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Sample records for compact plasma wall

  1. Effect of Die Wall Lubrication on Warm Compaction Powder Metallurgy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Die wall lubrication was applied on warm compaction powder metallurgy in hope to reduce the concentration level of the admixed lubricant since lubricant is harmful to the mechanical property of the sintered materials. Iron-based samples were prepared by die wall lubricated warm compaction at 135 ℃ and 175 ℃, using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) emulsion as die wall lubricant. A compacting pressure of 700 MPa and 550 MPa were used. The admixed lubricant concentration ranging from 0 to 0.6 wt.% was used in th...

  2. COMPACT PROTON INJECTOR AND FIRST ACCELERATOR SYSTEM TEST FOR COMPACT PROTON DIELECTRIC WALL CANCER THERAPY ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y; Guethlein, G; Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Watson, J; Weir, J; Pearson, D

    2009-04-23

    A compact proton accelerator for cancer treatment is being developed by using the high-gradient dielectric insulator wall (DWA) technology [1-4]. We are testing all the essential DWA components, including a compact proton source, on the First Article System Test (FAST). The configuration and progress on the injector and FAST will be presented.

  3. Gravitational lensing by compact objects within plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Frequency-dependent gravitational lens effects are found for trajectories of electromagnetic rays passing through a distribution of plasma near a massive object. Ray propagation through plasma adds extra terms to the equations of motion that depend on the plasma refractive index. For low-frequency rays these refractive effects can dominate, turning the gravitational lens into a mirror. While light rays behave like particles with an effective mass given by the plasma frequency in a medium with constant density, an inhomogeneous plasma introduces more complicated behavior even for the spherically symmetric case. As a physical example, the pulse profile of a compact object sheathed in a dense plasma is examined, which introduces dramatic frequency-dependent shifts from the behavior in vacuum.

  4. Engineering Prototype for a Compact Medical Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zografos, Anthony; Hening, Andy; Joshkin, Vladimir; Leung, Kevin; Pearson, Dave; Pearce-Percy, Henry; Rougieri, Mario; Parker, Yoko; Weir, John [CPAC, Livermore, CA (United States); Blackfield, Donald; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Falabella, Steven; Guethlein, Gary; Poole, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Hamm, Robert W. [R and M Technical Enterprises, Pleasanton, CA (United States); Becker, Reinard [Scientific Software Service, Gelnhausen (Germany)

    2011-12-13

    A compact accelerator system architecture based on the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) for medical proton beam therapy has been developed by the Compact Particle Acceleration Corporation (CPAC). The major subsystems are a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) injector linac, a pulsed kicker to select the desired proton bunches, and a DWA linear accelerator incorporating a high gradient insulator (HGI) with stacked Blumleins to produce the required acceleration energy. The Blumleins are switched with solid state laser-driven optical switches integrated into the Blumlein assemblies. Other subsystems include a high power pulsed laser, fiber optic distribution system, electrical charging system, and beam diagnostics. An engineering prototype has been constructed and characterized, and these results will be used within the next three years to develop an extremely compact 150 MeV system capable of modulating energy, beam current, and spot size on a shot-to-shot basis. This paper presents the details the engineering prototype, experimental results, and commercialization plans.

  5. Studies on plasma production in a large volume system using multiple compact ECR plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarey, R. D.; Ganguli, A.; Sahu, D.; Narayanan, R.; Arora, N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a scheme for large volume plasma production using multiple highly portable compact ECR plasma sources (CEPS) (Ganguli et al 2016 Plasma Source Sci. Technol. 25 025026). The large volume plasma system (LVPS) described in the paper is a scalable, cylindrical vessel of diameter  ≈1 m, consisting of source and spacer sections with multiple CEPS mounted symmetrically on the periphery of the source sections. Scaling is achieved by altering the number of source sections/the number of sources in a source section or changing the number of spacer sections for adjusting the spacing between the source sections. A series of plasma characterization experiments using argon gas were conducted on the LVPS under different configurations of CEPS, source and spacer sections, for an operating pressure in the range 0.5-20 mTorr, and a microwave power level in the range 400-500 W per source. Using Langmuir probes (LP), it was possible to show that the plasma density (~1  -  2  ×  1011 cm-3) remains fairly uniform inside the system and decreases marginally close to the chamber wall, and this uniformity increases with an increase in the number of sources. It was seen that a warm electron population (60-80 eV) is always present and is about 0.1% of the bulk plasma density. The mechanism of plasma production is discussed in light of the results obtained for a single CEPS (Ganguli et al 2016 Plasma Source Sci. Technol. 25 025026).

  6. Profiling compact toroid plasma density on CTIX with laser deflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockington, Samuel Joseph Erwin

    A laser deflectometer measures line-integrated plasma density gradient using laser diodes and amplified point detectors. A laser passing through an optically thin plasma is refracted by an amount proportional to the line-integrated electron density gradient. I have designed, installed, and operated a deflection diagnostic for the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX), a plasma rail gun which can create compact toroid (CT) plasmas of controllable density and velocity. The diagnostic design and motivation are discussed, as well as three experiments performed with deflectometry. Thus, my thesis consists of the design of the deflectometer diagnostic, a comparison of its accuracy to interferometer density measurements, and finally a survey of compact toroid density profiles in two dimensions conducted with an array of detectors.

  7. Wall mode stabilization at slow plasma rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo; Betti, Riccardo; Reimerdes, Holger; Garofalo, Andrea; Manickam, Janardhan

    2007-11-01

    Unstable pressure-driven external kink modes, which become slowly growing resistive wall modes (RWMs) in the presence of a resistive wall, can lead to tokamak plasma disruptions at high beta. It has been shown that RWMs are stabilized by fast plasma rotation (about 1-2% of the Alfv'en frequency) in experiments. Conventional theories attribute the RWM suppression to the dissipation induced by the resonances between plasma rotation and ion bounce/transit or shear Alfv'en frequencies [1]. In those theories, the kinetic effects associated with the plasma diamagnetic frequencies and trapped-particle precession drift frequencies are neglected. It has been observed in recent experiments [2,3] that the RWM suppression also occurs at very slow plasma rotation (about 0.3% of the Alfv'en frequency), where the conventional dissipation is too small to fully suppress the RWMs. Here it is shown, that the trapped-particle kinetic contribution associated with the precession motion [4] is large enough to stabilize the RWM in DIII-D at low rotation. Work supported by the US-DoE OFES. [1] A. Bondeson and M. S. Chu, Physics of Plasmas, 3,3013 (1996). [2] H. Reimerdes et al., Physical Review Letters, 98,055001 (2007). [3] M. Takechi et al., Physical Review Letters, 98,055002 (2007). [4] B. Hu and R. Betti, Physical Review Letters, 93,105002 (2004).

  8. Die wall lubricated warm compaction behavior of non-lubricant admixed iron powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Tu-ming; YI Jian-hong; CHEN Shi-jin; PENG Yuan-dong; LI Li-ya; XIA Qing-lin

    2005-01-01

    The phenomena of die wall lubricated warm compaction of non-lubricant admixed iron powders were researched, and its mechanism of densification was discussed. Water atomized powder obtained from the Wuhan Iron and Steel Corporation was used. With compacting and sintering, compared with cold compaction, the density of warm compacted samples increases by 0.07-0.22 g/cm 3 at the same pressed pressure. The maximum achievable green density of warm compacted samples is 7.12 g/cm 3 at 120 ℃, and the maximum sintered density is 7.18 g/cm 3 at 80 ℃. Compared with cold compaction, the ejection force of warm compaction is smaller; the maximum discrepancy is about 7 kN. The warm compacted mechanism of densification of iron powders can be obtained: heating the powder contributes to improving plastic deformation of powder particles, and accelerating the mutual filling and rearrangement of powder particles.

  9. Intense Magnetized Plasma-Wall Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Bruno S. [UNR; Fuelling, Stephan [UNR

    2013-11-30

    This research project studied wall-plasma interactions relevant to fusion science. Such interactions are a critical aspect of Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) because flux compression by a pusher material, in particular the metal for the liner approach to MIF, involves strong eddy current heating on the surface of the pusher, and probably interactions and mixing of the pusher with the interior fuel during the time when fusion fuel is being burned. When the pusher material is a metal liner, high-energy-density conditions result in fascinating behavior. For example, "warm dense matter" is produced, for which material properties such as resistivity and opacity are not well known. In this project, the transformation into plasma of metal walls subjected to pulsed megagauss magnetic fields was studied with an experiment driven by the UNR 1 MA Zebra generator. The experiment was numerically simulated with using the MHRDR code. This simple, fundamental high-energy-density physics experiment, in a regime appropriate to MIF, has stimulated an important and fascinating comparison of numerical modeling codes and tables with experiment. In addition, we participated in developing the FRCHX experiment to compress a field-reversed-configuration (FRC) plasma with a liner, in collaboration with researchers from Air Force Research Laboratory and Los Alamos National Lab, and we helped develop diagnostics for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL. Last, but not least, this project served to train students in high-energy-density physics.

  10. Rail gun performance and plasma characteristics due to wall ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    The experiment of Bauer, et al. (1982) is analyzed by considering wall ablation and viscous drag in the plasma. Plasma characteristics are evaluated through a simple fluid-mechanical analysis considering only wall ablation. By equating the energy dissipated in the plasma with the radiation heat loss, the average properties of the plasma are determined as a function of time.

  11. Plasma-wall-interaction in ECRIS II

    CERN Document Server

    Mannel, C; Wiesemann, K

    1999-01-01

    In an ECR-discharge, where the plasma is confined inside a copper-resonator by a simple magnetic mirror, it could be shown that sputtering of wall material has an important influence upon the plasma [1]. Spectroscopic measurements in ECRIS II with a copper vessel confirmed this model. Evidence for the presence of copper atoms and ions in the plasma could be found by ion extraction as well as with VUV-spectrometry. In a nitrogen discharge by adding helium as a mixing-gas we found that the extracted current of Cu-ions decreased and measured line intensities of copper emission lines dropped down. [1] D. Meyer, "Einfluss der Plasmainstabilitaet auf die Produktion hochgeladener Ionen in einer ECR-Entladung", Dissertation, Bochum, 1997

  12. Compact collimated fiber optic array diagnostic for railgun plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, V; Solberg, J; Ferriera, T; Tully, L; Stephan, P

    2008-10-02

    We have developed and tested a compact collimated sixteen channel fiber optic array diagnostic for studying the light emission of railgun armature plasmas with {approx}mm spatial and sub-{micro}s temporal resolution. The design and operational details of the diagnostic are described. Plasma velocities, oscillation, and dimension data from the diagnostic for the Livermore Fixed Hybrid Armature experiment are presented and compared with 1-D simulations. The techniques and principles discussed allow the extension of the diagnostic to other railgun and related dense plasma experiments.

  13. Compact collimated fiber optic array diagnostic for railgun plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, V; Solberg, J M; Ferriera, T J; Tully, L K; Stephan, P L

    2009-01-01

    We developed and tested a compact collimated 16 channel fiber optic array diagnostic for studying the light emission of railgun armature plasmas with approximately millimeter spatial and submicrosecond temporal resolution. The design and operational details of the diagnostic are described. Plasma velocities, oscillation, and dimension data from the diagnostic for the Livermore fixed hybrid armature experiment are presented and compared with one-dimensional simulations. The techniques and principles discussed allow the extension of the diagnostic to other railgun and related dense plasma experiments.

  14. Experimental investigation of plasma relaxation using a compact coaxial magnetized plasma gun in a background plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Lynn, Alan; Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott; University of New Mexico Collaboration; Los Alamos National Laboratory Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    A compact coaxial plasma gun is employed for experimental studies of plasma relaxation in a low density background plasma. Experiments are being conducted in the linear HelCat device at UNM. These studies will advance the knowledge of basic plasma physics in the areas of magnetic relaxation and space and astrophysical plasmas, including the evolution of active galactic jets/radio lobes within the intergalactic medium. The gun is powered by a 120pF ignitron-switched capacitor bank which is operated in a range of 5-10 kV and ~100 kA. Multiple diagnostics are employed to investigate plasma relaxation process. Magnetized Argon plasma bubbles with velocities ~1.2Cs and densities ~1020 m-3 have been achieved. Different distinct regimes of operation with qualitatively different dynamics are identified by fast CCD camera images, with the parameter determining the operation regime. Additionally, a B-dot probe array is employed to measure the spatial toroidal and poloidal magnetic flux evolution to identify detached plasma bubble configurations. Experimental data and analysis will be presented.

  15. Simulation of die wall friction's effect on density distribution in metallic powder compaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周照耀; 赵伟斌; 陈普庆; 陈维平; 邵明; 王郡文

    2002-01-01

    A computer simulation procedure for metal powder die compaction was described. Friction behavior of metal powder during cold compaction was simulated by the finite element method. The movement of powder relative to the die wall was taken into consideration by utilizing the shear friction model. Friction between the powder and the rigid die wall leads to inhomogeneous density distribution during the compaction process. The floating die technique and double punch pressing can attain more homogenous compacts than the fixed die technique can do. The results obtained from numerical analysis agree well with the experimental results. Simulation model was built in MSC.Mentat, and MSC.Marc software was used to calculate the powder compaction process.

  16. Die wall lubricated warm compaction of iron-based powder metallurgy material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪东惠; 陈维平; 肖志瑜; 温利平; 吴苑标

    2002-01-01

    Lubricant is harmful to the mechanical properties of the sintered materials. Die wall lubrication was applied on warm compaction powder metallurgy in the hope of reducing the concentration level of the admixed lubricant. Iron-based samples were prepared by die wall lubricated warm compaction at 175℃, using a compacting pressure of 550MPa. Emulsified polytetrafluoroethylene(PTFE) was used as die wall lubricant. Admixed lubricant concentration ranging from 0 to 0.5% was tested. Extremely low admixed lubricant contents were used. Results show that in addition to the decrease in ejection forces, the green density of the compacts increases with the decrease of admixed lubricant content until it reaches the maximum at 0.06% of lubricant content, then decreases with the decrease of admixed lubricant content. The mechanical properties of the sintered compacts that contain more than 0.06% admixed lubricant are better than those of the samples that contain lesser lubricant. No scoring was observed in all die wall lubricated experiments.

  17. Nanoscale imaging using a compact laser plasma EUV source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Kostecki, Jerzy; Jarocki, Roman; Szczurek, Miroslaw; Szczurek, Anna; Feigl, Torsten; Pina, Ladislav

    2012-05-01

    High resolution imaging methods and techniques are currently under development. One of them is an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microscopy, based on Fresnel zone plates. In this paper a compact, high-repetition, laser-plasma EUV source, emitting quasi-monochromatic radiation at 13.8nm wavelength was used in a desktop EUV transmission microscopy with a spatial (half-pitch) resolution of 50nm. EUV microscopy images of objects with various thicknesses and the spatial resolution measurements using the knife-edge test are presented.

  18. RESISTIVE WALL MODES AND PLASMA ROTATION IN DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REIMERDES,H; CHU,MS; GAROFALO,AM; JACKSON,GL; JENSEN,TH; LAHAYE,RJ; NAVRATIL,GA; OKABAYASHI,M; SCOVILLE,JT; STRAIT,EJ

    2003-07-01

    A271 RESISTIVE WALL MODES AND PLASMA ROTATION IN DIII-D. The stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM) by toroidal plasma rotation has been demonstrated in neutral beam heated DIII-D discharges for values of {beta} up to 70% above the no-wall stability limit. The stabilizing effect of plasma rotation is explained by assuming some dissipation, which is caused by the rapid plasma flow through a perturbed magnetic field. Sufficient plasma rotation is predicted to extend the operating regime of tokamaks from the conventional no-wall {beta} limit up to the ideal wall {beta} limit. While plasma rotation has a stabilizing effect on the RWM, a finite amplitude RWM also increases the drag on the plasma, which leads to a non-linear interaction between the RWM and the plasma rotation. A good understanding of the underlying dissipation mechanism is crucial for reliable predictions of the plasma rotation which will be required for wall-stabilization in a burning-plasma experiment. In order to measure the stabilizing effect of plasma rotation on the RWM the technique of active MHD spectroscopy, which was previously applied to MHD modes at frequencies above 10 kHz, is extended to frequencies of a few Hz.

  19. A compact plasma focus device and its neutron emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新新; 韩旻; 王志文; 刘坤

    1999-01-01

    A 2.2-kJ compact plasma focus device was developed and its characteristics of neutron emission were investigated. A maximum neutron yield of (3.1 ± 1.5) × 10~7 was obtained at 15 hPa deuterium filling pressure. It was found that the neutron yield Y_n is strongly correlated with the amplitude of the pinch dip in di/dt waveform. The time resolved measurement of the neutron pulse indicated that both the hard X-rays and the neutrons are emitted from plasma focus at the same instant and the width of neutron pulse (FWHM) changes slightly from 50 to 53 ns. The pinch time t_p varies from 1.5 to 16.5 ns and it is usually the case that the shorter t_p, the higher the neutron yield. It was also found that the squirrel cage cathode is better than the tubular cathode.

  20. A compact and continuously driven supersonic plasma and neutral sourcea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, T.; Itagaki, H.; Numasawa, H.; Terashima, Y.; Hirano, Y.; Hirose, A.

    2010-10-01

    A compact and repetitively driven plasma source has been developed by utilizing a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) for diagnostics requiring deep penetration of a large amount of neutral flux. The system consists of a MCPG 95mm in length with a DN16 ConFlat connection port and an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) inverter power unit. The power supply consists of an array of eight IGBT units and is able to switch the discharge on and off at up to 10 kV and 600 A with a maximum repetitive frequency of 10 kHz. Multiple short duration discharge pulses maximize acceleration efficiency of the plasmoid. In the case of a 10 kHz operating frequency, helium-plasmoids in the velocity range of 20 km/s can be achieved.

  1. A compact and continuously driven supersonic plasma and neutral source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, T; Itagaki, H; Numasawa, H; Terashima, Y; Hirano, Y; Hirose, A

    2010-10-01

    A compact and repetitively driven plasma source has been developed by utilizing a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) for diagnostics requiring deep penetration of a large amount of neutral flux. The system consists of a MCPG 95mm in length with a DN16 ConFlat connection port and an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) inverter power unit. The power supply consists of an array of eight IGBT units and is able to switch the discharge on and off at up to 10 kV and 600 A with a maximum repetitive frequency of 10 kHz. Multiple short duration discharge pulses maximize acceleration efficiency of the plasmoid. In the case of a 10 kHz operating frequency, helium-plasmoids in the velocity range of 20 km/s can be achieved.

  2. Thermo-Rotational Instability in Plasma Disks Around Compact Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Coppi, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Differentially rotating plasma disks, around compact objects, that are imbedded in a ``seed'' magnetic field are shown to develop vertically localized ballooning modes that are driven by the combined radial gradient of the rotation frequency and vertical gradients of the plasma density and temperature. When the electron mean free path is shorter than the disk height and the relevant thermal conductivity can be neglected, the vertical particle flows produced by of these modes have the effect to drive the density and temperature profiles toward the ``adiabatic condition'' where $\\eta_{T}\\equiv(dlnT/dz)/(dlnn/dz)=2/3$. Here $T$ is the plasma temperature and $n$ the particle density. The faster growth rates correspond to steeper temperature profiles $(\\eta_{T}>2/3)$ such as those produced by an internal (e.g., viscous) heating process. In the end, ballooning modes excited for various values of $\\eta_{T}$ can lead to the evolution of the disk into a different current carrying configuration such as a sequence of pl...

  3. Materials Analysis of Transient Plasma-Wall Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-13

    model showing the importance sputter and re-deposition. plasma, pulsed plasma, directed energy, transient wall interaction, high energy density...each equipped with a 25kV copper- vapor thyratron start switch capable of sub-microsecond triggering resolution. Each start switch is paired with a...sample exposure positions within the plasma jet. The probe utilizes a PCB Piezotronics model 113B21 pressure sensor modified to work in the plasma jet

  4. Mirror-field confined compact plasma source using permanent magnet for plasma processings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tetsuya; Sato, Kei-ichiro; Yabuta, Yuki; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2016-12-01

    A mirror-field confined compact electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source using permanent magnets was developed, aiming for the realization of high-quality plasma processings where high-density reactive species are supplied to a substrate with minimizing the ion bombardment damages. The ECR position was located between a microwave transmissive window and a quartz limiter, and plasmas were transported from the ECR position to a midplane of the magnetic mirror field through the quartz limiter. Thus, a radius of core plasma could be determined by the limiter, which was 15 mm in this study. Plasma parameters were investigated by the Langmuir probe measurement. High-density plasma larger than 1011 cm-3 could be produced by applying 5.85-GHz microwave power of 10 W or more. For the outside region of the core plasma where a wafer for plasma processings will be set at, the ion current density was decreased dramatically with distance from the core plasma and became smaller by approximately two orders of magnitude that in the core plasma region for the radial position of 40 mm, suggesting the realization of reduction in ion bombardment damages.

  5. Mirror-field confined compact plasma source using permanent magnet for plasma processings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tetsuya; Sato, Kei-Ichiro; Yabuta, Yuki; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2016-12-01

    A mirror-field confined compact electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source using permanent magnets was developed, aiming for the realization of high-quality plasma processings where high-density reactive species are supplied to a substrate with minimizing the ion bombardment damages. The ECR position was located between a microwave transmissive window and a quartz limiter, and plasmas were transported from the ECR position to a midplane of the magnetic mirror field through the quartz limiter. Thus, a radius of core plasma could be determined by the limiter, which was 15 mm in this study. Plasma parameters were investigated by the Langmuir probe measurement. High-density plasma larger than 10(11) cm(-3) could be produced by applying 5.85-GHz microwave power of 10 W or more. For the outside region of the core plasma where a wafer for plasma processings will be set at, the ion current density was decreased dramatically with distance from the core plasma and became smaller by approximately two orders of magnitude that in the core plasma region for the radial position of 40 mm, suggesting the realization of reduction in ion bombardment damages.

  6. Lubrication effectiveness of composite lubricants during P/M electrostatic die wall lubrication and warm compaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Yang; Shiju Guo; Farid Akhtar

    2006-01-01

    The lubrication effectiveness of the composite lubricants, 50wt% ethylene bis-stearamide (EBS) wax + 50wt% graphite and 50wt% EBS wax + 50wt% BN, during the powder metallurgy (P/M) electrostatic die wall lubrication and warm compaction was studied. The results show that the combination of 50wt% EBS wax and 50wt% graphite has excellent lubrication performance, resulting in fairly high green densities, but the mixture of 50wt% EBS wax and 50wt% BN has less beneficial effect. In addition, corresponding die temperatures should be applied when different die wall lubricants are used to achieve the highest green densities.

  7. Electromagnetic thin-wall model for simulations of plasma wall-touching kink and vertical modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Leonid E.; Atanasiu, Calin V.; Lackner, Karl; Hoelzl, Matthias; Strumberger, Erika

    2015-12-01

    > The understanding of plasma disruptions in tokamaks and predictions of their effects require realistic simulations of electric current excitation in three-dimensional vessel structures by the plasma touching the walls. As discovered at JET in 1996 (Litunovski JET Internal Report contract no. JQ5/11961, 1995; Noll et al., Proceedings of the 19th Symposium on Fusion Technology, Lisbon (ed. C. Varandas & F. Serra), vol. 1, 1996, p. 751. Elsevier) the wall-touching kink modes are frequently excited during vertical displacement events and cause large sideways forces on the vacuum vessel which are difficult to withstand in large tokamaks. In disruptions, the sharing of electric current between the plasma and the wall plays an important role in plasma dynamics and determines the amplitude and localization of the sideways force (Riccardo et al., Nucl. Fusion, vol. 40, 2000, p. 1805; Riccardo & Walker, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, vol. 42, 2000, p. 29; Zakharov, Phys. Plasmas, vol. 15, 2008, 062507; Riccardo et al., Nucl. Fusion, vol. 49, 2009, 055012; Bachmann et al., Fusion Engng Des., vol. 86, 2011, pp. 1915-1919). This paper describes a flat triangle representation of the electric circuits of a thin conducting wall of arbitrary three-dimensional geometry. Implemented into the shell simulation code (SHL) and the source sink current code (SSC), this model is suitable for modelling the electric currents excited in the wall inductively and through current sharing with the plasma.

  8. Acceleration of compact toroid plasma rings for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, C.W.; Barr, W.L.; Eddleman, J.L.; Gee, M.; Hammer, J.H.; Ho, S.K.; Logan, B.G.; Meeker, D.J.; Mirin, A.A.; Nevins, W.M.

    1988-08-26

    We describe experimental results for a new type of collective accelerator based on magnetically confined compact torus (CT) plasma rings and discuss applications to both inertial and magnetic fusion. We have demonstrated the principle of CT acceleration in the RACE device with acceleration of 0.5 mg ring masses to 400 km/s and 0.02 mg ring masses to 1400 km/s at greater than or equal to30% efficiency. Scaling the CT accelerator to the multi-megajoule level could provide an efficient, economical driver for inertial fusion (ICF) or magnetically insulated inertial fusion. Efficient conversion to x-rays for driving hohlraum-type ICF targets has been modeled using a radiation-hydrodynamics code. At less demanding conditions than required for ICF, a CT accelerator can be applied to fueling and current drive in tokamaks. Fueling is accomplished by injecting CTs at the required rate to sustain the particle inventory and at a velocity sufficient to penetrate to the magnetic axis before CT dissolution. Current drive is a consequence of the magnetic helicity content of the CT, which is approximately conserved during reconnection of the CT fields with the tokamak. Major areas of uncertainty in CT fueling and current drive concern the mechanism by which CTs will stop in a tokamak plasma and the effects of the CT on energy confinement and magnetic stability. Bounds on the required CT injection velocity are obtained by considering drag due to emission of an Alfven-wave wake and rapid reconnection and tilting on the internal Alfven time scale of the CT. Preliminary results employing a 3-D, resistive MHD code show rapid tilting with the CT aligning its magnetic moment with the tokamak field. Requirements for an experimental test of CT injection and scenarios for fueling a reactor will also be discussed. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Magnetized plasma flow injection into tokamak and high-beta compact torus plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Komoriya, Yuuki; Tazawa, Hiroyasu; Asai, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Steinhauer, Loren; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Onchi, Takumi; Hirose, Akira

    2010-11-01

    As an application of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), magnetic helicity injection via injection of a highly elongated compact torus (magnetized plasma flow: MPF) has been conducted on both tokamak and field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. The injected plasmoid has significant amounts of helicity and particle contents and has been proposed as a fueling and a current drive method for various torus systems. In the FRC, MPF is expected to generate partially spherical tokamak like FRC equilibrium by injecting a significant amount of magnetic helicity. As a circumstantial evidence of the modified equilibrium, suppressed rotational instability with toroidal mode number n = 2. MPF injection experiments have also been applied to the STOR-M tokamak as a start-up and current drive method. Differences in the responses of targets especially relation with beta value and the self-organization feature will be studied.

  10. Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator Development For Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy And Homeland Security Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y -; Caporaso, G J; Guethlein, G; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Gower, E; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Stanley, J; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-06-17

    Compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator technology is being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The DWA accelerator uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. Its high electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The DWA concept can be applied to accelerate charge particle beams with any charge to mass ratio and energy. Based on the DWA system, a novel compact proton therapy accelerator is being developed. This proton therapy system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources. Applications of the DWA accelerator to problems in homeland security will also be discussed.

  11. Effect of Different Molding Materials on the Thin-Walled Compacted Graphite Iron Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górny, Marcin; Dańko, Rafał; Lelito, Janusz; Kawalec, Magdalena; Sikora, Gabriela

    2016-10-01

    This article addresses the effects of six mold materials used for obtaining thin-walled compacted graphite iron castings with a wall thickness of 3 mm. During this research, the following materials were analyzed: fine silica sand, coarse silica sand, cerabeads, molohite and also insulated materials in the shape of microspheres, including low-density alumina/silica ceramic sand. Granulometric and SEM observations indicate that the sand matrix used in these studies differs in terms of size, homogeneity and shape. This study shows that molds made with insulating sands (microspheres) possess both: thermal conductivity and material mold ability to absorb heat, on average to be more than five times lower compared to those of silica sand. In addition to that, the resultant peak of heat transfer coefficient at the mold/metal interface for microspheres is more than four times lower in comparison with fine silica sand. This is accompanied by a significant decrease in the cooling rate of metal in the mold cavity which promotes the development of compacted graphite in thin-walled castings as well as ferrite fractions in their microstructure.

  12. Analysis of stable resistive wall modes in a rotating plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, A. M.; Jensen, T. H.; Strait, E. J.

    2003-12-01

    Measurements of the resistive wall mode (RWM) response to external resonant field pulses yield complete knowledge of the mode characteristics in the parameter range explored. An ideal magnetohydrodynamics model [Garofalo et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 4573 (2002)] has been generalized to include the effects of plasma rotation and dissipation, and the new model is found to explain quantitatively the experimental observations. Rotation of the RWM with respect to the wall is often described as an essential feature of the mechanism by which plasma rotation stabilizes the RWM. This interpretation of the rotational stabilization of the RWM appears inconsistent with the measurements from recent DIII-D [Luxon and Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)] experiments. It is found that the theoretically predicted mode rotation with respect to the wall is not needed for stabilization and is only a consequence of torque balance in the absence of magnetic-field nonaxisymmetries.

  13. A Compact UWB Indoor and Through-Wall Radar with Precise Ranging and Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinan Yu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrawideband (UWB technology has many advantages compared to its narrowband counterpart in many applications. We present a new compact low-cost UWB radar for indoor and through-wall scenario. The focus of the paper is on the development of the signal processing algorithms for ranging and tracking, taking into account the particular properties of the UWB CMOS transceiver and the radiation characteristics of the antennas. Theoretical analysis for the algorithms and their evaluations by measurements are presented in the paper. The ranging resolution of this UWB radar has achieved 1-2 mm RMS accuracy for a moving target in indoor environment over a short range, and Kalman tracking algorithm functions well for the through-wall detection.

  14. The influence of self-compacting steel fibre reinforced concrete infill on the flexure strength and ductility of masonry walls

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Luiz António Pereira de; Bernardo, Luís Filipe Almeida

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on the influence of longitudinal reinforcement ratio and steel fibre volume in self-compacting concrete infill on the strength and ductility of reinforced masonry walls subjected to flexure. Flexure tests were performed as four-point bending tests on twelve walls. The analysis of the concrete infill contribution to the walls capacity is made considering recent recommendations for steel fibre reinforced concrete design. A ductility...

  15. Report on the joint meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, K.L. (ed.)

    1985-10-01

    This report of the Joint Meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups contains contributing papers in the following areas: Plasma/Materials Interaction Program and Technical Assessment, High Heat Flux Materials and Components Program and Technical Assessment, Pumped Limiters, Ignition Devices, Program Planning Activities, Compact High Power Density Reactor Requirements, Steady State Tokamaks, and Tritium Plasma Experiments. All these areas involve the consideration of High Heat Flux on Materials and the Interaction of the Plasma with the First Wall. Many of the Test Facilities are described as well. (LSP)

  16. Plasma stability theory including the resistive wall effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovitov, V. D.

    2015-12-01

    > Plasma stabilization due to a nearby conducting wall can provide access to better performance in some scenarios in tokamaks. This was proved by experiments with an essential gain in and demonstrated as a long-lasting effect at sufficiently fast plasma rotation in the DIII-D tokamak (see, for example, Strait et al., Nucl. Fusion, vol. 43, 2003, pp. 430-440). The rotational stabilization is the central topic of this review, though eventually the mode rotation gains significance. The analysis is based on the first-principle equations describing the energy balance with dissipation in the resistive wall. The method emphasizes derivation of the dispersion relations for the modes which are faster than the conventional resistive wall modes, but slower than the ideal magnetohydrodynamics modes. Both the standard thin wall and ideal-wall approximations are not valid in this range. Here, these are replaced by an approach incorporating the skin effect in the wall. This new element in the stability theory makes the energy sink a nonlinear function of the complex growth rate. An important consequence is that a mode rotating above a critical level can provide a damping effect sufficient for instability suppression. Estimates are given and applications are discussed.

  17. Experimental investigation in plasma relaxation by using a compact coaxial magnetized plasma gun in a background plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Lynn, Alan; Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott

    2012-10-01

    A compact coaxial plasma gun is employed for experimental studies of plasma relaxation process being conducted in the HELCAT device at UNM. These studies will advance the knowledge of basic plasma physics in the areas of magnetic relaxation and space and astrophysical plasmas, including the evolution of active galactic jets/radio lobes. The gun is powered by a 120pF ignitron-switched capacitor bank which is operated in a range of 5 - 10kV. Multiple diagnostics are employed to investigate plasma relaxation process. Magnetized Argon plasma bubbles with velocities 1.2Cs and densities 10e20 m-3 have been achieved. Different distinct regimes of operation with qualitatively different dynamics are identified by fast CCD camera images, with the parameter lambda determining the operation regime. Additionally, a B-dot probe array is employed to measure the spatial toroidal and poloidal magnetic flux evolution to identify detached plasma bubble configurations. Experimental data and analysis will be presented.

  18. Plasma engineering design of a Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathke, C. G.; Embrechts, M. J.; Hagenson, R. L.; Krakowski, R. A.; Miller, R. L.

    1983-11-01

    The rationale for and the characteristics of the high-power-density Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR) are discussed. Particular emphasis is given to key plasma engineering aspects of the conceptual design, including plasma operations, current drive, and impurity/ash control by means of pumped limiters or magnetic divertors. A brief description of the Fusion-Power-Core integration is given.

  19. The plasma focus as a tool for plasma-wall-interaction studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, G.; Martinez, M.; Herrera, J. J. E.; Castillo, F.

    2015-03-01

    The study of the interaction of magnetized plasmas with candidate materials for fusion reactors, as for example tungsten, is a main topic in fusion research. Many studies simulate the plasma wall interaction using ion beams, while only a few use plasma simulators. Plasma foci can produce dense magnetized plasmas of deuterium and helium among other species. We used the plasma focus Fuego-Nuevo II, to expose tungsten samples to deuterium and helium plasmas. The samples were analysed by means of SEM, RBS and NRA, evidencing surface erosion, surface melting and retention of deuterium in a shallow surface layer of 250 nm amounting 6.5·1016 D/cm2. The plasma temperature has been measured at the position of the samples using a triple Langmuir probe and compared to calculations of a snowplow model. The modelling of the electrode to reach desired plasma parameters is discussed.

  20. Improved Confinement in JET High {beta} Plasmas with an ITER-Like Wall

    CERN Document Server

    Challis, C D; Beurskens, M; Buratti, P; Delabie, E; Drewelow, P; Frassinetti, L; Giroud, C; Hawkes, N; Hobirk, J; Joffrin, E; Keeling, D; King, D B; Maggi, C F; Mailloux, J; Marchetto, C; McDonald, D; Nunes, I; Pucella, G; Saarelma, S; Simpson, J

    2015-01-01

    The replacement of the JET carbon wall (C-wall) by a Be/W ITER-like wall (ILW) has affected the plasma energy confinement. To investigate this, experiments have been performed with both the C-wall and ILW to vary the heating power over a wide range for plasmas with different shapes.

  1. Thermionic plasma injection for the Lockheed Martin T4 Compact Fusion Reactor experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Jonathon

    2015-11-01

    Lockheed Martin's Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) concept relies on diamagnetic confinement in a magnetically encapsulated linear ring cusp geometry. Plasma injection into cusp field configurations requires careful deliberation. Previous work has shown that axial injection via a plasma gun is capable of achieving high-beta conditions in cusp configurations. We present a pulsed, high power thermionic plasma source and the associated magnetic field topology for plasma injection into the caulked-cusp magnetic field. The resulting plasma fueling and cross-field diffusion is discussed.

  2. Numerical studies of wall-plasma interactions and ionization phenomena in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Zeng, Guangshang; Tang, Haibin; Huang, Yuping; Liu, Xiangyang

    2016-07-01

    Wall-plasma interactions excited by ablation controlled arcs are very critical physical processes in pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs). Their effects on the ionization processes of ablated vapor into discharge plasma directly determine PPT performances. To reveal the physics governing the ionization phenomena in PPT discharge, a modified model taking into account the pyrolysis effect of heated polytetrafluoroethylene propellant on the wall-plasma interactions was developed. The feasibility of the modified model was analyzed by creating a one-dimensional simulation of a rectangular ablative PPT. The wall-plasma interaction results based on this modified model were found to be more realistic than for the unmodified model; this reflects the dynamic changes of the inflow parameters during discharge in our model. Furthermore, the temporal and spatial variations of the different plasma species in the discharge chamber were numerically studied. The numerical studies showed that polytetrafluoroethylene plasma was mainly composed of monovalent ions; carbon and fluorine ions were concentrated in the upstream and downstream discharge chamber, respectively. The results based on this modified model were in good agreement with the experimental formation times of the various plasma species. A large number of short-lived and highly ionized carbon and fluorine species (divalent and trivalent ions) were created during initial discharge. These highly ionized species reached their peak density earlier than the singly ionized species.

  3. Gravitomagnetic Effects on Collective Plasma Oscillations in Compact Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The effects of gravitomagnetic force on plasma oscillations are investigated using the kinetic theory of homogeneous electrically neutral plasma in the absence of external electric or magnetic field. The random phase assumption is employed neglecting the thermal motion of the electrons with respect to a fixed ion background. It is found that the gravitomagnetic force reduces the characteristic frequency of the plasma thus enhancing the refractive index of the medium. The estimates for the predicted effects are given for a typical white dwarf, pulsar, and neutron star.

  4. Helium and deuterium irradiation effects in W-Ta composites produced by pulse plasma compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, M.; Catarino, N.; Nunes, D.; Fortunato, E.; Nogueira, I.; Rosinki, M.; Correia, J. B.; Carvalho, P. A.; Alves, E.

    2017-08-01

    Tungsten-tantalum composites have been envisaged for first-wall components of nuclear fusion reactors; however, changes in their microstructure are expected from severe irradiation with helium and hydrogenic plasma species. In this study, composites were produced from ball milled W powder mixed with 10 at.% Ta fibers through consolidation by pulse plasma compaction. Implantation was carried out at room temperature with He+ (30 keV) or D+ (15 keV) or sequentially with He+ and D+ using ion beams with fluences of 5 × 1021 at/m2. Microstructural changes and deuterium retention in the implanted composites were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, coupled with focused ion beam and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and nuclear reaction analysis. The composite materials consisted of Ta fibers dispersed in a nanostructured W matrix, with Ta2O5 layers at the interfacial regions. The Ta and Ta2O5 surfaces exhibited blisters after He+ implantation and subsequent D+ implantation worsened the blistering behavior of Ta2O5. Swelling was also pronounced in Ta2O5 where large blisters exhibited an internal nanometer-sized fuzz structure. Transmission electron microscopy revealed an extensive presence of dislocations in the metallic phases after the sequential implantation, while a relatively low density of defects was detected in Ta2O5. This behavior may be partially justified by a shielding effect from the blisters and fuzz structure developed progressively during implantation. The tungsten peaks in the X-ray diffractograms were markedly shifted after He+ implantation, and even more so after the sequential implantation, which is in agreement with the increased D retention inferred from nuclear reaction analysis.

  5. Up against the wall: is yeast cell wall integrity ensured by mechanosensing in plasma membrane microdomains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Christian; Dufrêne, Yves F; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2015-02-01

    Yeast cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling serves as a model of the regulation of fungal cell wall synthesis and provides the basis for the development of antifungal drugs. A set of five membrane-spanning sensors (Wsc1 to Wsc3, Mid2, and Mtl1) detect cell surface stress and commence the signaling pathway upon perturbations of either the cell wall structure or the plasma membrane. We here summarize the latest advances in the structure/function relationship primarily of the Wsc1 sensor and critically review the evidence that it acts as a mechanosensor. The relevance and physiological significance of the information obtained for the function of the other CWI sensors, as well as expected future developments, are discussed.

  6. Characterization of plasma sprayed beryllium ITER first wall mockups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, R.G.; Vaidya, R.U.; Hollis, K.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Material Science and Technology Div.

    1998-01-01

    ITER first wall beryllium mockups, which were fabricated by vacuum plasma spraying the beryllium armor, have survived 3000 thermal fatigue cycles at 1 MW/m{sup 2} without damage during high heat flux testing at the Plasma Materials Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico. The thermal and mechanical properties of the plasma sprayed beryllium armor have been characterized. Results are reported on the chemical composition of the beryllium armor in the as-deposited condition, the through thickness and normal to the through thickness thermal conductivity and thermal expansion, the four-point bend flexure strength and edge-notch fracture toughness of the beryllium armor, the bond strength between the beryllium armor and the underlying heat sink material, and ultrasonic C-scans of the Be/heat sink interface. (author)

  7. Plasmas in compact traps: From ion sources to multidisciplinary research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascali, D.; Musumarra, A.; Leone, F.; Galatà, A.; Romano, F. P.; Gammino, S.

    2017-09-01

    In linear (minimum-B) magneto-static traps dense and hot plasmas are heated by electromagnetic radiation in the GHz domain via the Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR). The values of plasma density, temperature and confinement times ( n_eτ_i>10^{13} cm ^{-3} s; T_e>10 keV) are similar to the ones of thermonuclear plasmas. The research in this field -devoted to heating and confinement optimization- has been supported by numerical modeling and advanced diagnostics, for probing the plasma especially in a non-invasive way. ECR-based systems are nowadays able to produce extremely intense (tens or hundreds of mA) beams of light ions (p, d, He), and relevant currents of heavier elements (C, O, N) up to heavy ions like Xe, Pb, U. Such beams can be extracted from the trap by a proper electrostatic system. The above-mentioned properties make these plasmas very attractive for interdisciplinary researches also, such as i) nuclear decays rates measurements in stellar-like conditions, ii) energy conversion studies, being exceptional sources of short-wavelength electromagnetic radiation (EUV, X-rays, hard X-rays and gammas, useful in material science and archaeometry), iii) environments allowing precise spectroscopical measurements as benchmarks for magnetized astrophysical plasmas. The talk will give an overview about the state-of-the-art in the field of intense ion sources, and some new perspectives for interdisciplinary research, with a special attention to the developments based at INFN-LNS.

  8. Evaluation of the Strength Variation of Normal and Lightweight Self-Compacting Concrete in Full Scale Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseinali, M.; Ranjbar, M. M.; Rezvani, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    The strength of cast concrete along the height and length of large structural members might vary due to inadequate compaction, segregation, bleeding, head pressure, and material type. The distribution of strength within a series of full scale reinforced concrete walls was examined using non...... strength variation and the relationship to the strength of standard cube samples. Investigation of the strength variation along the height of the wall showed that SCC mixes had better strength uniformity and that the NC mix had the greatest strength variation. There were no significant strength differences...... between mixtures along the length of the walls. Furthermore, different admixture replacements did not have a meaningful effect on the strength distribution....

  9. Overdense plasma generation in a compact ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, G.; Mascali, D.; Gammino, S.; Torrisi, G.; Romano, F. P.; Celona, L.; Altana, C.; Caliri, C.; Gambino, N.; Lanaia, D.; Miracoli, R.; Neri, L.; Sorbello, G.

    2017-05-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) are widely used plasma based machines for the production of intense ion beams in science and industry. The performance of modern devices is limited by the presence of the density cut-off, above which electromagnetic (EM) waves sustaining the plasma are reflected. We hereby discuss the systematic data analysis of electrostatic wave generation in an ECR prototype operating at 3.75 GHz-0.1 THz. In particular, electron Bernstein waves (EBW) have been excited. EBW have already been generated in large-scale plasma devices for thermonuclear fusion purposes. In ion sources where L c ˜ λ RF (L c being the plasma chamber size and λ RF the pumping wave wavelength) the EM field assumes a modal behaviour; thus both plasma and EM field self-organize so that no optical-like wave launching is possible (i.e. the cavity effect dominates on the optical path). The collected data, however, supported by 3D full-wave simulations, actually demonstrate that a Budden-type X-B conversion scenario can be established above some critical RF power thresholds, operating in an off-ECR regime. The generation and absorption of the EBW has been demonstrated by the presence of three peculiar signatures: along with the establishment of an overdense plasma, generation of supra-thermal electrons and modification (non-linear broadening) of the EM spectrum measured within the plasma have been observed. At the threshold establishing such a heating regime, the collected data provide evidence for a fast rotation of the electron fluid.

  10. Effects of oxygen plasma treatment on the surface wettability and dissolution of furosemide compacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, A; Olliff, C J; Martini, L G; Lloyd, A W

    2003-11-01

    The plasma irradiation of furosemide (frusemide) was investigated as a possible technique for increasing the dissolution rate of this drug. Oxygen plasma was used to generate oxygen-containing functional groups on the surface of the compact to increase the wettability of the surface and the dissolution rate of the drug. Compacts of furosemide (300 mg) were produced using a stainless steel die and punch assembly, which was placed into a KBr press. The time of the plasma treatment was varied to assess the effect if any upon the dissolution rate and the wettability of the drug. Dissolution experiments of the plasma-treated and untreated compacts were carried out using the paddle apparatus method. Dissolution was carried out at 37 degrees C using 1 L of 0.1 M HCl and phosphate buffer (pH 6). The wettability was assessed by contact angle measurements using the sessile drop technique. Untreated and plasma-treated samples were analysed by scanning electron microscopy at x 5000 magnification. Plasma treatment was found to lower the equilibrium contact angle from approximately 50 to 35 degrees but the dissolution rate was not significantly affected. This was attributed to fusion of the surface by the plasma treatment.

  11. Effects of plasma irradiation on the wettability and dissolution of compacts of griseofulvin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, A; Olliff, C J; Martini, L G; Lloyd, A W

    2004-01-28

    In this study, the use of plasma irradiation was investigated as a possible technique for increasing the dissolution rate of the poorly soluble drug griseofulvin. Plasma is a partially ionised gas consisting of ions, electrons and neutral species. Oxygen plasma was used to treat griseofulvin compacts as this would lead to the formation of oxygen containing functional groups on the surface of the compact thus increasing the wettability. Compacts containing 300 mg of the drug were prepared using a stainless steel punch and die assembly and plasma treated. The effect of the length and power of the plasma treatment upon the dissolution rate of griseofulvin was investigated. Dissolution experiments of griseofulvin were carried out using the paddle method using 0.1 M HCl and 0.1 M HCl with 2% sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) as the dissolution media. The wettability was assessed by contact angle measurements using the sessile drop technique with the contact angle being measured every second for a period of ten seconds using pure water (to European Pharmacopoeia standards). Plasma treated and untreated samples were also analysed by scanning electron microscopy. Although plasma treatment was found to increase the wettability of griseofulvin it was not found to increase the dissolution rate as the treatment caused surface fusion of the material.

  12. Magnetic Bubble Expansion Experimental Investigation Using a Compact Coaxial Magnetized Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Lynn, Alan; Hsu, Scott; Li, Hui; Liu, Wei; Gilmore, Mark; Watts, Christopher

    2009-11-01

    The poster will first discuss the construction and improved design of a compact coaxial magnetized plasma gun. The plasma gun is used for experimental studies of magnetic bubble expansion into a lower pressure background plasma, which as a model for extragalactic radio lobes and solar coronal mass ejections. In this experiment, the plasma bubble's density, electron temperature, and propagation speed are measured by using a multiple-tipped langmuir probe. Also a three axis B-dot probe array is used to measure the magnetic field in three dimensions during the expansion process. In this poster experiment setup and data will be provided. Finally the comparison with the simulation result will be made.

  13. Plasma-density evolution in compact polyacetal capillary discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasel, F.G.; Rocca, J.J.; Cortazar, O.D.; Szapiro, B.T. (Electrical Engineering Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)); Lee, R.W. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States))

    1993-05-01

    We have measured the temporal evolution of the electron density of plasmas produced in polyacetal capillaries with diameters between 0.5 and 1.5 mm excited by 110-ns full-width-at-half-maximum discharge pulses with currents between 13 and 42 kA. The electron density was determined from Stark-broadened line profiles of the 4[ital f]-3[ital d] O VI transition taking into account opacity effects. The electron density was found to increase continuously during the rise of the current pulse, and to decrease near the end of the current pulse, when a drop in plasma temperature causes the degree of ionization of the plasma to decrease. The peak plasma density in a 1-mm capillary excited by a 24-kA pulse was measured to be 5[times]10[sup 19] cm[sup [minus]3]. The plasma density was observed to increase linearly with discharge energy from 7.5[times]10[sup 18] cm[sup [minus]3] for a 5-J discharge to 5[times]10[sup 19] cm[sup [minus]3] for a 30-J discharge in a 1.5-mm-diam. capillary.

  14. Level crossings, excess times and transient plasma-wall interactions in fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Theodorsen, Audun

    2016-01-01

    Based on a stochastic model for intermittent fluctuations in the boundary region of magnetically confined plasmas, an expression for the level crossing rate is derived from the joint distribution of the process and its derivative. From this the average time spent by the process above a certain threshold level is obtained. This provides novel predictions of plasma-wall interactions due to transient transport events associated with radial motion of blob-like structures in the scrape-off layer.

  15. Developing Xenopus embryos recover by compacting and expelling single wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Brian D; Shawky, Joseph H; Dahl, Kris Noel; Davidson, Lance A; Islam, Mohammad F

    2016-04-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes are high aspect ratio nanomaterials being developed for use in materials, technological and biological applications due to their high mechanical stiffness, optical properties and chemical inertness. Because of their prevalence, it is inevitable that biological systems will be exposed to nanotubes, yet studies of the effects of nanotubes on developing embryos have been inconclusive and are lacking for single wall carbon nanotubes exposed to the widely studied model organism Xenopus laevis (African clawed frog). Microinjection of experimental substances into the Xenopus embryo is a standard technique for toxicology studies and cellular lineage tracing. Here we report the surprising finding that superficial (12.5 ± 7.5 µm below the membrane) microinjection of nanotubes dispersed with Pluronic F127 into one- to two-cell Xenopus embryos resulted in the formation and expulsion of compacted, nanotube-filled, punctate masses, at the blastula to mid-gastrula developmental stages, which we call "boluses." Such expulsion of microinjected materials by Xenopus embryos has not been reported before and is dramatically different from the typical distribution of the materials throughout the progeny of the microinjected cells. Previous studies of microinjections of nanomaterials such as nanodiamonds, quantum dots or spherical nanoparticles report that nanomaterials often induce toxicity and remain localized within the embryos. In contrast, our results demonstrate an active recovery pathway for embryos after exposure to Pluronic F127-coated nanotubes, which we speculate is due to a combined effect of the membrane activity of the dispersing agent, Pluronic F127, and the large aspect ratio of nanotubes.

  16. Effect of Wall Charge on Striation in Plasma Display Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Feng; OUYANG Jiting; CAO Jing; FENG Shuo; MIAO Jinsong; WANG Jianqi

    2007-01-01

    Different configurations and driving voltages have been employed to investigate the effect of the wall charge on the striations in macroscopic plasma display panel (PDP) cells.The experimental results show that a discharge channel near the dielectric layer is indispensable to striation occurring in the anode area during a discharge,while the pre-accumulated charge on the dielectric layer and the surface state are not important.The origin of the striation is related only to the physical process in the cell.The dielectric layer acts as a charge collector during a PDP discharge.

  17. A compact 300 kV solid-state high-voltage nanosecond generator for dielectric wall accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yi; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yi; Xia, Liansheng; Zhang, Huang; Pan, Haifeng; Zhu, Jun; Shi, Jinshui; Zhang, Linwen; Deng, Jianjun

    2015-05-01

    Compact solid-state system is the main development trend in pulsed power technologies. A compact solid-state high-voltage nanosecond pulse generator with output voltage of 300 kV amplitude, 10 ns duration (FWHM), and 3 ns rise-time was designed for a dielectric wall accelerator. The generator is stacked by 15 planar-plate Blumlein pulse forming lines (PFL). Each Blumlein PFL consists of two solid-state planar transmission lines, a GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch, and a laser diode trigger. The key components of the generator and the experimental results are reported in this paper.

  18. Impurity screening and edge-plasma modifications for plasma devices with liquid walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognlien, Thomas D.

    2001-10-01

    The edge-plasma region of magnetic fusion confinement devices plays various important roles, two of which are (1), shielding the core plasma from gas and impurities, and (2), influencing the core-boundary plasma temperature and density. The first role is crucial to the successful use of liquid walls, and the second role, if controllable, could enhance core energy confinement by reducing drives for core turbulence. In fusion reactors, liquid walls would allow higher wall power-loading, and sufficiently thick walls would greatly reduce neutron activation of support structures.(R.W. Moir, Nucl. Fusion 37), 557 (1997); M. Abdou, et al., Fusion Eng. Design 54, 181 (2001). In addition, liquid divertors could largely eliminate the surface erosion problem.(J.N. Brooks, et al.), J. Nucl. Mater. 290-293, 185 (2001.); R.F. Mattas, et al., Fusion Eng. Design 49-50, 127 (2000). In this talk, results of self-consistent, 2-D edge transport simulations are presented to quantify the allowable influx of liquid-wall vapor for various candidate liquids (Li, Flibe, SnLi, Sn) which, in turn, set the allowable surface operating temperatures that controls the vapor evaporation rates. The results are explained and summarized by a reduced model that includes the radiation characteristics of different impurity species, and the competition between anomalous radial transport and parallel flow along the B-field. The modification of the edge plasma properties by liquid walls is also presented, with an emphasis on the low-recycling regime thought possible by the use of lithium, which naturally leads to a high edge-temperature regime. The effect of long mean-free-path parallel transport in the high-temperature regime is described by the bounce-averaged, particle- and energy-loss model.

  19. The in-situ diagnosis of plasma-wall interactions on magnetic fusion devices with accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Zachary

    2013-10-01

    We present the first in-situ, time-resolved measurements of low-Z isotope composition and deuterium retention over a large plasma-facing component (PFC) surface area in a magnetic fusion device. These critical measurements were made using a novel diagnostic technique based on the analysis of induced nuclear reactions from PFC surfaces on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Achieving an integrated understanding of plasma physics and materials science in magnetic fusion devices is severely hindered by a dearth of in-situ PFC surface diagnosis. Plasma-wall interactions, such as the erosion/redeposition of PFC material, the evolution of PFC surface isotope composition, and fusion fuel retention present significant plasma physics and materials science challenges for long pulse or steady-state devices. Our diagnostic uses a compact (~1 meter), high-current (~1 milliamp) radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator to inject ~1 MeV deuterons into the vacuum vessel. We control the tokamak's magnetic fields - in between plasma shots - to steer the deuterons to PFC surfaces, where they induce high-Q nuclear reactions with low-Z isotopes in the first ~10 microns of material. Analysis of the induced gamma and neutron energy spectra provides quantitative reconstruction of PFC surface conditions. This nondestructive, in-situ technique achieves PFC surface composition measurements with plasma shot-to-shot time resolution and 1 centimeter spatial resolution over large PFC areas. Work supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-94ER54235 and Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  20. Penning neon plasma laser pumped by a compact accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derzhiev, V.I.; Zhidkov, A.G.; Koval' , A.V.; Skakun, V.S.; Tarasenko, V.F.

    1988-01-01

    A study is made of the emission characteristics of a neon laser (wavelengths, 585.3, 724.5, and 703.2 nm) in the afterglow (50-120 ns) of a plasma generated by a short (less than 10 ns) electron beam pulse (20-100 A/sq cm) during the longitudinal and transverse pumping of dense (0.5-3 atm) He-Ne-Ar(Kr) and Ne-H2 mixtures. It is shown experimentally that preheating has a negative effect on the lasing characteristics. The relaxation kinetics of the He-Ne-Ar mixture and the emission characteristics of the neon yellow line are calculated; the results are in good agreement with measured lasing characteristics. 7 references.

  1. Boundary Conditions at the Walls with Thermionic Electron Emission in Two Temperature Modeling of "Thermal" Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Pekker, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we propose new boundary conditions at the hot walls with thermionic electron emission for two-temperature thermal arc models. In the derived boundary conditions the walls are assumed to be made from refractory metals and that the erosion of the wall is small and, therefore, is not taken into account in the model. In these boundary conditions the plasma sheath formed at the electrode is considered as the interface between the plasma and the wall. The derived boundary conditions allow the calculation of the heat flux to the walls from the plasma and consequently the thermionic electron current that makes the two temperature thermal model self consistent.

  2. A compact laser-driven plasma accelerator for megaelectronvolt-energy neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeev, R.; Madhu Trivikram, T.; Rishad, K. P. M.; Narayanan, V.; Krishnakumar, E.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2013-03-01

    Tremendous strides have been made in charged-particle acceleration using intense, ultrashort laser pulses. Accelerating neutral atoms is an important complementary technology because such particles are unaffected by electric and magnetic fields and can thus penetrate deeper into a target than ions. However, compact laser-based accelerators for neutral atoms are limited at best to millielectronvolt energies. Here, we report the generation of megaelectronvolt-energy argon atoms from an optical-field-ionized dense nanocluster ensemble. Measurements reveal that nearly every laser-accelerated ion is converted to an energetic neutral atom as a result of highly efficient electron transfer from Rydberg excited clusters, within a sheath around the laser focus. This process, although optimal in nanoclusters, is generic and adaptable to most laser-produced plasmas. Such compact laser-driven energetic neutral atom sources could have applications in fast atom lithography for surface science and tokamak diagnostics in plasma technology.

  3. Plasma-enhanced gasification of low-grade coals for compact power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Han S.; Hong, Yong C.; Shin, Dong H.; Lee, Bong J.

    2011-10-01

    A high temperature of a steam torch ensures an efficient gasification of low-grade coals, which is comparable to that of high-grade coals. Therefore, the coal gasification system energized by microwaves can serve as a moderately sized power plant due to its compact and lightweight design. This plasma power plant of low-grade coals would be useful in rural or sparsely populated areas without access to a national power grid.

