional stellarators in their use of the plasma-generated bootstrap current to supplement the poloidal field from external coils. Using the ARIES-AT model with B max =12T on the coils gives Compact Stellarator reactors with R=7.3-8.2m, a factor of 2-3 smaller R than other stellarator reactors for the same assumptions, and neutron wall loadings up to 3.7MWm -2 . (author)

  14. Compact torsatron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.; Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Tolliver, J.S.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1988-05-01

    Low-aspect-ratio torsatron configurations could lead to compact stellarator reactors with R 0 = 8--11m, roughly one-half to one-third the size of more conventional stellarator reactor designs. Minimum-size torsatron reactors are found using various assumptions. Their size is relatively insensitive to the choice of the conductor parameters and depends mostly on geometrical constraints. The smallest size is obtained by eliminating the tritium breeding blanket under the helical winding on the inboard side and by reducing the radial depth of the superconducting coil. Engineering design issues and reactor performance are examined for three examples to illustrate the feasibility of this approach for compact reactors and for a medium-size (R 0 ≅ 4 m,/bar a/ /approx lt/ 1 m) copper-coil ignition experiment. 26 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs

  15. Compact Spreader Schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  16. Compact fusion reactors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Fusion research is currently to a large extent focused on tokamak (ITER) and inertial confinement (NIF) research. In addition to these large international or national efforts there are private companies performing fusion research using much smaller devices than ITER or NIF. The attempt to achieve fusion energy production through relatively small and compact devices compared to tokamaks decreases the costs and building time of the reactors and this has allowed some private companies to enter the field, like EMC2, General Fusion, Helion Energy, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics and Lockheed Martin. Some of these companies are trying to demonstrate net energy production within the next few years. If they are successful their next step is to attempt to commercialize their technology. In this presentation an overview of compact fusion reactor concepts is given.

  17. Compact nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, V.V.; Churakov, Yu.A.; Danchenko, Yu.V.; Bylkin, B.K.; Tsvetkov, S.V.

    1983-01-01

    Different constructions of racks for compact storage of spent fuel assemblies (FA) in ''coolin''g pools (CP) of NPPs with the BWR and PWR type reactors are described. Problems concerning nuclear and radiation safety and provision of necessary thermal conditions arising in such rack design are discussed. It is concluded that the problem of prolonged fuel storage at NPPs became Very actual for many countries because of retapdation of the rates of fuel reprocessing centers building. Application of compact storage racks is a promising solution of the problem of intermediate FA storage at NPPs. Such racks of stainless boron steel and with neutron absorbers in the from of boron carbide panels enable to increase the capacity of the present CP 2-2.6 times, and the period of FA storage in them up to 5-10 years

  18. Analysis of laboratory compaction methods of roller compacted concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trtík, Tomáš; Chylík, Roman; Bílý, Petr; Fládr, Josef

    2017-09-01

    Roller-Compacted Concrete (RCC) is an ordinary concrete poured and compacted with machines typically used for laying of asphalt road layers. One of the problems connected with this technology is preparation of representative samples in the laboratory. The aim of this work was to analyse two methods of preparation of RCC laboratory samples with bulk density as the comparative parameter. The first method used dynamic compaction by pneumatic hammer. The second method of compaction had a static character. The specimens were loaded by precisely defined force in laboratory loading machine to create the same conditions as during static rolling (in the Czech Republic, only static rolling is commonly used). Bulk densities obtained by the two compaction methods were compared with core drills extracted from real RCC structure. The results have shown that the samples produced by pneumatic hammer tend to overestimate the bulk density of the material. For both compaction methods, immediate bearing index test was performed to verify the quality of compaction. A fundamental difference between static and dynamic compaction was identified. In static compaction, initial resistance to penetration of the mandrel was higher, after exceeding certain limit the resistance was constant. This means that the samples were well compacted just on the surface. Specimens made by pneumatic hammer actively resisted throughout the test, the whole volume was uniformly compacted.

  19. Determination of DNA by solid substrate room temperature phosphorescence enhancing method based on the Morin.SiO{sub 2} luminescent nanoparticles-Pd system as a phosphorescence probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jiaming [Department of Chemistry, Zhangzhou Normal College, Zhangzhou 363000 (China)]. E-mail: zzsyliujiaming@163.com; Yang Tianlong [Department of Chemistry, Zhangzhou Normal College, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Gao Fei [Department of Chemistry, Zhangzhou Normal College, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Hu Lixiang [Department of Chemistry, Zhangzhou Normal College, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); He Hangxia [Department of Chemistry, Zhangzhou Normal College, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Liu Qinying [Department of Chemistry, Zhangzhou Normal College, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Liu Zhenbo [Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Fujian College of Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou 350003 (China); Huang Xiaomei [Department of Food and Chemical Engineering, Zhangzhou Institute of Technology, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Zhu Guohui [Department of Food and Chemical Engineering, Zhangzhou Institute of Technology, Zhangzhou 363000 (China)

    2006-03-02

    Sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}) as the precursor, was mixed with Morin organic dye to synthesize silicon dioxide luminescent nanoparticles containing Morin (Morin.SiO{sub 2}) by sol-gel method. The particle sizes of SiO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O and Morin.SiO{sub 2} were both 50 nm, measured with TEM (transmission electron microscope). Morin.SiO{sub 2} modified by HS-CH{sub 2}COOH could be dissolved by water. In the HMTA (hexamethylenetetramine)-HCl buffer solution, Pd{sup 2+} could coordinate with Morin in Morin.SiO{sub 2} to form complex Pd{sup 2+}-Morin.SiO{sub 2}, which could emit phosphorescence on polyamide membrane. And DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) could cause a sharp enhancement of the room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) intensity of complex Pd{sup 2+}-Morin.SiO{sub 2}. Thus a new method of solid substrate room temperature phosphorescence (SS-RTP) enhancing for the determination of DNA was established based on the Morin.SiO{sub 2} luminescent nanoparticles-Pd system as a phosphorescence probe. The {delta}Ip is directly proportional to the content of DNA in the range of 4.00-1000.0 fg spot{sup -1} (corresponding concentration: 0.010-2.50 ng ml{sup -1}). The regression equation of working curve was {delta}Ip = 21.13 + 0.2076m{sub DNA} (fg spot{sup -1}) (r = 0.9990) and the detection limit was 0.61 fg spot{sup -1} (corresponding concentration: 1.5 pg ml{sup -1}). This method had a wide linear range, high sensitivity, convenience, rapidity and only a little sample was needed. Samples containing 0.10 and 25.0 ng ml{sup -1} DNA were measured repeatedly for 11 times and RSDs were 3.2 and 4.1% (n = 11), respectively, which indicated that the method had a good repeatability. Disturbance of common ions, such as Mg{sup 2+}, K{sup +}, and Ca{sup 2+}, was small, and there was no disturbance in the presence of protein and RNA. This method has been applied to the determination of DNA in nectar successfully.

  20. Compaction of cereal grain

    OpenAIRE

    Wychowaniec, J.; Griffiths, I.; Gay, A.; Mughal, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report on simple shaking experiments to measure the compaction of a column of Firth oat grain. Such grains are elongated anisotropic particles with a bimodal polydispersity. In these experiments, the particle configurations start from an initially disordered, low-packing-fraction state and under vertical shaking evolve to a dense state with evidence of nematic-like structure at the surface of the confining tube. This is accompanied by an increase in the packing fraction of the grain.

  1. Compact nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juric, S.I.

    1975-01-01

    A compact nuclear reactor of the pressurized-water variety is described which has two separate parts separably engageable for ease of inspection, maintenance and repair. One of the parts is a pressure vessel having an active core and the other of the parts is a closure adapted on its lower surface with an integral steam generator. An integral pump, external pressurizer and control rods are provided which communicate with the active core when engaged to form a total unit. (U.S.)

  2. Compact power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetch, J.R.; Dieckamp, H.M.; Wilson, L.A.

    1978-01-01

    There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector

  3. CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The milestone workshops on LHC experiments in Aachen in 1990 and at Evian in 1992 provided the first sketches of how LHC detectors might look. The concept of a compact general-purpose LHC experiment based on a solenoid to provide the magnetic field was first discussed at Aachen, and the formal Expression of Interest was aired at Evian. It was here that the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) name first became public. Optimizing first the muon detection system is a natural starting point for a high luminosity (interaction rate) proton-proton collider experiment. The compact CMS design called for a strong magnetic field, of some 4 Tesla, using a superconducting solenoid, originally about 14 metres long and 6 metres bore. (By LHC standards, this warrants the adjective 'compact'.) The main design goals of CMS are: 1 - a very good muon system providing many possibilities for momentum measurement (physicists call this a 'highly redundant' system); 2 - the best possible electromagnetic calorimeter consistent with the above; 3 - high quality central tracking to achieve both the above; and 4 - an affordable detector. Overall, CMS aims to detect cleanly the diverse signatures of new physics by identifying and precisely measuring muons, electrons and photons over a large energy range at very high collision rates, while also exploiting the lower luminosity initial running. As well as proton-proton collisions, CMS will also be able to look at the muons emerging from LHC heavy ion beam collisions. The Evian CMS conceptual design foresaw the full calorimetry inside the solenoid, with emphasis on precision electromagnetic calorimetry for picking up photons. (A light Higgs particle will probably be seen via its decay into photon pairs.) The muon system now foresaw four stations. Inner tracking would use silicon microstrips and microstrip gas chambers, with over 10 7 channels offering high track finding efficiency. In the central CMS barrel, the tracking elements are

  4. Compact Information Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-02

    Department of Defense, Executive Services, Directorate (0704-0188).   Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person...which lies in the mission of AFOSR. 15.  SUBJECT TERMS sparse sampling , principal components analysis 16.  SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...approved for public release Contents 1 Training for Ph.D. Students and Postdoc Researchers 2 2 Papers 2 3 Summary of Proposed Research: Compact

  5. DNA topology and transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions. PMID:24755522

  6. In vitro efficacy of a gene-activated nerve guidance conduit incorporating non-viral PEI-pDNA nanoparticles carrying genes encoding for NGF, GDNF and c-Jun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackington, William A; Raftery, Rosanne M; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2018-06-07

