WorldWideScience

Sample records for compact moderate luminosity

  1. Near-Infrared Properties of Moderate-Redshift Galaxy Clusters: Luminosity Functions and Density Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzin, Adam; Yee, H. K. C.; Hall, Patrick B.; Ellingson, E.; Lin, H.

    2007-04-01

    We present K-band imaging for 15 of the CNOC1 clusters. The extensive spectroscopic data set available for these clusters allows us to determine the cluster K-band luminosity function and density profile without the need for statistical background subtraction. The luminosity density and number density profiles can be described by NFW models with concentration parameters of cl=4.28+/-0.70 and cg=4.13+/-0.57, respectively. Comparing these to the dynamical mass analysis of the same clusters shows that they are similar to the cluster dark matter profile. The luminosity functions show that the evolution of K* over the redshift range 0.2cluster galaxies form at high redshift (zf>1.5) and evolve passively thereafter. The best fit for the faint-end slope of the luminosity function is α=-0.84+/-0.08, which indicates that it does not evolve between z=0 and 0.3. Using principal component analysis of the spectra, we classify cluster galaxies as either star-forming/recently star-forming (EM+BAL) or non-star-forming (ELL) and compute their respective luminosity functions. The faint-end slope of the ELL luminosity function is much shallower than for the EM+BAL galaxies at z=0.3 and suggests that the number of faint ELL galaxies in clusters decreases by a factor of ~3 from z=0 to 0.3. The redshift evolution of K* for both EM+BAL and ELL types is consistent with a passively evolving stellar population formed at high redshift. Passive evolution in both classes demonstrates that the bulk of the stellar population in all bright cluster galaxies is formed at high redshift, and subsequent transformations in morphology/color/spectral type have little effect on the total stellar mass.

  2. Near-Infrared Properties of Moderate-Redshift Galaxy Clusters: Luminosity Functions and Density Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzzin, Adam; Yee, H.K.C.; /Toronto U., Astron. Dept.; Hall, Patrick B.; /York U., Canada; Ellingson, E.; /Colorado U., CASA; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    We present K-band imaging for 15 of the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology (CNOC1) clusters. The extensive spectroscopic dataset available for these clusters allows us to determine the cluster K-band luminosity function and density profile without the need for statistical background subtraction. The luminosity density and number density profiles can be described by NFW models with concentration parameters of c{sub l} = 4.28 {+-} 0.70 and c{sub g} = 4.13 {+-} 0.57 respectively. Comparing these to the dynamical mass analysis of the same clusters shows that the galaxy luminosity and number density profiles are similar to the dark matter profile, and are not less concentrated like in local clusters. The luminosity functions show that the evolution of K. over the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.5 is consistent with a scenario where the majority of stars in cluster galaxies form at high-redshift (z{sub f} > 1.5) and evolve passively thereafter. The best-fit for the faint-end slope of the luminosity function is {alpha} = -0.84 {+-} 0.08, which indicates that it does not evolve between z = 0 and z = 0.3. Using Principal Component Analysis of the spectra we classify cluster galaxies as either star-forming/recently-star-forming (EM+BAL) or non-star forming (ELL) and compute their respective luminosity functions. The faint-end slope of the ELL luminosity function is much shallower than for the EM+BAL galaxies at z = 0.3, and suggests the number of faint ELL galaxies in clusters decreases by a factor of {approx} 3 from z = 0 to z = 0.3. The redshift evolution of K* for both EM+BAL and ELL types is consistent with a passively evolving stellar population formed at high-redshift. Passive evolution in both classes, as well as the total cluster luminosity function, demonstrates that the bulk of the stellar population in all bright cluster galaxies is formed at high-redshift and subsequent transformations in morphology/color/spectral-type have little effect on the total stellar

  3. A Renewed Look at the Planetary Nebula Luminosity Function: Circumstellar Extinction and Contamination From Compact Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Brian; Ciardullo, Robin; Feldmeier, John; Jacoby, George H.; McCarron, Adam; Herrmann, Kimberly

    2018-01-01

    The planetary nebula luminosity function (PNLF) has been used as an extragalactic distance indicator since 1988, but there are still unsolved problems associated with its use. The two most serious involve PNLF distances beyond ~ 10 Mpc, which tend to be slightly smaller than those of other methods, and the lack of a theoretical explanation for the technique. We investigate these questions using a combination of narrow-band imaging data from the KPNO 4-m telescope, and recent LRS2 spectroscopy from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope.For the first project, we consider the implications of spectroscopic investigations by Kreckel et al. (2017), who found that in M74, several of the brightest planetary nebula (PN) candidates found by Herrmann et al. (2008) are actually compact supernova remnants (SNRs). First, we measure the [O III] and H-alpha fluxes of all the known SNRs in M31 and M33, and test whether those objects could be misidentified as bright PNe at distances beyond ~ 8 Mpc. We also obtain spectroscopy of bright PN candidates in the Fireworks Galaxy, NGC 6946, to test for PN/SNR confusion via the strengths of the [N II] and [S II] emission lines. Both experiments suggest that compact supernova remnants are not an important source of contamination in photometric surveys for extragalactic PNe.For the second project, we, for the first time, determine the de-reddened PNLF of an old stellar population. By performing spectroscopy of the brightest PN in M31’s bulge and measuring the objects’ Balmer decrements, we remove the effects of circumstellar extinction and derive the true location of the PNLF’s bright-end cutoff. In future studies, these data can be used to directly test the latest PNLF models, which combine modern post-AGB stellar evolutionary tracks with the physics of expanding nebulae.

  4. THE LUMINOSITY, MASS, AND AGE DISTRIBUTIONS OF COMPACT STAR CLUSTERS IN M83 BASED ON HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandar, Rupali; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Mutchler, Max; Bond, Howard; Kim, Hwihyun; Kaleida, Catherine; Calzetti, Daniela; Saha, Abhijit; O'Connell, Robert; Balick, Bruce; Carollo, Marcella; Disney, Michael; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick; Paresce, Francesco; Silk, Joe

    2010-01-01

    The newly installed Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope has been used to obtain multi-band images of the nearby spiral galaxy M83. These new observations are the deepest and highest resolution images ever taken of a grand-design spiral, particularly in the near-ultraviolet, and allow us to better differentiate compact star clusters from individual stars and to measure the luminosities of even faint clusters in the U band. We find that the luminosity function (LF) for clusters outside of the very crowded starburst nucleus can be approximated by a power law, dN/dL ∝ L α , with α = -2.04 ± 0.08, down to M V ∼ -5.5. We test the sensitivity of the LF to different selection techniques, filters, binning, and aperture correction determinations, and find that none of these contribute significantly to uncertainties in α. We estimate ages and masses for the clusters by comparing their measured UBVI, Hα colors with predictions from single stellar population models. The age distribution of the clusters can be approximated by a power law, dN/dτ ∝ τ γ , with γ = -0.9 ± 0.2, for M ∼> few x 10 3 M sun and τ ∼ 8 yr. This indicates that clusters are disrupted quickly, with ∼80%-90% disrupted each decade in age over this time. The mass function of clusters over the same M-τ range is a power law, dN/dM ∝ M β , with β = -1.94 ± 0.16, and does not have bends or show curvature at either high or low masses. Therefore, we do not find evidence for a physical upper mass limit, M C , or for the earlier disruption of lower mass clusters when compared with higher mass clusters, i.e., mass-dependent disruption. We briefly discuss these implications for the formation and disruption of the clusters.

  5. Optimization of Moderator Size of Thermal and Epithermal Neutron Source Based on a Compact Accelerator for Neutron Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasemi, Hiroyuki; Kamiyama, Takashi; Sato, Hirotaka; Kino, Koichi; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki; Nakajima, Ken

    A compact accelerator-driven neutron source has some advantages over a large accelerator facility in terms of accessibility and usability. Recently, the project to develop a non-destructive testing system for nuclear fuels by neutron imaging using a compact accelerator-driven neutron source has launched in Japan. In this project, the traditional neutron radiography and temperature imaging by neutron resonance absorption spectroscopy (N-RAS) have been studied. From the viewpoint of L/D, a high-brightness moderator is desirable for the neutron imaging. In this study, we investigated the dependence of moderator size on the source brightness and the pulse characteristics of the neutron by simulation calculations to design the moderator for imaging using thermal and epithermal neutrons. As a result, the optimal size of the moderator for the neutron imaging was 6∼7 cm in the energy region from 5 meV to 100 eV.

  6. Luminosity monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, D. G.

    1998-01-01

    Luminosity monitors are needed in each experiment doing spin physics at RHIC. They concentrate on the luminosity aspects here because, for example, with a 10 -3 raw asymmetry in an experiment, an error of 10 -4 in the luminosity is as significant as a 10% polarization error. Because luminosity is a property of how two beams overlap, the luminosity at an interaction region must be measured at that interaction region in order to be relevant to the experiment at that interaction region. The authors will have to do the physics and the luminosity measurements by using labels on the event sums according to the polarization labels on the colliding bunches. Most likely they will not have independent polarization measurement on each bunch, but only on all the filled bunches in a ring, or perhaps all the bunches that are actually used in an experiment. Most analyses can then be handled by using the nine combinations gotten from three kinds of bunches in each ring, +, - and empty bunches. The empty bunches are needed to measure beam-gas background, (and some, like six in a row, are needed for the beam abort). Much of the difficulty comes from the fact that they must use a physics process to represent the luminosity. This process must have kinematic and geometric cuts both to reduce systematics such as beam-gas backgrounds, and to make it representative of the part of the interaction diamond from which the physics events come

  7. Luminosity measurement at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Karacheban, Olena

    2017-01-01

    Luminosity is a key quantity of any collider, since it allows for the determinationof the absolute cross sections from the observed rates in a detector. Since theHiggs boson discovery in 2012, the highest priority at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) has been given to an accurate understanding of the electroweak scale anda search for new physics. Precise luminosity measurements in such conditions areof crucial importance, as they determine the precision of any physics cross sectionmeasurement.To increase the production of particles of interest, usually of low cross section,the LHC is running at the highest possible luminosity. After the first Long Shutdown (LS1) the original performance goal for the luminosity of 1 × 1034 cm−2 s−1was reached with 1011 protons per bunch and a bunch spacing of 25 ns. In suchconditions radiation hard detectors with extremely fast response time are required,especially for instrumentation near the beam.The Compact Muon Solenoid experiment is equipped with three online luminomet...

  8. The Sloan Lens ACS Survey. XI. Beyond Hubble Resolution : Size, Luminosity, and Stellar Mass of Compact Lensed Galaxies at Intermediate Redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newton, Elisabeth R.; Marshall, Philip J.; Treu, Tommaso; Auger, Matthew W.; Gavazzi, Raphaeel; Bolton, Adam S.; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    We exploit the strong lensing effect to explore the properties of intrinsically faint and compact galaxies at intermediate redshift (z(s) similar or equal to 0.4-0.8) at the highest possible resolution at optical wavelengths. Our sample consists of 46 strongly lensed emission line galaxies (ELGs)

  9. Luminosity measurement at CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karacheban, Olena

    2017-10-15

    Luminosity is a key quantity of any collider, since it allows for the determination of the absolute cross sections from the observed rates in a detector. Since the Higgs boson discovery in 2012, the highest priority at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been given to an accurate understanding of the electroweak scale and a search for new physics. Precise luminosity measurements in such conditions are of crucial importance, as they determine the precision of any physics cross section measurement. To increase the production of particles of interest, usually of low cross section, the LHC is running at the highest possible luminosity. After the first Long Shutdown (LS1) the original performance goal for the luminosity of 1 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} was reached with 10{sup 11} protons per bunch and a bunch spacing of 25 ns. In such conditions radiation hard detectors with extremely fast response time are required, especially for instrumentation near the beam. The Compact Muon Solenoid experiment is equipped with three online luminometers, which fulfill the listed requirements: the Fast Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM1F), the Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) and the Forward Hadron calorimeter (HF). The BCM1F was upgraded during LS1 from 8 to 24 diamond sensors and is read out by a dedicated fast ASIC. The back-end comprises a deadtime-less histogramming unit, with 6.25 ns bin width and analog-to-digital converters with 2 ns sampling time in the VME standard. A microTCA system with better time resolution is in development. Particles originating from collisions and machine induced background arrive with 12 ns time difference. Because of its excellent time resolution BCM1F measures separately both luminosity and machine induced background particles. The performance of the detector in the first running period and radiation damage monitoring of the sensors and electronics chain form the first part of this thesis. Calibration of the luminometers at the LHC is done using

  10. Luminosity measurement at CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karacheban, Olena

    2017-10-01

    Luminosity is a key quantity of any collider, since it allows for the determination of the absolute cross sections from the observed rates in a detector. Since the Higgs boson discovery in 2012, the highest priority at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been given to an accurate understanding of the electroweak scale and a search for new physics. Precise luminosity measurements in such conditions are of crucial importance, as they determine the precision of any physics cross section measurement. To increase the production of particles of interest, usually of low cross section, the LHC is running at the highest possible luminosity. After the first Long Shutdown (LS1) the original performance goal for the luminosity of 1 x 10 34 cm -2 s -1 was reached with 10 11 protons per bunch and a bunch spacing of 25 ns. In such conditions radiation hard detectors with extremely fast response time are required, especially for instrumentation near the beam. The Compact Muon Solenoid experiment is equipped with three online luminometers, which fulfill the listed requirements: the Fast Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM1F), the Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) and the Forward Hadron calorimeter (HF). The BCM1F was upgraded during LS1 from 8 to 24 diamond sensors and is read out by a dedicated fast ASIC. The back-end comprises a deadtime-less histogramming unit, with 6.25 ns bin width and analog-to-digital converters with 2 ns sampling time in the VME standard. A microTCA system with better time resolution is in development. Particles originating from collisions and machine induced background arrive with 12 ns time difference. Because of its excellent time resolution BCM1F measures separately both luminosity and machine induced background particles. The performance of the detector in the first running period and radiation damage monitoring of the sensors and electronics chain form the first part of this thesis. Calibration of the luminometers at the LHC is done using van der Meer (Vd

  11. A Concept for the LHC Luminosity Upgrade Based on Strong Beta* Reduction combined with a Minimized Geometric Luminosity Loss Factor

    CERN Document Server

    Koutchouk, Jean-Pierre; Métral, E; Todesco, E; Zimmermann, F; de Maria, R; Sterbini, G

    2007-01-01

    A significant reduction of b* requires a new beam crossing scheme to overcome the consequence of the luminosity loss factor. We define in this paper the parameters of a possible solution taking advantage of an early separation scheme optionally supplemented by a weak crab crossing. Large aperture (150 mm) Nb3Sn triplet quadrupoles are chosen for their compactness, temperature margin and ability to relax the collimator gap and impedance. This concept offers high performance for a moderate increase of complexity. An open issue is the possibility of integrating dipoles inside the detectors.

  12. Luminosity Spectrum Reconstruction at Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Poss, Stéphane

    2014-04-11

    A good knowledge of the luminosity spectrum is mandatory for many measurements at future e+e- colliders. As the beam-parameters determining the luminosity spectrum cannot be measured precisely, the luminosity spectrum has to be measured through a gauge process with the detector. The measured distributions, used to reconstruct the spectrum, depend on Initial State Radiation, cross-section, and Final State Radiation. To extract the basic luminosity spectrum, a parametric model of the luminosity spectrum is created, in this case the spectrum at the 3 TeV Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The model is used within a reweighting technique to extract the luminosity spectrum from measured Bhabha event observables, taking all relevant effects into account. The centre-of-mass energy spectrum is reconstructed within 5% over the full validity range of the model. The reconstructed spectrum does not result in a significant bias or systematic uncertainty in the exemplary physics benchmark process of smuon pair production.

  13. Luminosity monitor at PEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, J.D.; Franklin, M.E.B.

    1981-02-01

    The luminosity monitor system utilized by the MKII Detector and by the PEP operators is described. This system processes information from 56 photomultipliers and calculates independent luminosities for each of the 3 colliding bunches in PEP. Design considerations, measurement techniques, and sources of error in the luminosity measurement are discussed.

  14. Luminosity measurement at AMY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Y.

    1995-01-01

    A precise measurement of a luminosity is required by experiments with high statistics. The largest sources of a systematic error of a luminosity measurement are an alignment of the tube chambers which measure a polar angle of Bhabha events and a higher order correction for the Bhabha cross section calculation. We describe a resent study for these uncertainties and how to reduce the systematic errors from these sources. The total systematic error of the luminosity measurement of 1.8% can be reduced to 1.0% by this study. (author)

  15. properties and luminosity functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hektor Monteiro

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present an investigation of a sample of 1072 stars extracted from the Villanova Catalog of Spectroscopically Identified White Dwarfs (2005 on-line version, studying their distribution in the Galaxy, their physical properties and their luminosity functions. The distances and physical properties of the white dwarfs are determined through interpolation of their (B-V or (b-y colors in model grids. The solar position relative to the Galactic plane, luminosity function, as well as separate functions for each white dwarf spectral type are derived and discussed. We show that the binary fraction does not vary significantly as a function of distance from the Galactic disk out to 100 pc. We propose that the formation rates of DA and non-DAs have changed over time and/or that DAs evolve into non-DA types. The luminosity functions for DAs and DBs have peaks possibly related to a star burst event.

  16. Luminosity enhancements at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coward, D.H.

    1984-04-01

    Several ideas are discussed that have been proposed to improve the luminosity at the SPEAR and PEP electron-positron storage rings and to insure good luminosity at the SLAC Linear Collider. There have been two proposals studied recently for SPEAR: a Microbeta insertion using Samarium Cobalt permanent magnets, and a Minibeta insertion using conventional quadrupole magnets. The notations Microbeta and minibeta used here are somewhat arbitrary since the front faces of the first quadrupole magnets for both insertions are at nearly the same distance from the interaction point

  17. High luminosity particle colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-03-01

    The authors consider the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, p anti p), lepton (e + e - , μ + μ - ) and photon-photon colliders. Technical problems in obtaining increased energy in each type of machine are presented. The machines relative size are also discussed

  18. An Anthropology of Luminosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2007-01-01

    of luminosity in the practice of day-to-day activities. The article surveys an array of past conceptions of light within philosophy, natural science and more recent approaches to light in the fields of anthropology and material culture studies. A number of implications are discussed, and by way of three case...

  19. Hadron collider luminosity limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon R

    1992-01-01

    The three colliders operated to date have taught us a great deal about the behaviour of both bunched and debunched beams in storage rings. The main luminosity limitations are now well enough understood that most of them can be stronglu attenuated or eliminated by approriate design precautions. Experience with the beam-beam interaction in both the SPS and the Tevatron allow us to predict the performance of the new generation of colliders with some degree of confidence. One of the main challenges that the accelerator physicist faces is the problem of the dynamic aperture limitations due to the lower field quality expected, imposed by economic and other constraints.

  20. Luminosity measurement at ILC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2073074; Milutinovic Dumbelovic, G; Pandurovic, M; Smiljanic,I

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a method of luminosity measurement at the future linear collider ILC that estimates and corrects for the impact of the dominant sources of systematic uncertainty originating from the beam-induced effects and the background from physics processes. Based on the relativistic kinematics of the collision frame of the Bhabha process, the beam-beam related uncertainty is reduced to a permille independently of the precision with which the beam parameters are known. With the specific event selection, different from the isolation cuts based on topology of the signal used at LEP, combined with the corrective methods we introduce, the overall systematic uncertainty in the peak region above 80% of the nominal center-of-mass energy meets the physics requirements to be at the few permille level at all ILC energies.

  1. Remarks on the maximum luminosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Ikeda, Taishi; Moore, Christopher J.; Yoo, Chul-Moon

    2018-04-01

    The quest for fundamental limitations on physical processes is old and venerable. Here, we investigate the maximum possible power, or luminosity, that any event can produce. We show, via full nonlinear simulations of Einstein's equations, that there exist initial conditions which give rise to arbitrarily large luminosities. However, the requirement that there is no past horizon in the spacetime seems to limit the luminosity to below the Planck value, LP=c5/G . Numerical relativity simulations of critical collapse yield the largest luminosities observed to date, ≈ 0.2 LP . We also present an analytic solution to the Einstein equations which seems to give an unboundedly large luminosity; this will guide future numerical efforts to investigate super-Planckian luminosities.

  2. Different Luminosity Correlation of GRBs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 35; Issue 3. Different Luminosity Correlation of GRBs ... We report our recent understanding about a tight correlation between relative spectral lag and luminosity (or redshift) for -ray bursts. The latest investigations indicate that the empirical ...

  3. Luminosity class of neutron reflectometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleshanov, N.K.

    2016-01-01

    The formulas that relate neutron fluxes at reflectometers with differing q-resolutions are derived. The reference luminosity is defined as a maximum flux for measurements with a standard resolution. The methods of assessing the reference luminosity of neutron reflectometers are presented for monochromatic and white beams, which are collimated with either double diaphragm or small angle Soller systems. The values of the reference luminosity for unified parameters define luminosity class of reflectometers. The luminosity class characterizes (each operation mode of) the instrument by one number and can be used to classify operating reflectometers and optimize designed reflectometers. As an example the luminosity class of the neutron reflectometer NR-4M (reactor WWR-M, Gatchina) is found for four operation modes: 2.1 (monochromatic non-polarized beam), 1.9 (monochromatic polarized beam), 1.5 (white non-polarized beam), 1.1 (white polarized beam); it is shown that optimization of measurements may increase the flux at the sample up to two orders of magnitude with monochromatic beams and up to one order of magnitude with white beams. A fan beam reflectometry scheme with monochromatic neutrons is suggested, and the expected increase in luminosity is evaluated. A tuned-phase chopper with a variable TOF resolution is recommended for reflectometry with white beams.

  4. LHC luminosity upgrade detector challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; de Roeck, Albert; Bortoletto, Daniela; Wigmans, Richard; Riegler, Werner; Smith, Wesley H

    2006-01-01

    LHC luminosity upgrade: detector challenges The upgrade of the LHC machine towards higher luminosity (1035 cm -2s-1) has been studied over the last few years. These studies have investigated scenarios to achieve the increase in peak luminosity by an order of magnitude, as well as the physics potential of such an upgrade and the impact of a machine upgrade on the LHC DETECTORS. This series of lectures will cover the following topics: • Physics motivation and machine scenarios for an order of magnitude increase in the LHC peak luminosity (lecture 1) • Detector challenges including overview of ideas for R&D programs by the LHC experiments: tracking and calorimetry, other new detector developments (lectures 2-4) • Electronics, trigger and data acquisition challenges (lecture 5) Note: the much more ambitious LHC energy upgrade will not be covered

  5. LUCID: The ATLAS Luminosity Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cabras, Grazia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The LUCID detector is the main luminosity provider of the ATLAS experiment and the only one able to provide a reliable luminosity determination in all beam configurations, luminosity ranges and at bunch-crossing level. LUCID was entirely redesigned in preparation for Run II: both the detector and the electronics were upgraded in order to cope with the challenging conditions expected at the LHC center of mass energy of 13 TeV and with 25 ns bunch-spacing. An innovative calibration system based on radioactive 207Bi sources deposited on the quartz window of the readout photomultipliers was implemented, resulting in the ability to control the detectors long time stability at few percent level. A description of the detector and its readout electronics will be given as well as preliminary results on the ATLAS luminosity measurement and related systematic uncertainties.

  6. Luminosity lifetime in the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, G.; Finley, D.; Johnson, R.P.; Kerns, Q.; McCarthy, J.; Siemann, R.; Zhang, P.

    1988-01-01

    Since the inauguration of colliding proton-antiproton operations in 1987, the Tevatron has exhibited luminosity lifetimes shorter than expected. During a typical colliding beam storage period, called a store, luminosity is calculated periodically by measuring the charge and emittances of each bunch. The growth of the transverse bunch emittances is the dominant cause of luminosity deterioration. Throughout, this period, the position spectrum of the bunches exhibited betatron signals larger than expected from Schottky noise. A model assuming externally driven betatron oscillations explains both the betatron signals and the emittance growth. A program is underway to improve the Tevatron luminosity lifetime. The abort kickers have been identified as sources of emittance growth, and some quadrupole power supplies are further candidates. Because the horizontal dispersion through the RF cavities is nonzero, RF phase noise has been investigated. Noise in the main dipole regulation circuit has also been studied. 13 refs., 4 figs

  7. High Luminosity LHC: Challenges and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arduini, G.; Barranco, J.; Bertarelli, A.; Biancacci, N.; Bruce, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will undergo a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its rate of collisions by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity by a factor ten. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11–12 T superconducting magnets, including Nb 3 Sn-based magnets never used in accelerators before, compact superconducting cavities for longitudinal beam rotation, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation. As a result, the dynamics of the HL-LHC beams will be also particularly challenging and this aspect is the main focus of this paper.

  8. Fast luminosity monitor at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bini, C.; De Pedis, D.; De Zorzi, G.; Diambrini-Palazzi, G.; Di Cosimo, G.; Di Domenico, A.; Gauzzi, P.; Zanello, D.

    1994-01-01

    In 1990 the LEP-5 experiment measured luminosity at LEP by detecting the single bremsstrahlung photons emitted in the e + e - collisions. In 1991 the experiment was upgraded to exploit the intrinsic high speed of the method which allows luminosity measurement of the single bunches of LEP. In this paper the LEP-5 upgrade is described and the results of a test performed are discussed. ((orig.))

  9. ISR Superconducting High luminosity Insertion

    CERN Multimedia

    1981-01-01

    The picture shows two of the eight superconducting quadrupoles of the low-beta insertion at intersection I8.The increase of luminosity produced by this insertion was above a factor 7. At right one can also see the Open- Axial- Field Magnet. The person is Stephan Pichler. See also 7702690X, 8102123, 8010397, 8008332.

  10. LHC Report: A new luminosity record

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    After about one month of operation, the LHC has already accumulated an integrated luminosity of 28 pb-1, which corresponds to over 50% of the total delivered to the experiments in 2010. This impressive start to the LHC run in 2011 bodes well for the rest of year.   Following careful collimator set-up and validation, the first phase of beam commissioning 2011 has come to an end. The first stable beams were declared on Sunday 13 March with a moderate 3 bunches per beam and an initial luminosity of 1.6 × 1030 cm-2s-1. Machine protection tests continued during the following week as the commissioning team made absolutely sure that all critical systems (beam dumps, beam interlock system, etc.) were functioning properly. When these tests had finished, the way was opened to increased intensity and the LHC quickly moved through the first part of its planned, staged intensity increase. Fills with increasing numbers of bunches were delivered to the experiments, culminating in a fill with 200...

  11. A Luminosity Calorimeter for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H; Kananov, S; Levy, A; Sadeh, I

    2009-01-01

    For the relative precision of the luminosity measurement at CLIC, a preliminary target value of 1% is being assumed. This may be accomplished by constructing a finely granulated calorimeter, which will measure Bhabha scattering at small angles. In order to achieve the design goal, the geometrical parameters of the calorimeter need to be defined. Several factors influence the design of the calorimeter; chief among these is the need to minimize the error on the luminosity measurement while avoiding the intense beam background at small angles. In this study the geometrical parameters are optimized for the best performance of the calorimeter. In addition, the suppression of physics background to Bhabha scattering is investigated and a set of selection cuts is introduced.

  12. The luminosity function of quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yichuan C.

    1995-01-01

    We propose a new evolutionary model for the optical luminosity function of quasars. Our analytical model is derived from fits to the empirical luminosity function estimated by Hartwick and Schade and Warren, Hewett, and Osmer on the basis of more than 1200 quasars over the range of redshifts 0 approximately less than z approximately less than 4.5. We find that the evolution of quasars over this entire redshift range can be well fitted by a Gaussian distribution, while the shape of the luminosity function can be well fitted by either a double power law or an exponential L(exp 1/4) law. The predicted number counts of quasars, as a function of either apparent magnitude or redshift, are fully consistent with the observed ones. Our model indicates that the evolution of quasars reaches its maximum at z approximately = 2.8 and declines at higher redshifts. An extrapolation of the evolution to z approximately greater than 4.5 implies that quasars may have started their cosmic fireworks at z(sub f) approximately = 5.2-5.5. Forthcoming surveys of quasars at these redshifts will be critical to constrain the epoch of quasar formation. All the results we derived are based on observed quasars and are therefore subject to the bias of obscuration by dust in damped Ly alpha systems. Future surveys of these absorption systems at z approximately greater than 3 will also be important if the formation epoch of quasars is to be known unambiguously.

  13. Pinhole Luminosity Monitor with Feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J

    2004-05-17

    Previously, the generalized luminosity L was defined and calculated for all incident channels based on an NLC e{sup +}e{sup -} design. Alternatives were then considered to improve the differing beam-beam e{sup -}e{sup -} e{gamma} and {gamma}{gamma} channels. Regardless of the channel, there was a large flux of outgoing, high energy photons that were produced from the beam-beam interaction e.g. beamsstrahlung that needs to be disposed of and whose flux depended on L. One approach to this problem is to consider it a resource and attempt to take advantage of it by disposing of these straight-ahead photons in more useful ways than simply dumping them. While there are many options for monitoring the luminosity, any method that allows feedback and optimization in real time and in a non-intercepting and non-interfering way during normal data taking is extremely important--especially if it provides other capabilities such as high resolution tuning of spot sizes and can be used for all incident channels without essential modifications to their setup. Our ''pin-hole'' camera appears to be such a device if it can be made to work with high energy photons in ways that are compatible with the many other constraints and demands on space around the interaction region. The basis for using this method is that it has, in principle, the inherent resolution and bandwidth to monitor the very small spot sizes and their stabilities that are required for very high, integrated luminosity. While there are many possible, simultaneous uses of these outgoing photon beams, we limit our discussion to a single, blind, proof-of-principle experiment that was done on the FFTB line at SLAC to certify the concept of a camera obscura for high energy photons.

  14. Precision luminosity measurement at ILC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2073074; Pandurovic, M; Smiljanic, I

    2013-01-01

    In these proceedings a novel approach to deal with the beam-induced effects in luminosity measurement is presented. Based on the relativistic kinematics of the collision frame of the Bhabha process, the beam-beam related uncertainties can be reduced to the permille level independently of a precision with which the beam parameters are known. Specific event selection combined with the corrective methods we introduce, leads to the systematic uncertainty from the beam-induced effects to be at a few permille level in the peak region above the 80% of the nominal centre-of-mass energies at ILC.

  15. Optimizing integrated luminosity of future hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The integrated luminosity, a key figure of merit for any particle-physics collider, is closely linked to the peak luminosity and to the beam lifetime. The instantaneous peak luminosity of a collider is constrained by a number of boundary conditions, such as the available beam current, the maximum beam-beam tune shift with acceptable beam stability and reasonable luminosity lifetime (i.e., the empirical “beam-beam limit”), or the event pileup in the physics detectors. The beam lifetime at high-luminosity hadron colliders is largely determined by particle burn off in the collisions. In future highest-energy circular colliders synchrotron radiation provides a natural damping mechanism, which can be exploited for maximizing the integrated luminosity. In this article, we derive analytical expressions describing the optimized integrated luminosity, the corresponding optimum store length, and the time evolution of relevant beam parameters, without or with radiation damping, while respecting a fixed maximum value...

  16. To High Luminosity and beyond!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    This week marks a major milestone for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC - see here) project, as it moves from the design study to the machine construction phase. HL-LHC will extend the LHC’s discovery potential, increasing luminosity by a factor of 10 beyond the original design value and allowing the scientific community to study new phenomena.    Composer Domenico Vicinanza (left) directs the musical performance of sonified LHC data during a special Hi-Lumi event (see box). The green light was given during the 5th Joint HiLumi LHC-LARP annual meeting that took place at CERN from 26 to 30 October 2015. The meeting saw the participation of more than 230 experts from all over the world to discuss the results and achievements of the HiLumi LHC Design Study. During the week, these experts approved the first version of the HL-LHC Technical Design Report – the document that, following the Preliminary Design Report issued in 2014, describes in detail how the LHC upgrade progra...

  17. Luminosity Measurements with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Maettig, Stefan; Pauly, T

    For almost all measurements performed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) one crucial ingredient is the precise knowledge about the integrated luminosity. The determination and precision on the integrated luminosity has direct implications on any cross-section measurement, and its instantaneous measurement gives important feedback on the conditions at the experimental insertions and on the accelerator performance. ATLAS is one of the main experiments at the LHC. In order to provide an accurate and reliable luminosity determination, ATLAS uses a variety of different sub-detectors and algorithms that measure the luminosity simultaneously. One of these sub-detectors are the Beam Condition Monitors (BCM) that were designed to protect the ATLAS detector from potentially dangerous beam losses. Due to its fast readout and very clean signals this diamond detector is providing in addition since May 2011 the official ATLAS luminosity. This thesis describes the calibration and performance of the BCM as a luminosity detec...

  18. Differential Luminosity Measurement using Bhabha Events

    CERN Document Server

    Poss, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    A good knowledge of the luminosity spectrum is mandatory for many measurements at future e+e- colliders. As the beam-parameters determining the luminosity spectrum cannot be measured precisely, the luminosity spectrum has to be measured through a gauge process with the detector. The measured distributions, used to reconstruct the spectrum, depend on Initial State Radiation, cross-section, and Final State Radiation. To extract the basic luminosity spectrum, a parametric model of the luminosity spectrum is created, in this case the spectrum at the 3 TeV CLIC. The model is used in a reweighting technique to extract the luminosity spectrum from measured Bhabha event observables, taking all relevant effects into account. The centre-of-mass energy spectrum is reconstructed within 5% over the full validity range of the model. The reconstructed spectrum does not result in a significant bias or systematic uncertainty in the exemplary physics benchmark process of smuon pair production.

  19. Optimizing integrated luminosity of future hadron colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Benedikt, Michael; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The integrated luminosity, a key figure of merit for any particle-physics collider, is closely linked to the peak luminosity and to the beam lifetime. The instantaneous peak luminosity of a collider is constrained by a number of boundary conditions, such as the available beam current, the maximum beam-beam tune shift with acceptable beam stability and reasonable luminosity lifetime (i.e., the empirical “beam-beam limit”), or the event pileup in the physics detectors. The beam lifetime at high...

  20. Optimizing integrated luminosity of future hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Michael; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-10-01

    The integrated luminosity, a key figure of merit for any particle-physics collider, is closely linked to the peak luminosity and to the beam lifetime. The instantaneous peak luminosity of a collider is constrained by a number of boundary conditions, such as the available beam current, the maximum beam-beam tune shift with acceptable beam stability and reasonable luminosity lifetime (i.e., the empirical "beam-beam limit"), or the event pileup in the physics detectors. The beam lifetime at high-luminosity hadron colliders is largely determined by particle burn off in the collisions. In future highest-energy circular colliders synchrotron radiation provides a natural damping mechanism, which can be exploited for maximizing the integrated luminosity. In this article, we derive analytical expressions describing the optimized integrated luminosity, the corresponding optimum store length, and the time evolution of relevant beam parameters, without or with radiation damping, while respecting a fixed maximum value for the total beam-beam tune shift or for the event pileup in the detector. Our results are illustrated by examples for the proton-proton luminosity of the existing Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at its design parameters, of the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), and of the Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh).

  1. Optimizing integrated luminosity of future hadron colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Benedikt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The integrated luminosity, a key figure of merit for any particle-physics collider, is closely linked to the peak luminosity and to the beam lifetime. The instantaneous peak luminosity of a collider is constrained by a number of boundary conditions, such as the available beam current, the maximum beam-beam tune shift with acceptable beam stability and reasonable luminosity lifetime (i.e., the empirical “beam-beam limit”, or the event pileup in the physics detectors. The beam lifetime at high-luminosity hadron colliders is largely determined by particle burn off in the collisions. In future highest-energy circular colliders synchrotron radiation provides a natural damping mechanism, which can be exploited for maximizing the integrated luminosity. In this article, we derive analytical expressions describing the optimized integrated luminosity, the corresponding optimum store length, and the time evolution of relevant beam parameters, without or with radiation damping, while respecting a fixed maximum value for the total beam-beam tune shift or for the event pileup in the detector. Our results are illustrated by examples for the proton-proton luminosity of the existing Large Hadron Collider (LHC at its design parameters, of the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC, and of the Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh.

  2. Luminosity monitoring and measurement at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Beretvas, A.; Derwent, P.F.

    2000-01-01

    Using two telescopes of beam-beam counters, CDF (Collider Detector at Fermilab) has measured the luminosity to an accuracy of 4.1% (3.6%) in run Ib (Ia). For run Ib (Ia) the average luminosity was 9.1(3.3)x10 30 cm -2 s -1 . For a typical data set the integrated luminosity was 86.47 (19.65) pb -1 in run Ib (Ia) resulting in a total integrated luminosity of 106.1±4.1 pb -1 . This paper shows how we have determined the accuracy of our results

  3. Compact vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M.A.; Zafalan, I. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Fisica, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Menezes, R. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Rio Tinto, PB (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Departamento de Fisica, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2017-02-15

    We study a family of Maxwell-Higgs models, described by the inclusion of a function of the scalar field that represent generalized magnetic permeability. We search for vortex configurations which obey first-order differential equations that solve the equations of motion. We first deal with the asymptotic behavior of the field configurations, and then implement a numerical study of the solutions, the energy density and the magnetic field. We work with the generalized permeability having distinct profiles, giving rise to new models, and we investigate how the vortices behave, compared with the solutions of the corresponding standard models. In particular, we show how to build compact vortices, that is, vortex solutions with the energy density and magnetic field vanishing outside a compact region of the plane. (orig.)

  4. Missing mass from low-luminosity stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, M.R.S.

    1986-01-01

    Results from a deep photometric survey for low-luminosity stars show a turnup to the luminosity function at faint magnitudes, and reopen the possibility that the missing mass in the solar neighbourhood is made up of stars after all. (author)

  5. Cepheids : the period-luminosity relation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaulieu, JP

    1997-01-01

    The Cepheids are relatively young, bright, periodic supergiant variable stars showing a correlation between their periods and luminosities. Since the beginning of the century, the Cepheid Period-Luminosity relation has been the corner stone of distance determination, and of the measure of the

  6. Luminosity Monitoring in ATLAS with MPX Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086061

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS-MPX detectors are based on the Medipix2 silicon devices designed by CERN for the detection of multiple types of radiation. Sixteen such detectors were successfully operated in the ATLAS detector at the LHC and collected data independently of the ATLAS data-recording chain from 2008 to 2013. Each ATLAS-MPX detector provides separate measurements of the bunch-integrated LHC luminosity. An internal consistency for luminosity monitoring of about 2% was demonstrated. In addition, the MPX devices close to the beam are sensitive enough to provide relative-luminosity measurements during van der Meer calibration scans, in a low-luminosity regime that lies below the sensitivity of the ATLAS calorimeter-based bunch-integrating luminometers. Preliminary results from these luminosity studies are presented for 2012 data taken at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV proton-proton collisions.

  7. Luminosity Measurements at LHCb for Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Coombs, George

    2018-01-01

    A precise measurement of the luminosity is a necessary component of many physics analyses, especially cross-section measurements. At LHCb two different direct measurement methods are used to determine the luminosity: the “van der Meer scan” (VDM) and the “Beam Gas Imaging” (BGI) methods. A combined result from these two methods gave a precision of less than 2% for Run I and efforts are ongoing to provide a similar result for Run II. Fixed target luminosity is determined with an indirect method based on the single electron scattering cross-section.

  8. Luminosity determination at HERA-B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Adams, M. [Dortmund Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Agari, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (DE)] (and others)

    2007-05-15

    A detailed description of an original method used to measure the luminosity accumulated by the HERA-B experiment for a data sample taken during the 2002-2003 HERA running period is reported. We show that, with this method, a total luminosity measurement can be achieved with a typical precision, including overall systematic uncertainties, at a level of 5% or better. We also report evidence for the detection of {delta}-rays generated in the target and comment on the possible use of such delta rays to measure luminosity. (orig.)

  9. Possible Scenarios for the LHC Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2107593

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we consider possible scenarios to upgrade the LHC luminosity beyond 1034 cm−2s−1. By pushing the accelerator parameters to the ultimate performance we can increase to 1.7 1011 the bunch population and eventually reach a peak luminosity of 2.3×1034 cm−2s−1. To go beyond, a considerable improvement of the LHC parameters, such as ß*, beam intensity, bunch length, number of circulating bunches is required. Finally, the upgrade of the injector complex and of the injection energy is another important ingredient to upgrade both peak and integrated luminosity up to an order of magnitude above the nominal value.

  10. A Level 1 Tracking Trigger for the CMS Experiment at the LHC Phase 2 Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzobon, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    The second decade of Large Hadron Collider operations, from about 2020 onwards, envisages a remarkable increase in collider instantaneous luminosity, one order of magnitude above the project one. This luminosity increase presents several challenges to the LHC experiments. The present tracker of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment must be replaced with a system providing excellent tracking quality at higher luminosities, as well as Tracking Trigger inputs to the existing “Level 0” CMS trigger system at the full 40 MHz bunch-crossing rate. The minimal requirements for a Tracking Trigger would be the capability to confirm the presence of high-pT tracks associated with Calorimeter and/or Muon Level 0 triggers. The ability to provide eective isolation criteria may also be required, and would in any case substantially improve the Trigger performance. Maintaining the data rates generated by Tracking Trigger inputs within a manageable bandwidth requires sensor modules able to locally sparsify the data. Measuring...

  11. Luminosity and spectral evolution of QSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Y Y; Yi, I S

    1999-01-01

    We apply the observed spectral states of the Galactic black hole candidates (GBHCs) to the quasi-stellar object (QSO) luminosity evolution based on the correlation between luminosity and the spectrum, which is strongly supported by the similarities of emission mechanisms in GBHCs and QSOs. We derive the QSO luminosity evolution trends in the UV/optical and the X-ray energy bands and demonstrate that their trends are significantly affected by the spectral evolution. Each energy band shows distinct evolution properties. We test one of the widely discussed cosmological evolution scenarios of QSOs, in which QSOs evolve as a single long-lived population, and show that the resulting luminosity functions seen in different energy bands exhibit distinguishable and potentially observable evolution signatures in the X-ray energy bands.

  12. Online luminosity measurement at BES III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Wenbo; Fu Chengdong; Mo Xiaohu; He Kanglin; Zhu Kejun; Li Fei; Zhao Shujun

    2010-01-01

    As a crucial parameter of both accelerator and detector, the realization of online luminosity measurement is of great importance. Several methods of luminosity measurement are recapitulated and the emphasis is laid on the algorithm of using e + e - and γγ final states. Taking into account the status at the beginning of the joint commissioning of detector and accelerator, the information from end cap electromagnetic calorimeter is used to select the good event. With the help of online Event filter, the luminosity is calculated and the monitoring of online cross section of hadron is realized. The preliminary results indicate that the online luminosity measurement is stable and its role for machine tuning and monitoring of the overall running status is indispensable. (authors)

  13. High luminosity electron-hadron collider eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptitsyn, V.; Aschenauer, E.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M..; Calaga, R.; Chang, X.; Fedotov, A.; Gassner, D.; Hammons, L.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; He, P.; Hao, Y.; Jackson, W.; Jain, A.; Johnson, E.C.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luo, Y.; Mahler, G.; McIntyre, G.; Meng, W.; Minty, M.; Parker, B.; Pikin, A.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Skaritka, J.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Tepikian, S.; Than, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Webb, S.; Wu, Q.; Xu, W.; Pozdeyev, E.; Tsentalovich, E.

    2011-03-28

    We present the design of a future high-energy high-luminosity electron-hadron collider at RHIC called eRHIC. We plan on adding 20 (potentially 30) GeV energy recovery linacs to accelerate and to collide polarized and unpolarized electrons with hadrons in RHIC. The center-of-mass energy of eRHIC will range from 30 to 200 GeV. The luminosity exceeding 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} can be achieved in eRHIC using the low-beta interaction region with a 10 mrad crab crossing. We report on the progress of important eRHIC R&D such as the high-current polarized electron source, the coherent electron cooling, ERL test facility and the compact magnets for recirculation passes. A natural staging scenario of step-by-step increases of the electron beam energy by building-up of eRHIC's SRF linacs is presented.

  14. The luminosity function of field galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Mahtessian, A. P.

    2011-01-01

    Schmidt's method for construction of luminosity function of galaxies is generalized by taking into account the dependence of density of galaxies from the distance in the near Universe. The logarithmical luminosity function (LLF) of field galaxies depending on morphological type is constructed. We show that the LLF for all galaxies, and also separately for elliptical and lenticular galaxies can be presented by Schechter function in narrow area of absolute magnitudes. The LLF of spiral galaxies...

  15. Reverberation Mapping of High-Luminosity Quasars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shai Kaspi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past three decades reverberation mapping (RM has been applied to about 100 AGNs. Their broad line region (BLR sizes were measured and yielded mass estimates of the black holes in their center. However, very few attempts were carried out for high-luminosity quasars, at luminosities higher than 1046 erg/sec in the optical. Most of these attempts failed since RM of such quasars is difficult due to a number of reasons, mostly due to the long time needed to monitor these objects. During the past two decades we carried out a RM campaign on six high-luminosity quasars. This contribution presents some of the final light curves of that RM campaign in which we measured the BLR size in C iv of three of the objects (S5 0836+71, SBS 1116+603, and SBS 1425+606. We present the C iv BLR size and luminosity relation over eight orders of magnitude in luminosity, pushing the luminosity limit to its highest point so far.

  16. Reverberation Mapping of High-Luminosity Quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaspi, Shai [Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Brandt, William N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Maoz, Dan; Netzer, Hagai [Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Shemmer, Ohad, E-mail: shai@wise.tau.ac.il [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States)

    2017-10-30

    Over the past three decades reverberation mapping (RM) has been applied to about 100 AGNs. Their broad line region (BLR) sizes were measured and yielded mass estimates of the black holes in their center. However, very few attempts were carried out for high-luminosity quasars, at luminosities higher than 10{sup 46} erg/sec in the optical. Most of these attempts failed since RM of such quasars is difficult due to a number of reasons, mostly due to the long time needed to monitor these objects. During the past two decades we carried out a RM campaign on six high-luminosity quasars. This contribution presents some of the final light curves of that RM campaign in which we measured the BLR size in C iv of three of the objects (S5 0836+71, SBS 1116+603, and SBS 1425+606). We present the C iv BLR size and luminosity relation over eight orders of magnitude in luminosity, pushing the luminosity limit to its highest point so far.

  17. A high luminosity superconducting mini collider for Phi meson production and particle beam physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, C.; Robin, D.; Cline, D.; Kolonko, J.; Anderson, C.; Barletta, W.; Chargin, A.; Cornacchia, M.; Dalbacka, G.; Halbach, K.; Lueng, E.; Kimball, F.; Madura, D.; Patterson, L.

    1991-01-01

    A 510MeV electron-positron collider has been proposed at UCLA to study particle beam physics and Phi-Meson physics, at luminosities larger than 10 32 cm -2 s -1 . The collider consists of a single compact superconducting storage ring (SMC), with bending field of 4 T and a current larger than 1 A. The authors discuss the main characteristics of this system and its major technical components: superconducting dipoles, RF, vacuum, injection

  18. Performance of the Pixel Luminosity Telescope for Luminosity Measurement at CMS during Run2

    CERN Document Server

    Lujan, Paul Joseph

    2017-01-01

    The Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) is a dedicated system for luminosity measurement at the CMS experiment using silicon pixel sensors arranged into telescopes, each consisting of three sensor planes. It was installed in CMS at the beginning of 2015 and has been providing online and offline luminosity measurements throughout Run 2 of the LHC. The online bunch-by-bunch luminosity measurement employs the fast-or capability of the pixel readout chip to identify events where a hit is registered in all three sensors in a telescope, corresponding primarily to tracks originating from the interaction point. In addition, the full pixel information is read out at a lower rate, allowing for the calculation of corrections to the online luminosity from effects such as the miscounting of tracks not originating from the interaction point and detector efficiency. This paper presents results from the 2016 running of the PLT, including commissioning and operational history, luminosity calibration using Van der Meer scans, and...

  19. Performance of the Pixel Luminosity Telescope for Luminosity Measurement at CMS during Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) is a dedicated system for luminosity measurement at the CMS experiment using silicon pixel sensors arranged into "telescopes", each consisting of three planes. It was installed during LS1 at the beginning of 2015 and has been providing online and offline luminosity measurements throughout Run 2. The online bunch-by-bunch luminosity measurement employs the "fast-or" capability of the pixel readout chip (PSI46) to identify events where a hit is registered in all three sensors in a telescope corresponding primarily to tracks originating from the interaction point. In addition, the full pixel information is read out at a lower rate, allowing for the calculation of corrections to the online luminosity from effects such as the miscounting of tracks not originating from the interaction point and detector efficiency. In this talk, we will present results from 2016 running and preliminary 2017 results, including commissioning and operational history, luminosity calibration using Va...

  20. Operational results from the LHC luminosity monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, R.; Ratti, A.; Matis, H.S.; Stezelberger, T.; Turner, W.C.; Yaver, H.; Bravin, E.

    2011-03-28

    The luminosity monitors for the high luminosity regions in the LHC have been operating to monitor and optimize the luminosity since 2009. The device is a gas ionization chamber inside the neutral particle absorber 140 m from the interaction point and monitors showers produced by high energy neutral particles from the collisions. It has the ability to resolve the bunch-by-bunch luminosity as well as to survive the extreme level of radiation in the nominal LHC operation. We present operational results of the device during proton and lead ion operations in 2010 and make comparisons with measurements of experiments. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN can accelerate proton and lead ion beams to 7 TeV and 547 TeV and produce collisions of these particles. Luminosity measures performance of the LHC and is particularly important for experiments in high luminosity interaction points (IPs), ATLAS (IP1) and CMS (IP5). To monitor and optimize the luminosities of these IPs, BRAN (Beam RAte Neutral) detectors [1, 2] have been installed and operating since the beginning of the 2009 operation [3]. A neutral particle absorber (TAN) protects the D2 separation dipole from high energy forward neutral particles produced in the collisions [4]. These neutral particles produce electromagnetic and hadronic showers inside the TAN and their energy flux is proportional to the collision rate and hence to the luminosity. The BRAN detector is an Argon gas ionization chamber installed inside the TANs on both sides of the IP1 and IP5 and monitors the relative changes in the luminosity by detecting the ionization due to these showers. When the number of collisions per bunch crossing (multiplicity) is small, the shower rate inside the TAN is also proportional to the luminosity. Hence, the detector is designed to operate by measuring either the shower rate (counting mode for low and intermediate luminosities) or the average shower flux (pulse height mode for high luminosities). The detector is

  1. Pharmaceutical powder compaction technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Çelik, Metin

    2011-01-01

    ... through the compaction formulation process and application. Compaction of powder constituents both active ingredient and excipients is examined to ensure consistent and reproducible disintegration and dispersion profiles...

  2. MPX detectors as LHC luminosity monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopczak, Andre; Ali, Babar; Bergmann, Benedikt; Caforio, Davide; Heijne, Erik; Pospisil, Stanislav; Seifert, Frank; Solc, Jaroslav; Suk, Michal; Turecek, Daniel [IEAP CTU in Prague (Czech Republic); Ashba, Nedaa; Leroy, Claude; Soueid, Paul [University of Montreal (Canada); Bekhouche, Khaled [Biskra University (Algeria); Campbell, Michael; Nessi, Marzio [CERN (Switzerland); Lipniacka, Anna [Bergen University (Norway)

    2016-07-01

    A network of 16 Medipix-2 (MPX) silicon pixel devices was installed in the ATLAS detector cavern at CERN. It was designed to measure the composition and spectral characteristics of the radiation field in the ATLAS experiment and its surroundings. This study demonstrates that the MPX network can also be used as a self-sufficient luminosity monitoring system. The MPX detectors collect data independently of the ATLAS data-recording chain, and thus they provide independent measurements of the bunch-integrated ATLAS/LHC luminosity. In particular, the MPX detectors located close enough to the primary interaction point are used to perform van der Meer calibration scans with high precision. Results from the luminosity monitoring are presented for 2012 data taken at √(s) =8 TeV proton-proton collisions. The characteristics of the LHC luminosity reduction rate are studied and the effects of beam-beam (burn-off) and beam-gas (single bunch) interactions are evaluated. The systematic variations observed in the MPX luminosity measurements are below 0.3% for one minute intervals.

  3. ATLAS Upgrades Towards the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, H; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    With the LHC having successfully collected data at center-of-mass energies of sqrt{s} = 7/8 TeV, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades leading eventually to about five times the LHC design luminosity some 10-years from now in the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project. Coping with the high luminosity and the corresponding very high particle density will require significant changes to the ATLAS detector. Designs are developing rapidly for a replacement for the inner tracker, great changes in the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers. This article summarizes the environment expected at the HL-LHC and the status of various improvements to the ATLAS detector.

  4. The period-luminosity relation for Cepheids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodie, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the empirical determination of the period-luminosity-colour relation for classical Cepheids are presented. In this study the quantitative effects of random errors, reddening, sample size and the presence of both colour and period cut-offs (imposed by the finite extent of the instability strip) on the observational redetermination of the original relation are evaluated. Both random errors in the photometry and correlated errors in the reddening corrections are shown to have systematic effects. Especially sensitive to these errors is the colour coefficient in the period-luminosity-colour relation, where the ratio of the error to the width of the instability strip is the determining factor. With present observations only broad confidence limits can be placed on present knowledge of the intrinsic period-luminosity-colour relation and/or its variations from galaxy to galaxy. (author)

  5. The BRAN luminosity detectors for the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matis, H.S.; Placidi, M.; Ratti, A.; Turner, W.C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bravin, E. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Miyamoto, R. [European Spallation Source, ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2017-03-11

    This paper describes the several phases which led, from the conceptual design, prototyping, construction and tests with beam, to the installation and operation of the BRAN (Beam RAte of Neutrals) relative luminosity monitors for the LHC. The detectors have been operating since 2009 to contribute, optimize and maintain the accelerator performance in the two high luminosity interaction regions (IR), the IR1 (ATLAS) and the IR5 (CMS). The devices are gas ionization chambers installed inside a neutral particle absorber 140 m away from the Interaction Points in IR1 and IR5 and monitor the energy deposited by electromagnetic showers produced by high-energy neutral particles from the collisions. The detectors have the capability to resolve the bunch-by-bunch luminosity at the 40 MHz bunch rate, as well as to survive the extreme level of radiation during the nominal LHC operation. The devices have operated since the early commissioning phase of the accelerator over a broad range of luminosities reaching 1.4×10{sup 34} cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} with a peak pileup of 45 events per bunch crossing. Even though the nominal design luminosity of the LHC has been exceeded, the BRAN is operating well. After describing how the BRAN can be used to monitor the luminosity of the collider, we discuss the technical choices that led to its construction and the different tests performed prior to the installation in two IRs of the LHC. Performance simulations are presented together with operational results obtained during p-p operations, including runs at 40 MHz bunch rate, Pb-Pb operations and p-Pb operations.