  4. Escape and trapping of low-frequency gravitationally lensed rays by compact objects within plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Adam

    2017-02-01

    We consider the gravitational lensing of rays emitted by a compact object (CO) within a distribution of plasma with power-law density ∝r-h. For the simplest case of a cloud of spherically symmetric cold non-magnetized plasma, the diverging effect of the plasma and the converging effect of gravitational lensing compete with one another. When h excess of the plasma frequency at the CO surface. We define the anomalous propagation window for frequencies ω- < ω ≤ ω0. Rays emitted from the CO surface within this frequency range are dominated by optical effects from the plasma and curve back to the surface of the CO, effectively cloaking the star from distant observers. We conclude with a study of neutron star (NS) compactness ratios for a variety of nuclear matter equations of state (EoS). For h = 1, NSs generated from stiff EoS should display significant frequency dependence in the EW, and lower values of h with softer EoS can also show these effects.

  5. Bounds for a domain containing all compact invariant sets of the system describing the laser-plasma interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starkov, Konstantin E. [CITEDI-IPN, Avenue del Parque 1310, Mesa de Otay, Tijuana, BC (Mexico)], E-mail: konst@citedi.mx

    2009-02-28

    In this paper we consider the localization problem of compact invariant sets of the system describing the laser-plasma interaction. We establish that this system has an ellipsoidal localization for simple restrictions imposed on its parameters. Then we improve this localization by applying other localizing functions. In addition, we give sufficient conditions under which the origin is the unique compact invariant set.

  6. Quasi-linear landau kinetic equations for magnetized plasmas: compact propagator formalism, rotation matrices and interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misguich, J.H

    2004-04-01

    As a first step toward a nonlinear renormalized description of turbulence phenomena in magnetized plasmas, the lowest order quasi-linear description is presented here from a unified point of view for collisionless as well as for collisional plasmas in a constant magnetic field. The quasi-linear approximation is applied to a general kinetic equation obtained previously from the Klimontovich exact equation, by means of a generalised Dupree-Weinstock method. The so-obtained quasi-linear description of electromagnetic turbulence in a magnetoplasma is applied to three separate physical cases: -) weak electrostatic turbulence, -) purely magnetic field fluctuations (the classical quasi-linear results are obtained for cosmic ray diffusion in the 'slab model' of magnetostatic turbulence in the solar wind), and -) collisional kinetic equations of magnetized plasmas. This mathematical technique has allowed us to derive basic kinetic equations for turbulent plasmas and collisional plasmas, respectively in the quasi-linear and Landau approximation. In presence of a magnetic field we have shown that the systematic use of rotation matrices describing the helical particle motion allows for a much more compact derivation than usually performed. Moreover, from the formal analogy between turbulent and collisional plasmas, the results derived here in detail for the turbulent plasmas, can be immediately translated to obtain explicit results for the Landau kinetic equation.

  7. Investigation of MHD Instabilities in Jets and Bubbles Using a Compact Coaxial Plasma Gun in a Background Magnetized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Fisher, D. M.; Wallace, B.; Gilmore, M.; Hsu, S. C.

    2016-10-01

    A compact coaxial plasma gun is employed for experimental investigation of launching plasma into a lower density background magnetized plasma. Experiments are being conducted in the linear device HelCat at UNM. Four distinct operational regimes with qualitatively different dynamics are identified by fast CCD camera images. For regime I plasma jet formation, a global helical magnetic configuration is determined by a B-dot probe array data. Also the m =1 kink instability is observed and verified. Furthermore, when the jet is propagating into background magnetic field, a longer length and lifetime jet is formed. Axial shear flow caused by the background magnetic tension force contributes to the increased stability of the jet body. In regime II, a spheromak-like plasma bubble formation is identified when the gun plasma is injected into vacuum. In contrast, when the bubble propagates into a background magnetic field, the closed magnetic field configuration does not hold anymore and a lateral side, Reilgh-Taylor instability develops. Detailed experimental data and analysis will be presented for these cases.

  8. Kinetic theory of equilibrium axisymmetric collisionless plasmas in off-equatorial tori around compact objects

    CERN Document Server

    Cremaschini, Claudio; Slaný, Petr; Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Karas, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    The possible occurrence of equilibrium off-equatorial tori in the gravitational and electromagnetic fields of astrophysical compact objects has been recently proved based on non-ideal MHD theory. These stationary structures can represent plausible candidates for the modelling of coronal plasmas expected to arise in association with accretion discs. However, accretion disc coronae are formed by a highly diluted environment, and so the fluid description may be inappropriate. The question is posed of whether similar off-equatorial solutions can be determined also in the case of collisionless plasmas for which treatment based on kinetic theory, rather than fluid one, is demanded. In this paper the issue is addressed in the framework of the Vlasov-Maxwell description for non-relativistic multi-species axisymmetric plasmas subject to an external dominant spherical gravitational and dipolar magnetic field. Equilibrium configurations are investigated and explicit solutions for the species kinetic distribution functio...

  9. Synthesis of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes by Plasma Arc: Role of Plasma Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhart, Samir; Scott, Carl D.

    2000-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are porous objects on the molecular scale and have a low density, which gives them potential applications as adsorbent for molecular hydrogen. Their H2 absorption capacity published in the literature varies from 4 to 10% by mass according to the purity of the materials and storage conditions. Optimization of production methods of SWNTs should permit improving these new materials for storage of hydrogen. In this article, we show the potential of using SWNTs in hydrogen storage. In particular, we pose problems associated with synthesis, purification, and opening up of the nanotubes. We present an electric arc process currently used at laboratory scale to produce single wall carbon nanotubes. We discuss, in particular, operating conditions that permit growth of nanotubes and some plasma parameters that assure control of the material. Analysis of the process is carried out with the aid of local measurements of temperature and scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the materials.

  10. Escape and Trapping of Low-Frequency Gravitationally Lensed Rays by Compact Objects within Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, Adam

    2016-01-01

    We consider the gravitational lensing of rays emitted by a compact object (CO) within a distribution of plasma with power-law density $\\propto r^{-h}$. For the simplest case of a cloud of spherically symmetric cold non-magnetized plasma, the diverging effect of the plasma and the converging effect of gravitational lensing compete with one another. When $h<2$, the plasma effect dominates over the vacuum Schwarzschild curvature, potentially shifting the radius of the unstable circular photon orbit outside the surface of the CO. When this occurs, we define two relatively narrow radio-frequency bands in which plasma effects are particularly significant. Rays in the escape window have $\\omega_{0} < \\omega \\leq \\omega_{+}$ and are free to propagate to infinity from the CO surface. To a distant observer the visible portion of the CO surface appears to shrink as the observed frequency is reduced, and vanishes entirely at $\\omega_{0}$, in excess of the plasma frequency at the CO surface. We define the anomalous ...

  11. Development of a Compact Radiography Accelerator Using Dielectric Wall Accelerator Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Sampayan, Stephen; Chen Yu Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven; Holmes, Clifford; McCarrick, James F; Nelson, Scott D; Nunnally, William; Poole, Brian R; Rhodes, Mark; Sanders, David; Sullivan, James; Wang, Lisa; Watson, James

    2005-01-01

    We are developing of a compact accelerator system primarily intended for pulsed radiography. Design characteristics are an 8 MeV endpoint energy, 2 kA beam current and a cell gradient of approximately 3 MV/m. Overall length of the device is below 3 m. Such compact designs have been made possible with the development of high specific energy dielectrics (> 10 J/cc), specialized transmission line designs and multi-gap laser-triggered low jitter (<1 ns) gas switches. In this geometry, the pulse forming lines, switches and insulator/beam pipe are fully integrated within each cell to form a compact stand-alone stackable unit. We detail our research and modeling to date, recent high voltage test results, and the integration concept of the cells into a radiographic system.

  12. The connection of cytoskeletal network with plasma membrane and the cell wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zengyu Liu; Staffan Persson; Yi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall provides external support of the plant cells, while the cytoskeletons including the microtubules and the actin filaments constitute an internal framework. The cytoskeletons contribute to the cell wall biosynthesis by spatially and temporarily regulating the transportation and deposition of cell wall components. This tight control is achieved by the dynamic behavior of the cytoskeletons, but also through the tethering of these structures to the plasma membrane. This tethering may also extend beyond the plasma membrane and impact on the cell wall, possibly in the form of a feedback loop. In this review, we discuss the linking components between the cytoskeletons and the plasma membrane, and/or the cell wall. We also discuss the prospective roles of these components in cell wall biosyn-thesis and modifications, and aim to provide a platform for further studies in this field.

  13. Plasma-Wall Interaction and Electron Temperature Saturation in Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Artem

    2005-10-01

    Existing Hall thruster models predict that secondary electron emission from the channel walls is significant and that the near-wall sheaths are space charge saturated. The plasma-wall interaction and its dependence on the discharge voltage and channel width were studied through the measurements of the electron temperature, plasma potential, and plasma density in a 2 kW Hall thruster [1,2]. The experimental electron-wall collision frequency is computed using the measured plasma parameters. For high discharge voltages, the deduced electron-wall collision frequency is much lower than the theoretical value obtained for the space charge saturated sheath regime, but larger than the wall recombination frequency. The observed electron temperature saturation appears to be directly associated with a decrease of the Joule heating, rather than with the enhancement of the electron energy loss at the walls due to a strong secondary electron emission. The channel width is shown to have a more significant effect on the axial distribution of the plasma potential than the discharge voltage. 1. Y. Raitses, D. Staack, M. Keidar, and N.J. Fisch, Phys. Plasmas 12, 057104 (2005). 2. Y. Raitses, D. Staack, A. Smirnov, and N.J. Fisch, Phys. Plasmas 12, 073507 (2005).

  14. Compact Cryogenic Source of Periodic Hydrogen and Argon Droplet Beams for Intense Laser-Plasma Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, R A Costa; Kühnel, M; Hochhaus, D C; Schottelius, A; Polz, J; Kaluza, M C; Neumayer, P; Grisenti, R E

    2011-01-01

    We present a cryogenic source of periodic streams of micrometer-sized hydrogen (H2) and argon (Ar) droplets as ideal mass-limited target systems for fundamental intense laser-driven plasma applications. The highly compact design combined with a high temporal and spatial droplet stability makes our injector ideally suited for experiments using state-of-the-art low-repetition rate high-power lasers, in which a precise synchronization between the laser pulses and the droplets is mandatory. We demonstrate this explicitly by irradiating Ar droplets with pulses from a Petawatt laser.

  15. Compact cryogenic source of periodic hydrogen and argon droplet beams for relativistic laser-plasma generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraga, R. A. Costa; Kalinin, A.; Kuehnel, M.; Schottelius, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Hochhaus, D. C.; Neumayer, P. [EMMI Extreme Matter Institute and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); FIAS Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, J. W. Goethe-Universitaet, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Polz, J. [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Kaluza, M. C. [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Froebelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Grisenti, R. E. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    We present a cryogenic source of periodic streams of micrometer-sized hydrogen and argon droplets as ideal mass-limited target systems for fundamental intense laser-driven plasma applications. The highly compact design combined with a high temporal and spatial droplet stability makes our injector ideally suited for experiments using state-of-the-art high-power lasers in which a precise synchronization between the laser pulses and the droplets is mandatory. We show this by irradiating argon droplets with multi-terawatt pulses.

  16. Evaluation of a relativistic electron ring system as a plasma target for buildup of compact-toroid configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condit, W.C.

    1980-06-26

    A review of the idea of using plasma-loaded electron rings as buildup targets for future compact-toroid machines is presented. Present experiments at Cornell University and Nagoya University are analyzed, and the need for auxiliary heating to reach interesting temperatures is described. Consideration of the effect of two-stream instability, toroidal field, and plasma containment are discussed.

  17. Plasma operation with an all metal first-wall: Comparison of an ITER-like wall with a carbon wall in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, G. F.; Jet Efda Contributors; ASDEX-Upgrade Team

    2013-07-01

    Installation of the ITER-like Wall (ILW) in JET, has allowed a direct comparison of operation with all carbon plasma facing components (PFCs) to an all metal beryllium/tungsten first-wall under otherwise nearly identical conditions. The JET results are compared with experience from ASDEX-Upgrade where there was a gradual change to a full tungsten first-wall over an extended period. The scope of this review ranges from experience with machine conditioning, impurities and breakdown to material migration, fuel retention, disruptions, impact on operational space, energy confinement and compatibility with impurity seeding. Significant changes are reported, not only in the physics directly related to plasma-surface interactions but also to the main plasma which is strongly affected in unexpected ways, impacting many aspects of tokamak operation.

  18. Comparison of scrape-off layer transport in inner and outer wall limited JET plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, C., E-mail: csilva@ipfn.ist.utl.pt [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica Lisboa (Portugal); Arnoux, G.; Devaux, S. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Frigione, D. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla fusione, CR Frascati, Roma (Italy); Groth, M. [Aalto University, Association EURATOM-Tekes, Otakaari 4, 02015 Espoo (Finland); Horacek, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Association EURATOM/IPP.CR, Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Lomas, P.J. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Marsen, S. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Matthews, G. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Pitts, R.A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2013-07-15

    The JET scrape-off layer has been characterized with a reciprocating probe in inner wall, IW, and outer wall, OW, limited plasmas. Broad SOL profiles are observed for IW limited plasmas with power e-folding length substantially larger (by a factor of ∼5–7.5) than in OW limited plasmas. The properties of the fluctuations in the SOL parameters indicate larger turbulent transport for IW limited plasmas. The striking differences observed between IW and OW limited plasmas on the power e-folding length, parallel flow, turbulent transport as well as the characteristics of the fluctuations support the existence of a poloidally localized region of enhanced radial transport near the outboard midplane. The dependence of the SOL power e-folding length on the main plasma parameters was also investigated for IW limited plasmas and a modest negative dependence on both the plasma current and the line-averaged density found.

  19. A compact tunable polarized X-ray source based on laser-plasma helical undulators

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Ji; Zeng, Ming; Vieira, Jorge; Yu, Lu-Le; Weng, Su-Ming; Silva, Luis O; Jaroszynski, Dino A; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators have great potential as the basis for next generation compact radiation sources because their accelerating gradients are three orders of magnitude larger than traditional accelerators. However, X-ray radiation from such devices still lacks of tunability, especially the intensity and polarization distribution. Here we propose a tunable polarized radiation source from a helical plasma undulator based on plasma channel guided wakefield accelerator. When a laser pulse is initially incident with a skew angle relative to the channel axis, the laser and accelerated electrons experience collective spiral motions, which leads to elliptically polarized synchrotron-like radiation with flexible tunability on radiation intensity, spectra and polarization. We demonstrate that a radiation source with millimeter size and peak brilliance of $2\\times10^{19} photons/s/mm^{2}/mrad^{2}/0.1%$ bandwidth can be made with moderate laser and electron beam parameters. This brilliance is comparable with the ...

  20. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of low beta compact toroid injection into a hot strongly magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hsu, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We present results from three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of low {beta} compact toroid (CT) injection into a hot strongly magnetized plasma, with the aim of providing insight into CT fueling of a tokamak with parameters relevant for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). A regime is identified in terms of CT injection speed and CT-to-background magnetic field ratio that appears promising for precise core fueling. Shock-dominated regimes, which are probably unfavorable for tokamak fueling, are also identified. The CT penetration depth is proportional to the CT injection speed and density. The entire CT evolution can be divided into three stages: (1) initial penetration, (2) compression in the direction of propagation and reconnection, and (3) coming to rest and spreading in the direction perpendicular to injection. Tilting of the CT is not observed due to the fast transit time of the CT across the background plasma.

  1. A compact, low cost Marx bank for generating capillary discharge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, A. E.; Thornton, C.; Hooker, S. M.

    2016-09-01

    We describe in detail a low power Compact Marx Bank (CMB) circuit that can provide 20 kV, 500 A pulses of approximately 100-200 ns duration. One application is the generation of capillary discharge plasmas of density ≈1018 cm-3 used in laser plasma accelerators. The CMB is triggered with a high speed solid state switch and gives a high voltage output pulse with a ns scale rise time into a 50 Ω load (coaxial cable) with run at shot repetition rates of ≳1 Hz. This low power requirement means that the circuit can easily be powered by a small lead acid battery and, therefore, can be floated relative to laboratory earth. The CMB is readily scalable and pulses >45 kV are demonstrated in air discharges.

  2. Three-dimensional simulation study of compact toroid plasmoid injection into magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Y.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Sato, T.; Hayashi, T. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    Three-dimensional dynamics of a compact toroid (CT) plasmoid, which is injected into a magnetized target plasma region is investigated by using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulations. It is found that the process of the CT penetration into this region is much more complicated than what has been analyzed so far by using a conducting sphere (CS) model. The injected CT suffers from a tilting instability, which grows with the similar time scale as the CT penetration. The instability is accompanied by magnetic reconnection between the CT magnetic field and the target magnetic field, which disrupts the magnetic configuration of the CT. Magnetic reconnection plays a role to supply the high density plasma initially confined in the CT magnetic field into the target region. Also, the penetration depth of the CT high density plasma is examined. It is shown to be shorter than that estimated from the CS model. The CT high density plasma is decelerated mainly by the Lorentz force of the target magnetic field, which includes not only the magnetic pressure force but also the magnetic tension force. Furthermore, by comparing the CT plasmoid injection with the bare plasmoid injection, magnetic reconnection is considered to relax the magnetic tension force, that is the deceleration of the CT plasmoid. (author)

  3. Spectral characterization of Compact Toroidal Hybrid plasmas in preparation for Thomson scattering measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, M. M.; Loch, S. D.; Maurer, D. A.; Pearce, A. J.; Traverso, P. J.

    2014-10-01

    A Thomson scattering system is in development for the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH) experiment to provide localized, internal electron temperature and density measurements. Thomson scattering yields accurate information on the internal plasma electron pressure profile, which will aid in the equilibrium reconstruction of CTH plasmas using the V3FIT code. The expected Thomson scattered signal is approximately 1015 times less than the incident laser light, and can be overwhelmed by stray laser light, background plasma emission, and intrinsic detector noise. Background plasma emission measurements in the visible spectral region near the planned laser wavelength of 532 nm are underway using a Holospec f/1.8 spectrometer and an And or iStar image intensified CCD camera to quantify line and continuum background levels. In addition, impurity line identification and plans for a separate line-of-sight averaged impurity temperature and density measurement capability employing the Thomson spectrometer are in progress. This work is supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG-02-00ER54610 and by the Auburn University Undergraduate Research Fellowship.

  4. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Hai-En; Shaw, Joseph; Li, Zhengyan; Arefiev, Alexey V; Zhang, Xi; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Khudik, V; Shvets, G; Downer, M C

    2014-01-01

    We present results of the first tunable Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the easily aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The LPA is driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses, and produces high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beams. A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit efficiently retro-reflects the LPA driving pulse with relativistic intensity into oncoming electrons to produce $2\\times10^{7}$ CBS x-ray photons per shot with 10-20 mrad angular divergence and 50 % (FWHM) energy spread without detectable bremsstrahlung background. The x-ray central energy is tuned from 75 KeV to 200 KeV by tuning the LPA e-beam central energy. Particle-in-cell simulations of the LPA, the drive pulse/PM interaction and CBS agree well with measurements.

  5. Construction of the plasma-wall experiment Magnum-PSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapp, J.; Koppers, W.R.; van Eck, H.J.N.; van Rooij, G.J.; Goedheer, W.J.; de Groot, B.; Al, R.; Graswinckel, M.F.; van den Berg, M.A.; Kruyt, O.; Smeets, P.; van der Meiden, H.J.; Vijvers, W.; Scholten, J.; van de Pol, M.; Brons, S.; Melissen, W.; van der Grift, T.; Koch, R.; Schweer, B.; Samm, U.; Philipps, V.; Engeln, R.A.H.; Schram, D.C.; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.; Kleyn, A.W.

    2010-01-01

    The FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen is constructing Magnum-PSI; a magnetized (3 T), steady-state, large area (80 cm2) high-flux (up to 1024 H+ ions m−2 s−1) plasma generator. Magnum-PSI will be a highly accessible laboratory experiment in which the interaction of magnetized plasma with d

  6. Spectral and spatial structure of extreme ultraviolet radiation in laser plasma-wall interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuznetsov, A. S.; Stuik, R.; F. Bijkerk,; Shevelko, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    Intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation was observed during the interaction of low-temperature laser plasmas and wall materials. Laser plasmas with electron temperature T-e similar to 40 eV were created on massive solid targets (CF2 and Al) by an excimer KrF laser (248 nm/0.5 J/13 ns/1 Hz). The

  7. Construction of a Compact, Low-Inductance, 100 J Dense Plasma Focus for Yield Optimization Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Christopher; Povilus, Alex; Chapman, Steven; Falabella, Steve; Podpaly, Yuri; Shaw, Brian; Liu, Jason; Schmidt, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    A new 100 J mini dense plasma focus (DPF) is constructed to optimize neutron yields for a variety of plasma conditions and anode shapes. The device generates neutrons by leveraging instabilities that occur during a z-pinch in a plasma sheath to accelerate a beam of deuterium ions into a background deuterium gas target. The features that distinguish this miniDPF from previous 100 J devices are a compact, engineered electrode geometry and a low-impedance driver. The driving circuit inductance is minimized by mounting the capacitors close to the back of the anode and cathode yields. The anode can rapidly be changed out to test new designs. The neutron yield and 2D images of the visible light emission are compared to simulations with the hybrid kinetic code LSP which can directly simulate the device and anode designs. Initial studies of the sheath physics and neutron yields for a scaling of discharge voltages and neutral fill pressures are presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Effect of shear equilibrium flow in Tokamak plasma on resistive wall modes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; Liu Yue

    2013-01-01

    A code named LARWM with non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations in cylindrical model is used to describe the instability in Tokamak plasma surrounded by a conducting wall with finite resistivity.We mainly take three factors related to the shear equilibrium plasma flow into consideration to study the stabilizing effect of the shear flow on the resistive wall modes (RWMs).The three factors are the velocity amplitude of flow,the shear rate of flow on plasma surface,and the inertial energy of equilibrium plasma flow.In addition,a local shear plasma flow is also calculated by the LARWM code.Consequently,it is found that the inertial energy of the shear equilibrium plasma flow has an important role in the stabilization of the RWMs.

  9. An oil-free compact X-pinch plasma radiation source: Design and radiation performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapovalov, Roman V.; Spielman, Rick B.; Imel, George R.

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes a new, high-current, X-pinch radiation source recently developed and tested at Idaho State University. Our design is based on two linear transformer driver (LTD) bricks arranged in side-by-side geometry and directly coupled with an X-pinch load. The salient features of our 2-LTD-bricks are its simplicity, compactness, and portability: there is no oil, no water, and no SF6. It can be easily relocated to any place where a compact X-pinch radiation source is wanted. The driver can store up to 2.8 kJ of initial energy and can deliver more than 200-kA peak-current with less than 200-ns, 10%-90%, rise time into a short-circuit load. When the driver is coupled with an X-pinch load, it generates a very fast and bright radiation pulse. Source size measurements indicate that this radiation originates from a very small dense plasma, known as a "hot spot."

  10. A desktop extreme ultraviolet microscope based on a compact laser-plasma light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachulak, P. W.; Torrisi, A.; Bartnik, A.; Węgrzyński, Ł.; Fok, T.; Fiedorowicz, H.

    2017-01-01

    A compact, desktop size microscope, based on laser-plasma source and equipped with reflective condenser and diffractive Fresnel zone plate objective, operating in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region at the wavelength of 13.8 nm, was developed. The microscope is capable of capturing magnified images of objects with 95-nm full-pitch spatial resolution (48 nm 25-75% KE) and exposure time as low as a few seconds, combining reasonable acquisition conditions with stand-alone desktop footprint. Such EUV microscope can be regarded as a complementary imaging tool to already existing, well-established ones. Details about the microscope, characterization, resolution estimation and real sample images are presented and discussed.

  11. Compact beam transport system for free-electron lasers driven by a laser plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Dong; Huang, Zhirong

    2017-02-01

    Utilizing laser-driven plasma accelerators (LPAs) as a high-quality electron beam source is a promising approach to significantly downsize the x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facility. A multi-GeV LPA beam can be generated in several-centimeter acceleration distance, with a high peak current and a low transverse emittance, which will considerably benefit a compact FEL design. However, the large initial angular divergence and energy spread make it challenging to transport the beam and realize FEL radiation. In this paper, a novel design of beam transport system is proposed to maintain the superior features of the LPA beam and a transverse gradient undulator (TGU) is also adopted as an effective energy spread compensator to generate high-brilliance FEL radiation. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are presented based on a demonstration experiment with an electron energy of 380 MeV and a radiation wavelength of 30 nm.

  12. Construction of the plasma-wall experiment Magnum-PSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapp, J.; Koppers, W. R.; van Eck, H. J. N.; van Rooij, G. J.; W. J. Goedheer,; de Groot, B.; Al, R.; Graswinckel, M. F.; van den Berg, M. A.; Kruyt, O.; Smeets, P.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Vijvers, W.; Scholten, J.; van de Pol, M.; Brons, S.; Melissen, W.; Van der Grift, T.; Koch, R.; Schweer, B.; Samm, U.; Philipps, V.; Engeln, R. A. H.; D.C. Schram,; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Kleyn, A. W.

    2010-01-01

    The FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen is constructing Magnum-PSI: a magnetized (3 T), steady-state, large area (80 cm(2)) high-flux (up to 10(24) H+ ions m(-2) s(-1)) plasma generator. Magnum-PSI will be a highly accessible laboratory experiment in which the interaction of magnetized plasm

  13. Sustained Rotational Stabilization of DIII-D Plasmas Above the No-Wall Beta Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, A. M.

    2001-10-01

    Sustained stabilization of the n=1 kink mode by plasma rotation at beta approaching twice the stability limit calculated without a wall has been achieved in DIII-D by a combination of error field reduction and sufficient rotation drive. Previous experiments have transiently exceeded the no-wall beta limit, but demonstration of sustained rotational stabilization has remained elusive. Recent theory(A. Boozer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86), 5059 (2001). predicts a resonant response to error fields in a plasma approaching marginal stability to a low-n kink mode. Enhancement of magnetic non-axisymmetry in the plasma leads to strong damping of the toroidal rotation, precisely in the high-beta regime where it is needed for stabilization. This ``error field amplification," EFA, is demonstrated in DIII-D experiments: applied n=1 error fields cause enhanced plasma response and strong rotation damping at beta above the no-wall limit, but have little effect at lower beta. The discovery of EFA has led to sustained operation above the no-wall limit through improved error field correction using an external coil set. The required correction is determined both by optimizing the external currents with respect to the plasma rotation, and by use of feedback to detect and minimize the plasma response to error fields as beta increases. Stability analysis and rotation braking experiments at different beta values show that beta is maintained 50% higher than the no-wall stability limit for duration greater than 1 second, and approaches beta twice the no-wall limit in several cases, with steady-state rotation levels. The results suggest that improved error field correction could allow plasmas to be maintained well above no-wall beta limit for as long as sufficient torque is provided.

  14. NATO Advanced Study Institute entitled Physics of Plasma-Wall Interactions in Controlled Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Behrisch, R; Physics of plasma-wall interactions in controlled fusion

    1986-01-01

    Controlled thermonuclear fusion is one of the possible candidates for long term energy sources which will be indispensable for our highly technological society. However, the physics and technology of controlled fusion are extremely complex and still require a great deal of research and development before fusion can be a practical energy source. For producing energy via controlled fusion a deuterium-tritium gas has to be heated to temperatures of a few 100 Million °c corres­ ponding to about 10 keV. For net energy gain, this hot plasma has to be confined at a certain density for a certain time One pro­ mising scheme to confine such a plasma is the use of i~tense mag­ netic fields. However, the plasma diffuses out of the confining magnetic surfaces and impinges on the surrounding vessel walls which isolate the plasma from the surrounding air. Because of this plasma wall interaction, particles from the plasma are lost to the walls by implantation and are partially reemitted into the plasma. In addition, wall...

  15. New chamber walls conditioning and cleaning strategies to improve the stability of plasma processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunge, G.; Pelissier, B.; Joubert, O.; Ramos, R.; Maurice, C.

    2005-08-01

    One major challenge in plasma etching processes for integrated circuit fabrication is to achieve a good wafer-to-wafer repeatability. This requires a perfect control of the plasma chamber wall conditions. For silicon etching processes, which deposit SiOyClz layers on the chamber walls, this is achieved by cleaning the interior surfaces of the plasma chamber with an SF6-based plasma after each wafer is etched. However, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the reactor wall surfaces shows that the inner parts of the Al2O3 chamber are strongly fluorinated (formation of Al-F bonds) during the SF6 plasma. At the same time the AlFx layer is sputtered from some parts of the chamber (mostly from the roof, which is bombarded by high energy ions), and AlF redeposition is observed on other parts of the reactor body. Hence, the cleaning process of the reactor leaves AlF residues on the chamber wall on its own. This leads to several issues including flake off of AlxFy particles on the wafer and process drifts (due both to the progressive growth of AlF material on the SiO2 windows and to the release of F atoms from the chamber walls during the etching process). This indicates that a strategy other than dry-cleaning the Al2O3 chamber walls in fluorine-based plasmas should be found. In this paper we have investigated two different strategies. The first one consists of replacing Al2O3 covering the chamber walls by another material for the chamber walls inner coating. In particular, we have investigated the surface modification of several types of organic polymers (Teflon, Parylene and carbon-rich polymers), when exposed to SF6-based plasmas. We show that these materials can be reset to their original condition after exposure to a dry-cleaning process because carbon containing polymers are slowly etched away by the SF6/O2 plasma. This suggests that the replacement of the conventional Al2O3 chamber wall material by a carbon-coated liner should be possible. Alternatively, we

  16. Electron surface layer at the interface of a plasma and a dielectric wall

    CERN Document Server

    Heinisch, Rafael L; Fehske, Holger

    2011-01-01

    We study the potential and the charge distribution across the interface of a plasma and a dielectric wall. For this purpose, the charge bound to the wall is modelled as a quasi-stationary electron surface layer which satisfies Poisson's equation and minimizes the grand canonical potential of the wall-thermalized excess electrons constituting the wall charge. Based on an effective model for a graded interface taking into account the image potential and the offset of the conduction band to the potential just outside the dielectric, we specifically calculate the potential and the electron distribution for magnesium oxide, silicon dioxide and sapphire surfaces in contact with a helium discharge. Depending on the electron affinity of the surface, we find two vastly different behaviors. For negative electron affinity, electrons do not penetrate into the wall and an external surface charge is formed in the image potential, while for positive electron affinity, electrons penetrate into the wall and a space charge lay...

  17. MHD Spectroscopic Study of the Stabilizing Effect of Plasma Flow on the Resistive Wall Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimerdes, H.; Garofalo, A. M.; Navratil, G. A.; Chu, M. S.; Jackson, G. L.; Jensen, T. H.; La Haye, R. J.; Scoville, J. T.; Strait, E. J.; Edgell, D. H.; Jayakumar, R. J.; Okabayashi, M.

    2003-10-01

    MHD Spectroscopic Study of the Stabilizing Effect of Plasma Flow on the Resistive Wall Mode,* H. Reimerdes, A.M. Garofalo, G.A. Navratil, Columbia U, M.S. Chu, G.L. Jackson, T.H. Jensen, R.J. La Haye, J.T. Scoville, E.J. Strait, GA, D.H. Edgell, FAR-TECH, Inc., R.J. Jayakumar, LLNL, M. Okabayashi, PPPL - Resistive wall mode (RWM) stabilization by plasma rotation has been under study for the last decade. Dissipation caused by an interaction between the quasi-static magnetic perturbation and a near-sonic plasma flow alters the RWM stability [Bondeson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 2709 (1994)]. To probe the RWM stability in DIII-D, we extend the technique of MHD spectroscopy, which was previously applied at frequencies above 10 kHz [Fasoli, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 645 (1995)], to frequencies of a few Hz. Internal coils generate a rotating magnetic field, whose spatial structure largely overlaps with the RWM structure. The plasma response, measured as the perturbed field at the wall, is rigid and peaks when the external field rotates at a fraction of the inverse wall time in the direction of the plasma rotation, which is in good agreement with a single mode model [Garofalo, et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 4573 (2002)]. This measurement is used to determine the contribution of the proposed dissipation mechanisms to the stabilization of the RWM.

  18. Resistive wall mode and neoclassical tearing mode coupling in rotating tokamak plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    McAdams, Rachel; Chapman, I T

    2013-01-01

    A model system of equations has been derived to describe a toroidally rotating tokamak plasma, unstable to Resistive Wall Modes (RWMs) and metastable to Neoclassical Tearing Modes (NTMs), using a linear RWM model and a nonlinear NTM model. If no wall is present, the NTM growth shows the typical threshold/saturation island widths, whereas a linearly unstable kink mode grows exponentially in this model plasma system. When a resistive wall is present, the growth of the linearly unstable RWM is accelerated by an unstable island: a form of coupled RWM-NTM mode. Crucially, this coupled system has no threshold island width, giving the impression of a triggerless NTM, observed in high beta tokamak discharges. In addition, increasing plasma rotation at the island location can mitigate its growth, but does not restore the threshold width.

  19. Effect of the RF wall conditioning on the high performance plasmas in the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, H., E-mail: takahashi.hiromi@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Nakano, H.; Tokitani, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Fujii, K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Murakami, S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Takeiri, Y.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kasahara, H.; Seki, R.; Kamio, S.; Masuzaki, S.; Mutoh, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The wall conditioning using radio frequency (RF) plasma was carried out using Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating and/or Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) with the working gas of helium under the established confinement magnetic field. After sufficient numbers of repetitive wall discharge conditioning (DC, ICDC for ICRF and ECDC for ECRH), the formation of the parabolic electron density profile and the increase of the central ion temperature T{sub i} were observed. There was no difference in the attained central T{sub i} of the NBI discharge just after the conditioning using a similar value of input energy regardless of the applied RF source. Thus, it is concluded that both ICDC and the ECDC are effective for the higher T{sub i} plasma production under the established magnetic field in the Large Helical Device. The effective RF wall conditioning scenarios are also investigated for high T{sub i} plasma production.

  20. Compact disposal of high-energy electron beams using passive or laser-driven plasma decelerating stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonatto, A.; Schroeder, C. B.; Vay, J. -L.; Geddes, C. R.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey and, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2014-07-13

    A plasma decelerating stage is investigated as a compact alternative for the disposal of high-energy beams (beam dumps). This could benefit the design of laser-driven plasma accelerator (LPA) applications that require transportability and or high-repetition-rate operation regimes. Passive and laser-driven (active) plasma-based beam dumps are studied analytically and with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in a 1D geometry. Analytical estimates for the beam energy loss are compared to and extended by the PIC simulations, showing that with the proposed schemes a beam can be efficiently decelerated in a centimeter-scale distance.

  1. Beryllium plasma-facing components for the ITER-like wall project at JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, M J; Sundelin, P [Alfven Laboratory, Royal Institute of Technology, Association Euratom-VR (Sweden); Bailescu, V [Nuclear Fuel Plant, Pitesti (Romania); Coad, J P; Matthews, G F; Pedrick, L; Riccardo, V; Villedieu, E [Culham Science Centre, Euratom-UKAEA Fusion Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Hirai, T; Linke, J [IEF-2, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Association Euratom-FZJ, Juelich (Germany); Likonen, J [VTT, Association Euratom-Tekes, 02044 VTT (Finland); Lungu, C P [NILPRP, Association Euratom-MEdC, Bucharest (Romania)], E-mail: rubel@kth.se

    2008-03-15

    ITER-Like Wall Project has been launched at the JET tokamak in order to study a tokamak operation with beryllium components on the main chamber wall and tungsten in the divertor. To perform this first comprehensive test of both materials in a thermonuclear fusion environment, a broad program has been undertaken to develop plasma-facing components and assess their performance under high power loads. The paper provides a concise report on scientific and technical issues in the development of a beryllium first wall at JET.

  2. Compact Stellarator Path to DEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, J. F.

    2007-11-01

    Issues for a DEMO reactor are sustaining an ignited/high-Q plasma in steady state, avoiding disruptions and large variations in power flux to the wall, adequate confinement of thermal plasma and alpha-particles, control of a burning plasma, particle and power handling, etc. Compact stellarators have key advantages -- steady-state high-plasma-density operation without external current drive or disruptions, stability without a close conducting wall or active feedback systems, and low recirculating power -- in addition to moderate plasma aspect ratio, good confinement, and high-beta potential. The ARIES-CS study established that compact stellarators can be competitive with tokamaks as reactors. Many of the issues for a compact stellarator DEMO can be answered using results from large tokamaks, ITER D-T experiments and fusion materials, technology and component development programs, in addition to stellarators in operation, under construction or in development. However, a large next-generation stellarator will be needed to address some physics issues: size scaling and confinement at higher parameters, burning plasma issues, and operation with a strongly radiative divertor. Technology issues include simpler coils, structure, and divertor fabrication, and better cost information.

  3. Comprehensive Study of Plasma-Wall Sheath Transport Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-26

    temperature is always well below that expected for significant thermionic emission from LaB6, and the heat flux from the plasma is also low given the order...measurements from HET materials is their low electrical conductivity. In a typical electron emission study, a primary electron beam is focused onto to...Transition Controlled by Secondary Electron Emission at Low Gas Pressure,” 67th Annual Gaseous Electronics Conference, Raleigh, NC, November 2-7, 2014

  4. TFE-PLASMA POLYMERIZED DERMAL SHEEP COLLAGEN FOR THE REPAIR OF ABDOMINAL-WALL DEFECTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERLAAN, JS; LOPEZ, GP; VANWACHEM, PB; NIEUWENHUIS, P; RATNER, BD; BLEICHRODT, RP; SCHAKENRAAD, JM

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design and evaluate a degradable biomaterial for the repair of abdominal wall defects. Hexamethylenediisocyanate-tanned dermal sheep collagen (HDSC) was plasma-polymerized with tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) which resulted in a hydrophobic surface on the visceral side (TFE-HD

  5. Plasma excitations in a single-walled carbon nanotube with an external transverse magnetic field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K A Vijayalakshmi; T P Nafeesa Baby

    2013-02-01

    The effect of different uniform transverse external magnetic fields in plasma frequency when propagated parallel to the surface of the single-walled metallic carbon nanotubes is studied. The classical electrodynamics as well as Maxwell’s equations are used in the calculations. Equations are developed for both short- and long-wavelength limits and the variations are studied graphically.

  6. Overview of progress in European medium sized tokamaks towards an integrated plasma-edge/wall solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, H.; Eich, T.; Beurskens, M.

    2017-01-01

    Integrating the plasma core performance with an edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) that leads to tolerable heat and particle loads on the wall is a major challenge. The new European medium size tokamak task force (EU-MST) coordinates research on ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), MAST and TCV. This multi-machine ...

  7. Existence of a virtual cathode close to a strongly electron emissive wall in low density plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tierno, S. P., E-mail: sp.tierno@upm.es; Donoso, J. M.; Domenech-Garret, J. L.; Conde, L. [Department of Applied Physics, E.T.S.I. Aeronáutica y del Espacio. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    The interaction between an electron emissive wall, electrically biased in a plasma, is revisited through a simple fluid model. We search for realistic conditions of the existence of a non-monotonic plasma potential profile with a virtual cathode as it is observed in several experiments. We mainly focus our attention on thermionic emission related to the operation of emissive probes for plasma diagnostics, although most conclusions also apply to other electron emission processes. An extended Bohm criterion is derived involving the ratio between the two different electron densities at the potential minimum and at the background plasma. The model allows a phase-diagram analysis, which confirms the existence of the non-monotonic potential profiles with a virtual cathode. This analysis shows that the formation of the potential well critically depends on the emitted electron current and on the velocity at the sheath edge of cold ions flowing from the bulk plasma. As a consequence, a threshold value of the governing parameter is required, in accordance to the physical nature of the electron emission process. The latter is a threshold wall temperature in the case of thermionic electrons. Experimental evidence supports our numerical calculations of this threshold temperature. Besides this, the potential well becomes deeper with increasing electron emission, retaining a fraction of the released current which limits the extent of the bulk plasma perturbation. This noninvasive property would explain the reliable measurements of plasma potential by using the floating potential method of emissive probes operating in the so-called strong emission regime.

  8. Global modelling of plasma-wall interaction in reversed field pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagatin, M.; Costa, S.; Ortolani, S.

    1989-04-01

    The impurity production and deuterium recycling mechanisms in ETA—BETA II and RFX are firstly discussed by means of a simple model applicable to a stationary plasma interacting with the wall. This gives the time constant and the saturation values of the impurity concentration as a function of the boundary temperature and density. If the latter is sufficiently high, the impurity buildup in the main plasma becomes to some extent stabilized by the shielding effect of the edge. A self-consistent global model of the time evolution of an RFP plasma interacting with the wall is then described. The bulk and edge parameters are derived by solving the energy and particle balance equations incorporating some of the basic plasma-surface processes, such as sputtering, backscattering and desorption. The application of the model to ETA-BETA II confirms the impurity concentrations of the light and metal impurities as well as the time evolution of the average electron density found experimentally under different conditions. The model is then applied to RFX, a larger RFP experiment under construction, whose wall will be protected by a full graphite armour. The time evolution of the discharge shows that carbon sputtering could increase Zeff to ~ 4, but without affecting significantly the plasma performance.

  9. Compact X-ray Free Electron Laser from a Laser-plasma Accelerator using a Transverse Gradient Undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhirong; Ding, Yuantao; /SLAC; Schroeder, Carl B.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2012-09-13

    Compact laser-plasma accelerators can produce high energy electron beams with low emittance, high peak current but a rather large energy spread. The large energy spread hinders the potential applications for coherent FEL radiation generation. In this paper, we discuss a method to compensate the effects of beam energy spread by introducing a transverse field variation into the FEL undulator. Such a transverse gradient undulator together with a properly dispersed beam can greatly reduce the effects of electron energy spread and jitter on FEL performance. We present theoretical analysis and numerical simulations for SASE and seeded extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray FELs based on laser plasma accelerators.

  10. Real-time dielectric-film thickness measurement system for plasma processing chamber wall monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Yong; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-12-01

    An in-situ real-time processing chamber wall monitoring system was developed. In order to measure the thickness of the dielectric film, two frequencies of small sinusoidal voltage (∼1 V) signals were applied to an electrically floated planar type probe, which is positioned at chamber wall surface, and the amplitudes of the currents and the phase differences between the voltage and current were measured. By using an equivalent sheath circuit model including a sheath capacitance, the dielectric thickness can be obtained. Experiments were performed in various plasma condition, and reliable dielectric film thickness was obtained regardless of the plasma properties. In addition, availability in commercial chamber for plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition was verified. This study is expected to contribute to the control of etching and deposition processes and optimization of periodic maintenance in semiconductor manufacturing process.

  11. Plasma-Etching of Spray-Coated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Biointerfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon Hyub; Lee, Jun-Yong; Min, Nam Ki

    2012-08-01

    We present an effective method for the batch fabrication of miniaturized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) film electrodes using oxygen plasma etching. We adopted the approach of spray-coating for good adhesion of the SWCNT film onto a pre-patterned Pt support and used O2 plasma patterning of the coated films to realize efficient biointerfaces between SWCNT surfaces and biomolecules. By these approaches, the SWCNT film can be easily integrated into miniaturized electrode systems. To demonstrate the effectiveness of plasma-etched SWCNT film electrodes as biointerfaces, Legionella antibody was selected as analysis model owing to its considerable importance to electrochemical biosensors and was detected using plasma-etched SWCNT film electrodes and a 3,3',5,5'-tetramethyl-benzidine dihydrochloride/horseradish peroxidase (TMB/HRP) catalytic system. The response currents increased with increasing concentration of Legionella antibody. This result indicates that antibodies were effectively immobilized on plasma-etched and activated SWCNT surfaces.

  12. Influence of Wall Material on VUV Emission from Hydrogen Plasma in H- Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacal, M.; Glass-Maujean, M.; Ivanov, A. A., Jr; Nishiura, M.; Sasao, M.; Wada, M.

    2002-11-01

    The study of VUV emission from a hydrogen plasma produced in a filament discharge in a magnetic multicusp device showed that the use of tantalum and tungsten filaments leads to significant differences in the spectra. The effect of the filament material is interpreted in terms of the fresh film of this material, deposited on the wall. The synthetic spectrum convoluted with our apparatus function for the conditions of this experiment (gas temperature 500 K, electron energy 100 eV) agrees roughly well with the spectrum obtained with tungsten covered walls, but not with the spectrum obtained with tantalum covered walls. We show that in the case of tungsten covered walls the E-V singlet excitation is indeed a two-step Franck-Condon transition, going through either B or C state from an initial H2 molecule with v"=0, added to a Franck-Condon transition to highly excited states cascading to the B or C states. The excitation process to high v" states in the case of tantalum covered walls is a three step process, in which the first step is the formation by recombinative desorption on the wall of a vibrationally excited molecule with v"=1 or 2, which serves as the initial molecule in the subsequent E-V excitation through the B state. The results indicate a larger recombination coefficient of atoms on the tantalum covered wall.

  13. Edge and divertor plasma: detachment, stability, and plasma-wall interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Lee, Wonjae; Phsenov, A. A.; Smirnov, R. D.; Smolyakov, A. I.; Stepanenko, A. A.; Zhang, Yanzeng

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents an overview of the results of studies on a wide range of the edge plasma related issues. The rollover of the plasma flux to the target during progressing detachment process is shown to be caused by the increase of the impurity radiation loss and volumetric plasma recombination, whereas the ion-neutral friction, although important for establishing the necessary edge plasma conditions, does not contribute per se to the rollover of the plasma flux to the target. The processes limiting the power loss by impurity radiation are discussed and a simple estimate of this limit is obtained. Different mechanisms of meso-scale thermal instabilities driven by impurity radiation and resulting in self-sustained oscillations in the edge plasma are identified. An impact of sheared magnetic field on the dynamics of the blobs and ELM filaments playing an important role in the edge and SOL plasma transport is discussed. Trapping of He, which is an intrinsic impurity for the fusion plasmas, in the plasma-facing tungsten material is considered. A newly developed model, accounting for the generation of additional He traps caused by He bubble growth, fits all the available experimental data on the layer of nano-bubbles observed in W under irradiation by low energy He plasma.

  14. Impact of lithium on the plasma performance in the all-metal-wall tokamak ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, P.T.; Moreno Quicios, R.; Arredondo Parra, R.; Ploeckl, B.; McDermott, R.; Neu, R.; Wolfrum, E. [MPI fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D.K.; Diallo, A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-07-01

    Several tokamaks reported improvement in key plasma parameters concurrent with the presence of lithium in the plasma. At ASDEX Upgrade explorative experiments have been performed to find out if such effects can be observed when operating with an all-metal-wall. A gas gun launcher was developed capable to inject pellets containing about 1.6 x 10{sup 20} Li atoms at 2 Hz. The speed of about 600 m/s is sufficient to achieve core penetration and to create a homogeneous Li concentration of up to 10 %. With a typical sustainment time on the order of 100 ms, only transient Li presence without any pile up was achieved. Deposition of Li on plasma facing components, which remained for several discharges after injection, was observed. This short lived wall conditioning showed beneficial effects during plasma start-up. However, the accompanying surface contamination negatively impacted some diagnostics. The Li impact on the confinement was investigated in a dedicated plasma scenario with a proven sensitivity to nitrogen and helium. In phases with N seeding enhancing the confinement by about 30 %, Li injection resulted in a very modest, transient loss of confinement (about 5 %). No Li impact was found for pure Deuterium plasmas.

  15. Boundary conditions at the walls with thermionic electron emission in two temperature modeling of “thermal” plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pekker, Leonid; Hussary, Nakhleh [Victor Technologies, West Lebanon, New Hampshire 03781 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, we propose new boundary conditions for the electric potential, the electron energy equation, and the energy equation for heavy particles (ions and neutrals) at the hot walls with thermionic electron emission for two-temperature thermal arc models. The derived boundary conditions assume that the walls are made from refractory metals and, consequently, the erosion of the wall is small and can be neglected. In these boundary conditions, the plasma sheath formed at the electrode is viewed as the interface between the plasma and the wall. The derived boundary conditions allow the calculation of the heat flux to the walls from the plasma. This allows the calculation of the thermionic electron current that makes the model of electrode-plasma interaction self-consistent.

  16. Selective etching of metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes with hydrogen plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanien, A; Tokumoto, M; Umek, P; Vrbanič, D; Mozetič, M; Mihailović, D; Venturini, P; Pejovnik, S

    2005-02-01

    We present Raman scattering and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) measurements on hydrogen plasma etched single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Interestingly, both the STM and Raman spectroscopy show that the metallic SWNTs are dramatically altered and highly defected by the plasma treatment. In addition, structural characterizations show that metal catalysts are detached from the ends of the SWNT bundles. For semiconducting SWNTs we observe no feature of defects or etching along the nanotubes. Raman spectra in the radial breathing mode region of plasma-treated SWNT material show that most of the tubes are semiconducting. These results show that hydrogen plasma treatment favours etching of metallic nanotubes over semiconducting ones and therefore could be used to tailor the electronic properties of SWNT raw materials.

  17. Yeast cell wall integrity sensors form specific plasma membrane microdomains important for signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Christian; Arlt, Henning; Ungermann, Christian; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2016-09-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae relies on the detection of cell surface stress by five sensors (Wsc1, Wsc2, Wsc3, Mid2, Mtl1). Each sensor contains a single transmembrane domain and a highly mannosylated extracellular region, and probably detects mechanical stress in the cell wall or the plasma membrane. We here studied the distribution of the five sensors at the cell surface by using fluorescently tagged variants in conjunction with marker proteins for established membrane compartments. We find that each of the sensors occupies a specific microdomain at the plasma membrane. The novel punctate 'membrane compartment occupied by Wsc1' (MCW) shows moderate overlap with other Wsc-type sensors, but not with those of the Mid-type sensors or other established plasma membrane domains. We further observed that sensor density and formation of the MCW compartment depends on the cysteine-rich head group near the N-terminus of Wsc1. Yet, signalling capacity depends more on the sensor density in the plasma membrane than on clustering within its microcompartment. We propose that the MCW microcompartment provides a quality control mechanism for retaining functional sensors at the plasma membrane to prevent them from endocytosis.

  18. Effect of Wall Material on H– Production in a Plasma Sputter-Type Ion Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. D. M. Ponce

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of wall material on negative hydrogen ion (H– production was investigated in a multicusp plasma sputter-type ion source (PSTIS. Steady-state cesium-seeded hydrogen plasma was generated by a tungsten filament, while H– was produced through surface production using a molybdenum sputter target. Plasma parameters and H– yields were determined from Langmuir probe and Faraday cup measurements, respectively. At an input hydrogen pressure of 1.2 mTorr and optimum plasma discharge parameters Vd = –90 V and Id = –2.25 A, the plasma parameters ne was highest and T–e was lowest as determined from Langmuir probe measurements. At these conditions, aluminum generates the highest ion current density of 0.01697 mA/cm2, which is 64% more than the 0.01085 mA/cm2 that stainless steel produces. The yield of copper, meanwhile, falls between the two materials at 0.01164 mA/cm2. The beam is maximum at Vt = –125 V. Focusing is achieved at VL = –70 V for stainless steel, Vt = –60 V for aluminum, and Vt = –50 V for copper. The results demonstrate that proper selection of wall material can greatly enhance the H– production of the PSTIS.

  19. Deposition of lithium on a plasma edge probe in TFTR -- Behavior of lithium-painted walls interacting with edge plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirooka, Y. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Ashida, K. [Toyama Univ. (Japan); Kugel, H. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1998-05-01

    Recent observations have indicated that lithium pellet injection wall conditioning plays an important role in achieving the enhanced supershot regime in TFTR. However, little is understood about the behavior of lithium-coated limiter walls, interacting with edge plasmas. In the final campaign of TFTR, a cylindrical carbon fiber composite probe was inserted into the boundary plasma region and exposed to ohmically-heated deuterium discharges with lithium pellet injection. The ion-drift side probe surface exhibits a sign of codeposition of lithium, carbon, oxygen, and deuterium, whereas the electron side essentially indicates high-temperature erosion. It is found that lithium is incorporated in these codeposits in the form of oxide at the concentration of a few percent. In the electron side, lithium has been found to penetrate deeply into the probe material, presumably via rapid diffusion through interplane spaces in the graphite crystalline. Though it is not conclusive, materials mixing in the carbon and lithium system appears to be a key process in successful lithium wall conditioning.

  20. Study of the Effects of Liquid Lithium Curtain as First Wall on Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENGBaiquan; HUANGJinhua; YANJiancheng; PENGLilin

    2001-01-01

    The final goal of fusion energy research is to make it economically competitive and the cost of electricity (COE) as low as acceptable by the energy market. Therefore the fusion plasma has to be operating with high power density and the plasma facing components (PFC), such as first wall and divertor, have to sustain high surface heat load and bombardment with high particle flux. Such rigorous environments consequentially lead to severe damage and erosion of PFC materials. As a result, the lifetime of PFC would be shortened.

  1. Design of a Compact Coaxial Magnetized Plasma Gun for Magnetic Bubble Expansion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    COAXIAL MAGNETIZED PLASMA GUN FOR MAGNETIC BUBBLE EXPANSION EXPERIMENTS Y. Zhang1, A. G. Lynn1, S. C. Hsu2, M. Gilmore1, C... coaxial magnetized plasma gun and its associated hardware systems are discussed in detail. The plasma gun is used for experimental studies of...and coaxial plasma guns - which is the method employed in this work. The first coaxial plasma gun experiment was performed five decades ago by

  2. Regimes of pulsed formation of a compact plasma configuration with a high energy input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romadanov, I. V.; Ryzhkov, S. V., E-mail: svryzhkov@bmstu.ru [Bauman Moscow State Technical University (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    Results of experiments on the formation of a compact toroidal magnetic configuration at the Compact Toroid Challenge setup are presented. The experiments were primarily aimed at studying particular formation stages. Two series of experiments, with and without an auxiliary capacitor bank, were conducted. The magnetic field was measured, its time evolution and spatial distribution over the chamber volume were determined, and its influence on the formation regimes was investigated.

  3. Transition of single-walled carbon nanotubes from metallic to semiconducting in field-effect transistors by hydrogen plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gang; Li, Qunqing; Jiang, Kaili; Zhang, Xiaobo; Chen, Jia; Ren, Zheng; Fan, Shoushan

    2007-06-01

    We report hydrogen plasma treatment results on converting the metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes to semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes. We found that the as-grown single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be sorted as three groups which behave as metallic, as-metallic, and semiconducting SWNTs. These three groups have different changes under hydrogen plasma treatment and successive annealing process. The SWNTs can be easily hydrogenated in the hydrogen plasma environment and the as-metallic SWNTs can be transformed to semiconducting SWNTs. The successive annealing process can break the C-H bond, so the conversion is reversible.

  4. Depolarization of D-T plasmas by recycling in material walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenside, H.S.; Budny, R.V.; Post, D.E.

    1984-02-01

    The feasibility of using polarized deuterium (D) and tritium (T) plasmas in fusion reactors may be seriously affected by recycling in material walls. Theoretical and experimental results are reviewed which show how the depolarization rates of absorbed D and T depend on first wall parameters such as the temperature, the bulk and surface diffusivities, the density of electronic states at the Fermi surface, the spectral density of microscopic fluctuating electric field gradients, and the concentration of paramagnetic impurities. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of hydrogenated and deuterated amorphous semiconductors suggests that low-Z nonmetallic materials may provide a satisfactory first wall or limiter coating under reactor conditions with characteristic depolarization times of several seconds. Experiments are proposed to test the consequences of our analysis.

  5. Sub-70 nm resolution tabletop microscopy at 13.8 nm using a compact laser-plasma EUV source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachulak, Przemyslaw W; Bartnik, Andrzej; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2010-07-15

    We report the first (to our knowledge) demonstration of a tabletop, extreme UV (EUV) transmission microscope at 13.8 nm wavelength with a spatial (half-pitch) resolution of 69 nm. In the experiment, a compact laser-plasma EUV source based on a gas puff target is applied to illuminate an object. A multilayer ellipsoidal mirror is used to focus quasi-monochromatic EUV radiation onto the object, while a Fresnel zone plate objective forms the image. The experiment and the spatial resolution measurements, based on a knife-edge test, are described. The results might be useful for the realization of a compact high-resolution tabletop imaging systems for actinic defect characterization.

  6. Plasma-filled rippled wall rectangular backward wave oscillator driven by sheet electron beam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Hadap; J Mondal; K C Mittal; K P Maheshwari

    2011-03-01

    Performance of the backward wave oscillator (BWO) is greatly enhanced with the introduction of plasma. Linear theory of the dispersion relation and the growth rate have been derived and analysed numerically for plasma-filled rippled wall rectangular waveguide driven by sheet electron beam. To see the effect of plasma on the TM01 cold wave structure mode and on the generated frequency, the parameters used are: relativistic factor = 1.5 (i.e. / = 0.741), average waveguide height 0 = 1.445 cm, axial corrugation period 0 = 1.67 cm, and corrugation amplitude = 0.225 cm. The plasma density is varied from zero to 2 × 1012 cm-3. The presence of plasma tends to raise the TM01 mode cut-off frequency (14 GH at 2 × 1012 cm-3 plasma density) relative to the vacuum cut-off frequency (5 GH) which also causes a decrease in the group velocity everywhere, resulting in a flattening of the dispersion relation. With the introduction of plasma, an enhancement in absolute instability was observed.