    Despite the success of tissue engineered nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) for the treatment of small peripheral nerve injuries, autografts remain the clinical gold standard for larger injuries. The delivery of neurotrophic factors from conduits might enhance repair for more effective treatment of larger injuries but the efficacy of such systems is dependent on a safe, effective platform for controlled and localised therapeutic delivery. Gene therapy might offer an innovative approach to control the timing, release and level of neurotrophic factor production by directing cells to transiently sustain therapeutic protein production in situ. In this study, a gene-activated NGC was developed by incorporating non-viral polyethyleneimine-plasmid DNA (PEI-pDNA) nanoparticles (N/P 7 ratio, 2μg dose) with the pDNA encoding for nerve growth factor (NGF), glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) or the transcription factor c-Jun. The physicochemical properties of PEI-pDNA nanoparticles, morphology, size and charge, were shown to be suitable for gene delivery and demonstrated high Schwann cell transfection efficiency (60±13%) in vitro. While all three genes showed therapeutic potential in terms of enhancing neurotrophic cytokine production while promoting neurite outgrowth, delivery of the gene encoding for c-Jun showed the greatest capacity to enhance regenerative cellular processes in vitro. Ultimately, this gene-activated NGC construct was shown to be capable of transfecting both Schwann cells (S42 cells) and neuronal cells (PC12 and dorsal root ganglia) in vitro, demonstrating potential for future therapeutic applications in vivo. The basic requirements of biomaterial-based nerve guidance conduits have now been well established and include being able to bridge a nerve injury to support macroscopic guidance between nerve stumps, while being strong enough to withstand longitudinal tension and circumferential compression, in addition to being mechanically sound to facilitate

  7. Effects of CuO nanoparticles on compressive strength of self ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, the compressive strength, thermal properties and microstructure of self-compacting concrete with different amounts of CuO nanoparticles have been investigated. CuO nanoparticles with an average particle size of 15 nm were added to self-compacting concrete and various properties of the specimens ...

  8. Depletion of A-type lamins and Lap2α reduces 53BP1 accumulation at UV-induced DNA lesions and Lap2α protein is responsible for compactness of irradiated chromatin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bártová, Eva; Legartová, Soňa; Krejčí, Jana; Řezníčková, Petra; Kovaříková, Alena; Suchánková, Jana; Fedr, Radek; Smirnov, E.; Hornáček, M.; Raška, I.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 2018, č. 2018 (2018) ISSN 0730-2312 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP302/12/G157; GA MŠk 7F14369 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : DAPI * DNA damage response * FLIM Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 3.085, year: 2016

  9. Diffusion through statically compacted clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, C.L.; Shebl, M.A.A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents experimental work on the effect of compaction on contaminant flow through clay liners. The experimental program included evaluation of soil properties, compaction, permeability and solute diffusion. A permeameter was built of non reactive materials to test samples compacted at different water contents and compactive efforts. The flow of a permeating solute, LiCl, was monitored. Effluent samples were collected for solute concentration measurements. The concentrations were measured by performing atomic adsorption tests. The analyzed results showed different diffusion characteristics when compaction conditions changed. At each compactive effort, permeability decreased as molding water content increased. Consequently, transit time (measured at relative concentration 50%) increased and diffusivity decreased. As compactive effort increased for soils compacted dry of optimum, permeability and diffusion decreased. On the other hand, as compactive effort increased for soils compacted wet of optimum, permeability and diffusivity increased. Tortuosity factor was indirectly measured from the diffusion and retardation rate. Tortuosity factor also decreased as placement water content was increased from dry of optimum to wet of optimum. Then decreases were more pronounced for low compactive effort tests. 27 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  10. n-TiO{sub 2} and CdCl{sub 2} co-exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles and cadmium: Genomic, DNA and chromosomal damage evaluation in the marine fish European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigro, M.; Bernardeschi, M. [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pisa University, Pisa (Italy); Costagliola, D. [Department of Environmental, Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technologies, Second University of Naples, Caserta (Italy); Della Torre, C. [Department of Physical, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Siena, Siena (Italy); Frenzilli, G., E-mail: giada@biomed.unipi.it [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pisa University, Pisa (Italy); Guidi, P.; Lucchesi, P. [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pisa University, Pisa (Italy); Mottola, F.; Santonastaso, M. [Department of Environmental, Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technologies, Second University of Naples, Caserta (Italy); Scarcelli, V. [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pisa University, Pisa (Italy); Monaci, F.; Corsi, I. [Department of Physical, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Siena, Siena (Italy); Stingo, V.; Rocco, L. [Department of Environmental, Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technologies, Second University of Naples, Caserta (Italy)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • European sea bass was exposed to CdCl{sub 2} and n-TiO{sub 2} alone and in combination. • Genotoxicity was evaluated by RAPD-assay, comet assay and cytome assay. • CdCl{sub 2} induced DNA primary damage but not chromosomal damage. • n-TiO{sub 2} induced chromosomal damage but not DNA primary damage. • Co-exposure effects depend on the biomarker used. - Abstract: Due to the large production and growing use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (n-TiO{sub 2}), their release in the marine environment and their potential interaction with existing toxic contaminants represent a growing concern for biota. Different end-points of genotoxicity were investigated in the European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax exposed to n-TiO{sub 2} (1 mg L{sup −1}) either alone and combined with CdCl{sub 2} (0.1 mg L{sup −1}) for 7 days. DNA primary damage (comet assay), apoptotic cells (diffusion assay), occurrence of micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities (cytome assay) were assessed in peripheral erythrocytes and genomic stability (random amplified polymorphism DNA-PCR, RAPD assay) in muscle tissue. Results showed that genome template stability was reduced after CdCl{sub 2} and n-TiO{sub 2} exposure. Exposure to n-TiO{sub 2} alone was responsible for chromosomal alteration but ineffective in terms of DNA damage; while the opposite was observed in CdCl{sub 2} exposed specimens. Co-exposure apparently prevents the chromosomal damage and leads to a partial recovery of the genome template stability.

  11. One-step coelectrodeposition-assisted layer-by-layer assembly of gold nanoparticles and reduced graphene oxide and its self-healing three-dimensional nanohybrid for an ultrasensitive DNA sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarasamy, Jayakumar; Camarada, María Belén; Venkatraman, Dharuman; Ju, Huangxian; Dey, Ramendra Sundar; Wen, Yangping

    2018-01-18

    A layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly was employed for preparing multilayer thin films with a controlled architecture and composition. In this study, we report the one-step coelectrodeposition-assisted LBL assembly of both gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for the ultrasensitive electrochemical impedance sensing of DNA hybridization. A self-healable nanohybrid thin film with a three-dimensional (3D) alternate-layered nanoarchitecture was obtained by the one-step simultaneous electro-reduction of both graphene oxide and gold chloride in a high acidic medium of H 2 SO 4 using cyclic voltammetry and was confirmed by different characterization techniques. The DNA bioelectrode was prepared by immobilizing the capture DNA onto the surface of the as-obtained self-healable AuNP/rGO/AuNP/GCE with a 3D LBL nanoarchitecture via gold-thiol interactions, which then served as an impedance sensing platform for the label-free ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of DNA hybridization over a wide range from 1.0 × 10 -9 to 1.0 × 10 -13 g ml -1 , a low limit of detection of 3.9 × 10 -14 g ml -1 (S/N = 3), ultrahigh sensitivity, and excellent selectivity. This study presents a promising electrochemical sensing platform for the label-free ultrasensitive detection of DNA hybridization with potential application in cancer diagnostics and the preparation of a self-healable nanohybrid thin film with a 3D alternate-layered nanoarchitecture via a one-step coelectrodeposition-assisted LBL assembly.

  12. MECHANICS OF DYNAMIC POWDER COMPACTION PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    Nurettin YAVUZ

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, interest in dynamic compaction methods of metal powders has increased due to the need to improve compaction properties and to increase production rates of compacts. In this paper, review of dynamic and explosive compaction of metal powders are given. An attempt is made to get a better understanding of the compaction process with the mechanicis of powder compaction.

  13. Compact neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhavi, V.; Phatak, P.R.; Bahadur, C.; Bayala, A.K.; Jakati, R.K.; Sathian, V.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A compact size neutron flux monitor has been developed incorporating standard boards developed for smart radiation monitors. The sensitivity of the monitors is 0.4cps/nV. It has been tested up to 2075 nV flux with standard neutron sources. It shows convincing results even in high flux areas like 6m away from the accelerator in RMC (Parel) for 106/107 nV. These monitors have a focal and remote display, alarm function with potential free contacts for centralized control and additional provision of connectivity via RS485/Ethernet. This paper describes the construction, working and results of the above flux monitor

  14. Compact ignition experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, A.; Coppi, B.; Nassi, M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on high magnetic field experiments which can be designed to investigate D-T ignition conditions based on present-day experimental results and theoretical understanding of plasma phenomena. The key machine elements are: large plasma currents, compact dimensions, tight aspect ratios, moderate elongations and significant triangularities of the plasma column. High plasma densities, strong ohmic heating, the needed degree of energy confinement, good plasma purity and robust stability against ideal and resistive instabilities can be achieved simultaneously. The Ignitor design incorporates all these characteristics and involves magnet technology developments, started with the Alcator experiment, that use cryogenically cooled normal conductors

  15. Compact LINAC for deuterons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurennoy, S.S.; O'Hara, J.F.; Rybarcyk, L.J.

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the deuteron energy of a few MeV based on room-temperature inter-digital H-mode (IH) accelerating structures with the transverse beam focusing using permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ). Combining electromagnetic 3-D modeling with beam dynamics simulations and thermal-stress analysis, we show that IHPMQ structures provide very efficient and practical accelerators for light-ion beams of considerable currents at the beam velocities around a few percent of the speed of light. IH-structures with PMQ focusing following a short RFQ can also be beneficial in the front end of ion linacs.