  6. FAMECE Compaction Study - Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    apparatus chosen for the compaction study is model CN-992, manufactured by Soiltest. In(c., of’ Evanston, Illinois. This model is part of the Army Soill...Figure 17) is model CL-700, nmanufactured by Soiltest, Inc.. of Evanston, Illinois. It has a foot adapter (CL-701) for low-shear-strength soils. It will be...moderate plasticity. 12. Soil Characteristics. Samples of’ thc three soil types were analyzed -with stand- ardl soils testinig eq(uipmlent. Sieve, or

  7. Beam-beam effects and generalized luminosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    The assumption is made that before an NLC is approved, a prototype will be necessary that demonstrates the feasibility of a general purpose linear collider capable of {rvec e}{sup {+-}}{rvec e}{sup {+-}}, {rvec {gamma}}{rvec e} and {rvec {gamma}}{rvec {gamma}} incident channels. At an upgraded SLC, such channels could provide new physics over a range of energies upwards of a few GeV. Effects that limit the luminosity of a GLC are discussed together with their possible mitigations. The expected luminosities in the different channels are then predicted in a consistent way for {radical}s{sub ee} = 0.5 TeV.

  8. Spectrometers for compact neutron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, J.; Böhm, S.; Dabruck, J. P.; Rücker, U.; Gutberlet, T.; Brückel, T.

    2018-03-01

    We discuss the potential for neutron spectrometers at novel accelerator driven compact neutron sources. Such a High Brilliance Source (HBS) relies on low energy nuclear reactions, which enable cryogenic moderators in very close proximity to the target and neutron optics at comparably short distances from the moderator compared to existing sources. While the first effect aims at increasing the phase space density of a moderator, the second allows the extraction of a large phase space volume, which is typically requested for spectrometer applications. We find that competitive spectrometers can be realized if (a) the neutron production rate can be synchronized with the experiment repetition rate and (b) the emission characteristics of the moderator can be matched to the phase space requirements of the experiment. MCNP simulations for protons or deuterons on a Beryllium target with a suitable target/moderator design yield a source brightness, from which we calculate the sample fluxes by phase space considerations for different types of spectrometers. These match closely the figures of todays spectrometers at medium flux sources. Hence we conclude that compact neutron sources might be a viable option for next generation neutron sources.

  9. Model Compaction Equation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Petrophysical, Decompaction and Linear Regression techniques were used to investigate overpressure, degree of compaction and to derive a model compaction equation for. -1. -1 hydrostatic sandstones. Compaction coefficients obtained range from 0.0003 - 0.0005 m (averaging 0.0004 m ) and percentage compaction ...

  10. Some observational aspects of compact galactic X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heise, J.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis contains the following observations of compact galactic X-ray sources: i) the X-ray experiments onboard the Astronomical Netherlands Satellite ANS, ii) a rocket-borne ultra soft X-ray experiment and iii) the Objective Grating Spectrometer onboard the EINSTEIN observatory. In Chapter I the various types of compact galactic X-ray sources are reviewed and put into the perspective of earlier and following observations. In Chapter II the author presents some of the observations of high luminosity X-ray sources, made with ANS, including the detection of soft X-rays from the compact X-ray binary Hercules X-1 and the ''return to the high state'' of the black hole candidate Cygnus X-1. Chapter III deals with transient X-ray phenomena. Results on low luminosity galactic X-ray sources are collected in Chapter IV. (Auth.)

  11. Soil compaction and organic matter affect conifer seedling nonmycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal root tip abundance and diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael P. Amaranthus; Debbie Page-Dumroese; Al Harvey; Efren Cazares; Larry F. Bednar

    1996-01-01

    Three levels of organic matter removal (bole only; bole and crowns; and bole, crowns, and forest floor) and three levels of mechanical soil compaction (no compaction, moderate compaction, and severe soil compaction) were studied as they influence Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca (Beissn.) Franco) and western white...

  12. Funnel stability and VLBI-jet luminosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turolla, R.; Zaninetti, L.

    1986-01-01

    The stability of the jet-funnel interface in thick disc models is investigated. In particular an analysis is made of the circumstances in which the growth of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities can destroy the jet-funnel configuration, and the expected luminosity emitted at the top of the funnel from conversion of bulk kinetic energy into radiation via turbulent cascade processes. (author)

  13. Recent improvements in luminosity at PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, R.; Allen, M.; Chao, A.

    1983-03-01

    We will describe improvements which have led to new records for peak and average luminosity at PEP. Comparison of recent results with several earlier lattice and optical modifications shows rather good correlation with the predictions of a beam-beam simulation program

  14. Academic Training - LHC luminosity upgrade: detector challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES 13, 14, 15, March, from 11:00 to 12:00 - 16 March from 10:00 to 12:00 Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 14, 15 March, Council Room on 13, 16 March LHC luminosity upgrade: detector challenges A. De Roeck / CERN-PH, D. Bortoletto / Purdue Univ. USA, R. Wigmans / Texas, Tech Univ. USA, W. Riegler / CERN-PH, W. Smith / Wisconsin Univ. USA The upgrade of the LHC machine towards higher luminosity (1035 cm-2s-1) has been studied over the last few years. These studies have investigated scenarios to achieve the increase in peak luminosity by an order of magnitude, as well as the physics potential of such an upgrade and the impact of a machine upgrade on the LHC DETECTORS. This series of lectures will cover the following topics: Physics motivation and machine scenarios for an order of magnitude increase in the LHC peak luminosity (lecture 1) Detector challenges including overview of ideas for R&D programs by the LHC experiments: tracking and calorimetry, other new detector ...

  15. MPX Detectors as LHC Luminosity Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Sopczak, Andre; Asbah, Nedaa; Bergmann, Benedikt; Bekhouche, Khaled; Caforio, Davide; Campbell, Michael; Heijne, Erik; Leroy, Claude; Lipniacka, Anna; Nessi, Marzio; Pospisil, Stanislav; Seifert, Frank; Solc, Jaroslav; Soueid, Paul; Suk, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Vykydal, Zdenek

    2015-01-01

    A network of 16 Medipix-2 (MPX) silicon pixel devices was installed in the ATLAS detector cavern at CERN. It was designed to measure the composition and spectral characteristics of the radiation field in the ATLAS experiment and its surroundings. This study demonstrates that the MPX network can also be used as a self-sufficient luminosity monitoring system. The MPX detectors collect data independently of the ATLAS data-recording chain, and thus they provide independent measurements of the bunch-integrated ATLAS/LHC luminosity. In particular, the MPX detectors located close enough to the primary interaction point are used to perform van der Meer calibration scans with high precision. Results from the luminosity monitoring are presented for 2012 data taken at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV proton-proton collisions. The characteristics of the LHC luminosity reduction rate are studied and the effects of beam-beam (burn-off) and beam-gas (single bunch) interactions are evaluated. The systematic variations observed in the MPX lum...

  16. Simple luminosity normalization of greenness, yellowness and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 37; Issue 4. Simple luminosity normalization of greenness, yellowness and redness/greenness for comparison of leaf spectral profiles in multi-temporally acquired remote sensing images. Ryoichi Doi. Articles Volume 37 Issue 4 September 2012 pp 723-730 ...

  17. Simulating the X-ray luminosity of Be X-ray binaries: the case for black holes versus neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. O.; Ho, W. C. G.; Coe, M. J.; Okazaki, A. T.

    2018-04-01

    There are over 100 Be stars that are known to have neutron star companions but only one such system with a black hole. Previous theoretical work suggests this is not due to their formation but due to differences in X-ray luminosity. It has also been proposed that the truncation of the Be star's circumstellar disc is dependent on the mass of the compact object. Hence, Be star discs in black hole binaries are smaller. Since accretion onto the compact object from the Be star's disc is what powers the X-ray luminosity, a smaller disc in black hole systems leads to a lower luminosity. In this paper, simulations are performed with a range of eccentricities and compact object mass. The disc's size and density are shown to be dependent on both quantities. Mass capture and, in turn, X-ray luminosity are heavily dependent on the size and density of the disc. Be/black hole binaries are expected to be up to ˜10 times fainter than Be/neutron star binaries when both systems have the same eccentricity and can be 100 times fainter when comparing systems with different eccentricity.

  18. BOSS Great Wall: morphology, luminosity, and mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einasto, Maret; Lietzen, Heidi; Gramann, Mirt; Saar, Enn; Tempel, Elmo; Liivamägi, Lauri Juhan; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Streblyanska, Alina; Maraston, Claudia; Rubiño-Martín, José Alberto

    2017-06-01

    Context. Galaxy superclusters are the largest systems in the Universe that can give us information about the formation and evolution of the cosmic web. Aims: We study the morphology of the superclusters from the BOSS Great Wall (BGW), a recently discovered very rich supercluster complex at the redshift z = 0.47. Methods: We have employed the Minkowski functionals to quantify supercluster morphology. We calculate supercluster luminosities and masses using two methods. Firstly, we used data about the luminosities and stellar masses of high stellar mass galaxies with log (M∗/h-1M⊙) ≥ 11.3. Secondly, we applied a scaling relation that combines morphological and physical parameters of superclusters to obtain supercluster luminosities, and obtained supercluster masses using the mass-to-light ratios found for local rich superclusters. Results: The BGW superclusters are very elongated systems, with shape parameter values of less than 0.2. This value is lower than that found for the most elongated local superclusters. The values of the fourth Minkowski functional V3 for the richer BGW superclusters (V3 = 7 and 10) show that they have a complicated and rich inner structure. We identify two Planck SZ clusters in the BGW superclusters, one in the richest BGW supercluster, and another in one of the poor BGW superclusters. The luminosities of the BGW superclusters are in the range of 1-8 × 1013h-2L⊙, and masses in the range of 0.4-2.1 × 1016h-1M⊙. Supercluster luminosities and masses obtained with two methods agree well. Conclusions: The BGW is a complex of massive, luminous and large superclusters with very elongated shape. The search and detailed study, including the morphology analysis of the richest superclusters and their complexes from observations and simulations can help us to understand formation and evolution of the cosmic web.

  19. Luminosity measurement method for the LHC: Event selection and absolute luminosity determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasny, M. W.; Chwastowski, J.; Cyz, A.; Słowikowski, K.

    2013-11-01

    In our earlier papers Krasny et al. [1,2] have proposed a new luminosity measurement method which uses lepton pairs produced in peripheral collisions of the LHC beam particles, and identified the requirements for a new, specialized luminosity detector which is indispensable for their efficient on-line selection. In this paper we use the base-line detector model, with no precise timing capabilities, to evaluate the statistical and systematic accuracy of the method. We propose the complete event selection procedure and demonstrate that it allows to collect a sufficiently large sample of e+e- pairs to achieve a better than 1% statistical accuracy of the luminosity measurement over less than one-month-long running time intervals. We argue that the absolute luminosity measurement systematic errors can be kept below 1%. The proposed method can be directly applied to the LHC running periods for which the machine instantaneous luminosity does not exceed the L=1033 s-1 cm-2 value. Two ways extending the method to the large pile-up periods corresponding to higher instantaneous luminosities are proposed.

  20. GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES: A NEAR-UNIVERSAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, William E.; O' Halloran, Heather; Cockcroft, Robert, E-mail: harris@physics.mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ohallohm@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: cockcroft@physics.mcmaster.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); and others

    2014-12-20

    We present the first results from our Hubble Space Telescope brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) survey of seven central supergiant cluster galaxies and their globular cluster (GC) systems. We measure a total of 48,000 GCs in all seven galaxies, representing the largest single GC database. We find that a log-normal shape accurately matches the observed the luminosity function (LF) of the GCs down to the globular cluster luminosity function turnover point, which is near our photometric limit. In addition, the LF has a virtually identical shape in all seven galaxies. Our data underscore the similarity in the formation mechanism of massive star clusters in diverse galactic environments. At the highest luminosities (L ≳ 10{sup 7} L {sub ☉}), we find small numbers of ''superluminous'' objects in five of the galaxies; their luminosity and color ranges are at least partly consistent with those of ultra-compact dwarfs. Last, we find preliminary evidence that in the outer halo (R ≳ 20 kpc), the LF turnover point shows a weak dependence on projected distance, scaling as L {sub 0} ∼ R {sup –0.2}, while the LF dispersion remains nearly constant.

  1. LHC operation at higher energy and luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Papotti, G

    2013-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva) was commissioned and operated in the years 2009-2013 up to a beam energy of 4 TeV. A peak luminosity of 0.77 · 1034 cm−2s−1 was reached and an integrated luminosity of around 29 fb−1 was delivered to both ATLAS and CMS. This performance allowed the discovery of a scalar boson. The LHC is presently in a shutdown phase dedicated to consolidation and maintenance that will allow the restart of beam operation in early 2015 at an increased beam energy of 6.5 to 7TeV. Maximum acceptable pileup, effectiveness of electron-cloud scrubbing, and fast loss events are some of the issues that will shape the choice of operational parameters, cycle setup, and the commissioning strategy. The baseline choices and options for the restart after the shutdown are presented. In addition the roadmap for future performance upgrades is sketched.

  2. Robust Tracking at the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, Natasha Lee; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) aims to increase the LHC data-set by an order of magnitude in order to increase its potential for discoveries. Starting from the middle of 2026, the HL-LHC is expected to reach the peak instantaneous luminosity of 7.5×10^34cm^-2s^-1 which corresponds to about 200 inelastic proton-proton collisions per beam crossing. To cope with the large radiation doses and high pileup, the current ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced with a new all-silicon Inner Tracker. In this talk the expected performance of tracking and vertexing with the HL-LHC tracker is presented. Comparison is made to the performance with the Run2 detector. Ongoing developments of the track reconstruction for the HL-LHC are also discussed.

  3. High luminosity muon scattering at FNAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazizi, K. (California Univ., Riverside, CA (USA)); Conrad, J.; Fang, G. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Erdmann, M. (Freiburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.)); Geesaman, D.; Jackson, H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Guyot, C.; Virchaux, M. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Holmgren, H. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (USA)); Malensek, A.; Melanson, H.; Morfin

    1990-02-01

    The charge of this group was to evaluate the physics that can be done with a high luminosity {mu} scattering experiment at FNAL using the upgraded Tevatron muon beam, and consider the apparatus required. In this report, the physics that can be accomplished with a high luminosity {mu} scattering experiment is evaluated. The CERN and FNAL {mu} beams are compared in the context of such an experiment. The expected muon flux with the upgraded machine is estimated. Two possible detectors are compared: the air-core toroid experiment proposed by Guyot et al., and an upgraded version of the E665 double-diode apparatus now in place at FNAL. The relative costs of the detectors are considered. A list of detailed questions that need to be answered regarding the double-diode experiment has be compiled. 2 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Readout control for high luminosity accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belusevic, R.; Nixon, G.

    1991-01-01

    In this article we discuss some aspects of data acquisition at high luminosities and offer a set of design principles concerning readout control electronics and related software. As an example we include a brief description of a data transfer and processing system for future hadron colliders, featuring a transputer-based crate controller and a set of readout cards. This is a simplified and more efficient version of our design recently published in Nuclear Instruments and Methods. (orig.)

  5. Readout control for high luminosity accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belusevic, R.; Nixon, G. (University Coll., London (UK). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1991-09-15

    In this article we discuss some aspects of data acquisition at high luminosities and offer a set of design principles concerning readout control electronics and related software. As an example we include a brief description of a data transfer and processing system for future hadron colliders, featuring a transputer-based crate controller and a set of readout cards. This is a simplified and more efficient version of our design recently published in Nuclear Instruments and Methods. (orig.).

  6. Readout control for high luminosity accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belusevic, R.; Nixon, G.

    1991-09-01

    In this article we discuss some aspects of data acquisition at high luminosities and offer a set of design principles concerning readout control electronics and related software. As an example we include a brief description of a data transfer and processing system for future hadron colliders, featuring a transputer-based crate controller and a set of readout cards. This is a simplified and more efficient version of our design recently published in Nuclear Instruments and Methods. [A295 (1991) 391].

  7. The Boundary Layer in compact binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Hertfelder, Marius; Kley, Wilhelm; Suleimanov, Valery; Werner, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Disk accretion onto stars leads to the formation of a Boundary Layer (BL) near the stellar surface where the disk makes contact with the star. Albeit a large fraction of the total luminosity of the system originates from this tiny layer connecting the accretion disk and the accreting object, its structure has not been fully understood yet. It is the aim of this work, to obtain more insight into the Boundary Layer around the white dwarf in compact binary systems. There are still many uncertain...

  8. K0 finding efficiencies in increasing luminosities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassard, J.F.; Margetides S.

    1993-01-01

    In early LHC running it is anticipated that experiments will obtain luminosities of 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 , during which typically only one interaction per event will be obtained. But at higher luminosities, necessary for any Higgs and myriad other searches, experiments will have to deal with up to 50 distinct primary processes. Most will be minimum bias, and easily distinguished in terms of trigger. They can still, of course, confuse analysis of high P T events. When it comes to B events, the confusion even from minimum bias events becomes more acute, since B events are not open-quotes high P T close quotes in this environment. The need for vertex discrimination, particularly in z, is well understood; however, a collateral effect - the increasing difficulty in finding tracks at all - has received little attention. The authors show the distribution of the K 0 in the Pythia process B → J/ψK 0 in the space γ vs. η. Confusion in reconstructing the K 0 is acute for many reasons, not the least of which is the way their pions are boosted forward, and even out of acceptance. Extra luminosity merely increases the problems in finding K 0 's, so it must not be assumed that 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 is ten times better than 10 32 cm -2 sec -1

  9. High Luminosity LHC Studies with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Duncan, Anna Kathryn; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC aims to provide a total integrated luminosity of 3000fb$^{-1}$ from proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 14 TeV over the course of $\\sim$ 10 years, reaching instantaneous luminosities of up to L = 7.5 $\\times$ 1034cm$^{-2}s$^{-1}$, corresponding to an average of 200 inelastic p-p collisions per bunch crossing ($\\mu$ = 200). Fast simulation studies have been carried out to evaluate the prospects of various benchmark physics analyses to be performed using the upgraded ATLAS detector with the full HL-LHC dataset. The performance of the upgrade has been estimated in full simulation studies, assuming expected HL-LHC conditions. This talk will focus on the results of physics prospects studies for benchmark analyses involving in particular boosted hadronic objects (e.g. ttbar resonances, HH resonances), and on results of Jet/EtMiss studies of jet performance and pileup mitigation techniques that will be critical in HL-LHC analyses.

  10. Conceptual design of a high luminosity 510 MeV collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, C.; Robin, D.; Cornacchia, M.

    1991-01-01

    The authors discuss the magnetic lattice design of a high luminosity 510 MeV electron-positron collider, based on high field superconduction bending dipoles. The design criteria are flexibility in the choice of the tune and beta functions at the interaction point, horizontal emittance larger than 1 mm mrad to produce a luminosity larger than 10 32 cm -2 s -1 , large synchrotron radiation damping rate, and large momentum compaction. The RF system parameter are chosen to provide a short bunch length also when the beam energy spread is determined by the microwave instability. A satisfactory ring dynamic aperature, and a simultaneous small value of the horizontal and vertical beta function at the interaction point, the authors expect will be achieved by using Cornacchia-Halbach modified sextupoles

  11. Tuning of the Compact Linear Collider Beam Delivery System

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, H; Inntjore Levinsen, Y; Latina, A; Tomas, R; Snuverink, J

    2014-01-01

    Tuning the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) BeamDelivery System (BDS), and in particular the Final Focus (FF), is a challenging task. In simulations without misalignments, the goal is to reach 120%o f the nominal luminosity target, in order to allow for 10% loss due to static imperfections, and another 10% loss from dynamic imperfections. Various approaches have been considered to correct the magnet misalignments, including 1-1 correction, Dispersion Free Steering (DFS), and several minimization methods utilizing multipole movers. In this paper we report on the recent advancements towards a feasible tuning approach that reaches the required luminosity target.

  12. The galaxy luminosity function around groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, R. E.; Padilla, N. D.; Galaz, G.; Infante, L.

    2005-11-01

    We present a study on the variations of the luminosity function of galaxies around clusters in a numerical simulation with semi-analytic galaxies, attempting to detect these variations in the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey. We subdivide the simulation box into equal-density regions around clusters, which we assume can be achieved by selecting objects at a given normalized distance (r/rrms, where rrms is an estimate of the halo radius) from the group centre. The semi-analytic model predicts important variations in the luminosity function out to r/rrms~= 5. In brief, variations in the mass function of haloes around clusters (large dark matter haloes with M > 1012h-1Msolar) lead to cluster central regions that present a high abundance of bright galaxies (high M* values) as well as low-luminosity galaxies (high α) at r/rrms~= 3 there is a lack of bright galaxies, which shows the depletion of galaxies in the regions surrounding clusters (minimum in M* and α), and a tendency to constant luminosity function parameters at larger cluster-centric distances. We take into account the observational biases present in the real data by reproducing the peculiar velocity effect on the redshifts of galaxies in the simulation box, and also by producing mock catalogues. We find that excluding from the analysis galaxies which in projection are close to the centres of the groups provides results that are qualitatively consistent with the full simulation box results. When we apply this method to mock catalogues of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) and the 2PIGG catalogue of groups, we find that the variations in the luminosity function are almost completely erased by the Finger of God effect; only a lack of bright galaxies at r/rrms~= 3 can be marginally detected in the mock catalogues. The results from the real 2dFGRS data show a clearer detection of a dip in M* and α for r/rrms= 3, consistent with the semi-analytic predictions.

  13. Fuzzy Inverse Compactness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halis Aygün

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce definitions of fuzzy inverse compactness, fuzzy inverse countable compactness, and fuzzy inverse Lindelöfness on arbitrary -fuzzy sets in -fuzzy topological spaces. We prove that the proposed definitions are good extensions of the corresponding concepts in ordinary topology and obtain different characterizations of fuzzy inverse compactness.

  14. On the distinction between density and luminosity evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahcall, J.N.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that the assumptions of pure density evolution and pure luminosity evolution lead to observable differences in the distribution of sources for all convergent luminosity functions. The proof given is valid for sources with an arbitrary number of intrinisic luminosities (e.g., optical, infrared, and radio) and also holds in the special cases of mixed evolution that are considered. (author)

  15. The evolution of low-luminosity AGN and X-ray binaries in star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornasini, Francesca; Civano, Francesca M.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Elvis, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Numerous studies on the connection between X-ray AGN and their host galaxies are building up a detailed picture of the physical mechanisms regulating AGN activity and star formation as a function of redshift. Most of these works have focused on moderate and high-luminosity AGN with LX > 10^42 erg/s, and only recently the lower-luminosity AGN population in dwarf and early-type galaxies was investigated using stacking techniques. In this talk, we present the redshift evolution of low-luminosity AGN (LX seeds models, and are important for informing future mission studies. We compare our results to other studies of the redshift evolution of XRBs and the observed evolution of higher luminosity AGN.

  16. Oxygen-rich Mira variables: Near-infrared luminosity calibrations. Populations and period-luminosity relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, R.; Mennessier, M.-O.; Barthes, D.; Luri, X.; Mattei, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Hipparcos astrometric and kinematical data of oxygen-rich Mira variables are used to calibrate absolute near-infrared magnitudes and kinematic parameters. Three distinct classes of stars with different kinematics and scale heights were identified. The two most significant groups present characteristics close to those usually assigned to extended/thick disk-halo populations and old disk populations, respectively, and thus they may differ by their metallicity abundance. Two parallel period-luminosity relations are found, one for each population. The shift between these relations is interpreted as the consequence of the effects of metallicity abundance on the luminosity.

  17. Selected issues for the LHC luminosity upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laface, E.

    2008-12-01

    The Large Hadron Collider started its operations on September 10. 2008. In a realistic forecast it is supposed to demonstrate (or confute) the existence of the Higgs boson for the year 2014. After this date the physics of rare events will be explored more in details and an upgrade of the luminosity can make an important difference in the program of experiments at CERN. This thesis proposes several ideas to increase the luminosity of ATLAS and CMS experiments and the acceptance of TOTEM experiment. The main object of study is the Interaction Region, that consists in the set of magnets in charge to provide the final beam focalization for the collisions. The Interaction Region is studied with the methods of beam optics and beam dynamics to design new layouts for the upgrade. These layouts are also explored from the point of view of integrability in the existing experiments developing the analysis of energy deposition and misalignment tolerances. This study was performed with the use of analytical methods for the general considerations and numerical methods for the parameters optimization. (author)

  18. Thermodynamics and luminosities of rainbow black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Benrong [Physics Teaching and Research section, College of Medical Technology, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, No. 1166 Liutai Avenue, Chengdu (China); Wang, Peng; Yang, Haitang, E-mail: mubenrong@uestc.edu.cn, E-mail: pengw@scu.edu.cn, E-mail: hyanga@scu.edu.cn [Center for Theoretical Physics, College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1 Yihuan Road, Chengdu (China)

    2015-11-01

    Doubly special relativity (DSR) is an effective model for encoding quantum gravity in flat spacetime. As result of the nonlinearity of the Lorentz transformation, the energy-momentum dispersion relation is modified. One simple way to import DSR to curved spacetime is ''Gravity's rainbow'', where the spacetime background felt by a test particle would depend on its energy. Focusing on the ''Amelino-Camelia dispersion relation'' which is E{sup 2} = m{sup 2}+p{sup 2}[1−η(E/m{sub p}){sup n}] with n > 0, we investigate the thermodynamical properties of a Schwarzschild black hole and a static uncharged black string for all possible values of η and n in the framework of rainbow gravity. It shows that there are non-vanishing minimum masses for these two black holes in the cases with η < 0 and n ≥ 2. Considering effects of rainbow gravity on both the Hawking temperature and radius of the event horizon, we use the geometric optics approximation to compute luminosities of a 2D black hole, a Schwarzschild one and a static uncharged black string. It is found that the luminosities can be significantly suppressed or boosted depending on the values of η and n.

  19. High luminosity polarized proton collisions at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    2001-01-01

    The Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides the unique opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at a center-of-mass energy of up to 500 GeV and luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 . Such high luminosity and high energy polarized proton collisions will open up the possibility of studying spin effects in hard processes. However, the acceleration of polarized beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Using a partial Siberian snake and a rf dipole that ensure stable adiabatic spin motion during acceleration has made it possible to accelerate polarized protons to 25 GeV at the Brookhaven AGS. After successful operation of RHIC with gold beams polarized protons from the AGS have been successfully injected into RHIC and accelerated using a full Siberian snakes built from four superconducting helical dipoles. A new high energy proton polarimeter was also successfully commissioned. Operation with two snakes per RHIC ring is planned for next year

  20. LHC Report: a break from luminosity production

    CERN Multimedia

    Jan Uythoven for the LHC team

    2016-01-01

    The LHC has been in great shape over the last few months, delivering over 20 fb-1 of integrated luminosity before the ICHEP conference in Chicago at the beginning of August. This is not much below the 25 fb-1 target for the whole of 2016. With this success in mind, a break in luminosity production was taken for six days, starting on 26 July 2016, for a machine development period.   This year, 20 days of the LHC schedule are devoted to machine development with the aim of carrying out detailed studies of the accelerator. The 20 days are divided over five different periods, called MD blocks. They can be seen as an investment in the future, so the machine can produce collisions more efficiently in the months and years to come. A detailed programme is worked out for each MD block, whereby different specialist teams are assigned periods of four to twelve hours, depending on the topic, to perform their previously approved tests. The MD program continues 24 hours per day, as in normal physics operation. One...

  1. Tracking Triggers for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Palla, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    The planned High Luminosity Phase of the LHC (HL-LHC) will increase the collision rate in the ATLAS and CMS detectors by nearly an order of magnitude beyond the maximum luminosity for which the detectors have been designed. In that scenario, the number of proton-proton interactions per bunch crossing is expected to be about 140, on average. This very high pileup environment represents a major challenge for the L1 trigger of the experiments. The inclusion of the high granularity information coming from the Silicon Tracking detectors increases the performance of traditional triggers, based on Muon and Calorimeter information only. This poses new challenges in the design and integration of the novel inner tracking detectors in both ATLAS and CMS. On one hand, this is accomplished by modules capable of transverse momentum (p T ) discrimination, to only readout hits from relatively high p T particles. A second stage performs pattern recognition and tracking at the first level trigger in a few m s, then combined wi...

  2. The low-luminosity end of the radius-luminosity relationship for active galactic nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, M.C.; Denney, K.D.; Vestergaard, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3. The surface brightness decompositions allow us to create "AGN-free" images of the galaxies, from which we measure the starlight contribution to the optical luminosity measured through the ground-based spectroscopic aperture. We also incorporate 20 new...

  3. Compaction behaviour of soils

    OpenAIRE

    Kurucuk, Nurses

    2017-01-01

    Soil compaction is widely applied in geotechnical engineering practice. It is used to maximise the dry density of soils to reduce subsequent settlement under working loads or to reduce the permeability of soils. The durability and stability of structures are highly related to the appropriate compaction achievement. The structural failure of roads and airfields, and the damage caused by foundation settlement can often be traced back to the failure in achieving adequate compaction. For that rea...

  4. Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Okamura, Hajime; Ouchi, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete was first developed in 1988 to achieve durable concrete structures. Since then, various investigations have been carried out and this type of concrete has been used in practical structures in Japan, mainly by large construction companies. Investigations for establishing a rational mix-design method and self-compactability testing methods have been carried out from the viewpoint of making self-compacting concrete a standard concrete.

  5. Pharmaceutical powder compaction technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Çelik, Metin

    2011-01-01

    "Revised to reflect modern pharmaceutical compacting techniques, this Second Edition guides pharmaceutical engineers, formulation scientists, and product development and quality assurance personnel...

  6. Compact Polarimetry Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Loi, My-Linh; Dubois-Fernandez, Pascale; Pottier, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to show the potential of a compact-pol SAR system for vegetation applications. Compact-pol concept has been suggested to minimize the system design while maximize the information and is declined as the ?/4, ?/2 and hybrid modes. In this paper, the applications such as biomass and vegetation height estimates are first presented, then, the equivalence between compact-pol data simulated from full-pol data and compact-pol data processed from raw data as such is shown. Finally, a calibration procedure using external targets is proposed.

  7. Radio Emission in Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei: Jets, Accretion Flows, or Both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvestad, J. S.; Ho, L. C.

    2001-12-01

    The low-luminosity active galactic nuclei in NGC 3147, NGC 4203, and NGC 4579 have been imaged at four frequencies with the Very Long Baseline Array. The galaxies are unresolved at all frequencies, with size upper limits of 103--104 times the Schwarzschild radii of their central massive black holes. The spectral indices between 1.7 and 5.0 GHz range from 0.2 to 0.4; one and possibly two of the galaxies show spectral turnovers between 5.0 and 8.4 GHz. The high brightness temperatures (Tb >= 109 K) and relatively straight spectra imply that free-free emission and/or absorption cannot account for the slightly inverted spectra. Although the radio properties of the cores superficially resemble predictions for advection-dominated accretion flows, the radio luminosities are too high compared to the X-ray luminosities. We suggest that the bulk of the radio emission is generated by a compact radio jet, which may coexist with a low radiative efficiency accretion flow. NRAO is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  8. Conceptual design of the cryostat for the new high luminosity (HL-LHC) triplet magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, D.; Parma, V.; Moretti, M.; Eymin, C.; Todesco, E.; Van Weelderen, R.; Prin, H.; Berkowitz Zamora, D.

    2017-12-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is a project to upgrade the LHC collider after 2020-2025 to increase the integrated luminosity by about one order of magnitude and extend the physics production until 2035. An upgrade of the focusing triplets insertion system for the ATLAS and CMS experiments is foreseen using superconducting magnets operating in a pressurised superfluid helium bath at 1.9 K. This will require the design and construction of four continuous cryostats, each about sixty meters in length and one meter in diameter, for the final beam focusing quadrupoles, corrector magnets and beam separation dipoles. The design is constrained by the dimensions of the existing tunnel and accessibility restrictions imposing the integration of cryogenic piping inside the cryostat, thus resulting in a very compact integration. As the alignment and position stability of the magnets is crucial for the luminosity performance of the machine, the magnet support system must be carefully designed in order to cope with parasitic forces and thermo-mechanical load cycles. In this paper, we present the conceptual design of the cryostat and discuss the approach to address the stringent and often conflicting requirements of alignment, integration and thermal aspects.

  9. High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) Preliminary Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Apollinari, G; Béjar Alonso, I; Brüning, O; Lamont, M; Rossi, L

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community of about 7,000 scientists working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will need a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its luminosity (rate of collisions) by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity (total collisions created) by a factor ten. The LHC is already a highly complex and exquisitely optimised machine so this upgrade must be carefully conceived and will require about ten years to implement. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 tesla superconducting magnets, compact superconducting cav...

  10. High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) : Preliminary Design Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apollinari, G.; Béjar Alonso, I.; Brüning, O.; Lamont, M.; Rossi, L.

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community of about 7,000 scientists working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will need a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its luminosity (rate of collisions) by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity (total collisions created) by a factor ten. The LHC is already a highly complex and exquisitely optimised machine so this upgrade must be carefully conceived and will require about ten years to implement. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 tesla superconducting magnets, compact superconducting cavities for beam rotation with ultra-precise phase control, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation and 300 metre-long high-power superconducting links with negligible energy dissipation. The present document describes the technologies and components that will be used to realise the project and is intended to serve as the basis for the detailed engineering design of HL-LHC.

  11. High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) : Preliminary Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollinari, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Béjar Alonso, I. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Brüning, O. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Lamont, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Rossi, L. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-12-17

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community of about 7,000 scientists working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will need a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its luminosity (rate of collisions) by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity (total collisions created) by a factor ten. The LHC is already a highly complex and exquisitely optimised machine so this upgrade must be carefully conceived and will require about ten years to implement. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 tesla superconducting magnets, compact superconducting cavities for beam rotation with ultra-precise phase control, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation and 300 metre-long high-power superconducting links with negligible energy dissipation. The present document describes the technologies and components that will be used to realise the project and is intended to serve as the basis for the detailed engineering design of HL-LHC.

  12. LIGHT and LUMINOSITY, from Einstein to LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Prof. ROSSI, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    After an introduction on the concept of light in physics, this talk will focus on CERN’s High Luminosity LHC project, aiming at extending the discovery potential of CERN’s flagship accelerator by increasing its “luminosity” (ie the number of particles that can be squeezed inside the accelerator to maximize the number of collisions). To achieve this objective, many new technologies are being developed at CERN and many collaborating institutes worldwide, especially in the field of superconductivity. Lucio Rossi, the main speaker, is the head of the HL-LHC project, based at CERN. Giorgio Apollinari, Director for the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) will speak through a videoconference from Fermilab (USA). The event is webcast live and will be followed by Fermilab and other institutes in the USA.

  13. Burst Statistics Using the Lag-Luminosity Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, D. L.; Norris, J. P.; Bonnell, J. T.

    2003-01-01

    Using the lag-luminosity relation and various BATSE catalogs we create a large catalog of burst redshifts, peak luminosities and emitted energies. These catalogs permit us to evaluate the lag-luminosity relation, and to study the burst energy distribution. We find that this distribution can be described as a power law with an index of alpha = 1.76 +/- 0.05 (95% confidence), close to the alpha = 2 predicted by the original quasi-universal jet model.

  14. The Mass-Luminosity-Metallicity Relation for M Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Andrew; Dupuy, Trent; Rizzuto, Aaron; Kraus, Adam; Gaidos, Eric; Ansdell, Megan

    2018-01-01

    One of the most powerful tools for stellar characterization is the mass-luminosity relation (MLR). In addition to its use for characterizing exoplanet hosts, the MLR for late-type stars is critical to measuring the stellar IMF, testing isochrones, and studies of Galactic archeology. However, existing MLRs do not fully account for metallicity effects, do not extend down to the substellar boundary, and are not precise enough to take full advantage of the impending arrival of Gaia parallaxes for millions of late-type stars. For two years we monitored 72 nearby M-dwarf astrometric binaries using adaptive optics and non-redundant aperture masking, with the goal of better constraining the MLR. We combined our astrometry with measurements from the literature and Keck archive to measure orbits, masses, and flux ratios of all binaries in JHK bands. In parallel, we obtained moderate-resolution NIR spectra of all binaries, from which we determine empirical metallicities for each system. We derived an updated MLR-metallicity relation that spans most of the M dwarf sequence (K5 to M7) and the metallicity range expected in the solar neighborhood (-0.5 revised relation and Gaia-precision parallaxes, it will soon be possible to calculate empirical masses of nearby M dwarfs to better than 2%, and future studies will enable us to extend our relation to more metal-poor stars and explore the role of youth and evolution of the MLR for M dwarfs.

  15. Luminosity and cooling of highly magnetized white dwarfs: suppression of luminosity by strong magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Mukul; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata; Mukerjee, Subroto

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the luminosity and cooling of highly magnetized white dwarfs with electron-degenerate cores and non-degenerate surface layers where cooling occurs by diffusion of photons. We find the temperature and density profiles in the surface layers or envelope of white dwarfs by solving the magnetostatic equilibrium and photon diffusion equations in a Newtonian framework. We also obtain the properties of white dwarfs at the core-envelope interface, when the core is assumed to be practically isothermal. With the increase in magnetic field, the interface temperature increases whereas the interface radius decreases. For a given age of the white dwarf and for fixed interface radius or interface temperature, we find that the luminosity decreases significantly from about 10-6 L⊙ to 10-9 L⊙ as the magnetic field strength increases from about 109 G to 1012 G at the interface and hence the envelope. This is remarkable because it argues that magnetized white dwarfs are fainter and can be practically hidden in an observed H-R diagram. We also find the cooling rates corresponding to these luminosities. Interestingly, the decrease in temperature with time, for the fields under consideration, is not found to be appreciable.

  16. Detector Performance and Upgrade Plans of the Pixel Luminosity Telescope for Online per-Bunch Luminosity Measurement at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) is a dedicated system for luminosity measurement at the CMS experiment using silicon pixel sensors. It was installed during LS1 and has been providing luminosity measurements throughout Run 2. The online bunch-by-bunch luminosity measurement employs the "fast-or" capability of the pixel readout chip (PSI46) to quickly identify likely tracks at the full 40MHz interaction rate. In addition, the full pixel information is read out at a lower rate, allowing for more detailed offline analysis. In this talk, we will present details of the commissioning, performance and operational history of the currently installed hardware and upgrade plans for LS2.

  17. Luminosity Tuning at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Wittmer, W

    2006-01-01

    By measuring and adjusting the beta-functions at the interaction point (IP the luminosity is being optimized. In LEP (Large Electron Positron Collider) this was done with the two closest doublet magnets. This approach is not applicable for the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) due to the asymmetric lattice. In addition in the LHC both beams share a common beam pipe through the inner triplet magnets (in these region changes of the magnetic field act on both beams). To control and adjust the beta-functions without perturbation of other optics functions, quadrupole groups situated on both sides further away from the IP have to be used where the two beams are already separated. The quadrupoles are excited in specific linear combinations, forming the so-called "tuning knobs" for the IP beta-functions. For a specific correction one of these knobs is scaled by a common multiplier. The different methods which were used to compute such knobs are discussed: (1) matching in MAD, (2)i...

  18. Intrinsic luminosities of the Jovian planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, W.B.

    1980-01-01

    We review available data and theories on the size and nature of interior power sources in the Jovian planets. Broad band infrared measurements indicate that Jupiter and Saturn have interior heat fluxes about 150 and 50 times larger, respectively, than the terrestrial value. While Neptune has a modest heat flux (approx.5 times terrestrial), it is clearly detected by earth-based measurements. Only Uranus seems to lack a detectable interior heat flow. Various models, ranging from simple cooling to gravitational layering to radioactivity, are discussed. Current evidence seems to favor a cooling model in which the escape of heat is regulated by the atmosphere. This model seems capable of explaining phenomena such as the uniformity of effective temperature over Jupiter's surface and the different emission rates of Uranus and Neptune. In such a model the heat radiated from the atmosphere may derived from depletion of a thermal reservoir in the interior, or it may derive from separation of chemical elements during formation of a core. Calculations indicate that in the earlier stages of cooling, Jupiter and Saturn may have more homogeneous abundances of hydrogen and helium and radiate energy derived from simple cooling. At a subsequent phase (which may be later than the present time), hydrogen and helium will separate and supply grativational energy. Either model is consistent with a hot, high-luminosity origin for the Jovian Planets

  19. ATLAS gets its own luminosity detector

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    During the winter shutdown, the ATLAS collaboration has completed the installation of ALFA, the detector system that aims at the LHC absolute luminosity at Point 1 analysing the elastic scattering of protons at small angles.   Upper and lower ALFA Roman Pots as installed in sector 8-1 of the LHC tunnel, 240 metres from the ATLAS Interaction Point. The detectors of the ALFA system are installed at ± 240 meters from the interaction point 1, on either side of the ATLAS detector. The whole system consists of four stations, two on each side of the interaction point. Each station is equipped with two Roman Pots; each pot – that is separated from the vacuum of the accelerator by a thin window but is connected with bellows to the beam-pipe – can be moved very close to the beam. “The Roman Pot technique has been used successfully in the past for the measurement of elastic scattering very close to the circulating beam,” says Patrick Fassn...

  20. Higher luminosities via alternative incident channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, J.E.

    1985-04-01

    We show that PEP provides some unique opportunities for one and two photon physics with real photons as well as for QCD studies with internal targets. Photon beams would avoid the major limitation on the luminosity of present machines and could provide PEP an ideal b-physics factory producing the full range of J/sub c//sup PC/ and J/sub b//sup PC/ states that may not be observable otherwise as well as allow a whole new class of ''missing-mass'' experiments. These latter particles are the pseudo-Goldstone bosons and their supersymmetric counterparts. These and related possibilities like a single-pass, ''free electron laser'' facility or even synchrotron radiation beam lines all favor a mini-maxi configuration for the low-beta insertions in PEP. This allows more diverse experiments without excluding any ongoing experimental programs. Such possibilities have interesting implications for a number of proposed facilities including the SSC. Some systematic machine physics studies over a range of energies are suggested. 24 refs., 6 figs

  1. Evolution of the cluster X-ray luminosity function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullis, C.R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Henry, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    We report measurements of the cluster X-ray luminosity function out to z = 0.8 based on the final sample of 201 galaxy systems from the 160 Square Degree ROSAT Cluster Survey. There is little evidence for any measurable change in cluster abundance out to z similar to 0.6 at luminosities of less...

  2. Physics at high luminosity muon colliders and a facility overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Physics potentials at future colliders including high luminosity μ + μ - colliders are discussed. Luminosity requirement, estimates for Muon collider energies of interest (0.1 TeV to 100 TeV) are calculated. Schematics and an overview of Muon Collider facility concept are also included

  3. High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) general infographics

    CERN Multimedia

    Landua, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC, which is expected to be operational after 2025, will increase the LHC’s luminosity by a factor of 10. To achieve this major upgrade, several technologies, some of which are completely innovative, are being developed.

  4. Extreme star formation in the Milky Way: Luminosity distributions of young stellar objects in W49A and W51

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, D. J.; Moore, T. J. T.; Urquhart, J. S.; Elia, D.; Plume, R.; König, C.; Baldeschi, A.; Schisano, E.; Rigby, A. J.; Morgan, L. K.; Thompson, M. A.

    2018-03-01

    We have compared the star-formation properties of the W49A and W51 regions by using far-infrared data from the Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) and 850-μm observations from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) to obtain luminosities and masses, respectively, of associated compact sources. The former are infrared luminosities from the catalogue of Elia et al. (2017), while the latter are from the JCMT Plane survey source catalogue as well as measurements from new data. The clump-mass distributions of the two regions are found to be consistent with each other, as are the clump-formation efficiency and star-formation efficiency analogues. However, the frequency distributions of the luminosities of the young stellar objects are significantly different. While the luminosity distribution in W51 is consistent with Galaxy-wide samples, that of W49A is top-heavy. The differences are not dramatic, and are concentrated in the central regions of W49A. However, they suggest that physical conditions there, which are comparable in part to those in extragalactic starbursts, are significantly affecting the star-formation properties or evolution of the dense clumps in the region.

  5. Development of Silicon Detectors for the High Luminosity LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichhorn, Thomas Valentin

    2015-07-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will be upgraded to a High Luminosity LHC in the year 2022, increasing the instantaneous luminosity by a factor of five. This will have major impacts on the experiments at the LHC, such as the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, and especially for their inner silicon tracking systems. Among other things, the silicon sensors used therein will be exposed to unprecedented levels of radiation damage, necessitating a replacement of the entire tracking detector. In order to maintain the excellent current performance, a new tracking detector has to be equipped with sensors of increased radiation hardness and higher granularity. The CMS experiment is undertaking an extensive R and D campaign in the search for the future silicon sensor technology baseline to be used in this upgrade. This thesis presents two methods suitable for use in this search: finite element TCAD simulations and test beam measurements. The simulations are focussed on the interstrip capacitance between sensor strips and are compared to measurements before and after the inclusion of radiation damage effects. A geometrical representation of the strip sensors used in the campaign has been found, establishing the predictive power of simulations. The test beam measurements make use of the high-precision pixel telescopes available at the DESY-II test beam facility. The performance of these telescopes has been assessed and their achievable pointing resolution has been found to be below 2 μm. Thin, epitaxial silicon is a candidate material for usage in radiation hard sensors for the future CMS tracking detector. Sample strip sensors of this material have been irradiated to fluences of up to 1.3 x 10 16 n eq /cm 2 with 800 MeV or 23 GeV protons. Test beam measurements with 5 GeV electrons have been performed to investigate the radiation hardness of epitaxial sensors using the pixel beam telescopes. The epitaxial device under test (DUT) has been integrated into the

  6. Star-formation rate in compact star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izotova, I. Y.; Izotov, Y. I.

    2018-03-01

    We use the data for the Hβ emission-line, far-ultraviolet (FUV) and mid-infrared 22 μm continuum luminosities to estimate star formation rates averaged over the galaxy lifetime for a sample of about 14000 bursting compact star-forming galaxies (CSFGs) selected from the Data Release 12 (DR12) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The average coefficient linking and the star formation rate SFR0 derived from the Hβ luminosity at zero starburst age is found to be 0.04. We compare s with some commonly used SFRs which are derived adopting a continuous star formation during a period of {˜} 100 Myr, and find that the latter ones are 2-3 times higher. It is shown that the relations between SFRs derived using a geometric mean of two star-formation indicators in the UV and IR ranges and reduced to zero starburst age have considerably lower dispersion compared to those with single star-formation indicators. We suggest that our relations for determination are more appropriate for CSFGs because they take into account a proper temporal evolution of their luminosities. On the other hand, we show that commonly used SFR relations can be applied for approximate estimation within a factor of {˜} 2 of the averaged over the lifetime of the bursting compact galaxy.

  7. Compaction of FGD-gypsum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoop, B.T.J.; Larbi, J.A.; Heijnen, W.M.M.

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that it is possible to produce compacted gypsum with a low porosity and a high strength on a laboratory scale by uniaxial compaction of flue gas desulphurization (FGD-) gypsum powder. Compacted FGD-gypsum cylinders were produced at a compaction pres-sure between 50 and 500 MPa yielding

  8. Moderate Bravery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majgaard, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The ability to act in a purposeful and effective way amid institutional tensions and paradoxes is, right now, a highly prized quality in public leadership. The purpose of this chapter is to qualify moderately brave acts as a learning format that combines the analytical and performative...... skills implied in this kind of agency. Design/methodology/approach: The chapter explores the engagement with paradoxes as a narrative praxis. From existing literature, it sums up an understanding of agency as a social process of mediating paradoxes in order to make action possible. Drawing on Northrop...

  9. Formation of Compact Ellipticals in the merging star cluster scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia Zapata, Fernanda Cecilia; Theory and star formation group

    2018-01-01

    In the last years, extended old stellar clusters have been observed. They are like globular clusters (GCs) but with larger sizes(a limit of Re=10 pc is currently seen as reasonable). These extended objects (EOs) cover a huge range of mass. Objects at the low mass end with masses comparable to normal globular clusters are called extended clusters or faint fuzzies Larsen & Brodie (2000) and objects at the high-mass end are called ultra compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs). Ultra compact dwarf galaxies are compact object with luminositys above the brigtest known GCs. UCDs are more compact than typical dwarf galaxies but with comparable luminosities. Usually, a lower mass limit of 2 × 10^6 Solar masses is applied.Fellhauer & Kroupa (2002a,b) demostrated that object like ECs, FFs and UCDs can be the remnants of the merger of star clusters complexes, this scenario is called the Merging Star Cluster Scenario. Amore concise study was performed by Bruens et al. (2009, 2011).Our work tries to explain the formation of compact elliptical(cE). These objects are a comparatively rare class of spheroidal galaxies, possessing very small Re and high central surface brightnesses (Faber 1973). cEs have the same parameters as extended objects but they are slightly larger than 100 pc and the luminosities are in the range of -11 to -12 Mag.The standard formation sceanrio of these systems proposes a galaxy origin. CEs are the result of tidal stripping and truncation of nucleated larger systems. Or they could be a natural extension of the class of elliptical galaxies to lower luminosities and smaller sizes.We want to propose a completely new formation scenario for cEs. In our project we try to model cEs in a similar way that UCDs using the merging star cluster scenario extended to much higher masses and sizes. We think that in the early Universe we might have produced sufficiently strong star bursts to form cluster complexes which merge into cEs. So far it is observationally unknown if cEs are

  10. High precision measurements of the luminosity at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzyk, B.

    1994-01-01

    The art of the luminosity measurements at LEP is presented. First generation LEP detectors have measured the absolute luminosity with the precision of 0.3-0.5%. The most precise present detectors have reached the 0.07% precision and the 0.05% is not excluded in future. Center-of-mass energy dependent relative precision of the luminosity detectors and the use of the theoretical cross-section in the LEP experiments are also discussed. (author). 18 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs

  11. Signal processing for fast luminosity monitor of BEPC II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tao; Wang Yonggang; Li Kai; Yan Tianxin

    2008-01-01

    In order to meet the requirement of the fast luminosity monitor system of Beijing electron-positron collider (BEPC II), a high-speed bunch-by-bunch luminosity signal processing and displaying system was designed. The techniques such as fast signal amplification, discrimination, long-distance signal transmission, anti-coincidence event judgment, counting for each bunch and ping-pang storage were involved effectively. The preliminary test result shows that the system can process and display the luminosity signals for bunches with 4 ns separation. (authors)

  12. Physics potential of ATLAS detector with high luminosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Bing

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector is designed to exploit the full physics potential in the TeV energy region opened up by the Large Hadron Collider at a center of mass energy of 14 TeV with very high luminosities. The physics performance of the ATLAS detector on Higgs, extra-dimension and strong symmetry breaking scenario is summarized in this note. ATLAS experiment has great discovery potential for these new phenomena with high luminosity. Triple gauge couplings are very sensitive for probing new physics at TeV scale. We show that ATLAS can measure these couplings very precisely with high luminosity. (orig.)

  13. Final focus system tuning studies towards Compact Linear Collider feasibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Marin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the latest results regarding the tuning study of the baseline design of the final focus system of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC-FFS. CLIC aims to provide collisions to the experiments at a luminosity above 10^{34}  cm^{-2} s^{-1}. In order to deliver such luminosity in a single pass machine, the vertical beam size at the interaction point (IP is reduced to about 1 nm, which imposes unprecedented tuning difficulties to the system. In previous studies, 90% of the machines reached 90% of the nominal luminosity at the expense of 18 000 luminosity measurements, when considering beam position monitor errors and transverse misalignments of magnets for a single beam case. In the present study, additional static imperfections such as roll misalignments and strength errors are included. Moreover both e^{-} and e^{+} beamlines are properly simulated. A new tuning procedure based on linear and nonlinear knobs is implemented to effectively cure the most relevant beam size aberrations at the IP. The obtained results for single and double beam studies under solely static imperfections are presented.

  14. Final focus system tuning studies towards Compact Linear Collider feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, E.; Latina, A.; Tomás, R.; Schulte, D.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we present the latest results regarding the tuning study of the baseline design of the final focus system of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC-FFS). CLIC aims to provide collisions to the experiments at a luminosity above 1034 c m-2 s-1 . In order to deliver such luminosity in a single pass machine, the vertical beam size at the interaction point (IP) is reduced to about 1 nm, which imposes unprecedented tuning difficulties to the system. In previous studies, 90% of the machines reached 90% of the nominal luminosity at the expense of 18 000 luminosity measurements, when considering beam position monitor errors and transverse misalignments of magnets for a single beam case. In the present study, additional static imperfections as, roll misalignments, strength v2.epss are included. Moreover both e- and e+ beamlines are properly simulated. A new tuning procedure based on linear and nonlinear knobs is implemented to effectively cure the most relevant beam size aberrations at the IP. The obtained results for single and double beam studies under solely static imperfections are presented.

  15. The Red MSX Source survey: the bolometric fluxes and luminosity distributions of young massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottram, J. C.; Hoare, M. G.; Urquhart, J. S.; Lumsden, S. L.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Robitaille, T. P.; Moore, T. J. T.; Davies, B.; Stead, J.

    2011-01-01

    Context. The Red MSX Source (RMS) survey is returning a large sample of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) and ultra-compact (UC) H ii regions using follow-up observations of colour-selected candidates from the MSX point source catalogue. Aims: We obtain the bolometric fluxes and, using kinematic distance information, the luminosities for young RMS sources with far-infrared fluxes. Methods: We use a model spectral energy distribution (SED) fitter to obtain the bolometric flux for our sources, given flux data from our work and the literature. The inputs to the model fitter were optimised by a series of investigations designed to reveal the effect varying these inputs had on the resulting bolometric flux. Kinematic distances derived from molecular line observations were then used to calculate the luminosity of each source. Results: Bolometric fluxes are obtained for 1173 young RMS sources, of which 1069 have uniquely constrained kinematic distances and good SED fits. A comparison of the bolometric fluxes obtained using SED fitting with trapezium rule integration and two component greybody fits was also undertaken, and showed that both produce considerable scatter compared to the method used here. Conclusions: The bolometric flux results allowed us to obtain the luminosity distributions of YSOs and UCH ii regions in the RMS sample, which we find to be different. We also find that there are few MYSOs with L ≥ 105 L⊙, despite finding many MYSOs with 104 L⊙ ≥ L ≥ 105 L⊙. Full Tables 1 and 2 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.125.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/525/A149

  16. Truncation of the Inner Accretion Disk Around a Black Hole at Low Luminosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsick, John A.; Yamoka, Kazutaka; Corbel, Stephane; Kaaret, Philip; Kalemci, Emrah; Migliari, Simone

    2011-01-01

    Most black hole binaries show large changes in X-ray luminosity caused primarily by variations in mass accretion rate. An important question for understanding black hole accretion and jet production is whether the inner edge of the accretion disk recedes at low accretion rate. Measurements of the location of the inner edge (R(sub in)) can be made using iron emission lines that arise due to fluorescence of iron in the disk, and these indicate that R(sub in) is very close to the black hole at high and moderate luminosities (greater than or equal to 1% of the Eddington luminosity, L(sub Edd). Here, we report on X-ray observations of the black hole GX 339-4 in the hard state by Suzaku and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer that extend iron line studies to 0.14% L(sub Edd) and show that R(sub in) increases by a factor of greater than 27 over the value found when GX 339-4 was bright. The exact value of R(sub in) depends on the inclination of the inner disk (i), and we derive 90% confidence limits of R(sub in) greater than 35 R(sub g) at i = 0 degrees and R(sub in) greater than 175 R(sub g) at i = 30 degrees. This provides direct evidence that the inner portion of the disk is not present at low luminosity, allowing for the possibility that the inner disk is replaced by advection- or magnetically dominated accretion flows.