  7. Surface modification of tube inner wall by transferred atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Faze; Liu, Shuo; Liu, Jiyu; Huang, Shuai; Xia, Guangqing; Song, Jinlong; Xu, Wenji; Sun, Jing; Liu, Xin

    2016-12-01

    Tubes are indispensable in our daily life, mechanical engineering and biomedical fields. However, the practical applications of tubes are sometimes limited by their poor wettability. Reported herein is hydrophilization of the tube inner wall by transferred atmospheric pressure plasma (TAPP). An Ar atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is used to induce He TAPP inside polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tube to perform inner wall surface modification. Optical emission spectrum (OES) is used to investigate the distribution of active species, which are known as enablers for surface modification, along the TAPP. Tubes' surface properties demonstrate that after TAPP treatment, the wettability of the tube inner wall is well improved due to the decrease of surface roughness, the removal of surface fluorine and introduction of oxygen. Notably, a deep surface modification can significantly retard the aging of the obtained hydrophilicity. The results presented here clearly demonstrate the great potential of TAPP for surface modification of the inner wall of tube or other hollow bodies, and thus a uniform, effective and long-lasting surface modification of tube with any length can be easily realized by moving the tube along its axis.

  8. X-ray spectroscopic study of charge exchange phenomena in plasma-wall interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renner O.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Jets of energetic ions launched at laser-burnt-through foils represent an efficient tool for investigation of plasma interaction with solid surfaces (plasma-wall interaction, PWI and for description of transient phenomena occurring close to the walls. Highly charged ions approaching the secondary target interpenetrate the near surface layer, collide with the counter-propagating matter and capture a large number of electrons. This results in a creation of atoms in highly excited Rydberg states or hollow ions with multiple inner vacancies; plasma jet and target ions may also undergo charge exchange (CE processes. We report PWI experiments with Al/Si(PMMA and Al/C targets irradiated at normal or oblique laser incidence. The distinct dip structures observed in red wings of Al Lyγ self-emission is interpreted in terms of CE between C6+ and Al12+ in the near-wall zone. The spectroscopic identification of CE phenomena is supported by results of analytical and numerical calculations.

  9. Plasma isotopic change over experiments in JET under Carbon and ITER-Like Wall conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loarer, T., E-mail: thierry.loarer@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Brezinsek, S.; Philipps, V. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung Plasmaphysik, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Romanelli-Gruenhagen, S. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Alves, D.; Carvalho, I. [IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, IST Lisboa (Portugal); Douai, D. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Esser, H.G. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung Plasmaphysik, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Felton, R. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Frigione, D. [ENEA sulla Fusione, Via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Kruezi, U. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Reux, C. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Smith, R.; Stamp, M.F. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Vartanian, S. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-08-15

    Starting with a wall loaded by H{sub 2}, change over experiments from H{sub 2} to D{sub 2} have been carried out in JET-ILW. A series of 13 repetitive pulses (cumulating 215 s in divertor configuration) have been performed under conditions of: I{sub p} = 2.0 MA, B{sub T} = 2.4 T, 〈n{sub e}〉 = 4.5 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3} with a constant gas injection of 3.0 × 10{sup 21} D s{sup −1} and 0.5 MW of auxiliary heating by ICRH in L-mode. Gas balance analysis shows that the total amount of H removed from the wall is in the range of 3 × 10{sup 22} D compared to 2 × 10{sup 23} D for JET-C. This is consistent with the faster decay of the H plasma concentration and the drop of the retention also by a similar factor when removing all the carbon components. Isotopic plasma wall changeover is also demonstrated to allow for removal of some D/T from the device. However, since plasma change over also contributes to long-term retention by codeposition, in ITER, change over in between each discharge might not be effective to reduce the fuel retention on the long-term.

  10. Measurement Of Plasma Parameters In Micro-Discharge By Wall Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifutdinov, Almaz; Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Sysoev, Sergey

    2016-09-01

    The increasing scientific and practical interest for glow discharge at high pressure is largely determined by the fact that their use does not require expensive and huge vacuum equipment. The analysis shows that, in contrast to the well-studied positive column (PC), the basic parameters of the plasma negative glow (NG) and Faraday dark space (FDS) of micro-discharges are studied insufficiently. The difficulties of the experimental diagnostics are associated with the fact that for the fixed values of pL with the increasing gas pressure the length of the micro-discharge decreases. And a small size is extremely difficult to diagnose spatial parameters distribution of micro discharges. Since at a small size introducing traditional Langmuir probe into the plasma capacity is not possible technically, it was proposed to use an additional measuring electrode (wall probe) disposed between the cathode and the anode for measurement of the fast EEDF. With its use we have registered EEDF fast electrons produced in the reaction of Penning ionization out of earlier reach range of high-pressure gas (from 20 to 200 Torr). In this paper by using wall probe we measured the basic parameters of NG plasma in micro-discharge in helium in a wide range of pressures. It is shown that the electrons temperature in the NG plasma is low and amounts to few fraction of 1 eV, which differs from the electron temperature in PC plasma. This allows the use of NG plasma for analysis by gas plasma electron spectroscopy. Authors thanks RNF (Grant 14-19-00311) for the support.

  11. Shaping Effects on Resistive-Plasma Resistive-Wall Mode Stability in a Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Dov; Cole, A. J.; Navratil, G. A.; Levesque, J. P.; Mauel, M. E.; Brennan, D. P.; Finn, J. M.; Fitzpatrick, R.

    2016-10-01

    A sharp-boundary MHD model is used to explore the effects of toroidal curvature and cross-sectional shaping on resistive-plasma resistive-wall modes in a tokamak. Building on the work of Fitzpatrick, we investigate mode stability with fixed toroidal number n =1 and a broad spectrum of poloidal m-numbers, given varying aspect-ratio, elongation, triangularity and up-down asymmetry. The speed and versatility of the sharp-boundary model facilitate exploration of a large parameter space, revealing qualitative trends to be further investigated by larger codes. In addition, the study addresses the effect of geometric mode-coupling on higher beta stability limits associated with an ideal-plasma or ideal-wall. These beta limits were used by Brennan and Finn to identify plasma response domains for feedback control. Present results show how geometric mode-coupling affects the stability limits and plasma response domains. The results are explained by an analytic reduced-MHD model with two coupled modes having different m-numbers. The next phase of this work will explore feedback control in different tokamak geometries. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  12. Estimation of the domain containing all compact invariant sets of a system modelling the amplitude of a plasma instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishchenko, Alexander [Bauman Moscow State Technical University, 2nd Baumanskaya str., 5, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: apkri@bmstu.ru; Starkov, Konstantin [CITEDI-IPN, Av. del Parque 1310, Mesa de Otay, Tijuana, BC (Mexico)]. E-mail: konst@citedi.mx

    2007-07-16

    In this Letter we describe localization results of all compact invariant sets of a system modelling the amplitude of a plasma instability proposed by Pikovski, Rabinovich and Trakhtengerts. We derive ellipsoidal and polytopic localization sets for a number of domains in the 4-dimensional parametrical space of this system. Other localization sets have been obtained by using paraboloids of a revolution, a circular cylinder and an elliptic paraboloid. Our approach is based on the solution of the first order extremum problem. A comparison of our method with the method of semipermeable surfaces is presented as well.

  13. Tungsten transport and sources control in JET ITER-like wall H-mode plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorczak, N., E-mail: nicolas.fedorczak@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Monier-Garbet, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Pütterich, T. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Brezinsek, S. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Jlich, Assoc EURATOM-FZJ, Jlich (Germany); Devynck, P.; Dumont, R.; Goniche, M.; Joffrin, E. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Lerche, E. [Association EURATOM-Belgian State, LPP-ERM-KMS, TEC partner, Brussels (Belgium); Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lipschultz, B. [York Plasma Institute, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Luna, E. de la [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusin, Asociacin EURATOM/CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Maddison, G. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Maggi, C. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Matthews, G. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Nunes, I. [Istituto de plasmas e fusao nuclear, Lisboa (Portugal); Rimini, F. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Solano, E.R. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusin, Asociacin EURATOM/CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Tamain, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Tsalas, M. [Association EURATOM-Hellenic Republic, NCSR Demokritos 153 10, Attica (Greece); Vries, P. de [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-08-15

    A set of discharges performed with the JET ITER-like wall is investigated with respect to control capabilities on tungsten sources and transport. In attached divertor regimes, increasing fueling by gas puff results in higher divertor recycling ion flux, lower divertor tungsten source, higher ELM frequency and lower core plasma radiation, dominated by tungsten ions. Both pedestal flushing by ELMs and divertor screening (including redeposition) are possibly responsible. For specific scenarios, kicks in plasma vertical position can be employed to increase the ELM frequency, which results in slightly lower core radiation. The application of ion cyclotron radio frequency heating at the very center of the plasma is efficient to increase the core electron temperature gradient and flatten electron density profile, resulting in a significantly lower central tungsten peaking. Beryllium evaporation in the main chamber did not reduce the local divertor tungsten source whereas core radiation was reduced by approximately 50%.

  14. Fast functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolacyak, Daniel; Ihde, Jörg; Merten, Christian; Hartwig, Andreas; Lommatzsch, Uwe

    2011-07-01

    The afterglow of an atmospheric pressure plasma has been used for the fast oxidative functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy demonstrate that the MWCNT morphology is mostly preserved when the MWCNTs are dispersed in a solvent and injected as a spray into the plasma. Contact angle measurements show that this approach enhances the wettability of MWCNTs and reduces their sedimentation in an aqueous dispersion. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, and electrokinetic measurements show that oxygen plasma incorporates about 6.6 at.% of oxygen and creates mainly hydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups on the MWCNT surface. The typical effective treatment time is estimated to be in the range of milliseconds. The approach is ideally suited for combination with the industrial gas phase CVD synthesis of MWCNTs.

  15. Fast Identification of Recycling Properties of Wall-Released Hydrogenic Neutrals in Divertor Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chengyue; DENG Baiquan; YAN Jiancheng; G. A. EMMERT

    2007-01-01

    A new bipartition neutral transport model was developed for quick identification of the recycling properties of the wall-released hydrogenic neutral particles in the vicinity of the divertor target plate. Based on this model, the numerical calculation results are fairly consistent with the results obtained with the 'multi-generation method'. This model can not only be utilized to provide a source term from neutral transport calculations for the B2 edge plasma transport code, which has been used to simulate edge plasma transport of an HL-2A divertor configuration, but can also be specifically applied for fast classification of the divertor plasma as high recycling or low recycling. Our results also show that the transmissivity is lower in the high-recycling regime.

  16. Combined complementary plasma diagnostics to characterize a 2f plasma with additional DC current with conditioning effects at the chamber wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klick, Michael; Rothe, Ralf; Baek, Kye Hyun; Lee, Eunwoo

    2016-09-01

    Multiple frequencies and DC current used in a low-pressure plasma rf discharge result in an increased complexity. This needs plasma diagnostics applied, in particular in a plasma process chamber. That is done under manufacturing conditions which restrict the applicable plasma diagnostics to non-invasive methods with small footprint. So plasma chamber parameters, optical emission spectroscopy (OES), and self-excited electron spectroscopy (SEERS) are used to characterize the plasma and to understand chamber wall conditioning effects in an Ar plasma. The parameters are classified according to their origin--the region they are representative for. The center ion density is estimated from the DC current and compared to the SEERS electron density reflecting the electron density close to that at the chamber wall. The conditioning effects are caused by Si sputtering at a Si wafer changing the chamber wall state only when the chamber is clean, subsequent plasmas in the same chamber are not affected in that way. Through the combination of the complementary methods it can be shown that the chamber wall condition finally changes the radial plasma density distribution. Also the heating of electrons in the sheath is shown to be influenced by conditioning effects.

  17. Experimental Characterization of a Plasma Deflagration Accelerator for Simulating Fusion Wall Response to Disruption Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Thomas; Loebner, Keith; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the suitability of a pulsed deflagration accelerator to simulate the interaction of edge-localized modes with plasma first wall materials is investigated. Experimental measurements derived from a suite of diagnostics are presented that focus on the both the properties of the plasma jet and the manner in which such jets couple with material interfaces. Detailed measurements of the thermodynamic plasma state variables within the jet are presented using a quadruple Langmuir probe operating in current-saturation mode. This data in conjunction with spectroscopic measurements of H α Stark broadening via a fast-framing, intensified CCD camera provide spatial and temporal measurements of how the plasma density and temperature scale as a function of input energy. Using these measurements, estimates for the energy flux associated with the deflagration accelerator are found to be completely tunable over a range spanning 150 MW m-2 - 30 GW m-2. The plasma-material interface is investigated using tungsten tokens exposed to the plasma plume under variable conditions. Visualizations of resulting shock structures are achieved through Schlieren cinematography and energy transfer dynamics are discussed by presenting temperature measurements of exposed materials. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Stewardship Science Academic Program in addition to the National Defense Science Engineering Graduate Fellowship.

  18. Plasma Treated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs for Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Lian

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasma nanocoating of allylamine were deposited on the surfaces of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs to provide desirable functionalities and thus to tailor the surface characteristics of MWCNTs for improved dispersion and interfacial adhesion in epoxy matrices. Plasma nanocoated MWCNTs were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM, surface contact angle, and pH change measurements. Mechanical testing results showed that epoxy reinforced with 1.0 wt % plasma coated MWCNTs increased the tensile strength by 54% as compared with the pure epoxy control, while epoxy reinforced with untreated MWCNTs have lower tensile strength than the pure epoxy control. Optical and electron microscopic images show enhanced dispersion of plasma coated MWCNTs in epoxy compared to untreated MWCNTs. Plasma nanocoatings from allylamine on MWCNTs could significantly enhance their dispersion and interfacial adhesion in epoxy matrices. Simulation results based on the shear-lag model derived from micromechanics also confirmed that plasma nanocoating on MWCNTs significantly improved the epoxy/fillers interface bonding and as a result the increased composite strength.

  19. Wall ablation of heated compound-materials into non-equilibrium discharge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weizong; Kong, Linghan; Geng, Jinyue; Wei, Fuzhi; Xia, Guangqing

    2017-02-01

    The discharge properties of the plasma bulk flow near the surface of heated compound-materials strongly affects the kinetic layer parameters modeled and manifested in the Knudsen layer. This paper extends the widely used two-layer kinetic ablation model to the ablation controlled non-equilibrium discharge due to the fact that the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) approximation is often violated as a result of the interaction between the plasma and solid walls. Modifications to the governing set of equations, to account for this effect, are derived and presented by assuming that the temperature of the electrons deviates from that of the heavy particles. The ablation characteristics of one typical material, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) are calculated with this improved model. The internal degrees of freedom as well as the average particle mass and specific heat ratio of the polyatomic vapor, which strongly depends on the temperature, pressure and plasma non-equilibrium degree and plays a crucial role in the accurate determination of the ablation behavior by this model, are also taken into account. Our assessment showed the significance of including such modifications related to the non-equilibrium effect in the study of vaporization of heated compound materials in ablation controlled arcs. Additionally, a two-temperature magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model accounting for the thermal non-equilibrium occurring near the wall surface is developed and applied into an ablation-dominated discharge for an electro-thermal chemical launch device. Special attention is paid to the interaction between the non-equilibrium plasma and the solid propellant surface. Both the mass exchange process caused by the wall ablation and plasma species deposition as well as the associated momentum and energy exchange processes are taken into account. A detailed comparison of the results of the non-equilibrium model with those of an equilibrium model is presented. The non-equilibrium results

  20. Lectin receptor kinases participate in protein-protein interactions to mediate plasma membrane-cell wall adhesions in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouget, A.; Senchou, V.; Govers, F.; Sanson, A.; Barre, A.; Rougé, P.; Pont-Lezica, R.; Canut, H.

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsi

  1. Compact ring-based X-ray source with on-orbit and on-energy laser-plasma injection

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Marlene; Edelen, Auralee; Gerity, James; Lajoie, Andrew; Lawler, Gerard; Lishilin, Osip; Moon, Kookjin; Sahai, Aakash Ajit; Seryi, Andrei; Shih, Kai; Zerbe, Brandon

    2016-01-01

    We report here the results of a one week long investigation into the conceptual design of an X-ray source based on a compact ring with on-orbit and on-energy laser-plasma accelerator. We performed these studies during the June 2016 USPAS class "Physics of Accelerators, Lasers, and Plasma..." applying the art of inventiveness TRIZ. We describe three versions of the light source with the constraints of the electron beam with energy $1\\,\\rm{GeV}$ or $3\\,\\rm{GeV}$ and a magnetic lattice design being normal conducting (only for the $1\\,\\rm{GeV}$ beam) or superconducting (for either beam). The electron beam recirculates in the ring, to increase the effective photon flux. We describe the design choices, present relevant parameters, and describe insights into such machines.

  2. Electron density measurements of a field-reversed configuration plasma using a novel compact ultrastable second-harmonic interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandi, F.; Giammanco, F. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Harris, W. S.; Roche, T.; Trask, E.; Wessel, F. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    A compact high-sensitivity second-harmonic interferometer for line-integrated electron density measurements on a large plasma machine is presented. The device is based on a fiber coupled near-infrared continuous-wave Nd:YAG laser and is remotely controlled. The performances of the instrument are tested on the Irvine field-reversed configuration machine, and a sensitivity of few 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} in measuring line integrated electron density is demonstrated with a time resolution of a few microseconds. The interferometer is self calibrated, has an impressive stability, and it does not require any further alignment after proper installation. These features make this device a real turn-key system suitable for electron density measurement in large plasma machines.

  3. Compact x-ray free-electron laser from a laser-plasma accelerator using a transverse-gradient undulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhirong; Ding, Yuantao; Schroeder, Carl B

    2012-11-16

    Compact laser-plasma accelerators can produce high energy electron beams with low emittance, high peak current but a rather large energy spread. The large energy spread hinders the potential applications for coherent free-electron laser (FEL) radiation generation. We discuss a method to compensate the effects of beam energy spread by introducing a transverse field variation into the FEL undulator. Such a transverse gradient undulator together with a properly dispersed beam can greatly reduce the effects of electron energy spread and jitter on FEL performance. We present theoretical analysis and numerical simulations for self-amplified spontaneous emission and seeded extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray FELs based on laser plasma accelerators.

  4. Plasma-synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, R.; Kaneko, T.; Kato, T.; Li, Y. F.

    2011-05-01

    Plasma-based nanotechnology is a rapidly developing area of research ranging from physics of gaseous and liquid plasmas to material science, surface science and nanofabrication. In our case, nanoscopic plasma processing is performed to grow single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with controlled chirality distribution and to further develop SWNT-based materials with new functions corresponding to electronic and biomedical applications. Since SWNTs are furnished with hollow inner spaces, it is very interesting to inject various kinds of atoms and molecules into their nanospaces based on plasma nanotechnology. The encapsulation of alkali-metal atoms, halogen atoms, fullerene or azafullerene molecules inside the carbon nanotubes is realized using ionic plasmas of positive and negative ions such as alkali-fullerene, alkali-halogen, and pair or quasipair ion plasmas. Furthermore, an electrolyte solution plasma with DNA negative ions is prepared in order to encapsulate DNA molecules into the nanotubes. It is found that the electronic and optical properties of various encapsulated SWNTs are significantly changed compared with those of pristine ones. As a result, a number of interesting transport phenomena such as air-stable n- and p-type behaviour, p-n junction characteristic, and photoinduced electron transfer are observed. Finally, the creation of an emerging SWNTs-based nanobioelectronics system is challenged. Specifically, the bottom-up electric-field-assisted reactive ion etching is proposed to control the chirality of SWNTs, unexplored SWNT properties of magnetism and superconductivity are aimed at being pioneered, and innovative biomedical-nanoengineering with encapsulated SWNTs of higher-order structure are expected to be developed by applying advanced gas-liquid interfacial plasmas.

  5. Slow plasma dynamo driven by electric current helicity in non-compact Riemann surfaces of negative curvature

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2009-01-01

    Boozer addressed the role of magnetic helicity in dynamos [Phys Fluids \\textbf{B},(1993)]. He pointed out that the magnetic helicity conservation implies that the dynamo action is more easily attainable if the electric potential varies over the surface of the dynamo. This provided us with motivation to investigate dynamos in Riemannian curved surfaces [Phys Plasmas \\textbf{14}, (2007);\\textbf{15} (2008)]. Thiffeault and Boozer [Phys Plasmas (2003)] discussed the onset of dissipation in kinematic dynamos. When curvature is constant and negative, a simple simple laminar dynamo solution is obtained on the flow topology of a Poincare disk, whose Gauss curvature is $K=-1$. By considering a laminar plasma dynamo [Wang et al, Phys Plasmas (2002)] the electric current helicity ${\\lambda}\\approx{2.34m^{-1}}$ for a Reynolds magnetic number of $Rm\\approx{210}$ and a growth rate of magnetic field $|{\\gamma}|\\approx{0.022}$. Negative constant curvature non-compact $\\textbf{H}^{2}$, has also been used in one-component elec...

  6. Development of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun for compact toroid injection into the C-2 field-reversed configuration device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T; Sekiguchi, J; Asai, T; Gota, H; Garate, E; Allfrey, I; Valentine, T; Morehouse, M; Roche, T; Kinley, J; Aefsky, S; Cordero, M; Waggoner, W; Binderbauer, M; Tajima, T

    2016-05-01

    A compact toroid (CT) injector was developed for the C-2 device, primarily for refueling of field-reversed configurations. The CTs are formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), which consists of coaxial cylindrical electrodes and a bias coil for creating a magnetic field. First, a plasma ring is generated by a discharge between the electrodes and is accelerated by Lorenz self-force. Then, the plasma ring is captured by an interlinkage flux (poloidal flux). Finally, the fully formed CT is ejected from the MCPG. The MCPG described herein has two gas injection ports that are arranged tangentially on the outer electrode. A tungsten-coated inner electrode has a head which can be replaced with a longer one to extend the length of the acceleration region for the CT. The developed MCPG has achieved supersonic CT velocities of ∼100 km/s. Plasma parameters for electron density, electron temperature, and the number of particles are ∼5 × 10(21) m(-3), ∼40 eV, and 0.5-1.0 × 10(19), respectively.

  7. Plasma levels of the arterial wall protein fibulin-1 are associated with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Esben; Høyem, Pernille; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl;

    2013-01-01

    -associated extracellular matrix protein, fibulin-1, was recently found in higher concentrations in the arterial wall and in plasma in patients with long duration type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, plasma fibulin-1 independently predicted total mortality and was associated with pulse pressure, an indirect measure of arterial...

  8. Surprising synthesis of nanodiamond from single-walled carbon nanotubes by the spark plasma sintering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Ali; Ham, Heon; Na, Han Gil; Kwon, Yong Jung; Kang, Sung Yong; Choi, Myung Sik; Bang, Jae Hoon; Park, No-Hyung; Kang, Inpil; Kim, Hyoun Woo

    2016-10-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) was successfully synthesized using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a pure solid carbon source by means of a spark plasma sintering process. Raman spectra and X-ray diffraction patterns revealed the generation of the cubic diamond phase by means of the SPS process. Lattice-resolved TEM images confirmed that diamond nanoparticles with a diameter of about ˜10 nm existed in the products. The NDs were generated mainly through the gas-phase nucleation of carbon atoms evaporated from the SWCNTs. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Numerical analysis of a coupled problem: Time evolution of a tokamak plasma in contact with a conducting wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albanese, R.; Formisano, A.; Fresa, R.; Martone, R.; Rubinacci, G.; Villone, F. [Univ. degli Studi di Napoli Federico II (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Elettrica

    1996-05-01

    In this paper the authors analyze the time evolution of a tokamak plasma after the failure of the vertical control system. In this case, the plasma eventually touches the conducting wall and gives rise to currents which flow partly in the wall, partly in the plasma. They show how, under simplifying assumptions, the problem can be analyzed by means of pure electromagnetic formulations. After a brief review of the state of the art in the analysis of this phenomenon, they propose and discuss three alternative Eulerian approaches: an evolutionary equilibrium formulation, a convection-diffusion model and a 3D error-based approach.

  10. Recent results in the Los Alamos compact torus program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuszewski, M.; Armstrong, W.T.; Barnes, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    A Compact Toroid is a toroidal magnetic-plasma-containment geometry in which no conductors or vacuum-chamber walls pass through the hole in the torus. Two types of compact toroids are studied experimentally and theoretically at Los Alamos: spheromaks that are oblate in shape and contain both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields, and field-reversed configurations (FRC) that are very prolate and contain poloidal field only.

  11. Ultra-Sensitive Elemental and Isotope Measurements with Compact Plasma Source Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CPS-CRDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Yixiang; Wang, Chuji; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2005-06-01

    The proposed research is to develop a new class of instruments for actinide isotopes and hazardous element analysis through coupling highly sensitive cavity ring-down spectroscopy to a compact microwave plasma source. The research work will combine advantages of CRDS measurement with a low power, low flow rate, tubing-type microwave plasma source to reach breakthrough sensitivity for elemental analysis and unique capability of isotope measurement. The project has several primary goals: (1) Explore the feasibility of marrying CRDS with a new microwave plasma source; (2) Provide quantitative evaluation of CMP-CRDS for ultratrace elemental and actinide isotope analysis; (3) Approach a breakthrough detection limit of ca. 10{sup -13} g/ml or so, which are orders of magnitude better than currently available best values; (4) Demonstrate the capability of CMP-CRDS technology for isobaric measurements, such as {sup 238}U and {sup 238}Pu isotopes. (5) Design and assemble the first compact, field portable CMP-CRDS instrument with a high-resolution diode laser for DOE/EM on-site demonstration. With all these unique capabilities and sensitivities, we expect CMP-CRDS will bring a revolutionary change in instrument design and development, and will have great impact and play critical roles in supporting DOE's missions in environmental remediation, environmental emission control, waste management and characterization, and decontamination and decommissioning. The ultimate goals of the proposed project are to contribute to environmental management activities that would decrease risk for the public and workers, increase worker productivity with on-site analysis, and tremendously reduce DOE/EM operating costs.

  12. Plasma Cell Leukemia Presenting as a Chest Wall Mass: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell leukemia (PCL is an uncommon neoplasm of plasma cells, with an aggressive clinical course and poor outcome, even with current standard of care. It can occur either de novo (primary PCL or as a progression of multiple myeloma (MM. This disease has unique diagnostic criteria but certain genetic markers and clinical features may overlap with MM. Due to the low prevalence of PCL, guidelines on its management are extrapolated from the management of MM and based on small retrospective studies and cases reports/series. We present an interesting case of PCL in a middle-aged African-American male, who was diagnosed incidentally after chest wall imaging for an unrelated complaint. The diagnostic approach, management and outcomes of PCL are discussed.

  13. Plasma Cell Leukemia Presenting as a Chest Wall Mass: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmed; Paul, Yonette; Nwabudike, Stanley Madu; Ogbonna, Onyekachi; Grantham, Mica; Taddesse-Heath, Lekidelu

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is an uncommon neoplasm of plasma cells, with an aggressive clinical course and poor outcome, even with current standard of care. It can occur either de novo (primary PCL) or as a progression of multiple myeloma (MM). This disease has unique diagnostic criteria but certain genetic markers and clinical features may overlap with MM. Due to the low prevalence of PCL, guidelines on its management are extrapolated from the management of MM and based on small retrospective studies and cases reports/series. We present an interesting case of PCL in a middle-aged African-American male, who was diagnosed incidentally after chest wall imaging for an unrelated complaint. The diagnostic approach, management and outcomes of PCL are discussed. PMID:27462235

  14. Characterization of Ion-Acoustic Wave Reflection Off A Plasma Chamber Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen, Jorge; Chu, Feng; Hood, Ryan; Mattingly, Sean; Rogers, Anthony; Skiff, Fred

    2015-11-01

    We present an experimental characterization of the ion acoustic wave reflection coefficient off a plasma chamber wall. The experiment is performed in a cylindrical, magnetized, singly-ionized Argon inductively-coupled gas discharge plasma that is weakly collisional with typical conditions: n ~ 1010cm-3 Te ~ 3 eV and B ~ 1 kG. The main diagnostics are laser-induced fluorescence and Langmuir probe measurements. A survey of the ion velocity distribution function's zeroth and first order as well as density fluctuations at different wave excitation frequencies is obtained. Analysis of the reflection coefficient's dependence on the phase velocity and frequency of the wave is done through the characterization of waves utilizing Case-Van Kampen modes and the use of Morrison's G-transform. This research is supported by the Department of Energy under grant No. DOE DE-FG02-99ER54543.

  15. TiN coating on wall of holes and stitches by pulsed DC plasma enhanced CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马胜利; 徐可为; 介万奇

    2003-01-01

    TiN coating samples with narrow-stitch or deep-hole of different sizes and real dies with complex shape were processed by a larger-scale pulsed plasma enhanced CVD(PECVD) reactor. Scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, Vicker's hardness and interfacial adhesion tests were conducted to find the relation between the microstructure and properties of TiN coating on a flat and an inner surface. The results indicate that the inner-wall of holes (d>2 mm) and inner surface of narrow-stitches (d>3 mm) can be coated with the aid of pulsed DC plasma in an industrial-scale reactor. The quality of coatings on different surfaces is almost the same. The coating was applied to aluminum extrusion mould, and the mould life was increased at least by one time.

  16. Effects of a liquid lithium curtain as the first wall in a fusion reactor plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Cheng-Yue; J.P. Allain; Deng Bai-Quan

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the effect of a liquid lithium curtain on fusion reactor plasma, such curtain is utilized as the first wall for the engineering outline design of the Fusion Experimental Breeder (FEB-E). The relationships between the surface temperature of a liquid lithium curtain and the effective plasma charge, fuel dilution and fusion power production have been derived. Results indicate that under normal operation, the evaporation of liquid lithium does not seriously affect the effective plasma charge, but effects on fuel dilution and fusion power are more sensitive. As an example, it has investigated the relationships between the liquid lithium curtain flow velocity and the rise of surface temperature based on operation scenario Ⅱ of the FEB-E design with reversed shear configuration and high power density. Results show that even if the liquid lithium curtain flow velocity is as low as 0.5 m/s, the effects of evaporation from the liquid lithium curtain on plasma are negligible. In the present design, the sputtering of liquid lithium curtain and the particle removal effects of the divertor are not yet considered in detail. Further studies are in progress, and in this work implication of lithium erosion and divertor physics on fusion reactor operation are discussed.

  17. Plasma sheath properties in a magnetic field parallel to the wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, J.; Faudot, E.; Devaux, S.; Heuraux, S.

    2016-06-01

    Particle in cell simulations were carried out with a plasma bounded by two absorbing walls and a magnetic field applied parallel to them. Both the sheath extent and the potential drop in it were derived from simulations for different plasma parameters, such as the electron and ion temperature Ti, particle density, and ion mass. Both of them exhibit a power law dependent on the Larmor to plasma ion pulsation ratio Ωi. For increasing values of the magnetic field, the potential drop within the sheath decreases from a few Ti/e down to zero, where e stands for the electron charge. The space charge extent increases with Ωi and saturates to 2.15 ion Larmor radius. A simple model of sheath formation in such a magnetic field configuration is presented. Assuming strongly magnetized electrons, and neglecting collisions and ionizations, a new typical length is evidenced, which depends on the ratio Ωi. The charge separation sheath width is theoretically found to increase from a combination of the electron gyroradius and the ion Debye length for low Ωi ratios up to several ion gyroradii for strongly magnetized ions. Both the calculated sheath extent and plasma potential show a fair agreement with the numerical simulations.

  18. Modeling the Compression of Merged Compact Toroids by Multiple Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ron; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A fusion propulsion scheme has been proposed that makes use of the merging of a spherical distribution of plasma jets to dynamically form a gaseous liner. The gaseous liner is used to implode a magnetized target to produce the fusion reaction in a standoff manner. In this paper, the merging of the plasma jets to form the gaseous liner is investigated numerically. The Los Alamos SPHINX code, based on the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method is used to model the interaction of the jets. 2-D and 3-D simulations have been performed to study the characteristics of the resulting flow when these jets collide. The results show that the jets merge to form a plasma liner that converge radially which may be used to compress the central plasma to fusion conditions. Details of the computational model and the SPH numerical methods will be presented together with the numerical results.

  19. Construction, calibration, and application of a compact spectrophotometer for EUV (300-2500-A) plasma diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, H W; Chen, K I; Terry, J L; Fastie, W G

    1979-04-15

    A 400-mm normal incidence concave grating spectrophotometer, specifically designed for plasma diagnostics, is described. The wavelength drive, in which the grating is translated as well as rotated, is discussed in detail; the wavelength linearity of the sine drive and methods of improving it are analyzed. The instrument can be used in any orientation, is portable under vacuum, and quite rugged. The construction techniques utilized produce a high quality vacuum making the instrument compatible with both high purity plasma devices and synchrotron radiation sources. The photometric sensitivity calibration was found to be very stable during extended use on high temperature plasma devices. The applications of the instrument to diagnose plasmas in two tokamaks and a mirror device are described. A facility used for photometric calibration of extreme ultraviolet (lambda > 300-A) spectrophotometers against NBS standard diodes is described. The instrumental calibration obtained using this facility was checked by using synchrotron radiation from SURF II; very good agreement was observed.

  20. Multi-Bunch effect of resistive wall in the beam delivery system of the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mutzner, Raphael; Pieloni, Tatiana; Rivkin, Leonid

    2010-01-01

    Wake fields in the CLIC Beam Delivery System (BDS) can cause severe single or multi-bunch effects leading to luminosity loss. The main contributors in the BDS are geometric and resistive wall wake fields of the collimators and resistive wall wakes of the beam pipe. The present master thesis focuses only on the multi-bunch effects from resistive wall. Using particle tracking with wake fields through the BDS, we have established the aperture radius, above which the effect of the wake fields becomes negligible. Simulations were later extended to include a realistic aperture model along the BDS as well as the collimators. We examine the two cases of 3 TeV and 500 GeV in this work, for stainless steel and copper pipes.

  1. Compact Ultraintense Femtosecond Laser via Raman Amplifier and Compressor in Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suckewer, Szymon [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The main objective of this project was to conduct experimental and theoretical research to find conditions leading to higher, than previously obtained efficiency η of transfer the pump energy into the short seed beam in plasma of Stimulated Raman Back-Scattering (SRBS). We have demonstrated very large amplification and compression in our earlier SRBS plasma. However, the efficiency η was much too low to reach very high intensity of the output beam in the focal spot. Recently, by solving a very difficult technical SRBS’ problem, namely, the creation of very reproducible and much larger diameter plasma channels than in our earlier research, we propose a new approach to obtain higher efficiency η. The crucial new result was a very reproducible, low noise amplified seed in the larger diameter of the plasma channel leading to the higher efficiency. Using this new setup and very encouraging results about increase efficiency continuing this approach in the future the efficiency is expect to reach the range of η ≈15 - 20 % required to develop practical SRBS plasma laser. Intellectual Merit: The model for the present project was created by our earlier SRBS experiments. The main objective of those experiments was to amplify and compress the seed pulses in a plasma . The experiments demonstrated an unprecedented large pulse intensity amplification of 20,000 in system of 2-passes in ~2mm long plasma, and the seed pulse compression from 550fsec down to ~50fsec. The pump and seed beams in the present project have diameters of ~0.2–0.25mm each, propagating in ~0.35 - 0.45mm diameter and ~2-2.5mm long plasma channels (optimal length for our SRBS experiment) with input pump and seed intensities of 2x1014 and 3x1013 W/cm2, respectively. Such an SRBS system design was “prescribed” by computer simulations, which predict elimination of the SRBS “ saturation” for a such relatively short plasma channel. Plasma channels has been created by combining shorter (200psec) and

  2. In silicio identification of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored plasma-membrane and cell wall proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, L H; Tettelin, H; Vossen, J H; Ram, A F; van den Ende, H; Klis, F M

    1997-12-01

    Use of the Von Heijne algorithm allowed the identification of 686 open reading frames (ORFs) in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that encode proteins with a potential N-terminal signal sequence for entering the secretory pathway. On further analysis, 51 of these proteins contain a potential glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-attachment signal. Seven additional ORFs were found to belong to this group. Upon examination of the possible GPI-attachment sites, it was found that in yeast the most probable amino acids for GPI-attachment as asparagine and glycine. In yeast, GPI-proteins are found at the cell surface, either attached to the plasma-membrane or as an intrinsic part of the cell wall. It was noted that plasma-membrane GPI-proteins possess a dibasic residue motif just before their predicted GPI-attachment site. Based on this, and on homologies between proteins, families of plasma-membrane and cell wall proteins were assigned, revealing 20 potential plasma-membrane and 38 potential cell wall proteins. For members of three plasma-membrane protein families, a function has been described. On the other hand, most of the cell wall proteins seem to be structural components of the wall, responsive to different growth conditions. The GPI-attachment site of yeast slightly differs from mammalian cells. This might be of use in the development of anti-fungal drugs.

  3. Progress in the engineering design and assessment of the European DEMO first wall and divertor plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Thomas R., E-mail: tom.barrett@ukaea.uk [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Ellwood, G.; Pérez, G.; Kovari, M.; Fursdon, M.; Domptail, F.; Kirk, S.; McIntosh, S.C.; Roberts, S.; Zheng, S. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Boccaccini, L.V. [KIT, INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); You, J.-H. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bachmann, C. [EUROfusion, PPPT, Boltzmann Str. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Reiser, J.; Rieth, M. [KIT, IAM, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Visca, E.; Mazzone, G. [ENEA, Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Arbeiter, F. [KIT, INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Domalapally, P.K. [Research Center Rez, Hlavní 130, 250 68 Husinec – Řež (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The engineering of the plasma facing components for DEMO is an extreme challenge. • PFC overall requirements, methods for assessment and designs status are described. • Viable divertor concepts for 10 MW/m{sup 2} surface heat flux appear to be within reach. • The first wall PFC concept will need to vary poloidally around the wall. • First wall coolant, structural material and PFC topology are open design choices. - Abstract: The European DEMO power reactor is currently under conceptual design within the EUROfusion Consortium. One of the most critical activities is the engineering of the plasma-facing components (PFCs) covering the plasma chamber wall, which must operate reliably in an extreme environment of neutron irradiation and surface heat and particle flux, while also allowing sufficient neutron transmission to the tritium breeding blankets. A systems approach using advanced numerical analysis is vital to realising viable solutions for these first wall and divertor PFCs. Here, we present the system requirements and describe bespoke thermo-mechanical and thermo-hydraulic assessment procedures which have been used as tools for design. The current first wall and divertor designs are overviewed along with supporting analyses. The PFC solutions employed will necessarily vary around the wall, depending on local conditions, and must be designed in an integrated manner by analysis and physical testing.

  4. Diffusive, convective and Nernst-effect losses of magnetic flux and heat from a wall-confined magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2013-10-01

    The recently proposed MAGLIF approach to inertial fusion ignition involves compression and heating of plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. To reach fusion conditions, the compressed plasma should retain a large fraction of the magnetic flux and thermal energy enclosed by the liner. Magnetic flux and heat losses from strongly magnetized plasma to a cold liner wall are significantly influenced by the Nernst and Ettingshausen thermomagnetic effects. We present exact analytical solutions of 1D MHD equations with Ohmic heating, heat conductivity and thermomagnetic terms included and discuss relative roles of diffusive, conductive and Nernst-effect-related losses of magnetic flux and heat from the magnetized plasma to the wall. These solutions are compared to our 1D simulation results. They can serve for verification of plasma transport modeling by MHD codes. Work supported by DOE/NNSA.

  5. Suprathermal electron energy spectrum and nonlocally affected plasma-wall interaction in helium/air micro-plasma at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, V. I.; Adams, S. F.; Miles, J. A.; Koepke, M. E.; Kurlyandskaya, I. P.

    2016-10-01

    Details of ground-state and excited-state neutral atoms and molecules in an atmospheric-pressure micro-discharge plasma may be obtained by plasma electron spectroscopy (PLES), based on a wall probe. The presence and transport of energetic (suprathermal) electrons, having a nonlocal origin, are responsible for electrostatic charging of the plasma boundary surfaces to potentials many times that associated with the ambient electron kinetic energy. The energy-flux distribution function is shown to be controllable for applications involving analysis of composition and processes taking place in a multiphase (plasma-gas-solid), chemically reactive, interaction region.

  6. Experimental investigation of silicon photomultipliers as compact light readout systems for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications in fusion plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocente, M; Fazzi, A; Tardocchi, M; Cazzaniga, C; Lorenzoli, M; Pirovano, C; Rebai, M; Uboldi, C; Varoli, V; Gorini, G

    2014-11-01

    A matrix of Silicon Photo Multipliers has been developed for light readout from a large area 1 in. × 1 in. LaBr3 crystal. The system has been characterized in the laboratory and its performance compared to that of a conventional photo multiplier tube. A pulse duration of 100 ns was achieved, which opens up to spectroscopy applications at high counting rates. The energy resolution measured using radioactive sources extrapolates to 3%-4% in the energy range Eγ = 3-5 MeV, enabling gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at good energy resolution. The results reported here are of relevance in view of the development of compact gamma-ray detectors with spectroscopy capabilities, such as an enhanced gamma-ray camera for high power fusion plasmas, where the use of photomultiplier is impeded by space limitation and sensitivity to magnetic fields.

  7. Experimental investigation of silicon photomultipliers as compact light readout systems for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocente, M., E-mail: massimo.nocente@mib.infn.it; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milano (Italy); Fazzi, A.; Lorenzoli, M.; Pirovano, C. [Dipartimento di Energia, CeSNEF, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milano (Italy); Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Uboldi, C.; Varoli, V. [Dipartimento di Energia, CeSNEF, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    A matrix of Silicon Photo Multipliers has been developed for light readout from a large area 1 in. × 1 in. LaBr{sub 3} crystal. The system has been characterized in the laboratory and its performance compared to that of a conventional photo multiplier tube. A pulse duration of 100 ns was achieved, which opens up to spectroscopy applications at high counting rates. The energy resolution measured using radioactive sources extrapolates to 3%–4% in the energy range E{sub γ} = 3–5 MeV, enabling gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at good energy resolution. The results reported here are of relevance in view of the development of compact gamma-ray detectors with spectroscopy capabilities, such as an enhanced gamma-ray camera for high power fusion plasmas, where the use of photomultiplier is impeded by space limitation and sensitivity to magnetic fields.

  8. Plasma-wall interactions data compendium-1. ''Hydrogen retention property, diffusion and recombination coefficients database for selected plasma-facing materials''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwakiri, Hirotomo [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Matsuhiro, Kenjirou [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan); Hirooka, Yoshi [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Yamamura, Yasunori [Okayama Univ. of Scinece, Okayama (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    A summary on the recent activities of the plasma-wall interactions database task group at the National Institute for Fusion Science is presented in this report. These activities are focused on the compilation of literature data on the key parameters related to wall recycling characteristics that affect dynamic particle balance during plasma discharges and also on-site tritium inventory. More specifically, in this task group a universal fitting formula has been proposed and successfully applied to help compile hydrogen implantation-induced retention data. Also, presented here are the data on hydrogen diffusion and surface recombination coefficients, both critical in modeling dynamic wall recycling behavior. Data compilation has been conducted on beryllium, carbon, tungsten and molybdenum, all currently used for plasma-facing components in magnetic fusion experiments. (author)

  9. Optimization of negative ion current in a compact microwave driven upper hybrid resonance multicusp plasma source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, D; Bhattacharjee, S; Singh, M J; Bandyopadhyay, M; Chakraborty, A

    2012-02-01

    Performance of a microwave driven upper hybrid resonance multicusp plasma source as a volume negative ion source is reported. Microwaves are directly launched into the plasma chamber predominantly in the TE(11) mode. The source is operated at different discharge conditions to obtain the optimized negative H(-) ion current which is ∼33 μA (0.26 mA∕cm(2)). Particle balance equations are solved to estimate the negative ion density, which is compared with the experimental results. Future prospects of the source are discussed.

  10. Optimization of negative ion current in a compact microwave driven upper hybrid resonance multicusp plasma sourcea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, D.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Singh, M. J.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Chakraborty, A.

    2012-02-01

    Performance of a microwave driven upper hybrid resonance multicusp plasma source as a volume negative ion source is reported. Microwaves are directly launched into the plasma chamber predominantly in the TE11 mode. The source is operated at different discharge conditions to obtain the optimized negative H- ion current which is ˜33 μA (0.26 mA/cm2). Particle balance equations are solved to estimate the negative ion density, which is compared with the experimental results. Future prospects of the source are discussed.

  11. Model of a laser heated plasma interacting with walls arising in laser keyhole welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tix, C.; Simon, G.

    1994-07-01

    In laser welding with laser intensities of approximately 1011 W/m2, a hole, called a keyhole, is formed in the material. In this keyhole a plasma is detected, which is characterized by high pressure as well as being influenced by the boundary of the keyhole. Experimental data on plasma parameters are rare and difficult to obtain [W. Sokolowski, G. Herziger, and E. Beyer, in High Power Lasers and Laser Machining Technology, edited by A. Quenzer, SPIE Proc. Vol. 1132 (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 1989), pp. 288-295]. In a previous paper [C. Tix and G. Simon, J. Phys. D 26, 2066 (1993)] we considered just a simple plasma model without excited states and with constant ion-neutral-atom temperature. Therefore we neglected radiative transport of excitations and underestimated the ion-neutral-atom temperature and the ionization rate. Here we extend our previous model for a continuous CO2 laser and iron and take into account radiative transfer of excitations and a variable ion-neutral-atom temperature. We consider singly charged ions, electrons, and three excitation states of neutral atoms. The plasma is divided in plasma bulk, presheath, and sheath. The transport equations are solved with boundary conditions mainly determined through the appearance of walls. Some effort is made to clarify the energy transport mechanism from the laser beam into the material. Dependent on the incident laser power, the mean electron temperature and density are obtained to be 1.0-1.3 eV and 2.5×1023-3×1023 m-3. Radiative transport of excitations does not contribute significantly to the energy transport.

  12. An integrated time-of-flight versus residual energy subsystem for a compact dual ion composition experiment for space plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, M I; Ogasawara, K; Ebert, R W; McComas, D J; Allegrini, F; Weidner, S E; Alexander, N; Livi, S A

    2015-05-01

    We have developed a novel concept for a Compact Dual Ion Composition Experiment (CoDICE) that simultaneously provides high quality plasma and energetic ion composition measurements over 6 decades in ion energy in a wide variety of space plasma environments. CoDICE measures the two critical ion populations in space plasmas: (1) mass and ionic charge state composition and 3D velocity and angular distributions of ∼10 eV/q-40 keV/q plasma ions—CoDICE-Lo and (2) mass composition, energy spectra, and angular distributions of ∼30 keV-10 MeV energetic ions—CoDICE-Hi. CoDICE uses a common, integrated Time-of-Flight (TOF) versus residual energy (E) subsystem for measuring the two distinct ion populations. This paper describes the CoDICE design concept, and presents results of the laboratory tests of the TOF portion of the TOF vs. E subsystem, focusing specifically on (1) investigation of spill-over and contamination rates on the start and stop microchannel plate (MCP) anodes vs. secondary electron steering and focusing voltages, scanned around their corresponding model-optimized values, (2) TOF measurements and resolution and angular resolution, and (3) cross-contamination of the start and stop MCPs' singles rates from CoDICE-Lo and -Hi, and (4) energy resolution of avalanche photodiodes near the lower end of the CoDICE-Lo energy range. We also discuss physical effects that could impact the performance of the TOF vs. E subsystem in a flight instrument. Finally, we discuss advantages of the CoDICE design concept by comparing with capabilities and resources of existing flight instruments.

  13. An integrated time-of-flight versus residual energy subsystem for a compact dual ion composition experiment for space plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, M. I.; McComas, D. J.; Allegrini, F.; Livi, S. A. [Space Science and Engineering Division, Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, Texas 78238-5166 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, Texas 78249-0697 (United States); Ogasawara, K.; Ebert, R. W.; Weidner, S. E.; Alexander, N. [Space Science and Engineering Division, Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, Texas 78238-5166 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We have developed a novel concept for a Compact Dual Ion Composition Experiment (CoDICE) that simultaneously provides high quality plasma and energetic ion composition measurements over 6 decades in ion energy in a wide variety of space plasma environments. CoDICE measures the two critical ion populations in space plasmas: (1) mass and ionic charge state composition and 3D velocity and angular distributions of ∼10 eV/q–40 keV/q plasma ions—CoDICE-Lo and (2) mass composition, energy spectra, and angular distributions of ∼30 keV–10 MeV energetic ions—CoDICE-Hi. CoDICE uses a common, integrated Time-of-Flight (TOF) versus residual energy (E) subsystem for measuring the two distinct ion populations. This paper describes the CoDICE design concept, and presents results of the laboratory tests of the TOF portion of the TOF vs. E subsystem, focusing specifically on (1) investigation of spill-over and contamination rates on the start and stop microchannel plate (MCP) anodes vs. secondary electron steering and focusing voltages, scanned around their corresponding model-optimized values, (2) TOF measurements and resolution and angular resolution, and (3) cross-contamination of the start and stop MCPs’ singles rates from CoDICE-Lo and -Hi, and (4) energy resolution of avalanche photodiodes near the lower end of the CoDICE-Lo energy range. We also discuss physical effects that could impact the performance of the TOF vs. E subsystem in a flight instrument. Finally, we discuss advantages of the CoDICE design concept by comparing with capabilities and resources of existing flight instruments.

  14. Edge and Plasma -Wall Interaction Diagnostics in the TJ-II Stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares, F. L.; Tafalla, D.; Branas, B.; Hidalgo, A.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Ortiz, P.

    2003-07-01

    The operation of the TJ-II stellarator, carried out under ECR heating conditions until now, the plasma edge parameters and those processes has been identified. Therefore, an important , has implieda careful control of partied e sources and the associated plasma-wall interaction processes. A clear coupling between the plasma edge parameters and those processes has been identified. Therefore, an important effort has been devoted to the development of dedicated diagnostics in both fields. Remarkable success has been attained in the development of atomic-beam based edge diagnostics, namely, thermal Li and supersonic He beams. In particular, fast (up to 200 Hz) sampling of temperature and density profiles has been made possible thorough an upgraded version of the pulsed, supersonic He beam diagnostic. In this paper, whorl devoted to the upgrading of these techniques is described. Also, preliminary experiments oriented to the validation of the collisional radiative models use din the beam-based diagnostic interpretaron as well as simulations of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) studies of level populations of electronically excited He atoms are shown. (Author) 17 refs.

  15. Adsorbed plasma proteins modulate the effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on neutrophils in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, Irina I; Mikhalchik, Elena V; Barinov, Nikolay A; Kostevich, Valeria A; Smolina, Natalia V; Klinov, Dmitry V; Sokolov, Alexey V

    2016-08-01

    Proteins adsorbed on a surface may affect the interaction of this surface with cells. Here, we studied the binding of human serum albumin (HSA), fibrinogen (FBG) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) to PEGylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (PEG-SWCNTs) and evaluated the impact of PEG-SWCNT treated by these proteins on neutrophils in whole blood samples. Measurements of adsorption parameters revealed tight binding of proteins to PEG-SWCNTs. AFM was employed to directly observe protein binding to sidewalls of PEG-SWCNTs. Fluorescein-labeled IgG was used to ascertain the stability of PEG-SWCNT-IgG complexes in plasma. In blood samples, all plasma proteins mitigated damage of neutrophils observed just after blood exposure to PEG-SWCNTs, while only treatment of PEG-SWCNTs with IgG resulted in dose- and time-dependent enhancement of CNT-induced neutrophil activation and in potentiation of oxidative stress. Our study demonstrates the ability of adsorbed plasma proteins to influence neutrophil response caused by PEG-SWCNTs in whole blood.

  16. Plasma facing components: a conceptual design strategy for the first wall in FAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labate, C.; Di Gironimo, G.; Renno, F.

    2015-09-01

    Satellite tokamaks are conceived with the main purpose of developing new or alternative ITER- and DEMO-relevant technologies, able to contribute in resolving the pending issues about plasma operation. In particular, a high criticality needs to be associated to the design of plasma facing components, i.e. first wall (FW) and divertor, due to physical, topological and thermo-structural reasons. In such a context, the design of the FW in FAST fusion plant, whose operational range is close to ITER’s one, takes place. According to the mission of experimental satellites, the FW design strategy, which is presented in this paper relies on a series of innovative design choices and proposals with a particular attention to the typical key points of plasma facing components design. Such an approach, taking into account a series of involved physical constraints and functional requirements to be fulfilled, marks a clear borderline with the FW solution adopted in ITER, in terms of basic ideas, manufacturing aspects, remote maintenance procedure, manifolds management, cooling cycle and support system configuration.

  17. Plasma-activated multi-walled carbon nanotube-polystyrene composite substrates for biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Sanchez, Cesar; Orozco, Jahir; Jimenez-Jorquera, Cecilia [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM (CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Pellicer, Eva; Lechuga, Laura M; Mendoza, Ernest, E-mail: cesar.fernandez@imb-cnm.csic.e [Nanobiosensors and Molecular Nanobiophysics Group, Research Center on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CIN2) CSIC-ICN, ETSE, Campus UAB-Edificio Q, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-08-19

    Carbon nanotube-polymer composites have shown to be suitable materials for the fabrication of electrochemical transducers. The exposed surface of these materials is commonly passivated by a very thin layer of the polymer component that buries the conductive carbon particles. Working with multi-walled carbon nanotube-polystyrene (MWCNT-PS) composite structures, it was previously described how a simple low power oxygen plasma process produced an effective etching of the composite surface, thereby exposing the conductive surface of CNTs. This work shows how this plasma process not only gave rise to a suitable composite conductive surface for electrochemical sensing but simultaneously exposed and created a high density of oxygen-containing functional groups at both the CNT and the PS components, without affecting the material's mechanical stability. These chemical groups could be effectively modified for the stable immobilization of biological receptors. A detailed chemical characterization of the plasma-activated composite surface was possible using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The material reactivity towards the tethering of a protein was studied and protein-protein interactions were then evaluated on the modified composite transducers by scanning electron microscopy. Finally, an amperometric immunosensor approach for the detection of rabbit Immunoglobulin G target analyte was described and a minimum concentration of 3 ng ml{sup -1} was easily measured.

  18. Plasma-wall interaction data needs critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-11-01

    The Division of Development and Technology has sponsored a four day US-Japan workshop ''Plasma-Wall Interaction Data Needs Critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)'', held at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California on June 24 to 27, 1985. The workshop, which brought together fifty scientists and engineers from the United States, Japan, Germany, and Canada, considered the plasma-material interaction and high heat flux (PMI/HHF) issues for the next generation of magnetic fusion energy devices, the Burning Core Experiment (BCX). Materials options were ranked, and a strategy for future PMI/HHF research was formulated. The foundation for international collaboration and coordination of this research was also established. This volume contains the last three of the five technical sessions. The first of the three is on plasma materials interaction issues, the second is on research facilities and the third is from smaller working group meetings on graphite, beryllium, advanced materials and future collaborations.

  19. Study of plasma-wall interactions in Tore-supra; Etude des phenomenes d'interaction plasma/paroi dans Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggieri, R

    2000-01-01

    In tokamaks the interaction between wall and plasma generates impurities that affect the thermonuclear fusion. This thesis is divided into 2 parts. The first part describes the physico-chemical processes that are involved in chemical erosion, the second part deals with the study of the wear of Tore-supra's walls due to chemical erosion. Chapter 1 presents the wall-plasma interaction and reviews the different processes between plasma and carbon that occur in Tore-supra. Chapter 2 considers the various crystallographic and electronic structures of the carbon that interferes with Tore-supra plasma, the evolution of these structures during irradiation and their temperature dependence are studied. Chapter 3 presents a crystallo-chemical study of graphite samples that have undergone different surface treatments: ionic bombardment, annealing and air exposure. This experimental study has been performed by using energy-loss spectroscopy. It is shown that air exposure modifies the crystallo-chemical structure of surfaces, so it is necessary to prevent air from contaminating wall samples from Tore-supra. Chapter 4 presents a parametric study of chemical erosion rate of plasma facing components (LPM) of Tore-supra. A relation such as Y{sub cd4}{alpha}{gamma}{sup -0.1} gives a good agreement for chemical erosion rate between measurements and the numerical values of the simulation. (A.C.)

  20. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  1. Theory and Numerical Simulation of Plasma-wall Interactions in Electric Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikellides, Ioannis

    2016-10-01

    Electric propulsion (EP) can be an enabling technology for many science missions considered by NASA because it can produce high exhaust velocities, which allow for less propellant mass compared to typical chemical systems. Over the last decade two EP technologies have emerged as primary candidates for several proposed science missions, mainly due to their superior performance and proven record in space flight: the Ion and Hall thrusters. As NASA looks ahead to increasingly ambitious science goals, missions demand higher endurance from the propulsion system. So, by contrast to the early years of development of these thrusters, when the focus was on performance, considerable focus today is shifting towards extending their service life. Considering all potentially life-limiting mechanisms in Ion and Hall thrusters two are of primary concern: (a) the erosion of the acceleration channel in Hall thrusters and (b) the erosion of the hollow cathode. The plasma physics leading to material wear in these devices are uniquely challenging. For example, soon after the propellant is introduced into the hollow cathode it becomes partially ionized as it traverses a region of electron emission. Electron emission involves highly non-linear boundary conditions. Also, the sheath size is typically many times smaller than the characteristic physical scale of the device, yet energy gained by ions through the sheath must be accounted for in the erosion calculations. The plasma-material interactions in Hall thruster channels pose similar challenges that are further exacerbated by the presence of a strong applied magnetic field. In this presentation several complexities associated with plasma-wall interactions in EP will be discussed and numerical simulation results of key plasma properties in two examples, Hall thrusters and hollow cathodes, will be presented.