  16. Compact electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, G.P.

    1987-01-01

    There have been many recent developments in the area of compact storage rings. Such rings would have critical wavelengths of typically 10 A, achieved with beam energies of several hundreds of MeV and superconducting dipole fields of around 5 Tesla. Although the primary motivation for progress in this area is that of commercial x-ray lithography, such sources might be an attractive source for college campuses to operate. They would be useful for many programs in materials science, solid state, x-ray microscopy and other biological areas. We discuss the properties of such sources and review developments around the world, primarily in the USA, japan and W. Germany

  17. Compact synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, N.; Wang, T.; Tian, J.; Lin, Y.; Chen, S.; He, W.; Hu, Y.; Li, Q.

    1985-01-01

    A compact 800 MeV synchrotron radiation source is discussed. The storage ring has a circumference of 30.3 m, two 90 degree and four 45 degree bending magnet sections, two long straight sections and four short straight sections. The radius of the bending magnet is 2.224m. The critical wave length is 24A. The injector is a 15 Mev Microtron Electrons are accelerated from 15 Mev to 800 Mev by ramping the field of the ring. The expected stored current will be around 100 ma

  18. LASL Compact Torus Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.K.; Armstrong, W.T.; Bartsch, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Compact Torus (CT) concept includes any axisymmetric toroidal plasma configuration, which does not require the linking of any material through the hole in the torus. Thus, the magnet coils, vacuum vessel, etc., have a simple cylindrical or spherical geometry instead of the toroidal geometry required for Tokamaks and RFP's. This simplified geometry results in substantial engineering advantages in CT reactor embodiments while retaining the good confinement properties afforded by an axisymmetric toroidal plasma-field geometry. CT's can be classified into three major types by using the ion gyro radius rho/sub i/ and the magnitude of the maximum toroidal field B/sub tm/

  19. Compact Q-balls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, D., E-mail: bazeia@fisica.ufpb.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-970 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Losano, L.; Marques, M.A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-970 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Menezes, R. [Departamento de Ciências Exatas, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58297-000 Rio Tinto, PB (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, 58109-970 Campina Grande, PB (Brazil); Rocha, R. da [Centro de Matemática, Computação e Cognição, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André (Brazil)

    2016-07-10

    In this work we deal with non-topological solutions of the Q-ball type in two space–time dimensions, in models described by a single complex scalar field that engenders global symmetry. The main novelty is the presence of stable Q-balls solutions that live in a compact interval of the real line and appear from a family of models controlled by two distinct parameters. We find analytical solutions and study their charge and energy, and show how to control the parameters to make the Q-balls classically and quantum mechanically stable.

  20. Reversible DNA condensation induced by a tetranuclear nickel(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xindian; Wang, Xiaoyong; He, Yafeng; Yu, Zhen; Lin, Miaoxin; Zhang, Changli; Wang, Jing; Song, Yajie; Zhang, Yangmiao; Liu, Zhipeng; Li, Yizhi; Guo, Zijian

    2010-12-17

    DNA condensing agents play a critical role in gene therapy. A tetranuclear nickel(II) complex, [Ni(II)(4)(L-2H)(H(2)O)(6)(CH(3)CH(2)OH)(2)]·6NO(3) (L=3,3',5,5'-tetrakis{[(2-hydroxyethyl)(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]methyl}biphenyl-4,4'-diol), has been synthesized as a nonviral vector to induce DNA condensation. X-ray crystallographic data indicate that the complex crystallizes in the monoclinic system with space group P2(1)/n, a=10.291(9), b=24.15(2), c=13.896(11) Å, and β=98.175(13)°. The DNA condensation induced by the complex has been investigated by means of UV/Vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, gel electrophoresis assay, and zeta potential analysis. The complex interacts strongly with DNA through electrostatic attraction and induces its condensation into globular nanoparticles at low concentration. The release of DNA from its compact state has been achieved using the chelator ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) for the first time. Other essential properties, such as DNA cleavage inactivity and biocompatibility, have also been examined in vitro. In general, the complex satisfies the requirements of a gene vector in all of these respects.

  1. Scalable Nonlinear Compact Schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Debojyoti [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Constantinescu, Emil M. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Brown, Jed [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we focus on compact schemes resulting in tridiagonal systems of equations, specifically the fifth-order CRWENO scheme. We propose a scalable implementation of the nonlinear compact schemes by implementing a parallel tridiagonal solver based on the partitioning/substructuring approach. We use an iterative solver for the reduced system of equations; however, we solve this system to machine zero accuracy to ensure that no parallelization errors are introduced. It is possible to achieve machine-zero convergence with few iterations because of the diagonal dominance of the system. The number of iterations is specified a priori instead of a norm-based exit criterion, and collective communications are avoided. The overall algorithm thus involves only point-to-point communication between neighboring processors. Our implementation of the tridiagonal solver differs from and avoids the drawbacks of past efforts in the following ways: it introduces no parallelization-related approximations (multiprocessor solutions are exactly identical to uniprocessor ones), it involves minimal communication, the mathematical complexity is similar to that of the Thomas algorithm on a single processor, and it does not require any communication and computation scheduling.

  2. Compact magnetic fusion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linford, R.K.

    1983-12-01

    If the core (first wall, blanket, shield, and magnet coils) of fusion reactor systems could be made smaller in mass and volume for a given net electric power output than is usually predicted for the mainline tokamak/sup 1/ and mirror concepts, the cost of the technological development of the core and the construction of power plants might be significantly reduced. Although progress in plasma physics and engineering approaches should continue to yield improvements in reactor designs, certain physics features of the mainline concepts may prevent major reductions in the size of the core without straining the limits of technology. However, more than a factor of ten reduction in volume and mass of the core, at constant output power, may be possible for a class of toroidal confinement concepts in which the confining magnetic fields are supported more by currents flowing in the plasma than those in the external coils. In spite of this dramatic increase in power density (ratio of total thermal output power to the volume of the core), the design of compact systems need not rely on any materials requirements that are qualitatively more difficult than those proposed for the lower-power-density mainline fusion concepts. In some respects compact systems require less of an extension of existing technology, e.g. magnetics.

  3. Compact magnetic fusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.K.

    1983-01-01

    If the core (first wall, blanket, shield, and magnet coils) of fusion reactor systems could be made smaller in mass and volume for a given net electric power output than is usually predicted for the mainline tokamak 1 and mirror concepts, the cost of the technological development of the core and the construction of power plants might be significantly reduced. Although progress in plasma physics and engineering approaches should continue to yield improvements in reactor designs, certain physics features of the mainline concepts may prevent major reductions in the size of the core without straining the limits of technology. However, more than a factor of ten reduction in volume and mass of the core, at constant output power, may be possible for a class of toroidal confinement concepts in which the confining magnetic fields are supported more by currents flowing in the plasma than those in the external coils. In spite of this dramatic increase in power density (ratio of total thermal output power to the volume of the core), the design of compact systems need not rely on any materials requirements that are qualitatively more difficult than those proposed for the lower-power-density mainline fusion concepts. In some respects compact systems require less of an extension of existing technology, e.g. magnetics

  4. Diffusion in compacted betonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Rantanen, J.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this report is to collect the literature bearing on the diffusion in compacted betonite, which has been suggested as possible buffer material for the disposal of spent fuel. Diffusion in a porous, water-saturated material is usually described as diffusion in the pore-water where sorption on the solid matter can delay the migration in the instationary state. There are also models which take into consideration that the sorbed molecules can also move while being sorbed. Diffusion experiments in compacted bentonite have been reported by many authors. Gases, anions, cations and actinides have been used as diffusing molecules. The report collects the results and the information on the measurement methods. On the basis of the results can be concluded that different particles possibly follow different diffusion mechanisms. The parameters which affect the diffusion seem to be for example the size, the electric charge and the sorption properties of the diffusing molecule. The report also suggest the parameters to be used in the diffusion calculation of the safety analyses of spent fuel disposal. (author)

  5. Compact Infrasonic Windscreen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Shams, Qamar A.; Sealey, Bradley S.; Comeaux, Toby

    2005-01-01

    A compact windscreen has been conceived for a microphone of a type used outdoors to detect atmospheric infrasound from a variety of natural and manmade sources. Wind at the microphone site contaminates received infrasonic signals (defined here as sounds having frequencies <20 Hz), because a microphone cannot distinguish between infrasonic pressures (which propagate at the speed of sound) and convective pressure fluctuations generated by wind turbulence. Hence, success in measurement of outdoor infrasound depends on effective screening of the microphone from the wind. The present compact windscreen is based on a principle: that infrasound at sufficiently large wavelength can penetrate any barrier of practical thickness. Thus, a windscreen having solid, non-porous walls can block convected pressure fluctuations from the wind while transmitting infrasonic acoustic waves. The transmission coefficient depends strongly upon the ratio between the acoustic impedance of the windscreen and that of air. Several materials have been found to have impedance ratios that render them suitable for use in constructing walls that have practical thicknesses and are capable of high transmission of infrasound. These materials (with their impedance ratios in parentheses) are polyurethane foam (222), space shuttle tile material (332), balsa (323), cedar (3,151), and pine (4,713).

  6. Compact electrostatic comb actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Burg, Michael S.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Samuel L.; Barnes, Stephen M.

    2000-01-01

    A compact electrostatic comb actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator is based upon a plurality of meshed electrostatic combs, some of which are stationary and others of which are moveable. One or more restoring springs are fabricated within an outline of the electrostatic combs (i.e. superposed with the moveable electrostatic combs) to considerably reduce the space required for the actuator. Additionally, a truss structure is provided to support the moveable electrostatic combs and prevent bending or distortion of these combs due to unbalanced electrostatic forces or external loading. The truss structure formed about the moveable electrostatic combs allows the spacing between the interdigitated fingers of the combs to be reduced to about one micron or less, thereby substantially increasing the number of active fingers which can be provided in a given area. Finally, electrostatic shields can be used in the actuator to substantially reduce unwanted electrostatic fields to further improve performance of the device. As a result, the compact electrostatic comb actuator of the present invention occupies only a fraction of the space required for conventional electrostatic comb actuators, while providing a substantial increase in the available drive force (up to one-hundred times).