  17. Improvement to the D0 luminosity monitor constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bantley, J.

    1996-03-01

    The D0 experiment has previously calculated its luminosity using the visible cross section (luminosity monitor constant) for its Level 0 trigger, σ L0 = 48.2 mb, based on the world average pp inelastic cross sections at √s = 1.8 TeV. The error on luminosity had been set at 12%. Recent studies using the MBR and DTUJET Monte Carlo event generators and unbiased D0 data samples have resulted in a more precise determination of the D0 luminosity monitor constant. The result, σ L0 = 46.7 ± 2.5 mb, lowers the central value by 3.1% and reduces the error to 5.4%. 12 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs

  18. The CMS Outer Tracker Upgrade for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Luetic, Jelena

    2017-01-01

    The era of the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider will pose unprecedented challenges for detector design and operation. The planned luminosity of the upgraded machine is $5$x$10^{34} $ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$, reaching an integrated luminosity of more than 3000 fb$^{-1}$ by the end of 2037. The CMS Tracker detector will have to be replaced in order to fully exploit the delivered luminosity and cope with the demanding operating conditions. The new detector will provide robust tracking as well as input for the first level trigger. This report is focusing on the replacement of the CMS Outer Tracker system, describing the new layout and technological choices together with some highlights of research and development activities.

  19. Physics potential of precision measurements of the LHC luminosity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The uncertainty in the determination of the LHC luminosity is rapidly becoming a limiting factor for the analysis and interpretation of many important LHC processes. In this talk first of all we discuss the theoretical accuracy of total cross sections and examine in which cases the luminosity error is or will be dominant. We then review the impact of LHC data in PDF determinations, with enphasis on the effects of the luminosity uncertainty. We explore the requirements for the accuracy of the 2011 luminosity determination from the point of view of standard candle cross section and other important processes. Finally we discuss what we can learn from the accurate measurement of cross section ratios at different center of mass energies for processes like W, ttbar and dijet production.

  20. LOW CO LUMINOSITIES IN DWARF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schruba, Andreas; Walter, Fabian; Sandstrom, Karin; Leroy, Adam K.; Bigiel, Frank; Brinks, Elias; De Blok, W. J. G.; Kramer, Carsten; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schuster, Karl; Usero, Antonio; Weiss, Axel; Wiesemeyer, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    We present maps of 12 COJ = 2-1 emission covering the entire star-forming disks of 16 nearby dwarf galaxies observed by the IRAM HERACLES survey. The data have 13'' angular resolution, ∼250 pc at our average distance of D = 4 Mpc, and sample the galaxies by 10-1000 resolution elements. We apply stacking techniques to perform the first sensitive search for CO emission in dwarf galaxies outside the Local Group ranging from individual lines of sight, stacking over IR-bright regions of embedded star formation, and stacking over the entire galaxy. We detect five galaxies in CO with total CO luminosities of L CO2-1 = (3-28) × 10 6 K km s –1 pc 2 . The other 11 galaxies remain undetected in CO even in the stacked images and have L CO2-1 ∼ 6 K km s –1 pc 2 . We combine our sample of dwarf galaxies with a large sample of spiral galaxies from the literature to study scaling relations of L CO with M B and metallicity. We find that dwarf galaxies with metallicities of Z ≈ 1/2-1/10 Z ☉ have L CO of 2-4 orders of magnitude smaller than massive spiral galaxies and that their L CO per unit L B is 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller. A comparison with tracers of star formation (FUV and 24 μm) shows that L CO per unit star formation rate (SFR) is 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller in dwarf galaxies. One possible interpretation is that dwarf galaxies form stars much more efficiently: we argue that the low L CO /SFR ratio is due to the fact that the CO-to-H 2 conversion factor, α CO , changes significantly in low-metallicity environments. Assuming that a constant H 2 depletion time of τ dep = 1.8 Gyr holds in dwarf galaxies (as found for a large sample of nearby spirals) implies α CO values for dwarf galaxies with Z ≈ 1/2-1/10 Z ☉ that are more than one order of magnitude higher than those found in solar metallicity spiral galaxies. Such a significant increase of α CO at low metallicity is consistent with previous studies, in particular those of Local Group dwarf

  1. Performance of the CMS precision electromagnetic calorimeter at the LHC Run II and prospects for high-luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Negro, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is a high-performance calorimeter wich will operate also at the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). This talk will describe the strategies that have been employed to maintain the excellent performance of the CMS ECAL throughout Run 2. Performance results from the 2015-2016 data taking periods will be shown and an outlook on the expected Run 2 performance in the years to come will be provided. The status and plans for the upgraded ECAL barrel electronics for the HL-LHC will be presented, based on recent results from simulations, laboratory tests, and test beam measurements of prototype devices.

  2. High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider A description for the European Strategy Preparatory Group

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the largest scientific instrument ever built. It has been exploring the new energy frontier since 2009, gathering a global user community of 7,000 scientists. It will remain the most powerful accelerator in the world for at least two decades, and its full exploitation is the highest priority in the European Strategy for Particle Physics, adopted by the CERN Council and integrated into the ESFRI Roadmap. To extend its discovery potential, the LHC will need a major upgrade around 2020 to increase its luminosity (rate of collisions) by a factor of 10 beyond its design value. As a highly complex and optimized machine, such an upgrade of the LHC must be carefully studied and requires about 10 years to implement. The novel machine configuration, called High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovative technologies, representing exceptional technological challenges, such as cutting-edge 13 tesla superconducting magnets, very compact and ultra-precise superconduc...

  3. Development of a Novel Diamond Based Detector for Machine Induced Background and Luminosity Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Hempel, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the largest particle accelerator and storage ring in the world,used to investigate fundamentals of particle physics and to develop at the same time the technology of accelerators and detectors. Four main experiments, located around the LHC ring, provideinsight into the nature of particles and search for answers to as yet unexplained phenomena in theuniverse. These four experiments are ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus), ALICE (A Large IonCollider Experiment), CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) and LHCb (LHC beauty). Two proton orheavy ion beams circulate in the LHC and are brought into collision in the four experiments.The physics potential of each experiment is determined by the luminosity, which is a ratio of thenumber of the events during a certain time period to the cross section of a physics process. Ameasurement of the luminosity is therefore essential to determine the cross section of interestingphysics processes.In addition, safe and high-quality data-taking requires stable b...

  4. High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) Technical Design Report V. 0.1

    CERN Document Server

    Béjar Alonso I.; Brüning O.; Fessia P.; Lamont M.; Rossi L.; Tavian L.

    2017-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a newenergy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community of about 7,000 scientists work-ing in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. Tosustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will need a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase itsinstantaneous luminosity (rate of collisions) by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integratedluminosity (total collisions created) by a factor ten. The LHC is already a highly complex and exquisitely opti-mised machine so this upgrade must be carefully conceived and will require about ten years to implement. Thenew configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), relies on a number of key innovations that pushaccelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 tesla superconducting mag-nets, compact superconduc...

  5. Inhomogeneous compact extra dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronnikov, K.A. [Center of Gravity and Fundamental Metrology, VNIIMS, 46 Ozyornaya st., Moscow 119361 (Russian Federation); Budaev, R.I.; Grobov, A.V.; Dmitriev, A.E.; Rubin, Sergey G., E-mail: kb20@yandex.ru, E-mail: buday48@mail.ru, E-mail: alexey.grobov@gmail.com, E-mail: alexdintras@mail.ru, E-mail: sergeirubin@list.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-10-01

    We show that an inhomogeneous compact extra space possesses two necessary features— their existence does not contradict the observable value of the cosmological constant Λ{sub 4} in pure f ( R ) theory, and the extra dimensions are stable relative to the 'radion mode' of perturbations, the only mode considered. For a two-dimensional extra space, both analytical and numerical solutions for the metric are found, able to provide a zero or arbitrarily small Λ{sub 4}. A no-go theorem has also been proved, that maximally symmetric compact extra spaces are inconsistent with 4D Minkowski space in the framework of pure f ( R ) gravity.

  6. Performance of the new high precision luminosity monitor of DELPHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvsvaag, S.J.; Maeland, O.A.; Klovning, A.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Giordano, V.; Guerzoni, M.; Navarria, F.L.; Perrotta, A.; Camporesi, T.; Obraztsov, V.; Paganoni, M.; Vallazza, E.; Bozzo, M.; Cereseto, R.; Barreira, G.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Maio, A.; Onofre, A.; Peralta, L.; Pimenta, M.; Tome, B.; Carling, H.; Falk, E.; Hedberg, V.; Jarlskog, G.; Kronkvist, I.; Bonesini, M.; Chignoli, F.; Ferrari, P.; Gumenyuk, S.; Leoni, R.; Mazza, R.; Negri, P.; Petrovykh, L.; Terranova, F.; Dharmasiri, D.R.; Nossum, B.; Read, A.L.; Skaali, B.; Rohne, O.; Castellani, L.; Pegoraro, M.; Fenyuk, A.; Ivanyushenkov, I.; Karyukhin, A.; Konopliannikov, A.; Shalanda, N.; Sen'ko, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zaitsev, A.; Bigi, M.; Cassio, V.; Gamba, D.; Gouz, I.; Migliore, E.; Romero, A.; Simonetti, L.; Trapani, P.P.; Bari, M.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Prest, M.

    1997-01-01

    The STIC calorimeter was installed in the DELPHI detector in 1994. The main goal is to measure the luminosity with an accuracy better than 0.1%. The calorimeter was built using the ''Shashlik'' technique. The light is collected by wavelength shifting fibers and readout by phototetrodes that can operate inside the magnetic field. The detector performance during the 1994-1995 data taking is presented. The different contributions to the systematic error on the luminosity measurement are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Triggering at high luminosity: fake triggers from pile-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.

    1983-01-01

    Triggers based on a cut in transverse momentum (p/sub t/) have proved to be useful in high energy physics both because they indicte that a hard constituent scattering has occurred and because they can be made quickly enough to gate electronics. These triggers will continue to be useful at high luminosities if overlapping events do not cause an excessive number of fake triggers. In this paper, I determine if this is indeed a problem at high luminosity machines

  8. On the Luminosity Distance and the Hubble Constant

    OpenAIRE

    Yuri Heymann

    2013-01-01

    By differentiating luminosity distance with respect to time using its standard formula we find that the peculiar velocity is a time varying velocity of light. Therefore, a new definition of the luminosity distance is provided such that the peculiar velocity is equal to c. Using this definition a Hubble constant H0 = 67.3 km s−1 Mpc−1 is obtained from supernovae data.

  9. Precision of MPX detectors as LHC luminosity monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopczak, Andre; Ali, Babar; Benes, Petr; Bergmann, Benedikt; Biskup, Bartolomej; Caforio, Davide; Heijne, Erik; Pospisil, Stanislav; Seifert, Frank; Solc, Jaroslav; Suk, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Vykydal, Zdenek [IEAP CTU in Prague (Czech Republic); Asbah, Nedaa; Leroy, Claude; Soueid, Paul [University of Montreal (Canada); Campbell, Michael; Nessi, Marzio [CERN (Switzerland); Kladiva, Edward [IEP SAS Kosice (Slovakia)

    2015-07-01

    A network consisting of MPX detectors based on Medipix2 silicon pixel devices were originally adapted for measuring the composition and spectral characteristics of the radiation field in the ATLAS experiment and its surroundings. We demonstrate that the MPX network, which consists of 16 MPX detectors, is a self-contained luminosity monitor system. As the MPX detectors are collecting data independently of the ATLAS data-recording chain, they provide independent measurements of the bunch-integrated ATLAS/LHC luminosity. In particular, the MPX detectors close enough to the primary interaction point are used to perform van der Meer calibration scans with good precision. Results from the luminosity monitoring are presented for 2012 data taken at √(s)=8 TeV proton-proton collisions. The characteristics of the LHC luminosity reduction are studied and the effects of beam-beam (burn-off) and beam-gas (single bunch) interactions are evaluated. The variations of the MPX luminosity measurements around the fitted curve lead to a relative uncertainty on the luminosity measurement below 0.3% for one minute time intervals.

  10. Real Compact Surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The classification of real compact surfaces is a main result which is at the same time easy to understand and non- trivial, simple in formulation and rich in consequences. The aim of this article is to explain the theorem by means of many drawings. It is an invitation to a visual approach of mathematics. First Definitions and ...

  11. Hadrons in compact stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 817–825. Hadrons in compact stars. DEBADES BANDYOPADHYAY. Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064, India ... There is a growing interplay between the physics of dense matter in relativistic .... Kaplan and Nelson [7] first showed in a chiral SU(3)L × SU(3)R model that.

  12. A luminosity measurement at LEP using the L3 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koffeman, E.N.

    1996-01-01

    To perform high precision measurements at particle colliders it is crucial to know the exact intensity of the colliding beams. In particle physics this quantity is generally referred to as the luminosity. The determination of the luminosity in one of the experiments (L3) is the topic of this thesis. The implementation and the use of a silicon strip detector in L3, will be described in detail. In chapter one the most important parameters measured at LEP are discussed, preceded by a short introduction to the Standard Model. The process generally used for luminosity measurements in electron positron colliders is small angle Bhabha scattering. This process is discussed at the end of chapter one. In chapter two the characteristics of the collider and the L3 experiment are given. Together with the signature of the small angle Bhabha scattering, these experimental conditions determine the specifications for the design of the luminosity monitor. The general features of silicon strip detectors for their application in high energy physics are presented in chapter three. Some special attention is given to the behaviour of the sensors used for the tracking detector in the luminosity monitor. The more specific design details of the luminosity monitor are constricted to chapter four. In chapter five the conversion from detector signals into ccordinates relevant for the analysis is explained. The selection of the small angle Bhabha scattering events and the subsequent determination of the luminosity, are presented in chapter six. Systematic uncertainties are carefully studied. Important for a good understanding of the Bhabha selection are the events where a photon is produced in the scattering process. These events are separately studied. In chapter seven a comparison is presented between the radiative events observed in the data and their modelling in the Bhlumi Monte Carlo programme. (orig.)

  13. Luminosity dependence in the Fundamental Plane projections of elliptical galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Quataert, Eliot; Ma, Chung-Pei; West, Andrew A.

    2007-05-01

    We analyse the Fundamental Plane projections of elliptical galaxies as a function of luminosity, using a sample of ~80000 galaxies drawn from Data Release 4 (DR4) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We separate brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) from our main sample and reanalyse their photometry due to a problem with the default pipeline sky subtraction for BCGs. The observables we consider are effective radius (Re), velocity dispersion (σ), dynamical mass (Mdyn ~ Reσ2), effective density (σ2/R2e) and effective surface brightness (μe). With the exception of the L -Mdyn correlation, we find evidence of variations in the slope (i.e. the power-law index) of the Fundamental Plane projections with luminosity for our normal elliptical galaxy population. In particular, the radius-luminosity and Faber-Jackson relations are steeper at high luminosity relative to low luminosity, and the more luminous ellipticals become progressively less dense and have lower surface brightnesses than lower luminosity ellipticals. These variations can be understood as arising from differing formation histories, with more luminous galaxies having less dissipation. Data from the literature and our reanalysis of BCGs show that BCGs have radius-luminosity and Faber-Jackson relations steeper than the brightest non-BCG ellipticals in our sample, consistent with significant growth of BCGs via dissipationless mergers. The variations in slope we find in the Faber-Jackson relation of non-BCGs are qualitatively similar to that reported in the black hole mass-velocity dispersion (MBH-σ) correlation. This similarity is consistent with a roughly constant value of MBH/M* over a wide range of early-type galaxies, where M* is the stellar mass.

  14. Soft b-compact spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkan Özkan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new class of generalized soft open sets in soft generalized topological spaces as a generalization of compact spaces, called soft b-compact spaces, is introduced and studied. A soft generalized topological space is soft b-compact if every soft b-open soft cover of (F,E contains a finite soft subcover. We characterize soft b-compact space and study some of their basic properties.

  15. Weakly compact operators and interpolation

    OpenAIRE

    Maligranda, Lech

    1992-01-01

    The class of weakly compact operators is, as well as the class of compact operators, a fundamental operator ideal. They were investigated strongly in the last twenty years. In this survey, we have collected and ordered some of this (partly very new) knowledge. We have also included some comments, remarks and examples. The class of weakly compact operators is, as well as the class of compact operators, a fundamental operator ideal. They were investigated strongly in the last twenty years. I...

  16. Gravitational microlensing of high-redshift supernovae by compact objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Kevin P.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of the effect of microlensing by a cosmologically dominant density of compact objects is performed, using high-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia's) as probes. The compact objects are modeled as a three-dimensional distribution of point masses, and Monte Carlo simulations are done to calculate the resulting amplification probability distributions for several column densities and cosmologies. By combining these distributions with the intrinsic SN Ia luminosity function and comparing with the results for a perfectly smooth universe, estimates are made of the number of supernovae that would need to be observed to confirm or rule out this lensing scenario. It is found that about 1000 SN Ia's with redshifts of z = 1 would be needed to perform this test, which is beyond what current searches can hope to accomplish. Observations of many fewer high-redshift supernovae, used merely as standard candles, appears a promising way of distinguishing between different cosmological models.

  17. Luminosity Measurement at The CMS Detector (BCM1F)

    CERN Document Server

    Shaglel, Salwa

    2017-01-01

    The most important performance parameters for a particle collider are the beam energy and the luminosity. An event is the rate of useful interactions, and it’s a very important term in particle collider world. The quantity that defines the ability of a collider to produce events is called the luminosity (L). Precise luminosity measurements are of crucial importance, as it determines the precision of any physics cross section measurement. After the first Long Shutdown (LS1) the original performance goal for the luminosity of 1 × 10 34 cm −2 s −1 was reached with 10 11 protons per bunch and bunch spacing of 25 ns. In such conditions radiation hard detectors with extremely fast response are required, especially for instrumentation near the beam. BCM1F measures separately both luminosity and machine induced background particles with an excellent time resolution. Particles originating from collisions and machine induced back- ground arrive with 12 ns time difference. The performance of the BCM1F detector is...

  18. LHCb: LHCb Muon System Performance at High Luminosity

    CERN Multimedia

    Pinci, D

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb detector was conceived to operate with an average Luminosity of $2 \\times 10^{32}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. During the last year of LHC run, the whole apparatus has shown to be able to perfectly acquire and manage data produced at a Luminosity as high as $4 \\times 10^{32}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. In these conditions, all sub-detectors operated at average particle rates higher than the design ones and in particular the Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers equipping the Muon System had to sustain a particle rate as high as 250 kHz/cm$^{2}$. In order to study the possibility of increasing the Luminosity of operation of the whole experiment several tests were performed. The effective beam Luminosity at the interaction point of LHCb was increased in several steps up to $10^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ and in each step the behavior of all the detectors in the Muon System was recorded. The data analysis has allowed to study the performance of the Muon System as a function of the LHC Luminosity and the results are r...

  19. Very high-luminosity infrared galaxies - are they very young?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burbidge, G.

    1986-01-01

    It is proposed that most of the very high-luminosity IRAS galaxies, those which emit greater than or equal to 10 to the 12th solar luminosities nearly all in the far infrared out to 100 microns, are very young systems with ages less than or equal to 10 to the 9th years. The luminosity comes largely from stars with masses near 100 solar masses which evolve rapidly, ejecting much of their mass as elements heavier than hydrogen. The gas ejected condenses into dust in circumstellar shells. The prototype star in the Galaxy which shows all of these attributes is Eta Car. It is shown that total masses of order 10 to the 7th-10 to the 8th solar masses condensed into such stars can produce the observed luminosities, and that 10-100 generations of such stars will produce enough dust (about 10 to the 8th solar masses) to explain the observed infrared luminosities. If this hypothesis is correct the composition of gas and dust may well be highly anomalous, and there should be no old stars with ages about 10 to the 10th years present. Initial star formation is probably triggered by interactions with close companion galaxies. 40 references

  20. An early separation scheme for the LHC luminosity upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Sterbini, G

    2010-01-01

    The present document is organized in five chapters. In the first chapter the framework of the study is described, developing the motivations, the goals and the requirements for the LHC Luminosity Upgrade. We analyze the need for the crossing angle and its impact on the peak luminosity of the collider. After having introduced the Early Separation Scheme, we explain how it may overcome some limitations of the present machine. We compare the nominal LHC crossing scheme with the proposed one underlining its potential in terms of performance and its issues with respect to the integration in the detectors. An analysis of the integrated magnetic field required is given. In the second chapter we introduce one of the most powerful aspect of the scheme: the luminosity leveling. After the description of the physical model adopted, we compare the results of its analytical and numerical solutions. All the potential improvement due to the Early Separation Scheme are shown on the luminosity plane (peak luminosity versus int...

  1. Analysis of laboratory compaction methods of roller compacted concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trtík, Tomáš; Chylík, Roman; Bílý, Petr; Fládr, Josef

    2017-09-01

    Roller-Compacted Concrete (RCC) is an ordinary concrete poured and compacted with machines typically used for laying of asphalt road layers. One of the problems connected with this technology is preparation of representative samples in the laboratory. The aim of this work was to analyse two methods of preparation of RCC laboratory samples with bulk density as the comparative parameter. The first method used dynamic compaction by pneumatic hammer. The second method of compaction had a static character. The specimens were loaded by precisely defined force in laboratory loading machine to create the same conditions as during static rolling (in the Czech Republic, only static rolling is commonly used). Bulk densities obtained by the two compaction methods were compared with core drills extracted from real RCC structure. The results have shown that the samples produced by pneumatic hammer tend to overestimate the bulk density of the material. For both compaction methods, immediate bearing index test was performed to verify the quality of compaction. A fundamental difference between static and dynamic compaction was identified. In static compaction, initial resistance to penetration of the mandrel was higher, after exceeding certain limit the resistance was constant. This means that the samples were well compacted just on the surface. Specimens made by pneumatic hammer actively resisted throughout the test, the whole volume was uniformly compacted.

  2. Compact Spreader Schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  3. Compact spreader schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J.-Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C., E-mail: csun@lbl.gov

    2014-12-21

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  4. Compact stellarators as reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.; Valanju, P.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Hirshman, S.; Spong, D.A.; Strickler, D.; Williamson, D.E.; Ware, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two types of compact stellarators are examined as reactors: two- and three-field-period (M=2 and 3) quasi-axisymmetric devices with volume-average =4-5% and M=2 and 3 quasi-poloidal devices with =10-15%. These low-aspect-ratio stellarator-tokamak hybrids differ from conventional stellarators in their use of the plasma-generated bootstrap current to supplement the poloidal field from external coils. Using the ARIES-AT model with B max =12T on the coils gives Compact Stellarator reactors with R=7.3-8.2m, a factor of 2-3 smaller R than other stellarator reactors for the same assumptions, and neutron wall loadings up to 3.7MWm -2 . (author)

  5. Compact fusion reactors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Fusion research is currently to a large extent focused on tokamak (ITER) and inertial confinement (NIF) research. In addition to these large international or national efforts there are private companies performing fusion research using much smaller devices than ITER or NIF. The attempt to achieve fusion energy production through relatively small and compact devices compared to tokamaks decreases the costs and building time of the reactors and this has allowed some private companies to enter the field, like EMC2, General Fusion, Helion Energy, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics and Lockheed Martin. Some of these companies are trying to demonstrate net energy production within the next few years. If they are successful their next step is to attempt to commercialize their technology. In this presentation an overview of compact fusion reactor concepts is given.

  6. Compact SAW aerosol generator

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler, A.; Harazim, S.; Collins, D.J.; Br?nig, R.; Schmidt, H.; Menzel, S.B.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we discuss and demonstrate the principle features of surface acoustic wave (SAW) aerosol generation, based on the properties of the fluid supply, the acoustic wave field and the acoustowetting phenomena. Furthermore, we demonstrate a compact SAW-based aerosol generator amenable to mass production fabricated using simple techniques including photolithography, computerized numerical control (CNC) milling and printed circuit board (PCB) manufacturing. Using this device, we present ...

  7. High precision electromagnetic calorimetry with 40 MHz readout: the CMS crystal ECAL for the High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Orimoto, Toyoko Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    The electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment (CMS) will be upgraded to meet the challenging running conditions expected after the High-Luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC). Particular challenges at HL-LHC are the harsh radiation environment, the increasing data rates and the extreme level of pile-up events, with up to 200 simultaneous proton-proton collisions. The detector will have to sustain an instantaneous luminosity of above $5 \\times 10^{34} cm^2 s^{-1}$, maintaining a performance similar to the one of LHC Run I for an integrated luminosity of 3 to 5 $ab^{-1}$. This poses stringent requirements on the radiation resistance of detector components, the readout and data transfer from the front end to the back end electronics, as well as the latency of the trigger system. The barrel region of the CMS ECAL will be able to retain the current lead tungstate crystals and avalanche photodiode detectors which will meet the energy measurement performance requirements throughout t...

  8. Accretion effects on compact members of binary stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spyrou, N.

    1988-01-01

    The change in the period of axial rotation and in the radius of a magnetized compact star in a binary system, induced by the accretion on it of mass with angular momentum from the surface of its non-compact companion is explored. No specific assumption is made concerning the accretion model, and the primary's interior is described by the Fermi-Dirac statistics for degenerate matter. The rate of change with time of the period and radius is expressed in terms of the compact primary's physical parameters and total absolute luminosity. The conditions are fully derived under which the above changes can be positive, negative or even vanish. In the case of the millisecond pulsars in binary X-ray sources the predicted values of the period time derivative, depending on the values of the accretion rate and the absolute luminosity, can be positive or negative - if not vanishing - and they fall absolutely in the range 10 -21 - 10 -17 ss -1 , in good agreement with current observational data. The corresponding rate of change of radius, either positive or negative, fall in the range of 10 -3 - 10 -1 cm y -1 . Finally, it is proved that the wellknown bursters can be explained by thermonuclear flash due to gravitational instability in the accreted matter, but their explanation as a result of direct contraction could be possible only for quite high accretion rates (>10 -7 M y -1 ). This last result indicates that, in contrast to the accretion-induced change in period, which can be of either sign irrespective of the primary's age, the accretion-induced non-catastrophic contraction is impossible, while according to recent results the contraction in general is possible for young compact objects. (author). 27 refs

  9. Report of the Working Group on High Luminosities at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blucher, E.; Jowett, J.; Merritt, F.; Mikenberg, G.; Panman, J.; Renard, F.M.; Treille, D.

    1991-01-01

    The availability of an order-of-magnitude increase in the luminosity of LEP (CERN's Large Electron-Positron Collider) can dramatically increase its physics output. With the help of a pretzel scheme, it should be possible to increase the peak luminosity beyond 10 32 cm -2 s -1 at the Z energy and to significantly increase the luminosity around the W-pari threshold. This report spells out the physics possibilities opened up by the availability of several 10 7 Z events. The three domains of physics that benefit mostly from this abundance are very accurate measurements of Standard Model parameters, rare decays of the Z, and the physics of fermion-antifermion states such as B physics. The possibilities and implications for the machine and the experiments are presented. The physics possibilities are explored and compared with those at other accelerators. (orig.)

  10. Reduction of beta* and increase of luminosity at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilat, F.; Bai, M.; Bruno, D.; Cameron, P.; Della Penna, A.; Drees, A.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2009-01-01

    The reduction of β* beyond the 1m design value at RHIC has been consistently achieved over the last 6 years of RHIC operations, resulting in an increase of luminosity for different running modes and species. During the recent 2007-08 deuteron-gold run the reduction to 0.70 from the design 1m achieved a 30% increase in delivered luminosity. The key ingredients allowing the reduction have been the capability of efficiently developing ramps with tune and coupling feedback, orbit corrections on the ramp, and collimation, to minimize beam losses in the final focus triplets, the main aperture limitations for the collision optics. We will describe the operational strategy used to reduce the β*, at first squeezing the beam at store, to test feasibility, followed by the operationally preferred option of squeezing the beam during acceleration, and the resulting luminosity increase. We will conclude with future plans for the beta squeeze

  11. The luminosity of particle beams from thick accretion discs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, R.; Nityananda, R.; Wiita, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of the radiation produced in the funnels of thick, highly luminous accretion discs with the walls of these funnels is investigated. Some processes not considered in an earlier discussion have been included. The turbulent mixing of the surface layer with deeper regions acts to reduce the luminosity associated with outflowing matter. The modification of the radiation field by the moving walls is also important. It is found, for the specific funnel geometry studied, corresponding to a radiation luminosity of 8.5 times the Eddington limit Lsub(E), that up to 1.5 Lsub(E) can be carried away as a particle beam, even for an optically thin funnel. This particle luminosity is sensitive to the sound velocity and the mixing efficiency in the walls. (author)

  12. High luminosity μ+ μ- collider: Report of a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.; Tollestrup, A.; Sessler, A.

    1996-12-01

    Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV (c-of-m) high luminosity μ + μ - colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Detector background, polarization, and nonstandard operating conditions are analyzed. Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. We briefly mention the luminosity requirements of hadrons and lepton machines and their high-energy-physics advantages and disadvantages in reference to their effective center of mass energy. Finally, we present an R ampersand D plan to determine whether such machines are practical

  13. LUCID Upgrade for ATLAS Luminosity Measurement in Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00444244; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The main ATLAS luminosity monitor, LUCID, and its read-out electronics have been completely rebuilt for the LHC Run II in order to cope with a higher center of mass energy ($\\sqrt{s}$=13 TeV) and the 25 ns bunch-spacing. The LUCID detector is measuring Cherenkov light produced in photomultiplier quartz windows and in quartz optical fibers. It has a novel calibration system that uses radioactive $^{207}$Bi sources that produce internal-conversion electrons with energy above the Cherenkov threshold in quartz. The new electronics can count signals with amplitude above a predefined threshold (hits) as well as the integrated pulseheight of the signals, which makes it possible to measure luminosity with complementary methods. The new detector, calibration system and electronics will be described, together with the results of the 2015 luminosity measurement.

  14. LUCID Upgrade for ATLAS Luminosity Measurement in Run II.

    CERN Document Server

    Ucchielli, Giulia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The main ATLAS luminosity monitor LUCID and its read-out electronics has been completely rebuilt for the 2015 LHC run in order to cope with a higher center of mass energy (13 TeV) and with 25 ns bunch-spacing. The LUCID detector is measuring Cherenkov light produced in photomultiplier quartz windows and in quartz optical fibers. It has a novel calibration system that uses radioactive Bi$^{207}$ sources that produces internal conversion electrons above the Cherenkov threshold in quartz. The new electronics can count particle hits above a threshold but also the integrated pulseheight of the signals from the particles which makes it possible to measure luminosity with new methods. The new detector, calibration system and electronics will be covered by the contribution as well as the results of the luminosity measurements with the detector in 2015.

  15. ATLAS Future Plans: Upgrade and the Physics with High Luminosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopalan S.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The ATLAS experiment is planning a series of detector upgrades to cope with the planned increases in instantaneous luminosity and multiple interactions per crossing to maintain its physics capabilities. During the coming decade, the Large Hadron Collider will collide protons on protons at a center of mass energy up to 14 TeV with luminosities steadily increasing in a phased approach to over 5 × 1034 cm−2s−1. The resulting large data sets will significantly enhance the physics reach of the ATLAS detector building on the recent discovery of the Higgs-like boson. The planned detector upgrades being designed to cope with the increasing luminosity and its impact on the ATLAS physics program will be discussed.

  16. RHIC PERFORMANCE AND PLANS TOWARDS HIGHER LUMINOSITY AND HIGHER POLARIZATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SATOGATA,T.

    2004-07-05

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the first hadron accelerator and collider consisting of two independent rings, has completed its fourth year of operation since commissioning in 1999. RHIC is designed to provide luminosity over a wide range of beam energies and species, including heavy ions, polarized protons, and asymmetric beam collisions. RHIC has produced physics data at four experiments in runs that include gold-on-gold collisions at various beam energies (9.8, 31, 65, and 100 GeV/u), high-energy polarized proton-proton collisions (100 GeV), and deuteron-gold collisions (100 GeV/u). We review recent machine performance for high-luminosity gold-gold operations and polarized proton operations, including causes and solutions for known operational limits. Plans and progress for luminosity and polarization improvements, electron cooling, and the electron-ion collider eRHIC are discussed.

  17. The Radius-Luminosity Relationship for Active Galactic Nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Misty C.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Pogge, Richard W.

    2006-01-01

    beta line to be 0.518 +/- 0.039, shallower than previously reported and consistent with the slope of 0.5 expected from the naive theoretical assumption that all AGN have, on average, the same ionizing spectrum and the same ionization parameter and gas density in the H beta line-emitting region.......We have obtained high resolution images of the central regions of 14 reverberation-mapped active galactic nuclei (AGN) using the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys High Resolution Camera to account for host-galaxy starlight contamination of measured AGN luminosities. We measure...... the host-galaxy starlight contribution to the continuum luminosity at 5100 A through the typical ground-based slit position and geometry used in the reverberation-mapping campaigns. We find that removing the starlight contribution results in a significant correction to the luminosity of each AGN, both...

  18. Reduction of beta* and increase of luminosity at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilat,F.; Bai, M.; Bruno, D.; Cameron, P.; Della Penna, A.; Drees, A.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2009-05-04

    The reduction of {beta}* beyond the 1m design value at RHIC has been consistently achieved over the last 6 years of RHIC operations, resulting in an increase of luminosity for different running modes and species. During the recent 2007-08 deuteron-gold run the reduction to 0.70 from the design 1m achieved a 30% increase in delivered luminosity. The key ingredients allowing the reduction have been the capability of efficiently developing ramps with tune and coupling feedback, orbit corrections on the ramp, and collimation, to minimize beam losses in the final focus triplets, the main aperture limitations for the collision optics. We will describe the operational strategy used to reduce the {beta}*, at first squeezing the beam at store, to test feasibility, followed by the operationally preferred option of squeezing the beam during acceleration, and the resulting luminosity increase. We will conclude with future plans for the beta squeeze.

  19. A method for manufacturing compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baschwitz, Robert; Raymond, Jean.

    1974-01-01

    Description is given of a method for preparing compacts with high matrix density. The method is characterized by the steps of forming the mixture by simultaneously pouring the components directly into a compacting matrix comprising coated particles and a graphite binder mixture in the granular form, then compressing the compact after having brought the material to be compacted to a temperature at which the binder is in the fluid state. The method can be applied to the manufacture of compacts for high temperature nuclear reactors [fr

  20. Diffusion through statically compacted clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, C.L.; Shebl, M.A.A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents experimental work on the effect of compaction on contaminant flow through clay liners. The experimental program included evaluation of soil properties, compaction, permeability and solute diffusion. A permeameter was built of non reactive materials to test samples compacted at different water contents and compactive efforts. The flow of a permeating solute, LiCl, was monitored. Effluent samples were collected for solute concentration measurements. The concentrations were measured by performing atomic adsorption tests. The analyzed results showed different diffusion characteristics when compaction conditions changed. At each compactive effort, permeability decreased as molding water content increased. Consequently, transit time (measured at relative concentration 50%) increased and diffusivity decreased. As compactive effort increased for soils compacted dry of optimum, permeability and diffusion decreased. On the other hand, as compactive effort increased for soils compacted wet of optimum, permeability and diffusivity increased. Tortuosity factor was indirectly measured from the diffusion and retardation rate. Tortuosity factor also decreased as placement water content was increased from dry of optimum to wet of optimum. Then decreases were more pronounced for low compactive effort tests. 27 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  1. Modified use of Van de Meer method for luminosity determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.

    1975-01-01

    Modifications are suggested which should improve the accuracy of the Van de Meer method of determining beam luminosity at the CERN ISR. Four bending magnets would be inserted between the quadrupoles of a given experimental straight section, connected in series, and shimmed so that the machine parameters are not affected. The magnets would be driven with a zigzag current power supply with a uniform rate of current change. Experiments requiring accurate luminosity determination would be run while the deflection magnets are being driven with the oscillatory current pattern. (U.S.)

  2. Online calculation of the Tevatron collider luminosity using accelerator instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, A.A.

    1997-07-01

    The luminosity of a collision region may be calculated if one understands the lattice parameters and measures the beam intensities, the transverse and longitudinal emittances, and the individual proton and antiproton beam trajectories (space and time) through the collision region. This paper explores an attempt to make this calculation using beam instrumentation during Run 1b of the Tevatron. The instrumentation used is briefly described. The calculations and their uncertainties are compared to luminosities calculated independently by the Collider Experiments (CDF and D0)

  3. The Radius-Luminosity Relationship for Active Galactic Nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Misty C.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Netzer, Hagai

    2009-01-01

    measurements at 5100A. After correcting the luminosities of the AGNs for the contribution from starlight, we re-examine the Hbeta R-L relationship. Our best fit for the relationship gives a powerlaw slope of 0.52 with a range of 0.45 - 0.59 allowed by the uncertainties. This is consistent with our previous...... findings, and thus still consistent with the naive assumption that all AGNs are simply luminosity-scaled versions of each other. We discuss various consistency checks relating to the galaxy modeling and starlight contributions, as well as possible systematic errors in the current set of reverberation...

  4. Performance of New and Upgraded Detectors for Luminosity and Beam Condition Measurement at CMS

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard, Jessica Lynn

    2015-01-01

    The beam monitoring and luminosity systems of the CMS experiment are enhanced by several new and upgraded sub-detectors to match the challenges of the LHC operation and physics program at increased energy and higher luminosity. A dedicated pixelated luminosity telescope is installed for a fast and precise luminosity measurement. This detector measures coincidences between several three-layer telescopes of silicon pixel detectors to arrive at luminosity for each colliding LHC bunch pair. An up...

  5. The Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider The Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Delepine

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider will study protonproton collisions at unprecedented energies and luminosities. In this article we providefi rst a brief general introduction to particle physics. We then explain what CERN is. Thenwe describe the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the most powerful particle acceleratorever built. Finally we describe the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment, its physics goals,construction details, and current status.El experimento Compact Muon Solenoid en el Large Hadron Collider del CERN estudiarácolisiones protón protón a energías y luminosidades sin precedente. En este artículo presentamos primero una breve introducción general a la física de partículas. Despuésexplicamos lo que es el CERN. Luego describimos el Large Hadron Collider, el más potente acelerador de partículas construido por el hombre, en el CERN. Finalmente describimos el experimento Compact Muon Solenoid, sus objetivos en física, los detalles de su construcción,y su situación presente.

  6. Compact synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, N.; Wang, T.; Tian, J.; Lin, Y.; Chen, S.; He, W.; Hu, Y.; Li, Q.

    1985-01-01

    A compact 800 MeV synchrotron radiation source is discussed. The storage ring has a circumference of 30.3 m, two 90 degree and four 45 degree bending magnet sections, two long straight sections and four short straight sections. The radius of the bending magnet is 2.224m. The critical wave length is 24A. The injector is a 15 Mev Microtron Electrons are accelerated from 15 Mev to 800 Mev by ramping the field of the ring. The expected stored current will be around 100 ma

  7. Compact neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhavi, V.; Phatak, P.R.; Bahadur, C.; Bayala, A.K.; Jakati, R.K.; Sathian, V.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A compact size neutron flux monitor has been developed incorporating standard boards developed for smart radiation monitors. The sensitivity of the monitors is 0.4cps/nV. It has been tested up to 2075 nV flux with standard neutron sources. It shows convincing results even in high flux areas like 6m away from the accelerator in RMC (Parel) for 106/107 nV. These monitors have a focal and remote display, alarm function with potential free contacts for centralized control and additional provision of connectivity via RS485/Ethernet. This paper describes the construction, working and results of the above flux monitor

  8. Compact Q-balls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, D., E-mail: bazeia@fisica.ufpb.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-970 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Losano, L.; Marques, M.A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-970 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Menezes, R. [Departamento de Ciências Exatas, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58297-000 Rio Tinto, PB (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, 58109-970 Campina Grande, PB (Brazil); Rocha, R. da [Centro de Matemática, Computação e Cognição, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André (Brazil)

    2016-07-10

    In this work we deal with non-topological solutions of the Q-ball type in two space–time dimensions, in models described by a single complex scalar field that engenders global symmetry. The main novelty is the presence of stable Q-balls solutions that live in a compact interval of the real line and appear from a family of models controlled by two distinct parameters. We find analytical solutions and study their charge and energy, and show how to control the parameters to make the Q-balls classically and quantum mechanically stable.

  9. Compact synchrotron light sources

    CERN Document Server

    Weihreter, Ernst

    1996-01-01

    This book covers a new niche in circular accelerator design, motivated by the promising industrial prospects of recent micromanufacturing methods - X-ray lithography, synchrotron radiation-based micromachining and microanalysis techniques. It describes the basic concepts and the essential challenges for the development of compact synchrotron radiation sources from an accelerator designer's point of view and gives an outline of the actual state of the art. The volume is intended as an introduction and as a reference for physicists, engineers and managers involved in this rapidly developing fiel

  10. LHC Report: Boost in bunches brings record luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Having hit a luminosity of around 8.4x1032 cm-2 s-1 with 768 bunches per beam, the LHC went into a 5-day machine development (MD) program on Wednesday 4 May. Operators are now working on increasing the number of particle bunches in the machine towards a 2011 maximum of around 1380 bunches. The team is already hitting major milestones, recording another record-breaking peak luminosity on Monday 23 May.   Former LHC Project Leader Lyn Evans (to the right) and Laurette Ponce, the engineer-in-charge when the recent luminosity record was achieved. The MD periods improve our understanding of the machine, with the aim of increasing its short- and long-term performance. This one also included tests of the machine’s configurations for special physics runs and a future high luminosity LHC. It was an intense program and overall it went very well, with most measurements carried out successfully. Highlights included: commissioning a dedicated machine setup for TOTEM and ALFA; succe...

  11. Optical Variability Properties of High Luminosity AGN Classes C. S. ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. We present the results of a comparative study of the intra- night optical variability (INOV) characteristics of radio-loud and radio- quiet quasars, which involves a systematic intra-night optical monitoring of seven sets of high luminosity AGNs covering the redshift range z ≃ 0.2 to z ≃ 2.2. The sample, matched in the ...

  12. Gravitational-Wave Luminosity of Binary Neutron Stars Mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Francesco; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Radice, David; Perego, Albino; Dietrich, Tim

    2018-03-16

    We study the gravitational-wave peak luminosity and radiated energy of quasicircular neutron star mergers using a large sample of numerical relativity simulations with different binary parameters and input physics. The peak luminosity for all the binaries can be described in terms of the mass ratio and of the leading-order post-Newtonian tidal parameter solely. The mergers resulting in a prompt collapse to black hole have the largest peak luminosities. However, the largest amount of energy per unit mass is radiated by mergers that produce a hypermassive neutron star or a massive neutron star remnant. We quantify the gravitational-wave luminosity of binary neutron star merger events, and set upper limits on the radiated energy and the remnant angular momentum from these events. We find that there is an empirical universal relation connecting the total gravitational radiation and the angular momentum of the remnant. Our results constrain the final spin of the remnant black hole and also indicate that stable neutron star remnant forms with super-Keplerian angular momentum.

  13. Luminosity limits for funnels in thick accretion discs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nityananda, R.; Narayan, R.

    1982-01-01

    A narrow, highly luminous funnel in a thick accretion disc is a common feature of many models for active galactic nuclei. The constraints on the luminosity imposed by the effects of radiation forces on the funnel are examined. The treatment allows properly for the irradiation of any part of the funnel by the rest, an important effect for this problem. It is found that the maximum luminosity of a funnel of small semi-angle phi is reduced below the Eddington limit Lsub(E) by a factor phi 2 if the funnel is to be in strict equilibrium. Even with allowance for flow induced viscous stresses, the luminosity cannot exceed of the order of Lsub(E)phi. In contrast, current models have luminosities of the order of Lsub(E)/phi. It is shown that the resulting large unbalanced forces at the funnel surface cause a significant outflow of matter which should be incorporated in the model for consistency. These results do not depend on the detailed angular momentum distribution over the disc surface but only on the funnel geometry. (author)

  14. Fast and precise luminosity measurement at the international linear

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The detectors of the ILC will feature a calorimeter system in the very forward region. The system comprises mainly two electromagnetic calorimeters: LumiCal, which is dedicated to the measurement of the absolute luminosity with highest precision and BeamCal, which uses the energy deposition from beamstrahlung pairs ...

  15. The Evolution of the Type Ia Supernova Luminosity Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, K.J.; Toonen, S.; Graur, O.

    2017-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) exhibit a wide diversity of peak luminosities and light curve shapes: the faintest SNe Ia are 10 times less luminous and evolve more rapidly than the brightest SNe Ia. Their differing characteristics also extend to their stellar age distributions, with fainter SNe Ia

  16. Pixel-Cluster Counting Luminosity Measurement In ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)782710; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A precision measurement of the delivered luminosity is a key component of the ATLAS physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A fundamental ingredient of the strategy to control the systematic uncertainties affecting the absolute luminosity has been to compare the measure- ments of several luminometers, most of which use more than one counting technique. The level of consistency across the various methods provides valuable cross-checks as well as an estimate of the detector-related systematic uncertainties. This poster describes the development of a luminosity algorithm based on pixel-cluster counting in the recently installed ATLAS inner b-layer (IBL), using data recorded during the 2015 pp run at the LHC. The noise and background contamination of the luminosity-associated cluster count is minimized by a multi-component fit to the measured cluster-size distribution in the forward pixel modules of the IBL. The linearity, long-term stability and statistical precision of the cluster- counting method a...

  17. Gravitational-Wave Luminosity of Binary Neutron Stars Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Francesco; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Radice, David; Perego, Albino; Dietrich, Tim

    2018-03-01

    We study the gravitational-wave peak luminosity and radiated energy of quasicircular neutron star mergers using a large sample of numerical relativity simulations with different binary parameters and input physics. The peak luminosity for all the binaries can be described in terms of the mass ratio and of the leading-order post-Newtonian tidal parameter solely. The mergers resulting in a prompt collapse to black hole have the largest peak luminosities. However, the largest amount of energy per unit mass is radiated by mergers that produce a hypermassive neutron star or a massive neutron star remnant. We quantify the gravitational-wave luminosity of binary neutron star merger events, and set upper limits on the radiated energy and the remnant angular momentum from these events. We find that there is an empirical universal relation connecting the total gravitational radiation and the angular momentum of the remnant. Our results constrain the final spin of the remnant black hole and also indicate that stable neutron star remnant forms with super-Keplerian angular momentum.

  18. Theoretical stellar luminosity functions and globular cluster ages and compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, S. J.

    The ages and chemical compositions of the stars in globular clusters are of great interest, particularly because age estimates from the well known exercise of fitting observed color-magnitude diagrams to theoretical predictions tend to yield ages in excess of the Hubble time in standard cosmological models. Relatively little use was made of the stellar luminosity functions of the globular clusters to constrain the ages or compositions. The comparison of observed luminosity functions to theoretical ones allows the use of information not usually considered, and has the advantage of being relatively insensitive to lack of knowledge of the detailed structure of stellar envelopes and atmospheres. A computer program was developed to apply standard stellar evolutionary theory, using the most recently available input physics to the calculation of the evolution of low-mass Population II stars. A comparison of the computed theoretical luminosity functions to an observed, though still preliminary, luminosity function for the cluster M13 demonstrates the viability of this approach.

  19. From Nearby Low Luminosity AGN to High Redshift Radio Galaxies ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Review. J. Astrophys. Astr. (2016) 37: 34. DOI: 10.1007/s12036-016-9411-z. From Nearby Low Luminosity AGN to High Redshift Radio. Galaxies: Science Interests with Square Kilometre Array. P. Kharb1,2,∗, D. V. Lal1, ..... action or past merger. So far, J0315−1906, ..... Approximately half of the baryons in the present day ...

  20. A new record peak luminosity for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Two weeks of dedicated machine development paid off last weekend when the LHC ran for physics with three nominal intensity (∼1011 protons) bunches in each beam.   This brought a new record peak luminosity of around 8×1029 cm-2 s-1, and allowed the LHC to double the integrated luminosity delivered to the experiments since 30 March from 16 to 32 inverse nanobarns over the weekend. After a few more fills in this configuration, the number of bunches will be raised to six per beam, which will in turn allow the peak luminosity to break the 1030 cm-2 s-1 barrier for the first time, well on the way to achieving the 2010 objective of 1032 cm-2 s-1. This peak luminosity goal requires 800 nominal bunches per beam squeezed to a beta of 3.5 metres. The plan for 2011 is to run the LHC in this configuration over about 10 months, thus achieving the objective of recording one inverse femtobarn of data in total. The machine development period also allowed the TOTEM detectors to be set up with 45...

  1. Upgrade of the CMS Tracker for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Auzinger, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The LHC machine is planning an upgrade program which will smoothly bring the luminosity to about $ 5 \\times 10^{34}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ in 2028, possibly reaching an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb$^{-1}$ by the end of 2037. This High Luminosity LHC scenario, HL-LHC, will require a preparation program of the LHC detectors known as Phase-2 Upgrade. The current CMS Tracker, including both inner pixel and outer strip systems, is already running beyond design specifications and will not be able to survive HL-LHC radiation conditions. CMS will need a completely new device in order to fully exploit the demanding operating conditions and the delivered luminosity. The upgrade plan includes extending the Pixel Detector in the forward region from the current coverage of $ \\lvert \\eta \\rvert < 2.4 $ to $ \\lvert \\eta \\rvert < 4$, where up to seven forward- and four extension disks will compose the new detector. Additionally, the new outer system should also have trigger capabilities. To achieve such goals, R\\&...

  2. Emittance scans for CMS luminosity calibration in 2017

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Emittance scans are short van der Meer type scans performed at the beginning and at the end of LHC fills. The beams are scanned against each other in X and Y planes in 7 displacement steps. These scans are used for LHC diagnostics and since 2017 for a cross check of the CMS luminosity calibration. An XY pair of scans takes around 3 minutes. The BRIL project provides to LHC three independent online luminosity measurement from the Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT), the Fast Beam Condition Monitor (BCM1F) and the Forward calorimeter (HF). The excellent performance of the BRIL detector front-ends, fast back-end electronics and CMS XDAQ based data processing and publication allow the use of emittance scans for linearity and stability studies of the luminometers. Emittance scans became a powerful tool and dramatically improved the understanding of the luminosity measurement during the year. Since each luminometer is independently calibrated in every scan the measurements are independent and ratios of luminometers ca...

  3. Fast and precise luminosity measurement at the international linear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The detectors of the ILC will feature a calorimeter system in the very forward region. The system comprises mainly two electromagnetic calorimeters: LumiCal, which is dedicated to the measurement of the absolute luminosity with highest precision and BeamCal, which uses the energy deposition from beamstrahlung pairs ...

  4. A Size-Luminosity Relationship for Protoplanetary Disks in Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Marie; Andrews, Sean

    2018-01-01

    The sizes of the 340 GHz continuum emission from 56 protoplanetary disks in the Lupus star-forming region were measured by modeling their ALMA visibility profiles. We describe the mechanism for these measurements and some preliminary results regarding the correlation between the continuum luminosities and sizes.

  5. Machine constraints for experiments in an intermediate luminosity interaction region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groom, D.

    1989-05-01

    We summarize existing information about the luminosity as a function of clear space between the interaction point and the front of the final-focus triplet, and about the minimum beam pipe dimensions (stay-clear dimensions) in the region. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  6. A Single Bremsstrahlung Monitor to Measure Luminosity at LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The luminosity, the beam divergence and the longitudinal polarization can be measured at an interaction point of LEP by dectecting the energy, the angular distribution and the circular polarization of the single bremsstrahlung photons (SB) emitted at very forward angle. The luminosity can be measured by this met than by the conventional method of detecting small angle Bhabha scattering. The bunch to bunch relative luminosity can be monitored at a few per mil level in few minutes. Absolute values of the luminosity and of the polarization can be measured with a precision of the order of 1\\%. \\\\ \\\\ The apparatus to detect SB photons consists of a low Z absorber and of an EM calorimeter made of lead and scintillating fibres. Both the total energy and the space distribution of the SB photons are measured. This apparatus has been designed and built at the Department of Physics and INFN Section of the University of Rome ``La Sapienza''. Later on, together with suitable monocrystal converters, it may be used also for...

  7. Design, prototyping, and testing of a compact superconducting double quarter wave crab cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binping Xiao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a novel design for a compact superconducting crab cavity with a double quarter wave (DQWCC shape. After fabrication and surface treatments, this niobium proof-of-principle cavity was tested cryogenically in a vertical cryostat. The cavity is extremely compact yet has a low frequency of 400 MHz, an essential property for service in the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade. The cavity’s electromagnetic properties are well suited for this demanding task. The demonstrated deflecting voltage of 4.6 MV is well above the required 3.34 MV for a crab cavity in the future High Luminosity LHC. In this paper, we present the design, prototyping, and results from testing the DQWCC.