  2. Plasma protein corona modulates the vascular wall interaction of drug carriers in a material and donor specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Sobczynski

    Full Text Available The nanoscale plasma protein interaction with intravenously injected particulate carrier systems is known to modulate their organ distribution and clearance from the bloodstream. However, the role of this plasma protein interaction in prescribing the adhesion of carriers to the vascular wall remains relatively unknown. Here, we show that the adhesion of vascular-targeted poly(lactide-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA spheres to endothelial cells is significantly inhibited in human blood flow, with up to 90% reduction in adhesion observed relative to adhesion in simple buffer flow, depending on the particle size and the magnitude and pattern of blood flow. This reduced PLGA adhesion in blood flow is linked to the adsorption of certain high molecular weight plasma proteins on PLGA and is donor specific, where large reductions in particle adhesion in blood flow (>80% relative to buffer is seen with ∼60% of unique donor bloods while others exhibit moderate to no reductions. The depletion of high molecular weight immunoglobulins from plasma is shown to successfully restore PLGA vascular wall adhesion. The observed plasma protein effect on PLGA is likely due to material characteristics since the effect is not replicated with polystyrene or silica spheres. These particles effectively adhere to the endothelium at a higher level in blood over buffer flow. Overall, understanding how distinct plasma proteins modulate the vascular wall interaction of vascular-targeted carriers of different material characteristics would allow for the design of highly functional delivery vehicles for the treatment of many serious human diseases.

  3. An Assessment of the Penetrations in the First Wall Required for Plasma Measurments for Control of an Advanced Tokamak Plasma Demo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth M. Young

    2010-02-22

    A Demonstration tokamak (Demo) is an essential next step toward a magnetic-fusion based reactor. One based on advanced-tokamak (AT) plasmas is especially appealing because of its relative compactness. However, it will require many plasma measurements to provide the necessary signals to feed to ancillary systems to protect the device and control the plasma. This note addresses the question of how much intrusion into the blanket system will be required to allow the measurements needed to provide the information required for plasma control. All diagnostics will require, at least, the same shielding designs as planned for ITER, while having the capability to maintain their calibration through very long pulses. Much work is required to define better the measurement needs and the quantity and quality of the measurements that will have to be made, and how they can be integrated into the other tokamak structures.

  4. Growth of Ag nanoparticles using plasma-modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chun-Hao; Chen, Chuh-Yung

    2008-01-23

    This study presents a novel method for preparing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) grafted with a poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (HEMA)-silver complex (CNTs-HEMA-Ag complex) through plasma-induced grafting polymerization. The characteristics of the MWNTs after being grafted with HEMA polymer are monitored by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The chelating groups in the HEMA polymer grafted on the surface of the CNTs-HEMA are the coordination sites for chelating silver ions, and are further used as nanotemplates for the growing of Ag nanoparticles (quantum dots). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the particle size of Ag nanoparticles on the CNT surfaces increases with the Ag(+) chelating concentration, reaction time, and reaction temperature. Moreover, the crystalline phase of Ag nanoparticles is identified by using x-ray diffraction (XRD). In addition, high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to characterize the functional groups on the surface of the MWNTs after chemical modification through plasma treatment; it demonstrates that the growing amount of the Ag nanoparticles on the nanotubes increases with the Ag(+) chelating concentration due to the blocking effect of the Ag particles forming on the MWNTs.

  5. Rapid Changes in Plasma Membrane Protein Phosphorylation during Initiation of Cell Wall Digestion 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blowers, David P.; Boss, Wendy F.; Trewavas, Anthony J.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles from wild carrot cells grown in suspension culture were isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning, and ATP-dependent phosphorylation was measured with [γ-32P]ATP in the presence and absence of calcium. Treatment of the carrot cells with the cell wall digestion enzymes, driselase, in a sorbitol osmoticum for 1.5 min altered the protein phosphorylation pattern compared to that of cells treated with sorbitol alone. Driselase treatment resulted in decreased phosphorylation of a band of Mr 80,000 which showed almost complete calcium dependence in the osmoticum treated cells; decreased phosphorylation of a band of Mr 15,000 which showed little calcium activation, and appearance of a new band of calcium-dependent phosphorylation at Mr 22,000. These effects appeared not to be due to nonspecific protease activity and neither in vivo nor in vitro exposure to driselase caused a significant loss of Coomassie blue-staining bands on the gels of the isolated plasma membranes. However, protein phosphorylation was decreased. Adding driselase to the in vitro reaction mixture caused a general decrease in the membrane protein phosphorylation either in the presence or absence of calcium which did not mimic the in vivo response. Cells labeled in vivo with inorganic 32P also showed a response to the Driselase treatment. An enzymically active driselase preparation was required for the observed responses. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16665936

  6. Rapid Changes in Plasma Membrane Protein Phosphorylation during Initiation of Cell Wall Digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blowers, D P; Boss, W F; Trewavas, A J

    1988-02-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles from wild carrot cells grown in suspension culture were isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning, and ATP-dependent phosphorylation was measured with [gamma-(32)P]ATP in the presence and absence of calcium. Treatment of the carrot cells with the cell wall digestion enzymes, driselase, in a sorbitol osmoticum for 1.5 min altered the protein phosphorylation pattern compared to that of cells treated with sorbitol alone. Driselase treatment resulted in decreased phosphorylation of a band of M(r) 80,000 which showed almost complete calcium dependence in the osmoticum treated cells; decreased phosphorylation of a band of M(r) 15,000 which showed little calcium activation, and appearance of a new band of calcium-dependent phosphorylation at M(r) 22,000. These effects appeared not to be due to nonspecific protease activity and neither in vivo nor in vitro exposure to driselase caused a significant loss of Coomassie blue-staining bands on the gels of the isolated plasma membranes. However, protein phosphorylation was decreased. Adding driselase to the in vitro reaction mixture caused a general decrease in the membrane protein phosphorylation either in the presence or absence of calcium which did not mimic the in vivo response. Cells labeled in vivo with inorganic (32)P also showed a response to the Driselase treatment. An enzymically active driselase preparation was required for the observed responses.

  7. Plasma Wall Interaction Phenomena on Tungsten Armour Materials for Fusion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uytdenhouwen, I. [SCK.CEN - The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM-association, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Massaut, V. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Linke, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM-association, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Van Oost, G. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-07-01

    One of the most attractive future complements to present energy sources is nuclear fusion. A large progress was made throughout the last decade from both the physical as the technological area leading to the construction of the ITER machine. One of the key issues that recently received a large interest at international level is focused on the Plasma Wall Interaction (PWI). One of the promising Plasma Facing Materials (PFM) are Tungsten (W) and Tungsten alloys. However, despite the worldwide use and industrial availability of W, the database of physical and mechanical properties is very limited. Especially after fusion relevant neutron irradiation and PWI phenomena, most of the properties are still unknown. The plasma fuel consists out of deuterium (D) and tritium (T). Tritium is radio-active and therefore an issue from the safety point of view. During steady-state plasma operation of future fusion power plants, the PFM need to extract a power density of {approx}10-20 MW/m{sup 2}. On top of this heat, transient events will deposit an additional non-negligible amount of energy (Disruptions, Vertical Displacement Events, Edge Localized Modes) during short durations. These severe heat loads cause cracking and even melting of the surface resulting in a reduced lifetime and the creation of dust. A contribution to the understanding of cracking phenomena under the severe thermal loads is described as well as the properties degradation under neutron irradiation. Several W grades were irradiated in the BR2 reactor (SCK.CEN) and the thermal loads were simulated with the electron-beam facility JUDITH (FZJ). Since knowledge should be gained about the Tritium retention in the PFM for safety and licensing reasons, a unique test facility at SCK.CEN is being set-up. The plasmatron VISION-I will simulate steady state plasmas for Tritium retention studies. The formation of surface cracks and dust, the initial porosity, neutron induced traps, re-deposited material - change the Tritium

  8. Compact, accurate description of diagnostic neutral beam propagation and attenuation in a high temperature plasma for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespamyatnov, Igor O; Rowan, William L; Granetz, Robert S

    2008-10-01

    Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on Alcator C-Mod relies on the use of the diagnostic neutral beam injector as a source of neutral particles which penetrate deep into the plasma. It employs the emission resulting from the interaction of the beam atoms with fully ionized impurity ions. To interpret the emission from a given point in the plasma as the density of emitting impurity ions, the density of beam atoms must be known. Here, an analysis of beam propagation is described which yields the beam density profile throughout the beam trajectory from the neutral beam injector to the core of the plasma. The analysis includes the effects of beam formation, attenuation in the neutral gas surrounding the plasma, and attenuation in the plasma. In the course of this work, a numerical simulation and an analytical approximation for beam divergence are developed. The description is made sufficiently compact to yield accurate results in a time consistent with between-shot analysis.

  9. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Marder, B.M. [and others

    1996-03-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays, driven by 5 MA from the Saturn accelerator, are measured and compared with LLNL Radiation-Hydro-Code (RHC) and SNL Hydro-Code (HC) numerical models. Multiple implosions, due to sequential compressions and expansions of the plasma, are inferred from the measured multiple x-radiation bursts. Timing of the multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra measured between 1 and 10 keV are consistent with the RHC simulations. The magnitude of the nonthermal x-ray emission measured from 10 to 100 keV ranges from 0.02 to 0.08% of the total energy radiated and is correlated with bright-spot emission along the z-axis, as observed in earlier Gamble-11 single exploding-wire experiments. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum and bright-spot emission with those measured at 0.8 MA on Gamble-II suggest a common production mechanism for this process. A model of electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas is developed, which shows the existence of a critical electric field, E{sub c}, below which strong nonthermal electron creation (and the associated nonthermal x rays) do not occur. HC simulations show that significant nonthermal electrons are not expected in this experiment (as observed) because the calculated electric fields are at least one to two orders-of-magnitude below E{sub c}. These negative nonthermal results are confirmed by RHC simulations using a nonthermal model based on a Fokker-Plank analysis. Lastly, the lower production efficiency and the larger, more irregular pinch spots formed in this experiment relative to those measured on Gamble II suggest that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single exploding-wire geometries for warm x-ray production.

  10. Coupled core-SOL modelling of W contamination in H-mode JET plasmas with ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parail, V., E-mail: Vassili.parail@ccfe.ac.uk [CCFE Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Corrigan, G.; Da Silva Aresta Belo, P. [CCFE Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); De La Luna, E. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, Madrid (Spain); Harting, D. [CCFE Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Koechl, F. [Atominstitut, TU Wien, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Koskela, T. [Aalto University, Department of Applied Physics, P.O. Box 14100, FIN-00076 Aalto (Finland); Meigs, A.; Militello-Asp, E.; Romanelli, M. [CCFE Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Tsalas, M. [FOM Institute DIFFER, P.O. Box 1207, NL-3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    The influence of the ITER-like Wall (ILW) with divertor target plate made of tungsten (W), on plasma performance in JET H-mode is being investigated since 2011 (see F. Romanelli and references therein). One of the key issues in discharges with low level of D fuelling is observed accumulation of W in the plasma core, which leads to a reduction in plasma performance. To study the interplay between W sputtering on the target plate, penetration of W through the SOL and edge transport barrier (ETB) and its further accumulation in plasma core predictive modelling was launched using a coupled 1.5D core and 2D SOL code JINTRAC (Romanelli, 2014; Cenacchi and Taroni, 1988; Taroni et al., 1992; Wiesen et al., 2006). Simulations reveal the important role of ELMs in W sputtering and plasma density control. Analyses also confirm pivotal role played by the neo-classical pinch of heavy impurities within the ETB.

  11. Extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray imaging with compact, table top laser plasma EUV and SXR sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachulak, P. W.; Bartnik, A.; Kostecki, J.; Wegrzynski, L.; Fok, T.; Jarocki, R.; Szczurek, M.; Fiedorowicz, H.

    2015-12-01

    We present a few examples of imaging experiments, which were possible using a compact laser-plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray (SXR) source, based on a double stream gas puff target. This debris-free source was used in full-field EUV imaging to obtain magnified images of test samples, ZnO nanofibers and images of the membranes coated with salt crystals. The source was also employed for SXR microscopy in the "water-window" spectral range using grazing incidence Wolter type-I objective to image test samples and to perform the initial studies of biological objects. Gas puff target EUV source, spectrally tuned for 13.5 nm wavelength with multilayer mirror and thin film filters, was also used in variety of shadowgraphy experiments to study the density of newly developed modulated density gas puff targets. Finally, the source was also employed in EUV tomography experiments of low density objects with the goal to measure and optimize the density of the targets dedicated to high harmonic generation.

  12. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adjei, Daniel, E-mail: nana.adjeidan@gmail.com [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, 2, Kaliskiego Str., 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Radiation Protection Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG 80, Legon, Accra (Ghana); Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, 2, Kaliskiego Str., 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Vyšín, Luděk [Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Engineering Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Břehová 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 152, Radzikowskiego Str., 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Pina, Ladislav [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Engineering Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Břehová 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Davídková, Marie [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Řež (Czech Republic); Juha, Libor [Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray “water window” spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280–540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 10{sup 3} photons/μm{sup 2}/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms’ sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the “water window”, where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET – Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  13. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei, Daniel; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Vyšín, Luděk; Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Pina, Ladislav; Davídková, Marie; Juha, Libor

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray "water window" spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280-540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 103 photons/μm2/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms' sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the "water window", where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET - Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  14. Overview of progress in European medium sized tokamaks towards an integrated plasma-edge/wall solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, H.; Eich, T.; Beurskens, M.; Coda, S.; Hakola, A.; Martin, P.; Adamek, J.; Agostini, M.; Aguiam, D.; Ahn, J.; Aho-Mantila, L.; Akers, R.; Albanese, R.; Aledda, R.; Alessi, E.; Allan, S.; Alves, D.; Ambrosino, R.; Amicucci, L.; Anand, H.; Anastassiou, G.; Andrèbe, Y.; Angioni, C.; Apruzzese, G.; Ariola, M.; Arnichand, H.; Arter, W.; Baciero, A.; Barnes, M.; Barrera, L.; Behn, R.; Bencze, A.; Bernardo, J.; Bernert, M.; Bettini, P.; Bilková, P.; Bin, W.; Birkenmeier, G.; Bizarro, J. P. S.; Blanchard, P.; Blanken, T.; Bluteau, M.; Bobkov, V.; Bogar, O.; Böhm, P.; Bolzonella, T.; Boncagni, L.; Botrugno, A.; Bottereau, C.; Bouquey, F.; Bourdelle, C.; Brémond, S.; Brezinsek, S.; Brida, D.; Brochard, F.; Buchanan, J.; Bufferand, H.; Buratti, P.; Cahyna, P.; Calabrò, G.; Camenen, Y.; Caniello, R.; Cannas, B.; Canton, A.; Cardinali, A.; Carnevale, D.; Carr, M.; Carralero, D.; Carvalho, P.; Casali, L.; Castaldo, C.; Castejón, F.; Castro, R.; Causa, F.; Cavazzana, R.; Cavedon, M.; Cecconello, M.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Cesario, R.; Challis, C. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Chapman, S.; Chernyshova, M.; Choi, D.; Cianfarani, C.; Ciraolo, G.; Citrin, J.; Clairet, F.; Classen, I.; Coelho, R.; Coenen, J. W.; Colas, L.; Conway, G.; Corre, Y.; Costea, S.; Crisanti, F.; Cruz, N.; Cseh, G.; Czarnecka, A.; D'Arcangelo, O.; De Angeli, M.; De Masi, G.; De Temmerman, G.; De Tommasi, G.; Decker, J.; Delogu, R. S.; Dendy, R.; Denner, P.; Di Troia, C.; Dimitrova, M.; D'Inca, R.; Dorić, V.; Douai, D.; Drenik, A.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Dunne, M.; Duval, B. P.; Easy, L.; Elmore, S.; Erdös, B.; Esposito, B.; Fable, E.; Faitsch, M.; Fanni, A.; Fedorczak, N.; Felici, F.; Ferreira, J.; Février, O.; Ficker, O.; Fietz, S.; Figini, L.; Figueiredo, A.; Fil, A.; Fishpool, G.; Fitzgerald, M.; Fontana, M.; Ford, O.; Frassinetti, L.; Fridström, R.; Frigione, D.; Fuchert, G.; Fuchs, C.; Furno Palumbo, M.; Futatani, S.; Gabellieri, L.; Gałązka, K.; Galdon-Quiroga, J.; Galeani, S.; Gallart, D.; Gallo, A.; Galperti, C.; Gao, Y.; Garavaglia, S.; Garcia, J.; Garcia-Carrasco, A.; Garcia-Lopez, J.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Gardarein, J.-L.; Garzotti, L.; Gaspar, J.; Gauthier, E.; Geelen, P.; Geiger, B.; Ghendrih, P.; Ghezzi, F.; Giacomelli, L.; Giannone, L.; Giovannozzi, E.; Giroud, C.; Gleason González, C.; Gobbin, M.; Goodman, T. P.; Gorini, G.; Gospodarczyk, M.; Granucci, G.; Gruber, M.; Gude, A.; Guimarais, L.; Guirlet, R.; Gunn, J.; Hacek, P.; Hacquin, S.; Hall, S.; Ham, C.; Happel, T.; Harrison, J.; Harting, D.; Hauer, V.; Havlickova, E.; Hellsten, T.; Helou, W.; Henderson, S.; Hennequin, P.; Heyn, M.; Hnat, B.; Hölzl, M.; Hogeweij, D.; Honoré, C.; Hopf, C.; Horáček, J.; Hornung, G.; Horváth, L.; Huang, Z.; Huber, A.; Igitkhanov, J.; Igochine, V.; Imrisek, M.; Innocente, P.; Ionita-Schrittwieser, C.; Isliker, H.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Jacquet, P.; Jakubowski, M.; Jardin, A.; Jaulmes, F.; Jenko, F.; Jensen, T.; Jeppe Miki Busk, O.; Jessen, M.; Joffrin, E.; Jones, O.; Jonsson, T.; Kallenbach, A.; Kallinikos, N.; Kálvin, S.; Kappatou, A.; Karhunen, J.; Karpushov, A.; Kasilov, S.; Kasprowicz, G.; Kendl, A.; Kernbichler, W.; Kim, D.; Kirk, A.; Kjer, S.; Klimek, I.; Kocsis, G.; Kogut, D.; Komm, M.; Korsholm, S. B.; Koslowski, H. R.; Koubiti, M.; Kovacic, J.; Kovarik, K.; Krawczyk, N.; Krbec, J.; Krieger, K.; Krivska, A.; Kube, R.; Kudlacek, O.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Labit, B.; Laggner, F. M.; Laguardia, L.; Lahtinen, A.; Lalousis, P.; Lang, P.; Lauber, P.; Lazányi, N.; Lazaros, A.; Le, H. B.; Lebschy, A.; Leddy, J.; Lefévre, L.; Lehnen, M.; Leipold, F.; Lessig, A.; Leyland, M.; Li, L.; Liang, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Liu, Y. Q.; Loarer, T.; Loarte, A.; Loewenhoff, T.; Lomanowski, B.; Loschiavo, V. P.; Lunt, T.; Lupelli, I.; Lux, H.; Lyssoivan, A.; Madsen, J.; Maget, P.; Maggi, C.; Maggiora, R.; Magnussen, M. L.; Mailloux, J.; Maljaars, B.; Malygin, A.; Mantica, P.; Mantsinen, M.; Maraschek, M.; Marchand, B.; Marconato, N.; Marini, C.; Marinucci, M.; Markovic, T.; Marocco, D.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, Y.; Solis, J. R. Martin; Martitsch, A.; Mastrostefano, S.; Mattei, M.; Matthews, G.; Mavridis, M.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Mazon, D.; McCarthy, P.; McAdams, R.; McArdle, G.; McCarthy, P.; McClements, K.; McDermott, R.; McMillan, B.; Meisl, G.; Merle, A.; Meyer, O.; Milanesio, D.; Militello, F.; Miron, I. G.; Mitosinkova, K.; Mlynar, J.; Mlynek, A.; Molina, D.; Molina, P.; Monakhov, I.; Morales, J.; Moreau, D.; Morel, P.; Moret, J.-M.; Moro, A.; Moulton, D.; Müller, H. W.; Nabais, F.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Nemes-Czopf, A.; Nespoli, F.; Neu, R.; Nielsen, A. H.; Nielsen, S. K.; Nikolaeva, V.; Nimb, S.; Nocente, M.; Nouailletas, R.; Nowak, S.; Oberkofler, M.; Oberparleiter, M.; Ochoukov, R.; Odstrčil, T.; Olsen, J.; Omotani, J.; O'Mullane, M. G.; Orain, F.; Osterman, N.; Paccagnella, R.; Pamela, S.; Pangione, L.; Panjan, M.; Papp, G.; Papřok, R.; Parail, V.; Parra, F. I.; Pau, A.; Pautasso, G.; Pehkonen, S.-P.; Pereira, A.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Pericoli Ridolfini, V.; Peterka, M.; Petersson, P.; Petrzilka, V.; Piovesan, P.; Piron, C.; Pironti, A.; Pisano, F.; Pisokas, T.; Pitts, R.; Ploumistakis, I.; Plyusnin, V.; Pokol, G.; Poljak, D.; Pölöskei, P.; Popovic, Z.; Pór, G.; Porte, L.; Potzel, S.; Predebon, I.; Preynas, M.; Primc, G.; Pucella, G.; Puiatti, M. E.; Pütterich, T.; Rack, M.; Ramogida, G.; Rapson, C.; Rasmussen, J. Juul; Rasmussen, J.; Rattá, G. A.; Ratynskaia, S.; Ravera, G.; Réfy, D.; Reich, M.; Reimerdes, H.; Reimold, F.; Reinke, M.; Reiser, D.; Resnik, M.; Reux, C.; Ripamonti, D.; Rittich, D.; Riva, G.; Rodriguez-Ramos, M.; Rohde, V.; Rosato, J.; Ryter, F.; Saarelma, S.; Sabot, R.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Salewski, M.; Salmi, A.; Samaddar, D.; Sanchis-Sanchez, L.; Santos, J.; Sauter, O.; Scannell, R.; Scheffer, M.; Schneider, M.; Schneider, B.; Schneider, P.; Schneller, M.; Schrittwieser, R.; Schubert, M.; Schweinzer, J.; Seidl, J.; Sertoli, M.; Šesnić, S.; Shabbir, A.; Shalpegin, A.; Shanahan, B.; Sharapov, S.; Sheikh, U.; Sias, G.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, C.; Silva, A.; Silva Fuglister, M.; Simpson, J.; Snicker, A.; Sommariva, C.; Sozzi, C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spizzo, G.; Spolaore, M.; Stange, T.; Stejner Pedersen, M.; Stepanov, I.; Stober, J.; Strand, P.; Šušnjara, A.; Suttrop, W.; Szepesi, T.; Tál, B.; Tala, T.; Tamain, P.; Tardini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Teplukhina, A.; Terranova, D.; Testa, D.; Theiler, C.; Thornton, A.; Tolias, P.; Tophøj, L.; Treutterer, W.; Trevisan, G. L.; Tripsky, M.; Tsironis, C.; Tsui, C.; Tudisco, O.; Uccello, A.; Urban, J.; Valisa, M.; Vallejos, P.; Valovic, M.; Van den Brand, H.; Vanovac, B.; Varoutis, S.; Vartanian, S.; Vega, J.; Verdoolaege, G.; Verhaegh, K.; Vermare, L.; Vianello, N.; Vicente, J.; Viezzer, E.; Vignitchouk, L.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; Villone, F.; Viola, B.; Vlahos, L.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Vondráček, P.; Vu, N. M. T.; Wagner, D.; Walkden, N.; Wang, N.; Wauters, T.; Weiland, M.; Weinzettl, V.; Westerhof, E.; Wiesenberger, M.; Willensdorfer, M.; Wischmeier, M.; Wodniak, I.; Wolfrum, E.; Yadykin, D.; Zagórski, R.; Zammuto, I.; Zanca, P.; Zaplotnik, R.; Zestanakis, P.; Zhang, W.; Zoletnik, S.; Zuin, M.; ASDEX Upgrade, the; MAST; TCV Teams

    2017-10-01

    Integrating the plasma core performance with an edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) that leads to tolerable heat and particle loads on the wall is a major challenge. The new European medium size tokamak task force (EU-MST) coordinates research on ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), MAST and TCV. This multi-machine approach within EU-MST, covering a wide parameter range, is instrumental to progress in the field, as ITER and DEMO core/pedestal and SOL parameters are not achievable simultaneously in present day devices. A two prong approach is adopted. On the one hand, scenarios with tolerable transient heat and particle loads, including active edge localised mode (ELM) control are developed. On the other hand, divertor solutions including advanced magnetic configurations are studied. Considerable progress has been made on both approaches, in particular in the fields of: ELM control with resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP), small ELM regimes, detachment onset and control, as well as filamentary scrape-off-layer transport. For example full ELM suppression has now been achieved on AUG at low collisionality with n  =  2 RMP maintaining good confinement {{H}\\text{H≤ft(98,\\text{y}2\\right)}}≈ 0.95 . Advances have been made with respect to detachment onset and control. Studies in advanced divertor configurations (Snowflake, Super-X and X-point target divertor) shed new light on SOL physics. Cross field filamentary transport has been characterised in a wide parameter regime on AUG, MAST and TCV progressing the theoretical and experimental understanding crucial for predicting first wall loads in ITER and DEMO. Conditions in the SOL also play a crucial role for ELM stability and access to small ELM regimes. In the future we will refer to the author list of the paper as the EUROfusion MST1 Team.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic instability excited by interplay between a resistive wall mode and stable ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes in rotating tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiba, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Hirota, M. [Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    In a rotating toroidal plasma surrounded by a resistive wall, it is shown that linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities can be excited by interplay between the resistive wall mode (RWM) and stable ideal MHD modes, where the RWM can couple with not only a stable external kink mode but also various stable Alfvén eigenmodes that abound in a toroidal plasma. The RWM growth rate is shown to peak repeatedly as the rotation frequency reaches specific values for which the frequencies of the ideal MHD modes are Doppler-shifted to the small RWM frequency. Such destabilization can be observed even when the RWM in a static plasma is stable. A dispersion relation clarifies that the unstable mode changes from the RWM to the ideal MHD mode destabilized by wall resistivity when the rotation frequency passes through these specific values. The unstable mode is excited at these rotation frequencies even though plasma rotation also tends to stabilize the RWM from the combination of the continuum damping and the ion Landau damping.

  16. Rapid changes in plasma membrane protein phosphorylation during initiation of cell wall digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blowers, D.P.; Boss, W.F.; Trewavas, A.J. (Univ. of Edinburgh (England))

    1988-02-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles from wild carrot cells grown in suspension culture were isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning, and ATP-dependent phosphorylation was measured with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in the presence and absence of calcium. Treatment of the carrot cells with the cell wall digestion enzymes, driselase, in a sorbitol osmoticum for 1.5 min altered the protein phosphorylation pattern compared to that of cells treated with sorbitol alone. Driselase treatment resulted in decreased phosphorylation of a band of M{sub r} 80,000 which showed almost complete calcium dependence in the osmoticum treated cells; decreased phosphorylation of a band of M{sub r} 15,000 which showed little calcium activation, and appearance of a new band of calcium-dependent phosphorylation at M{sub r} 22,000. However, protein phosphorylation was decreased. Adding driselase to the in vitro reaction mixture caused a general decrease in the membrane protein phosphorylation either in the presence or absence of calcium which did not mimic the in vivo response. Cells labeled in vivo with inorganic {sup 32}P also showed a response to the Driselase treatment. An enzymically active driselas preparation was required for the observed responses.

  17. Development of a compact thermal lithium atom beam source for measurements of electron velocity distribution function anisotropy in electron cyclotron resonance plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, T; Shikama, T; Nagamizo, S; Fujii, K; Zushi, H; Uchida, M; Iwamae, A; Tanaka, H; Maekawa, T; Hasuo, M

    2013-07-01

    The anisotropy of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) in plasmas can be deduced from the polarization of emissions induced by anisotropic electron-impact excitation. In this paper, we develop a compact thermal lithium atom beam source for spatially resolved measurements of the EVDF anisotropy in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas. The beam system is designed such that the ejected beam has a slab shape, and the beam direction is variable. The divergence and flux of the beam are evaluated by experiments and calculations. The developed beam system is installed in an ECR plasma device with a cusp magnetic field, and the LiI 2s-2p emission (670.8 nm) is observed in low-pressure helium plasma. The two-dimensional distributions of the degree and direction of the polarization in the LiI emission are measured by a polarization imaging system. The evaluated polarization distribution suggests the spatial variation of the EVDF anisotropy.

  18. Towards highly stable aqueous dispersions of multi-walled carbon nanotubes: the effect of oxygen plasma functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzia Trulli, Marta; Sardella, Eloisa; Palumbo, Fabio; Palazzo, Gerardo; Giannossa, Lorena Carla; Mangone, Annarosa; Comparelli, Roberto; Musso, Simone; Favia, Pietro

    2017-04-01

    In order to improve the dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in aqueous media, their surface functionalization was carried out in O2-fed low-pressure plasmas. Differently from what can be found in the literature of this field, homogeneous functionalization was achieved by generating the plasma inside vials containing the nanotube powders properly stirred. Experimental parameters, such as input power, treatment time and pressure, were varied to investigate their influence on the process efficiency. A detailed characterization of the plasma treated nanotubes, dry and in aqueous suspension, was carried out with a multi-diagnostic analytical approach, to evaluate their surface chemical properties, morphology, structural integrity and stability in the colloidal state. The plasma grafting of polar ionizable (e.g. acid) groups has been proved to successfully limit the agglomeration of MWCNTs and to produce nanotubes suspensions that are stable for one month and more in water.

  19. Design of a portable optical emission tomography system for microwave induced compact plasma for visible to near-infrared emission lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Kavita; Munshi, Prabhat; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2016-03-01

    A new non-invasive diagnostic system is developed for Microwave Induced Plasma (MIP) to reconstruct tomographic images of a 2D emission profile. A compact MIP system has wide application in industry as well as research application such as thrusters for space propulsion, high current ion beams, and creation of negative ions for heating of fusion plasma. Emission profile depends on two crucial parameters, namely, the electron temperature and density (over the entire spatial extent) of the plasma system. Emission tomography provides basic understanding of plasmas and it is very useful to monitor internal structure of plasma phenomena without disturbing its actual processes. This paper presents development of a compact, modular, and versatile Optical Emission Tomography (OET) tool for a cylindrical, magnetically confined MIP system. It has eight slit-hole cameras and each consisting of a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor linear image sensor for light detection. The optical noise is reduced by using aspheric lens and interference band-pass filters in each camera. The entire cylindrical plasma can be scanned with automated sliding ring mechanism arranged in fan-beam data collection geometry. The design of the camera includes a unique possibility to incorporate different filters to get the particular wavelength light from the plasma. This OET system includes selected band-pass filters for particular argon emission 750 nm, 772 nm, and 811 nm lines and hydrogen emission Hα (656 nm) and Hβ (486 nm) lines. Convolution back projection algorithm is used to obtain the tomographic images of plasma emission line. The paper mainly focuses on (a) design of OET system in detail and (b) study of emission profile for 750 nm argon emission lines to validate the system design.

  20. Comparative analysis of core heat transport of JET high density H-mode plasmas in carbon wall and ITER-like wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Tae; Romanelli, M.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Koskela, T.; Conboy, J.; Giroud, C.; Maddison, G.; Joffrin, E.; contributors, JET

    2015-06-01

    A consistent deterioration of global confinement in H-mode experiments has been observed in JET [1] following the replacement of all carbon plasma facing components (PFCs) with an all metal (‘ITER-like’) wall (ILW). This has been correlated to the observed degradation of the pedestal confinement, as lower electron temperature (Te) values are routinely measured at the top of the edge barrier region. A comparative investigation of core heat transport in JET-ILW and JET-CW (carbon wall) discharges has been performed, to assess whether core confinement has also been affected by the wall change. The results presented here have been obtained by analysing a set of discharges consisting of high density JET-ILW H-mode plasmas and comparing them against their counterpart discharges in JET-CW having similar global operational parameters. The set contains 10 baseline ({βN}=1.5∼ 2 ) discharge-pairs with 2.7 T toroidal magnetic field, 2.5 MA plasma current, and 14 to 17 MW of neutral beam injection (NBI) heating. Based on a Te profile analysis using high resolution Thomson scattering (HRTS) data, the Te profile peaking (i.e. core Te (ρ = 0.3) / edge Te (ρ = 0.7)) is found to be similar, and weakly dependent on edge Te, for both JET-ILW and JET-CW discharges. When ILW discharges are seeded with N2, core and edge Te both increase to maintain a similar peaking factor. The change in core confinement is addressed with interpretative TRANSP simulations. It is found that JET-ILW H-mode plasmas have higher NBI power deposition to electrons and lower NBI power deposition to ions as compared to the JET-CW counterparts. This is an effect of the lower electron temperature at the top of the pedestal. As a result, the core electron energy confinement time is reduced in JET-ILW discharges, but the core ion energy confinement time is not decreased. Overall, the core energy confinement is found to be the same in the JET-ILW discharges compared to the JET-CW counterparts.

  1. Lectin receptor kinases participate in protein-protein interactions to mediate plasma membrane-cell wall adhesions in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouget, Anne; Senchou, Virginie; Govers, Francine; Sanson, Arnaud; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Canut, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are disrupted by the RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) tripeptide sequence, a characteristic cell adhesion motif in mammals. In planta induced-O (IPI-O) is an RGD-containing protein from the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans that can disrupt cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions through its RGD motif. To identify peptide sequences that specifically bind the RGD motif of the IPI-O protein and potentially play a role in receptor recognition, we screened a heptamer peptide library displayed in a filamentous phage and selected two peptides acting as inhibitors of the plasma membrane RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis. Moreover, the two peptides also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions. Sequence comparison of the RGD-binding peptides with the Arabidopsis proteome revealed 12 proteins containing amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains common with the two RGD-binding peptides. Eight belong to the receptor-like kinase family, four of which have a lectin-like extracellular domain. The lectin domain of one of these, At5g60300, recognized the RGD motif both in peptides and proteins. These results imply that lectin receptor kinases are involved in protein-protein interactions with RGD-containing proteins as potential ligands, and play a structural and signaling role at the plant cell surfaces.

  2. Lectin Receptor Kinases Participate in Protein-Protein Interactions to Mediate Plasma Membrane-Cell Wall Adhesions in Arabidopsis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouget, Anne; Senchou, Virginie; Govers, Francine; Sanson, Arnaud; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Canut, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are disrupted by the RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) tripeptide sequence, a characteristic cell adhesion motif in mammals. In planta induced-O (IPI-O) is an RGD-containing protein from the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans that can disrupt cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions through its RGD motif. To identify peptide sequences that specifically bind the RGD motif of the IPI-O protein and potentially play a role in receptor recognition, we screened a heptamer peptide library displayed in a filamentous phage and selected two peptides acting as inhibitors of the plasma membrane RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis. Moreover, the two peptides also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions. Sequence comparison of the RGD-binding peptides with the Arabidopsis proteome revealed 12 proteins containing amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains common with the two RGD-binding peptides. Eight belong to the receptor-like kinase family, four of which have a lectin-like extracellular domain. The lectin domain of one of these, At5g60300, recognized the RGD motif both in peptides and proteins. These results imply that lectin receptor kinases are involved in protein-protein interactions with RGD-containing proteins as potential ligands, and play a structural and signaling role at the plant cell surfaces. PMID:16361528

  3. Gamma-ray spectroscopy at MHz counting rates with a compact LaBr{sub 3} detector and silicon photomultipliers for fusion plasma applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocente, M., E-mail: massimo.nocente@mib.infn.it [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “Piero Caldirola,” Milano (Italy); Rigamonti, D.; Croci, G.; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “Piero Caldirola,” Milano (Italy); Perseo, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Tardocchi, M.; Cremona, A.; Muraro, A. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “Piero Caldirola,” Milano (Italy); Boltruczyk, G.; Broslawski, A.; Gosk, M.; Korolczuk, S.; Zychor, I. [Narodowe Centrum Badan Jadrowych (NCBJ), Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Kiptily, V. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham (United Kingdom); Mazzocco, M.; Strano, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy); Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at MHz counting rates have been carried out, for the first time, with a compact spectrometer based on a LaBr{sub 3} scintillator and silicon photomultipliers. The instrument, which is also insensitive to magnetic fields, has been developed in view of the upgrade of the gamma-ray camera diagnostic for α particle measurements in deuterium-tritium plasmas of the Joint European Torus. Spectra were measured up to 2.9 MHz with a projected energy resolution of 3%-4% in the 3-5 MeV range, of interest for fast ion physics studies in fusion plasmas. The results reported here pave the way to first time measurements of the confined α particle profile in high power plasmas of the next deuterium-tritium campaign at the Joint European Torus.

  4. Gamma-ray spectroscopy at MHz counting rates with a compact LaBr3 detector and silicon photomultipliers for fusion plasma applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocente, M; Rigamonti, D; Perseo, V; Tardocchi, M; Boltruczyk, G; Broslawski, A; Cremona, A; Croci, G; Gosk, M; Kiptily, V; Korolczuk, S; Mazzocco, M; Muraro, A; Strano, E; Zychor, I; Gorini, G

    2016-11-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at MHz counting rates have been carried out, for the first time, with a compact spectrometer based on a LaBr3 scintillator and silicon photomultipliers. The instrument, which is also insensitive to magnetic fields, has been developed in view of the upgrade of the gamma-ray camera diagnostic for α particle measurements in deuterium-tritium plasmas of the Joint European Torus. Spectra were measured up to 2.9 MHz with a projected energy resolution of 3%-4% in the 3-5 MeV range, of interest for fast ion physics studies in fusion plasmas. The results reported here pave the way to first time measurements of the confined α particle profile in high power plasmas of the next deuterium-tritium campaign at the Joint European Torus.

  5. Gamma-ray spectroscopy at MHz counting rates with a compact LaBr3 detector and silicon photomultipliers for fusion plasma applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocente, M.; Rigamonti, D.; Perseo, V.; Tardocchi, M.; Boltruczyk, G.; Broslawski, A.; Cremona, A.; Croci, G.; Gosk, M.; Kiptily, V.; Korolczuk, S.; Mazzocco, M.; Muraro, A.; Strano, E.; Zychor, I.; Gorini, G.

    2016-11-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at MHz counting rates have been carried out, for the first time, with a compact spectrometer based on a LaBr3 scintillator and silicon photomultipliers. The instrument, which is also insensitive to magnetic fields, has been developed in view of the upgrade of the gamma-ray camera diagnostic for α particle measurements in deuterium-tritium plasmas of the Joint European Torus. Spectra were measured up to 2.9 MHz with a projected energy resolution of 3%-4% in the 3-5 MeV range, of interest for fast ion physics studies in fusion plasmas. The results reported here pave the way to first time measurements of the confined α particle profile in high power plasmas of the next deuterium-tritium campaign at the Joint European Torus.

  6. Plasma discharge in ferritic first wall vacuum vessel of the Hitachi Tokamak HT-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Mitsushi; Nakayama, Takeshi; Asano, Katsuhiko; Otsuka, Michio [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    A tokamak discharge with ferritic material first wall was tried successfully. The Hitachi Tokamak HT-2 had a stainless steel SUS304 vacuum vessel and modified to have a ferritic plate first wall for experiments to investigate the possibility of ferritic material usage in magnetic fusion devices. The achieved vacuum pressure and times used for discharge cleaning was roughly identical with the stainless steel first wall or the original HT-2. We concluded that ferritic material vacuum vessel is possible for tokamaks. (author)

  7. Spark-plasma-sintering magnetic field assisted compaction of Co{sub 80}Ni{sub 20} nanowires for anisotropic ferromagnetic bulk materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouar, Nassima; Schoenstein, Frédéric; Mercone, Silvana; Farhat, Samir; Jouini, Noureddine [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux, CNRS, LSPM—UPR 3407, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne-Paris-Cité, 99 Avenue J.-B. Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Villeroy, Benjamin [Institut de Chimie et des Matériaux Paris Est, CNRS, ICMPE—UMR 7182, Equipe de Chimie Métallurgique des Terres Rares, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, 94320 Thiais Cedex (France); Leridon, Brigitte [Laboratoire de Physique et d’Étude des Matériaux, LPEM, ESPCI-ParisTech, CNRS, UPMC, 10 rue Vauquelin, F-75231 Paris Cedex 5 (France)

    2013-10-28

    We developed a two-step process showing the way for sintering anisotropic nanostructured bulk ferromagnetic materials. A new reactor has been optimized allowing the synthesis of several grams per batch of nanopowders via a polyol soft chemistry route. The feasibility of the scale-up has been successfully demonstrated for Co{sub 80}Ni{sub 20} nanowires and a massic yield of ∼97% was obtained. The thus obtained nanowires show an average diameter of ∼6 nm and a length of ∼270 nm. A new bottom-up strategy allowed us to compact the powder into a bulk nanostructured system. We used a spark-plasma-sintering technique under uniaxial compression and low temperature assisted by a permanent magnetic field of 1 T. A macroscopic pellet of partially aligned nanowire arrays has been easily obtained. This showed optimized coercive properties along the direction of the magnetic field applied during compaction (i.e., the nanowires' direction)

  8. Breakdown of a space charge limited regime of a sheath in a weakly collisional plasma bounded by walls with secondary electron emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydorenko, D; Kaganovich, I; Raitses, Y; Smolyakov, A

    2009-10-02

    A new regime of plasma-wall interaction is identified in particle-in-cell simulations of a hot plasma bounded by walls with secondary electron emission. Such a plasma has a strongly non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution function and consists of bulk plasma electrons and beams of secondary electrons. In the new regime, the plasma sheath is not in a steady space charge limited state even though the secondary electron emission produced by the plasma bulk electrons is so intense that the corresponding partial emission coefficient exceeds unity. Instead, the plasma-sheath system performs relaxation oscillations by switching quasiperiodically between the space charge limited and non-space-charge limited states.

  9. Particulate suspension Jeffrey fluid flow in a stenosed artery with a particle-free plasma layer near the wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponalagusamy, R.

    2016-08-01

    The present article concerns the problem of blood flow through an artery with an axially asymmetric stenosis (constriction). The two-layered macroscopic model consisting of a cell-rich core of suspension of all the erythrocytes described as a particle-fluid suspension (Jeffrey fluid) and a peripheral zone of cell-free plasma (Newtonian fluid). The analytical expressions for flow characteristics such as fluid phase and particle phase velocities, flow rate, wall shear stress, and resistive force are obtained. It is of interest to mention that the magnitudes of wall shear stress and flow resistance increase with red cell concentration but the flow resistance decreases with increasing shape parameter. One of the important observations is that when blood behaves like a Jeffrey fluid, the flowing blood experiences lesser wall shear stress and flow resistance than in the case of blood being characterized as a Newtonian fluid in both the particle-fluid suspension and particle- free flow studies. The rheology of blood as Jeffrey fluid and the introduction of plasma layer thickness cause significant reduction in the magnitudes of the flow characteristics.

  10. Warm compacting behavior of stainless steel powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖志瑜; 柯美元; 陈维平; 召明; 李元元

    2004-01-01

    The warm compacting behaviors of four different kinds of stainless steel powders, 304L, 316L, 410L and 430L, were studied. The results show that warm compaction can be applied to stainless steel powders. The green densities and strengths of compacts obtained through warm compaction are generally higher than those obtained through cold compaction. The compacting behaviors in warm compaction and cold compaction are similar.Under the compacting pressure of 700 MPa, the warm compacted densities are 0. 10 - 0.22 g/cm3 higher than the cold compacted ones, and the green strengths are 11.5 %-50 % higher. The optimal warm compacting temperature is 100 - 110 ℃. In the die wall lubricated warm compaction, the optimum internal lubricant content is 0.2%.

  11. Fabrication of single-crystal silicon nanotubes with sub-10 nm walls using cryogenic inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiqin; Chen, Yiqin; Zhu, Xupeng; Zheng, Mengjie; Dong, Fengliang; Chen, Peipei; Xu, Lihua; Chu, Weiguo; Duan, Huigao

    2016-09-09

    Single-crystal silicon nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years due in part to their unique optical properties. In this work, we demonstrate direct fabrication of single-crystal silicon nanotubes with sub-10 nm walls which show low reflectivity. The fabrication was based on a cryogenic inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching process using high-resolution hydrogen silsesquioxane nanostructures as the hard mask. Two main etching parameters including substrate low-frequency power and SF6/O2 flow rate ratio were investigated to determine the etching mechanism in the process. With optimized etching parameters, high-aspect-ratio silicon nanotubes with smooth and vertical sub-10 nm walls were fabricated. Compared to commonly-used antireflection silicon nanopillars with the same feature size, the densely packed silicon nanotubes possessed a lower reflectivity, implying possible potential applications of silicon nanotubes in photovoltaics.

  12. Ideal MHD stability spectrum of an arbitrarily flowing cylindrical plasma with a Green's function approach for coupling to the resistive wall using a linear eigenvalue formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. P.; Jardin, S. C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Guazzotto, L.

    2008-11-01

    The ideal MHD linear stability normal modes and frequencies for a circular cylindrical plasma (having an arbitrary equilibrium flow) interacting with a resistive wall are calculated. Projections of the plasma displacement are expanded as finite elements, using a Galerkin approach to form the inner products. A Green's function approach is taken to couple the perturbed wall currents to the plasma surface perturbations. The standard linear form, φAx=B x, is obtained by introducing an auxiliary variable, u=φξ+iV .∇ξ, and an additional degree of freedom representing the perturbed current in the resistive wall. It is shown that having projections aligned with (or perpendicular to) the equilibrium magnetic field is more important for correctly calculating the slow wave part of the spectrum than having a higher order finite element expansion with non-field-aligned projections. Investigations into the effects of axial and azimuthal flows on the resistive wall mode are also presented.

  13. Cytocompatibility studies of vertically-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes: Raw material and functionalized by oxygen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, A.O., E-mail: loboao@yahoo.com [Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais, INPE, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, ITA, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); Laboratorio de Nanotecnologia Biomedica, Universidade do Vale do Paraiba, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); Corat, M.A.F. [Centro Multidisciplinar para Investigacao Biologica na Area da Ciencia em Animais de Laboratorio, CEMIB, UNICAMP, Campinas/SP (Brazil); Antunes, E.F. [Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais, INPE, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, ITA, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); Ramos, S.C. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, ITA, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); Pacheco-Soares, C. [Laboratorio de Dinamica de Compartimentos Celulares, UNIVAP, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); and others

    2012-05-01

    It was presented a strong difference on cell adhesion and proliferation of functionalized vertically-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube (VACNT) scaffolds compared to raw-VACNT. Biocompatibility in vitro tests were performed on raw-VACNT after superficial modification by oxygen plasma, which changes its superhydrophobic character to superhydrophilic. Two cytocompatibility tests were applied: 1) total lactate dehydrogenase colorimetric assay for the study of proliferating cells; and 2) cellular adhesion by scanning electron microscopy. Results showed that superhydrophilic VACNT scaffolds stimulate cell growth with proliferation up to 70% higher than normal growth of cell culture.

  14. Hybrid-PIC modeling of laser-plasma interactions and hot electron generation in gold hohlraum walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, C.; Welch, D. R.; Clark, R. E.; Rose, D. V.; Golovkin, I. E.

    2017-06-01

    The walls of the hohlraum used in experiments at the national ignition facility are heated by laser beams with intensities ˜ 10 15 W/cm2, a wavelength of ˜ 1 / 3 μm, and pulse lengths on the order of a ns, with collisional absorption believed to be the primary heating mechanism. X-rays generated by the hot ablated plasma at the gold walls are then used to implode a target in the hohlraum interior. In addition to the collisional absorption of laser energy at the walls, non-linear laser-plasma interactions (LPI), such as stimulated Raman scattering and two plasmon decay, are believed to generate a population of supra-thermal electrons which, if present in the hohlraum, can have a deleterious effect on target implosion. We describe results of hohlraum modeling using a hybrid particle-in-cell code. To enable this work, new particle-based algorithms for a multiple-ion magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) treatment, and a particle-based ray-tracing model were developed. The use of such hybrid methods relaxes the requirement to resolve the laser wavelength, and allows for relatively large-scale hohlraum simulations with a reasonable number of cells. But the non-linear effects which are believed to be the cause of hot electron generation can only be captured by fully kinetic simulations with good resolution of the laser wavelength. For this reason, we employ a two-tiered approach to hohlraum modeling. Large-scale simulations of the collisional absorption process can be conducted using the fast quasi-neutral MHD algorithm with fluid particle species. From these simulations, we can observe the time evolution of the hohlraum walls and characterize the density and temperature profiles. From these results, we can transition to smaller-scale highly resolved simulations using traditional kinetic particle-in-cell methods, from which we can fully model all of the non-linear laser-plasma interactions, as well as assess the details of the electron distribution function. We find that vacuum

  15. Velocity shear, turbulent saturation, and steep plasma gradients in the scrape-off layer of inner-wall limited tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, F. D.; Ricci, P.

    2017-03-01

    The narrow power decay-length ({λq} ), recently found in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of inner-wall limited (IWL) discharges in tokamaks, is studied using 3D, flux-driven, global two-fluid turbulence simulations. The formation of the steep plasma profiles is found to arise due to radially sheared \\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} poloidal flows. A complex interaction between sheared flows and parallel plasma currents outflowing into the sheath regulates the turbulent saturation, determining the transport levels. We quantify the effects of sheared flows, obtaining theoretical estimates in agreement with our non-linear simulations. Analytical calculations suggest that the IWL {λq} is roughly equal to the turbulent correlation length.

  16. Velocity shear, turbulent saturation, and steep plasma gradients in the scrape-off layer of inner-wall limited tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Halpern, Federico D

    2016-01-01

    The narrow power decay-length ($\\lambda_q$), recently found in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of inner-wall limited (IWL) discharges in tokamaks, is studied using 3D, flux-driven, global two-fluid turbulence simulations. The formation of the steep plasma profiles measured is found to arise due to radially sheared $\\vec{E}\\times\\vec{B}$ poloidal flows. A complex interaction between sheared flows and outflowing plasma currents regulates the turbulent saturation, determining the transport levels. We quantify the effects of sheared flows, obtaining theoretical estimates in agreement with our non-linear simulations. Analytical calculations suggest that the IWL $\\lambda_q$ is roughly equal to the turbulent correlation length.

  17. Plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition of TiO2 compact layers for flexible mesostructured perovskite solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zardetto, V.; Di Giacomo, F.; Lucarelli, G.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Brown, T.M.; Creatore, M.

    2017-01-01

    In mesostructured perovskite solar cell devices, charge recombination processes at the interface between the transparent conductive oxide, perovskite and hole transport layer are suppressed by depositing an efficient compact TiO2 blocking layer. In this contribution we investigate the role of the

  18. PEG-albumin plasma expansion increases expression of MCP-1 evidencing increased circulatory wall shear stress: an experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Makena Hightower

    Full Text Available Treatment of blood loss with plasma expanders lowers blood viscosity, increasing cardiac output. However, increased flow velocity by conventional plasma expanders does not compensate for decreased viscosity in maintaining vessel wall shear stress (WSS, decreasing endothelial nitric oxide (NO production. A new type of plasma expander using polyethylene glycol conjugate albumin (PEG-Alb causes supra-perfusion when used in extreme hemodilution and is effective in treating hemorrhagic shock, although it is minimally viscogenic. An acute 40% hemodilution/exchange-transfusion protocol was used to compare 4% PEG-Alb to Ringer's lactate, Dextran 70 kDa and 6% Hetastarch (670 kDa in unanesthetized CD-1 mice. Serum cytokine analysis showed that PEG-Alb elevates monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, a member of a small inducible gene family, as well as expression of MIP-1α, and MIP-2. MCP-1 is specific to increased WSS. Given the direct link between increased WSS and production of NO, the beneficial resuscitation effects due to PEG-Alb plasma expansion appear to be due to increased WSS through increased perfusion and blood flow rather than blood viscosity.

  19. Electrochemical Characterization of O2 Plasma Functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Electrode for Legionella pneumophila DNA Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Jin; Lee, Jun-Yong; Hyup Kim, Jun; Kug Kim, Sun; Lee, Cheol Jin; Min, Nam Ki

    2010-08-01

    An electrochemical DNA sensor for Legionella pneumophila detection was constructed using O2 plasma functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) film as a working electrode (WE). The cyclic voltammetry (CV) results revealed that the electrocatalytic activity of plasma functionalized MWCNT (pf-MWCNT) significantly changed depending on O2 plasma treatment time due to some oxygen containing functional groups on the pf-MWCNT surface. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra were also presented the changes of their surface morphologies and oxygen composition before and after plasma treatment. From a comparison study, it was found that the pf-MWCNT WEs had higher electrocatalytic activity and more capability of probe DNA immobilization: therefore, electrochemical signal changes by probe DNA immobilization and hybridization on pf-MWCNT WEs were larger than on Au WEs. The pf-MWCNT based DNA sensor was able to detect a concentration range of 10 pM-100 nM of target DNA to detect L. pneumophila.

  20. The Design and Test of a Compact Hydrogen Plasma Gun System%紧凑型氢等离子体枪设计和实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨建华; 张亚洲; 刘金亮

    2000-01-01

    设计了一种紧凑型氢等离子体枪及驱动电路. 这种枪采用同轴结构,电极之间有两层石墨环和两层氢化钛,利用氢化钛作为气源储存体, 利用表面闪络机制产生等离子体.实验诊断表明,等离子体枪能产生密度为1010~10 12/cm3,半径为1~2cm,长度为60~80cm的等离子体柱,它在磁场导引下存在时间大于400μs.%A compact hydrogen plasma gun system was designed and test ed. There are two rings of graphite and two rings of Ti hydride between coaxial electrodes. Ti hydride is utilized as a reservoir of hydrogen. The surface flash over is taken advantage to produce plasma. The produced plasma density is 1010cm -3~1012cm-3 in a volume of a column with radius 1~2cm and len gth of 60~80cm. The plasma existing time is over 400μs.

  1. High affinity RGD-binding sites at the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana links the cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut, H; Carrasco, A; Galaud, J P; Cassan, C; Bouyssou, H; Vita, N; Ferrara, P; Pont-Lezica, R

    1998-10-01

    The heptapeptide Tyr-Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD--the essential structure recognised by animal cells in substrate adhesion molecules) was tested on epidermal cells of onion and cultured cells of Arabidopsis upon plasmolysis. Dramatic changes were observed on both types of cells following treatment: on onion cells, Hechtian strands linking the cell wall to the membrane were lost, while Arabidopsis cells changed from concave to convex plasmolysis. A control heptapeptide Tyr-Gly-Asp-Gly-Arg-Ser-Pro had no effect on the shape of plasmolysed cells. Protoplasts isolated from Arabidopsis cells agglutinate in the presence of ProNectinF, a genetically engineered protein of 72 kDa containing 13 RGD sequences: several protoplasts may adhere to a single molecule of ProNectinF. The addition of the RGD-heptapeptide disrupted the adhesion between the protoplasts. Purified plasma membrane from Arabidopsis cells exhibits specific binding sites for the iodinated RGD-heptapeptide. The binding is saturable, reversible, and two types of high affinity sites (Kd1 approximately 1 nM, and Kd2 approximately 40 nM) can be discerned. Competitive inhibition by several structurally related peptides and proteins noted the specific requirement for the RGD sequence. Thus, the RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis fulfils the adhesion features of integrins, i.e. peptide specificity, subcellular location, and involvement in plasma membrane-cell wall attachments.

  2. Design aspects of a compact, single-frequency, permanent magnet ECR ion source with a large uniformly distributed resonant plasma volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.; Alton, G.D.; Mills, G.D.; Reed, C.A.; Haynes, D.L.

    1997-09-01

    A compact, all-permanent-magnet single-frequency ECR ion source with a large uniformly distributed ECR plasma volume has been designed and is presently under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The central region of the field is designed to achieve a flat-field (constant mod-B) which extends over the length of the central field region along the axis of symmetry and radially outward to form a uniformly distributed ECR plasma volume. The magnetic field design strongly contrasts with those used in conventional ECR ion sources where the central field regions are approximately parabolic and the consequent ECR zones are surfaces. The plasma confinement magnetic field mirror has a mirror ratio B{sub max}/B{sub ECR} of slightly greater than two. The source is designed to operate at a nominal RF frequency of 6 GHz. The central flat magnetic field region can be easily adjusted by mechanical means to tune the source to the resonant conditions within the limits of 5.5 to 6.8 GHz. The RF injection system is broadband to ensure excitation of transverse electric (TE) modes so that the RF power is largely concentrated in the resonant plasma volume which lies along and surrounds the axis of symmetry of the source. Because of the much larger ECR zone, the probability for absorption of microwave power is dramatically increased thereby increasing the probability for acceleration of electrons, the electron temperature of the plasma and, consequently, the hot electron population within the plasma volume of the source. The creation of an ECR volume rather than a surface is commensurate with higher charge states and higher beam intensities within a particular charge state.

  3. Present status of plasma-wall interactions research and materials development activities in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.