  7. Development task of compact reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurushima, Morihiro

    1982-01-01

    In the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, studies proceed on the usage of compact medium and small LWRs. As such, the reactors from 100 to 200 MW may meet varieties of demands in scale and kind in view of the saving of petroleum and the economy of nuclear power. In this case, the technology of light water reactors with already established safety will be suitable for the development of compact reactors. The concept of ''nuclear power community'' using the compact reactors in local society and industrial zones was investigated. The following matters are described: need for the introduction of compact reactors, the survey on the compact reactor systems, and the present status and future problems for compact reactor usage. (J.P.N.)

  8. (BDMCA) Nanoparticles

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Available online at http://www.tjpr.org. Research Article ... Methods: Nanoparticle formulations were fabricated by a double emulsion solvent evaporation technique using .... Characterization of BDMCA nanoparticles. The nanoparticle ...

  9. The United Nations Global Compact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasche, Andreas; Waddock, Sandra; McIntosh, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the interdisciplinary literature on the UN Global Compact. The review identifies three research perspectives, which scholars have used to study the UN Global Compact so far: a historical perspective discussing the Global Compact in the context of UN-business relations...... key empirical as well as conceptual scholarly contributions. The remainder of this article contains focused summaries of the articles selected for this Special Issue. All articles are introduced and evaluated against the background of the three research perspectives....

  10. Ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair......ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair...

  11. DNA nanotechnology and fluorescence applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichthaerle, Thomas; Strauss, Maximilian T; Schueder, Florian; Woehrstein, Johannes B; Jungmann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology allow researchers to use the unique molecular recognition properties of DNA strands to construct nanoscale objects with almost arbitrary complexity in two and three dimensions. Abstracted as molecular breadboards, DNA nanostructures enable nanometer-precise placement of guest molecules such as proteins, fluorophores, or nanoparticles. These assemblies can be used to study biological phenomena with unprecedented control over number, spacing, and molecular identity. Here, we give a general introduction to structural DNA nanotechnology and more specifically discuss applications of DNA nanostructures in the field of fluorescence and plasmonics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Compact particle accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.

    2017-08-29

    A compact particle accelerator having an input portion configured to receive power to produce particles for acceleration, where the input portion includes a switch, is provided. In a general embodiment, a vacuum tube receives particles produced from the input portion at a first end, and a plurality of wafer stacks are positioned serially along the vacuum tube. Each of the plurality of wafer stacks include a dielectric and metal-oxide pair, wherein each of the plurality of wafer stacks further accelerate the particles in the vacuum tube. A beam shaper coupled to a second end of the vacuum tube shapes the particles accelerated by the plurality of wafer stacks into a beam and an output portion outputs the beam.

  13. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  14. Compact vacuum insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  15. The Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses his lab's plan for completing the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) conceptual design during calendar year 1987. Around July 1 they froze the subsystem envelopes on the device to continue with the conceptual design. They did this by formalizing a general requirements document. They have been developing the management plan and submitted a version to the DOE July 10. He describes a group of management activities. They released the vacuum vessel Request For Proposals (RFP) on August 5. An RFP to do a major part of the system engineering on the device is being developed. They intend to assemble the device outside of the test cell, then move it into the the test cell, install it there, and bring to the test cell many of the auxiliary facilities from TFTR, for example, power supplies

  16. Compact cryocooler heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, J.; Frederking, T.H.K.

    1991-01-01

    Compact heat exchangers are subject to different constraints as a room temperature gas is cooled down by a cold stream returning from a JT valve (or a similar cryoprocess component). In particular, the optimization of exchangers for liquid helium systems has to cover a wide range in temperature and density of the fluid. In the present work we address the following thermodynamic questions: 1. The optimization of intermediate temperatures which optimize stage operation (a stage is assumed to have a constant cross section); 2. The optimum temperature difference available for best overall economic performance values. The results are viewed in the context of porous media concepts applied to rather low speeds of fluid flow in narrow passages. In this paper examples of fluid/solid constraints imposed in this non-classical low temperature area are presented

  17. Compact semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Siyuan; Lourtioz, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book brings together in a single volume a unique contribution by the top experts around the world in the field of compact semiconductor lasers to provide a comprehensive description and analysis of the current status as well as future directions in the field of micro- and nano-scale semiconductor lasers. It is organized according to the various forms of micro- or nano-laser cavity configurations with each chapter discussing key technical issues, including semiconductor carrier recombination processes and optical gain dynamics, photonic confinement behavior and output coupling mechanisms, carrier transport considerations relevant to the injection process, and emission mode control. Required reading for those working in and researching the area of semiconductors lasers and micro-electronics.

  18. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Shara Carol [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices

  19. Compaction simulation of nano-crystalline metals with molecular dynamics analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoei A.R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular-dynamics analysis is presented for 3D compaction simulation of nano-crystalline metals under uniaxial compaction process. The nano-crystalline metals consist of nickel and aluminum nano-particles, which are mixed with specified proportions. The EAM pair-potential is employed to model the formation of nano-particles at different temperatures, number of nano-particles, and mixing ratio of Ni and Al nano-particles to form the component into the shape of a die. The die-walls are modeled using the Lennard-Jones inter-atomic potential between the atoms of nano-particles and die-walls. The forming process is model in uniaxial compression, which is simulated until the full-dense condition is attained at constant temperature. Numerical simulations are performed by presenting the densification of nano-particles at different deformations and distribution of dislocations. Finally, the evolutions of relative density with the pressure as well as the stress-strain curves are depicted during the compaction process.

  20. Compact magnetic fusin reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, K.M.

    1984-01-01

    Compact, high-power-density approaches to fusion power represent alternatives to main-line fusion concepts, Tokamaks and mirrors. If technological issues are resolved, theses approaches would yield small, low-cost fusion power plants. This survey reviews the principal physics and technology employed by leading compact magnetic fusion plants. (Author)

  1. Solid targetry for compact cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comor, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation authors present experimental results of solid targetry for compact cyclotrons. It is concluded: Solid targetry is not restricted to large accelerator centers anymore; Small and medium scale radioisotope production is feasible with compact cyclotrons; The availability of versatile solid target systems is expected to boost the radiochemistry of 'exotic' positron emitters

  2. Roller-compacted concrete pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Roller-compacted concrete (RCC) gets its name from the heavy vibratory steel drum and rubber-tired rollers used to help compact it into its final form. RCC has similar strength properties and consists of the same basic ingredients as conventional con...

  3. Machine for compacting solid residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, J.

    1981-11-01

    Machine for compacting solid residues, particularly bulky radioactive residues, constituted of a horizontally actuated punch and a fixed compression anvil, in which the residues are first compacted horizontally and then vertically. Its salient characteristic is that the punch and the compression anvil have embossments on the compression side and interpenetrating plates in the compression position [fr

  4. Development of Tat-Conjugated Dendrimer for Transdermal DNA Vaccine Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadoran, Azadeh; Moeini, Hassan; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    In order to enhance cellular uptake and to facilitate transdermal delivery of DNA vaccine, polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers conjugated with HIV transactivator of transcription (TAT) was developed. First, the plasmid DNA (pIRES-H5/GFP) nanoparticle was formulated using PAMAM dendrimer and TAT peptide and then characterized for surface charge, particle size, DNA encapsulation and protection of the pIRES-H5/GFP DNA plasmid to enzymatic digestion. Subsequently, the potency of the TAT-conjugated dendrimer for gene delivery was evaluated through in vitro transfection into Vero cells followed by gene expression analysis including western blotting, fluorescent microscopy and PCR. The effect of the TAT peptide on cellular uptake of DNA vaccine was studied by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry. Finally, the ability of TAT-conjugated PAMAM dendrimer for transdermal delivery of the DNA plasmid was assessed through artificial membranes followed by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry. TAT-conjugated PAMAM dendrimer showed the ability to form a compact and nanometre-sized polyplexes with the plasmid DNA, having the size range of 105 to 115 nm and a positive charge of +42 to +45 mV over the N/P ratio of 6:1(+/-).  In vitro transfection analysis into Vero cells confirms the high potency of TAT-conjugated PAMAM dendrimer to enhance the cellular uptake of DNA vaccine.  The permeability value assay through artificial membranes reveals that TAT-conjugated PAMAM has more capacity for transdermal delivery of the DNA compared to unmodified PAMAM dendrimer (Pdendrimer is a promising non-viral vector for transdermal use.This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  5. Compact radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altschuler, D.R.

    1975-01-01

    Eighty-seven compact radio sources were monitored between 1971 and 1974 with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory interferometer. Both flux density and polarization were measured at intervals of about one month at wavelengths of 3.7 and 11.1 cms. Forty-four sources showed definite variability in their total and/or polarized flux density. The variations in polarization were of a shorter time scale than the corresponding flux density variations. Some of the qualitative features of an expanding source model were observed. The data suggest that some form of injection of relativistic electrons is taking place. The absence of significant depolarization in the variable sources indicates that only a small fraction of the mass of the radio outburst is in the form of non-relativistic plasma. Some of the objects observed belong to the BL-Lacertal class. It is shown that this class is very inhomogeneous in its radio properties. For the violently variable BL-Lacertal type objects the spectrum, flux variations and polarization data strongly suggest that these are very young objects

  6. Compact Dexterous Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovchik, Christopher Scott (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A compact robotic hand includes a palm housing, a wrist section, and a forearm section. The palm housing supports a plurality of fingers and one or more movable palm members that cooperate with the fingers to grasp and/or release an object. Each flexible finger comprises a plurality of hingedly connected segments, including a proximal segment pivotally connected to the palm housing. The proximal finger segment includes at least one groove defining first and second cam surfaces for engagement with a cable. A plurality of lead screw assemblies each carried by the palm housing are supplied with power from a flexible shaft rotated by an actuator and output linear motion to a cable move a finger. The cable is secured within a respective groove and enables each finger to move between an opened and closed position. A decoupling assembly pivotally connected to a proximal finger segment enables a cable connected thereto to control movement of an intermediate and distal finger segment independent of movement of the proximal finger segment. The dexterous robotic hand closely resembles the function of a human hand yet is light weight and capable of grasping both heavy and light objects with a high degree of precision.