  8. Precision luminosity measurement at LHCb with beam-gas imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barschel, Colin

    2014-01-01

    The luminosity is the physical quantity which relates the cross-section to the production rate in collider experiments. The cross-section being the particle physics observable of interest, a precise determination of the luminosity is required. This work presents the absolute luminosity calibration results performed at the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment at CERN using a novel method based on beam-gas interactions with data acquired at a center of mass energy √(s)=8 TeV and √(s)=2.76 TeV. Reconstructed beam-gas interaction vertices in LHCb are used to measure the beam profiles, thus making it possible to determine the beams overlap integral. An important element of this work was to install and use a neon gas injection system to increase the beam-gas interaction rate. The precision reached with the beam-gas imaging method relies on the two-dimensional beam shape determination developed in this work. For such precision, the interaction vertex resolution is an important ingredient. Therefore, a new method has been developed using all reconstructed vertices in order to improve the understanding of the vertex resolution. In addition to the overlap integral, the knowledge of the colliding bunch populations is required to measure the luminosity. The determination of the bunch populations relies on LHC instruments to measure the bunch population fractions and the total beam intensity. Studies performed as part of this work resulted in a reduction of the bunch current normalization uncertainty from ±2.7% to ±0.2% and making it possible to achieve precision luminosity measurements at all LHC experiments. Furthermore, information on beam-gas interactions not originating from nominally filled bunches was analyzed to determine the charge fraction not participating in bunch collisions. The knowledge of this fraction is required to correct the total beam intensity. The reference cross-section of pp interactions with at least two tracks in the vertex detector

  9. Compact, self-regulating nuclear power source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, Otis G.; Kimpland, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    An inherently safe nuclear power source has been designed, that is self-stabilizing and requires no moving mechanical components. Unlike conventional designs, the proposed reactor is self-regulating through the inherent properties of uranium hydride, which serves as a combination fuel and moderator. The temperature driven mobility of the hydrogen contained in the hydride will control the nuclear activity. If the core temperature increases over the set point, the hydrogen is driven out of the core, the moderation drops and the power production decreases. If the temperature drops, the hydrogen returns and the process is reversed. Thus the design is inherently fail-safe and requires only minimal human oversight. The compact nature and inherent safety opens the possibility for low-cost mass production and operation of the reactors. This design has the capability to dramatically alter the manner in which nuclear energy is harnessed for commercial use. (author)

  10. M DWARF LUMINOSITY, RADIUS, AND α-ENRICHMENT FROM I-BAND SPECTRAL FEATURES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Bender, Chad F.; Deshpande, Rohit; Robertson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of M dwarfs and their growing importance to studies of exoplanets, Galactic evolution, and stellar structure, methods for precisely measuring their fundamental stellar properties remain elusive. Existing techniques for measuring M dwarf luminosity, mass, radius, or composition are calibrated over a limited range of stellar parameters or require expensive observations. We find a strong correlation between the K S -band luminosity (M K ), the observed strength of the I-band sodium doublet absorption feature, and [Fe/H] in M dwarfs without strong Hα emission. We show that the strength of this feature, coupled with [Fe/H] and spectral type, can be used to derive M dwarf M K and radius without requiring parallax. Additionally, we find promising evidence that the strengths of the I-band sodium doublet and the nearby I-band calcium triplet may jointly indicate α-element enrichment. The use of these I-band features requires only moderate-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy to provide valuable information about the potential habitability of exoplanets around M dwarfs, and surface gravity and distance for M dwarfs throughout the Galaxy. This technique has immediate applicability for both target selection and candidate planet–host system characterization for exoplanet missions such as TESS and K2

  11. M DWARF LUMINOSITY, RADIUS, AND α-ENRICHMENT FROM I-BAND SPECTRAL FEATURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Bender, Chad F.; Deshpande, Rohit; Robertson, Paul, E-mail: rct151@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2015-03-20

    Despite the ubiquity of M dwarfs and their growing importance to studies of exoplanets, Galactic evolution, and stellar structure, methods for precisely measuring their fundamental stellar properties remain elusive. Existing techniques for measuring M dwarf luminosity, mass, radius, or composition are calibrated over a limited range of stellar parameters or require expensive observations. We find a strong correlation between the K{sub S}-band luminosity (M{sub K}), the observed strength of the I-band sodium doublet absorption feature, and [Fe/H] in M dwarfs without strong Hα emission. We show that the strength of this feature, coupled with [Fe/H] and spectral type, can be used to derive M dwarf M{sub K} and radius without requiring parallax. Additionally, we find promising evidence that the strengths of the I-band sodium doublet and the nearby I-band calcium triplet may jointly indicate α-element enrichment. The use of these I-band features requires only moderate-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy to provide valuable information about the potential habitability of exoplanets around M dwarfs, and surface gravity and distance for M dwarfs throughout the Galaxy. This technique has immediate applicability for both target selection and candidate planet–host system characterization for exoplanet missions such as TESS and K2.

  12. Design of a High Luminosity 100 TeV Proton Antiproton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveros Tuativa, Sandra Jimena [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Currently new physics is being explored with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and with Intensity Frontier programs at Fermilab and KEK. The energy scale for new physics is known to be in the multi-TeV range, signaling the need for a future collider which well surpasses this energy scale. A 10$^{\\,34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ luminosity 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider is explored with 7$\\times$ the energy of the LHC. The dipoles are 4.5\\,T to reduce cost. A proton-antiproton collider is selected as a future machine for several reasons. The cross section for many high mass states is 10 times higher in $p\\bar{p}$ than $pp$ collisions. Antiquarks for production can come directly from an antiproton rather than indirectly from gluon splitting. The higher cross sections reduce the synchrotron radiation in superconducting magnets and the number of events per bunch crossing, because lower beam currents can produce the same rare event rates. Events are also more centrally produced, allowing a more compact detector with less space between quadrupole triplets and a smaller $\\beta^{*}$ for higher luminosity. To adjust to antiproton beam losses (burn rate), a Fermilab-like antiproton source would be adapted to disperse the beam into 12 different momentum channels, using electrostatic septa, to increase antiproton momentum capture 12 times. At Fermilab, antiprotons were stochastically cooled in one Debuncher and one Accumulator ring. Because the stochastic cooling time scales as the number of particles, two options of 12 independent cooling systems are presented. One electron cooling ring might follow the stochastic cooling rings for antiproton stacking. Finally antiprotons in the collider ring would be recycled during runs without leaving the collider ring, by joining them to new bunches with snap bunch coalescence and synchrotron damping. These basic ideas are explored in this work on a future 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider and the main parameters are presented.

  13. Design of a High Luminosity 100 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveros Tautiva, Sandra Jimena

    Currently new physics is being explored with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and with Intensity Frontier programs at Fermilab and KEK. The energy scale for new physics is known to be in the multi-TeV range, signaling the need for a future collider which well surpasses this energy scale. A 10 34 cm-2 s-1 luminosity 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider is explored with 7x the energy of the LHC. The dipoles are 4.5 T to reduce cost. A proton-antiproton collider is selected as a future machine for several reasons. The cross section for many high mass states is 10 times higher in pp than pp collisions. Antiquarks for production can come directly from an antiproton rather than indirectly from gluon splitting. The higher cross sections reduce the synchrotron radiation in superconducting magnets and the number of events per bunch crossing, because lower beam currents can produce the same rare event rates. Events are also more centrally produced, allowing a more compact detector with less space between quadrupole triplets and a smaller beta* for higher luminosity. To adjust to antiproton beam losses (burn rate), a Fermilab-like antiproton source would be adapted to disperse the beam into 12 different momentum channels, using electrostatic septa, to increase antiproton momentum capture 12 times. At Fermilab, antiprotons were stochastically cooled in one Debuncher and one Accumulator ring. Because the stochastic cooling time scales as the number of particles, two options of 12 independent cooling systems are presented. One electron cooling ring might follow the stochastic cooling rings for antiproton stacking. Finally antiprotons in the collider ring would be recycled during runs without leaving the collider ring, by joining them to new bunches with snap bunch coalescence and synchrotron damping. These basic ideas are explored in this work on a future 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider and the main parameters are presented.

  14. Exploration of a High Luminosity 100 TeV Proton Antiproton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveros, Sandra J. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Summers, Don [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Cremaldi, Lucien [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Acosta, John [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Neuffer, David [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-04-12

    New physics is being explored with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and with Intensity Frontier programs at Fermilab and KEK. The energy scale for new physics is known to be in the multi-TeV range, signaling the need for a future collider which well surpasses this energy scale. We explore a 10$^{\\,34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ luminosity, 100 TeV $p\\bar{p}$ collider with 7$\\times$ the energy of the LHC but only 2$\\times$ as much NbTi superconductor, motivating the choice of 4.5 T single bore dipoles. The cross section for many high mass states is 10 times higher in $p\\bar{p}$ than $pp$ collisions. Antiquarks for production can come directly from an antiproton rather than indirectly from gluon splitting. The higher cross sections reduce the synchrotron radiation in superconducting magnets and the number of events per beam crossing, because lower beam currents can produce the same rare event rates. Events are more centrally produced, allowing a more compact detector with less space between quadrupole triplets and a smaller $\\beta^{*}$ for higher luminosity. A Fermilab-like $\\bar p$ source would disperse the beam into 12 momentum channels to capture more antiprotons. Because stochastic cooling time scales as the number of particles, 12 cooling ring sets would be used. Each set would include phase rotation to lower momentum spreads, equalize all momentum channels, and stochastically cool. One electron cooling ring would follow the stochastic cooling rings. Finally antiprotons would be recycled during runs without leaving the collider ring by joining them to new bunches with synchrotron damping.

  15. Scalable Nonlinear Compact Schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Debojyoti [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Constantinescu, Emil M. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Brown, Jed [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we focus on compact schemes resulting in tridiagonal systems of equations, specifically the fifth-order CRWENO scheme. We propose a scalable implementation of the nonlinear compact schemes by implementing a parallel tridiagonal solver based on the partitioning/substructuring approach. We use an iterative solver for the reduced system of equations; however, we solve this system to machine zero accuracy to ensure that no parallelization errors are introduced. It is possible to achieve machine-zero convergence with few iterations because of the diagonal dominance of the system. The number of iterations is specified a priori instead of a norm-based exit criterion, and collective communications are avoided. The overall algorithm thus involves only point-to-point communication between neighboring processors. Our implementation of the tridiagonal solver differs from and avoids the drawbacks of past efforts in the following ways: it introduces no parallelization-related approximations (multiprocessor solutions are exactly identical to uniprocessor ones), it involves minimal communication, the mathematical complexity is similar to that of the Thomas algorithm on a single processor, and it does not require any communication and computation scheduling.

  16. Development of a novel diamond based detector for machine induced background and luminosity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hempel, Maria

    2017-07-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the largest particle accelerator and storage ring in the world, used to investigate fundamentals of particle physics and to develop at the same time the technology of accelerators and detectors. Four main experiments, located around the LHC ring, provide insight into the nature of particles and search for answers to as yet unexplained phenomena in the universe. These four experiments are ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus), ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment), CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) and LHCb (LHC beauty). Two proton or heavy ion beams circulate in the LHC and are brought into collision in the four experiments. The physics potential of each experiment is determined by the luminosity, which is a ratio of the number of the events during a certain time period to the cross section of a physics process. A measurement of the luminosity is therefore essential to determine the cross section of interesting physics processes. In addition, safe and high-quality data-taking requires stable beam conditions with almost no beam losses. So-called beam loss monitors are installed in the LHC rings to monitor beam losses around the LHC. Each experiment has in addition its own detectors to measure beam losses, hereafter called machine induced background. One such detector is installed in CMS, the Fast Beam Condition Monitor (BCM1F). Based on diamond sensors it was designed and built to measure both, the luminosity and the machine induced background. BCM1F ran smoothly during the first LHC running period from 2009-2012 and delivered valuable beam loss and luminosity information to the control rooms of CMS and LHC. At the end of 2012 the LHC was shut down for an upgrade to improve the performance by increasing the proton energy from 4 TeV to 7 TeV and decreasing the proton bunch spacing from 50 ns to 25 ns. Due to the success of BCM1F an upgrade of its sensors and readout components was planned in order to fulfil the new requirements. The upgrade

  17. Development of a novel diamond based detector for machine induced background and luminosity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hempel, Maria

    2017-07-15

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the largest particle accelerator and storage ring in the world, used to investigate fundamentals of particle physics and to develop at the same time the technology of accelerators and detectors. Four main experiments, located around the LHC ring, provide insight into the nature of particles and search for answers to as yet unexplained phenomena in the universe. These four experiments are ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus), ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment), CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) and LHCb (LHC beauty). Two proton or heavy ion beams circulate in the LHC and are brought into collision in the four experiments. The physics potential of each experiment is determined by the luminosity, which is a ratio of the number of the events during a certain time period to the cross section of a physics process. A measurement of the luminosity is therefore essential to determine the cross section of interesting physics processes. In addition, safe and high-quality data-taking requires stable beam conditions with almost no beam losses. So-called beam loss monitors are installed in the LHC rings to monitor beam losses around the LHC. Each experiment has in addition its own detectors to measure beam losses, hereafter called machine induced background. One such detector is installed in CMS, the Fast Beam Condition Monitor (BCM1F). Based on diamond sensors it was designed and built to measure both, the luminosity and the machine induced background. BCM1F ran smoothly during the first LHC running period from 2009-2012 and delivered valuable beam loss and luminosity information to the control rooms of CMS and LHC. At the end of 2012 the LHC was shut down for an upgrade to improve the performance by increasing the proton energy from 4 TeV to 7 TeV and decreasing the proton bunch spacing from 50 ns to 25 ns. Due to the success of BCM1F an upgrade of its sensors and readout components was planned in order to fulfil the new requirements. The upgrade

  18. Advances in compact torus research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    A compact torus is a low aspect ratio, axisymmetric, closed magnetic field line configuration with no vessel wall or magnetic field coils linking the hole in the plasma toroid. This concept offers reactor advantages such as simplicity, high β, and the possibility of translation. Several methods have been used to generate compact toroids, including plasma guns, high energy particle rings, and field-reversed theta pinches. This document summarizes the results of recent work on compact toroids, presented at the first IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Compact Torus Research held in Sydney, Australia from 4 to 7 March 1985

  19. THE NUCLEAR INFRARED EMISSION OF LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, R. E. [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 N. A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Lopez-Rodriguez, E.; Packham, C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Alonso-Herrero, A. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-UC, Avenida de los Castros s/n, 39005 Santander (Spain); Levenson, N. A.; Radomski, J. [Gemini Observatory, Southern Operations Center, c/o AURA, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Ramos Almeida, C. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea, s/n, E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Colina, L. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC/INTA), Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial, Crta de Torrejon a Ajalvir, km 4, 28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Elitzur, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Aretxaga, I. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Aptdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Roche, P. F. [Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, DWB, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Oi, N. [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2012-07-15

    We present high-resolution mid-infrared (MIR) imaging, nuclear spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and archival Spitzer spectra for 22 low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs; L{sub bol} {approx}< 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}). Infrared (IR) observations may advance our understanding of the accretion flows in LLAGNs, the fate of the obscuring torus at low accretion rates, and, perhaps, the star formation histories of these objects. However, while comprehensively studied in higher-luminosity Seyferts and quasars, the nuclear IR properties of LLAGNs have not yet been well determined. We separate the present LLAGN sample into three categories depending on their Eddington ratio and radio emission, finding different IR characteristics for each class. (1) At the low-luminosity, low-Eddington-ratio (log L{sub bol}/L{sub Edd} < -4.6) end of the sample, we identify 'host-dominated' galaxies with strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bands that may indicate active (circum-)nuclear star formation. (2) Some very radio-loud objects are also present at these low Eddington ratios. The IR emission in these nuclei is dominated by synchrotron radiation, and some are likely to be unobscured type 2 AGNs that genuinely lack a broad-line region. (3) At higher Eddington ratios, strong, compact nuclear sources are visible in the MIR images. The nuclear SEDs of these galaxies are diverse; some resemble typical Seyfert nuclei, while others lack a well-defined MIR 'dust bump'. Strong silicate emission is present in many of these objects. We speculate that this, together with high ratios of silicate strength to hydrogen column density, could suggest optically thin dust and low dust-to-gas ratios, in accordance with model predictions that LLAGNs do not host a Seyfert-like obscuring torus. We anticipate that detailed modeling of the new data and SEDs in terms of accretion disk, jet, radiatively inefficient accretion flow, and torus components will provide further

  20. Reference Ultraviolet Luminosity Functions for the JWST Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Steven

    We propose to construct the most accurate set of galaxy ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions yet assembled over the redshift range 4 early universe. This will be accomplished using archival data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope, and a variety of ground-based telescopes (NOAO CTIO and KPNO 4m, VISTA, Subaru, VLT, CFHT), selecting an expected sample of 47,000 galaxies (>4x larger than the previous largest sample of galaxies in this epoch selected with multiwavelength data). In an advance over previous studies, we will select samples of galaxies including Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) mid-infrared imaging data, which are crucial to both minimize contamination and to improve the precision of photometric redshifts. Additionally, we will be the first to apply a uniform set of selection criteria simultaneously to datasets spanning an order of magnitude in dynamic range of area covered, allowing the construction of high-redshift UV luminosity functions spanning nearly 10 astronomical magnitudes. We will use this dataset to accomplish the following science goals: 1) We will provide the most robust constraints on the abundance of bright star-forming galaxies in the epoch 4 early times. While initial results concluded that the SFR density decreased rapidly in this epoch, our pilot study using Spitzer/IRAC data implies that galaxies in this epoch are more numerous than previously observed. Our proposed project will perform a detailed analysis into the abundance of galaxies at z=9-10, providing a robust baseline for future studies with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). 3) Due to our large volume probed, we expect 1600 AGNs at z=4-6. These AGN come from the faint-end of the AGN luminosity function, which is presently poorly constrained. Our large dynamic range in UV luminosity probed will allow us to fit the galaxy and AGN luminosity functions simultaneously (supplementing with Sloan quasar data to constrain the bright-end of the AGN

  1. High Impact Technology Compact Combustion (HITCC) Compact Core Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    were combusted in a vitiated stream. The molecular weight and hydrogen -to-carbon ratios of these fuels were measured by Princeton University [17...AFRL-RQ-WP-TR-2016-0010 HIGH IMPACT TECHNOLOGY COMPACT COMBUSTION (HITCC) COMPACT CORE TECHNOLOGIES Andrew W. Caswell Combustion ...ANDREW W. CASWELL CHARLES J. CROSS, Branch Chief Program Engineer Combustion Branch Combustion Branch Turbine Engine Division Turbine

  2. Isometric coactions of compact quantum groups on compact ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We propose a notion of isometric coaction of a compact quantum group on a compact quantum metric space in the framework of Rieffel, where the metric structure is given by a Lipnorm. Within this setting we study the problem of the existence of a quantum isometry group.

  3. Dynamical properties of compact groups of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson, Paul; De Oliveira, Claudia M.; Huchra, John P.; Palumbo, Giorgio G.

    1992-01-01

    Radial velocities are presented for 457 galaxies in the 100 Hickson compact groups. More than 84 percent of the galaxies measured have velocities within 1000 km/s of the median velocity in the group. Ninety-two groups have at least three accordant members, and 69 groups have at least four. The radial velocities of these groups range from 1380 to 42,731 km/s with a median of 8889 km/s, corresponding to a median distance of 89/h Mpc. The apparent space density of these systems ranges from 300 to as much as 10 exp 8 sq h/sq Mpc, which exceeds the densities in the centers of rich clusters. The median projected separation between galaxies is 39/h kpc, comparable to the sizes of the galaxies themselves. A significant correlation is found between crossing time and the fraction of gas-rich galaxies in the groups, and a weak anticorrelation is found between crossing time and the luminosity contrast of the first-ranked galaxy.

  4. Specific luminosity limit of e^{+}e^{-} colliding rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Talman

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available The luminosity in flat-beam circular colliders is known to “saturate” at some “threshold” beam current above which (because the beam height grows the luminosity varies (only linearly with beam current, making both the specific luminosity (luminosity/current and the beam-beam tune shift parameter ξ_{y} independent of current. The purpose of this paper is to calculate ξ_{y} analytically with the goal of maximizing the luminosity. A zero parameter application of the theory to 13 existing storage ring configurations yields theory/experiment equal to 1.26±0.45 for ξ_{y,max}. Parameter values (especially tunes Q_{x}, Q_{y}, and Q_{s} expected to maximize ξ_{y} are given. The most favored tune combinations seem not to have been tried so far in colliding beam facilities. The vertical beam growth is ascribed to “parametric pumping” of the vertical betatron amplitude of each individual particle by its own (inexorable horizontal and longitudinal oscillation. A unique determination of the distribution of all particles then follows from a saturation principle which asserts that the beam height adjusts itself to the value for which the least stable particle (of probable amplitude is barely stable. The difference equation describing the pumping can be solved by numerical iteration or, because it is (almost linear, it can be solved analytically, at least for amplitudes small enough that resonances remain isolated. Because of the aliasing (or undersampling characteristic of accelerators, this equation exhibits an even richer spectrum of resonances than the Mathieu equation, which the present theory generalizes. Contrary to the lore of the field (which motivates the intentional increase of damping decrement δ_{y} using wigglers, the theory presented here predicts the dependence of luminosity on δ_{y} to be quite weak. This is not inconsistent with actual collider performance according to a survey by Rice [D. Rice, Cornell University Report No

  5. The Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses his lab's plan for completing the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) conceptual design during calendar year 1987. Around July 1 they froze the subsystem envelopes on the device to continue with the conceptual design. They did this by formalizing a general requirements document. They have been developing the management plan and submitted a version to the DOE July 10. He describes a group of management activities. They released the vacuum vessel Request For Proposals (RFP) on August 5. An RFP to do a major part of the system engineering on the device is being developed. They intend to assemble the device outside of the test cell, then move it into the the test cell, install it there, and bring to the test cell many of the auxiliary facilities from TFTR, for example, power supplies

  6. Compacting spent fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachter, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    A method and apparatus for compacting spent fuel rods comprises transferring the rods from a nuclear fuel rod assembly into a different nuclear fuel rod container having a smaller cross section than the assembly. The individual rods are moved from a fuel assembly and through a transition funnel by movable grippers at opposite ends of the funnel. One movable gripper reciprocates between gripping and release positions in a gap between the fuel assembly and the transition funnel. All of the fuel rods are withdrawn concurrently and are merged towards one another into a tighter array within the transition funnel and emerge as a bundle. A movable and a stationary bundle gripper are provided between the funnel and the storage container to advance the bundle of fuel rods into the container. (author)

  7. Compact cryocooler heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, J.; Frederking, T.H.K.

    1991-01-01

    Compact heat exchangers are subject to different constraints as a room temperature gas is cooled down by a cold stream returning from a JT valve (or a similar cryoprocess component). In particular, the optimization of exchangers for liquid helium systems has to cover a wide range in temperature and density of the fluid. In the present work we address the following thermodynamic questions: 1. The optimization of intermediate temperatures which optimize stage operation (a stage is assumed to have a constant cross section); 2. The optimum temperature difference available for best overall economic performance values. The results are viewed in the context of porous media concepts applied to rather low speeds of fluid flow in narrow passages. In this paper examples of fluid/solid constraints imposed in this non-classical low temperature area are presented

  8. Compact particle accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.

    2017-08-29

    A compact particle accelerator having an input portion configured to receive power to produce particles for acceleration, where the input portion includes a switch, is provided. In a general embodiment, a vacuum tube receives particles produced from the input portion at a first end, and a plurality of wafer stacks are positioned serially along the vacuum tube. Each of the plurality of wafer stacks include a dielectric and metal-oxide pair, wherein each of the plurality of wafer stacks further accelerate the particles in the vacuum tube. A beam shaper coupled to a second end of the vacuum tube shapes the particles accelerated by the plurality of wafer stacks into a beam and an output portion outputs the beam.

  9. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  10. Compact vacuum insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  11. Compact semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Siyuan; Lourtioz, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book brings together in a single volume a unique contribution by the top experts around the world in the field of compact semiconductor lasers to provide a comprehensive description and analysis of the current status as well as future directions in the field of micro- and nano-scale semiconductor lasers. It is organized according to the various forms of micro- or nano-laser cavity configurations with each chapter discussing key technical issues, including semiconductor carrier recombination processes and optical gain dynamics, photonic confinement behavior and output coupling mechanisms, carrier transport considerations relevant to the injection process, and emission mode control. Required reading for those working in and researching the area of semiconductors lasers and micro-electronics.

  12. ARE ALL SHORT-HARD GAMMA-RAY BURSTS PRODUCED FROM MERGERS OF COMPACT STELLAR OBJECTS?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgili, Francisco J.; Zhang Bing; O'Brien, Paul; Troja, Eleonora

    2011-01-01

    The origin and progenitors of short-hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remain a puzzle and a highly debated topic. Recent Swift observations suggest that these GRBs may be related to catastrophic explosions in degenerate compact stars, denoted as 'Type I' GRBs. The most popular models include the merger of two compact stellar objects (NS-NS or NS-BH). We utilize a Monte Carlo approach to determine whether a merger progenitor model can self-consistently account for all the observations of short-hard GRBs, including a sample with redshift measurements in the Swift era (z-known sample) and the CGRO/BATSE sample. We apply various merger time delay distributions invoked in compact star merger models to derive the redshift distributions of these Type I GRBs, and then constrain the unknown luminosity function of Type I GRBs using the observed luminosity-redshift (L-z) distributions of the z-known sample. The best luminosity function model, together with the adopted merger delay model, is then applied to confront the peak flux distribution (log N-log P distribution) of the BATSE and Swift samples. We find that for all the merger models invoking a range of merger delay timescales (including those invoking a large fraction of 'prompt mergers'), it is difficult to reconcile the models with all the data. The data are instead statistically consistent with the following two possible scenarios. First, that short/hard GRBs are a superposition of compact-star-merger-origin (Type I) GRBs and a population of GRBs that track the star formation history, which are probably related to the deaths of massive stars (Type II GRBs). Second, the entire short/hard GRB population is consistent with a typical delay of 2 Gyr with respect to the star formation history with modest scatter. This may point toward a different Type I progenitor than the traditional compact star merger models.

  13. MASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN STELLAR SYSTEMS: 'QUIESCENT' ACCRETION AND LUMINOSITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volonteri, M.; Campbell, D.; Mateo, M.; Dotti, M.

    2011-01-01

    Only a small fraction of local galaxies harbor an accreting black hole, classified as an active galactic nucleus. However, many stellar systems are plausibly expected to host black holes, from globular clusters to nuclear star clusters, to massive galaxies. The mere presence of stars in the vicinity of a black hole provides a source of fuel via mass loss of evolved stars. In this paper, we assess the expected luminosities of black holes embedded in stellar systems of different sizes and properties, spanning a large range of masses. We model the distribution of stars and derive the amount of gas available to a central black hole through a geometrical model. We estimate the luminosity of the black holes under simple, but physically grounded, assumptions on the accretion flow. Finally, we discuss the detectability of 'quiescent' black holes in the local universe.

  14. Luminosity Measurement at ATLAS with a Scintillating Fiber Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Ask, S

    2007-01-01

    We are reporting about a scintillating fiber tracking detector which is proposed for a precise determination of the absolute luminosity of the CERN LHC at interaction point 1 where the ATLAS experiment is located. The detector needs to track protons elastically scattered under micro-radian angles in direct vicinity to the LHC beam. It is based on square shaped scintillating plastic fibers read out by multi-anode photomultiplier tubes and is housed in Roman Pots. We describe the design and construction of prototype detectors and the results of two beam test experiments carried out at DESY and at CERN. The excellent detector performance established in these tests validates the detector design and supports the feasibility of the proposed challenging method of luminosity measurement. All results from the CERN beam test should be considered as preliminary.

  15. The CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Sauvan, Jean-baptiste

    2017-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will integrate 10 times more luminosity than the LHC, posing significant challenges for radiation tolerance and event pileup on detectors, especially for forward calorimetry, and hallmarks the issue for future colliders. As part of its HL-LHC upgrade program, the CMS collaboration is designing a High Granularity Calorimeter to replace the existing endcap calorimeters. It features unprecedented transverse and longitudinal segmentation for both electromagnetic (ECAL) and hadronic (HCAL) compartments. This will facilitate particle-flow calorimetry, where the fine structure of showers can be measured and used to enhance pileup rejection and particle identification, whilst still achieving good energy resolution. The ECAL and a large fraction of HCAL will be based on hexagonal silicon sensors of 0.5 - 1 cm$^2$ cell size, with the remainder of the HCAL based on highly-segmented scintillators with silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readout. The intrinsic high-precision timing capabilities...

  16. Silicon Sensors for Trackers at High-Luminosity Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Peltola, Timo

    2015-01-01

    The planned upgrade of the LHC accelerator at CERN, namely the high luminosity (HL) phase of the LHC (HL-LHC foreseen for 2023), will result in a more intense radiation environment than the present tracking system was designed for. The required upgrade of the all-silicon central trackers at the ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments will include higher granularity and radiation hard sensors. The radiation hardness of the new sensors must be roughly an order of magnitude higher than the one of LHC detectors. To address this, a massive R&D program is underway within the CERN RD50 collaboration "Development of Radiation Hard Semiconductor Devices for Very High Luminosity Colliders" to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation tolerance. Research topics include the improvement of the intrinsic radiation tolerance of the sensor material and novel detector designs with benefits like reduced trapping probability (thinned and 3D sensors), maximized sensitive area (active edge sensors) and enhanced charge ...

  17. Symmetric Moeller/Bhabha luminosity monitor for the OLYMPUS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capozza, Luigi; Maas, Frank; Perez Benito, Roberto; Rodriguez Pineiro, David [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, Mainz (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); O' Connor, Colton [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Diefenbach, Juergen; Glaeser, Boris [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Khaneft, Dmitry [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Ma, Yue [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The OLYMPUS experiment is motivated by the discrepancy between the proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio measured using unpolarized and polarized electron scattering. This discrepancy can be explained by a two-photon exchange (TPE) contribution in lepton-hadron scattering. Measuring the ratio of electron-proton and positron-proton elastic scattering cross sections the contribution of the TPE can be determined. For this purpose, very precise measurements of the relative luminosity have to be performed. The symmetric Moeller/Bhabha luminosity monitor, made of calorimetric lead fluoride (PbF{sub 2}) Cherenkov detectors, provides precise data from counting coincidences Moeller and Bhabha events. High sensitivity to the geometrical acceptance and alignment requires accurate study of systematic uncertainties.

  18. ATLAS Trigger and DAQ Upgrades for High-Luminosity LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishino, M.

    2017-12-01

    The ATLAS Trigger-DAQ system will be significantly upgraded to explore new physics beyond the standard model in the High-Luminosity LHC environment with instantaneous luminosity of up to 7.5⨯1034cm-2 s-1. Two general trigger schemes are under study and their prospects and concerns are discussed. The muon trigger and readout electronics will be totally replaced to cope with a longer latency and a higher trigger rate. At the same time, new trigger algorithms using the precision tracker will be introduced to sharpen efficiency turn-ons and suppress fake triggers. The algorithm and the expected performance of the muon trigger are described. The hardware based track trigger is one of the major items introduced in the upgrade program. It will improve the trigger performance of various trigger items with a combination of the calorimeter or muon signature. The procedure for processing track information and an expected performance on the electron trigger are presented.

  19. SLHC, the High-Luminosity Upgrade (public event)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    In the morning of June 23rd a public event is organised in CERN's Council Chamber with the aim of providing the particle physics community with up-to-date information about the strategy for the LHC luminosity upgrade and to describe the current status of preparation work. The presentations will provide an overview of the various accelerator sub-projects, the LHC physics prospects and the upgrade plans of ATLAS and CMS. This event is organised in the framework of the SLHC-PP project, which receives funding from the European Commission for the preparatory phase of the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade project. Informing the public is among the objectives of this EU-funded project. A simultaneous transmission of this meeting will be broadcast, available at the following address: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  20. Temperatures and luminosities of white dwarfs in dwarf novae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smak, J.

    1984-01-01

    Far ultraviolet radiation observed in dwarf novae at minimum can only be attributed to their white dwarfs. In three systems white dwarfs are detected directly through their eclipses. These data are used to determine the effective temperatures and luminosities of white dwarfs. The resulting temperatures range from about logT e = 4.1 to about 4.9, with typical values of about 4.5. The luminosities range from about logL 1 = 31.0 to about 33.5 and show correlation with the average accretion rates. Radiation from white dwarfs is likely to be the source of excitation of the emission lines from disks. It is also argued that the heating by the white dwarf can significantly modify the structure of the innermost parts of the disk and, particularly, inhibit the incidence of thermal instability in that region. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  1. Deadtime corrections of luminosity in the ATLAS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Gabriel [Kirchhoff-Institut fuer Physik, Heidelberg (Germany); CERN, Genf (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva bunched beams of protons or lead ions are collided with unprecedented energies. The general purpose detector ATLAS is located at one of the four interaction points and is searching amongst others for new physics beyond the Standard Model. In order to measure cross sections for a given physics process, the knowledge of the precise integrated luminosity is essential. Due to readout limitations of the data acquisition system and detector hardware not all collisions can be recorded, that is, deadtime is introduced at the first level trigger. In this talk I present an overview of the different types of deadtime in ATLAS and how to measure it. I also present a technique for correcting the integrated luminosity of a physics analysis for deadtime, which accounts for bunch dependent effects of trigger deadtime and response.

  2. Level-1 track triggers for the ATLAS high luminosity upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Lipeles, E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The HL-LHC, the planned high luminosity upgrade for the LHC, will increase the collision rate in the ATLAS detector approximately a factor of 5 beyond the luminosity for which the detectors were designed, while also increasing the number of pile-up collisions in each event by a similar factor. This means that the level-1 trigger must achieve a higher rejection factor in a more difficult environment. This talk will discuss the challenges that arise in this environment and strategies being considered by ATLAS to include information from the tracking systems in the level-1 decision. The main challenges involve reducing the data volume exported from the tracking system for which two options are under consideration: a region of interest based system and a intelligent sensor method which filters on hits likely to come from higher transverse momentum tracks.

  3. ATLAS Fast Tracker Status and Tracking at High luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ilic, Nikolina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The LHC’s increase in centre of mass energy and luminosity in 2015 makes controlling trigger rates with high efficiency challenging. The ATLAS Fast TracKer (FTK) is a hardware processor built to reconstruct tracks at a rate of up to 100 kHz and provide them to the high level trigger. The FTK reconstructs tracks by matching incoming detector hits with pre-defined track patterns stored in associative memory on custom ASICs. Inner detector hits are fit to these track patterns using modern FPGAs. This talk describes the electronics system used for the FTK’s massive parallelization. The installation, commissioning and running of the system is happening in 2016, and is detailed in this talk. Tracking at High luminosity LHC is also presented.

  4. Absolute luminosity measurement at LHCb with beam-gas imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Barschel, C

    2013-01-01

    A novel technique to measure the absolute luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using beam-gas interactions has been successfully used in the LHCb experiment. A gas injection device (SMOG) has been installed in the LHCb experiment to increase the pressure around the interaction point during dedicated fills. The Beam-Gas Imaging method (BGI) has now the potential to surpass the accuracy of the commonly used *van der Meer scan* method (VDM). The technique has been used in 10 LHC fills during 2012 including and also provided a first luminosity measurement for proton-lead collisions. This talk presents the principles of the gas injection and the improvements reached with the increased pressure. Furthermore the gas injection increased the accuracy measurement of the so-called ghost charges and also intensities per bunch. Those uncertainties are becoming the dominating factor because the uncertainty on the total beam current have been reduced.

  5. SLC-2000: A luminosity upgrade for the SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breidenbach, M.; Decker, F.-J.; Helm, R.; Napoly, O.; Phinney, N.; Raimondi, P.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Siemann, R.; Zimmermann, F.; Hertzbach, S.

    1996-01-01

    We discuss a possible upgrade to the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), whose objective is to increase the SLC luminosity by at least a factor 7, to an average Z production rate of more than 35,000 per week. The centerpiece of the upgrade is the installation of a new superconducting final doublet with a field gradient of 240 T/m, which will be placed at a distance of only 70 cm from the interaction point. In addition, several bending magnets in each final focus will be lengthened and two octupole correctors are added. A complementary upgrade of damping rings and bunch compressors will allow optimum use of the modified final focus and can deliver, or exceed, the targeted luminosity. The proposed upgrade will place the SLC physics program in a very competitive position, and will also enable it to pursue its pioneering role as the first and only linear collider. (author)

  6. COMPACTION CHARACTERISTICS OF IGUMALE SHALE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    *

    In 1933 Proctor first conducted tests on compaction for application to construction of earth fill dams in California. Results published by. Proctor (1933) showed that with a given amount of compaction, there exists for each soil a moisture content, termed the optimum moisture content (OMC) at which a maximum dry density.

  7. Roller-compacted concrete pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Roller-compacted concrete (RCC) gets its name from the heavy vibratory steel drum and rubber-tired rollers used to help compact it into its final form. RCC has similar strength properties and consists of the same basic ingredients as conventional con...

  8. Progenitors of low-luminosity Type II-Plateau supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisakov, Sergey M.; Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Waldman, Roni; Livne, Eli

    2018-01-01

    The progenitors of low-luminosity Type II-Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P) are believed to be red supergiant (RSG) stars, but there is much disparity in the literature concerning their mass at core collapse and therefore on the main sequence. Here, we model the SN radiation arising from the low-energy explosion of RSG stars of 12, 25 and 27 M⊙ on the main sequence and formed through single star evolution. Despite the narrow range in ejecta kinetic energy (2.5-4.2 × 1050 erg) in our model set, the SN observables from our three models are significantly distinct, reflecting the differences in progenitor structure (e.g. surface radius, H-rich envelope mass and He-core mass). Our higher mass RSG stars give rise to Type II SNe that tend to have bluer colours at early times, a shorter photospheric phase, and a faster declining V-band light curve (LC) more typical of Type II-linear SNe, in conflict with the LC plateau observed for low-luminosity SNe II. The complete fallback of the CO core in the low-energy explosions of our high-mass RSG stars prevents the ejection of any 56Ni (nor any core O or Si), in contrast to low-luminosity SNe II-P, which eject at least 0.001 M⊙ of 56Ni. In contrast to observations, Type II SN models from higher mass RSGs tend to show an H α absorption that remains broad at late times (due to a larger velocity at the base of the H-rich envelope). In agreement with the analyses of pre-explosion photometry, we conclude that low-luminosity SNe II-P likely arise from low-mass rather than high-mass RSG stars.

  9. The luminosity monitor of the HERMES experiment at DESY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benisch, Th.; Bernreuther, S.; Devitsin, E.; Kozlov, V.; Potashov, S.; Rith, K.; Terkulov, A.; Weiskopf, Ch.

    2001-01-01

    A detector is described which measures the luminosity of the HERMES experiment at DESY. It is based on the coincident detection of electron-positron and photon pairs, or electron pairs, originating from the interaction of the beam positrons, or electrons, with the electrons of the atomic gas target. It consists of two calorimeters with radiation hard NaBi(WO 4 ) 2 crystals. Properties of the monitor, investigated in an electron test beam, and its performance in the experiment are presented

  10. ISR Superconducting High-Luminosity (low beta ) insertion

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    The photograph shows two of the 8 Superconducting Quadrupoles installed in ISR intersection I8 with their helium supply flexible lines,vacuum equipment,power and signal cables. The increase of luminosity produced by this insertion was above a factor 7. On the right one can see part of Open-Axial-Field Magnet. The person on the left side is Stephan Pichler. See also photo 7702690 and its abstract.

  11. LHC abort gap cleaning studies during luminosity operation

    CERN Document Server

    Bartmann, W; Bracco, C; Bravin, E; Goddard, B; Höfle, W; Jacquet, D; Jeff, A; Kain, V; Meddahi, M; Roncarolo, F; Uythoven, J; Valuch, D; Gianfelice-Wendt, E

    2012-01-01

    The presence of significant intensities of un-bunched beam is a potentially serious issue in the LHC. Procedures using damper kickers for cleaning both the Abort Gap (AG) and the buckets targeted for injection, are currently in operation at flat bottom. Recent observations of relatively high population of the AG during physics runs brought up the need for AG cleaning during luminosity operation. In this paper the results of experimental studies performed in October 2011 are presented.

  12. Operating microscope in Endodontics: visual magnification and luminosity

    OpenAIRE

    Letícia Moreira Feix; Daiana Boijink; Ronise Ferreira; Márcia Helena Wagner; Fernando Branco Barletta

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The surgical microscope has been used in Endodontics in order to minimize the obscurity of the surgical field, because it provides a high magnification and luminosity, thereby enhancing the procedures performed and providing a final result of higher quality. Objective and literature review: The objective of this study was to review the literature by addressing the current situation of the operating microscope in Endodontics, emphasizing its advantages and limitations. Despite be...

  13. Luminosity geometric reduction factor from colliding bunches with different lengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdu-Andres, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-09-29

    In the interaction point of the future electron-Ion collider eRHIC, the electron beam bunches are at least one order of magnitude shorter than the proton beam bunches. With the introduction of a crossing angle, the actual number of collisions resulting from the bunch collision gets reduced. Here we derive the expression for the luminosity geometric reduction factor when the bunches of the two incoming beams are not equal.

  14. A high Luminosity electrostatic spectrometer for conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeverstam, U.; Bodlund-Ringstroem, B.; Bohm, C.; Ekdahl, T.; Liljeqvist, D.

    1977-10-01

    The properties of the electrostatic mirror spectrometer, especially its luminosity at modest resolution, are investigated by means of computer simulation. On the basis of the results of the simulations a spectrometer is built, which has figures of merit in very good agreement with the computed results. For a circular source having a radius equal to one tenth of the radius of the inner cylinder of the spectrometer a resolution (fwhm) of 2.5 precent is reached. (author)

  15. LUMINOUS SATELLITES. II. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION, LUMINOSITY FUNCTION, AND COSMIC EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nierenberg, A. M.; Treu, T. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Auger, M. W. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB30HA (United Kingdom); Marshall, P. J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Fassnacht, C. D. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Busha, Michael T., E-mail: amn01@physics.ucsb.edu [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-06-20

    We infer the normalization and the radial and angular distributions of the number density of satellites of massive galaxies (log{sub 10}[M*{sub h}/M{sub Sun }] > 10.5) between redshifts 0.1 and 0.8 as a function of host stellar mass, redshift, morphology, and satellite luminosity. Exploiting the depth and resolution of the COSMOS Hubble Space Telescope images, we detect satellites up to 8 mag fainter than the host galaxies and as close as 0.3 (1.4) arcsec (kpc). Describing the number density profile of satellite galaxies to be a projected power law such that P(R){proportional_to}R{sup {gamma}{sub p}}, we find {gamma}{sub p} = -1.1 {+-} 0.3. We find no dependency of {gamma}{sub p} on host stellar mass, redshift, morphology, or satellite luminosity. Satellites of early-type hosts have angular distributions that are more flattened than the host light profile and are aligned with its major axis. No significant average alignment is detected for satellites of late-type hosts. The number of satellites within a fixed magnitude contrast from a host galaxy is dependent on its stellar mass, with more massive galaxies hosting significantly more satellites. Furthermore, high-mass late-type hosts have significantly fewer satellites than early-type galaxies of the same stellar mass, possibly indicating that they reside in more massive halos. No significant evolution in the number of satellites per host is detected. The cumulative luminosity function of satellites is qualitatively in good agreement with that predicted using SubHalo Abundance Matching techniques. However, there are significant residual discrepancies in the absolute normalization, suggesting that properties other than the host galaxy luminosity or stellar mass determine the number of satellites.

  16. LHC Luminosity calibration using the Longitudinal Density Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Boccardi, A; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Mazzoni, S; Palm, M

    2013-01-01

    The present note describes how data measured with the LHC Longitudinal Density Monitor (LDM) can contribute to the 2012-2013 LHC luminosity calibration experiments. More specifically, LDM data can provide an estimation of the ghost fraction fghost and satellite fraction fsat needed for the normalisation of bunch populations. After a concise description of the LDM data treatment, the key quantities of interest are derived and commented. Finally, a description of the LDM analysis products is given.

  17. Electron-cloud effects in high-luminosity colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, F.

    1998-01-01

    Electron-cloud instabilities are expected to be important in most high-luminosity double-ring colliders. In this report, the author describes a few parameter regimes and some critical parameter dependences of this type of instability, and illustrate these with simulation results for the PEP-II and KEK B factories, the LHC, the VLHC, and DAPHNE. In addition, the author studies the possibility and the potential impact of an electron cloud in the interaction region.

  18. EU supports the LHC high-luminosity study

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The design collision energy and luminosity of the LHC are already at record numbers, making the machine one of the most complex scientific instruments ever built. However, to extend its discovery potential even further, a major upgrade of the LHC will be required around 2020. This will increase its average luminosity by a factor of 5 to 10 beyond its design value. Fifteen worldwide institutions and the European Union are supporting the initial design phase of the project through the HiLumi LHC programme, whose kick-off meeting will take place on 16-18 November.   The CERN team that has successfully built and tested the Short Magnet Coil – a small 40 cm long magnet capable of producing a 12.5 T magnetic field. The upgrade of the LHC will require about 10 years of design, construction and implementation. The new machine configuration will be called “High Luminosity LHC” (HL-LHC). The similarly named “HiLumi LHC” is the EU programme that supports...

  19. Precision luminosity measurement at LHCb with beam-gas imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Barschel, Colin

    The luminosity is the physical quantity which relates the cross-section to the production rate in collider experiments. The cross-section being the particle physics observable of interest, a precise determination of the luminosity is required. This work presents the absolute luminosity calibration results performed at the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment at CERN using a novel method based on beam-gas interactions with data acquired at a center of mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV and $\\sqrt{s}=2.76$ TeV. Reconstructed beam-gas interaction vertices in LHCb are used to measure the beam profiles, thus making it possible to determine the beams overlap integral. An important element of this work was to install and use a neon gas injection system to increase the beam-gas interaction rate. The precision reached with the beam-gas imaging method relies on the two-dimensional beam shape determination developed in this work. For such precision, the interaction vertex resolution is an important ingredient. There...

  20. Quality Factor for the Hadronic Calorimeter in High Luminosity Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Seixas, Jose; The ATLAS collaboration; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Sotto-Maior-Peralva, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of ATLAS experiment and has about 10,000 eletronic channels. An Optimal Filter (OF) has been used to estimate the energy sampled by the calorimeter and applies a Quality Factor (QF) for signal acceptance. An approach using Matched Filter (MF) has also been pursued. In order to cope with the luminosity rising foreseen for LHC operation upgrade, different algorithms have been developed. Currently, the OF measure for signal acceptance is implemented through a chi-square test. At a low luminosity scenario, such QF measure has been used as a way to describe how the acquired signal is compatible to the pulse shape pattern. However, at high-luminosity conditions, due to pile up, this QF acceptance is no longer possible when OF is employed, and the QF becomes a measure to indicate whether the reconstructed signal suffers or not from pile up. Methods are being developed in order to recover the superposed information, and the QF may be us...

  1. An ionization chamber shower detector for the LHC luminosity monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Beche, J F; Datte, P S; Haguenauer, Maurice; Manfredi, P F; Millaud, J E; Placidi, Massimo; Ratti, L; Re, V; Riot, V J; Schmickler, Hermann; Speziali, V; Turner, W C

    2000-01-01

    The front IR quadrupole absorbers (TAS) and the IR neutral particle absorbers (TAN) in the high luminosity insertions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) each absorb approximately 1.8 TeV of forward collision products on average per pp interaction (~235 W at design luminosity 10/sup 34/ cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/). This secondary particle flux can be exploited to provide a useful storage ring operations tool for optimization of luminosity. A novel segmented, multi-gap, pressurized gas ionization chamber is being developed for sampling the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The system design choices have been strongly influenced by optimization of signal to noise ratio and by the very high radiation environment. The ionization chambers are instrumented with low noise, fast, pulse shaping electronics to be capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40 MHz. Data on each bunch are to be separately accumulated over multiple bunch crossings until the desire...

  2. High-Luminosity LHC moves to the next phase

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    This week saw several meetings vital for the medium-term future of CERN.    From Monday to Wednesday, the Resource Review Board, RRB, that oversees resource allocation in the LHC experiments, had a series of meetings. Thursday then saw the close-out meeting for the Hi-Lumi LHC design study, which was partially funded by the European Commission. These meetings focused on the High Luminosity upgrade for the LHC, which responds to the top priority of the European Strategy for Particle Physics adopted by the CERN Council in 2013. This upgrade will transform the LHC into a facility for precision studies, the logical next step for the high-energy frontier of particle physics. It is a challenging upgrade, both for the LHC and the detectors. The LHC is already the highest luminosity hadron collider ever constructed, generating up to a billion collisions per second at the heart of the detectors. The High Luminosity upgrade will see that number rise by a factor of five from 2025. For the detectors...

  3. Beam dynamics studies to develop LHC luminosity model

    CERN Document Server

    Campogiani, Giovanna; Papaphilippou, Ioannis

    The thesis project aims at studying the different physical processes that are impacting luminosity, one of the key figures of merit of a collider operation. In particular the project focuses on extracting the most relevant parameters for the high-energy part of the model, which is mostly dominated by the beam-beam effect. LHC luminosity is degraded by parasitic collisions that reduce the beam lifetime and the particles stability in the collider. This instability is due to the non-linear effects of one beam electromagnetic field on another in the interaction region. Such parasitic encounters can be as many as 16 per interaction region, piling up to around 180 000 per second. Our goal is to study the evolution of charge density distribution in the beam, by tracking particles through a symplectic integrator that includes the beam-beam effect. In particular we want to obtain data on the halo particles, which are more sensible to instability, to better characterise the beam lifetime and monitor the luminosity evol...

  4. ATLAS ITk Strip Detector for High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kroll, Jiri; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is currently preparing for an upgrade of the tracking system in the course of the High-Luminosity LHC that is scheduled for 2026. The expected peak instantaneous luminosity up to 7.5E34 per second and cm2 corresponding to approximately 200 inelastic proton-proton interactions per beam crossing, radiation damage at an integrated luminosity of 3000/fb and hadron fluencies over 1E16 1 MeV neutron equivalent per cm2, as well as fast hardware tracking capability that will bring Level-0 trigger rate of a few MHz down to a Level-1 trigger rate below 1 MHz require a replacement of existing Inner Detector by an all-silicon Inner Tracker (ITk) with a pixel detector surrounded by a strip detector. The current prototyping phase, that is working with ITk Strip Detector consisting of a four-layer barrel and a forward region composed of six discs on each side of the barrel, has resulted in the ATLAS ITk Strip Detector Technical Design Report (TDR), which starts the pre-production readiness phase at the ...

  5. Designing the ATLAS trigger menu for high luminosities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahama, Yu

    2012-01-01

    The LHC has a bunch-crossing rate of 20 MHz whereas the ATLAS detector has an average recording rate of about 400 Hz. To reduce the rate of events but still maintain a high efficiency for selecting interesting events needed by ATLAS physics analyses, a three-level trigger system is used in ATLAS. Events are selected based on the Trigger Menu, the definitions of the physics signatures the experiment triggers on. In the 2012 data taking since April, approximately 700 chains are used online. The menu must reflect not only the physics goals of the collaboration but also take into consideration the LHC luminosity and the strict DAQ limitations. An overview of the design, the validation and the performance of the trigger menu for the 2011 data-taking is given. During 2011, the menu had to evolve as the luminosity increase from below 2×10 33 cm −2 s −1 to almost 5×10 33 cm −2 s −1 . Re-designing the menu for the up-coming high luminosity of around 10 34 cm −2 s −1 and large number of collision events that take place per each bunch crossing (pile-up) of around 35 interactions per bunch crossing at √s = 8 TeV is described. Initial performance in the 2012 data-taking is also reported.

  6. ATLAS ITk Strip Detector for High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kroll, Jiri; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is currently preparing for an upgrade of the tracking system in the course of the High-Luminosity LHC that is scheduled for 2026. The expected peak instantaneous luminosity up to $7.5\\times10^{34}\\;\\mathrm{cm}^{-2}\\mathrm{s}^{-1}$ corresponding to approximately 200 inelastic proton-proton interactions per beam crossing, radiation damage at an integrated luminosity of $3000\\;\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ and hadron fluencies over $2\\times10^{16}\\;\\mathrm{n}_{\\mathrm{eq}}/\\mathrm{cm}^{2}$, as well as fast hardware tracking capability that will bring Level-0 trigger rate of a few MHz down to a Level-1 trigger rate below 1 MHz require a replacement of existing Inner Detector by an all-silicon Inner Tracker with a pixel detector surrounded by a strip detector. The current prototyping phase, that is working with ITk Strip Detector consisting of a four-layer barrel and a forward region composed of six disks on each side of the barrel, has resulted in the ATLAS Inner Tracker Strip Detector Technical Design R...

  7. Investigations of the Parameter Space for the LHC Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Koutchouk, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Increasing the LHC luminosity by a factor of ten is a major challenge, especially for the beam-beam long-range interactions and even more for the magnet technology and insertion layout. To help identifying consistent solutions in this multi-dimensional constrained space, a parametric model of an LHC insertion was prepared, based on the present LHC layout, i.e. ?quadrupole first? and small crossing angle. The model deals with the layout, beam optics, beam-beam effect, superconductor margin and peak heat deposition in the coils. The approach is simplified to obtain a large gain in the optimization time. This study puts in evidence, as critical for the luminosity upgrade, the following actions: enlarging significantly the quadrupole aperture, moving the insertion towards the interaction point, using the highest available critical field superconductors and complementing the insertion with an early separation scheme. The luminosity reach can then be extended to 2×1035 cm-2s-1 while 1×1035 can be obtained with si...

  8. The High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider the new machine for illuminating the mysteries of Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Brüning, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a broad introduction to the physics and technology of the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). This new configuration of the LHC is one of the major accelerator projects for the next 15 years and will give new life to the LHC after its first 15-year operation. Not only will it allow more precise measurements of the Higgs boson and of any new particles that might be discovered in the next LHC run, but also extend the mass limit reach for detecting new particles. The HL-LHC is based on the innovative accelerator magnet technologies capable of generating 11–13 Tesla fields, with effectiveness enhanced by use of the new Achromatic Telescopic Squeezing scheme, and other state-of-the-art accelerator technologies, such as superconducting compact RF crab cavities, advanced collimation concepts, and novel power technology based on high temperature superconducting links. The book consists of a series of chapters touching on all issues of technology and design, and each chapter can be re...

  9. MAD ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGING OF HIGH-LUMINOSITY QUASARS: A PILOT PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liuzzo, E. [Osservatorio di Radioastronomia, INAF, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Falomo, R.; Paiano, S.; Baruffolo, A.; Farinato, J.; Moretti, A.; Ragazzoni, R. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, INAF, vicolo dell’Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Treves, A. [Università dell’Insubria (Como) (Italy); Uslenghi, M. [INAF-IASF, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Arcidiacono, C.; Diolaiti, E.; Lombini, M. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, INAF, Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Brast, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Via Irnerio, 46, I-40126, Bologna (Italy); Donaldson, R.; Kolb, J.; Marchetti, E.; Tordo, S., E-mail: liuzzo@ira.inaf.it [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany)

    2016-08-01

    We present near-IR images of five luminous quasars at z ∼ 2 and one at z ∼ 4 obtained with an experimental adaptive optics (AO) instrument at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope. The observations are part of a program aimed at demonstrating the capabilities of multi-conjugated adaptive optics imaging combined with the use of natural guide stars for high spatial resolution studies on large telescopes. The observations were mostly obtained under poor seeing conditions but in two cases. In spite of these nonoptimal conditions, the resulting images of point sources have cores of FWHM ∼ 0.2 arcsec. We are able to characterize the host galaxy properties for two sources and set stringent upper limits to the galaxy luminosity for the others. We also report on the expected capabilities for investigating the host galaxies of distant quasars with AO systems coupled with future Extremely Large Telescopes. Detailed simulations show that it will be possible to characterize compact (2–3 kpc) quasar host galaxies for quasi-stellar objects at z = 2 with nucleus K -magnitude spanning from 15 to 20 (corresponding to absolute magnitude −31 to −26) and host galaxies that are 4 mag fainter than their nuclei.