    1989-08-01

    It is well known in the fusion engineering community that the plasma confinement performance in magnetic fusion devices is strongly affected by edge-plasma interactions with surface components. These plasma-material interactions (PMI) include fuel particle recycling and impurity generation both during normal and off-normal operation. To understand and then to control PMI effects, considerable effort has been made, particularly over the last decade in US, supported by Department of Energy, Division of Development and Technology. Also, because plasma-facing components are generally expected to receive significant amount of heat due to plasma bombardment and run-away electrons, materials must tolerate high-heat fluxes (HHF). The HHF-component research has been conducted in parallel with PMI research. One strong motivation for these research activities is that DT-burning experiments are currently planned in the Tokamak Test Fusion Reactor (TFTR) in early 1990s. Several different but mutually complementary approaches have been taken in the PMI+HHF research. The first approach is to conduct PMI experiments using toroidal fusion devices such as TFTR. The second one is to simulate elemental processes involved in PMI using ion beams and electron beams, etc. The last one but not least is to use non-tokamak plasma facilities. Along with these laboratory activities, new materials have been developed and evaluated from the PMI+HHF point of view. In this paper, several major PMI+HHF research facilities in US and their activities are briefly reviewed. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. A comparative study of nitrogen plasma effect on field emission characteristics of single wall carbon nanotubes synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Avshish; Parveen, Shama; Husain, Samina; Ali, Javid; Zulfequar, Mohammad; Harsh; Husain, Mushahid

    2014-12-01

    Vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with large scale control of diameter, length and alignment have successfully been grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. The nickel (Ni) as catalyst deposited on silicon (Si) substrate was used to grow the SWCNTs. Field emission (FE) characteristics of the as grown SWCNTs were measured using indigenously designed setup in which a diode is configured in such a way that by applying negative voltage on the copper plate (cathode) with respect to stainless steel anode plate, current density can be recorded. To measure the FE characteristics, SWCNTs film pasted on the copper plate with silver epoxy was used as electron emitter source. The effective area of anode was ∼78.5 mm2 for field emission measurements. The emission measurements were carried out under high vacuum pressure of the order of 10-6 Torr to minimize the electron scattering and degradation of the emitters. The distance between anode and cathode was kept 500 μm (constant) during entire field emission studies. The grown SWCNTs are excellent field emitters, having emission current density higher than 25 mA/cm2 at turn-on field 1.3 V/μm. In order to enhance the field emission characteristics, the as grown SWCNTs have been treated under nitrogen (N2) plasma for 5 min and again field emission characteristics have been measured. The N2 plasma treated SWCNTs show a good enhancement in the field emission properties with emission current density 81.5 mA/cm2 at turn on field 1.2 V/μm. The as-grown and N2 plasma treated SWCNTs were also characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), Raman spectrometer, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  5. Materials needs for compact fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The economic prospects for magnetic fusion energy can be dramatically improved if for the same total power output the fusion neutron first-wall (FW) loading and the system power density can be increased by factors of 3 to 5 and 10 to 30, respectively. A number of compact fusion reactor embodiments have been proposed, all of which would operate with increased FW loadings, would use thin (0.5 to 0.6 m) blankets, and would confine quasi-steady-state plasma with resistive, water-cooled copper or aluminum coils. Increased system power density (5 to 15 MWt/m/sup 3/ versus 0.3 to 0.5 MW/m/sup 3/), considerably reduced physical size of the fusion power core (FPC), and appreciably reduced economic leverage exerted by the FPC and associated physics result. The unique materials requirements anticipated for these compact reactors are outlined against the well documented backdrop provided by similar needs for the mainline approaches. Surprisingly, no single materials need that is unique to the compact systems is identified; crucial uncertainties for the compact approaches must also be addressed by the mainline approaches, particularly for in-vacuum components (FWs, limiters, divertors, etc.).

  6. Issues Arising from Plasma-Wall Interactions in Inner-Class Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wampler, William R.

    1999-06-23

    This section reviews physical processes involved in the implantation of energetic hydrogen into plasma facing materials and its subsequent diffusion, release, or immobilization by trapping or precipitation within the material. These topics have also been discussed in previous reviews. The term hydrogen or H is used here generically to refer to protium, deuterium or tritium.

  7. Evidence of active transport (filtration?) of plasma proteins across the capillary walls in muscle and subcutis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noer, Ivan; Lassen, N A

    1978-01-01

    Under slight lymphatic stasis (tilting the body 15 degrees) we measured the arrival of locally injected I-albumin to the plasma pool. From 30 min. to 90 min. after the injection the return rate was zero i.e. local back transport in the two tissues studied viz.muscle and subcutaneous fat is very...

  8. Evidence of active transport (filtration?) of plasma proteins across the capillary walls in muscle and subcutis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noer, Ivan; Lassen, N A

    1979-01-01

    Under slight lymphatic stasis (tilting the body 15 degrees) we measured the arrival of locally injected 131I-albumin in the plasma pool. From 30 min to 90 min after the injection the return rate was zero, i.e. local back transport in the two tissues studied, muscle and subcutaneous fat, is very...

  9. The target for the new plasma/wall experiment Magnum-PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, M.A. van den, E-mail: m.a.vandenberg@rijnhuizen.nl [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Brons, S.; Kruijt, O.G.; Scholten, J.; Pasquet, R.; Smeets, P.H.M. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Schweer, B. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, IEF-4, Euratom association, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); De Temmerman, G. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2011-10-15

    The construction of Magnum-PSI is in its final stage. The aim is to provide a controlled and highly accessible linear plasma device to perform the basic plasma-surface interaction research needed for the design of the plasma facing components of future fusion devices. This contribution will focus on the thermal challenges imposed by those extreme conditions on the design of the target holder of Magnum-PSI. The target holder is designed to allow the exposure of large size targets with variable inclination angles with respect to the magnetic field. A test set up was made to test different interlayers (grafoil, soft metal sheets) and improve the thermal contact between the target and the heat sink. In addition, a modular target holder for sequential exposure of smaller size targets has been designed. Finite element modeling using the ANSYS code was used to optimize the cooling geometry and to predict the temperature profiles due to the heat load of the plasma. Experiments were done on the Pilot-PSI linear device to validate the thermal calculations. Calorimetry and infrared thermography were used to experimentally measure the temperature profile on the target and the heat deposition.

  10. The Fatty Acid Composition of Blood Plasma and Arterial Wall in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Osipenko

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the fatty acid balance in the blood plasma, in the fragments of the intact vessels and the vessels showing signs of atherosclerosis.Material and Methods: The article presents the results of the examination of the blood plasma samples of patients with coronary heart disease and coronary atherosclerosis. The control group consisted of 16 healthy individuals. Also, the fragments of the abdominal aorta and the common carotid artery with varying degrees of atherosclerotic lesions were studied. Fatty acid analysis was conducted using capillary gas-liquid chromatography. Results: A reduction in the relative linoleic acid level with an increase in almost all the saturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated dihomo-γ-linolenic acid in the plasma was noted in patients with coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis. The relationships between certain fatty acids in patients with atherosclerosis and myocardial ischemia showed changes. In patients with atherosclerosis, a marked imbalance was observed between the monounsaturated and correspondingly the saturated fatty acids (with the same number of carbon atoms in the abdominal aorta with significant atherosclerotic lesions, as well as in the intact common carotid arteries. These disorders are probably related to the relatively low content of the linoleic acid in the blood plasma. The reasons for the increased activity of the fatty acid synthase in vessels with significant atherosclerotic lesions are described. It is concluded that most of the fatty acids of the plaque were formed due to the synthetic processes in the smooth muscle cells, and not as a result of their intake from the blood plasma.

  11. 'Water window' compact, table-top laser plasma soft X-ray sources based on a gas puff target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachulak, P.W., E-mail: wachulak@gmail.co [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, ul. gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Rudawski, P.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; Szczurek, M. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, ul. gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-05-15

    We have developed compact, high repetition, table-top soft-X-ray sources, based on a gas puff target, emitting in 'water window' spectral range at lambda = 2.88 nm from nitrogen gas target or, in 2-4 nm range of wavelengths, from argon gas target. Double stream gas puff target was pumped optically by commercial Nd:YAG laser, energy 0.74 J, pulse time duration 4 ns. Spatial distribution of laser-produced plasma was imaged using a pinhole camera. Using transmission grating spectrometer, argon and nitrogen emission spectra were obtained, showing strong emission in the 'water window' spectral range. Using AXUV100 detector the flux measurements of the soft-X-ray pulses were carried out and are presented. These debris free sources are table-top alternative for free electron lasers and synchrotron installations. They can be successfully employed in microscopy, spectroscopy and metrology experiments among others.

  12. Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD-spectroscopic observations of resistive wall mode stability in DIII-D plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turco, F., E-mail: turcof@fusion.gat.com; Hanson, J. M.; Navratil, G. A. [Columbia University, 116th and Broadway, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Turnbull, A. D. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Experiments conducted at DIII-D investigate the role of drift kinetic damping and fast neutral beam injection (NBI)-ions in the approach to the no-wall β{sub N} limit. Modelling results show that the drift kinetic effects are significant and necessary to reproduce the measured plasma response at the ideal no-wall limit. Fast neutral-beam ions and rotation play important roles and are crucial to quantitatively match the experiment. In this paper, we report on the model validation of a series of plasmas with increasing β{sub N}, where the plasma stability is probed by active magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) spectroscopy. The response of the plasma to an externally applied field is used to probe the stable side of the resistive wall mode and obtain an indication of the proximity of the equilibrium to an instability limit. We describe the comparison between the measured plasma response and that calculated by means of the drift kinetic MARS-K code [Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], which includes the toroidal rotation, the electron and ion drift-kinetic resonances, and the presence of fast particles for the modelled plasmas. The inclusion of kinetic effects allows the code to reproduce the experimental results within ∼13% for both the amplitude and phase of the plasma response, which is a significant improvement with respect to the undamped MHD-only model. The presence of fast NBI-generated ions is necessary to obtain the low response at the highest β{sub N} levels (∼90% of the ideal no-wall limit). The toroidal rotation has an impact on the results, and a sensitivity study shows that a large variation in the predicted response is caused by the details of the rotation profiles at high β{sub N}.

  13. Generation of magnetic fields by the ponderomotive force of electromagnetic waves in dense plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, P K; Shukla, Nitin; Stenflo, Lennart

    2010-01-01

    We show that the non-stationary ponderomotive force of a, large-amplitude electromagnetic move in a very dense quantum plasma wall streaming degenerate electrons can spontaneously create d.c. magnetic fields. The present result can account for the seed magnetic fields in compact astrophysical objects and in the next-generation intense laser-solid density, plasma interaction experiments.

  14. Characterization of cell wall lipids from the pathogenic phase of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis cultivated in the presence or absence of human plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa V G Longo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The fungal cell wall is a complex and dynamic outer structure. In pathogenic fungi its components interact with the host, determining the infection fate. The present work aimed to characterize cell wall lipids from P. brasiliensis grown in the presence and absence of human plasma. We compared the results from isolates Pb3 and Pb18, which represent different phylogenetic species that evoke distinct patterns of experimental paracoccidioidomycosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We comparatively characterized cell wall phospholipids, fatty acids, sterols, and neutral glycolipids by using both electrospray ionization- and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses of lipids extracted with organic solvents followed by fractionation in silica-gel-60. We detected 49 phospholipid species in Pb3 and 38 in Pb18, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidic acid. In both Pb3 and Pb18, PC and PE had the most numerous species. Among the fatty acids, C18:1 and C18:2 were the most abundant species in both isolates, although C18:2 was more abundant in Pb18. There was a different effect of plasma supplementation on fatty acids depending on the fungal isolate. The prevalent glycolipid species was Hex-C18:0-OH/d19:2-Cer, although other four minor species were also detected. The most abundant sterol in all samples was brassicasterol. Distinct profiles of cell wall and total yeast sterols suggested that the preparations were enriched for cell wall components. The presence of plasma in the culture medium specially increased cell wall brassicasterol abundance and also other lipids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We here report an original comparative lipidomic analysis of P. brasiliensis cell wall. Our results open doors to understanding the role of cell wall lipids in fungal biology, and interaction with anti-fungal drugs and the host.

  15. Spark plasma sintering of silicon carbide and multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced zirconium diboride ceramic composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadhukulakrishnan, Govindaraajan B.; Rahman, Arif; Karumuri, Sriharsha [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Stackpoole, Margaret M. [ELORET Corporation, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Kalkan, A. Kaan; Singh, Raman P. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Harimkar, Sandip P., E-mail: sandip.harimkar@okstate.edu [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States)

    2012-08-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dense SiC and carbon nanotube reinforced ZrB{sub 2} composites were spark plasma sintered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SiC and carbon nanotube reinforcement favored the densification of ZrB{sub 2} composites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SiC and carbon nanotube reinforcement resulted in toughening of ZrB{sub 2} composites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon nanotubes were retained in the spark plasma sintered ZrB{sub 2} composites. - Abstract: In this paper spark plasma sintering (SPS) of silicon carbide and multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced zirconium diboride ultra-high temperature ceramic matrix composites is reported. Systematic investigations on the effect of reinforcement type (SiC and CNTs) and content (10-40 vol.% SiC and 2-6 vol.% CNTs) on densification behavior, microstructure development, and mechanical properties (microhardness, bi-axial flexural strength, and indentation fracture toughness) are presented. With the similar SPS processing parameters (1900 Degree-Sign C, 70 MPa pressure, and 15 min soaking time), near-full densification (>99% relative density) was achieved with 10-40% SiC (in ZrB{sub 2}-SiC) and 4-6% CNT (in ZrB{sub 2}-CNT) reinforced composites. The SiC and CNT reinforcement further improved the indentation fracture toughness of the composites through a range of toughening mechanisms, including particle shearing, crack deflection at the particle-matrix interface, and grain pull-outs for ZrB{sub 2}-SiC composites, and CNT pull-outs and crack deflection in ZrB{sub 2}-CNT composites.

  16. Impact of nitrogen seeding on confinement and power load control of a high-triangularity JET ELMy H-mode plasma with a metal wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giroud, C.; Maddison, G. P.; Jachmich, S.; Rimini, F.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Balboa, I.; Brezinsek, S.; Coelho, R.; Coenen, J. W.; Frassinetti, L.; Joffrin, E.; Oberkofler, M.; Lehnen, M.; Liu, Y.; Marsen, S.; McCormick, K.; Meigs, A.; Neu, R.; Sieglin, B.; van Rooij, G. J.; Arnoux, G.; Belo, P.; Brix, M.; Clever, M.; Coffey, I.; Devaux, S.; Douai, D.; Eich, T.; Flanagan, J.; S. Grünhagen,; Huber, A.; Kempenaars, M.; Kruezi, U.; Lawson, K.; Lomas, P.; Lowry, C.; Nunes, I.; Sirinnelli, A.; Sips, A.C.C.; Stamp, M.; Wiesen, S.; JET-EFDA Contributors,

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the impact on confinement and power load of the high-shape 2.5 MA ELMy H-mode scenario at JET of a change from all carbon plasma-facing components to an all metal wall. In preparation to this change, systematic studies of power load reduction and impact on confinement as a result

  17. Target particle and heat loads in low-triangularity L-mode plasmas in JET with carbon and beryllium/tungsten walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groth, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Belo, P.; Corrigan, G.; Harting, D.; Wiesen, S.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Brix, M.; Clever, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Eich, T.; Flanagan, J.; Giroud, C.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M.; Lowry, C.; Maggi, C. F.; Marsen, S.; Meigs, A. G.; Sergienko, G.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, C.; Sirinelli, A.; Stamp, M. F.; van Rooij, G. J.

    2013-01-01

    Divertor radiation profiles, and power and particle fluxes to the target have been measured in attached \\{JET\\} L-mode plasmas with carbon and beryllium/tungsten wall materials. In the beryllium/tungsten configuration, factors of 2–3 higher power loads and peak temperatures at the low field side tar

  18. Compact Orthoalgebras

    CERN Document Server

    Wilce, A

    2004-01-01

    We initiate a study of topological orthoalgebras (TOAs), concentrating on the compact case. Examples of TOAs include topological orthomodular lattices, and also the projection lattice of a Hilbert space. As the latter example illustrates, a lattice-ordered TOA need not be a topological lattice. However, we show that a compact Boolean TOA is a topological Boolean algebra. Using this, we prove that any compact regular TOA is atomistic, and has a compact center. We prove also that any compact TOA with isolated 0 is of finite height. We then focus on stably ordered TOAs: those in which the upper-set generated by an open set is open. These include both topological orthomodular lattices and interval orthoalgebras -- in particular, projection lattices. We show that the topology of a compact stably-ordered TOA with isolated 0 is determined by that of of its space of atoms.

  19. Target particle and heat loads in low-triangularity L-mode plasmas in JET with carbon and beryllium/tungsten walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groth, M., E-mail: mathias.groth@aalto.fi [Aalto University, Association EURATOM-Tekes, Espoo (Finland); Brezinsek, S. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Belo, P. [Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, Association EURATOM-IST, Lisbon (Portugal); Corrigan, G. [Culham Centre of Fusion Energy, EURATOM-Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Harting, D.; Wiesen, S. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Beurskens, M.N.A.; Brix, M. [Culham Centre of Fusion Energy, EURATOM-Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Clever, M.; Coenen, J.W. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Eich, T. [Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM-Association, Garching (Germany); Flanagan, J.; Giroud, C. [Culham Centre of Fusion Energy, EURATOM-Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Huber, A. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Jachmich, S. [Association “EURATOM Belgium State”, Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Brussels (Belgium); Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Lowry, C. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Maggi, C.F. [Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM-Association, Garching (Germany); Marsen, S. [Max-Planck-Institut for Plasma Physics, EURATOM-Association, Greifswald (Germany); and others

    2013-07-15

    Divertor radiation profiles, and power and particle fluxes to the target have been measured in attached JET L-mode plasmas with carbon and beryllium/tungsten wall materials. In the beryllium/tungsten configuration, factors of 2–3 higher power loads and peak temperatures at the low field side target were observed in high-recycling scrape-off layer conditions, whilst in close-to-sheath-limited conditions almost identical plasmas were obtained. The 30% reduction in total radiation with the beryllium/tungsten wall is consistent with a reduction of carbon as the dominant impurity radiator; however similar ion current to the plates, emission from recycling neutrals and neutral pressures in the pumping plenum were measured. Simulations with the EDGDE2/EIRENE code of these plasmas indicate a reduction of the total divertor radiation when carbon is omitted, but significantly higher power loads in high-recycling and detached conditions are predicted than measured.

  20. Ultrahigh charging of dust grains by the beam−plasma method for creating a compact neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akishev, Yu. S., E-mail: fav@triniti.ru; Karal’nik, V. B.; Petryakov, A. V.; Starostin, A. N.; Trushkin, N. I.; Filippov, A. V. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Generation of high-voltage high-current electron beams in a low-pressure (P = 0.1–1 Torr) gas discharge is studied experimentally as a function of the discharge voltage and the sort and pressure of the plasma-forming gas. The density of the plasma formed by a high-current electron beam is measured. Experiments on ultrahigh charging of targets exposed to a pulsed electron beam with an energy of up to 25 keV, an electron current density of higher than 1 A/cm{sup 2}, a pulse duration of up to 1 μs, and a repetition rate of up to 1 kHz are described. A numerical model of ultrahigh charging of dust grains exposed to a high-energy electron beam is developed. The formation of high-energy positive ions in the field of negatively charged plane and spherical targets is calculated. The calculations performed for a pulse-periodic mode demonstrate the possibility of achieving neutron yields of higher than 10{sup 6} s{sup –1} cm{sup –2} in the case of a plane target and about 10{sup 9} s{sup –1} in the case of 10{sup 3} spherical targets, each with a radius of 250 μm.

  1. Natural gas pyrolysis in double-walled reactor tubes using thermal plasma or concentrated solar radiation as external heating source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stèphane Abanades; Stefania Tescari; Sylvain Rodat; Gilles Flamant

    2009-01-01

    The thermal pyrolysis of natural gas as a clean hydrogen production route is examined.The concept of a double-walled reactor tube is proposed and implemented.Preliminary experiments using an external plasma heating source are carded out to validate this concept.The results point out the efficient CH4 dissociation above 1850 K (CH4 conversion over 90%) and the key influence of the gas residence time.Simulations are performed to predict the conversion rate of CH4 at the reactor outlet,and are consistent with experimental tendencies.A solar reactor prototype featuring four independent double-walled tubes is then developed.The heat in high temperature process required for the endothermic reaction of natural gas pyrolysis is supplied by concentrated solar energy.The tubes are heated uniformly by radiation using the blackbody effect of a cavity-receiver absorbing the concentrated solar irradiation through a quartz window.The gas composition at the reactor outlet,the chemical conversion of CH4,and the yield to H2 are determined with respect to reaction temperature,inlet gas flow-rates,and feed gas composition.The longer the gas residence time,the higher the CH4 conversion and H2 yield,whereas the lower the amount of acetylene.A CH4 conversion of 99% and H2 yield of about 85% are measured at 1880 K with 30% CH4 in the feed gas (6 L/min injected and residence time of 18 ms).A temperature increase from 1870 K to 1970 K does not improve the H2 yield.

  2. Design of a high-temperature first wall/blanket for a d-d compact Reversed-Field-Pinch reactor (CRFPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabiri, A.E.; Glancy, J.E.

    1983-05-01

    A high-temperature first wall/blanket which would take full advantage of the absence of tritium breeding in a d-d reactor was designed. This design which produces steam at p = 7 MPa and T = 538/sup 0/C at the blanket exit eliminates the requirement for a separate steam generator. A steam cycle with steam-to-steam reheat yielding about 37.5 percent efficiency is compatible with this design.

  3. Impact of nitrogen seeding on confinement and power load control of a high-triangularity JET ELMy H-mode plasma with a metal wall

    CERN Document Server

    Giroud, C; Jachmich, S; Rimini, F; Beurskens, M N A; Balboa, I; Brezinsek, S; Coelho, R; Coenen, J W; Frassinetti, L; Joffrin, E; Oberkofler, M; Lehnen, M; Liu, Y; Marsen, S; K, K McCormick; Meigs, A; Neu, R; Sieglin, B; van Rooij, G; Arnoux, G; Belo, P; Brix, M; Clever, M; Coffey, I; Devaux, S; Douai, D; Eich, T; Flanagan, J; Grunhagen, S; Huber, A; Kempenaars, M; Kruezi, U; Lawson, K; Lomas, P; Lowry, C; Nunes, I; Sirinnelli, A; Sips, A C C; Stamp, M; Wiesen, S; contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the impact on confinement and power load of the high-shape 2.5MA ELMy H-mode scenario at JET of a change from an all carbon plasma facing components to an all metal wall. In preparation to this change, systematic studies of power load reduction and impact on confinement as a result of fuelling in combination with nitrogen seeding were carried out in JET-C and are compared to their counterpart in JET with a metallic wall. An unexpected and significant change is reported on the decrease of the pedestal confinement but is partially recovered with the injection of nitrogen.

  4. Laser-plasma interactions from thin tapes for high-energy electron accelerators and seeding compact FELs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Brian Henry

    This thesis comprises a detailed investigation of the physics of using a plasma mirror (PM) from a tape by reflecting ultrashort pulses from a laser-triggered surface plasma. The tapes used in the characterization of the PM are VHS and computer data storage tape. The tapes are 6.6 m (computer storage tape) and 15 m (VHS) thick. Each tape is 0.5 inches wide, and 10s of meters of tape are spooled using a tape drive; providing thousands of shots on a single reel of tape. The amount of reflected energy of the PM was studied for different input intensities. The fluence was varied by translating the focus of the laser upstream and downstream of the tape, which changed the spot size on the tape surface and hence changed the fluence. This study measured reflectances from both sides of the two tapes, and for input light of both s and p-polarizations. Lastly, an analytic model was developed to understand the reflectance as a function of fluence for each tape material and polarization. Another application that benefits from the advancements of LPA technology is an LPAbased FEL. By sending a high quality electron bunch through an undulator (a periodic structure of positive and negative magnetic poles), the electrons oscillate transversely to the propagation axis and produce radiation. The 1.5 m THUNDER undulator at the BELLA Center has been commissioned using electron beams of 400MeV beams with broad energy spread (35%). To produce a coherent LPA-based FEL, the beam quality would need to improve to sub-percent level energy spread. A seed source could be used to help induce bunching of the electron beam within the undulator. This thesis described the experimental investigation of the physics of using solid-based surface high-harmonic generation (SHHG) from a thin tape as a possible seed source for an FEL. A thin tape placed within centimeters of the undulator's entrance could act as a harmonic generating source, while simultaneously transmitting an electron beam. This removes

  5. Modelling of impurity transport and plasma-wall interaction in fusion devices with the ERO code: basics of the code and examples of application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirschner, A.; Borodin, D.; Brezinsek, S.; Linsmeier, C.; Romazanov, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik, Juelich (Germany); Tskhakaya, D. [Fusion rate at OeAW, Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien (Austria); Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck (Austria); Kawamura, G. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu (Japan); Ding, R. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2016-08-15

    The 3D ERO code, which simulates plasma-wall interaction and impurity transport in magnetically confined fusion-relevant devices is described. As application, prompt deposition of eroded tungsten has been simulated at surfaces with shallow magnetic field of 3 T. Dedicated PIC simulations have been performed to calculate the characteristics of the sheath in front of plasma-exposed surfaces to use as input for these ERO simulations. Prompt deposition of tungsten reaches 100% at the highest electron temperature and density. In comparison to more simplified assumptions for the sheath the amount of prompt deposition is in general smaller if the PIC-calculated sheath is used. Due to friction with the background plasma the impact energy of deposited tungsten can be significantly larger than the energy gained in the sheath potential. (copyright 2016 The Authors. Contributions to Plasma Physics published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA Weinheim. This)

  6. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  7. Study on wall recycling behaviour in CPD spherical tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyay, R. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)], E-mail: raju@triam.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Zushi, H. [Research Institute of Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Hirooka, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Sakamoto, M. [Research Institute of Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Yoshinaga, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Okamoto, K. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Kawasaki, S.; Hanada, K.; Sato, K.N.; Nakamura, K.; Idei, H. [Research Institute of Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Ryoukai, T. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A. [Research Institute of Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    Experiments to study wall recycling behaviour have been performed in the small spherical tokamak compact plasma-wall interaction experimental device (CPD) from the viewpoint of global as well as local plasma wall interaction condition. Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma of typically {approx}50 to 400 ms duration is produced using {approx}40 to 80 kW RF power. In order to study the global wall recycling behaviour, pressure measurements are carried out just before and after the ECR plasma in the absence of any external pumping. The recycling behaviour is found to change from release to pumping beyond a certain level of pressure value which is again found to be a function of shot history. The real-time local wall behaviour is studied in similar RF plasma using a rotating tungsten limiter, actively coated with lithium. Measurement of H{sub {alpha}} light intensity in front of the rotating surface has indicated a clear reduction ({approx}10%) in the steady-state hydrogen recycling with continuous Li gettering of several minutes.

  8. Effect of the chamber wall on fluorocarbon-assisted atomic layer etching of SiO2 using cyclic Ar/C4F8 plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Masatoshi; Metzler, Dominik; Li, Chen; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S

    2016-07-01

    The authors studied the effect of the temperature and chemical state of the chamber wall on process performance for atomic layer etching of SiO2 using a steady-state Ar plasma, periodic injection of a defined number of C4F8 molecules, and synchronized plasma-based Ar(+) ion bombardment. To evaluate these effects, the authors measured the quartz coupling window temperature. The plasma gas phase chemistry was characterized using optical emission spectroscopy. It was found that although the thickness of the polymer film deposited in each cycle is constant, the etching behavior changed, which is likely related to a change in the plasma gas phase chemistry. The authors found that the main gas phase changes occur after C4F8 injection. The C4F8 and the quartz window react and generate SiF and CO. The emission intensity changes with wall surface state and temperature. Therefore, changes in the plasma gas species generation can lead to a shift in etching performance during processing. During initial cycles, minimal etching is observed, while etching gradually increases with cycle number.

  9. A theoretical interpretation of the main scrape-off layer heat-flux width scaling for tokamak inner-wall limited plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, F. D.; Horacek, J.; Pitts, R. A.; Ricci, P.

    2016-08-01

    The International Tokamak Physics Activity Topical Group on scrape-off layer and divertor physics has amassed a database comprising hundreds of reciprocating Langmuir probe measurements of the main scrape-off layer heat-flux width {λq} in inner-wall limited discharges. We have carried out an analysis, based on turbulent transport theory, of the variation of {λq} with respect to the dimensionless plasma parameters. Restricting our analysis to circular plasmas, we find that a model based on non-linearly saturated turbulence can well reproduce the {λq} values found in the database.

  10. US-Japan workshop on field-reversed configurations with steady-state high-temperature fusion plasmas and the 11th US-Japan workshop on compact toroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, D.C.; Fernandez, J.C.; Rej, D.J. (comps.)

    1990-05-01

    The US-Japan Workshop on Field-Reversed Configurations with Steady-State High-Temperature Fusion Plasma and the 11th US-Japan Workshop on Compact Toroids were held at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico on November 7--9, 1989. These proceedings contain the papers presented at the workshops as submitted by the authors. These papers have been indexed separately.

  11. US-Japan Workshop on Field-Reversed Configurations with Steady-State High-Temperature Fusion Plasmas and the 11th US-Japan Workshop on Compact Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, D. C.; Fernandez, J. C.; Rej, D. J.

    1990-05-01

    The U.S.-Japan Workshop on Field-Reversed Configurations with Steady-State High-Temperature Fusion Plasma and the 11th U.S.-Japan Workshop on Compact Toroids were held at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico on November 7 to 9, 1989. These proceedings contain the papers presented at the workshops as submitted by the authors. These papers have been indexed separately.

  12. Simulation of radiative divertor plasmas by Ar seeding with the full W-wall in JT-60SA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, H.; Shimizu, K.; Nakano, T.; Asakura, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Hoshino, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Radiative divertor plasmas for JT-60SA with a full tungsten (W) wall, which is one of options in future, have been simulated with a SOL/divertor integrated code, SONIC. A conventional modified-coronal radiation (MCR) model with a finite confinement time is used for both Ar and W for the purpose of wide-range parameter surveys for the divertor plasma to obtain the required conditions (q{sub t} ≤ 10 MW/m{sup 2}, n{sup Sep}{sub e-mid} = 3∝8 x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, P{sub rad} < ∝30 MW), saving the calculation time. At low W density ratio (n{sub W}/n{sub i} = 1 x 10{sup -5}), due to low radiative power from W ions, Ar density ratio (n{sub Ar}/n{sub i} ≥ 1.0 x 10{sup -3}) and a strong gas puff (Γ{sub p} ≥ 3.0 x 10{sup 22} s{sup -1}) are inevitable to suppress the divertor heat flux down to 10 MW/m{sup 2}. Increasing n{sub W}/n{sub i} to 1 x 10{sup -3} in the divertor region, the divertor heat load becomes low and the operative regions are expanded. While, the W production shall be suppressed since the W radiation is increased with replacement of Ar radiation and the particle recycling decreased. A Monte-Carlo module (IMPMC) implemented in SONIC for Ar seeding reveals that the spatial distribution of Ar ions is predominantly determined by shell structures of the Ar ions. The consistency between IMPMC and MCR calculations is demonstrated for the averaged n{sub Ar}/n{sub i} ratio, the electron density and temperature profiles on the divertor target and typical parameter such as the divertor heat load. It shows that the detailed analysis with IMPMC model can be speedily obtained, using a steady state solution obtained by MCR model as an initial state. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Warm compaction behaviors of iron-based powder lubricated by different kinds of graphite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖志瑜; 李元元; 倪东惠; 郭国文; 陈维平

    2003-01-01

    Warm compaction behaviors and their affecting factors such as compaction temperature, compaction pressure and lubricant concentration were studied. Effect of die wall lubrication on the powders warm compaction behavior was also studied. The use of smaller size colloidal graphite investigated can give a higher compact density and lesser spring-back effect than the use of flake graphite.

  14. Compact NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemich, Bernhard; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Zia, Wasif [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie (ITMC)

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  15. Compact Vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Bazeia, D; Marques, M A; Menezes, R; Zafalan, I

    2016-01-01

    We study a family of Maxwell-Higgs models, described by the inclusion of a function of the scalar field that represent generalized magnetic permeability. We search for vortex configurations which obey first-order differential equations that solve the equations of motion. We first deal with the asymptotic behavior of the field configurations, and then implement a numerical study of the solutions, the energy density and the magnetic field. We work with the generalized permeability having distinct profiles, giving rise to new models, and we investigate how the vortices behave, compared with the solutions of the corresponding standard models. In particular, we show how to build compact vortices, that is, vortex solutions with the energy density and magnetic field vanishing outside a compact region of the plane.

  16. Compact vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M.A.; Zafalan, I. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Fisica, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Menezes, R. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Rio Tinto, PB (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Departamento de Fisica, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2017-02-15

    We study a family of Maxwell-Higgs models, described by the inclusion of a function of the scalar field that represent generalized magnetic permeability. We search for vortex configurations which obey first-order differential equations that solve the equations of motion. We first deal with the asymptotic behavior of the field configurations, and then implement a numerical study of the solutions, the energy density and the magnetic field. We work with the generalized permeability having distinct profiles, giving rise to new models, and we investigate how the vortices behave, compared with the solutions of the corresponding standard models. In particular, we show how to build compact vortices, that is, vortex solutions with the energy density and magnetic field vanishing outside a compact region of the plane. (orig.)

  17. Compact fusion reactors

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Fusion research is currently to a large extent focused on tokamak (ITER) and inertial confinement (NIF) research. In addition to these large international or national efforts there are private companies performing fusion research using much smaller devices than ITER or NIF. The attempt to achieve fusion energy production through relatively small and compact devices compared to tokamaks decreases the costs and building time of the reactors and this has allowed some private companies to enter the field, like EMC2, General Fusion, Helion Energy, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics and Lockheed Martin. Some of these companies are trying to demonstrate net energy production within the next few years. If they are successful their next step is to attempt to commercialize their technology. In this presentation an overview of compact fusion reactor concepts is given.

  18. Vacuum vessel system design for the compact ignition tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddan, W. (Ebasco Services Inc., Princeton, NJ (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The compact ignition tokamak (CIT) is envisioned to be the test bed for the study of self- sustained, or ignited, fusion plasmas. The design basis for CIT is a 11-T toroidal field, 12-MA plasma current and peak fusion power of 500 MW. A major portion of this project is the vacuum vessel system, which includes the vacuum chamber, the divertor, first wall, and the robotics systems necessary to maintain the in-vessel components. The vacuum chamber is 2.1 m major radius torus with a D-shaped cross section. For hydrogenic species the base pressure is 10{sup {minus}7} Torr, with a total pumping speed of 5000 l/s. It is designed to withstand the forces resulting from plasma disruptions and be bakeable to approximately 350 {degree}C. A swept divertor and fixed limiters are provided. Both are carbon based structures designed to accommodate heat fluxes as large as 40 MW/m{sup 2} during the 5 s pulse. Articulated booms and manipulators will be deployed for in-vessel maintenance tasks, such as first wall removal/replacement and leak checking. This paper summarizes the engineering considerations and design status. In addition, the unique organization of the project's national design team, led by the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, and the integration into this organization of the industrial consortium responsible for the design and fabrication of the vacuum vessel system is described.

  19. Highly efficient metal-free growth of nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes on plasma-etched substrates for oxygen reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dingshan; Zhang, Qiang; Dai, Liming

    2010-11-03

    We have for the first time developed a simple plasma-etching technology to effectively generate metal-free particle catalysts for efficient metal-free growth of undoped and/or nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Compared with undoped CNTs, the newly produced metal-free nitrogen-containing CNTs were demonstrated to show relatively good electrocatalytic activity and long-term stability toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an acidic medium. Owing to the highly generic nature of the plasma etching technique, the methodology developed in this study can be applied to many other substrates for efficient growth of metal-free CNTs for various applications, ranging from energy related to electronic and to biomedical systems.

  20. Dynamics of energetic particle driven modes and MHD modes in wall-stabilized high-β plasmas on JT-60U and DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, G.; Okabayashi, M.; Aiba, N.; Boedo, J. A.; Ferron, J. R.; Hanson, J. M.; Hao, G. Z.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Holcomb, C. T.; In, Y.; Jackson, G. L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Luce, T. C.; McKee, G. R.; Osborne, T. H.; Pace, D. C.; Shinohara, K.; Snyder, P. B.; Solomon, W. M.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Watkins, J. G.; Zeng, L.; the DIII-D Team; the JT-60 Team

    2013-12-01

    In the wall-stabilized high-β plasmas in JT-60U and DIII-D, interactions between energetic particle (EP) driven modes (EPdMs) and edge localized modes (ELMs) have been observed. The interaction between the EPdM and ELM are reproducibly observed. Many EP diagnostics indicate a strong correlation between the distorted waveform of the EPdM and the EP transport to the edge. The waveform distortion is composed of higher harmonics (n ⩾ 2) and looks like a density snake near the plasma edge. According to statistical analyses, ELM triggering by the EPdMs requires a finite level of waveform distortion and pedestal recovery. ELM pacing by the EPdMs occurs when the repetition frequency of the EPdMs is higher than the natural ELM frequency. EPs transported by EPdMs are thought to contribute to change the edge stability.

  1. Analytical procedure for characterization of medieval wall-paintings by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syta, Olga; Rozum, Karol; Choińska, Marta [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Zielińska, Dobrochna [Institute of Archaeology, University of Warsaw, Krakowskie Przedmieście 26/28, 00-927 Warsaw (Poland); Żukowska, Grażyna Zofia [Chemical Faculty, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland); Kijowska, Agnieszka [National Museum in Warsaw, Aleje Jerozolimskie 3, 00-495 Warsaw (Poland); Wagner, Barbara, E-mail: barbog@chem.uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-11-01

    Analytical procedure for the comprehensive chemical characterization of samples from medieval Nubian wall-paintings by means of portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) was proposed in this work. The procedure was used for elemental and molecular investigations of samples from archeological excavations in Nubia (modern southern Egypt and northern Sudan). Numerous remains of churches with painted decorations dated back to the 7th–14th century were excavated in the region of medieval kingdoms of Nubia but many aspects of this art and its technology are still unknown. Samples from the selected archeological sites (Faras, Old Dongola and Banganarti) were analyzed in the form of transfers (n = 26), small fragments collected during the excavations (n = 35) and cross sections (n = 15). XRF was used to collect data about elemental composition, LA-ICPMS allowed mapping of selected elements, while RS was used to get the molecular information about the samples. The preliminary results indicated the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure for distinguishing the substances, from both the surface and sub-surface domains of the wall-paintings. The possibility to identify raw materials from the wall-paintings will be used in the further systematic, archeometric studies devoted to the detailed comparison of various historic Nubian centers. - Highlights: • The analytical procedure for examination of unique wall paintings was proposed. • Identification of pigments and supporting layers of wall-paintings was obtained. • Heterogeneous samples were mapped with the use of LA-ICPMS. • Anatase in the sub-surface regions of samples was detected by Raman spectroscopy.

  2. Studies of single-walled carbon nanotubes-induced hepatotoxicity by NMR-based metabonomics of rat blood plasma and liver extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bencheng; Zhang, Huashan; Lin, Zhiqing; Fang, Yanjun; Tian, Lei; Yang, Honglian; Yan, Jun; Liu, Huanliang; Zhang, Wei; Xi, Zhuge

    2013-05-01

    The toxicological effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated after intratracheal instillation in male Wistar rats over a 15-day period using metabonomic analysis of 1H (nuclear magnetic resonance) NMR spectra of blood plasma and liver tissue extracts. Concurrent liver histopathology examinations and plasma clinical chemistry analyses were also performed. Significant changes were observed in clinical chemistry features, including alkaline phosphatase, total protein, and total cholesterol, and in liver pathology, suggesting that SWCNTs clearly have hepatotoxicity in the rat. 1H NMR spectra and pattern recognition analyses from nanomaterial-treated rats showed remarkable differences in the excretion of lactate, trimethylamine oxide, bilineurin, phosphocholine, amylaceum, and glycogen. Indications of amino acid metabolism impairment were supported by increased lactate concentrations and decreased alanine concentrations in plasma. The rise in plasma and liver tissue extract concentrations of choline and phosphocholine, together with decreased lipids and lipoproteins, after SWCNTs treatment indicated a disruption of membrane fluidity caused by lipid peroxidation. Energy, amino acid, and fat metabolism appeared to be affected by SWCNTs exposure. Clinical chemistry and metabonomic approaches clearly indicated liver injury, which might have been associated with an indirect mechanism involving nanomaterial-induced oxidative stress.

  3. Analytical procedure for characterization of medieval wall-paintings by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syta, Olga; Rozum, Karol; Choińska, Marta; Zielińska, Dobrochna; Żukowska, Grażyna Zofia; Kijowska, Agnieszka; Wagner, Barbara

    2014-11-01

    Analytical procedure for the comprehensive chemical characterization of samples from medieval Nubian wall-paintings by means of portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) was proposed in this work. The procedure was used for elemental and molecular investigations of samples from archeological excavations in Nubia (modern southern Egypt and northern Sudan). Numerous remains of churches with painted decorations dated back to the 7th-14th century were excavated in the region of medieval kingdoms of Nubia but many aspects of this art and its technology are still unknown. Samples from the selected archeological sites (Faras, Old Dongola and Banganarti) were analyzed in the form of transfers (n = 26), small fragments collected during the excavations (n = 35) and cross sections (n = 15). XRF was used to collect data about elemental composition, LA-ICPMS allowed mapping of selected elements, while RS was used to get the molecular information about the samples. The preliminary results indicated the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure for distinguishing the substances, from both the surface and sub-surface domains of the wall-paintings. The possibility to identify raw materials from the wall-paintings will be used in the further systematic, archeometric studies devoted to the detailed comparison of various historic Nubian centers.

  4. Boundary conditions at the ablative walls in two-temperature modelling of thermal plasmas with reactive working gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekker, Leonid; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new set of boundary conditions at ablative hot walls with thermionic electron emission for two-temperature thermal arc models in which the temperature of electrons can deviate from the temperature of heavy particles,~{{T}\\text{e}}\

  5. Effects of parallel sound wave damping and drift kinetic damping on the resistive wall mode stability with various plasma rotation profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Liu, Yue

    2015-10-01

    > The effect of a parallel viscous force induced damping and the magnetic precessional drift resonance induced damping on the stability of the resistive wall mode (RWM) is numerically investigated for one of the advanced steady-state scenarios in international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER). The key element of the investigation is to study how different plasma rotation profiles affect the stability prediction. The single-fluid, toroidal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code MARS-F (Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 7, 2000, p. 3681) and the MHD-kinetic hybrid code MARS-K (Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 15, 2008, 112503) are used for this purpose. Three extreme rotation profiles are considered: (a) a uniform profile with no shear, (b) a profile with negative flow shear at the rational surface ( is the equilibrium safety factor), and (c) a profile with positive shear at . The parallel viscous force is found to be effective for the mode stabilization at high plasma flow speed (about a few percent of the Alfven speed) for the no shear flow profile and the negative shear flow profile, but the stable domain does not appear with the positive shear flow profile. The predicted eigenmode structure is different with different rotation profiles. With a self-consistent inclusion of the magnetic precession drift resonance of thermal particles in MARS-K computations, a lower critical flow speed, i.e. the minimum speed needed for full suppression of the mode, is obtained. Likewise the eigenmode structure is also modified by different rotation profiles in the kinetic results.

  6. Restricted access magnetic core-mesoporous shell microspheres with C8-modified interior pore-walls for the determination of diazepam in rat plasma by LC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaodan; Yu, Yingjia; Li, Yan; Ning, Suli; Liu, Tingting; Li, Fajie; Duan, Gengli

    2013-03-15

    In this study, a novel enrichment technique based on magnetic core-mesoporous shell microspheres with C8-modified interior pore-walls (C8-Fe₃O₄@mSiO₂) was successfully developed for the determination of diazepam in rat plasma by LC-MS. Due to the unique properties of the synthesized C8-Fe₃O₄@mSiO₂ microspheres (C8-modified magnetic mesoporous microsphere), small drug molecules like diazepam can enter the mesopore channels and be efficiently absorbed through hydrophobic interaction by interior C8-groups (Octyl functional groups). Large molecules like proteins are excluded from the mesopore channels as a result of size exclusion effect, leading to direct extraction of drug molecules from protein-rich biosmaples such as plasma without any other pretreatment procedure. Moreover, diazepam adsorbed C8-Fe₃O₄@mSiO₂ microspheres could be simply and rapidly isolated through placing a magnet on the bottom of container, and then diazepam could be easily eluted from C8-Fe₃O₄@mSiO₂ microspheres for further LC-MS analysis. Extraction conditions such as amounts of C8-Fe₃O₄@mSiO₂ microspheres added, adsorption time, elution solvent and elution time were investigated. Method validations including linear range, the limit of detection, precision, and recovery were also studied. The results indicated that the proposed method based on C8-Fe₃O₄@mSiO₂ microspheres was simple and accurate for the analysis of diazepam in the rat plasma. And it will provide new ideas for analyzing plasma concentration and pharmacokinetics of similar drugs.

  7. Determination of tryptophan and kynurenine in human plasma by liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection with multi-wall carbon nanotube-modified glassy carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lihong; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Yulin; Wang, Fang; Chen, Zilin

    2011-08-01

    A novel method was developed for the simultaneous determination of kynurenine and tryptophan by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection at multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-modified glassy carbon electrode. The separation and detection conditions were optimized. The typical HPLC experiments were conducted by using a reversed-phase ODS column with a mobile phase consisting of stock acetate buffer (pH 5)-methanol (4:1, v/v) using an isocratic elution at the flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The obtained LODs for kynurenine and tryptophane were 0.5 and 0.4 µmol/L, respectively. The analytical method for human plasma samples was validated and confirmed by LC-UV and LC-MS. The recoveries were in the range of 84.8-110%, and the precision was lower than 5.9%. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Unraveling wall conditioning effects on plasma facing components in NSTX-U with the Materials Analysis Particle Probe (MAPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, F.; Allain, J. P.; Kaita, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Buzi, L.; Koel, B. E.

    2016-11-01

    A novel Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) diagnostic, the Materials Analysis Particle Probe (MAPP), has been recently commissioned in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U). MAPP is currently monitoring the chemical evolution of the PFCs in the NSTX-U lower divertor at 107 cm from the tokamak axis on a day-to-day basis. In this work, we summarize the methodology that was adopted to obtain qualitative and quantitative descriptions of the samples chemistry. Using this methodology, we were able to describe all the features in all our spectra to within a standard deviation of ±0.22 eV in position and ±248 s-1 eV in area. Additionally, we provide an example of this methodology with data of boronized ATJ graphite exposed to NSTX-U plasmas.

  9. Microstructural evolution and mechanical property of Ti-6Al-4V wall deposited by continuous plasma arc additive manufacturing without post heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jianjun; Lv, Yaohui; Liu, Yuxin; Sun, Zhe; Wang, Kaibo; Li, Zhuguo; Wu, Yixiong; Xu, Binshi

    2017-05-01

    Plasma arc additive manufacturing (PAM) is a novel additive manufacturing (AM) technology due to its big potential in improving efficiency, convenience and being cost-savings compared to other AM processes of high energy bea\\m. In this research, several Ti-6Al-4V thin walls were deposited by optimized weld wire-feed continuous PAM process (CPAM), in which the heat input was gradually decreased layer by layer. The deposited thin wall consisted of various morphologies, which includes epitaxial growth of prior β grains, horizontal layer bands, martensite and basket weave microstructure, that depends on the heat input, multiple thermal cycles and gradual cooling rate in the deposition process. By gradually reducing heat input of each bead and using continuous current in the PAM process, the average yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation reach about 877MPa, 968MPa and 1.5%, respectively, which exceed the standard level of forging. The mechanical property was strengthened and toughened due to weakening the aspect ratio of prior β grains and separating nano-dispersoids among α lamellar. Furthermore, this research demonstrates that the CPAM process has a potential to manufacture or remanufacture in AM components of metallic biomaterials without post-processing heat treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of sample digestion techniques for the determination of trace and residual catalyst metal content in single-wall carbon nanotubes by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinberg, Patricia, E-mail: patricia.grinberg@nrc.ca [Measurement Science and Standards, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa (Canada); Sturgeon, Ralph E. [Measurement Science and Standards, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa (Canada); Diehl, Liange de O.; Bizzi, Cezar A. [Measurement Science and Standards, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa (Canada); Chemistry Department, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria (Brazil); Flores, Erico M.M. [Chemistry Department, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria (Brazil)

    2015-03-01

    A single-wall carbon nanotube material produced by laser ablation of renewable biochar in the presence of Ni and Co catalyst was characterized for residual catalyst (Co and Ni) as well as trace metal impurity content (Fe, Mo, Cr, Pb and Hg) by isotope dilution ICP-MS following sample digestion. Several matrix destruction procedures were evaluated, including a multi-step microwave-assisted acid digestion, dry ashing at 450 °C and microwave-induced combustion with oxygen. Results were benchmarked against those derived from neutron activation analysis and also supported by solid sampling continuum source GF-AAS for several of the elements. Although laborious to execute, the multi-step microwave-assisted acid digestion proved to be most reliable for recovery of the majority of the analytes, although content of Cr remained biased low for each approach, likely due to its presence as refractory carbide. - Highlights: • Determination of trace and residual catalyst metal content in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. • Comparative study of digestion methodology combined with high precision isotope dilution ICP-MS for quantitation of elements of toxicologic relevance. • Results were benchmarked against those derived from neutron activation analysis and also supported by solid sampling continuum source GF-AAS for several of the elements.

  11. Kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the interactions between the components of human plasma kinin-forming system and isolated and purified cell wall proteins of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seweryn, Karolina; Karkowska-Kuleta, Justyna; Wolak, Natalia; Bochenska, Oliwia; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Kozik, Andrzej; Rapala-Kozik, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Cell wall proteins of Candida albicans, besides their best known role in the adhesion of this fungal pathogen to host's tissues, also bind some soluble proteins, present in body fluids and involved in maintaining the biochemical homeostasis of the human organism. In particular, three plasma factors - high-molecular-mass kininogen (HK), factor XII (FXII) and prekallikrein (PPK) - have been shown to adhere to candidal cells. These proteins are involved in the surface-contact-catalyzed production of bradykinin-related peptides (kinins) that contribute to inflammatory states associated with microbial infections. We recently identified several proteins, associated with the candidal cell walls, and probably involved in the binding of HK. In our present study, a list of potential FXII- and PPK-binding proteins was proposed, using an affinity selection (on agarose-coupled FXII or PPK) from a whole mixture of β-1,3-glucanase-extrated cell wall-associated proteins and the mass-spectrometry protein identification. Five of these fungal proteins, including agglutinin-like sequence protein 3 (Als3), triosephosphate isomerase 1 (Tpi1), enolase 1 (Eno1), phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (Gpm1) and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase 1 (Gpi1), were purified and characterized in terms of affinities to the human contact factors, using the surface plasmon resonance measurements. Except Gpm1 that bound only PPK, and Als3 that exhibited an affinity to HK and FXII, the other isolated proteins interacted with all three contact factors. The determined dissociation constants for the identified protein complexes were of 10(-7) M order, and the association rate constants were in a range of 10(4)-10(5) M(-1)s(-1). The identified fungal pathogen-host protein interactions are potential targets for novel anticandidal therapeutic approaches.

  12. Research on Pressure Characteristics of Self-compacting Concrete Applied in AP1000 Nuclear Structure Module Wall%自密实混凝土在AP1000核电结构模块中的侧压力特点研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵建忠; 武伟

    2016-01-01

    自密实混凝土具有很高的流动性,在AP1000结构模块墙体中应用较广。通过对自密实混凝土在浇筑过程中钢模板的应变和位移情况监测,整理结构模块的应变和位移变化数据,分析提出自密实混凝土对结构模块钢板的侧压力特点。%With very high fluidity, self⁃compacting concrete is widely used in AP1000 nuclear structure module wall. Through detecting the displacement and strain change of modular structure when self compacting concrete was pouring in the module, deformation data was collected. Based on the data, pressure characteristics on the module steel structure are put forward.

  13. Effects of warm compaction on mechanical properties of sintered P/M steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Jian-hong; YE Tu-ming; PENG Yuan-dong; XIA Qing-lin; WANG Hong-zhong

    2007-01-01

    The green and sintered densities, and tensile strength of sintered P/M steels produced by cold compaction, warm compaction, warm compaction combined with die wall lubrication (DWL) were measured under various compaction pressures using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) emulsion as the die wall lubricant. The effects of warm compaction on the mechanical properties were studied. The tensile fracture behaviors of cold compaction and warm compaction were studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results show that the density of sintered P/M steel prepared by warm compaction or warm compaction with DWL is higher than that by cold compaction under all compaction pressures. Meanwhile, the highest tensile strength is obtained by combination of warm compaction and die wall lubrication under all compaction pressures. The SEM results show that the fracture modes of the sintered samples prepared by cold compaction and warm compaction at 700 MPa are the mixed mode of ductile fracture and brittle fracture, and obvious dimples can be found in some regions. The fracture of sample prepared by cold compaction is uneven and has irregular and big pores, but that by warm compaction is relatively even and the pores are round mostly, and the samples have many obvious dimples on the whole fracture surface.

  14. Effect of Plasma Treatment on Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for the Detection of H2S and SO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Zhang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available H2S and SO2 are important characteristic gases of partial discharge (PD generated by latent insulated defects in gas insulated switchgear (GIS. The detection of H2S and SO2 is of great significance in the diagnosis and assessment of the operating status of GIS. In this paper, we perform experiments on the gas sensitivity of unmodified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs and those modified by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD air plasma at different times (30, 60 and 120 s for H2S and SO2, respectively. The results show that the sensitivity and response time of modified MWNTs to H2S are both improved, whereas the opposite effects are observed for SO2. The modified MWNTs have almost zero sensitivity to SO2. Thus, the MWNTs modified by atmospheric pressure DBD air plasma present good selectivity to H2S, and have great potential in H2S detection.

  15. Effects of O 2 and N 2/H 2 plasma treatments on the neuronal cell growth on single-walled carbon nanotube paper scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ok Ja; Lee, Hyun Jung; Jang, Yeong Mi; Kim, Hyun Woo; Lee, Won Bok; Kim, Sung Su; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2011-08-01

    The O 2 and N 2/H 2 plasma treatments of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) papers as scaffolds for enhanced neuronal cell growth were conducted to functionalize their surfaces with different functional groups and to roughen their surfaces. To evaluate the effects of the surface roughness and functionalization modifications of the SWCNT papers, we investigated the neuronal morphology, mitochondrial membrane potential, and acetylcholine/acetylcholinesterase levels of human neuroblastoma during SH-SY5Y cell growth on the treated SWCNT papers. Our results demonstrated that the plasma-chemical functionalization caused changes in the surface charge states with functional groups with negative and positive charges and then the increased surface roughness enhanced neuronal cell adhesion, mitochondrial membrane potential, and the level of neurotransmitter in vitro. The cell adhesion and mitochondrial membrane potential on the negatively charged SWCNT papers were improved more than on the positively charged SWCNT papers. Also, measurements of the neurotransmitter level showed an enhanced acetylcholine level on the negatively charged SWCNT papers compared to the positively charged SWCNT papers.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of the NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/Ni{sub 3}Fe nanocomposite powder and compacts obtained by mechanical milling and spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinca, T.F.; Neamţu, B.V.; Popa, F.; Tarţa, V.F. [Materials Sciences and Engineering Department, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, 103-105, Muncii Avenue, 400641 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Pascuta, P. [Physics and Chemistry Department, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, 103-105 Muncii Avenue, 400641 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Takacs, A.F. [Faculty of Physics, Babeş-Bolyai University, 1 Mihail Kogălniceanu, 400084 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Chicinaş, I., E-mail: Ionel.Chicinas@stm.utcluj.ro [Materials Sciences and Engineering Department, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, 103-105, Muncii Avenue, 400641 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-15

    Nanocomposite powder and compacts of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/Ni{sub 3}Fe type were synthesized using mechanical milling and spark plasma sintering (SPS) techniques. The samples have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), laser particles size analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX). The nanocomposite powder was obtained by mechanical milling in a high planetary ball mill of nanocrystalline NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and nanocrystalline Ni{sub 3}Fe powders. The nanocomposite powder consists from Ni{sub 3}Fe particles covered at the surface with a layer of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} fine particles and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles. The nanocomposite particles have the median diameter d{sub 50} of 1.6 μm. The sintering in 400–600 °C temperature range preserve the nanocomposite phases but lead to a high porosity. The nanocomposite compacts consist in Ni{sub 3}Fe clusters surrounded by NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. A sintering temperature of 800 °C leads to a good density for the nanocomposite compacts and to the new phase formation. The new phase is a wustite type (Fe{sub 1−x}Ni{sub x}O) and is formed at the metal/ceramic interface. A change in the Ni/Fe ratio, in the spinel structure, was evidenced during sintering. Sintering at a temperature of 800 °C, leads to the formation of a mixed iron–nickel ferrite with a very small amount of nickel, Ni{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  17. Effect of Negative Pulse Width on Compactness of Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation Coatings on Mg-Gd-Y Alloy%负向脉宽对Mg-Gd-Y合金微弧氧化膜致密性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭泉忠; 杜克勤; 朱秀荣; 王荣; 徐永东; 王福会

    2013-01-01

    通过在特定的电参数下改变负向脉宽,在Mg-Gd-Y合金表面制备了不同的微弧氧化膜.利用扫描电镜和电化学方法研究氧化膜的显微组织和电化学行为.结果表明:负向脉宽对于微弧氧化膜的致密性具有重要影响,适当的负向脉宽可以有效地提高膜层致密性,而稍低或者过高的负向脉宽都会降低氧化膜的致密性,从而降低涂层的耐腐蚀性.%The effect of negative pulse width of asymmetric bipolar pulse on the compactness of plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating on Mg-Gd-Y alloy is not yet revealed nowadays. Here, PEO coatings on Mg-Gd-Y alloy were prepared by means of bipolar pulse whose negative pulse width was changed within a desired range. The microstructure and corrosion performance of the coatings were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and electrochemical measure ments respectively. The results show that negative pulse width plays an important role on compact ness of PEO coatings; and with negative pulse width within a suitable range the compactness of coatings can be surely enhanced, as a sequence, the corrosion resistance of the coatings is evidently increased.

  18. Modification of multi-walled carbon nanotubes by plasma treatment and further use as templates for growth of CdS nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chun-Hao; Wang, Cheng-Chien; Chen, Chuh-Yung

    2006-11-28

    In this study, we present a novel method for preparing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) grafted with a poly(2-methacrylic acid 3-(bis-carboxymethylamino)-2-hydroxy-propyl ester) (GMA-IDA)-cadmium sulfide complex (CNTs-G-ICdS complex) through plasma-induced grafting polymerization. The characteristics of the MWCNTs after being grafted with the GMA-IDA polymer were monitored by a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscope. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) shows that the amount of GMA-IDA grafted onto the MWCNTs increases with the concentration of GMA-IDA monomer. The complex resulting from GMA-IDA polymer grafting onto the MWCNTs, CNTs-G-I (15%), shows excellent dispersion properties in aqueous solution and has high Zeta potential values over a wide range of pH values, from 2 to 12. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy was used to confirm the successful chemical modification of MWCNTs through the plasma treatment. The chelating groups, -N(CH(2)COO(-))(2) in the GMA-IDA polymer grafted on the surface of the CNTs-G-I, are the coordination sites for chelating cadmium ions, and are further used as nano-templates for the growth of CdS nanocrystals (quantum dots). Moreover, TEM microscopy reveals that the size of the CdS nanocrystals on the CNT surfaces increases with increasing S(2-) concentration. In addition, high resolution x-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy was used to characterize the functional groups on the surface of the MWCNTs after chemical modification by the plasma treatment and grafting with GMA-IDA polymer.