  7. Compact stellarator coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomphrey, N.; Berry, L.A.; Boozer, A.H.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental devices to study the physics of high-beta (β>∼4%), low aspect ratio (A<∼4.5) stellarator plasmas require coils that will produce plasmas satisfying a set of physics goals, provide experimental flexibility, and be practical to construct. In the course of designing a flexible coil set for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment, we have made several innovations that may be useful in future stellarator design efforts. These include: the use of Singular Value Decomposition methods for obtaining families of smooth current potentials on distant coil winding surfaces from which low current density solutions may be identified; the use of a Control Matrix Method for identifying which few of the many detailed elements of the stellarator boundary must be targeted if a coil set is to provide fields to control the essential physics of the plasma; the use of Genetic Algorithms for choosing an optimal set of discrete coils from a continuum of potential contours; the evaluation of alternate coil topologies for balancing the tradeoff between physics objective and engineering constraints; the development of a new coil optimization code for designing modular coils, and the identification of a 'natural' basis for describing current sheet distributions. (author)

  8. Compact neutron generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  9. Compact tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.; Wiley, J.C.; Edmonds, P.H.; Ross, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    The possible use of tokamaks for thermonuclear power plants is discussed, in particular tokamaks with low aspect ratio and copper toroidal field coils. Three approaches are presented. First, the existing literature is reviewed and summarized. Second, using simple analytic estimates, the size of the smallest tokamak to produce an ignited plasma is derived. This steady state energy balance analysis is then extended to determine the smallest tokamaks power plant, by including the power required to drive the toroidal field and by considering two extremes of plasma current drive efficiency. Third, the analytic results are augmented by a numerical calculation that permits arbitrary plasma current drive efficiency and different confinement scaling relationships. Throughout, the importance of various restrictions is emphasized, in particular plasma current drive efficiency, plasma confinement, plasma safety factor, plasma elongation, plasma beta, neutron wall loading, blanket availability and recirculation of electric power. The latest published reactor studies show little advantage in using low aspect ratios to obtain a more compact device (and a low cost of electricity) unless either remarkably high efficiency plasma current drive and low safety factor are combined, or unless confinement (the H factor), the permissible elongation and the permissible neutron wall loading increase as the aspect ratio is reduced. These results are reproduced with the analytic model. (author). 22 refs, 3 figs

  10. Ultrasensitive, Ultradense Nanoelectronic Biosensing with Nanoparticle Probes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mirkin, Chad A; Ratner, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A robust and effective model for determining the presence or absence of an analyte in a DPN-assembled gold nanoparticle/DNA conjugate structure in the limit of single molecule binding was developed...

  11. Novel compaction resistant and ductile nanocomposite nanofibrous microfiltration membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homaeigohar, Seyed Shahin; Elbahri, Mady

    2012-04-15

    Despite promising filtration abilities, low mechanical properties of extraordinary porous electrospun nanofibrous membranes could be a major challenge in their industrial development. In addition, such kind of membranes are usually hydrophobic and non-wettable. To reinforce an electrospun nanofibrous membrane made of polyethersulfone (PES) mechanically and chemically (to improve wettability), zirconia nanoparticles as a novel nanofiller in membrane technology were added to the nanofibers. The compressive and tensile results obtained through nanoindentation and tensile tests, respectively, implied an optimum mechanical properties after incorporation of zirconia nanoparticles. Especially compaction resistance of the electrospun nanofibrous membranes improved significantly as long as no agglomeration of the nanoparticles occurred and the electrospun nanocomposite membranes showed a higher tensile properties without any brittleness i.e. a high ductility. Noteworthy, for the first time the compaction level was quantified through a nanoindentation test. In addition to obtaining a desired mechanical performance, the hydrophobicity declined. Combination of promising properties of optimum mechanical and surface chemical properties led to a considerably high water permeability also retention efficiency of the nanocomposite PES nanofibrous membranes. Such finding implies a longer life span and lower energy consumption for a water filtration process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Topotactic interconversion of nanoparticle superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Robert J; Jones, Matthew R; Lee, Byeongdu; Auyeung, Evelyn; Mirkin, Chad A

    2013-09-13

    The directed assembly of nanoparticle building blocks is a promising method for generating sophisticated three-dimensional materials by design. In this work, we have used DNA linkers to synthesize nanoparticle superlattices that have greater complexity than simple binary systems using the process of topotactic intercalation-the insertion of a third nanoparticle component at predetermined sites within a preformed binary lattice. Five distinct crystals were synthesized with this methodology, three of which have no equivalent in atomic or molecular crystals, demonstrating a general approach for assembling highly ordered ternary nanoparticle superlattices whose structures can be predicted before their synthesis. Additionally, the intercalation process was demonstrated to be completely reversible; the inserted nanoparticles could be expelled into solution by raising the temperature, and the ternary superlattice could be recovered by cooling.

  13. A transient ischemic environment induces reversible compaction of chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmes, Ina; Szczurek, Aleksander; Prakash, Kirti; Charapitsa, Iryna; Heiser, Christina; Musheev, Michael; Schock, Florian; Fornalczyk, Karolina; Ma, Dongyu; Birk, Udo; Cremer, Christoph; Reid, George

    2015-11-05

    Cells detect and adapt to hypoxic and nutritional stress through immediate transcriptional, translational and metabolic responses. The environmental effects of ischemia on chromatin nanostructure were investigated using single molecule localization microscopy of DNA binding dyes and of acetylated histones, by the sensitivity of chromatin to digestion with DNAseI, and by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of core and linker histones. Short-term oxygen and nutrient deprivation of the cardiomyocyte cell line HL-1 induces a previously undescribed chromatin architecture, consisting of large, chromatin-sparse voids interspersed between DNA-dense hollow helicoid structures 40-700 nm in dimension. The chromatin compaction is reversible, and upon restitution of normoxia and nutrients, chromatin transiently adopts a more open structure than in untreated cells. The compacted state of chromatin reduces transcription, while the open chromatin structure induced upon recovery provokes a transitory increase in transcription. Digestion of chromatin with DNAseI confirms that oxygen and nutrient deprivation induces compaction of chromatin. Chromatin compaction is associated with depletion of ATP and redistribution of the polyamine pool into the nucleus. FRAP demonstrates that core histones are not displaced from compacted chromatin; however, the mobility of linker histone H1 is considerably reduced, to an extent that far exceeds the difference in histone H1 mobility between heterochromatin and euchromatin. These studies exemplify the dynamic capacity of chromatin architecture to physically respond to environmental conditions, directly link cellular energy status to chromatin compaction and provide insight into the effect ischemia has on the nuclear architecture of cells.

  14. Growth of compact arrays of optical quality single crystalline ZnO

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report the synthesis and optical properties of compact and aligned ZnO nanorod arrays (dia, ∼ 50–200 nm) grown on a glass substrate with varying seed particle density. The suspension of ZnO nanoparticles (size, ∼ 15 nm) of various concentrations are used as seed layer for the growth of nanorod arrays via ...

  15. Compact Holographic Data Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, T. H.; Reyes, G. F.; Zhou, H.

    2001-01-01

    NASA's future missions would require massive high-speed onboard data storage capability to Space Science missions. For Space Science, such as the Europa Lander mission, the onboard data storage requirements would be focused on maximizing the spacecraft's ability to survive fault conditions (i.e., no loss in stored science data when spacecraft enters the 'safe mode') and autonomously recover from them during NASA's long-life and deep space missions. This would require the development of non-volatile memory. In order to survive in the stringent environment during space exploration missions, onboard memory requirements would also include: (1) survive a high radiation environment (1 Mrad), (2) operate effectively and efficiently for a very long time (10 years), and (3) sustain at least a billion write cycles. Therefore, memory technologies requirements of NASA's Earth Science and Space Science missions are large capacity, non-volatility, high-transfer rate, high radiation resistance, high storage density, and high power efficiency. JPL, under current sponsorship from NASA Space Science and Earth Science Programs, is developing a high-density, nonvolatile and rad-hard Compact Holographic Data Storage (CHDS) system to enable large-capacity, high-speed, low power consumption, and read/write of data in a space environment. The entire read/write operation will be controlled with electrooptic mechanism without any moving parts. This CHDS will consist of laser diodes, photorefractive crystal, spatial light modulator, photodetector array, and I/O electronic interface. In operation, pages of information would be recorded and retrieved with random access and high-speed. The nonvolatile, rad-hard characteristics of the holographic memory will provide a revolutionary memory technology meeting the high radiation challenge facing the Europa Lander mission. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Compact instantaneous water heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, Jorge G.W.; Machado, Antonio R.; Ferraz, Andre D.; Rocha, Ivan C.C. da; Konishi, Ricardo [Companhia de Gas de Santa Catarina (SCGAS), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Lehmkuhl, Willian A.; Francisco Jr, Roberto W.; Hatanaka, Ricardo L.; Pereira, Fernando M.; Oliveira, Amir A.M. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of combustion in an inert porous medium in a liquid heating device application. This project aims to increase efficiency in the application of natural gas in residential and commercial sectors with the use of advanced combustion and heat transfer. The goal is to facilitate the development of a high performance compact water heater allowing hot water supply for up to two simultaneous showers. The experiment consists in a cylindrical porous burner with an integrated annular water heat exchanger. The reactants were injected radially into the burner and the flame stabilizes within the porous matrix. The water circulates in a coiled pipe positioned at the center of the burner. This configuration allows for heat transfer by conduction and radiation from the solid matrix to the heat exchanger. This article presented preliminary experimental results of a new water heater based on an annular porous burner. The range of equivalence ratios tested varied from 0.65 to 0.8. The power range was varied from 3 to 5 kW. Increasing the equivalence ratio or decreasing the total power input of the burner resulted in increased thermal efficiencies of the water heater. Thermal efficiencies varying from 60 to 92% were obtained. The condition for the goal of a comfortable bath was 20 deg C for 8-12 L/min. This preliminary prototype has achieved water temperature of 11deg C for 5 L/min. Further optimizations will be necessary in order to achieve intense heating with high thermal efficiency. (author)

  17. Genotoxicity of metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong; Mason, Michael M; Wise, John Pierce

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is currently used in industry, medicine, and military applications, as well as in more than 300 commercial products. Yet, the same properties that make these particles exciting for technology also make them daunting public health concerns because their toxicity is unknown and relatively unexplored. Increased attention is being placed on the study of metal particle genotoxicity; however, a lot of unknowns remain about their effects and the mechanisms. In this article, we highlight some metal and metal oxide nanoparticles of interest and discuss the current in vivo and in vitro studies of genotoxic effects. Many metal nanoparticles were found to cause chromosomal aberrations, DNA strand breaks, oxidative DNA damage, and mutations. Inconsistencies are found in the literature, however, thus drawing conclusions is difficult due to a variety of factors. Therefore, the areas requiring further attention are highlighted and recommendations to improve our understanding of the genotoxic potential are addressed.