  10. Compact Dexterous Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovchik, Christopher Scott (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A compact robotic hand includes a palm housing, a wrist section, and a forearm section. The palm housing supports a plurality of fingers and one or more movable palm members that cooperate with the fingers to grasp and/or release an object. Each flexible finger comprises a plurality of hingedly connected segments, including a proximal segment pivotally connected to the palm housing. The proximal finger segment includes at least one groove defining first and second cam surfaces for engagement with a cable. A plurality of lead screw assemblies each carried by the palm housing are supplied with power from a flexible shaft rotated by an actuator and output linear motion to a cable move a finger. The cable is secured within a respective groove and enables each finger to move between an opened and closed position. A decoupling assembly pivotally connected to a proximal finger segment enables a cable connected thereto to control movement of an intermediate and distal finger segment independent of movement of the proximal finger segment. The dexterous robotic hand closely resembles the function of a human hand yet is light weight and capable of grasping both heavy and light objects with a high degree of precision.

  11. Compact stellarator coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomphrey, N.; Berry, L.A.; Boozer, A.H.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental devices to study the physics of high-beta (β>∼4%), low aspect ratio (A<∼4.5) stellarator plasmas require coils that will produce plasmas satisfying a set of physics goals, provide experimental flexibility, and be practical to construct. In the course of designing a flexible coil set for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment, we have made several innovations that may be useful in future stellarator design efforts. These include: the use of Singular Value Decomposition methods for obtaining families of smooth current potentials on distant coil winding surfaces from which low current density solutions may be identified; the use of a Control Matrix Method for identifying which few of the many detailed elements of the stellarator boundary must be targeted if a coil set is to provide fields to control the essential physics of the plasma; the use of Genetic Algorithms for choosing an optimal set of discrete coils from a continuum of potential contours; the evaluation of alternate coil topologies for balancing the tradeoff between physics objective and engineering constraints; the development of a new coil optimization code for designing modular coils, and the identification of a 'natural' basis for describing current sheet distributions. (author)

  12. Compact neutron generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  13. Compact vacuum insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  14. Good environmental performance from Compact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinnunen, L.

    1996-01-01

    For Rovaniemi and the designers of the town's new Suosiola power plant, it was clear from the start that it would be based on atmospheric-pressurized fluidized bed technology. In a bid to keep environmental emissions to a minimum, the decision fell to Foster Wheeler's new Compact CFB boiler. Work on developing the Compact boiler has been carried out since 1989. Flow models and cold air and hot air tests were completed in 1990. The first Compact boiler, an 18 MW unit, was commissioned at Kuhmo in 1993; this was followed by one at Kokkola in 1994

  15. The United Nations Global Compact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasche, Andreas; Waddock, Sandra; McIntosh, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the interdisciplinary literature on the UN Global Compact. The review identifies three research perspectives, which scholars have used to study the UN Global Compact so far: a historical perspective discussing the Global Compact in the context of UN-business relations......, an operational perspective discussing the composition and impact of its participants, as well as a governance perspective discussing the constraints and opportunities of the initiative as an institutionalized arena for addressing global governance gaps. The authors contrast these three perspectives and identify...

  16. High-resolution spectra of distant compact narrow emission line galaxies: Progrenitors of spheroidal galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, David C.; Guzman, Rafael; Faber, S. M.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Kron, Richard G.; Takamiya, Marianne

    1995-01-01

    Emission-line velocity widths have been determined for 17 faint (B approximately 20-23) very blue, compact galaxies whose redshifts range from z = 0.095 to 0.66. The spectra have a resolution of 8 Km/s and were taken with the HIRES echelle spectrograph of the Keck 10 m telescope. The galaxies are luminous with all but two within 1 mag of M(sub B) approximately -21. Yet they exhibit narrow velocity widths between sigma = 28-157 km/s, more consistent with typical values of extreme star-forming galaxies than with those of nearby spiral galaxies of similar luminosity. In particular, objects with sigma is less than or equal to 65 km/s follow the same correlations between sigma and both blue and H beta luminosities as those of nearby H II galaxies. These results strengthen the identification of H II glaxies as thier local counterparts. The blue colors and strong emission lines suggest these compact galaxies are undergoing a recent, strong burst of star formation. Like those which characterize some H II galaxies, this burst could be a nuclear star-forming event within a much larger, older stellar population. If the burst is instead a major episode in the total star-forming history, these distant galaxies could fade enough to match the low luminosities and surface brightnesses typical of nearby spheroidals like NGC 185 or NGC 205. Together with evidence for recent star formation, exponential light profiles, and subsolar metallicities, the postfading correlations between luminosity and velocity width and bewtween luminosity and surface brightness suggest that among the low-sigma galaxies, we may be witnessing, in situ, the progenitors of today's spheroidal galaxies.

  17. COMPACTNESS IN INTUITIONISTIC FUZZY MULTISET TOPOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Kunnambath, Shinoj Thekke; John, Sunil Jacob

    2017-01-01

    – In this paper, we discussVarious properties of Compact and Homeomorphic Intuitionistic Fuzzy Multiset Topological spacesarious properties of Compact and Homeomorphic Intuitionistic Fuzzy Multiset Topological spaces

  18. Fast and precise luminosity measurement at the international linear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The amount and spatial distribution of the energy deposition from them will be used for this purpose. LumiCal and BeamCal are compact electromagnetic sandwich calorimeters using tungsten as an absorber and silicon as a sensor. For the inner part of the BeamCal a sufficiently radiation hard material like polycrystalline ...

  19. Variations of the core luminosity and solar neutrino fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandpierre, Attila

    The aim of the present work is to analyze the geological and astrophysical data as well as presenting theoretical considerations indicating the presence of dynamic processes present in the solar core. The dynamic solar model (DSM) is suggested to take into account the presence of cyclic variations in the temperature of the solar core. Comparing the results of calculations of the CO2 content, albedo and solar evolutionary luminosity changes with the empirically determined global earthly temperatures, and taking into account climatic models, I determined the relation between the earthly temperature and solar luminosity. These results indicate to the observed maximum of 10o change on the global terrestrial surface temperature a related solar luminosity change around 4-5 % on a ten million years timescale, which is the timescale of heat diffusion from the solar core to the surface. The related solar core temperature changes are around 1 % only. At the same time, the cyclic luminosity changes of the solar core are shielded effectively by the outer zones since the radiation diffusion takes more than 105 years to reach the solar surface. The measurements of the solar neutrino fluxes with Kamiokande 1987-1995 showed variations higher than 40 % around the average, at the Super-Kamiokande the size of the apparent scatter decreased to 13 %. This latter scatter, if would be related completely to stochastic variations of the central temperature, would indicate a smaller than 1 % change. Fourier and wavelet analysis of the solar neutrino fluxes indicate only a marginally significant period around 200 days (Haubold, 1998). Helioseismic measurements are known to be very constraining. Actually, Castellani et al. (1999) remarked that the different solar models lead to slightly different sound speeds, and the different methods of regularization yield slightly different sound speeds, too. Therefore, they doubled the found parameter variations, and were really conservative assuming

  20. Compact instantaneous water heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, Jorge G.W.; Machado, Antonio R.; Ferraz, Andre D.; Rocha, Ivan C.C. da; Konishi, Ricardo [Companhia de Gas de Santa Catarina (SCGAS), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Lehmkuhl, Willian A.; Francisco Jr, Roberto W.; Hatanaka, Ricardo L.; Pereira, Fernando M.; Oliveira, Amir A.M. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of combustion in an inert porous medium in a liquid heating device application. This project aims to increase efficiency in the application of natural gas in residential and commercial sectors with the use of advanced combustion and heat transfer. The goal is to facilitate the development of a high performance compact water heater allowing hot water supply for up to two simultaneous showers. The experiment consists in a cylindrical porous burner with an integrated annular water heat exchanger. The reactants were injected radially into the burner and the flame stabilizes within the porous matrix. The water circulates in a coiled pipe positioned at the center of the burner. This configuration allows for heat transfer by conduction and radiation from the solid matrix to the heat exchanger. This article presented preliminary experimental results of a new water heater based on an annular porous burner. The range of equivalence ratios tested varied from 0.65 to 0.8. The power range was varied from 3 to 5 kW. Increasing the equivalence ratio or decreasing the total power input of the burner resulted in increased thermal efficiencies of the water heater. Thermal efficiencies varying from 60 to 92% were obtained. The condition for the goal of a comfortable bath was 20 deg C for 8-12 L/min. This preliminary prototype has achieved water temperature of 11deg C for 5 L/min. Further optimizations will be necessary in order to achieve intense heating with high thermal efficiency. (author)

  1. Physics as a function of energy and luminosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, a new physics in the range of mass up to TeV region is discussed. Most of the discussion concern hadron-hadron (hh) colliders, and also electron-positron colliders are discussed. The cross-sections for new particle production in hh colliders have the general Drell-Yan form, in which the differential luminosity for the collision of partons is included. The formulas with the parton distribution scaled up from present energy using the Altarelli-Parisi equations may be approximately correct within a factor of 2 for the production of particles. Some typical parton-parton luminosity functions for proton-proton and proton-antiproton collisions are presented. From the consideration of luminosity, it can be said that the pp colliders are to be preferred. The case studies of some of the possible new physics discussed by Zakharov, mainly on Higgs bosons and supersymmetric particles, but also a few remarks about technicolor are presented. It seems possible to detect technicolor at a large hh collider. The physics reaches of different possible hh colliders are summarized in tables. In the tables, the observable production of Higgses up to 1 TeV in mass, the observable masses for gluinos (squarks) and the technicolor observability are shown. The cleanliness of electron-positron colliders compared to hadron-hadron colliders is pled, a guess is given as to the appropriate conversion factors between the energy in the electron-positron and hh collisions, the complementarity of electron-positron and hh colliders is urged, and it is argued that a rational mix of world accelerators would include both. (Kato, T.)

  2. The field luminosity function and nearby groups of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huchra, J.

    1978-01-01

    A catalog of radial velocities and magnitudes on a homogeneous system (the corrected Harvard, B(o) magnitudes of de Vaucouleurs) has been assembled for over 4000 galaxies. Using this catalog, a magnitude limited sample of approximately 1000 galaxies with nearly complete radial velocity data was compiled. The magnitude limit is 13.0 and the galaxies are primarily from the Shapley-Ames catalog plus a few low and high surface brightness objects properly included in a magnitude limited sample. A new determination of the field luminosity function and density plus initial experiments with the use of a redshift catalog to select groups of galaxies, are briefly described. (Auth.)

  3. Luminosity measurements for the R scan experiment at BESIII

    OpenAIRE

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ahmed, S.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Bakina, O.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.

    2017-01-01

    By analyzing the large-angle Bhabha scattering events $e^{+}e^{-}$ $\\to$ ($\\gamma$)$e^{+}e^{-}$ and diphoton events $e^{+}e^{-}$ $\\to$ $\\gamma\\gamma$ for the data sets collected at center-of-mass (c.m.) energies between 2.2324 and 4.5900 GeV (131 energy points in total) with the upgraded Beijing Spectrometer (BESIII) at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider (BEPCII), the integrated luminosities have been measured at the different c.m. energies, individually. The results are the important inp...

  4. ATLAS Higgs Physics Prospects at the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Varol, Tulin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Higgs physics prospects at the high-luminosity LHC are presented, assuming an energy of $\\sqrt s = 14$ TeV and a data sample of 3000-4000 fb$^{-1}$. In particular, the ultimate precision attainable on the couplings measurements of the 125 GeV Higgs boson with SM fermions and bosons is discussed, as well as perspectives on the search for the Standard Model di-Higgs production, which could lead to the measurement of the Higgs boson self-coupling.

  5. Low-beta Quadrupole Designs for the LHC Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Ostojic, Ranko; Kirby, Glyn; Russenschuck, Stephan

    2005-01-01

    Several scenarios are considered for the upgrade of the LHC insertions in view of increasing the luminosity beyond 1034 cm-2s-1. In the case of “quadrupole first” option, superconducting low-b quadrupoles with apertures in the range of 90-110 mm are required in view of increased heat loads and beam crossing angles. We present possible low-b quadrupole designs based on existing Nb3Sn and LHC NbTi superconductors, present scaling laws for the magnet parameters and discuss relative advantages of the underlying triplet layouts.

  6. Sky luminosity for Rio de Janeiro City - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbella, O.D.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents sky luminosity data for Rio de Janeiro City, useful to be used in daylighting design in architecture. The data are presented as monthly graphics that correlate sunshine-hours with the frequency of occurrence during the day of a specific type of sky, that would present one of five defined characteristics (among clear and overcast sky). These results were derived from the knowledge of daily solar radiation and sunshine-hours data, for every day for a twelve year period. (author). 10 refs, 13 figs, 16 tabs

  7. LHCb VELO Closing Control, Vertex Resolution and Luminosity Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Redford, S

    2010-01-01

    The LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO) surrounds the collision point at IP8 of the LHC ring and performs precise tracking and vertexing. This silicon micro-strip detector is built in two halves, which each move independently in the transverse plane so as to approach the collision region during data taking, but retract whilst the beams are injected and adjusted. The closing procedure of the VELO is detailed, along with an analysis of the primary vertex resolution and a description of the role of the VELO in the LHCb luminosity measurement.

  8. APD performance in a luminosity monitor at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolomé, E; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Clemente, S; Fernández, E; Garrido, L; Lorenz, E; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Wright, A

    2000-01-01

    Avalanche photo-diodes (APDs) are being used as optical readout elements in a sampling electromagnetic calorimeter made of alternate layers of tungsten and plastic scintillators. The calorimeter serves as a small-angle luminosity monitor in the stray magnetic field of the ALEPH detector at LEP (CERN). Its scintillators are coupled both to APDs and conventional PMTs simultaneously via wavelength shifter fibres. In this paper we present results on the overall performance of the APDs, including gain and stability versus time and energy, based on the direct comparison of the two photosensitive devices. (6 refs).

  9. Prospects for physics at high luminosity with CMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varela João

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The precision measurements of the properties of the recently discovered Higgs-like boson will be central to the future LHC physics program. In parallel the search for New Physics beyond the SM will continue. Higher luminosity will extend the mass reach and allow sensitive searches for possible subtle signatures for new physics. In this paper we review the potential sensitivity of CMS to a selection of relevant future physics scenarios accessible with the LHC upgrades and a correspondingly upgraded CMS detector.

  10. The luminosity monitor of the HERMES experiment at DESY

    CERN Document Server

    Benisch, T; Devitsin, E G; Kozlov, V; Potashov, S Yu; Rith, K; Terkulov, A R; Weiskopf, C

    2001-01-01

    A detector is described which measures the luminosity of the HERMES experiment at DESY. It is based on the coincident detection of electron-positron and photon pairs, or electron pairs, originating from the interaction of the beam positrons, or electrons, with the electrons of the atomic gas target. It consists of two calorimeters with radiation hard NaBi(WO sub 4) sub 2 crystals. Properties of the monitor, investigated in an electron test beam, and its performance in the experiment are presented.

  11. What Is Business's Social Compact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avishai, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Under the "new" social compact, businesses must focus on continuous learning and thus have both an obligation to support teaching and an opportunity to profit from it. Learning organizations must also be teaching organizations. (SK)

  12. Compact, Ultrasensitive Formaldehyde Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Small Business Innovative Research Phase II proposal seeks to develop a compact UV laser ?based sensor for Earth science and planetary atmosphere exploration....

  13. Compaction with Automatic Jog Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-11-01

    conserve area. For these reasons, compaction algorithms have gained widespread attention in the VLSI literature S ,[4, 5, 9, 111, and have been incorporated...graph is (V,E), then Dijkstra’s algorithm runs in time 6 (IEl - IVI log IV!) using Fibonacci heaps [3]. In contrast, the longest- path algorithm of...however, so that hierarchical compaction can alleviate much of the resource -. 33 pa. .1 N’, problem. It also may be suited to use in channel routing

  14. Compact reactor/ORC power source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, K.L.; Kirchner, W.L.; Willcutt, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    A compact power source that combines an organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) electric generator with a nuclear reactor heat source is being designed and fabricated. Incorporating existing ORC technology with proven reactor technology, the compact reactor/ORC power source offers high reliability while minimizing the need for component development. Thermal power at 125 kWt is removed from the coated particle fueled, graphite moderated reactor by heat pipes operating at 500 0 C. Outside the reactor vessel and connected to the heat pipes are vaporizers in which the toluene ORC working fluid is heated to 370 0 C. In the turbine-alternator-pump (TAP) combined-rotating unit, the thermal energy of the toluene is converted to 25 kWe of electric power. Lumped parameter systems analyses combined with a finite element thermal analysis have aided in the power source design. The analyses have provided assurance of reliable multiyear normal operation as well as full power operation with upset conditions, such as failed heat pipes and inoperative ORC vaporizers. Because of inherent high reliability, long life, and insensitivity to upset conditions, this power source is especially suited for use in remote, inaccessible locations where fuel delivery and maintenance costs are high. 10 refs

  15. Compact neutron generators for environmental recovery applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, K. N.; Firestone, R. B.; Lou, T. P.; Reijonen, J.; Vujic, J. Lj.

    2002-01-01

    New generations of compact neutron sources are being developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The D-D or D-T neutron generators can be used to perform precise elemental analysis by Prompt Gamma-Ray Activation Analysis (PGAA) in place of a nuclear reactor. The neutron generators will be composed of an ion source, from which a 1.5 A deuterium beam will be extracted and accelerated to about 150 keV onto a target loaded with deuterium. Based on the D-D nuclear reaction, the neutron generator will yield approximately 10 12 n/s (10 14 n/s for D-T reaction). With this neutron output, thermal and cold neutron fluxes of 10 7 n/s cm 2 and 6 x 10 6 n/s cm 2 have been estimated using neutron moderators designed by the neutron transport simulation code MCNP. (author)

  16. Conceptual design of multipurpose compact research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Hiroshi; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Hori, Naohiko; Kaminaga, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    Conceptual design of the high-performance and low-cost multipurpose compact research reactor which will be expected to construct in the nuclear power plant introduction countries, started from 2010 in JAEA and nuclear-related companies in Japan. The aims of this conceptual design are to achieve highly safe reactor, economical design, high availability factor and advanced irradiation utilization. One of the basic reactor concept was determined as swimming pool type, thermal power of 10MW and water cooled and moderated reactor with plate type fuel element same as the JMTR. It is expected that the research reactors are used for human resource development, progress of the science and technology, expansion of industry use, lifetime extension of LWRs and so on. (author)

  17. Beam Trajectory control of the future Compact LInear Collider beam

    CERN Document Server

    Balik, G; Bolzon, B; Brunetti, L; Caron, B; Deleglise, G; Jeremie, A; Le Breton, R; Lottin, J; Pacquet, L

    2011-01-01

    The future Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) currently under design at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) would create high-energy particle collisions between electrons and positrons, and provide a tool for scientists to address many of the most compelling questions about the fundamental nature of matter, energy, space and time. In accelerating structure, it is well-established that vibrations generated by the ground motion constitute the main limiting factors for reaching the luminosity of 10^34 cm-2s-1. Several methods have been proposed to counteract this phenomena and active vibration controls based on the integration of mechatronic systems into the machine structure is probably one of the most promising. This paper studies the strategy of the vibration suppression. Active vibration control methods, such as optimized parameter of a numerical compensator, adaptive algorithm with real time control are investigated and implemented in the simulation layout. The requirement couldn’t be achieved w...

  18. Compact binary merger and kilonova: outflows from remnant disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Tuan; Gu, Wei-Min; Liu, Tong; Kumar, Rajiv; Mu, Hui-Jun; Song, Cui-Ying

    2018-05-01

    Outflows launched from a remnant disc of compact binary merger may have essential contribution to the kilonova emission. Numerical calculations are conducted in this work to study the structure of accretion flows and outflows. By the incorporation of limited-energy advection in the hyper-accretion discs, outflows occur naturally from accretion flows due to imbalance between the viscous heating and the sum of the advective and radiative cooling. Following this spirit, we revisit the properties of the merger outflow ejecta. Our results show that around 10-3 ˜ 10-1 M⊙ of the disc mass can be launched as powerful outflows. The amount of unbound mass varies with the disc mass and the viscosity. The outflow-contributed peak luminosity is around 1040 ˜ 1041 erg s-1. Such a scenario can account for the observed kilonovae associated with short gamma-ray bursts, including the recent event AT2017gfo (GW170817).

  19. Luminosity Optimization for a Higher-Energy LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dominguez, O

    2011-01-01

    A Higher-Energy Large Hadron Collider (HE-LHC) is an option to further push the energy frontier of particle physics beyond the present LHC. A beam energy of 16.5 TeV would require 20 T dipole magnets in the existing LHC tunnel, which should be compared with 7 TeV and 8.33 T for the nominal LHC. Since the synchrotron radiation power increases with the fourth power of the energy, radiation damping becomes significant for the HE-LHC. It calls for transverse and longitudinal emittance control vis-a-vis beam-beam interaction and Landau damping. The heat load from synchrotron radiation, gas scattering, and electron cloud also increases with respect to the LHC. In this paper we discuss the proposed HE-LHC beam parameters; the time evolution of luminosity, beam-beam tune shifts, and emittances during an HE-LHC store; the expected heat load; and luminosity optimization schemes for both round and flat beams.

  20. The CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for the High Luminosity LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvan, J.-B.

    2018-02-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will integrate 10 times more luminosity than the LHC, posing significant challenges for radiation tolerance and event pileup on detectors, especially for forward calorimetry, and hallmarks the issue for future colliders. As part of its HL-LHC upgrade program, the CMS collaboration is designing a High Granularity Calorimeter to replace the existing endcap calorimeters. It features unprecedented transverse and longitudinal segmentation for both electromagnetic (ECAL) and hadronic (HCAL) compartments. This will facilitate particle-flow calorimetry, where the fine structure of showers can be measured and used to enhance pileup rejection and particle identification, whilst still achieving good energy resolution. The ECAL and a large fraction of HCAL will be based on hexagonal silicon sensors of 0.5-1 cm2 cell size, with the remainder of the HCAL based on highly-segmented scintillators with silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readout. The intrinsic high-precision timing capabilities of the silicon sensors will add an extra dimension to event reconstruction, especially in terms of pileup rejection.

  1. Detector Development for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00367854; Gößling, Claus

    To maximise the discovery potential of the Large Hadron Collider, it will be upgraded to the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider in 2024. New detector challenges arise from the higher instantaneous luminosity and the higher particle flux. The new ATLAS Inner Tracker will replace the current tracking detector to be able to cope with these challenges. Many pixel detector technologies exist for particle tracking, but their suitability for the ATLAS Inner Tracker needs to be studied. Active high-voltage CMOS sensors, which are produced in industrialised processes, offer a fast readout and radiation tolerance. In this thesis the HV2FEI4v2 sensor, which is capacitively coupled to the ATLAS Pixel FE-I4 readout chip, is characterised for the usage in the outer layers of the ATLAS Inner Tracker. Key quantities of this prototype module are studied, such as the hit efficiency and the subpixel encoding. The early HV2FEI4v2 prototype shows promising results as a starting point for further module developments. Active CMO...

  2. Absolute luminosity measurements with the LHCb detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Brisbane, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Caicedo Carvajal, J M; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Constantin, F; Conti, G; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Almagne, B; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Deissenroth, M; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Eames, C; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; d'Enterria, D G; Esperante Pereira, D; Estève, L; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hofmann, W; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koblitz, S; Koppenburg, P; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kukulak, S; Kumar, R; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Luisier, J; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Mclean, C; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nardulli, J; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Nies, S; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B; Palacios, J; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilar, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; du Pree, T; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shao, B; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skottowe, H P; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A C; Smith, N A; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Styles, N; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Vervink, K; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wacker, K; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zverev, E; Zvyagin, A

    2012-01-01

    Absolute luminosity measurements are of general interest for colliding-beam experiments at storage rings. These measurements are necessary to determine the absolute cross-sections of reaction processes and are valuable to quantify the performance of the accelerator. LHCb has applied two methods to determine the absolute scale of its luminosity measurements for proton-proton collisions at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. In addition to the classic ``van der Meer scan'' method a novel technique has been developed which makes use of direct imaging of the individual beams using beam-gas and beam-beam interactions. This beam imaging method is made possible by the high resolution of the LHCb vertex detector and the close proximity of the detector to the beams, and allows beam parameters such as positions, angles and widths to be determined. The results of the two methods have comparable precision and are in good agreement. Combining the two methods, an overall precision of 3.5\\% in the absolute lumi...

  3. ATLAS Trigger and DAQ Upgrades for High-Luminosity LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishino M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ATLAS Trigger-DAQ system will be significantly upgraded to explore new physics beyond the standard model in the High-Luminosity LHC environment with instantaneous luminosity of up to 7.5⨯1034cm-2 s-1. Two general trigger schemes are under study and their prospects and concerns are discussed. The muon trigger and readout electronics will be totally replaced to cope with a longer latency and a higher trigger rate. At the same time, new trigger algorithms using the precision tracker will be introduced to sharpen efficiency turn-ons and suppress fake triggers. The algorithm and the expected performance of the muon trigger are described. The hardware based track trigger is one of the major items introduced in the upgrade program. It will improve the trigger performance of various trigger items with a combination of the calorimeter or muon signature. The procedure for processing track information and an expected performance on the electron trigger are presented.

  4. ATLAS Physics Prospects at the High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bindi, Marcello; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The physics prospects at the luminosity upgrade of LHC, HL-LHC, with a data set equivalent to 3000 fb-1 simulated in the ATLAS detector, are presented and discussed. The ultimate precision attainable on measurements of 125 GeV Higgs boson couplings to elementary fermions and bosons is discussed, as well as the searches for partners associated with this new particle. The electroweak sector is further studied with the analysis of the vector boson scattering, testing the SM predictions at the LHC energy scale. Supersymmetry is still one of the best motivated extensions of the Standard Model. The current searches at the LHC have yielded sensitivity to TeV scale gluinos and 1st and 2nd generation squarks, as well as to 3rd generation squarks. The sensitivity to electro-weakinos has reached the hundreds of GeV mass range. Benchmark studies are presented to show how the sensitivity improves at the future high-luminosity LHC runs. Prospects for searches for new heavy bosons and dark matter candidates at 14 TeV pp col...

  5. LHC Report: spring cleaning over, bunches of luminosity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Scrubbing was completed on Wednesday 13 April. The run had seen over 1000 bunches per beam successfully circulating at 450 GeV. Measurements showed that electron cloud activity in the cold regions had been suppressed. A decrease of vacuum activity in the warm regions demonstrated that the cleaning had also achieved the required results there. As discussed in the last Bulletin, the scrubbing was performed with high intensity bunches with 50 nanosecond spacing. Given the potential luminosity performance with this spacing (more bunches, higher bunch intensity from the injectors) and in the light of the results of the scrubbing run, the decision was taken to continue the 2011 physics run with this bunch spacing.   A few issues with 50 nanosecond spacing had to be resolved when standard operations for luminosity production resumed. Once things had been tidied up, stable beams were provided for the experiments, firstly with 228 bunches per beam and then with 336 bunches per beam. The 336 bunch fill that w...

  6. NGC 5548 in a Low-Luminosity State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Misty C.; Denney, Kelly D.; Cackett, Edward M.

    2007-01-01

    the previously-discovered virial relationship between the time lag of emission lines relative to the continuum and the width of the emission lines in NGC 5548, which is the expected signature of a gravity-dominated broad-line region. Using this lowest luminosity state, we extend the range of the relationship...... between the luminosity and the time lag in NGC 5548 and measure a slope that is consistent with alpha = 0.5, the naive expectation for the broad line region for an assumed form of r ~ L^alpha. This value is also consistent with the slope recently determined by Bentz et al. for the population...... flux variations in the continuum and the Hbeta line of 6.3 (+2.6/-2.3) days. Combining our measurements with those of previous campaigns, we determine a weighted black hole mass of M_BH = 6.54 (+0.26/-0.25) x 10^7 M_sun based on all broad emission lines with suitable variability data. We confirm...

  7. ATLAS Muon Spectrometer Upgrades for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Valderanis, Chrysostomos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS Muon Spectrometer Upgrades for the High Luminosity LHC The luminosity of the LHC will increase up to 2x10^34 cm-2s-1 after the long shutdown in 2019 (phase-1 upgrade) and up to 7x10^34 cm-2s-1 after the long shutdown in 2025 (phase-2 upgrade). In order to cope with the increased particle fluxes, upgrades are envisioned for the ATLAS muon spectrometer. At phase-1, the current innermost stations of the ATLAS muon endcap tracking system (the Small Wheels) will be upgraded with 2x4-layer modules of Micromega detectors, sandwiched by two 4 layer modules of small strip Thin Gap Chambers on either side. Each 4-layer module of the so-called New Small Wheels covers a surface area of approximately 2 to 3 m2 for a total active area of 1200 m2 each for the two technologies. On such large area detectors, the mechanical precision (30 \\mu m along the precision coordinate and 80 \\mu m along the beam) is a key point and must be controlled and monitored along the process of construction and integration. The design and re...

  8. Radio variability survey of very low luminosity protostars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdaero, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Eun, E-mail: minho@kasi.re.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Ten very low luminosity objects were observed multiple times in the 8.5 GHz continuum in search of protostellar magnetic activities. A radio outburst of IRAM 04191+1522 IRS was detected, and the variability timescale was about 20 days or shorter. The results of this survey and archival observations suggest that IRAM 04191+1522 IRS is in active states about half the time. Archival data show that L1014 IRS and L1148 IRS were detectable previously and suggest that at least 20%-30% of very low luminosity protostars are radio variables. Considering the variability timescale and flux level of IRAM 04191+1522 IRS and the previous detection of the circular polarization of L1014 IRS, the radio outbursts of these protostars are probably caused by magnetic flares. However, IRAM 04191+1522 IRS is too young and small to develop an internal convective dynamo. If the detected radio emission is indeed coming from magnetic flares, the discovery implies that the flares may be caused by the fossil magnetic fields of interstellar origin.

  9. High-luminosity LHC prospects with the upgraded ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00379172; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Run 1 at the LHC was very successful with the discovery of a new boson. The boson’s properties are found to be compatible with those of the Standard Model Higgs boson. It is now revealing the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking and (possibly) the discovery of physics beyond the Standard Model that are the primary goals of the just restarted LHC. The ultimate precision will be reached at the high-luminosity LHC run with a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. In this contribution physics prospects are presented for ATLAS for the integrated luminosities 300 and 3000 fb−1: the ultimate precision attainable on measurements of the Higgs boson couplings to elementary fermions and bosons, its trilinear self-coulping, as well as perspectives on the searches for partners associated with it. Benchmark studies are presented to show how the sensitivity improves at the future LHC runs. For all these studies, a parameterised simulation of the upgraded ATLAS detector is used and expected pileup condition...

  10. Topological and Central Trigger Processor for 2014 LHC luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Simioni, E; The ATLAS collaboration; Bauss, B; Berge, D; Buscher, V; Childers, T; Degele, R; Dobson, E; Ebling, A; Ellis, N; Farthouat, P; Gabaldon, C; Gorini, B; Haas, S; Ji, W; Kaneda, M; Mattig, S; Messina, A; Meyer, C; Moritz, S; Pauly, T; Pottgen, R; Schafer, U; Spiwoks, R; Tapprogge, S; Wengler, T; Wenzel, V

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is located at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland. It is designed to observe phenomena that involve highly massive particles produced in the collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC): the world’s largest and highest-energy particle accelerator. Event triggering and Data Acquisition is one of the extraordinary challenges faced by the detectors at the high luminosity LHC collider. During 2011, the LHC reached instantaneous luminosities of 4 10^33 cm−1 s−1 and produced events with up to 24 interactions per colliding proton bunch. This places stringent operational and physical requirements on the ATLAS Trigger in order to reduce the 40MHz collision rate to a manageable event storage rate of 400Hz and, at the same time, selecting those events considered interesting. The Level-1 Trigger is the first rate-reducing step in the ATLAS Trigger, with an output rate of 75kHz and decision latency of less than 2.5 micro seconds. It is primarily composed of the Calori...

  11. Topological and Central Trigger Processor for 2014 LHC luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Simioni, E; The ATLAS collaboration; Bauss, B; Berge, D; B\\"{u}scher, V; Childers, T; Degele, R; Dobson, E; Ebling, A; Ellis, N; Farthouat, P; Gabaldon, C; Gorini, B; Haas, S; Ji, W; Kaneda, M; M\\"{a}ttig, S; Messina, A; Meyer, C; Moritz, S; Pauly, T; Pottgen, R; Sch\\"{a}fer, U; Spiwoks, R; Tapprogge, S; Wengler, T; Wenzel, V

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is located at the European Center for Nu- clear Research (CERN) in Switzerland. It is designed to observe phe- nomena that involve highly massive particles produced in the collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC): the world’s largest and highest-energy particle accelerator. Event triggering and Data Acquisition is one of the extraordinary challenges faced by the detectors at the high luminosity LHC collider. During 2011, the LHC reached instantaneous luminosities of 4×10^33 cm−1 s−1 and produced events with up to 24 interactions per colliding proton bunch. This places stringent operational and physical requirements on the AT- LAS Trigger in order to reduce the 40MHz collision rate to a manageable event storage rate of 400Hz and, at the same time, selecting those events considered interesting. The Level-1 Trigger is the first rate-reducing step in the ATLAS Trigger, with an output rate of 75kHz and decision latency of less than 2.5μs. It is primarily composed of the Calorimete...

  12. ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition Upgrades for High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00439268; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at CERN is planning a second phase of upgrades to prepare for the "High Luminosity LHC", a 4th major run due to start in 2026. In order to deliver an order of magnitude more data than previous runs, 14 TeV protons will collide with an instantaneous luminosity of 7.5 × 1034 cm−2s−1, resulting in much higher pileup and data rates than the current experiment was designed to handle. While this extreme scenario is essential to realise the physics programme, it is a huge challenge for the detector, trigger, data acquisition and computing. The detector upgrades themselves also present new requirements and opportunities for the trigger and data acquisition system. Initial upgrade designs for the trigger and data acquisition system are shown, including the real time low latency hardware trigger, hardware-based tracking, the high throughput data acquisition system and the commodity hardware and software-based data handling and event filtering. The motivation, overall architecture and expected ...

  13. ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition Upgrades for High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00421104; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at CERN is planning a second phase of upgrades to prepare for the "High Luminosity LHC", a 4th major run due to start in 2026. In order to deliver an order of magnitude more data than previous runs, 14 TeV protons will collide with an instantaneous luminosity of $7.5 \\times 10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1}$, resulting in much higher pileup and data rates than the current experiment was designed to handle. While this extreme scenario is essential to realise the physics programme, it is a huge challenge for the detector, trigger, data acquisition and computing. The detector upgrades themselves also present new requirements and opportunities for the trigger and data acquisition system. Initial upgrade designs for the trigger and data acquisition system are shown, including the real time low latency hardware trigger, hardware-based tracking, the high throughput data acquisition system and the commodity hardware and software-based data handling and event filtering. The motivation, overall architecture an...

  14. ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition Upgrades for High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    George, Simon; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at CERN is planning a second phase of upgrades to prepare for the "High Luminosity LHC", a 4th major run due to start in 2026. In order to deliver an order of magnitude more data than previous runs, 14 TeV protons will collide with an instantaneous luminosity of 7.5 × 10^{34} cm^{−2}s^{−1}, resulting in much higher pileup and data rates than the current experiment was designed to handle. While this extreme scenario is essential to realise the physics programme, it is a huge challenge for the detector, trigger, data acquisition and computing. The detector upgrades themselves also present new requirements and opportunities for the trigger and data acquisition system. Initial upgrade designs for the trigger and data acquisition system are shown, including the real time low latency hardware trigger, hardware-based tracking, the high throughput data acquisition system and the commodity hardware and software-based data handling and event filtering. The motivation, overall architecture and ...

  15. ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition Upgrades for High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Balunas, William Keaton; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at CERN is planning a second phase of upgrades to prepare for the "High Luminosity LHC", a 4th major run due to start in 2026. In order to deliver an order of magnitude more data than previous runs, 14 TeV protons will collide with an instantaneous luminosity of $7.5 × 10^{34}$ cm$^{−2}$s$^{−1}$, resulting in much higher pileup and data rates than the current experiment was designed to handle. While this extreme scenario is essential to realise the physics programme, it is a huge challenge for the detector, trigger, data acquisition and computing. The detector upgrades themselves also present new requirements and opportunities for the trigger and data acquisition system. Initial upgrade designs for the trigger and data acquisition system are shown, including the real time low latency hardware trigger, hardware-based tracking, the high throughput data acquisition system and the commodity hardware and software-based data handling and event filtering. The motivation, overall architectur...

  16. Kilonova/Macronova Emission from Compact Binary Mergers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaomi Tanaka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We review current understanding of kilonova/macronova emission from compact binary mergers (mergers of two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole. Kilonova/macronova is emission powered by radioactive decays of r-process nuclei and it is one of the most promising electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave sources. Emission from the dynamical ejecta of ~0.01M⊙ is likely to have a luminosity of ~1040–1041 erg s−1 with a characteristic timescale of about 1 week. The spectral peak is located in red optical or near-infrared wavelengths. A subsequent accretion disk wind may provide an additional luminosity or an earlier/bluer emission if it is not absorbed by the precedent dynamical ejecta. The detection of near-infrared excess in short GRB 130603B and possible optical excess in GRB 060614 supports the concept of the kilonova/macronova scenario. At 200 Mpc distance, a typical peak brightness of kilonova/macronova with 0.01M⊙ ejecta is about 22 mag and the emission rapidly fades to >24 mag within ~10 days. Kilonova/macronova candidates can be distinguished from supernovae by (1 the faster time evolution, (2 fainter absolute magnitudes, and (3 redder colors. Since the high expansion velocity (v~0.1–0.2c is a robust outcome of compact binary mergers, the detection of smooth spectra will be the smoking gun to conclusively identify the gravitational wave source.

  17. Quadrupole-free detector optics design for the Compact Linear Collider final focus system at 3 TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Plassard

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to simplify the machine detector interface of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC, a new detector model has been designed allowing the last quadrupole QD0 of the final focus system (FFS to be located outside of the experiment with a distance L^{*} from the interaction point of 6 m. In this paper, the beam delivery system (BDS has been reoptimized, offering a luminosity performance that exceeds the design requirements by 11% for the total luminosity and by 7% in the energy peak. A simulation campaign has been carried out and has proved the feasibility of recovering the luminosity under realistic transverse misalignments of the FFS optics, by means of different orbit and aberration correction techniques, making this long L^{*} design a realistic candidate for the future CLIC BDS.

  18. Quadrupole-free detector optics design for the Compact Linear Collider final focus system at 3 TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plassard, Fabien; Latina, Andrea; Marin, Eduardo; Tomás, Rogelio; Bambade, Philip

    2018-01-01

    Aiming to simplify the machine detector interface of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), a new detector model has been designed allowing the last quadrupole QD0 of the final focus system (FFS) to be located outside of the experiment with a distance L* from the interaction point of 6 m. In this paper, the beam delivery system (BDS) has been reoptimized, offering a luminosity performance that exceeds the design requirements by 11% for the total luminosity and by 7% in the energy peak. A simulation campaign has been carried out and has proved the feasibility of recovering the luminosity under realistic transverse misalignments of the FFS optics, by means of different orbit and aberration correction techniques, making this long L* design a realistic candidate for the future CLIC BDS.

  19. Compact Intracloud Discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, David A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1998-11-01

    In November of 1993, mysterious signals recorded by a satellite-borne broadband VHF radio science experiment called Blackboard led to a completely unexpected discovery. Prior to launch of the ALEXIS satellite, it was thought that its secondary payload, Blackboard, would most often detect the radio emissions from lightning when its receiver was not overwhelmed by noise from narrowband communication carriers. Instead, the vast majority of events that triggered the instrument were isolated pairs of pulses that were one hundred times more energetic than normal thunderstorm electrical emissions. The events, which came to be known as TIPPs (for transionospheric pulse pairs), presented a true mystery to the geophysics community. At the time, it was not even known whether the events had natural or anthropogenic origins. After two and one half years of research into the unique signals, two ground-based receiver arrays in New Mexico first began to detect and record thunderstorm radio emissions that were consistent with the Blackboard observations. On two occasions, the ground-based systems and Blackboard even recorded emissions that were produced by the same exact events. From the ground based observations, it has been determined that TIPP events areproduced by brief, singular, isolated, intracloud electrical discharges that occur in intense regions of thunderstorms. These discharges have been dubbed CIDS, an acronym for compact intracloud discharges. During the summer of 1996, ground-based receiver arrays were used to record the electric field change signals and broadband HF emissions from hundreds of CIDS. Event timing that was accurate to within a few microseconds made possible the determination of source locations using methods of differential time of arrival. Ionospheric reflections of signals were recorded in addition to groundwave/line-of-sight signals and were used to determine accurate altitudes for the discharges. Twenty-four CIDS were recorded from three

  20. Compact magnetic confinement fusion: Spherical torus and compact torus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Gao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The spherical torus (ST and compact torus (CT are two kinds of alternative magnetic confinement fusion concepts with compact geometry. The ST is actually a sub-category of tokamak with a low aspect ratio; while the CT is a toroidal magnetic configuration with a simply-connected geometry including spheromak and field reversed pinch. The ST and CT have potential advantages for ultimate fusion reactor; while at present they can also provide unique fusion science and technology contributions for mainstream fusion research. However, some critical scientific and technology issues should be extensively investigated.

  1. Co-compact Gabor Systems on Locally Compact Abelian Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Mads Sielemann; Lemvig, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    In this work we extend classical structure and duality results in Gabor analysis on the euclidean space to the setting of second countable locally compact abelian (LCA) groups. We formulate the concept of rationally oversampling of Gabor systems in an LCA group and prove corresponding characteriz......In this work we extend classical structure and duality results in Gabor analysis on the euclidean space to the setting of second countable locally compact abelian (LCA) groups. We formulate the concept of rationally oversampling of Gabor systems in an LCA group and prove corresponding...

  2. NuSTAR and XMM-Newton Observations of 1E1743.1-2843: Indications of a Neutron Star LMXB Nature of the Compact Object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotti, Simone; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Mori, Kaya; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hong, Jaesub; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report on the results of NuSTAR and XMM-Newton observations of the persistent X-ray source 1E1743.1-2843, located in the Galactic Center region. The source was observed between 2012 September and October by NuSTAR and XMM-Newton, providing almost simultaneous observations in the hard and soft X-ray bands. The high X-ray luminosity points to the presence of an accreting compact object. We analyze the possibilities of this accreting compact object being either a neutron star (NS) or a black hole, and conclude that the joint XMM-Newton and NuSTAR spectrum from 0.3 to 40 keV fits a blackbody spectrum with kT approximately 1.8 keV emitted from a hot spot or an equatorial strip on an NS surface. This spectrum is thermally Comptonized by electrons with kTe approximately 4.6 keV. Accepting this NS hypothesis, we probe the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) or high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) nature of the source. While the lack of Type-I bursts can be explained in the LMXB scenario, the absence of pulsations in the 2 MHz-49 Hz frequency range, the lack of eclipses and of an IR companion, and the lack of a Kaline from neutral or moderately ionized iron strongly disfavor interpreting this source as a HMXB. We therefore conclude that 1E1743.1-2843 is most likely an NS-LMXB located beyond the Galactic Center. There is weak statistical evidence for a soft X-ray excess which may indicate thermal emission from an accretion disk. However, the disk normalization remains unconstrained due to the high hydrogen column density (N(sub H) approximately 1.6 x 10(exp 23) cm(exp -2)).

  3. Present and past neutrino luminosity of the sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowley, J.K.; Cleveland, B.T.; Davis, R. Jr.; Hampel, W.; Kirsten, T.

    1979-01-01

    The neutrino radiation from the sun can give direct information on the basic nuclear fusion processes that provide the solar energy. Results are reported which have been obtained over the last seven years with the Brookhaven solar neutrino detector that depends upon the neutrino capture reaction, 37 Cl(ν,e - ) 37 Ar. These results do not agree with the predictions of the standard solar model. It is of great interest to know whether the lack of agreement between the measurements and theoretical expectation could possibly be explained by a secular variation in the rate of the fusion process. Two radiochemical neutrino detection techniques have been proposed previously that could in principle record the neutrino flux of the past. An analysis of the expected background processes for these experiments is given. These and other possible methods of recording the past solar neutrino luminosity are discussed in relation to variations expected from theoretical solar models. 2 figures, 6 tables, 36 references

  4. 3rd ECFA High Luminosity LHC Experiments Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The third ECFA Workshop will gather again the theory, accelerator and experiments communities to discuss the future experiments at the High Luminosity LHC. While the previous workshops, provided a panorama of the exciting physics goals and challenges for the experiments, the project is now entering a new stage with the preparation of Technical Design Reports for ATLAS and CMS upgrades and with the execution of the ALICE and LHCb upgrades. The emphasis of this meeting will be on: the progress in the theoretical concepts and the framework developed to assess the physics reach of the experiments, including experience with the run II data analyses; the discussion of accelerator options to facilitate the experiment operation and enhance the performance; and the optimization of the detector design and related techniques. Progress in common experimental developments will also be reported, along with new ideas to operate a the extreme rates and collision pile-up conditions.

  5. Upgrade of RHIC Vacuum Systems for High Luminosity Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Smart, Loralie; Todd, Robert J; Weiss, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    With increasing ion beam intensity during recent RHIC operations, pressure rises of several decades were observed at most room temperature sections and at a few cold sections. The pressure rises are associated with electron multi-pacting, electron stimulated desorption and beam ion induced desorption and have been one of the major intensity and luminosity limiting factors for RHIC. Improvement of the warm sections has been carried out in the last few years. Extensive in-situ bakes, additional UHV pumping, anti-grazing ridges and beam tube solenoids have been implemented. Several hundred meters of NEG coated beam pipes have been installed and activated. Vacuum monitoring and interlock were enhanced to reduce premature beam aborts. Preliminary measures, such as pumping before cool down to reduce monolayer condensates, were also taken to suppress the pressure rises in the cold sections. The effectiveness of these measures in reducing the pressure rises during machine studies and during physics runs are discussed...

  6. An Upgraded ATLAS Central Trigger for 2015 Luminosities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poettgen, Ruth; Gutenberg, Johannes

    2013-06-01

    The Central Trigger Processor (CTP) is a core unit of the first of three levels that constitute the ATLAS trigger system. Based on information from calorimeter and muon trigger processors as well as from some additional systems it produces the level-1 trigger decision and prompts the read-out of the sub-detectors. The increase in luminosity at the LHC has pushed the CTP operation to its design limits. In order to still satisfy the physics goals of the experiment after the shutdown of the LHC of 2013/2014 the CTP will be upgraded during this period. This article discusses the current Central Trigger Processor, the motivation for the upgrade, and the changes foreseen to meet the requirements of the post-2014 physics runs at the LHC. (authors)

  7. The evolution of solar ultraviolet luminosity. [influence on planetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, K. J.; Walker, J. C. G.

    1982-01-01

    Astronomical observations of stars analogous to the sun are used to construct a tentative account of the evolution of solar UV luminosity. Evidence exists that the young sun was a much more powerful source of energetic particles and radiation than it is today, and while on the main sequence, solar activity has declined as an inverse power law of age as a consequence of angular momentum loss to the solar wind. Observations of pre-main sequence stars indicate that before the sun reached the main sequence, it may have emitted as much as ten thousand times the amount of ultraviolet radiation that it does today. The impact of the results on knowledge of photochemistry and escape of constituents of primordial planetary atmospheres is discussed.

  8. Preliminary accelerator plans for maximizing the integrated LHC luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, Michael; Ruggiero, F; Ostojic, R; Scandale, Walter; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Wenninger, J

    2006-01-01

    A working group on "Proton Accelerators for the Future" (PAF) has been created in May 2005 by the CERN direction to elaborate a baseline scenario of the possible development and upgrade of the present Proton Accelerator Complex. This report is the result of the investigation conducted until the end of 2005, in close connection with the working group on "Physics Opportunities with Future Proton Accelerators" (POFPA) and is consistent with their recommendations. Focused on the goal of maximizing the integrated luminosity for the LHC experiments, a scenario of evolution is proposed, subject to further refinement using the future experience of commissioning and running-in the collider and its injector complex. The actions to be taken in terms of consolidation, R & D and improvement are outlined. The benefits for other types of physics are mentioned and will be investigated in more detail in the future.

  9. The Physics Landscape of the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mangano, M

    2015-01-01

    We review the status of HEP after the first run of the LHC and discuss the opportunities offered by the HL-LHC, in light of the needs for future progress that are emerging from the data. The HL-LHC will push to the systematic limit the precision of most measurements of the Higgs boson, and will be necessary to firmly establish some of the more rare decays foreseen by the Standard Model, such as the decays to dimuons and to a Z+ photon pair. The HL-LHC luminosity will provide additional statistics required by the quantitative study of any discovery the LHC may achieve during the first 300 inverse femtobarn, and will further extend the discovery potential of the LHC, particularly for rare, elusive or low-sensitivity processes.

  10. SLHC, the high-luminosity upgrade (public event)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    In the morning of February 26th a public event is organised in CERN's main auditorium with the aim of informing the particle physics community about the current status of preparation work for the future LHC luminosity upgrade (Phase 1 and Phase 2). The presentations will provide an overview of the various accelerator sub-projects, the physics potential and the experiment upgrade plans. This event is organised in the framework of the SLHC-PP project, which receives funding from the European Commission for the preparatory phase of the SLHC project. Informing the public about the overall status of SLHC is among the objectives of this EU-funded project. A simultaneous transmission of this meeting will be broadcast, available at the following address: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  11. Color Retinal Image Enhancement Based on Luminosity and Contrast Adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mei; Jin, Kai; Wang, Shaoze; Ye, Juan; Qian, Dahong

    2018-03-01

    Many common eye diseases and cardiovascular diseases can be diagnosed through retinal imaging. However, due to uneven illumination, image blurring, and low contrast, retinal images with poor quality are not useful for diagnosis, especially in automated image analyzing systems. Here, we propose a new image enhancement method to improve color retinal image luminosity and contrast. A luminance gain matrix, which is obtained by gamma correction of the value channel in the HSV (hue, saturation, and value) color space, is used to enhance the R, G, and B (red, green and blue) channels, respectively. Contrast is then enhanced in the luminosity channel of L * a * b * color space by CLAHE (contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization). Image enhancement by the proposed method is compared to other methods by evaluating quality scores of the enhanced images. The performance of the method is mainly validated on a dataset of 961 poor-quality retinal images. Quality assessment (range 0-1) of image enhancement of this poor dataset indicated that our method improved color retinal image quality from an average of 0.0404 (standard deviation 0.0291) up to an average of 0.4565 (standard deviation 0.1000). The proposed method is shown to achieve superior image enhancement compared to contrast enhancement in other color spaces or by other related methods, while simultaneously preserving image naturalness. This method of color retinal image enhancement may be employed to assist ophthalmologists in more efficient screening of retinal diseases and in development of improved automated image analysis for clinical diagnosis.

  12. Maximum likelihood random galaxy catalogues and luminosity function estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Shaun

    2011-09-01

    We present a new algorithm to generate a random (unclustered) version of an magnitude limited observational galaxy redshift catalogue. It takes into account both galaxy evolution and the perturbing effects of large-scale structure. The key to the algorithm is a maximum likelihood (ML) method for jointly estimating both the luminosity function (LF) and the overdensity as a function of redshift. The random catalogue algorithm then works by cloning each galaxy in the original catalogue, with the number of clones determined by the ML solution. Each of these cloned galaxies is then assigned a random redshift uniformly distributed over the accessible survey volume, taking account of the survey magnitude limit(s) and, optionally, both luminosity and number density evolution. The resulting random catalogues, which can be employed in traditional estimates of galaxy clustering, make fuller use of the information available in the original catalogue and hence are superior to simply fitting a functional form to the observed redshift distribution. They are particularly well suited to studies of the dependence of galaxy clustering on galaxy properties as each galaxy in the random catalogue has the same list of attributes as measured for the galaxies in the genuine catalogue. The derivation of the joint overdensity and LF estimator reveals the limit in which the ML estimate reduces to the standard 1/Vmax LF estimate, namely when one makes the prior assumption that the are no fluctuations in the radial overdensity. The new ML estimator can be viewed as a generalization of the 1/Vmax estimate in which Vmax is replaced by a density corrected Vdc, max.

  13. A supermassive black hole in an ultra-compact dwarf galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Anil C; van den Bosch, Remco; Mieske, Steffen; Baumgardt, Holger; den Brok, Mark; Strader, Jay; Neumayer, Nadine; Chilingarian, Igor; Hilker, Michael; McDermid, Richard; Spitler, Lee; Brodie, Jean; Frank, Matthias J; Walsh, Jonelle L

    2014-09-18

    Ultra-compact dwarf galaxies are among the densest stellar systems in the Universe. These systems have masses of up to 2 × 10(8) solar masses, but half-light radii of just 3-50 parsecs. Dynamical mass estimates show that many such dwarfs are more massive than expected from their luminosity. It remains unclear whether these high dynamical mass estimates arise because of the presence of supermassive black holes or result from a non-standard stellar initial mass function that causes the average stellar mass to be higher than expected. Here we report adaptive optics kinematic data of the ultra-compact dwarf galaxy M60-UCD1 that show a central velocity dispersion peak exceeding 100 kilometres per second and modest rotation. Dynamical modelling of these data reveals the presence of a supermassive black hole with a mass of 2.1 × 10(7) solar masses. This is 15 per cent of the object's total mass. The high black hole mass and mass fraction suggest that M60-UCD1 is the stripped nucleus of a galaxy. Our analysis also shows that M60-UCD1's stellar mass is consistent with its luminosity, implying a large population of previously unrecognized supermassive black holes in other ultra-compact dwarf galaxies.

  14. Compact Chern–Simons vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bazeia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We introduce and investigate new models of the Chern–Simons type in the three-dimensional spacetime, focusing on the existence of compact vortices. The models are controlled by potentials driven by a single real parameter that can be used to change the profile of the vortex solutions as they approach their boundary values. One of the models unveils an interesting new behavior, the tendency to make the vortex compact, as the parameter increases to larger and larger values. We also investigate the behavior of the energy density and calculate the total energy numerically.

  15. Professional Windows Embedded Compact 7

    CERN Document Server

    Phung, Samuel; Joubert, Thierry; Hall, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Learn to program an array of customized devices and solutions As a compact, highly efficient, scalable operating system, Windows Embedded Compact 7 (WEC7) is one of the best options for developing a new generation of network-enabled, media-rich, and service-oriented devices. This in-depth resource takes you through the benefits and capabilities of WEC7 so that you can start using this performance development platform today. Divided into several major sections, the book begins with an introduction and then moves on to coverage of OS design, application development, advanced application developm

  16. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baity, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively-tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas the model treats stub-tuned resonant double loop antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mockups of resonant double loop antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

  17. Isometric coactions of compact quantum groups on compact ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a compact quantum metric space in the framework of Rieffel, where the metric structure is given by a ... For finite classical metric spaces, this problem was studied by Banica [2]. He has given a definition for a quantum symmetry of a classical finite metric space. With this ..... The graph theory we need concerns flow networks.