  19. Compaction behavior of dry granulated red wall tile paste prepared using raw materials from Rio de Janeiro State Comportamento de compactação de massa de revestimento poroso base vermelha granulada a seco preparada com matérias-primas do estado do Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. G. Sousa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the results of a study about on the compaction behavior of a dry granulated red wall tile paste. The ceramic paste was formulated using raw materials of the Rio de Janeiro state. The raw materials were dry-ground and then microgranulated using a mixer of high intensity. The produced powder was characterized regarding X-ray diffraction, chemical composition, granule size analysis and morphology. The moisture content of the granulated powder (moisture mass/dry mass varied between 0 and 10%. The granulated powder with different moisture contents was submitted to cold compaction process using a uniaxial die-pressing technique with compaction pressure up to 60 MPa. The compaction behavior of the wall tile powder was evaluated through compaction response and compaction rate diagrams. The development of the microstructure during compaction process was followed by scanning electron microscopy. The experimental results show that the green density of the tile compacts behaves as a function of moisture content. It was also found that the compaction process is ruled, at the applied pressure range, by two dominant mechanisms including granule rearrangement and plastic deformation. The rate of densification is high initially, but then decreases rapidly for pressures above apparent yield pressure (2.44 - 5.38 MPa. In addition, the better compaction efficiency was found to be influenced by the moisture content.Este trabalho apresenta os resultados de um estudo sobre o comportamento de compactação de uma massa de revestimento cerâmico poroso base vermelha granulada pelo processo via seca. A massa cerâmica foi formulada usando matérias-primas do estado do Rio de Janeiro. As matérias-primas foram moídas a seco e em seguida microgranuladas usando um microgranulador de alta intensidade. O pó obtido foi caracterizado em termos de difração de raios X, composição química, análise de tamanho de grânulos e morfologia. O conteúdo de

  20. Warm Compaction Process of P/M Steels by Orthogonal Testing Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Tuming; YI Jianhong; PENG Yuandong; XIA Qinglin; WANG Hongzhong

    2008-01-01

    In order to achieve higher density of P/M steels using the die wall lubrication compacting method or powder lubricant in warm compaction process,the influence of different process parameters on the green density of warm compacted samples was studied.According to the orthogonal test method,the authors systematically study the influence of the different compaction pressure,condition of lubrication and compaction temperature on the green density of the sample in the warm compaction process,and put forward the optimal process parameter of warm compaction experiment.It is found that,a high compaction pressure(≥700 MPa),die wall lubrication combined with a small amount of internal lubricants,and fitting compaction temperature by different condition of lubrication,are the optimal parameters in warm compaction process.

  1. Linear Shrinkage Behaviour of Compacted Loam Masonry Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAWAB ALI LAKHO

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Walls of wet loam, used in earthen houses, generally experience more shrinkage which results in cracks and less compressive strength. This paper presents a technique of producing loam masonry blocks that are compacted in drained state during casting process in order to minimize shrinkage. For this purpose, loam masonry blocks were cast and compacted at a pressure of 6 MPa and then dried in shade by covering them in plastic sheet. The results show that linear shrinkage of 2% occurred which is smaller when compared to un-compacted wet loam walls. This implies that the loam masonry blocks compacted in drained state is expected to perform better than un-compacted wet loam walls.

  2. Compaction Behavior of Isomalt after Roll Compaction

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force....

  3. Spark plasma sintering of silicon carbide, multi-walled carbon nanotube and graphene reinforced zirconium diboride ceramic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaraman Yadhukulakrishnan, Govindaraajan

    Scope and Method of Study: Space vehicles re-entering the earth's atmosphere experience very high temperatures due to aerodynamic heating. Ultra-high temperature ceramics (UHTC) with melting point higher than 3200°C are promising materials for thermal protection systems of such space vehicles re-entering the earth's atmosphere. Among several UHTC systems ZrB2 based ceramic composites are particularly important for thermal protection systems due to their better mechanical and thermoelectric properties and high oxidation resistance. In this study spark plasma sintering of SiC, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and graphene nano platelets (GNP) reinforced ZrB2 ultra-high temperature ceramic matrix composites is reported. Findings and Conclusions: Systematic investigations on the effect of reinforcement type (SiC, CNTs and GNP) and content (10-40 vol.% SiC, 2-6 vol.% CNTs and 2-6 vol.% GNP) on densification behavior, microstructure development, and mechanical properties (microhardness, bi-axial flexural strength, and indentation fracture toughness) are reported. With the similar SPS parameters near-full densification (>99% relative density) was achieved with 10-40 vol.% SiC, 4-6 vol.% CNT reinforced composites. Highly dense composites were obtained in 4-6 vol.% GNP reinforced composites. The SiC, CNT and GNP reinforcement improved the indentation fracture toughness of the composites through a range of toughening mechanisms, including particle shearing, crack deflection at the particle-matrix interface, and grain pull-outs for ZrB2-SiC composites, CNT pull-outs and crack deflection in ZrB2-CNT composites and crack deflection, crack bridging and GNP sheet pull-out for ZrB2 -GNP composites.

  4. Formation of a compact toroid for enhanced efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozgovoy, A. G. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Romadanov, I. V.; Ryzhkov, S. V., E-mail: ryzhkov@power.bmstu.ru [Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15

    We report here our results on the formation of a plasma configuration with the generic name of compact toroid (CT). A method of compact toroid formation to confine, heat and compress a plasma is investigated. Formation of a compact torus using an additional toroidal magnetic field helps to increase the plasma current to a maintainable level of the original magnetic field. We design the Compact Toroid Challenge (CTC) experiment in order to improve the magnetic flux trapping during field reversal in the formation of a compact toroid. The level of the magnetic field immersed in the plasma about 70% of the primary field is achieved. The CTC device and scheme of high level capturing of magnetic flux are presented.

  5. Improvement of the mechanical properties of spark plasma sintered hap bioceramics by decreasing the grain size and by adding multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljović Đ.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Composites based on HAP and oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (o-MWCNT and monophase HAP materials were processed by spark plasma sintering. Starting from stoichiometric nano-sized HAP powder, monophase bioceramics were obtained with a density close to the theoretical one and with an average grain size of several hundred nanometers to micron dimensions. It was shown that decreasing the sintering temperature resulted in a decrease of the grain size, which affected an increase in the fracture toughness and hardness. The fracture toughness of an HAP/ o-MWCNT bioceramic processed at 900°C for only 5 min was 30 % higher than that of monophase HAP materials obtained under the same conditions. The addition of MWCNT during SPS processing of HAP materials caused a decrease in the grain size to the nano-dimension, which was one of the reasons for the improved mechanical properties. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III45019 i FP7-REGPOT-2009-1 NANOTECH FTM, Grant Agreement Number: 245916

  6. 高海拔地区碾压式沥青混凝土心墙施工技术--以旁多水利枢纽大坝为例%Construction technology of roller-compacted asphalt concrete core walls in high-altitude areas:A case study of dams in Pangduo Hydraulic Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向尚君; 石林; 廖佼

    2014-01-01

    为总结碾压式沥青混凝土心墙在高海拔地区的施工经验,以首次在西藏高海拔地区应用的西藏旁多水利枢纽大坝碾压式沥青混凝土心墙施工为例,从原材料、施工机械设备、沥青混合料施工配合比、沥青混合料拌和、沥青混凝土心墙施工方法、温度控制及防护措施等方面针对制约高海拔地区碾压式沥青混凝土心墙施工的主要问题进行了总结,指出高地震烈度、强紫外线辐射、深覆盖层、高寒等地质和气候特点是制约高海拔地区碾压式沥青混凝土心墙施工的主要问题,初步探寻出了加大沥青含量提高变形能力、采用帆布覆盖措施防止紫外线辐射、采取棉被和砂砾石覆盖措施进行保温等解决方法,并在旁多水利枢纽大坝碾压式沥青混凝土心墙施工中得到成功应用。%In order to summarize the construction experience of roller-compacted asphalt concrete core walls in high-altitude areas, the construction of core walls of the dams in the Pangduo Hydraulic Project, which were first used in the high-altitude area in Tibet, was taken as an instance. The construction technology for the roller-compacted hydraulic asphalt concrete cores in high-altitude areas is discussed, including raw materials, construction machinery and equipment, the construction mixing ratio of the asphalt mixture, the mixing technology of the asphalt mixture, construction methods of asphalt concrete core walls, temperature control and protective measures. It is concluded that geological and climatic characteristics such as high seismic intensity, strong ultraviolet radiation, deep overburden, and the extremely cold climate mainly affected the construction of roller-compacted asphalt concrete core walls in high-altitude areas. Methods to solve these problems are proposed, such as improving the deformation capacity by increasing the asphalt content, preventing ultraviolet radiation by using a

  7. Development and application of a tree-code in simulation scenarios of the plasma-wall interaction; Entwicklung und Anwendung eines Tree-Codes in Simulationsszenarios der Plasma-Wand-Wechselwirkung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berberich, Benjamin

    2012-03-15

    Processes in the plasma edge layer of magnetic fusion devices occur on widely disparate length- and time-scales. Also recently developed features in this particular region, such as stochastic magnetic fields, underline the necessity for three dimensional, full-kinetic simulation tools. Contemporary programs often deploy ad hoc assumptions and approximations for microscopic phenomena for which self-consistent ab initio models in principle exist, but are still computationally too expensive or complex to implement. Recently, mesh-free methods have matured into a new class of tools for such first-principles computations which thanks to their geometric flexibility are highly promising for tackling complicated TOKAMAK regions. In this work we have develop the massively parallel Tree-Code PEPC-B (Pretty Efficient Parallel Coulomb solver) into a new tool for plasma material interaction studies. After a brief overview of the working principles of Tree-Codes two main topic groups are addressed: First the leap-frog Boris integration scheme is discussed and its numerical limitations are pointed out. To overcome these limitations the method is enhanced to a guiding-center integrator. As a proof of principal, numerical experiments are conducted reproducing the anticipated drift kinetic aspects of particle orbits. It turns out that this new technique is much less sensitive to large time steps than the original concept was. One major drawback of mesh-free methods which hinders their direct use for plasma-edge simulations is the difficulty in representing solid structures and associated boundary conditions. Therefore, an alternative concept is proposed using charge carrying Wall-Particles, which fits naturally in the mesh-free doctrine. These developments incorporate the second main topic group of this report. To prove the physical correctness of this new idea, a quasi one dimensional plasma-wall interface scenario is chosen. By studying the system with great detail, good agreement

  8. Effect of the chamber wall on fluorocarbon-assisted atomic layer etching of SiO{sub 2} using cyclic Ar/C{sub 4}F{sub 8} plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Masatoshi [Electronic Device Systems Business Group, Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation, 794 Higashitoyoi, Kudamatsu, Yamaguchi 744-0002 (Japan); Metzler, Dominik; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S., E-mail: oehrlein@umd.edu [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Li, Chen [Department of Physics, Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    The authors studied the effect of the temperature and chemical state of the chamber wall on process performance for atomic layer etching of SiO{sub 2} using a steady-state Ar plasma, periodic injection of a defined number of C{sub 4}F{sub 8} molecules, and synchronized plasma-based Ar{sup +} ion bombardment. To evaluate these effects, the authors measured the quartz coupling window temperature. The plasma gas phase chemistry was characterized using optical emission spectroscopy. It was found that although the thickness of the polymer film deposited in each cycle is constant, the etching behavior changed, which is likely related to a change in the plasma gas phase chemistry. The authors found that the main gas phase changes occur after C{sub 4}F{sub 8} injection. The C{sub 4}F{sub 8} and the quartz window react and generate SiF and CO. The emission intensity changes with wall surface state and temperature. Therefore, changes in the plasma gas species generation can lead to a shift in etching performance during processing. During initial cycles, minimal etching is observed, while etching gradually increases with cycle number.

  9. On Compact Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping WANG; Jiong Sheng LI

    2005-01-01

    Let G be a finite simple graph with adjacency matrix A, and let P(A) be the convex closure of the set of all permutation matrices commuting with A. G is said to be compact if every doubly stochastic matrix which commutes with A is in P(A). In this paper, we characterize 3-regular compact graphs and prove that if G is a connected regular compact graph, G - v is also compact, and give a family of almost regular compact connected graphs.

  10. Compactness in Metric Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakasho Kazuhisa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we mainly formalize in Mizar [2] the equivalence among a few compactness definitions of metric spaces, norm spaces, and the real line. In the first section, we formalized general topological properties of metric spaces. We discussed openness and closedness of subsets in metric spaces in terms of convergence of element sequences. In the second section, we firstly formalize the definition of sequentially compact, and then discuss the equivalence of compactness, countable compactness, sequential compactness, and totally boundedness with completeness in metric spaces.

  11. Synthesis of chemically-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes by counter-current ammonia gas injection into the induction thermal plasma process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahverdi, Ali

    Pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are poorly dispersible and insoluble in many solvents and need to be chemically modified prior to their use in many applications. This work is focused on the investigation of the synthesis of chemically modified SWCNTs material through an in situ approach. The main objectives of the presented research are: 1) to explore the in situ chemical process during the synthesis of SWCNT and 2) to closely examine the effect of a reactive environment on SWCNTs. Effects of the catalyst type and content on the SWCNTs final product, synthesized by induction thermal plasma (ITP), were studied to replace toxic cobalt (Co) in the feedstock. In this regard, three different catalyst mixtures (i.e. Ni-Y2O3, Ni-Co-Y2O3, and Ni-Mo-Y2O3) were used. Experimental results showed that the catalyst type affects the quality of the SWCNT final product. Similar quality SWCNTs can be produced when the same amount of Co was replaced by Ni. Moreover, the results observed in this experimental work were further explained by thermodynamic calculation results. Thermogravimetry (TG) was used throughout the work to characterize the SWCNTs product. TG was firstly standardized by studying the effects of three main instrumental parameters (temperature ramp, TR, initial mass of the sample, IM, and gas flow rate, FR) on the Tonset and full-width half maximum (FWHM) obtained from TG and derivative TG graphs of carbon black, respectively. Therefore, a two-level factorial statistical design was performed. The statistical analysis showed that the effect of TR, IM, and to a lower extent, FR, is significant on FWHM and insignificant on Tonset. A methodology was then developed based upon the SWCNTs synthesis using the ITP system, through an in situ chemistry approach. Ammonia (NH3) was selected and counter-currently injected into the ITP reactor at three different flow rates and by four different nozzle designs. Numerical simulation indicated a better mixing of NH3 in

  12. Pathway to a compact SASE FEL device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattoli, G., E-mail: giuseppe.dattoli@enea.it [ENEA – Centro Ricerche Frascati, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Di Palma, E. [ENEA – Centro Ricerche Frascati, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Petrillo, V. [Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Rau, Julietta V. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, ISM-CNR, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100-00133 Rome (Italy); Sabia, E.; Spassovsky, I. [ENEA – Centro Ricerche Frascati, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Biedron, S.G.; Einstein, J.; Milton, S.V. [CSU – Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2015-10-21

    Newly developed high peak power lasers have opened the possibilities of driving coherent light sources operating with laser plasma accelerated beams and wave undulators. We speculate on the combination of these two concepts and show that the merging of the underlying technologies could lead to new and interesting possibilities to achieve truly compact, coherent radiator devices.

  13. Pathway to a Compact SASE FEL Device

    CERN Document Server

    Dattoli, G; Petrillo, V; Rau, J V; Sabia, E; Spassovsky, I; Biedron, S G; Einstein, J; Milton, S V

    2015-01-01

    Newly developed high peak power lasers have opened the possibilities of driving coherent light sources operating with laser plasma accelerated beams and wave undulators. We speculate on the combination of these two concepts and show that the merging of the underlying technologies could lead to new and interesting possibilities to achieve truly compact, coherent radiator devices.

  14. Steady-state operation in compact tokamaks with copper coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Azizov, E. A.; Bykov, A. S.; Dnestrovsky, A. Yu.; Dokuka, V. N.; Gladush, G. G.; Golikov, A. A.; Goncharov, P. R.; Gryaznevich, M.; Gurevich, M. I.; Ivanov, A. A.; Khairutdinov, R. R.; Khripunov, V. I.; Kingham, D.; Klishchenko, A. V.; Kurnaev, V. A.; Lukash, V. E.; Medvedev, S. Yu.; Savrukhin, P. V.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Shpansky, Yu. S.; Sykes, A.; Voss, G.; Zhirkin, A. V.

    2011-07-01

    This paper considers a fast track to non-energy applications of nuclear fusion that is associated with the 'fusion for neutrons' (F4N) paradigm. Being a useful product accompanying energy, fusion neutrons are more valuable than the energy released in DT reactions and they are urgently needed for research purposes and to develop and validate modern technologies. In the near future neutron yield in fusion devices will become significantly larger than that of fission and accelerator sources. This paper describes a compact tokamak fusion neutron source based on a small spherical tokamak (FNS-ST) with a MW range of DT fusion power and considers the key physics issues of this device. The major and minor radii are ~0.5 and ~0.3 m with magnetic field ~1.5 T, heating power less than 15 MW and plasma current 1-2 MA. The production rate of DT neutrons of (3-10) × 1017 n s-1 and their flux at the first wall of 0.2 MW m-2 ensure that the device is capable of fusion-fission demonstration experiments. The problems of major concern are discharge initiation, current drive, plasma—fast ion beam stability and high first wall and divertor loads. The conceptual design provides solutions to these problems and suggests the feasibility of the FNS-ST.

  15. Compaction behavior of isomalt after roll compaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quodbach, Julian; Mosig, Johanna; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2012-09-27

    The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force. In all cases, the tensile strength increases with raising tableting forces. The specific compaction force has a different influence. For isomalt alone the tensile strength is highest for tablets made from granules prepared at 2 kN/cm and 6 kN/cm and decreases at higher values, i.e., >10 kN/cm. Tensile strength of the blend tablets is almost one third lower compared to the strongest tablets of pure isomalt. Friability of pure isomalt tablets is above the limit. Disintegration time is longest when the tensile strength is at its maximum and decreases with higher porosity and lower tensile strengths. Isomalt proves to be suitable for tableting after roll compaction. Even though the capacity as a binder might not be as high as of other excipients, it is a further alternative for the formulation scientist.

  16. Compaction Behavior of Isomalt after Roll Compaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kleinebudde

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force. In all cases, the tensile strength increases with raising tableting forces. The specific compaction force has a different influence. For isomalt alone the tensile strength is highest for tablets made from granules prepared at 2 kN/cm and 6 kN/cm and decreases at higher values, i.e., >10 kN/cm. Tensile strength of the blend tablets is almost one third lower compared to the strongest tablets of pure isomalt. Friability of pure isomalt tablets is above the limit. Disintegration time is longest when the tensile strength is at its maximum and decreases with higher porosity and lower tensile strengths. Isomalt proves to be suitable for tableting after roll compaction. Even though the capacity as a binder might not be as high as of other excipients, it is a further alternative for the formulation scientist.

  17. Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Okamura, Hajime; Ouchi, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete was first developed in 1988 to achieve durable concrete structures. Since then, various investigations have been carried out and this type of concrete has been used in practical structures in Japan, mainly by large construction companies. Investigations for establishing a rational mix-design method and self-compactability testing methods have been carried out from the viewpoint of making self-compacting concrete a standard concrete.

  18. Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Okamura, Hajime; Ouchi, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete was first developed in 1988 to achieve durable concrete structures. Since then, various investigations have been carried out and this type of concrete has been used in practical structures in Japan, mainly by large construction companies. Investigations for establishing a rational mix-design method and self-compactability testing methods have been carried out from the viewpoint of making self-compacting concrete a standard concrete.

  19. Color-based tracking of plasma dust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villamayor, Michelle Marie S., E-mail: mvillamayor@nip.upd.edu.ph; Soriano, Maricor N.; Ramos, Henry J. [National Institute of Physics, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines); Kato, Shuichi; Wada, Motoi [Graduate School of Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Color-based tracking to observe agglomeration of deposited particles inside a compact planar magnetron during plasma discharge was done by creating high dynamic range (HDR) images of photos captured by a Pentax K10D digital camera. Carbon erosion and redeposition was also monitored using the technique. The HDR images were subjected to a chromaticity-based constraint discoloration inside the plasma chamber indicating film formation or carbon redeposition. Results show that dust deposition occurs first near the evacuation pumps due to the pressure gradient and then accumulates at the positively charged walls of the chamber. This method can be applied to monitor dust formation during dusty plasma experiments without major modification of plasma devices, useful especially for large fusion reactors.

  20. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  1. Compact Polarimetry Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Loi, My-Linh; Dubois-Fernandez, Pascale; Pottier, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to show the potential of a compact-pol SAR system for vegetation applications. Compact-pol concept has been suggested to minimize the system design while maximize the information and is declined as the ?/4, ?/2 and hybrid modes. In this paper, the applications such as biomass and vegetation height estimates are first presented, then, the equivalence between compact-pol data simulated from full-pol data and compact-pol data processed from raw data as such is shown. Finally, a calibration procedure using external targets is proposed.

  2. Mechanics of tissue compaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlier, Hervé; Maître, Jean-Léon

    2015-12-01

    During embryonic development, tissues deform by a succession and combination of morphogenetic processes. Tissue compaction is the morphogenetic process by which a tissue adopts a tighter structure. Recent studies characterized the respective roles of cells' adhesive and contractile properties in tissue compaction. In this review, we formalize the mechanical and molecular principles of tissue compaction and we analyze through the prism of this framework several morphogenetic events: the compaction of the early mouse embryo, the formation of the fly retina, the segmentation of somites and the separation of germ layers during gastrulation.

  3. Compact Polarimetry Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Loi, My-Linh; Dubois-Fernandez, Pascale; Pottier, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to show the potential of a compact-pol SAR system for vegetation applications. Compact-pol concept has been suggested to minimize the system design while maximize the information and is declined as the ?/4, ?/2 and hybrid modes. In this paper, the applications such as biomass and vegetation height estimates are first presented, then, the equivalence between compact-pol data simulated from full-pol data and compact-pol data processed from raw data as such is shown. Finally, a calibration procedure using external targets is proposed.

  4. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  5. Multiple-applications of Accelerated Compact Toroid Injection for MFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, David; Horton, Robert; Evans, Russell; Liu, Fei; Zhu, Ben; Hong, Sean; Buchenauer, Dean

    2010-11-01

    The CTIX experiment has explored the potential applications of launching a fast moving magnetized compact toroid for Magnetic Fusion experiments. These applications include central fueling of a MFE device such as tokamaks, stellarators, etc. At present, the UC Davis CTIX accelerator has achieved densities at mid to upper 10^15 per cc, at speeds reaching over 200 km/sec. In order to meet the parameters of even larger fusion devices, the technology of the accelerator needs to incorporate the latest plasma wall interaction findings. As a result of the next step in CT development, UC Davis will be collaborating with the Fusion Technology group at Sandia National Laboratory in Livermore California. We will be designing new plasmas facing electrodes that can reduce electrode impurities and increase electrode lifetime. In addition to producing high density CTs, we will include the updated conical compression results from our previous installed drift section compressor. In addition of the MFE applications, the ability to enhance the CT density, fields as well as speed can be useful to other fusion areas such as MIF, etc.

  6. Non-compaction of the ventricular myocardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livio Dei Cas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-compaction of the left ventricle (LVNC is a disorder of endomyocardial morphogenesis that results in multiple trabeculations in the left ventricular (LV myocardium. This rare disorder is characterized by an excessively prominent trabecular meshwork and deep intratrabecular recesses. This idiopathic cardiomyopathy is characterized by an altered structure of the myocardial wall as a result of intrauterine arrest of compaction of the myocardial fibers in the absence of any coexisting congenital lesion. It can be associated with neuromuscular disorders and can co-exist with other cardiac malformations, and it is accompanied by depressed ventricular function, systemic embolism and ventricular arrhythmia. Echocardiography is the method of choice for diagnosing LVNC, but the correct diagnosis is often missed or delayed due to a lack of knowledge concerning this uncommon disease and its similarity to other diseases of the myocardium and endocardium. There is a two-layered structure of the myocardial wall consisting of a thin compacted epicardial layer and a thick non-compacted endocardial layer with prominent trabeculations and deep recesses. (Heart International 2006; 3-4: 178-83

  7. Compaction properties of isomalt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, Gerad K.; Engelhart, Jeffrey J. P.; Eissens, Anko C.

    2009-01-01

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of ispoma

  8. Compact Information Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-02

    network traffic, information retrieval, and databases are faced with very large, inherently high-dimensional, or naturally streaming datasets. This...proposal aims at developing mathematically rigorous and general- purpose statistical methods based on stable random projections, to achieve compact...detections (e.g., DDoS attacks), machine learning, databases , and search. Fundamentally, compact data representations are highly beneficial because they

  9. Compaction properties of isomalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhuis, Gerad K; Engelhart, Jeffrey J P; Eissens, Anko C

    2009-08-01

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of ispomalt were studied. The types used were the standard product sieved isomalt, milled isomalt and two types of agglomerated isomalt with a different ratio between 6-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-sorbitol (GPS) and 1-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-mannitol dihydrate (GPM). Powder flow properties, specific surface area and densities of the different types were investigated. Compactibility was investigated by compression of the tablets on a compaction simulator, simulating the compression on high-speed tabletting machines. Lubricant sensitivity was measured by compressing unlubricated tablets and tablets lubricated with 1% magnesium stearate on an instrumented hydraulic press. Sieved isomalt had excellent flow properties but the compactibility was found to be poor whereas the lubricant sensitivity was high. Milling resulted in both a strong increase in compactibility as an effect of the higher surface area for bonding and a decrease in lubricant sensitivity as an effect of the higher surface area to be coated with magnesium stearate. However, the flow properties of milled isomalt were too bad for use as filler-binder in direct compaction. Just as could be expected, agglomeration of milled isomalt by fluid bed agglomeration improved flowability. The good compaction properties and the low lubricant sensitivity were maintained. This effect is caused by an early fragmentation of the agglomerated material during the compaction process, producing clean, lubricant-free particles and a high surface for bonding. The different GPS/GPM ratios of the agglomerated isomalt types studied had no significant effect on the compaction properties.

  10. Effect of sintering parameters on warm compacted iron-based material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李元元; 肖志瑜; 倪东惠; 夏伟; 陈维平

    2003-01-01

    Iron-based powder metallurgy material was prepared by warm compaction at 125℃ using a compacting pressure of 700 Mpa.Sintering temperature ranging from 1100℃ to 1300℃ and sintering time ranging from 40min to 80 min were used to study the effects of sintering parameters on the compacts.Die wall lubrication polytetrafluoroethylene(PTFE)emulsion was also applied in combination with warm compaction in hope to increase the compact density and the mechanical properties of the sintered material.Green and sintered density,spring back effect and sinter shrinkage were measured.Mechanical properties of both as-sinter and heat treated samples were also measured.Results show that mechanical properties of the sintered compacts increase with the increase of sintering temperature and sintering time.Sample prepared by die wall lubricated warm compaction always shows higher density and mechanical properties.

  11. Small Valdivia compact spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kubi's, W; Kubi\\'s, Wieslaw; Michalewski, Henryk

    2005-01-01

    We prove a preservation theorem for the class of Valdivia compact spaces, which involves inverse sequences of ``simple'' retractions. Consequently, a compact space of weight $\\loe\\aleph_1$ is Valdivia compact iff it is the limit of an inverse sequence of metric compacta whose bonding maps are retractions. As a corollary, we show that the class of Valdivia compacta of weight at most $\\aleph_1$ is preserved both under retractions and under open 0-dimensional images. Finally, we characterize the class of all Valdivia compacta in the language of category theory, which implies that this class is preserved under all continuous weight preserving functors.

  12. Conducting Wall Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Hofer, Richard R.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Polk, James E.; Dotson, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    A unique configuration of the magnetic field near the wall of Hall thrusters, called Magnetic Shielding, has recently demonstrated the ability to significantly reduce the erosion of the boron nitride (BN) walls and extend the life of Hall thrusters by orders of magnitude. The ability of magnetic shielding to minimize interactions between the plasma and the discharge chamber walls has for the first time enabled the replacement of insulating walls with conducting materials without loss in thruster performance. The boron nitride rings in the 6 kW H6 Hall thruster were replaced with graphite that self-biased to near the anode potential. The thruster efficiency remained over 60% (within two percent of the baseline BN configuration) with a small decrease in thrust and increase in Isp typical of magnetically shielded Hall thrusters. The graphite wall temperatures decreased significantly compared to both shielded and unshielded BN configurations, leading to the potential for higher power operation. Eliminating ceramic walls makes it simpler and less expensive to fabricate a thruster to survive launch loads, and the graphite discharge chamber radiates more efficiently which increases the power capability of the thruster compared to conventional Hall thruster designs.

  13. Compact microchannel system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Stewart

    2003-09-30

    The present invention provides compact geometries for the layout of microchannel columns through the use of turns and straight channel segments. These compact geometries permit the use of long separation or reaction columns on a small microchannel substrate or, equivalently, permit columns of a fixed length to occupy a smaller substrate area. The new geometries are based in part on mathematical analyses that provide the minimum turn radius for which column performance in not degraded. In particular, we find that straight channel segments of sufficient length reduce the required minimum turn radius, enabling compact channel layout when turns and straight segments are combined. The compact geometries are obtained by using turns and straight segments in overlapped or nested arrangements to form pleated or coiled columns.

  14. NCSX Plasma Heating Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.W. Kugel; D. Spong; R. Majeski; M. Zarnstorff

    2003-02-28

    The NCSX (National Compact Stellarator Experiment) has been designed to accommodate a variety of heating systems, including ohmic heating, neutral-beam injection, and radio-frequency. Neutral beams will provide one of the primary heating methods for NCSX. In addition to plasma heating, beams are also expected to provide a means for external control over the level of toroidal plasma rotation velocity and its profile. The plan is to provide 3 MW of 50 keV balanced neutral-beam tangential injection with pulse lengths of 500 msec for initial experiments, and to be upgradeable to pulse lengths of 1.5 sec. Subsequent upgrades will add 3 MW of neutral-beam injection. This Chapter discusses the NCSX neutral-beam injection requirements and design issues, and shows how these are provided by the candidate PBX-M (Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification) neutral-beam injection system. In addition, estimations are given for beam-heating efficiencies, scaling of heating efficiency with machine size an d magnetic field level, parameter studies of the optimum beam-injection tangency radius and toroidal injection location, and loss patterns of beam ions on the vacuum chamber wall to assist placement of wall armor and for minimizing the generation of impurities by the energetic beam ions. Finally, subsequent upgrades could add an additional 6 MW of radio-frequency heating by mode-conversion ion-Bernstein wave (MCIBW) heating, and if desired as possible future upgrades, the design also will accommodate high-harmonic fast-wave and electron-cyclotron heating. The initial MCIBW heating technique and the design of the radio-frequency system lend themselves to current drive, so that if current drive became desirable for any reason only minor modifications to the heating system described here would be needed. The radio-frequency system will also be capable of localized ion heating (bulk or tail), and possibly ion-Bernstein-wave-generated sheared flows.

  15. NCSX Plasma Heating Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugel, H. W.; Spong, D.; Majeski, R.; Zarnstorff, M.

    2008-01-18

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) has been designed to accommodate a variety of heating systems, including ohmic heating, neutral beam injection, and radio-frequency (rf). Neutral beams will provide one of the primary heating methods for NCSX. In addition to plasma heating, neutral beams are also expected to provide a means for external control over the level of toroidal plasma rotation velocity and its profile. The experimental plan requires 3 MW of 50-keV balanced neutral beam tangential injection with pulse lengths of 500 ms for initial experiments, to be upgradeable to pulse lengths of 1.5 s. Subsequent upgrades will add 3MW of neutral beam injection (NBI). This paper discusses the NCSX NBI requirements and design issues and shows how these are provided by the candidate PBX-M NBI system. In addition, estimations are given for beam heating efficiencies, scaling of heating efficiency with machine size and magnetic field level, parameter studies of the optimum beam injection tangency radius and toroidal injection location, and loss patterns of beam ions on the vacuum chamber wall to assist placement of wall armor and for minimizing the generation of impurities by the energetic beam ions. Finally, subsequent upgrades could add an additional 6 MW of rf heating by mode conversion ion Bernstein wave (MCIBW) heating, and if desired as possible future upgrades, the design also will accommodate high-harmonic fast-wave and electron cyclotron heating. The initial MCIBW heating technique and the design of the rf system lend themselves to current drive, so if current drive became desirable for any reason, only minor modifications to the heating system described here would be needed. The rf system will also be capable of localized ion heating (bulk or tail), and possiblyIBW-generated sheared flows.

  16. Instationary compaction wave propagation in highly porous cohesive granular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunkelmann, Nina; Ringl, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2016-07-01

    We study the collision of a highly porous granular aggregate of adhesive \\upmu m-sized silica grains with a hard wall using a granular discrete element method. A compaction wave runs through the granular sample building up an inhomogeneous density profile. The compaction is independent of the length of the aggregate, within the regime of lengths studied here. Also short pulses, as they might be exerted by a piston pushing the granular material, excite a compaction wave that runs through the entire material. The speed of the compaction wave is larger than the impact velocity but considerably smaller than the sound speed. The wave speed is related to the compaction rate at the colliding surface and the average slope of the linear density profile.

  17. Wonderful Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Jim

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author emphasizes the importance of "working" walls in children's programs. Children's programs need "working" walls (and ceilings and floors) which can be put to use for communication, display, storage, and activity space. The furnishings also work, or don't work, for the program in another sense: in aggregate, they serve as…

  18. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how wall...

  19. Studies of accelerated compact toruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, C.W.; Eddleman, J.; Hammer, J.H.

    1983-01-04

    In an earlier publication we considered acceleration of plasma rings (Compact Torus). Several possible accelerator configurations were suggested and the possibility of focusing the accelerated rings was discussed. In this paper we consider one scheme, acceleration of a ring between coaxial electrodes by a B/sub theta/ field as in a coaxial rail-gun. If the electrodes are conical, a ring accelerated towards the apex of the cone undergoes self-similar compression (focusing) during acceleration. Because the allowable acceleration force, F/sub a/ = kappaU/sub m//R where (kappa < 1), increases as R/sup -2/, the accelerating distance for conical electrodes is considerably shortened over that required for coaxial electrodes. In either case, however, since the accelerating flux can expand as the ring moves, most of the accelerating field energy can be converted into kinetic energy of the ring leading to high efficiency.

  20. Compact, super heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortini, A.; Kazaroff, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Heat exchanger uses porous media to enhance heat transfer through walls of cooling channels, thereby lowering wall temperature. Porous media within cooling channel increases internal surface area from which heat can be transferred to coolant. Comparison data shows wall has lower temperature and coolant has higher temperature when porous medium is used within heat exchanger. Media can be sintered powedered metal, metal fibers, woven wire layers, or any porous metal having desired permeability and porosity.

  1. Fusion potential for spherical and compact tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandzelius, Mikael

    2003-02-01

    The tokamak is the most successful fusion experiment today. Despite this, the conventional tokamak has a long way to go before being realized into an economically viable power plant. In this master thesis work, two alternative tokamak configurations to the conventional tokamak has been studied, both of which could be realized to a lower cost. The fusion potential of the spherical and the compact tokamak have been examined with a comparison of the conventional tokamak in mind. The difficulties arising in the two configurations have been treated from a physical point of view concerning the fusion plasma and from a technological standpoint evolving around design, materials and engineering. Both advantages and drawbacks of either configuration have been treated relative to the conventional tokamak. The spherical tokamak shows promising plasma characteristics, notably a high {beta}-value but have troubles with high heat loads and marginal tritium breeding. The compact tokamak operates at a high plasma density and a high magnetic field enabling it to be built considerably smaller than any other tokamak. The most notable down-side being high heat loads and neutron transport problems. With the help of theoretical reactor studies, extrapolating from where we stand today, it is conceivable that the spherical tokamak is closer of being realized of the two. But, as this study shows, the compact tokamak power plant concept offers the most appealing prospect.

  2. Differentiation and compaction in the Skaergaard intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegner, C.; Thy, P.; Holness, M.; Jakobsen, J. K.; Salmonsen, L.; Humphreys, M.; Lesher, C. E.

    2009-12-01

    Although it is largely agreed that crystallization occurs inwardly in crystal mushes along the margins of magma chambers, the efficiency and mechanisms of differentiation are contended. The fractionation paradigm hinges on mass exchange between a crystal mush and the main magma reservoir resulting in coarse-grained, refractory (cumulate) rocks of primary crystals, and complementary enrichment of incompatible elements in the main magma. Diffusion, convection, liquid immiscibility and compaction have been proposed as mechanisms driving this mass exchange. We examine the efficiency of differentiation in basaltic crystal mushes of the Skaergaard magma chamber. The contents of incompatible elements such as phosphorus and calculated final porosities are smallest in cumulate rocks at the floor (~5% final porosity above the level of magnetite-in), intermediate at the walls (~20%) and highest at the roof (~55%). Mass exchange and differentiation are thus highly efficient at the floor but inefficient at the roof. This is best explained by compaction squeezing interstitial liquid out of the crystal mush preferentially at the floor. At the walls only mush with porosity less than ~20% was able to stick rather than collapsing into the chamber, resulting in moderately efficient differentiation. We conclude that compaction moderates the final crystal mush porosity and the efficiency of magma differentiation depending on chamber dynamics.

  3. Compactness theorems of fuzzy semantics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The relationship among diverse fuzzy semantics vs. the corresponding logic consequence operators has been analyzed systematically. The results that compactness and logical compactness of fuzzy semantics are equivalent to compactness and continuity of the logic consequence operator induced by the semantics respectively have been proved under certain conditions. A general compactness theorem of fuzzy semantics have been established which says that every fuzzy semantics defined on a free algebra with members corresponding to continuous functions is compact.

  4. Compact, energy EFFICIENT neutron source: enabling technology for various applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Roser, T.

    2009-12-01

    A novel neutron source comprising of a deuterium beam (energy of about 100 KeV) injected into a tube filled with tritium gas and/or tritium plasma that generates D-T fusion reactions, whose products are 14.06 MeV neutrons and 3.52 MeV alpha particles, is described. At the opposite end of the tube, the energy of deuterium ions that did not interact is recovered. Beryllium walls of proper thickness can be utilized to absorb 14 MeV neutrons and release 2-3 low energy neutrons. Each ion source and tube forms a module. Larger systems can be formed from multiple units. Unlike currently proposed methods, where accelerator-based neutron sources are very expensive, large, and require large amounts of power for operation, this neutron source is compact, inexpensive, easy to test and to scale up. Among possible applications for this neutron source concept are sub-critical nuclear breeder reactors and transmutation of radioactive waste.

  5. Intelligent compaction theory of high roller compacted concrete dam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Donghai

    2012-01-01

    The concept and realization process of intelligent compaction for the construction of high roller compacted concrete dam were presented, as well as the theory of monitoring and intelligent feedback control. Based on the real-time analysis of the compaction index, a multiple regression model of the dam compactness was established and a realime estimation method of compaction quality for the entire work area of roller compacted concrete dam was proposed finally. The adaptive adjustment of the roiling process parameters was achieved, with the speed, the exciting force, the roller pass and the compaction thickness meeting the standards during the whole construction process. As a result, the compaction quality and construction efficiency can be improved. The research provides a new way for the construction quality control of roller compacted concrete dam.

  6. Wall Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  7. The TJ-II Stellarator. Impact of vacuum and first wall conditioning techniques in the generation of fusion plasmas; El Stellarator TJ-II. Impacto del vacio y tecnicas de acondicionamiento de primera pared en la generacion de plasmas de fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares, F. L.

    2010-07-01

    The great scientific facility, the Stellarator TJ-II, has been operated by the National Laboratory CIEMAT Fusion since early 1998. During this time, there have been over 21 000 downloads of hot plasma, the duration between 100 and 300 ms. The heating power coupled plasma varied from 300 kW to 1600 kW early today. For that purpose, techniques used microwave heating Electronics resonant frequency (ECRH) and Warming Neutral Beam Injection (NBI). The first wall conditions have evolved from pure stainless steel to the combination of graphite and lithium limiters full the remaining components of the vacuum chamber. This process has been driven by the need increasing control over the particle and energy loads associated with greater warming. In the This work provides a review of the vacuum techniques and first wall conditioning used in the past 12 years. The role of these techniques has played in obtaining plasmas clean, reproducible and controlled will be emphasized. Finally, we describe future plans progress on these issues. (Author) 25 refs.

  8. Compaction of granular material inside confined geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Benjy; Sandnes, Bjornar; Dumazer, Guillaume; Eriksen, Jon Alm; Måløy, Knut Jørgen

    2015-06-01

    In both nature and the laboratory, loosely packed granular materials are often compacted inside confined geometries. Here, we explore such behaviour in a quasi-two dimensional geometry, where parallel rigid walls provide the confinement. We use the discrete element method to investigate the stress distribution developed within the granular packing as a result of compaction due to the displacement of a rigid piston. We observe that the stress within the packing increases exponentially with the length of accumulated grains, and show an extension to current analytic models which fits the measured stress. The micromechanical behaviour is studied for a range of system parameters, and the limitations of existing analytic models are described. In particular, we show the smallest sized systems which can be treated using existing models. Additionally, the effects of increasing piston rate, and variations of the initial packing fraction, are described.

  9. Monte Carlo model of neutral-particle transport in diverted plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heifetz, D.; Post, D.; Petravic, M.; Weisheit, J.; Bateman, G.

    1981-11-01

    The transport of neutral atoms and molecules in the edge and divertor regions of fusion experiments has been calculated using Monte-Carlo techniques. The deuterium, tritium, and helium atoms are produced by recombination in the plasma and at the walls. The relevant collision processes of charge exchange, ionization, and dissociation between the neutrals and the flowing plasma electrons and ions are included, along with wall reflection models. General two-dimensional wall and plasma geometries are treated in a flexible manner so that varied configurations can be easily studied. The algorithm uses a pseudo-collision method. Splitting with Russian roulette, suppression of absorption, and efficient scoring techniques are used to reduce the variance. The resulting code is sufficiently fast and compact to be incorporated into iterative treatments of plasma dynamics requiring numerous neutral profiles. The calculation yields the neutral gas densities, pressures, fluxes, ionization rates, momentum transfer rates, energy transfer rates, and wall sputtering rates. Applications have included modeling of proposed INTOR/FED poloidal divertor designs and other experimental devices.

  10. Experiments and modeling of dynamic powder compaction in the scope of deflagration to detonation transition studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodard, S.; Lapébie, E.; Saurel, R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper deals with dynamic compaction of confined powders and associated wave dynamics. An experimental setup has been designed to generate one-dimensional dynamic compaction waves. Quantitative data such as displacement and velocity fields are obtained. A multiphase compaction model is considered as well and its results are compared to experimental data. Grain/wall friction is also modeled as it appeared to have significant effects when considering confined granular beds.

  11. Advancements in subsurface barrier wall technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutch, R.D. Jr.; Ash, R.E. IV; Caputi, J.R. [Eckenfelder Inc., Mahwah, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Subsurface barrier walls have been an important component of site remediation efforts for nearly thirty years. However, until the last decade, limited design options were available for barrier wall construction. Most barrier walls were constructed using traditional technologies such as soil-bentonite slurry trench and, in some instances, conventional compacted clay. While other technologies certainly existed, such as vibrating beam and sheet pile walls, they represented a minor share of the remediation market. Today the remediation engineer considering a subsurface barrier wall-based remediation is confronted with a baffling array, of new technologies and permutations of these technologies. Moreover, new technologies are entering the marketplace seemingly on a monthly basis. A partial listing of available barrier wall technologies is presented.

  12. Compact tokamak reactors. Part 1 (analytic results)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, A.J.; Wiley, J.C.; Edmonds, P.H.; Ross, D.W.

    1996-09-13

    We discuss the possible use of tokamaks for thermonuclear power plants, in particular tokamaks with low aspect ratio and copper toroidal field coils. Three approaches are presented. First we review and summarize the existing literature. Second, using simple analytic estimates, the size of the smallest tokamak to produce an ignited plasma is derived. This steady state energy balance analysis is then extended to determine the smallest tokamak power plant, by including the power required to drive the toroidal field, and considering two extremes of plasma current drive efficiency. The analytic results will be augmented by a numerical calculation which permits arbitrary plasma current drive efficiency; the results of which will be presented in Part II. Third, a scaling from any given reference reactor design to a copper toroidal field coil device is discussed. Throughout the paper the importance of various restrictions is emphasized, in particular plasma current drive efficiency, plasma confinement, plasma safety factor, plasma elongation, plasma beta, neutron wall loading, blanket availability and recirculating electric power. We conclude that the latest published reactor studies, which show little advantage in using low aspect ratio unless remarkably high efficiency plasma current drive and low safety factor are combined, can be reproduced with the analytic model.

  13. Limestone compaction: an enigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Eugene A.; Halley, Robert B.; Hudson, J. Harold; Lidz, Barbara H.

    1977-01-01

    Compression of an undisturbed carbonate sediment core under a pressure of 556 kg/cm2 produced a “rock” with sedimentary structures similar to typical ancient fine-grained limestones. Surprisingly, shells, foraminifera, and other fossils were not noticeably crushed, which indicates that absence of crushed fossils in ancient limestones can no longer be considered evidence that limestones do not compact.

  14. Compact rotating cup anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, J. B.

    1968-01-01

    Compact, collapsible rotating cup anemometer is used in remote locations where portability and durability are factors in the choice of equipment. This lightweight instrument has a low wind-velocity threshold, is capable of withstanding large mechanical shocks while in its stowed configuration, and has fast response to wind fluctuations.

  15. Improving the compaction properties of roller compacted calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacher, C; Olsen, P M; Bertelsen, P; Kristensen, J; Sonnergaard, J M

    2007-09-05

    The effects of roller compaction process parameters, morphological forms of calcium carbonate and particle size of sorbitol on flow, compaction and compression properties were investigated. The morphology of the calcium carbonate and the sorbitol particle size were more influential on the compaction properties than the settings of the roller compactor. The roller compaction process was demonstrated to be robust and stable in regard to flowability and compactibility. The flowability of the granules was improved adequately to facilitate compression in a production scale rotary tablet press. By adding sorbitol to the calcium carbonate, the compressibility - characterized by the Walker coefficient W(ID) - and the compactibility C(P) were improved considerably. A correlation between the consolidation characteristics was demonstrated. Compactibility data from the compaction simulator correlated with the tablet press for two of the calcium carbonates, the cubic form and the ground quality.

  16. Wall charge and potential from a microscopic point of view

    CERN Document Server

    Bronold, F X; Heinisch, R L; Marbach, J

    2012-01-01

    Macroscopic objects floating in an ionized gas (plasma walls) accumulate electrons more efficiently than ions because the influx of electrons outruns the influx of ions. The floating potential acquired by plasma walls is thus negative with respect to the plasma potential. Until now plasma walls are typically treated as perfect absorbers for electrons and ions, irrespective of the microphysics at the surface responsible for charge deposition and extraction. This crude description, sufficient for present day technological plasmas, will run into problems in solid-state based gas discharges where, with continuing miniaturization, the wall becomes an integral part of the plasma device and the charge transfer across it has to be modelled more precisely. The purpose of this paper is to review our work, where we questioned the perfect absorber model and initiated a microscopic description of the charge transfer across plasma walls, put it into perspective, and indicate directions for future research.

  17. 等离子喷涂薄壁零件涂层中的残余应力%Residual Stresses of Plasma-Spraying Coating of Thin-Walled Part

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛丽萍; 张延安; 史冠勇; 豆志河

    2011-01-01

    A concept of thin-walled and thick-walled parts was proposed for plasma-spraying coating parts,and a mathematical model based on superposition principle established to calculate residual stresses.The results showed that both tensile stress and compressive stress may arise in the coating.The limit value of residual stress appears in the combination zone of substrate and coating.The relaxation of residual stress was effectively estimated with layer model and stress superposition method.The experimental results agree with the calculated results.The effect of thermal expansion coefficient,preheating temperature of substrate and coating thickness on residual stress is great.These results may provide a valuable reference for the design of plasma spraying coating.%以等离子喷涂零件为研究对象,提出了薄壁零件与厚壁零件的概念,并建立了一种基于叠加原理的残余应力计算模型.计算结果表明:在涂层中既可能产生拉应力,也可能产生压应力;喷涂零件残余应力极限值位于基体与涂层的结合区域;增层模型和应力叠加方法可有效估算残余应力的松弛;估算值与测量值吻合得较好;热膨胀系数、基体预热温度、涂层厚度对残余应力的影响较大.研究结果对等离子喷涂涂层的设计具有一定的参考价值.

  18. Preparation and properties of a composite SiC with addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized in the plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavelkina, M. B.; Amirov, R. Kh; Kelina, I. Yu; Golubeva, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    Ceramic composite reinforced with plaits of carbon nanotubes have been fabricated by the reaction bonded silicon carbide method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are produced using a 35 kW dc plasma torch and C2H2 as carbon precursor. Effective methods of CNTs adding and dispersing in the preform volume have been found. The optimal content and operational technological parameters have been determined for ceramic matrix. Physico-mechanical properties of the reinforcing ceramic matrices with nanomaterials have been investigated.

  19. Cell wall proteins: a new insight through proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2006-01-01

    Cell wall proteins are essential constituents of plant cell walls; they are involved in modifications of cell wall components, wall structure, signaling and interactions with plasma membrane proteins at the cell surface. The application of proteomic approaches to the cell wall compartment raises important questions: are there technical problems specific to cell wall proteomics? What kinds of proteins can be found in Arabidopsis walls? Are some of them unexpected? What sort of post-translational modifications have been characterized in cell wall proteins to date? The purpose of this review is to discuss the experimental results obtained to date using proteomics, as well as some of the new questions challenging future research.

  20. Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2002-09-01

    The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

  1. Effects of Initial Powder Compact Thickness, Lubrication, and Particle Morphology on the Cold Compaction Behavior of Ti Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jia; Gabbitas, Brian; Zhang, Deliang; Yang, Fei

    2015-08-01

    This work investigates the compaction behavior of hydride-dehydride CP-Ti powder from green density/compaction pressure curves. These were obtained through a modification of selected processing conditions, such as variation in compact thickness, the use of internal lubrication, and additions of plasma rotating electrode process powder. A modified Cooper-Eaton equation, which treats the compaction process to be a combination of particle rearrangement (PR) and plastic deformation (PD) mechanisms, was used to simulate the curves. A comparison with aluminum and iron compaction is also carried out in this study. The research indicated that the cold compaction of titanium powder can be separated into two stages: a PR stage (stage I), which occurs at a compacting pressure in the range of 0 to 200 MPa, followed by a further PR stage initiated by PD, when the compaction pressure is in the range of 200 to 1000 MPa. The existence of stage II is due to the low plastic deformability of titanium and low density achieved at the end of stage I.

  2. Wall Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  3. The United Nations Global Compact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasche, Andreas; Waddock, Sandra; McIntosh, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the interdisciplinary literature on the UN Global Compact. The review identifies three research perspectives, which scholars have used to study the UN Global Compact so far: a historical perspective discussing the Global Compact in the context of UN-business relations...

  4. Compact Spreader Schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  5. Compact fiber optic accelerometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Peng; Jun Yang; Bing Wu; Yonggui Yuan; Xingliang Li; Ai Zhou; Libo Yuan

    2012-01-01

    A compact fiber optic accelerometer based on a Michelson interferometer is proposed and demonstrated.In the proposed system,the sensing element consists of two single-mode fibers glued together by epoxy,which then act as a simple supported beam.By demodulating the optical phase shift,the acceleration is determined as proportional to the force applied on the central position of the two single-mode fibers.This simple model is able to calculate the sensitivity and the resonant frequency of the compact accelerometer.The experimental results show that the sensitivity and the resonant frequency of the accelerometer are 0.42 rad/g and 600 Hz,respectively.

  6. Progress Toward Improved Compact Stellarator Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, G. H.; Brown, T.; Gates, D.; Ku, L. P.; Lazerson, S.; Pomphrey, N.; Reiman, A.; Zarnstorff, M.; Bromberg, L.; Boozer, A.; Harris, J.

    2010-11-01

    Stellarators offer robust physics solutions for MFE challenges-- steady-state operation, disruption elimination, and high-density operation-- but require design improvements to overcome technical risks in the construction and maintenance of future large-scale stellarators. Using the ARIES-CS design (aspect ratio 4.56) as a starting point, compact stellarator designs with improved maintenance characteristics have been developed. By making the outboard legs of the main magnetic field coils nearly straight and parallel, a sector maintenance scheme compatible with high availability becomes possible. Approaches that can allow the main coil requirements to be relaxed in this way are: 1) increase aspect ratio at the expense of compactness, 2) add local removable coils in the maintenance ports for plasma shaping, and 3) use passive conducting tiles made of bulk high-temperature superconducting material to help shape the magnetic field. Such tiles would be arranged on a shaped, segmented internal support structure behind the shield.

  7. Analysis of laboratory compaction methods of roller compacted concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trtík, Tomáš; Chylík, Roman; Bílý, Petr; Fládr, Josef

    2017-09-01

    Roller-Compacted Concrete (RCC) is an ordinary concrete poured and compacted with machines typically used for laying of asphalt road layers. One of the problems connected with this technology is preparation of representative samples in the laboratory. The aim of this work was to analyse two methods of preparation of RCC laboratory samples with bulk density as the comparative parameter. The first method used dynamic compaction by pneumatic hammer. The second method of compaction had a static character. The specimens were loaded by precisely defined force in laboratory loading machine to create the same conditions as during static rolling (in the Czech Republic, only static rolling is commonly used). Bulk densities obtained by the two compaction methods were compared with core drills extracted from real RCC structure. The results have shown that the samples produced by pneumatic hammer tend to overestimate the bulk density of the material. For both compaction methods, immediate bearing index test was performed to verify the quality of compaction. A fundamental difference between static and dynamic compaction was identified. In static compaction, initial resistance to penetration of the mandrel was higher, after exceeding certain limit the resistance was constant. This means that the samples were well compacted just on the surface. Specimens made by pneumatic hammer actively resisted throughout the test, the whole volume was uniformly compacted.

  8. 等离子射流与渐扩边界中液体工质相互作用特性的模拟实验%Experiment on plasma-liquid interaction in a stepped-wall chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琦; 余永刚; 陆欣; 刘东尧

    2011-01-01

    To explore the influence of the chamber boundary shape on the combustion control in a bulk-loaded liquid-medium electrothermal-chemical gun, the plasma jet propagation in the liquid medium was experimentally investigated by using a high-speed digital camera. Special attention was paid to the plasma jet-liquid medium interaction under the conditions of different discharge voltages, different nozzle diameters and different divergent boundaries. The time-sequence photos of the plasma jet propagation in the liquid medium were obtained, from the photos the axial displacement histories of the Taylor cavity were achieved under the different conditions, and the corresponding propagation velocities of the Taylor cavity were calculated. Sequentially, the interaction mechanism between the plasma jet and the liquid medium was analyzed. The results indicate that though the axial velocity of the Taylor cavity is fluctuant, as a whole it is decrescent; and that at the wall steps, the radial turbulence of the plasma jet is enhanced, which can strengthen the entrainment effect of reflux.%为了探索整装式液体工质电热化学炮中药室边界形状对燃烧控制的影响,采用数字高速录像系统对等离子体射流在液体工质中的扩展过程进行了测试,研究了不同放电电压、不同喷嘴直径、不同渐扩边界结构下等离子射流与液体工质的相互作用特性.获得了等离子射流在液体工质中扩展形态的时间序列图,处理出不同工况下Taylor空腔扩展的轴向位移与时间的关系曲线,计算并分析了不同工况下等离子射流在液体工质中的扩展速度和相互作用的机理.研究结果表明:Taylor空腔的轴向扩展速度具有波动性,但总体上呈衰减趋势.渐扩台阶处,径向湍流增强,强化了等离子射流的回流卷吸效应.

  9. Electron-wall Interaction in Hall Thrusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Raitses; D. Staack; M. Keidar; N.J. Fisch

    2005-02-11

    Electron-wall interaction effects in Hall thrusters are studied through measurements of the plasma response to variations of the thruster channel width and the discharge voltage. The discharge voltage threshold is shown to separate two thruster regimes. Below this threshold, the electron energy gain is constant in the acceleration region and therefore, secondary electron emission (SEE) from the channel walls is insufficient to enhance electron energy losses at the channel walls. Above this voltage threshold, the maximum electron temperature saturates.

  10. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, A Hakan; Ozdamar, Tuğçe

    2013-06-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of compacted zeolites were investigated as a function of compaction water content and zeolite particle size. Initially, the compaction characteristics of zeolites were determined. The compaction test results showed that maximum dry unit weight (γ(dmax)) of fine zeolite was greater than that of granular zeolites. The γ(dmax) of compacted zeolites was between 1.01 and 1.17 Mg m(-3) and optimum water content (w(opt)) was between 38% and 53%. Regardless of zeolite particle size, compacted zeolites had low γ(dmax) and high w(opt) when compared with compacted natural soils. Then, hydraulic conductivity tests were run on compacted zeolites. The hydraulic conductivity values were within the range of 2.0 × 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 1.1 × 10(-7) cm s(-1). Hydraulic conductivity of all compacted zeolites decreased almost 50 times as the water content increased. It is noteworthy that hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite was strongly dependent on the zeolite particle size. The hydraulic conductivity decreased almost three orders of magnitude up to 39% fine content; then, it remained almost unchanged beyond 39%. Only one report was found in the literature on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite, which is in agreement with the findings of this study.