  18. What Is Business's Social Compact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avishai, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Under the "new" social compact, businesses must focus on continuous learning and thus have both an obligation to support teaching and an opportunity to profit from it. Learning organizations must also be teaching organizations. (SK)

  19. Collapse settlement in compacted soils

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Booth, AR

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available Research into collapse settlement in compacted soils is described, with special reference to recent cases in Southern Africa where collapse settlement occurred in road embankments following wetting of the soil. The laboratory work described...

  20. Compaction agent clarification of microbial lysates

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWalt, Brad W.; Murphy, Jason C.; Fox, George E.; Willson, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are often purified from microbial lysates containing high concentrations of nucleic acids. Pre-purification steps such as nuclease addition or precipitation with polyethyleneimine or ammonium sulfate are normally required to reduce viscosity and to eliminate competing polyanions before anion exchange chromatography. We report that small polycationic compaction agents such as spermine selectively precipitate nucleic acids during or after Escherichia coli lysis, allowing DNA and RNA to be pelleted with the insoluble cell debris. Analysis by spectrophotometry and protein assay confirmed a significant reduction in the concentration of nucleic acids present, with preservation of protein. Lysate viscosity is greatly reduced, facilitating subsequent processing. We have used 5mM spermine to remove nucleic acids from E. coli lysate in the purification of a hexahistidine-tagged HIV reverse transcriptase.

  1. Investigation of the complex structure, comparative DNA-binding and DNA cleavage of two water-soluble mono-nuclear lanthanum(III) complexes and cytotoxic activity of chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles as drug delivery for the complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Zahra; Nasrollahi, Neda; Karbalaei-Heidari, Hamidreza; Eigner, Vaclav; Dusek, Michal; Mobaraki, Nabiallah; Pournejati, Roya

    2017-05-01

    Two water-soluble mono-nuclear macrocyclic lanthanum(III) complexes of 2,6-diformyl-4-methylphenol with 1,3-diamino-2-propanol (C1) or 1,3-propylenediamine (C2) were synthesized and characterized by UV-Vis, FT-IR, 13C and 1H NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. C1 complex was structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, which revealed that the complex was mononuclear and ten-coordinated. The coordination sites around lanthanum(III) were occupied with a five-dentate ligand, two bidentate nitrates, and one water molecule. The interaction of complexes with DNA was studied in buffered aqueous solution at pH 7.4. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, emission spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) and viscometric measurements provided clear evidence of the intercalation mechanism of binding. The obtained intrinsic binding constants (Kb) 9.3 × 103 and 1.2 × 103 M- 1 for C1 and C2, respectively confirmed that C1 is better intercalator than C2. The DNA docking studies suggested that the complexes bind with DNA in a groove binding mode with the binding affinity of C1 > C2. Moreover, agarose gel electrophoresis study of the DNA-complex for both compounds revealed that the C1 intercalation cause ethidium bromide replacement in a competitive manner which confirms the suggested mechanism of binding. Finally, the anticancer experiments for the treated cancerous cell lines with both synthesized compounds show that these hydrophilic molecules need a suitable carrier to pass through the hydrophobic nature of cell membrane efficiently.

  2. DNA-based machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fuan; Willner, Bilha; Willner, Itamar

    2014-01-01

    The base sequence in nucleic acids encodes substantial structural and functional information into the biopolymer. This encoded information provides the basis for the tailoring and assembly of DNA machines. A DNA machine is defined as a molecular device that exhibits the following fundamental features. (1) It performs a fuel-driven mechanical process that mimics macroscopic machines. (2) The mechanical process requires an energy input, "fuel." (3) The mechanical operation is accompanied by an energy consumption process that leads to "waste products." (4) The cyclic operation of the DNA devices, involves the use of "fuel" and "anti-fuel" ingredients. A variety of DNA-based machines are described, including the construction of "tweezers," "walkers," "robots," "cranes," "transporters," "springs," "gears," and interlocked cyclic DNA structures acting as reconfigurable catenanes, rotaxanes, and rotors. Different "fuels", such as nucleic acid strands, pH (H⁺/OH⁻), metal ions, and light, are used to trigger the mechanical functions of the DNA devices. The operation of the devices in solution and on surfaces is described, and a variety of optical, electrical, and photoelectrochemical methods to follow the operations of the DNA machines are presented. We further address the possible applications of DNA machines and the future perspectives of molecular DNA devices. These include the application of DNA machines as functional structures for the construction of logic gates and computing, for the programmed organization of metallic nanoparticle structures and the control of plasmonic properties, and for controlling chemical transformations by DNA machines. We further discuss the future applications of DNA machines for intracellular sensing, controlling intracellular metabolic pathways, and the use of the functional nanostructures for drug delivery and medical applications.

  3. Structure, phase content and mechanical properties of aluminium with hard particles after shock-wave compaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkov, S; Vorozhtsov, S; Turuntaev, I

    2015-01-01

    The possibilities to combine metal and metal oxide powders in various compositions open a broad range of mechanical and thermal behavior. When using in nanostructured components the resulting materials might exhibit even more interesting properties, like product effectiveness, tensile strength, wear resistance, endurance and corrosion resistance. Intermetallics like TiAl could be obtained as TiAl x in a quality similar to that obtained from melting where only eutectic mixture can be produced. Similar effects are possible when compacting nanoceramic powders whereas these can be combined with intermetallics. Currently, it is very difficult to produce wires and special shaped parts from high temperature superconducting materials. The compacting by explosives could solve this problem.The present paper uses explosion compacting of Al nanoparticles to create nanocomposite with increased physico-mechanical properties. Russian civil explosive Uglenit was chosen as high energy material (HEM) for shock-wave compaction. The different schemes and conditions were suggested to run the explosion process. Al nanoparticles as produced by electric wire explosion contain 8-10% of aluminum oxide. That aluminum oxide can serve as strengthening material in the final nanocomposite which may be generated in various compositions by explosive compacting. Further modifications of nanocomposites were obtained when including nanodiamonds into the mixture with aluminum nanoparticles with different percentages. The addition of nanodiamonds results in a substantial strengthening effect.The experiments with compacting aluminum nanoparticles by explosives are described in detail including the process variations and conditions. The physico-mechanical properties of the nanocomposites are determined and discussed by considering the applied conditions. Especially, microstructure and phases of the obtained nanocomposites are analyzed by X-ray diffraction. (paper)

  4. Structure, phase content and mechanical properties of aluminium with hard particles after shock-wave compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkov, S.; Vorozhtsov, S.; Turuntaev, I.

    2015-04-01

    The possibilities to combine metal and metal oxide powders in various compositions open a broad range of mechanical and thermal behavior. When using in nanostructured components the resulting materials might exhibit even more interesting properties, like product effectiveness, tensile strength, wear resistance, endurance and corrosion resistance. Intermetallics like TiAl could be obtained as TiAlx in a quality similar to that obtained from melting where only eutectic mixture can be produced. Similar effects are possible when compacting nanoceramic powders whereas these can be combined with intermetallics. Currently, it is very difficult to produce wires and special shaped parts from high temperature superconducting materials. The compacting by explosives could solve this problem.The present paper uses explosion compacting of Al nanoparticles to create nanocomposite with increased physico-mechanical properties. Russian civil explosive Uglenit was chosen as high energy material (HEM) for shock-wave compaction. The different schemes and conditions were suggested to run the explosion process. Al nanoparticles as produced by electric wire explosion contain 8-10% of aluminum oxide. That aluminum oxide can serve as strengthening material in the final nanocomposite which may be generated in various compositions by explosive compacting. Further modifications of nanocomposites were obtained when including nanodiamonds into the mixture with aluminum nanoparticles with different percentages. The addition of nanodiamonds results in a substantial strengthening effect. The experiments with compacting aluminum nanoparticles by explosives are described in detail including the process variations and conditions. The physico-mechanical properties of the nanocomposites are determined and discussed by considering the applied conditions. Especially, microstructure and phases of the obtained nanocomposites are analyzed by X-ray diffraction.

  5. Investigation of the complex structure, comparative DNA-binding and DNA cleavage of two water-soluble mono-nuclear lanthanum(III) complexes and cytotoxic activity of chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles as drug delivery for the complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Asadi, Z.; Nasrollahi, N.; Karbalaei-Heidari, H.; Eigner, Václav; Dušek, Michal; Mobaraki, N.; Pournejati, R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 178, May (2017), s. 125-135 ISSN 1386-1425 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-12653S; GA MŠk LO1603 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24510 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : lanthanum(III) * binding constant * molecular docking * DNA cleavage * cytotoxicity * chitosan Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 2.536, year: 2016

  6. A new full-field interferometry approach for counting and differentiating aquatic biotic nanoparticles (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccara, A. Claude; Fedala, Yasmina; Voronkoff, Justine; Paffoni, Nina; Boccara, Martine

    2017-03-01

    Due to the huge abundance and the major role that viruses and membrane vesicles play in the seas or rivers ecosystems it is necessary to develop simple, sensitive, compact and reliable methods for their detection and characterization. Our approach is based on the measurement of the weak light level scattered by the biotic nanoparticles. We describe a new full-field, incoherently illuminated, shot-noise limited, common-path interferometric detection method coupled with the analysis of Brownian motion to detect, quantify, and differentiate biotic nanoparticles. The last developments take advantage of a new fast (700 Hz) camera with 2 Me- full well capacity that improves the signal to noise ratio and increases the precision of the Brownian motion characterization. We validated the method with calibrated nanoparticles and homogeneous DNA or RNA.viruses. The smallest virus size that we characterized with a suitable signal-to-noise ratio was around 30 nm in diameter with a target towards the numerous 20 nm diameter viruses. We show for the first time anisotropic trajectories for myoviruses meaning that there is a memory of the initial direction of their Brownian motions. Significant improvements have been made in the handling of the sample as well as in the statistical analysis for differentiating the various families of vesicles and virus. We further applied the method for vesicles detection and for analysis of coastal and oligotrophic samples from Tara Oceans circumnavigation as well of various rivers.