  18. Design, prototyping and testing of a compact superconducting double quarter wave crab cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Binping; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Calaga, Rama; Cullen, Chris; Capatina, Ofelia; Hammons, Lee; Li, Zenghai; Marques, Carlos; Skaritka, John; Verdú-Andres, Silvia; Wu, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    A novel design of superconducting Crab Cavity was proposed and designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The new cavity shape is a Double Quarter Wave or DQWCC. After fabrication and surface treatments, the niobium proof-of-principle cavity was cryogenically tested in a vertical cryostat. The cavity is extremely compact yet has a low frequency of 400 MHz, an essential property for service for the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade. The electromagnetic properties of the cavity are also well matched for this demanding task. The demonstrated deflecting voltage of 4.6 MV is well above the requirement for a crab cavity in the future High Luminosity LHC of 3.34 MV. In this paper we present the design, prototyping and test results of the DQWCC.

  19. The Radius-Luminosity Relationship for Active Galactic Nuclei: The Effect of Host-Galaxy Starlight on Luminosity Measurements. II. The Full Sample of Reverberation-Mapped AGNs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Misty C.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Netzer, Hagai

    2009-01-01

    to ground-based spectroscopic luminosity measurements at 5100 Å. After correcting the luminosities of the AGNs for the contribution from starlight, we re-examine the Hß R BLR-L relationship. Our best fit for the relationship gives a power-law slope of 0.52 with a range of 0.45-0.59 allowed...... by the uncertainties. This is consistent with our previous findings, and thus still consistent with the naive assumption that all AGNs are simply luminosity-scaled versions of each other. We discuss various consistency checks relating to the galaxy modeling and starlight contributions, as well as possible systematic...

  20. Compaction dynamics of crunchy granular material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillard François

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Compaction of brittle porous material leads to a wide variety of densification patterns. Static compaction bands occurs naturally in rocks or bones, and have important consequences in industry for the manufacturing of powder tablets or metallic foams for example. Recently, oscillatory compaction bands have been observed in brittle porous media like snow or cereals. We will discuss the great variety of densification patterns arising during the compaction of puffed rice, including erratic compaction at low velocity, one or several travelling compaction bands at medium velocity and homogeneous compaction at larger velocity. The conditions of existence of each pattern are studied thanks to a numerical spring lattice model undergoing breakage and is mapped to the phase diagram of the patterns based on dimensionless characteristic quantities. This also allows to rationalise the evolution of the compaction behaviour during a single test. Finally, the localisation of compaction bands is linked to the strain rate sensitivity of the material.

  1. Compaction dynamics of crunchy granular material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillard, François; Golshan, Pouya; Shen, Luming; Valdès, Julio R.; Einav, Itai

    2017-06-01

    Compaction of brittle porous material leads to a wide variety of densification patterns. Static compaction bands occurs naturally in rocks or bones, and have important consequences in industry for the manufacturing of powder tablets or metallic foams for example. Recently, oscillatory compaction bands have been observed in brittle porous media like snow or cereals. We will discuss the great variety of densification patterns arising during the compaction of puffed rice, including erratic compaction at low velocity, one or several travelling compaction bands at medium velocity and homogeneous compaction at larger velocity. The conditions of existence of each pattern are studied thanks to a numerical spring lattice model undergoing breakage and is mapped to the phase diagram of the patterns based on dimensionless characteristic quantities. This also allows to rationalise the evolution of the compaction behaviour during a single test. Finally, the localisation of compaction bands is linked to the strain rate sensitivity of the material.

  2. The Ultraviolet and Infrared Star Formation Rates of Compact Group Galaxies: An Expanded Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenkic, Laura; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Desjardins, Tyler D.; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Fedotov, Konstantin; Charlton, Jane; Cardiff, Ann H.; Durell, Pat R.

    2016-01-01

    Compact groups of galaxies provide insight into the role of low-mass, dense environments in galaxy evolution because the low velocity dispersions and close proximity of galaxy members result in frequent interactions that take place over extended time-scales. We expand the census of star formation in compact group galaxies by Tzanavaris et al. (2010) and collaborators with Swift UVOT, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 m photometry of a sample of 183 galaxies in 46 compact groups. After correcting luminosities for the contribution from old stellar populations, we estimate the dust-unobscured star formation rate (SFRUV) using the UVOT uvw2 photometry. Similarly, we use the MIPS 24 m photometry to estimate the component of the SFR that is obscured by dust (SFRIR). We find that galaxies which are MIR-active (MIR-red), also have bluer UV colours, higher specific SFRs, and tend to lie in Hi-rich groups, while galaxies that are MIR-inactive (MIR-blue) have redder UV colours, lower specific SFRs, and tend to lie in Hi-poor groups. We find the SFRs to be continuously distributed with a peak at about 1 M yr1, indicating this might be the most common value in compact groups. In contrast, the specific SFR distribution is bimodal, and there is a clear distinction between star-forming and quiescent galaxies. Overall, our results suggest that the specific SFR is the best tracer of gas depletion and galaxy evolution in compact groups.

  3. Update on Predictions for Yearly Integrated Luminosity for HL-LHC based on Expected Machine Availability

    OpenAIRE

    Apollonio, Andrea; Jonker, Michael; Schmidt, Ruediger; Todd, Benjamin; Wollmann, Daniel; Zerlauth, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Machine availability is one of the key performance indicators to reach the ambitious goals for integrated luminosity in the post Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) era. Machine availability is even more important for the future High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) [1]. In this paper a Monte Carlo approach has been used to predict integrated luminosity as a function of LHC machine availability. The baseline model assumptions such as fault-time distributions and machine failure rate (number of fills with stable bea...

  4. THE LOCAL [C ii] 158 μ m EMISSION LINE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Yan, Lin; Capak, Peter; Faisst, Andreas; Masters, Daniel [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena CA 91125 (United States); Diaz-Santos, Tanio [Nucleo de Astronomia de la Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejercito Libertador 441, Santiago (Chile); Armus, Lee, E-mail: shemmati@ipac.caltech.edu [Spitzer Science Center, Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2017-01-01

    We present, for the first time, the local [C ii] 158 μ m emission line luminosity function measured using a sample of more than 500 galaxies from the Revised Bright Galaxy Sample. [C ii] luminosities are measured from the Herschel PACS observations of the Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey and estimated for the rest of the sample based on the far-infrared (far-IR) luminosity and color. The sample covers 91.3% of the sky and is complete at S{sub 60μm} > 5.24 Jy. We calculate the completeness as a function of [C ii] line luminosity and distance, based on the far-IR color and flux densities. The [C ii] luminosity function is constrained in the range ∼10{sup 7–9} L{sub ⊙} from both the 1/ V{sub max} and a maximum likelihood methods. The shape of our derived [C ii] emission line luminosity function agrees well with the IR luminosity function. For the CO(1-0) and [C ii] luminosity functions to agree, we propose a varying ratio of [C ii]/CO(1-0) as a function of CO luminosity, with larger ratios for fainter CO luminosities. Limited [C ii] high-redshift observations as well as estimates based on the IR and UV luminosity functions are suggestive of an evolution in the [C ii] luminosity function similar to the evolution trend of the cosmic star formation rate density. Deep surveys using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array with full capability will be able to confirm this prediction.

  5. Energy and Beam-Offset dependence of the Luminosity weighted depolarization for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Esberg, Jakob; Uggerhoj, Ulrik; Dalena, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    We report on simulations of e+e- depolarization due to beam-beam effects. These effects are studied for CLIC at 3 TeV, using GUINEA PIG++. We find a strong energy dependence of the luminosity weighted depolarization. In the luminosity peak at CLIC the total luminosity weighted depolarization remains below the one per-mil level. The effect of a vertical offset on the energy dependent depolarization is investigated. The depolarization in the luminosity peak remains below per-cent level even for 5sy offsets.

  6. Extremely luminous far-infrared colliding galaxies - computation of colliding-galaxy luminosity function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harwit, M.; Fuller, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    A computational model used to determine the luminosity function for gaseous galaxies in collision is described. It is based on the assumption of high-velocity encounters of two thin, gas-rich disks having identical radii and thickness, able to approach each other from arbitrary directions, with arbitrary orientations and with arbitrary degree of overlap. The distribution of expected luminosities generated in the dissipation of translational energy is then found to closely fit the observed distribution of luminosities of extremely luminous IRAS galaxies. Bursts of star formation resulting from such collisions would not have the correct luminosity function. 8 references

  7. Gaia's Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars and luminosity calibrations based on Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementini, Gisella; Eyer, Laurent; Muraveva, Tatiana; Garofalo, Alessia; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Marconi, Marcella; Sarro, Luis; Palmer, Max; Luri, Xavier; Molinaro, Roberto; Rimoldini, Lorenzo; Szabados, Laszlo; Anderson, Richard I.; Musella, Ilaria

    2017-09-01

    Gaia Data Release 1 contains parallaxes for more than 700 Galactic Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars, computed as part of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). We have used TGAS parallaxes, along with literature (V, I, J, Ks, W1) photometry and spectroscopy, to calibrate the zero point of the period-luminosity and period-Wesenheit relations of classical and type II Cepheids, and the near-infrared period-luminosity, period-luminosity-metallicity and optical luminosity-metallicity relations of RR Lyrae stars. In this contribution we briefly summarise results obtained by fitting these basic relations adopting different techniques that operate either in parallax or distance (absolute magnitude) space.

  8. The classification of 2-compact groups

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Kasper K. S.; Grodal, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    We prove that any connected 2-compact group is classified by its 2-adic root datum, and in particular the exotic 2-compact group DI(4), constructed by Dwyer-Wilkerson, is the only simple 2-compact group not arising as the 2-completion of a compact connected Lie group. Combined with our earlier work with Moeller and Viruel for p odd, this establishes the full classification of p-compact groups, stating that, up to isomorphism, there is a one-to-one correspondence between connected p-compact gr...

  9. Compactness in fuzzy function spaces

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In [3] we defined a notion of compactness in FCS, the category of fuzzy convergence spaces as defined by Lowen/Lowen/Wuyts [8]. In their paper the latter also introduced a fuzzy convergence structure c-lim for fuzzy function spaces thus proving that FCS is a topological quasitopos. In this paper we start the investigation of ...

  10. Permeation characteristics of compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banno, Katsunori; Nishi, Kenji; Yoshida, Hiroshi

    1991-01-01

    Bentonite has properties such as impermeability, hygroscopic swelling, which seem to make it a promising water cut-off material. In this research, performance tests were conducted with various types of compacted bentonite toward the application of bentonite to cut-off technology. (author)

  11. Learning from the Jordan Compact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Lenner

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the implementation of the Jordan Compact offers three key lessons: governmental approval is important but not sufficient, the incorporation of critical voices is crucial, and meeting numeric targets is not the same as achieving underlying goals.

  12. Mesoscale Simulations of Power Compaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomov, I; Fujino, D; Antoun, T; Liu, B

    2009-08-06

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of metal and ceramic powder compaction in shock waves have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating shock compaction of porous well-characterized ductile metal using Steinberg material model. Results of the simulations with handbook values for parameters of solid 2024 aluminum have good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not so well studied as metals, so material model for ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been fitted to shock compression experiments of non-porous samples and further calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powder have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. Numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as measured with VISAR. Numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line also observed in experiments. They found that to receive good quantitative agreement with experiment it is essential to perform 3D simulations.

  13. Engineering aspects of compact stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, B.E.; Benson, R.D.; Brooks, A.

    2003-01-01

    Compact stellarators could combine the good confinement and high beta of a tokamak with the inherently steady state, disruption-free characteristics of a stellarator. Two U.S. compact stellarator facilities are now in the conceptual design phase: the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) and the Quasi- Poloidal Stellarator (QPS). NCSX has a major radius of 1.4 m and a toroidal field up to 2 T. The primary feature of both NCSX and QPS is the set of modular coils that provide the basic magnetic configuration. These coils represent a major engineering challenge due to the complex shape, precise geometric accuracy, and high current density of the windings. The winding geometry is too complex for conventional hollow copper conductor construction. Instead, the modular coils will be wound with flexible, multi strand cable conductor that has been compacted to a 75% copper packing fraction. Inside the NCSX coil set and surrounding the plasma is a highly contoured vacuum vessel. The vessel consists of three identical, 120 deg. segments that are bolted together at double sealed joints. The QPS device has a major radius of 0.9 m, a toroidal field of 1 T, and an aspect ratio of only 2.7. Instead of an internal vacuum vessel, the QPS modular coils will operate in an external vacuum tank. (author)

  14. Compactness of eventually different families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrittesser, David

    2018-01-01

    We show that there is an effectively closed maximal eventually different family in spaces of the form ∏ An with each An countable and discrete (for example, Baire space) and give an exact criterion for when there exists an effectively compact such family. The proof generalizes and simplifies...

  15. DNA compaction by nonbinding macromolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Compaction of DNA by nonbinding macromolecules such as uncharged flexible polymer chains and negatively charged globular proteins is thought to have various applications in biophysics, for example in the formation of a nucleoid structure in bacteria. A simple experimental model that has been very

  16. Compact He-Ne lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskin, N. I.; Ischenko, P. I.; Kozel, Stanislav M.; Kaplitsky, V. E.; Kononenko, V. I.

    1999-01-01

    The presented laser is a brand new elaboration of the compact gas laser with longitudinal excitation. This development has no analogues and is protected by the patent of Russia. Its main features are: monoblock construction of the had, internal mirrors, optical contact, small size and weight, long term of work and storage.

  17. Dynamic compaction of ceramic powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, C.F.

    1982-06-10

    Dynamic consolidation is a technique for densifying powder ensembles to near theoretical with or without external application of heat. The technique itself is simple: the confined powder, initially at a green density of approx. 50% encounters a high pressure shock wave which exceeds the yield strength and densifies as the wave proceeds through the compact. The time scales and pressure range from 1-10's of microseconds and 10-100's of kilobars (10 Kb = 1 GPa). The short time scale of the pressure pulse during the compaction stage inhibits kinetic processes which have longer time constants. The pressure pulse can be delivered to the green compact by a number of techniques, i.e. high explosive, projectile. The methods differ in the degree that one can control the amplitude, duration, and nature of the pressure pulse. The lecture compares powders compacted by explosive and light gas guns and when possible characterize their resulting structures and properties, using AlN as example. 14 figures.

  18. Compaction and relaxation of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.

    2015-06-18

    Operation of membrane systems for water treatment can be seriously hampered by biofouling. A better characterization of biofilms in membrane systems and their impact on membrane performance may help to develop effective biofouling control strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence, extent and timescale of biofilm compaction and relaxation (decompaction), caused by permeate flux variations. The impact of permeate flux changes on biofilm thickness, structure and stiffness was investigated in situ and non-destructively with optical coherence tomography using membrane fouling monitors operated at a constant crossflow velocity of 0.1 m s−1 with permeate production. The permeate flux was varied sequentially from 20 to 60 and back to 20 L m−2 h−1. The study showed that the average biofilm thickness on the membrane decreased after elevating the permeate flux from 20 to 60 L m−2 h−1 while the biofilm thickness increased again after restoring the original flux of 20 L m−2 h−1, indicating the occurrence of biofilm compaction and relaxation. Within a few seconds after the flux change, the biofilm thickness was changed and stabilized, biofilm compaction occurred faster than the relaxation after restoring the original permeate flux. The initial biofilm parameters were not fully reinstated: the biofilm thickness was reduced by 21%, biofilm stiffness had increased and the hydraulic biofilm resistance was elevated by 16%. Biofilm thickness was related to the hydraulic biofilm resistance. Membrane performance losses are related to the biofilm thickness, density and morphology, which are influenced by (variations in) hydraulic conditions. A (temporarily) permeate flux increase caused biofilm compaction, together with membrane performance losses. The impact of biofilms on membrane performance can be influenced (increased and reduced) by operational parameters. The article shows that a (temporary) pressure increase leads to more

  19. LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SPITZER-IDENTIFIED PROTOSTARS IN NINE NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryukova, E.; Megeath, S. T.; Allen, T. S.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Pipher, J.; Allen, L. E.; Myers, P. C.; Muzerolle, J.

    2012-01-01

    We identify protostars in Spitzer surveys of nine star-forming (SF) molecular clouds within 1 kpc: Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Lupus, Taurus, Orion, Cep OB3, and Mon R2, which combined host over 700 protostar candidates. These clouds encompass a variety of SF environments, including both low-mass and high-mass SF regions, as well as dense clusters and regions of sparsely distributed star formation. Our diverse cloud sample allows us to compare protostar luminosity functions in these varied environments. We combine near- and mid-infrared photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and Spitzer to create 1-24 μm spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Using protostars from the c2d survey with well-determined bolometric luminosities, we derive a relationship between bolometric luminosity, mid-IR luminosity (integrated from 1-24 μm), and SED slope. Estimations of the bolometric luminosities for protostar candidates are combined to create luminosity functions for each cloud. Contamination due to edge-on disks, reddened Class II sources, and galaxies is estimated and removed from the luminosity functions. We find that luminosity functions for high-mass SF clouds (Orion, Mon R2, and Cep OB3) peak near 1 L ☉ and show a tail extending toward luminosities above 100 L ☉ . The luminosity functions of the low-mass SF clouds (Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Taurus, Lupus, and Chamaeleon) do not exhibit a common peak, however the combined luminosity function of these regions peaks below 1 L ☉ . Finally, we examine the luminosity functions as a function of the local surface density of young stellar objects. In the Orion molecular clouds, we find a significant difference between the luminosity functions of protostars in regions of high and low stellar density, the former of which is biased toward more luminous sources. This may be the result of primordial mass segregation, although this interpretation is not unique. We compare our luminosity functions to those

  20. LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SPITZER-IDENTIFIED PROTOSTARS IN NINE NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kryukova, E.; Megeath, S. T.; Allen, T. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Gutermuth, R. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Pipher, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Allen, L. E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ (United States); Myers, P. C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Muzerolle, J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-08-15

    We identify protostars in Spitzer surveys of nine star-forming (SF) molecular clouds within 1 kpc: Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Lupus, Taurus, Orion, Cep OB3, and Mon R2, which combined host over 700 protostar candidates. These clouds encompass a variety of SF environments, including both low-mass and high-mass SF regions, as well as dense clusters and regions of sparsely distributed star formation. Our diverse cloud sample allows us to compare protostar luminosity functions in these varied environments. We combine near- and mid-infrared photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and Spitzer to create 1-24 {mu}m spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Using protostars from the c2d survey with well-determined bolometric luminosities, we derive a relationship between bolometric luminosity, mid-IR luminosity (integrated from 1-24 {mu}m), and SED slope. Estimations of the bolometric luminosities for protostar candidates are combined to create luminosity functions for each cloud. Contamination due to edge-on disks, reddened Class II sources, and galaxies is estimated and removed from the luminosity functions. We find that luminosity functions for high-mass SF clouds (Orion, Mon R2, and Cep OB3) peak near 1 L{sub Sun} and show a tail extending toward luminosities above 100 L{sub Sun }. The luminosity functions of the low-mass SF clouds (Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Taurus, Lupus, and Chamaeleon) do not exhibit a common peak, however the combined luminosity function of these regions peaks below 1 L{sub Sun }. Finally, we examine the luminosity functions as a function of the local surface density of young stellar objects. In the Orion molecular clouds, we find a significant difference between the luminosity functions of protostars in regions of high and low stellar density, the former of which is biased toward more luminous sources. This may be the result of primordial mass segregation, although this interpretation is not unique. We compare our luminosity

  1. Moderator for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milgram, M.S.; Dunn, J.T.; Hart, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a moderator for a nuclear reactor and more specifically, to a composite moderator. A moderator is designed to slow down, or thermalize, neutrons which are released during nuclear reactions in the reactor fuel. Pure or almost pure materials like light water, heavy water, beryllium or graphite are used singly as moderators at present. All these materials, are used widely. Graphite has a good mechanical strength at high temperatures encountered in the nuclear core and therefore is used as both the moderator and core structural material. It also exhibits a low neutron-capture cross section and high neutron scattering cross section. However, graphite is susceptible to attach by carbon dioxide and/or oxygen where applicable, and releases stress energy under certain circumstances, although under normal operating conditions these reactions can be controlled. (author). 1 tab

  2. Rate type isotach compaction of consolidated sandstone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, J.A. de; Thienen-Visser, K. van; Pruiksma, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on samples from a consolidated sandstone reservoir are presented that demonstrate rate type compaction behaviour similar to that observed on unconsolidated sands and soils. Such rate type behaviour can have large consequences for reservoir compaction, surface subsidence and

  3. Sequential normal compactness versur topological normal compactness in variational analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fabian, Marián; Mordukhovich, B. S.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 6 (2003), s. 1057-1067 ISSN 0362-546X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/01/1198 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1019905; CEZ:AV0Z1019905 Keywords : variational analysis * sequential and topological normal compactness * Banach spaces Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.354, year: 2003

  4. Upgrade of the ATLAS Calorimeters for Higher LHC Luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Carbone, Ryne Michael; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHC will bring instantaneous and total luminosities which are a factor 5-7 beyond the original design of the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) and Tile Calorimeters and their read-out systems. Due to radiation requirements and a new hardware trigger concept the read-out electronics will be improved in two phases. In Phase-I, a dedicated read-out of the LAr Calorimeters will provide higher granularity input to the trigger, in order to mitigate pile-up effects and to reduce the background rates. In Phase-II, completely new read-out electronics will allow a digital processing of all LAr and Tile Calorimeter channels at the full 40 MHz bunch-crossing frequency and a transfer of calibrated energy inputs to the trigger. Results from system design and performance of the developed read-out components, including fully functioning demonstrator systems already operated on the detector, will be reported. Furthermore, the current Forward Calorimeter (FCal) may suffer from signal degradation and argon bubble form...

  5. Luminosity measurements with the LUCID detector in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Valentinetti, Sara

    La misura della luminosità è un obiettivo importante per tutta la fisica del modello standard e per la scoperta di nuova fisica, poiché è legata alla sezione d'urto (σ) e al rate di produzione (R) di un determinato processo dalla relazione L = R*σ. Nell'eserimento ATLAS a LHC è installato un monitor di luminosità dedicato chiamato LUCID (Luminosity measurements Using Cherenkov Integrating Detector). Grazie ai dati acquisiti durante il 2010 la valutazione off-line delle performances del LUCID e l'implementazione di controlli on-line sulla qualità dei dati raccolti è stata possibile. I dati reali sono stati confrontati con i dati Monte Carlo e le simulazioni sono state opportunamente aggiustate per ottimizzare l'accordo tra i due. La calibrazione della luminosità relativa che permette di ottenere una valutazione della luminosità assoluta è stata possibile grazie ai cosiddetti Van der Meer scan, grazie ai quale è stata ottenuta una precisione dell'11%. L'analisi della fisica del decadimento della Z...

  6. Removing Known SPS Intensity Limitations for High Luminosity LHC Goals

    CERN Document Server

    Shaposhnikova, Elena; Bohl, Thomas; Cruikshank, Paul; Goddard, Brennan; Kaltenbacher, Thomas; Lasheen, Alexandre; Perez Espinos, Jaime; Repond, Joël; Salvant, Benoit; Vollinger, Christine

    2016-01-01

    In preparation of the SPS as an LHC injector its impedance was significantly reduced in 1999 - 2000. A new SPS impedance reduction campaign is planned now for the High Luminosity (HL)-LHC project, which requires bunch intensities twice as high as the nominal one. One of the known intensity limitations is a longitudinal multi-bunch instability with a threshold 3 times below this operational intensity. The instability is presently cured using the 4th harmonic RF system and controlled emittance blow-up, but reaching the HL-LHC parameters cannot be assured without improving the machine impedance. Recently the impedance sources responsible for this instability were identified and implementation of their shielding and damping is foreseen during the next long shutdown (2019 - 2020) in synergy with two other important upgrades: amorphous carbon coating of (part of) the vacuum chamber against the e-cloud effect and rearrangement of the 200 MHz RF system. In this paper the strategy of impedance reduction is presented t...

  7. High-luminosity LHC prospects with the upgraded ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Slawinska, Magdalena; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Run-I at the LHC was very successful with the discovery of a new boson with properties compatible with those of the Higgs boson predicted by Standard Model. Precise measurements of the boson properties, and the discovery of physics beyond the Standard Model, are primary goals of the just restarted LHC running at 13 TeV collision energy and all future running at the LHC. The physics prospects with a pp centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV are presented for 300 and 3000 fb-1 at the high-luminosity LHC. The ultimate precision attainable on measurements of the couplings of the 125 GeV boson to elementary fermions and bosons is discussed, as well as perspectives on the searches for partners associated with it. Supersymmetry is one of the best motivated extensions of the Standard Model. The current searches at the LHC have yielded sensitivity to TeV scale gluinos and 1st and 2nd generation squarks, as well as to 3rd generation squarks and electro-weakinos in the hundreds of GeV mass range. Benchmark studies are presente...

  8. CMS - The Compact Muon Solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Bergauer, T; Waltenberger, W; Kratschmer, I; Treberer-treberspurg, W; Escalante del valle, A; Andreeva, I; Innocente, V; Camporesi, T; Malgeri, L; Marchioro, A; Moneta, L; Weingarten, W; Beni, N T; Cimmino, A; Rovere, M; Jafari, A; Lange, C G; Vartak, A P; Gilbert, A J; Pantaleo, F; Reis, T; Cucciati, G; Alipour tehrani, N; Stakia, A; Fallavollita, F; Pizzichemi, M; Pinna, D; Rauco, G; Zhang, S; Hu, T; Yazgan, E; Zhang, H; Thomas-wilsker, J; Reithler, H K V; Philipps, B; Merschmeyer, M K; Heidemann, C A; Mukherjee, S; Geenen, H; Kuessel, Y; Weingarten, S; Nehrkorn, A; Gallo, E; Schwanenberger, C; Walsh bastos rangel, R; Beernaert, K S; De wit, A M; Elwood, A C; Connor, P; Lelek, A A; Wichmann, K H; Myronenko, V; Kovalchuk, N; Bein, S L; Dreyer, T; Scharf, C; Quast, G; Dierlamm, A H; Barth, C; Mol, X; Kudella, S; Schafer, D; Schimassek, R R; Matorras, F; Calderon tazon, A; Garcia ferrero, J; Bercher, M J; Sirois, Y; Callier, S; Depasse, P; Laktineh, I B; Grenier, G; Boudoul, G; Heath, G P; 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Kienzle, W; Reynaud, S; Schwick, C; Troska, J; Zeuner, W D; Osborne, J A; Moll, M; Franzoni, G; Tinoco mendes, A D; Milenovic, P; Garai, Z; Bendavid, J L; Dupont, N A; Gulhan, D C; Daponte, V; Martinez turtos, R; Giuffredi, R; Rapacz, K J; Otiougova, P; Zhu, G; Leggat, D A; Kiesel, M K; Lipinski, M; Wallraff, W; Meyer, A; Pook, T; Pooth, O; Behnke, O; Eckstein, D; Fischer, D J; Garay garcia, J; Vagnerini, A; Klanner, R; Stadie, H; Perieanu, A; Benecke, A; Abbas, S M; Schroeder, M; Lobelle pardo, P; Chwalek, T; Heidecker, C; Floh, K M; Gomez, G; Cabrillo bartolome, I J; Orviz fernandez, P; Duarte campderros, J; Busson, P; Dobrzynski, L; Fontaine, G R R; Granier de cassagnac, R; Paganini, P R J; Arleo, F P; Balagura, V; Martin blanco, J; Ortona, G; Kucher, I; Contardo, D C; Lumb, N; Baulieu, G; Lagarde, F; Figueiredo marques, B E; Heath, H F; Kreczko, L; Clement, E J; Paramesvaran, S; Bologna, S; Bell, K W; Petyt, D A; Moretti, S; Hill, J A; Durkin, T J; Daskalakis, G; Kataria, S K; Iaselli, G; Pugliese, G; My, S; Sharma, A; Abbiendi, G; Taneja, S; Benussi, L; Fabbri, F; Calvelli, V; Frizziero, E; Barone, L M; De notaristefani, F; D'imperio, G; Gobbo, B; Jo, Y; Gyun, D; Yusupov, H; Liew, C S; Zabolotny, W M; Sobolev, S; Gavrikov, Y; Kozlov, I; Golubev, N; Andreev, Y; Tlisov, D; Zaytsev, V; Stepennov, A; Popova, E; Kolchanova, A; Shtol, D; Sirunyan, A; Gokbulut, G; Kara, O; Damarseckin, S; Guler, A M; Ozpineci, A; Hayreter, A; Li, S; Gruenendahl, S; Yarba, J; Para, A; Ristori, L F; Ronzhin, A I; Rubinov, P M; Reichanadter, M A; Churin, I; Beretvas, A; Muzaffar, S M; Lykken, J D; Gutsche, O; Baldin, B; Uplegger, L A; Lei, C M; Wu, W; Derylo, G E; Ruschman, M K; Lipton, R J; Whitbeck, A J; Schmitt, R; Contreras pasuy, L C; Olsen, J T; Cavanaugh, R J; Betts, R R; Wang, H; Sturdy, J T; Gutierrez jr, A; Campagnari, C F; White, D T; Brewer, F D; Qu, H; Ranjan, K; Lalwani, K; Md, H; Shah, A H; Fonseca de souza, S; De jesus damiao, D; Revoredo, E A; Chinellato, J A; Amadei marques da costa, C; 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Beaudette, F; Lobanov, A; Grasseau, G J; Pierre-emile, T B; El mamouni, H; Gouzevitch, M; Goldstein, J; Cussans, D G; Seif el nasr, S A; Titterton, A S; Ford, P J W; Olaiya, E O; Salisbury, J G; Paspalaki, G; Asenov, P; Hidas, P; Kiss, T N; Zalan, P; Shukla, P; Abbrescia, M; De filippis, N; Donvito, G; Radogna, R; Miniello, G; Gelmi, A; Capiluppi, P; Marcellini, S; Odorici, F; Bonacorsi, D; Genta, C; Ferri, G; Saviano, G; Ferrini, M; Minutoli, S; Tosi, S; Lista, L; Passeggio, G; Breglio, G; Merola, M; Diemoz, M; Rahatlou, S; Baccaro, S; Bartoloni, A; Talamo, I G; Kim, J Y; Oh, G; Lim, J H; Lee, J; Mohamad idris, F B; Gani, A B; Cwiok, M; Doroba, K; Martins galinhas, B E; Kim, V; Krivshich, A; Vorobyev, A; Ivanov, Y; Tarakanov, V; Lobodenko, A; Obikhod, T; Isayev, O; Kurov, O; Leonidov, A; Lvova, N; Kirsanov, M; Suvorova, O; Karneyeu, A; Demidov, S; Konoplyannikov, A; Popov, V; Pakhlov, P; Vinogradov, S; Klemin, S; Blinov, V; Skovpen, I; Chatrchyan, S; Grigorian, N; Kayis topaksu, A; Sunar cerci, D; Hos, I; Girgis chyla, S; Guler, Y; Kiminsu, U; Serin, M; Deniz, M; Turan, I; Eryol, F; Pozdnyakov, A; Liu, Z; Doan, T H; Genser, K; Hanlon, J E; Mcbride, P L; Pal, I; Garren, L; Oleynik, G; Harris, R M; Bolla, G; Kowalkowski, J B; Evans, D E; Vaandering, E W; Patrick, J F; Rechenmacher, R; Prosser, A G; Messer, T A; Tiradani, A R; Rivera, R A; Jayatilaka, B A; Duarte, J M; Todri, A; Harr, R F; Richman, J D; Bhandari, R; Dordevic, M; Cirkovic, P; Mora herrera, C; Rosa lopes zachi, A; De paula carvalho, W; Kinnunen, R L A; Lehti, S T; Maeenpaeae, T H; Bloch, D; Chabert, E C; Rudolf, N G; Devroede, O; Skovpen, K; Lontkovskyi, D; De wolf, E A; Van mechelen, P; Van spilbeeck, A B E; Georgiev, L S; Novaes, S F; Costa, M A; Costa leal, B; Horisberger, R P; De la cruz, B; Willmott, C; Perez-calero yzquierdo, A M; Dejardin, M M; Mehta, A; Barbagli, G; Focardi, E; Bacchetta, N; Gasparini, U; Pantano, D; Sgaravatto, M; Ventura, S; Zotto, P; Candelori, A; Pozzobon, N; Boletti, A; Servoli, L; Postolache, V; Rossi, A; Ciangottini, D; Alunni solestizi, L; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Amapane, N C; Shchelina, K; Lopez fernandez, R; Sanchez hernandez, A; Heredia de la cruz, I; Matveev, V; Kracikova, T; Shmatov, S; Vasilev, S; Kurenkov, A; Oleynik, D; Verkheev, A; Voytishin, N; Proskuryakov, A; Bogdanova, G; Petrova, E; Bagaturia, I; Tsamalaidze, Z; Zhao, Z; Arcaro, D J; Barberis, E; Wamorkar, T; Wang, B; Ralph, D K; Velasco, M M; Odell, N J; Sevova, S; Li, W; Merlo, J; Onel, Y; Mermerkaya, H; Moeller, A R; Haytmyradov, M; Dong, R; Bugg, W M; Ragghianti, G C; Delannoy sotomayor, A G; Thapa, K; Yagil, A; Gerosa, R A; Masciovecchio, M; Schmitz, E J; Kapustinsky, J S; Greene, S V; Zhang, L; Vlimant, J V; Mughal, A; Cury siqueira, S; Gershtein, Y; Arora, S R R; Lin, W X; Stickland, D P; Mc donald, K T; Pivarski, J M C; Lucchini, M T; Higginbotham, S L; Rosenfield, M; Long, O R; Johnson, K F; Adams, T; Susa, T; Rykaczewski, H; Ge, Y; Levin, A M; Li, J; Li, L; Bloom, K A; Monroy montanez, J A; Kunori, S; Wang, Z; Favart, D; Maltoni, F; Vidal marono, M; Delcourt, M; Markov, S I; Seez, C; Richards, A J; Ferguson, W; Chatziangelou, M; Karathanasis, G; Kontaxakis, P; Jones, J A; Strologas, J; Katsoulis, P; Dutt, S; Roy chowdhury, S; Bhardwaj, R; Purohit, A; Singh, B; Behera, P K; Sharma, A; Spagnolo, P; Tonelli, G E; Fedi, G; Giannini, L; Poulios, S; Groote, J F; Untuc, B; Oztirpan, F O; Koseoglu, I; Luiggi lopez, E E; Krohn, M D; Hadley, N J; Shin, Y H; Safonov, A; Eusebi, R; Rose, A K; Overton, D A; Erbacher, R D; Funk, G N; Pilot, J R; Regnery, B J; Klimenko, S; Matchev, K; Gleyzer, S; Wang, J; Bortignon, P; Curry, D A; Cadamuro, L; Sun, W M; Soffi, L; Lantz, S R; Wright, D; Cline, D; Cousins jr, R D; Erhan, S; Yang, X; Schnaible, C J; Dasgupta, A; Bradley, D C; Monzat, D; Dodd, L M; Tikalsky, J L; Kapusta, J; Gilbert, W J; Lesko, Z J; Marinelli, N; Wayne, M R; Heering, A H; Galanti, M; Duh, Y; Roy, A; Arabgol, M; Hacker, T J; Salva, S; Petrov, V; Barychevski, V; Drobychev, G; Lobko, A; Gabusi, M; Fabris, L; Conte, E R E; Kasprowicz, G H; Kyberd, P; Cole, J E; Lopez, J M; Salazar gonzalez, C A; Benzon, A M; Pelagio, L; Walsh, M F; Postnov, A; Lelas, D; Vaitkus, J V; Jurciukonis, D; Sulmanas, B; Ahmad, A; Ahmed, W; Jalil, S H; Kahl, W E; Taylor, D R; Choi, Y I; Jeong, Y; Roy, T; Guerrero ibarra, D F; Schoenenberger, M A; Khateri, P; Etesami, S M; Fiorini, E; Pullia, A; Magni, S; Gennai, S; Fiorendi, S; Zuolo, D; Sanabria arenas, J C; Florez bustos, C A; Holguin coral, A; Mendez, H; Srimanobhas, N; Jaikar, A H; Arteche gonzalez, F J; Call, K R; Vazquez valencia, E F; Calderon monroy, M A; Aly mohamed mahmoud mohamed, R; Elkafrawy, T; Abdelmaguid, A; Mal, P K; Yuan, L; Lomidze, I; Prangishvili, I; Adamov, G; Dube, S S; Dugad, S; Mohanty, G B; Bhat, M A; Bheesette, S; Abou kors, D J

    CMS is a general purpose proton-proton detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the LHC. It is also well adapted for studies at the initially lower luminosities. The CMS Collaboration consists of over 1800 scientists and engineers from 151 institutes in 31 countries. The main design goals of CMS are: \\begin{enumerate} \\item a highly performant muon system, \\item the best possible electromagnetic calorimeter \\item high quality central tracking \\item hermetic calorimetry \\item a detector costing less than 475 MCHF. \\end{enumerate} All detector sub-systems have started construction. Engineering Design Reviews of parts of these sub-systems have been successfully carried-out. These are held prior to granting authorization for purchase. The schedule for the LHC machine and the experiments has been revised and CMS will be ready for first collisions now expected in April 2006. \\\\\\\\ ~~~~$\\bullet$ Magnet \\\\ The detector (see Figure) will be built around a long (13~m) and large bore ($\\phi$=5.9~m) high...

  9. UV written compact broadband optical couplers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivero, Massimo; Svalgaard, Mikael

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the first demonstration of compact asymmetric directional couplers made by UV writing is presented. The combined performance in terms bandwidth, loss and compactness exceeds that reported using other, more elaborate fabrication techniques.......In this paper the first demonstration of compact asymmetric directional couplers made by UV writing is presented. The combined performance in terms bandwidth, loss and compactness exceeds that reported using other, more elaborate fabrication techniques....

  10. Compact Beamformer Design with High Frame Rate for Ultrasound Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Luo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In medical field, two-dimension ultrasound images are widely used in clinical diagnosis. Beamformer is critical in determining the complexity and performance of an ultrasound imaging system. Different from traditional means implemented with separated chips, a compact beamformer with 64 effective channels in a single moderate Field Programmable Gate Array has been presented in this paper. The compactness is acquired by employing receive synthetic aperture, harmonic imaging, time sharing and linear interpolation. Besides that, multi-beams method is used to improve the frame rate of the ultrasound imaging system. Online dynamic configuration is employed to expand system’s flexibility to two kinds of transducers with multi-scanning modes. The design is verified on a prototype scanner board. Simulation results have shown that on-chip memories can be saved and the frame rate can be improved on the case of 64 effective channels which will meet the requirement of real-time application.

  11. A compact neutron source for research and industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schriber, S.O.; Chidley, B.G.; Delong, M.S.; Kushneriuk, S.A.; Lone, M.A.; Selander, W.N.

    1983-01-01

    The use of neutrons as a diagnostic tool has become more extensive in radiography, non-destructive analysis, bio-medical investigations and other general research studies. Although most diagnostic neutron work has been conducted at large nuclear research reactors, there is a need for compact and semi-portable neutron sources. Such a neutron source can be based on a low energy proton linac and suitable target. Design of a compact, 100% duty cycle, 2.5 MeV proton linac that delivers 10 mA to a thick 7 Li target is described. Calculated thermal neutron peak flux with an H 2 O moderator is 2 x 10 11 n/cm 2 Xs. The associated low gamma ray yield results in the availability of good neutron beam quality for radiography and other purposes

  12. Equationally Compact Acts : Coproducts / Peeter Normak

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Normak, Peeter

    1998-01-01

    In this article equational compactness of acts and its generalizations are discussed. As equational compactness does not carry over to coproducts a slight generalization of c-equational campactness is introduced. It is proved that a coproduct of acts is c-equationally compact if and only if all components are c-equationally campact

  13. Invariant subsets under compact quantum group actions

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Huichi

    2012-01-01

    We investigate compact quantum group actions on unital $C^*$-algebras by analyzing invariant subsets and invariant states. In particular, we come up with the concept of compact quantum group orbits and use it to show that countable compact metrizable spaces with infinitely many points are not quantum homogeneous spaces.

  14. Electron-electron luminosity in the Next Linear Collider -- a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, F.; Thompson, K.A.; Helm, R.H.

    1997-11-01

    In this paper, the authors discuss some operational aspects of electron-electron collisions at the Next Linear Collider (NLC) and estimate the luminosity attainable in such a machine. They also consider the use of two future technologies which could simplify the operation and improve the luminosity in an e - e - collider: polarized rf guns and plasma lenses

  15. Different Luminosity Correlation of GRBs ZB Zhang1,2,∗, HC Liu1,2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We report our recent understanding about a tight correlation between relative spectral lag and luminosity (or redshift) for γ-ray bursts. The latest investigations indicate that the empirical correlations got from. BATSE bursts also exist for Swift/BAT ones. The special luminosity- lag correlation is much similar to that of ...

  16. Test-beam programs for devices to measure luminosity and energy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tem studies for luminosity and energy measurements and beam diagnostics for luminosity optimization. Keywords. ... tional information is obtained from a calorimeter measuring e+e− pairs produced by beamstrahlung ... (left); A diamond sensor of 10 × 10 mm2 size and 300 µm thickness assembled for the test-beam (right).

  17. Different Luminosity Correlation of GRBs ZB Zhang1,2,∗, HC Liu1,2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We report our recent understanding about a tight correlation between relative spectral lag and luminosity (or redshift) for γ-ray bursts. The latest investigations indicate that the empirical correlations got from. BATSE bursts also exist for Swift/BAT ones. The special luminosity- lag correlation is much similar to that of ...

  18. Calculation of integrated luminosity for beams stored in the Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finley, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    A model for calculating the integrated luminosity of beams stored in the Tevatron collider will be presented. The model determines the instantaneous luminosity by calculating the overlap integral of bunched beams passing through the interaction region. The calculation accounts for the variation in beam size due to the beta functions and also for effects due to finite longitudinal emittance and non-zero dispersion in the interaction region. The integrated luminosity is calculated for the beams as they evolve due to processes including collisions and intrabeam scattering. The model has been applied to both the extant and upgraded Tevatron collider, but is not limited to them. The original motivation for developing the computer model was to determine the reduction in luminosity due to beams with non-zero longitudinal emittances. There are two effects: the transverse beam size is increased where the dispersion is non-zero; the finite length of the beam bunch combined with an increasing β function results in an increased transverse beam size at the ends of the bunch. The derivation of a sufficiently useful analytic expression for the luminosity proved to be intractable. Instead, a numerical integration computer program was developed to calculate the luminosity in the presence of a finite longitudinal emittance. The program was then expanded into a model which allows the luminosity to vary due to changes in emittances and reduction in bunch intensities. At that point, it was not difficult to calculate the integrated luminosity. 5 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  19. The luminosity dependence of clustering and higher order correlations in the PSCz survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szapudi, [No Value; Branchini, E; Frenk, CS; Maddox, S; Saunders, W

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the spatial clustering of galaxies in the PSCz galaxy redshift survey, as revealed by the two-point correlation function, the luminosity mark correlations and the moments of counts-in-cells. We construct volume-limited subsamples at different depths and search for a luminosity

  20. Bolometric Luminosity Correction of H2O Maser AGNs Q. Guo1,2, JS ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. As a special subsample of AGN, H2O maser AGNs are always heavily obscured. (Zhang et al. 2006). So their AGN intrinsic bolometric luminosities Lb is difficult to be measured directly. It can generally be estimated with the bolometric correction, which is the ratio between the AGN intrinsic bolometric luminosity ...

  1. Compact analyzer: an interactive simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ipakchi, A.; Khadem, M.; Colley, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Compact Analyzer is a computer system that combines dynamic simulation models with interactive and color graphics user interface functions to provide a cost-effective simulator for dynamic analysis and evaluation of power plant operation, with engineering and training applications. Most dynamic simulation packages such as RETRAN and TRAC are designed for a batch-mode operation. With advancements in computer technology and man/machine interface capabilities, it is possible to integrate such codes with interactive and graphic functions into advanced simulators. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has sponsored development of plant analyzers with such characteristics. The Compact Analyzer is an Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)-sponsored project, which currently utilizes the EPRI modular modeling system (MMS) for process simulation, and uses an adaptable color graphic package for dynamic display of the simulation results

  2. Probability on compact Lie groups

    CERN Document Server

    Applebaum, David

    2014-01-01

    Probability theory on compact Lie groups deals with the interaction between “chance” and “symmetry,” a beautiful area of mathematics of great interest in its own sake but which is now also finding increasing applications in statistics and engineering (particularly with respect to signal processing). The author gives a comprehensive introduction to some of the principle areas of study, with an emphasis on applicability. The most important topics presented are: the study of measures via the non-commutative Fourier transform, existence and regularity of densities, properties of random walks and convolution semigroups of measures, and the statistical problem of deconvolution. The emphasis on compact (rather than general) Lie groups helps readers to get acquainted with what is widely seen as a difficult field but which is also justified by the wealth of interesting results at this level and the importance of these groups for applications. The book is primarily aimed at researchers working in probability, s...

  3. Compact sources for eyesafe illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranova, Nadia; Pu, Rui; Stebbins, Kenneth; Bystryak, Ilya; Rayno, Michael; Ezzo, Kevin; DePriest, Christopher

    2018-02-01

    Q-peak has demonstrated a compact, pulsed eyesafe laser architecture operating with >10 mJ pulse energies at repetition rates as high as 160 Hz. The design leverages an end-pumped solid-state laser geometry to produce adequate eyesafe beam quality (M2˜4), while also providing a path toward higher-density laser architectures for pulsed eyesafe applications. The baseline discussed in this paper has shown a unique capability for high-pulse repetition rates in a compact package, and offers additional potential for power scaling based on birefringence compensation. The laser consists of an actively Q-switched oscillator cavity producing pulse widths designed to fit within a volume of 3760 cm3. We will discuss details of the optical system design, modeled thermal effects and stress-induced birefringence, as well as experimental advantages of the end-pumped laser geometry, along with proposed paths to higher eyesafe pulse energies.

  4. Luminosity excesses in low-mass young stellar objects - a statistical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strom, K.M.; Strom, S.E.; Kenyon, S.J.; Hartmann, L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical study in which the observed total luminosity is compared quantitatively with an estimate of the stellar luminosity for a sample of 59 low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Taurus-Auriga complex. In 13 of the analyzed YSOs, luminosity excesses greater than 0.20 are observed together with greater than 0.6 IR excesses, which typically contribute the bulk of the observed excess luminosity and are characterized by spectral energy distributions which are flat or rise toward long wavelengths. The analysis suggests that YSOs showing the largest luminosity excesses typically power optical jets and/or molecular outflows or have strong winds, as evidenced by the presence of O I emission, indicating a possible correlation between accretion and mass-outflow properties. 38 references

  5. Compact objects in relativistic theories of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada da Silva, Hector

    2017-05-01

    In this dissertation we discuss several aspects of compact objects, i.e. neutron stars and black holes, in relativistic theories of gravity. We start by studying the role of nuclear physics (encoded in the so-called equation of state) in determining the properties of neutron stars in general relativity. We show that low-mass neutron stars are potentially useful astrophysical laboratories that can be used to constrain the properties of the equation of state. More specifically, we show that various bulk properties of these objects, such as their quadrupole moment and tidal deformability, are tightly correlated. Next, we develop a formalism that aims to capture how generic modifications from general relativity affect the structure of neutron stars, as predicted by a broad class of gravity theories, in the spirit of the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism (PPN). Our "post-Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff" formalism provides a toolbox to study both stellar structure and the interior/exterior geometries of static, spherically symmetric relativistic stars. We also apply the formalism to parametrize deviations from general relativity in various astrophysical observables related with neutron stars, including surface redshift, apparent radius, Eddington luminosity. We then turn our attention to what is arguably the most well-motivated and well-investigated generalization of general relativity: scalar-tensor theory. We start by considering theories where gravity is mediated by a single extra scalar degree of freedom (in addition to the metric tensor). An interesting class of scalar-tensor theories passes all experimental tests in the weak-field regime of gravity, yet considerably deviates from general relativity in the strong-field regime in the presence of matter. A common assumption in modeling neutron stars is that the pressure within these object is spatially isotropic. We relax this assumption and examine how pressure anisotropy affects the mass, radius and moment of inertia

  6. Strange matter in compact stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klähn, Thomas; Blaschke, David B.

    2018-02-01

    We discuss possible scenarios for the existence of strange matter in compact stars. The appearance of hyperons leads to a hyperon puzzle in ab-initio approaches based on effective baryon-baryon potentials but is not a severe problem in relativistic mean field models. In general, the puzzle can be resolved in a natural way if hadronic matter gets stiffened at supersaturation densities, an effect based on the quark Pauli quenching between hadrons. We explain the conflict between the necessity to implement dynamical chiral symmetry breaking into a model description and the conditions for the appearance of absolutely stable strange quark matter that require both, approximately masslessness of quarks and a mechanism of confinement. The role of strangeness in compact stars (hadronic or quark matter realizations) remains unsettled. It is not excluded that strangeness plays no role in compact stars at all. To answer the question whether the case of absolutely stable strange quark matter can be excluded on theoretical grounds requires an understanding of dense matter that we have not yet reached.

  7. Durability of Self Compacting Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benmarce, A.; Boudjehem, H.; Bendjhaiche, R.

    2011-01-01

    Self compacting concrete (SCC) seem to be a very promising materials for construction thanks to their properties in a fresh state. Studying of the influence of the parameters of specific designed mixes to their mechanical, physical and chemical characteristics in a state hardened is an important stage so that it can be useful for new-to-the-field researchers and designers (worldwide) beginning studies and work involving self compacting concrete. The objective of this research is to study the durability of self compacting concrete. The durability of concrete depends very much on the porosity; the latter determines the intensity of interactions with aggressive agents. The pores inside of concrete facilitate the process of damage, which began generally on the surface. We are interested to measure the porosity of concrete on five SCC with different compositions (w/c, additives) and vibrated concrete to highlight the influence of the latter on the porosity, thereafter on the compressive strength and the transfer properties (oxygen permeability, chloride ion diffusion, capillary absorption). (author)

  8. The quasar luminosity function at redshift 4 with the Hyper Suprime-Cam Wide Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Masayuki; He, Wanqiu; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Niida, Mana; Nagao, Tohru; Bosch, James; Coupon, Jean; Enoki, Motohiro; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Oguri, Masamune; Ono, Yoshiaki; Onoue, Masafusa; Ouchi, Masami; Schulze, Andreas; Silverman, John D.; Tanaka, Manobu M.; Tanaka, Masayuki; Terashima, Yuichi; Toba, Yoshiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro

    2018-01-01

    We present the luminosity function of z ˜ 4 quasars based on the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program Wide layer imaging data in the g, r, i, z, and y bands covering 339.8 deg2. From stellar objects, 1666 z ˜ 4 quasar candidates are selected via the g-dropout selection down to i = 24.0 mag. Their photometric redshifts cover the redshift range between 3.6 and 4.3, with an average of 3.9. In combination with the quasar sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in the same redshift range, a quasar luminosity function covering the wide luminosity range of M1450 = -22 to -29 mag is constructed. The quasar luminosity function is well described by a double power-law model with a knee at M1450 = -25.36 ± 0.13 mag and a flat faint-end slope with a power-law index of -1.30 ± 0.05. The knee and faint-end slope show no clear evidence of redshift evolution from those seen at z ˜ 2. The flat slope implies that the UV luminosity density of the quasar population is dominated by the quasars around the knee, and does not support the steeper faint-end slope at higher redshifts reported at z > 5. If we convert the M1450 luminosity function to the hard X-ray 2-10 keV luminosity function using the relation between the UV and X-ray luminosity of quasars and its scatter, the number density of UV-selected quasars matches well with that of the X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) above the knee of the luminosity function. Below the knee, the UV-selected quasars show a deficiency compared to the hard X-ray luminosity function. The deficiency can be explained by the lack of obscured AGNs among the UV-selected quasars.

  9. Advanced radioactive waste compaction techniques: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volodzko, M.; McGrath, R.N.; Kinsman, J.F.; Palo, W.J.

    1988-08-01

    The purpose of this test program is to provide definitive information on the volume reduction capabilities of conventional compactors used in the nuclear industry for the treatment of dry active waste and the effects of preshredding on compaction. The test program presents comprehensive data on compacted densities of dry active waste collected at five facilities generating this waste and using conventional compactors. Waste materials presently classified as ''non-compactable'' which would lend themselves to preshredding and compaction are identified. An ALARA evaluation of shredding operations and an economic evaluation of preshredding prior to compaction are also presented. 32 figs., 72 tabs

  10. Beam dynamics issues of high-luminosity asymmetric collider rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    Machines for use in high-energy physics are advancing along two frontiers. First, there is the frontier of energy, currently being pressed by the Fermilab collider (p bar p), and SLC and LEP (e + e - ) and in the near future by HERA (ep), the LHC, and the SSC (pp). Second, there is the frontier of intensity, currently being pressed by a variety of low-energy machines and, at higher energies, by various linacs such as those at KEK. Fermilab, GSI, and LAMPF (p) and CEBAF (e - ). In the future there should be, along this frontier, various ''factories'' such as those for Kaons at TRIUMF, and those proposed for var-phi mesons, τ-charm particles, and B mesons. It is with the intensity frontier that these proceedings are concerned. The elementary particle motivation to study the nonconservation of PC in the B-stringB system (which topic is not covered in these Proceedings, but is treated extensively in the literature) has motivated the study of very high intensity asymmetric collider rings. It was for this purpose that a Workshop on Beam Dynamics Issues of High-Luminosity Asymmetric Collider Rings was held, in Berkeley, during February 12--16, 1990. A general introduction to the subject has been given in an article which is reprinted here as an Appendix. The nonexpert may wish to start there. The volume consists of four parts. The first part consists of Summaries; first an overall summary of the Workshop and then, second, more detailed summaries from each of the working groups. The second part consists of the Invited Talks at the workshop. The third part contains various Contributed Papers, most of which represent work that came out of the workshop. Finally, there are, in the fourth part, brief Summaries of the Various Proposed B-Factory Projects in the world

  11. SuperB: a Linear High-Luminosity B Factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, J.; Bettarini, S.; Biagini, M.; Bonneaud, G.; Cai, Y.; Calderini, G.; Ciuchini, M.; Dubois-Felsmann, G.P.; Ecklund, S.; Forti, F.; Gershon, T.J.; Giorgi, M.A.; Hitlin, D.G.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Lusiani, A.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Neri, N.; Novokhatski, A.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; /Caltech /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale

    2006-02-08

    This paper is based on the outcome of the activity that has taken place during the recent workshop on ''SuperB in Italy'' held in Frascati on November 11-12, 2005. The workshop was opened by a theoretical introduction of Marco Ciuchini and was structured in two working groups. One focused on the machine and the other on the detector and experimental issues.. The present status on CP is mainly based on the results achieved by BABAR and Belle. Establishment of the indirect CP violation in B sector in 2001 and of the direct CP violation in 2004 thanks to the success of PEP-II and KEKB e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric B Factories operating at the center of mass energy corresponding to the mass of the {Upsilon}(4S ). With the two B Factories taking data, the Unitarity Triangle is now beginning to be over constrained by improving the measurements of the sides and now also of the angles {alpha}, and {gamma}. We are also in presence of the very intriguing results about the measurements of sin2{beta} in the time dependent analysis of decay channels via penguin loops, where b {yields} s{bar s}s and b {yields} s{bar d}d. {tau} physics, in particular LFV search, as well as charm and ISR physics are important parts of the scientific program of a SuperB Factory. The physics case together with possible scenarios for the high luminosity SuperB Factory based on the concepts of the Linear Collider and the related experimental issues are discussed.