  11. Wind Load Test of Earthbag Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Scott

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Earthbag construction is a sustainable, low-cost, housing option for developing countries. Earthbag structures are built of individual soil-filled fabric bags (i.e., sand bags stacked in a running bond pattern. Once stacked, earthbags are compacted and the soil inside the bags is dried in-place to form earthen bricks. Barbed wires are placed between each course to affect shear transfer within the wall. Results of an out-of-plane load test on a full-scale earthbag wall are presented in this paper. The wall was subjected to out-of-plane pressure up to 3.16 kPa, which resulted in plastic deformations up to 50 mm. The wall did not collapse during loading. Wall behavior and force transfer mechanisms are discussed.

  12. CLIMBING WALL

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The FIRE AND RESCUE Group of TIS Commission informs that the climbing wall in the yard of the Fire-fighters Station, is intended for the sole use of the members of that service, and recalls that access to this installation is forbidden for safety reasons to all persons not belonging to the Service.CERN accepts no liability for damage or injury suffered as a result of failure to comply with this interdiction.TIS/DI

  13. Effect of Lubrication on the Improvement of Uniformity in Uniaxial Powder Compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yukinori; Dohda, Kuniaki; Wang, Zhrgang

    Density distribution in powder compact caused by frictional force at die wall has been estimated. The pressure transmission ratio λ was defined for the estimation of the magnitude of frictional force occurrence on die wall. The density gradient α was also defined for the estimation of density distribution. The iron and pre-alloyed stainless steel powder were tested, and the performance of zinc stearate and paraffin wax applied as internal lubricant or die wall lubricant has been investigated in various conditions. The die wall lubrication becomes effective way to increase λ in comparison with the internal lubrication. Admixed lubricant prevents the occurrence of density distribution and uniform green compact is obtained in the critical amount of lubricant. Paraffin wax shows higher performance as a die wall lubricant compared with zinc stearate, and remarkable increase of lubrication effect is observed in the combination between zinc stearate as internal lubricant and paraffin wax as wall lubricant.

  14. New linear plasma devices in the trilateral euregio cluster for an integrated approach to plasma surface interactions in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unterberg, B., E-mail: b.unterberg@fz-juelich.de [Institut fuer Energieforschung - Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association EURATOM- Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Jaspers, R. [Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Koch, R. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas/Laboratorium voor Plasmafysica, ERM/KMS, EURATOM-Association, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Massaut, V. [SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, EURATOM-Association, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Rapp, J. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Reiter, D.; Kraus, S.; Kreter, A.; Philipps, V.; Reimer, H.; Samm, U.; Scheibl, L.; Schweer, B. [Institut fuer Energieforschung - Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association EURATOM- Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Schuurmans, J.; Uytdenhouwen, I. [SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, EURATOM-Association, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Al, R.; Berg, M.A. van den; Brons, S.; Eck, H.J.N. van; Goedheer, W.J. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2011-10-15

    New linear plasma devices are currently being constructed or planned in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster (TEC) to meet the challenges with respect to plasma surface interactions in DEMO and ITER: i) MAGNUM-PSI (FOM), a high particle and power flux device with super-conducting magnetic field coils which will reach ITER-like divertor conditions at high magnetic field, ii) the newly proposed linear plasma device JULE-PSI (FZJ), which will allow to expose toxic and neutron activated target samples to ITER-like fluences and ion energies including in vacuo analysis of neutron activated samples, and iii) the plasmatron VISION I, a compact plasma device which will be operated inside the tritium lab at SCK-CEN Mol, capable to investigate tritium plasmas and moderately activated wall materials. This contribution shows the capabilities of the new devices and their forerunner experiments (Pilot-PSI at FOM and PSI-2 Juelich at FZJ) in view of the main objectives of the new TEC program on plasma surface interactions.

  15. Compact proton spectrometers for measurements of shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackinnon, A; Zylstra, A; Frenje, J A; Seguin, F H; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M G; Casey, D T; Sinenian, N; Manuel, M; Waugh, C J; Sio, H W; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Friedrich, S; Knittel, K; Bionta, R; McKernan, M; Callahan, D; Collins, G; Dewald, E; Doeppner, T; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S H; Hicks, D; Landen, O L; London, R; Meezan, N B

    2012-05-02

    The compact Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometer was developed for OMEGA and transferred to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a National Ignition Campaign (NIC) diagnostic. The WRF measures the spectrum of protons from D-{sup 3}He reactions in tuning-campaign implosions containing D and {sup 3}He gas; in this work we report on the first proton spectroscopy measurement on the NIF using WRFs. The energy downshift of the 14.7-MeV proton is directly related to the total {rho}R through the plasma stopping power. Additionally, the shock proton yield is measured, which is a metric of the final merged shock strength.

  16. Numerical modelling of cold compaction of metal powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redanz, Pia

    1998-01-01

    model (J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 1992, 40(5), 1139-1162), developed by Fleck, Kuhr. and McMeeking, and a combination of the two models are used. The friction between the mould wall and the metal powder is modelled by a combination of Coulomb friction and a constant friction shear stress, since Coulomb...... friction is not realistic at high normal pressures. The finite element programme has been used to study the effects of friction, compaction method, and material parameters. Analyses for powder compacts of various geometries are presented to illustrate the method. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights...

  17. Properties, characterization, and decay of sticky rice–lime mortars from the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall (China)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Ya [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Cultural Relics and Archaeology Institute of Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Fu, Xuan; Gu, Haibing [Cultural Relics and Archaeology Institute of Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Gao, Feng [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Liu, Shaojun, E-mail: liumatthew@csu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Urgent restoration of the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall brings about the need for a study of the formulation and properties of mortars. In the present paper, mortar samples from the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall were characterized in a combination of sheet polarized light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer, thermogravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy. Results show that mortars are mainly built up from inorganic calcium carbonate based organic–inorganic hybrid material with a small amount of sticky rice, which plays a crucial role in forming dense and compact microstructure of mortars and effectively hindering penetration of water and air into mortars. Analysis of decayed products shows that the detrimental soluble salts originates from ambient environment. - Highlights: • Mortars used in the Wugang city wall are a calcium carbonate-sticky rice hybrid bonding material. • Carbonation processing is extremely slow due to dense and compact microstructure of mortars. • Decying of mortars results from the appearance of soluble salt from ambient environment.

  18. Do Stops Slow Down Electroweak Bubble Walls?

    CERN Document Server

    John, P

    2001-01-01

    We compute the wall velocity in the MSSM. We therefore generalize the SMequations of motion for bubble walls moving through a hot plasma at theelectroweak phase transition and calculate the friction terms which describethe viscosity of the plasma. We give the general expressions and apply them toa simple model where stops, tops and W bosons contribute to the friction. In awide range of parameters including those which fulfil the requirements ofbaryogenesis we find a wall velocity of order v = 0.001-0.01 much below the SMvalue.

  19. Compact LINAC for deuterons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, S S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, J F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rybarcyk, L J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the deuteron energy of a few MeV based on room-temperature inter-digital H-mode (IH) accelerating structures with the transverse beam focusing using permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ). Combining electromagnetic 3-D modeling with beam dynamics simulations and thermal-stress analysis, we show that IHPMQ structures provide very efficient and practical accelerators for light-ion beams of considerable currents at the beam velocities around a few percent of the speed of light. IH-structures with PMQ focusing following a short RFQ can also be beneficial in the front end of ion linacs.

  20. Compact synchrotron light sources

    CERN Document Server

    Weihreter, Ernst

    1996-01-01

    This book covers a new niche in circular accelerator design, motivated by the promising industrial prospects of recent micromanufacturing methods - X-ray lithography, synchrotron radiation-based micromachining and microanalysis techniques. It describes the basic concepts and the essential challenges for the development of compact synchrotron radiation sources from an accelerator designer's point of view and gives an outline of the actual state of the art. The volume is intended as an introduction and as a reference for physicists, engineers and managers involved in this rapidly developing fiel

  1. Compact Q-balls

    CERN Document Server

    Bazeia, D; Marques, M A; Menezes, R; da Rocha, R

    2016-01-01

    In this work we deal with non-topological solutions of the Q-ball type in two space-time dimensions, in models described by a single complex scalar field that engenders global symmetry. The main novelty is the presence of stable Q-balls solutions that live in a compact interval of the real line and appear from a family of models controlled by two distinct parameters. We find analytical solutions and study their charge and energy, and show how to control the parameters to make the Q-balls classically and quantum mechanically stable.

  2. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  3. Immersion Refractometry of Isolated Bacterial Cell Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, Robert E.

    1973-01-01

    Immersion-refractometric and light-scattering measurements were adapted to determinations of average refractive indices and physical compactness of isolated bacterial cell walls. The structures were immersed in solutions containing various concentrations of polymer molecules that cannot penetrate into wall pores, and then an estimate was made of the polymer concentration or the refractive index of the polymer solution in which light scattering was reduced to zero. Because each wall preparation was heterogeneous, the refractive index of the medium for zero light scattering had to be estimated by extrapolation. Refractive indices for walls suspended in bovine serum albumin solutions ranged from 1.348 for walls of the rod form of Arthrobacter crystallopoietes to 1.382 for walls of the teichoic acid deficient, 52A5 strain of Staphylococcus aureus. These indices were used to calculate approximate values for solids content per milliliter, and the calculated values agreed closely with those estimated from a knowledge of dextran-impermeable volumes per gram, dry weight, of the walls. When large molecules such as dextrans or serum albumin were used for immersion refractometry, the refractive indices obtained were for entire walls, including both wall polymers and wall water. When smaller molecules that can penetrate wall pores to various extents were used with Micrococcus lysodeikticus walls, the average, apparent refractive index of the structures increased as the molecular size of probing molecules was decreased. It was possible to obtain an estimate of 1.45 to 1.46 for the refractive index of wall polymers, predominantly peptidoglycans in this case, by extrapolating the curve for refractive index versus molecular radius to a value of 0.2 nm, the approximate radius of a water molecule. This relatively low value for polymer refractive index was interpreted as evidence in favor of the amorphous, elastic model of peptidoglycan structure and against the crystalline, rigid

  4. Lacunarity for compact groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, R E; Hewitt, E; Ross, K A

    1971-01-01

    Let G be a compact Abelian group with character group X. A subset Delta of X is called a [unk](q) set (1 < q < infinity) if for all trigonometric polynomials f = [unk](k=1) (n) alpha(k)chi(k) (chi(1),...,chi(n) [unk] Delta) an inequality parallelf parallel(q) [unk] [unk] parallelf parallel(1) obtains, where [unk] is a positive constant depending only on Delta. The subset Delta is called a Sidon set if every bounded function on Delta can be matched by a Fourier-Stieltjes transform. It is known that every Sidon set is a [unk](q) set for all q. For G = T, X = Z, Rudin (J. Math. Mech., 9, 203 (1960)) has found a set that is [unk](q) for all q but not Sidon. We extend this result to all infinite compact Abelian groups G: the character group X contains a subset Delta that is [unk](q) for all q, 1 < q < infinity, but Delta is not a Sidon set.

  5. A compact SADM family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbet, Vincent; Le Quintrec, Cyrille; Jeandot, Xavier; Chaix, Alain; Grain, Eric; Roux, Jerome

    2005-07-01

    Alcatel Space has developed a new SADM family driven by cost, modularity, mass and performances. The modularity concept is based on separating the rotation drive function from the electrical transfer function. The drive actuator has been designed for various applications where pointing and reliability is needed. It can be associated with high dissipative rotary devices (SA collectors, RF joints..). The design goal was to minimize the number of parts in order to reach the most simple and compact mechanism. Mass reduction was achieved by reducing as much as possible the load path between the Solar Array interface and the spacecraft interface. Following these guidelines, the drive actuator was developed and qualified on ATV SADM (part od Alcatel Space Solar Array Drive Sub System for ATV). Further more a high power integrated collector was qualified inside the SADM for Geo-stationary telecom satellite (SPACEBUS platforms). Fine thermal and mechanical modeling was necessary to predict SADM behaviors for the numerous thermal environments over the missions (steady and transient cases). These modeling were well correlated through mechanical and thermal balances qualification tests. The challenging approach of thermal dissipation in a compact design leads to a family of 3 SADM capabilities form 2kW up to 15kW per SADM weighing less than 4.5 kg each.

  6. Compact electrostatic comb actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Burg, Michael S.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Samuel L.; Barnes, Stephen M.

    2000-01-01

    A compact electrostatic comb actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator is based upon a plurality of meshed electrostatic combs, some of which are stationary and others of which are moveable. One or more restoring springs are fabricated within an outline of the electrostatic combs (i.e. superposed with the moveable electrostatic combs) to considerably reduce the space required for the actuator. Additionally, a truss structure is provided to support the moveable electrostatic combs and prevent bending or distortion of these combs due to unbalanced electrostatic forces or external loading. The truss structure formed about the moveable electrostatic combs allows the spacing between the interdigitated fingers of the combs to be reduced to about one micron or less, thereby substantially increasing the number of active fingers which can be provided in a given area. Finally, electrostatic shields can be used in the actuator to substantially reduce unwanted electrostatic fields to further improve performance of the device. As a result, the compact electrostatic comb actuator of the present invention occupies only a fraction of the space required for conventional electrostatic comb actuators, while providing a substantial increase in the available drive force (up to one-hundred times).

  7. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerdemann, Stephen,J; Jablonski, Paul, J

    2011-05-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines<150 {micro}m,<75 {micro}m, and<45 {micro}m; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH]<75 {micro}m and<45 {micro}m; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  8. First wall thermal hydraulic models for fusion blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillo, J A

    1980-01-01

    Subject to normal and off-normal reactor conditions, thermal hydraulic models of first walls, e.g., a thermal mass barrier, a tubular shield, and a radiating liner are reviewed. Under normal operation the plasma behaves as expected in a predicted way for transient and steady-state conditions. The most severe thermal loading on the first wall occurs when the plasma becomes unstable and dumps its energy on the wall in a very short period of time (milliseconds). Depending on the plasma dump time and area over which the energy is deposited may result in melting of the first wall surface, and if the temperature is high enough, vaporization.

  9. On stable compact minimal submanifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Torralbo, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Stable compact minimal submanifolds of the product of a sphere and any Riemannian manifold are classified whenever the dimension of the sphere is at least three. The complete classification of the stable compact minimal submanifolds of the product of two spheres is obtained. Also, it is proved that the only stable compact minimal surfaces of the product of a 2-sphere and any Riemann surface are the complex ones.

  10. Embodied energy in cement stabilised rammed earth walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatarama Reddy, B.V.; Prasanna Kumar, P. [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2010-03-15

    Rammed earth walls are low carbon emission and energy efficient alternatives to load bearing walls. Large numbers of rammed earth buildings have been constructed in the recent past across the globe. This paper is focused on embodied energy in cement stabilised rammed earth (CSRE) walls. Influence of soil grading, density and cement content on compaction energy input has been monitored. A comparison between energy content of cement and energy in transportation of materials, with that of the actual energy input during rammed earth compaction in the actual field conditions and the laboratory has been made. Major conclusions of the investigations are (a) compaction energy increases with increase in clay fraction of the soil mix and it is sensitive to density of the CSRE wall, (b) compaction energy varies between 0.033 MJ/m{sup 3} and 0.36 MJ/m{sup 3} for the range of densities and cement contents attempted, (c) energy expenditure in the compaction process is negligible when compared to energy content of the cement and (d) total embodied energy in CSRE walls increases linearly with the increase in cement content and is in the range of 0.4-0.5 GJ/m{sup 3} for cement content in the rage of 6-8%. (author)

  11. STATUS OF THE DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Carroll, J; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-04-22

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) system being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. High electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The system is capable of accelerating any charge to mass ratio particle. Applications of high gradient proton and electron versions of this accelerator will be discussed. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, photoconductive switches and compact proton sources.

  12. Overview of the Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) T4B Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) Program endeavors to quickly develop a compact fusion power plant with favorable commercial economics and military utility. The CFR uses a diamagnetic, high beta, magnetically encapsulated, linear ring cusp plasma confinement scheme. The goal of the T4B experiment is to demonstrate a suitable plasma target for heating experiments and to characterize the behavior of plasma sources in the CFR configuration. The design of the T4B experiment will be presented, including discussion of predicted behavior, plasma sources, heating mechanisms, diagnostics suite and relevant numerical modeling. ©2016 Lockheed Martin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Matching network for RF plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Daniel S.; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2007-11-20

    A compact matching network couples an RF power supply to an RF antenna in a plasma generator. The simple and compact impedance matching network matches the plasma load to the impedance of a coaxial transmission line and the output impedance of an RF amplifier at radio frequencies. The matching network is formed of a resonantly tuned circuit formed of a variable capacitor and an inductor in a series resonance configuration, and a ferrite core transformer coupled to the resonantly tuned circuit. This matching network is compact enough to fit in existing compact focused ion beam systems.

  14. Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics Stability Spectrum with a Resistive Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Jardin, S. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2008-05-01

    We show that the eigenvalue equations describing a cylindrical ideal magnetophydrodynamicsw (MHD) plasma interacting with a thin resistive wall can be put into the standard mathematical form: Α•χ = λΒ• χ. This is accomplished by using a finite element basis for the plasma, and by adding an extra degree of freedom corresponding to the electrical current in the thin wall. The standard form allows the use of linear eigenvalue solvers, without additional interations, to compute the complete spectrum of plasma modes in the presence of a surrounding restrictive wall at arbitrary separation. We show that our method recovers standard results in the limits of (1) an infinitely resistive wall (no wall), and (2) a zero resistance wall (ideal wall).

  15. Atacama Compact Array Antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Masao; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Naoi, Takahiro; Yamada, Masumi; Saito, Hiro; Ikenoue, Bungo; Kato, Yoshihiro; Morita, Kou-ichiro; Mizuno, Norikazu; Iguchi, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    We report major performance test results of the Atacama Compact Array (ACA) 7-m and 12-m antennas of ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array). The four major performances of the ACA antennas are all-sky pointing (to be not more than 2.0 arcsec), offset pointing (to be < 0.6 arcsec) surface accuracy (< 25(20) micrometer for 12(7)m-antenna), stability of path-length (15 micrometer over 3 min), and high servo capability (6 degrees/s for Azimuth and 3 degrees/s for Elevation). The high performance of the ACA antenna has been extensively evaluated at the Site Erection Facility area at an altitude of about 2900 meters. Test results of pointing performance, surface performance, and fast motion capability are demonstrated.

  16. Compact particle accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.

    2017-08-29

    A compact particle accelerator having an input portion configured to receive power to produce particles for acceleration, where the input portion includes a switch, is provided. In a general embodiment, a vacuum tube receives particles produced from the input portion at a first end, and a plurality of wafer stacks are positioned serially along the vacuum tube. Each of the plurality of wafer stacks include a dielectric and metal-oxide pair, wherein each of the plurality of wafer stacks further accelerate the particles in the vacuum tube. A beam shaper coupled to a second end of the vacuum tube shapes the particles accelerated by the plurality of wafer stacks into a beam and an output portion outputs the beam.

  17. Compact Toroid Propagation in a Magnetized Drift Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Robert D.; Baker, Kevin L.; Hwang, David Q.; Evans, Russell W.

    2000-10-01

    Injection of a spheromak-like compact toroid (SCT) plasma into a toroidal plasma confinement device may require the SCT to propagate through a drift tube region occupied by a pre-existing magnetic field. This field is expected to extert a retarding force on the SCT, but may also result in a beneficial compression. The effects of transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields will be measured using the CTIX compact-toroid injector, together with a fast framing camera with an axial view of the formation, coaxial, and drift-tube regions. In the case of longitudinal magnetic field, comparisons will be made with the predictions of two-dimensional numerical simulation. The use of localized magnetic field to reduce plasma bridging of the insulating gap will also be investigated.

  18. Wall force produced during disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, H.; Paccagnella, R.; Breslau, J.

    2009-11-01

    The study of disruptions is of great importance for ITER. Previous work on disruptions [1] is extended to compute toroidally asymmetric wall force in ITER, using the M3D code. The disruptions are produced by n = 1 resistive wall modes or external kink modes. A thin wall resistive boundary model is used to calculate the wall forces. The symmetric wall force, produced by a VDE, and the asymmetric wall force, produced by n = 1 modes, are comparable in magnitude. It is found that the asymmetric and axisymmetric forces scale with the growth rate of the instability multiplied by the square of the current divided by magnetic field. A similar scaling was reported for VDEs in JET [2]. Numerically, the study of disruptions is very challenging. In the M3D extended MHD code, dealiasing was applied in the toroidal direction. Advection terms were treated with a numerical upwind method. These techniques provided sufficient numerical stability to simulate entire disruption events. [4pt] [1] R. Paccagnella, H. R. Strauss, and J. Breslau, Nucl. Fusion (2009) 49 035003. [2] V. Riccardo, T. C. Hender, P. J. Lomas, et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion (2004)

  19. The Finslerian compact star model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahaman, Farook; Paul, Nupur [Jadavpur University, Department of Mathematics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); De, S.S. [University of Calcutta, Department of Applied Mathematics, Kolkata (India); Ray, Saibal [Government College of Engineering and Ceramic Technology, Department of Physics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Jafry, M.A.K. [Shibpur Dinobundhoo Institution, Department of Physics, Howrah, West Bengal (India)

    2015-11-15

    We construct a toy model for compact stars based on the Finslerian structure of spacetime. By assuming a particular mass function, we find an exact solution of the Finsler-Einstein field equations with an anisotropic matter distribution. The solutions are revealed to be physically interesting and pertinent for the explanation of compact stars. (orig.)

  20. Compact waveguide circular polarizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-08-16

    A multi-port waveguide is provided having a rectangular waveguide that includes a Y-shape structure with first top arm having a first rectangular waveguide port, a second top arm with second rectangular waveguide port, and a base arm with a third rectangular waveguide port for supporting a TE.sub.10 mode and a TE.sub.20 mode, where the end of the third rectangular waveguide port includes rounded edges that are parallel to a z-axis of the waveguide, a circular waveguide having a circular waveguide port for supporting a left hand and a right hand circular polarization TE.sub.11 mode and is coupled to a base arm broad wall, and a matching feature disposed on the base arm broad wall opposite of the circular waveguide for terminating the third rectangular waveguide port, where the first rectangular waveguide port, the second rectangular waveguide port and the circular waveguide port are capable of supporting 4-modes of operation.

  1. A new visible spectroscopy diagnostic for the JET ITER-like wall main chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, C F; Brezinsek, S; Stamp, M F; Griph, S; Heesterman, P; Hogben, C; Horton, A; Meigs, A; Morlock, C; Studholme, W; Zastrow, K-D

    2012-10-01

    In preparation for ITER, JET has been upgraded with a new ITER-like wall (ILW), whereby the main plasma facing components, previously of carbon, have been replaced by mainly Be in the main chamber and W in the divertor. As part of the many diagnostic enhancements, a new, survey, visible spectroscopy diagnostic has been installed for the characterization of the ILW. An array of eight lines-of-sight (LOS) view radially one of the two JET neutral beam shine through areas (W coated carbon fibre composite tiles) at the inner wall. In addition, one vertical LOS views the solid W tile at the outer divertor. The light emitted from the plasma is coupled to a series of compact overview spectrometers, with overall wavelength range of 380-960 nm and to one high resolution Echelle overview spectrometer covering the wavelength range 365-720 nm. The new survey diagnostic has been absolutely calibrated in situ by means of a radiometric light source placed inside the JET vessel in front of the whole optical path and operated by remote handling. The diagnostic is operated in every JET discharge, routinely monitoring photon fluxes from intrinsic and extrinsic impurities (e.g., Be, C, W, N, and Ne), molecules (e.g., BeD, D(2), ND) and main chamber and divertor recycling (typically Dα, Dβ, and Dγ). The paper presents a technical description of the diagnostic and first measurements during JET discharges.

  2. Falling walls

    CERN Multimedia

    It was 20 years ago this week that the Berlin wall was opened for the first time since its construction began in 1961. Although the signs of a thaw had been in the air for some time, few predicted the speed of the change that would ensue. As members of the scientific community, we can take a moment to reflect on the role our field played in bringing East and West together. CERN’s collaboration with the East, primarily through links with the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, in Dubna, Russia, is well documented. Less well known, however, is the role CERN played in bringing the scientists of East and West Germany together. As the Iron curtain was going up, particle physicists on both sides were already creating the conditions that would allow it to be torn down. Cold war historian Thomas Stange tells the story in his 2002 CERN Courier article. It was my privilege to be in Berlin on Monday, the anniversary of the wall’s opening, to take part in a conference entitled &lsquo...

  3. Compact Dexterous Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovchik, Christopher Scott (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A compact robotic hand includes a palm housing, a wrist section, and a forearm section. The palm housing supports a plurality of fingers and one or more movable palm members that cooperate with the fingers to grasp and/or release an object. Each flexible finger comprises a plurality of hingedly connected segments, including a proximal segment pivotally connected to the palm housing. The proximal finger segment includes at least one groove defining first and second cam surfaces for engagement with a cable. A plurality of lead screw assemblies each carried by the palm housing are supplied with power from a flexible shaft rotated by an actuator and output linear motion to a cable move a finger. The cable is secured within a respective groove and enables each finger to move between an opened and closed position. A decoupling assembly pivotally connected to a proximal finger segment enables a cable connected thereto to control movement of an intermediate and distal finger segment independent of movement of the proximal finger segment. The dexterous robotic hand closely resembles the function of a human hand yet is light weight and capable of grasping both heavy and light objects with a high degree of precision.

  4. Fast plasma discharge capillary design as a high power throughput soft x-ray emission source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyndham, E S; Favre, M; Valdivia, M P; Valenzuela, J C; Chuaqui, H; Bhuyan, H

    2010-09-01

    We present the experimental details and results from a low energy but high repetition rate compact plasma capillary source for extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray research and applications. Two lengths of capillary are mounted in two versions of a closely related design. The discharge operates in 1.6 and 3.2 mm inner diameter alumina capillaries of lengths 21 and 36 mm. The use of water both as dielectric and as coolant simplifies the compact low inductance design with nanosecond discharge periods. The stored electrical energy of the discharge is approximately 0.5 J and is provided by directly charging the capacitor plates from an inexpensive insulated-gate bipolar transistor in 1 μs or less. We present characteristic argon spectra from plasma between 30 and 300 Å as well as temporally resolved x-ray energy fluence in discrete bands on axis. The spectra also allow the level of ablated wall material to be gauged and associated with useful capillary lifetime according to the chosen configuration and energy storage. The connection between the electron beams associated with the transient hollow cathode mechanism, soft x-ray output, capillary geometry, and capillary lifetime is reported. The role of these e-beams and the plasma as measured on-axis is discussed. The relation of the electron temperature and the ionization stages observed is discussed in the context of some model results of ionization in a non-Maxwellian plasma.

  5. Compacting biomass waste materials for use as fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ou

    conducted in a stoke boiler. A separate burning test was also carried out by burning biomass logs alone in an outdoor hot-water furnace for heating a building. Based on a previous coal compaction study, the process of biomass compaction was studied numerically by use of a non-linear finite element code. A constitutive model with sufficient generality was adapted for biomass material to deal with pore contraction during compaction. A contact node algorithm was applied to implement the effect of mold wall friction into the finite element program. Numerical analyses were made to investigate the pressure distribution in a die normal to the axis of compaction, and to investigate the density distribution in a biomass log after compaction. The results of the analyses gave generally good agreement with theoretical analysis of coal log compaction, although assumptions had to be made about the variation in the elastic modulus of the material and the Poisson's ratio during the compaction cycle.

  6. High Impact Technology Compact Combustion (HITCC) Compact Core Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    the CO and CO2 net reaction rates from the FGM. This, in turn, provides another benefit . That is, the source term in YC is not just now dependent on...AFRL-RQ-WP-TR-2016-0010 HIGH IMPACT TECHNOLOGY COMPACT COMBUSTION (HITCC) COMPACT CORE TECHNOLOGIES Andrew W. Caswell Combustion...information exchange, and its publication does not constitute the Government’s approval or disapproval of its ideas or findings. *Disseminated

  7. Using multi-walled carbon nanotubes in spark plasma sintered Pb(Zr0.47Ti0.53)O3 ceramics for tailoring dielectric and tunability properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciomaga, Cristina E.; Padurariu, Leontin; Curecheriu, Lavinia P.; Lupu, Nicoleta; Lisiecki, Isabelle; Deluca, Marco; Tascu, Sorin; Galassi, Carmen; Mitoseriu, Liliana

    2014-10-01

    The addition of small amounts (below 0.1 wt. %) of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to Pb(Zr0.47Ti0.53)O3 (PZT) ceramics prepared by spark plasma sintering is proposed as a method of tailoring the electrical properties, which are expected to be modified with respect to the pure PZT, both as result of the presence of 1-D conductive fillers in the ceramic product and via the microstructural modifications of ceramics induced during the sintering. The addition of even small amounts of carbon nanotubes strongly reduced the sinterability of PZT ceramics and resulted in the porous and fine-grained microstructures (relative density of 73% for a MWCNT addition of 0.5 vol. % by comparison with 91% in the pure PZT, produced in the same conditions). A monotonous decrease of permittivity with increasing the MWCNT level from ˜830 in pure PZT to ˜627 for x = 0.5 vol. %, at a fixed frequency f = 1kHz, and low dielectric losses below 2% have been observed. Tunability increases with respect to the values of dense PZT for small concentration of MWCNT as high as 0.0625 vol. % and then monotonically decreases for higher additions. Calculations by finite element modeling demonstrated that by addition of 1-D conductive fillers with compositions below the percolation limits to porous microstructures, the major role in changing the electrical properties via local field modification is related to the induced porosity rather than to the influence of the small amounts of MWCNTs survived after sintering and post-annealing treatment. The reduced permittivity with about 14% combined with low losses and higher tunability than in the pure PZT ceramics obtained at reasonable fields, makes the idea of using the addition of MWCNTs to ferroelectric ceramics an interesting approach in searching new structures for tunability properties.

  8. Effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma on bone regeneration for osseointegration of dental implants: preliminary study in canine three-wall intrabony defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jeong-Ho; Han, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Seong-Ho; Lee, Myung-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Jin; Song, Sun U; Oh, Namsik

    2014-07-01

    Tissue engineering has been applied to overcome the obstacles encountered with bone regeneration for the placement of dental implants. The purpose of this study was to determine the bone formation ability of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) when applied separately or together to the intrabony defect around dental implants with a porous hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold. Standardized three-wall intrabony defects (4 × 4 × 4 mm) were created at the mesial of each dental implant site in four mongrel dogs. Defects were then grafted with the following materials: HA + BMMSCs (HS group), HA + PRP (HP group), HA + BMMSCs + PRP (HSP group), and HA scaffold alone (HA group). The level of bone formation (bone density) and osseointegration (bone-to-implant contact [BIC]) in bone defects around the implants were evaluated by histological and histometric analysis at 6 and 12 weeks after the placement of implants. HA, HS, HP, and HSP groups generally showed an increase in bone density and BIC between 6 and 12 weeks, except BIC in the HS group. Although no statistically significant differences were found among HA, HS, HP, and HSP groups (p > 0.05), the highest level of bone density and BIC were observed in the HSP group after the 12-week healing period. Furthermore, the level of bone maturation was higher in the HSP group than in the other groups as determined histologically. The findings of this preliminary study suggest that BMMSCs and PRP combined with HA scaffold may provide additional therapeutic effects on bone regeneration and improve osseointegration in bone defects around dental implants.

  9. Wall to Wall Optimal Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Doering, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    The calculus of variations is employed to find steady divergence-free velocity fields that maximize transport of a tracer between two parallel walls held at fixed concentration for one of two constraints on flow strength: a fixed value of the kinetic energy or a fixed value of the enstrophy. The optimizing flows consist of an array of (convection) cells of a particular aspect ratio Gamma. We solve the nonlinear Euler-Lagrange equations analytically for weak flows and numerically (and via matched asymptotic analysis in the fixed energy case) for strong flows. We report the results in terms of the Nusselt number Nu, a dimensionless measure of the tracer transport, as a function of the Peclet number Pe, a dimensionless measure of the energy or enstrophy of the flow. For both constraints the maximum transport Nu_{MAX}(Pe) is realized in cells of decreasing aspect ratio Gamma_{opt}(Pe) as Pe increases. For the fixed energy problem, Nu_{MAX} \\sim Pe and Gamma_{opt} \\sim Pe^{-1/2}, while for the fixed enstrophy scen...

  10. Quantum Plasmas An Hydrodynamic Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Haas, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the basic concepts and new methods in the emerging scientific area known as quantum plasmas. In the near future, quantum effects in plasmas will be unavoidable, particularly in high density scenarios such as those in the next-generation intense laser-solid density plasma experiment or in compact astrophysics objects. Currently, plasmas are in the forefront of many intriguing questions around the transition from microscopic to macroscopic modeling of charged particle systems. Quantum Plasmas: an Hydrodynamic Approach is devoted to the quantum hydrodynamic model paradigm, which, unlike straight quantum kinetic theory, is much more amenable to investigate the nonlinear realm of quantum plasmas. The reader will have a step-by-step construction of the quantum hydrodynamic method applied to plasmas. The book is intended for specialists in classical plasma physics interested in methods of quantum plasma theory, as well as scientists interested in common aspects of two major areas of...

  11. Compact Grism Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teare, S. W.

    2003-05-01

    Many observatories and instrument builders are retrofitting visible and near-infrared spectrometers into their existing imaging cameras. Camera designs that reimage the focal plane and have the optical filters located in a pseudo collimated beam are ideal candidates for the addition of a spectrometer. One device commonly used as the dispersing element for such spectrometers is a grism. The traditional grism is constructed from a prism that has had a diffraction grating applied on one surface. The objective of such a design is to use the prism wedge angle to select the desired "in-line" or "zero-deviation" wavelength that passes through on axis. The grating on the surface of the prism provides much of the dispersion for the spectrometer. A grism can also be used in a "constant-dispersion" design which provides an almost linear spatial scale across the spectrum. In this paper we provide an overview of the development of a grism spectrometer for use in a near infrared camera and demonstrate that a compact grism spectrometer can be developed on a very modest budget that can be afforded at almost any facility. The grism design was prototyped using visible light and then a final device was constructed which provides partial coverage in the near infrared I, J, H and K astronomical bands using the appropriate band pass filter for order sorting. The near infrared grism presented here provides a spectral resolution of about 650 and velocity resolution of about 450 km/s. The design of this grism relied on a computer code called Xspect, developed by the author, to determine the various critical parameters of the grism. This work was supported by a small equipment grant from NASA and administered by the AAS.

  12. Compact instantaneous water heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, Jorge G.W.; Machado, Antonio R.; Ferraz, Andre D.; Rocha, Ivan C.C. da; Konishi, Ricardo [Companhia de Gas de Santa Catarina (SCGAS), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Lehmkuhl, Willian A.; Francisco Jr, Roberto W.; Hatanaka, Ricardo L.; Pereira, Fernando M.; Oliveira, Amir A.M. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of combustion in an inert porous medium in a liquid heating device application. This project aims to increase efficiency in the application of natural gas in residential and commercial sectors with the use of advanced combustion and heat transfer. The goal is to facilitate the development of a high performance compact water heater allowing hot water supply for up to two simultaneous showers. The experiment consists in a cylindrical porous burner with an integrated annular water heat exchanger. The reactants were injected radially into the burner and the flame stabilizes within the porous matrix. The water circulates in a coiled pipe positioned at the center of the burner. This configuration allows for heat transfer by conduction and radiation from the solid matrix to the heat exchanger. This article presented preliminary experimental results of a new water heater based on an annular porous burner. The range of equivalence ratios tested varied from 0.65 to 0.8. The power range was varied from 3 to 5 kW. Increasing the equivalence ratio or decreasing the total power input of the burner resulted in increased thermal efficiencies of the water heater. Thermal efficiencies varying from 60 to 92% were obtained. The condition for the goal of a comfortable bath was 20 deg C for 8-12 L/min. This preliminary prototype has achieved water temperature of 11deg C for 5 L/min. Further optimizations will be necessary in order to achieve intense heating with high thermal efficiency. (author)

  13. Sawtooth Instability in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfindal, J. L.; Maurer, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Ennis, D. A.; Knowlton, S. F.

    2015-11-01

    Sawtooth instabilities have been observed in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH), a current-carrying stellarator/tokamak hybrid device. The sawtooth instability is driven by ohmic heating of the core plasma until the safety factor drops below unity resulting in the growth of an m = 1 kink-tearing mode. Experiments varying the vacuum rotational transform from 0.02 to 0.13 are being conducted to study sawtooth property dependance on vacuum flux surface structure. The frequency of the sawtooth oscillations increase from 2 kHz to 2.8 kHz solely due the decrease in rise time of the oscillation, the crash time is unchanged. CTH has three two-color SXR cameras, a three-channel 1mm interferometer, and a new bolometer system capable of detecting the signatures of sawtooth instabilities. The new bolometer system consists of two cameras, each containing a pair of diode arrays viewing the plasma directly or through a beryllium filter. Electron temperature measurements are found with the two-color SXR cameras through a ratio of the SXR intensities. Impurity radiation can drastically affect the electron temperature measurement, therefore new filters consisting of aluminum and carbon were selected to avoid problematic line radiation while maximizing the signal for a 100 eV plasma. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  14. Compact, Ultrasensitive Formaldehyde Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Small Business Innovative Research Phase II proposal seeks to develop a compact UV laser ?based sensor for Earth science and planetary atmosphere exploration....

  15. Countably determined compact abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Dikranjan, Dikran

    2008-01-01

    For an abelian topological group G let G^* be the dual group of all continuous characters endowed with the compact open topology. A subgroup D of G determines G if the restriction homomorphism G^* --> D^* of the dual groups is a topological isomorphism. Given a scattered compact subset X of an infinite compact abelian group G such that |X|compact abelian group determined by its countable subgroup must be metrizable. This gives a negative answer to questions of Comfort, Hernandez, Macario, Raczkowski and Trigos-Arrieta, as well as provides short proofs of main results established in three manuscripts by these authors.

  16. Compact energy conversion module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR project delivers a compact vibration-based Energy Conversion Module (ECM) that powers sensors for purposes like structural health monitoring (SHM). NASA...

  17. What Is Business's Social Compact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avishai, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Under the "new" social compact, businesses must focus on continuous learning and thus have both an obligation to support teaching and an opportunity to profit from it. Learning organizations must also be teaching organizations. (SK)

  18. What Is Business's Social Compact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avishai, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Under the "new" social compact, businesses must focus on continuous learning and thus have both an obligation to support teaching and an opportunity to profit from it. Learning organizations must also be teaching organizations. (SK)

  19. Compact, Airborne Multispecies Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Small Business Innovative Research Phase I proposal seeks to develop a compact mid-infrared laser spectrometer to benefit Earth science research activities. To...

  20. Cell wall integrity signaling and innate immunity in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nühse, Thomas S

    2012-01-01

    All plant pathogens and parasites have had to develop strategies to overcome cell walls in order to access the host's cytoplasm. As a mechanically strong, multi-layered composite exoskeleton, the cell wall not only enables plants to grow tall but also protects them from such attacks. Many plant pathogens employ an arsenal of cell wall degrading enzymes, and it has long been thought that the detection of breaches in wall integrity contributes to the induction of defense. Cell wall fragments are danger-associated molecular patterns or DAMPs that can trigger defense signaling pathways comparable to microbial signals, but the picture is likely to be more complicated. A wide range of defects in cell wall biosynthesis leads to enhanced pathogen resistance. We are beginning to understand the essential role of cell wall integrity surveillance for plant growth, and the connection of processes like cell expansion, plasma membrane-cell wall contact and secondary wall biosynthesis with plant immunity is emerging.

  1. Operation of JET with an ITER-like Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, Lorne, E-mail: Lorne.Horton@jet.uk [EFDA-CSU Culham, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); European Commission, B-1049 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • JET has entered the second phase of operation with an ITER-like Wall. • Boundaries of safe plasma operation are being explored. • Studies have focused on material migration and erosion, disruptions and runaway electron beams, and optimisation of plasma and divertor performance. • Strong influence of the wall material on plasma performance but with significant scope for optimisation. - Abstract: The JET Programme in Support of ITER has entered its second phase, in which the boundaries for safe plasma operation with an ITER-like Wall are being explored. A key element of these studies is the benchmarking of the codes that are being used for ITER to predict plasma–wall interactions and, more generally, the influence of wall material on plasma performance and regimes of operation. Studies have focused on material migration and erosion, disruptions and runaway electron beams, and optimisation of plasma and divertor performance. In addition, a dedicated tungsten divertor melt experiment was carried out and provided key information for the ITER decision to begin operation with an all-W divertor. Initial results underline the strong influence that the wall material has on plasma performance and regimes of operation but show that there is significant scope for optimisation by careful discharge design. The future JET programme will concentrate on completing this optimisation and demonstrating the resulting performance in deuterium–tritium plasmas, thus providing the best possible preparation of ITER operation.

  2. Compact stellar object: the formation and structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, S.B. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF/MCT), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: The formation of compact objects is viewed at the final stages of stellar evolution. The supernova explosion events are then focalized to explain the formation of pulsars, hybrid neutron star and the limit case of the latter, the quark stars. We discuss the stability and structure of these objects in connection with the properties of the hadron and quark-gluon plasma equation of state. The hadron-quark phase transition in deep interior of these objects is discussed taking into account the implications on the density distribution of matter along the radial direction. The role of neutrinos confinement in the ultradense stellar medium in the early stages of pulsar formation is another interesting aspect to be mentioned in this presentation. Recent results for maximum mass of compact stellar objects for different forms of equations of state will be shown, presenting some theoretical predictions for maximum mass of neutron stars allowed by different equations of state assigned to dense stellar medium. Although a density greater than few times the nuclear equilibrium density appears in deep interior of the core, at the crust the density decreases by several orders of magnitude where a variety of hadronic states appears, the 'pasta'-states of hadrons. More externally, a lattice of nuclei can be formed permeated not only by electrons but also by a large amount of free neutrons and protons. These are possible structure of neutron star crust to have the density and pressures with null values at the neutron star surface. The ultimate goal of this talk is to give a short view of the compact star area for students and those who are introducing in this subject. (author)

  3. Large area plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, John (Inventor); Patterson, Michael (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An all permanent magnet Electron Cyclotron Resonance, large diameter (e.g., 40 cm) plasma source suitable for ion/plasma processing or electric propulsion, is capable of producing uniform ion current densities at its exit plane at very low power (e.g., below 200 W), and is electrodeless to avoid sputtering or contamination issues. Microwave input power is efficiently coupled with an ionizing gas without using a dielectric microwave window and without developing a throat plasma by providing a ferromagnetic cylindrical chamber wall with a conical end narrowing to an axial entrance hole for microwaves supplied on-axis from an open-ended waveguide. Permanent magnet rings are attached inside the wall with alternating polarities against the wall. An entrance magnet ring surrounding the entrance hole has a ferromagnetic pole piece that extends into the chamber from the entrance hole to a continuing second face that extends radially across an inner pole of the entrance magnet ring.

  4. Compact intra- and extracorporeal oxygenator developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Giorgio; Strauss, Andreas; Reul, Helmut

    2004-07-01

    For patients with acute lung failure, mechanical ventilation entails the risk of lung tissue damage due to high oxygen pressure and concentration. Membrane oxygenation for one to two weeks can rest the lungs due to decreased ventilation parameters, representing a potential bridge to recovery, but implies the substantial risks of blood damage, plasma leakage and infection, which often have fatal results for patients. At the Helmholtz Institute in Aachen, two types of membrane oxygenators, which aim to overcome previous limits, are under development. Both present compact designs, reduced surface and priming volumes and easier handling. HEXMO is a miniaturized extracorporeal membrane oxygenator. The integration of a small rotary blood pump into the centre of the oxygenator reduces the amount of tubing and connectors in the system. Blood is convectively warmed by the pump motor housing, thus, the use of a heat-exchanger can be avoided. This compact design reduces surface and priming volume and allows better handling, especially in critical situations. A second development is the intravascular oxygenator HIMOX, which is inserted directly into the vena cava. Priming volume and blood contact surface are reduced, as well as infection risk and control needs for the patient. A new cross-flow fibre configuration is used for improving gas transfer within the limited space inside the vena cava. A microaxial blood pump is integrated into the device for compensating the pressure drop across the fibres and allowing venous return and physiological pressure in the organs proximal to the oxygenator.

  5. ROSAT observations of compact groups of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Saracco, P; Saracco, P; Ciliegi, P

    1994-01-01

    A search for X-ray emission from compact groups revealed detection from 8 out of the 12 HCG images extracted from the ROSAT public archive. For two of them the X-ray emission originates from galaxies in the group. On the contrary, three groups show an extended emission clearly caused by hot intracluster gas. A Raymond-Smith hot plasma model provides an excellent fit to the X-ray spectra. The estimated temperatures are distributed in a quite narrow range (from 0.73 to 0.92 keV) and are consistent, within the errors, with 0.9 keV. The luminosity ranging from 0.75 to 5.1\\cdot10^{42}erg s^{-1}. The most relevant result is the low metal abundance surely detected in two of them and likely in a third that characterizes the hot gas cloud responsible for the X-ray emission. The data concerning the remaining 3 detected compact groups are not sufficient to discriminate with certainty between diffuse and/or point-like X-ray emission. However the results of the spectral analysis point to the presence of a hot gas again wi...

  6. Compact microwave ion source for industrial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong-Sub; Kim, Dae-Il; Kim, Han-Sung; Seol, Kyung-Tae; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Hong, In-Seok

    2012-02-01

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source for ion implanters has many good properties for industrial application, such as easy maintenance and long lifetime, and it should be compact for budget and space. But, it has a dc current supply for the solenoid and a rf generator for plasma generation. Usually, they are located on high voltage platform because they are electrically connected with beam extraction power supply. Using permanent magnet solenoid and multi-layer dc break, high voltage deck and high voltage isolation transformer can be eliminated, and the dose rate on targets can be controlled by pulse duty control with semiconductor high voltage switch. Because the beam optics does not change, beam transfer components, such as focusing elements and beam shutter, can be eliminated. It has shown the good performances in budget and space for industrial applications of ion beams.

  7. Preliminary characterization of interlayer for Be/Cu sintered compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, N.; Kawamura, H. [Oarai Research Establishment, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    At present, beryllium is under consideration as a main candidate material for plasma facing components of ITER, because of its many advantages such as low Z, high thermal conductivity, low tritium retention, low activation and so on. Among the different divertor design options, the duplex structure where the beryllium armor is bonded with heat sink structural materials (DS-copper, Cu-Cr-Zr and so on) is under consideration. And plasma facing components will be exposed to high heat load and high neutron flux generated by the plasma. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the reliable bonding technologies between beryllium and heat sink structural materials in order to fabricate plasma facing components which can resist those. Then, we started the bonding technology development of beryllium and copper alloy with FGM (functional gradient material) in order to reduce thermal stress due to the difference of thermal expansion between beryllium and copper alloy. As the interlayers for FGM, eleven kinds of sintered compacts in which the mixing ratio of beryllium powder and oxygen free copper powder is different, were fabricated by the hot press/HIP method. The dimension of each compact is 8mm in diameter, 2mm in thickness. Then, thermal diffusivity and specific heat of these compacts were measured by laser flash method, and thermal conductivity was calculated from those values. From metalographical observation, it became clear that the sintered compacts of mixture of beryllium powder and copper powder contain residual beryllium, copper and two kinds of intermetallic compounds, Be{sub 2}Cu({delta}) and BeCu({gamma}). From the results of thermal characterization, thermal diffusivity of interlayers increased with increase of copper containing ratio. And, specific heat gradually decreased with increase of copper containing ratio.

  8. Directional Oscillations, Concentrations, and Compensated Compactness via Microlocal Compactness Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindler, Filip

    2015-01-01

    This work introduces microlocal compactness forms (MCFs) as a new tool to study oscillations and concentrations in L p -bounded sequences of functions. Decisively, MCFs retain information about the location, value distribution, and direction of oscillations and concentrations, thus extending at the same time the theories of (generalized) Young measures and H-measures. In L p -spaces oscillations and concentrations precisely discriminate between weak and strong compactness, and thus MCFs allow one to quantify the difference in compactness. The definition of MCFs involves a Fourier variable, whereby differential constraints on the functions in the sequence can also be investigated easily—a distinct advantage over Young measure theory. Furthermore, pointwise restrictions are reflected in the MCF as well, paving the way for applications to Tartar's framework of compensated compactness; consequently, we establish a new weak-to-strong compactness theorem in a "geometric" way. After developing several aspects of the abstract theory, we consider three applications; for lamination microstructures, the hierarchy of oscillations is reflected in the MCF. The directional information retained in an MCF is harnessed in the relaxation theory for anisotropic integral functionals. Finally, we indicate how the theory pertains to the study of propagation of singularities in certain systems of PDEs. The proofs combine measure theory, Young measures, and harmonic analysis.

  9. Basic plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Basudev

    2014-01-01

    Basic Plasma Physics is designed to serve as an introductory compact textbook for advanced undergraduate, postgraduate and research students taking plasma physics as one of their subject of study for the first time. It covers the current syllabus of plasma physics offered by the most universities and technical institutions. The book requires no background in plasma physics but only elementary knowledge of basic physics and mathematics. Emphasis has been given on the analytical approach. Topics are developed from first principle so that the students can learn through self-study. One chapter has been devoted to describe some practical aspects of plasma physics. Each chapter contains a good number of solved and unsolved problems and a variety of review questions, mostly taken from recent examination papers. Some classroom experiments described in the book will surely help students as well as instructors.

  10. Final report on the LLNL compact torus acceleration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddleman, J.; Hammer, J.; Hartman, C.; McLean, H.; Molvik, A.

    1995-03-19

    In this report, we summarize recent work at LLNL on the compact torus (CT) acceleration project. The CT accelerator is a novel technique for projecting plasmas to high velocities and reaching high energy density states. The accelerator exploits magnetic confinement in the CT to stably transport plasma over large distances and to directed kinetic energies large in comparison with the CT internal and magnetic energy. Applications range from heating and fueling magnetic fusion devices, generation of intense pulses of x-rays or neutrons for weapons effects and high energy-density fusion concepts.

  11. Compactness in intuitionistic fuzzy topological spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Abbas

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We introduce fuzzy almost continuous mapping, fuzzy weakly continuous mapping, fuzzy compactness, fuzzy almost compactness, and fuzzy near compactness in intuitionistic fuzzy topological space in view of the definition of Å ostak, and study some of their properties. Also, we investigate the behavior of fuzzy compactness under several types of fuzzy continuous mappings.

  12. Adiabatic Compression of Compact Tori for Current Drive and Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Simon; McNab, Angus; Miller, Kenneth; Ziemba, Tim

    2008-11-01

    Several critical issues stand in the development path for compact tori. An important one is the production of strong magnetic fields, (or large flux amplifications) by use of a low current source. The Pulsed Build-up Experiment is a Phase II SBIR project in which we aim to show a new means for generating strong magnetic fields from a low current source, namely, the repetitive injection of helicity-bearing plasma that also undergoes an acceleration and compression. In the Phase I SBIR, advanced computations were benchmarked against analytic theory and run to determine the best means for the acceleration and compression of a compact torus plasma. The study included detailed simulations of magnetic reconnection. In Phase II, an experiment has been designed and is being built to produce strong magnetic fields in a spheromak by the repetitive injection of magnetic helicity from a low current coaxial plasma source. The plasma will be accelerated and compressed in a similar manner to a traveling wave adiabatic compression scheme that was previously applied to a mirror plasma [1]. [1] P. M. Bellan Scalings for a Traveling Mirror Adiabatic Magnetic Compressor Rev. Sci. Instrum. 53(8) 1214 (1982) Work supported by DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-06ER84449.

  13. Compact Intracloud Discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, David A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1998-11-01

    In November of 1993, mysterious signals recorded by a satellite-borne broadband VHF radio science experiment called Blackboard led to a completely unexpected discovery. Prior to launch of the ALEXIS satellite, it was thought that its secondary payload, Blackboard, would most often detect the radio emissions from lightning when its receiver was not overwhelmed by noise from narrowband communication carriers. Instead, the vast majority of events that triggered the instrument were isolated pairs of pulses that were one hundred times more energetic than normal thunderstorm electrical emissions. The events, which came to be known as TIPPs (for transionospheric pulse pairs), presented a true mystery to the geophysics community. At the time, it was not even known whether the events had natural or anthropogenic origins. After two and one half years of research into the unique signals, two ground-based receiver arrays in New Mexico first began to detect and record thunderstorm radio emissions that were consistent with the Blackboard observations. On two occasions, the ground-based systems and Blackboard even recorded emissions that were produced by the same exact events. From the ground based observations, it has been determined that TIPP events areproduced by brief, singular, isolated, intracloud electrical discharges that occur in intense regions of thunderstorms. These discharges have been dubbed CIDS, an acronym for compact intracloud discharges. During the summer of 1996, ground-based receiver arrays were used to record the electric field change signals and broadband HF emissions from hundreds of CIDS. Event timing that was accurate to within a few microseconds made possible the determination of source locations using methods of differential time of arrival. Ionospheric reflections of signals were recorded in addition to groundwave/line-of-sight signals and were used to determine accurate altitudes for the discharges. Twenty-four CIDS were recorded from three

  14. The Construction of Finer Compact Topologies

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that each locally compact strongly sober topology is contained in a compact Hausdorff topology; just take the supremum of its topology with its dual topology. On the other hand, examples of compact topologies are known that do not have a finer compact Hausdorff topology. This led to the question (first explicitly formulated by D.E. Cameron) whether each compact topology is contained in a compact topology with respect to which all compact sets are closed. (For the obvious r...

  15. Compactly convex sets in linear topological spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Banakh, T; Ravsky, O

    2012-01-01

    A convex subset X of a linear topological space is called compactly convex if there is a continuous compact-valued map $\\Phi:X\\to exp(X)$ such that $[x,y]\\subset\\Phi(x)\\cup \\Phi(y)$ for all $x,y\\in X$. We prove that each convex subset of the plane is compactly convex. On the other hand, the space $R^3$ contains a convex set that is not compactly convex. Each compactly convex subset $X$ of a linear topological space $L$ has locally compact closure $\\bar X$ which is metrizable if and only if each compact subset of $X$ is metrizable.

  16. The DEMO wall load challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenninger, R.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, R.; Arbeiter, F.; Aubert, J.; Bachmann, C.; Barbato, L.; Barrett, T.; Beckers, M.; Biel, W.; Boccaccini, L.; Carralero, D.; Coster, D.; Eich, T.; Fasoli, A.; Federici, G.; Firdaouss, M.; Graves, J.; Horacek, J.; Kovari, M.; Lanthaler, S.; Loschiavo, V.; Lowry, C.; Lux, H.; Maddaluno, G.; Maviglia, F.; Mitteau, R.; Neu, R.; Pfefferle, D.; Schmid, K.; Siccinio, M.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, C.; Snicker, A.; Subba, F.; Varje, J.; Zohm, H.

    2017-04-01

    For several reasons the challenge to keep the loads to the first wall within engineering limits is substantially higher in DEMO compared to ITER. Therefore the pre-conceptual design development for DEMO that is currently ongoing in Europe needs to be based on load estimates that are derived employing the most recent plasma edge physics knowledge. An initial assessment of the static wall heat load limit in DEMO infers that the steady state peak heat flux limit on the majority of the DEMO first wall should not be assumed to be higher than 1.0 MW m-2. This compares to an average wall heat load of 0.29 MW m-2 for the design {\\tt {EU}}{\\tt {~}}{\\tt {DEMO1}}{\\tt {~2015}} assuming a perfect homogeneous distribution. The main part of this publication concentrates on the development of first DEMO estimates for charged particle, radiation, fast particle (all static) and disruption heat loads. Employing an initial engineering wall design with clear optimization potential in combination with parameters for the flat-top phase (x-point configuration), loads up to 7 MW m-2 (penalty factor for tolerances etc not applied) have been calculated. Assuming a fraction of power radiated from the x-point region between 1/5 and 1/3, peaks of the total power flux density due to radiation of 0.6-0.8 MW m-2 are found in the outer baffle region. This first review of wall loads, and the associated limits in DEMO clearly underlines a significant challenge that necessitates substantial engineering efforts as well as a considerable consolidation of the associated physics basis.

  17. Compact magnetic confinement fusion: Spherical torus and compact torus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Gao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The spherical torus (ST and compact torus (CT are two kinds of alternative magnetic confinement fusion concepts with compact geometry. The ST is actually a sub-category of tokamak with a low aspect ratio; while the CT is a toroidal magnetic configuration with a simply-connected geometry including spheromak and field reversed pinch. The ST and CT have potential advantages for ultimate fusion reactor; while at present they can also provide unique fusion science and technology contributions for mainstream fusion research. However, some critical scientific and technology issues should be extensively investigated.

  18. Viral RNAs are unusually compact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajaykumar Gopal

    Full Text Available A majority of viruses are composed of long single-stranded genomic RNA molecules encapsulated by protein shells with diameters of just a few tens of nanometers. We examine the extent to which these viral RNAs have evolved to be physically compact molecules to facilitate encapsulation. Measurements of equal-length viral, non-viral, coding and non-coding RNAs show viral RNAs to have among the smallest sizes in solution, i.e., the highest gel-electrophoretic mobilities and the smallest hydrodynamic radii. Using graph-theoretical analyses we demonstrate that their sizes correlate with the compactness of branching patterns in predicted secondary structure ensembles. The density of branching is determined by the number and relative positions of 3-helix junctions, and is highly sensitive to the presence of rare higher-order junctions with 4 or more helices. Compact branching arises from a preponderance of base pairing between nucleotides close to each other in the primary sequence. The density of branching represents a degree of freedom optimized by viral RNA genomes in response to the evolutionary pressure to be packaged reliably. Several families of viruses are analyzed to delineate the effects of capsid geometry, size and charge stabilization on the selective pressure for RNA compactness. Compact branching has important implications for RNA folding and viral assembly.