  7. Compact Intracloud Discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, David A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1998-11-01

    In November of 1993, mysterious signals recorded by a satellite-borne broadband VHF radio science experiment called Blackboard led to a completely unexpected discovery. Prior to launch of the ALEXIS satellite, it was thought that its secondary payload, Blackboard, would most often detect the radio emissions from lightning when its receiver was not overwhelmed by noise from narrowband communication carriers. Instead, the vast majority of events that triggered the instrument were isolated pairs of pulses that were one hundred times more energetic than normal thunderstorm electrical emissions. The events, which came to be known as TIPPs (for transionospheric pulse pairs), presented a true mystery to the geophysics community. At the time, it was not even known whether the events had natural or anthropogenic origins. After two and one half years of research into the unique signals, two ground-based receiver arrays in New Mexico first began to detect and record thunderstorm radio emissions that were consistent with the Blackboard observations. On two occasions, the ground-based systems and Blackboard even recorded emissions that were produced by the same exact events. From the ground based observations, it has been determined that TIPP events areproduced by brief, singular, isolated, intracloud electrical discharges that occur in intense regions of thunderstorms. These discharges have been dubbed CIDS, an acronym for compact intracloud discharges. During the summer of 1996, ground-based receiver arrays were used to record the electric field change signals and broadband HF emissions from hundreds of CIDS. Event timing that was accurate to within a few microseconds made possible the determination of source locations using methods of differential time of arrival. Ionospheric reflections of signals were recorded in addition to groundwave/line-of-sight signals and were used to determine accurate altitudes for the discharges. Twenty-four CIDS were recorded from three

  8. Summary of Self-compacting Concrete Workability

    OpenAIRE

    GUO Gui-xiang; Duan Hong-jun

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of a large number of domestic and foreign literature, situation and development of self-compacting concrete is introduced. Summary of the compacting theory of self-compacting concrete. And some of the factors affecting the workability of self-compacting concrete were discussed and summarized to a certain extent. Aims to further promote the application and research of self-compacting concrete

  9. Clustering of near clusters versus cluster compactness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Gao; Yipeng Jing

    1989-01-01

    The clustering properties of near Zwicky clusters are studied by using the two-point angular correlation function. The angular correlation functions for compact and medium compact clusters, for open clusters, and for all near Zwicky clusters are estimated. The results show much stronger clustering for compact and medium compact clusters than for open clusters, and that open clusters have nearly the same clustering strength as galaxies. A detailed study of the compactness-dependence of correlation function strength is worth investigating. (author)

  10. Compact magnetic confinement fusion: Spherical torus and compact torus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Gao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The spherical torus (ST and compact torus (CT are two kinds of alternative magnetic confinement fusion concepts with compact geometry. The ST is actually a sub-category of tokamak with a low aspect ratio; while the CT is a toroidal magnetic configuration with a simply-connected geometry including spheromak and field reversed pinch. The ST and CT have potential advantages for ultimate fusion reactor; while at present they can also provide unique fusion science and technology contributions for mainstream fusion research. However, some critical scientific and technology issues should be extensively investigated.

  11. Dendrimer-based biosensor for chemiluminescent detection of DNA hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, P.; Hun, X.; Qing, H.

    2011-01-01

    We report on a highly sensitive chemiluminescent (CL) biosensor for the sequence-specific detection of DNA using a novel bio barcode DNA probe modified with gold nanoparticles that were covered with a dendrimer. The modified probe is composed of gold nanoparticles, a dendrimer, the CL reagent, and the DNA. The capture probe DNA was immobilized on magnetic beads covered with gold. It first hybridizes with the target DNA and then with one terminal end of the signal DNA on the barcoded DNA probe. CL was generated by adding H 2 O 2 and Co(II) ions as the catalyst. The immobilization of dendrimer onto the gold nanoparticles can significantly enhance sensitivity and gives a detection limit of 6 fmol L -1 of target DNA. (author)

  12. Effects of Laser Printer-Emitted Engineered Nanoparticles on Cytotoxicity, Chemokine Expression, Reactive Oxygen Species, DNA Methylation, and DNA Damage: A Comprehensive in Vitro Analysis in Human Small Airway Epithelial Cells, Macrophages, and Lymphoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirela, Sandra V; Miousse, Isabelle R; Lu, Xiaoyan; Castranova, Vincent; Thomas, Treye; Qian, Yong; Bello, Dhimiter; Kobzik, Lester; Koturbash, Igor; Demokritou, Philip

    2016-02-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) incorporated into toner formulations of printing equipment become airborne during consumer use. Although information on the complex physicochemical and toxicological properties of both toner powders and printer-emitted particles (PEPs) continues to grow, most toxicological studies have not used the actual PEPs but rather have primarily used raw toner powders, which are not representative of current exposures experienced at the consumer level during printing. We assessed the biological responses of a panel of human cell lines to PEPs. Three physiologically relevant cell lines--small airway epithelial cells (SAECs), macrophages (THP-1 cells), and lymphoblasts (TK6 cells)--were exposed to PEPs at a wide range of doses (0.5-100 μg/mL) corresponding to human inhalation exposure durations at the consumer level of 8 hr or more. Following treatment, toxicological parameters reflecting distinct mechanisms were evaluated. PEPs caused significant membrane integrity damage, an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine release in different cell lines at doses equivalent to exposure durations from 7.8 to 1,500 hr. Furthermore, there were differences in methylation patterns that, although not statistically significant, demonstrate the potential effects of PEPs on the overall epigenome following exposure. The in vitro findings obtained in this study suggest that laser printer-emitted engineered nanoparticles may be deleterious to lung cells and provide preliminary evidence of epigenetic modifications that might translate to pulmonary disorders.

  13. Application of biomolecular recognition via magnetic nanoparticle in nanobiotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wei-Zheng; Cetinel, Sibel; Montemagno, Carlo

    2018-05-01

    The marriage of biomolecular recognition and magnetic nanoparticle creates tremendous opportunities in the development of advanced technology both in academic research and in industrial sectors. In this paper, we review current progress on the magnetic nanoparticle-biomolecule hybrid systems, particularly employing the recognition pairs of DNA-DNA, DNA-protein, protein-protein, and protein-inorganics in several nanobiotechnology application areas, including molecular biology, diagnostics, medical treatment, industrial biocatalysts, and environmental separations.

  14. Genetic control over the processes of postirradiation recovery of a compact chromosome in micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryashova, N.Yu.; Groshev, V.V.; Shestakov, S.V.

    1984-01-01

    X-irradiation of Micrococcus radiodurans cells with sublethal doses caused disturbances in the structure of a membrane-bound compact chromosome. Recovery of the compact chromosome occurred during the postirradiation incubation of the wild type cells and cells of the UVS-17 mutant deficient in DNA-polymerase. This process was blocked in cells of rec-30 mutant with the impaired system of genetic recombination: this is indicative of an important role played by rec-30 gene product in the postirradiation recovery of the compact chromosome in M. radiodurans cells

  15. Biosynthesis of Nanoparticles by Microorganisms and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangqian Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of eco-friendly technologies in material synthesis is of considerable importance to expand their biological applications. Nowadays, a variety of inorganic nanoparticles with well-defined chemical composition, size, and morphology have been synthesized by using different microorganisms, and their applications in many cutting-edge technological areas have been explored. This paper highlights the recent developments of the biosynthesis of inorganic nanoparticles including metallic nanoparticles, oxide nanoparticles, sulfide nanoparticles, and other typical nanoparticles. Different formation mechanisms of these nanoparticles will be discussed as well. The conditions to control the size/shape and stability of particles are summarized. The applications of these biosynthesized nanoparticles in a wide spectrum of potential areas are presented including targeted drug delivery, cancer treatment, gene therapy and DNA analysis, antibacterial agents, biosensors, enhancing reaction rates, separation science, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The current limitations and future prospects for the synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles by microorganisms are discussed.

  16. Professional Windows Embedded Compact 7

    CERN Document Server

    Phung, Samuel; Joubert, Thierry; Hall, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Learn to program an array of customized devices and solutions As a compact, highly efficient, scalable operating system, Windows Embedded Compact 7 (WEC7) is one of the best options for developing a new generation of network-enabled, media-rich, and service-oriented devices. This in-depth resource takes you through the benefits and capabilities of WEC7 so that you can start using this performance development platform today. Divided into several major sections, the book begins with an introduction and then moves on to coverage of OS design, application development, advanced application developm

  17. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baity, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively-tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas the model treats stub-tuned resonant double loop antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mockups of resonant double loop antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

  18. Compact accelerator for medical therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Paul, Arthur C.

    2010-05-04

    A compact accelerator system having an integrated particle generator-linear accelerator with a compact, small-scale construction capable of producing an energetic (.about.70-250 MeV) proton beam or other nuclei and transporting the beam direction to a medical therapy patient without the need for bending magnets or other hardware often required for remote beam transport. The integrated particle generator-accelerator is actuable as a unitary body on a support structure to enable scanning of a particle beam by direction actuation of the particle generator-accelerator.

  19. Compact toroid refueling of reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouge, M.J.; Hogan, J.T.; Milora, S.L.; Thomas, C.E.