  12. Luminosity measurements for the R scan experiment at BESIII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ahmed, S.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Bakina, O.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chai, J.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; Heinsius, F. H.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Holtmann, T.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, X. Z.; Huang, Z. L.; Hussain, T.; Ikegami Andersson, W.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kupsc, A.; Kühn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leithoff, H.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, H. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. B.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. Y.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, M. M.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Mezzadri, G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Musiol, P.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schnier, C.; Schoenning, K.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. H.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, L. J.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xie, Y. H.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, J. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; You, Z. Y.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; BESIII Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    By analyzing the large-angle Bhabha scattering events e+e- → (γ)e+e- and diphoton events e+e- → (γ)γγ for the data sets collected at center-of-mass (c.m.) energies between 2.2324 and 4.5900 GeV (131 energy points in total) with the upgraded Beijing Spectrometer (BESIII) at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider (BEPCII), the integrated luminosities have been measured at the different c.m. energies, individually. The results are important inputs for the R value and J/ψ resonance parameter measurements. Supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (2015CB856700), National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (10935007, 11121092, 11125525, 11235011, 11322544, 11335008, 11375170, 11275189, 11079030, 11475164, 11475169, 11005109, 10979095, 11275211), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) Large-Scale Scientific Facility Program; Joint Large-Scale Scientific Facility Funds of the NSFC and CAS (11179007, U1232201, U1332201, U1532102). (KJCX2-YW-N29, KJCX2-YW-N45). 100 Talents Program of CAS, INPAC and Shanghai Key Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology, German Research Foundation DFG (Collaborative Research Center CRC-1044), Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Italy, Ministry of Development of Turkey (DPT2006K-120470), Russian Foundation for Basic Research (14-07-91152), U. S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-04ER41291, DE-FG02-05ER41374, DE-FG02-94ER40823, DESC0010118), U.S. National Science Foundation, University of Groningen (RuG) and the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (GSI), Darmstadt, WCU Program of National Research Foundation of Korea (R32-2008-000-10155-0)

  13. On Intuitionistic Fuzzy β-Almost Compactness and β-Nearly Compactness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renuka, R; Seenivasan, V

    2015-01-01

    The concept of intuitionistic fuzzy β-almost compactness and intuitionistic fuzzy β-nearly compactness in intuitionistic fuzzy topological spaces is introduced and studied. Besides giving characterizations of these spaces, we study some of their properties. Also, we investigate the behavior of intuitionistic fuzzy β-compactness, intuitionistic fuzzy β-almost compactness, and intuitionistic fuzzy β-nearly compactness under several types of intuitionistic fuzzy continuous mappings.

  14. Numerical simulation of intelligent compaction technology for construction quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Intelligent compaction (IC) technique is a fast-developing technology for compaction quality control and acceptance. Proof rolling using the intelligent compaction rollers after completing compaction can eectively identify : the weak spots and sig...

  15. Response Of Lowland Rice To Soil Compaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idawati; Haryanto

    2000-01-01

    Soil compaction, as a new tillage practice for paddy soil, is to substitute pudding in order to reduce land preparation cost. To study response of lowland rice to soil compaction, a pot experiment has been conducted which took place in the greenhouse of P3TIR-BATAN. Soil for experiment was taken from pusakanegara. Two factors (degree of soil compaction and rice variety) were combined. Degree of compaction was split into 3 levels (DI = normal; D215% more compact than normal; 30 % more compact than normal), and rice variety into 2 levels (IR64 and Atomita IV). KH 2 32 PO 4 solution was injected into the soil surrounding rice clump to test the root activity at blooming stage of rice plant. Data resulted from this experiment is presented together with additional data from some other experiments of fertilization in the research s erie to study soil compaction. Some information's from experiment results are as following. Both rice varieties tested gave the same response to soil compaction. Root activity, according to data of 32 P absorbed by plant, was not harmed by soil compaction at the degree tested in the experiment. This prediction is supported by the growth by rice observed at generative growth stage, in pot experiment as well as in field experiment, which showed that soil compaction tested did not decrease rice yield but in opposite in tended to increase the yield. In practising soil compaction in land preparation, fertilizers should be applied by deep placement to have higher increasing is rice yield

  16. Effect of cohesion on local compaction and granulation of sheared soft granular materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, Sudeshna; Luding, Stefan; Weinhart, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This paper results from an ongoing investigation of the effect of cohesion on the compaction of sheared soft wet granular materials. We compare dry non-cohesive and wet moderately-to-strongly cohesive soft almost frictionless granular materials and report the effect of cohesion between the grains on

  17. New Evidence for a Black Hole in the Compact Binary Cygnus X-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrader, Chris R.; Titarchuk, Lev; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2010-01-01

    The bright and highly variable X-ray and radio source known as Cygnus X-3 was among the first X-ray sources discovered, yet it remains in many ways an enigma. Its known to consist of a massive. Wolf-Rayet primary in an extremely tight orbit with a compact object. Yet one of the most basic of pa.ranietern the mass of the compact object - is not known. Nor is it even clear whether its is a neutron star or a black hole. In this Paper we present our analysis of the broad-band high-energy continua covering a substantial range in luminosity and spectral morphology. We apply these results to a recently identified scaling relationship which has been demonstrated to provide reliable estimates of the compact object mass in a number of accretion powered binaries. This analysis leads us to conclude that the compact object in Cygnus X-3 has a mass greater than 4.2 solar mass thus clearly indicative of a black hole and as such resolving a longstanding issue. The full range of uncertainty in our analysis and from using a. range of recently published distance estimates constrains the compact object mass to lie between 4.2 solar mass and 14.4 solar mass. Our favored estimate, based on a 9.0 kpc distance estimate is approx. l0 solar mass, with the. error margin of 3.2 solar masses. This result may thus pose challenges to shared-envelope evolutionary models of compact binaries. as well as establishing Cygnus X-3 as the first confirmed accretion-powered galactic gamma: ray source.

  18. EVOLUTION OF GALAXY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION USING PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, B. H. F.; Pellegrini, P. S.; Da Costa, L. N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Ogando, R. L. C.; De Simoni, F.; Benoist, C.; Makler, M.; Mesquita, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    We examine the impact of using photometric redshifts for studying the evolution of both the global galaxy luminosity function (LF) and that for different galaxy types. To this end, we compare the LFs obtained using photometric redshifts from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) D1 field with those from the spectroscopic survey VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) comprising ∼4800 galaxies. We find that for z ≤ 2.0, in the interval of magnitudes considered by this survey, the LFs obtained using photometric and spectroscopic redshifts show a remarkable agreement. This good agreement led us to use all four Deep fields of the CFHTLS comprising ∼386,000 galaxies to compute the LF of the combined fields and directly estimate the error in the parameters based on the field-to-field variation. We find that the characteristic absolute magnitude M* of Schechter fits fades by ∼0.7 mag from z ∼ 1.8 to z ∼ 0.3, while the characteristic density φ* increases by a factor of ∼4 in the same redshift interval. We use the galaxy classification provided by the template fitting program used to compute photometric redshifts and split the sample into galaxy types. We find that these Schechter parameters evolve differently for each galaxy type, an indication that their evolution is a combination of several effects: galaxy merging, star formation quenching, and mass assembly. All these results are compatible with those obtained by different spectroscopic surveys such as VVDS, DEEP2, and zCosmos, which reinforces the fact that photometric redshifts can be used to study galaxy evolution, at least for the redshift bins adopted so far. This is of great interest since future very large imaging surveys containing hundreds of millions of galaxies will allow us to obtain important precise measurements to constrain the evolution of the LF and to explore the dependence of this evolution on morphology and/or color helping constrain the mechanisms of galaxy evolution.

  19. Portable compact multifunction IR calibrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyatt, C.L.; Jacobsen, L.; Steed, A.

    1988-01-01

    A compact portable multifunction calibrator designed for future sensor systems is described which enables a linearity calibration for all detectors simultaneously using a near small-area source, a high-resolution mapping of the focal plane with 10 microrad setability and with a blur of less than 100 microrad, system spectral response calibration (radiometer) using a Michelson interferometer source, relative spectral response (spectrometer) using high-temperature external commercial blackbody simulators, and an absolute calibration using an internal low-temperature extended-area source. 5 references

  20. Simplified compact containment BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Tsutagawa, M.; Hiraiwa, K.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2004-01-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, is expected to prove attractive in the world energy markets due to its flexibility in regard to both energy demands and site conditions, its high potential for reducing investment risk and its safety features facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's small power output of 300 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). CCR is expected to be attractive from view point of investment due to its simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, internal upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure containment concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps and the maintenance of such pumps. The internal upper entry CRDs reduce the height of the reactor vessel (RPV) and consequently reduce the height of the primary containment vessel (PCV). The safety features mainly consist of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), passive auto catalytic recombiner and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in the case of design-base accidents, including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. The recombiner decreases hydrogen concentration in the PCV in the case of a severe accident. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. The feasibility of CCR safety system has been confirmed by LOCA

  1. Compact objects in Horndeski gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Hector O.; Maselli, Andrea; Minamitsuji, Masato; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    Horndeski gravity holds a special position as the most general extension of Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR) with a single scalar degree of freedom and second-order field equations. Because of these features, Horndeski gravity is an attractive phenomenological playground to investigate the consequences of modifications of GR in cosmology and astrophysics. We present a review of the progress made so far in the study of compact objects (black holes (BHs) and neutron stars (NSs)) within Horndeski gravity. In particular, we review our recent work on slowly rotating BHs and present some new results on slowly rotating NSs.

  2. Matter in compact binary mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Jocelyn; LIGO Scientific Collaboration, Virgo Scientific Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Mergers of binary neutron stars or neutron-star/black-hole systems are promising targets for gravitational-wave detection. The dynamics of merging compact objects, and thus their gravitational-wave signatures, are primarily determined by the mass and spin of the components. However, the presence of matter can make an imprint on the final orbits and merger of a binary system. I will outline efforts to understand the impact of neutron-star matter on gravitational waves, using both theoretical and computational input, so that gravitational-wave observations can be used to measure the properties of source systems with neutron-star components.

  3. Self-compacting concrete (SCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Mette Rica

    2008-01-01

    In many aspects Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC, “Self-Consolidating Concrete” in North America) can be considered the concrete of the future. SCC is a family of tailored concretes with special engineered properties in the fresh state. SCC flows into the formwork and around even complicated...... reinforcement arrangements under its own weight. Thus, SCC is not vibrated like conventional concrete. This drastically improves the working environment during construction, the productivity, and potentially improves the homogeneity and quality of the concrete. In addition SCC provides larger architectural...

  4. Compact Radiometers Expand Climate Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles, NASA plans to embark on the Soil Moisture Active and Passive mission in 2015. To prepare, Goddard Space Flight Center provided Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding to ProSensing Inc., of Amherst, Massachusetts, to develop a compact ultrastable radiometer for sea surface salinity and soil moisture mapping. ProSensing incorporated small, low-cost, high-performance elements into just a few circuit boards and now offers two lightweight radiometers commercially. Government research agencies, university research groups, and large corporations around the world are using the devices for mapping soil moisture, ocean salinity, and wind speed.

  5. H-alpha as a Luminosity Class Diagnostic for K- and M-type Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Jennings, Jeff; Levesque, Emily M.

    2016-01-01

    We have identified the H-alpha absorption feature as a new spectroscopic diagnostic of luminosity class in K- and M-type stars. From high-resolution spectra of 19 stars with well-determined physical properties (including effective temperatures and stellar radii), we measured equivalent widths for H-alpha and the Ca II triplet and examined their dependence on both luminosity class and stellar radius. H-alpha shows a strong relation with both luminosity class and radius that extends down to lat...

  6. Characterization of exoplanets from their formation. III. The statistics of planetary luminosities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordasini, C.; Marleau, G.-D.; Mollière, P.

    2017-12-01

    Context. This paper continues a series in which we predict the main observable characteristics of exoplanets based on their formation. In Paper I we described our global planet formation and evolution model that is based on the core accretion paradigm. In Paper II we studied the planetary mass-radius relationship with population syntheses. Aims: In this paper we present an extensive study of the statistics of planetary luminosities during both formation and evolution. Our results can be compared with individual directly imaged extrasolar (proto)planets and with statistical results from surveys. Methods: We calculated three populations of synthetic planets assuming different efficiencies of the accretional heating by gas and planetesimals during formation. We describe the temporal evolution of the planetary mass-luminosity relation. We investigate the relative importance of the shock and internal luminosity during formation, and predict a statistical version of the post-formation mass vs. entropy "tuning fork" diagram. Because the calculations now include deuterium burning we also update the planetary mass-radius relationship in time. Results: We find significant overlap between the high post-formation luminosities of planets forming with hot and cold gas accretion because of the core-mass effect. Variations in the individual formation histories of planets can still lead to a factor 5 to 20 spread in the post-formation luminosity at a given mass. However, if the gas accretional heating and planetesimal accretion rate during the runaway phase is unknown, the post-formation luminosity may exhibit a spread of as much as 2-3 orders of magnitude at a fixed mass. As a key result we predict a flat log-luminosity distribution for giant planets, and a steep increase towards lower luminosities due to the higher occurrence rate of low-mass (M ≲ 10-40 M⊕) planets. Future surveys may detect this upturn. Conclusions: Our results indicate that during formation an estimation of

  7. Detector Developments for the High Luminosity LHC Era (1/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    Calorimetry and Muon Spectrometers - Part I : In the first part of the lecture series, the motivation for a high luminosity upgrade of the LHC will be quickly reviewed together with the challenges for the LHC detectors. In particular, the plans and ongoing research for new calorimeter detectors will be explained. The main issues in the high-luminosity era are an improved radiation tolerance, natural ageing of detector components and challenging trigger and physics requirements. The new technological solutions for calorimetry at a high-luminosity LHC will be reviewed.

  8. The Truncated Lognormal Distribution as a Luminosity Function for SWIFT-BAT Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Zaninetti

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the luminosity function (LF in Gamma ray bursts (GRBs depends on the adopted cosmology, each one characterized by its corresponding luminosity distance. Here, we analyze three cosmologies: the standard cosmology, the plasma cosmology and the pseudo-Euclidean universe. The LF of the GRBs is firstly modeled by the lognormal distribution and the four broken power law and, secondly, by a truncated lognormal distribution. The truncated lognormal distribution fits acceptably the range in luminosity of GRBs as a function of the redshift.

  9. Potential luminosity improvement for low-energy RHIC operation with electron cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedotov,A.

    2009-06-08

    There is a strong interest in heavy-ion RHIC collisions in the energy range below the present RHIC injection energy, which is termed 'low-energy' operation. These collisions will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about the existence and location of a critical point on the QCD phase diagram. However, luminosity projections are relatively low for the lowest energy points of interest. Luminosity improvement can be provided with RHIC electron cooling at low beam energies. This report summarizes the expected luminosity improvements with electron cooling and various limitations.

  10. Contribution of terms containing Z-boson exchange to the luminosity measurements at LEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beenakker, W.; Pietrzyk, B.

    1992-12-01

    We have investigated the contribution of terms containing Z-boson exchange to the luminosity measurements at LEP. Comparing the Monte Carlo program BABAMC and the semi-analytical program ALIBABA, we have determined the technical precision of the corresponding O( α) calculation in BABAMC to be 0.03%. Using the ALIBABA program we have assessed the higher-order corrections to these Z-boson exchange contributions to be of the order of 0.1% for the present luminosity measurements. The total theoretical error on the luminosity calculation for LEP experiments is at present not larger than 0.3%.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Cosmic evolution of long gamma-ray burst luminosity (Deng+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, C.-M.; Wang, X.-G.; Guo, B.-B.; Lu, R.-J.; Wang, Y.-Z.; Wei, J.-J.; Wu, X.-F.; Liang, E.-W.

    2018-02-01

    Our sample includes only the redshift-known long GRBs observed with Swift/BAT from 2005 January to 2015 April. Low-luminosity GRBs are excluded since they may belong to another distinct population (e.g., Chapman et al. 2007MNRAS.382L..21C; Liang et al. 2007ApJ...662.1111L; Lu et al. 2010ApJ...725.1965L). Although the durations of some GRBs, such as GRB 050724 and GRB 060614, are larger than 2s, we do not include them in our sample since they may be from merger of compact stars (Berger et al. 2005Natur.438..988B; Gehrels et al. 2006Natur.444.1044G; Zhang et al. 2007ApJ...655L..25Z, 2009ApJ...703.1696Z). The afterglow and host galaxy observations of the high-z SGRB GRB 090426 (T90=1.2s) show that it may be from the collapse of a massive star (Antonelli et al. 2009A&A...507L..45A; Xin et al. 2011MNRAS.410...27X). We thus include this GRB in our sample. We finally obtain a sample of 258 GRBs. They are reported in Table 1. (1 data file).

  12. Performance of the CMS precision electromagnetic calorimeter at LHC Run II and prospects for High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhicai

    2017-01-01

    Many physics analyses using the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the LHC require accurate, high-resolution electron and photon energy measurements. Following the excellent performance achieved during LHC Run I at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is operating at the LHC with proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV center-of-mass energy. The instantaneous luminosity delivered by the LHC during Run II has achieved unprecedented levels. The average number of concurrent proton-proton collisions per bunch-crossing (pileup) has reached up to 40 interactions in 2016 and may increase further in 2017. These high pileup levels necessitate a retuning of the ECAL readout and trigger thresholds and reconstruction algorithms. In addition, the energy response of the detector must be precisely calibrated and monitored. We present new reconstruction algorithms and calibration strategies that were implemented to maintain the excellent performance of the CMS ECAL throughout Run...

  13. Coupled moderator neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Pitcher, E.J.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1995-01-01

    Optimizing the neutronic performance of a coupled-moderator system for a Long-Pulse Spallation Source is a new and challenging area for the spallation target-system designer. For optimal performance of a neutron source, it is essential to have good communication with instrument scientists to obtain proper design criteria and continued interaction with mechanical, thermal-hydraulic, and materials engineers to attain a practical design. A good comprehension of the basics of coupled-moderator neutronics will aid in the proper design of a target system for a Long-Pulse Spallation Source

  14. AGN POPULATION IN HICKSON COMPACT GROUPS. I. DATA AND NUCLEAR ACTIVITY CLASSIFICATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MartInez, M. A.; Del Olmo, A.; Perea, J.; Coziol, R.

    2010-01-01

    We have conducted a new spectroscopic survey to characterize the nature of nuclear activity in Hickson compact group (HCG) galaxies and establish its frequency. We have obtained new intermediate-resolution optical spectroscopy for 200 member galaxies and corrected for underlying stellar population contamination using galaxy templates. Spectra for 11 additional galaxies have been acquired from the ESO and 6dF public archives, and emission-line ratios have been taken from the literature for 59 more galaxies. Here we present the results of our classification of the nuclear activity for 270 member galaxies, which belong to a well-defined sample of 64 HCGs. We found a large fraction of galaxies, 63%, with emission lines. Using standard diagnostic diagrams, 45% of the emission-line galaxies were classified as pure active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 23% as Transition Objects (TOs), and 32% as star-forming nuclei (SFNs). In the HCGs, the AGN activity appears as the most frequent activity type. Adopting the interpretation that in TOs a low-luminosity AGN coexists with circumnuclear star formation, the fraction of galaxies with an AGN could rise to 42% of the whole sample. The low frequency (20%) of SFNs confirms that there is no star formation enhancement in HCGs. After extinction correction, we found a median AGN Hα luminosity of 7.1 x 10 39 erg s -1 , which implies that AGNs in HCG have a characteristically low luminosity. This result added to the fact that there is an almost complete absence of broad-line AGNs in compact groups (CGs) as found by MartInez et al. and corroborated in this study for HCGs, is consistent with very few gas left in these galaxies. In general, therefore, what may characterize the level of activity in CGs is a severe deficiency of gas.

  15. RESOLUTION OF THE COMPACT RADIO CONTINUUM SOURCES IN Arp220

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batejat, Fabien; Conway, John E.; Hurley, Rossa; Parra, Rodrigo; Diamond, Philip J.; Lonsdale, Colin J.; Lonsdale, Carol J.

    2011-01-01

    We present 2 cm and 3.6 cm wavelength very long baseline interferometry images of the compact radio continuum sources in the nearby ultra-luminous infrared galaxy Arp220. Based on their radio spectra and variability properties, we confirm these sources to be a mixture of supernovae (SNe) and supernova remnants (SNRs). Of the 17 detected sources we resolve 7 at both wavelengths. The SNe generally only have upper size limits. In contrast all the SNRs are resolved with diameters ≥0.27 pc. This size limit is consistent with them having just entered their Sedov phase while embedded in an interstellar medium (ISM) of density 10 4 cm -3 . These objects lie on the diameter-luminosity correlation for SNRs (and so also on the diameter-surface brightness relation) and extend these correlations to very small sources. The data are consistent with the relation L∝D -9/4 . Revised equipartition arguments adjusted to a magnetic field to a relativistic particle energy density ratio of 1% combined with a reasonable synchrotron-emitting volume filling factor of 10% give estimated magnetic field strengths in the SNR shells of ∼15-50 mG. The SNR shell magnetic fields are unlikely to come from compression of ambient ISM fields and must instead be internally generated. We set an upper limit of 7 mG for the ISM magnetic field. The estimated energy in relativistic particles, 2%-20% of the explosion kinetic energy, is consistent with estimates from models that fit the IR-radio correlation in compact starburst galaxies.

  16. Compact Visualisation of Video Summaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janko Ćalić

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a system for compact and intuitive video summarisation aimed at both high-end professional production environments and small-screen portable devices. To represent large amounts of information in the form of a video key-frame summary, this paper studies the narrative grammar of comics, and using its universal and intuitive rules, lays out visual summaries in an efficient and user-centered way. In addition, the system exploits visual attention modelling and rapid serial visual presentation to generate highly compact summaries on mobile devices. A robust real-time algorithm for key-frame extraction is presented. The system ranks importance of key-frame sizes in the final layout by balancing the dominant visual representability and discovery of unanticipated content utilising a specific cost function and an unsupervised robust spectral clustering technique. A final layout is created using an optimisation algorithm based on dynamic programming. Algorithm efficiency and robustness are demonstrated by comparing the results with a manually labelled ground truth and with optimal panelling solutions.

  17. Geotechnical Aspects of Explosive Compaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Shakeran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Explosive Compaction (EC is the ground modification technique whereby the energy released from setting off explosives in subsoil inducing artificial earthquake effects, which compact the soil layers. The efficiency of EC predominantly depends on the soil profile, grain size distribution, initial status, and the intensity of energy applied to the soil. In this paper, in order to investigate the geotechnical aspects, which play an important role in performance of EC, a database has been compiled from thirteen-field tests or construction sites around the world, where EC has been successfully applied for modifying soil. This research focuses on evaluation of grain size distribution and initial stability status of deposits besides changes of soil penetration resistance due to EC. Results indicated suitable EC performance for unstable and liquefiable deposits having particle sizes ranging from gravel to silty sand with less than 40% silt content and less than 10% clay content. However, EC is most effective in fine-to-medium sands with a fine content less than 5% and hydraulically deposited with initial relative density ranging from 30% to 60%. Moreover, it has been observed that EC can be an effective method to improve the density, stability, and resistance of the target soils.

  18. High flux compact neutron generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reijonen, J.; Lou, T.-P.; Tolmachoff, B.; Leung, K.-N.; Verbeke, J.; Vujic, J.

    2001-01-01

    Compact high flux neutron generators are developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The neutron production is based on D-D or D-T reaction. The deuterium or tritium ions are produced from plasma using either a 2 MHz or 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) discharge. RF-discharge yields high fraction of atomic species in the beam which enables higher neutron output. In the first tube design, the ion beam is formed using a multiple hole accelerator column. The beam is accelerated to energy of 80 keV by means of a three-electrode extraction system. The ion beam then impinges on a titanium target where either the 2.4 MeV D-D or 14 MeV D-T neutrons are generated. The MCNP computation code has predicted a neutron flux of ∼10 11 n/s for the D-D reaction at beam intensity of 1.5 A at 150 kV. The neutron flux measurements of this tube design will be presented. Recently new compact high flux tubes are being developed which can be used for various applications. These tubes also utilize RF-discharge for plasma generation. The design of these tubes and the first measurements will be discussed in this presentation

  19. Quark matter in compact stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, H., E-mail: harg@cefet-rj.b [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica do Rio de Janeiro, Av. Maracana 249, 20271-110, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Duarte, S.B., E-mail: sbd@cbpf.b [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, J.C.T., E-mail: jcto@cbpf.b [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Roraima, Campus do Paricarana s/n, 69310-270, Boa Vista, RR (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    Recently reported massive compact stars (Mapprox2M{sub o}) have provided strong constraints on the properties of the ultradense matter beyond the saturation nuclear density. Therefore, realistic quark or hybrid star models must be compatible with these observational data. Some used equations of state (EoS) describing quark matter are in general too soft and hence are not suitable to explain the stability of high compact star masses. In this work, we present the calculations of static spherically symmetric quark star structure by using an equation of state which takes into account the superconducting colour-flavour locked phase of the strange quark matter. In addition, some fundamental aspects of QCD (asymptotic freedom and confinement) are considered by means of a phenomenological description of the deconfined quark phase, the density-dependent quark mass model. We discuss the influence of the obtained quark matter equation of state on the mass-radius relationship of quark stars. Massive quark stars are found due to the stiffness of the equation of state, when reasonable values of the superconducting gap, taken as a free parameter, are used.

  20. Den moderate revolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bøje

    "normale" industrivirksomheder, men den er absolut set begrænset. Årsagerne til denne kun "moderate revolution" af organisationsformerne diskuteres: Er det fordi klassisk organisation og social nærkontakt er nødvendig i den nye økonomi, eller er det manglende fantasi og tryghedsbehov? Begge muligheder...

  1. Cryogenic moderator design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diplock, B.R.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the present design of the two cold moderators to be built for the Spallation Neutron Source. It discusses the reasons behind a number of the design features and highlights several problem areas requiring solutions before a final design can be constructed

  2. Luminosity-Environment Relation in the Lowz Sample of the SDSS-III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Xin-Fa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we examine the environmental dependence of the u-, g-, r-, i- and z-band luminosities in the LOWZ sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 (SDSS DR10. To decrease the radial selection effect, we divide the LOWZ sample into subsamples with a redshift bin size of Δz = 0.01 and analyze the environmental dependence of luminosities for these subsamples in each redshift bin. It is found that all five band luminosities of the LOWZ galaxy sample in the redshift region z=0.16–0.23 show substantial correlation with the local environment, especially in the redshift bins 0.19–0.20 and 0.20–0.21. The environmental dependence of all five band luminosities in the LOWZ galaxy sample becomes weak with increasing redshift, like the one in the apparent-magnitude limited Main galaxy sample.

  3. Upgrade of ATLAS and CMS for High Luminosity LHC: Detector performance and Physics potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testa, M.

    2017-01-01

    The High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) is expected to start providing proton-proton collisions by 2026. In the following 10 years it will deliver about 3000 fb −1 of integrated luminosity, more than a factor 10 of the data that will be collected by the end of Run3 at LHC in 2023. For such amount of data, an instantaneous luminosity of ∼ 7.5 × 10 34 cm −2 s −1 is needed. At this luminosity an unprecedented average number of pile-up collision per bunch crossing of 200 is expected. The ATLAS and CMS detectors will be upgraded to fully exploit the HL-LHC potential in this harsh environment. In this document the performances of the ATLAS and CMS upgraded detectors will be described. Their impact on crucial measurements of the Higgs boson sector, of the vector boson fusion process and on new physics searches, will be reported as well.

  4. H α AS A LUMINOSITY CLASS DIAGNOSTIC FOR K- AND M-TYPE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, Jeff [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Levesque, Emily M., E-mail: emsque@uw.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2016-04-20

    We have identified the H α absorption feature as a new spectroscopic diagnostic of luminosity class in K- and M-type stars. From high-resolution spectra of 19 stars with well-determined physical properties (including effective temperatures and stellar radii), we measured equivalent widths for H α and the Ca ii triplet and examined their dependence on both luminosity class and stellar radius. H α shows a strong relation with both luminosity class and radius that extends down to late M spectral types. This behavior in H α has been predicted as a result of the density-dependent overpopulation of the metastable 2s level in hydrogen, an effect that should become dominant for Balmer line formation in non-LTE conditions. We conclude that this new metallicity-insensitive diagnostic of luminosity class in cool stars could serve as an effective means of discerning between populations such as Milky Way giants and supergiant members of background galaxies.

  5. H α AS A LUMINOSITY CLASS DIAGNOSTIC FOR K- AND M-TYPE STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, Jeff; Levesque, Emily M.

    2016-01-01

    We have identified the H α absorption feature as a new spectroscopic diagnostic of luminosity class in K- and M-type stars. From high-resolution spectra of 19 stars with well-determined physical properties (including effective temperatures and stellar radii), we measured equivalent widths for H α and the Ca ii triplet and examined their dependence on both luminosity class and stellar radius. H α shows a strong relation with both luminosity class and radius that extends down to late M spectral types. This behavior in H α has been predicted as a result of the density-dependent overpopulation of the metastable 2s level in hydrogen, an effect that should become dominant for Balmer line formation in non-LTE conditions. We conclude that this new metallicity-insensitive diagnostic of luminosity class in cool stars could serve as an effective means of discerning between populations such as Milky Way giants and supergiant members of background galaxies.

  6. RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS: IS THERE A LINK BETWEEN LUMINOSITY AND CLUSTER ENVIRONMENT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ineson, J.; Croston, J. H.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kraft, R. P.; Evans, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    We present here the first results from the Chandra ERA (Environments of Radio-loud AGN) Large Project, characterizing the cluster environments of a sample of 26 radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z ∼ 0.5 that covers three decades of radio luminosity. This is the first systematic X-ray environmental study at a single epoch, and has allowed us to examine the relationship between radio luminosity and cluster environment without the problems of Malmquist bias. We have found a weak correlation between radio luminosity and host cluster X-ray luminosity, as well as tentative evidence that this correlation is driven by the subpopulation of low-excitation radio galaxies, with high-excitation radio galaxies showing no significant correlation. The considerable scatter in the environments may be indicative of complex relationships not currently included in feedback models.

  7. Prospects for SUSY and BSM Physics at the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Richman, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    elucidate the origin of a signal. A brief discussion is also given for exotic particle searches, illustrating how high-luminosity data samples can provide key information on the properties of discovered particles.

  8. Instrumentation for beam radiation and luminosity measurement in the CMS experiment using novel detector technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Guthoff, Moritz

    2016-01-01

    The higher energy and luminosity of the LHC initiated the development of dedicated technologies for radiation monitoring and luminosity measurement. A pixelated luminosity detector counts coincidences in several three layer telescopes of silicon pixel detectors to measure the luminosity for each colliding LHC bunch pair. In addition, charged particle tracking allows to monitor the location of the collision point.The upgraded fast beam conditions monitor measures the particle flux using 24 two pad single crystalline diamond sensors, equipped with a fast front-end ASIC produced in 130 nm CMOS technology. The excellent time resolution is used to separate collision products from machine induced background.A new beam-halo monitor at larger radius exploits Cerenkov light produced by relativistic charged particles in fused quartz crystals to provide direction sensitivity and time resolution to separate incoming and outgoing particles. The back-end electronics of the beam monitoring systems includes dedicated modules...

  9. Consistency between the luminosity function of resolved millisecond pulsars and the galactic center excess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploeg, Harrison; Gordon, Chris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutherford Building, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand); Crocker, Roland [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek (Australia); Macias, Oscar, E-mail: harrison.ploeg@pg.canterbury.ac.nz, E-mail: chris.gordon@canterbury.ac.nz, E-mail: Roland.Crocker@anu.edu.au, E-mail: oscar.macias@vt.edu [Center for Neutrino Physics, Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, 850 West Campus Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Fermi Large Area Telescope data reveal an excess of GeV gamma rays from the direction of the Galactic Center and bulge. Several explanations have been proposed for this excess including an unresolved population of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) and self-annihilating dark matter. It has been claimed that a key discriminant for or against the MSP explanation can be extracted from the properties of the luminosity function describing this source population. Specifically, is the luminosity function of the putative MSPs in the Galactic Center consistent with that characterizing the resolved MSPs in the Galactic disk? To investigate this we have used a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo to evaluate the posterior distribution of the parameters of the MSP luminosity function describing both resolved MSPs and the Galactic Center excess. At variance with some other claims, our analysis reveals that, within current uncertainties, both data sets can be well fit with the same luminosity function.

  10. The relative spatial distributions of high- and low-luminosity galaxies toward Coma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzer, J.J.; Hanson, M.M.; Gavazzi, G.

    1990-01-01

    The relative spatial distributions of low- and high-mass galaxies which lie in a field in the direction of the Coma Supercluster are investigated. Three tests are used to compare the distributions of high-luminosity and low-luminosity galaxies in the field: correlation functions, nearest neighbor distributions, and local density environments. All three tests indicate that the low-luminosity galaxies are significantly less confined to the structure defined by the luminous galaxies than are the luminous galaxies themselves. Several galaxies in the low-luminosity subsample are within voids. These findings lend support to various models for the formation of large-scale structure that include biased galaxy formation. In particular, the ratio of the amplitudes of the correlation functions for dwarfs and giants agrees closely with the predictions of the cold dark matter models of White et al. (1987). 54 refs

  11. Strip Detector for the ATLAS Detector Upgrade for the High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Sperlich, Dennis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The planned HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) in 2025 is being designed to maximise the physics potential of the LHC through a sizeable increase in the luminosity, reaching 1*10^35 cm2s-1 after 10 years of operation. A consequence of this increased luminosity is the expected radiation damage at an integrated luminosity of 3000/fb, requiring the tracking detectors to withstand hadron fluencies to over 1*10^16 1 MeV neutron equivalent per cm2. With the addition of increased readout rates, a complete re-design of the current ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) is being developed as the Inner Tracker (ITk), which will consist of both strip and pixelated silicon detectors. The physics motivations, required performance characteristics and basic design of the proposed upgrade of the strip detector will be a subject of this talk. Present ideas and solutions for the strip detector and current research and development program will be discussed.

  12. Strip Detector for the ATLAS Detector Upgrade for the High - Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Sperlich, Dennis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The planned HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) in 2025 is being designed to maximise the physics potential of the LHC through a sizeable increase in the luminosity, reaching 1*10^35 cm2s-1 after 10 years of operation. A consequence of this increased luminosity is the expected radiation damage at an integrated luminosity of 3000/fb, requiring the tracking detectors to withstand hadron fluencies to over 1*10^16 1 MeV neutron equivalent per cm2. With the addition of increased readout rates, a complete re-design of the current ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) is being developed as the Inner Tracker (ITk), which will consist of both strip and pixelated silicon detectors. The physics motivations, required performance characteristics and basic design of the proposed upgrade of the strip detector will be a subject of this talk. Present ideas and solutions for the strip detector and current research and development program will be discussed.

  13. Luminosity and beta function measurement at the electron-positron collider ring LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Castro, P

    1996-01-01

    The optimization of luminosity needs a fast signal which is provided with the measurement of the rate of small angle Bhabba scattered e+ and e-. It is shown that, despite the excess of background particles received at the detectors, luminosity measurements are possible by using appropriate techniques. The results presented include examples of luminosity optimization with the adjustment of the vertical beam separation at interaction points. The correlation between changes in measured beam sizes and changes in luminosity is shown. In the second part, a new method to obtain precise optics measurements is presented. The procedure to measure the phase advance using 1000-turn orbit measurements of a horizontally or vertically excited beam is described. Beta, alpha and phase advance functions can be obtained exclusively from the phase advances at beam position monitors. This method has been used to measure optics imperfections at LEP. Results of these experiments are compared with simulation results using MAD Measur...

  14. Semi-empirical model for optimising future heavy-ion luminosity of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Schaumann, M

    2014-01-01

    The wide spectrum of intensities and emittances imprinted on the LHC Pb bunches during the accumulation of bunch trains in the injector chain result in a significant spread in the single bunch luminosities and lifetimes in collision. Based on the data collected in the 2011 Pb-Pb run, an empirical model is derived to predict the single-bunch peak luminosity depending on the bunch’s position within the beam. In combination with this model, simulations of representative bunches are used to estimate the luminosity evolution for the complete ensemble of bunches. Several options are being considered to improve the injector performance and to increase the number of bunches in the LHC, leading to several potential injection scenarios, resulting in different peak and integrated luminosities. The most important options for after the long shutdown (LS) 1 and 2 are evaluated and compared.

  15. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

    1980-01-21

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  16. Luminosity, beam monitoring and triggering for the CMS experiment and measurement of the total inelastic cross-section at √s = 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Alan James

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector, situated on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring is a multi-purpose detector designed to search for new physics phenomena, make precise measurements of known processes at previously untapped energies and look for hints of physics beyond the Standard Model. During the initial low luminosity stages, the Beam Scintillation Counter (BSC) sub-detector was vital in providing accurate and efficient ( 98%) triggering of beam halo and minimum bias events and helped in the commissioning of the CMS detector. This thesis is given in three parts. The first section describes the design and implementation of the BSC and the commissioning of the system before and during the early operation of the LHC. Analysis of the technical triggers it provided, using early low pile-up data in shown to demonstrate that the goal of providing an efficient trigger for low luminosities was achieved. Demonstrations of its use beyond its intended design are also shown, which helped drive the need for an...

  17. Studies on the measurement of differential luminosity using Bhabha events at the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, Andre Philippe

    2009-04-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is an electron-positron-collider with a variable center-of-mass energy {radical}(2) between 200 and 500 GeV. The small bunch sizes needed to reach the design luminosity of L{sub Peak}=2.10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} necessary for the physics goals of the ILC, cause the particles to radiate beamstrahlung during the bunch crossings. Beamstrahlung reduces the center-of-mass energy from its nominal value to the effective center-of-mass energy {radical}(2'). The spectrum of the effective center-of-mass energy {radical}(2') is the differential luminosity dL/d{radical}(2'), which has to be known to precisely measure particle masses through threshold scans. The differential luminosity can be measured by using Bhabha events. The real differential luminosity is simulated by the GuineaPig software. The energy spectrum of the Bhabha events is measured by the detector and compared to the energy spectrum of Monte Carlo (MC) Bhabha events with a known differential luminosity given by an approximate parameterization. The parameterization is used to assign each MC event a weight. By re-weighting the events, until the energy spectra from the real and the MC Bhabha events match, the differential luminosity can be measured. The approximate parameterization of the differential luminosity is given by the Circe parameterization introduced by T. Ohl (1997), which does not include the correlation between the particle energies due to beamstrahlung. The Circe parameterization is extended to include the correlation and better describe the differential luminosity. With this new parameterization of the differential luminosity it is possible to predict the observed production cross section of a MC toy particle with a mass of 250 GeV/c{sup 2} to a precision better than 0.2%. Using the re-weighting fit with the extended parameterization also allows the measurement of the beam energy spreads of {sigma}{sub E}=0.0014 for electrons and {sigma

  18. Studies on the measurement of differential luminosity using Bhabha events at the International Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sailer, Andre Philippe

    2009-04-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is an electron-positron-collider with a variable center-of-mass energy √(2) between 200 and 500 GeV. The small bunch sizes needed to reach the design luminosity of L Peak =2.10 34 cm -2 s -1 necessary for the physics goals of the ILC, cause the particles to radiate beamstrahlung during the bunch crossings. Beamstrahlung reduces the center-of-mass energy from its nominal value to the effective center-of-mass energy √(2'). The spectrum of the effective center-of-mass energy √(2') is the differential luminosity dL/d√(2'), which has to be known to precisely measure particle masses through threshold scans. The differential luminosity can be measured by using Bhabha events. The real differential luminosity is simulated by the GuineaPig software. The energy spectrum of the Bhabha events is measured by the detector and compared to the energy spectrum of Monte Carlo (MC) Bhabha events with a known differential luminosity given by an approximate parameterization. The parameterization is used to assign each MC event a weight. By re-weighting the events, until the energy spectra from the real and the MC Bhabha events match, the differential luminosity can be measured. The approximate parameterization of the differential luminosity is given by the Circe parameterization introduced by T. Ohl (1997), which does not include the correlation between the particle energies due to beamstrahlung. The Circe parameterization is extended to include the correlation and better describe the differential luminosity. With this new parameterization of the differential luminosity it is possible to predict the observed production cross section of a MC toy particle with a mass of 250 GeV/c 2 to a precision better than 0.2%. Using the re-weighting fit with the extended parameterization also allows the measurement of the beam energy spreads of σ E =0.0014 for electrons and σ E = 0.0010 for positrons with a precision of a few percent. The total error

  19. Soil compaction and growth of woody plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowski, T.T.

    1999-01-01

    Although soil compaction in the field may benefit or inhibit the growth of plants, the harmful effects are much more common. This paper emphasizes the deleterious effects of predominantly high levels of soil compaction on plant growth and yield. High levels of soil compaction are common in heavily used recreation areas, construction sites, urban areas, timber harvesting sites, fruit orchards, agroforestry systems and tree nurseries. Compaction can occur naturally by settling or slumping of soil or may be induced by tillage tools, heavy machinery, pedestrian traffic, trampling by animals and fire. Compaction typically alters soil structure and hydrology by increasing soil bulk density; breaking down soil aggregates; decreasing soil porosity, aeration and infiltration capacity; and by increasing soil strength, water runoff and soil erosion. Appreciable compaction of soil leads to physiological dysfunctions in plants. Often, but not always, reduced water absorption and leaf water deficits develop. Soil compaction also induces changes in the amounts and balances of growth hormones in plants, especially increases in abscisic acid and ethylene. Absorption of the major mineral nutrients is reduced by compaction of both surface soils and subsoils. The rate of photosynthesis of plants growing in very compacted soil is decreased by both stomatal and non-stomatal inhibition. Total photosynthesis is reduced as a result of smaller leaf areas. As soils become increasingly compacted respiration of roots shifts toward an anaerobic state. Severe soil compaction adversely influences regeneration of forest stands by inhibiting seed germination and growth of seedlings, and by inducing seedling mortality. Growth of woody plants beyond the seedling stage and yields of harvestable plant products also are greatly decreased by soil compaction because of the combined effects of high soil strength, decreased infiltration of water and poor soil aeration, all of which lead to a decreased

  20. Soil compaction and growth of woody plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, T.T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy and Management

    1999-07-01

    Although soil compaction in the field may benefit or inhibit the growth of plants, the harmful effects are much more common. This paper emphasizes the deleterious effects of predominantly high levels of soil compaction on plant growth and yield. High levels of soil compaction are common in heavily used recreation areas, construction sites, urban areas, timber harvesting sites, fruit orchards, agroforestry systems and tree nurseries. Compaction can occur naturally by settling or slumping of soil or may be induced by tillage tools, heavy machinery, pedestrian traffic, trampling by animals and fire. Compaction typically alters soil structure and hydrology by increasing soil bulk density; breaking down soil aggregates; decreasing soil porosity, aeration and infiltration capacity; and by increasing soil strength, water runoff and soil erosion. Appreciable compaction of soil leads to physiological dysfunctions in plants. Often, but not always, reduced water absorption and leaf water deficits develop. Soil compaction also induces changes in the amounts and balances of growth hormones in plants, especially increases in abscisic acid and ethylene. Absorption of the major mineral nutrients is reduced by compaction of both surface soils and subsoils. The rate of photosynthesis of plants growing in very compacted soil is decreased by both stomatal and non-stomatal inhibition. Total photosynthesis is reduced as a result of smaller leaf areas. As soils become increasingly compacted respiration of roots shifts toward an anaerobic state. Severe soil compaction adversely influences regeneration of forest stands by inhibiting seed germination and growth of seedlings, and by inducing seedling mortality. Growth of woody plants beyond the seedling stage and yields of harvestable plant products also are greatly decreased by soil compaction because of the combined effects of high soil strength, decreased infiltration of water and poor soil aeration, all of which lead to a decreased

  1. Determination of the Integrated Luminosity at HERA using Elastic QED Compton Events

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kramer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Malinovski, E.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zlebcik, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2012-10-10

    A measurement of the integrated luminosity at the ep collider HERA is presented, exploiting the elastic QED Compton process ep \\rightarrow ep. The electron and the photon are detected in the backward calorimeter of the H1 experiment. The integrated luminosity of the data recorded in 2003 to 2007 is determined with a precision of 2.3%. The measurement is found to be compatible with the corresponding result obtained using the Bethe-Heitler process.

  2. A Search for Water Maser Emission from Brown Dwarfs and Low-luminosity Young Stellar Objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez, José F.; Manjarrez, Guillermo [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Palau, Aina [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, P.O. Box 3-72, 58090, Morelia, Michoacán, México (Mexico); Uscanga, Lucero [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Guanajuato, A.P. 144, 36000 Guanajuato, Gto., México (Mexico); Barrado, David, E-mail: jfg@iaa.es [Centro de Astrobiología, INTA-CSIC, PO BOX 28692, ESAC Campus, E-208691 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-05-01

    We present a survey for water maser emission toward a sample of 44 low-luminosity young objects, comprising (proto-)brown dwarfs, first hydrostatic cores (FHCs), and other young stellar objects (YSOs) with bolometric luminosities lower than 0.4 L {sub ⊙}. Water maser emission is a good tracer of energetic processes, such as mass-loss and/or accretion, and is a useful tool to study these processes with very high angular resolution. This type of emission has been confirmed in objects with L {sub bol} ≳ 1 L {sub ⊙}. Objects with lower luminosities also undergo mass-loss and accretion, and thus, are prospective sites of maser emission. Our sensitive single-dish observations provided a single detection when pointing toward the FHC L1448 IRS 2E. However, follow-up interferometric observations showed water maser emission associated with the nearby YSO L1448 IRS 2 (a Class 0 protostar of L {sub bol} ≃ 3.6–5.3 L {sub ⊙}) and did not find any emission toward L1448 IRS 2E. The upper limits for water maser emission determined by our observations are one order of magnitude lower than expected from the correlation between water maser luminosities and bolometric luminosities found for YSOs. This suggests that this correlation does not hold at the lower end of the (sub)stellar mass spectrum. Possible reasons are that the slope of this correlation is steeper at L {sub bol} ≤ 1 L {sub ⊙} or that there is an absolute luminosity threshold below which water maser emission cannot be produced. Alternatively, if the correlation still stands at low luminosity, the detection rates of masers would be significantly lower than the values obtained in higher-luminosity Class 0 protostars.

  3. Determination of the integrated luminosity at HERA using elastic QED Compton events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2012-04-15

    A measurement of the integrated luminosity at the ep collider HERA is presented, exploiting the elastic QED Compton process ep{yields}e{gamma}p. The electron and the photon are detected in the backward calorimeter of the H1 experiment. The integrated luminosity of the data recorded in 2003 to 2007 is determined with a precision of 2.3%. The measurement is found to be compatible with the corresponding result obtained using the Bethe-Heitler process.

  4. Abort Gap Cleaning tests performed on 13 October 2011 during luminosity operation

    CERN Document Server

    Boccardi, A; Jeff, A; Roncarolo, F; Höfle, W; Valuch, D; Kain, V; Goddard, B; Meddahi, M; Uythoven, J; Gianfelice-Wendt, E

    2012-01-01

    Following the abort gap cleaning tests performed on 7 October 2011 [1] additional tests were carried out on 13 October 2011 to further investigate the effects of the cleaning on the luminosity production. The abort gap cleaning parameters (strength and duration of the beam excitation kick) were varied and the cleaning effectiveness measured together with the change in luminosity. The outcome is summarised in this note.

  5. Determination of the integrated luminosity at HERA using elastic QED Compton events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Vazdik, Y.; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Belov, P.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Kleinwort, C.; Kraemer, M.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Wuensch, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Fedotov, A.; Lubimov, V.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Ceccopieri, F.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Roosen, R.; Staykova, Z.; Mechelen, P. van; Cerny, K.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Zlebcik, R.; Chekelian, V.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cvach, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Vallee, C.; Dobre, M.; Kogler, R.; Nowak, K.; Dodonov, V.; Povh, B.; Dossanov, A.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Grab, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Huber, F.; Pirumov, H.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A.; Joensson, L.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Morozov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Stella, B.; Sykora, T.; Tsakov, I.; Wegener, D.

    2012-01-01

    A measurement of the integrated luminosity at the ep collider HERA is presented, exploiting the elastic QED Compton process ep→eγp. The electron and the photon are detected in the backward calorimeter of the H1 experiment. The integrated luminosity of the data recorded in 2003 to 2007 is determined with a precision of 2.3 %. The measurement is found to be compatible with the corresponding result obtained using the Bethe-Heitler process. (orig.)

  6. The European Large Area ISO Survey - IV. The preliminary 90-mu m luminosity function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serjeant, S.; Efstathiou, A.; Oliver, S.

    2001-01-01

    We present the luminosity function of 90-mum-selected galaxies from the European Large Area ISO Survey (ELAIS), extending to z = 0.3. Their luminosities are in the range 10(9)

  7. THE RELATIONSHIPS AMONG COMPACT STELLAR SYSTEMS: A FRESH VIEW OF ULTRACOMPACT DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, Jean P.; Romanowsky, Aaron J. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Strader, Jay [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Forbes, Duncan A., E-mail: brodie@ucolick.org [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    We use a combined imaging and spectroscopic survey of the nearby central cluster galaxy, M87, to assemble a sample of 34 confirmed ultracompact dwarfs (UCDs) with half-light radii of {approx}>10 pc measured from Hubble Space Telescope images. This doubles the existing sample in M87, making it the largest such sample for any galaxy, while extending the detection of UCDs to unprecedentedly low luminosities (M{sub V} = -9). With this expanded sample, we find no correlation between size and luminosity, in contrast to previous suggestions, and no general correlation between size and galactocentric distance. We explore the relationships between UCDs, less luminous extended clusters (including faint fuzzies), globular clusters (GCs), as well as early-type galaxies and their nuclei, assembling an extensive new catalog of sizes and luminosities for stellar systems. Most of the M87 UCDs follow a tight color-magnitude relation, offset from the metal-poor GCs. This, along with kinematical differences, demonstrates that most UCDs are a distinct population from normal GCs, and not simply a continuation to larger sizes and higher luminosities. The UCD color-magnitude trend couples closely with that for Virgo dwarf elliptical nuclei. We conclude that the M87 UCDs are predominantly stripped nuclei. The brightest and reddest UCDs may be the remnant nuclei of more massive galaxies while a subset of the faintest UCDs may be tidally limited and related to more compact star clusters. In the broader context of galaxy assembly, blue UCDs may trace halo build-up by accretion of low-mass satellites, while red UCDs may be markers of metal-rich bulge formation in larger galaxies.

  8. The high luminosity interaction region for a ring-ring Large Hadron Electron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, R. B.; Thompson, L.; Holzer, B.; Fitterer, M.; Bernard, N.; Kostka, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC) project is a proposal for high luminosity TeV-scale electron-proton (ep) collisions at the LHC. The LHeC Conceptual Design Report presented an early overview of the machine, including an electron linac solution and a solution involving a 60 GeV electron storage ring. Here we present a new complete solution for the collision insertion of this electron ring, incorporating all constraints including those imposed by the LHC and, for the first time, proving the feasibility of ep collisions at a luminosity of ˜1033 cm-2s-1 in the LHC era. The solution presented offers high luminosity while maintaining the large detector coverage required by the particle physics programme. This negates the earlier need for two separate interaction region designs, one optimized for high luminosity at the cost of detector coverage, and the other for lower luminosity but higher coverage. Synchrotron radiation emission is also a major factor in electron accelerator design, and studies are presented showing the feasibility of the design in this regard. The design is found to be technically viable, solving the problem of TeV-scale, high luminosity and high coverage ep collisions at a ring-ring LHeC.