  19. Cell Wall Assembly in Fucus Zygotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quatrano, Ralph S.; Stevens, Patricia T.

    1976-01-01

    Fertilization triggers the assembly of a cell wall around the egg cell of three brown algae, Fucus vesiculosus, F. distichus, and F. inflatus. New polysaccharide polymers are continually being added to the cell wall during the first 24 hours of synchronous embryo development. This wall assembly involves the extracellular deposition of fibrillar material by cytoplasmic vesicles fusing with the plasma membrane. One hour after fertilization a fragmented wall can be isolated free of cytoplasm and contains equal amounts of cellulose and alginic acid with no fucose-containing polymers (fucans) present. Birefringence of the wall caused by oriented cellulose microfibrils is not detected in all zygotes until 4 hours, at which time intact cell walls can be isolated that retain the shape of the zygote. These walls have a relatively low ratio of fucose to xylose and little sulfate when compared to walls from older embryos. When extracts of walls from 4-hour zygotes are subjected to cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH 7, a single fucan (F1) can be detected. By 12 hours, purified cell walls are composed of fucans containing a relatively high ratio of fucose to xylose and high levels of sulfate, and contain a second fucan (F2) which is electrophoretically distinct from F1. F2 appears to be deposited in only a localized region of the wall, that which elongates to form the rhizoid cell. Throughout wall assembly, the polyuronide block co-polymer alginic acid did not significantly vary its mannuronic (M) to guluronic (G) acid ratio (0.33-0.55) or its block distribution (MG, 54%; GG, 30%; MM, 16%). From 6 to 24 hours of embryo development, the proportion of the major polysaccharide components found in purified walls is stable. Alginic acid is the major polymer and comprises about 60% of the total wall, while cellulose and the fucans each make-up about 20% of the remainder. During the extracellular assembly of this wall, the intracellular levels of the storage glucan laminaran

  20. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  1. Current status of the JET ITER-like Wall Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, G F; Edwards, P; Greuner, H; Loving, A; Maier, H; Mertens, Ph; Philipps, V; Riccardo, V; Rubel, M; Ruset, C; Scmidt, A; Villedieu, E [JET-EFDA Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gfm@jet.uk

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents an overview of the status and relevant technical issues for the ITER-like Wall Project with emphasis on progress since the 11th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications.

  2. Bright X-ray source from a laser-driven micro-plasma-waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Longqing

    2016-01-01

    Bright tunable x-ray sources have a number of applications in basic science, medicine and industry. The most powerful sources are synchrotrons, where relativistic electrons are circling in giant storage rings. In parallel, compact laser-plasma x-ray sources are being developed. Owing to the rapid progress in laser technology, very high-contrast femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensities become available. These pulses allow for interaction with micro-structured solid-density plasma without destroying the structure by parasitic pre-pulses. The high-contrast laser pulses as well as the manufacturing of materials at micro- and nano-scales open a new realm of possibilities for laser interaction with photonic materials at the relativistic intensities. Here we demonstrate, via numerical simulations, that when coupling with a readily available 1.8 Joule laser, a micro-plasma-waveguide (MPW) may serve as a novel compact x-ray source. Electrons are extracted from the walls by the laser field and form a dense ...

  3. Professional Windows Embedded Compact 7

    CERN Document Server

    Phung, Samuel; Joubert, Thierry; Hall, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Learn to program an array of customized devices and solutions As a compact, highly efficient, scalable operating system, Windows Embedded Compact 7 (WEC7) is one of the best options for developing a new generation of network-enabled, media-rich, and service-oriented devices. This in-depth resource takes you through the benefits and capabilities of WEC7 so that you can start using this performance development platform today. Divided into several major sections, the book begins with an introduction and then moves on to coverage of OS design, application development, advanced application developm

  4. Compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Vernon, George E.; Hoke, Darren A.; De Marquis, Virginia K.; Harris, Steven M.

    2007-06-26

    A compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit (CDU) is disclosed in which a thyristor switch and a flyback charging circuit are both sandwiched about a ceramic energy storage capacitor. The result is a compact rugged assembly which provides a low-inductance current discharge path. The flyback charging circuit preferably includes a low-temperature co-fired ceramic transformer. The CDU can further include one or more ceramic substrates for enclosing the thyristor switch and for holding various passive components used in the flyback charging circuit. A load such as a detonator can also be attached directly to the CDU.

  5. Compact toroid injection into C-2U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Thomas; Gota, H.; Garate, E.; Asai, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Sekiguchi, J.; Putvinski, S.; Allfrey, I.; Beall, M.; Cordero, M.; Granstedt, E.; Kinley, J.; Morehouse, M.; Sheftman, D.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    Sustainment of an advanced neutral beam-driven FRC for a period in excess of 5 ms is the primary goal of the C-2U machine at Tri Alpha Energy. In addition, a criteria for long-term global sustainment of any magnetically confined fusion reactor is particle refueling. To this end, a magnetized coaxial plasma-gun has been developed. Compact toroids (CT) are to be injected perpendicular to the axial magnetic field of C-2U. To simulate this environment, an experimental test-stand has been constructed. A transverse magnetic field of B ~ 1 kG is established (comparable to the C-2U axial field) and CTs are fired across it. As a minimal requirement, the CT must have energy density greater than that of the magnetic field it is to penetrate, i.e., 1/2 ρv2 >=B2 / 2μ0 . This criteria is easily met and indeed the CTs traverse the test-stand field. A preliminary experiment on C-2U shows the CT also capable of penetrating into FRC plasmas and refueling is observed resulting in a 20 - 30% increase in total particle number per single-pulsed CT injection. Results from test-stand and C-2U experiments will be presented.

  6. Remodeling of the collagen fiber architecture due to compaction in small vessels under tissue engineered conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ana L F; Stekelenburg, Maria; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2011-07-01

    Mechanical loading protocols in tissue engineering (TE) aim to improve the deposition of a properly organized collagen fiber network. In addition to collagen remodeling, these conditioning protocols can result in tissue compaction. Tissue compaction is beneficial to tissue collagen alignment, yet it may lead to a loss of functionality of the TE construct due to changes in geometry after culture. Here, a mathematical model is presented to relate the changes in collagen architecture to the local compaction within a TE small blood vessel, assuming that under static conditions, compaction is the main factor responsible for collagen fiber organization. An existing structurally based model is extended to incorporate volumetric tissue compaction. Subsequently, the model is applied to describe the collagen architecture of TE constructs under either strain based or stress based stimulus functions. Our computations indicate that stress based simulations result in a helical collagen fiber distribution along the vessel wall. The helix pitch angle increases from a circumferential direction in the inner wall, over about 45 deg in the middle vessel layer, to a longitudinal direction in the outer wall. These results are consistent with experimental data from TE small diameter blood vessels. In addition, our results suggest a stress dependent remodeling of the collagen, suggesting that cell traction is responsible for collagen orientation. These findings may be of value to design improved mechanical conditioning protocols to optimize the collagen architecture in engineered tissues.

  7. The magnetic properties of powdered and compacted microcrystalline permalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollár, P.; Olekšáková, D.; Füzer, J.; Kováč, J.; Roth, S.; Polański, K.

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the magnetic properties of powdered and compacted microcrystalline Ni-Fe (81 wt% of Ni) permalloy. It was found by investigating the influence of mechanical milling on the magnetic properties of powder samples prepared by milling of the ribbon that the alloy remains a solid solution with stable structure during the whole milling process. With decreasing particle size the rotation of magnetization vector gradually becomes dominant magnetization process and thus coercivity increases. After compaction of the powder by uniaxial hot pressing the magnetic contact between powder particles is recreated and for resulting bulk the displacement of the domain walls becomes dominant magnetization process with coercivity of 11 A/m (comparable with the coercivity of conventional permalloy).

  8. Coupled mechanical and thermal simulation of warm compaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuan-yuan; ZHAO Wei-bin; ZHOU Zhao-yao; CHEN Pu-qing

    2006-01-01

    Warm compaction process of pure iron powder was investigated. Due to the existence of elastic, plastic and thermal strains,a coupled mechanical and thermal model was applied. The elasto-plastic constitutive equations for powder material were developed based on ellipsoidal yield criterion and continuum theory. The constitutive equations were integrated into the constitutive integral arithmetic and solved employing incremental iterative solution strategy. The yield strength of iron powder was obtained according to the tensile experiments. When the compaction temperature was raised to 130 ℃, the yield strength of iron powder metal drops to 85% of room temperature value. Modified coulomb friction law is applied and the simulation results show that friction was an important factor resulting in the inhomogeneous relative density and reverse-density distribution phenomena in the regions near the die wall and the symmetrical axis.

  9. Absorption of an electron by a dielectric wall

    CERN Document Server

    Bronold, Franz X

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a method for calculating the probability with which a low-energy electron hitting the wall of a plasma gets stuck in it and apply the method to a dielectric wall with positive electron affinity smaller than the bandgap using MgO as an example. In accordance with electron beam scattering data we obtain energy-dependent sticking probabilities significantly less than unity and question thereby for electrons the perfect absorber assumption unisono used in plasma modeling.

  10. Compaction dynamics of crunchy granular material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillard François

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Compaction of brittle porous material leads to a wide variety of densification patterns. Static compaction bands occurs naturally in rocks or bones, and have important consequences in industry for the manufacturing of powder tablets or metallic foams for example. Recently, oscillatory compaction bands have been observed in brittle porous media like snow or cereals. We will discuss the great variety of densification patterns arising during the compaction of puffed rice, including erratic compaction at low velocity, one or several travelling compaction bands at medium velocity and homogeneous compaction at larger velocity. The conditions of existence of each pattern are studied thanks to a numerical spring lattice model undergoing breakage and is mapped to the phase diagram of the patterns based on dimensionless characteristic quantities. This also allows to rationalise the evolution of the compaction behaviour during a single test. Finally, the localisation of compaction bands is linked to the strain rate sensitivity of the material.

  11. Reforming of JP-8 in Microplasmas for Compact SOFC Power 500 W

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    REPORT Final Report: Reforming of JP-8 in Microplasmas for Compact SOFC Power  W (W911NF0710118) 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The...Mar-2007 Standard Form 298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 31-Jul-2010 Final Report: Reforming of JP-8 in Microplasmas for Compact SOFC ...for Compact SOFC Power,” Topical Symposium on Plasma Processing, AIChE Spring Meeting, Tampa, Florida, April 27, 2009. R.S. Besser, “Micro and

  12. First Wall and Operational Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasnier, C; Allen, S; Boedo, J; Groth, M; Brooks, N; McLean, A; LaBombard, B; Sharpe, J; Skinner, C; Whyte, D; Rudakov, D; West, W; Wong, C

    2006-06-19

    In this chapter we review numerous diagnostics capable of measurements at or near the first wall, many of which contribute information useful for safe operation of a tokamak. There are sections discussing infrared cameras, visible and VUV cameras, pressure gauges and RGAs, Langmuir probes, thermocouples, and erosion and deposition measurements by insertable probes and quartz microbalance. Also discussed are dust measurements by electrostatic detectors, laser scattering, visible and IR cameras, and manual collection of samples after machine opening. In each case the diagnostic is discussed with a view toward application to a burning plasma machine such as ITER.

  13. Searching for Compact Radio Sources Associated with UCHII Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masqué, Josep M.; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Trinidad, Miguel A.; Kurtz, Stan; Dzib, Sergio A.; Rodríguez-Rico, Carlos A.; Loinard, Laurent

    2017-02-01

    Ultra-compact (UC)H ii regions represent a very early stage of massive star formation. The structure and evolution of these regions are not yet fully understood. Interferometric observations showed in recent years that compact sources of uncertain nature are associated with some UCH ii regions. To examine this, we carried out VLA 1.3 cm observations in the A configuration of selected UCH ii regions in order to report additional cases of compact sources embedded in UCH ii regions. With these observations, we find 13 compact sources that are associated with 9 UCH ii regions. Although we cannot establish an unambiguous nature for the newly detected sources, we assess some of their observational properties. According to the results, we can distinguish between two types of compact sources. One type corresponds to sources that are probably deeply embedded in the dense ionized gas of the UCH ii region. These sources are photoevaporated by the exciting star of the region and will last for 104–105 years. They may play a crucial role in the evolution of the UCH ii region as the photoevaporated material could replenish the expanding plasma and might provide a solution to the so-called lifetime problem of these regions. The second type of compact sources is not associated with the densest ionized gas of the region. A few of these sources appear resolved and may be photoevaporating objects such as those of the first type, but with significantly lower mass depletion rates. The remaining sources of this second type appear unresolved, and their properties are varied. We speculate on the similarity between the sources of the second type and those of the Orion population of radio sources.

  14. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  15. FIWATKA - a first-wall thermal fatigue test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, G.; Eggert, E. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Inst. fuer Reaktorbauelemente (Germany))

    1991-12-01

    The first wall of a fusion device receives from the plasma thermal loads in addition to neutron radiation, chemical and mechanical loads. To qualify a first-wall design, it needs to be tested under these loads, which is done out of the device in separate tests. The test facility described in this paper is designed for testing medium sized first-wall specimens under cyclic thermal loads. A technical description of the facility and its design limits are given. (orig.).

  16. Comparative study of Trombe wall, water wall and trans wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sodha, M.S.; Bansal, N.K.; Singh, S.; Ram, S.; Annamalai, M.; Iyer, M.V.; Nirmala, K.A.; Venkatesh, P.; Prasad, C.R.; Subramani, C.

    1982-01-01

    The thermal performances of three systems viz. Trombe wall: (1) without; and (2) with vents (forced air circulation), water wall and Transwall have been studied analytically interms of heat flux entering the living space (Maintained at 20/sup 0/C) corresponding to the meteriological data on January 19, 1981 at New Delhi (India), a typical cold winter day. Subsequent parametric studies using the simulation indicated that the Transwall system is the more efficient system for the passive heating of buildings.

  17. The Compact Project: Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Alliance of Business, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The National Alliance of Business (NAB) surveyed the 12 sites that participated in the Compact Project to develop and implement programs of business-education collaboration. NAB studied start-up activities, key players, conditions for collaboration, accomplishments, challenges, and future plans. Program outcomes indicated that building successful…

  18. JACKSON'S THEOREM FOR COMPACT GROUPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Vaezi; S. F. Rzaev

    2002-01-01

    In this article we consider the generalized shift operator defined by(Sh.f)(g) = ∫Gf (tut-1g)dton compact group G and by help of this operator we define "Spherical" modulus of continuity. So we proveStechkin and Jackson type theorems.

  19. Compact Photon Source Conceptual Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degtyarenko, Pavel V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    We describe options for the production of an intense photon beam at the CEBAF Hall D Tagger facility, needed for creating a high-quality secondary K 0 L delivered to the Hall D detector. The conceptual design for the Compact Photon Source apparatus is presented.

  20. DNA compaction by nonbinding macromolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Compaction of DNA by nonbinding macromolecules such as uncharged flexible polymer chains and negatively charged globular proteins is thought to have various applications in biophysics, for example in the formation of a nucleoid structure in bacteria. A simple experimental model that has been very

  1. Dynamics of a compact operator

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Teck-Cheong

    2010-01-01

    Let $T:X\\to X$ be a compact linear (or more generally affine) operator from a Banach space into itself. For each $x\\in X$, the sequence of iterates $T^nx, n=0,1,...$ and its averages $\\frac{1}{k}\\sum_{k=0}^nT^{k-1}x, n=0,1,...$ are either bounded or approach infinity.

  2. DNA compaction by nonbinding macromolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Compaction of DNA by nonbinding macromolecules such as uncharged flexible polymer chains and negatively charged globular proteins is thought to have various applications in biophysics, for example in the formation of a nucleoid structure in bacteria. A simple experimental model that has been very we

  3. Fuzzy Soft Compact Topological Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have studied compactness in fuzzy soft topological spaces which is a generalization of the corresponding concept by R. Lowen in the case of fuzzy topological spaces. Several basic desirable results have been established. In particular, we have proved the counterparts of Alexander’s subbase lemma and Tychonoff theorem for fuzzy soft topological spaces.

  4. Wall Conditioning and Impurity Measurements in the PEGASUS Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, M.; Fonck, R.; Toonen, R.; Thorson, T.; Tritz, K.; Winz, G.

    1999-11-01

    Wall conditioning and impurity effects on plasma evolution are increasingly relevant to the PEGASUS program. Surface conditioning consists of hydrogen glow discharge cleaning (GDC) to remove water and oxides, followed by He GDC to reduce the hydrogen inventory. Isotope exchange measurements indicate that periodic He GDC almost eliminates uncontrolled fueling from gas desorbed from the limiting surfaces. Additional wall conditioning will include Ti gettering and/or boronization. Impurity monitoring is provided by the recent installation of a SPRED multichannel VUV spectrometer (wavelength range = 10-110 nm; 1 msec time resolution), several interference filter (IF) monochromators, and a multichannel Ross-filter SXR diode assembly (for CV, CVI, OVII, and OVIII). The IF monitors indicate increased C radiation upon contact of the plasma with the upper and lower limiters for highly elongated plasmas. This radiation appears correlated with a subsequent rollover in the plasma current, and motivates an upgrade to the poloidal limiters to provide better plasma-wall interaction control.

  5. On sequential countably compact topological semigroups

    CERN Document Server

    Gutik, Oleg V; Repovš, Dušan

    2008-01-01

    We study topological and algebraic properties of sequential countably compact topological semigroups similar to compact topological semigroups. We prove that a sequential countably compact topological semigroup does not contain the bicyclic semigroup. Also we show that the closure of a subgroup in a sequential countably compact topological semigroup is a topological group, that the inversion in a Clifford sequential countably compact topological semigroup is continuous and we prove the analogue of the Rees-Suschkewitsch Theorem for simple regular sequential countably compact topological semigroups.

  6. Compaction and relaxation of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.

    2015-06-18

    Operation of membrane systems for water treatment can be seriously hampered by biofouling. A better characterization of biofilms in membrane systems and their impact on membrane performance may help to develop effective biofouling control strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence, extent and timescale of biofilm compaction and relaxation (decompaction), caused by permeate flux variations. The impact of permeate flux changes on biofilm thickness, structure and stiffness was investigated in situ and non-destructively with optical coherence tomography using membrane fouling monitors operated at a constant crossflow velocity of 0.1 m s−1 with permeate production. The permeate flux was varied sequentially from 20 to 60 and back to 20 L m−2 h−1. The study showed that the average biofilm thickness on the membrane decreased after elevating the permeate flux from 20 to 60 L m−2 h−1 while the biofilm thickness increased again after restoring the original flux of 20 L m−2 h−1, indicating the occurrence of biofilm compaction and relaxation. Within a few seconds after the flux change, the biofilm thickness was changed and stabilized, biofilm compaction occurred faster than the relaxation after restoring the original permeate flux. The initial biofilm parameters were not fully reinstated: the biofilm thickness was reduced by 21%, biofilm stiffness had increased and the hydraulic biofilm resistance was elevated by 16%. Biofilm thickness was related to the hydraulic biofilm resistance. Membrane performance losses are related to the biofilm thickness, density and morphology, which are influenced by (variations in) hydraulic conditions. A (temporarily) permeate flux increase caused biofilm compaction, together with membrane performance losses. The impact of biofilms on membrane performance can be influenced (increased and reduced) by operational parameters. The article shows that a (temporary) pressure increase leads to more

  7. Study on plasma parameters and dust charging in an electrostatically plugged multicusp plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2011-06-01

    The effect of the electrostatic confinement potential on the charging of dust grains and its relationship with the plasma parameters has been studied in an electrostatically plugged multicusp dusty plasma device. Electrostatic plugging is implemented by biasing the electrically isolated magnetic multicusp channel walls. The experimental results show that voltage applied to the channel walls can be a controlling parameter for dust charging.

  8. Density Measurement of Compact Toroid with Mach-Zehnder Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufman-Wollitzer, Lauren; Endrizzi, Doug; Brookhart, Matt; Flanagan, Ken; Forest, Cary

    2016-10-01

    Utilizing a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) built by Tri Alpha Energy, a dense compact toroid (CT) is created and injected at high speed into the Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory (WiPAL) vessel. A modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer from the Line-Tied Reconnection Experiment (LTRX) provides an absolute measurement of electron density. The interferometer is located such that the beam intersects the plasma across the diameter of the MCPG drift region before the CT enters the vessel. This placement ensures that the measurement is taken before the CT expand. Results presented will be used to further analyze characteristics of the CT. Funding provided by DoE, NSF, and WISE Summer Research.

  9. Measurements of Beam Ion Loss from the Compact Helical System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. S. Darrow, M. Isobe, Takashi Kondo, M. Sasao, and the CHS Group National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu, Japan

    2010-02-03

    Beam ion loss from the Compact Helical System (CHS) has been measured with a scintillator-type probe. The total loss to the probe, and the pitch angle and gyroradius distributions of that loss, have been measured as various plasma parameters were scanned. Three classes of beam ion loss were observed at the probe position: passing ions with pitch angles within 10o of those of transition orbits, ions on transition orbits, and ions on trapped orbits, typically 15o or more from transition orbits. Some orbit calculations in this geometry have been performed in order to understand the characteristics of the loss. Simulation of the detector signal based upon the following of orbits from realistic beam deposition profiles is not able to reproduce the pitch angle distribution of the losses measured. Consequently it is inferred that internal plasma processes, whether magnetohydrodynamic modes, radial electric fields, or plasma turbulence, move previously confined beam ions to transition orbits, resulting in their loss.

  10. Plasma chemistry for inorganic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, O.

    1980-01-01

    Practical application of plasma chemistry to the development of inorganic materials using both low temperature and warm plasmas are summarized. Topics cover: the surface nitrification and oxidation of metals; chemical vapor deposition; formation of minute oxide particles; the composition of oxides from chloride vapor; the composition of carbides and nitrides; freezing high temperature phases by plasma arc welding and plasma jet; use of plasma in the development of a substitute for petroleum; the production of silicon for use in solar cell batteries; and insulating the inner surface of nuclear fusion reactor walls.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Residual Stress Distributions in Plasma-Sprayed Coating on Thick Wall Component%基于Nastran等离子喷涂厚壁零件涂层中残余应力分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛丽萍; 张延安; 史冠勇; 赫冀成

    2012-01-01

    The residual stress distributions in the plasma sprayed coatings on thick wall component were modeled and numerically simulated in finite element method, based on the software package Nastran. The impacts of the coating conditions, including the species of the coating and substrate, I. E. Ceramic or metal, on the residual stress were evaluated. The simulated results show that the strongest stress distribution exists at the coating/substrate interface, increasing in the radial direction and peaking at the edges; and that the normal stress in the central area of the substrate decreases with an increase in substrate depth, and linearly distributes in the coating. Various key factors, including the dimensionless equation of radial stress, shear stress, maximum stain and immersion depth of the residual stress in the coating, were determined . The results, calculated with the dimensionless equation, agree fairly well with the simulated ones in all the coating/ substrate systems of interest. The influence of various factors, such as the thickness and elastic modulus of the coating, and the radius and modulus of the substrates, on the variations in the residual stress distributions was also tentatively discussed.%基于有限元数值分析对等离子喷涂不同的基体上的喷涂陶瓷涂层和金属涂层中残余应力进行了分析,结果表明:涂层与基体体系的最大应力分布在接触界面附近,由中心线向外依次递增,在边缘处达到最大值.在体系中心区域正应力沿厚度方向逐渐减小,而在涂层中应力分布则趋于线性;建立了涂层中各残余应力分量的准数方程式,准数方程式与数值计算结果显示了较好的吻合,而且对于不同基体-涂层体系均是适用的.无因次最大径向应变、无因次剪应力侵入深度和无因次最大径向应力的大小均取决于涂层厚度与弹性模量的积和基体半径与基体弹性模量积之间比值,而影响无因次径向最大剪应

  12. Domain Walls on Singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, Edi

    2009-01-01

    We describe domain walls that live on $A_2$ and $A_3$ singularities. The walls are BPS if the singularity is resolved and non--BPS if it is deformed and fibered. We show that these domain walls may interpolate between vacua that support monopoles and/or vortices.

  13. The Lamportian cell wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiliszewski, M.; Lamport, D. (Michigan State Univ. Plant Research Lab., East Lansing (United States))

    1991-05-01

    The Lamportian Warp-Weft hypothesis suggests a cellulose-extensin interpenetrating network where extensin mechanically couples the load-bearing cellulose microfibrils in a wall matrix that is best described as a microcomposite. This model is based on data gathered from the extensin-rich walls of tomato and sycamore cell suspension culture, wherein extensin precursors are insolubilized into the wall by undefined crosslinks. The authors recent work with cell walls isolated from intact tissue as well as walls from suspension cultured cells of the graminaceous monocots maize and rice, the non-graminaceous monocot asparagus, the primitive herbaceous dicot sugar beet, and the gymnosperm Douglas Fir indicate that although extensins are ubiquitous to all plant species examined, they are not the major structural protein component of most walls examined. Amino acid analyses of intact and HF-treated walls shows a major component neither an HRGP, nor directly comparable to the glycine-rich wall proteins such as those associated with seed coat walls or the 67 mole% glycine-rich proteins cloned from petunia and soybean. Clearly, structural wall protein alternatives to extensin exist and any cell wall model must take that into account. If we assume that extracellular matrices are a priori network structures, then new Hypless' structural proteins in the maize cell wall raise questions about the sort of network these proteins create: the kinds of crosslinks involved; how they are formed; and the roles played by the small amounts of HRGPs.

  14. Halogenation of microcapsule walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. R.; Schaab, C. K.; Scott, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Procedure for halogenation of confining walls of both gelatin and gelatin-phenolic resin capsules is similar to that used for microencapsulation. Ten percent halogen content renders capsule wall nonburning; any higher content enhances flame-retardant properties of selected internal phase material. Halogenation decreases permeability of wall material to encapsulated materials.

  15. The antipodal sets of compact symmetric spaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Xingda; Deng, Shaoqiang

    2014-01-01

    We study the antipodal set of a point in a compact Riemannian symmetric space. It turns out that we can give an explicit description of the antipodal set of a point in any connected simply connected compact Riemannian symmetric space...

  16. Rate type isotach compaction of consolidated sandstone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, J.A. de; Thienen-Visser, K. van; Pruiksma, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on samples from a consolidated sandstone reservoir are presented that demonstrate rate type compaction behaviour similar to that observed on unconsolidated sands and soils. Such rate type behaviour can have large consequences for reservoir compaction, surface subsidence and

  17. Warm compaction powder metallurgy of Cu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NGAI Tungwai Leo; WANG Shang-lin; LI Yuan-yuan; ZHOU Zho-yao; CHEN Wei-ping

    2005-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out using different admixed lubricant contents,different compaction pressures and temperatures in order to study the warm compaction of copper powder.Results show that too much admixed lubricant will lead to the squeeze out of the lubricant from the compact during the warm compaction processing of Cu powder.Results also show that blisters can be found in sintered samples that contain lubricant less than 0.15% (mass fraction).Optimal warm compaction parameters for producing high density powder metallurgy copper material are obtained.Compacts with green density of 8.6 g/cm3 and a sintered density of 8.83 g/cm3 can be produced by warm compacting the Cu powder,which contains 0.2% admixed lubricant,and is compacted at 145 ℃ with a pressure of 700 Mpa.

  18. Isolation of plant cell wall proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Boudart, Georges; Borderies, Giséle; Charmont, Stephane; Lafitte, Claude; Rossignol, Michel; Canut, Herve; Pont-Lezica, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    The quality of a proteomic analysis of a cell compartment strongly depends on the reliability of the isolation procedure for the cell compartment of interest. Plant cell walls possess specific drawbacks: (1) the lack of a surrounding membrane may result in the loss of cell wall proteins (CWP) during the isolation procedure; (2) polysaccharide networks of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectins form potential traps for contaminants such as intracellular proteins; (3) the presence of proteins interacting in many different ways with the polysaccharide matrix require different procedures to elute them from the cell wall. Three categories of CWP are distinguished: labile proteins that have little or no interactions with cell wall components, weakly bound proteins extractable with salts, and strongly bound proteins. Two alternative protocols are decribed for cell wall proteomics: (1) nondestructive techniques allowing the extraction of labile or weakly bound CWP without damaging the plasma membrane; (2) destructive techniques to isolate cell walls from which weakly or strongly bound CWP can be extracted. These protocols give very low levels of contamination by intracellular proteins. Their application should lead to a realistic view of the cell wall proteome at least for labile and weakly bound CWP extractable by salts.

  19. On the Effect of Carbon Content to the Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Green Compacts Formed at above Ambient Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Mujibur Rahman; Sany Shahriman Md Nor; Hendri Yani Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Friction force is generated during the generation of green compacts from metal powder, which obviously gives adverse effect to the mechanical properties and microstructure of the green compacts. In this study, fine carbon powder is used to minimize the interparticle as well as die wall frictions and as alloying element hence high density yet defect-free near-net shape or net shape mechanical components can be produced. Powder forming at elevated temperature is a relatively new technology henc...

  20. The Kolmogorov-Riesz compactness theorem

    CERN Document Server

    Hanche-Olsen, Harald

    2009-01-01

    We show that the Arzela-Ascoli theorem and Kolmogorov compactness theorem both are consequences of a simple lemma on compactness in metric spaces. Their relation to Helly's theorem is discussed. The paper contains a detailed discussion on the historical background of the Kolmogorov compactness theorem.

  1. Equationally Compact Acts : Coproducts / Peeter Normak

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Normak, Peeter

    1998-01-01

    In this article equational compactness of acts and its generalizations are discussed. As equational compactness does not carry over to coproducts a slight generalization of c-equational campactness is introduced. It is proved that a coproduct of acts is c-equationally compact if and only if all components are c-equationally campact

  2. Equationally Compact Acts : Coproducts / Peeter Normak

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Normak, Peeter

    1998-01-01

    In this article equational compactness of acts and its generalizations are discussed. As equational compactness does not carry over to coproducts a slight generalization of c-equational campactness is introduced. It is proved that a coproduct of acts is c-equationally compact if and only if all components are c-equationally campact

  3. Formation and evolution of compact binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, Marcel Vincent van der

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate the formation and evolution of compact binaries. Chapters 2 through 4 deal with the formation of luminous, ultra-compact X-ray binaries in globular clusters. We show that the proposed scenario of magnetic capture produces too few ultra-compact X-ray binaries to explain

  4. Living Near de Sitter Bubble Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Jin-Ho; Nam, Soonkeon

    2006-01-01

    We study various bubble solutions in string/M theories obtained by double Wick rotations of (non-)extremal brane configurations. Typically, the geometry interpolates de Sitter space-time times non-compact extra-dimensional space in the near-bubble wall region and the asymptotic flat Minkowski space-time. These bubble solutions provide nice background geometries reconciling string/M theories with de Sitter space-time. For the application of these solutions to cosmology, we consider multi-bubbl...

  5. Compact lanthanum hexaboride hollow cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Dan M; Watkins, Ronald M

    2010-08-01

    A compact lanthanum hexaboride hollow cathode has been developed for space applications where size and mass are important and research and industrial applications where access for implementation might be limited. The cathode design features a refractory metal cathode tube that is easily manufactured, mechanically captured orifice and end plates to eliminate expensive e-beam welding, graphite sleeves to provide a diffusion boundary to protect the LaB6 insert from chemical reactions with the refractory metal tube, and several heater designs to provide long life. The compact LaB(6) hollow cathode assembly including emitter, support tube, heater, and keeper electrode is less than 2 cm in diameter and has been fabricated in lengths of 6-15 cm for different applications. The cathode has been operated continuously at discharge currents of 5-60 A in xenon. Slightly larger diameter versions of this design have operated at up to 100 A of discharge current.

  6. Compact NMR relaxometry of human blood and blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cistola, David P; Robinson, Michelle D

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry is a uniquely practical and versatile implementation of NMR technology. Because it does not depend on chemical shift resolution, it can be performed using low-field compact instruments deployed in atypical settings. Early relaxometry studies of human blood were focused on developing a diagnostic test for cancer. Those efforts were misplaced, as the measurements were not specific to cancer. However, important lessons were learned about the factors that drive the water longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times. One key factor is the overall distribution of proteins and lipoproteins. Plasma water T2 can detect shifts in the blood proteome resulting from inflammation, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. In whole blood, T2 is sensitive to hemoglobin content and oxygenation, although the latter can be suppressed by manipulating the static and applied magnetic fields. Current applications of compact NMR relaxometry include blood tests for candidiasis, hemostasis, malaria and insulin resistance.

  7. Rotational stabilization of the resistive wall modes in tokamaks with a ferritic wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovitov, V. D.; Yanovskiy, V. V.

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics of the rotating resistive wall modes (RWMs) is analyzed in the presence of a uniform ferromagnetic resistive wall with μ ̂≡μ/μ0≤4 ( μ is the wall magnetic permeability, and μ0 is the vacuum one). This mimics a possible arrangement in ITER with ferromagnetic steel in test blanket modules or in future experiments in JT-60SA tokamak [Y. Kamada, P. Barabaschi, S. Ishida, the JT-60SA Team, and JT-60SA Research Plan Contributors, Nucl. Fusion 53, 104010 (2013)]. The earlier studies predict that such a wall must provide a destabilizing influence on the plasma by reducing the beta limit and increasing the growth rates, compared to the reference case with μ ̂=1 . This is true for the locked modes, but the presented results show that the mode rotation changes the tendency to the opposite. At μ ̂>1 , the rotational stabilization related to the energy sink in the wall becomes even stronger than at μ ̂=1 , and this "external" effect develops at lower rotation frequency, estimated as several kHz at realistic conditions. The study is based on the cylindrical dispersion relation valid for arbitrary growth rates and frequencies. This relation is solved numerically, and the solutions are compared with analytical dependences obtained for slow ( s /dw≫1 ) and fast ( s /dw≪1 ) "ferromagnetic" rotating RWMs, where s is the skin depth and dw is the wall thickness. It is found that the standard thin-wall modeling becomes progressively less reliable at larger μ ̂ , and the wall should be treated as magnetically thick. The analysis is performed assuming only a linear plasma response to external perturbations without constraints on the plasma current and pressure profiles.

  8. Rotational stabilization of the resistive wall modes in tokamaks with a ferritic wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustovitov, V. D. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute,” Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI,” Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Yanovskiy, V. V. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Padova 35127 (Italy)

    2015-03-15

    The dynamics of the rotating resistive wall modes (RWMs) is analyzed in the presence of a uniform ferromagnetic resistive wall with μ{sup ^}≡μ/μ{sub 0}≤4 (μ is the wall magnetic permeability, and μ{sub 0} is the vacuum one). This mimics a possible arrangement in ITER with ferromagnetic steel in test blanket modules or in future experiments in JT-60SA tokamak [Y. Kamada, P. Barabaschi, S. Ishida, the JT-60SA Team, and JT-60SA Research Plan Contributors, Nucl. Fusion 53, 104010 (2013)]. The earlier studies predict that such a wall must provide a destabilizing influence on the plasma by reducing the beta limit and increasing the growth rates, compared to the reference case with μ{sup ^}=1. This is true for the locked modes, but the presented results show that the mode rotation changes the tendency to the opposite. At μ{sup ^}>1, the rotational stabilization related to the energy sink in the wall becomes even stronger than at μ{sup ^}=1, and this “external” effect develops at lower rotation frequency, estimated as several kHz at realistic conditions. The study is based on the cylindrical dispersion relation valid for arbitrary growth rates and frequencies. This relation is solved numerically, and the solutions are compared with analytical dependences obtained for slow (s/d{sub w}≫1) and fast (s/d{sub w}≪1) “ferromagnetic” rotating RWMs, where s is the skin depth and d{sub w} is the wall thickness. It is found that the standard thin-wall modeling becomes progressively less reliable at larger μ{sup ^}, and the wall should be treated as magnetically thick. The analysis is performed assuming only a linear plasma response to external perturbations without constraints on the plasma current and pressure profiles.

  9. Target-local Gromov compactness

    CERN Document Server

    Fish, Joel W

    2009-01-01

    We prove a version of Gromov's compactness theorem for pseudo-holomorphic curves which holds locally in the target symplectic manifold. This result applies to sequences of curves with an unbounded number of free boundary components, and in families of degenerating target manifolds which have unbounded geometry (e.g. no uniform energy threshold). Core elements of the proof regard curves as submanifolds (rather than maps) and then adapt methods from the theory of minimal surfaces.

  10. Multipole structure of compact objects

    CERN Document Server

    Quevedo, Hernando

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the applications of general relativity in relativistic astrophysics in order to solve the problem of describing the geometric and physical properties of the interior and exterior gravitational and electromagnetic fields of compact objects. We focus on the interpretation of exact solutions of Einstein's equations in terms of their multipole moments structure. In view of the lack of physical interior solutions, we propose an alternative approach in which higher multipoles should be taken into account.

  11. Weak compactness of biharmonic maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenzhou Zheng

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This article shows that if a sequence of weak solutions of a perturbed biharmonic map satisfies $Phi_ko 0$ in $(W^{2,2}^*$ and $u_kightharpoonup u$ weakly in $W^{2,2}$, then $u$ is a biharmonic map. In particular, we show that the space of biharmonic maps is sequentially compact under the weak-$W^{2,2}$ topology.

  12. Compact differences of composition operators

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, Katherine; Weir, Rachel J

    2010-01-01

    When $\\varphi$ and $\\psi$ are linear-fractional self-maps of the unit ball $B_N$ in ${\\mathbb C}^N$, $N\\geq 1$, we show that the difference $C_{\\varphi}-C_{\\psi}$ cannot be non-trivially compact on either the Hardy space $H^2(B_N)$ or any weighted Bergman space $A^2_{\\alpha}(B_N)$. Our arguments emphasize geometrical properties of the inducing maps $\\varphi$ and $\\psi$.

  13. 78 FR 61384 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... of this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  14. 78 FR 20355 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  15. 77 FR 60475 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... of this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  16. 76 FR 20044 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  17. 75 FR 62568 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  18. 76 FR 66326 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  19. 77 FR 20051 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-03

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  20. Preliminary electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical design for first wall and vacuum vessel of FAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucca, F., E-mail: Flavio.Lucca@LTCalcoli.it [LT Calcoli srl, Piazza Prinetti 26/B, 23807 Merate, LC (Italy); Bertolini, C. [LT Calcoli srl, Piazza Prinetti 26/B, 23807 Merate, LC (Italy); Crescenzi, F.; Crisanti, F. [C.R. ENEA Frascati – UT FUS, Via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Di Gironimo, G. [CREATE, Università di Napoli Federico II, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Labate, C. [CREATE, Università di Napoli Parthenope, Via Acton 38, 80133 Napoli (Italy); Manzoni, M.; Marconi, M.; Pagani, I. [LT Calcoli srl, Piazza Prinetti 26/B, 23807 Merate, LC (Italy); Ramogida, G. [C.R. ENEA Frascati – UT FUS, Via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Renno, F. [CREATE, Università di Napoli Federico II, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Roccella, M. [LT Calcoli srl, Piazza Prinetti 26/B, 23807 Merate, LC (Italy); Roccella, S. [C.R. ENEA Frascati – UT FUS, Via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Viganò, F. [LT Calcoli srl, Piazza Prinetti 26/B, 23807 Merate, LC (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    The fusion advanced study torus (FAST), with its compact design, high toroidal field and plasma current, faces many of the problems met by ITER, and at the same time anticipates much of the DEMO relevant physics and technology. The conceptual design of the first wall (FW) and the vacuum vessel (VV) has been defined on the basis of FAST operative conditions and of “Snow Flakes” (SF) magnetic topology, which is also relevant for DEMO. The EM loads are one of the most critical load components for the FW and the VV during plasma disruptions and a first dimensioning of these components for such loads is mandatory. During this first phase of R&D activities the conceptual design of the FW and VV have been assessed estimating, by means of FE simulations, the EM loads due to a typical vertical disruption event (VDE) in FAST. EM loads were then transferred on a FE mechanical model of the FAST structures and the mechanical response of the FW and VV design for the analyzed VDE event was assessed. The results indicate that design criteria are not fully satisfied by the current drawing of the VV and FW components. The most critical regions have been individuated and the effect of some geometrical and material changes has been checked in order to improve the structure.

  1. Strings in compact cosmological spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Craps, Ben; Konechny, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    We confront the problem of giving a fundamental definition to perturbative string theory in spacetimes with totally compact space (taken to be a torus for simplicity, though the nature of the problem is very general) and non-compact time. Due to backreaction induced by the presence of even a single string quantum, the usual formulation of perturbative string theory in a fixed classical background is infrared-divergent at all subleading orders in the string coupling, and needs to be amended. The problem can be seen as a closed string analogue of D0-brane recoil under an impact by closed strings (a situation displaying extremely similar infrared divergences). Inspired by the collective coordinate treatment of the D0-brane recoil, whereby the translational modes of the D0-brane are introduced as explicit dynamical variables in the path integral, we construct a similar formalism for the case of string-induced gravitational backreaction, in which the spatially uniform modes of the background fields on the compact ...

  2. Comminution circuits for compact itabirites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Ferreira Pinto

    Full Text Available Abstract In the beneficiation of compact Itabirites, crushing and grinding account for major operational and capital costs. As such, the study and development of comminution circuits have a fundamental importance for feasibility and optimization of compact Itabirite beneficiation. This work makes a comparison between comminution circuits for compact Itabirites from the Iron Quadrangle. The circuits developed are: a crushing and ball mill circuit (CB, a SAG mill and ball mill circuit (SAB and a single stage SAG mill circuit (SSSAG. For the SAB circuit, the use of pebble crushing is analyzed (SABC. An industrial circuit for 25 million tons of run of mine was developed for each route from tests on a pilot scale (grinding and industrial scale. The energy consumption obtained for grinding in the pilot tests was compared with that reported by Donda and Bond. The SSSAG route had the lowest energy consumption, 11.8kWh/t and the SAB route had the highest energy consumption, 15.8kWh/t. The CB and SABC routes had a similar energy consumption of 14.4 kWh/t and 14.5 kWh/t respectively.

  3. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the skin on ...

  4. Impact of physics and technology innovations on compact tokamak fusion pilot plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    For magnetic fusion to be economically attractive and have near-term impact on the world energy scene it is important to focus on key physics and technology innovations that could enable net electricity production at reduced size and cost. The tokamak is presently closest to achieving the fusion conditions necessary for net electricity at acceptable device size, although sustaining high-performance scenarios free of disruptions remains a significant challenge for the tokamak approach. Previous pilot plant studies have shown that electricity gain is proportional to the product of the fusion gain, blanket thermal conversion efficiency, and auxiliary heating wall-plug efficiency. In this work, the impact of several innovations is assessed with respect to maximizing fusion gain. At fixed bootstrap current fraction, fusion gain varies approximately as the square of the confinement multiplier, normalized beta, and major radius, and varies as the toroidal field and elongation both to the third power. For example, REBCO high-temperature superconductors (HTS) offer the potential to operate at much higher toroidal field than present fusion magnets, but HTS cables are also beginning to access winding pack current densities up to an order of magnitude higher than present technology, and smaller HTS TF magnet sizes make low-aspect-ratio HTS tokamaks potentially attractive by leveraging naturally higher normalized beta and elongation. Further, advances in kinetic stabilization and feedback control of resistive wall modes could also enable significant increases in normalized beta and fusion gain. Significant reductions in pilot plant size will also likely require increased plasma energy confinement, and control of turbulence and/or low edge recycling (for example using lithium walls) would have major impact on fusion gain. Reduced device size could also exacerbate divertor heat loads, and the impact of novel divertor solutions on pilot plant configurations is addressed. For

  5. Motion Analysis of Fiber Band in Compact Field of Compact Spinning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The technological process of compact spinning and the compact procedure of fiber band in compact field are briefly illustrated. The motions of fiber band in compact field are discussed theoretically from which tilting angle of suction slot in profile tube, additional twists created by fiber band's rotating around its own axis and ultimate twists in compact yarn are deduced accordingly. The existence of additional twists is also verified through experiments.

  6. Liquid Wall Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  7. Electrical resisitivity of mechancially stablized earth wall backfill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snapp, Michael; Tucker-Kulesza, Stacey; Koehn, Weston

    2017-06-01

    Mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) retaining walls utilized in transportation projects are typically backfilled with coarse aggregate. One of the current testing procedures to select backfill material for construction of MSE walls is the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials standard T 288: ;Standard Method of Test for Determining Minimum Laboratory Soil Resistivity.; T 288 is designed to test a soil sample's electrical resistivity which correlates to its corrosive potential. The test is run on soil material passing the No. 10 sieve and believed to be inappropriate for coarse aggregate. Therefore, researchers have proposed new methods to measure the electrical resistivity of coarse aggregate samples in the laboratory. There is a need to verify that the proposed methods yield results representative of the in situ conditions; however, no in situ measurement of the electrical resistivity of MSE wall backfill is established. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) provides a two-dimensional (2D) profile of the bulk resistivity of backfill material in situ. The objective of this study was to characterize bulk resistivity of in-place MSE wall backfill aggregate using ERT. Five MSE walls were tested via ERT to determine the bulk resistivity of the backfill. Three of the walls were reinforced with polymeric geogrid, one wall was reinforced with metallic strips, and one wall was a gravity retaining wall with no reinforcement. Variability of the measured resistivity distribution within the backfill may be a result of non-uniform particle sizes, thoroughness of compaction, and the presence of water. A quantitative post processing algorithm was developed to calculate mean bulk resistivity of in-situ backfill. Recommendations of the study were that the ERT data be used to verify proposed testing methods for coarse aggregate that are designed to yield data representative of in situ conditions. A preliminary analysis suggests that ERT may be utilized

  8. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  9. Flow Control in a Compact Inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, John C.

    2011-12-01

    An experimental investigation of flow control, via various control jets actuators, was undertaken to eliminate separation and secondary flows in a compact inlet. The compact inlet studied was highly aggressive with a length-to-diameter ratio of 1.5. A brand new facility was designed and built to enable various actuation methodologies as well as multiple measurement techniques. Techniques included static surface pressure, total pressure, and stereoscopic particle image velocimetry. Experimental data were supplemented with numerical simulations courtesy of Prof. Kenneth Jansen, Dr. Onkar Sahni, and Yi Chen. The baseline flow field was found to be dominated by two massive separations and secondary flow structures. These secondary structures were present at the aerodynamic interface plane in the form of two counter-rotating vortices inducing upwash along centerline. A dominant shedding frequency of 350 Hz was measured both at the aerodynamic interface plane and along the lower surface of the inlet. Flow control experiments started utilizing a pair of control jets placed in streamwise locations where flow was found to separate. Tests were performed for a range of inlet Mach numbers from 0.2 to 0.44. Steady and unsteady static pressure measurements along the upper and lower walls of the duct were performed for various combinations of actuation. The parameters that were tested include the control jets momentum coefficient, their blowing ratio, the actuation frequency, as well as different combinations of jets. It was shown that using mass flux ratio as a criterion to define flow control is not sufficient, and one needs to provide both the momentum coefficient and the blowing ratio to quantify the flow control performance. A detailed study was undertaken on controlling the upstream separation point for an inlet Mach number of 0.44. Similar to the baseline flow field, the flow field associated with the activation of a two-dimensional control jet actuator was dominated by

  10. Solar heating wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, J.L.

    1983-08-16

    A solar heating wall is disclosed including a water pipe circulation system having a plurality of separate tubes, each formed as a loop, connected between a water supply and a return. The separate tubes are arranged in a single vertical plane at the approximate center of the wall. The wall is formed within a frame which is packed with a material suited for use as a thERMAL RESERVOIR, SUCH AS concrete. The frame provides extra support by having a series of horizontally disposed cross supports on one surface of the wall and a series of vertically disposed cross supports on the opposite surface A pressure relief valve may be provided between the water supply to the separate tubes and the water supply to the building or structure containing the solar wall, so that the solar wall can be adapted for use with a city water system.

  11. Heavy ion physics at LHC with the Compact Muon Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedjidian, M.; Contardo, D.; Haroutunian, R. [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France)] [and others

    1995-07-15

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), is one of the two detectors proposed to achieve the primary goal of the LHC: the discovery of the Higgs boson(s). For this purpose, the detector is optimized for the precise measurement of muons, photons, electrons and jets. It is a clear motivation to investigate its ability to measure the hard processes probing the formation of a Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) in ion collisions. It is the case of the heavy quark bound states, long predicted to be suppressed in a QGP. In CMS they can be detected, via their muonic decay according to the principle adopted for the p-p physics.

  12. Cell Wall Proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Boudart, Georges; Minic, Zoran; Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Jamet, Elisabeth; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2007-01-01

    In this chapter, we will focus on the contribution of proteomics to the identification and determination of the structure and function of CWPs as well as discussing new perspectives in this area. The great variety of proteins found in the plant cell wall is described. Some families, such as glycoside hydrolases, proteases, lectins, and inhibitors of cell wall modifying enzymes, are discussed in detail. Examples of the use of proteomic techniques to elucidate the structure of various cell wall...

  13. Staggered domain wall fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Hoelbling, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We construct domain wall fermions with a staggered kernel and investigate their spectral and chiral properties numerically in the Schwinger model. In some relevant cases we see an improvement of chirality by more than an order of magnitude as compared to usual domain wall fermions. Moreover, we present first results for four-dimensional quantum chromodynamics, where we also observe significant reductions of chiral symmetry violations for staggered domain wall fermions.

  14. Green walls in Vancouver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, R. [Sharp and Diamond Landscape Architecture Inc., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    With the renewed interest in design for microclimate control and energy conservation, many cities are implementing clean air initiatives and sustainable planning policies to mitigate the effects of urban climate and the urban heat island effect. Green roofs, sky courts and green walls must be thoughtfully designed to withstand severe conditions such as moisture stress, extremes in temperature, tropical storms and strong desiccating winds. This paper focused on the installation of green wall systems. There are 2 general types of green walls systems, namely facade greening and living walls. Green facades are trellis systems where climbing plants can grow vertically without attaching to the surface of the building. Living walls are part of a building envelope system where plants are actually planted and grown in a wall system. A modular G-SKY Green Wall Panel was installed at the Aquaquest Learning Centre at the Vancouver Aquarium in Stanley Park in September 2006. This green wall panel, which was originally developed in Japan, incorporates many innovative features in the building envelope. It provides an exterior wall covered with 8 species of plants native to the Coastal Temperate Rain Forest. The living wall is irrigated by rainwater collected from the roof, stored in an underground cistern and fed through a drip irrigation system. From a habitat perspective, the building imitates an escarpment. Installation, support systems, irrigation, replacement of modules and maintenance are included in the complete wall system. Living walls reduce the surface temperature of buildings by as much as 10 degrees C when covered with vegetation and a growing medium. The project team is anticipating LEED gold certification under the United States-Canada Green Building Council. It was concluded that this technology of vegetated building envelopes is applicable for acoustical control at airports, biofiltration of indoor air, greywater treatment, and urban agriculture and vertical

  15. Negative plasma potential relative to electron-emitting surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanell, M D

    2013-09-01

    Most works on plasma-wall interaction predict that with strong electron emission, a nonmonotonic "space-charge-limited" (SCL) sheath forms where the plasma potential is positive relative to the wall. We show that a fundamentally different sheath structure is possible where the potential monotonically increases toward a positively charged wall that is shielded by a single layer of negative charge. No ion-accelerating presheath exists in the plasma and the ion wall flux is zero. An analytical solution of the "inverse sheath" regime is demonstrated for a general plasma-wall system where the plasma electrons and emitted electrons are Maxwellian with different temperatures. Implications of the inverse sheath effect are that (a) the plasma potential is negative, (b) ion sputtering vanishes, (c) no charge is lost at the wall, and (d) the electron energy flux is thermal. To test empirically what type of sheath structure forms under strong emission, a full plasma bounded by strongly emitting walls is simulated. It is found that inverse sheaths form at the walls and ions are confined in the plasma. This result differs from past particle-in-cell simulation studies of emission which contain an artificial "source sheath" that accelerates ions to the wall, leading to a SCL sheath at high emission intensity.

  16. Der Global Compact und der Schutz der Menschenrechte

    OpenAIRE

    Hamm, Brigitte I.

    2011-01-01

    Inhalt: - I. Einleitung - II. Was ist der Global Compact? - III. Wie funktioniert der Global Compact? - IV. Der Global Compact will kein Verhaltenskodex sein. - V. Der Global Compact als Bestandteil von „global governance“ - VI. Der Global Compact und der Schutz der Menschenrechte - VII. Ausschau - Literatur - Teilnehmer des Global Compact

  17. ARC: A compact, high-field, fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant with demountable magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorbom, B.N., E-mail: bsorbom@mit.edu; Ball, J.; Palmer, T.R.; Mangiarotti, F.J.; Sierchio, J.M.; Bonoli, P.; Kasten, C.; Sutherland, D.A.; Barnard, H.S.; Haakonsen, C.B.; Goh, J.; Sung, C.; Whyte, D.G.

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • ARC reactor designed to have 500 MW fusion power at 3.3 m major radius. • Compact, simplified design allowed by high magnetic fields and jointed magnets. • ARC has innovative plasma physics solutions such as inboardside RF launch. • High temperature superconductors allow high magnetic fields and jointed magnets. • Liquid immersion blanket and jointed magnets greatly simplify tokamak reactor design. - Abstract: The affordable, robust, compact (ARC) reactor is the product of a conceptual design study aimed at reducing the size, cost, and complexity of a combined fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion Pilot power plant. ARC is a ∼200–250 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has rare earth barium copper oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils, which have joints to enable disassembly. This allows the vacuum vessel to be replaced quickly, mitigating first wall survivability concerns, and permits a single device to test many vacuum vessel designs and divertor materials. The design point has a plasma fusion gain of Q{sub p} ≈ 13.6, yet is fully non-inductive, with a modest bootstrap fraction of only ∼63%. Thus ARC offers a high power gain with relatively large external control of the current profile. This highly attractive combination is enabled by the ∼23 T peak field on coil achievable with newly available REBCO superconductor technology. External current drive is provided by two innovative inboard RF launchers using 25 MW of lower hybrid and 13.6 MW of ion cyclotron fast wave power. The resulting efficient current drive provides a robust, steady state core plasma far from disruptive limits. ARC uses an all-liquid blanket, consisting of low pressure, slowly flowing fluorine lithium beryllium (FLiBe) molten salt. The liquid blanket is low-risk technology and provides effective neutron moderation and shielding, excellent

  18. 慢性心力衰竭患者AngⅡ、Ald水平与左室平均室壁应力的关系%Relationships between Left Ventricular Mean Wall Stress and Plasma level of Angiotensin Ⅱ and Aldosterone and in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨建峰; 石亮; 魏经汉

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate relationships between the left ventricular mean wall stress (MWS) and levels of plasma angiotensin Ⅱ ,aldosterone in the patients with chronic heart failure (CHF).Methods CHF group include 61 patients, healthy control group include 20 healthy volunteers.plasma concentration of angiotensin Ⅱ and aldosterone were measured by specific radioimmunoassays.LYDd, LVDs, IVSd, IVSs, LVPWd and LVPWs were determined by two-dimensional echocardiography, and MWS was calculated.Results The plasma angiotensin Ⅱ, aldosterone and MWS in the patients with CHF were significantly higher than these in healthy control group;the plasma angiotensin Ⅱ and aldosterone were positively with MWS( r =0.4658,r=0.4367 ,P < 0.001 ).Conclusion Changes of plasma concentration of angiotensin Ⅱ ,aldosterone and MWS in the patients with CHF may play a role in the pathogenic mechanism of chronic heart failure,they may interact and influence each other in the pathogenic mechanism of chronic heart failure.%目的 探讨慢性心力衰竭(CHF)患者血浆血管紧张素Ⅱ(AngⅡ)、醛固酮水平(Ald)含量变化与左室平均室壁应力(mean wall stress,MWS)的相关性分析及临床意义.方法 应用放射免疫法测定20例正常人和61例慢性充血性心力衰竭患者血浆血管紧张素Ⅱ、醛固酮含量,心脏超声测定左室收缩/舒张内径及室壁厚度并计算平均室壁应力.结果 CHF患者血浆血管紧张素Ⅱ、醛固酮含量较正常对照组明显升高,并随着心功能等级的增加而有升高趋势.血浆血管紧张素Ⅱ、醛固酮含量与左室平均室壁应力呈正相关.结论 慢性心力衰竭患者血清血浆血管紧张素Ⅱ、醛固酮含量的变化及室壁应力增加参与慢性心力衰竭致病机制,它们之间可能还有相互作用及影响,共同参与慢性心力衰竭的致病机制.

  19. Self-compacting concrete (SCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Mette Rica

    2008-01-01

    In many aspects Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC, “Self-Consolidating Concrete” in North America) can be considered the concrete of the future. SCC is a family of tailored concretes with special engineered properties in the fresh state. SCC flows into the formwork and around even complicated...... reinforcement arrangements under its own weight. Thus, SCC is not vibrated like conventional concrete. This drastically improves the working environment during construction, the productivity, and potentially improves the homogeneity and quality of the concrete. In addition SCC provides larger architectural...

  20. Porewater chemistry in compacted bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muurinen, A.; Lehikoinen, J. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    In this study, the porewater chemistry in compacted bentonite, considered as an engineered barrier in the repository of spent fuel, has been studied in interaction experiments. Many parameters, like the composition and density of bentonite, composition of the solution, bentonite-to-water ratio (B/W), surrounding conditions and experimental time have been varied in the experiments. At the end of the interaction the equilibrating solution, the porewaters squeezed out of the bentonite samples, and bentonites themselves were analyzed to give information for the interpretation and modelling of the interaction. Equilibrium modelling was performed with the HYDRAQL/CE computer code 33 refs.