    1988-04-01

    The feasibility of refueling fusion reactors and devices such as the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) with high-velocity compact toroids is investigated. For reactors with reasonable limits on recirculating power, it is concluded that the concept is not economically feasible. For typical ITER designs, the compact toroid fueling requires about 15 MW of electrical power, with about 5 MW of thermal power deposited in the plasma. At these power levels, ideal ignition (Q = ∞) is not possible, even for short-pulse burns. The pulsed power requirements for this technology are substantial. 6 ref., 1 figs

  20. Co-compact Gabor Systems on Locally Compact Abelian Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Mads Sielemann; Lemvig, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    In this work we extend classical structure and duality results in Gabor analysis on the euclidean space to the setting of second countable locally compact abelian (LCA) groups. We formulate the concept of rationally oversampling of Gabor systems in an LCA group and prove corresponding characteriz...

  1. Isometric coactions of compact quantum groups on compact ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a compact quantum metric space in the framework of Rieffel, where the ... This problem can be formulated and studied in various settings. ... The spaces we are interested in this paper are metric spaces, both classical and quantum. ... He has given a definition for a quantum symmetry of a classical ...... by the construction of I.

  2. Real-time colorimetric detection of DNA methylation of the PAX1 gene in cervical scrapings for cervical cancer screening with thiol-labeled PCR primers and gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang J

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Jin Huang,1,2 Yu-Ligh Liou,1,2 Ya-Nan Kang,3 Zhi-Rong Tan,1,2 Ming-Jing Peng,1,2 Hong-Hao Zhou1,2 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, 2Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, People’s Republic of China Background: DNA methylation can induce carcinogenesis by silencing key tumor suppressor genes. Analysis of aberrant methylation of tumor suppressor genes can be used as a prognostic and predictive biomarker for cancer. In this study, we propose a colorimetric method for the detection of DNA methylation of the paired box gene 1 (PAX1 gene in cervical scrapings obtained from 42 patients who underwent cervical colposcopic biopsy. Methods: A thiolated methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP primer was used to generate MSP products labeled with the thiol group at one end. After bisulfite conversion and MSP amplification, the unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs were placed in a reaction tube and NaCl was added to induce aggregation of bare AuNPs without generating polymerase chain reaction products. After salt addition, the color of AuNPs remained red in the methylated PAX1 gene samples because of binding to the MSP-amplified products. By contrast, the color of the AuNP colloid solution changed from red to blue in the non-methylated PAX1 gene samples because of aggregation of AuNPs in the absence of the MSP-amplified products. Furthermore, PAX1 methylation was quantitatively detected in cervical scrapings of patients with varied pathological degrees of cervical cancer. Conventional quantitative MSP (qMSP was also performed for comparison. Results: The two methods showed a significant correlation of the methylation frequency of the PAX1 gene in cervical scrapings with severity of cervical cancer (n=42, P<0.05. The results of the

  3. Compaction dynamics of crunchy granular material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillard François

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Compaction of brittle porous material leads to a wide variety of densification patterns. Static compaction bands occurs naturally in rocks or bones, and have important consequences in industry for the manufacturing of powder tablets or metallic foams for example. Recently, oscillatory compaction bands have been observed in brittle porous media like snow or cereals. We will discuss the great variety of densification patterns arising during the compaction of puffed rice, including erratic compaction at low velocity, one or several travelling compaction bands at medium velocity and homogeneous compaction at larger velocity. The conditions of existence of each pattern are studied thanks to a numerical spring lattice model undergoing breakage and is mapped to the phase diagram of the patterns based on dimensionless characteristic quantities. This also allows to rationalise the evolution of the compaction behaviour during a single test. Finally, the localisation of compaction bands is linked to the strain rate sensitivity of the material.

  4. Compaction dynamics of crunchy granular material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillard, François; Golshan, Pouya; Shen, Luming; Valdès, Julio R.; Einav, Itai

    2017-06-01

    Compaction of brittle porous material leads to a wide variety of densification patterns. Static compaction bands occurs naturally in rocks or bones, and have important consequences in industry for the manufacturing of powder tablets or metallic foams for example. Recently, oscillatory compaction bands have been observed in brittle porous media like snow or cereals. We will discuss the great variety of densification patterns arising during the compaction of puffed rice, including erratic compaction at low velocity, one or several travelling compaction bands at medium velocity and homogeneous compaction at larger velocity. The conditions of existence of each pattern are studied thanks to a numerical spring lattice model undergoing breakage and is mapped to the phase diagram of the patterns based on dimensionless characteristic quantities. This also allows to rationalise the evolution of the compaction behaviour during a single test. Finally, the localisation of compaction bands is linked to the strain rate sensitivity of the material.

  5. Plasmid DNA Delivery: Nanotopography Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hao; Yu, Meihua; Lu, Yao; Gu, Zhengying; Yang, Yannan; Zhang, Min; Fu, Jianye; Yu, Chengzhong

    2017-12-20

    Plasmid DNA molecules with unique loop structures have widespread bioapplications, in many cases relying heavily on delivery vehicles to introduce them into cells and achieve their functions. Herein, we demonstrate that control over delicate nanotopography of silica nanoparticles as plasmid DNA vectors has significant impact on the transfection efficacy. For silica nanoparticles with rambutan-, raspberry-, and flower-like morphologies composed of spike-, hemisphere-, and bowl-type subunit nanotopographies, respectively, the rambutan-like nanoparticles with spiky surfaces demonstrate the highest plasmid DNA binding capability and transfection efficacy of 88%, higher than those reported for silica-based nanovectors. Moreover, it is shown that the surface spikes of rambutan nanoparticles provide a continuous open space to bind DNA chains via multivalent interactions and protect the gene molecules sheltered in the spiky layer against nuclease degradation, exhibiting no significant transfection decay. This unique protection feature is in great contrast to a commercial transfection agent with similar transfection performance but poor protection capability against enzymatic cleavage. Our study provides new understandings in the rational design of nonviral vectors for efficient gene delivery.

  6. Compact objects and accretion disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blandford, Roger; Agol, Eric; Broderick, Avery; Heyl, Jeremy; Koopmans, Leon; Lee, Hee-Won

    2002-01-01

    Recent developments in the spectropolarimetric study of compact objects, specifically black holes (stellar and massive) and neutron stars are reviewed. The lectures are organized around five topics: disks, jets, outflows, neutron stars and black holes. They emphasize physical mechanisms and are

  7. Engineering aspects of compact stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, B.E.; Benson, R.D.; Brooks, A.

    2003-01-01

    Compact stellarators could combine the good confinement and high beta of a tokamak with the inherently steady state, disruption-free characteristics of a stellarator. Two U.S. compact stellarator facilities are now in the conceptual design phase: the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) and the Quasi- Poloidal Stellarator (QPS). NCSX has a major radius of 1.4 m and a toroidal field up to 2 T. The primary feature of both NCSX and QPS is the set of modular coils that provide the basic magnetic configuration. These coils represent a major engineering challenge due to the complex shape, precise geometric accuracy, and high current density of the windings. The winding geometry is too complex for conventional hollow copper conductor construction. Instead, the modular coils will be wound with flexible, multi strand cable conductor that has been compacted to a 75% copper packing fraction. Inside the NCSX coil set and surrounding the plasma is a highly contoured vacuum vessel. The vessel consists of three identical, 120 deg. segments that are bolted together at double sealed joints. The QPS device has a major radius of 0.9 m, a toroidal field of 1 T, and an aspect ratio of only 2.7. Instead of an internal vacuum vessel, the QPS modular coils will operate in an external vacuum tank. (author)

  8. Compact Circuit Preprocesses Accelerometer Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Compact electronic circuit transfers dc power to, and preprocesses ac output of, accelerometer and associated preamplifier. Incorporated into accelerometer case during initial fabrication or retrofit onto commercial accelerometer. Made of commercial integrated circuits and other conventional components; made smaller by use of micrologic and surface-mount technology.

  9. Using nanocomposite materials technology to understand and control reverse osmosis membrane compaction

    KAUST Repository

    Pendergast, Mary Theresa M.; Nygaard, Jodie M.; Ghosh, Asim K.; Hoek, Eric M.V.

    2010-01-01

    Composite reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were formed by interfacial polymerization of polyamide thin films over pure polysulfone and nanocomposite-polysulfone support membranes. Nanocomposite support membranes were formed from amorphous non-porous silica and crystalline microporous zeolite nanoparticles. For each hand-cast membrane, water flux and NaCl rejection were monitored over time at two different applied pressures. Nanocomposite-polysulfone supported RO membranes generally had higher initial permeability and experienced less flux decline due to compaction than pure polysulfone supported membranes. In addition, observed salt rejection tended to increase as flux declined from compaction. Crosssectional SEM images verified significant reduction in thickness of pure polysulfone supports, whereas nanocomposites better resisted compaction due to enhanced mechanical stability imparted by the nanoparticles. A conceptual model was proposed to explain the mechanistic relationship between support membrane compaction and observed changes in water flux and salt rejection. As the support membrane compacts, skin layer pore constriction increased the effective path length for diffusion through the composite membranes, which reduced both water and salt permeability identically. However, experimental salt permeability tended to decline to a greater extent than water permeability; hence, the observed changes in flux and rejection might also be related to structural changes in the polyamide thin film. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Using nanocomposite materials technology to understand and control reverse osmosis membrane compaction

    KAUST Repository

    Pendergast, Mary Theresa M.

    2010-10-01

    Composite reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were formed by interfacial polymerization of polyamide thin films over pure polysulfone and nanocomposite-polysulfone support membranes. Nanocomposite support membranes were formed from amorphous non-porous silica and crystalline microporous zeolite nanoparticles. For each hand-cast membrane, water flux and NaCl rejection were monitored over time at two different applied pressures. Nanocomposite-polysulfone supported RO membranes generally had higher initial permeability and experienced less flux decline due to compaction than pure polysulfone supported membranes. In addition, observed salt rejection tended to increase as flux declined from compaction. Crosssectional SEM images verified significant reduction in thickness of pure polysulfone supports, whereas nanocomposites better resisted compaction due to enhanced mechanical stability imparted by the nanoparticles. A conceptual model was proposed to explain the mechanistic relationship between support membrane compaction and observed changes in water flux and salt rejection. As the support membrane compacts, skin layer pore constriction increased the effective path length for diffusion through the composite membranes, which reduced both water and salt permeability identically. However, experimental salt permeability tended to decline to a greater extent than water permeability; hence, the observed changes in flux and rejection might also be related to structural changes in the polyamide thin film. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.