  9. THE SDSS-III BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: THE QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM DATA RELEASE NINE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin; Bailey, Stephen; McGreer, Ian D.; Richards, Gordon T.; Myers, Adam D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yèche, Christophe; Strauss, Michael A.; Anderson, Scott F.; Shen, Yue; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Brandt, W. N.; Aubourg, Éric; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J.; Bovy, Jo; DeGraf, Colin; Di Matteo, Tiziana

    2013-01-01

    We present a new measurement of the optical quasar luminosity function (QLF), using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-III: BOSS). From the SDSS-III Data Release Nine, a uniform sample of 22,301 i ∼ 2 , with confirmed spectroscopic redshifts between 2.2 i (z = 2.2) ≈ –24.5 and see a clear break in the QLF at all redshifts up to z = 3.5. A log-linear relation (in log Φ* – M*) for a luminosity evolution and density evolution model is found to adequately describe our data within the range 2.2 < z < 3.5; across this interval the break luminosity increases by a factor of ∼2.6 while Φ* declines by a factor of ∼8. At z ∼< 2.2 our data are reasonably well fit by a pure luminosity evolution model, and only a weak signature of ''AGN downsizing'' is seen, in line with recent studies of the hard X-ray luminosity function. We compare our measured QLF to a number of theoretical models and find that models making a variety of assumptions about quasar triggering and halo occupation can fit our data over a wide range of redshifts and luminosities

  10. Upper limits on the total cosmic-ray luminosity of individual sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjos, R.C.; De Souza, V.; Supanitsky, A.D.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, upper limits on the total luminosity of ultra-high-energy cosmic-rays (UHECR) E > 10 18 eV) are determined for five individual sources. The upper limit on the integral flux of GeV--TeV gamma-rays is used to extract the upper limit on the total UHECR luminosity of individual sources. The correlation between upper limit on the integral GeV--TeV gamma-ray flux and upper limit on the UHECR luminosity is established through the cascading process that takes place during propagation of the cosmic rays in the background radiation fields, as explained in reference [1]. Twenty-eight sources measured by FERMI-LAT, VERITAS and MAGIC observatories have been studied. The measured upper limit on the GeV--TeV gamma-ray flux is restrictive enough to allow the calculation of an upper limit on the total UHECR cosmic-ray luminosity of five sources. The upper limit on the UHECR cosmic-ray luminosity of these sources is shown for several assumptions on the emission mechanism. For all studied sources an upper limit on the ultra-high-energy proton luminosity is also set

  11. Updated baseline for a staged Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Boland, M J; Giansiracusa, P J; Lucas, T G; Rassool, R P; Balazs, C; Charles, T K; Afanaciev, K; Emeliantchik, I; Ignatenko, A; Makarenko, V; Shumeiko, N; Patapenka, A; Zhuk, I; Abusleme Hoffman, A C; Diaz Gutierrez, M A; Gonzalez, M Vogel; Chi, Y; He, X; Pei, G; Pei, S; Shu, G; Wang, X; Zhang, J; Zhao, F; Zhou, Z; Chen, H; Gao, Y; Huang, W; Kuang, Y P; Li, B; Li, Y; Shao, J; Shi, J; Tang, C; Wu, X; Ma, L; Han, Y; Fang, W; Gu, Q; Huang, D; Huang, X; Tan, J; Wang, Z; Zhao, Z; Laštovička, T; Uggerhoj, U; Wistisen, T N; Aabloo, A; Eimre, K; Kuppart, K; Vigonski, S; Zadin, V; Aicheler, M; Baibuz, E; Brücken, E; Djurabekova, F; Eerola, P; Garcia, F; Haeggström, E; Huitu, K; Jansson, V; Karimaki, V; Kassamakov, I; Kyritsakis, A; Lehti, S; Meriläinen, A; Montonen, R; Niinikoski, T; Nordlund, K; Österberg, K; Parekh, M; Törnqvist, N A; Väinölä, J; Veske, M; Farabolini, W; Mollard, A; Napoly, O; Peauger, F; Plouin, J; Bambade, P; Chaikovska, I; Chehab, R; Davier, M; Kaabi, W; Kou, E; LeDiberder, F; Pöschl, R; Zerwas, D; Aimard, B; Balik, G; Baud, J-P; Blaising, J-J; Brunetti, L; Chefdeville, M; Drancourt, C; Geoffroy, N; Jacquemier, J; Jeremie, A; Karyotakis, Y; Nappa, J M; Vilalte, S; Vouters, G; Bernard, A; Peric, I; Gabriel, M; Simon, F; Szalay, M; van der Kolk, N; Alexopoulos, T; Gazis, E N; Gazis, N; Ikarios, E; Kostopoulos, V; Kourkoulis, S; Gupta, P D; Shrivastava, P; Arfaei, H; Dayyani, M K; Ghasem, H; Hajari, S S; Shaker, H; Ashkenazy, Y; Abramowicz, H; Benhammou, Y; Borysov, O; Kananov, S; Levy, A; Levy, I; Rosenblat, O; D'Auria, G; Di Mitri, S; Abe, T; Aryshev, A; Higo, T; Makida, Y; Matsumoto, S; Shidara, T; Takatomi, T; Takubo, Y; Tauchi, T; Toge, N; Ueno, K; Urakawa, J; Yamamoto, A; Yamanaka, M; Raboanary, R; Hart, R; van der Graaf, H; Eigen, G; Zalieckas, J; Adli, E; Lillestøl, R; Malina, L; Pfingstner, J; Sjobak, K N; Ahmed, W; Asghar, M I; Hoorani, H; Bugiel, S; Dasgupta, R; Firlej, M; Fiutowski, T A; Idzik, M; Kopec, M; Kuczynska, M; Moron, J; Swientek, K P; Daniluk, W; Krupa, B; Kucharczyk, M; Lesiak, T; Moszczynski, A; Pawlik, B; Sopicki, P; Wojtoń, T; Zawiejski, L; Kalinowski, J; Krawczyk, M; Żarnecki, A F; Firu, E; Ghenescu, V; Neagu, A T; Preda, T; Zgura, I-S; Aloev, A; Azaryan, N; Budagov, J; Chizhov, M; Filippova, M; Glagolev, V; Gongadze, A; Grigoryan, S; Gudkov, D; Karjavine, V; Lyablin, M; Olyunin, A; Samochkine, A; Sapronov, A; Shirkov, G; Soldatov, V; Solodko, A; Solodko, E; Trubnikov, G; Tyapkin, I; Uzhinsky, V; Vorozhtov, A; Levichev, E; Mezentsev, N; Piminov, P; Shatilov, D; Vobly, P; Zolotarev, K; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Kacarevic, G; Lukic, S; Milutinovic-Dumbelovic, G; Pandurovic, M; Iriso, U; Perez, F; Pont, M; Trenado, J; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Calero, J; Garcia-Tabares, L; Gavela, D; Gutierrez, J L; Lopez, D; Toral, F; Moya, D; Ruiz-Jimeno, A; Vila, I; Argyropoulos, T; Blanch Gutierrez, C; Boronat, M; Esperante, D; Faus-Golfe, A; Fuster, J; Fuster Martinez, N; Galindo Muñoz, N; García, I; Giner Navarro, J; Ros, E; Vos, M; Brenner, R; Ekelöf, T; Jacewicz, M; Ögren, J; Olvegård, M; Ruber, R; Ziemann, V; Aguglia, D; Alipour Tehrani, N; Aloev, A; Andersson, A; Andrianala, F; Antoniou, F; Artoos, K; Atieh, S; Ballabriga Sune, R; Barnes, M J; Barranco Garcia, J; Bartosik, H; Belver-Aguilar, C; Benot Morell, A; Bett, D R; Bettoni, S; Blanchot, G; Blanco Garcia, O; Bonnin, X A; Brunner, O; Burkhardt, H; Calatroni, S; Campbell, M; Catalan Lasheras, N; Cerqueira Bastos, M; Cherif, A; Chevallay, E; Constance, B; Corsini, R; Cure, B; Curt, S; Dalena, B; Dannheim, D; De Michele, G; De Oliveira, L; Deelen, N; Delahaye, J P; Dobers, T; Doebert, S; Draper, M; Duarte Ramos, F; Dubrovskiy, A; Elsener, K; Esberg, J; Esposito, M; Fedosseev, V; Ferracin, P; Fiergolski, A; Foraz, K; Fowler, A; Friebel, F; Fuchs, J-F; Fuentes Rojas, C A; Gaddi, A; Garcia Fajardo, L; Garcia Morales, H; Garion, C; Gatignon, L; Gayde, J-C; Gerwig, H; Goldblatt, A N; Grefe, C; Grudiev, A; Guillot-Vignot, F G; Gutt-Mostowy, M L; Hauschild, M; Hessler, C; Holma, J K; Holzer, E; Hourican, M; Hynds, D; Inntjore Levinsen, Y; Jeanneret, B; Jensen, E; Jonker, M; Kastriotou, M; Kemppinen, J M K; Kieffer, R B; Klempt, W; Kononenko, O; Korsback, A; Koukovini Platia, E; Kovermann, J W; Kozsar, C-I; Kremastiotis, I; Kulis, S; Latina, A; Leaux, F; Lebrun, P; Lefevre, T; Linssen, L; Llopart Cudie, X; Maier, A A; Mainaud Durand, H; Manosperti, E; Marelli, C; Marin Lacoma, E; Martin, R; Mazzoni, S; Mcmonagle, G; Mete, O; Mether, L M; Modena, M; Münker, R M; Muranaka, T; Nebot Del Busto, E; Nikiforou, N; Nisbet, D; Nonglaton, J-M; Nuiry, F X; Nürnberg, A; Olvegard, M; Osborne, J; Papadopoulou, S; Papaphilippou, Y; Passarelli, A; Patecki, M; Pazdera, L; Pellegrini, D; Pepitone, K; Perez, F; Perez Codina, E; Perez Fontenla, A; Persson, T H B; Petrič, M; Pitters, F; Pittet, S; Plassard, F; Rajamak, R; Redford, S; Renier, Y; Rey, S F; Riddone, G; Rinolfi, L; Rodriguez Castro, E; Roloff, P; Rossi, C; Rude, V; Rumolo, G; Sailer, A; Santin, E; Schlatter, D; Schmickler, H; Schulte, D; Shipman, N; Sicking, E; Simoniello, R; Skowronski, P K; Sobrino Mompean, P; Soby, L; Sosin, M P; Sroka, S; Stapnes, S; Sterbini, G; Ström, R; Syratchev, I; Tecker, F; Thonet, P A; Timeo, L; Timko, H; Tomas Garcia, R; Valerio, P; Vamvakas, A L; Vivoli, A; Weber, M A; Wegner, R; Wendt, M; Woolley, B; Wuensch, W; Uythoven, J; Zha, H; Zisopoulos, P; Benoit, M; Vicente Barreto Pinto, M; Bopp, M; Braun, H H; Csatari Divall, M; Dehler, M; Garvey, T; Raguin, J Y; Rivkin, L; Zennaro, R; Aksoy, A; Nergiz, Z; Pilicer, E; Tapan, I; Yavas, O; Baturin, V; Kholodov, R; Lebedynskyi, S; Miroshnichenko, V; Mordyk, S; Profatilova, I; Storizhko, V; Watson, N; Winter, A; Goldstein, J; Green, S; Marshall, J S; Thomson, M A; Xu, B; Gillespie, W A; Pan, R; Tyrk, M A; Protopopescu, D; Robson, A; Apsimon, R; Bailey, I; Burt, G; Constable, D; Dexter, A; Karimian, S; Lingwood, C; Buckland, M D; Casse, G; Vossebeld, J; Bosco, A; Karataev, P; Kruchinin, K; Lekomtsev, K; Nevay, L; Snuverink, J; Yamakawa, E; Boisvert, V; Boogert, S; Boorman, G; Gibson, S; Lyapin, A; Shields, W; Teixeira-Dias, P; West, S; Jones, R; Joshi, N; Bodenstein, R; Burrows, P N; Christian, G B; Gamba, D; Perry, C; Roberts, J; Clarke, J A; Collomb, N A; Jamison, S P; Shepherd, B J A; Walsh, D; Demarteau, M; Repond, J; Weerts, H; Xia, L; Wells, J D; Adolphsen, C; Barklow, T; Breidenbach, M; Graf, N; Hewett, J; Markiewicz, T; McCormick, D; Moffeit, K; Nosochkov, Y; Oriunno, M; Phinney, N; Rizzo, T; Tantawi, S; Wang, F; Wang, J; White, G; Woodley, M

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a multi-TeV high-luminosity linear e+e- collider under development. For an optimal exploitation of its physics potential, CLIC is foreseen to be built and operated in a staged approach with three centre-of-mass energy stages ranging from a few hundred GeV up to 3 TeV. The first stage will focus on precision Standard Model physics, in particular Higgs and top-quark measurements. Subsequent stages will focus on measurements of rare Higgs processes, as well as searches for new physics processes and precision measurements of new states, e.g. states previously discovered at LHC or at CLIC itself. In the 2012 CLIC Conceptual Design Report, a fully optimised 3 TeV collider was presented, while the proposed lower energy stages were not studied to the same level of detail. This report presents an updated baseline staging scenario for CLIC. The scenario is the result of a comprehensive study addressing the performance, cost and power of the CLIC accelerator complex as a function of...

  12. (U) Influence of Compaction Model Form on Planar and Cylindrical Compaction Geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredenburg, David A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carney, Theodore Clayton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fichtl, Christopher Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ramsey, Scott D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-05

    The dynamic compaction response of CeO2 is examined within the frameworks of the Ramp and P-a compaction models. Hydrocode calculations simulating the dynamic response of CeO2 at several distinct pressures within the compaction region are investigated in both planar and cylindrically convergent geometries. Findings suggest additional validation of the compaction models is warranted under complex loading configurations.

  13. Compact Microwave Fourier Spectrum Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2009-01-01

    A compact photonic microwave Fourier spectrum analyzer [a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer, (FTMWS)] with no moving parts has been proposed for use in remote sensing of weak, natural microwave emissions from the surfaces and atmospheres of planets to enable remote analysis and determination of chemical composition and abundances of critical molecular constituents in space. The instrument is based on a Bessel beam (light modes with non-zero angular momenta) fiber-optic elements. It features low power consumption, low mass, and high resolution, without a need for any cryogenics, beyond what is achievable by the current state-of-the-art in space instruments. The instrument can also be used in a wide-band scatterometer mode in active radar systems.

  14. A Compact UWB Diversity Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A compact printed ultrawideband (UWB diversity antenna with a size of 30 mm × 36 mm operating at a frequency range of 3.1–10.6 GHz is proposed. The antenna is composed of two semielliptical monopoles fed by two microstrip lines. Two semicircular slots, two rectangular slots, and one stub are introduced in the ground plane to adjust the impedance bandwidth of the antenna and improve the isolation between two feeding ports. The simulated and measured results show that impedance bandwidth of the proposed antenna can cover the whole UWB band with a good isolation of < −15 dB. The radiation patterns, peak antenna gain, and envelope correlation coefficient are also measured and discussed. The measured results show that the proposed antenna can be a good candidate for some portable MIMO/diversity UWB applications.

  15. Spiral Inflector For Compact Cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Karamysheva, G A

    2004-01-01

    Compact cyclotron for explosives detection by nuclear resonance absorption of γ-rays in nitrogen is under development [1] Cyclotron will be equipped with the external ion source. The injection system consists of a double-drift beam bunching system, a spiral inflector, beam diagnostics, focusing and adjustment elements [2]. The spiral inflector for ion bending from axial to median plane is used. Computer model of spiral inflector for the Customs cyclotron is developed. 3D electrostatic field calculations of the designed inflector are performed. Calculated electric field map and magnetic field map of the cyclotron [3] are used for beam dynamic simulations. Numeric simulations are carried out for 500 particles using code for calculation of particle dynamics by integration of differential equations in Cartesian coordinate system written in MATLAB. Direct Coulomb particle-to-particle method is used to take into account space-charge effects.

  16. Experimental studies of compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Berkeley Compact Toroid Experiment (BCTX) device is a plasma device with a Marshall-gun generated, low aspect ratio toroidal plasma. The device is capable of producing spheromak-type discharges and may, with some modification, produce low-aspect ratio tokamak configurations. A unique aspect of this experimenal devie is its large lower hybrid (LH) heating system, which consists of two 450MHz klystron tubes generating 20 megawatts each into a brambilla-type launching structure. Successful operation with one klystron at virtually full power (18 MW) has been accomplished with 110 μs pulse length. A second klystron is currently installed in its socket and magnet but has not been added to the RF drive system. This report describes current activities and accomplishments and describes the anticipated results of next year's activity

  17. Compact Digital High Voltage Charger

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ge

    2005-01-01

    The operation of classical resonant circuit developed for the pulse energizing is investigated. The HV pulse or generator is very compact by a soft switching circuit made up of IGBT working at over 30 kHZ. The frequencies of macro pulses andμpulses can be arbitrarily tuned below resonant frequency to digitalize the HV pulse power. Theμpulses can also be connected by filter circuit to get the HVDC power. The circuit topology is given and its novel control logic is analyzed by flowchart. The circuit is part of a system consisting of a AC or DC LV power supply, a pulse transformer, the pulse generator implemented by LV capacitor and leakage inductance of the transformer, a HV DC or pulse power supply and the charged HV capacitor of the modulators.

  18. Quasistatic evolution of compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgro, A.G.; Spencer, R.L.; Lilliequist, C.

    1981-01-01

    Some results are presented of simulations of the post formation evolution of compact toroids. The simulations were performed with a 1-1/2 D transport code. Such a code makes explicit use of the fact that the shapes of the flux surfaces in the plasma change much more slowly than do the profiles of the physical variables across the flux surfaces. Consequently, assuming that the thermodynamic variables are always equilibrated on a flux surface, one may calculate the time evolution of these profiles as a function of a single variable that labels the flux surfaces. Occasionally, during the calculation these profiles are used to invert the equilibrium equation to update the shapes of the flux surfaces. In turn, these shapes imply certain geometric cofficients, such as A = 2 >, which contain the geometric information required by the 1-D equations

  19. Magnetohydodynamics stability of compact stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, G.Y.; Ku, L.P.; Cooper, W.A.; Hirshman, S.H.

    2000-01-01

    Recent stability results of external kink modes and vertical modes in compact stellarators are presented. The vertical mode is found to be stabilized by externally generated poloidal flux. A simple stability criterion is derived in the limit of large aspect ratio and constant current density. For a wall at infinite distance from the plasma, the amount of external flux needed for stabilization is given by Fi = (k2 minus k)=(k2 + 1), where k is the axisymmetric elongation and Fi is the fraction of the external rotational transform. A systematic parameter study shows that the external kink mode in QAS can be stabilized at high beta (approximately 5%) without a conducting wall by magnetic shear via 3D shaping. It is found that external kinks are driven by both parallel current and pressure gradient. The pressure contributes significantly to the overall drive through the curvature term and the Pfirsch-Schluter current

  20. Optimal shapes of compact strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maritan, A.; Micheletti, C.; Trovato, A.; Banavar, J.R.

    2000-07-01

    Optimal geometrical arrangements, such as the stacking of atoms, are of relevance in diverse disciplines. A classic problem is the determination of the optimal arrangement of spheres in three dimensions in order to achieve the highest packing fraction; only recently has it been proved that the answer for infinite systems is a face-centred-cubic lattice. This simply stated problem has had a profound impact in many areas, ranging from the crystallization and melting of atomic systems, to optimal packing of objects and subdivision of space. Here we study an analogous problem-that of determining the optimal shapes of closely packed compact strings. This problem is a mathematical idealization of situations commonly encountered in biology, chemistry and physics, involving the optimal structure of folded polymeric chains. We find that, in cases where boundary effects are not dominant, helices with a particular pitch-radius ratio are selected. Interestingly, the same geometry is observed in helices in naturally-occurring proteins. (author)

  1. General Relativity&Compact Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glendenning, Norman K.

    2005-08-16

    Compact stars--broadly grouped as neutron stars and white dwarfs--are the ashes of luminous stars. One or the other is the fate that awaits the cores of most stars after a lifetime of tens to thousands of millions of years. Whichever of these objects is formed at the end of the life of a particular luminous star, the compact object will live in many respects unchanged from the state in which it was formed. Neutron stars themselves can take several forms--hyperon, hybrid, or strange quark star. Likewise white dwarfs take different forms though only in the dominant nuclear species. A black hole is probably the fate of the most massive stars, an inaccessible region of spacetime into which the entire star, ashes and all, falls at the end of the luminous phase. Neutron stars are the smallest, densest stars known. Like all stars, neutron stars rotate--some as many as a few hundred times a second. A star rotating at such a rate will experience an enormous centrifugal force that must be balanced by gravity or else it will be ripped apart. The balance of the two forces informs us of the lower limit on the stellar density. Neutron stars are 10{sup 14} times denser than Earth. Some neutron stars are in binary orbit with a companion. Application of orbital mechanics allows an assessment of masses in some cases. The mass of a neutron star is typically 1.5 solar masses. They can therefore infer their radii: about ten kilometers. Into such a small object, the entire mass of our sun and more, is compressed.

  2. Compact autonomous navigation system (CANS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Y. C.; Ying, L.; Xiong, K.; Cheng, H. Y.; Qiao, G. D.

    2017-11-01

    Autonomous navigation of Satellite and constellation has series of benefits, such as to reduce operation cost and ground station workload, to avoid the event of crises of war and natural disaster, to increase spacecraft autonomy, and so on. Autonomous navigation satellite is independent of ground station support. Many systems are developed for autonomous navigation of satellite in the past 20 years. Along them American MANS (Microcosm Autonomous Navigation System) [1] of Microcosm Inc. and ERADS [2] [3] (Earth Reference Attitude Determination System) of Honeywell Inc. are well known. The systems anticipate a series of good features of autonomous navigation and aim low cost, integrated structure, low power consumption and compact layout. The ERADS is an integrated small 3-axis attitude sensor system with low cost and small volume. It has the Earth center measurement accuracy higher than the common IR sensor because the detected ultraviolet radiation zone of the atmosphere has a brightness gradient larger than that of the IR zone. But the ERADS is still a complex system because it has to eliminate many problems such as making of the sapphire sphere lens, birefringence effect of sapphire, high precision image transfer optical fiber flattener, ultraviolet intensifier noise, and so on. The marginal sphere FOV of the sphere lens of the ERADS is used to star imaging that may be bring some disadvantages., i.e. , the image energy and attitude measurements accuracy may be reduced due to the tilt image acceptance end of the fiber flattener in the FOV. Besides Japan, Germany and Russia developed visible earth sensor for GEO [4] [5]. Do we have a way to develop a cheaper/easier and more accurate autonomous navigation system that can be used to all LEO spacecraft, especially, to LEO small and micro satellites? To return this problem we provide a new type of the system—CANS (Compact Autonomous Navigation System) [6].

  3. General Relativity and Compact Stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendenning, Norman K.

    2005-01-01

    Compact stars--broadly grouped as neutron stars and white dwarfs--are the ashes of luminous stars. One or the other is the fate that awaits the cores of most stars after a lifetime of tens to thousands of millions of years. Whichever of these objects is formed at the end of the life of a particular luminous star, the compact object will live in many respects unchanged from the state in which it was formed. Neutron stars themselves can take several forms--hyperon, hybrid, or strange quark star. Likewise white dwarfs take different forms though only in the dominant nuclear species. A black hole is probably the fate of the most massive stars, an inaccessible region of spacetime into which the entire star, ashes and all, falls at the end of the luminous phase. Neutron stars are the smallest, densest stars known. Like all stars, neutron stars rotate--some as many as a few hundred times a second. A star rotating at such a rate will experience an enormous centrifugal force that must be balanced by gravity or else it will be ripped apart. The balance of the two forces informs us of the lower limit on the stellar density. Neutron stars are 10 14 times denser than Earth. Some neutron stars are in binary orbit with a companion. Application of orbital mechanics allows an assessment of masses in some cases. The mass of a neutron star is typically 1.5 solar masses. They can therefore infer their radii: about ten kilometers. Into such a small object, the entire mass of our sun and more, is compressed

  4. Physics of Compact Advanced Stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarnstorff, M.C.; Berry, L.A.; Brooks, A.; Fredrickson, E.; Fu, G.-Y.; Hirshman, S.; Hudson, S.; Ku, L.-P.; Lazarus, E.; Mikkelsen, D.; Monticello, D.; Neilson, G.H.; Pomphrey, N.; Reiman, A.; Spong, D.; Strickler, D.; Boozer, A.; Cooper, W.A.; Goldston, R.; Hatcher, R.; Isaev, M.; Kessel, C.; Lewandowski, J.; Lyon, J.; Merkel, P.; Mynick, H.; Nelson, B.E.; Nuehrenberg, C.; Redi, M.; Reiersen, W.; Rutherford, P.; Sanchez, R.; Schmidt, J.; White, R.B.

    2001-01-01

    Compact optimized stellarators offer novel solutions for confining high-beta plasmas and developing magnetic confinement fusion. The 3-D plasma shape can be designed to enhance the MHD stability without feedback or nearby conducting structures and provide drift-orbit confinement similar to tokamaks. These configurations offer the possibility of combining the steady-state low-recirculating power, external control, and disruption resilience of previous stellarators with the low-aspect ratio, high beta-limit, and good confinement of advanced tokamaks. Quasi-axisymmetric equilibria have been developed for the proposed National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) with average aspect ratio 4-4.4 and average elongation of approximately 1.8. Even with bootstrap-current consistent profiles, they are passively stable to the ballooning, kink, vertical, Mercier, and neoclassical-tearing modes for beta > 4%, without the need for external feedback or conducting walls. The bootstrap current generates only 1/4 of the magnetic rotational transform at beta = 4% (the rest is from the coils), thus the equilibrium is much less nonlinear and is more controllable than similar advanced tokamaks. The enhanced stability is a result of ''reversed'' global shear, the spatial distribution of local shear, and the large fraction of externally generated transform. Transport simulations show adequate fast-ion confinement and thermal neoclassical transport similar to equivalent tokamaks. Modular coils have been designed which reproduce the physics properties, provide good flux surfaces, and allow flexible variation of the plasma shape to control the predicted MHD stability and transport properties

  5. An Investigation of X-ray Luminosity versus Crystalline Powder Granularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borade, Ramesh; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; ,

    2012-03-07

    At the High-throughput Discovery of Scintillator Materials Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, scintillators are synthesized by solid-state reaction or melt mixing, forming crystalline powders. These powders are formed in various granularity and the crystal grain size affects the apparent luminosity of the scintillator. To accurately predict a "full-size" scintillator's crystal luminosity, the crystal luminosity as a function of crystal granularity size has to be known. In this study, we examine Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BGO), Lu{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce (LSO), YAlO{sub 3}:Ce (YAP:Ce), and CsBa{sub 2}I{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+} (CBI) luminosities as a function of crystalline grain size. The highest luminosities were measured for 600- to 1000-{micro}m crystal grain sizes for BGO and LSO, for 310- to 600-{micro}m crystal grain sizes for CBI, and for crystal grains larger than 165{micro}m for YAP:Ce. Crystal grains that were larger than 1 mm had a lower packing fraction, and smaller grains were affected by internal scattering. We measured a 34% decrease in luminosity for BGO when decreasing from the 600- to 1000- {micro}m crystal grain size range down to the 20- to 36-{micro}m range. The corresponding luminosity decrease for LSO was 44% for the same grain size decrease. YAP:Ce exhibited a luminosity decrease of 47% when the grain size decreased from the 165- to 310-{micro}m crystal grains to the 20- to 36-{micro}m range, and CBI exhibited a luminosity decrease of 98% when the grain size decreased from the 310- to 600-{micro}m crystal grain range to the 36- to 50-{micro}m range. We were able to very accurately estimate full-size crystal luminosities from crystalline grains that are larger than 90 {micro}m.

  6. Influence of compaction on chloride ingress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zlopasa, J.

    2012-01-01

    Experiences from practice show the need for more of an understanding and optimization of the compaction process in order to design a more durable concrete structure. Local variations in compaction are very often the reason for initiation of local damage and initiation of chloride induced corrosion.

  7. Ultrasonic compaction of granular geological materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Andrew; Sikaneta, Sakalima; Harkness, Patrick; Lucas, Margaret

    2017-04-01

    It has been shown that the compaction of granular materials for applications such as pharmaceutical tableting and plastic moulding can be enhanced by ultrasonic vibration of the compaction die. Ultrasonic vibrations can reduce the compaction pressure and increase particle fusion, leading to higher strength products. In this paper, the potential benefits of ultrasonics in the compaction of geological granular materials in downhole applications are explored, to gain insight into the effects of ultrasonic vibrations on compaction of different materials commonly encountered in sub-sea drilling. Ultrasonic vibrations are applied, using a resonant 20kHz compactor, to the compaction of loose sand and drill waste cuttings derived from oolitic limestone, clean quartz sandstone, and slate-phyllite. For each material, a higher strain for a given compaction pressure was achieved, with higher sample density compared to that in the case of an absence of ultrasonics. The relationships between the operational parameters of ultrasonic vibration amplitude and true strain rate are explored and shown to be dependent on the physical characteristics of the compacting materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantification of the compactibility of pharmaceutical powders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnergaard, Jørn

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate and to quantify the compactibility of pharmaceutical powders by a simple linear relationship between the diametral compressive strength of tablets and the applied compaction pressure. The mechanical strength of the tablets is characterized as the crushing...

  9. The double explosive layer cylindrical compaction method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuivinga, M.E.C.; Verbeek, H.J.; Carton, E.P.

    1999-01-01

    The standard cylindrical configuration for shock compaction is useful for the compaction of composite materials which have some plastic behavior. It can also be used to densify hard ceramics up to about 85% of the theoretical density (TMD), when low detonation velocity explosives (2-4 km s-1) are

  10. Compact Process Development at Babcock & Wilcox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Shaber; Jeffrey Phillips

    2012-03-01

    Multiple process approaches have been used historically to manufacture cylindrical nuclear fuel compacts. Scale-up of fuel compacting was required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project to achieve an economically viable automated production process capable of providing a minimum of 10 compacts/minute with high production yields. In addition, the scale-up effort was required to achieve matrix density equivalent to baseline historical production processes, and allow compacting at fuel packing fractions up to 46% by volume. The scale-up approach of jet milling, fluid-bed overcoating, and hot-press compacting adopted in the U.S. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program involves significant paradigm shifts to capitalize on distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of mixed waste. A series of compaction trials have been completed to optimize compaction conditions of time, temperature, and forming pressure using natural uranium oxycarbide (NUCO) fuel at packing fractions exceeding 46% by volume. Results from these trials are included. The scale-up effort is nearing completion with the process installed and operable using nuclear fuel materials. Final process testing is in progress to certify the process for manufacture of qualification test fuel compacts in 2012.

  11. Computing Decoupled Residuals for Compact Disc Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    2006-01-01

    In order to improve Compact Disc Players playability regarding playing Compact Discs with surface faults, like scratches and fingerprints etc, the attention has been put on fault tolerant control schemes. Almost every of those methods are based on fault detection. The standard approach is to use...

  12. On compact galaxies in the UGC catalogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogoshvili, N.G.

    1980-01-01

    A problem of separation of compact galaxies in the UGC Catalogue is considered. Value of surface brightness equal to or less than 21sup(m) was used as compactness criterion from a square second of arc. 96 galaxies, which are brighter than 14sup(m)5 satisfy this criterion. Among compact galaxies discovered in the UGC Catalogue 7% are the Zwicky galaxies, 15% belong to the Markarian galaxies and 27% of galaxies are part of a galaxy list with high surface brightness. Considerable divergence in estimates of total share of compact galaxies in the B.A. Worontsov-Veljaminov Morphological Catalogue of Galaxies (MCG) and the UGC Catalogue is noted. This divergence results from systematical underestimation of visible sizes of compact galaxies in the MCG Catalogue as compared with the UGC Catalogue [ru

  13. LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF LMXBs IN CENTAURUS A: GLOBULAR CLUSTERS VERSUS THE FIELD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, Rasmus; Gilfanov, Marat; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Jordan, Andres; Brassington, Nicola J.; Evans, Daniel A.; Murray, Stephen S.; Raychaudhury, Somak; Birkinshaw, Mark; Worrall, Diana M.; Croston, Judith H.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Harris, William E.; Woodley, Kristin A.; Juett, Adrienne M.

    2009-01-01

    We study the X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) in the nearby early-type galaxy Centaurus A, concentrating primarily on two aspects of binary populations: the XLF behavior at the low-luminosity limit and the comparison between globular cluster and field sources. The 800 ksec exposure of the deep Chandra VLP program allows us to reach a limiting luminosity of ∼8 x 10 35 erg s -1 , about ∼2-3 times deeper than previous investigations. We confirm the presence of the low-luminosity break of the overall LMXB XLF at log(L X ) ∼ 37.2-37.6, below which the luminosity distribution follows a dN/d(ln L) ∼ const law. Separating globular cluster and field sources, we find a statistically significant difference between the two luminosity distributions with a relative underabundance of faint sources in the globular cluster population. This demonstrates that the samples are drawn from distinct parent populations and may disprove the hypothesis that the entire LMXB population in early-type galaxies is created dynamically in globular clusters. As a plausible explanation for this difference in the XLFs, we suggest an enhanced fraction of helium-accreting systems in globular clusters, which are created in collisions between red giants and neutron stars. Due to the four times higher ionization temperature of He, such systems are subject to accretion disk instabilities at ∼20 times higher mass accretion rate and, therefore, are not observed as persistent sources at low luminosities.

  14. Luminosity measurement in H1; Mesure de la luminosite pour l'experience H1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisson, T

    2006-10-15

    At HERA, luminosity is determined on-line and bunch by bunch by measuring the Bremsstrahlung spectrum from e-p collisions. The Hl collaboration has built a completely new luminosity system in order to sustain the harsh running conditions after the fourfold luminosity increase. Namely, the higher synchrotron radiation doses and the increased event pile-up have governed the design of the two major components, a radiation resistant quartz-fibre electro-magnetic calorimeter, and a fast read-out electronic with on-line energy histogram loading at a rate of 500 kHz. The group was in charge of the electronic and the on-line data analysis of the new luminosity system. In this thesis, I present analysis tools and methods to improve the precision of the luminosity measurement. The energy scale and acceptance calculation methods set out in this thesis permit these values to be determined every four minutes, to an accuracy of 0.5 parts per thousand for the energy scale and 2 parts per thousand for the acceptance. From these results, the degree of accuracy obtained on the luminosity measurement is between 6.5 and 9.5 parts per thousand. These results are currently undergoing validation, with the aim of becoming the standard H1 method. I also studied quasi-elastic Compton events to cross-check the luminosity measurement using the 2003- 2004 and 2005 data. Indeed, this process has a well calculable cross section and a clear experimental signature. The leptonic final state consists of a coplanar e-gamma system, both observable in the central H1 detector. (author)

  15. Power spectrum, correlation function, and tests for luminosity bias in the CfA redshift survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Changbom; Vogeley, Michael S.; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.

    1994-01-01

    We describe and apply a method for directly computing the power spectrum for the galaxy distribution in the extension of the Center for Astrophysics Redshift Survey. Tests show that our technique accurately reproduces the true power spectrum for k greater than 0.03 h Mpc(exp -1). The dense sampling and large spatial coverage of this survey allow accurate measurement of the redshift-space power spectrum on scales from 5 to approximately 200 h(exp -1) Mpc. The power spectrum has slope n approximately equal -2.1 on small scales (lambda less than or equal 25 h(exp -1) Mpc) and n approximately -1.1 on scales 30 less than lambda less than 120 h(exp -1) Mpc. On larger scales the power spectrum flattens somewhat, but we do not detect a turnover. Comparison with N-body simulations of cosmological models shows that an unbiased, open universe CDM model (OMEGA h = 0.2) and a nonzero cosmological constant (CDM) model (OMEGA h = 0.24, lambda(sub zero) = 0.6, b = 1.3) match the CfA power spectrum over the wavelength range we explore. The standard biased CDM model (OMEGA h = 0.5, b = 1.5) fails (99% significance level) because it has insufficient power on scales lambda greater than 30 h(exp -1) Mpc. Biased CDM with a normalization that matches the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy (OMEGA h = 0.5, b = 1.4, sigma(sub 8) (mass) = 1) has too much power on small scales to match the observed galaxy power spectrum. This model with b = 1 matches both Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) and the small-scale power spect rum but has insufficient power on scales lambda approximately 100 h(exp -1) Mpc. We derive a formula for the effect of small-scale peculiar velocities on the power spectrum and combine this formula with the linear-regime amplification described by Kaiser to compute an estimate of the real-space power spectrum. Two tests reveal luminosity bias in the galaxy distribution: First, the amplitude of the pwer spectrum is approximately 40% larger for the brightest

  16. ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Readout Electronics Upgrade Program for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Cerqueira, A S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. The TileCal readout consists of about 10000 channels. The ATLAS upgrade program is divided in three phases: The Phase 0 occurs during 2013-2014 and prepares the LHC to reach peak luminosities of 1034 cm2s-1; Phase 1, foreseen for 2018-1019, prepares the LHC for peak luminosity up to 2-3 x 1034 cm2s-1, corresponding to 55 to 80 interactions per bunch-crossing with 25 ns bunch interval; and Phase 2 is foreseen for 2022-2023, whereafter the peak luminosity will reach 5-7 x 1034 cm2s-1 (HL-LHC). With luminosity leveling, the average luminosity will increase with a factor 10. The main TileCal upgrade is focused on the HL-LHC period. The upgrade aims at replacing the majority of the on- and off-detector electronics so that all calorimeter signals are directly digitized and sent to the off-detector electronics in the counting room. All new electronics must be able to cope with the increased rad...

  17. A DENSITY DEPENDENCE FOR PROTOSTELLAR LUMINOSITY IN CLASS I SOURCES: COLLABORATIVE ACCRETION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Hts., NY 10598 (United States); Hurst, Rachel [Scarsdale High School, 1057 White Plains Rd, Scarsdale, NY 10583 (United States); Koenig, Xavier, E-mail: bge@us.ibm.com [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    Class I protostars in three high-mass star-forming regions are found to have correlations among the local projected density of other Class I protostars, the summed flux from these other protostars, and the protostellar luminosity in the WISE 22 μm band. Brighter Class I sources form in higher-density and higher-flux regions, while low luminosity sources form anywhere. These correlations depend slightly on the number of neighbors considered (from 2 to 20) and could include a size-of-sample effect from the initial mass function (i.e., larger numbers include rarer and more massive stars). Luminosities seem to vary by neighborhood with nearby protostars having values proportional to each other and higher density regions having higher values. If Class I luminosity is partially related to the accretion rate, then this luminosity correlation is consistent with the competitive accretion model, although it is more collaborative than competitive. The correlation is also consistent with primordial mass segregation and could explain why the stellar initial mass function resembles the dense core mass function even when cores form multiple stars.

  18. An Alternative High Luminosity LHC with Flat Optics and Long-Range Beam-Beam Compensation

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070952; Valishev, Aleksander; Shatilov, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    In the baseline scenario of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the geometric loss of luminosity in the two high luminosity experiments due to collisions with a large crossing angle is recovered by tilting the bunches in the interaction region with the use of crab cavities. A possible backup scenario would rely on a reduced crossing angle together with flat optics (with different horizontal and vertical β∗ values) for the preservation of luminosity performance. However, the reduction of crossing angle coupled with the flat optics significantly enhances the strength of long-range beam-beam interactions. This paper discusses the possibility to mitigate the long-range beam-beam effects by current bearing wire compensators (or e-lens). We develop a new HL-LHC parameter list and analyze it in terms of integrated luminosity performance as compared to the baseline. Further, we evaluate the operational scenarios using numerical simulations of single-particle dynamics with beam-beam effects.

  19. Exploring the Faint End of the Luminosity-Metallicity Relation with Hα Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschauer, Alec S.; Salzer, John J.

    2015-01-01

    The well-known correlation between a galaxy's luminosity and its gas-phase oxygen abundance (the luminosity-metallicity (L-Z) relation) offers clues toward our understanding of chemical enrichment histories and evolution. Bright galaxies are comparatively better studied than faint ones, leaving a relative dearth of observational data points to constrain the L-Z relation in the low-luminosity regime. We present high S/N nebular spectroscopy of low-luminosity star-forming galaxies observed with the KPNO 4m using the new KOSMOS spectrograph to derive direct-method metallicities. Our targets are strong point-like emission-line sources discovered serendipitously in continuum-subtracted narrowband images from the ALFALFA Hα survey. Follow-up spectroscopy of these "Hα dots" shows that these objects represent some of the lowest luminosity star-forming systems in the local Universe. Our KOSMOS spectra cover the full optical region and include detection of [O III] λ4363 in roughly a dozen objects. This paper presents some of the first scientific results obtained using this new spectrograph, and demonstrates its capabilities and effectiveness in deriving direct-method metallicities of faint objects.

  20. A compact tritium AMS system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, M.L.; Hamm, R.W.; Dingley, K.H.; Chiarappa-Zucca, M.L.; Love, A.H.

    2000-01-01

    Tritium ( 3 H) is a radioisotope that is extensively utilized in biological and environmental research. For biological research, 3 H is generally quantified by liquid scintillation counting requiring gram-sized samples and counting times of several hours. For environmental research, 3 H is usually quantified by 3 He in-growth which requires gram-sized samples and in-growth times of several months. In contrast, provisional studies at LLNL's Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry have demonstrated that accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) can be used to quantify 3 H in milligram-sized biological samples with a 100 to 1000-fold improvement in detection limits when compared to scintillation counting. This increased sensitivity is expected to have great impact on the biological and environmental research community. However, in order to make the 3 H AMS technique more broadly accessible, smaller, simpler, and less expensive AMS instrumentation must be developed. To meet this need, a compact, relatively low cost prototype 3 H AMS system has been designed and built based on an LLNL ion source/sample changer and an AccSys Technology radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. With the prototype system, 3 H/ 1 H ratios ranging from 1x10 -10 to 1x10 -13 have be measured from milligram-sized samples. With improvements in system operation and sample preparation methodology, the sensitivity limit of the system is expected to increase to approximately 1x10 -15

  1. Compact, Pneumatically Actuated Filter Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighy, Bradley D.

    2003-01-01

    A compact, pneumatically actuated filter shuttle has been invented to enable alternating imaging of a wind-tunnel model in two different spectral bands characteristic of the pressure and temperature responses of a pressure and temperature-sensitive paint. This filter shuttle could also be used in other settings in which there are requirements for alternating imaging in two spectral bands. Pneumatic actuation was chosen because of a need to exert control remotely (that is, from outside the wind tunnel) and because the power leads that would be needed for electrical actuation would pose an unacceptable hazard in the wind tunnel. The entire shuttle mechanism and its housing can be built relatively inexpensively [camera used for viewing the wind-tunnel model. The mechanism includes a pneumatic actuator connected to a linkage. The linkage converts the actuator stroke to a scissor-like motion that places one filter in front of the camera and the other filter out of the way. Optoelectronic sensors detect tabs on the sliding panels for verification of the proper positioning of the filters.

  2. Compact dynamic microfluidic iris array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmle, Christina; Doering, Christoph; Steuer, Anna; Fouckhardt, Henning

    2011-09-01

    A dynamic microfluidic iris is realized. Light attenuation is achieved by absorption of an opaque liquid (e.g. black ink). The adjustment of the iris diameter is achieved by fluid displacement via a transparent elastomer (silicone) half-sphere. This silicone calotte is hydraulically pressed against a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrate as the bottom window, such that the opaque liquid is squeezed away, this way opening the iris. With this approach a dynamic range of more than 60 dB can be achieved with response times in the ms to s regime. The design allows the realization of a single iris as well as an iris array. So far the master for the molded silicone structure was fabricated by precision mechanics. The aperture diameter was changed continuously from 0 to 8 mm for a single iris and 0 to 4 mm in case of a 3 x 3 iris array. Moreover, an iris array was combined with a PMMA lens array into a compact module, the distance of both arrays equaling the focal length of the lenses. This way e.g. spatial frequency filter arrays can be realized. The possibility to extend the iris array concept to an array with many elements is demonstrated. Such arrays could be applied e.g. in light-field cameras.

  3. Cooling of hypernuclear compact stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raduta, Adriana R.; Sedrakian, Armen; Weber, Fridolin

    2018-04-01

    We study the thermal evolution of hypernuclear compact stars constructed from covariant density functional theory of hypernuclear matter and parametrizations which produce sequences of stars containing two-solar-mass objects. For the input in the simulations, we solve the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer gap equations in the hyperonic sector and obtain the gaps in the spectra of Λ, Ξ0, and Ξ- hyperons. For the models with masses M/M⊙ ≥ 1.5 the neutrino cooling is dominated by hyperonic direct Urca processes in general. In the low-mass stars the (Λp) plus leptons channel is the dominant direct Urca process, whereas for more massive stars the purely hyperonic channels (Σ-Λ) and (Ξ-Λ) are dominant. Hyperonic pairing strongly suppresses the processes on Ξ-s and to a lesser degree on Λs. We find that intermediate-mass 1.5 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 1.8 models have surface temperatures which lie within the range inferred from thermally emitting neutron stars, if the hyperonic pairing is taken into account. Most massive models with M/M⊙ ≃ 2 may cool very fast via the direct Urca process through the (Λp) channel because they develop inner cores where the S-wave pairing of Λs and proton is absent.

  4. Laboratory evaluation of friction loss and compactability of asphalt mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to develop prediction models for friction loss and laboratory compaction of asphalt : mixtures. In addition, the study evaluated the effect of compaction level and compaction method of skid : resistance and the internal structure of ...

  5. A case study of intelligent compaction used in road upgrades

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Leyland, R

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available is that of intelligent compaction (IC) systems. As a whole such systems are said to provide numerous advantages including increased productivity, proactive compaction process adjustment, reduced spatial variations in compaction and greater data coverage compared...

  6. Implementation of intelligent compaction technologies for road constructions in Wyoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Conventional test methods for roadway compaction cover less than 1% of roadway; whereas, intelligent : compaction (IC) offers a method to measure 100% of a roadway. IC offers the ability to increase : compaction uniformity of soils and asphalt paveme...

  7. Moderation of neutron energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlatt, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor system having a nuclear reactor which has a core including fuel assemblies, means for transmitting through the core a coolant, the coolant having a predetermined neutron-energy moderating property, sealed tubes in the core, each tube containing a material having a different neutron-energy moderating property than the coolant, means, when actuated, to engage at least certain of the tubes, for opening certain of the tubes to permit the coolant to replace the material in the tubes thereby to change the energy spectrum of the neutrons in the reactor, hydraulic means, connected to the opening means, for actuating the opening means to engage certain of the tubes to open the tubes. A device, external to the reactor, connected to the hydraulic means controlls the actuation of the opening means, the opening means being so set with reference to the tubes that only certain of the tubes are opened at any time as the opening means is advanced towards the tubes by the hydraulic means

  8. Nuclear Activity of Compact Group Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubee, Sohn; Hwang, H.; Lee, M.; Lee, G.; Lee, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present results of a study on nuclear activities of compact group galaxies in the local universe. The triggering mechanism of AGN is an intriguing proble, and one of the suggested AGN triggering mechanism is galaxy interaction. In this regard, compact groups are a great laboratory to study the connection between galaxy interaction and nuclear activities. To study the environmental effects on nuclear activity, we estimate the fraction of AGN-host galaxies for a spectroscopic sample of 238 member galaxies in 59 compact groups from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey using the emission-line ratio diagnostic diagrams in comparison with field and cluster regions. We derive the 17-42% of AGN fraction of the compact groups depending on the AGN classification methods. The AGN fraction of compact groups is not the highest among the galaxy environments for both early and late type galaxies. We also examine the environmental dependence of nuclear activity using the surface galaxy number density. For early type galaxies, the AGN fraction decreases with increasing galaxy number density, while the AGN fraction of late-type galaxies barely changes. Moreover, we do not find any mid-infrared detected AGN-host compact group galaxies in our sample using WISE photometry. These results imply that the compact group galaxies is not stronngly active because of lack of gas supply, in contrast to the expectation that they may experience frequent galaxy-galaxy interactions.

  9. Does soil compaction increase floods? A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaoui, Abdallah; Rogger, Magdalena; Peth, Stephan; Blöschl, Günter

    2018-02-01

    Europe has experienced a series of major floods in the past years which suggests that flood magnitudes may have increased. Land degradation due to soil compaction from crop farming or grazing intensification is one of the potential drivers of this increase. A literature review suggests that most of the experimental evidence was generated at plot and hillslope scales. At larger scales, most studies are based on models. There are three ways in which soil compaction affects floods at the catchment scale: (i) through an increase in the area affected by soil compaction; (ii) by exacerbating the effects of changes in rainfall, especially for highly degraded soils; and (iii) when soil compaction coincides with soils characterized by a fine texture and a low infiltration capacity. We suggest that future research should focus on better synthesising past research on soil compaction and runoff, tailored field experiments to obtain a mechanistic understanding of the coupled mechanical and hydraulic processes, new mapping methods of soil compaction that combine mechanical and remote sensing approaches, and an effort to bridge all disciplines relevant to soil compaction effects on floods.

  10. Strategy Guideline. Compact Air Distribution Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdick, Arlan [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This guideline discusses the benefits and challenges of using a compact air distribution system to handle the reduced loads and reduced air volume needed to condition the space within an energy efficient home. The decision criteria for a compact air distribution system must be determined early in the whole-house design process, considering both supply and return air design. However, careful installation of a compact air distribution system can result in lower material costs from smaller equipment, shorter duct runs, and fewer outlets; increased installation efficiencies, including ease of fitting the system into conditioned space; lower loads on a better balanced HVAC system, and overall improved energy efficiency of the home.

  11. Generalised model for anisotropic compact stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurya, S.K. [University of Nizwa, Department of Mathematical and Physical Sciences College of Arts and Science, Nizwa (Oman); Gupta, Y.K. [Raj Kumar Goel Institute of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh (India); Ray, Saibal [Government College of Engineering and Ceramic Technology, Department of Physics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Deb, Debabrata [Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Department of Physics, Howrah, West Bengal (India)

    2016-12-15

    In the present investigation an exact generalised model for anisotropic compact stars of embedding class 1 is sought with a general relativistic background. The generic solutions are verified by exploring different physical aspects, viz. energy conditions, mass-radius relation, stability of the models, in connection to their validity. It is observed that the model presented here for compact stars is compatible with all these physical tests and thus physically acceptable as far as the compact star candidates RXJ 1856-37, SAX J 1808.4-3658 (SS1) and SAX J 1808.4-3658 (SS2) are concerned. (orig.)

  12. Compact vs. Exponential-Size LP Relaxations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, R.D.; Lancia, G.

    2000-09-01

    In this paper we introduce by means of examples a new technique for formulating compact (i.e. polynomial-size) LP relaxations in place of exponential-size models requiring separation algorithms. In the same vein as a celebrated theorem by Groetschel, Lovasz and Schrijver, we state the equivalence of compact separation and compact optimization. Among the examples used to illustrate our technique, we introduce a new formulation for the Traveling Salesman Problem, whose relaxation we show equivalent to the subtour elimination relaxation.

  13. THE GALAXY OPTICAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM THE AGN AND GALAXY EVOLUTION SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Brown, Michael J. I.; Caldwell, Nelson; Forman, William R.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Moustakas, John

    2012-01-01

    We present the galaxy optical luminosity function for the redshift range 0.05 2 in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. Our statistical sample is composed of 12,473 galaxies with known redshifts down to I = 20.4 (AB). Our results at low redshift are consistent with those from Sloan Digital Sky Survey; at higher redshift, we find strong evidence for evolution in the luminosity function, including differential evolution between blue and red galaxies. We find that the luminosity density evolves as (1 + z) (0.54±0.64) for red galaxies and (1 + z) (1.64±0.39) for blue galaxies.

  14. New Technique for Luminosity Measurement Using 3D Pixel Modules in the ATLAS IBL Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Peilian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Insertable b-Layer ( IBL ) is the innermost layer of the ATLAS tracking system. It consists of planar pixel modules in the central region and 3D modules at two extremities. We use the cluster length distributions in 3D sensor modules of the IBL to determine the number of primary charged particles per event and suppress backgrounds. This Pixel Cluster Counting ( PCC ) algorithm provides a bunch-by-bunch luminosity measurement. An accurate luminosity measurement is a key component for precision measurements at the Large Hadron Collider and one of the largest uncertainties on the luminosity determination in ATLAS arises from the long-term stability of the measurement technique. The comparison of the PCC algorithm with other existing algorithms provides key insights in assessing and reducing such uncertainty.

  15. Proceeding Paper for HSTD11 Conference about Luminosity Measurement by Pixel-Cluster-Counting

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Peilian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Insertable B-Layer (IBL) is the innermost layer of the ATLAS tracking system. It consists of planar pixel modules in the central region and 3D pixel modules at two extremities. We use the longitudinal cluster size distributions in 3D modules of the IBL to determine the number of pixel clusters produced by primary charged particles per event and suppress backgrounds. This Pixel Cluster Counting (PCC) algorithm provides a bunch-by-bunch luminosity measurement. An accurate luminosity measurement is a key component for precision measurements at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and one of the largest uncertainties on the luminosity determination in ATLAS arises from the long-term stability of the measurement technique. The comparison of the PCC algorithm with other existing algorithms provides key insights in assessing and reducing such uncertainty.

  16. Initial test results of an ionization chamber shower detector for a LHC luminosity monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Datte, P S; Haguenauer, Maurice; Manfredi, P F; Manghisoni, M; Millaud, J E; Placidi, Massimo; Ratti, L; Riot, V J; Schmickler, Hermann; Speziali, V; Traversi, G; Turner, W C

    2003-01-01

    A novel segmented multigap pressurized gas ionization chamber is being developed for optimization of the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The ionization chambers are to be installed in the front quadrupole and 0 degrees neutral particle absorbers in the high luminosity interaction regions (IRs) and sample the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The ionization chambers are instrumented with low noise, fast pulse-shaping electronics to be capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40 MHz. In this paper, we report the initial results of our second test of this instrumentation in a super proton synchrotron (SPS) external proton beam. Single 300 GeV protons are used to simulate the hadronic/electromagnetic showers produced by the forward collision products from the interaction regions of the LHC. The capability of instrumentation to measure the luminosity of individual bunches in a 40 MHz bunch train is demonstrated. (10 refs) .

  17. Initial test results of an ionization chamber shower detector for a LHC luminosity monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datte, P.; Beche, J.-F.; Haguenauer, M.; Manfredi, P.F.; Manghisoni, M.; Millaud, J.; Placidi, M.; Ratti, L.; Riot, V.; Schmickler, H.; Speziali, V.; Turner, W.

    2002-01-01

    A novel, segmented, multi-gap, pressurized gas ionization chamber is being developed for optimization of the luminosity of the LHC. The ionization chambers are to be installed in the front quadrupole and zero degree neutral particle absorbers in the high luminosity IRs and sample the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The ionization chambers are instrumented with low noise, fast, pulse shaping electronics to be capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40 MHz. In this paper we report the initial results of our second test of this instrumentation in an SPS external proton beam. Single 300 GeV protons are used to simulate the hadronic/electromagnetic shower produced by the forward collision products from the interaction regions of the LHC. The capability of instrumentations to measure the luminosity of individual bunches in a 40 MHz bunch train is demonstrated

  18. Luminosity monitor topics for RHIC spin and AA, and pA interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, D.

    1998-01-01

    This is a note to define topics to be studied in more depth for the Luminosity monitoring for Spin Asymmetries. My numerical examples here are to stimulate discussion and should be taken with a grain of salt. The RHIC Spin experiments will require a very high degree of coordination between the experiments and the accelerator. For example see AGS/RHIC/SN 035. In this note we list some of the issues to be considered in monitoring the relative luminosity between various beam-beam spin combinations and beam-gas combinations. We give simplified numerical examples of the problems encountered in doing the luminosity monitoring to the 10 -4 level. It is hoped that this will provide a framework for serious study of these problems with simulations and other means. Many of the issues may also be relevant to pA and AA running where there may be sizable beam-gas backgrounds

  19. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, Strahinja

    2013-01-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at CLIC at 3 TeV CM energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations: -> Correction of the angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation (ISR) effects, based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. -> Deconvolution of the luminosity spectrum distortion due to the ISR emission. -> Correction of the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution. All procedures were tested by simulation. Bhabha events were generated using BHLUMI, and used in Guinea-PIG to simulate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. Residual uncertainties after correction are listed in a table in the conclusions. The beam-beam related systematic counting uncertainty in the luminosity peak can be reduced to the order of permille.

  20. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, Strahinja

    2013-01-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at CLIC at 3 TeV CM energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations: - Correction of the angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation (ISR) effects, based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. - Deconvolution of the luminosity spectrum distortion due to the ISR emission. - Correction of the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution. All procedures were tested by simulation. Bhabha events were generated using BHLUMI, and used in Guinea-PIG to simulate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. Residual uncertainties after correction are listed in a table in the conclusions. The beam-beam related systematic counting uncertainty in the luminosity peak can be reduced to the order of permille.